Science.gov

Sample records for orb web sticky

  1. Optics of spider "sticky" orb webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Deb M.; Staib, Gregory R.; Naidoo, Nishen; Little, Douglas J.; Herberstein, Marie E.

    2011-04-01

    Spider orb webs are known to produce colour displays in nature, both in reflection and transmission of sunlight, under certain illumination conditions. The cause of these colours has been the subject of speculation since the time of Newton. It has also been the topic of observational interpretation and some experiment which has proposed diffraction by the fine silks, scattering from rough/structured surfaces and thin film effects as the primary causes. We report systematic studies carried out using the silks of Australian orb web weaving spiders. Studies of both white light and laser light scattering/propagation by natural spider silks have definitively determined the primary cause of the colour displays is rainbows that can be understood by the application of geometric optics combined with new knowledge of the optical properties of the spider web strands, silks, and proteins as optical materials. Additionally, a range of microscopies (optical, AFM, optical surface profiling) show the silks to be optically flat. Overall, spider silks emerge as fascinating optical materials with high dispersion, high birefringence and the potential for future research to show they have high nonlinear optical coefficients. Their importance as a bioinspiration in optics is only just beginning to be realised. Their special optical properties have been achieved by ~136 million years of evolution driven by the need for the web to evade detection by insect prey.

  2. Changes in composition of spider orb web sticky droplets with starvation and web removal, and synthesis of sticky droplet compounds

    PubMed Central

    Townley, Mark A.; Tillinghast, Edward K.; Neefus, Christopher D.

    2006-01-01

    Summary The sticky spiral of araneoid spider orb webs consists of silk fibers coated with adhesive droplets. The droplets contain a variety of low-molecular-mass compounds (LMM). Within a species, a fairly consistent ratio of LMM is often observed, but substantial variability can exist. To gain insight into factors influencing LMM composition, spiders of three araneid species were starved and LMM from their webs were analyzed for changes in composition. To determine if these changes were consistent with the spider’s ability to synthesize the different organic LMM, synthetic capacities were estimated following the feeding of radiolabeled metabolites. Some changes in droplet composition were broadly consistent with differing synthetic capacities: molar percentages of less readily synthesized compounds (e.g., choline, isethionate, n-acetyltaurine) typically declined with starvation, at least during a portion of the imposed fast, while more readily synthesized compounds (e.g., GABamide, glycine) tended to increase. Most striking was the apparent partial substitution of n-acetylputrescine by the more readily synthesized GABamide in fasting Argiope trifasciata. However, departures from expected compositional shifts demonstrated that synthetic capacity alone does not adequately predict sticky droplet compositional shifts with starvation. Moreover, feeding controls exhibited some changes in composition similar to starving spiders. As the webs of both feeding and starving spiders were removed for chemical analysis and could not be recycled, the loss of LMM contained in these webs likely contributed to similarities between treatments. In addition, feeding spiders molted, oviposited, and/or built heavier webs. The added metabolic demands of these activities may have contributed to changes in composition similar to those resulting from starvation. PMID:16574806

  3. Small organic solutes in sticky droplets from orb webs of the spider Zygiella atrica (Araneae; Araneidae): β-alaninamide is a novel and abundant component.

    PubMed

    Townley, Mark A; Pu, Qinglin; Zercher, Charles K; Neefus, Christopher D; Tillinghast, Edward K

    2012-10-01

    In northeastern North America, Zygiella atrica often build their orb webs near the ocean. We analyzed individual field-built Z. atrica webs to determine if organic low-molecular-mass solutes (LMM) in their sticky droplets showed any unusual features not previously seen in orb webs of other species living in less salty environments. While two of the three most abundant organic LMM (putrescine (butane-1,4-diamine) and GABamide (4-aminobutanamide)) are already well-known from webs of inland spiders, the third major LMM, β-alaninamide (3-aminopropanamide), a homolog of GABamide, has not been detected in sticky droplets from any other araneoid spiders (27 species). It remains to be established, however, whether or not use of β-alaninamide is related to proximity to saltwater. We observed variability in organic LMM composition in Z. atrica webs that appeared to be influenced more by an undetermined factor associated with different collecting locations and/or collection dates than by different genders or instars. Shifts in composition when adult females were transferred from the field to the laboratory were also observed. Structural similarities and inverse correlations among β-alaninamide, GABamide, and N-acetylputrescine suggest that they may form a series of LMM fulfilling essentially the same, as yet unknown, role in the webs of those species in which they occur. PMID:23081916

  4. On the Colours of Spider Orb-Webs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suhr, Wilfried; Schlichting, H. Joachim

    2011-01-01

    A sticky capture thread from the spiral element of spider orb-webs is formed of almost regularly spaced droplets that surround a supporting axial fibre. From the perspective of physical optics it represents a periodic linear array of scattering elements that acts as a diffraction grating. This is a novel aspect, which is of vital importance for…

  5. Wind induces variations in spider web geometry and sticky spiral droplet volume.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao-Chia; Blamires, Sean J; Wu, Chung-Lin; Tso, I-Min

    2013-09-01

    Trap building by animals is rare because it comes at a substantial cost. Using materials with properties that vary across environments maintains trap functionality. The sticky spiral silks of spider orb webs are used to catch flying prey. Web geometry, accompanied by compensatory changes in silk properties, may change across environments to sustain web functionality. We exposed the spider Cyclosa mulmeinensis to wind to test whether wind-induced changes in web geometry are accompanied by changes in aggregate silk droplet morphology, axial thread width or spiral stickiness. We compared: (i) web catching area, (ii) length of total silks, (iii) mesh height, (iv) number of radii, (v) aggregate droplet morphology and (vi) spiral thread stickiness, between webs made by spiders exposed to wind and those made by spiders not exposed to wind. We interpreted co-variation in droplet morphology or spiral stickiness with web capture area, mesh height or spiral length as the silk properties functionally compensating for changes in web geometry to reduce wind drag. Wind-exposed C. mulmeinensis built webs with smaller capture areas, shorter capture spiral lengths and more widely spaced capture spirals, resulting in the expenditure of less silk. Individuals that were exposed to wind also deposited larger droplets of sticky silk but the stickiness of the spiral threads remained unchanged. The larger droplets may be a product of a greater investment in water, or low molecular weight compounds facilitating atmospheric water uptake. Either way, droplet dehydration in wind is likely to be minimized. PMID:23737558

  6. Radius construction and structure in the orb-web of Zilla diodia (Araneidae).

    PubMed

    Zschokke, S

    2000-10-01

    In orb-webs, the tension of the sticky spiral produces a centripetal force on the radii, resulting in an increase in tension along each radius from the centre of the web to the periphery. Zilla diodia (Walckenaer, 1802) atypical of araneids, was found to adapt the structure of its radii to this tension gradient by building radii that are double stranded at the periphery of the web and single stranded near the centre. Furthermore, the proportion of each radius that is doubled was found to be larger in the upper part of the web - where the overall tensions in the radii are known to be higher than in the lower part of the web. suggesting that the spider adjusts the proportion of each radius that is doubled to the overall tension in the radius. PMID:11138801

  7. Does ontogenetic change in orb web asymmetry reflect biogenetic law?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Kensuke

    2010-11-01

    Most orb web spiders face downward on the web hub, and their webs are vertically asymmetrical, that is, the lower part of the web is larger than the upper part and the ratio of the lower part to the whole web area increases as the spider grows. This phenomenon may reflect biogenetic law such that young animals exhibit a general ancestral trait whereas adults exhibit specific and derived traits. An alternative explanation is that vertical asymmetry may arise from the difference in time required by spiders to move up or down the web to capture prey. The present study tested these two hypotheses for Eriophora sagana. Subadults of this species build their webs with reverse asymmetry in that the upper part of the web area is larger than the lower part. In both subadults and adults, the upper proportion decreased with spider weight, and adult spiders built more symmetric webs. These results support the capture time difference hypothesis.

