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Sample records for oral mucosa mouse

  1. Apoptotic and proliferative activity of mouse gastric mucosa following oral administration of fumonisin B1

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad; Mohammadghasemi, Fahimeh; Zendehdel, Kazem; Kamyabi-moghaddam, Zahra; Tavassoli, Abbas; Amini-najafi, Fatemeh; Khosravi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Fumonisins are a group of toxic and carcinogenic mycotoxins, which contaminate the grains and their products. The aim of this study was to examine the apoptotic and proliferative activity of mouse gastric mucosa following administration of fumonisin B1 (FB1). Materials and Methods: Twenty-nine female mice divided into treatment (n=15) and control (n=14) groups. The treatment group received FB1 (150 mg/kg diet) for 16 weeks. The gastric atrophy was allocated using grading criteria modeled on the updated Sydney System. Immunohistochemistry studies were performed for evaluation of apoptosis and proliferative activity in gastric mucosa. Results: Mild to moderate gastric atrophy were observed in microscopic findings of the gastric mucosa in treated animals (P<0.05). Number of parietal cells significantly decreased in the treatment group in comparison with the control (P<0.05). Treatment with FB1 for 16 weeks significantly reduced both gastric mucosa height and mitotic index in the gastric glands (P<0.05). TUNEL- and Bax-labeled positive cell numbers significantly increased in the FB1-treated group compared to the control (P<0.05). In addition, proliferative activity of gastric glands in the treated group was significantly lower than the control (P<0.05). Conclusion: Oral administration of FB1 caused atrophy in gastric mucosa both via increasing of apoptosis and suppressing the mitotic activity of these cells. PMID:25810870

  2. Biomechanics of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of prosthodontic treatment has been well recognized, and the need is continuously increasing with the ageing population. While the oral mucosa plays a critical role in the treatment outcome, the associated biomechanics is not yet fully understood. Using the literature available, this paper provides a critical review on four aspects of mucosal biomechanics, including static, dynamic, volumetric and interactive responses, which are interpreted by its elasticity, viscosity/permeability, apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient, respectively. Both empirical studies and numerical models are analysed and compared to gain anatomical and physiological insights. Furthermore, the clinical applications of such biomechanical knowledge on the mucosa are explored to address some critical concerns, including stimuli for tissue remodelling (interstitial hydrostatic pressure), pressure–pain thresholds, tissue displaceability and residual bone resorption. Through this review, the state of the art in mucosal biomechanics and their clinical implications are discussed for future research interests, including clinical applications, computational modelling, design optimization and prosthetic fabrication. PMID:26224566

  3. Biomechanics of oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of prosthodontic treatment has been well recognized, and the need is continuously increasing with the ageing population. While the oral mucosa plays a critical role in the treatment outcome, the associated biomechanics is not yet fully understood. Using the literature available, this paper provides a critical review on four aspects of mucosal biomechanics, including static, dynamic, volumetric and interactive responses, which are interpreted by its elasticity, viscosity/permeability, apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient, respectively. Both empirical studies and numerical models are analysed and compared to gain anatomical and physiological insights. Furthermore, the clinical applications of such biomechanical knowledge on the mucosa are explored to address some critical concerns, including stimuli for tissue remodelling (interstitial hydrostatic pressure), pressure-pain thresholds, tissue displaceability and residual bone resorption. Through this review, the state of the art in mucosal biomechanics and their clinical implications are discussed for future research interests, including clinical applications, computational modelling, design optimization and prosthetic fabrication. PMID:26224566

  4. Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Yardimci, Gurkan; Kutlubay, Zekayi; Engin, Burhan; Tuzun, Yalcin

    2014-01-01

    Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa, known as potentially malignant disorders in recent years, are consists of a group of diseases, which should be diagnosed in the early stage. Oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, and oral erythroplakia are the most common oral mucosal diseases that have a very high malignant transformation rate. Oral lichen planus is one of the potentially malignant disorders that may be seen in six different subtypes including papular, reticular, plaque-like, atrophic, erosive, and bullous type, clinically. Atrophic and erosive subtypes have the greater increased malignant transformation risk compared to another subtypes. Although there are various etiological studies, the etiology of almost all these diseases is not fully understood. Geographically, etiologic factors may vary. The most frequently reported possible factors are tobacco use, alcohol drinking, chewing of betel quid containing areca nut, and solar rays. Early diagnosis is very important and can be lifesaving, because in late stages, they may be progressed to severe dysplasia and even carcinoma in situ and/or squamous cell carcinoma. For most diseases, treatment results are not satisfactory in spite of miscellaneous therapies. While at the forefront of surgical intervention, topical and systemic treatment alternatives such as corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and retinoids are widely used. PMID:25516862

  5. Autofluorescence spectroscopy of oral mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, S. K.; Uppal, A.; Gupta, P. K.

    1998-06-01

    We report the results of an in-vitro study on autofluorescence from pathologically characterized normal and malignant squamous tissues from the oral cavity. The study involved biopsy samples from 47 patients with oral cancer of which 11 patients had cancer of tongue, 17 of buccal mucosa and 19 of alveolus. The results of excitation and emission spectroscopy at several wavelengths (280 nm less than or equal to (lambda) exless than or equal to 460 nm; 340 nm less than or equal to (lambda) em less than or equal to 520 nm) showed that at (lambda) ex equals 337 nm and 400 nm the mean value for the spectrally integrated fluorescence intensity [(Sigma) (lambda ) IF((lambda) )] from the normal tissue sites was about a factor of 2 larger than that from the malignant tissue sites. At other excitation wavelengths the difference in (Sigma) (lambda ) IF((lambda) ) was not statistically significant. Similarly, for (lambda) em equals 390 nm and 460 nm, the intensity of the 340 nm band of the excitation spectra from normal tissues was observed to be a factor of 2 larger than that from malignant tissues. Analysis of these results suggests that NADH concentration is higher in normal oral tissues compared to the malignant. This contrasts with our earlier observation of an reduced NADH concentration in normal sites of breast tissues vis a vis malignant sites. For the 337 nm excited emission spectra a 10-variable MVLR score (using (Sigma) (lambda ) IF((lambda) ) and normalized intensities at nine wavelengths as input parameters) provided a sensitivity and specificity of 95.7% and 93.1% over the sample size investigated.

  6. [Vesiculobullous lesions of the oral mucosa].

    PubMed

    Spijkervet, F K; Vissink, A; Raghoebar, G M; van der Waal, I

    2001-06-01

    In general practice, the dentist can be confronted with a vesiculobullous lesion of the oral mucosa. In many cases the lesion can be classified as recurrent herpes labialis, but many other causes can induce a vesiculobullous lesion of the oral mucosa and perioral skin as well. This article gives an overview of the various vesiculous and bullous lesions of the oral mucous membranes. Special attention is given to the possible causes and their treatment. PMID:11441714

  7. Diseases of the Oral Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, G.

    1988-01-01

    This article provides a clinical approach to the more common oral mucosal lesions. Histologic diagnoses are not included, apart from their use in diagnosis and management. In a small number of oral mucosal lesions, clinical appearance is sufficiently distinctive to permit accurate diagnosis, but a biopsy is usually necessary. Clinical appearance is important in directing further investigations such as culture and serologic testing. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:21253207

  8. Desmoplastic Melanocytic Nevus of Oral Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Damm, Douglas D; Fowler, Craig B; Schmidt, David P

    2016-09-01

    The desmoplastic melanocytic nevus is an uncommon variant that easily may be confused with a fibrohistiocytic neoplasm or a desmoplastic melanoma. It is believed that the following report describes the first known example of a desmoplastic melanocytic nevus arising in the oral mucosa. The histopathologic and immunohistochemical features that allow separation from other microscopically similar pathoses are stressed. PMID:26747459

  9. Age and the architecture of oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Abu Eid, Rasha; Sawair, Faleh; Landini, Gabriel; Saku, Takashi

    2012-06-01

    Age changes affect the oral mucosa (the protective lining of the oral cavity), but few of these have been studied objectively. The aim of this study was to quantitatively analyse a number of morphometric parameters of the ageing oral mucosa. The fractal dimension of the epithelial connective tissue interface (ECTI) was estimated in 42 samples of normal buccal mucosa to correlate any changes in their irregularity to the age of the individuals. Morphometric parameters extracted from theoretical cell areas computed programatically were also analysed. Results showed no significant change in ECTI complexity associated with age; however, there was indication that epithelial cells tended to become larger and flatter with age. Interestingly, while some parameters did not show significant differences case wise, cluster analysis showed that the data clustered the cases into three main age groups: one representing the first two decades of life, another group represents adult life (21-50 years) and the last group representing the ageing population (50-90 years). PMID:21559867

  10. Optimum Topical Delivery of Adrenergic Agonists to Oral Mucosa Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Soref, Cheryl M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Identify an orotopical vehicle to deliver an α-adrenergic vasoconstrictor to submucosal vasculature that is readily palatable to cancer/bone marrow transplant patients that suppresses chemo-radiotherapy-associated oral mucositis. Methods A [3H] norepinephrine ligand binding assay was developed to quantify receptor binding in hamster oral mucosa. Vehicle components (alcohols, polyols, cellulose, PVP) were tested versus [3H] norepinephrine binding. Vehicle refinement was also done to mask phenylephrine bitter taste and achieve human subject acceptance. The optimized vehicle was tested with α-adrenergic active agents to suppress radiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. Results The ligand binding assay quantified dose- and time-dependent, saturable binding of [3H] norepinephrine. An ethanol:glycerol:propylene glycol:water (6:6:8:80) vehicle provided the best delivery and binding. Further vehicle modification (flavoring and sucralose) yielded a vehicle with excellent taste scores in humans. Addition of phenylephrine, norepinephrine or epinephrine to the optimized vehicle and painting into mouse mouths 20 min before 19 Gy irradiation conferred significant suppression of the weight loss (P < 0.001) observed in mice who received oral vehicle. Conclusion We identified a highly efficient vehicle for the topical delivery of phenylephrine to the oral mucosa of both hamster and human subjects. This will enable its testing to suppress oral mucositis in an upcoming human clinical trial. PMID:25079392

  11. Lichenoid reaction to carbamazepine in the oral mucosa: case report.

    PubMed

    Artico, Gabriela; Bruno, Ingrid S; Seo, Juliana; Hirota, Silvio K; Acay, Renata; Migliari, Dante A

    2011-01-01

    Lichenoid drug reactions are more common in skin, but they may also occur in the oral mucosa. It is difficult to diagnose these lesions due to their clinical similarity to the idiopathic oral lichen planus lesions. The present article reports a case of lichenoid reaction in oral mucosa associated to the use of carbamazepine, emphasizing the diagnostic process. PMID:22068798

  12. Epithelioid leiomyoma of the oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Koutlas, I G; Manivel, J C

    1996-12-01

    Oral leiomyomas are rare because of the paucity of smooth muscle in the mouth. The solid and vascular types are the most frequent variants. The purpose of this article is to present the pathologic features and differential diagnosis of an example of epithelioid leiomyoma. A 50-year-old woman presented with a small raised nonpainful polypoid lesion of unknown duration on the right buccal mucosa. The tumor was well demarcated and consisted of large epithelioid cells with distinct cytoplasmic borders, round to oval nuclei, and prominent nucleoli. A few mitoses (4 in 20 high power fields) were present. Scattered spindle cells were also seen. The cytoplasm was eosinophilic to amphophilic and showed frequent clearing and retraction. Small capillaries were identified and surrounded by neoplastic cells that gave the lesion an angiomyomatous appearance. Masson trichrome stain highlighted focally smooth muscle cells. Immunohistochemical evaluation revealed staining for vimentin, desmin, and muscle-specific actim. PMID:8974140

  13. MAGE-A antigens in lesions of the oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Eva; Rauthe, Stephan; Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Reuther, Tobias; Kochel, Michael; Kriegebaum, Ulrike; Kübler, Alexander C; Müller-Richter, Urs D A

    2011-06-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma develops continuously out of predamaged oral mucosa. For the physician and pathologist, difficulties arise in distinguishing precancerous from cancerous lesions. MAGE-A antigens are tumor antigens that are found solely in malignant transformed cells. These antigens might be useful in distinguishing precancerous from cancerous lesions. The aim of this study was to verify this assumption by comparing MAGE-A expression in benign, precancerous, and cancerous lesions of the oral mucosa. Retrospectively, biopsies of different oral lesions were randomly selected. The lesions that were included are 64 benign oral lesions (25 traumatic lesions (oral ulcers), 13 dental follicles, and 26 epulis), 26 oral lichen planus, 123 epithelial precursor lesions (32 epithelial hyperplasia found in leukoplakias, 24 epithelial dysplasia found in leukoplakias, 26 erythroplasia with oral epithelial dysplasia, and 41 carcinomas in situ in erythroleukoplakias). The lesions were immunohistochemically stained with the poly-MAGE-A antibody 57B, and the results were compared. Biopsies of oral lichen planus, oral ulcers, dental follicles, epulis, and leukoplakia without dysplasia showed no positive staining for MAGE-A antigens. Leukoplakia with dysplasia, dysplasia, and carcinomata in situ displayed positive staining in 33%, 65%, and 56% of the cases, respectively. MAGE-A antigens were not detectable via immunohistochemistry in benign lesions of the oral mucosa. The staining rate of dysplastic precancerous lesions or malignant lesions ranged from 33% to 65%. The MAGE-A antigens might facilitate better differentiation between precancerous and cancerous lesions of the oral mucosa. PMID:20174843

  14. [Premalignant lesions and conditions of the oral mucosa].

    PubMed

    Bruaset, I

    1989-04-01

    An overview is presented of the premalignant lesions and conditions of the oral mucosa. The dentist can play an important role in the detection of these lesions, thereby reducing the chance of premalignant transformation. PMID:2622509

  15. Leptin Promotes Wound Healing in the Oral Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Umeki, Hirochika; Tokuyama, Reiko; Ide, Shinji; Okubo, Mitsuru; Tadokoro, Susumu; Tezuka, Mitsuki; Tatehara, Seiko; Satomura, Kazuhito

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Leptin, a 16 kDa circulating anti-obesity hormone, exhibits many physiological properties. Recently, leptin was isolated from saliva; however, its function in the oral cavity is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the physiological role of leptin in the oral cavity by focusing on its effect on wound healing in the oral mucosa. Methods Immunohistochemical analysis was used to examine the expression of the leptin receptor (Ob-R) in human/rabbit oral mucosa. To investigate the effect of leptin on wound healing in the oral mucosa, chemical wounds were created in rabbit oral mucosa, and leptin was topically administered to the wound. The process of wound repair was histologically observed and quantitatively analyzed by measuring the area of ulceration and the duration required for complete healing. The effect of leptin on the proliferation, differentiation and migration of human oral mucosal epithelial cells (RT7 cells) was investigated using crystal violet staining, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and a wound healing assay, respectively. Results Ob-R was expressed in spinous/granular cells in the epithelial tissue and vascular endothelial cells in the subepithelial connective tissue of the oral mucosa. Topical administration of leptin significantly promoted wound healing and shortened the duration required for complete healing. Histological analysis of gingival tissue beneath the ulceration showed a denser distribution of blood vessels in the leptin-treated group. Although the proliferation and differentiation of RT7 cells were not affected by leptin, the migration of these cells was accelerated in the presence of leptin. Conclusion Topically administered leptin was shown to promote wound healing in the oral mucosa by accelerating epithelial cell migration and enhancing angiogenesis around the wounded area. These results strongly suggest that topical administration of leptin may be useful as a treatment to promote wound

  16. Oral focal mucinosis of palatal mucosa: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Vipin; Singh, Jagmohan

    2012-01-01

    Oral focal mucinosis (OFM), an oral counterpart of cutaneous focal mucinosis, is a rare disease of unknown etiology. Its pathogenesis may be due to the overproduction of hyaluronic acid by a fibroblast, at the expense of collagen production, resulting in focal myxoid degeneration of the connective tissue, primarily affecting the mucosa overlying the bone. It has no distinctive clinical features, as the diagnosis is solely based on the histopathological features. This article reports of a 32-year-old female having the rare disease of oral focal mucinosis, involving the posterior palatal mucosa, and discusses its clinicopathological features and differential diagnosis of myxomatous lesions of the oral cavity. PMID:23230367

  17. Optical detection of (pre-)malignant lesions of the oral mucosa: autofluorescence characteristics of healthy mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Veld, Diana C. G.; Witjes, Max; Roodenburg, Jan L.; Star, Willem M.; Sterenborg, Hericus J. C. M.

    2001-10-01

    Previous clinical results demonstrate the potential of in vivo autofluorescence spectroscopy for early detection of (pre-)malignant lesions of the oral mucosa. For reliable diagnosis, it is necessary to study autofluorescence spectra of healthy mucosa first. We measured excitation-emission maps in healthy subjects and subjects with a history of cancer in the head -neck region. Our results show that different anatomical locations produce distinct autofluorescence spectra. Influences of, among others, smoking and drinking habits require further investigation.

  18. Nested PCR for detection of HSV-1 in oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Jalouli, Miranda-Masoumeh; Jalouli, Jamshid; Hasséus, Bengt; Öhman, Jenny; Hirsch, Jan-Michaél

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been estimated that 15%-20% of human tumours are driven by infection and inflammation, and viral infections play an important role in malignant transformation. The evidence that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) could be involved in the aetiology of oral cancer varies from weak to persuasive. This study aimed to investigate by nested PCR (NPCR) the prevalence of HSV-1 in samples from normal oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia, and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Material and Methods We investigated the prevalence of HSV-1 in biopsies obtained from 26 fresh, normal oral mucosa from healthy volunteers as well as 53 oral leukoplakia and 27 OSCC paraffin-embedded samples. DNA was extracted from the specimens and investigated for the presence of HSV-1 by nested polymerase chain reaction (NPCR) and DNA sequencing. Results HSV-1 was detected in 14 (54%) of the healthy samples, in 19 (36%) of the oral leukoplakia samples, and in 14 (52%) of the OSCC samples. The differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions We observed a high incidence of HSV-1 in healthy oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia, and OSCC tissues. Thus, no connection between OSCC development and presence of HSV-1 was detected. Key words:HSV-1, nested PCR, PCR. PMID:26449432

  19. Harvesting oral mucosa for one-stage anterior urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Sanjay Balwant; Barbagli, Guido; Sansalone, Salvatore; Joshi, Pankaj Mangalkumar

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucosa has been the most popular substitute material for urethral reconstructive surgery because it is easy to harvest, is easy to access, has a concealed donor site scar, and obviates most of the problems associated with other grafts. However, the success of using oral mucosa for urethral surgery is mainly attributed to the biological properties of this tissue. Herein, the surgical steps of harvesting oral mucosa from the inner cheek are presented with an emphasis on tips and tricks to render the process easier and more reproducible and to prevent intra and post-operative complications. The following steps are emphasized: Nasal intubation, ovoid shape graft, delicate harvesting leaving the muscle intact, donor site closure and removal of submucosal tissue. PMID:24497698

  20. Raman microspectroscopic study of oral buccal mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behl, Isha; Mamgain, Hitesh; Deshmukh, Atul; Kukreja, Lekha; Hole, Arti R.; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Oral cancer is the most common cancer among Indian males, with 5-year- survival-rates of less than 50%. Efficacy of Raman spectroscopic methods in non-invasive and objective diagnosis of oral cancers and confounding factors has already been demonstrated. The present Raman microspectroscopic study was undertaken for in-depth and site-specific analysis of normal and tumor tissues. 10 normal and 10 tumors unstained sections from 20 tissues were accrued. Raman data of 160 x 60 μm and 140 x 140 μm in normal and tumor sections, respectively, were acquired using WITec alpha 300R equipped with 532 nm laser, 50X objective and 600 gr/mm grating. Spectral data were corrected for CCDresponse, background. First-derivitized and vector-normalized data were then subjected to K-mean cluster analysis to generate Raman maps and correlated with their respective histopathology. In normal sections, stratification among epithelial layers i.e. basal, intermediate, superficial was observed. Tumor, stromal and inflammatory regions were identified in case of tumor section. Extracted spectra of the pathologically annotated regions were subjected to Principal component analysis. Findings suggest that all three layers of normal epithelium can be differentiated against tumor cells. In epithelium, basal and superficial layers can be separated while intermediate layer show misclassifications. In tumors, discrimination of inflammatory regions from tumor cells and tumor-stroma regions were observed. Finding of the study indicate Raman mapping can lead to molecular level insights of normal and pathological states.

  1. [Oral medicine 9. Lichen planus and lichenoid lesions of the oral mucosa].

    PubMed

    van der Meij, E H; Schepman, K P; de Visscher, J G A M

    2013-09-01

    The general dentist is sometimes confronted with white lesions of the oral mucosa. Oral lichen planus is the most common oral white lesion. The diagnosis can usually be made on the basis of the clinical aspect, but is sometimes made more difficult by certain abnormalities in the oral mucosa which clinically resemble oral lichen planus or by abnormalities which cannot be distinguished from oral lichen planus but have a different origin. Those lesions are classified as oral lichenoid lesions. Malignant deterioration has been described in allforms of oral lichen planus lesions and oral lichenoid lesions. There is no known method to predict or prevent malignant transformation. Nor are there any studies examining the efficacy of frequent follow-up visits. It seems sensible, in keeping with the tendency in recent literature, to schedule annual check-ups for patients to be on the safe side. These follow-up visits may reasonably be performed in a general dental practice. PMID:24159754

  2. The bacterial microbiota in the oral mucosa of rural Amerindians.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Monica; Costello, Elizabeth K; Hidalgo, Glida; Magris, Magda; Knight, Rob; Dominguez-Bello, Maria G

    2010-11-01

    The oral microbiota plays an important role in buccal health and in diseases such as periodontitis and meningitis. The study of the human oral bacteria has so far focused on subjects from Western societies, while little is known about subjects from isolated communities. This work determined the composition of the oral mucosa microbiota from six Amazon Amerindians, and tested a sample preservation alternative to freezing. Paired oral swabs were taken from six adults of Guahibo ethnicity living in the community of Platanillal, Amazonas State, Venezuela. Replicate swabs were preserved in liquid nitrogen and in Aware Messenger fluid (Calypte). Buccal DNA was extracted, and the V2 region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and pyrosequenced. A total of 17 214 oral bacterial sequences were obtained from the six subjects; these were binned into 1034 OTUs from 10 phyla, 30 families and 51 genera. The oral mucosa was highly dominated by four phyla: Firmicutes (mostly the genera Streptococcus and Veillonella), Proteobacteria (mostly Neisseria), Bacterioidetes (Prevotella) and Actinobacteria (Micrococcineae). Although the microbiota were similar at the phylum level, the Amerindians shared only 62 % of the families and 23 % of the genera with non-Amerindians from previous studies, and had a lower richness of genera (51 vs 177 reported in non-Amerindians). The Amerindians carried unidentified members of the phyla Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria and their microbiota included soil bacteria Gp1 (Acidobacteriaceae) and Xylanibacter (Prevotellaceae), and the rare genus Phocoenobacter (Pasteurellaceae). Preserving buccal swabs in the Aware Messenger oral fluid collection device substantially altered the bacterial composition in comparison to freezing, and therefore this method cannot be used to preserve samples for the study of microbial communities. PMID:20847007

  3. Eosinophilic ulcer of oral mucosa: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Passador-Santos, Fabrício; Capella, Diogo L.; Manfro, Gabriel; Nodari, Rudy José; Presta, Andréia Antoniuk

    2012-01-01

    Summary Eosinophilic Ulcer (EU) is a rare self-limiting chronic benign lesion of the oral mucosa with pathogenesis still unclear, however it may resemble malignancies, traumatic ulcerations and some infections such as deep fungal infections, tuberculosis and primary syphilis. This is a case report of a patient with EU in the lateral border of the tongue with no history of associated trauma and refractory to treatment with drugs. The ulcer rapidly healed after an incisional biopsy and the definite diagnosis was achieved only combining histologic findings and the clinical follow-up. PMID:22783449

  4. Comparison of Immunohistochemical Expression of Antiapoptotic Protein Survivin in Normal Oral Mucosa, Oral Leukoplakia, and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Negi, Amita; Puri, Abhiney; Gupta, Rakhi; Nangia, Rajat; Sachdeva, Alisha; Mittal, Megha

    2015-01-01

    Background. Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the sixth most frequent malignant tumor worldwide and the third most common cancers in developing countries. Oral leukoplakia is the best-known precursor lesion of oral squamous cell carcinoma. The aim of the present study was to compare immunohistochemical expression of antiapoptotic protein survivin in normal oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia, and oral squamous cell carcinoma. Method. Total 45 specimens of formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue blocks, 15 in each of the following: normal oral mucosa, leukoplakia, and oral squamous cell carcinoma were used for the study. Immunohistochemical reaction for survivin protein was performed for the 4 µm thick histological sections taken on positively charged slides. Results. 20% normal mucosa cases, 53.33% cases of leukoplakia, and 80% of oral squamous cell carcinoma were found out to be survivin positive. One way ANOVA test indicated statistically significant difference of survivin expression between the three different groups (p < 0.001). Conclusion. A high incidence of survivin protein expression in oral epithelial dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma samples indicate that survivin protein expression may be an early event in initiation and progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26457223

  5. Epidemiology of oral HPV in the oral mucosa in women without signs of oral disease from Yucatan, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Losa, María del Refugio; Barrera, Ernesto Soria; Herrera-Pech, Verónica; Conde-Ferráez, Laura; Puerto-Solís, Marylin; Ayora-Talavera, Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) are considered necessary for the development of cervical cancer. Furthermore, there is no doubt that some types of oral squamous cell carcinoma are associated with HR-HPV. The epidemiology of oral HPV infections in healthy subjects remains unclear due to a lack of knowledge. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of human papillomavirus infections of the oral mucosa without pathology. A cross-sectional study was performed; samples from 390 women seeking prenatal care, Pap smears, family planning or gynecological diseases were studied. Oral cells were collected by direct swab sampling. Information regarding sociodemographic status, sexual behavior, infectious diseases, contraceptive history and tobacco and alcohol consumption were obtained through direct interviews. HPV and genotypes were detected by type-specific polymerase chain reaction. Our results revealed that 14% of the women studied had an oral HPV infection. Women ≤ 20 years of age had the highest HPV prevalence (24.5%). In total, seven genotypes were identified, including the high-risk genotypes 16, 18, 58 and 59 and the low-risk genotypes 6, 81 and 13, the latter of which is a type exclusive to oral mucosa. Sexual behavior was not associated with the presence of genital HPV types in the oral mucosa. Genital HPV types were present in the oral mucosa of women without associated clinical manifestations; however, sexual behavior was not associated with infection, and therefore others routes of transmission should be explored. PMID:26221121

  6. Raman mapping of oral buccal mucosa: a spectral histopathology approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behl, Isha; Kukreja, Lekha; Deshmukh, Atul; Singh, S. P.; Mamgain, Hitesh; Hole, Arti R.; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-12-01

    Oral cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. One-fifth of the world's oral cancer subjects are from India and other South Asian countries. The present Raman mapping study was carried out to understand biochemical variations in normal and malignant oral buccal mucosa. Data were acquired using WITec alpha 300R instrument from 10 normal and 10 tumors unstained tissue sections. Raman maps of normal sections could resolve the layers of epithelium, i.e. basal, intermediate, and superficial. Inflammatory, tumor, and stromal regions are distinctly depicted on Raman maps of tumor sections. Mean and difference spectra of basal and inflammatory cells suggest abundance of DNA and carotenoids features. Strong cytochrome bands are observed in intermediate layers of normal and stromal regions of tumor. Epithelium and stromal regions of normal cells are classified by principal component analysis. Classification among cellular components of normal and tumor sections is also observed. Thus, the findings of the study further support the applicability of Raman mapping for providing molecular level insights in normal and malignant conditions.

  7. Reduction in oral mucosa micronuclei frequency following alpha-tocopherol treatment of oral leukoplakia.

    PubMed

    Benner, S E; Wargovich, M J; Lippman, S M; Fisher, R; Velasco, M; Winn, R J; Hong, W K

    1994-01-01

    Micronuclei frequency, a marker of genotoxicity, was studied within a trial of alpha-tocopherol for chemoprevention of oral leukoplakia. Oral swabs were obtained from two sites, the leukoplakia lesion and normal-appearing mucosa, at baseline and following 24 weeks of therapy with 400 international units of alpha-tocopherol twice daily. These specimens were analyzed for micronuclei frequency. The major risk factors for oral carcinogenesis in the group studied were cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption. alpha-tocopherol therapy produced a significant reduction in micronuclei frequencies in specimens from both the visible lesions (P < 0.01) and the normal-appearing mucosa (P < 0.01). The micronuclei frequencies, both at baseline and following therapy, were greater in specimens taken from the lesion than in those from the normal-appearing mucosa. Although these results indicate that alpha-tocopherol has a beneficial effect in oral carcinogenesis, there was no significant clinical or histological response associated with the change in micronuclei frequency. Micronuclei frequency has not yet been validated as a biomarker for cancer incidence, and consequently, its utility as an intermediate end point for chemoprevention trials is not known. Determining clinical significance of micronuclei frequency patterns in oral carcinogenesis and chemoprevention will require further study. PMID:8118389

  8. Integrating-Sphere Measurements for Determining Optical Properties of Tissue-Engineered Oral Mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, A. M.; Cardona, J. C.; Garzón, I.; Oliveira, A. C.; Ghinea, R.; Alaminos, M.; Pérez, M. M.

    2015-02-01

    Surgical procedures carried out in the oral and maxillofacial region can result in large tissue defects. Accounting for the shortage of oral mucosa to replace the excised tissues, different models of an organotypic substitute of the oral mucosa generated by tissue engineering have recently been proposed. In this work, the propagation of light radiation through artificial human oral mucosa substitutes based on fibrin-agarose scaffolds (fibrin, fibrin-0.1% agarose, fibrin-0.2%agarose) is investigated, and their optical properties are determined using the inverse adding-doubling (IAD) method based on integrating-sphere measurements. Similar values for the absorption and scattering coefficients between the fibrin and fibrin-0.1% agarose bioengineered tissues and the native oral mucosa were found. These results suggest the adequacy of these biomaterials for potential clinical use in human oral mucosa applications. These optical properties represent useful references and data for applications requiring the knowledge of the light transport through this type of tissues, applications used in clinical practice. It also provides a new method of information analysis for the quality control of the development of the artificial nanostructured oral mucosa substitutes and its comparison with native oral mucosa tissues.

  9. Expression of E-cadherin in normal oral mucosa, in oral precancerous lesions and in oral carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Sridevi, Ugrappa; Jain, Ajay; Nagalaxmi, Velpula; Kumar, Ugrappa Vijay; Goyal, Stuti

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of E-cad in oral precancerous lesions and conditions and oral carcinomas in comparison with normal mucosa. Materials and Methods: Total of 50 samples were selected for the study and were categorized into five groups and 10 samples in each group as Group I-oral leukoplakia (OL), Group II-oral lichen planus (OLP), Group III-oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF), Group IV-oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and Group V-normal oral mucosa (NOM) as control group. All the samples were assessed for the expression of E-cad by immunohistochemical study. Results: Upon assessing the expression of E-cad in OL, OSMF, OLP and OSCC, as majority of the samples with OSCC (90%), OL (80%), OLP (70%) and OSMF (60%) showed mild to moderate expression of E-cad staining, which was suggestive of reduction in dysplastic cells on comparison to NOM cells. This difference in expression and variation of E-cad upon comparison with normal mucosa was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusion: There is significant (P < 0.001) variation of expression of E-cad with the histopathological dysplasia of the oral precancerous lesions and conditions, and the tumor differentiation of the oral cancers. However, there was no correlation of the degree of loss of expression of E-cad with the degree of dysplasia or the tumor differentiation of oral cancers. We conclude with our study that, there is a variation in the expression of E-cad but its value as a prognostic marker is questionable. PMID:26430364

  10. The expression profile of filaggrin-2 in the normal and pathologic human oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Makino, Teruhiko; Mizawa, Megumi; Inoue, Sayaka; Noguchi, Makoto; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2016-04-01

    The epithelial cells of the oral cavity show a remarkable degree of regional variation with respect to their morphology and keratinization status. In the oral cavity, the tongue and palate contain keratinizing stratified epithelia, while the buccal mucosa contains non-keratinizing stratified epithelia. We herein examined the expression of filaggrin-2, a member of the S100 fused-type protein family, in the oral mucosa. Filaggrin-2 was weakly expressed in the normal epithelium of the palate, but not in the buccal mucosa or tongue, although filaggrin protein was observed in the epithelium of the buccal mucosa and the palate. We next examined the expression of filaggrin-2 in the oral mucosa of subjects with hyperkeratotic diseases. The expression of filaggrin-2 was markedly increased in the epithelium of the oral mucosa in patients with lichen planus, leukokeratosis and leukoplakia. Filaggrin-2 positivity was observed in granules, some of which were co-localized with those of filaggrin. These results indicate that filaggrin-2 was expressed in the oral mucosa under certain pathological conditions, demonstrating that an aberrant protein expression, together with filaggrin, indicates the altered differentiation program including hyperkeratosis that occurs in these diseases. PMID:26858109

  11. Late effects of radiotherapy on oral mucosa in humans.

    PubMed

    Handschel, J; Sunderkötter, C; Kruse-Lösler, B; Prott, F J; Meyer, U; Piffko, J; Joos, U

    2001-04-01

    In order to gain further understanding of the late effects of radiotherapy on oral mucosa, we analysed the histomorphological alterations, the cell populations in the subepithelial tissue, and the endothelial expression pattern of different adhesion molecules. Biopsies were taken from patients before irradiation, directly after 60 Gy, and 6-12 months after radiotherapy. Besides the histomorphological evaluation of the vessels, the endothelial expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin was determined as well as the distribution of LFA-1-, Mac-1-, VLA-4-, RM3/1-, 27E10- and 25F9-bearing cells in the subepithelial tissue. The expression of ICAM-1 was downregulated after radiotherapy, whereas the percentage of LFA-1- and VLA-4-bearing cells increased. VCAM-1 remained at low levels. The subepithelial infiltration was still dominated by RM3/1-positive macrophages. The number of vessels decreased, while the lumen of the remaining vessels increased. In conclusion, the late effects of radiotherapy are characterized by a decreased number of blood vessels and by significantly different expression patterns of the adhesion molecules studied, and of integrins and macrophage subpopulations, compared to the conditions before irradiation and directly after irradiation with 60 Gy. PMID:11347662

  12. Multiple recurrent vesicles in oral mucosa suggestive of superficial mucocele: An unusual presentation of allergic stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Motallebnejad, Mina; Shirzad, Atena; Molania, Tahere; Seyedmajidi, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Background: Superficial mucocele presents as small, clear vesicle on noninflamed mucosa. In this study, we report several vesicles on the bucal mucosa of a woman diagnosed as superficial mucocele. Case Presentation: A 48-year old woman presented with multiple vesicles on her labial mucosa, ventral surface of the tongue, floor of the mouth and palate. A mucosal biopsy was taken from the vesicle. Histopathologically, intraepithelial mucocele was diagnosed. The lesion was successfully treated with mouthwash betamethasone. There has been no recurrence for 18 months. Conclusion: In the present study, several mucoceles were seen in the oral mucosa. No similar case was reported previously. PMID:24294477

  13. Dendritic Cell Subsets in Oral Mucosa of Allergic and Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Reinartz, Susanne M.; van Tongeren, Joost; van Egmond, Danielle; de Groot, Esther J. J.; Fokkens, Wytske J.; van Drunen, Cornelis M.

    2016-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry was used to identify, enumerate, and describe the tissue distribution of Langerhans type (CD1a and CD207), myeloid (CD1c and CD141), and plasmacytoid (CD303 and CD304) dendritic cell subsets in oral mucosa of allergic and non-allergic individuals. Allergic individuals have more CD141+ myeloid cells in epithelium and more CD1a+ Langerhans cells in the lamina propria compared to healthy controls, but similar numbers for the other DC subtypes. Our data are the first to describe the presence of CD303+ plasmacytoid DCs in human oral mucosa and a dense intraepithelial network of CD141+ DCs. The number of Langerhans type DCs (CD1a and CD207) and myeloid DCs (CD1c), was higher in the oral mucosa than in the nasal mucosa of the same individual independent of the atopic status. PMID:27166951

  14. Effects of Glyprolines on DNA Synthesis and Free Radical Oxidation in Mouse Gastric Mucosa Under Physiological Conditions and During Therapy with Oral Non-Steroid Anti-Inflammatory Drugs.

    PubMed

    Fleishman, M Yu; Tolstenok, I V; Lebed'ko, O A; Andreeva, L A; Myasoedov, N F; Timoshin, S S

    2015-08-01

    Studies by (3)H-thymidin autoradiography showed that injections of Pro-Gly-Pro and Arg-Gly-Pro peptides caused no changes in the DNA synthesis processes in the gastric mucosa. Both peptides induced a reduction of free radical oxidation activity, which was shown by chemiluminescence. Indomethacin induced lesions in the gastric mucosa, triggered oxidative stress, and reduced proliferative activity. Injection of Pro-Gly-Pro peptide before indomethacin corrected disorders in oxidative status and normalized DNA synthesis. Preinjection of Arg-Gly-Pro led to enlargement (by 4.6 times) of the focus of lesions in animals treated by indomethacin and augmented oxidative stress. PMID:26388565

  15. [Pulmonary tuberculosis complicated with tuberculosis of oral mucosa, mandible and cervical lymph nodes].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, K; Ueda, S; Horie, T

    1995-04-01

    A case of pulmonary tuberculosis complicated with tuberculous of oral mucosa, mandible and cervical lymph nodes in 53-year-old man is reported. He was firstly treated for right side dental caries. He also received routinely an empiric antibiotic therapy, but discharge of pus continued. Then, pain of oral cavities spread to the right shoulder. The diagnosis of oral mucosa, osteomyelitis of mandible and lymph node tuberculosis was made by the histological examination of biopsy specimens and positive smear test for M. tuberculosis in granulation. The chest X-ray film showed multiple nodular shadows in bilateral lungs. The combination of INH, RFP and SM was applied initially and then SM was replaced by CS due to its side effect. Negative smear test for M. tuberculosis of oral mucosa was achieved five months after the initiation of treatment. PMID:7760539

  16. The effect of cryotherapy on oral mucosa: a study in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Svanberg, Anncarin; Ohrn, Kerstin; Broström, Hans; Birgegård, Gunnar

    2012-12-01

    Oral cryotherapy causes local vasoconstriction, which reduces blood flow and reduces the cytotoxic damage to the oral mucosa, has been shown to reduce oral mucositis after intense cytostatic treatment. The main object of this study was to investigate the effect of oral cryotherapy on the temperature in the oral mucosa, the level of proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in saliva and the effect on blood pressure in healthy volunteers, before and after 1 h of cooling the oral cavity with crushed ice. Twelve healthy volunteers [mean age 32.4 (SD 13.2) (20-56) years] were treated with oral cryotherapy in the form of crushed ice. Temperature measurements were performed in the oral mucosa using infrared thermograph following a flowchart protocol. Blood pressure (BP) was measured with a sphygmomanometer. Saliva was analysed for inflammatory cytokine IL-6, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). All participants fulfilled the cooling session. The temperature in the oral cavity decreased significantly (mean 12.9 °C, p < .002). The systolic BP was marginally but significantly higher after cooling (~5 mmHg, p = .019). We could not detect any differences in cytokine IL-6 levels before and after oral cooling. We conclude that cryotherapy during 1 h lowers the mucosal temperature as much as ~12.9 °C, which explains the significant protective effect against mucosal damage by cytostatic drugs. The cooling caused no increase in IL-6 levels. Systemic blood pressure was marginally increased. PMID:22476810

  17. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis interacts with dermal dendritic cells and keratinocytes in human skin and oral mucosa lesions.

    PubMed

    Ferreira da Silva, Wellington Luiz; Pagliari, Carla; Duarte, Maria Irma Seixas; Sotto, Mirian N

    2016-05-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic disease caused by the fungusParacoccidioides brasiliensisandParacoccidioides lutzii In PCM the skin and oral mucosa are often affected. Dendritic cells and keratinocytes of the integument play a role in innate and adaptive immune response against pathogens, due to their function as antigen presenting cells. Aiming to verify the interaction ofP. brasiliensiswith these cell populations, we studied 52 skin and 47 oral mucosa samples taken from patients with proven diagnosis of PCM. The biopsies were subjected to immunohistochemical and/or immunofluorescence staining with anti-factor XIIIa (marker of dermal dendrocytes), anti-CD207 (marker of mature Langerhans cells), anti-pan cytokeratins (AE1-AE3) and anti-P. brasiliensisantibodies. Analyses with confocal laser microscopy were also performed for better visualization of the interaction between keratinocytes and the fungi. In sum, 42% of oral mucosa samples displayed yeast forms in Factor XIIIa dermal dendrocytes cytoplasm. Langerhans cells in skin and oral mucosa samples did not show yeast cells in their cytoplasm. In sum, 54% of skin and 60% of mucosal samples displayed yeast cells in the cytoplasm of keratinocytes. The parasitism of keratinocytes may represent a possible mechanism of evasion of the fungus to local immune mechanisms. Factor XIIIa dendrocytes and keratinocytes may be acting as antigen-presenting cells to fulfill the probably impaired function of Langerhans cells in skin and oral mucosa of human PCM. PMID:26768374

  18. Tissue reactions to suture materials in the oral mucosa of beagle dogs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Seok; Shin, Seung-Il; Herr, Yeek; Park, Joon-Bong; Kwon, Young-Hyuk

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to compare and evaluate the inflammatory responses of three widely used suture materials in the keratinized gingiva and buccal mucosa of beagle dogs. Methods Silk, polyglycolic acid, and nylon sutures were placed within the mandibular keratinized gingiva and maxillary buccal mucosa of four male beagle dogs. Biopsies were taken 3, 7, and 14 days after suturing. Specimens were prepared with hematoxylin-eosin stain for evaluation under a light microscope. Results The suture materials placed in the oral mucosa elicited more inflammatory reactions than did those placed in the keratinized gingiva. The multifilament suture materials caused more inflammatory tissue reactions than did the monofilament suture materials in the oral mucosa. Conclusions If oral hygiene is well maintained and suture materials are placed in the keratinized gingiva, silk, nylon, and polyglycolic acid are considered to be proper suture materials for oral surgery. However, it is advisable to use monofilament suture materials if the suture site is within the oral mucosa. PMID:21954423

  19. Regeneration of Vocal Fold Mucosa Using Tissue-Engineered Structures with Oral Mucosal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fukahori, Mioko; Chitose, Shun-ichi; Sato, Kiminori; Sueyoshi, Shintaro; Kurita, Takashi; Umeno, Hirohito; Monden, Yu; Yamakawa, Ryoji

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Scarred vocal folds result in irregular vibrations during phonation due to stiffness of the vocal fold mucosa. To date, a completely satisfactory corrective procedure has yet to be achieved. We hypothesize that a potential treatment option for this disease is to replace scarred vocal folds with organotypic mucosa. The purpose of this study is to regenerate vocal fold mucosa using a tissue-engineered structure with autologous oral mucosal cells. Study Design Animal experiment using eight beagles (including three controls). Methods A 3 mm by 3 mm specimen of canine oral mucosa was surgically excised and divided into epithelial and subepithelial tissues. Epithelial cells and fibroblasts were isolated and cultured separately. The proliferated epithelial cells were co-cultured on oriented collagen gels containing the proliferated fibroblasts for an additional two weeks. The organotypic cultured tissues were transplanted to the mucosa-deficient vocal folds. Two months after transplantation, vocal fold vibrations and morphological characteristics were observed. Results A tissue-engineered vocal fold mucosa, consisting of stratified epithelium and lamina propria, was successfully fabricated to closely resemble the normal layered vocal fold mucosa. Laryngeal stroboscopy revealed regular but slightly small mucosal waves at the transplanted site. Immunohistochemically, stratified epithelium expressed cytokeratin, and the distributed cells in the lamina propria expressed vimentin. Elastic Van Gieson staining revealed a decreased number of elastic fibers in the lamina propria of the transplanted site. Conclusion The fabricated mucosa with autologous oral mucosal cells successfully restored the vocal fold mucosa. This reconstruction technique could offer substantial clinical advantages for treating intractable diseases such as scarring of the vocal folds. PMID:26730600

  20. Evaluation of Cytological Alterations of Oral Mucosa in Smokers and Waterpipe Users

    PubMed Central

    Seifi, Safoura; Feizi, Farideh; Mehdizadeh, Mohammad; Khafri, Soraya; Ahmadi, Behrang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Oral mucosal epithelia of smokers and waterpipe users are more susceptible to malignant alterations. The aim of this study was morphometric evaluation of the effects of using waterpipe on normal oral mucosa. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study, cytologic smear samples from the following three different areas: buccal mucosa, lateral surface of the tongue, and floor of the mouth (right) were taken from 40 smokers, 40 waterpipe users, and 40 normal individuals. They were then stained using Papanicolaou staining technique. Quantitative cytologic alterations such as nuclear and cytoplasmic size, nuclear-cytoplasmic (N/C) ratio, Feret ratio (FR), percent of karriorhexis, vacuolization of cytoplasm, two or multilobed nuclei, inflammation, and candida were evaluated. Quantitative evaluation was performed using MoticPlus 2 software, and 50 cells in each slide were studied. Practitioners were matched with age and sex in three groups. Results: An increase in nuclear size, the N/C ratio, and F.R, while a decrease in cytoplasm size were observed in lateral surface of the tongue, buccal mucosa and floor of the mouth of smokers, waterpipe users and normal individuals, respectively (p≤0.001). No statistically significant differences were observed in percent of karriorhexis, vacuolization of cytoplasm, and two or multilobed nuclei in oral mucosa of smokers, waterpipe users (p=0.8), and normal individuals (p=0.9) in buccal mucosa, tongue, and mouth floor areas. However, the percentage of inflammation and candida in smokers (p<0.001) and waterpipe users (p=0.002) were higher than normal individuals. Conclusion: Smoking and using waterpipe are effective in creating some quantitative cytometric alterations in oral mucosa; however, smoking shows greater effect in the cytometric alterations than using waterpipe. Role of cytology in screening and detection of oral mucosa malignancies in smokers and waterpipe users needs further studies. PMID:24381854

  1. HIV infection induces morphometrical changes on the oral (buccal mucosa and tongue) epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pompermayer, Adriane Bastos; Gil, Francisca Berenice Dias; França, Beatriz Helena Sottile; Machado, Maria Ângela Naval; Trevilatto, Paula Cristina; Fernandes, Angela; de Lima, Antônio Adilson Soares

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess morphological and morphometrical alterations of oral squamous epithelial cells in type 1 HIV infected individuals. Oral smears were collected from tongue and buccal mucosa of 30 HIV infected (experimental) and 30 non-infected (control) individuals by liquid-based exfoliative cytology. The cells were morphologically analyzed and the nuclear area (NA), the cytoplasmic area (CA) and the nucleus-to-cytoplasm area ratio (NA/CA) were calculated. No morphological differences were found between the groups. The mean values of CA were decreased in tongue (P=.00006) and buccal mucosa (P=.00242) in HIV infected individual, while mean values of NA were increased (P=.00308 and .00095, respectively) in the same group. NA/CA ratio for experimental group was increased in both collected places, with P=.00001 (tongue) and P=.00000 (buccal mucosa). This study revealed that HIV infection was able to induce morphometrical changes on the oral epithelial cells. PMID:21198427

  2. Cultivated Oral Mucosa Epithelium in Ocular Surface Reconstruction in Aniridia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Orzechowska-Wylegala, Boguslawa; Wowra, Bogumil; Wroblewska-Czajka, Ewa; Grolik, Maria; Szczubialka, Krzysztof; Nowakowska, Maria; Puzzolo, Domenico; Wylegala, Edward A.; Micali, Antonio; Aragona, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Efficacy of cultivated oral mucosa epithelial transplantation (COMET) procedure in corneal epithelium restoration of aniridia patients. Methods. Study subjects were aniridia patients (13 patients; 17 eyes) with irregular, vascular conjunctival pannus involving visual axis who underwent autologous transplantation of cultivated epithelium. For the procedure oral mucosa epithelial cells were obtained from buccal mucosa with further enzymatic treatment. Suspension of single cells was seeded on previously prepared denuded amniotic membrane. Cultures were carried on culture dishes inserts in the presence of the inactivated with Mitomycin C monolayer of 3T3 fibroblasts. Cultures were carried for seven days. Stratified oral mucosa epithelium with its amniotic membrane carrier was transplanted on the surgically denuded corneal surface of aniridia patients with total or subtotal limbal stem cell deficiency. Outcome Measures. Corneal surface, epithelial regularity, and visual acuity improvement were evaluated. Results. At the end of the observation period, 76.4% of the eyes had regular transparent epithelium and 23.5% had developed epithelial defects or central corneal haze; in 88.2% of cases visual acuity had increased. VA range was from HM 0.05 before the surgery to HM up to 0.1 after surgery. Conclusion. Application of cultivated oral mucosa epithelium restores regular epithelium on the corneal surface with moderate improvement in quality of vision. PMID:26451366

  3. Evaluation of different pig oral mucosa sites as permeability barrier models for drug permeation studies.

    PubMed

    Franz-Montan, Michelle; Serpe, Luciano; Martinelli, Claudia Cristina Maia; da Silva, Camila Batista; Santos, Cleiton Pita Dos; Novaes, Pedro Duarte; Volpato, Maria Cristina; de Paula, Eneida; Lopez, Renata Fonseca Vianna; Groppo, Francisco Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of preparation and storage conditions on the histology and permeability of different parts of porcine oral mucosa used for in vitro studies of transbuccal formulations. Fresh and frozen (-20°C and -80°C, with or without cryoprotectant) epithelia of porcine palatal, gingival, dorsum of the tongue, and buccal mucosa were submitted for histological analyses to determine the effects of storage conditions on barrier integrity. Permeation of lidocaine hydrochloride (used as a hydrophilic model drug) across fresh and previously frozen oral epithelium was measured in order to evaluate the barrier function. Histological evaluation demonstrated that the oral epithelium was successfully separated from the connective tissue, except for gingival mucosa. After storage under different conditions, all tissues presented desquamation of superficial layers and spherical spaces induced by the freezing process. The permeability of lidocaine hydrochloride varied among the fresh oral mucosa and generally increased after freezing. In conclusion, fresh epithelium from the buccal and dorsum of the tongue mucosa should be used for in vitro studies investigating hydrophilic drug transport when these are the desired clinical application sites. However, when the palate is the target site, both fresh and frozen (for up to 4weeks, without addition of cryoprotectant) samples could be used. The addition of glycerol as a cryoprotectant should be avoided due to increased lidocaine hydrochloride permeability. PMID:26435216

  4. Oral Mucocele of Unusual Size on the Buccal Mucosa: Clinical Presentation and Surgical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Juliana; Bruno, Ingrid; Artico, Gabriela; Vechio, Aluana dal; Migliari, Dante A

    2012-01-01

    Oral mucoceles are small-size, benign minor salivary gland pathologies. The most frequent localizations of these lesions are the lower lip mucosa. However, in some cases, they grow to an unusual size and hinder the preliminary diagnosis of mucocele. The purpose of this article is to report a case of a large oral mucocele with a diameter of 3.5 cm on the buccal mucosa of a 43-years-old male patient. The surgical procedure was carried out for a complete removal of the lesion. PMID:22550550

  5. Oral mucocele of unusual size on the buccal mucosa: clinical presentation and surgical approach.

    PubMed

    Seo, Juliana; Bruno, Ingrid; Artico, Gabriela; Vechio, Aluana Dal; Migliari, Dante A

    2012-01-01

    Oral mucoceles are small-size, benign minor salivary gland pathologies. The most frequent localizations of these lesions are the lower lip mucosa. However, in some cases, they grow to an unusual size and hinder the preliminary diagnosis of mucocele. The purpose of this article is to report a case of a large oral mucocele with a diameter of 3.5 cm on the buccal mucosa of a 43-years-old male patient. The surgical procedure was carried out for a complete removal of the lesion. PMID:22550550

  6. Oral myiasis involving palatal mucosa of a young female.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Suresh; Tyagi, Shallu; Kumar, Prince; Puri, Naveen

    2014-01-01

    In literal terms myiasis is the invasion of the tissues and organs of human beings by fly larvae. This phenomenon is well documented in the skin, especially among animals and people in developed and developing countries. When the tissues of oral cavity are invaded by the parasitic larvae of flies, the condition is called as oral myiasis. With the paper we are presenting a case of 19-year-old female suffering from oral myiasis of upper lip and palate. The treatment consisted of manual removal of the larvae, surgical debridement of the wound and oral therapy with doxycycline used as a locally acting drug for faster and better recovery. PMID:24678227

  7. The microbiome of the oral mucosa in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fourie, Nicolaas H.; Wang, Dan; Abey, Sarah K.; Sherwin, LeeAnne B.; Joseph, Paule V.; Rahim-Williams, Bridgett; Ferguson, Eric G.; Henderson, Wendy A.

    2016-01-01

    abstract Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood disorder characterized by persistent symptoms, including visceral pain. Studies have demonstrated oral microbiome differences in inflammatory bowel diseases suggesting the potential of the oral microbiome in the study of non-oral conditions. In this exploratory study we examine whether differences exist in the oral microbiome of IBS participants and healthy controls, and whether the oral microbiome relates to symptom severity. The oral buccal mucosal microbiome of 38 participants was characterized using PhyloChip microarrays. The severity of visceral pain was assessed by orally administering a gastrointestinal test solution. Participants self-reported their induced visceral pain. Pain severity was highest in IBS participants (P = 0.0002), particularly IBS-overweight participants (P = 0.02), and was robustly correlated to the abundance of 60 OTUs, 4 genera, 5 families and 4 orders of bacteria (r2 > 0.4, P < 0.001). IBS-overweight participants showed decreased richness in the phylum Bacteroidetes (P = 0.007) and the genus Bacillus (P = 0.008). Analysis of β-diversity found significant separation of the IBS-overweight group (P < 0.05). Our oral microbial results are concordant with described fecal and colonic microbiome-IBS and -weight associations. Having IBS and being overweight, rather than IBS-subtypes, was the most important factor in describing the severity of visceral pain and variation in the microbiome. Pain severity was strongly correlated to the abundance of many taxa, suggesting the potential of the oral microbiome in diagnosis and patient phenotyping. The oral microbiome has potential as a source of microbial information in IBS. PMID:26963804

  8. A phase contrast cytomorphometric study of squames of normal oral mucosa and oral leukoplakia: Original study

    PubMed Central

    Nadaf, Afreen; Bavle, Radhika M; Thambiah, Lalita J; Paremala, K; Sudhakara, M; Soumya, M

    2014-01-01

    Oral leukoplakia represents the most common potentially malignant oral disorder, representing 85% of such lesions. The worldwide prevalence of leukoplakia is 1.5- 4.3%. Leukoplakia is often associated with carcinogenic exposures, such as from use of tobacco, alcohol or betel nut. The level of risk for malignant transformation of leukoplakia is associated with lesion histology. The overall malignant transformation rates for dysplastic lesions range from 11% to 36%, depending on the length of follow-up. Exfoliative cytology is a simple and minimally invasive method. Phase contrast microscope, an essential tool in the field of biology and medical research provides improved discrimination of cellular details. Aims: To study and compare the cytomorphological and cytomorphometric features of squames obtained from the mucosa of normal individuals, tobacco habituates with and without clinically evident leukoplakia. To assess the role of phase contrast microscopy as an alternative and easy method of cytological evaluation of wet and unstained smears. Materials and Methods: Fifty cases from each group were taken. Fixed, unstained smears were viewed under phase contrast microscope and were evaluated morphologically and morphometrically for nuclear and cellular diameters. Results: The study showed a significant increase in the mean nuclear diameter and decrease in the mean cellular diameter. Conclusion: Cytomorphometric changes could be the earliest indicators of cellular alterations. This indicates that there could be a cause-effect relationship between tobacco and quantitative alterations. PMID:25364176

  9. Impact of oral mucosa lesions on the quality of life related to oral health. An etiopathogenic study

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva-Vilchis, María-del-Carmen; López-Ríos, Patricia; García, Ixchel-Maya

    2016-01-01

    Background To assess the impact of oral mucosa lesions on quality of life related to oral health (QLROH) and additionally to establish whether the etiopathogenicy of oral lesion is associated to the degree of QLROH impact. Material and Methods In this cross-sectional study performed on a non-probability sample of 247 consecutively patients attending the oral medicine and pathology clinic the Spanish version of Oral Health Impact Profile-49 questionnaire (OHIP-49-mx) was applied. Responses were recorded on Likert-type scale whose values ranged from 0 (never) to 4 (always). Values greater than the 50 percentile (median) were considered as indicative of poor quality of life. All patients were orally examined and diagnosed. In accordance to their etiopathogenicy 6 study groups were formed: 4 corresponded to MIND classification for diseases (Metabolic, Inflammatory, Neoplastic, and Development groups), with ≥2 diseases and no-lesion group. To identify possible differences of OHIP-49 values between study groups an ANOVA (one factor) parametric and a chi square tests were performed (SPSS®20.0). Results The OHIP-49-mx values were higher than the 50 percentile (established at 39) in metabolic, inflammatory, development, and ≥2 diseases groups, suggesting that this type of oral lesions negatively impact the quality of life. ≥2 diseasesgroup followed by metabolic and inflammatory diseases group (p 0.001) depicted worst quality of life. Functional limitation (p 0.003), pain, physical inability (p 0.001) and psychological disabilities dimensions exhibited greater values in all groups. Conclusions Injured oral mucosa negatively impacts quality of life, specifically functional limitation, physical inability and psychological disabilities could lead to social isolation.To our knowledge, this is the first time that an association between QLROH and the etiopathogenicy of oral mucosal diseases is established. Key words:Quality of life, quality of life related to oral health

  10. Mycobacterium leprae is identified in the oral mucosa from paucibacillary and multibacillary leprosy patients.

    PubMed

    Morgado de Abreu, M A M; Roselino, A M; Enokihara, M; Nonogaki, S; Prestes-Carneiro, L E; Weckx, L L M; Alchorne, M M A

    2014-01-01

    In leprosy, the nasal mucosa is considered as the principal route of transmission for the bacillus Mycobacterium leprae. The objective of this study was to identify M. leprae in the oral mucosa of 50 untreated leprosy patients, including 21 paucibacillary (PB) and 29 multibacillary (MB) patients, using immunohistochemistry (IHC), with antibodies against bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and phenolic glycolipid antigen-1 (PGL-1), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), with MntH-specific primers for M. leprae, and to compare the results. The material was represented by 163 paraffin blocks containing biopsy samples obtained from clinically normal sites (including the tongue, buccal mucosa and soft palate) and visible lesions anywhere in the oral mucosa. All patients and 158 available samples were included for IHC study. Among the 161 available samples for PCR, 110 had viable DNA. There was viable DNA in at least one area of the oral mucosa for 47 patients. M. leprae was detected in 70% and 78% of patients using IHC and PCR, respectively, and in 94% of the patients by at least one of the two diagnostic methods. There were no differences in detection of M. leprae between MB and PB patients. Similar results were obtained using anti-BCG and anti-PGL-1 antibodies, and immunoreactivity occurred predominantly on free-living bacteria on the epithelial surface, with a predilection for the tongue. Conversely, there was no area of predilection according to the PCR results. M. leprae is present in the oral mucosa at a high frequency, implicating this site as a potential means of leprosy transmission. PMID:23473290

  11. Differentiation of oral precancerous stages with optical coherence tomography based on the evaluation of optical scattering properties of oral mucosae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, M. T.; Lee, J. D.; Lee, Y. J.; Lee, C. K.; Jin, H. L.; Chang, F. Y.; Hu, K. Y.; Wu, C. P.; Chiang, C. P.; Yang, C. C.

    2013-04-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool for noninvasive, real-time oral cancer diagnosis. However, in previous reports, OCT has still been found to be difficult to use in the diagnosis of oral precancerous stages, including mild dysplasia and moderate dysplasia. In clinical applications, early diagnosis and treatment of oral cancer can greatly improve the survival rate. Therefore, in this study, we propose a new approach to differentiate the oral precancerous stages based on the evaluation of the optical scattering properties of the epithelial layer, which is where the dysplastic cells start to develop in the precancerous stages. Instead of using exponential decay fitting to evaluate the scattering properties of mucosal tissues based on the Beer-Lambert law, linear fitting of the OCT depth intensity is used to evaluate the scattering properties of normal and dysplastic cells. From the statistical results of the linear fitting, the slope, a, can be an effective indicator to discriminate healthy mucosa and moderate dysplasia when an a value equal to zero is the threshold value, and the intercept, b, can be used to differentiate healthy and dysplastic mucosae, as well as mild and moderate dysplasia, when b values of 0.15 and 0.18 are used as the threshold values, respectively. Furthermore, this approach is also applied to the determination of the safe margin between normal and abnormal mucosae, making it possible to provide real-time, in vivo inspection during oral maxillofacial surgery.

  12. Positional differences in the wound transcriptome of skin and oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background When compared to skin, oral mucosal wounds heal rapidly and with reduced scar formation. Recent studies suggest that intrinsic differences in inflammation, growth factor production, levels of stem cells, and cellular proliferation capacity may underlie the exceptional healing that occurs in oral mucosa. The current study was designed to compare the transcriptomes of oral mucosal and skin wounds in order to identify critical differences in the healing response at these two sites using an unbiased approach. Results Using microarray analysis, we explored the differences in gene expression in skin and oral mucosal wound healing in a murine model of paired equivalent sized wounds. Samples were examined from days 0 to 10 and spanned all stages of the wound healing process. Using unwounded matched tissue as a control, filtering identified 1,479 probe sets in skin wounds yet only 502 probe sets in mucosal wounds that were significantly differentially expressed over time. Clusters of genes that showed similar patterns of expression were also identified in each wound type. Analysis of functionally related gene expression demonstrated dramatically different reactions to injury between skin and mucosal wounds. To explore whether site-specific differences might be derived from intrinsic differences in cellular responses at each site, we compared the response of isolated epithelial cells from skin and oral mucosa to a defined in vitro stimulus. When cytokine levels were measured, epithelial cells from skin produced significantly higher amounts of proinflammatory cytokines than cells from oral mucosa. Conclusions The results provide the first detailed molecular profile of the site-specific differences in the genetic response to injury in mucosa and skin, and suggest the divergent reactions to injury may derive from intrinsic differences in the cellular responses at each site. PMID:20704739

  13. Leukoplakia and erythroplakia of the oral mucosa--a brief overview.

    PubMed

    Boy, S C

    2012-11-01

    Leukoplakia and erythroplakia are the two most common potentially malignant disorders of the oral cavity. The prognosis and overall survival of a patient with oral cancer is dependent on the early detection of any lesion that might identify a patient with higher risk than normal or with early infiltration before metastatic disease. The role of the general dentist cannot be overstressed and the aim of this brief summary is to give the general practitioner an overview on the current concepts relating to these disorders. Leukoplakia and erythroplakia were traditionally known as two "precancerous lesions of the oral mucosa". The term "precancer" defines all lesions classified as such to have a "precancerous nature" implying that all of them will eventually become malignant. Through the years it became known that even clinically normal mucosa may show features of dysplasia and in some instances molecular aberrations of early malignant transformation may be found in the mucosa of a patient without any clinical lesions or dysplasia. The consensus view then was to introduce the term: "potentially malignant disorders" (PMD) reflecting the more generalised mucosal involvement in these patients. It remans a challenge to predict the behaviour of any of these lesions but early detection thereof remains the best chance any oral cancer patient will have for survival. PMID:23957095

  14. Two-photon autofluorescence spectroscopy of oral mucosa tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edward, Kert; Shilagard, Tuya; Qiu, Suimin; Vargas, Gracie

    2011-03-01

    The survival rate for individuals diagnosed with oral cancer is correlated with the stage of detection. Thus the development of novel techniques for the earliest possible detection of malignancies is of critical importance. Single photon (1P) autofluorescence spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful diagnostic tool in this regard, but 2P (two photon) spectroscopy remains essentially unexplored. In this investigation, a spectroscopic system was incorporated into a custom-built 2P laser scanning microscope. Oral cancer was induced in the buccal pouch of Syrian Golden hamsters by tri-weekly topical application of 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA).Three separated sites where investigated in each hamster at four excitation wavelengths from 780 nm to 890 nm. A Total of 8 hamsters were investigated (4 normal and 4 DMBA treated). All investigated sites were imaged via 2p imaging, marked for biopsy, processed for histology and H&E staining, and graded by a pathologist. The in vivo emission spectrum for normal, mild/high grade dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma is presented. It is shown that the hamsters with various stages of dysplasia are characterized by spectral differences as a function of depth and excitation wavelength, compared to normal hamsters.

  15. Expression of Alcohol Dehydrogenase 3 in Tissue and Cultured Cells from Human Oral Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Hedberg, Jesper J.; Höög, Jan-Olov; Nilsson, Jan A.; Xi, Zheng; Elfwing, Åsa; Grafström, Roland C.

    2000-01-01

    Because formaldehyde exposure has been shown to induce pathological changes in human oral mucosa, eg, micronuclei, the potential enzymatic defense by alcohol dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3)/glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase was characterized in oral tissue specimens and cell lines using RNA hybridization and immunological methods as well as enzyme activity measurements. ADH3 mRNA was expressed in basal and parabasal cell layers of oral epithelium, whereas the protein was detected throughout the cell layers. ADH3 mRNA and protein were further detected in homogenates of oral tissue and various oral cell cultures, including, normal, SV40T antigen-immortalized, and tumor keratinocyte lines. Inhibition of the growth of normal keratinocytes by maintenance at confluency significantly decreased the amount of ADH3 mRNA, a transcript with a determined half-life of 7 hours. In contrast, decay of ADH3 protein was not observed throughout a 4-day period in normal keratinocytes. In samples from both tissue and cells, the ADH3 protein content correlated to oxidizing activity for the ADH3-specific substrate S-hydroxymethylglutathione. The composite analyses associates ADH3 mRNA primarily to proliferative keratinocytes where it exhibits a comparatively short half-life. In contrast, the ADH3 protein is extremely stable, and consequently is retained during the keratinocyte life span in oral mucosa. Finally, substantial capacity for formaldehyde detoxification is shown from quantitative assessments of alcohol- and aldehyde-oxidizing activities including Km determinations, indicating that ADH3 is the major enzyme involved in formaldehyde oxidation in oral mucosa. PMID:11073833

  16. Surgical approach to snus-induced injury of the oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kharazmi, Mohammad; Carlsson, Anders-Petter; Hallberg, Pär; Modig, Maria; Björnstad, Lillemor; Hirsch, Jan-Michael

    2014-03-01

    Snus (Swedish moist snuff) causes lesions in the oral mucosa at the location where pinches are regularly placed. In addition, some patients develop irreversible local gingival recession and sometimes ulcers with perforations to the roots. Such injuries lead to denuded roots that are at risk for caries and periodontal disease, with subsequent esthetic consequences. Therapy for irreversible local gingival recession is currently lacking. In the present report, we describe two cases of successful surgical treatment for irreversible lesions caused by snus. PMID:24739713

  17. Management of physiological hyperpigmentation of oral mucosa by cryosurgical treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Maryam; Farmanbar, Niloofar; Abolfazli, Salman; Sarraf Shirazi, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    Melanin hyperpigmentation is the result of melanin granules. "Black gums" may cause esthetic problems. Different treatment modalities have been used with the aim of removing pigmentations for esthetic reasons, all of which have some advantages and disadvantages. Recurrent lesions are the most important concept in all of these treatments. Cryotherapy is a method of tissue destruction by rapid freezing. It is an atraumatic, cost-effective and simple method for treating oral pigmentation. This report presents the effects of cryotherapy on physiologic pigmentations of oral mucosa in a 9-year-old boy. In this case no recurrent lesions were observed after 12 months. PMID:23277862

  18. Reflectance confocal endomicroscope with optical axial scanning for in vivo imaging of the oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Joey M.; Bentley, Julie L.; Malik, Bilal H.; Nemechek, John; Warda, John; Cuenca, Rodrigo; Cheng, Shuna; Jo, Javier A.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and evaluation of a reflectance confocal laser endomicroscope using a miniature objective lens within a rigid probe in conjunction with an electrically tunable lens for axial scanning. The miniature lens was characterized alone as well as in the endoscope across a 200 µm axial scan range using the tunable lens. The ability of the confocal endoscope to probe the human oral cavity is demonstrated by imaging of the oral mucosa in vivo. The results indicate that reflectance confocal endomicroscopy has the potential to be used in a clinical setting and guide diagnostic evaluation of biological tissue. PMID:25426310

  19. Reflectance confocal endomicroscope with optical axial scanning for in vivo imaging of the oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Joey M; Bentley, Julie L; Malik, Bilal H; Nemechek, John; Warda, John; Cuenca, Rodrigo; Cheng, Shuna; Jo, Javier A; Maitland, Kristen C

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the design and evaluation of a reflectance confocal laser endomicroscope using a miniature objective lens within a rigid probe in conjunction with an electrically tunable lens for axial scanning. The miniature lens was characterized alone as well as in the endoscope across a 200 µm axial scan range using the tunable lens. The ability of the confocal endoscope to probe the human oral cavity is demonstrated by imaging of the oral mucosa in vivo. The results indicate that reflectance confocal endomicroscopy has the potential to be used in a clinical setting and guide diagnostic evaluation of biological tissue. PMID:25426310

  20. A novel mechanism for NETosis provides antimicrobial defense at the oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Tirthankar; Sjögren, Jonathan; Kahn, Fredrik; Abu-Humaidan, Anas H A; Fisker, Niels; Assing, Kristian; Mörgelin, Matthias; Bengtsson, Anders A; Borregaard, Niels; Sørensen, Ole E

    2015-10-29

    Neutrophils are essential for host defense at the oral mucosa and neutropenia or functional neutrophil defects lead to disordered oral homeostasis. We found that neutrophils from the oral mucosa harvested from morning saliva had released neutrophil extracellular traps (undergone NETosis) in vivo. The NETosis was mediated through intracellular signals elicited by binding of sialyl Lewis(X) present on salival mucins to l-selectin on neutrophils. This led to rapid loss of nuclear membrane and intracellular release of granule proteins with subsequent neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) release independent of elastase and reduced NAD phosphate-oxidase activation. The saliva-induced NETs were more DNase-resistant and had higher capacity to bind and kill bacteria than NETs induced by bacteria or by phorbol-myristate acetate. Furthermore, saliva/sialyl Lewis(X) mediated signaling enhanced intracellular killing of bacteria by neutrophils. Saliva from patients with aphthous ulcers and Behçet disease prone to oral ulcers failed to induce NETosis, but for different reasons it demonstrated that disordered homeostasis in the oral cavity may result in deficient saliva-mediated NETosis. PMID:26243777

  1. Overgrowth of oral mucosa and facial skin, a novel feature of aspartylglucosaminuria

    PubMed Central

    Arvio, P.; Arvio, M.; Kero, M.; Pirinen, S.; Lukinmaa, P.

    1999-01-01

    Aspartylglucosaminuria (AGU) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of aspartylglucosaminidase (AGA). The main symptom is progressive mental retardation. A spectrum of different mutations has been reported in this disease, one missense mutation (Cys163Ser) being responsible for the majority of Finnish cases. We were able to examine 66 Finnish AGU patients for changes in the oral mucosa and 44 of these for changes in facial skin. Biopsy specimens of 16 oral lesions, 12 of them associated with the teeth, plus two facial lesions were studied histologically. Immunohistochemical staining for AGA was performed on 15 oral specimens.
  Skin was seborrhoeic in adolescent and adult patients, with erythema of the facial skin already common in childhood. Of 44 patients, nine (20%) had facial angiofibromas, tumours primarily occurring in association with tuberous sclerosis. Oedemic buccal mucosa (leucoedema) and gingival overgrowths were more frequent in AGU patients than in controls (p<0.001).
  Of 16 oral mucosal lesions studied histologically, 15 represented fibroepithelial or epithelial hyperplasias and were reactive in nature. Cytoplasmic vacuolisation was evident in four. Immunohistochemically, expression of AGA in AGU patients' mucosal lesions did not differ from that seen in corresponding lesions of normal subjects. Thus, the high frequency of mucosal overgrowth in AGU patients does not appear to be directly associated with lysosomal storage or with alterations in the level of AGA expression.


Keywords: aspartylglucosaminidase; lysosomal storage disease; oral mucosa; skin tumours PMID:10353787

  2. Recombinant Human Epidermal Growth Factor Accelerates Recovery of Mouse Small Intestinal Mucosa After Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Kyoo; Jo, Hyang Jeong; Hong, Joon Pio; Lee, Sang-wook Sohn, Jung Sook; Moon, Soo Young; Yang, Sei Hoon; Shim, Hyeok; Lee, Sang Ho; Ryu, Seung-Hee; Moon, Sun Rock

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether systemically administered recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) accelerates the recovery of mouse small intestinal mucosa after irradiation. Methods and Materials: A mouse mucosal damage model was established by administering radiation to male BALB/c mice with a single dose of 15 Gy applied to the abdomen. After irradiation, rhEGF was administered subcutaneously at various doses (0.04, 0.2, 1.0, and 5.0 mg/kg/day) eight times at 2- to 3-day intervals. The evaluation methods included histologic changes of small intestinal mucosa, change in body weight, frequency of diarrhea, and survival rate. Results: The recovery of small intestinal mucosa after irradiation was significantly improved in the mice treated with a high dose of rhEGF. In the mice that underwent irradiation without rhEGF treatment, intestinal mucosal ulceration, mucosal layer damage, and severe inflammation occurred. The regeneration of villi was noticeable in mice treated with more than 0.2 mg/kg rhEGF, and the villi recovered fully in mice given more than 1 mg/kg rhEGF. The frequency of diarrhea persisting for more than 3 days was significantly greater in the radiation control group than in the rhEGF-treated groups. Conclusions: Systemic administration of rhEGF accelerates recovery from mucosal damage induced by irradiation. We suggest that rhEGF treatment shows promise for the reduction of small intestinal damage after irradiation.

  3. Overgrowth of oral mucosa and facial skin, a novel feature of aspartylglucosaminuria.

    PubMed

    Arvio, P; Arvio, M; Kero, M; Pirinen, S; Lukinmaa, P L

    1999-05-01

    Aspartylglucosaminuria (AGU) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of aspartylglucosaminidase (AGA). The main symptom is progressive mental retardation. A spectrum of different mutations has been reported in this disease, one missense mutation (Cys163Ser) being responsible for the majority of Finnish cases. We were able to examine 66 Finnish AGU patients for changes in the oral mucosa and 44 of these for changes in facial skin. Biopsy specimens of 16 oral lesions, 12 of them associated with the teeth, plus two facial lesions were studied histologically. Immunohistochemical staining for AGA was performed on 15 oral specimens. Skin was seborrhoeic in adolescent and adult patients, with erythema of the facial skin already common in childhood. Of 44 patients, nine (20%) had facial angiofibromas, tumours primarily occurring in association with tuberous sclerosis. Oedemic buccal mucosa (leucoedema) and gingival overgrowths were more frequent in AGU patients than in controls (p<0.001). Of 16 oral mucosal lesions studied histologically, 15 represented fibroepithelial or epithelial hyperplasias and were reactive in nature. Cytoplasmic vacuolisation was evident in four. Immunohistochemically, expression of AGA in AGU patients' mucosal lesions did not differ from that seen in corresponding lesions of normal subjects. Thus, the high frequency of mucosal overgrowth in AGU patients does not appear to be directly associated with lysosomal storage or with alterations in the level of AGA expression. PMID:10353787

  4. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen treatment on irradiated oral mucosa: microvessel density.

