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Sample records for oral potentially malignant

  1. Potentially malignant oral lesions: clinicopathological correlations.

    PubMed

    Maia, Haline Cunha de Medeiros; Pinto, Najara Alcântara Sampaio; Pereira, Joabe Dos Santos; Medeiros, Ana Miryam Costa de; Silveira, Éricka Janine Dantas da; Miguel, Márcia Cristina da Costa

    2016-03-01

    Objective To determine the incidence of potentially malignant oral lesions, and evaluate and correlate their clinical and pathological aspects. Methods The sample consisted of cases clinically diagnosed as oral leukoplakia, oral erythroplakia, erythroleukoplakia, actinic cheilitis, and oral lichen planus treated at a diagnostic center, between May 2012 and July 2013. Statistical tests were conducted adopting a significance level of 5% (p≤0.05). Results Out of 340 patients, 106 (31.2%) had potentially malignant oral lesions; and 61 of these (17.9%) were submitted to biopsy. Actinic cheilitis was the most frequent lesion (37.5%) and the lower lip was the most affected site (49.6%). Among 106 patients in the sample, 48 (45.3%) reported nicotine consumption, 35 (33%) reported alcohol intake and 34 (32.1%) sun exposure while working. When clinical and histopathological diagnoses were compared, oral erythroplakia and atypical ulcer were the lesions that exhibited greater compatibility (100% each). Conclusion In most cases, clinical and histopathological diagnoses were compatible. An association between the occurrence of erythroplakia, leukoplakia and erythroleukoplakia with smoking was observed. Similarly, an association between actinic cheilitis and sun exposure was noted. Erythroleukoplakia presented the highest malignancy grade in this study. Finally, dental surgeons should draw special attention to diagnosis of potentially malignant oral lesions, choose the best management, and control the lesions to avoid their malignant transformation. PMID:27074232

  2. Advances in Optical Adjunctive Aids for Visualisation and Detection of Oral Malignant and Potentially Malignant Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Nirav; Lalla, Yastira; Vu, An N.; Farah, Camile S.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional methods of screening for oral potentially malignant disorders and oral malignancies involve a conventional oral examination with digital palpation. Evidence indicates that conventional examination is a poor discriminator of oral mucosal lesions. A number of optical aids have been developed to assist the clinician to detect oral mucosal abnormalities and to differentiate benign lesions from sinister pathology. This paper discusses advances in optical technologies designed for the detection of oral mucosal abnormalities. The literature regarding such devices, VELscope and Identafi, is critically analysed, and the novel use of Narrow Band Imaging within the oral cavity is also discussed. Optical aids are effective in assisting with the detection of oral mucosal abnormalities; however, further research is required to evaluate the usefulness of these devices in differentiating benign lesions from potentially malignant and malignant lesions. PMID:24078812

  3. Oral potentially malignant disorders in a large dental population

    PubMed Central

    Alessandro, VILLA; Anita, GOHEL

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Oral cancer (OC) may be preceded by clinically evident oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs). Oral carcinogenesis is a multistep process that begins as epithelial hyperplasia and progresses to oral epithelial dysplasia and finally to fully malignant phenotypes. The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence of OPMDs in a large population of dental patients. Methods Patients were seen in the Oral Diagnosis and Oral Medicine clinics at Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine between July 2013 and February 2014 and received a comprehensive oral examination to identify any possible mucosal lesions. Patients with a suspected OPMD (submucous fibrosis, oral lichen planus, leukoplakia and erythroplakia) that did not resolve in 2–3 weeks received a biopsy for definitive diagnosis. Logistic regression models were used to explore the relationship between OPMDs and associated risk factors. Results A total of 3,142 patients received a comprehensive oral examination [median age: 43 (range: 18–97); 54.3% females]. Among these, 4.5% had an oral mucosal lesion with 0.9% being an OPMD (one submucous fibrosis, three epithelial dysplasias, fourteen with hyperkeratosis/epithelial hyperplasia and nine with oral lichen planus). Males and current smokers were associated with higher odds of having OPMD (OR 1.7, 95% CI 0.8–3.8; OR 1.9, 95%CI 0.8–4.1). Increasing age was associated with having OPMDs (p<0.01). Conclusion Optimal oral visual screening for OC remains a simple and essential tool to identify any suspicious lesions and potentially increase survival. Although OPMDs were rare, our results confirm the importance of a thorough chairside screening by dentists and dental students to detect any mucosal changes. PMID:25591015

  4. Quantitative Immunoexpression of EGFR in Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders: Oral Leukoplakia and Oral Submucous Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jyothi Meka, Naga; Ugrappa, Sridevi; Velpula, Nagalaxmi; Kumar, Sravan; Naik Maloth, Kotya; Kodangal, Srikanth; ch, Lalitha; Goyal, Stuti

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Many oral squamous cell carcinomas develop from potentially malignant disorders (PMDs)which include a variety of lesions and conditions characterized by an increased risk for malignant transformation. Thisstudy evaluated the quantitative expression of EGFR in normal oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia and oral submucous fibrosis to predict the malignant risk in compliance with the intensity of staining with EGFR. Materials and methods. Thirty subjects were included in the study, consisting of 10 oral leukoplakia (OL), 10 oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) and 10 normal oral mucosa (NOM) as the control group. Owing to the histopathological confirmation of precancerous state of tissue, 4-μm-thick sections of tissue were taken from paraffin-embedded wax blocks for immunohistochemical staining for EGFR. Results. All the control cases showed positive expression for EGFR, while 20% of oral leukoplakia and 40% of OSMF cases showed strong expression (3+), 40% of OL and 30% of OSMF cases showed weak expression (2+), and 40% of OLand 30% of OSMF cases showed poor expression (1+) compared to controls (P=0.012). Conclusion. EGFR expression levels in the premalignant lesion appear to be a sensitive factor in predicting the neoplastic potential. This suggests that EGFR may serve as a biological marker to identify high-risk subgroups and guide prophylactic therapy with chemopreventive drugs or surgical intervention to prevent progression to carcinoma. Hence, further investigations in the direction of chemopreventive trials with a larger sample size are suggested to determine its role in the head and neck tumorigenesis. PMID:26697149

  5. Quantitative Immunoexpression of EGFR in Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders: Oral Leukoplakia and Oral Submucous Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jyothi Meka, Naga; Ugrappa, Sridevi; Velpula, Nagalaxmi; Kumar, Sravan; Naik Maloth, Kotya; Kodangal, Srikanth; Ch, Lalitha; Goyal, Stuti

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Many oral squamous cell carcinomas develop from potentially malignant disorders (PMDs)which include a variety of lesions and conditions characterized by an increased risk for malignant transformation. Thisstudy evaluated the quantitative expression of EGFR in normal oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia and oral submucous fibrosis to predict the malignant risk in compliance with the intensity of staining with EGFR. Materials and methods. Thirty subjects were included in the study, consisting of 10 oral leukoplakia (OL), 10 oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) and 10 normal oral mucosa (NOM) as the control group. Owing to the histopathological confirmation of precancerous state of tissue, 4-μm-thick sections of tissue were taken from paraffin-embedded wax blocks for immunohistochemical staining for EGFR. Results. All the control cases showed positive expression for EGFR, while 20% of oral leukoplakia and 40% of OSMF cases showed strong expression (3+), 40% of OL and 30% of OSMF cases showed weak expression (2+), and 40% of OLand 30% of OSMF cases showed poor expression (1+) compared to controls (P=0.012). Conclusion. EGFR expression levels in the premalignant lesion appear to be a sensitive factor in predicting the neoplastic potential. This suggests that EGFR may serve as a biological marker to identify high-risk subgroups and guide prophylactic therapy with chemopreventive drugs or surgical intervention to prevent progression to carcinoma. Hence, further investigations in the direction of chemopreventive trials with a larger sample size are suggested to determine its role in the head and neck tumorigenesis. PMID:26697149

  6. Malignant transformation in 5071 southern Taiwanese patients with potentially malignant oral mucosal disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral cancers can be preceded by clinically evident oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs). The current study evaluated the rate and the time of malignant transformation in the various OPMDs in a cohort of patients from southern Taiwan. Parameters possibly indicative for malignant transformation of OPMDs, such as epidemiological and etiological factors, and clinical and histopathological features were also described. Methods We followed-up 5071 patients with OPMDs—epithelial dysplasia with oral submucous fibrosis, epithelial dysplasia with hyperkeratosis/epithelial hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis/epithelial hyperplasia, oral submucous fibrosis, lichen planus, and verrucous hyperplasia—between 2001 and 2010 for malignant transformation. Results Two hundred nineteen of these 5071 OPMD patients (202 men, 17 women; mean age: 51.25 years; range: 30–81 years) developed oral cancers (179 squamous cell carcinomas; 40 verrucous carcinomas) in the same sites as the initial lesions at least 6 months after their initial biopsies. The overall transformation rate was 4.32% (mean duration of transformation: 33.56 months; range: 6–67 months). Additionally, the mean time of malignant transformation was significantly shorter for lesions with than without epithelial dysplasia. The risk of malignant transformation was 1.89 times higher for epithelially dysplastic than non-dysplastic lesions. The anatomical site of OPMD and the presence of epithelial dysplasia were significantly associated with malignant transformation. The hazard rate ratio was 1.87 times larger for tongue lesions than for buccal lesions. Conclusion Patients with OPMDs require long-term follow up. PMID:25096230

  7. HBO: a possible supplementary therapy for oral potentially malignant disorders.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaojing; Zhang, Jing; Lu, Rui; Zhou, Gang

    2014-08-01

    Oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs) are chronic inflammatory diseases in which cells suffer hypoxia referring to deprivation of adequate oxygen supply. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBO), which can increase oxygen tension and delivery to oxygen-deficient tissue, is a supplementary therapy to improve or cure disorders involving hypoxia. Although the applications of HBO in wound healings, acute ischemic stroke, radiation-induced soft tissue injury and cancers are extensively reported, there are only few studies on their effect in OPMDs. Not only does HBO furnish oxygen-it also possesses potent anti-inflammatory properties. At the cellular level, HBO can decrease lymphocyte proliferation and promote apoptosis of fibroblasts. At the molecular level, it can decrease expression of HIF, ICAM-1, TNF-α, TGF-β, and IFN-γ, as well as increase vascular VEGF expression and angiogenesis. Thus, we hypothesize that HBO may contribute to treat OPMDs, including oral lichen planus, oral leukoplakia, and oral submucous fibrosis both at the cellular level and the molecular level, and that it would be a safe and inexpensive therapeutic strategy. PMID:24908359

  8. Use of electrical impedance spectroscopy to detect malignant and potentially malignant oral lesions

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, Craig; Brown, Brian H; Hearnden, Vanessa; Speight, Paul M; D’Apice, Katy; Hegarty, Anne M; Tidy, John A; Healey, T Jamie; Highfield, Peter E; Thornhill, Martin H

    2014-01-01

    The electrical properties of tissues depend on their architecture and cellular composition. We have previously shown that changes in electrical impedance can be used to differentiate between different degrees of cervical dysplasia and cancer of the cervix. In this proof-of-concept study, we aimed to determine whether electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) could distinguish between normal oral mucosa; benign, potentially malignant lesions (PML); and oral cancer. EIS data were collected from oral cancer (n=10), PML (n=27), and benign (n=10) lesions. EIS from lesions was compared with the EIS reading from the normal mucosa on the contralateral side of the mouth or with reference spectra from mucosal sites of control subjects (n=51). Healthy controls displayed significant differences in the EIS obtained from different oral sites. In addition, there were significant differences in the EIS of cancer and high-risk PML versus low-risk PML and controls. There was no significant difference between benign lesions and normal controls. Study subjects also deemed the EIS procedure considerably less painful and more convenient than the scalpel biopsy procedure. EIS shows promise at distinguishing among malignant, PML, and normal oral mucosa and has the potential to be developed into a clinical diagnostic tool. PMID:25285005

  9. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders in Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Debnath, Nitai; Ismail, Mohammed B.; Kumar, Arunoday; Kumar, Amit; Badiyani, Bhumika K.; Dubey, Pavan K.; Sukhtankar, Laxmi V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the prevalence of oral potentially malignant disorders and to determine the potential risk factors for its development in Indian population. Materials and Methods. This cross-sectional study was carried out on 1241 individuals in Indore, Madhya Pradesh. A questionnaire was designed to record information about sociodemographic characteristics, oral hygiene practices, dietary habits, and risk factors for oral potentially malignant disorders. Oral mucosal lesions were examined by a skilled person. Results. The overall prevalence of oral potentially malignant disorders was found to be 13.7% with oral submucous fibrosis (8.06%) found to be more common and erythroplakia (0.24%) found to be least prevalent. Results of Logistic Regression analysis showed that males (OR = 2.09, P value < 0.0001) who were ever consumers of tobacco (OR = 2.06, P value = 0.030) and areca nut chewing (OR = 2.64, P value = 0.004) were more likely to develop oral potentially malignant disorders compared to never consumers. Diabetic (OR = 2.21, P value = 0.014) and underweight individuals (OR = 2.23, P value = 0.007) were more likely to suffer from oral potentially malignant disorders. Conclusion. The study reinforces the association of tobacco and areca nut consumption with oral potentially malignant disorders. An association of oral potentially malignant disorders with diabetes and BMI was confirmed by this study. PMID:26347822

  10. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders in Indian Population.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Debnath, Nitai; Ismail, Mohammed B; Kumar, Arunoday; Kumar, Amit; Badiyani, Bhumika K; Dubey, Pavan K; Sukhtankar, Laxmi V

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the prevalence of oral potentially malignant disorders and to determine the potential risk factors for its development in Indian population. Materials and Methods. This cross-sectional study was carried out on 1241 individuals in Indore, Madhya Pradesh. A questionnaire was designed to record information about sociodemographic characteristics, oral hygiene practices, dietary habits, and risk factors for oral potentially malignant disorders. Oral mucosal lesions were examined by a skilled person. Results. The overall prevalence of oral potentially malignant disorders was found to be 13.7% with oral submucous fibrosis (8.06%) found to be more common and erythroplakia (0.24%) found to be least prevalent. Results of Logistic Regression analysis showed that males (OR = 2.09, P value < 0.0001) who were ever consumers of tobacco (OR = 2.06, P value = 0.030) and areca nut chewing (OR = 2.64, P value = 0.004) were more likely to develop oral potentially malignant disorders compared to never consumers. Diabetic (OR = 2.21, P value = 0.014) and underweight individuals (OR = 2.23, P value = 0.007) were more likely to suffer from oral potentially malignant disorders. Conclusion. The study reinforces the association of tobacco and areca nut consumption with oral potentially malignant disorders. An association of oral potentially malignant disorders with diabetes and BMI was confirmed by this study. PMID:26347822

  11. Expression of p63 in potentially malignant and malignant oral lesions

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Anju; Chandra, Shaleen; Raj, Vineet; Zaidi, Iram; Saxena, Shikha; Dwivedi, Ruby

    2015-01-01

    Background p63, a member of p53 family, known to be expressed in embryonic tissues and basal regenerative layers of many epithelial tissues in the adult, is also expressed in various benign and malignant lesions of body including lesions of oral cavity. To evaluate the expression of p63 and compare the expression qualitatively and quantitatively in normal buccal mucosa, epithelial dysplasia, oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF), and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Methods The study material consisted of 45 archival cases which were divided into Group I with 5 cases of normal buccal mucosa, Group II with 15 cases of epithelial dysplasia, and Group III with 10 cases of OSMF and 15 cases of OSCC. Immunohistochemical expression of p63 was assessed by using mean, standard deviation, and analysis of variance. Results Overexpression of p63 was seen in epithelial dysplasia, OSMF, and squamous cell carcinoma with an increased suprabasal expression in cases of epithelial dysplasia. The mean labeling index (LI) of p63 was found to be in increasing order from normal oral mucosa (33.75%), OSMF (57.37%), epithelial dysplasia (63.87%) to squamous cell carcinoma (69.76%). Conclusion The results suggest a possible role of p63 in oral carcinogenesis, and an increased LI as well as increased suprabasal expression of this gene in dysplastic lesions may have a potential to be utilized as a marker for premalignancy. PMID:26605141

  12. Evaluation of cell proliferation in malignant and potentially malignant oral lesions

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Mani; Chandra, Shaleen; Raj, Vineet; Madan, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the cell proliferation rate by the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and argyrophilic nucleolar organizing region (AgNOR) counts and to assess its usefulness as a marker for malignant potential in oral epithelial lesions. Materials and Methods: The study group included 30 cases of leukoplakia, 15 nondysplastic (NDL), 15 dysplastic (DL), 15 cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and 5 cases of normal oral mucosa. Formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissues were subjected to immunohistochemical staining for PCNA and AgNOR technique. The PCNA labeling index (LI) and the AgNOR dots were evaluated for the entire sample. Statistical Analysis Used: ANOVA, Tukey honestly significant difference, Pearson's correlation. Results: In this study, the AgNOR count of OSCC was lower than the DL lesions moreover the AgNOR counts were found to be higher in normal mucosa as compared to the DL and the NDL epithelium. The study results also showed that the mean AgNOR count failed to distinguish between DL and NDL lesions. Overall we observed increased PCNA expression from normal epithelium to NDL to DL lesion. Conclusions: Based on the findings of the present study on oral epithelial precancerous and cancerous lesions we conclude that mean AgNOR count alone cannot be a valuable parameter to distinguish between the normal, NDL, DL epithelium and OSCC but, on the other hand, we found out that PCNA can be a useful biomarker for delineating normal epithelium from DL epithelium and OSCC. PMID:26980956

  13. Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders: An Overview of More than 20 Entities

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Hamed; Baharvand, Maryam; Mehdipour, Masoumeh

    2014-01-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity accounts for approximately 3% of all malignancies diagnosed annually in 270,000 patients world-wide. Oral cancer is the 12th most common cancer in women and the 6th in men. Many oral squamous cell carcinomas develop from potentially malignant disorders (PMDs). Lack of awareness about the signs and symptoms of oralPMDs in the general population and even healthcare providers is believed to be responsible for the diagnostic delay of these entities. The aim of this article is to update and improve the knowledge of healthcare providers about oral PMDs. PMID:25024833

  14. Oral potentially malignant disorders: an overview of more than 20 entities.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Hamed; Baharvand, Maryam; Mehdipour, Masoumeh

    2014-01-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity accounts for approximately 3% of all malignancies diagnosed annually in 270,000 patients world-wide. Oral cancer is the 12th most common cancer in women and the 6th in men. Many oral squamous cell carcinomas develop from potentially malignant disorders (PMDs). Lack of awareness about the signs and symptoms of oralPMDs in the general population and even healthcare providers is believed to be responsible for the diagnostic delay of these entities. The aim of this article is to update and improve the knowledge of healthcare providers about oral PMDs. PMID:25024833

  15. Non-Invasive Techniques for Detection and Diagnosis of Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongjuan; Zhao, Xin; Zeng, Xin; Dan, Hongxia; Chen, Qianming

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common oral and maxillofacial malignancy, and its morbidity and mortality rates are still high in most countries. Oral potentially malignant disorders (PMDs) are used to refer to a heterogeneous group of conditions that are characterized by increased risk for malignant transformation to OSCC. Currently identified oral PMDs include leukoplakia, erythroplakia, palatal lesions associated with reverse smoking, oral lichen planus, oral submucous fibrosis, actinic keratosis, and discoid lupus erythematosus. The early detection and diagnosis of these lesions are important for cancer prevention and disease management. In recent years, there has been a growing and persistent demand for new non-invasive, practical diagnostic techniques that might facilitate the early detection of oral PMDs. The non-invasive detection techniques evaluated in this review are divided into four categories: vital staining with a solution that can be used as a mouth rinse or applied onto a suspected area of the mouth, light-based detection systems, optical diagnostic technologies that employ returned optical signals to reflect structural and morphological changes within tissues, and salivary biomarkers. Most of these techniques have shown great potential for screening and monitoring oral PMDs. In this review article, the authors critically assess these non-invasive detection techniques for oral PMDs. We also provide a summary of the sensitivity and specificity of each technique in detecting oral PMDs and oral cancer, as well as their advantages, disadvantages, clinical applications, and indications. PMID:26888696

  16. Ability of Dental Students in Spain to Identify Potentially Malignant Disorders and Oral Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cerero-Lapiedra, Rocío; Esparza-Gómez, Germán C; Casado-de la Cruz, Laura; Domínguez-Gordillo, Adelaida A; Corral-Linaza, César; Seoane-Romero, Juan M

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the ability of students at the School of Dentistry, Complutense University of Madrid, Spain, to diagnose oral cancer and other potentially malignant disorders, as well as to compare their ability at different stages of the learning process and evaluate their knowledge retention. Students were surveyed after they had studied oral medicine and oral pathology at two time points: midway through and near the end of their studies. The survey consisted of questions about 40 photographs of benign oral lesions, malignant oral lesions, and potentially malignant disorders. The response rate for all groups was greater than 70%. The results showed that these students' overall success rate in differentiating benign from malignant lesions averaged 73.9%. When the distinction for potentially malignant disorders was included, their average overall success rate decreased to 42.8% (p<0.001). Furthermore, the students' average success rate was at its lowest at the end of the dental program (p<0.001). Results from this study suggest that, given these students' difficulties in identifying potentially malignant disorders, an increased emphasis on cancer education in the dental curriculum may be needed for future practitioners to master this ability. PMID:26246535

  17. Optical imaging for the diagnosis of oral cancer and oral potentially malignant disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.

    2016-03-01

    Optical Imaging is being conducted as a therapeutic non-invasive. Many kinds of the light source are selected for this purpose. Recently the oral cancer screening is conducted by using light-induced tissue autofluorescence examination such as several kinds of handheld devices. However, the mechanism of its action is still not clear. Therefore basic experimental research was conducted. One of auto fluorescence Imaging (AFI) device, VELscopeTM and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging using ICG-labeled antibody as a probe were compared using oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) mouse models. The experiments revealed that intracutaneous tumor was successfully visualized as low density image by VELscopeTM and high density image by NIR image. In addition, VELscopeTM showed higher sensitivity and lower specificity than that of NIR fluorescence imaging and the sensitivity of identification of carcinoma areas with the VELscopeTM was good results. However, further more studies were needed to enhance the screening and diagnostic uses, sensitivity and specificity for detecting malignant lesions and differentiation from premalignant or benign lesions. Therefore, additional studies were conducted using a new developed near infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging method targeting podoplanine (PDPN) which consists of indocyanine green (ICG)-labeled anti-human podoplanin antibody as a probe and IVIS imaging system or a handy realtime ICG imaging device that is overexpressed in oral malignant neoplasm to improve imaging for detection of early oral malignant neoplasm. Then evaluated for its sensitivity and specificity for detection of oral malignant neoplasm in xenografted mice model and compared with VELscopeTM. The results revealed that ICG fluorescence imaging method and VELscopeTM had the almost the same sensitivity for detection of oral malignant neoplasm. The current topics of optical imaging about oral malignant neoplasm were reviewed.

  18. Expression of ABCG2 and Bmi-1 in oral potentially malignant lesions and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dalley, Andrew J; Pitty, Luke P; Major, Aidan G; Abdulmajeed, Ahmad A; Farah, Camile S

    2014-04-01

    Early diagnosis is vital for effective treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The optimal time for clinical intervention is prior to malignancy when patients present with oral potentially malignant lesions such as leukoplakia or erythroplakia. Transformation rates for oral dysplasia vary greatly and more rigorous methods are needed to predict the malignant potential of oral lesions. We hypothesized that the expression of two putative stem cell markers, ABCG2 and Bmi-1, would correlate with disease severity for non diseased, potentially malignant and OSCC specimens and cell lines derived from an equivalent range of tissues. We compared immunoreactive protein and relative gene expression of ABCG2 and Bmi-1 in eight cell lines derived from source tissues ranging in disease severity from normal (OKF6-TERT2) through mild and moderate/severe dysplasia (DOK, POE-9n) to OSCC (PE/CA-PJ15, SCC04, SCC25, SCC09, SCC15). We also analyzed immunoreactive protein expression of ABCG2 and Bmi-1 in 189 tissue samples with the same range of disease severity. A trend between oral lesion severity to ABCG2 and Bmi-1 immunostain intensity was observed. Flow cytometry of oral cell lines confirmed this trend and gave good correlation with RT-PCR results for ABCG2 (r = 0.919, P = 0.001; Pearson) but not Bmi-1 (r = -0.311). The results provide evidence of increased density of ABCG2 and Bmi-1-positive populations in malignant and oral potentially malignant lesions and derived cell lines, but that intragroup variability within IHC, flow cytometry, and RT-PCR results compromise the diagnostic potential of these techniques for discriminating oral dysplasia from normal tissue or OSCC. PMID:24415717

  19. Increased nuclear ?-catenin expression in oral potentially malignant lesions: A marker of epithelial dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Maturana, Andrea; Aitken, Juan-Pablo; Rojas, Carolina; Ortega, Ana-Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Background Deregulation of ?-catenin is associated with malignant transformation; however, its relationship with potentially malignant and malignant oral processes is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the nuclear ?-catenin expression in oral dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Material and Methods Cross sectional study. Immunodetection of ?-catenin was performed on 72 samples, with the following distribution: 21 mild dysplasia, 12 moderate dysplasia, severe dysplasia 3, 36 OSCC including 19 well differentiated, 15 moderately differentiated and 2 poorly differentiated. Through microscopic observation the number of positive cells per 1000 epithelial cells was counted. For the statistical analysis, the Kruskal Wallis test was used. Results Nuclear expression of ?-catenin was observed in all samples with severe and moderate dysplasia, with a median of 267.5, in comparison to mild dysplasia whose median was 103.75. Only 10 samples (27.7%) with OSCC showed nuclear expression, with statistically significant differences between groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions Our results are consistent with most of the reports which show increased presence of ?-catenin in severe and moderate dysplasia compared to mild dysplasia; however the expression of nuclear ?-catenin decreased after starting the invasive neoplastic process. This suggests a role for this protein in the progression of dysplasia and early malignant transformation to OSCC. Immunodetection of ?-catenin could be a possible immune marker in the detection of oral dysplasia. Key words:Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), ?-catenin, oral dysplasia. PMID:26241451

  20. Efficacy of light based detection systems for early detection of oral cancer and oral potentially malignant disorders: Systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Reddy-Kantharaj, Yashoda-Bhoomi; Rakesh, Nagaraju; Janardhan-Reddy, Sujatha; Sahu, Shashikant

    2016-01-01

    Background Earlier detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) is essential for dental professionals to improve patient survival rates. The aim of this systematic review is to to evaluate the effectiveness of devices that utilise the principles of chemiluminescence and tissue autofluorescence as adjuncts in the detection of OSCC and OPMD. Material and Methods The electronic retrieval systems and databases searched for relevant articles were PubMed [MEDLINE] and Science direct. The search was for limited articles published in English or with an English abstract and articles published during the period from January 2005 to April 2014. Clinical trials utilized ViziLite, Microlux TM/DL and Visual Enhanced Light scope (VELscope) for early detection of OPMD and OSCC. Results Twenty primary studies published satisfied our criteria for selection - 10 utilised chemiluminescence and 10 tissue autofluorescence. Senstivity of Vizilite for detecting OSCC nad OPMD ranged from 77.1 % to 100% and specificity was low that ranged from 0% to 27.8%.Most have shown that chemiluminescence increases the brightness and margins of oral mucosal white lesions and thus assist in identification of mucosal lesions not considered under Conventional visual examination. However, it preferentially detects leukoplakia and may fail to spot red patches. Clinical trials demonstrated that sensitivity of VELscope in detecting malignancy and OPMD ranged from 22 % to 100 % and specificity ranged from 16 % to 100%. Most studies concluded that VELscope can help the experienced clinician to find oral precursor malignant lesions. But it couldnot differentiate between dysplasia and benign inflammatory conditions. Conclusions Both devices are simple, non-invasive test of the oral mucosa but are suited for clinicians with sufficient experience and training. More clinical trials in future should be conducted to establish optical imaging as an efficacious adjunct

  1. Frequent detection of high human papillomavirus DNA loads in oral potentially malignant disorders.

    PubMed

    Pierangeli, A; Cannella, F; Scagnolari, C; Gentile, M; Sciandra, I; Antonelli, G; Ciolfi, C; Russo, C; Palaia, G; Romeo, U; Polimeni, A

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is estimated to be the cause of 40--80% of the squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx but only of a small fraction of the oral cavity cancers. The prevalence of oral HPV infection has significantly increased in the last decade, raising concerns about the role of HPV in progression of oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) toward squamous cell carcinomas. We sought to study HPV infection in patients with oral lesions, and in control individuals, using non-invasive and site-specific oral brushing and sensitive molecular methods. HPV DNA positivity and viral loads were evaluated in relation to patient data and clinical diagnosis. We enrolled 116 individuals attending Dental Clinics: 62 patients with benign oral lesions (e.g. fibromas, papillomatosis, ulcers) or OPMD (e.g. lichen, leukoplakia) and 54 controls. Oral cells were collected with Cytobrush and HPV-DNA was detected with quantitative real-time PCR for the more common high-risk (HR) and low-risk (LR) genotypes. HPV detection rate, percentage of HR HPVs and HPV-DNA loads (namely HPV16 and in particular, HPV18) were significantly higher in patients than in controls. Lichen planus cases had the highest HPV-positive rate (75.0%), hairy leukoplakia the lowest (33.3%). This study detected unexpectedly high rates of HPV infection in cells of the oral mucosa. The elevated HR HPV loads found in OPMD suggest the effectiveness of quantitative PCR in testing oral lesions. Prospective studies are needed to establish whether elevated viral loads represent a clinically useful marker of the risk of malignant progression. PMID:26408278

  2. Prevalence of potentially malignant oral mucosal lesions among tobacco users in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Attas, Safia Ali; Ibrahim, Suzan Seif; Amer, Hala Abbas; Darwish, Zeinab El-Said; Hassan, Mona Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Smoking is recognized as a health problem worldwide and there is an established tobacco epidemic in Saudi Arabia as in many other countries, with tobacco users at increased risk of developing many diseases. This cross sectional study was conducted to assess the prevalence of oral mucosal, potentially malignant or malignant, lesions associated with tobacco use among a stratified cluster sample of adults in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. A sample size of 599 was collected and each participant underwent clinical conventional oral examination and filled a questionnaire providing information on demographics, tobacco use and other relevant habits. The most common form of tobacco used was cigarette smoking (65.6 %) followed by Shisha or Moasel (38.1%), while chewing tobacco, betel nuts and gat accounted for 21-2%, 7.7%, and 5% respectively. A high prevalence (88.8%) of soft tissue lesions was found among the tobacco users examined, and a wide range of lesions were detected, about 50% having hairy tongue, 36% smoker's melanosis, 28.9% stomatitis nicotina, 27% frictional keratosis, 26.7% fissured tongue, 26% gingival or periodontal inflammation and finally 20% leukodema. Suspicious potentially malignant lesions affected 10.5% of the subjects, most prevalent being keratosis (6.3%), leukoplakia (2.3%), erythroplakia (0.7%), oral submucous fibrosis (0.5%) and lichenoid lesions (0.4%), these being associated with male gender, lower level of education, presence of diabetes and a chewing tobacco habit. It is concluded that smoking was associated with a wide range of oral mucosal lesions , those suspicious for malignancy being linked with chewable forms, indicating serious effects. PMID:24568491

  3. Prevalence of oral potentially malignant disorders in workers of Udupi taluk

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Yeturu Sravan; Acharya, Shashidhar; Pentapati, Kalyana Chakravarthy

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to assess the prevalence and risk factors of oral potentially malignant disorders (PMD) among industrial workers of Udupi taluk, Karnataka. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of industrial workers aged >18 years from randomly selected industries in Udupi Taluk. A self-administered questionnaire was given to the participants to assess sociodemographic factors and abusive habits (Tobacco, Alcohol, and Betel quid) followed by clinical oral examination by single trained and calibrated examiner. Results: A total of 396 completed all steps of the survey and were included for analysis. A total of 14, 11.4, and 14.4% were tobacco, alcohol, and betel quid users, respectively. A total of 8.6% (n = 34) have at least one PMD. A significantly higher number of participants with single (11.4%) or combined habits (60.4%) had oral lesions while none of the participants without habits reported any oral lesions (P = 0.001). Conclusion: Prevalence of abusive habits and oral premalignant lesions or conditions was substantial among the workers. The cause and effect relationship and dose-response were also shown to be significantly associated. Prevention and early diagnosis through workplace screening are the major cornerstones for the control of oral cancer. PMID:26942144

  4. Longitudinal evaluation of patients with oral potentially malignant disorders using optical imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Richard A.; Pierce, Mark C.; Mondrik, Sharon; Gao, Wen; Quinn, Mary K.; Bhattar, Vijayashree; Williams, Michelle D.; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2012-02-01

    Dysplastic and cancerous alterations in oral tissue can be detected noninvasively in vivo using optical techniques including autofluorescence imaging, high-resolution imaging, and spectroscopy. Interim results are presented from a longitudinal study in which optical imaging and spectroscopy were used to evaluate the progression of lesions over time in patients at high risk for development of oral cancer. Over 100 patients with oral potentially malignant disorders have been enrolled in the study to date. Areas of concern in the oral cavity are measured using widefield autofluorescence imaging and depth-sensitive optical spectroscopy during successive clinical visits. Autofluorescence intensity patterns and autofluorescence spectra are tracked over time and correlated with clinical observations. Patients whose lesions progress and who undergo surgery are also measured in the operating room immediately prior to surgery using autofluorescence imaging and spectroscopy, with the addition of intraoperative high-resolution imaging to characterize nuclear size, nuclear crowding, and tissue architecture at selected sites. Optical measurements are compared to histopathology results from biopsies and surgical specimens collected from the measured sites. Autofluorescence imaging and spectroscopy measurements are continued during post-surgery followup visits. We examined correlations between clinical impression and optical classification over time with an average followup period of 4 months. The data collected to date suggest that multimodal optical techniques may aid in noninvasive monitoring of the progression of oral premalignant lesions, biopsy site selection, and accurate delineation of lesion extent during surgery.

  5. Programmable Bio-Nano-Chip based Cytologic Testing of Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders in Fanconi Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Floriano, Pierre; Abram, Tim; Taylor, Leander; Le, Cathy; Talavera, Humberto; Nguyen, Michael; Raja, Rameez; Gillenwater, Ann; McDevitt, John; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is caused by mutations of DNA repair genes. The risk of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) among FA patients is 800-folds higher than in the general population. Early detection of OSCC, preferably at it precursor stage is critical in FA patients to improve their survival. In an ongoing clinical trial, we are evaluating the effectiveness of the programmable bio-nano-chip (p-BNC)-based oral cytology test in diagnosing oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) in non-FA patients. We used this test to compare the cytomorphometric and molecular biomarkers in OSCC cell lines derived from FA patients and non-FA patients and brush biopsy samples of a FA patient’s OPMD and normal mucosa of healthy volunteers. Our data showed that expression patterns of molecular biomarkers were not notably different between sporadic and FA OSCC cell lines. The p-BNC assay revealed significant differences in cytometric parameters and biomarker MCM2 expression between cytobrush samples of the FA patient and cytobrush samples of normal oral mucosa obtained from healthy volunteers. Microscopic examination of the FA patient’s OPMD confirmed the presence of dysplasia. Our pilot data suggests that p-BNC brush biopsy test recognizes dysplastic oral epithelial cells in a brush biopsy sample of a FA patient. PMID:25662766

  6. Comparative study of frequency of micronuclei in normal, potentially malignant diseases and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sangle, Varsha Ajit; Bijjaragi, Shobha; Shah, Nishat; Kangane, Suresh; Ghule, Hrishikesh M.; Rani, SR Ashwini

    2016-01-01

    Context: The assessment of micronuclei (MN) in exfoliated oral epithelial cells is a promising tool for the study of epithelial carcinogens and can be used to detect chromosome breakage or mitotic interference, thought to be relevant to carcinogenesis. Aims: To detect MN in exfoliated oral mucosal cells in individuals using various tobacco forms and also to detect frequency of MN in premalignant lesions and conditions (potentially malignant diseases [PMD's]) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). To correlate frequency of MN in oral exfoliated cells in clinically diagnosed cases of OSCC followed by a histopathological grading. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 subjects (30 smokeless tobacco users, 30 smokers and 30 nontobacco users) consisted of clinically diagnosed cases of PMD's and OSCC were selected for the study. Cytosmears from the groups were stained with rapid Papanicolaou stain. MN was identified according to the Tolbert et al. criteria. Results: MN cells were found to be significantly higher in smokeless tobacco users than in smokers. The frequency of MN was three to four times higher in patients with OSCC as compared to patients in PMD's (P < 0.0001). The frequency of MN correlated with the histopathological grade was statistically significant. Conclusion: MN index can be used as a biomarker/screening test among the high-risk groups particularly the smokeless tobacco users and PMD's. MN can be a candidate to serve as a biomarker for prediction of the grade of OSCC. PMID:27003966

  7. Leptin receptor polymorphism Gln223Arg (rs1137101) in oral squamous cell carcinoma and potentially malignant oral lesions.

    PubMed

    Domingos, Patrícia Luciana Batista; Farias, Lucyana Conceição; Pereira, Camila Santos; das Graças Pena, Geórgia; Reis, Tatiana Carvalho; Silva, Rosângela Ramos Veloso; Fraga, Carlos Alberto de Carvalho; de Souza, Marcela Gonçalves; Soares, Mariana Batista; Jones, Kimberly Marie; Menezes, Elytania Veiga; Nobre, Sérgio Avelino Mota; Rodrigues Neto, João Felício; de Paula, Alfredo Maurício Batista; Velásquez-Meléndez, Jorge Gustavo; Sena Guimarães, André Luiz

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the LEPR gene Gln223Arg polymorphism (rs1137101) in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and in potentially malignant oral lesions (PMOL) in comparison to normal oral mucosa in a Brazilian population. Smokers (n = 89) were selected from a representative sample of 471 individuals from the general population of Montes Claros, Brazil. Participants were age and gender matched to patients with OSCC (n = 25) and oral epithelial dysplasia (n = 25). We investigated the LEPR Gln223Arg polymorphism (A>G; rs1137101) in these groups. Genotype variants were assessed by RFLP-PCR, using MspI (HPAII) restriction endonuclease. The institutional review board of the Universidade Estadual de Montes Claros approved the study (process number 2667/2011). Written informed consent for this study was obtained from all participants. The GG genotype (Arg223Arg) appears to be the more relevant polymorphic variant in OSCC. It occurred, approximately, twice as frequently in OSCC patients than in the general population. In contrast, the A allele in its homozygosis form (Gln223Gln) is significantly associated with the development of PMOL; 80% of the samples from the PMOL group exhibit AA genotype. Our findings suggest new insights regarding LEPR gene variations in the development of OSCC and PMOL. PMID:26034683

  8. Expression of MUC1 mucin in potentially malignant disorders, oral squamous cell carcinoma and normal oral mucosa: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M Harish; Sanjai, Karpagaselvi; Kumarswamy, Jayalakshmi; Keshavaiah, Roopavathi; Papaiah, Lokesh; Divya, S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mucins alteration in glycosylation is associated with the development and progression of malignant diseases. Therefore, mucins are used as valuable markers to distinguish normal and disease conditions. Many studies on MUC1 expression have been conducted on variety of neoplastic lesions other than head and neck region. None of the study has made an attempt to show its significance in potentially malignant disorders (PMDs) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Hence, ours is one of the pioneer studies done to assess and evaluate the same. Aims: This study aims to compare and correlate the expression of MUC1 mucin protein in normal oral mucosa (NOM), PMD's and OSCC by immunohistochemical method. Materials and Methods: Institutional study, archived tissue sections of OSCC (n = 20), PMD's (n = 20) and NOM (n = 20) were immunostained for MUC1 mucin and percentage of positive cells evaluated. Results obtained were statistically analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis test, Mann–Whitney test and Student's t-test. Results: The mean MUC1 mucin positive cells in the study groups were as follows, 40% in OSCC, 28% in PMD's and 0.75% in NOM. Higher mean immunohistochemical score was observed in OSCC group followed by PMD's group and NOM group. The difference in immunohistochemical score among the groups was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The result of the current study suggests that determination of MUC1 mucin expression may be a parameter in the diagnosis of malignant behavior of PMD's to OSCC. MUC1 mucin expression may be a useful diagnostic marker for prediction of the invasive/metastatic potential of OSCC. PMID:27601811

  9. Potential of optical coherence tomography for early diagnosis of oral malignancies

    PubMed Central

    DeCoro, Michael; Wilder-Smith, Petra

    2014-01-01

    With nearly 1,500,000 new patients diagnosed every year in the USA, cancer poses a considerable challenge to healthcare today. Oral cancer is responsible for a sizeable portion of deaths due to cancer, primarily because it is diagnosed at a late stage when the prognosis is poor. Current methods for diagnosing oral cancer need to be augmented by better early detection, monitoring and screening modalities. A new approach is needed that provides real-time, accurate, noninvasive diagnosis. The results of early clinical trials using in vivo optical coherence tomography for the diagnosis of oral dysplasia and malignancy are encouraging. PMID:20214513

  10. Fluorescence spectroscopy for the detection of potentially malignant disorders of the oral cavity: analysis of 30 cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco, A. L. N.; Correr, W. R.; Azevedo, L. H.; Galletta, V. K.; Pinto, C. A. L.; Kowalski, L. P.; Kurachi, C.

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancer is a major health problem worldwide and although early diagnosis of potentially malignant and malignant diseases is associated with better treatment results, a large number of cancers are initially misdiagnosed, with unfortunate consequences for long-term survival. Fluorescence spectroscopy is a noninvasive modality of diagnostic approach using induced fluorescence emission in tumors that can improve diagnostic accuracy. The objective of this study was to determine the ability to discriminate between normal oral mucosa and potentially malignant disorders by fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence investigation under 408 and 532 nm excitation wavelengths was performed on 60 subjects, 30 with potentially malignant disorders and 30 volunteers with normal mucosa. Data was analyzed to correlate fluorescence patterns with clinical and histopathological diagnostics. Fluorescence spectroscopy used as a point measurement technique resulted in a great variety of spectral information. In a qualitative analysis of the fluorescence spectral characteristics of each type of injury evaluated, it was possible to discriminate between normal and abnormal oral mucosa. The results show the potential use of fluorescence spectroscopy for an improved discrimination of oral disorders.

  11. Targeting of chemoprevention to high-risk potentially malignant oral lesions: Challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Victor D.; MacCaulay, Calum E.; Guillaud, Martial; Lam, Wan L; Zhang, Lewei; Corbett, Kitty; Rosin, Miriam P.

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, oral cancer is responsible for 170,000 deaths per year. Intervention to prevent this disease is a long sought after goal. Chemoprevention studies have focused on clinicopathological features of potentially malignant lesions (PML) in an effort to prevent their progression to cancer. However, prediction of future behavior for such lesions is difficult and remains a major challenge to such intervention. Different approaches to this problem have been tested in the past 20 years. Early genetic progression models identified critical regions of allelic imbalance at 3p and 9p, and provided the basis for molecular markers to identify progressing PMLs. Subsequently, technological advances, such as genome-wide high-throughput array platforms, computer imaging, visualization technology and next generation sequencing, have broadened the scope for marker development and have the potential of further improving our ability to identify high-risk lesions in the near future either alone or in combination. In this article, we examine the milestones in the development of markers for PML progression. We emphasize the critical importance of networks among scientists, health professionals and community to facilitate the validation and application of putative markers into clinical practice. With a growing number of new agents to validate, it is necessary to coordinate the design and implementation of strategies for patient recruitment, integration of marker assessment, and the final translation of such approaches into clinical use. PMID:25240917

  12. Potentially malignant disorders of the oral cavity: current practice and future directions in the clinic and laboratory.

    PubMed

    Dionne, Kalen R; Warnakulasuriya, Saman; Zain, Rosnah Binti; Cheong, Sok Ching

    2015-02-01

    Despite commendable progress in the prevention, detection, and treatment of a wide variety of solid tumor types, oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remains a significant health burden across the globe. OSCC carcinogenesis involves accumulation of genetic alterations that coincide with the multistep malignant transformation of normal oral epithelium. OSCC is often first diagnosed at late stages of the disease (advanced regional disease and/or metastasis). Delayed diagnosis precludes successful treatment and favorable outcomes. In clinical practice, opportunities exist to identify patients with oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs), which precede the development of cancer. This review addresses the current status of laboratory and clinical research on OPMDs, with emphasis on leukoplakia and erythroplakia. OSF is also presented, though there is a paucity of published studies on this disorder. We focus on findings that could translate into earlier diagnosis and more efficacious treatment of those lesions with significant malignant potential. We explore how markers of OPMD malignant transformation might be implemented into current diagnostic practice to help clinicians objectively stratify patients into treatment/follow-up groups according to relative risk. We provide an overview of recently concluded and ongoing OPMD chemoprevention trials. We describe laboratory OPMD models that can be used to not only to reveal the genetic and molecular intricacies of oral cancer but also to develop novel screening methods and therapeutic approaches. Finally, we call for targeted screening programs of at-risk populations in order to facilitate diagnosis and treatment of OPMD and early OSCC. PMID:24482244

  13. A comparison of the management of potentially malignant oral mucosal lesions by oral medicine practitioners and oral & maxillofacial surgeons in the UK.

    PubMed

    Marley, J J; Linden, G J; Cowan, C G; Lamey, P J; Johnson, N W; Warnakulasuriya, K A; Scully, C

    1998-11-01

    This study describes the results of a survey undertaken to assess the management of potentially malignant oral mucosal lesions by oral medicine practitioners and compares their approach with that of oral & maxillofacial surgeons that we have previously described. Significant differences were noted between the two groups in the use of photography to document the lesions and in the use of certain special investigations, which included measurement of serum iron, serum ferritin, serum Vit B12, red cell folate and candidal isolation. The groups also varied in the perceived importance of the age of the patient and anatomical site of the lesion when deciding on the need for further biopsy. There was also significant variation in the use of certain treatment modalities, including excising non-dysplastic and severely dysplastic/carcinoma in-situ lesions and eliminating trauma when treating mild/moderately dysplastic and severely dysplastic/carcinoma in-situ lesions. Significant differences in the frequency and duration of follow-up were noted for non-dysplastic lesions. Finally, the two groups differed significantly when asked to rank the perceived importance of certain factors (the histopathology of the most recent biopsy and the anatomical site of the lesion) when deciding the need to follow-up. Possible reasons for the variation are discussed. PMID:9831962

  14. Immunoexpression of tenascin as a predictor of the malignancy potential of oral leukoplakia associated with a tobacco habit.

    PubMed

    Mane, D R; Bhat, K; Kale, A D; Hallikerimath, S

    2015-01-01

    Oral leukoplakia is a morphological alteration of tissue that is an early indicator for malignancy. Tenascin (TN) is a large hexameric extracellular matrix (ECM) protein with anti-adhesive properties that fosters cell migration during development, wound healing and tissue remodeling; it is present in small amounts in adult tissues. Overexpression of TN in a pathological condition may be either a cause or a consequence of the disease. We evaluated the efficacy of TN for early prediction of tobacco-associated oral cancers. We studied retrospectively 95 cases of oral leukoplakia, including mild, moderate and severe cases, using immunohistochemistry for TN. We evaluated the intensity, area and pattern of TN expression. Greater intensity and area of TN expression was observed in mild and severe dysplasia than in moderate dysplasia. Most cases showed a reticular pattern of expression, especially in mild and moderate dysplasia; a fibrillar pattern was more evident in severe dysplasia. We also observed homogeneous expression pattern in some cases. TN is a marker for dysplastic changes in epithelium and its expression may be helpful for predicting the malignancy potential of tobacco-associated oral leukoplakia. PMID:25839195

  15. Accuracy of autofluorescence in diagnosing oral squamous cell carcinoma and oral potentially malignant disorders: a comparative study with aero-digestive lesions

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaobo; Xu, Hao; He, Mingjing; Han, Qi; Wang, Hui; Sun, Chongkui; Li, Jing; Jiang, Lu; Zhou, Yu; Dan, Hongxia; Feng, Xiaodong; Zeng, Xin; Chen, Qianming

    2016-01-01

    Presently, various studies had investigated the accuracy of autofluorescence in diagnosing oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) with diverse conclusions. This study aimed to assess its accuracy for OSCC and OPMD and to investigate its applicability in general dental practice. After a comprehensive literature search, a meta-analysis was conducted to calculate the pooled diagnostic indexes of autofluorescence for premalignant lesions (PML) and malignant lesions (ML) of the oral cavity, lung, esophagus, stomach and colorectum and to compute indexes regarding the detection of OSCC aided by algorithms. Besides, a u test was performed. Twenty-four studies detecting OSCC and OPMD in 2761 lesions were included. This demonstrated that the overall accuracy of autofluorescence for OSCC and OPMD was superior to PML and ML of the lung, esophagus and stomach, slightly inferior to the colorectum. Additionally, the sensitivity and specificity for OSCC and OPMD were 0.89 and 0.8, respectively. Furthermore, the specificity could be remarkably improved by additional algorithms. With relatively high accuracy, autofluorescence could be potentially applied as an adjunct for early diagnosis of OSCC and OPMD. Moreover, approaches such as algorithms could enhance its specificity to ensure its efficacy in primary care. PMID:27416981

  16. Accuracy of autofluorescence in diagnosing oral squamous cell carcinoma and oral potentially malignant disorders: a comparative study with aero-digestive lesions.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaobo; Xu, Hao; He, Mingjing; Han, Qi; Wang, Hui; Sun, Chongkui; Li, Jing; Jiang, Lu; Zhou, Yu; Dan, Hongxia; Feng, Xiaodong; Zeng, Xin; Chen, Qianming

    2016-01-01

    Presently, various studies had investigated the accuracy of autofluorescence in diagnosing oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) with diverse conclusions. This study aimed to assess its accuracy for OSCC and OPMD and to investigate its applicability in general dental practice. After a comprehensive literature search, a meta-analysis was conducted to calculate the pooled diagnostic indexes of autofluorescence for premalignant lesions (PML) and malignant lesions (ML) of the oral cavity, lung, esophagus, stomach and colorectum and to compute indexes regarding the detection of OSCC aided by algorithms. Besides, a u test was performed. Twenty-four studies detecting OSCC and OPMD in 2761 lesions were included. This demonstrated that the overall accuracy of autofluorescence for OSCC and OPMD was superior to PML and ML of the lung, esophagus and stomach, slightly inferior to the colorectum. Additionally, the sensitivity and specificity for OSCC and OPMD were 0.89 and 0.8, respectively. Furthermore, the specificity could be remarkably improved by additional algorithms. With relatively high accuracy, autofluorescence could be potentially applied as an adjunct for early diagnosis of OSCC and OPMD. Moreover, approaches such as algorithms could enhance its specificity to ensure its efficacy in primary care. PMID:27416981

  17. Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF-2) and Its Receptors FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 May Be Putative Biomarkers of Malignant Transformation of Potentially Malignant Oral Lesions into Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Seema; Goel, Madhu Mati; Makker, Annu; Bhatia, Vikram; Chandra, Saumya; Kumar, Sandeep; Agarwal, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    There are several factors like angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, genetic alterations, mutational factors that are involved in malignant transformation of potentially malignant oral lesions (PMOLs) to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) is one of the prototypes of the large family of growth factors that bind heparin. FGF-2 induces angiogenesis and its receptors may play a role in synthesis of collagen. FGFs are involved in transmission of signals between the epithelium and connective tissue, and influence growth and differentiation of a wide variety of tissue including epithelia. The present study was undertaken to analyze expression of FGF-2 and its receptors FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 in 72 PMOLs, 108 OSCC and 52 healthy controls, and their role in risk assessment for malignant transformation of Leukoplakia (LKP) and Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) to OSCC. Immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies against FGF-2, FGFR-2 and FGFR-3. IHC results were validated by Real Time PCR. Expression of FGF-2, FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 was upregulated from PMOLs to OSCC. While 90% (9/10) of PMOLs which showed malignant transformation (transformed) expressed FGF-2, only 24.19% cases (15/62) of PMOLs which were not transformed (untransformed) to OSCC expressed FGF-2. Similarly, FGFR-2 expression was seen in 16/62 (25.81%) of untransformed PMOLs and 8/10 (80%) cases of transformed PMOLs. FGFR-3 expression was observed in 23/62 (37.10%) cases of untransformed PMOLs and 6/10 (60%) cases of transformed PMOLs. A significant association of FGF-2 and FGFR-2 expression with malignant transformation from PMOLs to OSCC was observed both at phenotypic and molecular level. The results suggest that FGF-2 and FGFR-2 may be useful as biomarkers of malignant transformation in patients with OSMF and LKP. PMID:26465941

  18. Prevalence of oral cancer and potentially malignant lesions among shammah users in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Scheifele, C; Nassar, A; Reichart, P A

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of oral precancerous lesions and squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in Yemeni users of shammah, a traditional smokeless tobacco habit known in the Arabian Peninsula. The study group comprised 199 male and one female shammah users who were interviewed via a standardised questionnaire and clinically examined in 48 Yemeni villages and cities. Cases with oral leukoplakia (OL) or mucosal burns (MB) were compared with users without any lesion. MB were detected in 31%, of which 46.8% were located on the tongue or floor of the mouth, and OL in 27%, of which 59.2% were located in the same region. In addition, two cases (1%) of apparent OSCC were identified. Statistically significant increased OR (95% CI) of OL were (a) 6.91 (2.66-17.95) for an average duration of the respective shammah application >5min.; (b) 4.90 (1.99-12.08) for a daily frequency of those applications >10; and (c) 4.22 (1.43-12.43) for a daily duration >6h of chewing qat, also a traditional habit in Yemen. Likewise, decreased OR were (a) 0.39 (0.18-0.85) for rinsing the mouth after the shammah application; (b) 0.36 (0.17-0.78) for successful attempts to stop the use in the past; and (c) 0.26 (0.09-0.72) for existing knowledge about the carcinogenicity of shammah that was present in only 19% overall. In conclusion, evidence was shown for a significant association between the prevalence of OL and the daily duration of shammah application in a dose-dependent manner. An appropriate public health program might help to reduce this potential OSCC burden in shammah users. PMID:16759897

  19. Characterization of different tissue changes in normal, betel chewers, potentially malignant lesions, conditions and oral squamous cell carcinoma using reflectance confocal microscopy: correlation with routine histopathology.

    PubMed

    Anuthama, Krishnamurthy; Sherlin, Herald J; Anuja, N; Ramani, Pratibha; Premkumar, Priya; Chandrasekar, T

    2010-04-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the features of normal mucosa, mucosa in betel chewers and smokers, potentially malignant lesions and squamous cell carcinoma of oral mucosa using reflectance confocal microscopy. Oral cavity biopsies were acquired from 25 patients from College of Dental Surgery, Saveetha University who underwent screening for suspected lesions of Oral precancer and Oral cancer along with normal patients who underwent impaction. Biopsies were acquired from the clinically suspicious area and immediately placed in Dulbecco modified eagles growth medium (DMEM). Reflectance confocal images were obtained at multiple image plane depths from biopsies within 6h of excision. After imaging, biopsies were fixed in 10% formalin and submitted for routine histopathological examination by an experienced oral and maxillofacial pathologist. Reflectance confocal images were compared with histological images from the same sample to determine the tissue features which contribute to early cellular changes, image contrast and early diagnosis. The confocal images were obtained to a depth of up to 150 microns on intact biopsy specimens and subsequent 3-dimensional images, keratin thickness measurements, cell measurements, cell density analysis and graphical representations were performed using Leica image analysis software. In normal mucosa keratin deposition were seen as alternating dark and bright stacks and in different cell layers the nuclei were seen as disks of varying intensities. In pre-cancerous lesions the keratin thickness and cell nuclear density were found to be increased when compared to normal controls. In OSMF cases confocal images of fibrosis show scattering from individual fibres as hyperdense areas. Oral squamous cell carcinoma cases demonstrated extensive variations in cell size, nuclear size and nuclear morphology. At cellular level, dysplastic features like increased nuclear density, increased nuclear cytoplasmic ratio, nuclear and cellular

  20. [Organization of public oral health services for early diagnosis of potentially malignant disorders in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Casotti, Elisete; Monteiro, Ana Beatriz Fonseca; Castro Filho, Evelyn Lima de; Santos, Manuella Pires Dos

    2016-05-01

    This is a study of the organization of public health services in the state of Rio de Janeiro concerning the diagnosis of potentially malignant disorders. Secondary data from the database of the first phase of the Program for Enhancement for Access to and Quality of Primary Care were used. The implementation of actions at different levels for cancer prevention, the availability of diagnostic support services and the organization of the care network were assessed. The results show that only 58.8% of oral health teams record and monitor suspect cases; that only 47.1% reported having preferential channels for referring patients and there is great variation in waiting times to confirm the diagnosis. Local managerial and regional support actions can improve the organization of the care network for oral cancer prevention in the state. PMID:27166905

  1. Oral submucous fibrosis: review on mechanisms of malignant transformation.

    PubMed

    Ekanayaka, Rasika Priyadharshani; Tilakaratne, Wanninayake Mudiyanselage

    2016-08-01

    Research studies focusing on various aspects of carcinogenesis in the background of fibrosis have advanced significantly in the recent past, allowing us to understand the mechanisms involved in malignant transformation of oral submucous fibrosis (OSF), the most prevalent potentially malignant oral disorder in South Asia. The role of areca nut as a carcinogen has been proven beyond doubt, with a large number of animal studies demonstrating its carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and genotoxicity. Studies on the molecules implicated in cell cycle regulation, hypoxia, processes leading to DNA double-strand breaks, senescence, and many other pathways related to carcinogenesis have shown ample evidence for the malignant transformation in OSF induced by areca nut. More importantly, the understanding of the mechanisms of malignant transformation may lead to early diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma arising in the background of OSF, which is now considered to constitute a clinicopathologically distinct disease, and the differences are believed to arise from the differential mechanisms of areca nut carcinogenesis. Therefore, the objective of this study is to review the literature on the various mechanisms leading to the malignant transformation of OSF. PMID:27289264

  2. Noninvasive imaging of oral premalignancy and malignancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Krasieva, T.; Jung, W.; You, J. S.; Chen, Z.; Osann, K.; Tromberg, B.

    2005-04-01

    Objectives: Early detection of cancer and its curable precursors remains the best way to ensure patient survival and quality of life. Despite significant advances in treatment, oral cancer still results in 10,000 U.S. deaths annually, mainly due to the late detection of most oral lesions. Specific aim was to use a combination of non-invasive optical in vivo technologies to test a multi-modality approach to non-invasive diagnostics of oral premalignancy and malignancy. Methods: In the hamster cheek pouch model (120 hamsters), in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical Doppler tomography (ODT) mapped epithelial, subepithelial and vascular change throughout carcinogenesis in specific, marked sites. In vivo multi-wavelength multi-photon (MPM) and second harmonic generated (SHG) fluorescence techniques provided parallel data on surface and subsurface tissue structure, specifically collagen presence and structure, cellular presence, and vasculature. Images were diagnosed by 2 blinded, pre-standardized investigators using a standardized scale from 0-6 for all modalities. After sacrifice, histopathological sections were prepared and pathology evaluated on a scale of 0-6. ANOVA techniques compared imaging diagnostics with histopathology. 95% confidence limits of the sensitivity and specificity were established for the diagnostic capability of OCT/ODT+ MPM/SHG using ROC curves and kappa statistics. Results: Imaging data were reproducibly obtained with good accuracy. Carcinogenesis-related structural and vascular changes were clearly visible to tissue depths of 2mm. Sensitivity (OCT/ODT alone: 71-88%; OCT+MPM/SHG: 79-91%) and specificity (OCT alone: 62-83%;OCT+MPM/SHG: 67-90%) compared well with conventional techniques. Conclusions: OCT/ODT and MPM/SHG are promising non-invasive in vivo diagnostic modalities for oral dysplasia and malignancy. Supported by CRFA 30003, CCRP 00-01391V-20235, NIH (LAMMP) RR01192, DOE DE903-91ER 61227, NIH EB-00293 CA91717, NSF BES

  3. Primary oral malignant melanoma: Clinicopathological series of four cases

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ajay; Bindal, Ruchi; Shetty, Devi C.; Singh, Harkanwal P.

    2012-01-01

    Melanoma of the oral cavity is a rare malignant disease. On account of the presence at relatively obscure areas in the oral cavity, most of oral malignant melanomas are diagnosed at a late stage. Early diagnosis is essential for successful treatment and perhaps is the key factor in improving the prognosis of oral malignant melanoma. However, no large clinical series exist, and in fact, clinical cases are the sole key source of information. We hereby present a series of four cases of primary oral malignant melanoma of South-East Asian ethnic origin, with long-term, regular follow-up. The age of the patients ranged between 40 and 70 years, with equal sex predilection, and the gingiva was found to be the most common site of its occurrence. Based on clinical and histological parameters, all the cases were diagnosed as primary malignant melanoma, which were further confirmed by using immunohistochemical markers. PMID:23087742

  4. Malignant transformation of oral submucous fibrosis: overview of histopathological aspects.

    PubMed

    Ray, Jay Gopal; Ranganathan, Kannan; Chattopadhyay, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF), first described in 1952, is a potentially malignant disorder associated with betel quid and areca nut chewing, mostly prevalent in the population of the Indian subcontinent and South East Asia. Malignant transformation of OSF to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has been estimated to be between 2% and 8%. Our study aimed to review the histopathologic changes that contribute to the understanding of the malignant transformation of OSF. Changes in epithelial thickness and dysplasia characterized by micronuclei, altered AgNOR counts and distribution, keratin protein alteration, and alteration of P63 and E-cadherin characterize the epithelial changes during the transformation of OSF to SCC. Common mechanisms have been proposed to be involved in OSF and SCC, through collagen maturation and their interaction with myofibroblasts and mast cells. Fibrosis-driven vascular constriction that results in epithelial hypoxia has also been proposed as an important mechanism for the malignant transformation of OSF. However, reassessment of the classical view is required, because with demonstration of large blood vasculature in the connective tissue stroma of OSF, the hypothesis associated with tissue hypoxia-induced malignant transformation of OSF can be questioned. PMID:27422418

  5. Efficacy of Oral Brush Biopsy without Computer-Assisted Analysis in Oral Premalignant and Malignant Lesions: A Study

    PubMed Central

    Trakroo, Aarti; Sunil, M K; Trivedi, Ashwarya; Garg, Ranjana; Kulkarni, Arun; Arora, Saloni

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the present study, the reliability of oral brush biopsy in identifying dysplasia in clinically diagnosed oral potentially malignant and malignant lesions was evaluated while comparing the findings with scalpel biopsy in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Materials and Methods: In our study, a total number of 50 patients that included both premalignant and malignant lesions were included. Oral brush cytology using a cytobrush was done for all patients, which was followed by incisional biopsy. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were obtained. To see the agreement between two modalities Kappa test of agreement was applied. A P < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. Proportions were compared using Chi-square or Fisher’s exact test. Results: Brush cytology using a cytobrush is a reliable adjunct to histopathology in detecting oral premalignant and malignant oral lesions and can be easily performed with less cost and less discomfort. This technique showed a reasonable sensitivity and specificity thus substantiating its reliability in evaluation of oral premalignant and malignant lesions. Conclusion: The oral brush biopsy is a simple and rapid, non-invasive and relatively painless and well accepted by patient. It is suitable in population screening programs and for pre- and post-treatment observation of confirmed premalignant and malignant lesions and has proved applications in incapacitated areas. PMID:25878476

  6. Morphometry As a Diagnostic Tool for Potentially Malignant Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Sarvani; SR, Ashwinirani; Singh, Sakshi; CP, Athira; Shivaram, Shilpa Kuppareddy; Neethupriya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Though we are in 21st century with nano technology & tissue printing, there still exist many lacunae in the field of diagnosis. Not much is known about prognostic markers till now from literature to assess potentially malignant lesions. Lesions so called potentially malignant can be termed only after clinical & malignant changes have been developed and there are no means of predicting with certainty the risk of cancerous transformation. Aim Our present study was undertaken to establish the morphometric parameters of the parabasal and spinous cells of normal oral epithelium with the changes occurring in cells of Oral Leukoplakia (OL), Oral Verrucous Carcinoma (OVC) and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). Materials and Methods Total 40 patients were divided into Group I which includes patients with normal oral mucosa, group II oral leukoplakia patients, group III oral verrucous carcinoma patients and group IV includes oral squamous cell carcinoma patients. Tissue sections were taken and morphometric analysis of cell area, cell diameter, nuclear area, nuclear diameter, nuclear cytoplasmic ratio was done for parabasal and spinous layer cells. Statistical analysis was done using one-way ANOVA and T-test. Results Nuclear diameter, nuclear area, cell area, nuclear cytoplasmic ratio were significantly increased in OL, OVC, OSCC patients than normal oral mucosa, which was statistically significant. Cell diameter was decreased in OL, OVC, OSCC patients than with normal oral mucosa which was statistically significant. Conclusion Cellular & nuclear parameters showed statistically significant changes in oral leukoplakia, oral verrucous carcinoma & oral squamous cell carcinoma in comparison with normal oral mucosa. PMID:26816987

  7. Survivin expression in oral lichen planus: Role in malignant transformation

    PubMed Central

    Suganya, G; Bavle, Radhika M; Paremala, K; Makarla, Soumya; Sudhakar, M; Reshma, V

    2016-01-01

    Context: Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a potentially malignant disease with a prevalence rate of 0.5–2.2%. It is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease, in which cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells trigger apoptosis of the basal cells of oral epithelium. The reported progression of OLP to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) ranges from 0.4% to 6.5%. Apoptosis plays a major role in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. The evasion of apoptosis in the form of dysregulation of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) may lead to malignant transformation. Survivin belongs to the second gene family of IAPs, which is overexpressed in many tumors such as OSCC and gastric carcinomas, and its expression is widely involved in apoptosis as well as in tumor metastasis. Materials and Methods: Sections were obtained from the paraffin-embedded archival blocks of patients diagnosed histologically as OLP, and cases with normal epithelium were used for comparison whereas cases with OSCC were used as positive control. Results: We analyzed the expression of survivin in OLP and normal epithelium. Survivin expression with moderate intensity was seen in the cells of basal layer with nuclear positivity in cases of OLP, whereas mild to nil expression was seen in normal epithelium with nuclear and cytoplasmic positivity in different layers. Conclusions: Survivin positivity was seen predominantly in the basal cells of OLP suggesting increased longevity of these cells which in turn might acquire dysplastic changes leading to increased risk of malignant transformation of this premalignant condition. Although the conversion rate may be low, the potential exists in the indolent course of the disease. PMID:27601815

  8. Thymoma: benign appearance, malignant potential.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Richard F; Burfeind, William R

    2006-09-01

    Thymoma is a rare tumor with a largely indolent growth pattern. It does, however, have malignant potential as a result of its ability to invade locally and metastasize regionally. Often associated with a number of immune- and nonimmune-mediated paraneoplastic syndromes, patient outcomes are directly related to stage of disease and the ability to achieve a complete surgical resection. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, with adjuvant radiation recommended for invasive thymoma. Sensitive to both chemotherapy and radiation, durable responses are achievable in incompletely resected and inoperable patients. We present two cases of thymoma followed by a general discussion with an emphasis on treatment for both early and advanced-stage disease. PMID:16951392

  9. Oral malignant melanoma: A case report with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Manigandan, T.; Sagar, G. Vikram; Amudhan, A.; Hemalatha, V. T.; Babu, N. Aravinda

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucosal melanoma is a rare malignancy with the tendency to metastasize and locally invade tissues more readily than other malignant tumor of the oral cavity. It occurs approximately four times more frequently in the oral mucosa of the upper jaw usually on the palate or alveolar gingiva. The chameleonic presentation of malignant melanoma, its asymptomatic condition, rarity of the lesion, poor prognosis and the necessity of a highly specialized treatment are factors that should be seriously considered by the involved health care provider. Herein we report a rare and interesting case of oral malignant melanoma of the maxillary anterior gingiva, which was clinically and histopathologically diagnosed with a brief review of literature, has been discussed. PMID:25191086

  10. Oral malignant melanoma: A case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Manigandan, T; Sagar, G Vikram; Amudhan, A; Hemalatha, V T; Babu, N Aravinda

    2014-07-01

    Oral mucosal melanoma is a rare malignancy with the tendency to metastasize and locally invade tissues more readily than other malignant tumor of the oral cavity. It occurs approximately four times more frequently in the oral mucosa of the upper jaw usually on the palate or alveolar gingiva. The chameleonic presentation of malignant melanoma, its asymptomatic condition, rarity of the lesion, poor prognosis and the necessity of a highly specialized treatment are factors that should be seriously considered by the involved health care provider. Herein we report a rare and interesting case of oral malignant melanoma of the maxillary anterior gingiva, which was clinically and histopathologically diagnosed with a brief review of literature, has been discussed. PMID:25191086

  11. Myeloid cell leukemia-1 is a molecular indicator for malignant transformation of oral lichen planus

    PubMed Central

    SHIN, JI-AE; SEO, JAE-MIN; OH, SEJUN; CHO, SUNG-DAE; LEE, KYUNG-EUN

    2016-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP), characterized by a chronic mucocutaneous inflammatory condition, is a common disease of the oral cavity. Retrospective and prospective epidemiological data suggest that OLP is considered to have malignant potential. However, it is unclear as to which types of molecules may cause malignant transformation of OLP. In the present study, the presence of myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) and B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) was studied by western blot analysis in 11 OLP and three normal oral mucosa (NOM) samples and in two human oral cancer cell lines. The functional role of Mcl-1 in oral cancer cells was analyzed using a trypan blue exclusion assay and soft agar assay. Mcl-1 was strongly expressed in the OLP and the two oral cancer cell lines compared with NOM, whereas Bcl-2 was not. Sorafenib and mithramycin A decreased cell viability in MC-3 and HSC-3 oral cancer cells and at same concentration they reduced the expression level of Mcl-1 in the two cell lines. The two chemicals affected Mcl-1 protein and significantly inhibited neoplastic cell transformation in the two cell lines. We suggest that the malignant potential of OLP may be associated with the expression of Mcl-1, and that downregulation of Mcl-1 may prevent malignant transformation of OLP to oral cancer. PMID:26893789

  12. Oral malignant melanoma: Report of three cases with literature review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shalini; Tandon, Ankita; Ram, Hari; Gupta, O. P.

    2015-01-01

    Primary oral melanoma is known to be an extremely rare and aggressive neoplasm arising from the mucosal epithelium of the oral cavity especially upper jaw (palate or alveolar gingivae). Malignant melanoma that does not originate in the skin is a very rare disease and is considered one of the most deadly of all human neoplasms. Oral malignant melanoma (OMM) represents about 1% of all melanomas and approximately 0.5% of all oral malignancies. OMM has been reported in patients aged 20 to 80 years and has a male predilection. Because most mucosal melanotic lesions are painless in their early stages, so delayed recognition and subsequent treatment result in worst prognosis. Here, we report three cases with significant heterogeneity in morphological features and biologic behavior. PMID:26668465

  13. Management of potentially malignant disorders: evidence and critique.

    PubMed

    Lodi, Giovanni; Porter, Stephen

    2008-02-01

    At a workshop coordinated by the WHO Collaborating Centre of Oral Cancer and Precancer in the United Kingdom, issues related to management of patients affected by oral leukoplakia were discussed by an expert group. The consensus views of the working group are presented here. Although removal of a lesion still seems to be the predominant method of treatment by the majority of relevant health care professionals, no randomized controlled trials have been undertaken to test the hypothesis that excision either by scalpel or laser greatly influences the potential for later malignant transformation within the oral mucosa of an affected individual. Results of observational studies indicate that, although surgery may have a beneficial effect, this is not likely to reduce the risk of later recurrence nor malignant transformation at the same or another site. Medical measures that lessen the size, extent or histopathological features of dysplasia within leukoplakia likewise presently do not seem to be of particular promise, as relapse or later malignant transformation can occur, and there is a risk of adverse effects, particularly with systemic agents (which themselves may be contra-indicated in some individuals). While the risk of malignant transformation, and the development of further potentially malignant disease may theoretically be reduced by cessation of risk activities, such as tobacco usage and alcohol consumption, there remain no good studies that demonstrate that such measures significantly reduce such events. PMID:18197849

  14. Elucidating drivers of oral epithelial dysplasia formation and malignant transformation to cancer using RNAseq

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Caroline; Graham, Jennifer L.; Chengot, Preetha; Daly, Catherine; Chalkley, Rebecca; Ross, Lisa; Droop, Alastair; Rabbitts, Pamela; Stead, Lucy F.