  8. Food caching in orb-web spiders (Araneae: Araneoidea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion de Crespigny, Fleur E.; Herberstein, Marie E.; Elgar, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    Caching or storing surplus prey may reduce the risk of starvation during periods of food deprivation. While this behaviour occurs in a variety of birds and mammals, it is infrequent among invertebrates. However, golden orb-web spiders, Nephila edulis, incorporate a prey cache in their relatively permanent web, which they feed on during periods of food shortage. Heavier spiders significantly reduced weight loss if they were able to access a cache, but lost weight if the cache was removed. The presence or absence of stored prey had no effect on the weight loss of lighter spiders. Furthermore, N. edulis always attacked new prey, irrespective of the number of unprocessed prey in the web. In contrast, females of Argiope keyserlingi, who build a new web every day and do not cache prey, attacked fewer new prey items if some had already been caught. Thus, a necessary pre-adaptation to the evolution of prey caching in orb-web spiders may be a durable or permanent web, such as that constructed by Nephila.

  9. Adjustment of web-building initiation to high humidity: a constraint by humidity-dependent thread stickiness in the spider Cyrtarachne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Yuki G.; Kusahara, Miki; Maezono, Yasunori; Miyashita, Tadashi

    2014-07-01

    Cyrtarachne is an orb-weaving spider belonging to the subfamily Cyrtarachninae (Araneidae) which includes triangular-web-building Pasilobus and bolas spiders. The Cyrtarachninae is a group of spiders specialized in catching moths, which is thought to have evolved from ordinary orb-weaving araneids. Although the web-building time of nocturnal spiders is in general related to the time of sunset, anecdotal evidence has suggested variability of web-building time in Cyrtarachne and its closely related genera. This study has examined the effects of temperature, humidity, moonlight intensity, and prey (moths) availability on web-building time of Cyrtarachne bufo, Cyrtarachne akirai, and Cyrtarachne nagasakiensis. Generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) have revealed that humidity, and not prey availability, was the essential variable that explained the daily variability of web-building time. Experiments measuring thread stickiness under different humidities showed that, although the thread of Cyrtarachne was found to have strong stickiness under high humidity, low humidity caused a marked decrease of thread stickiness. By contrast, no obvious change in stickiness was seen in an ordinary orb-weaving spider, Larinia argiopiformis. These findings suggest that Cyrtarachne adjusts its web-building time to favorable conditions of high humidity maintaining strong stickiness, which enables the threads to work efficiently for capturing prey.

  10. Biomaterial evolution parallels behavioral innovation in the origin of orb-like spider webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackledge, Todd A.; Kuntner, Matjaž; Marhabaie, Mohammad; Leeper, Thomas C.; Agnarsson, Ingi

    2012-11-01

    Correlated evolution of traits can act synergistically to facilitate organism function. But, what happens when constraints exist on the evolvability of some traits, but not others? The orb web was a key innovation in the origin of >12,000 species of spiders. Orb evolution hinged upon the origin of novel spinning behaviors and innovations in silk material properties. In particular, a new major ampullate spidroin protein (MaSp2) increased silk extensibility and toughness, playing a critical role in how orb webs stop flying insects. Here, we show convergence between pseudo-orb-weaving Fecenia and true orb spiders. As in the origin of true orbs, Fecenia dragline silk improved significantly compared to relatives. But, Fecenia silk lacks the high compliance and extensibility found in true orb spiders, likely due in part to the absence of MaSp2. Our results suggest how constraints limit convergent evolution and provide insight into the evolution of nature's toughest fibers.

  11. Biomaterial evolution parallels behavioral innovation in the origin of orb-like spider webs

    PubMed Central

    Blackledge, Todd A.; Kuntner, Matjaž; Marhabaie, Mohammad; Leeper, Thomas C.; Agnarsson, Ingi

    2012-01-01

    Correlated evolution of traits can act synergistically to facilitate organism function. But, what happens when constraints exist on the evolvability of some traits, but not others? The orb web was a key innovation in the origin of >12,000 species of spiders. Orb evolution hinged upon the origin of novel spinning behaviors and innovations in silk material properties. In particular, a new major ampullate spidroin protein (MaSp2) increased silk extensibility and toughness, playing a critical role in how orb webs stop flying insects. Here, we show convergence between pseudo-orb-weaving Fecenia and true orb spiders. As in the origin of true orbs, Fecenia dragline silk improved significantly compared to relatives. But, Fecenia silk lacks the high compliance and extensibility found in true orb spiders, likely due in part to the absence of MaSp2. Our results suggest how constraints limit convergent evolution and provide insight into the evolution of nature's toughest fibers. PMID:23150784

  12. Consequences of electrical conductivity in an orb spider's capture web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollrath, Fritz; Edmonds, Donald

    2013-12-01

    The glue-coated and wet capture spiral of the orb web of the garden cross spider Araneus diadematus is suspended between the dry silk radial and web frame threads. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that the capture spiral is electrically conductive because of necks of liquid connecting the droplets even if the thread is stretched. We examine how this conductivity of the capture spiral may lead to entrapment of charged airborne particles such as pollen, spray droplets and even insects. We further describe and model how the conducting spiral will also locally distort the Earth's ambient electric field. Finally, we examine the hypothesis that such distortion could be used by potential prey to detect the presence of a web but conclude that any effect would probably be too small to allow an insect to take evasive action.

  13. Sexual behavior, cannibalism, and mating plugs as sticky traps in the orb weaver spider Leucauge argyra (Tetragnathidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisenberg, Anita; Barrantes, Gilbert

    2011-07-01

    Unpublished field observations in Leucauge argyra, a tropical orb weaver spider, suggest the occurrence of conspicuous mating plugs that could reduce or prevent remating attempts. Otherwise, the sexual behavior of this species remains unknown. The aims of this study were to describe the courtship behavior and copulation in L. argyra and investigate mating plug formation in this species. Fourteen virgin females and 12 plugged females were exposed to up to three males and checked for mating plug formation. Of the 12 virgins that copulated, nine produced plugs (five immediately after copulation), and the five plugged females that copulated produced another mating plug immediately after copulation. We did not detect the transfer of any male substance during copulation but observed a whitish liquid emerging from female genital ducts. Plug formation was positively associated with male twanging during courtship. One virgin and four plugged females cannibalized males. In seven trials with virgins and in three trials with plugged females, the male's palp adhered to a substance that emerged from female genital ducts and spread on her genital plate. The male had to struggle energetically to free his glued palp; two of these males were cannibalized while trying to release their palps. Females seem to determine copulation duration by altering the timing of mating plug formation and through sexual cannibalism. This is the first case reported of a mating plug as a sticky trap for males.

  14. Mechanical performance of spider orb webs is tuned for high-speed prey.

    PubMed

    Sensenig, Andrew T; Kelly, Sean P; Lorentz, Kimberly A; Lesher, Brittany; Blackledge, Todd A

    2013-09-15

    Spiders in the Orbiculariae spin orb webs that dissipate the mechanical energy of their flying prey, bringing the insects to rest and retaining them long enough for the spider to attack and subdue their meals. Small prey are easily stopped by webs but provide little energetic gain. While larger prey offer substantial nourishment, they are also challenging to capture and can damage the web if they escape. We therefore hypothesized that spider orb webs exhibit properties that improve their probability of stopping larger insects while minimizing damage when the mechanical energy of those prey exceeds the web's capacity. Large insects are typically both heavier and faster flying than smaller prey, but speed plays a disproportionate role in determining total kinetic energy, so we predicted that orb webs may dissipate energy more effectively under faster impacts, independent of kinetic energy per se. We used high-speed video to visualize the impact of wooden pellets fired into orb webs to simulate prey strikes and tested how capture probability varied as a function of pellet size and speed. Capture probability was virtually nil above speeds of ~3 m s(-1). However, successful captures do not directly measure the maximum possible energy dissipation by orb webs because these events include lower-energy impacts that may not significantly challenge orb web performance. Therefore, we also compared the total kinetic energy removed from projectiles that escaped orb webs by breaking through the silk, asking whether more energy was removed at faster speeds. Over a range of speeds relevant to insect flight, the amount of energy absorbed by orb webs increases with the speed of prey (i.e. the rates at which webs are stretched). Orb webs therefore respond to faster - and hence higher kinetic energy - prey with better performance, suggesting adaptation to capture larger and faster flying insect prey. This speed-dependent toughness of a complex structure suggests the utility of the

  15. Prey interception drives web invasion and spider size determines successful web takeover in nocturnal orb-web spiders.

