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Sample records for oral potentially malignant

  1. Candida in potentially malignant oral disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sankari, S. Leena; Gayathri, K.; Balachander, N.; Malathi, L.

    2015-01-01

    Oro-pharyngeal cancer is a significant component in the global burden of cancer. A considerable proportion of oral squamous carcinomas develop from preexsiting potentially malignant disorder of the oral cavity. The term potentially malignant oral disorders (PMD) were proposed for the precancerous lesions and conditions by World Health Organization in 2007. PMD are considered an in-between clinical state, which showed increased risk for cancer development. Etiology of PMD is multifactorial. Tobacco and alcohol are the major risk factors. In recent years, role of candidal infection is recognized as a significant factor in the development of PMD. There is an enduring discussion whether Candida infection can be a cause of PMD or a superimposed infection in a preexisting lesion. This article highlights the association between Candida and PMD. PMID:26015698

  2. Quantitative Immunoexpression of EGFR in Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders: Oral Leukoplakia and Oral Submucous Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jyothi Meka, Naga; Ugrappa, Sridevi; Velpula, Nagalaxmi; Kumar, Sravan; Naik Maloth, Kotya; Kodangal, Srikanth; ch, Lalitha; Goyal, Stuti

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Many oral squamous cell carcinomas develop from potentially malignant disorders (PMDs)which include a variety of lesions and conditions characterized by an increased risk for malignant transformation. Thisstudy evaluated the quantitative expression of EGFR in normal oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia and oral submucous fibrosis to predict the malignant risk in compliance with the intensity of staining with EGFR. Materials and methods. Thirty subjects were included in the study, consisting of 10 oral leukoplakia (OL), 10 oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) and 10 normal oral mucosa (NOM) as the control group. Owing to the histopathological confirmation of precancerous state of tissue, 4-?m-thick sections of tissue were taken from paraffin-embedded wax blocks for immunohistochemical staining for EGFR. Results. All the control cases showed positive expression for EGFR, while 20% of oral leukoplakia and 40% of OSMF cases showed strong expression (3+), 40% of OL and 30% of OSMF cases showed weak expression (2+), and 40% of OLand 30% of OSMF cases showed poor expression (1+) compared to controls (P=0.012). Conclusion. EGFR expression levels in the premalignant lesion appear to be a sensitive factor in predicting the neoplastic potential. This suggests that EGFR may serve as a biological marker to identify high-risk subgroups and guide prophylactic therapy with chemopreventive drugs or surgical intervention to prevent progression to carcinoma. Hence, further investigations in the direction of chemopreventive trials with a larger sample size are suggested to determine its role in the head and neck tumorigenesis. PMID:26697149

  3. Frequent gene deletions in potentially malignant oral lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Emilion, G.; Langdon, J. D.; Speight, P.; Partridge, M.

    1996-01-01

    Some oral cancers are preceded by premalignant lesions which include leucoplakia and erythroplakia. At present there are no reliable markers to identify lesions that may progress to malignancy. We have analysed 30 potentially malignant oral lesions for deletions at chromosomal regions that harbour tumour-suppressor genes for oral cancer. A total of 16 of 30 cases (53%) showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) or allele imbalance at TP53, DCC, 3p21.3-22.1 or 3p12.1-13. These genetic alterations were detected in dysplastic lesions but not in histologically normal mucosa and may be early events in the carcinogenic process. A total of 64% of dysplastic lesions that recurred during the study showed LOH or allele imbalance in the initial biopsy and the number of genetic abnormalities increased in the tumours that developed. This type of molecular profiling may help to identify patients with lesions that may recur or acquire additional genetic events and progress to malignancy. Images Figure 2 PMID:8611386

  4. Malignant transformation of oral potentially malignant disorders in males: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Oral squamous cell carcinoma could be preceded by clinically evident oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs). Transformation of OPMDs to cancer has been studied in several population groups. It is difficult to undertake comparisons across populations due to variations in the methods of computation of malignancy rates among different studies. The aim of our study was to estimate the rate of malignant transformation of OPMDs taking into account the duration of follow-up and to identify the significant factors indicative of malignant potential. Methods A total of 148 male patients with OPMDs were included. They were selected among all consecutive subjects registered at the maxillofacial clinic at a medical hospital in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. The mean follow up period was 37.8 months. Results The malignant transformation rate was highest in subjects diagnosed with oral epithelial dysplasia. In this group the transformation rate was 7.62 per 100 persons-year. The rate in the group with verrucous hyperplasia (VH) was 5.21 per 100 persons-year, and in those with hyperkeratosis or epithelial hyperplasia was 3.26 per 100 persons-year. The anatomical site of OPMDs was the only statistically significant variable associated with malignancy. The hazard rate ratio (HRR) was 2.41 times for tongue lesions when compared with buccal lesions. Conclusion The reported discrepancies of malignant transformation of OPMDs involve the follow-up time to cancer development and hence it is preferable to use a time-to-event estimation for comparisons. We found that malignant transformation of OPMDs involving the tongue was significantly higher than in other anatomical subsites after adjusting for the clinicopathological type or lifestyle factors at diagnosis. PMID:19640311

  5. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders in Indian Population.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Debnath, Nitai; Ismail, Mohammed B; Kumar, Arunoday; Kumar, Amit; Badiyani, Bhumika K; Dubey, Pavan K; Sukhtankar, Laxmi V

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the prevalence of oral potentially malignant disorders and to determine the potential risk factors for its development in Indian population. Materials and Methods. This cross-sectional study was carried out on 1241 individuals in Indore, Madhya Pradesh. A questionnaire was designed to record information about sociodemographic characteristics, oral hygiene practices, dietary habits, and risk factors for oral potentially malignant disorders. Oral mucosal lesions were examined by a skilled person. Results. The overall prevalence of oral potentially malignant disorders was found to be 13.7% with oral submucous fibrosis (8.06%) found to be more common and erythroplakia (0.24%) found to be least prevalent. Results of Logistic Regression analysis showed that males (OR = 2.09, P value < 0.0001) who were ever consumers of tobacco (OR = 2.06, P value = 0.030) and areca nut chewing (OR = 2.64, P value = 0.004) were more likely to develop oral potentially malignant disorders compared to never consumers. Diabetic (OR = 2.21, P value = 0.014) and underweight individuals (OR = 2.23, P value = 0.007) were more likely to suffer from oral potentially malignant disorders. Conclusion. The study reinforces the association of tobacco and areca nut consumption with oral potentially malignant disorders. An association of oral potentially malignant disorders with diabetes and BMI was confirmed by this study. PMID:26347822

  6. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders in Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Debnath, Nitai; Ismail, Mohammed B.; Kumar, Arunoday; Kumar, Amit; Badiyani, Bhumika K.; Dubey, Pavan K.; Sukhtankar, Laxmi V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the prevalence of oral potentially malignant disorders and to determine the potential risk factors for its development in Indian population. Materials and Methods. This cross-sectional study was carried out on 1241 individuals in Indore, Madhya Pradesh. A questionnaire was designed to record information about sociodemographic characteristics, oral hygiene practices, dietary habits, and risk factors for oral potentially malignant disorders. Oral mucosal lesions were examined by a skilled person. Results. The overall prevalence of oral potentially malignant disorders was found to be 13.7% with oral submucous fibrosis (8.06%) found to be more common and erythroplakia (0.24%) found to be least prevalent. Results of Logistic Regression analysis showed that males (OR = 2.09, P value < 0.0001) who were ever consumers of tobacco (OR = 2.06, P value = 0.030) and areca nut chewing (OR = 2.64, P value = 0.004) were more likely to develop oral potentially malignant disorders compared to never consumers. Diabetic (OR = 2.21, P value = 0.014) and underweight individuals (OR = 2.23, P value = 0.007) were more likely to suffer from oral potentially malignant disorders. Conclusion. The study reinforces the association of tobacco and areca nut consumption with oral potentially malignant disorders. An association of oral potentially malignant disorders with diabetes and BMI was confirmed by this study. PMID:26347822

  7. Expression of p63 in potentially malignant and malignant oral lesions

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Anju; Chandra, Shaleen; Raj, Vineet; Zaidi, Iram; Saxena, Shikha; Dwivedi, Ruby

    2015-01-01

    Background p63, a member of p53 family, known to be expressed in embryonic tissues and basal regenerative layers of many epithelial tissues in the adult, is also expressed in various benign and malignant lesions of body including lesions of oral cavity. To evaluate the expression of p63 and compare the expression qualitatively and quantitatively in normal buccal mucosa, epithelial dysplasia, oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF), and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Methods The study material consisted of 45 archival cases which were divided into Group I with 5 cases of normal buccal mucosa, Group II with 15 cases of epithelial dysplasia, and Group III with 10 cases of OSMF and 15 cases of OSCC. Immunohistochemical expression of p63 was assessed by using mean, standard deviation, and analysis of variance. Results Overexpression of p63 was seen in epithelial dysplasia, OSMF, and squamous cell carcinoma with an increased suprabasal expression in cases of epithelial dysplasia. The mean labeling index (LI) of p63 was found to be in increasing order from normal oral mucosa (33.75%), OSMF (57.37%), epithelial dysplasia (63.87%) to squamous cell carcinoma (69.76%). Conclusion The results suggest a possible role of p63 in oral carcinogenesis, and an increased LI as well as increased suprabasal expression of this gene in dysplastic lesions may have a potential to be utilized as a marker for premalignancy. PMID:26605141

  8. Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders: An Overview of More than 20 Entities

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Hamed; Baharvand, Maryam; Mehdipour, Masoumeh

    2014-01-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity accounts for approximately 3% of all malignancies diagnosed annually in 270,000 patients world-wide. Oral cancer is the 12th most common cancer in women and the 6th in men. Many oral squamous cell carcinomas develop from potentially malignant disorders (PMDs). Lack of awareness about the signs and symptoms of oralPMDs in the general population and even healthcare providers is believed to be responsible for the diagnostic delay of these entities. The aim of this article is to update and improve the knowledge of healthcare providers about oral PMDs. PMID:25024833

  9. Ability of Dental Students in Spain to Identify Potentially Malignant Disorders and Oral Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cerero-Lapiedra, Rocío; Esparza-Gómez, Germán C; Casado-de la Cruz, Laura; Domínguez-Gordillo, Adelaida A; Corral-Linaza, César; Seoane-Romero, Juan M

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the ability of students at the School of Dentistry, Complutense University of Madrid, Spain, to diagnose oral cancer and other potentially malignant disorders, as well as to compare their ability at different stages of the learning process and evaluate their knowledge retention. Students were surveyed after they had studied oral medicine and oral pathology at two time points: midway through and near the end of their studies. The survey consisted of questions about 40 photographs of benign oral lesions, malignant oral lesions, and potentially malignant disorders. The response rate for all groups was greater than 70%. The results showed that these students' overall success rate in differentiating benign from malignant lesions averaged 73.9%. When the distinction for potentially malignant disorders was included, their average overall success rate decreased to 42.8% (p<0.001). Furthermore, the students' average success rate was at its lowest at the end of the dental program (p<0.001). Results from this study suggest that, given these students' difficulties in identifying potentially malignant disorders, an increased emphasis on cancer education in the dental curriculum may be needed for future practitioners to master this ability. PMID:26246535

  10. Oral potentially malignant disorders: A proposal for terminology and definition with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Sarode, Sachin C; Sarode, Gargi S; Tupkari, Jagdish V

    2014-01-01

    Several attempts to produce internationally accepted terminologies and definitions of ‘oral precancer’ have appeared in the literature. World Health Organizations (WHO) in 1972 subdivided ‘precancer’ into ‘lesions’ and ‘conditions’ with their definitions. Recent working group of WHO is not in favor of such subdivision and recommended the use of the term ‘oral potentially malignant disorder (OPMD)’. This is mainly attributed to the recent advancement in molecular and genetic aspects of ‘oral precancer’. But efforts to define OPMDs are few in the literature. ‘Oral precancer’ is ultimately colligated to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). With this semantics in mind, different OPMD and related terminologies in the literature used till date with their lexicographic analysis have been reviewed in the present paper. Attempt has also been made to propose desirable terminology and definition which suits to the current concept of OPMD. The proposed terminology and definition is based on the authors’ opinions with a hope for further suggestions from readers. PMID:25364185

  11. Prevalence of potentially malignant oral mucosal lesions among tobacco users in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Attas, Safia Ali; Ibrahim, Suzan Seif; Amer, Hala Abbas; Darwish, Zeinab El-Said; Hassan, Mona Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Smoking is recognized as a health problem worldwide and there is an established tobacco epidemic in Saudi Arabia as in many other countries, with tobacco users at increased risk of developing many diseases. This cross sectional study was conducted to assess the prevalence of oral mucosal, potentially malignant or malignant, lesions associated with tobacco use among a stratified cluster sample of adults in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. A sample size of 599 was collected and each participant underwent clinical conventional oral examination and filled a questionnaire providing information on demographics, tobacco use and other relevant habits. The most common form of tobacco used was cigarette smoking (65.6 %) followed by Shisha or Moasel (38.1%), while chewing tobacco, betel nuts and gat accounted for 21-2%, 7.7%, and 5% respectively. A high prevalence (88.8%) of soft tissue lesions was found among the tobacco users examined, and a wide range of lesions were detected, about 50% having hairy tongue, 36% smoker's melanosis, 28.9% stomatitis nicotina, 27% frictional keratosis, 26.7% fissured tongue, 26% gingival or periodontal inflammation and finally 20% leukodema. Suspicious potentially malignant lesions affected 10.5% of the subjects, most prevalent being keratosis (6.3%), leukoplakia (2.3%), erythroplakia (0.7%), oral submucous fibrosis (0.5%) and lichenoid lesions (0.4%), these being associated with male gender, lower level of education, presence of diabetes and a chewing tobacco habit. It is concluded that smoking was associated with a wide range of oral mucosal lesions , those suspicious for malignancy being linked with chewable forms, indicating serious effects. PMID:24568491

  12. Longitudinal evaluation of patients with oral potentially malignant disorders using optical imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Richard A.; Pierce, Mark C.; Mondrik, Sharon; Gao, Wen; Quinn, Mary K.; Bhattar, Vijayashree; Williams, Michelle D.; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2012-02-01

    Dysplastic and cancerous alterations in oral tissue can be detected noninvasively in vivo using optical techniques including autofluorescence imaging, high-resolution imaging, and spectroscopy. Interim results are presented from a longitudinal study in which optical imaging and spectroscopy were used to evaluate the progression of lesions over time in patients at high risk for development of oral cancer. Over 100 patients with oral potentially malignant disorders have been enrolled in the study to date. Areas of concern in the oral cavity are measured using widefield autofluorescence imaging and depth-sensitive optical spectroscopy during successive clinical visits. Autofluorescence intensity patterns and autofluorescence spectra are tracked over time and correlated with clinical observations. Patients whose lesions progress and who undergo surgery are also measured in the operating room immediately prior to surgery using autofluorescence imaging and spectroscopy, with the addition of intraoperative high-resolution imaging to characterize nuclear size, nuclear crowding, and tissue architecture at selected sites. Optical measurements are compared to histopathology results from biopsies and surgical specimens collected from the measured sites. Autofluorescence imaging and spectroscopy measurements are continued during post-surgery followup visits. We examined correlations between clinical impression and optical classification over time with an average followup period of 4 months. The data collected to date suggest that multimodal optical techniques may aid in noninvasive monitoring of the progression of oral premalignant lesions, biopsy site selection, and accurate delineation of lesion extent during surgery.

  13. Fibrotic Effects of Arecoline N-Oxide in Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tzer-Min; Luo, Shun-Yuan; Chiang, Shang-Lun; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Hsu, Hui-Ting; Wu, Cheng-Tien; Lu, Chi-Yu; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Ko, Ying-Chin

    2015-06-24

    The metabolites of environmental chemicals play key roles in carcinogenesis. Areca nut is strongly associated with the development of oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) or cancer. The main alkaloid in the areca nut is arecoline, which is highly cytotoxic and genotoxic. Arecoline N-oxide, a metabolite of areca nut alkaloids, which has been identified in animal urine, has been shown to induce mutagenicity in bacteria. In this study, it was found that its protein adduct could be detected in oral keratinocytes treated with areca nut extract. Increased collagen expression and severity of squamous hyperplasia were observed in arecoline N-oxide treated mice. In cultured oral fibroblasts, arecoline N-oxide showed stronger effects on the increase of fibrotic related genes including TGF-beta1, S100A4, MMP-9, IL-6, and fibronectin and a decrease of E-cadherin as compared with arecoline. Finally, arecoline N-oxide stimulation effectively increased the DNA damage marker, gamma-H2A.X, both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, these results indicate that arecoline N-oxide shows a high potential for the induction of OPMD. PMID:26061808

  14. Fluorescence spectroscopy for the detection of potentially malignant disorders of the oral cavity: analysis of 30 cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco, A. L. N.; Correr, W. R.; Azevedo, L. H.; Galletta, V. K.; Pinto, C. A. L.; Kowalski, L. P.; Kurachi, C.

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancer is a major health problem worldwide and although early diagnosis of potentially malignant and malignant diseases is associated with better treatment results, a large number of cancers are initially misdiagnosed, with unfortunate consequences for long-term survival. Fluorescence spectroscopy is a noninvasive modality of diagnostic approach using induced fluorescence emission in tumors that can improve diagnostic accuracy. The objective of this study was to determine the ability to discriminate between normal oral mucosa and potentially malignant disorders by fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence investigation under 408 and 532 nm excitation wavelengths was performed on 60 subjects, 30 with potentially malignant disorders and 30 volunteers with normal mucosa. Data was analyzed to correlate fluorescence patterns with clinical and histopathological diagnostics. Fluorescence spectroscopy used as a point measurement technique resulted in a great variety of spectral information. In a qualitative analysis of the fluorescence spectral characteristics of each type of injury evaluated, it was possible to discriminate between normal and abnormal oral mucosa. The results show the potential use of fluorescence spectroscopy for an improved discrimination of oral disorders.

  15. Potential of optical coherence tomography for early diagnosis of oral malignancies

    PubMed Central

    DeCoro, Michael; Wilder-Smith, Petra

    2014-01-01

    With nearly 1,500,000 new patients diagnosed every year in the USA, cancer poses a considerable challenge to healthcare today. Oral cancer is responsible for a sizeable portion of deaths due to cancer, primarily because it is diagnosed at a late stage when the prognosis is poor. Current methods for diagnosing oral cancer need to be augmented by better early detection, monitoring and screening modalities. A new approach is needed that provides real-time, accurate, noninvasive diagnosis. The results of early clinical trials using in vivo optical coherence tomography for the diagnosis of oral dysplasia and malignancy are encouraging. PMID:20214513

  16. Immunoexpression of tenascin as a predictor of the malignancy potential of oral leukoplakia associated with a tobacco habit.

    PubMed

    Mane, D R; Bhat, K; Kale, A D; Hallikerimath, S

    2015-10-01

    Oral leukoplakia is a morphological alteration of tissue that is an early indicator for malignancy. Tenascin (TN) is a large hexameric extracellular matrix (ECM) protein with anti-adhesive properties that fosters cell migration during development, wound healing and tissue remodeling; it is present in small amounts in adult tissues. Overexpression of TN in a pathological condition may be either a cause or a consequence of the disease. We evaluated the efficacy of TN for early prediction of tobacco-associated oral cancers. We studied retrospectively 95 cases of oral leukoplakia, including mild, moderate and severe cases, using immunohistochemistry for TN. We evaluated the intensity, area and pattern of TN expression. Greater intensity and area of TN expression was observed in mild and severe dysplasia than in moderate dysplasia. Most cases showed a reticular pattern of expression, especially in mild and moderate dysplasia; a fibrillar pattern was more evident in severe dysplasia. We also observed homogeneous expression pattern in some cases. TN is a marker for dysplastic changes in epithelium and its expression may be helpful for predicting the malignancy potential of tobacco-associated oral leukoplakia. PMID:25839195

  17. Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF-2) and Its Receptors FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 May Be Putative Biomarkers of Malignant Transformation of Potentially Malignant Oral Lesions into Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Seema; Goel, Madhu Mati; Makker, Annu; Bhatia, Vikram; Chandra, Saumya; Kumar, Sandeep; Agarwal, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    There are several factors like angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, genetic alterations, mutational factors that are involved in malignant transformation of potentially malignant oral lesions (PMOLs) to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) is one of the prototypes of the large family of growth factors that bind heparin. FGF-2 induces angiogenesis and its receptors may play a role in synthesis of collagen. FGFs are involved in transmission of signals between the epithelium and connective tissue, and influence growth and differentiation of a wide variety of tissue including epithelia. The present study was undertaken to analyze expression of FGF-2 and its receptors FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 in 72 PMOLs, 108 OSCC and 52 healthy controls, and their role in risk assessment for malignant transformation of Leukoplakia (LKP) and Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) to OSCC. Immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies against FGF-2, FGFR-2 and FGFR-3. IHC results were validated by Real Time PCR. Expression of FGF-2, FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 was upregulated from PMOLs to OSCC. While 90% (9/10) of PMOLs which showed malignant transformation (transformed) expressed FGF-2, only 24.19% cases (15/62) of PMOLs which were not transformed (untransformed) to OSCC expressed FGF-2. Similarly, FGFR-2 expression was seen in 16/62 (25.81%) of untransformed PMOLs and 8/10 (80%) cases of transformed PMOLs. FGFR-3 expression was observed in 23/62 (37.10%) cases of untransformed PMOLs and 6/10 (60%) cases of transformed PMOLs. A significant association of FGF-2 and FGFR-2 expression with malignant transformation from PMOLs to OSCC was observed both at phenotypic and molecular level. The results suggest that FGF-2 and FGFR-2 may be useful as biomarkers of malignant transformation in patients with OSMF and LKP. PMID:26465941

  18. Leukoplakia: A short review on malignant potential

    PubMed Central

    Masthan, K. M. K.; Babu, N. Aravindha; Sankari, S. Leena; Priyadharsini, C.

    2015-01-01

    Oral leukoplakia is one of the most common potentially malignant disorders. Right diagnosis of potentially malignant disorders may help to prevent these lesions from malignant transformation. Proper understanding, recognizing, identification and differentiating these lesions from normal mucosa are necessary for proper treatment. PMID:26015699

  19. Correlated analysis of semi-quantitative immunohistochemical features of E-cadherin, VEGF and CD105 in assessing malignant potentiality of oral submucous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Anura, Anji; Das, Raunak Kumar; Pal, Mousumi; Paul, Ranjan Rashmi; Ray, Ajoy Kumar; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy

    2014-12-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis, a potentially premalignant condition for oral squamous cell carcinoma, manifests both non-dysplastic and dysplastic grades. Early and specific identification of its malignant potentiality suffers from diagnostic limitations that may be addressed by correlated molecular pathology attributes having histopathological backdrop. Present study correlates expressional alteration in prime epithelial marker E-cadherin, with neo-angiogenic molecules viz. VEGF and CD105 for elucidation of malignant potentiality in different stages of oral submucous fibrosis. Sixty-eight incision biopsies from normal oral mucosa (n = 10), non-dysplastic (n = 18) and different dysplastic grades (n = 40) of oral submucous fibrosis were semi-quantitatively analyzed for immunohistochemical expressions of E-cadherin (membranous and cytoplasmic), VEGF and CD105 which were further statistically correlated. The loss of membranous E-cadherin with increase in cytoplasmic accumulation in differentiative layers of epithelium through the progression of dysplasia was noted along with up-regulation in VEGF expressions. The number of CD105(+) blood vessels and their major axis also showed significant increase from non-dysplasia toward higher grades of dysplasia. The positive correlation between deregulated expression of epithelial cell-cell adhesion molecule and increase in neo-angiogenic attributes of oral submucous fibrosis with increase in dysplastic grades indicated elucidatory potential of molecular expression features in assessment of malignant potentiality in oral submucous fibrosis. PMID:25015036

  20. Between-Lesion Discrepancies in Terms of Dysplasia, Cell Turnover and Diagnosis in Patients with Multiple Potentially Malignant Oral Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lucio, Montebugnoli; Andrea, Gabusi; Bartolomeo, Gissi Davide; Fabio, Cervellati; Dora, Servidio

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The present study assessed patients with multiple oral lesions to evaluate the mis-estimation rate in terms of diagnosis and risk of malignant transformation when only one biopsy is performed. Study Design: Thirty-five patients presenting at least two white and/or red lesions in different oral mucosa sites with a final diagnosis of leuko/erythroplakias or lichenoid lesions were included, for a total of 70 biopsies. Results: Nineteen patients (54%) had at least one between-lesion discrepancy considering the presence/absence of dysplasia (10 patients), normal/high cell turnover (13 patients) or diagnosis (5 patients). Discrepancies were not related to clinical aspect or within-patient similarity of lesions. Conclusions: Multiple oral lesions in the same patient can significantly differ in terms of dysplasia, high cell turnover and, even diagnosis. Multiple biopsies are imperative and diagnosis as well as risk of malignant transformation should be formulated for each single lesion rather than for each individual patient. PMID:24363787

  1. Noninvasive imaging of oral premalignancy and malignancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Krasieva, T.; Jung, W.; You, J. S.; Chen, Z.; Osann, K.; Tromberg, B.

    2005-04-01

    Objectives: Early detection of cancer and its curable precursors remains the best way to ensure patient survival and quality of life. Despite significant advances in treatment, oral cancer still results in 10,000 U.S. deaths annually, mainly due to the late detection of most oral lesions. Specific aim was to use a combination of non-invasive optical in vivo technologies to test a multi-modality approach to non-invasive diagnostics of oral premalignancy and malignancy. Methods: In the hamster cheek pouch model (120 hamsters), in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical Doppler tomography (ODT) mapped epithelial, subepithelial and vascular change throughout carcinogenesis in specific, marked sites. In vivo multi-wavelength multi-photon (MPM) and second harmonic generated (SHG) fluorescence techniques provided parallel data on surface and subsurface tissue structure, specifically collagen presence and structure, cellular presence, and vasculature. Images were diagnosed by 2 blinded, pre-standardized investigators using a standardized scale from 0-6 for all modalities. After sacrifice, histopathological sections were prepared and pathology evaluated on a scale of 0-6. ANOVA techniques compared imaging diagnostics with histopathology. 95% confidence limits of the sensitivity and specificity were established for the diagnostic capability of OCT/ODT+ MPM/SHG using ROC curves and kappa statistics. Results: Imaging data were reproducibly obtained with good accuracy. Carcinogenesis-related structural and vascular changes were clearly visible to tissue depths of 2mm. Sensitivity (OCT/ODT alone: 71-88%; OCT+MPM/SHG: 79-91%) and specificity (OCT alone: 62-83%;OCT+MPM/SHG: 67-90%) compared well with conventional techniques. Conclusions: OCT/ODT and MPM/SHG are promising non-invasive in vivo diagnostic modalities for oral dysplasia and malignancy. Supported by CRFA 30003, CCRP 00-01391V-20235, NIH (LAMMP) RR01192, DOE DE903-91ER 61227, NIH EB-00293 CA91717, NSF BES-86924, AFOSR FA 9550-04-1-0101.

  2. Malignant conversion of oral submucous fibrosis in surgically treated case.

    PubMed

    Arora, Rajendra; Adwani, Dwarkadas; Naphade, Milind; Bhagat, Bhushan; Qureshi, Abdul Qahar

    2014-10-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is an insidious chronic disease affecting any part of the oral cavity and sometimes the pharynx with epithelial atrophy leading to stiffness of the oral mucosa, causing trismus and inability to eat. However a more serious complication of this disease is the risk of the development of oral carcinoma. We reported the histopathologically proven case of OSMF with initial interincisal mouth opening 2mm which was treated surgically with nasolabial flap technique but failed to follow up and could not do active mouth opening exercises. Malignant conversion of OSMF was seen in this case. This is required to assess the progress and evaluate any malignant transformation at the earliest. So, the importance of active co-operation and frequent follow up cannot be overemphasized. The purpose of this study is to emphasize the importance of regular follow up and frequent biopsies to facilitate oral examination and to check any malignant conversion after the surgery. PMID:25478469

  3. Malignant Conversion of Oral Submucous Fibrosis in Surgically Treated Case

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Rajendra; Adwani, Dwarkadas; Naphade, Milind; Qureshi, Abdul Qahar

    2014-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is an insidious chronic disease affecting any part of the oral cavity and sometimes the pharynx with epithelial atrophy leading to stiffness of the oral mucosa, causing trismus and inability to eat. However a more serious complication of this disease is the risk of the development of oral carcinoma. We reported the histopathologically proven case of OSMF with initial interincisal mouth opening 2mm which was treated surgically with nasolabial flap technique but failed to follow up and could not do active mouth opening exercises. Malignant conversion of OSMF was seen in this case. This is required to assess the progress and evaluate any malignant transformation at the earliest. So, the importance of active co-operation and frequent follow up cannot be overemphasized. The purpose of this study is to emphasize the importance of regular follow up and frequent biopsies to facilitate oral examination and to check any malignant conversion after the surgery. PMID:25478469

  4. Oral malignant melanoma: Report of three cases with literature review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shalini; Tandon, Ankita; Ram, Hari; Gupta, O. P.

    2015-01-01

    Primary oral melanoma is known to be an extremely rare and aggressive neoplasm arising from the mucosal epithelium of the oral cavity especially upper jaw (palate or alveolar gingivae). Malignant melanoma that does not originate in the skin is a very rare disease and is considered one of the most deadly of all human neoplasms. Oral malignant melanoma (OMM) represents about 1% of all melanomas and approximately 0.5% of all oral malignancies. OMM has been reported in patients aged 20 to 80 years and has a male predilection. Because most mucosal melanotic lesions are painless in their early stages, so delayed recognition and subsequent treatment result in worst prognosis. Here, we report three cases with significant heterogeneity in morphological features and biologic behavior.

  5. Methylation-Mediated Molecular Dysregulation in Clinical Oral Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Towle, Rebecca; Garnis, Cathie

    2012-01-01

    Herein we provide a concise review of the state of methylation research as it pertains to clinical oral cancerous and precancerous tissues. We provide context for ongoing research efforts in this field and describe technologies that are presently being applied to analyze clinical specimens. We also discuss the various recurrent methylation changes that have been reported for oral malignancy (including those genes frequently silenced by promoter methylation and the small RNAs with activity modulated by methylation changes) and describe surrogate disease markers identified via epigenetic analysis of saliva and blood specimens from patients with oral cancer. PMID:22645611

  6. Marked variation in malignant transformation rates of oral leukoplakia.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Aisling; Ishak, Nurul

    2015-12-01

    Data sourcesSearches were carried out in the Medline, Embase and PubMed databases in July 2014 with a date range, 1960-2013.Study selectionObservational cohort studies (either prospective or retrospective) were included. Studies following identical cohorts, case control studies, clinical trials, interventional studies, laboratory studies, experimental studies, studies with no follow-up data, studies of pre-leukoplakia or snuff-induced lesions were excluded.Data extraction and synthesisThe databases were searched by one reviewer who also screened the studies and evaluated them against the inclusion criteria. Final decision on both inclusion and exclusion of the papers was agreed upon by both authors.ResultsA total of 24 studies were included in this review, involving 12,103 patients. Of the 24 studies included 14 were retrospective. Studies were analysed by subgroup, allowing the authors to identify the rate of malignant transformation as 14.9% with a range of 0.13% to 34%. Only 11 studies gave information on the site of malignant transformation; the most common site was the buccal mucosa. For buccal mucosa the malignant transformation was 3.53%, compared to 24.22% for the tongue. Homogenous oral leukoplakia (OL) was most common, however non-homogenous types showed a higher rate of transformation of 13.1%. There was an increased risk of malignant transformation with age. Most studies demonstrated that there is a higher risk of transformation in the female population.ConclusionsMalignant transformation rate of OL varies from 0.13 to 34% across the 24 studies reviewed here. The authors identified clear risk factors for malignant transformation of oral leukoplakia, including location (tongue), appearance (non-homogenous), increased age and female gender. There was little evidence that surgical intervention had any benefit in reducing the risk of transformation. PMID:26680515

  7. Detection of galectins during malignant transformation of oral cells

    PubMed Central

    Hossaka, Thais A; Focchi, Gustavo R; Oshima, Celina T F; Ribeiro, Daniel A

    2013-01-01

    Oral cancer is a common neoplasm world-wide. The incidence and mortality have increased over the past decades. It is characterized by poor prognosis and a low survival rate despite sophisticated surgical and radiotherapeutic modalities. Galectins are detected in a wide variety of tissues. The expression of galectins is modulated during the differentiation of individual cells and during the development of organisms and tissues, being altered in different physiological or pathological conditions including, carcinogenesis. In this review, we will discuss the role of galectins during the malignant transformation of oral cells, in order to understand their mechanisms of the action in a several cellular activities and test systems. Certainly, such information will contribute for understanding oral cancer pathogenesis. PMID:24130575

  8. Oral bacterial community dynamics in paediatric patients with malignancies in relation to chemotherapy-related oral mucositis: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Y; Carlsson, G; Agholme, M Barr; Wilson, J A L; Roos, A; Henriques-Normark, B; Engstrand, L; Modéer, T; Pütsep, K; Raoult, D

    2013-01-01

    The role of oral bacteria in the development of chemotherapy-related oral mucositis has not been fully elucidated. This study aimed to investigate oral bacterial community diversity and dynamics in paediatric patients with malignancies in relation to the occurrence of oral mucositis. Patients with malignancies (n = 37) and reference individuals without known systemic disorders (n = 38) were recruited. For patients, oral bacterial samples were taken from mucosal surfaces both at the time of malignancy diagnosis and during chemotherapy. If oral mucositis occurred, samples were taken from the surface of the mucositis lesions. Oral mucosal bacterial samples were also taken from reference individuals. All samples were assessed using a 16S ribosomal RNA gene 454 pyrosequencing method. A lower microbial diversity (p < 0.01) and a higher intersubject variability (p < 0.001) were found in patients as compared with reference individuals. At the time of malignancy diagnosis (i.e. before chemotherapy) patients that later developed mucositis showed a higher microbial diversity (p < 0.05) and a higher intersubject variability (p < 0.001) compared with those without mucositis. The change of bacterial composition during chemotherapy was more pronounced in patients who later developed mucositis than those without mucositis (p < 0.01). In conclusion, we found a higher microbial diversity at the time of malignancy diagnosis in patients who later develop oral mucositis and that these patients had a more significant modification of the bacterial community by chemotherapy before the occurrence of mucositis. These findings may possibly be of clinical importance in developing better strategies for personalized preventive management. PMID:23829394

  9. The wonderous chaperones: A highlight on therapeutics of cancer and potentially malignant disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Nutan; Tyagi, Rishi

    2015-01-01

    Diverse environmental and physiological factors are known to induce the transcription of a set of genes encoding special protective molecules known as “molecular chaperones” within our cells. Literature abounds in evidence regarding the varied roles; these “guides” can effectively perform in our system. Highly conserved through evolution, from the prokaryotes to the eukaryotes, these make perfect study tools for verifying their role in both the pathogenesis as well as the therapeutics of varied neurodegenerative, autoimmune and potentially malignant disorders and varied cancer states. We present a concise review of this ever dynamic molecule, highlighting the probable role in a potentially malignant disorder, oral lichen planus. PMID:26604499

  10. Alcohol metabolism by oral streptococci and interaction with human papillomavirus leads to malignant transformation of oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Tao, Lin; Pavlova, Sylvia I; Gasparovich, Stephen R; Jin, Ling; Schwartz, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Poor oral hygiene, ethanol consumption, and human papillomavirus (HPV) are associated with oral and esophageal cancers. However, the mechanism is not fully known. This study examines alcohol metabolism in Streptococcus and its interaction with HPV-16 in the malignant transformation of oral keratinocytes. The acetaldehyde-producing strain Streptococcus gordonii V2016 was analyzed for adh genes and activities of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases. Streptococcus attachment to immortalized HPV-16 infected human oral keratinocytes, HOK (HPV/HOK-16B), human oral buccal keratinocytes, and foreskin keratinocytes was studied. Acetaldehyde, malondialdehyde, DNA damage, and abnormal proliferation among keratinocytes were also quantified. We found that S. gordonii V2016 expressed three primary alcohol dehydrogenases, AdhA, AdhB, and AdhE, which all oxidize ethanol to acetaldehyde, but their preferred substrates were 1-propanol, 1-butanol, and ethanol, respectively. S. gordonii V2016 did not show a detectable aldehyde dehydrogenase. AdhE is the major alcohol dehydrogenase in S. gordonii. Acetaldehyde and malondialdehyde production from permissible Streptococcus species significantly increased the bacterial attachment to keratinocytes, which was associated with an enhanced expression of furin to facilitate HPV infection and several malignant phenotypes including acetaldehyde adduct formation, abnormal proliferation, and enhanced migration through integrin-coated basement membrane by HPV-infected oral keratinocytes. Therefore, expression of multiple alcohol dehydrogenases with no functional aldehyde dehydrogenase contributes to excessive production of acetaldehyde from ethanol by oral streptococci. Oral Streptococcus species and HPV may cooperate to transform oral keratinocytes after ethanol exposure. These results suggest a significant clinical interaction, but further validation is warranted. PMID:25427911

  11. Mast Cells and Angiogenesis in Oral Malignant and Premalignant Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Michailidou, E.Z; Markopoulos, A.K; Antoniades, D.Z

    2008-01-01

    Mast cell contribution to neoangiogenesis during tumorigenesis in oral squamous cell carcinoma is not determined yet. Objectives: To associate numerical mast cell density (MCD) to numerical microvessel density (MVD) during the progression of oral leukoplakia without dysplasia and leukoplakia with dysplasia to squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Materials and methods: MVD was analysed immunohistochemically (mouse monoclonal anti-human CD34) in 49 paraffin-embedded specimens, 35 OSCCs, 9 leukoplakias and 5 normal oral tissues. Toluidine blue counterstaining revealed mast cells. MCD and MVD were assessed at the same optical field. Results: MVD increased between: normal oral mucosa, dysplasia (p=0.004), OSCC (p=0.001), leukoplakia and OSCC (p=0.041). MCD increased between: normal oral mucosa, dysplasia (p=0.003), OSCC (p=0.000), leukoplakia and OSCC (p=0.007). MVD was found to depend on MCD (p=0.000) in a percent 28.3% (power curve fit model). Conclusions: Mast cells are attracted at the lesion site and may turn on an angiogenic switch during tumorigenesis in OSCC. PMID:19444318

  12. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging to investigate cell metabolism in malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rück, Angelika; Hauser, Carmen; Mosch, Simone; Kalinina, Sviatlana

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence-guided diagnosis of tumor tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results interfere with the outcome. Improvement through observation of cell metabolism might offer the solution, but needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. With respect to this, spectrally resolved multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging was investigated to analyze cell metabolism in metabolic phenotypes of malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells. The time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of NADH were measured in cells of different origins. The fluorescence lifetime of bound and free NADH was calculated from biexponential fitting of the fluorescence intensity decay within different spectral regions. The mean lifetime was increased from nonmalignant oral mucosa cells to different squamous carcinoma cells, where the most aggressive cells showed the longest lifetime. In correlation with reports in the literature, the total amount of NADH seemed to be less for the carcinoma cells and the ratio of free/bound NADH was decreased from nonmalignant to squamous carcinoma cells. Moreover for squamous carcinoma cells a high concentration of bound NADH was found in cytoplasmic organelles (mainly mitochondria). This all together indicates that oxidative phosphorylation and a high redox potential play an important role in the energy metabolism of these cells.

  13. PTHrP promotes malignancy of human oral cancer cell downstream of the EGFR signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Tamaki; Tsuda, Masumi; Ohba, Yusuke Kawaguchi, Hideaki; Totsuka, Yasunori; Shindoh, Masanobu

    2008-04-11

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is detected in many aggressive tumors and involved in malignant conversion; however, the underlying mechanism remains obscure. Here, we identified PTHrP as a mediator of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling to promote the malignancies of oral cancers. PTHrP mRNA was abundantly expressed in most of the quiescent oral cancer cells, and was significantly upregulated by EGF stimulation via ERK and p38 MAPK. PTHrP silencing by RNA interference, as well as EGFR inhibitor AG1478 treatment, significantly suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and invasiveness. Furthermore, combined treatment of AG1478 and PTHrP knockdown achieved synergistic inhibition of malignant phenotypes. Recombinant PTHrP substantially promoted cell motility, and rescued the inhibition by PTHrP knockdown, suggesting the paracrine/autocrine function of PTHrP. These data indicate that PTHrP contributes to the malignancy of oral cancers downstream of EGFR signaling, and may thus provide a therapeutic target for oral cancer.

  14. Long-term survival in metastatic malignant struma ovarii treated with oral chemotherapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    UKITA, MASAYO; NAKAI, HIDEKATSU; KOTANI, YASUSHI; TOBIUME, TAKAKO; KOIKE, EIJI; TSUJI, ISAO; SUZUKI, AYAKO; MANDAI, MASAKI

    2014-01-01

    Malignant struma ovarii is a rare type of ovarian tumor. Metastasis from malignant struma ovarii is rare and has only been documented in 5–6% of cases. The natural history and optimal treatment strategy for malignant struma ovarii remains controversial due to its rarity. The current report presents the case of a 45-year-old female who presented with a tumor of the rib bone. Following resection, the postoperative diagnosis was a metastasizing thyroid carcinoma. No abnormality was detected in the thyroid gland, however, computed tomography revealed a tumor in the left ovary. The patient underwent a left salpingo-oophorectomy and a wedge resection of the right ovary. The postoperative diagnosis was determined as a mature cystic teratoma with malignant struma ovarii (thyroid type, follicular carcinoma) of the left ovary and mature cystic teratoma of the right ovary. Four years subsequent to the initial diagnosis, multiple lung metastases were detected. The following chemotherapies were administered sequentially and intermittently: Tegafur-uracil, paclitaxel/carboplatin and oral etoposide. During this period, the metastatic lesions extended into the bone and progressed slowly. The patient continues to survive with the disease and 24 years have passed since the initial diagnosis, 20 years following the diagnosis of multiple lung metastates. The present report describes a rare case of malignant struma ovarii in which surgical resection and pathological examination of a metastatic rib tumor resulted in the identification of the primary ovarian lesion. The clinical behavior of malignant struma ovarii does not necessarily indicate a histological malignancy, therefore, prediction of future metastasis is difficult and the optimal treatment strategy for malignant struma ovarii is controversial. The present case indicates that the long-term use of oral anticancer agents may facilitate the maintenance of tumor dormancy. PMID:25364407

  15. Tobacco use, Body Mass Index, and Potentially Malignant Disorders Among petrol fillers in Pimpri-Pune (India): A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Mamatha G. S.; Kakodkar, Pradnya V.; Singh, Akanksha

    2014-01-01

    Background: Since petrol is combustible and smoking is banned at the petrol pumps, it may be predicted that use of smokeless tobacco is more prevalent among the petrol fillers. Also, smokeless tobacco is a major risk factor for developing oral potentially malignant disorders. The present study was conducted to determine the tobacco use, body mass index (BMI), and potentially malignant disorders among a cohort of petrol fillers and also to evaluate the interaction of tobacco use and BMI with the presence of potentially malignant disorders. Settings and Design: The study was conducted at 45 petrol stations located at Pimpri-Pune, India. A descriptive study design was used. Materials and Method: Four hundred and ten petrol fillers aged 17-64 years participated in the study. General information and tobacco history was obtained by interview. Height and weight were recorded to obtain BMI. Oral examination was conducted to identify the potentially malignant disorders. Statistical analysis: Chi-square test, Z test, and logistic regression were used. The level of significance was fixed at 5%. Results and Conclusions: It was found that 242 (59.02%) used tobacco in different forms. 77.68% were tobacco chewers, and 8.26% were smokers. Leukoplakia was prevalent among 68.47%, oral submucous fibrosis among 27.45%, and 5.08% had erythroplakia. Age (?2 = 11.46, P < 0.05), duration (?2 = 17.46, P < 0.05), and frequency of tobacco chewing (?2 = 14.16, P < 0.05) were significantly associated with potentially malignant disorders. Tobacco chewing was more prevalent as compared to smoking. It can be concluded that the petrol fillers are at a high risk for developing oral potentially malignant disorders. PMID:25422802

  16. Translational approach utilizing COX-2, p53, and MDM2 expressions in malignant transformation of oral submucous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pratik N; Thennavan, Aatish; Sen, Subhalakshmi; Chandrashekar, Chetana; Radhakrishnan, Raghu

    2015-09-01

    About 20% of the world's population uses some form of betel nut, which suggests that the incidence of oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is higher than current estimates. OSF has the potential to undergo malignant transformation; thus, there is a need to identify relevant markers to assess its aggressiveness. We evaluated changes in COX-2, p53, and MDM2 expressions in progressive OSF. Expressions of COX-2, p53, and MDM2 increased with OSF progression. There was a strong association between COX-2 overexpression and recurrence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (P < 0.001) and a positive relation between increased MDM2 expression and failure of radiotherapy (P = 0.007). These findings suggest that COX-2 is an important marker of disease progression and that MDM2 expression is useful for treatment planning. PMID:26369479

  17. Outcomes of dogs undergoing radiotherapy for treatment of oral malignant melanoma: 111 cases (2006-2012).

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Mifumi; Mori, Takashi; Ito, Yusuke; Murakami, Mami; Sakai, Hiroki; Yanai, Tokuma; Maruo, Kohji

    2015-11-15

    Objective-To evaluate the characteristics and outcomes of dogs with stage I, II, III, or IV oral malignant melanoma treated by various types of radiotherapy. Design-Retrospective case series. Animals-111 dogs. Procedures-Medical records of dogs with oral malignant melanoma treated by radiotherapy (with or without adjunctive treatments) at a veterinary medical center between July 2006 and December 2012 were reviewed. Information regarding signalment, tumor location, disease stage, treatment protocols, adverse effects, and survival time were obtained from medical records and by telephone follow-up. Associations between variables of interest and outcome were analyzed. Results-Dogs received orthovoltage x-ray (n = 68), megavoltage x-ray (39), or electron beam (4) radiotherapy. Adjunctive treatments included debulking surgery (n = 18), chemotherapy (39), or both (27). Median survival times for dogs with stage I, II, III, and IV melanoma were 758 days (n = 19), 278 days (24), 163 days (37), and 80 days (31), respectively, and differed significantly between dogs with stage I disease and those with all other disease stages. Among dogs with stage III melanoma, risk of death was significantly higher in those that received orthovoltage x-ray treatment than in those that received megavoltage x-ray treatment. Severe (primary or secondary) adverse effects were identified in 9 dogs. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Median survival time was significantly longer for dogs with stage I oral malignant melanoma than for dogs with more advanced disease at the time of staging. The staging system used may be a useful tool for prognosis prediction in dogs undergoing similar treatment protocols for oral malignant melanomas. PMID:26517618

  18. Integrative metabonomics as potential method for diagnosis of thyroid malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuan; Nie, Xiu; Xu, Shan; Li, Yan; Huang, Tao; Tang, Huiru; Wang, Yulan

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid nodules can be classified into benign and malignant tumors. However, distinguishing between these two types of tumors can be challenging in clinics. Since malignant nodules require surgical intervention whereas asymptomatic benign tumors do not, there is an urgent need for new techniques that enable accurate diagnosis of malignant thyroid nodules. Here, we used 1H NMR spectroscopy coupled with pattern recognition techniques to analyze the metabonomes of thyroid tissues and their extracts from thyroid lesion patients (n?=?53) and their adjacent healthy thyroid tissues (n?=?46). We also measured fatty acid compositions using GC?FID/MS techniques as complementary information. We demonstrate that thyroid lesion tissues can be clearly distinguishable from healthy tissues, and malignant tumors can also be distinguished from the benign tumors based on the metabolic profiles, both with high sensitivity and specificity. In addition, we show that thyroid lesions are accompanied with disturbances of multiple metabolic pathways, including alterations in energy metabolism (glycolysis, lipid and TCA cycle), promotions in protein turnover, nucleotide biosynthesis as well as phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis. These findings provide essential information on the metabolic features of thyroid lesions and demonstrate that metabonomics technology can be potentially useful in the rapid and accurate preoperative diagnosis of malignant thyroid nodules. PMID:26486570

  19. Differential inhibition of protein translation machinery by curcumin in normal, immortalized, and malignant oral epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chakravarti, Nitin; Kadara, Humam; Yoon, Do-Jun; Shay, Jerry W; Myers, Jeffrey N; Lotan, Dafna; Sonenberg, Nahum; Lotan, Reuben

    2010-03-01

    Curcumin has shown some promise in the prevention of oral carcinogenesis by mechanism(s) that are still not completely resolved. Messenger RNA translation is mediated in eukaryotes by the eIF4F complex composed of eukaryotic translation initiation factors eIF4E, eIF4G, and eIF4A. Overexpression of some of these components or the inactivation of initiation repressor proteins (4E-BP1) has been implicated in cancer development including oral carcinogenesis by affecting cell survival, angiogenesis, and tumor growth and invasion. In this study, we examined the possibility that curcumin affects the translational machinery differently in normal, immortalized normal, leukoplakia, and malignant cells. Curcumin treatment in vitro inhibited the growth of immortalized oral mucosa epithelial cells (NOM9-CT) and the leukoplakia cells (MSK-Leuk1s) as well as in the UMSCC22B and SCC4 cells derived from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Curcumin only exerted minor effects on the growth of normal oral epithelial cells (NOM9). In the immortalized, leukoplakia, and cancer cells, curcumin inhibited cap-dependent translation by suppressing the phosphorylation of 4E-BP1, eIF4G, eIF4B, and Mnk1, and also reduced the total levels of eIF4E and Mnk1. Our findings show that immortalized normal, leukoplakia, and malignant oral cells are more sensitive to curcumin and show greater modulation of protein translation machinery than the normal oral cells, indicating that targeting this process may be an important approach to chemoprevention in general and for curcumin in particular. PMID:20145189

  20. Endovascular Therapy for Management of Oral Hemorrhage in Malignant Head and Neck Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kakizawa, Hideaki Toyota, Naoyuki; Naito, Akira; Ito, Katsuhide

    2005-12-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of endovascular therapy in oral hemorrhage from malignant head and neck tumors. Methods. Ten patients (mean age 56 years) with oral hemorrhage caused by malignant head and neck tumors underwent a total of 13 emergency embolization procedures using gelatin sponge particles, steel and/or platinum coils, or a combination of these embolic materials. Angiographic abnormalities, technical success rate, clinical success rate, recurrence rate, complications, hemostatic period, hospital days, survival days, and patient outcome were all analyzed. Results. Angiographic abnormalities were identified during 85% of procedures (11/13). The technical success rate was 100% (13/13 procedures). The primary and secondary clinical success rates were 77% (10/13 procedures) and 67% (2/3 procedures), respectively. The overall clinical success rate was 92%, and the recurrence rate was 22% (2/9 procedures) in patients whom we were able to observe during the 1-month period after embolization. No major complications occurred. Several patients in whom gelatin sponge particles had been used complained of transient local pain after the procedure. The median hemostatic period was 71 days (range 0-518 days). Median hospital and survival days were 59 days (range 3-209 days) and 141 days (range 4-518 days), respectively. Three patients survived and 7 patients died during the observation period. Only 1 of these 7 patients died from hemorrhage. Conclusion. In conclusion, our findings suggest that endovascular therapy is an effective, safe, and repeatable treatment for oral hemorrhage caused by malignant head and neck tumors.

  1. The domino effect: Role of hypoxia in malignant transformation of oral submucous fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Minal; Bajaj, Shree; Bohra, Shruti; Swastika, Nisu; Hande, Alka

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a precancerous condition predominantly seen in people of Asian descent. About 7–12% OSMF patients develop oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Morphological features of OSMF especially fibrosis suggests a possibility of the hypoxic environment in diseased tissues. Oral cancer usually develops from hyperplasia through dysplasia to carcinoma. Neovascularization and increased glycolysis, represent adaptations to a hypoxic microenvironment that are correlated with tumor invasion and metastasis. The adaptation of cells to hypoxia appears to be mediated via hypoxia inducible factor-1? (HIF-1?). HIF-1? is said to be associated with malignant transformation of epithelium in other sites. It appears that HIF-1? plays a significant role in both prostate and cervical carcinogenesis at early stages. We hypothesize that progression of OSMF and malignant transformation in the background of fibrosis mediates via HIF-1? either by up- or down-regulation of various such molecules. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between the expression of HIF-1? in OSMF, OSCC and OSCC with OSMF. Aim: To investigate the relationship between the expression of HIF-1? in OSMF, OSCC and OSCC with OSMF. Materials and Methods: The study group consists of histopathologically diagnosed 20 cases of OSCC, oral submucous fibrosis and OSCC with OSMF each. The immunohistochemistry was carried out on neutral buffered formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections by using the monoclonal antibody of HIF-1?. Results: A rise in the expression of HIF-1? from OSMF to OSCC to OSCC with OSMF is observed. PMID:26604484

  2. A Potential Therapeutic Strategy for Malignant Mesothelioma with Gene Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Yuji; Shimada, Hideaki; Hiroshima, Kenzo; Tagawa, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma, closely linked with occupational asbestos exposure, is relatively rare in the frequency, but the patient numbers are going to increase in the next few decades all over the world. The current treatment modalities are not effective in terms of the overall survival and the quality of life. Mesothelioma mainly develops in the thoracic cavity and infrequently metastasizes to extrapleural organs. A local treatment can thereby be beneficial to the patients, and gene therapy with an intrapleural administration of vectors is one of the potential therapeutics. Preclinical studies demonstrated the efficacy of gene medicine for mesothelioma, and clinical trials with adenovirus vectors showed the safety of an intrapleural injection and a possible involvement of antitumor immune responses. Nevertheless, low transduction efficiency remains the main hurdle that hinders further clinical applications. Moreover, rapid generation of antivector antibody also inhibits transgene expressions. In this paper, we review the current status of preclinical and clinical gene therapy for malignant mesothelioma and discuss potential clinical directions of gene medicine in terms of a combinatory use with anticancer agents and with immunotherapy. PMID:23484132

  3. Origins of heterogeneous ovarian carcinomas. A molecular cytogenetic analysis of histologically benign, low malignant potential, and fully malignant components.

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, N. G.; Abdul-Karim, F. W.; Schork, N. J.; Schwartz, S.

    1996-01-01

    It is unclear whether ovarian carcinomas develop from malignant transformation of benign precursors or whether they arise de novo. Thus, histologically benign or low malignant potential components found in heterogeneous ovarian carcinomas may be remnants of pre-existing lesions that progressed to malignancy or, alternatively, elements that arose independently (de novo). In a third possible interpretation, they represent areas of malignant epithelium that matured. We evaluated clonal relationships of histological components in 10 heterogeneous ovarian carcinomas using fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal microscopy. Detailed analysis of aneuploidy for chromosomes 8, 12, and 17 on intact paraffin sections revealed that two tumors were aneuploid in all components, two lacked abnormalities in benign-appearing components, and one lacked aneuploidy in both histologically benign and low malignant potential components. Histological appearance was significantly related to aneuploidy (P < 0.05). The distribution of aneuploidy among tumor components strongly supports the tumor progression theory and demonstrates that the de novo hypothesis is highly unlikely (P < 0.001). Results also indicate that benign-appearing components in heterogeneous ovarian carcinomas do not represent maturation of malignant tissue and suggest that some benign tumors that become cancerous may have genetic aberrations that predispose them to malignant transformation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8701990

  4. Role of human papillomavirus and its detection in potentially malignant and malignant head and neck lesions: updated review.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Ajay Kumar; Singh, Mamta; Sundaram, Shanthy; Mehrotra, Ravi

    2009-01-01

    Head and neck malignancies are characterized by a multiphasic and multifactorial etiopathogenesis. Tobacco and alcohol consumption are the most common risk factors for head and neck malignancy. Other factors, including DNA viruses, especially human papilloma virus (HPV), may also play a role in the initiation or development of these lesions. The pathways of HPV transmission in the head and neck mucosal lesions include oral-genital contact, more than one sexual partner and perinatal transmission of HPV to the neonatal child. The increase in prevalence of HPV infection in these lesions may be due to wider acceptance of oral sex among teenagers and adults as this is perceived to be a form of safe sex. The prevalence of HPV in benign lesions as well as malignancies has been assessed by many techniques. Among these, the polymerase chain reaction is the most sensitive method. Review of literature reveals that HPV may be a risk factor for malignancies, but not in all cases. For confirmation of the role of HPV in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, large population studies are necessary in an assortment of clinical settings. Prophylactic vaccination against high-risk HPV types eventually may prevent a significant number of cervical carcinomas. Of the two vaccines currently available, Gardasil (Merck & Co., Inc.) protects against HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18, while the other vaccine, Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline, Rixensart, Belgium) protects against HPV types 16 and 18 only. However, the HPV vaccine has, to the best of our knowledge, not been tried in head and neck carcinoma. The role of HPV in etiopathogenesis, prevalence in benign and malignant lesions of this area and vaccination strategies are briefly reviewed here. PMID:19555477

  5. Photodynamic detection in visualisation of cutaneous and oral mucosa premalignant and malignant lesions: two clinical cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurczyszyn, Kamil; Ziólkowski, Piotr; Osiecka, Beata; Gerber, Hanna; Dziedzic, Magdalena

    2008-11-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is promising method of visualisation of premalignant and malignant lesions. PDD is consisted of two main agents: special chemical compound which is called photosensitizer and light. Photosensitizer has affinity to fast proliferating cells such as pre- or malignant. During light irradiation (with proper wavelength - corresponding to absorption peak of photosensitizer) photosensitizer gains energy and passes into excited singlet state S1. Returning to basic singlet state Sn, leads to fluorescence. Due to difference between concentration of photosensitizer in lesion and normal tissue it is possible to obtain high contrast image of lesion. Case #1: 53 years old woman with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in nasal region; 20% delta-aminolevulinic acid as a precursor of photosensitizer on eucerin base was used. Case #2: 57 years old woman with multifocal oral leukoplakia on cheek mucosa and tongue; 2% chlorophyll gel as photosesitizer was used. All photographs were taken in white light without any filter and in blue and UV light with orange filter: in both cases the total area of the lesions appeared to be larger than it has been clinically observed. Thus, the PDD might be helpful in evaluation of margins of surgical excision of such lesions.

  6. Therapeutic potential of TAS-102 in the treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies.

    PubMed

    Peters, Godefridus J

    2015-11-01

    Fluoropyrimidines form the mainstay in treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies. For decades 5-fluorouracil (5FU), was the major fluoropyrimidine. Currently it is usually given in a combination with leucovorin and oxaliplatin, i.e. FOLFOX, or irinotecan, i.e. FOLFIRI, or all three, i.e. FOLFIRINOX, but gradually it has been replaced by oral fluoropyrimidine prodrug formulations, such as tegafur-uracil and S-1 (both contain ftorafur), and capecitabine (Xeloda®). Novel drugs such as the antivascular endothelial growth factor antibody, bevacizumab, and the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody, cetuximab, are often combined with one of these treatment options. However, when resistance emerged, no alternatives were available. TAS-102, a combination of trifluorothymidine and the thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor TPI in a 1:0.5 ratio, is a novel oral formulation, which is active in 5FU-resistant models, both in vitro and in xenograft models. In addition to inhibition of thymidylate synthase, the major mechanism of action of classical fluoropyrimidines, TAS-102's major mechanism of action is incorporation into DNA, thereby causing DNA damage. TAS-102 also follows an alternative activation pathway via thymidine kinase, and is not a substrate for dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase. All together this explains the efficacy in 5FU-resistant models. In early clinical studies, the twice-daily schedule (5 days on, 2 days rest) for 2 weeks every 4 weeks, led to a significant disease control rate in various malignancies. This schedule showed consistent activity in two randomized trials on fluoropyrimidine refractory colorectal cancer patients, reflected by an increase of 2-3 months in overall survival in the TAS-102 group compared with placebo. Considering the impressive preclinical potential of various combinations TAS-102 has the promise to become an alternative for 5FU-resistant cancer. PMID:26557901

  7. Therapeutic potential of TAS-102 in the treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Godefridus J.

    2015-01-01

    Fluoropyrimidines form the mainstay in treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies. For decades 5-fluorouracil (5FU), was the major fluoropyrimidine. Currently it is usually given in a combination with leucovorin and oxaliplatin, i.e. FOLFOX, or irinotecan, i.e. FOLFIRI, or all three, i.e. FOLFIRINOX, but gradually it has been replaced by oral fluoropyrimidine prodrug formulations, such as tegafur-uracil and S-1 (both contain ftorafur), and capecitabine (Xeloda®). Novel drugs such as the antivascular endothelial growth factor antibody, bevacizumab, and the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody, cetuximab, are often combined with one of these treatment options. However, when resistance emerged, no alternatives were available. TAS-102, a combination of trifluorothymidine and the thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor TPI in a 1:0.5 ratio, is a novel oral formulation, which is active in 5FU-resistant models, both in vitro and in xenograft models. In addition to inhibition of thymidylate synthase, the major mechanism of action of classical fluoropyrimidines, TAS-102’s major mechanism of action is incorporation into DNA, thereby causing DNA damage. TAS-102 also follows an alternative activation pathway via thymidine kinase, and is not a substrate for dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase. All together this explains the efficacy in 5FU-resistant models. In early clinical studies, the twice-daily schedule (5 days on, 2 days rest) for 2 weeks every 4 weeks, led to a significant disease control rate in various malignancies. This schedule showed consistent activity in two randomized trials on fluoropyrimidine refractory colorectal cancer patients, reflected by an increase of 2–3 months in overall survival in the TAS-102 group compared with placebo. Considering the impressive preclinical potential of various combinations TAS-102 has the promise to become an alternative for 5FU-resistant cancer. PMID:26557901

  8. Efficacy of Oral Cryotherapy on Oral Mucositis Prevention in Patients with Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Ruiren; Zhao, Shasha; Luo, Lan; Li, Dandan; Zhao, Xiaoli; Wei, Huaping; Pang, Zhaoxia; Wang, Lili; Liu, Daihong; Wang, Quanshun; Gao, Chunji

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Controversy exists regarding whether oral cryotherapy can prevent oral mucositis (OM) in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The aim of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy of oral cryotherapy for OM prevention in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing HSCT. Methods PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched through October 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effect of oral cryotherapy with no treatment or with other interventions for OM in patients undergoing HSCT were included. The primary outcomes were the incidence, severity, and duration of OM. The secondary outcomes included length of analgesic use, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) use, and length of hospital stay. Results Seven RCTs involving eight articles analyzing 458 patients were included. Oral cryotherapy significantly decreased the incidence of severe OM (RR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.27 to 0.99) and OM severity (SMD = -2.07, 95% CI = -3.90 to -0.25). In addition, the duration of TPN use and the length of hospitalization were markedly reduced (SMD = -0.56, 95% CI = -0.92 to -0.19; SMD = -0.44, 95% CI = -0.76 to -0.13; respectively). However, the pooled results were uncertain for the duration of OM and analgesic use (SMD = -0.13, 95% CI = -0.41 to 0.15; SMD = -1.15, 95% CI = -2.57 to 0.27; respectively). Conclusions Oral cryotherapy is a readily applicable and cost-effective prophylaxis for OM in patients undergoing HSCT. PMID:26024220

  9. Bacteriophage and their potential roles in the human oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Edlund, Anna; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Boehm, Tobias K.; Pride, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The human oral cavity provides the perfect portal of entry for viruses and bacteria in the environment to access new hosts. Hence, the oral cavity is one of the most densely populated habitats of the human body containing some 6 billion bacteria and potentially 35 times that many viruses. The role of these viral communities remains unclear; however, many are bacteriophage that may have active roles in shaping the ecology of oral bacterial communities. Other implications for the presence of such vast oral phage communities include accelerating the molecular diversity of their bacterial hosts as both host and phage mutate to gain evolutionary advantages. Additional roles include the acquisitions of new gene functions through lysogenic conversions that may provide selective advantages to host bacteria in response to antibiotics or other types of disturbances, and protection of the human host from invading pathogens by binding to and preventing pathogens from crossing oral mucosal barriers. Recent evidence suggests that phage may be more involved in periodontal diseases than were previously thought, as their compositions in the subgingival crevice in moderate to severe periodontitis are known to be significantly altered. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to dysbiosis or the transition of the microbial community into a state promoting oral disease. Bacteriophage communities are distinct in saliva compared to sub- and supragingival areas, suggesting that different oral biogeographic niches have unique phage ecology shaping their bacterial biota. In this review, we summarize what is known about phage communities in the oral cavity, the possible contributions of phage in shaping oral bacterial ecology, and the risks to public health oral phage may pose through their potential to spread antibiotic resistance gene functions to close contacts. PMID:25861745

  10. Bacteriophage and their potential roles in the human oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Edlund, Anna; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Boehm, Tobias K; Pride, David T

    2015-01-01

    The human oral cavity provides the perfect portal of entry for viruses and bacteria in the environment to access new hosts. Hence, the oral cavity is one of the most densely populated habitats of the human body containing some 6 billion bacteria and potentially 35 times that many viruses. The role of these viral communities remains unclear; however, many are bacteriophage that may have active roles in shaping the ecology of oral bacterial communities. Other implications for the presence of such vast oral phage communities include accelerating the molecular diversity of their bacterial hosts as both host and phage mutate to gain evolutionary advantages. Additional roles include the acquisitions of new gene functions through lysogenic conversions that may provide selective advantages to host bacteria in response to antibiotics or other types of disturbances, and protection of the human host from invading pathogens by binding to and preventing pathogens from crossing oral mucosal barriers. Recent evidence suggests that phage may be more involved in periodontal diseases than were previously thought, as their compositions in the subgingival crevice in moderate to severe periodontitis are known to be significantly altered. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to dysbiosis or the transition of the microbial community into a state promoting oral disease. Bacteriophage communities are distinct in saliva compared to sub- and supragingival areas, suggesting that different oral biogeographic niches have unique phage ecology shaping their bacterial biota. In this review, we summarize what is known about phage communities in the oral cavity, the possible contributions of phage in shaping oral bacterial ecology, and the risks to public health oral phage may pose through their potential to spread antibiotic resistance gene functions to close contacts. PMID:25861745

  11. Melanoma cell galectin-1 ligands functionally correlate with malignant potential*

    PubMed Central

    Yazawa, Erika M.; Geddes-Sweeney, Jenna E.; Cedeno-Laurent, Filiberto; Walley, Kempland C.; Barthel, Steven R.; Opperman, Matthew J.; Liang, Jennifer; Lin, Jennifer Y.; Schatton, Tobias; Laga, Alvaro C.; Mihm, Martin C.; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Widlund, Hans R.; Murphy, George F.; Dimitroff, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1)-binding to Gal-1 ligands on immune and endothelial cells can influence melanoma development through dampening anti-tumor immune responses and promoting angiogenesis. However, whether Gal-1 ligands are functionally expressed on melanoma cells to help control intrinsic malignant features remains poorly understood. Here, we analyzed expression, identity and function of Gal-1 ligands in melanoma progression. Immunofluorescent analysis of benign and malignant human melanocytic neoplasms revealed that Gal-1 ligands were abundant in severely-dysplastic nevi as well as in primary and metastatic melanomas. Biochemical assessments indicated that melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM) was a major Gal-1 ligand on melanoma cells that was largely dependent on its N-glycans. Other melanoma cell Gal-1 ligand activity conferred by O-glycans was negatively regulated by ?2,6 sialyltransferase ST6GalNAc2. In Gal-1-deficient mice, MCAM-silenced (MCAMKD) or ST6GalNAc2-overexpressing (ST6O/E) melanoma cells exhibited slower growth rates, underscoring a key role for melanoma cell Gal-1 ligands and host Gal-1 in melanoma growth. Further analysis of MCAMKD or ST6O/E melanoma cells in cell migration assays indicated that Gal-1 ligand-dependent melanoma cell migration was severely inhibited. These findings provide a refined perspective on Gal-1 – melanoma cell Gal-1 ligand interactions as contributors to melanoma malignancy. PMID:25756799

  12. Melanoma Cell Galectin-1 Ligands Functionally Correlate with Malignant Potential.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, Erika M; Geddes-Sweeney, Jenna E; Cedeno-Laurent, Filiberto; Walley, Kempland C; Barthel, Steven R; Opperman, Matthew J; Liang, Jennifer; Lin, Jennifer Y; Schatton, Tobias; Laga, Alvaro C; Mihm, Martin C; Qureshi, Abrar A; Widlund, Hans R; Murphy, George F; Dimitroff, Charles J

    2015-07-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1)-binding to Gal-1 ligands on immune and endothelial cells can influence melanoma development through dampening antitumor immune responses and promoting angiogenesis. However, whether Gal-1 ligands are functionally expressed on melanoma cells to help control intrinsic malignant features remains poorly understood. Here, we analyzed expression, identity, and function of Gal-1 ligands in melanoma progression. Immunofluorescent analysis of benign and malignant human melanocytic neoplasms revealed that Gal-1 ligands were abundant in severely dysplastic nevi, as well as in primary and metastatic melanomas. Biochemical assessments indicated that melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM) was a major Gal-1 ligand on melanoma cells that was largely dependent on its N-glycans. Other melanoma cell Gal-1 ligand activity conferred by O-glycans was negatively regulated by ?2,6 sialyltransferase ST6GalNAc2. In Gal-1-deficient mice, MCAM-silenced (MCAM(KD)) or ST6GalNAc2-overexpressing (ST6(O/E)) melanoma cells exhibited slower growth rates, underscoring a key role for melanoma cell Gal-1 ligands and host Gal-1 in melanoma growth. Further analysis of MCAM(KD) or ST6(O/E) melanoma cells in cell migration assays indicated that Gal-1 ligand-dependent melanoma cell migration was severely inhibited. These findings provide a refined perspective on Gal-1/melanoma cell Gal-1 ligand interactions as contributors to melanoma malignancy. PMID:25756799

  13. Do Clear Cell Papillary Renal Cell Carcinomas Have Malignant Potential?

    PubMed

    Diolombi, Mairo L; Cheng, Liang; Argani, Pedram; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2015-12-01

    There have been no recurrences or metastases of clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCPRCC) in 268 reported cases with follow-up in the English-language literature. We identified all our cases of CCPRCC (1990 to 2013), reviewing all cases that preceded the formal designation of the entity. Immunohistochemical stains were performed on 32 cases during their initial workup. In addition, stains for carbonic anhydrase IX and cytokeratin 7 were performed on 2 cases, one with atypical follow-up and the other with a more compact morphology, although not performed initially. An extended panel with AMACR, CD10, and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) was added to the case with atypical follow-up. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for chromosomes 3p, 7, and 17 was performed on the latter case and on another clinically presumed metastatic tumor. In classic cases, immunohistochemical staining was not performed. Fifty-eight patients (31 women; 27 men) with follow-up data were included in our study; 39 cases were from our consult service. The patients' ages ranged from 36 to 83 years. Thirty-five patients had cystic or partially cystic lesions; 6 tumors were multifocal, 3 of which were bilateral. The majority (53 patients; 91.4%) presented with stage pT1 disease (size range, 0.2 to 8 cm), 2 patients presented with pT2 disease (8.5 and 10.3 cm), 1 patient presented with pT3 disease (6.5 cm sarcomatoid RCC focally extending out of the kidney), and pathologic stage was unavailable in 2 cases. Treatment consisted of 29 partial nephrectomies, 26 radical nephrectomies, 2 cryoablations, and 1 cyst ablation. The resection margins were negative in all but one case, with this case disease free after a 26-month period. Two patients had intraoperative tumor disruption and were disease free at 9 and 34 months. Five patients had synchronous ipsilateral renal cell carcinomas (non-CCPRCC). Mean follow-up time was 21 months (range, 1 to 175 mo), with all but 3 patients having no evidence of disease. One patient was presumed to have contralateral disease on the basis of imaging findings and is alive and well 37 months after multiple partial nephrectomies. Metastatic disease to the lung was clinically presumed in 1 patient in whom a higher-grade lesion may have been missed during sampling of the predominantly cystic pT1b tumor and tissue confirmation of the metastases was not obtained. Another case presented with multiple skeletal and pulmonary metastases 8 months after resection of pT3 sarcomatoid CCPRCC. The patient with the sarcomatoid RCC died of multifocal skeletal and pulmonary metastatic disease 13 months after resection of the renal tumor. Our study, the largest to date with follow-up, along with others, suggests that pure CCPRCC is an indolent tumor and should be renamed "clear cell papillary neoplasm of low malignant potential" to reflect their biology. PMID:26426379

  14. Human RGM249-Derived Small RNAs Potentially Regulate Tumor Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Mika; Shinoda, Waka; Tsuno, Satoshi; Sato, Reina; Wang, Xinhui; Jo, Jun-ichiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Hasegawa, Junichi

    2013-01-01

    The human noncoding RNA gene RGM249 has been shown to regulate the degree of cancer cell differentiation. In this study, we investigated the effects of 3 microRNA-like molecules digested from RGM249 on the loss of malignant properties in cancer cells in immunodeficient KSN/Slc mice. We utilized small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) alone or in combination with a cationized drug delivery system (DDS) consisting of atelocollagen or gelatin hydrogel microspheres. The results demonstrated growth inhibition and apoptosis and the inhibition of both neovascularization and metastasis, indicating that the DDSs effectively infiltrated the majority of tumor cells in vivo. Systemic administration of the 3 siRNAs inhibited the metastatic ability of malignant cells. Cotransfection of these siRNAs exerted a regulatory effect upon the genes involved in differentiation, pluripotency, and proliferation in cancer cells. These results suggest that RGM249-derived oligonucleotides may be involved in the regulation of metastasis, proliferation, and differentiation in vivo, and that the tested siRNAs may therefore represent a new anticancer therapeutic approach. PMID:23988019

  15. Oral Health Scales: Design of an Oral Health Scale of Infectious Potential

    PubMed Central

    Relvas, Marta; Diz, Pedro; Seoane, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: In this paper we propose a new Global Oral Health Scale that will allow the infectious potential of the oral cavity, clinically manifest as local and focal infections, to be condensed into a single parameter. Study Design: Based on a number of oral health scales previously designed by our group, we designed a final version that incorporates dental and periodontal variables (some of them evaluated using corroborated objective indices) that reflect the presence of caries and periodontal disease. Results: The application of the proposed oral health scale requires the examination of 6 sites per tooth (mesio-buccal, medio-buccal, disto-buccal, disto-lingual, medio-lingual and mesio-lingual). The following variables are analysed: number of tooth surfaces with supragingival plaque, determined using the O’Leary index; number of teeth with caries and the severity of the caries; number of tooth surfaces with gingival inflammation, determined using the Ainamo and Bay index; and number of tooth surfaces with pockets ?4 mm and severity of the pockets. These variables are then grouped into 2 categories, dental and periodontal. The final grades of dental and periodontal health correspond to the grades assigned to a least 2 of the 3 variables analysed in each of these categories. The category (dental or periodontal) with the highest grade is the one that determines the grade of the Global Oral Health Scale. Conclusion: This scale could be particularly useful for the epidemiological studies comparing different populations and for analysis of the influence of distinct degrees of oral health on the development of certain systemic diseases. Key words:Scale, oral health, infectious potential, systemic disease. PMID:23524418

  16. [Prostatic stromal tumors of uncertain malignant potential (STUMP): a case report].