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a prevalent cancer with poor prognosis. Most OSCC progresses via a non-malignant stage called dysplasia. Effective treatment of dysplasia prior to potential malignant transformation is an unmet clinical need. To identify markers of early disease, we performed RNA sequencing of 19 matched HPV negative patient trios: normal oral mucosa, dysplasia and associated OSCC. We performed differential gene expression, principal component and correlated gene network analysis using these data. We found differences in the immune cell signatures present at different disease stages and were able to distinguish early events in pathogenesis, such as upregulation of many HOX genes, from later events, such as down-regulation of adherens junctions. We herein highlight novel coding and non-coding candidates for involvement in oral dysplasia development and malignant transformation, and speculate on how our findings may guide further translational research into the treatment of oral dysplasia. PMID:26515596

  15. Malignant melanoma of the oral cavity: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Munde, Anita; Juvekar, Monica Vivek; Karle, Ravindra R.; Wankhede, Pranali

    2014-01-01

    Primary malignant melanoma is a rare and aggressive neoplasm that originates from the proliferation of melanocytes. Although, it comprises 1.3% of all cancers, malignant melanoma of the oral cavity accounts for only 0.2-8% of all reported melanomas and occurs approximately 4 times more frequently in the oral mucosa of the upper jaw, usually on the palate or alveolar gingivae. Most of the mucosal melanomas are usually asymptomatic in early stages, and presents as pigmented patch or a mass delaying the diagnosis until symptoms of swelling, ulceration, bleeding, or loosening of teeth are noted. The prognosis is extremely poor, especially in advanced stages. Therefore, any pigmented lesion of undetermined origin should always be biopsied. We herewith report of two cases of oral malignant melanoma in a 60 and 75-year-old female. PMID:24963252

  16. Malignant melanoma of the oral cavity: Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Munde, Anita; Juvekar, Monica Vivek; Karle, Ravindra R; Wankhede, Pranali

    2014-04-01

    Primary malignant melanoma is a rare and aggressive neoplasm that originates from the proliferation of melanocytes. Although, it comprises 1.3% of all cancers, malignant melanoma of the oral cavity accounts for only 0.2-8% of all reported melanomas and occurs approximately 4 times more frequently in the oral mucosa of the upper jaw, usually on the palate or alveolar gingivae. Most of the mucosal melanomas are usually asymptomatic in early stages, and presents as pigmented patch or a mass delaying the diagnosis until symptoms of swelling, ulceration, bleeding, or loosening of teeth are noted. The prognosis is extremely poor, especially in advanced stages. Therefore, any pigmented lesion of undetermined origin should always be biopsied. We herewith report of two cases of oral malignant melanoma in a 60 and 75-year-old female. PMID:24963252

  17. Tofacitinib, an oral Janus kinase inhibitor: analysis of malignancies across the rheumatoid arthritis clinical development programme

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Jeffrey R; Lee, Eun Bong; Kaplan, Irina V; Kwok, Kenneth; Geier, Jamie; Benda, Birgitta; Soma, Koshika; Wang, Lisy; Riese, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To further assess the potential role of Janus kinase inhibition in the development of malignancies, we performed an integrated analysis of data from the tofacitinib RA clinical development programme. Methods Malignancy data (up to 10 April 2013) were pooled from six phase II, six Phase III and two long-term extension (LTE) studies involving tofacitinib. In the phase II and III studies, patients with moderate-to-severe RA were randomised to various tofacitinib doses as monotherapy or with background non-biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), mainly methotrexate. The LTE studies (tofacitinib 5 or 10 mg twice daily) enrolled patients from qualifying prior phase I, II and III index studies. Results Of 5671 tofacitinib-treated patients, 107 developed malignancies (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC)). The most common malignancy was lung cancer (n=24) followed by breast cancer (n=19), lymphoma (n=10) and gastric cancer (n=6). The rate of malignancies by 6-month intervals of tofacitinib exposure indicates rates remained stable over time. Standardised incidence ratios (comparison with Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results) for all malignancies (excluding NMSC) and selected malignancies (lung, breast, lymphoma, NMSC) were within the expected range of patients with moderate-to-severe RA. Conclusions The overall rates and types of malignancies observed in the tofacitinib clinical programme remained stable over time with increasing tofacitinib exposure. PMID:25902789

  18. Clinical systemic lupeol administration for canine oral malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    YOKOE, INORU; AZUMA, KAZUO; HATA, KEISHI; MUKAIYAMA, TOSHIYUKI; GOTO, TAKAHIRO; TSUKA, TAKESHI; IMAGAWA, TOMOHIRO; ITOH, NORIHIKO; MURAHATA, YUSUKE; OSAKI, TOMOHIRO; MINAMI, SABURO; OKAMOTO, YOSHIHARU

    2015-01-01

    Canine oral malignant melanoma (COMM) is the most aggressive malignant tumor in dogs. Lupeol is a triterpene extracted from various fruits and vegetables that reportedly inhibits melanoma cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. In this study, the efficacy of subcutaneous lupeol for spontaneous COMM was evaluated. A total of 11 dogs (3, 5 and 3 dogs diagnosed with clinical stage I, II and III melanoma, respectively) were evaluated. Subcutaneous lupeol (10 mg/kg) was administered postoperatively at various time points to treat these 11 COMM cases. Of the 11 subjects, 7 exhibited no local recurrence 180 days postoperatively and no severe adverse effects were observed in any of the cases. Furthermore, no distant metastasis was observed during the experimental period. Therefore, systemic lupeol may prevent local tumor progression and distant metastasis and may be a novel adjuvant treatment for the treatment of COMM. PMID:25469276

  19. Optical detection of (pre-)malignant lesions of the oral mucosa: autofluorescence characteristics of healthy mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Veld, Diana C. G.; Witjes, Max; Roodenburg, Jan L.; Star, Willem M.; Sterenborg, Hericus J. C. M.

    2001-10-01

    Previous clinical results demonstrate the potential of in vivo autofluorescence spectroscopy for early detection of (pre-)malignant lesions of the oral mucosa. For reliable diagnosis, it is necessary to study autofluorescence spectra of healthy mucosa first. We measured excitation-emission maps in healthy subjects and subjects with a history of cancer in the head -neck region. Our results show that different anatomical locations produce distinct autofluorescence spectra. Influences of, among others, smoking and drinking habits require further investigation.

  20. General Information about Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Malignant Potential Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors Go to ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  1. Oral complications in patients receiving treatment for malignancies other than of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Sonis, S T; Sonis, A L; Lieberman, A

    1978-09-01

    Oral complications in patients being treated for malignancies that were not in the head and neck were studied. Age, type of therapy, and type of malignancy were factors related to the prevalence of oral complications. Mucosal ulcerations, xerostomia, and bacterial and fungal infections were the most frequently encountered oral problems. The frequency of oral complications in these patients indicates the need for an awareness and involvement of dental practitioners in their management. PMID:279602

  2. Therapeutic Potential of Resveratrol in Lymphoid Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Khan, Omar S; Bhat, Ajaz A; Krishnankutty, Roopesh; Mohammad, Ramzi M; Uddin, Shahab

    2016-01-01

    Natural products have always been sought as a dependable source for the cure of many fatal diseases including cancer. Resveratrol (RSV), a naturally occurring plant polyphenol, has been of recent research interest and is being investigated for its beneficial biological properties that include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, proapoptotic, and growth inhibitory activities. These effects are mainly mediated by cell cycle arrest, upregulation of proapoptotic proteins, loss of mitochondrial potential, and generation of reactive oxygen species. Among the beneficial properties of RSV, the anticancer property has been of the prime focus and extensively explored during the last few years. Although reports exist on the chemopreventive role of RSV in many solid tumors, limited information is available on the antiproliferative activity of RSV in human lymphoma cells and experimental models. Potential mechanisms for its antiproliferative effect include induction of cell differentiation, apoptosis, and inhibition of DNA synthesis. In this review, the different kinds of lymphoid malignancies and the main mechanisms of cell death induced by resveratrol are discussed. The challenges are limiting in vivo experimental studies involving resveratrol. An attempt for the translation of this compound into a clinical drug also forms a part of this review. PMID:27028800

  3. A case report of metastasis of malignant mesothelioma to the oral gingiva

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Metastatic mesothelioma to the oral cavity arises from the pleura or peritoneum and distant hematogenous metastases are seen in more than half of cases but only a few cases are reported to the oral cavity. Case A 75 year old male suffering from metastatic mesothelioma presents an hyperplasia of the attached gingiva. Malignant mesothelioma is a rare tumour arising from pleura, pericardium or peritoneum. Conclusion This article highlights the importance of biopsy and histopathological diagnosis of oral lesions especially in case of a malignant history. PMID:21513537

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of less common pancreatic malignancies and pancreatic tumors with malignant potential

    PubMed Central

    Franz, D.; Esposito, I.; Kapp, A.-C.; Gaa, J.; Rummeny, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors are an increasingly common finding in abdominal imaging. Various kinds of pathologies of the pancreas are well known, but it often remains difficult to classify the lesions radiologically in respect of type and grade of malignancy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the method of choice for the evaluation of pancreatic pathologies due to its superior soft tissue contrast. In this article we present a selection of less common malignant and potentially malignant pancreatic neoplasms with their characteristic appearance on established MRI sequences with and without contrast enhancement. PMID:26937427

  5. In vivo Raman spectroscopy of oral buccal mucosa: a study on malignancy associated changes (MAC)/cancer field effects (CFE).

    PubMed

    Singh, S P; Sahu, Aditi; Deshmukh, Atul; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Krishna, C Murali

    2013-07-21

    Occurrence of metachronous and synchronous secondary tumors in oral cavities has been associated with poor prognosis and decreased 5-year disease-free survival rates. The origin of secondary tumors in the oral cavity has been primarily attributed to cancer field effects (CFE) or malignancy-associated changes (MAC) in uninvolved areas. Classification of normal, cancerous and pre-cancerous oral lesions by in vivo Raman spectroscopy (RS) has already been demonstrated. In the present study, MAC/CFE in oral buccal mucosa were explored. In vivo Raman spectra from 84 subjects (722 spectra) under five categories - cancer and contralateral normal (opposite side of tumor), healthy controls (no tobacco habit, no cancer), habitués healthy controls (tobacco habit, no cancer) and non-habitués contralateral normal (no tobacco habit with cancer) were acquired. Mean and difference spectra suggest that loss of lipids and additional features representing proteins and DNA are characteristics of all pathological conditions, with respect to healthy controls. Spectral data were analyzed by PC-LDA followed by leave-one-out cross-validation. Results suggest that Raman characteristics of mucosa of healthy controls are exclusive, while those of habitués healthy controls are similar to those of contralateral normal mucosa. It was observed that the cluster of non-habitués contralateral normal mucosa is different from habitués healthy controls, suggesting that malignancy associated changes can be identified and also indicating that transformation of uninvolved oral mucosa due to tobacco habit or malignancy is different. The findings of the study demonstrate the potential of RS in identifying early transformation changes in oral mucosa and the efficacy of this approach in oral cancer applications. PMID:23392131

  6. Oral Chemotherapy in Patients with Hematological Malignancies-Care Process, Pharmacoeconomic and Policy Implications.

    PubMed

    Betcher, Jeffrey; Dow, Elizabeth; Khera, Nandita

    2016-08-01

    Patients with hematologic malignancies are increasing being prescribed oral anticancer medications (OAMs) and/or biologics. These newer targeted OAMs are associated with a host of practical and pharmacoeconomic implications for patients and healthcare providers. Issues such as safety, procurement challenges, and the need for proactive involvement of all stakeholders to optimize adherence for successful use of these agents are increasingly being recognized. The current reactive model is negatively impacting the patient experience through delays in care, financial toxicity, and decreased safety. It also impacts the healthcare providers in the form of lost revenue and staff burnout due to labor-intensive procurement and patient financial assistance burdens. In this review, we describe some of the issues identified and discuss potential strategies to improve patient access, minimize healthcare burden, and review current policy initiatives and patient advocacy efforts to reduce financial toxicity. PMID:27086140

  7. Automated classification of optical coherence tomography images for the diagnosis of oral malignancy in the hamster cheek pouch

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Paritosh; Shrestha, Sebina; Park, Jesung; Serafino, Michael J.; Gimenez-Conti, Irma; Brandon, Jimi; Cheng, Yi-Shing; Applegate, Brian E.; Jo, Javier A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Most studies evaluating the potential of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for the diagnosis of oral cancer are based on visual assessment of OCT B-scans by trained experts. Human interpretation of the large pool of data acquired by modern high-speed OCT systems, however, can be cumbersome and extremely time consuming. Development of image analysis methods for automated and quantitative OCT image analysis could therefore facilitate the evaluation of such a large volume of data. We report automated algorithms for quantifying structural features that are associated with the malignant transformation of the oral epithelium based on image processing of OCT data. The features extracted from the OCT images were used to design a statistical classification model to perform the automated tissue diagnosis. The sensitivity and specificity of distinguishing malignant lesions from benign lesions were found to be 90.2% and 76.3%, respectively. The results of the study demonstrate the feasibility of using quantitative image analysis algorithms for extracting morphological features from OCT images to perform the automated diagnosis of oral malignancies in a hamster cheek pouch model. PMID:25162909

  8. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging to investigate cell metabolism in malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rück, Angelika; Hauser, Carmen; Mosch, Simone; Kalinina, Sviatlana

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence-guided diagnosis of tumor tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results interfere with the outcome. Improvement through observation of cell metabolism might offer the solution, but needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. With respect to this, spectrally resolved multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging was investigated to analyze cell metabolism in metabolic phenotypes of malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells. The time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of NADH were measured in cells of different origins. The fluorescence lifetime of bound and free NADH was calculated from biexponential fitting of the fluorescence intensity decay within different spectral regions. The mean lifetime was increased from nonmalignant oral mucosa cells to different squamous carcinoma cells, where the most aggressive cells showed the longest lifetime. In correlation with reports in the literature, the total amount of NADH seemed to be less for the carcinoma cells and the ratio of free/bound NADH was decreased from nonmalignant to squamous carcinoma cells. Moreover for squamous carcinoma cells a high concentration of bound NADH was found in cytoplasmic organelles (mainly mitochondria). This all together indicates that oxidative phosphorylation and a high redox potential play an important role in the energy metabolism of these cells.

  9. PTHrP promotes malignancy of human oral cancer cell downstream of the EGFR signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Tamaki; Tsuda, Masumi; Ohba, Yusuke Kawaguchi, Hideaki; Totsuka, Yasunori; Shindoh, Masanobu

    2008-04-11

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is detected in many aggressive tumors and involved in malignant conversion; however, the underlying mechanism remains obscure. Here, we identified PTHrP as a mediator of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling to promote the malignancies of oral cancers. PTHrP mRNA was abundantly expressed in most of the quiescent oral cancer cells, and was significantly upregulated by EGF stimulation via ERK and p38 MAPK. PTHrP silencing by RNA interference, as well as EGFR inhibitor AG1478 treatment, significantly suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and invasiveness. Furthermore, combined treatment of AG1478 and PTHrP knockdown achieved synergistic inhibition of malignant phenotypes. Recombinant PTHrP substantially promoted cell motility, and rescued the inhibition by PTHrP knockdown, suggesting the paracrine/autocrine function of PTHrP. These data indicate that PTHrP contributes to the malignancy of oral cancers downstream of EGFR signaling, and may thus provide a therapeutic target for oral cancer.

  10. A Rare and Extensive Case of Oral Malignant Melanoma involving Mandibular Gingiva.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Rajendrasinh S; Phulari, Rashmi Gs; Vasavada, Dharmesh G; Patel, Dipen K

    2016-02-01

    Oral malignant melanoma is an infrequent but an aggressive neoplasm of unknown etiology, seen most commonly in middle age male patients and is more frequently seen at the hard palate and gingiva. The tumor tends to metastasize or locally invade tissue more readily than other malignant tumors in the oral region. In this article, we report a rare case of extensive oral melanoma in a 55-year-old male patient, with a chief complaint of painless growth in mandibular anterior gingiva measuring about 2.6 X 1.7 X 0.8 cm and extending bilaterally till posterior mandibular gingiva and unilaterally to right buccal mucosa. The most common site being hard palate and maxillary gingiva, it is extremely rare in mandibular gingiva (less than 7%) and hence, this rare occurrence in mandibular gingiva is reported, the diagnosis of which was confirmed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. PMID:27042595

  11. A Rare and Extensive Case of Oral Malignant Melanoma involving Mandibular Gingiva

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Rajendrasinh S; Vasavada, Dharmesh G; Patel, Dipen K

    2016-01-01

    Oral malignant melanoma is an infrequent but an aggressive neoplasm of unknown etiology, seen most commonly in middle age male patients and is more frequently seen at the hard palate and gingiva. The tumor tends to metastasize or locally invade tissue more readily than other malignant tumors in the oral region. In this article, we report a rare case of extensive oral melanoma in a 55-year-old male patient, with a chief complaint of painless growth in mandibular anterior gingiva measuring about 2.6 X 1.7 X 0.8 cm and extending bilaterally till posterior mandibular gingiva and unilaterally to right buccal mucosa. The most common site being hard palate and maxillary gingiva, it is extremely rare in mandibular gingiva (less than 7%) and hence, this rare occurrence in mandibular gingiva is reported, the diagnosis of which was confirmed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. PMID:27042595

  12. Primary malignant melanoma of oral cavity: A report of three rare cases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Hanspal; Kumar, Priya; Augustine, Jeyaseelan; Urs, Aadithya B; Gupta, Sunita

    2016-01-01

    Oral malignant melanoma (OMM) is a rare tumor of melanocytic origin, accounting for 20-30% of malignant melanomas at the mucosal surface and 16% intra-orally. Hard palate and maxillary gingiva are the most common involved sites. In this case series, we present varying patterns of presentation of three cases of OMM with one case of distant metastasis. All cases in the current series presented at an advanced stage and died within a year of diagnosis. In conclusion, due to the aggressive clinical course and poor prognosis of this deadly lesion, it is of paramount importance to maintain a high index of suspicion for early detection and diagnosis for any pigmented lesion in the oral cavity. PMID:27041909

  13. Ultrasonic diagnosis of oral and neck malignant lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ishii, J; Fujii, E; Suzuki, H; Shinozuka, K; Kawase, N; Amagasa, T

    1992-12-01

    A series of 14 patients with nodal and extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the oral and neck region was analyzed by ultrasonogram evaluation. Eight nodal lymphomas and six extranodal lymphomas commonly exhibited almost completely similar ultrasonographic findings, specifically, clear delineation of the boundary echo and a homogeneous, weak internal echo, the so-called pseudo-liquid-like images. The results derived from our study suggest that ultrasonic diagnosis is also helpful in evaluating patients with lymphoma during the initial diagnosis and initial treatment like other diagnostic imaging modalities. PMID:1458552

  14. Integrative metabonomics as potential method for diagnosis of thyroid malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuan; Nie, Xiu; Xu, Shan; Li, Yan; Huang, Tao; Tang, Huiru; Wang, Yulan

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid nodules can be classified into benign and malignant tumors. However, distinguishing between these two types of tumors can be challenging in clinics. Since malignant nodules require surgical intervention whereas asymptomatic benign tumors do not, there is an urgent need for new techniques that enable accurate diagnosis of malignant thyroid nodules. Here, we used 1H NMR spectroscopy coupled with pattern recognition techniques to analyze the metabonomes of thyroid tissues and their extracts from thyroid lesion patients (n = 53) and their adjacent healthy thyroid tissues (n = 46). We also measured fatty acid compositions using GC−FID/MS techniques as complementary information. We demonstrate that thyroid lesion tissues can be clearly distinguishable from healthy tissues, and malignant tumors can also be distinguished from the benign tumors based on the metabolic profiles, both with high sensitivity and specificity. In addition, we show that thyroid lesions are accompanied with disturbances of multiple metabolic pathways, including alterations in energy metabolism (glycolysis, lipid and TCA cycle), promotions in protein turnover, nucleotide biosynthesis as well as phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis. These findings provide essential information on the metabolic features of thyroid lesions and demonstrate that metabonomics technology can be potentially useful in the rapid and accurate preoperative diagnosis of malignant thyroid nodules. PMID:26486570

  15. Value of FDG PET/CT in staging of oral cancer: four simultaneous primary malignancies.

    PubMed

    Linz, Christian; Müller-Richter, Urs D A; Kircher, Stefan; Lapa, Constantin; Bluemel, Christina

    2015-05-01

    Patients with squamous cell cancer (SCC) of the head and neck are at increased risk for second primary malignancies (SPMs). We report on a 53-year-old patient with primary diagnosis of SCC in the anterior floor of the mouth. Panendoscopy suspected an SPM of the right vocal cord. FDG PET/CT, as a whole-body imaging method, confirmed this suspicion and raised concern for further SPM of both esophagus and colon. All malignancies were confirmed by biopsy. Subsequently, the patient underwent radiochemotherapy. In summary, FDG PET/CT revealed unexpected multiple SPMs, prevented unnecessary resection of the oral SCC, and enabled individualized therapeutic management. PMID:25742223

  16. Translational approach utilizing COX-2, p53, and MDM2 expressions in malignant transformation of oral submucous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pratik N; Thennavan, Aatish; Sen, Subhalakshmi; Chandrashekar, Chetana; Radhakrishnan, Raghu

    2015-09-01

    About 20% of the world's population uses some form of betel nut, which suggests that the incidence of oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is higher than current estimates. OSF has the potential to undergo malignant transformation; thus, there is a need to identify relevant markers to assess its aggressiveness. We evaluated changes in COX-2, p53, and MDM2 expressions in progressive OSF. Expressions of COX-2, p53, and MDM2 increased with OSF progression. There was a strong association between COX-2 overexpression and recurrence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (P < 0.001) and a positive relation between increased MDM2 expression and failure of radiotherapy (P = 0.007). These findings suggest that COX-2 is an important marker of disease progression and that MDM2 expression is useful for treatment planning. PMID:26369479

  17. Apoptotic Index and Proliferative Index in Premalignant and Malignant Squamous Cell Lesions of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Vidya; Juluri, Ravichandra; Goel, Seema; Madan, Jyotsna; Mitra, Subir K; Gopalakrishnan, Dharmarajan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oral squamous cell lesions are most commonly diagnosed lesions in India. Both premalignant and malignant lesions are frequently encountered. In this study, we evaluated the role and significance of apoptotic indices (AI) and proliferative indices (PI) in premalignant and malignant squamous cell lesions of the oral cavity. Materials and Methods: A total of 62 histologically proven cases of premalignant and malignant oral squamous cell lesions were analyzed. The biopsies were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and also with monoclonal antibody Ki-67. AI and PI were assessed using a light microscope. Results: AI was found to increase gradually from normal to dysplasia to carcinoma. The highest AI was seen in well-differentiated squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). PI also was found to increase significantly from normal to dysplasia to carcinoma. The highest PI was seen in poorly differentiated SCC. Conclusion: AI in conjunction with the PI offers an accurate idea as to the nature and course of the lesion and may help to plan timely surgical intervention that results in better clinical prognosis and outcome. PMID:25709366

  18. Malignant Potential of Gastrointestinal Cancers Assessed by Structural Equation Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Kei; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Okahara, Satoshi; Kodaira, Junichi; Oohashi, Hirokazu; Isshiki, Hiroyuki; Kawakami, Kentaro; Yamashita, Kentaro; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Hosokawa, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Background Parameters reported in pathologic reviews have been failing to assess exactly the malignant potential of gastrointestinal cancers. We hypothesized that malignant potential could be defined by common latent variables (hypothesis I), but there are substantial differences in the associations between malignant potential and pathologic parameters according to the origin of gastrointestinal cancers (hypothesis II). We shed light on these issues by structural equation modeling. Materials and Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 217 esophageal, 192 gastric, and 175 colorectal cancer patients who consecutively underwent curative surgery for their pathologic stage I cancers at Keiyukai Sapporo Hospital. Latent variables identified by factor analysis and seven conventional pathologic parameters were introduced in the structural equation modeling analysis. Results Because latent variables were disparate except for their number, 'three' in the examined gastrointestinal cancers, the first hypothesis was rejected. Because configural invariance across gastrointestinal cancers was not approved, the second hypothesis was verified. We could trace the three significant paths on the causal graph from latent variables to lymph node metastasis, which were mediated through depth, lymphatic invasion, and matrilysin expression in esophageal cancer, whereas only one significant path could be traced in both gastric and colorectal cancer. Two of the three latent variables were exogenous in esophageal cancer, whereas one factor was exogenous in the other gastrointestinal cancers. Cancer stemness promoted viability in esophageal cancer, but it was suppressed in others. Conclusion These results reflect the malignant potential of esophageal cancer is higher than that of the other gastrointestinal cancers. Such information might contribute to refining clinical treatments for gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:26889682

  19. Prognostic potential of AgNORs in oral submucous fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Murgod, Sanjay; Channabasaviah, Girish Hemadal; Shivamurthy, Dyamenahalli Malleshappa; Ashok, Lingappa; Krishnappa, Savita Jangal

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Objective: The role of prognosis cannot be stressed enough, especially when it comes to potentially malignant lesions. The argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs), which is simple and cost-effective has been used in diagnostic and prognostic pathologies. This study seeks to identify the nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) in oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF), to correlate the AgNOR count with the histologic grade of OSMF, and to evaluate the prognostic potential of AgNOR. Materials and Methods: The sample size consisted of archival paraffin blocks of 35 cases of varying grades of OSMF and 10 cases of squamous cell carcinoma. Normal mucosa samples served as controls for the study. AgNOR staining in accordance with the method of Smith and Crocker was performed and Student's t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results: The results showed an increase in AgNOR counts with corresponding grades of OSMF, the count being least in normal mucosa and also an increase in AgNOR count with corresponding decrease in differentiation of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusion: AgNOR staining is a rapid and inexpensive procedure representing cellular proliferation that can be used to assess the nature of the lesion and therefore, the prognosis. PMID:27114958

  20. Therapeutic radiation and the potential risk of second malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kamran, Sophia C; Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Ng, Andrea; Haas-Kogan, Daphne; Viswanathan, Akila N

    2016-06-15

    Radiation has long been associated with carcinogenesis. Nevertheless, it is an important part of multimodality therapy for many malignancies. It is critical to assess the risk of secondary malignant neoplasms (SMNs) after radiation treatment. The authors reviewed the literature with a focus on radiation and associated SMNs for primary hematologic, breast, gynecologic, and pediatric tumors. Radiation appeared to increase the risk of SMN in all of these; however, this risk was found to be associated with age, hormonal influences, chemotherapy use, environmental influences, genetic predisposition, infection, and immunosuppression. The risk also appears to be altered with modern radiotherapy techniques. Practitioners of all specialties who treat cancer survivors in follow-up should be aware of this potential risk. Cancer 2016;122:1809-21. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:26950597

  1. FT-IR Spectroscopic Analysis of Normal and Malignant Human Oral Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnakumar, N.; Madhavan, R. Nirmal; Sumesh, P.; Palaniappan, Pl. Rm.; Venkatachalam, P.; Ramachandran, C. R.

    2008-11-01

    FT-IR spectroscopy has been used to explore the changes in the vibrational bands of normal and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) tissues in the region 4000-400 cm-1. Significant changes in the spectral features were observed. The spectral changes were the results of characteristics structural alterations at the molecular level in the malignant tissues. These alterations include structural changes of proteins and possible increase of its content, an increase in the nucleic-to-cytoplasm ratio, an increase in the relative amount of DNA, an increase in the rate of phosphorylation process induced by carcinogenesis, a loss of hydrogen bonding of the C-OH groups in the amino acid residues of proteins, a decrease in the relative amount of lipids compared to normal epithelial oral tissues. The results of the present study demonstrate that the FT-IR technique has the feasibility of discriminating malignant from normal tissues and other pathological states in a short period of time and may detect malignant transformation earlier than the standard histological examination stage.

  2. HPV and oral lesions: preventive possibilities, vaccines and early diagnosis of malignant lesions

    PubMed Central

    TESTI, D.; NARDONE, M.; MELONE, P.; CARDELLI, P.; OTTRIA, L.; ARCURI, C.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The importance of HPV in world healthy is high, in fact high-risk HPV types contribute significantly to viral associated neoplasms. In this article we will analyze vary expression of HPV in oral cavity both benign and malignant, their prevalence and the importance in early diagnosis and prevention. The classical oral lesions associated with human papillomavirus are squamous cell papilloma, condyloma acuminatum, verruca vulgaris and focal epithelial hyperplasia. Overall, HPV types 2, 4, 6, 11, 13 and 32 have been associated with benign oral lesions while HPV types 16 and 18 have been associated with malignant lesions, especially in cancers of the tonsils and elsewhere in the oropharynx. Transmission of the virus can occur with direct contact, genital contact, anal and oral sex; latest studies suggest a salivary transmission and from mother to child during delivery. The number of lifetime sexual partners is an important risk factor for the development of HPV-positive head-neck cancer. Oral/oropharyngeal cancer etiologically associated with HPV having an increased survival and a better prognostic (85%–90% to five years). There is no cure for the virus. There are two commercially available prophylactic vaccines against HPV today: the bivalent (16 and 18) Cervarix® and the tetravalent (6, 11, 16 and 18) Gardasil® and new vaccine Gardasil 9 (6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, 58) was approved in the United States. To be effective, such vaccination should start before “sexual puberty”. The vaccine could be an important preventive strategy, in fact the scientific community is in agreement on hypothesis that blocking the contagion it may also limit the distance complications as the oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:27555904

  3. HPV and oral lesions: preventive possibilities, vaccines and early diagnosis of malignant lesions.

    PubMed

    Testi, D; Nardone, M; Melone, P; Cardelli, P; Ottria, L; Arcuri, C

    2015-01-01

    The importance of HPV in world healthy is high, in fact high-risk HPV types contribute significantly to viral associated neoplasms. In this article we will analyze vary expression of HPV in oral cavity both benign and malignant, their prevalence and the importance in early diagnosis and prevention. The classical oral lesions associated with human papillomavirus are squamous cell papilloma, condyloma acuminatum, verruca vulgaris and focal epithelial hyperplasia. Overall, HPV types 2, 4, 6, 11, 13 and 32 have been associated with benign oral lesions while HPV types 16 and 18 have been associated with malignant lesions, especially in cancers of the tonsils and elsewhere in the oropharynx. Transmission of the virus can occur with direct contact, genital contact, anal and oral sex; latest studies suggest a salivary transmission and from mother to child during delivery. The number of lifetime sexual partners is an important risk factor for the development of HPV-positive head-neck cancer. Oral/oropharyngeal cancer etiologically associated with HPV having an increased survival and a better prognostic (85%-90% to five years). There is no cure for the virus. There are two commercially available prophylactic vaccines against HPV today: the bivalent (16 and 18) Cervarix® and the tetravalent (6, 11, 16 and 18) Gardasil® and new vaccine Gardasil 9 (6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, 58) was approved in the United States. To be effective, such vaccination should start before "sexual puberty". The vaccine could be an important preventive strategy, in fact the scientific community is in agreement on hypothesis that blocking the contagion it may also limit the distance complications as the oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:27555904

  4. Areca nut contributes to oral malignancy through facilitating the conversion of cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Chen; Chang, Joseph T; Chiu, Crystal; Lu, Ya-Ching; Li, Yan-Liang; Chiang, Chang-Hsu; You, Guo-Rung; Lee, Li-Yu; Cheng, Ann-Joy

    2016-05-01

    Oral cancer is one of the most frequent malignant diseases worldwide, and areca nut is a primary carcinogen causing this cancer in Southeast Asia. Previous studies to examine the effects of this carcinogen often used short-term and high-dose treatment of area nut extract as a research model, which do not recapitulate the conditions of patients with long-term and habitual use of this substance. To approach authentic mechanism of areca nut-induced oral carcinogenesis that occurs in human, we established four isogenic sublines of oral cells which were chronic exposed to areca nut extract. Without eliciting cytotoxicity or senescence, these four sublines cells exhibited significant increase in invasive ability, along with epithelial-mesenchymal transition. These cells also showed resistance to chemotherapeutic drug and irradiation, accompanying with the augmentation of ABCG2 protein efflux and increased ROS clearance. Moreover, these sublines possessed the characteristics of cancer stemness, as demonstrated by enriched CD24-/CD44+ and CD133+ sub-populations, enhanced spheroid cell formation, and induced expressions of pluripotent stemness regulators, including Gp96, Grp78, Slug, Sox9, Snail, and Foxc2. These stemness regulators were further shown up-regulations in oral cancer patients with areca nut-chewing habit, and were statistically correlated with CD44 expression, a stemness marker. In conclusion, our findings suggested that areca nut contributes to oral malignancy through facilitating the conversion of cancer stem cells. This study may further contribute to clinical applications in disease prevention, risk assessment or molecular therapeutics on areca nut- associated diseases. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26087469

  5. A rare case of amelanotic malignant melanoma in the oral region: Clinical investigation and immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    OHNISHI, YUICHI; WATANABE, MASAHIRO; FUJII, TOMOKO; SUNADA, NORIKO; YOSHIMOTO, HITOSHI; KUBO, HIROHITO; WATO, MASAHIRO; KAKUDO, KENJI

    2015-01-01

    Amelanotic malignant melanoma (AMM) is rare in the oral region. The present study examined the clinical features of this tumor in an attempt to establish diagnostic criteria. The expression of three melanocytic differentiation markers, HMB-45, S-100 and Melan-A, was also measured in primary oral AMMs in order to determine whether the markers could be used to diagnose primary oral AMMs and to find out which marker was the most sensitive. It may be particularly difficult to correctly diagnose AMM that lacks a radial growth phase without immunohistochemical assistance. In the present study, mixtures of polygonal and spindle cells at different ratios were observed in the tumors with and without a radial growth phase. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the HMB-45, S-100 and Melan-A expression in the formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens of primary oral AMMs. Comparison of staining intensities (SIs) and labeling indices (LIs) of the markers was also performed. The immunostaining results revealed that the SI of Melan-A was significantly higher than that of S-100 (P=0.0011). HMB-45, S-100 and Melan-A also exhibited high positive rates and LIs in AMMs and, therefore, may be good markers for the immunohistochemical diagnosis of primary oral AMMs. Furthermore, Melan-A may be a more sensitive marker than S-100 and HMB-45, as it has a higher SI. PMID:26788204

  6. Oral Malignant Melanoma Initially Misdiagnosed as a Racial Pigmentation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli-Kläy, Carla Patrícia; Laporte, Marcel Leandro; Martinelli, Celso Ricardo; Martinelli, Celso; Lombardi, Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    Oral malignant melanoma (OMM) is rare, representing less than 0.5% of all oral malignancies. The most affected sites are the palate and the maxillary gingiva. Histological examination is important to establish the diagnosis of any suspicious pigmented lesion in the oral cavity, mainly if a precise clinical diagnosis is not possible. We present one case of OMM that was initially diagnosed as a racial pigmentation elsewhere 2 years earlier. Clinical examination showed multiple macules and nodules located on the hard and soft palate, gingiva and superior alveolar mucosa. These lesions were painless and presented a color variation going from dark blue to black. Histological analysis showed sheets and nests of atypical melanocytes displaying a range of shapes such as plasmacytoid, epithelioid, and round cells, located in the superficial corium extending to the deep tissues. A few tumor cells contained variable amounts of melanin. There was no invasion of blood vessels or nerve fibers. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the neoplastic cells were positive for HMB-45, melan-A, S-100 and negative for AE1/AE3, confirming the diagnosis of melanoma. The Ki-67 labeling index was around 25%. The patient refused any treatment and died 11 months later. PMID:27195264

  7. Efficacy of Diode Laser for the Management of Potentially Malignant Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Reddy Kundoor, Vinay Kumar; Patimeedi, Ashwini; Roohi, Shameena; Maloth, Kotya Naik; Kesidi, Sunitha; Masabattula, Geetha Kumari

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Laser dentistry is a one of the upcoming advanced treatment modality for oral mucosal lesions. Diode laser is a soft tissue laser that has found much acceptance in all branches of dentistry. Available compact size and feasibility has render diode laser an enhanced tool for today’s clinical practice. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy and safety of diode laser for the management of white lesions such as oral leukoplakia (OL) and oral lichen planus (OLP). Methods: The study was conducted by using diode laser 980 nm on 10 patients with white lesions (5 OL and 5 OLP) aged between 35 to 65 years. Results: Of the 10 patients (5 OL and 5 OLP), 3 patients (30%) complained of moderate pain and 7 patients (70%) complained of mild pain, for first 3 days after laser irradiation, and pain disappeared at end of first week. There was no recurrence of the lesion during the 6-month follow up. Conclusion: Diode lasers provide acceptable clinical improvement of potentially malignant lesions with minimal side effects. It can be considered one of the best alternative treatment modality for oral mucosal lesions. PMID:26464779

  8. Endovascular Therapy for Management of Oral Hemorrhage in Malignant Head and Neck Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kakizawa, Hideaki Toyota, Naoyuki; Naito, Akira; Ito, Katsuhide

    2005-12-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of endovascular therapy in oral hemorrhage from malignant head and neck tumors. Methods. Ten patients (mean age 56 years) with oral hemorrhage caused by malignant head and neck tumors underwent a total of 13 emergency embolization procedures using gelatin sponge particles, steel and/or platinum coils, or a combination of these embolic materials. Angiographic abnormalities, technical success rate, clinical success rate, recurrence rate, complications, hemostatic period, hospital days, survival days, and patient outcome were all analyzed. Results. Angiographic abnormalities were identified during 85% of procedures (11/13). The technical success rate was 100% (13/13 procedures). The primary and secondary clinical success rates were 77% (10/13 procedures) and 67% (2/3 procedures), respectively. The overall clinical success rate was 92%, and the recurrence rate was 22% (2/9 procedures) in patients whom we were able to observe during the 1-month period after embolization. No major complications occurred. Several patients in whom gelatin sponge particles had been used complained of transient local pain after the procedure. The median hemostatic period was 71 days (range 0-518 days). Median hospital and survival days were 59 days (range 3-209 days) and 141 days (range 4-518 days), respectively. Three patients survived and 7 patients died during the observation period. Only 1 of these 7 patients died from hemorrhage. Conclusion. In conclusion, our findings suggest that endovascular therapy is an effective, safe, and repeatable treatment for oral hemorrhage caused by malignant head and neck tumors.

  9. Photodynamic therapy in the treatment of epithelial potentially malignant disorders of the mouth: advantages and disadvantages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaimari, G.; Russo, C.; Palaia, G.; Tenore, G.; Del Vecchio, A.; Romeo, U.

    2016-03-01

    Introduction: Leukoplakia is a potentially malignant epithelial lesion with carcinomatous percentages transformation comprehended between 1% and 7% for the homogeneous forms and from 4% to 15% for the non-homogeneous ones. Their removal can be performed by scalpel or laser surgery (excision or vaporization). Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a bloodless treatment option, based on the involvement of three elements: light, photosensitizer and oxygen. When the molecules of the photosensitizer are activated by a low power laser, energy is transferred to molecular oxygen creating highly reactive radicals of oxygen, that have a cytotoxic effect on target cells. Aim of the study: According to several studies in Literature, it has been decided to evaluate through an initial clinical trial, the efficacy of PDT using topical aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) activated by a laser diode (λ = 635 nm) to treat potentially oral malignant lesions and to illustrate the advantages and disadvantages derived from the use of this technique. Materials and Methods: Five patients, affected by oral leukoplakia (OL) and oral verrucous leukoplakia (OVL) on the mucosal cheeks, labial commissure, fornix and retromolar areas, have been treated using the PDT. Irradiation time with Diode laser: 1000s. Irradiation mode: Scanning. 5 cycles of 3 minute + final cycle of 100 seconds. Each cycle has been interrupted by pauses of 3 minutes. Results and conclusion: PDT results to be effective in the treatment of OL, especially on OVL. In fact, OVL, due to its irregularity, has got an area of increased retention for the gel that is more difficult to be removed by salivary flow. This could explain the better results obtained in this case rather than in those ones of OL. Furthermore, the advantages have been represented by: less invasivity, high sensitivity for altered tissues, minimal scar tissue, less side effects and no pain during and after operation. In contrast to this, the disadvantages were: longer treatment

  10. Early Oral Feeding After Surgery for Upper Gastrointestinal Malignancies: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Shoar, Saeed; Naderan, Mohammad; Mahmoodzadeh, Habibollah; Hosseini-Araghi, Negin; Mahboobi, Nastaran; Sirati, Freydoon; Khorgami, Zhamak

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Poor nutritional status following abdominal surgeries for esophageal and gastric cancers remains a major challenge in postoperative care. Our study aimed to investigate the efficacy of starting early oral feeding (EOF) in patients undergoing surgical resection of upper gastrointestinal malignancies. Methods A total of 180 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of esophageal or gastric malignancies undergoing elective surgical resection between January 2008 and February 2011 were enrolled in this prospective cohort study. Seventy-two patients were assigned to the EOF group, and 108 patients received late oral feeding (LOF). Postoperative endpoints were compared between the two groups. Results Nasogastric tubes were removed from patients on average 3.3±1.6 days after the surgery in the EOF group and 5.2±2.5 days in the LOF group (p < 0.001). The soft diet regimen was started and tolerated significantly sooner in the EOF group (5.8±1.2 days) than the LOF group (9.5±5.5 days). Hospital stay was significantly shorter in the EOF group compared to the LOF group (6.7±3.1 days vs. 9.1±5.8 days, p < 0.001). Surgical complications and rehospitalization occurred less in EOF group compared with the LOF group. However, the differences were not significant (p > 0.050). Conclusions EOF is safe following esophageal and gastric cancer surgery and results in faster recovery and hospital discharge. PMID:27162588

  11. Oral malignant melanoma: A report of two cases with BRAF molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Soma, Pier Francesco; Pettinato, Angela; Agnone, Anna Maria; Donia, Claudio; Improta, Giuseppina; Fraggetta, Filippo

    2014-09-01

    Primary oral malignant melanoma is a rare condition, accounting for 1.3-1.4% of all melanomas, usually presenting with an aggressive clinical behavior. The present study reports the clinicopathological findings of two cases of oral malignant melanoma and discusses the epidemiology, diagnosis and current therapeutic approaches for this uncommon condition. In the first case the patient presented with a pigmented lesion located on the lower mucosal lip. The patient showed no nodal metastases and therefore, underwent a wedge resection. After seven months, the patient presented with neck lymph nodes and multiple visceral metastases. Molecular analysis of BRAF, using a pyrosequencing approach, revealed the presence of BRAF V600E mutation. The patient developed multiple visceral metastases, but refused treatment and was lost to follow-up. In the second case, no BRAF V600E mutation was found, but the patient exhibited a pigmented patch in the lower gingival mucosa, which was excised by surgical treatment. The patient was followed up by an oncologist, but did not undergo an additional therapy and is currently alive with no evidence of visceral metastases at one year following the diagnosis. PMID:25120707

  12. Oral malignant melanoma: A report of two cases with BRAF molecular analysis

    PubMed Central

    SOMA, PIER FRANCESCO; PETTINATO, ANGELA; AGNONE, ANNA MARIA; DONIA, CLAUDIO; IMPROTA, GIUSEPPINA; FRAGGETTA, FILIPPO

    2014-01-01

    Primary oral malignant melanoma is a rare condition, accounting for 1.3–1.4% of all melanomas, usually presenting with an aggressive clinical behavior. The present study reports the clinicopathological findings of two cases of oral malignant melanoma and discusses the epidemiology, diagnosis and current therapeutic approaches for this uncommon condition. In the first case the patient presented with a pigmented lesion located on the lower mucosal lip. The patient showed no nodal metastases and therefore, underwent a wedge resection. After seven months, the patient presented with neck lymph nodes and multiple visceral metastases. Molecular analysis of BRAF, using a pyrosequencing approach, revealed the presence of BRAF V600E mutation. The patient developed multiple visceral metastases, but refused treatment and was lost to follow-up. In the second case, no BRAF V600E mutation was found, but the patient exhibited a pigmented patch in the lower gingival mucosa, which was excised by surgical treatment. The patient was followed up by an oncologist, but did not undergo an additional therapy and is currently alive with no evidence of visceral metastases at one year following the diagnosis. PMID:25120707

  13. Oral malignant melanoma: An aggressive clinical entity - Report of a rare case with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Shamimul; Jamdar, Sami Faisal; Jangra, Jogender; Al Beaiji, Sadun Mohammad Al Ageel

    2016-01-01

    Melanomais one of the most dreaded and aggressive neoplasms, being derived from epidermal melanocytes. The majority of melanomas are seen to involve the skin, and primary mucosal melanomas account for less than 1% of all melanomas. Oral malignant melanomas (OMM) are asymptomatic at the initial presentation, but later they become painful with growth and expansion. In the late stages, the patient may present with ulceration, bleeding, tooth mobility, paresthesia, ill-fitting prosthesis, and delayed healing of the extraction sockets. Diagnosis is often delayed due to asymptomatic clinical presentation, with silent progression of the lesion. OMM are associated with poor prognosis due to their invasive and metastasizing tendencies. The condition has poor survival rates, and metastatic melanomas show even worse prognosis. The 5-year survival rate for OMM ranges 4.5–29%, with 18.5 months being the mean survival rate. The tumor is best managed by wide surgical resection; however, consideration should also be made for adjunctive therapies such as chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and radiotherapy. Recurrences may be seen even 10–15 years after the primary therapy. This paper aims to present an interesting report of aggressive OMM in a 50-year-old male patient and emphasizes the role of dental professionals in maintaining a high degree of vigilance for the pigmented lesions of the oral cavity. Pigmented lesions of uncertain origin should be routinely biopsied to rule out malignancy. Early diagnosis of this dreadful entity entails thorough history taking, physical examination, and radiographic features coupled with histopathology. PMID:27114959

  14. Oral malignant melanoma: An aggressive clinical entity - Report of a rare case with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Shamimul; Jamdar, Sami Faisal; Jangra, Jogender; Al Beaiji, Sadun Mohammad Al Ageel

    2016-01-01

    Melanomais one of the most dreaded and aggressive neoplasms, being derived from epidermal melanocytes. The majority of melanomas are seen to involve the skin, and primary mucosal melanomas account for less than 1% of all melanomas. Oral malignant melanomas (OMM) are asymptomatic at the initial presentation, but later they become painful with growth and expansion. In the late stages, the patient may present with ulceration, bleeding, tooth mobility, paresthesia, ill-fitting prosthesis, and delayed healing of the extraction sockets. Diagnosis is often delayed due to asymptomatic clinical presentation, with silent progression of the lesion. OMM are associated with poor prognosis due to their invasive and metastasizing tendencies. The condition has poor survival rates, and metastatic melanomas show even worse prognosis. The 5-year survival rate for OMM ranges 4.5-29%, with 18.5 months being the mean survival rate. The tumor is best managed by wide surgical resection; however, consideration should also be made for adjunctive therapies such as chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and radiotherapy. Recurrences may be seen even 10-15 years after the primary therapy. This paper aims to present an interesting report of aggressive OMM in a 50-year-old male patient and emphasizes the role of dental professionals in maintaining a high degree of vigilance for the pigmented lesions of the oral cavity. Pigmented lesions of uncertain origin should be routinely biopsied to rule out malignancy. Early diagnosis of this dreadful entity entails thorough history taking, physical examination, and radiographic features coupled with histopathology. PMID:27114959

  15. IL-1β promotes malignant transformation and tumor aggressiveness in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chia-Huei; Chang, Jeffrey Shu-Ming; Syu, Shih-Han; Wong, Thian-Sze; Chan, Jimmy Yu-Wai; Tang, Ya-Chu; Yang, Zhi-Ping; Yang, Wen-Chan; Chen, Chiung-Tong; Lu, Shao-Chun; Tang, Pei-Hua; Yang, Tzu-Ching; Chu, Pei-Yi; Hsiao, Jenn-Ren; Liu, Ko-Jiunn

    2015-04-01

    Chronic inflammation, coupled with alcohol, betel quid, and cigarette consumption, is associated with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) is a critical mediator of chronic inflammation and implicated in many cancers. In this study, we showed that increased pro-IL-1β expression was associated with the severity of oral malignant transformation in a mouse OSCC model induced by 4-Nitroquinolin-1-oxide (4-NQO) and arecoline, two carcinogens related to tobacco and betel quid, respectively. Using microarray and quantitative PCR assay, we showed that pro-IL-1β was upregulated in human OSCC tumors associated with tobacco and betel quid consumption. In a human OSCC cell line TW2.6, we demonstrated nicotine-derived nitrosamine ketone (NNK) and arecoline stimulated IL-1β secretion in an inflammasome-dependent manner. IL-1β treatment significantly increased the proliferation and dysregulated the Akt signaling pathways of dysplastic oral keratinocytes (DOKs). Using cytokine antibodies and inflammation cytometric bead arrays, we found that DOK and OSCC cells secreted high levels of IL-6, IL-8, and growth-regulated oncogene-α following IL-1β stimulation. The conditioned medium of IL-1β-treated OSCC cells exerted significant proangiogenic effects. Crucially, IL-1β increased the invasiveness of OSCC cells through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), characterized by downregulation of E-cadherin, upregulation of Snail, Slug, and Vimentin, and alterations in morphology. These findings provide novel insights into the mechanism underlying OSCC tumorigenesis. Our study suggested that IL-1β can be induced by tobacco and betel quid-related carcinogens, and participates in the early and late stages of oral carcinogenesis by increasing the proliferation of dysplasia oral cells, stimulating oncogenic cytokines, and promoting aggressiveness of OSCC. PMID:25204733

  16. Poor oral health, a potential new geriatric syndrome.

    PubMed

    van der Putten, Gert-Jan; de Baat, Cees; De Visschere, Luc; Schols, Jos

    2014-02-01

    This article presents a brief introduction to the medical aspects of ageing and age-related diseases, and to some geriatric syndromes, followed by a discussion on their impact on general and oral healthcare provision to community-dwelling older people. Recent investigations suggest that inflammation constitutes a biological foundation of ageing and the onset of age-related diseases. Multimorbidity and polypharmacy, together with alterations in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, make older people at risk of adverse medication reactions. A side effect of several medications is causing xerostomia and hyposalivation, and both the type and number of medications used are relevant. New options of general healthcare provision to community-dwelling older people are the use of mobility aids and assistive technology devices, domiciliary health care, respite care and telecare. Their oral health status may be jeopardised by frailty, disability, care dependency and limited access to professional oral health care. Recommendations for improvement are the following: better integrating oral health care into general health care, developing and implementing an oral healthcare guideline, providing customised oral hygiene care aids, domiciliary oral healthcare provision, visiting dental hygienists and/or nurses, oral hygiene telecare, easily and safely accessible dental offices, transforming dentistry into medical oral health care and upgrading dentists to oral physicians. In case oral healthcare providers do not take the responsibility of persuading society of the importance of adequate oral health, weakened oral health of community-dwelling older people will become a potential new geriatric syndrome. PMID:24446975

  17. Photodynamic detection in visualisation of cutaneous and oral mucosa premalignant and malignant lesions: two clinical cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurczyszyn, Kamil; Ziólkowski, Piotr; Osiecka, Beata; Gerber, Hanna; Dziedzic, Magdalena

    2008-11-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is promising method of visualisation of premalignant and malignant lesions. PDD is consisted of two main agents: special chemical compound which is called photosensitizer and light. Photosensitizer has affinity to fast proliferating cells such as pre- or malignant. During light irradiation (with proper wavelength - corresponding to absorption peak of photosensitizer) photosensitizer gains energy and passes into excited singlet state S1. Returning to basic singlet state Sn, leads to fluorescence. Due to difference between concentration of photosensitizer in lesion and normal tissue it is possible to obtain high contrast image of lesion. Case #1: 53 years old woman with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in nasal region; 20% delta-aminolevulinic acid as a precursor of photosensitizer on eucerin base was used. Case #2: 57 years old woman with multifocal oral leukoplakia on cheek mucosa and tongue; 2% chlorophyll gel as photosesitizer was used. All photographs were taken in white light without any filter and in blue and UV light with orange filter: in both cases the total area of the lesions appeared to be larger than it has been clinically observed. Thus, the PDD might be helpful in evaluation of margins of surgical excision of such lesions.

  18. Altered p53 in microdissected, metachronous, premalignant and malignant oral lesions from the same patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y-Q; Pavelic, Z P; Wang, L-J; McDonald, J S; Gleich, L; Munck-Wikland, E; Dacic, S; Danilovic, Z; Pavelic, L J; Wilson, K M; Gluckman, J L; Stambrook, P J

    1995-01-01

    Aims—To determine whether mutant p53 alleles harboured by malignant tumours of the oral cavity were also present in previous premalignant lesions at the same site. Methods—Paraffin embedded tumour specimens along with their premalignant counterparts were analysed for p53 alterations using immunohistochemistry, microdissection, polymerase chain reaction amplification, and DNA sequencing. Results—Malignant lesions from five of eight patients showed overexpression of p53 protein by immunohistochemistry. Upon DNA sequencing, two of these five specimens had p53 mutations. Of the five patients whose cancers showed p53 overexpression by immunohistochemistry, three had previous premalignant lesions that also had immunohistochemically detectable p53 protein. However, DNA sequencing showed that none of these three had mutations in the p53 gene. The remaining five premalignant lesions had no immunohistochemically detectable p53 protein. Conclusions—Some premalignant lesions have increased p53 protein which can be detected by staining with antibody to p53. This staining is not caused by mutations in p53 that are found in subsequent tumours at the same site. Images PMID:16696020

  19. Collision Tumour of Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Malignant Melanoma in the Oral Cavity of a Dog.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, F; Castro, P; Ramírez, G A

    2016-05-01

    A 7-year-old, male cocker spaniel was presented with a gingival proliferative lesion in the rostral maxilla and enlargement of the regional lymph node. Morphological and immunohistochemical analysis revealed a collision tumour composed of two malignant populations, epithelial and melanocytic, with metastasis of the neoplastic melanocytes to the regional lymph node. The epithelial component consisted of trabeculae and islands of well-differentiated squamous epithelium immunoreactive to cytokeratins. The melanocytic component had a varying degree of pigmentation of polygonal and spindle-shaped cells, growing in nests or densely packed aggregates and immunolabelled with S100, melanoma-associated antigen (melan A), neuron-specific enolase and vimentin antibodies. Protein markers involved in tumorigenesis or cell proliferation (i.e. COX-2, p53, c-kit and Ki67), were overexpressed by the neoplastic cells. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first description of an oral collision tumour involving malignant melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma in the dog. PMID:27147111

  20. A malignant cellular network in gliomas: potential clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Osswald, Matthias; Solecki, Gergely; Wick, Wolfgang; Winkler, Frank

    2016-04-01

    The recent discovery of distinct, ultra-long, and highly functional membrane protrusions in gliomas, particularly in astrocytomas, extends our understanding of how these tumors progress in the brain and how they resist therapies. In this article, we will focus on ideas on how to target these membrane protrusions, for which we have suggested the term "tumor microtubes" (TMs), and the malignant multicellular network they form. First, we discuss TM-specific features and their differential biological functions known so far. Second, the connection between 1p/19q codeletion and the inability to form functional TMs via certain neurodevelopmental pathways is presented; this could provide an explanation for the distinct clinical features of oligodendrogliomas. Third, the role of TMs for primary and potentially also adaptive resistance to cytotoxic therapies is highlighted. Fourth, avenues for therapeutic approaches to inhibit TM formation and/or function are discussed, with a focus on disruption (or exploitation) of network functionality. Finally, we propose ideas on how to use TMs as a biomarker in glioma patients. An increasing understanding of TMs in clinical and preclinical settings will show us whether they really are a long-sought-after Achilles' heel of treatment-resistant gliomas. PMID:26995789

  1. Therapeutic potential of TAS-102 in the treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies.

    PubMed

    Peters, Godefridus J

    2015-11-01

    Fluoropyrimidines form the mainstay in treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies. For decades 5-fluorouracil (5FU), was the major fluoropyrimidine. Currently it is usually given in a combination with leucovorin and oxaliplatin, i.e. FOLFOX, or irinotecan, i.e. FOLFIRI, or all three, i.e. FOLFIRINOX, but gradually it has been replaced by oral fluoropyrimidine prodrug formulations, such as tegafur-uracil and S-1 (both contain ftorafur), and capecitabine (Xeloda®). Novel drugs such as the antivascular endothelial growth factor antibody, bevacizumab, and the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody, cetuximab, are often combined with one of these treatment options. However, when resistance emerged, no alternatives were available. TAS-102, a combination of trifluorothymidine and the thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor TPI in a 1:0.5 ratio, is a novel oral formulation, which is active in 5FU-resistant models, both in vitro and in xenograft models. In addition to inhibition of thymidylate synthase, the major mechanism of action of classical fluoropyrimidines, TAS-102's major mechanism of action is incorporation into DNA, thereby causing DNA damage. TAS-102 also follows an alternative activation pathway via thymidine kinase, and is not a substrate for dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase. All together this explains the efficacy in 5FU-resistant models. In early clinical studies, the twice-daily schedule (5 days on, 2 days rest) for 2 weeks every 4 weeks, led to a significant disease control rate in various malignancies. This schedule showed consistent activity in two randomized trials on fluoropyrimidine refractory colorectal cancer patients, reflected by an increase of 2-3 months in overall survival in the TAS-102 group compared with placebo. Considering the impressive preclinical potential of various combinations TAS-102 has the promise to become an alternative for 5FU-resistant cancer. PMID:26557901

  2. Therapeutic potential of TAS-102 in the treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Godefridus J.

    2015-01-01

    Fluoropyrimidines form the mainstay in treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies. For decades 5-fluorouracil (5FU), was the major fluoropyrimidine. Currently it is usually given in a combination with leucovorin and oxaliplatin, i.e. FOLFOX, or irinotecan, i.e. FOLFIRI, or all three, i.e. FOLFIRINOX, but gradually it has been replaced by oral fluoropyrimidine prodrug formulations, such as tegafur-uracil and S-1 (both contain ftorafur), and capecitabine (Xeloda®). Novel drugs such as the antivascular endothelial growth factor antibody, bevacizumab, and the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody, cetuximab, are often combined with one of these treatment options. However, when resistance emerged, no alternatives were available. TAS-102, a combination of trifluorothymidine and the thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor TPI in a 1:0.5 ratio, is a novel oral formulation, which is active in 5FU-resistant models, both in vitro and in xenograft models. In addition to inhibition of thymidylate synthase, the major mechanism of action of classical fluoropyrimidines, TAS-102’s major mechanism of action is incorporation into DNA, thereby causing DNA damage. TAS-102 also follows an alternative activation pathway via thymidine kinase, and is not a substrate for dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase. All together this explains the efficacy in 5FU-resistant models. In early clinical studies, the twice-daily schedule (5 days on, 2 days rest) for 2 weeks every 4 weeks, led to a significant disease control rate in various malignancies. This schedule showed consistent activity in two randomized trials on fluoropyrimidine refractory colorectal cancer patients, reflected by an increase of 2–3 months in overall survival in the TAS-102 group compared with placebo. Considering the impressive preclinical potential of various combinations TAS-102 has the promise to become an alternative for 5FU-resistant cancer. PMID:26557901

  3. Malignant melanoma of the oral mucosa in a 17-year-old adolescent girl.

    PubMed

    D'Silva, Nisha J; Kurago, Zoya; Polverini, Peter J; Hanks, Carl T; Paulino, Augusto F

    2002-09-01

    Mucosal melanomas of the oral cavity are rarely seen in the United States. The hard palate is the most common intraoral site. This unusual case occurred in the oral cavity of a 17-year-old Asian girl, who presented to her dentist with complaints of pain and swelling in the upper jaw. The lesion was distal and palatal to the maxillary left second molar, which was vital. Interestingly, the clinical presentation was a hyperplastic, tender lesion that bled when probed. Histopathologically, the biopsy demonstrated a sheet of spindle-shaped cells arranged in nests and fascicles. The nuclei were vesicular, oval to spindle-shaped, and some contained nucleoli that were distinguishable but not prominent. No melanin pigment was observed in the lesion. Tumor cells strongly expressed S100 protein, gp100 (HMB-45), and microphthalmia transcription factor, and variably expressed MART1, but not cytokeratins, CD34, or muscle-specific actin. The histopathologic features and immunohistochemical findings are consistent with a diagnosis of malignant melanoma. PMID:12204064

  4. Malignant lymphoma of the oral cavity and the maxillofacial region: Overall survival prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Vadillo, Rafael; Sacsaquispe-Contreras, Sonia J.; Barrionuevo-Cornejo, Carlos; Montes-Gil, Jaime; Cava-Vergiú, Carlos E.; Soares, Fernando A.; Chaves-Netto, Henrique D M.; Chaves, Maria G A M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify the overall survival and prognostic factors of malignant lymphoma of the oral cavity and the maxillofacial region. Study Design: Clinical records data were obtained in order to determine overall survival at 2 and 5 years, the individual survival percentage of each possible prognostic factor with the actuarial technique, and the survival regarding the possible prognostic factors with the actuarial technique and the Log-rank and Cox’s regression tests. Results: Of 151 subjects, an overall survival was 60% at 2 years, and 45% at 5 years. The multivariate analysis demonstrated statistically significant differences for clinical stage (p=0.002), extranodal involvement (p=0.030), presence of human immunodeficiency virus (p=0.032), and presence of Epstein-Barr virus (p=0.010). Conclusion: The advanced clinical stage and the larger number of involved extranodular sites are related to a lower overall survival, as well as, the presence of previous infections such as the human immunodeficiency and the Epstein-Barr virus. Key words:Lymphoma, oral cavity, survival. PMID:23722134

  5. Evaluation of exfoliative cytology in the diagnosis of oral premalignant and malignant lesions: A cytomorphometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Renuka; Singh, Anil; Badni, Manjunath; Chandra, Akhilesh; Gupta, Shalini; Verma, Ruchita

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) arise within regions that previously had premalignant lesion. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of premalignant lesions offers the best hope of improving the prognosis in patients with OSCC. Exfoliative cytology is a simple and non-invasive diagnostic technique that could be used for early detection of oral premalignant and malignant lesions. This study was undertaken to evaluate the quantitative changes in nuclear area (NA), cytoplasmic area (CA) and nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio (NA/CA) in cytological buccal smears of oral leukoplakia with dysplasia (OLD) and OSCC patients while comparing with normal healthy mucosa. Materials and Methods: A quantitative study was conducted over 90 subjects including 30 cases each of OLD, OSCC and clinically normal oral mucosa. The smears obtained were stained with Papanicolaou (PAP) stain and cytomorphological assessment of the keratinocytes was carried out. The statistical tools included arithmetic mean, standard deviation, Chi-square test, analysis of variance, Tukey multiple comparison. P < 0.001 was considered as significant. Results: The mean NA of keratinocytes in the normal mucosa was 65.47 ± 4.77 μm2 while for OLD it was 107.97 ± 5.44 μm2 and 139.02 ± 8.10 μm2 for that of OSCC. The differences show a statistically significant increment in NA (P < 0.001). There was significant reduction (P < 0.001) in the CA of keratinocytes from OSCC when compared with those from smears of OLD and normal mucosa with the values of 1535.80 ± 79.38 μm2, 1078.51 ± 56.65 μm2 and 769.70 ± 38.77 μm2 respectively. The NA/CA ratio in the smears from normal oral mucosa, OLD and OSCC showed a mean value of 0.043 ± 0.004, 0.100 ± 0.008, 0.181 ± 0.015 respectively with a significant difference among the groups (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Evaluation of nuclear and CA of keratinocytes by cytomorphometry can serve as a useful adjunct in the diagnosis and prognosis of a dysplastic lesion

  6. Interleukin-37 expression and its potential role in oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Wang, Jiayi; Liu, Dongjuan; Liu, Sai; Xu, Hao; Ji, Ning; Zhou, Min; Zeng, Xin; Zhang, Dunfang; Li, Jing; Chen, Qianming

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin 37 (IL-37) has been reported to play a significant role in innate immune response and to be involved in several kinds of cancers. However, the investigation of association between IL-37 and oral mucosa carcinogenesis hasn't been clearly established. The aim of the study was to assess IL-37 expression and explore its role in oral mucosa carcinogenesis. The expression of IL-37 increased from normal control (NC) to Oral leukoplakia (OLK) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Moreover, statistically highly significant difference was present between scores of OLK with and without mild/moderate dysplasia (P < 0.001). In addition, IL-37 expression was lower in OSCC with lymph node metastasis than those without metastasis (P < 0.01). What’s more, overexpression of IL-37 in RAW264.7 cells remarkably reduced the pseudopodia, vacuolization and the expression of IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β. Finally, we found IL-37 and its receptor IL-18Rα but not its binding partner IL-18BP have similar tissue location and expression trend in different stages of oral mucosa carcinogenesis. Overall, IL-37 can be used as a biomarker for early oral tumorigenesis and for malignant transformation risk assessment of premalignant lesions. PMID:27225603

  7. Interleukin-37 expression and its potential role in oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Wang, Jiayi; Liu, Dongjuan; Liu, Sai; Xu, Hao; Ji, Ning; Zhou, Min; Zeng, Xin; Zhang, Dunfang; Li, Jing; Chen, Qianming

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin 37 (IL-37) has been reported to play a significant role in innate immune response and to be involved in several kinds of cancers. However, the investigation of association between IL-37 and oral mucosa carcinogenesis hasn't been clearly established. The aim of the study was to assess IL-37 expression and explore its role in oral mucosa carcinogenesis. The expression of IL-37 increased from normal control (NC) to Oral leukoplakia (OLK) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Moreover, statistically highly significant difference was present between scores of OLK with and without mild/moderate dysplasia (P < 0.001). In addition, IL-37 expression was lower in OSCC with lymph node metastasis than those without metastasis (P < 0.01). What's more, overexpression of IL-37 in RAW264.7 cells remarkably reduced the pseudopodia, vacuolization and the expression of IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β. Finally, we found IL-37 and its receptor IL-18Rα but not its binding partner IL-18BP have similar tissue location and expression trend in different stages of oral mucosa carcinogenesis. Overall, IL-37 can be used as a biomarker for early oral tumorigenesis and for malignant transformation risk assessment of premalignant lesions. PMID:27225603

  8. Association Study between Novel CYP26 Polymorphisms and the Risk of Betel Quid-Related Malignant Oral Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun-Ju; Shieh, Tien-Yu; Chen, Chun-Ming; Wang, Yen-Yun; Lin, Yueh-Ming; Chien, Pei-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    BQ chewing may produce significant amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in oral mucosa damage, and ROS may be metabolized by CYP26 families. Because the CYP26 polymorphisms associated with malignant oral disorders are not well known, we conducted an association study on the associations between the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of CYP26 families and the risks of malignant oral disorders. BQ chewers with the CYP26A1 rs4411227 C/C+C/G genotype and C allele showed an increased risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 2.30 and 1.93, respectively). The CYP26B1 rs3768647 G allele may be associated with oral and pharyngeal cancer (aOR = 3.12) and OPMDs (aOR = 2.23). Subjects with the rs9309462 CT genotype and C allele had an increased risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer (aOR = 9.24 and 8.86, respectively) and OPMDs (aOR = 8.17 and 7.87, respectively). The analysis of joint effects between the CYP26A1 rs4411227 and CYP26B1 rs3768647/rs9309462 polymorphisms revealed statistical significance (aOR = 29.91 and 10.03, respectively). Additionally, we observed a significant mRNA expression of CY26A1 and CYP26B1 in cancerous tissues compared with adjacent noncancerous tissues. Our findings suggest that novel CYP26 polymorphisms are associated with an increased risk of malignant oral disorders, particularly among BQ chewers. PMID:25839051

  9. A case-control study of the possible association between oral contraceptives and malignant melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Adam, S. A.; Sheaves, J. K.; Wright, N. H.; Mosser, G.; Harris, R. W.; Vessey, M. P.