    PubMed

    Svalestad, J; Hellem, S; Thorsen, E; Johannessen, A C

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) on microvascular tissue and cell proliferation in the oral mucosa. Twenty patients, aged 51-78 years, were allocated randomly to a treatment or a control group. All had a history of radiotherapy (50-70 Gy) to the orofacial region 2-6 years previously. Tissue samples were taken from the irradiated buccal oral mucosa before HBOT and at 6 months after treatment. In the control group, tissue samples were taken on two occasions, 6 months apart. The samples were subjected to immunohistochemistry staining: double staining with CD31 and D2-40 for microvessels, or Ki-67 for the analysis of cell proliferation. Blood vessel density and area were significantly increased after HBOT (P=0.002-0.041). D2-40-positive lymphatic vessels were significantly increased in number and area in the sub-epithelial area (P=0.002 and P=0.019, respectively). No significant differences were observed in the control group. There were no significant differences in Ki-67-expressing epithelial cells between the two groups. It is concluded that the density and area of blood and lymphatic vessels in the irradiated mucosa are increased by HBOT 6 months after therapy. Epithelial cell proliferation is not affected by HBOT. PMID:25604154

  5. In-vivo optical coherent tomography of teeth and oral mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ourutina, M. N.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Kuranov, Roman V.; Sergeev, Alexander M.

    1999-02-01

    Our investigations have been devoted to OCT capabilities in imaging normal and diseased tooth structures and different types of oral mucosa. OCT tomograms distinctly exhibit the structural elements of oral mucosa. Depending on localization and keratinization, different types of mucosa are also seen in OCT images. OCT images of those parts where epithelium evidences high keratinization substantially differ from images of those parts where epithelium evidences low or no keratinization in its normal state. OCT imaging allows one to clearly differentiate between caries and noncaries lesions, which is very important in practical dentistry. OCT has made it possible to quite accurately diagnose a fissure caries in the early stage that has been unreliable with an X- ray examination. The OCT technique is capable of dynamic monitoring the restorative process. It also allows in vivo examination of fillings as well as the state of surrounding tissues. It is possible to detect filling defects caused by an incorrect filling procedure either during the process of restoration of some time later. The results of our investigations suggest that OCT is a potentially useful modality for clinical and research dentistry.

  6. Theoretical Considerations and a Mathematical Model for the Analysis of the Biomechanical Response of Human Keratinized Oral Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Tsaira, Aikaterini; Karagiannidis, Panagiotis; Sidira, Margarita; Kassavetis, Spyros; Kugiumtzis, Dimitris; Logothetidis, Stergios; Naka, Olga; Pissiotis, Argirios; Michalakis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Removable complete and partial dentures are supported by the residual alveolar ridges consisting of mucosa, submucosa, periosteum, and bone. An understanding of the biomechanical behavior of the oral mucosa is essential in order to improve the denture-bearing foundations for complete and partially edentulous patients. The purpose of this paper was to examine the biomechanical behavior of the soft tissues supporting a removable denture and develop a model for that reason. Keratinized oral mucosa blocks with their underlying bone were harvested from the maxillary palatal area adjacent to the edentulous ridges of a cadaver. The compressive response of the oral mucosa was tested by using atomic force microscopy. The specimens were first scanned in order their topography to be obtained. The mechanical properties of the specimens were tested using a single crystal silicon pyramidal tip, which traversed toward the keratinized oral mucosa specimens. Loading-unloading cycles were registered and four mathematical models were tested using MATLAB to note which one approximates the force-displacement curve as close as possible: a. spherical, b. conical, c. third order polynomial, d. Murphy (fourth order polynomial, non-linear Hertzian based). The third order polynomial model showed the best accuracy in representing the force-displacement data of the tested specimens. A model was developed in order to analyze the biomechanical behavior of the human oral keratinized mucosa and obtain information about its mechanical properties. PMID:27621708

  7. Theoretical Considerations and a Mathematical Model for the Analysis of the Biomechanical Response of Human Keratinized Oral Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Tsaira, Aikaterini; Karagiannidis, Panagiotis; Sidira, Margarita; Kassavetis, Spyros; Kugiumtzis, Dimitris; Logothetidis, Stergios; Naka, Olga; Pissiotis, Argirios; Michalakis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Removable complete and partial dentures are supported by the residual alveolar ridges consisting of mucosa, submucosa, periosteum, and bone. An understanding of the biomechanical behavior of the oral mucosa is essential in order to improve the denture-bearing foundations for complete and partially edentulous patients. The purpose of this paper was to examine the biomechanical behavior of the soft tissues supporting a removable denture and develop a model for that reason. Keratinized oral mucosa blocks with their underlying bone were harvested from the maxillary palatal area adjacent to the edentulous ridges of a cadaver. The compressive response of the oral mucosa was tested by using atomic force microscopy. The specimens were first scanned in order their topography to be obtained. The mechanical properties of the specimens were tested using a single crystal silicon pyramidal tip, which traversed toward the keratinized oral mucosa specimens. Loading-unloading cycles were registered and four mathematical models were tested using MATLAB to note which one approximates the force-displacement curve as close as possible: a. spherical, b. conical, c. third order polynomial, d. Murphy (fourth order polynomial, non-linear Hertzian based). The third order polynomial model showed the best accuracy in representing the force-displacement data of the tested specimens. A model was developed in order to analyze the biomechanical behavior of the human oral keratinized mucosa and obtain information about its mechanical properties. PMID:27621708

  8. [Use of "functional tooth paste," made with nanotechnology, in the treatment of oral mucosa diseases].

    PubMed

    Szabó, György; Németh, Zsolt

    2010-06-01

    The authors report their experience connected with the introduction of "functional toothpaste" in Hungary. This cream (gel), prepared with nanotechnology, contains vitamins C and E, propolis and various herb extracts. It is manufactured in South Korea and is commercially available in the USA, among others. It protects the gingiva, and its use is recommended in cases of diseases of the oral mucosa. The experience in Hungary indicates that it is well applicable after surgery in the oral cavity (it promotes wound healing), in cases involving processes in the oral cavity that heal with difficulty, and during the healing of burn wounds (e.g. after laser surgery). In view of the favourable experience, its distribution in Hungary can be recommended. PMID:20672750

  9. Cytological picture of the oral mucosa in patients with gastric and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Kędra, Bożena; Chomczyk, Monika; Złotkowski, Marcin; Stokowska, Wanda; Borsuk, Agnieszka; Bicz, Mieczysław; Pietruska, Małgorzata; Tokajuk, Grażyna; Charkiewicz, Radosław; Czajka, Piotr; Chyczewski, Lech; Zimnoch, Lech; Kędra, Bogusław

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of malignant gastrointestinal cancers in Poland has been constantly growing, which has led to an intensification of the search for new markers of the early clinical stage of this disease. The oral cavity,as the first part of the gastrointestinal tract, has a very important role. The oral cavity presents symptoms of both typically stomatological and systemic diseases. Oral cancers, benign or malignant, may originate and grow in any of the tissues of the mouth, and within this small area they may be of varied clinical, histological and biological features. These can be lesions typically observed in the oral cavity, but also characteristic of cases where the symptoms occur both in the mouth and in other body parts. The aim of this study was to present a cytological picture of the oral mucosa in patients with gastric and colon cancer and to compare the cytological picture with that obtained from a group of patients with no cancer, using the Papanicolaou classification and the Bethesda system. The study was conducted in 126 patients treated surgically in the II General and Gastroenterological Surgery Clinic between 2006 and 2008. All patients were divided into two groups based on the type of lesions. In both of the studied groups, more than half of the patients did not present any abnormalities in the mucosa of the mouth, lips and cheeks in the physical examination. None of the patients had erosion, ulceration or lesions typical of leukoplakia or lichen planus. No malignant cells were detected in either of the studied groups, and there were no well-defined lesions found in the oral cavity that would distinguish the patients with gastrointestinal cancer. PMID:23042267

  10. Ex vivo and in vivo modulatory effects of umbilical cord Wharton's jelly stem cells on human oral mucosa stroma substitutes.

    PubMed

    Alfonso-Rodríguez, C A; González-Andrades, E; Jaimes-Parra, B D; Fernández-Valadés, R; Campos, A; Sánchez-Quevedo, M C; Alaminos, M; Garzón, I

    2015-11-01

    Novel oral mucosa substitutes have been developed in the laboratory using human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly stem cells -HWJSC- as an alternative cell source. In the present work, we have generated human oral mucosa substitutes with oral mucosa keratinocytes and HWJSC to determine the influence of these cell sources on stromal differentiation. First, acellular and cellular stroma substitutes and bilayered oral mucosa substitutes with an epithelial layer consisting of oral mucosa keratinocytes -OM samples- or HWJSC -hOM- were generated. Then, tissues were analyzed by light and electron microscopy, histochemistry and immunohistochemistry to quantify all major extracellular matrix components after 1, 2 and 3 weeks of ex vivo development, and OM and hOM were also analyzed after in vivo grafting. The results showed that bioengineered oral mucosa stromas displayed an adequate fibrillar mesh. Synthesis of abundant collagen fibers was detected in OM and hOM after 3 weeks, and in vivo grafting resulted in an increased collagen synthesis. No elastic or reticular fibers were found. Glycoprotein synthesis was found at the epithelial-stromal layer when samples were grafted in vivo. Finally, proteoglycans, decorin, versican and aggrecan were strongly dependent on the in vivo environment and the presence of a well-structured epithelium on top. The use of HWJSC was associated to an increased synthesis of versican. These results confirm the usefulness of fibrin-agarose biomaterials for the generation of an efficient human oral mucosa stroma substitute and the importance of the in vivo environment and the epithelial-mesenchymal interaction for the adequate differentiation of the bioengineered stroma. PMID:25967581

  11. [The role of the dentist in the diagnosis, screening and followup of lesions of the oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Thoné, M; Reychler, H; Mahy, P

    2000-01-01

    The early detection and follow up of oral mucosa lesions are a must for every dentist. The importance of these activities is tremendous for oral cancerous and precancerous lesions, so every dentist is officially responsible for this important role in the public health. The modalities of such early detection and follow up are described. PMID:11210659

  12. Local anaesthesia through the action of cocaine, the oral mucosa and the Vienna group.

    PubMed

    López-Valverde, A; de Vicente, J; Martínez-Domínguez, L; de Diego, R Gómez

    2014-07-11

    Local anaesthesia through the action of cocaine was introduced in Europe by the Vienna group, which includeed Freud, Koller and Königstein. Before using the alkaloid in animal or human experimentation all these scientists tested it on their oral mucosa - so-called self-experimentation. Some of them with different pathologies (that is, in the case of Freud), eventually became addicted to the alkaloid. Here we attempt to describe the people forming the so-called 'Vienna group', their social milieu, their experiences and internal disputes within the setting of a revolutionary discovery of the times. PMID:25012333

  13. Identification of Helicobacter spp. in oral secretions vs. gastric mucosa of stray cats.

    PubMed

    Shojaee Tabrizi, A; Jamshidi, Sh; Oghalaei, A; Zahraei Salehi, T; Bayati Eshkaftaki, A; Mohammadi, M

    2010-01-01

    The definite mode of transmission of Helicobacter infection is largely unknown. This study was carried out primarily, to determine the existence of Helicobacter spp. in the oral secretions of stray cats as one of the possible routes of transmission and secondly, to evaluate the accordance between oral and gastric colonization of Helicobacter spp. in these cats. Forty-three adult stray cats were thus studied for the presence of Helicobacter species by quantitative rapid urease test (RUT), cytology and PCR. Helicobacter spp. were found in the oral secretions and gastric biopsies of 93% and 67.5% of the stray cats, respectively. There was not, however, any agreement observed between Helicobacter colonization at these two locations, at neither genus nor species level. These findings suggest that the oral cavity is routinely exposed to transient forms of bacteria and may temporarily harbor Helicobacter spp. Thus, oral cavity as a source of Helicobacter spp. may act as a reservoir for transmission and may not necessarily reflect the colonization status of the gastric mucosa. PMID:19726141

  14. [Clinico-pathological study on giant cell fibroma of oral mucosa].

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Levy, B

    1995-11-01

    The biopsy specimens of the Department of Oral Pathology, Dental School, UMBC, between 1985-1988 were reviewed in 1990 and. 124 cases of giant cell fibroma (GCF) of oral mucosa were found. GCF may develop at any age, but the highest incidence is middle adult life. GCF is slightly common in female than in male (1: 0.85). GCF occurs frequently in gingiva, tongue and cheek and is mistaken commonly for irritation fibroma, neurofibroma, papilloma and pyogenic granuloma, because there are no specific clinic features of it. The fusiform cells, star cells and multinucleated giant cells in the lesion are common histologic features of GCF. Local removal is usually successful. PMID:8762534

  15. Cytokeratin changes in cell culture systems of epithelial cells isolated from oral mucosa: a short review.

    PubMed

    Gasparoni, Alberto; Squier, Christopher Alan; Fonzi, Luciano

    2005-01-01

    In the past three decades, many studies have analyzed ultrastructural and molecular markers of differentiation in squamous stratified epithelial tissues. In these tissues, epithelial cells migrating from the basal layer to the upper layers undergo drastic changes, which involve membrane-associated proteins, DNA synthesis, phenotypic aspects, lipid composition, and cytoskeletal components. Cytoskeletal components include a large and heterogeneous group, including intermediate filaments, components of the cornified envelope, and of the stratum corneum. When grown in mono- and multilayer cell cultures, epithelial cells isolated from the oral mucosa may reproduce many of the biochemical and morphological aspects of epithelial tissue in vivo. In the present paper, we examine phenotypic changes, development of suprabasal layer, and Involucrin expression occurring in differentiating oral epithelial cells, based on literature review and original data. PMID:16277157

  16. Histomorphometric study to compare histological changes between oral squamous cell carcinoma and apparently normal adjacent oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Babji, Deepa V; Kale, Alka D; Hallikerimath, Seema R; Kotrashetti, Vijayalakshmi S

    2015-03-01

    Despite the advances in surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy the annual death for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is rising rapidly. The carcinoma has propensity to develop in a field of cancerization. Clinically may it be apparently normal mucosa (ANM) adjacent to squamous cell carcinoma which harbours certain discrete molecular alteration which ultimately reflects in cellular morphology. Hence the aim of the study is to assess histomorphometric changes in ANM adjacent to OSCC. A prospective study was done on 30 each of histologically diagnosed cases OSCC, ANM at least 1 cm away from OSCC, and normal oral mucosa (NOM). Cellular and nuclear morphometric measurements were assessed on hematoxylin and eosin sections using image analysis software. Statistical analysis was done using analysis of variance test and Tukey's post hoc test. The present study showed significant changes in cellular and nuclear area in superficial and invasive island of OSCC compared to ANM. The basal cells of ANM showed significant decrease in cellular and nuclear areas and nuclear cytoplasmic ratio when compared to NOM. Histomorphometry definitely can differentiate OSCC form ANM and NOM. The basal cells of ANM showed significant alterations in cellular area, nuclear area and nuclear cytoplasmic area when compared to NOM suggesting change in the field and have high risk of malignant transformation. These parameters can be used as indicator of field cancerization. PMID:25621249

  17. In vivo Raman spectroscopy of oral buccal mucosa: a study on malignancy associated changes (MAC)/cancer field effects (CFE).

    PubMed

    Singh, S P; Sahu, Aditi; Deshmukh, Atul; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Krishna, C Murali

    2013-07-21

    Occurrence of metachronous and synchronous secondary tumors in oral cavities has been associated with poor prognosis and decreased 5-year disease-free survival rates. The origin of secondary tumors in the oral cavity has been primarily attributed to cancer field effects (CFE) or malignancy-associated changes (MAC) in uninvolved areas. Classification of normal, cancerous and pre-cancerous oral lesions by in vivo Raman spectroscopy (RS) has already been demonstrated. In the present study, MAC/CFE in oral buccal mucosa were explored. In vivo Raman spectra from 84 subjects (722 spectra) under five categories - cancer and contralateral normal (opposite side of tumor), healthy controls (no tobacco habit, no cancer), habitués healthy controls (tobacco habit, no cancer) and non-habitués contralateral normal (no tobacco habit with cancer) were acquired. Mean and difference spectra suggest that loss of lipids and additional features representing proteins and DNA are characteristics of all pathological conditions, with respect to healthy controls. Spectral data were analyzed by PC-LDA followed by leave-one-out cross-validation. Results suggest that Raman characteristics of mucosa of healthy controls are exclusive, while those of habitués healthy controls are similar to those of contralateral normal mucosa. It was observed that the cluster of non-habitués contralateral normal mucosa is different from habitués healthy controls, suggesting that malignancy associated changes can be identified and also indicating that transformation of uninvolved oral mucosa due to tobacco habit or malignancy is different. The findings of the study demonstrate the potential of RS in identifying early transformation changes in oral mucosa and the efficacy of this approach in oral cancer applications. PMID:23392131

  18. Normalization of keratinocyte-type integrins during the establishment of the oral mucosa phenotype in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tomakidi, P; Breitkreutz, D; Kohl, A; Komposch, G

    1999-01-01

    In stratified epithelia, integrins play a fundamental role in mediating basal cell attachment to a variety of extracellular matrix molecules. To assess whether keratinocyte-specific integrins are expressed in a similar way as in the normal situation also under in vivo related conditions, we processed oral mucosa equivalents consisting of keratinocytes and fibroblasts from non-cornified gingiva. In this model histomorphology, the expression of differentiation-specific keratins and keratinocyte-type integrins exhibited similarity to the tissue of origin. The stages of tissue normalization were assessed on frozen sections by indirect immunofluorescence. The initial activated stage (1 week) was characterized by (i) incomplete epithelial organization and a weak presence of the suprabasal mucosa type keratin K4, (ii) diffuse expression of the integrin chains beta 1 and alpha 6 and (iii) abundance of the wound healing-associated integrin alpha v throughout the whole epithelium. After 2 weeks, the increase in epithelial organization was characterized by (i) the presence of a basal and suprabasal cell compartment, (ii) extension of K4 in the suprabasal compartment, (iii) extended expression of the keratinocyte integrins beta 1 and alpha 6 and (iv) concentration of alpha v integrin underneath basal cells. Further normalization of tissue architecture was indicated by (i) a slight increase in K4 extension, (ii) appearance of keratinocyte integrins beta 1 and alpha 6 in basal and parabasal cells and (iii) interruption of the band-like alpha v integrin immunolocalization at the subepithelial site. The findings in the in vitro model system indicate that these oral mucosa equivalents exhibit similarities to the in vivo situation of non-cornified gingiva, thus rendering them a suitable model for the assessment of stages during epithelial reconstruction or in vivo relevant studies on material effects. PMID:10081576

  19. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging to investigate cell metabolism in malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rück, Angelika; Hauser, Carmen; Mosch, Simone; Kalinina, Sviatlana

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence-guided diagnosis of tumor tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results interfere with the outcome. Improvement through observation of cell metabolism might offer the solution, but needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. With respect to this, spectrally resolved multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging was investigated to analyze cell metabolism in metabolic phenotypes of malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells. The time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of NADH were measured in cells of different origins. The fluorescence lifetime of bound and free NADH was calculated from biexponential fitting of the fluorescence intensity decay within different spectral regions. The mean lifetime was increased from nonmalignant oral mucosa cells to different squamous carcinoma cells, where the most aggressive cells showed the longest lifetime. In correlation with reports in the literature, the total amount of NADH seemed to be less for the carcinoma cells and the ratio of free/bound NADH was decreased from nonmalignant to squamous carcinoma cells. Moreover for squamous carcinoma cells a high concentration of bound NADH was found in cytoplasmic organelles (mainly mitochondria). This all together indicates that oxidative phosphorylation and a high redox potential play an important role in the energy metabolism of these cells.

  20. Photofrin and 5-aminolevulinic acid permeation through oral mucosa in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flock, Stephen T.; Alleman, Anthony; Lehman, Paul; Blevins, Steve; Stone, Angie; Fink, Louis; Dinehart, Scott; Stern, Scott J.

    1994-07-01

    Photofrin and 5-aminolevulinic acid are photosensitizers that show promise in the photodynamic treatment of cancer, port-wine stains, atherosclerosis and viral lesions. Photofrin is a mixture of porphyrins which, upon the absorption of light, become temporarily cytotoxic. One side-effect associated with the use of Photofrin is long-term cutaneous photosensitivity. It is possible that topical application of this photosensitizing dye will ameliorate such a side-effect. Another way to avoid the cutaneous photosensitivity in photodynamic therapy is to use 5- aminolevulinic acid, which is a porphyrin precursor that causes an increase in the synthesis and concentration of the photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX. 5-aminolevulinic acid is usually applied topically, and so minimizes cutaneous photosensitivity while maximizing the local protoporphyrin concentration. There are a host of disorders in oral mucosa that are potentially treatable by photodynamic therapy. However, since stratum corneum presents an impermeable barrier to many pharmaceuticals, it is not clear that topical application of the photosensitizer will result in a clinically relevant tissue concentration. We have therefore studied the permeation behavior of Photofrin and 5-aminolevulinic acid by applying them to the surface of ex vivo oral mucosa tissue positioned by a Franz diffusion cell. In order to increase the permeability of the photosensitizer across the stratum corneum, we studied the effects of four different drug carriers: phosphate buffered saline, dimethylsulfoxide, ethanol and Azone with isopropyl alcohol.

  1. Tissue-engineered oral mucosa for mucosal reconstruction in a pediatric patient with hemifacial microsomia and ankyloglossia.

    PubMed

    Llames, Sara; Recuero, Ignacio; Romance, Ana; García, Eva; Peña, Ignacio; Del Valle, Alvaro Fernández; Meana, Alvaro; Larcher, Fernando; Del Río, Marcela

    2014-03-01

    Many types of soft tissue grafts have been used for the reconstruction of oral mucosal defects. The best results are achieved with mucosal grafts; however, when large areas must be grafted, sufficient donor tissue is not available. Tissue engineering represents an alternative method to obtain sufficient autologous tissue for reconstructing oral wounds. Herein we present a pediatric patient with hemifacial microsomia and congenital ankyloglossia requiring multiple surgical interventions, and in which an autologous full-thickness tissue-engineered oral mucosa was used for successful oral reconstruction. Our study demonstrates that even under challenging conditions, robust tissue-engineered products, such as the fibrin-based oral mucosa described here, can achieve successful tissue regeneration. PMID:23879858

  2. Assessment of oral mucosa in normal, precancer and cancer using chemiluminescent illumination, toluidine blue supravital staining and oral exfoliative cytology

    PubMed Central

    Rajmohan, M; Rao, Umadevi Krishnamohan; Joshua, Elizabeth; Rajasekaran, Saraswathy Thillai; Kannan, Ranganathan

    2012-01-01

    Context: Carcinoma in an early stage of development is hard to detect clinically because the lesion may not be palpable and color of the lesional tissue is not necessarily different from the color of the surrounding mucosa. In order to improve the efficacy of the diagnosis, techniques are being developed to complement clinical examination and to facilitate the identification of initial carcinomas. Aims: To find out the efficacy of chemiluminescent illumination (ViziLite™) for the diagnosis in precancer and cancer patients and compare this result to toluidine blue staining and oral exfoliative cytology. Materials and Methods: This study was done in 3 groups. Each group consists of 10 cases. Group I consists of normal appearing mucosa. Group II and III consist of clinically diagnosed pre-cancer and clinically suggestive of cancer respectively. Chemiluminescent illumination, toluidine blue supravital staining, oral exfoliative cytology and biopsy were performed in all cases. Statistical analysis used: SPSS version 10.05 was used to calculate positive and negative predictive values. Results: In Group I, all 10 patients showed negative result to ViziLite™. 8 patients showed positivity and 2 patients showed negativity to ViziLite™ test in Group II. 9 patients were positive and one patient was negative for ViziLite™. Conclusions: Chemiluminescent illumination test was sensitive for precancerous and cancerous lesions, which presented as keratotic lesions and red-white lesions. It showed negative result to erosive lesions. Toluidine blue staining test was reliable in precancerous and cancerous lesions, which present as erosive and red-white lesions. It showed negative result to keratotic lesions. Oral exfoliative cytology has diagnostic value in cancer patients than in precancer patients. These Results indicate that chemiluminescent illumination test is relatively reliable and accurate than toluidine blue staining test and useful chair side diagnostic test. PMID

  3. Role of the lymphoreticular system in prion neuroinvasion from the oral and nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Bessen, Richard A; Martinka, Scott; Kelly, Jessica; Gonzalez, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    Prion neuroinvasion from peripheral tissues involves agent replication in the lymphoreticular system (LRS) prior to entry into the nervous system. This study investigated the role of the LRS in prion neuroinvasion from the oral and nasal mucosa in wild-type and immunodeficient mice and in hamsters infected with the HY and DY strains of the transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) agent. Following inoculation at neural sites, all hosts were susceptible to prion disease and had evidence of prion infection in the brain, but infection of the LRS was found only in scrapie-infected wild-type mice and HY TME-infected hamsters. In the LRS replication-deficient models, prion neuroinvasion was not observed following intraperitoneal or oral inoculation. However, immunodeficient mice, which have impaired follicular dendritic cells, were susceptible to scrapie following intratongue and intranasal inoculation despite the absence of PrP(Sc) in the tongue or the nasal cavity. For DY TME, hamsters were susceptible following intratongue but not intranasal inoculation and PrP(Sc) was limited to nerve fibers of the tongue. These findings indicate that neuroinvasion from the tongue and nasal cavity can be independent of LRS infection but neuroinvasion was partially dependent on the strain of the prion agent and/or the host species. The paucity of PrP(Sc) deposition in the oral and nasal mucosa from LRS replication-deficient hosts following neuroinvasion from these tissues suggests an infection of nerve fibers that is below the threshold of PrP(Sc) detection and/or the transport of the prion agent along cranial nerves without agent replication. PMID:19369351

  4. Hypermethylation of the p16 gene in normal oral mucosa of smokers.

    PubMed

    von Zeidler, S Ventorin; Miracca, E C; Nagai, M A; Birman, E G

    2004-11-01

    The oral cavity is the sixth most common anatomical localization of head and neck carcinoma in men. Detection of oral carcinomas in the early asymptomatic stages improves cure rates and the quality of life. Tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking are the most important known risk factors for the development of head and neck tumors, suggesting that the exposure to these risk factors may increase the predisposition for genetic and epigenetic alterations, such as DNA methylation. The presence of methylated CpG islands in the promoter region of human genes can suppress their expression due to the presence of 5-methylcytosine that interferes with the binding of transcription factors or other DNA-binding proteins repressing transcription activity. Hypermethylation leading to the inactivation of some tumor suppressor genes, such as p16, has been pointed out as an initial event in head and neck cancer. Our aim was to evaluate an early diagnostic method of oral pre-cancerous lesions through the analysis of methylation of the p16 gene. DNA samples from normal oral mucosa and posterior tongue border from 258 smokers, without oral cancer, were investigated for the occurrence of p16 promoter hypermethylation. The methylation status of the p16 gene was analyzed using MS-PCR (methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes and PCR amplification), MSP (Methylation-specific PCR) or direct DNA sequence of bisulfite modified DNA. Hyper-methylation was detected in 9.7% (25/258) of the cases analyzed. These findings provide further evidence that epigenetic alteration, leading to the inactivation of the p16 tumor suppressor gene is an early event that might confer cell growth advantages contributing to the tumorigenic process. Thus, the detection of abnormal p16 methylation pattern may be a valuable tool for early oral cancer detection. PMID:15492849

  5. PCR based detection of HPV 16 and 18 genotypes in normal oral mucosa of tobacco users and non-users.

    PubMed

    Pattanshetty, S; Kotrashetti, V S; Nayak, R; Bhat, K; Somannavar, P; Babji, D

    2014-08-01

    There is increasing evidence of a causal association between human papillomavirus (HPV) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Several studies have shown that HPV is associated with increased risk of oral cancer independent of exposure to tobacco and alcohol. The association is valid for HPVs 16 and 18, which generally are considered high risk types, because they have been detected in oral dysplastic lesions and cancers. We determined the baseline prevalence of HPVs 16 and 18 in normal oral mucosa of individuals with and without tobacco habit. PCR was used for DNA collected by oral smears to detect HPV 16/18 DNA in normal oral mucosa of 60 healthy individuals who were assigned to two groups of 30 subjects each. One group had a tobacco habit, the other did not. The tobacco user group comprised individuals who were tobacco chewers only. Sixty-five percent of individuals were positive for HPV 16/18 DNA, but HPV 16/18 positivity was less in individuals with tobacco habit than in those without tobacco habit. No significant association was found between the presence of HPVs and gender, age or duration of chewing habit, or between groups with and without a tobacco habit. We propose that HPVs16 and 18 commonly are present in normal oral mucosa and emphasize the importance of distinguishing clinical, subclinical and latent HPV infections when investigating HPVs and OSCC. PMID:24588599

  6. The role of autofluorescence diagnostics in the diseases of oral mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosciarz-Grzesiok, A.; Waskowska, J.; Kawczyk-Krupka, A.; Ledwon, A.; Misiak, A.; Latos, W.; Koszowski, R.; Sieron-Stoltny, K.; Sieron, A.

    2008-02-01

    Introduction. Life induced fluorescence (LIFE) diagnostics can be used as an imaging system of precancerous and neoplastic lesions of the oral mucosa. Neoplastic lesions are visible in pseudo colours, healthy tissue in green colour and abnormal tissue in red colour. All the observed colours present different intensity. Colour intensity is relevant to the grade of dysplasia, carcinoma progress and is called Numerological Value of Color Index (NCV). The aim of our study was to find correlation between autofluorescence diagnostics combined with NCV assessment and histopathological findings of taken specimen biopsies. Patients and methods. 10 patients participated in our study. Lesions affected a variety of intraoral sites. The most common location was: buccal, gingival and mandibular mucosa. Patients were examined using Life Induced Fluorescence diagnosis (400 - 750 nm wavelength) with Numerological Value of Color index (NCV) using Onco LIFE system. Afterwards the specimen biopsies from the lesions were taken and histopathological examination was performed. Results. Different NCV and dependence of NCV on the histopathological findings were observed. Conclusion. Diagnostic procedures with the application of white-light imaging with LIFE imaging is not only a significantly faster method and a better diagnostic tool of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions, but there exist also correlations between measured NCV and histopathological diagnosis. The farther investigations are necessary in order to prove these preliminary findings.

  7. Human Oral Mucosa Tissue-Engineered Constructs Monitored by Raman Fiber-Optic Probe

    PubMed Central

    Khmaladze, Alexander; Kuo, Shiuhyang; Kim, Roderick Y.; Matthews, Robert V.; Marcelo, Cynthia L.; Feinberg, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    In maxillofacial and oral surgery, there is a need for the development of tissue-engineered constructs. They are used for reconstructions due to trauma, dental implants, congenital defects, or oral cancer. A noninvasive monitoring of the fabrication of tissue-engineered constructs at the production and implantation stages done in real time is extremely important for predicting the success of tissue-engineered grafts. We demonstrated a Raman spectroscopic probe system, its design and application, for real-time ex vivo produced oral mucosa equivalent (EVPOME) constructs noninvasive monitoring. We performed in vivo studies to find Raman spectroscopic indicators for postimplanted EVPOME failure and determined that Raman spectra of EVPOMEs preexposed to thermal stress during manufacturing procedures displayed correlation of the band height ratio of CH2 deformation to phenylalanine ring breathing modes, giving a Raman metric to distinguish between healthy and compromised postimplanted constructs. This study is the step toward our ultimate goal to develop a stand-alone system, to be used in a clinical setting, where the data collection and analysis are conducted on the basis of these spectroscopic indicators with minimal user intervention. PMID:24826804

  8. Raman fiberoptic probe for monitoring human tissue engineered oral mucosa constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmaladze, Alexander; Kuo, Shiuhyang; Okagbare, Paul; Marcelo, Cynthia L.; Feinberg, Stephen E.; Morris, Michael D.

    2013-02-01

    In oral and maxillofacial surgery, there is a need for tissue engineered constructs for dental implants, reconstructions due to trauma, oral cancer or congenital defects. A non-invasive quality monitoring of the fabrication of tissue engineered constructs during their production and implantation is a required component of any successful tissue engineering technique. We demonstrate the design and application of a Raman spectroscopic probe for rapid and noninvasive monitoring of Ex Vivo Produced Oral Mucosa Equivalent constructs (EVPOMEs). We conducted in vivo studies to identify Raman spectroscopic failure indicators for EVPOMEs (already developed in vitro), and found that Raman spectra of EVPOMEs exposed to thermal stress showed correlation of the band height ratio of CH2 deformation to phenylalanine ring breathing modes, providing a Raman metric to distinguish between viable and nonviable constructs. This is the first step towards the ultimate goal to design a stand-alone system, which will be usable in a clinical setting, as the data processing and analysis will be performed with minimal user intervention, based on already established and tested Raman spectroscopic indicators for EVPOMEs.

  9. [Differential diagnosis of bluish and pigmented lesions of the oral mucosa].

    PubMed

    Tsiklakis, K; Patsakas, A

    1989-01-01

    The clinical features of the most common bluish and pigmented lesions of the oral mucosa are discussed in this paper. Considerable attention is given to the findings from the medical and dental history of the patient, in the methodology of the clinical examination (inspection, palpation, digital pressure, aspiration) in the clinical characteristics of the lesions (location, size duration, consistency, prognosis) in the laboratory findings (radiographs and other supplementary examinations) and in the differential diagnosis. The bluish and pigmented lesions which are discussed include: melanoma, Albright's syndrome, Addison's diseases, Peutz-Jeghers's syndrome, arsening poisoning, hemangioma, hematoma, petechia and ecchymosis, Sturge-Weber syndrome, amalgam tatoo, heavy metal lines, mucocele and eruption cyst. PMID:2519153

  10. Estimation of trace metal elements in oral mucosa specimens by using SR-XRF, PIXE, and XAFS.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Tomoko; Uo, Motohiro; Wada, Takahiro; Omagari, Daisuke; Komiyama, Kazuo; Noguchi, Tadahide; Jinbu, Yoshinori; Kusama, Mikio

    2015-02-01

    The effects of dissolved elements from metal dental restorations are a major concern in lesions of the oral mucosa, and the evaluation of accumulated metal elements, especially their distribution and chemical state, is essential for determining the precise effects of trace metals. In this study, X-ray fluorescence with synchrotron radiation (SR-XRF) and particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) were applied for distribution analysis of the trace metal elements contained in the oral mucosa, and the chemical states of the elements were estimated using X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis. Appropriate combination of these analysis techniques, particularly SR-XRF and PIXE, to visualize the distributions of the elements in the oral mucosa allowed for the observation and evaluation of accumulated metal ions and debris. Importantly, the analyses in this study could be carried out using conventional histopathological specimens without damaging the specimens. Therefore, this method would be applicable for the detection of accumulated trace metal elements in biopsy specimens from the oral mucosa. PMID:25522792

  11. Characterization of cornified oral mucosa for iontophoretically enhanced delivery of chlorhexidine.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wei; Baig, Arif; White, Donald J; Li, S Kevin

    2016-02-01

    Topical administration of chlorhexidine for periodontal disease can provide advantages over systemic delivery, but is limited by the permeability of the cornified oral mucosal tissue. In the present study, passive and iontophoretic transport of tetraethylammonium, salicylate, mannitol, dexamethasone, fluoride, and chlorhexidine across bovine palate was investigated to (a) determine the intrinsic barrier properties of bovine palate for its eventual use as a model of human cornified oral mucosa, (b) examine the feasibility of iontophoretically enhanced transport of chlorhexidine into and across bovine palate, and (c) identify the transport mechanisms involved in iontophoretic transport across the palate. The histology study suggests that bovine and human palates have similar cornified epithelium structures; bovine palate could be a model tissue of human hard palate for drug delivery studies. Transport study of tetraethylammonium, salicylate, and mannitol suggests that bovine palate was net negatively charged and the cornified epithelial layer was the rate-determining barrier. The direct-field effect (electrophoresis) was shown to be the dominant flux-enhancing mechanism in iontophoretic transport of ionic compounds. Electroosmosis also contributed to the iontophoretic transport of both neutral and ionic permeants. Anodal iontophoresis enhanced the delivery of chlorhexidine into and across the palate, reduced the transport lag time, and provided tissue concentration above the drug minimum inhibitory concentration, and therefore could be a promising method to assist in the treatment of periodontal disease. PMID:26598208

  12. Expression of p53 in leukoplakia and squamous cell carcinoma of the oral mucosa: correlation with expression of Ki67

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, S; Chandran, G Jagadeesh; Pillai, K Raveendran; Mathew, Babu; Sujathan, K; Nalinakumary, K R; Nair, M Krishnan

    1996-01-01

    Aim—To study p53 expression in relation to proliferative status in normal and nondysplastic, dysplastic and malignant lesions of the oral mucosa. Method—The standard avidin-biotin complex (ABC) immunohistochemical staining method was used to study the expression of p53 and Ki67 on frozen sections of oral leukoplakias and carcinomas. Results—Of the leukoplakia and carcinoma samples, 70% expressed p53 in over 5% of cells. In normal mucosa less than 5% of cells expressed p53. The proliferation index, as assessed by expression of Ki67, was highest in the malignant lesions (43%) and lowest in normal mucosa (11%). Statistical analysis revealed that expression of both p53 and Ki67 was correlated significantly with the histopathological stage of the tumour. However, expression of p53 was not correlated with that of Ki67. In leukoplakia lesions with proliferative features p53 immunostaining was less intense than in non-proliferative lesions; this difference was statistically significant. Conclusions—These results emphasise the potential of Ki67 and p53 as biomarkers of carcinogenesis in oral cancer and may also serve as intermediate points for cancer prevention programmes, such as the oral chemopreventive trials. Factors other than p53 may have a more important role in the deregulation of proliferation in pre-malignant oral lesions. Images PMID:16696067

  13. Oral magnesium reduces gastric mucosa susceptibility to injury in experimental diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ige, A O; Adewoye, E O; Okwundu, N C; Alade, O E; Onuobia, P C

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of magnesium on the gastric defence mechanism in alloxan-diabetic male Wistar rats. Sixty rats were randomly divided into 2 groups, A (n=40) and B (n=20). Each group was subdivided into control, diabetic untreated (DU), diabetic magnesium (250mg/kg) treated (DMg250) and diabetic insulin (3IU/kgs.c) treated (DI). Diabetes was induced with alloxan (120mg/kg) and both groups were treated for 14days. By day 14, group A rats were sacrificed, the stomach excised and evaluated for histopathology, mucus content, parietal and mucus cell counts. Blood was withdrawn from the orbital sinus of group B rats for biochemical evaluation (blood glucose, superoxide dismutase (SOD), lipid peroxidation (LP) and nitric oxide (NO)) and later sacrificed for gastric SOD, LP and NO evaluation. Blood glucose level was reduced (p<0.05) in all treatment groups compared to DU. Gastric SOD, parietal and mucus cell counts were increased (p<0.05) in the DMg250 and DI compared to DU. Serum LP and NO were reduced while gastric LP was increased in the DMg250 compared to DU. Gastric NO and mucous content were significantly reduced (p<0.05) in all diabetic groups compared to control. The gastric mucosa of the DU group had haemorrhage, inflammation and parasites embedded. The DMg250 and DI had normal submucus and muscle layers with reduced inflammation. Oral magnesium treatment in diabetes exerts hypoglycaemic effects, reduces serum nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation, increases gastric superoxide dismutase, mucous cell count and reduces the susceptibility of the gastric mucosa to ulceration. PMID:27133222

  14. Diagnosis and indications for low-intensity laser therapy of the pathology of the oral cavity mucosa of patients with hematologic and gastroenteric diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunin, Anatoly A.; Minakov, E. V.; Sutscenko, A. V.; Vornovsky, V. A.; Dunaeva, S. V.; Stepanov, Nicolay N.; Shumilovitch, Bogdan R.

    1996-11-01

    In the recent years low intensity laser irradiation is made use of in stomatology with the view of treating numerous diseases of the oral cavity mucosa and parodontium. The oral cavity mucosa lesions caused by the internal organs diseases, especially those of blood and the gastroenteric tract, constitute a particular group. Such diseases are usually manifested by an inflammation, erosions, ulcers, hemorrhages. An abundant microflora of the oral cavity and diminished immunity of the patients contribute to the possibility of septicaemia development. Laser therapy of the oral cavity mucosa lesions according to strictly defined indications promotes rapid healing of ulcers, arresting the oral cavity mucosa inflammation, providing a reduction in bleeding and presents a safe prophylactic means of stomatogenic sepsis.

  15. Expression of MUC1 mucin in potentially malignant disorders, oral squamous cell carcinoma and normal oral mucosa: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M Harish; Sanjai, Karpagaselvi; Kumarswamy, Jayalakshmi; Keshavaiah, Roopavathi; Papaiah, Lokesh; Divya, S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mucins alteration in glycosylation is associated with the development and progression of malignant diseases. Therefore, mucins are used as valuable markers to distinguish normal and disease conditions. Many studies on MUC1 expression have been conducted on variety of neoplastic lesions other than head and neck region. None of the study has made an attempt to show its significance in potentially malignant disorders (PMDs) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Hence, ours is one of the pioneer studies done to assess and evaluate the same. Aims: This study aims to compare and correlate the expression of MUC1 mucin protein in normal oral mucosa (NOM), PMD's and OSCC by immunohistochemical method. Materials and Methods: Institutional study, archived tissue sections of OSCC (n = 20), PMD's (n = 20) and NOM (n = 20) were immunostained for MUC1 mucin and percentage of positive cells evaluated. Results obtained were statistically analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis test, Mann–Whitney test and Student's t-test. Results: The mean MUC1 mucin positive cells in the study groups were as follows, 40% in OSCC, 28% in PMD's and 0.75% in NOM. Higher mean immunohistochemical score was observed in OSCC group followed by PMD's group and NOM group. The difference in immunohistochemical score among the groups was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The result of the current study suggests that determination of MUC1 mucin expression may be a parameter in the diagnosis of malignant behavior of PMD's to OSCC. MUC1 mucin expression may be a useful diagnostic marker for prediction of the invasive/metastatic potential of OSCC. PMID:27601811

  16. Betaine reduces the irritating effect of sodium lauryl sulfate on human oral mucosa in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rantanen, Irma; Nicander, Ingrid; Jutila, Kirsti; Ollmar, Stig; Tenovuo, Jorma; Söderling, Eva

    2002-10-01

    Our aim was to evaluate whether betaine has a protective effect during exposure of the human oral mucosa in vivo to sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) or cocoamidopropylbetaine (CAPB) as measured with a multifrequency electrical impedance spectrometer (EI). Both detergents were used at the concentration of 2.0% w/v with and without 4.0% w/v betaine in distilled water in 20 volunteers, and 0.5% and 1.0% w/v SLS combined with 4.0% w/v betaine in 5 volunteers. EI measurements were taken before application of the test solutions, after their removal, and every 15 min up to 45 min. Both 0.5% and 1% SLS solutions showed a significant reduction in 3 of the 4 indices, indicating mucosal irritation after the 15-min exposure (P < 0.05), whereas 2% SLS did so in all 4 indices (P < 0.001). Betaine had no effect on the detergent-induced decline with either the 2% or the 0.5% SLS solutions. However, when combined with the 1% SLS solution, betaine significantly (P < 0.05) reduced mucosal irritation by abolishing decreases in indices MIX (magnitude index) and IMIX (imaginary part index) and lowering it for PIX (phase index). The 2% CAPB solution showed a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in all 4 indices after the 15-min exposure, but the effect was significantly weaker than that of 2% SLS (P < 0.05). Betaine did not reduce the irritating effect of 2% CAPB. These findings can be used in the development of less irritating products for oral health care. PMID:12418722

  17. Development of alginate microspheres as nystatin carriers for oral mucosa drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Martín, María J; Calpena, Ana C; Fernández, Francisco; Mallandrich, Mireia; Gálvez, Patricia; Clares, Beatriz

    2015-03-01

    To develop more effective antifungal mucoadhesive systems for the treatment of oral candidiasis, three types of microspheres, alginate (AM1), chitosan coated (CCM) and hydrogel (AM2) containing nystatin (Nys) were successfully elaborated by emulsification/internal gelation method. Physicochemical properties of microspheres resulted in 85-135 μm mean sizes, spherical shaped with narrow distribution. Optimal encapsulation efficiency and negative zeta potentials were observed. AM2 showed a consistent decrease in viscosity with increasing shear rate (Herschel-Bulkley). Optimal mucoadhesive properties and swelling behaviour where evidenced. Nys release from AM1 and CCM followed a concentration gradient pattern, contrary AM2 followed a complex release mechanism. All systems exhibited a marked fungicidal activity against Candida albicans strains. In vivo studies demonstrated that Nys was not found in systemic circulation assuring the safety of the treatment. Nys amounts retained in the mucosa were more than enough to ensure an effective fungicidal action without tissue damage. Based on the obtained results, AM2 could be proposed as the vehicle with the best properties for the buccal vehiculization of Nys. PMID:25498619

  18. Photodynamic detection in visualisation of cutaneous and oral mucosa premalignant and malignant lesions: two clinical cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurczyszyn, Kamil; Ziólkowski, Piotr; Osiecka, Beata; Gerber, Hanna; Dziedzic, Magdalena

    2008-11-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is promising method of visualisation of premalignant and malignant lesions. PDD is consisted of two main agents: special chemical compound which is called photosensitizer and light. Photosensitizer has affinity to fast proliferating cells such as pre- or malignant. During light irradiation (with proper wavelength - corresponding to absorption peak of photosensitizer) photosensitizer gains energy and passes into excited singlet state S1. Returning to basic singlet state Sn, leads to fluorescence. Due to difference between concentration of photosensitizer in lesion and normal tissue it is possible to obtain high contrast image of lesion. Case #1: 53 years old woman with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in nasal region; 20% delta-aminolevulinic acid as a precursor of photosensitizer on eucerin base was used. Case #2: 57 years old woman with multifocal oral leukoplakia on cheek mucosa and tongue; 2% chlorophyll gel as photosesitizer was used. All photographs were taken in white light without any filter and in blue and UV light with orange filter: in both cases the total area of the lesions appeared to be larger than it has been clinically observed. Thus, the PDD might be helpful in evaluation of margins of surgical excision of such lesions.

  19. Cytological changes in the oral mucosa after use of a mouth rinse with alcohol: A prospective double blind control study

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Sempere, Francisco; Marzal, Cristina; Pellín-Carcelén, Ana; Martí-Bonmatí, Ezequiel; Bagan, Leticia

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this preliminary study was to detect cytological changes in the oral mucosa after using a mouth wash with alcohol. Material and Methods: A prospective double-blind, controlled study was performed, for 6 months. Group 1 consisted of 30 subjects who used a mouth rinse with 26.9% of alcohol [Listerine®] and Group 2 consisted of 30 subjects who used a mouth rinse with the same ingredients but with no alcohol. We obtained three cytological samples from the oral mucosa. The presence of cytological atypia, binucleation and karyorrhesis, and type of cells were studied. We also used a fluorescent in situ hybridization technique (FISH) in 15 samples in each group, for the micronucleus. Results: We found no clinical mucosal alteration after using the mouth wash at the end of the study in either group. We observed no cytological differences between the groups at the end of the study (p>0.05). Regarding the study of the micronucleus by FISH, we observed no significant difference between the groups (p>0.05). Conclusions: Our results showed no cytological alteration in patients using a mouth rinse with alcohol, but these findings should be considered preliminary results, to be confirmed in a greater sample of patients. Key words:Mouth wash, oral mucosa, cytological change, alcohol. PMID:23085712

  20. Detection of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in oral mucosa of women with cervical lesions and their relation to oral sex practices

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous studies have either investigated the relationship of HPV with oral cancer or the prevalence of HPV on the oral cavity. The purpose of this investigation was to study the prevalence of HPV in oral cavity of women with oral sex practices and cervical lesions. Methods Forty six (46) non-smokers and non-alcoholic patients attended the "Clínica de Displasias" of "Ciudad Juarez" were sampled. This population had a CIN diagnosis sometime between the previous six months. On previous consent they filled out a questionnaire related to their oral sex practices. Afterwards one swab from cheeks and another from palate/gum were taken; PCR was used to determine generic HPV, HPV16 and HPV18. Results Seventy two percent (72%) of the patients stated to have oral sex practices regularly which all of them were positive to HPV either in oral mucus, palate/gum or both. The total of the given results showed that 35% had HPV16; among those distributed in 26% with regular oral sex practices and 9% stated as never practiced oral sex. An association was found between oral HPV16 positivity and progression to cervical CIN advanced lesions. On the other hand HPV18 was not detected. The frequency of HPV16 was higher in buccal mucosa (23%) versus palate/gum (16%). Conclusions This study suggests that buccal HPV16 infection is associated with CIN progression. PMID:21129222

  1. Raman spectroscopy of oral buccal mucosa: a study on age-related physiological changes and tobacco-related pathological changes.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Aditi; Deshmukh, Atul; Ghanate, A D; Singh, S P; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Krishna, C Murali

    2012-12-01

    Biophysical techniques play an important role in detecting physiological alterations during pathogenesis. Raman spectroscopy has shown immense potential in identifying several diseased conditions, including oral cancers. Classification of normal, inflammatory, premalignant and malignant conditions has been demonstrated using ex vivo Raman spectroscopy. Feasibility of recording in vivo spectra in clinically implementable time has also been shown. Translation of this technology to clinics requires extensive validation of methodologies, building of robust models and testing the same under stringent conditions as well as on diverse populations. In this context, the ability of Raman spectroscopy in identifying subtle changes in oral mucosa with increasing age, and the influence of these aging related changes on classification with tobacco-related pathological changes was evaluated. A total of 451 spectra from 62 subjects were recorded from buccal mucosa of healthy subjects of 4 different age groups (aged 20-60 years). Also, 478 spectra from 85 subjects belonging to 4 different categories, tobacco exposed mucosa, contralateral normal (opposite side of tumor), premalignant patches and tumors on buccal mucosa were recorded using fiber optic probe-coupled commercial Raman spectrometer. Differences in spectra were explored by unsupervised Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and supervised Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), followed by Leave one out cross validation. Results indicate feasibility of classifying early and late age groups. Also, clear classification is observed between healthy and pathological groups, thus inherent heterogeneity in healthy groups seems to have no bearing on classification of normal with abnormal conditions. Findings of the study indicate high sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy in detecting subtle mucosal changes, further supporting efficacy of Raman spectroscopic approaches in oral cancer applications. Prospectively, more vigorous validation

  2. Effects of C-xylopyranoside derivative on epithelial regeneration in an in vitro 3D oral mucosa model.

    PubMed

    Uenoyama, Atsushi; Kakizaki, Ikuko; Shiomi, Aki; Saito, Naoaki; Hara, Yuko; Saito, Taro; Ohnuki, Hisashi; Kato, Hiroko; Takagi, Ritsuo; Maeda, Takeyasu; Izumi, Kenji

    2016-07-01

    Identifying substandard tissue-engineered oral mucosa grafts with a poor epithelium before clinical use is critical to ensure quality assurance/control in regenerative medicine, leading to success of grafting. This study investigated the effects of one of the C-xylopyranoside derivatives, β-D-xylopyranoside-n-propane-2-one (XPP), on oral epithelial regeneration. Using a three-dimensional oral mucosa model, we analyzed changes of the epithelial structure, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis, the expression levels of basement membrane zone markers, and substrates of Akt/mTOR signaling. Compared with the control, 2 mM XPP treatment increased the mean and minimal epithelial thickness, and reduced the variation of epithelial thickness. It also stimulated expressions of decorin and syndecan-1 with change of GAG amount and/or composition, and enhanced the expressions of integrin α6, CD44, and Akt/mTOR signaling substrates. These findings suggest that XPP supplementation contributes to consistent epithelial regeneration. Moreover, upregulation of those markers may play a role in increasing the quality of the oral mucosal epithelium. PMID:26966997

  3. [Epidemiologic studies of oral mucosa changes occurring in children, adolescents, and adults 13-24 years of age in Warsaw].

    PubMed

    Górska, R

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was the analysis of RAS occurrence in the population and a comparison to other oral mucosa lesions as well as an analysis of the influence of various factors on RAS occurrence: age, social status of the subject's, parents' education, CPITN index. In the school year 1994/95 a questionnaire concerning the frequency of RAS was distributed to children and adolescents (13-18y) from two Warsaw schools and a group of soldiers of the Polish Army serving in Warsaw. Additionally, all study participants were checked towards RAS by the use of the clinical methods according to WHO methodological guidelines. The periodontal state was measured with the CPITN index described by Ainamo. The following diseases were identified: RAS, leukoplakia, lichen planus, herpes simplex and tongue lesions. The most common declared diseases of oral mucosa was RAS, which usually occurred to patients of age below 18. Clinically the most often observed diseases were oral leukoplakia in soldiers' group and RAS in both students' groups. RAS occurs more often in students, whose parents have higher education compared with persons whose parents have primary education. Parental history of disease (cases of RAS among family members) predisposes to occurrence of RAS. Stress and exhaustion are the supporting factors of RAS incidence. Furthermore, clinical periodontal status and treatment needs may also cause the increase of RAS incidence. PMID:9411506

  4. Effects of aging in the expression of NOD-like receptors and inflammasome-related genes in oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Ebersole, J L; Kirakodu, S; Novak, M J; Exposto, C R; Stromberg, A J; Shen, S; Orraca, L; Gonzalez-Martinez, J; Gonzalez, O A

    2016-02-01

    The molecular changes underlying the higher risk of chronic inflammatory disorders during aging remain incompletely understood. Molecular variations in the innate immune response related to recognition and interaction with microbes at mucosal surfaces could be involved in aging-related inflammation. We developed an ontology analysis of 20 nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) and seven inflammasome-related genes (IRGs) in healthy and inflamed/periodontitis oral mucosal tissues from young, adolescent, adult, and aged non-human primates (Macaca mulatta) using the GeneChip(®) Rhesus Macaque Genome array. Validation of some of the significant changes was done by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The expression of NLRB/NAIP, NLRP12, and AIM2 increased with aging in healthy mucosa whereas NLRC2/NOD2 expression decreased. Although higher expression levels of some NLRs were generally observed with periodontitis in adult mucosal tissues (e.g. NLRB/NAIP, NLRP5, and NLRX1), various receptors (e.g. NLRC2/NOD2 and NLRP2) and the inflammasome adaptor protein ASC, exhibited a significant reduction in expression in aged periodontitis tissues. Accordingly, the expression of NLR-activated innate immune genes, such as HBD3 and IFNB1, was impaired in aged but not adult periodontitis tissues. Both adult and aged tissues showed significant increase in interleukin-1β expression. These findings suggest that the expression of a subset of NLRs appears to change with aging in healthy oral mucosa, and that aging-related oral mucosal inflammation could involve an impaired regulation of the inflammatory and antimicrobial response associated with downregulation of specific NLRs and IRGs. PMID:26197995

  5. Small cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (cheek mucosa): a case report with an immunohistochemical and molecular genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity is extremely rare; only one case has been reported in the English Literature. The author herein reports the second case of SCC of the oral cavity. A 59-year-old man presented with oral tumor (5 cm) in the right cheek mucosa. A biopsy was taken. The HE histology was typical SCC consisting of small epithelial cells with hyperchromatic nuclei, molded nuclei, scant nucleocytoplasmic ratio, and negative nucleoli. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells are positive for pancytokeratin (PCK) WSS, PCK MNF-116, cytokeratin (CK) 34BE12, CK5/6, CK14, vimentin, KIT (CD117), CD56, synaptophysin, p53 protein, and Ki67 antigen (Ki-67 labeling = 70%). The tumor cells are negative for PCK AE1/3, PSK CAM5.2, CK7, CK8, CK18, CK19, CK20, EMA, NSE, chromogranin, platelet-derived growth factor-α (PDGFRA), CD45, CD45RO, CD3, CD20, CD30, CD79a, and bcl-2. A retrospective genetic analysis using PCR-direct sequencing method in paraffin sections identified no mutations of KIT (exons 9, 11, 13 and 17) and PDGFRA (exons 12 and 18) genes. Various imaging modalities including CT and MRI and upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy did not identified no tumors other than the oral tumor. Thus, the oral tumor was thought primary. The oral tumor rapidly enlarged, and distant metastases to cervical lymph nodes, ribs and iliac bones emerged. The patient is now treated by cisplatin-based chemotherapy 16 months after the first manifestation. PMID:23573327

  6. Carbamazepine transbuccal delivery: the histo-morphological features of reconstituted human oral epithelium and buccal porcine mucosae in the transmucosal permeation.

    PubMed

    Campisi, G; Paderni, C; Saccone, R; Siragusa, M G; Lo Muzio, L; Tripodo, C; Giannola, L I; Florena, A M

    2008-01-01

    Transbuccal drug delivery is an attractive way of administration since several well-known advantages are provided, especially with respect to peroral management. Carbamazepine (CBZ) is an anticonvulsant which is useful in controlling neuropathic pain, and it is currently administered by peroral route, although its absorption and bioavailability is limited due to various factors. The oral cavity could be an interesting site for transbuccal CBZ delivery due to two properties: slow administration of constant low drug doses and less dose-related side effects. However, in transbuccal absorption a major limitation could be the low permeability of the mucosa which results in low drug bioavailability; thus the aptitude of the drug to penetrate the buccal mucosa has to be assessed by using tissue models resembling human normal mucosa. In our experience, CBZ well permeates mucosal membranes. In order to assess the efficacy of CBZ transbuccal delivery and to verify the reliability of these tissues in permeability testing before and after the passage of CBZ, the histo-morphological features of reconstituted human oral (RHO) epithelium (E) and buccal porcine mucosae were investigated. Significant histological changes due to CBZ passage were observed both in RHO-E and porcine mucosa. The main findings detected in RHO samples were cellular swellings with a signet ring-like appearance, nuclear swelling, prominent nucleoli lined against the nuclear membrane and the presence of keratohyalin granules. The most striking finding regarding porcine buccal mucosa was a cytoplasmic vacuolization, mainly involving the basal layer. PMID:19144275

  7. The inflammatory and normal transcriptome of mouse bladder detrusor and mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Saban, Marcia R; Hellmich, Helen L; Turner, Mary; Nguyen, Ngoc-Bich; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth; Dyer, David W; Hurst, Robert E; Centola, Michael; Saban, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    Background An organ such as the bladder consists of complex, interacting set of tissues and cells. Inflammation has been implicated in every major disease of the bladder, including cancer, interstitial cystitis, and infection. However, scanty is the information about individual detrusor and urothelium transcriptomes in response to inflammation. Here, we used suppression subtractive hybridizations (SSH) to determine bladder tissue- and disease-specific genes and transcriptional regulatory elements (TRE)s. Unique TREs and genes were assembled into putative networks. Results It was found that the control bladder mucosa presented regulatory elements driving genes such as myosin light chain phosphatase and calponin 1 that influence the smooth muscle phenotype. In the control detrusor network the Pax-3 TRE was significantly over-represented. During development, the Pax-3 transcription factor (TF) maintains progenitor cells in an undifferentiated state whereas, during inflammation, Pax-3 was suppressed and genes involved in neuronal development (synapsin I) were up-regulated. Therefore, during inflammation, an increased maturation of neural progenitor cells in the muscle may underlie detrusor instability. NF-κB was specifically over-represented in the inflamed mucosa regulatory network. When the inflamed detrusor was compared to control, two major pathways were found, one encoding synapsin I, a neuron-specific phosphoprotein, and the other an important apoptotic protein, siva. In response to LPS-induced inflammation, the liver X receptor was over-represented in both mucosa and detrusor regulatory networks confirming a role for this nuclear receptor in LPS-induced gene expression. Conclusion A new approach for understanding bladder muscle-urothelium interaction was developed by assembling SSH, real time PCR, and TRE analysis results into regulatory networks. Interestingly, some of the TREs and their downstream transcripts originally involved in organogenesis and

  8. Loss of Aβ-nerve endings associated with the Merkel cell-neurite complex in the lesional oral mucosa epithelium of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis

    PubMed Central

    Carrión, Daniela Calderón; Korkmaz, Yüksel; Cho, Britta; Kopp, Marion; Bloch, Wilhelm; Addicks, Klaus; Niedermeier, Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    The Merkel cell-neurite complex initiates the perception of touch and mediates Aβ slowly adapting type I responses. Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease with T-cell-mediated inflammation, whereas hyperkeratosis is characterized with or without epithelial dysplasia in the oral mucosa. To determine the effects of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis on the Merkel cell-neurite complex, healthy oral mucosal epithelium and lesional oral mucosal epithelium of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis patients were stained by immunohistochemistry (the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex and double immunofluorescence methods) using pan cytokeratin, cytokeratin 20 (K20, a Merkel cell marker), and neurofilament 200 (NF200, a myelinated Aβ- and Aδ-nerve fibre marker) antibodies. NF200-immunoreactive (ir) nerve fibres in healthy tissues and in the lesional oral mucosa epithelium of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis were counted and statistically analysed. In the healthy oral mucosa, K20-positive Merkel cells with and without close association to the intraepithelial NF200-ir nerve fibres were detected. In the lesional oral mucosa of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis patients, extremely rare NF200-ir nerve fibres were detected only in the lamina propria. Compared with healthy tissues, lichen planus and hyperkeratosis tissues had significantly decreased numbers of NF200-ir nerve fibres in the oral mucosal epithelium. Lichen planus and hyperkeratosis were associated with the absence of Aβ-nerve endings in the oral mucosal epithelium. Thus, we conclude that mechanosensation mediated by the Merkel cell-neurite complex in the oral mucosal epithelium is impaired in lichen planus and hyperkeratosis. PMID:27025263

  9. State of Oral Mucosa as an Additional Symptom in the Course of Primary Amyloidosis and Multiple Myeloma Disease

    PubMed Central

    Czerniuk, Maciej R.; Jurczyszyn, Artur; Charlinski, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (myeloma multiplex (MM)) is a malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphoma derived from B cell. Its essence is a malignant clone of plasma cells synthesizing growth of monoclonal immunoglobulin, which infiltrate the bone marrow, destroy the bone structure, and prevent the proper production of blood cells components. The paper presents a case of 62-year-old patient who developed symptoms in addition to neurological and haematological changes in the oral mucosa in the course of multiple myeloma. The treatment resulted in partial improvement. The authors wish to draw attention not only to nonspecificity and rarity of changes in the mouth which can meet the dentist but also to the complexity of the multidisciplinary therapy patients diagnosed with MM. PMID:25013412

  10. A histochemical comparison of methyl green-pyronin, and hematoxylin and eosin for detecting apoptotic cells in oral squamous cell carcinoma, oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis and normal oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Sumedha, S; Kotrashetti, V S; Somannavar, P; Nayak, R; Babji, D

    2015-05-01

    Analysis of apoptotic cells in oral pathological states could be useful for determining the rates of tissue turnover, which would help determine prognosis. The use of histochemical stains such as hematoxylin and eosin (H & E) and methyl green-pyronin (MGP) can provide a simple and cost-effective method for detecting apoptotic cells. We compared the efficacy of MGP and H & E for detecting apoptotic cells in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), oral leukoplakia (OL), oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) and normal oral mucosa (NOM). Ten cases each of OSCC, OSMF, OL and NOM were retrieved from the archives and two serial sections were stained, one with H & E and the other with MGP. Apoptotic cells were identified at 100 x magnification and the apoptotic index was calculated. Apoptotic cells were distinguished more readily in MGP stained sections than in those stained with H & E. Also, the apoptotic cell count was greater in OSCC compared to OL, OSMF and NOM. We concluded that MGP staining can be used as a routine, cost-effective method for detecting apoptotic cells. PMID:25539051

  11. [Coexistence of infection of the oral cavity and stomach and duodenal mucosa with Helicobacter pylori in patients with ulcer and chronic gastritis].

    PubMed

    Kopaánski, Z; Cienciala, A; Banaś, J; Kamiński, B; Witkowska, B; Zastepa, P; Brandys, J; Micherdziński, J

    1995-01-01

    In a group of 260 patients with a peptic ulcer of the stomach or the duodenum and/or chronic gastritis, bacteriological tests were conducted aiming at the detection of Helicobacter pylori in the mucosa of the stomach and the duodenum and in the gingival pockets. The presence of the infection of the mucosa of the stomach and/or of the duodenum was confirmed in 197 patients (75.8%). In this group of patients the bacteria occurred simultaneously in the oral cavity in 77 (39.1%) patients. It was found that the frequency of coexistence of Helicobacter pylori infection in the gingival pockets with an infected gastric or duodenal ulcer was not statistically significant. However, there was a statistically significant correlation between the frequency of Helicobacter pylori infection in the oral cavity (83.3%) and the simultaneous occurrence of extensive infection of the gastric mucosa. PMID:7754615

  12. Quantification of the global and local complexity of the epithelial-connective tissue interface of normal, dysplastic, and neoplastic oral mucosae using digital imaging.

    PubMed

    Abu Eid, Rasha; Landini, Gabriel

    2003-01-01

    This study aimed at quantifying the complexity of the epithelial-connective tissue interface (ECTI) in human normal mucosa, premalignant, and malignant lesions using fractal geometry. Two approaches were used to describe the complexity of 377 oral mucosa ECTI profiles. The box counting method was used to estimate their global fractal dimension, while local fractal dimensions were estimated using the mass radius relation at various local scales. The ECTI complexity significantly increased from normal through premalignant to malignant profiles in both global and local (over 283 microm) scales. Normal mucosa samples from different sites of the oral cavity also had different degrees of global complexity. Fractal geometry is a useful morphological marker of tissue complexity changes taking place during epithelial malignancy and premalignancy, and we propose it as a quantitative marker of epithelial complexity. PMID:14521264

  13. Carbon monoxide absorption through the oral and nasal mucosae of cynomolgus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfisch, W.H.; Hoop, K.A.

    1980-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that blood levels of carbon monoxide increase during cigarette smoking. It has genrally been assumed that increases in blood levels of carbon monoxide could be interpreted as evidence that deep lung penetration of cigarette smoke had occurred. This study was designed to examine whether increased blood levels of carbon monoxide could result from absorption in the nasal and oral cavitites. The nasal and oral cavities of cynomolgus monkeys were exposed, independently of the lungs, to cigarette smoke under rigorous smoking conditions. Pre- and post-exposure blood levels of carbon monoxide were measured. As a positive control, similar volumes of cigarette smoke were passed directly into the lungs, thus bypassing the oral and nasal cavities, and blood levels of carbon monoxide were again measured. The results inidcate that absorption of carbon monoxide in the oral and nasal cavities is negligible under the heavy smoking regimen employed here, and hence, would be negligible under normal smoking conditions.

  14. Collaborative Interferon-γ and Interleukin-17 Signaling Protects the Oral Mucosa from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Barin, Jobert G; Talor, Monica V; Schaub, Julie A; Diny, Nicola L; Hou, Xuezhou; Hoyer, Matthew; Archer, Nathan K; Gebremariam, Elizabeth S; Davis, Meghan F; Miller, Lloyd S; Rose, Noel R; Čiháková, Daniela

    2016-09-01

    Infections with Staphylococcus aureus are a continuing and growing problem in community and hospital settings. Preclinical animal modeling of S. aureus relies on experimental infection, which carries some limitations. We describe here a novel, spontaneous model of oral staphylococcal infection in double knockout mice, deficient in the receptors for IL-17 (IL-17RA) and interferon (IFN)-γ (IFNγRI), beginning at 6 to 8 weeks of age. IFNγRI(-/-)IL17RA(-/-) (GRAKO) mice developed progressive oral abscesses. Cytometric methods revealed extensive neutrophilic infiltration of oral tissues in GRAKO mice; further investigation evidenced that IL-17 predominated neutrophil defects in these mice. To investigate the contribution of IFN-γ signaling to this native host defense to S. aureus, we observed perturbations of monocyte recruitment and macrophage differentiation in the oral tissues of GRAKO mice, and CXCL9/chemokine ligand receptor (CXCR)3-driven recruitment of T-cell oral tissues and draining lymph nodes. To address the former finding, we depleted macrophages and monocytes in vivo from IL17RA(-/-) mice using liposomes loaded with clodronate. This treatment elicited oral abscesses, recapitulating the phenotype of GRAKO mice. From these findings, we propose novel collaborative functions of IL-17 and IFN-γ, acting through neutrophils and macrophages, respectively, in native mucocutaneous host defenses to S. aureus. PMID:27470712

  15. In vivo Raman spectroscopic identification of premalignant lesions in oral buccal mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Deshmukh, Atul; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Murali Krishna, C.

    2012-10-01

    Cancers of oral cavities are one of the most common malignancies in India and other south-Asian countries. Tobacco habits are the main etiological factors for oral cancer. Identification of premalignant lesions is required for improving survival rates related to oral cancer. Optical spectroscopy methods are projected as alternative/adjunct for cancer diagnosis. Earlier studies have demonstrated the feasibility of classifying normal, premalignant, and malignant oral ex-vivo tissues. We intend to evaluate potentials of Raman spectroscopy in detecting premalignant conditions. Spectra were recorded from premalignant patches, contralateral normal (opposite to tumor site), and cancerous sites of subjects with oral cancers and also from age-matched healthy subjects with and without tobacco habits. A total of 861 spectra from 104 subjects were recorded using a fiber-optic probe-coupled HE-785 Raman spectrometer. Spectral differences in the 1200- to 1800-cm-1 region were subjected to unsupervised principal component analysis and supervised linear discriminant analysis followed by validation with leave-one-out and an independent test data set. Results suggest that premalignant conditions can be objectively discriminated with both normal and cancerous sites as well as from healthy controls with and without tobacco habits. Findings of the study further support efficacy of Raman spectroscopic approaches in oral-cancer applications.

  16. Mutagenesis and carcinogenesis induced by dibenzo[a,l]pyrene in the mouse oral cavity: a potential new model for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guttenplan, Joseph B.; Kosinska, Wieslawa; Zhao, Zhong-Lin; Chen, Kun-Ming; Aliaga, Cesar; DelTondo, Joseph; Cooper, Timothy; Sun, Yuan-Wan; Zhang, Shang-Min; Jiang, Kun; Bruggeman, Richard; Sharma, Arun K.; Amin, Shantu; Ahn, Kwangmi; El-Bayoumy, Karam

    2013-01-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity is a serious disease, affecting about 30,000 individuals in US annually. There are several animal models of oral cancer, but each has certain disadvantages. As a new model, we investigated whether topical application of the tobacco smoke carcinogen, dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P) is mutagenic and carcinogenic in the oral cavity of the B6C3F1 lacI and B6C3F1 mouse, respectively. B6C3F1 lacI mice received DB[a,l]P (0, 3, 6, 12 nmol) 3× per week. B6C3F1 mice received the same doses and also 24 nmol. At 38 weeks mutagenesis was measured in oral tissues in lacI mice. For the high dose group, the mutant fraction (MF) in upper mucosa and tongue increased about twofold relative to that in vehicle-alone. The increases were statistically significant. The mutational profile in the DB[a,l]P-induced mutants was compared with that induced by benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in oral tissue. BaP is mutagenic in many tissues when administered by gavage. The mutational profile for DB[a,l]P was more similar to that reported for p53 mutations in head and neck cancers than was that of BaP. At 47 weeks, oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) were found in 31% of the high-dose B6C3F1 group. Elevations of p53 and COX-2 protein were observed in tumor and dysplastic tissue. As DB[a,l]P induces mutations and tumors in the oral cavity, and has a mutational profile in oral tissue similar to that found in p53 in human OSCC, the treatment protocol described here may represent a new and relevant model for cancer of the oral cavity. PMID:21815141

  17. Effects of subepithelial fibroblasts on epithelial differentiation in human skin and oral mucosa: heterotypically recombined organotypic culture model.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Mutsumi; Yoshimura, Kotaro; Suzuki, Yasutoshi; Harii, Kiyonori

    2003-09-01

    The stratified squamous epithelia differ regionally in their patterns of morphogenesis and differentiation. Although some reports suggested that the adult epithelial phenotype is an intrinsic property of the epithelium, there is increasing evidence that subepithelial connective tissue can modify the phenotypic expression of the epithelium. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether the differentiation of cutaneous and oral epithelia is influenced by underlying mesenchymal tissues. Three normal skin samples and three normal buccal mucosa samples were used for the experiments. Skin equivalents were constructed in four ways, depending on the combinations of keratinocytes (cutaneous or mucosal keratinocytes) and fibroblasts (dermal or mucosal fibroblasts), and the effects of subepithelial fibroblasts on the differentiation of oral and cutaneous keratinocytes were studied with histological examinations and immunohistochemical analyses with anti-cytokeratin (keratins 10 and 13) antibodies. For each experiment, three paired skin equivalents were constructed by using single parent keratinocyte and fibroblast sources for each group; consequently, nine (3 x 3) organotypic cultures per group were constructed and studied. The oral and cutaneous epithelial cells maintained their intrinsic keratin expression. The keratin expression patterns in oral and cutaneous epithelia of skin equivalents were generally similar to their original patterns but were partly modified exogenously by the topologically different fibroblasts. The mucosal keratinocytes were more differentiated and expressed keratin 10 when cocultured with dermal fibroblasts, and the expression patterns of keratin 13 in cutaneous keratinocytes cocultured with mucosal fibroblasts were different from those in keratinocytes cocultured with cutaneous fibroblasts. The results suggested that the epithelial phenotype and keratin expression could be extrinsically modified by mesenchymal fibroblasts. In epithelial

  18. The role of tobacco as an etiological agent for oral cancer: Cytomorphometrical analysis of the buccal mucosa in tobacco users

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Megha; Sircar, Keya; Tandon, Ankita; Chowdhry, Aman; Popli, Deepika Bablani

    2014-01-01

    Background: Histopathological diagnosis of lesions arising from the intake of tobacco is based on subjective evaluation of morphological alterations within the lesional tissue. Oral exfoliative cytology is a non-invasive diagnostic technique for early detection of oral premalignant and malignant lesions. Morphometric techniques have been advocated as objective and reproducible methods of detecting changes before they are visible by routine microscopy and can facilitate differentiation of normal and abnormal epithelium. This study was conducted to assess the morphometric parameters (cell diameter, nuclear diameter and nuclear cytoplasmic ratio [N:C ratio]) in tobacco smokers and chewers and to evaluate the variations, if any. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on cytological smears obtained from oral lesions of patients with habit of tobacco smoking (Group B) and tobacco chewing (Group C). Group A comprised of subjects free from oral lesions and not using tobacco in any form. Patients with both the habits were excluded. The smears were stained using Papanicoloaou staining method. For morphometric analysis, Microimage 3.0 image analysis software was employed. The statistical test employed was an analysis of variance and P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The results of this study showed that the cellular diameter was progressively reduced and nuclear diameter progressively increased from Group A to Group B to Group C. The N:C ratio also showed a progressive increase from Group A to Group C. Conclusion: The results confirmed that tobacco chewing and smoking influenced the cytomorphology of normal appearing buccal mucosa and the degree of these changes were found to be greater in chewers as compared to smokers. PMID:25540659

  19. Orthotopic non-metastatic and metastatic oral cancer mouse models.

    PubMed

    Bais, Manish V; Kukuruzinska, Maria; Trackman, Philip C

    2015-05-01

    Oral cancer is characterized by high morbidity and mortality with a predisposition to metastasize to different tissues, including lung, liver, and bone. Despite progress in the understanding of mutational profiles and deregulated pathways in oral cancer, patient survival has not significantly improved over the past decades. Therefore, there is a need to establish in vivo models that recapitulate human oral cancer metastasis to evaluate therapeutic potential of novel drugs. Here we report orthotopic tongue cancer nude mouse models to study oral cancer growth and metastasis using human metastatic (UMSCC2) and non-metastatic (CAL27) cell lines, respectively. Transduction of these cell lines with lentivirus expressing red fluorescent protein (DsRed) followed by injection into tongues of immunodeficient mice generated orthotopic tongue tumors that could be monitored for growth and metastasis by fluorescence measurement with an in vivo Imaging System (IVIS 200). The growth rates of CAL27-DsRed induced tumors were higher than UMSCC2-DsRed tumors after day 15, while UMSCC2-DsRed tumors revealed metastasis beginning on day 21. Importantly, UMSCC2 tumors metastasized to a number of tissues including the submandibular gland, lung, kidney, liver, and bone. Further, immunohistochemical analyses of tongue tumors induced by CAL27 and UMSCC2 cells revealed elevated expression of components of protumorigenic pathways deregulated in human cancers, including Cyclin D1, PCNA, Ki-67, LSD1, LOXL2, MT-MMP1, DPAGT1, E-cadherin, OCT4A, and H3K4me1/2. These orthotopic mouse models are likely to be useful tools for gaining insights into the activity and mechanisms of novel oral cancer drug candidates. PMID:25682387

  20. Immunohistochemical expression of basement membrane proteins of verrucous carcinoma of the oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Arduino, Paolo G; Carrozzo, Marco; Pagano, Marco; Broccoletti, Roberto; Scully, Crispian; Gandolfo, Sergio

    2010-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity is an extremely invasive tumour of stratified squamous epithelium that spreads throughout degradation of the basement membrane (BM) and extra-cellular matrix. Oral verrucous carcinoma (VC) is a rare low-grade variant of oral SCC that penetrates into the subepithelial connective tissue. It also has a different clinical behaviour from classical oral SCC. We investigated the immunohistochemical expression of laminin, laminin-5, collagen IV and fibronectin in VC, severe epithelial dysplasia (SED) and SCC in order to analyse if the pattern of these molecules expression contributes to the differences in the biological behaviour of these diseases. The staining pattern of laminin was less intensive in SCC compared with SED and VC, and collagen IV expression was increased in VC compared with SED. Discontinuities of laminin, collagen IV and fibronectin were more evident in SED than in VC. This study indicates that VC has a biological behaviour different from SED or SCC, observable by immunohistochemistry in the BM zone. PMID:19506920

  1. Raman spectroscopy of normal oral buccal mucosa tissues: study on intact and incised biopsies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Atul; Singh, S. P.; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Krishna, C. Murali

    2011-12-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is one of among the top 10 malignancies. Optical spectroscopy, including Raman, is being actively pursued as alternative/adjunct for cancer diagnosis. Earlier studies have demonstrated the feasibility of classifying normal, premalignant, and malignant oral ex vivo tissues. Spectral features showed predominance of lipids and proteins in normal and cancer conditions, respectively, which were attributed to membrane lipids and surface proteins. In view of recent developments in deep tissue Raman spectroscopy, we have recorded Raman spectra from superior and inferior surfaces of 10 normal oral tissues on intact, as well as incised, biopsies after separation of epithelium from connective tissue. Spectral variations and similarities among different groups were explored by unsupervised (principal component analysis) and supervised (linear discriminant analysis, factorial discriminant analysis) methodologies. Clusters of spectra from superior and inferior surfaces of intact tissues show a high overlap; whereas spectra from separated epithelium and connective tissue sections yielded clear clusters, though they also overlap on clusters of intact tissues. Spectra of all four groups of normal tissues gave exclusive clusters when tested against malignant spectra. Thus, this study demonstrates that spectra recorded from the superior surface of an intact tissue may have contributions from deeper layers but has no bearing from the classification of a malignant tissues point of view.