    PubMed

    Gan, Wenjin; Liu, Shengjie; Yang, Xiaodong; Li, Daiqin; Lei, Chaoliang

    2015-01-01

    A striking feature of web-building spiders is the use of silk to make webs, mainly for prey capture. However, building a web is energetically expensive and increases the risk of predation. To reduce such costs and still have access to abundant prey, some web-building spiders have evolved web invasion behaviour. In general, no consistent patterns of web invasion have emerged and the factors determining web invasion remain largely unexplored. Here we report web invasion among conspecifics in seven nocturnal species of orb-web spiders, and examined the factors determining the probability of webs that could be invaded and taken over by conspecifics. About 36% of webs were invaded by conspecifics, and 25% of invaded webs were taken over by the invaders. A web that was built higher and intercepted more prey was more likely to be invaded. Once a web was invaded, the smaller the size of the resident spider, the more likely its web would be taken over by the invader. This study suggests that web invasion, as a possible way of reducing costs, may be widespread in nocturnal orb-web spiders. PMID:26405048

  16. Prey interception drives web invasion and spider size determines successful web takeover in nocturnal orb-web spiders

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Wenjin; Liu, Shengjie; Yang, Xiaodong; Li, Daiqin; Lei, Chaoliang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A striking feature of web-building spiders is the use of silk to make webs, mainly for prey capture. However, building a web is energetically expensive and increases the risk of predation. To reduce such costs and still have access to abundant prey, some web-building spiders have evolved web invasion behaviour. In general, no consistent patterns of web invasion have emerged and the factors determining web invasion remain largely unexplored. Here we report web invasion among conspecifics in seven nocturnal species of orb-web spiders, and examined the factors determining the probability of webs that could be invaded and taken over by conspecifics. About 36% of webs were invaded by conspecifics, and 25% of invaded webs were taken over by the invaders. A web that was built higher and intercepted more prey was more likely to be invaded. Once a web was invaded, the smaller the size of the resident spider, the more likely its web would be taken over by the invader. This study suggests that web invasion, as a possible way of reducing costs, may be widespread in nocturnal orb-web spiders. PMID:26405048

  17. Spider orb webs rely on radial threads to absorb prey kinetic energy.

    PubMed

    Sensenig, Andrew T; Lorentz, Kimberly A; Kelly, Sean P; Blackledge, Todd A

    2012-08-01

    The kinetic energy of flying insect prey is a formidable challenge for orb-weaving spiders. These spiders construct two-dimensional, round webs from a combination of stiff, strong radial silk and highly elastic, glue-coated capture spirals. Orb webs must first stop the flight of insect prey and then retain those insects long enough to be subdued by the spiders. Consequently, spider silks rank among the toughest known biomaterials. The large number of silk threads composing a web suggests that aerodynamic dissipation may also play an important role in stopping prey. Here, we quantify energy dissipation in orb webs spun by diverse species of spiders using data derived from high-speed videos of web deformation under prey impact. By integrating video data with material testing of silks, we compare the relative contributions of radial silk, the capture spiral and aerodynamic dissipation. Radial silk dominated energy absorption in all webs, with the potential to account for approximately 100 per cent of the work of stopping prey in larger webs. The most generous estimates for the roles of capture spirals and aerodynamic dissipation show that they rarely contribute more than 30 per cent and 10 per cent of the total work of stopping prey, respectively, and then only for smaller orb webs. The reliance of spider orb webs upon internal energy absorption by radial threads for prey capture suggests that the material properties of the capture spirals are largely unconstrained by the selective pressures of stopping prey and can instead evolve freely in response to alternative functional constraints such as adhering to prey. PMID:22431738

  18. Uncovering changes in spider orb-web topology owing to aerodynamic effects

    PubMed Central

    Zaera, Ramón; Soler, Alejandro; Teus, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    An orb-weaving spider's likelihood of survival is influenced by its ability to retain prey with minimum damage to its web and at the lowest manufacturing cost. This set of requirements has forced the spider silk to evolve towards extreme strength and ductility to a degree that is rare among materials. Previous studies reveal that the performance of the web upon impact may not be based on the mechanical properties of silk alone, aerodynamic drag could play a role in the dissipation of the prey's energy. Here, we present a thorough analysis of the effect of the aerodynamic drag on wind load and prey impact. The hypothesis considered by previous authors for the evaluation of the drag force per unit length of thread has been revisited according to well-established principles of fluid mechanics, highlighting the functional dependence on thread diameter that was formerly ignored. Theoretical analysis and finite-element simulations permitted us to identify air drag as a relevant factor in reducing deterioration of the orb web, and to reveal how the spider can take greater—and not negligible—advantage of drag dissipation. The study shows the beneficial air drag effects of building smaller and less dense webs under wind load, and larger and denser webs under prey impact loads. In essence, it points out why the aerodynamics need to be considered as an additional driving force in the evolution of silk threads and orb webs. PMID:24966235

  19. Phylogenomics resolves a spider backbone phylogeny and rejects a prevailing paradigm for orb web evolution.

    PubMed

    Bond, Jason E; Garrison, Nicole L; Hamilton, Chris A; Godwin, Rebecca L; Hedin, Marshal; Agnarsson, Ingi

    2014-08-01

    Spiders represent an ancient predatory lineage known for their extraordinary biomaterials, including venoms and silks. These adaptations make spiders key arthropod predators in most terrestrial ecosystems. Despite ecological, biomedical, and biomaterial importance, relationships among major spider lineages remain unresolved or poorly supported. Current working hypotheses for a spider "backbone" phylogeny are largely based on morphological evidence, as most molecular markers currently employed are generally inadequate for resolving deeper-level relationships. We present here a phylogenomic analysis of spiders including taxa representing all major spider lineages. Our robust phylogenetic hypothesis recovers some fundamental and uncontroversial spider clades, but rejects the prevailing paradigm of a monophyletic Orbiculariae, the most diverse lineage, containing orb-weaving spiders. Based on our results, the orb web either evolved much earlier than previously hypothesized and is ancestral for a majority of spiders or else it has multiple independent origins, as hypothesized by precladistic authors. Cribellate deinopoid orb weavers that use mechanically adhesive silk are more closely related to a diverse clade of mostly webless spiders than to the araneoid orb-weaving spiders that use adhesive droplet silks. The fundamental shift in our understanding of spider phylogeny proposed here has broad implications for interpreting the evolution of spiders, their remarkable biomaterials, and a key extended phenotype--the spider web. PMID:25042592

  20. Large orb-webs adapted to maximise total biomass not rare, large prey

    PubMed Central

    Harmer, Aaron M. T.; Clausen, Philip D.; Wroe, Stephen; Madin, Joshua S.

    2015-01-01

    Spider orb-webs are the ultimate anti-ballistic devices, capable of dissipating the relatively massive kinetic energy of flying prey. Increased web size and prey stopping capacity have co-evolved in a number orb-web taxa, but the selective forces driving web size and performance increases are under debate. The rare, large prey hypothesis maintains that the energetic benefits of rare, very large prey are so much greater than the gains from smaller, more common prey that smaller prey are irrelevant for reproduction. Here, we integrate biophysical and ecological data and models to test a major prediction of the rare, large prey hypothesis, that selection should favour webs with increased stopping capacity and that large prey should comprise a significant proportion of prey stopped by a web. We find that larger webs indeed have a greater capacity to stop large prey. However, based on prey ecology, we also find that these large prey make up a tiny fraction of the total biomass (=energy) potentially captured. We conclude that large webs are adapted to stop more total biomass, and that the capacity to stop rare, but very large, prey is an incidental consequence of the longer radial silks that scale with web size. PMID:26374379

  1. Wind speed affects prey-catching behaviour in an orb web spider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Joe; Vollrath, Fritz; Hesselberg, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    Wind has previously been shown to influence the location and orientation of spider web sites and also the geometry and material composition of constructed orb webs. We now show that wind also influences components of prey-catching behaviour within the web. A small wind tunnel was used to generate different wind speeds. Araneus diadematus ran more slowly towards entangled Drosophila melanogaster in windy conditions, which took less time to escape the web. This indicates a lower capture probability and a diminished overall predation efficiency for spiders at higher wind speeds. We conclude that spiders' behaviour of taking down their webs as wind speed increases may therefore not be a response only to possible web damage.