    PubMed

    Michaud, Sébastien; Moreau, Anne; Braud, Guillaume; Renaudin, Karine; Branchereau, Julien; Bouchot, Olivier; Rigaud, Jérôme

    2014-06-01

    We report the case of a patient affected by a voluminous prostatic tumor for which the histological analysis conclude in a stromal tumor of uncertain malignant potential. This type of tumor is rare, but requires to be individualized to differentiate it from a benign prostatic hyperplasia or a sarcoma of the prostate. The therapeutic care must be made keeping in mind the risk of degeneration towards a malignant shape. PMID:24950874

  17. Malignant epignathus.

    PubMed

    Rayudu, Harijan Hanumantha; Reddy, Kilashnath; Lakshmi, Kasa; Varma, Santhosh

    2011-07-01

    Report of a neonate with a huge mass protruding from the oral cavity. The mass has originated from the base of the tongue. Successful excision and histopathological examination revealed it to be a malignant epignathus. PMID:21897571

  18. Chemoprevention of premalignant and malignant lesions of oral cavity: Recent trends

    PubMed Central

    Bodhade, Ashish S.; Dive, Alka M.

    2013-01-01

    The word chemoprevention includes prevention of initiation, promotion, and progression of carcinogenesis to cancer. This article is an attempt to review the dietary chemopreventive agents and their mode of action in chemoprevention of oral premalignant lesions and oral cancer using a systematic approach. Selected chemoprevention trials are discussed with a focus on strategies of trial design and clinical outcome. Future in the field of chemoprevention will be more promising than the recently available therapeutic alternatives. PMID:24883036

  19. Essentials of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators. PMID:26617944

  20. Malignant transformation of proliferative verrucous leukoplakia to oral squamous cell carcinoma: a series of 55 cases.

    PubMed

    Bagan, Jose V; Jiménez-Soriano, Yolanda; Diaz-Fernandez, Jose M; Murillo-Cortés, Judith; Sanchis-Bielsa, José M; Poveda-Roda, Rafael; Bagan, Leticia

    2011-08-01

    In this study, we compared clinical differences between patients with proliferative verrucous leukoplakia (PVL) who did and did not develop oral cancer. This was a retrospective study of 55 PVL cases. All patients were followed for at least 1year, with a mean follow-up of 7.53 (SD=4.18) years. The mean age of the patients was 61.69 (SD=11.76) years. There were 36 (65.5%) females and 19 (34.5%) males. Group 1 included the 28 PVL patients who did not develop oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) during the period. Group 2 included the 27 PVL patients who developed at least one OSCC during the period. The latter group was subdivided into patients with PVL who developed one (Subgroup 2a; n=16) or more than one (Subgroup 2b; n=11) OSCC during follow-up. There was no statistical difference in age or oral location of the PVL between Groups 1 and 2. Females had a greater tendency to develop cancer than males (58.3% vs. 31.6%). In Group 2, only six (22.2%) were smokers. There was no difference between Subgroups 2a and b in terms of age, gender, and oral location of the PVL. Subgroup 2b included fewer smokers, had higher gingival involvement rate, and lower frequency of PVL on the tongue. The PVL patients who develop oral cancers were more commonly female and non-smokers. Those patients who developed more than one OSCC were most likely to develop lesions of the gingiva. PMID:21683646

  1. Saliva proteome profiling reveals potential salivary biomarkers for detection of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chih-Ching; Chu, Hao-Wei; Hsu, Chia-Wei; Chang, Kai-Ping; Liu, Hao-Ping

    2015-10-01

    Oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), which is frequently associated with poor prognosis and mortality, is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Discovery of body fluid accessible biomarkers is needed to improve OSCC screening. To this end, we profiled proteomes of saliva from the healthy volunteers, the individuals with oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD), and the OSCC patients by means of SDS-PAGE coupled with LC-MS/MS. In the control, the OPMD, and the OSCC groups, 958, 845, and 1030 salivary proteins were detected, respectively. With spectral counting-based label-free quantification, 22 overexpressed salivary proteins were identified in the OSCC group compared with the healthy controls and the OPMD individuals. Among them, resistin (RETN) was subjected to further validation with an independent cohort using ELISA. The data confirmed that the salivary RETN levels in the OSCC patients were significantly higher than that in the healthy or in the OPMD group. Moreover, the elevated levels of salivary RETN were highly correlated with late-stage primary tumors, advanced overall stage, and lymph-node metastasis. Our results not only reveal that profiling of saliva proteome is feasible for discovery of OSCC biomarkers, but also identify RETN as a potential salivary biomarker for OSCC detection. PMID:26205615

  2. The novel herbal cocktail MA128 suppresses tumor growth and the metastatic potential of highly malignant tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Aeyung; Im, Minju; Yim, Nam-Hiu; Hwang, Youn-Hwan; Yang, Hye Jin; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2015-08-01

    MA128, a novel herbal medicine, was previously identified and its effectiveness in the treatment of asthma and atopic dermatitis (AD) was demonstrated. In particular, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) in AD mice was improved by treatment with MA128. In addition, MA128 exhibited anti-melanogenic activity by inhibiting tyrosinase activity via the p38 MAPK and protein kinase A signaling pathways in B16F10 cells. In the present study, we examined whether oral administration of MA128 suppressed the in vivo tumor growth of HT1080 cells in athymic nude mice. The results showed that the daily oral administration of 75 and 150 mg/kg MA128 suppressed the tumorigenic growth of HT1080 cells efficiently. Since metastasis is a major cause of cancer-associated mortality and the greatest challenge during cancer treatment, we investigated the effect of non-toxic concentrations of MA128 on the metastatic potential of HT1080 cells. MA128 inhibited anchorage-independent colony formation, migration and invasion. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity under resting and PMA-stimulated conditions was decreased in a dose-dependent manner by MA128 in HT1080 cells. In addition, the daily oral administration of MA128 at doses of 75 and 150 mg/kg efficiently blocked the lung metastasis of B16F10 cells that had been injected into the tail veins of C57BL/6 mice. In particular, none of the mice treated with MA128 exhibited systemic toxicity, such as body weight loss or liver and kidney dysfunction. MA128 also inhibited tumor?induced angiogenesis. Taken together, the results suggest that MA128 is a potential therapeutic agent and a safe herbal medicine for controlling malignant and metastatic cancer. PMID:26035620

  3. Lesions of uncertain malignant potential in the breast (B3): what do we know?

    PubMed

    Purushothaman, H N; Lekanidi, K; Shousha, S; Wilson, R

    2016-02-01

    Breast lesions classified as of uncertain malignant potential (B3) on biopsy form a diverse group of abnormalities, which pose a diagnostic and management challenge. In this paper, we discuss the imaging and pathology features as well as the management of the most controversial B3 lesions, consisting of papillary lesions, complex sclerosing lesions/radial scars, lobular intraepithelial neoplasia, and atypical epithelial proliferation of ductal type. As there is an association with malignancy at the time of diagnosis, as well as an increase in the risk of subsequent development of cancer, a multidisciplinary discussion is almost always required to tailor treatment. PMID:26607917

  4. ALA-based fluorescent diagnosis of malignant oral lesions in the presence of bacterial porphyrin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleier, P.; Berndt, A.; Zinner, K.; Zenk, W.; Dietel, W.; Pfister, W.

    2006-02-01

    The aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) -based fluorescence diagnosis has been found to be promising for an early detection and demarcation of superficial oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC). This method has previously demonstrated high sensitivity, however this clinical trial showed a specificity of approximately 62 %. This specificity was mainly restricted by tumor detection in the oral cavity in the presence of bacteria. After topical ALA application in the mouth of patients with previously diagnosed OSSC, red fluorescent areas were observed which did not correlate to confirm histological findings. Swabs and plaque samples were taken from 44 patients and cultivated microbiologically. Fluorescence was investigated (OMA-system) from 32 different bacteria strains found naturally in the oral cavity. After ALA incubation, 30 of 32 strains were found to synthesize fluorescent porphyrins, mainly Protoporphyrin IX. Also multiple fluorescent spectra were obtained having peak wavelengths of 636 nm and around 618 nm - 620 nm indicating synthesis of different porphyrins, such as the lipophylic Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) and hydrophylic porphyrins (water soluble porphyrins, wsp). Of the 32 fluorescent bacterial strains, 18 produced wsp, often in combination with PpIX, and 5 produced solely wsp. These results clarify that ALA-based fluorescence diagnosis without consideration or suppression of bacteria fluorescence may lead to false-positive findings. It is necessary to suppress bacteria fluorescence with suitable antiseptics before starting the procedure. In this study, when specific antiseptic pre-treatment was performed bacterial associated fluorescence was significantly reduced.

  5. Conversion of normal to malignant phenotype: telomere shortening, telomerase activation, and genomic instability during immortalization of human oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Kang, M K; Park, N H

    2001-01-01

    Normal somatic cells terminate their replicative life span through a pathway leading to cellular senescence, which is triggered by activation of p53 and/or pRb in response to critically shortened telomere DNA. Potentially neoplastic cells must first overcome the senescence checkpoint mechanisms and subsequently activate telomerase to propagate indefinitely. Although telomerase activation is closely associated with cellular immortality, telomerase alone is not sufficient to warrant tumorigenicity. Environmental factors, including chemical carcinogens and viral infection, often contribute to aberrant changes leading to tumorigenic conversion of normal cells. Of particular importance in oral cancer development are tobacco-related chemical carcinogens and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. To describe the molecular mechanisms by which these environmental factors facilitate the genesis of oral cancer, we first established an in vitro multistep oral carcinogenesis model by sequential exposure of normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOK) to "high risk" HPV and chemical carcinogens. Upon introduction of the HPV genome, the cells bypassed the senescence checkpoint and entered into an extended, but not immortal, life span during which telomere DNA continued to shorten. In a few immortal clones surviving beyond the crisis, we found a marked elevation of telomerase activity and stabilization of telomere length. Furthermore, the E6 and E7 oncoproteins of "high risk" HPV disrupted the cell cycle control and DNA repair in immortalized HOK, and enhanced mutation frequency resulting from genomic instability. However, HPV infection alone failed to give rise to a tumorigenic cell population, which required further exposure to chemical carcinogens in addition to HPV infection. Analysis of the data presented suggests that oral carcinogenesis is a series of discrete genetic alterations that result from a continued genotoxic challenge by environmental risk factors. Our in vitro model may be useful for investigators with interest in furthering our understanding of oral carcinogenesis. PMID:11349961

  6. Exploring Therapeutic Potentials of Baicalin and Its Aglycone Baicalein for Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haijun; Gao, Yu; Wu, Jianlei; Chen, Yingyu; Chen, Buyuan; Hu, Jianda; Zhou, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Despite tremendous advances in the targeted therapy for various types of hematological malignancies with successful improvements in the survival rates, emerging resistance issues are startlingly high and novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. In addition, chemoprevention is currently becoming an elusive goal. Plant-derived natural products have garnered considerable attention in recent years due to the potential dual functions as chemotherapeutics and dietary chemoprevention. One of the particularly ubiquitous families is the polyphenolic flavonoids. Among them, baicalin and its aglycone baicalein have been widely investigated in hematological malignancies because both of them exhibit remarkable pharmacological properties. This review focuses on the recent achievements in drug discovery research associated with baicalin and baicalein for hematological malignancy therapies. The promising anticancer activities of these two flavonoids targeting diverse signaling pathways and their potential biological mechanisms in different types of hematological malignancies, as well as the combination strategy with baicalin or baicalein as chemotherapeutic adjuvants for recent therapies in these intractable diseases are discussed. Meanwhile, the biotransformation of baicalin and baicalein and the relevant approaches to improve their bioavailability are also summarized. PMID:25128647

  7. Human salivary proteome--a resource of potential biomarkers for oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Sivadasan, Priya; Gupta, Manoj Kumar; Sathe, Gajanan J; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Palit, Priyanka; Gowda, Harsha; Suresh, Amritha; Kuriakose, Moni Abraham; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi

    2015-09-01

    Proteins present in human saliva offer an immense potential for clinical applications. However, exploring salivary proteome is technically challenged due to the presence of amylase and albumin in high abundance. In this study, we used four workflows to analyze human saliva from healthy individuals which involved depletion of abundant proteins using affinity-based separation methods followed by protein or peptide fractionation and high resolution mass spectrometry analysis. We identified a total of 1256 human salivary proteins, 292 of them being reported for the first time. All identifications were verified for any shared proteins/peptides from the salivary microbiome that may conflict with the human protein identifications. On integration of our results with the analyses reported earlier, we arrived at an updated human salivary proteome containing 3449 proteins, 808 of them have been reported as differentially expressed proteins in oral cancer tissues. The secretory nature of 598 of the 808 proteins has also been supported on the basis of the presence of signal sequence, transmembrane domain or association with exosomes. From this subset, we provide a priority list of 139 proteins along with their proteotypic peptides, which may serve as a reference for targeted investigations as secretory markers for clinical applications in oral malignancies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India. PMID:26073025

  8. Potential misinterpretation of data on differential gene expression in normal and malignant cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaofeng; Lotan, Reuben

    2008-07-01

    High throughput genomic and proteomic methods are often used for comparisons between expression of genes and proteins, respectively in normal cells and malignant counterparts for the identification of potential tumor markers for diagnosis and prognosis. Some experiments use normal and malignant cells cultured in vitro as a source of the mRNA or proteins for analysis. The conditions used for cell culture can exert major effects on the expression of genes and proteins. The interpretation of results of some such studies can be erroneous if normal cells and cancer cells are cultured in serum-free medium (SFM) and serum-supplemented media, respectively as recommended for their optimal growth. The reason for potential complications in the data interpretation is that serum contains different factors that affect gene expression. Likewise, SFM is usually supplemented with specific growth factors as well as bovine pituitary extract. Experimental examples demonstrating the issue include the stimulatory effects of serum on the expression of retinoic acid-inducible genes (e.g. GPRC5A) leading to the potentially erroneous conclusion that such genes are overexpressed in cancer cells. Potential remedy for this problem is to grow the normal and malignant cells in the same medium (serum-free or serum-containing) before analysis. PMID:18467351

  9. Increased malignancy of oral squamous cell carcinomas (oscc) is associated with macrophage polarization in regional lymph nodes – an immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is largely accepted that specific immunological parameters in solid malignancies are associated with patient’s prognosis. Recently a correlation of macrophage polarization with histomorphological parameters could also be shown in oral squamous cell carcinoma (oscc). The observed tumor derived peripheral immune tolerance could be associated with the macrophage polarization in regional tumor draining lymph nodes. So far there are no studies analyzing the macrophage polarization in cervical lymph nodes of oscc patients. In the present study we aimed to correlate macrophage polarization in different anatomical lymph node compartments of patients diagnosed with oscc with histopathologic parameters of the primary tumor (T-, N-, L-, V-, Pn-status, grading). Methods Tumor free (n?=?37) and metastatic (n?=?17) lymph nodes of T1 and T2 oscc patients were processed for immunohistochemistry to detect CD68, CD11c, CD163 and MRC1 positive cells. Samples were digitized using whole slide imaging and the number of cells expressing the aforementioned markers in the region of interest quantitatively analyzed. Results The malignancy of the primary tumor (defined by T-, L-, Pn-status, grading) correlated with the lymph node macrophage polarization. L1 and Pn1 tumor cases displayed a significantly (p?malignant behavior in the primary tumor were associated with a shift of macrophage polarization in lymph nodes from the anti-tumoral M1 type to the tumor-promoting M2 type. As tumor free and metastatic lymph nodes did not differ in terms of their macrophage polarization pattern, there must be other factors influencing the location for lymph node metastasis formation. PMID:25042135

  10. Current Understanding of Circulating Tumor Cells – Potential Value in Malignancies of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk, Lukasz A.; Williams, Hannah; Frankow, Aleksandra; Ellis, Hayley Patricia; Haynes, Harry R.; Perks, Claire; Holly, Jeff M. P.; Kurian, Kathreena M.

    2015-01-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood via so-called “liquid biopsies” carries enormous clinical potential in malignancies of the central nervous system (CNS) because of the potential to follow disease evolution with a blood test, without the need for repeat neurosurgical procedures with their inherent risk of patient morbidity. To date, studies in non-CNS malignancies, particularly in breast cancer, show increasing reproducibility of detection methods for these rare tumor cells in the circulation. However, no method has yet received full recommendation to use in clinical practice, in part because of lack of a sufficient evidence base regarding clinical utility. In CNS malignancies, one of the main challenges is finding a suitable biomarker for identification of these cells, because automated systems, such as the widely used Cell Search system, are reliant on markers, such as the epithelial cell adhesion molecule, which are not present in CNS tumors. This review examines methods for CTC enrichment and detection, and reviews the progress in non-CNS tumors and the potential for using this technique in human brain tumors. PMID:26322014

  11. Opioid switch from low dose of oral oxycodone to transdermal fentanyl matrix patch for patients with stable thoracic malignancy-related pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The effectiveness and safety of switch from oral oxycodone to fentanyl patch is little known. Here, we investigated if early phase opioid switch from low dose of oral oxycodone to transdermal fentanyl matrix patch provided any benefits for patients with thoracic malignancy and stable cancer-related pain. Methods This open-label two-centered prospective study enrolled patients with thoracic malignancy suffering persistent malignancy-related pain with numeric rating scale of pain intensity???3 which had been controlled by oral oxycodone???20 mg/day. Eligible patients switched from oral oxycodone to 12.5 ?g/h of transdermal fentanyl matrix patch. The dose was allowed to be titrated upwards every 3 day by 25-50%, except for the first increase from 12.5 ?g/hr to 25 ?g/hr,until achieving adequate pain control. The data on patients’ global assessment scores measured on a five-step scale, an 11-point numeric rating scale of pain intensity, the severity of adverse effects using a four-point categorical rating scale, and the Epworth sleepiness scale questionnaire were collected for 15 days. Results Forty-nine eligible patients were analyzed. Overall patients’ satisfaction score significantly improved from day 1 (2.7?±?0.9) to day 15 (2.3?±?0.9) (p?malignancies. PMID:25313295

  12. Salivary Endothelin-1 Potential for Detecting Oral Cancer in Patients with Oral Lichen Planus or Oral Cancer in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi-Shing Lisa; Rees, Terry; Jordan, Lee; Oxford, Lance; O’Brien, John; Chen, Huey-Shys; Wong, David

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a potent vasoconstrictor involved not only in vascular biology but also in carcinogenesis. Results of a study in 2007 suggested salivary ET-1 as a potential biomarker for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), but a later study showed conflicting results. The purpose of our pilot study was to investigate feasibility of using salivary ET-1 as a biomarker for OSCC in two groups: oral lichen planus (OLP) patients and patients with OSCC in remission. Materials and Methods Saliva samples were collected from five groups of subjects: patients with newly diagnosed, active OSCC (Group A); patients with OSCC in remission (Group B); patients with active OLP lesions (Group C); patients with OLP in remission (Group D); and normal controls (Group E). Salivary ET-1 levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the results were analyzed by the Mann Whitney U test. Results The mean salivary ET-1 level in Group A was significantly higher than that found in Group C (p=0.001), Group D (p=0.015) or Group E (p=0.004). There were no significant differences (p>0.05) in the mean salivary ET-1 levels between Groups A and B; Groups B and C; Groups B and D; Groups B and E; Groups C and D; Groups C and E; or Groups D and E. Conclusion Salivary ET-1 could be a good biomarker for OSCC development in OLP patients regardless of the degree of OLP disease activity. However, it appeared not to be a good biomarker for detecting recurrence of OSCC in patients in remission. PMID:21868280

  13. Oral Leukoplakia – an Update

    PubMed Central

    PARLATESCU, Ioanina; GHEORGHE, Carmen; COCULESCU, Elena; TOVARU, Serban

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper was to assess the current state of science on oral leukoplakia. Although it is considered a potentially malignant disorder the overall malignant progression of oral leukoplakia is of the order of 5% and even more. Nowadays there are no currently accepted markers to distinguish those that may progress to cancer from those that may not. The current golden standard is considered the presence of epithelial dysplasia on the tissue biopsy of the lesion. Proliferative verrucous leukoplakia is a rare form of OL which has multiple recurrences, is refractory to treatment and has malignant transformation in a short period. It is considered a true premalignant lesion. The management of oral leukoplakia varies from a "wait and see" attitude and topical chemopreventive agents to complete surgical removal. PMID:25553134

  14. Microarray analysis of potential genes in the pathogenesis of recurrent oral ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jingying; He, Zhiwei; Li, Kun; Hou, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent oral ulcer seriously threatens patients’ daily life and health. This study investigated potential genes and pathways that participate in the pathogenesis of recurrent oral ulcer by high throughput bioinformatic analysis. RT-PCR and Western blot were applied to further verify screened interleukins effect. Recurrent oral ulcer related genes were collected from websites and papers, and further found out from Human Genome 280 6.0 microarray data. Each pathway of recurrent oral ulcer related genes were got through chip hybridization. RT-PCR was applied to test four recurrent oral ulcer related genes to verify the microarray data. Data transformation, scatter plot, clustering analysis, and expression pattern analysis were used to analyze recurrent oral ulcer related gene expression changes. Recurrent oral ulcer gene microarray was successfully established. Microarray showed that 551 genes involved in recurrent oral ulcer activity and 196 genes were recurrent oral ulcer related genes. Of them, 76 genes up-regulated, 62 genes down-regulated, and 58 genes up-/down-regulated. Total expression level up-regulated 752 times (60%) and down-regulated 485 times (40%). IL-2 plays an important role in the occurrence, development and recurrence of recurrent oral ulcer on the mRNA and protein levels. Gene microarray can be used to analyze potential genes and pathways in recurrent oral ulcer. IL-2 may be involved in the pathogenesis of recurrent oral ulcer. PMID:26722428

  15. The Potential Role of Oral Fluid in Antidoping Testing

    PubMed Central

    Anizan, Sebastien; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Currently, urine and blood are the only matrices authorized for antidoping testing by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). Although the usefulness of urine and blood is proven, issues remain for monitoring some drug classes and for drugs prohibited only in competition. The alternative matrix oral fluid (OF) may offer solutions to some of these issues. OF collection is easy, noninvasive, and sex neutral and is directly observed, limiting potential adulteration, a major problem for urine testing. OF is used to monitor drug intake in workplace, clinical toxicology, criminal justice, and driving under the influence of drugs programs and potentially could complement urine and blood for antidoping testing in sports. CONTENT This review outlines the present state of knowledge and the advantages and limitations of OF testing for each of the WADA drug classes and the research needed to advance OF testing as a viable alternative for antidoping testing. SUMMARY Doping agents are either prohibited at all times or prohibited in competition only. Few OF data from controlled drug administration studies are available for substances banned at all times, whereas for some agents prohibited only in competition, sufficient data may be available to suggest appropriate analytes and cutoffs (analytical threshold concentrations) to identify recent drug use. Additional research is needed to characterize the disposition of many banned substances into OF; OF collection methods and doping agent stability in OF also require investigation to allow the accurate interpretation of OF tests for antidoping monitoring. PMID:24153253

  16. The human oral metaproteome reveals potential biomarkers for caries disease.

    PubMed

    Belda-Ferre, Pedro; Williamson, James; Simón-Soro, Áurea; Artacho, Alejandro; Jensen, Ole N; Mira, Alex

    2015-10-01

    Tooth decay is considered the most prevalent human disease worldwide. We present the first metaproteomic study of the oral biofilm, using different mass spectrometry approaches that have allowed us to quantify individual peptides in healthy and caries-bearing individuals. A total of 7771 bacterial and 853 human proteins were identified in 17 individuals, which provide the first available protein repertoire of human dental plaque. Actinomyces and Coryneybacterium represent a large proportion of the protein activity followed by Rothia and Streptococcus. Those four genera account for 60-90% of total diversity. Healthy individuals appeared to have significantly higher amounts of L-lactate dehydrogenase and the arginine deiminase system, both implicated in pH buffering. Other proteins found to be at significantly higher levels in healthy individuals were involved in exopolysaccharide synthesis, iron metabolism and immune response. We applied multivariate analysis in order to find the minimum set of proteins that better allows discrimination of healthy and caries-affected dental plaque samples, detecting seven bacterial and five human protein functions that allow determining the health status of the studied individuals with an estimated specificity and sensitivity over 96%. We propose that future validation of these potential biomarkers in larger sample size studies may serve to develop diagnostic tests of caries risk that could be used in tooth decay prevention. PMID:26272225

  17. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knockout of NANOG and NANOGP8 decreases the malignant potential of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Norihiko; Nimura, Keisuke; Nagano, Hiromichi; Yamaguchi, Sohei; Nonomura, Norio; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2015-01-01

    NANOG expression in prostate cancer is highly correlated with cancer stem cell characteristics and resistance to androgen deprivation. However, it is not clear whether NANOG or its pseudogenes contribute to the malignant potential of cancer. We established NANOG- and NANOGP8-knockout DU145 prostate cancer cell lines using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Knockouts of NANOG and NANOGP8 significantly attenuated malignant potential, including sphere formation, anchorage-independent growth, migration capability, and drug resistance, compared to parental DU145 cells. NANOG and NANOGP8 knockout did not inhibit in vitro cell proliferation, but in vivo tumorigenic potential decreased significantly. These phenotypes were recovered in NANOG- and NANOGP8-rescued cell lines. These results indicate that NANOG and NANOGP8 proteins are expressed in prostate cancer cell lines, and NANOG and NANOGP8 equally contribute to the high malignant potential of prostate cancer. PMID:26087476

  18. Salivary detection of human Papilloma virus 16 & 18 in pre-malignant and malignant lesions of oral cavity: Is it feasible in Pakistani context of Socio-Cultural Taboos?

    PubMed Central

    Khyani, Iqbal A. Muhammad; Qureshi, Masood A.; Mirza, Talat; Farooq, M. Umar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate salivary detection of HPV-16 & 18 would be feasible and informative biomarker for oral pre-malignant and malignant lesion in our population. Methods: This non-interventional, case control study was carried out at department of E.N.T, Head and Neck Surgery, Dow University of Health Sciences, Dow Medical College and Civil Hospital Karachi, Pakistan between July 2011 to December 2012. Total of 105 cases were recruited. These were divided in three groups ‘A’, ‘B’ & ‘C’ having 35 subjects each. Group‘A’ constitutes patients having strong clinical evidence of oral pre-malignant lesions (PML). Group ‘B’ includes histologically proven oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and Group ‘C’ comprised disease free subjects as controls. After taking informed consent, relevant clinical history was recorded on institutional approved performa. Saliva from all subjects was procured by standard ‘drooling method’. Samples were stored at +4°C and later transferred to Laboratory to store at-20°C before further process. Samples were centrifuged at 4500 rpm for 15 minutes at 4°C. Cell pellets sediments were used for identification of HPV-16 & 18 by real-time PCR method. Data was entered and analysed using SPSS version 16. P-value of 0.05 was taken as standard. Results: In group ‘A’, HPV-16 was detected in 3 (8.6%) cases while HPV-18 was not detected in any of the subject. In group ‘B’, HPV-16 was detected in 07 (20%) while HPV-18 was found in 06 (17.1%) cases. Mixed HPV-16 and HPV-18 were found in 02 (5.7%) cases. In group ‘C’, HPV-16 was detected in 03(8.6%) while HPV-18 was not detected in any of the subjects. Significant relationship was observed between the groups for HPV-18 detection (P= 0.002) while for HPV-16, no significant association was found (P= 0.245). Conclusion: HPV infection for the causation of oral cancer cannot be fully established possibly due to small sample size. More over differences in genetic makeup, environment, indulgence in peculiar risk factor habits, sexual practices and difficult evaluation of the acquisition of viral load due to socio-cultural and religious restrictions could be the reason.

  19. Potential of 'flat' fibre evanescent wave spectroscopy to discriminate between normal and malignant cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hammody, Z; Huleihel, M; Salman, A; Argov, S; Moreh, R; Katzir, A; Mordechai, S

    2007-11-01

    The present study focuses on evaluating the potential of flattened AgClBr fibre-optic evanescent wave spectroscopy (FTIR-FEWS) technique for detection and identification of cancer cells in vitro using cell culture as a model system. The FTIR-FEWS results are compared to those from FTIR-microspectroscopy (FTIR-MSP) method extensively used to identify spectral properties of intact cells. Ten different samples of control and malignant cells were measured in parallel by the above two methods. Our results show a significant similarity between the results obtained by the two methodologies. The absorbance level of Amide I/Amide II, phosphates and carbohydrates were significantly altered in malignant compared to the normal cells using both systems. Thus, common biomarkers such as Amide I/Amide II, phosphate and carbohydrate levels can be derived to discern between normal and cancer cells. However, marked differences are also noted between the two methodologies in the protein bands due to CH3 bending vibration (1480-1350 cm(-1)). The spectral differences may be attributed to the variation in the penetration depth of the two methodologies. The use of flattened fibre rather than the standard cylindrical fibre has several practical advantages and is considered as an important step towards in vivo measurements in real time, such as that of skin nevi and melanoma using special designs of fibre-optic-based sensors. PMID:17970920

  20. [Involvement of zinc in taste disturbance occurring during treatment for malignant tumor in the chest and the effects of polaprezinc oral disintegrating tablets (a retrospective study)].

    PubMed

    Nakata, Yoko; Hirashima, Tomonori; Kondou, Yoko; Tokuoka, Yoshie; Imazato, Hitomi; Iwata, Kaori; Oomori, Yukari; Yamato, Akihiro; Shimizu, Saburou; Nagao, Sadako; Matsui, Kaoru; Abe, Noriko

    2008-06-01

    We analyzed the correlation between serum zinc levels and taste disturbance, and between patient backgrounds and serum zinc levels or taste disturbance, and evaluated the effects of polaprezinc oral disintegrating tablets on taste disturbance in 29 patients with lung cancer and one patient with malignant pleural mesothelioma who were receiving chemotherapy. Taste disturbance developed in 11 (36.7%) out of 30 patients. Serum zinc levels significantly correlated with taste disturbance (p=0.0227). Serum zinc levels were significantly lower (p=0.0235) and taste disturbance tended to be more frequent (p=0.0625) in males. Polaprezinc improved taste disturbance in 5 of 8 patients. PMID:18633224

  1. Disulfiram, an old drug with new potential therapeutic uses for human hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Conticello, Concetta; Martinetti, Daniela; Adamo, Luana; Buccheri, Simona; Giuffrida, Raffaella; Parrinello, Nunziatina; Lombardo, Laura; Anastasi, Gabriele; Amato, Gabriella; Cavalli, Maide; Chiarenza, Annalisa; De Maria, Ruggero; Giustolisi, Rosario; Gulisano, Massimo; Di Raimondo, Francesco

    2012-11-01

    Disulfiram (DSF) is an aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor currently used for the treatment of alcoholism. Here, we show that multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines and primary cells from newly diagnosed and relapsed/resistant patients affected by MM, acute myeloid and lymphoblastic leukemia are significantly sensitive to DSF alone and in combination with copper. These effects are present at doses lower than those achievable in vivo after DSF standard administration. The cytotoxic effect achieved by this treatment is comparable to that obtained by conventional chemotherapy and is absent in normal hematopoietic cells. In addition, we found that DSF plus copper induces loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, triggers reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and activates executioner caspases. DSF-copper-induced apoptosis and caspases activation are strongly reversed by antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, thus indicating a critical role of ROS. These results might suggest the use of the old drug DSF, alone or in combination with copper, in the treatment of hematological malignancies. PMID:22322883

  2. The potential of chitosan for the oral administration of peptides.

    PubMed

    Prego, Cecilia; Torres, Dolores; Alonso, Maria Jose

    2005-09-01

    Over recent years, a major challenge in drug delivery has been the design of appropriate vehicles for the oral administration of macromolecular drugs (peptides and proteins). Indeed, despite the increasing market value of these complex molecules, their clinical use has been highly limited by their reduced oral bioavailability. Among the different delivery approaches explored so far, those based on the use of the polysaccharide chitosan have opened promising alternatives towards this ambitious goal. This is due to the interesting physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties of this polymer. This article describes the advances that have been made in the design of chitosan-based systems specially adapted for the oral administration of peptides. These systems include solutions, microspheres, nanoparticles, nanocapsules and liposomes. More specifically, this article discusses the efficacy of the different delivery approaches for improving the absorption of peptides, and analyses the various mechanisms that have been proposed for the understanding of their efficacy. PMID:16296782

  3. A standard picture of healthy oral mucosae by direct oral microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Drogoszewska, Barbara; Michcik, Adam; Polcyn, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Direct oral microscopy constitutes a novel technique of in vivo oral mucosae examination. The basic principles of this method derive from colposcopy and dermoscopy. The main goal of direct oral microscopy is the earliest possible detection of oral precancerous lesions in order to implement their treatment as quickly as possible and prevent malignant transformation. Aim To establish a standard picture of healthy oral mucosae with direct oral microscopy applying standard colposcopic criteria in order to create a reference point for further diagnosis of precancerous lesions. Material and methods Thirty patients of both genders with clinically unaltered oral mucosae were examined. For every individual, clinical examination with the naked eye was performed, followed by direct oral microscopy with colposcopic assessment criteria. Oral mucosae at various sites (lip, cheek, floor of mouth, ventral and lateral sides of the tongue, alveolar ridge and soft palate) were examined. Results Subepithelial blood vessel patterns, mucosal surface, colour tone and transparency were described for healthy oral mucosae. Moreover, cases with clinically unaltered oral mucosae where direct oral microscopy revealed subclinical alterations were described. Conclusions Direct oral microscopy with colposcopic assessment criteria enables establishment of a repeated picture of unaltered oral mucosae. The standard picture of healthy oral mucosae is an essential reference point for application of this technique to early diagnose potentially malignant oral mucosal lesions as well as apply their early treatment. PMID:24278068

  4. Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Yardimci, Gurkan; Kutlubay, Zekayi; Engin, Burhan; Tuzun, Yalcin

    2014-12-16

    Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa, known as potentially malignant disorders in recent years, are consists of a group of diseases, which should be diagnosed in the early stage. Oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, and oral erythroplakia are the most common oral mucosal diseases that have a very high malignant transformation rate. Oral lichen planus is one of the potentially malignant disorders that may be seen in six different subtypes including papular, reticular, plaque-like, atrophic, erosive, and bullous type, clinically. Atrophic and erosive subtypes have the greater increased malignant transformation risk compared to another subtypes. Although there are various etiological studies, the etiology of almost all these diseases is not fully understood. Geographically, etiologic factors may vary. The most frequently reported possible factors are tobacco use, alcohol drinking, chewing of betel quid containing areca nut, and solar rays. Early diagnosis is very important and can be lifesaving, because in late stages, they may be progressed to severe dysplasia and even carcinoma in situ and/or squamous cell carcinoma. For most diseases, treatment results are not satisfactory in spite of miscellaneous therapies. While at the forefront of surgical intervention, topical and systemic treatment alternatives such as corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and retinoids are widely used. PMID:25516862

  5. Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Yardimci, Gurkan; Kutlubay, Zekayi; Engin, Burhan; Tuzun, Yalcin

    2014-01-01

    Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa, known as potentially malignant disorders in recent years, are consists of a group of diseases, which should be diagnosed in the early stage. Oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, and oral erythroplakia are the most common oral mucosal diseases that have a very high malignant transformation rate. Oral lichen planus is one of the potentially malignant disorders that may be seen in six different subtypes including papular, reticular, plaque-like, atrophic, erosive, and bullous type, clinically. Atrophic and erosive subtypes have the greater increased malignant transformation risk compared to another subtypes. Although there are various etiological studies, the etiology of almost all these diseases is not fully understood. Geographically, etiologic factors may vary. The most frequently reported possible factors are tobacco use, alcohol drinking, chewing of betel quid containing areca nut, and solar rays. Early diagnosis is very important and can be lifesaving, because in late stages, they may be progressed to severe dysplasia and even carcinoma in situ and/or squamous cell carcinoma. For most diseases, treatment results are not satisfactory in spite of miscellaneous therapies. While at the forefront of surgical intervention, topical and systemic treatment alternatives such as corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and retinoids are widely used. PMID:25516862

  6. Epstein-Barr virus LMP1 modulates the malignant potential of gastric carcinoma cells involving apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, L. F.; Chen, A.; Wei, Y. H.; Ho, K. C.; Cheng, J. Y.; Meng, C. L.; Lee, W. H.

    1998-01-01

    About 10% of gastric carcinomas including lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma and adenocarcinoma are associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. In EBV-associated gastric carcinomas, the tumor cells express Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1) but not EBNA-2, -3A, -3B, or -3C, leader protein, or latent membrane proteins (LMPs) because of gene methylation. Only a few exceptional cases have LMP1 expression in tumor cells as demonstrated by immunohistochemical studies. To elucidate the biological effects of LMP1 and the significance of its restricted expression in EBV-associated gastric carcinomas, the LMP1 gene was transferred into EBV-negative gastric carcinoma cell lines (SCM1 and TMC1) and into EBV-negative nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells (HONE-1) as a control. The biological effects of LMP1 in gastric carcinoma cells were monitored in vitro and in vivo. These results showed that the consequence of LMP1 expression is a growth enhancement in NPC cells, but it is a growth suppression in gastric carcinoma cells. The LMP1-expressing gastric carcinoma cells had a reduced growth rate, colony-forming efficiency, mean colony size, and tumorigenicity and a lower malignant cytological grade. The reduced growth rate, colony-forming efficiency, and mean colony size were partially reversible in vitro with treatment with LMP1 antisense oligonucleotide. In addition, enhanced apoptosis was found in the LMP1-expressing gastric carcinoma cells. This suggests that LMP1 may negatively modulate the malignant potential of gastric carcinoma cells via an enhancement of apoptosis. We concluded that the restriction of LMP1 expression in EBV-associated gastric carcinomas may lead to a growth advantage for tumor cells by avoiding LMP1 apoptotic effects and immunologically mediated elimination. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9422524

  7. Cooperatively transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of sonic hedgehog overexpression drives malignant potential of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhao-Heng; Wang, Hao-Chuan; Zhao, Dong-Mei; Ji, Xiao-Xin; Song, Min; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Cui, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh), a ligand of Hedgehog signaling pathway, is considered an important oncogene and an exciting potential therapeutic target in several cancers. Comprehensive understanding of the regulation mechanism of Shh in cancer cells is necessary to find an effective approach to selectively block its tumorigenic function. We and others previously demonstrated that nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) activation and promoter hypomethylation contributed to the overexpression of Shh. However, the relationship between transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of Shh, and their roles in the malignant phenotype of cancer cells are still not clearly elucidated. In the present study, our data showed that the level of Shh was higher in breast cancer tissues with positive NF-?B nuclear staining and promoter hypomethylation. In addition, survival analysis revealed that Shh overexpression, but not hypomethylation and NF-?B nuclear staining, was a poor prognosis indicator for breast cancers. Moreover, in vitro data demonstrated that both NF-?B activation and hypomethylation in promoter region were positively associated with the overexpression of Shh. Mechanistically, the hypomethylation in Shh promoter could facilitate NF-?B binding to its site, and subsequently cooperate to induce transcription of Shh. Furthermore, the biological function data indicated that overexpressed Shh enhanced the self-renewal capacity and migration ability of breast cancer cells, which could be augmented by promoter demethylation and NF-?B activation. Overall, our findings reveal multiple and cooperative mechanisms of Shh upregulation in cancer cells, and the roles of Shh in tumor malignant behavior, thus suggesting a new strategy for therapeutic interventions to reduce Shh in tumors and improve patients’ prognosis. PMID:25990213

  8. Ets1 as a marker of malignant potential in gastric carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yong; Zhang, Yi-Chu; Zhang, Wen-Zhu; Shen, Li-Song; Hertzog, Paul; Wilson, Trevor J; Xu, Da-Kang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Ets1 proto-oncogene is a transcription factor involved in the activation of several genes of tumor invasion and metastasis. We aimed to determine the relationship between the extent and intensity of Ets1 expression and patients’ clinicopathological factors in gastric carcinoma. METHODS: Immunohistochemical analysis was performed for gastric tumor paraffin-embedded sections, followed by image analysis. RESULTS: Ets1 was not expressed in the normal gastric epithelium and its surrounding cells. The percentage of Ets1 expressing cells detected increased significantly in both epithelial tumor and stromal cells from high T classification, lymph node metastasis positive, clinical advanced-stage groups (P < 0.001). The level of Ets1 staining in epithelial tumor cells also reflected the degree of cell differentiation. The percentage of epithelial and stromal cells expressing Ets1 was significantly correlated with the presence of lymph node metastasis (P = 0.014 and P < 0.001 respectively). Ets1 expression was not observed in tissue samples from patients with benign gastric ulcers. CONCLUSION: Ets1 protein expression in epithelial tumor cells reflects the degree of differentiation, and the percentage of Ets1 positive tumor and stromal cells correlates with lymph node metastasis. Thus Ets1 is a valuable marker of malignant potential in terms of invasiveness and metastasis of gastric carcinoma. It is also possible that inhibition of Ets1 is a potential avenue for therapy in gastric cancer. PMID:14562368

  9. Evaluation of an oral health scale of infectious potential using a telematic survey of visual diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Relvas, Marta; Limeres, Jacobo; Cabral, Cristina; Velazco, Corsina; Diz, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the results of a subjective estimation of oral health through review of a set of intraoral photographs with those of an objective oral health scale of infectious potential. Method: The pool of patients was made up of 100 adults. Using an infectious-potential scale based on dental and periodontal variables, we assigned 1 of the 4 grades of the scale (range, 0 to 3; 0 corresponds to an excellent oral health status and 3 to the poorest oral health status) to each subject. A total of 20 representative subjects were selected from the pool of patients, 5 subjects for each one of the grades of the scale, and a standardized photographic record was made. One thousand dentists practicing in Spain were sent the survey by e-mail and 174 completed forms were received. We then calculated the concordance of the oral health status indicated by the respondents after visualising the photographs on comparison with the results of the oral health scale of infectious potential; concordance was termed correct grade allocation (CGA). Results: The majority of respondents (69.1%) achieved a CGA in 8 to 12 cases and none achieved more than 15 CGAs. The poorest CGA rates were found with grades 1 and 2, with a mean of 1.74 ± 1.09 and 1.87 ± 1.18, respectively, out of a maximum of 5. The concordance in terms of CGA was high for grade 0 (70.5%), very low for grade 1 (10.8%), low for grade 2 (37.3%), and moderate for grade 3 (42.6%). Conclusion: In comparison with visual examination of the oral cavity, the use of objective scale that establishes a reliable diagnosis of oral health in terms of infectious potential was found to be advantageous. Key words:Diagnosis, intraoral photographies, oral health scale, objective estimation, visual examination. PMID:23524432

  10. Oral health technicians in Brazilian primary health care: potentials and constraints.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Dulce Maria Lucena de; Tomita, Nilce Emy; Machado, Maria de Fátima Antero Sousa; Martins, Cleide Lavieri; Frazão, Paulo

    2014-07-01

    Different perspectives on the role of mid-level workers in health care might represent a constraint to health policies. This study aimed to investigate how different agents view the participation of oral health technicians in direct activities of oral healthcare with the goal of understanding the related symbolic dispositions. Theoretical assumptions related to inter-professional collaboration and conflicts in the field of healthcare were used for this analysis. A researcher conducted 24 in-depth interviews with general dental practitioners, oral health technicians and local managers. The concepts of Pierre Bourdieu supported the data interpretation. The results indicated inter-professional relations marked by collaboration and conflict that reflect an action space related to different perspectives of primary care delivery. They also unveiled the symbolic devices related to the participation of oral health technicians that represent a constraint to the implementation of oral health policy, thus reducing the potential of primary health care in Brazil. PMID:25166951

  11. HDAC8, A Potential Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors (MPNST)

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Gonzalo; Bill, Kate Lynn J.; Bid, Hemant Kumar; Braggio, Danielle; Constantino, Dylan; Prudner, Bethany; Zewdu, Abeba; Batte, Kara; Lev, Dina; Pollock, Raphael E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction HDAC isoform-specific inhibitors may improve the therapeutic window while limiting toxicities. Developing inhibitors against class I isoforms poses difficulties as they share high homology among their catalytic sites; however, HDAC8 is structurally unique compared to other class I isoforms. HDAC8 inhibitors are novel compounds and have affinity for class I HDAC isoforms demonstrating anti-cancer effects; little is known about their activity in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST). Recently, we demonstrated anti-MPNST efficacy of HDAC8i in human and murine-derived MPNST pre-clinical models; we now seek to consider the potential therapeutic inhibition of HDAC8 in MPNST. Methods Four Human MPNST cell lines, a murine-derived MPNST cell line, and two HDAC8 inhibitors (PCI-34051, PCI-48012; Pharmacyclics, Inc. Sunnyvale, CA) were studied. Proliferation was determined using MTS and clonogenic assays. Effects on cell cycle were determined via PI FACS analysis; effects on apoptosis were determined using Annexin V-PI FACS analysis and cleaved caspase 3 expression. In vivo growth effects of HDAC8i were evaluated using MPNST xenograft models. 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to identify potential HDAC8 deacetylation substrates. Results HDAC8i induced cell growth inhibition and marked S-phase cell cycle arrest in human and murine-derived MPNST cells. Relative to control, HDAC8i induced apoptosis in both human and murine-derived MPNST cells. HDAC8i exhibited significant effects on MPNST xenograft growth (p=0.001) and tumor weight (p=0.02). Four potential HDAC8 substrate targets were identified using a proteomic approach: PARK7, HMGB1, PGAM1, PRDX6. Conclusions MPNST is an aggressive sarcoma that is notoriously therapy-resistant, hence the urgent need for improved anti-MPNST therapies. HDAC8 inhibition may be useful for MPNST by improving efficacy while limiting toxicities as compared to pan-HDACis. PMID:26200462

  12. Combination therapy of potential gene to enhance oral cancer therapeutic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chia-Hsien; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2015-03-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) over-regulation related to uncontrolled cell division and promotes progression in tumor. Over-expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been detected in oral cancer cells. EGFR-targeting agents are potential therapeutic modalities for treating oral cancer based on our in vitro study. Liposome nanotechnology is used to encapsulate siRNA and were modified with target ligand to receptors on the surface of tumor cells. We used EGFR siRNA to treat oral cancer in vitro.

  13. Anticancer property of bromelain with therapeutic potential in malignant peritoneal mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Krishna; Akhter, Javed; Chua, Terence C; Morris, David Lawson

    2013-05-01

    Bromelain is a mixture of proteolytic enzymes that is capable of hydrolyzing glycosidic linkages in glycoprotein. Glycoprotein's are ubiquitously distributed throughout the body and serve a variety of physiologic functions. Faulty glycosylation of proteins may lead to cancer. Antitumor properties of bromelain have been demonstrated in both, in vitro and in vivo studies, along with scanty anecdotal human studies. Various mechanistic pathways have been proposed to explain the anticancer properties of bromelain. However, proteolysis by bromelain has been suggested as a main pathway by some researchers. MUC1 is a glycoprotein that provides tumor cells with invasive, metastatic, and chemo-resistant properties. To date, there is no study that examines the effect of bromelain on MUC1. However, the viability of MUC1 expressing pancreatic and breast cancer cells are adversely affected by bromelain. Further, the efficacy of cisplatin and 5-FU are enhanced by adjuvant treatment with bromelain, indicating that the barrier function of MUC1 may be affected. Other studies have also indicated that there is a greater accumulation of 5-FU in the cell compartment on treatment with 5-FU and bromelain. Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) expresses MUC1 and initial studies have shown that the viability of MPM cells is adversely affected by exposure to bromelain. Further, bromelain in combination with either 5-FU or cisplatin, the efficacy of the chemotherapeutic drug is enhanced. Hence, current evidence indicates that bromelain may have the potential of being developed into an effective anticancer agent for MPM. PMID:23570457

  14. Can Prostate-Specific Antigen Kinetics before Prostate Biopsy Predict the Malignant Potential of Prostate Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Jin; Jeong, Tae Yoong; Yoo, Dae Seon; Park, Jinsung; Cho, Seok; Kang, Seok Ho; Lee, Sang Hyub; Jeon, Seung Hyun; Lee, Tchun Yong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To predict the malignant potential of prostate cancer (PCa) according to prostate-specific antigen velocity (PSAV), PSA density (PSAD), free/total PSA ratio (%fPSA), and digital rectal examination (DRE). Materials and Methods From January 2009 to December 2012, 548 adult male patients were diagnosed with PCa by prostate biopsy at four hospitals in Korea. We retrospectively analyzed 155 adult male patients with an initial PSA level ?10 ng/mL and whose PSA levels had been checked more than two times at least 6 months before they had been diagnosed with PCa, with test intervals of more than 3 months. Patients with a urinary tract infection, and patients who had previously undergone cystoscopy or surgery of the prostate were excluded. We separated patients into two groups according to Gleason sum [Gleason sum ?7 (n=134) or Gleason sum ?8 (n=21)] and the presence of extracapsular invasion [organ confined (n=129) or extracapsular invasion (n=26)]. Differences between the groups were compared. Results The group with a Gleason sum ?8 or extracapsular invasion of PCa showed high PSAV and significantly lower %fPSA. There were no significant differences in PSAD and the presence of an abnormality on DRE between two groups. Conclusion In PCa patients treated with other therapies besides prostatectomy, a high PSA velocity and a low %fPSA may predict high grade PCa with a Gleason sum ?8 or the presence of extracapsular invasion. PMID:26446628

  15. Low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMWPTP) upregulation mediates malignant potential in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hoekstra, Elmer; Kodach, Liudmila L.; Das, Asha M.; Ruela-de-Sousa, Roberta R.; Ferreira, Carmen V.; Hardwick, James C.; van der Woude, C. Janneke; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; ten Hagen, Timo L.M.; Fuhler, Gwenny M.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatases have long been regarded as tumor suppressors, however there is emerging evidence for a tumor initiating role for some phosphatases in several forms of cancer. Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (LMWPTP; acid phosphatase 1 [ACP1]) is an 18 kDa enzyme that influences the phosphorylation of signaling pathway mediators involved in cancer and is thus postulated to be a tumor-promoting enzyme, but neither unequivocal clinical evidence nor convincing mechanistic actions for a role of LMWPTP have been identified. In the present study, we show that LMWPTP expression is not only significantly increased in colorectal cancer (CRC), but also follows a step-wise increase in different levels of dysplasia. Chemical inhibition of LMWPTP significantly reduces CRC growth. Furthermore, downregulation of LMWPTP in CRC leads to a reduced migration ability in both 2D- and 3D-migration assays, and sensitizes tumor cells to the chemotherapeutic agent 5-FU. In conclusion, this study shows that LMWPTP is not only overexpressed in colorectal cancer, but it is correlated with the malignant potential of this cancer, suggesting that this phosphatase may act as a predictive biomaker of CRC stage and represents a rational novel target in the treatment of this disease. PMID:25811796

  16. Risk, Outcomes, and Costs of Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis Among Patients With Head-and-Neck Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Elting, Linda S. . E-mail: lelting@mdanderson.org; Cooksley, Catherine D.; Chambers, Mark S.; Garden, Adam S.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To study the risk, outcomes, and costs of radiation-induced oral mucositis (OM) among patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) to head and neck primary cancers. Methods and Materials: A retrospective cohort consisting of 204 consecutive head-and-neck cancer patients who received RT with or without chemotherapy during 2002 was formed; their records were reviewed for clinical and resource use information. Patients who had received prior therapy, had second primary cancers, or received palliative radiation therapy were excluded. The risk of OM was analyzed by multiple variable logistic regression. The cost of care was computed from the provider's perspective in 2006 U.S. dollars and compared among patients with and without OM. Results: Oral mucositis occurred in 91% of patients; in 66% it was severe (Grade 3-4). Oral mucositis was more common among patients with oral cavity or oropharynx primaries (odds ratio [OR], 44.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.2 to >100; p < 0.001), those who received chemotherapy (OR = 7.8; 95% CI, 1.5-41.6; p 0.02), and those who were treated with altered fractionation schedules (OR 6.3; 95% CI, 1.1-35.1; p = 0.03). Patients with OM were significantly more likely to have severe pain (54% vs. 6%; p < 0.001) and a weight loss of {>=}5% (60% vs. 17%; p < 0.001). Oral mucositis was associated with an incremental cost of $1700-$6000, depending on the grade. Conclusions: Head-and-neck RT causes OM in virtually all patients. Oral mucositis is associated with severe pain, significant weight loss, increased resource use, and excess cost. Preventive strategies are needed.

  17. Mucinous cystic tumour of low malignant potential presenting in a patient with prior non-seminatous germ cell tumour

    PubMed Central

    Chahal, Daljeet; Martens, Mildred; Kinahan, John

    2015-01-01

    Urachal neoplasms are rare entities which may be classified as cystic or non-cystic. Literature surrounding patient outcomes remains limited to non-cystic, urachal adenocarcinomas. Literature focusing on mucinous cystic neoplasms of the urachus is sparse. These mucinous cystic lesions may be subclassified as benign mucinous cystadenomas, mucinous cystic tumours of low malignant potential, and mucinous cystadenocarcinomas. Mucinous subtypes have the potential to behave aggressively and may result in pseudomyxoma peritonei. We describe here the case of a 37-year-old male with a mucinous cystic tumour of low malignant potential after prior right orchiectomy and left hydrocelectomy. This case raises the interesting possibility of multiple genitourinary neoplasms arising in a similar time frame. PMID:26664515

  18. [Changes in the redox potential of serum samples following in vitro irradiation--an indicator of malignant tumor growth].

    PubMed

    Hamann, D; Heinrich, H

    1989-01-01

    In serum samples of healthy persons and patients with malignant neoplasia the reduction-oxidation-potentials were determined. Measurements were made in untreated sera and after irradiation with different doses. Sera of healthy persons showed a decrease that of tumor patients an increase of redox-potential values. With this method malignant tumor growth can be demonstrated. It does not yet permit any statements on tumor localisation. On the other hand conclusions seem to be possible on growth speed of neoplasia. To our hitherto existing experiences estimations of redox-potential are applicable to the diagnosis of fast growing recurrences and metastases in tumor after-care, but can also support the therapeutic procedure decisively in defined differential diagnostic problems and in tumors of dignity in question. PMID:2608893

  19. Antidotes for novel oral anticoagulants: current status and future potential.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Mark; Crowther, Mark A

    2015-08-01

    The direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran and the anti-Xa agents rivaroxaban, edoxaban, and apixaban are a new generation of oral anticoagulants. Their advantage over the vitamin K antagonists is the lack of the need for monitoring and dose adjustment. Their main disadvantage is currently the absence of a specific reversal agent. Dabigatran's, unlike the anti-Xa agents, absorption can be reduced by activated charcoal if administered shortly after ingestion and it can be removed from the blood with hemodialysis. Prothrombin complex concentrate, activated prothrombin complex concentrate, and recombinant factor VIIa all show some activity in reversing the anticoagulant effect of these drugs but this is based on ex vivo, animal, and volunteer studies. It is unclear, which, if any, of these drugs is the most suitable for emergency reversal. Three novel molecules (idarucizumab, andexanet, and PER977) may provide the most effective and safest way of reversal. These agents are currently in premarketing studies. PMID:26088576

  20. Lethal photosensitisation of oral bacteria and its potential application in the photodynamic therapy of oral infections.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael

    2004-05-01

    Chemical antibacterial agents are increasingly being used in prophylactic and therapeutic regimes for dental plaque-related diseases, which are among the most common human infections. As these agents are difficult to maintain at a therapeutic concentration in the oral cavity and can be rendered ineffective by resistance development in the target organisms, there is a need to develop alternative antimicrobial approaches. Bacteria and other microbes can be sensitised to light through prior treatment with a chemical photosensitising agent. Lethal photosensitisation of a wide range of bacteria responsible for caries, periodontal diseases and root canal infections has been demonstrated using red light in conjunction with a number of photosensitisers, including Toluidine Blue, phthalocyanines and chlorins. The advantages of this approach are that bacteria can be eradicated in very short periods of time (seconds or minutes), resistance development in the target bacteria is unlikely and damage to adjacent host tissues and disruption of the normal microflora can be avoided. This approach may be a useful alternative to antibiotics and antiseptics in eliminating cariogenic and periodontopathogenic bacteria from disease lesions and for the disinfection of root canals. Not only would this be of benefit for the treatment of these diseases but, by replacing the antimicrobial agents that are currently used for such purposes, it would help to conserve our dwindling supply of antimicrobial agents that are effective in the treatment of serious systemic infections. PMID:15122357

  1. Garlic allicin as a potential agent for controlling oral pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, Gilad; Jamil, Areen; Naor, Ronit; Tal, Golan; Ludmer, Zvi; Steinberg, Doron

    2011-11-01

    Garlic has been used medicinally throughout human history. Allicin is considered the most therapeutic constituent of garlic. This study tested the antimicrobial activity of garlic allicin on oral pathogens associated with dental caries and periodontitis. Allicin was found effective against all the tested bacteria. The broth dilution method revealed that planktonic growth of the cariogenic, gram-positive species Streptococcus mutans, S. sobrinus, and Actinomyces oris was inhibited by an allicin concentration of 600 ?g/mL or higher. Planktonic growth of the tested gram-negative periopathogenic species Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Fusobacterium nucleatum was inhibited by a minimum allicin concentration of 300 ?g/mL. Porphyromonas gingivalis, an anaerobic, gram-negative pathogen and the bacterium most associated with chronic periodontitis, demonstrated the lowest sensitivity to allicin (2,400 ?g/mL). Gel zymography and the synthetic chromogenic substrate N(?)-benzoyl-L-arginine 4-nitroanilide hydrochloride demonstrated that allicin inhibits the proteases of P. gingivalis, including the arginine and lysine gingipains known as major virulence factors of this organism. A gingipain-inactivated mutant demonstrated high sensitivity to allicin (<300 ?g/mL), revealing that gingipains confer resistance to allicin. Live/dead staining followed by analysis with confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that allicin was bactericidal to S. mutans grown in mature biofilms. However, this bactericidal effect was reduced as biofilm depth increased. In conclusion, these results support the traditional medicinal use of garlic and suggest the use of allicin for alleviating dental diseases. PMID:21548800

  2. MicroRNA-214 and MicroRNA-126 Are Potential Biomarkers for Malignant Endothelial Proliferative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Heishima, Kazuki; Mori, Takashi; Ichikawa, Yukie; Sakai, Hiroki; Kuranaga, Yuki; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Tanaka, Yuiko; Okamura, Yasuhiko; Masuzawa, Mikio; Sugito, Nobuhiko; Murakami, Mami; Yamada, Nami; Akao, Yukihiro; Maruo, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Malignant endothelial proliferative diseases including human angiosarcoma (AS) and canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA) are serious diseases with a grave prognosis. Establishing liquid biopsy-based biomarkers for screening has definite clinical utility; however, plasma miRNAs up- or down-regulated in these sarcomas have been unclear. For identifying possible diagnostic plasma miRNAs for these sarcomas, we investigated whether plasma miR-214 and miR-126, which miRNAs play important roles in angiogenesis and tumorigenesis, were elevated in malignant endothelial proliferative diseases. For this investigation, human angiosarcoma and canine hemangiosarcoma cell lines and clinical plasma samples of canine hemangiosarcoma were examined by performing miRNA qRT-PCR. We report here that human angiosarcoma and canine hemangiosarcoma cell lines over-secreted miR-214 and miR-126 via microvesicles; in addition, their levels in the plasma samples from canines with hemangiosarcoma were increased. Moreover, the surgical resection of primary tumors decreased the levels of plasma miR-214 and miR-126. Our findings suggest that these malignant endothelial proliferative diseases over-secreted miR-214 and miR-126, thus suggesting that these miRNAs have potential as diagnostic biomarkers for malignant endothelial proliferative diseases in canine and possible in human angiosarcoma. PMID:26512652

  3. Anisi stellati fructus extract attenuates the in vitro and in vivo metastatic and angiogenic potential of malignant cancer cells by downregulating proteolytic activity and pro-angiogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Aeyung; Im, Minju; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2014-11-01

    Anisi stellati fructus (ASF), commonly known as star anise, has long been used as a traditional Chinese medicine to treat inflammation, nervousness, insomnia and pain. In recent studies, it has been demonstrated that ASF possesses anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and anti-oxidant activities, as well as exhibits inhibitory effects on capillary?like tube formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). However, the effects of ASF extract on the metastatic potential of malignant tumor cells have not been examined. In this study, we found that daily oral administration of ASF (50 mg/kg) remarkably reduced the number of pulmonary metastatic colonies of B16F10 cells in C57BL/6J mice with no observed systemic toxicity. In an in vitro system, ASF inhibited metastatic properties, including anchorage?independent colony formation, migration and invasion. Upon phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulation, the mRNA levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) -9, -13, -14 and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) decreased in a dose-dependent manner with ASF treatment. Gelatinase, type I collagenase, and uPA activities were also suppressed efficiently by ASF treatment. In response to PMA, NF-?B and AP-1 activation as well as p38 phosphorylation, which are crucial for MMP activation, were significantly decreased by ASF. In particular, ASF considerably inhibited tumor-induced HUVEC migration and tube formation and suppressed in vivo tumor-induced angiogenesis via a reduction of pro-angiogenic factors in tumors. These results collectively indicate that ASF might be useful in the management of metastatic malignant tumors. PMID:25176510

  4. Potential use of oral fluid samples for serological diagnosis of African swine fever.

    PubMed

    Mur, Lina; Gallardo, Carmina; Soler, Alejandro; Zimmermman, Jeffrey; Pelayo, Virginia; Nieto, Raquel; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel; Arias, Marisa

    2013-07-26

    African swine fever (ASF) is a complex, highly lethal, notifiable disease of swine. ASF is wide-spread in sub-Saharan Africa and East European countries and there is presently a great risk of spread to neighboring countries. Since there is no vaccine for ASF virus (ASFV), control is based on rapid and early detection of the disease via surveillance. This approach requires collecting blood samples from large number of animals. Laborious and expensive of itself, this process also presents an additional risk because ASFV is present at high concentrations in the blood. The objective of this study was to initiate studies into the potential use of oral fluid as an alternative to serum for ASF diagnosis, for latter studying its possible use in surveillance and control programs. To this end, oral fluid samples collected at different times post infection from eight pigs experimentally inoculated with an attenuated ASFV were assayed using modified protocols of the two validated serological techniques, the enzyme-immune-liked assay (ELISA) and immunoperoxidase technique (IPT). Antibodies against ASFV were detected in oral fluid samples of all animals from early post infection through the end of the experiment by ELISA and IPT. These results confirmed the presence of ASFV antibodies in swine oral fluids samples, the possibility of an oral fluid-based approach in ASF diagnosis and, potentially in ASF surveillance. PMID:23374655

  5. Recent trends in prevention of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mangalath, Ummar; Aslam, Sachin Aslam; Abdul Khadar, Abdul Hafiz Kooliyat; Francis, Pulikkan George; Mikacha, Muhamed Shaloob Karimbil; Kalathingal, Jubin Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancers often occurs out of long standing potentially malignant lesions and conditions so called premalignant lesions and conditions. Oral precancer is a intermediate state with increased cancer rate which can be recognized and treated obviously with much better prognosis than a full blown malignancy. Oral cancer risk can be lowered or even prevented by simply understanding basic oral hygiene, different bacteria found in the mouth, and how diet influences oral cancers. Currently, research is being done on the relationship between diet and oral cancer. Oral cancer is a very serious disease that can be prevented. Practicing good oral hygiene is key to help keep the oral cavity clean. Limiting the use of tobacco and alcohol products is also important because these are the causes of most oral cancers. Lastly, eating a well balanced diet that has protective affects can reduce the risk of oral cancer. This includes a diet high in fruits, vegetables, and fish and low in high fat and cholesterol meats, rice, and refined grains. PMID:25625069

  6. Phase I study of OPB-51602, an oral inhibitor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, in patients with relapsed/refractory hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Michinori; Uchida, Toshiki; Terui, Yasuhito; Hayakawa, Fumihiko; Kobayashi, Yukio; Taniwaki, Masafumi; Takamatsu, Yasushi; Naoe, Tomoki; Tobinai, Kensei; Munakata, Wataru; Yamauchi, Takeshi; Kageyama, Akiko; Yuasa, Miyuki; Motoyama, Masaaki; Tsunoda, Takeshi; Hatake, Kiyohiko

    2015-01-01

    We carried out a multicenter dose-escalation phase I study of oral OPB-51602, a signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation inhibitor, in patients with relapsed or refractory hematological malignancies to evaluate the safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), pharmacokinetics, and preliminary antitumor activity. Twenty patients were treated with OPB-51602 at doses of 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 mg in the “3 + 3” dose escalation design. The most common treatment-related adverse events included nausea (55%), peripheral sensory neuropathy (45%), and diarrhea (40%). The most frequently observed grade 3 or 4 drug-related adverse events were neutropenia (20%), leukopenia (15%), lymphopenia (10%), and thrombocytopenia (10%). The MTD was 6 mg, with dose-limiting toxicities of grade 3 lactic acidosis and increased blood lactic acid levels observed in one of three patients and grade 1–2 peripheral neuropathy in three of three patients. The recommended dose was determined to be 4 mg. OPB-51602 was rapidly absorbed, and exposure tended to increase in a dose-dependent manner. Accumulation of OPB-51602 was seen with 4 weeks of multiple treatments. No clear therapeutic response was observed. Durable stable disease was observed in two patients with acute myeloid leukemia and one with myeloma. In conclusion, the MTD of OPB-51602 was 6 mg. OPB-51602 was safe and well tolerated in a dose range of 1–4 mg. However, long-term administration at higher doses was difficult with the daily dosing schedule, and no response was seen. Therefore, further clinical development of OPB-51602 for hematological malignancies with a daily dosing schedule was terminated. PMID:25912076

  7. Oral squamous cell carcinoma proliferative phenotype is modulated by proanthocyanidins: a potential prevention and treatment alternative for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    King, Michael; Chatelain, Kourt; Farris, Dustin; Jensen, Dayne; Pickup, Jason; Swapp, Aaron; O'Malley, Susan; Kingsley, Karl

    2007-01-01

    Background Despite the recently reported drop in the overall death rate from cancer, the estimated survival rate and number of deaths from oral cancer remain virtually unchanged. Early detection efforts, in combination with strategies for prevention and risk-reduction, have the potential to dramatically improve clinical outcomes. The identification of non-toxic, effective treatments, including complementary and alternative therapies, is critical if the survival rate is to be improved. Epidemiologic studies have suggested a protective effect from certain plant-derived foods and extracts; however, it has been difficult to isolate and identify the compounds most responsible for these observations. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the response of human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) to proanthocyanidin (PAC), a plant-derived compound that may inhibit the progression of several other cancers. Methods Using a series of in vitro assays, we sought to quantify the effects of PAC on OSCC, cervical carcinoma, and non-cancerous cell lines, specifically the effects of PAC on cell proliferation. Recent data suggest that infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV) may also modulate the proliferative potential of OSCC; therefore, we also measured the effects of PAC administration on HPV-transfected OSCC proliferation. Results Our results demonstrated that PAC administration was sufficient to significantly suppress cellular proliferation of OSCC in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the increased proliferation of OSCC after transfection with HPV 16 was reduced by the administration of PAC, as was the proliferation of the cervical cancer and non-cancerous cell lines tested. Our results also provide preliminary evidence that PAC administration may induce apoptosis in cervical and oral cancer cell lines, while acting merely to suppress proliferation of the normal cell line control. Conclusion These results signify that PAC may be a compelling candidate for testing in both animal and human models. Furthermore, these data provide adequate justification for elucidating the divergent mechanisms of PAC-induced proliferation, inhibition, and apoptosis among these and other cell lines. PMID:17578576

  8. The human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor ritonavir is potentially active against urological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor ritonavir has recently been shown to have antineoplastic activity, and its use in urological malignancies is under investigation with an eye toward drug repositioning. Ritonavir is thought to exert its antineoplastic activity by inhibiting multiple signaling pathways, including the Akt and nuclear factor-kappaB pathways. It can increase the amount of unfolded proteins in the cell by inhibiting both the proteasome and heat shock protein 90. Combinations of ritonavir with agents that increase the amount of unfolded proteins, such as proteasome inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, or heat shock protein 90 inhibitors, therefore, induce endoplasmic reticulum stress cooperatively and thereby kill cancer cells effectively. Ritonavir is also a potent cytochrome P450 3A4 and P-glycoprotein inhibitor, increasing the intracellular concentration of combined drugs by inhibiting their degradation and efflux from cancer cells and thereby enhancing their antineoplastic activity. Furthermore, riotnavir’s antineoplastic activity includes modulation of immune system activity. Therapies using ritonavir are thus an attractive new approach to cancer treatment and, due to their novel mechanisms of action, are expected to be effective against malignancies that are refractory to current treatment strategies. Further investigations using ritonavir are expected to find new uses for clinically available drugs in the treatment of urological malignancies as well as many other types of cancer. PMID:25914545

  9. Salivary Heparanase Level Is a Potential Biomarker to Diagnose and Prognose the Malignant Salivary Gland Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Yang; Zhu, Shengrong; Gong, Zhongjian

    2015-01-01

    Background Upregulation of heparanase has been reported in an increasing number of human cancer tissues. However, the level of salivary heparanase and its clinical significance in patients with salivary gland tumors remain unclear. Methods Salivary heparanase levels in patients with salivary gland tumors were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and the clinical significance was evaluated by analyzing the correlations among salivary heparanase levels, clinicopathological parameters, and clinical outcomes. Results The levels of salivary heparanase were significantly higher in patients with malignant salivary gland tumors than in benign tumors and normal controls (P<0.0001). High salivary heparanase levels were positively correlated with increased lymph node metastasis (P = 0.0235) and poorer tumor node metastasis stage (TNM) (P = 0.0183). Survival analyses revealed that high salivary heparanase levels were associated with worse overall survival (P = 0.0023) and disease-free survival (DFS) (P = 0.0025). Conclusions The study shows that salivary heparanase levels, as detected by the ELISAs, can be used to diagnose and provide an accurate prognosis for malignant salivary gland tumors. Salivary heparanase level was an independent predictor in patients with malignant salivary gland tumors. PMID:26569485

  10. Evaluating the potential of cubosomal nanoparticles for oral delivery of amphotericin B in treating fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiwen; Chen, Meiwan; Yang, Muhua; Chen, Jian; Fang, Weijun; Xu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The oral administration of amphotericin B (AmB) has a major drawback of poor bioavailability. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of glyceryl monoolein (GMO) cubosomes as lipid nanocarriers to improve the oral efficacy of AmB. Antifungal efficacy was determined in vivo in rats after oral administration, to investigate its therapeutic use. The human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (Caco-2) was used in vitro to evaluate transport across a model of the intestinal barrier. In vivo antifungal results showed that AmB, loaded in GMO cubosomes, could significantly enhance oral efficacy, compared against Fungizone, and that during a 2 day course of dosage 10 mg/kg the drug reached effective therapeutic concentrations in renal tissue for treating fungal infections. In the Caco-2 transport studies, GMO cubosomes resulted in a significantly larger amount of AmB being transported into Caco-2 cells, via both clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, but not macropinocytosis. These results suggest that GMO cubosomes, as lipid nanovectors, could facilitate the oral delivery of AmB. PMID:24421641

  11. Correlation of c-erbB-2 and S-100 expression with the malignancy grading and anatomical site in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque Júnior, Ricardo L C; Miguel, Márcia C C; Costa, Antonio L L; Souza, Lélia B

    2003-01-01

    An immunohistochemical analysis of 32 cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (eight in the inferior lip, eight in the lateral angle of the tongue, eight in the palate and eight in the mouth floor) was performed to evaluate the expression pattern of c-erbB-2 protein and S-100-positive cells in the lesions. The immunohistochemical expression was correlated with the tumour anatomical site and histological grading of malignancy. A higher frequency of c-erbB-2-positive cases was found in the tongue, even though no correlation could be detected between the protein expression and the tumour histological grading. With respect to the S-100-positive cells, it was observed that a quantitative decrease was present in the cases classified as high-grade tumours when compared to the low ones (P = 0.0007). Thus, c-erbB-2 immunohistochemical expression is correlated with anatomical localization, and the expression of the S-100 Langerhans' cell markers is decreased significantly in high-grade carcinomas. PMID:14748745

  12. Data from human salivary proteome - A resource of potential biomarkers for oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Sivadasan, Priya; Kumar Gupta, Manoj; Sathe, Gajanan J; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Palit, Priyanka; Gowda, Harsha; Suresh, Amritha; Abraham Kuriakose, Moni; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi

    2015-09-01

    Salivary proteins are an important source for developing marker-based assays for oral cancers. To get an insight into the proteins present in human saliva, we applied multiple strategies involving affinity-based depletion of abundant proteins, fractionation of the resulting proteins or their tryptic peptides followed by LC-MS/MS analysis, using high resolution mass spectrometry. By integrating the protein identifications observed by us with those from similar workflows employed in earlier investigations, we compiled an updated salivary proteome. We have mapped the salivary proteome to the published data on differentially expressed proteins from oral cancer tissues and also for their secretory features using prediction tools, SignalP 4.1, TMHMM 2c and Exocarta. Proteotypic peptides for the subset of proteins implicated in oral cancer and mapped to any two of the prediction tools for secretory potential have been listed. The data here are related to the research article "Human saliva proteome - a resource of potential biomarkers for oral cancer" in the Journal of Proteomics [1]. PMID:26217819

  13. Potential of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST).

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takuya; Andoh, Tooru; Sudo, Tamotsu; Fujita, Ikuo; Fukase, Naomasa; Takeuchi, Tamotsu; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Hirose, Tkanori; Sakuma, Toshiko; Moritake, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Kawamoto, Teruya; Fukumori, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Satomi; Atagi, Shinji; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Ono, Koji; Ichikawa, Hideki; Suzuki, Minoru

    2015-12-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are relatively rare neoplasms with poor prognosis. At present there is no effective treatment for MPNST other than surgical resection. Nonetheless, the anti-tumor effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was recently demonstrated in two patients with MPNST. Subsequently, tumor-bearing nude mice subcutaneously transplanted with a human MPNST cell line were injected with p-borono-L-phenylalanine (L-BPA) and subjected to BNCT. Pathological studies then revealed that the MPNST cells were selectively destroyed by BNCT. PMID:26278348

  14. From regenerative dentistry to regenerative medicine: progress, challenges, and potential applications of oral stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Li; Nasu, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and epithelial stem cells play essential roles in tissue repair and self-healing. Oral MSCs and epithelial stem cells can be isolated from adult human oral tissues, for example, teeth, periodontal ligament, and gingiva. Cocultivated adult oral epithelial stem cells and MSCs could represent some developmental events, such as epithelial invagination and tubular structure formation, signifying their potentials for tissue regeneration. Oral epithelial stem cells have been used in regenerative medicine over 1 decade. They are able to form a stratified cell sheet under three-dimensional culture conditions. Both experimental and clinical data indicate that the cell sheets can not only safely and effectively reconstruct the damaged cornea in humans, but also repair esophageal ulcer in animal models. Oral MSCs include dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED), stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), and mesenchymal stem cells from gingiva (GMSCs). They are widely applied in both regenerative dentistry and medicine. DPSCs, SHED, and SCAP are able to form dentin–pulp complex when being transplanted into immunodeficient animals. They have been experimentally used for the regeneration of dental pulp, neuron, bone muscle and blood vessels in animal models and have shown promising results. PDLSCs and GMSCs are demonstrated to be ideal cell sources for repairing the damaged tissues of periodontal, muscle, and tendon. Despite the abovementioned applications of oral stem cells, only a few human clinical trials are now underway to use them for the treatment of certain diseases. Since clinical use is the end goal, their true regenerative power and safety need to be further examined. PMID:25506228

  15. Role of micronucleus in oral exfoliative cytology

    PubMed Central

    Shashikala, R.; Indira, A. P.; Manjunath, G. S.; rao, K. Arathi; Akshatha, B. K.