  2. Oral manifestations in Urbach--Wiethe disease (lipoglycoproteinosis; lipoid proteinosis; hyalinosis cutis et mucosae).

    PubMed

    Hofer, P A; Bergenholtz, A

    1975-01-01

    The oral manifestations in 27 patients with Urbach--Wiethe disease (UWD) discovered in Northern Sweden are described. The oral regions most frequently affected are the lips, the back of the tongue, the frenulum of the tongue, the palate and the back wall of the pharynx. The general impression is that older patients usually have more marked manifestations than younger, indicating that the oral lesions may become more severe with increasing age. Histopathologically, the disorder is essentially a microangiopathy in which the walls of small blood vessels are thick and PAS-positive, indicating the presence of glycoproteins. In clinically affected regions there are usually PAS-positive extravascular deposits. In material used of lipid histochemical studies, sudanophil droplets were found in the vessel walls. By staining with osmium tetroxide the osmium is--contrary to previous assumptions--in some way bound to the droplets, but for unknown reasons is not reduced to a coloured product. The binding of osmium was demonstrated by the OTAN (osmium textroxide alpha-naphthylamine) method. The exact significance of this finding awaits further studies. The implications of dental anomalies occurring in UWD are discussed. PMID:1054442

  3. Automated segmentation of oral mucosa from wide-field OCT images (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldan, Ryan N.; Lee, Anthony M. D.; Cahill, Lucas; Liu, Kelly; MacAulay, Calum; Poh, Catherine F.; Lane, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) can discriminate morphological tissue features important for oral cancer detection such as the presence or absence of basement membrane and epithelial thickness. We previously reported an OCT system employing a rotary-pullback catheter capable of in vivo, rapid, wide-field (up to 90 x 2.5mm2) imaging in the oral cavity. Due to the size and complexity of these OCT data sets, rapid automated image processing software that immediately displays important tissue features is required to facilitate prompt bed-side clinical decisions. We present an automated segmentation algorithm capable of detecting the epithelial surface and basement membrane in 3D OCT images of the oral cavity. The algorithm was trained using volumetric OCT data acquired in vivo from a variety of tissue types and histology-confirmed pathologies spanning normal through cancer (8 sites, 21 patients). The algorithm was validated using a second dataset of similar size and tissue diversity. We demonstrate application of the algorithm to an entire OCT volume to map epithelial thickness, and detection of the basement membrane, over the tissue surface. These maps may be clinically useful for delineating pre-surgical tumor margins, or for biopsy site guidance.

  4. Differential distribution of ghrelin-O-acyltransferase (GOAT) immunoreactive cells in the mouse and rat gastric oxyntic mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Wang, Lixin; Taché, Yvette; Sachs, George; Lambrecht, Nils W.G.

    2013-01-01

    The enzyme that acylates ghrelin was recently identified in mice as the fourth member of the membrane-bound O-acyltransferases superfamily (MBOAT4) and named ghrelin-O-acyltransferase (GOAT). Only one report showed GOAT mRNA expression in ghrelin-expressing cells of the mouse stomach. We investigated the distribution of GOAT protein in peripheral tissues and co-expression with endocrine markers in the gastric mucosa using a custom-made anti-GOAT antibody. Tissues were collected from male Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL/6 mice. Western blot revealed two immunoreactive bands in rat and mouse gastric corpus mucosal proteins, a 50 kDa band corresponding to the GOAT protein and a 100 kDa band likely corresponding to a dimer. Western blot also detected GOAT in the plasma and levels were strongly increased after 24-h fasting in mice and slightly in rats. GOAT-immunoreactive cells were located in the gastric corpus mucosa and the anterior pituitary gland, whereas other peripheral tissues of rats and mice examined were negative. In mice, GOAT-immunoreactive cells were mainly distributed throughout the middle portion of the oxyntic glands, whereas in rats they were localized mainly in the lower portion of the glands. Double labeling showed that 95±1% of GOAT-immunoreactive cells in mice co-labeled with ghrelin, whereas in rats only 56±4% of GOAT-positive cells showed co-expression of ghrelin. The remainder of the GOAT-immunopositive cells in rats co-expressed histidine decarboxylase (44±3%). No co-localization was observed with somatostatin in rats or mice. These data suggest species differences between rats and mice in gastric GOAT expression perhaps resulting in a different role of the MBOAT4 enzyme in the rat stomach. Detection of GOAT in the plasma raises the possibility that ghrelin octanoylation may occur in the circulation and the fasting-induced increase in GOAT may contribute to the increase of acylated ghrelin after fasting. PMID:20059966

  5. Photodynamic therapy of oral Candida infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Freire, Fernanda; Ferraresi, Cleber; Jorge, Antonio Olavo C; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-06-01

    Species of the fungal genus Candida, can cause oral candidiasis especially in immunosuppressed patients. Many studies have investigated the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to kill fungi in vitro, but this approach has seldom been reported in animal models of infection. This study investigated the effects of PDT on Candida albicans as biofilms grown in vitro and also in an immunosuppressed mouse model of oral candidiasis infection. We used a luciferase-expressing strain that allowed non-invasive monitoring of the infection by bioluminescence imaging. The phenothiazinium salts, methylene blue (MB) and new methylene blue (NMB) were used as photosensitizers (PS), combined or not with potassium iodide (KI), and red laser (660nm) at four different light doses (10J, 20J, 40J and 60J). The best in vitro log reduction of CFU/ml on biofilm grown cells was: MB plus KI with 40J (2.31 log; p<0.001); and NMB without KI with 60J (1.77 log; p<0.001). These conditions were chosen for treating the in vivo model of oral Candida infection. After 5days of treatment the disease was practically eradicated, especially using MB plus KI with 40J. This study suggests that KI can potentiate PDT of fungal infection using MB (but not NMB) and could be a promising new approach for the treatment of oral candidiasis. PMID:27074245

  6. Laminin α5 influences the architecture of the mouse small intestinal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Zhen X.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Miner, Jeffrey H.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The mammalian intestine displays two distinct patterns of mucosal organization. The small intestine contains mucosal epithelial invaginations called crypts of Lieberkühn that are continuous with evaginations into the lumen called villi. The colon also contains crypts, but its epithelial surface is lined by flat surface cuffs. The epithelial cells of both organs communicate with the underlying mesenchyme through a basement membrane that is composed of a variety of extracellular matrix proteins, including members of the laminin family. The basement membranes of the small intestine and colon contain distinct laminin subtypes; notably, the villus basement membrane is rich in laminin α5. Here we show that diminution of laminin α5 in a mouse model led to a compensatory deposition of colonic laminins that resulted in a transformation from a small intestinal to a colonic mucosal architecture. The alteration in mucosal architecture was associated with reduced levels of nuclear p27Kip1, a cell cycle regulator, and altered intestinal epithelial cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Our results suggest that laminin α5 plays a crucial role in establishing and maintaining the specific mucosal pattern of the mouse small intestine. PMID:18628307

  7. Malignant melanoma of the oral mucosa in a 17-year-old adolescent girl.

    PubMed

    D'Silva, Nisha J; Kurago, Zoya; Polverini, Peter J; Hanks, Carl T; Paulino, Augusto F

    2002-09-01

    Mucosal melanomas of the oral cavity are rarely seen in the United States. The hard palate is the most common intraoral site. This unusual case occurred in the oral cavity of a 17-year-old Asian girl, who presented to her dentist with complaints of pain and swelling in the upper jaw. The lesion was distal and palatal to the maxillary left second molar, which was vital. Interestingly, the clinical presentation was a hyperplastic, tender lesion that bled when probed. Histopathologically, the biopsy demonstrated a sheet of spindle-shaped cells arranged in nests and fascicles. The nuclei were vesicular, oval to spindle-shaped, and some contained nucleoli that were distinguishable but not prominent. No melanin pigment was observed in the lesion. Tumor cells strongly expressed S100 protein, gp100 (HMB-45), and microphthalmia transcription factor, and variably expressed MART1, but not cytokeratins, CD34, or muscle-specific actin. The histopathologic features and immunohistochemical findings are consistent with a diagnosis of malignant melanoma. PMID:12204064

  8. Gelucire-Based Nanoparticles for Curcumin Targeting to Oral Mucosa: Preparation, Characterization, and Antimicrobial Activity Assessment.

    PubMed

    Hazzah, Heba A; Farid, Ragwa M; Nasra, Maha M A; Hazzah, Walaa A; El-Massik, Magda A; Abdallah, Ossama Y

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to prepare and characterize curcumin (Cur) solid lipid nanoparticles (CurSLN) with a high-loading capacity and chemical stability for the treatment of oral mucosal infection. CurSLN were formulated using different lipids, namely, Gelucire 39/01, Gelucire 50/13, Precirol, Compritol, and poloxamer 407 as a surfactant. Formulae were evaluated for their entrapment efficiency, particle size, and ex vivo mucoadhesion test. Microbiological evaluation was carried out on six microorganisms, five of which are the most commonly affecting oral cavity in terms of determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and minimum bactericidal concentration. Transmission electron microscopy was conducted for ultrathin section for Candida albicans-treated with formulated Cur. The results showed high entrapment efficiency and stability enhancement for Cur powder. Significant amount of Cur was retained onto the mucosal tissue indicating preferential mucosal uptake. CurSLN showed higher antimicrobial activity as compared with Cur raw material and chemically stabilized Cur where it showed MIC (0.185, 0.09375, 0.75, 3, 1.5, and 0.1875 mg/mL) against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans, Viridansstrept, Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Candida albicans, respectively. The prepared lipid nanoparticles maintained Cur chemical stability and microbiological activity. The lack of local antimicrobial therapeutics with minimum side effects augments the importance of studying natural products for this purpose. PMID:26202796

  9. Hierarchical deconstruction of mouse olfactory sensory neurons: from whole mucosa to single-cell RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Luis R.; Ibarra-Soria, Ximena; Khan, Mona; Omura, Masayo; Scialdone, Antonio; Mombaerts, Peter; Marioni, John C.; Logan, Darren W.

    2015-01-01

    The mouse olfactory mucosa is a complex chemosensory tissue composed of multiple cell types, neuronal and non-neuronal. We have here applied RNA-seq hierarchically, in three steps of decreasing cellular heterogeneity: starting with crude tissue samples dissected from the nose, proceeding to flow-cytometrically sorted pools of mature olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), and finally arriving at single mature OSNs. We show that 98.9% of intact olfactory receptor (OR) genes are expressed in mature OSNs. We uncover a hitherto unknown bipartition among mature OSNs. We find that 19 of 21 single mature OSNs each express a single intact OR gene abundantly, consistent with the one neuron-one receptor rule. For the 9 single OSNs where the two alleles of the abundantly expressed OR gene exhibit single-nucleotide polymorphisms, we demonstrate that monoallelic expression of the abundantly expressed OR gene is extremely tight. The remaining two single mature OSNs lack OR gene expression but express Trpc2 and Gucy1b2. We establish these two cells as a neuronal cell type that is fundamentally distinct from canonical, OR-expressing OSNs and that is defined by the differential, higher expression of 55 genes. We propose this tiered experimental approach as a paradigm to unravel gene expression in other cellularly heterogeneous systems. PMID:26670777

  10. Novel papillomavirus isolated from the oral mucosa of a polar bear does not cluster with other papillomaviruses of carnivores.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Hans; Rector, Annabel; Bertelsen, Mads F; Leifsson, Pall S; Van Ranst, Marc

    2008-05-25

    Papillomatosis has been documented in several carnivores, and papillomavirus (PV) types have been characterized from lesions in a number of carnivore species: the canine oral PV (COPV), the Felis domesticus PV type 1 (FdPV-1) isolated from a Persian cat, the Procyon lotor PV type 1 (PlPV-1) isolated from a raccoon, the canine PV type 2 (CPV-2) from a dog's foot pad lesion and the canine PV type 3 (CPV-3) associated with a canine epidermodysplasia verruciformis - like disease. A tissue sample was taken from a papillomatous lesion on the oral mucosa of a polar bear (Ursus maritimus). Extracted DNA was used as a template for multiply primed rolling-circle amplification (RCA), and restriction enzyme analysis of the RCA product indicated the presence of papillomaviral DNA. The genome of this PV was cloned and the complete genomic sequence was determined. The Ursus maritimus PV type 1 (UmPV-1) genome counts 7582 basepairs and is smaller than that of other papillomaviruses from carnivore species. UmPV-1 contains the typical noncoding region NCR1, but unlike the carnivore PVs of the Lambda genus, UmPV-1 does not possess a second noncoding region NCR2. Phylogenetic analysis based on a nucleotide sequence alignment of the L1 ORF of UmPV-1 and 51 other PV types indicates that UmPV-1 does not cluster with any of the other carnivore PVs, but branches off near the root of the common branch of the genus Alphapapillomavirus. PMID:18215475

  11. Effects of oral intake of cetirizine HCl and desloratadine molecules on the middle ear mucosa: an experimental animal study.

    PubMed

    Songu, Murat; Ozkul, Yilmaz; Kirtay, Seyithan; Arslanoglu, Secil; Ozkut, Mahmut; Inan, Sevinc; Onal, Kazim

    2014-04-01

    We have planned to demonstrate histopathologic effects of mid- or long-term oral use of desloratadine and cetirizine HCl molecules on middle ear mucosa of rats. Thirty-six rats were randomized equally into six groups. Desloratadine groups received once daily doses of 1 mg/ml desloratadine for 30 (D30 Group) or 60 (D60 Group) days. The Cetirizine study groups were given once daily doses of 1 mg/ml cetirizine for 30 (S30 Group) or 60 (S60 Group) days. Control groups were given 2 cc physiologic saline using orogastric gavage method through a 12 G gavage catheter for 30 (K30 Group) or 60 (K60) days. At the end of 30 days, D30, S30 and K30 Groups were sacrificed. Tissue samples harvested from groups were evaluated between 1 and 4 Grades for histological characteristics of middle ear canal, eardrum, middle ear epithelium and connective tissue, edema, vascular congestion and inflammatory cells. In the control group no pathological finding was encountered in rats sacrificed on 30 and 60 days. No statistical difference was observed when groups were compared on external ear epithelial tissue, external ear sebaceous gland, middle ear inflammation, and middle ear capillary dilatation both on 30 and 60 days. Tympanic membrane collagen was more evident in D30 and D60 groups when compared with C30 and C60 groups. Comparison of histopathological grading results between 30 and 60 days revealed no significant changes. In conclusion, oral intake of cetirizine and desloratadine preparations has effects of tympanic membrane collagen, degrees of edema and vascular congestion being more prominent with desloratadine molecule. PMID:24526000

  12. Preliminary study of genotoxicity evaluation of orthodontic miniscrews on mucosa oral cells by the alkaline comet assay.

    PubMed

    Martín-Cameán, Ana; Puerto, María; Jos, Ángeles; Azqueta, Amaya; Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro; Solano, Enrique; Cameán, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    Miniscrew implants are widely used nowadays in orthodontic treatments due to their good results in clinical practice. However, data regarding the biocompatibility of commercially available orthodontic miniscrews and temporary devices are very scarce, and their role as genotoxicity inducers has been not previously evaluated with the alkaline comet assay. The aim of this study was to investigate the DNA damage in buccal cells of patients subjected to orthodontic treatments. The alkaline comet assay has been applied in oral mucosa cells from patients treated with conventional orthodontic treatment in comparison to patients treated additionally with miniscrews, non-treated volunteers (control) and smoking volunteers (positive control). The application of orthodontic appliances and miniscrews induced significant and similar (2-fold) increases of %DNA in tail in comparison to control group. Females experienced a significant increase in %DNA in all the treatments in comparison to the control group, whereas males showed significant damage only with the combined orthodontic and miniscrew treatment. In conclusion, conventional orthodontic appliances induced genotoxicity, and the incorporation of miniscrews assayed did not imply any additional increase of DNA damage. PMID:26062010

  13. Comparison of divided and full pupil configurations for line-scanning confocal microscopy in human skin and oral mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Bjorg; Abeytunge, Sanjeewa; Glazowski, Chris; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2012-02-01

    Confocal point-scanning microscopy has been showing promise in the detection, diagnosing and mapping of skin lesions in clinical settings. The noninvasive technique allows provides optical sectioning and cellular resolution for in vivo diagnosis of melanoma and basal cell carcinoma and pre-operative and intra-operative mapping of margins. The imaging has also enabled more accurate "guided" biopsies while minimizing the otherwise large number of "blind" biopsies. Despite these translational advances, however, point-scanning technology remains relatively complex and expensive. Line-scanning technology may offer an alternative approach to accelerate translation to the clinic. Line-scanning, using fewer optical components, inexpensive linear-array detectors and custom electronics, may enable smaller, simpler and lower-cost confocal microscopes. A line is formed using a cylindrical lens and scanned through the back focal plane of the objective with a galvanometric scanner. A linear CCD is used for detection. Two pupil configurations were compared for performance in imaging human tissue. In the full-pupil configuration, illumination and detection is made through the full objective pupil. In the divided pupil approach, half the pupil is illuminated and the other half is used for detection. The divided pupil configuration loses spatial and axial resolution due to a diminished NA, but the sectioning capability and rejection of background is improved. Imaging in skin and oral mucosa illustrate the performance of the two configurations.

  14. Oral Mucosa Bleeding Times of Normal Cats and Cats with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome or Hageman Trait (Factor XII Deficiency).

    PubMed

    Parker, M T; Collier, L L; Kier, A B; Johnson, G S

    1988-01-01

    A commercially available, disposable blade in a spring-loaded cassette was used to measure oral mucosa bleeding times (OMBT) of ketamine/acepromazine-anesthetized cats. The OMBT were determined in cats homozygous for Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS, n = 7), cats heterozygous for CHS (n = 6), and cats homozygous for Hageman factor (factor XII) deficiency (n = 5). In addition, OMBT were determined in three groups of normal cats: random-source cats (n = 14), inbred normal relatives of the cats with CHS (n = 7), and inbred normal relatives of Hageman factor deficient cats (n = 9). No significant differences were found in the OMBT of the three groups of normal cats. The mean OMBT for all 30 normal cats was 1.9 minutes +/- 0.5 minutes s.d. Compared to the normal cats, those homozygous for CHS had significantly prolonged OMBT (14.1 +/- 3.3 minutes; p < 0.05). The mean OMBT of cats heterozygous for CHS (2.6 +/- 0.8 minutes) was also significantly longer than the OMBT of the combined normal group. The mean OMBT of the CHS heterozygotes, however, was not significantly longer than that of their normal relatives (OMBT = 1.8 +/- 0.5 minutes), probably because of the low number of cats in this subgroup of normals. As expected, the OMBT of cats homozygous for Hageman factor deficiency (2.3 +/- 0.3 minutes) were not significantly prolonged. PMID:15162339

  15. Colonization by Candida Species of the Oral and Vaginal Mucosa in HIV-Infected and Noninfected Women

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Haihong; Wang, Cuiwei; Hamilton, Pilar; Blackmon, Mandy; Chen, Hui; Calderone, Richard; Li, Dongmei

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Candidiasis in HIV/AIDS patients continues to be a public health problem. Effective antifungal therapies are few in number and have inherent problems such as selecting for drug-resistant strains of Candida species. To evaluate the state of Candida colonization of the oral and vaginal mucosa, we recruited 80 women, both HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected, from the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). Diet diaries were collected by participants to examine the role of diet on fungal growth. Baseline studies were initially done in participants that followed the colonization of both mucosal sites over 0–90 days. The most common Candida species from both groups of patients were C. albicans and C. glabrata. Among the HIV-infected cohort, the percentage of participants who were positive for Candida spp. was higher than in the HIV-uninfected control group. Furthermore, the frequency of colonization (1 episode versus >1 episode) was also increased in the HIV-infected cohort. These data indicate that Candida species remain an important component of the microbial community in both populations. PMID:23098053

  16. SU-D-16A-02: A Novel Methodology for Accurate, Semi-Automated Delineation of Oral Mucosa for Radiation Therapy Dose-Response Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, J; Welsh, L; Gulliford, S; Harrington, K; Nutting, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The significant morbidity caused by radiation-induced acute oral mucositis means that studies aiming to elucidate dose-response relationships in this tissue are a high priority. However, there is currently no standardized method for delineating the mucosal structures within the oral cavity. This report describes the development of a methodology to delineate the oral mucosa accurately on CT scans in a semi-automated manner. Methods: An oral mucosa atlas for automated segmentation was constructed using the RayStation Atlas-Based Segmentation (ABS) module. A radiation oncologist manually delineated the full surface of the oral mucosa on a planning CT scan of a patient receiving radiotherapy (RT) to the head and neck region. A 3mm fixed annulus was added to incorporate the mucosal wall thickness. This structure was saved as an atlas template. ABS followed by model-based segmentation was performed on four further patients sequentially, adding each patient to the atlas. Manual editing of the automatically segmented structure was performed. A dose comparison between these contours and previously used oral cavity volume contours was performed. Results: The new approach was successful in delineating the mucosa, as assessed by an experienced radiation oncologist, when applied to a new series of patients receiving head and neck RT. Reductions in the mean doses obtained when using the new delineation approach, compared with the previously used technique, were demonstrated for all patients (median: 36.0%, range: 25.6% – 39.6%) and were of a magnitude that might be expected to be clinically significant. Differences in the maximum dose that might reasonably be expected to be clinically significant were observed for two patients. Conclusion: The method developed provides a means of obtaining the dose distribution delivered to the oral mucosa more accurately than has previously been achieved. This will enable the acquisition of high quality dosimetric data for use in

  17. High expression levels of the "erythroid/brain" type glucose transporter (GLUT1) in the basal cells of human eye conjunctiva and oral mucosa reconstituted in culture.

    PubMed

    Gherzi, R; Melioli, G; De Luca, M; D'Agostino, A; Guastella, M; Traverso, C E; D'Anna, F; Franzi, A T; Cancedda, R

    1991-07-01

    The expression of the "erythroid/brain" type glucose transporter (GLUT1) seems to be a feature of "barrier" tissues, at least in humans. Recently, we reported that GLUT1 is highly expressed in the basal layers of either "authentic" human epidermis or human epidermis reconstituted in culture and that its expression seems to be related to keratinocyte differentiation. In this paper we demonstrate that GLUT1 is selectively expressed in the basal layers of either eye conjunctiva epithelia or oral mucosa, reconstituted in culture starting from 1-2 mm2 bioptic specimens of normal human tissue. GLUT1 mRNA and protein levels are very high in conjunctiva and oral mucosa, 2-3 times higher than in epidermis reconstituted in culture. Taking into account its localization at the border of tissues not directly vascularized, but metabolically active, GLUT1 could play an important role in controlling the entry of glucose into these firmly guarded tissues. PMID:2055270

  18. Element concentrations in the intestinal mucosa of the mouse as measured by X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    von Zglinicki, T; Roomans, G M

    1989-06-01

    Subcellular ion distribution in villus, crypt, Paneth and smooth muscle cells of the mouse small intestine under resting conditions was investigated by X-ray microanalysis of ultrathin cryosections. In addition, the mass distribution was estimated by measuring the optical transmission of the compartments in transmission electron micrographs. Each cell type is characterized by a special composition in terms of the major monovalent ions Na, K, and Cl. In particular, among crypt epithelial cells, those cells containing small secretion granula (termed crypt A cells) also display cytoplasmic ion concentrations significantly different from crypt epithelial cells lacking secretion granula (crypt B cells). Monovalent ion concentrations in the cytoplasm of Paneth cells, muscle cells, and crypt epithelial cells lacking secretion granula are higher than expected from osmotic considerations. Hence, significant binding of ions to cytoplasmic polyelectrolytes is assumed in these cells. There are gradients of dry mass and K concentration from the luminal to the basal side of the cell, both in crypt and in villus cells. The terminal web in these cells is rich in Na and Cl. The elemental composition of the large, dark secretion granula in Paneth cells is similar to that of the small dark granula in crypt cells. However, the two morphologically different types of granula within the Paneth cells have a significantly different elemental composition, which might reflect maturation of secretion granula. PMID:2814397

  19. CO2 laser biopsies of oral mucosa: an immunocytological and histological comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, Marina C.; Botticelli, Annibale R.; Zaffe, Davide; Martignone, Alessandra; Cisternino, Aurelia; Vezzoni, Franco; Scarpelli, Francesco

    2001-04-01

    The relationship between bioptic technique and tissue preservation has been studied in 18 oral biopsies of young patients obtained by electro surgery or CO2 laser surgery. Biopsies were formalin fixed, paraffin embedded and histologically, histochemically and immunocytochemically treated. All the biopsies show inflammatory cell infiltration, epithelial spongiosis, trichocariosis, supra basal small blisters, and epithelial clefts with lamina detaching from the corium. Histochemistry shows both the presence of edema and acid mucopolysaccharides inside the corium, and variable glycogen content in epithelial cells. Trichocariotic cells show a positive MiB1/Ki67 expression, when they are present. Nevertheless, laser biopsies show a lower amount of basophilic fibrous tissue and of bc12 bodies detection, connected with a higher amount of glycogen, Cytokeratin and MiB1/Ki67 expression in epithelial cells, compared to bovie biopsies. The result show a higher degree of damages in particular at the epithelial level, in electro surgery biopsies rather than laser biopsies. The best epithelial and corium preservation showed by laser biopsies suggest a chance of reversible condition, which can lead to a complete recovery due to its higher capability of restoring tissues.

  20. Dual-wavelength excitation to reduce background fluorescence for fluorescence spectroscopic quantitation of erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin-IX and protoporphyrin-IX from whole blood and oral mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Georg; Vogeser, Michael; Holdt, Lesca M.; Homann, Christian; Großmann, Michael; Stepp, Herbert; Gruber, Christian; Erdogan, Ilknur; Hasmüller, Stephan; Hasbargen, Uwe; Brittenham, Gary M.

    2014-02-01

    Erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin-IX (ZnPP) and protoporphyrin-IX (PPIX) accumulate in a variety of disorders that restrict or disrupt the biosynthesis of heme, including iron deficiency and various porphyrias. We describe a reagent-free spectroscopic method based on dual-wavelength excitation that can measure simultaneously both ZnPP and PPIX fluorescence from unwashed whole blood while virtually eliminating background fluorescence. We further aim to quantify ZnPP and PPIX non-invasively from the intact oral mucosa using dual-wavelength excitation to reduce the strong tissue background fluorescence while retaining the faint porphyrin fluorescence signal originating from erythrocytes. Fluorescence spectroscopic measurements were made on 35 diluted EDTA blood samples using a custom front-face fluorometer. The difference spectrum between fluorescence at 425 nm and 407 nm excitation effectively eliminated background autofluorescence while retaining the characteristic porphyrin peaks. These peaks were evaluated quantitatively and the results compared to a reference HPLC-kit method. A modified instrument using a single 1000 μm fiber for light delivery and detection was used to record fluorescence spectra from oral mucosa. For blood measurements, the ZnPP and PPIX fluorescence intensities from the difference spectra correlated well with the reference method (ZnPP: Spearman's rho rs = 0.943, p < 0.0001; PPIX: rs = 0.959, p < 0.0001). In difference spectra from oral mucosa, background fluorescence was reduced significantly, while porphyrin signals remained observable. The dual-wavelength excitation method evaluates quantitatively the ZnPP/heme and PPIX/heme ratios from unwashed whole blood, simplifying clinical laboratory measurements. The difference technique reduces the background fluorescence from measurements on oral mucosa, allowing for future non-invasive quantitation of erythrocyte ZnPP and PPIX.

  1. Cd34 and Mast Cell Analysis in Normal Oral Mucosa and Different Grades of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kathuriya, Pargatsingh T; Palaskar, Sangeeta J; Narang, Bindiya R; Patil, Swati S; Pawar, Rasika B

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) remains a serious health problem worldwide. Prognosis of OSCC is poor and long term survival rate still remains below 50%. Angiogenesis or neovascularisation plays an important role in tumour progression and metastasis. Mast cells have been implicated in promoting tumour angiogenesis, especially of digestive tract, little is known in OSCC. Aim & Objective To study the correlation between blood vessel density (BVD) and mast cell density (MCD) in different grades of OSCC. Materials and Methods Methods: Thirty eight paraffin blocks of different grades of OSCC were retrieved from the department and sections were stained with CD34 followed by counterstaining with toluidine blue. The slides were then analysed using Leica Software (Version 4.5). Results Mean BVD and MCD were found to be increased in OSCC as compared to normal mucosa. Increase in BVD with co-current increase in MCD was also observed in different grades of OSCC Conclusion From our study, it was concluded that, mast cells play a major role in promoting tumour angiogenesis. But, as the grade of the tumour increases, other angiogenic factors may play a more significant role than mast cells in tumour progression. PMID:26417554

  2. Carrier-free cultured autologous oral mucosa epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) for corneal epithelium reconstruction: a histological study.

    PubMed

    Bardag-Gorce, Fawzia; Oliva, Joan; Wood, Andrew; Hoft, Richard; Pan, Derek; Thropay, Jacquelyn; Makalinao, Andrew; French, Samuel W; Niihara, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the therapeutic effects of carrier-free cultured autologous oral mucosa epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) transplantation for experimentally induced severe rabbit limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). Buccal biopsies were performed and CAOMECS were cultured and transplanted onto diseased corneas. Six-month follow-up examinations indicated that three out of four corneas with CAOMECS grafts showed a decrease in superficial vascularization, while almost all the sham corneas did not show a similar decrease. H&E staining of corneas showed that CAOMECS transplantation reduced blood vessel invasion of central cornea, reduced lymphocyte infiltration and fibrotic tissue formation. DeltaNp63 stained markedly in the grafted cornea and to a lesser extent in the sham corneas. PCNA and Ki-67 staining were much greater in the sham corneas than in the grafted and normal corneas. K3 and K13 staining demonstrated that CAOMECS transplanted corneas had much more K3- and less K13- positive cells compared to the sham corneas. Muc5AC was decreased in the central region of grafted corneas. Very little alpha-smooth muscle actin (aSMA) staining was detected in grafted corneas, while there was a greater amount of aSMA staining in sham corneas. Staining for anti-angiogenic factor TIMP -3 was also increased, and pro-angiogenic factor MMP-3 was decreased in grafted corneas compared to sham corneas. Our results indicate that CAOMECS grafts resulted in improved epithelialization of the corneal surface and decreased vascularization and fibrosis of the diseased corneas. PMID:25881998

  3. Comparative evaluation of genotoxicity by micronucleus assay in the buccal mucosa over comet assay in peripheral blood in oral precancer and cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Katarkar, Atul; Mukherjee, Sanjit; Khan, Masood H; Ray, Jay G; Chaudhuri, Keya

    2014-09-01

    Early detection and quantification of DNA damage in oral premalignancy or malignancy may help in management of the disease and improve survival rates. The comet assay has been successfully utilised to detect DNA damage in oral premalignant or malignancy. However, due to the invasive nature of collecting blood, it may be painful for many unwilling patients. This study compares the micronucleus (MN) assay in oral buccal mucosa cells with the comet assay in peripheral blood cells in a subset of oral habit-induced precancer and cancer patients. For this, MN assay of exfoliated epithelial cells was compared with comet assay of peripheral blood leucocytes among 260 participants, including those with oral lichen planus (OLP; n = 52), leukoplakia (LPK; n = 51), oral submucous fibrosis (OSF; n = 51), oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC; n = 54) and normal volunteers (n = 52). Among the precancer groups, LPK patients showed significantly higher levels of DNA damage as reflected by both comet tail length (P < 0.0001) and micronuclei (MNi) frequency (P = 0.0009). The DNA damage pattern in precancer and cancer patients was OLP < OSF < LPK < OSCC, and with respective oral habits, it was multiple habits > cigarette + khaini > cigarette smokers > areca + khaini > areca. There was no significant difference in the comet length and MNi frequency between males and females who had oral chewing habits. An overall significant correlation was observed between MNi frequency and comet tail length with r = 0.844 and P < 0.0001. Thus, the extent of DNA damage evaluation by the comet assay in peripheral blood cells is perfectly reflected by the MN assay on oral exfoliated epithelial cells, and MNi frequency can be used with the same effectiveness and greater efficiency in early detection of oral premalignant conditions. PMID:25053835

  4. Anti-Siglec-F antibody inhibits oral egg allergen induced intestinal eosinophilic inflammation in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Song, Dae Jin; Cho, Jae Youn; Miller, Marina; Strangman, Wendy; Zhang, Mai; Varki, Ajit; Broide, David H

    2009-01-01

    Siglec-F is a sialic acid binding immunoglobulin-superfamily receptor that is highly expressed on eosinophils. We have used a mouse model of oral egg ovalbumin (OVA)-induced eosinophilic inflammation of the gastrointestinal mucosa associated with diarrhea and weight loss to determine whether administering an anti-Siglec-F antibody would reduce levels of intestinal mucosal eosinophilic inflammation. Mice administered the anti-Siglec-F antibody had significantly lower levels of intestinal eosinophilic inflammation, and this was associated with reduced intestinal permeability changes, normalization of intestinal villous crypt height, and restoration of weight gain. The reduced numbers of intestinal eosinophils in anti-Siglec-F antibody treated mice was associated with significantly reduced numbers of bone marrow and peripheral blood eosinophils, but was not associated with significant changes in the numbers of proliferating or apoptotic jejunal eosinophils. In addition, the anti-Siglec-F Ab reduced Th2 cytokines and IgE levels. Overall, these studies demonstrate that administration of an anti-Siglec-F antibody significantly reduces levels of eosinophilic inflammation in the intestinal mucosa and that this was associated with reduced intestinal permeability changes, normalization of intestinal villous crypt height, and restoration of weight gain. PMID:19135419

  5. Single-Dose Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Osama Muhammad; Syme, Alasdair; Eliopoulos, Nicoletta; Muanza, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The generation of a self-resolved radiation-induced oral mucositis (RIOM) mouse model using the highest possibly tolerable single ionizing radiation (RT) dose was needed in order to study RIOM management solutions. We used 10-week-old male BALB/c mice with average weight of 23 g for model production. Mice were treated with an orthovoltage X-ray irradiator to induce the RIOM ulceration at the intermolar eminence of the animal tongue. General anesthesia was injected intraperitoneally for proper animal immobilization during the procedure. Ten days after irradiation, a single RT dose of 10, 15, 18, 20, and 25 Gy generated a RIOM ulcer at the intermolar eminence (posterior upper tongue surface) with mean ulcer floor (posterior epithelium) heights of 190, 150, 25, 10, and 10 μm, respectively, compared to 200 μm in non-irradiated animals. The mean RIOM ulcer size % of the total epithelialized upper surface of the animal tongue was RT dose dependent. At day 10, the ulcer size % was 2, 5, 27, and 31% for 15, 18, 20, and 25 Gy RT, respectively. The mean relative surface area of the total epithelialized upper surface of the tongue was RT dose dependent, since it was significantly decreased to 97, 95, 88, and 38% with 15, 18, 20, and 25 Gy doses, respectively, at day 10 after RT. Subcutaneous injection of 1 mL of 0.9% saline/6 h for 24 h yielded a 100% survival only with 18 Gy self-resolved RIOM, which had 5.6 ± 0.3 days ulcer duration. In conclusion, we have generated a 100% survival self-resolved single-dose RIOM male mouse model with long enough duration for application in RIOM management research. Oral mucositis ulceration was radiation dose dependent. Sufficient hydration of animals after radiation exposure significantly improved their survival. PMID:27446800

  6. Validation of a method to quantify titanium, vanadium and zirconium in oral mucosa cells by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Martín-Cameán, Ana; Jos, Angeles; Calleja, Ana; Gil, Fernando; Iglesias, Alejandro; Solano, Enrique; Cameán, Ana M

    2014-01-01

    The release of metal ions from fixed orthodontic appliances is a source of major concern. Various studies have evaluated the discharge of metals from these appliances in biological fluids, such as saliva or blood, overlooking the cells with prolonged contact with fixed appliances. The aim of this work is to develop and optimize an analytical procedure to determine Ti, V and Zr in oral mucosa cells in patients with and without orthodontic appliances by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The analytical procedure is based on an extraction and digestion of the samples and quantification of the elements. A suitable and practical procedure for assessing the trueness and precision of the proposed method has been applied by using validation standards. The method has been suitably validated: the regression equation was calculated from standards prepared in the same matrix without oral mucosa cells and the linear range was 0.5-50.0 ng/mL for Zr and 5.0-50.0 ng/mL for Ti and V. Limits of detection were 0.9, 2.8 and 0.4 ng/mL and limits of quantification 1.8, 3.4 and 0.7 ng/mL for Ti, V and Zr, respectively. The recovery percentages (%) obtained oscillated between 101 and 108 for Ti, 98 and 111 for V, and 92 and 104 for Zr. Intermediate precision (RSD%) data obtained were also adequate. The present method showed to be robust for the three factors considered: heating time, volume of the deionized water, and volume of PlasmaPure 65% HNO₃ used to dilute the samples, which permits its validation and application to oral mucosa cells from orthodontic patients. PMID:24274294

  7. Verrucous carcinoma of the oral mucosa: An epidemiological and follow-up study of patients treated with surgery in 5 last years

    PubMed Central

    Dean-Ferrer, Alicia; Alamillos-Granados, Francisco J.; Heredero-Jung, Susana; García-García, Blas; Ruiz-Masera, Juan J.; Arévalo-Arévalo, Rafael; Zafra-Camacho, Francisco; Valenzuela-Salas, Borja

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Oral Verrucous Carcinoma (OVC) is described apart of the Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) due to its specific properties. The objective of our study is to show our series of cases of OVC and to compare with the SCC in terms of clinical manifestations, epidemiology, histopathology, treatment and follow-up. Material and Methods: This is a retrospective study of all the OVC treated in our department between January-2007 and December-2011. The analyzed variables were sex, age, localization in the oral cavity, histopathology, number of biopsies needed to diagnose OVC, TNM classification, treatment and recurrences during follow-up. Results: Our sample was composed by n=14 patients, 57% female, with a mean age of 69.14 years. The most common localization was buccal mucosa (n=5). Seven patients were diagnosed of OVC with the first biopsy. TNM classification was: pT1: 7 patients, pT2: 3 patients, pT3: 3 patients, pT4: 1 patient. No cervical metastases were observed either in cervical neck dissection or during the follow-up of the patients. The treatment was surgery with clinical resection margins up to 1 cm in all cases, followed by radiotherapy in selected cases. Only n=1 patient (7.69%) presented a recurrence after 34 months of follow-up. The overall survival rate was 92.85%. Conclusions: In our population, OVC represents the 6.16% of all oral cavity and oropharynx cancer, and is more frequent in female patients above 70 years old. It uses to rise over a previous lesion, and usually affects the buccal mucosa. In patients with high suspicious lesions, more than one biopsy may be needed to diagnose OVC. No patient showed cervical dissemination. In our experience, treatment based on local resection, without cervical neck dissection, could be a good option for these patients. Key words:Verrucous carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, oral cancer, oral cavity, epidemiology, follow-up. PMID:24880446

  8. Induction of Sd(a)-sialomucin and sulfated H-sulfomucin in mouse small intestinal mucosa by infection with parasitic helminth.

    PubMed

    Tsubokawa, Daigo; Ishiwata, Kenji; Goso, Yukinobu; Yokoyama, Takuya; Kanuka, Hirotaka; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Takeshi; Tsuji, Naotoshi

    2015-06-01

    Mucin is a major component of mucus on gastrointestinal mucosa. Mucin alteration in the host is considered to be the principal event for expulsion of intestinal helminths. However, it is unclear what mucin alterations are induced by various helminth infections. In this study, the alterations of mouse small intestinal mucin after infection with two nematodes, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and Heligmosomoides polygyrus, which parasitize the jejunal epithelium, and a cestode, Vampirolepis nana, which parasitizes the ileal epithelium, were examined biochemically and histologically using two anti-mucin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), HCM31 and PGM34, which recognize Sd(a) antigen, NeuAcα2-3(GalNAcβ1-4)Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ-, and sulphated H type 2 antigen, Fucα1-2Galβ1-4GlcNAc(6SO₃H)β-, respectively. The goblet cell mucins that reacted with HCM31 increased conspicuously on the jejunal mucosa concurrently with expulsion of N. brasiliensis. Increased levels of HCM31-reactive mucins were observed in the jejunal mucosa after H. polygyrus infection, despite the ongoing parasitism. Goblet cell mucins that reacted with PGM34 increased on the ileal mucosa during V. nana parasitism. Small intestinal goblet cells reacting with the two mAbs were not observed in non-infected mice, although sialomucins and sulfomucins were abundantly present. Additionally, the number of ileal goblet cells that reacted with the two mAbs was increased at the time of expulsion of heterophyid trematode. These results indicate that the type of specific acidic mucins expressed after infection varies among species of intestinal helminth, and, furthermore, that the relationship with worm expulsion is also different. PMID:25819298

  9. Increased levels of the acetaldehyde-derived DNA adduct N 2-ethyldeoxyguanosine in oral mucosa DNA from Rhesus monkeys exposed to alcohol.

    PubMed

    Balbo, Silvia; Juanes, Rita Cervera; Khariwala, Samir; Baker, Erich J; Daunais, James B; Grant, Kathleen A

    2016-09-01

    Alcohol is a human carcinogen. A causal link has been established between alcohol drinking and cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract, colon, liver and breast. Despite this established association, the underlying mechanisms of alcohol-induced carcinogenesis remain unclear. Various mechanisms may come into play depending on the type of cancer; however, convincing evidence supports the concept that ethanol's major metabolite acetaldehyde may play a major role. Acetaldehyde can react with DNA forming adducts which can serve as biomarkers of carcinogen exposure and potentially of cancer risk. The major DNA adduct formed from this reaction is N (2)-ethylidenedeoxyguanosine, which can be quantified as its reduced form N (2)-ethyl-dG by LC-ESI-MS/MS. To investigate the potential use of N (2)-ethyl-dG as a biomarker of alcohol-induced DNA damage, we quantified this adduct in DNA from the oral, oesophageal and mammary gland tissues from rhesus monkeys exposed to alcohol drinking over their lifetimes and compared it to controls. N (2)-Ethyl-dG levels were significantly higher in the oral mucosa DNA of the exposed animals. Levels of the DNA adduct measured in the oesophageal mucosa of exposed animals were not significantly different from controls. A correlation between the levels measured in the oral and oesophageal DNA, however, was observed, suggesting a common source of formation of the DNA adducts. N (2) -Ethyl-dG was measured in mammary gland DNA from a small cohort of female animals, but no difference was observed between exposed animals and controls. These results support the hypothesis that acetaldehyde induces DNA damage in the oral mucosa of alcohol-exposed animals and that it may play role in the alcohol-induced carcinogenic process. The decrease of N (2)-ethyl-dG levels in exposed tissues further removed from the mouth also suggests a role of alcohol metabolism in the oral cavity, which may be considered separately from ethanol liver metabolism in the

  10. Evaluation of Various Nuclear Cytological Changes in Normal Buccal Mucosa and Peritumoural Area in Patients with Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Receiving Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Minhas, Sadia; Kashif, Muhammad; Nagi, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the role of serial cytological assay in calculating the nuclear response of contralateral normal buccal mucosa and peritumoural area of squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity in patients receiving fractionated radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy. Materials and Methods. This prospective, nonrandomized study was comprised of 76 histologically confirmed cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma on cyclical chemoradiation treatment. Chemoradiosensitivity was evaluated using serial scrape smears taken before and after immediate exposure to CCRT, at 17th day of CCRT (mid of treatment), and at the end of treatment. The nuclear changes, such as multinucleation, micronucleation, karyorrhexis, karyolysis, nuclear budding, prominent nucleoli, and binucleation occurring in both irradiated cancer cells and contralateral normal buccal mucosa, had a statistically significant dose related increase with concomitant chemoradiotherapy (p < 0.05). Conclusion. We recommend regular use of serial cytological assay during CCRT as it may prove to be a valuable tool for assessment of chemoradiosensitivity and persistence of tumour/dysplastic cells after radiotherapy. PMID:27148467

  11. In-Vivo Nonlinear Optical Microscopy (NLOM) of Epithelial-Connective Tissue Interface (ECTI) Reveals Quantitative Measures of Neoplasia in Hamster Oral Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Rahul; Yang, Jinping; Ortiz, Daniel; Qiu, Suimin; Resto, Vicente; McCammon, Susan; Vargas, Gracie

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial-connective tissue interface (ECTI) plays an integral role in epithelial neoplasia, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). This interface undergoes significant alterations due to hyperproliferating epithelium that supports the transformation of normal epithelium to precancers and cancer. We present a method based on nonlinear optical microscopy to directly assess the ECTI and quantify dysplastic alterations using a hamster model for oral carcinogenesis. Neoplastic and non-neoplastic normal mucosa were imaged in-vivo by both multiphoton autofluorescence microscopy (MPAM) and second harmonic generation microscopy (SHGM) to obtain cross-sectional reconstructions of the oral epithelium and lamina propria. Imaged sites were biopsied and processed for histopathological grading and measurement of ECTI parameters. An ECTI shape parameter was calculated based on deviation from the linear geometry (ΔLinearity) seen in normal mucosa was measured using MPAM-SHGM and histology. The ECTI was readily visible in MPAM-SHGM and quantitative shape analysis showed ECTI deformation in dysplasia but not in normal mucosa. ΔLinearity was significantly (p < 0.01) higher in dysplasia (0.41±0.24) than normal (0.11±0.04) as measured in MPAM-SHGM and results were confirmed in histology which showed similar trends in ΔLinearity. Increase in ΔLinearity was also statistically significant for different grades of dysplasia. In-vivo ΔLinearity measurement alone from microscopy discriminated dysplasia from normal tissue with 87.9% sensitivity and 97.6% specificity, while calculations from histology provided 96.4% sensitivity and 85.7% specificity. Among other quantifiable architectural changes, a progressive statistically significant increase in epithelial thickness was seen with increasing grade of dysplasia. MPAM-SHGM provides new noninvasive ways for direct characterization of ECTI which may be used in preclinical studies to investigate the role of this interface in

  12. Candida albicans and Streptococcus salivarius modulate IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-alpha expression and secretion by engineered human oral mucosa cells.

    PubMed

    Mostefaoui, Yakout; Bart, Christian; Frenette, Michel; Rouabhia, Mahmoud

    2004-11-01

    We investigated the involvement of oral epithelial cells via two cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-alpha) and one chemokine (IL-8) in local defences against live yeast (Candida albicans) and bacteria (Streptococcus salivarius) using an engineered human oral mucosa model. We report that the yeast changed from the blastospore to the hyphal form and induced significant tissue disorganization at later contact periods (24 and 48 h) compared to the bacteria. However, this effect did not reduce the viability or total number of epithelial cells. Gene activation analyses revealed that IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-alpha mRNA levels rose in tissues in contact with live C. albicans or S. salivarius. Gene activation was followed by an upregulation of protein secretion. IL-6 levels were higher after contact with C. albicans than with S. salivarius. IL-8 levels after contact with S. salivarius were higher than with C. albicans. Our study suggests that S. salivarius is more efficient at inducing proinflammatory mediator release than C. albicans. These results provide additional evidence for the contribution of oral epithelial cells to the inflammatory response against fungi and bacteria. PMID:15469436

  13. Effect of orally administered betel leaf (Piper betle Linn.) on digestive enzymes of pancreas and intestinal mucosa and on bile production in rats.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, M S; Platel, K; Saraswathi, G; Srinivasan, K

    1995-10-01

    The influence of two varieties of betel leaf (Piper betle Linn.) namely, the pungent Mysore and non-pungent Ambadi, was examined on digestive enzymes of pancreas and intestinal mucosa and on bile secretion in experimental rats. The betel leaves were administered orally at two doses which were either comparable to human consumption level or 5 times this. The results indicated that while these betel leaves do not influence bile secretion and composition, they have a significant stimulatory influence on pancreatic lipase activity. Besides, the Ambadi variety of betel leaf has a positive stimulatory influence on intestinal digestive enzymes, especially lipase, amylase and disaccharidases. A slight lowering in the activity of these intestinal enzymes was seen when Mysore variety of betel leaf was administered, and this variety also had a negative effect on pancreatic amylase. Further, both the betel leaf varieties have shown decreasing influence on pancreatic trypsin and chymotrypsin activities. PMID:8575807

  14. Nickel-Related Intestinal Mucositis in IBS-Like Patients: Laser Doppler Perfusion Imaging and Oral Mucosa Patch Test in Use.

    PubMed

    Borghini, Raffaele; Puzzono, Marta; Rosato, Edoardo; Di Tola, Marco; Marino, Mariacatia; Greco, Francesca; Picarelli, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Nickel (Ni) is often the trigger of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-like gastrointestinal disorders: its ingestion may cause allergic contact mucositis, identifiable by means of oral mucosa patch test (omPT). OmPT effectiveness has been proven, but it is still an operator-dependent method. Laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) was tested to support omPT in Ni allergic contact mucositis diagnosis. Group A: 22 patients with intestinal/systemic symptoms related to the ingestion of Ni-containing foods. Group B: 12 asymptomatic volunteers. Ni-related symptoms and their severity were tested by a questionnaire. All patients underwent Ni omPT with clinical evaluation at baseline (T0), after 30 min (T1), after 2 h (T2), and after 24-48 h (T3). LDPI was performed to evaluate the mean mucosal perfusion at T0, T1, and T2. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA test and Bonferroni multiple-comparison test. All 22 Ni-sensitive patients (group A) presented oral mucosa hyperemia and/or edema at T2. Eight out of the same 22 patients presented a local delayed vesicular reaction at T3 (group A1), unlike the remaining 14 out of 22 patients (group A2). All 12 patients belonging to control group B did not show any alteration. The mean mucosal perfusion calculated with LDPI showed an increase in both subgroups A1 and A2. In group B, no significant perfusion variations were observed. LDPI may support omPT for diagnostic purposes in Ni allergic contact mucositis. This also applies to symptomatic Ni-sensitive patients without aphthous stomatitis after 24-48 h from omPT and that could risk to miss the diagnosis. PMID:26899317

  15. TISSUE DISPOSITION OF DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID IN THE MOUSE AFTER ACUTE ORAL ADMINISTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    TISSUE DISPOSITION OF DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID IN THE MOUSE
    AFTER ACUTE ORAL ADMINISTRATION

    Michael F. Hughes, Ph.D., Brenda C. Edwards, Carol T. Mitchell and Elaina M. Kenyon, Ph.D. United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Nation...

  16. [Results of treatment of oral cavity mucosa cancer according to the data of the regional oncological clinic].

    PubMed

    Get'man, E E

    1998-01-01

    The results of treatment of 139 patients with mucosal cancer of oral cavity are summarized. The most effective method of treatment is combined one, including the operative intervention conduction. In 18 patients intraoperative cryoimpact on tumor was conducted, permitting to reduce the recidives frequency and to increase their life span. PMID:9866321

  17. Decision-making on detection and triage of oral mucosa lesions in community dental practices: Screening decisions and referral

    PubMed Central

    Laronde, Denise M.; Williams, P. Michele; Hislop, T. Greg; Poh, Catherine; Ng, Samson; Zhang, Lewei; Rosin, Miriam P.

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancer is a substantial, often unrecognized issue globally, with close to 300,000 new cases reported annually. It is a management conundrum: a cancer site that is easily examined; yet more than 40% of oral cancers are diagnosed at a late stage when prognosis is poor and treatment can be devastating. Opportunistic screening within the dental office could lead to earlier diagnosis and intervention with improved survival. Objectives To describe how clinicians make decisions about referral based on the risk classification of the lesion. Methods 18 dentists from 15 dental offices participated in a 1-day workshop on oral cancer screening. Participants then screened patients (medical history, conventional oral exam, fluorescent visualization exam) in-office for 11 months, triaging patients by apparent clinical risk: low-risk (common benign conditions, geographic tongue, candidiasis, trauma), intermediate-risk (lichenoid lesions) and high-risk (white or red lesions or ulcers without apparent cause). Clinicians made the decision on which lesions to reassess in 3 weeks based on risk assessment and clinical judgment. Lesions of concern were seen by a community facilitator or referred to an oral medicine specialist. Results 2542 patients were screened and 389 lesions were identified (15% of patients). 350 were determined to be low-risk (90%), 19 IR (5%) and 20 HR (5%). One hundred and sixty-six (43%) patients were recalled for 3-week reassessment: 90% of HR lesions, 63% of IR lesions (63%) and 39% of low-risk lesions. Compliance to recall was high (92% of cases). Reassessment eliminated the referral of 99/166 (60%) of lesions that had resolved. 6 lesions were biopsied with 3 low-grade dysplasias identified. Conclusions Three key decision points were tested: risk assessment, need for reassessment and need for referral. A 3-week reassessment appointment was invaluable to prevent the unnecessary referral due to confounders. There is a need for a well-defined triage pathway

  18. Genotoxic Evaluation of Mexican Welders Occupationally Exposed to Welding-Fumes Using the Micronucleus Test on Exfoliated Oral Mucosa Cells: A Cross-Sectional, Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Jara-Ettinger, Ana Cecilia; López-Tavera, Juan Carlos; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe; Torres-Bugarín, Olivia

    2015-01-01

    Background An estimated 800,000 people worldwide are occupationally exposed to welding-fumes. Previous studies show that the exposure to such fumes is associated with damage to genetic material and increased cancer risk. In this study, we evaluate the genotoxic effect of welding-fumes using the Micronucleus Test on oral mucosa cells of Mexican welders. Material and Methods We conducted a cross-sectional, matched case-control study of n = 66 (33 exposed welders, and 33 healthy controls). Buccal mucosa smears were collected and stained with acridine orange, observed under 100x optical amplification with a fluorescence lamp, and a single-blinded observer counted the number of micronuclei and other nuclear abnormalities per 2,000 observed cells. We compared the frequencies of micronuclei and other nuclear abnormalities, and fitted generalised linear models to investigate the interactions between nuclear abnormalities and the exposure to welding-fumes, while controlling for smoking and age. Results Binucleated cells and condensed-chromatin cells showed statistically significant differences between cases and controls. The frequency of micronuclei and the rest of nuclear abnormalities (lobed-nuclei, pyknosis, karyolysis, and karyorrhexis) did not differ significantly between the groups. After adjusting for smoking, the regression results showed that the occurrence of binucleated cells could be predicted by the exposure to welding-fumes plus the presence of tobacco consumption; for the condensed-chromatin cells, our model showed that the exposure to welding-fumes is the only reliable predictor. Conclusions Our findings suggest that Mexican welders who are occupationally exposed to welding-fumes have increased counts of binucleated and condensed-chromatin cells. Nevertheless, the frequencies of micronuclei and the rest of nuclear abnormalities did not differ between cases and controls. Further studies should shed more light on this subject. PMID:26244938

  19. Assessment of the mutagenic potential of Cr(VI) in the oral mucosa of Big Blue® transgenic F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Chad M; Young, Robert R; Suh, Mina; Dinesdurage, Harshini R; Elbekai, Reem H; Harris, Mark A; Rohr, Annette C; Proctor, Deborah M

    2015-08-01

    Exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in drinking water was associated with an increased incidence of oral tumors in F344 rats in a 2-year cancer bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. These tumors primarily occurred at 180 ppm Cr(VI) and appeared to originate from the gingival mucosa surrounding the upper molar teeth. To investigate whether these tumors could have resulted from a mutagenic mode of action (MOA), a transgenic mutation assay based on OECD Test Guideline 488 was conducted in Big Blue(®) TgF344 rats. The mutagenic oral carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO) served as a positive control. Mutant frequency was measured in the inner gingiva with adjacent palate, and outer gingiva with adjacent buccal tissue. Exposure to 10 ppm 4-NQO in drinking water for 28 days increased mutant frequency in the cII transgene significantly, from 39.1 ± 7.5 × 10(-6) to 688 ± 250 × 10(-6) in the gingival/buccal region, and from 49.8 ± 17.8 × 10(-6) to 1818 ± 362 × 10(-6) in the gingival/palate region. Exposure to 180 ppm Cr(VI) in drinking water for 28 days did not significantly increase the mutant frequency in the gingival/buccal (44.4 ± 25.4 × 10(-6)) or the gingival/palate (57.8 ± 9.1 × 10(-6)) regions relative to controls. These data indicate that high (∼180,000 times expected human exposure), tumorigenic concentrations of Cr(VI) did not significantly increase mutations in the gingival epithelium, and suggest that Cr(VI) does not act by a mutagenic MOA in the rat oral cavity. PMID:26010270

  20. Noninvasive assessment of the risk of tobacco abuse in oral mucosa using fluorescence spectroscopy: a clinical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazeer, Shaiju S.; Asish, Rajashekharan; Venugopal, Chandrashekharan; Anita, Balan; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Jayasree, Ramapurath S.

    2014-05-01

    Tobacco abuse and alcoholism cause cancer, emphysema, and heart disease, which contribute to high death rates, globally. Society pays a significant cost for these habits whose first demonstration in many cases is in the oral cavity. Oral cavity disorders are highly curable if a screening procedure is available to diagnose them in the earliest stages. The aim of the study is to identify the severity of tobacco abuse, in oral cavity, as reflected by the emission from endogenous fluorophores and the chromophore hemoglobin. A group who had no tobacco habits and another with a history of tobacco abuse were included in this study. To compare the results with a pathological condition, a group of leukoplakia patients were also included. Emission from porphyrin and the spectral filtering modulation effect of hemoglobin were collected from different sites. Multivariate analysis strengthened the spectral features with a sensitivity of 60% to 100% and a specificity of 76% to 100% for the discrimination. Total hemoglobin and porphyrin levels of habitués and leukoplakia groups were comparable, indicating the alarming situation about the risk of tobacco abuse. Results prove that fluorescence spectroscopy along with multivariate analysis is an effective noninvasive tool for the early diagnosis of pathological changes due to tobacco abuse.

  1. Prevalence of human papillomaviruses in the healthy oral mucosa of women with high-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesion and of their partners as compared to healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Tatár, Tímea Zsófia; Kis, Andrea; Szabó, Éva; Czompa, Levente; Boda, Róbert; Tar, Ildikó; Szarka, Krisztina

    2015-10-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) carriage rates were investigated in relation to genital HPV carriage in women with HPV-associated cervical lesions and male partner of such women, including several couples, in comparison with healthy individuals. Buccal and lingual mucosa of 60 males and 149 females with healthy oral mucosa and without known genital lesion, genital and oral mucosa of further 40 females with cervical high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) and 34 male sexual partners of women with HSIL (including 20 couples) were sampled. HPV DNA was detected using MY/GP PCR. Genotype was determined by sequencing or restriction fragment length polymorphism. Virus copy numbers were determined by real-time PCR. Overall, oral HPV carriage rate was 5.7% (12/209) in healthy individuals; average copy number was 5.8 × 10(2) copies/1 μg DNA; male and female rates were comparable. Oral carriage in women with HSIL was significantly higher, 20.0% (8/40, P = 0.003); males with partners with HSIL showed a carriage rate of 17.6% (6/34), copy numbers were similar to the healthy controls. In contrast, genital carriage rate (52.9%, 18/34 vs. 82.5%, 33/40; P = 0.006) and average copy number were lower in males (5.0 × 10(5) vs. 7.8 × 10(5) copies/1 μg DNA; P = 0.01). Oral copy numbers in these groups and in healthy individuals were comparable. High-risk genotypes were dominant; couples usually had the same genotype in the genital sample. In conclusion, genital HPV carriage is a risk factor of oral carriage for the individual or for the sexual partner, but alone is not sufficient to produce an oral HPV infection in most cases. PMID:25495524

  2. BMP4 and FGF strongly induce differentiation of mouse ES cells into oral ectoderm.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Hiroshi; Suga, Hidetaka; Yamada, Tomiko; Sakakibara, Mayu; Kasai, Takatoshi; Ozone, Chikafumi; Ogawa, Koichiro; Goto, Motomitsu; Banno, Ryoichi; Tsunekawa, Shin; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Arima, Hiroshi; Oiso, Yutaka

    2015-09-01

    During embryonic development, oral ectoderm differentiates into the adenohypophysis, dental epithelia, salivary glands, and nasal pit. Few reports exist concerning the induction of oral ectoderm from embryonic stem (ES) cells. Generally, any lot differences in fetal bovine serum (FBS) and serum replacer may affect the induction of ES cell-differentiation. Using a previously established culture strategy for differentiation, the proportion of cell aggregates containing Pitx1+ oral ectoderm varied widely between 9-36% when several different lots of FBS or serum replacer were used. We therefore tried to enhance the differentiation method. We found that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 4 and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) treatments improved oral ectoderm induction. Such treatment also improved the differentiation of oral ectoderm into the adenohypophysis. Furthermore, increased BMP4 treatment induced dental epithelium and mesenchyme. Such differentiation suggests that the Pitx1+ layer displays similar properties to oral ectoderm, as found in vivo. Differentiation of ES cells into oral ectoderm using different lots of FBS and serum replacer increased 78-90% after treatment with BMP4 and FGF. In summary, we have established a robust strategy for the induction of oral ectoderm differentiation from mouse ES cells. PMID:26209816

  3. Laser irradiation of bone. I. An in vitro study concerning the effects of the CO2 laser on oral mucosa and subjacent bone.

    PubMed

    Krause, L S; Cobb, C M; Rapley, J W; Killoy, W J; Spencer, P

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to evaluate the histologic effects of CO2 laser irradiation on biopsies of porcine oral mucosa and underlying bone under conditions that simulate the applications of the laser during gingival surgery; and second, to evaluate the histologic effects on cortical bone following irradiation with increasing energy densities. Specimens consisting of mucosa and underlying bone were subjected to multiple passes of the laser beam in the same line of incision at energy densities ranging from 240 to 1,032 J/cm2. A second group of specimens consisting only of cortical bone was irradiated by a single pass of the laser at energy densities ranging from 40 to 2,062 J/cm2. In both groups the mean depth of ablation, width of surface damage, and widths of the zones of thermal necrosis and thermal damage were determined. Results showed a direct correlation between increasing energy density and/or number of energy beam passes and increasing depths of ablation and widths of surface damage. Further, more than three passes at 1,032 J/cm2 penetrated the mucosal layer to involve underlying bone. The mean depth of ablation for bone specimens following a single pass of the energy beam ranged from 0.02 mm at 160 J/cm2 to a maximum of 0.75 mm at 2,062 J/cm2. Using those energy densities most common to oral soft tissue surgery, the mean depth of ablation in bone specimens ranged from 0.17 mm at 240 J/cm2 to 0.28 mm at 640 J/cm2 to 0.35 mm at 1,032 J/cm2. All specimens regardless of tissue composition, energy density, or number of energy beam passes exhibited a distinct layer of residual carbonized tissue, a zone of thermal necrosis characterized by tissue coagulation, and a zone of tissue exhibiting thermal damage. PMID:9379332

  4. Naegleria fowleri glycoconjugates with residues of α-D-mannose are involved in adherence of trophozoites to mouse nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Yepez, Maricela; Campos-Rodriguez, Rafael; Godinez-Victoria, Marycarmen; Rodriguez-Monroy, Marco Aurelio; Jarillo-Luna, Adriana; Bonilla-Lemus, Patricia; De Oca, Arturo Contis-Montes; Rojas-Hernandez, Saul

    2013-10-01

    We analyzed the possible role of glycoconjugates containing α-D-mannose and α-D-glucose residues in adherence of trophozoites to mouse nasal epithelium. Trophozoites incubated with 20 μg of one of three different lectins which preferentially recognized these residues were inoculated intranasally in Balb/c mice. Mouse survival was 40% with Pisum sativum and Canavalia ensiformis and 20% with Galanthus nivalis amebic pretreatment, compared with 0% survival for control animals administered trophozoites without pretreatment. Possibly some of the glycoproteins found in Naegleria fowleri represent an adherence factor. Differences in the saccharide sequences of the Naegleria species, even on the same glycoconjugate structure, could explain the different results corresponding to the distinct pretreatments (C. ensiformis, G. nivalis, and P. sativum). We found a higher expression of glycoconjugates recognized by P. sativum in Naegleria lovaniensis than N. fowleri, probably due to the higher number of oligosaccharides containing an α-1,6-linked fucose moiety expressed on the former species. PMID:23922203

  5. Influence of regular black tea consumption on tobacco associated DNA damage and HPV prevalence in human oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Pal, Debolina; Banerjee, Sarmistha; Indra, Dipanjana; Mandal, Shyamsundar; Dum, Anirudha; Bhowmik, Anup; Panda, Chinmay Kr; Das, Sukta

    2007-01-01

    Black tea is more widely consumed than green tea worldwide, particularly in India. Therefore, it is necessary to focus attention on black tea with respect to its health promoting and anti-cancer actions. In order to establish the concept that black tea is a potential candidate for cancer prevention, it is important to provide epidemiological evidence derived from investigations of human populations. In view of this, the objective of the present study was to determine the correlation between nature of black tea consumption and DNA damage in normal subjects with or without tobacco habit and oral cancer patients, taking the latter as positive controls. Much experimental evidence points to associations between tobacco habit and HPV 16 and HPV 18 (Human Papilloma virus) infection. But no studies have taken into account the possible confounding effect of black tea consumption on DNA damage along with HPV infection. A pilot study was therefore undertaken. Comet assay was used to evaluate the DNA damage among normal subjects including tobacco users (n = 86), non-tobacco users (n = 45) and Oral cancer patients (n = 37). Percentage of damaged cells was scored in the buccal squamous cells of all subjects mentioned above. HPV analysis was performed on 79 samples (including 37 oral cancer patients). The evaluation of various confounding factors like age, tenure of tobacco habit and tea habit showed significant associations with DNA damage. The observations strongly indicate that regular intake of black tea at least above four cups can reduce tobacco associated DNA damage among normal tobacco users. HPV prevalence was not seen to be associated with age, tenure of tobacco habit or the tea drinking habit. PMID:17696743

  6. A novel protocol allowing oral delivery of a protein complement inhibitor that subsequently targets to inflamed colon mucosa and ameliorates murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Elvington, M; Blichmann, P; Qiao, F; Scheiber, M; Wadsworth, C; Luzinov, I; Lucero, J; Vertegel, A; Tomlinson, S

    2014-01-01

    While there is evidence of a pathogenic role for complement in inflammatory bowel disease, there is also evidence for a protective role that relates to host defence and protection from endotoxaemia. There is thus concern regarding the use of systemic complement inhibition as a therapeutic strategy. Local delivery of a complement inhibitor to the colon by oral administration would ameliorate such concerns, but while formulations exist for oral delivery of low molecular weight drugs to the colon, they have not been used successfully for oral delivery of proteins. We describe a novel pellet formulation consisting of cross-linked dextran coated with an acrylic co-polymer that protects the complement inhibitor CR2-Crry from destruction in the gastrointestinal tract. CR2-Crry containing pellets administered by gavage, were characterized using a therapeutic protocol in a mouse model of dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Oral treatment of established colitis over a 5-day period significantly reduced mucosal inflammation and injury, with similar therapeutic benefit whether or not the proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, was co-administered. Reduction in injury was associated with the targeting of CR2-Crry to the mucosal surface and reduced local complement activation. Treatment had no effect on systemic complement activity. This novel method for oral delivery of a targeted protein complement inhibitor will reduce systemic effects, thereby decreasing the risk of opportunistic infection, as well as lowering the required dose and treatment cost and improving patient compliance. Furthermore, the novel delivery system described here may provide similar benefits for administration of other protein-based drugs, such as anti-tumour necrosis factor-α antibodies. PMID:24730624

  7. Impact of Eating Probiotic Yogurt on Colonization by Candida Species of the Oral and Vaginal Mucosa in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Women

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Haihong; Wang, Cuiwei; Hamilton, Pilar R.; Blackmon, Mandy L.; Chen, Hui; Calderone, Richard A.; Li, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    Background Candidiasis in HIV/AIDS patients continues to be a public health problem. Antifungal therapies are not always effective and may result in complications, such as the development of drug-resistant strains of Candida species. Objectives This study evaluated the impact of probiotic consumption on Candida colonization of the oral and vaginal mucosa. Patients/Methods A pilot study was conducted in 24 women (17 HIV-infected, 7 HIV-uninfected) from the Women's Interagency HIV Study. The women underwent a 60-day initiation period with no probiotic consumption, followed by two 15-day consumption periods, with a different probiotic yogurt (DanActive™ or YoPlus™ yogurt) during each interval. There was a 30-day washout period between the two yogurt consumption periods. Oral and vaginal culture swabs were collected on days 0, 60, 74, and 120. Candida was detected by inoculating each swab in both Sabouraud's dextrose agar with or without chloramphenicol and CHROMagar. Results Less fungal colonization among women was observed when the women consumed probiotic yogurts (54 % of the women had vaginal fungal colonization during the non-probiotic yogurt consumption period, 29 % during the DanActive™ period, and 38 % during YoPlus™ yogurt consumption period), and HIV-infected women had significantly lower vaginal fungal colonization after they consumed DanActive™ yogurt compared to the nonintervention periods (54 vs 29 %, p = 0.03). Conclusions These data are promising, but as expected in a small pilot study, there were some significant changes but also some areas where colonization was not changed. This type of conflicting data is supportive of the need for a larger trial to further elucidate the role of probiotic yogurts in fungal growth in HIV-infected women. PMID:23925786

  8. Characterisation and cytotoxic screening of metal oxide nanoparticles putative of interest to oral healthcare formulations in non-keratinised human oral mucosa cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Best, M; Phillips, G; Fowler, C; Rowland, J; Elsom, J

    2015-12-25

    Nanoparticles are increasingly being utilised in the innovation of consumer product formulations to improve their characteristics; however, established links between their properties, dose and cytotoxicity are not well defined. The purpose of this study was to screen four different nanomaterials of interest to oral care product development in the absence of stabilisers, alongside their respective bulk equivalents, within a non-keratinised oral epithelial cell model (H376). Particle morphology and size were characterised using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The H376 model showed that zinc oxide (ZnO) was the most cytotoxic material at concentrations exceeding 0.031% w/v, as assessed using the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and dimethylthiazolyl-diphenyl-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT) assays. ZnO cytotoxicity does not appear to be dependent upon size of the particle; a result supported by SEM of cell-particle interactions. Differences in cytotoxicity were observed between the bulk and nanomaterial forms of hydroxyapatite and silica (SiO2); titanium dioxide (TiO2) was well tolerated in both forms at the doses tested. Overall, nano-size effects have some impact on the cytotoxicity of a material; however, these may not be as significant as chemical composition or surface properties. Our data highlights the complexities involved at the nano-scale, in both the characterisation of materials and in relation to cytotoxic properties exerted on oral epithelial cells. PMID:26432707

  9. Raman spectroscopic analysis of human tissue engineered oral mucosa constructs (EVPOME) perturbed by physical and biochemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmaladze, Alexander; Ganguly, Arindam; Raghavan, Mekhala; Kuo, Shiuhyang; Cole, Jacqueline H.; Marcelo, Cynthia L.; Feinberg, Stephen E.; Izumi, Kenji; Morris, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    We show the application of near-infrared Raman Spectroscopy to in-vitro monitoring of the viability of tissue constructs (EVPOMEs). During their two week production period EVPOME may encounter thermal, chemical or biochemical stresses that could cause development to cease, rendering the affected constructs useless. We discuss the development of a Raman spectroscopic technique to study EVPOMEs noninvasively, with the ultimate goal of applying it in-vivo. We identify Raman spectroscopic failure indicators for EVPOMEs, which are stressed by temperature, and discuss the implications of varying calcium concentration and pre-treatment of the human keratinocytes with Rapamycin. In particular, Raman spectra show correlation of the peak height ratios of CH2 deformation to phenylalanine ring breathing, providing a Raman metric to distinguish between viable and nonviable constructs. We also show the results of singular value decomposition analysis, demonstrating the applicability of Raman spectroscopic technique to both distinguish between stressed and non-stressed EVPOME constructs, as well as between EVPOMEs and bare AlloDerm® substrates, on which the oral keratinocytes have been cultured. We also discuss complications arising from non-uniform thickness of the AlloDerm® substrate and the cultured constructs, as well as sampling protocols used to detect local stress and other problems that may be encountered in the constructs.