  2. Males of the orb-web spider Argiope bruennichi sacrifice themselves to unrelated females.

    PubMed

    Welke, Klaas W; Schneider, Jutta M

    2010-10-23

    Costs of inbreeding can lead to total reproductive failure and inbreeding avoidance is, therefore, common. In classical sex roles with no paternal care, the selective pressure to avoid inbreeding is mostly on the female, which carries the higher costs. In some orb-web spiders, this situation is very different because females are polyandrous and males are monogynous or at most bigynous. Additionally, females of many entelegyne orb weavers are thought to bias paternity post-copulatorily towards a desired mate. This increases the selective pressure on males to adjust their investment in a mating with regard to the compatibility to a female. Here, we examine whether genetic relatedness influences mating behaviour in the orb-web spider Argiope bruennichi. We mated either a sibling or a non-sibling male to a female in single copulation trials and compared copulation duration, cannibalism rate and female fecundity. Our experiment revealed that males prolonged their copulation duration and were cannibalized more frequently when mating with a non-sibling female. Males mating with a sibling female were more likely to escape cannibalism by copulating briefly, thus presumably increasing their chances of re-mating with a more compatible female. This suggests that males can adaptively adjust their investment relating to the compatibility of a female. PMID:20410027

  3. Males of the orb-web spider Argiope bruennichi sacrifice themselves to unrelated females

    PubMed Central

    Welke, Klaas W.; Schneider, Jutta M.

    2010-01-01

    Costs of inbreeding can lead to total reproductive failure and inbreeding avoidance is, therefore, common. In classical sex roles with no paternal care, the selective pressure to avoid inbreeding is mostly on the female, which carries the higher costs. In some orb-web spiders, this situation is very different because females are polyandrous and males are monogynous or at most bigynous. Additionally, females of many entelegyne orb weavers are thought to bias paternity post-copulatorily towards a desired mate. This increases the selective pressure on males to adjust their investment in a mating with regard to the compatibility to a female. Here, we examine whether genetic relatedness influences mating behaviour in the orb-web spider Argiope bruennichi. We mated either a sibling or a non-sibling male to a female in single copulation trials and compared copulation duration, cannibalism rate and female fecundity. Our experiment revealed that males prolonged their copulation duration and were cannibalized more frequently when mating with a non-sibling female. Males mating with a sibling female were more likely to escape cannibalism by copulating briefly, thus presumably increasing their chances of re-mating with a more compatible female. This suggests that males can adaptively adjust their investment relating to the compatibility of a female. PMID:20410027

  4. Tangled in a sparse spider web: single origin of orb weavers and their spinning work unravelled by denser taxonomic sampling.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Dimitar; Lopardo, Lara; Giribet, Gonzalo; Arnedo, Miquel A; Alvarez-Padilla, Fernando; Hormiga, Gustavo

    2012-04-01

    In order to study the tempo and the mode of spider orb web evolution and diversification, we conducted a phylogenetic analysis using six genetic markers along with a comprehensive taxon sample. The present analyses are the first to recover the monophyly of orb-weaving spiders based solely on DNA sequence data and an extensive taxon sample. We present the first dated orb weaver phylogeny. Our results suggest that orb weavers appeared by the Middle Triassic and underwent a rapid diversification during the end of the Triassic and Early Jurassic. By the second half of the Jurassic, most of the extant orb-weaving families and web designs were already present. The processes that may have given origin to this diversification of lineages and web architectures are discussed. A combination of biotic factors, such as key innovations in web design and silk composition, as well as abiotic environmental changes, may have played important roles in the diversification of orb weavers. Our analyses also show that increased taxon sampling density in both ingroups and outgroups greatly improves phylogenetic accuracy even when extensive data are missing. This effect is particularly important when addition of character data improves gene overlap. PMID:22048955

  5. The secondary frame in spider orb webs: the detail that makes the difference.

    PubMed

    Soler, Alejandro; Zaera, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Spider orb webs are multifunctional structures, the main function of which is to dissipate the kinetic energy of the impacting prey, while minimizing structural damage. There is no single explanation for their remarkable strength and ductility. However, it is clear that topology is decisive in the structural performance upon impact, and the arrangement of the different silk threads in the web must also exert an effect. The aim of this study is to show how a slight variation in the geometry markedly affects the prey-capture ability of spider orb webs. The study is focused on the secondary frame, a thread interposed between radial and primary frame strands, the importance of which has not been examined until now. The simulation of the impact performance of webs using different lengths of the secondary frame clarifies its structural role, which has proven to be decisive. Furthermore, the study explains why secondary frame threads of moderate length, as commonly encountered, enable the capture of prey with higher energy without a marked increase in the volume of silk used. PMID:27507613

  6. The secondary frame in spider orb webs: the detail that makes the difference

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Alejandro; Zaera, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Spider orb webs are multifunctional structures, the main function of which is to dissipate the kinetic energy of the impacting prey, while minimizing structural damage. There is no single explanation for their remarkable strength and ductility. However, it is clear that topology is decisive in the structural performance upon impact, and the arrangement of the different silk threads in the web must also exert an effect. The aim of this study is to show how a slight variation in the geometry markedly affects the prey-capture ability of spider orb webs. The study is focused on the secondary frame, a thread interposed between radial and primary frame strands, the importance of which has not been examined until now. The simulation of the impact performance of webs using different lengths of the secondary frame clarifies its structural role, which has proven to be decisive. Furthermore, the study explains why secondary frame threads of moderate length, as commonly encountered, enable the capture of prey with higher energy without a marked increase in the volume of silk used. PMID:27507613

  7. Female genital mutilation and monandry in an orb-web spider.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Kensuke

    2016-02-01

    Monandry, in which a female has only one mating partner during the reproductive period, is established when a female spontaneously refrains from re-mating, or when a partner male interferes with the attempts of a female to mate again. In the latter case, however, females often have countermeasures against males, which may explain why polyandry is ubiquitous. Here, I demonstrate that the genital appendage, or scape, of the female orb-web spider (Cyclosa argenteoalba) is injured after her first mating, possibly by her first male partner. This female genital mutilation (FGM) permanently precludes copulation, and females appear to have no countermeasures. FGM is considered to confer a strong advantage to males in sexual conflicts over the number of female matings, and it may widely occur in spiders. PMID:26911338

  8. The Role of Salts in the Evolution of Modern Orb-Webs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, Vasav; Miyoshi, Toshikazu; Chen, Kelley; Jain, Dharamdeep; Blamires, Sean J.; Blackledge, Todd A.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2014-03-01

    The evolution of modern viscid silk webs from ancient cribellate silk webs is associated with a 95% increase in diversity of orb-weaving spiders, and their dominance as predators of flying insects. Yet the transition's mechanistic basis is an evolutionary puzzle. Ancient cribellate silk is a dry adhesive that functions through van der Waals interactions. Viscid threads adhere more effectively than cribellate threads due to high extensibility of their axial silk fibers, and firm adhesion of the viscid glue droplets. The organic and inorganic salts present in viscid glue sequester atmospheric water that plasticizes the axial silk fibers and renders them extensible. Here, we provide direct molecular and macro-scale evidence to show that salts also generate adhesion by directly solvating the glycoproteins, regardless of water content, thus imparting viscoelasticity and enabling the glue droplets to establish good contact. This `dual role' of salts provides a crucial link to the evolutionary transition from cribellate silk to viscid silk. In addition, salts also provide a simple mechanism to adhere even at the extremes of relative humidity, a feat eluding most synthetic adhesives. The work was done when I was at University of Akron.