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, the interest for oral cytology as a diagnostic and prognostic methodology, for monitoring patients in oral potentially malignant disorders and oral cancer has re-emerged substantially. In 1983, buccal mucosal micronuclei assay was first proposed to evaluate genetic instability. There are biomarkers that predict if a potentially malignant disorder is likely to develop into an aggressive tumor. These genotoxic and carcinogenic chemicals have been reported to be potent clastogenic and mutagenic agents which are thought to be responsible for the induction of chromatid/chromosomal aberrations resulting in the production of micronuclei. Various studies have concluded that the gradual increase in micronucleus (MN) counts from normal oral mucosa to potentially malignant disorders to oral carcinoma suggested a link of this biomarker with neoplastic progression. MN scoring can be used as a biomarker to identify different preneoplastic conditions much earlier than the manifestations of clinical features and might specifically be exploited in the screening of high-risk population for a specific cancer. Hence, it can be used as a screening prognostic and educational tool in community centers of oral cancer. PMID:26538888

  16. Atonal homolog 1 protein stabilized by tumor necrosis factor ? induces high malignant potential in colon cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Keita; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Kano, Yoshihito; Horita, Nobukatsu; Hibiya, Shuji; Hayashi, Ryohei; Kitagaki, Keisuke; Negi, Mariko; Itoh, Eisaku; Akashi, Takumi; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Oshima, Shigeru; Nagaishi, Takashi; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2015-08-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of developing colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC). CAC cells often develop chemoresistance, resulting in a poorer prognosis than that of sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC). The mechanism by which CAC enhances malignant potential remains unknown. We have previously reported that the proteasomal degradation of the transcription factor Atonal homolog 1 (Atoh1) protein results in the non-mucinous form of CRC. It also remains unknown whether Atoh1 protein is expressed in CAC. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated whether Atoh1 protein stabilizes in CAC. Consequently, the treatment with TNF-? stabilized Atoh1 protein through the inactivation of GSK-3? via Akt, resulting in the mucinous form of CRC cell lines. Atoh1 protein also enriched cancer stem cells with upregulated Lgr5 expression and cells in G0/G1 cell cycle phase, resulting in both the chemoresistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin and the promotion of cell migration. Immunofluorescence of the human mucinous CAC specimens showed the accumulation of NF-?B p65 at nuclei with the expression of Atoh1 in mucinous cancer. In conclusion, the inflammation associated with carcinogenesis may preserve the differentiation system of intestinal epithelial cell (IEC), resulting in the acquisition of both the mucinous phenotype and high malignant potential associated with the enrichment of cancer stem cell. PMID:26017781

  17. Atonal homolog 1 protein stabilized by tumor necrosis factor ? induces high malignant potential in colon cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Keita; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Kano, Yoshihito; Horita, Nobukatsu; Hibiya, Shuji; Hayashi, Ryohei; Kitagaki, Keisuke; Negi, Mariko; Itoh, Eisaku; Akashi, Takumi; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Oshima, Shigeru; Nagaishi, Takashi; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2015-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of developing colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC). CAC cells often develop chemoresistance, resulting in a poorer prognosis than that of sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC). The mechanism by which CAC enhances malignant potential remains unknown. We have previously reported that the proteasomal degradation of the transcription factor Atonal homolog 1 (Atoh1) protein results in the non-mucinous form of CRC. It also remains unknown whether Atoh1 protein is expressed in CAC. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated whether Atoh1 protein stabilizes in CAC. Consequently, the treatment with TNF-? stabilized Atoh1 protein through the inactivation of GSK-3? via Akt, resulting in the mucinous form of CRC cell lines. Atoh1 protein also enriched cancer stem cells with upregulated Lgr5 expression and cells in G0/G1 cell cycle phase, resulting in both the chemoresistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin and the promotion of cell migration. Immunofluorescence of the human mucinous CAC specimens showed the accumulation of NF-?B p65 at nuclei with the expression of Atoh1 in mucinous cancer. In conclusion, the inflammation associated with carcinogenesis may preserve the differentiation system of intestinal epithelial cell (IEC), resulting in the acquisition of both the mucinous phenotype and high malignant potential associated with the enrichment of cancer stem cell. PMID:26017781

  18. Potential protective effects of oral administration of allicin on acrylamide-induced toxicity in male mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lulu; Wang, Enting; Chen, Feng; Yan, Haiyang; Yuan, Yuan

    2013-08-01

    Acrylamide (AA) forms during the heating of starchy foods at high temperature, and is regarded as a potential genotoxic carcinogen. However, with the worldwide concern about the carcinogenicity of AA, how to reduce the toxicity of AA has become a hot research topic. In this study, we further discussed the effects of oral administration of allicin on AA-induced toxicity by determining the hematological, biochemical and immunological parameters in the serum, kidney, liver, and brain of male mice. Our data showed that the orally administered allicin of 5, 10, and 20 mg kg?¹ bw d?¹ could significantly decrease thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels, and simultaneously remarkably increased the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutathione (GSH) levels in the kidney, liver, and brain of the AA-treated mice. Furthermore, oral administration of allicin not only significantly decreased aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-?), interleukin (IL)-1?, interleukin (IL)-6, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and 8-hydroxy-desoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), but also increased interleukin (IL)-10 in the serum of AA-treated mice. Therefore, it was concluded that oral administration of allicin had a significant in vivo protective effect against the AA induced toxicity. PMID:23760623

  19. Oral Lichen Planus as a Preneoplastic Inflammatory Model

    PubMed Central

    Georgakopoulou, Eleni A.; Achtari, Marina D.; Achtaris, Michael; Foukas, Periklis G.; Kotsinas, Athanassios

    2012-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic oral inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. According to reports, 1-2% of OLP patients develop oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in the long run. While World Health Organization (WHO) classifies OLP as “a potentially malignant disorder,” it is still a matter of debate which mechanisms drive OLP to such a condition. The current hypothesis connecting OLP and OSCC is that chronic inflammation results in crucial DNA damage which over time results in cancer development. Initial studies investigating the OLP and OSCC link were mainly retrospective clinical studies. Over the past years, several amount of information has accumulated, mainly from molecular studies on the OLP malignant potential. This article is a critical review of whether OLP has a malignant potential and, therefore, represents a model of preneoplastic inflammation. PMID:22675259

  20. Chemopreventive Potential of Flavonoids in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Human Studies

    PubMed Central

    Iriti, Marcello; Varoni, Elena Maria

    2013-01-01

    Evidence available from nutritional epidemiology has indicated an inverse association between regular consumption of fruits and vegetables and the risk of developing certain types of cancer. In turn, preclinical studies have attributed the health-promoting effects of plant foods to some groups of phytochemicals, by virtue of their many biological activities. In this survey, we briefly examine the chemopreventive potential of flavonoids and flavonoid-rich foods in human oral carcinogenesis. Despite the paucity of data from clinical trials and epidemiological studies, in comparison to in vitro/in vivo investigations, a high level of evidence has been reported for epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and anthocyanins. These flavonoids, abundant in green tea and black raspberries, respectively, represent promising chemopreventive agents in human oral cancer. PMID:23857227

  1. miR-193a-3p is a potential tumor suppressor in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Williams, Marissa; Kirschner, Michaela B; Cheng, Yuen Yee; Hanh, Jacky; Weiss, Jocelyn; Mugridge, Nancy; Wright, Casey M; Linton, Anthony; Kao, Steven C; Edelman, J James B; Vallely, Michael P; McCaughan, Brian C; Cooper, Wendy; Klebe, Sonja; Lin, Ruby C Y; Brahmbhatt, Himanshu; MacDiarmid, Jennifer; van Zandwijk, Nico; Reid, Glen

    2015-09-15

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an asbestos-induced cancer with poor prognosis that displays characteristic alterations in microRNA expression. Recently it was reported that the expression of a subset of microRNAs can distinguish between MPM and adenocarcinoma of the lung. However, the functional importance of these changes has yet to be investigated. We compared expression of miR-192, miR-193a-3p and the miR-200 family in normal pleura and MPM tumor specimens and found a statistically significant reduction in the levels of miR-193a-3p (3.1-fold) and miR-192 (2.8-fold) in MPM. Transfection of MPM cells with a miR-193a-3p mimic resulted in inhibition of growth and an induction of apoptosis and necrosis in vitro. The growth inhibitory effects of miR-193a-3p were associated with a decrease in MCL1 expression and were recapitulated by RNAi-mediated MCL1 silencing. Targeted delivery of miR-193a-3p mimic using EDV minicells inhibited MPM xenograft tumour growth, and was associated with increased apoptosis. In conclusion, miR-193a-3p appears to have importance in the biology of MPM and may represent a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26125439

  2. Oral calcitonin.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, Ronald C; Daley, Dane N

    2012-01-01

    Calcitonin is a hormone secreted by the C-cells of the thyroid gland in response to elevations of the plasma calcium level. It reduces bone resorption by inhibiting mature active osteoclasts and increases renal calcium excretion. It is used in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis, Paget's disease of bone, and malignancy-associated hypercalcemia. Synthetic and recombinant calcitonin preparations are available; both have similar pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. As calcitonin is a peptide, the traditional method of administration has been parenteral or intranasal. This hinders its clinical use: adherence with therapy is notoriously low, and withdrawal from clinical trials has been problematic. An oral formulation would be more attractive, practical, and convenient to patients. In addition to its effect on active osteoclasts and renal tubules, calcitonin has an analgesic action, possibly mediated through ?-endorphins and the central modulation of pain perception. It also exerts a protective action on cartilage and may be useful in the management of osteoarthritis and possibly rheumatoid arthritis. Oral formulations of calcitonin have been developed using different techniques. The most studied involves drug-delivery carriers such as Eligen(®) 8-(N-2hydroxy-5-chloro-benzoyl)-amino-caprylic acid (5-CNAC) (Emisphere Technologies, Cedar Knolls, NJ). Several factors affect the bioavailability and efficacy of orally administered calcitonin, including amount of water used to take the tablet, time of day the tablet is taken, and proximity to intake of a meal. Preliminary results looked promising. Unfortunately, in two Phase III studies, oral calcitonin (0.8 mg with 200 mg 5-CNAC, once a day for postmenopausal osteoporosis and twice a day for osteoarthritis) failed to meet key end points, and in December 2011, Novartis Pharma AG announced that it would not pursue further clinical development of oral calcitonin for postmenopausal osteoporosis or osteoarthritis. A unique feature of calcitonin is that it is able to uncouple bone turnover, reducing bone resorption without affecting bone formation and therefore increasing bone mass and improving bone quality. This effect, however, may be dose-dependent, with higher doses inhibiting both resorption and formation. Because so many factors affect the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of calcitonin, especially orally administered calcitonin, much work remains to be done to explore the full pharmacologic spectrum and potential of calcitonin and determine the optimum dose and timing of administration, as well as water and food intake. PMID:23071417

  3. Antiepileptic drugs: are women aware of interactions with oral contraceptives and potential teratogenicity?

    PubMed

    Pack, Alison M; Davis, Anne R; Kritzer, Jordana; Yoon, Ava; Camus, Adela

    2009-04-01

    Women with epilepsy (WWE)'s knowledge of the interaction between antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and oral contraceptives (OCs) and the potential teratogenicity of AEDs has received limited study. We conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire study (English or Spanish) among young WWE (18-44 years) to assess demographic characteristics, current AED use, and knowledge of AED interactions with OCs and teratogenicity. We used the Food and Drug Administration's classification system to categorize each AED's teratogenic potential. Participants (n=148) had a mean age of 32 years (SD 8); 32% spoke Spanish and described themselves as Hispanic. Among women prescribed a cytochrome p450-inducing AED, 65% were unaware of decreased OC efficacy. Forty percent of those prescribed Category D AEDs were unaware of potential teratogenic effects. WWE have limited knowledge of the potential interaction between AEDs and OCs and the teratogenic effects of AEDs. Educational efforts should highlight the reproductive health effects of AEDs in WWE. PMID:19435578

  4. Work in progress: potential oral and intravenous paramagnetic NMR contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Runge, V M; Stewart, R G; Clanton, J A; Jones, M M; Lukehart, C M; Partain, C L; James, A E

    1983-06-01

    The potential use of paramagnetic compounds as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) contrast agents was examined in vitro. The T1 relaxation times for serial dilutions of Cu2+, Cr3+, Fe3+, and Mn2+ ions in saline, gadolinium oxalate (a potential oral contrast agent) in suspension, and chromium EDTA (a potential intravenous contrast agent) in solution were determined. The effect on T1 of increasing the concentration of oxygen in solution was also examined. The relative magnitude of the decrease in T1 was, as expected, proportional to both the concentration of the paramagnetic substance and its effective magnetic moment. Thus NMR has the potential to detect differences in tissue oxygenation. By incorporating paramagnetic metal ions into insoluble compounds or stable complexes, toxicity can be dramatically reduced while maintaining a significant paramagnetic effect. Highly insoluble paramagnetic compounds or stable paramagnetic ion complexes can thus be utilized as effective NMR contrast agents with significantly diminished toxicity. PMID:6844614

  5. Clinical Evaluation of Specific Oral Manifestations in Pediatric Patients with Ascertained versus Potential Coeliac Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Matacena, Giada; Costa, Stefano; Magazzù, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Patients involved on coeliac disease (CD) have atypical symptoms and often remain undiagnosed. Specific oral manifestations are effective risk indicators of CD and for this reason an early diagnosis with a consequent better prognosis can be performed by the dentist. There are not researches analysing the frequency of these oral manifestations in potential coeliac patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the oral hard and soft tissue lesions in potential and ascertained coeliac children in comparison with healthy controls. 50 ascertained children, 21 potential coeliac patients, and 54 controls were recruited and the oral examination was performed. The overall oral lesions were more frequently present in CD patients than in controls. The prevalence of oral soft tissue lesions was 62% in ascertained coeliac, 76.2% in potential coeliac patients, and 12.96% in controls (P < 0.05). Clinical dental delayed eruption was observed in 38% of the ascertained coeliac and 42.5% of the potential coeliac versus 11.11% of the controls (P < 0.05). The prevalence of specific enamel defects (SED) was 48% in ascertained coeliac and 19% in potential coeliac versus 0% in controls (P < 0.05; OR = 3.923). The SED seem to be genetically related to the histological damage and villous atrophy. PMID:25197270

  6. Clinical applications of palifermin: amelioration of oral mucositis and other potential indications

    PubMed Central

    Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Goldberg, Jenna D; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Berger, Dietmar P; Brink, Marcel RM

    2013-01-01

    Mucositis is one of the most significant toxicities in cancer patients undergoing cytotoxic treatment. It can have a negative impact on both quality of life and health economics. Severe oral mucositis can contribute to hospitalization, need for narcotic analgesics, total parentral nutrition, suboptimal delivery of anti-neoplastic treatment, and morbidity and mortality. Palifermin, a recombinant derivative of human keratinocyte growth factor, is the first active agent approved by the FDA for the prevention of severe oral mucositis in patients undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Several studies have also shown significant reduction in the incidence, severity and/or duration of oral mucositis in other high-risk settings such as concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CT/RT) for patients with head and neck cancer, and use of mucotoxic chemotherapeutic agents such as doxorubicin in sarcoma and fluorouracil for the treatment of colorectal cancer. The reduction in mucositis has translated into amelioration of symptoms and improvement in daily functioning as measured by patient-reported outcome in multiple studies. The clinical response to palifermin appears to be related in part to epithelial proliferation and mucosal thickening. Palifermin also has other potential clinical applications including the acceleration of immune reconstitution and inhibition of graft-versus-host disease in patients undergoing HSCT, and mitigation of dysphagia in lung cancer patients treated with concurrent CT/RT. Palifermin is generally well tolerated with mild-to-moderate skin and oral adverse events. Future studies may expand the use of palifermin into other areas that would benefit from its cytoprotective and regenerative effects. PMID:24251854

  7. Osteogenic Potential of Human Oral-Periosteal Cells (PCs) Isolated From Different Oral Origin: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, Gabriele; Graziano, Antonio; Benedetti, Laura; Imbriani, Marcello; Romano, Federica; Ferrarotti, Francesco; Aimetti, Mario; Cusella De Angelis, Gabriella M

    2016-03-01

    The periosteum is a specialized connective tissue containing multipotent stem cells capable of bone formation. In this study, we aimed at demonstrating that human oral periosteal cells derived from three different oral sites (upper vestibule, lower vestibule, and hard palate) represent an innovative cell source for maxillo-facial tissue engineering applications in terms of accessibility and self-commitment towards osteogenic lineage. Periosteal cells (PCs) were isolated from patients with different ages (20-30 yy, 40-50 yy, 50-60 yy); we then analyzed the in vitro proliferation capacity and the bone self-commitment of cell clones culturing them without any osteogenic supplement to support their differentiation. We found that oral PCs, independently of their origin and age of patients, are mesenchymal stem cells with stem cell characteristics (clonogenical and proliferative activity) and that, even in absence of any osteogenic induction, they undertake the osteoblast lineage after 45 days of culture. These results suggest that oral periosteal cells could replace mesenchymal cells from bone marrow in oral tissue-engineering applications. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 607-612, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26206324

  8. Potential Compounds for Oral Cancer Treatment: Resveratrol, Nimbolide, Lovastatin, Bortezomib, Vorinostat, Berberine, Pterostilbene, Deguelin, Andrographolide, and Colchicine

    PubMed Central

    Bundela, Saurabh; Sharma, Anjana; Bisen, Prakash S.

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the main causes of cancer-related deaths in South-Asian countries. There are very limited treatment options available for oral cancer. Research endeavors focused on discovery and development of novel therapies for oral cancer, is necessary to control the ever rising oral cancer related mortalities. We mined the large pool of compounds from the publicly available compound databases, to identify potential therapeutic compounds for oral cancer. Over 84 million compounds were screened for the possible anti-cancer activity by custom build SVM classifier. The molecular targets of the predicted anti-cancer compounds were mined from reliable sources like experimental bioassays studies associated with the compound, and from protein-compound interaction databases. Therapeutic compounds from DrugBank, and a list of natural anti-cancer compounds derived from literature mining of published studies, were used for building partial least squares regression model. The regression model thus built, was used for the estimation of oral cancer specific weights based on the molecular targets. These weights were used to compute scores for screening the predicted anti-cancer compounds for their potential to treat oral cancer. The list of potential compounds was annotated with corresponding physicochemical properties, cancer specific bioactivity evidences, and literature evidences. In all, 288 compounds with the potential to treat oral cancer were identified in the current study. The majority of the compounds in this list are natural products, which are well-tolerated and have minimal side-effects compared to the synthetic counterparts. Some of the potential therapeutic compounds identified in the current study are resveratrol, nimbolide, lovastatin, bortezomib, vorinostat, berberine, pterostilbene, deguelin, andrographolide, and colchicine. PMID:26536350

  9. Potential Compounds for Oral Cancer Treatment: Resveratrol, Nimbolide, Lovastatin, Bortezomib, Vorinostat, Berberine, Pterostilbene, Deguelin, Andrographolide, and Colchicine.

    PubMed

    Bundela, Saurabh; Sharma, Anjana; Bisen, Prakash S

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the main causes of cancer-related deaths in South-Asian countries. There are very limited treatment options available for oral cancer. Research endeavors focused on discovery and development of novel therapies for oral cancer, is necessary to control the ever rising oral cancer related mortalities. We mined the large pool of compounds from the publicly available compound databases, to identify potential therapeutic compounds for oral cancer. Over 84 million compounds were screened for the possible anti-cancer activity by custom build SVM classifier. The molecular targets of the predicted anti-cancer compounds were mined from reliable sources like experimental bioassays studies associated with the compound, and from protein-compound interaction databases. Therapeutic compounds from DrugBank, and a list of natural anti-cancer compounds derived from literature mining of published studies, were used for building partial least squares regression model. The regression model thus built, was used for the estimation of oral cancer specific weights based on the molecular targets. These weights were used to compute scores for screening the predicted anti-cancer compounds for their potential to treat oral cancer. The list of potential compounds was annotated with corresponding physicochemical properties, cancer specific bioactivity evidences, and literature evidences. In all, 288 compounds with the potential to treat oral cancer were identified in the current study. The majority of the compounds in this list are natural products, which are well-tolerated and have minimal side-effects compared to the synthetic counterparts. Some of the potential therapeutic compounds identified in the current study are resveratrol, nimbolide, lovastatin, bortezomib, vorinostat, berberine, pterostilbene, deguelin, andrographolide, and colchicine. PMID:26536350

  10. Molecular markers and imaging tools to identify malignant potential in Barrett's esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Michael; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Due to its rapidly rising incidence and high mortality, esophageal adenocarcinoma is a major public health concern, particularly in Western countries. The steps involved in the progression from its predisposing condition, gastroesophageal reflux disease, to its premalignant disorder, Barrett’s esophagus, and to cancer, are incompletely understood. Current screening and surveillance methods are limited by the lack of population-wide utility, incomplete sampling of standard biopsies, and subjectivity of evaluation. Advances in endoscopic ablation have raised the hope of effective therapy for eradication of high-risk Barrett’s lesions, but improvements are needed in determining when to apply this treatment and how to follow patients clinically. Researchers have evaluated numerous potential molecular biomarkers with the goal of detecting dysplasia, with varying degrees of success. The combination of biomarker panels with epidemiologic risk factors to yield clinical risk scoring systems is promising. New approaches to sample tissue may also be combined with these biomarkers for less invasive screening and surveillance. The development of novel endoscopic imaging tools in recent years has the potential to markedly improve detection of small foci of dysplasia in vivo. Current and future efforts will aim to determine the combination of markers and imaging modalities that will most effectively improve the rate of early detection of high-risk lesions in Barrett’s esophagus. PMID:25400987

  11. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) as a potential targeting agent for delivery of boron to malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Capala, J.; Barth, R.F.; Adams, D.M.; Bailey, M.Q.; Soloway, A.H.; Carlsson, J.

    1994-12-31

    The majority of high grade gliomas express an amplified epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, and this often is associated with an increase in cell surface receptor expression. The rapid internalization and degradation of EGF-EGFR complexes, as well as their high affinity make EGF a potential targeting agent for delivery of {sup 10}B to tumor cells with an amplified number of EGFR. Human glioma cells can expresses as many as 10{sup 5} {minus}10{sup 6} EGF receptors per cell, and if these could be saturated with boronated EGF, then > 10{sup 8} boron atoms would be delivered per cell. Since EGF has a comparatively low molecular weight ({approximately} 6 kD), this has allowed us to construct relatively small bioconjugates containing {approximately} 900 boron atoms per EGF molecule{sup 3}, which also had high affinity for EGFR on tumor cells. In the present study, the feasibility of using EGF receptors as a potential target for therapy of gliomas was investigated by in vivo scintigraphic studies using {sup 131}I{minus} or {sup 99m}{Tc}-labeled EGF in a rat brain tumor model. Our results indicate that intratumorally delivered boron- EGF conjugates might be useful for targeting EGFR on glioma cells if the boron containing moiety of the conjugates persisted intracellularly. Further studies are required, however, to determine if this approach can be used for BNCT of the rat glioma.

  12. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Kai; Song, Yong; Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hui; Wang, Meng; Yan, Ting-lin; Liu, Ke; Shang, Zheng-jun

    2014-10-15

    Most previous studies have linked cancer–macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression. - Highlights: • The fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion. • The resulting hybrid cells acquire a new property of drug resistance. • The resulting hybrid cells express the markers of both parental cells (i.e. vimentin and cytokeratin 18). • The hybrid cells contribute to tumor repopulation in vivo.

  13. Areca nut and its role in oral submucous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Rachana V; Prabhu, Vishnudas; Chatra, Laxmikanth; Shenai, Prashant; Suvarna, Nithin; Dandekeri, Savita

    2014-12-01

    Areca nut, commonly called as betel nut or supari, is a fruit of areca catechu palm tree, which is native of South Asia and Pacific Islands. The seed or endosperm is consumed fresh, boiled or after sun drying or curing. Chewing areca nut is thought to have central nervous system stimulating effect and along with this it is known to have salivary stimulating and digestive properties. According to the traditional Ayurvedic medicine, chewing areca nut and betel leaf is a good remedy against halitosis. It is also used for its deworming property. Along with these beneficial effects of areca nut one of its most harmful effects on the human body in general and oral cavity in particular is the development of potentially malignant disorder called Oral Submucous Fibrosis. The present paper discusses in detail the effects of the components of areca nut on pathogenesis of Oral Submucous Fibrosis. Key words:Areca nut, oral submucous fibrosis, potentially malignant disorder, supari. PMID:25674328

  14. Areca nut and its role in oral submucous fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Vishnudas; Chatra, Laxmikanth; Shenai, Prashant; Suvarna, Nithin; Dandekeri, Savita

    2014-01-01

    Areca nut, commonly called as betel nut or supari, is a fruit of areca catechu palm tree, which is native of South Asia and Pacific Islands. The seed or endosperm is consumed fresh, boiled or after sun drying or curing. Chewing areca nut is thought to have central nervous system stimulating effect and along with this it is known to have salivary stimulating and digestive properties. According to the traditional Ayurvedic medicine, chewing areca nut and betel leaf is a good remedy against halitosis. It is also used for its deworming property. Along with these beneficial effects of areca nut one of its most harmful effects on the human body in general and oral cavity in particular is the development of potentially malignant disorder called Oral Submucous Fibrosis. The present paper discusses in detail the effects of the components of areca nut on pathogenesis of Oral Submucous Fibrosis. Key words:Areca nut, oral submucous fibrosis, potentially malignant disorder, supari. PMID:25674328

  15. Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitors and their clinical potential in the treatment of B-cell malignancies: focus on ibrutinib

    PubMed Central

    Aalipour, Amin

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant signaling of the B-cell receptor pathway has been linked to the development and maintenance of B-cell malignancies. Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK), a protein early in this pathway, has emerged as a new therapeutic target in a variety of such malignancies. Ibrutinib, the most clinically advanced small molecule inhibitor of BTK, has demonstrated impressive tolerability and activity in a range of B-cell lymphomas which led to its recent approval for relapsed mantle cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This review focuses on the preclinical and clinical development of ibrutinib and discusses its therapeutic potential. PMID:25360238

  16. Anti-Heparanase Aptamers as Potential Diagnostic and Therapeutic Agents for Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Dilson; Cortez, Celia M.; McKenzie, Edward A.; Bitu, Carolina C.; Salo, Sirpa; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Nyberg, Pia; Risteli, Juha; deAlmeida, Carlos E. B.; Brenchley, Paul E. C.; Salo, Tuula; Missailidis, Sotiris

    2014-01-01

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase enzyme present in activated leucocytes, mast cells, placental tissue, neutrophils and macrophages, and is involved in tumour metastasis and tissue invasion. It presents a potential target for cancer therapies and various molecules have been developed in an attempt to inhibit the enzymatic action of heparanase. In an attempt to develop a novel therapeutic with an associated diagnostic assay, we have previously described high affinity aptamers selected against heparanase. In this work, we demonstrated that these anti-heparanase aptamers are capable of inhibiting tissue invasion of tumour cells associated with oral cancer and verified that such inhibition is due to inhibition of the enzyme and not due to other potentially cytotoxic effects of the aptamers. Furthermore, we have identified a short 30 bases aptamer as a potential candidate for further studies, as this showed a higher ability to inhibit tissue invasion than its longer counterpart, as well as a reduced potential for complex formation with other non-specific serum proteins. Finally, the aptamer was found to be stable and therefore suitable for use in human models, as it showed no degradation in the presence of human serum, making it a potential candidate for both diagnostic and therapeutic use. PMID:25295847

  17. Human BK Polyomavirus—The Potential for Head and Neck Malignancy and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Burger-Calderon, Raquel; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Members of the human Polyomaviridae family are ubiquitous and pathogenic among immune-compromised individuals. While only Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) has conclusively been linked to human cancer, all members of the polyomavirus (PyV) family encode the oncoprotein T antigen and may be potentially carcinogenic. Studies focusing on PyV pathogenesis in humans have become more abundant as the number of PyV family members and the list of associated diseases has expanded. BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) in particular has emerged as a new opportunistic pathogen among HIV positive individuals, carrying harmful implications. Increasing evidence links BKPyV to HIV-associated salivary gland disease (HIVSGD). HIVSGD is associated with elevated risk of lymphoma formation and its prevalence has increased among HIV/AIDS patients. Determining the relationship between BKPyV, disease and tumorigenesis among immunosuppressed individuals is necessary and will allow for expanding effective anti-viral treatment and prevention options in the future. PMID:26184314

  18. The potential use of cell-based therapies in the treatment of oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Kagami, H

    2015-07-01

    A recent and exciting development in medicine is the use of living cells for patient treatment. The utility of living cells to treat diseases was first proved in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for leukemia patients. This approach has been expanded for other diseases such as islet transplantation for diabetic patients. In those cases, the cells were isolated from donors or the patient and used without complex manipulation. Since the 1980s, cells have been expanded outside of the body for the treatment of burn patients' skin. This novel treatment strategy is designated 'tissue engineering' and has been successfully applied for treatment of skin, cartilage, and also bone defects. Due to the recent developments in stem cell science, this area has attracted much attention and the application has been expanding. In this review, the potential of cell-based therapy for oral diseases is discussed with a concise review of recent developments in this field. PMID:25652598

  19. Potential Therapeutic Targets for Oral Cancer: ADM, TP53, EGFR, LYN, CTLA4, SKIL, CTGF, CD70

    PubMed Central

    Bundela, Saurabh; Sharma, Anjana; Bisen, Prakash S.

    2014-01-01

    In India, oral cancer has consistently ranked among top three causes of cancer-related deaths, and it has emerged as a top cause for the cancer-related deaths among men. Lack of effective therapeutic options is one of the main challenges in clinical management of oral cancer patients. We interrogated large pool of samples from oral cancer gene expression studies to identify potential therapeutic targets that are involved in multiple cancer hallmark events. Therapeutic strategies directed towards such targets can be expected to effectively control cancer cells. Datasets from different gene expression studies were integrated by removing batch-effects and was used for downstream analyses, including differential expression analysis. Dependency network analysis was done to identify genes that undergo marked topological changes in oral cancer samples when compared with control samples. Causal reasoning analysis was carried out to identify significant hypotheses, which can explain gene expression profiles observed in oral cancer samples. Text-mining based approach was used to detect cancer hallmarks associated with genes significantly expressed in oral cancer. In all, 2365 genes were detected to be differentially expressed genes, which includes some of the highly differentially expressed genes like matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1/3/10/13), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligands (IL8, CXCL-10/-11), PTHLH, SERPINE1, NELL2, S100A7A, MAL, CRNN, TGM3, CLCA4, keratins (KRT-3/4/13/76/78), SERPINB11 and serine peptidase inhibitors (SPINK-5/7). XIST, TCEAL2, NRAS and FGFR2 are some of the important genes detected by dependency and causal network analysis. Literature mining analysis annotated 1014 genes, out of which 841 genes were statistically significantly annotated. The integration of output of various analyses, resulted in the list of potential therapeutic targets for oral cancer, which included targets such as ADM, TP53, EGFR, LYN, CTLA4, SKIL, CTGF and CD70. PMID:25029526

  20. Drug-Loaded Nanoparticle Systems And Adult Stem Cells: A Potential Marriage For The Treatment Of Malignant Glioma?

    PubMed Central

    Auffinger, Brenda; Morshed, Ramin; Tobias, Alex; Cheng, Yu; Ahmed, Atique U; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2013-01-01

    Despite all recent advances in malignant glioma research, only modest progress has been achieved in improving patient prognosis and quality of life. Such a clinical scenario underscores the importance of investing in new therapeutic approaches that, when combined with conventional therapies, are able to effectively eradicate glioma infiltration and target distant tumor foci. Nanoparticle-loaded delivery systems have recently arisen as an exciting alternative to improve targeted anti-glioma drug delivery. As drug carriers, they are able to efficiently protect the therapeutic agent and allow for sustained drug release. In addition, their surface can be easily manipulated with the addition of special ligands, which are responsible for enhancing tumor-specific nanoparticle permeability. However, their inefficient intratumoral distribution and failure to target disseminated tumor burden still pose a big challenge for their implementation as a therapeutic option in the clinical setting. Stem cell-based delivery of drug-loaded nanoparticles offers an interesting option to overcome such issues. Their ability to incorporate nanoparticles and migrate throughout interstitial barriers, together with their inherent tumor-tropic properties and synergistic anti-tumor effects make these stem cell carriers a good fit for such combined therapy. In this review, we will describe the main nanoparticle delivery systems that are presently available in preclinical and clinical studies. We will discuss their mechanisms of targeting, current delivery methods, attractive features and pitfalls. We will also debate the potential applications of stem cell carriers loaded with therapeutic nanoparticles in anticancer therapy and why such an attractive combined approach has not yet reached clinical trials. PMID:23594406

  1. CARCINOGENIC POTENTIAL OF ROTENONE: SUBCHRONIC ORAL AND PERITONEAL ADMINISTRATION TO RATS AND CHRONIC DIETARY ADMINISTRATION TO SYRIAN GOLDEN HAMSTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three long-term studies were performed to evaluate the carcinogenic potential of the pesticide rotenone in hamsters and rats. Rotenone was administered orally to Wistar rats and by intraperitoneal injection to Sprague-Dawley rats, which were maintained and observed for 14 and 18 ...

  2. Caffeic Acid phenethyl ester is a potential therapeutic agent for oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ying-Yu; Jim, Wai-Tim; Su, Liang-Cheng; Chung, Chi-Jung; Lin, Ching-Yu; Huo, Chieh; Tseng, Jen-Chih; Huang, Shih-Han; Lai, Chih-Jen; Chen, Bo-Chih; Wang, Bi-Juan; Chan, Tzu-Min; Lin, Hui-Ping; Chang, Wun-Shaing Wayne; Chang, Chuang-Rung; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancers, which affect 650,000 people and cause 350,000 deaths per year, is the sixth leading cancer by cancer incidence and eighth by cancer-related death worldwide. Oral cancer is the most common type of head and neck cancer. More than 90% of oral cancers are oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The overall five-year survival rate of OSCC patients is approximately 63%, which is due to the low response rate to current therapeutic drugs. In this review we discuss the possibility of using caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) as an alternative treatment for oral cancer. CAPE is a strong antioxidant extracted from honeybee hive propolis. Recent studies indicate that CAPE treatment can effectively suppress the proliferation, survival, and metastasis of oral cancer cells. CAPE treatment inhibits Akt signaling, cell cycle regulatory proteins, NF-?B function, as well as activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Therefore, CAPE treatment induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in oral cancer cells. According to the evidence that aberrations in the EGFR/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling, NF-?B function, COX-2 activity, and MMPs activity are frequently found in oral cancers, and that the phosphorylation of Akt, EGFR, and COX-2 correlates to oral cancer patient survival and clinical progression, we believe that CAPE treatment will be useful for treatment of advanced oral cancer patients. PMID:25984601

  3. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Is a Potential Therapeutic Agent for Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ying-Yu; Jim, Wai-Tim; Su, Liang-Cheng; Chung, Chi-Jung; Lin, Ching-Yu; Huo, Chieh; Tseng, Jen-Chih; Huang, Shih-Han; Lai, Chih-Jen; Chen, Bo-Chih; Wang, Bi-Juan; Chan, Tzu-Min; Lin, Hui-Ping; Chang, Wun-Shaing Wayne; Chang, Chuang-Rung; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancers, which affect 650,000 people and cause 350,000 deaths per year, is the sixth leading cancer by cancer incidence and eighth by cancer-related death worldwide. Oral cancer is the most common type of head and neck cancer. More than 90% of oral cancers are oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The overall five-year survival rate of OSCC patients is approximately 63%, which is due to the low response rate to current therapeutic drugs. In this review we discuss the possibility of using caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) as an alternative treatment for oral cancer. CAPE is a strong antioxidant extracted from honeybee hive propolis. Recent studies indicate that CAPE treatment can effectively suppress the proliferation, survival, and metastasis of oral cancer cells. CAPE treatment inhibits Akt signaling, cell cycle regulatory proteins, NF-?B function, as well as activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Therefore, CAPE treatment induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in oral cancer cells. According to the evidence that aberrations in the EGFR/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling, NF-?B function, COX-2 activity, and MMPs activity are frequently found in oral cancers, and that the phosphorylation of Akt, EGFR, and COX-2 correlates to oral cancer patient survival and clinical progression, we believe that CAPE treatment will be useful for treatment of advanced oral cancer patients. PMID:25984601

  4. Potential of Text-Based Internet Chats for Improving Oral Fluency in a Second Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Although a number of studies have reported on the positive effects of Internet chats in the second language classroom, to the best of my knowledge no studies to date have examined the effect of text-based chats on oral fluency development. This exploratory study addressed the above question by examining the oral fluency development of 34 English…

  5. Second malignancies after prostate brachytherapy: Incidence of bladder and colorectal cancers in patients with 15 years of potential follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Liauw, Stanley L.; Sylvester, John E. . E-mail: johnsylvester@seattleprostateinst.com; Morris, Christopher G.; Blasko, John C.; Grimm, Peter D.

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence of second bladder and colorectal cancers after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: This review included 125 patients treated with I-125 brachytherapy alone, and 223 patients who received supplemental external beam radiation therapy. Median follow-up was 10.5 years. Patients were followed for the development of lower genitourinary and colorectal cancers. Second malignancies arising five years after radiation therapy were defined as being potentially associated with treatment; observed rates were then compared with age-matched expected rates according to Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data. Results: Five years out of treatment, there were 15 patients with a second solid tumor, including bladder cancer (n = 11), colorectal cancer (n = 3), and prostatic urethra cancer (n = 1). The incidence of second malignancy was no different in patients treated with brachytherapy alone (1.6%) vs. those receiving external beam radiotherapy (5.8%, p = 0.0623). There were more observed bladder cancers compared with those expected (relative risk, 2.34, 95% confidence interval 0.96-3.72; absolute excess risk 35 cancers per 10,000 patients). Relative risk did not significantly change over increasing follow-up intervals up to 20 years after treatment. Conclusions: There may be an increased but small risk of developing a second malignancy after radiation therapy for prostate cancer. This outcome could be related to radiation carcinogenesis, but more vigilant screening and thorough workup as a result of radiation side effects and predisposing conditions (e.g., genetic and environmental factors) in many of the patients found to have second malignancies likely contributed to the higher number of observed malignancies than expected.

  6. Poly-?,?-Polyasparthydrazide-Based Nanogels for Potential Oral Delivery of Paclitaxel: In Vitro and In Vivo Properties.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingwen; Ma, Mingxin; Chang, Di; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Chen; Yue, Yang; Liu, Jia; Wang, Siling; Jiang, Tongying

    2015-12-01

    A family of nanogel drug carriers has been designed to enhance the oral absorption of paclitaxel (PTX). The PAHy-based nanogels were prepared by the interpenetration of poly-?,?-polyasparthydrazide (PAHy) chains and dicarboxyl-poly (ethylene glycol) (CPEG), forming a smart chain network. The PAHy-based nanogels were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), dynamic light scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The adhesion and retention properties of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-nanogels in vivo were investigated using an in vivo imaging system and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The smart nanogels had a particle size of -200 nm, increased the degree and rate of release, and spent over 12 h in the gastrointestinal tract. They also produced excellent adhesion, permeability and retention (APR) effects and increased oral absorption, confirming their use as potential sustained-release carriers for the oral delivery of the hydrophobic anticancer agent PTX. PMID:26510316

  7. Long-term low-dose ?-particle enhanced the potential of malignant transformation in human bronchial epithelial cells through MAPK/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Weili; Xiao, Linlin; Dong, Chen; He, Mingyuan; Pan, Yan; Xie, Yuexia; Tu, Wenzhi; Fu, Jiamei; Shao, Chunlin

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Multi-exposures of 25 mGy ?-ray enhanced cell proliferation, adhesion, and invasion. • MAPK/Akt but not JNK/P66 was positively correlated with cell invasive phenotypes. • LDR of ?-irradiation triggers cell malignant transformation through MAPK/Akt. - Abstract: Since the wide usage of ionizing radiation, the cancer risk of low dose radiation (LDR) (<0.1 Gy) has become attractive for a long time. However, most results are derived from epidemiologic studies on atomic-bomb survivors and nuclear accidents surrounding population, and the molecular mechanism of this risk is elusive. To explore the potential of a long-term LDR-induced malignant transformation, human bronchial epithelial cells Beas-2B were fractionally irradiated with 0.025 Gy ?-particles for 8 times in total and then further cultured for 1–2 months. It was found that the cell proliferation, the abilities of adhesion and invasion, and the protein expressions of p-ERK, p-Akt, especially p-P38 were not only increased in the multiply-irradiated cells but also in their offspring 1–2 months after the final exposure, indicating high potentiality of cell malignant transformation. On opposite, the expressions of p-JNK and p-P66 were diminished in the subcultures of irradiated cells and thus may play a role of negative regulation in canceration. When the cells were transferred with p38 siRNA, the LDR-induced enhancements of cell adhesion and invasion were significantly reduced. These findings suggest that long-term LDR of ?-particles could enhance the potential of malignant transformation incidence in human bronchial epithelial cells through MAPK/Akt pathway.

  8. ANGPTL4 regulates the metastatic potential of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Junichi; Irié, Tarou; Yamamoto, Gou; Yasuhara, Rika; Isobe, Tomohide; Hokazono, Chie; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Kohno, Yohko; Mishima, Kenji

    2015-02-01

    Lymph node metastasis is a major factor for poor prognosis in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). However, the molecular mechanisms of lymph node metastasis are unclear. We determined that angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) mRNA and protein expression were increased in OSCC cells established from the primary site in metastatic cases. In addition, ANGPTL4 expression in biopsy specimens was correlated with the presence of lymph node metastasis. Therefore, our initial findings suggest that OSCC cells expressing ANGPTL4 may possess metastatic ability. Furthermore, cell culture supernatants from OSCC cells that metastasized to the lymph node contain ANGPTL4 and promote invasive ability. These findings suggest that secreted ANGPTL4 may affect the invasive ability of OSCC. Moreover, the rates of positive ANGPTL4 expression at the primary site were significantly higher in the lymph node metastasis group. These results demonstrate that ANGPTL4 contributes to OSCC metastasis by stimulating cell invasion. Therefore, ANGPTL4 is a potential therapeutic target for preventing cancer metastasis. PMID:25060575

  9. Detection and Isolation of Swine Influenza A Virus in Spiked Oral Fluid and Samples from Individually Housed, Experimentally Infected Pigs: Potential Role of Porcine Oral Fluid in Active Influenza A Virus Surveillance in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Decorte, Inge; Steensels, Mieke; Lambrecht, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    Background The lack of seasonality of swine influenza A virus (swIAV) in combination with the capacity of swine to harbor a large number of co-circulating IAV lineages, resulting in the risk for the emergence of influenza viruses with pandemic potential, stress the importance of swIAV surveillance. To date, active surveillance of swIAV worldwide is barely done because of the short detection period in nasal swab samples. Therefore, more sensitive diagnostic methods to monitor circulating virus strains are requisite. Methods qRT-PCR and virus isolations were performed on oral fluid and nasal swabs collected from individually housed pigs that were infected sequentially with H1N1 and H3N2 swIAV strains. The same methods were also applied to oral fluid samples spiked with H1N1 to study the influence of conservation time and temperature on swIAV infectivity and detectability in porcine oral fluid. Results All swIAV infected animals were found qRT-PCR positive in both nasal swabs and oral fluid. However, swIAV could be detected for a longer period in oral fluid than in nasal swabs. Despite the high detectability of swIAV in oral fluid, virus isolation from oral fluid collected from infected pigs was rare. These results are supported by laboratory studies showing that the PCR detectability of swIAV remains unaltered during a 24 h incubation period in oral fluid, while swIAV infectivity drops dramatically immediately upon contact with oral fluid (3 log titer reduction) and gets lost after 24 h conservation in oral fluid at ambient temperature. Conclusions Our data indicate that porcine oral fluid has the potential to replace nasal swabs for molecular diagnostic purposes. The difficulty to isolate swIAV from oral fluid could pose a drawback for its use in active surveillance programs. PMID:26431039

  10. Goats are a potential reservoir for the herpesvirus (MCFV-WTD),causing malignant catarrhal fever in deer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the recent investigation of malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) in a red brocket deer (Mazama americana) from a Texas zoo, the MCF viral DNA from the newly recognized herpesvirus causing disease in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) (termed MCFV-WTD) was detected. The epidemiology information...

  11. Levels of Potential Oral Cancer Salivary mRNA Biomarkers in Oral Cancer Patients in Remission and Oral Lichen Planus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi-Shing Lisa; Jordan, Lee; Rees, Terry; Chen, Huey-Shys; Oxford, Lance; Brinkmann, Ole; Wong, David

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To gather preliminary data concerning the feasibility of using 7 salivary mRNAs--IL-8; IL-1?; dual specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1); H3 histone family 3A (H3F3A); ornithin decarboxylase antizyme 1 (OAZ1); S100 calcium-binding protein P (S100P); and spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase 1 (SAT1)—for detecting development of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in oral lichen planus (OLP) patients and OSCC patients whose disease was in remission. Materials and Methods Saliva samples were collected from five study groups (25 subjects/group): newly-diagnosed OSCC; OSCC-in-remission; disease-active OLP; disease-inactive OLP; and normal controls. The salivary mRNA levels were determined by a pre-amplification RT-qPCR approach with nested gene-specific primers. Mean fold changes between each pair of study groups were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U test. Results Salivary levels of OAZ1, S100P, and DUSP1 mRNAs were significantly higher in newly-diagnosed OSCC patients, compared to: 1) normal controls (p=0.003; p=0.003; and p<0.001, respectively); 2) OSCC-in-remission (p<0.001; p=0.001; and p<0.001, respectively); 3) disease-active OLP (p<0.001; p=0.016; and p<0.001, respectively); and 4) disease-inactive OLP (p=0.043; p<0.001; and p<0.001, respectively). No significant differences were found in the levels of salivary IL-8, IL-1?, H3F3A and SAT1 mRNAs between newly-diagnosed OSCC patients and the normal controls (p=0.093, 0.327, 0.764 and 0.560, respectively). Conclusion Salivary OAZ1, S100P and DUSP1 mRNAs are candidate biomarkers for detecting OSCC development in OSCC patients in remission and in OLP patients. Clinical Relevance The results of this study serve as the basis for a further large-scale study which may lead to a non-invasive screening method for early detection of OSCC. PMID:23892499

  12. Clinical and biochemical studies support smokeless tobacco's carcinogenic potential in the human oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Mallery, Susan R; Tong, Meng; Michaels, Gregory C; Kiyani, Amber R; Hecht, Stephen S

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer presented compelling evidence that linked smokeless tobacco use to the development of human oral cancer. Although these findings imply vigorous local carcinogen metabolism, little is known about levels and distribution of phase I, II, and III (drug egress) enzymes in human oral mucosa. In this study here, we integrated clinical data, and imaging and histopathologic analyses of an oral squamous cell carcinoma that arose at the site of smokeless tobacco quid placement in a patient. Immunoblot and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses were used to identify tumor and normal human oral mucosal smokeless tobacco-associated metabolic activation and detoxification enzymes. Human oral epithelium contains every known phase I enzyme associated with nitrosamine oxidative bioactivation with approximately 2-fold interdonor differences in protein levels. Previous studies have confirmed approximately 3.5-fold interdonor variations in intraepithelial phase II enzymes. Unlike the superficially located enzymes in nonreplicating esophageal surface epithelium, IHC studies confirmed that oral mucosal nitrosamine metabolizing enzymes reside in the basilar and suprabasilar region, which notably is the site of ongoing keratinocyte DNA replication. Clearly, variations in product composition, nitrosamine metabolism, and exposure duration will modulate clinical outcomes. The data presented here form a coherent picture consistent with the abundant experimental data that link tobacco-specific nitrosamines to human oral cancer. PMID:24265177

  13. Adenovirus-mediated suppression of HMGI(Y) protein synthesis as potential therapy of human malignant neoplasias

    PubMed Central

    Scala, Stefania; Portella, Giuseppe; Fedele, Monica; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Fusco, Alfredo

    2000-01-01

    High mobility group I (HMGI) proteins are overexpressed in several human malignant tumors. We previously demonstrated that inhibition of HMGI synthesis prevents thyroid cell transformation. Here, we report that an adenovirus carrying the HMGI(Y) gene in an antisense orientation (Ad-Yas) induced programmed cell death of two human thyroid anaplastic carcinoma cell lines (ARO and FB-1), but not normal thyroid cells. The Ad-Yas virus led to death of lung, colon, and breast carcinoma cells. A control adenovirus carrying the lacZ gene did not inhibit the growth of either normal or neoplastic cells. Ad-Yas treatment of tumors induced in athymic mice by ARO cells caused a drastic reduction in tumor size. Therefore, suppression of HMGI(Y) protein synthesis by an HMGI(Y) antisense adenoviral vector may be a useful treatment strategy in a variety of human malignant neoplasias, in which HMGI(Y) gene overexpression is a general event. PMID:10759549

  14. The potential of immobilized artificial membrane chromatography to predict human oral absorption.

    PubMed

    Tsopelas, Fotios; Vallianatou, Theodosia; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The potential of immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) chromatography to estimate human oral absorption (%HOA) was investigated. For this purpose, retention indices on IAM stationary phases reported previously by our group or measured by other authors under similar conditions were used to model %HOA data, compiled from literature sources. Considering the pH gradient in gastrointestinal tract, the highest logkw(IAM) values were considered, obtained either at pH7.4 or 5.5, defined as logkw(IAM)(best). Non linear models were established upon introduction of additional parameters and after exclusion of drugs which are substrates either to efflux or uptake transporters. The best model included Abraham's hydrogen-bond acidity parameter, molecular weight as well as the positively and negatively charged molecular fractions. For reasons of comparison between IAM chromatography and traditional lipophilicity, corresponding models were derived by replacing IAM retention factors with octanol-water distribution coefficients (logD). An overexpression of electrostatic interactions with phosphate anions was observed in the case of IAM retention as expressed by the negative contribution of the positively charged fraction F(+). The same parameter is statistically significant also in the logD model, but with a positive sign, indicating the attraction of basic drugs in the negatively charged inner membrane. To validate the obtained models a blind test set of 22 structurally diverse drugs was used, whose logkw(IAM)(best) values were determined and analyzed in the present study under similar conditions. IAM retention factors were further compared with MDCK cell lines permeability data taken from literature for a set of validation drugs. The overexpression of electrostatic interactions with phosphate anions on IAM surface was also evident in respect to MDCK permeability. In contrast to the clear classification between drugs with high and poor (or intermediate) absorption provided by MDCK permeability, %HOA plotted versus both IAM and logD data result in a saturation curve with a smoother ascending line. PMID:26485055

  15. Non-hematopoietic PAR-2 is essential for matriptase-driven pre-malignant progression and potentiation of ras-mediated squamous cell carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sales, Katiuchia Uzzun; Friis, Stine; Konkel, Joanne E.; Godiksen, Sine; Hatakeyama, Marcia; Hansen, Karina K.; Rogatto, Silvia Regina; Szabo, Roman; Vogel, Lotte K.; Chen, Wanjun; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Bugge, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-anchored serine protease, matriptase, is consistently dysregulated in a range of human carcinomas, and high matriptase activity correlates with poor prognosis. Furthermore, matriptase is unique among tumor-associated proteases in that epithelial stem cell expression of the protease suffices to induce malignant transformation. Here, we use genetic epistasis analysis to identify proteinase-activated receptor (PAR)-2-dependent inflammatory signaling as an essential component of matriptase-mediated oncogenesis. In cell-based assays, matriptase was a potent activator of PAR-2, and PAR-2 activation by matriptase caused robust induction of NF?B through G?i. Importantly, genetic elimination of PAR-2 from mice completely prevented matriptase-induced pre-malignant progression, including inflammatory cytokine production, inflammatory cell recruitment, epidermal hyperplasia, and dermal fibrosis. Selective ablation of PAR-2 from bone marrow-derived cells did not prevent matriptase-driven pre-malignant progression, indicating that matriptase activates keratinocyte stem cell PAR-2 to elicit its pro-inflammatory and pro-tumorigenic effects. When combined with previous studies, our data suggest that dual induction of PAR-2-NF?B inflammatory signaling and PI3K-Akt-mTor survival/proliferative signaling underlies the transforming potential of matriptase and may contribute to pro-tumorigenic signaling in human epithelial carcinogenesis. PMID:24469043

  16. Non-hematopoietic PAR-2 is essential for matriptase-driven pre-malignant progression and potentiation of ras-mediated squamous cell carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sales, K U; Friis, S; Konkel, J E; Godiksen, S; Hatakeyama, M; Hansen, K K; Rogatto, S R; Szabo, R; Vogel, L K; Chen, W; Gutkind, J S; Bugge, T H

    2015-01-15

    The membrane-anchored serine protease, matriptase, is consistently dysregulated in a range of human carcinomas, and high matriptase activity correlates with poor prognosis. Furthermore, matriptase is unique among tumor-associated proteases in that epithelial stem cell expression of the protease suffices to induce malignant transformation. Here, we use genetic epistasis analysis to identify proteinase-activated receptor (PAR)-2-dependent inflammatory signaling as an essential component of matriptase-mediated oncogenesis. In cell-based assays, matriptase was a potent activator of PAR-2, and PAR-2 activation by matriptase caused robust induction of nuclear factor (NF)?B through G?i. Importantly, genetic elimination of PAR-2 from mice completely prevented matriptase-induced pre-malignant progression, including inflammatory cytokine production, inflammatory cell recruitment, epidermal hyperplasia and dermal fibrosis. Selective ablation of PAR-2 from bone marrow-derived cells did not prevent matriptase-driven pre-malignant progression, indicating that matriptase activates keratinocyte stem cell PAR-2 to elicit its pro-inflammatory and pro-tumorigenic effects. When combined with previous studies, our data suggest that dual induction of PAR-2-NF?B inflammatory signaling and PI3K-Akt-mTor survival/proliferative signaling underlies the transforming potential of matriptase and may contribute to pro-tumorigenic signaling in human epithelial carcinogenesis. PMID:24469043

  17. Oral Lichenoid Lesions - A Review and Update

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Venkatesh Vishwanath; Setlur, Krishnanand; Yerlagudda, Komali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oral lichenoid lesions or reactions (OLLs/OLRs) are clinical and histological contemporaries of the classical oral lichen planus (OLP) that have generated a lot of debate in literature. In contrast to the idiopathic nature of OLP, OLLs are often associated with a known identifiable inciting factor. A superficial examination of these lesions clinically and histologically often reveals many similarities with OLP, but recent data indicate that distinguishable features do exist and form the basis of most classifications. Aims and Objectives: This paper attempts to collate available data in English literature on OLLs, highlight distinguishing features clinically and histologically and reflect on the malignant transformation potential and treatment modalities of the condition. Materials and Methods: A comprehensive search of medical and dental databases including PubMed, Ovid, Cochrane, Pubget, Researchgate, and non-medical search engines were utilized for the review. The search words included “oral lichen planus”, “oral lichenoid lesions”, “oral drug reactions”, “lichenoid dysplasia”, and “adverse effects of dental materials”. Review Results: OLLs seem to grossly underrated and most cases were clubbed as OLP. Definite clinical and histological features were uncovered to establish the identity of this lesion. Associations with dental restorative materials, drugs, and medications have been conclusively proven in the etiology of this condition. Specific markers are being utilized to diagnose the condition and monitor its progress. Conclusion: Substantial differentiating features were uncovered to delineate OLLs as a separate entity with definite etiology, pathogenesis, and a high malignant transformation rate compared with OLP. PMID:25657414

  18. The potential of oral vaccines for disease control in wildlife species.

    PubMed

    Cross, M L; Buddle, B M; Aldwell, F E

    2007-11-01

    Numerous infectious diseases caused by bacteria or viruses persist in developed and developing countries due to ongoing transmission among wildlife reservoir species. Such diseases become the target of control and management programmes in cases where they represent a threat to public health (for example rabies, sylvatic plague, Lyme disease), or livestock production (for example bovine tuberculosis, brucellosis, pseudorabies), or where they threaten the survival of endangered animal populations. In the majority of cases, lethal control operations are neither economically feasible nor publicly supported as a practical means for disease management. Prophylactic vaccination has emerged over the last 15 years as an alternative control strategy for wildlife diseases, mainly driven by the success of widescale oral rabies vaccination programmes for meso-carnivores in North America and Northern Europe. Different methods have been trialled for the effective delivery of wildlife vaccines in the field, however oral vaccination remains the most widely used approach. Successful implementation of an oral wildlife vaccine is dependent on a combination of three components: an efficacious immunogen, a suitable delivery vehicle, and a species-specific bait. This review outlines the major wildlife disease problems for which oral vaccination is currently under consideration as a disease management tool, and also focuses on the technological challenges that face wildlife vaccine development. The major conclusion is that attenuated or recombinant live microbes represent the most widely-used vaccines that can be delivered by the oral route; this in turn places major emphasis on effective delivery systems (to maintain vaccine viability), and on selective baiting systems, as the keys to wildlife vaccine success. Oral vaccination is a valuable adjunct or alternative strategy to culling for the control of diseases which persist in wildlife reservoirs. PMID:17113798

  19. Telomerase reverse transcriptase potentially promotes the progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma through induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tengda; Hu, Fengchun; Qiao, Bin; Chen, Zhifeng; Tao, Qian

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, researchers have found the critical role of telomerase in cellular transformation, proliferation, stemness and cell survival. High levels of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) expression and telomerase activation have been reported in most cancer cells. Moreover, overexpression of human TERT (hTERT) is reported to be correlated with advanced invasive stage of the tumor progression and poor prognosis. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), characterized by the loss of the cell-cell contact of epithelial cells and the acquisition of migratory and motile properties, is known to be a central mechanism responsible for invasiveness and metastasis of various cancers. Thus, we investigated whether hTERT plays a potential role in the development of EMT. As we expected, our clinical results showed that hTERT is overexpressed in oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) and OSCC tissues and correlates with clinical aggressiveness of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients. We then overexpressed hTERT in primary human oral epithelial cells (HOECS) and found that hTERT has the potential to prolong the lifespan, a process confering the characteristics of EMT by activating the Wnt/?-catenin pathway. Our findings provided an explanation for the aggressive nature of human tumors overexpressing hTERT and the possibly mechanism that links hTERT to EMT property, which represents a possible therapeutic target in highly metastatic cancers. PMID:25775973

  20. The therapeutic potential of inhibitors of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 for central nervous system malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Heimberger, Amy B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: High-grade primary and metastatic central nervous system (CNS) tumors are common, deadly, and refractory to conventional therapy and continue to be therapeutically challenging. A key nodal transcriptional factor, the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), drives the fundamental components of tumor malignancy and metastases in the CNS by enhancing proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis, and immunosuppression. The introduction of STAT3 inhibitors in clinical trials for this patient population is imminent. Methods: STAT3 inhibitors have been extensively tested in a variety of preclinical murine models. Results: The STAT3 inhibitor, WP1066, has displayed marked efficacy with minimal toxicity against malignancy in murine models, including established intracerebral tumors. The mechanism of this in vivo efficacy of the STAT3 blockade agents is a combination of direct tumor cytotoxicity and immune cytotoxic clearance. Conclusions: Given their direct antitumor cytotoxic effects, STAT3 inhibitors may exert therapeutic activity in the monotherapy setting but may also have compelling use as immunotherapeutic modulators or as a salvage therapy. PMID:22140648

  1. Microbial inhibition of oral epithelial wound recovery: potential role for quorum sensing molecules?

    PubMed

    De Ryck, Tine; Vanlancker, Eline; Grootaert, Charlotte; Roman, Bart I; De Coen, Laurens M; Vandenberghe, Isabel; Stevens, Christian V; Bracke, Marc; Van de Wiele, Tom; Vanhoecke, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Awareness of the impact of microbiota in both health and disease is growing. Using a new in vitro oral mucosa co-culture model, we recently showed a clear inhibition of epithelial wound healing in the presence of an oral microbial community. In this paper, we have used the same model in combination with specific oral microbial species to obtain a better insight into the role of the oral microbiota in wound healing. Monocultures of Klebsiella oxytoca and Lactobacillus salivarius significantly inhibited wound healing with ~20%, whereas Streptococcus mitis and S. oralis enhanced the healing process with ~15% in 24 h. Yet, neither S. oralis or S. mitis were able to counteract the inhibitory effects from K. oxytoca on wound healing. Other tested microbial species had no effect on wound healing. Apart from this species-dependency, the inhibitory effect on wound healing depended on a microbial threshold concentration. Further mechanistic experiments with K. oxytoca excluded different microbial factors and hypothesized that quorum sensing molecules might play a role in the inter-kingdom signalling during wound healing. These results are important for the development of new strategies for the management of (infected) wounds and ulcerations. PMID:25995981

  2. Oral soft tissue biopsies in Oporto, Portugal: An eight year retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Manuel-Moreira; Albuquerque, Rui; Monteiro, Marta; Lopes, Carlos-Alberto; do Amaral, José-Barbas; Pacheco, José-Júlio

    2015-01-01

    Background The diseases that affect the oral cavity are wide and diverse, comprising a broad spectrum of either benign or malignant lesions. However, few histological-based studies were performed for the evaluation of oral cavity lesions, and very few directed to oral soft tissue pathology. The aim of this study was to carry out pioneering research, within a Portuguese population, to determine the frequency and characteristics of oral malignancies, potential malignant disorders, and soft benign tissues pathologies submitted for biopsy in a north Portugal (Oporto) hospital population. Material and Methods We performed a retrospective study of soft tissue, oral cavity biopsies, in a hospital north of Portugal (Oporto) between 1999 and 2006. We analysed information on gender, age, location of the lesion, and the histopathological diagnosis. Results A total of 1042 oral biopsies were observed, 557(53.5%) in females and 485 (46.5%) in males, with a mean age of 51.7 years (S.D. ±17.6). The topographic location most frequently affected was labial mucosa (n=306). Considering the nature of the lesions, 700 (67.2%) corresponded to non-neoplasic lesions, 45 (4.3%) to potentially malignant disorders, and 297 (28.5%) to neoplasms (93 benign and 204 malignant). Non-neoplasic lesions were more prevalent in female gender (59.9%) when compared with potentially malignant disorders (46.7%) and neoplasms (39.4%) (P< 0.001). Non-neoplasic lesions presented the lower mean age (49.2±17.6) and potentially malignant disorders the highest mean age (60.5±14.5) (P< 0.001). The most common lesion of entire sample was fibro-epithelial hyperplasia (n=186; 17.9%), followed by squamous cell carcinoma (n=158; 15.1%). Conclusions Fibro-epithelial hyperplasia, followed by squamous cell carcinoma, was the most common pathologies. This pioneering study provided, for the first time, data about the proportion of squamous cell carcinoma when compared with benign conditions in a Portuguese hospital population. Key words:Oral biopsies, oral cavity, oral pathology, Portugal, soft tissue lesions. PMID:26644842

  3. Investigations on the potential of a low power diode pumped Er:YAG laser system for oral surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Karl; Wurm, Holger; Hausladen, Florian; Wagner, Sophia; Hibst, Raimund

    2015-02-01

    Flash lamp pumped Er:YAG-lasers are used in clinical practice for dental applications successfully. As an alternative, several diode pumped Er:YAG laser systems (Pantec Engineering AG) become available, with mean laser power of 2W, 15W, and 30W. The aim of the presented study is to investigate the potential of the 2W Er:YAG laser system for oral surgery. At first an appropriate experimental set-up was realized with a beam delivery and both, a focusing unit for non-contact tissue cutting and a fiber tip for tissue cutting in contact mode. In order to produce reproducible cuts, the samples (porcine gingiva) were moved by a computer controlled translation stage. On the fresh samples cutting depth and quality were determined by light microscopy. Afterwards histological sections were prepared and microscopically analyzed regarding cutting depth and thermal damage zone. The experiments show that low laser power ? 2W is sufficient to perform efficient oral soft tissue cutting with cut depth up to 2mm (sample movement 2mm/s). The width of the thermal damage zone can be controlled by the irradiation parameters within a range of about 50?m to 110?m. In general, thermal injury is more pronounced using fiber tips in contact mode compared to the focused laser beam. In conclusion the results reveal that even the low power diode pumped Er:YAG laser is an appropriate tool for oral surgery.

  4. Traditional Medicinal Plant Extracts and Natural Products with Activity against Oral Bacteria: Potential Application in the Prevention and Treatment of Oral Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Palombo, Enzo A.

    2011-01-01

    Oral diseases are major health problems with dental caries and periodontal diseases among the most important preventable global infectious diseases. Oral health influences the general quality of life and poor oral health is linked to chronic conditions and systemic diseases. The association between oral diseases and the oral microbiota is well established. Of the more than 750 species of bacteria that inhabit the oral cavity, a number are implicated in oral diseases. The development of dental caries involves acidogenic and aciduric Gram-positive bacteria (mutans streptococci, lactobacilli and actinomycetes). Periodontal diseases have been linked to anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Actinobacillus, Prevotella and Fusobacterium). Given the incidence of oral disease, increased resistance by bacteria to antibiotics, adverse affects of some antibacterial agents currently used in dentistry and financial considerations in developing countries, there is a need for alternative prevention and treatment options that are safe, effective and economical. While several agents are commercially available, these chemicals can alter oral microbiota and have undesirable side-effects such as vomiting, diarrhea and tooth staining. Hence, the search for alternative products continues and natural phytochemicals isolated from plants used as traditional medicines are considered as good alternatives. In this review, plant extracts or phytochemicals that inhibit the growth of oral pathogens, reduce the development of biofilms and dental plaque, influence the adhesion of bacteria to surfaces and reduce the symptoms of oral diseases will be discussed further. Clinical studies that have investigated the safety and efficacy of such plant-derived medicines will also be described. PMID:19596745

  5. Assessment of the allergic potential of food protein extracts and proteins on oral application using the brown Norway rat model.