  10. Cyclin D1 expression in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck and in oral mucosa in relation to proliferation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kotelnikov, V M; Coon, J S; Mundle, S; Kelanic, S; LaFollette, S; Taylor S, I V; Hutchinson, J; Panje, W; Caldarelli, D D; Preisler, H D

    1997-01-01

    Deregulation of expression of the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 (cD1) may be responsible for rapid proliferation of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). We have studied the expression of cD1 in 46 SCCHNs using immunohistochemistry. Before biopsy, the patients received an in vivo infusion of iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) for cell proliferation assessment. Additionally, the level of apoptosis was estimated using in situ end labeling (ISEL). Among 33 tumors, the proportion of cD1(+) cells varied from 0.5 to 51.3% (19.9 +/- 2.2%). Thirteen tumors did not express cD1. The fraction of S-phase (IdUrd-positive) cells was 26.3 +/- 1.8% in cD1(+) versus 20.0 +/- 2.4% in cD1(-) tumors (P = 0.06). The percentages of cD1(+) cells and of S-phase cells were not correlated (P = 0.37). Apoptosis was detected by ISEL in 15 of 33 tumors studied. ISEL-positive tumors contained a significantly higher proportion of cD1(+) cells (14.9 +/- 2.6%) than cD1(-) ones (7.9 +/- 2.8%; P = 0.03). There was a positive correlation between the percentage of cD1(+) cells and the degree of ISEL (r = 0.54; P < 0.001). In noninvolved oral mucosa, cD1(+) cells were located primarily in the suprabasal layers (29.3 +/- 3.8% versus 1.2 +/- 0. 2% in the basal layer). Only 23 of 44 mucosal specimens contained cD1(+) cells. All cD1(-) samples were proliferatively active and contained IdUrd-labeled cells. The percentage of cD1(+) cells in the oral epithelium from nontumor controls (uvula samples) was significantly higher than in the SCCHN group in both basal (2.4 +/- 0.4%; P = 0.008) and suprabasal (42.7 +/- 3.3%; P = 0.005) layers. Additionally, whereas in uvuli, cD1(+) cells were distributed evenly along the epithelial lining, in SCCHN samples the regions showing cD1 expression alternated with areas in which cD1 expression was undetectable. These data indicate that cD1 expression in SCCHN varies among tumors and is not correlated with cell proliferation. In noninvolved oral mucosa, cD1 expression

  11. Peroxiredoxin 1 has an anti-apoptotic role via apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 and p38 activation in mouse models with oral precancerous lesions

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JIANFEI; JING, XINYING; NIU, WENWEN; ZHANG, MIN; GE, LIHUA; MIAO, CONGCONG; TANG, XIAOFEI

    2016-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin 1 (Prx1) is important in the protection of cells from oxidative damage and the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Prx1 is overexpressed in oral precancerous lesions of oral leukoplakia (OLK) and oral cancer; however, the association between Prx1 expression and OLK pathogenesis remains unknown. The present study investigated the role of Prx1 and its molecular mechanisms in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis during the pathogenesis of OLK. Wild-type and Prx1 knockout mice were treated with 50 µg/ml 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) or 4NQO + H2O2 for 16 weeks to establish mouse models with tongue precancerous lesions. Apoptotic cells were detected using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay. The expression of Prx1, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), phosphor-ASK1, p38 and phosphor-p38 was analyzed using immunohistochemical staining, and their mRNA expression levels were evaluated by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The present results demonstrated that 4NQO or 4NQO + H2O2 induced the development of tongue precancerous lesions in Prx1 knockout and wild-type mice. Prx1 was overexpressed in tongue precancerous lesions compared with normal tongue mucosa. There was a significant decrease in the degree of moderate or severe epithelial dysplasia, and mild epithelial dysplasia was clearly elevated, in Prx1 knockout mice treated with 4NQO + H2O2 compared with wild-type mice treated with 4NQO + H2O2. Prx1 suppressed apoptosis and upregulated phosphor-ASK1 and phosphor-p38 expression in tongue precancerous lesions. The present results suggest that Prx1 suppresses oxidative stress-induced apoptosis via the ASK1/p38 signalling pathway in mouse tongue precancerous lesions. In conclusion, Prx1 and H2O2 have a coordination role in promoting the progression of tongue precancerous mucosa lesions. The present findings provide novel insight into Prx1 function and the mechanisms of Prx1 in OLK

  12. Vermilion Reconstruction with Genital Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Weyandt, Gerhard H.; Woeckel, Achim; Kübler, Alexander C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Functional and aesthetical reconstruction, especially of the upper lip after ablative tumor surgery, can be very challenging. The skin of the lip might be sufficiently reconstructed by transpositional flaps from the nasolabial or facial area. Large defects of the lip mucosa, including the vestibule, are even more challenging due to the fact that flaps from the inner lining of the oral cavity often lead to functional impairments. We present a case of multiple vermilion and skin resections of the upper lip. At the last step, we had to resect even the whole vermilion mucosa, including parts of the oral mucosa of the vestibule, leaving a bare orbicularis oris muscle. To reconstruct the mucosal layer, we used a mucosal graft from the labia minora and placed it on the compromised lip and the former transpositional flaps for the reconstructed skin of the upper lip with very good functional and aesthetic results.

  13. Vermilion Reconstruction with Genital Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Müller-Richter, Urs D A; Weyandt, Gerhard H; Woeckel, Achim; Kübler, Alexander C

    2016-05-01

    Functional and aesthetical reconstruction, especially of the upper lip after ablative tumor surgery, can be very challenging. The skin of the lip might be sufficiently reconstructed by transpositional flaps from the nasolabial or facial area. Large defects of the lip mucosa, including the vestibule, are even more challenging due to the fact that flaps from the inner lining of the oral cavity often lead to functional impairments. We present a case of multiple vermilion and skin resections of the upper lip. At the last step, we had to resect even the whole vermilion mucosa, including parts of the oral mucosa of the vestibule, leaving a bare orbicularis oris muscle. To reconstruct the mucosal layer, we used a mucosal graft from the labia minora and placed it on the compromised lip and the former transpositional flaps for the reconstructed skin of the upper lip with very good functional and aesthetic results. PMID:27579226

  14. Lobular capillary hemangioma of the oral mucosa: clinicopathological study of 43 cases with a special reference to immunohistochemical characterization of the vascular elements.

    PubMed

    Toida, Makoto; Hasegawa, Tomomi; Watanabe, Fumio; Kato, Keizo; Makita, Hiroki; Fujitsuka, Hideki; Kato, Yukihiro; Miyamoto, Ken; Shibata, Toshiyuki; Shimokawa, Kuniyasu

    2003-01-01

    Clinical and histopathological features were investigated in 43 cases of oral lobular capillary hemangiomas (LCH) with a special reference to characteristics of the vascular elements. The lesions affected females more than males by a ratio of 1:1.5. Average age of the patients was 52.7 years. The lesions involved the gingiva (n = 15), the tongue (n = 13), the labial mucosa (n = 10) and other sites. The lesions appeared usually as a pedunculated mass with ulceration; size of the lesions was up to 15 mm. Histologically, a lobular area and an ulcerative area were distinguished. The density of vessels was about 1045/mm2 and 160/mm2 in the lobular and ulcerative areas, respectively. The average diameter of the vascular lumen was 9.1 5.6 mm (range: 2.8-42.0 mm) and 18.8 20.9 mm (range: 5.6-139.7 mm) in the lobular and ulcerative areas, respectively. In the lobular area, most of the vessels had an inner layer of endothelial cells showing positive reaction for von Willebrand factor (vWF) and CD34, as well as an outer layer of mesenchymal cells showing positive reaction for alpha-smooth muscle actin (ASMA). However, in the ulcerative area, there was a variety of types of vessels consisting of various proportions of both endothelial and ASMA-positive perivascular mesenchymal cells. These results indicate that most of the vascular elements in the lobular area resemble more pericapillary microvascular segments than they do capillaries. Thus, the authors propose the term 'lobular pericapillary hemangioma' to represent this type of lesion. PMID:12558863

  15. Dopaminergic-Like Neurons Derived from Oral Mucosa Stem Cells by Developmental Cues Improve Symptoms in the Hemi-Parkinsonian Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Ganz, Javier; Arie, Ina; Buch, Sigal; Zur, Tali Ben; Barhum, Yael; Pour, Sammy; Araidy, Shareef; Pitaru, Sandu; Offen, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Achieving safe and readily accessible sources for cell replacement therapy in Parkinson’s disease (PD) is still a challenging unresolved issue. Recently, a primitive neural crest stem cell population (hOMSC) was isolated from the adult human oral mucosa and characterized in vitro and in vivo. In this study we assessed hOMSC ability to differentiate into dopamine-secreting cells with a neuronal-dopaminergic phenotype in vitro in response to dopaminergic developmental cues and tested their therapeutic potential in the hemi-Parkinsonian rat model. We found that hOMSC express constitutively a repertoire of neuronal and dopaminergic markers and pivotal transcription factors. Soluble developmental factors induced a reproducible neuronal-like morphology in the majority of hOMSC, downregulated stem cells markers, upregulated the expression of the neuronal and dopaminergic markers that resulted in dopamine release capabilities. Transplantation of these dopaminergic-induced hOMSC into the striatum of hemi-Parkinsonian rats improved their behavioral deficits as determined by amphetamine-induced rotational behavior, motor asymmetry and motor coordination tests. Human TH expressing cells and increased levels of dopamine in the transplanted hemispheres were observed 10 weeks after transplantation. These results demonstrate for the first time that soluble factors involved in the development of DA neurons, induced a DA phenotype in hOMSC in vitro that significantly improved the motor function of hemiparkinsonian rats. Based on their neural-related origin, their niche accessibility by minimal-invasive procedures and their propensity for DA differentiation, hOMSC emerge as an attractive tool for autologous cell replacement therapy in PD. PMID:24945922

  16. Adjuvant antifungal therapy using tissue tolerable plasma on oral mucosa and removable dentures in oral candidiasis patients: a randomised double-blinded split-mouth pilot study.

    PubMed

    Preissner, Saskia; Kastner, Isabell; Schütte, Eyke; Hartwig, Stefan; Schmidt-Westhausen, Andrea Maria; Paris, Sebastian; Preissner, Robert; Hertel, Moritz

    2016-07-01

    Extended use of antimycotics in oral candidiasis therapy gives rise to problems related to fungal drug resistance. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the efficacy of tissue tolerable plasma (TTP) in denture stomatitis patients. It was hypothesised that (I): erythema and (IIa): complaint remission would be accelerated and (IIb): colony forming unit (CFU) reduction would be improved. The halves of the upper jaws of eight patients were randomly assigned to control (nystatin, chlorhexidine and placebo treatment) and test sides (nystatin, chlorhexidine and TTP administered six times each 7 days). The patients and the investigators, who were different from the therapists, were both blinded. Compared to the control sides, the erythema surface was reduced significantly more extensively on the test sides between 2 and 6 weeks of antifungal therapy (P ≤ 0.05). Visual analogue scale values and the frequency of moderate or heavy growth of Candida post-treatment did not differ significantly between both sides (P > 0.05). The primary hypothesis was confirmed, which may be interpreted as an accelerated remission. As drug therapy is usually limited to the time in which signs of infection are present, TTP might help reducing antifungal use. Even though the secondary hypotheses were not confirmed, persistence of Candida might be only colonisation. PMID:26932256

  17. Oral Typhoid Vaccination With Live-Attenuated Salmonella Typhi Strain Ty21a Generates Ty21a-Responsive and Heterologous Influenza Virus–Responsive CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells at the Human Intestinal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, Shaun H.; Thompson, Ameeka L.; Wright, Adam K. A.; Ferreira, Daniela M.; Jambo, Kondwani C.; Wright, Angela D.; Faragher, Brian; Gilmour, Jill W.; Gordon, Stephen B.; Gordon, Melita A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Oral vaccination with live-attenuated Salmonella Typhi strain Ty21a is modestly efficacious, but the mechanisms of protection are currently unknown. While humoral and cellular immune responses are well described in peripheral blood, the cellular response at the intestinal mucosa has never been directly assessed. Methods. We vaccinated healthy adults with Ty21a and assessed humoral and cellular immunity in vaccinated volunteers and controls after 18 days. Immunoglobulin levels were assessed in peripheral blood by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cellular responses were assessed in peripheral blood and at the duodenal and colonic mucosa by flow cytometry. Results. We demonstrate the generation of Ty21a-responsive and heterologous influenza virus–responsive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells at the duodenal mucosa. All duodenal responses were consistently correlated, and no responses were observed at the colonic mucosa. Peripheral anti-lipopolysaccharide immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin A responses were significantly correlated with duodenal responses. The assessment of integrin β7 expression intensity among peripheral and duodenal T-cell subsets revealed varied capacities for mucosal homing and residence. Conclusions. The breadth of duodenal cellular responses was not reflected peripherally. The direct evaluation of mucosal immune defense may yield functional correlates of protection and could provide insight into mechanisms that may be manipulated to enhance vaccine immunogenicity. PMID:26810369

  18. Orthotopic non-metastatic and metastatic oral cancer mouse models ⋆

    PubMed Central

    Bais, Manish V.; Kukuruzinska, Maria; Trackman, Philip C.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Oral cancer is characterized by high morbidity and mortality with a predisposition to metastasize to different tissues, including lung, liver, and bone. Despite progress in the understanding of mutational profiles and deregulated pathways in oral cancer, patient survival has not significantly improved over the past decades. Therefore, there is a need to establish in vivo models that recapitulate human oral cancer metastasis to evaluate therapeutic potential of novel drugs. Here we report orthotopic tongue cancer nude mouse models to study oral cancer growth and metastasis using human metastatic (UMSCC2) and non-metastatic (CAL27) cell lines, respectively. Transduction of these cell lines with lentivirus expressing red fluorescent protein (DsRed) followed by injection into tongues of immunodeficient mice generated orthotopic tongue tumors that could be monitored for growth and metastasis by fluorescence measurement with an in vivo Imaging System (IVIS 200). The growth rates of CAL27-DsRed induced tumors were higher than UMSCC2-DsRed tumors after day 15, while UMSCC2-DsRed tumors revealed metastasis beginning on day 21. Importantly, UMSCC2 tumors metastasized to a number of tissues including the submandibular gland, lung, kidney, liver, and bone. Further, immunohistochemical analyses of tongue tumors induced by CAL27 and UMSCC2 cells revealed elevated expression of components of protumorigenic pathways deregulated in human cancers, including Cyclin D1, PCNA, Ki-67, LSD1, LOXL2, MT-MMP1, DPAGT1, E-cadherin, OCT4A, and H3K4me1/2. These orthotopic mouse models are likely to be useful tools for gaining insights into the activity and mechanisms of novel oral cancer drug candidates. PMID:25682387

  19. Methylation-Associated Gene Silencing of RARB in Areca Carcinogens Induced Mouse Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Yung-An; Fan, Shin-Ru; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Chang, Nai-Wen; Cheng, Ju-Chien

    2014-01-01

    Regarding oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) development, chewing areca is known to be a strong risk factor in many Asian cultures. Therefore, we established an OSCC induced mouse model by 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO), or arecoline, or both treatments, respectively. These are the main two components of the areca nut that could increase the occurrence of OSCC. We examined the effects with the noncommercial MCGI (mouse CpG islands) microarray for genome-wide screening the DNA methylation aberrant in induced OSCC mice. The microarray results showed 34 hypermethylated genes in 4-NQO plus arecoline induced OSCC mice tongue tissues. The examinations also used methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MS-PCR) and bisulfite sequencing to realize the methylation pattern in collected mouse tongue tissues and human OSCC cell lines of different grades, respectively. These results showed that retinoic acid receptor β (RARB) was indicated in hypermethylation at the promoter region and the loss of expression during cancer development. According to the results of real-time PCR, it was shown that de novo DNA methyltransferases were involved in gene epigenetic alternations of OSCC. Collectively, our results showed that RARB hypermethylation was involved in the areca-associated oral carcinogenesis. PMID:25197641

  20. Genomic analysis to define molecular basis of aggressiveness in a mouse model of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chalivendra, Varun; Kanchi, Krishna Latha; Onken, Michael D.; Winkler, Ashley E.; Mardis, Elaine; Uppaluri, Ravindra

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the molecular basis underlying aggressive behavior in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), our laboratory developed a carcinogen-induced mouse oral cancer (MOC) cell line model that encompasses the growth and metastasis spectrum of its human counterpart. We performed next-generation sequencing (NGS) and gene expression microarray profiles to explore the genomic and transcriptional backgrounds of the differential MOC line phenotypes, as well as, the cross-species relevance of the model. Here we describe the comparative analysis of NGS (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/biosample?LinkName=bioproject_biosample_all&from_uid=247825) and expression microarray (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE50041) data from the MOC lines and corresponding human data, as described in our recent publication [1]. PMID:25729643

  1. An adjuvant free mouse model of oral allergenic sensitization to rice seeds protein

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rice is commonly known as a staple crop consumed worldwide, though with several rice proteins being reported for allergic properties in clinical studies. Thus, there is a growing need for the development of an animal model to better understand the allergenicity of rice proteins and the immunological and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of food allergy. Methods Groups of BALB/c mice were sensitized daily with freshly homogenized rice flour (30 mg or 80 mg) without adjuvant by intragastric gavage. In addition, the mice were challenged with extracted rice flour proteins at several time points intragastrically. Hypersensitivity symptoms in mice were evaluated according to a scoring system. Vascular leakage, ELISA of rice protein-specific IgE, histopathology of small intestine, and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis were conducted on challenged mice. Results An adjuvant free mouse model of rice allergy was established with sensitized mice showing increased scratching behaviors and increased vascular permeability. Rice protein-specific IgE was detected after eighteen days of sensitization and from the fifth challenge onwards. Inflammatory damage to the epithelium in the small intestine of mice was observed beyond one month of sensitization. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis results confirmed the positive rice allergy in the mouse model. Conclusions We introduced a BALB/c mouse model of rice allergy with simple oral sensitization without the use of adjuvant. This model would serve as a useful tool for further analysis on the immunopathogenic mechanisms of the various rice allergens, for the evaluation of the hypersensitivity of rice or other cereal grains, and to serve as a platform for the development of immunotherapies against rice allergens. PMID:21605393

  2. Effects of cigarette smoke and ethanol intake on mouse oesophageal mucosa changes induced by dietary zinc deficiency and deoxycholic acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Zapaterini, Joyce R; de Moura, Nelci A; Ribeiro, Daniel A; Rodrigues, Maria A M; Barbisan, Luis F

    2012-08-01

    The noxious effects of dietary zinc deficiency (ZD) and deoxycholic bile acid (DCA) supplementation in the oesophagus were investigated. The additional influence of cigarette smoke and ethanol intake on the changes in the oesophageal mucosa induced by dietary ZD plus DCA was also assessed. Male C57BL/6 mice were allocated into four groups: Group 1 was fed control diet and groups 2-4 were fed ZD plus DCA diet. After 5 weeks, groups 3 and 4 were exposed to 10% ethanol intake or cigarette smoke for 15 weeks, respectively. All animals were euthanized at the end of week 20, and the oesophagus, lung, liver and colon were collected and analysed by conventional morphology. Cell proliferation was assessed in the oesophageal mucosa by Ki-67 immunohistochemistry and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) protein by Western blotting. Dietary ZD plus DCA treatment induced mild hyperkeratosis and hyperplasia, increased cell proliferation index and COX-2 protein expression in the oesophagus, and intranuclear inclusion, karyocytomegaly and microvesicular fatty change in the liver. Cigarette smoke increased COX-2 protein expression in oesophageal mucosa and irregular enlargement of alveolus and alveolar ductal air spaces, while ethanol enhanced liver damage induced by ZD plus DCA diet. These findings indicate that dietary ZD plus DCA treatment during 20 weeks induces a pattern of chemical oesophageal injury but not Barrett's-like lesions. PMID:22380924

  3. Effect of oral calcium and calcium + fluoride treatments on mouse bone properties during suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simske, S. J.; Luttges, M. W.; Allen, K. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The bone effects of oral dosages of calcium chloride with or without supplementary sodium fluoride were assessed in antiorthostatically suspended mice. Two calcium dosages were used to replace half (3.1 mM) or all(6.3 mM) of the dietary calcium lost due to reduced food intake by the suspended mice. Two groups of 6.3 mM CaCl2-treated mice were additionally treated with 0.25 or 2.5 mM NaF. The results indicate that supplementation of the mouse drinking water with calcium salts prevents bone changes induced by short-term suspension, while calcium salts in combination with fluoride are less effective as fluoride dosage increases. However, the calcium supplements change the relationship between the femur mechanical properties and the mineral composition of the bone. Because of this, it appears that oral calcium supplements are effective through a mechanism other than simple dietary supplementation and may indicate a dependence of bone consistency on systemic and local fluid conditions.

  4. Interaction of mouse intestinal P-glycoprotein with oral antidiabetic drugs and its inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kalsi, Harman; Grewal, Ravneet K

    2015-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is a progressive insulin secretory defect accompanied by resistance to insulin, and thereby making glycemic control a major concern in the treatment of these patients. Oral drug administration, though a popular option for its non-invasiveness, suffer from poor bioavailability. It could be related to the efflux transport of intestinal P-glycoprotein (Pgp). In the present study, we explored the binding interactions of antidiabetic drugs i.e., sulfonylurea drugs (glimepiride, glipizide, glyburide) and rapid acting insulin secretagogues viz., nateglinide, repaglinide and rosiglitazone; and Pgp inhibitors i.e., Generation I (verapamil and tamoxifen), III (tetradrine and tariquidar), and natural inhibitors (fumagillin and piperine) in mouse Pgp model. Our results revealed that fumagillin piperine and verapamil possess maximum interaction energies with Pgp compared to antidiabetic drugs. These observations elucidate the role of fumagillin and piperine as potential natural compounds which could intervene in the efflux action of Pgp in extruding the antidiabetic drugs and may have implications for increasing efficacy of oral antidiabetic therapy. PMID:26548081

  5. Development and application of an oral challenge mouse model for studying Clostridium perfringens type D infection.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Miyakawa, Mariano E; Sayeed, Sameera; Fisher, Derek J; Poon, Rachael; Adams, Vicki; Rood, Julian I; McClane, Bruce A; Saputo, Julian; Uzal, Francisco A

    2007-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens type D isolates cause enterotoxemia in sheep, goats, and probably cattle. While the major disease signs and lesions of type D animal disease are usually attributed to epsilon toxin, a class B select agent, these bacteria typically produce several lethal toxins. Understanding of disease pathogenesis and development of improved vaccines are hindered by the lack of a small-animal model mimicking natural disease caused by type D isolates. Addressing this need, we developed an oral challenge mouse model of C. perfringens type D enterotoxemia. When BALB/c mice with a sealed anus were inoculated by intragastric gavage with type D isolates, 7 of 10 type D isolates were lethal, as defined by spontaneous death or severe clinical signs necessitating euthanasia. The lethalities of the seven type D isolates varied between 14 and 100%. Clinical signs in the lethally challenged mice included seizures, convulsions, hyperexcitability, and/or depression. Mild intestinal gas distention and brain edema were observed at necropsy in a few mice, while histology showed multifocal acute tubular necrosis of the kidney and edema in the lungs of most challenged mice that developed a clinical response. When the lethality of type D isolates in this model was compared with in vitro toxin production, only a limited correlation was observed. However, mice could be protected against lethality by intravenous passive immunization with an epsilon toxin antibody prior to oral challenge. This study provides an economical new model for studying the pathogenesis of C. perfringens type D infections. PMID:17562765

  6. Amelioration of Chemotherapy-Induced Intestinal Mucositis by Orally Administered Probiotics in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chun-Bin; Cheng, Mei-Lien; Liu, Chia-Yuan; Chang, Szu-Wen; Chiang Chiau, Jen-Shiu; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Intestinal mucositis is a frequently encountered side effect in oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. No well-established or up to date therapeutic strategies are available. To study a novel way to alleviate mucositis, we investigate the effects and safety of probiotic supplementation in ameliorating 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. Methods Seventy-two mice were injected saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) intraperitoneally daily. Mice were either orally administrated daily saline, probiotic suspension of Lactobacillus casei variety rhamnosus (Lcr35) or Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum (LaBi). Diarrhea score, pro-inflammatory cytokines serum levels, intestinal villus height and crypt depth and total RNA from tissue were assessed. Samples of blood, liver and spleen tissues were assessed for translocation. Results Marked diarrhea developed in the 5-FU groups but was attenuated after oral Lcr35 and LaBi administrations. Diarrhea scores decreased significantly from 2.64 to 1.45 and 0.80, respectively (P<0.001). Those mice in 5-FU groups had significantly higher proinflammatory cytokine levels (TNF-α: 234.80 vs. 29.10, P<0.001, IL-6: 25.13 vs. 7.43, P<0.001, IFN-γ: 22.07 vs. 17.06, P = 0.137). A repairing of damage in jejunal villi was observed following probiotics administration. We also found TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA expressions were up-regulated in intestinal mucositis tissues following 5-FU treatment (TNF-α: 4.35 vs. 1.18, IL-1β: 2.29 vs. 1.07, IL-6: 1.49 vs. 1.02) and that probiotics treatment suppressed this up-regulation (P<0.05). No bacterial translocation was found in this study. Conclusions In conclusion, our results show that oral administration of probiotics Lcr35 and LaBi can ameliorate chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. This suggests probiotics may serve as an alternative therapeutic strategy for the prevention or management of chemotherapy-induced mucositis in

  7. Combination of Estrogen and Immunosuppressive Agents to Establish a Mouse Model of Candidiasis with Concurrent Oral and Vaginal Mucosal Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Le; Wang, Chong; Mei, Huan; Shen, Yongnian; Lv, Guixia; Zeng, Rong; Zhan, Ping; Li, Dongmei; Liu, Weida

    2016-02-01

    Mouse model is an appropriate tool for pathogenic determination and study of host defenses during the fungal infection. Here, we established a mouse model of candidiasis with concurrent oral and vaginal mucosal infection. Two C. albicans strains sourced from clinical candidemia (SC5314) and mucosal infection (ATCC62342) were tested in ICR mice. The different combinational panels covering estrogen and immunosuppressive agents, cortisone, prednisolone and cyclophosphamide were used for concurrent oral and vaginal candidiasis establishment. Prednisolone in combination with estrogen proved an optimal mode for concurrent mucosal infection establishment. The model maintained for 1 week with fungal burden reached at least 10(5) cfu/g of tissue. This mouse model was evaluated by in vivo pharmacodynamics of fluconazole and host mucosal immunity of IL-17 and IL-23. Mice infected by SC5314 were cured by fluconazole. An increase in IL-23 in both oral and vaginal homogenates was observed after infection, while IL-17 only had a prominent elevation in oral tissue. This model could properly mimic complicated clinical conditions and provides a valuable means for antifungal assay in vivo and may also provide a useful method for the evaluation of host-fungal interactions. PMID:26404163

  8. Disruption of the ECM33 gene in Candida albicans prevents biofilm formation, engineered human oral mucosa tissue damage and gingival cell necrosis/apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Chandra, Jyotsna; Mukherjee, Pranab; Chmielewski, Witold; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A

    2012-01-01

    In this study we demonstrated that ΔCaecm33 double mutant showed reduced biofilm formation and causes less damage to gingival mucosa tissues. This was confirmed by the reduced level of necrotic cells and Bax/Bcl2 gene expression as apoptotic markers. In contrast, parental and Caecm33 mutant strains decreased basement membrane protein production (laminin 5 and type IV collagen). We thus propose that ECM33 gene/protein represents a novel target for the prevention and treatment of infections caused by Candida. PMID:22665950

  9. In vivo determination of aluminum, cobalt, chromium, copper, nickel, titanium and vanadium in oral mucosa cells from orthodontic patients with mini-implants by Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Martín-Cameán, Ana; Jos, Angeles; Puerto, Maria; Calleja, Ana; Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro; Solano, Enrique; Cameán, Ana M

    2015-10-01

    Miniscrews are used as orthodontic anchorage devices in the dentistry clinical practice but the in vivo metallic release from these structures has been not previously investigated. The aim of this study was to determine the content of Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Ti and V in oral mucosa cells of control subjects, patients under orthodontic treatment and with both, orthodontic treatment and miniscrew, in order to know the contribution of these mini-implants to the total metallic content. ICP-MS measurements revealed the following ascending order: Cr

  10. A novel method for oral delivery of drug compounds to the neonatal SMNΔ7 mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Butchbach, Matthew E. R.; Edwards, Jonathan D.; Schussler, Kristie R.; Burghes, Arthur H. M.

    2009-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a devastating motor neuron disease that is one of the leading genetic causes of infant mortality. Currently, there is no cure for SMA. Mouse models that genetically and phenotypically resemble SMA have been generated and have the potential to be used for the discovery of novel therapeutics. Oral administration is a commonly used mode of drug delivery in humans as well as in rodents. Unfortunately, there is no method of drug delivery that can accurately and reliably deliver drug compounds orally to neonatal mice. In this report, we describe a novel method to orally administer compounds to neonatal SMA mice. Oral delivery to neonatal mice, usually starting at postnatal day 4 (PND04), is both rapid and safe to the pup. Oral delivery of two different commonly used vehicle formulations, distilled water and 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin, does not affect the survival of SMA mice. After oral delivery for 3 days, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine could be detected in the kidneys, brains and spinal cords of treated non-SMA as well as SMA neonatal pups. In conclusion, we have developed a method by which drugs can be safely and reliably administered orally to neural targets of neonatal mice. This approach offers a simple and rapid means by which potential therapeutics for SMA can be identified. PMID:17161463

  11. Generation and Characterization of a Cyp2f2-Null Mouse and Studies on the Role of CYP2F2 in Naphthalene-Induced Toxicity in the Lung and Nasal Olfactory MucosaS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Wei, Yuan; Van Winkle, Laura; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Hu, Jinping; Xie, Fang; Kluetzman, Kerri

    2011-01-01

    The CYP2F enzymes, abundantly expressed in the respiratory tract, are active toward many xenobiotic compounds, including naphthalene (NA). However, the precise roles of these enzymes in tissue-selective chemical toxicity have been difficult to resolve. A Cyp2f2-null mouse was generated in this study by disrupting the Cyp2f2 fourth exon. Homozygous Cyp2f2-null mice, which had no CYP2F2 expression and showed no changes in the expression of other P450 genes examined, were viable and fertile and had no in utero lethality or developmental deficits. The loss of CYP2F2 expression led to substantial decreases in the in vitro catalytic efficiency of microsomal NA epoxygenases in lung (up to ∼160-fold), liver (∼3-fold), and nasal olfactory mucosa (OM; up to ∼16-fold), and significant decreases in rates of systemic NA (300 mg/kg i.p.) clearance. The Cyp2f2-null mice were largely resistant to NA-induced cytotoxicity, when examined at 24 h after NA dosing (at 300 mg/kg i.p.), and to NA-induced depletion of total nonprotein sulfhydryl (NPSH), examined at 2 h after dosing, in the lungs. In contrast, the loss of CYP2F2 expression did not alleviate NA-induced NPSH depletion or tissue toxicity in the OM. Mouse CYP2F2 clearly plays an essential role in the bioactivation and toxicity of NA in the lung but not in the OM. The Cyp2f2-null mouse should be valuable for studies on the role of CYP2F2 in the metabolism and toxicity of numerous other xenobiotic compounds and for future production of a CYP2F1-humanized mouse. PMID:21730012

  12. Oral Supplementation with Cocoa Extract Reduces UVB-Induced Wrinkles in Hairless Mouse Skin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Eun; Song, Dasom; Kim, Junil; Choi, Jina; Kim, Jong Rhan; Yoon, Hyun-Sun; Bae, Jung-Soo; Han, Mira; Lee, Sein; Hong, Ji Sun; Song, Dayoung; Kim, Seong-Jin; Son, Myoung-Jin; Choi, Sang-Woon; Chung, Jin Ho; Kim, Tae-Aug; Lee, Ki Won

    2016-05-01

    Cacao beans contain various bioactive phytochemicals that could modify the pathogeneses of certain diseases. Here, we report that oral administration of cacao powder (CP) attenuates UVB-induced skin wrinkling by the regulation of genes involved in dermal matrix production and maintenance. Transcriptome analysis revealed that 788 genes are down- or upregulated in the CP supplemented group, compared with the UVB-irradiated mouse skin controls. Among the differentially expressed genes, cathepsin G and serpin B6c play important roles in UVB-induced skin wrinkle formation. Gene regulatory network analysis also identified several candidate regulators responsible for the protective effects of CP supplementation against UVB-induced skin damage. CP also elicited antiwrinkle effects via inhibition of UVB-induced matrix metalloproteinases-1 expression in both the human skin equivalent model and human dermal fibroblasts. Inhibition of UVB-induced activator protein-1 via CP supplementation is likely to affect the expression of matrix metalloproteinases-1. CP supplementation also downregulates the expression of cathepsin G in human dermal fibroblasts. 5-(3',4'-Dihydroxyphenyl)-γ-valerolactone, a major in vivo metabolite of CP, showed effects similar to CP supplementation. These results suggest that cacao extract may offer a protective effect against photoaging by inhibiting the breakdown of dermal matrix, which leads to an overall reduction in wrinkle formation. PMID:26854493

  13. Oral administration of Lactobacillus plantarum HY7714 protects hairless mouse against ultraviolet B-induced photoaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Mee; Lee, Dong Eun; Park, Soo Dong; Kim, Yong-Tae; Kim, Yu Jin; Jeong, Ji Woong; Jang, Sung Sik; Ahn, Young-Tae; Sim, Jae-Hun; Huh, Chul-Sung; Chung, Dae Kyun; Lee, Jung-Hee

    2014-11-28

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation alters multiple molecular pathways in the skin, thereby inducing skin damage, including photoaging. In recent years, probiotics have gained interest due to their beneficial effects on skin health, such as inhibiting atopic dermatitis and improving skin immunity or inflammation. However, little is known about the effects of probiotics on UVBinduced photoaging. In this study, we evaluated the effect of Lactobacillus plantarum HY7714 against UVB-induced photoaging in human dermal fibroblasts and hairless mice. The results showed that L. plantarum HY7714 treatment effectively rescued UVB-reduced procollagen expression through the inhibition of UVB-induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 expression in human dermal fibroblasts. Data from a western blot showed that L. plantarum HY7714 inhibited the phosphorylation of Jun N-terminal kinase, thereby suppressing the UVB-induced phosphorylation and expression of c-Jun. Oral administration of L. plantarum HY7714 clearly inhibited the number, depth, and area of wrinkles in hairless mouse skin. Histological data showed that L. plantarum HY7714 significantly inhibited UVB-induced epidermal thickness in mice. Western blot and zymography data also revealed that L. plantarum HY7714 effectively inhibited MMP-13 expression as well as MMP-2 and -9 activities in dermal tissue. Collectively, these results provide further insight regarding the skin biological actions of L. plantarum HY7714, a potential skin anti-photoaging agent. PMID:25112318

  14. Early life exposure to bisphenol A investigated in mouse models of airway allergy, food allergy and oral tolerance.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Unni Cecilie; Vinje, Nina Eriksen; Samuelsen, Mari; Andreassen, Monica; Groeng, Else-Carin; Bølling, Anette Kocbach; Becher, Rune; Lovik, Martinus; Bodin, Johanna

    2015-09-01

    The impact of early life exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) through drinking water was investigated in mouse models of respiratory allergy, food allergy and oral tolerance. Balb/c mice were exposed to BPA (0, 10 or 100 μg/ml), and the offspring were intranasally exposed to the allergen ovalbumin (OVA). C3H/HeJ offspring were sensitized with the food allergen lupin by intragastric gavage, after exposure to BPA (0, 1, 10 or 100 μg/ml). In separate offspring, oral tolerance was induced by gavage of 5 mg lupin one week before entering the protocol for the food allergy induction. In the airway allergy model, BPA (100 μg/ml) caused increased eosinophil numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and a trend of increased OVA-specific IgE levels. In the food allergy and tolerance models, BPA did not alter the clinical anaphylaxis or antibody responses, but induced alterations in splenocyte cytokines and decreased mouse mast cell protease (MMCP)-1 serum levels. In conclusion, early life exposure to BPA through drinking water modestly augmented allergic responses in a mouse model of airway allergy only at high doses, and not in mouse models for food allergy and tolerance. Thus, our data do not support that BPA promotes allergy development at exposure levels relevant for humans. PMID:26048442

  15. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive action of an orally available nociceptin receptor agonist SCH 221510 in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Sobczak, Marta; Mokrowiecka, Anna; Cygankiewicz, Adam I; Zakrzewski, Piotr K; Sałaga, Maciej; Storr, Martin; Kordek, Radzisław; Małecka-Panas, Ewa; Krajewska, Wanda M; Fichna, Jakub

    2014-03-01

    The nociceptin receptors (NOPs) are expressed in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract on muscle cell membranes and neurons, as well as the immune cells that infiltrate the mucosa. The involvement of NOPs in the pathophysiology of GI inflammation has been suggested, but due to the lack of selective NOP agonists, it never fully elucidated. Our aim was to characterize the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effect of the NOP agonist, SCH 221510 [3-endo-8-[bis(2-methylphenyl)methyl]-3-phenyl-8-azabicyclo [3.2.1]octan-3-ol], as a potential therapeutic strategy in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). The anti-inflammatory action of SCH 221510 was determined after intraperitoneal, oral, and intracolonic administration of SCH 221510 (0.1-3.0 mg/kg once or twice daily) in mice treated with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). Antinociceptive action of SCH 221510 was evaluated in the mouse model of mustard oil (MO)-induced abdominal pain. Relative NOP mRNA expression was assessed in patients with IBD using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. We found that the expression of NOP mRNA was significantly decreased in patients with IBD. The administration (0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg i.p. twice daily and 3 mg/kg p.o. twice daily) of SCH 221510 attenuated TNBS colitis in mice. This effect was blocked by a selective NOP antagonist [J-113397 [(±)-1-[(3R*,4R*)-1-(cyclooctylmethyl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-4-piperidinyl]-3-ethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one

  16. Oral insulin (human, murine, or porcine) does not prevent diabetes in the non-obese diabetic mouse.

    PubMed

    Pham, Minh N; Gibson, Claire; Rydén, Anna K E; Perdue, Nikole; Boursalian, Tamar E; Pagni, Philippe P; Coppieters, Ken; Skonberg, Christian; Porsgaard, Trine; von Herrath, Matthias; Vela, Jose Luis

    2016-03-01

    Studies have shown oral insulin prevents type 1 diabetes (T1D) in mouse models, however human trials were inconclusive. We tested the ability of different insulins to prevent T1D in non-obese diabetic mice. Mice received oral insulin or PBS twice weekly and disease was monitored. Contrary to previous studies, no insulin tested showed significant ability to prevent T1D, nor did testing of linked suppression in a delayed type hypersensitivity model have reproducible effect. To investigate delivery of antigen within the GI tract, blue dye was fed to mice. Dye traveled 5-8 cm from stomach to small intestine within 10s, suggesting orally administered antigen may not get digested in the stomach in mice. Insulin incubated with jejunum extracts was instantly digested. Thus, in humans large doses of insulin may be required to achieve tolerance as antigen may be more vulnerable to digestion in the stomach even before reaching the small intestine. PMID:26821303

  17. Claudin immunolocalization in neonatal mouse epithelial tissues.

    PubMed

    Troy, Tammy-Claire; Arabzadeh, Azadeh; Yerlikaya, Seda; Turksen, Kursad

    2007-11-01

    Emerging evidence supports the notion that claudins (Cldns) are dynamically regulated under normal conditions to respond to the selective permeability requirements of various tissues, and that their expression is developmentally controlled. We describe the localization of those Cldns that we have previously demonstrated to be functionally important in epidermal differentiation and the formation of the epidermal permeability barrier, e.g., Cldn1, Cldn6, Cldn11, and Cldn18, and the presence of Cldn3 and Cldn5 in various neonatal mouse epithelia including the epidermis, nail, oral mucosa, tongue, and stomach. Cldn1 is localized in the differentiated and/or undifferentiated compartments of the epidermis and nail and in the dorsal surface of the tongue and glandular compartment of the stomach but is absent from the oral mucosa and the keratinized compartment of the stomach. Cldn3 is present in the basal cells of the nail matrix and both compartments of the murine stomach but not in the epidermis, oral mucosa, or tongue. Cldn5 is found in the glandular compartment of the stomach but not in the epidermis, nail unit, oral mucosa, forestomach, and tongue. Cldn6, Cldn11, and Cldn18 occur in the differentiating suprabasal compartment of the epidermis, nail, and oral mucosa and in the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the tongue and the keratinized squamous epithelium of the stomach. The simple columnar epithelium of the glandular stomach stains for Cldn18 and reveals a non-membranous pattern for Cldn6 and Cldn11 expression. Our results demonstrate differential Cldn protein profiles in various epithelial tissues and their differentiation stages. Although the molecular mechanisms regulating Cldn expression are unknown, elucidation of their differential localization patterns in tissues with diverse permeability requirements should provide a better understanding of the role of tight junctions in tissue function. PMID:17828607

  18. Detection of human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus DNA sequences in oral mucosa of HIV-infected patients by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Snijders, P. J.; Schulten, E. A.; Mullink, H.; ten Kate, R. W.; Jiwa, M.; van der Waal, I.; Meijer, C. J.; Walboomers, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was analyzed in 21 oral biopsy specimens of HIV-infected patients using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Biopsies were categorized as hairy leukoplakia (HL) (n = 12), candidiasis (n = 3), oral warts (n = 2), and clinically normal epithelium (n = 4). For HPV detection a modified general primer-mediated PCR method (GP-PCR), which detects a broad spectrum of HPV genotypes at sub-picogram levels, was used. Human papillomavirus DNA was only found in two oral warts and was identified as HPV type 32. Epstein-Barr virus DNA was detected in 16 biopsy specimens, including the 12 HLs, 2 cases of candidiasis, and 2 samples of normal epithelium. Epstein-Barr virus positivity in HL could be confirmed by Southern blot analysis and DNA in situ hybridization using biotinylated DNA probes (bio-DISH). Epstein-Barr virus bio-DISH was also positive in one sample of normal epithelium from a patient with HL. The results indicate that HL is strongly associated with EBV and not with any of the common HPV types that react with general HPV primers in the PCR. However the detection of EBV in normal oral epithelium by PCR and bio-DISH suggests that the presence of this virus is not exclusively related to HL. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2169191

  19. Periluminal Distribution of HIV-Binding Target Cells and Gp340 in the Oral, Cervical and Sigmoid/Rectal Mucosae: A Mapping Study

    PubMed Central

    Patyka, Mariia; Malamud, Daniel; Weissman, Drew; Abrams, William R.; Kurago, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that the transmission of HIV is most likely to occur via rectal or vaginal routes, and rarely through oral exposure. However, the mechanisms of virus entry at mucosal surfaces remain incompletely understood. Prophylactic strategies against HIV infection may be attainable once gaps in current knowledge are filled. To address these gaps, we evaluated essentially normal epithelial surfaces and mapped the periluminal distribution of CD4+ HIV target cells, including T cells and antigen-presenting cells, and an HIV-binding molecule gp340 that can be expressed by epithelial cells in secreted and cell-associated forms. Immunohistochemistry for CD4, CD16, CD3, CD1a and gp340 in human oral, rectal/sigmoid and cervical mucosal samples from HIV-negative subjects demonstrated that periluminal HIV target cells were more prevalent at rectal/sigmoid and endocervical surfaces lined by simple columnar epithelium, than at oral and ectocervical surfaces covered by multilayered stratified squamous epithelium (p<0.001). gp340 expression patterns at these sites were also distinct and strong in oral minor salivary gland acini and ducts, including ductal saliva, in individual rectum/sigmoid and endocervix periluminar columnar cells, and in ectocervix squamous cells. Only weak expression was noted in the oral non-ductal squamous epithelium. We conclude that periluminal HIV target cells, together with periluminal epithelial cell-associated gp340 appear to be most accessible for HIV transmission at rectal/sigmoid and endocervical surfaces. Our data help define vulnerable structural features of mucosal sites exposed to HIV. PMID:26172445

  20. CFTR with a partially deleted R domain corrects the cystic fibrosis chloride transport defect in human airway epithelia in vitro and in mouse nasal mucosa in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Zabner, Joseph; Vermeer, Daniel W.; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Karp, Philip H.; Stecenko, Arlene A.; Randak, Christoph; Welsh, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    In developing gene therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) airways disease, a transgene encoding a partially deleted CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel could be of value for vectors such as adeno-associated virus that have a limited packaging capacity. Earlier studies in heterologous cells indicated that the CFTR R (regulatory) domain is predominantly random coil and that parts of the R domain can be deleted without abolishing channel function. Therefore, we designed a series of CFTR variants with shortened R domains (between residues 708 and 835) and expressed them in well-differentiated cultures of CF airway epithelia. All of the variants showed normal targeting to the apical membrane, and for the constructs we tested, biosynthesis was like wild type. Moreover, all constructs generated transepithelial Cl− current in CF epithelia. Comparison of the Cl− transport suggested that the length of the R domain, the presence of phosphorylation sites, and other factors contribute to channel activity. A variant deleting residues 708–759 complemented CF airway epithelia to the same extent as wild-type CFTR and showed no current in the absence of cAMP stimulation. In addition, expression in nasal mucosa of CF mice corrected the Cl− transport defect. These data provide insight into the structure and function of the R domain and identify regions that can be deleted with retention of function. Thus they suggest a strategy for shortening the transgene used in CF gene therapy. PMID:11854474

  1. CFTR with a partially deleted R domain corrects the cystic fibrosis chloride transport defect in human airway epithelia in vitro and in mouse nasal mucosa in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Zabner, Joseph; Vermeer, Daniel W; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Karp, Philip H; Stecenko, Arlene A; Randak, Christoph; Welsh, Michael J

    2002-03-01

    In developing gene therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) airways disease, a transgene encoding a partially deleted CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel could be of value for vectors such as adeno-associated virus that have a limited packaging capacity. Earlier studies in heterologous cells indicated that the CFTR R (regulatory) domain is predominantly random coil and that parts of the R domain can be deleted without abolishing channel function. Therefore, we designed a series of CFTR variants with shortened R domains (between residues 708 and 835) and expressed them in well-differentiated cultures of CF airway epithelia. All of the variants showed normal targeting to the apical membrane, and for the constructs we tested, biosynthesis was like wild type. Moreover, all constructs generated transepithelial Cl- current in CF epithelia. Comparison of the Cl- transport suggested that the length of the R domain, the presence of phosphorylation sites, and other factors contribute to channel activity. A variant deleting residues 708-759 complemented CF airway epithelia to the same extent as wild-type CFTR and showed no current in the absence of cAMP stimulation. In addition, expression in nasal mucosa of CF mice corrected the Cl- transport defect. These data provide insight into the structure and function of the R domain and identify regions that can be deleted with retention of function. Thus they suggest a strategy for shortening the transgene used in CF gene therapy. PMID:11854474

  2. Oral Administration of Ginseng Ameliorates Cyclosporine-Induced Pancreatic Injury in an Experimental Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sun Woo; Doh, Kyoung Chan; Jin, Long; Piao, Shang Guo; Heo, Seong Beom; Zheng, Yu Fen; Bae, Soo Kyung; Chung, Byung Ha; Yang, Chul Woo

    2013-01-01

    Background This study was performed to investigate whether ginseng has a protective effect in an experimental mouse model of cyclosporine-induced pancreatic injury. Methods Mice were treated with cyclosporine (30 mg/kg/day, subcutaneously) and Korean red ginseng extract (0.2 or 0.4 g/kg/day, oral gavage) for 4 weeks while on a 0.01% salt diet. The effect of ginseng on cyclosporine-induced pancreatic islet dysfunction was investigated by an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and measurements of serum insulin level, β cell area, macrophage infiltration, and apoptosis. Using an in vitro model, we further examined the effect of ginseng on a cyclosporine-treated insulin-secreting cell line. Oxidative stress was measured by the concentration of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine in serum, tissue sections, and culture media. Results Four weeks of cyclosporine treatment increased blood glucose levels and decreased insulin levels, but cotreatment with ginseng ameliorated the cyclosporine-induced glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Pancreatic β cell area was also greater with ginseng cotreatment compared with cyclosporine monotherapy. The production of proinflammatory molecules, such as induced nitric oxide synthase and cytokines, and the level of apoptotic cell death also decreased in pancreatic β cell with ginseng treatment. Consistent with the in vivo results, the in vitro study showed that the addition of ginseng protected against cyclosporine-induced cytotoxicity, inflammation, and apoptotic cell death. These in vivo and in vitro changes were accompanied by decreases in the levels of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine in pancreatic β cell in tissue section, serum, and culture media during cotreatment of ginseng with cyclosporine. Conclusions The results of our in vivo and in vitro studies demonstrate that ginseng has a protective effect against cyclosporine-induced pancreatic β cell injury via reducing oxidative stress. PMID:24009697

  3. Oral immunization with a Salmonella enterica serovar typhi vaccine induces specific circulating mucosa-homing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in humans.

    PubMed

    Lundin, B Samuel; Johansson, Camilla; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2002-10-01

    The kinetics and homing characteristics of T-cell responses in humans after mucosal immunizations have not been well characterized. Therefore, we have investigated the magnitude and duration of such responses as well as the homing receptor expression of antigen-specific peripheral blood T cells by using an oral model vaccine, i.e., the live, attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi vaccine (Ty21a). Eight volunteers were each given three doses of the vaccine 2 days apart, and blood samples, from which CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were selected by the use of magnetic beads, were collected before vaccination and at regular intervals thereafter. To purify the potentially antigen-specific gut-homing T cells, CD45RA(-) integrin beta(7)(+) cells were further sorted by flow cytometry. The sorted cells were then stimulated in vitro with the serovar Typhi vaccine strain, and the proliferation of cells and the cytokine production were measured. Following vaccination, there was a large increase in both the proliferation of and the gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) production by blood T cells stimulated with the vaccine strain. The responses were seen among both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, although the CD8(+) cells produced the largest amounts of IFN-gamma. Peak responses were seen 7 to 14 days after the onset of vaccination. Furthermore, most of the IFN-gamma produced by both CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells emanated from cells with the potential to home to mucosal tissues, as the integrin beta(7)-expressing memory T cells produced around 10-fold more IFN-gamma than the remaining populations. In conclusion, we demonstrate that oral vaccination with a live oral bacterial vaccine induces antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) memory T cells, almost all of which express the gut-homing integrin beta(7). PMID:12228290

  4. Biological effects caused by low-power laser light in the treatment of the dentition, periodontium, and mucosa of oral cavity, and lip diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunin, Anatoly A.; Erina, Stanislava V.; Kashuba, Victor A.; Pankova, Svetlana N.; Stepanov, Nicolay N.; Kazmina, Svetlana G.; Dergunova, Elvira I.; Buerger, F.; Herdt, Alexander; Podolskaya, Elana E.; Shumilovitch, Bogdan R.; Ippolitov, Yu. A.; Tchernov, V. I.

    1997-12-01

    Nowadays low-power therapy is one of the leading trends in a combined treatment of the oral cavity and lips diseases. The present paper sums up the results of the investigation into the biological effects caused by low-power laser light (LPLL) during its interaction with hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity and lips. A research on the effect of LPLL upon the remineralization processes in the hard dental tissues in the stage in the stage of an initial caries was carried out in 150 patients. The biological effects caused by an interaction of LPLL with the parodontium tissues in the process of treatment of medium degree disease of the parodontium were studied in 140 patients; the effects of the above mentioned character which generated in lips tissues during treatment of a post-radiation chilitis were analyzed in 32 patients. Immunological, biochemical histochemical, morphological, stomatoscopic, bacteriological and other methods were employed while studying the bioeffects caused by LPLL in the parodontium, lips tissues and hard tissues of the tooth.

  5. Oral Administration of Gintonin Attenuates Cholinergic Impairments by Scopolamine, Amyloid-β Protein, and Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Shin, Eun-Joo; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Choi, Sun-Hye; Jung, Seok-Won; Cho, Ik-Hyun; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Kim, Joon Yong; Han, Jung-Soo; Chung, ChiHye; Jang, Choon-Gon; Rhim, Hyewon; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2015-09-01

    Gintonin is a novel ginseng-derived lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor ligand. Oral administration of gintonin ameliorates learning and memory dysfunctions in Alzheimer's disease (AD) animal models. The brain cholinergic system plays a key role in cognitive functions. The brains of AD patients show a reduction in acetylcholine concentration caused by cholinergic system impairments. However, little is known about the role of LPA in the cholinergic system. In this study, we used gintonin to investigate the effect of LPA receptor activation on the cholinergic system in vitro and in vivo using wild-type and AD animal models. Gintonin induced [Ca(2+)]i transient in cultured mouse hippocampal neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Gintonin-mediated [Ca(2+)]i transients were linked to stimulation of acetylcholine release through LPA receptor activation. Oral administration of gintonin-enriched fraction (25, 50, or 100 mg/kg, 3 weeks) significantly attenuated scopolamine-induced memory impairment. Oral administration of gintonin (25 or 50 mg/kg, 2 weeks) also significantly attenuated amyloid-β protein (Aβ)-induced cholinergic dysfunctions, such as decreased acetylcholine concentration, decreased choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity and immunoreactivity, and increased acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity. In a transgenic AD mouse model, long-term oral administration of gintonin (25 or 50 mg/kg, 3 months) also attenuated AD-related cholinergic impairments. In this study, we showed that activation of G protein-coupled LPA receptors by gintonin is coupled to the regulation of cholinergic functions. Furthermore, this study showed that gintonin could be a novel agent for the restoration of cholinergic system damages due to Aβ and could be utilized for AD prevention or therapy. PMID:26255830

  6. Rectal mucosa in cows' milk allergy.

    PubMed Central

    Iyngkaran, N; Yadav, M; Boey, C G

    1989-01-01

    Eleven infants who were suspected clinically of having cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy were fed with a protein hydrolysate formula for six to eight weeks, after which they had jejunal and rectal biopsies taken before and 24 hours after challenge with cows' milk protein. When challenged six infants (group 1) developed clinical symptoms and five did not (group 2). In group 1 the lesions developed in both the jejunal mucosa (four infants at 24 hours and one at three days), and the rectal mucosa, and the injury was associated with depletion of alkaline phosphatase activity. Infants in group 2 were normal. It seems that rectal injury that develops as a direct consequence of oral challenge with the protein in reactive infants may be used as one of the measurements to confirm the diagnosis of cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy. Moreover, ingestion of such food proteins may injure the distal colonic mucosa without affecting the proximal small gut in some infants. PMID:2817945

  7. Exploratory study of oral mucosal colonization of human gastric Helicobacter pylori in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xueqin; Tang, Dongsheng; Zhang, Xiaohuan; Li, Hongming; Cui, Zhixin; Hu, Sijuan; Huang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    In this study, human gastric Helicobacter pylori (Hp) was closely attached to the pre-treated mouse buccal mucosa by using artificial oral film to induce the growth and colonization of Hp on the buccal mucosa in mice. Sixty BALB/c mice were divided into three groups, in which Hp biofilm colonization was detected in three mice in Hp film group (Hp mesh biofilm accumulation under an optical microscope; Hp accumulated colonization under an electron microscope). There were no Hp biofilms detected in Hp smear group or the control group with black film. In this study, human gastric Hp was first used to artificially induce the growth and colonization of Hp on the buccal mucosa in mice. The mouse model of oral infection with Hp was initially established, providing animal experimental evidences for oral conditions of growth and colonization of Hp on the buccal mucosa in mice, and providing a workable animal modeling method for further research of joint infection of Hp on the mouth and stomach, as well as the relationship between oral Hp and gastric Hp. PMID:24753744

  8. DIGESTIBILITY AND ORAL TOLERANCE IN A MOUSE MODEL FOR FOOD ALLERGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An animal model for food allergy is needed to test novel proteins produced through biotechnology for potential allergenicity. We demonstrate that mice can distinguish allergens from non-allergens when exposed to foods orally, both in terms of oral tolerance and allergic antibody ...

  9. RELATIVE POTENCY OF ORAL ANTIGENS IN PROVOKING FOOD ALLERGY IN THE MOUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: An animal model for food allergy is needed to test novel proteins produced through biotechnology for potential allergenicity. While the oral route is the most relevant method of exposure, oral tolerance is an impediment. We demonstrate that mice can distinguish...

  10. The short- and long-term effects of orally administered high-dose reduced graphene oxide nanosheets on mouse behaviors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ding; Zhang, Zheyu; Liu, Yayun; Chu, Maoquan; Yang, Chengyu; Li, Wenhao; Shao, Yuxiang; Yue, Yan; Xu, Rujiao

    2015-11-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO), a carbon-based nanomaterial, has enormous potential in biomedical research, including in vivo cancer therapeutics. Concerns over the toxicity remain outstanding and must be investigated before clinical application. The effect of rGO exposure on animal behaviors, such as learning and memory abilities, has not been clarified. Herein, we explored the short- and long-term effects of orally administered rGO on mouse behaviors, including general locomotor activity level, balance and neuromuscular coordination, exploratory and anxiety behaviors, and learning and memory abilities using open-field, rotarod, and Morris water maze tests. Compared with mice administered buffer-dispersed mouse chow or buffer alone, mice receiving a high dose of small or large rGO nanosheets showed little change in exploratory, anxiety-like, or learning and memory behaviors, although general locomotor activity, balance, and neuromuscular coordination were initially affected, which the mechanisms (e.g. the influence of rGO exposure on the activity of superoxide dismutase in mouse serum) were discussed. The results presented in this work look to provide a deep understanding of the in vivo toxicity of rGO to animals, especially its effect on learning and memory and other behaviors. PMID:26276695

  11. Comparative toxicogenomic analysis of oral Cr(VI) exposure effects in rat and mouse small intestinal epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Kopec, Anna K.; Thompson, Chad M.; Kim, Suntae; Forgacs, Agnes L.; Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2012-07-15

    Continuous exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in drinking water results in intestinal tumors in mice but not rats. Concentration-dependent gene expression effects were evaluated in female F344 rat duodenal and jejunal epithelia following 7 and 90 days of exposure to 0.3–520 mg/L (as sodium dichromate dihydrate, SDD) in drinking water. Whole-genome microarrays identified 3269 and 1815 duodenal, and 4557 and 1534 jejunal differentially expressed genes at 8 and 91 days, respectively, with significant overlaps between the intestinal segments. Functional annotation identified gene expression changes associated with oxidative stress, cell cycle, cell death, and immune response that were consistent with reported changes in redox status and histopathology. Comparative analysis with B6C3F1 mouse data from a similarly designed study identified 2790 differentially expressed rat orthologs in the duodenum compared to 5013 mouse orthologs at day 8, and only 1504 rat and 3484 mouse orthologs at day 91. Automated dose–response modeling resulted in similar median EC{sub 50}s in the rodent duodenal and jejunal mucosae. Comparative examination of differentially expressed genes also identified divergently regulated orthologs. Comparable numbers of differentially expressed genes were observed at equivalent Cr concentrations (μg Cr/g duodenum). However, mice accumulated higher Cr levels than rats at ≥ 170 mg/L SDD, resulting in a ∼ 2-fold increase in the number of differentially expressed genes. These qualitative and quantitative differences in differential gene expression, which correlate with differences in tissue dose, likely contribute to the disparate intestinal tumor outcomes. -- Highlights: ► Cr(VI) elicits dose-dependent changes in gene expression in rat intestine. ► Cr(VI) elicits less differential gene expression in rats compared to mice. ► Cr(VI) gene expression can be phenotypically anchored to intestinal changes. ► Species

  12. Mouse Single Oral Dose Toxicity Study of DHU001, a Polyherbal Formula

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Seong-Soo

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to obtain acute information of the oral dose toxicity of DHU001, a polyherbal formula in male and female mice. In order to calculated 50% lethal dose (LD50) and approximate lethal dose (LD) , test material was once orally administered to male and female ICR mice at dose levels of 2000, 1000, 500, 250 and 0 (vehicle control) ml/kg (body weight) . The mortality and changes on body weight, clinical signs, gross observation, organ weight and histopathology of principle organs were monitored 14 days after treatment with DHU001. We could not find any mortalities, DHU001 treatment-related clinical signs, changes on the body and organ weights, gross and histopathological findings. The results obtained in this study suggest that LD50 and approximate LD in mice after single oral dose of DHU001 were considered over 2000 mg/kg in both female and male mice. PMID:24278506

  13. Developmental changes in primary cilia in the mouse tooth germ and oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Hisamoto, Meri; Goto, Marie; Muto, Mami; Nio-Kobayashi, Junko; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilium, a sensory apparatus, functions as both a chemical and mechanical sensor to receive environmental stimuli. The present study focused on the primary cilia in the epithelialmesenchymal interaction during tooth development. We examined the localization and direction of projection of primary cilia in the tooth germ and oral cavity of mice by immunohistochemical observation. Adenylyl cyclase 3 (ACIII)-immunolabeled cilia were visible in the inner/outer enamel epithelium of molars at the fetal stage and then conspicuously developed in the odontoblast layer postnatally. The primary cilia in ameloblasts and odontoblasts-shown by the double staining of acetylated tubulin and γ-tubulin-were regularly arranged from postnatal Day12, projecting apart from each other. The periodontal ligament possessed ACIII-positive cilia, which gathered on both sides of the dentin/cement and alveolar bone in postnatal days. In the oral cavity, numerous long primary cilia immunoreactive for ACIII were condensed at subepithelial stromal cells in the oral processes in fetuses, while postnatally a small number of short cilia were dispersed throughout the stroma of the oral cavity. These findings suggest that the primary cilia showing stage- and regionspecific morphology are involved in the epithelial-mesenchymal interaction during tooth development via mechano- and/or chemoreception for growth factors. PMID:27356608

  14. YAP Regulates the Expression of Hoxa1 and Hoxc13 in Mouse and Human Oral and Skin Epithelial Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming; Zhao, Shuangyun; Lin, Qingjie

    2015-01-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a Hippo signaling transcriptional coactivator that plays pivotal roles in stem cell proliferation, organ size control, and tumor development. The downstream targets of YAP have been shown to be highly context dependent. In this study, we used the embryonic mouse tooth germ as a tool to search for the downstream targets of YAP in ectoderm-derived tissues. Yap deficiency in the dental epithelium resulted in a small tooth germ with reduced epithelial cell proliferation. We compared the gene expression profiles of embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) Yap conditional knockout and YAP transgenic mouse tooth germs using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) and further confirmed the differentially expressed genes using real-time PCR and in situ hybridization. We found that YAP regulates the expression of Hoxa1 and Hoxc13 in oral and dental epithelial tissues as well as in the epidermis of skin during embryonic and adult stages. Sphere formation assay suggested that Hoxa1 and Hoxc13 are functionally involved in YAP-regulated epithelial progenitor cell proliferation, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay implies that YAP may regulate Hoxa1 and Hoxc13 expression through TEAD transcription factors. These results provide mechanistic insights into abnormal YAP activities in mice and humans. PMID:25691658

  15. 4-N-pyridin-2-yl-benzamide nanotubes compatible with mouse stem cell and oral delivery in Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Jhillu S.; Lavanya, Madugula P.; Das, Pragna P.; Bag, Indira; Krishnan, Anita; Jagannadh, Bulusu; Mohapatra, Debendra K.; Pal Bhadra, Manika; Bhadra, Utpal

    2010-04-01

    p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), a structural moiety of many commercial drugs, is self-assembled with linker alkyl side chains to form tubular nanostructures. The tubes exhibited fluorescence either intrinsic or from fluorescent molecules embedded in the wall during self-assembly. Uptake and inter-cellular delivery of the conjugated nanotubes in human cancer cells and in mouse embryonic stem cells were demonstrated by fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry. Biocompatibility, cytotoxicity and clearance were monitored both ex vivo in mouse multipotent embryonic stem cells and in vivo in adult Drosophila. Accumulation of nanotubes had no adverse effects and abnormalities on stem cell morphology and proliferation rate. A distinct distribution of two separate nanotubes in various internal organs of Drosophila interprets that accumulation of nanomaterials might be interdependent on the side chain modifications and physiological settings of cell or tissue types. Unlike carbon nanomaterials, exposure of PABA nanotubes does not produce any hazards including locomotion defects and mortality of adult flies. Despite differential uptake and clearance from multiple live tissues, the use of self-assembled nanotubes can add new dimensions and scope to the development of dual-purpose oral carriers for the fulfilment of many biological promises.

  16. Oral Triphenylmethane Food Dye Analog, Brilliant Blue G, Prevents Neuronal Loss in APPSwDI/NOS2-/- Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Jacob A; Erisir, Alev; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-01-01

    Reducing amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation is a promising strategy for developing Alzheimer's Disease (AD) therapeutics. We recently reported that a triphenylmethane food dye analog, Brilliant Blue G (BBG), is a dose-dependent modulator of in vitro amyloid-β aggregation and cytotoxicity in cell-based assays. Following up on this recent work, we sought to further evaluate this novel modulator in a therapeutically-relevant AD transgenic mouse model. BBG was orally administered to APPSwDI/NOS2-/- mice for three months in order to assess its biocompatibility, its permeability across the blood-brain barrier, and its efficacy at rescuing AD pathology. The results showed that BBG was well-tolerated, caused no significant weight change/unusual behavior, and was able to significantly cross the AD blood-brain barrier in APPSwDI/NOS2-/- mice. Immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analysis of the brain sections revealed that BBG was able to significantly prevent neuronal loss and reduce intracellular APP/Aβ in hippocampal neurons. This is the first report of 1) the effect of Brilliant Blue G on neuronal loss in a transgenic animal model of AD, 2) oral administration of BBG to affect a protein conformation/aggregation disease, and 3) electron microscopic ultrastructural analysis of AD pathology in APPSwDI/NOS2-/- mice. PMID:26852943

  17. [Prevention of oral cancer].

    PubMed

    Roodenburg, J L; Vermey, A; Nauta, J M

    1994-05-01

    Etiology control is the most important primary prevention of oral cancer. The use of tobacco and alcohol increases the risk of a squamous cell carcinoma of the oral mucosa. The dentist can play an important role in the secondary prevention or screening for premalignant lesions, asymptomatic malignancies and second primary tumours of the oral cavity. Because of their age, edentulous patients run a high risk of oral cancer. Therefore, a regular oral check-up of these patients should be recommended. PMID:11830977

  18. Hyperspectral imaging of neoplastic progression in a mouse model of oral carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guolan; Qin, Xulei; Wang, Dongsheng; Muller, Susan; Zhang, Hongzheng; Chen, Amy; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2016-03-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an emerging modality for medical applications and holds great potential for noninvasive early detection of cancer. It has been reported that early cancer detection can improve the survival and quality of life of head and neck cancer patients. In this paper, we explored the possibility of differentiating between premalignant lesions and healthy tongue tissue using hyperspectral imaging in a chemical induced oral cancer animal model. We proposed a novel classification algorithm for cancer detection using hyperspectral images. The method detected the dysplastic tissue with an average area under the curve (AUC) of 0.89. The hyperspectral imaging and classification technique may provide a new tool for oral cancer detection.

  19. Morphoclinical aspects of the human paraprostethic gingival mucosa.

    PubMed

    Scrieciu, Monica; Niculescu, Mihaela; Mercuţ, Veronica; Andrei, Victoria; Pancă, Oana Adina

    2005-01-01

    The multiple and various changes that the human gingival mucosa undergoes when coming into contact with a denture, require a histopathological study correlated with that of clinical manifestations. The highlighting of the histological lesions of the prosthetic field's mucosa is extremely important in the study concerning the tolerance of the oral cavity tissues towards the materials of dentures, because it has been observed that different materials can cause the same type of clinical changes. The clinical research has been carried out having as a basis a group of patients, carriers of fixed dentures made of different materials, the study method consisting in their clinical evaluation. The investigation of microscopic preparations, obtained through drawing mucosa from those patients under study, has been made by using both usual colorations for an overall examination of the tissue architecture, as well as special colorations for pointing out certain structures. The results of the investigation have made clear the fact that the clinical changes of the prosthetic field's mucosa can be adaptable to the denture or can react pathologically to the various possibilities of denture aggression. The histopathological picture of the paraprosthetic mucosa lesions is polymorphous due to the morphofunctional complexity as well as to the reacting capacity of the oral mucosa when interfering with a fixed denture. PMID:16688373

  20. Oral Immunization with Cholera Toxin Provides Protection against Campylobacter jejuni in an Adult Mouse Intestinal Colonization Model

    PubMed Central

    Albert, M. John; Mustafa, Abu Salim; Islam, Anjum; Haridas, Shilpa

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Immunity to Campylobacter jejuni, a major diarrheal pathogen, is largely Penner serotype specific. For broad protection, a vaccine should be based on a common antigen(s) present in all strains. In our previous study (M. J. Albert, S. Haridas, D. Steer, G. S. Dhaunsi, A. I. Smith, and B. Adler, Infect. Immun. 75:3070–3073, 2007), we demonstrated that antibody to cholera toxin (CT) cross-reacted with the major outer membrane proteins (MOMPs) of all Campylobacter jejuni strains tested. In the current study, we investigated whether immunization with CT protects against intestinal colonization by C. jejuni in an adult mouse model and whether the nontoxic subunit of CT (CT-B) is the portion mediating cross-reaction. Mice were orally immunized with CT and later challenged with C. jejuni strains (48, 75, and 111) of different serotypes. Control animals were immunized with phosphate-buffered saline. Fecal shedding of challenge organisms was studied daily for 9 days. Serum and fecal antibody responses were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblotting. The cross-reactivity of rabbit CT-B antibody to MOMP was studied by immunoblotting. The reactivity of 21 overlapping 30-mer oligopeptides (based on MOMP’s sequence) against rabbit CT antibody was tested by ELISA. Test animals produced antibodies to CT and MMP in serum and feces and showed resistance to colonization, the vaccine efficacies being 49% (for strain 48), 37% (for strain 75), and 34% (for strain 111) (P, ≤0.05 to ≤0.001). One peptide corresponding to a variable region of MOMP showed significant reactivity. CT-B antibody cross-reacted with MOMP. Since CT-B is a component of oral cholera vaccines, it might be possible to control C. jejuni diarrhea with these vaccines. PMID:23653448

  1. Dual Inhibition of VEGFR and EGFR is an Effective Chemopreventive Strategy in the Mouse 4-NQO Model of Oral Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guolin; Hasina, Rifat; Wroblewski, Kristen; Mankame, Tanmayi P.; Doçi, Colleen L.; Lingen, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent therapeutic advances, several factors, including field cancerization, have limited improvements in long-term survival for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Therefore, comprehensive treatment plans must include improved chemopreventive strategies. Using the 4-Nitroquinoline 1-Oxide (4-NQO) mouse model, we tested the hypothesis that ZD6474 (Vandetanib, ZACTIMA) is an effective chemopreventive agent. CBA mice were fed 4-NQO (100 ug/ml) in their drinking water for 8 weeks and then randomized to no treatment or oral ZD6474 (25 mg/Kg/day) for 24 weeks. The percentage of animals with OSCC was significantly different between the two groups (71% in control and 12% in ZD6474 group; p≤0.001). The percentage of mice with dysplasia or OSCC was significantly different (96% in the control and 28% in the ZD6474 group; p≤0.001). Proliferation and MVD scores were significantly decreased in the ZD6474 group (p<=0.001 for both). While proliferation and MVD increased with histologic progression in control and treatment cohorts, EGFR and VEGFR-2 phosphorylation was decreased in the treatment group for each histologic diagnosis, including mice harboring tumors. OSCC from ZD6474-treated mice exhibited features of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), as demonstrated by loss E-cadherin and gain of vimentin protein expression. These data suggest that ZD6474 holds promise as an OSCC chemopreventive agent. They further suggest that acquired resistance to ZD6474 may be mediated by the expression of an EMT phenotype. Finally, the data suggests that this model is a useful pre-clinical platform to investigate the mechanisms of acquired resistance in the chemopreventive setting. PMID:20978113

  2. Multi-photon Imaging of Tumor Cell Invasion in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gatesman Ammer, Amanda; Hayes, Karen E.; Martin, Karen H.; Zhang, Lingqing; Spirou, George A.; Weed, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Loco-regional invasion of head and neck cancer is linked to metastatic risk and presents a difficult challenge in designing and implementing patient management strategies. Orthotopic mouse models of oral cancer have been developed to facilitate the study of factors that impact invasion and serve as model system for evaluating anti-tumor therapeutics. In these systems, visualization of disseminated tumor cells within oral cavity tissues has typically been conducted by either conventional histology or with in vivo bioluminescent methods. A primary drawback of these techniques is the inherent inability to accurately visualize and quantify early tumor cell invasion arising from the primary site in three dimensions. Here we describe a protocol that combines an established model for squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue (SCOT) with two-photon imaging to allow multi-vectorial visualization of lingual tumor spread. The OSC-19 head and neck tumor cell line was stably engineered to express the F-actin binding peptide LifeAct fused to the mCherry fluorescent protein (LifeAct-mCherry). Fox1nu/nu mice injected with these cells reliably form tumors that allow the tongue to be visualized by ex-vivo application of two-photon microscopy. This technique allows for the orthotopic visualization of the tumor mass and locally invading cells in excised tongues without disruption of the regional tumor microenvironment. In addition, this system allows for the quantification of tumor cell invasion by calculating distances that invaded cells move from the primary tumor site. Overall this procedure provides an enhanced model system for analyzing factors that contribute to SCOT invasion and therapeutic treatments tailored to prevent local invasion and distant metastatic spread. This method also has the potential to be ultimately combined with other imaging modalities in an in vivo setting. PMID:21808230

  3. Effects of garlic preparations on the gastrointestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, T; Kashimoto, N; Kasuga, S

    2001-03-01

    The effects of garlic preparations, including dehydrated raw garlic powder (RGP), dehydrated boiled garlic powder (BGP) and aged garlic extract (AGE), on the gastric mucosa were determined using a newly established endoscopic air-powder delivery system, which can deliver solid materials directly into the stomach. Among the three preparations, RGP caused severe damage, including erosion. BGP also caused reddening of the mucosa, whereas AGE did not cause any undesirable effects. The safety of enteric-coated garlic products was also determined. Direct administration of pulverized enteric-coated products on the gastric mucosa caused reddening of the mucosa. When an enteric-coated tablet was administered orally, it caused loss of epithelial cells at the top of crypts in the ileum. These results suggest that caution be used with regard to safety and effectiveness when choosing a garlic preparation because some preparations may have undesirable effects, including gastrointestinal problems. PMID:11238827

  4. Vital-dye-enhanced multimodal imaging of neoplastic progression in a mouse model of oral carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellebust, Anne; Rosbach, Kelsey; Wu, Jessica Keren; Nguyen, Jennifer; Gillenwater, Ann; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    In this longitudinal study, a mouse model of 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide chemically induced tongue carcinogenesis was used to assess the ability of optical imaging with exogenous and endogenous contrast to detect neoplastic lesions in a heterogeneous mucosal surface. Widefield autofluorescence and fluorescence images of intact 2-NBDG-stained and proflavine-stained tissues were acquired at multiple time points in the carcinogenesis process. Confocal fluorescence images of transverse fresh tissue slices from the same specimens were acquired to investigate how changes in tissue microarchitecture affect widefield fluorescence images of intact tissue. Widefield images were analyzed to develop and evaluate an algorithm to delineate areas of dysplasia and cancer. A classification algorithm for the presence of neoplasia based on the mean fluorescence intensity of 2-NBDG staining and the standard deviation of the fluorescence intensity of proflavine staining was found to separate moderate dysplasia, severe dysplasia, and cancer from non-neoplastic regions of interest with 91% sensitivity and specificity. Results suggest this combination of noninvasive optical imaging modalities can be used in vivo to discriminate non-neoplastic from neoplastic tissue in this model with the potential to translate this technology to the clinic.