    1981-01-01

    In a case-control study, we investigated 169 women aged 15-49 years with malignant melanoma notified to the Oxford and South Western cancer registries during the years 1971-1976, together with 507 matched controls. Data about medical, reproductive, drug and smoking histories were obtained both by reviewing general practitioner (GP) records and from the women themselves by postal questionnaires. There was no significant evidence of any overall increase in the risk of melanoma in oral contraceptive (OC) users (data from GP records-ever use vs never use, relative risk (RR) 1.34, 95% confidence limits 0.92-1.96; corresponding data from postal questionnaires-RR 1.13, limits 0.73-1.75). However, although not significant, the risk estimated from data in the postal questionnaires was higher in women who had used OCs for 5 years or more (use greater than or equal to 5 years vs never use, RR 1.57, limits 0.83-3.03). Previously demonstrated risk factors for melanoma, such as fair skin, blond or red hair and Celtic origin were found to be commoner in the cases than in the controls. Data from the Oxford/Family Planning Association contraceptive study were also examined. Unexpectedly there was a strong suggestion of a negative association between OC use and melanoma risk, but the analysis was based on only 12 women with the disease. PMID:7259960

  10. Clinical Outcomes of Patients with Resected Oral Cavity Cancer and Simultaneous Second Primary Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chung-Jan; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Tsang, Ngan-Ming; Huang, Bing-Shen; Chao, Yin-Kai; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Wang, Hung-Ming; Liau, Chi-Ting; Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lin, Chih-Hung; Tsao, Chung-Kan; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Chang, Kai-Ping; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Simultaneous second primary tumors (SSPT) are not uncommon in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) living in areas where the habit of betel quid chewing is widespread. We sought to identify the main prognostic factors in OSCC patients with SSPT and incorporate them into a risk stratification scheme. Methods A total of 1822 consecutive patients with primary OSCC treated between January 1996 and February 2014 were analyzed for the presence of SSPT. The 18-month and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates served as the main outcome measures. Results Of the 1822 patients, 77 (4%) were found to have SSPT (i.e, two malignancies identified within one month of each other). The 18-month and 5-year OS rates in patients without SSPT and with SSPT were 82% and 69%, and 72% and 53%, respectively (p = 0.0063). Patients with SSPT were further divided into patients with either esophageal cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma (eso-HCC subgroup, n = 8) and other tumors (NO eso-HCC subgroup, n = 69). After multivariate analysis, neck nodal extracapsular spread (ECS, n = 18) and the presence of eso-HCC were identified as independent adverse prognostic factors. The 18-month OS rates of SSPT patients with both eso-HCC and ECS (n = 5) vs. the remaining patients (n = 72) were 0% and 78%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusion OSCC patients with neck nodal ECS and esophageal cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma as SSPT have a dismal short-term prognosis. PMID:26335067

  11. Bacteriophage and their potential roles in the human oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Edlund, Anna; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Boehm, Tobias K.; Pride, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The human oral cavity provides the perfect portal of entry for viruses and bacteria in the environment to access new hosts. Hence, the oral cavity is one of the most densely populated habitats of the human body containing some 6 billion bacteria and potentially 35 times that many viruses. The role of these viral communities remains unclear; however, many are bacteriophage that may have active roles in shaping the ecology of oral bacterial communities. Other implications for the presence of such vast oral phage communities include accelerating the molecular diversity of their bacterial hosts as both host and phage mutate to gain evolutionary advantages. Additional roles include the acquisitions of new gene functions through lysogenic conversions that may provide selective advantages to host bacteria in response to antibiotics or other types of disturbances, and protection of the human host from invading pathogens by binding to and preventing pathogens from crossing oral mucosal barriers. Recent evidence suggests that phage may be more involved in periodontal diseases than were previously thought, as their compositions in the subgingival crevice in moderate to severe periodontitis are known to be significantly altered. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to dysbiosis or the transition of the microbial community into a state promoting oral disease. Bacteriophage communities are distinct in saliva compared to sub- and supragingival areas, suggesting that different oral biogeographic niches have unique phage ecology shaping their bacterial biota. In this review, we summarize what is known about phage communities in the oral cavity, the possible contributions of phage in shaping oral bacterial ecology, and the risks to public health oral phage may pose through their potential to spread antibiotic resistance gene functions to close contacts. PMID:25861745

  12. Bacteriophage and their potential roles in the human oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Edlund, Anna; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Boehm, Tobias K; Pride, David T

    2015-01-01

    The human oral cavity provides the perfect portal of entry for viruses and bacteria in the environment to access new hosts. Hence, the oral cavity is one of the most densely populated habitats of the human body containing some 6 billion bacteria and potentially 35 times that many viruses. The role of these viral communities remains unclear; however, many are bacteriophage that may have active roles in shaping the ecology of oral bacterial communities. Other implications for the presence of such vast oral phage communities include accelerating the molecular diversity of their bacterial hosts as both host and phage mutate to gain evolutionary advantages. Additional roles include the acquisitions of new gene functions through lysogenic conversions that may provide selective advantages to host bacteria in response to antibiotics or other types of disturbances, and protection of the human host from invading pathogens by binding to and preventing pathogens from crossing oral mucosal barriers. Recent evidence suggests that phage may be more involved in periodontal diseases than were previously thought, as their compositions in the subgingival crevice in moderate to severe periodontitis are known to be significantly altered. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to dysbiosis or the transition of the microbial community into a state promoting oral disease. Bacteriophage communities are distinct in saliva compared to sub- and supragingival areas, suggesting that different oral biogeographic niches have unique phage ecology shaping their bacterial biota. In this review, we summarize what is known about phage communities in the oral cavity, the possible contributions of phage in shaping oral bacterial ecology, and the risks to public health oral phage may pose through their potential to spread antibiotic resistance gene functions to close contacts. PMID:25861745

  13. Melanoma cell galectin-1 ligands functionally correlate with malignant potential*

    PubMed Central

    Yazawa, Erika M.; Geddes-Sweeney, Jenna E.; Cedeno-Laurent, Filiberto; Walley, Kempland C.; Barthel, Steven R.; Opperman, Matthew J.; Liang, Jennifer; Lin, Jennifer Y.; Schatton, Tobias; Laga, Alvaro C.; Mihm, Martin C.; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Widlund, Hans R.; Murphy, George F.; Dimitroff, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1)-binding to Gal-1 ligands on immune and endothelial cells can influence melanoma development through dampening anti-tumor immune responses and promoting angiogenesis. However, whether Gal-1 ligands are functionally expressed on melanoma cells to help control intrinsic malignant features remains poorly understood. Here, we analyzed expression, identity and function of Gal-1 ligands in melanoma progression. Immunofluorescent analysis of benign and malignant human melanocytic neoplasms revealed that Gal-1 ligands were abundant in severely-dysplastic nevi as well as in primary and metastatic melanomas. Biochemical assessments indicated that melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM) was a major Gal-1 ligand on melanoma cells that was largely dependent on its N-glycans. Other melanoma cell Gal-1 ligand activity conferred by O-glycans was negatively regulated by α2,6 sialyltransferase ST6GalNAc2. In Gal-1-deficient mice, MCAM-silenced (MCAMKD) or ST6GalNAc2-overexpressing (ST6O/E) melanoma cells exhibited slower growth rates, underscoring a key role for melanoma cell Gal-1 ligands and host Gal-1 in melanoma growth. Further analysis of MCAMKD or ST6O/E melanoma cells in cell migration assays indicated that Gal-1 ligand-dependent melanoma cell migration was severely inhibited. These findings provide a refined perspective on Gal-1 – melanoma cell Gal-1 ligand interactions as contributors to melanoma malignancy. PMID:25756799

  14. Efficacy of Oral Cryotherapy on Oral Mucositis Prevention in Patients with Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Ruiren; Zhao, Shasha; Luo, Lan; Li, Dandan; Zhao, Xiaoli; Wei, Huaping; Pang, Zhaoxia; Wang, Lili; Liu, Daihong; Wang, Quanshun; Gao, Chunji

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Controversy exists regarding whether oral cryotherapy can prevent oral mucositis (OM) in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The aim of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy of oral cryotherapy for OM prevention in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing HSCT. Methods PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched through October 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effect of oral cryotherapy with no treatment or with other interventions for OM in patients undergoing HSCT were included. The primary outcomes were the incidence, severity, and duration of OM. The secondary outcomes included length of analgesic use, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) use, and length of hospital stay. Results Seven RCTs involving eight articles analyzing 458 patients were included. Oral cryotherapy significantly decreased the incidence of severe OM (RR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.27 to 0.99) and OM severity (SMD = -2.07, 95% CI = -3.90 to -0.25). In addition, the duration of TPN use and the length of hospitalization were markedly reduced (SMD = -0.56, 95% CI = -0.92 to -0.19; SMD = -0.44, 95% CI = -0.76 to -0.13; respectively). However, the pooled results were uncertain for the duration of OM and analgesic use (SMD = -0.13, 95% CI = -0.41 to 0.15; SMD = -1.15, 95% CI = -2.57 to 0.27; respectively). Conclusions Oral cryotherapy is a readily applicable and cost-effective prophylaxis for OM in patients undergoing HSCT. PMID:26024220

  15. Do Clear Cell Papillary Renal Cell Carcinomas Have Malignant Potential?

    PubMed

    Diolombi, Mairo L; Cheng, Liang; Argani, Pedram; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2015-12-01

    disease. One patient was presumed to have contralateral disease on the basis of imaging findings and is alive and well 37 months after multiple partial nephrectomies. Metastatic disease to the lung was clinically presumed in 1 patient in whom a higher-grade lesion may have been missed during sampling of the predominantly cystic pT1b tumor and tissue confirmation of the metastases was not obtained. Another case presented with multiple skeletal and pulmonary metastases 8 months after resection of pT3 sarcomatoid CCPRCC. The patient with the sarcomatoid RCC died of multifocal skeletal and pulmonary metastatic disease 13 months after resection of the renal tumor. Our study, the largest to date with follow-up, along with others, suggests that pure CCPRCC is an indolent tumor and should be renamed "clear cell papillary neoplasm of low malignant potential" to reflect their biology. PMID:26426379

  16. Immunohistochemical Analysis of PD-L1 Expression in Canine Malignant Cancers and PD-1 Expression on Lymphocytes in Canine Oral Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Naoya; Konnai, Satoru; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Nishimori, Asami; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Izumi, Yusuke; Takagi, Satoshi; Kagawa, Yumiko; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Kato, Yukinari; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous cancers are common diseases in dogs. Among these, some malignant cancers such as oral melanoma, osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, and mast cell tumor are often recognized as clinical problems because, despite their high frequencies, current treatments for these cancers may not always achieve satisfying outcomes. The absence of effective systemic therapies against these cancers leads researchers to investigate novel therapeutic modalities, including immunotherapy. Programmed death 1 (PD-1) is a costimulatory receptor with immunosuppressive function. When it binds its ligands, PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1) or PD-L2, PD-1 on T cells negatively regulates activating signals from the T cell receptor, resulting in the inhibition of the effector function of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Aberrant PD-L1 expression has been reported in many human cancers and is considered an immune escape mechanism for cancers. In clinical trials, anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 antibodies induced tumor regression for several malignancies, including advanced melanoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, and renal cell carcinoma. In this study, to assess the potential of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis as a novel therapeutic target for canine cancer immunotherapy, immunohistochemical analysis of PD-L1 expression in various malignant cancers of dogs was performed. Here, we show that dog oral melanoma, osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, mast cell tumor, mammary adenocarcinoma, and prostate adenocarcinoma expressed PD-L1, whereas some other types of cancer did not. In addition, PD-1 was highly expressed on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes obtained from oral melanoma, showing that lymphocytes in this cancer type might have been functionally exhausted. These results strongly encourage the clinical application of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors as novel therapeutic agents against these cancers in dogs. PMID:27276060

  17. Immunohistochemical Analysis of PD-L1 Expression in Canine Malignant Cancers and PD-1 Expression on Lymphocytes in Canine Oral Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Maekawa, Naoya; Konnai, Satoru; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Nishimori, Asami; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Izumi, Yusuke; Takagi, Satoshi; Kagawa, Yumiko; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Kato, Yukinari; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous cancers are common diseases in dogs. Among these, some malignant cancers such as oral melanoma, osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, and mast cell tumor are often recognized as clinical problems because, despite their high frequencies, current treatments for these cancers may not always achieve satisfying outcomes. The absence of effective systemic therapies against these cancers leads researchers to investigate novel therapeutic modalities, including immunotherapy. Programmed death 1 (PD-1) is a costimulatory receptor with immunosuppressive function. When it binds its ligands, PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1) or PD-L2, PD-1 on T cells negatively regulates activating signals from the T cell receptor, resulting in the inhibition of the effector function of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Aberrant PD-L1 expression has been reported in many human cancers and is considered an immune escape mechanism for cancers. In clinical trials, anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 antibodies induced tumor regression for several malignancies, including advanced melanoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, and renal cell carcinoma. In this study, to assess the potential of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis as a novel therapeutic target for canine cancer immunotherapy, immunohistochemical analysis of PD-L1 expression in various malignant cancers of dogs was performed. Here, we show that dog oral melanoma, osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, mast cell tumor, mammary adenocarcinoma, and prostate adenocarcinoma expressed PD-L1, whereas some other types of cancer did not. In addition, PD-1 was highly expressed on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes obtained from oral melanoma, showing that lymphocytes in this cancer type might have been functionally exhausted. These results strongly encourage the clinical application of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors as novel therapeutic agents against these cancers in dogs. PMID:27276060

  18. Benign and Malignant Proliferative Fibro-osseous and Osseous Lesions of the Oral Cavity of Dogs.

    PubMed

    Soltero-Rivera, M; Engiles, J B; Reiter, A M; Reetz, J; Lewis, J R; Sánchez, M D

    2015-09-01

    Ossifying fibroma (OF) and fibrous dysplasia (FD) are benign, intraosseous, proliferative fibro-osseous lesions (PFOLs) characterized by replacement of normal bone by a fibrous matrix with various degrees of mineralization and ossification. Osteomas are benign tumors composed of mature, well-differentiated bone. Clinical, imaging, and histologic features of 15 initially diagnosed benign PFOLs and osteomas of the canine oral cavity were evaluated. Final diagnoses after reevaluation were as follows: OF (3 cases), FD (4 cases), low-grade osteosarcoma (LG-OSA) (3 cases), and osteoma (5 cases). Histology alone often did not result in a definitive diagnosis for PFOL. OF appeared as a well-circumscribed, radiopaque mass with some degree of bone lysis on imaging. Most lesions of FD showed soft tissue opacity with bone lysis and ill-defined margins. Low-grade OSA appeared as a lytic lesion with a mixed opacity and ill-defined margins. Osteomas were characterized by a mineralized, expansile, well-circumscribed lesion. Although histologic features of PFOLs were typically bland, the lesions diagnosed as LG-OSA had some features of malignancy (eg, bone invasion or a higher mitotic index). Treatment varied widely. Of the 10 dogs with benign PFOL or osteoma with known outcome (10/12), 9 showed either complete response (6/10) or stable disease (3/10) after treatment. Of the 2 dogs with LG-OSA with known outcome, 1 showed complete response after curative intent surgery, but 1 patient had recurrence after partial maxillectomy. Definitive diagnosis of mandibular/maxillary PFOL is challenging via histopathologic examination alone, and accurate diagnosis is best achieved through assimilation of clinical, imaging, and histopathologic features. PMID:25957357

  19. The Potential Role of Aurora Kinase Inhibitors in Haematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Sherif S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Aurora kinases play an important role in the control of the cell cycle and have been implicated in tumourigenesis in a number of cancers. Among the haematological malignancies, overexpression of Aurora kinases has been reported in acute myeloid leukaemia, chronic myeloid leukaemia, acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, multiple myeloma, aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma. A large number of Aurora kinase inhibitors are currently in different stages of clinical development. In addition to varying in their selectivity for the different Aurora kinases, some also have activity directed at other cellular kinases involved in important molecular pathways in cancer cells. This review summarizes the biology of Aurora kinases and discusses why they may be good therapeutic targets in different haematological cancers. We describe preclinical data that has served as the rationale for investigating Aurora kinase inhibitors in different haematological malignancies, and summarize published results from early phase clinical trials. While the anti-tumour effects of Aurora kinase inhibitors appear promising, we highlight important issues for future clinical research and suggest that the optimal use of these inhibitors is likely to be in combination with cytotoxic agents already in use for the treatment of various haematological cancers. PMID:21980926

  20. The impact of oral herpes simplex virus infection and candidiasis on chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis among patients with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y-K; Hou, H-A; Chow, J-M; Chen, Y-C; Hsueh, P-R; Tien, H-F

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influences of oral candidiasis and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infections in chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis (OM). The medical records of 424 consecutive patients with hematological malignancies who had received chemotherapy at a medical center in Taiwan from January 2006 to November 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. The results of swab cultures of fungus and HSV-1 for OM were correlated with associated clinical features. Younger age, myeloid malignancies, and disease status other than complete remission before chemotherapy were significantly correlated with the development of OM. Risks of fever (p < 0.001) and bacteremia were higher in patients with OM. Among 467 episodes of OM with both swab cultures available, 221 were non-infection (47.3%) and 246 were related to either fungal infections, HSV-1 infections, or both (52.7%); of the 246 episodes, 102 were associated with fungal infections alone (21.8%), 98 with HSV-1 infections alone (21%), and 46 with both infections (9.9%). Patients who had received antifungal agents prior to OM occurrence tended to have HSV-1 infection (p < 0.001). Our results suggest that Candida albicans and HSV-1 play an important role in chemotherapy-induced OM in patients with hematological malignancies. PMID:21225303

  1. Oral malignant melanomas and other head and neck neoplasms in Danish dogs - data from the Danish Veterinary Cancer Registry

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Head and neck cancers (HNC) are relatively common and often very serious diseases in both dogs and humans. Neoplasms originating in the head and neck region are a heterogeneous group. HNC often has an unfavourable prognosis and the proximity of the tissue structures renders extirpation of tumours with sufficient margins almost incompatible with preservation of functionality. In humans oral malignant melanoma (OMM) is extremely rare, but represents a particular challenge since it is highly aggressive as is the canine counterpart, which thus may be of interest as a spontaneous animal model. Methods Canine cases entered in the Danish Veterinary Cancer Registry (DVCR) from May 15th 2005 through February 29th 2008 were included in this study. Fisher's exact test was used to compare proportions of HNC in dogs and humans as well as proportions of surgically treated cases of OMM and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). Also the proportions of benign and malignant neoplasms of different locations in dogs were compared using Fisher's exact test. Results A total of 1768 cases of neoplasias (679 malignant, 826 benign, 263 unknown) were submitted. Of all neoplasias HNC accounted for 7.2% (n = 128). Of these, 64 (50%) were malignant and 44 (34%) benign. The most common types of malignant neoplasia were SCC (18; 28% of malignant), OMM (13; 20% of malignant), soft tissue sarcoma (11; 17% of malignant) and adenocarcinoma (5; 11% of malignant). The most common types of benign neoplasms were adenoma (7; 16% of benign), polyps (6; 14% of benign) and fibroma (5; 11% of benign). Conclusions In the current study, the proportion of neoplasia in the head and neck region in dogs in Denmark was similar to other canine studies and significantly more common than in humans with a large proportion of malignancies. Spontaneous HNC in dogs thus, may serve as a model for HNC in humans. Canine OMM is a spontaneous cancer in an outbred, immune-competent large mammal population and could be a

  2. Potential contribution of SIM2 and ETS2 functional polymorphisms in Down syndrome associated malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proper expression and functioning of transcription factors (TFs) are essential for regulation of different traits and thus could be crucial for the development of complex diseases. Subjects with Down syndrome (DS) have a higher incidence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) while solid tumors, like breast cancer (BC) and oral cancer (OC), show rare incidences. Triplication of the human chromosome 21 in DS is associated with altered genetic dosage of different TFs. V-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2 (ETS2) and Single Minded 2 (SIM2) are two such TFs that regulate several downstream genes involved in developmental and neurological pathways. Here we studied functional genetic polymorphisms (fSNP) in ETS2 and SIM2 encoding genes in a group of patients and control subjects to better understand association of these variants with DS phenotypes. Methods We employed an in silico approach to identify potential target pathways of ETS2 and SIM2. fSNPs in genes encoding for these two TFs were identified using available databases. Selected sites were genotyped in individuals with DS, their parents, ALL, BC, OC as well as ethnically matched control individuals. We further analyzed these data by population-based statistical methods. Results Allelic/genotypic association analysis showed significant (P < 0.03) differences of rs2070530, rs1051476, rs11254, rs711 for DS subjects compared to control. rs711 also exhibited significantly different genotypic distribution pattern in parents of DS probands (P < 0.02) and BC patients (P < 0.02). Interaction analysis revealed independent main effect of rs711 in all the groups, while rs11254 exhibited independent main effect in DS subjects only. High entropy values were noticed for rs461155 in the solid tumor groups. Significant interactive effects of rs2070531 with rs1051475, rs1051476, rs11254 were observed in all the groups except DS. Conclusions We infer from the present investigation that the

  3. Immunohistochemical evaluation of oral epithelial dysplasia using cyclin-D1, p27 and p63 expression as predictors of malignant transformation

    PubMed Central

    Ramasubramanian, Abilasha; Ramani, Pratibha; Sherlin, Herald J.; Premkumar, Priya; Natesan, Anuja; Thiruvengadam, Chandrasekar

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the degree of expression of cyclin-D1, p27 and p63 in mild, moderate and severe dysplasia using immunohistochemical evaluation in order to illustrate their prognostic value and attempt to propose a molecular grading system for oral epithelial dysplasia. Materials and Methods: The analysis included thirty cases of mild, moderate and severe dysplasia from Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Saveetha Dental College, Chennai after a critical review of the Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E) stained sections. They were subjected to immunohistochemical evaluation using the markers cyclin-D1, p27 and p63. The assessment of the expression based on staining intensity and distribution of immunohistochemical staining of the various markers was analyzed followed by statistical analysis. Results: A highly significant increase in the expression of cyclin-D1 (P < 0.000) and p63 (P < 0.001) and a moderately significant decrease in the expression of p27 (P < 0.012) with the increasing severity of dysplasia was observed in our study. Conclusions: The result of our research affirms the fact that the increase in the expression of markers of cell cycle regulators such as cyclin D1, decrease in the expression of cell cycle inhibitors like p27 and increased expression of p63 in parallel with the increasing severity of dysplasia, emphasizes the use of immunohistochemical markers cyclin D1, p27 and p63 as prognostic markers for better understanding the behaviour of these potentially malignant disorders aiming towards proposing a molecular grading system for oral epithelial dysplasia to enable timely management prior to their possible malignant transformation. PMID:24082731

  4. Transition of Immunohistochemical Expression of E-Cadherin and Vimentin from Premalignant to Malignant Lesions of Oral Cavity and Oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Kafil; Ara, Anjum; Siddiqui, Shahid A; Sherwani, Rana K

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to study the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers E-cadherin and vimentin in precancerous lesions of the oral cavity and oropharynx and to use the specific pattern of expression to predict invasiveness. Methods This cross-sectional study looked at 87 cases of oral and oropharyngeal lesions obtained between December 2012 and November 2014 in the Department of Pathology, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, India. Fifty-three biopsies from the buccal mucosa, tongue, and pharynx and 34 resected oral specimens were evaluated for premalignant and malignant lesions using hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical stains. Immunohistochemical expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin and mesenchymal marker vimentin was evaluated wherever possible. Slides were examined for staining pattern (cytoplasmic or membrane), proportion, and intensity of staining of tumor cells. Patients follow-up and therapy related changes were also studied. Results There were 64 premalignant and 23 malignant cases in our study with 65 (74.7%) cases seen in males and 22 (25.3%) cases seen in females. The majority of malignant cases, (n = 15; 64.2%) were seen in the fifth and sixth decades of life while most of the premalignant lesions (n = 36; 56.4%) were seen in the fourth and fifth decade. Amongst the 64 premalignant oral lesions, leukoplakia comprised of 14 cases (21.9%), of which three cases had associated mild to moderate dysplasia. The majority of premalignant lesions showed strong E-cadherin expression and decreased expression of vimentin with negative and weak expression in both dysplasias and carcinoma in situ (p = 0.013). E-cadherin expression was significantly reduced in invasive carcinomas compared to dysplasias and carcinoma in situ and the difference in immunoreactivity was statistically significant (p < 0.050). Vimentin expression increased as the tumor progressed from dysplasias to carcinoma in situ to invasive

  5. Oral squamous cell carcinoma of the maxilla, a second malignancy after a right ethmoido-maxillary chondrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Suciu, Mircea; Morariu, Silviu Horia; Ormenişan, Alina; Grigoraş, Radu Ionuţ; Bostan, Radu Horia; Mocanu, Simona; Vartolomei, Mihai Dorin; Cotoi, Ovidiu Simion

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma is defined as an invasive epithelial neoplasm, with variable degrees of squamous differentiation, with or without keratinization. It is origins stand at the level of the keratinized stratified squamous epithelium (skin) or non-keratinized (oral mucosa, esophageal mucosa, uterine exocervical mucosa), but it can also be found in squamous metaplasia areas (uterine endocervix or trachea-bronchial tree). This report presents the case of an oral squamous cell carcinoma as a second malignancy in the same anatomical territory, in a patient with prior treatment for chondrosarcoma, both surgical and radiotherapy. The tumor had appeared 5-6 months prior and had undergone a relatively rapid growth, this being the patient's main motive for addressing the doctors. The tumor was greyish, with imprecisely demarcated margins, of firm consistency, bleeding and with local necrotic deposits. The tumor extended from the incisive region to the maxillary tuberosity, towards the cheek mucosa and the soft palate. After a large excision, the histopathological diagnosis was infiltrative keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma, with moderate differentiation, with origins in the oral mucosa, infiltrating the whole of the maxilla and the maxillary sinus mucosa. Approximately three months after the surgery, a new tumor appeared in the oral cavity, on superior and inferior mucosa of the right cheek, extending towards the right buccal commissure, implying a relapse of the primary tumor. Postoperative oncological therapy included standard chemotherapy, which resulted in favorable postoperative evolution. This case is interesting by the association, of two metachronous malignant tumors, of different histological origin: a chondrosarcoma and a squamous cell carcinoma, at an interval of 25 years. PMID:25607415

  6. Prophylaxis of mucosal toxicity by oral propantheline and cryotherapy in children with malignancies undergoing myeloablative chemo-radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsushi; Saisho-Hattori, Takako; Koizumi, Yoshitsugu; Minegishi, Masayoshi; Iinuma, Kazuie; Imaizumi, Masue

    2006-12-01

    Mucosal toxicity is an incapacitating complication of intensive chemo-radiotherapy for children with malignant disorders, and is physically and psychologically distressful. It is therefore important to minimize mucosal toxicity in those patients. In this report, the effects of the combined prophylaxis of oral cooling (cryotherapy) and administration of propantheline, an anticholinergic drug, were studied in patients (aged 2-16 year) with acute leukemias or solid tumors, who underwent myeloablative chemo-radiotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell rescue from 1993 to 1997. Patients were pretreated with the combined prophylaxis (n = 12) or single prophylaxis (n = 5), or left untreated (n = 7). The combined prophylaxis significantly reduced the severe mucositis (combined, 8.3%; single, 20.0%; and untreated, 42.9%) and severe diarrhea (combined, 16.7%; single, 60.0%; and untreated, 57.1%). Moreover, the combined prophylaxis tended to shorten the periods of febrile episodes defined as temperature > 38 degrees C (combined, 3.8 days; single, 4.6 days; and untreated, 5.6 days). Therefore, the combination of propantheline and oral cryotherapy may be feasible and effective for reduction of mucosal toxicity in patients with malignancy who undergo high-dose chemotherapy. PMID:17146197

  7. Mucoadhesive oral films: The potential for unmet needs.

    PubMed

    Silva, Branca M A; Borges, Ana Filipa; Silva, Cláudia; Coelho, Jorge F J; Simões, Sérgio

    2015-10-15

    Oral drug delivery is the most common route of drug administration. Nevertheless, there are some important limitations that reinforce the need for developing new drug delivery systems. Mucoadhesive oral films (MOF) are promising dosage forms that adhere to the oral mucosa and deliver the drug through it, which present several advantages. These include: bypassing the hepatic first pass effect, fast onset of action, ease of transportation and handling. The use of such dosage form is beneficial for drugs that have poor oral bioavailability and also for drugs that need to be rapidly absorbed. In spite of the known benefits, the number of marketed MOF is still quite small. This review explores the products under development and corresponding clinical trials in respect to their status, therapeutic indication, companies involved and technologies. In this way, it was possible to identify the preferred therapeutic indications, new research and market trends as well as future prospects of MOF. Moreover, it is reasonable to expect an increase in the number of products on the market due to their great potential to satisfy unmet medical needs. PMID:26315122

  8. Phase I Study of Oral Rigosertib (ON 01910.Na), a Dual Inhibitor of the PI3K and Plk1 Pathways, in Adult Patients with Advanced Solid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Daniel W.; Diamond, Jennifer R.; Lam, Elaine T.; Weekes, Colin D.; Astling, David P.; Anderson, Ryan T.; Leong, Stephen; Gore, Lia; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Vogler, Brian W.; Keysar, Stephen B.; Freas, Elizabeth; Aisner, Dara L.; Ren, Chen; Tan, Aik-Chook; Wilhelm, Francois; Maniar, Manoj; Eckhardt, S. Gail; Messersmith, Wells A.; Jimeno, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the pharmacokinetics (PK), maximum tolerated dose (MTD), safety, and antitumor activity of an oral formulation of rigosertib, a dual phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) pathway inhibitor, in patients with advanced solid malignancies. Experimental Design Patients with advanced solid malignancies received rigosertib twice daily continuously in 21-day cycles. Doses were escalated until intolerable grade ≥ 2 toxicities, at which point the previous dose level was expanded to define the MTD. All patients were assessed for safety, PK, and response. Urinary PK were performed at the MTD. Archival tumors were assessed for potential molecular biomarkers with multiplex mutation testing. A subset of squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) underwent exome sequencing. Results Forty-eight patients received a median of 2 cycles of therapy at 5 dose levels. Rigosertib exposure increased with escalating doses. Dose-limiting toxicities were hematuria and dysuria. The most common grade ≥2 drug-related toxicities involved urothelial irritation. The MTD is 560 mg twice daily. Activity was seen in head and neck SCCs (1 complete response, 1 partial response) and stable disease for ≥ 12 weeks was observed in 8 additional patients. Tumors experiencing ≥partial response had PI3K pathway activation, inactivated p53, and unique variants in ROBO3 and FAT1, two genes interacting with the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Conclusions The recommended phase II dose of oral rigosertib is 560 mg twice daily given continuously. Urinary toxicity is the dose-limiting and most common toxicity. Alterations in PI3K, p53, and Wnt/β-catenin pathway signaling should be investigated as potential biomarkers of response in future trials. PMID:24493827

  9. Therapeutic potential of melatonin in oral medicine and periodontology.

    PubMed

    Najeeb, Shariq; Khurshid, Zohaib; Zohaib, Sana; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail

    2016-08-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxy tryptamine) is a substance secreted by multiple organs in vertebrates. In addition to playing a part in the circadian cycle of the body, melatonin is known to have antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and antioncotic effects on human tissues. Oral cavity is affected by a number of conditions such as periodontitis, mucositis, cancers, and cytotoxicity from various drugs or biomaterials. Research has suggested that melatonin is effective in treating the aforementioned pathologies. Furthermore, melatonin has been observed to enhance osseointegration and bone regeneration. The aim of this review is to critically analyze and summarize the research focusing on the potential of melatonin in the field of oral medicine. Topical administration of melatonin has a positive effect on periodontal health and osseointegration. Furthermore, melatonin is particularly effective in improving the periodontal parameters of diabetic patients with periodontitis. Melatonin exerts a regenerative effect on periodontal bone and may be incorporated into of periodontal scaffolds. The cytotoxic effect of various drugs and dental materials may be countered by the antioxidant properties of melatonin. Topical administration of melatonin promotes the healing of tooth extraction sockets and may also impede the progression of oral cancer. Although, there are a number of current and potential applications of melatonin, further long term clinical and animal studies are needed to assess its efficacy. Moreover, the role of melatonin supplements in the management of periodontitis should also be assessed. PMID:27523451

  10. Adrenal oncoctyoma of uncertain malignant potential: a rare etiology of adrenal incidentaloma.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Rohit R; Muinov, Lucy; Lele, Subodh M; Shivaswamy, Vijay

    2016-03-01

    A rare cause for rapid adrenal enlargement is adrenal oncocytoma of uncertain malignant potential. A full biochemical evaluation is warranted to screen secreting adrenal adenomas as well as to evaluate adrenal cortical carcinoma. Careful pathologic evaluation is required as the diagnosis of AOC cannot be made by imaging. PMID:27014458

  11. Oral Bacteria as Potential Probiotics for the Pharyngeal Mucosa▿

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmetti, Simone; Taverniti, Valentina; Minuzzo, Mario; Arioli, Stefania; Stuknyte, Milda; Karp, Matti; Mora, Diego

    2010-01-01

    The research described here was aimed at the selection of oral bacteria that displayed properties compatible with their potential use as probiotics for the pharyngeal mucosa. We included in the study 56 bacteria newly isolated from the pharynges of healthy donors, which were identified at the intraspecies level and characterized in vitro for their probiotic potential. The experiments led us to select two potential probiotic bacterial strains (Streptococcus salivarius RS1 and ST3) and to compare them with the prototype oral probiotic S. salivarius strain K12. All three strains efficiently bound to FaDu human epithelial pharyngeal cells and thereby antagonized Streptococcus pyogenes adhesion and growth. All were sensitive to a variety of antibiotics routinely used for the control of upper respiratory tract infections. Immunological in vitro testing on a FaDu layer revealed different responses to RS1, ST3, and K12. RS1 and ST3 modulated NF-κB activation and biased proinflammatory cytokines at baseline and after interleukin-1β (IL-1β) induction. In conclusion, we suggest that the selected commensal streptococci represent potential pharyngeal probiotic candidates. They could display a good degree of adaptation to the host and possess potential immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:20418429

  12. Multiplatform molecular profiling identifies potentially targetable biomarkers in malignant phyllodes tumors of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Gatalica, Zoran; Vranic, Semir; Ghazalpour, Anatole; Xiu, Joanne; Ocal, Idris Tolgay; McGill, John; Bender, Ryan P.; Discianno, Erin; Schlum, Aaron; Sanati, Souzan; Palazzo, Juan; Reddy, Sandeep; Pockaj, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Malignant phyllodes tumor is a rare breast malignancy with sarcomatous overgrowth and with limited effective treatment options for recurrent and metastatic cases. Recent clinical trials indicated a potential for anti-angiogenic, anti-EGFR and immunotherapeutic approaches for patients with sarcomas, which led us to investigate these and other targetable pathways in malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast. Thirty-six malignant phyllodes tumors (including 8 metastatic tumors with two cases having matched primary and metastatic tumors) were profiled using gene sequencing, gene copy number analysis, whole genome expression, and protein expression. Whole genome expression analysis demonstrated consistent over-expression of genes involved in angiogenesis including VEGFA, Angiopoietin-2, VCAM1, PDGFRA, and PTTG1. EGFR protein overexpression was observed in 26/27 (96%) of cases with amplification of the EGFR gene in 8/24 (33%) cases. Two EGFR mutations were identified including EGFRvIII and a presumed pathogenic V774M mutation, respectively. The most common pathogenic mutations included TP53 (50%) and PIK3CA (15%). Cases with matched primary and metastatic tumors harbored identical mutations in both sites (PIK3CA/KRAS and RB1 gene mutations, respectively). Tumor expression of PD-L1 immunoregulatory protein was observed in 3/22 (14%) of cases. Overexpression of molecular biomarkers of increased angiogenesis, EGFR and immune checkpoints provides novel targeted therapy options in malignant phyllodes tumors of the breast. PMID:26625196

  13. Exploring Therapeutic Potentials of Baicalin and Its Aglycone Baicalein for Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haijun; Gao, Yu; Wu, Jianlei; Chen, Yingyu; Chen, Buyuan; Hu, Jianda; Zhou, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Despite tremendous advances in the targeted therapy for various types of hematological malignancies with successful improvements in the survival rates, emerging resistance issues are startlingly high and novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. In addition, chemoprevention is currently becoming an elusive goal. Plant-derived natural products have garnered considerable attention in recent years due to the potential dual functions as chemotherapeutics and dietary chemoprevention. One of the particularly ubiquitous families is the polyphenolic flavonoids. Among them, baicalin and its aglycone baicalein have been widely investigated in hematological malignancies because both of them exhibit remarkable pharmacological properties. This review focuses on the recent achievements in drug discovery research associated with baicalin and baicalein for hematological malignancy therapies. The promising anticancer activities of these two flavonoids targeting diverse signaling pathways and their potential biological mechanisms in different types of hematological malignancies, as well as the combination strategy with baicalin or baicalein as chemotherapeutic adjuvants for recent therapies in these intractable diseases are discussed. Meanwhile, the biotransformation of baicalin and baicalein and the relevant approaches to improve their bioavailability are also summarized. PMID:25128647

  14. Galectin-3 as a Potential Therapeutic Target in Tumors Arising from Malignant Endothelia1

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kim D; Glinskii, Olga V; Mossine, Valeri V; Turk, James R; Mawhinney, Thomas P; Anthony, Douglas C; Henry, Carolyn J; Huxley, Virginia H; Glinsky, Gennadi V; Pienta, Kenneth J; Raz, Avraham; Glinsky, Vladislav V

    2007-01-01

    Angiosarcoma (ASA) in humans and hemangiosarcoma (HSA) in dogs are deadly neoplastic diseases characterized by an aggressive growth of malignant cells with endothelial phenotype, widespread metastasis, and poor response to chemotherapy. Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a β-galactoside-binding lectin implicated in tumor progression and metastasis, endothelial cell biology and angiogenesis, and regulation of apoptosis and neoplastic cell response to cytotoxic drugs, has not been studied before in tumors arising from malignant endothelia. Here, we tested the hypothesis that Gal-3 could be widely expressed in human ASA and canine HSA and could play an important role in malignant endothelial cell biology. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that 100% of the human ASA (10 of 10) and canine HSA (17 of 17) samples analyzed expressed Gal-3. Two carbohydrate-based Gal-3 inhibitors, modified citrus pectin (MCP) and lactulosyl-l-leucine (LL), caused a dose-dependent reduction of SVR murine ASA cell clonogenic survival through the inhibition of Gal-3 antiapoptotic function. Furthermore, both MCP and LL sensitized SVR cells to the cytotoxic drug doxorubicin to a degree sufficient to reduce the in vitro IC50 of doxorubicin by 10.7-fold and 3.6-fold, respectively. These results highlight the important role of Gal-3 in the biology of ASA and identify Gal-3 as a potential therapeutic target in tumors arising from malignant endothelial cells. PMID:17786185

  15. Current Understanding of Circulating Tumor Cells – Potential Value in Malignancies of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk, Lukasz A.; Williams, Hannah; Frankow, Aleksandra; Ellis, Hayley Patricia; Haynes, Harry R.; Perks, Claire; Holly, Jeff M. P.; Kurian, Kathreena M.

    2015-01-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood via so-called “liquid biopsies” carries enormous clinical potential in malignancies of the central nervous system (CNS) because of the potential to follow disease evolution with a blood test, without the need for repeat neurosurgical procedures with their inherent risk of patient morbidity. To date, studies in non-CNS malignancies, particularly in breast cancer, show increasing reproducibility of detection methods for these rare tumor cells in the circulation. However, no method has yet received full recommendation to use in clinical practice, in part because of lack of a sufficient evidence base regarding clinical utility. In CNS malignancies, one of the main challenges is finding a suitable biomarker for identification of these cells, because automated systems, such as the widely used Cell Search system, are reliant on markers, such as the epithelial cell adhesion molecule, which are not present in CNS tumors. This review examines methods for CTC enrichment and detection, and reviews the progress in non-CNS tumors and the potential for using this technique in human brain tumors. PMID:26322014

  16. Myofibroblasts of the muscle layer stimulate the malignant potential of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takatsuna, Masafumi; Morohashi, Satoko; Yoshizawa, Tadashi; Hirai, Hideaki; Haga, Toshihiro; Ota, Rie; Wu, Yunyan; Morohashi, Hajime; Hakamada, Kenichi; Terai, Shuji; Kijima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Myofibroblasts of colorectal cancer (CRC) have been associated with histopathological factors such as lymph node metastasis, liver metastasis and local recurrence. However, few studies have assessed the association between these malignant potentials and the myofibroblast distribution in CRC. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between clinical factors and myofibroblast distribution around CRC invasive lesions. The study included 121 cases of pT3 CRC that were diagnosed at stage II or III. Myofibroblast density of the following three histological layers was measured: the submucosa (SM), muscularis propria (MP) and subserosa (SS). We analyzed the relationship between the clinicopathological factors and myofibroblast density by studying the histopathological features of the three layers. The myofibroblast density of the MP layer was significantly higher in the groups with high-frequency lymphatic and venous invasion than the groups with low-frequency lymphatic (P<0.001) and venous (P<0.01) invasion, respectively. In the positive lymph node metastasis group, the myofibroblast density at the MP layer was significantly higher than that in the negative lymph node metastasis group (P<0.001). The high myofibroblast density group at the MP layer was significantly associated with poor overall survival (P<0.003). Our study indicated that myofibroblasts are a type of cancer-associated fibroblasts and that the myofibroblast distribution contributes to the malignant potential of CRC. Furthermore, we demonstrated that myofibroblasts present at the MP layer play an important role in the malignant potential and poor prognosis of patients with CRC. PMID:27431808

  17. Casein/pectin nanocomplexes as potential oral delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yangchao; Pan, Kang; Zhong, Qixin

    2015-01-01

    Delivery systems prepared with natural biopolymers are of particular interests for applications in food, pharmaceutics and biomedicine. In this study, nanocomplex particles of sodium caseinate (NaCas) and pectin were fabricated and investigated as potential oral delivery vehicles. Nanocomplexes were prepared with three mass ratios of NaCas/pectin by acidification using glucono-δ-lactone and thermal treatment. NaCas/pectin at 1:1 mass ratio resulted in dispersions with the lowest turbidity and the smallest and most uniform nanocomplexes. Thermal treatment at 85 °C for 30 min facilitated the formation of stable, compact, and spherical nanocomplexes. Heating not only greatly increased the yield of nanocomplexes but also significantly improved the encapsulation capability of rutin studied as a model compound. Pectin in nanocomplexes delayed the hydrolysis of NaCas by pepsin at gastric conditions and enabled the controlled release of most rutin in simulated intestinal conditions. The nanocomplexes based on food-sourced biopolymers have promising features for oral delivery of nutrients and medicines. PMID:25800678

  18. Essentials of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators. PMID:26617944

  19. The importance of consistency in the classification of malignant tumours, illustrated by oral cancer material.

    PubMed

    Voss, R

    1985-08-01

    To evaluate the best treatment for the cancer patient, comparisons are often made between groups who have received different therapy. Such studies may be carried out within one hospital, but results from several hospitals may also be compared. It is therefore of the utmost importance that the groups/materials are selected according to the same criteria and classified and analysed by the same system and methods respectively. To illustrate this point, 125 cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma were classified according to two different systems, i.e. TNM 1973 and TNM 1978, but otherwise the material was similarly analyzed. The survival curves for stage I, II, III and IV78 were quite different from the corresponding curves of the 1973 system. The universal use of a simple, consistent classification system is recommended, and the effort to develop and improve the TNM system should continue. PMID:3860593

  20. Pediatric phase I trial of oral sorafenib and topotecan in refractory or recurrent pediatric solid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Reed, Damon R; Mascarenhas, Leo; Manning, Kathleen; Hale, Gregory A; Goldberg, John; Gill, Jonathan; Sandler, Eric; Isakoff, Michael S; Smith, Tiffany; Caracciolo, Jamie; Lush, Richard M; Juan, Tzu-Hua; Lee, Jae K; Neuger, Anthony M; Sullivan, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    Targeted kinase inhibitors and camptothecins have shown preclinical and clinical activity in several cancers. This trial evaluated the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities of sorafenib and topotecan administered orally in pediatric patients with relapsed solid tumors. Sorafenib was administered twice daily and topotecan once daily on days 1-5 and 8-12 of each 28-day course. The study utilized a standard 3 + 3 dose escalation design. Three dose levels (DL) were evaluated: (1) sorafenib 150 mg/m(2) and topotecan 1 mg/m(2) ; (2) sorafenib 150 mg/m(2) and topotecan 1.4 mg/m(2) ; and (3) sorafenib 200 mg/m(2) and topotecan 1.4 mg/m(2) . Pharmacokinetics were ascertained and treatment response assessed. Thirteen patients were enrolled. DL2 was the determined MTD. Grade 4 thrombocytopenia delaying therapy for >7 days was observed in one of six patients on DL2, and grade 4 neutropenia that delayed therapy in two of three patients on DL3. A patient with preexisting cardiac failure controlled with medication developed a transient drop in the left ventricular ejection fraction that improved when sorafenib was withheld. Sorafenib exposure with or without topotecan was comparable, and the concentration-time profiles for topotecan alone and in combination with sorafenib were similar. One objective response was noted in a patient with fibromatosis. We determined MTD to be sorafenib 150 mg/m(2) twice daily orally on days 1-28 combined with topotecan 1.4 mg/m(2) once daily on days 1-5 and 8-12. While these doses are 1 DL below the MTD of the agents individually, pharmacokinetic studies suggested adequate drug exposure without drug interactions. The combination had limited activity in the population studied. PMID:26714427

  1. A Case of Oncocytic Adrenocortical Neoplasm of Borderline (Uncertain) Malignant Potential.

    PubMed

    Shenouda, Mina; Brown, Linda G; Denning, Krista L; Pacioles, Toni

    2016-01-01

    Oncocytic neoplasms are tumors composed predominantly or exclusively of oncocytes (large polygonal cells with granular eosinophilic cytoplasm due to abnormal mitochondrial accumulation). These tumors are frequently reported in the thyroid, kidneys, and salivary glands. However, they are distinctly rare in the adrenal cortex. Oncocytic adrenocortical neoplasms (OAN) are classified regarding their biological behavior by their histological features according to the Lin-Weiss-Bisceglia system (LWB). Here, we report a case of OAN of borderline or uncertain malignant potential (BMP) with subsequently identified papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). A 34-year-old female with a nine-month history of fatigue presented with chest pain. A right adrenal mass was incidentally found while ruling out pulmonary embolism. A CT-guided adrenal biopsy, although not routinely indicated, was performed and interpreted as malignant with no definitive origin. Hormonal workup was unremarkable. PET-scan showed hypermetabolic adrenal mass with peak standardized uptake value of 15, suspicious of malignancy. A hypermetabolic thyroid nodule was also identified, but there was no evidence of metastatic disease. The patient underwent adrenalectomy, and the initial pathology report was interpreted as atypical pink cell tumor. A second pathology report from another laboratory favored OAN based on the morphology and immunohistochemical staining. While the histologic criteria of malignancy were not met, the large tumor size makes it compatible with BMP according to LWB criteria. A follow-up thyroid ultrasound revealed a complex thyroid nodule. A total thyroidectomy was performed, and pathology was consistent with PTC. Of interest, PTC frequently shows an increase in mitochondrial content, which is characteristic of oncocytic tumors. This case illustrates that OAN, although rare, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of adrenal masses. When OAN is identified, it should be classified

  2. A Case of Oncocytic Adrenocortical Neoplasm of Borderline (Uncertain) Malignant Potential

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Linda G; Denning, Krista L; Pacioles, Toni

    2016-01-01

    Oncocytic neoplasms are tumors composed predominantly or exclusively of oncocytes (large polygonal cells with granular eosinophilic cytoplasm due to abnormal mitochondrial accumulation). These tumors are frequently reported in the thyroid, kidneys, and salivary glands. However, they are distinctly rare in the adrenal cortex. Oncocytic adrenocortical neoplasms (OAN) are classified regarding their biological behavior by their histological features according to the Lin-Weiss-Bisceglia system (LWB). Here, we report a case of OAN of borderline or uncertain malignant potential (BMP) with subsequently identified papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). A 34-year-old female with a nine-month history of fatigue presented with chest pain. A right adrenal mass was incidentally found while ruling out pulmonary embolism. A CT-guided adrenal biopsy, although not routinely indicated, was performed and interpreted as malignant with no definitive origin. Hormonal workup was unremarkable. PET-scan showed hypermetabolic adrenal mass with peak standardized uptake value of 15, suspicious of malignancy. A hypermetabolic thyroid nodule was also identified, but there was no evidence of metastatic disease. The patient underwent adrenalectomy, and the initial pathology report was interpreted as atypical pink cell tumor. A second pathology report from another laboratory favored OAN based on the morphology and immunohistochemical staining. While the histologic criteria of malignancy were not met, the large tumor size makes it compatible with BMP according to LWB criteria. A follow-up thyroid ultrasound revealed a complex thyroid nodule. A total thyroidectomy was performed, and pathology was consistent with PTC. Of interest, PTC frequently shows an increase in mitochondrial content, which is characteristic of oncocytic tumors. This case illustrates that OAN, although rare, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of adrenal masses. When OAN is identified, it should be classified

  3. Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase inhibition: A potential treatment of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor.

    PubMed

    Kivlin, Christine M; Watson, Kelsey L; Al Sannaa, Ghadah A; Belousov, Roman; Ingram, Davis R; Huang, Kai-Lieh; May, Caitlin D; Bolshakov, Svetlana; Landers, Sharon M; Kalam, Azad Abul; Slopis, John M; McCutcheon, Ian E; Pollock, Raphael E; Lev, Dina; Lazar, Alexander J; Torres, Keila E

    2016-01-01

    Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, first evaluated nearly a decade ago, are primarily used in malignancies with known defects in DNA repair genes, such as alterations in breast cancer, early onset 1/2 (BRCA1/2). While no specific mutations in BRCA1/2 have been reported in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), MPNST cells could be effectively targeted with a PARP inhibitor to drive cells to synthetic lethality due to their complex karyotype and high level of inherent genomic instability. In this study, we assessed the expression levels of PARP1 and PARP2 in MPNST patient tumor samples and correlated these findings with overall survival. We also determined the level of PARP activity in MPNST cell lines. In addition, we evaluated the efficacy of the PARP inhibitor AZD2281 (Olaparib) in MPNST cell lines. We observed decreased MPNST cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis in vitro at doses similar to, or less than, the doses used in cell lines with established defective DNA repair genes. Furthermore, AZD2281 significantly reduced local growth of MPNST xenografts, decreased the development of macroscopic lung metastases, and increased survival of mice with metastatic disease. Our results suggest that AZD2281 could be an effective therapeutic option in MPNST and should be further investigated for its potential clinical use in this malignancy. PMID:26650448

  4. The Potential Role of Oral Fluid in Antidoping Testing

    PubMed Central

    Anizan, Sebastien; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Currently, urine and blood are the only matrices authorized for antidoping testing by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). Although the usefulness of urine and blood is proven, issues remain for monitoring some drug classes and for drugs prohibited only in competition. The alternative matrix oral fluid (OF) may offer solutions to some of these issues. OF collection is easy, noninvasive, and sex neutral and is directly observed, limiting potential adulteration, a major problem for urine testing. OF is used to monitor drug intake in workplace, clinical toxicology, criminal justice, and driving under the influence of drugs programs and potentially could complement urine and blood for antidoping testing in sports. CONTENT This review outlines the present state of knowledge and the advantages and limitations of OF testing for each of the WADA drug classes and the research needed to advance OF testing as a viable alternative for antidoping testing. SUMMARY Doping agents are either prohibited at all times or prohibited in competition only. Few OF data from controlled drug administration studies are available for substances banned at all times, whereas for some agents prohibited only in competition, sufficient data may be available to suggest appropriate analytes and cutoffs (analytical threshold concentrations) to identify recent drug use. Additional research is needed to characterize the disposition of many banned substances into OF; OF collection methods and doping agent stability in OF also require investigation to allow the accurate interpretation of OF tests for antidoping monitoring. PMID:24153253

  5. The detection of oral pre- malignant lesions with an autofluorescence based imaging system (VELscopeTM) – a single blinded clinical evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective The disease specific five-year survival rate especially for patients with advanced oral cancer has not improved significantly over the period of time. The most effective way of combating this dilemma is an early detection, diagnosis and eradication of early-stage lesions and their precursors. The use of VELscope® using an autofluorescence as a diagnostic tool might be useful in early detection of oral malignant lesions. Materials and methods 120 patients with suspicious oral premalignant lesions were examined with two examination methods. They were randomly divided into two groups. Group 1 was examined conventional with white-light and group 2 was examined additionally to the white-light-examination with an autofluorescence visualization device, VELscope®. Biopsies were obtained from all suspicious areas identified in both examination groups (n = 52). The diagnostic strategies were compared regarding sensitivity and specificity. Results Based upon the result, use of the VELscope® leads to a higher sensitivity (22.0%), but regarding specificity the additional use of the VELscope® is inferior (8.4%). Conclusion The VELscope device is a simple, non-invasive test of the oral mucosa, which can help the experienced clinician to find oral precursor malignant lesions. PMID:23967796

  6. Myofibroblasts of the muscle layer stimulate the malignant potential of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Takatsuna, Masafumi; Morohashi, Satoko; Yoshizawa, Tadashi; Hirai, Hideaki; Haga, Toshihiro; Ota, Rie; Wu, Yunyan; Morohashi, Hajime; Hakamada, Kenichi; Terai, Shuji; Kijima, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    Myofibroblasts of colorectal cancer (CRC) have been associated with histopathological factors such as lymph node metastasis, liver metastasis and local recurrence. However, few studies have assessed the association between these malignant potentials and the myofibroblast distribution in CRC. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between clinical factors and myofibroblast distribution around CRC invasive lesions. The study included 121 cases of pT3 CRC that were diagnosed at stage II or III. Myofibroblast density of the following three histological layers was measured: the submucosa (SM), muscularis propria (MP) and subserosa (SS). We analyzed the relationship between the clinicopathological factors and myofibroblast density by studying the histopathological features of the three layers. The myofibroblast density of the MP layer was significantly higher in the groups with high-frequency lymphatic and venous invasion than the groups with low-frequency lymphatic (P<0.001) and venous (P<0.01) invasion, respectively. In the positive lymph node metastasis group, the myofibroblast density at the MP layer was significantly higher than that in the negative lymph node metastasis group (P<0.001). The high myofibroblast density group at the MP layer was significantly associated with poor overall survival (P<0.003). Our study indicated that myofibroblasts are a type of cancer-associated fibroblasts and that the myofibroblast distribution contributes to the malignant potential of CRC. Furthermore, we demonstrated that myofibroblasts present at the MP layer play an important role in the malignant potential and poor prognosis of patients with CRC. PMID:27431808

  7. Entrapment into nanoemulsions potentiates the anticancer activity of tocotrienols against the highly malignant (+SA) mouse mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Alayoubi, Alaadin; Ayoub, Nehad M; Malaviya, Abhita; Sylvester, Paul W; Nazzal, Sami

    2014-05-01

    The highly malignant +SA mouse mammary epithelial cells were used as the model cell line over the years to establish the anticancer activity of tocotrienols. Tocotrienols, however, have poor oral bioavailability and were therefore entrapped into parenteral nanoemulsions for parenteral administration. The objective of this work was to test whether the activity of tocotrienols in lipid nanoemulsions against the +SA cells was retained. A secondary objective was to test whether stabilizing the nanoemulsions with poloxamer or sodium oleate would affect their activity. Nanoemulsions were found to be significantly more potent than tocotrienol/albumin conjugate. The IC50 values of the poloxamer and sodium oleate nanoemulsions were 3 and 6 microM, respectively, whereas the IC50 value of the conjugate was 10 microM. The antiproliferative activity of the nanoemulsions was also found to inversely correlate with particle size. No activity was observed with nanoemulsions loaded with alpha-tocopherol or vehicle, which confirmed the cytotoxic activity of tocotrienols and the potential use of nanoemulsions in cancer therapy. PMID:24734680

  8. Altered Immunohistochemical Expression of Mast Cell Tryptase and Chymase in the Pathogenesis of Oral Submucous Fibrosis and Malignant Transformation of the Overlying Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Archana; Desai, Rajiv S.; Bhuta, Bansari A.; Singh, Jatinder S.; Mehta, Reema; Nehete, Akash P.

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) expressing serine proteases; tryptase and chymase, are associated with fibrosis in various diseases. However, little is known about their involvement in oral submucous fibrosis (OSF). Our goal was to evaluate the role of MC tryptase and chymase in the pathogenesis of OSF and its malignant transformation. Immunohistochemical expression of MC tryptase and chymase was evaluated in 20 cases of OSF, 10 cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and 10 cases of healthy controls. Subepithelial zone of Stage 1 and 2 while deep zone of Stage 3 and 4 OSF demonstrated increased tryptase positive MCs. OSCC revealed a proportionate increase in tryptase and chymase positive MCs irrespective of areas of distribution. An altered balance in the subepithelial and deep distribution of tryptase and chymase positive MCs play an important role in the pathogenesis of OSF and its malignant transformation. PMID:24874976

  9. Orality, Literacy and Music's Creative Potential: A Comparative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Patricia Shehan

    1989-01-01

    Describes the rise of musical notation in the West, showing the relationship between that development and the origin of music literacy in China. Suggests that the balance of oral and literate means of music learning may foster creative expression in performance. Encourages the study and practice of orality in the training of young musicians. (LS)

  10. Mesothelioma of tunica vaginalis of "uncertain malignant potential" - an evolving concept: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Mesothelioma of tunica vaginalis is a rare neoplasm, typically demonstrating frankly malignant morphology and aggressive behavior. Rare cases of well-differentiated papillary mesotheliomas have also been reported, which, in contrast, demonstrate indolent behavior. There are, however, cases which do not fit into the well-differentiated or diffuse malignant mesothelioma categories and can be considered mesothelioma of tunica vaginalis of "uncertain malignant potential", which is an emerging diagnostic category. A 57-year-old man presented with a neoplasm in a hydrocele sac. The neoplasm was non-invasive, but showed focal complex and solid growth and it was difficult to categorize either as well-differentiated papillary mesotheliomas or malignant mesothelioma. After the initial limited resection, the patient underwent radical orchiectomy with hemiscrotectomy and is alive and without disease progression after 6 years. Documentation of these rare tumors will allow their distinction from true malignant mesotheliomas and will facilitate the development of specific treatment recommendations. PMID:21867523

  11. Opioid switch from low dose of oral oxycodone to transdermal fentanyl matrix patch for patients with stable thoracic malignancy-related pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The effectiveness and safety of switch from oral oxycodone to fentanyl patch is little known. Here, we investigated if early phase opioid switch from low dose of oral oxycodone to transdermal fentanyl matrix patch provided any benefits for patients with thoracic malignancy and stable cancer-related pain. Methods This open-label two-centered prospective study enrolled patients with thoracic malignancy suffering persistent malignancy-related pain with numeric rating scale of pain intensity ≤ 3 which had been controlled by oral oxycodone ≤ 20 mg/day. Eligible patients switched from oral oxycodone to 12.5 μg/h of transdermal fentanyl matrix patch. The dose was allowed to be titrated upwards every 3 day by 25-50%, except for the first increase from 12.5 μg/hr to 25 μg/hr,until achieving adequate pain control. The data on patients’ global assessment scores measured on a five-step scale, an 11-point numeric rating scale of pain intensity, the severity of adverse effects using a four-point categorical rating scale, and the Epworth sleepiness scale questionnaire were collected for 15 days. Results Forty-nine eligible patients were analyzed. Overall patients’ satisfaction score significantly improved from day 1 (2.7 ± 0.9) to day 15 (2.3 ± 0.9) (p < 0.05), and 90% and 78% of patients remained to receive the minimum dose of fentanyl patch on day 8 and 15 from the opioid switch. There was a significant difference in sleepiness throughout the study period, though no difference was detected in pain intensity and other adverse effects. Conclusion Transdermal fentanyl matrix patch is an alternative analgesic option for a stable cancer pain in patients with thoracic malignancies. PMID:25313295

  12. Microarray analysis of potential genes in the pathogenesis of recurrent oral ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jingying; He, Zhiwei; Li, Kun; Hou, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent oral ulcer seriously threatens patients’ daily life and health. This study investigated potential genes and pathways that participate in the pathogenesis of recurrent oral ulcer by high throughput bioinformatic analysis. RT-PCR and Western blot were applied to further verify screened interleukins effect. Recurrent oral ulcer related genes were collected from websites and papers, and further found out from Human Genome 280 6.0 microarray data. Each pathway of recurrent oral ulcer related genes were got through chip hybridization. RT-PCR was applied to test four recurrent oral ulcer related genes to verify the microarray data. Data transformation, scatter plot, clustering analysis, and expression pattern analysis were used to analyze recurrent oral ulcer related gene expression changes. Recurrent oral ulcer gene microarray was successfully established. Microarray showed that 551 genes involved in recurrent oral ulcer activity and 196 genes were recurrent oral ulcer related genes. Of them, 76 genes up-regulated, 62 genes down-regulated, and 58 genes up-/down-regulated. Total expression level up-regulated 752 times (60%) and down-regulated 485 times (40%). IL-2 plays an important role in the occurrence, development and recurrence of recurrent oral ulcer on the mRNA and protein levels. Gene microarray can be used to analyze potential genes and pathways in recurrent oral ulcer. IL-2 may be involved in the pathogenesis of recurrent oral ulcer. PMID:26722428

  13. Oral microbiota and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meurman, Jukka H.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation caused by infections may be the most important preventable cause of cancer in general. However, in the oral cavity the role of microbiota in carcinogenesis is not known. Microbial populations on mouth mucosa differ between healthy and malignant sites and certain oral bacterial species have been linked with malignancies but the evidence is still weak in this respect. Nevertheless, oral microorganisms inevitably up-regulate cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that affect the complex metabolic pathways and may thus be involved in carcinogenesis. Poor oral health associates statistically with prevalence of many types of cancer, such as pancreatic and gastrointestinal cancer. Furthermore, several oral micro-organisms are capable of converting alcohol to carcinogenic acetaldehyde which also may partly explain the known association between heavy drinking, smoking, poor oral health and the prevalence of oral and upper gastrointestinal cancer. A different problem is the cancer treatment-caused alterations in oral microbiota which may lead to the emergence of potential pathogens and subsequent other systemic health problems to the patients. Hence clinical guidelines and recommendations have been presented to control oral microbiota in patients with malignant disease, but also in this area the scientific evidence is weak. More controlled studies are needed for further conclusion. PMID:21523227

  14. Potential of mid IR spectroscopy in the rapid label free identification of skin malignancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastl, Lena; Kemper, Björn; Lloyd, Gavin R.; Nallala, Jayakrupakar; Stone, Nick; Naranjo, Valery; Penaranda, Francisco; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    The rapid inspection of suspicious skin lesions for pathological cell types is the objective of optical point of care diagnostics technologies. A marker free fast diagnosis of skin malignancies would overcome the limitations of the current gold standard surgical biopsy. The time consuming and costly biopsy procedure requires the inspection of each sample by a trained pathologist, which limits the analysis of potentially malignant lesions. Optical technologies like RAMAN or infrared spectroscopy, which provide both, localization and chemical information, can be used to differentiate malignant from healthy tissue by the analysis of multi cell structures and cell type specific spectra. We here report the application of midIR spectroscopy towards fast and reliable skin diagnostics. Within the European research project MINERVA we developed standardized in vitro skin systems with increasing complexity, from single skin cell types as fibroblasts, keratinocytes and melanoma cells, to mixtures of these and finally three dimensional human skin equivalents. The standards were characterized in the established midIR range and also with newly developed systems for fast imaging up to 12 μm. The analysis of the spectra by novel data processing algorithms demonstrated the clear separation of all cell types, especially the tumor cells. The signals from single cell layers were sufficient for cell type differentiation. We have compared different midIR systems and found all of them suitable for specific cell type identification. Our data demonstrate the potential of midIR spectroscopy for fast image acquisition and an improved data processing as sensitive and specific optical biopsy technology.

  15. The human oral metaproteome reveals potential biomarkers for caries disease.

    PubMed

    Belda-Ferre, Pedro; Williamson, James; Simón-Soro, Áurea; Artacho, Alejandro; Jensen, Ole N; Mira, Alex

    2015-10-01

    Tooth decay is considered the most prevalent human disease worldwide. We present the first metaproteomic study of the oral biofilm, using different mass spectrometry approaches that have allowed us to quantify individual peptides in healthy and caries-bearing individuals. A total of 7771 bacterial and 853 human proteins were identified in 17 individuals, which provide the first available protein repertoire of human dental plaque. Actinomyces and Coryneybacterium represent a large proportion of the protein activity followed by Rothia and Streptococcus. Those four genera account for 60-90% of total diversity. Healthy individuals appeared to have significantly higher amounts of L-lactate dehydrogenase and the arginine deiminase system, both implicated in pH buffering. Other proteins found to be at significantly higher levels in healthy individuals were involved in exopolysaccharide synthesis, iron metabolism and immune response. We applied multivariate analysis in order to find the minimum set of proteins that better allows discrimination of healthy and caries-affected dental plaque samples, detecting seven bacterial and five human protein functions that allow determining the health status of the studied individuals with an estimated specificity and sensitivity over 96%. We propose that future validation of these potential biomarkers in larger sample size studies may serve to develop diagnostic tests of caries risk that could be used in tooth decay prevention. PMID:26272225

  16. Round cell pattern of prostatic stromal tumor of uncertain malignant potential: a subtle newly recognized variant.

    PubMed

    Sadimin, Evita T; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2016-06-01

    Prostatic stromal tumor of uncertain malignant potential (STUMP) is a distinct entity which includes several different patterns. Four patterns of STUMP have been described including stroma with (1) degenerative atypia, (2) hypercellular spindle cells, (3) myxoid spindle cells, and (4) phyllodes-like pattern. The current study identified a novel round cell pattern. We searched our database from 1999 to 2015 and identified 7 patients with round cell pattern out of a total number of 98 patients with STUMP. All 7 cases showed mildly increased stromal cellularity with rounded nuclei, diagnosed on core biopsies in 5 cases, transurethral resection in 1 case, and radical prostatectomy in 1 case. Some degree of glandular displacement was observed in 4 cases. In 2 of the cases, STUMP was not recognized histologically by the referring pathologists and was initially diagnosed as benign prostatic hyperplasia. As has been described with other patterns of STUMP, several cases showed associated epithelial proliferations that in some instances masked the neoplastic stromal process. The round cell pattern of STUMP is a new deceptively subtle pattern that may not be recognized as a neoplasm and may be misdiagnosed as benign prostatic hyperplasia. Although there was no direct evidence in our study that the round cell pattern of STUMP has the same behavior as other variants of STUMPs, increased recognition of this entity will hopefully lead to additional studies to further understand its malignant potential. PMID:26980017

  17. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... Oral cancer most commonly involves the lips or the tongue. It may also occur on the: Cheek lining Floor ...

  18. The EGF Receptor Promotes the Malignant Potential of Glioma by Regulating Amino Acid Transport System xc(-).

    PubMed

    Tsuchihashi, Kenji; Okazaki, Shogo; Ohmura, Mitsuyo; Ishikawa, Miyuki; Sampetrean, Oltea; Onishi, Nobuyuki; Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Yoshikawa, Momoko; Seishima, Ryo; Iwasaki, Yoshimi; Morikawa, Takayuki; Abe, Shinya; Takao, Ayumi; Shimizu, Misato; Masuko, Takashi; Nagane, Motoo; Furnari, Frank B; Akiyama, Tetsu; Suematsu, Makoto; Baba, Eishi; Akashi, Koichi; Saya, Hideyuki; Nagano, Osamu

    2016-05-15

    Extracellular free amino acids contribute to the interaction between a tumor and its microenvironment through effects on cellular metabolism and malignant behavior. System xc(-) is composed of xCT and CD98hc subunits and functions as a plasma membrane antiporter for the uptake of extracellular cystine in exchange for intracellular glutamate. Here, we show that the EGFR interacts with xCT and thereby promotes its cell surface expression and function in human glioma cells. EGFR-expressing glioma cells manifested both enhanced antioxidant capacity as a result of increased cystine uptake, as well as increased glutamate, which promotes matrix invasion. Imaging mass spectrometry also revealed that brain tumors formed in mice by human glioma cells stably overexpressing EGFR contained higher levels of reduced glutathione compared with those formed by parental cells. Targeted inhibition of xCT suppressed the EGFR-dependent enhancement of antioxidant capacity in glioma cells, as well as tumor growth and invasiveness. Our findings establish a new functional role for EGFR in promoting the malignant potential of glioma cells through interaction with xCT at the cell surface. Cancer Res; 76(10); 2954-63. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26980765

  19. ZNF423 and ZNF521: EBF1 Antagonists of Potential Relevance in B-Lymphoid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Mesuraca, Maria; Chiarella, Emanuela; Scicchitano, Stefania; Codispoti, Bruna; Giordano, Marco; Nappo, Giovanna; Bond, Heather M.; Morrone, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The development of the B-lymphoid cell lineage is tightly controlled by the concerted action of a network of transcriptional and epigenetic regulators. EBF1, a central component of this network, is essential for B-lymphoid specification and commitment as well as for the maintenance of the B-cell identity. Genetic alterations causing loss of function of these B-lymphopoiesis regulators have been implicated in the pathogenesis of B-lymphoid malignancies, with particular regard to B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemias (B-ALLs), where their presence is frequently detected. The activity of the B-cell regulatory network may also be disrupted by the aberrant expression of inhibitory molecules. In particular, two multi-zinc finger transcription cofactors named ZNF423 and ZNF521 have been characterised as potent inhibitors of EBF1 and are emerging as potentially relevant contributors to the development of B-cell leukaemias. Here we will briefly review the current knowledge of these factors and discuss the importance of their functional cross talk with EBF1 in the development of B-cell malignancies. PMID:26788497

  20. Prostatic Stromal Tumor of Uncertain Malignant Potential Which Was Difficult to Diagnose

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Satoko; Nohara, Takahiro; Kawaguchi, Shohei; Seto, Chikashi; Nakanishi, Yuko; Uchiyama, Akio; Ishizawa, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a case of stromal tumor of uncertain malignant potential (STUMP) that was difficult to diagnose. A 53-year-old male was found to have a hard nodule on digital rectal examination; magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large nodule on the left side of the prostate, indicating prostate cancer. However, pathological diagnosis of the biopsy specimen was benign prostatic hyperplasia. Although a papillary tumor in the prostatic urethra was also seen on urethrocystoscopy, the tumor specimen obtained from transurethral resection was not malignant. The tumor in the prostatic urethra recurred only 3 months after transurethral resection, and pathological findings revealed benign hyperplasia not only in the stromal tissue but also in the epithelium; therefore, the prostate tumor was suspected to be STUMP. It took many prostate pathologists a long time to reach the final diagnosis of STUMP. STUMP is a rare benign tumor, difficult to diagnose, and sometimes transforms into stromal sarcoma. Thus, we should consider radical resection in such cases. PMID:26839730

  1. Voluminous Incidental Oncocytic Neoplasm of the Adrenal Gland With Uncertain Malignant Potential.

    PubMed

    Chakroun, Marouene; Kerkeni, Waild; Zidi, Yosra; Ayed, Haroun; Bouzouita, Abderrazak; Ben Slama, Mohamed Riadh; Rammeh, Sihem; Derouiche, Amine; Chebil, Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    A 74-year-old man presented with right flank pain and a palpable mass in the left flank. Blood pressure was normal. Contrastenhanced computed tomography (CT) showed a 17 × 16 × 12 cm retroperitoneal mass over the left kidney, solid and heterogeneous. There were also 3 retro aortic lymph nodes and bilateral renal lithiasis. Twenty four-hour urinary metanephrines and normetanephrines were normal. The patient underwent a resection of the mass with left adrenalectomy by a lumbar incision. Histological findings revealed an adrenal oncocytic neoplasm (AON) with uncertain malignant potential. Six months after surgery, CT control showed neither local nor distant recurrence. PMID:27413692

  2. The mitogenic effect of KGF and the expression of its cell surface receptor on cultured normal and malignant human oral keratinocytes and on contiguous fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Drugan, C S; Stone, A; Game, S M; Prime, S S

    1997-08-01

    This study examined the mitogenic response to keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) of normal and tumour-derived human oral keratinocytes in which the degree of cellular differentiation was known and in contiguous fibroblast cultures derived from the malignant epithelial cultures. Keratinocytes, but not fibroblasts, were stimulated by KGF, thereby demonstrating epithelial target cell specificity of the ligand. KGF-induced stimulation of the tumour-derived keratinocytes cultured in the absence of the 3T3 fibroblast support broadly correlated with the degree of cellular differentiation; well-differentiated keratinocytes were stimulated more by KGF than their less differentiated counterparts. Malignant oral keratinocytes expressed KGF cell surface receptors (KD 451-709 pM; receptors/cell 2306-13645), but KGF receptor mRNA did not correlate with either KGF-induced mitogenesis or the degree of epithelial cell differentiation. When the tumour-derived keratinocytes were cultured in the presence of 3T3 fibroblasts, the mitogenic response to KGF was comparable to normal epithelial cells. The results suggest that KGF-mediated growth stimulation may not be significant in providing a selective advantage for the growth of malignant keratinocytes. PMID:9250933

  3. Inhibition of transient receptor potential canonical channels impairs cytokinesis in human malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Bomben, V. C.; Sontheimer, H. W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Glial-derived primary brain tumours, gliomas, are among the fastest growing malignancies and present a huge clinical challenge. Research suggests an important, yet poorly understood, role of ion channels in growth control of normal and malignant cells. In this study, we sought to functionally characterize Transient Receptor Potential Canoncial (TRPC) channels in glioma cell proliferation. TRPC channels form non-selective cation channels that have been suggested to represent a Ca2+ influx pathway impacting cellular growth. Materials and Methods Employing a combination of molecular, biochemical and biophysical techniques, we characterized TRPC channels in glioma cells. Results We showed consistent expression of four channel family members (TRPC-1, -3, -5, -6) in glioma cell lines and acute patient-derived tissues. These channels gave rise to small, non-voltage-dependent cation currents that were blocked by the TRPC inhibitors GdCl3, 2-APB, or SKF96365. Importantly, TRPC channels contributed to the resting conductance of glioma cells and their acute pharmacological inhibition caused an ~10 mV hyperpolarization of the cells’ resting potential. Additionally, chronic application of the TRPC inhibitor SKF96365 caused near complete growth arrest. A detailed analysis, by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and time-lapse microscopy, showed that growth inhibition occurred at the G2 + M phase of the cell cycle with cytokinesis defects. Cells underwent incomplete cell divisions and became multinucleate, enlarged cells. Conclusions Nuclear atypia and enlarged cells are histopathological hallmarks for glioblastoma multiforme, the highest grade glioma, suggesting that a defect in TRPC channel function may contribute to cellular abnormalities in these tumours. PMID:18211288

  4. Swietenine: a potential oral hypoglycemic from Swietenia macrophylla seed.

    PubMed

    Dewanjee, Saikat; Maiti, Anup; Das, Anup K; Mandal, Subhash C; Dey, Sankar P

    2009-06-01

    Swietenine, a tetranortriterpenoid, was isolated from the Swietenia macrophylla seeds. The in vivo hypoglycemic activity was evaluated against neonatal-streptozotocin induced type 2 diabetic rats. Oral administration of swietenine at 25 and 50 mg/kg body weight per day to diabetic rats was found to possess significant dose dependant hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic activity in type 2 diabetic rats. PMID:19239921

  5. Hypoxia-Related Marker GLUT-1, CAIX, Proliferative Index and Microvessel Density in Canine Oral Malignant Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Valeria; Guscetti, Franco; Roos, Malgorzata; Ohlerth, Stefanie; Pruschy, Martin; Rohrer Bley, Carla

    2016-01-01

    For various types of tumor therapy, it is suggested that co-targeting of tumor microenvironment, mainly tumor vasculature, mediates tumor response mechanisms. Immunohistochemistry for glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1), carbonic anhydrase-IX (CAIX), Ki-67, and von Willebrand factor VIII for microvessel density (MVD) were performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples of canine oral malignant neoplasms. Polarographic oxygen measurements (median pO2) and perfusion data via contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasound (median vascularity, median blood volume) provided additional information. Ninety-two samples were analyzed: sarcomas (n = 32), carcinomas (n = 30), and malignant melanomas (n = 30). Polarographic oxygen and perfusion data was available in 22.8% (sarcomas n = 9, carcinomas n = 7, melanomas n = 5), and 27.1% (sarcomas n = 10, carcinomas n = 8, melanomas n = 7) of cases, respectively. GLUT-1 expression was detected in 46.7% of all samples, and was generally weak. CAIX expression was found in 34.8% of all samples. Median Ki-67 score and MVD count was 19% and 17, respectively. The evaluation of the GLUT-1 score and continuous data showed significantly lower GLUT-1 levels in sarcomas (mean 5.1%, SD 6.2) versus carcinomas and melanomas (mean 16.5%/ 19.0%, SD 17.3/ 20.9, p = 0.001). The expression of CAIX correlated mildly positively with GLUT-1 (p = 0.018, rho = 0.250) as well as with Ki-67 (p = 0.014, rho = 0.295). MVD showed a significantly lower level in melanomas (mean 12.6, SD 7.7) versus sarcomas and carcinomas (mean 21.8/ 26.9, SD 13.0/20.4, p = 0.001). Median vascularity and blood volume were significantly lower in sarcomas (mean 10.4%, SD 11.0, and mean 6.3%, SD 6.5, respectively) versus carcinomas (mean 39.2%, SD 16.4 and mean 33.0%, SD 25.6, respectively) and melanomas (mean 36.0%, SD 18.3, and 31.5%, SD 24.5). Between the 3 histological groups, there was neither a significant difference in the GLUT-1 and CAIX score and continuous data, nor the Ki

  6. Malignant oral-maxillary neoplasm in children and adolescents. A retrospective analysis from the biopsy service at a school of dentistry in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Piloni, Maria Julia; Molina, Gladys; Keszler, Alicia

    2009-01-01

    There are few studies on oral-maxillary lesions in children and adolescents, and reports on malignant neoplasms are scarce. Comparison of available data is difficult due to the different criteria and racial-ethnic origin of the populations in each study. The aim of this work was to perform a retrospective study of malignant oral neoplasms in patients aged up to 20 years diagnosed at a center specialized in histopathological diagnosis of oral diseases between 1990 and 2005. The 24 retrieved cases accounted for 0.9% (n: 2434) of total biopsies in this age group during that period, and for 8.4% (n: 236) of the tumors. Mean age of the whole population was 9.2 years with even distribution according to sex. The most frequent tumor types were extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma (7 cases), osteosarcoma (4 cases) and Ewing sarcoma (3 cases). These data can be considered representative of our population of children and adolescents and serve as a basis for recognition and presumptive diagnosis in clinical practice. PMID:20302224

  7. Fenofibrate Suppresses Oral Tumorigenesis via Reprogramming Metabolic Processes: Potential Drug Repurposing for Oral Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jan, Chia-Ing; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Huang, Yi-Ping; Liu, Chia Jen; Chang, Nai Wen

    2016-01-01

    One anticancer strategy suggests targeting mitochondrial metabolism to trigger cell death through slowing down energy production from the Warburg effect. Fenofibrate is a clinical lipid-lowering agent and an effective anticancer drug. In the present study, we demonstrate that fenofibrate provided novel mechanisms for delaying oral tumor development via the reprogramming of metabolic processes. Fenofibrate induced cytotoxicity by decreasing oxygen consumption rate (OCR) that was accompanied with increasing extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) and reducing ATP content. Moreover, fenofibrate caused changes in the protein expressions of hexokinase II (HK II), pyruvate kinase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), which are associated with the Warburg effect. In addition, fenofibrate reprogrammed the metabolic pathway by interrupting the binding of HK II to VDAC. In an oral cancer mouse model, fenofibrate exhibited both preventive and therapeutic efficacy on oral tumorigenesis. Fenofibrate administration suppressed the incidence rate of tongue lesions, reduced the tumor sizes, decreased the tumor multiplicity, and decreased the immunoreactivities of VDAC and mTOR. The molecular mechanisms involved in fenofibrate's ability to delay tumor development included the down-regulation of mTOR activity via TSC1/2-dependent signaling through activation of AMPK and inactivation of Akt, or via a TSC1/2-independent pathway through direct suppression of raptor. Our findings provide a molecular rationale whereby fenofibrate exerts anticancer and additional beneficial effects for the treatment of oral cancer patients. PMID:27313493

  8. Fenofibrate Suppresses Oral Tumorigenesis via Reprogramming Metabolic Processes: Potential Drug Repurposing for Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Chia-Ing; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Huang, Yi-Ping; Liu, Chia Jen; Chang, Nai Wen

    2016-01-01

    One anticancer strategy suggests targeting mitochondrial metabolism to trigger cell death through slowing down energy production from the Warburg effect. Fenofibrate is a clinical lipid-lowering agent and an effective anticancer drug. In the present study, we demonstrate that fenofibrate provided novel mechanisms for delaying oral tumor development via the reprogramming of metabolic processes. Fenofibrate induced cytotoxicity by decreasing oxygen consumption rate (OCR) that was accompanied with increasing extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) and reducing ATP content. Moreover, fenofibrate caused changes in the protein expressions of hexokinase II (HK II), pyruvate kinase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), which are associated with the Warburg effect. In addition, fenofibrate reprogrammed the metabolic pathway by interrupting the binding of HK II to VDAC. In an oral cancer mouse model, fenofibrate exhibited both preventive and therapeutic efficacy on oral tumorigenesis. Fenofibrate administration suppressed the incidence rate of tongue lesions, reduced the tumor sizes, decreased the tumor multiplicity, and decreased the immunoreactivities of VDAC and mTOR. The molecular mechanisms involved in fenofibrate's ability to delay tumor development included the down-regulation of mTOR activity via TSC1/2-dependent signaling through activation of AMPK and inactivation of Akt, or via a TSC1/2-independent pathway through direct suppression of raptor. Our findings provide a molecular rationale whereby fenofibrate exerts anticancer and additional beneficial effects for the treatment of oral cancer patients. PMID:27313493

  9. CD8 T Cell-Independent Antitumor Response and Its Potential for Treatment of Malignant Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Katherine A; Griffith, Thomas S

    2016-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors continue to represent a devastating diagnosis with no real chance for cure. Despite an increasing list of potential salvage therapies, standard-of-care for these patients has not changed in over a decade. Immunotherapy has been seen as an exciting option, with the potential to offer specific and long lasting tumor clearance. The "gold standard" in immunotherapy has been the development of a tumor-specific CD8 T cell response to potentiate tumor clearance and immunological memory. While many advances have been made in the field of immunotherapy, few therapies have seen true success. Many of the same principles used to develop immunotherapy in tumors of the peripheral organs have been applied to brain tumor immunotherapy. The immune-specialized nature of the brain should call into question whether this approach is appropriate. Recent results from our own experiments require a rethinking of current dogma. Perhaps a CD8 T cell response is not sufficient for an organ as immunologically unique as the brain. Examination of previously elucidated principles of the brain's immune-specialized status and known immunological preferences should generate discussion and experimentation to address the failure of current therapies. PMID:27472363

  10. CD8 T Cell–Independent Antitumor Response and Its Potential for Treatment of Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Katherine A.; Griffith, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors continue to represent a devastating diagnosis with no real chance for cure. Despite an increasing list of potential salvage therapies, standard-of-care for these patients has not changed in over a decade. Immunotherapy has been seen as an exciting option, with the potential to offer specific and long lasting tumor clearance. The “gold standard” in immunotherapy has been the development of a tumor-specific CD8 T cell response to potentiate tumor clearance and immunological memory. While many advances have been made in the field of immunotherapy, few therapies have seen true success. Many of the same principles used to develop immunotherapy in tumors of the peripheral organs have been applied to brain tumor immunotherapy. The immune-specialized nature of the brain should call into question whether this approach is appropriate. Recent results from our own experiments require a rethinking of current dogma. Perhaps a CD8 T cell response is not sufficient for an organ as immunologically unique as the brain. Examination of previously elucidated principles of the brain’s immune-specialized status and known immunological preferences should generate discussion and experimentation to address the failure of current therapies. PMID:27472363

  11. Liquid biopsies for liquid tumors: emerging potential of circulating free nucleic acid evaluation for the management of hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Jay; Mithraprabhu, Sridurga; Kalff, Anna; Spencer, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Circulating free nucleic acids; cell free DNA and circulating micro-RNA, are found in the plasma of patients with hematologic and solid malignancies at levels higher than that of healthy individuals. In patients with hematologic malignancy cell free DNA reflects the underlying tumor mutational profile, whilst micro-RNAs reflect genetic interference mechanisms within a tumor and potentially the surrounding microenvironment and immune effector cells. These circulating nucleic acids offer a potentially simple, non-invasive, repeatable analysis that can aid in diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic decisions in cancer treatment. PMID:27458529

  12. Potential therapeutic effects of oral bisphosphonates on the intestine.

    PubMed

    Pazianas, Michael; Russell, R Graham G

    2011-12-01

    Bisphosphonates are the principal drugs prescribed for the prevention of osteoporotic fractures. They are bone specific but poorly absorbed. In oral formulations, almost 99% of the administered dose remains within the intestinal tract and reaches the small and large bowel. Although the nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates can irritate the distal esophageal/gastric mucosa, they improve drug-induced colitis in animal models and exhibit antitumor properties on intestinal cells in vitro. Several recent epidemiological studies provide evidence of a reduced risk of colorectal cancer in osteoporotic patients treated with oral bisphosphonates, notably alendronate. In this review, we will explore the possible mechanisms of action underlying these effects and raise the question of whether these agents might be used in the chemoprophylaxis against colorectal cancer. PMID:22360293

  13. [Involvement of zinc in taste disturbance occurring during treatment for malignant tumor in the chest and the effects of polaprezinc oral disintegrating tablets (a retrospective study)].