    PubMed Central

    Knippels, Léon M J; Penninks, André H

    2003-01-01

    The need for widely accepted and validated animal models to test the potential allergenicity and potency of novel (biotechnology-derived) proteins has become an important issue for their safety evaluation. In this article, we summarize the results of the development of an oral sensitization protocol for food proteins in the rat. Young Brown Norway rats were exposed to either various purified allergenic proteins (e.g., ovalbumin, partly purified), a whole food (cow's milk), or total protein extracts (hen's egg white, peanut) by daily gavage dosing during 42 days without the use of an adjuvant. The results showed that Brown Norway rats can be sensitized orally to the various allergenic food proteins tested, resulting in antigen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) G and IgE responses, without the use of adjuvants. Animals orally exposed to cow's milk or total protein extracts of egg white also developed specific IgE and IgG antibodies that recognized the same proteins compared with antibodies from patients allergic to egg white or cow's milk. We also studied local and systemic immune-mediated effects. In ovalbumin-sensitized rats, some clinical symptoms of food allergy were studied upon an oral challenge with ovalbumin. The results demonstrated that gut permeability was increased and that in some animals breathing frequency and systolic blood pressure were temporarily decreased. The results obtained show that the Brown Norway rat provides a suitable animal model for food allergy research and for the study of relative allergenicity of existing and novel food proteins. PMID:12573912

  6. MicroRNAs-mRNAs Expression Profile and Their Potential Role in Malignant Transformation of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Induced by Cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qun; Zheng, Chanjiao; Shen, Huanyu; Zhou, Zhiheng; Lei, Yixiong

    2015-01-01

    Background. Our study was designed to elucidate whether there were miRNA and mRNA aberrantly expression profiles and potential role in malignant transformation of 16HBE induced by Cd. Methods. mRNA and miRNA expression profiles were determined in 35th Cd-induced 16HBE and untreated 16HBE by microarray. A series of bioinformatics analyses such as predicting targets, GO, KEGG were performed to find DEGs, coexpressing networks between miRNAs and mRNAs and its functions. Results. 498 DEGs were found. 8 Cd-responsive novel miRNAs predicted previously were identified, and 5 of them were downregulated. 214 target genes were predicted for the Cd-responsive miRNAs, many of which appeared to regulate gene networks. Target gene CCM2 was showed reciprocal effect by miRNAs. According to the combination analysis, hsa-miR-27b-3p regulated most of the mRNAs, especially upregulated expression genes. The differentially expressed miRNAs are involved in the biological processes and channels, and these GO and KEGG enrichment analyses result were significantly enriched in the Cd-responsive. Discussion. These results provided a tight link for the miRNA-mRNA integrated network and implied the role of novel miRNAs in malignant transformation of 16HBE induced by Cadmium. It is better to understand the novel molecular mechanism of cadmium-induced tumorigenesis. PMID:26504844

  7. Definitions of Single and Subsequent Primaries for Hematologic Malignancies

    Cancer.gov

    While it is recognized that some malignancies occur predominantly (or even exclusively) in liquid or solid form, because so many malignancies can potentially arise as either leukemias or lymphomas (or both), all hematopoietic malignancies are assumed to have this potential. 2. Malignancies of the lymphoid series are considered to be different from those of the myeloid series.

  8. Oral pigmentation: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sreeja, C.; Ramakrishnan, K.; Vijayalakshmi, D.; Devi, M.; Aesha, I.; Vijayabanu, B.

    2015-01-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations. PMID:26538887

  9. Mutagenesis and carcinogenesis induced by dibenzo[a,l]pyrene in the mouse oral cavity: a potential new model for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guttenplan, Joseph B.; Kosinska, Wieslawa; Zhao, Zhong-Lin; Chen, Kun-Ming; Aliaga, Cesar; DelTondo, Joseph; Cooper, Timothy; Sun, Yuan-Wan; Zhang, Shang-Min; Jiang, Kun; Bruggeman, Richard; Sharma, Arun K.; Amin, Shantu; Ahn, Kwangmi; El-Bayoumy, Karam

    2013-01-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity is a serious disease, affecting about 30,000 individuals in US annually. There are several animal models of oral cancer, but each has certain disadvantages. As a new model, we investigated whether topical application of the tobacco smoke carcinogen, dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P) is mutagenic and carcinogenic in the oral cavity of the B6C3F1 lacI and B6C3F1 mouse, respectively. B6C3F1 lacI mice received DB[a,l]P (0, 3, 6, 12 nmol) 3× per week. B6C3F1 mice received the same doses and also 24 nmol. At 38 weeks mutagenesis was measured in oral tissues in lacI mice. For the high dose group, the mutant fraction (MF) in upper mucosa and tongue increased about twofold relative to that in vehicle-alone. The increases were statistically significant. The mutational profile in the DB[a,l]P-induced mutants was compared with that induced by benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in oral tissue. BaP is mutagenic in many tissues when administered by gavage. The mutational profile for DB[a,l]P was more similar to that reported for p53 mutations in head and neck cancers than was that of BaP. At 47 weeks, oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) were found in 31% of the high-dose B6C3F1 group. Elevations of p53 and COX-2 protein were observed in tumor and dysplastic tissue. As DB[a,l]P induces mutations and tumors in the oral cavity, and has a mutational profile in oral tissue similar to that found in p53 in human OSCC, the treatment protocol described here may represent a new and relevant model for cancer of the oral cavity. PMID:21815141

  10. Potentiating effect of morphine on oral Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection is ?-opioid receptor-dependent.

    PubMed

    Breslow, Jessica M; Feng, Pu; Meissler, Joseph J; Pintar, John E; Gaughan, John; Adler, Martin W; Eisenstein, Toby K

    2010-12-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory demonstrated that mice treated with morphine pellets are sensitized to Salmonella enterica, serovar Typhimurium infection. However, the opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone, only partially blocked the effect of morphine, raising the possibility that the opioid might have some of its effects through a nonopioid receptor. To further clarify whether sensitization to infection is an opioid receptor-dependent phenomenon, ?-opioid receptor knockout (MORKO) mice were used in the present study. Wild-type (WT) and MORKO mice were treated with morphine and their sensitivity to oral Salmonella infection was assessed by mortality, bacterial burdens in gut associated lymphoid tissue and in blood and peritoneal fluid, and by levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in plasma. MORKO animals treated with morphine were refractory to a sublethal dose of Salmonella, while similar treatment of WT animals resulted in 100% mortality. WT animals treated with morphine had high bacterial loads in all organs tested, while morphine-treated MORKO animals had no culturable Salmonella in any organs. Pro-inflammatory cytokine levels were elevated in morphine-treated WT but not MORKO mice infected with Salmonella. These results provide definitive evidence that the morphine-mediated enhancement of oral Salmonella infection is dependent on the ?-opioid receptor. PMID:20688146

  11. Genitourinary Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, John G.

    1975-01-01

    Early diagnosis of malignant disease in the genitourinary system means a better opportunity for cure. The family physician must be aware of the signs and symptoms of GU tumors in all stages, and the investigations required to establish a diagnosis. In this article the symptomatology, investigative procedures and available treatment options are presented. Carcinoma of the scrotum and penis are not included because they are relatively uncomplicated diagnostic problems. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:20469262

  12. Kinesin Family member 4A: A Potential Predictor for Progression of Human Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Minakawa, Yasuyuki; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Koike, Hirofumi; Higo, Morihiro; Nakashima, Dai; Kouzu, Yukinao; Sakamoto, Yosuke; Ogawara, Katsunori; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Background Kinesin family member 4A (KIF4A), a microtubule-based motor protein, was implicated in regulation of chromosomal structure and kinetochore microtubule dynamics. Considering the functions of KIF4A, we assumed that KIF4A is involved in progression of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) via activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). However, little is known about the relevance of KIF4A in the behavior of OSCC. We investigated the KIF4A expression status and its functional mechanisms in OSCC. Methods The KIF4A expression levels in seven OSCC-derived cells were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting analyses. Using a KIF4A knockdown model, we assessed the expression of (SAC)-related molecules (BUB1, MAD2, CDC20, and cyclin B1), cell-cycle, and cellular proliferation. In addition to in vitro data, the clinical correlation between the KIF4A expression levels in primary OSCCs (n = 106 patients) and the clinicopathologic status by immunohistochemistry (IHC) also were evaluated. Results KIF4A mRNA and protein were up-regulated significantly (P < 0.05) in seven OSCC-derived cells compared with human normal oral keratinocytes. In the KIF4A knockdown cells, SAC activation was observed via increased BUB1 expression on the kinetochores, appropriate kinetochore localization of MAD2, down-regulation of CDC20, up-regulation of cyclin B1, and cell-cycle arrested at G2/M phase. The results showed that cellular proliferation of KIF4A knockdown cells decreased significantly (P < 0.05) compared with control cells. IHC showed that KIF4A expression in primary OSCCs was significantly (P < 0.05) greater than in the normal oral counterparts and that KIF4A-positive OSCCs were correlated closely (P < 0.05) with tumoral size. Conclusions Our results proposed for the first time that KIF4A controls cellular proliferation via SAC activation. Therefore, KIF4A might be a key regulator for tumoral progression in OSCCs. PMID:24386490

  13. Potential of erlotinib cyclodextrin nanosponge complex to enhance solubility, dissolution rate, in vitro cytotoxicity and oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Dora, Chander Parkash; Trotta, Francesco; Kushwah, Varun; Devasari, Naresh; Singh, Charan; Suresh, Sarasija; Jain, Sanyog

    2016-02-10

    The present study was envisaged to evaluate the effect of erlotinib ?-cyclodextrin nanosponge (ERL-NS) on the solubility, dissolution, in vitro cytotoxicity and oral bioavailability of erlotinib (ERL). Preliminary studies were conducted to select the optimized stoichiometry concentration of ERL and NS. The drug nanosponge complex comprising of 1:4 proportions of ERL and NS was prepared by freeze drying. ERL-NS formed nanoparticles of 372±31nm size with narrow size distribution (0.21±0.07 PDI) and high zeta potential (-32.07±4.58mV). The complexation phenomenon was confirmed by DSC, SEM, PXRD, FTIR, and TEM studies. In vitro dissolution studies revealed an increased dissolution rate (2-folds) with an enhanced dissolution efficiency of the nanosponge complex in comparison to pure drug. In vitro cytotoxicity study and apoptosis assay in pancreatic cell lines (MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1) indicates the increased toxicity of ERL-NS. Both, quantitative and qualitative cell uptake studies unveiled the higher uptake efficiency of ERL-NS than free drug. ERL-NS showed enhanced oral bioavailability with 1.8-fold higher Cmax (78.98±6.2 vs. 42.36±1.75?g/ml), and ?2-fold AUC0-? (1079.95±41.38 vs. 580.43±71.91), in comparison to pure ERL. Therefore, we conclude that the formation of a complex of nanosponge with ERL is a successful approach to increase its solubility, dissolution and oral bioavailability which may ultimately result in reduction in dose and dose related side-effects. PMID:26686138

  14. The Potential Association of Later Initiation of Oral/Enteral Nutrition on Euthyroid Sick Syndrome in Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Guisado, Joaquín; de Haro-Padilla, Jesús M.; Rioja, Luis F.; DeRosier, Leo C.; de la Torre, Jorge I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to determine if early initiation of oral/enteral nutrition in burn patients minimizes the drop in fT3 levels, reduces the potential for euthyroid sick syndrome (ESS), and shortens the length of hospital stay (LHS). Subjects and Methods. We retrospectively evaluated the statistical association of serum fT3, fT4, and TSH at the first (2nd–5th day) and second sample collection (9th–12th day) after the burn injury in 152 burn patients. Three groups were established depending on time of initiation of the oral/enteral nutrition: <24?h before the injury (Group 1), 24–48?h after the injury (Group 2), and >48?h after the injury (Group 3). Results. They were expressed as mean ± standard deviation. We found that LHS and the fT3 levels were statistically different in the 3 groups. The LHS (in days) was, respectively, in each group, 16.77 ± 4.56, 21.98 ± 4.86, and 26.06 ± 5.47. Despite the quantifiable drop in fT3, ESS was present only at the first sample collection (2.61 ± 0.92 days) in Group 3, but there was no group with ESS at the second sample collection (9.89 ± 1.01 days). Our data suggest that early initiation of nutritional supplementation decreases the length of hospitalization and is associated with decreasing fT3 serum concentration depression. Conclusion. Early initiation of oral/enteral nutrition counteracts ESS and improves the LHS in burn patients. PMID:23401683

  15. Techniques for early diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma: Systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Carreras-Torras, Clàudia

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives The diagnosis of early oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is of paramount clinical importance given the mortality rate of late stage disease. The aim of this study is to review the literature to assess the current situation and progress in this area. Material and Methods A search in Cochrane and PubMed (January 2006 to December 2013) has been used with the key words “squamous cell carcinoma”, “early diagnosis” “oral cavity”, “Potentially Malignant Disorders” y “premalignant lesions”. The inclusion criteria were the use of techniques for early diagnosis of OSCC and OPMD, 7 years aged articles and publications written in English, French or Spanish. The exclusion criteria were case reports and studies in other languages. Results Out of the 89 studies obtained initially from the search 60 articles were selected to be included in the systematic review: 1 metaanalysis, 17 systematic reviews, 35 prospective studies, 5 retrospective studies, 1 consensus and 1 semi-structured interviews. Conclusions The best diagnostic technique is that which we have sufficient experience and training. Definitely tissue biopsy and histopathological examination should remain the gold standard for oral cancer diagnose. In this systematic review it has not been found sufficient scientific evidence on the majority of proposed techniques for early diagnosis of OSCC, therefore more extensive and exhaustive studies are needed. Key words: Squamous cell carcinoma, early diagnosis, oral cavity, potentially malignant disorders, premalignant lesions. PMID:25662554

  16. Verrucous Carcinoma with Oral Submucous Fibrosis: A Rare Case with Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Komal, Khot; Deshmukh, Anjum

    2015-01-01

    Oral verrucous carcinoma (VC) is a variant of well differentiated oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) characterized by exophytic over growth. Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a potentially malignant disorder associated with chronic betel nut chewing habit. The development of OSCC is seen in one-third of the OSMF patients, but the development of VC is rare in such patients. There are very few cases of OSMF with VC reported in literature. Here, present a rare case of an elderly patient with VC in conjunction with OSMF. PMID:26468468

  17. Oral epithelial dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: clinical presentation and treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mawardi, Hani; Elad, Sharon; Correa, M. Elvira; Stevenson, Kristen; Woo, Sook-Bin; Almazrooa, Soulafa; Haddad, Robert; Antin, Joseph H.; Soiffer, Robert; Treister, Nathaniel

    2011-01-01

    Background Late complications of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) include a risk of secondary malignancies, including oral cancers. Optimization of best clinical practices for early diagnosis and treatment of oral premalignant or malignant lesions requires an assessment of potential predisposing risk factors as well as treatment outcomes. Methods The medical records of patients who developed oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) following allogeneic HSCT were reviewed. Data on demographics, HSCT course, chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD), smoking and alcohol consumption, oral lesion characteristics, mode of therapy and clinical outcome were recorded; landmark survival was calculated. Results Twenty-six patients with OED (n = 8) and OSCC (n = 18) were identified with a median follow-up of 26.5 and 21.5 months, respectively. Premalignant and malignant oral lesions were diagnosed at a median time of 2.5 and 8 years after HSCT, respectively. Chronic GVHD was present in 96% of patients and of these, 96% had oral involvement. Multifocal oral cancer was found in 28% of cases, and localized recurrence was observed in 44% of cases. Five-year overall survival was 75% and 70% for OED and OSCC, respectively. Conclusions These results suggest that oral cGVHD may be considered a potential risk factor for the development of OSCC following allogeneic HSCT. The observation that oral cancers were frequently multifocal and recurred locally supports the concept of field cancerization and suggests that these cancers may be more aggressive compared with the non-HSCT population. Vigilant follow-up and coordination of care between hematologists and oral health specialists are critical to minimize morbidity and mortality. PMID:21460866

  18. A potential oral anticancer drug candidate, Moringa oleifera leaf extract, induces the apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    JUNG, IL LAE; LEE, JU HYE; KANG, SE CHAN

    2015-01-01

    It has previously been reported that cold water-extracts of Moringa oleifera leaf have anticancer activity against various human cancer cell lines, including non-small cell lung cancer. In the present study, the anticancer activity of M. oleifera leaf extracts was investigated in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. By the analysis of apoptotic signals, including the induction of caspase or poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, and the Annexin V and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assays, it was demonstrated that M. oleifera leaf extracts induce the apoptosis of HepG2 cells. In the hollow fiber assay, oral administration of the leaf extracts significantly reduced (44–52%) the proliferation of the HepG2 cells and A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells. These results support the potential of soluble extracts of M. oleifera leaf as orally administered therapeutics for the treatment of human liver and lung cancers. PMID:26622717

  19. Localization and osteoblastic differentiation potential of neural crest-derived cells in oral tissues of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Ono, Miki; Suzawa, Tetsuo; Takami, Masamichi; Yamamoto, Gou; Hosono, Tomohiko; Yamada, Atsushi; Suzuki, Dai; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Watahiki, Junichi; Hayashi, Ryuhei; Arata, Satoru; Mishima, Kenji; Nishida, Kohji; Osumi, Noriko; Maki, Koutaro; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2015-09-01

    In embryos, neural crest cells emerge from the dorsal region of the fusing neural tube and migrate throughout tissues to differentiate into various types of cells including osteoblasts. In adults, subsets of neural crest-derived cells (NCDCs) reside as stem cells and are considered to be useful cell sources for regenerative medicine strategies. Numerous studies have suggested that stem cells with a neural crest origin persist into adulthood, especially those within the mammalian craniofacial compartment. However, their distribution as well as capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts in adults is not fully understood. To analyze the precise distribution and characteristics of NCDCs in adult oral tissues, we utilized an established line of double transgenic (P0-Cre/CAG-CAT-EGFP) mice in which NCDCs express green fluorescent protein (GFP) throughout their life. GFP-positive cells were scattered like islands throughout tissues of the palate, gingiva, tongue, and buccal mucosa in adult mice, with those isolated from the latter shown to form spheres, typical cell clusters composed of stem cells, under low-adherent conditions. Furthermore, GFP-positive cells had markedly increased alkaline phosphatase (a marker enzyme of osteoblast differentiation) activity and mineralization as shown by alizarin red staining, in the presence of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2. These results suggest that NCDCs reside in various adult oral tissues and possess potential to differentiate into osteoblastic cells. NCDCs in adults may be a useful cell source for bone regeneration strategies. PMID:26225748

  20. Inhibition of bromodomain and extra-terminal proteins (BET) as a potential therapeutic approach in haematological malignancies: emerging preclinical and clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Chaidos, Aristeidis; Caputo, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of the nucleosomal histone proteins orchestrate chromatin organization and gene expression in normal and cancer cells. Among them, the acetylation of N-terminal histone tails represents the fundamental epigenetic mark of open structure chromatin and active gene transcription. The bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) proteins are epigenetic readers which utilize tandem bromodomains (BRD) modules to recognize and dock themselves on the acetylated lysine tails. The BET proteins act as scaffolds for the recruitment of transcription factors and chromatin organizers required in transcription initiation and elongation. The recent discovery of small molecules capable of blocking their lysine-binding pocket is the first paradigm of successful pharmacological inhibition of epigenetic readers. JQ1 is a prototype benzodiazepine molecule and a specific BET inhibitor with antineoplastic activity both in solid tumours and haematological malignancies. The quinolone I-BET151 and the suitable for clinical development I-BET762 benzodiazepine were introduced in parallel with JQ1 and have also shown potent antitumour activity in preclinical studies. I-BET762 is currently being tested in early phase clinical trials, along with a rapidly growing list of other BET inhibitors. Unlike older epigenetic therapies, the study of BET inhibitors has offered substantial, context-specific, mechanistic insights of their antitumour activity, which will facilitate optimal therapeutic targeting in future. Here, we review the development of this novel class of epigenetic drugs, the biology of BET protein inhibition, the emerging evidence from preclinical work and early phase clinical studies and we discuss their potential role in the treatment of haematological malignancies. PMID:26137204

  1. Inhibition of bromodomain and extra-terminal proteins (BET) as a potential therapeutic approach in haematological malignancies: emerging preclinical and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Chaidos, Aristeidis; Caputo, Valentina; Karadimitris, Anastasios

    2015-06-01

    Post-translational modifications of the nucleosomal histone proteins orchestrate chromatin organization and gene expression in normal and cancer cells. Among them, the acetylation of N-terminal histone tails represents the fundamental epigenetic mark of open structure chromatin and active gene transcription. The bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) proteins are epigenetic readers which utilize tandem bromodomains (BRD) modules to recognize and dock themselves on the acetylated lysine tails. The BET proteins act as scaffolds for the recruitment of transcription factors and chromatin organizers required in transcription initiation and elongation. The recent discovery of small molecules capable of blocking their lysine-binding pocket is the first paradigm of successful pharmacological inhibition of epigenetic readers. JQ1 is a prototype benzodiazepine molecule and a specific BET inhibitor with antineoplastic activity both in solid tumours and haematological malignancies. The quinolone I-BET151 and the suitable for clinical development I-BET762 benzodiazepine were introduced in parallel with JQ1 and have also shown potent antitumour activity in preclinical studies. I-BET762 is currently being tested in early phase clinical trials, along with a rapidly growing list of other BET inhibitors. Unlike older epigenetic therapies, the study of BET inhibitors has offered substantial, context-specific, mechanistic insights of their antitumour activity, which will facilitate optimal therapeutic targeting in future. Here, we review the development of this novel class of epigenetic drugs, the biology of BET protein inhibition, the emerging evidence from preclinical work and early phase clinical studies and we discuss their potential role in the treatment of haematological malignancies. PMID:26137204

  2. The oral health consequences of chewing areca nut.

    PubMed

    Trivedy, C R; Craig, G; Warnakulasuriya, S

    2002-01-01

    Deleterious effects of areca nut on oral soft tissues are published extensively in the dental literature. Its effects on dental caries and periodontal tissues, two major oral diseases, are less well researched. Areca-induced lichenoid lesions mainly on buccal mucosa or tongue are reported at quid retained sites. In chronic chewers a condition known as betel chewer's mucosa, a discoloured areca nut-encrusted change, is often found where the quid particles are retained. Areca nut chewing is implicated in oral leukoplakia and submucous fibrosis, both of which are potentially malignant in the oral cavity. Oral cancer often arises from such precancerous changes in Asian populations. In 1985 the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that there is limited evidence to conclude that areca chewing may directly lead to oral cancer. There is, however, new information linking oral cancer to pan chewing without tobacco, suggesting a strong cancer risk associated with this habit. Public health measures to quit areca use are recommended to control disabling conditions such as submucous fibrosis and oral cancer among Asian populations. PMID:11900631

  3. Oral Carcinogenesis and Oral Cancer Chemoprevention: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takuji; Tanaka, Mayu; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the major global threats to public health. The development of oral cancer is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field cancerization and carcinogenesis. The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is promising. Biomarkers of genomic instability, including aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, are possible to measure the cancer risk of oral premalignancies. Understanding of the biology of oral carcinogenesis will yield important advances for detecting high-risk patients, monitoring preventive interventions, and assessing cancer risk and pharmacogenomics. In addition, novel chemopreventive agents based on molecular mechanisms and targets against oral cancers will be derived from studies using appropriate animal carcinogenesis models. New approaches, such as molecular-targeted agents and agent combinations in high-risk oral individuals, are undoubtedly needed to reduce the devastating worldwide consequences of oral malignancy. PMID:21660266

  4. Construction and physiochemical characterisation of a multi-composite, potential oral vaccine delivery system (VDS).

    PubMed

    Pettit, Marie W; Dyer, Paul D R; Mitchell, John C; Griffiths, Peter C; Alexander, Bruce; Cattoz, Beatrice; Heenan, Richard K; King, Stephen M; Schweins, Ralf; Pullen, Frank; Wicks, Stephen R; Richardson, Simon C W

    2014-07-01

    An increasing human population requires a secure food supply and a cost effective, oral vaccine delivery system for livestock would help facilitate this end. Recombinant antigen adsorbed onto silica beads and coated with myristic acid, was released (?15% (w/v)) over 24 h at pH 8.8. At pH 2, the myristic acid acted as an enteric coating, protecting the antigen from a variety of proteases. The antigen adsorbed onto silica particles, coated in myristic acid had a conserved secondary structure (measured by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy) following its pH-triggered release. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to measure the thickness of the adsorbed antigen, finding that its adsorbed conformation was slightly greater than its solution radius of gyration, i.e. 120-160 Å. The addition of myristic acid led to a further increase in particle size, with scattering data consistent with an acid thickness slightly greater than a monolayer of fully extended alkyl chains and a degree of hydration of around 50%. Whilst adsorbed onto the silica and coated in myristic acid, the protein was stable over 14 days at 42 °C, indicating a reduced need for cold chain storage. These data indicate that further investigation is warranted into the development of this technology. PMID:24680960

  5. Re-exploring promising ?-glucosidase inhibitors for potential development into oral anti-diabetic drugs: Finding needle in the haystack.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Usman

    2015-10-20

    Treatment of diabetes mellitus by oral ?-glucosidase inhibitors is currently confined to acarbose, miglitol and voglibose marred by efficacy problems and unwanted side effects. Since the discovery of the drugs more than three decades ago, no significant progress has been made in the drug development area of anti-diabetic ?-glucosidase inhibitors. Despite existence of a wide chemical diversity of ?-glucosidase inhibitors identified to date, majority of them are simply piled up in publications and reports thus creating a haystack destined to be forgotten in the scientific literature without given consideration for further development into drugs. This review finds those "needles" in that haystack and lays groundwork for highlighting promising ?-glucosidase inhibitors from the literature that may potentially become suitable candidates for pre-clinical or clinical trials while drawing attention of the drug development community to consider and take already-identified promising ?-glucosidase inhibitors into the next stage of drug development. PMID:26344912

  6. Oral Warts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for providing oral care. NIDCR > Image Gallery > Oral Health > Oral Warts Oral Warts Main Content Title: Oral Warts Description: Warts are small, white, gray, or pinkish rough bumps that look like cauliflower. They can appear inside the lips and on ...

  7. Effects of tungstate, a new potential oral antidiabetic agent, in Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M C; Barberà, A; Domínguez, J; Fernàndez-Alvarez, J; Gomis, R; Guinovart, J J

    2001-01-01

    Tungstate was orally administered to 7.5-week-old male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats that already showed moderate hyperglycemia (180 +/- 16 mg/dl). The animals became normoglycemic for approximately 10 days. Then, glycemia started to rise again, although it did not reach the initial values until day 24, when levels stabilized at approximately 200 mg/dl for the duration of the experiment. Untreated ZDF rats showed steadily increased blood glucose levels between 7.5 and 10 weeks of age, when they reached a maximum value of 450 +/- 19 mg/dl, which was maintained throughout the experiment. In addition, tolerance to intraperitoneal glucose load improved in treated diabetic rats. Serum levels of triglycerides were elevated in untreated diabetic rats compared with their lean counterparts (ZLC). In the liver of diabetic animals, glucokinase (GK), glycogen phosphorylase a (GPa), liver-pyruvate kinase (L-PK), and fatty acid synthase (FAS) activities decreased by 81, 30, 54, and 35%, respectively, whereas phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) levels increased by 240%. Intracellular glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) decreased by 40%, whereas glycogen levels remained unaffected. Tungstate treatment of these rats induced a 42% decrease in serum levels of triglycerides and normalized hepatic G6P concentrations, GPa activity, and PEPCK levels. GK activity in treated diabetic rats increased to 50% of the values of untreated ZLC rats. L-PK and FAS activity increased to higher values than those in untreated lean rats (1.7-fold L-PK and 2.4-fold FAS). Hepatic glycogen levels were 55% higher than those in untreated diabetic and healthy rats. Tungstate treatment did not significantly change the phosphotyrosine protein profile of primary cultured hepatocytes from diabetic animals. These data suggest that tungstate administration to ZDF rats causes a considerable reduction of glycemia, mainly through a partial restoration of hepatic glucose metabolism and a decrease in lipotoxicity. PMID:11147778

  8. Oral primary localized amyloidosis in HIV-infected patients: the oral face of a described skin lesion.

    PubMed

    Anaya-Saavedra, Gabriela; Ramírez-Amador, Velia; Valencia-Mayoral, Pedro

    2015-12-01

    Oral primary localized amyloidosis should be considered in the diagnosis of oral white lesions such as hyperplastic candidosis, lichen planus and lichenoid reactions; it is not associated with antiretroviral therapy use, systemic involvement or malignant transformation. PMID:25586447

  9. An in vitro investigation of the cariogenic potential of oral streptococci.

    PubMed

    Chestnutt, I G; MacFarlane, T W; Stephen, K W

    1994-07-01

    Whilst the importance of the mutans streptococci in the aetiology of dental caries is clear, a number of studies have described caries development in their absence. This investigation aimed to assess the cariogenic potential of Streptococcus gordonii, Strep. sanguis, Strep. vestibularis and Enterococcus faecalis in comparison with Strep. mutans and Strep. sobrinus, using a recently described in vitro model. In the presence of a 146 mM sucrose solution and powdered hydroxyapatite, each species was incubated for 5 h, after which acid anion production, calcium release and change in pH were measured. It was possible to assign each species to one of three groups, with E. faecalis, Strep. gordonii, Strep. sanguis exhibiting low, Strep. vestibularis intermediate, and Strep. mutans and Strep. sobrinus high in vitro cariogenic potential. This assay could be used as a screening test to assess the potential cariogenicity of a range of bacterial species. PMID:7945017

  10. Mechanisms and potential molecular markers of early response to combination epigenetic therapy in patients with myeloid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Liu, H B; Urbanavicius, D; Tan, P; Spencer, A; Dear, A E

    2014-10-01

    Combination epigenetic treatment (EGT) utilizing DNA methyl transferase inhibitors (DNMTi) and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) may be more efficacious than single agent treatment in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The molecular mechanisms behind the potential clinical efficacy of combination EGT treatment are incompletely understood and the frequently lengthy EGT regimes required to determine clinical response have generated a significant demand for early molecular markers of treatment response. Our study aimed to identify the effect of combination azacitidine (AZA) and panobinostat (LBH589) on expression levels of a panel of genes implicated in the pathogenesis of high-risk MDS or AML in HL-60 cells. We also characterized gene expression profiles in peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMCs) from patients in a recently reported phase Ib/II clinical trial using the combination of AZA and LBH589 and correlated these findings with clinical response to treatment. In vitro analysis demonstrated increased expression of caspase-3, Nor-1, NUR77, p15INK4B and p21WAF1/CIP1 and decreased expression of Bcl?xL in HL-60 cells treated with combination EGT. Analysis of patient samples prior to treatment demonstrated a significant reduction in NUR77 and p21WAF1/CIP1 expression compared to healthy controls. NUR77 and p21WAF1/CIP1 levels were similar between treatment non?responders and responders at screening. Early post first cycle treatment (day 25) analysis demonstrated a significant increase in expression of both NUR77, and p21WAF1/CIP1. A significant increase in NUR77, and p21WAF1/CIP1 together with a trend to increase in p15INK4B first cycle expression was observed in treatment responders compared to non-responders. In summary, combination AZA and LBH589 epigenetic treatment is associated with in vitro and in vivo modulation of genes implicated in the pathogenesis of MDS/AML. Early expression of NUR77 and p21WAF1/CIP1 correlated with clinical response to combination EGT suggesting investigation for potential use as molecular markers of early treatment response may be warranted. PMID:25051119

  11. Assessment of the carcinogenic potential of mitemcinal (GM-611): Increased incidence of malignant lymphoma in a rat carcinogenicity study

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Etsuko Kimura, Kazuya; Mizoguchi, Keiji; Kato, Atsuhiko; Takanashi, Hisanori; Itoh, Zen; Omura, Satoshi; Suzuki, Masami

    2008-04-01

    Mitemcinal is an erythromycin derivative, which acts as an agonist of the motilin receptor. For assessment of the carcinogenicity of mitemcinal, we conducted a short-term carcinogenicity study in p53 (+/-) C57BL/6 mice and a 104-week carcinogenicity study in CD(SD)IGS rats. There was no evidence of a carcinogenic potential in mouse when administered for 26 consecutive weeks at levels up to 250 mg/kg/day. In the rat study, an increased incidence of lymphoma was noted in 5/60 males and 8/60 females of the high dose group (60 mg/kg/day) compared to 1/60 and 0/60 in control males and females, respectively, with statistical significance in females. Rat lymphomas include different immunomorphologic types (T- or B-cell lineage). Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that lymphomas from mitemcinal-treated rats and spontaneous cases were of T-cell lineage. The overall weight of evidence suggests that the incidence of spontaneous lymphoma was enhanced in the rat study. They also indicate that the increased incidence of lymphomas was based on a non-genotoxic effect with a threshold dose-response and that the tumorigenesis was based on the strain or species specificity of background factors. The high dose in the rat study is approximately 1600-fold higher (AUC) than that of the clinical dose, a sufficient margin of safety for the clinical dose. We conclude that the risk of carcinogenesis due to mitemcinal in humans can be considered to be minimal and is to represent an acceptable risk for the continued administration of mitemcinal to humans.

  12. An RNAi-based screen reveals PLK1, CDK1 and NDC80 as potential therapeutic targets in malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Linton, A; Cheng, Y Y; Griggs, K; Kirschner, M B; Gattani, S; Srikaran, S; Chuan-Hao Kao, S; McCaughan, B C; Klebe, S; van Zandwijk, N; Reid, G

    2014-01-01

    Background: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive tumour originating in the thoracic mesothelium. Prognosis remains poor with 9- to 12-month median survival, and new targets for treatments are desperately needed. Methods: Utilising an RNA interference (RNAi)-based screen of 40 genes overexpressed in tumours, including genes involved in the control of cell cycle, DNA replication and repair, we investigated potential therapeutic targets for MPM. Following in vitro characterisation of the effects of target silencing on MPM cells, candidates were assessed in tumour samples from 154 patients. Results: Gene knockdown in MPM cell lines identified growth inhibition following knockdown of NDC80, CDK1 and PLK1. Target knockdown induced cell-cycle arrest and increased apoptosis. Using small-molecule inhibitors specific for these three proteins also led to growth inhibition of MPM cell lines, and Roscovitine (inhibitor of CDK1) sensitised cells to cisplatin. Protein expression was also measured in tumour samples, with markedly variable levels of CDK1 and PLK1 noted. PLK1 expression in over 10% of cells correlated significantly with a poor prognosis. Conclusion: These results suggest that RNAi-based screening has utility in identifying new targets for MPM, and that inhibition of NDC80, CDK1 and PLK1 may hold promise for treatment of this disease. PMID:24327015

  13. Sabin monovalent oral polio vaccines: review of past experiences and their potential use after polio eradication.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, V M; Sutter, R W

    2001-08-15

    After global eradication of polio is achieved, there will be a need for stockpiles of vaccine to combat potential outbreaks of poliomyelitis caused by (1) unforeseen release of polioviruses, (2) continued circulation of vaccine-derived strains, or (3) prolonged replication of polioviruses in immunodeficient persons. We conducted a review of the literature to document the immunogenicity and safety of monovalent Sabin vaccines, considered ideal candidates for these situations. The National Library of Medicine archives were searched for the keywords "polio," "monovalent," and "vaccine." Seroconversion rates for monovalent Sabin type 1 ranged from 53% to 100% (median, 95%); for type 2, 77%-100% (median, 93%); and for type 3, 52%-100% (median, 85%). The risk of vaccine-associated poliomyelitis per million persons vaccinated ranged from.05 to 0.99 (type 1), 0-0.65 (type 2), and 1.18-8.91 (type 3). Single-dose monovalent Sabin vaccines are highly immunogenic and safe and should be considered for stockpiles of vaccine to provide an effective response to potential outbreaks of poliomyelitis in the post-eradication period. PMID:11462191

  14. Graft-versus-host disease affecting oral cavity. A review

    PubMed Central

    Margaix-Muñoz, Maria; Bagán, José V.; Jiménez, Yolanda; Sarrión, María-Gracia; Poveda-Roda, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is one of the most frequent and serious complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and is regarded as the leading cause of late mortality unrelated to the underlying malignant disease. GVHD is an autoimmune and alloimmune disorder that usually affects multiple organs and tissues, and exhibits a variable clinical course. It can manifest in either acute or chronic form. The acute presentation of GVHD is potentially fatal and typically affects the skin, gastrointestinal tract and liver. The chronic form is characterized by the involvement of a number of organs, including the oral cavity. Indeed, the oral cavity may be the only affected location in chronic GVHD. The clinical manifestations of chronic oral GVHD comprise lichenoid lesions, hyperkeratotic plaques and limited oral aperture secondary to sclerosis. The oral condition is usually mild, though moderate to severe erosive and ulcerated lesions may also be seen. The diagnosis is established from the clinical characteristics, though confirmation through biopsy study is sometimes needed. Local corticosteroids are the treatment of choice, offering overall response rates of close to 50%. Extracorporeal photopheresis and systemic corticosteroids in turn constitute second line treatment. Oral chronic GVHD is not considered a determinant factor for patient survival, which is close to 52% five years after diagnosis of the condition. Key words:Chronic graft-versus-host disease, oral chronic graft-versus-host disease, pathogenics, management, survival. PMID:25810826

  15. Graft-versus-host disease affecting oral cavity. A review.

    PubMed

    Margaix-Muñoz, Maria; Bagán, José V; Jiménez, Yolanda; Sarrión, María-Gracia; Poveda-Roda, Rafael

    2015-02-01

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is one of the most frequent and serious complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and is regarded as the leading cause of late mortality unrelated to the underlying malignant disease. GVHD is an autoimmune and alloimmune disorder that usually affects multiple organs and tissues, and exhibits a variable clinical course. It can manifest in either acute or chronic form. The acute presentation of GVHD is potentially fatal and typically affects the skin, gastrointestinal tract and liver. The chronic form is characterized by the involvement of a number of organs, including the oral cavity. Indeed, the oral cavity may be the only affected location in chronic GVHD. The clinical manifestations of chronic oral GVHD comprise lichenoid lesions, hyperkeratotic plaques and limited oral aperture secondary to sclerosis. The oral condition is usually mild, though moderate to severe erosive and ulcerated lesions may also be seen. The diagnosis is established from the clinical characteristics, though confirmation through biopsy study is sometimes needed. Local corticosteroids are the treatment of choice, offering overall response rates of close to 50%. Extracorporeal photopheresis and systemic corticosteroids in turn constitute second line treatment. Oral chronic GVHD is not considered a determinant factor for patient survival, which is close to 52% five years after diagnosis of the condition. Key words:Chronic graft-versus-host disease, oral chronic graft-versus-host disease, pathogenics, management, survival. PMID:25810826

  16. Radiosensitization by fullerene-C60 dissolved in squalene on human malignant melanoma through lipid peroxidation and enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shinya; Kimura, Masatsugu; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2014-04-01

    We examined fullerene-C60 dissolved in squalene (C60/Sqe) for the ability to potentiate the radiosensitization under X-ray irradiation on human malignant melanoma HMV-II cells, which were treated with C60/Sqe and thereafter irradiated with X-ray. The cell proliferation for C60/Sqe was inhibited more markedly than for Sqe alone. Meanwhile, cell proliferation was almost unaltered for C60/squalane (Sqa) or Sqa, a hydrogenated form of Sqe, as compared to no-additive control. Thus radiosensitization of C60/Sqe is attributed to peroxidation of unsaturated bonds of squalene by X-ray-excited C60 in contrast to squalane. The fluorescence images of HMV-II cells stained with Rhodamine123, an indicator for mitochondrial membrane potential, were monitored for 6 h after X-ray irradiation. C60/Sqe obviously exhibited more augmented fluorescence intensity on perinuclear region of HMV-II cells than Sqe alone. TBARS assay showed that the lipid peroxidation level as malondialdehyde-equivalent increased by combination of C60/Sqe and X-ray dose-dependently on X-ray doses. C60/Sqe exhibited lipid peroxidation more markedly by 1.2-fold than Sqe alone. Thus the level of lipid peroxidation of squalene was sufficiently higher in C60/Sqe than in Sqe in the absence of C60 under X-ray irradiation, suggesting the combination of C60/Sqe and X-ray irradiation induced radiosensitization on HMV-II cells by peroxidation of absorbed Sqe in mitochondrial membrane via oxidative stress mediated by fullerene-C60.

  17. Evaluation of amitrole (aminotriazole) for potential carcinogenicity in orally dosed rats, mice, and golden hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, D.; Weber, H.; Mohr, U.; Boehme, K.

    1983-06-30

    Amitrole was evaluated for carcinogenic potential in lifespan studies on Wistar rats, NMRI mice, and golden hamsters. At the start of the studies the animals were 6 weeks old. Amitrole was administered, mixed with pulverized chow, at dietary concentrations of 0, 1, 10, and 100 micrograms/g (ppm). Each treated group and control group consisted of 75 male and 75 female rats and mice and of 76 male and 76 female golden hamsters. Additional animals were used to evaluate the functional state of the thyroid. Somewhat lower body weights, slightly reduced survival times, and transient effects on thyroid function were observed in golden hamsters at 100 ppm. In mice, a slight increase in pituitary gland hyperemias was seen at 100 ppm; also an effect on thyroid function usually occurred at the same concentration. In rats, a very large number of cystic dilatations of follicles in the thyroid at 100 ppm and a dose-unrelated increase in hemorrhages and hyperemias in the pituitary gland were indicative of an effect of amitrole on these organs. The strongest effect of amitrole on thyroid function, as compared to golden hamsters and mice, was seen in rats at 100 ppm. At this concentration a highly increased number of thyroid and pituitary gland tumors was observed in rats. In golden hamsters and mice, no tumor induction was seen.

  18. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... kinds of oral cancer: oral cavity cancer and oropharyngeal cancer. The most common symptom of oral cancer ... the oral cavity. • HPV infection The number of oropharyngeal cancers linked to human papilloma virus (HPV) has ...

  19. Oral curcumin mitigates the clinical and neuropathologic phenotype of the Trembler-J mouse: a potential therapy for inherited neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Khajavi, Mehrdad; Shiga, Kensuke; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; He, Feng; Shaw, Chad A; Yan, Jiong; Wensel, Theodore G; Snipes, G Jackson; Lupski, James R

    2007-09-01

    Mutations in myelin genes cause inherited peripheral neuropathies that range in severity from adult-onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 to childhood-onset Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy. Many myelin gene mutants that cause severe disease, such as those in the myelin protein zero gene (MPZ) and the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene (PMP22), appear to make aberrant proteins that accumulate primarily within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), resulting in Schwann cell death by apoptosis and, subsequently, peripheral neuropathy. We previously showed that curcumin supplementation could abrogate ER retention and aggregation-induced apoptosis associated with neuropathy-causing MPZ mutants. We now show reduced apoptosis after curcumin treatment of cells in tissue culture that express PMP22 mutants. Furthermore, we demonstrate that oral administration of curcumin partially mitigates the severe neuropathy phenotype of the Trembler-J mouse model in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of curcumin significantly decreases the percentage of apoptotic Schwann cells and results in increased number and size of myelinated axons in sciatic nerves, leading to improved motor performance. Our findings indicate that curcumin treatment is sufficient to relieve the toxic effect of mutant aggregation-induced apoptosis and improves the neuropathologic phenotype in an animal model of human neuropathy, suggesting a potential therapeutic role in selected forms of inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:17701891

  20. Oral Curcumin Mitigates the Clinical and Neuropathologic Phenotype of the Trembler-J Mouse: A Potential Therapy for Inherited Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Khajavi, Mehrdad ; Shiga, Kensuke ; Wiszniewski, Wojciech ; He, Feng ; Shaw, Chad A. ; Yan, Jiong ; Wensel, Theodore G. ; Snipes, G. Jackson ; Lupski, James R. 

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in myelin genes cause inherited peripheral neuropathies that range in severity from adult-onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 to childhood-onset Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy. Many myelin gene mutants that cause severe disease, such as those in the myelin protein zero gene (MPZ) and the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene (PMP22), appear to make aberrant proteins that accumulate primarily within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), resulting in Schwann cell death by apoptosis and, subsequently, peripheral neuropathy. We previously showed that curcumin supplementation could abrogate ER retention and aggregation-induced apoptosis associated with neuropathy-causing MPZ mutants. We now show reduced apoptosis after curcumin treatment of cells in tissue culture that express PMP22 mutants. Furthermore, we demonstrate that oral administration of curcumin partially mitigates the severe neuropathy phenotype of the Trembler-J mouse model in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of curcumin significantly decreases the percentage of apoptotic Schwann cells and results in increased number and size of myelinated axons in sciatic nerves, leading to improved motor performance. Our findings indicate that curcumin treatment is sufficient to relieve the toxic effect of mutant aggregation-induced apoptosis and improves the neuropathologic phenotype in an animal model of human neuropathy, suggesting a potential therapeutic role in selected forms of inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:17701891

  1. Positive/negative surface charge of chitosan based nanogels and its potential influence on oral insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Xu, Mengxue; Cheng, Xiaojie; Kong, Ming; Liu, Ya; Feng, Chao; Chen, Xiguang

    2016-01-20

    To develop insulin delivery system for the treatment of diabetes, two insulin-loaded nanogels with opposite zeta potential (-15.94±0.449mV for insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(-) and +17.15±0.492mV for insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(+)) were obtained. Ex vivo results showed that the nanogels with opposite surface charge exhibited different adhesion and permeation in specific intestinal segments. There was no significant differences in adhesion and permeation in rat duodenum, but in rat jejunum, insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(-) exhibited enhanced adhesion and permeation, which were about 3 folds (adhesion) and 1.7 folds (permeation) higher than insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(+). These results demonstrated that the surface charge property of nanogels determined the absorption sites of CMCS/CS-NGs in small intestine. In vivo study, the blood glucose level in insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(-) group had 3mmol/L lower than insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(+) group during 1h to 11h after the oral administration, which demonstrated that negative insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs had a better management of blood glucose than positive ones. PMID:26572423

  2. EGFR/HER2 inhibitors effectively reduce the malignant potential of MDR breast cancer evoked by P-gp substrates in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yiting; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Hongying; Zhang, Zijing; Chu, Chengyu; Liu, Xiuping; Zou, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) induced by chemotherapy in breast cancer frequently leads to tumor invasion, metastasis and poor clinical outcome. We preliminarily found that the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is involved in enhancing the malignant potential of MDR breast cancer cells, but the mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated in vitro and in vivo that EGFR/HER2 promote the invasive and metastatic abilities of MDR breast cancer. More importantly, a new function of EGFR/HER2 inhibitors was revealed for the first time, which could improve the treatment efficacy of breast cancer by reversing the MDR process rather than by inhibiting tumor growth. Firstly, using quantitative real?time PCR and western blot analysis, we found that overexpression of EGFR/HER2 in MCF7/Adr cells upregulated CD147 and MMP2/9 at both the transcription and protein expression levels, which promoted tumor cell migration, as determined using an in vitro invasion assay. Secondly, the upregulated levels of CD147 and MMP2/9 were decreased when EGFR/HER2 activity was inhibited, and therefore tumor invasion was also significantly inhibited. These phenomena were also demonstrated in nude mouse assays. Additionally, in MDR breast cancer patients, we found that overexpression of EGFR and P?gp levels led to shorter overall survival (OS) and disease?free survival (DFS) by IHC assays and Kaplan?Meier survival analysis. In conclusion, EGFR/HER2 play a crucial role in enhancing CD147 and MMP expression to establish favorable conditions for invasion/metastasis in MDR breast cancer. The scope of application of EGFR/HER2 inhibitors may be expanded in EGFR/HER2?positive patients. We suggest that MDR breast cancer patients may benefit from novel therapies targeting EGFR/HER2. PMID:26718028

  3. Recurrent papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential. Subtle architectural disorder detected by quantitative analysis in DAXX-immunostained tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Castellini, Paolo; Montironi, Maria A; Zizzi, Antonio; Scarpelli, Marina; Mazzucchelli, Roberta; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Paone, Nicola; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to identify subtle changes in the so-called architectural predominant order in nonrecurrent and recurrent papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP). Quantitative analysis was performed with a software package written in LabVIEW (National Instruments, Austin, TX) in DAXX-immunostained tissue sections. Twelve cases of PUNLMP with papillary fronds sectioned lengthwise through the core were investigated and subdivided as follows: 7 nonrecurrent and 5 recurrent PUNLMP cases. Six cases of normal urothelium (NU) were included. When an epithelial thickness threshold is set at 108 ?m (ie, 400 pixels), there is a complete separation between NU and PUNLMP; however, nonrecurrent and recurrent cases fall in the same range of thickness. In setting a nuclear elongation factor threshold at 2.1, there are differences between the 2 PUNLMP groups, recurrent PUNLMP and NU cases, showing a somewhat similar proportion of elongated nuclei. The nuclear orientation separates nonrecurrent from recurrent PUNLMP groups; however, NU cases do not appear as a separate group from the 2 PUNLMP groups. In combining epithelial thickness, nuclear elongation, and orientation in a multivariate analysis, the 2 PUNLMP groups appear separate between them and from NU. NU is less thickened than the 2 PUNLMP groups and shows a combination of elongated and less elongated nuclei. Elongated nuclei are more numerous in nonrecurrent PUNLMP, whereas the nuclei in recurrent PUNLMP are less elongated and less polarized than in the other group. Such finding can be used routinely to identify those PUNLMP patients who will have recurrence. PMID:24565208

  4. Development and characterization of a novel nanoemulsion drug-delivery system for potential application in oral delivery of protein drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongwu; Liu, Kaiyun; Liu, Wei; Wang, Wenxiu; Guo, Chunliang; Tang, Bin; Gu, Jiang; Zhang, Jinyong; Li, Haibo; Mao, Xuhu; Zou, Quanming; Zeng, Hao

    2012-01-01

    Background: The stability of protein drugs remains one of the key hurdles to their success in the market. The aim of the present study was to design a novel nanoemulsion drug-delivery system (NEDDS) that would encapsulate a standard-model protein drug – bovine serum albumin (BSA) – to improve drug stability. Methods: The BSA NEDDS was prepared using a phase-inversion method and pseudoternary phase diagrams. The following characteristics were studied: morphology, size, zeta potential, drug loading, and encapsulation efficiency. We also investigated the stability of the BSA NEDDS, bioactivity of BSA encapsulated within the NEDDS, the integrity of the primary, secondary, and tertiary structures, and specificity. Results: The BSA NEDDS consisted of Cremophor EL-35, propylene glycol, isopropyl myristate, and normal saline. The average particle diameter of the BSA NEDDS was about 21.8 nm, and the system showed a high encapsulation efficiency (>90%) and an adequate drug-loading capacity (45 mg/mL). The thermodynamic stability of the system was investigated at different temperatures and pH levels and in room-temperature conditions for 180 days. BSA NEDDS showed good structural integrity and specificity for the primary, secondary, and tertiary structures, and good bioactivity of the loaded BSA. Conclusions: BSA NEDDS showed the properties of a good nanoemulsion-delivery system. NEDDS can greatly enhance the stability of the protein drug BSA while maintaining high levels of drug bioactivity, good specificity, and integrity of the primary, secondary, and tertiary protein structures. These findings indicate that the nanoemulsion is a potential formulation for oral administration of protein drugs. PMID:23118537

  5. Malignant hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Henry; Davis, Mark; James, Danielle; Pollock, Neil; Stowell, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle that presents as a hypermetabolic response to potent volatile anesthetic gases such as halothane, sevoflurane, desflurane and the depolarizing muscle relaxant succinylcholine, and rarely, in humans, to stresses such as vigorous exercise and heat. The incidence of MH reactions ranges from 1:5,000 to 1:50,000–100,000 anesthesias. However, the prevalence of the genetic abnormalities may be as great as one in 3,000 individuals. MH affects humans, certain pig breeds, dogs, horses, and probably other animals. The classic signs of MH include hyperthermia to marked degree, tachycardia, tachypnea, increased carbon dioxide production, increased oxygen consumption, acidosis, muscle rigidity, and rhabdomyolysis, all related to a hypermetabolic response. The syndrome is likely to be fatal if untreated. Early recognition of the signs of MH, specifically elevation of end-expired carbon dioxide, provides the clinical diagnostic clues. In humans the syndrome is inherited in autosomal dominant pattern, while in pigs in autosomal recessive. The pathophysiologic changes of MH are due to uncontrolled rise of myoplasmic calcium, which activates biochemical processes related to muscle activation. Due to ATP depletion, the muscle membrane integrity is compromised leading to hyperkalemia and rhabdomyolysis. In most cases, the syndrome is caused by a defect in the ryanodine receptor. Over 90 mutations have been identified in the RYR-1 gene located on chromosome 19q13.1, and at least 25 are causal for MH. Diagnostic testing relies on assessing the in vitro contracture response of biopsied muscle to halothane, caffeine, and other drugs. Elucidation of the genetic changes has led to the introduction, on a limited basis so far, of genetic testing for susceptibility to MH. As the sensitivity of genetic testing increases, molecular genetics will be used for identifying those at risk with greater frequency. Dantrolene sodium is a specific antagonist of the pathophysiologic changes of MH and should be available wherever general anesthesia is administered. Thanks to the dramatic progress in understanding the clinical manifestation and pathophysiology of the syndrome, the mortality from MH has dropped from over 80% thirty years ago to less than 5%. PMID:17456235

  6. Early genetic and functional events in the pathogenesis of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Prime, S S; Eveson, J W; Guest, P G; Parkinson, E K; Paterson, I C

    1997-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a major world health problem, but the changes leading to the development of malignancy remain essentially unknown. Early changes are thought to include the loss of tumour suppressor genes on chromosomes 3p, 9p, and 17p. Although what genes are involved on chromosome 3 remains speculative, p16 (9p21) and p53 (17p13) are inactivated in a high proportion of oral dysplastic lesions and carcinomas. SCC-derived cell lines are immortal, have decreased growth requirements in vitro, and show a variable capacity to form tumours in athymic mice. Normal oral keratinocytes and cells from potentially malignant lesions invariably senesce at early culture passage, have strict growth requirements in vitro, and are nontumorigenic in vivo. By contrast to normal oral keratinocytes, cells from potentially malignant lesions are defective in their capacity to terminally differentiate in suspension culture. Loss of cellular senescence and gain of the immortal phenotype is associated with inactivation of p16 and p53. PMID:9303062

  7. [Soft tissue pathologies of the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Margotta, V; Capogreco, M

    2003-01-01

    The most frequent form of neoplasia in the oral cavity is the squamous cell carcinoma (about 90% of cases) representing the 3-5% of all malignant tumors with about 56% of mortality rate, at 5 years from the diagnosis. In general, the neoplastic disease is now unanimly considered as a multifactorial and multiphasic pathology. Multiphasic since the carcinogenic process consists in the cellular capacity to acquire oncological potentialities through several stages such as: moltiplication (a), transmission (b) of malignity caracteristics to progenic cells, invasivity (c), capacity to give metastasis (d) and also resistance to chemiotherapy. Multifactorial since in the onset of the disease intrinsic and extrinsic factors are certainly involved. In the carcinogenic process of CCS a high percentage has been noticed of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the short arm (P) of cromosoms 3 and 9, which contains the tumor-suppressor genes p53 and DDC (Deleted in colon rectal cancer). In the onset of VADS carcinoma and in particular of oral CCS, it has also been formulated the hypothesis of an intrinsic genetic factor (Llewellyn et al., 2001) between patients, also young, who present the neoplasia even trough they have never been exposed to extrinsic risk factors such as smoke and alcohol. Since part of patients with oral CCS do not always refer a common risk factors history as possible extrinsic neoplasia causes, it has been formulated the hypothesis that some viral infections, for their oncogenic capacity, could be the main ethiological factors predisposing to this neoplasia. The HPV are responsible, either in the oral cavity or on the epidermis, for benign proliferations such as: Verruca Vulgaris, Condyloma Acuminatum, Focal Epithelial Hyperplasia, Squamous Cell Papillomas, but also lesions that are potentially or certainly malignant such as CCS and Verrucous Carcinoma. The molecular analysis performed show that proteins produced from E6 and E7 portions of viral genoma (HPV 16-18) interfer and degrade proteins p53 and pRb produced by tumor suppressor genes (TSg). Recently, thanks to new molecular biology techniques, several authors are studying potentially neoplastic lesions, in order to better understand the association with HPV. PMID:12686915

  8. In Vivo Curative and Protective Potential of Orally Administered 5-Aminolevulinic Acid plus Ferrous Ion against Malaria.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shigeo; Hikosaka, Kenji; Balogun, Emmanuel O; Komatsuya, Keisuke; Niikura, Mamoru; Kobayashi, Fumie; Takahashi, Kiwamu; Tanaka, Tohru; Nakajima, Motowo; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2015-11-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is a naturally occurring amino acid present in diverse organisms and a precursor of heme biosynthesis. ALA is commercially available as a component of cosmetics, dietary supplements, and pharmaceuticals for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Recent reports demonstrated that the combination of ALA and ferrous ion (Fe(2+)) inhibits the in vitro growth of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. To further explore the potential application of ALA and ferrous ion as a combined antimalarial drug for treatment of human malaria, we conducted an in vivo efficacy evaluation. Female C57BL/6J mice were infected with the lethal strain of rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii 17XL and orally administered ALA plus sodium ferrous citrate (ALA/SFC) as a once-daily treatment. Parasitemia was monitored in the infected mice, and elimination of the parasites was confirmed using diagnostic PCR. Treatment of P. yoelii 17XL-infected mice with ALA/SFC provided curative efficacy in 60% of the mice treated with ALA/SFC at 600/300 mg/kg of body weight; no mice survived when treated with vehicle alone. Interestingly, the cured mice were protected from homologous rechallenge, even when reinfection was attempted more than 230 days after the initial recovery, indicating long-lasting resistance to reinfection with the same parasite. Moreover, parasite-specific antibodies against reported vaccine candidate antigens were found and persisted in the sera of the cured mice. These findings provide clear evidence that ALA/SFC is effective in an experimental animal model of malaria and may facilitate the development of a new class of antimalarial drug. PMID:26324278

  9. In Vivo Curative and Protective Potential of Orally Administered 5-Aminolevulinic Acid plus Ferrous Ion against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shigeo; Hikosaka, Kenji; Balogun, Emmanuel O.; Komatsuya, Keisuke; Niikura, Mamoru; Kobayashi, Fumie; Takahashi, Kiwamu; Tanaka, Tohru; Nakajima, Motowo

    2015-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is a naturally occurring amino acid present in diverse organisms and a precursor of heme biosynthesis. ALA is commercially available as a component of cosmetics, dietary supplements, and pharmaceuticals for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Recent reports demonstrated that the combination of ALA and ferrous ion (Fe2+) inhibits the in vitro growth of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. To further explore the potential application of ALA and ferrous ion as a combined antimalarial drug for treatment of human malaria, we conducted an in vivo efficacy evaluation. Female C57BL/6J mice were infected with the lethal strain of rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii 17XL and orally administered ALA plus sodium ferrous citrate (ALA/SFC) as a once-daily treatment. Parasitemia was monitored in the infected mice, and elimination of the parasites was confirmed using diagnostic PCR. Treatment of P. yoelii 17XL-infected mice with ALA/SFC provided curative efficacy in 60% of the mice treated with ALA/SFC at 600/300 mg/kg of body weight; no mice survived when treated with vehicle alone. Interestingly, the cured mice were protected from homologous rechallenge, even when reinfection was attempted more than 230 days after the initial recovery, indicating long-lasting resistance to reinfection with the same parasite. Moreover, parasite-specific antibodies against reported vaccine candidate antigens were found and persisted in the sera of the cured mice. These findings provide clear evidence that ALA/SFC is effective in an experimental animal model of malaria and may facilitate the development of a new class of antimalarial drug. PMID:26324278

  10. AGS67E, an Anti-CD37 Monomethyl Auristatin E Antibody–Drug Conjugate as a Potential Therapeutic for B/T-Cell Malignancies and AML: A New Role for CD37 in AML

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Daniel S.; Guevara, Claudia I.; Jin, Liqing; Mbong, Nathan; Verlinsky, Alla; Hsu, Ssucheng J.; Aviña, Hector; Karki, Sher; Abad, Joseph D.; Yang, Peng; Moon, Sung-Ju; Malik, Faisal; Choi, Michael Y.; An, Zili; Morrison, Kendall; Challita-Eid, Pia M.; Doñate, Fernando; Joseph, Ingrid B.J.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Dick, John E.; Stover, David R.

    2015-01-01

    CD37 is a tetraspanin expressed on malignant B cells. Recently, CD37 has gained interest as a therapeutic target. We developed AGS67E, an antibody–drug conjugate that targets CD37 for the potential treatment of B/T-cell malignancies. It is a fully human monoclonal IgG2 antibody (AGS67C) conjugated, via a protease-cleavable linker, to the microtubule-disrupting agent mono-methyl auristatin E (MMAE). AGS67E induces potent cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and cell-cycle alterations in many non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cell lines and patient-derived samples in vitro. It also shows potent antitumor activity in NHL and CLL xenografts, including Rituxan-refractory models. During profiling studies to confirm the reported expression of CD37 in normal tissues and B-cell malignancies, we made the novel discovery that the CD37 protein was expressed in T-cell lymphomas and in AML. AGS67E bound to >80% of NHL and T-cell lymphomas, 100% of CLL and 100% of AML patient-derived samples, including CD34+CD38? leukemic stem cells. It also induced cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and cell-cycle alterations in AML cell lines and antitumor efficacy in orthotopic AML xenografts. Taken together, this study shows not only that AGS67E may serve as a potential therapeutic for B/T-cell malignancies, but it also demonstrates, for the first time, that CD37 is well expressed and a potential drug target in AML. PMID:25934707

  11. In vivo Raman spectroscopic identification of premalignant lesions in oral buccal mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Deshmukh, Atul; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Murali Krishna, C.

    2012-10-01

    Cancers of oral cavities are one of the most common malignancies in India and other south-Asian countries. Tobacco habits are the main etiological factors for oral cancer. Identification of premalignant lesions is required for improving survival rates related to oral cancer. Optical spectroscopy methods are projected as alternative/adjunct for cancer diagnosis. Earlier studies have demonstrated the feasibility of classifying normal, premalignant, and malignant oral ex-vivo tissues. We intend to evaluate potentials of Raman spectroscopy in detecting premalignant conditions. Spectra were recorded from premalignant patches, contralateral normal (opposite to tumor site), and cancerous sites of subjects with oral cancers and also from age-matched healthy subjects with and without tobacco habits. A total of 861 spectra from 104 subjects were recorded using a fiber-optic probe-coupled HE-785 Raman spectrometer. Spectral differences in the 1200- to 1800-cm-1 region were subjected to unsupervised principal component analysis and supervised linear discriminant analysis followed by validation with leave-one-out and an independent test data set. Results suggest that premalignant conditions can be objectively discriminated with both normal and cancerous sites as well as from healthy controls with and without tobacco habits. Findings of the study further support efficacy of Raman spectroscopic approaches in oral-cancer applications.

  12. Quantitative proteomic analysis of microdissected oral epithelium for cancer biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hua; Langerman, Alexander; Zhang, Yan; Khalid, Omar; Hu, Shen; Cao, Cheng-Xi; Lingen, Mark W; Wong, David T W

    2015-11-01

    Specific biomarkers are urgently needed for the detection and progression of oral cancer. The objective of this study was to discover cancer biomarkers from oral epithelium through utilizing high throughput quantitative proteomics approaches. Morphologically malignant, epithelial dysplasia, and adjacent normal epithelial tissues were laser capture microdissected (LCM) from 19 patients and used for proteomics analysis. Total proteins from each group were extracted, digested and then labelled with corresponding isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ). Labelled peptides from each sample were combined and analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for protein identification and quantification. In total, 500 proteins were identified and 425 of them were quantified. When compared with adjacent normal oral epithelium, 17 and 15 proteins were consistently up-regulated or down-regulated in malignant and epithelial dysplasia, respectively. Half of these candidate biomarkers were discovered for oral cancer for the first time. Cornulin was initially confirmed in tissue protein extracts and was further validated in tissue microarray. Its presence in the saliva of oral cancer patients was also explored. Myoglobin and S100A8 were pre-validated by tissue microarray. These data demonstrated that the proteomic biomarkers discovered through this strategy are potential targets for oral cancer detection and salivary diagnostics. PMID:26321370

  13. Exploring the potential of self-assembled mixed micelles in enhancing the stability and oral bioavailability of an acid-labile drug.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingwang; Wang, Huan; Zhang, Tianpeng; Zhou, Xiaotong; Wu, Baojian

    2014-10-01

    Oral delivery of many drugs is plagued with limited solubility and/or poor stability. This paper aimed to explore the performance of polymeric mixed micelles on solubilization, stabilization and bioavailability enhancement with stiripentol as model drug. Stiripentol-loaded mixed micelles were prepared by solvent-diffusion method: rapid dispersion of an ethanol solution containing stiripentol, monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(?-caprolactone) and sodium oleate into water. Stiripentol micelles were characterized by the particle size, entrapment efficiency, in vitro drug release, TEM, DSC and FTIR. The pharmacokinetic profile of stiripentol was determined in rats after oral administration of stiripentol micelles. The obtained stiripentol micelles were 44.2 nm in size with an entrapment efficiency over 90%. It was shown that micelles substantially improved the solubility and gastric stability of stiripentol. The oral absorption of stiripentol was also enhanced to a great extent with a relative bioavailability of 157% and 444% to the commercial formulation (Diacomit®) and in-house suspensions. Mixed micelles assembled by di-block copolymer/sodium oleate exhibited a good potential in the improvement of drug stability and bioavailability. It should be a promising carrier for oral delivery of therapeuticals with solubility and stability issues. PMID:24956461

  14. Stages of Malignant Mesothelioma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Malignant mesothelioma is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the lining of the chest or ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread to other parts of the body. ...

  15. Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia after diode laser oral surgery. An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Seoane, Juan; González-Mosquera, Antonio; García-Martín, José-Manuel; García-Caballero, Lucía; Varela-Centelles, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Background To examine the process of epithelial reparation in a surgical wound caused by diode laser. Material and Methods An experimental study with 27 Sprage-Dawley rats was undertaken. The animals were randomly allocated to two experimental groups, whose individuals underwent glossectomy by means of a diode laser at different wattages, and a control group treated using a number 15 scalpel blade. The animals were slaughtered at the 2nd, 7th, and 14th day after glossectomy. The specimens were independently studied by two pathologists (blinded for the specimens’ group). Results At the 7th day, re-epithelisation was slightly faster for the control group (conventional scalpel) (p=0.011). At the 14th day, complete re-epithelization was observed for all groups. The experimental groups displayed a pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia. Conclusions It is concluded that, considering the limitations of this kind of experimental studies, early re-epithelisation occurs slightly faster when a conventional scalpel is used for incision, although re-epithelisation is completed in two weeks no matter the instrument used. In addition, pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia is a potential event after oral mucosa surgery with diode laser. Knowledge about this phenomenon (not previously described) may prevent diagnostic mistakes and inadequate treatment approaches, particularly when dealing with potentially malignant oral lesions. Key words:Diode laser, animal model, oral biopsy, oral cancer, oral precancer, pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia. PMID:26116841

  16. Pediatric Salivary Gland Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ord, Robert A; Carlson, Eric R

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric malignant salivary gland tumors are extremely rare. The percentage of malignant tumors is higher than that seen in adults, although the outcomes in terms of survival are better in pediatric patients. The mainstay of treatment is surgical excision with negative margins. This article reviews current concepts in demographics, etiology, management, and outcomes of malignant salivary tumors in children. PMID:26614703

  17. Oral Herpes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Improving the Nation's Oral Health National Institutes of Health Español Staff Directory A– ... Index Search Text size: Website Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum Disease TMJ Disorders Oral ...

  18. Oral Myiasis

    PubMed Central

    Saravanan, Thalaimalai; Mohan, Mathan A; Thinakaran, Meera; Ahammed, Saneem

    2015-01-01

    Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy. PMID:25709196

  19. Anatomy-Based Algorithms for Detecting Oral Cancer Using Reflectance and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    McGee, Sasha

    OBJECTIVES: We used reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy to noninvasively and quantitatively distinguish benign from dysplastic/malignant oral lesions. We designed diagnostic algorithms to account for differences in ...

  20. Strategies of targeting oral drug delivery systems to the colon and their potential use for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Krishnaiah, Yellela S R; Khan, Mansoor A

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women. Often, surgical intervention remains the choice in treating CRC. Traditional dosage forms used for treating CRC deliver drug to wanted as well as unwanted sites of drug action resulting in several adverse side effects. Targeted oral drug delivery systems are being investigated to target and deliver chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agents directly to colon and rectum. Site-specific delivery of a drug to colon increases its concentration at the target site, and thus requires a lower dose with reduced incidence of side effects. The major obstacle to be overcome for successful targeting of drug to colon through oral route is that drug absorption/degradation must be avoided in stomach and small intestine before the dosage form reaches colon. The review includes discussion of physiological factors that must be considered when targeting drugs directly to colorectal region, an outline on drugs used for treatment and prevention of CRC, and a brief description of various types of colon-targeted oral drug delivery systems. The focus is on the assessment of various formulation approaches being investigated for oral colon-specific delivery of drugs used in the treatment and prevention of CRC. PMID:22681390

  1. Oral lichen planus: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Krupaa, R. Jayasri; Sankari, S. Leena; Masthan, K. M. K.; Rajesh, E.