  5. Oral administration of acarbose ameliorates imiquimod-induced psoriasis-like dermatitis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Hua; Chao, Ya-Hsuan; Chen, Der-Yuan; Yang, Deng-Ho; Chung, Ting-Wen; Li, Yi-Rong; Lin, Chi Chen

    2016-04-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune disease of undefined etiology that involves dysregulated interplay between immune cells and keratinocytes. Acarbose was found to decrease inflammatory parameters in diabetic patients in addition to its anti-diabetic effects. Here, we report that imiquimod (IMQ)-induced epidermal hyperplasia and psoriasis like-inflammation were significantly inhibited by acarbose treatment. Real-time PCR showed that mRNA levels of the cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β IL-17A, and IL-22 in skin were also decreased significantly by acarbose. In addition, we found that acarbose reduced infiltration of CD3(+) T cells and GR-1(+) neutrophils in lesional skin and also reduced the percentage of IL-17-producing CD4(+) T cells (Th17) and IL-17- and IL-22-producing γδ T cells in the spleen. In contrast, acarbose increased the frequency of IL-10-producing CD4(+) regulator Tr1 T cells in the spleen and small intestine. These results indicate that oral administration of acarbose can attenuate the severity of imiquimod-induced psoriasis with local and systemic anti-inflammatory and immune modulation effects, thus suggesting that acarbose is an effective therapeutic strategy for psoriasis regulation. PMID:26874324

  6. [Oral viral infections].

    PubMed

    Parent, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    Exclude herpes infection in the presence of acute oral ulcers of unknown origin, particularly in patients in poor general condition. Remember that asymptomatic HSV-1 shedding in saliva may result in an oral-genital transmission. Perform an anogenital examination and a screening for other sexually transmitted diseases when oral warts are diagnosed. Search for immunosuppression and monitor the patient (screening for a potential associated carcinoma) when there is rapid growth of oral warts. Consider all the clinical signs (systemic, skin, other mucosa, immunity...) when a patient has an enanthem or oral ulcerations. Ask for a HIV test when an oral Kaposi's sarcoma, a hairy leukoplakia or major aphthae are diagnosed. PMID:26854091

  7. A surprising cross-species conservation in the genomic landscape of mouse and human oral cancer identifies a transcriptional signature predicting metastatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Onken, Michael D.; Winkler, Ashley E.; Kanchi, Krishna-Latha; Chalivendra, Varun; Law, Jonathan H.; Rickert, Charles G.; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Judd, Nancy P.; Dunn, Gavin P.; Piccirillo, Jay F.; Lewis, James S.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Uppaluri, Ravindra

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Improved understanding of the molecular basis underlying oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) aggressive growth has significant clinical implications. Herein, cross-species genomic comparison of carcinogen-induced murine and human OSCCs with indolent or metastatic growth yielded results with surprising translational relevance. Experimental Design Murine OSCC cell lines were subjected to next-generation sequencing (NGS) to define their mutational landscape, to define novel candidate cancer genes and to assess for parallels with known drivers in human OSCC. Expression arrays identified a mouse metastasis signature and we assessed its representation in 4 independent human datasets comprising 324 patients using weighted voting and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA). Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling were used to stratify outcomes. A qRT-PCR assay based on the mouse signature coupled to a machine-learning algorithm was developed and used to stratify an independent set of 31 patients with respect to metastatic lymphadenopathy. Results NGS revealed conservation of human driver pathway mutations in mouse OSCC including in Trp53, MAPK, PI3K, NOTCH, JAK/STAT and FAT1–4. Moreover, comparative analysis between The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and mouse samples defined AKAP9, MED12L and MYH6 as novel putative cancer genes. Expression analysis identified a transcriptional signature predicting aggressiveness and clinical outcomes, which were validated in 4 independent human OSCC datasets. Finally, we harnessed the translational potential of this signature by creating a clinically feasible assay that stratified OSCC patients with a 93.5% accuracy. Conclusions These data demonstrate surprising cross-species genomic conservation that has translational relevance for human oral squamous cell cancer. PMID:24668645

  8. Oral Administration of Gintonin Attenuates Cholinergic Impairments by Scopolamine, Amyloid-β Protein, and Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Shin, Eun-Joo; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Choi, Sun-Hye; Jung, Seok-Won; Cho, Ik-Hyun; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Kim, Joon Yong; Han, Jung-Soo; Chung, ChiHye; Jang, Choon-Gon; Rhim, Hyewon; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Gintonin is a novel ginseng-derived lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor ligand. Oral administration of gintonin ameliorates learning and memory dysfunctions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) animal models. The brain cholinergic system plays a key role in cognitive functions. The brains of AD patients show a reduction in acetylcholine concentration caused by cholinergic system impairments. However, little is known about the role of LPA in the cholinergic system. In this study, we used gintonin to investigate the effect of LPA receptor activation on the cholinergic system in vitro and in vivo using wild-type and AD animal models. Gintonin induced [Ca2+]i transient in cultured mouse hippocampal neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Gintonin-mediated [Ca2+]i transients were linked to stimulation of acetylcholine release through LPA receptor activation. Oral administration of gintonin-enriched fraction (25, 50, or 100 mg/kg, 3 weeks) significantly attenuated scopolamine-induced memory impairment. Oral administration of gintonin (25 or 50 mg/kg, 2 weeks) also significantly attenuated amyloid-β protein (Aβ)-induced cholinergic dysfunctions, such as decreased acetylcholine concentration, decreased choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity and immunoreactivity, and increased acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity. In a transgenic AD mouse model, long-term oral administration of gintonin (25 or 50 mg/kg, 3 months) also attenuated AD-related cholinergic impairments. In this study, we showed that activation of G protein-coupled LPA receptors by gintonin is coupled to the regulation of cholinergic functions. Furthermore, this study showed that gintonin could be a novel agent for the restoration of cholinergic system damages due to Aβ and could be utilized for AD prevention or therapy. PMID:26255830

  9. Drug-induced lesions of the oesophageal mucosa.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    Lesions of the oesophageal mucosa are observed in various situations: most often with gastrooesophageal reflux disease, but also with infections, cancer, contact with a toxic substance, etc. When they are symptomatic, these lesions provoke burning sensations, dysphagia, regurgitation and sometimes dorsal pain. The changes to the oesophageal mucosa may take various forms: inflammation, erosion, ulceration or necrosis. Serious or even fatal complications can develop but are rare; they include oesophageal perforation, stricture and haemorrhage. Some oral drugs damage the oesophageal mucosa through direct contact. The symptoms often develop several hours after ingestion. The pain is of sudden onset. The resulting lesions are solitary or multiple ulcers that vary in depth and usually occur in the upper portion of the oesophagus. Various factors prolong contact between a drug and the oesophageal mucosa, in particular: swallowing the drug with insufficient liquid or just before lying down; capsule forms; and oesophageal abnormalities. The drugs most frequently implicated are tetracyclines, particularly doxycycline, bisphosphonates and various nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Many drugs, used in various situations, provoke gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, sometimes causing mucosal lesions in the lower oesophagus: calcium-channel blockers, nitrates, exenatide and liraglutide, drugs with antimuscarinic effects, theophylline, etc. Some drugs affect all mucous membranes in the body, including the oesophageal mucosa, irrespective of their route of administration: cancer drugs, isotretinoin, and nicorandil. PMID:26417631

  10. Cleft palate cells can regenerate a palatal mucosa in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Lamme, E N; Steegers-Theunissen, R P M; Krapels, I P C; Bian, Z; Marres, H; Spauwen, P H M; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M; Von den Hoff, J W

    2008-08-01

    Cleft palate repair leaves full-thickness mucosal defects on the palate. Healing might be improved by implantation of a mucosal substitute. However, the genetic and phenotypic deviations of cleft palate cells may hamper tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to construct mucosal substitutes from cleft palate cells, and to compare these with substitutes from normal palatal cells, and with native palatal mucosa. Biopsies from the palatal mucosa of eight children with cleft palate and eight age-matched control individuals were taken. Three biopsies of both groups were processed for (immuno)histochemistry; 5 were used to culture mucosal substitutes. Histology showed that the substitutes from cleft-palate and non-cleft-palate cells were comparable, but the number of cell layers was less than in native palatal mucosa. All epithelial layers in native palatal mucosa and mucosal substitutes expressed the cytokeratins 5, 10, and 16, and the proliferation marker Ki67. Heparan sulphate and decorin were present in the basal membrane and the underlying connective tissue, respectively. We conclude that mucosal cells from children with cleft palate can regenerate an oral mucosa in vitro. PMID:18650554

  11. Condyloma acuminatum of the buccal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Rashmi; Pandey, Manoj; Shukla, Mridula; Kumar, Mohan

    2014-06-01

    Condyloma acuminatum is a human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced disease. It is usually transmitted sexually, and it frequently occurs in the anogenital area. A finding of condyloma acuminatum in the oral cavity is rare. Besides HPV, other risk factors for oral condyloma include chewing betel quid and smoking. We report the case of a 52-year-old man who presented with a 2 × 2-cm verrucous white patch on his buccal mucosa. He was habituated to both betel quid and cigarette smoking. A biopsy of the lesion identified it as a verrucous hyperplasia of the squamous epithelium with HPV-related koilocytic changes. The lesion was excised, and further histopathology identified it as condyloma acuminatum. The patient was disease-free 9 months postoperatively. The possibility of condyloma acuminatum should be considered in the differential diagnosis of an oral white lesion. The most common treatments are surgical excision, cryosurgery, electrocautery, and laser excision. There is no known role for antiviral therapy. PMID:24932820

  12. Distant Skin Metastases from Carcinoma Buccal Mucosa: A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Shashank; Leekha, Nitin; Gupta, Sweety; Mithal, Umang; Arora, Vandana; De, Sudarsan

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity makes up approximately 30% of all head and neck region tumors. Skin metastasis is rare with an incidence ranging between 0.7% and 2.4%. Skin metastasis usually occurs in the neck, scalp, and over the skin near the primary site. We report a patient with carcinoma left buccal mucosa who presented with distant skin metastases to the right side chest wall. PMID:27512210

  13. Distant Skin Metastases from Carcinoma Buccal Mucosa: A Rare Presentation.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Shashank; Leekha, Nitin; Gupta, Sweety; Mithal, Umang; Arora, Vandana; De, Sudarsan

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity makes up approximately 30% of all head and neck region tumors. Skin metastasis is rare with an incidence ranging between 0.7% and 2.4%. Skin metastasis usually occurs in the neck, scalp, and over the skin near the primary site. We report a patient with carcinoma left buccal mucosa who presented with distant skin metastases to the right side chest wall. PMID:27512210

  14. Extensive amalgam tattoo on the alveolar-gingival mucosa.

    PubMed

    Galletta, Vivian C; Artico, Gabriela; Dal Vechio, Aluana M C; Lemos Jr, Celso A; Migliari, Dante A

    2011-01-01

    Amalgam tattoos are common exogenous pigmented lesions of the oral mucosa occurring mainly by inadvertent placement of amalgam particles into soft tissues. The diagnosis of amalgam tattoo is simple, usually based on clinical findings associated with presence or history of amalgam fillings removal. Intraoral X-rays may be helpful in detecting amalgam-related radiopacity. In cases where amalgam tattoo cannot be differentiated from other causes of oral pigmentation, a biopsy should be performed. This article deals with an extensive amalgam tattoo lesion which required a biopsy for a definitive diagnosis. PMID:22147048

  15. The drug efficacy and adverse reactions in a mouse model of oral squamous cell carcinoma treated with oxaliplatin at different time points during a day

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai; Zhao, Ningbo; Zhao, Dan; Chen, Dan; Li, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that the growth and proliferation of cancer cells in vivo exhibit circadian rhythm, and the efficacy and adverse reactions of platinum-based anticancer drugs administered at different times of the day vary significantly on colon cancer. However, since the circadian rhythms of growth and proliferation of various cancer cells often differ, the question of whether the administration of platinum anticancer drugs at different times of the day exerts significantly different efficacy and adverse effects on oral cancers remains to be elucidated. This study has compared the efficacy and adverse effects of oxaliplatin (L-OHP) administration at different times during a day on oral squamous cell carcinoma in mice and has analyzed cellular circadian rhythms. Methods The mouse model for oral squamous cell carcinoma was established in 75 nude mice, housed in a 12 hour light/12 hour dark cycle environment. The mice were randomly divided into five groups; four experimental groups were intravenously injected with L-OHP at four time points within a 24-hour period (4, 10, 16, and 22 hours after lights on [HALO]). The control group was intravenously injected with the same volume of saline. Treatment efficacy and adverse reactions were compared on the seventh day after the injection, at 22 HALO. The existence of circadian rhythms was determined by cosine analysis. Results Only injections of L-OHP at 16 and 22 HALO significantly prolonged animal survival time. The adverse reactions in mice injected with L-OHP at 16 and 22 HALO were significantly less than those observed in mice administered L-OHP at 4 and 10 HALO. The cosine fitting curve showed that the survival time and adverse reactions exhibited circadian rhythm. Conclusion The time factor should be considered when treating patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma with L-OHP in order to achieve better efficacy, reduce the adverse reactions, and improve the patients’ survival time and quality

  16. Preventive and therapeutic effects of Smad7 on radiation-induced oral mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Gangwen; Bian, Li; Li, Fulun; Cotrim, Ana; Wang, Donna; Lu, Jian Bo; Deng, Yu; Bird, Gregory; Sowers, Anastasia; Mitchell, James B.; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Zhao, Rui; Raben, David; Dijke, Peter ten; Refaeli, Yosef; Zhang, Qinghong; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2013-01-01

    We report that K5.Smad7 mice, which express Smad7 transgene by a keratin-5 promoter, were resistant to radiation-induced oral mucositis, a painful oral ulceration. In addition to NF-κB activation known to contribute to oral mucositis, we found activated TGF-β signaling in oral mucositis. Smad7 dampened both pathways to attenuate inflammation, growth inhibition and apoptosis. Additionally, Smad7 promoted oral epithelial migration to close the wound. Further analyses revealed that TGF-β signaling Smads and their co-repressor CtBP1 transcriptionally repressed Rac1, and Smad7 abrogated this repression. Knocking down Rac1 in mouse keratinocytes abrogated Smad7-induced migration. Topically applying Smad7 protein with a cell permeable Tat-tag (Tat-Smad7) to oral mucosa showed preventive and therapeutic effects on radiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. Thus, we have identified novel molecular mechanisms involved in oral mucositis pathogenesis and our data suggest an alternative therapeutic strategy to block multiple pathological processes of oral mucositis. PMID:23475202

  17. Oral care.

    PubMed

    Hitz Lindenmüller, Irène; Lambrecht, J Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Adequate dental and oral hygiene may become a challenge for all users and especially for elderly people and young children because of their limited motor skills. The same holds true for patients undergoing/recovering from chemo-/radiotherapy with accompanying sensitive mucosal conditions. Poor dental hygiene can result in tooth decay, gingivitis, periodontitis, tooth loss, bad breath (halitosis), fungal infection and gum diseases. The use of a toothbrush is the most important measure for oral hygiene. Toothbrushes with soft bristles operated carefully by hand or via an electric device help to remove plaque and to avoid mucosal trauma. A handlebar with a grip cover can be helpful for manually disabled patients or for those with reduced motor skills. In case of oral hygiene at the bedside or of patients during/after chemo-/radiotherapy a gauze pad can be helpful for gently cleaning the teeth, gums and tongue. The use of fluoride toothpaste is imperative for the daily oral hygiene. Detergents such as sodium lauryl sulphate improve the cleaning action but may also dehydrate and irritate the mucous membrane. The use of products containing detergents and flavouring agents (peppermint, menthol, cinnamon) should therefore be avoided by bedridden patients or those with dry mouth and sensitive mucosa. Aids for suitable interdental cleaning, such as dental floss, interdental brushes or dental sticks, are often complicated to operate. Their correct use should be instructed by healthcare professionals. To support dental care, additional fluoridation with a fluoride gel or rinse can be useful. Products further containing antiseptics such as chlorhexidine or triclosan reduce the quantity of bacteria in the mouth. For patients undergoing or having undergone radio-/chemotherapy, a mouthwash that concomitantly moisturizes the oral mucosa is advisable. PMID:21325845

  18. Nutrition and oral mucosal diseases.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Danielle Marie; Mirowski, Ginat W

    2010-01-01

    Oral manifestations of nutritional deficiencies can affect the mucous membranes, teeth, periodontal tissue, salivary glands, and perioral skin. This contribution reviews how the water-soluble vitamins (B(2), B(3), B(6), B(12), C, and folic acid), fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, and E), and minerals (calcium, fluoride, iron, and zinc) can affect the oral mucosa. PMID:20620760

  19. Oral cavity cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    Imaging plays a crucial role in the staging of oral cancers. Imaging information is essential for determining tumour resectibility, post resection surgical reconstruction and radiation therapy planning. The aim of this paper is to highlight the natural history of oral cancer spread and how malignant infiltration can be accurately mapped. It focuses on buccal mucosa, hard palate, tongue and floor of mouth carcinoma. PMID:16361136

  20. Oral pigmentation: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sreeja, C.; Ramakrishnan, K.; Vijayalakshmi, D.; Devi, M.; Aesha, I.; Vijayabanu, B.

    2015-01-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations. PMID:26538887

  1. Scap is required for sterol synthesis and crypt growth in intestinal mucosa[S

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, Matthew R.; Cantoria, Mary Jo; Linden, Albert G.; January, Brandon A.; Liang, Guosheng; Engelking, Luke J.

    2015-01-01

    SREBP cleavage-activating protein (Scap) is an endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein required for cleavage and activation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), which activate the transcription of genes in sterol and fatty acid biosynthesis. Liver-specific loss of Scap is well tolerated; hepatic synthesis of sterols and fatty acids is reduced, but mice are otherwise healthy. To determine whether Scap loss is tolerated in the intestine, we generated a mouse model (Vil-Scap−) in which tamoxifen-inducible Cre-ERT2, a fusion protein of Cre recombinase with a mutated ligand binding domain of the human estrogen receptor, ablates Scap in intestinal mucosa. After 4 days of tamoxifen, Vil-Scap− mice succumb with a severe enteropathy and near-complete collapse of intestinal mucosa. Organoids grown ex vivo from intestinal crypts of Vil-Scap− mice are readily killed when Scap is deleted by 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Death is prevented when culture medium is supplemented with cholesterol and oleate. These data show that, unlike the liver, the intestine requires Scap to sustain tissue integrity by maintaining the high levels of lipid synthesis necessary for proliferation of intestinal crypts. PMID:25896350

  2. An Orally Active Phenylaminotetralin-Chemotype Serotonin 5-HT7 and 5-HT1A Receptor Partial Agonist that Corrects Motor Stereotypy in Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Canal, Clinton E; Felsing, Daniel E; Liu, Yue; Zhu, Wanying; Wood, JodiAnne T; Perry, Charles K; Vemula, Rajender; Booth, Raymond G

    2015-07-15

    Stereotypy (e.g., repetitive hand waving) is a key phenotype of autism spectrum disorder, Fragile X and Rett syndromes, and other neuropsychiatric disorders, and its severity correlates with cognitive and attention deficits. There are no effective treatments, however, for stereotypy. Perturbation of serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission contributes to stereotypy, suggesting that distinct 5-HT receptors may be pharmacotherapeutic targets to treat stereotypy and related neuropsychiatric symptoms. For example, preclinical studies indicate that 5-HT7 receptor activation corrects deficits in mouse models of Fragile X and Rett syndromes, and clinical trials for autism are underway with buspirone, a 5-HT1A partial agonist with relevant affinity at 5-HT7 receptors. Herein, we report the synthesis, in vitro molecular pharmacology, behavioral pharmacology, and pharmacokinetic parameters in mice after subcutaneous and oral administration of (+)-5-(2'-fluorophenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-amine ((+)-5-FPT), a new, dual partial agonist targeting both 5-HT7 (Ki = 5.8 nM, EC50 = 34 nM) and 5-HT1A (Ki = 22 nM, EC50 = 40 nM) receptors. Three unique, heterogeneous mouse models were used to assess the efficacy of (+)-5-FPT to reduce stereotypy: idiopathic jumping in C58/J mice, repetitive body rotations in C57BL/6J mice treated with the NMDA antagonist, MK-801, and repetitive head twitching in C57BL/6J mice treated with the 5-HT2 agonist, DOI. Systemic (+)-5-FPT potently and efficaciously reduced or eliminated stereotypy in each of the mouse models without altering locomotor behavior on its own, and additional tests showed that (+)-5-FPT, at the highest behaviorally active dose tested, enhanced social interaction and did not cause behaviors indicative of serotonin syndrome. These data suggest that (+)-5-FPT is a promising medication for treating stereotypy in psychiatric disorders. PMID:26011730

  3. Oral TNFα Modulation Alters Neutrophil Infiltration, Improves Cognition and Diminishes Tau and Amyloid Pathology in the 3xTgAD Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Gabbita, S. Prasad; Johnson, Ming F.; Kobritz, Naomi; Eslami, Pirooz; Poteshkina, Aleksandra; Varadarajan, Sridhar; Turman, John; Zemlan, Frank; Harris-White, Marni E.

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines such as TNFα can polarize microglia/macrophages into different neuroinflammatory types. Skewing of the phenotype towards a cytotoxic state is thought to impair phagocytosis and has been described in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Neuroinflammation can be perpetuated by a cycle of increasing cytokine production and maintenance of a polarized activation state that contributes to AD progression. In this study, 3xTgAD mice, age 6 months, were treated orally with 3 doses of the TNFα modulating compound isoindolin-1,3 dithione (IDT) for 10 months. We demonstrate that IDT is a TNFα modulating compound both in vitro and in vivo. Following long-term IDT administration, mice were assessed for learning & memory and tissue and serum were collected for analysis. Results demonstrate that IDT is safe for long-term treatment and significantly improves learning and memory in the 3xTgAD mouse model. IDT significantly reduced paired helical filament tau and fibrillar amyloid accumulation. Flow cytometry of brain cell populations revealed that IDT increased the infiltrating neutrophil population while reducing TNFα expression in this population. IDT is a safe and effective TNFα and innate immune system modulator. Thus small molecule, orally bioavailable modulators are promising therapeutics for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26436670

  4. Oral benzo[a]pyrene-induced cancer: two distinct types in different target organs depend on the mouse Cyp1 genotype

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhanquan; Dragin, Nadine; Miller, Marian L.; Stringer, Keith F.; Johansson, Elisabet; Chen, Jing; Uno, Shigeyuki; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Rubio, Carlos A.; Nebert, Daniel W.

    2010-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a prototypical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) found in combustion processes. Cytochrome P450 1A1 and 1B1 enzymes (CYP1A1, CYP1B1) can both detoxify PAHs and activate them to cancer-causing reactive intermediates. Following high dosage of oral BaP (125 mg/kg/day), ablation of the mouse Cyp1a1 gene causes immunosuppression and death within ~28 days, whereas Cyp1(+/+) wild-type mice remain healthy for >12 months on this regimen. In the present study, male Cyp1(+/+) wild-type, Cyp1a1(−/−) and Cyp1b1(−/−) single-knockout, and Cyp1a1/1b1(−/−) double-knockout mice received a lower dose (12.5 mg/kg/day) of oral BaP. Tissues from 16 different organs––including proximal small intestine (PSI), liver, preputial gland duct (PGD)––were evaluated; microarray cDNA expression and >30 mRNA levels were measured. Cyp1a1(−/−) mice revealed markedly increased CYP1B1 mRNA levels in the PSI, and between 8 and 12 weeks developed unique PSI adenomas and adenocarcinomas. Cyp1a1/1b1(−/−) mice showed no PSI tumors but instead developed squamous cell carcinoma of the PGD. Cyp1(+/+) and Cyp1b1(−/−) mice remained healthy with no remarkable abnormalities in any tissue examined. PSI adenocarcinomas exhibited striking up-regulation of the Xist gene, suggesting epigenetic silencing of specific genes on the Y-chromosome; the Rab30 oncogene was up-regulated; the Nr0b2 tumor suppressor gene was down-regulated; paradoxical over-expression of numerous immunoglobulin kappa and heavy chain variable genes was found––although the adenocarcinoma showed no immunohistochemical evidence of being lymphatic in origin. This oral BaP mouse paradigm represents an example of “gene-environment interactions” in which the same exposure of carcinogen results in altered target organ and tumor type, as a function of just one or two globally absent genes. PMID:20127859

  5. Distinct Transmissibility Features of TSE Sources Derived from Ruminant Prion Diseases by the Oral Route in a Transgenic Mouse Model (TgOvPrP4) Overexpressing the Ovine Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Arsac, Jean-Noël; Baron, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases associated with a misfolded form of host-encoded prion protein (PrP). Some of them, such as classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle (BSE), transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME), kuru and variant Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease in humans, are acquired by the oral route exposure to infected tissues. We investigated the possible transmission by the oral route of a panel of strains derived from ruminant prion diseases in a transgenic mouse model (TgOvPrP4) overexpressing the ovine prion protein (A136R154Q171) under the control of the neuron-specific enolase promoter. Sources derived from Nor98, CH1641 or 87V scrapie sources, as well as sources derived from L-type BSE or cattle-passaged TME, failed to transmit by the oral route, whereas those derived from classical BSE and classical scrapie were successfully transmitted. Apart from a possible effect of passage history of the TSE agent in the inocula, this implied the occurrence of subtle molecular changes in the protease-resistant prion protein (PrPres) following oral transmission that can raises concerns about our ability to correctly identify sheep that might be orally infected by the BSE agent in the field. Our results provide proof of principle that transgenic mouse models can be used to examine the transmissibility of TSE agents by the oral route, providing novel insights regarding the pathogenesis of prion diseases. PMID:24797075

  6. Accelerated tau aggregation, apoptosis and neurological dysfunction caused by chronic oral administration of aluminum in a mouse model of tauopathies.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Etsuko; Ishihara, Takeshi; Yokota, Osamu; Nakashima-Yasuda, Hanae; Nagao, Shigeto; Ikeda, Chikako; Naohara, Jun; Terada, Seishi; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2013-11-01

    To clarify whether long-term oral ingestion of aluminum (Al) can increase tau aggregation in mammals, we examined the effects of oral Al administration on tau accumulation, apoptosis in the central nervous system (CNS) and motor function using tau transgenic (Tg) mice that show very slowly progressive tau accumulation. Al-treated tau Tg mice had almost twice as many tau-positive inclusions in the spinal cord as tau Tg mice without Al treatment at 12 months of age, a difference that reached statistical significance, and the development of pretangle-like tau aggregates in the brain was also significantly advanced from 9 months. Al exposure did not induce any tau pathology in wild-type (WT) mice. Apoptosis was observed in the hippocampus in Al-treated tau Tg mice, but was virtually absent in the other experimental groups. Motor function as assessed by the tail suspension test was most severely impaired in Al-treated tau Tg mice. Given our results, chronic oral ingestion of Al may more strongly promote tau aggregation, apoptosis and neurological dysfunction if individuals already had a pathological process causing tau aggregation. These findings may also implicate chronic Al neurotoxicity in humans, who frequently have had mild tau pathology from a young age. PMID:23574527

  7. Concentrations of acidic antiinflammatory drugs in gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Frey, H H; El-Sayed, M A

    1977-12-01

    In rats, the concentrations of the acidic antiinflammatory drugs salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, phenylbutazone, flufenamic acid and indomethacin in the glandular portion of the gastric mucosa were determined 30 and 60 min after oral or subcutaneous administration. In another series of experiments, solutions of the drugs were introduced into the ligated stomach and the concentrations in the mucosa and in the contents of the stomach were determined after 60 min. The ratio between the concentrations in the musoca and those in serum or gastric contents were much lower than expected according to the distribution by passive non-ionic diffusion. This apparent discrepancy may be explained as a result of a drug-induced damage to the mucosal cell allowing free diffusion of ionized drug across the cell membrane. PMID:603322

  8. Oral Manifestations of Secondary Syphilis.

    PubMed

    de Paulo, Luiz Fernando Barbosa; Servato, João Paulo Silva; Oliveira, Maiolino Thomaz Fonseca; Durighetto, Antonio Francisco; Zanetta-Barbosa, Darceny

    2015-06-01

    Known as "the great imitator," secondary syphilis may clinically manifest itself in myriad ways, involving different organs including the oral mucosa, and mimicking, both clinically and histologically, several diseases, thereby making diagnosis a challenge for clinicians. We highlight the clinical aspects of oral manifestation in 7 patients with secondary syphilis. Clinicians should consider secondary syphilis in the differential diagnosis of ulcerative and/or white oral lesions. PMID:25892249

  9. Mucosal tissue pharmacokinetics of the integrase inhibitor raltegravir in a humanized mouse model: Implications for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Veselinovic, Milena; Yang, Kuo-Hsiung; Sykes, Craig; Remling-Mulder, Leila; Kashuba, Angela D M; Akkina, Ramesh

    2016-02-01

    Orally administered anti-retroviral drugs show considerable promise for HIV/AIDS pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). For the success of these strategies, pharmacokinetic (PK) data defining the optimal concentration of the drug needed for protection in relevant mucosal exposure sites is essential. Here we employed a humanized mouse model to derive comprehensive PK data on the HIV integrase inhibitor raltegravir (RAL), a leading PrEP drug candidate. Under steady state conditions following oral dosing, plasma and multiple mucosal tissues were sampled simultaneously. RAL exhibited higher drug exposure in mucosal tissues relative to that in plasma with one log higher exposure in vaginal and rectal tissue and two logs higher exposure in intestinal mucosa reflecting the trends seen in the human studies. These data demonstrate the suitability of RAL for HIV PrEP and validate the utility of humanized mouse models for deriving important preclinical PK-PD data. PMID:26771889

  10. Immunohistochemical aspects of apoptosis in gingival mucosa with papilloma and condyloma acuminata.

    PubMed

    Scrieciu, Monica; Mercuţ, Veronica; Mercuţ, Răzvan; Amărăscu, Marina Olimpia; Popescu, Sanda Mihaela; Predescu, Anca Mihaela; Baniţă, Ileana Monica

    2015-01-01

    The oral mucosa is a component of the oral ecosystem, which can be aggressed by corrosion products released from the dental alloys used in prosthetic dentistry therapy. The purpose of this study was to compare the in vivo effect of nickel and copper compounds on the oral mucosa cells, including their ability to induce cell death, by analyzing the cytochrome c (cyt. c) immunohistochemical expression. Gingival mucosa fragments obtained from the subjects with dentures manufactured by nickel or copper casting alloys were processed through the histological technique of paraffin inclusion. The sections obtained were stained by usually histological methods in order to highlight the histopathological lesions and also analyzed using the immunohistochemical technique in order to study the cyt. c expression. The papillomatosis lesions were observed in the gingival mucosa fragments obtained from the subjects with nickel-based alloy dentures and the condyloma acuminata lesions were observed in those obtained from the subjects with copper-based alloy dentures. The cyt. c immunohistochemical expression was different in the epithelial layer of two types of mucosal fragments but it was the same in their lamina propria connective tissue. We can conclude that the two types of metal alloys have different effects on the adjacent gingival mucosa. PMID:26193209

  11. Lanthanum phosphate deposition in the gastric mucosa of patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Iwamuro, Masaya; Kanzaki, Hiromitzu; Tanaka, Takehiro; Kawano, Seiji; Kawahara, Yoshiro; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    A 77-year-old Japanese man underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection twice over a 5-year period for the treatment of two separate early gastric cancers. He had been taking lanthanum carbonate, an orally administered phosphate binder, for 3 years. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed reddish mucosa in the greater curvature and anterior wall of the gastric angle, while granular, white deposits were also observed in some areas of this reddish mucosa. Additionally, biopsy specimens from the gastric mucosa revealed the deposition of fine, amorphous, eosinophilic material, which appeared bright on scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed the presence of lanthanum and phosphate in these bright areas, and elemental mapping confirmed that their distribution was identical to that seen in the bright areas. Based on these findings, the diagnosis of lanthanum phosphate deposition in the gastric mucosa was determined. PMID:27383105

  12. One Odontogenic Cell-Population Contributes to the Development of the Mouse Incisors and of the Oral Vestibule.

    PubMed

    Hovorakova, Maria; Lochovska, Katerina; Zahradnicek, Oldrich; Domonkosova Tibenska, Kristina; Dornhoferova, Michaela; Horakova-Smrckova, Lucie; Bodorikova, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The area of the oral vestibule is often a place where pathologies appear (e.g., peripheral odontomas). The origin of these pathologies is not fully understood. In the present study, we traced a cell population expressing Sonic hedgehog (Shh) from the beginning of tooth development using Cre-LoxP system in the lower jaw of wild-type (WT) mice. We focused on Shh expression in the area of the early appearing rudimentary incisor germs located anteriorly to the prospective incisors. The localization of the labelled cells in the incisor germs and also in the inner epithelial layer of the vestibular anlage showed that the first very early developmental events in the lower incisor area are common to the vestibulum oris and the prospective incisor primordia in mice. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of human historical tooth-like structures found in the vestibular area of jaws confirmed their relation to teeth and thus the capability of the vestibular tissue to form teeth. The location of labelled cells descendant of the early appearing Shh expression domain related to the rudimentary incisor anlage not only in the rudimentary and functional incisor germs but also in the externally located anlage of the oral vestibule documented the odontogenic potential of the vestibular epithelium. This potential can be awakened under pathological conditions and become a source of pathologies in the vestibular area. PMID:27611193

  13. “Osteolipoma of buccal mucosa: Case report and literature review”

    PubMed Central

    Kumar-Bokkasam, Vijay; Suresh, Dirasantchu; Venkata, Suman

    2016-01-01

    Osteolipoma affecting oral cavity is indeed rare. We hereby report a case of osteolipoma affecting buccal mucosa. A review of literature of osteolipoma of oral cavity, particularly on radiographic/imaging findings was done. Only 16 cases of Osteolipoma of oral cavity are reported in the literature. The radiographic findings of our case, i.e. multiple dense homogenous radio-opaque structures was reported earlier only in one case [out of 16] of osteolipoma of oral cavity. Key words:Lipoma, osteolipoma, panoramic radiography, radio-opaque, radiography. PMID:27034764

  14. Dextran sulfate sodium administered orally is depolymerized in the stomach and induces cell cycle arrest plus apoptosis in the colon in early mouse colitis.

    PubMed

    Araki, Yoshio; Bamba, Tadao; Mukaisho, Ken-ichi; Kanauchi, Osamu; Ban, Hiromitsu; Bamba, Shigeki; Andoh, Akira; Fujiyama, Yoshihide; Hattori, Takanori; Sugihara, Hiroyuki

    2012-11-01

    The mechanisms responsible for human inflammatory bowel disease remain poorly understood. The pathogenic factors for dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, one of the experimental animal colitis models, also remain unknown. Furthermore, detailed studies on DSS metabolism in the gut lumen have not been reported. Therefore, we investigated DSS metabolism in the mouse gut lumen and report the mechanisms which induce colitis. DSS was labeled with 2-aminopyridine (pyridylamino-DSS, PA-DSS). PA-DSS was administered orally to male BALB/cA Jcl mice. The metabolites and histological findings were observed using HPLC and light or fluorescence microscopy. PA-DSS with Mr 5000 was depolymerized rapidly in the gastric lumen, and the depolymerized PA-DSS was absorbed in the small intestine. Therefore, the majority of the PA-DSS in the cecal contents returned to Mr 5000 PA-DSS, escaping absorption in the small intestine. Mr 5000 DSS induced severe colitis, and immunostaining using an anti-mouse Ki-67 antibody and the TUNEL assay showed that DSS arrested the cell cycle at the G0 phase and induced apoptosis of the colonic epithelium. Mr 2500 PA-DSS, however, induced these same effects weakly. During these processes, we observed that the epithelial cells can depolymerize DSS themselves. An in vitro study using Caco-2 cells also showed similar effects. Mr 5000 DSS was depolymerized in the gut lumen and epithelial cells. Therefore, the molecular mass distribution of the DSS differed between each part in the lumen. As an early stage event, DSS induced colitis through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis according to its molecular mass. PMID:22895560

  15. Mouse models for assessing the cross-protective efficacy of oral non-typhoidal Salmonella vaccine candidates harbouring in-frame deletions of the ATP-dependent protease lon and other genes.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hidenori; Fukiya, Satoru; Kodama-Akaboshi, Chie; Eguchi, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Tomoko

    2015-03-01

    In BALB/c mouse models of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, a single oral immunization with a mutant strain with an insertion of the chloramphenicol resistance gene into the ATP-dependent protease clpP or lon gene decreased the number of salmonellae in each tissue sample 5 days after oral challenge with virulent S. Typhimurium at weeks 26 and 54 post-immunization. These data suggested that an oral immunization with the ClpP- or Lon-disrupted S. Typhimurium strain could provide long-term protection against oral challenge with virulent S. Typhimurium. Accordingly, recombinant oral non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) vaccines were constructed by incorporating mutants of both S. Typhimurium and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis harbouring stable in-frame markerless deletions of the clpP-lon-sulA (suppressor of lon), lon-sulA or lon-msbB (acyltransferase) genes. Amongst these orally administered vaccine candidates, those with the lon-sulA gene deletion mutants of S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis protected BALB/c and C57BL/6J mice against oral challenge with both virulent S. Typhimurium and virulent S. Enteritidis. Therefore, the in-frame markerless lon-sulA gene deletion mutant of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis could be a promising cross-protective NTS live vaccine candidate for practical use in humans. PMID:25589672

  16. Zein-Based Nanoparticles Improve the Oral Bioavailability of Resveratrol and Its Anti-inflammatory Effects in a Mouse Model of Endotoxic Shock.

    PubMed

    Penalva, Rebeca; Esparza, Irene; Larraneta, Eneko; González-Navarro, Carlos J; Gamazo, Carlos; Irache, Juan M

    2015-06-17

    Resveratrol offers pleiotropic health benefits including a reported ability to inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokine production. The aim of this work was to prepare, characterize, and evaluate a resveratrol nanoparticulate formulation based on zein. For this purpose, the oral bioavailability of the encapsulated polyphenol as well as its anti-inflammatory effects in a mouse model of endotoxic shock was studied. The resveratrol-loaded nanoparticles displayed a mean size of 307 ± 3 nm, with a negative zeta potential (-51.1 ± 1.55 mV), and a polyphenol loading of 80.2 ± 3.26 μg/mg. In vitro, the release of resveratrol from the nanoparticles was found to be pH independent and adjusted well to the Peppas-Sahlin kinetic model, suggesting a mechanism based on the combination of diffusion and erosion of the nanoparticle matrix. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated that zein-based nanoparticles provided high and prolonged plasma levels of the polyphenol for at least 48 h. The oral bioavailability of resveratrol when administered in these nanoparticles increased up to 50% (19.2-fold higher than for the control solution of the polyphenol). Furthermore, nanoparticles administered daily for 7 days at 15 mg/kg were able to diminish the endotoxic symptoms induced in mice by the intraperitoneal administration of LPS (i.e., hypothermia, piloerection, and stillness). In addition, serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels were slightly lower (approximately 15%) than those observed in the control. PMID:26027429

  17. Pigmented Lesion of Buccal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Manas; Kumar, Malay; Kumar, Manish; Agarwal, Deshant

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented lesions are commonly found in the mouth. Such lesions represent a variety of clinical entities, ranging from physiologic changes to manifestation of systemic illness and malignant neoplasm. Diagnosis of such lesions requires a proper case history, extraoral and intraoral examination, and, in some cases, biopsy, aspiration cytology, and laboratory investigations. Here we present a case of purple lesion on the buccal mucosa of a 34-year-old male patient which was provisionally diagnosed as mucocele but on the basis of histopathological picture it was finally diagnosed as angiofibroma, and we also discuss the clinical and histopathological differential diagnosis. PMID:25161669

  18. Pigmented lesion of buccal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Manas; Kumar, Malay; Kumar, Manish; Agarwal, Deshant

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented lesions are commonly found in the mouth. Such lesions represent a variety of clinical entities, ranging from physiologic changes to manifestation of systemic illness and malignant neoplasm. Diagnosis of such lesions requires a proper case history, extraoral and intraoral examination, and, in some cases, biopsy, aspiration cytology, and laboratory investigations. Here we present a case of purple lesion on the buccal mucosa of a 34-year-old male patient which was provisionally diagnosed as mucocele but on the basis of histopathological picture it was finally diagnosed as angiofibroma, and we also discuss the clinical and histopathological differential diagnosis. PMID:25161669

  19. Leiomyosarcoma of the buccal mucosa: a case report with immunohistochemistry findings.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Renu; Bharathan, Shantha

    2008-06-01

    Leiomyosarcoma is a relatively uncommon malignant lesion that exhibits smooth muscle differentiation. Occurrence of this tumor in the oral cavity is exceedingly rare, reflecting the paucity of smooth muscle in this region. This article presents a rare case of leiomyosarcoma of the buccal mucosa, which was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. PMID:18587214

  20. Immunoperoxidase detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts in mouth floor and buccal mucosa cells of smokers and nonsmokers.

    PubMed

    Besaratinia, A; Besarati Nia, A; Van Straaten, H W; Godschalk, R W; Van Zandwijk, N; Balm, A J; Kleinjans, J C; Van Schooten, F J

    2000-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is a major risk factor for oral cancer; mouth floor and buccal mucosa are among the most and least cancer-prone subsites, respectively, in the oral cavity. We investigated the applicability of immunohistochemistry of smoking-induced DNA adducts in oral cells for assessing the exposure to carcinogens, and estimating the risk for oral cancer. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-DNA adducts were measured in mouth floor and buccal mucosa cells of smokers (n = 26) and nonsmokers (n = 22) by means of a semiquantitative immunoperoxidase assay. Smokers had elevated levels of PAH-DNA adducts compared to nonsmokers in their mouth floor cells (0.045 +/- 0.022 versus 0.022 +/- 0.016, P = 0.0008 arbitrary units of immunohistochemistry) as well as in their buccal mucosa cells (0.058 +/- 0.028 versus 0.028 +/- 0.012, P = 0.001). Also, there was a correlation between the levels of PAH-DNA adducts in mouth floor cells and those in buccal mucosa cells (r = 0.4, P = 0.01). Furthermore, PAH-DNA adduct levels in both mouth floor and buccal mucosa cells were significantly related to current smoking indices (amount of tar and number of cigarettes consumed per day). Expectedly, the levels of PAH-DNA adducts neither in mouth floor cells nor in buccal mucosa cells, both being short-lived cells, were related to smoking history index (pack years). The levels of PAH-DNA adducts, however, in mouth floor cells as the cancer prone cells were lower than those in buccal mucosa cells (0.037 +/- 0.023 versus 0.044 +/- 0.026, P = 0.04). We conclude that immunohistochemistry of PAH-DNA adducts in oral cells can be used for exposure assessment of tobacco-related carcinogens, however, it cannot be used for oral cancer risk estimation. PMID:11013411

  1. Oral encapsulated vascular malformation: An undescribed presentation in the mouth

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Márcio-Américo; Dias, Pedro-de Souza; Martínez-Martínez, Marisol; Sena-Filho, Marcondes; de Almeida, Oslei-Paes

    2016-01-01

    Vascular lesions have been classified in two broad categories, hemangiomas and malformations. Encapsulated vascular lesions have not been reported in the oral cavity, but they were described in other sites, mainly in the orbit. Herein, we present a case of an oral encapsulated vascular lesion located in the right buccal mucosa of a 69-year-old male, including histological and immunohistochemical description and a literature review. Key words:Buccal mucosa, hemangioma, vascular malformation, oral cavity. PMID:26855712

  2. The corn smut-made cholera oral vaccine is thermostable and induces long-lasting immunity in mouse.

    PubMed

    Monreal-Escalante, Elizabeth; Navarro-Tovar, Gabriela; León-Gallo, Amalia; Juárez-Montiel, Margarita; Becerra-Flora, Alicia; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan Francisco; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio

    2016-09-20

    The use of corn smut for the production of recombinant vaccines has been recently implemented by our group. In this study, the stability and immunogenic properties of the corn smut-based cholera vaccine, based on the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), were determined in mouse. The immunogenic potential of distinct corn smut CTB doses ranging from 1 to 30μg were assessed, with maximum humoral responses at both the systemic (IgG) and intestinal (IgA) levels at a dose of 15μg. The humoral response last for up to 70days after the third boost. Mice were fully protected against a challenge with cholera toxin after receiving three 15μg-doses. Remarkably, the corn smut-made vaccine retained its immunogenic activity after storage at room temperature for a period of 1year and no reduction on CTB was observed following exposure at 50°C for 2h. These data support the use of the corn smut-made CTB vaccine as a highly stable and effective immunogen and justify its evaluation in target animal models, such as piglet and sheep, as well as clinical evaluations in humans. PMID:27165506

  3. Identification of talinolol metabolites in urine of man, dog, rat and mouse after oral administration by high-performance liquid chromatography-thermospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schupke, H; Hempel, R; Eckardt, R; Kronbach, T

    1996-12-01

    A new specific HPLC-TSP-MS/MS assay for identification of beta-blocking drug talinolol and its metabolites in urinary samples of man, dog, rat and mouse after single oral administration has been developed. Centrifuged urines were directly injected into the HPLC-TSP-MS system. Based on thermospray MS/MS studies of 10 reference compounds, several selective CID-MS/MS reactions were found, which were typical of substructure elements of potential phase I metabolites. In this way the differentiation of various stereochemical positions of the hydroxyl group in the cyclohexyl ring moiety of metabolites was possible. Renal metabolic profiles for all investigated species were generated by HPLC-multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The detected metabolites were characterized by TSP full scan and MS/MS analysis in relation to synthesized reference compounds. The major metabolic pathway in all species results in the hydroxylation of the cyclohexylring moiety of talinolol. In dog urine, a phase II metabolite, the O-glucuronide of talinolol (I) was found. In order to identify this structure, the use of electrospray ionization was also necessary. PMID:8990520

  4. Incidence of bone metastasis in carcinoma buccal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Virendra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Head and neck cancer is a leading health problem in India due to the habit of chewing tobacco and bad oral and dental hygiene. Carcinoma buccal mucosa is more common and is 2.5% of all malignancies at our center. Most of the patients present in stage III and IV and the survival in these cases is not very good. Bone metastasis in advanced cases of carcinoma buccal mucosa is rarely reported in the world literature. Materials and Methods: We present here cases developing bone metastasis in carcinoma buccal mucosa in last 5 years. These patients were young with loco-regionally advanced disease where bone metastasis developed within 1-year of definitive treatment. Results: The flat bones and vertebrae were mainly involved and the survival was also short after diagnosis of metastasis despite the treatment with local Radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Conclusion: The exact cause of metastasis cannot be proved, but the probability of subclinical seedling of malignant cells before the eradication of the primary tumor should be considered along with advanced local and nodal disease with high grade of tumor. PMID:27168702

  5. Effect of orally administered collagen hydrolysate on gene expression profiles in mouse skin: a DNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Oba, Chisato; Ito, Kyoko; Ichikawa, Satomi; Morifuji, Masashi; Nakai, Yuji; Ishijima, Tomoko; Abe, Keiko; Kawahata, Keiko

    2015-08-01

    Dietary collagen hydrolysate has been hypothesized to improve skin barrier function. To investigate the effect of long-term collagen hydrolysate administration on the skin, we evaluated stratum corneum water content and skin elasticity in intrinsically aged mice. Female hairless mice were fed a control diet or a collagen hydrolysate-containing diet for 12 wk. Stratum corneum water content and skin elasticity were gradually decreased in chronologically aged control mice. Intake of collagen hydrolysate significantly suppressed such changes. Moreover, we used DNA microarrays to analyze gene expression in the skin of mice that had been administered collagen hydrolysate. Twelve weeks after the start of collagen intake, no significant differences appeared in the gene expression profile compared with the control group. However, 1 wk after administration, 135 genes were upregulated and 448 genes were downregulated in the collagen group. This suggests that gene changes preceded changes of barrier function and elasticity. We focused on several genes correlated with functional changes in the skin. Gene Ontology terms related to epidermal cell development were significantly enriched in upregulated genes. These skin function-related genes had properties that facilitate epidermal production and differentiation while suppressing dermal degradation. In conclusion, our results suggest that altered gene expression at the early stages after collagen administration affects skin barrier function and mechanical properties. Long-term oral intake of collagen hydrolysate improves skin dysfunction by regulating genes related to production and maintenance of skin tissue. PMID:26058835

  6. Aspirin treatment exacerbates oral infections by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Cossentini, Luana Aparecida; Da Silva, Rosiane Valeriano; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi; De Almeida Araújo, Eduardo José; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2016-05-01

    Oral transmission of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, has been documented in Latin American countries. The reported cases of infection were due to the ingestion of contaminated fresh fruit, juices, or sugar cane juice. There have been few studies on the physiopathology of the disease in oral transmission cases. Gastritis is a common ailment that can be caused by poor dietary habits, intake of alcohol or other gastric irritants, bacterial infection, or by the widespread use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). This study investigated in a mouse model whether gastric mucosal injury, induced by aspirin, would affect the course of disease in animals infected with T. cruzi by the oral route. The CL14 and G strains of T. cruzi, both of low infectivity, were used. To this end, groups of BALB/c mice were treated during 5 days with aspirin (100 mg kg(-1)) before oral infection with T. cruzi metacyclic forms (4 × 10(5) or 5 × 10(7) parasites/mouse). Histological analysis and determination of nitric oxide and TNF-α were performed in gastric samples obtained 5 days after infection. Parasitemia was monitored from the thirteenth day after infection. The results indicate that aspirin treatment of mice injured their gastric mucosa and facilitated invasion by both CL14 and G strains of T. cruzi. Strain CL14 caused more severe infection compared to the G strain, as larger numbers of amastigote nests were found in the stomach and parasitemia levels were higher. Our study is novel in that it shows that gastric mucosal damage caused by aspirin, a commonly used NSAID, facilitates T. cruzi infection by the oral route. PMID:26826555

  7. SB939, a novel potent and orally active histone deacetylase inhibitor with high tumor exposure and efficacy in mouse models of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Novotny-Diermayr, Veronica; Sangthongpitag, Kanda; Hu, Chang Yong; Wu, Xiaofeng; Sausgruber, Nina; Yeo, Pauline; Greicius, Gediminas; Pettersson, Sven; Liang, Ai Leng; Loh, Yung Kiang; Bonday, Zahid; Goh, Kee Chuan; Hentze, Hannes; Hart, Stefan; Wang, Haishan; Ethirajulu, Kantharaj; Wood, Jeanette Marjorie

    2010-03-01

    Although clinical responses in liquid tumors and certain lymphomas have been reported, the clinical efficacy of histone deacetylase inhibitors in solid tumors has been limited. This may be in part due to the poor pharmacokinetic of these drugs, resulting in inadequate tumor concentrations of the drug. SB939 is a new hydroxamic acid based histone deacetylase inhibitor with improved physicochemical, pharmaceutical, and pharmacokinetic properties. In vitro, SB939 inhibits class I, II, and IV HDACs, with no effects on other zinc binding enzymes, and shows significant antiproliferative activity against a wide variety of tumor cell lines. It has very favorable pharmacokinetic properties after oral dosing in mice, with >4-fold increased bioavailability and 3.3-fold increased half-life over suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). In contrast to SAHA, SB939 accumulates in tumor tissue and induces a sustained inhibition of histone acetylation in tumor tissue. These excellent pharmacokinetic properties translated into a dose-dependent antitumor efficacy in a xenograft model of human colorectal cancer (HCT-116), with a tumor growth inhibition of 94% versus 48% for SAHA (both at maximum tolerated dose), and was also effective when given in different intermittent schedules. Furthermore, in APC(min) mice, a genetic mouse model of early-stage colon cancer, SB939 inhibited adenoma formation, hemocult scores, and increased hematocrit values more effectively than 5-fluorouracil. Emerging clinical data from phase I trials in cancer patients indicate that the pharmacokinetic and pharmacologic advantages of SB939 are translated to the clinic. The efficacy of SB939 reported here in two very different models of colorectal cancer warrants further investigation in patients. PMID:20197387

  8. Biopsy of the oral mucosa and use of histopathology services.

    PubMed

    Logan, R M; Goss, A N

    2010-06-01

    Patients often present with intraoral pathology in the general dental practice setting. Therefore, it is important that dental practitioners are aware of how to deal with pathology when this occurs and have an understanding of investigative techniques that might assist in making a diagnosis. Biopsy and subsequent histological examination of the lesion is an important diagnostic tool. Even if dentists refer the patient to another practitioner for the biopsy, the referring practitioner still needs to be familiar with the procedure and results obtained so that the patient can be appropriately managed. This paper reviews clinical issues that may impact on biopsy procedures and the potential pitfalls and problems that may affect the histological assessment of tissue and therefore affect diagnosis. The medico-legal responsibilities of practitioners are also addressed. PMID:20553240

  9. Oral microbiota and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meurman, Jukka H.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation caused by infections may be the most important preventable cause of cancer in general. However, in the oral cavity the role of microbiota in carcinogenesis is not known. Microbial populations on mouth mucosa differ between healthy and malignant sites and certain oral bacterial species have been linked with malignancies but the evidence is still weak in this respect. Nevertheless, oral microorganisms inevitably up-regulate cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that affect the complex metabolic pathways and may thus be involved in carcinogenesis. Poor oral health associates statistically with prevalence of many types of cancer, such as pancreatic and gastrointestinal cancer. Furthermore, several oral micro-organisms are capable of converting alcohol to carcinogenic acetaldehyde which also may partly explain the known association between heavy drinking, smoking, poor oral health and the prevalence of oral and upper gastrointestinal cancer. A different problem is the cancer treatment-caused alterations in oral microbiota which may lead to the emergence of potential pathogens and subsequent other systemic health problems to the patients. Hence clinical guidelines and recommendations have been presented to control oral microbiota in patients with malignant disease, but also in this area the scientific evidence is weak. More controlled studies are needed for further conclusion. PMID:21523227

  10. Oral vs. salivary diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Joana; Corby, Patricia M.; Barber, Cheryl A.; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The field of "salivary diagnostics" includes studies utilizing samples obtained from a variety of sources within the oral cavity. These samples include; whole unstimulated saliva, stimulated whole saliva, duct saliva collected directly from the parotid, submandibular/sublingual glands or minor salivary glands, swabs of the buccal mucosa, tongue or tonsils, and gingival crevicular fluid. Many publications state "we collected saliva from subjects" without fully describing the process or source of the oral fluid. Factors that need to be documented in any study include the time of day of the collection, the method used to stimulate and collect the fluid, and how much fluid is being collected and for how long. The handling of the oral fluid during and post-collection is also critical and may include addition of protease or nuclease inhibitors, centrifugation, and cold or frozen storage prior to assay. In an effort to create a standard protocol for determining a biomarker's origin we carried out a pilot study collecting oral fluid from 5 different sites in the mouth and monitoring the concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines detected using MesoScaleDiscovery (MSD) electrochemiluminesence assays. Our data suggested that 3 of the cytokines are primarily derived from the submandibular gland, while 7 of the cytokines come from a source other than the major salivary glands such as the minor salivary glands or cells in the oral mucosae. Here we review the literature on monitoring biomarkers in oral samples and stress the need for determining the blood/saliva ratio when a quantitative determination is needed and suggest that the term oral diagnostic be used if the source of an analyte in the oral cavity is unknown.

  11. Results of examination of the nasal mucosa. [in Apollo 17 BIOCORE pocket mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, L. M.; Vogel, F. S.; Lloyd, B.; Benton, E. V.; Cruty, M. R.; Haymaker, W.; Leon, H. A.; Billingham, J.; Turnbill, C. E.; Teas, V.

    1975-01-01

    The olfactory epithelium, but not the nasal respiratory epithelium, of the four pocket mice (Perognathus longimembris) that survived their flight on Apollo XVII showed both diffuse alterations and numerous disseminated focal lesions. The olfactory mucosa of the mouse that died during flight was also affected, but to a minor degree insofar as could be determined. All this was in contrast to the normal appearance of the olfactory mucosa of the numerous control animals. A number of possible causes were considered: systemic or regional infection; inhaled particulate material (seed dust); by-products from the KO2 bed in aerosol or particulate form; gas contaminants originating in the flight package; volatile substances from the dead mouse; weightlessness; and cosmic ray particle radiation. Where feasible, studies were conducted in an effort to rule in or rule out some of these potentially causative factors. No definitive conclusions were reached as to the cause of the lesions in the flight mice.

  12. Occurrence of recurrent aphthous stomatitis only on lining mucosa and its relationship to smoking--a possible hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Subramanyam, R V

    2011-08-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is one of the most common ulcers affecting the oral cavity. Though it is known that RAS affects only the lining (non-keratinized) mucosa sparing the masticatory (keratinized) mucosa and is unlikely to be seen in smokers, no concrete explanations have been put forward. A hypothesis is proposed that the keratin layer blocks the ingress of antigens and prevents the occurrence of RAS on masticatory mucosa. Similarly, combustible products of smoking are known to cause keratinization and therefore have a similar effect on the lining mucosa and inhibit its occurrence. In addition, nicotine or its metabolites can result in decrease of pro-inflammatory cytokines like tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukins 1 and 6, and increase of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10. Consequently, there is reduced susceptibility to RAS due to immunosuppression and/or reduction in inflammatory response. PMID:21546167

  13. The Effect of Propolis in Healing Injured Nasal Mucosa: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    El-Anwar, Mohammad Waheed; Abdelmonem, Said; Abdelsameea, Ahmed A.; AlShawadfy, Mohamed; El-Kashishy, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction  Mechanical trauma to the nasal mucosa increases the risk of synechia formation, especially after chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal surgeries. Objective  This study was carried to assess the effect of propolis administration in healing injured nasal mucosa in rats. Methods  We randomly divided eighteen rats into three equal experimental groups: (1) non-treated group; (2) gum tragacanth (suspending agent for propolis) treated group; and (3) propolis treated group. The non-treated group received no treatment for 15 days. The second group received gum tragacanth administration (5 ml/kg, orally) once daily for 15 days. The third group received propolis suspension orally at a dose of 100 mg/kg once daily for 15 days. At the beginning of this study, we induced unilateral mechanical nasal trauma on the right nasal mucosa of all rats in the three groups using a brushing technique. A pathologist stained tissue samples using hematoxylin and examined eosin by using a light microscope. Results  The severity of inflammation was milder with the absence of ulcerations in the propolis treated group compared with the non-treated and gum tragacanth groups. Goblet cell and ciliated cell loss was substantially lower in patients treated with propolis compared with groups without treatment and those treated with gum tragacanth. Conclusion  Propolis decreased inflammation and enhanced healing of wounds of the nasal mucosa in rats. PMID:27413403

  14. Preparation of the Multifunctional Liposome-Containing Microneedle Arrays as an Oral Cavity Mucosal Vaccine Adjuvant-Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the multifunctional liposome-constituted microneedle arrays (LiposoMAs) have been proven to be an interesting vaccine adjuvant-delivery system (VADS) that are stable and can be vaccinated via oral cavity mucosal route. When given to mice at oral mucosa, the LiposoMAs can effectively eliminate the ingredient loss caused by chewing, swallowing, and saliva flowing and can, thus, elicit robust systemic as well as mucosal immunoresponses against the loaded antigens. In addition, the LiposoMAs can induce a mixed Th1/Th2 immunoresponse and strong cellular/humoral immunity due to special adjuvanticity and targeting delivery functions of the nanoparticulate VADS. In this chapter, the preparation, characterization as well as mucosal vaccination of the LiposoMAs are introduced. In addition, the methods for sampling mouse organs, tissues, and cells and for evaluation of the immunization efficacy are mainly included. PMID:27076328

  15. Genomic Landscape of Colorectal Mucosa and Adenomas.

    PubMed

    Borras, Ester; San Lucas, F Anthony; Chang, Kyle; Zhou, Ruoji; Masand, Gita; Fowler, Jerry; Mork, Maureen E; You, Y Nancy; Taggart, Melissa W; McAllister, Florencia; Jones, David A; Davies, Gareth E; Edelmann, Winfried; Ehli, Erik A; Lynch, Patrick M; Hawk, Ernest T; Capella, Gabriel; Scheet, Paul; Vilar, Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    The molecular basis of the adenoma-to-carcinoma transition has been deduced using comparative analysis of genetic alterations observed through the sequential steps of intestinal carcinogenesis. However, comprehensive genomic analyses of adenomas and at-risk mucosa are still lacking. Therefore, our aim was to characterize the genomic landscape of colonic at-risk mucosa and adenomas. We analyzed the mutation profile and copy number changes of 25 adenomas and adjacent mucosa from 12 familial adenomatous polyposis patients using whole-exome sequencing and validated allelic imbalances (AI) in 37 adenomas using SNP arrays. We assessed for evidence of clonality and performed estimations on the proportions of driver and passenger mutations using a systems biology approach. Adenomas had lower mutational rates than did colorectal cancers and showed recurrent alterations in known cancer driver genes (APC, KRAS, FBXW7, TCF7L2) and AIs in chromosomes 5, 7, and 13. Moreover, 80% of adenomas had somatic alterations in WNT pathway genes. Adenomas displayed evidence of multiclonality similar to stage I carcinomas. Strong correlations between mutational rate and patient age were observed in at-risk mucosa and adenomas. Our data indicate that at least 23% of somatic mutations are present in at-risk mucosa prior to adenoma initiation. The genomic profiles of at-risk mucosa and adenomas illustrate the evolution from normal tissue to carcinoma via greater resolution of molecular changes at the inflection point of premalignant lesions. Furthermore, substantial genomic variation exists in at-risk mucosa before adenoma formation, and deregulation of the WNT pathway is required to foster carcinogenesis. Cancer Prev Res; 9(6); 417-27. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27221540

  16. [Tobacco, snuff and oral health].

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Anna Maria; Meurman, Jukka H; Sorsa, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Smoking is estimated to cause 6.3 million deaths annually worldwide. The use of snuff, differing from smoking, has significantly increased especially among the adolescents. Snuff powder contains 20-fold more nicotine compared to cigarettes, leading to strong nicotine addiction. In addition to cancer development, both smoking and snuff use exert other risks for oral health. Compared with non-smokers, smokers are at a 10-fold risk for the development and progression of periodontal diseases. Snuff causes oral mucosal changes, gingival recessions and root surface caries. Smoking induces systemic low-grade inflammation, which weakens defensive immune responses in oral mucosa, gingiva, gingival crevicular fluid and saliva. PMID:26677547

  17. Oral cysticercosis: a clinical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Wanjari, Sangeeta Panjab; Patidar, Kalpana A; Parwani, Rajkumar N; Tekade, Satyajitraje A

    2013-01-01

    Cysticercosis is a potentially fatal parasitic disease caused by cysticercus cellulosae, the larval stage of Taenia solium. Oral cysticercosis is a rare entity and represents difficulty in clinical diagnosis. This article reports two cases of oral cysticercosis involving buccal and labial mucosa. Both the cases presented with solitary, nodular swelling that had been clinically diagnosed as a mucocele. Histopathology of excisional biopsy revealed it to be cysticercosis. Single, cystic nodular swelling of oral cavity may be the only evidence of cysticercosis and may present first to dentist. These cases emphasise the role of dentist and thorough histopathological examination in the early diagnosis of disease that can prevent potential systemic complication. PMID:23580668

  18. Oral cysticercosis: a clinical dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Wanjari, Sangeeta Panjab; Patidar, Kalpana A; Parwani, Rajkumar N; Tekade, Satyajitraje A

    2013-01-01

    Cysticercosis is a potentially fatal parasitic disease caused by cysticercus cellulosae, the larval stage of Taenia solium. Oral cysticercosis is a rare entity and represents difficulty in clinical diagnosis. This article reports two cases of oral cysticercosis involving buccal and labial mucosa. Both the cases presented with solitary, nodular swelling that had been clinically diagnosed as a mucocele. Histopathology of excisional biopsy revealed it to be cysticercosis. Single, cystic nodular swelling of oral cavity may be the only evidence of cysticercosis and may present first to dentist. These cases emphasise the role of dentist and thorough histopathological examination in the early diagnosis of disease that can prevent potential systemic complication. PMID:23580668

  19. Pyogenic Granuloma on the Upper Labial Mucosa: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    K A, Kamala; Ashok, L.; G P, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Pyogenic granuloma is thought to represent an exuberant tissue response to a local irritation or trauma. It is a reactional response to constant minor trauma and it might be related to hormonal changes. Clinically, these lesions usually present as single nodules or sessile papules with smooth or lobulated surfaces. These may be seen in any size, from a few millimetres to several centimetres. Pyogenic granuloma of the oral cavity is known to involve the gingiva more commonly (75% of all the cases). An extragingival occurrence of pyogenic granuloma is rare. This paper has described an extragingival pyogenic granuloma which occurred on the upper labial mucosa in a 30 years old female patient. PMID:23905151

  20. Oral and Perioral Piercing Complications

    PubMed Central

    Escudero-Castaño, N; Perea-García, M.A; Campo-Trapero, J; Cano-Sánchez; Bascones-Martínez, A

    2008-01-01

    Background. The oral an perioral piercing has a long history as part of religious, tribal,cultural or sexual symbolism and nowdays there is a high incidence of oral and perioral piercing in the adolescent population. This practice has a long history as part of religious, tribal, cultural or sexual symbolism. This article reviews current knowledge on injuries or diseases that might be produced by piercing in the oral cavity. We propose a classification to diagnosed the pathologies related to oral an perioral piercing Methods. A search was conducted of articles in PubMed, Scielo published between 1997 and 2007, using the key words ``oral and perioral, piercing ´´, ``oral, piercing and disease”, ``recessions and oral piercing´´. It has reviewed about twentythree articles 17 were narrative reviews and 6 case series Results. A review was carried out on the origins of oral and perioral body piercing and its local implications, classifying the different alterations like recessions, systemic implications that it can produce in the oral and perioral cavity. Conclusion. Patients with oral and perioral piercing should be regularly followed up because of the possible development of different types of adverse effects. Clinical implications. Adverse effects of oral and perioral piercing can be systemic, with transmission of infectious diseases such as hepatitis B or C, or can be local, with alteration of oral mucosae or even of dental structures. PMID:19444317

  1. Salivary Gland Dysplasia in Fgf10 Heterozygous Mice: A New Mouse Model of Xerostomia

    PubMed Central

    May, A.J.; Chatzeli, L.; Proctor, G.B.; Tucker, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Xerostomia, or chronic dry mouth, is a common syndrome caused by a lack of saliva that can lead to severe eating difficulties, dental caries and oral candida infections. The prevalence of xerostomia increases with age and affects approximately 30% of people aged 65 or older. Given the large numbers of sufferers, and the potential increase in incidence given our aging population, it is important to understand the complex mechanisms that drive hyposalivation and the consequences for the dentition and oral mucosa. From this study we propose the Fgf10 +/- mouse as a model to investigate xerostomia. By following embryonic salivary gland development, in vivo and in vitro, we show that a reduction in Fgf10 causes a delay in branching of salivary glands. This leads to hypoplasia of the glands, a phenotype that is not rescued postnatally or by adulthood in both male and female Fgf10 +/- mice. Histological analysis of the glands showed no obvious defect in cellular differentiation or acini/ductal arrangements, however there was a significant reduction in their size and weight. Analysis of saliva secretion showed that hypoplasia of the glands led to a significant reduction in saliva production in Fgf10 +/- adults, giving rise to a reduced saliva pellicle in the oral cavity of these mice. Mature mice were shown to drink more and in many cases had severe tooth wear. The Fgf10 +/- mouse is therefore a useful model to explore the causes and effects of xerostomia.

  2. Carnosinase activity of human gastrointestinal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Sadikali, F; Darwish, R; Watson, W C

    1975-01-01

    Carnosinase, the dipeptidase which hydrolyses carnosine and other histidine-containing dipeptides, was assayed in mucosal tissues of the human and of the rat gut. Kinetic properties of the intestinal enzyme were found to be similar to carnosinase of other animal tissues. Little or no activity was detected in human gastric or colonic mucosa, and the levels were lower in duodenal than jejunal mucosa. The distribution of carnosinase is similar to that of the disaccharidases. Mean carnosinase activity was 8-8 units/g weight in 15 patients with histologically normal mucosa compared with 5-7 units in five with villous atrophy. The enzyme levels increased with histological improvement of the mucosa in patients with coeliac disease on a gluten-free diet. Tolerance curves for carnosine and its constitutent amino acids showed malabsorption of the dipeptide in a patient with carnosinase deficiency. It is concluded that the intestinal mucosa has much less hydrolase activity for carnosine than for glycylglycine and other dipeptidases, and the relatively slow hydrolysis appears to be the rate-limiting step in the total absorptive process. PMID:1237444

  3. Transepithelial Transport of PAMAM Dendrimers across Isolated Rat Jejunal Mucosae in Ussing Chambers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Oral delivery remains a challenge for poorly permeable hydrophilic macromolecules. Poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers have shown potential for their possible oral delivery. Transepithelial transport of carboxyl-terminated G3.5 and amine-terminated G4 PAMAM dendrimers was assessed using isolated rat jejunal mucosae mounted in Ussing chambers. The 1 mM FITC-labeled dendrimers were added to the apical side of mucosae. Apparent permeability coefficients (Papp) from the apical to the basolateral side were significantly increased for FITC when conjugated to G3.5 PAMAM dendrimer compared to FITC alone. Minimal signs of toxicity were observed when mucosae were exposed to both dendrimers with respect to transepithelial electrical resistance changes, carbachol-induced short circuit current stimulation, and histological changes. [14C]-mannitol fluxes were not altered in the presence of 1 mM dendrimers, suggesting that the paracellular pathway was not affected at this concentration in this model. These results give insight into the mechanism of PAMAM dendrimer transepithelial rat jejunal transport, as well as toxicological considerations important for oral drug delivery. PMID:24992090

  4. Radiation tolerance of the vaginal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Hintz, b.L.; Kagan, A.R.; Chan, P.; Gilbert, H.A.; Nussbaum, H.; Rao, A.R.; Wollin, M.

    1980-06-01

    Sixteen patients with cancer of the vagina that were controlled locally for a minimum of eighteen months after teletherpay (T) or brachytherapy (B) or both (T and B), were analyzed for radiation tolerance of the vaginal mucosa. The site of vaginal necrosis did not always coincide with the site of the tumor. The posterior wall appeared more vulnerable than the anterior or lateral walls. For the distal vaginal mucosa, necrosis requiring surgical intervention occurred following combined T and B, if summated rad exceeded9800. The upper vagina tolerated higher dosages. No patient surgery for upper vaginal necrosis even though summated (T and B) dosage up to 14,000 rad was applied. Placing radioactive needles on the surface of the vaginal cylinder with or without interstitial perincal needles should be avoided. Further accumulation of data is needed to define these vaginal mucosa tolerance limits more closely.

  5. Tuberculosis of the oral cavity: a case report.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, M C; Arrais, M J; Mato, M J; de Araújo, V C

    1997-11-01

    Tuberculosis of the oral mucosa was associated with pulmonary tuberculosis in a 38-year-old white man. The patient presented with multiple oral ulcerations with an irregular periphery and a granular vegetative fundus. The oral lesions antedated the findings of primary pulmonary tuberculosis, and the diagnosis was initially established histologically. Through the differential diagnosis of oral ulcerations, the dentist can play a role in the early detection of tuberculosis. PMID:9573865

  6. Bioimpedance Detection of Oral Lichen Planus Used as Preneoplastic Model

    PubMed Central

    Tatullo, Marco; Marrelli, Massimo; Amantea, Massimiliano; Paduano, Francesco; Santacroce, Luigi; Gentile, Stefano; Scacco, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bioimpedance is a measure of the electrical properties of biological tissues. In the last two decades bioimpedance has been successfully introduced in clinical diagnosis of cancer. It has been demonstrated that tumoral tissues often show lower bioimpedance values than healthy tissues. The aim of this work is to assess the bioimpedentiometric differences between healthy and Oral Lichen Planus (OLP) affected oral mucosa, taking attention to the erosive form which may represent a potential pre-cancerous condition. Methods: 52 patients affected by OLP were recruited for bioimpedance examination of oral mucosa. Four electrical properties, resistance (R), reactance (Xc), phase angle (θ) and impedance (Z) of the tongue and of the intraoral mucosa, were measured. Results: We observed a significant increase of Z and a significant decrease of θ values in correspondence of OLP lesions compared to healthy oral mucosa, and a marked decrease of Z values in correspondence of erosive OLP lesions. Conclusions: These results provide evidence of the usefulness of bioimpedance assay for the characterization of healthy and clinically OLP affected mucosa. Bioimpedance is a valid aid in the early detection and clinical monitoring of the suspicious lesions which could lead to a potentially malignant evolution. The present research article is a valuable addition to the scientific literature of cancer prevention, and our findings can be considered extremely encouraging as they represent the initial step for a more wide clinical study for better define the different cut-off values in the different precancerous conditions occurring in the oral mucosa. PMID:26366210

  7. Oral Mucosal Lesions: Oral Cavity Biology-Part I.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Syed, Nazim Hussain; Aggarwal, Ashok; Sehgal, Shruti

    2015-01-01

    It is important to evaluate the background of oral cavity biology to define morphologic abrasions in oral mucosa following a host of local and/ or systemic disorders. The oral cavity is not only the beginning of the digestive system, but it also plays a significant role in communication; the voice (although the voice is produced in the throat), tongue, lips, and jaw are its essential components to produce the range of sounds. The vestibule and the oral cavity are its major parts, and are usually moist. The lips and the teeth are in approximation, marking its start up. The anatomy of the oral cavity in brief has been reviewed in right prospective for disease related changed morphology, thus facilitating interpretation. PMID:26861428

  8. Oral lichen planus: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Krupaa, R. Jayasri; Sankari, S. Leena; Masthan, K. M. K.; Rajesh, E.