  9. Comparison of the spinning of selachian egg case ply sheets and orb web spider dragline filaments.

    PubMed

    Knight, D P; Vollrath, F

    2001-01-01

    Liquid crystal spinning appears to be widespread in the animal kingdom, utilizing protein dopes to give materials with a range of different secondary structures including beta-pleat, alpha-helix and collagen-fold. Here we seek to identify the essential design features used in natural liquid crystal spinning by comparing the spinning of two very different materials: the egg case wall of Selachians (dogfish, rays, and their allies) and the dragline silk of orb web spiders. The fish extrudes a "sea and island" composite in which the islands consist of flat ribbons of carefully orientated collagen and the sea, small quantities of an amorphous matrix. Dragline silk filaments are largely constructed from spidroin, a beta protein and have a skin and core structure together with two to three coats. The essential design features common to both systems appear to be the following: (i) intracellular co-storage of a hexagonal columnar liquid crystalline component and a peroxidase within the same secretory vesicles; (ii) luminal storage of a highly concentrated liquid crystalline dope; (iii) use of a dope containing immiscible droplets; (iv) hyperbolic extrusion dies; (v) control of pH and water content of the dope; (vi) preorientation of dope molecules before assembly into fibrils; (vii) combination of extrusion die, treatment/coating bath, and solvent recovery plant within a single microminiaturized device; (viii) slow natural spinning rates. The most important difference is that spiders produce a tough material by unfolding and hydrogen-bonding their silk dope molecules while Selachian fish do it by covalently cross-linking the molecules without unfolding them. PMID:11749189

  10. Old maids have more appeal: effects of age and pheromone source on mate attraction in an orb-web spider.

    PubMed

    Cory, Anna-Lena; Schneider, Jutta M

    2016-01-01

    Background. In many insects and spider species, females attract males with volatile sex pheromones, but we know surprisingly little about the costs and benefits of female pheromone emission. Here, we test the hypothesis that mate attraction by females is dynamic and strategic in the sense that investment in mate attraction is matched to the needs of the female. We use the orb-web spider Argiope bruennichi in which females risk the production of unfertilised egg clutches if they do not receive a copulation within a certain time-frame. Methods. We designed field experiments to compare mate attraction by recently matured (young) females with females close to oviposition (old). In addition, we experimentally separated the potential sources of pheromone transmission, namely the female body and the web silk. Results. In accordance with the hypothesis of strategic pheromone production, the probability of mate attraction and the number of males attracted differed between age classes. While the bodies and webs of young females were hardly found by males, the majority of old females attracted up to two males within two hours. Old females not only increased pheromone emission from their bodies but also from their webs. Capture webs alone spun by old females were significantly more efficient in attracting males than webs of younger females. Discussion. Our results suggest that females modulate their investment in signalling according to the risk of remaining unmated and that they thereby economize on the costs associated with pheromone production and emission. PMID:27114864

  11. Old maids have more appeal: effects of age and pheromone source on mate attraction in an orb-web spider

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Jutta M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. In many insects and spider species, females attract males with volatile sex pheromones, but we know surprisingly little about the costs and benefits of female pheromone emission. Here, we test the hypothesis that mate attraction by females is dynamic and strategic in the sense that investment in mate attraction is matched to the needs of the female. We use the orb-web spider Argiope bruennichi in which females risk the production of unfertilised egg clutches if they do not receive a copulation within a certain time-frame. Methods. We designed field experiments to compare mate attraction by recently matured (young) females with females close to oviposition (old). In addition, we experimentally separated the potential sources of pheromone transmission, namely the female body and the web silk. Results. In accordance with the hypothesis of strategic pheromone production, the probability of mate attraction and the number of males attracted differed between age classes. While the bodies and webs of young females were hardly found by males, the majority of old females attracted up to two males within two hours. Old females not only increased pheromone emission from their bodies but also from their webs. Capture webs alone spun by old females were significantly more efficient in attracting males than webs of younger females. Discussion. Our results suggest that females modulate their investment in signalling according to the risk of remaining unmated and that they thereby economize on the costs associated with pheromone production and emission. PMID:27114864

  12. The Influence of Vibratory Courtship on Female Mating Behaviour in Orb-Web Spiders (Argiope keyserlingi, Karsch 1878)

    PubMed Central

    Wignall, Anne E.; Herberstein, Marie E.

    2013-01-01

    Web-building spiders are important models for sexual selection. While our understanding of post-copulatory mechanisms including sperm competition and cryptic female choice is considerable, our knowledge of courtship and how it influences male and female mating decisions is still extremely poor. Here, we provide the first comprehensive description of male courtship behaviour and vibrations generated in the web by the orb-web spider, Argiope keyserlingi – a recognised model species. We identified three main elements of male courtship: shudders, abdominal wags and mating thread dances (including both plucks and bounces). The vibrations generated by these behaviours are described in detail. Male shuddering behaviour appears to have a strong influence on female latency to mate acceptance, with males that shudder at high rates without compromising shudder duration being preferred. Shuddering behaviour may also mediate female aggressive behaviour, with males that generate long shudders less likely to be cannibalised after copulation. Male abdominal wagging behaviour, however, appears to have only limited influence on female mating decisions. This study provides avenues for future work that synthesises pre- and post-copulatory mechanisms in web-building spiders to generate an all-encompassing model of how sexual selection operates. PMID:23341922

  13. One size fits all? Determinants of sperm transfer in a highly dimorphic orb-web spider.

    PubMed

    Assis, B A; Foellmer, M W

    2016-06-01

    The evolutionary significance of widespread hypo-allometric scaling of genital traits in combination with rapid interspecific genital trait divergence has been of key interest to evolutionary biologists for many years and remains poorly understood. Here, we provide a detailed assessment of quantitative genital trait variation in males and females of the sexually highly dimorphic and cannibalistic orb-weaving spider Argiope aurantia. We then test how this trait variation relates to sperm transfer success. In particular, we test specific predictions of the one-size-fits-all and lock-and-key hypotheses for the evolution of genital characters. We use video-taped staged matings in a controlled environment with subsequent morphological microdissections and sperm count analyses. We find little support for the prediction of the one-size-fits-all hypothesis for the evolution of hypo-allometric scaling of genital traits, namely that intermediate trait dimensions confer highest sperm transfer success. Likewise, our findings do not support the prediction of the lock-and-key hypothesis that a tight fit of male and female genital traits mediates highest sperm transfer success. We do, however, detect directional effects of a number of male and female genital characters on sperm transfer, suggesting that genital trait dimensions are commonly under selection in nature. Importantly, even though females are much larger than males, spermatheca size limits the number of sperm transferred, contradicting a previous hypothesis about the evolutionary consequences of genital size dimorphism in extremely size-dimorphic taxa. We also find strong positive effects of male body size and copulation duration on the probability of sperm transfer and the number of sperm transferred, with implications for the evolution of extreme sexual size dimorphism and sexual cannibalism in orb weavers. PMID:26881910

  14. The effect of colour polymorphism on thermoregulation in an orb web spider.

    PubMed

    Rao, Dinesh; Mendoza-Cuenca, Luis

    2016-08-01

    Spiders that build aerial webs in open areas face the risk of overheating due to incident solar radiation. These spiders can counteract overheating by either moving the web to another site or by adopting behavioural thermoregulation within the web. Since moving can be costly, studies have suggested that a passive but effective method of reducing heat load is by light reflectance through body colouration. We explored the interaction between colour and thermoregulation in a colour polymorphic species, under both field and laboratory conditions. We show that in natural conditions, the spiders maintain their body temperature below that of the ambient, but with no difference in surface temperature between colour morphs. In laboratory experiments with internal temperature measurements, white morphs bore the risk of overheating better than the yellow morphs since they heated up slower and cooled faster. We suggest that the thermoregulatory properties of colour polymorphism in Verrucosa arenata have physiological consequences and may play an important role in the maintenance of colour polymorphism in this species. PMID:27379401

  15. The effect of colour polymorphism on thermoregulation in an orb web spider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Dinesh; Mendoza-Cuenca, Luis

    2016-08-01

    Spiders that build aerial webs in open areas face the risk of overheating due to incident solar radiation. These spiders can counteract overheating by either moving the web to another site or by adopting behavioural thermoregulation within the web. Since moving can be costly, studies have suggested that a passive but effective method of reducing heat load is by light reflectance through body colouration. We explored the interaction between colour and thermoregulation in a colour polymorphic species, under both field and laboratory conditions. We show that in natural conditions, the spiders maintain their body temperature below that of the ambient, but with no difference in surface temperature between colour morphs. In laboratory experiments with internal temperature measurements, white morphs bore the risk of overheating better than the yellow morphs since they heated up slower and cooled faster. We suggest that the thermoregulatory properties of colour polymorphism in Verrucosa arenata have physiological consequences and may play an important role in the maintenance of colour polymorphism in this species.