    PubMed

    Nakata, Yoko; Hirashima, Tomonori; Kondou, Yoko; Tokuoka, Yoshie; Imazato, Hitomi; Iwata, Kaori; Oomori, Yukari; Yamato, Akihiro; Shimizu, Saburou; Nagao, Sadako; Matsui, Kaoru; Abe, Noriko

    2008-06-01

    We analyzed the correlation between serum zinc levels and taste disturbance, and between patient backgrounds and serum zinc levels or taste disturbance, and evaluated the effects of polaprezinc oral disintegrating tablets on taste disturbance in 29 patients with lung cancer and one patient with malignant pleural mesothelioma who were receiving chemotherapy. Taste disturbance developed in 11 (36.7%) out of 30 patients. Serum zinc levels significantly correlated with taste disturbance (p=0.0227). Serum zinc levels were significantly lower (p=0.0235) and taste disturbance tended to be more frequent (p=0.0625) in males. Polaprezinc improved taste disturbance in 5 of 8 patients. PMID:18633224

  14. HDAC8, A Potential Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors (MPNST)

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Gonzalo; Bill, Kate Lynn J.; Bid, Hemant Kumar; Braggio, Danielle; Constantino, Dylan; Prudner, Bethany; Zewdu, Abeba; Batte, Kara; Lev, Dina; Pollock, Raphael E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction HDAC isoform-specific inhibitors may improve the therapeutic window while limiting toxicities. Developing inhibitors against class I isoforms poses difficulties as they share high homology among their catalytic sites; however, HDAC8 is structurally unique compared to other class I isoforms. HDAC8 inhibitors are novel compounds and have affinity for class I HDAC isoforms demonstrating anti-cancer effects; little is known about their activity in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST). Recently, we demonstrated anti-MPNST efficacy of HDAC8i in human and murine-derived MPNST pre-clinical models; we now seek to consider the potential therapeutic inhibition of HDAC8 in MPNST. Methods Four Human MPNST cell lines, a murine-derived MPNST cell line, and two HDAC8 inhibitors (PCI-34051, PCI-48012; Pharmacyclics, Inc. Sunnyvale, CA) were studied. Proliferation was determined using MTS and clonogenic assays. Effects on cell cycle were determined via PI FACS analysis; effects on apoptosis were determined using Annexin V-PI FACS analysis and cleaved caspase 3 expression. In vivo growth effects of HDAC8i were evaluated using MPNST xenograft models. 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to identify potential HDAC8 deacetylation substrates. Results HDAC8i induced cell growth inhibition and marked S-phase cell cycle arrest in human and murine-derived MPNST cells. Relative to control, HDAC8i induced apoptosis in both human and murine-derived MPNST cells. HDAC8i exhibited significant effects on MPNST xenograft growth (p=0.001) and tumor weight (p=0.02). Four potential HDAC8 substrate targets were identified using a proteomic approach: PARK7, HMGB1, PGAM1, PRDX6. Conclusions MPNST is an aggressive sarcoma that is notoriously therapy-resistant, hence the urgent need for improved anti-MPNST therapies. HDAC8 inhibition may be useful for MPNST by improving efficacy while limiting toxicities as compared to pan-HDACis. PMID:26200462

  15. First International Consensus Conference on lesions of uncertain malignant potential in the breast (B3 lesions).

    PubMed

    Rageth, Christoph J; O'Flynn, Elizabeth Am; Comstock, Christopher; Kurtz, Claudia; Kubik, Rahel; Madjar, Helmut; Lepori, Domenico; Kampmann, Gert; Mundinger, Alexander; Baege, Astrid; Decker, Thomas; Hosch, Stefanie; Tausch, Christoph; Delaloye, Jean-François; Morris, Elisabeth; Varga, Zsuzsanna

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to obtain a consensus for the therapy of B3 lesions. The first International Consensus Conference on lesions of uncertain malignant potential in the breast (B3 lesions) including atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), flat epithelial atypia (FEA), classical lobular neoplasia (LN), papillary lesions (PL), benign phyllodes tumors (PT), and radial scars (RS) took place in January 2016 in Zurich, Switzerland organized by the International Breast Ultrasound School and the Swiss Minimally Invasive Breast Biopsy group-a subgroup of the Swiss Society of Senology. Consensus recommendations for the management and follow-up surveillance of these B3 lesions were developed and areas of research priorities were identified. The consensus recommendation for FEA, LN, PL, and RS diagnosed on core needle biopsy or vacuum-assisted biopsy (VAB) is to therapeutically excise the lesion seen on imaging by VAB and no longer by open surgery, with follow-up surveillance imaging for 5 years. The consensus recommendation for ADH and PT is, with some exceptions, therapeutic first-line open surgical excision. Minimally invasive management of selected B3 lesions with therapeutic VAB is acceptable as an alternative to first-line surgical excision. PMID:27522516

  16. Kinesin family members KIF11 and KIF23 as potential therapeutic targets in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tatsuya; Lee, Daiyoon; Wu, Licun; Patel, Priya; Young, Ahn Jin; Wada, Hironobu; Hu, Hsin-Pei; Ujiie, Hideki; Kaji, Mitsuhito; Kano, Satoshi; Matsuge, Shinichi; Domen, Hiromitsu; Kaga, Kichizo; Matsui, Yoshiro; Kanno, Hiromi; Hatanaka, Yutaka; Hatanaka, Kanako C; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; de Perrot, Marc; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare and aggressive form of cancer commonly associated with asbestos exposure that stems from the thoracic mesothelium with high mortality rate. Currently, treatment options for MPM are limited, and new molecular targets for treatments are urgently needed. Using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and an RNA interference-based screening, we screened two kinesin family members as potential therapeutic targets for MPM. Following in vitro investigation of the target silencing effects on MPM cells, a total of 53 MPMs were analyzed immunohistochemically with tissue microarray. KIF11 and KIF23 transcripts were found to be overexpressed in the majority of clinical MPM samples as well as human MPM cell lines as determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Gene knockdown in MPM cell lines identified growth inhibition following knockdown of KIF11 and KIF23. High expression of KIF11 (KIF11-H) and KIF23 (KIF23-H) were found in 43.4 and 50.9% of all the MPM cases, respectively. Patients who received curative resection with tumors displaying KIF23-H showed shorter overall survival (P=0.0194). These results provide that inhibition of KIF11 and KIF23 may hold promise for treatment of MPMs, raising the possibility that kinesin-based drug targets may be developed in the future. PMID:27279560

  17. Functional and Biological Role of Endothelial Precursor Cells in Tumour Progression: A New Potential Therapeutic Target in Haematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Reale, Antonia; Melaccio, Assunta; Lamanuzzi, Aurelia; Saltarella, Ilaria; Dammacco, Franco; Vacca, Angelo; Ria, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    It was believed that vasculogenesis occurred only during embryo life and that postnatal formation of vessels arose from angiogenesis. Recent findings demonstrate the existence of Endothelial Precursor Cells (EPCs), which take partin postnatal vasculogenesis. EPCs are recruited from the bone marrow under the stimulation of growth factors and cytokines and reach the sites of neovascularization in both physiological and pathological conditions such as malignancies where they contribute to the "angiogenic switch" and tumor progression. An implementation of circulating EPCs in the bloodstream of patients with haematological malignancies has been demonstrated. This increase is strictly related to the bone marrow microvessel density and correlated with a poor prognosis. The EPCs characterization is a very complex process and still under investigation. This literature review aims to provide an overview of the functional and biological role of EPCs in haematological malignancies and to investigate their potential as a new cancer therapeutic target. PMID:26788072

  18. Morphology as a risk factor for the malignant potential of T2 colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Yuichi; Kudo, Shin-Ei; Endo, Shungo; Maeda, Chiyo; Mukai, Shumpei; Maeda, Yasuharu; Kataoka, Shinichi; Takeda, Kenichi; Ichimasa, Katsuro; Miyachi, Hideyuki; Sawada, Naruhiko; Hidaka, Eiji; Ishida, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Currently, depressed type T1 colorectal cancer is often detected and its malignant potential is being revealed. However, few reports have focused on the morphology of T2 colorectal cancer types. The aim of the present retrospective study was to clarify the characteristics of colorectal T2 cancer types derived from depressed type T1 cancer. The present study included 195 patients with colorectal T2 cancer surgically resected at a referral hospital between April 2001 and April 2009. A total of 48 lesions (25%) with lymph node metastasis and 4 (2%) with distant metastasis were found. The lesions were classified by their form during endoscopy into four categories: Group A, depressed type (the periphery consists of normal mucosa); group B, laterally spreading type; group C, protruded type; group D, ulcerative type (the periphery consists of neoplastic mucosa). Tumor size, lymphatic and venous involvement, lymph node metastasis, and distant metastasis were compared between the four categories. The distribution of patients were as follows: Group A, 73 (37%), group B, 26 (13%), group C, 24 (12%) and group D, 72 (37%). The average tumor size for each category was 23, 51, 30 and 36 mm for groups A, B, C and D, respectively. The number of positive findings for lymphatic involvement, venous involvement, lymph node metastasis and distant metastasis for each category were: Group A, 50 (69%), 54 (74%), 19 (26%) and 1 (1%); group B, 14 (54%), 12 (46%), 8 (31%) and 0 (0%); group C, 14 (58%), 8 (33%), 6 (25%) and 0 (0%); group D 35 (49%), 41 (57%), 16 (22%) and 3 (4%). Group A demonstrated a significantly smaller tumor size (P<0.01), and higher rates of lymphatic and venous involvement (P=0.0333 and P=0.0019, respectively). No significant differences were observed between categories with regards to nodal and distant metastases. Of the T2 cancer types, ~40% were the depressed type. Compared with the other forms, depressed type lesions exhibited a smaller tumor size, and higher rates

  19. Potential strategies to ameliorate risk of radiotherapy-induced second malignant neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Martin, Olga A; Yin, Xiaoyu; Forrester, Helen B; Sprung, Carl N; Martin, Roger F

    2016-06-01

    This review is aimed at the issue of radiation-induced second malignant neoplasms (SMN), which has become an important problem with the increasing success of modern cancer radiotherapy (RT). It is imperative to avoid compromising the therapeutic ratio while addressing the challenge of SMN. The dilemma is illustrated by the role of reactive oxygen species in both the mechanisms of tumor cell kill and of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. We explore the literature focusing on three potential routes of amelioration to address this challenge. An obvious approach to avoiding compromise of the tumor response is the use of radioprotectors or mitigators that are selective for normal tissues. We also explore the opportunities to avoid protection of the tumor by topical/regional radioprotection of normal tissues, although this strategy limits the scope of protection. Finally, we explore the role of the bystander/abscopal phenomenon in radiation carcinogenesis, in association with the inflammatory response. Targeted and non-targeted effects of radiation are both linked to SMN through induction of DNA damage, genome instability and mutagenesis, but differences in the mechanisms and kinetics between targeted and non-targeted effects may provide opportunities to lessen SMN. The agents that could be employed to pursue each of these strategies are briefly reviewed. In many cases, the same agent has potential utility for more than one strategy. Although the parallel problem of chemotherapy-induced SMN shares common features, this review focuses on RT associated SMN. Also, we avoid the burgeoning literature on the endeavor to suppress cancer incidence by use of antioxidants and vitamins either as dietary strategies or supplementation. PMID:26721424

  20. Combination therapy of potential gene to enhance oral cancer therapeutic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chia-Hsien; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2015-03-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) over-regulation related to uncontrolled cell division and promotes progression in tumor. Over-expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been detected in oral cancer cells. EGFR-targeting agents are potential therapeutic modalities for treating oral cancer based on our in vitro study. Liposome nanotechnology is used to encapsulate siRNA and were modified with target ligand to receptors on the surface of tumor cells. We used EGFR siRNA to treat oral cancer in vitro.

  1. Paclitaxel-loaded ethosomes®: potential treatment of squamous cell carcinoma, a malignant transformation of actinic keratoses.

    PubMed

    Paolino, Donatella; Celia, Christian; Trapasso, Elena; Cilurzo, Felisa; Fresta, Massimo

    2012-05-01

    Topical application of anticancer drugs for the treatment of malignancies represents a new challenge in dermatology, potentially being an alternative therapeutic approach for the efficacious treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer, that is, actinic keratoses, and malignant lesions of the skin caused by ultraviolet radiation. Anti-proliferative and antimitotic drugs, including many of the taxanes, are currently under investigation for the treatment of cutaneous malignant transformation of actinic keratoses, particularly the squamous cell carcinoma. Paclitaxel-loaded ethosomes® are proposed as topical drug delivery systems for the treatment of this pathology due to their suitable physicochemical characteristics and enhanced skin penetration ability for deep dermal delivery. Our in vitro data show that the skin application of paclitaxel-loaded ethosomes® improved the permeation of paclitaxel in a stratum corneum-epidermis membrane model and increased its anti-proliferative activity in a squamous cell carcinoma model as compared to the free drug. The results obtained encouraged the use of the paclitaxel-loaded ethosomes® as the formulation for the potential treatment of squamous cell carcinoma, a malignant transformation of actinic keratoses. PMID:22414731

  2. Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Yardimci, Gurkan; Kutlubay, Zekayi; Engin, Burhan; Tuzun, Yalcin

    2014-01-01

    Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa, known as potentially malignant disorders in recent years, are consists of a group of diseases, which should be diagnosed in the early stage. Oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, and oral erythroplakia are the most common oral mucosal diseases that have a very high malignant transformation rate. Oral lichen planus is one of the potentially malignant disorders that may be seen in six different subtypes including papular, reticular, plaque-like, atrophic, erosive, and bullous type, clinically. Atrophic and erosive subtypes have the greater increased malignant transformation risk compared to another subtypes. Although there are various etiological studies, the etiology of almost all these diseases is not fully understood. Geographically, etiologic factors may vary. The most frequently reported possible factors are tobacco use, alcohol drinking, chewing of betel quid containing areca nut, and solar rays. Early diagnosis is very important and can be lifesaving, because in late stages, they may be progressed to severe dysplasia and even carcinoma in situ and/or squamous cell carcinoma. For most diseases, treatment results are not satisfactory in spite of miscellaneous therapies. While at the forefront of surgical intervention, topical and systemic treatment alternatives such as corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and retinoids are widely used. PMID:25516862

  3. Garlic allicin as a potential agent for controlling oral pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, Gilad; Jamil, Areen; Naor, Ronit; Tal, Golan; Ludmer, Zvi; Steinberg, Doron

    2011-11-01

    Garlic has been used medicinally throughout human history. Allicin is considered the most therapeutic constituent of garlic. This study tested the antimicrobial activity of garlic allicin on oral pathogens associated with dental caries and periodontitis. Allicin was found effective against all the tested bacteria. The broth dilution method revealed that planktonic growth of the cariogenic, gram-positive species Streptococcus mutans, S. sobrinus, and Actinomyces oris was inhibited by an allicin concentration of 600 μg/mL or higher. Planktonic growth of the tested gram-negative periopathogenic species Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Fusobacterium nucleatum was inhibited by a minimum allicin concentration of 300 μg/mL. Porphyromonas gingivalis, an anaerobic, gram-negative pathogen and the bacterium most associated with chronic periodontitis, demonstrated the lowest sensitivity to allicin (2,400 μg/mL). Gel zymography and the synthetic chromogenic substrate N(α)-benzoyl-L-arginine 4-nitroanilide hydrochloride demonstrated that allicin inhibits the proteases of P. gingivalis, including the arginine and lysine gingipains known as major virulence factors of this organism. A gingipain-inactivated mutant demonstrated high sensitivity to allicin (<300 μg/mL), revealing that gingipains confer resistance to allicin. Live/dead staining followed by analysis with confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that allicin was bactericidal to S. mutans grown in mature biofilms. However, this bactericidal effect was reduced as biofilm depth increased. In conclusion, these results support the traditional medicinal use of garlic and suggest the use of allicin for alleviating dental diseases. PMID:21548800

  4. Potential Factors for Inadequate Voriconazole Plasma Concentrations in Intensive Care Unit Patients and Patients with Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Duettmann, Wiebke; Raggam, Reinhard B.; Seeber, Katharina; Troppan, Katharina; Fruhwald, Sonja; Prueller, Florian; Wagner, Jasmin; Valentin, Thomas; Zollner-Schwetz, Ines; Wölfler, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Voriconazole plasma concentrations (VPCs) vary widely, and concentrations outside the therapeutic range are associated with either worse outcome in invasive aspergillosis (IA) or increased toxicity. The primary goal of this cohort study conducted in a real-life setting was to identify potential factors associated with inadequate VPCs in ICU patients and patients with hematological malignancies. Within a period of 12 months, trough VPCs were obtained and analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography, and the adequate range was defined as 1.5 to 5.5 mg/liter. VPCs of <1.5 mg/liter were defined as low, whereas VPCs of >5.5 mg/liter were defined as potentially toxic. A total of 221 trough VPCs were obtained in 61 patients receiving voriconazole, and 124/221 VPCs (56%) were found to be low. Multivariate analysis revealed that low VPCs were significantly associated with clinical failure of voriconazole, prophylactic use, younger age, underlying hematological malignancy, concomitant proton pump inhibitor (PPI) (pantoprazole was used in 88% of the patients), and absence of side effects. Low VPCs remained an independent predictor of clinical failure of voriconazole. The defined adequate range was reached in 79/221 (36%) VPCs. In 18 samples (8%), potentially toxic levels were measured. Multivariate analysis revealed higher body mass index (BMI), absence of hematological malignancy, therapeutic application, and diarrhea as factors associated with potentially toxic VPCs. Neurotoxic adverse events occurred in six patients and were mostly associated with VPCs in the upper quartile of our defined adequate range. In conclusion, potential factors like younger age, prophylaxis, underlying hematological malignancy, BMI, and concomitant PPI should be considered within the algorithm of voriconazole treatment. PMID:23629724

  5. Breast lesions of uncertain malignant nature and limited metastatic potential: Proposals to improve their recognition and clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Rakha, Emad A.; Badve, Sunil; Eusebi, Vincenzo; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Fox, Stephen B.; Dabbs, David J.; Decker, Thomas; Hodi, Zsolt; Ichihara, Shu; Lee, Andrew HS.; Palacios, José; Richardson, Andrea L.; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Schmitt, Fernando C.; Tan, Puay-Hoon; Tse, Gary M.; Ellis, Ian O.

    2016-01-01

    Breast lesions comprise a family of heterogeneous entities with variable patterns of presentation, morphology and clinical behaviour. The majority of breast lesions are traditionally classified into benign and malignant conditions and their behaviour can, in the vast majority of cases, be predicted with a reasonable degree of accuracy. However, there remain lesions which show borderline features and lie in a grey-zone between benign and malignant as their behaviour cannot be predicted reliably. Defined pathological categorisation of such lesions is challenging and for some entities is recognised to be subjective and include a range of diagnoses, and forms of terminology, which may trigger over-treatment or under-treatment. The rarity of these lesions makes acquisition of clinical evidence problematic and limits the development of a sufficient evidence base to support informed decision making by clinicians and patients. Emerging molecular evidence is providing a greater understanding of the biology of these lesions, but this may or may not be reflected in their clinical behaviour. Herein we discuss some breast lesions that are associated with uncertainty regarding classification, behaviour and hence management. These include biologically invasive malignant lesions associated with uncertain metastatic potential such as low-grade adenosquamous carcinoma, low-grade fibromatosis-like spindle cell carcinoma and encapsulated papillary carcinoma. Other lesions remain of uncertain malignant nature such as mammary cylindroma, atypical microglandular adenosis, mammary pleomorphic adenoma and infiltrating epitheliosis. The concept of categories of 1) breast lesions of uncertain malignant nature and 2) breast lesions of limited metastatic potential, are proposed with details of which histological entities could be included in each category, and their management implications are discussed. PMID:26348644

  6. Breast lesions of uncertain malignant nature and limited metastatic potential: proposals to improve their recognition and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Rakha, Emad A; Badve, Sunil; Eusebi, Vincenzo; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Fox, Stephen B; Dabbs, David J; Decker, Thomas; Hodi, Zsolt; Ichihara, Shu; Lee, Andrew H S; Palacios, José; Richardson, Andrea L; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Schmitt, Fernando C; Tan, Puay-Hoon; Tse, Gary M; Ellis, Ian O

    2016-01-01

    Breast lesions comprise a family of heterogeneous entities with variable patterns of presentation, morphology and clinical behaviour. The majority of breast lesions are classified traditionally into benign and malignant conditions and their behaviour can, in the vast majority of cases, be predicted with a reasonable degree of accuracy. However, there remain lesions which show borderline features and lie in a grey zone between benign and malignant, as their behaviour cannot be predicted reliably. Defined pathological categorization of such lesions is challenging, and for some entities is recognized to be subjective and include a range of diagnoses, and forms of terminology, which may trigger over- or undertreatment. The rarity of these lesions makes the acquisition of clinical evidence problematic and limits the development of a sufficient evidence base to support informed decision-making by clinicians and patients. Emerging molecular evidence is providing a greater understanding of the biology of these lesions, but this may or may not be reflected in their clinical behaviour. Herein we discuss some breast lesions that are associated with uncertainty regarding classification and behaviour, and hence management. These include biologically invasive malignant lesions associated with uncertain metastatic potential, such as low-grade adenosquamous carcinoma, low-grade fibromatosis-like spindle cell carcinoma and encapsulated papillary carcinoma. Other lesions of uncertain malignant nature remain, such as mammary cylindroma, atypical microglandular adenosis, mammary pleomorphic adenoma and infiltrating epitheliosis. The concept of categories of (1) breast lesions of uncertain malignant nature and (2) breast lesions of limited metastatic potential are proposed with details of which histological entities could be included in each category, and their management implications are discussed. PMID:26348644

  7. Oral infectious diseases: a potential risk factor for HIV virus recrudescence?

    PubMed

    González, O A; Ebersole, J L; Huang, C B

    2009-07-01

    As the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has transitioned human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection into a 'chronic disease' management strategy, there is growing evidence that infection with non-HIV pathogens in HIV+ patients may have important public health implications in undermining HAART success and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome progression. Several bacterial and host cell products during infections with non-HIV pathogens have shown the capacity to regulate HIV replication in latently infected cells. A high prevalence of oral infections caused by bacteria, viruses and fungi has been described in HIV+ patients, including periodontal disease. The oral cavity appears to be a site of HIV pathogenesis and potential reservoir for the disease as HIV RNA and DNA forms are present in saliva as well as in gingival crevicular fluid, and oral epithelial cells are susceptible to either cell free or cell-associated HIV infection. The clinical and biological bases of potential associations between chronic oral inflammatory disorders, such as periodontal disease, and exacerbation of HIV viraemia have received little attention. This review attempts to evaluate the current understanding of HIV reactivation as a result of co-infection and/or inflammation induced by non-HIV pathogens in HIV-infected patients, and presents a hypothetic model about the potential role of periodontitis as a global oral infection that potentially contributes to HIV recrudescence. PMID:19364391

  8. β-lactoglobulin-pectin Nanoparticle-based Oral Drug Delivery System for Potential Treatment of Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Zhila; Divsalar, Adeleh; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Sawyer, Lindsay

    2016-08-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most common internal malignancies, and conventional chemotherapy is not effective in its treatment. Nanoparticles hold tremendous potential as an effective drug delivery system. The physicochemical properties of β-lactoglobulin, the main whey protein of cow's milk, such as its stability at low pH, its resistance to gastric protease, and its ability to bind hydrophobic ligands, give it potential for transporting drugs specifically for colon cancer. In the present research, β-lactoglobulin-pectin nanoparticles were designed to transfer a newly synthesized, anticancer platinum complex (bipyridine ethyl dithiocarbamate Pt(II) nitrate), to the colon. The effects of multiple factors on the size and the colloidal stability of the nanoparticles were studied using dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Results showed that the best particle size and highest colloidal stability were obtained in phosphate buffer, pH 4.5, with 0.5 mg/mL β-lactoglobulin and 0.025-0.05wt% pectin. The drug release profile in simulated gastrointestinal conditions demonstrated that β-lactoglobulin with a secondary coating is stable in acidic conditions but is able to release its cargo at pH 7. Hence, these nanoparticles have potential to serve as novel and effective vehicles for oral drug delivery preparations. PMID:26896377

  9. MicroRNA-214 and MicroRNA-126 Are Potential Biomarkers for Malignant Endothelial Proliferative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Heishima, Kazuki; Mori, Takashi; Ichikawa, Yukie; Sakai, Hiroki; Kuranaga, Yuki; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Tanaka, Yuiko; Okamura, Yasuhiko; Masuzawa, Mikio; Sugito, Nobuhiko; Murakami, Mami; Yamada, Nami; Akao, Yukihiro; Maruo, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Malignant endothelial proliferative diseases including human angiosarcoma (AS) and canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA) are serious diseases with a grave prognosis. Establishing liquid biopsy-based biomarkers for screening has definite clinical utility; however, plasma miRNAs up- or down-regulated in these sarcomas have been unclear. For identifying possible diagnostic plasma miRNAs for these sarcomas, we investigated whether plasma miR-214 and miR-126, which miRNAs play important roles in angiogenesis and tumorigenesis, were elevated in malignant endothelial proliferative diseases. For this investigation, human angiosarcoma and canine hemangiosarcoma cell lines and clinical plasma samples of canine hemangiosarcoma were examined by performing miRNA qRT-PCR. We report here that human angiosarcoma and canine hemangiosarcoma cell lines over-secreted miR-214 and miR-126 via microvesicles; in addition, their levels in the plasma samples from canines with hemangiosarcoma were increased. Moreover, the surgical resection of primary tumors decreased the levels of plasma miR-214 and miR-126. Our findings suggest that these malignant endothelial proliferative diseases over-secreted miR-214 and miR-126, thus suggesting that these miRNAs have potential as diagnostic biomarkers for malignant endothelial proliferative diseases in canine and possible in human angiosarcoma. PMID:26512652

  10. Risk, Outcomes, and Costs of Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis Among Patients With Head-and-Neck Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Elting, Linda S. . E-mail: lelting@mdanderson.org; Cooksley, Catherine D.; Chambers, Mark S.; Garden, Adam S.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To study the risk, outcomes, and costs of radiation-induced oral mucositis (OM) among patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) to head and neck primary cancers. Methods and Materials: A retrospective cohort consisting of 204 consecutive head-and-neck cancer patients who received RT with or without chemotherapy during 2002 was formed; their records were reviewed for clinical and resource use information. Patients who had received prior therapy, had second primary cancers, or received palliative radiation therapy were excluded. The risk of OM was analyzed by multiple variable logistic regression. The cost of care was computed from the provider's perspective in 2006 U.S. dollars and compared among patients with and without OM. Results: Oral mucositis occurred in 91% of patients; in 66% it was severe (Grade 3-4). Oral mucositis was more common among patients with oral cavity or oropharynx primaries (odds ratio [OR], 44.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.2 to >100; p < 0.001), those who received chemotherapy (OR = 7.8; 95% CI, 1.5-41.6; p 0.02), and those who were treated with altered fractionation schedules (OR 6.3; 95% CI, 1.1-35.1; p = 0.03). Patients with OM were significantly more likely to have severe pain (54% vs. 6%; p < 0.001) and a weight loss of {>=}5% (60% vs. 17%; p < 0.001). Oral mucositis was associated with an incremental cost of $1700-$6000, depending on the grade. Conclusions: Head-and-neck RT causes OM in virtually all patients. Oral mucositis is associated with severe pain, significant weight loss, increased resource use, and excess cost. Preventive strategies are needed.

  11. Potential implications of adjuvant endocrine therapy for the oral health of postmenopausal women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, L. Susan; Havens, Aaron M.

    2012-01-01

    Current adjuvant treatment modalities for breast cancer that express the estrogen receptor or progesterone receptor include adjuvant anti-estrogen therapies, and tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors. Bone, including the jaw, is an endocrine-sensitive organ, as are other oral structures. This review examines the potential links between adjuvant anti-estrogen treatments in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor positive breast cancer and oral health. A search of PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and the Web of Knowledge was conducted using combinations of key terms “breast,” “cancer,” “neoplasm,” “Tamoxifen,” “Aromatase Inhibitor,” “chemotherapy,” “hormone therapy,” “alveolar bone loss,” “postmenopausal bone loss,” “estrogen,” “SERM,” “hormone replacement therapy,” and “quality of life.” We selected articles published in peer-reviewed journals in the English. The authors found no studies reporting on periodontal diseases, alveolar bone loss, oral health, or oral health-related quality of life in association with anti-estrogen breast cancer treatments in postmenopausal women. Periodontal diseases, alveolar bone density, tooth loss, and conditions of the soft tissues of the mouth have all been associated with menopausal status supporting the hypothesis that the soft tissues and bone of the oral cavity could be negatively affected by anti-estrogen therapy. As a conclusion, the impact of adjuvant endocrine breast cancer therapy on the oral health of postmenopausal women is undefined. The structures of the oral cavity are influenced by estrogen; therefore, anti-estrogen therapies may carry the risk of oral toxicities. Oral health care for breast cancer patients is an important but understudied aspect of cancer survivorship. PMID:22986813

  12. A phase I dose-escalation study of MSC1992371A, an oral inhibitor of aurora and other kinases, in advanced hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Graux, Carlos; Sonet, Anne; Maertens, Johan; Duyster, Justus; Greiner, Jochen; Chalandon, Yves; Martinelli, Giovanni; Hess, Dagmar; Heim, Dominik; Giles, Francis J; Kelly, Kevin R; Gianella-Borradori, Athos; Longerey, Blandine; Asatiani, Ekaterine; Rejeb, Narmyn; Ottmann, Oliver G

    2013-09-01

    A phase I dose-escalation study of MSC1992371A, an oral aurora kinase inhibitor, was carried out in patients with hematologic malignancies. Patients received escalating doses either on days 1-3 and 8-10 (n=36) or on days 1-6 (n=39) of a 21-day cycle. The maximum tolerated doses were 37 and 28 mg/m(2)/day, respectively. Dose-limiting toxicities included severe neutropenia with infection and sepsis, mucositis/stomatitis, and diarrhea. Complete responses occurred in 3 patients. Four disease-specific expansion cohorts then received the dose and schedule dictated by the escalation phase but the study was prematurely discontinued due to hematologic and gastrointestinal toxicity at clinically effective doses. PMID:23746966

  13. Oral Leukoplakia – an Update

    PubMed Central

    PARLATESCU, Ioanina; GHEORGHE, Carmen; COCULESCU, Elena; TOVARU, Serban

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper was to assess the current state of science on oral leukoplakia. Although it is considered a potentially malignant disorder the overall malignant progression of oral leukoplakia is of the order of 5% and even more. Nowadays there are no currently accepted markers to distinguish those that may progress to cancer from those that may not. The current golden standard is considered the presence of epithelial dysplasia on the tissue biopsy of the lesion. Proliferative verrucous leukoplakia is a rare form of OL which has multiple recurrences, is refractory to treatment and has malignant transformation in a short period. It is considered a true premalignant lesion. The management of oral leukoplakia varies from a "wait and see" attitude and topical chemopreventive agents to complete surgical removal. PMID:25553134

  14. Potentiation of oral anticoagulation and hemarthrosis associated with nabumetone.

    PubMed

    Dennis, V C; Thomas, B K; Hanlon, J E

    2000-02-01

    Concomitant therapy with warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is of concern due to the potential for increased bleeding. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs may alter patient response to warfarin by pharmacodynamic or pharmacokinetic interactions. A man receiving long-term, stable warfarin therapy experienced a significant increase in international normalized ratio 1 week after nabumetone was added to his regimen. Despite prompt reduction of the warfarin dosage, he experienced hemarthrosis of his right knee. Previous reports suggested lack of interaction between nabumetone and warfarin. Caution and close monitoring are advisable when the two agents are administered concomitantly. PMID:10678303

  15. Primary hepatic epithelioid angiomyolipoma: A malignant potential tumor which should be recognized

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Hong, De-Fei; Tao, Ran; Chen, Yuan; Shang, Min-Jie; Zhang, Yu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    or metastasis after surgery, which was a very high and alarming rate. CONCLUSION: HEAML is a very rare primary hepatic tumor that is often misdiagnosed before surgery. Patients should be followed closely after surgery because of its malignant potential. PMID:27239117

  16. Overexpression and potential targeting of the oncofoetal antigen 5T4 in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Al-Taei, Saly; Salimu, Josephine; Lester, Jason F; Linnane, Seamus; Goonewardena, Madusha; Harrop, Richard; Mason, Malcolm D; Tabi, Zsuzsanna

    2012-08-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is resistant to conventional treatments. Novel, targeted treatments are hampered by the relative lack of MPM-associated tumour antigens. The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of expression and the relevance of 5T4 as a tumour-associated antigen in MPM. 5T4 expression was assessed by Western blotting, flow cytometry, immuno-cytochemistry and -histochemistry in 11 mesothelioma cell lines, 21 tumour biopsies, and ex vivo tumour cells obtained from the pleural fluid (PF) of 10 patients. 5T4 antibody levels were also determined in the plasma of patients and healthy donors. The susceptibility of MPM cells to 5T4-specific T-cell-mediated killing was determined using an HLA-A2(+), CD8(+) T-cell line, developed against the 5T4(17-25) peptide. We report here that cell surface 5T4 expression was detected in all mesothelioma cell lines and PF cell samples. Mesothelin and CD200, a suggested mesothelioma marker, were co-expressed with 5T4 on tumour cells in PF. Immunohistochemistry confirmed overexpression of 5T4, similar to mesothelin, on tumour cells but not on reactive stroma in all tissue sections tested. Median 5T4 antibody levels were 46% higher in patient than in healthy donor plasma, indicating immune recognition. Importantly, 5T4-specific CD8(+) T-cells were able to kill four out of six HLA-A2(+) MPM cell lines but not an HLA-A2(-) cell line, demonstrating immune recognition of MPM-associated 5T4 antigen at the effector T-cell level. We conclude that 5T4 is a potential new antigen for targeted therapies such as immunotherapy in MPM, as it is overexpressed on mesothelioma cells and recognised by 5T4-specific cytotoxic T-cells. Our findings have been translated into a Phase II clinical trial applying 5T4-targeted therapies in MPM patients. PMID:22498111

  17. Prevalence of potential drug–drug interactions in cancer patients treated with oral anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, R W F; Brundel, D H S; Neef, C; van Gelder, T; Mathijssen, R H J; Burger, D M; Jansman, F G A

    2013-01-01

    Background: Potential drug–drug interactions (PDDIs) in patients with cancer are common, but have not previously been quantified for oral anticancer treatment. We assessed the prevalence and seriousness of potential PDDIs among ambulatory cancer patients on oral anticancer treatment. Methods: A search was conducted in a computer-based medication prescription system for dispensing oral anticancer drugs to outpatients in three Dutch centres. Potential drug–drug interactions were identified using electronic (Drug Interaction Fact software) and manual screening methods (peer-reviewed reports). Results: In the 898 patients included in the study, 1359 PDDIs were identified in 426 patients (46%, 95% confidence interval (CI)=42–50%). In 143 patients (16%), a major PDDI was identified. The drug classes most frequently involved in a major PDDI were coumarins and opioids. The majority of cases concerned central nervous system interactions, PDDIs that can cause gastrointestinal toxicity and prolongation of QT intervals. In multivariate analysis, concomitant use of more drugs (odds ratio (OR)=1.66, 95% CI=1.54–1.78, P<0001) and genito-urinary cancer (OR=0.25, 95% CI=0.12–0.52, P<0001) were risk factors. Conclusion: Potential drug–drug interactions are very common among cancer patients on oral cancer therapy. Physicians and pharmacists should be more aware of these potential interactions. PMID:23412102

  18. A retrospective review of outcome and survival following surgery and adjuvant xenogeneic DNA vaccination in 32 dogs with oral malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    TREGGIARI, Elisabetta; GRANT, Jessica Pauline; NORTH, Susan Margaret

    2016-01-01

    A xenogeneic DNA vaccination has been licensed for use in dogs with locally controlled stage II and III oral malignant melanoma (OMM). At present, there are limited outcome data for dogs with OMM treated with surgery and immunotherapy. The aim of this study is to retrospectively review the outcome and survival of 32 dogs affected by OMM that were treated with a combination of surgery and the xenogeneic DNA vaccination (with the addition of radiotherapy in some cases) and to determine the influence of surgical margins and delay in receiving vaccination. The overall median survival time (MST) was 335 days (95% CI: 301–540 days), and the overall median progression-free survival (PFS) was 160 days (mean 182 days, 95% CI: 132–232 days). Stage, completeness of surgical margins and delay in administration of the vaccine did not appear to statistically influence survival or PFS, although these results may reflect the low statistical power of the study due to small numbers. Further studies are required to assess whether the addition of any adjuvant treatment to surgery, including immunotherapy, is able to significantly prolong survival in cases of canine oral melanoma. PMID:26781703

  19. Potential use of computer navigation in the treatment of primary benign and malignant tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Saidi, Kevan

    2012-06-01

    The treatment of benign and malignant primary bone tumors has progressed over time from relatively simple practice to complex resection and reconstruction techniques. Recently, computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS) has been used to assist surgeons to enhance surgical precision in order to achieve these goals. Initially, software developed for CT-based spinal applications was used to perform simple intraoperative point localization. With advances in technique and software design, oncology surgeons have now performed joint sparing complex multiplanar osteotomies using combined CT and MRI image data with precision and accuracy. The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the clinical progress to date, the different types of navigation available, methods for error management, and limitations of CAOS in the treatment of pediatric benign and malignant primary bone tumors. PMID:22488037

  20. It's Story Time!: Exploring the Potential of Multimodality in Oral Storytelling to Support Children's Vocabulary Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lwin, Soe Marlar

    2016-01-01

    Although many studies have been done on the benefits of parent/teacher-child interactions during shared storybook reading or read'aloud sessions, very few have examined the potential of professional storytellers' oral discourse to support children's vocabulary learning. In those storytelling sessions conducted by professional storytellers, the…

  1. Salivary Heparanase Level Is a Potential Biomarker to Diagnose and Prognose the Malignant Salivary Gland Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Yang; Zhu, Shengrong; Gong, Zhongjian

    2015-01-01

    Background Upregulation of heparanase has been reported in an increasing number of human cancer tissues. However, the level of salivary heparanase and its clinical significance in patients with salivary gland tumors remain unclear. Methods Salivary heparanase levels in patients with salivary gland tumors were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and the clinical significance was evaluated by analyzing the correlations among salivary heparanase levels, clinicopathological parameters, and clinical outcomes. Results The levels of salivary heparanase were significantly higher in patients with malignant salivary gland tumors than in benign tumors and normal controls (P<0.0001). High salivary heparanase levels were positively correlated with increased lymph node metastasis (P = 0.0235) and poorer tumor node metastasis stage (TNM) (P = 0.0183). Survival analyses revealed that high salivary heparanase levels were associated with worse overall survival (P = 0.0023) and disease-free survival (DFS) (P = 0.0025). Conclusions The study shows that salivary heparanase levels, as detected by the ELISAs, can be used to diagnose and provide an accurate prognosis for malignant salivary gland tumors. Salivary heparanase level was an independent predictor in patients with malignant salivary gland tumors. PMID:26569485

  2. Anisi stellati fructus extract attenuates the in vitro and in vivo metastatic and angiogenic potential of malignant cancer cells by downregulating proteolytic activity and pro-angiogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Aeyung; Im, Minju; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2014-11-01

    Anisi stellati fructus (ASF), commonly known as star anise, has long been used as a traditional Chinese medicine to treat inflammation, nervousness, insomnia and pain. In recent studies, it has been demonstrated that ASF possesses anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and anti-oxidant activities, as well as exhibits inhibitory effects on capillary‑like tube formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). However, the effects of ASF extract on the metastatic potential of malignant tumor cells have not been examined. In this study, we found that daily oral administration of ASF (50 mg/kg) remarkably reduced the number of pulmonary metastatic colonies of B16F10 cells in C57BL/6J mice with no observed systemic toxicity. In an in vitro system, ASF inhibited metastatic properties, including anchorage‑independent colony formation, migration and invasion. Upon phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulation, the mRNA levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) -9, -13, -14 and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) decreased in a dose-dependent manner with ASF treatment. Gelatinase, type I collagenase, and uPA activities were also suppressed efficiently by ASF treatment. In response to PMA, NF-κB and AP-1 activation as well as p38 phosphorylation, which are crucial for MMP activation, were significantly decreased by ASF. In particular, ASF considerably inhibited tumor-induced HUVEC migration and tube formation and suppressed in vivo tumor-induced angiogenesis via a reduction of pro-angiogenic factors in tumors. These results collectively indicate that ASF might be useful in the management of metastatic malignant tumors. PMID:25176510

  3. Sirtuin-3 (SIRT3), a Novel Potential Therapeutic Target for Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alhazzazi, Turki Y; Kamarajan, Pachiyappan; Joo, Nam; Huang, Jing-Yi; Verdin, Eric; D'Silva, Nisha J; Kapila, Yvonne L

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Several sirtuin family members (SIRT1-7), which are evolutionarily conserved NAD-dependent deacetylases, play an important role in carcinogenesis. However, their role in oral cancer has not yet been investigated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate whether sirtuins play a role in oral cancer carcinogenesis. METHODS The expression levels of all sirtuins in several oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines were compared with normal human oral keratinocytes and observed that SIRT3 was highly expressed. Therefore, tissue microarrays were used to evaluate the clinical relevance of this overexpression. SIRT3 down-regulation in OSCC cell proliferation and survival was investigated and analyzed by using cell-proliferation and cell-viability assays. Ionizing radiation and cisplatin were used to investigate whether SIRT3 down-regulation could increase the sensitivity of OSCC to both treatments. To further assess the in vivo role of SIRT3 in OSCC carcinogenesis, a floor-of-mouth oral cancer murine model was used to study the effect of SIRT3 down-regulation on OSCC tumor growth in immunodeficient mice. RESULTS The current results demonstrated for the first time that SIRT3 is overexpressed in OSCC in vitro and in vivo compared with other sirtuins. Down-regulation of SIRT3 inhibited OSCC cell growth and proliferation and increased OSCC cell sensitivity to radiation and cisplatin treatments in vitro. SIRT3 down-regulation also reduced tumor burden in vivo. CONCLUSIONS The current investigation revealed a novel role for SIRT3 in oral cancer carcinogenesis as a promoter of cell proliferation and survival, thus implicating SIRT3 as a new potential therapeutic target to treat oral cancer. Cancer 2011. © 2010 American Cancer Society. PMID:21472714

  4. Primary malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Mısır, A. Ferhat; Durmuşlar, Mustafa C.; Zerener, Tamer; Gün, Banu D.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanomas (MM) of the oral cavity are extremely rare, accounting for 0.2% to 8.0% of all malignant melanomas. Malignant melanomas is more frequently seen at the level of the hard palate and gingiva. Early diagnosis and treatment are important for reducing morbidity. Malignant melanoma cells stain positively with antibodies to human melanoma black 45, S-100 protein, and vimentin; therefore, immunohistochemistry can play an important role in evaluating the depth of invasion and the location of metastases. A 76-year-old man developed an oral malignant melanoma, which was originally diagnosed as a bluish reactive denture hyperplasia caused by an ill-fitting lower denture. The tumor was removed surgically, and histopathological examination revealed a nodular-type MM. There was no evidence of recurrence over a 4-year follow-up period. PMID:27052289

  5. Evaluating the potential of cubosomal nanoparticles for oral delivery of amphotericin B in treating fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiwen; Chen, Meiwan; Yang, Muhua; Chen, Jian; Fang, Weijun; Xu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The oral administration of amphotericin B (AmB) has a major drawback of poor bioavailability. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of glyceryl monoolein (GMO) cubosomes as lipid nanocarriers to improve the oral efficacy of AmB. Antifungal efficacy was determined in vivo in rats after oral administration, to investigate its therapeutic use. The human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (Caco-2) was used in vitro to evaluate transport across a model of the intestinal barrier. In vivo antifungal results showed that AmB, loaded in GMO cubosomes, could significantly enhance oral efficacy, compared against Fungizone, and that during a 2 day course of dosage 10 mg/kg the drug reached effective therapeutic concentrations in renal tissue for treating fungal infections. In the Caco-2 transport studies, GMO cubosomes resulted in a significantly larger amount of AmB being transported into Caco-2 cells, via both clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, but not macropinocytosis. These results suggest that GMO cubosomes, as lipid nanovectors, could facilitate the oral delivery of AmB. PMID:24421641

  6. The rationale and potential for the reduction of oral malodour using Streptococcus salivarius probiotics.

    PubMed

    Burton, J P; Chilcott, C N; Tagg, J R

    2005-01-01

    The primary treatment for oral malodour is the reduction of bacterial populations, especially those present on the tongue, by use of a variety of antimicrobial agents or mechanical devices. However, shortly after treatment the problematic bacteria quickly repopulate the tongue and the malodour returns. In our studies, we have used a broadly-active antimicrobial (chlorhexidine) to effect temporary depletion of the oral microbiota and then have attempted to repopulate the tongue surface with Streptococcus salivarius K12, a benign commensal probiotic. The objective of this is to prevent re-establishment of non-desirable bacterial populations and thus help limit the re-occurrence of oral malodour over a prolonged period. In this paper, we discuss why contemporary probiotics are inadequate for treatment of oral malodour and examine the rationale for selection of particular bacterial species for future use in the treatment of this condition. In our preliminary trials of the use of a chlorhexidine rinse followed by strain K12 lozenges, the majority (8/13) of subjects with confirmed halitosis maintained reduced breath levels of volatile sulphur compounds for at least 2 weeks. We conclude that probiotic bacterial strains originally sourced from the indigenous oral microbiotas of healthy humans may have potential application as adjuncts for the prevention and treatment of halitosis. PMID:15752094

  7. Maltose-binding protein is a potential carrier for oral immunizations.

    PubMed

    Bellot, P; Tiels, P; Melkebeek, V; Devriendt, B; Goddeeris, B M; Cox, E

    2013-03-15

    Maltose binding protein (MBP) is often fused to a relevant protein to improve its yield and facilitate its purification, but MBP can also enhance the immunogenicity of the fused proteins. Recent data suggest that MBP may potentiate antigen-presenting functions in immunized animals by providing intrinsic maturation stimuli to dendritic cells through TLR4. The aim of this study was to examine if an MBP-specific immune response can be elicited by oral administration of MBP. Therefore, in a first experiment the MBP specific immune response was analyzed after oral immunization with MBP or MBP+CT to piglets and both the systemic and mucosal immune responses were examined Although no high systemic response was observed in the MBP-group, a local mucosal IgM MBP-specific response in the jejunal Peyer's patches was observed. In the second experiment MBPFedF was orally administered to piglets. A significant systemic response against MBP and a weak response against FedF were found after oral administration of MBPFedF+CT. Also the presence of MBP-specific IgA ASC in the lamina propria indicates that a local intestinal immune response against MBP was induced. Our data suggests that MBP can cross the epithelial barrier reaching the gut-associated lymphoid tissue after oral administration to pigs, which implicates that MBP could act as a carrier and delivery system for fused proteins to target the vaccine antigens to intestinal immune cells. PMID:23078905

  8. Potential of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST).

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takuya; Andoh, Tooru; Sudo, Tamotsu; Fujita, Ikuo; Fukase, Naomasa; Takeuchi, Tamotsu; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Hirose, Tkanori; Sakuma, Toshiko; Moritake, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Kawamoto, Teruya; Fukumori, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Satomi; Atagi, Shinji; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Ono, Koji; Ichikawa, Hideki; Suzuki, Minoru

    2015-12-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are relatively rare neoplasms with poor prognosis. At present there is no effective treatment for MPNST other than surgical resection. Nonetheless, the anti-tumor effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was recently demonstrated in two patients with MPNST. Subsequently, tumor-bearing nude mice subcutaneously transplanted with a human MPNST cell line were injected with p-borono-L-phenylalanine (L-BPA) and subjected to BNCT. Pathological studies then revealed that the MPNST cells were selectively destroyed by BNCT. PMID:26278348

  9. Sclerosing paraganglioma of the carotid body: a potential pitfall of malignancy.

    PubMed

    Santi, Raffaella; Franchi, Alessandro; Saladino, Valeria; Trovati, Massimo; Cenacchi, Giovanna; Squadrelli-Saraceno, Massimo; Nesi, Gabriella

    2015-06-01

    Paragangliomas (PGs) of the head and neck region are typically benign, slow-growing neuroendocrine tumours. At times, they may exhibit unusual histological features, such as prominent stromal sclerosis (sclerosing PG), which may raise concerns of malignancy. We describe a case of sclerosing PG of the carotid body, emphasizing the value of immunohistochemical stains for differential diagnosis. A 43-year-old woman presented with a painless lump on the neck. A magnetic resonance imaging scan demonstrated a hypervascular lesion of the carotid body, which was surgically excised. Grossly, the lesion measured 1.8 cm at maximum diameter. On microscopic examination, irregular nests and tiny bundles of neoplastic cells were found between thick bands of fibrous tissue. Focal nuclear cytomegaly and marked pleomorphism were noted. Neoplastic cells proved to be immunoreactive for chromogranin, synaptophysin and neuron specific enolase, but negative for cytokeratins, smooth muscle actin and CD34. Ultrastructurally, numerous mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum structures and endocrine granules were seen in the cytoplasm of the tumour cells. On consideration of the above-mentioned clinico-pathological and ultrastructural findings a diagnosis of sclerosing PG was established. Sclerosing PG is a rare entity which may mimic a malignant neoplasm. The recognition of this unusual morphological variant of PG, together with appropriate immunostains, leads to the correct diagnosis. PMID:25194351

  10. Parafibromin and APC as screening markers for malignant potential in atypical parathyroid adenomas.

    PubMed

    Juhlin, C Christofer; Nilsson, Inga-Lena; Johansson, Kenth; Haglund, Felix; Villablanca, Andrea; Höög, Anders; Larsson, Catharina

    2010-09-01

    The identification of parathyroid carcinomas is based upon histopathological criteria in which an invasive growth pattern or distant metastasis is demonstrated. A dilemma arises when tumours present with atypical histopathological features but lack direct evidence of malignancy. Recently, reduced expression or loss of the tumour suppressor proteins parafibromin and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) has been associated with parathyroid malignancy. We report results from APC and parafibromin expression analyses by immunohistochemistry and Western blot in five cases of atypical adenoma, a single case of carcinoma and 54 adenomas without atypical features. Complete loss of APC immunoreactivity and reduced expression of parafibromin was evident in two of the atypical adenomas and in the parathyroid carcinoma. By contrast, all adenomas displayed APC expression, including two cases with hyperparathyroidism 2 gene (HRPT2) mutations and loss of parafibromin expression. We conclude that loss of APC is a frequent molecular event in atypical adenomas and carcinomas, but not in adenomas. Following verification in an independent material, APC could become a valuable tool when assessing parathyroid tumours in the clinical setting. Furthermore, the molecular resemblance of atypical adenomas with carcinoma concerning parafibromin and APC expression indicates that atypical adenomas should be subjects to watchful follow-up. PMID:20473645

  11. KAT5 (Tip60) is a potential therapeutic target in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Cregan, Sian; McDonagh, Lauran; Gao, Yun; Barr, Martin P; O'Byrne, Kenneth J; Finn, Stephen P; Cuffe, Sinead; Gray, Steven G

    2016-03-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare aggressive cancer of the pleura. Asbestos exposure (through inhalation) is the most well established risk factor for mesothelioma. The current standard of care for patients suffering from MPM is a combination of cisplatin and pemetrexed (or alternatively cisplatin and raltitrexed). Most patients, however, die within 24 months of diagnosis. New therapies are therefore urgently required for this disease. Lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) including KAT5 have been linked with the development of cisplatin resistance. This gene may therefore be altered in MPM and could represent a novel candidate target for intervention. Using RT-PCR screening the expression of all known KAT5 variants was found to be markedly increased in malignant tumors compared to benign pleura. When separated according to histological subtype, KAT5 was significantly overexpressed in both the sarcomatoid and biphasic subgroups for all transcript variants. A panel of MPM cell lines including the normal pleural cells LP9 and Met5A was screened for expression of KAT5 variants. Treatment of cells with a small molecule inhibitor of KAT5 (MG-149) caused significant inhibition of cellular proliferation (p<0.0001), induction of apoptosis and was accompanied by significant induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines. PMID:26780987

  12. [BETA-III TUBULIN AS A POTENTIAL TARGET FOR BLOCKING INVASIVE GROWTH OF MALIGNANT EPITHELIAL TUMORS].

    PubMed

    Portyanko, A S; Akalovich, S T; Doroshenko, T M

    2015-01-01

    Invasive growth is the first step of metastatic cascade in the growth of malignant tumors. The mobility of cells, which is a necessary factor of the invasive growth of malignant tumors, is closely linked to the dynamic structure of cytoskeleton. An important role in cell motility is played by microtubules and actin microfilaments. Microtubules consist of tubulin--a heterodimer comprising α and β subunits, which can be represented by different isotypes. The appearance of beta-III tubulin in a tumor is essential for chemoresistance and prognosis of some tumors in humans. This study focuses on determining the possibility of using beta-III tubulin as a target molecule for the suppression of invasive growth. It is established that blocking of the beta-III tubulin expression in colorectal cancer cells does not affect their viability, but reduces the cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix by 40% for HT-29 (∂ = 0.0044) and by 15% (p = 0.0436) for HCT 116) and produces a four-fold decrease in the invasive activity (p = 0.0000 and 0.0001, respectively). These facts allow considering beta-III tubulin as a target molecule in the development of antitumor drugs. PMID:26591579

  13. Data from human salivary proteome – A resource of potential biomarkers for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sivadasan, Priya; Kumar Gupta, Manoj; Sathe, Gajanan J.; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Palit, Priyanka; Gowda, Harsha; Suresh, Amritha; Abraham Kuriakose, Moni; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Salivary proteins are an important source for developing marker-based assays for oral cancers. To get an insight into the proteins present in human saliva, we applied multiple strategies involving affinity-based depletion of abundant proteins, fractionation of the resulting proteins or their tryptic peptides followed by LC–MS/MS analysis, using high resolution mass spectrometry. By integrating the protein identifications observed by us with those from similar workflows employed in earlier investigations, we compiled an updated salivary proteome. We have mapped the salivary proteome to the published data on differentially expressed proteins from oral cancer tissues and also for their secretory features using prediction tools, SignalP 4.1, TMHMM 2c and Exocarta. Proteotypic peptides for the subset of proteins implicated in oral cancer and mapped to any two of the prediction tools for secretory potential have been listed. The data here are related to the research article “Human saliva proteome – a resource of potential biomarkers for oral cancer” in the Journal of Proteomics [1]. PMID:26217819

  14. Blockade of TRPM8 activity reduces the invasion potential of oral squamous carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yoshihiko; Ohkubo, Tsuyako; Ikebe, Tetsuro; Yamazaki, Jun

    2012-05-01

    Several members of the transient receptor potential (TRP)-channel family are expressed in cancer cells. One, cold/menthol-sensitive TRPM8, is reportedly an important player in carcinogenesis in human prostate cancer, although its involvement in oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) remains unclear. The present immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR results revealed intense TRPM8 expression in two SCC cell lines, HSC3 and HSC4, derived from the human tongue. Menthol, icilin, and a more specific TRPM8 agonist (WS-12) induced non-specific cation currents, with Ca2+ permeability being greater than that of Na+ or K+. The novel TRPM8 antagonist RQ-00203078 (RQ) profoundly reduced such agonist-induced cation currents. Intracellular Ca2+ imaging revealed that menthol induced both intracellular Ca2+ release and store-operated Ca2+ entry, with RQ inhibiting each effect. To assess the possible pathophysiological role of TRPM8 in oral SCC, we performed motility and invasion assays, and gelatin zymography. Menthol augmented the migration and invasion abilities of both HSC3 and HSC4 cells by potentiating MMP-9 activity. RQ suppressed all of these effects. These results may aid understanding of the pathophysiological implications of TRPM8 channels in the oral SCC cells, support TRP proteins as valuable targets for pharmaceutical intervention, and inform the targeting of oral SCC in which the prognosis is poor. PMID:22267123

  15. Clinicopathologic Review of 31 Cases of Solid Pseudopapillary Pancreatic Tumors: Can We Use the Scoring System of Microscopic Features for Suggesting Clinically Malignant Potential?

    PubMed

    Kim, Jang-Hee; Lee, Jae-Myeong

    2016-04-01

    A solid pseudopapillary tumor (SPT) is a pancreatic neoplasm of low malignant potential. The potentially malignant pathologic features of SPTs were regarded as angioinvasion, perineural invasion, deep invasion of the surrounding acinar tissue, and nuclear pleomorphism. We retrospectively reviewed 31 cases of SPTs (25 female and 6 male patients, with an average age of 35 ± 14 years). The mean follow-up period was 132.0 ± 55.9 months. To evaluate the clinical impact of above pathological parameters, we analyzed their correlation with actually observed clinical malignancy. In three cases, the SPTs were clearly clinically malignant: one patient had recurrences three times, one showed lymph node metastases, and one deep soft tissue invasion around the gastroduodenal artery. Tumor infiltration to the peripancreatic soft tissue was observed in 17 cases (54.8%). The pathologic features considered suggestive of malignant potential were angioinvasion (25.8%), perineural invasion (6.5%), presence of mitosis in 10 high-power fields (16.1%), and moderate nuclear pleomorphism (19.4%). The presence of at least three of these features was not correlated with clinically confirmed malignant behavior (P = 0.570). Microscopic pathologic features of SPTs cannot be reliably associated with aggressive clinical behavior. Moreover, the absence of these microscopic features cannot exclude clinical malignancy. PMID:27097622

  16. From regenerative dentistry to regenerative medicine: progress, challenges, and potential applications of oral stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Li; Nasu, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and epithelial stem cells play essential roles in tissue repair and self-healing. Oral MSCs and epithelial stem cells can be isolated from adult human oral tissues, for example, teeth, periodontal ligament, and gingiva. Cocultivated adult oral epithelial stem cells and MSCs could represent some developmental events, such as epithelial invagination and tubular structure formation, signifying their potentials for tissue regeneration. Oral epithelial stem cells have been used in regenerative medicine over 1 decade. They are able to form a stratified cell sheet under three-dimensional culture conditions. Both experimental and clinical data indicate that the cell sheets can not only safely and effectively reconstruct the damaged cornea in humans, but also repair esophageal ulcer in animal models. Oral MSCs include dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED), stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), and mesenchymal stem cells from gingiva (GMSCs). They are widely applied in both regenerative dentistry and medicine. DPSCs, SHED, and SCAP are able to form dentin–pulp complex when being transplanted into immunodeficient animals. They have been experimentally used for the regeneration of dental pulp, neuron, bone muscle and blood vessels in animal models and have shown promising results. PDLSCs and GMSCs are demonstrated to be ideal cell sources for repairing the damaged tissues of periodontal, muscle, and tendon. Despite the abovementioned applications of oral stem cells, only a few human clinical trials are now underway to use them for the treatment of certain diseases. Since clinical use is the end goal, their true regenerative power and safety need to be further examined. PMID:25506228

  17. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL): a potential candidate for combined treatment of hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Secchiero, Paola; Vaccarezza, Mauro; Gonelli, Arianna; Zauli, Giorgio

    2004-01-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a member of the TNF gene superfamily, which induces apoptosis through engagement of death receptors. TRAIL is unusual as compared to the other cytokines of this family, as it interacts with a complex system of receptors consisting of two pro-apoptotic death receptors (TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2) and three decoy receptors (TRAIL-R3, TRAIL-R4 and osteoprotegerin). Moreover, with respect to other members of the TNF superfamily, such as CD95L and TNF-alpha, TRAIL has generated great interest as a potential tumor-specific cancer therapeutic because as a stable soluble trimer it selectively induces apoptosis in many transformed cells but not in normal cells. Of note, TRAIL cytotoxicity is at least partially independent of the major systems involved in resistance to chemotherapy, such as p53 wild-type function and multidrug resistance (MDR) genes. Since one fundamental problem of most cancers is the development of multiple mechanisms of resistance, which progressively reduce or suppress the therapeutic efficacy of conventional chemotherapy, new therapeutic approaches that either restore the pro-apoptotic activity of chemotherapeutic drugs or by-pass the mechanisms of resistance are highly desirable. This review will focus on the potential of TRAIL for its application in the therapy of hematological malignancies, used either alone or in combination with chemotherapy. The scenario emerging from the literature is that the treatment and management of hematological malignancies will require the rational combination of TRAIL plus conventional or new drugs in a regimen that would optimize the anti-neoplastic activity in malignant cells resistant to chemotherapy through restoration of the pro-apoptotic activity of TRAIL. PMID:15579063

  18. Adoptive cell therapy: a highly successful individualized therapy for melanoma with great potential for other malignancies.

    PubMed

    Verdegaal, Els M E

    2016-04-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) by infusion of autologous or redirected tumor-specific T-cells has had a major impact on the treatment of several metastasized malignancies that were until now hardly treatable. Recent findings provide a more profound knowledge on the underlying mechanisms of success and allow the optimization of the ACT protocol with respect to (1) the treatment related side-effects, (2) the quality and specificity of infused T-cells, and (3) the immunosuppressive phenotype of the tumor environment. In this review, the results and insights in the success of ACT as well as the possibilities to improve ACT and its exploitation as treatment option for various metastatic cancer types, will be discussed. PMID:26829458

  19. Diagnostic potential of ancillary molecular testing in differentiation of benign and malignant thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Parisha; Deniwar, Ahmed; Friedlander, Paul; Aslam, Rizwan; Kandil, Emad

    2015-03-01

    Fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytology, being the mainstay to diagnose thyroid nodules, does not provide definitive results in a subset of patients. The use of molecular markers testing has been described as a useful aid in differentiation of thyroid nodules that present with an indeterminate cytodiagnosis. Molecular tests, such as the Afirma gene classifier, mutational assay and immunohistochemical markers have been increasingly used to further increase the accuracy and defer unnecessary surgeries for benign thyroid nodules. However, in light of the current literature, their emerging roles in clinical practice are limited due to financial and technical limitations. Nevertheless, their synergistic implementation can predict the risk of malignancy and yield an accurate diagnosis. This review discusses the clinical utility of various molecular tests done on FNA indeterminate nodules to avoid diagnostic thyroidectomies and warrant the need of future multi-Institutional studies. PMID:25750270

  20. The Internet and the oral healthcare professionals: potential and challenges of a new era.

    PubMed

    Mattheos, N

    2007-08-01

    The Internet is increasingly used as a means of continuous education for healthcare practitioners. At the same time, a rapidly growing number of patients rely on the Internet for the search and acquisition of healthcare-related information and services. This fact has introduced new challenges for the oral healthcare personnel, which must not only often face the misperceptions of ill-informed patients but also be able to redirect them to quality sources of healthcare-related information. Consequently, there is a great need for the whole oral healthcare team to further understand the potential and dangers of Internet-based information. The present paper aimed to briefly discuss the major implications of Internet use from two distinct points of view: (a) potential and risks of Internet use for lifelong learning and quality assessment of the oral healthcare team and (b) potential and dangers from the Internet as a means of patients' education. (1) generic Internet search; (2) search within healthcare-related databases; and (3) principles quality assessment of information and resources. PMID:17615024

  1. Preliminary analysis of salivary microbiome and their potential roles in oral lichen planus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Lu, Wenxin; Tu, Qichao; Ge, Yichen; He, Jinzhi; Zhou, Yu; Gou, Yaping; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Qin, Yujia; Li, Jiyao; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Yan; Xiao, Liying; Zhou, Xuedong

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have explored the origin and development mechanism of oral lichen planus (OLP) with limited attention to the role of bacteria in the progression of this common oral disease. Here we utilized MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons to identify complex oral microbiota associated with OLP from saliva samples of two subtypes (reticular and erosive) of OLP patients and healthy controls. Our analyses indicated that the overall structure of the salivary microbiome was not significantly affected by disease status. However, we did observe evident variations in abundance for several taxonomic groups in OLP. Porphyromonas and Solobacterium showed significantly higher relative abundances, whereas Haemophilus, Corynebacterium, Cellulosimicrobium and Campylobacter showed lower abundances in OLP patients, as compared with healthy controls. In addition, we explored specific microbial co-occurrence patterns in OLP, and revealed significantly fewer linkers of Streptococcus comprising species in erosive OLP. Furthermore, the disease severity and immune dysregulation were also genus-associated, including with Porphyromonas that correlated to disease scores and salivary levels of interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-23. Overall, this study provides a general description of oral microbiome in OLP, and it will be useful for further investigation of their potential roles in the initiation and immune modulation of OLP. PMID:26961389

  2. Recent trends in prevention of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mangalath, Ummar; Aslam, Sachin Aslam; Abdul Khadar, Abdul Hafiz Kooliyat; Francis, Pulikkan George; Mikacha, Muhamed Shaloob Karimbil; Kalathingal, Jubin Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancers often occurs out of long standing potentially malignant lesions and conditions so called premalignant lesions and conditions. Oral precancer is a intermediate state with increased cancer rate which can be recognized and treated obviously with much better prognosis than a full blown malignancy. Oral cancer risk can be lowered or even prevented by simply understanding basic oral hygiene, different bacteria found in the mouth, and how diet influences oral cancers. Currently, research is being done on the relationship between diet and oral cancer. Oral cancer is a very serious disease that can be prevented. Practicing good oral hygiene is key to help keep the oral cavity clean. Limiting the use of tobacco and alcohol products is also important because these are the causes of most oral cancers. Lastly, eating a well balanced diet that has protective affects can reduce the risk of oral cancer. This includes a diet high in fruits, vegetables, and fish and low in high fat and cholesterol meats, rice, and refined grains. PMID:25625069

  3. Recent trends in prevention of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Mangalath, Ummar; Aslam, Sachin Aslam; Abdul Khadar, Abdul Hafiz Kooliyat; Francis, Pulikkan George; Mikacha, Muhamed Shaloob Karimbil; Kalathingal, Jubin Hassan

    2014-12-01

    Oral cancers often occurs out of long standing potentially malignant lesions and conditions so called premalignant lesions and conditions. Oral precancer is a intermediate state with increased cancer rate which can be recognized and treated obviously with much better prognosis than a full blown malignancy. Oral cancer risk can be lowered or even prevented by simply understanding basic oral hygiene, different bacteria found in the mouth, and how diet influences oral cancers. Currently, research is being done on the relationship between diet and oral cancer. Oral cancer is a very serious disease that can be prevented. Practicing good oral hygiene is key to help keep the oral cavity clean. Limiting the use of tobacco and alcohol products is also important because these are the causes of most oral cancers. Lastly, eating a well balanced diet that has protective affects can reduce the risk of oral cancer. This includes a diet high in fruits, vegetables, and fish and low in high fat and cholesterol meats, rice, and refined grains. PMID:25625069

  4. Morcellator's Port-site Metastasis of a Uterine Smooth Muscle Tumor of Uncertain Malignant Potential After Minimally Invasive Myomectomy.

    PubMed

    Bogani, Giorgio; Ditto, Antonino; Martinelli, Fabio; Signorelli, Mauro; Chiappa, Valentina; Lorusso, Domenica; Sabatucci, Ilaria; Carcangiu, Maria L; Fiore, Marco; Gronchi, Alessandro; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Since the safety warning from the US Food and Drug Administration on the use of power morcellators, minimally invasive procedures involving the removal of uterine myomas and large uteri are under scrutiny. Growing evidence suggests that morcellation of undiagnosed uterine malignancies is associated with worse survival outcomes of patients affected by uterine sarcoma. However, to date, only limited data regarding morcellation of low-grade uterine neoplasms are available. In the present article, we reported a case of a (morcellator) port-site implantation of a smooth muscle tumor that occurred 6 years after laparoscopic morcellation of a uterine smooth muscle tumor of uncertain potential. This case highlights the effects of intra-abdominal morcellation, even in low-grade uterine neoplasms. Caution should be used when determining techniques for tissue extraction; the potential adverse consequences of morcellation should be more fully explored. PMID:26851127

  5. Boronated dipeptide borotrimethylglycylphenylalanine as a potential boron carrier in boron neutron capture therapy for malignant brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Takagaki, M; Powell, W; Sood, A; Spielvogel, B F; Hosmane, N S; Kirihata, M; Ono, K; Masunaga, S I; Kinashi, Y; Miyatake, S I; Hashimoto, N

    2001-07-01

    Takagaki, M., Ono, K., Masunaga, S-I., Kinashi, Y., Oda, Y., Miyatake, S-I., Hashimoto, N., Powell, W., Sood, A. and Spielvogel, B. F. Boronated Dipeptide Borotrimethylglycylphenylalanine as a Potential Boron Carrier in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors. Radiat. Res. 156, 118-122 (2001).A boronated dipeptide, borotrimethylglycylphenylalanine (BGPA), was synthesized as a possible boron carrier for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant brain tumors. In vitro, at equal concentrations of (10)B in the extracellular medium, BGPA had the same effect in BNCT as p-boronophenylalanine (BPA). Boron analysis was carried out using prompt gamma-ray spectrometry and track-etch autoradiography. The tumor:blood and tumor:normal brain (10)B concentration ratios were 8.9 +/- 2.1 and 3.0 +/- 1.2, respectively, in rats bearing intracranial C6 gliosarcomas using alpha-particle track autoradiography. The IC(50), i.e. the dose capable of inhibiting the growth of C6 gliosarcoma cells by 50% after 3 days of incubation, was 5.9 x 10(-3) M BGPA, which is similar to that of 6.4 x 10(-3) M for BPA. The amide bond of BGPA is free from enzymatic attack, since it is protected from hydrolysis by the presence of a boron atom at the alpha-carbon position of glycine. These results suggest promise for the use of this agent for BNCT of malignant brain tumors. Further preclinical studies of BGPA are warranted, since BGPA has advantages over both BPA and BSH. PMID:11418080

  6. miR-193a-3p is a potential tumor suppressor in malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuen Yee; Hanh, Jacky; Weiss, Jocelyn; Mugridge, Nancy; Wright, Casey M.; Linton, Anthony; Kao, Steven C.; Edelman, J. James B.; Vallely, Michael P.; McCaughan, Brian C.; Cooper, Wendy; Klebe, Sonja; Lin, Ruby C.Y.; Brahmbhatt, Himanshu; MacDiarmid, Jennifer; van Zandwijk, Nico; Reid, Glen

    2015-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an asbestos-induced cancer with poor prognosis that displays characteristic alterations in microRNA expression. Recently it was reported that the expression of a subset of microRNAs can distinguish between MPM and adenocarcinoma of the lung. However, the functional importance of these changes has yet to be investigated. We compared expression of miR-192, miR-193a-3p and the miR-200 family in normal pleura and MPM tumor specimens and found a statistically significant reduction in the levels of miR-193a-3p (3.1-fold) and miR-192 (2.8-fold) in MPM. Transfection of MPM cells with a miR-193a-3p mimic resulted in inhibition of growth and an induction of apoptosis and necrosis in vitro. The growth inhibitory effects of miR-193a-3p were associated with a decrease in MCL1 expression and were recapitulated by RNAi-mediated MCL1 silencing. Targeted delivery of miR-193a-3p mimic using EDV minicells inhibited MPM xenograft tumour growth, and was associated with increased apoptosis. In conclusion, miR-193a-3p appears to have importance in the biology of MPM and may represent a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26125439

  7. Immune dysregulation mediated by the oral microbiome: potential link to chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Slocum, C; Kramer, C; Genco, C A

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is an inflammatory disorder characterized by the progressive formation of plaque in coronary arteries, termed atherosclerosis. It is a multifactorial disease that is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Although a number of risk factors have been associated with disease progression, the underlying inflammatory mechanisms contributing to atherosclerosis remain to be fully delineated. Within the last decade, the potential role for infection in inflammatory plaque progression has received considerable interest. Microbial pathogens associated with periodontal disease have been of particular interest due to the high levels of bacteremia that are observed after routine dental procedures and every day oral activities, such as tooth brushing. Here, we explore the potential mechanisms that may explain how periodontal pathogens either directly or indirectly elicit immune dysregulation and consequently progressive inflammation manifested as atherosclerosis. Periodontal pathogens have been shown to contribute directly to atherosclerosis by disrupting endothelial cell function, one of the earliest indicators of cardiovascular disease. Oral infection is thought to indirectly induce elevated production of inflammatory mediators in the systemic circulation. Recently, a number of studies have been conducted focusing on how disruption of the gut microbiome influences the systemic production of proinflammatory cytokines and consequently exacerbation of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. It is clear that the immune mechanisms leading to atherosclerotic plaque progression, by oral infection, are complex. Understanding the immune pathways leading to disease progression is essential for the future development of anti-inflammatory therapies for this chronic disease. PMID:26791914

  8. Depleted Uranium. Is it potentially involved in the recent upsurge of malignancies in populations exposed to war dust?