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is an immunologically mediated mucocutaneous disease that is triggered by varied etiological agents. The oral lichenoid reaction is considered a variant of the disease that needs to be clearly diagnosed as a separate entity from oral lichen planus and treated. They follow a strict cause-effector relationship, protocols that suggest the differentiation. Lichen planus has varied clinical forms in the oral mucosa and cutaneously that has different prognosis. This condition also arises in association with various other systemic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus. There have been cases reported in the esophagus, larynx, scalp, nail, cutaneous areas, especially arms and wrists, trunk. There is reported malignant transformation that essentiates careful examination, treatment protocol and regular follow-up sessions. This article throws light on the disease condition of oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid reaction that is essential for the differentiation and treatment. PMID:26015696

  9. Bioengineered vocal fold mucosa for voice restoration.

    PubMed

    Ling, Changying; Li, Qiyao; Brown, Matthew E; Kishimoto, Yo; Toya, Yutaka; Devine, Erin E; Choi, Kyeong-Ok; Nishimoto, Kohei; Norman, Ian G; Tsegyal, Tenzin; Jiang, Jack J; Burlingham, William J; Gunasekaran, Sundaram; Smith, Lloyd M; Frey, Brian L; Welham, Nathan V

    2015-11-18

    Patients with voice impairment caused by advanced vocal fold (VF) fibrosis or tissue loss have few treatment options. A transplantable, bioengineered VF mucosa would address the individual and societal costs of voice-related communication loss. Such a tissue must be biomechanically capable of aerodynamic-to-acoustic energy transfer and high-frequency vibration and physiologically capable of maintaining a barrier against the airway lumen. We isolated primary human VF fibroblasts and epithelial cells and cocultured them under organotypic conditions. The resulting engineered mucosae showed morphologic features of native tissue, proteome-level evidence of mucosal morphogenesis and emerging extracellular matrix complexity, and rudimentary barrier function in vitro. When grafted into canine larynges ex vivo, the mucosae generated vibratory behavior and acoustic output that were indistinguishable from those of native VF tissue. When grafted into humanized mice in vivo, the mucosae survived and were well tolerated by the human adaptive immune system. This tissue engineering approach has the potential to restore voice function in patients with otherwise untreatable VF mucosal disease. PMID:26582902

  10. Evaluation of intraoral complications of buccal mucosa graft in augmentation urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Akyüz, Mehmet; Güneş, Mustafa; Koca, Orhan; Sertkaya, Zülfü; Kanberoğlu, Hüseyin; Karaman, Muhammet İhsan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate intraoral complications of buccal mucosa grafts harvested from one cheek, and used in augmentation urethroplasty. Material and methods: Twenty-one patients with anterior urethral strictures were included in our study. In twelve patients, dorsal onlay, in five patients ventral onlay and in four patients lateral onlay procedures were applied. Average length of buccal mucosa graft from one cheek was 5.2 cm (3–8 cm). In all graft harvesting patients, bleeding in graft side, swelling, pain intensity of oral or perineal area, analgesic use, transition time to normal diet, slurred speech, loss of sensation, and patients’ opinions about oral mucosa regrafting using this technique were evaluated using nine-item questionnaire forms. Results: Eighteen (85.7%) of our patients had mild pain, 13 (61.9%) had mild intraoral swelling, none of our patients had oral bleeding that needed extra procedure and all of our patients were observed to start off their normal diet in the first 3 days. Twelve (57.1%) of our patients needed analgesic agents after the operation while 14 (66.7%) of them have remarked that perineal incision was more painful. Twenty (95.3%) of our patients stated that they could go under the same procedure again. None of our patients had speech disorders or intraoral numbness. Conclusion: Even though buccal mucosal grafting used in augmentation urethroplasty is not a completely painless procedure, buccal mucosa graft is an ideal source of allograft in terms of safe and easy obtainance and improved patient tolerance. PMID:26328170

  11. Effect of indigestible saccharides on B lymphocyte response of intestinal mucosa and cecal fermentation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kudoh, K; Shimizu, J; Wada, M; Takita, T; Kanke, Y; Innami, S

    1998-02-01

    The effects of water-soluble and -insoluble indigestible saccharides (IDS) on immune responses of the intestinal tract were studied. Male 4-week-old Sprague Dawley rats were fed for three weeks on diets containing several kinds of IDS at 5%. The results revealed that the proportion of kappa-light chain and IgA-presenting lymphocytes in small intestinal and cecal mucosa differed in increased number depending on the type of IDS. The response of colonic mucosa was not pronounced. The amounts of short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) and lactic acid in the cecal contents of the other test groups except the celfur group tended to be higher than those in the cellulose group, particularly in the lactulose group where many acids showed significant increases. The correlation between the proportion of kappa-light chain and IgA-presenting lymphocytes in the cecal mucosa and lactic acid in the cecal contents was significant, but that between the proportion of both lymphocytes and SCFA was not. Based on the above, we concluded that the oral administration of IDS induces the proliferation of kappa-light chain and IgA-producing B lymphocytes in small intestinal and cecal mucosa, but the degree of response differs depending on the type of IDS. It is thus suggested that IDS are involved in the intestinal immune system of rats. PMID:9591238

  12. Update on oral herpes virus infections.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Ramesh; Kuperstein, Arthur S; Stoopler, Eric T

    2014-04-01

    Oral herpes virus infections (OHVIs) are among the most common mucosal disorders encountered by oral health care providers. These infections can affect individuals at any age, from infants to the elderly, and may cause significant pain and dysfunction. Immunosuppressed patients may be at increased risk for serious and potential life-threatening complications caused by OHVIs. Clinicians may have difficulty in diagnosing these infections because they can mimic other conditions of the oral mucosa. This article provides oral health care providers with clinically relevant information regarding etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of OHVIs. PMID:24655522

  13. Role of Oral Mucosal Fluid and Electrolyte Absorption and Secretion in Dry Mouth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo H; Castro, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Dry mouth is induced by dehydration of the oral mucosa, resulting from an imbalance of fluid supply and clearance within the oral cavity. Saliva is the major source of oral mucosal fluid, whereas oral fluid clearance includes evaporation and swallowing. Oral mucosal fluid absorption has been suggested to play a critical role in oral fluid clearance; over-absorption of water and ions across the oral mucosa under certain conditions may be a major component for oral fluid imbalance, leading to mucosal dehydration. While numerous studies have confirmed that the oral mucosa absorbs fluid and electrolytes, the pathways and mechanisms mediating the absorption remain undefined. The transcellular pathway regulating oral mucosal epithelial absorption includes aquaporins, epithelial Na+ channel and/or Na+/H+ exchanger, whereas the paracellular transport is likely to be mediated by tight junctions. The regulatory mechanisms of these pathways require further elucidation. It remains unclear whether the oral mucosa also secretes fluid and ions into the oral cavity. Although intercellular lipids secreted by epithelial cells form the major barrier to paracellular water and ion transport, the role and regulation of these lipids in oral mucosal hydration in physiological and pathological conditions need further investigation. Delineation of these mechanisms will be conducive to the development of preventive and therapeutic interventions for dry mouth. PMID:26485506

  14. Anatomical Mapping and Density of Merkel Cells in Skin and Mucosae of the Dog.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Gustavo A; Rodríguez, Francisco; Quesada, Óscar; Herráez, Pedro; Fernández, Antonio; Espinosa-de-Los-Monteros, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Merkel cells (MCs) are specialized cutaneous receptor cells involved with tactile sense. Although the distribution of MCs has been extensively studied in humans and rodents, their precise distribution and density throughout skin in the dog has not previously been determined. Knowledge of their distribution could facilitate understanding of their functions. By using of immunohistochemistry, density, and anatomical mapping of the MCs population in the dog skin was determined. Assessment of the MCs innervation was also achieved. Different patterns were noted in epidermis, hair follicles, or mucosa, including variable-sized clusters, linear or horse-shaped arrangements, and scattered and individualized cells. MCs revealed great variations in density and distribution over the body surface, with the highest numbers in oral mucosa and facial skin. There was no correlation of MCs density with age, sex, type of breed, coat type or pigmentation. Between 41 and 65% of MCs in hairy and glabrous skin and 8-18% of MCs in oral mucosa were in intimate contact with intraepithelial axon terminals. These findings indicate that canine MCs are numerous in sensory receptive areas and may be associated with the tactile sense in the dog. The present article enhances the knowledge of the skin structure in this species. Anat Rec, 299:1157-1164, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27341526

  15. Photoletter to the editor: Disseminated histoplasmosis with initial oral manifestations.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Surabhi; Sardana, Kabir; Garg, Vijay K

    2013-03-30

    Histoplasmosis is a systemic fungal disease that may present in a variety of clinical manifestations. Involvment of the oral mucosa is very rare and may occur as part of disseminated histoplasmosis or as isolated involvement. We present a patient with disseminated histoplasmosis, in whom oral lesions were the initial manifestation of the disease. PMID:23580913

  16. Oral Amelanotic Melanoma of the Maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Saghravanian, Nasrollah; Pazouki, Mahdi; Zamanzadeh, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Amelanotic melanoma is a variant of malignant melanoma comprising 2% to 8% of all malignant melanomas. The amelanotic presentation of melanoma in the oral cavity is extremely rare and has been reported only occasionally in the literature. Moreover, the lack of melanin makes these tumors difficult to diagnose than that of pigmented lesions and the prognosis tends to be poorer. Herein, we report an amelanotic melanoma involving the oral mucosa of the maxilla in a 27 year-old male. PMID:25628704

  17. Cytomorphological Analysis of Keratinocytes in Oral Smears from Tobacco Users and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Lesions — A Histochemical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Suneet; Solomon, Monica Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Aim To analyse the cytomorphological features of keratinocytes in smears obtained from the oral mucosa of tobacco users and from oral squamous cell carcinoma lesions. Methodology Oral smears were obtained from clinically, normal appearing mucosa of oral squamous cell carcinoma patients (n=20) and from the mucosa of smokers (n=20), and apparently healthy individuals (n=20) were used as controls. The smears were histochemically stained and cytomorphological assessment of the keratinocytes was carried out. One-way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) was used for comparing the parameters among multiple groups and Tukey-HSD test was used to compare the mean values between groups. Results The mean nuclear area of keratinocytes from the mucosa of tobacco users was 46 ± 2.57 and that of the oral squamous cell carcinoma lesion was 81.54 ± 4.31. While there was a significant (P=0.001) reduction in the cellular area of keratinocytes from oral squamous cell carcinoma lesion when compared with those from oral smears of tobacco users. Conclusion Cytomorphometric analysis of keratinocytes can serve as a useful adjunct in the early diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:20690418

  18. Buccal mucosa urethroplasty for adult urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, W. Britt; Santucci, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Urethral strictures are difficult to manage. Some treatment modalities for urethral strictures are fraught with high patient morbidity and stricture recurrence rates; however, an extremely useful tool in the armamentarium of the Reconstructive Urologist is buccal mucosal urethroplasty. We like buccal mucosa grafts because of its excellent short and long-term results, low post-operative complication rate, and relative ease of use. We utilize it for most our bulbar urethral stricture repairs and some pendulous urethral stricture repairs, usually in conjunction with a first-stage Johanson repair. In this report, we discuss multiple surgical techniques for repair of urethral stricture disease. Diagnosis, evaluation of candidacy, surgical techniques, post-operative care, and complications are included. The goal is to raise awareness of buccal mucosa grafting for the management urethral stricture disease. PMID:22022061

  19. Pyogenic granuloma of labial mucosa: A misnomer in an anomolous site

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Vaiyapuri; Jacob, Mathew; Sivakumar, Aandamuthu; Saravanan, Srinivasan; Priya, Kesavan

    2012-01-01

    Pyogenic granuloma is tumor-like proliferation to a nonspecific infection. Clinically, pyogenic granuloma presents as sessile or pedunculated exophytic mass with a smooth or lobulated surface which has a tendency to bleed easily. These lesions tend to occur slightly more in females, frequently involving the gingiva of the maxillary region. Histologically, these lesions show an excessive proliferation of vascular type of connective tissue to a nonspecific infection. The most common treatment is surgical excision with eradication of local irritants. This case report describes a pyogenic granuloma on the labial mucosa in a 33-year-old male, discussing the clinical features and histopathologic features that distinguish this lesion from other similar oral mucosa lesions. PMID:23066251

  20. Unifocal orofacial granulomatosis in retromolar mucosa: surgical treatment with Er,Cr:YSGG laser

    PubMed Central

    Castelo-Baz, Pablo; Seoane-Romero, Juan M.; García-Caballero, Lucía; Suárez-Peñaranda, José M.; Romero-Méndez, María A.

    2014-01-01

    Orofacial granulomatosis is defined by permanent or recurrent swelling of orofacial tissues with different multiform and multifocal clinical patterns. An 11-year old boy presented with a 2-month history of mucosa enlargement. Intraoral examination revealed an erythematous, polylobulated, exophytic lesion with a smooth surface located in retromolar mucosa, non-tender and non-infiltratated to palpation. The diagnosis was inflammatory lesion compatible with pyogenic granuloma and laser excision was decided. Haematological parameters were within normal range, as well as chest Xrays. These findings lead to a diagnosis of non-symptomatic orofacial granulomatosis, whose early diagnosis can minimize the impact of systemic-related disorders, like Chron’s disease. Key words:Laser, orofacial granulomatosis, childhood, oral lesions, diagnosis. PMID:24790722

  1. Staged buccal mucosa urethroplasty in reoperative hypospadias

    PubMed Central

    Nerli, R. B.; Neelagund, S. E.; Guntaka, Ajay; Patil, Shivagouda; Hiremath, Siddayya C.; Jali, Sujata M.; Vernekar, Ritesh; Hiremath, Murigendra B.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Repeated attempts at surgical repair of serious complications involving either the partial or complete breakdown of the hypospadias repair are less likely to succeed because the penis is densely scarred, or significantly shortened, and the skin over the penis is immobile and hypovascular. Buccal mucosa (BM) has become the preferred material for reconstruction, whenever a child with skin-deficient hypospadias needs reoperation. We report the results of our surgical experience with staged reoperation using BM, in the repair of hypospadias in children with complications after multiple failed repairs. Materials and Methods: Children needing reoperation for hypospadias underwent a staged repair using buccal mucosa. The complications were noted. Results: Twenty-one children aged 3 – 16 years underwent this staged repair during the period May 2000 – April 2010. Two of these 21 children had a failed first stage. One child developed a urethro-cutaneous fistula following the second stage, which was corrected in an additional stage. Conclusions: The use of the buccal mucosa graft for urethral reconstruction in a child with hypospadias, needing a reoperation, is a successful method, with a low incidence of complications. PMID:21814309

  2. Human keratinocyte culture from the peritonsillar mucosa.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, P; Bonnekoh, B; Wevers, A; Michel, O; Mahrle, G; Krieg, T; Stennert, E

    1996-01-01

    Tonsillectomy tissue can be used as a routine source for cultures of oropharyngeal keratinocytes. In so doing, a peritonsillar strip of unaltered mucosa was dissected in the upper submucosa. Subsequent trypsinization yielded 7.0 +/- 3.4 x 10(6) keratinocytes per bilateral tonsillectomy. Keratinocyte attachment and growth in primary culture were promoted by sublethally irradiated 3T3 murine fibroblasts. Three subcultures could be performed without a feeder layer and were characterized by a population doubling time of 4.5 days during log growth phase. Electrophoretic and immunoblot analysis of the third subculture revealed a strong expression of keratin pairs 5/14 and 6/16 as well as keratins 7 and 19, whereas keratins 8/18 were expressed less intensely. The lowest intensity, was found for keratin 13, which is known to be indicative of the differentiated mucosa. The culture technique thus provides an easily available in vitro model for morphological and functional studies on the epithelial compartment of human oropharyngeal mucosa. PMID:8737778

  3. [Bioelectric properties of excised rabbit nasal mucosa].

    PubMed

    Suzumura, E; Takeuchi, K; Sakakura, Y

    1990-06-01

    The water flow across the respiratory epithelia is an important determinant of the efficiency of mucociliary clearance. Bulk water flow has been shown to be coupled to net ion flux. We studied ion transport across rabbit nasal mucosa by measuring bioelectric properties using Ussing chambers. Results were summarized as follows. (1) Compared with tracheal mucosa, nasal mucosa exhibited lower potential difference (p less than 0.01), lower short-circuit current (p less than 0.05), and higher conductance (p less than 0.01). (2) Ouabain 10(-4)M inhibited short-circuit current when added to the submucosal bath of Ussing chambers, and amiloride decreased short-circuit current to about 40% when added to the mucosal bath. (3) When the bubbling of the solution was changed from 95%O2, 5%CO2 to 100%N2, short-circuit current remarkably decreased. (4) A significant positive correlation existed between temperature ranging from 33 degrees C to 41 degrees C and short-circuit current (r = 0.46, p less than 0.02). PMID:2213352

  4. Dopamine receptors in human gastrointestinal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, D.E.; Mason, G.A.; Walker, C.H.; Valenzuela, J.E.

    1987-12-21

    Dopamine is a putative enteric neurotransmitter that has been implicated in exocrine secretory and motility functions of the gastrointestinal tract of several mammalian species including man. This study was designed to determine the presence of dopamine binding sites in human gastric and duodenal mucosa and to describe certain biochemical characteristics of these enteric receptor sites. The binding assay was performed in triplicate with tissue homogenates obtained from healthy volunteers of both sexes using /sup 3/H-dopamine as a ligand. The extent of nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of a 100-fold excess of unlabeled dopamine. Scatchard analysis performed with increasing concentrations of /sup 3/H-dopamine (20-500 nM) revealed a single class of saturable dopamine binding sites in gastric and duodenal mucosa. The results of this report demonstrate the presence of specific dopamine receptors in human gastric and duodenal mucosa. These biochemical data suggest that molecular abnormalities of these receptor sites may be operative in the pathogenesis of important gastrointestinal disorders. 33 references, 2 figures.

  5. Oral Delivery of a Novel Recombinant Streptococcus mitis Vector Elicits Robust Vaccine Antigen-Specific Oral Mucosal and Systemic Antibody Responses and T Cell Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Emily; Kotha, Abhiroop; Biaco, Tracy; Sedani, Nikita; Zou, Jonathan; Stashenko, Phillip; Duncan, Margaret J.; Campos-Neto, Antonio; Cayabyab, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    The pioneer human oral commensal bacterium Streptococcus mitis has unique biologic features that make it an attractive mucosal vaccine or therapeutic delivery vector. S. mitis is safe as a natural persistent colonizer of the mouth, throat and nasopharynx and the oral commensal bacterium is capable of inducing mucosal antibody responses. A recombinant S. mitis (rS. mitis) that stably expresses HIV envelope protein was generated and tested in the germ-free mouse model to evaluate the potential usefulness of this vector as a mucosal vaccine against HIV. Oral vaccination led to the efficient and persistent bacterial colonization of the mouth and the induction of both salivary and systemic antibody responses. Interestingly, persistently colonized animals developed antigen-specific systemic T cell tolerance. Based on these findings we propose the use of rS. mitis vaccine vector for the induction of mucosal antibodies that will prevent the penetration of the mucosa by pathogens such as HIV. Moreover, the first demonstration of rS. mitis having the ability to elicit T cell tolerance suggest the potential use of rS. mitis as an immunotherapeutic vector to treat inflammatory, allergic and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26618634

  6. Oral or parenteral administration of curcumin does not prevent the growth of high-risk t(4;11) acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells engrafted into a NOD/SCID mouse model

    PubMed Central

    ZUNINO, SUSAN J.; STORMS, DAVID H.; NEWMAN, JOHN W.; PEDERSEN, THERESA L.; KEEN, CARL L.; DUCORE, JONATHAN M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the efficacy of orally and parenter-ally administered curcumin was evaluated in non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice (NOD.CB17-Prkdcscid/J mice) engrafted with the human t(4;11) acute lymphoblastic leukemia line, SEM. SEM cells were injected into the tail vein and engraftment was monitored by flow cytometry. Once engraftment was observed, the chemotherapeutic potential was examined by injecting mice intraperitoneally with curcumin (5 mg/kg body weight) dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) or DMSO alone (control) every other day, or vincristine (0.5 mg/kg body weight) 3 times per week for 4 weeks (n=16 per group). The intraperitoneal administration of curcumin did not inhibit the growth of the leukemia cells. To determine the efficacy of oral curcumin, mice were fed a control diet or a diet containing 0.5% w/w curcumin 3 weeks prior to the injection of the leukemia cells and throughout the experimental period (n=16 per group). To determine whether dietary curcumin can enhance the efficacy of a conventional chemotherapeutic agent, vincristine was injected intraperitoneally into leukemic mice fed the different diets. Dietary curcumin did not delay the engraftment or growth of leukemia cells, or sensitize the cells to vincristine. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analyses of mouse sera showed that curcumin rapidly metabolized to glucuronidated and sulfated forms within 1 h post-injection and these were the major curcumin metabolites found in the sera of the mice fed the curcumin diet. In contrast to the findings in previous in vitro models, the current data indicate that orally or parenterally administered curcumin is not a potent preventive agent against high-risk t(4;11) acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:23232667

  7. Gene expression profiling of duodenal biopsies discriminates celiac disease mucosa from normal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Bragde, Hanna; Jansson, Ulf; Jarlsfelt, Ingvar; Söderman, Jan

    2011-06-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is identified by histopathologic changes in the small intestine which normalize during a gluten-free diet. The histopathologic assessment of duodenal biopsies is usually routine but can be difficult. This study investigated gene expression profiling as a diagnostic tool. A total of 109 genes were selected to reflect alterations in crypt-villi architecture, inflammatory response, and intestinal permeability and were examined for differential expression in normal mucosa compared with CD mucosa in pediatric patients. Biopsies were classified using discriminant analysis of gene expression. Fifty genes were differentially expressed, of which eight (APOC3, CYP3A4, OCLN, MAD2L1, MKI67, CXCL11, IL17A, and CTLA4) discriminated normal mucosa from CD mucosa without classification errors using leave-one-out cross-validation (n = 39) and identified the degree of mucosal damage. Validation using an independent set of biopsies (n = 27) resulted in four discrepant cases. Biopsies from two of these cases showed a patchy distribution of lesions, indicating that discriminant analysis based on single biopsies failed to identify CD mucosa. In the other two cases, serology support class according to discriminant analysis and histologic specimens were judged suboptimal but assessable. Gene expression profiling shows promise as a diagnostic tool and for follow-up of CD, but further evaluation is needed. PMID:21378598

  8. Development of three-dimensional tissue engineered bone-oral mucosal composite models.

    PubMed

    Almela, Thafar; Brook, Ian M; Moharamzadeh, Keyvan

    2016-04-01

    Tissue engineering of bone and oral mucosa have been extensively studied independently. The aim of this study was to develop and investigate a novel combination of bone and oral mucosa in a single 3D in vitro composite tissue mimicking the natural structure of alveolar bone with an overlying oral mucosa. Rat osteosarcoma (ROS) cells were seeded into a hydroxyapatite/tri-calcium phosphate scaffold and bone constructs were cultured in a spinner bioreactor for 3 months. An engineered oral mucosa was fabricated by air/liquid interface culture of immortalized OKF6/TERET-2 oral keratinocytes on collagen gel-embedded fibroblasts. EOM was incorporated into the engineered bone using a tissue adhesive and further cultured prior to qualitative and quantitative assessments. Presto Blue assay revealed that ROS cells remained vital throughout the experiment. The histological and scanning electron microscope examinations showed that the cells proliferated and densely populated the scaffold construct. Micro computed tomography (micro-CT) scanning revealed an increase in closed porosity and a decrease in open and total porosity at the end of the culture period. Histological examination of bone-oral mucosa model showed a relatively differentiated parakeratinized epithelium, evenly distributed fibroblasts in the connective tissue layer and widely spread ROS cells within the bone scaffold. The feasibility of fabricating a novel bone-oral mucosa model using cell lines is demonstrated. Generating human 'normal' cell-based models with further characterization is required to optimize the model for in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:26883949

  9. Impairment of mesenchymal stem cells derived from oral leukoplakia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhihui; Song, Jiangyuan; Han, Ying; Mu, Dongdong; Su, Sha; Ji, Xiaoli; Liu, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Oral leukoplakia is one of the common precancerous lesions in oral mucosa. To compare the biological characteristics and regenerative capacities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from oral leukoplakia (epithelial hyperplasia and dysplasia) and normal oral mucosa, MSCs were isolated by enzyme digestion. Then these cells were identified by the expression of MSC related markers, STRO-1, CD105 and CD90, with the absent for the hematopoietic stem cell marker CD34 by flow cytometric detection. The self-renewal ability of MSCs from oral leukoplakia was enhanced, while the multipotent differentiation was descended, compared with MSCs from normal oral mucosa. Fibrin gel was used as a carrier for MSCs transplanted into immunocompromised mice to detect their regenerative capacity. The regenerative capacities of MSCs from oral leukoplakia became impaired partly. Collagen IV (Col IV) and matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) were selected to analyze the potential mechanism for the functional changes of MSCs from oral leukoplakia by immunochemical and western blot analysis. The expression of Col IV was decreased and that of MMP-9 was increased by MSCs with the progression of oral leukoplakia, especially in MSCs from epithelial dysplasia. The imbalance between regenerative and metabolic self-regulatory functions of MSCs from oral leukoplakia may be related to the progression of this premalignant disorder. PMID:26617710

  10. High-Resolution Optical Imaging of Benign and Malignant Mucosa in the Upper Aerodigestive Tract: An Atlas for Image-Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Lauren L.; Vila, Peter M.; Park, Richard W.; Schwarz, Richard; Polydorides, Alexandros D.; Teng, Marita S.; Gurudutt, Vivek V.; Genden, Eric M.; Miles, Brett; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Sikora, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    Background High-resolution optical imaging provides real-time visualization of mucosa in the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) which allows non-invasive discrimination of benign and neoplastic epithelium. The high-resolution microendoscope (HRME) utilizes a fiberoptic probe in conjunction with a tissue contrast agent to display nuclei and cellular architecture. This technology has broad potential applications to intraoperative margin detection and early cancer detection. Methods Our group has created an extensive image collection of both neoplastic and normal epithelium of the UADT. Here, we present and describe imaging characteristics of benign, dysplastic, and malignant mucosa in the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, and esophagus. Results There are differences in the nuclear organization and overall tissue architecture of benign and malignant mucosa which correlate with histopathologic diagnosis. Different anatomic subsites also display unique imaging characteristics. Conclusion HRME allows discrimination between benign and neoplastic mucosa, and familiarity with the characteristics of each subsite facilitates correct diagnosis. PMID:23641314

  11. Oral epithelial stem cells – implications in normal development and cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Papagerakis, Silvana; Pannone, Giuseppe; Zheng, Li; About, Imad; Taqi, Nawar; Nguyen, Nghia P.T.; Matossian, Margarite; McAlpin, Blake; Santoro, Angela; McHugh, Jonathan; Prince, Mark E.; Papagerakis, Petros

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucosa is continuously exposed to environmental forces and has to be constantly renewed. Accordingly, the oral mucosa epithelium contains a large reservoir of epithelial stem cells necessary for tissue homeostasis. Despite considerable scientific advances in stem cell behavior in a number of tissues, fewer studies have been devoted to the stem cells in the oral epithelium. Most of oral mucosa stem cells studies are focused on identifying cancer stem cells (CSC) in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) among other head and neck cancers. OSCCs are the most prevalent epithelial tumors of the head and neck region, marked by their aggressiveness and invasiveness. Due to their highly tumorigenic properties, it has been suggested that CSC may be the critical population of cancer cells in the development of OSCC metastasis. This review presents a brief overview of epithelium stem cells with implications in oral health, and the clinical implications of the CSC concept in OSCC metastatic dissemination. PMID:24803391

  12. Role of topical drugs in treatment of oral mucosal diseases. A literature review.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Soheyl; Gupta, Deepak; Pallagatti, Shambulingappa; Singla, Isha; Gupta, Rajesh; Goel, Varun

    2013-11-01

    Few topical formulations have been designed specifically to treat oral mucosal diseases. Local drug delivery may provide a more targeted and efficient option than systemic delivery for diseases of the oral mucosa. The permeability to the topical drugs differs according to the thickness of the epithelium and the extent of keratinization. The loss of the permeability barrier in the oral mucosa, due to ulceration or erosion, leads to rapid diffusion of the drug into tissues as compared to the intact areas of the mucosa. Oral mucosal delivery has the potential to treat many different conditions and diseases, such as oral cancer, mucositis, lichen planus, herpes simplex, candidiasis, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, vesiculo-bullous diseases, neuropathic pain and salivary dysfunction. Each therapy requires distinct penetration and drug retention profiles in order to optimize treatment and minimize side effects. In this paper, topical medications are discussed, as these are advantageous for the treatment of oral mucosal lesions with fewer side effects. PMID:24600767

  13. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Description and incidence of oral complications

    SciTech Connect

    Dreizen, S. )

    1990-01-01

    No part of the body reflects the complications of cancer chemotherapy as visibly and as vividly as the mouth. The infectious, hemorrhagic, cytotoxic, nutritional, and neurologic signs of drug toxicity are reflected in the mouth by changes in the color, character, comfort, and continuity of the mucosa. The stomatologic complications of radiotherapy for oral cancer are physical and physiological in nature, transient or lasting in duration, and reversible or irreversible in type. Some linger as permanent mementos long after the cancer has been destroyed. They stem from radiation injury to the salivary glands, oral mucosa, oral musculature, alveolar bone, and developing teeth. They are expressed clinically by xerostomia, trismus, radiation dermatitis, nutritional stomatitis, and dentofacial malformation. In both cancer chemotherapy and cancer radiotherapy, the oral complications vary in pattern, duration, intensity, and number, with not every patient developing every complication. 21 references.

  14. Quantitative Immunoexpression of EGFR in Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders: Oral Leukoplakia and Oral Submucous Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jyothi Meka, Naga; Ugrappa, Sridevi; Velpula, Nagalaxmi; Kumar, Sravan; Naik Maloth, Kotya; Kodangal, Srikanth; ch, Lalitha; Goyal, Stuti

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Many oral squamous cell carcinomas develop from potentially malignant disorders (PMDs)which include a variety of lesions and conditions characterized by an increased risk for malignant transformation. Thisstudy evaluated the quantitative expression of EGFR in normal oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia and oral submucous fibrosis to predict the malignant risk in compliance with the intensity of staining with EGFR. Materials and methods. Thirty subjects were included in the study, consisting of 10 oral leukoplakia (OL), 10 oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) and 10 normal oral mucosa (NOM) as the control group. Owing to the histopathological confirmation of precancerous state of tissue, 4-μm-thick sections of tissue were taken from paraffin-embedded wax blocks for immunohistochemical staining for EGFR. Results. All the control cases showed positive expression for EGFR, while 20% of oral leukoplakia and 40% of OSMF cases showed strong expression (3+), 40% of OL and 30% of OSMF cases showed weak expression (2+), and 40% of OLand 30% of OSMF cases showed poor expression (1+) compared to controls (P=0.012). Conclusion. EGFR expression levels in the premalignant lesion appear to be a sensitive factor in predicting the neoplastic potential. This suggests that EGFR may serve as a biological marker to identify high-risk subgroups and guide prophylactic therapy with chemopreventive drugs or surgical intervention to prevent progression to carcinoma. Hence, further investigations in the direction of chemopreventive trials with a larger sample size are suggested to determine its role in the head and neck tumorigenesis. PMID:26697149

  15. Quantitative Immunoexpression of EGFR in Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders: Oral Leukoplakia and Oral Submucous Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jyothi Meka, Naga; Ugrappa, Sridevi; Velpula, Nagalaxmi; Kumar, Sravan; Naik Maloth, Kotya; Kodangal, Srikanth; Ch, Lalitha; Goyal, Stuti

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Many oral squamous cell carcinomas develop from potentially malignant disorders (PMDs)which include a variety of lesions and conditions characterized by an increased risk for malignant transformation. Thisstudy evaluated the quantitative expression of EGFR in normal oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia and oral submucous fibrosis to predict the malignant risk in compliance with the intensity of staining with EGFR. Materials and methods. Thirty subjects were included in the study, consisting of 10 oral leukoplakia (OL), 10 oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) and 10 normal oral mucosa (NOM) as the control group. Owing to the histopathological confirmation of precancerous state of tissue, 4-μm-thick sections of tissue were taken from paraffin-embedded wax blocks for immunohistochemical staining for EGFR. Results. All the control cases showed positive expression for EGFR, while 20% of oral leukoplakia and 40% of OSMF cases showed strong expression (3+), 40% of OL and 30% of OSMF cases showed weak expression (2+), and 40% of OLand 30% of OSMF cases showed poor expression (1+) compared to controls (P=0.012). Conclusion. EGFR expression levels in the premalignant lesion appear to be a sensitive factor in predicting the neoplastic potential. This suggests that EGFR may serve as a biological marker to identify high-risk subgroups and guide prophylactic therapy with chemopreventive drugs or surgical intervention to prevent progression to carcinoma. Hence, further investigations in the direction of chemopreventive trials with a larger sample size are suggested to determine its role in the head and neck tumorigenesis. PMID:26697149

  16. GPR40 and GPR120 fatty acid sensors are critical for postoral but not oral mediation of fat preferences in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Anthony; Zukerman, Steven; Ackroff, Karen

    2013-12-15

    In addition to orosensory signals, postoral actions of fat stimulate appetite and condition flavor preferences, but the gut sensors mediating these responses are unknown. Here, we investigated the role of the fatty acid sensors GPR40 and GPR120 in postoral and oral preferences for a soybean oil emulsion (Intralipid). Mice were trained to drink a flavored solution (CS+) paired with intragastric (IG) oil infusions and another flavored solution (CS-) paired with water infusions. Knockout (KO) mice missing GPR40 or GPR120 sensors increased their CS+ intake in one-bottle tests (1 h/day) but less so than wild-type (WT) mice. The KO mice also preferred the CS+ to CS- in a two-bottle test, but the preference was attenuated in GPR40 KO mice. Double-knockout (DoKO) mice missing both GPR40 and GPR120 displayed attenuated stimulation of CS+ intake and only a marginal CS+ preference. The DoKO mice developed a more substantial CS+ preference when tested 24 h/day, although weaker than that of WT mice. The DoKO mice also consumed less of the CS+ paired with IG Intralipid, as well as less Intralipid in oral tests. However, DoKO mice, like GPR40 KO and GPR120 KO mice did not differ from WT mice in their preference for Intralipid over water at 0.001%-20% concentrations. In contrast to prior results obtained with mice missing the CD36 fatty acid sensor, these findings indicate that, together, GPR40 and GPR120 play a critical role in the postoral stimulation of appetite by fat but are not essential for oral fat preferences. PMID:24154510

  17. Report of a Rare Case of Nasal Mucosa Pyoderma Vegetans in a Patient with Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Vahedi, Homayoon; Nozari, Neda; Sotoudeh, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Some dermatologic manifestations are common in ulcerative colitis (UC). Herein, we present a 36-year-old woman with ulcerative colitis and uncommon nasal mucosa pyoderma vegetans. The patient presented to our hospital with symptoms of active colitis and a concomitant 3×4×5 cm dermato-mucosal lesion in her left nasal lumen. After surgery of the mucosal lesion, the treatment for her active colitis was initiated with intravenous infliximab and oral asacol. After a 1-year follow-up, no sign of recurrence favoring mucosal lesion was noted and symptoms of ulcerative colitis were managed properly. PMID:26106471

  18. Innovative dual impression technique for patients with atrophia idiopathica mucosa oris

    PubMed Central

    Praveen, G; Agarwal, Swatantra; Nirmala, B. G; Gupta, Saurabh; Sharma, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Atrophia idiopathica mucosa oris is an oral fibrosing disease resulting in marked rigidity and an eventual inability to open the mouth or had limited mouth opening. Patients with limited mouth opening are a common occurrence in prosthodontic practice. The majority of these patients can be treated with exercise and stretching movements before impressions are made. Some will not respond to these procedures because of facial scarring and surgical manipulation of the facial muscles. This article presents an impression procedure for overcoming difficulties encountered in such reduced mouth opening patients that can be assembled intraorally, disassembled intraorally, and reassembled extraorally. PMID:26929494

  19. Spindle Cell Lipoma Occurring in the Buccal Mucosa: An Unusual Location of This Benign Lipomatous Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Milhan, Noala Vicensoto Moreira; Cavalcante, Ana Sueli Rodrigues; Marques, Yonara Maria Freire Soares; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2015-01-01

    Spindle cell lipoma is a benign lipomatous neoplasm, which rarely occurs in the oral cavity. The aims of this paper are to report a case of spindle cell lipoma located in buccal mucosa and discuss the main clinical, histological, and immunohistochemical findings of this entity. Thus, we report a 4-year history of an asymptomatic smooth surface nodule in an elderly Caucasian man with clinical hypothesis of fibroma. The histopathological examination showed spindle cells, mature adipose tissue, and many mast cells in a stroma of connective tissue presenting ropey collagen fibers bundles. After immunohistochemical analysis, the final diagnosis was spindle cell lipoma. PMID:26491592

  20. Oral Tolerance Induced by Transfer of Food Antigens via Breast Milk of Allergic Mothers Prevents Offspring from Developing Allergic Symptoms in a Mouse Food Allergy Model

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Takeshi; Tsubota, Yuma; Kodama, Toshihisa; Kageyama-Yahara, Natsuko; Kadowaki, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    We examined whether maternal exposure to food antigens during lactation and maternal allergic status would affect the development of food allergy in offspring. OVA-sensitized or OVA-nonsensitized BALB/c female mice were exposed or unexposed to OVA during lactation. After weaning, their offspring were systemically sensitized twice with OVA and repeatedly given OVA by oral intubation. While 97.1% of the mice breastfed by OVA-nonsensitized and OVA-unexposed mothers developed allergic diarrhea, 59.7% of the mice breastfed by OVA-exposed nonallergic mothers during lactation and 24.6% of the mice breastfed by OVA-exposed allergic mothers during lactation developed food allergy. Furthermore, OVA was detected in breast-milk from OVA-exposed nonallergic mothers during lactation (4.6 ± 0.5 μg/mL). In addition, OVA-specific IgG1 titers were markedly increased in breast milk from allergic mothers (OVA-sensitized and OVA-unexposed mother: 11.0 ± 0.5, OVA-sensitized and OVA-exposed mother: 12.3 ± 0.3). Our results suggest that oral tolerance induced by breast milk-mediated transfer of dietary antigens along with their specific immunoglobulins to offspring leads to antigen-specific protection from food allergy. PMID:22505952

  1. Interleukin-37 expression and its potential role in oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Wang, Jiayi; Liu, Dongjuan; Liu, Sai; Xu, Hao; Ji, Ning; Zhou, Min; Zeng, Xin; Zhang, Dunfang; Li, Jing; Chen, Qianming

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin 37 (IL-37) has been reported to play a significant role in innate immune response and to be involved in several kinds of cancers. However, the investigation of association between IL-37 and oral mucosa carcinogenesis hasn't been clearly established. The aim of the study was to assess IL-37 expression and explore its role in oral mucosa carcinogenesis. The expression of IL-37 increased from normal control (NC) to Oral leukoplakia (OLK) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Moreover, statistically highly significant difference was present between scores of OLK with and without mild/moderate dysplasia (P < 0.001). In addition, IL-37 expression was lower in OSCC with lymph node metastasis than those without metastasis (P < 0.01). What’s more, overexpression of IL-37 in RAW264.7 cells remarkably reduced the pseudopodia, vacuolization and the expression of IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β. Finally, we found IL-37 and its receptor IL-18Rα but not its binding partner IL-18BP have similar tissue location and expression trend in different stages of oral mucosa carcinogenesis. Overall, IL-37 can be used as a biomarker for early oral tumorigenesis and for malignant transformation risk assessment of premalignant lesions. PMID:27225603

  2. Interleukin-37 expression and its potential role in oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Wang, Jiayi; Liu, Dongjuan; Liu, Sai; Xu, Hao; Ji, Ning; Zhou, Min; Zeng, Xin; Zhang, Dunfang; Li, Jing; Chen, Qianming

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin 37 (IL-37) has been reported to play a significant role in innate immune response and to be involved in several kinds of cancers. However, the investigation of association between IL-37 and oral mucosa carcinogenesis hasn't been clearly established. The aim of the study was to assess IL-37 expression and explore its role in oral mucosa carcinogenesis. The expression of IL-37 increased from normal control (NC) to Oral leukoplakia (OLK) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Moreover, statistically highly significant difference was present between scores of OLK with and without mild/moderate dysplasia (P < 0.001). In addition, IL-37 expression was lower in OSCC with lymph node metastasis than those without metastasis (P < 0.01). What's more, overexpression of IL-37 in RAW264.7 cells remarkably reduced the pseudopodia, vacuolization and the expression of IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β. Finally, we found IL-37 and its receptor IL-18Rα but not its binding partner IL-18BP have similar tissue location and expression trend in different stages of oral mucosa carcinogenesis. Overall, IL-37 can be used as a biomarker for early oral tumorigenesis and for malignant transformation risk assessment of premalignant lesions. PMID:27225603

  3. Evaluation of a suspicious oral mucosal lesion.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Michele; Poh, Catherine F; Hovan, Allan J; Ng, Samson; Rosin, Miriam P

    2008-04-01

    Dentists who encounter a change in the oral mucosa of a patient must decide whether the abnormality requires further investigation. In this paper, we describe a systematic approach to the assessment of oral mucosal conditions that are thought likely to be premalignant or an early cancer. These steps, which include a comprehensive history, step-by-step clinical examination (including use of adjunctive visual tools), diagnostic testing and formulation of diagnosis, are routinely used in clinics affiliated with the British Columbia Oral Cancer Prevention Program (BC OCPP) and are recommended for consideration by dentists for use in daily practice. PMID:18387268

  4. An Orally Bioavailable, Indole-3-glyoxylamide Based Series of Tubulin Polymerization Inhibitors Showing Tumor Growth Inhibition in a Mouse Xenograft Model of Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Colley, Helen E; Muthana, Munitta; Danson, Sarah J; Jackson, Lucinda V; Brett, Matthew L; Harrison, Joanne; Coole, Sean F; Mason, Daniel P; Jennings, Luke R; Wong, Melanie; Tulasi, Vamshi; Norman, Dennis; Lockey, Peter M; Williams, Lynne; Dossetter, Alexander G; Griffen, Edward J; Thompson, Mark J

    2015-12-10

    A number of indole-3-glyoxylamides have previously been reported as tubulin polymerization inhibitors, although none has yet been successfully developed clinically. We report here a new series of related compounds, modified according to a strategy of reducing aromatic ring count and introducing a greater degree of saturation, which retain potent tubulin polymerization activity but with a distinct SAR from previously documented libraries. A subset of active compounds from the reported series is shown to interact with tubulin at the colchicine binding site, disrupt the cellular microtubule network, and exert a cytotoxic effect against multiple cancer cell lines. Two compounds demonstrated significant tumor growth inhibition in a mouse xenograft model of head and neck cancer, a type of the disease which often proves resistant to chemotherapy, supporting further development of the current series as potential new therapeutics. PMID:26580420

  5. Honey and Apoptosis in Human Gastric Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Aida; Somi, Mohammad H; Safaiyan, Abdolrasoul; Modaresi, Jabiz; Ostadrahimi, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    Background: Gastric cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in the world. Honey is a complex mixture of special biological active constituents. Honey possesses antioxidant and antitumor properties. Nutritional studies have indicated that consumption of honey modulates the risk of developing gastric cancer. On the other hand, apoptosis has been reported to play a decisive role in precancerous changes. Our chief study was conducted to assess the relationship between consumption of honey and apoptosis in human gastric mucosa. Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 98 subjects over 18 years old, referred to two hospitals in Tabriz, Iran. Subjects were undergone an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, 62 subjects were finally enrolled. Honey consumption was assessed by a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and apoptosis was detected by TUNEL technique. We tested polynomial curve to find the best fit between honey consumption and apoptosis. Results: A positive relation between honey consumption and apoptosis was found (P=0.024). Our results indicated that the final and the best fit curve was: apoptosis = 1.714+1.648(honey amount) - 0.533(honey amount)2 +1.833×10-5(honey amount)7. Conclusion: Honey consumption had positive effects on gastric cancer by inducing apoptosis in gastric mucosa. PMID:24688918

  6. Chronic oral or intraarticular administration of docosahexaenoic acid reduces nociception and knee edema and improves functional outcomes in a mouse model of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant–induced knee arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Clinical and preclinical studies have shown that supplementation with ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) reduce joint destruction and inflammation present in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the effects of individual ω-3 PUFAs on chronic arthritic pain have not been evaluated to date. Thus, our aim in this study was to examine whether purified docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, an ω-3 PUFA) reduces spontaneous pain-related behavior and knee edema and improves functional outcomes in a mouse model of knee arthritis. Methods Unilateral arthritis was induced by multiple injections of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA) into the right knee joints of male ICR adult mice. Mice that received CFA injections were then chronically treated from day 15 until day 25 post–initial CFA injection with oral DHA (10, 30 and 100 mg/kg daily) or intraarticular DHA (25 and 50 μg/joint twice weekly). Spontaneous flinching of the injected extremity (considered as spontaneous pain-related behavior), vertical rearing and horizontal exploratory activity (considered as functional outcomes) and knee edema were assessed. To determine whether an endogenous opioid mechanism was involved in the therapeutic effect of DHA, naloxone (NLX, an opioid receptor antagonist, 3 mg/kg subcutaneously) was administered in arthritic mice chronically treated with DHA (30 mg/kg by mouth) at day 25 post–CFA injection. Results The intraarticular CFA injections resulted in increasing spontaneous flinching and knee edema of the ipsilateral extremity as well as worsening functional outcomes as time progressed. Chronic administration of DHA, given either orally or intraarticularly, significantly improved horizontal exploratory activity and reduced flinching behavior and knee edema in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of NLX did not reverse the antinociceptive effect of DHA. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first to demonstrate DHA’s antinociceptive and

  7. Estrogen-like effects of diet-derived cadmium differ from those of orally administered CdCl(2) in the ERE-luc estrogen reporter mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Balaji; Mäkelä, Sari; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Berglund, Marika; Håkansson, Helen; Damdimopoulou, Pauliina; Maggi, Adriana

    2011-04-25

    Cadmium (Cd), an environmental and dietary contaminant, has been described to mimic the effects of 17β-estradiol (E(2)) in selected model systems when studied as an inorganic salt. However, inorganic Cd salts do not represent the main form of Cd exposure in general human populations. The aims of this study were to compare the estrogen-like effects and the bioavailability of dietary Cd to inorganic CdCl(2). Adult ovariectomized ERE-luc reporter mice were administered two bread based diets containing different concentrations of Cd (17.57 and 49.22μg/kg, corresponding to oral intakes of 1.8 and 5.1μg/kg body weight (bw) per day, respectively), inorganic CdCl(2) (1μg/kg bw per day by gavage) or E(2) (5μg/kg bw per day pellet) for 21 days. The effects on estrogen signaling were investigated by studying the uterine weights, luciferase activation, and expression of endogenous estrogen target genes. The uterine weight was significantly increased by both CdCl(2) and E(2) but not by the Cd containing diets. All treatments modulated the expression of luciferase and the endogenous estrogen target genes; however, there was no consistent overlap between the responses triggered by the bread diets and the responses stimulated by CdCl(2) or E(2). Oral exposure to Cd was calculated and the concentrations in liver and kidneys quantified to estimate the amount of absorbed Cd retained in tissues. The results suggest significantly lower absorption and/or tissue retention of dietary Cd compared to CdCl(2) following oral exposure. Altogether, our results support previous reports on in vivo estrogenicity of CdCl(2) but do not suggest the same activity for diet bound Cd. This study calls for caution when extrapolating results from pure compound studies (e.g. estrogenicity of CdCl(2)) to dietary exposure scenarios (e.g. estrogenicity of diet bound Cd). Further basic research is needed on the mechanisms of interaction between Cd and the estrogen signaling, biologically active species of

  8. Do we need keratinized mucosa for a healthy peri-implant soft tissue?

    PubMed

    Esfahanizadeh, Nasrin; Daneshparvar, Niloufar; Motallebi, Sara; Akhondi, Nasrin; Askarpour, Farinaz; Davaie, Sotudeh

    2016-01-01

    The presence of keratinized mucosa plays a fundamental role in peri-implant soft tissue health. This study assessed the impact of the width of keratinized mucosa (WKM) on peri-implant soft tissue parameters. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 110 bone-level implants in 36 patients. A minimum of 6 months had passed since the loading of implants, and the patients had at least 1 implant in 1 quadrant at the molar or premolar site restored with a single crown or fixed partial denture. The health of peri-implant soft tissue was assessed with a modified bleeding index (MBI), modified plaque index (MPI), and modified gingival index (MGI). Probing depth (PD), gingival recession (GR), and WKM were also measured. History of smoking and oral hygiene methods were recorded. A significant inverse correlation existed between WKM and the parameters MBI, MPI, MGI, and GR (P < 0.05). Values of MBI, MPI, MGI, and GR were significantly lower in areas with WKM ≥ 2 mm and higher in areas with WKM < 2 mm (P < 0.05). The WKM was greatest in subjects using the vibratory toothbrushing technique and narrowest in those using the horizontal toothbrushing technique (P < 0.05). The mean WKM was significantly greater in smokers than in nonsmokers (P < 0.05). Results of this study indicate that an association exists between WKM and peri-implant soft tissue health. A minimum of 2 mm of keratinized mucosa around implants is recommended. PMID:27367634

  9. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health About Oral Cancer Oral cancer includes cancers of the mouth and pharynx (the back of the throat). Oral cancer accounts for roughly two percent of all cancers ...

  10. In vivo confocal microscopy for the oral cavity: Current state of the field and future potential.

    PubMed

    Maher, N G; Collgros, H; Uribe, P; Ch'ng, S; Rajadhyaksha, M; Guitera, P

    2016-03-01

    Confocal microscopy (CM) has been shown to correlate with oral mucosal histopathology in vivo. The purposes of this review are to summarize what we know so far about in vivo CM applications for oral mucosal pathologies, to highlight some current developments with CM devices relevant for oral applications, and to formulate where in vivo CM could hold further application for oral mucosal diagnosis and management. Ovid Medline® and/or Google® searches were performed using the terms 'microscopy, confocal', 'mouth neoplasms', 'mouth mucosa', 'leukoplakia, oral', 'oral lichen planus', 'gingiva', 'cheilitis', 'taste', 'inflammatory oral confocal', 'mucosal confocal' and 'confocal squamous cell oral'. In summary, inclusion criteria were in vivo use of any type of CM for the human oral mucosa and studies on normal or pathological oral mucosa. Experimental studies attempting to identify proteins of interest and microorganisms were excluded. In total 25 relevant articles were found, covering 8 main topics, including normal oral mucosal features (n=15), oral dysplasia or neoplasia (n=7), inflamed oral mucosa (n=3), taste impairment (n=3), oral autoimmune conditions (n=2), pigmented oral pathology/melanoma (n=1), delayed type hypersensitivity (n=1), and cheilitis glandularis (n=1). The evidence for using in vivo CM in these conditions is poor, as it is limited to mainly small descriptive studies. Current device developments for oral CM include improved probe design. The authors propose that future applications for in vivo oral CM may include burning mouth syndrome, intra-operative mapping for cancer surgery, and monitoring and targeted biopsies within field cancerization. PMID:26786962

  11. Oral Myiasis

    PubMed Central

    Saravanan, Thalaimalai; Mohan, Mathan A; Thinakaran, Meera; Ahammed, Saneem

    2015-01-01

    Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy. PMID:25709196

  12. Betel quid-induced oral lichen planus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Stoopler, Eric T; Parisi, Ernesta; Sollecito, Thomas P

    2003-04-01

    The social use of betel nut is relatively common in certain geographic areas, especially India and Southeast Asia. The term betel nut does not truly describe the product that is chewed; rather, the term quid is more accurate because it refers to a substance or mixture of substances, including the areca nut, that are chewed and remain in contact with the mucosa. Betel quid is a type of quid that contains betel leaf. Chewer's mucosa and oral submucous fibrosis are clinical entities that have been associated with betel quid use. We report a case of oral lichen planus induced by betel quid use in a 79-year-old Cambodian woman. PMID:12729096

  13. Fluoride retention of a mucosa adhesive paste compared with other home-care fluoride products.

    PubMed

    Gabre, P; Birkhed, D; Gahnberg, L

    2008-01-01

    Home-care use of fluoride (F) requires a motivated individual and several F products rely on a person's ability to follow instructions and to cooperate with the treatment. The aim of this crossover study was to investigate concentrations, distribution in the oral cavity and duration of the elevated F concentrations after using four F products: (1) a mucosa adhesive paste with 0.1% F, (2) a mouth rinsing solution with 0.2% NaF, (3) toothpaste containing 0.5% F and (4) a tablet with 0.75 mg F. Fourteen subjects used the four products in randomized order either during the daytime or just before going to bed. The F concentration was measured both in saliva and at interproximal sites. After 6 h of sleep, the F concentration after using the mucosa adhesive paste and the mouth rinse solution was high in saliva. In the interproximal area, the adhesive paste showed the highest values. During daytime use, all the products increased the F concentration, but only the mucosa adhesive paste and the rinsing solution elevated F in saliva for up to 2 h. In the interproximal area, the paste increased the F concentration most. In conclusion, this study showed that the mucosa adhesive paste and the mouth rinse solution led to higher F concentrations and for a longer time than tablets and toothpaste. For patients who are unable to comply with traditional F treatment, an F-containing adhesive paste therefore has the potential to be a useful vehicle. For individuals who are able to cooperate, a mouth rinse with an F solution is a simple, efficient and well-known method for preventing dental caries. PMID:18523382

  14. Effects of oral exposure to naturally-occurring and synthetic deoxynivalenol congeners on proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine mRNA expression in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenda; He, Kaiyu; Zhou, Hui-Ren; Berthiller, Franz; Adam, Gerhard; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Watanabe, Maiko; Krantis, Anthony; Durst, Tony; Zhang, Haibin; Pestka, James J.

    2014-07-15

    The foodborne mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) induces a ribotoxic stress response in mononuclear phagocytes that mediate aberrant multi-organ upregulation of TNF-α, interleukins and chemokines in experimental animals. While other DON congeners also exist as food contaminants or pharmacologically-active derivatives, it is not known how these compounds affect expression of these cytokine genes in vivo. To address this gap, we compared in mice the acute effects of oral DON exposure to that of seven relevant congeners on splenic expression of representative cytokine mRNAs after 2 and 6 h. Congeners included the 8-ketotrichothecenes 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON), 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON), fusarenon X (FX), nivalenol (NIV), the plant metabolite DON-3-glucoside (D3G) and two synthetic DON derivatives with novel satiety-inducing properties (EN139528 and EN139544). DON markedly induced transient upregulation of TNF-α IL-1β, IL-6, CXCL-2, CCL-2 and CCL-7 mRNA expressions. The two ADONs also evoked mRNA expression of these genes but to a relatively lesser extent. FX induced more persistent responses than the other DON congeners and, compared to DON, was: 1) more potent in inducing IL-1β mRNA, 2) approximately equipotent in the induction of TNF-α and CCL-2 mRNAs, and 3) less potent at upregulating IL-6, CXCL-2, and CCL-2 mRNAs. EN139528's effects were similar to NIV, the least potent 8-ketotrichothecene, while D3G and EN139544 were largely incapable of eliciting cytokine or chemokine mRNA responses. Taken together, the results presented herein provide important new insights into the potential of naturally-occurring and synthetic DON congeners to elicit aberrant mRNA upregulation of cytokines associated with acute and chronic trichothecene toxicity. - Highlights: • We compared effects of DON congeners on biomarker proinflammatory genes in mice. • Oral DON induced splenic IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α,CXCL-2, CCL-2 and CCL-7 mRNAs. • 8-Ketotrichothecene ranking for

  15. Products used on female genital mucosa.

    PubMed

    Farage, Miranda A; Lennon, Lisa; Ajayi, Funmi

    2011-01-01

    A wide variety of products are used by women in the genital area and, therefore, come into contact with the genital mucosa. The largest category of such products would be those used for cleanliness and odor control, such as soaps and body washes, douches, premoistened wipes and towelettes, dusting powder and deodorant sprays. A second large category of products are those intended to absorb fluids, such as products used for menstrual protection (tampons, pads and panty liners) and incontinence protection. Lubricants and moisturizers, and aesthetic products (hair removal products and dyes) are also fairly common. In addition, over the counter medications are now available for the treatment of fungal infections. This chapter briefly discusses the products women use on or around the genital area, the perceived or real benefits, and the potential health effects of these products. PMID:21325843

  16. [Pigmented lesions of the genital mucosa].

    PubMed

    Hengge, U R; Meurer, M

    2005-06-01

    Pigmented lesions of the genital mucosa are more frequent in women than in men. They represent a spectrum of different benign entities. A biopsy is always recommended when the diagnosis cannot be made with certainty on clinical examination and dermatoscopy. Differential diagnostic considerations include melanocytic nevi, blue nevi and syndromes featuring lentigines. Malignant melanomas of the penis and vulva are uncommon tumors which usually appear in elderly patients. They frequently present as painless palpable nodules at routine examination. The treatment consists of excision with histological control of the margins. An aggressive surgical approach has not been shown to prolong the poor 5-year survival. Cooperation with gynecologists and urologists is essential for the optimal management of such patients. PMID:15905972

  17. Targeted therapy via oral administration of attenuated Salmonella expression plasmid-vectored Stat3-shRNA cures orthotopically transplanted mouse HCC.

    PubMed

    Tian, Y; Guo, B; Jia, H; Ji, K; Sun, Y; Li, Y; Zhao, T; Gao, L; Meng, Y; Kalvakolanu, D V; Kopecko, D J; Zhao, X; Zhang, L; Xu, D

    2012-06-01

    The development of RNA interference-based cancer gene therapies has been delayed due to the lack of effective tumor-targeting delivery systems. Attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) has a natural tropism for solid tumors. We report here the use of attenuated S. Typhimurium as a vector to deliver shRNA directly into tumor cells. Constitutively activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) is a key transcription factor involved in both hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) growth and metastasis. In this study, attenuated S. Typhimurium was capable of delivering shRNA-expressing vectors to the targeted cancer cells and inducing RNA interference in vivo. More importantly, a single oral dose of attenuated S. Typhimurium carrying shRNA-expressing vectors targeting Stat3 induced remarkably delayed and reduced HCC (in 70% of mice). Cancer in these cured mice did not recur over 2 years following treatment. These data demonstrated that RNA interference combined with Salmonella as a delivery system may offer a novel clinical approach for cancer gene therapy. PMID:22555509

  18. Oral administration of Aloe vera gel, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory herbal remedy, stimulates cell-mediated immunity and antibody production in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bałan, Barbara Joanna; Niemcewicz, Marcin; Kocik, Janusz; Jung, Leszek; Skopiński, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Aloe vera (L.) Burm. f. (Aloe barbadensis Mill) Liliaceae, succulent plant native to northern Africa, is presently cultivated in many regions of the world. Traditionally, its inner part of parenchyma, which contains aloe gel, was used for the treatment of minor wounds, inflammatory skin disorders, thermal and radiation burns and to alleviate chronic osteoarthritis pain. It also possesses some antimicrobial activity. Now, aloe gel is also increasingly consumed as a dietary supplement. Some data suggest its immunomodulatory properties. The aim of the study The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of orally administered aloe gel on some parameters of cellular and humoral immunity viz. mitogen-induced proliferation of splenic lymphocytes and their chemokinetic activity, and anti-sheep red blood cells (SRBC) antibody production in Balb/c mice. Results Daily treatment of mice for 14 and 21 days with 50 µl or 150 µl of aloe gel dose resulted in enhanced chemokinetic activity and stronger response of their splenic lymphocytes to mitogen PHA and enhancement of anti-SRBC antibody production. PMID:26155113

  19. Morphological characteristics of the canine and feline stomach mucosa.

    PubMed

    Zahariev, P; Sapundzhiev, E; Pupaki, D; Rashev, P; Palov, A; Todorov, T

    2010-12-01

    The stomach mucosa structure in animals belonging to Order Carnivora indicates some specific characteristics in comparison with the other mammals. Between the bases of the mucosal glands and the lamina muscularis mucosae there is an additional plate which most of the morphologists have defined as lamina subglandularis. In currently used Nomina histologica this layer is indicated as stratum compactum in carnivorous stomach mucosa. The investigation aims were to study and compare canine and feline stomach tunica mucosa characteristics as well as to measure the thickness of stratum compactum and to specify some of the certain collagen types and fibronectin compounds. Conventional and differential histological and ultrastructural methods and immuno-histochemical approaches for investigation of the canine and feline stomach samples were used. The specific organization of the carnivorous stomach wall arrangement was established. In the structure of the canine stomach mucosa, no evidence of stratum compactum was observed. The presence of stratum compactum in feline stomach mucosa was ascertained and measured. Using an immunohistochemical method very high expression of collagen type IV and fibronectin, moderate positive reaction of collagen type III, and a comparatively weakest expression of collagen types I and V in the structure of stratum compactum from cat stomach mucosa was shown. The obtained results clarify the characteristics of the stomach mucosa morphology and could be used as a basis for distinguishing the stomach wall structure of the animal species belonging to Canidae and Felidae families although they are both carnivores. PMID:20825386

  20. Urethral mucosa prolapse in an 18-year-old adolescent.

    PubMed

    Olumide, Akadiri; Kayode Olusegun, Ajenifuja; Babatola, Bakare

    2013-01-01

    Urethra mucosa prolapse is a benign condition in which there is a circular protrusion of the distal urethra through the external urethra meatus. It is more commonly seen in prepubertal black girls and postmenopausal white women. It is rare in the reproductive age group. This case describes the presentation and management of an 18-year-old adolescent with urethra mucosa prolapse. PMID:24109533

  1. High Expression of Antiviral Proteins in Mucosa from Individuals Exhibiting Resistance to Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Feria, Manuel Gerónimo; Arcia, David; Aguilar-Jiménez, Wbeimar; Zapata, Wildeman; Rugeles, María Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Background Several soluble factors have been reported to have the capacity of inhibiting HIV replication at different steps of the virus life cycle, without eliminating infected cells and through enhancement of specific cellular mechanisms. Yet, it is unclear if these antiviral factors play a role in the protection from HIV infection or in the control of viral replication. Here we evaluated two cohorts: i) one of 58 HIV-exposed seronegative individuals (HESNs) who were compared with 59 healthy controls (HCs), and ii) another of 13 HIV-controllers who were compared with 20 HIV-progressors. Peripheral blood, oral and genital mucosa and gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) samples were obtained to analyze the mRNA expression of ELAFIN, APOBEC3G, SAMHD1, TRIM5α, RNase 7 and SerpinA1 using real-time PCR. Results HESNs exhibited higher expression of all antiviral factors in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), oral or genital mucosa when compared with HCs. Furthermore, HIV-controllers exhibited higher levels of SerpinA1 in GALT. Conclusions These findings suggest that the activity of these factors is compartmentalized and that these proteins have a predominant role depending on the tissue to avoid the infection, reduce the viral load and modulate the susceptibility to HIV infection. PMID:26091527

  2. Milk and oral health.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Ingegerd; Lif Holgerson, Pernilla

    2011-01-01

    Oral health includes freedom from disease in the gums, the mucosa and the teeth. There has been a striking reduction in dental caries and periodontitis in industrialized countries, although the proportion with severe disease has remained at 10-15%, and the prevalence increases in less developed countries. If left untreated, these diseases may lead to pain, and impaired quality of life and nutritional status. Prevention and treatment need, besides traditional implementation of proper oral hygiene, sugar restriction and use of fluoride, newer cost-effective strategies. Non-sweetened dairy products, which are proven non-cariogenic, or specific bioactive components from alike sources might prove to be part of such strategies. Thus, milk proteins, such as bovine and human caseins and lactoferrin, inhibit initial attachment of cariogenic mutans streptococci to hydroxyapatite coated with saliva or purified saliva host ligands. In contrast, both bovine and human milk coated on hydroxyapatite promotes attachment of commensal Actinomyces naeslundii and other streptococci in vitro, and phosphorylated milk-derived peptides promote maintenance of tooth minerals, as shown for the β-casein-derived caseino-phosphate peptide. Observational studies are promising, but randomized clinical trials are needed to reveal if dairy products could be a complementary treatment for oral health. PMID:21335990

  3. Autofluorescence imaging in recurrent oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Martin; Fuss, Juliana; Derman, Mehmet Ali; Kreppel, Matthias; Neugebauer, Jörg; Rothamel, Daniel; Drebber, Uta; Zoeller, Joachim E

    2016-03-01

    The survival of patients with oral cancer is decreased by locoregional recurrence after an initial multimodal treatment. In order to identify lesions in the oral cavity for a possible recurrence, clinical evaluation as well as MRI or CT scanning is advised. The evaluation of mucosa lesions is hampered by changes related to radio- and chemotherapy as well as reconstruction with tissue flaps. Several techniques for easier identification of tissue abnormalities in the oral cavity have been advocated as adjuncts in order to facilitate identification. Especially methods using altered tissue fluorescence have gained much interest during the last decade. The aim of our prospective study was to evaluate fluorescence properties of undiagnosed mucosa lesions with the VELscope device in patients with multimodal treated oral cancer prior to histological confirmation. In total, 41 patients with a history of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) (19 females and 22 males) with undiagnosed mucosa lesions where included in the study. After clinical evaluation, examination and documentation using the VELscope® device were performed. Then, an incisional biopsy was performed. An autofluorescence loss indicating a malignant or dysplastic mucosa condition could be detected in six patients (14.6 %); however, only one OSCC and one SIN revealed a complete autofluorescence loss. In four patients, OSCC was present in lesions with retained autofluorescence. Sensitivity and specificity for the VELscope® examination to identify malignant oral lesions by autofluorescence were 33.3 and 88.6 %, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 33.3 and 88.6 %, respectively. No statistical correlation between gender and lesion appearance versus autofluorescence loss could be detected. In contrast to mucosa lesions in patients with no prior treatment, the autofluorescence evaluation with the VELscope reveals no additional information in our analysis. Accordingly, invasive biopsies

  4. Accessory oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Gnaneswaran, Manica Ramamoorthy; Varadarajan, Usha; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Kamatchi, Sangeetha

    2012-01-01

    This is a rare case report of a patient around 11 years with the complaint of extra mouth who reported to the hospital for removal of that extra mouth. On examination there was accessory oral cavity with small upper and lower lips, seven teeth and saliva was drooling out. Under general anesthesia crevicular incision from 32 to 43 was put and labial gingiva with alveolar mucosa was reflected completely and bone exposed to lower border of mandible. There were seven teeth resembling lower permanent anterior teeth in the accessory mouth, which was excised with the accessory lips. 41 extracted and osteotomy carried out extending the incision from the extracted site and osteotomy carried out. Dermoid cyst both below and above the mylohyoid muscle and rudimentary tongue found and excised and the specimen sent for histopathological examination. The wound was closed and uneventful healing noted to the satisfaction of the patient. This is a rare and interesting case which has been documented. PMID:23833508

  5. Ornithine transcarbamylase and disaccharidase activities in damaged intestinal mucosa of children--diagnosis of hereditary ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency in mucosa.

    PubMed

    Cathelineau, L; Briand, P; Rabier, D; Navarro, J

    1985-12-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) and disaccharidase activities were measured in the intestinal mucosa from 182 children. Sixty-nine had normal mucosa, whereas the others had different degrees of mucosal damage. Brush border disaccharidases are significantly decreased in all degrees of villous atrophy. In contrast, OTC is not affected in moderate atrophy and only slightly decreased in severe atrophy. Consequently, the OTC-to-lactase ratio increases with the degree of atrophy and permits discrimination between normal and damaged mucosa. The assay of OTC activity in intestinal mucosa for the diagnosis of hereditary deficiency in male hemizygote patients generally provides nonambiguously low results, whereas in heterozygote females the amount of residual activity is in the range of the results found in damaged mucosa. PMID:4067786

  6. Disruption of the arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase gene in the mouse alters the phenotype for methylation of arsenic and affects distribution and retention of orally administered arsenate

    PubMed Central

    Drobna, Zuzana; Narenmandura, Hua; Kubachka, Kevin M.; Edwards, Brenda C.; Herbin-Davis, Karen; Styblo, Miroslav; Le, X. Chris; Creed, John T.; Maeda, Noboyu; Hughes, Michael F.; Thomas, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) gene encodes a 43 kDa protein that catalyzes methylation of inorganic arsenic. Altered expression of AS3MT in cultured human cells controls arsenic methylation phenotypes, suggesting a critical role in arsenic metabolism. Because methylated arsenicals mediate some toxic or carcinogenic effects linked to inorganic arsenic exposure, studies of the fate and effects of arsenicals in mice which cannot methylate arsenic could be instructive. This study compared retention and distribution of arsenic in As3mt knockout mice and in wild-type C57BL/6 mice in which expression of the As3mt gene is normal. Male and female mice of either genotype received an oral dose of 0.5 mg of arsenic as arsenate per kg containing [73As]-arsenate. Mice were radioassayed for up to 96 hours after dosing; tissues were collected at 2 and 24 hours after dosing. At 2 and 24 hours after dosing, livers of As3mt knockouts contained a greater proportion of inorganic and monomethylated arsenic than did livers of C57BL/6 mice. A similar predominance of inorganic and monomethylated arsenic was found in the urine of As3mt knockouts. At 24 hours after dosing, As3mt knockouts retained significantly higher percentages of arsenic dose in liver, kidneys, urinary bladder, lungs, heart, and carcass than did C57BL/6 mice. Whole body clearance of [73As] in As3mt knockouts was substantially slower than in C57BL/6 mice. At 24 hours after dosing, As3mt knockouts retained about 50% and C57BL/6 mice about 6% of the dose. After 96 hours, As3mt knockouts retained about 20% and C57BL/6 mice retained less than 2% of the dose. These data confirm a central role for As3mt in metabolism of inorganic arsenic and indicate that phenotypes for arsenic retention and distribution are markedly affected by the null genotype for arsenic methylation, indicating a close linkage between the metabolism and retention of arsenicals. PMID:19691357

  7. The Antiadhesive Strategy in Crohn's Disease: Orally Active Mannosides to Decolonize Pathogenic Escherichia coli from the Gut.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Dorta, Dimitri; Sivignon, Adeline; Chalopin, Thibaut; Dumych, Tetiana I; Roos, Goedele; Bilyy, Rostyslav O; Deniaud, David; Krammer, Eva-Maria; de Ruyck, Jérome; Lensink, Marc F; Bouckaert, Julie; Barnich, Nicolas; Gouin, Sébastien G

    2016-05-17

    Blocking the adherence of bacteria to cells is an attractive complementary approach to current antibiotic treatments, which are faced with increasing resistance. This strategy has been particularly studied in the context of urinary tract infections (UTIs), in which the adhesion of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains to uroepithelial cells is prevented by blocking the FimH adhesin expressed at the tips of bacteria organelles called fimbriae. Recently, we extended the antiadhesive concept, showing that potent FimH antagonists can block the attachment of adherent-invasive E. coli (AIEC) colonizing the intestinal mucosa of patients with Crohn's disease (CD). In this work, we designed a small library of analogues of heptyl mannoside (HM), a previously identified nanomolar FimH inhibitor, but one that displays poor antiadhesive effects in vivo. The anomeric oxygen atom was replaced by a sulfur or a methylene group to prevent hydrolysis by intestinal glycosidases, and chemical groups were attached at the end of the alkyl tail. Importantly, a lead compound was shown to reduce AIEC levels in the feces and in the colonic and ileal mucosa after oral administration (10 mg kg(-1) ) in a transgenic mouse model of CD. The compound showed a low bioavailability, preferable in this instance, thus suggesting the possibility of setting up an innovative antiadhesive therapy, based on the water-soluble and non-cytotoxic FimH antagonists developed here, for the CD subpopulation in which AIEC plays a key role. PMID:26946458

  8. Cinnamon-induced Oral Mucosal Contact Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Vivas, Ana P. M; Migliari, Dante A

    2015-01-01

    Contact stomatitis associated with consumption of cinnamon flavoring agents is a relatively uncommon disorder. Of relevance, both clinical features and the histopathologic findings of this condition are nonspecific, and, more importantly, may resemble some other inflammatory oral mucosa disorders, eventually making diagnosis difficult. Usually a patient exhibits a combination of white and erythematous patches of abrupt onset, accompanied by a burning sensation. To shed some light on this subject, a case of a 64-year-old woman with hypersensitivity contact reaction on the oral mucosa due to cinnamon mints is presented, with emphasis on differential diagnosis and the process for confirmation of the diagnosis. The treatment consists of discontinuing the use of cinnamon products. Clinicians will be able to recognize this disorder following a careful clinical examination and detailed history. This recognition is important in order to avoid invasive and expensive diagnostic procedures. PMID:26312097

  9. Increased susceptibility to otitis media in a Splunc1-deficient mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Jennifer A.; Meyerholz, David K.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L.; Naumann, Paul W.; Salzman, Nita H.; McCray, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Otitis media (inflammation of the middle ear) is one of the most common diseases of early childhood. Susceptibility to otitis is influenced by a number of factors, including the actions of innate immune molecules secreted by the epithelia lining the nasopharynx, middle ear and Eustachian tube. The SPLUNC1 (short palate, lung, nasal epithelial clone 1) protein is a highly abundant secretory product of the mammalian nasal, oral and respiratory mucosa that is thought to play a multifunctional role in host defense. In this study we investigated Splunc1 expression in the ear of the mouse, and examined whether this protein contributes to overall host defense in the middle ear and/or Eustachian tube. We found that Splunc1 is highly expressed in both the surface epithelium and in submucosal glands in these regions in wild-type mice. In mice lacking Splunc1, we noted histologically an increased frequency of otitis media, characterized by the accumulation of leukocytes (neutrophils with scattered macrophages), proteinaceous fluid and mucus in the middle ear lumens. Furthermore, many of these mice had extensive remodeling of the middle ear wall, suggesting a chronic course of disease. From these observations, we conclude that loss of Splunc1 predisposes mice to the development of otitis media. The Splunc1−/− mouse model should help investigators to better understand both the biological role of Splunc1 as well as host defense mechanisms in the middle ear. PMID:25765466

  10. Characterization of oral pemphigus vulgaris in Thai patients.

    PubMed

    Iamaroon, Anak; Boonyawong, Pattriyaporn; Klanrit, Poramaporn; Prasongtunskul, Suwan; Thongprasom, Kobkan

    2006-03-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a serious mucocutaneous disease that be fatal if left untreated. The oral mucosa is often the first site to be affected by the disease. It is thus important that the dentist is able to recognize oral manifestations of PV and refer appropriately. Although oral PV is a well-characterized condition, the disease characteristics of patients in Thailand have not been previously reported. Here, we describe patient and lesion characteristics of 18 cases of oral PV. For these 18 cases, the mean age was 38 years, and the male:female ratio was 1:2. The most commonly affected sites were the gingiva and buccal mucosa, and the duration of disease was approximately one year. Medications previously used included corticosteroids and interferon, and nine patients reported systemic disease. Histopathologic examination with/without direct immunofluorescence was the method of diagnosis in all cases. PMID:16617201

  11. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology. PMID:16277953

  12. Cell volume regulation in goldfish intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Groot, J A

    1981-11-01

    1. Ion and water content of goldfish intestinal mucosa, stripped free from muscular layers were measured under various incubation conditions. 2. Ouabain induces an increase in cation content that is electrically compensated for by chloride. The increase in solute content is accompanied by an increase in water content. 3. When extracellular chloride is partially replaced by sulphate, ouabain does induce cell shrinkage. 4. Anoxia induces a rapid increase in cell volume that is restored by oxygenation of the incubation solution. Ouabain prevents the restoration of volume. 5. It is concluded that the classical ouabain-sensitive Na/K pump participates in the maintenance of cellular volume. We suggest that the constancy in volume after ouabain poisoning as is reported for many tissues might be due to a low chloride conductance of its membranes. 6. Anisotonic media (range: 0.6-1.2 isotonicity), made by variation on mannitol concentration, induce changes in cell water content that deviates from the simplified van't Hoff equation by about 10%. No change in water content after the initial increase was found. 7. We conclude that goldfish enterocytes do not possess a mechanism for rapid volume readjustment. PMID:7322833

  13. Immune response in the lungs following oral immunization with bacterial lysates of respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Ruedl, C; Frühwirth, M; Wick, G; Wolf, H

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the local immune response of the BALB/c mouse respiratory tract after oral immunization with a bacterial lysate of seven common respiratory pathogens. After two immunization on five consecutive days, we examined the immunoglobulin (immunoglobulin G [IgG], IgM, and IgA) secretion rates of cells isolated from the lungs and compared them with those of spleen cells of orally immunized and nonimmunized animals by using a new test system based on time-resolved fluorescence. The procedure followed the principle of the classical ELISPOT test with nitrocellulose-bottomed microtiter plates, but europium (Eu3+)-linked streptavidin rather than enzyme-conjugated streptavidin was used, with the advantage of quantifying secreted immunoglobulins instead of detecting single antibody-secreting cells. Lymphocytes isolated from the lungs of treated animals revealed significant increases in total and antigen-specific IgA synthesis compared with the rates of the controls, whereas IgG and IgM production rates showed no remarkable differences. In addition, the sera of treated mice revealed higher antigen-specific IgA titers but not increased IgM and IgG levels. We conclude that priming the gut-associated lymphoid tissue with bacterial antigens of pneumotropic microorganisms can elicit an enhanced IgA response in a distant mucosal effector site, such as the respiratory tract, according to the concept of a common mucosa-associated immune system. PMID:7496936

  14. Oral mucocele: A clinical and histopathological study

    PubMed Central

    More, Chandramani B; Bhavsar, Khushbu; Varma, Saurabh; Tailor, Mansi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oral mucocele is the most common benign minor (accessory) salivary gland lesion, caused due to mechanical trauma to the excretory duct of the gland. Clinically they are characterized by single or multiple, soft, fluctuant nodule, ranging from the normal color of the oral mucosa to deep blue. It affects at any age and is equally present in both sexes with highest incidence in second decade of life. They are classified as extravasation or retention type. Objectives: To analyze the data between 2010 and 2011 of, clinically and histopathologically diagnosed 58 oral mucoceles for age, gender, type, site, color, cause, symptoms and dimension. Results: Oral mucoceles were highly prevalent in the age group of 15-24 years, were seen in 51.72% of males and 48.28% of females, with a ratio of 1.07:1. The extravasation type (84.48%) was more common than the retention type (15.52%). The most common affected site was lower lip (36.20%) followed by ventral surface of the tongue (25.86%). The lowest frequency was observed in floor of mouth, upper lip and palate. The maximum numbers of mucoceles were asymptomatic (58.62%), and the color of the overlying mucosa had color of adjacent normal mucosa (48.28%). It was also observed that most of the mucoceles had diameter ranging from 5 to 14 mm. The causative factors of the lesion were lip biting (22.41%), trauma (5.18%) and numerous lesions (72.41%). Conclusion: Oral Mucoceles are frequently seen in an oral medicine service, mainly affecting young people and lower lip, measuring around 5 to 14 mm and the extravasation type being the most common. PMID:25364184

  15. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavities of patients with leukoplakia and oral lichen planus

    PubMed Central

    Kazanowska-Dygdała, Magdalena; Duś, Irena; Radwan-Oczko, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections in men. This gastrointestinal pathogen is closely related to gastritis, peptic ulcers, and the increased risk of gastric cancer. Numerous studies have indicated oral cavities as possible Helicobacter pylori reservoirs. Helicobacter pylori has been detected both in supragingival and subgingival plaques, and also in saliva. In addition, the relationship between lesions of oral mucosa and the presence of H. pylori has been evaluated and described in some studies. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of Helicobacter pylori DNA in the oral cavity of patients with oral leukoplakia and oral lichen planus. Material and Methods The study included 54 patients with oral leukoplakia, 72 with oral lichen planus lesions, and 40 healthy controls. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavity samples was analyzed using a single-step Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method. All patients underwent a periodontal examination and the following clinical parameters were collected: pocket depth, bleeding, and plaque indexes. The periodontal status was assessed using the Offenbacher classification. Results In most patients, pathological lesions were in typical sites on the buccal mucosa (leukoplakia in 88%, and oral lichen planus in 93% of patients). The DNA of the Helicobacter pylori was present in 20% of patients with leukoplakia and 23% of patients with lichen planus. We did not find the DNA of H. pylori in healthy controls. The periodontal status described by periodontal indices was worse in the investigated group than in the control group. Conclusion These findings suggest that the H. pylori presence in oral cavities may be related with leukoplakia and lichen planus oral lesions. PMID:27008253

  16. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavities of patients with leukoplakia and oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Kazanowska-Dygdała, Magdalena; Duś, Irena; Radwan-Oczko, Małgorzata

    2016-02-01

    Objective Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections in men. This gastrointestinal pathogen is closely related to gastritis, peptic ulcers, and the increased risk of gastric cancer. Numerous studies have indicated oral cavities as possible Helicobacter pylori reservoirs. Helicobacter pylori has been detected both in supragingival and subgingival plaques, and also in saliva. In addition, the relationship between lesions of oral mucosa and the presence of H. pylori has been evaluated and described in some studies. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of Helicobacter pylori DNA in the oral cavity of patients with oral leukoplakia and oral lichen planus. Material and Methods The study included 54 patients with oral leukoplakia, 72 with oral lichen planus lesions, and 40 healthy controls. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavity samples was analyzed using a single-step Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method. All patients underwent a periodontal examination and the following clinical parameters were collected: pocket depth, bleeding, and plaque indexes. The periodontal status was assessed using the Offenbacher classification. Results In most patients, pathological lesions were in typical sites on the buccal mucosa (leukoplakia in 88%, and oral lichen planus in 93% of patients). The DNA of the Helicobacter pylori was present in 20% of patients with leukoplakia and 23% of patients with lichen planus. We did not find the DNA of H. pylori in healthy controls. The periodontal status described by periodontal indices was worse in the investigated group than in the control group. Conclusion These findings suggest that the H. pylori presence in oral cavities may be related with leukoplakia and lichen planus oral lesions. PMID:27008253

  17. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... Oral cancer most commonly involves the lips or the tongue. It may also occur on the: Cheek lining Floor ...