  16. Spiders avoid sticking to their webs: clever leg movements, branched drip-tip setae, and anti-adhesive surfaces.

    PubMed

    Briceño, R D; Eberhard, W G

    2012-04-01

    Orb-weaving spiders construct webs with adhesive silk but are not trapped by it. Previous studies have attributed this defense to an oily coating on their legs that protects against adhesion or, more recently, to behavioral avoidance of sticky lines. The old evidence is very weak, however, and the behavioral avoidance explanation is inadequate because orb-weavers push with their hind legs against sticky lines hundreds or thousands of times during construction of each orb and are not trapped. Video analyses of behavior and experimental observations of isolated legs pulling away from contact with sticky lines showed that the spider uses three anti-adhesion traits: dense arrays of branched setae on the legs that reduce the area of contact with adhesive material; careful engagement and withdrawal movements of its legs that minimize contact with the adhesive and that avoid pulling against the line itself; and a chemical coating or surface layer that reduces adhesion. PMID:22382404

  17. Spiders avoid sticking to their webs: clever leg movements, branched drip-tip setae, and anti-adhesive surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, R. D.; Eberhard, W. G.

    2012-04-01

    Orb-weaving spiders construct webs with adhesive silk but are not trapped by it. Previous studies have attributed this defense to an oily coating on their legs that protects against adhesion or, more recently, to behavioral avoidance of sticky lines. The old evidence is very weak, however, and the behavioral avoidance explanation is inadequate because orb-weavers push with their hind legs against sticky lines hundreds or thousands of times during construction of each orb and are not trapped. Video analyses of behavior and experimental observations of isolated legs pulling away from contact with sticky lines showed that the spider uses three anti-adhesion traits: dense arrays of branched setae on the legs that reduce the area of contact with adhesive material; careful engagement and withdrawal movements of its legs that minimize contact with the adhesive and that avoid pulling against the line itself; and a chemical coating or surface layer that reduces adhesion.

  18. Effect of 9. 6-GHz pulsed microwaves on the orb web spinning ability of the cross spider (Araneus diadematus)

    SciTech Connect

    Liddle, C.G.; Putnam, J.P.; Lewter, O.L.; Lewis, J.Y.; Bell, B.

    1986-01-01

    Eight cross spiders (Araneus diadematus) were exposed overnight (16 h) during web-building activity to pulsed 9.6-GHz microwaves at average power densities of 10, 1, and 0.1 mW/sq. cm. (estimated SARs 40, 4, and 0.4 mW/g). Under these conditions, 9.6-GHz pulsed microwaves did not affect the web-spinning ability of the cross spider.

  19. EFFECT OF 9.6-GHZ PULSED MICROWAVES ON THE ORB WEB SPINNING ABILITY OF THE CROSS SPIDER (ARANEUS DIADEMATUS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eight cross spiders (Araneus diadematus) were exposed overnight (16 h) during web-building activity to pulsed 9.6-GHz microwaves at average power densities of 10, 1, and 0.1 mW/sq. cm. (estimated SARs 40, 4, and 0.4 mW/g). Under these conditions, 9.6-GHz pulsed microwaves did not...

  20. The Great Silk Alternative: Multiple Co-Evolution of Web Loss and Sticky Hairs in Spiders

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Jonas O.; Nentwig, Wolfgang; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2013-01-01

    Spiders are the most important terrestrial predators among arthropods. Their ecological success is reflected by a high biodiversity and the conquest of nearly every terrestrial habitat. Spiders are closely associated with silk, a material, often seen to be responsible for their great ecological success and gaining high attention in life sciences. However, it is often overlooked that more than half of all Recent spider species have abandoned web building or never developed such an adaptation. These species must have found other, more economic solutions for prey capture and retention, compensating the higher energy costs of increased locomotion activity. Here we show that hairy adhesive pads (scopulae) are closely associated with the convergent evolution of a vagrant life style, resulting in highly diversified lineages of at least, equal importance as the derived web building taxa. Previous studies often highlighted the idea that scopulae have the primary function of assisting locomotion, neglecting the fact that only the distal most pads (claw tufts) are suitable for those purposes. The former observations, that scopulae are used in prey capture, are largely overlooked. Our results suggest the scopulae evolved as a substitute for silk in controlling prey and that the claw tufts are, in most cases, a secondary development. Evolutionary trends towards specialized claw tufts and their composition from a low number of enlarged setae to a dense array of slender ones, as well as the secondary loss of those pads are discussed further. Hypotheses about the origin of the adhesive setae and their diversification throughout evolution are provided. PMID:23650526

  1. Do parasitoids explain differential abundance of two syntopic orb-weaver spiders (Araneae: Araneidae)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzaga, Marcelo O.; Cardoso, João C. F.; Vasconcellos-Neto, João

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we examined the relative abundance of two congeneric species of orb-weaver spiders, Cyclosa fililineata and Cyclosa morretes, in an area of Atlantic forest in southeastern Brazil, and the relationship of this variable with fecundity and attacks by parasitoids. We also investigated responses to vibrational stimuli that simulated the approach of a wasp and described architectural changes in webs of parasitized individuals of C. fililineata. C.fililineata was more abundant throughout the year, although this species produced a lower number of egg sacs and a lower number of eggs per egg sac when compared with C. morretes. Both species showed similar types of behavioral responses to vibrational stimuli, but C. fililineata remained motionless more often. The frequency of parasitism by the wasp Polysphincta janzeni on adults and juveniles was low and similar for C. fililineata and C. morretes in both dry and wet seasons. The parasitoid caused alterations in the web design of C. fililineata similar of those observed in other orb-weavers attacked by ichneumonid wasps. Webs constructed by spiders parasitized by larvae in their last instar had a lower number of radii and sticky spirals were completely absent. An egg parasitoid, Baeus cyclosae, attacked C. morretes more often than C. fililineata, possibly as a consequence of its greater clutch size and/or larger eggs. These results indicate that egg mortality caused by B. cyclosae, but not subadult and adult mortality promoted by P. janzeni, may be an important factor determining the relative abundance of these two Cyclosa species.

  2. Phylogenomic analysis of spiders reveals nonmonophyly of orb weavers.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Rosa; Hormiga, Gustavo; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2014-08-01

    Spiders constitute one of the most successful clades of terrestrial predators. Their extraordinary diversity, paralleled only by some insects and mites, is often attributed to the use of silk, and, in one of the largest lineages, to stereotyped behaviors for building foraging webs of remarkable biomechanical properties. However, our understanding of higher-level spider relationships is poor and is largely based on morphology. Prior molecular efforts have focused on a handful of genes but have provided little resolution to key questions such as the origin of the orb weavers. We apply a next-generation sequencing approach to resolve spider phylogeny, examining the relationships among its major lineages. We further explore possible pitfalls in phylogenomic reconstruction, including missing data, unequal rates of evolution, and others. Analyses of multiple data sets all agree on the basic structure of the spider tree and all reject the long-accepted monophyly of Orbiculariae, by placing the cribellate orb weavers (Deinopoidea) with other groups and not with the ecribellate orb weavers (Araneoidea). These results imply independent origins for the two types of orb webs (cribellate and ecribellate) or a much more ancestral origin of the orb web with subsequent loss in the so-called RTA clade. Either alternative demands a major reevaluation of our current understanding of the spider evolutionary chronicle. PMID:25042584

  3. A Sticky Installation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Rama

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art project--a school-wide sticky-note show. The show was inspired by Giant Robot's annual Post-It Show in Los Angeles. The gallery invites hundreds of artists to doodle, draw, paint, and collage onto sticky notes. The individual sticky notes can be silly, ambitious, conceptual, or beautiful, but the…

  4. Sticky-Note Murals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Ian

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a sticky-note mural project that originated from his desire to incorporate contemporary materials into his assignments as well as to inspire collaboration between students. The process takes much more than sticking sticky notes to the wall. It takes critical thinking skills and teamwork to design and complete…