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is an immunologically mediated mucocutaneous disease that is triggered by varied etiological agents. The oral lichenoid reaction is considered a variant of the disease that needs to be clearly diagnosed as a separate entity from oral lichen planus and treated. They follow a strict cause-effector relationship, protocols that suggest the differentiation. Lichen planus has varied clinical forms in the oral mucosa and cutaneously that has different prognosis. This condition also arises in association with various other systemic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus. There have been cases reported in the esophagus, larynx, scalp, nail, cutaneous areas, especially arms and wrists, trunk. There is reported malignant transformation that essentiates careful examination, treatment protocol and regular follow-up sessions. This article throws light on the disease condition of oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid reaction that is essential for the differentiation and treatment. PMID:26015696

  2. Understanding Carcinogenesis for Fighting Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takuji; Ishigamori, Rikako

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the major global threats to public health. Oral cancer development is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field cancerization and carcinogenesis. The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is promising. Biomarkers of genomic instability, including aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, are able to measure the cancer risk of oral premalignancies. Understanding of the biology of oral carcinogenesis will give us important advances for detecting high-risk patients, monitoring preventive interventions, assessing cancer risk, and pharmacogenomics. In addition, novel chemopreventive agents based on molecular mechanisms and targets against oral cancers will be derived from research using appropriate animal carcinogenesis models. New approaches, such as interventions with molecular-targeted agents and agent combinations in high-risk oral individuals, are undoubtedly needed to reduce the devastating worldwide consequences of oral malignancy. PMID:21772845

  3. Oral nicotinamide and actinic keratosis: a supplement success story.

    PubMed

    Kim, Burcu; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide has shown potential as a safe and effective intervention for the prevention of malignant and premalignant skin lesions. Recent studies have shown that nicotinamide, in both oral and topical forms, is able to prevent ultraviolet-induced immunosuppression in humans [1,2,3] and mice [4,5]. Immunosuppression is a known factor for the progression of premalignant lesions, such as actinic keratosis [6]. Murine studies have shown that nicotinamide is also able to protect against photocarcinogenesis [4,5]. Preliminary human studies suggest that nicotinamide may help prevent skin cancers and enhance the regression of actinic keratoses. PMID:25561219

  4. Management of malignant hyperthermia: diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schneiderbanger, Daniel; Johannsen, Stephan; Roewer, Norbert; Schuster, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia is a potentially lethal inherited disorder characterized by disturbance of calcium homeostasis in skeletal muscle. Volatile anesthetics and/or the depolarizing muscle relaxant succinylcholine may induce this hypermetabolic muscular syndrome due to uncontrolled sarcoplasmic calcium release via functionally altered calcium release receptors, resulting in hypoxemia, hypercapnia, tachycardia, muscular rigidity, acidosis, hyperkalemia, and hyperthermia in susceptible individuals. Since the clinical presentation of malignant hyperthermia is highly variable, survival of affected patients depends largely on early recognition of the symptoms characteristic of malignant hyperthermia, and immediate action on the part of the attending anesthesiologist. Clinical symptoms of malignant hyperthermia, diagnostic criteria, and current therapeutic guidelines, as well as adequate management of anesthesia in patients susceptible to malignant hyperthermia, are discussed in this review. PMID:24868161

  5. Collecting and Storing Malignant, Borderline Malignant Neoplasms, and Related Samples From Young Patients With Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-12

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Hairy Cell Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Neoplasm of Uncertain Malignant Potential; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  6. Effects of amitriptyline and intra-oral device appliance on clinical and laser-evoked potentials features in chronic tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Shevel, E; Libro, G; Guido, M; Di Venere, D; Genco, S; Monetti, C; Serpino, C; Barile, G; Lamberti, P; Livrea, P

    2005-05-01

    In the present study, we examined clinical and laser-evoked potentials (LEP) features in two groups of chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) patients treated with two different approaches: intra-oral appliance of prosthesis, aiming to reduce muscular tenderness, and 10 mg daily amitriptyline. Eighteen patients suffering from CTTH (IHS, 2004) participated in the study. We performed a basal evaluation of clinical features and LEPs in all patients (T0) vs. 12 age- and sex-matched controls; successively, patients were randomly assigned to a two-month treatment by amitriptyline or intra-oral device appliance. The later LEPs, especially the P2 component, were significantly increased in amplitude in the CTTH group. Both the intra-oral prosthesis and amitriptyline significantly reduced headache frequency. Total Tenderness Score was significantly reduced in the group treated by the prosthesis. The amplitude of P2 response elicited by stimulation of pericranial zones showed a reduction after amitriptyline treatment. The results of this study may confirm that pericranial tenderness is primarily a phenomenon initiating a self-perpetuating circuit, favoured by central sensitisation at the level of the cortical nociceptive areas devoted to the attentive and emotive compounds of pain. Both the interventions at the peripheral and central levels may interrupt this reverberating circuit, improving the outcome of headache. PMID:15926017

  7. Oral leukoplakia, the ongoing discussion on definition and terminology

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades several definitions of oral leukoplakia have been proposed, the last one, being authorized by the World Health Organization (WHO), dating from 2005. In the present treatise an adjustment of that definition and the 1978 WHO definition is suggested, being : “A predominantly white patch or plaque that cannot be characterized clinically or pathologically as any other disorder; oral leukoplakia carries an increased risk of cancer development either in or close to the area of the leukoplakia or elsewhere in the oral cavity or the head-and-neck region”. Furthermore, the use of strict diagnostic criteria is recommended for predominantly white lesions for which a causative factor has been identified, e.g. smokers’ lesion, frictional lesion and dental restoration associated lesion. A final diagnosis of such leukoplakic lesions can only be made in retrospect after successful elimination of the causative factor within a somewhat arbitrarily chosen period of 4-8 weeks. It seems questionable to exclude “frictional keratosis” and “alveolar ridge keratosis” from the category of leukoplakia as has been suggested in the literature. Finally, brief attention has been paid to some histopathological issues that may cause confusion in establishing a final diagnosis of leukoplakia. Key words:Oral leukoplakia, potentially malignant oral disorders, definition. PMID:26449439

  8. Canine oral melanoma.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Philip J

    2007-05-01

    Melanoma is the most common oral malignancy in the dog. Oral and/or mucosal melanoma has been routinely considered an extremely malignant tumor with a high degree of local invasiveness and high metastatic propensity. Primary tumor size has been found to be extremely prognostic. The World Health Organization staging scheme for dogs with oral melanoma is based on size, with stage I = <2-cm-diameter tumor, stage II = 2- to <4-cm-diameter tumor, stage III = > or = 4cm tumor and/or lymph node metastasis, and stage IV = distant metastasis. Median survival times for dogs with oral melanoma treated with surgery are approximately 17 to 18, 5 to 6, and 3 months with stage I, II, and III disease, respectively. Significant negative prognostic factors include stage, size, evidence of metastasis, and a variety of histologic criteria. Standardized treatments such as surgery, coarse-fractionation radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have afforded minimal to modest stage-dependent clinical benefits and death is usually due to systemic metastasis. Numerous immunotherapeutic strategies have been employed to date with limited clinical efficacy; however, the use of xenogeneic DNA vaccines may represent a leap forward in clinical efficacy. Oral melanoma is a spontaneous syngeneic cancer occurring in outbred, immunocompetent dogs and appears to be a more clinically faithful therapeutic model for human melanoma; further use of canine melanoma as a therapeutic model for human melanoma is strongly encouraged. In addition, the development of an expanded but clinically relevant staging system incorporating the aforementioned prognostic factors is also strongly encouraged. PMID:17591290

  9. Effects of near-infrared laser radiation on the survival and inflammatory potential of Candida spp. involved in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Clemente, A M; Rizzetto, L; Castronovo, G; Perissi, E; Tanturli, M; Cozzolino, F; Cavalieri, D; Fusi, F; Cialdai, F; Vignali, L; Torcia, M G; Monici, M

    2015-10-01

    Candida spp. usually colonize ulcerative lesions of atrophic mucosa in patients with chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis inducing severe inflammation. The spread of antifungal-resistant strains strongly encouraged the search of complementary or alternative therapeutic strategies to cure inflamed mucosa. In this paper, we studied the effects of a near-infrared (NIR) laser system with dual-wavelength emission (808 nm + 904 nm) on the survival and inflammatory potential of C. albicans, C. glabrata, and C. parapsilosis. Laser treatment was performed with a Multiwave Locked System laser. Survival and apoptosis of fungal strains were evaluated by colony-forming units (CFU) counting and annexin V staining. Cytokine production was evaluated by ImmunoPlex array. Laser treatment significantly affected the survival of Candida spp. by inducing apoptosis and induced a lower production of inflammatory cytokines by dendritic cells compared to untreated fungi. No differences in the survival and inflammatory potential were recorded in treated or untreated Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, used as the control non-pathogenic microorganism. Laser treatment altered the survival and inflammatory potential of pathogenic Candida spp. These data provide experimental support to the use of NIR laser radiation as a co-adjuvant of antifungal therapy in patients with oral mucositis (OM) complicated by Candida infections. PMID:26173694

  10. Assessment of the mutagenic potential of Cr(VI) in the oral mucosa of Big Blue® transgenic F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Chad M; Young, Robert R; Suh, Mina; Dinesdurage, Harshini R; Elbekai, Reem H; Harris, Mark A; Rohr, Annette C; Proctor, Deborah M

    2015-08-01

    Exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in drinking water was associated with an increased incidence of oral tumors in F344 rats in a 2-year cancer bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. These tumors primarily occurred at 180 ppm Cr(VI) and appeared to originate from the gingival mucosa surrounding the upper molar teeth. To investigate whether these tumors could have resulted from a mutagenic mode of action (MOA), a transgenic mutation assay based on OECD Test Guideline 488 was conducted in Big Blue(®) TgF344 rats. The mutagenic oral carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO) served as a positive control. Mutant frequency was measured in the inner gingiva with adjacent palate, and outer gingiva with adjacent buccal tissue. Exposure to 10 ppm 4-NQO in drinking water for 28 days increased mutant frequency in the cII transgene significantly, from 39.1?±?7.5 × 10(-6) to 688?±?250 × 10(-6) in the gingival/buccal region, and from 49.8?±?17.8 × 10(-6) to 1818?±?362 × 10(-6) in the gingival/palate region. Exposure to 180 ppm Cr(VI) in drinking water for 28 days did not significantly increase the mutant frequency in the gingival/buccal (44.4?±?25.4 × 10(-6)) or the gingival/palate (57.8?±?9.1 × 10(-6)) regions relative to controls. These data indicate that high (?180,000 times expected human exposure), tumorigenic concentrations of Cr(VI) did not significantly increase mutations in the gingival epithelium, and suggest that Cr(VI) does not act by a mutagenic MOA in the rat oral cavity. PMID:26010270

  11. The cultivable human oral gluten-degrading microbiome and its potential implications in coeliac disease and gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Feo, M; Wei, G; Blumenkranz, G; Dewhirst, F E; Schuppan, D; Oppenheim, F G; Helmerhorst, E J

    2013-09-01

    Coeliac disease is characterized by intestinal inflammation caused by gluten, proteins which are widely contained in the Western diet. Mammalian digestive enzymes are only partly capable of cleaving gluten, and fragments remain that induce toxic responses in patients with coeliac disease. We found that the oral microbiome is a novel and rich source of gluten-degrading organisms. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of the cultivable resident oral microbes that are capable of cleaving gluten, with special emphasis on the immunogenic domains. Bacteria were obtained by a selective culturing approach and enzyme activities were characterized by: (i) hydrolysis of paranitroanilide-derivatized gliadin-derived tripeptide substrates; (ii) gliadin degradation in-gel (gliadin zymography); (iii) gliadin degradation in solution; (iv) proteolysis of the highly immunogenic ?-gliadin-derived 33-mer peptide. For selected strains pH activity profiles were determined. The culturing strategy yielded 87 aerobic and 63 anaerobic strains. Species with activity in at least two of the four assays were typed as: Rothia mucilaginosa HOT-681, Rothia aeria HOT-188, Actinomyces odontolyticus HOT-701, Streptococcus mitis HOT-677, Streptococcus sp. HOT-071, Neisseria mucosa HOT-682 and Capnocytophaga sputigena HOT-775, with Rothia species being active in all four assays. Cleavage specificities and substrate preferences differed among the strains identified. The approximate molecular weights of the enzymes were ~75 kD (Rothia spp.), ~60 kD (A. odontolyticus) and ~150 kD (Streptococcus spp.). In conclusion, this study identified new gluten-degrading microorganisms in the upper gastrointestinal tract. A cocktail of the most active oral bacteria, or their isolated enzymes, may offer promising new treatment modalities for coeliac disease. PMID:23714165

  12. A comparative study of the potential of solid triglyceride nanostructures coated with chitosan or poly(ethylene glycol) as carriers for oral calcitonin delivery.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Fuentes, M; Prego, C; Torres, D; Alonso, M J

    2005-05-01

    We have previously reported the formation and characterization of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-coated and chitosan (CS)-coated lipid nanoparticles. In the present work our goal was to study the interaction of these surface-modified lipid nanoparticles with Caco-2 cells and to evaluate the potential of these nanostructures as oral delivery systems for salmon calcitonin (sCT). The interaction of rhodamine-loaded nanoparticles with the Caco-2 cell monolayers was evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively by confocal laser scanning microscopy and fluorimetry, respectively. The ability of these nanoparticles to reversibly enhance the transport of hydrophilic macromolecules through the monolayers was investigated by measuring the transepithelial electric resistance and the permeability to Texas Red-dextran. Finally, in vivo studies of the response to sCT-loaded nanoparticles were performed in rats. The results showed that the association of rhodamine-loaded nanoparticles to the Caco-2 cell monolayer was independent of the surface coating of the nanoparticles (CS-coated versus PEG-coated nanoparticles). However, while PEG-coated nanoparticles did not affect the permeability of Caco-2 monolayers, CS-coated nanoparticles produced a dose-dependent reduction in the transepithelial electric resistance, simultaneously to an enhanced dextran transport. The results obtained following oral administration of sCT-loaded CS-coated nanoparticles to rats showed a significant and prolonged reduction in the serum calcium levels as compared to those obtained for control (sCT solution). In contrast, the hypocalcemic response of sCT-loaded PEG-coated nanoparticles was not significantly different of that provided by the control (sCT solution). Therefore, these results indicate that the surface composition of the particles is a key factor in the improvement of the efficiency of oral sCT formulations. Moreover, the encouraging results obtained for CS-coated nanoparticles underline their potential as carriers for peptide delivery. PMID:15854809

  13. The role of estrogen receptor {beta} (ER{beta}) in malignant diseases-A new potential target for antiproliferative drugs in prevention and treatment of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Margaret; Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling, Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, University of Houston, Houston, TX ; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling, Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, University of Houston, Houston, TX

    2010-05-21

    The discovery of ER{beta} in the middle of the 1990s represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of estrogen signaling. It has turned out that estrogen action is not mediated by one receptor, ER{alpha}, but by two balancing factors, ER{alpha} and ER{beta}, which are often antagonistic to one another. Excitingly, ER{beta} has been shown to be widespread in the body and to be involved in a multitude of physiological and pathophysiological events. This has led to a strong interest of the pharmaceutical industry to target ER{beta} by drugs against various diseases. In this review, focus is on the role of ER{beta} in malignant diseases where the anti proliferative activity of ER{beta} gives hope of new therapeutic approaches.

  14. Potential use of 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin for preparation of orally disintegrating tablets containing dl-alpha-tocopheryl acetate, an oily drug.

    PubMed

    Motoyama, Keiichi; Nagatomo, Kiyoshi; Abd Elazim, Soliman Osama; Hirayama, Fumitoshi; Uekama, Kaneto; Arima, Hidetoshi

    2009-11-01

    To expand the application of a drug in orally disintegrating tablets, the potential use of beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CyD) and 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-beta-CyD) as excipients for the tablets containing dl-alpha-tocopheryl acetate (VE), an oily drug, was evaluated. HP-beta-CyD, not beta-CyD, solubilized VE in water through the formation of higher order of complexes at the molar ratio of 1 : 2 (VE : HP-beta-CyD). When prepared under the optimal preparation conditions, the VE tablets containing lactose and 5% (w/w) of HP-beta-CyD, not beta-CyD, had high hardness more than 4 kg and rapid disintegration within 100 s both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, VE tablets containing lactose and 5% (w/w) of HP-beta-CyD, not beta-CyD, maintained the high hardness and rapid disintegration under the accelerated stability test using different conditions for 4 weeks. Therefore, these results suggest the potential use of HP-beta-CyD, not beta-CyD, as an excipient for orally disintegrating tablets containing VE, an oily drug, in the molding method. PMID:19881268

  15. Oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Huber, Michaell A; Tantiwongkosi, Bundhit

    2014-11-01

    Oral and oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is a complex and often relentless malignancy prone to local invasion and dissemination. Despite advances in understanding of the disease and improved therapeutic interventions, it continues to be diagnosed at an advanced stage and the survival rate remains poor. The financial cost of treating OPC may be the highest of all cancers in the United States and survivors often experience major detriments to quality of life. Major risk factors for OPC are tobacco, alcohol, areca nut, and human papillomavirus infection. This article updates medical practitioners on the causes, presentation, diagnosis, and management of OPC. PMID:25443678

  16. Estimation of Pyruvic acid in serum and saliva among healthy and potentially malignant disorder subjects – a stepping stone for cancer screening?

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Anithraj; Prasad, Kakarla; Trivedi, Dhiraj; Acharya, Swathi

    2015-01-01

    Background According to Warburg’s effect, the rate of glycolysis increases in cancerous cells. This will increase overall levels of pyruvic acid. The present on-going study was conducted to estimate the levels of pyruvic acid in saliva and serum in normal, oral PMD subjects. Material and Methods A total of 50 subjects in healthy, PMD of the oral cavity individuals were selected based on clinical and histological criteria. Collected saliva and serum samples were subjected to pyruvic acid level estimation using biochemical analysis. Results Of the 50 participants 25 (13: Males; 12: Females) & 25 (16: Males; 9: Females) were PMD group. Independent samples t test showed statistically significant difference in serum & salivary pyruvic acid level in between 2 groups (p < 0.001 respectively). Conclusions Estimation of pyruvic acid showed sequential increase in the level in PMD group compared to healthy. Hence the study results open new direction in cancer screening. Key words:Pyruvic acid, glycolysis, warburg’s effect. PMID:26535090

  17. Discrimination of premalignant conditions of oral cancer using Raman spectroscopy of urinary metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elumalai, Brindha; Rajasekaran, Ramu; Aruna, Prakasarao; Koteeswaran, Dornadula; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2015-03-01

    Oral cancers are considered to be one of the most commonly occurring malignancy worldwide. Over 70% of the cases report to the doctor only in advanced stages of the disease, resulting in poor survival rates. Hence it is necessary to detect the disease at the earliest which may increase the five year survival rate up to 90%. Among various optical spectroscopic techniques, Raman spectroscopy has been emerged as a tool in identifying several diseased conditions, including oral cancers. Around 30 - 80% of the malignancies of the oral cavity arise from premalignant lesions. Hence, understanding the molecular/spectral differences at the premalignant stage may help in identifying the cancer at the earliest and increase patient's survival rate. Among various bio-fluids such as blood, urine and saliva, urine is considered as one of the diagnostically potential bio-fluids, as it has many metabolites. The distribution and the physiochemical properties of the urinary metabolites may vary due to the changes associated with the pathologic conditions. The present study is aimed to characterize the urine of 70 healthy subjects and 51 pre-malignant patients using Raman spectroscopy under 785nm excitation, to know the molecular/spectral differences between healthy subjects and premalignant conditions of oral malignancy. Principal component analysis based Linear discriminant analysis were also made to find the statistical significance and the present technique yields the sensitivity and specificity of 86.3% and 92.9% with an overall accuracy of 90.9% in the discrimination of premalignant conditions from healthy subjects urine.

  18. Oral Ulcerations

    E-print Network

    Fetterolf, Brandon; Zabella, Alexandra; Strote, Jared

    2015-01-01

    of Emergency Medicine Fetterolf et al. Oral UlcerationsOral Ulcerations Brandon Fetterolf, DO* Alexandra Zaballa, BS † Jared Strote, MD, MS ‡ * Madigan Army Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine,

  19. Familial malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kopf, A.W.; Hellman, L.J.; Rogers, G.S.; Gross, D.F.; Rigel, D.S.; Friedman, R.J.; Levenstein, M.; Brown, J.; Golomb, F.M.; Roses, D.F.; Gumport, S.L.

    1986-10-10

    Characteristics associated with familial compared with nonfamilial malignant melanoma were assessed. These data were obtained from consecutive prospectively completed questionnaires on 1169 cases of cutaneous malignant melanoma. Of these, 69 patients indicated a positive family history for this cancer. Among the various clinical and histological variables compared, those that significantly correlated with the familial occurrence of malignant melanoma include younger age at first diagnosis, smaller diameter of the lesion, lower Clark level, decreased frequency of nonmelanoma skin cancer, and reduced prevalence of noncutaneous cancer. Increased awareness of malignant melanoma among family members could account for some of these observations. Identification of the familial variety of malignant melanoma has practical implications concerning early detection and prompt intervention.

  20. Expression of cdk4 and p16 in Oral Lichen Planus

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Nita; Marwah, Akanksha; Gupta, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of cdk4 and p16, the proteins implicated in hyperproliferation and arrest in oral lichen planus and to compare their expression in erosive and non-erosive oral lichen planus and with normal mucosa and oral squamous cell carcinoma. Material and Methods Analysis of cdk4 and p16 expression was done in 43 erosive oral lichen planus (EOLP) and 17 non-erosive oral lichen planus (NOLP) cases, 10 normal mucosa and 10 oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cases with immunohistochemistry. Results This study demonstrated a significantly increased expression of cytoplasmic cdk4 (80% cases, cells stained - 19.6%), and cytoplasmic p16 (68.3% cases, cells stained - 16.4%) in oral lichen planus (OLP) compared to normal mucosa. cdk4 was much higher in OSCC in both cytoplasm and nuclei compared to normal mucosa. Also, while comparing OLP with positive control, significant difference was noted for cdk4 and p16, with expression being more in OSCC. While comparing EOLP with NOLP; significant differences were seen for cdk4 cytoplasmic staining only, for number of cases with positive staining as well as number of cells stained. Conclusions Overexpression of cytoplasmic cdk4 and p16 was registered in oral lichen planus, however considerably lower than in squamous cell carcinoma. Erosive oral lichen planus demonstrated overexpression of cytoplasmic cdk4 and premalignant nature compared to non-erosive lesion. Therefore there is an obvious possibility for cytoplasmic expression of cdk4 and p16 to predict malignant potential of oral lichen planus lesions. PMID:26229583

  1. Oral premalignant lesions: epidemiological and clinical analysis in the northern Polish population

    PubMed Central

    Paw?owska, Anita; Renkielska, Dorota; Michaj?owski, Igor; Sobjanek, Micha?; B?a?ewicz, Izabela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Leukoplakia is the most common potentially malignant condition of the oral cavity. Aim Epidemiological and clinical analysis of patients with oral leukoplakia (OL) diagnosed and treated in the Department of Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, Medical University of Gdansk. Material and methods The study was retrospective and prospective. Among 55 911 patients diagnosed and treated in the Department in 1999–2009, 204 people with OL were selected. The material includes 104 women and 100 men with an average age of 58.1. Most of the patients were in the age group of 50–70 years, average age was 58.1. Results The most common concomitant disease was diabetes. More than 88% of the patients declared occurrence of OL predisposing development factors (50.49% – cigarette smoking). Three hundred and twenty foci of OL were found among patients. Homogeneous OL dominated (72.05%). Multifocal OL was diagnosed in 58.3% of patients. The most common location of lesions was buccal mucosa (52.2%). Cancers developed on the basis of OL in 7 patients (3.43%). The percentage of malignant transformation was 12.19% for untreated patients and 1.41% for treated patients. The floor of the oral cavity was proven to be the location of the highest risk of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Patients with diabetes may be more likely to develop OL. The risk of malignant transformation is relatively high. In our material it was equal to 3.43%. Conclusions Cigarette smoking is the most important factor, which can influence the effectiveness of treatment. PMID:25610347

  2. THE NEUROLEPTIC MALIGNANT SYNDROME : REPORT OF THREE CASES

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, R.C.; Thakur, S.; Sharma, Vijay

    1996-01-01

    Three patients, one male and two females who developed neuroleptic malignant syndrome following exposure to depot and oral neuroleptic are presented. The patients satisfied Levenson?s criteria for diagnosis. Bromocriptine and Electro Convulsive Therapy were found effective whereas trihexyphenidyl proved unsatisfactory in the treatment. All the patients recovered completely without complications. PMID:21584154

  3. Malignant melanoma maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Seema; Sinha, Richi; Singh, Rakesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A malignant melanoma is a highly lethal melanocytic neoplasm. A neoplasm usually affects the skin. Malignant melanomas in the head and neck region are rare, accounting for less than 1% of all melanomas. Malignant melanoma of the nose and paranasal sinuses is an aggressive disease typically presenting at an advanced stage, with a 5-year survival rate ranging 20-30%. Melanomas are tumors arising from melanocytes, which are neuroectodermally derived cells located in the basal layers of the skin. This is a case report of a 35-year-old male, who presented with very aggressive disease and developed liver metastasis.

  4. Hamartomas of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S.; Majumdar, Barnali

    2015-01-01

    The majority of oral diseases present as growths and masses of varied cellular origin. Such masses may include simple hyperplasia, hamartoma, choristoma, teratoma, benign or malignant neoplasms. The distinguishing features of hamartomatous lesions are not certain, and often these non-neoplastic masses are indiscreetly denoted as neoplasms without weighing their pathology or biological behaviour. Essentially, understanding the dynamics of each of these disease processes forms an integral part of the appropriate treatment planning. PMID:26539384

  5. Distinct clinicopathological features of NAB2-STAT6 fusion gene variants in solitary fibrous tumor with emphasis on the acquisition of highly malignant potential.

    PubMed

    Akaike, Keisuke; Kurisaki-Arakawa, Aiko; Hara, Kieko; Suehara, Yoshiyuki; Takagi, Tatsuya; Mitani, Keiko; Kaneko, Kazuo; Yao, Takashi; Saito, Tsuyoshi

    2015-03-01

    The impact of NGFI-A binding protein 2 (NAB2)-signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) fusion on the biological behavior and the mechanism of acquisition of malignant phenotype in solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is not well understood. We examined variations of the NAB2-STAT6 fusion gene in 40 cases of SFT using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues and secondary genetic alterations of tumor protein p53 (TP53),, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, ? polypeptide (PDGFRB), and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoters. These gene variations were compared with the clinicopathological features. The 2-year and 5-year disease-free survival rates (DFSRs) were 91% and 83%, respectively. All 40 samples demonstrated nuclear staining for STAT6, including CD34-negative cases. Moreover, p53-positive staining was associated with a lower DFSR and was significantly associated with higher Ki-67 label index, higher mitotic rate (mitosis, >4/high-power field), and the presence of nuclear atypia/pleomorphism. NAB2-STAT6 fusions were detected in all of the cases; the NAB2 exon 4-STAT6 exon 2, the most common genotype, appeared in 18 cases, which was associated with thoracic tumor location and the less aggressive phenotype. In contrast, tumors with NAB2 exon 6-STAT6 exon 16/18 demonstrated an aggressive phenotype. Mutations in TP53 and PDGFRB were detected in 2 and 3 cases respectively, and these occurred in a mutually exclusive fashion. TERT promoter hot spot mutations were observed in 5 cases, which were associated with shorter DFSR. Two dedifferentiated SFT cases harbored both TP53 and TERT promoter mutations. TP53 mutations, which result in its overexpression, in combination with TERT promoter mutations seem to play an important role in the dedifferentiation process. PMID:25582503

  6. Brain Malignancies Steering Committee

    Cancer.gov

    The Brain Malignancy Steering Committee evaluates and prioritizes concepts for phase 3 and large phase 2 therapeutic clinical trials to be conducted in the NCI National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN).

  7. Chemoembolization of hepatic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Carin F; Brown, Daniel B

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of primary and secondary hepatic malignancies with transarterial chemoembolization represents an essential component of interventional oncology. This article discusses patient selection, procedure technique, results, and complications associated with transarterial chemoembolization. PMID:18668189

  8. Thoracic Malignancy Steering Committee

    Cancer.gov

    The Thoracic Malignancy Steering Committee evaluates and prioritizes concepts for phase 3 and large phase 2 therapeutic clinical trials to be conducted in the NCI National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN).

  9. Gastrointestinal Malignancies Faculty

    Cancer.gov

    Mission Statement The Gastrointestinal Malignancies Faculty (GMF) facilitates interactions among basic, epidemiological, translational, and clinical researchers promoting a community of investigators working together for the prevention, diagnosis, and cur

  10. Gastrointestinal Malignancies Faculty

    Cancer.gov

    1) Promote collaborative interactions among NCI basic, epidemiological, translational, and clinical investigators who conduct research in gastrointestinal malignancies; and 2) Facilitate the development of new prevention, diagnosis, and treatment options

  11. Lethal effect of blue light-activated hydrogen peroxide, curcumin and erythrosine as potential oral photosensitizers on the viability of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum

    PubMed Central

    Habiboallh, Ghanbari; Mahbobeh, Naderi Nasab; Mina, Zareian Jahromi; Majid, Zakeri; Nooshin, Arjmand

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Recently, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been introduced as a new modality in oral bacterial decontamination. Current research aims to evaluate the effect of photodynamic killing of visible blue light in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, curcumin and erythrosine as potential oral photosensitizers on Porphyromonas gingivalis associated with periodontal bone loss and Fusobacterium nucleatum associated with soft tissue inflammation. Materials and methods: Standard suspension of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum were exposed to Light Emitting Diode (LED) (440–480 nm) in combination with erythrosine (22 µm), curcumin (60 µM) and hydrogen peroxide (0.3 mM) for 5 min. Bacterial samples from each treatment groups (radiation-only group, photosensitizer-only group and blue light-activated photosensitizer group) were subcultured onto the surface of agar plates. Survival of these bacteria was determined by counting the number of colony forming units (CFU) after incubation. Results: Results for antibacterial assays on P. gingivalis confirmed that curcumin, Hydrogen peroxide and erythrosine alone exerted a moderate bactericidal effect which enhanced noticeably in conjugation with visible light. The survival rate of P. gingivalis reached zero present when the suspension exposed to blue light-activated curcumin and hydrogen peroxide for 2 min. Besides, curcumin exerted a remarkable antibacterial activity against F. nucleatum in comparison with erythrosine and hydrogen peroxide (P=0.00). Furthermore, the bactericidal effect of visible light alone on P. gingivalis as black-pigmented bacteria was significant. Conclusion: Our result suggested that visible blue light in the presence of erythrosine, curcumin and hydrogen peroxide would be consider as a potential approach of PDT to kill the main gramnegative periodontal pathogens. From a clinical standpoint, this regimen could be established as an additional minimally invasive antibacterial treatment of plaque induced periodontal pathologies. PMID:26246690

  12. The in vivo fate of nanoparticles and nanoparticle-loaded microcapsules after oral administration in mice: Evaluation of their potential for colon-specific delivery.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yiming; Fuchs, Adrian V; Boase, Nathan R B; Rolfe, Barbara E; Coombes, Allan G A; Thurecht, Kristofer J

    2015-08-01

    Anti-cancer drug loaded-nanoparticles (NPs) or encapsulation of NPs in colon-targeted delivery systems shows potential for increasing the local drug concentration in the colon leading to improved treatment of colorectal cancer. To investigate the potential of the NP-based strategies for colon-specific delivery, two formulations, free Eudragit® NPs and enteric-coated NP-loaded chitosan-hypromellose microcapsules (MCs) were fluorescently-labelled and their tissue distribution in mice after oral administration was monitored by multispectral small animal imaging. The free NPs showed a shorter transit time throughout the mouse digestive tract than the MCs, with extensive excretion of NPs in faeces at 5h. Conversely, the MCs showed complete NP release in the lower region of the mouse small intestine at 8h post-administration. Overall, the encapsulation of NPs in MCs resulted in a higher colonic NP intensity from 8h to 24h post-administration compared to the free NPs, due to a NP 'guarding' effect of MCs during their transit along mouse gastrointestinal tract which decreased NP excretion in faeces. These imaging data revealed that this widely-utilised colon-targeting MC formulation lacked site-precision for releasing its NP load in the colon, but the increased residence time of the NPs in the lower gastrointestinal tract suggests that it is still useful for localised release of chemotherapeutics, compared to NP administration alone. In addition, both formulations resided in the stomach of mice at considerable concentrations over 24h. Thus, adhesion of NP- or MC-based oral delivery systems to gastric mucosa may be problematic for colon-specific delivery of the cargo to the colon and should be carefully investigated for a full evaluation of particulate delivery systems. PMID:26117186

  13. Better grade of tumor differentiation of oral squamous cell carcinoma arising in background of oral submucous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Sachin C; Sarode, Gargi S

    2013-10-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a potentially malignant disorder of the oral cavity. Most of the people affected by OSMF are betel quid chewers. It is characterized by epithelial atrophy and progressive accumulation of collagen fibers in lamina propria and submucosa of the oral mucosa. 7.6% of OSMF cases undergo oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) transformation of which majority display low grade of tumor differentiation. In the present paper, a hypothesis has been proposed to correlate atrophy, turnover rate and surface keratization in OSMF with degree of tumor differentiation in OSCC. A novel hypothesis for epithelial atrophy in OSMF has also been emphasized. High proliferative activity and basal cell hyperplasia in conjunction with rapid exfoliation of superficial cells and epithelial atrophy suggest that epithelial turnover rate is very high in OSMF. Presence of surface keratinized layer in this situation suggests faster maturation or differentiation of epithelium in OSMF. Thus, the epithelial cells are genetically programmed for high turnover rate and faster differentiation or maturation to form keratin. During malignant transformation of OSMF, the transformed epithelial cells may retain the genetic memory of faster differentiation and maturation resulting in better grade of tumor differentiation. The well differentiated OSCC has good prognosis, better survival rate and less chances of recurrence of regional and distant metastasis. Studies are needed to explore the biomarkers or molecular markers associated with carcinogenesis like genetic instability, oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and angiogenesis in OSCC associated with OSMF. If investigated in the suggested direction, it might provide some important clues about the pathogenesis of OSCC arising in background of OSMF and for the future development of treatment strategies. PMID:23891040

  14. Prevalence of oral mucosal alterations in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients attending a diabetic center

    PubMed Central

    Mohsin, Syed Fareed; Ahmed, Syed Azhar; Fawwad, Asher; Basit, Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore an association between oral mucosal alterations and type 2 Diabetes mellitus. Methods: This study was conducted at Baqai Institute of Diabetology and Endocrinology and Baqai Medical University from September 2010 to September 2012. A total of 800 individuals’ 395 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and 405 healthy individuals were enrolled in this study. An oral clinical examination was carried out for all participants using a mouth mirror, visible light source and cotton gauze. Results: The prevalence of oral mucosal lesions was high significantly < 0.0001; odd ratio 2.601, CI 1.929-3.509 in type 2 diabetic as compared to non-diabetic. With respect to specific oral mucosal lesions, highly significant association p<0.0001; Odd ratio 4.275, CI 2.798-6.534 was found between coated tongue with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study did not find any association (p>0.05) between type 2 diabetes mellitus and potentially malignant disorders. Conclusion: This study showed that the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions was higher in type 2 diabetic than non-diabetics. This study provides evidence that diabetes has a negative influence on oral health. PMID:25097503

  15. Hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin functionalized calcium carbonate microparticles as a potential carrier for enhancing oral delivery of water-insoluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihua; Zhu, Wufu; Lin, Qisi; Han, Jin; Jiang, Liqun; Zhang, Yanzhuo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to demonstrate that a novel hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin functionalized calcium carbonate (HP-?-CD/CC) based amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) can be used to increase the solubility and oral bioavailability of water-insoluble drugs. Irbesartan (IRB) was selected as a model compound and loaded into the nanoporous HP-?-CD/CC matrix using an immersion method. The IRB-loaded HP-?-CD/CC formulation was characterized by various analytical techniques, such as specific surface area analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Analyses with PXRD and DSC confirmed that IRB was fully converted into the amorphous form in the nanopores of HP-?-CD/CC. From the solubility and dissolution tests, it was observed that the aqueous solubility and dissolution rate of IRB-loaded HP-?-CD/CC were increased significantly compared with those of pure IRB and IRB-loaded mesoporous silica. Likewise, the IRB-loaded HP-?-CD/CC formulation exhibited better absorption compared with that of the commercially available IRB capsules in beagle dogs. The mean peak plasma concentration (C max) and the area under the mean plasma concentration-time curve (AUC[0?48]) of IRB-loaded HP-?-CD/CC were 1.56- and 1.52-fold higher than that of the commercial product, respectively. Furthermore, the IRB-loaded HP-?-CD/CC formulation exhibited excellent stability against re-crystallization. These results clearly demonstrate that HP-?-CD/CC based porous ASD is a promising formulation approach to improve the aqueous solubility and the in vivo absorption performance of a water-insoluble compound like IRB. PMID:25995635

  16. Hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin functionalized calcium carbonate microparticles as a potential carrier for enhancing oral delivery of water-insoluble drugs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lihua; Zhu, Wufu; Lin, Qisi; Han, Jin; Jiang, Liqun; Zhang, Yanzhuo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to demonstrate that a novel hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin functionalized calcium carbonate (HP-?-CD/CC) based amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) can be used to increase the solubility and oral bioavailability of water-insoluble drugs. Irbesartan (IRB) was selected as a model compound and loaded into the nanoporous HP-?-CD/CC matrix using an immersion method. The IRB-loaded HP-?-CD/CC formulation was characterized by various analytical techniques, such as specific surface area analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Analyses with PXRD and DSC confirmed that IRB was fully converted into the amorphous form in the nanopores of HP-?-CD/CC. From the solubility and dissolution tests, it was observed that the aqueous solubility and dissolution rate of IRB-loaded HP-?-CD/CC were increased significantly compared with those of pure IRB and IRB-loaded mesoporous silica. Likewise, the IRB-loaded HP-?-CD/CC formulation exhibited better absorption compared with that of the commercially available IRB capsules in beagle dogs. The mean peak plasma concentration (Cmax) and the area under the mean plasma concentration–time curve (AUC[0?48]) of IRB-loaded HP-?-CD/CC were 1.56- and 1.52-fold higher than that of the commercial product, respectively. Furthermore, the IRB-loaded HP-?-CD/CC formulation exhibited excellent stability against re-crystallization. These results clearly demonstrate that HP-?-CD/CC based porous ASD is a promising formulation approach to improve the aqueous solubility and the in vivo absorption performance of a water-insoluble compound like IRB. PMID:25995635

  17. Oral administration of aqueous extract of Carthami Flos induces macrophage activation and preferentially potentiates type 1 helper T-cell response in vivo.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youn-Hwa; Do, Jeong-Su; Seo, Hyo-Jung; Hwang, Jin-Ki; Kim, Jun-Hee; Song, Eun-Jung; Nam, Sang-Yun

    2007-01-01

    In vivo immunomodulatory activity of aqueous extract of Carthami Flos (AECF) was investigated using a mouse model immunized with keyhole limpet hemocyanin. Serum level of Ag-specific IgG2a was significantly elevated by oral administration of AECF but not IgG1. However, no selective B-cell proliferation by AECF was observed in vivo. Ag-specific proliferation and IFN-gamma and IL-5 production of draining lymph node T cells also was higher in AECF-treated mice when compared with water-treated control mice. However, AECF failed to enhance nonspecific T-cell response under CD3 stimulation. These results led us to hypothesize that AECF potentiates Ag-specific T-cell response, possibly through activation of antigen presenting cells (APC) other than B cells. Functional assessment of splenic macrophages showed that AECF administration significantly enhances IL-12 production as well as APC activity for IFN-gamma production and STAT-4 activation by T cells. Collectively, these data strongly support that AECF preferentially potentiates immune response polarized toward TH1 and for which increased activation of macrophages is most likely to be responsible. The present data implicate a possible application of AECF to potentiate cellular immunity and, we hope, prevent intracellular infections. PMID:17849267

  18. Targeted therapy in gastrointestinal malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Chhatrala, Ravi; Thanavala, Yasmin; Iyer, Renuka

    2014-01-01

    Increased understanding of cancer pathogenesis has identified several pathways that serve as potential targets for novel targeted agents in development. The selection of targeted cancer therapy based on biomarkers has instigated a new era of personalized medicine and changed the way we practice oncology. Many targeted agents are approved for treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies most targeting tumor angiogenesis, and many more are in different phases of development. Here we briefly summarize nine different targeted agents that are approved currently in the U.S. and several other agents currently being studied in various gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:24737952

  19. Oral treatments of Echinococcus multilocularis-infected mice with the antimalarial drug mefloquine that potentially interacts with parasite ferritin and cystatin.

    PubMed

    Küster, Tatiana; Stadelmann, Britta; Rufener, Reto; Risch, Corina; Müller, Joachim; Hemphill, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of oral treatments of Echinococcus multilocularis-infected mice with the antimalarial drug mefloquine (MEF) and identified proteins that bind to MEF in parasite extracts and human cells by affinity chromatography. In a pilot experiment, MEF treatment was applied 5 days per week and was intensified by increasing the dosage stepwise from 12.5mg/kg to 200mg/kg during 4 weeks followed by treatments of 100mg/kg during the last 7 weeks. This resulted in a highly significant reduction of parasite weight in MEF-treated mice compared with mock-treated mice, but the reduction was significantly less efficacious compared with the standard treatment regimen of albendazole (ABZ). In a second experiment, MEF was applied orally in three different treatment groups at dosages of 25, 50 or 100mg/kg, but only twice a week, for a period of 12 weeks. Treatment at 100mg/kg had a profound impact on the parasite, similar to ABZ treatment at 200mg/kg/day (5 days/week for 12 weeks). No adverse side effects were noted. To identify proteins in E. multilocularis metacestodes that physically interact with MEF, affinity chromatography of metacestode extracts was performed on MEF coupled to epoxy-activated Sepharose(®), followed by SDS-PAGE and in-gel digestion LC-MS/MS. This resulted in the identification of E. multilocularis ferritin and cystatin as MEF-binding proteins. In contrast, when human cells were exposed to MEF affinity chromatography, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase was identified as a MEF-binding protein. This indicates that MEF could potentially interact with different proteins in parasites and human cells. PMID:26395219

  20. Expression and promoter methylation of Wnt inhibitory factor-1 in the development of oral submucous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shanghui; Chen, Ling; Mashrah, Mubarak; Zhu, Yun; He, Zhijing; Hu, Yuhua; Xiang, Tingxiu; Yao, Zhigang; Guo, Feng; Zhang, Chenping

    2015-11-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a type of head and neck malignancy with a high mortality rate. Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is the pre-cancerous lesion of OSCC, whose molecular mechanisms in OSCC tumorigenesis remain largely unclear. Activation of the Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway plays an important role in oral mucous carcinogenesis, although rare mutations of Wnt signaling molecules are found in OSCC, suggesting an epigenetic mechanism mediating aberrant Wnt/??catenin signaling in OSCC. Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF1) is an Wnt antagonist, and its downregulation and methylation have been reported in a number of malignancies. However, the expression and methylation of WIF1 in the development of OSF have yet to be reported. In the present study, we investigated the WIF1 expression level by immuno-histochemical staining and semi?quantitative RT-PCR in normal oral, OSF and OSCC tissues, as well as the methylation status by methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite genomic sequencing. The results showed that WIF1 was readily expressed in normal oral mucous tissues, but decreased gradually in OSF early, moderately advanced and advanced tissues, and was less expressed in OSCC tissues. Moreover, WIF1 was able to translocate from the nuclear to cytoplasm in OSF and OSCC tissues. Furthermore, WIF1 was frequently methylated in OSCC cases with betel quid chewing habit, but not in normal oral mucous and different stages of OSF tissues, suggesting WIF1 methylation is tumor-specific in the development of OSF. Thus, the results demonstrated that WIF1 is frequently downregulated or silenced by promoter methylation in the carcinogenesis of OSF, which serves as a potential epigenetic biomarker for the early detection of OSCC. PMID:26352791

  1. Nucleus Accumbens-Associated Protein 1 Expression Has Potential as a Marker for Distinguishing Oral Epithelial Dysplasia and Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Joji; Kanno, Takahiro; Nariai, Yoshiki; Urano, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) and carcinoma in situ (CIS) are defined by dysplastic cells in the epithelium. Over a third of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients present with associated OED. However, accurate histopathological diagnosis of such lesions is difficult. Nucleus accumbens-associated protein 1 (NAC1) is a member of the Pox virus and Zinc finger/Bric-a-brac Tramtrack Broad complex family of proteins, and is overexpressed in OSCC. This study aimed to determine whether NAC1 has the potential to be used as a marker to distinguish OED and OSCC. Methods and Findings The study included 114 patients (64 men, 50 women). There were 67, 10, and 37 patients with OED, CIS, and OSCC, respectively. NAC1 labeling indices (LIs) and immunoreactivity intensities (IRI) were evaluated. The patients’ pathological classification was significantly associated with age, sex, NAC1 LIs, and NAC1 IRI (p = 0.025, p = 0.022, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001, respectively). As a result of multivariate analysis, a predictive model was made; this identified the NAC1 LIs (OR [95% CI] 1.18 [1.11–1.28], p < 0.001) and NAC1 IRI (0.78 [0.68–0.86], p < 0.001) as predictive factors for CIS/OSCC. The NAC1 LIs/IRI cut-off values which discriminated between OED and CIS/OSCC were 50%/124 pixels. For NAC1 LIs with > 50% positivity the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were 0.766, 0.910, 0.857, and 0.847, respectively. For NAC1 IRI with ? 124 positive pixels, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 0.787, 0.866, 0.804, and 0.853, respectively. Though there are several potential limitations to this study and the results were obtained from a retrospective analysis of a single site cohort, the data suggest that the NAC1 LIs/IRI is a strong predictor of CIS/OSCC. Conclusions NAC1 has potential as a marker for distinguishing OED from CIS/OSCC. PMID:26172271

  2. Contemporary management of cancer of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Genden, Eric M.; Silver, Carl E.; Takes, Robert P.; Suárez, Carlos; Owen, Randall P.; Haigentz, Missak; Stoeckli, Sandro J.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Rapidis, Alexander D.; Rodrigo, Juan Pablo; Rinaldo, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Oral cancer represents a common entity comprising a third of all head and neck malignant tumors. The options for curative treatment of oral cavity cancer have not changed significantly in the last three decades; however, the work up, the approach to surveillance, and the options for reconstruction have evolved significantly. Because of the profound functional and cosmetic importance of the oral cavity, management of oral cavity cancers requires a thorough understanding of disease progression, approaches to management and options for reconstruction. The purpose of this review is to discuss the most current management options for oral cavity cancers. PMID:20155361

  3. Screening and analysis of the potential bioactive components in rabbit plasma after oral administration of hot-water extracts from leaves of Bambusa textilis McClure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Yue, Yong-De; Tang, Feng; Sun, Jia

    2012-01-01

    Bambusa textilis McClure is a traditional Chinese medicinal plant belonging to the Bambusoideae subfamily and used to treat chronic fever and infectious diseases. To investigate the bioactive compounds absorbed in the rabbit blood after oral administration of hot-water extracts from the leaves of B. textilis McClure, a validated chromatographic fingerprint method was established using LC-Q-TOF-MS. Twenty compounds in bamboo leaves and three potential bioactive compounds in rabbit plasma were detected. Of the twenty detected compounds in vitro, fifteen of which were tentatively identified either by comparing the retention time and mass spectrometry data with that of reference compounds or by reviewing the literature. Three potential bioactive compounds, including (E)-pcoumaric acid, (Z)-p-coumaric acid, and apigenin-8-C-?-D-(2"-O-?-L-rhamnosyl)-glucopyranoside, were detected in both the leaves of B. textilis McClure and rabbit plasma. Of the three compounds, apigenin-8-C-?-D-(2"-O-?-L-rhamnosyl)glucopyranoside was identified based on its UV, MS, and NMR spectra. This study provides helpful chemical information for further pharmacology and active mechanism research on B. textilis McClure. PMID:22836207

  4. Targeting Cyclooxygenase-2 in Hematological Malignancies: Rationale and Promise

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, M. P.; Bancos, S.; Sime, P. J.; Phipps, R. P.

    2009-01-01

    There is much interest in the potential use of Cox-2 selective inhibitors in combination with other cancer therapeutics. Malignancies of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic origin often have increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), a key modulator of inflammation. For example, hematological malignancies such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, Hodgkin’s lymphoma, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and multiple myeloma often highly express Cox-2, which correlates with poor patient prognosis. Expression of Cox-2 enhances survival and proliferation of malignant cells, while negatively influencing anti-tumor immunity. Hematological malignancies expressing elevated levels of Cox-2 potentially avoid immune responses by producing factors that enhance angiogenesis and metastases. Cellular immune responses regulated by natural killer cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and T regulatory cells are also influenced by Cox-2 expression. Therefore, Cox-2 selective inhibitors have promising therapeutic potential in patients suffering from certain hematological malignancies. PMID:18691115

  5. MicroRNA-155 and Its Role in Malignant Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Ranganath, Prajnya

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) is a multifunctional molecule involved in both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. It has been found to be involved in the pathogenesis of many different hematological malignancies with either an oncogenic or a tumor-repressor effect, depending on the nature of the cell and the type of malignancy. In particular, it has been strongly implicated in the causation of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. This review focuses on the molecular interactions of miR-155, its oncogenic mechanisms, and its potential as an effective therapeutic target for the associated malignancies. PMID:26523117

  6. Cancer Prevention Research Objective Detection and Delineation of Oral Neoplasia Using

    E-print Network

    Roblyer, Darren

    malignancy in the world. There were more than 270,000 new cases of oral cancer reported in 2002 (1Cancer Prevention Research Objective Detection and Delineation of Oral Neoplasia Using is easily accessible to inspection, patients with oral cancer most often present at a late stage, leading

  7. Pediatric Head and Neck Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Qaisi, Mohammed; Eid, Issam

    2016-02-01

    Head and neck malignancies are rare in pediatric patients, and represent 12% of all pediatric malignancies. The incidence for these head and neck tumors is 1.49 cases per 1,000,000 person-years. Among the most common pediatric head and neck malignancies are lymphomas (27%), neural tumors including primitive neurectodermal tumors (23%), thyroid malignancies (21%), soft tissue sarcomas including rhabdomyosarcoma (12%), nasopharyngeal carcinoma, skeletal and odontogenic malignancies including osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, and ameloblastic carcinoma. This article presents an overview of pediatric head and neck malignancies with emphasis on diagnosis and management. PMID:26614697

  8. Inhibition of integrin ?1 decreases the malignancy of ovarian cancer cells and potentiates anticancer therapy via the FAK/STAT1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zou, Wen

    2015-12-01

    Integrin ?1 (ITGB1) is frequently upregulated in ovarian cancer, and promotes ovarian tumorigenesis and cancer progression. However, the effects of ITGB1 inhibition on ovarian cancer progression and anticancer therapy remain to be elucidated. The results of the present study indicated that ITGB1 was upregulated in HO?8910 and HO?8910PM ovarian cancer cell lines, and knockdown of ITGB1 using short hairpin RNA markedly increased tumor cell apoptosis, decreased tumor cell adhesion and migration, and reduced tumor cell invasion by suppressing matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)?2 and MMP?9 expression. Furthermore, the results of the present study provided evidence regarding the role of ITGB1 inhibition in bevacizumab anticancer therapy. The activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) by focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is involved in integrin?mediated cell migration and adhesion. In the present study, the expression levels of FAK were markedly upregulated in ovarian cancer. The adherence and migratory potentials of ovarian cancer cells were significantly reduced when the FAK/STAT1 signaling pathway was inhibited by fludarabine. The results of the present study demonstrated that ITGB1 inhibition effectively reduced tumorigenesis and disease exacerbation, and contributed to bevacizumab anticancer therapy via the FAK/STAT1 signaling pathway, suggesting that inhibition of ITGB1 is a potential novel therapeutic strategy for ovarian carcinogenesis. PMID:26497667

  9. Attacking malignant cells that survive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hodge, James W; Kwilas, Anna; Ardiani, Andressa; Gameiro, Sofia R

    2013-01-01

    We have recently defined “immunogenic modulation,” a mechanism whereby malignant cells that survive anticancer therapy, due to sublethal delivery or development of treatment resistance, become nonetheless more sensitive to killing by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. This mechanism can be exploited to identify which therapies will best synergize with immunotherapy, potentially maximizing patient clinical benefit. PMID:24498561

  10. Pro-Arrhythmic Potential of Oral Antihistamines (H1): Combining Adverse Event Reports with Drug Utilization Data across Europe

    PubMed Central

    Poluzzi, Elisabetta; Raschi, Emanuel; Godman, Brian; Koci, Ariola; Moretti, Ugo; Kalaba, Marija; Wettermark, Bjorn; Sturkenboom, Miriam; De Ponti, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Background There is appreciable utilisation of antihistamines (H1) in European countries, either prescribed by physician and purchased by patients for self-medication. Terfenadine and astemizole underwent regulatory restrictions in ’90 because of their cardiac toxicity, but only scarce clinical data are available on other antihistamines. Aim To investigate the pro-arrhythmic potential of antihistamines by combining safety reports of the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) with drug utilization data from 13 European Countries. Methods We identified signals of antihistamine arrhythmogenic potential by analyzing FAERS database for all cases of Torsades de Pointes (TdP), QT abnormalities (QTabn), ventricular arrhythmia (VA) and sudden cardiac death/cardiac arrest (SCD/CA). Number of cases ?3 and disproportionality were used to define alert signals: TdP and QTabn identified stronger signals, whereas SCD/CA identified weaker signals. Drug utilization data from 2005 to 2010 were collected from administrative databases through health authorities and insurance. Results Antihistamines were reported in 109 cases of TdP/QT prolongation, 278 VA and 610 SCD/CA. Five agents resulted in stronger signals (cetirizine, desloratadine, diphenhydramine, fexofenadine, loratadine) and 6 in weaker signals (alimemazine, carbinoxamine, cyclizine, cyproeptadine, dexchlorpheniramine and doxylamine). Exposure to antihistamines with stronger signal was markedly different across European countries and was at least 40% in each Country. Cetirizine was >29 Defined Daily Doses per 1000 inhabitants per day (DID) in Norway, desloratadine >11 DID in France and loratadine >9 DID in Sweden and Croatia. Drugs with weaker signals accounted for no more than 10% (in Sweden) and in most European countries their use was negligible. Conclusions Some second-generation antihistamines are associated with signal of torsadogenicity and largely used in most European countries. Although confirmation by analytical studies is required, regulators and clinicians should consider risk-minimisation activities. Also antihistamines without signal but with peculiar use in a few Countries (e.g., levocetirizine) or with increasing consumption (e.g., rupatadine) deserve careful surveillance. PMID:25785934

  11. Identification of endoplasmic reticulum stress-inducing agents by antagonizing autophagy: a new potential strategy for identification of anti-cancer therapeutics in B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Emilia; Maddocks, Kami; Flynn, Joseph; Jones, Jeffrey; Cole, Sara L.; Zhang, Xiaoli; Byrd, John C.; Johnson, Amy J.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays a vital function in multiple cellular processes. There is a growing interest in developing therapeutic agents that can target the ER in cancer cells, inducing a stress response that leads to cell death. However, ER stress-inducing agents can also induce autophagy, a survival strategy of cancer cells. Therefore, by inhibiting autophagy we can increase the efficacy of the ER stress-inducing agents. Nelfinavir, a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitor with anti-cancer properties, can induce ER stress. Nelfinavir’s effects on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are yet to be elucidated. Herein we demonstrate that nelfinavir induces ER morphological changes and stress response, along with an autophagic protective strategy. Our data reveal that chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, significantly increases nelfinavir cytotoxicity. These results identify a novel strategy potentially effective in CLL treatment, by repositioning two well-known drugs as a combinatorial therapy with anti-cancer properties. PMID:23469959

  12. [In vitro reconstruction of malignant melanoma].

    PubMed

    Lugassy, C; Escande, J P

    1987-01-01

    It is report here that three dimensional melanocytic tumors may be reconstituted when adding collagen to the cells harvested during the under covering lattice culture of malignant melanoma explants (cutaneous metastasis). The cells issued from these rebuilt malignant melanoma may be used following the same methods. Thus, the serial making of melanocytic tumors becomes possible. The problem of the relation between cellular differentiation and invasive potential of the cells may be studied using as an original model the rebuilt tumors and the cellular population which are issued from them. PMID:3121142

  13. Malignant tumors of childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 34 papers about malignant tumors. some of the titles are: Invasive Cogenital Mesoblastic Nephroma, Leukemia Update, Unusual Perinatal Neoplasms, Lymphoma Update, Gonadal Germ Cell Tumors in Children, Nutritional Status and Cancer of Childhood, and Chemotherapy of Brain tumors in Children.

  14. Malignant Catarrhal Fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a frequently fatal viral disease of ruminant species, particularly cattle, bison, and deer. Clinical signs vary between species. Two major epidemiologic types of MCF exist, and are defined by the ruminant species that serve as natural reservoir hosts for infection...

  15. Postirradiation malignant fibrous histiocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tewfik, H.H.; Tewfik, F.A.; Latourette, H.B.

    1981-02-01

    Three patients who were treated successfully with postoperative external radiation therapy for ovarian carcinoma, endometrial adenocarcinoma, and bilateral retinoblastoma respectively developed years later malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) within the irradiated field. MFH is a recently described soft tissue sarcoma known for its dual fibroblastic and histiocytic differentiation resulting in a pleomorphic histologic appearance.

  16. Feasibility of using gold nanorods for optical contrast in two photon microscopy of oral carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motamedi, Saam; Shilagard, Tuya; Koong, Luke; Vargas, Gracie

    2010-02-01

    Gold nanorods (GNRs) combined with two-photon microscopy were explored for potential application in imaging of oral carcinogenesis. GNRs have been shown to be effective contrast agents for two photon luminescence in that excitation laser powers required for imaging are low compared to traditional fluorophores. Imaging of cells, ex vivo tissues, and in vivo oral mucosa labeled with GNRs was performed to evaluate potential advantages of these agents in molecular imaging of epithelial carcinogenesis. Powers required to elicit a two-photon luminescence signal from GNRs were determined for cells as well as normal and malignant transformed lesions, 24 hours following injection of GNRs in a hamster model for oral cancer. The strength of the detected emission as the function of the average incident laser power was measured in tissues with and without GNRs to compare the sensitivity of GNRs against tissue autofluorescence. Finally, in vivo imaging was performed immediately following GNR injection to establish the ability to image microvasculature at low incident powers. The pilot study demonstrated uptake of GNRs by cells and in tissues yielding bright fluorescence signals using significantly lower incident powers than those needed to excite tissue autofluorescence. The in vivo imaging aspect of the study demonstrated the localization of GNRs within the microvasculature of the oral cancer model. These preliminary studies demonstrated the ability of GNRs to function as photostable, high contrast imaging agents and suggest that GNRs and multi-photon imaging have great potential for applications in the field of molecular imaging and early detection of cancer.

  17. The potential of organic-based amylose-ethylcellulose film coatings as oral colon-specific drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Siew, L F; Basit, A W; Newton, J M

    2000-01-01

    Amylose-ethylcellulose film coatings obtained from organic-based solvents were investigated as potential vehicles for colonic drug delivery. Amylose, in the form of an amylose-butan-1-ol dispersion, and ethylcellulose, dissolved in either ethyl lactate, ethanol, or propanol and plasticized with dibutyl sebacate, were mixed in various proportions and applied using a fluidized bed coater to achieve a range of film thicknesses on 5-aminosalicylic acid pellets. Drug release from the coated pellets was assessed under gastric and small intestinal conditions in the presence and absence of pepsin and pancreatin using dissolution methodology, and also within a simulated colonic environment involving fermentation testing with human feces in the form of a slurry. Under upper gastrointestinal tract conditions, the rate and extent of drug release were found to be related to the thickness of the coating and the ratio of amylose to ethylcellulose within the film. Modeling of the drug release data revealed that the ratio was more important than coat thickness in controlling drug release, irrespective of the solvent used for coating. Coatings with a thick film and/or low amylose content were relatively impermeable and able to delay drug release under conditions mimicking the upper gastrointestinal tract. Furthermore, drug release was unaffected by the presence of pepsin and pancreatin and by long-term storage. Under simulated colonic conditions, drug release was more pronounced from coating formulations containing higher proportions of amylose. Colon-specificity can therefore be achieved using such systems by judicious choice of the appropriate ratio of amylose to ethylcellulose and coat thickness. PMID:14727908

  18. Malignant Melanoma of the Foot

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Text Size Print Bookmark Malignant Melanoma of the Foot What is Malignant Melanoma? Melanoma is a cancer ... age groups, even the young. Melanoma in the Foot Melanoma that occurs in the foot or ankle ...

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Malignant Mesothelioma)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Malignant mesothelioma is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the lining of the chest or ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread to other parts of the body. ...

  20. General Information about Malignant Mesothelioma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Malignant mesothelioma is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the lining of the chest or ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread to other parts of the body. ...

  1. Discovery of A-971432, An Orally Bioavailable Selective Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor 5 (S1P5) Agonist for the Potential Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Hobson, Adrian D; Harris, Christopher M; van der Kam, Elizabeth L; Turner, Sean C; Abibi, Ayome; Aguirre, Ana L; Bousquet, Peter; Kebede, Tegest; Konopacki, Donald B; Gintant, Gary; Kim, Youngjae; Larson, Kelly; Maull, John W; Moore, Nigel S; Shi, Dan; Shrestha, Anurupa; Tang, Xiubo; Zhang, Peng; Sarris, Kathy K

    2015-12-10

    S1P5 is one of 5 receptors for sphingosine-1-phosphate and is highly expressed on endothelial cells within the blood-brain barrier, where it maintains barrier integrity in in vitro models ( J. Neuroinflamm. 2012 , 9 , 133 ). Little more is known about the effects of S1P5 modulation due to the absence of tool molecules with suitable selectivity and drug-like properties. We recently reported that molecule A-971432 ( Harris , 2010 ) (29 in this paper) is highly efficacious in reversing lipid accumulation and age-related cognitive decline in rats ( Van der Kam , , AAIC 2014 ). Herein we describe the development of a series of selective S1P5 agonists that led to the identification of compound 29, which is highly selective for S1P5 and has excellent plasma and CNS exposure after oral dosing in preclinical species. To further support its suitability for in vivo studies of S1P5 biology, we extensively characterized 29, including confirmation of its selectivity in pharmacodynamic assays of S1P1 and S1P3 function in rats. In addition, we found that 29 improves blood-brain barrier integrity in an in vitro model and reverses age-related cognitive decline in mice. These results suggest that S1P5 agonism is an innovative approach with potential benefit in neurodegenerative disorders involving lipid imbalance and/or compromised blood-brain barrier such as Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. PMID:26509640

  2. Ampicillin Oral

    MedlinePLUS

    ... capsule, liquid, and pediatric drops to take by mouth. It is usually taken every 6 hours (four ... blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin), atenolol (Tenormin), oral contraceptives, probenecid (Benemid), rifampin, sulfasalazine, and vitamins.tell ...

  3. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... swallowing A lump in your neck An earache Oral cancer treatments may include surgery, radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Some patients have a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  4. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... oral cancer during regular checkups. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) also make note of unusual or abnormal growths ... examinations and provide referrals to appropriate medical professionals. SLPs are important members of the cancer team. They ...

  5. FOXM1 Upregulation Is an Early Event in Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma and it Is Enhanced by Nicotine during Malignant Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Gemenetzidis, Emilios; Bose, Amrita; Riaz, Adeel M.; Chaplin, Tracy; Young, Bryan D.; Ali, Muhammad; Sugden, David; Thurlow, Johanna K.; Cheong, Sok-Ching; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Wan, Hong; Waseem, Ahmad; Parkinson, Eric K.; Fortune, Farida; Teh, Muy-Teck

    2009-01-01

    Background Cancer associated with smoking and drinking remains a serious health problem worldwide. The survival of patients is very poor due to the lack of effective early biomarkers. FOXM1 overexpression is linked to the majority of human cancers but its mechanism remains unclear in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methodology/Principal Findings FOXM1 mRNA and protein expressions were investigated in four independent cohorts (total 75 patients) consisting of normal, premalignant and HNSCC tissues and cells using quantitative PCR (qPCR), expression microarray, immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry. Effect of putative oral carcinogens on FOXM1 transcriptional activity was dose-dependently assayed and confirmed using a FOXM1-specific luciferase reporter system, qPCR, immunoblotting and short-hairpin RNA interference. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array was used to ‘trace’ the genomic instability signature pattern in 8 clonal lines of FOXM1-induced malignant human oral keratinocytes. Furthermore, acute FOXM1 upregulation in primary oral keratinocytes directly induced genomic instability. We have shown for the first time that overexpression of FOXM1 precedes HNSCC malignancy. Screening putative carcinogens in human oral keratinocytes surprisingly showed that nicotine, which is not perceived to be a human carcinogen, directly induced FOXM1 mRNA, protein stabilisation and transcriptional activity at concentrations relevant to tobacco chewers. Importantly, nicotine also augmented FOXM1-induced transformation of human oral keratinocytes. A centrosomal protein CEP55 and a DNA helicase/putative stem cell marker HELLS, both located within a consensus loci (10q23), were found to be novel targets of FOXM1 and their expression correlated tightly with HNSCC progression. Conclusions/Significance This study cautions the potential co-carcinogenic effect of nicotine in tobacco replacement therapies. We hypothesise that aberrant upregulation of FOXM1 may be inducing genomic instability through a program of malignant transformation involving the activation of CEP55 and HELLS which may facilitate aberrant mitosis and epigenetic modifications. Our finding that FOXM1 is upregulated early during oral cancer progression renders FOXM1 an attractive diagnostic biomarker for early cancer detection and its candidate mechanistic targets, CEP55 and HELLS, as indicators of malignant conversion and progression. PMID:19287496

  6. Boron delivery with liposomes for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): biodistribution studies in an experimental model of oral cancer demonstrating therapeutic potential

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg

    2012-05-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) combines selective accumulation of 10B carriers in tumor tissue with subsequent neutron irradiation. We previously demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. Optimization of BNCT depends largely on improving boron targeting to tumor cells. Seeking to maximize the potential of BNCT for the treatment for head and neck cancer, the aim of the present study was to perform boron biodistribution studies in the oral cancer model employing two different liposome formulations that were previously tested for a different pathology, i.e., in experimental mammary carcinoma in BALB/c mice: (1) MAC: liposomes incorporating K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] in the bilayer membrane and encapsulating a hypertonic buffer, administered intravenously at 6 mg B per kg body weight, and (2) MAC-TAC: liposomes incorporating K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] in the bilayer membrane and encapsulating a concentrated aqueous solution of the hydrophilic species Na3 [ae-B20H17NH3], administered intravenously at 18 mg B per kg body weight. Samples of tumor, precancerous and normal pouch tissue, spleen, liver, kidney, and blood were taken at different times post-administration and processed to measure boron content by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. No ostensible clinical toxic effects were observed with the selected formulations. Both MAC and MAC-TAC delivered boron selectively to tumor tissue. Absolute tumor values for MAC-TAC peaked to 66.6 {+-} 16.1 ppm at 48 h and to 43.9 {+-} 17.6 ppm at 54 h with very favorable ratios of tumor boron relative to precancerous and normal tissue, making these protocols particularly worthy of radiobiological assessment. Boron concentration values obtained would result in therapeutic BNCT doses in tumor without exceeding radiotolerance in precancerous/normal tissue at the thermal neutron facility at RA-3.

  7. Boron delivery with liposomes for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): biodistribution studies in an experimental model of oral cancer demonstrating therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Heber, Elisa M; Kueffer, Peter J; Lee, Mark W; Hawthorne, M Frederick; Garabalino, Marcela A; Molinari, Ana J; Nigg, David W; Bauer, William; Hughes, Andrea Monti; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Trivillin, Verónica A; Schwint, Amanda E

    2012-05-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) combines selective accumulation of (10)B carriers in tumor tissue with subsequent neutron irradiation. We previously demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. Optimization of BNCT depends largely on improving boron targeting to tumor cells. Seeking to maximize the potential of BNCT for the treatment for head and neck cancer, the aim of the present study was to perform boron biodistribution studies in the oral cancer model employing two different liposome formulations that were previously tested for a different pathology, i.e., in experimental mammary carcinoma in BALB/c mice: (1) MAC: liposomes incorporating K[nido-7-CH(3)(CH(2))(15)-7,8-C(2)B(9)H(11)] in the bilayer membrane and encapsulating a hypertonic buffer, administered intravenously at 6 mg B per kg body weight, and (2) MAC-TAC: liposomes incorporating K[nido-7-CH(3)(CH(2))(15)-7,8-C(2)B(9)H(11)] in the bilayer membrane and encapsulating a concentrated aqueous solution of the hydrophilic species Na(3) [ae-B(20)H(17)NH(3)], administered intravenously at 18 mg B per kg body weight. Samples of tumor, precancerous and normal pouch tissue, spleen, liver, kidney, and blood were taken at different times post-administration and processed to measure boron content by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. No ostensible clinical toxic effects were observed with the selected formulations. Both MAC and MAC-TAC delivered boron selectively to tumor tissue. Absolute tumor values for MAC-TAC peaked to 66.6 ± 16.1 ppm at 48 h and to 43.9 ± 17.6 ppm at 54 h with very favorable ratios of tumor boron relative to precancerous and normal tissue, making these protocols particularly worthy of radiobiological assessment. Boron concentration values obtained would result in therapeutic BNCT doses in tumor without exceeding radiotolerance in precancerous/normal tissue at the thermal neutron facility at RA-3. PMID:22271404

  8. Chemokine Function in Periodontal Disease and Oral Cavity Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sahingur, Sinem Esra; Yeudall, W. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The chemotactic cytokines, or chemokines, comprise a superfamily of polypeptides with a wide range of activities that include recruitment of immune cells to sites of infection and inflammation, as well as stimulation of cell proliferation. As such, they function as antimicrobial molecules and play a central role in host defenses against pathogen challenge. However, their ability to recruit leukocytes and potentiate or prolong the inflammatory response may have profound implications for the progression of oral diseases such as chronic periodontitis, where tissue destruction may be widespread. Moreover, it is increasingly recognized that chronic inflammation is a key component of tumor progression. Interaction between cancer cells and their microenvironment is mediated in large part by secreted factors such as chemokines, and serves to enhance the malignant phenotype in oral and other cancers. In this article, we will outline the biological and biochemical mechanisms of chemokine action in host–microbiome interactions in periodontal disease and in oral cancer, and how these may overlap and contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:25999952

  9. Langerhans Cell Expression in Oral Submucous Fibrosis: An Immunohistochemical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Malathi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Langerhans cells (LCs), are dendritic cells of the epithelium which play a role in an array of oral lesions from gingivitis to oral cancer. Oral Submucous Fibrosis (OSMF), a potentially malignant disorder (PMD), is an insidious chronic disease with juxta-epithelial inflammatory changes leading to fibrosis. Langerhans cells (LCs) may play a part in the ongoing inflammatory dysregulation of OSMF. Objective The study was aimed at elucidating the distribution of LCs in varying grades of OSMF. Materials and Methods A retrospective study using 39 cases of OSMF, graded using Haematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stained section. Immunohistochemistry was performed using polyclonal anti- CD1a antibodies to identify LCs in 5 cases of normal tissue and 39 samples of OSMF. The distribution of LCs among the various grades and normal mucosa analysed using Mann-Whitney U test. Results LC population in the OSMF was significantly higher when compared to the normal epithelium (p<0.001). Within the grades the advanced stage had more LCs than the other stages. Conclusion The increase in LCs might indicate the role of antigenic exposure in turn leading to cell mediated immunity in OSMF. Thus the fibrosis in OSMF might have a direct link to LCs. PMID:26393203

  10. Lymphocytosis, lymphadenopathy: benign or malignant?

    PubMed

    Winter, Jane N; Peterson, LoAnn C

    2015-12-01

    The increasing use of immunophenotypic and molecular analysis in the routine evaluation of patients with lymphocytosis, lymphadenopathy, or other hematologic disorders has led to the identification of unexpected small clonal lymphoid populations. These clones, sometimes with disease-specific markers, such as the t(14;18), are especially challenging for the clinician because of their unknown biologic potential and uncertain clinical behavior. Study of these early lymphoid lesions is providing important clues to the process of lymphomagenesis, and may provide the rationale for preemptive therapy in the future. More and more, the hematologist/oncologist is consulted regarding otherwise healthy individuals with lymphadenopathy and/or lymphocytosis, and pathology reports that confound the referring internist or surgeon. The report does not name a malignant lymphoproliferative disorder, but is not completely "normal". Does the patient have a benign or malignant condition? How should they be evaluated? Is treatment indicated? These patients prove challenging for the consulting hematologist as well as the referring physician. In this review, we will focus on some of these scenarios and attempt to provide guidance for their management. PMID:26637708

  11. Immunology of oral candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Sivakumar, Muniapillai; Karthikeyan, M.; Udayakumar, P.; Shanmugam, K. T.; Kesavan, G.

    2014-01-01

    A successful pathogen is one that is able to effectively survive and evade detection by the host immune defense. Oral candidiasis has adopted strategies, which evade host defense and eventually cause disease in at-risk patients. Host defense against infections with Candida spp. depends on rapid activation of an acute inflammatory response by innate immunity, followed by an incremental stimulation of specific immune responses mediated by T-cells (cellular immunity) or B-cells (humoral immunity). Understanding these complex pathways of immune evasion can potentially contribute to the development of novel therapeutic strategies against oral candidiasis. PMID:25210393

  12. Lymphoscintigraphy in malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, C.G.; Norman, J.; Cruse, C.W.; Reintgen, D.S.; Clark, R.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The development and rationale for the use of lymphoscintigraphy in the preoperative evaluation of patients with malignant melanoma being considered for elective lymph node dissection is reviewed. This overview is updated by an analysis of 135 patients with early stage malignant melanoma involving the head, neck, shoulders, and trunk at Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute at the University of South Florida (Tampa, FL). High discordancy rates (overall, 41%) were seen between drainage patterns predicted from historical anatomical guidelines and those revealed by the lymphoscintigraphic examination. The high discordancy rate was most pronounced in the head (64%) and the neck (73%). Surgical management was changed in 33% of the patients, overall. A preoperative lymphoscintigram is recommended for all patients with melanoma with head, neck, and truncal lesions evaluated for elective lymph node dissection as the lymphatic drainage patterns are often unpredictable and variable.