    PubMed

    Shelleh, Hamdi H

    2012-05-01

    Due to its extreme density, depleted Uranium (DU) has recently entered the warfare industry and became a major pollutant to the biosphere. Although DU is less radioactive than natural Uranium, it still retains all its chemical toxicity. Limited data exists regarding the long-term hazards of DU on humans, however, it is suspected to be a major toxic and mutagenic agent. Literature review reveals the scarcity of the World Health Organization's knowledge regarding related DU-malignancies. Battlefield reports documented a steady rise of malignancies and newborn malformations after war, that is, leukemia in the Balkans, and congenital anomalies and Kaposi sarcoma (KS) in Iraq. Kaposi sarcoma in Iraq has a quite aggressive behavior compared with the classic KS before, suggesting a potential relation with DU, and possibly a different DU related KS-type. Children are more susceptible to radiation than adults. This enlarges the responsibility of the medical communities for an evidence-based attitude towards DU, and to ban its use until proven otherwise. We, as medical bodies have a human approach - stand with man not to be mistreated, and with green norms, which veto all suspected pollutants of the planet. Until further notice, DU should be thoroughly checked for safety, before it kills. PMID:22588807

  9. Inhaled vs. oral alprazolam: subjective, behavioral and cognitive effects, and modestly increased abuse potential

    PubMed Central

    Reissig, Chad J.; Harrison, Joseph A.; Carter, Lawrence P.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Infrahuman and human studies suggest that a determinant of the abuse potential of a drug is rate of onset of subjective effects. Objectives This study sought to determine if the rate of onset of subjective effects and abuse potential of alprazolam would be increased when administered via inhalation vs. the oral route. Methods Placebo, inhaled alprazolam (0.5, 1, 2 mg), and oral alprazolam (1, 2, 4 mg) were administered under double-blind, double-dummy conditions using a cross-over design in 14 healthy participants with histories of drug abuse. Participant and observer ratings, and behavioral and cognitive performance measures were assessed repeatedly during 9 hour sessions. Results Both routes of administration produced orderly dose and time-related effects, with higher doses producing greater and longer lasting effects. Onset of subjective effects following inhaled alprazolam was very rapid (e.g., 2 vs. 49 minutes after 2 mg inhaled vs. oral). On measures of abuse potential (e.g., liking and good effects), inhaled alprazolam was more potent, as evidenced by a leftward shift in the dose response curve. Despite the potency difference, at the highest doses, peak ratings of subjective effects related to abuse potential (e.g., “drug liking”) were similar across the two routes. On other measures (e.g., sedation and performance) the routes were equipotent. Conclusions The inhaled route of administration modestly increased the abuse potential of alprazolam despite significantly increasing its rate of onset. If marketed, the reduced availability and increased cost of inhaled alprazolam may render the societal risk of increased abuse to be low. PMID:25199955

  10. Anti-Endosialin Antibody-Drug Conjugate: Potential in Sarcoma and Other Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Rouleau, Cecile; Gianolio, Diego A; Smale, Robert; Roth, Stephanie D; Krumbholz, Roy; Harper, Jay; Munroe, Kenneth J; Green, Tessa L; Horten, Bruce C; Schmid, Steven M; Teicher, Beverly A

    2015-09-01

    Endosialin/TEM1/CD248 is a cell surface protein expressed at high levels by the malignant cells of about 50% of sarcomas and neuroblastomas. The antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) anti-endosialin-MC-VC-PABC-MMAE was selectively cytotoxic to endosialin-positive cells in vitro and achieved profound and durable antitumor efficacy in preclinical human tumor xenograft models of endosialin-positive disease. MC-VC-PABC-MMAE was conjugated with anti-endosialin with 3-4 MMAE molecules per ADC. The anti-endosialin-MC-VC-PABC-MMAE conjugate was tested for activity in four human cell lines with varied endosialin levels. The HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells do not express endosialin, A-673 Ewing sarcoma cells and SK-N-AS neuroblastoma cells are moderate expressers of endosialin, and SJSA-1 osteosarcoma cells express very high levels of endosialin. To determine whether endosialin expression was maintained in vivo, A-673 Ewing sarcoma, SK-N-AS neuroblastoma, and SJSA-1 osteosarcoma cells were grown as xenograft tumors in nude mice. The SK-N-AS neuroblastoma and the A-673 Ewing sarcoma lines were selected for in vivo efficacy testing of the anti-endosialin-MC-VC-PABC-MMAE conjugate. The treatment groups included a vehicle control, unconjugated anti-endosialin, an admix control consisting of anti-endosialin and a dose of free MMAE equivalent to the dose administered as the ADC, and the anti-endosialin-MC-VC-PABC-MMAE conjugate. The unconjugated anti-endosialin had no antitumor activity and resulted in similar tumor growth as the vehicle control. The admix control produced a modest tumor growth delay. Administration of the anti-endosialin-MC-VC-PABC-MMAE conjugate resulted in a marked prolonged tumor response of both xenograts. These proof-of-concept results break new ground and open a promising drug discovery approach to these rare and neglected tumors. PMID:26184481

  11. Antitumor effect and antiangiogenic potential of the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus against malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Makio; Yamada, Tadaaki; Tamura, Masaya; Ishikawa, Daisuke; Hoda, Mir Alireza; Matsumoto, Isao; Klepetko, Walter; Oda, Makoto; Yano, Seiji; Watanabe, Go

    2014-03-01

    The mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus has antitumor and antiangiogenic activity against several carcinomas, yet few reports document the efficacy of temsirolimus against malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Therefore, we evaluated the efficacy of temsirolimus and the antiangiogenic effect of temsirolimus in the treatment of MPM. We examined the efficacy of temsirolimus alone and the efficacy of the combination of temsirolimus and cisplatin or pemetrexed against four MPM cell lines using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The effect of temsirolimus on the production of proangiogenic cytokines by MPM cell lines was examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Expression of mTOR and proangiogenic cytokines in clinical specimens from MPM patients was determined by immunohistochemistry. Temsirolimus inhibited cell viability and suppressed cell proliferation of all MPM cell lines. Combined treatment with temsirolimus and cisplatin inhibited the viability of all MPM cell lines more effectively than temsirolimus alone. Temsirolimus strongly inhibited the phosphorylation of p70s6k, a downstream molecule of mTOR, in all MPM cell lines and led to an increase in the levels of cleaved caspase-3 in the H226 and Y-meso14 cells. Temsirolimus also inhibited the production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA). Phosphorylated mTOR and high expression of VEGF and PDGF were detected in 2 and 3, respectively, out of the 5 MPM specimens. These results suggest that temsirolimus has activity against MPM cells by inhibition of cell proliferation and angiogenesis, and may be beneficial for a subset of MPM patients with high mTOR expression. PMID:24378576

  12. Malignant potential of cells isolated from lymph node or brain metastases of melanoma patients and implications for prognosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R D; Price, J E; Schackert, G; Itoh, K; Fidler, I J

    1991-04-15

    We studied the correlation between the formation of brain metastasis and the malignant growth potential of seven human melanoma cell lines, isolated from lymph node metastases (A375-SM, TXM-1, DM-4) or from brain metastases (TXM-13, TXM-18, TXM-34, TXM-40), and the potential of three variants of the mouse K-1735 melanoma. Growth rates in different concentrations of fetal bovine serum and colony-forming efficiency in semisolid agarose were measured, and the tumorigenicity and metastatic ability were determined in nude mice (for the human melanoma cell lines) or in C3H/HeN mice (for the K-1735 variants). The ability to form brain metastasis was tested by injection of cells into the carotid artery. A high colony-forming efficiency in agarose, especially at concentrations of agarose greater than 0.6%, corresponded with high tumor take rates, rapid tumor growth rates, and metastatic colonization of the lungs of the recipient mice. For the human melanomas, the lymph node metastasis-derived cells were more tumorigenic and metastatic than the brain metastasis-derived cells. In the K-1735 mouse melanoma, the tumorigenic and metastatic behavior of the cells after i.v. and s.c. injection corresponded with growth in agarose cultures. However, for growth in the brain after intracarotid injection, the different melanoma cell lines showed similar frequencies of tumor take, regardless of tumorigenicity in other sites of the recipient mice, although mice given injections of brain metastasis-derived cells survived longer than mice given injections of lymph node metastasis (human melanoma) or lung metastasis (K-1735 M-2)-derived cell lines. The results from the human and mouse melanoma cell lines show that the brain metastasis-derived cell lines were not more malignant than the lymph node or lung metastasis-derived cells. These data imply that the production of brain metastasis is not always the final stage of a metastatic cascade. PMID:1826230

  13. Down-regulation of malignant potential by alpha linolenic acid in human and mouse colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chamberland, John P; Moon, Hyun-Seuk

    2015-03-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (also called ω-3 fatty acis or n-3 fatty acid) are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) with a double bond (C=C) at the third carbon atom from the end of the carbon chain. Numerous test tube and animal studies have shown that omega-3 fatty acids may prevent or inhibit the growth of cancers, suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids are important in cancer physiology. Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is one of an essential omega-3 fatty acid and organic compound found in seeds (chia and flaxseed), nuts (notably walnuts), and many common vegetable oils. ALA has also been shown to down-regulate cell proliferation of prostate, breast, and bladder cancer cells. However, direct evidence that ALA suppresses to the development of colon cancer has not been studied. Also, no previous studies have evaluated whether ALA may regulate malignant potential (adhesion, invasion and colony formation) in colon cancer cells. In order to address the questions above, we conducted in vitro studies and evaluated whether ALA may down-regulate malignant potential in human (HT29 and HCT116) and mouse (MCA38) colon cancer cell lines. We observed that treatment with 1-5 mM of ALA inhibits cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion in both human and mouse colon cancer cell lines. Interestingly, we observed that ALA did not decrease total colony numbers when compared to control. By contrast, we found that size of colony was significantly changed by ALA treatment when compared to control in all colon cancer cell lines. We suggest that our data enhance our current knowledge of ALA's mechanism and provide crucial information to further the development of new therapies for the management or chemoprevention of colon cancer. PMID:25336096

  14. The anti-tubercular drug delamanid as a potential oral treatment for visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Stephen; Wyllie, Susan; Norval, Suzanne; Stojanovski, Laste; Simeons, Frederick Rc; Auer, Jennifer L; Osuna-Cabello, Maria; Read, Kevin D; Fairlamb, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent requirement for safe, oral and cost-effective drugs for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis (VL). We report that delamanid (OPC-67683), an approved drug for multi-drug resistant tuberculosis, is a potent inhibitor of Leishmania donovani both in vitro and in vivo. Twice-daily oral dosing of delamanid at 30 mg kg(-1) for 5 days resulted in sterile cures in a mouse model of VL. Treatment with lower doses revealed a U-shaped (hormetic) dose-response curve with greater parasite suppression at 1 mg kg(-1) than at 3 mg kg(-1) (5 or 10 day dosing). Dosing delamanid for 10 days confirmed the hormetic dose-response and improved the efficacy at all doses investigated. Mechanistic studies reveal that delamanid is rapidly metabolised by parasites via an enzyme, distinct from the nitroreductase that activates fexinidazole. Delamanid has the potential to be repurposed as a much-needed oral therapy for VL. PMID:27215734

  15. The anti-tubercular drug delamanid as a potential oral treatment for visceral leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Stephen; Wyllie, Susan; Norval, Suzanne; Stojanovski, Laste; Simeons, Frederick RC; Auer, Jennifer L; Osuna-Cabello, Maria; Read, Kevin D; Fairlamb, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent requirement for safe, oral and cost-effective drugs for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis (VL). We report that delamanid (OPC-67683), an approved drug for multi-drug resistant tuberculosis, is a potent inhibitor of Leishmania donovani both in vitro and in vivo. Twice-daily oral dosing of delamanid at 30 mg kg-1 for 5 days resulted in sterile cures in a mouse model of VL. Treatment with lower doses revealed a U-shaped (hormetic) dose-response curve with greater parasite suppression at 1 mg kg-1 than at 3 mg kg-1 (5 or 10 day dosing). Dosing delamanid for 10 days confirmed the hormetic dose-response and improved the efficacy at all doses investigated. Mechanistic studies reveal that delamanid is rapidly metabolised by parasites via an enzyme, distinct from the nitroreductase that activates fexinidazole. Delamanid has the potential to be repurposed as a much-needed oral therapy for VL. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09744.001 PMID:27215734

  16. Synchronous clear cell renal cell carcinoma and multilocular cystic renal cell neoplasia of low malignant potential: A clinico-pathologic and molecular study.

    PubMed

    Raspollini, Maria Rosaria; Castiglione, Francesca; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    We report a rare case of synchronous clear cell renal cell carcinoma and multilocular cystic renal cell neoplasia of low malignant potential in the same kidney. The tumors were seen incidentally in a 45-year-old man. Pathologic study revealed that the former tumor was nucleolar grade 2, and the multilocular cystic renal cell neoplasia of low malignant potential was nucleolar grade 1. At immunohistochemistry, the clear cells in both tumors were positive for CD10 and CA IX. Interestingly, these uncommon synchronous tumors showed a different KRAS/NRAS mutation analysis that was characterized by KRAS mutation at codon p.G12C in the clear cell renal cell carcinoma, while this mutation was not present in the case of multilocular cystic renal cell neoplasia of low malignant potential. NRAS mutation was not seen in any of the tumors. PMID:26874573

  17. Functionalized carbon nanomaterials: exploring the interactions with Caco-2 cells for potential oral drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Coyuco, Jurja C; Liu, Yuanjie; Tan, Bee-Jen; Chiu, Gigi NC

    2011-01-01

    Although carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) have been increasingly studied for their biomedical applications, there is limited research on these novel materials for oral drug delivery. As such, this study aimed to explore the potential of CNMs in oral drug delivery, and the objectives were to evaluate CNM cytotoxicity and their abilities to modulate paracellular transport and the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux pump. Three types of functionalized CNMs were studied, including polyhydroxy small-gap fullerenes (OH-fullerenes), carboxylic acid functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (f SWCNT-COOH) and poly(ethylene glycol) functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (f SWCNT-PEG), using the well-established Caco-2 cell monolayer to represent the intestinal epithelium. All three CNMs had minimum cytotoxicity on Caco-2 cells, as demonstrated through lactose dehydrogenase release and 3-(4,5-dimethyliazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. Of the three CNMs, f SWCNT-COOH significantly reduced transepithelial electrical resistance and enhanced transport of Lucifer Yellow across the Caco-2 monolayer. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that f SWCNT-COOH treated cells had the highest perturbation in the distribution of ZO-1, a protein marker of tight junction, suggesting that f SWCNT-COOH could enhance paracellular permeability via disruption of tight junctions. This modulating effect of f SWCNT-COOH can be reversed over time. Furthermore, cellular accumulation of the P-gp substrate, rhodamine-123, was significantly increased in cells treated with f SWCNT-COOH, suggestive of P-gp inhibition. Of note, f SWCNT-PEG could increase rhodamine-123 accumulation without modifying the tight junction. Collectively, these results suggest that the functionalized CNMs could be useful as modulators for oral drug delivery, and the differential effects on the intestinal epithelium imparted by different types of CNMs would create unique opportunities for drug-specific oral

  18. Clinical Evaluation of Specific Oral Manifestations in Pediatric Patients with Ascertained versus Potential Coeliac Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Matacena, Giada; Costa, Stefano; Magazzù, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Patients involved on coeliac disease (CD) have atypical symptoms and often remain undiagnosed. Specific oral manifestations are effective risk indicators of CD and for this reason an early diagnosis with a consequent better prognosis can be performed by the dentist. There are not researches analysing the frequency of these oral manifestations in potential coeliac patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the oral hard and soft tissue lesions in potential and ascertained coeliac children in comparison with healthy controls. 50 ascertained children, 21 potential coeliac patients, and 54 controls were recruited and the oral examination was performed. The overall oral lesions were more frequently present in CD patients than in controls. The prevalence of oral soft tissue lesions was 62% in ascertained coeliac, 76.2% in potential coeliac patients, and 12.96% in controls (P < 0.05). Clinical dental delayed eruption was observed in 38% of the ascertained coeliac and 42.5% of the potential coeliac versus 11.11% of the controls (P < 0.05). The prevalence of specific enamel defects (SED) was 48% in ascertained coeliac and 19% in potential coeliac versus 0% in controls (P < 0.05; OR = 3.923). The SED seem to be genetically related to the histological damage and villous atrophy. PMID:25197270

  19. Osteogenic Potential of Human Oral-Periosteal Cells (PCs) Isolated From Different Oral Origin: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, Gabriele; Graziano, Antonio; Benedetti, Laura; Imbriani, Marcello; Romano, Federica; Ferrarotti, Francesco; Aimetti, Mario; Cusella de Angelis, Gabriella M

    2016-03-01

    The periosteum is a specialized connective tissue containing multipotent stem cells capable of bone formation. In this study, we aimed at demonstrating that human oral periosteal cells derived from three different oral sites (upper vestibule, lower vestibule, and hard palate) represent an innovative cell source for maxillo-facial tissue engineering applications in terms of accessibility and self-commitment towards osteogenic lineage. Periosteal cells (PCs) were isolated from patients with different ages (20-30 yy, 40-50 yy, 50-60 yy); we then analyzed the in vitro proliferation capacity and the bone self-commitment of cell clones culturing them without any osteogenic supplement to support their differentiation. We found that oral PCs, independently of their origin and age of patients, are mesenchymal stem cells with stem cell characteristics (clonogenical and proliferative activity) and that, even in absence of any osteogenic induction, they undertake the osteoblast lineage after 45 days of culture. These results suggest that oral periosteal cells could replace mesenchymal cells from bone marrow in oral tissue-engineering applications. PMID:26206324

  20. Incidental Finding of a Rare Urachal Pathology: Urachal Mucinous Cystic Tumour of Low Malignant Potential

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Luke L.; Liddell, Heath; Tanny, Sharman Tan; Norris, Briony; Appu, Sree; Pan, David

    2016-01-01

    Urachal mucinous cystic tumours are rare pathological findings with only 23 previously reported cases in the literature. We present the case of a 54-year-old man with an incidentally found urachal mucinous cystic tumour laparoscopically excised. With its known potential to cause pseudomyxoma peritonei, complete surgical excision is important. Long-term cystoscopic and radiological surveillance is also required. PMID:26881171

  1. Role of micronucleus in oral exfoliative cytology

    PubMed Central

    Shashikala, R.; Indira, A. P.; Manjunath, G. S.; rao, K. Arathi; Akshatha, B. K.

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, the interest for oral cytology as a diagnostic and prognostic methodology, for monitoring patients in oral potentially malignant disorders and oral cancer has re-emerged substantially. In 1983, buccal mucosal micronuclei assay was first proposed to evaluate genetic instability. There are biomarkers that predict if a potentially malignant disorder is likely to develop into an aggressive tumor. These genotoxic and carcinogenic chemicals have been reported to be potent clastogenic and mutagenic agents which are thought to be responsible for the induction of chromatid/chromosomal aberrations resulting in the production of micronuclei. Various studies have concluded that the gradual increase in micronucleus (MN) counts from normal oral mucosa to potentially malignant disorders to oral carcinoma suggested a link of this biomarker with neoplastic progression. MN scoring can be used as a biomarker to identify different preneoplastic conditions much earlier than the manifestations of clinical features and might specifically be exploited in the screening of high-risk population for a specific cancer. Hence, it can be used as a screening prognostic and educational tool in community centers of oral cancer. PMID:26538888

  2. Skp2 Regulates the Expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9, and Enhances the Invasion Potential of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shin-Ichi; Yanamoto, Souichi; Naruse, Tomofumi; Matsushita, Yuki; Takahashi, Hidenori; Umeda, Masahiro; Nemoto, Takayuki K; Kurita, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common malignant tumor of the head and neck regions and accounts for more than 90 % of cancers in the oral cavity. S-phase kinase-associated protein-2 (Skp2) is a member of the F-box protein family and the substrate recognition subunit of the Skp1-Cullin-F box protein E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Skp2 is oncogenic and overexpressed in human cancers. The aims of the present study were to determine the clinicopathological significance of Skp2 in OSCC and clarify its function in OSCC cell lines in vitro. Multiple methods including immunohistochemical staining, RT-PCR, western blotting, migration and invasion assays, and siRNA transfection were employed in order to investigate the clinicopathological significance and molecular function of Skp2 in OSCC. The overexpression of Skp2 was more frequent in OSCC than in the normal oral epithelium. It was also more frequently detected in cancers with higher grades according to the T classification, N classification, and pattern of invasion. The high-Skp2 expression group had a significantly poorer prognosis, at 30.1 %, than that of the low-expression group, at 63.0 %. The downregulation of Skp2 decreased migration and invasion potentials in HSC3 cells. Moreover, the suppression of Skp2 reduced the enzyme activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 via Sp1. Skp2 may be a prognostic factor in OSCC patients, and may also play crucial roles in the migration and invasion potentials of OSCC cells. PMID:26874697

  3. Molecular markers and imaging tools to identify malignant potential in Barrett's esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Michael; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Due to its rapidly rising incidence and high mortality, esophageal adenocarcinoma is a major public health concern, particularly in Western countries. The steps involved in the progression from its predisposing condition, gastroesophageal reflux disease, to its premalignant disorder, Barrett’s esophagus, and to cancer, are incompletely understood. Current screening and surveillance methods are limited by the lack of population-wide utility, incomplete sampling of standard biopsies, and subjectivity of evaluation. Advances in endoscopic ablation have raised the hope of effective therapy for eradication of high-risk Barrett’s lesions, but improvements are needed in determining when to apply this treatment and how to follow patients clinically. Researchers have evaluated numerous potential molecular biomarkers with the goal of detecting dysplasia, with varying degrees of success. The combination of biomarker panels with epidemiologic risk factors to yield clinical risk scoring systems is promising. New approaches to sample tissue may also be combined with these biomarkers for less invasive screening and surveillance. The development of novel endoscopic imaging tools in recent years has the potential to markedly improve detection of small foci of dysplasia in vivo. Current and future efforts will aim to determine the combination of markers and imaging modalities that will most effectively improve the rate of early detection of high-risk lesions in Barrett’s esophagus. PMID:25400987

  4. Analysis of Potential Oral Cleft Risk Factors in the Kosovo Population

    PubMed Central

    Salihu, Sami; Krasniqi, Blerim; Sejfija, Osman; Heta, Nijazi; Salihaj, Nderim; Geci, Agreta; Sejdini, Milaim; Arifi, Hysni; Isufi, Ramazan; Ueeck, Brett A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the association of potential risk factors such as positive family cleft history, smoking, use of drugs during pregnancy, and parental age with oral clefts in offspring within the Kosovo population. We conducted a population-based case-control study of live births in Kosovo from 1996 to 2005. Using a logistic regression model, 244 oral cleft cases were compared with 488 controls. We have excluded all syndromic clefts. Heredity increases the risk of clefts in newborns [odds ratio (OR) = 8.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.12–23.52]. Clefts were also associated with smoking (OR = 1.87, 95% CI 0.75–4.08), use of drugs during pregnancy (OR = 2.25, 95% CI 0.82–5.12), increasing maternal age (OR = 1.83, 95% CI 1.42–2.49), and increasing paternal age (OR = 1.3, 95% CI 1.2– 1.4). We found heredity to be the most important factor for cleft occurrence in Kosovar newborns. Another significant potential risk factor for occurrence of clefts is the parental age. We found the use of drugs and smoking during pregnancy to be less significant. PMID:24670027

  5. Masculinizing effects on otoacoustic emissions and auditory evoked potentials in women using oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    McFadden, D

    2000-04-01

    The otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) and auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) measured in two separate large scale studies were examined retrospectively for potential differences between those women using, and those not using, oral contraception (OC). Fourteen dependent variables were examined, all of which exhibited substantial sex differences. For 13 of those 14 dependent variables, the means for the users of OC were shifted away from the means of the non-users in the direction of the males. Specifically, for four different measures of OAE strength, for seven of eight measures of AEP latency or amplitude, and for two cognitive tests (mental rotation and water level), the means for the users of OC were located intermediate to those of the non-users of OC and the males. Few of these differences between users and non-users of OC achieved statistical significance, but the near universality of the direction of the difference suggests that oral contraceptives do produce a weak masculinizing effect on some auditory structures. These weak masculinizing effects appear to run contrary to the facts that the levels of both free testosterone and estradiol are lower in women using OC than in normal-cycling women. Past findings on auditory sex differences may have underestimated those sex differences. PMID:10748325

  6. Plant and fungal food components with potential activity on the development of microbial oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Daglia, Maria; Papetti, Adele; Mascherpa, Dora; Grisoli, Pietro; Giusto, Giovanni; Lingström, Peter; Pratten, Jonathan; Signoretto, Caterina; Spratt, David A; Wilson, Michael; Zaura, Egija; Gazzani, Gabriella

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the content in macronutrients, free sugars, polyphenols, and inorganic ions, known to exert any positive or negative action on microbial oral disease such as caries and gingivitis, of seven food/beverages (red chicory, mushroom, raspberry, green and black tea, cranberry juice, dark beer). Tea leaves resulted the richest material in all the detected ions, anyway tea beverages resulted the richest just in fluoride. The highest content in zinc was in chicory, raspberry and mushroom. Raspberry is the richest food in strontium and boron, beer in selenium, raspberry and mushroom in copper. Beer, cranberry juice and, especially green and black tea are very rich in polyphenols, confirming these beverages as important sources of such healthy substances. The fractionation, carried out on the basis of the molecular mass (MM), of the water soluble components occurring in raspberry, chicory, and mushroom extracts (which in microbiological assays revealed the highest potential action against oral pathogens), showed that both the high and low MM fractions are active, with the low MM fractions displaying the highest potential action for all the fractionated extracts. Our findings show that more compounds that can play a different active role occur in these foods. PMID:22013381

  7. Plant and Fungal Food Components with Potential Activity on the Development of Microbial Oral Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Daglia, Maria; Papetti, Adele; Mascherpa, Dora; Grisoli, Pietro; Giusto, Giovanni; Lingström, Peter; Pratten, Jonathan; Signoretto, Caterina; Spratt, David A.; Wilson, Michael; Zaura, Egija; Gazzani, Gabriella

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the content in macronutrients, free sugars, polyphenols, and inorganic ions, known to exert any positive or negative action on microbial oral disease such as caries and gingivitis, of seven food/beverages (red chicory, mushroom, raspberry, green and black tea, cranberry juice, dark beer). Tea leaves resulted the richest material in all the detected ions, anyway tea beverages resulted the richest just in fluoride. The highest content in zinc was in chicory, raspberry and mushroom. Raspberry is the richest food in strontium and boron, beer in selenium, raspberry and mushroom in copper. Beer, cranberry juice and, especially green and black tea are very rich in polyphenols, confirming these beverages as important sources of such healthy substances. The fractionation, carried out on the basis of the molecular mass (MM), of the water soluble components occurring in raspberry, chicory, and mushroom extracts (which in microbiological assays revealed the highest potential action against oral pathogens), showed that both the high and low MM fractions are active, with the low MM fractions displaying the highest potential action for all the fractionated extracts. Our findings show that more compounds that can play a different active role occur in these foods. PMID:22013381

  8. Potential Compounds for Oral Cancer Treatment: Resveratrol, Nimbolide, Lovastatin, Bortezomib, Vorinostat, Berberine, Pterostilbene, Deguelin, Andrographolide, and Colchicine

    PubMed Central

    Bundela, Saurabh; Sharma, Anjana; Bisen, Prakash S.

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the main causes of cancer-related deaths in South-Asian countries. There are very limited treatment options available for oral cancer. Research endeavors focused on discovery and development of novel therapies for oral cancer, is necessary to control the ever rising oral cancer related mortalities. We mined the large pool of compounds from the publicly available compound databases, to identify potential therapeutic compounds for oral cancer. Over 84 million compounds were screened for the possible anti-cancer activity by custom build SVM classifier. The molecular targets of the predicted anti-cancer compounds were mined from reliable sources like experimental bioassays studies associated with the compound, and from protein-compound interaction databases. Therapeutic compounds from DrugBank, and a list of natural anti-cancer compounds derived from literature mining of published studies, were used for building partial least squares regression model. The regression model thus built, was used for the estimation of oral cancer specific weights based on the molecular targets. These weights were used to compute scores for screening the predicted anti-cancer compounds for their potential to treat oral cancer. The list of potential compounds was annotated with corresponding physicochemical properties, cancer specific bioactivity evidences, and literature evidences. In all, 288 compounds with the potential to treat oral cancer were identified in the current study. The majority of the compounds in this list are natural products, which are well-tolerated and have minimal side-effects compared to the synthetic counterparts. Some of the potential therapeutic compounds identified in the current study are resveratrol, nimbolide, lovastatin, bortezomib, vorinostat, berberine, pterostilbene, deguelin, andrographolide, and colchicine. PMID:26536350

  9. Human BK Polyomavirus—The Potential for Head and Neck Malignancy and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Burger-Calderon, Raquel; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Members of the human Polyomaviridae family are ubiquitous and pathogenic among immune-compromised individuals. While only Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) has conclusively been linked to human cancer, all members of the polyomavirus (PyV) family encode the oncoprotein T antigen and may be potentially carcinogenic. Studies focusing on PyV pathogenesis in humans have become more abundant as the number of PyV family members and the list of associated diseases has expanded. BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) in particular has emerged as a new opportunistic pathogen among HIV positive individuals, carrying harmful implications. Increasing evidence links BKPyV to HIV-associated salivary gland disease (HIVSGD). HIVSGD is associated with elevated risk of lymphoma formation and its prevalence has increased among HIV/AIDS patients. Determining the relationship between BKPyV, disease and tumorigenesis among immunosuppressed individuals is necessary and will allow for expanding effective anti-viral treatment and prevention options in the future. PMID:26184314

  10. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Kai; Song, Yong; Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hui; Wang, Meng; Yan, Ting-lin; Liu, Ke; Shang, Zheng-jun

    2014-10-15

    Most previous studies have linked cancer–macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression. - Highlights: • The fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion. • The resulting hybrid cells acquire a new property of drug resistance. • The resulting hybrid cells express the markers of both parental cells (i.e. vimentin and cytokeratin 18). • The hybrid cells contribute to tumor repopulation in vivo.

  11. Anti-Heparanase Aptamers as Potential Diagnostic and Therapeutic Agents for Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Dilson; Cortez, Celia M.; McKenzie, Edward A.; Bitu, Carolina C.; Salo, Sirpa; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Nyberg, Pia; Risteli, Juha; deAlmeida, Carlos E. B.; Brenchley, Paul E. C.; Salo, Tuula; Missailidis, Sotiris

    2014-01-01

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase enzyme present in activated leucocytes, mast cells, placental tissue, neutrophils and macrophages, and is involved in tumour metastasis and tissue invasion. It presents a potential target for cancer therapies and various molecules have been developed in an attempt to inhibit the enzymatic action of heparanase. In an attempt to develop a novel therapeutic with an associated diagnostic assay, we have previously described high affinity aptamers selected against heparanase. In this work, we demonstrated that these anti-heparanase aptamers are capable of inhibiting tissue invasion of tumour cells associated with oral cancer and verified that such inhibition is due to inhibition of the enzyme and not due to other potentially cytotoxic effects of the aptamers. Furthermore, we have identified a short 30 bases aptamer as a potential candidate for further studies, as this showed a higher ability to inhibit tissue invasion than its longer counterpart, as well as a reduced potential for complex formation with other non-specific serum proteins. Finally, the aptamer was found to be stable and therefore suitable for use in human models, as it showed no degradation in the presence of human serum, making it a potential candidate for both diagnostic and therapeutic use. PMID:25295847

  12. [Prevention of oral cancer].

    PubMed

    Roodenburg, J L; Vermey, A; Nauta, J M

    1994-05-01

    Etiology control is the most important primary prevention of oral cancer. The use of tobacco and alcohol increases the risk of a squamous cell carcinoma of the oral mucosa. The dentist can play an important role in the secondary prevention or screening for premalignant lesions, asymptomatic malignancies and second primary tumours of the oral cavity. Because of their age, edentulous patients run a high risk of oral cancer. Therefore, a regular oral check-up of these patients should be recommended. PMID:11830977

  13. In vivo confocal microscopy for the oral cavity: Current state of the field and future potential.

    PubMed

    Maher, N G; Collgros, H; Uribe, P; Ch'ng, S; Rajadhyaksha, M; Guitera, P

    2016-03-01

    Confocal microscopy (CM) has been shown to correlate with oral mucosal histopathology in vivo. The purposes of this review are to summarize what we know so far about in vivo CM applications for oral mucosal pathologies, to highlight some current developments with CM devices relevant for oral applications, and to formulate where in vivo CM could hold further application for oral mucosal diagnosis and management. Ovid Medline® and/or Google® searches were performed using the terms 'microscopy, confocal', 'mouth neoplasms', 'mouth mucosa', 'leukoplakia, oral', 'oral lichen planus', 'gingiva', 'cheilitis', 'taste', 'inflammatory oral confocal', 'mucosal confocal' and 'confocal squamous cell oral'. In summary, inclusion criteria were in vivo use of any type of CM for the human oral mucosa and studies on normal or pathological oral mucosa. Experimental studies attempting to identify proteins of interest and microorganisms were excluded. In total 25 relevant articles were found, covering 8 main topics, including normal oral mucosal features (n=15), oral dysplasia or neoplasia (n=7), inflamed oral mucosa (n=3), taste impairment (n=3), oral autoimmune conditions (n=2), pigmented oral pathology/melanoma (n=1), delayed type hypersensitivity (n=1), and cheilitis glandularis (n=1). The evidence for using in vivo CM in these conditions is poor, as it is limited to mainly small descriptive studies. Current device developments for oral CM include improved probe design. The authors propose that future applications for in vivo oral CM may include burning mouth syndrome, intra-operative mapping for cancer surgery, and monitoring and targeted biopsies within field cancerization. PMID:26786962

  14. Oral medicine and the ageing population.

    PubMed

    Yap, T; McCullough, M

    2015-03-01

    The oral cavity is subject to age related processes such as cellular ageing and immunosenescence. The ageing population bears an increased burden of intraoral pathology. In oral medicine, the majority of presenting patients are in their fifth to seventh decade of life. In this review, we discuss the ageing population's susceptibility to mucosal disorders and the increased prevalence of potentially malignant disorders and oral squamous cell carcinoma, as well as dermatoses including oral lichen planus and immunobullous conditions. We also address the ageing population's susceptibility to oral discomfort and explore salivary secretion, ulceration and the symptoms of oral burning. Finally, we will describe orofacial pain conditions which are more likely encountered in an older population. This update highlights clinical presentations which are more likely to be encountered in the ageing population in a general practice setting and the importance of screening both new and long-term patients. PMID:25762041

  15. Investigation of the Enteric Pathogenic Potential of Oral Campylobacter concisus Strains Isolated from Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Octavia, Sophie; Day, Andrew S.; Riordan, Stephen M.; Grimm, Michael C.; Lan, Ruiting; Lemberg, Daniel; Tran, Thi Anh Tuyet; Zhang, Li

    2012-01-01

    Background Campylobacter concisus, a bacterium colonizing the human oral cavity, has been shown to be associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This study investigated if patients with IBD are colonized with specific oral C. concisus strains that have potential to cause enteric diseases. Methodology Seventy oral and enteric C. concisus isolates obtained from eight patients with IBD and six controls were examined for housekeeping genes by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), Caco2 cell invasion by gentamicin-protection-assay, protein analysis by mass spectrometry and SDS-PAGE, and morphology by scanning electron microscopy. The whole genome sequenced C. concisus strain 13826 which was isolated from an individual with bloody diarrhea was included in MLST analysis. Principal Findings MLST analysis showed that 87.5% of individuals whose C. concisus belonged to Cluster I had inflammatory enteric diseases (six IBD and one with bloody diarrhea), which was significantly higher than that in the remaining individuals (28.6%) (P<0.05). Enteric invasive C. concisus (EICC) oral strain was detected in 50% of patients with IBD and none of the controls. All EICC strains were in Cluster 1. The C. concisus strain colonizing intestinal tissues of patient No. 1 was closely related to the oral C. concisus strain from patient No. 6 and had gene recombination with the patient’s own oral C. concisus. The oral and intestinal C. concisus strains of patient No. 3 were the same strain. Some individuals were colonized with multiple oral C. concisus strains that have undergone natural recombination. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence that patients with IBD are colonized with specific oral C. concisus strains, with some being EICC strains. C. concisus colonizing intestinal tissues of patients with IBD at least in some instances results from an endogenous colonization of the patient’s oral C. concisus and that C. concisus strains undergo natural recombination. PMID

  16. Teriflunomide, an inhibitor of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase for the potential oral treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Alan M

    2010-11-01

    Teriflunomide, being developed as a potential oral treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS) by sanofi-aventis, is the active metabolite of the rheumatoid arthritis drug leflunomide. Both teriflunomide and leflunomide are inhibitors of the mitochondrial enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, which is critically involved in pyrimidine synthesis. The production of activated T-cells largely depends on de novo pyrimidine synthesis, and thus pyrimidine depletion is thought to result in the inhibition of immune cell proliferation. Therapeutic efficacy of teriflunomide has been demonstrated in vivo in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model of MS using Dark Agouti rats. In a phase II, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of patients with relapsing-remitting MS, treatment with teriflunomide reduced the number of active lesions in the brain and preliminary evidence indicated a slowing in the development of disability. Recently reported data from the phase III TEMSO clinical trial support these initial findings. Compared with current therapies, teriflunomide has the advantage of oral administration. Thus, if good efficacy is demonstrated, teriflunomide may have a role to play in the future treatment of MS. PMID:21157651

  17. Intoxication by intraperitoneal injection or oral gavage equally potentiates postburn organ damage and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Michael M; Palmer, Jessica L; Ippolito, Jill A; Curtis, Brenda J; Choudhry, Mashkoor A; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2013-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of binge drinking and its association with trauma necessitate accurate animal models to examine the impact of intoxication on the response and outcome to injuries such as burn. While much research has focused on the effect of alcohol dose and duration on the subsequent inflammatory parameters following burn, little evidence exists on the effect of the route of alcohol administration. We examined the degree to which intoxication before burn injury causes systemic inflammation when ethanol is given by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection or oral gavage. We found that intoxication potentiates postburn damage in the ileum, liver, and lungs of mice to an equivalent extent when either ethanol administration route is used. We also found a similar hematologic response and levels of circulating interleukin-6 (IL-6) when either ethanol paradigm achieved intoxication before burn. Furthermore, both i.p. and gavage resulted in similar blood alcohol concentrations at all time points tested. Overall, our data show an equal inflammatory response to burn injury when intoxication is achieved by either i.p. injection or oral gavage, suggesting that findings from studies using either ethanol paradigm are directly comparable. PMID:24379525

  18. The potential role of microbes in oncogenesis with particular emphasis on oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Faden, Asmaa A.

    2016-01-01

    For over a century, non-virus microorganisms, notably bacteria have been implicated as causal agents of cancers, a relatively small number of researchers have provided evidence to support the so-called “cancer germ” hypothesis. With the exception of the link between Helicobacter pylori and stomach cancer, other supposed links have been ignored. A wide range of bacteria and other non-virus microbes, including fungi, have been implicated over the years in oncogenesis, as well as the ability to induce inflammation, which may cause cancer. It seems that there is no single “cancer germ,” as most bacteria can apparently induce cancer. Here, the role of bacteria and other non-virus microorganisms and oral cancers will be discussed. By ignoring bacteria as a causal agent of cancer, we set back our understanding of this crucially important disease and, as a result, have hindered the development of potential cures. PMID:27279505

  19. Emergence of new oral antithrombotics: a critical appraisal of their clinical potential

    PubMed Central

    Lassen, Michael Rud; Laux, Volker

    2008-01-01

    In Western countries, venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a widespread and serious disorder, with hospital admission rates that appear to be increasing. Current anticoagulant therapies available for the prevention and treatment of VTE have several drawbacks that make them either difficult to manage effectively, due to a need for careful monitoring to control coagulation, or, in the case of parenterally administered agents, inconvenient for long-term use. To address some of these issues, new anticoagulants are in clinical development that can be orally administered and directly target specific factors in the coagulation cascade. This article reviews the rationale behind development of these novel agents and provides a critical appraisal of their clinical potential. In addition, the impact that the introduction of such agents into clinical practice would have is discussed from the patient perspective. PMID:19337550

  20. Emergence of new oral antithrombotics: a critical appraisal of their clinical potential.

    PubMed

    Lassen, Michael Rud; Laux, Volker

    2008-01-01

    In Western countries, venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a widespread and serious disorder, with hospital admission rates that appear to be increasing. Current anticoagulant therapies available for the prevention and treatment of VTE have several drawbacks that make them either difficult to manage effectively, due to a need for careful monitoring to control coagulation, or, in the case of parenterally administered agents, inconvenient for long-term use. To address some of these issues, new anticoagulants are in clinical development that can be orally administered and directly target specific factors in the coagulation cascade. This article reviews the rationale behind development of these novel agents and provides a critical appraisal of their clinical potential. In addition, the impact that the introduction of such agents into clinical practice would have is discussed from the patient perspective. PMID:19337550

  1. Oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Olson, Meredith A; Rogers, Roy S; Bruce, Alison J

    2016-01-01

    Lichen planus is an inflammatory mucocutaneous disease that can affect the skin, hair, nails, and mucosal surfaces. Mucosal sites of involvement include oral, genital, ocular, otic, esophageal, and, less commonly, bladder, nasal, laryngeal, and anal surfaces. Oral lichen planus is a mucosal variant of lichen planus, which tends to affect women more often than men, with a typically more chronic course and potential for significant morbidity. Treatment can be challenging, and there is potentially a low risk of malignant transformation; however, therapeutic benefits can be obtained with various topical and systemic medications. Clinical monitoring is recommended to ensure symptomatic control. Increasing awareness and recognition of this entity have continued to fuel advances in therapy and in our understanding of the disease. PMID:27343965

  2. Investigating potential exogenous tumor initiating and promoting factors for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphomas (CTCL), a rare skin malignancy.

    PubMed

    Litvinov, Ivan V; Shtreis, Anna; Kobayashi, Kenneth; Glassman, Steven; Tsang, Matthew; Woetmann, Anders; Sasseville, Denis; Ødum, Niels; Duvic, Madeleine

    2016-07-01

    Most skin malignancies are caused by external and often preventable environmental agents. Multiple reports demonstrated that cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) can occur in married couples and cluster in families. Furthermore, recent studies document geographic clustering of this malignancy in Texas as well as in other areas of the United States. Multiple infectious, occupational, and medication causes have been proposed as triggers or promoters of this malignancy including hydrochlorothiazide diuretics, Staphylococcus aureus, dermatophytes, Mycobacterium leprae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, human T-Cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV1), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and herpes simplex virus (HSV). In this report, we review recent evidence evaluating the involvement of these agents in cancer initiation/progression. Most importantly, recent molecular experimental evidence documented for the first time that S. aureus can activate oncogenic STAT3 signaling in malignant T cells. Specifically, S. aureus Enterotoxin type A (SEA) was recently shown to trigger non-malignant infiltrating T cells to release IL-2 and other cytokines. These signals upon binging to their cognate receptors on malignant T cells are then able to activate STAT3 and STAT5 oncogenic signaling and promote cancer progression and IL-17 secretion. In light of these findings, it might be important for patients with exacerbation of their CTCL symptoms to maintain high index of suspicion and treat these individuals for S. aureus colonization and/or sepsis with topical and systemic antibiotics. PMID:27622024

  3. Malignant Vagal Paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Hamersley, Erin R S; Barrows, Amy; Perez, Angel; Schroeder, Ashley; Castle, James T

    2016-06-01

    Paragangliomas are rare, typically benign neuroendocrine tumors that represent a small portion of head and neck tumors. A small percentage of these are known to have malignant potential. They arise from the carotid body, jugular bulb or vagus nerves. There is limited literature discussing the management of malignant vagal paragangliomas. We present a case of a 25 year old female with a left malignant vagal paraganglioma. The following case presentation will describe the presentation, classic radiologic findings, and management of a malignant vagal paraganglioma along with a review of the literature. PMID:25712400

  4. Analysis of the excreted JC virus strains and their potential oral transmission.

    PubMed

    Bofill-Mas, Sílvia; Clemente-Casares, Pilar; Major, Eugene O; Curfman, Blanche; Girones, Rosina

    2003-08-01

    JC virus (JCV) particles have been detected in urban sewage of divergent geographical areas. In this study, the authors evaluate the genetic characteristics and the infective capabilities of JCV strains in relation to the potential oral transmission of JCV in the population. JCV strains excreted in urine and detected in sewage have been described as presenting archetypal structure of the regulatory region of the viral genome. The regulatory region of JCV viral particles detected in two urban sewage samples have been cloned and characterized. From a total of 40 clones tested, 39 presented archetypal-like regulatory regions, whereas 1 of the clones analyzed presented a tandem repeated structure. Archetypal strains present in the urine of a pregnant woman were able to infect SVG cells, producing infectious virions, as demonstrated by confirmative cell culture, electron microscopy, and in situ DNA hybridization. This is the first description of archetypal JCV productive infection of SVG cells. SVG cells were also successfully infected with Mad-4 JCV viral particles subjected to pH 3 for 1 h at 37 degrees C and to 10 microg/ml of trypsin in the same conditions. A decrease in the viral progeny production was observed when Mad-4 was subjected to acidic pH. Mad-4 did not produce any detectable infection in the enteric cell line CaCo-2. The oral route could represent a significant route of transmission of JCV infections because JCV virions have demonstrated relative resistance in the environment and to some of the conditions present in the gastrointestinal tract. The archetypal strains commonly detected in the environment may be implicated in the transmission of JCV among the population. Sporadic infection with strains presenting tandem repeated structures may have implications in pathogenicity. PMID:12907394

  5. Antibacterial potential of Manuka honey against three oral bacteria in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schmidlin, PatrickSchmidlin R; English, Helen; Duncan, Warwick; Belibasakis, Georgios N; Thurnheer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Honey is an ancient natural remedy for the treatment of infected wounds. It has regained attention in the medical profession, as it has recently been reported to have a broad-spectrum inhibitory effect against bacteria. Data concerning Manuka honey of New Zealand origin, which is claimed to provide additional non-peroxide antimicrobial activity (so-called standard NPA) against oral pathogens, is still scarce. Therefore, this study aimed to screen for the antibacterial efficacy of different Manuka honey products against S. mutans (OMZ 918), P. gingivalis (OMZ 925) and A. actinomycetemcomitans (OMZ 299). Chlorhexidine and saline served as positive and negative controls, respectively, whereas a Swiss multifloral honey served as control honey without intrinsic non-peroxide activity. Chlorhexidine showed the highest inhibiting potential against all specimens tested. Manuka honey below an NPA value of 15 showed the least bacterial growth-inhibiting potential, even less – although not significantly so – than multifloral Swiss honey. Manuka honey above an NPA value of 15 showed a significantly higher antibacterial effect compared to the other honeys tested. All Manuka honey preparations were more effective in inhibiting the growth of P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans, rather than S. mutans. In conclusion, the study showed an NPA dose-dependent antibacterial efficacy of Manuka honey. Further investigations of this natural product are now open for scrutiny. PMID:25253413

  6. Pseudoepitheliomatous Hyperplasia: Relevance in Oral Pathology.

    PubMed

    Sarangarajan, R; Vedam, V K Vaishnavi; Sivadas, G; Krishnaraj, R; Sarangarajan, Anuradha; Shanmugam, K T

    2015-07-01

    Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia (PEH), a neglected entity by oral pathologist possesses utmost importance in the field of research. Of all the investigative challenges, PEH, a reactive epithelial proliferation is seen secondary to lesions with infectious, inflammatory, reactive, and degenerative origin. Small sized samples, incomplete excision, improper orientation, and dense inflammatory changes render diagnostic confront to the oral pathologist in exclusion of frankly invasive malignant lesions like squamous cell carcinoma from lesions exhibiting PEH. The diagnosis can occasionally be difficult as they mimic other lesions also, on clinic-pathological assessment. Thus, this article gives an insight regarding the various concepts of etiopathogenesis, histopathology, differential diagnosis, and malignant potential of PEH. A combined effort of a clinician and pathologist benefits every patient to rule out malignancy and render appropriate treatment as the only local conservative approach is essential to remove PEH associated lesions. PMID:26229388

  7. Caffeic Acid phenethyl ester is a potential therapeutic agent for oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ying-Yu; Jim, Wai-Tim; Su, Liang-Cheng; Chung, Chi-Jung; Lin, Ching-Yu; Huo, Chieh; Tseng, Jen-Chih; Huang, Shih-Han; Lai, Chih-Jen; Chen, Bo-Chih; Wang, Bi-Juan; Chan, Tzu-Min; Lin, Hui-Ping; Chang, Wun-Shaing Wayne; Chang, Chuang-Rung; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancers, which affect 650,000 people and cause 350,000 deaths per year, is the sixth leading cancer by cancer incidence and eighth by cancer-related death worldwide. Oral cancer is the most common type of head and neck cancer. More than 90% of oral cancers are oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The overall five-year survival rate of OSCC patients is approximately 63%, which is due to the low response rate to current therapeutic drugs. In this review we discuss the possibility of using caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) as an alternative treatment for oral cancer. CAPE is a strong antioxidant extracted from honeybee hive propolis. Recent studies indicate that CAPE treatment can effectively suppress the proliferation, survival, and metastasis of oral cancer cells. CAPE treatment inhibits Akt signaling, cell cycle regulatory proteins, NF-κB function, as well as activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Therefore, CAPE treatment induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in oral cancer cells. According to the evidence that aberrations in the EGFR/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling, NF-κB function, COX-2 activity, and MMPs activity are frequently found in oral cancers, and that the phosphorylation of Akt, EGFR, and COX-2 correlates to oral cancer patient survival and clinical progression, we believe that CAPE treatment will be useful for treatment of advanced oral cancer patients. PMID:25984601

  8. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Is a Potential Therapeutic Agent for Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ying-Yu; Jim, Wai-Tim; Su, Liang-Cheng; Chung, Chi-Jung; Lin, Ching-Yu; Huo, Chieh; Tseng, Jen-Chih; Huang, Shih-Han; Lai, Chih-Jen; Chen, Bo-Chih; Wang, Bi-Juan; Chan, Tzu-Min; Lin, Hui-Ping; Chang, Wun-Shaing Wayne; Chang, Chuang-Rung; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancers, which affect 650,000 people and cause 350,000 deaths per year, is the sixth leading cancer by cancer incidence and eighth by cancer-related death worldwide. Oral cancer is the most common type of head and neck cancer. More than 90% of oral cancers are oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The overall five-year survival rate of OSCC patients is approximately 63%, which is due to the low response rate to current therapeutic drugs. In this review we discuss the possibility of using caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) as an alternative treatment for oral cancer. CAPE is a strong antioxidant extracted from honeybee hive propolis. Recent studies indicate that CAPE treatment can effectively suppress the proliferation, survival, and metastasis of oral cancer cells. CAPE treatment inhibits Akt signaling, cell cycle regulatory proteins, NF-κB function, as well as activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Therefore, CAPE treatment induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in oral cancer cells. According to the evidence that aberrations in the EGFR/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling, NF-κB function, COX-2 activity, and MMPs activity are frequently found in oral cancers, and that the phosphorylation of Akt, EGFR, and COX-2 correlates to oral cancer patient survival and clinical progression, we believe that CAPE treatment will be useful for treatment of advanced oral cancer patients. PMID:25984601

  9. Antibacterial peptide nisin: a potential role in the inhibition of oral pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhongchun; Ni, Longxing; Ling, Junqi

    2014-10-01

    Although the antimicrobial peptide nisin has been extensively studied in the food industry for decades, its application in the oral cavity remains to develop and evaluate its feasibility in treating oral common diseases. Nisin is an odorless, colorless, tasteless substance with low toxicity and with antibacterial activities against Gram-positive bacteria. These biologic properties may establish its use in promising products for oral diseases. This article summarizes the antibacterial efficiency of nisin against pathogenic bacteria related to dental caries and root canal infection and discusses the combination of nisin and common oral drugs. PMID:25088158

  10. Circulating miR-223 in Oral Cancer: Its Potential as a Novel Diagnostic Biomarker and Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Hirohiko; Sho, Ri; Takeda, Yuji; Zhang, Xuhong; Yoshida, Yukie; Narimatsu, Hiroto; Otani, Katsumi; Ishikawa, Shigeo; Fukao, Akira; Asao, Hironobu; Iino, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) have been detected in various types of cancer and have been proposed as novel biomarkers for diagnosis and treatment. Until recently, however, no studies had comprehensively examined circulating miRNAs in oral cancer. The current study used an ultra-sensitive genome-wide miRNA array to investigate changes in circulating miRNAs in plasma from five patients with oral cancer and ten healthy individuals. Results indicated that there were only a few circulating miRNAs, including miR-223, miR-26a, miR-126, and miR-21, that were up-regulated in patients with oral cancer. A subsequent validation test indicated that circulating miR-223 levels were significantly higher (~2-fold, P< 0.05) in patients with oral cancer (n = 31) than in those without cancer (n = 31). Moreover, miR-223 was found to be up-regulated in tumor-adjacent normal tissue compared to tumor tissue from patients with oral cancer. A gain-of-function assay was performed to explore the potential roles of circulating miR-223 in the development of oral cancer. Results revealed that miR-223 functions as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. In conclusion, this study suggested that circulating miR-223 may serve as a potential biomarker for diagnosis and that it may represent a novel therapeutic target for treatment of oral cancer. PMID:27441818

  11. Potential impact of new oral anticoagulants on the management of atrial fibrillation-related stroke in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Harris, K; Mant, J

    2013-01-01

    Aim Anticoagulant prophylaxis with vitamin K antagonists (such as warfarin) is effective in reducing the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). New oral anticoagulants have emerged as potential alternatives to traditional oral agents. The purpose of this review was to summarise the effectiveness and safety of rivaroxaban, dabigatran and apixaban in stroke prevention in patients with AF in phase III trials, evaluate their cost-effectiveness and consider the implications for primary care. Methodology A literature search was performed between 2007 and 2012, selecting all phase III trials (ROCKET AF, RE-LY and ARISTOTLE) of new oral anticoagulants and relevant cost–benefit studies. Results Evidence shows that all three agents are at least as effective as warfarin in the prevention of stroke and systemic emboli, with similar safety profiles. Cost–benefit studies of rivaroxaban and dabigatran further confirm their potential use as alternatives to warfarin in clinical practice. These observations may allow stratification of the general practice AF population, to help prioritise which patients may benefit from receiving a new oral anticoagulant. Conclusion The clinical and economic benefits of the new oral anticoagulants, along with appropriate risk stratification, may enable a higher number of patients with AF to receive effective and convenient prophylaxis for stroke prevention. PMID:23621153

  12. A Tumor-Specific Neo-Antigen Caused by a Frameshift Mutation in BAP1 Is a Potential Personalized Biomarker in Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jun; Zhou, Zhan; Tang, Xiao-Jing; Gao, Zhi-Bin; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Shu-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive rare malignancy associated with asbestos exposure. A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of MPM will help develop a targeted therapy strategy. Oncogene targeted depth sequencing was performed on a tumor sample and paired peripheral blood DNA from a patient with malignant mesothelioma of the peritoneum. Four somatic base-substitutions in NOTCH2, NSD1, PDE4DIP, and ATP10B and 1 insert frameshift mutation in BAP1 were validated by the Sanger method at the transcriptional level. A 13-amino acids neo-peptide of the truncated Bap1 protein, which was produced as a result of this novel frameshift mutation, was predicted to be presented by this patient’s HLA-B protein. The polyclonal antibody of the synthesized 13-mer neo-peptide was produced in rabbits. Western blotting results showed a good antibody-neoantigen specificity, and Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining with the antibody of the neo-peptide clearly differentiated neoplastic cells from normal cells. A search of the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) database also revealed that 53.2% of mutations in BAP1 were frameshift indels with neo-peptide formation. An identified tumor-specific neo-antigen could be the potential molecular biomarker for personalized diagnosis to precisely subtype rare malignancies such as MPM. PMID:27187383

  13. A Tumor-Specific Neo-Antigen Caused by a Frameshift Mutation in BAP1 Is a Potential Personalized Biomarker in Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jun; Zhou, Zhan; Tang, Xiao-Jing; Gao, Zhi-Bin; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Shu-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive rare malignancy associated with asbestos exposure. A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of MPM will help develop a targeted therapy strategy. Oncogene targeted depth sequencing was performed on a tumor sample and paired peripheral blood DNA from a patient with malignant mesothelioma of the peritoneum. Four somatic base-substitutions in NOTCH2, NSD1, PDE4DIP, and ATP10B and 1 insert frameshift mutation in BAP1 were validated by the Sanger method at the transcriptional level. A 13-amino acids neo-peptide of the truncated Bap1 protein, which was produced as a result of this novel frameshift mutation, was predicted to be presented by this patient's HLA-B protein. The polyclonal antibody of the synthesized 13-mer neo-peptide was produced in rabbits. Western blotting results showed a good antibody-neoantigen specificity, and Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining with the antibody of the neo-peptide clearly differentiated neoplastic cells from normal cells. A search of the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) database also revealed that 53.2% of mutations in BAP1 were frameshift indels with neo-peptide formation. An identified tumor-specific neo-antigen could be the potential molecular biomarker for personalized diagnosis to precisely subtype rare malignancies such as MPM. PMID:27187383

  14. CARCINOGENIC POTENTIAL OF ROTENONE: SUBCHRONIC ORAL AND PERITONEAL ADMINISTRATION TO RATS AND CHRONIC DIETARY ADMINISTRATION TO SYRIAN GOLDEN HAMSTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three long-term studies were performed to evaluate the carcinogenic potential of the pesticide rotenone in hamsters and rats. Rotenone was administered orally to Wistar rats and by intraperitoneal injection to Sprague-Dawley rats, which were maintained and observed for 14 and 18 ...

  15. Potential of Text-Based Internet Chats for Improving Oral Fluency in a Second Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Although a number of studies have reported on the positive effects of Internet chats in the second language classroom, to the best of my knowledge no studies to date have examined the effect of text-based chats on oral fluency development. This exploratory study addressed the above question by examining the oral fluency development of 34 English…

  16. Intraoral malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Babburi, Suresh; Subramanyam, R. V.; Aparna, V.; Sowjanya, P.

    2013-01-01

    Primary oral mucosal melanoma is a rare aggressive neoplasm and accounts for only 0.2-8% of all reported melanomas. It is a malignant neoplasm of melanocytes that may arise from a benign melanocytic lesion or de novo from melanocytes within normal skin or mucosa. It is considered to be the most deadly and biologically unpredictable of all human neoplasms, having the worst prognosis. In this article, we report a case of oral melanoma in a 52-year-old female patient with a chief complaint of black discolouration of the maxillary gingiva and palate. PMID:24249959

  17. Areca nut and its role in oral submucous fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Vishnudas; Chatra, Laxmikanth; Shenai, Prashant; Suvarna, Nithin; Dandekeri, Savita

    2014-01-01

    Areca nut, commonly called as betel nut or supari, is a fruit of areca catechu palm tree, which is native of South Asia and Pacific Islands. The seed or endosperm is consumed fresh, boiled or after sun drying or curing. Chewing areca nut is thought to have central nervous system stimulating effect and along with this it is known to have salivary stimulating and digestive properties. According to the traditional Ayurvedic medicine, chewing areca nut and betel leaf is a good remedy against halitosis. It is also used for its deworming property. Along with these beneficial effects of areca nut one of its most harmful effects on the human body in general and oral cavity in particular is the development of potentially malignant disorder called Oral Submucous Fibrosis. The present paper discusses in detail the effects of the components of areca nut on pathogenesis of Oral Submucous Fibrosis. Key words:Areca nut, oral submucous fibrosis, potentially malignant disorder, supari. PMID:25674328

  18. Areca nut and its role in oral submucous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Rachana V; Prabhu, Vishnudas; Chatra, Laxmikanth; Shenai, Prashant; Suvarna, Nithin; Dandekeri, Savita

    2014-12-01

    Areca nut, commonly called as betel nut or supari, is a fruit of areca catechu palm tree, which is native of South Asia and Pacific Islands. The seed or endosperm is consumed fresh, boiled or after sun drying or curing. Chewing areca nut is thought to have central nervous system stimulating effect and along with this it is known to have salivary stimulating and digestive properties. According to the traditional Ayurvedic medicine, chewing areca nut and betel leaf is a good remedy against halitosis. It is also used for its deworming property. Along with these beneficial effects of areca nut one of its most harmful effects on the human body in general and oral cavity in particular is the development of potentially malignant disorder called Oral Submucous Fibrosis. The present paper discusses in detail the effects of the components of areca nut on pathogenesis of Oral Submucous Fibrosis. Key words:Areca nut, oral submucous fibrosis, potentially malignant disorder, supari. PMID:25674328

  19. The oral microbiome in health and disease and the potential impact on personalized dental medicine.

    PubMed

    Zarco, M F; Vess, T J; Ginsburg, G S

    2012-03-01

    Every human body contains a personalized microbiome that is essential to maintaining health but capable of eliciting disease. The oral microbiome is particularly imperative to health because it can cause both oral and systemic disease. The oral microbiome rests within biofilms throughout the oral cavity, forming an ecosystem that maintains health when in equilibrium. However, certain ecological shifts in the microbiome allow pathogens to manifest and cause disease. Severe forms of oral disease may result in systemic disease at different body sites. Microbiomics and metagenomics are two fields of research that have emerged to identify the presence of specific microbes in the body and understand the nature of the microbiome activity during both health and disease. The analysis of the microbiome and its genomes will pave the way for more effective therapeutic and diagnostic techniques and, ultimately, contribute to the development of personalized medicine and personalized dental medicine. PMID:21902769

  20. Goats are a potential reservoir for the herpesvirus (MCFV-WTD),causing malignant catarrhal fever in deer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the recent investigation of malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) in a red brocket deer (Mazama americana) from a Texas zoo, the MCF viral DNA from the newly recognized herpesvirus causing disease in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) (termed MCFV-WTD) was detected. The epidemiology information...

  1. Procaine in Malignant Hyperpyrexia

    PubMed Central

    Moulds, R. F. W.; Denborough, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    The caffeine contracture of normal human muscle, which has been used as a model for malignant hyperpyrexia, is greatly potentiated by halothane. Prior administration of procaine markedly reduces the halothane-potentiated caffeine contracture, and procaine given at the height of the contracture induces relaxation. Lignocaine, on the other hand, produces a variable response and sometimes increases the contracture. The muscle from a patient with an inherited susceptibility to malignant hyperpyrexia contracted spontaneously with halothane alone, and this contracture was reversed by procaine. These experiments support the therapeutic use of procaine in malignant hyperpyrexia. PMID:4642792

  2. Experimental oral inoculations in birds to evaluate potential definitive hosts of Neospora caninum.

    PubMed

    Baker, D G; Morishita, T Y; Brooks, D L; Shen, S K; Lindsay, D S; Dubey, J P

    1995-10-01

    Experimental oral inoculations to evaluate potential definitive hosts of Neospora caninum were conducted by feeding infected rodent tissues to 9 carnivorous birds of 4 species. Birds included 2 red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), 2 turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), 2 barn owls (Tyto alba), and 3 American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchus). The rodents (mice or rats) had been inoculated with 100,000 culture-derived tachyzoites of N. caninum 1-6 mo before feeding to the birds. Fecal samples were collected from each bird daily for 1 mo after feeding rodents and examined for oocysts by fecal flotation. In addition, processed aliquots from all avian fecal samples were fed to BALB/c mice. Five weeks after feeding, mice were bled and sera were tested for antibodies against N. caninum. One to two months later, mice were killed and brain tissue was examined microscopically for protozoal cysts. While occasional oocysts were found in avian fecal samples, these were likely not N. caninum because they were not infective to BALB/c mice. It was concluded that the bird species tested are not likely to be definitive hosts of N. caninum. PMID:7472875

  3. Therapeutic potential of an orally effective small molecule inhibitor of plasminogen activator inhibitor for asthma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Ming; Eldridge, Stephanie; Watanabe, Nobuo; Deshane, Jessy; Kuo, Hui-Chien; Jiang, Chunsun; Wang, Yong; Liu, Gang; Schwiebert, Lisa; Miyata, Toshio; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-02-15

    Asthma is one of the most common respiratory diseases. Although progress has been made in our understanding of airway pathology and many drugs are available to relieve asthma symptoms, there is no cure for chronic asthma. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a primary inhibitor of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators, has pleiotropic functions besides suppression of fibrinolysis. In this study, we show that administration of TM5275, an orally effective small-molecule PAI-1 inhibitor, 25 days after ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization-challenge, significantly ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-induced chronic asthma model. Furthermore, we show that TM5275 administration significantly attenuated OVA-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes), the increase in the levels of OVA-specific IgE and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5), the production of mucin in the airways, and airway subepithelial fibrosis. Together, the results suggest that the PAI-1 inhibitor TM5275 may have therapeutic potential for asthma through suppressing eosinophilic allergic response and ameliorating airway remodeling. PMID:26702150

  4. Classification of Extraovarian Implants in Patients With Ovarian Serous Borderline Tumors (Tumors of Low Malignant Potential) Based on Clinical Outcome.

    PubMed

    McKenney, Jesse K; Gilks, C Blake; Kalloger, Steve; Longacre, Teri A

    2016-09-01

    The classification of extraovarian disease into invasive and noninvasive implants predicts patient outcome in patients with high-stage ovarian serous borderline tumors (tumors of low malignant potential). However, the morphologic criteria used to classify implants vary between studies. To date, there has been no large-scale study with follow-up data comparing the prognostic significance of competing criteria. Peritoneal and/or lymph node implants from 181 patients with high-stage serous borderline tumors were evaluated independently by 3 pathologists for the following 8 morphologic features: micropapillary architecture; glandular architecture; nests of epithelial cells with surrounding retraction artifact set in densely fibrotic stroma; low-power destructive tissue invasion; single eosinophilic epithelial cells within desmoplastic stroma; mitotic activity; nuclear pleomorphism; and nucleoli. Follow-up of 156 (86%) patients ranged from 11 to 264 months (mean, 89 mo; median, 94 mo). Implants with low-power destructive invasion into underlying tissue were the best predictor of adverse patient outcome with 69% overall and 59% disease-free survival (P<0.01). In the evaluation of individual morphologic features, the low-power destructive tissue invasion criterion also had excellent reproducibility between observers (κ=0.84). Extraovarian implants with micropapillary architecture or solid nests with clefts were often associated with tissue invasion but did not add significant prognostic value beyond destructive tissue invasion alone. Implants without attached normal tissue were not associated with adverse outcome and appear to be noninvasive. Because the presence of invasion in an extraovarian implant is associated with an overall survival analogous to that of low-grade serous carcinoma, the designation low-grade serous carcinoma is recommended. Even though the low-power destructive tissue invasion criterion has excellent interobserver reproducibility, it is further

  5. Long-term low-dose α-particle enhanced the potential of malignant transformation in human bronchial epithelial cells through MAPK/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Weili; Xiao, Linlin; Dong, Chen; He, Mingyuan; Pan, Yan; Xie, Yuexia; Tu, Wenzhi; Fu, Jiamei; Shao, Chunlin

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Multi-exposures of 25 mGy α-ray enhanced cell proliferation, adhesion, and invasion. • MAPK/Akt but not JNK/P66 was positively correlated with cell invasive phenotypes. • LDR of α-irradiation triggers cell malignant transformation through MAPK/Akt. - Abstract: Since the wide usage of ionizing radiation, the cancer risk of low dose radiation (LDR) (<0.1 Gy) has become attractive for a long time. However, most results are derived from epidemiologic studies on atomic-bomb survivors and nuclear accidents surrounding population, and the molecular mechanism of this risk is elusive. To explore the potential of a long-term LDR-induced malignant transformation, human bronchial epithelial cells Beas-2B were fractionally irradiated with 0.025 Gy α-particles for 8 times in total and then further cultured for 1–2 months. It was found that the cell proliferation, the abilities of adhesion and invasion, and the protein expressions of p-ERK, p-Akt, especially p-P38 were not only increased in the multiply-irradiated cells but also in their offspring 1–2 months after the final exposure, indicating high potentiality of cell malignant transformation. On opposite, the expressions of p-JNK and p-P66 were diminished in the subcultures of irradiated cells and thus may play a role of negative regulation in canceration. When the cells were transferred with p38 siRNA, the LDR-induced enhancements of cell adhesion and invasion were significantly reduced. These findings suggest that long-term LDR of α-particles could enhance the potential of malignant transformation incidence in human bronchial epithelial cells through MAPK/Akt pathway.

  6. Co-existence of a giant splenic hemangioma and multiple hepatic hemangiomas and the potential association with the use of oral contraceptives: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Chatzoulis, George; Kaltsas, Andreas; Daliakopoulos, Stauros; Sallam, Osama; Maria, Kaltsa; Chatzoulis, Kostas; Pachiadakis, Ioannis

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Hepatic and splenic hemangiomas are common benign tumors that mainly affect female patients. Giant splenic hemangiomas are extremely rare, especially when correlated with multiple hepatic hemangiomas. Pathogenetic mechanisms between hemangiomas and oral contraceptives, as well as therapeutic approaches, are analyzed in this case report, in particular for the management of synchronous splenic and hepatic hemangiomas. Case presentation We report here a 42-year-old woman with a giant splenic hemangioma, multiple hepatic hemangiomas and a history of oral estrogen intake for many years. At first it was difficult to determine the organ from which the giant hemangioma originated. Angiography proved extremely helpful in tracing its origin in the spleen. Hematomas in the giant hemangioma posed a significant threat of rupture and catastrophic hemorrhage. We left the small hepatic hemangiomas in place, and removed the spleen along with the giant splenic hemangioma. Conclusion Diagnostic pitfalls in the determination of the origin of this giant hemangioma, attribution of its origin to the spleen angiographically, the unusual co-existence of the giant splenic hemangioma with multiple hepatic ones, and the potential threat of rupture of the giant hemangioma are some of the highlights of this case report. Estrogen administration represents a pathogenic factor that has been associated with hemangiomas in solid organs of the abdominal cavity. The therapeutic dilemma between resection and embolization of giant hemangiomas is another point of discussion in this case report. Splenectomy for the giant splenic hemangioma eliminates the risk of rupture and malignant degeneration, whereas observation for the small hepatic ones (<4 cm) was the preferable therapeutic strategy in our patient. PMID:18462497

  7. Clinical and biochemical studies support smokeless tobacco's carcinogenic potential in the human oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Mallery, Susan R; Tong, Meng; Michaels, Gregory C; Kiyani, Amber R; Hecht, Stephen S

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer presented compelling evidence that linked smokeless tobacco use to the development of human oral cancer. Although these findings imply vigorous local carcinogen metabolism, little is known about levels and distribution of phase I, II, and III (drug egress) enzymes in human oral mucosa. In this study here, we integrated clinical data, and imaging and histopathologic analyses of an oral squamous cell carcinoma that arose at the site of smokeless tobacco quid placement in a patient. Immunoblot and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses were used to identify tumor and normal human oral mucosal smokeless tobacco-associated metabolic activation and detoxification enzymes. Human oral epithelium contains every known phase I enzyme associated with nitrosamine oxidative bioactivation with approximately 2-fold interdonor differences in protein levels. Previous studies have confirmed approximately 3.5-fold interdonor variations in intraepithelial phase II enzymes. Unlike the superficially located enzymes in nonreplicating esophageal surface epithelium, IHC studies confirmed that oral mucosal nitrosamine metabolizing enzymes reside in the basilar and suprabasilar region, which notably is the site of ongoing keratinocyte DNA replication. Clearly, variations in product composition, nitrosamine metabolism, and exposure duration will modulate clinical outcomes. The data presented here form a coherent picture consistent with the abundant experimental data that link tobacco-specific nitrosamines to human oral cancer. PMID:24265177

  8. Orally active carbapenem antibiotics I. Antibacterial and pharmacokinetic potential of 2-phenyl and 2-thienylcarbapenems.

    PubMed

    Sunagawa, Makoto; Ueda, Yutaka; Okada, Shin-Ichiro; Watanabe, Shoji; Hashizuka, Takahiko; Hori, Seiji; Sasaki, Akira; Eriguchi, Yoshiro; Kanazawa, Katsunori

    2005-12-01

    In order to design orally active carbapenem antibiotics effective against beta-lactam-resistant pathogens, such as penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP) and beta-lactamase non-producing ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae (BLNAR), a series of novel 2-phenylcarbapenems and some 2-thienyl derivatives were synthesized and tested for antibacterial activities. These compounds were highly active against PRSP, BLNAR, and major Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that cause community-acquired infections. Their pivaloyloxymethylester-type prodrug exhibited good oral absorption in mice, suggesting that this series of carbapenems were promising as a prototype of novel orally active beta-lactams. PMID:16506696

  9. MR spectroscopy of intracranial tuberculomas: A singlet peak at 3.8 ppm as potential marker to differentiate them from malignant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro, David; Martinot, Carlos; Fayed, Nicolas; Gaskill-Shipley, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The diagnosis of intracranial tuberculomas is often challenging. Our purpose is to describe the most common metabolic patterns of tuberculomas by MR spectroscopy (MRS) with emphasis on potential specific markers. Methods Single-voxel MRS short echo time was performed in 13 cases of tuberculomas proven by histology and/or response to anti-mycobacterial therapy. For comparison MRS was also performed in 19 biopsy-proven malignant tumors (13 high-grade gliomas and six metastasis). Presence of metabolic peaks was assessed visually and categorical variables between groups were compared using chi-square. Metabolite ratios were compared using Mann-Whitney test and diagnostic accuracy of the metabolite ratios was compared using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves analysis. Results Spectroscopic peaks representing lipids and glutamate/glutamine (Glx) as well as a peak at ∼3.8 ppm were well defined in 77% (10/13), 77% (10/13) and 69% (nine of 13) of tuberculomas, respectively. Lipid and Glx peaks were also present in most of the malignant lesions, 79% (15/19) and 74% (14/19) respectively. However, a peak at ∼3.8 ppm was present in only 10% (two of 19) of the tumor cases (p < 0.001). Higher Cho/Cr and mI/Cr ratios helped discriminate malignant lesions with an area under the ROC curve of 0.86 (SE: 0.078, p < 0.002, CI: 0.7–1) and 0.8 (SE: 0.1, p < 0.009, CI: 0.6–1), respectively. Threshold values between 1.7–1.9 for Cho/Cr and 0.8–0.9 for mI/Cr provided high specificity (91% for both metabolites) and adequate sensitivity (75% and 80%, respectively) for discrimination of malignant lesions. Conclusion A singlet peak at ∼3.8 ppm is present in the majority of tuberculomas and absent in most malignant tumors, potentially a marker to differentiate these lesions. The assignment of the peak is difficult from our analysis; however, guanidinoacetate (Gua) is a possibility. Higher Cho/Cr and mI/Cr ratios should favor malignant lesions

  10. [Importance of proliferative potential (as the ratio of a proliferative cells number and duration of mitosis) in diagnoses of malignant degree and prognosis of adrenocortical cancer].