  5. Sequential origin in the high performance properties of orb spider dragline silk

    PubMed Central

    Blackledge, Todd A.; Pérez-Rigueiro, José; Plaza, Gustavo R.; Perea, Belén; Navarro, Andrés; Guinea, Gustavo V.; Elices, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Major ampullate (MA) dragline silk supports spider orb webs, combining strength and extensibility in the toughest biomaterial. MA silk evolved ~376 MYA and identifying how evolutionary changes in proteins influenced silk mechanics is crucial for biomimetics, but is hindered by high spinning plasticity. We use supercontraction to remove that variation and characterize MA silk across the spider phylogeny. We show that mechanical performance is conserved within, but divergent among, major lineages, evolving in correlation with discrete changes in proteins. Early MA silk tensile strength improved rapidly with the origin of GGX amino acid motifs and increased repetitiveness. Tensile strength then maximized in basal entelegyne spiders, ~230 MYA. Toughness subsequently improved through increased extensibility within orb spiders, coupled with the origin of a novel protein (MaSp2). Key changes in MA silk proteins therefore correlate with the sequential evolution high performance orb spider silk and could aid design of biomimetic fibers. PMID:23110251

  6. Sequential origin in the high performance properties of orb spider dragline silk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackledge, Todd A.; Pérez-Rigueiro, José; Plaza, Gustavo R.; Perea, Belén; Navarro, Andrés; Guinea, Gustavo V.; Elices, Manuel

    2012-10-01

    Major ampullate (MA) dragline silk supports spider orb webs, combining strength and extensibility in the toughest biomaterial. MA silk evolved ~376 MYA and identifying how evolutionary changes in proteins influenced silk mechanics is crucial for biomimetics, but is hindered by high spinning plasticity. We use supercontraction to remove that variation and characterize MA silk across the spider phylogeny. We show that mechanical performance is conserved within, but divergent among, major lineages, evolving in correlation with discrete changes in proteins. Early MA silk tensile strength improved rapidly with the origin of GGX amino acid motifs and increased repetitiveness. Tensile strength then maximized in basal entelegyne spiders, ~230 MYA. Toughness subsequently improved through increased extensibility within orb spiders, coupled with the origin of a novel protein (MaSp2). Key changes in MA silk proteins therefore correlate with the sequential evolution high performance orb spider silk and could aid design of biomimetic fibers.

  7. Nearshore Sticky Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Juan; Vankataramani, Shankar; Dawson, Clint

    2015-04-01

    Wind- and current-driven flotsam, oil spills, pollutants, and nutrients, approaching the nearshore will frequently appear to park just beyond the break zone, where waves break. Moreover, the portion of these tracers that beach will do so only after a long time. In this environment we refer to the parking phenomenon as nearshore sticky waters, for which we offer a model when buoyant tracers are not subject to inertial effects. The solution to an asymptotic approximation to the model yields an explanation for the phenomenon and the conditions whereby it is expected to occur.

  8. Spider webs: Damage control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.; Kaplan, David L.

    2012-04-01

    A study reveals that spider orb webs fail in a nonlinear fashion, owing to the hierarchical organization of the silk proteins. The discovery may serve as inspiration for engineers for the design of aerial, light-weight, robust architectures.

  9. [Pavlov's unknown letter to L. A. Orbely].

    PubMed

    Budko, A A; Nazartsev, B I

    2012-07-01

    The text of Ivan P. Pavlov's unknown letter addressed to Leon A. Orbely is published for the first time. The document is kept in the Fund of the Military Medical Museum of the Military Medical Academy named after Sergey M. Kirov. PMID:23074838

  10. Yellow sticky, PHP software for an electronic brainstorming experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Dornburg, Courtney C.; Stevens, Susan Marie; Davidson, George S.; Forsythe, James Chris

    2007-09-01

    A web-based brainstorm was conducted in the summer of 2007 within the Sandia Restricted Network. This brainstorming experiment was modeled around the 'yellow sticky' brainstorms that are used in many face-to-face meetings at Sandia National Laboratories. This document discusses the implementation and makes suggestions for future implementations.

  11. String and Sticky Tape Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, R. D., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Explains how to demonstrate the fundamentals of one dimensional kinematics such as Newton's third law of motion, and collision between bodies, using simple materials of marbles, strings, sticky tape, drinking straws, and rubber bands. (GA)

  12. Planets, Stars, and Orbs 2 Volume Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Edward

    2009-07-01

    Illustrations; Preface; Acknowledgements; Abbreviations; Introduction: scope, sources, and social context; 1. Pierre Duhem, Medieval cosmology and the scope of the present day; 2. The sources of cosmology in the late Middle Ages; 3. The social and institutional matrix of scholastic cosmology; Part I. The Cosmos as a Whole and What, if Anything, Lies Beyond: 4. Is the world eternal, without beginning or end?; 5. The creation of the world; 6. The finitude, shape, and place of the world; 7. The perfection of the world; 8. The possibility of other worlds; 9. Extracosmic void space; Part II. The Celestial Region: 10. The incorruptibility of the celestial region; 11. Celestial perfection; 12. On celestial matter: can it exist in a changeless state?; 13. The mobile celestial orbs: concentrics, eccentrics, and epicycles; 14. Are the heavens composed of hard orbs or a fluid substance?; 15. The immobile orb of the cosmos: the empyrean heaven; 16. Celestial light; 17. The properties and qualities of celestial bodies, and the dimensions of the world; 18. On celestial motions and their causes; 19. The influence of the celestial region on the terrestrial; 20. The earth and its cosmic relations: size, centrality, shape, and immobility; Conclusion: Five centuries of scholastic cosmology; Appendices; Bibliography; Index.

  13. Herbivory in Spiders: The Importance of Pollen for Orb-Weavers

    PubMed Central

    Eggs, Benjamin; Sanders, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Orb-weaving spiders (Araneidae) are commonly regarded as generalist insect predators but resources provided by plants such as pollen may be an important dietary supplementation. Their webs snare insect prey, but can also trap aerial plankton like pollen and fungal spores. When recycling their orb webs, the spiders may therefore also feed on adhering pollen grains or fungal spores via extraoral digestion. In this study we measured stable isotope ratios in the bodies of two araneid species (Aculepeira ceropegia and Araneus diadematus), their potential prey and pollen to determine the relative contribution of pollen to their diet. We found that about 25% of juvenile orb-weaving spiders’ diet consisted of pollen, the other 75% of flying insects, mainly small dipterans and hymenopterans. The pollen grains in our study were too large to be taken up accidentally by the spiders and had first to be digested extraorally by enzymes in an active act of consumption. Therefore, pollen can be seen as a substantial component of the spiders’ diet. This finding suggests that these spiders need to be classified as omnivores rather than pure carnivores. PMID:24312430

  14. Herbivory in spiders: the importance of pollen for orb-weavers.

    PubMed

    Eggs, Benjamin; Sanders, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Orb-weaving spiders (Araneidae) are commonly regarded as generalist insect predators but resources provided by plants such as pollen may be an important dietary supplementation. Their webs snare insect prey, but can also trap aerial plankton like pollen and fungal spores. When recycling their orb webs, the spiders may therefore also feed on adhering pollen grains or fungal spores via extraoral digestion. In this study we measured stable isotope ratios in the bodies of two araneid species (Aculepeira ceropegia and Araneus diadematus), their potential prey and pollen to determine the relative contribution of pollen to their diet. We found that about 25% of juvenile orb-weaving spiders' diet consisted of pollen, the other 75% of flying insects, mainly small dipterans and hymenopterans. The pollen grains in our study were too large to be taken up accidentally by the spiders and had first to be digested extraorally by enzymes in an active act of consumption. Therefore, pollen can be seen as a substantial component of the spiders' diet. This finding suggests that these spiders need to be classified as omnivores rather than pure carnivores. PMID:24312430

  15. COTTON STICKINESS MITIGATION BY BACTERIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugars deposited on lint by late season sucking insects can make cotton difficult to spin and difficult to market. This study evaluated a lacto bacillus strain that metabolizes insect sugars under low moisture conditions. Lint with known levels of stickiness was sprayed with water containing Lasil...