  13. Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase in Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, Rodney E.; Mayhall, Kim; Maxwell, Nicole M.; Kandil, Emad

    2013-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) synthesis. Both intracellular and extracellular Nampt (iNampt and eNampt) levels are increased in several human malignancies and some studies demonstrate increased iNampt in more aggressive/invasive tumors and in tumor metastases. Several different molecular targets have been identified that promote carcinogenesis following iNampt overexpression, including SirT1, CtBP, and PARP-1. Additionally, eNampt is elevated in several human cancers and is often associated with a higher tumor stage and worse prognoses. Here we review the roles of Nampt in malignancy, some of the known mechanisms by which it promotes carcinogenesis, and discuss the possibility of employing Nampt inhibitors in cancer treatment. PMID:24386506

  14. Hyaluronan in human malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Sironen, R.K.; Department of Pathology, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O. Box 1777, FI-70211 Kuopio ; Tammi, M.; Tammi, R.; Auvinen, P.K.; Anttila, M.; Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O. Box 1777, FI-70211 Kuopio ; Kosma, V-M.

    2011-02-15

    Hyaluronan, a major macropolysaccharide in the extracellular matrix of connective tissues, is intimately involved in the biology of cancer. Hyaluronan accumulates into the stroma of various human tumors and modulates intracellular signaling pathways, cell proliferation, motility and invasive properties of malignant cells. Experimental and clinicopathological evidence highlights the importance of hyaluronan in tumor growth and metastasis. A high stromal hyaluronan content is associated with poorly differentiated tumors and aggressive clinical behavior in human adenocarcinomas. Instead, the squamous cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas tend to have a reduced hyaluronan content. In addition to the stroma-cancer cell interaction, hyaluronan can influence stromal cell recruitment, tumor angiogenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Hyaluronan receptors, hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronan degrading enzymes, hyaluronidases, are involved in the modulation of cancer progression, depending on the tumor type. Furthermore, intracellular signaling and angiogenesis are affected by the degradation products of hyaluronan. Hyaluronan has also therapeutic implications since it is involved in multidrug resistance.

  15. Endobronchial tuberculosis mimicking malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shahid M; Iyer, Aparna; Jayalakshmi, TK; Nair, Girija

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial tuberculosis has a very varied presentation. Diagnosis is often very challenging as typical radiological features are absent and sputum smear for acid-fast bacilli is often negative. However, detection is essential as it may lead to long-term sequelae such as bronchial stenosis. Bronchoscopy is a very useful investigation in such cases. Our case is a rare manifestation of endobronchial tuberculosis as it mimicked malignancy.

  16. Oral Cancer and Oral Precancerous Lesions in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Katsanos, Konstantinos H; Roda, Giulia; Brygo, Alexandre; Delaporte, Emmanuel; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric

    2015-11-01

    Oral cancer is historically linked to well-known behavioural risk factors such as tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption. Other risk factors include age over 40, male sex, several dietary factors, nutritional deficiencies, viruses, sexually transmitted infections, human papillomavirus, chronic irritation, and possibly genetic predisposition. Precancerous lesions in the oral cavity include leukoplakia, erythroplakia, and lichen planus. Histology of oral cancer varies widely but the great majority are squamous cell carcinomas.Epidemiological studies and cancer registries have shown a consistently increased risk of oral malignancies in kidney, bone marrow, heart, or liver transplantation, in graft vs host disease, and in patients with HIV infection. Because of the increasing use of immunosuppressive drugs in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, it is useful to more accurately delineate the consequences of chronic immunosuppression to the oral cavity. Oral cancer and precancerous oral lesions in patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] have been scarcely reported and reviews on the topic are lacking.We conducted a literature search using the terms and variants of all cancerous and precancerous oral manifestations of inflammatory bowel diseases. By retrieving the existing literature, it is evident that patients with IBD belong to the high-risk group of developing these lesions, a phenomenon amplified by the increasing HPV prevalence. Education on modifiable risk behaviours in patients with oral cancer is the cornerstone of prevention.Oral screening should be performed for all IBD patients, especially those who are about to start an immunosuppressant or biological drug. PMID:26163301

  17. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy—A Novel Treatment Modality in Oral Submucous Fibrosis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M. Ashwini; Radhika, Besta; Reddy, Satya Prakash; Yaga, Uday Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a chronic, debilitating disease characterized by juxta epithelial fibrosis of the oral cavity and regarded as a potentially malignant disorder. Numerous treatment modalities ranging from various drugs to behavioral therapy have been tried with inconsistent results with varying degrees of success reflecting low predictability, requiring further evaluation and standardization. Novel treatment modality such as Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) involves inhalation of 100% oxygen at increased atmospheric pressure usually ranging between 2.0 and 2.5 atmospheres for periods between 60 and 120 min. HBOT which can increase oxygen tension and delivery to oxygen-deficient tissue, is a supplementary therapy to improve hypoxic environment of OSMF and also possesses potent anti-inflammatory properties. This article enlightens on possible beneficial effects of HBOT in the management of OSMF at cellular and molecular level. PMID:26155590

  18. Vaccine Therapies in Malignant Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Taemin; Sayegh, Eli T.; Fakurnejad, Shayan; Oyon, Daniel; Lamano, Jonathan Balquiedra; DiDomenico, Joseph David; Bloch, Orin; Parsa, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is a grade IV astrocytoma that is widely accepted in clinical neurosurgery as being an extremely lethal diagnosis. Long-term survival rates remain dismal and, even when tumors undergo gross resection with confirmation of total removal on neuroimaging, they invariably recur with even greater virulence. Standard therapeutic modalities as well as more contemporary treatments have largely resulted in disappointing improvements. However, the therapeutic potential of vaccine immunotherapy for malignant glioma should not be underestimated. In contrast to many of the available treatments, vaccine immunotherapy is unique because it offers the means of delivering treatment that is highly specific to both the patient and the tumor. Peptide, heat-shock proteins, and dendritic cell vaccines collectively encapsulate the majority of research efforts involving vaccine-based treatment modalities. In this review, important recent findings for these vaccine types are discussed in the context of ongoing clinical trials. Broad challenges to immunotherapy are also considered. PMID:25431096

  19. Current advances in radiotherapy of head and neck malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Roopashri, G; Baig, Muqeet

    2013-01-01

    Necessity is the mother of all inventions. This is also true in case of cancer therapy. With increasing incidence of head and neck malignancies, remarkable developments have been made towards cancer development and treatment which continues to be a major challenge. Approximately fifty percent of all cancer patients receive radiotherapy which contributes towards forty percent of curative treatment for cancer. New developments in radiation oncology have helped to improve outlook for patients and find more effective treatment. With the advent of new technologies, radiotherapy seems to be promising in patients with head and neck malignancies these advancements include Altered fractionation, Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, Image Guided Radiotherapy, Stereotactic radiation, Charged-particle radiotherapy, and Intraoperative radiotherapy. How to cite this article: Roopashri G, Baig M. Current advances in radiotherapy of head and neck malignancies. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(6):119-23 . PMID:24453456

  20. Diagnostic Concordance Characteristics of Oral Cavity Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Tatli, Ufuk; Erdo?an, Özgür; U?uz, Aysun; Üstün, Yakup; Sertdem?r, Ya?ar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic concordance characteristics of oral cavity lesions by comparing the clinical diagnosis of the lesions with the histopathologic diagnosis. Material and Method. A retrospective analysis was conducted on the patients, who were admitted with oral cavity pathology and underwent biopsy procedure between 2007 and 2011. The oral cavity lesions were classified into 6 different groups as odontogenic cysts, nonodontogenic cysts, odontogenic tumors, nonodontogenic tumors, malignant tumors, and precancerous lesions in accordance with the 2005 WHO classification. The diagnoses were also recategorized into 3 groups expressing prognostic implications as benign, precancerous, and malignant. The initial clinical diagnoses were compared with the histopathologic diagnoses. Data were analyzed statistically. Results. A total of 2718 cases were included. Histopathologic diagnosis did not match the clinical diagnosis in 6.7% of the cases. Nonodontogenic tumors and malignant tumors had the highest misdiagnosis rates (11.5% and 9%, resp.), followed by odontogenic tumors (7.7%), precancerous lesions (6.9%), and odontogenic cysts (4.4%). Clinicians were excelled in diagnosis of benign and precancerous lesions in clinical setting. Conclusion. The detailed discordance characteristics for each specific lesion should be considered during oral pathology practice to provide early detection without delay. PMID:24453906

  1. Identification of RAB2A and PRDX1 as the potential biomarkers for oral squamous cell carcinoma using mass spectrometry-based comparative proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Dey, Kaushik Kumar; Pal, Ipsita; Bharti, Rashmi; Dey, Goutam; Kumar, B N Prashanth; Rajput, Shashi; Parekh, Aditya; Parida, Sheetal; Halder, Priyanka; Kulavi, Indranil; Mandal, Mahitosh

    2015-12-01

    Despite the recent advances in diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remains a major health burden. Protein biomarker discovery for early detection will help to improve patient survival rate in OSCC. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has emerged as an excellent approach for detection of protein biomarkers in various types of cancers. In the current study, we have used 4-Plex isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based shotgun quantitative proteomic approach to identify proteins that are differentially expressed in cancerous tissues compared to normal tissues. The high-resolution mass spectrometric analysis resulted in identifying 2,074 proteins, among which 288 proteins were differentially expressed. Further, it was noticed that 162 proteins were upregulated, while 125 proteins were downregulated in OSCC-derived cancer tissue samples as compared to the adjacent normal tissues. We identified some of the known molecules which were reported earlier in OSCC such as MMP-9 (8.4-fold), ZNF142 (5.6-fold), and S100A7 (3.5-fold). Apart from this, we have also identified some novel signature proteins which have not been reported earlier in OSCC including ras-related protein Rab-2A isoform, RAB2A (4.6-fold), and peroxiredoxin-1, PRDX1 (2.2-fold). The immunohistochemistry-based validation using tissue microarray slides in OSCC revealed overexpression of the RAB2A and PRDX1 gene in 80 and 68 % of the tested clinical cases, respectively. This study will not only serve as a resource of candidate biomarkers but will contribute towards the existing knowledge on the role of the candidate molecules towards disease progression and therapeutic potential. PMID:26159854

  2. Impact of Hormone-Associated Resistance to Activated Protein C on the Thrombotic Potential of Oral Contraceptives: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Jens; Sukhitashvili, Shorena; Welz, Julia; Kuhn, Walther C.; Oldenburg, Johannes; Rudlowski, Christian; Pötzsch, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The increased thrombotic risk of oral contraceptives (OC) has been attributed to various alterations of the hemostatic system, including acquired resistance to activated protein C (APC). To evaluate to what extent OC-associated APC resistance induces a prothrombotic state we monitored plasma levels of thrombin and molecular markers specific for thrombin formation in women starting OC use. Elevated plasma levels of thrombin have been reported to characterize situations of high thrombotic risk such as trauma-induced hypercoagulability, but have not yet been studied during OC use. Patients and Methods Blood samples were collected prospectively from healthy women (n?=?21) before and during three menstruation cycles after start of OC. APC resistance was evaluated using a thrombin generation-based assay. Plasma levels of thrombin and APC were directly measured using highly sensitive oligonucleotide-based enzyme capture assay (OECA) technology. Thrombin generation markers and other hemostasis parameters were measured additionally. Results All women developed APC resistance as indicated by an increased APC sensitivity ratio compared with baseline after start of OC (p?=?0.0003). Simultaneously, plasma levels of thrombin, prothrombin fragment 1+2, and of thrombin-antithrombin complexes did not change, ruling out increased thrombin formation. APC plasma levels were also not influenced by OC use, giving further evidence that increased thrombin formation did not occur. Conclusions In the majority of OC users no enhanced thrombin formation occurs despite the development of APC resistance. It cannot be ruled out, however, that thrombin formation might occur to a greater extent in the presence of additional risk factors. If this were the case, endogenous thrombin levels might be a potential biomarker candidate to identify women at high thrombotic risk during OC treatment. Large-scale studies are required to assess the value of plasma levels of thrombin as predictors of OC-associated thrombotic risk. PMID:25121606

  3. Stages of Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are a pair of organs in the female reproductive system . They are in the pelvis , one on each ... and female hormones . Enlarge Anatomy of the female reproductive system. The organs in the female reproductive system include ...

  4. Plexiform neurofibromatosis involving face and oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Jayachandran, Dorairaj; Sunantha, Selvaraj; Gopalaiah, Hema; Veeraraghavan, Gajendra

    2014-01-01

    Plexiform neurofibromas (PNFs) are one of the most common and debilitating complications of neurofibromatosis type I (NF-I). They account for substantial morbidity, disfigurement, functional impairment and are life threatening. PNFs can also be subjected to transformation into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST). This complication is refractory to treat due to paucity of effective therapies for malignant soft tissue sarcomas in general and also the delay in diagnosis from a preexisting tumor. We report a case of PNF of face involving oral cavity with literature review. PMID:24959050

  5. Possible association between hepatitis C virus and malignancies different from hepatocellular carcinoma: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fiorino, Sirio; Bacchi-Reggiani, Letizia; de Biase, Dario; Fornelli, Adele; Masetti, Michele; Tura, Andrea; Grizzi, Fabio; Zanello, Matteo; Mastrangelo, Laura; Lombardi, Raffaele; Acquaviva, Giorgia; di Tommaso, Luca; Bondi, Arrigo; Visani, Michela; Sabbatani, Sergio; Pontoriero, Laura; Fabbri, Carlo; Cuppini, Andrea; Pession, Annalisa; Jovine, Elio

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To summarize the current knowledge about the potential relationship between hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the risk of several extra-liver cancers. METHODS: We performed a systematic review of the literature, according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) Statement. We extracted the pertinent articles, published in MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library, using the following search terms: neoplasm/cancer/malignancy/tumor/carcinoma/adeno-carcinoma and non-Hodgkin lymphomas, kidney/renal-, cholangio-, pancreatic-, thyroid-, breast-,oral-, skin-, prostate-, lung-, colon-, stomach-, haematologic. Case series, case-series with control-group, case-control, cohort-studies as well as meta-analyses, written in English were collected. Some of the main characteristics of retrieved trials, which were designed to investigate the prevalence of HCV infection in each type of the above-mentioned human malignancies were summarised. A main table was defined and included a short description in the text for each of these tumours, whether at least five studies about a specific neoplasm, meeting inclusion criteria, were available in literature. According to these criteria, we created the following sections and the corresponding tables and we indicated the number of included or excluded articles, as well as of meta-analyses and reviews: (1) HCV and haematopoietic malignancies; (2) HCV and cholangiocarcinoma; (3) HCV and pancreatic cancer; (4) HCV and breast cancer; (5) HCV and kidney cancer; (6) HCV and skin or oral cancer; and (7) HCV and thyroid cancer. RESULTS: According to available data, a clear correlation between regions of HCV prevalence and risk of extra-liver cancers has emerged only for a very small group of types and histological subtypes of malignancies. In particular, HCV infection has been associated with: (1) a higher incidence of some B-cell Non-Hodgkin-Lymphoma types, in countries, where an elevated prevalence of this pathogen is detectable, accounting to a percentage of about 10%; (2) an increased risk of intra-hepatic cholangiocarcinoma; and (3) a correlation between HCV prevalence and pancreatic cancer (PAC) incidence. CONCLUSION: To date no definitive conclusions may be obtained from the analysis of relationship between HCV and extra-hepatic cancers. Further studies, recruiting an adequate number of patients are required to confirm or deny this association. PMID:26668515

  6. Oral Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening (PDQ®) What is screening? ... are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Key Points Oral cancer is ...

  7. Oral Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®) What is prevention? ... and How to Quit General Information About Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Key Points Oral cavity cancer ...

  8. The casein kinase 2 inhibitor, CX-4945, as an anti-cancer drug in treatment of human hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Hae J.; Bae, Kyoung J.; Lee, Yura; Kim, Jiyeon

    2015-01-01

    The casein kinase 2 (CK2) protein kinase is a pro-survival kinase and therapeutic target in treatment of various human cancers. CK2 overexpression has been demonstrated in hematological malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and multiple myeloma. CX-4945, also known as Silmitasertib, is an orally administered, highly specific, ATP-competitive inhibitor of CK2. CX-4945 induces cytotoxicity and apoptosis and is currently being evaluated in clinical trials for treatment of many cancer types. In the past 2 years, the focus on the therapeutic potential of CX-4945 has shifted from solid tumors to hematological malignancies. CX-4945 exerts anti-proliferative effects in hematological tumors by downregulating CK2 expression and suppressing activation of CK2-mediated PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways. Furthermore, combination of CX-4945 with other inhibitors yielded synergistic effects in cell death induction. These new findings demonstrate that CK2 overexpression contributes to blood cancer cell survival and resistance to chemotherapy. Combinatorial use of CX-4945 is a promising therapeutic tool for treatment of hematological malignancies. PMID:25873900

  9. Oral Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... mouth A lump, rough spot, or other change Pain, tenderness, or numbness anywhere in the mouth or on the lips Problems chewing, swallowing, speaking, or moving the jaw or tongue A change in the way the teeth fit together Thrush. Thrush is also called oral ...

  10. Salivary Gland Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Cristina P; Parvathaneni, Upendra; Méndez, Eduardo; Martins, Renato G

    2015-12-01

    Salivary gland malignant tumors represent a diverse group of neoplasms. Their low incidence makes research studies challenging, with most therapeutic recommendations based on case reviews, single-arm trials, or small randomized trials. The standard of care for localized disease is surgical resection. Radiotherapy is the preferred local therapy when surgery is not possible or if there is significant morbidity. When symptomatic metastatic disease develops, systemic therapy is considered. Recent trial accrual success with a cooperative group, treatments based on defined molecular targets, and the development of immunotherapies all hold promise in improving the care of patients with these tumors. PMID:26568553

  11. Early diagnosis of tongue malignancy using laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Ajeetkumar; Unnikrishnan V., K.; Ongole, Ravikiran; Pai, Keerthilatha M.; Kartha, V. B.; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2015-07-01

    Oral cancer together with pharyngeal cancer is the sixth most common malignancy reported worldwide and one with high mortality ratio among all malignancies [1]. Worldwide 450,000 new cases are estimated in 2014[2]. About 90% are a type of cancer called squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). SCC of the tongue is the most common oral malignancy accounting for approximately 40% of all oral carcinomas. One of the important factors for successful therapy of any malignancy is early diagnosis. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis, lack of reliable diagnostic methods for early detection leading to delay in therapy is an important factor responsible for the increase in the mortality rate in various types of cancers. Spectroscopy techniques are extremely sensitive for the analysis of biochemical changes in cellular systems. These techniques can provide a valuable information on alterations that occur during the development of cancer. This is especially important in oral cancer, where "tumor detection is complicated by a tendency towards field cancerization, leading to multi-centric lesions" and "current techniques detect malignant change too late" [3], and "biopsies are not representative of the whole premalignant lesion". [4

  12. Stathmin 1 in normal and malignant hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Neto, João Agostinho; Olalla Saad, Sara Teresinha; Traina, Fabiola

    2014-01-01

    Stathmin 1 is a microtubule destabilizer that plays an important role in cell cycle progression, segregation of chromosomes, clonogenicity, cell motility and survival. Stathmin 1 overexpression has been reported in malignant hematopoietic cells and Stathmin 1 inhibition reduces the highly proliferative potential of leukemia cell lines. However, during the differentiation of primary hematopoietic cells, Stathmin 1 expression decreases in parallel to decreases in the proliferative potential of early hematopoietic progenitors. The scope of the present review is to survey the current knowledge and highlight future perspectives for Stathmin 1 in normal and malignant hematopoiesis, with regard to the expression, function and clinical implications of this protein. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(12): 660-665] PMID:24667172

  13. Sindbis viral vectors target hematopoietic malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Suzme, R; Tseng, J-C; Levin, B; Ibrahim, S; Meruelo, D; Pellicer, A

    2012-11-01

    Sindbis viral vectors target and inhibit the growth of various solid tumors in mouse models. However, their efficacy against blood cancer has not been well established. Here, we show that Sindbis vectors infect and efficiently trigger apoptosis in mouse BW5147 malignant hematopoietic T-cells, but only at low levels in human lymphoma and leukemia cells (Jurkat, Karpas, CEM, DHL and JB). The Mr 37/67?kD laminin receptor (LAMR) has been suggested to be the receptor for Sindbis virus. However, JB cells, which are infected by Sindbis at low efficiency, express high levels of LAMR, revealing that additional factors are involved in Sindbis tropism. To test the infectivity and therapeutic efficacy of Sindbis vectors against malignant hematopoietic cells in vivo, we injected BW5147 cells intraperitoneally into (C3HXAKR) F1 hybrid mice. We found that Sindbis vectors targeted the tumors and significantly prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice. We also tested the Sindbis vectors in a transgenic CD4-Rgr model, which spontaneously develop thymic lymphomas. However, infectivity in this model was less efficient. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Sindbis vectors have the potential to target and kill hematopoietic malignancies in mice, but further research is needed to evaluate the mechanism underlining the susceptibility of human lymphoid malignancies to Sindbis therapy. PMID:22956041

  14. Oral verrucous lesions: Controversies in diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, D.; Goel, M.; Kumar, S.; Pandey, R.; Ram, Hari

    2012-01-01

    Aims Oral verrucous lesions, typically presenting as slowly enlarging, grey or white, warty, exophytic overgrowths on the buccal mucosa or gingiva may be verrucous carcinoma (VC), verrucous hyperplasia (VH), proliferative verrucous leukoplakia (PVL), or may show the conventional invasive pattern of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). This study was undertaken with the aim to report the demography of different types of oral verrucous lesions and evaluate their long-term outcome. Material & methods This clinical study comprised 15 patients with verrucous lesions of the oral cavity who underwent biopsy for confirmation of diagnosis. Results Among these, 12 (80%) were male and only three (20%) were female. The age distribution ranged from 32 to 74 years with a median age of 45 years at the time of diagnosis. The most common site of VC within the oral cavity was the buccal mucosa (46.7%). 5 were proven cases of VC, 3 PVL and 7 VH. All cases of VH, PVL were managed by surgical excision, while VC was managed by surgical excision with superficial ostectomy followed by two cycles of chemotherapy additionally, if micro-invasion was observed on histopathological examination. The 2-year overall survival and tumour control rate was 93.4%. Recurrence was not seen in any patient till the time of analysis at a follow up of 3–5 years. Conclusion Accurate diagnosis of the verrucous lesions is important and should be differentiated from grade I squamous cell carcinoma. Management should be based upon the nature, behaviour and malignant potential of the lesion. PMID:25737860

  15. Functional MR Imaging in Chest Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Broncano, Jordi; Luna, Antonio; Sánchez-González, Javier; Alvarez-Kindelan, Antonio; Bhalla, Sanjeev

    2016-02-01

    With recent advances in MR imaging, its application in the thorax has been feasible. The performance of both morphologic and functional techniques in the evaluation of thoracic malignances has improved not only differentiation from benign etiologies but also treatment monitoring based on a multiparametric approach. Several MR imaging-derived parameters have been described as potential biomarkers linked with prognosis and survival. Therefore, an integral approach with a nonradiating and noninvasive technique could be an optimal alternative for evaluating those patients. PMID:26613879

  16. Management of oral submucous fibrosis: an overview.

    PubMed

    Angadi, Punnya V; Rao, Sanjay

    2010-09-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis is a disease due to a chronic, insidious change in fibroelasticity, characterized by burning sensation in the oral cavity, blanching, and stiffening of the oral mucosa and oro-pharynx leading to trismus and inability to open the mouth. The symptoms and signs depend on the progression of the lesions and number of affected sites. It is predominantly seen in Indians and other Asians. Once, the disease has developed, there is neither regression nor any effective treatment. It is considered as a pre-malignant stage of oral cancer and reported risk of malignant transformation varies from 2.3-7.6%.The common etiological factor considered for this unremitting disease is use of areca nut; however, the precise pathogenesis still remains elusive and controversial. A wide range of treatment consisting of drug management, surgical therapy, and physiotherapy have been attempted till date; with varying degrees of benefit, but none of them have proved to be a cure for this disease. This field remains open for clinical trials and research. This paper aims to provide an overview on various management modalities available for oral submucous fibrosis. PMID:20177949

  17. Radioimmunotherapy of malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, R.M. )

    1991-05-01

    The critical issues in radioimmunotherapy are highlighted, and novel ways of improving the therapeutic indexes of radioimmunotherapeutic agents are outlined. The use of radioactively labeled monoclonal antibodies to treat malignant tumors has been investigated in animals and humans. Radionuclides suitable for labeling antibodies for such use include iodine 125, iodine 131, yttrium 90, rhenium 188, and copper 67. Radiobiological factors to be considered in radioimmunotherapy include the size and density of the tumor and the ability of a radiolabeled antibody to penetrate the tumor nodule. The dose of radiation required to destroy a tumor varies; however, the whole-body dose must not exceed 200 rads to avoid irreversible toxicity to the bone marrow. Despite the theoretical inadequacy of radiation doses to tumors indicated by conventional dosimetry, responses have been observed in animals and humans. More reliable and accurate dosimetric methods are under development. The induction of human antimouse antibodies can alter the pharmacokinetics of radiolabeled antibodies. Improving the therapeutic index of radioimmunotherapeutic agents may be achieved through regional therapy, administering a secondary antibody to improve clearance, combining radioimmunotherapy with external-beam irradiation, using an avidin-biotin conjugate system to deliver the radiolabeled antibodies, and addressing the problem of tumor antigen heterogeneity. Researchers are working to reduce or eliminate the clinical problems associated with radioimmunotherapy. Hematologic malignancies, such as lymphomas, are more likely than solid tumors to respond satisfactorily. 110 refs.

  18. Oral Health in Children with Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Vijay Prakash; Dhillon, Jatinder Kaur; Kalra, Gauri

    2012-01-01

    Leukemia is one of the most common malignancies affecting children in India. These children usually suffer from various oral complications, which may be due to the leukemia or due to the chemotherapeutic agents and/or radiotherapy. The complications may include some of the opportunistic infections like candidiasis, herpes simplex; hemorrhage, mucositis, taste alterations and increased incidence of dental caries etc. These complications can cause significant morbidity and mortality in the patients. The aim of this review is to summarize the various oral complications in these children and the methods of prevention and management. PMID:22837605

  19. A case–control study to detect the extent of DNA damage in oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid reactions using comet assay

    PubMed Central

    Madhulika, N.; Rangdhol, R. Vishwanath; Sitra, G.; Ballaiah, John; Jaikumar, R. Arun; Brooklyin, S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study aims to quantify the extent of DNA damage in lymphocytes of patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) and oral lichenoid reactions (OLRs) using comet assay. Methodology: Lymphocytes from peripheral blood were subjected to alkaline comet assay. Comet length (CL), head diameter (HD), percentage of DNA in head, tail length (TL), percentage of DNA in tail, tail intensity, tail mean and tail moment were compared between study group (OLP and OLR) and control group using Student's t-test. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to examine the linear association between the variables. Results: Significantly higher levels of DNA damage was present in study group as reflected by CL, HD and TL, tail intensity and tail moment with P = 0.0001; percentage of DNA in head and tail with P = 0.02 and tail mean with P = 0.012. Conclusion: This study brings out the fact that DNA damage measured by comet assay was greater in the study group when compared to the control group. As a reflection of uniqueness, this study crowns the scenario with respect to early detection and prevention of potentially malignant disorders and the process of malignant transformation. PMID:26538896

  20. Management of Oral Submucous Fibrosis with Injection of Hyaluronidase and Dexamethasone in Grade III Oral Submucous Fibrosis: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    James, Leena; Shetty, Akshay; Rishi, Diljith; Abraham, Marin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a chronic debilitating and potentially malignant condition of the oral cavity. It is resistant and progressive affecting the entire oral cavity that sometimes causes a gradual reduction in mouth opening that may even extend up to the pharynx. Although the medical treatment is not completely systematized, optimal doses of its treatment with local injection of corticosteroids with hyaluronidase or placental extract is effective to some extent. However, a combination of steroids and topical hyaluronidase shows better long-term results than either agents used individually. To evaluate the efficacy of dexamethasone and hyaluronidase in the treatment of Grade III OSMF. Materials and Methods: A total of 28 patients diagnosed with OSMF were treated in Sri Rajiv Gandhi College of Dental Sciences for a time period of 9 months, by obtaining the patient’s consent and with the approval of the institution’s research ethical committee. They were treated by administering an intralesional injection of dexamethasone1.5 ml, hyaluronidase 1500 IU with 0.5 ml lignocaine HCL injected intralesionally biweekly for 4 weeks. Results: Improvement in the patient’s mouth opening with a net gain of 6 ± 2 mm (92%), the range being 4-8 mm. Definite reduction in burning sensation, painful ulceration and blanching of oral mucosa and patient followed up for an average of 9 months. Conclusion: Injection of hyaluronidase with dexamethasone is an effective method of managing Grade III OSMF and can possibly eliminate the morbidity associated with surgical management. PMID:26464545

  1. Strong Relationship between Oral Dose and Tenofovir Hair Levels in a Randomized Trial: Hair as a Potential Adherence Measure for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Albert Y.; Yang, Qiyun; Huang, Yong; Bacchetti, Peter; Anderson, Peter L.; Jin, Chengshi; Goggin, Kathy; Stojanovski, Kristefer; Grant, Robert; Buchbinder, Susan P.; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Gandhi, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Background Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) trials using tenofovir-based regimens have demonstrated that high levels of adherence are required to evaluate efficacy; the incorporation of objective biomarkers of adherence in trial design has been essential to interpretation, given the inaccuracy of self-report. Antiretroviral measurements in scalp hair have been useful as a marker of long-term exposure in the HIV treatment setting, and hair samples are relatively easy and inexpensive to collect, transport, and store for analysis. To evaluate the relationship between dose and tenofovir concentrations in hair, we examined the dose proportionality of tenofovir in hair in healthy, HIV-uninfected adults. Methods A phase I, crossover pharmacokinetic study was performed in 24 HIV-negative adults receiving directly-observed oral tenofovir tablets administered 2, 4, and 7 doses/week for 6 weeks, with a ?3-week break between periods. Small samples of hair were collected after each six-week period and analyzed for tenofovir concentrations. Geometric-mean-ratios compared levels between each pair of dosing conditions. Intensive plasma pharmacokinetic studies were performed during the daily-dosing period to calculate areas-under-the-time-concentration curves (AUCs). Results Over 90% of doses were observed per protocol. Median tenofovir concentrations in hair increased monotonically with dose. A log-linear relationship was seen between dose and hair levels, with an estimated 76% (95% CI 60–93%) increase in hair level per 2-fold dose increase. Tenofovir plasma AUCs modestly predicted drug concentrations in hair. Conclusions This study found a strong linear relationship between frequency of dosing and tenofovir levels in scalp hair. The analysis of quantitative drug levels in hair has the potential to improve adherence measurement in the PrEP field and may be helpful in determining exposure thresholds for protection and explaining failures in PrEP trials. Hair measures for adherence monitoring may also facilitate adherence measurement in real-world settings and merit further investigation in upcoming PrEP implementation studies and programs. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov +NCT00903084. PMID:24421901

  2. Primary oral soft tissue angiosarcoma of the cheek: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Samaila, Modupe; Edaigbini, Sunday; Agbara, Rowlan; Okeke, Uche Albert

    2015-01-01

    Angiosarcoma is a rare and aggressive malignant tumor that has a poor prognosis. It represents less than 1% of all malignancies occurring in the oral cavity and salivary glands. We present a 35-year-old male with angiosarcoma of the cheek following traumatic injury and a review of the current literature. PMID:26568931

  3. Investigation of infrared Fourier-Transform spectroscopy for oral cancer detection 

    E-print Network

    Cooney, Kevin Michael

    1998-01-01

    and one for benign lesions in soft oral tissue (i.e. inflammation) was used. After tissue transform-nation in the malignant and benign cases and when no transformation occurred (i.e. healthy), the animals were euthanized and the malignant, inflamed...

  4. Incidence of Subsequent Cholangiocarcinomas After Another Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Kai; Jiang, Wen; Liu, Jieqiong; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) characterized by late diagnosis and poor outcomes represents the commonest malignancy of biliary tract. Understanding metachronous cancer associations may achieve earlier detection. We aimed to evaluate the risk of subsequent CCAs among common cancer survivors. The National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database (1973–2010) was reviewed for patients with 1 of the 25 primary cancers. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated as an approximation of relative risk for subsequent CCAs after primary malignancy. Data were stratified by age at primary cancer diagnosis, latency period, and application of radiation. A total of 1487 patients developed subsequent CCAs. For patients diagnosed with primary cancers between the ages 20 and 39 years, the risk was increased among colon (SIR 14.65), gallbladder (129.29), and uterus (7.29) cancer survivors. At ages of 40 to 59 years, oral cavity and pharynx (1.89), stomach (3.24), colon (1.76), gallbladder (11.78), and lung cancers (1.75) were associated with increased risk. We found persistently elevated SIRs after colon and gallbladder cancer between ages 60 and 79 years. The SIR remained significant among gallbladder cancer survivors diagnosed after 80 years. Gallbladder cancer showed elevated risk at all of the latency periods except first 6 to 11 months. Increased risk of lung cancer (1.66) was detected after 120 months. However, radiation therapy did not contribute to increased risk. This population-based study suggests that several initial cancers are associated with elevated risk of CCA. The increased risk may be due to shared genetic or environmental etiological factors between these malignancies. Lower threshold for CCA surveillance may be warranted in high-risk patients. PMID:25715268

  5. Oral Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gallus, Alexander S.; Wittkowsky, Ann; Crowther, Mark; Hylek, Elaine M.; Palareti, Gualtiero

    2012-01-01

    Background: The objective of this article is to summarize the published literature concerning the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral anticoagulant drugs that are currently available for clinical use and other aspects related to their management. Methods: We carried out a standard review of published articles focusing on the laboratory and clinical characteristics of the vitamin K antagonists; the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate; and the direct factor Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban Results: The antithrombotic effect of each oral anticoagulant drug, the interactions, and the monitoring of anticoagulation intensity are described in detail and discussed without providing specific recommendations. Moreover, we describe and discuss the clinical applications and optimal dosages of oral anticoagulant therapies, practical issues related to their initiation and monitoring, adverse events such as bleeding and other potential side effects, and available strategies for reversal. Conclusions: There is a large amount of evidence on laboratory and clinical characteristics of vitamin K antagonists. A growing body of evidence is becoming available on the first new oral anticoagulant drugs available for clinical use, dabigatran and rivaroxaban. PMID:22315269

  6. Investigating the biological properties of carbohydrate derived fulvic acid (CHD-FA) as a potential novel therapy for the management of oral biofilm infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A number of oral diseases, including periodontitis, derive from microbial biofilms and are associated with increased antimicrobial resistance. Despite the widespread use of mouthwashes being used as adjunctive measures to control these biofilms, their prolonged use is not recommended due to various side effects. Therefore, alternative broad-spectrum antimicrobials that minimise these effects are highly sought after. Carbohydrate derived fulvic acid (CHD-FA) is an organic acid which has previously demonstrated to be microbiocidal against Candida albicans biofilms, therefore, the aims of this study were to evaluate the antibacterial activity of CHD-FA against orally derived biofilms and to investigate adjunctive biological effects. Methods Minimum inhibitory concentrations were evaluated for CHD-FA and chlorhexidine (CHX) against a range of oral bacteria using standardised microdilution testing for planktonic and sessile. Scanning electron microscopy was also employed to visualise changes in oral biofilms after antimicrobial treatment. Cytotoxicity of these compounds was assessed against oral epithelial cells, and the effect of CHD-FA on host inflammatory markers was assessed by measuring mRNA and protein expression. Results CHD-FA was highly active against all of the oral bacteria tested, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, with a sessile minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.5%. This concentration was shown to kill multi-species biofilms by approximately 90%, levels comparable to that of chlorhexidine (CHX). In a mammalian cell culture model, pretreatment of epithelial cells with buffered CHD-FA was shown to significantly down-regulate key inflammatory mediators, including interleukin-8 (IL-8), after stimulation with a multi-species biofilm. Conclusions Overall, CHD-FA was shown to possess broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, with a supplementary function of being able to down-regulate inflammation. These properties offer an attractive spectrum of function from a naturally derived compound, which could be used as an alternative topical treatment strategy for oral biofilm diseases. Further studies in vitro and in vivo are required to determine the precise mechanism by which CHD-FA modulates the host immune response. PMID:24063298

  7. Genomic DNA Copy Number Aberrations, Histological Diagnosis, Oral Subsite and Aneuploidy in OPMDs/OSCCs

    PubMed Central

    Monticone, Massimiliano; Malacarne, Davide; Cirmena, Gabriella; Brown, David; Aiello, Cinzia; Maffei, Massimo; Marino, Roberto; Giaretti, Walter; Pentenero, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs) characterized by the presence of dysplasia and DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs), may reflect chromosomal instability (CIN) and predispose to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Early detection of OPMDs with such characteristics may play a crucial role in OSCC prevention. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between CNAs, histological diagnosis, oral subsite and aneuploidy in OPMDs/OSCCs. Samples from OPMDs and OSCCs were processed by high-resolution DNA flow cytometry (hr DNA-FCM) to determine the relative nuclear DNA content. Additionally, CNAs were obtained for a subset of these samples by genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) using DNA extracted from either diploid or aneuploid nuclei suspension sorted by FCM. Our study shows that: i) aneuploidy, global genomic imbalance (measured as the total number of CNAs) and specific focal CNAs occur early in the development of oral cancer and become more frequent at later stages; ii) OPMDs limited to tongue (TNG) mucosa display a higher frequency of aneuploidy compared to OPMDs confined to buccal mucosa (BM) as measured by DNA-FCM; iii) TNG OPMDs/OSCCs show peculiar features of CIN compared to BM OPMDs/OSCCs given the preferential association with total broad and specific focal CNA gains. Follow-up studies are warranted to establish whether the presence of DNA aneuploidy and specific focal or broad CNAs may predict cancer development in non-dysplastic OPMDs. PMID:26540282

  8. Oral dirofilariasis.

    PubMed

    Desai, R S; Pai, N; Nehete, A P; Singh, J S

    2015-01-01

    Dirofilaria is parasitic nematodes of domestic and wild animals that can infect humans accidentally via vectors. Its occurrence in the oral cavity is extremely rare. The most frequent presentation of human dirofilariasis is a single submucosal nodule without signs of inflammation. We hereby, report a case of human dirofilariasis affecting the buccal mucosa in a 32-year-old farmer caused by D. repens. PMID:26470974

  9. Hematologic malignancies: at the forefront of immunotherapeutic innovation

    PubMed Central

    Bachireddy, Pavan; Burkhardt, Ute E.; Rajasagi, Mohini; Wu, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    The recent successes of cancer immunotherapy have stimulated interest for the potential widespread application of these approaches; hematologic malignancies have provided both initial proofs-of-concept and an informative testing ground for a variety of immune-based therapeutics. The immune-cell origin of many of the blood malignancies provides a unique opportunity to both understand the mechanisms of human immune-responsiveness and immune-evasion as well as to exploit the unique therapeutic opportunities they provide. PMID:25786696

  10. Comparative study of protoporphyrin IX fluorescence image enhancement methods to improve an optical imaging system for oral cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ching-Fen; Wang, Chih-Yu; Chiang, Chun-Ping

    2011-07-01

    Optoelectronics techniques to induce protoporphyrin IX fluorescence with topically applied 5-aminolevulinic acid on the oral mucosa have been developed to noninvasively detect oral cancer. Fluorescence imaging enables wide-area screening for oral premalignancy, but the lack of an adequate fluorescence enhancement method restricts the clinical imaging application of these techniques. This study aimed to develop a reliable fluorescence enhancement method to improve PpIX fluorescence imaging systems for oral cancer detection. Three contrast features, red-green-blue reflectance difference, R/B ratio, and R/G ratio, were developed first based on the optical properties of the fluorescence images. A comparative study was then carried out with one negative control and four biopsy confirmed clinical cases to validate the optimal image processing method for the detection of the distribution of malignancy. The results showed the superiority of the R/G ratio in terms of yielding a better contrast between normal and neoplastic tissue, and this method was less prone to errors in detection. Quantitative comparison with the clinical diagnoses in the four neoplastic cases showed that the regions of premalignancy obtained using the proposed method accorded with the expert's determination, suggesting the potential clinical application of this method for the detection of oral cancer.

  11. Oral Mucosal Lesions Associated with Smokers and Chewers – A Case-Control Study in Chennai Population

    PubMed Central

    Masthan, Mahaboob Kader; Narayanasamy, Aravindha Babu

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives To determine the association of oral mucosal lesions in a group of Chennai population aged 15 years and above with smoking and chewing habits. To also determine the dose-response relationship of these habits associated with the risk of oral mucosal lesions. Materiala and Methods The study was undertaken with 450 subjects with smoking and/or chewing habits aged 15 years and over gathered through random selection in Chennai, India. Subjects with alcohol intake were excluded from the study. Based on the habits the study group was categorized into smokers, chewers and mixed (smoking+chewing). One hundred and fifty subjects diagnosed with oral mucosal lesions designated as “cases” and 300 lesion-free “controls”, frequency matched for age, sex, habit and family income were assessed during the study. The study protocol included a visual oral soft tissue examination and a questionnaire-based interview. In addition, those requiring further examination, scalpel biopsies were performed to establish a definitive diagnosis. Results Irrespective of the type of habit, 78% of cases smoked and/or chewed for more than 10 years as compared to 37.4% of the control group. Similarly, 71.3% of cases smoked and/or chewed more than 5 times per day as compared to 25.6% of the control group. Eleven habits related mucosal lesions of the oral cavity were encountered. Smoker’s melanosis was the most common oral mucosal lesion followed by Oral submucous fibrosis and Leukoplakia. Dose-response relationships were observed for both duration and frequency of habits on the risk of oral mucosal lesions. Conclusion The result of the present study provides information on the association of oral mucosal lesions in smokers, chewers and patients with mixed habits. The mucosal lesions encountered included a few potentially malignant conditions and oral squamous cell carcinoma. Habits were more prevalent in men thus more lesions were encountered in males than in females. Moreover, increase in the duration and frequency of habits was significant predictors of risk in the case population. PMID:26393198

  12. The malignant primate?

    PubMed

    de Grouchy, J

    1991-01-01

    Speciation and carcinogenesis result from genomic instability at the gametic or at the somatic levels. After an infinity of trials they occur, by chromosome rearrangements, in single individuals or in single cells and evolve by similar chromosomal or clonal evolutions. Loss of heterozygosity for the first event is essential in both processes: in evolution, a chromosomal rearrangement, a pericentric inversion or a Robertsonian fusion, must become homozygous to ensure a reproductive barrier for a new species; Knudson's two-event sequence is a similar situation in cancer. Position effect is equally important: we have shown overexpression of the SOD1 gene in the orangutan phylum probably by an intrachromosomal rearrangement; the t(9;22) in CML acts by typical position effect. Parental imprinting underlies the evolution of genome function and the unset of certain cancers. Evolution and malignancy are interweaved by viruses and oncogenes since the dawn of life. Cancer uses its intelligence to expand and to destroy the other tissues, using subtle metabolic pathways and a variety of tricks to metastasize other cells. It always wins but saws the branch on which it sits. Mankind also grows exponentially, killing thousands of other species, poisoning the oceans and soft waters, polluting the atmosphere, all for his egoistic needs. Man also travels and metastasizes other Earths. He modifies his genome or that of other species, and develops new technologies for his reproduction. He can destroy the planet in an eyeblink. To be or not to be the malignant primate, that will be the dilemma for the 21st Century. PMID:1809219

  13. [Oral cavity cancer: epidemiology and early diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Ghantous, Y; Yaffi, V; Abu-Elnaaj, I

    2015-07-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity (Oral cancer) is the 11th most common malignancy in the world, despite the general global trend of a slight decrease in the incidence of oral cancer, tongue cancer incidence is increasing. About 90% of tumors are subtyped to oral Squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The incidence and mortality of this tumor shows variability according to the geographic location in which it is diagnosed, however in the last decade an increase was seen in the percentage of young patients, especially patients with tongue cancer. The overall prognosis of this cancer is roughly 55-65%, this is probably due to late diagnosis. Early diagnosis of oral cancer is the most important factor affecting the overall survival and prognosis, thus several diagnosis methods have been developed in the past few years. Still, the prognosis did not improve as expected. Oral cancer biomarkers in saliva is as easy body fluid, for noninvasive detection. Several researches identified several possible biomarkers, but none was specific. In our review, the incidence and mortality of oral tumors pose a main health problem in many aspects all around the world, as well as differences in behavior of these tumors. We witnessed more cases of anterior tongue cancers affecting mainly the young age patient group, a two decades younger than the normal risk group of oral cancer. Several countries in Europe showed a significant increase of oral cancer prevalence, such as Germany, especially in men. Similar behavior was also reported in the United States, which showed a change in the risk groups. Studies have reported an alarming lack of awareness about oral cancer, its symptoms and early diagnosis. These gaps in knowledge need to be addressed by further public education, possibly targeted at high-risk groups. With the knowledge of possible, specific, early biomarkers, primary detection could improve the prognosis tremendously. Research on the salivary biomarkers of the disease would help to develop screening programs tailored more to the risk groups. PMID:26548152

  14. Oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma: role of pretreatment imaging and its influence on management.

    PubMed

    Arya, S; Rane, P; Deshmukh, A

    2014-09-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the commonest malignancy in the oral cavity. The oral cavity has several subsites. Knowledge of the patterns of disease spread at each subsite with the impact on treatment and prognosis provides a deeper understanding of the role of imaging. Information from imaging helps accurate staging, assess resectability, and plan multimodality treatment. Mandibular erosion, posterior soft tissue extent, and perineural spread influence treatment and prognosis in gingival, buccal, and retromolar trigone (RMT) cancers. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) with multiplanar reformations and bone and soft tissue algorithms provides the highest specificity for bone erosion. Hard palate SCC is optimally imaged with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect perineural spread. In oral tongue and floor of the mouth (FOM) SCC, extrinsic muscle invasion, extension across the midline, extent of posterior and inferior spread, and proximity to the hyoid are issues that impact therapeutic options. Contrast-enhanced MRI is the optimal imaging method for staging the primary due to its superior soft tissue resolution. In oral tongue SCCs with tumour thickness ?4 mm, elective neck dissection can be avoided. For nodal staging (N-staging), all imaging methods are comparable, but fall short of surgical staging. Sentinel lymph node biopsy has a promising role in N-staging. Positron emission tomography (PET)/integrated PET/CT has no role in evaluating the clinically negative neck. PET/CT has a role in pretreatment evaluation of advanced oral cavity SCC for depicting distant metastases and for mapping nodal extent in the clinically positive neck. Diffusion-weighted MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, and CT perfusion have a potential role as baseline pretreatment studies for response assessment to chemoradiation in advanced oral cavity SCC. PMID:24908285

  15. In situ carcinoma developed over oral lichen planus: a case report with analysis of BUB3, p16, p53, Ki67 and SOX4 expression.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Eduardo Augusto; Lia, Erica Negrini; Macedo, Sergio Bruzadelli; Amorim, Rivadavio Fernandes Batista de

    2015-08-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) represents a common mucocutaneous disease. Various authors have suggested that OLP has malignant potential; however, the mechanisms involved in malignant transformation have not yet been elucidated. A 79-year-old man presented a white lesion for five months in the buccal mucosa diagnosed as OLP. After two months using 0.05% clobetasol ointment for treatment, the lesion became ulcerated. A new biopsy of the same lesion was performed, and histological analysis showed an in situ oral carcinoma (ISOC). An immunohistochemistry panel was performed, and p16 expression was negative in OLP, however, it showed weak cytoplasmic staining in ISOC. There was strong nuclear BUB3 staining in both OLP and ISOC areas. p53 showed less intense nuclear staining in both regions. Ki67 was negative in OLP area, but showed nuclear staining in the ISOC. SOX4 was negative in both studied areas. BUB3 expression, first reported in this case, and the p16 expression may suggest some influence of these genes on pathogenesis or malignant potential of OLP. PMID:26398519

  16. In situ carcinoma developed over oral lichen planus: a case report with analysis of BUB3, p16, p53, Ki67 and SOX4 expression

    PubMed Central

    ROSA, Eduardo Augusto; Erica Negrini, LIA; MACEDO, Sergio Bruzadelli; de AMORIM, Rivadavio Fernandes Batista

    2015-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) represents a common mucocutaneous disease. Various authors have suggested that OLP has malignant potential; however, the mechanisms involved in malignant transformation have not yet been elucidated. A 79-year-old man presented a white lesion for five months in the buccal mucosa diagnosed as OLP. After two months using 0.05% clobetasol ointment for treatment, the lesion became ulcerated. A new biopsy of the same lesion was performed, and histological analysis showed an in situ oral carcinoma (ISOC). An immunohistochemistry panel was performed, and p16 expression was negative in OLP, however, it showed weak cytoplasmic staining in ISOC. There was strong nuclear BUB3 staining in both OLP and ISOC areas. p53 showed less intense nuclear staining in both regions. Ki67 was negative in OLP area, but showed nuclear staining in the ISOC. SOX4 was negative in both studied areas. BUB3 expression, first reported in this case, and the p16 expression may suggest some influence of these genes on pathogenesis or malignant potential of OLP. PMID:26398519

  17. Management of ascites due to gastrointestinal malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Muhammad W.; Siddiqui, Imran A. P.; Sohail, Muhammad A.

    2009-01-01

    Ascites is the pathological accumulation of fluid within the abdominal cavity. The most common cancers associated with ascites are adenocarcinomas of the ovary, breast, colon, stomach and pancreas. Symptoms include abdominal distension, nausea, vomiting, early satiety, dyspnea, lower extremity edema, weight gain and reduced mobility. There are many potential causes of ascites in cancer patients, including peritoneal carcinomatosis, malignant obstruction of draining lymphatics, portal vein thrombosis, elevated portal venous pressure from cirrhosis, congestive heart failure, constrictive pericarditis, nephrotic syndrome and peritoneal infections. Depending on the clinical presentation and expected survival, a diagnostic evaluation is usually indicated as it will impact both prognosis and the treatment approach. Key tests include serum albumin and protein and a simultaneous diagnostic paracentesis, checking ascitic fluid, WBCs, albumin, protein and cytology. Median survival after diagnosis of malignant ascites is in the range of 1 to 4 months; survival is apt to be longer for ovarian and breast cancers if systemic anti-cancer treatments are available. PMID:19700895

  18. Serum lipid profile in oral submucous fibrosis: A clinico pathological study

    PubMed Central

    Kanthem, Ranjith Kumar; Guttikonda, Venkateswar Rao

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lipids play a key role in the maintenance of cell integrity. These are major cell membrane components essential for various biological functions, including cell growth and division of normal and malignant tissues. Abnormal changes have long been associated with alterations in lipid profile. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the alterations in lipid profile in oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) patients and to compare the levels with respect to the clinical staging and histological grading. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients of OSMF, diagnosed clinically and histopathologically, were included as the study subjects. A group of 50 age and sex matched normal subjects without any oral pernicious habits were taken as controls. The serum lipid profile consisting of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TGs), high density lipoprotein (HDL), very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) were analyzed using Erba Chem-5 Plus Analyzer. Results: Serum TC, HDL and LDL levels were significantly decreased in OSMF patients as compared to controls. As the clinical stage progresses, the TC and HDL levels were gradually reduced. All the lipid profile parameters such as TC, TG, HDL, VLDL and LDL progressively reduced as the histological grade advanced. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that there is an inverse relationship between lipid profile and the presence of OSMF. The decreased serum lipid profile may be considered as a useful indicator for initial changes occurring in the cells of potentially malignant disorders like OSMF.

  19. Micronuclei Frequencies and Nuclear Abnormalities in Oral Exfoliated Cells of Nuclear Power Plant Workers

    PubMed Central

    Babannavar, Roopa; Lohra, Abhishek; Kodgi, Ashwin; Bapure, Sunil; Rao, Yogesh; J., Arun; Malghan, Manjunath

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Biomonitoring provides a useful tool to estimate the genetic risk from exposure to genotoxic agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequencies of Micronuclei (MN) and other Nuclear abnormalities (NA) from exfoliated oral mucosal cells in Nuclear Power Station (NPS) workers. Materials and Methods: Micronucleus frequencies in oral exfoliated cells were done from individuals not known to be exposed to either environmental or occupational carcinogens (Group I). Similarly samples were obtained from full-time Nuclear Power Station (NPS) workers with absence of Leukemia and any malignancy (Group II) and workers diagnosed as leukemic patients and undergoing treatment (Group III). Results: There was statistically significant difference between Group I, Group II & Group III. MN and NA frequencies in Leukemic Patients were significantly higher than those in exposed workers &control groups (p < 0.05). Conclusion: MN and other NA reflect genetic changes, events associated with malignancies. Therefore, there is a need to educate those who work in NPS about the potential hazard of occupational exposure and the importance of using protective measures. PMID:25654022

  20. Retroperitoneal Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumour: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Deger, Ayse Nur; Bayar, Mehmet Akif; Caydere, Muzaffer; Deger, Hakki; Tayfur, Mahir

    2015-09-01

    Malignant nerve sheath tumours (MPNST) are rare neoplasias and retroperitoneal cases are fairly rare and clinically difficult to be detected, but they are very agressive neoplasias. MPNST are frequently seen in head, neck and upper extremities. In patients with NF1; MPNST, a poor-prognostic lesion, may result from a malignant degeneration of a former plexiform neurofibroma. It is necessary to be aware of a potential malignancy in patients diagnosed with plexiform neurofibroma. We present a 21-year-old female with a diagnosis of MPNST. The patient was admited to the hospital because of a tumour in the subcutaneous region on her left buttock. The surgeon's clinical diagnosis was lipoma. After the pathological examination of biopsy specimen, the lesion was identified as "plexiform neurofibroma" and then the patient was diagnosed with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1). Simultaneously, another mass on the retroperitoneal region was identified as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST). PMID:26500915

  1. Retroperitoneal Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumour: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bayar, Mehmet Akif; Caydere, Muzaffer; Deger, Hakki; Tayfur, Mahir

    2015-01-01

    Malignant nerve sheath tumours (MPNST) are rare neoplasias and retroperitoneal cases are fairly rare and clinically difficult to be detected, but they are very agressive neoplasias. MPNST are frequently seen in head, neck and upper extremities. In patients with NF1; MPNST, a poor-prognostic lesion, may result from a malignant degeneration of a former plexiform neurofibroma. It is necessary to be aware of a potential malignancy in patients diagnosed with plexiform neurofibroma. We present a 21-year-old female with a diagnosis of MPNST. The patient was admited to the hospital because of a tumour in the subcutaneous region on her left buttock. The surgeon’s clinical diagnosis was lipoma. After the pathological examination of biopsy specimen, the lesion was identified as “plexiform neurofibroma” and then the patient was diagnosed with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1). Simultaneously, another mass on the retroperitoneal region was identified as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST). PMID:26500915

  2. Endogenous fluorescence of normal and malignant fibroblast cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Nili; Chaims, Orna; Ilovitz, Efrat; Mark, Shlomo; Goppas, Jacob; Salman, Ahmad; Cohen, Beny; Mordechai, Shaul

    2000-11-01

    Light-induced Fluorescence (LIF) technique is based on fluorescence emitted from intracellular chromophores upon illumination of cells by monochromatic light. We compared LIF emitted from a pair of normal and malignant murine cell lines, differing in H-ras expression. The malignant cells fluoresced significantly less than the normal cells, upon excitation at 290 +/- 10 nm. For both cell types, fluorescence decreased with decreasing cell concentration, but at each concentration, the normal cells fluoresced more than the malignant cells. The effect of viability and metabolic stage of the cells on this pattern was compared. The difference among the cells was not due to a difference in protein or DNA content. Thus, this model system demonstrates the specific contribution of H-ras to sub-cellular chromophores, resulting in a significant difference in their autofluorescence intensity, while measuring both emission and excitation scans. This study suggests a potential use of the LIF technique to distinguish between normal and malignant cells and tissues.

  3. Role of abnormal Langerhans cells in oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Shyamsundar Vidya; Aravindha, Babu; Leena, Sankari; Balachander, Nandagopal; Malathi, Letchumana Kumar; Masthan, Mahaboob Kadar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), although initiated by tobacco carcinogens, their progression is due to inability of Langerhans cells (LCs) to detect these abnormal cells and promote lymphocytes to destroy these cells. We assessed and quantified the tumor associated LCs and inflammation in OED and OSCC to understand their role. Materials and Methods: Fifty-five microscopic sections were assessed (27 OED and 28 OSCC). The LCs were detected using S-100 immunohistochemical marker. The number of tumor associated LCs were counted. The presence of abnormal appearing large cells and its relation to histopathologic grade and inflammation was assessed. Results: Significant increase in the LC count was observed in OSCC when compared to dysplasia. Large, abnormal appearing cells were observed in dysplasia and carcinomas however, these were more pronounced in moderate dysplasia and poorly-differentiated carcinomas. The presence of these abnormal appearing cells was associated with decrease in lymphocytic infiltrate. Conclusion: The present study indicates more LC are recruited into the carcinoma. These accumulated nonfunctional LC in the tumor tissue are indicative of aggressive tumor with potential malignant transformation. PMID:26604600

  4. [Not diagnosable malignant melanomas].

    PubMed

    Neuber, H; Lippold, A; Hundeiker, M

    1991-04-01

    Of the 3574 malignant melanomas treated in Hornheide between December 1981 and August 1990 (not including preinvasive cases) 97 were not immediately recognized. These tumours did not look like melanomas. In 72% they were smaller than 10 mm in diameter, and in 20%, smaller than 5 mm. Clark's so often quoted "pencil rule" should no longer be used as an aid to exclusion of invasive melanoma. Localization of the unrecognized melanomas was on the head and neck in 22% of cases. In 37%, the patients were under the age of 40 years. No less than 25% of the patients had multiple melanomas. Many of these melanomas. Many of these melanomas were thin tumours (less than 0.75 mm in 55% and less than 1.5 mm in 77%). This explains why more than 50% of the lesions are described as "macules". The most common incorrect diagnoses were dysplastic naevi (44%) and common (23%) naevi. The most important anamnestic criteria are the patients' own statements about changes in size, colour and shape. These "dynamic" elements must be more carefully observed and documented during process of the clinical diagnosis. PMID:1860796

  5. Urban legends series: oral leukoplakia.

    PubMed

    Arduino, P G; Bagan, J; El-Naggar, A K; Carrozzo, M

    2013-10-01

    To date, the term oral leukoplakia (OL) should be used to recognize 'predominantly white plaques of questionable risk, having excluded (other) known diseases or disorders that carry no increased risk of cancer'. In this review, we addressed four controversial topics regarding oral leukoplakias (OLs): (i) Do tobacco and alcohol cause OLs?, (ii) What percentage of OLs transform into oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC)?, (iii) Can we distinguish between premalignant and innocent OLs?, and (iv) Is proliferative verrucous leukoplakia (PVL) a specific entity or just a form of multifocal leukoplakia? Results of extensive literature search suggest that (i) no definitive evidence for direct causal relationship between smoked tobacco and alcohol as causative factors of OLs, (ii and iii) the vast majority of OLs follow a benign course and do not progress into a cancer, and no widely accepted and/or validated clinical and/or biological factors can predict malignant transformation, and (iv) the distinction between multifocal/multiple leukoplakias and PVL in their early presentation is impossible; the temporal clinical progression and the high rate of recurrences and development of cancer of PVL are the most reliable features for diagnosis. PMID:23379968

  6. Evaluation of premalignant and malignant lesions by fluorescent light (VELscope)

    PubMed Central

    Sawan, Dania; Mashlah, Ammar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was the early detection of premalignant and malignant oral soft lesions by fluorescent light (VELscope). Materials and Methods: A total of 748 patients were evaluated through clinical and fluorescent light analysis of the entire oral cavity. Any lesion that was detected underwent a surgical excision biopsy as the golden standard for the detection of the lesion's histology; then a comparison was made between the results to assure the efficacy of the fluorescent light analysis outcome. Results: About 9.4% of the lesions detected were abnormal lesions and 83.09% had loss of fluorescent light effect. Based on the use of surgical biopsy, the machine had a sensitivity of 74.1% and a specificity of 96.3%. According to the statistical analysis, the P value was much lower than 0.05, so we can conclude that at 95% confidence level, there was significant agreement between VELscope results and biopsy results. Kappa coefficient value was approximately 0.5, which means that the strength of the agreement was medium. Conclusion: VELscope can be used as a clinical diagnostic aid in the detection of premalignant and malignant lesions of the oral cavity. In addition, it helps in the detection of the borders in both surgical biopsy and surgical excision. PMID:26236687

  7. Oral Sex, Oral Health and Orogenital Infections

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Rajiv; Saini, Santosh; Sharma, Sugandha

    2010-01-01

    Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active male-female and same-gender couples of various ages, including adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus and analingus. Oral sex is infrequently examined in research on adolescents; oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital pathogens. Oral health has a direct impact on the transmission of infection; a cut in your mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of infection. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection and safer sex precautions. There are various methods of preventing infection during oral sex such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues and oral hygiene and dental issues. The lesions or unhealthy periodontal status of oral cavity accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex. PMID:20300419

  8. Recurrent genomic alterations in sequential progressive leukoplakia and oral cancer: drivers of oral tumorigenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Cervigne, Nilva K.; Machado, Jerry; Goswami, Rashmi S.; Sadikovic, Bekim; Bradley, Grace; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Galloni, Natalie Naranjo; Gilbert, Ralph; Gullane, Patrick; Irish, Jonathan C.; Jurisica, Igor; Reis, Patricia P.; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    A significant proportion (up to 62%) of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) may arise from oral potential malignant lesions (OPMLs), such as leukoplakia. Patient outcomes may thus be improved through detection of lesions at a risk for malignant transformation, by identifying and categorizing genetic changes in sequential, progressive OPMLs. We conducted array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of 25 sequential, progressive OPMLs and same-site OSCCs from five patients. Recurrent DNA copy number gains were identified on 1p in 20/25 cases (80%) with minimal, high-level amplification regions on 1p35 and 1p36. Other regions of gains were frequently observed: 11q13.4 (68%), 9q34.13 (64%), 21q22.3 (60%), 6p21 and 6q25 (56%) and 10q24, 19q13.2, 22q12, 5q31.2, 7p13, 10q24 and 14q22 (48%). DNA losses were observed in >20% of samples and mainly detected on 5q31.2 (35%), 16p13.2 (30%), 9q33.1 and 9q33.29 (25%) and 17q11.2, 3p26.2, 18q21.1, 4q34.1 and 8p23.2 (20%). Such copy number alterations (CNAs) were mapped in all grades of dysplasia that progressed, and their corresponding OSCCs, in 70% of patients, indicating that these CNAs may be associated with disease progression. Amplified genes mapping within recurrent CNAs (KHDRBS1, PARP1, RAB1A, HBEGF, PAIP2, BTBD7) were selected for validation, by quantitative real-time PCR, in an independent set of 32 progressive leukoplakia, 32 OSSCs and 21 non-progressive leukoplakia samples. Amplification of BTBD7, KHDRBS1, PARP1 and RAB1A was exclusively detected in progressive leukoplakia and corresponding OSCC. BTBD7, KHDRBS1, PARP1 and RAB1A may be associated with OSCC progression. Protein–protein interaction networks were created to identify possible pathways associated with OSCC progression. PMID:24403051

  9. A neuroleptic malignant-like syndrome (NMLS) in a patient with Parkinson's disease resolved with rotigotine: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Stefania; Persichino, Lidia; Anticoli, Sabrina; De Pandis, Maria Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Neuroleptic Malignant-Like Syndrome (NMLS) is a rare, but potentially fatal complication of dopaminergic therapy in Parkinson's disease due to a sudden withdrawal of dopaminergic therapy. Here, we describe the case of a 79 years old woman, with 19 years history of Parkinson disease treated with L-dopa, dopamine agonists and MAO inhibitors, whose sudden withdrawal due to lack of therapeutic compliance, led to sudden onset of high fever, muscle rigidity, akinesia, autonomic dysfunction, impaired level of consciousness, respiratory distress and dysphagia with inability to take oral dopaminergic therapy. High blood levels of CPK and myoglobinaemia were found. The patient was treated with transdermal Rotigotine starting from a dose of 2 mg/24 hours, that was rapidly increased to 6 mg/24 hours, leading to resolution of the acute disturbances. PMID:25567468

  10. Targets for Ibrutinib Beyond B Cell Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Berglöf, A; Hamasy, A; Meinke, S; Palma, M; Krstic, A; Månsson, R; Kimby, E; Österborg, A; Smith, C I E

    2015-09-01

    Ibrutinib (Imbruvica™) is an irreversible, potent inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). Over the last few years, ibrutinib has developed from a promising drug candidate to being approved by FDA for the treatment of three B cell malignancies, a truly remarkable feat. Few, if any medicines are monospecific and ibrutinib is no exception; already during ibrutinib's initial characterization, it was found that it could bind also to other kinases. In this review, we discuss the implications of such interactions, which go beyond the selective effect on BTK in B cell malignancies. In certain cases, the outcome of ibrutinib treatment likely results from the combined inhibition of BTK and other kinases, causing additive or synergistic, effects. Conversely, there are also examples when the clinical outcome seems unrelated to inhibition of BTK. Thus, more specifically, adverse effects such as enhanced bleeding or arrhythmias could potentially be explained by different interactions. We also predict that during long-term treatment bone homoeostasis might be affected due to the inhibition of osteoclasts. Moreover, the binding of ibrutinib to molecular targets other than BTK or effects on cells other than B cell-derived malignancies could be beneficial and result in new indications for clinical applications. PMID:26111359

  11. Fertility issues in patients with hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Loren, Alison W

    2015-12-01

    An essential component of a cancer patient's comprehensive care is addressing potential threats to his or her reproductive health. Providers should discuss the risk of infertility with newly diagnosed patients and offer the chance to consult with a reproductive specialist as early as possible. Standard fertility preservation options include embryo or oocyte cryopreservation for women and sperm banking for men; all options for pre-pubertal children are experimental. Patients with hematologic malignancies are a distinct population in whom standard options may present special challenges, and alternative management strategies are being explored. Unique approaches in hematologic malignancy patients include experimental techniques, such as hormonal therapy, referrals to reproductive specialists after cancer treatment, or discontinuation of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy in appropriate chronic myelogenous leukemia patients. Importantly, expedited communication between hematologists and reproductive specialists may greatly enhance the quality of care for these patients. Facilitation of referrals will both improve the quality-of-life and expand the prospect of parenthood in survivors. There are ample opportunities to advance the field of oncofertility through additional research, especially in hematologic malignancy patients. PMID:26637713

  12. Malignant external otitis: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, H.D.; Wolfe, P.; May, M.

    1982-11-01

    Malignant external otitis is an aggressive infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that most often occurs in elderly diabetics. Malignant external otitis often spreads inferiorly from the external canal to involve the subtemporal area and progresses medially towards the petrous apex leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies. The computed tomographic (CT) findings in malignant external otitis include obliteration of the normal fat planes in the subtemporal area as well as patchy destruction of the bony cortex of the mastoid. The point of exit of the various cranial nerves can be identified on CT scans, and the extent of the inflammatory mass correlates well with the clinical findings. Four cases of malignant external otitis are presented. In each case CT provided a good demonstration of involvement of the soft tissues at the base of the skull.

  13. AMG 319 Lymphoid Malignancy FIH

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-16

    Cancer; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Hematologic Malignancies; Hematology; Leukemia; Low Grade Lymphoma; Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Oncology; Oncology Patients; T Cell Lymphoma; Tumors

  14. Ibrutinib for B cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Research over the role of Bruton’s agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK) in B-lymphocyte development, differentiation, signaling and survival has led to better understanding of the pathogenesis of B-cell malignancies. Down-regulation of BTK activity is an attractive novel strategy for treating patients with B-cell malignancies. Ibrutinib (PCI-32765), a potent inhibitor of BTK induces impressive responses in B-cell malignancies through irreversible bond with cysteine-481 in the active site of BTK (TH/SH1 domain) and inhibits BTK phosphorylation on Tyr223. This review discussed in details the role of BTK in B-cell signaling, molecular interactions between B cell lymphoma/leukemia cells and their microenvironment. Clinical trials of the novel BTK inhibitor, ibrutinib (PCI-32765), in B cell malignancies were summarized. PMID:24472371

  15. Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for malignant mesothelioma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  16. [Malignant tumours of the hand].

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Britt Mejer; Rasmussen, Per Joen Svabo; Lausten, Gunnar Schwarz; Jensen, Nina Vendel; Søe, Niels Henrik

    2011-05-30

    Malignant tumours of the hand are rare and are often misdiagnosed. A painful swelling of the hand or digits are often diagnosed with an infection, benign tumours such as ganglion cysts, or arthritis. Wounds that do not heal despite adequate treatment should be biopsied to rule out malignancy. A correct diagnosis without delay is important because the life expectancy, due to a metastasis on the hand or fingers is approximately six months. PMID:21627901

  17. Malignant hyperthermia: a review.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Henry; Pollock, Neil; Schiemann, Anja; Bulger, Terasa; Stowell, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle that presents as a hypermetabolic response to potent volatile anesthetic gases such as halothane, sevoflurane, desflurane, isoflurane and the depolarizing muscle relaxant succinylcholine, and rarely, in humans, to stressors such as vigorous exercise and heat. The incidence of MH reactions ranges from 1:10,000 to 1: 250,000 anesthetics. However, the prevalence of the genetic abnormalities may be as great as one in 400 individuals. MH affects humans, certain pig breeds, dogs and horses. The classic signs of MH include hyperthermia, tachycardia, tachypnea, increased carbon dioxide production, increased oxygen consumption, acidosis, hyperkalaemia, muscle rigidity, and rhabdomyolysis, all related to a hypermetabolic response. The syndrome is likely to be fatal if untreated. An increase in end-tidal carbon dioxide despite increased minute ventilation provides an early diagnostic clue. In humans the syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, while in pigs it is autosomal recessive. Uncontrolled rise of myoplasmic calcium, which activates biochemical processes related to muscle activation leads to the pathophysiologic changes. In most cases, the syndrome is caused by a defect in the ryanodine receptor. Over 400 variants have been identified in the RYR1 gene located on chromosome 19q13.1, and at least 34 are causal for MH. Less than 1 % of variants have been found in CACNA1S but not all of these are causal. Diagnostic testing involves the in vitro contracture response of biopsied muscle to halothane, caffeine, and in some centres ryanodine and 4-chloro-m-cresol. Elucidation of the genetic changes has led to the introduction of DNA testing for susceptibility to MH. Dantrolene sodium is a specific antagonist and should be available wherever general anesthesia is administered. Increased understanding of the clinical manifestation and pathophysiology of the syndrome, has lead to the mortality decreasing from 80 % thirty years ago to <5 % in 2006. PMID:26238698

  18. Retooling Manganese(III) Porphyrin-Based Peroxynitrite Decomposition Catalysts for Selectivity and Oral Activity: A Potential New Strategy for Treating Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Rausaria, Smita; Ghaffari, Mahsa M.E.; Kamadulski, Andrew; Rodgers, Kenny; Bryant, Leesa; Chen, Zhoumou; Doyle, Tim; Shaw, Michael J.; Salvemini, Daniela; Neumann, William L.

    2011-01-01

    Redox-active metalloporphyrins represent the most well characterized class of catalysts capable of attenuating oxidative stress in vivo through the direct interception and decomposition of superoxide and peroxynitrite. While many interesting pharmacological probes have emerged from these studies, few catalysts have been developed with pharmaceutical properties in mind. Herein we describe our efforts to identify new Mn(III)-porphyrin systems with enhanced membrane solubilizing properties. To this end seven new Mn(III)-tetracyclohexenylporphyin (TCHP) analogues 7, 10, 12, 15, 16a–c have been prepared in which the beta-fused cyclohexenyl rings provide a means to shield the charged metal center from the membrane during passive transport. Compounds 7, 15, and 16a–c have been shown to be orally active and potent analgesics in a model of carrageenan-induced thermal hyperalgesia. In addition oral administration of compound 7 (10–100 mg/kg, n = 5) has been shown to dose dependently reverse mechano-allodynia in the CCI model of chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:22082008

  19. Oral Assessment in Mathematics: Implementation and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannone, P.; Simpson, A.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we report the planning and implementation of an oral assessment component in a first-year pure mathematics module of a degree course in mathematics. Our aim was to examine potential barriers to using oral assessments, explore the advantages and disadvantages compared to existing common assessment methods and document the outcomes…

  20. Basic and clinical aspects of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nathanson, L. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the following 10 chapters: The role of oncogenes in the pathogenesis of malignant melanoma; Laminin and fibronectin modulate the metastatic activity of melanoma cells; Structure, function and biosynthesis of ganglioside antigens associated with human tumors derived from the neuroectoderm; Epidemiology of ocular melanoma; Malignant melanoma: Prognostic factors; Endocrine influences on the natural history of human malignant melanoma; Psychosocial factors associated with prognostic indicators, progression, psychophysiology, and tumor-host response in cutaneous malignant melanoma; Central nervous system metastases in malignant melanoma; Interferon trials in the management of malignant melanoma and other neoplasms: an overview; and The treatment of malignant melanoma by fast neutrons.