    PubMed

    Raĭkhlin, N T; Bukaeva, I A; Filimoniuk, A V; Smirnova, E A; Probatova, N A; Pavlovskaia, A I; Shabanov, M A; Ponomareva, M V

    2011-01-01

    The aim of research has been the estimation of a proliferative potential as simultaneous detection of a proliferative cells number (Ki-67 index) and duration of mitosis (nucleolar argyrophilic protein expression--B23/nucleophosmin and C23/nucleolin) at patients with adrenocortical cancer. In according to lifetime of patients after operation 2 groups had been sorted out. The first one included patients surviving 56.12 months, the second one--9.25 months. We've found out that different aspects of tumor diagnosis as well distinction of benignant or malignant tumor growth, a malignant degree of tumors, a prognostic criteria of illness, survival of patients etc. must be characterized by total research both a proliferative cells fraction (Ki-67 index) and a rate of mitosis (expressions of B23/nucleophosmin and C23/nucleolin). PMID:22288173

  11. Corrosion in the oral cavity--potential local and systemic effects.

    PubMed

    Bergman, M

    1986-03-01

    The main current-generating corrosion cells in the oral cavity are the bimetallic cell and the concentration cell, the latter mainly occurring due to differences in access to oxygen in the various parts of the metallic material. Corrosion resistance is not an intrinsic property of a metal or an alloy for it depends on an interaction with the environment. Thus, the contents of the oral cavity, have a decisive influence. This implies that corrosion tests in vitro are of limited value in predicting the clinical corrosion behaviour of a metallic material. Results from a series of clinical studies concerning a possible relationship between galvanic currents and certain oral and other symptoms in a group of patients who had been referred to the Faculty of Odontology, University of Umeå, are briefly presented. The possibility of local and systemic effects of intra-oral galvanic cells is discussed. PMID:3457767

  12. Malignancy after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zeier, Martin; Hartschuh, Wolfgang; Wiesel, Manfred; Lehnert, Thomas; Ritz, Eberhard

    2002-01-01

    Malignancy following renal transplantation is an important medical problem during the long-term follow-up. The overall incidence of malignancy at this time is 3 to 5 times higher than in the general population. The most common malignancies are lymphoproliferative disorders (early after transplantation) and skin carcinomas (late after transplantation). The type of malignancy is different in various countries and dependent on genetic and environmental factors. Another important confounder for risk of malignancy after renal transplantation is the type of immunosuppression. Previous use of cytotoxic drugs (eg, cyclophosphamide) or a history of analgesic abuse are additional risk factors. Malignancy may even be transplanted by the graft. Previous cancer treatment in a uremic patient on the transplant waiting list is of great importance in relation to waiting time and postmalignancy screening. Finally, every dialysis patient on the waiting list should undergo a regular screening program before and after renal transplantation to detect a potentially malignant tumor in an early stage. In addition to specific oncological treatment, managing a malignancy after renal transplantation should include modification of immunosuppression. PMID:11774131

  13. Adenovirus-mediated suppression of HMGI(Y) protein synthesis as potential therapy of human malignant neoplasias

    PubMed Central

    Scala, Stefania; Portella, Giuseppe; Fedele, Monica; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Fusco, Alfredo

    2000-01-01

    High mobility group I (HMGI) proteins are overexpressed in several human malignant tumors. We previously demonstrated that inhibition of HMGI synthesis prevents thyroid cell transformation. Here, we report that an adenovirus carrying the HMGI(Y) gene in an antisense orientation (Ad-Yas) induced programmed cell death of two human thyroid anaplastic carcinoma cell lines (ARO and FB-1), but not normal thyroid cells. The Ad-Yas virus led to death of lung, colon, and breast carcinoma cells. A control adenovirus carrying the lacZ gene did not inhibit the growth of either normal or neoplastic cells. Ad-Yas treatment of tumors induced in athymic mice by ARO cells caused a drastic reduction in tumor size. Therefore, suppression of HMGI(Y) protein synthesis by an HMGI(Y) antisense adenoviral vector may be a useful treatment strategy in a variety of human malignant neoplasias, in which HMGI(Y) gene overexpression is a general event. PMID:10759549

  14. p53 Expression Helps Identify High Risk Oral Tongue Pre- malignant Lesions and Correlates with Patterns of Invasive Tumour Front and Tumour Depth in Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cases.

    PubMed

    Viveka, Thangaraj Soundara; Shyamsundar, Vidyarani; Krishnamurthy, Arvind; Ramani, Pratibha; Ramshankar, Vijayalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) is the most common oral cancer subtype with a maximum propensity for regional spread. Our objective was to study if p53 expression might have any correlation with aggressive patterns of invasion within oral tongue cancers as well as with the histologically identified degree of oral tongue dysplasia. p53 immunoexpression was studied using immunohistochemistry in early staged OTSCCs (n=155), oral tongue dysplasias, (n=29) and oral tongue normal specimens (n=10) and evaluated for correlations with histological and clinicopathological parameters. Our study (n=194) showed a pattern of p53 expression increasing with different grades of tongue dysplasia to different grades of invasive OTSCC (p=0.000). Among the OTSCC tumours, positive p53 expression was seen in 43.2% (67/155) and a higher p53 labelling index was significantly associated with increased Bryne's grade of the tumour invasive front (p=0.039) and increased tumour depth (p=0.018). Among the OTSCC patients with tobacco habits, (n=91), a higher p53 labelling index was significantly associated with increased risk of local recurrence (p=0.025) and with lymphovascular space involvement (p=0.014). Evaluation of p53 through varying degrees of dysplasia to oral tongue cancer indicates that p53 expression is linked to aggressive features of oral tongue cancers and tongue precancers entailing a closer monitoring in positive cases. Among the OTSCCs, p53 expression is associated with tumour aggressiveness correlating with increased grading of invasive tumour front and tumour depth. PMID:26838208

  15. Cavin-2 in oral cancer: A potential predictor for tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Unozawa, Motoharu; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Higo, Morihiro; Fukumoto, Chonji; Koyama, Tomoyoshi; Sakazume, Tomomi; Nakashima, Dai; Ogawara, Katsunori; Yokoe, Hidetaka; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro

    2016-06-01

    Cavin-2 (CVN2) affects formation of large caveolae, which are membrane-rich cholesterol domains associated with several functions in signal transduction. Accumulating evidence suggests that CVN2 is present in many cellular types; however, the molecular mechanisms of CVN2 in cancers and its clinical relevance are unknown. We proposed a mechanism by which CVN2 regulates caveolin-1 expression leading to slow cellular proliferation by inactivation of the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analyses were used to assess the CVN2 regulation mechanism in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed to analyze the correlation between CVN2 expression and clinical behavior in 115 patients with OSCC. A CVN2 overexpressed model of OSCC cells (oeCVN2 cells) was used for functional experiments. CVN2 expression was down-regulated significantly (P < 0.05) in OSCCs compared with normal counterparts in vitro and in vivo. In addition to the findings that a serum deprivation culture induced up-regulation of CVN2 and slowed cellular proliferation, oeCVN2 cell growth decreased because of cell-cycle arrest at the G1 phase resulting from up-regulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1) ) and down-regulated cyclins (cyclin D1, cyclin E) and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK2, CDK4, and CDK6). Interestingly, CVN2 overexpression facilitated caveolin-1 recruitment and colocalization with each other. We also found decreased ERK phosphorylation levels, an upstream event in cell-cycle arrest. Clinically, IHC data from primary OSCCs showed high tumoral progression in CVN2-negative patients with OSCC. CVN2 may be a possible key regulator of OSCC progression via the CVN2/caveolin-1/ERK pathway and a potential therapeutic target for developing new treatments for OSCCs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26086332

  16. The potential of immobilized artificial membrane chromatography to predict human oral absorption.

    PubMed

    Tsopelas, Fotios; Vallianatou, Theodosia; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The potential of immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) chromatography to estimate human oral absorption (%HOA) was investigated. For this purpose, retention indices on IAM stationary phases reported previously by our group or measured by other authors under similar conditions were used to model %HOA data, compiled from literature sources. Considering the pH gradient in gastrointestinal tract, the highest logkw(IAM) values were considered, obtained either at pH7.4 or 5.5, defined as logkw(IAM)(best). Non linear models were established upon introduction of additional parameters and after exclusion of drugs which are substrates either to efflux or uptake transporters. The best model included Abraham's hydrogen-bond acidity parameter, molecular weight as well as the positively and negatively charged molecular fractions. For reasons of comparison between IAM chromatography and traditional lipophilicity, corresponding models were derived by replacing IAM retention factors with octanol-water distribution coefficients (logD). An overexpression of electrostatic interactions with phosphate anions was observed in the case of IAM retention as expressed by the negative contribution of the positively charged fraction F(+). The same parameter is statistically significant also in the logD model, but with a positive sign, indicating the attraction of basic drugs in the negatively charged inner membrane. To validate the obtained models a blind test set of 22 structurally diverse drugs was used, whose logkw(IAM)(best) values were determined and analyzed in the present study under similar conditions. IAM retention factors were further compared with MDCK cell lines permeability data taken from literature for a set of validation drugs. The overexpression of electrostatic interactions with phosphate anions on IAM surface was also evident in respect to MDCK permeability. In contrast to the clear classification between drugs with high and poor (or intermediate) absorption provided by MDCK

  17. Detection and Isolation of Swine Influenza A Virus in Spiked Oral Fluid and Samples from Individually Housed, Experimentally Infected Pigs: Potential Role of Porcine Oral Fluid in Active Influenza A Virus Surveillance in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Decorte, Inge; Steensels, Mieke; Lambrecht, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    Background The lack of seasonality of swine influenza A virus (swIAV) in combination with the capacity of swine to harbor a large number of co-circulating IAV lineages, resulting in the risk for the emergence of influenza viruses with pandemic potential, stress the importance of swIAV surveillance. To date, active surveillance of swIAV worldwide is barely done because of the short detection period in nasal swab samples. Therefore, more sensitive diagnostic methods to monitor circulating virus strains are requisite. Methods qRT-PCR and virus isolations were performed on oral fluid and nasal swabs collected from individually housed pigs that were infected sequentially with H1N1 and H3N2 swIAV strains. The same methods were also applied to oral fluid samples spiked with H1N1 to study the influence of conservation time and temperature on swIAV infectivity and detectability in porcine oral fluid. Results All swIAV infected animals were found qRT-PCR positive in both nasal swabs and oral fluid. However, swIAV could be detected for a longer period in oral fluid than in nasal swabs. Despite the high detectability of swIAV in oral fluid, virus isolation from oral fluid collected from infected pigs was rare. These results are supported by laboratory studies showing that the PCR detectability of swIAV remains unaltered during a 24 h incubation period in oral fluid, while swIAV infectivity drops dramatically immediately upon contact with oral fluid (3 log titer reduction) and gets lost after 24 h conservation in oral fluid at ambient temperature. Conclusions Our data indicate that porcine oral fluid has the potential to replace nasal swabs for molecular diagnostic purposes. The difficulty to isolate swIAV from oral fluid could pose a drawback for its use in active surveillance programs. PMID:26431039

  18. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in different subtypes of oral lichenoid disease

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Ramírez, Dionisio A.; Rodríguez-Tojo, María J.; Coca-Meneses, Juan C.; Marichalar-Mendia, Xabier

    2014-01-01

    The oral lichenoid disease (OLD) includes different chronic inflammatory processes such as oral lichen planus (OLP) and oral lichenoid lesions (OLL), both entities with controversial diagnosis and malignant potential. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EFGR) is an important oral carcinogenesis biomarker and overexpressed in several oral potentially malignant disorders. Objectives: To analyze the EGFR expression in the OLD to find differences between OLP and OLL, and to correlate it with the main clinical and pathological features. Material and Methods: Forty-four OLD cases were studied and classified according to their clinical (Group C1: only papular lesions / Group C2: papular and other lesions) and histopathological features (Group HT: OLP-typical / Group HC: OLP-compatible) based in previous published criteria. Standard immunohistochemical identification of EGFR protein was performed. Comparative and descriptive statistical analyses were performed. Results: Thirty-five cases (79.5%) showed EGFR overexpression without significant differences between clinical and histopathological groups (p<0.05). Histological groups showed significant differences in the EGFR expression pattern (p=0.016). Conlusions: All OLD samples showed high EGFR expression. The type of clinical lesion was not related with EGFR expression; however, there are differences in the EGFR expression pattern between histological groups that may be related with a different biological profile and malignant risk. Key words:Oral lichenoid disease, oral lichen planus, oral lichenoid lesion, oral carcinogenesis, EGFR. PMID:24880441

  19. Epigenetics in the hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Chun Yew; Morison, Jessica; Dawson, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    A wealth of genomic and epigenomic data has identified abnormal regulation of epigenetic processes as a prominent theme in hematologic malignancies. Recurrent somatic alterations in myeloid malignancies of key proteins involved in DNA methylation, post-translational histone modification and chromatin remodeling have highlighted the importance of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the initiation and maintenance of various malignancies. The rational use of targeted epigenetic therapies requires a thorough understanding of the underlying mechanisms of malignant transformation driven by aberrant epigenetic regulators. In this review we provide an overview of the major protagonists in epigenetic regulation, their aberrant role in myeloid malignancies, prognostic significance and potential for therapeutic targeting. PMID:25472952

  20. Pharmacokinetics and potential advantages of a new oral solution of levothyroxine vs. other available dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Yue, C S; Scarsi, C; Ducharme, M P

    2012-12-01

    To better understand the pharmacokinetics and potential advantages of a levothyroxine oral solution vs. tablets and soft gel capsules.4 randomized, 2-treatment, single-dose (600 mcg levothyroxine), 2-way crossover bioequivalence studies in 84 healthy subjects were analyzed. Samples were collected before dosing and until 48-72 h post-dose to calculate noncompartmental baseline-adjusted pharmacokinetic parameters: maximum concentration, time to maximum concentration, and area-under-the-concentration-time-curve from 0 to 48 h and from 0 to 2 h.Mean pharmacokinetic parameters (±standard deviation) for tablets, capsules and solution, respectively, were: area-under-the-concentration-time-curve from 0 to 2 h (ng*h/mL)=68.4±32.8, 64.4±24.4, 99.1±22.7; area-under-the-concentration-time-curve from 0 to 48 h (ng*h/mL)=1 632±424, 1 752±445, 1 862±439; maximum concentration (ng/mL)=67.6±20.9, 68.0±15.9, 71.4±16.0; time of maximum concentration (hours)=2.25±0.99, 2.38±1.58, 1.96±1.07. Overall rate and extent of exposure were not statistically different between formulations, but a faster onset of absorption for the solution was suggested (greater area-under-the-concentration-time-curve from 0 to 2 h and faster time to maximum concentration by an average of 30 min).Levothyroxine rate and extent of exposure are similar between tested formulations. The solution appears however to reach systemic circulation quicker as dissolution is not needed before absorption starts. The solution's greater early exposure and a faster time to maximal concentration of around 30 min may be of benefit to minimize drug-food interactions and deserves further investigations. PMID:23154888

  1. [The potential financial impact of oral health problems in the families of preschool children].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Gustavo Leite; Gomes, Monalisa Cesarino; Lima, Kenio Costa de; Martins, Carolina Castro; Paiva, Saul Martins; Granville-Garcia, Ana Flávia

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the perception of parents/caregivers regarding the financial impact of oral health problems on the families of preschool children. A preschool-based, cross-sectional study was conducted with 834 preschool children in Campina Grande, Brazil. Parents/caregivers answered the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale. "Financial impact" was the dependent variable. Questionnaires addressing socio-demographic variables, history of toothache and health perceptions were administered. Clinical exams were performed by three dentists previously calibrated (Kappa: 0.85-0.90). Descriptive statistics were performed, followed by logistic regression for complex samples (α = 5%). The frequency of financial impact due to oral health problems in preschool children was 7.7%. The following variables were significantly associated with financial impact: parental perception of child's oral health as poor, the interaction between history of toothache and absence of dental caries and the interaction between history of toothache and presence of dental caries. It is concluded that often parents/caregivers reported experiencing a financial impact due to seeking treatment late, mainly by the presence of toothache and complications of the clinical condition. PMID:27076020

  2. Telomerase reverse transcriptase potentially promotes the progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma through induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tengda; Hu, Fengchun; Qiao, Bin; Chen, Zhifeng; Tao, Qian

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, researchers have found the critical role of telomerase in cellular transformation, proliferation, stemness and cell survival. High levels of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) expression and telomerase activation have been reported in most cancer cells. Moreover, overexpression of human TERT (hTERT) is reported to be correlated with advanced invasive stage of the tumor progression and poor prognosis. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), characterized by the loss of the cell-cell contact of epithelial cells and the acquisition of migratory and motile properties, is known to be a central mechanism responsible for invasiveness and metastasis of various cancers. Thus, we investigated whether hTERT plays a potential role in the development of EMT. As we expected, our clinical results showed that hTERT is overexpressed in oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) and OSCC tissues and correlates with clinical aggressiveness of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients. We then overexpressed hTERT in primary human oral epithelial cells (HOECS) and found that hTERT has the potential to prolong the lifespan, a process confering the characteristics of EMT by activating the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Our findings provided an explanation for the aggressive nature of human tumors overexpressing hTERT and the possibly mechanism that links hTERT to EMT property, which represents a possible therapeutic target in highly metastatic cancers. PMID:25775973

  3. Depth sensitive oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy of oral epithelial tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Maria K.; Lam, Sylvia; Poh, Catherine; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2014-05-01

    Identifying depth-dependent alterations associated with epithelial cancerous lesions can be challenging in the oral cavity where variable epithelial thicknesses and troublesome keratin growths are prominent. Spectroscopic methods with enhanced depth resolution would immensely aid in isolating optical properties associated with malignant transformation. Combining multiple beveled fibers, oblique collection geometry, and polarization gating, oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy (OPRS) achieves depth sensitive detection. We report promising results from a clinical trial of patients with oral lesions suspected of dysplasia or carcinoma demonstrating the potential of OPRS for the analysis of morphological and architectural changes in the context of multilayer, epithelial oral tissue.

  4. Potent and Orally Bioavailable Antiplatelet Agent, PLD-301, with the Potential of Overcoming Clopidogrel Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingyu; Wang, Michael Zhiyan

    2016-01-01

    PLD-301, a phosphate prodrug of clopidogrel thiolactone discovered by Prelude Pharmaceuticals with the aim to overcome clopidogrel resistance, was evaluated for its in vivo inhibitory effect on ADP-induced platelet aggregation in rats. The potency of PLD-301 was similar to that of prasugrel, but much higher than that of clopidogrel. The results of pharmacokinetic analysis showed that the oral bioavailability of clopidogrel thiolactone converted from PLD-301 was 4- to 5-fold higher than that of the one converted from clopidogrel, suggesting that in comparison with clopidogrel, lower doses of PLD-301 could be used clinically. In summary, PLD-301 presents a potent and orally bioavailable antiplatelet agent that might have some advantages over clopidogrel, such as overcoming clopidogrel resistance for CYP2C19-allele loss-of-function carriers, and lowering dose-related toxicity due to a much lower effective dose.

  5. Recurrent Chromosomal Imbalances Detected in Biopsy Material from Oral Premalignant and Malignant Lesions by Combined Tissue Microdissection, Universal DNA Amplification, and Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Ruthild G.; Scheer, Martin; Born, I. Antonio; Joos, Stefan; Cobbers, J. M. J. Ludwig; Hofele, Christof; Reifenberger, Guido; Zöller, Joachim E.; Lichter, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Biopsies routinely performed for the histopathological diagnosis of oral epithelial lesions before treatment were screened for chromosomal imbalances by comparative genomic hybridization. Comparative genomic hybridization was performed on 12 oral premalignant lesions (OPLs; dysplasias and carcinomas in situ) and 14 oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs). Eight biopsies displayed areas of different histopathological appearance, so that OPLs and OSCCs from the same patient were analyzed. To avoid contamination with nonneoplastic cells, defined cell populations were isolated by micromanipulation with a glass needle. Before comparative genomic hybridization analysis, universal DNA amplification was performed using the DOP-polymerase chain reaction protocol. In the 14 OSCCs examined, the average number of chromosomal imbalances was significantly higher than in the 12 OPLs (mean ± SEM: 11.9 ± 1.9 versus 3.2 ± 1.2; P = 0.003). The DNA copy number changes identified in more than one OPL were gains on 8q (3 of 12) and 16p (2 of 12), as well as losses on 3p (5 of 12); 5q (4 of 12); 13q (3 of 12); and 4q, 8p, and 9p (2 of 12 each). In more than 30% of OSCCs, gains of chromosomal material were identified on 20q (8 of 14); 8q, 11q, 22q (7 of 14 each); 3q, 15q, and 17p (6 of 14 each); and 14q, 17q, and 20p (5 of 14 each), and losses were identified on 3p and 4q (9 of 14 each), 5q (7 of 14), 13q (6 of 14), and 2q and 9p (5 of 14 each). These results were validated by positive and negative control comparative genomic hybridization experiments and microsatellite analysis for the detection of allelic loss. The vast majority of genomic alterations found in OPLs were again identified in OSCCs from the same biopsy, supporting the hypothesis that multiple lesions in the same patient are clonally related. In summary, we show that comprehensive information on the genomic alterations in oral epithelial lesions can be obtained from small biopsies. Such data may identify prognostic

  6. Aerobic bacterial oral flora of garter snakes: development of normal flora and pathogenic potential for snakes and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, E J; Agyare, E O; Vagvolgyi, A E; Halpern, M

    1981-01-01

    Garter snakes that are used for scientific laboratory studies or kept as exotic pets often become ill and die early in captivity. They may also act as reservoirs of potential human pathogens or transmit infection to man. A total of 126 strains of aerobic and facultative bacteria, most potential human and snake pathogens, were isolated from 82 garter snake oropharyngeal cultures. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species were the most common species isolated. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus var. anitratus, Hafnia alvei, Arizona hinshawii, Salmonella species, Shigella species, Klebsiella oxytoca, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were among the potential pathogens isolated. The spectrum of bacteria with potential for causing oral and pulmonary infections in garter snakes is greater than has been previously appreciated. Garter snakes should also be considered reservoirs of human pathogens, and appropriate precautions should be taken by laboratory personnel and pet owners. PMID:7240404

  7. Potential for use of retinoic acid as an oral vaccine adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Mwanza-Lisulo, Mpala; Kelly, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Despite the heavy burden of diarrhoeal disease across much of the tropical world, only two diarrhoea-causing pathogens, cholera and rotavirus, are the target of commercially available vaccines. Oral vaccines are generally less immunogenic than the best parenteral vaccines, but the reasons for this are still debated. Over the past decade, several lines of evidence from work in experimental animals have suggested that all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), a form of vitamin A which is highly transcriptionally active, can alter the homing receptor expression of T lymphocytes. Increased expression of α4β7 integrin and the chemokine receptor CCR9 following exposure to ATRA can be used to redirect T cells to the gut. Early work in human volunteers suggests that oral ATRA administration 1 h prior to dosing with oral typhoid vaccine can augment secretion of specific IgA against vaccine-derived lipopolysaccharide into gut secretions. In this review, we set out the rationale for using ATRA in this way and assess its likely applicability to vaccination programmes for protection of children in low-income countries from the considerable mortality caused by diarrhoeal disease. Comparison of recent work in experimental animals, non-human primates and men suggests that a more detailed understanding of ATRA dosage and kinetics will be important to taking forward translational work into human vaccinology. PMID:25964457

  8. Prevalence and potential influencing factors of non-nutritive oral behaviors of veal calves on commercial farms.

    PubMed

    Leruste, H; Brscic, M; Cozzi, G; Kemp, B; Wolthuis-Fillerup, M; Lensink, B J; Bokkers, E A M; van Reenen, C G

    2014-11-01

    Veal calves raised under intensive conditions may express non-nutritive oral behaviors. When expressed in an abnormal way, these behaviors can be a sign of mental suffering and reduced welfare due to a mismatch between environmental or management features and the animal's needs. The aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence of non-nutritive oral behaviors in a large sample of veal farms in Europe and to determine the potential influencing factors present at farm level. Data were collected on 157 commercial veal farms in the 3 main veal-producing countries in Europe (the Netherlands, France, and Italy). Observations of 3 non-nutritive oral behaviors (manipulating substrates, tongue rolling, and manipulating a penmate) were performed when calves were aged 14 wk, and the prevalence of these behaviors was calculated. Information on management practices and characteristics of the building and equipment were collected on all farms to assess potential influencing factors for each of the 3 behaviors. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated to evaluate the effect of each individual factor within a generalized linear model. The mean percentage of calves per farm performing manipulating substrates was 11.0 ± 0.46%, performing tongue rolling 2.8 ± 0 .18%, and manipulating a penmate 2.7 ± 0.09%, with a high range between farms. Allowing more space for calves than the legal minimum requirement of 1.8 m(2)/ calf and housing them in groups of >10 calves/pen reduced the incidences of manipulating substrates and tongue rolling. Incidence of manipulating substrates was lower for calves fed maize silage compared with calves fed cereal grain, pellets, or muesli. A higher risk of tongue rolling was found when baby-boxes (i.e., single housing during the first 5 to 8 wk) were not used. Risk of calves manipulating a penmate was higher for calves of milk- or meat-type breeds compared with dual-purpose breeds and for calves fed with 280 to 380 kg compared with

  9. Transcription analysis in the MeLiM swine model identifies RACK1 as a potential marker of malignancy for human melanocytic proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Egidy, Giorgia; Julé, Sophia; Bossé, Philippe; Bernex, Florence; Geffrotin, Claudine; Vincent-Naulleau, Silvia; Horak, Vratislav; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Panthier, Jean-Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Background Metastatic melanoma is a severe disease. Few experimental animal models of metastatic melanoma exist. MeLiM minipigs exhibit spontaneous melanoma. Cutaneous and metastatic lesions are histologically similar to human's. However, most of them eventually spontaneously regress. Our purpose was to investigate whether the MeLiM model could reveal markers of malignancy in human melanocytic proliferations. Results We compared the serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) between normal pig skin melanocytes and melanoma cells from an early pulmonary metastasis of MeLiM minipigs. Tag identification revealed 55 regulated genes, including GNB2L1 which was found upregulated in the melanoma library. In situ hybridisation confirmed GNB2L1 overexpression in MeLiM melanocytic lesions. GNB2L1 encodes the adaptor protein RACK1, recently shown to influence melanoma cell lines tumorigenicity. We studied the expression of RACK1 by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy in tissues specimens of normal skin, in cutaneous and metastatic melanoma developped in MeLiM minipigs and in human patients. In pig and human samples, the results were similar. RACK1 protein was not detected in normal epidermal melanocytes. By contrast, RACK1 signal was highly increased in the cytoplasm of all melanocytic cells of superficial spreading melanoma, recurrent dermal lesions and metastatic melanoma. RACK1 partially colocalised with activated PKCαβ. In pig metastases, additional nuclear RACK1 did not associate to BDNF expression. In human nevi, the RACK1 signal was low. Conclusion RACK1 overexpression detected in situ in human melanoma specimens characterized cutaneous and metastatic melanoma raising the possibility that RACK1 can be a potential marker of malignancy in human melanoma. The MeLiM strain provides a relevant model for exploring mechanisms of melanocytic malignant transformation in humans. This study may contribute to a better understanding of melanoma pathophysiology and to

  10. Investigations on the potential of a low power diode pumped Er:YAG laser system for oral surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Karl; Wurm, Holger; Hausladen, Florian; Wagner, Sophia; Hibst, Raimund

    2015-02-01

    Flash lamp pumped Er:YAG-lasers are used in clinical practice for dental applications successfully. As an alternative, several diode pumped Er:YAG laser systems (Pantec Engineering AG) become available, with mean laser power of 2W, 15W, and 30W. The aim of the presented study is to investigate the potential of the 2W Er:YAG laser system for oral surgery. At first an appropriate experimental set-up was realized with a beam delivery and both, a focusing unit for non-contact tissue cutting and a fiber tip for tissue cutting in contact mode. In order to produce reproducible cuts, the samples (porcine gingiva) were moved by a computer controlled translation stage. On the fresh samples cutting depth and quality were determined by light microscopy. Afterwards histological sections were prepared and microscopically analyzed regarding cutting depth and thermal damage zone. The experiments show that low laser power ≤ 2W is sufficient to perform efficient oral soft tissue cutting with cut depth up to 2mm (sample movement 2mm/s). The width of the thermal damage zone can be controlled by the irradiation parameters within a range of about 50μm to 110μm. In general, thermal injury is more pronounced using fiber tips in contact mode compared to the focused laser beam. In conclusion the results reveal that even the low power diode pumped Er:YAG laser is an appropriate tool for oral surgery.

  11. Poly-α,β-Polyasparthydrazide-Based Nanogels for Potential Oral Delivery of Paclitaxel: In Vitro and In Vivo Properties.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingwen; Ma, Mingxin; Chang, Di; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Chen; Yue, Yang; Liu, Jia; Wang, Siling; Jiang, Tongying

    2015-12-01

    A family of nanogel drug carriers has been designed to enhance the oral absorption of paclitaxel (PTX). The PAHy-based nanogels were prepared by the interpenetration of poly-α,β-polyasparthydrazide (PAHy) chains and dicarboxyl-poly (ethylene glycol) (CPEG), forming a smart chain network. The PAHy-based nanogels were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), dynamic light scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The adhesion and retention properties of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-nanogels in vivo were investigated using an in vivo imaging system and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The smart nanogels had a particle size of -200 nm, increased the degree and rate of release, and spent over 12 h in the gastrointestinal tract. They also produced excellent adhesion, permeability and retention (APR) effects and increased oral absorption, confirming their use as potential sustained-release carriers for the oral delivery of the hydrophobic anticancer agent PTX. PMID:26510316

  12. No significant association between malignancy and topical use of pimecrolimus

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, David J; Abuabara, Katrina; Hoffstad, Ole; Wan, Joy; Raimondo, Denise; Bilker, Warren

    2015-01-01

    Importance A black box warning describes a potential risk of malignancy associated with the topical use of pimecrolimus to treat atopic dermatitis (AD) due to its similarity to oral calcineurin inhibitors used in solid organ transplantation and spontaneous reporting of malignancies including lymphomas and cutaneous malignancies. Objective The goal of this study was to evaluate the risk of malignancy in a post marketing study of children exposed to pimecrolimus. Design A longitudinal cohort study. Setting A nation-wide ongoing long-term cohort of children with AD. Participants Children enrolled in the Pediatric Eczema Elective Registry (PEER) who had a history of AD and pimecrolimus use. Main outcome Reports of malignancy in those in PEER as compared to expected rates from the Surveillance Research (SEER) Program. Results 7,457 subjects were enrolled in the PEER study for a total of 26,792 person-years. Children used a mean of 793 (SD 1356) grams of pimecrolimus while enrolled in the study. As of May 2014, 5 malignancies had been reported. These include 2 leukemias, 1 osteosarcoma, and 2 lymphomas. No skin cancers were reported. The Standardized Incidence Ratio (SIR) for all malignancies (primary outcome) based on the age standardized SEER population was 1.2 (0.5, 2.8). As secondary analyses, the SIR (based on 2 cases for each) for lymphoma was 2.9 (0.7, 11.7) and for leukemia was 2.0 (0.5, 8.2). None of these findings were statistically significant. Conclusions and Relevance Based on more than 25,000 person-years of follow-up it seems unlikely that topical pimecrolimus as it was used in the PEER cohort to treat AD is associated with an increased risk of malignancy. PMID:25692459

  13. White oral lesions, actinic cheilitis, and leukoplakia: confusions in terminology and definition: facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Huber, Michaell A

    2010-01-01

    Many diseases affecting the cutaneous tissues may incur observable changes to the mucosal tissues of the oral cavity. As a consequence, the dermatologist should always assess the oral mucosal tissues of their patients as a matter of routine. Equivocal lesions should be referred to a dentist for further assessment. Although most encountered white oral lesions are innocuous, some potentially serious conditions may mimic an innocuous white lesion. As examples, oral lichen planus may cause significant patient discomfort and is associated with some degree of increased malignant risk, whereas actinic cheilitis and leukoplakia have a confirmed association with an increased malignant risk. This contribution reviews the characteristics and management strategies for some of the more common white oral lesions that the dermatologist may observe in clinical practice. PMID:20541677

  14. Malignant Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Min-Yuen Cynthia; Shahed, Joohi; Jankovic, Joseph

    2007-09-15

    The aim of this work was to draw attention to potentially life-threatening symptoms associated with Tourette syndrome (TS) and to explore their relationship to TS comorbidities. Medical records of all patients with TS evaluated at our Movement Disorders Clinic between July 2003 and July 2006 were reviewed. Data on patients with malignant TS, defined as >or=2 emergency room (ER) visits or >or=1 hospitalizations for TS symptoms or its associated behavioral comorbidities, were entered into a dataset and analyzed. Five illustrative cases are described. Of 333 TS patients evaluated during the 3-year period, 17 (5.1%) met the criteria for malignant TS. Hospital admission or ER visits were for tic-related injuries, self-injurious behavior (SIB), uncontrollable violence and temper, and suicidal ideation/attempts. Compared with patients with nonmalignant TS, those with malignant TS were significantly more likely to have a personal history of obsessive compulsive behavior/disorder (OCB/OCD), complex phonic tics, coprolalia, copropraxia, SIB, mood disorder, suicidal ideation, and poor response to medications. Although TS is rarely a disabling disorder, about 5% of patients referred to a specialty clinic have life-threatening symptoms. Malignant TS is associated with greater severity of motor symptoms and the presence of >or=2 behavioral comorbidities. OCD/OCB in particular may play a central role in malignant TS; obsessive compulsive qualities were associated with life-threatening tics, SIB, and suicidal ideation. Malignant TS is more refractory to medical treatment than nonmalignant TS. PMID:17566119

  15. Cytochrome P450 2J2, a new key enzyme in cyclophosphamide bioactivation and a potential biomarker for hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    El-Serafi, I; Fares, M; Abedi-Valugerdi, M; Afsharian, P; Moshfegh, A; Terelius, Y; Potácová, Z; Hassan, M

    2015-10-01

    The role of cytochrome P450 2J2 (CYP2J2) in cyclophosphamide (Cy) bioactivation was investigated in patients, cells and microsomes. Gene expression analysis showed that CYP2J2 mRNA expression was significantly (P<0.01) higher in 20 patients with hematological malignancies compared with healthy controls. CYP2J2 expression showed significant upregulation (P<0.05) during Cy treatment before stem cell transplantation. Cy bioactivation was significantly correlated to CYP2J2 expression. Studies in HL-60 cells expressing CYP2J2 showed reduced cell viability when incubated with Cy (half maximal inhibitory concentration=3.6 mM). Inhibition of CYP2J2 using telmisartan reduced Cy bioactivation by 50% and improved cell survival. Cy incubated with recombinant CYP2J2 microsomes has resulted in apparent Km and Vmax values of 3.7-6.6 mM and 2.9-10.3 pmol/(min·pmol) CYP, respectively. This is the first study demonstrating that CYP2J2 is equally important to CYP2B6 in Cy metabolism. The heart, intestine and urinary bladder express high levels of CYP2J2; local Cy bioactivation may explain Cy-treatment-related toxicities in these organs. PMID:25601761

  16. Assessment of the allergic potential of food protein extracts and proteins on oral application using the brown Norway rat model.

    PubMed Central

    Knippels, Léon M J; Penninks, André H

    2003-01-01

    The need for widely accepted and validated animal models to test the potential allergenicity and potency of novel (biotechnology-derived) proteins has become an important issue for their safety evaluation. In this article, we summarize the results of the development of an oral sensitization protocol for food proteins in the rat. Young Brown Norway rats were exposed to either various purified allergenic proteins (e.g., ovalbumin, partly purified), a whole food (cow's milk), or total protein extracts (hen's egg white, peanut) by daily gavage dosing during 42 days without the use of an adjuvant. The results showed that Brown Norway rats can be sensitized orally to the various allergenic food proteins tested, resulting in antigen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) G and IgE responses, without the use of adjuvants. Animals orally exposed to cow's milk or total protein extracts of egg white also developed specific IgE and IgG antibodies that recognized the same proteins compared with antibodies from patients allergic to egg white or cow's milk. We also studied local and systemic immune-mediated effects. In ovalbumin-sensitized rats, some clinical symptoms of food allergy were studied upon an oral challenge with ovalbumin. The results demonstrated that gut permeability was increased and that in some animals breathing frequency and systolic blood pressure were temporarily decreased. The results obtained show that the Brown Norway rat provides a suitable animal model for food allergy research and for the study of relative allergenicity of existing and novel food proteins. PMID:12573912

  17. Traditional Medicinal Plant Extracts and Natural Products with Activity against Oral Bacteria: Potential Application in the Prevention and Treatment of Oral Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Palombo, Enzo A.

    2011-01-01

    Oral diseases are major health problems with dental caries and periodontal diseases among the most important preventable global infectious diseases. Oral health influences the general quality of life and poor oral health is linked to chronic conditions and systemic diseases. The association between oral diseases and the oral microbiota is well established. Of the more than 750 species of bacteria that inhabit the oral cavity, a number are implicated in oral diseases. The development of dental caries involves acidogenic and aciduric Gram-positive bacteria (mutans streptococci, lactobacilli and actinomycetes). Periodontal diseases have been linked to anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Actinobacillus, Prevotella and Fusobacterium). Given the incidence of oral disease, increased resistance by bacteria to antibiotics, adverse affects of some antibacterial agents currently used in dentistry and financial considerations in developing countries, there is a need for alternative prevention and treatment options that are safe, effective and economical. While several agents are commercially available, these chemicals can alter oral microbiota and have undesirable side-effects such as vomiting, diarrhea and tooth staining. Hence, the search for alternative products continues and natural phytochemicals isolated from plants used as traditional medicines are considered as good alternatives. In this review, plant extracts or phytochemicals that inhibit the growth of oral pathogens, reduce the development of biofilms and dental plaque, influence the adhesion of bacteria to surfaces and reduce the symptoms of oral diseases will be discussed further. Clinical studies that have investigated the safety and efficacy of such plant-derived medicines will also be described. PMID:19596745

  18. Traditional Medicinal Plant Extracts and Natural Products with Activity against Oral Bacteria: Potential Application in the Prevention and Treatment of Oral Diseases.

    PubMed

    Palombo, Enzo A

    2011-01-01

    Oral diseases are major health problems with dental caries and periodontal diseases among the most important preventable global infectious diseases. Oral health influences the general quality of life and poor oral health is linked to chronic conditions and systemic diseases. The association between oral diseases and the oral microbiota is well established. Of the more than 750 species of bacteria that inhabit the oral cavity, a number are implicated in oral diseases. The development of dental caries involves acidogenic and aciduric Gram-positive bacteria (mutans streptococci, lactobacilli and actinomycetes). Periodontal diseases have been linked to anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Actinobacillus, Prevotella and Fusobacterium). Given the incidence of oral disease, increased resistance by bacteria to antibiotics, adverse affects of some antibacterial agents currently used in dentistry and financial considerations in developing countries, there is a need for alternative prevention and treatment options that are safe, effective and economical. While several agents are commercially available, these chemicals can alter oral microbiota and have undesirable side-effects such as vomiting, diarrhea and tooth staining. Hence, the search for alternative products continues and natural phytochemicals isolated from plants used as traditional medicines are considered as good alternatives. In this review, plant extracts or phytochemicals that inhibit the growth of oral pathogens, reduce the development of biofilms and dental plaque, influence the adhesion of bacteria to surfaces and reduce the symptoms of oral diseases will be discussed further. Clinical studies that have investigated the safety and efficacy of such plant-derived medicines will also be described. PMID:19596745

  19. Lipid-based oral delivery systems for skin deposition of a potential chemopreventive DIM derivative: characterization and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Boakye, Cedar H A; Patel, Ketan; Patel, Apurva R; Faria, Henrique A M; Zucolotto, Valtencir; Safe, Stephen; Singh, Mandip

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the oral route as a viable potential for the skin deposition of a novel diindolylmethane derivative (DIM-D) for chemoprevention activity. Various lipid-based oral delivery systems were optimized and compared for enhancing DIM-D's oral bioavailability and skin deposition. Preformulation studies were performed to evaluate the log P and solubility of DIM-D. Microsomal metabolism, P-glycoprotein efflux, and caco-2 monolayer permeability of DIM-D were determined. Comparative evaluation of the oral absorption and skin deposition of DIM-D-loaded various lipid-based formulations was performed in rats. DIM-D showed pH-dependent solubility and a high log P value. It was not a strong substrate of microsomal degradation and P-glycoprotein. SMEDDs comprised of medium chain triglycerides, monoglycerides, and kolliphor-HS15 (36.70 ± 0.42 nm). SNEDDs comprised of long chain triglycerides, cremophor RH40, labrasol, and TPGS (84.00 ± 14.14 nm). Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) consisted of compritol, miglyol, and surfactants (116.50 ± 2.12 nm). The blank formulations all showed >70 % cell viability in caco-2 cells. Differential Scanning Calorimetry confirmed the amorphization of DIM-D within the lipid matrices while Atomic Force Microscopy showed particle size distribution similar to the dynamic light scattering data. DIM-D also showed reduced permeation across caco-2 monolayer that was enhanced (p < 0.05) by SNEDDs in comparison to SMEDDs and NLC. Fabsolute for DIM-D SNEDDs, SMEDDs, and NLC was 0.14, 0.04, and 0.007, respectively. SNEDDs caused 53.90, 11.32, and 15.08-fold more skin deposition of DIM-D than the free drug, SMEDDs, and NLC, respectively, at 2 h following oral administration and shows a viable potential for use in skin cancer chemoprevention. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27405772

  20. Readily restoring freeze-dried probilosomes as potential nanocarriers for enhancing oral delivery of cyclosporine A.

    PubMed

    Guan, Peipei; Lu, Yi; Qi, Jianping; Wu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Formulating vesicular nanocarriers into dried precursors so as to overcome the drawbacks associated with liquid formulations is challengeable due to low efficiency of restoration. In this study, bilosomes interiorly thickened with gelatin (G-BLs) was evaluated for the ability to withstand freeze-drying stress and enhanced oral bioavailability of a model drug, cyclosporine A (CyA). The restoration efficiency of freeze-dried pro-G-BLs is investigated by comparing the particle size distribution, entrapment efficiency and morphology of the bilosomes before and after freeze-drying. Particle size and polydispersity index (PI) of pro-G-BLs after restoration was similar to that before freeze-drying, whereas freeze-dried bilosomes without gelatin thickening (pro-BLs) show irreversible damage and aggregation along with significantly increased particle size and PI after restoration. Entrapment efficiency of pro-G-BLs remains as high as 83.7%, in sharp contrast with 66.7% for pro-BLs. Pharmacokinetics in beagle dogs show improved absorption of CyA in pro-G-BLs as compared to pro-BLs, G-BLs and microemulsion-based Sandimmun Neoral(®). The relative oral bioavailability of CyA-loaded pro-G-BLs, pro-BLs and G-BLs was 165.2%, 123.5% and 130.1%, respectively, with Neoral(®) as the reference. It is concluded that interior thickening with gelatin significantly enhanced the stability against freeze-drying stress, which as a result improves the restoring efficiency and oral bioavailability. PMID:27085046

  1. Molecular markers in oral lichen planus: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sagari, Shitalkumar; Sanadhya, Sudhanshu; Doddamani, Mallikarjun; Rajput, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory mucosal disease that is usually detected in 0.5-2.2% of the human population. Among these, only 0.5-2.9% of the lesions progress to carcinoma. However, there are no prognostic markers available presently to recognize the increased risk in malignant transformation of the lesions. Selected markers for cell proliferation, adhesion, apoptosis and lymphocytic infiltration were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in addition to static cytometry for DNA content. The concept linking OLP and oral squamous cell carcinoma states that chronic inflammation results in crucial DNA damage, which further progresses to development of carcinoma. Even though in the past decade, enormous information has been accumulated on malignant potential of OLP, its transformation still remains unclear. Hence, the purpose of this article was to review cellular and molecular markers to understand the pathogenesis of OLP and its progression toward malignancy. PMID:27194873

  2. Molecular markers in oral lichen planus: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sagari, Shitalkumar; Sanadhya, Sudhanshu; Doddamani, Mallikarjun; Rajput, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory mucosal disease that is usually detected in 0.5–2.2% of the human population. Among these, only 0.5–2.9% of the lesions progress to carcinoma. However, there are no prognostic markers available presently to recognize the increased risk in malignant transformation of the lesions. Selected markers for cell proliferation, adhesion, apoptosis and lymphocytic infiltration were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in addition to static cytometry for DNA content. The concept linking OLP and oral squamous cell carcinoma states that chronic inflammation results in crucial DNA damage, which further progresses to development of carcinoma. Even though in the past decade, enormous information has been accumulated on malignant potential of OLP, its transformation still remains unclear. Hence, the purpose of this article was to review cellular and molecular markers to understand the pathogenesis of OLP and its progression toward malignancy. PMID:27194873

  3. Malignant mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Alastair J; Parker, Robert J; Wiggins, John

    2008-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is a fatal asbestos-associated malignancy originating from the lining cells (mesothelium) of the pleural and peritoneal cavities, as well as the pericardium and the tunica vaginalis. The exact prevalence is unknown but it is estimated that mesotheliomas represent less than 1% of all cancers. Its incidence is increasing, with an expected peak in the next 10–20 years. Pleural malignant mesothelioma is the most common form of mesothelioma. Typical presenting features are those of chest pain and dyspnoea. Breathlessness due to a pleural effusion without chest pain is reported in about 30% of patients. A chest wall mass, weight loss, sweating, abdominal pain and ascites (due to peritoneal involvement) are less common presentations. Mesothelioma is directly attributable to occupational asbestos exposure with a history of exposure in over 90% of cases. There is also evidence that mesothelioma may result from both para-occupational exposure and non-occupational "environmental" exposure. Idiopathic or spontaneous mesothelioma can also occur in the absence of any exposure to asbestos, with a spontaneous rate in humans of around one per million. A combination of accurate exposure history, along with examination radiology and pathology are essential to make the diagnosis. Distinguishing malignant from benign pleural disease can be challenging. The most helpful CT findings suggesting malignant pleural disease are 1) a circumferential pleural rind, 2) nodular pleural thickening, 3) pleural thickening of > 1 cm and 4) mediastinal pleural involvement. Involvement of a multidisciplinary team is recommended to ensure prompt and appropriate management, using a framework of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, surgery and symptom palliation with end of life care. Compensation issues must also be considered. Life expectancy in malignant mesothelioma is poor, with a median survival of about one year following diagnosis. PMID:19099560

  4. Claudin-3 Overexpression Increases the Malignant Potential of Colorectal Cancer Cells: Roles of ERK1/2 and PI3K-Akt as Modulators of EGFR signaling

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Waldemir F.; Fortunato-Miranda, Natalia; Robbs, Bruno K.; de Araujo, Wallace M.; de-Freitas-Junior, Julio C.; Bastos, Lilian G.; Viola, João P. B.; Morgado-Díaz, José A.

    2013-01-01

    The altered expressions of claudin proteins have been reported during the tumorigenesis of colorectal cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate these events in this cancer type are poorly understood. Here, we report that epidermal growth factor (EGF) increases the expression of claudin-3 in human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells. This increase was related to increased cell migration and the formation of anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent colonies. We further showed that the ERK1/2 and PI3K-Akt pathways were involved in the regulation of these effects because specific pharmacological inhibition blocked these events. Genetic manipulation of claudin-1 and claudin-3 in HT-29 cells showed that the overexpression of claudin-1 resulted in decreased cell migration; however, migration was not altered in cells that overexpressed claudin-3. Furthermore, the overexpression of claudin-3, but not that of claudin-1, increased the tight junction-related paracellular flux of macromolecules. Additionally, an increased formation of anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent colonies were observed in cells that overexpressed claudin-3, while no such changes were observed when claudin-1 was overexpressed. Finally, claudin-3 silencing alone despite induce increase proliferation, and the formation of anchoragedependent and -independent colonies, it was able to prevent the EGF-induced increased malignant potential. In conclusion, our results show a novel role for claudin-3 overexpression in promoting the malignant potential of colorectal cancer cells, which is potentially regulated by the EGF-activated ERK1/2 and PI3K-Akt pathways. PMID:24069372

  5. Oral manifestations of hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Carrozzo, Marco; Scally, Kara

    2014-01-01

    Extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can affect a variety of organ systems with significant morbidity and mortality. Some of the most frequently reported EHM of HCV infection, involve the oral region predominantly or exclusively. Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory condition that is potentially malignant and represents cell-mediated reaction to a variety of extrinsic antigens, altered self-antigens, or super antigens. Robust epidemiological evidence support the link between OLP and HCV. As the virus may replicate in the oral mucosa and attract HCV-specific T lymphocytes, HCV may be implicated in OLP pathogenesis. Sjögren syndrome (SjS) is an autoimmune exocrinopathy, characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes and a multitude of other systemic signs and symptoms. SjS patients have also an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients with chronic hepatitis C do frequently have histological signs of Sjögren-like sialadenitis with mild or even absent clinical symptoms. However, it is still unclear if HCV may cause a disease mimicking SjS or it is directly responsible for the development of SjS in a specific subset of patients. Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common oral malignant tumour and at least in some part of the world could be linked to HCV. PMID:24976694

  6. Outcome of excision of oral erythroplakia.

    PubMed

    Yang, S W; Lee, Y S; Chang, L C; Hsieh, T Y; Chen, T A

    2015-02-01

    Oral erythroplakia is a precancerous lesion with high malignant potential, and resection is the recommended treatment. We designed a retrospective study to analyse the outcome of treatment in patients who had operations for oral erythroplakia. A total of 84 patients (74 men and 10 women, mean (SD) age 54 (12) years, range 29-83) were enrolled. Histopathologically the diagnoses were invasive carcinoma (n=3), dysplasia/carcinoma in situ (n=61), and squamous hyperplasia (n=20), and all patients were treated by carbon dioxide laser excision. There was no postoperative malignant transformation, but invasive carcinoma found after initial excision (n=3) was treated by further radical excision. The mean (SD) follow-up period was 46 (29) months (range 1-124), The postoperative recurrent rate was 14/84 (16.7%). The area of oral erythroplakia was the only factor associated with postoperative recurrence on univariate analysis, and was also the only independent factor that predicted postoperative recurrence in multivariate logistic regression analysis. An area exceeding 80 mm2 had the best predictive value (sensitivity=0.71, specificity=0.67) with a 5.1 times increased risk (odds ratio=5.1, CI 95% 1.45 to 18.05, p=0.01) of recurrence. Laser excision is effective for oral erythroplakia that is still confined to dysplasia of any degree, with low morbidity. The area of oral erythroplakia is a predictive factor for postoperative recurrence. PMID:25467247

  7. Computer aided morphometric analysis of oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gupta, K; Gupta, J; Miglani, R

    2016-01-01

    We compared the changes in the cells in the basal layer of normal mucosa, oral leukoplakia with dysplasia and different grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) using computer aided image analysis of tissue sections. We investigated three morphometric parameters: nuclear area (NA), cell area (CA) and their ratio (NA:CA). NA and NA:CA ratio showed a statistically significant increase from dysplasia to increasing grades of OSCC. Nuclear size was useful for differentiating normal tissue, potentially malignant leukoplakia and OSCC. PMID:26983454

  8. Antiherpetic potential of 6-bromoindirubin-3'-acetoxime (BIO-acetoxime) in human oral epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Mei-Ju; Hung, Shan-Ling

    2013-06-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) functions in the regulation of glycogen metabolism, in the cell cycle, and in immune responses and is targeted by some viruses to favor the viral life cycle. Inhibition of GSK-3 by 6-bromoindirubin-3'-acetoxime (BIO-acetoxime), a synthetic derivative of a compound from the Mediterranean mollusk Hexaplex trunculus, protects cells from varicella infection. In this study, we examined the effects of BIO-acetoxime against herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection in human oral epithelial cells, which represent a natural target cell type. The results revealed that BIO-acetoxime relieves HSV-1-induced cytopathic effects and apoptosis. We also found that BIO-acetoxime reduced viral yields and the expression of different classes of viral proteins. Furthermore, addition of BIO-acetoxime before, simultaneously with or after HSV-1 infection significantly reduced viral yields. Collectively, BIO-acetoxime may suppress viral gene expression and protect oral epithelial cells from HSV-1 infection. These results suggest the possible involvement of GSK-3 in HSV-1 infection. PMID:23392633

  9. Contaminated tooth brushes–potential threat to oral and general health

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Rashmi; Ahmed Mujib, B. R.; Telagi, Neethu; Anil, B. S.; Spoorthi, B. R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tooth brushing is most common method of maintaining oral hygiene. In removing plaque and other soft debris from the teeth, tooth brushes become contaminated with bacteria, blood, saliva and oral debris. These contaminated tooth brushes can be a source of infection. Aims and objectives: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of microorganisms in the tooth brushes and to investigate the effect of disinfectants such as chlorhexidine gluconate, sodium hypochlorite and water to decontaminate them. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one children were asked to brush their teeth for 5 days with a tooth brush. The tooth brushes were put in Robertson's Cooked Meat broth and were observed for growth of Streptococcal microorganisms. These tooth brushes were then placed in disinfectants such as 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate (Group I), 1% sodium hypochlorite (Group II) and water (Group III) for 24 hrs and then cultured again. Reduction of growth of microorganisms was seen in Group I, Group II and remnants of growth seen in Group III. Conclusion: We conclude that the use of disinfectant for a tooth brush is a must for every individual at least at regular intervals. PMID:26288790

  10. Do oral bacteria alter the regenerative potential of stem cells? A concise review.

    PubMed

    Chatzivasileiou, Kyriaki; Kriebel, Katja; Steinhoff, Gustav; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Lang, Hermann

    2015-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely recognized as critical players in tissue regeneration. New insights into stem cell biology provide evidence that MSCs may also contribute to host defence and inflammation. In case of tissue injury or inflammatory diseases, e.g. periodontitis, stem cells are mobilized towards the site of damage, thus coming in close proximity to bacteria and bacterial components. Specifically, in the oral cavity, complex ecosystems of commensal bacteria live in a mutually beneficial state with the host. However, the formation of polymicrobial biofilm communities with pathogenic properties may trigger an inadequate host inflammatory-immune response, leading to the disruption of tissue homoeostasis and development of disease. Because of their unique characteristics, MSCs are suggested as crucial regulators of tissue regeneration even under such harsh environmental conditions. The heterogeneous effects of bacteria on MSCs across studies imply the complexity underlying the interactions between stem cells and bacteria. Hence, a better understanding of stem cell behaviour at sites of inflammation appears to be a key strategy in developing new approaches for in situ tissue regeneration. Here, we review the literature on the effects of oral bacteria on cell proliferation, differentiation capacity and immunomodulation of dental-derived MSCs. PMID:26058313

  11. Do oral bacteria alter the regenerative potential of stem cells? A concise review

    PubMed Central

    Chatzivasileiou, Kyriaki; Kriebel, Katja; Steinhoff, Gustav; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Lang, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely recognized as critical players in tissue regeneration. New insights into stem cell biology provide evidence that MSCs may also contribute to host defence and inflammation. In case of tissue injury or inflammatory diseases, e.g. periodontitis, stem cells are mobilized towards the site of damage, thus coming in close proximity to bacteria and bacterial components. Specifically, in the oral cavity, complex ecosystems of commensal bacteria live in a mutually beneficial state with the host. However, the formation of polymicrobial biofilm communities with pathogenic properties may trigger an inadequate host inflammatory-immune response, leading to the disruption of tissue homoeostasis and development of disease. Because of their unique characteristics, MSCs are suggested as crucial regulators of tissue regeneration even under such harsh environmental conditions. The heterogeneous effects of bacteria on MSCs across studies imply the complexity underlying the interactions between stem cells and bacteria. Hence, a better understanding of stem cell behaviour at sites of inflammation appears to be a key strategy in developing new approaches for in situ tissue regeneration. Here, we review the literature on the effects of oral bacteria on cell proliferation, differentiation capacity and immunomodulation of dental-derived MSCs. PMID:26058313

  12. Can MMP-9 be a Prognosticator Marker for Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Shiva Kumar; Kumar, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Invasion and metastasis of malignant tumours severely endanger the life of cancer patients. Squamous cell carcinoma is one of the commonly found malignancies in the oral cavity and its survival rate has not improved from past few decades. Since an important risk factor for oral squamous cell carcinoma is the presence of epithelial dysplasia, it is necessary to check the presence of a prognosticator marker in both of them. As matrix metalloproteinase’s (MMP’s) are involved in degradation of type IV collagen, which are one of the important components of extracellular matrix components which play a relevant role in several steps of tumour progression such as invasion and metastasis. We have studied MMP-9 expression to evaluate its prognostic potential in oral cancers as well as oral epithelial dysplasia along with tissues of normal oral epithelium. Materials and Methods The expression was examined using immunohistochemistry procedure with MMP-9 in 100 samples including cases of epithelium from normal oral mucosa, oral dysplastic lesions and oral squamous cell carcinoma. One set of formalin fixed, paraffin embedded sections of the three categories were stained by haematoxylin and eosin. The sections were then evaluated under microscope. Data was examined for statistical significance using SPSS 13.0 by Mann-Whitney Test and Kruskal-Wallis Test. Results With MMP-9 gain of expression was noted from Control group to oral squamous cell carcinoma. Cytoplasmic staining was seen with MMP-9. Statistically highly significant differences were seen between oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma and statistically significant differences were found between the control group and the oral squamous cell carcinoma group. Conclusion This study suggested that oral squamous cell carcinoma shows higher MMP-9 expression as compared to oral epithelial dysplasia followed by epithelium from normal oral mucosa. However, no correlation was found among the

  13. Simulants of Malignant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine; Delvenne, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    During the recent period, dermoscopy has yielded improvement in the early disclosure of various atypical melanocytic neoplasms (AMN) of the skin. Beyond this clinical procedure, AMN histopathology remains mandatory for establishing their precise diagnosis. Of note, panels of experts in AMN merely report moderate agreement in various puzzling cases. Divergences in opinion and misdiagnosis are likely increased when histopathological criteria are not fine-tuned and when facing a diversity of AMN types. Furthermore, some AMN have been differently named in the literature including atypical Spitz tumor, metastasizing Spitz tumor, borderline and intermediate melanocytic tumor, malignant Spitz nevus, pigmented epithelioid melanocytoma or animal-type melanoma. Some acronyms have been further suggested such as MELTUMP (after melanocytic tumor of uncertain malignant potential) and STUMP (after Spitzoid melanocytic tumor of uncertain malignant potential). In this review, such AMN at the exclusion of cutaneous malignant melanoma (MM) variants, are grouped under the tentative broad heading skin melanocytoma. Such set of AMN frequently follows an indolent course, although they exhibit atypical and sometimes worrisome patterns or cytological atypia. Rare cases of skin melanocytomas progress to loco regional clusters of lesions (agminate melanocytomas), and even to regional lymph nodes. At times, the distinction between a skin melanocytoma and MM remains puzzling. However, multipronged immunohistochemistry and emerging molecular biology help profiling any malignancy risk if present. PMID:26779311

  14. Kinesin Family member 4A: A Potential Predictor for Progression of Human Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Minakawa, Yasuyuki; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Koike, Hirofumi; Higo, Morihiro; Nakashima, Dai; Kouzu, Yukinao; Sakamoto, Yosuke; Ogawara, Katsunori; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Background Kinesin family member 4A (KIF4A), a microtubule-based motor protein, was implicated in regulation of chromosomal structure and kinetochore microtubule dynamics. Considering the functions of KIF4A, we assumed that KIF4A is involved in progression of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) via activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). However, little is known about the relevance of KIF4A in the behavior of OSCC. We investigated the KIF4A expression status and its functional mechanisms in OSCC. Methods The KIF4A expression levels in seven OSCC-derived cells were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting analyses. Using a KIF4A knockdown model, we assessed the expression of (SAC)-related molecules (BUB1, MAD2, CDC20, and cyclin B1), cell-cycle, and cellular proliferation. In addition to in vitro data, the clinical correlation between the KIF4A expression levels in primary OSCCs (n = 106 patients) and the clinicopathologic status by immunohistochemistry (IHC) also were evaluated. Results KIF4A mRNA and protein were up-regulated significantly (P < 0.05) in seven OSCC-derived cells compared with human normal oral keratinocytes. In the KIF4A knockdown cells, SAC activation was observed via increased BUB1 expression on the kinetochores, appropriate kinetochore localization of MAD2, down-regulation of CDC20, up-regulation of cyclin B1, and cell-cycle arrested at G2/M phase. The results showed that cellular proliferation of KIF4A knockdown cells decreased significantly (P < 0.05) compared with control cells. IHC showed that KIF4A expression in primary OSCCs was significantly (P < 0.05) greater than in the normal oral counterparts and that KIF4A-positive OSCCs were correlated closely (P < 0.05) with tumoral size. Conclusions Our results proposed for the first time that KIF4A controls cellular proliferation via SAC activation. Therefore, KIF4A might be a key regulator for tumoral progression in OSCCs. PMID

  15. Hematologic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogstraten, B.

    1986-01-01

    The principle aim of this book is to give practical guidelines to the modern treatment of the six important hematologic malignancies. Topics considered include the treatment of the chronic leukemias; acute leukemia in adults; the myeloproliferative disorders: polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and idiopathic myelofibrosis/agnogenic myeloid metaplasia; Hodgkin's Disease; non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; and Multiple Myeloma.

  16. Mutagenesis and carcinogenesis induced by dibenzo[a,l]pyrene in the mouse oral cavity: a potential new model for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guttenplan, Joseph B.; Kosinska, Wieslawa; Zhao, Zhong-Lin; Chen, Kun-Ming; Aliaga, Cesar; DelTondo, Joseph; Cooper, Timothy; Sun, Yuan-Wan; Zhang, Shang-Min; Jiang, Kun; Bruggeman, Richard; Sharma, Arun K.; Amin, Shantu; Ahn, Kwangmi; El-Bayoumy, Karam

    2013-01-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity is a serious disease, affecting about 30,000 individuals in US annually. There are several animal models of oral cancer, but each has certain disadvantages. As a new model, we investigated whether topical application of the tobacco smoke carcinogen, dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P) is mutagenic and carcinogenic in the oral cavity of the B6C3F1 lacI and B6C3F1 mouse, respectively. B6C3F1 lacI mice received DB[a,l]P (0, 3, 6, 12 nmol) 3× per week. B6C3F1 mice received the same doses and also 24 nmol. At 38 weeks mutagenesis was measured in oral tissues in lacI mice. For the high dose group, the mutant fraction (MF) in upper mucosa and tongue increased about twofold relative to that in vehicle-alone. The increases were statistically significant. The mutational profile in the DB[a,l]P-induced mutants was compared with that induced by benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in oral tissue. BaP is mutagenic in many tissues when administered by gavage. The mutational profile for DB[a,l]P was more similar to that reported for p53 mutations in head and neck cancers than was that of BaP. At 47 weeks, oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) were found in 31% of the high-dose B6C3F1 group. Elevations of p53 and COX-2 protein were observed in tumor and dysplastic tissue. As DB[a,l]P induces mutations and tumors in the oral cavity, and has a mutational profile in oral tissue similar to that found in p53 in human OSCC, the treatment protocol described here may represent a new and relevant model for cancer of the oral cavity. PMID:21815141

  17. Oral Health Status of the Veddas-Sri Lankan Indigenous People.

    PubMed

    Jayashantha, Pradeep; Johnson, Newell W

    2016-01-01

    Sri Lanka's Veddas/Vanniya-laeto, are a small Indigenous group today with little information on their oral health status. This report is to provide an overview on oral health status of Veddas. Oral health status was recorded by the principal investigator after obtaining consent, using World Health Organization criteria, at an initial screening point before sending the person for any necessary treatment. Total participants were 194: 78% were males>35 years. Mean decayed, missing, filled teeth was 0.9 and 3% had pockets <3.5mm. Three had oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs), while three were treated for oral cancer. While the prevalence of dental caries and periodontal conditions was low, oral cancer and OPMDs is a serious concern. The Veddas have a culturally specific health system based on herbal medicinal knowledge. Thus, it is challenging to introduce and implement a preventive and curative oral health care system that would be culturally acceptable to this community. PMID:26853207

  18. Potential of ordered mesoporous silica for oral delivery of poorly soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Vialpando, Monica; Martens, Johan A; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2011-08-01

    The use of ordered mesoporous silica is one of the more recent and rapidly developing formulation techniques for enhancing the solubility of poorly water-soluble drugs. Their large surface area and pore volume make ordered mesoporous silica materials excellent candidates for efficient drug loading and rapid release. While this new approach offers many promising advantages, further research is still necessary to elucidate the molecular mechanisms and to improve our scientific insight into the behavior of this system. In this review, the significant developments to date are presented and research challenges highlighted. Aspects of downstream processability are discussed in view of their special bulk powder properties and unique pore architecture. Lastly, perspectives for successful oral dosage form development are presented. PMID:22833866

  19. Treatments of the oral leukoplakia by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capocci, M.; Mohsen, M.; Lo Giudice, R.; Del Vecchio, A.; Gaimari, G.; Tribolati, L.; Palaia, G.; Romeo, U.

    2016-03-01

    Oral leukoplakia is catalogued under the group of "potentially malignant disorders". In daily practice, the World Health Organization definition "white patch or plaque that cannot be characterized clinically or histologically as any other disease" is completed by including the observation that it cannot be removed by simple scraping, thereby distinguishing it from pseudo-membranous candidiasis. The aim of this study is to find a definitive treatment of oral leukoplakia, because of its recurrence and its potentiality to the malignant transformation. There are currently different approaches to oral leukoplakia: scalpel surgery, systemic therapy (carotenoids, vitamins, etc.), electro-cauterization, cryotherapy and the use of the laser. In every lesion, biopsy and histological analysis has been performed to identify the stage and classification of the oral leukoplakia. Laser can be used for the complete excision of the lesion (which is more effective, but also more invasive), for the photodynamic therapy (non-invasive procedure, which requires several applications) or for the vaporization of the lesion (very precise treatment and relatively easy to perform). Laser treatments have shown better healing, less soft tissues retraction and less post-operative pain, comparing with traditional surgery. The use of systemic therapies and smoking habit interruption (where present) has been also useful to reduce the lesions before the clinical treatments. The treatment has always to be supported by histological analysis to identify the risk and consequently planning the clinical approach.

  20. Potential of erlotinib cyclodextrin nanosponge complex to enhance solubility, dissolution rate, in vitro cytotoxicity and oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Dora, Chander Parkash; Trotta, Francesco; Kushwah, Varun; Devasari, Naresh; Singh, Charan; Suresh, Sarasija; Jain, Sanyog

    2016-02-10

    The present study was envisaged to evaluate the effect of erlotinib β-cyclodextrin nanosponge (ERL-NS) on the solubility, dissolution, in vitro cytotoxicity and oral bioavailability of erlotinib (ERL). Preliminary studies were conducted to select the optimized stoichiometry concentration of ERL and NS. The drug nanosponge complex comprising of 1:4 proportions of ERL and NS was prepared by freeze drying. ERL-NS formed nanoparticles of 372 ± 31 nm size with narrow size distribution (0.21 ± 0.07 PDI) and high zeta potential (-32.07 ± 4.58 mV). The complexation phenomenon was confirmed by DSC, SEM, PXRD, FTIR, and TEM studies. In vitro dissolution studies revealed an increased dissolution rate (2-folds) with an enhanced dissolution efficiency of the nanosponge complex in comparison to pure drug. In vitro cytotoxicity study and apoptosis assay in pancreatic cell lines (MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1) indicates the increased toxicity of ERL-NS. Both, quantitative and qualitative cell uptake studies unveiled the higher uptake efficiency of ERL-NS than free drug. ERL-NS showed enhanced oral bioavailability with 1.8-fold higher Cmax (78.98 ± 6.2 vs. 42.36 ± 1.75 μg/ml), and ∼ 2-fold AUC0-∞ (1079.95 ± 41.38 vs. 580.43 ± 71.91), in comparison to pure ERL. Therefore, we conclude that the formation of a complex of nanosponge with ERL is a successful approach to increase its solubility, dissolution and oral bioavailability which may ultimately result in reduction in dose and dose related side-effects. PMID:26686138

  1. Potential of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging in the Characterization of Malignant, Benign, and Healthy Breast Tissues and Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Uma; Sah, Rani G.; Agarwal, Khushbu; Parshad, Rajinder; Seenu, Vurthaluru; Mathur, Sandeep R.; Hari, Smriti; Jagannathan, Naranamangalam R.

    2016-01-01

    The role of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the diagnosis of breast cancer and its association with molecular biomarkers was investigated in 259 patients with breast cancer, 67 with benign pathology, and 54 healthy volunteers using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) at 1.5 T. In 59 breast cancer patients, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCEMRI) was also acquired. Mean ADC of malignant lesions was significantly lower (1.02 ± 0.17 × 10−3 mm2/s) compared to benign (1.57 ± 0.26 × 10−3 mm2/s) and healthy (1.78 ± 0.13 × 10−3 mm2/s) breast tissues. A cutoff ADC value of 1.23 × 10−3 mm2/s (sensitivity 92.5%; specificity 91.1%; area under the curve 0.96) to differentiate malignant from benign diseases was arrived by receiver operating curve analysis. In 10/59 breast cancer patients, indeterminate DCE curve was seen, while their ADC value was indicative of malignancy, implying the potential of the addition of DWI in increasing the specificity of DCEMRI data. Further, the association of ADC with tumor volume, stage, hormonal receptors [estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor (HER2)], and menopausal status was investigated. A significant difference was seen in tumor volume between breast cancer patients of stages IIA and IIIA, IIB and IIIA, and IIB and III (B + C), respectively (P < 0.05). Patients with early breast cancer (n = 52) had significantly lower ADC and tumor volume than those with locally advanced breast cancer (n = 207). No association was found in ADC and tumor volume with the menopausal status. Breast cancers with ER−, PR−, and triple-negative (TN) status showed a significantly larger tumor volume compared to ER+, PR+, and non-triple-negative (nTN) cancers, respectively. Also, TN tumors showed a significantly higher ADC compared to ER+, PR+, and nTN cancers. Patients with ER− and TN cancers were younger than those with ER+ and nTN cancers

  2. Potential of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging in the Characterization of Malignant, Benign, and Healthy Breast Tissues and Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Uma; Sah, Rani G; Agarwal, Khushbu; Parshad, Rajinder; Seenu, Vurthaluru; Mathur, Sandeep R; Hari, Smriti; Jagannathan, Naranamangalam R

    2016-01-01

    The role of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the diagnosis of breast cancer and its association with molecular biomarkers was investigated in 259 patients with breast cancer, 67 with benign pathology, and 54 healthy volunteers using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) at 1.5 T. In 59 breast cancer patients, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCEMRI) was also acquired. Mean ADC of malignant lesions was significantly lower (1.02 ± 0.17 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s) compared to benign (1.57 ± 0.26 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s) and healthy (1.78 ± 0.13 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s) breast tissues. A cutoff ADC value of 1.23 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s (sensitivity 92.5%; specificity 91.1%; area under the curve 0.96) to differentiate malignant from benign diseases was arrived by receiver operating curve analysis. In 10/59 breast cancer patients, indeterminate DCE curve was seen, while their ADC value was indicative of malignancy, implying the potential of the addition of DWI in increasing the specificity of DCEMRI data. Further, the association of ADC with tumor volume, stage, hormonal receptors [estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor (HER2)], and menopausal status was investigated. A significant difference was seen in tumor volume between breast cancer patients of stages IIA and IIIA, IIB and IIIA, and IIB and III (B + C), respectively (P < 0.05). Patients with early breast cancer (n = 52) had significantly lower ADC and tumor volume than those with locally advanced breast cancer (n = 207). No association was found in ADC and tumor volume with the menopausal status. Breast cancers with ER-, PR-, and triple-negative (TN) status showed a significantly larger tumor volume compared to ER+, PR+, and non-triple-negative (nTN) cancers, respectively. Also, TN tumors showed a significantly higher ADC compared to ER+, PR+, and nTN cancers. Patients with ER- and TN cancers were younger than those with ER+ and n

  3. Oral soft tissue biopsies in Oporto, Portugal: An eight year retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Manuel-Moreira; Albuquerque, Rui; Monteiro, Marta; Lopes, Carlos-Alberto; do Amaral, José-Barbas; Pacheco, José-Júlio

    2015-01-01

    Background The diseases that affect the oral cavity are wide and diverse, comprising a broad spectrum of either benign or malignant lesions. However, few histological-based studies were performed for the evaluation of oral cavity lesions, and very few directed to oral soft tissue pathology. The aim of this study was to carry out pioneering research, within a Portuguese population, to determine the frequency and characteristics of oral malignancies, potential malignant disorders, and soft benign tissues pathologies submitted for biopsy in a north Portugal (Oporto) hospital population. Material and Methods We performed a retrospective study of soft tissue, oral cavity biopsies, in a hospital north of Portugal (Oporto) between 1999 and 2006. We analysed information on gender, age, location of the lesion, and the histopathological diagnosis. Results A total of 1042 oral biopsies were observed, 557(53.5%) in females and 485 (46.5%) in males, with a mean age of 51.7 years (S.D. ±17.6). The topographic location most frequently affected was labial mucosa (n=306). Considering the nature of the lesions, 700 (67.2%) corresponded to non-neoplasic lesions, 45 (4.3%) to potentially malignant disorders, and 297 (28.5%) to neoplasms (93 benign and 204 malignant). Non-neoplasic lesions were more prevalent in female gender (59.9%) when compared with potentially malignant disorders (46.7%) and neoplasms (39.4%) (P< 0.001). Non-neoplasic lesions presented the lower mean age (49.2±17.6) and potentially malignant disorders the highest mean age (60.5±14.5) (P< 0.001). The most common lesion of entire sample was fibro-epithelial hyperplasia (n=186; 17.9%), followed by squamous cell carcinoma (n=158; 15.1%). Conclusions Fibro-epithelial hyperplasia, followed by squamous cell carcinoma, was the most common pathologies. This pioneering study provided, for the first time, data about the proportion of squamous cell carcinoma when compared with benign conditions in a Portuguese hospital

  4. Formulating SLMs as oral pulsatile system for potential delivery of melatonin to pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Albertini, Beatrice; Di Sabatino, Marcello; Melegari, Cecilia; Passerini, Nadia

    2014-07-20

    The formulation development of melatonin (MLT) for infants and children with neurodevelopmental difficulties was fully investigated. This population have a higher prevalence of sleep disorders and present special challenges for drug administration and swallowing. To solve these issues, solid lipid microparticles (SLMs) were designed to obtain an oral flexible dosage form constituted by GRAS excipients and a free flow pulsatile delivery system for MLT, able to maintain its release through 8h. Three groups of SLMs were produced by spray congealing and characterized as regards particle size, morphology, flowability, solid state, drug content and release behavior. The SLMs manipulation with milk and yogurt and the MLT stability in these foods were also investigated. Microparticles with different excipient composition were selected to obtain a pulsatile release pattern over 8h. The final delivery platform displayed a prompt release from group I SLMs together with a lag phase of groups II and III SLMs, followed by a repeated MLT release from group II and a prolonged MLT release related to the last group. Finally, MLT was compatible and stable in milk and yogurt suggesting that microparticles sprinkled into food is acceptable for MLT administration to children unable to swallow capsules or tablets. PMID:24768728

  5. The potential anticancer activity of extracts derived from the roots of Scutellaria baicalensis on human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    SATO, DAISUKE; KONDO, SEIJI; YAZAWA, KAZUNAGA; MUKUDAI, YOSHIKI; LI, CHUNNAN; KAMATANI, TAKAAKI; KATSUTA, HIDEYUKI; YOSHIHAMA, YASUTO; SHIROTA, TATSUO; SHINTANI, SATORU

    2013-01-01

    Various herb products derived from plants have potent biological effects including anticancer activity. In the present study, the antitumor activity of a herbal product derived from the Scutellaria baicalensis (S. baicalensis) was examined, using in vitro assays in a human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell line. Results showed that S. baicalensis root extract at the concentration of 100 μg/ml inhibited monolayer- and anchorage-independent growth in human OSCC cell lines, while not affecting the adhering abilities of cells. This suggested that it did not alter the expression of any of the adhesion receptors that mediate cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. The S. baicalensis root extract demonstrated potent cytostatic and apoptotic effects due to the downregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 expression and its partner cyclin D1, resulting in G1 arrest and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Additionally, the S. baicalensis root extract was found to have blocked vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced migration and tube formation in human endothelial cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that as a herbal product, the S. baicalensis root extract is a potential inhibitor of tumori- and angiogenesis and may be valuable in the development of pharmaceutical medications for the treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:24649131

  6. A potential oral anticancer drug candidate, Moringa oleifera leaf extract, induces the apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    JUNG, IL LAE; LEE, JU HYE; KANG, SE CHAN

    2015-01-01

    It has previously been reported that cold water-extracts of Moringa oleifera leaf have anticancer activity against various human cancer cell lines, including non-small cell lung cancer. In the present study, the anticancer activity of M. oleifera leaf extracts was investigated in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. By the analysis of apoptotic signals, including the induction of caspase or poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, and the Annexin V and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assays, it was demonstrated that M. oleifera leaf extracts induce the apoptosis of HepG2 cells. In the hollow fiber assay, oral administration of the leaf extracts significantly reduced (44–52%) the proliferation of the HepG2 cells and A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells. These results support the potential of soluble extracts of M. oleifera leaf as orally administered therapeutics for the treatment of human liver and lung cancers. PMID:26622717

  7. Potentiation of treosulfan toxicity by the glutathione-depleting agent buthionine sulfoximine in human malignant glioma cells: the role of bcl-2.