  18. Primary oral leishmaniasis mimicking oral cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Celentano, A; Ruoppo, E; Mansueto, G; Mignogna, M D

    2015-04-01

    Primary mucosal leishmaniasis is a rare infectious disease, particularly in immunocompetent patients. We present a 50-year-old patient with a 6-week history of a painful lesion of the left buccal mucosa that mimicked cancer. The exophytic lesion looked invasive, and we took an incisional biopsy specimen to exclude cancer. The diagnosis of leishmaniasis was unexpected, and the patient was successfully treated with amphotericin B for five weeks. After five months the patient had a visceral recurrence. Chronic exophytic and ulcerated mucosal lesions that do not heal within 3-4 weeks should be regarded as the first signs of oral cancer, but primary oral leishmaniasis can easily mimic it. PMID:25701438

  19. Protection of Gastrointestinal Mucosa from Acute Heavy Alcohol Consumption: The Effect of Berberine and Its Correlation with TLR2, 4/IL1β-TNFα Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Du, Feng; Chai, Yu-Shuang; Jiang, Jing-Fei; Wang, Yu-Gang; Yu, Xuan; Yan, Xiao-Jin; Xing, Dong-Ming; Du, Li-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to confirm the protective effect of berberine (BBR) on gastrointestinal injury caused by acute heavy alcohol exposure, an effect that has not been reported previously. Our research details how BBR protects against gastrointestinal injuries from acute alcohol exposure using both in vivo and in vitro experiments. Acute high alcohol concentrations lead to obvious damage to the gastrointestinal mucosa, resulting in necrosis of the intestinal mucosa. Oral administration of BBR was able to significantly reduce this alcohol-induced damage, inhibit increases of alcohol-induced TNFα and IL-1β expression in gastrointestinal mucosa as well as their upstream signals TLR2 and TLR4, and regulate cytokines that modulate tight junctions. Alcohol consumption is a popular human social behavior worldwide, and the present study reports a comprehensive mechanism by which BBR protects against gastrointestinal injuries from alcohol stress, providing people with a novel application of BBR. PMID:26226164

  20. The effects of oral Cardax (disodium disuccinate astaxanthin) on multiple independent oxidative stress markers in a mouse peritoneal inflammation model: influence on 5-lipoxygenase in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Samuel F; Penn, Marc S; Hazen, Stanley L; Bikádi, Zsolt; Zsila, Ferenc

    2006-06-01

    Disodium disuccinate astaxanthin ('rac'-dAST; Cardax) is a water-dispersible C40 carotenoid derivative under development for oral and parenteral administration for cardioprotection of the at-risk ischemic cardiovascular patient. In experimental infarction models in animals (rats, rabbits, and dogs), significant myocardial salvage has been obtained, up to 100% at the appropriate dose in dogs. The documented mechanism of action in vitro includes direct scavenging of biologically produced superoxide anion; in vivo in rabbits, modulation of the complement activity of serum has also been shown. A direct correlation between administration of the test compound in animals and reductions of multiple, independent markers of oxidative stress in serum was recently obtained in a rat experimental infarction model. For the current study, it was hypothesized that oral Cardax administration would inhibit oxidative damage of multiple relevant biological targets in a representative, well-characterized murine peritoneal inflammation model. A previously developed mass spectrometry-based (LC/ESI/MS/MS) approach was used to interrogate multiple distinct pathways of oxidation in a black mouse (C57/BL6) model system. In vivo markers of oxidant stress from peritoneal lavage samples (supernatants) were evaluated in mice on day eight (8) after treatment with either Cardax or vehicle (lipophilic emulsion without drug) orally by gavage at 500 mg/kg once per day for seven (7) days at five (5) time points: (1) baseline prior to treatment (t=0); (2) 16 h following intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection with thioglycollate to elicit a neutrophilic infiltrate; (3) 4 h following i.p. injection of yeast cell wall (zymosan; t=16 h/4 h thioglycollate+zymosan); (4) 72 h following i.p. injection with thioglycollate to elicit monocyte/macrophage infiltration; and (5) 72 h/4 h thioglycollate+zymosan. A statistically significant sparing effect on the arachidonic acid (AA) and linoleic acid (LA) substrates was

  1. Roseomonas mucosa Isolated from Bloodstream of Pediatric Patient ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bard, J. Dien; Deville, J. G.; Summanen, P. H.; Lewinski, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of catheter-related bacteremia associated with Roseomonas mucosa isolated from an immunocompromised pediatric patient with a history of multiple episodes of urinary tract infection and bacteremia. PMID:20534804

  2. Oral Insulin

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Oral insulin is an exciting area of research and development in the field of diabetology. This brief review covers the various approaches used in the development of oral insulin, and highlights some of the recent data related to novel oral insulin preparation. PMID:21059246

  3. Dietary Leucine Supplementation Improves the Mucin Production in the Jejunal Mucosa of the Weaned Pigs Challenged by Porcine Rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiangbing; Liu, Minghui; Tang, Jun; Chen, Hao; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The present study was mainly conducted to determine whether dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the decrease of the mucin production in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs infected by porcine rotavirus (PRV). A total of 24 crossbred barrows weaned at 21 d of age were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 diets supplemented with 1.00% L-leucine or 0.68% L-alanine (isonitrogenous control) for 17 d. On day 11, all pigs were orally infused PRV or the sterile essential medium. During the first 10 d of trial, dietary leucine supplementation could improve the feed efficiency (P = 0.09). The ADG and feed efficiency were impaired by PRV infusion (P<0.05). PRV infusion also increased mean cumulative score of diarrhea, serum rotavirus antibody concentration and crypt depth of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and decreased villus height: crypt depth (P = 0.07), goblet cell numbers (P<0.05), mucin 1 and 2 concentrations (P<0.05) and phosphorylated mTOR level (P<0.05) of the jejunal mucosa in weaned pigs. Dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the effects of PRV infusion on feed efficiency (P = 0.09) and mean cumulative score of diarrhea (P = 0.09), and improve the effects of PRV infusion on villus height: crypt depth (P = 0.06), goblet cell numbers (P<0.05), mucin 1 (P = 0.08) and 2 (P = 0.07) concentrations and phosphorylated mTOR level (P = 0.08) of the jejunal mucosa in weaned pigs. These results suggest that dietary 1% leucine supplementation alleviated the decrease of mucin production and goblet cell numbers in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs challenged by PRV possibly via activation of the mTOR signaling. PMID:26336074

  4. Dietary Leucine Supplementation Improves the Mucin Production in the Jejunal Mucosa of the Weaned Pigs Challenged by Porcine Rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiangbing; Liu, Minghui; Tang, Jun; Chen, Hao; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The present study was mainly conducted to determine whether dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the decrease of the mucin production in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs infected by porcine rotavirus (PRV). A total of 24 crossbred barrows weaned at 21 d of age were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 diets supplemented with 1.00% L-leucine or 0.68% L-alanine (isonitrogenous control) for 17 d. On day 11, all pigs were orally infused PRV or the sterile essential medium. During the first 10 d of trial, dietary leucine supplementation could improve the feed efficiency (P = 0.09). The ADG and feed efficiency were impaired by PRV infusion (P<0.05). PRV infusion also increased mean cumulative score of diarrhea, serum rotavirus antibody concentration and crypt depth of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and decreased villus height: crypt depth (P = 0.07), goblet cell numbers (P<0.05), mucin 1 and 2 concentrations (P<0.05) and phosphorylated mTOR level (P<0.05) of the jejunal mucosa in weaned pigs. Dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the effects of PRV infusion on feed efficiency (P = 0.09) and mean cumulative score of diarrhea (P = 0.09), and improve the effects of PRV infusion on villus height: crypt depth (P = 0.06), goblet cell numbers (P<0.05), mucin 1 (P = 0.08) and 2 (P = 0.07) concentrations and phosphorylated mTOR level (P = 0.08) of the jejunal mucosa in weaned pigs. These results suggest that dietary 1% leucine supplementation alleviated the decrease of mucin production and goblet cell numbers in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs challenged by PRV possibly via activation of the mTOR signaling. PMID:26336074

  5. Oral Insulin Delivery: How Far Are We?

    PubMed Central

    Fonte, Pedro; Araújo, Francisca; Reis, Salette; Sarmento, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Oral delivery of insulin may significantly improve the quality of life of diabetes patients who routinely receive insulin by the subcutaneous route. In fact, compared with this administration route, oral delivery of insulin in diabetes treatment offers many advantages: higher patient compliance, rapid hepatic insulinization, and avoidance of peripheral hyperinsulinemia and other adverse effects such as possible hypoglycemia and weight gain. However, the oral delivery of insulin remains a challenge because its oral absorption is limited. The main barriers faced by insulin in the gastrointestinal tract are degradation by proteolytic enzymes and lack of transport across the intestinal epithelium. Several strategies to deliver insulin orally have been proposed, but without much clinical or commercial success. Protein encapsulation into nanoparticles is regarded as a promising alternative to administer insulin orally because they have the ability to promote insulin paracellular or transcellular transport across the intestinal mucosa. In this review, different delivery systems intended to increase the oral bioavailability of insulin will be discussed, with a special focus on nanoparticulate carrier systems, as well as the efforts that pharmaceutical companies are making to bring to the market the first oral delivery system of insulin. The toxicological and safety data of delivery systems, the clinical value and progress of oral insulin delivery, and the future prospects in this research field will be also scrutinized. PMID:23567010

  6. Oral insulin delivery: how far are we?

    PubMed

    Fonte, Pedro; Araújo, Francisca; Reis, Salette; Sarmento, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Oral delivery of insulin may significantly improve the quality of life of diabetes patients who routinely receive insulin by the subcutaneous route. In fact, compared with this administration route, oral delivery of insulin in diabetes treatment offers many advantages: higher patient compliance, rapid hepatic insulinization, and avoidance of peripheral hyperinsulinemia and other adverse effects such as possible hypoglycemia and weight gain. However, the oral delivery of insulin remains a challenge because its oral absorption is limited. The mainbarriers faced by insulin in the gastrointestinal tract are degradation by proteolytic enzymes and lack of transport across the intestinal epithelium. Several strategies to deliver insulin orally have been proposed, but without much clinical or commercial success. Protein encapsulation into nanoparticles is regarded as a promising alternative to administer insulin orally because they have the ability to promote insulin paracellular or transcellular transport across the intestinal mucosa. In this review, different delivery systems intended to increase the oral bioavailability of insulin will be discussed, with a special focus on nanoparticulate carrier systems, as well as the efforts that pharmaceutical companies are making to bring to the market the first oral delivery system of insulin. The toxicological and safety data of delivery systems, the clinical value and progress of oral insulin delivery, and the future prospects in this research field will be also scrutinized. PMID:23567010

  7. Oral and vulvovaginal changes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ramos-E-Silva, Marcia; Martins, Natalia Regina; Kroumpouzos, George

    2016-01-01

    Physiologic alterations of the oral and vulvovaginal mucosal surfaces result from the profound hormonal and immunologic changes of gestation. High estrogen levels are responsible for the vascular changes noted on mucosal surfaces. Gingival hyperemia and edema, gingivitis and pyogenic granuloma are the most common alterations of the oral mucosa during gestation. Physiologic changes of the vulvovaginal area are mainly of vascular nature, and include among others varicose veins. The oral and vulvovaginal mucosal surfaces can be affected by diseases that can worsen or develop in pregnancy. Oral lesions are encountered in a large spectrum of diseases including aphthosis, pemphigus vulgaris, systemic lupus, and Behçet disease. Pregnancy dermatoses such as impetigo herpetiformis and gestational pemphigoid can exceptionally affect the oral mucosa. Infections of the vulvovaginal region by Candida species, Trichomononas vaginalis, human papilloma virus, and herpes simplex virus have been associated with fetal risks. The dermatologist, obstetric medicine physician, and neonatologist should be familiar with the above physiologic changes as well as maternal/fetal risks relevant to disease affecting these mucosal surfaces during gestation. PMID:27265073

  8. Signaling through IL-17C/IL-17RE is dispensable for immunity to systemic, oral and cutaneous candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Conti, Heather R; Whibley, Natasha; Coleman, Bianca M; Garg, Abhishek V; Jaycox, Jillian R; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal fungal microbe of the human orogastrointestinal tract and skin. C. albicans causes multiple forms of disease in immunocompromised patients, including oral, vaginal, dermal and disseminated candidiasis. The cytokine IL-17 (IL-17A) and its receptor subunits, IL-17RA and IL-17RC, are required for protection to most forms of candidiasis. The importance of the IL-17R pathway has been observed not only in knockout mouse models, but also in humans with rare genetic mutations that impact generation of Th17 cells or the IL-17 signaling pathway, including Hyper-IgE Syndrome (STAT3 or TYK2 mutations) or IL17RA or ACT1 gene deficiency. The IL-17 family of cytokines is a distinct subclass of cytokines with unique structural and signaling properties. IL-17A is the best-characterized member of the IL-17 family to date, but far less is known about other IL-17-related cytokines. In this study, we sought to determine the role of a related IL-17 cytokine, IL-17C, in protection against oral, dermal and disseminated forms of C. albicans infection. IL-17C signals through a heterodimeric receptor composed of the IL-17RA and IL-17RE subunits. We observed that IL-17C mRNA was induced following oral C. albicans infection. However, mice lacking IL-17C or IL-17RE cleared C. albicans infections in the oral mucosa, skin and bloodstream at rates similar to WT littermate controls. Moreover, these mice demonstrated similar gene transcription profiles and recovery kinetics as WT animals. These findings indicate that IL-17C and IL-17RE are dispensable for immunity to the forms of candidiasis evaluated, and illustrate a surprisingly limited specificity of the IL-17 family of cytokines with respect to systemic, oral and cutaneous Candida infections. PMID:25849644

  9. Nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of Met in oral squamous cell carcinoma and in an organotypic oral cancer model.

    PubMed

    Brusevold, Ingvild J; Søland, Tine M; Khuu, Cuong; Christoffersen, Thoralf; Bryne, Magne

    2010-08-01

    Met, the hepatocyte growth factor receptor, is important in transducing signals for tumour growth and metastasis. The aim of this study was to examine the pattern of Met expression and its value as a prognostic factor in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs). The material consisted of 53 OSCCs and five healthy controls from normal oral mucosa supplied with cell lines, 10 organotypic models supplied with oral cancer cells, and three organotypic models supplied with normal keratinocytes. Met protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Met expression was scarce and limited to the basal layer in normal oral mucosa, but was more extensive in the tumours. Cytoplasmic expression of Met was found in the majority of the tumours, and nuclear expression was found in 72%, including a high fraction of the cells located at the invasive front. Organotypic models with normal or malignant oral cells yielded principally similar results as in the mucosa and the cancers, respectively. A smaller amount of Met immunoreactivity was detected, by western blotting, in the nuclear fraction of cultured oral cancer cells. In conclusion, Met was upregulated in OSCCs and was also found in the nucleus. However, Met was not a marker for prognosis in this study. PMID:20662906

  10. A review of premalignant oral conditions.

    PubMed

    Huber, Michael A

    2006-06-01

    The value of mass oral cancer screenings has come under scrutiny, as a consequence of a lack of improvement in the long-term outcomes associated with oral carcinoma over the past several decades. However, it is generally accepted that most oral carcinomas are preceded by visible changes to the mucosa and certain high risk lesions have been identified. The responsibility to evaluate the mucosal tissues of the oral cavity clearly falls under the purview of the dentist. The dentist must clearly grasp the distinction between reactive lesions which usually change in 7 to 14 days and malignant and premalignant lesions which do not. Therefore, appropriate diagnostic procedures (i.e., biopsy of the lesion) must be implemented as a matter of course in the evaluation of any lesion that does not respond to usual therapy in 7 to 14 days. PMID:16875017

  11. Oral manifestations of paracoccidioidomycosis (South American blastomycosis).

    PubMed

    de Almeida, O P; Jorge, J; Scully, C; Bozzo, L

    1991-10-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (South American blastomycosis) is an uncommon, progressive systemic mycosis, potentially fatal if untreated. It is virtually restricted to persons spending time in Latin America. Reports of oral lesions are extremely rare in the English-language literature. Three adults with oral lesions as the first sign of paracoccidioidomycosis are described; this appears to be the largest series in the dental literature. The oral lesions had a characteristic appearance with a granular purpuric surface. The upper gingiva was a typical site, but lesions were also seen in the palate, tongue, and buccal mucosa. Two of the patients proved to have detectable pulmonary involvement. Long-term systemic ketoconazole therapy produced resolution of oral lesions in all cases. PMID:1923441

  12. Micronuclei and nuclear abnormalities in buccal mucosa cells in patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Torres-Bugarín, Olivia; Pacheco-Gutiérrez, Angélica Guadalupe; Vázquez-Valls, Eduardo; Ramos-Ibarra, María Luisa; Torres-Mendoza, Blanca Miriam

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the frequency of micronucleated cell (MNC) and nuclear abnormalities (NA) in the buccal mucosa cells of females with anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN), compared with healthy women. Individuals with AN and BN have inadequate feeding and compensatory behaviour to avoid weight gain. These behaviours can cause extreme body stress, thereby inducing DNA damage. In a cross-sectional study, we assessed the frequency of MNC and NA in the buccal mucosa cells of female participants with AN or BN. All of these patients had been admitted to a private clinic for the treatment of eating disorders after diagnosis with AN (n = 10) or BN (n = 7) according to the DSM-IV. Age-matched healthy female participants (n = 17) composed the control group. Oral mucosa samples were collected, fixed, stained by aceto-orcein/fast green and microscopically examined. Normal cells, MNC and NAs were counted within a 2000 cell sample. The results were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Differences were observed in the frequency of MNC in healthy females (1.2±0.9) versus that of patients with AN (3.4±1.5) (P < 0.0001) and BN (4.1±2.2) (P < 0.001). No differences were found among these groups in terms of NA. AN and BN are related to the loss of genetic material through chromosomal fractures and/or damage to the mitotic spindle (i.e. possibly a result of a deficiency in DNA precursors). Self-imposed compensatory behaviours in AN and BN, such as severe food restriction, potential malnutrition, vomiting, use of diuretics and laxatives and acute exhaustive exercise, are possible inducers of MNC and genotoxic damage. Of these compensatory behaviours, only vomiting has not been linked to genotoxic damage. This is the first report in women with BN, which should be studied in the future. PMID:25232046

  13. Application of direct oral microscopy in evaluating mucosal margins around invasive oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Michcik, Adam; Michajłowski, Igor; Starzyńska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Direct oral microscopy constitutes a novel, non-invasive diagnostic technique, which aids clinical examination of the oral cavity. The oral mucosa is examined at multiple magnifications and features such as sub-epithelial mucosal vessels, surface patterns, colour tone, transparency and the exact demarcation of mucosal lesions are estimated. The incidence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) oscillates between 1.9% and 3.5%, which makes it the eighth most common carcinoma occurring around the world and in Poland. The 5-year survival rates oscillate between 20% and 30%. Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate clinically unchanged mucosal margins around OSCC by direct oral microscopy. The authors approached the question whether the borders of mucosal margins around OSCC established via direct oral microscopy differ from those established based on clinical examination. Material and methods Fifteen patients diagnosed with OSCC were enrolled. Patients were first clinically examined to evaluate the extent of the tumour and to plan resection margins. Eventually, direct oral microscopy was performed to establish the width of the subclinically unchanged mucosal margins based on a standard picture of healthy oral mucosae, followed by comparison with those established by clinical evaluation. Results Histopathologic results of biopsies from areas indicated by direct oral microscopy revealed dysplasia in 86.7% of patients, whereas biopsies from areas indicated by clinical examination revealed dysplasia only in 40% of individuals, resulting in the need for widening of mucosal margins. Conclusions Direct oral microscopy enables detection of dysplasia within clinically unaltered mucosal margins around OSCC, which results in more precise establishing of resection boundaries, contributing to improvement of resection totality. PMID:26759543

  14. Clinical diagnosis of oral erosive lichen planus by direct oral microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Drogoszewska, Barbara; Polcyn, Adam; Michcik, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Direct oral microscopy is a novel, non-invasive diagnostic technique that aids clinical examination of the oral cavity. The basic principles of this method derive from colposcopy and dermoscopy. The principle is to reveal precancerous lesions of oral mucosae in their subclinical phase in order to begin their treatment as early as possible and prevent malignant transformation. Oral lichen planus (OLP) is an autoimmune, inflammatory, chronic disease affecting oral mucous membranes. Buccal mucosae are most often affected. Aim To describe the in vivo picture of erosive OLP in direct oral microscopy in terms of the pattern and density of subepithelial blood vessels, surface texture, color, transparency and borders of the lesions. The study also demonstrates the utility of the method in the selection of the most appropriate biopsy site. Material and methods A total of 30 patients with erosive OLP were examined. Clinical examination of the oral cavity with the naked eye was performed, followed by direct oral microscopy. The most appropriate biopsy sites based on both examinations were chosen for every individual and biopsies were taken for histopathological evaluation. Results Biopsies obtained based on direct oral microscopy revealed dysplasia in 16 patients (53.3%). Biopsies obtained based on clinical examination with the naked eye revealed dysplasia in 3 cases (10%). Conclusions Direct oral microscopy makes it possible to obtain a repeated picture of erosive OLP and constitutes an alternative to the clinical examination with the naked eye in election of the most appropriate biopsy site. Thus, introduction of the most accurate and early therapy is possible. PMID:25254007

  15. Communication—Microelectrode Detection of Cholesterol Efflux from the Human Buccel Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaochun; Kelley, Thomas J.; Chiel, Hillel J.; Burgess, James D.

    2016-01-01

    It has previously demonstrated that cholesterol efflux from the cell plasma membrane is increased in a mouse model of cystic fibrosis (CF) compared to a wild-type control. A noninvasive means of characterizing plasma membrane cholesterol efflux at the surface of airway tissue of CF patients is needed to extend the trends found in animal models of CF to the human disease state. Microelectrode-induced cholesterol efflux from the plasma membrane of cells at the surface of tissue is proposed as a strategy to demonstrate increased cholesterol efflux for CF in human subjects. Data demonstrating detection of cholesterol efflux from the human buccal mucosa is reported as proof-of-concept for an in vivo diagnostic assay. PMID:27546897

  16. Esophageal mucosa exfoliation induced by oxalic acid poisoning: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, JIERU; KAN, BAOTIAN; JIAN, XIANGDONG; WU, XIAOPENG; YU, GUANCAI; SUN, JING

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the case of a 44-year-old woman with oral oxalic acid poisoning. As the illness progressed, the patient exhibited severe metabolic acidosis, large-area esophageal mucosa injury and acute kidney injury, which required dialysis. A guide wire slipped out of position during the process of hemodialysis and moved back and forth in the veins, but was removed successfully by interventional endovascular treatment. However, the patient's esophageal mucosa exfoliated, which lead to severe benign esophageal stenosis and dysphagia. Balloon distention was conducted twice in the upper digestive tract using X-ray location in combination with a dumb-bell bladder and interventional wire. The patient exhibited convulsions, shock, embolism and loss of consciousness while undergoing the second balloon distention procedure. Following symptomatic treatment, the patient eventually remained in a stable condition, the digestive tract expansion procedure was not resumed and a jejunostomy was performed in order to facilitate enteral nutrition, which was administered via the jejunum and had little stimulatory effect on the pancreas. Following various treatments, the patient's condition improved markedly, with renal function returning to normal. PMID:26889241

  17. Pulmonary infiltration with eosinophilia complicated with mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yin; Tangsun, Yinyan; Xiao, Yonglong; Zhang, Deping; Cao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Tissue eosinophilia is rarely observed in cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of B cell origin. The present study describes a rare case of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, which was initially misdiagnosed as eosinophilic pneumonia. The initial diagnosis was formed based on the results of chest radiography, peripheral eosinophilia tests and bronchoalveolar lavage, and the clinical course of the patient. Following administration of methylprednisolone (40 mg/day) for 4 days and oral administration of prednisolone (30 mg/day), the clinical course rapidly improved and the eosinophil count immediately decreased a to normal level. However, abnormal shadows observed on computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest did not diminish. At 6 months after the initiation of treatment, CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsy was performed, and a final diagnosis of primary pulmonary mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma was made based on immunohistochemical examination. Primary lung MALT lymphoma remains a rare entity, with an indolent course and a reasonably favorable prognosis, whose diagnosis may be challenging. PMID:27588128

  18. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the lower labial mucosa: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    do Amaral, Thiago Lucena; Valiati, Renato; de Andrade, Bruno Augusto Benevenuto; Rumayor Piña, Alicia; Torres, Sandra Regina; Romañach, Mário José; Agostini, Michelle

    2016-08-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is an uncommon soft tissue sarcoma with a predilection for the extremities and trunk of adults, rarely occurring in the oral cavity. To date, 10 cases of MPNSTs affecting the lower labial mucosa have been reported in the English language literature. We describe an additional case of MPNST in the lower labial mucosa of a 67-year-old male patient, who exhibited a painful swelling with a history of 4 months of evolution. Microscopic examination showed dense plexiform fascicles of spindle cells with wavy atypical nuclei. Mitotic figures and nuclear pleomorphism were evident. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor cells revealed positivity for S-100 protein, CD56, CD34, and neuron-specific enolase but was negative for neurofilament protein, glut-1, claudin-1, desmin, and smooth muscle actin. Ki-67 labeling was 20%. The final diagnosis was MPNST. The lesion was surgically removed with wide margins, with no signs of recurrence after 4 years of follow-up. PMID:26852824

  19. New algorithms based on the Voronoi Diagram applied in a pilot study on normal mucosa and carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Sudbø, J; Marcelpoil, R; Reith, A

    2000-01-01

    An adequate reproducibility in the description of tissue architecture is still a challenge to diagnostic pathology, sometimes with unfortunate prognostic implications. To assess a possible diagnostic and prognostic value of quantitiative tissue architecture analysis, structural features based on the Voronoi Diagram (VD) and its subgraphs were developed and tested. A series of 27 structural features were developed and tested in a pilot study of 30 cases of prostate cancer, 10 cases of cervical carcinomas, 8 cases of tongue cancer and 8 cases of normal oral mucosa. Grey level images were acquired from hematoxyline-eosine (HE) stained sections by a charge coupled device (CCD) camera mounted on a microscope connected to a personal computer (PC) with an image array processor. From the grey level images obtained, cell nuclei were automatically segmented and the geometrical centres of cell nuclei were computed. The resulting 2-dimensional (2D) swarm of pointlike seeds distributed in a flat plane was the basis for construction of the VD and its subgraphs. From the polygons, triangulations and arborizations thus obtained, 27 structural features were computed as numerical values. Comparison of groups (normal vs. cancerous oral mucosa, cervical and prostate carcinomas with good and poor prognosis) with regard to distribution in the values of the structural features was performed with Student's t-test. We demonstrate that some of the structural features developed are able to distinguish structurally between normal and cancerous oral mucosa (P = 0.001), and between good and poor outcome groups in prostatic (P = 0.001) and cervical carcinomas (P = 0.001). We present results confirming previous findings that graph theory based algorithms are useful tools for describing tissue architecture (e.g., normal versus malignant). The present study also indicates that these methods have a potential for prognostication in malignant epithelial lesions. PMID:11310643

  20. Exposure to a social stressor disrupts the community structure of the colonic mucosa-associated microbiota

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The microbiota of the mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract consists of diverse populations of commensal bacteria that interact with host physiological function. Dysregulating these populations, through exogenous means such as antibiotics or dietary changes, can have adverse consequences on the health of the host. Studies from laboratories such as ours have demonstrated that exposure to psychological stressors disrupts the population profile of intestinal microbiota. To date, such studies have primarily focused on prolonged stressors (repeated across several days) and have assessed fecal bacterial populations. It is not known whether shorter stressors can also impact the microbiota, and whether colonic mucosa-associated populations can also be affected. The mucosa-associated microbiota exist in close proximity to elements of the host immune system and the two are tightly interrelated. Therefore, alterations in these populations should be emphasized. Additionally, stressors can induce differential responses in anxiety-like behavior and corticosterone outputs in variant strains of mice. Thus, whether stressor exposure can have contrasting effects on the colonic microbiota in inbred C57BL/6 mice and outbred CD-1 mice was also examined. Results In the present study, we used high throughput pyrosequencing to assess the effects of a single 2-hour exposure to a social stressor, called social disruption (SDR), on colonic mucosa-associated microbial profiles of C57BL/6 mice. The data indicate that exposure to the stressor significantly changed the community profile and significantly reduced the relative proportions of two genera and one family of highly abundant intestinal bacteria, including the genus Lactobacillus. This finding was confirmed using a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) technique. The use of qPCR also identified mouse strain-specific differences in bacterial abundances. L. reuteri, an immunomodulatory species, was decreased in

  1. Mapping of healthy oral mucosal tissue using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: ratiometric-based total hemoglobin comparative study.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Razan; Hamadah, Omar; Bachir, Wesam

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study is to clinically evaluate the diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) ratiometric method for differentiation of normal oral mucosal tissues with different histological natures and vascularizations in the oral cavity. Twenty-one healthy patients aged 20-44 years were diagnosed as healthy and probed with a portable DRS system. Diffuse reflectance spectra were recorded in vivo in the range (450-650 nm). In this study, the following three oral mucosal tissues were considered: masticatory mucosa, lining mucosa, and specialized mucosa. Spectral features based on spectral intensity ratios were determined at five specific wavelengths (512, 540, 558, 575, and 620 nm). Total hemoglobin based on spectral ratios for the three anatomical regions have also been evaluated. The three studied groups representing different anatomical regions in the oral cavity were compared using analysis of variance and post hoc least significant difference tests. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference in the mean of diffuse spectral ratios between the groups (P < 0.05). Post hoc test detected significant difference between masticatory mucosa group and lining mucosa group (P < 0.05) and between masticatory mucosa group and specialized mucosa group (P = 0.000, at ratio 558/620 and P = 0.000, at ratio 575/620). Significant difference was also found between the lining mucosa group and specialized mucosa group (P = 0.000, at ratio 512/558 and P = 0.000, at ratio 512/575). It has also been shown that spectral ratios at wavelengths 558, 575, and 620 nm reveal the greatest difference among the main oral sites in terms of total hemoglobin content. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy might be used for creating a DRS databank of normal oral mucosal tissue with specific spectral ratios featuring the total hemoglobin concentrations. That would further enhance the discrimination of oral tissue for examining the histological nature of oral mucosa

  2. Genetic Ablation of Parietal Cells in Transgenic Mice: A New Model for Analyzing Cell Lineage Relationships in the Gastric Mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Victor; West, A. Brian; Goldenring, James R.; Levenson, Robert

    1996-03-01

    The gastric mucosa of mammalian stomach contains several differentiated cell types specialized for the secretion of acid, digestive enzymes, mucus, and hormones. Understanding whether each of these cell lineages is derived from a common stem cell has been a challenging problem. We have used a genetic approach to analyze the ontogeny of progenitor cells within mouse stomach. Herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase was targeted to parietal cells within the gastric mucosa of transgenic mice, and parietal cells were ablated by treatment of animals with the antiherpetic drug ganciclovir. Ganciclovir treatment produced complete ablation of parietal cells, dissolution of gastric glands, and loss of chief and mucus-producing cells. Termination of drug treatment led to the reemergence of all major gastric epithelial cell types and restoration of glandular architecture. Our results imply the existence of a pluripotent stem cell for the gastric mucosa. Parietal cell ablation should provide a model for analyzing cell lineage relationships within the stomach as well as mechanisms underlying gastric injury and repair.

  3. A cytomorphometric analysis of oral mucosal changes in tobacco users

    PubMed Central

    Khot, Komal; Deshmane, Swati; Bagri-Manjarekar, Kriti; Warke, Darshana; Kotak, Keyuri

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Tobacco use is the major cause of oral cancer, which is the sixth most common form of malignancy globally. Even in the absence of clinical manifestations, early changes in the oral mucosa can be detected microscopically by exfoliative cytology. The present study aimed to study and compare the cellular changes in the oral mucosa of tobacco users using cytomorphometry. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 subjects were included: 20 without any tobacco use habits, 20 tobacco chewers, 20 smokers, and 20 mishri users. Smears were collected from each subject, fixed, and stained using Papanicolaou stain. All slides were evaluated for nuclear and cytoplasmic changes using image analysis software. Results: Statistically significant decrease in cytoplasmic area and an increase in nuclear area and nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio were observed in tobacco users. Conclusion: Tobacco in any form causes significant cellular changes, which could be the earliest indicators of developing malignant pathology. Exfoliative cytology can be used to detect such changes. PMID:26604613

  4. Computer aided morphometric analysis of oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gupta, K; Gupta, J; Miglani, R

    2016-01-01

    We compared the changes in the cells in the basal layer of normal mucosa, oral leukoplakia with dysplasia and different grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) using computer aided image analysis of tissue sections. We investigated three morphometric parameters: nuclear area (NA), cell area (CA) and their ratio (NA:CA). NA and NA:CA ratio showed a statistically significant increase from dysplasia to increasing grades of OSCC. Nuclear size was useful for differentiating normal tissue, potentially malignant leukoplakia and OSCC. PMID:26983454

  5. Canine oral mucosal mast cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Elliott, J W; Cripps, P; Blackwood, L; Berlato, D; Murphy, S; Grant, I A

    2016-03-01

    Mast cell tumours (MCTs) are the most common cutaneous tumours of dogs, however rarely they can arise from the oral mucosa. This subset of MCT is reported to demonstrate a more aggressive clinical course than those tumours on the haired skin and the authors hypothesised that dogs with oral, mucosal MCT would have a high incidence of local lymph node metastasis at presentation and that this would be a negative prognostic factor. An additional hypothesis was that mitotic index (MI) would be prognostic. This retrospective study examines 33 dogs with MCTs arising from the oral mucosa. The results suggest that oral mucosal MCTs in the dog have a high incidence of lymph node metastasis at diagnosis (55%) which results in a poor prognosis. MI and nodal metastasis is highly prognostic. Loco-regional progression is common in these patients and dogs with adequate local control of their tumour had an improved outcome. Despite a more aggressive clinical course, treatment can result in protracted survivals, even when metastasis is present. PMID:24215587

  6. Paracoccidioidomycosis manifesting as oral lesions: clinical, cytological and serological investigation.

    PubMed

    Sposto, M R; Mendes-Giannini, M J; Moraes, R A; Branco, F C; Scully, C

    1994-02-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (South American blastomycosis) is a systemic mycosis which can be associated with oral lesions. This study on a group of 14 patients showed oral lesions mainly on the gingival or alveolar mucosa, with pulmonary involvement detectable on chest radiography in most. Microscopic detection of the fungus on a direct smear showed positive results in all 14 patients. Serological investigations including immunodiffusion, counterimmunoelectrophoresis and immunoblot were also positive in 100% of cases. The results suggest that direct smear together with serology may obviate the need for lesional biopsy for the diagnosis of oral paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:8164159

  7. Coaggregation properties of human oral Veillonella spp.: relationship to colonization site and oral ecology.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, C V; Kolenbrander, P E; Andersen, R N; Moore, L V

    1988-01-01

    The primary habitats of oral veillonellae are the tongue, dental plaque, and the buccal mucosa. Isolates were obtained from each habitat and tested for coaggregation with a battery of other oral bacterial strains. All 59 tongue isolates tested for coaggregation were Veillonella atypica or Veillonella dispar. All but one of them coaggregated with strains of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant inhabitant of the tongue surface but not subgingival dental plaque. These tongue isolates were unable to coaggregate with most normal members of the subgingival flora such as Actinomyces viscosus, Actinomyces naeslundii, Actinomyces israelii, and Streptococcus sanguis. In contrast, 24 of 29 Veillonella isolates, of which 20 were Veillonella parvula from subgingival dental plaque samples, coaggregated strongly with the three species of Actinomyces, S. sanguis, and other bacteria usually present in subgingival plaque, but they did not coaggregate with S. salivarius. The majority of isolates from the buccal mucosa (42 of 55) has coaggregation properties like those from the tongue. These results indicate that the three human oral Veillonella species are distributed on oral surfaces that are also occupied by their coaggregation partners and thus provide strong evidence that coaggregation plays a critical role in the bacterial ecology of the oral cavity. PMID:3178207

  8. Histochemical study of the olfactory mucosae of the horse.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Hyup; Park, Changnam; Bang, Hyojin; Ahn, Meejung; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Seungjoon; Shin, Taekyun

    2016-05-01

    The olfactory mucosae of the horse were examined by using histology and lectin histochemistry to characterize the carbohydrate sugar residues therein. Histological findings revealed that olfactory epithelium (OE) consisted of both olfactory marker protein (OMP)- and protein gene product (PGP) 9.5-positive receptor cells, supporting cells and basal cells with intervening secretory ducts from Bowman's glands. Mucus histochemistry showed that Bowman's gland acini contain periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) reagent-positive neutral mucins and alcian blue pH 2.5-positive mucosubstances. Lectin histochemistry revealed that a variety of carbohydrate sugar residues, including N-acetylglucosamine, mannose, galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine, fucose and complex type N-glycan groups, are present in the various cell types in the olfactory mucosa at varying levels. Collectively, this is the first descriptive study of horse olfactory mucosa to characterize carbohydrate sugar residues in the OE and Bowman's glands. PMID:27040092

  9. Localization of type IV collagen a 1 to a 6 chains in basement membrane during mouse molar germ development.

    PubMed

    Nagai, N; Nakano, K; Sado, Y; Naito, I; Gunduz, M; Tsujigiwa, H; Nagatsuka, H; Ninomiya, Y; Siar, C H

    2001-10-01

    The dental basement membrane (BM) putatively mediates epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during tooth morphogenesis and cytodifferentiation. Type IV collagen alpha chains, a major network-forming protein of the dental BM, was studied and results disclosed distinct expression patterns at different stages of mouse molar germ development. At the dental placode and bud stage, the BM of the oral epithelium expressed alpha 1, alpha 2, alpha 5 and alpha 6 chains while the gubernaculum dentis, in addition to the above four chains, also expressed a 4 chain. An asymmetrical expression for alpha 4, alpha 5 and alpha 6 chains was observed at the bud stage. At the early bell stage, the BM associated with the inner enamel epithelium (IEE) of molar germ expressed alpha 1, alpha 2 and alpha 4 chains while the BM of the outer enamel epithelium (OEE) expressed only alpha 1 and a 2 chains. With the onset of dentinogenesis, the collagen a chain profile of the IEE BM gradually disappeared. Howeverfrom the early to late bell stage, the gubernaculum dentis consistently expressed alpha 1, alpha 2, alpha 5 and a 6 chains resembling fetal oral mucosa. These findings suggest that stage- and position-specific distribution of type IV collagen alpha subunits occur during molar germ development and that these changes are essential for molar morphogenesis and cytodifferentiation. PMID:11732842

  10. Species-specific fibroblasts required for triggering invasiveness of partially transformed oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Costea, Daniela Elena; Kulasekara, Keerthi; Neppelberg, Evelyn; Johannessen, Anne Christine; Vintermyr, Olav Karsten

    2006-06-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that invasion of partially transformed keratinocytes is initiated by diffusible, proinvasive signals provided by species-specific fibroblasts. In vitro organotypic cultures of neoplastic human oral mucosa were constructed by growing a partially transformed, nontumorigenic keratinocytic cell line isolated from a dysplastic human oral lesion (DOK-ECACC94122104) on top of various types of connective tissue equivalents. Cultured tissues were analyzed by histomorphometry (depth and area of invasion: Dinv, Ainv) and immunohistochemistry. Presence of human fibroblasts in the matrix induced a local invasion of DOK (Dinv = 95.6 +/- 7.1 microm, Ainv = 45.8 +/- 3.5%). Minimal invasion (P < 0.05) was observed when DOK grew on simple collagen matrix (Dinv = 14.1 +/- 2.1 microm, Ainv = 3.7 +/- 0.8%) or matrices containing fibroblasts from mouse (Dinv = 11.5 +/- 4.0 microm, Ainv = 4.3 +/- 1.0%) or rat (Dinv = 15.6 +/- 1.2 microm, Ainv = 6.1 +/- 0.5%). In these cultures, local invasion could be induced by the presence of human fibroblasts in a bottom layer of the collagen matrix (P < 0.05) or by conditioned medium from organotypic cultures of DOK on human fibroblast-containing matrix (P < 0.05) but not by conditioned medium from human fibroblast monocultures (P > 0.05). Deposition of human collagen IV was observed at epithelial-matrix interface only when DOK behaved invasively. In conclusion, invasion of partially transformed oral keratinocytes was triggered by keratinocyte-induced fibroblast-derived diffusible factor(s) in a species-specific manner and associated with de novo synthesis of collagen IV. PMID:16723704

  11. Buccal mucosa ridging and tongue indentation: incidence and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Piquero, K; Ando, T; Sakurai, K

    1999-05-01

    Buccal mucosa ridging and tongue indentation have been considered as one of the visible and reliable signs of bruxism. However, there have not been any reports justifying this relationship scientifically. Moreover, there have not been any studies reporting specific procedures to assess them. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to determine the clinical incidence of buccal mucosa ridging and tongue indentation and assess the possible relationship between certain factors that can influence their occurrence. A total of 244 (178 males and 66 females) dentulous adults from 20 to 59 years of age, who were employees at the Bank of Yokohama, were randomly selected. At first, the buccal mucosa ridging and tongue indentation were classified into three groups based in their intensity: none, mild, and severe. The incidence of both conditions in the different age groups, as well as the incidence by gender was evaluated. Furthermore, the possible relationships between buccal mucosa ridging and tongue indentation and age, gender, clenching awareness, grinding awareness, headache, neck stiffness, vertical dimension, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain to palpation, masticatory muscle tenderness to palpation, and the presence of premature contacts were evaluated using the chi-square test. A positive relationship was found between the occurrence of buccal mucosa ridging and tongue indentation and gender (p < 0.01); both conditions were observed more frequently in females than in males. A positive relationship was also found to age; the group between 20-29 years old showed the highest incidence. The vertical dimension had a positive relationship with the occurrence of both buccal mucosa ridging and tongue indentation. Other factors evaluated did not show any correlation. PMID:10825817

  12. Oral heparins.

    PubMed

    Hiebert, Linda M

    2002-01-01

    The antithrombotic drug heparin is administered parenterally and believed not effective orally. Oral heparin would be most suitable for long term administration, often required for the prevention of thrombosis. Following parenteral administration, heparin is taken up by endothelial cells. Our laboratory has shown that heparin is similarly taken up by endothelium following oral administration, despite low plasma heparin concentrations. In a twenty-four hour period, endothelial heparin concentrations are greatest within 15 minutes of oral dosing although plasma levels never exceed one percent of dose. Endothelial uptake accounts for a considerable amount of absorption if the total body endothelium is considered. In support of oral heparin absorption, we demonstrated a dose-dependent decrease in thrombosis incidence in a rat jugular vein model following single oral doses of unfractionated heparins (bovine and porcine) or low molecular weight heparins (reviparin, logiparin and ardeparin). Low molecular weight heparins were effective at lower doses than unfractionated heparins where a fifty percent reduction in thrombosis was observed with 0.025 mg/kg reviparin, 0.1 mg/kg logiparin, versus 7.5 mg/kg bovine unfractionated heparin. These studies support the work of others demonstrating measurable systemic changes following oral heparin administration and suggest that heparin may be effective when administered by the oral route. It also indicates that the presence of heparin in plasma likely reflects a much greater amount associated with endothelium. PMID:11934211

  13. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Main Content National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Improving the Nation's Oral Health National Institutes of Health Español Staff Directory A–Z Index Search Text size: Website Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum ...

  14. Oral Herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Main Content National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Improving the Nation's Oral Health National Institutes of Health Español Staff Directory A–Z Index Search Text size: Website Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum ...

  15. Oral cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Chunduri, Nagendra S; Goteki, Venkateswarulu; Gelli, Vamsi; Madasu, Krishnaveni

    2013-03-01

    Cysticercosis is a common disease in developing countries, but oral lesions caused by this parasitic infestation are rare. We report here a rare case of oral cysticercosis in a 17 year old male who sought treatment for an asymptomatic nodule of the lower lip that had previously been diagnosed as a mucocele. PMID:23691623

  16. Oral Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Charruf, Laurie Frey

    1984-01-01

    Oral tests for speaking skills evaluate two major skills: linguistic competence, including accuracy of pronunciation, vocabulary, and structure, and communication ease. Four factors affect students' oral performance: verbal intelligence, short-term auditory and visual memory, sound-symbol association skill, and grammatical analysis. Personality…

  17. Oral cenesthopathy.

    PubMed

    Umezaki, Yojiro; Miura, Anna; Watanabe, Motoko; Takenoshita, Miho; Uezato, Akihito; Toriihara, Akira; Nishikawa, Toru; Toyofuku, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Cenesthopathy is characterized by abnormal and strange bodily sensations and is classified as a 'delusional disorder, somatic type' or 'somatoform disorder' according to the DSM 5. The oral cavity is one of the frequent sites of cenesthopathy, thus the term 'oral cenesthopathy.' Patients with oral cenesthopathy complain of unusual sensations without corresponding abnormal findings in the oral area, such as excessive mucus secretion, a slimy sensation, or a feeling of coils or wires being present within the oral region. They usually visit multiple dentists rather than psychiatrists. Without a proper diagnosis, they repeatedly pursue unnecessary surgical procedures to remove their 'foreign body'. This sometimes creates a dilemma between the dentists and patients. The nosography of oral cenesthopathy has been discussed in some case reports and reviews but is overlooked in mainstream medicine. This review focuses on the various aspects of oral cenesthopathy. The estimated prevalence of cenesthopathy was 0.2 to 1.9 % in a study done at a Japanese university psychiatry clinic and 27 % in a study done at a Japanese psychosomatic dentistry clinic. Oral cenesthopathy do not have clear disposition, while some studies reported that elderly women were most commonly affected. Its pathophysiology has not been fully elucidated. However, recent studies have suggested a right > left asymmetrical pattern of the cerebral blood flow of patients with oral cenesthopathy. Antidepressants, antipsychotic drugs, electroconvulsive therapy, and psychotherapy might be effective in some cases, though it is known to be intractable. To date, the epidemiology, pathophysiology, etiology, classification and treatment of oral cenesthopathy are unknown due to the few reports on the disorder, though there are a few case reports. To overcome this difficult medical condition, clinico-statistical and case-control studies done under rigorous criteria and with a large sample size are required. PMID

  18. Comprehensive review on oral disintegrating films.

    PubMed

    Nagaraju, T; Gowthami, R; Rajashekar, M; Sandeep, S; Mallesham, M; Sathish, D; Kumar, Y Shravan

    2013-02-01

    Fast-dissolving drug-delivery systems were first developed in the late 1970s as an alternative to tablets, capsules, and syrups for pediatric and geriatric patients who experience difficulties swallowing traditional oral solid dosage forms. In response to this need, a variety of orally disintegrating tablet (ODT) formats were commercialized, which disintegrate within 1 min when placed in the mouth without drinking water or chewing. Oral drug delivery technology has improved from conventional dosage forms to modified release dosage forms to ODT to the recent oral disintegrating films (ODF). Oral disintegrating film or strip that employs a water dissolving polymer which allows the dosage form to quickly hydrate by saliva, adhere to mucosa, and disintegrate within a few seconds, dissolve and releases medication for oromucosal absorption when placed on the tongue or oral cavity. Oral strip technology provides an alternate route for drugs with first pass metabolism. This review give details of materials used in ODF, manufacturing aspects, technologies, evaluation tests and marketed products. PMID:22920576

  19. Expression of Endoglin (CD-105) and Microvessel Density in Oral Dysplasia and Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    SR, Shashikanth; BNVS, Satish

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the expression of Endoglin (CD-105) and Microvessel Density in clinically normal oral mucosa of non-tobacco and tobacco habituated patients & also histopathologically confirmed cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients. Materials and Methods: Twenty cases of clinically normal oral mucosa with tobacco habituation in the form of chewing or smoking, 20 histopathologically confirmed cases of OSCC and twelve normal healthy oral mucosal cases without tobacco habituation in any form, served as control group, were immunohistochemically analysed for expression of Endoglin (CD-105). Chi-square test is used to determine statistical analysis and significance. Result & Conclusion: The finding of 65% of Endoglin CD - 105 positivity and microvessel density (MVD) in the mucosal specimens of tobacco users may be attributed as neoangiogenesis or angiogenic squamous dysplasia like phenomenon occurring as important pathological biomarker preceding oral cancer development, and may therefore be useful as a predictive marker of malignancy. PMID:25386532

  20. In vivo OCT imaging of hard and soft tissue of the oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldchtein, Felix I.; Gelikonov, V. M.; Iksanov, R. R.; Gelikonov, G. V.; Kuranov, R. V.; Sergeev, Alexander M.; Gladkova, N.; Ourutina, M. N.; Reitze, David H.; Warren, J. A.

    1998-09-01

    We use optical coherence tomography (OCT) to perform a comprehensive program of in vivo and in vitro structural imaging of hard and soft tissues within the oral cavity. We have imaged the different types of healthy oral mucosa as well as normal and abnormal tooth structure. OCT is able to differentiate between the various types of keratinized and non-keratinized mucosa with high resolution. OCT is also able to provide detailed structural information on clinical abnormalities (caries and non-caries lesions) in teeth and provide guidance in dental restorative procedures. Our investigations demonstrate the utility of OCT as a diagnostic imaging modality in clinical and research dentistry.

  1. Comparative cytomorphometric analysis of oral mucosal cells in normal, tobacco users, oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nivia, Mahadoon; Sunil, Sukumaran Nair; Rathy, Ravindran; Anilkumar, Thapasimuthu Vijayamma

    2015-01-01

    Background: Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the third most common cause of oral morbidity in India despite the numerous advances made in the treatment protocol. Aim: To compare the cytomorphometric changes of oral mucosal cells in normal subjects (Group I) with that of tobacco users without any lesion (Group II), tobacco users with oral leukoplakia (Group III), and tobacco users with oral SCC (Group IV) through a semi-automated image analysis system. Materials and Methods: Oral mucosal cells collected from study subjects (n = 100) stained using rapid Papanicolaou stain. Photomicrograph of 50 nonoverlapping cells captured at 50× magnification with a digital image capture system. Cytomorphometric analysis of cells in the captured images was performed with Image-Pro image analysis software. Image analysis was performed to obtain cell diameter (CD), cytoplasmic area (CyA), nuclear diameter (ND), nuclear area (NA), and nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio. These values were statistically compared among the groups using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Mann-Whitney U test. Results: The ND, NA, and nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio values were found to be increased in the samples collected from leukoplakia and oral SCC. The CD and CyA decreased compared to the normal mucosa in oral SCC samples. Conclusion: The cytomorphometric changes observed in samples from oral SCC and oral leukoplakia were consistent with the current diagnostic features. Hence, the semi-automated cytomorphometric analysis of oral mucosal cells can be used as an objective adjunct diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of these lesions. PMID:26811574

  2. Micro- and Nanosized Particles in Nasal Mucosa: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this prospective study is to evaluate presence and quantity of micro- and nanosized particles (NPs) and interindividual differences in their distribution and composition in nasal mucosa. Methods. Six samples of nasal mucosa obtained by mucotomy from patients with chronic hypertrophic rhinosinusitis were examined. Samples divided into 4 parts according to the distance from the nostrils were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and Raman microspectroscopy to detect solid particles and characterize their morphology and composition. A novel method of quantification of the particles was designed and used to evaluate interindividual differences in distribution of the particles. The findings were compared with patients' employment history. Results. In all the samples, NPs of different elemental composition were found (iron, barium, copper, titanium, etc.), predominantly in the parts most distant from nostrils, in various depths from the surface of the mucosa and interindividual differences in their quantity and composition were found, possibly in relation to professional exposition. Conclusions. This study has proven the possibility of quantification of distribution of micro- and nanosized particles in tissue samples and that the NPs may deposit in deeper layers of mucosa and their elemental composition may be related to professional exposition to the sources of NPs. PMID:26125023

  3. Epigenetic maturation in colonic mucosa continues beyond infancy in mice.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monozygotic twin and other epidemiologic studies indicate that epigenetic processes may play an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases that commonly affect the colonic mucosa. The peak onset of these disorders in young adulthood, suggests that epigenetic changes normally o...

  4. Differences in reactive hyperemia between the intestinal mucosa and muscularis.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, A P; Riedel, G L

    1984-12-01

    In a previous study of regional intestinal blood flow by laser-Doppler velocimetry, we noted that the mucosa displayed reactive hyperemia following arterial occlusion but that the muscularis did not. Therefore, to determine whether this observation is generally valid, we compared responses of the mucosa and muscularis externa to arterial occlusion. We measured total blood flow to isolated loops of canine small bowel with an electromagnetic flow probe on the supply artery; blood flow either in the mucosa or in the muscularis was measured by laser-Doppler velocimetry. Mucosal and total blood flow consistently showed reactive hyperemia in response to a 60-s occlusion, but the muscularis did not. To determine whether metabolic rate influenced reactive hyperemia, we increased enteric oxygen uptake by placing 5% bile and transportable solutes in the lumen; these agents increased oxygen consumption by 36%. After a 60-s occlusion, the durations of both total and mucosal reactive hyperemia were significantly prolonged by increased metabolic rate. Similarly, the payback-to-debt ratios in both total and mucosal blood flows were significantly increased at elevated metabolic rate. These data support the conclusions that reactive hyperemia occurs more frequently and has a greater magnitude in the mucosa compared with the muscularis and both total and mucosal reactive hyperemia are strongly influenced by the preocclusive oxygen demand. These findings therefore constitute further evidence that metabolic factors contribute to reactive hyperemia in the intestinal circulation. PMID:6391202

  5. Oral and dental signs of child abuse and neglect

    PubMed Central

    COSTACURTA, M.; BENAVOLI, D.; ARCUDI, G.; DOCIMO, R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Aim The aim of this report is to identify the main oral and dental aspects of physical and sexual abuse and dental neglect in childhood, contributing to the precocious identification and diagnosis in a dental practice. Methods The oral and dental manifestations were divided and classified according to the type of child abuse: physical abuse, sexual abuse, neglect. Physical abuse Several studies in the literature have shown that oral or facial trauma occurs in about 50% of physically abused children; the oral cavity may be a central focus for physical abuse. Oro-facial manifestations of physical abuse include bruising, abrasions or lacerations of tongue, lips, oral mucosa, hard and soft palate, gingiva, alveolar mucosa, frenum; dental fractures, dental dislocations, dental avulsions; maxilla and mandible fractures. Sexual abuse Although the oral cavity is a frequent site of sexual abuse in children, visible oral injuries or infections are rare. Some oral signs may represent significant indications of sexual abuse, as erythema, ulcer, vescicle with purulent drainage or pseudomembranus and condylomatous lesions of lips, tongue, palate and nose-pharynx. Furthermore, if present erythema and petechiae, of unknown etiology, found on soft and hard palates junction or on the floor of the mouth, can be certainly evident proofs of forced oral sex. Dental neglect Oral signs of neglect are easily identifiable and are: poor oral hygiene, halitosis, Early Childhood Caries (ECC), odontogenous infections (recurrent and previous abscesses), periodontal disease, aptha lesions as a consequence of a nutritional deficiency status. Moreover, it is analyzed the assessment of bite marks because often associated with child abuse, the identification and collection of clinical evidence of this type of injury. Conclusion A precocious diagnosis of child abuse, in a dental practice, could considerably contribute in the identification of violence cases and in an early intervention. PMID

  6. Oral Manifestations in the American Tegumentary Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Daniel Cesar Silva; Palmeiro, Mariana Reuter; Moreira, João Soares; Martins, Ana Cristina da Costa; da Silva, Aline Fagundes; de Fátima Madeira, Maria; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira; Confort, Eliame Mouta; de Oliveira Schubach, Armando; da Conceição Silva, Fátima; Valete-Rosalino, Cláudia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) can affect the skin or mucosa (mucocutaneous leishmaniasis – MCL) including the oral cavity. MCL oral lesions are often confused with other oral diseases, delaying diagnosis and specific treatment, and increasing the likelihood of sequelae. Thus, increasing the knowledge of the evolution of ATL oral lesions can facilitate its early diagnosis improving the prognosis of healing. Objectives Evaluate the frequency of ATL oral lesion and describe its clinical, laboratory and therapeutic peculiarities. Methods A descriptive transversal study was carried out, using data from medical records of 206 patients with MCL examined at the outpatient clinics-IPEC-Fiocruz between 1989 and 2013. Proportions were calculated for the categorical variables and the association among them was assessed by the Pearson's chi-square test. Measures of central tendency and dispersion were used for the continuous variables and their differences were assessed by both parametric (t test) and non parametric (Mann-Whitney) tests. P-values <0.05 were considered as significant. Results The most affected site was the nose, followed by the mouth, pharynx and larynx. Seventy eight (37.9%) have oral lesions and the disease presented a lower median of the evolution time than in other mucous sites as well as an increased time to heal. The presence of oral lesion was associated with: the presence of lesions in the other three mucosal sites; a smaller median of the leishmanin skin test values; a longer healing time of the mucosal lesions; a higher recurrence frequency; and a smaller frequency of treatment finishing and healing. When the oral lesion was isolated, it was associated with an age 20 years lower than when the oral lesion was associated with other mucosal sites. Conclusion Considering the worst therapy results associated with the presence of oral lesions, we suggest that lesions in this location represent a factor of worse prognosis for MCL

  7. Oral Cancer Exam

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – This booklet presents ... developmental disabilities and offers strategies for providing oral care. NIDCR > OralHealth > Topics > Oral Cancer > Oral Cancer Exam ...

  8. The in vivo fate of nanoparticles and nanoparticle-loaded microcapsules after oral administration in mice: Evaluation of their potential for colon-specific delivery.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yiming; Fuchs, Adrian V; Boase, Nathan R B; Rolfe, Barbara E; Coombes, Allan G A; Thurecht, Kristofer J

    2015-08-01

    Anti-cancer drug loaded-nanoparticles (NPs) or encapsulation of NPs in colon-targeted delivery systems shows potential for increasing the local drug concentration in the colon leading to improved treatment of colorectal cancer. To investigate the potential of the NP-based strategies for colon-specific delivery, two formulations, free Eudragit® NPs and enteric-coated NP-loaded chitosan-hypromellose microcapsules (MCs) were fluorescently-labelled and their tissue distribution in mice after oral administration was monitored by multispectral small animal imaging. The free NPs showed a shorter transit time throughout the mouse digestive tract than the MCs, with extensive excretion of NPs in faeces at 5h. Conversely, the MCs showed complete NP release in the lower region of the mouse small intestine at 8h post-administration. Overall, the encapsulation of NPs in MCs resulted in a higher colonic NP intensity from 8h to 24h post-administration compared to the free NPs, due to a NP 'guarding' effect of MCs during their transit along mouse gastrointestinal tract which decreased NP excretion in faeces. These imaging data revealed that this widely-utilised colon-targeting MC formulation lacked site-precision for releasing its NP load in the colon, but the increased residence time of the NPs in the lower gastrointestinal tract suggests that it is still useful for localised release of chemotherapeutics, compared to NP administration alone. In addition, both formulations resided in the stomach of mice at considerable concentrations over 24h. Thus, adhesion of NP- or MC-based oral delivery systems to gastric mucosa may be problematic for colon-specific delivery of the cargo to the colon and should be carefully investigated for a full evaluation of particulate delivery systems. PMID:26117186

  9. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... is advanced Other symptoms may include: Chewing problems Mouth sores that may bleed Pain with swallowing Speech difficulties ... Your doctor or dentist will examine your mouth area. The exam may ... bleeding Tests used to confirm oral cancer include: Gum biopsy ...

  10. Oral Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... its box has the American Dental Association's (ADA) seal of acceptance, it is good for your oral ... dispensed solutions have the American Dental Association (ADA) seal. Other over-the-counter whitening products include whitening ...

  11. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... use. Some oral cancers are linked to human papilloma virus (HPV) infections of the mouth and throat. ... The number of oropharyngeal cancers linked to human papilloma virus (HPV) has risen dramatically over the past ...

  12. Herpes - oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... virus type 2 (HSV-2) most often causes genital herpes . However, sometimes HSV-2 is spread to the ... the virus to the genitals. Both oral and genital herpes viruses can sometimes be spread, even when you ...

  13. Methylprednisolone Oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nizoral), oral contraceptives, phenobarbital, phenytoin (Dilantin), rifampin (Rifadin), theophylline (Theo-Dur), and vitamins.if you have a ... stomach irritation vomiting headache dizziness insomnia restlessness depression anxiety acne increased hair growth easy bruising irregular or ...

  14. Dexamethasone Oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nizoral), oral contraceptives, phenobarbital, phenytoin (Dilantin), rifampin (Rifadin), theophylline (Theo-Dur), and vitamins.if you have a ... stomach irritation vomiting headache dizziness insomnia restlessness depression anxiety acne increased hair growth easy bruising irregular or ...

  15. Hydrocortisone Oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nizoral), oral contraceptives, phenobarbital, phenytoin (Dilantin), rifampin (Rifadin), theophylline (Theo-Dur), and vitamins.if you have a ... stomach irritation vomiting headache dizziness insomnia restlessness depression anxiety acne increased hair growth easy bruising irregular or ...

  16. Cadmium inhibits acid secretion in stimulated frog gastric mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Gerbino, Andrea; Debellis, Lucantonio; Caroppo, Rosa; Curci, Silvana; Colella, Matilde

    2010-06-01

    Cadmium, a toxic environmental pollutant, affects the function of different organs such as lungs, liver and kidney. Less is known about its toxic effects on the gastric mucosa. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which cadmium impacts on the physiology of gastric mucosa. To this end, intact amphibian mucosae were mounted in Ussing chambers and the rate of acid secretion, short circuit current (I{sub sc}), transepithelial potential (V{sub t}) and resistance (R{sub t}) were recorded in the continuous presence of cadmium. Addition of cadmium (20 {mu}M to 1 mM) on the serosal but not luminal side of the mucosae resulted in inhibition of acid secretion and increase in NPPB-sensitive, chloride-dependent short circuit current. Remarkably, cadmium exerted its effects only on histamine-stimulated tissues. Experiments with TPEN, a cell-permeant chelator for heavy metals, showed that cadmium acts from the intracellular side of the acid secreting cells. Furthermore, cadmium-induced inhibition of acid secretion and increase in I{sub sc} cannot be explained by an action on: 1) H{sub 2} histamine receptor, 2) Ca{sup 2+} signalling 3) adenylyl cyclase or 4) carbonic anhydrase. Conversely, cadmium was ineffective in the presence of the H{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase blocker omeprazole suggesting that the two compounds likely act on the same target. Our findings suggest that cadmium affects the functionality of histamine-stimulated gastric mucosa by inhibiting the H{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase from the intracellular side. These data shed new light on the toxic effect of this dangerous environmental pollutant and may result in new avenues for therapeutic intervention in acute and chronic intoxication.

  17. Oral cytology in cannabis smokers.

    PubMed

    Darling, Mark R; Learmonth, Genevieve M; Arendorf, Trevor M

    2002-04-01

    The effects of cannabis/methaqualone/tobacco smoking on the epithelial cells of the tongue, buccal mucosa and floor of the mouth were examined. Oral mucosal smears for detection of cellular changes were taken from 4 sites in 16 patients. The tongue blade scraping technique was used. The sites sampled included the buccal mucosa (left and right sides), the posterior dorsum of the tongue and the anterior floor of the mouth. Tobacco smoking and non-smoking controls were also examined. The only significant difference between cannabis users and controls was the greater prevalence of bacterial cells in the smears taken from cannabis users. However, there were also greater numbers of degenerate and atypical squamous cells in cannabis smokers than in cigarette-smoking and non-smoking controls. Epithelial cells in smears taken from cannabis users and tobacco-smoking controls also showed koilocytic changes, which were not seen in smears taken from non-smoking controls. Koilocytosis is indicative of human papilloma virus infection, although no apparent lesions were seen in the patients from whom smears had been taken. It would appear that there is a greater tendency towards damaged and immature surface epithelial cells in cannabis smokers. PMID:12078330

  18. Ricin crosses polarized human intestinal cells and intestines of ricin-gavaged mice without evident damage and then disseminates to mouse kidneys.

    PubMed

    Flora, Alyssa D; Teel, Louise D; Smith, Mark A; Sinclair, James F; Melton-Celsa, Angela R; O'Brien, Alison D

    2013-01-01

    Ricin is a potent toxin found in the beans of Ricinus communis and is often lethal for animals and humans when aerosolized or injected and causes significant morbidity and occasional death when ingested. Ricin has been proposed as a bioweapon because of its lethal properties, environmental stability, and accessibility. In oral intoxication, the process by which the toxin transits across intestinal mucosa is not completely understood. To address this question, we assessed the impact of ricin on the gastrointestinal tract and organs of mice after dissemination of toxin from the gut. We first showed that ricin adhered in a specific pattern to human small bowel intestinal sections, the site within the mouse gut in which a variable degree of damage has been reported by others. We then monitored the movement of ricin across polarized human HCT-8 intestinal monolayers grown in transwell inserts and in HCT-8 cell organoids. We observed that, in both systems, ricin trafficked through the cells without apparent damage until 24 hours post intoxication. We delivered a lethal dose of purified fluorescently-labeled ricin to mice by oral gavage and followed transit of the toxin from the gastrointestinal tracts to the internal organs by in vivo imaging of whole animals over time and ex vivo imaging of organs at various time points. In addition, we harvested organs from unlabeled ricin-gavaged mice and assessed them for the presence of ricin and for histological damage. Finally, we compared serum chemistry values from buffer-treated versus ricin-intoxicated animals. We conclude that ricin transverses human intestinal cells and mouse intestinal cells in situ prior to any indication of enterocyte damage and that ricin rapidly reaches the kidneys of intoxicated mice. We also propose that mice intoxicated orally with ricin likely die from distributive shock. PMID:23874986

  19. Gene profiling analysis for patients with oral verrucous carcinoma and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue-Hong; Tian, Xin; Liu, Ou-Sheng; Fang, Xiao-Dan; Quan, Hong-Zhi; Xie, Shang; Gao, Shan; Tang, Zhan-Gui

    2014-01-01

    Oral verrucous carcinoma (OVC) is one malignant tumor which was carved out from the oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). However, the clinical and pathological features as well as the treatment strategies of OVC are different from OSCC. Here, global transcript abundance of tumor tissues from five patients with primary OVC and six patients with primary OSCC including their matched adjacently normal oral mucosa were profiled using the Affymetrix HGU133 Plus 2.0. Ingenuity Systems IPA software was used to analyse the gene function and biological pathways. There were 109 differentially expressed genes (more than 2-fold) between OVC and the adjacently normal tissue, among them 66 were up-regulated and 43 were down-regulated; 1172 differentially expressed genes (more than 2-fold) between OSCC and the adjacently normal tissue, among them 608 were up-regulated and 564 were down-regulated. There were 39 common differentially expressed genes in OVC and OSCC compared with their matched normal oral mucosa, among them 22 up-regulated and 17 down-regulated, and 8 of them different between OVC and OSCC. In addition, the gene expression profile was further validated by quantitative real-time PCR (Q-RT-PCR) analysis for four of those 39 selected genes. PMID:25126189

  20. An update on oral human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Ankit H; Chotaliya, Kiran; Marfatia, Y S

    2013-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) constitutes the majority of newly acquired sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in United States as per the centers for disease control factsheet 2013. Genital HPV is the most common STI with incidence of about 5.5 million world-wide, nearly 75% of sexually active men and women have been exposed to HPV at some point in their lives. Oral Sexual behavior is an important contributor to infection of HPV in the oral mucosa especially in cases known to practice high risk behavior and initiating the same at an early age. HPV infection of the oral mucosa currents is believed to affect 1-50% of the general population, depending on the method used for diagnosis. The immune system clears most HPV naturally within 2 years (about 90%), but the ones that persist can cause serious diseases. HPV is an essential carcinogen being implicated increasingly in association with cancers occurring at numerous sites in the body. Though there does not occur any specific treatment for the HPV infection, the diseases it causes are treatable such as genital warts, cervical and other cancers. PMID:24339456

  1. Oral Findings in 58 Adults with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Sparling, MAJ Joshua D.; Hong, Chien-Hui; Brahim, Jaime S.; Moss, Joel; Darling, Thomas N.

    2010-01-01

    Background Gingival fibromas and dental pitting are among the diagnostic criteria for tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Objective Our goal was to document the oral findings in 58 adult patients with TSC. Results Forty patients (69%) had oral fibromas, appearing mostly on the attached or interdental gingiva. Other oral sites included buccal and labial mucosa, the superior labial frenulum, palate, and tongue. Fifty-six patients (97 %) had multiple dental enamel pits. Limitations This case series comprised predominantly adult females with TSC and lymphangioleiomyomatosis. Conclusions Oral fibromas in TSC are mostly, but not exclusively, gingival. Dental pits are present in nearly all patients. The multiple oral papules in TSC may appear similar to those observed in Cowden syndrome, Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome, and rarely in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. PMID:17239986

  2. Unmet diagnostic needs in contact oral mucosal allergies.

    PubMed

    Minciullo, Paola Lucia; Paolino, Giovanni; Vacca, Maddalena; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Nettis, Eustachio

    2016-01-01

    The oral mucosa including the lips is constantly exposed to several noxious stimuli, irritants and allergens. However, oral contact pathologies are not frequently seen because of the relative resistance of the oral mucosa to irritant agents and allergens due to anatomical and physiological factors. The spectrum of signs and symptoms of oral contact allergies (OCA) is broad and a large number of condition can be the clinical expression of OCA such as allergic contact stomatitis, allergic contact cheilitis, geographic tongue, oral lichenoid reactions, burning mouth syndrome. The main etiological factors causing OCA are dental materials, food and oral hygiene products, as they contain flavouring agents and preservatives. The personal medical history of the patient is helpful to perform a diagnosis, as a positive history for recent dental procedures. Sometimes histology is mandatory. When it cannot identify a direct cause of a substance, in both acute and chronic OCA, patch tests can play a pivotal role in the diagnosis. However, patch tests might have several pitfalls. Indeed, the presence of metal ions as haptens and specifically the differences in their concentrations in oral mucosa and in standard preparation for patch testing and in the differences in pH of the medium might result in either false positive/negative reactions or non-specific irritative reactions. Another limitation of patch test results is the difficulty to assess the clinical relevance of haptens contained in dental materials and only the removal of dental materials or the avoidance of other contactant and consequent improvement of the disease may demonstrate the haptens' responsibility. In conclusion, the wide spectrum of clinical presentations, the broad range of materials and allergens which can cause it, the difficult interpretation of patch-test results, the clinical relevance assessment of haptens found positive at patch test are the main factors that make sometimes difficult the diagnosis

  3. Reduction of radiochemotherapy-induced early oral mucositis by recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor (palifermin): Experimental studies in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, Wolfgang . E-mail: doerr@rcs.urz.tu-dresden.de; Baessler, Stefan; Reichel, Sandra; Spekl, Kathrin

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: To study the effect of recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor (rHuKGF or palifermin) on oral mucositis induced by radiochemotherapy in a mouse model. Methods and Materials: Cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (cisplatin) and/or 5-fluorouracil were given before single dose irradiation, combined with palifermin before or after the treatment, or both. Daily fractionated irradiation for 2 weeks was followed by graded test doses. With additional chemotherapy in Week 1, palifermin was given before radiotherapy and at the end of the first week, or additionally at the end of Week 2. Radiochemotherapy in Week 2 was combined with palifermin at the end of Weeks 1 and 2, Weeks 1, 2, and 3, or additionally before radiotherapy. Ulceration of mouse tongue mucosa was analyzed as the endpoint. Results: The dose associated with ulcer induction in 50% of the mice (ED{sub 50}) for single-dose irradiation was 11.5 {+-} 0.7 Gy. Palifermin increased the ED{sub 50} to about 19 Gy in all protocols tested. Similar values were observed when chemotherapy was added before irradiation. With fractionated irradiation, palifermin increased the ED{sub 50} for test irradiation from 5.7 {+-} 1.5 Gy to 12-15 Gy, depending on the administration protocol. With chemotherapy in Week 1, two palifermin injections had no significant effect, but a third injection increased the ED{sub 50} to 13 Gy. With chemotherapy in Week 2, all palifermin protocols resulted in ED{sub 50} values of 13-14 Gy. Conclusion: A marked increase in oral mucosal radiation tolerance by palifermin was found, which was preserved in combinations with chemotherapy using cisplatin and/or 5-fluorouracil.