  1. [Heroin and oral health].

    PubMed

    Brand, H S; Van Zalingen, D; Veerman, E C I

    2009-09-01

    Heroin is a half synthetic opiate with. It is used by a relatively small number of the general population, but relatively frequently by homeless people and prisoners. Since heroin has an inhibitory effect on the nervous system and on breathing, an overdose of heroin can have fatal consequences. Sudden abstinence of heroin results in general discomfort, restlessness, muscle cramps, perspiration, nausea, shivers and goose bumps. Oral effects of heroin include increased risks of caries, periodontitis and bruxism. Saliva has the potential of detecting heroin abuse. PMID:19791491

  2. Reproducibility of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Measurements in Malignant Breast Masses

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Mijung; Yun, Bo La; Ahn, Hye Shin; Kim, Soo Yeon; Kang, Eunyoung; Kim, Sung-Won

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the reproducibility of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements in malignant breast masses, and to determine the influence of mammographic parenchymal density on this reproducibility. Sixty-six patients with magnetic resonance findings of the mass were included. Two breast radiologists measured the ADC of the malignant breast mass and the same area on the contralateral normal breast in each patient twice. The effects of mammographic parenchymal density, histology, and lesion size on reproducibility were also assessed. There was no significant difference in the mean ADC between repeated measurements in malignant breast masses and normal breast tissue. The overall reproducibility of ADC measurements was good in both. The 95% limits of agreement for repeated ADCs were approximately 30.2%-33.4% of the mean. ADC measurements in malignant breast masses were highly reproducible irrespective of mass size, histologic subtype, or coexistence of microcalcifications; however, the measurements tended to be less reproducible in malignant breast masses with extremely dense parenchymal backgrounds. ADC measurements in malignant breast masses are highly reproducible; however, mammographic parenchymal density can potentially influence this reproducibility. PMID:26539016

  3. Oral Contraceptives and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePLUS

    ... endometrial cancer risk? How do oral contraceptives affect cervical cancer risk? How do oral contraceptives affect liver cancer ... oral contraceptives ( 11 ). How do oral contraceptives affect cervical cancer risk? Long-term use of oral contraceptives (5 ...

  4. Risk of secondary solid malignancies after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and preventive strategies.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Janak; Sharma, Priyadarshani; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2015-12-01

    The risk of secondary solid malignancies is increased after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The risk starts at about 10 years after HSCT and continues even 20 years later. The most common secondary malignancies include squamous cell carcinoma of skin, genitourinary tract and oral cavity; lung and breast cancers. The use of total body irradiation or conditioning chemotherapy, chronic graft-versus-host disease and duration since HSCT can influence the risk of secondary solid malignancies. Secondary solid malignancies are common causes of nonrelapse mortality in long-term survivors and may account for up to 10% of late deaths. Avoiding smoking, alcohol use and excess sun exposure may reduce the risk. Cancer prevention guidelines are largely consensus-driven and follow the recommendations for general population. PMID:26551415

  5. Multiparametric MR Imaging in Abdominal Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Luna, Antonio; Pahwa, Shivani; Bonini, Claudio; Alcalá-Mata, Lidia; Wright, Katherine L; Gulani, Vikas

    2016-02-01

    Modern MR imaging protocols can yield both anatomic and functional information for the assessment of hepatobiliary and pancreatic malignancies. Diffusion-weighted imaging is fully integrated into state-of-the-art protocols for tumor detection, characterization, and therapy monitoring. Hepatobiliary contrast agents have gained ground in the evaluation of focal liver lesions during the last years. Perfusion MR imaging is expected to have a central role for monitoring therapy in body tumors treated with antivascular drugs. Approaches such as Magnetic resonance (MR) elastography and (1)H-MR spectroscopy are still confined to research centers, but with the potential to grow in a short time frame. PMID:26613880

  6. A cytomorphometric analysis of oral mucosal changes in tobacco users

    PubMed Central

    Khot, Komal; Deshmane, Swati; Bagri-Manjarekar, Kriti; Warke, Darshana; Kotak, Keyuri

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Tobacco use is the major cause of oral cancer, which is the sixth most common form of malignancy globally. Even in the absence of clinical manifestations, early changes in the oral mucosa can be detected microscopically by exfoliative cytology. The present study aimed to study and compare the cellular changes in the oral mucosa of tobacco users using cytomorphometry. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 subjects were included: 20 without any tobacco use habits, 20 tobacco chewers, 20 smokers, and 20 mishri users. Smears were collected from each subject, fixed, and stained using Papanicolaou stain. All slides were evaluated for nuclear and cytoplasmic changes using image analysis software. Results: Statistically significant decrease in cytoplasmic area and an increase in nuclear area and nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio were observed in tobacco users. Conclusion: Tobacco in any form causes significant cellular changes, which could be the earliest indicators of developing malignant pathology. Exfoliative cytology can be used to detect such changes. PMID:26604613

  7. [Malignancies in patients on dialysis].

    PubMed

    Motán, J; Krízek, M; Fínek, J; Mukensnabl, P

    2005-01-01

    Incidence of malignancies in patients on dialysis is higher than in the comparable population. The topic is discussed from different points of view: A. Malignancy as a cause of renal failure (renal and urinary tract tumors, von Hippel-Lindau disease, Wilms tumor, multiple myeloma, tumors that compress urinary tract). B. Treatment of malignancies may result in renal failure and dialysis (nephrectomy, tumor-lysis syndrome, postradiation fibrosis, direct toxic effect of chemotherapy). C. Dialyzed patients are in higher risk of malignancies, especially those of the kidney and urinary tract but also of pharynx and larynx, thyroid gland etc. The following factors may play some roles: the basic disease, (e.g. analgesic and Balcan nephropathies, China Herba nephropathy etc.), changed metabolic milieu with retention of carcinogens, deficiency of selenium and other substances, acquired renal cysts, compromised immunity, decreased "wash-effect" in oligo-anuria and possible influence of dialysis itself (contact with phtalates, ethylenoxide, nitrosamines etc.). D. Special problems in diagnostics of malignancies. Controversial validity of s.c. "tumor markers" is mentioned. Among the causes of death in dialyzed patients cardiovascular and infectious diseases predominate. The active search for renal and urinary tract tumors should be performed. All other diagnostic procedures depend on the individual patient's risk profile. E. Methods of renal substitution are used in the treatment of malignancies (e.g. dialysis in the tumor-lysis syndrome, plasma filtration to remove paraproteins, intraperitoneal administration of chemotherapy similar to peritoneal dialysis approach). F. Malignant tumors and dialysis--some ethical problems. Withdrawal of dialysis in severely suffering patients should be approved by an informed patient and followed by maximal palliative therapy including palliative ultrafiltration if threat of lung edema occurs. PMID:16013514

  8. Identification and pharmacokinetics of multiple potential bioactive constituents after oral administration of radix astragali on cyclophosphamide-induced immunosuppression in Balb/c mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Menghua; Li, Panlin; Zeng, Xuan; Wu, Huanxian; Su, Weiwei; He, Jingyu

    2015-01-01

    Radix Astragali (RA) is one of the commonly-used traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) with an immunomodulatory effect confirmed in the clinic. In order to better understand the material basis for the therapeutic effects, this study was to investigate the absorbed components and their pharmacokinetic profile after oral administration of RA on cyclophosphamide-induced immunosuppression in Balb/c mice. As a result, 51 compounds in RA extract and 31 prototype compounds with nine metabolites were detected in mice plasma by the ultra-fast liquid chromatography (UFLC)-DAD-Q-TOF-MS/MS method. The pharmacokinetic parameters of five main constituents, including calycosin-7-O-glucoside, ononin, calycosin, formononetin and astragaloside IV, were obtained using HPLC-MS/MS. These results offered useful information for research on the pharmacological mechanism of RA and for its further development. PMID:25751722

  9. Identification and Pharmacokinetics of Multiple Potential Bioactive Constituents after Oral Administration of Radix Astragali on Cyclophosphamide-Induced Immunosuppression in Balb/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Menghua; Li, Panlin; Zeng, Xuan; Wu, Huanxian; Su, Weiwei; He, Jingyu

    2015-01-01

    Radix Astragali (RA) is one of the commonly-used traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) with an immunomodulatory effect confirmed in the clinic. In order to better understand the material basis for the therapeutic effects, this study was to investigate the absorbed components and their pharmacokinetic profile after oral administration of RA on cyclophosphamide-induced immunosuppression in Balb/c mice. As a result, 51 compounds in RA extract and 31 prototype compounds with nine metabolites were detected in mice plasma by the ultra-fast liquid chromatography (UFLC)-DAD-Q-TOF-MS/MS method. The pharmacokinetic parameters of five main constituents, including calycosin-7-O-glucoside, ononin, calycosin, formononetin and astragaloside IV, were obtained using HPLC-MS/MS. These results offered useful information for research on the pharmacological mechanism of RA and for its further development. PMID:25751722

  10. The role of epigenetics in kidney malignancies

    PubMed Central

    la Rosa, Alfredo Harb-De; Acker, Matthew; Swain, Sanjaya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Renal cell carcinomas (RCC) are collectively the third most common type of genitourinary neoplasms, surpassed only by prostate and bladder cancer. Cure rates for renal cell carcinoma are related to tumor grade and stage; therefore, diagnostic methods for early detection and new therapeutic modalities are of paramount importance. Epigenetics can be defined as inherited modifications in gene expression that are not encoded in the DNA sequence itself. Epigenetics may play an important role in the pursuit of early diagnosis, accurate prognostication and identification of new therapeutic targets. Material and methods We used PubMed to conduct a comprehensive search of the English medical literature using search terms including epigenetics, DNA methylation, histone modification, microRNA regulation (miRNA) and RCC. In this review, we discuss the potential application of epigenetics in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of kidney cancer. Results During the last decade, many different types of epigenetic alterations of DNA have been found to be associated with malignant renal tumors. This has led to the research of the diagnostic and prognostic implications of these changes in renal malignancies as well as to the development of novel drugs to target these changes, with the aim of achieving a survival benefit. Conclusions Epigenetics has become a promising field in cancer research. The potential to achieve early detection and accurate prognostication in kidney cancer might be feasible through the application of epigenetics. The possibility to reverse these epigenetic changes with new therapeutic agents motivates researchers to continue pursuing better treatment options for kidney cancer and other malignancies. PMID:26251734

  11. Nested PCR for detection of HSV-1 in oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Jalouli, Miranda-Masoumeh; Jalouli, Jamshid; Hasséus, Bengt; Öhman, Jenny; Hirsch, Jan-Michaél

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been estimated that 15%-20% of human tumours are driven by infection and inflammation, and viral infections play an important role in malignant transformation. The evidence that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) could be involved in the aetiology of oral cancer varies from weak to persuasive. This study aimed to investigate by nested PCR (NPCR) the prevalence of HSV-1 in samples from normal oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia, and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Material and Methods We investigated the prevalence of HSV-1 in biopsies obtained from 26 fresh, normal oral mucosa from healthy volunteers as well as 53 oral leukoplakia and 27 OSCC paraffin-embedded samples. DNA was extracted from the specimens and investigated for the presence of HSV-1 by nested polymerase chain reaction (NPCR) and DNA sequencing. Results HSV-1 was detected in 14 (54%) of the healthy samples, in 19 (36%) of the oral leukoplakia samples, and in 14 (52%) of the OSCC samples. The differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions We observed a high incidence of HSV-1 in healthy oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia, and OSCC tissues. Thus, no connection between OSCC development and presence of HSV-1 was detected. Key words:HSV-1, nested PCR, PCR. PMID:26449432

  12. Metastatic potential of melanoma cells is not affected by electrochemotherapy

    E-print Network

    Ljubljana, University of

    Metastatic potential of melanoma cells is not affected by electrochemotherapy Vesna Todorovica in the treatment of malignant melanoma. However, the effect of electrochemotherapy on the metastatic potential of human malignant melanoma cells. Cells treated by electrochemotherapy with cisplatin were tested

  13. Cyclosporin-A associated malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Durnian, Jonathan M; Stewart, Rosalind MK; Tatham, Richard; Batterbury, Mark; Kaye, Stephen B

    2007-01-01

    The use of cyclosporin is well established within the ophthalmology community, especially against sight threatening intraocular inflammation. It is well known however, that immunosuppression in general is a risk factor for the development of malignancy and numerous studies point to the risk imposed by cyclosporin. This article analyses and reviews all relevant studies with regard to the development of malignancy associated with the use of cyclosporin and extrapolates this into the ophthalmic setting. This is to enable clinicians to assess the risks in individual patients and to present a monitoring regime which can be used in patients undergoing cyclosporin treatment. The review is solely concerned with the risk of the development of malignancy following cyclosporin immunosuppression and not with any other adverse effect. PMID:19668519

  14. Pleomorphism of argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions in oral submucous fibrosis and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Khot, Komal P.; Kotak, Keyuri J.; Bagri-Manjrekar, Kriti; Alex, Sheeba; Choudhari, Sheetal S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) is demonstrated to be useful in diagnostic pathology, mainly to distinguish benign lesions from their malignant counterparts. We aimed to correlate AgNORs pleomorphism with the severity of lesion in oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) using a retrospective study on 45 archival tissues. Materials and Methods: Silver nitrate staining was performed on archival tissues consisting of 20 OSMF and 20 OSCC. Five biopsies from normal oral mucosa acted as a control. One hundred cells per slide were observed for AgNORs dots, which were classified as typical (spherical) and atypical (large, kidney-shaped and clustered). Results: A positive and significant correlation was found between increased atypical shapes and increasing grades of OSMF and OSCC. Conclusions: AgNORs pleomorphism can be a reliable criterion to assess disease severity and progression in OSMF and OSCC.

  15. Decidualized Ovarian Mass Mimicking Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Lufee; Botolahy, Vola; Carteret, Thibault; Marty, Marion; Brun, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Deciduosis classically occurs in the context of known endometriosis in the pelvis, most commonly in the ovaries, but also in the peritoneum. However, ovarian deciduosis outside the context of endometriosis is rare and makes diagnosis difficult, especially as the sonographic appearance suggests a malignant process. We report a case of decidualized ovarian mass in a patient without prior history of endometriosis that mimicked an ovarian malignancy. MRI may be a useful imaging modality to monitor these lesions and guide management. Consultation with a multidisciplinary team accustomed to such conditions will help to tailor the management to each individual. PMID:25960900

  16. Evaluation of Podoplanin in Oral Leukoplakia and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Ashok; Patil, Kishor; Tupsakhare, Suyog; Gabhane, Mahesh; Sonune, Shrikant; Kandalgaonkar, Shilpa

    2015-01-01

    Background. Recent studies have demonstrated that podoplanin was expressed in some dysplastic lesions adjacent to primary oral cancers suggesting that podoplanin expression may occur in early oral tumorigenesis and lymphangiogenesis and therefore is related to tumor growth. The purpose of this study is to determine the role of podoplanin as a biomarker for cancer risk assessment in oral leukoplakia and correlation of podoplanin expression with grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Materials and Methods. In the present retrospective study, podoplanin expression was investigated immunohistochemically in 40 patients each of oral leukoplakia and OSCC. The scores were analyzed statistically using one-way ANOVA test followed by Tukey HSD. Results. By applying one-way ANOVA test, there was a highly significant increase of the podoplanin expression from mild to severe dysplasia and from well to poorly differentiated OSCC (P < 0.01). Statistically highly significant difference was present between scores of mild to moderate dysplasia, moderate to severe dysplasia, well to poorly differentiated OSCC, and moderately to poorly differentiated OSCC (Tukey HSD test, P < 0.01). Conclusion. Podoplanin can be used as a biomarker for early oral tumorigenesis and for malignant transformation risk assessment of premalignant lesions and as a tumor progression biomarker for advanced grades of OSCC. PMID:26558136

  17. Histochemical identification of malignant and premalignant lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebow, Charles; Maloney, M. J.

    1991-06-01

    Malignant and transforming cells can be identified by biochemical parameters which can be used to localize lesions in situ for laser surgery. These cells express unique proteins, proteins in unusual quantities, or other biochemical alterations which can be utilized to image lesions of such cells. Several methods have been identified, both in vitro and in vivo, to identify such lesions. Several antibodies were examined for their properties of tissue identification, including CEA, F36/22, and AE1/AE3. F36/22, an antibody developed by M. T. Chu against human breast cancer cells, associated with two lines of oral cancer (KB and HCPC), and against two naturally occurring human oral squamous cell cancers. CEA, an antibody developed against human colon cancer, also reacted against both cell lines and both pathological samples. AE1/AE3, developed against normal fibrous components, also reacted against the samples, but in a much less regular manner. F36/22 associated with the histologically identifiably most dedifferentiated cells at the leading edge of the invading cancer. CEA, on the other hand, associated with more quiescent, older, established cancer cells. This demonstrates that antibodies developed against cancers of different organs can be used to identify a wide variety of cancers, and may have prognostic value. F36/22 coupled to fluorescein was used to identify oral cancer cells. Other properties of cancers and developing cancers can also be exploited to identify cancers, including their over-expression of tyrosine kinase and tyrosine kinase stimulating hormones such as Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF). A model of premalignant lesion produced in the hamster buccal cheek pouch with 6 week application of DMBA over-expresses constitutive tyrosine kinase which can be demonstrated biochemically. This initiated lesion can be promoted to frank cancer by growth factors released in response to laser surgery. Preliminary results suggest that these lesions can be identified by Photofrin II uptake. This work suggests that biochemical properties of cancers can be used to identify premalignant cells.

  18. Molecular concept in human oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Akhilesh; Singh, Shraddha; Kumar, Vijay; Pal, U. S.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of oral cancer remains high in both Asian and Western countries. Several risk factors associated with development of oral cancer are now well-known, including tobacco chewing, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Cancerous risk factors may cause many genetic events through chromosomal alteration or mutations in genetic material and lead to progression and development of oral cancer through histological progress, carcinogenesis. Oral squamous carcinogenesis is a multistep process in which multiple genetic events occur that alter the normal functions of proto-oncogenes/oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Furthermore, these gene alterations can deregulate the normal activity such as increase in the production of growth factors (transforming growth factor-? [TGF-?], TGF-?, platelet-derived growth factor, etc.) or numbers of cell surface receptors (epidermal growth factor receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor, etc.), enhanced intracellular messenger signaling and mutated production of transcription factors (ras gene family, c-myc gene) which results disturb to tightly regulated signaling pathways of normal cell. Several oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes have been implicated in oral cancer especially cyclin family, ras, PRAD-1, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p53 and RB1. Viral infections, particularly with oncogenic human papilloma virus subtype (16 and 18) and Epstein-Barr virus have tumorigenic effect on oral epithelia. Worldwide, this is an urgent need to initiate oral cancer research programs at molecular and genetic level which investigates the causes of genetic and molecular defect, responsible for malignancy. This approach may lead to development of target dependent tumor-specific drugs and appropriate gene therapy. PMID:26668446

  19. Overexpression of Lipocalins and Pro-Inflammatory Chemokines and Altered Methylation of PTGS2 and APC2 in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas Induced in Rats by 4-Nitroquinoline-1-Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xinjian; Li, Wenping; Johnson, William D.; Torres, Karen E. O.; McCormick, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) induced in F344 rats by 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO) demonstrate considerable phenotypic similarity to human oral cancers. Gene expression studies (microarray and PCR) were coupled with methylation analysis of selected genes to identify molecular markers of carcinogenesis in this model and potential biochemical and molecular targets for oral cancer chemoprevention. Microarray analysis of 11 pairs of OSCC and site-matched phenotypically normal oral tissues from 4-NQO-treated rats identified more than 3500 differentially expressed genes; 1735 genes were up-regulated in rat OSCC versus non-malignant tissues, while 1803 genes were down-regulated. In addition to several genes involved in normal digestion, genes demonstrating the largest fold increases in expression in 4-NQO-induced OSCC include three lipocalins (VEGP1, VEGP2, LCN2) and three chemokines (CCL, CXCL2, CXCL3); both classes are potentially druggable targets for oral cancer chemoprevention and/or therapy. Down-regulated genes in 4-NQO-induced OSCC include numerous keratins and keratin-associated proteins, suggesting that alterations in keratin expression profiles may provide a useful biomarker of oral cancer in F344 rats treated with 4-NQO. Confirming and extending our previous results, PTGS2 (cyclooxygenase-2) and several cyclooxygenase-related genes were significantly up-regulated in 4-NQO-induced oral cancers; up-regulation of PTGS2 was associated with promoter hypomethylation. Rat OSCC also demonstrated increased methylation of the first exon of APC2; the increased methylation was correlated with down-regulation of this tumor suppressor gene. Overexpression of pro-inflammatory chemokines, hypomethylation of PTGS2, and hypermethylation of APC2 may be causally linked to the etiology of oral cancer in this model. PMID:25635769

  20. Overexpression of lipocalins and pro-inflammatory chemokines and altered methylation of PTGS2 and APC2 in oral squamous cell carcinomas induced in rats by 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xinjian; Li, Wenping; Johnson, William D; Torres, Karen E O; McCormick, David L

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) induced in F344 rats by 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO) demonstrate considerable phenotypic similarity to human oral cancers. Gene expression studies (microarray and PCR) were coupled with methylation analysis of selected genes to identify molecular markers of carcinogenesis in this model and potential biochemical and molecular targets for oral cancer chemoprevention. Microarray analysis of 11 pairs of OSCC and site-matched phenotypically normal oral tissues from 4-NQO-treated rats identified more than 3500 differentially expressed genes; 1735 genes were up-regulated in rat OSCC versus non-malignant tissues, while 1803 genes were down-regulated. In addition to several genes involved in normal digestion, genes demonstrating the largest fold increases in expression in 4-NQO-induced OSCC include three lipocalins (VEGP1, VEGP2, LCN2) and three chemokines (CCL, CXCL2, CXCL3); both classes are potentially druggable targets for oral cancer chemoprevention and/or therapy. Down-regulated genes in 4-NQO-induced OSCC include numerous keratins and keratin-associated proteins, suggesting that alterations in keratin expression profiles may provide a useful biomarker of oral cancer in F344 rats treated with 4-NQO. Confirming and extending our previous results, PTGS2 (cyclooxygenase-2) and several cyclooxygenase-related genes were significantly up-regulated in 4-NQO-induced oral cancers; up-regulation of PTGS2 was associated with promoter hypomethylation. Rat OSCC also demonstrated increased methylation of the first exon of APC2; the increased methylation was correlated with down-regulation of this tumor suppressor gene. Overexpression of pro-inflammatory chemokines, hypomethylation of PTGS2, and hypermethylation of APC2 may be causally linked to the etiology of oral cancer in this model. PMID:25635769

  1. Cutaneous metastasis of breast carcinoma mimicking malignant melanoma in scalp

    E-print Network

    Martí, Nuria; Molina, Inmaculada; Monteagudo, Carlos; López, Verónica; García, Laura; Jordá, Esperanza

    2008-01-01

    Cutaneous metastatic carcinoma of the breast mimicking malignant melanoma,Cutaneous pigmented metastasis from breast carcinoma simulating malignant melanoma.Cutaneous metastasis of breast carcinoma mimicking malignant melanoma

  2. R306465 is a novel potent inhibitor of class I histone deacetylases with broad-spectrum antitumoral activity against solid and haematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Arts, J; Angibaud, P; Mariën, A; Floren, W; Janssens, B; King, P; van Dun, J; Janssen, L; Geerts, T; Tuman, R W; Johnson, D L; Andries, L; Jung, M; Janicot, M; van Emelen, K

    2007-01-01

    R306465 is a novel hydroxamate-based histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor with broad-spectrum antitumour activity against solid and haematological malignancies in preclinical models. R306465 was found to be a potent inhibitor of HDAC1 and -8 (class I) in vitro. It rapidly induced histone 3 (H3) acetylation and strongly upregulated expression of p21waf1,cip1, a downstream component of HDAC1 signalling, in A2780 ovarian carcinoma cells. R306465 showed class I HDAC isotype selectivity as evidenced by poor inhibition of HDAC6 (class IIb) confirmed by the absence of downregulation of Hsp90 chaperone c-raf protein expression and tubulin acetylation. This distinguished it from other HDAC inhibitors currently in clinical development that were either more potent towards HDAC6 (e.g. vorinostat) or had a broader HDAC inhibition spectrum (e.g. panobinostat). R306465 potently inhibited cell proliferation of all main solid tumour indications, including ovarian, lung, colon, breast and prostate cancer cell lines, with IC50 values ranging from 30 to 300?nM. Haematological cell lines, including acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, acute myeloid leukaemia, chronic lymphoblastic leukaemia, chronic myeloid leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma, were potently inhibited at a similar concentration range. R306465 induced apoptosis and inhibited angiogenesis in cell-based assays and had potent oral in vivo antitumoral activity in xenograft models. Once-daily oral administration of R306465 at well-tolerated doses inhibited the growth of A2780 ovarian, H460 lung and HCT116 colon carcinomas in immunodeficient mice. The high activity of R306465 in cell-based assays and in vivo after oral administration makes R306465 a promising novel antitumoral agent with potential applicability in a broad spectrum of human malignancies. PMID:18000499

  3. Proton therapy for the treatment of children with CNS malignancies.

    PubMed

    Sreeraman, Radhika; Indelicato, Daniel J

    2014-03-01

    Proton therapy is a novel technique for treating pediatric malignancies. As a tool to reduce normal-tissue dose, it has the potential to decrease late toxicity. Although proton therapy has been used for over five decades, most pediatric dosimetry studies and clinical series have been published over the last 10 years. The purpose of this article is to review the physical, radiobiological and economic rationales for proton therapy in pediatric CNS malignancies, and provide an overview of the current challenges and future direction of research and utilization of this approach. PMID:25055020

  4. Nematode infection mimicking paratesticular malignancy.

    PubMed

    Kallampallil, Jins; Wood, Sarah J; O'Dempsey, Timothy; Craigie, Ross J

    2013-01-01

    Paratesticular swellings pose a diagnostic dilemma due to concerns over malignancy. We present a case of paratesticular swelling in a 13-year-old boy as a result of Dirofilaria immitis infection. The boy presented with a 2-month history of right testicular discomfort associated with an irregular mass within the scrotum. PMID:24326431

  5. Differentiation of benign and malignant

    E-print Network

    Yodh, Arjun G.

    based on large optical data sets. Images of oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentration as well subjects. Malignant can- cers N=41 showed statistically significant higher total hemoglobin, oxy-hemoglobin- bin, oxy-hemoglobin concentration, and scattering exhibited high area under

  6. Malignant skin melanoma in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Materljan, Eris; Zamolo, Gordana; Petkovi?, Marija; Ivosevi?, Dejan; Popovi?, Branislava; Materljan, Mauro; Katunari?, Miljenko; Jurisi?, Davor

    2009-12-01

    Global heating and increased solar ultraviolet irradiance have caused an increase in number of many diseases, particularly skin malignant diseases. Aim of this study was to investigate the influence of climate changes on the health of the population of the Primorsko-goranska and Istria Counties. We gathered and analyzed data about the frequency of skin malignant melanoma in the period of eight years (1998-2005). The data were collected from the Croatian cancer registry. The incidence of malignant skin cancer was estimated overall, by age group and gender. We found that the incidence of the skin melanoma was approximately the same in both counties during the period 1998-2005. However, significant increase has been noted when compared to the situation in the period 1977-1996 (p = 4.95 E-13) The incidence of malignant skin melanoma has risen during the last ten years. It is differently distributed between gender and age groups in Primorsko-goranska and Istria County. It can be related to climate changes, but also to different ways way of life between these two counties. PMID:20102094

  7. The Origin of Malignant Malaria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasmodium falciparum is the causative agent of malignant malaria, which is among the most severe human infectious diseases. Despite its overwhelming significance to human health, the parasite’s origins remain unclear. The favored origin hypothesis holds that P. falciparum and its closest known rel...

  8. Nematode infection mimicking paratesticular malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Kallampallil, Jins; Wood, Sarah J; O'Dempsey, Timothy; Craigie, Ross J

    2013-01-01

    Paratesticular swellings pose a diagnostic dilemma due to concerns over malignancy. We present a case of paratesticular swelling in a 13-year-old boy as a result of Dirofilaria immitis infection. The boy presented with a 2-month history of right testicular discomfort associated with an irregular mass within the scrotum. PMID:24326431

  9. Do We Know What Causes Malignant Mesothelioma?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Next Topic Can malignant mesothelioma be prevented? Do we know what causes malignant mesothelioma? Researchers have found ... genes – the instructions for how our cells function. We usually look like our parents because they are ...

  10. pH-Responsive poly(itaconic acid-co-N-vinylpyrrolidone) hydrogels with reduced ionic strength loading solutions offer improved oral delivery potential for high isoelectric point-exhibiting therapeutic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Koetting, Michael C.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2014-01-01

    pH-Responsive hydrogels comprised of itaconic acid copolymerized with N-vinylpyrrolidone (P(IA-co-NVP)) were synthesized and tested as carriers for the oral delivery of high isoelectric point (pI) exhibiting therapeutic proteins. Swelling studies show that P(IA-co-NVP) hydrogels exhibit significantly greater and faster pH-responsive swelling than previously studied methacrylic acid-based hydrogels, achieving up to 68% greater equilibrium swelling and 10.4 times greater swelling in time-limited experiments. Using salmon calcitonin as a model high pI protein therapeutic, we show that P(IA-co-NVP) hydrogels exhibit significantly greater delivery potential than methacrylic acid-based hydrogels. Additionally, we show that utilizing a lower ionic strength solution during drug loading significantly improves drug delivery potential for high pI therapeutics. By using a 1.5 mM PBS buffer rather than the standard 150 mM PBS buffer during loading, up to 83 times as much calcitonin can be delivered in neutral conditions, with up to a 9.6 fold improvement in percent release. Using P(IA-co-NVP) hydrogel microparticles and a low ionic strength loading solution, up to 48 ?g calcitonin/mg hydrogel can be delivered in small intestinal conditions. Based on expected absorption in the small intestine, this is sufficient delivery potential for achieving therapeutic dosage via a single, regularly-sized pill taken daily. PMID:24853463

  11. Pigmented Pre-malignant and Malignant Lesions of Skin with Special Reference to Atypical Presentations

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Rashmi; Singh, Sneha; Harsh, Meena; Ahmad, Sohaib

    2015-01-01

    Background Cutaneous melanocytic proliferations are diverse both morphologically as well as in their behavioural patterns. Both dermatologists and pathologists regularly encounter diagnostic dilemmas while interpreting such lesions. Aim To study all cutaneous premalignant and malignant lesions with respect to their clinical features and histopathological findings. Materials and Methods A retrospective study was done in the Department of Pathology over a period of 10 years (2004-14) on all the clinically pigmented lesions that were biopsied or excised. Out of these only premalignant and malignant melanocytic lesions were analysed with respect to their important clinical and histologic features. Immunohistochemistry was carried out using HMB-45 and S-100 where indicated. Results A total of 338 skin cancers were reported, out of these 27, 7.9% were cutaneous malignant melanoma. Premalignant lesions were 33. The mean age for premalignant lesions and melanomas was 43 years and 50.7 years respectively with a male predominance in both groups. The sole of foot/ankle was the most common site of involvement by melanoma (n=8,29.6%) while sun exposed sites like face and scalp were common sites for development of premalignant lesions like dysplastic nevi, lentigo simplex, pigmented seborrheic keratosis and Bowens disease. One case presented as post-traumatic scar tissue which turned out to be desmoplastic melanoma. One case of amelanotic melanoma presented as recurrent painful penile ulcers. Both cases were confirmed on Immunohistochemistry. Conclusion All pigmented lesions should be regarded as tumours of uncertain malignant potential and treated with complete excision if possible with long term follow up. PMID:26393132

  12. Pollen grains for oral vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Atwe, Shashwati U.; Ma, Yunzhe; Gill, Harvinder Singh

    2015-01-01

    Oral vaccination can offer a painless and convenient method of vaccination. Furthermore, in addition to systemic immunity it has potential to stimulate mucosal immunity through antigen-processing by the gut-associated lymphoid tissues. In this study we propose the concept that pollen grains can be engineered for use as a simple modular system for oral vaccination. We demonstrate feasibility of this concept by using spores of Lycopodium clavatum (clubmoss) (LSs). We show that LSs can be chemically cleaned to remove native proteins to create intact clean hollow LS shells. Empty pollen shells were successfully filled with molecules of different sizes demonstrating their potential to be broadly applicable as a vaccination system. Using ovalbumin (OVA) as a model antigen, LSs formulated with OVA were orally fed to mice. LSs stimulated significantly higher anti-OVA serum IgG and fecal IgA antibodies compared to those induced by use of cholera toxin as a positive-control adjuvant. The antibody response was not affected by pre-neutralization of the stomach acid, and persisted for up to seven months. Confocal microscopy revealed that LSs can translocate in to mouse intestinal wall. Overall, this study lays the foundation of using LSs as a novel approach for oral vaccination. PMID:25151980

  13. PERCEPTIONS OF RISK OF MALIGNANT MELANOMA SKIN

    E-print Network

    Bateman, Ian J.

    PERCEPTIONS OF RISK OF MALIGNANT MELANOMA SKIN CANCER FROM SUNLIGHT: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF YOUNG OF MALIGNANT MELANOMA SKIN CANCER FROM SUNLIGHT: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF YOUNG PEOPLE IN THE UK AND NEW ZEALAND Research Council (ESRC) ISSN 0967-8875 #12;Abstract Malignant melanoma skin cancer has been increasing

  14. Nicotine Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePLUS

    Nicotine oral inhalation is used to help people stop smoking. Nicotine oral inhalation should be used together with a ... support groups, counseling, or specific behavioral change techniques. Nicotine inhalation is in a class of medications called ...

  15. Nanotechnology applications in hematological malignancies (Review).

    PubMed

    Samir, Ahmed; Elgamal, Basma M; Gabr, Hala; Sabaawy, Hatem E

    2015-09-01

    A major limitation to current cancer therapies is the development of therapy-related side-effects and dose limiting complications. Moreover, a better understanding of the biology of cancer cells and the mechanisms of resistance to therapy is rapidly developing. The translation of advanced knowledge and discoveries achieved at the molecular level must be supported by advanced diagnostic, therapeutic and delivery technologies to translate these discoveries into useful tools that are essential in achieving progress in the war against cancer. Nanotechnology can play an essential role in this aspect providing a transforming technology that can translate the basic and clinical findings into novel diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive tools useful in different types of cancer. Hematological malignancies represent a specific class of cancer, which attracts special attention in the applications of nanotechnology for cancer diagnosis and treatment. The aim of the present review is to elucidate the emerging applications of nanotechnology in cancer management and describe the potentials of nanotechnology in changing the key fundamental aspects of hematological malignancy diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. PMID:26134389

  16. Nanotechnology applications in hematological malignancies (Review)

    PubMed Central

    SAMIR, AHMED; ELGAMAL, BASMA M; GABR, HALA; SABAAWY, HATEM E

    2015-01-01

    A major limitation to current cancer therapies is the development of therapy-related side-effects and dose limiting complications. Moreover, a better understanding of the biology of cancer cells and the mechanisms of resistance to therapy is rapidly developing. The translation of advanced knowledge and discoveries achieved at the molecular level must be supported by advanced diagnostic, therapeutic and delivery technologies to translate these discoveries into useful tools that are essential in achieving progress in the war against cancer. Nanotechnology can play an essential role in this aspect providing a transforming technology that can translate the basic and clinical findings into novel diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive tools useful in different types of cancer. Hematological malignancies represent a specific class of cancer, which attracts special attention in the applications of nanotechnology for cancer diagnosis and treatment. The aim of the present review is to elucidate the emerging applications of nanotechnology in cancer management and describe the potentials of nanotechnology in changing the key fundamental aspects of hematological malignancy diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. PMID:26134389

  17. Prevalence of Oral Mucosal Lesions in Male Smokers and Nonsmokers

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi-Motamayel, Fatemeh; Falsafi, Parisa; Hayati, Zahra; Rezaei, Farzad

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is one of the most important risk factors for the development of oral mucosal lesions such as leukoplakia and hairy tongue. Controversy exists in the literature, however, about the prevalence of oral lesions in smokers. The aim of this study was to evaluate oral lesions in male smokers compared with nonsmokers in Hamadan. A total of 516 male participants were assessed, 258 of whom were smokers and 258 of whom were healthy nonsmokers. The prevalence of lesions was evaluated by clinical observation and biopsy. We found that the most prevalent lesions among smokers were gingival problems and coated tongue; smokers had significantly more lesions than did nonsmokers. Malignant and premalignant lesions were found in a higher age range. Among all participants in our study, we found a large number of oral mucosal lesions in smokers that had a strong correlation with smoking. Dental services need to implement care and health education for smokers to promote health. PMID:24010068

  18. Epithelio-mesenchymal transitional attributes in oral sub-mucous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Das, Raunak Kumar; Anura, Anji; Pal, Mousumi; Bag, Swarnendu; Majumdar, Subhadipa; Barui, Ananya; Chakraborty, Chandan; Ray, Ajoy Kumar; Sengupta, Sanghamitra; Paul, Ranjan Rashmi; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy

    2013-12-01

    Evaluating molecular attributes in association with its epithelial and sub-epithelial changes of oral sub-mucous fibrosis is meaningful in exploring the plausibility of an epithelio-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and malignant potentiality of this pathosis. In this study histopathological and histochemical attributes for basement membrane and connective tissue in biopsies of oral sub-mucous fibrosis (n = 55) and normal oral mucosa (n = 16) were assessed and expressions of p63, E-cadherin, ?-catenin, N-cadherin and TWIST were analyzed immunohistochemically. The p63 and its isoforms (TA and ?N), PARD3, E-cadherin and ?-catenin were also assessed transcriptomically by q-PCR and EMT players like TWIST1, ZEB1, MMP9 and micro-RNA 205 were searched in gene expression microarrays. Oral epithelium demonstrating impairment in progressive maturation in oral sub-mucous fibrosis concomitantly experienced an increase in basement membrane thickness and collagen deposition along with alteration in target molecular expressions. In comparison to non-dysplastic conditions dysplastic stages exhibited significant increase in p63 and p63?N expressions whereas, E-cadherin and ?-catenin exhibited loss from the membrane with concurrent increase in cytoplasm. Further the N-cadherin and TWIST were gained remarkably along with the appearance of nuclear accumulation features of ?-catenin. The microarray search had noticed the up-regulation of TWIST1, ZEB1 and MMP9 along with down regulation of micro-RNA 205. The simultaneous increase in basement membrane thickness and sub-epithelial collagen deposition were the plausible indicators for increased matrix stiffness with expected impact on oral epithelial functional homoeostasis. This was corroborated with the increase in expressions of epithelial master regulator p63 and its oncogenic isoform (?N) along with membranous loss of E-cadherin (EMT hallmark) and its associate ?-catein and gain of mesenchymal markers like N-cadherin and TWIST. These also became indicative for the induction of epithelial to mesenchymal transitional mechanism in oral sub-mucous fibrosis when connoted here with the relevant modulation in expressions of EMT regulators. PMID:23994666

  19. Evaluation of oral, subcutaneous, and nasal administration of Salmonella enteritidis-immune lymphokines on the potentiation of a protective heterophilic inflammatory response to Salmonella enteritidis in day-old chickens.

    PubMed Central

    Kogut, M H; Genovese, K; Moyes, R B; Stanker, L H

    1998-01-01

    We have previously reported that the prophylactic administration of factor(s) from T-cell supernatants derived from Salmonella enteritidis-immune chickens (ILK) have a favorable effect in controlling or eliminating salmonellosis in neonatal poultry. Experimentally, we have used the intraperitoneal injection as the standard method of administering ILK to neonatal poultry. However, this method is neither easy, practical, nor economical for the poultry industry. In the present study, we evaluated the effectiveness of oral (p.o.), intranasal (i.n.), and subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of ILK for ease of delivery, induction of protective resistance against Salmonella enteritidis (Se) organ invasion, and the ability to activate peripheral blood heterophils in day-old chickens. In the first experiments, delivery of ILK p.o., i.n., and s.c. significantly (P < 0.01) increased the resistance of day-old chickens to Se organ invasion. The level of protection was equivalent to that induced by the i.p. route. Administration of a comparable protein control (bovine serum albumin, BSA) by the 3 routes induced no protective effect against Se organ invasion. Likewise, a significant increase was found in the number of circulating heterophils within 4 h of administration of the ILK by all routes. In the 2nd experiment, the function of the heterophils from ILK-treated birds was compared with that of the control cells in adherence, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis assays. The heterophils from birds given ILK i.p., s.c., p.o., or i.n. had significantly (P < 0.01) increased functional activities when compared to the activities of the heterophils from the control birds. These studies indicate that the delivery of ILK either orally or parenterally, routes which can be used by the poultry industry, can confer protection to chickens against a localized enteric Se organ invasion by potentiating the systemic heterophilic innate response. Images FIGURES 1A and 1B. PMID:9442936

  20. Oral food desensitization.

    PubMed

    Green, Todd D; Burks, A Wesley

    2010-11-01

    The immunologic interactions in the gastrointestinal tract are extensive and complex. In most cases, the end result of this activity is one of tolerance, which refers to the inhibition of an immune response. However, in a minority of cases, food allergy develops, and this seems to be increasing in prevalence. We continue to learn about the mechanisms involved in these processes and the factors that may promote tolerance as opposed to allergy. At this point, management of food allergy consists of allergen avoidance and readiness to manage an accidental exposure reaction, but using current knowledge of gastrointestinal immunity, researchers are investigating immunomodulatory approaches that will provide "active" therapy for food allergy and induce tolerance. Oral immunotherapy is one important therapy being studied, and in this article, we review recent results from studies of this potential treatment for food allergy. PMID:20730515

  1. The Consequences of Tongue Piercing on Oral and Periodontal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sakellari, Dimitra

    2014-01-01

    This paper is discussing the potential consequences that may arise by the implementation of piercing in the oral cavity and is also categorizing the consequences according to their extent and severity. Furthermore, this paper is reviewing some possible oral hygiene methods that can prove to be auxiliary in decreasing the potential complications arising from oral piercing. This literature review is based on articles published from 1985 to 2012. PMID:24616814

  2. Oral microbial habitat a dynamic entity

    PubMed Central

    Faran Ali, Syed Muhammad; Tanwir, Farzeen

    2012-01-01

    Oral microbial habitat is composed of wide variety of species. These species play a significant role in maintaining the well being of the oral cavity by contributing in various ways. However the proper functioning of these oral microbes can be detrimental for the human oral cavity if the conditions are not suitable such as redox potential (Eh), pH of a site, the activity of the host defenses, and the presence of antimicrobial agents. The oral microbial community represents the best-characterized group associated with the human host. There are strong correlations between the qualitative composition of the oral microbiota and clinically healthy or diseased states. Amongst the bacteria of more than 700 species now identified within the human oral microbiota, it is the streptococci that are numerically predominant. Interactions between mucosal surfaces and microbial microbiota are key to host defense, health, and disease. These surfaces are exposed to high numbers of microbes and must be capable of distinguishing between those that are beneficial or avirulent and those that will invade and cause disease. Our understanding of the mechanisms involved in these discriminatory processes has recently begun to expand as new studies bring to light the importance of epithelial cells and novel immune cell subsets such as T(h)17 T cells in these processes. In this review article we have tried to find out the factors responsible for maintaining oral microbial habitat intact and the reasons which cause changes in its composition. PMID:25737863

  3. Oral and Dental Findings of Dyskeratosis Congenita

    PubMed Central

    Barlak, Pelin; Seymen, Figen

    2014-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenital (DC) is a rare condition characterized by reticulate skin hyperpigmentation, mucosal leukoplakia, and nail dystrophy. More serious features are bone marrow involvement with pancytopenia and a predisposition to malignancy. The purpose of this case report is to describe the oral and dental findings in children with DC syndrome. A 10-year-old male diagnosed with DC was admitted because of extensive caries and toothache. Inadequate oral hygiene and extensive caries were observed in oral examination of the patient. Plaque accumulation was seen in gingival border of maxillary teeth. Papillary atrophy on the tongue was observed. Short and blunted roots of mandible incisors and upper and lower molars were determined on the radiographic examination. Dryness on the lips and commisuras, ectropion on his eyes, and epiphora were observed. Hematologic tests were performed and showed aplastic anemia at the age of 2. At the age of 4, the bone marrow transplantation was performed. Dermatological findings occurred after the bone marrow transplantation. The skin of the patient was thin, dry, and wrinkled in some areas. He had palmoplantar hyperkeratosis and syndactylia on his fingers. Endodontic treatment procedures were applied and other extensive caries are still being restored. The patient will be given full preventive care during regular follow-up. Oral hygiene was improved to the optimum level. PMID:25610666

  4. Endobronchial metastases from extrathoracic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Akoglu, Sebahat; Uçan, Eyüp S; Celik, Gülperi; Sener, Gülper; Sevinç, Can; Kilinç, O?uz; Itil, Oya

    2005-01-01

    Endobronchial metastases (EBM) from extrapulmonary malignant tumors are rare. The most common extrathoracic malignancies associated with EBM are breast, renal and colorectal carcinomas. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the clinical, radiographic and bronchoscopic aspects of patients with EBM who were diagnosed between 1992 and 2002. Data about patients' clinical conditions, symptoms, radiographic and endoscopic findings, and histopathological examination results were investigated. EBM was defined as bronchoscopically visible lesions histopathologically identical to the primary tumor in patients with extrapulmonary malignancies. We found 15 cases with EBM. Primary tumors included breast (3), colorectal (3), and renal (2) carcinomas; Malignant Melanoma (2); synovial sarcoma (1), ampulla of Vater adenocarcinoma (1), pheochromocytoma (1), hypernephroma (1), and Hodgkin's Disease (1). The most common symptoms were dyspnea (80%), cough (66.6%) and hemoptysis (33.3%). Multiple (40%) or single (13.3%) pulmonary nodules, mediastinal or hilar lymphadenopathy (40%), and effusion (40%) were the most common radiographic findings. The mean interval from initial diagnosis to diagnosis of EBM was 32.8 months (range, 0-96 months) and median survival time was 18 months (range, 4-84). As a conclusion, various extrapulmonary tumors can metastasize to the bronchus. Symptoms and radiographic findings are similar with those in primary lung cancer. Therefore, EBM should be discriminated from primary lung cancer histopathologically. Although mean survival time is usually short, long-term survivors were reported. Consequently, treatment must be planned according to the histology of the primary tumor, evidence of metastasis to other sites and medical status of the patient. PMID:16475029

  5. Skin manifestations of internal malignancy.

    PubMed

    Braverman, Irwin M

    2002-02-01

    This article concentrates on the major signs and syndromes that are associated with internal malignancies in the geriatric population. Included are cutaneous metastases, ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing syndromes, and disorders arising from APUD cell tumors. The major paraneoplastic disorders of dermatomyositis, generalized pruritus, Bazex's syndrome, and acanthosis nigricans also are discussed. Also included are Bowen's disease of skin; arsenical toxicity; and the Peutz-Jeghers', Gardner's, and Torre's syndromes, which are indicative of systemic or organ-related carcinogens. PMID:11913734

  6. Molecular analysis of oral lichen planus. A premalignant lesion?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L.; Michelsen, C.; Cheng, X.; Zeng, T.; Priddy, R.; Rosin, M. P.

    1997-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a common mucosal condition that is considered premalignant by some, although others argue that only lichenoid lesions with dysplasia are precancerous. To address the question of whether OLP without dysplasia is premalignant, we used microsatellite analysis to examine 33 cases of OLP for allelic loss at nine loci located on chromosomes 3p, 9p, and 17p. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on these three arms occurs frequently in oral tumors, and the presence of these alterations in premalignant lesions suggests that they may play an important role in tumor progression. Results were compared with those observed in oral dysplasias (10 mild, 11 moderate, 16 severe/carcinoma in situ), 22 oral squamous cell carcinomas, and 29 reactive lesions. LOH was present in 6% of OLP, 14% of reactive lesions, 40% of mild dysplasia, 46% of moderate dysplasia, 81% of severe dysplasia/carcinoma in situ, and 91% of squamous cell carcinomas. LOH was detected on only a single arm in OLP and reactive lesions but occurred on more than one chromosome in dysplasia and cancer, and the frequency of this multiple loss correlated significantly with increasing degrees of dysplasia and progression into squamous cell carcinoma (P = 0.0028). Although these findings do not support OLP as a lesion at risk for malignant transformation, such results need to be confirmed by use of other genetic markers as OLP may undergo malignant transformation through genetic pathways different from those of oral dysplasia. Images Figure 1 PMID:9250145

  7. Malignant cancer and invasive placentation

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Alaric W.; Wagner, Günter P.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer metastasis is an invasive process that involves the transplantation of cells into new environments. Since human placentation is also invasive, hypotheses about a relationship between invasive placentation in eutherian mammals and metastasis have been proposed. The relationship between metastatic cancer and invasive placentation is usually presented in terms of antagonistic pleiotropy. According to this hypothesis, evolution of invasive placentation also established the mechanisms for cancer metastasis. Here, in contrast, we argue that the secondary evolution of less invasive placentation in some mammalian lineages may have resulted in positive pleiotropic effects on cancer survival by lowering malignancy rates. These positive pleiotropic effects would manifest themselves as resistance to cancer cell invasion. To provide a preliminary test of this proposal, we re-analyze data from Priester and Mantel (Occurrence of tumors in domestic animals. Data from 12 United States and Canadian colleges of veterinary medicine. J Natl Cancer Inst 1971;47:1333-44) about malignancy rates in cows, horses, cats and dogs. From our analysis we found that equines and bovines, animals with less invasive placentation, have lower rates of metastatic cancer than felines and canines in skin and glandular epithelial cancers as well as connective tissue sarcomas. We conclude that a link between type of placentation and species-specific malignancy rates is more likely related to derived mechanisms that suppress invasion rather than different degrees of fetal placental aggressiveness. PMID:25324490

  8. Oral cancer detection using diffuse reflectance spectral ratio R540/R575 of oxygenated hemoglobin bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhash, N.; Mallia, J. R.; Thomas, S. S.; Mathews, A.; Sebastian, P.; Madhaven, J.

    2006-01-01

    A low-cost, fast, and noninvasive method for early diagnosis of malignant lesions of oral mucosa based on diffuse reflectance spectral signatures is presented. In this technique, output of a tungsten halogen lamp is guided to the tissue through the central fiber of a reflection probe whose surrounding six fibers collects tissue reflectance. Ex vivo diffuse reflectance spectra in the 400 to 600-nm region is measured from surgically removed oral cavity lesions using a miniature fiber optic spectrometer connected to a computer. Reflectance spectral intensity is higher in malignant tissues and shows dips at 542 and 577 nm owing to absorption from oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2). Measurements carried out, within an hour of surgical excision, on malignant lesion and adjoining uninvolved mucosa show that these absorption features are more prominent in neoplastic tissues owing to increased microvasculature and blood content. It is observed that reflectance intensity ratio of hemoglobin bands, R540/R575, from malignant sites are always lower than that from normal sites and vary according to the histological grade of malignancy. The diffuse reflectance intensity ratio R540/R575 of the hemoglobin bands appears to be a useful tool to discriminate between malignant lesions and normal mucosa of the oral cavity in a clinical setting.

  9. Oral Lesions: The Clue to Diagnosis of Pemphigus Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Kuriachan, Diana; Suresh, Rakesh; Janardhanan, Mahija; Savithri, Vindhya

    2015-01-01

    Pemphigus is a group of potentially fatal dermatoses with both cutaneous and oral manifestations. Characterized by the appearance of vesicle or bullae, their manifestations in the oral cavity often precede those on the skin by many months or may remain as the only symptoms of the disease. It is therefore important that the oral manifestations of the disease are recognized on time, to make a proper diagnosis and initiate timely treatment. Here we present a case of Pemphigus Vulgaris (PV) that presented with oral lesions at multiple sites including tongue, to highlight the importance of timely recognition of the oral lesions during routine dental practice for the diagnosis and management of this disease.

  10. Prebiotics and Probiotics and Oral Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurman, J. H.

    The first part of this chapter describes the unique characteristics of the mouth with special emphasis on the oral microbiota. Next, the highly prevalent dental diseases are briefly described together with more rare but still important diseases and symptoms of the mouth. Prevention and treatment of oral and dental diseases are also discussed focusing on aspects considered important with respect to the potential application of prebiotics and probiotics. The second part of the chapter then concentrates on research data on prebiotics and probiotics in the oral health perspective, ending up with conclusions and visions for future research.

  11. Zomepirac sodium -- a new oral analgesic.

    PubMed

    1981-01-01

    Zomepirac sodium is a new oral analgesic that is more effective than aspirin, with no apparent tolerance or potential for addiction. It causes gastrointestinal bleeding similar to that caused by large doses of aspirin. For occasional moderate pain not responsive to aspirin, zomepirac may prove to be preferable to oral narcotics such as codeine, oxycodone, propoxyphene, pentazocine and meperidine. For chronic use, the safety and continued effectiveness of the new drug remain to be determined; it probably cannot replace oral narcotics in narcotic-dependent patients. For severe pain, as in myocardial infarction, renal colic and after some operations, zomepirac is no substitute for parenteral morphine. PMID:7005639

  12. Estimation of argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions in different grades of oral submucous fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Girish, KL; Kumaraswamy, KL; Balan, Usha; Jose, Maji

    2015-01-01

    Context: Assessment of potential for malignant transformation of oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) through clinical or light microscopic examination of hematoxylin and eosin stained tissue sections is not totally satisfactory. The search is for such a tissue marker that will differentiate those cases of OSF, which carry a higher risk for malignant transformation. During the past few years, numerous workers have validated the usefulness of enumerating argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) in predicting the malignant potential of lesions. The present study was carried out to validate the diagnostic potential of this marker. Objectives of the Study: Quantitative and qualitative assessment of AgNORs in different grades of OSF and to compare the count of AgNORs in different grades of OSF and normal mucosa. Materials and Methods: AgNORs were investigated in tissue specimens from 90 patients diagnosed with different histopathological grades of OSF. AgNORs were identified in tissue specimens stained with silver nitrate, using light microscope. AgNORs were counted as small, large and total count to analyze them both quantitatively and qualitatively. Statistical Analysis Used: Results were subjected to statistical analysis for obtaining significance value (P value) by unpaired Student's t-test. Results: The mean total count of AgNORs was 2.464 ± 0.101, 4.358 ± 0.108, 3.704 ± 0.106 and 3.279 ± 0.161 in normal mucosa, Grades I, II and III of OSF, respectively. A qualitative difference was observed in the presentation of AgNORs in different grades of OSF. Mean value of small nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) decreased while the mean of large NORs increased as the grade of OSF increased. Conclusions: The study findings suggest that AgNORs are increased in OSF and they can serve as a reliable tool adjunct to histopathological diagnosis. Their ease of demonstration and high specificity to cellular proliferation make them the best available histopathological marker in the arsenal of an oral pathologist.

  13. In vitro antioxidative potential of lactoferrin and black tea polyphenols and protective effects in vivo on carcinogen activation, DNA damage, proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis during experimental oral carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Letchoumy, P. Vidjaya; Mohan, K. V.P Chandra; Stegeman, J.J.; Gelboin, H.V.; Hara, Y.; Nagini

    2014-01-01

    Objective The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant potential of bovine lactoferrin (bLF) and black tea polyphenol (Polyphenon-B; P-B) as well as in vivo inhibitory effects on the development of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinomas. Design Antioxidant activity was screened using a panel of assays including 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethyl-benzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), hydroxyl radical anion (OH•), superoxide anion (O2•?), and nitric oxide (NO) radical scavenging assays as well as assay for reducing power. The chemopreventive potential of bLF and P-B was assessed in the HBP model based on the modulatory effects on DMBA-induced oxidative DNA damage as well as the expression of proteins associated with carcinogen activation (CYP1A1, CYP1B1), cell proliferation (cyclin D1, proliferating cell nuclear antigen; PCNA, glutathione S-transferase pi; GST-P), angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor; VEGF, VEGF receptor 1; VEGFR1), and invasion and metastasis (matrix metalloproteinase-9; MMP-9 and tissue inhibitors of MMP-2; TIMP-2). Results Both bLF and P-B showed high radical scavenging activity and reductive potential. Although administration of bLF and P-B alone suppressed DMBA-induced HBP tumors, combined administration of bLF and P-B was more effective in inhibiting HBP carcinogenesis by inhibiting oxidative DNA damage, carcinogen activation, cell proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis. Conclusion Our study suggests that the antioxidative property of bLF and P-B may be responsible for chemoprevention of HBP carcinogenesis by modulating multiple molecular targets. PMID:18980016

  14. Tribbles in normal and malignant haematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Sarah J.; Mack, Ethan A.; Rome, Kelly S.; Pear, Warren S.

    2015-01-01

    The tribbles protein family, an evolutionarily conserved group of pseudokinases, have been shown to regulate multiple cellular events including those involved in normal and malignant haematopoiesis. The three mammalian Tribbles homologues, Trib1, Trib2 and Trib3 are characterized by conserved motifs, including a pseudokinase domain and a C-terminal E3 ligase-binding domain. In this review, we focus on the role of Trib (mammalian Tribbles homologues) proteins in mammalian haematopoiesis and leukaemia. The Trib proteins show divergent expression in haematopoietic cells, probably indicating cell-specific functions. The roles of the Trib proteins in oncogenesis are also varied and appear to be tissue-specific. Finally, we discuss the potential mechanisms by which the Trib proteins preferentially regulate these processes in multiple cell types. PMID:26517933

  15. Tribbles in normal and malignant haematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Stein, Sarah J; Mack, Ethan A; Rome, Kelly S; Pear, Warren S

    2015-10-01

    The tribbles protein family, an evolutionarily conserved group of pseudokinases, have been shown to regulate multiple cellular events including those involved in normal and malignant haematopoiesis. The three mammalian Tribbles homologues, Trib1, Trib2 and Trib3 are characterized by conserved motifs, including a pseudokinase domain and a C-terminal E3 ligase-binding domain. In this review, we focus on the role of Trib (mammalian Tribbles homologues) proteins in mammalian haematopoiesis and leukaemia. The Trib proteins show divergent expression in haematopoietic cells, probably indicating cell-specific functions. The roles of the Trib proteins in oncogenesis are also varied and appear to be tissue-specific. Finally, we discuss the potential mechanisms by which the Trib proteins preferentially regulate these processes in multiple cell types. PMID:26517933

  16. Oral targeted therapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carrington, Christine

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Oral targeted therapies are increasingly being used to treat cancer. They work by interfering with specific molecules or pathways involved in tumour growth. It is essential that health professionals managing patients taking these drugs have appropriate training and skills. They should be aware of potential adverse effects and drug interactions, and be able to manage toxicities when they occur. Despite the selectivity of these targeted therapies, they still have serious adverse effects including skin reactions, diarrhoea and altered organ function. PMID:26648656

  17. An analysis of oral biopsies extracted from 1995 to 2009, in an oral medicine and surgery unit in Galicia (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Diniz-Freitas, Marco; Torreira-Lorenzo, Juan-Carlos; García-García, Abel; Gándara-Rey, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To conduct an analysis of the frequency of oral lesions in biopsies over a 14-year period in the Oral Medicine, Oral Surgery and Implantology Unit. Material and Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of biopsies removed from 1995-2009, recording data regarding age, sex, location of the lesions, biopsy types, anatomical and pathological diagnosis and definitive diagnosis. Results: Of the 562 patients studied, the average age was 51.8 years, with a standard deviation of 18.5 (range 5-96). The distribution by sex was 318 (56.6%) women and 244 (43.4%) men. The most common diagnostic category was mucosal pathologies in 37.9% of cases, followed by odontogenic cysts in 27.8%. Malignant tumors accounted for 3.9% of cases, oral squamous cell carcinomas were the most frequent malignancy, appearing in 22 cases. Bisphosphonate- related osteonecrosis of the jaws was the most common injury within the bone lesions group. Conclusion: Following the performance of 647 biopsies on 562 patients, we can say that the most common injury was radicular cysts (appearing in 108 cases), having found statistical differences in relation to the patients’ sex and age. Key words: Frequency, oral pathology, biopsy. PMID:21743423

  18. Usage of Probabilistic and General Regression Neural Network for Early Detection and Prevention of Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neha; Om, Hari

    2015-01-01

    In India, the oral cancers are usually presented in advanced stage of malignancy. It is critical to ascertain the diagnosis in order to initiate most advantageous treatment of the suspicious lesions. The main hurdle in appropriate treatment and control of oral cancer is identification and risk assessment of early disease in the community in a cost-effective fashion. The objective of this research is to design a data mining model using probabilistic neural network and general regression neural network (PNN/GRNN) for early detection and prevention of oral malignancy. The model is built using the oral cancer database which has 35 attributes and 1025 records. All the attributes pertaining to clinical symptoms and history are considered to classify malignant and non-malignant cases. Subsequently, the model attempts to predict particular type of cancer, its stage and extent with the help of attributes pertaining to symptoms, gross examination and investigations. Also, the model envisages anticipating the survivability of a patient on the basis of treatment and follow-up details. Finally, the performance of the PNN/GRNN model is compared with that of other classification models. The classification accuracy of PNN/GRNN model is 80% and hence is better for early detection and prevention of the oral cancer. PMID:26171415

  19. Snus (nass) and oral cancer: A case series report

    PubMed Central

    Hashemipour, Maryam Alsadat; Gholampour, Farzad; Fatah, Fatemeh; Bazregari, Samaneh

    2013-01-01

    Snus (nass) is a form of snuff used in a similar manner to American dipping tobacco, but it does not typically result in a need for spitting. Possible hazards associated with this material include malignant and premalignant lesions in the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract. The use of smokeless tobacco has increased in the Middle East in recent decades, particularly among teenagers and young adults. Therefore, practitioners must be able to recognize malignant and premalignant lesions. Although, an estimated 10-25% of the world's population uses smokeless tobacco, this practice is virtually unknown in Iran. The aim of this study is to report a series of cases of squamous cell carcinoma and verrucous carcinoma occurring in the users of snus, who referred to the Department of Oral Medicine in Kerman Dental School. PMID:23878575

  20. A Computer-Aided Distinction Method of Borderline Grades of Oral Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sami, Mustafa M.; Saito, Masahisa; Muramatsu, Shogo; Kikuchi, Hisakazu; Saku, Takashi

    We have developed a new computer-aided diagnostic system for differentiating oral borderline malignancies in hematoxylin-eosin stained microscopic images. Epithelial dysplasia and carcinoma in-situ (CIS) of oral mucosa are two different borderline grades similar to each other, and it is difficult to distinguish between them. A new image processing and analysis method has been applied to a variety of histopathological features and shows the possibility for differentiating the oral cancer borderline grades automatically. The method is based on comparing the drop-shape similarity level in a particular manually selected pair of neighboring rete ridges. It was found that the considered similarity level in dysplasia was higher than those in epithelial CIS, of which pathological diagnoses were conventionally made by pathologists. The developed image processing method showed a good promise for the computer-aided pathological assessment of oral borderline malignancy differentiation in clinical practice.

  1. Chronic exposure to chewing tobacco selects for overexpression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase in normal oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Nanjappa, Vishalakshi; Renuse, Santosh; Sathe, Gajanan J; Raja, Remya; Syed, Nazia; Radhakrishnan, Aneesha; Subbannayya, Tejaswini; Patil, Arun; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini A; Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Somani, Babu L; Nair, Bipin; Kundu, Gopal C; Prasad, T Keshava; Califano, Joseph A; Gowda, Harsha; Sidransky, David; Pandey, Akhilesh; Chatterjee, Aditi

    2015-10-30

    Chewing tobacco is a common practice in certain socio-economic sections of southern Asia, particularly in the Indian subcontinent and has been well associated with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The molecular mechanisms of chewing tobacco which leads to malignancy remains unclear. In large majority of studies, short-term exposure to tobacco has been evaluated. From a biological perspective, however, long-term (chronic) exposure to tobacco mimics the pathogenesis of oral cancer more closely. We developed a cell line model to investigate the chronic effects of chewing tobacco. Chronic exposure to tobacco resulted in higher cellular proliferation and invasive ability of the normal oral keratinocytes (OKF6/TERT1). We carried out quantitative proteomic analysis of OKF6/TERT1 cells chronically treated with chewing tobacco compared to the untreated cells. We identified a total of 3,636 proteins among which expression of 408 proteins were found to be significantly altered. Among the overexpressed proteins, stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) was found to be 2.6-fold overexpressed in the tobacco treated cells. Silencing/inhibition of SCD using its specific siRNA or inhibitor led to a decrease in cellular proliferation, invasion and colony forming ability of not only the tobacco treated cells but also in a panel of head and neck cancer cell lines. These findings suggest that chronic exposure to chewing tobacco induced carcinogenesis in non-malignant oral epithelial cells and SCD plays an essential role in this process. The current study provides evidence that SCD can act as a potential therapeutic target in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, especially in patients who are users of tobacco. PMID:26391970

  2. Potentially harmful elements (PHEs) in scalp hair, soil and metallurgical wastes in Mitrovica, Kosovo: the role of oral bioaccessibility and mineralogy in human PHE exposure.

    PubMed

    Boisa, N; Bird, G; Brewer, P A; Dean, J R; Entwistle, J A; Kemp, S J; Macklin, M G

    2013-10-01

    Internationally publicized impacts upon human health associated with potentially harmful element (PHE) exposure have been reported amongst internally displaced populations (IDPs) in Mitrovica, Kosovo, following the Kosovan War. Particular concern has surrounded the exposure to Pb indicated by the presence of highly elevated concentrations of Pb in blood and hair samples. This study utilizes a physiologically-based in-vitro extraction method to assess the bioaccessibility of PHEs in surface soils and metallurgical waste in Mitrovica and assesses the potential daily intake of soil-bound PHEs. Maximum As (210mgkg(-1)), Cd (38mgkg(-1)), Cu (410mgkg(-1)), Pb (18790mgkg(-1)) and Zn (8500mgkg(-1)) concentrations in surface soils (0-10cm) are elevated above guideline values. Samples with high PHE concentrations (e.g. As >1000mgkg(-1); Pb >1500mgkg(-1)) exhibit a wide range of bioaccessibilities (5.40 - 92.20% in the gastric (G) phase and 10.00 - 55.80% in the gastric-intestinal (G-I) phase). Samples associated with lower bioaccessibilities typically contain a number of XRD-identifiable primary and secondary mineral phases, particularly As- and Pb-bearing arsenian pyrite, beudantite, galena and cerrusite. Quantification of the potential human exposure risk associated with the ingestion of soil-associated PHEs indicates that on average, 0.01?g Cd kg(-1) BW d(-1), 0.16?g Cu kg(-1) BW d(--1), 0.12?g As kg(-1) BW d(-1), 7.81?g Pb kg(-1) BW d(-1), and 2.68?g Zn kg(-1) BW d(-1) could be bioaccessible following ingestion of PHE-rich soils in the Mitrovica region, with Pb, and to a lesser extent As, indicating the likely possibility of local populations exceeding the recommended tolerable daily intake. Lead present within surface soils of the area could indeed have contributed to the human Pb burden due to the high bioaccessibility of Pb present within these soils (13.40 - 92.20% in the gastric phase). Data for Pb levels in scalp hair (?120?gg(-1)) and blood (?650?gdL(-1); WHO, 2004) for children that have lived within IDP camps in Mitrovica indicate significant Pb uptake has indeed taken place. The highly bioaccessible nature of soil-associated PHEs in this study highlights the need for appropriate environmental management approaches that limit the exposure of local populations to these contaminated soils. PMID:24013020

  3. A scoring system for the prognosis and treatment of malignant bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Jon C.; Pouly, Severin; Sullivan, Rachael; Sharif, Suhail; Klemanski, Dori; Abdel-Misih, Sherif; Arradaza, Nicole; Jarjoura, David; Schmidt, Carl; Bloomston, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant bowel obstruction is a common result of end-stage abdominal cancer that is a treatment dilemma for many physicians. Little has been reported predicting outcomes or determining the role of surgical intervention. We sought to review our experience with surgical and nonsurgical management of malignant bowel obstruction to identify predictors of 30-day mortality and of who would most likely benefit from surgical intervention. Methods A chart review of 523 patients treated between 2000 and 2007 with malignant bowel obstruction were evaluated for factors present at admission to determine return to oral intake, 30-day mortality, and overall survival. Propensity score matching was used to homogenize patients treated with and without surgery to identify those who would benefit most from operative intervention. Results Radiographic evidence of large bowel obstruction was predictive of return to oral intake. Hypoalbuminemia and radiographic evidence of ascites or carcinomatosis were all predictive of increased 30-day mortality and overall survival. A nomogram of 5 identified risk factors correlated with increased 30-day mortality independent of therapy. Patients with large bowel or partial small bowel obstruction benefited most from surgery. A second nomogram was created from 4 identified risk factors that revealed which patients with complete small bowel obstruction might benefit from surgery. Conclusion Two nomograms were created that may guide decisions in the care of patients with malignant bowel obstruction. These nomograms are able to predict 30-day mortality and who may benefit from surgery for small bowel obstruction. PMID:22929404

  4. Possible salivary and serum biomarkers for oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Totan, A; Miricescu, D; Parlatescu, I; Mohora, M; Greabu, M

    2015-10-01

    There are few reports concerning the potential for clinical application of oxidative stress (OS) and collagen degradation markers in oral lichen planus (OLP) patients. We investigated the possibility of using some disease-related biomarkers in saliva and serum of OLP patients. Our study included 30 patients with OLP and 30 controls. We evaluated serum and salivary OS biomarkers including 8-OHdG, MDA, uric acid, TAC and GPx. We also investigated collagen degradation markers such as CTX I and MMP-8. We found significantly increased salivary levels of MMP-8 and CTX I in the OLP group compared to controls and significant differences between the OLP and control groups in serum and saliva for 8-OHdG, MDA (significantly increased), uric acid, TAC and GPx (significantly reduced). Currently there are no criteria for evaluating which OLP patients have a greater risk of malignant transformation. In addition to clinical surveillance, the serum and salivary biomarkers that we evaluated may be useful biomarkers for monitoring OLP patients in the future. PMID:25839238

  5. NOTCH mutations: multiple faces in human malignancies.

    PubMed

    Mao, Li

    2015-04-01

    NOTCH proteins have been implicated in multiple cellular functions, such as stem cell maintenance and cell fate determination. Initially identified as proto-oncogenes because they promote the development of certain types of leukemia, inactivating mutations of NOTCH were later reported. Together with the potential distinct functions of NOTCH family members, their ligands and associated niches, the precise roles of NOTCH in human cancers, particularly solid tumors, remain unsettled. In oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), mutations of NOTCH1 are found in 10% to 15% tumors from Caucasian patients, mostly inactivating mutations. Recent studies of OSCC from Chinese patients, however, showed mutation rates of NOTCH1 about 50% with a considerable portion of potential activating mutations. These findings add another twist into the already complex picture of NOTCH alterations in human cancers, calling for further investigation to uncover what role exactly these molecules play in cancer initiation and progression to develop strategies targeting NOTCH signaling for cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:25712049

  6. A Review of the Nonsurgical Treatment of Oral Leukoplakia

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Adriana Spinola; Salles, Patrícia Ribeiro; da Silva, Tarcília Aparecida; Mesquita, Ricardo Alves

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to assess the nonsurgical treatment of oral leukoplakia (OL). A medline search from 1983 to 2009 was conducted. The topical or systemic nonsurgical treatments or combination of both was reviewed. The primary outcomes of interest were clinical resolution, malignant transformation, follow-up, and recurrence of OL. Studies showed a rate higher than 50% of clinical resolution with photodynamic therapy, beta-carotene, lycopene, or vitamin A. Few studies reported rates of recurrence from 5 to 67% and of malignant transformation from 8 to 23%. There is a lack of randomized clinical trials that assess the effectiveness of nonsurgical treatment of OL. At this time, randomized controlled trials for nonsurgical treatment of OL demonstrate no evidence of effective treatment in preventing malignant transformation and recurrence. It reinforces that even after clinical resolution, OL should be regularly followed. PMID:20339486

  7. Boron neutron capture therapy for oral precancer: proof of principle in an experimental animal model

    SciTech Connect

    A. Monti Hughes; ECC Pozzi; S. Thorp; M. A. Garabalino; R. O. Farias; S. J. Gonzalez; E. M. Heber; M. E. Itoiz; R. F. Aromando; A. J. Molinari; M. Miller; D. W. Nigg; P. Curotto; V. A. Trivillin; A. E. Schwint

    2013-11-01

    Field-cancerized tissue can give rise to second primary tumours, causing therapeutic failure. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on biological targeting and would serve to treat undetectable foci of malignant transformation. The aim of this study was to optimize BNCT for the integral treatment for oral cancer, with particular emphasis on the inhibitory effect on tumour development originating in precancerous conditions, and radiotoxicity of different BNCT protocols in a hamster cheek pouch oral precancer model.