    PubMed

    Reber, U; Wüllner, U; Trepel, M; Baumgart, J; Seyfried, J; Klockgether, T; Dichgans, J; Weller, M

    1998-02-01

    Median survival of human malignant glioma patients is less than one year even with cytoreductive surgery and postoperative radiotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy has been rather ineffective. Here, we studied the potentiation by L-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine (BSO), a glutathione-depleting agent, of anticancer drug actions on two human malignant glioma cell lines, LN-229 and T98G. LN-229 has wild-type p53 status, T98G is mutant for p53. Glutathione levels were depleted by BSO with similar kinetics in both cell lines. Only LN-229 cells were growth-inhibited by BSO. BSO had minor effects on the toxicity of doxorubicin, ACNU (1-[(4-amino-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl)methyl]-3-(2-chloroethyl)-3-nitrosou rea, nimustine) and vincristine. BSO failed to alter teniposide or cytarabine toxicity. BSO induced prominent sensitization to the alkylating agent, treosulfan, in both cell lines, as assessed by viability assays, in situ DNA end labeling and quantitative DNA fragmentation. Treosulfan is thought to mediate toxicity via formation of reactive epoxides. In the absence of BSO, treosulfan had little acute cytotoxic and moderate antiproliferative effects. Synergistic glioma cell cytotoxicity induced by treosulfan and BSO was not associated with reactive oxygen species formation. Ectopic expression of bcl-2 did not alter basal glutathione levels but attenuated glutathione depletion induced by BSO. Bcl-2 provided only moderate protection from synergistic induction of glioma cell death by treosulfan and BSO. Glutathione depletion may play a role in BSO-mediated chemosensitization, but other mechanisms are probably involved as well. BSO may be a useful agent for glioma cell sensitization to specific chemotherapeutic drugs such as treosulfan. PMID:9484802

  8. Inhibition of bromodomain and extra-terminal proteins (BET) as a potential therapeutic approach in haematological malignancies: emerging preclinical and clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Chaidos, Aristeidis; Caputo, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of the nucleosomal histone proteins orchestrate chromatin organization and gene expression in normal and cancer cells. Among them, the acetylation of N-terminal histone tails represents the fundamental epigenetic mark of open structure chromatin and active gene transcription. The bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) proteins are epigenetic readers which utilize tandem bromodomains (BRD) modules to recognize and dock themselves on the acetylated lysine tails. The BET proteins act as scaffolds for the recruitment of transcription factors and chromatin organizers required in transcription initiation and elongation. The recent discovery of small molecules capable of blocking their lysine-binding pocket is the first paradigm of successful pharmacological inhibition of epigenetic readers. JQ1 is a prototype benzodiazepine molecule and a specific BET inhibitor with antineoplastic activity both in solid tumours and haematological malignancies. The quinolone I-BET151 and the suitable for clinical development I-BET762 benzodiazepine were introduced in parallel with JQ1 and have also shown potent antitumour activity in preclinical studies. I-BET762 is currently being tested in early phase clinical trials, along with a rapidly growing list of other BET inhibitors. Unlike older epigenetic therapies, the study of BET inhibitors has offered substantial, context-specific, mechanistic insights of their antitumour activity, which will facilitate optimal therapeutic targeting in future. Here, we review the development of this novel class of epigenetic drugs, the biology of BET protein inhibition, the emerging evidence from preclinical work and early phase clinical studies and we discuss their potential role in the treatment of haematological malignancies. PMID:26137204

  9. Potential role of differentially expressed lncRNAs in the pathogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanchuan; Tian, Lili; Ma, Penghua; Sun, Qiang; Zhang, Kai; GuanchaoWang; Liu, Hongchen; Xu, Baohua

    2015-10-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have recently attracted more attention about the role in a broad range of biological processes and complex cancers. We aimed to identify differentially expressed lncRNAs that play an important role in the pathogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Microarray data GSE25099 consisting of 57 samples from patients with OSCC and 22 normal samples were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and lncRNAs were identified between OSCC samples and control using samr package in R and noncoder software. Co-expression network was constructed for lncRNAs and candidate target DEGs, followed by functional and pathway enrichment analysis using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery online tool. OSCC-related genes were screened by Genetic-Association-DB-Database analysis, and then protein-protein interaction (PPI) network construction of OSCC-related and co-expressed genes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that there were 998 DEGs and 160 differentially expressed lncRNAs between OSCC and normal control. We found LOC100130547, FTH1P3, PDIA3F and GTF2IRD2P1 targeted most of DEGs. Predicted targets-related functional annotation showed significant changes in inflammation-related functions and Toll-like receptor signaling pathway. By further conducting PPI network with lncRNA co-expressed DEGs, we found that OSCC-associated genes including MMP1 (matrix metallopeptidase), MMP3, MMP9, PLAU (plasminogen activator, urokinase) and IL8 (interleukin 8) were targeted by FTH1P3, PDIA3F and GTF2IRD2P1. Our results indicate that lncRNAs FTH1P3, PDIA3F and GTF2IRD2P1 may responsible for progression and metastasis of OSCC via targeting MMP1, MMP3, MMP9, PLAU and IL8 which are key regulators of tumorigenesis. PMID:26276270

  10. Discovery of Potent and Orally Active p53-MDM2 Inhibitors RO5353 and RO2468 for Potential Clinical Development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The development of small-molecule MDM2 inhibitors to restore dysfunctional p53 activities represents a novel approach for cancer treatment. In a previous communication, the efforts leading to the identification of a non-imidazoline MDM2 inhibitor, RG7388, was disclosed and revealed the desirable in vitro and in vivo pharmacological properties that this class of pyrrolidine-based inhibitors possesses. Given this richness and the critical need for a wide variety of chemical structures to ensure success in the clinic, research was expanded to evaluate additional derivatives. Here we report two new potent, selective, and orally active p53-MDM2 antagonists, RO5353 and RO2468, as follow-ups with promising potential for clinical development. PMID:24900784

  11. Discovery of Potent and Orally Active p53-MDM2 Inhibitors RO5353 and RO2468 for Potential Clinical Development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuming; Chu, Xin-Jie; Liu, Jin-Jun; Ding, Qingjie; Zhang, Jing; Bartkovitz, David; Jiang, Nan; Karnachi, Prabha; So, Sung-Sau; Tovar, Christian; Filipovic, Zoran M; Higgins, Brian; Glenn, Kelli; Packman, Kathryn; Vassilev, Lyubomir; Graves, Bradford

    2014-02-13

    The development of small-molecule MDM2 inhibitors to restore dysfunctional p53 activities represents a novel approach for cancer treatment. In a previous communication, the efforts leading to the identification of a non-imidazoline MDM2 inhibitor, RG7388, was disclosed and revealed the desirable in vitro and in vivo pharmacological properties that this class of pyrrolidine-based inhibitors possesses. Given this richness and the critical need for a wide variety of chemical structures to ensure success in the clinic, research was expanded to evaluate additional derivatives. Here we report two new potent, selective, and orally active p53-MDM2 antagonists, RO5353 and RO2468, as follow-ups with promising potential for clinical development. PMID:24900784

  12. Genetic mutations in accordance with a low malignant potential tumour are not demonstrated in clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Raspollini, Maria Rosaria; Castiglione, Francesca; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCPRCC) cases were evaluated for mutations on the following genes: KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, ALK, ERBB2, DDR2, MAP2K1, RET and EGFR. Four male and three female patients of age 42-74 years were evaluated. All cases were incidentally detected by ultrasound and ranged 1.8-3.5 cm. Microscopic examination showed variably tubulopapillary, tubular acinar, cystic architecture and the characteristic linear arrangement of nuclei. The cells were reactive with CK7 (strong), CA IX (cup-shape) and 34 β E12. CD10, AMACR/RACEMASE and GATA3 were negative. There were no mutations on any of the investigated genes. This preliminary observation supports the concept that CCPRCC might be indeed an indolent tumour worth it to be named as clear cell papillary neoplasm of low potential. PMID:26941183

  13. Insights into the therapeutic potential of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α small interfering RNA in malignant melanoma delivered via folate-decorated cationic liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhongjian; Zhang, Tianpeng; Wu, Baojian; Zhang, Xingwang

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma (MM) represents the most dangerous form of skin cancer, and its incidence is expected to rise in the coming time. However, therapy for MM is limited by low topical drug concentration and multidrug resistance. This article aimed to develop folate-decorated cationic liposomes (fc-LPs) for hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) small interfering (siRNA) delivery, and to evaluate the potential of such siRNA/liposome complexes in MM therapy. HIF-1α siRNA-loaded fc-LPs (siRNA-fc-LPs) were prepared by a film hydration method followed by siRNA incubation. Folate decoration of liposomes was achieved by incorporation of folate/oleic acid-diacylated oligochitosans. The resulting siRNA-fc-LPs were 95.3 nm in size with a ζ potential of 2.41 mV. The liposomal vectors exhibited excellent loading capacity and protective effect toward siRNA. The in vitro cell transfection efficiency was almost parallel to the commercially available Lipofectamine™ 2000. Moreover, the anti-melanoma activity of HIF-1α siRNA was significantly enhanced through fc-LPs. Western blot analysis and apoptosis test demonstrated that siRNA-fc-LPs substantially reduced the production of HIF-1α-associated protein and induced the apoptosis of hypoxia-tolerant melanoma cells. Our designed liposomal vectors might be applicable as siRNA delivery vehicle to systemically or topically treat MM. PMID:27042054

  14. Oral cavity cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    Imaging plays a crucial role in the staging of oral cancers. Imaging information is essential for determining tumour resectibility, post resection surgical reconstruction and radiation therapy planning. The aim of this paper is to highlight the natural history of oral cancer spread and how malignant infiltration can be accurately mapped. It focuses on buccal mucosa, hard palate, tongue and floor of mouth carcinoma. PMID:16361136

  15. Oral pigmentation: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sreeja, C.; Ramakrishnan, K.; Vijayalakshmi, D.; Devi, M.; Aesha, I.; Vijayabanu, B.

    2015-01-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations. PMID:26538887

  16. A potentially artifact-free oral contrast agent for gastrointestinal MRI.

    PubMed

    Liebig, T; Stoupis, C; Ros, P R; Ballinger, J R; Briggs, R W

    1993-11-01

    The combination of diamagnetic barium sulfate and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) in one suspension produces a macroscopic cancellation of positive and negative magnetic susceptibility components that can potentially eliminate susceptibility artifacts even with gradient echo pulse sequences. The relaxation properties that make the SPIO suspension a useful negative contrast agent are retained. PMID:8259066

  17. In vitro activity of bortezomib in cultures of patient tumour cells--potential utility in haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wiberg, Kristina; Carlson, Kristina; Aleskog, Anna; Larsson, Rolf; Nygren, Peter; Lindhagen, Elin

    2009-01-01

    Bortezomib represents a new class of anti-cancer drugs, the proteasome inhibitors. We evaluated the in vitro activity of bortezomib with regard to tumour-type specificity and possible mechanisms of drug resistance in 115 samples of tumour cells from patients and in a cell-line panel, using the short-term fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay. Bortezomib generally showed dose-response curves with a steep slope. In patient cells, bortezomib was more active in haematological than in solid tumour samples. Myeloma and chronic myeloid leukaemia were the most sensitive tumour types although with great variability in drug response between the individual samples. Colorectal and kidney cancer samples were the least sensitive. In the cell-line panel, only small differences in response were seen between the different cell lines, and the proteasome inhibitors, lactacystin and MG 262, showed an activity pattern similar to that of bortezomib. The cell-line data suggest that resistance to bortezomib was not mediated by MRP-, PgP, GSH-; tubulin and topo II-associated MDR. Combination experiments indicated synergy between bortezomib and arsenic trioxide or irinotecan. The data support the current use of bortezomib but also points to its potential utility in other tumour types and in combination with cytotoxic drugs. PMID:19016012

  18. Carisoprodol withdrawal syndrome resembling neuroleptic malignant syndrome: Diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Gunchan; Parshotam, Gautam L; Garg, Rajneesh

    2016-01-01

    Soma (Carisoprodol) is N-isopropyl-2 methyl-2-propyl-1,3-propanediol dicarbamate; a commonly prescribed, centrally acting skeletal muscle relaxant. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a potentially life-threatening adverse effect of antipsychotic agents. Although diagnostic criteria for NMS have been established, it should be recognized that atypical presentations occur and more flexible diagnostic criteria than currently mandated, may be warranted. We wish to report a postoperative case of bilateral knee replacement who presented with carisoprodol (Soma) withdrawal resembling NMS that was a diagnostic dilemma. Subsequently, it was successfully treated with oral baclofen in absence of sodium dantrolene.

  19. Radiopharmacological characterization of ⁶⁴Cu-labeled α-MSH analogs for potential use in imaging of malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Sihver, Wiebke; Jurischka, Christoph; Bergmann, Ralf; Haase-Kohn, Cathleen; Mosch, Birgit; Steinbach, Jörg; Carta, Davide; Bolzati, Cristina; Calderan, Andrea; Pietzsch, Jens; Pietzsch, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    The melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) plays an important role in melanoma growth, angiogenesis and metastasis, and is overexpressed in melanoma cells. α-Melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) and derivatives are known to bind with high affinity at this receptor that provides the potential for selective targeting of melanoma. In this study, one linear α-MSH-derived peptide Nle-Asp-His-D-Phe-Arg-Trp-Gly-NH2 (NAP-NS1) without linker and with εAhx-β-Ala linker, and a cyclic α-MSH derivative, [Lys-Glu-His-D-Phe-Arg-Trp-Glu]-Arg-Pro-Val-NH2 (NAP-NS2) with εAhx-β-Ala linker were conjugated with p-SCN-Bn-NOTA and labeled with (64)Cu. Radiochemical and radiopharmacological investigations were performed with regard to transchelation, stability, lipophilicity and in vitro binding assays as well as biodistribution in healthy rats. No transchelation reactions, but high metabolic stability and water solubility were demonstrated. The linear derivatives showed higher affinity than the cyclic one. [(64)Cu]Cu-NOTA-εAhx-β-Ala-NAP-NS1 ([(64)Cu]Cu-2) displayed rapid cellular association and dissociation in murine B16F10 cell homogenate. All [(64)Cu]Cu-labeled conjugates exhibited affinities in the low nanomolar range in B16F10. [(64)Cu]Cu-2 showed also high affinity in human MeWo and TXM13 cell homogenate. In vivo studies suggested that [(64)Cu]Cu-2 was stable, with about 85 % of intact peptide in rat plasma at 2 h p.i. Biodistribution confirmed the renal pathway as the major elimination route. The uptake of [(64)Cu]Cu-2 in the kidney was 5.9 % ID/g at 5 min p.i. and decreased to 2.0 % ID/g at 60 min p.i. Due to the prospective radiochemical and radiopharmacological properties of the linear α-MSH derivative [(64)Cu]Cu-2, this conjugate is a promising candidate for tracer development in human melanoma imaging. PMID:26643502

  20. Reducing the Risk of Xerostomia and Mandibular Osteoradionecrosis: The Potential Benefits of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy in Advanced Oral Cavity Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Merina; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Harrington, Kevin J.; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2009-10-01

    Radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity may be curative, but carries a risk of permanent damage to bone, salivary glands, and other soft tissues. We studied the potential of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to improve target volume coverage, and normal tissue sparing for advanced oral cavity carcinoma (OCC). Six patients with advanced OCC requiring bilateral irradiation to the oral cavity and neck were studied. Standard 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and inverse-planned IMRT dose distributions were compared by using dose-volume histograms. Doses to organs at risk, including spinal cord, parotid glands, and mandible, were assessed as surrogates of radiation toxicity. PTV1 mean dose was 60.8 {+-} 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and 59.8 {+-} 0.1 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.04). PTV1 dose range was 24.7 {+-} 6 Gy for 3DCRT and 15.3 {+-} 4 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.001). PTV2 mean dose was 54.5 {+-} 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and for IMRT was 54.2 {+-} 0.2 Gy (p = 0.34). PTV2 dose range was improved by IMRT (7.8 {+-} 3.2 Gy vs. 30.7 {+-} 12.8 Gy, p = 0.006). Homogeneity index (HI) values for PTV2 were closer to unity using IMRT (p = 0.0003). Mean parotid doses were 25.6 {+-} 2.7 Gy for IMRT and 42.0 {+-} 8.8 Gy with 3DCRT (p = 0.002). The parotid V30 in all IMRT plans was <45%. The mandible V50, V55, and V60 were significantly lower for the IMRT plans. Maximum spinal cord and brain stem doses were similar for the 2 techniques. IMRT provided superior target volume dose homogeneity and sparing of organs at risk. The magnitude of reductions in dose to the salivary glands and mandible are likely to translate into reduced incidence of xerostomia and osteoradionecrosis for patients with OCC.

  1. Reducing the risk of xerostomia and mandibular osteoradionecrosis: the potential benefits of intensity modulated radiotherapy in advanced oral cavity carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Merina; Hansen, Vibeke N; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M

    2009-01-01

    Radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity may be curative, but carries a risk of permanent damage to bone, salivary glands, and other soft tissues. We studied the potential of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to improve target volume coverage, and normal tissue sparing for advanced oral cavity carcinoma (OCC). Six patients with advanced OCC requiring bilateral irradiation to the oral cavity and neck were studied. Standard 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and inverse-planned IMRT dose distributions were compared by using dose-volume histograms. Doses to organs at risk, including spinal cord, parotid glands, and mandible, were assessed as surrogates of radiation toxicity. PTV1 mean dose was 60.8 +/- 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and 59.8 +/- 0.1 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.04). PTV1 dose range was 24.7 +/- 6 Gy for 3DCRT and 15.3 +/- 4 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.001). PTV2 mean dose was 54.5 +/- 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and for IMRT was 54.2 +/- 0.2 Gy (p = 0.34). PTV2 dose range was improved by IMRT (7.8 +/- 3.2 Gy vs. 30.7 +/- 12.8 Gy, p = 0.006). Homogeneity index (HI) values for PTV2 were closer to unity using IMRT (p = 0.0003). Mean parotid doses were 25.6 +/- 2.7 Gy for IMRT and 42.0 +/- 8.8 Gy with 3DCRT (p = 0.002). The parotid V30 in all IMRT plans was <45%. The mandible V50, V55, and V60 were significantly lower for the IMRT plans. Maximum spinal cord and brain stem doses were similar for the 2 techniques. IMRT provided superior target volume dose homogeneity and sparing of organs at risk. The magnitude of reductions in dose to the salivary glands and mandible are likely to translate into reduced incidence of xerostomia and osteoradionecrosis for patients with OCC. PMID:19647632

  2. Evaluating the acute effects of oral, non-combustible potential reduced exposure products marketed to smokers

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, CO; Weaver, MF; Eissenberg, T

    2011-01-01

    Background Non-combustible potential reduced exposure products (PREPs; eg, Star Scientific’s Ariva; a variety of other smokeless tobacco products) are marketed to reduce the harm associated with smoking. This marketing occurs despite an absence of objective data concerning the toxicant exposure and effects of these PREPs. Methods used to examine combustible PREPs were adapted to assess the acute effects of non-combustible PREPs for smokers. Methods 28 overnight abstinent cigarette smokers (17 men, 14 non-white) each completed seven, Latin-squared ordered, approximately 2.5 h laboratory sessions that differed by product administered: Ariva, Marlboro Snus (Philip Morris, USA), Camel Snus (RJ Reynolds, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA), Commit nicotine lozenge (GlaxoSmithKline; 2 mg), own brand cigarettes, Quest cigarettes (Vector Tobacco; delivers very low levels of nicotine) and sham smoking (ie, puffing on an unlit cigarette). In each session, the product was administered twice (separated by 60 min), and plasma nicotine levels, expired air CO and subjective effects were assessed regularly. Results Non-combustible products delivered less nicotine than own brand cigarettes, did not expose smokers to CO and failed to suppress tobacco abstinence symptoms as effectively as combustible products. Conclusions While decreased toxicant exposure is a potential indicator of harm reduction potential, a failure to suppress abstinence symptoms suggests that currently marketed non-combustible PREPs may not be a viable harm reduction strategy for US smokers. This study demonstrates how clinical laboratory methods can be used to evaluate the short-term effects of non-combustible PREPs for smokers. PMID:19346218

  3. Oral cancer or periimplantitis: A clinical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Sudhir; Rattan, Vidya; Panda, Naresh; Vaiphei, Kim; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to draw attention to a periimplantitis-like clinical presentation of oral malignancy around dental implants, a phenomenon that may develop without any associated risk factors for oral cancer. Such a benign appearance of oral malignancy may lead to delay in the diagnosis and initiation of ensuing treatment. Therefore, chronic nonhealing inflammatory lesions around dental implants should be considered as highly suspicious. PMID:26803178

  4. Thiolated polycarbophil/glutathione: defining its potential as a permeation enhancer for oral drug administration in comparison to sodium caprate.

    PubMed

    Perera, Glen; Barthelmes, Jan; Vetter, Anja; Krieg, Christof; Uhlschmied, Cindy; Bonn, Günther K; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2011-08-01

    Thiolated polyacrylates were shown to be permeation enhancers with notable potential. The aim of this study was to evaluate the permeation enhancing properties of a thiolated polycarbophil/glutathione (PCP-Cys/GSH) system for oral drug application in comparison to a well-established permeation enhancer, namely sodium caprate. In vitro permeation studies were conducted in Ussing-type chambers with sodium fluoresceine (NaFlu) and fluoresceine isothiocyanate labeled dextran (molecular mass 4 kDa; FD4) as model compounds. Bioavailability studies were carried out in Sprague Dawley rats with various formulations. Moreover, cytotoxic effects of both permeation enhancers were compared. Permeation enhancement ratios of 1% sodium caprate were found to be 3.0 (FD4) and 2.3 (NaFlu), whereas 1% PCP-Cys/0.5% GSH displayed enhancement ratios of 2.4 and 2.2. Both excipients performed at a similar level in vivo. Sodium caprate solutions increased oral bioavailability 2.2-fold (FD4) and 2.3-fold (NaFlu), while PCP-Cys hydrogels led to a 3.2-fold and 2.2-fold enhancement. Cell viability experiments revealed a significantly higher tolerance of Caco-2 cells towards 0.5% PCP-Cys (81% survival) compared to 0.5% sodium caprate (5%). As PCP-Cys is not absorbed from mucosal membranes due to its comparatively high molecular mass, systemic side-effects can be excluded. In conclusion, both systems displayed a similar potency for permeation enhancement of hydrophilic compounds. However, PCP-Cys seems to be less harmful to cultured cells. PMID:21554106

  5. Oral Complications in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Recipients: The Role of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Haverman, T. M.; Raber-Durlacher, J. E.; Rademacher, W. M. H.; Vokurka, S.; Epstein, J. B.; Huisman, C.; Hazenberg, M. D.; de Soet, J. J.; de Lange, J.; Rozema, F. R.

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is widely used as a potentially curative treatment for patients with various hematological malignancies, bone marrow failure syndromes, and congenital immune deficiencies. The prevalence of oral complications in both autologous and allogeneic HSCT recipients remains high, despite advances in transplant medicine and in supportive care. Frequently encountered oral complications include mucositis, infections, oral dryness, taste changes, and graft versus host disease in allogeneic HSCT. Oral complications are associated with substantial morbidity and in some cases with increased mortality and may significantly affect quality of life, even many years after HSCT. Inflammatory processes are key in the pathobiology of most oral complications in HSCT recipients. This review article will discuss frequently encountered oral complications associated with HSCT focusing on the inflammatory pathways and inflammatory mediators involved in their pathogenesis. PMID:24817792

  6. Immunotherapy for malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Suryadevara, Carter M.; Verla, Terence; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Reap, Elizabeth A.; Choi, Bryan D.; Fecci, Peter E.; Sampson, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas (MG) are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor. Most patients diagnosed with glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and malignant glial tumor, die within 12–15 months. Moreover, conventional treatment, which includes surgery followed by radiation and chemotherapy, can be highly toxic by causing nonspecific damage to healthy brain and other tissues. The shortcomings of standard-of-care have thus created a stimulus for the development of novel therapies that can target central nervous system (CNS)-based tumors specifically and efficiently, while minimizing off-target collateral damage to normal brain. Immunotherapy represents an investigational avenue with the promise of meeting this need, already having demonstrated its potential against B-cell malignancy and solid tumors in clinical trials. T-cell engineering with tumor-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is one proven approach that aims to redirect autologous patient T-cells to sites of tumor. This platform has evolved dramatically over the past two decades to include an improved construct design, and these modern CARs have only recently been translated into the clinic for brain tumors. We review here emerging immunotherapeutic platforms for the treatment of MG, focusing on the development and application of a CAR-based strategy against GBM. PMID:25722935

  7. Enhanced induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via the mitochondrial membrane potential disruption in human U87 malignant glioma cells by aloe emodin.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Samhani; Haris, Khalilah; Abdul Ghani, Abdul Rahman Izaini; Abdullah, Jafri Malin; Johan, Muhammad Farid; Mohamed Yusoff, Abdul Aziz

    2013-09-01

    Aloe emodin, one of the active compounds found in Aloe vera leaves, plays an important role in the regulation of cell growth and death. It has been reported to promote the anti-cancer effects in various cancer cells by inducing apoptosis. However, the mechanism of inducing apoptosis by this agent is poorly understood in glioma cells. This research is to investigate the apoptosis and cell cycle arrest inducing by aloe emodin on U87 human malignant glioma cells. Aloe emodin showed a time- and dose-dependent inhibition of U87 cells proliferation and decreased the percentage of viable U87 cells via the induction of apoptosis. Characteristic morphological changes, such as the formation of apoptotic bodies, were observed with confocal microscope by Annexin V-FITC/PI staining, supporting our viability study and flow cytometry analysis results. Our data also demonstrated that aloe emodin arrested the cell cycle in the S phase and promoted the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in U87 cells that indicated the early event of the mitochondria-induced apoptotic pathway. PMID:23869465

  8. An RNAi-based screen reveals PLK1, CDK1 and NDC80 as potential therapeutic targets in malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Linton, A; Cheng, Y Y; Griggs, K; Kirschner, M B; Gattani, S; Srikaran, S; Chuan-Hao Kao, S; McCaughan, B C; Klebe, S; van Zandwijk, N; Reid, G

    2014-01-01

    Background: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive tumour originating in the thoracic mesothelium. Prognosis remains poor with 9- to 12-month median survival, and new targets for treatments are desperately needed. Methods: Utilising an RNA interference (RNAi)-based screen of 40 genes overexpressed in tumours, including genes involved in the control of cell cycle, DNA replication and repair, we investigated potential therapeutic targets for MPM. Following in vitro characterisation of the effects of target silencing on MPM cells, candidates were assessed in tumour samples from 154 patients. Results: Gene knockdown in MPM cell lines identified growth inhibition following knockdown of NDC80, CDK1 and PLK1. Target knockdown induced cell-cycle arrest and increased apoptosis. Using small-molecule inhibitors specific for these three proteins also led to growth inhibition of MPM cell lines, and Roscovitine (inhibitor of CDK1) sensitised cells to cisplatin. Protein expression was also measured in tumour samples, with markedly variable levels of CDK1 and PLK1 noted. PLK1 expression in over 10% of cells correlated significantly with a poor prognosis. Conclusion: These results suggest that RNAi-based screening has utility in identifying new targets for MPM, and that inhibition of NDC80, CDK1 and PLK1 may hold promise for treatment of this disease. PMID:24327015

  9. Optimizing therapeutic efficacy of chemopreventive agents: A critical review of delivery strategies in oral cancer chemoprevention clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Holpuch, Andrew S.; Desai, Kashappa-Goud H.; Schwendeman, Steven P.; Mallery, Susan R.

    2011-01-01

    Due to its characterized progression from recognized premalignant oral epithelial changes (i.e., oral epithelial dysplasia) to invasive cancer, oral squamous cell carcinoma represents an optimal disease for chemopreventive intervention prior to malignant transformation. The primary goal of oral cancer chemoprevention is to reverse, suppress, or inhibit the progression of premalignant lesions to cancer. Over the last several decades, numerous oral cancer chemoprevention clinical trials have assessed the therapeutic efficacy of diverse chemopreventive agents. The standard of care for more advanced oral dysplastic lesions entails surgical excision and close clinical follow-up due to the potential (~33%) for local recurrence at a similar or more advanced histological stage. The purpose of this review was to identify prominent oral cancer chemoprevention clinical trials, assess their overall therapeutic efficacy, and delineate effects of local versus systemic drug administration. In addition, these compiled clinical trial data present concepts for consideration in the design and conduction of future clinical trials. PMID:22013393

  10. Has oral fluid the potential to replace serum for the evaluation of population immunity levels? A study of measles, rubella and hepatitis B in rural Ethiopia.

    PubMed Central

    Nokes, D. J.; Enquselassie, F.; Nigatu, W.; Vyse, A. J.; Cohen, B. J.; Brown, D. W.; Cutts, F. T.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the suitability of using oral-fluid samples for determining the prevalence of immunity to vaccine-preventable infections. METHODS: Paired blood and oral-fluid samples were obtained from 853 individuals of all ages from a rural Ethiopian community. Oral fluid around the gums was screened for measles- and rubella-specific antibodies using enhanced IgG antibody capture (GAC) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), and for anti-HBc antibodies using a prototype GACELISA. IgG antibodies in serum to measles, rubella and HBc were determined using commercial ELISAs. FINDINGS: Relative to serum, oral fluid assay sensitivity and specificity were as follows: 98% and 87% for measles, 79% and 90% for rubella, and 43% and 87% for anti-HBc. These assay characteristics yielded population prevalence estimates from oral fluid with a precision equal to that of serum for measles (all ages) and rubella (ages < 20 years). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that oral fluid could have the potential to replace serum in IgG antibody prevalence surveys. Further progress requires assessment of variation in assay performance between populations as well as the availability of standardized, easy to use assays. PMID:11477961

  11. Patients’ perspectives regarding long-term warfarin therapy and the potential transition to new oral anticoagulant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gebler-Hughes, Elizabeth S.; Kemp, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To examine patients’ perspectives regarding long-term vitamin K antagonist (VKA) therapy and the potential transition to new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) such as dabigatran and rivaroxaban, and to determine if factors such as residential location affect these opinions. Design, setting and participants: Patients on VKA therapy for at least 12 weeks completed a questionnaire specifically designed for the study. They were recruited while attending point-of-care international normalized ratio (INR) testing at six South Australian general practice clinics during the period July–September 2013. Main outcome measures: Opinions of current VKA therapy, level of awareness of NOACs, and ratings of potential benefits and deterrents of transition to NOACs were sought. Results: Data from 290 participants were available for analysis (response rate 95.4%). The majority of the sample (79.5%, 229/288) were either satisfied or very satisfied with current VKA therapy. The mean score for the potential benefits of transition to NOACs was 7.6 (±4.2) out of a possible 20, which was significantly lower than the mean score 10.9 (±4.5) for the perceived deterrents to transition (p < 0.001). Rural patients (82.0%, 82/100) were significantly more likely (p = 0.001) to have not heard of NOACs than metropolitan patients (50.3%, 95/189) and also perceived significant less benefits in a transition to NOACs (p = 0.001). Conclusion: When considering potential transition from VKAs to NOACs it is important for prescribers to consider that some patients, in particular those from a rural location, may not perceive a significant benefit in transitioning or may have particular concerns in this area. PMID:25436104

  12. Deletion of macrophage migration inhibitory factor inhibits murine oral carcinogenesis: Potential role for chronic pro-inflammatory immune mediators.

    PubMed

    Oghumu, Steve; Knobloch, Thomas J; Terrazas, Cesar; Varikuti, Sanjay; Ahn-Jarvis, Jennifer; Bollinger, Claire E; Iwenofu, Hans; Weghorst, Christopher M; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2016-09-15

    Oral cancer kills about 1 person every hour each day in the United States and is the sixth most prevalent cancer worldwide. The pro-inflammatory cytokine 'macrophage migration inhibitory factor' (MIF) has been shown to be expressed in oral cancer patients, yet its precise role in oral carcinogenesis is not clear. In this study, we examined the impact of global Mif deletion on the cellular and molecular process occurring during oral carcinogenesis using a well-established mouse model of oral cancer with the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO). C57BL/6 Wild-type (WT) and Mif knock-out mice were administered with 4NQO in drinking water for 16 weeks, then regular drinking water for 8 weeks. Mif knock-out mice displayed fewer oral tumor incidence and multiplicity, accompanied by a significant reduction in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines Il-1β, Tnf-α, chemokines Cxcl1, Cxcl6 and Ccl3 and other molecular biomarkers of oral carcinogenesis Mmp1 and Ptgs2. Further, systemic accumulation of myeloid-derived tumor promoting immune cells was inhibited in Mif knock-out mice. Our results demonstrate that genetic Mif deletion reduces the incidence and severity of oral carcinogenesis, by inhibiting the expression of chronic pro-inflammatory immune mediators. Thus, targeting MIF is a promising strategy for the prevention or therapy of oral cancer. PMID:27164411

  13. The Potential for Glycemic Control Monitoring and Screening for Diabetes at Dental Visits Using Oral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Rosedale, Mary T.; Pesce, Michael A.; Rindskopf, David M.; Kaur, Navjot; Juterbock, Caroline M.; Wolff, Mark S.; Malaspina, Dolores; Danoff, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the potential for glycemic control monitoring and screening for diabetes in a dental setting among adults (n = 408) with or at risk for diabetes. Methods. In 2013 and 2014, we performed hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) tests on dried blood samples of gingival crevicular blood and compared these with paired “gold-standard” HbA1c tests with dried finger-stick blood samples in New York City dental clinic patients. We examined differences in sociodemographics and diabetes-related risk and health care characteristics for 3 groups of at-risk patients. Results. About half of the study sample had elevated HbA1c values in the combined prediabetes and diabetes ranges, with approximately one fourth of those in the diabetes range. With a correlation of 0.991 between gingival crevicular and finger-stick blood HbA1c, measures of concurrence between the tests were extremely high for both elevated HbA1c and diabetes-range HbA1c levels. Persons already diagnosed with diabetes and undiagnosed persons aged 45 years or older could especially benefit from HbA1c testing at dental visits. Conclusions. Gingival crevicular blood collected at the dental visit can be used to screen for diabetes and monitor glycemic control for many at-risk patients. PMID:25713975

  14. Evaluation of amitrole (aminotriazole) for potential carcinogenicity in orally dosed rats, mice, and golden hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, D.; Weber, H.; Mohr, U.; Boehme, K.

    1983-06-30

    Amitrole was evaluated for carcinogenic potential in lifespan studies on Wistar rats, NMRI mice, and golden hamsters. At the start of the studies the animals were 6 weeks old. Amitrole was administered, mixed with pulverized chow, at dietary concentrations of 0, 1, 10, and 100 micrograms/g (ppm). Each treated group and control group consisted of 75 male and 75 female rats and mice and of 76 male and 76 female golden hamsters. Additional animals were used to evaluate the functional state of the thyroid. Somewhat lower body weights, slightly reduced survival times, and transient effects on thyroid function were observed in golden hamsters at 100 ppm. In mice, a slight increase in pituitary gland hyperemias was seen at 100 ppm; also an effect on thyroid function usually occurred at the same concentration. In rats, a very large number of cystic dilatations of follicles in the thyroid at 100 ppm and a dose-unrelated increase in hemorrhages and hyperemias in the pituitary gland were indicative of an effect of amitrole on these organs. The strongest effect of amitrole on thyroid function, as compared to golden hamsters and mice, was seen in rats at 100 ppm. At this concentration a highly increased number of thyroid and pituitary gland tumors was observed in rats. In golden hamsters and mice, no tumor induction was seen.

  15. Radiosensitization by fullerene-C60 dissolved in squalene on human malignant melanoma through lipid peroxidation and enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shinya; Kimura, Masatsugu; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2014-04-01

    We examined fullerene-C60 dissolved in squalene (C60/Sqe) for the ability to potentiate the radiosensitization under X-ray irradiation on human malignant melanoma HMV-II cells, which were treated with C60/Sqe and thereafter irradiated with X-ray. The cell proliferation for C60/Sqe was inhibited more markedly than for Sqe alone. Meanwhile, cell proliferation was almost unaltered for C60/squalane (Sqa) or Sqa, a hydrogenated form of Sqe, as compared to no-additive control. Thus radiosensitization of C60/Sqe is attributed to peroxidation of unsaturated bonds of squalene by X-ray-excited C60 in contrast to squalane. The fluorescence images of HMV-II cells stained with Rhodamine123, an indicator for mitochondrial membrane potential, were monitored for 6 h after X-ray irradiation. C60/Sqe obviously exhibited more augmented fluorescence intensity on perinuclear region of HMV-II cells than Sqe alone. TBARS assay showed that the lipid peroxidation level as malondialdehyde-equivalent increased by combination of C60/Sqe and X-ray dose-dependently on X-ray doses. C60/Sqe exhibited lipid peroxidation more markedly by 1.2-fold than Sqe alone. Thus the level of lipid peroxidation of squalene was sufficiently higher in C60/Sqe than in Sqe in the absence of C60 under X-ray irradiation, suggesting the combination of C60/Sqe and X-ray irradiation induced radiosensitization on HMV-II cells by peroxidation of absorbed Sqe in mitochondrial membrane via oxidative stress mediated by fullerene-C60.

  16. Loss of ATRX and DAXX expression identifies poor prognosis for smooth muscle tumours of uncertain malignant potential and early stage uterine leiomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Slatter, Tania L; Hsia, Howard; Samaranayaka, Ari; Sykes, Peter; Clow, William Bill; Devenish, Celia J; Sutton, Tim; Royds, Janice A; Pc, Philip; Cheung, Annie N; Hung, Noelyn Anne

    2015-04-01

    Uterine smooth muscle tumours of uncertain malignant potential (STUMP) are diagnostically and clinically challenging. The alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) telomere maintenance mechanism is associated with poor survival in soft tissue leiomyosarcoma. Time to first recurrence and survival were known for 18 STUMP and 43 leiomyosarcomata (LMS). These were screened for ALT telomere maintenance by the presence of ALT-associated PML bodies (APBs) and for changes associated with the ALT phenotype, namely aberrant p53 expression, isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutation (R132H substitution) expression, mutant ATRX (αthalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked) expression and mutant DAXX (death-domain-associated protein) expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Overexpression of p16(INK4A) was examined immunohistologically in a subset of cases. Many of the tumours associated with death or recurrence demonstrated APBs commensurate with ALT telomere maintenance. However, all uterine STUMP (4/4), and vaginal STUMP (2/2) patients, and almost all LMS patients (88.4%, 23/26, including 90% (9/10) of stage 1 LMS cases), who had died of disease or who had recurrent disease, displayed loss of ATRX or DAXX expression. Loss of ATRX or DAXX expression identified poor prognosis (95% CI 2.1 to 40.8, p < 0.003), in the LMS group. Thus, loss of ATRX or DAXX expression in uterine smooth muscle tumours identifies a clinically aggressive molecular subtype of early stage LMS and when histopathological features are problematic such as in STUMP. As ATRX and DAXX IHC is readily performed in diagnostic laboratories these are potentially useful for routine histopathological classification and management. PMID:27499896

  17. Autofluorescence imaging in recurrent oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Martin; Fuss, Juliana; Derman, Mehmet Ali; Kreppel, Matthias; Neugebauer, Jörg; Rothamel, Daniel; Drebber, Uta; Zoeller, Joachim E

    2016-03-01

    as gold standard are still needed to get sufficient evidence regarding potential malignancy in patients after multimodal treatment for oral cancer. PMID:26267490

  18. Malignant thymoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, L S; Huang, M H; Lin, T S; Huang, B S; Chien, K Y

    1992-07-15

    Sixty-one patients underwent operations for malignant thymomas between 1961 and 1989. Twenty-three patients had associated myasthenia gravis (MG), an incidence of 37.7%. Upon being admitted to the hospital, the patients' most common symptoms included chest pain, MG, cough, and dyspnea. Only 7 of 61 (11.5%) patients had no symptom. Tumor staging of 58 patients with invasive thymomas was performed according to Masaoka classification. The patients were classified as follows: Stage II disease, 5; Stage III, 41; Stage IVa, 8; and Stage IVb, 4. In addition, thymic carcinoma was present in three patients. The series had a resection rate of 55.7%. The incidence of operative complications was 16.3%. Only one patient died of myocardial infarction; the incidence of operative mortality was 1.6%. The patients with MG had a higher rate of resection (69.6%) and a higher incidence of complete thymectomy (14 of 23 patients; 60.9%). Mixed lymphoepithelial tumors and epithelial cell predominant tumors were the most frequent histologic patterns (45.9% and 34.4%, respectively). Fifty-two patients had postoperative radiation therapy, and 10 patients had chemotherapy. The overall cumulative survival rates in the series were 59% and 34% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. The results demonstrated that the factors affecting the prognosis may include resectability, postoperative irradiation or chemotherapy, MG, and tumor staging. The influence of histologic variation on survival rates could not be clearly defined in the series. Surgical resection, particularly complete thymectomy, followed by irradiation is the primary option of therapeutic management for malignant thymoma. PMID:1617594

  19. Subthalamic and Cortical Local Field Potentials Associated with Pilocarpine-Induced Oral Tremor in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Long, Lauren L.; Podurgiel, Samantha J.; Haque, Aileen F.; Errante, Emily L.; Chrobak, James J.; Salamone, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Tremulous jaw movements (TJMs) are rapid vertical deflections of the lower jaw that resemble chewing but are not directed at any particular stimulus. In rodents, TJMs are induced by neurochemical conditions that parallel those seen in human Parkinsonism, including neurotoxic or pharmacological depletion of striatal dopamine (DA), DA antagonism, and cholinomimetic administration. Moreover, TJMs in rodents can be attenuated by antiparkinsonian agents, including levodopa (L-DOPA), DA agonists, muscarinic antagonists, and adenosine A2A antagonists. In human Parkinsonian patients, exaggerated physiological synchrony is seen in the beta frequency band in various parts of the cortical/basal ganglia/thalamic circuitry, and activity in the tremor frequency range (3–7 Hz) also has been recorded. The present studies were undertaken to determine if tremor-related local field potential (LFP) activity could be recorded from motor cortex (M1) or subthalamic nucleus (STN) during the TJMs induced by the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine, which is a well-known tremorogenic agent. Pilocarpine induced a robust TJM response that was marked by rhythmic electromyographic (EMG) activity in the temporalis muscle. Compared to periods with no tremor activity, TJM epochs were characterized by increased LFP activity in the tremor frequency range in both neocortex and STN. Tremor activity was not associated with increased synchrony in the beta frequency band. These studies identified tremor-related LFP activity in parts of the cortical/basal ganglia circuitry that are involved in the pathophysiology of Parkinsonism. This research may ultimately lead to identification of the oscillatory neural mechanisms involved in the generation of tremulous activity, and promote development of novel treatments for tremor disorders. PMID:27378874

  20. Techniques for early diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma: Systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Carreras-Torras, Clàudia

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives The diagnosis of early oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is of paramount clinical importance given the mortality rate of late stage disease. The aim of this study is to review the literature to assess the current situation and progress in this area. Material and Methods A search in Cochrane and PubMed (January 2006 to December 2013) has been used with the key words “squamous cell carcinoma”, “early diagnosis” “oral cavity”, “Potentially Malignant Disorders” y “premalignant lesions”. The inclusion criteria were the use of techniques for early diagnosis of OSCC and OPMD, 7 years aged articles and publications written in English, French or Spanish. The exclusion criteria were case reports and studies in other languages. Results Out of the 89 studies obtained initially from the search 60 articles were selected to be included in the systematic review: 1 metaanalysis, 17 systematic reviews, 35 prospective studies, 5 retrospective studies, 1 consensus and 1 semi-structured interviews. Conclusions The best diagnostic technique is that which we have sufficient experience and training. Definitely tissue biopsy and histopathological examination should remain the gold standard for oral cancer diagnose. In this systematic review it has not been found sufficient scientific evidence on the majority of proposed techniques for early diagnosis of OSCC, therefore more extensive and exhaustive studies are needed. Key words: Squamous cell carcinoma, early diagnosis, oral cavity, potentially malignant disorders, premalignant lesions. PMID:25662554

  1. Verrucous Carcinoma with Oral Submucous Fibrosis: A Rare Case with Brief Review.

    PubMed

    Komal, Khot; Deshmukh, Siddharth B; Deshmukh, Anjum

    2015-08-01

    Oral verrucous carcinoma (VC) is a variant of well differentiated oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) characterized by exophytic over growth. Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a potentially malignant disorder associated with chronic betel nut chewing habit. The development of OSCC is seen in one-third of the OSMF patients, but the development of VC is rare in such patients. There are very few cases of OSMF with VC reported in literature. Here, present a rare case of an elderly patient with VC in conjunction with OSMF. PMID:26468468

  2. Verrucous Carcinoma with Oral Submucous Fibrosis: A Rare Case with Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Komal, Khot; Deshmukh, Anjum

    2015-01-01

    Oral verrucous carcinoma (VC) is a variant of well differentiated oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) characterized by exophytic over growth. Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a potentially malignant disorder associated with chronic betel nut chewing habit. The development of OSCC is seen in one-third of the OSMF patients, but the development of VC is rare in such patients. There are very few cases of OSMF with VC reported in literature. Here, present a rare case of an elderly patient with VC in conjunction with OSMF. PMID:26468468

  3. Minor Salivary Gland Changes in Oral Epithelial Dysplasia and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma - A Histopathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Chitturi, Ravi Teja; Ragunathan, Yoithapprabhunath Thukanayakanpalayam; Lakshmi, Suman Jhansi; Nallusamy, Jaisanghar; Joseph, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The most common etiology for Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) is tobacco and tobacco related products which cause nuclear damage to the keratinocytes. The chemical carcinogens not only affect the lining of oral epithelium but also affect the lining epithelium of the excretory ducts of the salivary glands. Thus, there is a possibility of epithelial dysplasia of the salivary duct epithelium which may lead to potential malignant transformation. Aim The study was performed to see the changes in the minor salivary glands and excretory ducts in cases of oral epithelial dysplasia and OSCC. Materials and Methods A total of 278 archival cases of mild, moderate and severe epithelial dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, OSCC including verrucous carcinoma were histopathologically evaluated to observe changes in the excretory ducts and the minor salivary glands. Results In the study there were 56.5% males and 43.5% females. The age group that was most commonly affected in both the sexes was 50-60 yr old. Buccal mucosa was the most common site of involvement. Ductal changes observed in the excretory duct include simple hyperplasia, metaplastic changes such as mucous, oncocytic & squamous, and infiltration of inflammatory cells and malignant cells. Acinar changes observed were degeneration, squamous metaplasia, myoepithelial cell proliferation and inflammatory cell infiltration. Both the excretory ducts and ducts within the gland showed dysplasia. Conclusion According to observations in our study it is suggested that histopathological interpretation for oral mucosal lesions especially oral epithelial dysplasias and OSCC should also include changes related to salivary gland tissue to provide a better treatment plan and prevent recurrence of the malignant tumours.

  4. Microwave Ablation of Hepatic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Brace, Christopher L.; Ziemlewicz, Tim J.; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Lee, Fred T.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave ablation is an extremely promising heat-based thermal ablation modality that has particular applicability in treating hepatic malignancies. Microwaves can generate very high temperatures in very short time periods, potentially leading to improved treatment efficiency and larger ablation zones. As the available technology continues to improve, microwave ablation is emerging as a valuable alternative to radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatic malignancies. This article reviews the current state of microwave ablation including technical and clinical considerations. PMID:24436518

  5. Leukoplakia and erythroplakia of the oral mucosa--a brief overview.

    PubMed

    Boy, S C

    2012-11-01

    Leukoplakia and erythroplakia are the two most common potentially malignant disorders of the oral cavity. The prognosis and overall survival of a patient with oral cancer is dependent on the early detection of any lesion that might identify a patient with higher risk than normal or with early infiltration before metastatic disease. The role of the general dentist cannot be overstressed and the aim of this brief summary is to give the general practitioner an overview on the current concepts relating to these disorders. Leukoplakia and erythroplakia were traditionally known as two "precancerous lesions of the oral mucosa". The term "precancer" defines all lesions classified as such to have a "precancerous nature" implying that all of them will eventually become malignant. Through the years it became known that even clinically normal mucosa may show features of dysplasia and in some instances molecular aberrations of early malignant transformation may be found in the mucosa of a patient without any clinical lesions or dysplasia. The consensus view then was to introduce the term: "potentially malignant disorders" (PMD) reflecting the more generalised mucosal involvement in these patients. It remans a challenge to predict the behaviour of any of these lesions but early detection thereof remains the best chance any oral cancer patient will have for survival. PMID:23957095

  6. In vivo detection of oral epithelial cancer using endogenous fluorescence lifetime imaging: a pilot human study (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Javier A.; Hwang, Dae Yon; Palma, Jorge; Cheng, Shuna; Cuenca, Rodrigo; Malik, Bilal; Jabbour, Joey; Cheng, Lisa; Wright, John; Maitland, Kristen

    2016-03-01

    Endogenous fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) provides direct access to the concomitant functional and biochemical changes accompanying tissue transition from benign to precancerous and cancerous. Since FLIM can noninvasively measure different and complementary biomarkers of precancer and cancer, we hypothesize that it will aid in clinically detecting early oral epithelial cancer. Our group has recently demonstrated the detection of benign from premalignant and malignant lesions based on endogenous multispectral FLIM in the hamster cheek-pouch model. Encouraged by these positive preliminary results, we have developed a handheld endoscope capable of acquiring multispectral FLIM images in real time from the oral mucosa. This novel FLIM endoscope is being used for imaging clinically suspicious pre-malignant and malignant lesions from patients before undergoing tissue biopsy for histopathological diagnosis of oral epithelial cancer. Our preliminary results thus far are already suggesting the potential of endogenous FLIM for distinguishing a variety of benign lesions from advanced dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). To the best of out knowledge, this is the first in vivo human study aiming to demonstrate the ability to predict the true malignancy of clinically suspicious lesions using endogenous FLIM. If successful, the resulting clinical tool will allow noninvasive real-time detection of epithelial precancerous and cancerous lesions in the oral mucosa and could potentially be used to assist at every step involved on the clinical management of oral cancer patients, from early screening and diagnosis, to treatment and monitoring of recurrence.

  7. Identification of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A as a migration-promoting gene in malignant pleural mesothelioma cells: a potential therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jun; Tabata, Sho; Kakiuchi, Soji; The Van, Trung; Goto, Hisatsugu; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent advances in treatment, malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) remains a deadly disease. Targeted therapy generated broad interests and is highly expected for the treatment of MPM, yet promising preclinical results have not been translated into substantial clinical benefits for the patients. In this study, we tried to identify the genes which play functional roles in cell migration as well as to test whether they can be used as novel targets for molecular targeted therapy for MPM in preclinical model. In our study, pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPPA) was identified as a gene whose expression level is correlated with MPM cell migration by correlation analysis combining MPM cell migration ability and their gene expression profiles. Highly migratory cells were selected from MPM cell lines, MSTO-211H, NCI-H290 and EHMES-1 in vitro and up-regulation of PAPPA in these cells were confirmed. In vitro, PAPPA was demonstrated to stimulate the MPM cell migration via cleavage of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-4 and subsequent release of IGF-1. Gene silencing of PAPPA in MPM cells led to reduced migration, invasion and proliferation. Furthermore, PAPPA shRNA transfected NCI-H290 when orthotopically inoculated into pleural cavity of severe combined immunodeficiency recipient mice, failed to develop tumors and produce bloody pleural effusion as control shRNA transfected cells did. Our study suggests that PAPPA plays a functional role in promoting MPM cell migration and it might serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of MPM. PMID:23896451

  8. The serrated neoplasia pathway of colorectal tumors: Identification of MUC5AC hypomethylation as an early marker of polyps with malignant potential.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Florence; Mariette, Christophe; Vincent, Audrey; Wacrenier, Agnès; Maunoury, Vincent; Leclerc, Julie; Coppin, Lucie; Crépin, Michel; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Buisine, Marie-Pierre

    2016-03-15

    The serrated neoplasia pathway accounts for 20-30% of colorectal cancers (CRC), which are characterized by extensive methylation (CpG island methylation phenotype, CIMP), frequent BRAF mutation and high microsatellite instability (MSI). We recently identified MUC5AC mucin gene hypomethylation as a specific marker of MSI CRC. The early identification of preneoplastic lesions among serrated polyps is currently challenging. Here, we performed a detailed pathological and molecular analysis of a large series of colorectal serrated polyps and evaluated the usefulness of mucin genes MUC2 and MUC5AC to differentiate serrated polyps and to identify lesions with malignant potential. A series of 330 colorectal polyps including 218 serrated polyps [42 goblet cell-rich hyperplastic polyps (GCHP), 68 microvesicular hyperplastic polyps (MVHP), 100 sessile serrated adenoma (SSA) and eight traditional serrated adenoma (TSA)] and 112 conventional adenomas was analyzed for BRAF/KRAS mutations, MSI, CIMP, MLH1 and MGMT methylation, and MUC2 and MUC5AC expression and methylation. We show that MUC5AC hypomethylation is an early event in the serrated neoplasia pathway, and specifically detects MVHP and SSA, arguing for a filiation between MVHP, SSA and CIMP-H/MSI CRC, whereas GCHP and TSA arise from a distinct pathway. Moreover, MUC5AC hypomethylation specifically identified serrated lesions with BRAF mutation, CIMP-H or MSI, suggesting that it may be useful to identify serrated neoplasia pathway-related precursor lesions. Our data suggest that MVHP should be recognized among HP and require particular attention. PMID:26476272

  9. EGFR/HER2 inhibitors effectively reduce the malignant potential of MDR breast cancer evoked by P-gp substrates in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yiting; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Hongying; Zhang, Zijing; Chu, Chengyu; Liu, Xiuping; Zou, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) induced by chemotherapy in breast cancer frequently leads to tumor invasion, metastasis and poor clinical outcome. We preliminarily found that the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is involved in enhancing the malignant potential of MDR breast cancer cells, but the mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated in vitro and in vivo that EGFR/HER2 promote the invasive and metastatic abilities of MDR breast cancer. More importantly, a new function of EGFR/HER2 inhibitors was revealed for the first time, which could improve the treatment efficacy of breast cancer by reversing the MDR process rather than by inhibiting tumor growth. Firstly, using quantitative real‑time PCR and western blot analysis, we found that overexpression of EGFR/HER2 in MCF7/Adr cells upregulated CD147 and MMP2/9 at both the transcription and protein expression levels, which promoted tumor cell migration, as determined using an in vitro invasion assay. Secondly, the upregulated levels of CD147 and MMP2/9 were decreased when EGFR/HER2 activity was inhibited, and therefore tumor invasion was also significantly inhibited. These phenomena were also demonstrated in nude mouse assays. Additionally, in MDR breast cancer patients, we found that overexpression of EGFR and P‑gp levels led to shorter overall survival (OS) and disease‑free survival (DFS) by IHC assays and Kaplan‑Meier survival analysis. In conclusion, EGFR/HER2 play a crucial role in enhancing CD147 and MMP expression to establish favorable conditions for invasion/metastasis in MDR breast cancer. The scope of application of EGFR/HER2 inhibitors may be expanded in EGFR/HER2‑positive patients. We suggest that MDR breast cancer patients may benefit from novel therapies targeting EGFR/HER2. PMID:26718028

  10. Malignant hyperpyrexia

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, Hyam; Barlow, M. B.

    1973-01-01

    The history, clinical presentation, and management of malignant hyperpyrexia are presented. The aetiology seems to be associated with some inherited abnormality which affects the movement and binding of calcium ions in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, sarcoplasm, and mitochondria. Whether this is a primary muscular defect or secondary to some trophic neural influence is yet to be established. The subjects carrying the abnormal trait show evidence of a myopathy which is subclinical in most instances and revealed only by estimation of serum CPK or biopsy. In some families where the myopathy is clinically obvious there may be, in addition, a variety of musculoskeletal abnormalities. A plea is made for routine monitoring of temperature during anaesthesia and for procainamide or procaine to be readily available in all operating theatres. A history of anaesthetic deaths in a family calls for special care, and, if the serum CPK is elevated, suxamethonium and halothane are to be avoided. Families with orthopaedic and muscular abnormalities are at increased risk and should have estimation of serum CPK before surgery. As a bonus of this study it is suggested that serum CPK estimations be used to screen pigs for selective breeding and so eliminate the disease, which causes soft exudative pork. Images PMID:4708457

  11. Evaluating the potential impact of a mobile telemedicine system on coordination of specialty care for patients with complicated oral lesions in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Tesfalul, Martha; Littman-Quinn, Ryan; Antwi, Cynthia; Ndlovu, Siphiwo; Motsepe, Didintle; Phuthego, Motsholathebe; Tau, Boitumelo; Mohutsiwa-Dibe, Neo; Kovarik, Carrie

    2016-04-01

    Mobile telemedicine involves the use of mobile device (e.g., cell phones, tablets) technology to exchange information to assist in the provision of patient care. Throughout the world, mobile telemedicine initiatives are increasing in number and in scale, but literature on their impact on patient outcomes in low-resource areas is limited. This study explores the potential impact of a mobile oral telemedicine system on the oral health specialty referral system in Botswana. Analysis of 26 eligible cases from June 2012 to July 2013 reveals high diagnosis concordance between dental officers and oral health specialists at 91.3% (21/23) but significant management plan discordance at 64.0% (16/25), over two-thirds of which involved the specialists disagreeing with the referring clinicians about the need for a visit to a specialist. These findings suggest mobile telemedicine can optimize the use of insights and skills of specialists remotely in regions where they are scarce. PMID:26510877

  12. Development and characterization of a novel nanoemulsion drug-delivery system for potential application in oral delivery of protein drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongwu; Liu, Kaiyun; Liu, Wei; Wang, Wenxiu; Guo, Chunliang; Tang, Bin; Gu, Jiang; Zhang, Jinyong; Li, Haibo; Mao, Xuhu; Zou, Quanming; Zeng, Hao

    2012-01-01

    Background: The stability of protein drugs remains one of the key hurdles to their success in the market. The aim of the present study was to design a novel nanoemulsion drug-delivery system (NEDDS) that would encapsulate a standard-model protein drug – bovine serum albumin (BSA) – to improve drug stability. Methods: The BSA NEDDS was prepared using a phase-inversion method and pseudoternary phase diagrams. The following characteristics were studied: morphology, size, zeta potential, drug loading, and encapsulation efficiency. We also investigated the stability of the BSA NEDDS, bioactivity of BSA encapsulated within the NEDDS, the integrity of the primary, secondary, and tertiary structures, and specificity. Results: The BSA NEDDS consisted of Cremophor EL-35, propylene glycol, isopropyl myristate, and normal saline. The average particle diameter of the BSA NEDDS was about 21.8 nm, and the system showed a high encapsulation efficiency (>90%) and an adequate drug-loading capacity (45 mg/mL). The thermodynamic stability of the system was investigated at different temperatures and pH levels and in room-temperature conditions for 180 days. BSA NEDDS showed good structural integrity and specificity for the primary, secondary, and tertiary structures, and good bioactivity of the loaded BSA. Conclusions: BSA NEDDS showed the properties of a good nanoemulsion-delivery system. NEDDS can greatly enhance the stability of the protein drug BSA while maintaining high levels of drug bioactivity, good specificity, and integrity of the primary, secondary, and tertiary protein structures. These findings indicate that the nanoemulsion is a potential formulation for oral administration of protein drugs. PMID:23118537

  13. Biochemical markers in oral submucous fibrosis: A review and update

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, V V; Satelur, K; Komali, Y

    2013-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a potentially malignant oral condition effectively linked to the causative habit of chewing areca nut. Since its first description in the 1950s, numerous epidemiological, biochemical, histological, and genetic studies have been reported. While most studies point out to the cause and effect of areca nut, co-additive factors are also implicated in the progression and malignant transformation of this condition. Biochemical investigations have concentrated on outlining such changes in the blood, serum or tissues of these patients and have given insights on the possible pathogenesis of OSMF. This article attempts to compile details of biochemical investigations in OSMF and summarize and infer on the findings. PMID:24348612

  14. [Oral viral infections].

    PubMed

    Parent, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    Exclude herpes infection in the presence of acute oral ulcers of unknown origin, particularly in patients in poor general condition. Remember that asymptomatic HSV-1 shedding in saliva may result in an oral-genital transmission. Perform an anogenital examination and a screening for other sexually transmitted diseases when oral warts are diagnosed. Search for immunosuppression and monitor the patient (screening for a potential associated carcinoma) when there is rapid growth of oral warts. Consider all the clinical signs (systemic, skin, other mucosa, immunity...) when a patient has an enanthem or oral ulcerations. Ask for a HIV test when an oral Kaposi's sarcoma, a hairy leukoplakia or major aphthae are diagnosed. PMID:26854091

  15. 1’-Acetoxychavicol acetate inhibits growth of human oral carcinoma xenograft in mice and potentiates cisplatin effect via proinflammatory microenvironment alterations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Oral cancers although preventable, possess a low five-year survival rate which has remained unchanged over the past three decades. In an attempt to find a more safe, affordable and effective treatment option, we describe here the use of 1’S-1’-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), a component of Malaysian ginger traditionally used for various medicinal purposes. Methods Whether ACA can inhibit the growth of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells alone or in combination with cisplatin (CDDP), was explored both in vitro using MTT assays and in vivo using Nu/Nu mice. Occurrence of apoptosis was assessed using PARP and DNA fragmentation assays, while the mode of action were elucidated through global expression profiling followed by Western blotting and IHC assays. Results We found that ACA alone inhibited the growth of oral SCC cells, induced apoptosis and suppressed its migration rate, while minimally affecting HMEC normal cells. ACA further enhanced the cytotoxic effects of CDDP in a synergistic manner as suggested by combination index studies. We also found that ACA inhibited the constitutive activation of NF-κB through suppression of IKKα/β activation. Human oral tumor xenografts studies in mice revealed that ACA alone was as effective as CDDP in reducing tumor volume, and further potentiated CDDP effects when used in combination with minimal body weight loss. The effects of ACA also correlated with a down-regulation of NF-κB regulated gene (FasL and Bim), including proinflammatory (NF-κB and COX-2) and proliferative (cyclin D1) biomarkers in tumor tissue. Conclusion Overall, our results suggest that ACA inhibits the growth of oral SCC and further potentiates the effect of standard CDDP treatment by modulation of proinflammatory microenvironment. The current preclinical data could form the basis for further clinical trials to improve the current standards for oral cancer care using this active component from the Malaysian ginger. PMID:23043547

  16. Oral primary localized amyloidosis in HIV-infected patients: the oral face of a described skin lesion.

    PubMed

    Anaya-Saavedra, Gabriela; Ramírez-Amador, Velia; Valencia-Mayoral, Pedro

    2015-12-01

    Oral primary localized amyloidosis should be considered in the diagnosis of oral white lesions such as hyperplastic candidosis, lichen planus and lichenoid reactions; it is not associated with antiretroviral therapy use, systemic involvement or malignant transformation. PMID:25586447

  17. In Vivo Curative and Protective Potential of Orally Administered 5-Aminolevulinic Acid plus Ferrous Ion against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shigeo; Hikosaka, Kenji; Balogun, Emmanuel O.; Komatsuya, Keisuke; Niikura, Mamoru; Kobayashi, Fumie; Takahashi, Kiwamu; Tanaka, Tohru; Nakajima, Motowo

    2015-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is a naturally occurring amino acid present in diverse organisms and a precursor of heme biosynthesis. ALA is commercially available as a component of cosmetics, dietary supplements, and pharmaceuticals for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Recent reports demonstrated that the combination of ALA and ferrous ion (Fe2+) inhibits the in vitro growth of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. To further explore the potential application of ALA and ferrous ion as a combined antimalarial drug for treatment of human malaria, we conducted an in vivo efficacy evaluation. Female C57BL/6J mice were infected with the lethal strain of rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii 17XL and orally administered ALA plus sodium ferrous citrate (ALA/SFC) as a once-daily treatment. Parasitemia was monitored in the infected mice, and elimination of the parasites was confirmed using diagnostic PCR. Treatment of P. yoelii 17XL-infected mice with ALA/SFC provided curative efficacy in 60% of the mice treated with ALA/SFC at 600/300 mg/kg of body weight; no mice survived when treated with vehicle alone. Interestingly, the cured mice were protected from homologous rechallenge, even when reinfection was attempted more than 230 days after the initial recovery, indicating long-lasting resistance to reinfection with the same parasite. Moreover, parasite-specific antibodies against reported vaccine candidate antigens were found and persisted in the sera of the cured mice. These findings provide clear evidence that ALA/SFC is effective in an experimental animal model of malaria and may facilitate the development of a new class of antimalarial drug. PMID:26324278

  18. Immunohistochemical expression of p16 protein in oral squamous cell carcinoma and lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Salehinejad, Jahanshah; Sharifi, Nourieh; Amirchaghmaghi, Maryam; Ghazi, Narges; Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi; Ghazi, Ala

    2014-08-01

    Epithelial carcinogenesis is a multistep process. Specific genetic events lead to malignant transformation of oral epithelium. Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) may be preceded by potentially malignant lesions such as oral lichen planus (OLP). The p16 protein functions as a negative regulator of the cell cycle progression. Altered pattern of p16 serves as a biomarker for oral mucosal dysplasia and malignant growth. The purpose of this study was to evaluate p16 expression in OSCC and OLP to determine whether it can be a useful marker for early detection of carcinogenesis. We examined p16 expression in 45 OSCCs (15 grade I, 15 grade II, and 15 grade III), 15 OLPs without dysplasia, and 8 normal mucosal specimens with immunohistochemistry. p16 was interpreted as positive if more than 70% of tumor cells showed brown nuclear and cytoplasmic staining. All of the OSCC and control group samples showed negative immunoreactivity, whereas 26.7% of OLP samples were positive for p16. Our findings suggest that p16 expression could not be used as a helpful marker for detection of development toward malignancy in OLP samples. PMID:24850170

  19. [Oral medicine 9. Lichen planus and lichenoid lesions of the oral mucosa].

    PubMed

    van der Meij, E H; Schepman, K P; de Visscher, J G A M

    2013-09-01

    The general dentist is sometimes confronted with white lesions of the oral mucosa. Oral lichen planus is the most common oral white lesion. The diagnosis can usually be made on the basis of the clinical aspect, but is sometimes made more difficult by certain abnormalities in the oral mucosa which clinically resemble oral lichen planus or by abnormalities which cannot be distinguished from oral lichen planus but have a different origin. Those lesions are classified as oral lichenoid lesions. Malignant deterioration has been described in allforms of oral lichen planus lesions and oral lichenoid lesions. There is no known method to predict or prevent malignant transformation. Nor are there any studies examining the efficacy of frequent follow-up visits. It seems sensible, in keeping with the tendency in recent literature, to schedule annual check-ups for patients to be on the safe side. These follow-up visits may reasonably be performed in a general dental practice. PMID:24159754

  20. Akt activation is a common event in pediatric malignant gliomas and a potential adverse prognostic marker: a report from the children’s oncology group

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Ronald L.; Murdoch, Geoffrey H.; Burger, Peter C.; Brat, Daniel J.; Rosenblum, Marc K.; Nikiforova, Marina N.; Holmes, Emiko J.; Zhou, Tianni; Cohen, Kenneth J.; Jakacki, Regina I.

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant activation of Akt is a common finding in adult malignant gliomas, resulting in most cases from mutations or deletions involving PTEN, which allows constitutive Akt phosphorylation. In contrast, we have previously reported that pediatric malignant gliomas, which are morphologically similar to lesions arising in adults, have a substantially lower incidence of genomic alterations of PTEN. The objective of this study was to determine whether Akt activation was also an uncommon finding in childhood malignant gliomas and whether this feature was associated with survival. To address this issue, we examined the frequency of Akt activation, determined by overexpression of the activated phosphorylated form of Akt (Se473) on immunohistochemical analysis, in a series of 53 childhood malignant gliomas obtained from newly diagnosed patients treated on the Children’s Oncology Group ACNS0126 and 0423 studies. The relationship between Akt activation and p53 over-expression, MIB1 labeling, and tumor histology was evaluated. The association between Akt activation and survival was also assessed. Overexpression of activated Akt was observed in 42 of 53 tumors, far in excess of the frequency of PTEN mutations we have previously observed. There was no association between Akt activation and either histology, p53 overexpression, or MIB1 proliferation indices. Although tumors that lacked Akt overexpression had a trend toward more favorable event-free survival and overall survival (p = 0.06), this association reflected that non-overexpressing tumors were significantly more likely to have undergone extensive tumor removal, which was independently associated with outcome. Activation of Akt is a common finding in pediatric malignant gliomas, although it remains uncertain whether this is an independent adverse prognostic factor. In view of the frequency of Akt activation, the evaluation of molecularly targeted therapies that inhibit this pathway warrants consideration for these tumors

  1. AGS67E, an Anti-CD37 Monomethyl Auristatin E Antibody–Drug Conjugate as a Potential Therapeutic for B/T-Cell Malignancies and AML: A New Role for CD37 in AML

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Daniel S.; Guevara, Claudia I.; Jin, Liqing; Mbong, Nathan; Verlinsky, Alla; Hsu, Ssucheng J.; Aviña, Hector; Karki, Sher; Abad, Joseph D.; Yang, Peng; Moon, Sung-Ju; Malik, Faisal; Choi, Michael Y.; An, Zili; Morrison, Kendall; Challita-Eid, Pia M.; Doñate, Fernando; Joseph, Ingrid B.J.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Dick, John E.; Stover, David R.