  4. Dermographism in the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Binmadi, Nada; Almazrooa, Soulafa

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Dermographism is a type of physical urticaria that can be induced by writing on the skin. It occurs in 2-5% of the population and is considered to be a normal physiological phenomenon. However, in a small subset of patients, it can be symptomatic and may affect the quality of life. The etiology of this disease remains unclear. CASE REPORT Herein, we present a case of dermographism in a 20-year-old male and discuss the involvement of the oral mucosa in this condition. CONCLUSIONS Although this condition is well known to occur in the skin, we believe this condition is rarely discussed among dentists. All healthcare providers, especially dentists, should know its potential to cause complications during dental procedures. PMID:27324161

  5. Dermographism in the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Binmadi, Nada; Almazrooa, Soulafa

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 20 Final Diagnosis: Dermographism Symptoms: Unusual skin reaction to trauma Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Dentistry Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Dermographism is a type of physical urticaria that can be induced by writing on the skin. It occurs in 2–5% of the population and is considered to be a normal physiological phenomenon. However, in a small subset of patients, it can be symptomatic and may affect the quality of life. The etiology of this disease remains unclear. Case Report: Herein, we present a case of dermographism in a 20-year-old male and discuss the involvement of the oral mucosa in this condition. Conclusions: Although this condition is well known to occur in the skin, we believe this condition is rarely discussed among dentists. All healthcare providers, especially dentists, should know its potential to cause complications during dental procedures. PMID:27324161

  6. Role of micronucleus in oral exfoliative cytology

    PubMed Central

    Shashikala, R.; Indira, A. P.; Manjunath, G. S.; rao, K. Arathi; Akshatha, B. K.

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, the interest for oral cytology as a diagnostic and prognostic methodology, for monitoring patients in oral potentially malignant disorders and oral cancer has re-emerged substantially. In 1983, buccal mucosal micronuclei assay was first proposed to evaluate genetic instability. There are biomarkers that predict if a potentially malignant disorder is likely to develop into an aggressive tumor. These genotoxic and carcinogenic chemicals have been reported to be potent clastogenic and mutagenic agents which are thought to be responsible for the induction of chromatid/chromosomal aberrations resulting in the production of micronuclei. Various studies have concluded that the gradual increase in micronucleus (MN) counts from normal oral mucosa to potentially malignant disorders to oral carcinoma suggested a link of this biomarker with neoplastic progression. MN scoring can be used as a biomarker to identify different preneoplastic conditions much earlier than the manifestations of clinical features and might specifically be exploited in the screening of high-risk population for a specific cancer. Hence, it can be used as a screening prognostic and educational tool in community centers of oral cancer. PMID:26538888

  7. The adhesiometer: a simple device to measure adherence of barium sulfate to intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Salomonowitz, E; Frick, M P; Cragg, A H; Lund, G

    1984-04-01

    A simple, inexpensive device assessing barium sulfate adherence to alimentary tract mucosa was tested in an animal study using pigs and dogs. Interaction of gastric, intestinal, and colonic mucosal lining with three different barium preparations was studied. In both pigs and dogs, barium adherence to gastric mucosa was significantly stronger when compared with colonic mucosa. PMID:6608230

  8. Betel nut chewing and its deleterious effects on oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Anand, Richa; Dhingra, Chandan; Prasad, Sumanth; Menon, Ipseeta

    2014-01-01

    The habit of chewing betel nut has a long history of use. Betel nut and products derived from it are widely used as a masticatory product among various communities and in several countries across the world. Over a long period, several additives have been added to a simple betel nut preparation; thus, creating the betel quid (BQ) and encompassing chewing tobacco in the preparation. Betel nut has deleterious effects on oral soft tissues. Its effects on dental caries and periodontal diseases, two major oral diseases are less well-documented. Betel-induced lichenoid lesions mainly on buccal mucosa have been reported at quid retained sites. In chronic chewers, a condition called betel chewers mucosa is often found where the quid is placed. Betel nut chewing is implicated in oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) and its use along with tobacco can cause leukoplakia, both of which are potentially malignant in the oral cavity. Oral cancer often arises from such precancerous changes. Thus, public health measures to quit betel use are recommended to control disabling conditions such as OSF and oral cancer. PMID:25313728

  9. Epidemiology of the most common oral mucosal diseases in children.

    PubMed

    Rioboo-Crespo, Maria del Rosario; Planells-del Pozo, Paloma; Rioboo-García, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    Dentists who treat children must be alert to the possibility of finding diseases of the oral mucosa, especially in younger children. The present study aimed to review the most updated information and the experience of our group in order to yield epidemiological data that assist diagnosis of the most common diseases of the oral mucosa in children. Recent epidemiologic studies have shown a wide variability in the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in different regions of the world and have led researchers to draw disparate conclusions. Moreover, studies have not been designed using standard criteria, further explaining the wide variability in the percentage of different groups of children with oral lesions, which ranges from 4.1 to 52.6%. The lesions most frequently considered by authors and that most often appear in the different studies are: recurrent aphthous stomatitis (0.9-10.8%), labial herpes (0.78-5.2%), fissured tongue (1.49-23%), geographic tongue (0.60-9.8%), oral candidiasis (0.01-37%) and traumatic injury (0.09%-22.15%). Dentists must be able to detect any of the numerous possible disorders and perform the correct differential diagnosis, key to the treatment plan. The aim of this paper, based on a review of the different national and international studies, is to contribute data on the most important oral mucosal diseases in the paediatric population in terms of prevalence and differential diagnosis. PMID:16264385

  10. Intra-oral adsorption and release of aroma compounds following in-mouth wine exposure.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Fernández, Adelaida; Rocha-Alcubilla, Nuria; Muñoz-González, Carolina; Moreno-Arribas, María Victoria; Pozo-Bayón, María Ángeles

    2016-08-15

    Wine "after-odour" defined as the long lasting aroma perception that remains after wine swallowing is an outstanding characteristic in terms of wine quality but a relatively unstudied phenomenon. Among the different parameters that might affect wine after-odour, the adsorption of odorants by the oral mucosa could be important but has been little explored. In this work, the impact of the chemical characteristics of aroma compounds on intra-oral adsorption was assessed by an in vivo approach that determined the amounts of odorants remaining in expectorated wine samples. In addition, the subsequent aroma release after in-mouth wine exposure was studied by means of intra-oral SPME/GC-MS using three different panellists. Oral adsorption of the aroma compounds added to the wines ranged from 6% to 43%, depending on their physicochemical characteristics. A progressive intra-oral aroma decrease at different decay rates depending on compound type and panellist was also found. The strength of the aroma-oral mucosa interactions seems to explain these results more than the amount of compound adsorbed by the oral mucosa. PMID:27006241

  11. Effectiveness of the supraomohyoid neck dissection in clinically N0 neck patients with squamous cell carcinoma of buccal mucosa and gingivobuccal sulcus

    PubMed Central

    Rahamthulla, S. A. K. Uroof; Priya, P. Vani; Hussain, S. M. D. Javeed; Nasyam, Fazil Arshad; Akifuddin, Syed; Srinivas, Velpula Sasidhar

    2015-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the effectiveness of the supraomohyoid neck dissection in clinically N0 neck patients with squamous cell carcinoma of buccal mucosa and gingivobuccal sulcus. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study of five patients with squamous cell carcinoma of gingivobuccal mucosa of oral cavity with clinically N0 neck, conducted over a period of 2 years from July 2007 to Oct 2009 in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Narayana Dental College and Hospital. The study was conducted in patients irrespective of age, sex, size, thickness, and type of differentiation of the lesion. All patients have clinically non-palpable lymphnodes (N0 neck), while patients with palpable lymphnodes, patients with previous surgery, and patients with previous radiotherapy were excluded from the study. Results: Level I was the commonest site of neck metastasis in our study. Among the five patients, two (40%) patients (case 2 and 3) had occult cervical metastasis (level IB nodes are histopathologically positive nodes) and the remaining three patients (60%) had no occult cervical metastasis. The recurrence rate was 20% for patients who received postoperative radiotherapy. There was no morbidity and postoperative dysfunction and the mortality rate was only 20% in our study. Conclusion: Supraomohyoid neck dissection is the therapeutic procedure in clinically N0 neck patients with squamous cell carcinoma of buccal mucosa and gingivobuccal sulcus of mandible. Supraomohyoid neck dissection, when indicated, contributes to the concept of less-invasive surgery and offers functional and aesthetic advantages without compromising the clearance with minimal morbidity. PMID:25992339

  12. Impeded establishment of the infective stage of Trichinella in the intestinal mucosa of mice by passive transfer of an IgA monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Takashi; Sato, Hiroshi; Kamiya, Haruo

    2003-11-01

    Our previous study showed that the IgA monoclonal antibody (mAb) HUSM-Tb1 forms immunoprecipitates on the cuticular surface of infective larvae of Trichinella britovi, and that intraperitoneal injection of this mAb to mice 5 hr before challenge infection confers a high level of protection against intestinal T. britovi. The same treatment produced a similar effect in BALB/c mice inoculated orally with Trichinella pseudospiralis larvae, indicating that the effects may be seen upon most members of the genus Trichinella. Worms recovered from the intestinal mucosa at 1 hr after challenge infection with T. pseudospiralis was few in mice passively immunized with the mAb, whereas a substantial number of worms were recovered from the mucosa of control groups. These results suggest that the IgA mAb impedes establishment of infective Trichinella worms in the intestinal mucosa. Trichinella worms inoculated orally into BALB/c mice vaccinated with ultraviolet-irradiated muscle larvae 3 weeks earlier were expelled between days 4 and 7 after challenge infection. Although the mAb HUSM-Tb1 originated from the mesenteric lymph node cells of mice vaccinated repeatedly with such irradiated larvae, IgA-mediated expulsion does not seem to play an important role in this vaccination model. PMID:14665753

  13. Examining smoking-induced differential gene expression changes in buccal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene expression changes resulting from conditions such as disease, environmental stimuli, and drug use, can be monitored in the blood. However, a less invasive method of sample collection is of interest because of the discomfort and specialized personnel necessary for blood sampling especially if multiple samples are being collected. Buccal mucosa cells are easily collected and may be an alternative sample material for biomarker testing. A limited number of studies, primarily in the smoker/oral cancer literature, address this tissue's efficacy as an RNA source for expression analysis. The current study was undertaken to determine if total RNA isolated from buccal mucosa could be used as an alternative tissue source to assay relative gene expression. Methods Total RNA was isolated from swabs, reverse transcribed and amplified. The amplified cDNA was used in RT-qPCR and microarray analyses to evaluate gene expression in buccal cells. Initially, RT-qPCR was used to assess relative transcript levels of four genes from whole blood and buccal cells collected from the same seven individuals, concurrently. Second, buccal cell RNA was used for microarray-based differential gene expression studies by comparing gene expression between a group of female smokers and nonsmokers. Results An amplification protocol allowed use of less buccal cell total RNA (50 ng) than had been reported previously with human microarrays. Total RNA isolated from buccal cells was degraded but was of sufficient quality to be used with RT-qPCR to detect expression of specific genes. We report here the finding of a small number of statistically significant differentially expressed genes between smokers and nonsmokers, using buccal cells as starting material. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis confirmed that these genes had a similar expression pattern to results from another study. Conclusions Our results suggest that despite a high degree of degradation, RNA from buccal cells from cheek mucosa

  14. [Ultrastructural aspects of keratinization of the rat oral mucosa. II. Soft palate (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bezerra, M S

    1980-04-01

    This paper presents a study of the ultrastructure of the epithelium of the soft plate of the rat. General morphology, ratio and localization of ribosomes, filaments, mitocondria, spaces of stratum basale, stratum spinosum and stratum granulosum, are described. The stratum corneum presents modified desmosomes, no organelles and enlarged intercellular spaces. Cornified cells are constituted of a filament-like material, densely packed in an amorphous matrix. PMID:6158072

  15. Paraffinoma of lips and oral mucosa: Case report and brief review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Reinhard E.; Zustin, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    Interstitial application of paraffin in plastic and reconstructive surgery is obsolete due to the development of permanent and extensive foreign body granulomas at the site of application. These granulomas can cause severe physical impairment and develop their own prognostic worth. Furthermore, the disperse oil droplets are not a locally stable suspension. Therefore, the desired aesthetic aspect can get lost in the course of a potential dislocation of the suspension. In addition, the interstitial confluence of non-resorbable droplets to larger oil drops causes palpable and sometimes visible indurations of the skin, the correlate of chronic inflammation. This case report describes the efforts undertaken to release the patient at least temporarily from her paraffin granulomas and to improve her appearance. The relevant literature is briefly discussed. Furthermore, we present some immunohistochemical findings to specify the foreign body reaction associated with paraffin injections into connective tissues. PMID:26504716

  16. Autologous Fat Grafting in the Treatment of Painful Postsurgical Scar of the Oral Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Lisa, Andrea; Summo, Valeria; Bandi, Valeria; Maione, Luca; Murolo, Matteo; Klinger, Francesco; Klinger, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background. Persistent pain as a consequence of surgical treatment has been reported for several common surgical procedures and represents a clinical problem of great magnitude. Material and Methods. We describe the case of a 47-year-old female who presented a retractile scar that adhered to deep planes at the upper right of the vestibule due to surgical removal of maxillary exostosis, which determined important pain symptoms extending till the right shoulder during both chewing and rest. We subsequently treated her with autologous fat grafting according to Coleman's technique. Results. Clinical assessments were performed at 5 and 14 days, 1, 3, and 6 months, and 1 year after surgical procedure. We observed a progressive release of scar retraction together with an important improvement of pain symptoms. Conclusion. The case described widens the possible application of autologous fat grafting on a new anatomical site as buccal vestibule and in one specific clinical setting confirming its promising biological effects. PMID:26064132

  17. Non-invasive monitoring of vascularization of grafted engineered human oral mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, D. E.; Seetamraju, M.; Gurjar, R. S.; Kuo, R. S.; Fasi, A.; Feinberg, S. E.

    2012-03-01

    Accident victims and victims of explosive devices often suffer from complex maxillofacial injuries. The lips are one of the most difficult areas of the face to reconstruct after an avulsion. Lip avulsion results in compromised facial esthetics and functions of speech and mastication. The process of reconstruction requires assessment of the vascularization of grafted ex vivo engineered tissue while it is buried underneath the skin. We describe the design and animal testing of a hand-held surgical probe based upon diffuse correlation spectroscopy to assess vascularization.

  18. Oral medicine case book 65: Necrotising stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Khammissa, R A G; Ciya, R; Munzhelele, T I; Altini, M; Rikhotso, E; Lemmer, J; Feller, L

    2014-11-01

    Necrotising stomatitis is a fulminating anaerobic polybacterial infection affecting predominantly the oral mucosa of debilitated malnourished children or immunosuppressed HIV-seropositive subjects. It starts as necrotising gingivitis which progresses to necrotising periodontitis and subsequently to necrotising stomatitis. In order to prevent the progression of necrotising stomatitis to noma (cancrum oris), affected patients should be vigorously treated and may require admission to hospital. Healthcare personnel should therefore be familiar with the signs and symptoms of necrotising gingivitis/necrotising periodontitis, of their potential sequelae and of the need for immediate therapeutic intervention. PMID:26506800

  19. Patch Testing with Dental Screening Series in Oral Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Wook; Kim, Woo-Il; Mun, Je-Ho; Song, Margaret; Kim, Hoon-Soo; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kim, Moon-Bum

    2015-01-01

    Background The oral mucosa is constantly exposed to several irritants and allergens including dental materials, but the role of contact allergy in oral disease is obscure. Objective To analyze positive patch test results in patients with oral diseases and evaluate the clinical relevance of oral diseases with contact allergy to dental materials. Methods We retrospectively analyzed patch test results with dental screening series in 44 patients with oral disease from 2004~2011. Results Oral diseases included oral lichen planus (54.5%), cheilitis (27.3%), burning mouth syndrome (9.1%), and others (9.1%). Thirty-one of 44 patients (70.5%) had positive reactions to one or more allergens. The most commonly detected allergens were gold sodium thiosulfate (25.0%) and nickel sulfate (25.0%), followed by potassium dichromate (22.7%), cobalt (15.9%), palladium (6.8%), mercury (4.5%), copper (4.5%), and methylhydroquinone (4.5%). Six of 24 patients with oral lichen planus had a symptom in areas adjacent to dental materials and positive patch test reactions to allergens contained in the suspected dental materials. Conclusion Patch tests with dental screening series are worth considering for oral diseases, especially for oral lichen planus. PMID:26273153

  20. Can MMP-9 be a Prognosticator Marker for Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Shiva Kumar; Kumar, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Invasion and metastasis of malignant tumours severely endanger the life of cancer patients. Squamous cell carcinoma is one of the commonly found malignancies in the oral cavity and its survival rate has not improved from past few decades. Since an important risk factor for oral squamous cell carcinoma is the presence of epithelial dysplasia, it is necessary to check the presence of a prognosticator marker in both of them. As matrix metalloproteinase’s (MMP’s) are involved in degradation of type IV collagen, which are one of the important components of extracellular matrix components which play a relevant role in several steps of tumour progression such as invasion and metastasis. We have studied MMP-9 expression to evaluate its prognostic potential in oral cancers as well as oral epithelial dysplasia along with tissues of normal oral epithelium. Materials and Methods The expression was examined using immunohistochemistry procedure with MMP-9 in 100 samples including cases of epithelium from normal oral mucosa, oral dysplastic lesions and oral squamous cell carcinoma. One set of formalin fixed, paraffin embedded sections of the three categories were stained by haematoxylin and eosin. The sections were then evaluated under microscope. Data was examined for statistical significance using SPSS 13.0 by Mann-Whitney Test and Kruskal-Wallis Test. Results With MMP-9 gain of expression was noted from Control group to oral squamous cell carcinoma. Cytoplasmic staining was seen with MMP-9. Statistically highly significant differences were seen between oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma and statistically significant differences were found between the control group and the oral squamous cell carcinoma group. Conclusion This study suggested that oral squamous cell carcinoma shows higher MMP-9 expression as compared to oral epithelial dysplasia followed by epithelium from normal oral mucosa. However, no correlation was found among the

  1. Animal Models--Decoding the Molecular Biology of Oral Cancer.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa; Raj, Thirumal

    2015-04-01

    Animal models have long been used to understand the initiation and progression of carcinogenesis, including that of oral mucosa.(1) One of the earliest models used was the chemical-induced oral cancer model, among which the Syrian Hamster check pouch was preferred for its ideal anatomical location and physiological features.(2) Salley et al(3) demonstrated that the cheek pouch mucosa underwent gradual changes from hyperplasia, carcinoma in situ to squamous cell carcinoma when exposed to polycyclic hydrocarbon 9, 10 dimethyl-1,2, benzanthracene (DMBA). Morris(4) standardized the dosage of carcinogen to 0.5% solution of DMBA in acetone and established that 5-week old animals were ideal to induce tumor with minimum time lag and maximum yield. Lin et al(5) demonstrated the synergistic effect of arecaidine with DMBA. PMID:26067740

  2. Treatment of oral lichen sclerosus with 1% pimecrolimus cream.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chi Yeon; Kim, Jin Gu; Oh, Chee Won

    2010-08-01

    Lichen sclerosus is a chronic inflammatory mucocutaneous disorder predominately affecting prepubertal girls and postmenopausal women. Isolated lichen sclerosus affecting the oral mucosa is exceedingly rare, and only 13 patients with biopsy-proved isolated oral disease have been reported in the literature. We report on a 7-year-old Korean girl with a well-demarcated 1.2x1.2 cm atrophic white plaque with an erythematous border and focal telangiectasia on the left vermillion lip, extending to the labial mucosa. No other cutaneous surfaces, including genitalia, were involved. An incisional biopsy of the plaque on the lip revealed a patchy lichenoid infiltrate of lymphocytes associated with sclerosis of the papillary dermis and a thinned epidermis consistent with a diagnosis of linear orofacial lichen sclerosus. Treatment with a short course of 1% pimecrolimus cream effectively prevented the progression of this lesion. PMID:20711272

  3. Oral mucocele: Review of literature and a case report

    PubMed Central

    Nallasivam, K. U.; Sudha, B. R.

    2015-01-01

    Mucocele is the most common lesion of the oral mucosa, which results from the accumulation of mucous secretion due to trauma and lip biting habits or alteration of minor salivary glands. Mostly they are two types based on histological features which as follows: Extravasation and retention. Mucoceles can appear at anywhere in the oral mucosa such as lip, cheeks and the floor of the mouth, but mainly appear in the lip. Diagnosis is mostly based on clinical findings. The most common location of the extravasation mucocele is the lower lip. Mucoceles most probably affect young patients but can affect all the age groups. They may have a soft consistency, bluish, and transparent cystic swelling, history of bursting and collapsing due to which resolves themselves then refilling which may be repeated. The treatment of choice is surgical removal of the mucocele. PMID:26538955

  4. Oral mucocele: Review of literature and a case report.

    PubMed

    Nallasivam, K U; Sudha, B R

    2015-08-01

    Mucocele is the most common lesion of the oral mucosa, which results from the accumulation of mucous secretion due to trauma and lip biting habits or alteration of minor salivary glands. Mostly they are two types based on histological features which as follows: Extravasation and retention. Mucoceles can appear at anywhere in the oral mucosa such as lip, cheeks and the floor of the mouth, but mainly appear in the lip. Diagnosis is mostly based on clinical findings. The most common location of the extravasation mucocele is the lower lip. Mucoceles most probably affect young patients but can affect all the age groups. They may have a soft consistency, bluish, and transparent cystic swelling, history of bursting and collapsing due to which resolves themselves then refilling which may be repeated. The treatment of choice is surgical removal of the mucocele. PMID:26538955

  5. Adherence of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites to rat and human colonic mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Ravdin, J I; John, J E; Johnston, L I; Innes, D J; Guerrant, R L

    1985-01-01

    We studied the adherence of [3H]thymidine-labeled axenic Entamoeba histolytica (strain HM1-IMSS) to in vitro preparations of rat and human colonic mucosa. Studies were performed with fixed or unfixed rat colonic mucosa, unfixed rat mucosa exposed to trypsin, unfixed rat submucosa, and fixed human colonic mucosa. Twenty percent of the amebae adhered to fixed rat colonic mucosa; adherence was specifically inhibited by N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc), galactose, and asialofetuin. The adherence of amebae to fixed human colonic mucosa was also GalNAc inhibitable. Greater adherence was found with unfixed rat colonic mucosa (40.9%) and was not GalNAc inhibitable unless the tissue was first exposed to trypsin. However, GalNAc did inhibit the adherence of amebae to unfixed rat submucosa. Glutaraldehyde fixation of amebae inactivates known amebic adhesion proteins; there was a markedly decreased adherence of fixed amebae to trypsin-exposed mucosa or fixed rat colonic mucosa. However, fixed or viable amebae had equal levels of adherence to unfixed rat colonic mucosa, suggesting the presence of a host adhesion protein that binds to receptors on amebae. Human (10%) and rabbit (5%) immune sera reduced the adherence of viable amebae to fixed rat colonic mucosa. We concluded that the GalNAc-inhibitable adhesion protein on the surface of E. histolytica trophozoites mediated adherence to fixed rat mucosa, fixed human colonic mucosa, trypsin-exposed unfixed rat mucosa, and unfixed rat submucosa. The surface of unfixed rat colonic mucosa contained a glutaraldehyde- and trypsin-sensitive host adhesion protein, perhaps in the overlying mucus blanket, which bound viable or fixed E. histolytica trophozoites. Images PMID:2580787

  6. Olfactory Mucosa Tissue Based Biosensor for Bioelectronic Nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingjun; Ye, Weiwei; Yu, Hui; Hu, Ning; Cai, Hua; Wang, Ping

    2009-05-01

    Biological olfactory system can distinguish thousands of odors. In order to realize the biomimetic design of electronic nose on the principle of mammalian olfactory system, we have reported bioelectronic nose based on cultured olfactory cells. In this study, the electrical property of the tissue-semiconductor interface was analyzed by the volume conductor theory and the sheet conductor model. Olfactory mucosa tissue of rat was isolated and fixed on the surface of the light-addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS), with the natural stations of the neuronal populations and functional receptor unit of the cilia well reserved. By the extracellular potentials of the olfactory receptor cells of the mucosa tissue monitored, both the simulation and the experimental results suggested that this tissue-semiconductor hybrid system was sensitive to odorants stimulation.

  7. [Microflora of pharyngeal mucosa in children with solid tumors].

    PubMed

    Polishchuk, V B; Baturo, A P; Romanenko, E E; Kostinov, M P; Zaeva, G E; Mikhaĭlova, S N; Leonova, A Iu; Moiseenko, E I

    2008-01-01

    Microbiological study of pharyngeal mucosa in 43 children with solid tumors revealed that 77.2% of isolated microorganisms belonged to Gram-positive flora. It was shown that streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus were the main species. Species composition of streptococci included both pyogenic (S. pyogenes, S. agalactiae, S. dysgalactiae, S. equi) andviridans species (S. acidominimus, S. oralis and "S. milleri" group). Nocardioform actinomycetes, corynebacteria and other staphylococci were referred to additional microflora. Accidental microflora was represented by Neisseria spp., non-fermenting Gram-negative bacteria, enterobacteria and yeast-like fungi. Microbiologic study of pharyngeal mucosa biocenosis showed that monoculture was present only in 2.3% of cases; in other cases microorganisms formed both intra-genus and inter-species associations. 2-6-component associations were revealed with predominance of 3-4-component associations (37.2% and 32.6% respectively). Relationship of distribution of microorganisms belonging to main and additional microflora was revealed. PMID:19186552

  8. Two Cases of Bacteremia Due to Roseomonas mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu Kyung; Moon, Jung Suk; Song, Kyung Eun

    2016-01-01

    Roseomonas is a genus of pink-pigmented nonfermentative bacilli. These slow-growing, gram-negative cocobacilli form pink-colored colonies on sheep blood agar. They differ from other pink-pigmented nonfermenters, including Methylobacterium, in morphology, biochemical characteristics, and DNA sequence. Roseomonas strains are rarely isolated in clinical laboratories; therefore, we report two cases in order to improve our ability to identify these pathogens. We isolated two strains of Roseomonas mucosa from the venous blood cultures of two patients, an 84-yr-old woman with common bile duct obstruction and a 17-yr-old male with acute myeloid leukemia who had an indwelling central-venous catheter for chemotherapy. The isolated strains were confirmed as R. mucosa by 16S rRNA sequencing. PMID:27139611

  9. Oral precancerous lesions: Problems of early detection and oral cancer prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gileva, Olga S.; Libik, Tatiana V.; Danilov, Konstantin V.

    2016-08-01

    The study presents the results of the research in the structure, local and systemic risk factors, peculiarities of the clinical manifestation, and quality of primary diagnosis of precancerous oral mucosa lesions (OMLs). In the study a wide range of OMLs and high (25.4%) proportion of oral precancerous lesions (OPLs) in their structure was indicated. The high percentage of different diagnostic errors and the lack of oncological awareness of dental practitioners, as well as the sharp necessity of inclusion of precancer/cancer early detection techniques into their daily practice were noted. The effectiveness of chemilumenescence system of early OPLs and oral cancer detection was demonstrated, the prospects of infrared thermography as a diagnostic tool were also discussed.

  10. Oral colonization and susceptibility testing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa oral isolates from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, R A; Newman, M G; Kaufman, A K; Le, T V

    1985-01-01

    Microbial samples from the oral cavities of cystic fibrosis (C.F.) patients and 20 age-matched normal control subjects were characterized. Mucoid variant Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from the tongue, buccal mucosa, and saliva of C.F. patients only. Analysis of the data suggests that the oral cavity is a potential reservoir for this organism. Aspiration and cross-contamination from this reservoir may be important in perpetuating chronic pulmonary infection in C.F. patients. Susceptibility testing was performed on 20 mucoid variant P. aeruginosa oral isolates obtained from the patients according to standardized broth dilution procedures. The in vitro antimicrobial effects of sodium fluoride, stannous fluoride, and chlorhexidine were measured. Analysis of the data suggests that clinically safe and achievable levels of chlorhexidine and stannous fluoride may be antimicrobial. PMID:3918088

  11. The quantitative assessment of normal canine small intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Hart, I R; Kidder, D E

    1978-09-01

    Quanitative methods of assessing the architecture of small intestinal mucosa have been applied to biopsy material from normal dogs. Mucosal samples taken from four predetermined sites show that there are significant quantitative differences between the various levels of the small bowel. Animals of one year of age and older show no correlation between age or weight and mucosal dimensions. The significance of these findings, in relation to examination of biopsy material from cases of clinical small intestinal disease, is discussed. PMID:364574

  12. Zur Struktur der Solenocyten (Cyrtocyten) von Anaitides mucosa (Annelida, Polychaeta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, K.

    1981-12-01

    Based on electron microscopic observations, the structure of the solenocytes of A. mucosa is described. The tube of the solenocyte is made up of 14 15 rods. These rods, which are filled with regularly packed filaments, are interconnected by an amorphous to filamentous substance. A single flagellum, lying in the tube, is surrounded by a sheet of amorphous material. The functional organization of the solenocytes is discussed.

  13. Alteration of gene expression in rat colon mucosa after exercise.

    PubMed

    Buehlmeyer, K; Doering, F; Daniel, H; Kindermann, B; Schulz, T; Michna, H

    2008-01-01

    The development of colon cancer is highly influenced by lifestyle factors such as nutrition and physical inactivity. Detailed biological mechanisms are thus far unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of regular treadmill exercise on gene expression in rat colon mucosa. For this purpose, 6-week-old male Wistar rats completed a stress-free voluntary treadmill exercise period of 12 weeks. Sedentary rats served as a control group. In the colon mucosa, steady-state mRNA expression levels of approximately 10,000 genes were compared between both groups by micro-array analysis (MWG rat 10K array). A total of 8846 mRNAs were detected above background level. Regular exercise led to a decreased expression of 47 genes at a threshold-factor of 2.0. Three genes were found to be up-regulated in the exercise group. The identified genes encode proteins involved in signal transduction (n=11), transport (n=8), immune system (n=7), cytoskeleton (n=6), protein targeting (n=6), metabolism (n=5), transcription (n=3) and vascularization (n=2). Among the genes regulated by regular exercise, the betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase 2 (BHMT2) seems to be of particular interest. Physical activity may protect against aberrant methylation by repressing the BHMT2 gene and thus contribute to a decreased risk of developing colon cancer. We have also identified vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiopoietin-2 (ANG-2) and calcium-independent phospholipase a2 (iPL-A2), all of them with markedly reduced transcript levels in the mucosa of active rats. In summary, our experiment presents the first gene expression pattern in rat colon mucosa following regular treadmill activity and represents an important step in understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the preventive effect of physical activity on the development of colon cancer. PMID:18342145

  14. Zollinger-Ellison syndrome with esophagitis and Barrett mucosa.

    PubMed

    Karl, T R; Pindyck, F; Sicular, A

    1983-10-01

    Although esophageal disease in Zollinger-Ellison syndrome is being recognized with increasing frequency, Barrett esophagus is seen only rarely. Basal lower esophageal sphincter pressure is probably not different in Zollinger-Ellison syndrome and non-Zollinger-Ellison syndrome patients. Circulating gastrin, therefore, cannot be the major determinant of lower esophageal sphincter pressure in vivo. Total gastrectomy and resection of all metaplastic esophagus, when feasible, is the treatment of choice for patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome and Barrett mucosa. PMID:6624733

  15. Untersuchungen zur Regeneration des Hinterendes bei Anaitides mucosa (Polychaeta, Phyllodocidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhrkasten, A.

    1983-06-01

    Caudal regeneration was investigated in decerebrate Anaitides mucosa and in brain-intact individuals. Both groups show an identical capacity to regenerate lost caudal segments. Furthermore there is no difference in males and females. Low temperature (5 °C) inhibits the regeneration of caudal segments, but it is necessary for normal oogenesis. Under conditions of high temperature (15 °C), caudal regeneration is very extensive. At the same time degeneration of most oocytes occurs.

  16. Evaluation of Microbial Load in Oropharyngeal Mucosa from Tannery Workers

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos-Arévalo, Diana C.; Castellanos-Arévalo, Andrea P.; Camarena-Pozos, David A.; Colli-Mull, Juan G.; Maldonado-Vega, María

    2014-01-01

    Background Animal skin provides an ideal medium for the propagation of microorganisms and it is used like raw material in the tannery and footware industry. The aim of this study was to evaluate and identify the microbial load in oropharyngeal mucosa of tannery employees. Methods The health risk was estimated based on the identification of microorganisms found in the oropharyngeal mucosa samples. The study was conducted in a tanners group and a control group. Samples were taken from oropharyngeal mucosa and inoculated on plates with selective medium. In the samples, bacteria were identified by 16S ribosomal DNA analysis and the yeasts through a presumptive method. In addition, the sensitivity of these microorganisms to antibiotics/antifungals was evaluated. Results The identified bacteria belonged to the families Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, Neisseriaceae, Alcaligenaceae, Moraxellaceae, and Xanthomonadaceae, of which some species are considered as pathogenic or opportunistic microorganisms; these bacteria were not present in the control group. Forty-two percent of bacteria identified in the tanners group are correlated with respiratory diseases. Yeasts were also identified, including the following species: Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida albicans, and Candida krusei. Regarding the sensitivity test of bacteria identified in the tanners group, 90% showed sensitivity to piperacillin/tazobactam, 87% showed sensitivity to ticarcillin/clavulanic acid, 74% showed sensitivity to ampicillin/sulbactam, and 58% showed sensitivity to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Conclusion Several of the bacteria and yeast identified in the oropharyngeal mucosa of tanners have been correlated with infections in humans and have already been reported as airborne microorganisms in this working environment, representing a health risk for workers. PMID:25830072

  17. l-Menthol sprayed on gastric mucosa causes edematous change

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Akihiro; Hachiya, Hiroki; Yumura, Takayuki; Ito, Shun; Hayashi, Shintaro; Nozaki, Masashi; Yoshida, Atsui; Ohashi, Noritsugu

    2014-01-01

    Background and study aims: l-Menthol (LM), sprayed on the distal gastric mucosa, is a safe antispasmodic agent used during esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). However, it seems to affect gastric mucosal endoscopic findings. Therefore, we evaluated whether LM causes specific changes and impacts the endoscopic morphology of gastric lesions. Patients and methods: A total of 98 patients scheduled to undergo EGD were randomly assigned to receive LM solution (160 mg of 0.8 % LM added to 2.5 mL of indigo carmine [IC]; n = 49; LM group) or decuple-diluted IC solution without LM (n = 49; placebo group). We compared the incidence of specific mucosal changes and the difference in the endoscopic findings of several gastric lesions between these groups. Results: Annular-reticular – like mucosal changes appeared immediately after the administration of LM solution. This change was observed in 71.4 % of the LM group compared with 12.2 % of the placebo group (P < 0.01). In the placebo group, this change was observed in 14.7 % of subjects with atrophic gastritis compared with 6.7 % of those without atrophic gastritis (P = 0.39), whereas in the LM group, this change was observed in 84.8 % of subjects with atrophic gastritis compared with 43.8 % of those without atrophic gastritis (P < 0.01). Most early gastric cancers, erosions, and ulcers observed in this study became well demarcated after LM administration, although the incidence of gastric lesions did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion: LM changes the gastric mucosa into edematous mucosa, and this occurs more frequently in atrophic gastric mucosa than in pathologic lesions. LM may facilitate the demarcation of pathologic gastric lesions without intestinal metaplasia. PMID:26135260

  18. Method of expression of certain bacterial microflora mucosa olfactory area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrunin, Oleg G.; Nosova, Yana V.; Shushlyapina, Natalia O.; Surtel, Wojciech; Burlibay, Aron; Zhassandykyzy, Maral

    2015-12-01

    The article is devoted to the actual problem - the development of new express diagnostic methods, based on which a doctor-otolaryngologist can quickly and efficiently determine a violation of smell. The work is based on the methods of processing and analysis of medical images and signals. We have also identified informative indicators of endoscopic image of the olfactory region of the nasal mucosa of the upper course.

  19. Oral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Millsop, Jillian W; Fazel, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) is a common fungal disease encountered in dermatology, most commonly caused by an overgrowth of Candida albicans in the mouth. Although thrush is a well-recognized presentation of OC, it behooves clinicians to be aware of the many other presentations of this disease and how to accurately diagnose and manage these cases. The clinical presentations of OC can be broadly classified as white or erythematous candidiasis, with various subtypes in each category. The treatments include appropriate oral hygiene, topical agents, and systemic medications. This review focuses on the various clinical presentations of OC and treatment options. PMID:27343964

  20. Local Immunoglobulin E in the Nasal Mucosa: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    De Schryver, Els; Devuyst, Lien; Derycke, Lara; Dullaers, Melissa; Van Zele, Thibaut; Bachert, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE) can be highly elevated in the airway mucosa independently of IgE serum levels and atopic status. Mostly, systemic markers are assessed to investigate inflammation in airway disease for research or clinical practice. A more accurate but more cumbersome approach to determine inflammation at the target organ would be to evaluate markers locally. We review evidence for local production of IgE in allergic rhinitis (AR) and chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP). Diagnostic and therapeutic consequences in clinical practice are discussed. We describe that the airway mucosa has the intrinsic capability to produce IgE. Moreover, not only do IgE-positive B cells reside within the mucosa, but all tools are present locally for affinity maturation by somatic hypermutation (SHM), clonal expansion, and class switch recombination to IgE. Recognizing local IgE in the absence of systemic IgE has diagnostic and therapeutic consequences. Therefore, we emphasize the importance of local IgE in patients with a history of AR or CRSwNP. PMID:25749769

  1. Acylation of lysolecithin in the intestinal mucosa of rats

    PubMed Central

    Subbaiah, P. V.; Sastry, P. S.; Ganguly, J.

    1970-01-01

    1. The presence of an active acyl-CoA–lysolecithin (1-acylglycerophosphorylcholine) acyltransferase was demonstrated in rat intestinal mucosa. 2. ATP and CoA were necessary for the incorporation of free [1-14C]oleic acid into lecithin (phosphatidylcholine). 3. The reaction was about 20 times as fast with [1-14C]oleoyl-CoA as with free oleic acid, CoA and ATP. 4. With 1-acylglycerophosphorylcholine as the acceptor, both oleic acid and palmitic acid were incorporated into the β-position of lecithin; the incorporation of palmitic acid was 60% of that of oleic acid. 5. Of the various analogues of lysolecithin tested as acyl acceptors from [1-14C]oleoyl CoA, a lysolecithin with a long-chain fatty acid at the 1-position was most efficient. 6. The enzyme was mostly present in the brush-border-free particulate fraction of the intestinal mucosa. 7. Of the various tissues of rats tested for the activity, intestinal mucosa was found to be the most active, with testes, liver, kidneys and spleen following it in decreasing order. PMID:5484668

  2. Synthesis, crystallization, and biological evaluation of an orally active prodrug of gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Bender, David M; Bao, Jingqi; Dantzig, Anne H; Diseroad, William D; Law, Kevin L; Magnus, Nicholas A; Peterson, Jeffrey A; Perkins, Everett J; Pu, Yangwei J; Reutzel-Edens, Susan M; Remick, David M; Starling, James J; Stephenson, Gregory A; Vaid, Radhe K; Zhang, Deyi; McCarthy, James R

    2009-11-26

    The design, synthesis, and biological characterization of an orally active prodrug (3) of gemcitabine are described. Additionally, the identification of a novel co-crystal solid form of the compound is presented. Valproate amide 3 is orally bioavailable and releases gemcitabine into the systemic circulation after passing through the intestinal mucosa. The compound has entered clinical trials and is being evaluated as a potential new anticancer agent. PMID:19860433

  3. Outcome of buccal mucosa and lingual mucosa graft urethroplasty in the management of urethral strictures: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Sharad; Yadav, Sher Singh; Tomar, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to compare the outcome of buccal and lingual mucosa graft (LMG) augmentation urethroplasty along with donor sites morbidities in anterior urethra stricture. Subjects and Methods: From September 2010 to January 2014, 125 patients underwent single stage augmentation urethroplasty. They were randomly divided into two groups to receive either buccal mucosa graft (BMG) or LMG. The patients were prospectively followed for complications and outcome. Results: Baseline characteristics such as mean age, etiology, stricture length, and location were comparable in both groups. Overall success rate for Group 1 and Group 2 were 69.2% and 80%, respectively. Mean follow-up periods were 28.2 and 25 months in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively. Conclusions: LMG provides the better outcome with fewer immediate and delayed complications as compared to BMG. The length of stricture and width of graft were main factors affecting the outcome. PMID:26834399

  4. Oral Microbial Ecology and the Role of Salivary Immunoglobulin A

    PubMed Central

    Marcotte, Harold; Lavoie, Marc C.

    1998-01-01

    In the oral cavity, indigenous bacteria are often associated with two major oral diseases, caries and periodontal diseases. These diseases seem to appear following an inbalance in the oral resident microbiota, leading to the emergence of potentially pathogenic bacteria. To define the process involved in caries and periodontal diseases, it is necessary to understand the ecology of the oral cavity and to identify the factors responsible for the transition of the oral microbiota from a commensal to a pathogenic relationship with the host. The regulatory forces influencing the oral ecosystem can be divided into three major categories: host related, microbe related, and external factors. Among host factors, secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) constitutes the main specific immune defense mechanism in saliva and may play an important role in the homeostasis of the oral microbiota. Naturally occurring SIgA antibodies that are reactive against a variety of indigenous bacteria are detectable in saliva. These antibodies may control the oral microbiota by reducing the adherence of bacteria to the oral mucosa and teeth. It is thought that protection against bacterial etiologic agents of caries and periodontal diseases could be conferred by the induction of SIgA antibodies via the stimulation of the mucosal immune system. However, elucidation of the role of the SIgA immune system in controlling the oral indigenous microbiota is a prerequisite for the development of effective vaccines against these diseases. The role of SIgA antibodies in the acquisition and the regulation of the indigenous microbiota is still controversial. Our review discusses the importance of SIgA among the multiple factors that control the oral microbiota. It describes the oral ecosystems, the principal factors that may control the oral microbiota, a basic knowledge of the secretory immune system, the biological functions of SIgA, and, finally, experiments related to the role of SIgA in oral microbial ecology

  5. Oral or parenteral administration of curcumin does not prevent the growth of high-risk t(4;11) acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells engrafted into a NOD/SCID mouse model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of orally and parenterally administered curcumin was evaluated in NOD.CB17-Prkdcscid/J mice engrafted with the human t(4;11) acute lymphoblastic leukemia line SEM. SEM cells were injected into the tail vein and engraftment was monitored by flow cytometry. Once engraftment was observed...

  6. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... What are the effects of oral cancer on speech and swallowing? The effects of cancer on speech and swallowing depend on the location and size ... movement. This could result in unclear production of speech sounds made with the lips such as /p/, / ...

  7. Oral Warts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Title: Oral Warts Description: Warts are small, white, gray, or pinkish rough bumps that look like cauliflower. They can appear inside the lips and on other parts of the mouth. Credit: NIDCR publication: Mouth Problems + HIV Download: Low-Resolution Image High- ...

  8. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... won't heal Bleeding in your mouth Loose teeth Problems or pain with swallowing A lump in your neck An earache Oral cancer treatments may include surgery, radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Some patients have a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  9. In silico analysis of gene expression profiles in the olfactory mucosae of aging senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Getchell, Thomas V; Peng, Xuejun; Green, C Paul; Stromberg, Arnold J; Chen, Kuey-Chu; Mattson, Mark P; Getchell, Marilyn L

    2004-08-01

    We utilized high-density Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays to investigate gene expression in the olfactory mucosae of near age-matched aging senescence-accelerated mice (SAM). The senescence-prone (SAMP) strain has a significantly shorter lifespan than does the senescence-resistant (SAMR) strain. To analyze our data, we applied biostatistical methods that included a correlation analysis to evaluate sources of methodologic and biological variability; a two-sided t-test to identify a subpopulation of Present genes with a biologically relevant P-value <0.05; and a false discovery rate (FDR) analysis adjusted to a stringent 5% level that yielded 127 genes with a P-value of <0.001 that were differentially regulated in near age-matched SAMPs (SAMP-Os; 13.75 months) compared to SAMRs (SAMR-Os, 12.5 months). Volcano plots related the variability in the mean hybridization signals as determined by the two-sided t-test to fold changes in gene expression. The genes were categorized into the six functional groups used previously in gene profiling experiments to identify candidate genes that may be relevant for senescence at the genomic and cellular levels in the aging mouse brain (Lee et al. [2000] Nat Genet 25:294-297) and in the olfactory mucosa (Getchell et al. [2003] Ageing Res Rev 2:211-243), which serves several functions that include chemosensory detection, immune barrier function, xenobiotic metabolism, and neurogenesis. Because SAMR-Os and SAMP-Os have substantially different median lifespans, we related the rate constant alpha in the Gompertz equation on aging to intrinsic as opposed to environmental mechanisms of senescence based on our analysis of genes modulated during aging in the olfactory mucosa. PMID:15248299

  10. Frenum-like oral synechiae of the lip and vestibule.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Katsuaki; Shiraishi, Mami; Kawai, Yui; Harada, Koji; Ueyama, Yoshiya

    2016-06-01

    Two cases where aberrant tissue was attached to the lower lip mimicking the inferior labial frenum were reported. The frenum-like tissue extended from the gingival margin between the lower left deciduous central and lateral incisors in case 1 and between the lower right deciduous central and lateral incisors in case 2, to the dry lower lip. Histologically, the resected specimen was regarded as normal oral mucosa covered with stratified squamous epithelium, without a clear amniotic band. The frenum-like tissue of the lower lip found in both our patients was diagnosed as a category of oral synechiae, of unknown origin. PMID:26780195

  11. Oral Health and Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Oral Health and Aging Oral Health and Aging Summer 2016 Table of Contents Jerrold H. Epstein, ... they may need. Read More "Oral Health and Aging" Articles Oral Health and Aging / 4 Myths About ...

  12. Oral Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Key Points Oral cavity and ...

  13. Oral manifestations of hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Carrozzo, Marco; Scally, Kara

    2014-01-01

    Extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can affect a variety of organ systems with significant morbidity and mortality. Some of the most frequently reported EHM of HCV infection, involve the oral region predominantly or exclusively. Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory condition that is potentially malignant and represents cell-mediated reaction to a variety of extrinsic antigens, altered self-antigens, or super antigens. Robust epidemiological evidence support the link between OLP and HCV. As the virus may replicate in the oral mucosa and attract HCV-specific T lymphocytes, HCV may be implicated in OLP pathogenesis. Sjögren syndrome (SjS) is an autoimmune exocrinopathy, characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes and a multitude of other systemic signs and symptoms. SjS patients have also an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients with chronic hepatitis C do frequently have histological signs of Sjögren-like sialadenitis with mild or even absent clinical symptoms. However, it is still unclear if HCV may cause a disease mimicking SjS or it is directly responsible for the development of SjS in a specific subset of patients. Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common oral malignant tumour and at least in some part of the world could be linked to HCV. PMID:24976694

  14. Oral mucosal manifestations of autoimmune skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mayson B; Porter, Stephen R; Smoller, Bruce R; Sitaru, Cassian

    2015-10-01

    A group of autoimmune diseases is characterised by autoantibodies against epithelial adhesion structures and/or tissue-tropic lymphocytes driving inflammatory processes resulting in specific pathology at the mucosal surfaces and the skin. The most frequent site of mucosal involvement in autoimmune diseases is the oral cavity. Broadly, these diseases include conditions affecting the cell-cell adhesion causing intra-epithelial blistering and those where autoantibodies or infiltration lymphocytes cause a loss of cell-matrix adhesion or interface inflammation. Clinically, patients present with blistering, erosions and ulcers that may affect the skin as well as further mucosal surfaces of the eyes, nose and genitalia. While the autoimmune disease may be suspected based on clinical manifestations, demonstration of tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies, or lymphocytic infiltrates, by various methods including histological examination, direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative immunoassay is a prerequisite for definitive diagnosis. Given the frequency of oral involvement and the fact that oral mucosa is the initially affected site in many cases, the informed practitioner should be well acquainted with diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of autoimmune dermatosis with oral involvement. This paper reviews the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of these conditions in the oral cavity with a specific emphasis on their differential diagnosis and current management approaches. PMID:26117595

  15. Tissular senescence and modifications of oral ecosystem in the elderly: risk factors for mucosal pathologies.

    PubMed

    Bodineau, Agnès; Folliguet, Marysette; Séguier, Sylvie

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this present review is to describe the pathogenesis and mechanisms behind mucosal pathologies in the elderly including a description of the risk factors for these pathologies. The oral cavity - and particularly oral mucosae - is exposed to many stresses as well as physical, chemical, thermic and pathogenic agents. In the elderly, mucosae are less resistant to the insults, and this increases the occurrence of diseases. Several factors contribute to the prevalence of mucosal pathologies with aging. There are two categories: intrinsic factors linked to the senescence of the tissues and functions, and extrinsic factors related to the older people general health status. The intrinsic factors are: 1) mucosal senescence which induces fragility 2) immunosenescence which causes a decrease in the host response against micro-organisms and an increase in the autoimmune diseases and 3) senescence of salivary glands and reduction of the saliva protective function. Furthermore, there are extrinsic factors which contribute to change the oral ecosystem during aging, such as polypathologies and polymedications, malnutrition, degradation of oral hygiene, pathogen proliferation (mainly bacteria and Candida species) and old or ill-fitted removable dentures. In the elderly several diseases occur on the oral mucosae: inflammation, bacterial infections or candidiasis, ulcerations, autoimmune dermatosis, tumoral processes. This review describes some common oral mucosal pathologies in the older people, which illustrate the impact of different risk factors described in the first part. PMID:20021405

  16. Drug induced oral erythema multiforme: A rare and less recognized variant of erythema multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, T Isaac; Vargheese, Geetha; George, Deepu; Sathyan, Pradeesh

    2012-01-01

    Oral erythema multiforme (EM) is considered as a third category of EM other than EM minor and major. Patients present with oral and lip ulcerations typical of EM but without any skin target lesions. It has been reported that primary attacks of oral EM is confined to the oral mucosa but the subsequent attacks can produce more severe forms of EM involving the skin. Hence, it is important to identify and distinguish them from other ulcerative disorders involving oral cavity for early management. This article reports two cases of oral EM that presented with oral and lip ulcerations typical of EM without any skin lesions and highlights the importance of early diagnosis and proper management. PMID:22434953

  17. Altered Interactions between the Gut Microbiome and Colonic Mucosa Precede Polyposis in APCMin/+ Mice

    PubMed Central

    Son, Joshua S.; Khair, Shanawaj; Pettet, Donald W.; Ouyang, Nengtai; Tian, Xinyu; Zhang, Yuanhao; Zhu, Wei; Mackenzie, Gerardo G.; Robertson, Charles E.; Ir, Diana; Frank, Daniel N.; Rigas, Basil; Li, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Mutation of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene), an early event in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, is present in 70-80% of sporadic human colorectal adenomas and carcinomas. To test the hypothesis that mutation of the APC gene alters microbial interactions with host intestinal mucosa prior to the development of polyposis, culture-independent methods (targeted qPCR assays and Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene V1V2 hypervariable region) were used to compare the intestinal microbial composition of 30 six-week old C57BL/6 APCMin/+ and 30 congenic wild type (WT) mice. The results demonstrate that similar to 12-14 week old APCMin/+ mice with intestinal neoplasia, 6 week old APCMin/+ mice with no detectable neoplasia, exhibit an increased relative abundance of Bacteroidetes spp in the colon. Parallel mouse RNA sequence analysis, conducted on a subset of proximal colonic RNA samples (6 APCMin/+, 6 WT) revealed 130 differentially expressed genes (DEGs, fold change ≥ 2, FDR <0.05). Hierarchical clustering of the DEGs was carried out by using 1-r dissimilarity measurement, where r stands for the Pearson correlation, and Ward minimum variance linkage, in order to reduce the number of input variables. When the cluster centroids (medians) were included along with APC genotype as input variables in a negative binomial (NB) regression model, four of seven mouse gene clusters, in addition to APC genotype, were significantly associated with the increased relative abundance of Bacteroidetes spp. Three of the four clusters include several downregulated genes encoding immunoglobulin variable regions and non-protein coding RNAs. These results support the concept that mutation of the APC gene alters colonic-microbial interactions prior to polyposis. It remains to be determined whether interventions directed at ameliorating dysbiosis in APCMin/+mice, such as through probiotics, prebiotics or antibiotics, could reduce tumor formation. PMID:26121046

  18. [Study of pyogenic granuloma of the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Inagi, K; Takahashi, H O; Yao, K; Kamata, T

    1991-12-01

    Pyogenic granuloma is one of the diseases sometimes seen in otorhinolaryngology clinics. The clinical features of this disease are understood to be that the lesion is located in the oral cavity in the majority of cases that its causative agent is usually discovered and that it most likely grows as a malignant tumor. However, the entity of pathological diagnosis has not been established. Thirty-one cases of oral pyogenic granuloma, including 16 males and 15 females, are reported in this paper. The granuloma was located most frequently at the tongue, followed, in order, by the gingiva, buccal mucosa, hard palate, lip and oral floor. The period between the patient's first visit to our clinic and the onset of his/her complaint was variable. It was relatively shorter in those cases with the lesion at the gingiva or tongue as compared to other locations. The size of the lesion was smaller than 10 x 10 mm. We classified the pathological features into three patterns; granuloma type, hemangioma type, and intermediate type. Many cases of lesions located at the back of the tongue, buccal mucosa, or hard palate were of the hemangioma type, while many cases of lesions located at the top of the tongue, gingiva, or oral floor were of the granuloma type. We have the impression that pyogenic granuloma could be one of the purulent changes associated with benign oral tumors. PMID:1779270

  19. Epidermal differentiation complex (locus 1q21) gene expression in head and neck cancer and normal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Tyszkiewicz, Tomasz; Jarzab, Michal; Szymczyk, Cezary; Kowal, Monika; Krajewska, Jolanta; Jaworska, Magdalena; Fraczek, Marcin; Krajewska, Anna; Hadas, Ewa; Swierniak, Michal; Markowski, Jaroslaw; Lange, Dariusz; Poltorak, Stanislaw; Wiench, Malgorzata; Krecicki, Tomasz; Jarzab, Jerzy; Maciejewski, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) comprises a number of genes associated with human skin diseases including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and hyperkeratosis. These genes have also been linked to numerous cancers, among them skin, gastric, colorectal, lung, ovarian and renal carcinomas. The involvement of EDC components encoding S100 proteins, small proline-rich proteins (SPRRs) and other genes in the tumorigenesis of head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) has been previously suggested. The aim of the study was to systematically analyze the expression of EDC components on the transcript level in HNSCC. Tissue specimens from 93 patients with HNC of oral cavity and 87 samples from adjacent or distant grossly normal oral mucosawere analyzed. 48 samples (24 tumor and 24 corresponding surrounding tissue) were hybridized to Affymetrix GeneChip Human 1.0 ST Arrays. For validation by quantitative real-time PCR (QPCR) the total RNA from all180 samples collected in the study was analyzed with Real-Time PCR system and fluorescent amplicon specific-probes. Additional set of samples from 14 patients with laryngeal carcinoma previously obtained by HG-U133 Plus 2.0 microarray was also included in the analyses. The expression of analyzed EDC genes was heterogeneous. Two transcripts (S100A1 and S100A4) were significantly down-regulated in oral cancer when compared to normal mucosa (0.69 and 0.36-fold change, respectively), showing an opposite pattern of expression to the remaining S100 genes. Significant up-regulation in tumors was found for S100A11, S100A7, LCE3D, S100A3 and S100A2 genes. The increased expression of S100A7 was subsequently validated by QPCR, confirming significant differences. The remaining EDC genes, including all encoding SPRR molecules, did not show any differences between oral cancer and normal mucosa. The observed differences were also assessed in the independent set of laryngeal cancer samples, confirming the role of S100A3 and LCE3D transcripts in

  20. Oral squamous cell carcinoma of the maxilla, a second malignancy after a right ethmoido-maxillary chondrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Suciu, Mircea; Morariu, Silviu Horia; Ormenişan, Alina; Grigoraş, Radu Ionuţ; Bostan, Radu Horia; Mocanu, Simona; Vartolomei, Mihai Dorin; Cotoi, Ovidiu Simion

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma is defined as an invasive epithelial neoplasm, with variable degrees of squamous differentiation, with or without keratinization. It is origins stand at the level of the keratinized stratified squamous epithelium (skin) or non-keratinized (oral mucosa, esophageal mucosa, uterine exocervical mucosa), but it can also be found in squamous metaplasia areas (uterine endocervix or trachea-bronchial tree). This report presents the case of an oral squamous cell carcinoma as a second malignancy in the same anatomical territory, in a patient with prior treatment for chondrosarcoma, both surgical and radiotherapy. The tumor had appeared 5-6 months prior and had undergone a relatively rapid growth, this being the patient's main motive for addressing the doctors. The tumor was greyish, with imprecisely demarcated margins, of firm consistency, bleeding and with local necrotic deposits. The tumor extended from the incisive region to the maxillary tuberosity, towards the cheek mucosa and the soft palate. After a large excision, the histopathological diagnosis was infiltrative keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma, with moderate differentiation, with origins in the oral mucosa, infiltrating the whole of the maxilla and the maxillary sinus mucosa. Approximately three months after the surgery, a new tumor appeared in the oral cavity, on superior and inferior mucosa of the right cheek, extending towards the right buccal commissure, implying a relapse of the primary tumor. Postoperative oncological therapy included standard chemotherapy, which resulted in favorable postoperative evolution. This case is interesting by the association, of two metachronous malignant tumors, of different histological origin: a chondrosarcoma and a squamous cell carcinoma, at an interval of 25 years. PMID:25607415

  1. Polyclonal Mucosa-Associated Invariant T Cells Have Unique Innate Functions in Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Wei-Jen; Truscott, Steven M.; Eickhoff, Christopher S.; Blazevic, Azra

    2012-01-01

    Mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are a unique population of αβ T cells in mammals that reside preferentially in mucosal tissues and express an invariant Vα paired with limited Vβ T-cell receptor (TCR) chains. Furthermore, MAIT cell development is dependent upon the expression of the evolutionarily conserved major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ib molecule MR1. Using in vitro assays, recent studies have shown that mouse and human MAIT cells are activated by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) infected with diverse microbes, including numerous bacterial strains and yeasts, but not viral pathogens. However, whether MAIT cells play an important, and perhaps unique, role in controlling microbial infection has remained unclear. To probe MAIT cell function, we show here that purified polyclonal MAIT cells potently inhibit intracellular bacterial growth of Mycobacterium bovis BCG in macrophages (MΦ) in coculture assays, and this inhibitory activity was dependent upon MAIT cell selection by MR1, secretion of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and an innate interleukin 12 (IL-12) signal from infected MΦ. Surprisingly, however, the cognate recognition of MR1 by MAIT cells on the infected MΦ was found to play only a minor role in MAIT cell effector function. We also report that MAIT cell-deficient mice had higher bacterial loads at early times after infection compared to wild-type (WT) mice, demonstrating that MAIT cells play a unique role among innate lymphocytes in protective immunity against bacterial infection. PMID:22778103

  2. Autophagy mediates oral submucous fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    LI, JIANG; ZHAO, TING-TING; ZHANG, PENG; XU, CHAO-JIN; RONG, ZHUO-XIANG; YAN, ZI-YI; FANG, CHANG-YUN

    2016-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is a chronic insidious disease of the oral mucosa, well-recognized as a premalignant condition and commonly found in Southern China. It is primarily caused by the habit of areca nut or gutkha chewing. OSF is believed to be a homeostatic disorder of the extracellular matrix and fibroblast proliferation. The present study demonstrated a novel link between autophagy and OSF. Tissue samples from human OSF showed an overexpression of the autophagy marker microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 using immunohistochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. With regard to the crucial role of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in OSF disease, western blot analysis demonstrated that TGF-β signaling was shown to contribute to the activation of autophagy in fibroblasts in vitro; however, a cell apoptosis and MTS assay demonstrated that the suppression of autophagy ameliorated the fibrosis induced by active TGF-β receptor type I signaling, as well as promoted fibroblast apoptosis and suppressed proliferation. Therefore, the present results suggest that autophagy serves a crucial function in OSF. PMID:27168817

  3. Oral submucous fibrosis: an update

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Verma, Shyam B; Ali, Fareedi Mukram; Patil, Kishor

    2015-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is a premalignant condition caused by betel chewing. It is very common in Southeast Asia but has started to spread to Europe and North America. OSF can lead to squamous cell carcinoma, a risk that is further increased by concomitant tobacco consumption. OSF is a diagnosis based on clinical symptoms and confirmation by histopathology. Hypovascularity leading to blanching of the oral mucosa, staining of teeth and gingiva, and trismus are major symptoms. Major constituents of betel quid are arecoline from betel nuts and copper, which are responsible for fibroblast dysfunction and fibrosis. A variety of extracellular and intracellular signaling pathways might be involved. Treatment of OSF is difficult, as not many large, randomized controlled trials have been conducted. The principal actions of drug therapy include antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxygen radical mechanisms. Potential new drugs are on the horizon. Surgery may be necessary in advanced cases of trismus. Prevention is most important, as no healing can be achieved with available treatments. PMID:25914554

  4. Oral malignant melanoma: A case report with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Manigandan, T.; Sagar, G. Vikram; Amudhan, A.; Hemalatha, V. T.; Babu, N. Aravinda

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucosal melanoma is a rare malignancy with the tendency to metastasize and locally invade tissues more readily than other malignant tumor of the oral cavity. It occurs approximately four times more frequently in the oral mucosa of the upper jaw usually on the palate or alveolar gingiva. The chameleonic presentation of malignant melanoma, its asymptomatic condition, rarity of the lesion, poor prognosis and the necessity of a highly specialized treatment are factors that should be seriously considered by the involved health care provider. Herein we report a rare and interesting case of oral malignant melanoma of the maxillary anterior gingiva, which was clinically and histopathologically diagnosed with a brief review of literature, has been discussed. PMID:25191086

  5. Oral malignant melanoma: A case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Manigandan, T; Sagar, G Vikram; Amudhan, A; Hemalatha, V T; Babu, N Aravinda

    2014-07-01

    Oral mucosal melanoma is a rare malignancy with the tendency to metastasize and locally invade tissues more readily than other malignant tumor of the oral cavity. It occurs approximately four times more frequently in the oral mucosa of the upper jaw usually on the palate or alveolar gingiva. The chameleonic presentation of malignant melanoma, its asymptomatic condition, rarity of the lesion, poor prognosis and the necessity of a highly specialized treatment are factors that should be seriously considered by the involved health care provider. Herein we report a rare and interesting case of oral malignant melanoma of the maxillary anterior gingiva, which was clinically and histopathologically diagnosed with a brief review of literature, has been discussed. PMID:25191086

  6. Connexin subtype expression during oral carcinogenesis: A pilot study in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    BROCKMEYER, PHILLIPP; HEMMERLEIN, BERNHARD; JUNG, KLAUS; FIALKA, FLORIAN; BRODMANN, TOBIAS; GRUBER, RUDOLF MATTHIAS; SCHLIEPHAKE, HENNING; KRAMER, FRANZ-JOSEF

    2016-01-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and connexin (Cx) expression were reported in association with carcinogenesis in various types of tumours. In an earlier histomorphometric study, the protein levels of Cx subtypes 26, 43 and 45 were differentially expressed in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), corresponding lymph node metastases and dysplasia-free oral mucosa. Moreover, membrane Cx43 acted as an independent prognostic marker in OSCC tissues. This study aimed to confirm the expression of described Cx subtypes at the mRNA level. Hence, a reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis of Cx26, Cx43 and Cx45 gene expressions was performed in paired carcinoma and mucosa samples of 15 OSCC patients. Additionally, we assessed the interaction between Cx subtype expression and clinicopathological routine parameters. The RT-qPCR analysis revealed that Cx26 was downregulated in OSCC (P=0.01), while Cx43 was marginally upregulated in cancer tissue (P=0.04). Cx45 was significantly overexpressed in OSCC tissue compared with the intraoral mucosa controls (P<0.01), and remained unchanged at different tumour stages. No significant interactions between differential Cx subtype expression and clinicopathological routine parameters were observed. In conclusion, Cx regulation at the transcriptional level appears to be an early event during the initiation and development of OSCC, and is maintained during further progression. However, the mRNA-protein correlation is variable. This may be indicative of post-transcriptional, translational and degradation regulations being associated with the determination of Cx protein concentration during oral carcinogenesis. PMID:26893879

  7. Chronic infection with Toxoplasma gondii induces death of submucosal enteric neurons and damage in the colonic mucosa of rats.

    PubMed

    Góis, Marcelo Biondaro; Hermes-Uliana, Catchia; Barreto Zago, Maísa Cristina; Zanoni, Jacqueline Nelisis; da Silva, Aristeu Vieira; de Miranda-Neto, Marcílio Hubner; Almeida Araújo, Eduardo José de; Sant'Ana, Débora de Mello Gonçales

    2016-05-01

    Intestinal epithelial secretion is coordinated by the submucosal plexus (SMP). Chemical mediators from SMP regulate the immunobiological response and direct actions against infectious agents. Toxoplasma gondii is a worldwide parasite that causes toxoplasmosis. This study aimed to determine the effects of chronic infection with T. gondii on the morphometry of the mucosa and the submucosal enteric neurons in the proximal colon of rats. Male adult rats were distributed into a control group (n = 10) and an infected group (n = 10). Infected rats received orally 500 oocysts of T. gondii (ME-49). After 36 days, the rats were euthanized and samples of the proximal colon were processed for histology to evaluate mucosal thickness in sections. Whole mounts were stained with methylene blue and subjected to immunohistochemistry to detect vasoactive intestinal polypeptide. The total number of submucosal neurons decreased by 16.20%. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-immunoreactive neurons increased by 26.95%. Intraepithelial lymphocytes increased by 62.86% and sulfomucin-producing goblet cells decreased by 22.87%. Crypt depth was greater by 43.02%. It was concluded that chronic infection with T. gondii induced death and hypertrophy in the remaining submucosal enteric neurons and damage to the colonic mucosa of rats. PMID:26902605

  8. Oral administration of recombinant Neisseria meningitidis PorA genetically fused to H. pylori HpaA antigen increases antibody levels in mouse serum, suggesting that PorA behaves as a putative adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Abel E; Manzo, Ricardo A; Soto, Daniel A; Barrientos, Magaly J; Maldonado, Aurora E; Mosqueira, Macarena; Avila, Anastasia; Touma, Jorge; Bruce, Elsa; Harris, Paul R; Venegas, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane protein PorA from a Chilean strain was purified as a recombinant protein. PorA mixed with AbISCO induced bactericidal antibodies against N. meningitidis in mice. When PorA was fused to the Helicobacter pylori HpaA antigen gene, the specific response against H. pylori protein increased. Splenocytes from PorA-immunized mice were stimulated with PorA, and an increase in the secretion of IL-4 was observed compared with that of IFN-γ. Moreover, in an immunoglobulin sub-typing analysis, a substantially higher IgG1 level was found compared with IgG2a levels, suggesting a Th2-type immune response. This study revealed a peculiar behavior of the purified recombinant PorA protein per se in the absence of AbISCO as an adjuvant. Therefore, the resistance of PorA to proteolytic enzymes, such as those in the gastrointestinal tract, was analyzed, because this is an important feature for an oral protein adjuvant. Finally, we found that PorA fused to the H. pylori HpaA antigen, when expressed in Lactococcus lactis and administered orally, could enhance the antibody response against the HpaA antigen approximately 3 fold. These observations strongly suggest that PorA behaves as an effective oral adjuvant. PMID:25750999

  9. Oral administration of recombinant Neisseria meningitidis PorA genetically fused to H. pylori HpaA antigen increases antibody levels in mouse serum, suggesting that PorA behaves as a putative adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Abel E; Manzo, Ricardo A; Soto, Daniel A; Barrientos, Magaly J; Maldonado, Aurora E; Mosqueira, Macarena; Avila, Anastasia; Touma, Jorge; Bruce, Elsa; Harris, Paul R; Venegas, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane protein PorA from a Chilean strain was purified as a recombinant protein. PorA mixed with AbISCO induced bactericidal antibodies against N. meningitidis in mice. When PorA was fused to the Helicobacter pylori HpaA antigen gene, the specific response against H. pylori protein increased. Splenocytes from PorA-immunized mice were stimulated with PorA, and an increase in the secretion of IL-4 was observed compared with that of IFN-γ. Moreover, in an immunoglobulin sub-typing analysis, a substantially higher IgG1 level was found compared with IgG2a levels, suggesting a Th2-type immune response. This study revealed a peculiar behavior of the purified recombinant PorA protein per se in the absence of AbISCO as an adjuvant. Therefore, the resistance of PorA to proteolytic enzymes, such as those in the gastrointestinal tract, was analyzed, because this is an important feature for an oral protein adjuvant. Finally, we found that PorA fused to the H. pylori HpaA antigen, when expressed in Lactococcus lactis and administered orally, could enhance the antibody response against the HpaA antigen approximately 3 fold. These observations strongly suggest that PorA behaves as an effective oral adjuvant. PMID:25750999

  10. Dysbiosis-induced IL-33 contributes to impaired antiviral immunity in the genital mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ji Eun; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Chang, Dong-Ho; Kwon, Meehyang; Lee, Sun Young; Kang, Dukjin; Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, Inhwa; Yu, Je-Wook; Nakae, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Commensal microbiota are well known to play an important role in antiviral immunity by providing immune inductive signals; however, the consequence of dysbiosis on antiviral immunity remains unclear. We demonstrate that dysbiosis caused by oral antibiotic treatment directly impairs antiviral immunity following viral infection of the vaginal mucosa. Antibiotic-treated mice succumbed to mucosal herpes simplex virus type 2 infection more rapidly than water-fed mice, and also showed delayed viral clearance at the site of infection. However, innate immune responses, including type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokine production at infection sites, as well as induction of virus-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in draining lymph nodes, were not impaired in antibiotic-treated mice. By screening the factors controlling antiviral immunity, we found that IL-33, an alarmin released in response to tissue damage, was secreted from vaginal epithelium after the depletion of commensal microbiota. This cytokine suppresses local antiviral immunity by blocking the migration of effector T cells to the vaginal tissue, thereby inhibiting the production of IFN-γ, a critical cytokine for antiviral defense, at local infection sites. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms of homeostasis maintained by commensal bacteria, and reveal a deleterious consequence of dysbiosis in antiviral immune defense. PMID:26811463

  11. Dysbiosis-induced IL-33 contributes to impaired antiviral immunity in the genital mucosa.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Eun; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Chang, Dong-Ho; Kwon, Meehyang; Lee, Sun Young; Kang, Dukjin; Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, Inhwa; Yu, Je-Wook; Nakae, Susumu; Lee, Heung Kyu

    2016-02-01

    Commensal microbiota are well known to play an important role in antiviral immunity by providing immune inductive signals; however, the consequence of dysbiosis on antiviral immunity remains unclear. We demonstrate that dysbiosis caused by oral antibiotic treatment directly impairs antiviral immunity following viral infection of the vaginal mucosa. Antibiotic-treated mice succumbed to mucosal herpes simplex virus type 2 infection more rapidly than water-fed mice, and also showed delayed viral clearance at the site of infection. However, innate immune responses, including type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokine production at infection sites, as well as induction of virus-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in draining lymph nodes, were not impaired in antibiotic-treated mice. By screening the factors controlling antiviral immunity, we found that IL-33, an alarmin released in response to tissue damage, was secreted from vaginal epithelium after the depletion of commensal microbiota. This cytokine suppresses local antiviral immunity by blocking the migration of effector T cells to the vaginal tissue, thereby inhibiting the production of IFN-γ, a critical cytokine for antiviral defense, at local infection sites. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms of homeostasis maintained by commensal bacteria, and reveal a deleterious consequence of dysbiosis in antiviral immune defense. PMID:26811463

  12. Zinc sulphate attenuates chloride secretion in human colonic mucosae in vitro.

    PubMed

    Medani, Mekki; Bzik, Victoria A; Rogers, Ailin; Collins, Danielle; Kennelly, Rory; Winter, Des C; Brayden, David J; Baird, Alan W

    2012-12-01

    Zinc's usefulness in the treatment of diarrhoea is well established as an addition to oral rehydration. Mechanisms of action of zinc have been explored in intestinal epithelia from rodents and in cell lines. The aim was to examine how zinc alters ion transport and signal transduction in human colon in vitro. Voltage clamped colonic sheets obtained at the time of surgical resection were used to quantify ion transport responses to established secretagogues. Nystatin permeabilisation was used to study basolaterally-sited ion channels. Direct actions of zinc were determined using preparations of colonic crypts isolated from human mucosal sheets. Electrophysiological measurements revealed zinc to be an inhibitor of electrogenic ion transport stimulated by forskolin, PGE(2), histamine and carbachol in isolated human colonic epithelium. Basolateral addition of zinc sulphate had no direct effect on the epithelium. To further outline the mechanism of action, levels of secondary intracellular messengers (3', 5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate; cAMP) were determined in isolated colonic crypts, and were found to be reduced by zinc sulphate. Finally, indirect evidence from nystatin-permeabilised mucosae further suggested that zinc inhibits basolateral K(+) channels, which are critical for transepithelial Cl(-) secretion linked to water flux. Anti-secretory, and therefore anti-diarrhoeal, actions of exogenous zinc are due, at least in part, to direct basolateral epithelial K(+) channel inhibition. PMID:23022335

  13. Increased apoptosis in gastric mucosa adjacent to intestinal metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    van Grieken, N C T; Meijer, G A; zur Hausen, A; Meuwissen, S G M; Baak, J P A; Kuipers, E J

    2003-01-01

    Background: The