  8. The Impact of Medicaid Expansion on Oral Health Equity for Older Adults: A Systems Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Sara S.; Birenz, Shirley S.; Kunzel, Carol; Wang, Hua; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Marshall, Stephen E.; Northridge, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses a collaborative, interdisciplinary systems science inquiry to explore implications of Medicaid expansion on achieving oral health equity for older adults. Through an iterative modeling process oriented toward the experiences of both patients and oral health care providers, complex feedback mechanisms for promoting oral health equity are articulated that acknowledge the potential for stigma as well as disparities in oral health care accessibility. Multiple factors mediate the impact of Medicaid expansion on oral health equity. PMID:26457047

  9. Oral Motor Intervention Improved the Oral Feeding in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xu; Yi, Li-Juan; Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Jian-Guo; Ma, Li; Ou, Yang-Xiang; Shuai, Ting; Zeng, Zi; Song, Guo-Min

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Oral feeding for preterm infants has been a thorny problem worldwide. To improve the efficacy of oral feeding in preterm infants, oral motor intervention (OMI), which consists of nonnutritive sucking, oral stimulation, and oral support, was developed. Published studies demonstrated that OMI may be as an alternative treatment to solve this problem; however, these results remain controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis (TSA) to objectively evaluate the potential of OMI for improving the current status of oral feeding in preterm infants. A search of PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure was performed to capture relevant citations until at the end of October, 2014. Lists of references of eligible studies and reviews were also hand-checked to include any latent studies. Two independent investigators screened literature, extracted data, and assessed the methodology, and then a meta-analysis and TSA was performed by using Reviewer Manager (RevMan) 5.3 and TSA 0.9 beta, respectively. A total of 11 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), which included 855 participants, were incorporated into our meta-analysis. The meta-analyses suggested that OMI is associated with the reduced transition time (ie, the time needed from tube feeding to totally oral feeding) (mean difference [MD], ?4.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], ?5.22 to ?2.84), shorten hospital stays (MD, ?3.64; 95% CI, ?5.57 to ?1.71), increased feeding efficiency (MD, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.36–1.27), and intake of milk (MD, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.06–0.21) rather than weight gain. Results of TSA for each outcomes of interest confirmed these pooled results. With present evidences, OMI can be as an alternative to improve the condition of transition time, length of hospital stays, feeding efficiency, and intake of milk in preterm infants. However, the pooled results may be impaired due to low quality included, and thus, well-designed and large RCTs were needed to further established effects. PMID:26252313

  10. Pre-malignant lymphoid cells arise from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kikushige, Yoshikane; Miyamoto, Toshihiro

    2015-11-01

    Human malignancies progress through a multistep process that includes the development of critical somatic mutations over the clinical course. Recent novel findings have indicated that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which have the potential to self-renew and differentiate into multilineage hematopoietic cells, are an important cellular target for the accumulation of critical somatic mutations in hematological malignancies and play a central role in myeloid malignancy development. In contrast to myeloid malignancies, mature lymphoid malignancies, such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), are thought to originate directly from differentiated mature lymphocytes; however, recent compelling data have shown that primitive HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells contribute to the pathogenesis of mature lymphoid malignancies. Several representative mutations of hematological malignancies have been identified within the HSCs of CLL and lymphoma patients, indicating that the self-renewing long-lived fraction of HSCs can serve as a reservoir for the development of oncogenic events. Novel mice models have been established as human mature lymphoma models, in which specific oncogenic events target the HSCs and immature progenitor cells. These data collectively suggest that HSCs can be the cellular target involved in the accumulation of oncogenic events in the pathogenesis of mature lymphoid and myeloid malignancies. PMID:25644149

  11. The psychosocial aspects of malignancy.

    PubMed

    Kriesel, H T

    1987-06-01

    This article has described many of the psychosocial issues associated with malignancy. Issues related to delivering the diagnosis of cancer, such as telling the truth, including the family, and initiating a "shared meaning" process, were considered. Patient reactions related to cancer such as grief, depression, and needs for control were described. Family reactions to the cancer patient, including anticipatory grief and weariness, were noted. The need for psychosocial support for the family of the cancer patient was discussed. Finally, the need for caregivers to pay attention to their own emotional needs was described. PMID:3299423

  12. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-?1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together, oral supplementation with antioxidants appears to be an effective approach for the radioprotection of hematopoietic cells against the cell killing effects of radiation, and for improving survival in irradiated animals. Preliminary data suggest similar antioxidant protective effects for animals exposed to potentially lethal doses of proton radiation. Studies were also performed to determine whether dietary antioxidants could affect the incidence rates of malignancies in CBA mice exposed to 300 cGy proton (1 GeV/n) radiation or 50 cGy iron ion (1 GeV/n) radiation [9]. Two antioxidant formulations were utilized in these studies; an AOX formulation containing the mixture of antioxidant agents developed from our previous studies and an antioxidant dietary formulation containing the soybean-derived protease inhibitor known as the Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI). BBI was evaluated in the form of BBI Concentrate (BBIC), which is the form of BBI utilized in human trials. BBIC has been utilized in human trials since 1992, as described [10]. The major finding in the long-term animal studies was that there was a reduced risk of malignant lymphoma in mice exposed to space radiations and maintained on diets containing the antioxidant formulations. In addition, the two different dietary countermeasures also reduced the yields of a variety of different rare tumor types, arising from both epithelial and connective tissue cells, observed in the animals exposed to space radiation. REFERENCES [1] Guan J. et al (2004) Radiation Research 162, 572-579. [2] Wan X.S. et al (2005) Radiation Research 163, 364-368. [3] Wan X.S. et al (2005) Radiation Research 163, 232-240. [4] Guan J. et al (2006) Radiation Research 165, 373-378. [5] Wan X.S. et al (2006) International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics 64, 1475-1481. [6] Kennedy A.R. et al (2006) Radiation Research 166, 327-332. [7] Kennedy A.R. et al (2007) Radiation & Environmental Biophysics 46(2), 201-3. [8]Wambi, C., Sanzari, J., Wan, X.S., Nuth, M., Davis, J., Ko, Y.-H., Sayers, C.M., Baran, M., Ware, J.H. and Kennedy, A

  13. Blood cells transcriptomics as source of potential biomarkers of articular health improvement: effects of oral intake of a rooster combs extract rich in hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Juana; Bonet, M Luisa; Keijer, Jaap; van Schothorst, Evert M; Mölller, Ingrid; Chetrit, Carles; Martinez-Puig, Daniel; Palou, Andreu

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study was to explore peripheral blood gene expression as a source of biomarkers of joint health improvement related to glycosaminoglycan (GAG) intake in humans. Healthy individuals with joint discomfort were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled intervention study in humans. Subjects ate control yoghurt or yoghurt supplemented with a recently authorized novel food in Europe containing hyaluronic acid (65 %) from rooster comb (Mobilee™ as commercial name) for 90 days. Effects on functional quality-of-life parameters related to joint health were assessed. Whole-genome microarray analysis of peripheral blood samples from a subset of 20 subjects (10 placebo and 10 supplemented) collected pre- and post-intervention was performed. Mobilee™ supplementation reduced articular pain intensity and synovial effusion and improved knee muscular strength indicators as compared to placebo. About 157 coding genes were differentially expressed in blood cells between supplemented and placebo groups post-intervention, but not pre-intervention (p < 0.05; fold change ?1.2). Among them, a reduced gene expression of glucuronidase-beta (GUSB), matrix metallopeptidase 23B (MMP23B), xylosyltransferase II (XYLT2), and heparan sulfate 6-O-sulfotransferase 1 (HS6ST1) was found in the supplemented group. Correlation analysis indicated a direct relationship between blood cell gene expression of MMP23B, involved in the breakdown of the extracellular matrix, and pain intensity, and an inverse relationship between blood cell gene expression of HS6ST1, responsible for 6-O-sulfation of heparan sulfate, and indicators of knee muscular strength. Expression levels of specific genes in blood cells, in particular genes related to GAG metabolism and extracellular matrix dynamics, are potential biomarkers of beneficial effects on articular health. PMID:25024048

  14. Comparison of two oral probiotic preparations in a randomized crossover trial highlights a potentially beneficial effect of Lactobacillus paracasei NCC2461 in patients with allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is promising but conflicting evidence to recommend the addition of probiotics to foods for prevention and treatment of allergy. Based on previous studies with fermented milk containing Lactobacillus paracasei NCC2461, we aimed to compare the effect of a powder form of the latter probiotic with the effect of a blend of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC SD5221 and Bifidobacterium lactis ATCC SD5219 in patients with allergic rhinitis. Methods A double-blind, randomized, cross-over study, involving 31 adults with allergic rhinitis to grass pollen, was performed outside the grass pollen season (registration number: NCT01233154). Subjects received each product for 4-weeks in two phases separated by a wash-out period of 6 to 8 weeks. A nasal provocation test was performed before and after each 4-week product intake period, and outcome parameters (objective and subjective clinical symptoms; immune parameters) were measured during and/or 24 hours after the test. Results Out of the 31 subject enrolled, 28 completed the study. While no effect was observed on nasal congestion (primary outcome), treatment with NCC2461 significantly decreased nasal pruritus (determined by VAS), and leukocytes in nasal fluid samples, enhanced IL-5, IL-13 and IL-10 production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in an allergen specific manner and tended to decrease IL-5 secretion in nasal fluid, in contrast to treatment with the blend of L. acidophilus and B. lactis. Conclusions Despite short-term consumption, NCC2461 was able to reduce subjective nasal pruritus while not affecting nasal congestion in adults suffering from grass pollen allergic rhinitis. The associated decrease in nasal fluid leukocytes and IL-5 secretion, and the enhanced IL-10 secretion in an allergen specific manner may partly explain the decrease in nasal pruritus. However, somewhat unexpected systemic immune changes were also noted. These data support the study of NCC2461 consumption in a seasonal clinical trial to further demonstrate its potentially beneficial effect. PMID:24393277

  15. Estimation of oral leukoplakia treatment records in the research of the Department of Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, Medical University of Gdansk

    PubMed Central

    Paw?owska, Anita; Renkielska, Dorota; Michaj?owski, Igor; Sobjanek, Micha?; B?a?ewicz, Izabela; W?odarkiewicz, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oral leukoplakia (OL) is the most common potentially malignant lesion of the oral cavity. Aim The purpose of the study was clinical and epidemiological analysis of patients with OL diagnosed and treated in the Department of Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, Medical University of Gdansk, comparison of effectiveness of treatment methods, defining whether van der Waal level of OL influences treatment effectiveness, correlation between localization of OL and treatment effectiveness, and defining the optimal OL therapeutic method. Material and methods Among 55 911 patients diagnosed and treated in the Department in the years 1999–2009, 204 people with OL were selected (104 women, 100 men, average age: 58.1 years). Treatment and observation period of 6 months was completed by 178 (87.25%) patients. Seventy-four patients were treated with cream containing 0.05% tretinoin. Sixty-three patients underwent cryosurgery, and 41 surgery. Control visits were made in week 2, 4, 6 and 8 and 6 months after completed treatment. Results Three hundred and twenty lesions of OL were diagnosed. According to van der Waal classification, the largest group of patients was classified into stage I and II. The percentage of totally cured patients was 90.07%. There were no statistic differences in effectiveness between surgical and cryosurgical treatment. Conclusions Evaluation of OL treatment methods depends on localization of the lesions and its stage of progression. The effectiveness of treatment with locally applied tretinoin is smaller in comparison to surgery and cryosurgery. It allows to reduce the number and size of OL lesions, what makes it possible to reduce the number of ablative procedures. PMID:26015781

  16. Oral health and elite sport performance.

    PubMed

    Needleman, Ian; Ashley, Paul; Fine, Peter; Haddad, Fares; Loosemore, Mike; de Medici, Akbar; Donos, Nikos; Newton, Tim; van Someren, Ken; Moazzez, Rebecca; Jaques, Rod; Hunter, Glenn; Khan, Karim; Shimmin, Mark; Brewer, John; Meehan, Lyndon; Mills, Steve; Porter, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    While the research base is limited, studies have consistently reported poor oral health in elite athletes since the first report from the 1968 Olympic Games. The finding is consistent both across selected samples attending dental clinics at major competitions and more representative sampling of teams and has led to calls from the International Olympic Committee for more accurate data on oral health. Poor oral health is an important issue directly as it can cause pain, negative effects on appearance and psychosocial effects on confidence and quality of life and may have long-term consequences for treatment burden. Self-reported evidence also suggests an impact on training and performance of athletes. There are many potential challenges to the oral health of athletes including nutritional, oral dehydration, exercise-induced immune suppression, lack of awareness, negative health behaviours and lack of prioritisation. However, in theory, oral diseases are preventable by simple interventions with good evidence of efficacy. The consensus statement aims to raise awareness of the issues of oral health in elite sport and recommends strategies for prevention and health promotion in addition to future research strategies. PMID:25263651

  17. Oral health and elite sport performance

    PubMed Central

    Needleman, Ian; Ashley, Paul; Fine, Peter; Haddad, Fares; Loosemore, Mike; de Medici, Akbar; Donos, Nikos; Newton, Tim; van Someren, Ken; Moazzez, Rebecca; Jaques, Rod; Hunter, Glenn; Khan, Karim; Shimmin, Mark; Brewer, John; Meehan, Lyndon; Mills, Steve; Porter, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    While the research base is limited, studies have consistently reported poor oral health in elite athletes since the first report from the 1968 Olympic Games. The finding is consistent both across selected samples attending dental clinics at major competitions and more representative sampling of teams and has led to calls from the International Olympic Committee for more accurate data on oral health. Poor oral health is an important issue directly as it can cause pain, negative effects on appearance and psychosocial effects on confidence and quality of life and may have long-term consequences for treatment burden. Self-reported evidence also suggests an impact on training and performance of athletes. There are many potential challenges to the oral health of athletes including nutritional, oral dehydration, exercise-induced immune suppression, lack of awareness, negative health behaviours and lack of prioritisation. However, in theory, oral diseases are preventable by simple interventions with good evidence of efficacy. The consensus statement aims to raise awareness of the issues of oral health in elite sport and recommends strategies for prevention and health promotion in addition to future research strategies. PMID:25263651

  18. Allison Oral History

    E-print Network

    Albin, Tami; Allison

    2014-03-13

    Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer People in Kansas Allison Oral History Interviewed by Tami Albin August 23, 2009 http://hdl.handle.net/1808.../13171 This interview was made possible by the generous support of the University of Kansas Libraries and the University of Kansas grants 2302114, 2301283, 2301334. © Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer...

  19. Mechanisms of Oral Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Commins, Scott P

    2015-12-01

    Oral tolerance is an active process of local and systemic immune unresponsiveness to orally ingested antigens such as food. The gut immune system must balance responses to commensal bacteria (microbiome), innocuous antigens, and pathogens. Although it is clear that specialized populations of immune cells and lymph nodes create a unique environment in the gut, there remains evidence to suggest that systemic effector sites also are critical to establishing and maintaining oral tolerance. PMID:26456448

  20. George Paris Oral History

    E-print Network

    Paris, George; Albin, Tami

    2010-01-11

    Histories of GLBTQ People in Kansas George Paris Oral History Part 1 video platform video management video solutionsvideo player Part 2 video platform video management video solutionsvideo player Part 3 video platform video management video... platform video management video solutionsvideo player Return to George Paris's Oral History in KU ScholarWorks Tami Albin, Director for Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of GLBTQ People in Kansas Anschutz Library University of Kansas 1301 Hoch...

  1. Laparoscopic approach to gastrointestinal malignancies: Toward the future with caution

    PubMed Central

    Bencini, Lapo; Bernini, Marco; Farsi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    After the rapid acceptance of laparoscopy to manage multiple benign diseases arising from gastrointestinal districts, some surgeons started to treat malignancies by the same way. However, if the limits of laparoscopy for benign diseases are mainly represented by technical issues, oncologic outcomes remain the foundation of any procedures to cure malignancies. Cancerous patients represent an important group with peculiar aspects including reduced survival expectancy, worsened quality of life due to surgery itself and adjuvant therapies, and challenging psychological impact. All these issues could, potentially, receive a better management with a laparoscopic surgical approach. In order to confirm such aspects, similarly to testing the newest weapons (surgical or pharmacologic) against cancer, long-term follow-up is always recommendable to assess the real benefits in terms of overall survival, cancer-free survival and quality of life. Furthermore, it seems of crucial importance that surgeons will be correctly trained in specific oncologic principles of surgical oncology as well as in modern miniinvasive technologies. Therefore, laparoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies requires more caution and deep analysis of published evidences, as compared to those achieved for inflammatory bowel diseases, gastroesophageal reflux disease or diverticular disease. This review tries to examine the evidence available to date for the use of laparoscopy and robotics in malignancies arising from the gastrointestinal district. PMID:24587655

  2. Intercellular communication in malignant pleural mesothelioma: properties of tunneling nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Ady, Justin W.; Desir, Snider; Thayanithy, Venugopal; Vogel, Rachel I.; Moreira, André L.; Downey, Robert J.; Fong, Yuman; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Moore, Malcolm A. S.; Lou, Emil

    2014-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a particularly aggressive and locally invasive malignancy with a poor prognosis despite advances in understanding of cancer cell biology and development of new therapies. At the cellular level, cultured mesothelioma cells present a mesenchymal appearance and a strong capacity for local cellular invasion. One important but underexplored area of mesothelioma cell biology is intercellular communication. Our group has previously characterized in multiple histological subtypes of mesothelioma a unique cellular protrusion known as tunneling nanotubes (TnTs). TnTs are long, actin filament-based, narrow cytoplasmic extensions that are non-adherent when cultured in vitro and are capable of shuttling cellular cargo between connected cells. Our prior work confirmed the presence of nanotube structures in tumors resected from patients with human mesothelioma. In our current study, we quantified the number of TnTs/cell among various mesothelioma subtypes and normal mesothelial cells using confocal microscopic techniques. We also examined changes in TnT length over time in comparison to cell proliferation. We further examined potential approaches to the in vivo study of TnTs in animal models of cancer. We have developed novel approaches to study TnTs in aggressive solid tumor malignancies and define fundamental characteristics of TnTs in malignant mesothelioma. There is mounting evidence that TnTs play an important role in intercellular communication in mesothelioma and thus merit further investigation of their role in vivo. PMID:25400582

  3. Targeted cellular ablation based on the morphology of malignant cells

    PubMed Central

    Ivey, Jill W.; Latouche, Eduardo L.; Sano, Michael B.; Rossmeisl, John H.; Davalos, Rafael V.; Verbridge, Scott S.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is especially challenging due to a shortage of methods to preferentially target diffuse infiltrative cells, and therapy-resistant glioma stem cell populations. Here we report a physical treatment method based on electrical disruption of cells, whose action depends strongly on cellular morphology. Interestingly, numerical modeling suggests that while outer lipid bilayer disruption induced by long pulses (~100??s) is enhanced for larger cells, short pulses (~1??s) preferentially result in high fields within the cell interior, which scale in magnitude with nucleus size. Because enlarged nuclei represent a reliable indicator of malignancy, this suggested a means of preferentially targeting malignant cells. While we demonstrate killing of both normal and malignant cells using pulsed electric fields (PEFs) to treat spontaneous canine GBM, we proposed that properly tuned PEFs might provide targeted ablation based on nuclear size. Using 3D hydrogel models of normal and malignant brain tissues, which permit high-resolution interrogation during treatment testing, we confirmed that PEFs could be tuned to preferentially kill cancerous cells. Finally, we estimated the nuclear envelope electric potential disruption needed for cell death from PEFs. Our results may be useful in safely targeting the therapy-resistant cell niches that cause recurrence of GBM tumors. PMID:26596248

  4. Targeted cellular ablation based on the morphology of malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Ivey, Jill W; Latouche, Eduardo L; Sano, Michael B; Rossmeisl, John H; Davalos, Rafael V; Verbridge, Scott S

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is especially challenging due to a shortage of methods to preferentially target diffuse infiltrative cells, and therapy-resistant glioma stem cell populations. Here we report a physical treatment method based on electrical disruption of cells, whose action depends strongly on cellular morphology. Interestingly, numerical modeling suggests that while outer lipid bilayer disruption induced by long pulses (~100??s) is enhanced for larger cells, short pulses (~1??s) preferentially result in high fields within the cell interior, which scale in magnitude with nucleus size. Because enlarged nuclei represent a reliable indicator of malignancy, this suggested a means of preferentially targeting malignant cells. While we demonstrate killing of both normal and malignant cells using pulsed electric fields (PEFs) to treat spontaneous canine GBM, we proposed that properly tuned PEFs might provide targeted ablation based on nuclear size. Using 3D hydrogel models of normal and malignant brain tissues, which permit high-resolution interrogation during treatment testing, we confirmed that PEFs could be tuned to preferentially kill cancerous cells. Finally, we estimated the nuclear envelope electric potential disruption needed for cell death from PEFs. Our results may be useful in safely targeting the therapy-resistant cell niches that cause recurrence of GBM tumors. PMID:26596248

  5. Management of spermatic cord tumors: a rare urologic malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Dayron

    2012-01-01

    Primary spermatic cord tumors are rare yet clinically significant urologic lesions that affect patients of all ages. They are the most common tumors of the paratesticular region and generally present as asymptomatic, slow growing, firm, palpable paratesticular masses. Although most of them are benign comprised primarily of lipomas, approximately 25% are potentially life-threatening malignant tumors. The most common reported malignant histological types include liposarcomas, leiomyosarcomas, rhabdomyosarcomas, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, and fibrosarcomas. Management of these malignant tumors has been difficult because of their rarity, therefore there is little consensus regarding optimal surgical and adjunctive treatment strategies. It is recommended that radiological techniques such as scrotal ultrasound (US), computed tomography, and magnetic resonance be used to evaluate these masses before surgery. The curative treatment of choice is radical orchiectomy with high cord ligation and wide excision of surrounding soft tissue structures within the inguinal canal. Patients with inadequately resected disease should undergo a reoperative procedure for wide inguinal re-resection. Retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy is recommended when there is preoperative evidence of retroperitoneal lymph node metastasis and as an adjuvant treatment for rhabdomyosarcomas since they have a higher propensity for lymphatic spread. Adjuvant treatments, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy, have shown little efficacy, except in the management of patients with local recurrence or high-grade rhabdomyosarcomas. Long-term follow up is recommended given their high recurrence rates. PMID:23205059

  6. Protumorigenic effects of mir-145 loss in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Cioce, M.; Ganci, F.; Canu, V.; Sacconi, A.; Mori, F.; Canino, C.; Korita, E.; Casini, B.; Alessandrini, G.; Cambria, A.; Carosi, M.A.; Blandino, R.; Panebianco, V.; Facciolo, F.; Visca, P.; Volinia, S.; Muti, P.; Strano, S.; Croce, CM; Pass, HI; Blandino, G.

    2015-01-01

    We identified a discrete number of microRNAs differentially expressed in benign or malignant mesothelial tissues. We focused on mir-145 whose levels were significantly downregulated in malignant mesothelial tissues and Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) cell lines as compared to benign tissues (pleura, peritoneum or cysts). We show that promoter hyper-methylation caused very low levels in MPM cell lines. Treatment of MPM cell lines with mir-145 agonists negatively modulated some protumorigenic properties of MPM cells, such as clonogenicity, cell migration and resistance to pemetrexed treatment. The main effector mechanism of the clonogenic death induced by mir-145 was that of accelerated senescence. We found that mir-145 targeted OCT4 via specific binding to its 3’-UTR. Increased intracellular levels of mir-145 decreased the levels of OCT4 and its target gene ZEB1 thereby counteracting the increase of OCT4 induced by pemetrexed treatment which is known to favor the development of chemoresistant cells. In line with this, reintroduction of OCT4 into mimic-145 treated cells counteracted the effects on clonogenicity and replicative senescence. This further supports the relevance of the mir-145-OCT4 interaction for the survival of MPM cells. The potential use of mir-145 expression levels to classify benign vs malignant mesothelial tissues and the differences between pemetrexed-induced senescence and that induced by the re-expression of mir-145 are discussed. PMID:24240684

  7. Raman spectroscopy and oral exfoliative cytology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Aditi; Shah, Nupur; Mahimkar, Manoj; Garud, Mandavi; Pagare, Sandeep; Nair, Sudhir; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Early detection of oral cancers can substantially improve disease-free survival rates. Ex vivo and in vivo Raman spectroscopic (RS) studies on oral cancer have demonstrated the applicability of RS in identifying not only malignant and premalignant conditions but also cancer-field-effects: the earliest events in oral carcinogenesis. RS has also been explored for cervical exfoliated cells analysis. Exfoliated cells are associated with several advantages like non-invasive sampling, higher patient compliance, transportation and analysis at a central facility: obviating need for on-site instrumentation. Thus, oral exfoliative cytology coupled with RS may serve as a useful adjunct for oral cancer screening. In this study, exfoliated cells from healthy controls with and without tobacco habits, premalignant lesions (leukoplakia and tobacco-pouch-keratosis) and their contralateral mucosa were collected using a Cytobrush. Cells were harvested by vortexing and centrifugation at 6000 rpm. The cellular yield was ascertained using Neubauer's chamber. Cell pellets were placed on a CaF2 window and Raman spectra were acquired using a Raman microprobe (40X objective) coupled HE-785 Raman spectrometer. Approximately 7 spectra were recorded from each pellet, following which pellet was smeared onto a glass slide, fixed in 95% ethanol and subjected to Pap staining for cytological diagnosis (gold standard). Preliminary PC-LDA followed by leave-one-out cross validation indicate delineation of cells from healthy and all pathological conditions. A tendency of classification was also seen between cells from contralateral, healthy tobacco and site of premalignant lesions. These results will be validated by cytological findings, which will serve as the basis for building standard models of each condition.

  8. The gallium scan in malignant fibrous histiocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, S.D.J.; Rosen, G.; Benua, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcoma is a relatively uncommon malignancy. Of its various histological types, malignant fibrous histiocytoma is most common and usually is seen in late adult life affecting primarily extremities and trunk with or without bony involvement. Before undertaking potentially toxic treatments with chemotherapeutic agents, tumor aggressiveness must be estimated. The authors use /sup 67/Ga citrate to supplement other imaging modalities to measure size, location and extent prior to and during treatment. In all, 22 consecutive patients were studied, with 13 males and 9 females. The median age was 43 (range 15 to 68) with majority of patients in 4th to 6th decades. Extremity lesions were present in 18, pelvic in 1, thoracic in 2, and abdominal in 1. Eighteen patients were studied shortly after the diagnosis and 4 during their recurrences. In the 18 patients with primary tumor, 12 showed marked increased uptake in the region of tumor, or increased uptake in soft tissues with a distribution different from the changes noted in the MDP bone scan. In 4 patients with extremity lesions, abnormalities were seen in Ga but were not definite in MDP bone scans. Four patients had tumor recurrences following surgery, radiation therapy or chemotherapy. High Ga uptake was found in the regions of recurrent tumor in 2 and in the lung metastases of another. Interval changes were more easily appreciated in the Ga scan than in the MDP bone scan. Information obtained from Ga images provides additional clues in determining extent of soft tissue involvement and assists in monitoring therapeutic responses.

  9. Neurotrophins and B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Hillis, Jennifer; O'Dwyer, Michael; Gorman, Adrienne M

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophins and their receptors act as important proliferative and pro-survival factors in a variety of cell types. Neurotrophins are produced by multiple cell types in both pro- and mature forms, and can act in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. The p75(NTR) and Trk receptors can elicit signalling in response to the presence or absence of their corresponding neurotrophin ligands. This signalling, along with neurotrophin and receptor expression, varies between different cell types. Neurotrophins and their receptors have been shown to be expressed by and elicit signalling in B lymphocytes. In general, most neurotrophins are expressed by activated B-cells and memory B-cells. Likewise, the TrkB95 receptor is seen on activated B-cells, while TrkA and p75(NTR) are expressed by both resting and active B-cells as well as memory B-cells. Nerve growth factor stimulates B-cell proliferation, memory B-cell survival, antibody production and CD40 expression. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is involved in B-cell maturation in the bone marrow through TrkB95. Overall neurotrophins and their receptors have been shown to be involved in B-cell proliferation, development, differentiation, antibody secretion and survival. As well as expression and activity in healthy B-cells, the neurotrophins and their receptors can contribute to B-cell malignancies including acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma and multiple myeloma. They are involved in B-cell malignancy survival and potentially in drug resistance. PMID:26399960

  10. Treatment of a relapsing facial pyoderma gangrenosum (malignant pyoderma).

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Lucia; Zauli, Stefania; Sarno, Oriele; Querzoli, Patrizia; Corazza, Monica; Virgili, Annarosa

    2013-06-01

    A case of rapidly relapsing pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) of the left preauricular area with no undermined borders is described. This might be considered a case of malignant pyoderma (PM), a rare variety of PG. Five months after complete healing obtained with systemic corticosteroids, the preauricular lesion of PG relapsed. As retreatment with oral methylprednisolone induced glucose intolerance and high arterial pressure, sulfa drugs were initially employed with a transitory recovery of the skin lesion. A successive prolonged course with minocycline induced a new complete resolution. To date, at six months' follow-up, the patient is relapse-free. This case confirms that sulfa drugs and minocycline may also be considered alternative therapies in PM. PM is a variety of PG characterized by specific morphological features, a higher tendency to relapse, and poor responsiveness to treatment. PMID:23330662

  11. [Oral precancer and cancer].

    PubMed

    López-López, José; Omaña-Cepeda, Carlos; Jané-Salas, Enric

    2015-11-01

    We reviewed the concept of oral precancerous lesions, oral cancer, and the possibility of early diagnosis. With the keywords: premalignant oral lesions prevention, a search was performed over the past 10 years. Also clinical trials are searched from January 2011 until today with the keywords: oral cancer prevention AND dentistry. It is emphasized that there can be no significant changes related to the concept of precancerous lesions and cancer, and those relating to the early diagnosis. Despite the numerous described methods of screening, biopsy remains the most useful test, and therefore it is essential, mainly if we consider the new possibilities of molecular studies. PMID:25638423

  12. The Controversial Role of Microglia in Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Malignant gliomas contain stroma and a variety of immune cells including abundant activated microglia/macrophages. Mounting evidence indicates that the glioma microenvironment converts the glioma-associated microglia/macrophages (GAMs) into glioma-supportive, immunosuppressive cells; however, GAMs can retain intrinsic anti-tumor properties. Here, we review and discuss this duality and the potential therapeutic strategies that may inhibit their glioma-supportive and propagating functions. PMID:23983766

  13. [De novo malignancy following renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Osaka, Y; Nakai, I; Yasumura, T; Omori, Y; Oka, T

    1994-11-01

    The characteristics and incidence of de novo malignancy was analyzed in 376 renal transplant recipients transplanted between April 1970 and December 1992. Malignancies developed in 21 recipients of living related donor renal allografts. The total number of malignancies was 23, with 2 patients developing 2 malignancies. The mean age at the time of diagnosis was 42 years. The average interval from transplantation to the time of diagnosis was 129 months. Malignancy developed in 12 of 21 patients who survived 10 years with a functioning graft. Nine patients died of their malignancy. The risk of developing malignancy is increased following renal transplantation. Compared with sex- and age-matched Japanese control, the incidence is 6.1 times greater for male, 10.5 times greater for female, and 7.3 times greater overall. The risk was increased at all sites except the stomach. The risk rate of acquiring malignancies at 5-year intervals following transplantation was 6.5 times greater from 0 to 5 years, 10.0 times greater from 5 to 10 years, and 9.3 times greater from 10 to 15 years. These results suggest that annual medical examinations should be performed as part of the routine log-term follow-up of renal transplant recipients to detect malignancies in the early stage. PMID:7830710

  14. B-Cell Hematologic Malignancy Vaccination Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-15

    Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Lymphocytosis; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Hematological Malignancies

  15. Radioguided surgery in urological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Weckermann, Dorothea; Thalgott, Mark; Holl, Gabriele; Wagner, Theodor; Harzmann, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    The current literature was reviewed for articles focusing on radioguided surgery in urological malignancies. In penile cancer sentinel lymph node dissection is part of international guidelines. By detailed histopathological analysis (serial sections, immunohistochemical staining) more micrometastases are detectable improving the histopathological staging. In prostate cancer this technique also improves staging since a high percentage of patients have lymph node metastases located outside the region of standard lymphadenectomy. Compared to extended lymph node dissection radioguided surgery has a lower morbidity, especially a lower rate of lymphoceles. In bladder cancer the sentinel lymph node (SLN) technique has some limitations. Combined with extended lymph node dissection more positive lymph nodes are removed which possibly improves survival. In renal cell and testicular cancer there are only preliminary results. Further investigations will show whether this technique will play an important role in the diagnostics and therapy of these tumors. In all urological malignancies the SLN concept is only a staging procedure. When the sentinel node(s) is (are) negative, the other lymph nodes are negative, too. Since there are no randomized prospective trials comparing the results of sentinel lymphadenectomy with other techniques of lymph node dissection, it is not clear whether sentinel lymph node dissection also has a prognostic impact. PMID:19468350

  16. Malignant melanoma of the skin

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, B. K.; Holman, C. D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Ultra-violet radiation (UVR) in sunlight is thought to be the main cause of malignant melanoma in lightly-pigmented populations. Individuals with fair skin, fair hair, blue eyes and/or a tendency to burn rather than tan when exposed to the sun are at particularly high risk of melanoma and should be given special attention in primary prevention programmes. Intermittent exposure to the sun, as in recreational exposure, may be a more potent cause of melanoma than more continuous exposure. Primary prevention offers the best prospects for a substantial reduction in mortality from malignant melanoma. However, there is little evidence available to judge the effectiveness of primary prevention of melanoma through reduction of exposure to the sun. Education for reducing exposure to the sun is common in high-risk populations but has never been evaluated adequately. Mortality from melanoma could also possibly be reduced by earlier diagnosis through education or screening of high-risk groups. Regular screening of patients with the familial dysplastic naevus syndrome should reduce their mortality from melanoma. PMID:3301043

  17. Role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of oral submucous fibrosis: A preliminary prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Shakunthala, G. K.; Annigeri, Rajeshwari G.; Arunkumar, Shantala

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the current scenario pathogenesis of majority of the diseases is deeply linked with the oxidative stress, irrespective of its etiology. Enumerable data suggests that reactive oxygen species play a key role in multistage carcinogenesis. Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is considered as a potentially malignant disorder. Its increased incidence over recent years in the Indian subcontinent is a major health concern to oral physicians. However, the role of oxidative stress has not been widely investigated in OSMF. Aims: Is to evaluate both antioxidant and oxidant status in OSMF and to compare with controls. Settings and Design: Twenty patients and 20 controls of the same age group were enrolled in the study. Subjects and Methods: Five milliliters of blood were collected from each individual and serum was separated. Malondialdehyde (MDA) estimation using thiobarbituric acid (TBA) method, and antioxidant activity (AOA) using principle of TBA reactive substances was done using this serum, with a calorimetric method. Statistical Analysis Used: Student's t-test and ANOVA test. Results: The mean serum AOA status was seen to significantly decrease in OSMF patients, as compared to controls (P = 0.013). The increase in mean serum MDA level was highly significant in OSMF patients, as compared to controls (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The disparity between AOA and MDA levels in the patients clearly demonstrates the role of oxidative stress in the disease process. The results also suggest the use of antioxidants in the management of OSMF. PMID:26604570

  18. A targeted proteomic strategy for the measurement of oral cancer candidate biomarkers in human saliva.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Rebeca; Bollinger, James G; Rivera, César; Ribeiro, Ana Carolina P; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Paes Leme, Adriana F; MacCoss, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancers, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), are the sixth most common malignancy in the world and are characterized by poor prognosis and a low survival rate. Saliva is oral fluid with intimate contact with OSCC. Besides non-invasive, simple, and rapid to collect, saliva is a potential source of biomarkers. In this study, we build an SRM assay that targets fourteen OSCC candidate biomarker proteins, which were evaluated in a set of clinically-derived saliva samples. Using Skyline software package, we demonstrated a statistically significant higher abundance of the C1R, LCN2, SLPI, FAM49B, TAGLN2, CFB, C3, C4B, LRG1, SERPINA1 candidate biomarkers in the saliva of OSCC patients. Furthermore, our study also demonstrated that CFB, C3, C4B, SERPINA1 and LRG1 are associated with the risk of developing OSCC. Overall, this study successfully used targeted proteomics to measure in saliva a panel of biomarker candidates for OSCC. PMID:26552850

  19. Peritoneal Malignant Mesothelioma with Epithelioid Type, Demonstrating High Serum and Ascitic KL-6 Levels: Immunohistochemical Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Nahar, Saifun; Nakamoto, Manabu; Hokama, Akira; Kobashigawa, Chiharu; Kaida, Masatoshi; Kinjo, Tetsu; Hirata, Tetsuo; Kinjo, Nagisa; Saio, Masanao; Yoshimi, Naoki; Ohtsuki, Yuji; Fujita, Jiro

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of KL-6 producing peritoneal malignant mesothelioma. A 56-year-old woman was referred to our hospital on November 2005 with severe abdominal distention. Peritoneal malignant mesothelioma with epithelioid type was diagnosed by clinical symptoms, laboratory investigations, imaging studies, and immunohistochemical examination of known tumor markers. In addition, high serum and ascitic KL-6 levels were observed and the immunostaining of the tumor for KL-6 was evident. We thus consider KL-6 to be a potential novel marker for peritoneal malignant mesothelioma with epithelioid type. PMID:26500734

  20. Peritoneal Malignant Mesothelioma with Epithelioid Type, Demonstrating High Serum and Ascitic KL-6 Levels: Immunohistochemical Analyses.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Saifun; Nakamoto, Manabu; Hokama, Akira; Kobashigawa, Chiharu; Kaida, Masatoshi; Kinjo, Tetsu; Hirata, Tetsuo; Kinjo, Nagisa; Saio, Masanao; Yoshimi, Naoki; Ohtsuki, Yuji; Fujita, Jiro

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of KL-6 producing peritoneal malignant mesothelioma. A 56-year-old woman was referred to our hospital on November 2005 with severe abdominal distention. Peritoneal malignant mesothelioma with epithelioid type was diagnosed by clinical symptoms, laboratory investigations, imaging studies, and immunohistochemical examination of known tumor markers. In addition, high serum and ascitic KL-6 levels were observed and the immunostaining of the tumor for KL-6 was evident. We thus consider KL-6 to be a potential novel marker for peritoneal malignant mesothelioma with epithelioid type. PMID:26500734

  1. Oral administration of drugs with hypersensitivity potential induces germinal center hyperplasia in secondary lymphoid organ/tissue in Brown Norway rats, and this histological lesion is a promising candidate as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Akitoshi Miyawaki, Izuru; Yamada, Toru; Kimura, Juki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2013-08-15

    It is important to evaluate the potential of drug hypersensitivity as well as other adverse effects during the preclinical stage of the drug development process, but validated methods are not available yet. In the present study we examined whether it would be possible to develop a new predictive model of drug hypersensitivity using Brown Norway (BN) rats. As representative drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans, phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), amoxicillin (AMX), and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) were orally administered to BN rats for 28 days to investigate their effects on these animals by examinations including observation of clinical signs, hematology, determination of serum IgE levels, histology, and flow cytometric analysis. Skin rashes were not observed in any animals treated with these drugs. Increases in the number of circulating inflammatory cells and serum IgE level did not necessarily occur in the animals treated with these drugs. However, histological examination revealed that germinal center hyperplasia was commonly induced in secondary lymphoid organs/tissues in the animals treated with these drugs. In cytometric analysis, changes in proportions of lymphocyte subsets were noted in the spleen of the animals treated with PHT or CBZ during the early period of administration. The results indicated that the potential of drug hypersensitivity was identified in BN rat by performing histological examination of secondary lymphoid organs/tissues. Data obtained herein suggested that drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans gained immune reactivity in BN rat, and the germinal center hyperplasia induced by administration of these drugs may serve as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence. - Highlights: • We tested Brown Norway rats as a candidate model for predicting drug hypersensitivity. • The allergic drugs did not induce skin rash, whereas D-penicillamine did so in the rats. • Some of allergic drugs increased inflammatory cells and IgE, but the others did not. • The allergic drugs commonly induced germinal center hyperplasia in lymphoid tissues. • Some of these allergic drugs transiently increased CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells in the spleen.

  2. Radiotherapy-Induced Malignancies: Review of Clinical Features, Pathobiology, and Evolving Approaches for Mitigating Risk

    PubMed Central

    Braunstein, Steve; Nakamura, Jean L.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most significant effects of radiation therapy on normal tissues is mutagenesis, which is the basis for radiation-induced malignancies. Radiation-induced malignancies are late complications arising after radiotherapy, increasing in frequency among survivors of both pediatric and adult cancers. Genetic backgrounds harboring germline mutations in tumor suppressor genes are recognized risk factors. Some success has been found with using genome wide association studies to identify germline polymorphisms associated with susceptibility. The insights generated by genetics, epidemiology, and the development of experimental models are defining potential strategies to offer to individuals at risk for radiation-induced malignancies. Concurrent technological efforts are developing novel radiotherapy delivery to reduce irradiation of normal tissues, and thereby, to mitigate the risk of radiation-induced malignancies. The goal of this review is to discuss epidemiologic, modeling, and radiotherapy delivery data, where these lines of research intersect and their potential impact on patient care. PMID:23565507

  3. A review: Immunological markers for malignant salivary gland tumors

    PubMed Central

    Namboodiripad, P.C. Anila

    2014-01-01

    Salivary gland cancers are rare. Around 8 out of 10 salivary gland tumors (80%) are in the parotid. Just fewer than 2 out of 10 salivary gland cancers develop in the other two salivary glands – the submandibular or sublingual glands. Fewer than 1 in 10 cancers start in the minor salivary glands. There are many different types of salivary gland cancers. The most common is mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC). Just over 3 out of 10 (25–35%) salivary gland cancers (SGT, SGC) are of this type. The others include adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC), acinic cell carcinoma, carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma (Ca-PA), polymorphous low grade adenocarcinoma (PLGA) and some newly discovered salivary gland tumors. Because of the infrequency of salivary gland tumors and their complex histopathological diagnosis, it is difficult to exactly predict their clinical course by means of its recurrence, malignant progression or metastasis. Salivary gland tumors always pose problems in diagnosis. This review provides an insight into the recent concepts and immunohistochemical markers to diagnose the malignant salivary gland tumors (SGT), thus guiding the Ear, Nose and Throat specialists, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, General Pathologists and other medical and dental specialists thereby enabling them to make correct diagnosis and provide the appropriate treatment. PMID:25737930

  4. Sarcoidosis: Oral and extra-oral manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sanjay; Tripathi, Amitandra Kumar; Kumar, Vivek; Saimbi, Charanjit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease, which is usually associated with the formation of noncaseating granulomas in affected tissues and organs. It is mostly present with bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, pulmonary infiltration, ocular, and cutaneous lesions. Oral manifestations of this disease are relatively rare. The present case report shows a 40-year-old male with lesions in the soft tissue of oral cavity (buccal mucosa, gingiva, and palate) and a diagnosis of sarcoidosis was established following hematological, biochemical and pulmonary function tests, chest radiograph, and histopathological investigation.

  5. Tongue piercing (oral body art).

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Chen, M

    1994-02-01

    Oral body art is a relatively recent fashion in the West where jewelry is inserted in the oral soft tissues. A patient who had tongue-piercing is presented, and the subject of oral piercing reviewed. PMID:8136338

  6. American Academy of Oral Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 5, 2016 AAOM: Representing the Discipline of Oral Medicine Oral Medicine is the discipline of dentistry concerned with the ... offers credentialing, resources and professional community for oral medicine practitioners. Our membership provides care to thousands We ...

  7. Thrush (Oral Candidiasis) in Children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A A A In oral candidiasis, normal mouth yeast overgrows, causing white, slightly elevated lesions. Overview Thrush ( ... candidiasis), also known as oral moniliasis, is a yeast infection of the mouth or throat (the oral ...

  8. Postoperative recurrence solitary fibrous tumor of the pelvic with malignant transformation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chao; Zhang, Yong; Li, Yu-Ying; Yu, Yong-Hua; Qu, Wei; Gao, Yong-Sheng; Zhang, Shuo

    2015-01-01

    A 48-year-old man with a solitary fibrous tumor of the pelvic underwent resection, but recurrent tumor was found 4 years later. Recurrent solitary fibrous tumor of the pelvic with malignant progression is rare. Solitary fibrous tumor of the pelvic often has an indolent clinical course, so postoperative surveillance may necessitate long-term follow-up because of the potential adverse biological behavior of this tumor, which may lead to repeated recurrences and/or malignant transformation. PMID:26629228

  9. Oral Melanotic Macule

    MedlinePLUS

    ... oral melanotic macule appears as a solitary, flat, tan-to-dark-brown spot usually less than 7 mm in diameter. It has a well-defined border and a uniform color. People can have more than one oral melanotic macule. Self-Care Guidelines There are no self-care measures ...

  10. Irreversible Electroporation of Hepatic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Govindarajan; Froud, Tatiana; Suthar, Rekhaben; Barbery, Katuska

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a worldwide problem of epidemic proportions, best treated in a multidisciplinary setting. Major advances have been made in all specialties that manage patients with HCC, with surgical options at one end of the spectrum and palliative chemotherapy on the other, and the vast majority of patients require the involvement and expertise of interventional oncology. Several ablative and transarterial technologies are currently available. Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a new ablative technology that uses high-voltage, low-energy DC current to create nanopores in the cell membrane, disrupting the homeostasis mechanism and inducing cell death by initiating apoptosis. This article discusses the evolution of IRE as well as its safety and efficacy in the context of other ablative therapies in the treatment of hepatic malignancies. PMID:24436519

  11. [Malignant hyperthermia syndrome: case report].

    PubMed

    Taffarel, Pedro; Koffman, Fernando; Zifferman, Andrea; Degiuseppe, Sebastián; Mansilla, Alejandro; Darduin, Marcelo; Acerenza, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    Malignant hyperthermia syndrome is a family myopathy of pharmacogenetic nature, which appears as a skeletal muscle hypercatabolic syndrome linked to anesthesia. The incidence in pediatrics is 1 event per 10 000 surgeries. The clinical picture may have a rapid onset associated with succinylcholine, or a late onset related to inhalation agents. The clinical picture includes tachycardia, hyperthermia, hypercapnia, acidosis, muscle rigidity, hyperkalemia, renal failure and arrhythmia. Mortality without specific treatment is of 80% and drops to 7% with the use of dantrolene sodium. We report an 8-year-old patient admitted for phimosis surgery; having tachycardia, hypercapnia and muscle rigidity, he started treatment with dantrolene sodium in the operating room, which was maintained for 72 hours. He evolved the first 12 hours with low cardiac output and creatine phosphokinase maximum of 155,147 U/L. He remained with mechanical ventilation for 48 hours. Discharge was given on the sixth day without sequelae. PMID:25727836

  12. Rare Malignant Tumors of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Trevor; Albarracin, Constance; Carkaci, Selin; Whitman, Gary J; Adrada, Beatriz E

    2015-01-01

    While the more common forms of breast cancer are well understood and recognized, there are many important rare malignancies that are less appreciated. Many of these cancers have imaging findings that, when understood, help to formulate a more educated differential diagnosis. In this article, the clinical features, imaging, and pathologic findings of rare breast malignancies will be discussed. PMID:26664775

  13. Malignant gonadal tumour formation in intersexual states

    PubMed Central

    Pigott, H. W. S.

    1975-01-01

    Two cases of malignant tumour are reported in phenotypically male hermaphrodites. The importance of establishing the presence of persistent Müllerian duct structures in pseudo-hermaphrodites is discussed in relation to prophylactic castration in anticipation of malignant change. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:1197157

  14. Gynecologic Malignancies Post-LeFort Colpocleisis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. LeFort colpocleisis (LFC) is a safe and effective obliterative surgical option for older women with advanced pelvic organ prolapse who no longer desire coital activity. A major disadvantage is the limited ability to evaluate for post-LFC gynecologic malignancies. Methods. We present the first case of endometrioid ovarian cancer diagnosed after LFC and review all reported gynecologic malignancies post-LFC in the English medical literature. Results. This is the second reported ovarian cancer post-LFC and the first of the endometrioid subtype. A total of nine other gynecologic malignancies post-LFC have been reported in the English medical literature. Conclusions. Gynecologic malignancies post-LFC are rare. We propose a simple 3-step strategy in evaluating post-LFC malignancies. PMID:25525536

  15. Expression of Cellular Oncogenes in Human Malignancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamon, Dennis J.; Dekernion, Jean B.; Verma, Inder M.; Cline, Martin J.

    1984-04-01

    Cellular oncogenes have been implicated in the induction of malignant transformation in some model systems in vitro and may be related to malignancies in vivo in some vertebrate species. This article describes a study of the expression of 15 cellular oncogenes in fresh human tumors from 54 patients, representing 20 different tumor types. More than one cellular oncogene was transcriptionally active in all of the tumors examined. In 14 patients it was possible to study normal and malignant tissue from the same organ. In many of these patients, the transcriptional activity of certain oncogenes was greater in the malignant than the normal tissue. The cellular fes (feline sarcoma) oncogene, not previously known to be transcribed in mammalian tissue, was found to be active in lung and hematopoietic malignancies.

  16. Oral Microbial Ecology and the Role of Salivary Immunoglobulin A

    PubMed Central

    Marcotte, Harold; Lavoie, Marc C.

    1998-01-01

    In the oral cavity, indigenous bacteria are often associated with two major oral diseases, caries and periodontal diseases. These diseases seem to appear following an inbalance in the oral resident microbiota, leading to the emergence of potentially pathogenic bacteria. To define the process involved in caries and periodontal diseases, it is necessary to understand the ecology of the oral cavity and to identify the factors responsible for the transition of the oral microbiota from a commensal to a pathogenic relationship with the host. The regulatory forces influencing the oral ecosystem can be divided into three major categories: host related, microbe related, and external factors. Among host factors, secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) constitutes the main specific immune defense mechanism in saliva and may play an important role in the homeostasis of the oral microbiota. Naturally occurring SIgA antibodies that are reactive against a variety of indigenous bacteria are detectable in saliva. These antibodies may control the oral microbiota by reducing the adherence of bacteria to the oral mucosa and teeth. It is thought that protection against bacterial etiologic agents of caries and periodontal diseases could be conferred by the induction of SIgA antibodies via the stimulation of the mucosal immune system. However, elucidation of the role of the SIgA immune system in controlling the oral indigenous microbiota is a prerequisite for the development of effective vaccines against these diseases. The role of SIgA antibodies in the acquisition and the regulation of the indigenous microbiota is still controversial. Our review discusses the importance of SIgA among the multiple factors that control the oral microbiota. It describes the oral ecosystems, the principal factors that may control the oral microbiota, a basic knowledge of the secretory immune system, the biological functions of SIgA, and, finally, experiments related to the role of SIgA in oral microbial ecology. PMID:9529888

  17. Literatura Oral Hispanica (Hispanic Oral Literature).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlpine, Dave

    As part of a class in Hispanic Oral Literature, students collected pieces of folklore from various Hispanic residents in the region known as "Siouxland" in Iowa. Consisting of some of the folklore recorded from the residents, this paper includes 18 "cuentos y leyendas" (tales and legends), 48 "refranes" (proverbs), 17 "chistes" (jokes), 1…

  18. Antitumor effect of fibrin glue containing temozolomide against malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Anai, Shigeo; Hide, Takuichiro; Takezaki, Tatsuya; Kuroda, Jun-ichiro; Shinojima, Naoki; Makino, Keishi; Nakamura, Hideo; Yano, Shigetoshi; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi

    2014-05-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ), used to treat glioblastoma and malignant glioma, induces autophagy, apoptosis and senescence in cancer cells. We investigated fibrin glue (FG) as a drug delivery system for the local administration of high-concentration TMZ aimed at preventing glioma recurrence. Our high-power liquid chromatography studies indicated that FG containing TMZ (TMZ-FG) manifested a sustained drug release potential. We prepared a subcutaneous tumor model by injecting groups of mice with three malignant glioma cell lines and examined the antitumor effect of TMZ-FG. We estimated the tumor volume and performed immunostaining and immunoblotting using antibodies to Ki-67, cleaved caspase 3, LC3 and p16. When FG sheets containing TMZ (TMZ-FGS) were inserted beneath the tumors, their growth was significantly suppressed. In mice treated with peroral TMZ plus TMZ-FGS the tumors tended to be smaller than in mice whose tumors were treated with TMZ-FGS or peroral TMZ alone. The TMZ-FGS induced autophagy, apoptosis and senescence in subcutaneous glioma tumor cells. To assess the safety of TMZ-FG for normal brain, we placed it directly on the brain of living mice and stained tissue sections obtained in the acute and chronic phase immunohistochemically. In both phases, TMZ-FG failed to severely damage normal brain tissue. TMZ-FG may represent a safe new drug delivery system with sustained drug release potential to treat malignant glioma. PMID:24673719

  19. Immunohistochemical staining of tumor necrosis factor-? and interleukin-10 in benign and malignant ovarian neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    JAMMAL, MILLENA PRATA; DA SILVA, ALLISON ARAÚJO; FILHO, AGRIMALDO MARTINS; DE CASTRO CÔBO, ELIÂNGELA; ADAD, SHEILA JORGE; MURTA, EDDIE FERNANDO CANDIDO; NOMELINI, ROSEKEILA SIMÕES

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the ninth most common malignancy and the fifth leading cause of cancer death in women in the USA. The majority of malignant tumors of the ovary are diagnosed at an advanced stage, making it the most fatal gynecological cancer. The aim of the current study was to determine whether there are differences in immunohistochemical tissue staining of cytokine tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) between benign tumors and malignant primary ovarian cancer. In total, 28 patients undergoing surgery for ovarian cysts were evaluated, and a diagnosis of benign neoplasm (n=14) or malignant neoplasm (n=14) was determined. An immunohistochemical study of histological sections of ovarian tumors was conducted. The results were analyzed using Fisher’s exact test, with P<0.05 indicating a statistically significant difference. Immunohistochemical staining of IL-10 was increased in malignant tumors compared with benign tumors (P=0.0128). For TNF-?, the immunohistochemical staining was more intense in malignant neoplasms, however, a statistically significant difference was not observed. These results indicate that the analysis of cytokines may be useful as a potential tissue marker of ovarian malignancy. PMID:25624918

  20. Oral Health Promotion in Schools: Rationale and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kizito, Alex; Caitlin, Meredith; Wang, Yili; Kasangaki, Arabat; Macnab, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explain the rationale and potential for the WHO health promoting schools (HPS) to improve children's oral health, and describe validated quantitative methodologies and qualitative approaches to measure program impact. Design/Methodology/Approach: Critical discussion of the impact of poor oral health and…

  1. From Ethnography to Social Action through Oral History in Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlin, Phyllis Scott

    The staged performance of oral history narratives scripted by interpreters/ethnographers has significant potential for instigating social change. Recent articles by Dwight Conquergood and Kristin Langellier provide the basis for merging ethnography, oral history and social action projects. Narratives from a 1984 farm crisis project illustrate this…

  2. Reducing patient harm with the use of opioid oral solutions.

    PubMed

    Grissinger, Matthew; Gaunt, Michael J

    2011-06-01

    Medication errors involving oral opioids have led to serious adverse events, including failure to control pain, over-sedation, respiratory depression, seizures, and death. This article will highlight medication errors that may arise during the use of opioid oral solutions, particularly concentrated formulations, and provide risk-reduction recommendations to address the potential for error and patient harm. PMID:21628137

  3. [Neuroleptic malignant syndrome : Rare cause of fever of unknown origin].

    PubMed

    Chackupurakal, R; Wild, U; Kamm, M; Wappler, F; Reske, D; Sakka, S G

    2015-07-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a possible cause of fever of unknown origin (FUO) and is a potentially fatal adverse effect of various drugs, especially of neuroleptics. First generation antipsychotics, such as received by the patient described in this article, are more likely to cause NMS than second generation antipsychotics. The key symptoms are the development of severe muscle rigidity and elevated temperature associated with the use of neuroleptic medication. Malignant catatonia (MC) is an important differential diagnosis of NMS. While neuroleptics can trigger NMS and must be immediately discontinued if NMS occurs, neuroleptic therapy represents the first line treatment for MC. This article describes the case of a patient with schizoaffective disorder where initially the diagnosis of NMS was not clear. Eventually, fever and a markedly elevated serum creatine kinase (CK) led to the correct diagnosis and the appropriate therapy with dantrolene, bromocriptine and amantadine. Furthermore, a thorough review of the currently available literature on NMS is provided. PMID:26122200

  4. Photoacoustic spectroscopic differences between normal and malignant thyroid tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Xie, Wengming; Li, Hui

    2012-12-01

    The thyroid is one of the main endocrine glands of human body, which plays a crucial role in the body's metabolism. Thyroid cancer mortality ranks only second to ovarian cancer in endocrine cancer. Routine diagnostic methods of thyroid diseases in present clinic exist misdiagnosis and missed diagnosis to varying degrees. Those lead to miss the best period of cancer treatment--early. Photoacoustic spectroscopy technology is a new tool, which provides an effective and noninvasive way for biomedical materials research, being highly sensitive and without sample pretreatment. In this paper, we use photoacoustic spectroscopy technology (PAST) to detect the absorption spectrum between normal and malignant thyroid tissues. The result shows that the photoacoustic spectroscopy technology (PAST) could differentiate malignant thyroid tissue from normal thyroid tissue very well. This technique combined with routine diagnostic methods has the potential to increase the diagnostic accuracy in clinical thyroid cancer diagnosis.

  5. Long noncoding RNAs during normal and malignant hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R.; Hu, Wenqian; Gromatzky, Austin A.

    2014-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are increasingly recognized to contribute to cellular development via diverse mechanisms during both health and disease. Here, we highlight recent progress on the study of lncRNAs that function in the development of blood cells. We emphasize lncRNAs that regulate blood cell fates through epigenetic control of gene expression, an emerging theme among functional lncRNAs. Many of these noncoding genes and their targets become dysregulated during malignant hematopoiesis, directly implicating lncRNAs in blood cancers such as leukemia. In a few cases, dysregulation of an lncRNA alone leads to malignant hematopoiesis in a mouse model. Thus, lncRNAs may be not only useful as markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of cancers of the blood, but also as potential targets for novel therapies. PMID:24609766

  6. Immunomodulatory drugs: Oral and systemic adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Riikka; Gomez-Font, Rafael; Meurman, Jukka H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The main objectives are to present the different adverses effects of the immunomodulatory drugs that can impair the quality of life of the immunosupressed patients and study the impact of immunomodualtion on oral diseases. Immunomodulatory drugs have changed the treatment protocols of many diseases where immune functions play a central role, such as rheumatic diseases. Their effect on oral health has not been systematically investigated, however. Study Design: We review current data on the new immunomodulatory drugs from the oral health perspective based on open literature search of the topic. Results: These target specific drugs appear to have less drug interactions than earlier immunomodulating medicines but have nevertheless potential side effects such as activating latent infections. There are some data showing that the new immunomodulatory drugs may also have a role in the treatment of certain oral diseases such as lichen planus or ameliorating symptoms in Sjögren´s syndrome, but the results have not been overly promising. Conclusions: In general, data are sparse of the effect of these new drugs vs. oral diseases and there are no properly powered randomized controlled trials published on this topic. Key words:Immunomodulatory drugs, oral diseases, adverse effects, therapeutic action. PMID:23986016

  7. Oral glycopyrrolate for refractory pediatric and adolescent hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Monique G; Foreman, Rebecca S; Berk, David R; Bayliss, Susan J

    2014-01-01

    Primary hyperhidrosis is a common disorder affecting children and adolescents, and it can have a significant negative psychosocial effect. Treatment for pediatric hyperhidrosis tends to be limited by low efficacy, low adherence, and poor tolerance. Oral glycopyrrolate is emerging as a potential second-line treatment option, but experience with safety, efficacy, and dosing is especially limited in children. We present an institutional review of 12 children with severe, refractory hyperhidrosis treated with oral glycopyrrolate; 11 (92%) noted improvement and 9 (75%) would recommend oral glycopyrrolate to their friends. No significant side effects were noted. Our retrospective analysis suggests that oral glycopyrrolate is safe and effective in children with hyperhidrosis. PMID:24266878

  8. Oral Immunotherapy for Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Burbank, Allison J; Sood, Puja; Vickery, Brian P; Wood, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Food allergy is a potentially life-threatening condition with no approved therapies, apart from avoidance and injectable epinephrine for acute allergic reactions. Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is an experimental treatment in which food-allergic patients consume gradually increasing quantities of the food to increase their threshold for allergic reaction. This therapy carries significant risk of allergic reactions. The ability of OIT to desensitize patients to particular foods is well-documented, although the ability to induce tolerance has not been established. This review focuses on recent studies for the treatment of food allergies such as cow's milk, hen's egg, and peanut. PMID:26617227

  9. Comparative Expression Study of the Endo–G Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR) Repertoire in Human Glioblastoma Cancer Stem-like Cells, U87-MG Cells and Non Malignant Cells of Neural Origin Unveils New Potential Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Lennon, Sarah; Carapito, Christine; Dong, Jihu; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Cianférani, Sarah; Haiech, Jacques; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are highly aggressive, invasive brain tumors with bad prognosis and unmet medical need. These tumors are heterogeneous being constituted by a variety of cells in different states of differentiation. Among these, cells endowed with stem properties, tumor initiating/propagating properties and particularly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapies are designed as the real culprits for tumor maintenance and relapse after treatment. These cells, termed cancer stem-like cells, have been designed as prominent targets for new and more efficient cancer therapies. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), a family of membrane receptors, play a prominent role in cell signaling, cell communication and crosstalk with the microenvironment. Their role in cancer has been highlighted but remains largely unexplored. Here, we report a descriptive study of the differential expression of the endo-GPCR repertoire in human glioblastoma cancer stem-like cells (GSCs), U-87 MG cells, human astrocytes and fetal neural stem cells (f-NSCs). The endo-GPCR transcriptome has been studied using Taqman Low Density Arrays. Of the 356 GPCRs investigated, 138 were retained for comparative studies between the different cell types. At the transcriptomic level, eight GPCRs were specifically expressed/overexpressed in GSCs. Seventeen GPCRs appeared specifically expressed in cells with stem properties (GSCs and f-NSCs). Results of GPCR expression at the protein level using mass spectrometry and proteomic analysis are also presented. The comparative GPCR expression study presented here gives clues for new pathways specifically used by GSCs and unveils novel potential therapeutic targets. PMID:24662753

  10. Maintenance of Increased Mouth Opening in Oral Submucous Fibrosis Patient Treated with Nasolabial Flap Technique

    PubMed Central

    Naphade, Milind; Bhagat, Bhushan; Adwani, Dwarkadas; Mandwe, Ranjit

    2014-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is an insidious chronic disease affecting any part of the oral cavity and sometimes the pharynx with epithelial atrophy leading to stiffness of the oral mucosa, causing trismus and inability to eat. However, a more serious complication of this disease is the risk of the development of oral carcinoma. A case of OSMF reported with initial interincisal mouth opening; 8?mm which was treated surgically with nasolabial flap technique followed by active mouth opening exercises for 6 months with Hister's jaw exerciser. The patient could maintain mouth opening of 32?mm at the end of 18-months followup. The patient was observed closely for any malignant changes in the oral cavity. PMID:24716001

  11. Maintenance of increased mouth opening in oral submucous fibrosis patient treated with nasolabial flap technique.

    PubMed

    Naphade, Milind; Bhagat, Bhushan; Adwani, Dwarkadas; Mandwe, Ranjit

    2014-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is an insidious chronic disease affecting any part of the oral cavity and sometimes the pharynx with epithelial atrophy leading to stiffness of the oral mucosa, causing trismus and inability to eat. However, a more serious complication of this disease is the risk of the development of oral carcinoma. A case of OSMF reported with initial interincisal mouth opening; 8?mm which was treated surgically with nasolabial flap technique followed by active mouth opening exercises for 6 months with Hister's jaw exerciser. The patient could maintain mouth opening of 32?mm at the end of 18-months followup. The patient was observed closely for any malignant changes in the oral cavity. PMID:24716001

  12. What Are Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? What are oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? Oral cavity cancer, or just ... parts of the mouth and throat. The oral cavity (mouth) and oropharynx (throat) The oral cavity includes ...

  13. Oral Chemotherapy: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePLUS

    Oral Chemotherapy: What You Need to Know Oral chemo is any drug you take by mouth to treat cancer. ... be ready for oral chemo. What is oral chemotherapy? There are many types of chemotherapy (chemo). Oral ...

  14. Stuttering and oral stereognosis.

    PubMed

    Martin, R R; Lawrence, B A; Haroldson, S K; Gunderson, D

    1981-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate oral stereognostic performance of stutterers. In Exp. I, stutterers and controls responded "same"--"different" to two oral forms placed successively on their tongues. In Exp. II, stutterers and controls underwent two procedures. For half the items, the task was the same as in Exp. I; for the other half, subjects were presented a single form and visually identified that form from among others on a placard. In both experiments, stutterers made significantly more oral stereognostic errors than did their matched controls. PMID:7290864

  15. Impairment of mesenchymal stem cells derived from oral leukoplakia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhihui; Song, Jiangyuan; Han, Ying; Mu, Dongdong; Su, Sha; Ji, Xiaoli; Liu, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Oral leukoplakia is one of the common precancerous lesions in oral mucosa. To compare the biological characteristics and regenerative capacities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from oral leukoplakia (epithelial hyperplasia and dysplasia) and normal oral mucosa, MSCs were isolated by enzyme digestion. Then these cells were identified by the expression of MSC related markers, STRO-1, CD105 and CD90, with the absent for the hematopoietic stem cell marker CD34 by flow cytometric detection. The self-renewal ability of MSCs from oral leukoplakia was enhanced, while the multipotent differentiation was descended, compared with MSCs from normal oral mucosa. Fibrin gel was used as a carrier for MSCs transplanted into immunocompromised mice to detect their regenerative capacity. The regenerative capacities of MSCs from oral leukoplakia became impaired partly. Collagen IV (Col IV) and matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) were selected to analyze the potential mechanism for the functional changes of MSCs from oral leukoplakia by immunochemical and western blot analysis. The expression of Col IV was decreased and that of MMP-9 was increased by MSCs with the progression of oral leukoplakia, especially in MSCs from epithelial dysplasia. The imbalance between regenerative and metabolic self-regulatory functions of MSCs from oral leukoplakia may be related to the progression of this premalignant disorder. PMID:26617710

  16. What Are the Key Statistics about Malignant Mesothelioma?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Article Close Push escape to close saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Malignant Mesothelioma + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » What Is Malignant Mesothelioma? TOPICS ...

  17. Oral sex and oral health: An enigma in itself

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Tarun; Puri, Gagan; Aravinda, Konidena; Arora, Neha; Patil, Deepa; Gupta, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active couples of various age groups, including male-female and same-gender adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus, and analingus. Oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital infections from one site in body to the other. Oral health has a direct correlation on the transmission of infection; a cut in the mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of life-threatening infections. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues, and oral hygiene and dental issues. The ulcerations or unhealthy periodontium in mouth accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus, consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex. PMID:26692602

  18. Building a gold standard to construct search filters: a case study with biomarkers for oral cancer*†

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, John J.; Stein, Corey D.; Tseytlin, Eugene; Bekhuis, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To support clinical researchers, librarians and informationists may need search filters for particular tasks. Development of filters typically depends on a “gold standard” dataset. This paper describes generalizable methods for creating a gold standard to support future filter development and evaluation using oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) as a case study. OSCC is the most common malignancy affecting the oral cavity. Investigation of biomarkers with potential prognostic utility is an active area of research in OSCC. The methods discussed here should be useful for designing quality search filters in similar domains. Methods: The authors searched MEDLINE for prognostic studies of OSCC, developed annotation guidelines for screeners, ran three calibration trials before annotating the remaining body of citations, and measured inter-annotator agreement (IAA). Results: We retrieved 1,818 citations. After calibration, we screened the remaining citations (n?=?1,767; 97.2%); IAA was substantial (kappa?=?0.76). The dataset has 497 (27.3%) citations representing OSCC studies of potential prognostic biomarkers. Conclusions: The gold standard dataset is likely to be high quality and useful for future development and evaluation of filters for OSCC studies of potential prognostic biomarkers. Implications: The methodology we used is generalizable to other domains requiring a reference standard to evaluate the performance of search filters. A gold standard is essential because the labels regarding relevance enable computation of diagnostic metrics, such as sensitivity and specificity. Librarians and informationists with data analysis skills could contribute to developing gold standard datasets and subsequent filters tuned for their patrons' domains of interest. PMID:25552941

  19. Metastatic malignant blue nevus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ozgür, F; Akyürek, M; Kayikçio?lu, A; Bari?ta, I; Gököz, A

    1997-10-01

    This report presents a 63-year-old Caucasian woman with a malignant blue nevus, which is an extremely rare form of melanoma originating from or associated with a preexisting blue nevus. The background blue nevus on the left upper arm, which had been present for 5 to 6 years, increased in size and darkened in color for 3 months prior to histological diagnosis of malignant blue nevus. Although the tumor looked much like a nodular melanoma clinically, the diagnosis of malignant blue nevus was established histologically. The patient had a poor outcome due to metastatic spread of the tumor to the visceral organs 1 year following the initial excision of the tumor. To distinguish this rare tumor from other melanocytic lesions, strict histological criteria are needed to make the diagnosis of malignant blue nevus. Differential diagnosis includes cellular blue nevus, atypical cellular blue nevus, primary malignant melanoma, and metastatic melanoma to the dermis. Malignant blue nevus is most commonly seen on the scalp. The tumor has an aggressive behavior and metastasizes in the majority of patients. This paper describes the second reported case of malignant blue nevus involving the upper arm. Clinical and histological features of this uncommon tumor are presented, along with a review of the literature. PMID:9339284

  20. Management of intestinal obstruction in advanced malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Henry John Murray; Ferguson, Claire Irene; Speakman, John; Ismail, Tariq

    2015-01-01

    Patients with incurable, advanced abdominal or pelvic malignancy often present to acute surgical departments with symptoms and signs of intestinal obstruction. It is rare for bowel strangulation to occur in these presentations, and spontaneous resolution often occurs, so the luxury of time should be afforded while decisions are made regarding surgery. Cross-sectional imaging is valuable in determining the underlying mechanism and pathology. The majority of these patients will not be suitable for an operation, and will be best managed in conjunction with a palliative medicine team. Surgeons require a good working knowledge of the mechanisms of action of anti-emetics, anti-secretories and analgesics to tailor early management to individual patients, while decisions regarding potential surgery are made. Deciding if and when to perform operative intervention in this group is complex, and fraught with both technical and emotional challenges. Surgery in this group is highly morbid, with no current evidence available concerning quality of life following surgery. The limited evidence concerning operative strategy suggests that resection and primary anastomosis results in improved survival, over bypass or stoma formation. Realistic prognostication and involvement of the patient, care-givers and the multidisciplinary team in treatment decisions is mandatory if optimum outcomes are to be achieved. PMID:26288731