    2015-01-01

    CD37 is a tetraspanin expressed on malignant B cells. Recently, CD37 has gained interest as a therapeutic target. We developed AGS67E, an antibody–drug conjugate that targets CD37 for the potential treatment of B/T-cell malignancies. It is a fully human monoclonal IgG2 antibody (AGS67C) conjugated, via a protease-cleavable linker, to the microtubule-disrupting agent mono-methyl auristatin E (MMAE). AGS67E induces potent cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and cell-cycle alterations in many non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cell lines and patient-derived samples in vitro. It also shows potent antitumor activity in NHL and CLL xenografts, including Rituxan-refractory models. During profiling studies to confirm the reported expression of CD37 in normal tissues and B-cell malignancies, we made the novel discovery that the CD37 protein was expressed in T-cell lymphomas and in AML. AGS67E bound to >80% of NHL and T-cell lymphomas, 100% of CLL and 100% of AML patient-derived samples, including CD34+CD38− leukemic stem cells. It also induced cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and cell-cycle alterations in AML cell lines and antitumor efficacy in orthotopic AML xenografts. Taken together, this study shows not only that AGS67E may serve as a potential therapeutic for B/T-cell malignancies, but it also demonstrates, for the first time, that CD37 is well expressed and a potential drug target in AML. PMID:25934707

  2. Potential prevention: Aloe vera mouthwash may reduce radiation-induced oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Amirhossein

    2012-08-01

    In recent years, more head and neck cancer patients have been treated with radiotherapy. Radiation-induced mucositis is a common and dose limiting toxicity of radiotherapy among patients with head and neck cancers. Patients undergoing radiation therapy for head and neck cancer are also at increased risk of developing oral candidiasis. A number of new agents applied locally or systemically to prevent or treat radiation-induced mucositis have been investigated, but there is no widely accepted prophylactic or effective treatment for mucositis. Topical Aloe vera is widely used for mild sunburn, frostbites, and scalding burns. Studies have reported the beneficial effects of Aloe gel for wound healing, mucous membrane protection, and treatment of oral ulcers, in addition to antiinflammatory, immunomudulation, antifungal, scavenging free radicals, increasing collagen formation and inhibiting collagenase. Herein the author postulates that oral Aloe vera mouthwash may not only prevent radiation-induced mucositis by its wound healing and antiinflammatory mechanism, but also may reduce oral candidiasis of patients undergoing head and neck radiotherapy due to its antifungal and immunomodulatory properties. Hence, Aloe vera mouthwash may provide an alternative agent for treating radiation-induced oral mucositis and candidiasis in patients with head and neck cancers. PMID:22855041

  3. Narrow band imaging: clinical applications in oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vu, A; Farah, C S

    2016-07-01

    Narrow Band Imaging (NBI) is an endoscopic optical imaging enhancement technology that improves the contrast of mucosal surface texture, and enhances visualisation of mucosal and submucosal vasculature. White light is filtered to emit two 30-nm narrow bands of blue (415 nm) and green light (540 nm) light simultaneously, the former corresponding to the main peak absorption spectrum of haemoglobin, and the latter allowing visualisation of blood vessels in the deeper mucosal and submucosal layers. NBI has been used to better assess oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD), identify oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and to define surgical margins of head and neck malignancies. NBI shows great potential in improving detection rates of OPMD, facilitating better assessment of oral and oropharyngeal SCC, and reducing the risk of recurrence for oral SCC. Although further research is required to better understand and define intrapapillary capillary loop (IPCL) patterns and to relate these with clinical, histopathological and molecular parameters especially for early mucosal changes, there is building evidence to recommend its use as the new gold standard for endoscopic assessment in head and neck oncology. PMID:26713751

  4. Oral Cancer-related Inherited Cancer Syndromes: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Gargi S; Batra, Akshit; Sarode, Sachin C; Yerawadekar, Sujata; Patil, Shankargouda

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common malignancy of the oral cavity, which is usually preceded by a myriad of oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs). In the classification of OPMDs, inherited cancer syndromes (ICSs) were proposed as one of the categories. Inherited cancer syndromes are genetic disorders in which inherited genetic mutation in one or more genes predispose the affected individuals to the development of cancer and may also cause its early onset. Many of these syndromes are caused by mutations in tumor suppressor genes, oncogenes, and genes involved in angiogenesis. General dental practitioners frequently come across OPMDs in their day-to-day practice. It becomes of paramount importance to have knowledge about these rare but prognostically important OPMDs. With this view in mind, in this article, efforts have been made to comprehensively discuss about various ICSs that have higher potential of transformation into oral cancer. The ICSs discussed in this article are xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), ataxia telangiectasia (AT), Bloom syndrome (BS), Fanconi's anemia (FA), and Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), with special emphasis on signs, symptoms, and genetic considerations. PMID:27484606

  5. Graft-versus-host disease affecting oral cavity. A review

    PubMed Central

    Margaix-Muñoz, Maria; Bagán, José V.; Jiménez, Yolanda; Sarrión, María-Gracia; Poveda-Roda, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is one of the most frequent and serious complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and is regarded as the leading cause of late mortality unrelated to the underlying malignant disease. GVHD is an autoimmune and alloimmune disorder that usually affects multiple organs and tissues, and exhibits a variable clinical course. It can manifest in either acute or chronic form. The acute presentation of GVHD is potentially fatal and typically affects the skin, gastrointestinal tract and liver. The chronic form is characterized by the involvement of a number of organs, including the oral cavity. Indeed, the oral cavity may be the only affected location in chronic GVHD. The clinical manifestations of chronic oral GVHD comprise lichenoid lesions, hyperkeratotic plaques and limited oral aperture secondary to sclerosis. The oral condition is usually mild, though moderate to severe erosive and ulcerated lesions may also be seen. The diagnosis is established from the clinical characteristics, though confirmation through biopsy study is sometimes needed. Local corticosteroids are the treatment of choice, offering overall response rates of close to 50%. Extracorporeal photopheresis and systemic corticosteroids in turn constitute second line treatment. Oral chronic GVHD is not considered a determinant factor for patient survival, which is close to 52% five years after diagnosis of the condition. Key words:Chronic graft-versus-host disease, oral chronic graft-versus-host disease, pathogenics, management, survival. PMID:25810826

  6. Graft-versus-host disease affecting oral cavity. A review.

    PubMed

    Margaix-Muñoz, Maria; Bagán, José V; Jiménez, Yolanda; Sarrión, María-Gracia; Poveda-Roda, Rafael

    2015-02-01

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is one of the most frequent and serious complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and is regarded as the leading cause of late mortality unrelated to the underlying malignant disease. GVHD is an autoimmune and alloimmune disorder that usually affects multiple organs and tissues, and exhibits a variable clinical course. It can manifest in either acute or chronic form. The acute presentation of GVHD is potentially fatal and typically affects the skin, gastrointestinal tract and liver. The chronic form is characterized by the involvement of a number of organs, including the oral cavity. Indeed, the oral cavity may be the only affected location in chronic GVHD. The clinical manifestations of chronic oral GVHD comprise lichenoid lesions, hyperkeratotic plaques and limited oral aperture secondary to sclerosis. The oral condition is usually mild, though moderate to severe erosive and ulcerated lesions may also be seen. The diagnosis is established from the clinical characteristics, though confirmation through biopsy study is sometimes needed. Local corticosteroids are the treatment of choice, offering overall response rates of close to 50%. Extracorporeal photopheresis and systemic corticosteroids in turn constitute second line treatment. Oral chronic GVHD is not considered a determinant factor for patient survival, which is close to 52% five years after diagnosis of the condition. Key words:Chronic graft-versus-host disease, oral chronic graft-versus-host disease, pathogenics, management, survival. PMID:25810826

  7. A phase contrast cytomorphometric study of squames of normal oral mucosa and oral leukoplakia: Original study

    PubMed Central

    Nadaf, Afreen; Bavle, Radhika M; Thambiah, Lalita J; Paremala, K; Sudhakara, M; Soumya, M

    2014-01-01

    Oral leukoplakia represents the most common potentially malignant oral disorder, representing 85% of such lesions. The worldwide prevalence of leukoplakia is 1.5- 4.3%. Leukoplakia is often associated with carcinogenic exposures, such as from use of tobacco, alcohol or betel nut. The level of risk for malignant transformation of leukoplakia is associated with lesion histology. The overall malignant transformation rates for dysplastic lesions range from 11% to 36%, depending on the length of follow-up. Exfoliative cytology is a simple and minimally invasive method. Phase contrast microscope, an essential tool in the field of biology and medical research provides improved discrimination of cellular details. Aims: To study and compare the cytomorphological and cytomorphometric features of squames obtained from the mucosa of normal individuals, tobacco habituates with and without clinically evident leukoplakia. To assess the role of phase contrast microscopy as an alternative and easy method of cytological evaluation of wet and unstained smears. Materials and Methods: Fifty cases from each group were taken. Fixed, unstained smears were viewed under phase contrast microscope and were evaluated morphologically and morphometrically for nuclear and cellular diameters. Results: The study showed a significant increase in the mean nuclear diameter and decrease in the mean cellular diameter. Conclusion: Cytomorphometric changes could be the earliest indicators of cellular alterations. This indicates that there could be a cause-effect relationship between tobacco and quantitative alterations. PMID:25364176

  8. Exploring the potential of self-assembled mixed micelles in enhancing the stability and oral bioavailability of an acid-labile drug.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingwang; Wang, Huan; Zhang, Tianpeng; Zhou, Xiaotong; Wu, Baojian

    2014-10-01

    Oral delivery of many drugs is plagued with limited solubility and/or poor stability. This paper aimed to explore the performance of polymeric mixed micelles on solubilization, stabilization and bioavailability enhancement with stiripentol as model drug. Stiripentol-loaded mixed micelles were prepared by solvent-diffusion method: rapid dispersion of an ethanol solution containing stiripentol, monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) and sodium oleate into water. Stiripentol micelles were characterized by the particle size, entrapment efficiency, in vitro drug release, TEM, DSC and FTIR. The pharmacokinetic profile of stiripentol was determined in rats after oral administration of stiripentol micelles. The obtained stiripentol micelles were 44.2 nm in size with an entrapment efficiency over 90%. It was shown that micelles substantially improved the solubility and gastric stability of stiripentol. The oral absorption of stiripentol was also enhanced to a great extent with a relative bioavailability of 157% and 444% to the commercial formulation (Diacomit®) and in-house suspensions. Mixed micelles assembled by di-block copolymer/sodium oleate exhibited a good potential in the improvement of drug stability and bioavailability. It should be a promising carrier for oral delivery of therapeuticals with solubility and stability issues. PMID:24956461

  9. Assessing the utility of autofluorescence-based pulmonary optical endomicroscopy to predict the malignant potential of solitary pulmonary nodules in humans.

    PubMed

    Seth, Sohan; Akram, Ahsan R; McCool, Paul; Westerfeld, Jody; Wilson, David; McLaughlin, Stephen; Dhaliwal, Kevin; Williams, Christopher K I

    2016-01-01

    Solitary pulmonary nodules are common, often incidental findings on chest CT scans. The investigation of pulmonary nodules is time-consuming and often leads to protracted follow-up with ongoing radiological surveillance, however, clinical calculators that assess the risk of the nodule being malignant exist to help in the stratification of patients. Furthermore recent advances in interventional pulmonology include the ability to both navigate to nodules and also to perform autofluorescence endomicroscopy. In this study we assessed the efficacy of incorporating additional information from label-free fibre-based optical endomicrosopy of the nodule on assessing risk of malignancy. Using image analysis and machine learning approaches, we find that this information does not yield any gain in predictive performance in a cohort of patients. Further advances with pulmonary endomicroscopy will require the addition of molecular tracers to improve information from this procedure. PMID:27550539

  10. Assessing the utility of autofluorescence-based pulmonary optical endomicroscopy to predict the malignant potential of solitary pulmonary nodules in humans

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Sohan; Akram, Ahsan R.; McCool, Paul; Westerfeld, Jody; Wilson, David; McLaughlin, Stephen; Dhaliwal, Kevin; Williams, Christopher K. I.

    2016-01-01

    Solitary pulmonary nodules are common, often incidental findings on chest CT scans. The investigation of pulmonary nodules is time-consuming and often leads to protracted follow-up with ongoing radiological surveillance, however, clinical calculators that assess the risk of the nodule being malignant exist to help in the stratification of patients. Furthermore recent advances in interventional pulmonology include the ability to both navigate to nodules and also to perform autofluorescence endomicroscopy. In this study we assessed the efficacy of incorporating additional information from label-free fibre-based optical endomicrosopy of the nodule on assessing risk of malignancy. Using image analysis and machine learning approaches, we find that this information does not yield any gain in predictive performance in a cohort of patients. Further advances with pulmonary endomicroscopy will require the addition of molecular tracers to improve information from this procedure. PMID:27550539

  11. Lesions with unclear malignant potential (B3) after minimally invasive breast biopsy: evaluation of vacuum biopsies performed in Switzerland and recommended further management

    PubMed Central

    Haueisen, Harald; Kampmann, Gert; Oehlschlegel, Christian; Seifert, B; Rageth, Luzi; Rageth, Christoph; Stadlmann, S; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A

    2015-01-01

    Background Histopathological B3 lesions after minimal invasive breast biopsy (VABB) are a particular challenge for the clinician, as there are currently no binding recommendations regarding the subsequent procedure. Purpose To analyze all B3 lesions, diagnosed at VABB and captured in the national central Swiss MIBB database and to provide a data basis for further management in this subgroup of patients. Material and Methods All 9,153 stereotactically, sonographically, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsies, performed in Switzerland between 2009 and 2011, captured in a central database, were evaluated. The rate of B3 lesions and the definitive pathological findings in patients who underwent surgical resection were analyzed. Results The B3 rate was 17.0% (1532 of 9000 biopsies with B classification). Among the 521 lesions with a definitive postoperative diagnosis, the malignancy rate (invasive carcinoma or DCIS) was 21.5%. In patients with atypical ductal hyperplasia, papillary lesions, flat epithelial atypia, lobular neoplasia, and radial scar diagnosed by VABB, the malignancy rates were 25.9%, 3.1%, 18.3%, 26.4%, and 11.1%, respectively. Conclusion B3 lesions, comprising 17%, of all analyzed biopsies, were common and the proportion of malignancies in those lesions undergoing subsequent surgical excision was high (21.5%). PMID:26552694

  12. Oral Amelanotic Melanoma of the Maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Saghravanian, Nasrollah; Pazouki, Mahdi; Zamanzadeh, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Amelanotic melanoma is a variant of malignant melanoma comprising 2% to 8% of all malignant melanomas. The amelanotic presentation of melanoma in the oral cavity is extremely rare and has been reported only occasionally in the literature. Moreover, the lack of melanin makes these tumors difficult to diagnose than that of pigmented lesions and the prognosis tends to be poorer. Herein, we report an amelanotic melanoma involving the oral mucosa of the maxilla in a 27 year-old male. PMID:25628704

  13. Oral Leukoplakia – Is Biopsy at the Initial Appointment a Must?

    PubMed Central

    Mutalik, Vimi S.; Pai, Keerthilatha M; Naikmasur, Venkatesh G.; Phaik, Khoo Suan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oral leukoplakia is a potentially malignant disorder of the oral cavity. Leukoplakias with chances of undergoing malignant transformation owing to the presence of dysplastic changes may not be clinically distinguishable from leukoplakias without dysplasia. The study was carried out to evaluate the usefulness of biopsy in assessing the clinico-pathologic correlations of oral leukoplakia at the patient’s initial visit. Materials and Methods: Hospital records with clinical diagnosis of oral leukoplakia were retrospectively analysed. All these patients had undergone biopsy in their initial visit. Histopathological slides were reviewed and reported by a single pathologist. Diagnosis agreement was considered to be present if the clinical diagnosis matched the histopathological diagnosis. Misdiagnosis was considered if the clinical diagnosis did not match the histopathological diagnosis and underdiagnosis when malignancy was detected on histopathological examination. Results: A total of 115 patients were clinically diagnosed with oral leukoplakia. According to clinical appearance of the leukoplakia patch was categorized in to three types viz homogeneous leukoplakia (n= 24 i.e. 20.87%), speckled leukoplakia (n=76 i.e. 66.08%) and verrucous leukoplakia (n=15 i.e. 13.04%). Histopathological examination confirmed clinical diagnosis in 88 cases (a diagnosis agreement of 76.52%). Histopathological examination of 19 cases revealed a different diagnosis, thus categorized as misdiagnosis (16.52%) and 8 cases had unexpected malignancy which accounted for underdiagnosis in 6.96% cases. There was dysplasia in 45 (51.13%) of the histopathologically confirmed cases of leukoplakia. Conclusion: The clinical appearance of suspicious white lesions does not provide a true nature of its disease status and malignant changes may be missed. PMID:25302256

  14. Oral cancer screening approach based on labeling exfoliated oral cells with molecularly-targeted optical contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leautaud, Veronica; Horres, Charles R.; Bhattar, Vijayashree S.; Williams, Michelle D.; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca R.

    2011-03-01

    Early detection is a potential key to improving the survival rates of oral cancer patients and reducing the morbidity associated with treatment. We seek to improve upon methods of detecting of early malignancies with oral brush biopsies by using immunofluorescence-based assessment of the expression of multiple well-described markers commonly overexpressed in oral cancers, such as Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and Cytokeratin 8 (CK8). Furthermore, since abnormal cells are often scarce in brush biopsy samples, we seek to use magnetic microparticles targeted to these markers as a means of enriching the concentration of abnormal cells. Finally, we plan to conduct a small pilot study using these methods with brush biopsies from patients of the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Head and Neck Clinic.

  15. Potential role of autophagy in smokeless tobacco extract-induced cytotoxicity and in morin-induced protection in oral epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ganguli, Arnab; Das, Amlan; Nag, Debasish; Bhattacharya, Surela; Chakrabarti, Gopal

    2016-04-01

    Toxic components of STE induced serious, adverse human oral health outcomes. In the present study, we observed that STE was involved in oral toxicity by reducing the viability of human squamous epithelial cells, SCC-25, along with the simultaneous induction of both apoptosis and autophagic signaling. STE was also found to induce significant amount ROS generation in SCC-25 cells. The dietary flavonoid morin, found abundantly in a variety of herbs, fruits and wine, has been reported to attenuate ROS-induced pathogenesis including autophagy. In this study we designed three different treatment regimes of morin treatment, such as pre, co, and post - treatment of STE challenged SCC-25 cells. In all cases morin provided cytoprotection to STE challenged SCC-25 cells by augmenting STE induced ROS-dependent cytotoxic autophagy. Hence, morin is a potential option for antioxidant therapy in treatment of STE induced toxicity. PMID:26891815

  16. Primary Malignant Melanoma of Maxilla: Report of a Case with Discussion

    PubMed Central

    Rani, G. Shirisha; Kumar, T. Vinay; Begum, Md Rezwana; Priya Srinivasan, Anu

    2014-01-01

    Primary oral malignant melanoma, very rare neoplasm of melanocytic origin, usually presents as a bluish black to tan-brown colored lesion Which is accounting for 0.2 to 8% of all melanomas, 1.6% of all head and neck malignancies, and 0.5% of all oral neoplasia. In general, the prognosis of oral melanoma is poor and worse than that of cutaneous melanoma. Here a case of oral malignant melanoma is presented, which was undetected during the first visit to a dental clinic. When a simple oral surgical treatment was carried out in that region, it resulted in the appearance of a massive pigmented lesion which was histopathologically diagnosed as malignant melanoma. This paper is presented to reemphasize the fact that any pigmented lesion in the oral cavity should be viewed with suspicion and proper investigation (biopsy) should be carried out to rule out any untoward experiences later. PMID:25642350

  17. Atypical neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    PubMed

    Collins, Ann; Davies, Drew; Menon, Sharmila

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old man was admitted to a psychiatric ward in a confused state. He had a 30-year history of lately stable schizophrenia and antipsychotic medication had recently been reduced. The clinical picture was characterised by confusion, agitation, autonomic instability, muscle rigidity and elevated creatine kinase. Despite no other identifiable cause, physicians were reluctant to accept a diagnosis of neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) due to the absence of fever. Despite acute renal failure, the patient was repeatedly transferred between medical and psychiatric wards; diagnosis and management were delayed, with potentially catastrophic consequences. NMS is a rare, life-threatening neurological disorder that can present atypically and requires emergency medical rather than psychiatric care. Clinicians must proactively distinguish between medical emergencies (including acute confusional states/delirium) and mental illness. Prompt, accurate diagnosis, management on the appropriate ward and effective teamwork between specialties are essential to improve patient outcomes in this potentially fatal condition. PMID:27298291

  18. Management of oral disease prior to radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Schiødt, Morten; Hermund, Niels Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    Radiation therapy for malignant tumors of the head and neck is associated with significant side effects involving the oral cavity. For example, radiation therapy leads to reduced vascularity and oxygen tension of the oral hard and soft tissues and also to salivary gland dysfunction. These changes increase the risk of dental decay and oral infections and lead to reduced healing capacity following oral surgery procedures. A severe complication of radiation therapy is osteoradionecrosis of the jaw bone. The purpose of this paper is to review preradiation oral examination and treatment. Patient management regarding oral disease prior to radiation therapy has to accomplish a number of goals: (1) to identify existing oral disease and potential risk of oral disease, (2) to remove infectious dental/oral foci before the start of radiation therapy, (3) to prepare the patient for the expected side effects with information about them, (4) to establish an adequate standard of oral hygiene to meet the increased challenge, (5) to provide a plan for maintaining oral hygiene and fluoride treatment, for oral rehabilitation, and for follow-up and (6) to inform the patient about the availability of any financial support for dental treatment, and finally (7) to establish the necessary multidiciplinary collaboration within the health care system so that oral symptoms and sequelae before, during and after the radiation therapy can be reduced or alleviated. The methods used to accomplish these goals may vary between cancer centers. Each center should have a multidisciplinary team to handle such problems. After the end of radiation therapy most of the dental treatments in our patients are done by private dentists, except for some oral surgery procedures, which are performed in hospital. In our experience, the major challenge in this process is related to (1) informing of the patient, (2) timing the coordination between all the health care workers involved, (3) establishing an adequate

  19. Malignant teratoma (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A malignant teratoma is a type of cancer consisting of cysts that contain one or more of the three primary embryonic germ layers: ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. Because malignant teratomas have usually spread by the time of diagnosis, ...

  20. Stenting in Malignant Biliary Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Almadi, Majid A; Barkun, Jeffrey S; Barkun, Alan N

    2015-10-01

    Decompression of the biliary system in patients with malignant biliary obstruction has been widely accepted and implemented as part of the care. Despite a wealth of literature, there remains a significant amount of uncertainty as to which approach would be most appropriate in different clinical settings. This review covers stenting of the biliary system in cases of resectable or palliative malignant biliary obstruction, potential candidates for biliary drainage, technical aspects of the procedure, as well as management of biliary stent dysfunction. Furthermore, periprocedural considerations including proper mapping of the location of obstruction and the use of antibiotics are addressed. PMID:26431598

  1. Oral Lesions and Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Castellarin, P.; Pozzato, G.; Tirelli, G.; Di Lenarda, R.; Biasotto, M.

    2010-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disorders are heterogeneous malignancy characterized by the expansion of a lymphoid clone more or less differentiated. At the level of the oral cavity, the lymphoproliferative disorder can occur in various ways, most commonly as lymphoid lesions with extranodal externalization, but sometimes, oral lesions may represent a localization of a disease spread. With regard to the primary localizations of lymphoproliferative disorders, a careful examination of the head and neck, oral, and oropharyngeal area is necessary in order to identify suspicious lesions, and their early detection results in a better prognosis for the patient. Numerous complications have been described and frequently found at oral level, due to pathology or different therapeutic strategies. These complications require precise diagnosis and measures to oral health care. In all this, oral pathologists, as well as dental practitioners, have a central role in the treatment and long-term monitoring of these patients. PMID:20871659

  2. Potential role of chemo-radiation with oral capecitabine in a breast cancer patient with central nervous system relapse.

    PubMed

    Hikino, Hajime; Yamada, Takako; Johbara, Kanta; Obayashi, Nobuhiko; Ozaki, Nobuhiro

    2006-02-01

    A 54-year-old woman underwent mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection for infiltrating ductal carcinoma with multiple lymph node involvement. The patient received adriamycin 60 mg/m(2) and cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m(2) (AC) followed by weekly paclitaxel 80 mg/m(2) and external irradiation to the local lymph node regions as adjuvant treatment. After 1 year and 5 months, the patient suffered her first recurrence, developing multiple brain and meningeal metastases. CNS involvement was well controlled by oral capecitabine (2400 mg twice daily, on days 1-21 of a 28-day cycle) and external whole brain irradiation of 50 Gy with minimal toxicity. We suggest that capecitabine contributed to the favorable clinical course in this patient and believe that, as an oral agent, this drug may benefit patients with CNS metastases of breast cancer by allowing home-based therapy. PMID:16005228

  3. Pediatric Salivary Gland Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ord, Robert A; Carlson, Eric R

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric malignant salivary gland tumors are extremely rare. The percentage of malignant tumors is higher than that seen in adults, although the outcomes in terms of survival are better in pediatric patients. The mainstay of treatment is surgical excision with negative margins. This article reviews current concepts in demographics, etiology, management, and outcomes of malignant salivary tumors in children. PMID:26614703

  4. Betel nut chewing and its deleterious effects on oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Anand, Richa; Dhingra, Chandan; Prasad, Sumanth; Menon, Ipseeta

    2014-01-01

    The habit of chewing betel nut has a long history of use. Betel nut and products derived from it are widely used as a masticatory product among various communities and in several countries across the world. Over a long period, several additives have been added to a simple betel nut preparation; thus, creating the betel quid (BQ) and encompassing chewing tobacco in the preparation. Betel nut has deleterious effects on oral soft tissues. Its effects on dental caries and periodontal diseases, two major oral diseases are less well-documented. Betel-induced lichenoid lesions mainly on buccal mucosa have been reported at quid retained sites. In chronic chewers, a condition called betel chewers mucosa is often found where the quid is placed. Betel nut chewing is implicated in oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) and its use along with tobacco can cause leukoplakia, both of which are potentially malignant in the oral cavity. Oral cancer often arises from such precancerous changes. Thus, public health measures to quit betel use are recommended to control disabling conditions such as OSF and oral cancer. PMID:25313728

  5. Potential involvement of miR-375 in the premalignant progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma mediated via transcription factor KLF5

    PubMed Central

    Li, Siyuan; Shan, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xiaosong; Hua, Hong; Zhao, Chuanke; Feng, Zhendong; Cai, Zhigang; Zhang, Lihe; Zhou, Demin

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the genetic effect involved in the premalignant progression of chronic inflammation to cancer, we performed microRNA and mRNA profiling in oral lichen planus (OLP), oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), and normal tissue from the same patients. We demonstrate the involvement of a suppressive microRNA, miR-375, in the regulation of this premalignant progression via KLF5, a transcription factor that modulates the expression of genes contributing to proliferation and apoptosis. We found that miR-375 abundance decreased in tissues with progression from the normal state to OLP and subsequently to OSCC. Restoration of miR-375 by transduction of a synthetic mimic into OSCC cells repressed cellular proliferation and promoted apoptosis, with concomitant down-regulation of KLF5, and vice versa. The direct binding of miR-375 to the 3′-untranslated region of KLF5 was further confirmed. Additionally, Survivin (BIRC5), a target of KLF5, was also regulated by miR-375, explaining the susceptibility of miR-375-mimic transfected cells to apoptosis. Further analysis of clinical specimens suggested that expression of KLF5 and BIRC5 is up-regulated during the progression from inflammation to cancer. Our findings provide novel insights into the involvement of microRNAs in progression of inflammation to carcinoma and suggest a potential early-stage biomarker or therapy target for oral carcinoma. PMID:26474386

  6. Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen in Premalignancy and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poosarla, Chandrashekar; Ramesh, K.; Gudiseva, Swetha; Bala, Sekar; Sundar, Murali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cancer has multifactorial aetiology and is a multistep process involving initiation, promotion and tumour progression. Cellular proliferation is one of the important indicators for the biologic aggressiveness of a malignant lesion. The dysregulated proliferation may be a significant change to determine the potential prognosis of various malignant tumours. Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) as an indicator for clinical aggressiveness in oral premalignancy and squamous cell carcinoma. Materials and Methods A total of 50 blocks were taken from the Department of Oral Pathology which was diagnosed previously histopathologically. It comprised of normal oral mucosa (10), dysplasia (10) and grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma (30) of patients between the age group of 40–60 years. From each block, sections of 4 micro metre thicknesses were prepared and placed on poly- L lysine coated slides. These sections were immunohistochemically stained with monoclonal proliferating cell antibody (PC10). The stained slides were evaluated by a single examiner for cell count. Results A comparison between study groups and controls showed a probability value (p-value) < 0.05. Significant increase in the proliferative index from the normal to oral squamous cell carcinoma was noticed. Poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma showed maximum proliferative index followed by moderately differentiated, well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, dysplasia and normal mucosa. Conclusion Present study concluded that PCNA index can be used to assess the proliferation and aggressiveness in dysplasia and different grades oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26266215

  7. Optical fiber Raman-based spectroscopy for oral lesions characterization: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Luis Felipe C. S.; Neto, Lázaro P. M.; Oliveira, Inajara P.; Rangel, João. Lucas; Ferreira, Isabelle; Kitakawa, Dárcio; Martin, Airton A.

    2016-03-01

    In the clinical daily life various lesions of the oral cavity have shown different aspects, generating an inconclusive or doubtful diagnosis. In general, oral injuries are diagnosed by histopathological analysis from biopsy, which is an invasive procedure and does not gives immediate results. In the other hand, Raman spectroscopy technique it is a real time and minimal invasive analytical tool, with notable diagnostic capability. This study aims to characterize, by optical fiber Raman-based spectroscopy (OFRS), normal, inflammatory, potentially malignant, benign and malign oral lesions. Raman data were collected by a Holospec f / 1.8 spectrograph (Kayser Optical Systems) coupled to an optical fiber, with a 785nm laser line source and a CCD Detector. The data were pre-processed and vector normalized. The average analysis and standard deviation was performed associated with cluster analysis and compared to the histopalogical results. Samples of described oral pathological processes were used in the study. The OFRS was efficient to characterized oral lesions and normal mucosa, in which biochemical information related to vibrational modes of proteins, lipids, nucleic acids and carbohydrates were observed. The technique (OFRS) is able to demonstrate biochemical information concern different types of oral lesions showing that Raman spectroscopy could be useful for an early and minimal invasive diagnosis.

  8. In vivo Raman spectroscopic identification of premalignant lesions in oral buccal mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Deshmukh, Atul; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Murali Krishna, C.

    2012-10-01

    Cancers of oral cavities are one of the most common malignancies in India and other south-Asian countries. Tobacco habits are the main etiological factors for oral cancer. Identification of premalignant lesions is required for improving survival rates related to oral cancer. Optical spectroscopy methods are projected as alternative/adjunct for cancer diagnosis. Earlier studies have demonstrated the feasibility of classifying normal, premalignant, and malignant oral ex-vivo tissues. We intend to evaluate potentials of Raman spectroscopy in detecting premalignant conditions. Spectra were recorded from premalignant patches, contralateral normal (opposite to tumor site), and cancerous sites of subjects with oral cancers and also from age-matched healthy subjects with and without tobacco habits. A total of 861 spectra from 104 subjects were recorded using a fiber-optic probe-coupled HE-785 Raman spectrometer. Spectral differences in the 1200- to 1800-cm-1 region were subjected to unsupervised principal component analysis and supervised linear discriminant analysis followed by validation with leave-one-out and an independent test data set. Results suggest that premalignant conditions can be objectively discriminated with both normal and cancerous sites as well as from healthy controls with and without tobacco habits. Findings of the study further support efficacy of Raman spectroscopic approaches in oral-cancer applications.

  9. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health About Oral Cancer Oral cancer includes cancers of the mouth and pharynx (the back of the throat). Oral cancer accounts for roughly two percent of all cancers ...

  10. Oral Myiasis

    PubMed Central

    Saravanan, Thalaimalai; Mohan, Mathan A; Thinakaran, Meera; Ahammed, Saneem

    2015-01-01

    Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy. PMID:25709196

  11. Segmental neurofibromatosis and malignancy.

    PubMed

    Dang, Julie D; Cohen, Philip R

    2010-01-01

    Segmental neurofibromatosis is an uncommon variant of neurofibromatosis type I characterized by neurofibromas and/or café-au-lait macules localized to one sector of the body. Although patients with neurofibromatosis type I have an associated increased risk of certain malignancies, malignancy has only occasionally been reported in patients with segmental neurofibromatosis. The published reports of patients with segmental neurofibromatosis who developed malignancy were reviewed and the characteristics of these patients and their cancers were summarized. Ten individuals (6 women and 4 men) with segmental neurofibromatosis and malignancy have been reported. The malignancies include malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (3), malignant melanoma (2), breast cancer (1), colon cancer (1), gastric cancer (1), lung cancer (1), and Hodgkin lymphoma (1). The most common malignancies in patients with segmental neurofibromatosis are derived from neural crest cells: malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and malignant melanoma. The incidence of malignancy in patients with segmental neurofibromatosis may approach that of patients with neurofibromatosis type I. PMID:21137621

  12. The Cultivable Human Oral Gluten-Degrading Microbiome and its Potential Implications in Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Feo, Martin; Wei, Guoxian; Blumenkranz, Gabriel; Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Schuppan, Detlef; Oppenheim, Frank G.; Helmerhorst, Eva J.

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease is characterized by intestinal inflammation caused by gluten, proteins which are widely contained in the Western diet. Mammalian digestive enzymes are only partly capable of cleaving gluten, and fragments remain that induce toxic responses in celiac patients. We found that the oral microbiome is a novel and rich source of gluten degrading enzymes. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of the cultivable resident oral microbes that are capable of cleaving gluten, with special emphasis on its immunogenic domains. Bacteria were obtained by a selective culturing approach and enzyme activities were characterised by: 1) Hydrolysis of paranitroanilide-derivatised gliadin-derived tripeptide substrates; 2) Gliadin degradation in-gel (gliadin zymography); 3) Gliadin degradation in solution; 4) Proteolysis of the highly immunogenic α-gliadin-derived 33-mer. For select strains pH activity profiles were determined. The culturing strategy yielded 87 aerobic and 63 anaerobic strains. Species with activity in at least two of the four assays were typed as: Rothia mucilaginosa HOT-681, Rothia aeria HOT-188, Actinomyces odontolyticus HOT-701, Streptococcus mitis HOT-677, Streptococcus sp. HOT-071, Neisseria mucosa HOT-682 and Capnocytophaga sputigena HOT-775, with Rothia species being active in all four assays. Cleavage specificities and substrate preferences differed among the strains identified. The approximate molecular weights of the enzymes were ~75 kD (Rothia spp.), ~60 kD (A. odontolyticus) and ~150 kD (Streptococcus spp.). In conclusion, this study identified new gluten-degrading microorganisms in the upper gastro-intestinal tract. A cocktail of the most active oral bacteria, or their isolated enzymes, may offer promising new treatment modalities for celiac disease. PMID:23714165

  13. A fusion protein derived from plants holds promising potential as a new oral therapy for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeehye; Diao, Hong; Feng, Zhi-Chao; Lau, Arthur; Wang, Rennian; Jevnikar, Anthony M; Ma, Shengwu

    2014-05-01

    The incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is recognized as a promising candidate for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D), with one of its mimetics, exenatide (synthetic exendin-4) having already been licensed for clinical use. We seek to further improve the therapeutic efficacy of exendin-4 (Ex-4) using innovative fusion protein technology. Here, we report the production in plants a fusion protein containing Ex-4 coupled with human transferrin (Ex-4-Tf) and its characterization. We demonstrated that plant-made Ex-4-Tf retained the activity of both proteins. In particular, the fusion protein stimulated insulin release from pancreatic β-cells, promoted β-cell proliferation, stimulated differentiation of pancreatic precursor cells into insulin-producing cells, retained the ability to internalize into human intestinal cells and resisted stomach acid and proteolytic enzymes. Importantly, oral administration of partially purified Ex-4-Tf significantly improved glucose tolerance, whereas commercial Ex-4 administered by the same oral route failed to show any significant improvement in glucose tolerance in mice. Furthermore, intraperitoneal (IP) injection of Ex-4-Tf showed a beneficial effect in mice similar to IP-injected Ex-4. We also showed that plants provide a robust system for the expression of Ex-4-Tf, producing up to 37 μg prEx-4-Tf/g fresh leaf weight in transgenic tobacco and 137 μg prEx-4-Tf/g freshweight in transiently transformed leaves of N. benthamiana. These results indicate that Ex-4-Tf holds substantial promise as a new oral therapy for type 2 diabetes. The production of prEx-4-Tf in plants may offer a convenient and cost-effective method to deliver the antidiabetic medicine in partially processed plant food products. PMID:24373324

  14. Effects of near-infrared laser radiation on the survival and inflammatory potential of Candida spp. involved in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Clemente, A M; Rizzetto, L; Castronovo, G; Perissi, E; Tanturli, M; Cozzolino, F; Cavalieri, D; Fusi, F; Cialdai, F; Vignali, L; Torcia, M G; Monici, M

    2015-10-01

    Candida spp. usually colonize ulcerative lesions of atrophic mucosa in patients with chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis inducing severe inflammation. The spread of antifungal-resistant strains strongly encouraged the search of complementary or alternative therapeutic strategies to cure inflamed mucosa. In this paper, we studied the effects of a near-infrared (NIR) laser system with dual-wavelength emission (808 nm + 904 nm) on the survival and inflammatory potential of C. albicans, C. glabrata, and C. parapsilosis. Laser treatment was performed with a Multiwave Locked System laser. Survival and apoptosis of fungal strains were evaluated by colony-forming units (CFU) counting and annexin V staining. Cytokine production was evaluated by ImmunoPlex array. Laser treatment significantly affected the survival of Candida spp. by inducing apoptosis and induced a lower production of inflammatory cytokines by dendritic cells compared to untreated fungi. No differences in the survival and inflammatory potential were recorded in treated or untreated Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, used as the control non-pathogenic microorganism. Laser treatment altered the survival and inflammatory potential of pathogenic Candida spp. These data provide experimental support to the use of NIR laser radiation as a co-adjuvant of antifungal therapy in patients with oral mucositis (OM) complicated by Candida infections. PMID:26173694

  15. Viral and molecular aspects of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Hillbertz, Nicolette Salmon; Hirsch, Jan-Michaél; Jalouli, Jamshid; Jalouli, Miranda M; Sand, Lars

    2012-10-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common epithelial malignancy in the oral cavity. SCCs and their variants constitute over 90% of oral malignancies, and the disease is associated with poor prognosis. OSCC is a complex malignancy where environmental factors, virus infections, and genetic alterations most likely interact, and thus give rise to the malignant condition. Herein, we review the available literature regarding high-risk factors such as alcohol and tobacco usage; discuss the roles of human papillomaviruses (HPV), the Epstein-Barr virus, and the human herpes simplex virus (HSV); and evaluate several candidate genes associated with the condition: p53, p16(INK4) and p21(WAF1/CIPI), survivin, B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2), keratins, Fibroblast growth factor 3 (FGF3), FGF4, FGF19, Oral cancer overexpressed gene 1 (ORAOV1), and Cyclin D1 (CCND1). PMID:23060540

  16. Bioimpedance Detection of Oral Lichen Planus Used as Preneoplastic Model

    PubMed Central

    Tatullo, Marco; Marrelli, Massimo; Amantea, Massimiliano; Paduano, Francesco; Santacroce, Luigi; Gentile, Stefano; Scacco, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bioimpedance is a measure of the electrical properties of biological tissues. In the last two decades bioimpedance has been successfully introduced in clinical diagnosis of cancer. It has been demonstrated that tumoral tissues often show lower bioimpedance values than healthy tissues. The aim of this work is to assess the bioimpedentiometric differences between healthy and Oral Lichen Planus (OLP) affected oral mucosa, taking attention to the erosive form which may represent a potential pre-cancerous condition. Methods: 52 patients affected by OLP were recruited for bioimpedance examination of oral mucosa. Four electrical properties, resistance (R), reactance (Xc), phase angle (θ) and impedance (Z) of the tongue and of the intraoral mucosa, were measured. Results: We observed a significant increase of Z and a significant decrease of θ values in correspondence of OLP lesions compared to healthy oral mucosa, and a marked decrease of Z values in correspondence of erosive OLP lesions. Conclusions: These results provide evidence of the usefulness of bioimpedance assay for the characterization of healthy and clinically OLP affected mucosa. Bioimpedance is a valid aid in the early detection and clinical monitoring of the suspicious lesions which could lead to a potentially malignant evolution. The present research article is a valuable addition to the scientific literature of cancer prevention, and our findings can be considered extremely encouraging as they represent the initial step for a more wide clinical study for better define the different cut-off values in the different precancerous conditions occurring in the oral mucosa. PMID:26366210

  17. The role of estrogen receptor {beta} (ER{beta}) in malignant diseases-A new potential target for antiproliferative drugs in prevention and treatment of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake

    2010-05-21

    The discovery of ER{beta} in the middle of the 1990s represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of estrogen signaling. It has turned out that estrogen action is not mediated by one receptor, ER{alpha}, but by two balancing factors, ER{alpha} and ER{beta}, which are often antagonistic to one another. Excitingly, ER{beta} has been shown to be widespread in the body and to be involved in a multitude of physiological and pathophysiological events. This has led to a strong interest of the pharmaceutical industry to target ER{beta} by drugs against various diseases. In this review, focus is on the role of ER{beta} in malignant diseases where the anti proliferative activity of ER{beta} gives hope of new therapeutic approaches.

  18. Dental status, dental rehabilitation procedures, demographic and oncological data as potential risk factors for infected osteoradionecrosis of the lower jaw after radiotherapy for oral neoplasms: a retrospective evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Retrospective evaluation of the dental status of patients with oral cancer before radiotherapy, the extent of dental rehabilitation procedures, demographic and radiotherapy data as potential risk factors for development of infected osteoradionecrosis of the lower jaw. Methods A total of 90 patients who had undergone radiotherapy for oral cancer were included into this retrospective evaluation. None of them had distant metastases. After tumour surgery the patients were referred to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon for dental examination and the necessary dental rehabilitation procedures inclusive potential tooth extraction combined with primary soft tissue closure. Adjuvant radiotherapy was started after complete healing of the gingiva (> 7 days after potential extraction). The majority of patients (n = 74) was treated with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy with total doses ranging from 50-70Gy whereas further 16 patients received hyperfractionated radiotherapy up to 72Gy. The records of the clinical data were reviewed. Furthermore, questionnaires were mailed to the patients’ general practitioners and dentists in order to get more data concerning tumour status and osteoradionecrosis during follow-up. Results The patients’ dental status before radiotherapy was generally poor. On average 10 teeth were present, six of them were regarded to remain conservable. Extensive dental rehabilitation procedures included a mean of 3.7 tooth extractions. Chronic periodontitis with severe attachment loss was found in 40%, dental biofilm in 56%. An infected osteoradionecrosis (IORN) grade II according to (Schwartz et al., Am J Clin Oncol 25:168-171, 2002) was diagnosed in 11 of the 90 patients (12%), mostly within the first 4 years after radiotherapy. We could not find significant prognostic factors for the occurrence of IORN, but a trendwise correlation with impaired dental status, rehabilitation procedures, fraction size and tumour outcome. Conclusion The

  19. Estimation of Pyruvic acid in serum and saliva among healthy and potentially malignant disorder subjects – a stepping stone for cancer screening?

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Anithraj; Prasad, Kakarla; Trivedi, Dhiraj; Acharya, Swathi

    2015-01-01

    Background According to Warburg’s effect, the rate of glycolysis increases in cancerous cells. This will increase overall levels of pyruvic acid. The present on-going study was conducted to estimate the levels of pyruvic acid in saliva and serum in normal, oral PMD subjects. Material and Methods A total of 50 subjects in healthy, PMD of the oral cavity individuals were selected based on clinical and histological criteria. Collected saliva and serum samples were subjected to pyruvic acid level estimation using biochemical analysis. Results Of the 50 participants 25 (13: Males; 12: Females) & 25 (16: Males; 9: Females) were PMD group. Independent samples t test showed statistically significant difference in serum & salivary pyruvic acid level in between 2 groups (p < 0.001 respectively). Conclusions Estimation of pyruvic acid showed sequential increase in the level in PMD group compared to healthy. Hence the study results open new direction in cancer screening. Key words:Pyruvic acid, glycolysis, warburg’s effect. PMID:26535090

  20. Expression of p53 in leukoplakia and squamous cell carcinoma of the oral mucosa: correlation with expression of Ki67

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, S; Chandran, G Jagadeesh; Pillai, K Raveendran; Mathew, Babu; Sujathan, K; Nalinakumary, K R; Nair, M Krishnan

    1996-01-01

    Aim—To study p53 expression in relation to proliferative status in normal and nondysplastic, dysplastic and malignant lesions of the oral mucosa. Method—The standard avidin-biotin complex (ABC) immunohistochemical staining method was used to study the expression of p53 and Ki67 on frozen sections of oral leukoplakias and carcinomas. Results—Of the leukoplakia and carcinoma samples, 70% expressed p53 in over 5% of cells. In normal mucosa less than 5% of cells expressed p53. The proliferation index, as assessed by expression of Ki67, was highest in the malignant lesions (43%) and lowest in normal mucosa (11%). Statistical analysis revealed that expression of both p53 and Ki67 was correlated significantly with the histopathological stage of the tumour. However, expression of p53 was not correlated with that of Ki67. In leukoplakia lesions with proliferative features p53 immunostaining was less intense than in non-proliferative lesions; this difference was statistically significant. Conclusions—These results emphasise the potential of Ki67 and p53 as biomarkers of carcinogenesis in oral cancer and may also serve as intermediate points for cancer prevention programmes, such as the oral chemopreventive trials. Factors other than p53 may have a more important role in the deregulation of proliferation in pre-malignant oral lesions. Images PMID:16696067

  1. Molecular and behavioral pharmacology of two novel orally-active 5HT2 modulators: potential utility as antipsychotic medications

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Drake; Kondabolu, Krishnakanth; Kuipers, Allison; Sakhuja, Rajeev; Robertson, Kimberly L.; Rowland, Neil E.; Booth, Raymond G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Desired serotonin 5HT2 receptor pharmacology for treatment of psychoses is 5HT2A antagonism and/or 5HT2C agonism. No selective 5HT2A antagonist has been approved for psychosis and the only approved 5HT2C agonist (for obesity) also activates 5HT2A and 5HT2B receptors, which can lead to clinical complications. Studies herein tested the hypothesis that a dual-function 5HT2A antagonist/5HT2C agonist that does not activate 5HT2B receptors would be suitable for development as an antipsychotic drug, without liability for weight gain. Methods The novel compounds (+)- and (−)-trans-4-(4′-chlorophenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-2-aminotetralin (p-Cl-PAT) were synthesized, characterized in vitro for affinity and functional activity at human 5HT2 receptors, and administered by intraperitoneal (i.p.) and oral (gavage) routes to mice in behavioral paradigms that assessed antipsychotic efficacy and effects on feeding behavior. Results (+)- and (−)-p-Cl-PAT activated 5HT2C receptors, with (+)-p-Cl-PAT being 12-times more potent, consistent with its higher affinity across 5HT2 receptors. Neither p-Cl-PAT enantiomer activated 5HT2A or 5HT2B receptors at concentrations up to 300-times greater than their respective affinity (Ki), and (+)-p-Cl-PAT was shown to be a 5HT2A competitive antagonist. When administered i.p. or orally, (+)- and (−)-p-Cl-PAT attenuated the head-twitch response (HTR) in mice elicited by the 5HT2 agonist (−)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI) and reduced intake of a highly palatable food in non-food-deprived mice, with (+)-p-Cl-PAT being more potent across behavioral assays. Conclusions The novel in vitro pharmacology of (+)-p-Cl-PAT (5HT2A antagonism/5HT2C agonism without activation of 5HT2B) translated in vivo to an orally-active drug candidate with preclinical efficacy to treat psychoses without liability for weight gain. PMID:23665356

  2. Direct oral anticoagulant use and stent thrombosis following an acute coronary syndrome: A potential new pharmacological option?

    PubMed

    Welsh, Robert C; Zeymer, Uwe; Tarrantini, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    With the evolution of techniques and pharmacological strategies in percutaneous coronary intervention, significant advances have been made towards reducing the risk of in-stent restenosis and improving patient outcomes. However, in spite of these advances, stent thrombosis remains a deadly complication of stent implantation. The fundamental challenge in implementing a combined anticoagulant and antiplatelet strategy is balancing the risk of bleeding with the enhanced efficacy of therapy on both pathways. Results from the ATLAS ACS 2-TIMI 51 trial suggest that the addition of rivaroxaban 2.5mg twice daily to standard antiplatelet therapy may achieve this desired balance alongside careful patient selection. This review considers the clinical burden and pathology of stent thrombosis, oral antithrombotic strategies to reduce stent thrombosis, and what findings from recent trials could mean for the long-term management of patients with an acute coronary syndrome. PMID:27020515

  3. Oral lichen planus: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Krupaa, R. Jayasri; Sankari, S. Leena; Masthan, K. M. K.; Rajesh, E.

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is an immunologically mediated mucocutaneous disease that is triggered by varied etiological agents. The oral lichenoid reaction is considered a variant of the disease that needs to be clearly diagnosed as a separate entity from oral lichen planus and treated. They follow a strict cause-effector relationship, protocols that suggest the differentiation. Lichen planus has varied clinical forms in the oral mucosa and cutaneously that has different prognosis. This condition also arises in association with various other systemic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus. There have been cases reported in the esophagus, larynx, scalp, nail, cutaneous areas, especially arms and wrists, trunk. There is reported malignant transformation that essentiates careful examination, treatment protocol and regular follow-up sessions. This article throws light on the disease condition of oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid reaction that is essential for the differentiation and treatment. PMID:26015696

  4. Collecting and Storing Malignant, Borderline Malignant Neoplasms, and Related Samples From Young Patients With Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-13

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Hairy Cell Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Neoplasm of Uncertain Malignant Potential; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  5. Nutritional Aspects of Essential Trace Elements in Oral Health and Disease: An Extensive Review.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Preeti Tomar; Misra, Satya Ranjan; Hussain, Mohsina

    2016-01-01

    Human body requires certain essential elements in small quantities and their absence or excess may result in severe malfunctioning of the body and even death in extreme cases because these essential trace elements directly influence the metabolic and physiologic processes of the organism. Rapid urbanization and economic development have resulted in drastic changes in diets with developing preference towards refined diet and nutritionally deprived junk food. Poor nutrition can lead to reduced immunity, augmented vulnerability to various oral and systemic diseases, impaired physical and mental growth, and reduced efficiency. Diet and nutrition affect oral health in a variety of ways with influence on craniofacial development and growth and maintenance of dental and oral soft tissues. Oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) are treated with antioxidants containing essential trace elements like selenium but even increased dietary intake of trace elements like copper could lead to oral submucous fibrosis. The deficiency or excess of other trace elements like iodine, iron, zinc, and so forth has a profound effect on the body and such conditions are often diagnosed through their early oral manifestations. This review appraises the biological functions of significant trace elements and their role in preservation of oral health and progression of various oral diseases. PMID:27433374

  6. Nutritional Aspects of Essential Trace Elements in Oral Health and Disease: An Extensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mohsina

    2016-01-01

    Human body requires certain essential elements in small quantities and their absence or excess may result in severe malfunctioning of the body and even death in extreme cases because these essential trace elements directly influence the metabolic and physiologic processes of the organism. Rapid urbanization and economic development have resulted in drastic changes in diets with developing preference towards refined diet and nutritionally deprived junk food. Poor nutrition can lead to reduced immunity, augmented vulnerability to various oral and systemic diseases, impaired physical and mental growth, and reduced efficiency. Diet and nutrition affect oral health in a variety of ways with influence on craniofacial development and growth and maintenance of dental and oral soft tissues. Oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) are treated with antioxidants containing essential trace elements like selenium but even increased dietary intake of trace elements like copper could lead to oral submucous fibrosis. The deficiency or excess of other trace elements like iodine, iron, zinc, and so forth has a profound effect on the body and such conditions are often diagnosed through their early oral manifestations. This review appraises the biological functions of significant trace elements and their role in preservation of oral health and progression of various oral diseases. PMID:27433374

  7. The New Orality: Oral Characteristics of Computer-Mediated Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Sharmila Pixy; Montgomery, Maureen

    1996-01-01

    Considers the characteristics of orality and literacy developed in the work of scholars such as Walter Ong to consider computer-mediated communication (CMC) as the potential site of a "new orality" which is neither purely oral or literate. Notes that the medium of CMC is writing, which has traditionally represented the "literate," while the…

  8. Diagnostic potential of fluorescence of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded malignant melanoma and pigmented skin lesions: quantitative study of fluorescence intensity using fluorescence microscope and digital imaging.

    PubMed

    Chwirot, B W; Sypniewska, N; Swiatlak, J

    2001-12-01

    The background for this study was reports in the literature of stronger fluorescence observed visually for melanomas compared with benign naevi in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections. Our objective was to carry out a quantitative study of the phenomenon and to investigate if such an approach could be used in the detection of melanomas. Microscopic digital imaging was used to measure quantitatively the fluorescence intensity in specimens from 50 malignant melanomas, four basal cell carcinomas and 58 benign lesions. The mean fluorescence intensity of the melanomas was considerably higher than of the other lesions. For melanomas, the intensity depended both on the distance from the skin surface and the distance from the centre of the lesion. A simple algorithm based on the intensity threshold correctly classified the melanomas with a sensitivity of 74% and a specificity of 59%. Quantitative measurements of the fluorescence of the pigmented skin lesions fixed with formalin and embedded in paraffin can be a useful auxiliary tool for differentiating melanoma from other pigmented lesions histopathologically. PMID:11725203

  9. ASK1 (MAP3K5) as a potential therapeutic target in malignant fibrous histiocytomas with 12q14-q15 and 6q23 amplifications.

    PubMed

    Chibon, Frédéric; Mariani, Odette; Derré, Josette; Mairal, Aline; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Guillou, Louis; Sastre, Xavier; Pédeutour, Florence; Aurias, Alain

    2004-05-01

    Malignant fibrous histiocytomas (MFHs) are aggressive tumors without any definable line of differentiation. We recently demonstrated that about 20% of them are characterized by high-level amplifications of the 12q14-q15 chromosome region, associated with either 1p32 or 6q23 band amplification. This genetic finding, very similar to that in well-differentiated liposarcomas, strongly suggests that these tumors actually correspond to undifferentiated liposarcomas. It also suggests that the lack of differentiation could be the consequence of amplification of target genes localized in the 1p32 or 6q23 bands. We report here the characterization by array CGH of the 6q23 minimal region of amplification. Our findings demonstrate that amplification and overexpression of ASK1 (MAP3K5), a gene localized in the 6q23 band and encoding a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase of the JNK-MAPK signaling pathway, could inhibit the adipocytic differentiation process of the tumor cells. Treatment of a cell line with specific inhibitors of ASK1 protein resulted in the bypass of the differentiation block and induction of a strong adipocytic differentiation. These observations indicate that ASK1 is a target for new therapeutic management of these aggressive tumors. PMID:15034865

  10. Oral nicotinamide and actinic keratosis: a supplement success story.

    PubMed

    Kim, Burcu; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide has shown potential as a safe and effective intervention for the prevention of malignant and premalignant skin lesions. Recent studies have shown that nicotinamide, in both oral and topical forms, is able to prevent ultraviolet-induced immunosuppression in humans [1,2,3] and mice [4,5]. Immunosuppression is a known factor for the progression of premalignant lesions, such as actinic keratosis [6]. Murine studies have shown that nicotinamide is also able to protect against photocarcinogenesis [4,5]. Preliminary human studies suggest that nicotinamide may help prevent skin cancers and enhance the regression of actinic keratoses. PMID:25561219

  11. The root bark of Paeonia moutan is a potential anticancer agent in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunnan; Yazawa, Kazunaga; Kondo, Seiji; Mukudai, Yoshiki; Sato, Daisuke; Kurihara, Yuji; Kamatani, Takaaki; Shintani, Satoru

    2012-07-01

    Currently there is growing use of complementary and alternative anticancer medicines worldwide, and considerable interest in finding anticancer drugs among Chinese medicinal herbs. The aim of this study was to determine the antitumor activity of the root bark of Paeonia moutan (RBPM) in human squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. Cell lines derived from human oral squamous cell carcinoma (HSC2, 3, 4, SAS) were tested with different concentrations of RBPM (1-100 μg/ml) using a series of in vitro assay systems. RBPM at a concentration of 100 μg/ml inhibited monolayer and anchorage-independent growth, and interrupted coordinated migration. RBPM activated the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and serine/threonine kinase AKT in 30 min; then, at a later stage (after 6 hours) exhibited potent cytostatic, pro-apoptotic effects through the down-regulation of the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and its partner cyclin D1, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. We found direct evidence that RBPM induces apoptotic cell death via DNA fragmentation. Taken together, the antitumor activity of RBPM was demonstrated through antiproliferative and apoptotic effects. PMID:22753719

  12. Improved stability and antidiabetic potential of insulin containing folic acid functionalized polymer stabilized multilayered liposomes following oral administration.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ashish Kumar; Harde, Harshad; Thanki, Kaushik; Jain, Sanyog

    2014-01-13

    The present study reports the folic acid (FA) functionalized insulin loaded stable liposomes with improved bioavailability following oral administration. Liposomes were stabilized by alternating coating of negatively charged poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and positively charged poly(allyl amine) hydrochloride (PAH) over liposomes. Furthermore, folic acid was appended as targeting ligand by synthesizing folic acid-poly(allyl amine) hydrochloride conjugate. The insulin entrapped within the freeze-dried formulation was found stable both chemically as well as conformationally and developed formulation exhibited excellent stability in simulated biological fluids. Caco-2 cell and ex vivo intestinal uptake studies revealed higher uptake of folic acid functionalized layersomes in comparison with their plain counterparts. In vivo pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic studies further revealed almost double hypoglycemia and approximately 20% relative bioavailability in comparison with subcutaneously administered standard insulin solution. Overall the proposed strategy is expected to contribute significantly in the field of designing ligand-anchored, polyelectrolyte-based stable systems in drug delivery. PMID:24283460

  13. Swelling, mechanical strength, and release properties of probucol microcapsules with and without a bile acid, and their potential oral delivery in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Negrulj, Rebecca; Mooranian, Armin; Chen-Tan, Nigel; Al-Sallami, Hesham S; Mikov, Momir; Golocorbin-Kon, Svetlana; Fakhoury, Marc; Watts, Gerald F; Arfuso, Frank; Al-Salami, Hani

    2016-08-01

    We have demonstrated a permeation-enhancing effect of deoxycholic acid (DCA), the bile acid, in diabetic rats. In this study, we designed DCA-based microcapsules for the oral delivery of the antilipidemic drug probucol (PB), which has potential antidiabetic effects. We aimed to further characterize these microcapsules and examine their pH-dependent release properties, as well as the effects of DCA on their stability and mechanical strength at various pH and temperature values. Using the polymer sodium alginate (SA), we prepared PB-SA (control) and PB-DCA-SA (test) microcapsules. The microcapsules were examined for drug content, size, surface composition, release, Micro-CT cross-sectional imaging, stability, Zeta potential, mechanical strength, and swelling characteristics at different pH and temperature values. The microencapsulation efficiency and production yield were also examined. The addition of DCA resulted in microcapsules with a greater density and with reduced swelling at a pH of 7.8 and at temperatures of 25°C and 37°C (p < 0.01). The size, surface composition, production yield, and microencapsulation efficiency of the microcapsules remained similar after DCA addition. PB-SA microcapsules produced multiphasic PB release, while PB-DCA-SA microcapsules produced monophasic PB release, suggesting more controlled PB release in the presence of DCA. The PB-DCA-SA microcapsules showed good stability and a pH-sensitive uniphasic release pattern, which may suggest potential applications in the oral delivery of PB in diabetes. PMID:25811999

  14. In vitro metabolism, disposition, preclinical pharmacokinetics and prediction of human pharmacokinetics of DNDI-VL-2098, a potential oral treatment for Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Mukkavilli, Rao; Pinjari, Jakir; Patel, Bhavesh; Sengottuvelan, Shankar; Mondal, Subodh; Gadekar, Ajit; Verma, Manas; Patel, Jignesh; Pothuri, Lavanya; Chandrashekar, Gopu; Koiram, Prabhakar; Harisudhan, Tanukrishnan; Moinuddin, Ansari; Launay, Delphine; Vachharajani, Nimish; Ramanathan, Vikram; Martin, Denis

    2014-12-18

    The in vitro metabolism and in vivo pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of DNDI-VL-2098, a potential oral agent for Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) were studied and used to predict its human pharmacokinetics. DNDI-VL-2098 showed a low solubility (10μM) and was highly permeable (>200nm/s) in the Caco-2 model. It was stable in vitro in liver microsomes and hepatocytes and no metabolite was detectable in circulating plasma from dosed animals suggesting very slow, if any, metabolism of the compound. DNDI-VL-2098 was moderate to highly bound to plasma proteins across the species tested (94-98%). DNDI-VL-2098 showed satisfactory PK properties in mouse, hamster, rat and dog with a low blood clearance (<15% of hepatic blood flow except hamster), a volume of distribution of about 3 times total body water, acceptable half-life (1-6h across the species) and good oral bioavailability (37-100%). Allometric scaling of the preclinical PK data to human gave a blood half-life of approximately 20h suggesting that the compound could be a once-a-day drug. Based on the above assumptions, the minimum efficacious dose predicted for a 50kg human was 150mg and 300mg, using efficacy results in the mouse and hamster, respectively. PMID:25261338

  15. Oral supplementation of Ocimum basilicum has the potential to improves the locomotory, exploratory, anxiolytic behavior and learning in adult male albino mice.

    PubMed

    Zahra, K; Khan, M A; Iqbal, F

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this project was to determine the effect of 100 mg/ml solvent/kg body weight of Ocimum basilicum leaf extract on neuromuscular co-ordination, exploratory, locomotory and short-term memory formation in male albino mice. Five weeks old, male albino mice were used as the experimental animals in order to demonstrate the effect of O. basilicum's extract on learning and memory. Each male albino mouse was weighted and orally treated either with 100 mg/ml solvent/kg body weight of O. basilicum leaf extract or with commercially available saline solution (Otsuka, Pakistan) for 7 days. Behavioral observations were made by applying a series of neurological tests (Elevated plus maze, Light and dark box, Open field and Rota rod). Dose supplementation continued during neurological testing. It was observed that 100 mg/ml solvent/kg body weight of leaf extract improves neuromuscular co-ordination and male albino mouse performance in open field, light dark box and during novel object test when compared with control group. We concluded that 100 mg/ml solvent/kg body weight of leaf extract has the potential to improve neuromuscular co-ordination, exploratory behavior, object recognition ability and transfer latency in male albino mice and can be safely administrated orally. PMID:25082078

  16. Evaluation of pretreatment serum interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor alpha as a potential biomarker for recurrence in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Brailo, Vlaho; Vidovic-Juras, Danica; Vucicevic-Boras, Vanja; Milenovic, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) constitutes 3 percent of all cancers with predominant occurrence in middle aged and elderly males. Tumour recurrence worsens disease prognosis and decreases quality of life in patients with OSCC. Proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) have been suggested to play a certain role in variety of tumours. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of pretreatment serum IL-6 and TNF-α levels on tumour recurrence in patients with OSCC in order to identify potential biomarkers for the early detection of disease recurrence. Material and Methods The patients with newly diagnosed OSCC were treated and followed from the first visit from November 2006 until January 2008. Serum IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations were measured. The records of the patients were re-examined in July 2012 and data were recorded about cancer characteristics and tumour recurrence. Disease free survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier survival curves, log rank test and Cox proportional hazards regression. Results Serum IL-6 was shown as an independent risk factor for tumour recurrence. Conclusions Pretreatment serum IL-6 concentration may be a useful biomarker for identification of OSCC patients with increased risk of the disease recurrence. Key words: Serum IL-6, serum TNF-α, oral cancer, recurrence. PMID:25858079

  17. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology. PMID:16277953

  18. Cancer associated fibroblasts in hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Raffaghello, Lizzia; Vacca, Angelo; Pistoia, Vito; Ribatti, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment plays an important role in cancer initiation and progression. In hematological malignancies, the bone marrow represents the paradigmatic anatomical site in which tumor microenvironment expresses its morphofunctional features. Among the cells participating in the composition of this microenvironment, cancer associated fibrobasts (CAFs) have received less attention in hematopoietic tumors compared to solid cancers. In this review article, we discuss the involvement of CAFs in progression of hematological malignancies and the potential targeting of CAFs in a therapeutic perspective. PMID:25474039

  19. E1AF/PEA3 activates the Rho/Rho-associated kinase pathway to increase the malignancy potential of non-small-cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hakuma, Nobuyuki; Kinoshita, Ichiro; Shimizu, Yasushi; Yamazaki, Koichi; Yoshida, Koichi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi

    2005-12-01

    E1AF/PEA3, an Ets family transcription factor, is frequently overexpressed in non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). Overexpression of E1AF increases motility and invasion of VMRC-LCD and NCI-H226 NSCLC cells, which lack endogenous E1AF expression, and the effect is synergistically increased by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). The small GTPase Rho/Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) pathway is also involved in motility and invasion. To determine the role of the Rho/ROCK pathway in malignant phenotypes induced by E1AF, we analyzed VMRC-LCD cells transfected with an E1AF expression vector (LCD-E1AF cells) or with empty vector (LCD-vector cells). LCD-E1AF cells had more GTP-bound (active) Rho than LCD-vector cells and Rho activation was synergistically increased by HGF. The Rho activation by E1AF and HGF was also shown in NCI-H226 cells. Phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC), a downstream effector of ROCK signaling, was higher in LCD-E1AF cells than in LCD-vector cells, especially under HGF treatment. A specific ROCK inhibitor, Y27632, strongly suppressed MLC phosphorylation, cell motility, and invasion. In nude mice implanted s.c. and intrapulmonarily, LCD-E1AF cells made more local tumors than LCD-vector cells (six of six versus one of seven mice and four of seven versus one of seven mice, respectively). Three of the four mice with lung tumors from LCD-E1AF cells had lymph node metastases whereas the mouse with LCD-vector tumors did not. LCD-E1AF tumors showed higher MLC phosphorylation than LCD-vector tumors. These results suggest that E1AF activates the Rho/ROCK pathway in an HGF-enhanced manner and its activation is important in E1AF-induced motility and invasion as well as tumorigenesis and metastasis in NSCLC cells. PMID:16322223

  20. pH-Dependent biodegradable silica nanotubes derived from Gd(OH)3 nanorods and their potential for oral drug delivery and MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kuo-Wei; Hsu, Kang-Che; Yeh, Chen-Sheng

    2010-09-01

    We report a pH dependence of degradable silica nanotubes, which dissolved to the biodegradation product monosilicic acid, Si(OH)(4). The silica nanotubes, potentially acting as oral-based administration carriers, were resistant to dissolution in the extreme acidic condition of pH 1, but degraded quickly at pH 8, and the degradation rate can be tuned by tailoring the thickness of silica nanotubes with thicker nanotubes dissolving more slowly. Because Gd(OH)(3) nanorods were used as templates, the silica nanotubes could be further developed as MR imaging contrast agents as well as drugs carriers. The released Gd(3+) ions resulting from the etching of Gd(OH)(3) nanorods were chelated by the pre-modified DOTA, yielding Gd-DOTA complexes grafted onto silica nanotubes. The Gd-DOTA grafted silica nanotubes loaded with doxorubicin revealed enhanced T(1) imaging contrast and anticancer activity. PMID:20542331

  1. Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma This page lists cancer ... in malignant mesothelioma that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma Alimta (Pemetrexed Disodium) Pemetrexed ...

  2. Lethal effect of blue light-activated hydrogen peroxide, curcumin and erythrosine as potential oral photosensitizers on the viability of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum

    PubMed Central

    Habiboallh, Ghanbari; Mahbobeh, Naderi Nasab; Mina, Zareian Jahromi; Majid, Zakeri; Nooshin, Arjmand

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Recently, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been introduced as a new modality in oral bacterial decontamination. Current research aims to evaluate the effect of photodynamic killing of visible blue light in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, curcumin and erythrosine as potential oral photosensitizers on Porphyromonas gingivalis associated with periodontal bone loss and Fusobacterium nucleatum associated with soft tissue inflammation. Materials and methods: Standard suspension of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum were exposed to Light Emitting Diode (LED) (440–480 nm) in combination with erythrosine (22 µm), curcumin (60 µM) and hydrogen peroxide (0.3 mM) for 5 min. Bacterial samples from each treatment groups (radiation-only group, photosensitizer-only group and blue light-activated photosensitizer group) were subcultured onto the surface of agar plates. Survival of these bacteria was determined by counting the number of colony forming units (CFU) after incubation. Results: Results for antibacterial assays on P. gingivalis confirmed that curcumin, Hydrogen peroxide and erythrosine alone exerted a moderate bactericidal effect which enhanced noticeably in conjugation with visible light. The survival rate of P. gingivalis reached zero present when the suspension exposed to blue light-activated curcumin and hydrogen peroxide for 2 min. Besides, curcumin exerted a remarkable antibacterial activity against F. nucleatum in comparison with erythrosine and hydrogen peroxide (P=0.00). Furthermore, the bactericidal effect of visible light alone on P. gingivalis as black-pigmented bacteria was significant. Conclusion: Our result suggested that visible blue light in the presence of erythrosine, curcumin and hydrogen peroxide would be consider as a potential approach of PDT to kill the main gramnegative periodontal pathogens. From a clinical standpoint, this regimen could be established as an additional minimally invasive antibacterial treatment of plaque induced

  3. The in vivo fate of nanoparticles and nanoparticle-loaded microcapsules after oral administration in mice: Evaluation of their potential for colon-specific delivery.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yiming; Fuchs, Adrian V; Boase, Nathan R B; Rolfe, Barbara E; Coombes, Allan G A; Thurecht, Kristofer J

    2015-08-01

    Anti-cancer drug loaded-nanoparticles (NPs) or encapsulation of NPs in colon-targeted delivery systems shows potential for increasing the local drug concentration in the colon leading to improved treatment of colorectal cancer. To investigate the potential of the NP-based strategies for colon-specific delivery, two formulations, free Eudragit® NPs and enteric-coated NP-loaded chitosan-hypromellose microcapsules (MCs) were fluorescently-labelled and their tissue distribution in mice after oral administration was monitored by multispectral small animal imaging. The free NPs showed a shorter transit time throughout the mouse digestive tract than the MCs, with extensive excretion of NPs in faeces at 5h. Conversely, the MCs showed complete NP release in the lower region of the mouse small intestine at 8h post-administration. Overall, the encapsulation of NPs in MCs resulted in a higher colonic NP intensity from 8h to 24h post-administration compared to the free NPs, due to a NP 'guarding' effect of MCs during their transit along mouse gastrointestinal tract which decreased NP excretion in faeces. These imaging data revealed that this widely-utilised colon-targeting MC formulation lacked site-precision for releasing its NP load in the colon, but the increased residence time of the NPs in the lower gastrointestinal tract suggests that it is still useful for localised release of chemotherapeutics, compared to NP administration alone. In addition, both formulations resided in the stomach of mice at considerable concentrations over 24h. Thus, adhesion of NP- or MC-based oral delivery systems to gastric mucosa may be problematic for colon-specific delivery of the cargo to the colon and should be carefully investigated for a full evaluation of particulate delivery systems. PMID:26117186

  4. Management of Inoperable Malignant Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kiess, Ana P; Quon, Harry

    2016-01-01

    For patients with inoperable salivary gland malignancy, radiation therapy has significant limitations but has been the mainstay of treatment. With standard photon radiation (X-rays), the 10-year loco-regional control (LRC) and overall survival rates are only ∼25%. Neutron radiation has potential biological advantages over photon radiation because it causes increased DNA damage, and studies of patients with inoperable salivary gland malignancy have shown improved 6-year LRC and overall survival of ∼60%. However, neutron radiation may also increase the risk of late toxicities, especially central nervous system toxicities after treatment of tumors involving the base of the skull. Proton radiation has potential physical advantages due to minimal exit dose through normal tissues, and a recent study has demonstrated 90% 5-year LRC after combined proton/photon radiation for adenoid cystic carcinoma involving the base of the skull. Stereotactic radiosurgery has also been used in combination with neutrons or standard photons as a technique to boost the skull base. The use of concurrent chemotherapy as a radiosensitizer has been considered based on extrapolation of data on squamous cell carcinomas, but further data are needed on inoperable salivary gland malignancies. Newer targeted therapies are also under investigation, and clinical trial enrollment is encouraged. PMID:27093559

  5. Oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Huber, Michaell A; Tantiwongkosi, Bundhit

    2014-11-01

    Oral and oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is a complex and often relentless malignancy prone to local invasion and dissemination. Despite advances in understanding of the disease and improved therapeutic interventions, it continues to be diagnosed at an advanced stage and the survival rate remains poor. The financial cost of treating OPC may be the highest of all cancers in the United States and survivors often experience major detriments to quality of life. Major risk factors for OPC are tobacco, alcohol, areca nut, and human papillomavirus infection. This article updates medical practitioners on the causes, presentation, diagnosis, and management of OPC. PMID:25443678

  6. In vivo imaging polarimeter for oral precancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jungrae; Jung, Woonggyu; Wilder-Smith, Petra; Chen, Zhongping

    2005-04-01

    The Mueller matrix describes all the polarizing properties of a sample, and therefore the optical differences between non-cancerous and pre-cancerous tissue should be present within the matrix elements. We present in this paper that a high speedpolarimetry system generates 16 full Mueller matrices to characterize tissues. Feature extraction is done on the Mueller matrix elements resulting in the depolarizance and retardance images by polar decomposition to detect and classify of early oral cancers and pre-cancerous changes in epithelium, such as dysplasia. These images are compared with orthogonal polarization image and analyzed in an attempt to determine the important factors for the identification of cancerous lesions from their benign counterparts. Our results indicate that polarimetry has potential as a method for the in vivo early detection and diagnosis of oral premalignancy and malignancy.

  7. Attitudes and Acceptance of Oral and Parenteral HIV Preexposure Prophylaxis among Potential User Groups: A Multinational Study

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Gabriela B.; Garnett, Geoffrey P.; Dybul, Mark R.; Piot, Peter K.

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of antiviral medications by HIV negative people to prevent acquisition of HIV or pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has shown promising results in recent trials. To understand the potential impact of PrEP for HIV prevention, in addition to efficacy data, we need to understand both the acceptability of PrEP among members of potential user groups and the factors likely to determine uptake. Methods and findings Surveys of willingness to use PrEP products were conducted with 1,790 members of potential user groups (FSWs, MSM, IDUs, SDCs and young women) in seven countries: Peru, Ukraine, India, Kenya, Botswana, Uganda and South Africa. Analyses of variance were used to assess levels of acceptance across different user groups and countries. Conjoint analysis was used to examine the attitudes and preferences towards hypothetical and known attributes of PrEP programs and medications. Overall, members of potential user groups were willing to consider taking PrEP (61% reported that they would definitely use PrEP). Current results demonstrate that key user groups in different countries perceived PrEP as giving them new possibilities in their lives and would consider using it as soon as it becomes available. These results were maintained when subjects were reminded of potential side effects, the need to combine condom use with PrEP, and for regular HIV testing. Across populations, route of administration was considered the most important attribute of the presented alternatives. Conclusions Despite multiple conceivable barriers, there was a general willingness to adopt PrEP in key populations, which suggests that if efficacious and affordable, it could be a useful tool in HIV prevention. There would be a willingness to experience inconvenience and expense at the levels included in the survey. The results suggest that delivery in a long lasting injection would be a good target in drug development. PMID:22247757

  8. Oral Insulin

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Oral insulin is an exciting area of research and development in the field of diabetology. This brief review covers the various approaches used in the development of oral insulin, and highlights some of the recent data related to novel oral insulin preparation. PMID:21059246

  9. A Rare Case of Tamarind Seed Induced Oral Submucous Fibrosis in a 12-Year-Old Indian Boy.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Mamata Sharad; Puranik, Rudrayya Shivanand; Hallur, Neelkamal Halappa; Kumar, Varsha Vimal; Kamat, Sharad Basavaraj

    2016-06-01

    Oral Submucous Fibrosis (OSMF) is a chronic debilitating, potentially malignant disorder of the oral cavity. It is characterized by restricted mouth opening which results due to abnormal accumulation of collagen in the sub-epithelial layers leading to dense fibrous bands in the mouth. The pathogenesis of the disease is believed to be multifactorial. However, literature reports suggest a strong association of OSMF and arecanut chewing habit. The present paper presents a case of OSMF in a 12-year-old boy without arecanut chewing habit, but with a heavy practice of chewing tamarind seeds. PMID:27504424

  10. A Rare Case of Tamarind Seed Induced Oral Submucous Fibrosis in a 12-Year-Old Indian Boy

    PubMed Central

    Puranik, Rudrayya Shivanand; Hallur, Neelkamal Halappa; Kumar, Varsha Vimal; Kamat, Sharad Basavaraj

    2016-01-01

    Oral Submucous Fibrosis (OSMF) is a chronic debilitating, potentially malignant disorder of the oral cavity. It is characterized by restricted mouth opening which results due to abnormal accumulation of collagen in the sub-epithelial layers leading to dense fibrous bands in the mouth. The pathogenesis of the disease is believed to be multifactorial. However, literature reports suggest a strong association of OSMF and arecanut chewing habit. The present paper presents a case of OSMF in a 12-year-old boy without arecanut chewing habit, but with a heavy practice of chewing tamarind seeds. PMID:27504424

  11. Childhood ovarian malignancy.

    PubMed

    Mahadik, Kalpana; Ghorpade, Kanchanmala

    2014-04-01

    Objective of this article is to appraise diagnostic aspects and treatment modalities in childhood ovarian tumor in background of available evidence. Literature search on Pubmed revealed various aspects of epidemiology, histopathological diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric ovarian tumor. 85 % of childhood tumors are germ cell tumors. The varied histopathological picture in germ cell tumors poses a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Immunohistochemistry and newer genetic markers like SALL4 and karyopherin-2 (KPNA2) have been helpful in differentiating ovarian yolk sac tumor from dysgerminoma, teratomas, and other pictures of hepatoid, endometrioid, clear cell carcinomatous, and adenocarcinomatous tissues with varied malignant potential. Before platinum therapy, these tumors were almost fatal in children. Fertility-conserving surgery with bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin has dramatically changed the survival rates in these patients. This modality gives cancer cure with healthy offspring to female patients with childhood ovarian tumor. Evidence also supports this protocol resulting in successful pregnancy rates and safety of cytotoxic drugs in children born to these patients. PMID:24757335

  12. Malignant melanoma maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Seema; Sinha, Richi; Singh, Rakesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A malignant melanoma is a highly lethal melanocytic neoplasm. A neoplasm usually affects the skin. Malignant melanomas in the head and neck region are rare, accounting for less than 1% of all melanomas. Malignant melanoma of the nose and paranasal sinuses is an aggressive disease typically presenting at an advanced stage, with a 5-year survival rate ranging 20-30%. Melanomas are tumors arising from melanocytes, which are neuroectodermally derived cells located in the basal layers of the skin. This is a case report of a 35-year-old male, who presented with very aggressive disease and developed liver metastasis. PMID:26668467

  13. Malignant eroticized countertransference.

    PubMed

    Chessick, R D

    1997-01-01

    . Countertransference enactments are a creation between the patient and the therapist on