  16. Translational Control of Autophagy by Orb in the Drosophila Germline.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Ríos, Patricia; Chartier, Aymeric; Pierson, Stéphanie; Séverac, Dany; Dantec, Christelle; Busseau, Isabelle; Simonelig, Martine

    2015-12-01

    Drosophila Orb, the homolog of vertebrate CPEB, is a key translational regulator involved in oocyte polarity and maturation through poly(A) tail elongation of specific mRNAs. orb also has an essential function during early oogenesis that has not been addressed at the molecular level. Here, we show that orb prevents cell death during early oogenesis, thus allowing oogenesis to progress. It does so through the repression of autophagy by directly repressing, together with the CCR4 deadenylase, the translation of Autophagy-specific gene 12 (Atg12) mRNA. Autophagy and cell death observed in orb mutant ovaries are reduced by decreasing Atg12 or other Atg mRNA levels. These results reveal a role of Orb in translational repression and identify autophagy as an essential pathway regulated by Orb during early oogenesis. Importantly, they also establish translational regulation as a major mode of control of autophagy, a key process in cell homeostasis in response to environmental cues. PMID:26625957

  17. The Effects of Alcohol on Spiders: What Happens to Web Construction after Spiders Consume Alcohol?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Victor E.

    2006-01-01

    In the high school experiment reported in this paper, spiders were provided with 40% ethanol (ETOH) in order to determine the effects of alcohol on the web-spinning ability of orb weaver spiders. It was hypothesized that alcohol would have a deleterious effect on the number of radii, number of cells, and area of cells in the webs of orb weaving…

  18. Loss of legs: is it or not a handicap for an orb-weaving spider?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquet, Alain; Anotaux, Mylène; Leborgne, Raymond

    2011-07-01

    Leg loss is a common phenomenon in spiders, and according to the species 5% to 40% of the adults can present at least one missing leg. There is no possibility of regeneration after adult moult and the animal must manage with its missing appendages until its death. With the loss of one or more legs, female orb-weaving spiders can be penalized twice: firstly, because the legs are necessary for web construction and secondly, the legs are essential for the control of the prey after its interception by the web. During development, spiders may be also penalized because regeneration has energetic costs that take away resources for survival, growth and reproduction. All these consequences should influence negatively the development of the spider and thus its fitness. We investigated the impact of leg loss in the orb-weaving spider, Zygiella x-notata by studying its frequency in a natural population and web building and prey capture behaviours in laboratory. In field populations, 9.5% to 13%, of the adult females presented the loss of one or more legs; the majority of individuals had lost only one leg (in 48% of cases, a first one). Leg loss seems to affect all the adult spiders, as there is no difference of mass between intact spiders and those with missing leg. Data obtained with laboratory-reared spiders, showed that the loss of legs due to the moult is rare (less than 1%). Considering changes in web design, spiders with missing legs decreased their silk investment, increased the distance between spiral turns but did not change the capture surface of the web. Under our laboratory experimental conditions, spiders with one or two lost legs did not present any difference in prey capture efficiency. In laboratory conditions, spiders with lost leg(s) did not show any difference in egg sac production or in longevity (adult lifespan) compared to intact spiders.

  19. OrbView-3 Initial On-Orbit Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Kent; Blonski, Slawomir; Holekamp, Kara; Pagnutti, Mary; Zanoni, Vicki; Carver, David; Fendley, Debbie; Smith, Charles

    2004-01-01

    NASA at Stennis Space Center (SSC) established a Space Act Agreement with Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC) and ORBIMAGE Inc. to collaborate on the characterization of the OrbView-3 system and its imagery products and to develop characterization techniques further. In accordance with the agreement, NASA performed an independent radiometric, spatial, and geopositional accuracy assessment of OrbView-3 imagery acquired before completion of the system's initial on-orbit checkout. OSC acquired OrbView-3 imagery over SSC from July 2003 through January 2004, and NASA collected ground reference information coincident with many of these acquisitions. After evaluating all acquisitions, NASA deemed two multispectral images and five panchromatic images useful for characterization. NASA then performed radiometric, spatial, and geopositional characterizations.

  20. Spider silk: Webs measure up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J.

    2013-03-01

    The complete elastic response of a spider's orb web has been quantified by non-invasive light scattering, revealing important insights into the architecture, natural material use and mechanical properties of the web. This knowledge advances our understanding of the prey-catching process and the role of supercontraction therein.

  1. Evolution of supercontraction in spider silk: structure-function relationship from tarantulas to orb-weavers.

    PubMed

    Boutry, Cecilia; Blackledge, Todd Alan

    2010-10-15

    Spider silk is a promising biomaterial with impressive performance. However, some spider silks also 'supercontract' when exposed to water, shrinking by up to ∼50% in length. Supercontraction may provide a critical mechanism to tailor silk properties, both for future synthetic silk production and by the spiders themselves. Several hypotheses are proposed for the mechanism and function of supercontraction, but they remain largely untested. In particular, supercontraction may result from a rearrangement of the GPGXX motif within the silk proteins, where G represents glycine, P proline and X is one of a small subset of amino acids. Supercontraction may prevent sagging in wet orb-webs or allow spiders to tailor silk properties for different ecological functions. Because both the molecular structures of silk proteins and how dragline is used in webs differ among species, we can test these hypotheses by comparing supercontraction of silk across diverse spider taxa. In this study we measured supercontraction in 28 spider taxa, ranging from tarantulas to orb-weaving spiders. We found that silk from all species supercontracted, except that of most tarantulas. This suggests that supercontraction evolved at least with the origin of the Araneomorphae, over 200 million years ago. We found differences in the pattern of evolution for two components of supercontraction. Stress generated during supercontraction of a restrained fiber is not associated with changes in silk structure and web architecture. By contrast, the shrink of unrestrained supercontracting fibers is higher for Orbiculariae spiders, whose silk contains high ratios of GPGXX motifs. These results support the hypothesis that supercontraction is caused by a rearrangement of GPGXX motifs in silk, and that it functions to tailor silk material properties. PMID:20889831

  2. The impact of UVB radiation on the glycoprotein glue of orb-weaving spider capture thread.

    PubMed

    Stellwagen, Sarah D; Opell, Brent D; Clouse, Mary E

    2015-09-01

    Many spider orb-webs are exposed to sunlight and the potentially damaging effects of ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. We examined the effect of UVB on the viscoelastic glycoprotein core of glue droplets deposited on the prey capture threads of these webs, hypothesizing that webs built by species that occupy sunny habitats are less susceptible to UVB damage than are webs built by species that prefer shaded forest habitats or by nocturnal species. Threads were tested shortly after being collected in the early morning and after being exposed to UVB energy equivalent to a day of summer sun and three times this amount. Droplets kept in a dark chamber allowed us to evaluate post-production changes. Droplet volume was unaffected by treatments, indicating that UVB did not damage the hygroscopic compounds in the aqueous layer that covers droplets. UVB exposure did not affect energies of droplet extension for species from exposed and partially to mostly shaded habitats (Argiope aurantia, Leucauge venusta and Verrucosa arenata). However, UVB exposure reduced the energy of droplet extension in Micrathena gracilis from shaded forests and Neoscona crucifera, which forages at night. Only in L. venusta did the energy of droplet extension increase after the dark treatment, suggesting endogenous molecular alignment. This study adds UVB irradiation to the list of factors (humidity, temperature and strain rate) known to affect the performance of spider glycoprotein glue, factors that must be more fully understood if adhesives that mimic spider glycoprotein glue are to be produced. PMID:26333924

  3. Adsorption of surfactant-rich stickies onto mineral surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gribble, Christopher M; Matthews, G Peter; Gantenbein, Daniel; Turner, Andrew; Schoelkopf, Joachim; Gane, Patrick A C

    2010-12-15

    "Stickies" are tacky species, present in recycled paper and coated broke, derived from coating formulations, adhesives etc. They impact negatively on paper quality and cause web runnability problems by deposit build-up. To sustain recycling, stickies are controlled by adsorbing them onto minerals added to the recycled stock. We report isotherms for a fatty acid ester defoamer and an acrylic acid ester copolymer adsorbing from colloidal suspension onto various talcs and modified calcium carbonates. We used commercial preparations of the fatty acid ester defoamer and acrylic acid ester copolymer to provide a simple analogue to the industrial process. The modified calcium carbonates are hydrophilic with anionic and cationic sites present. Adsorption isotherms for low surface area modified calcium carbonate conform to the Langmuir model, while those for high surface area modified calcium carbonate reflect a two stage process involving the formation of a monolayer over the mineral surface and subsequent partial aggregation. Talc platelets display hydrophilic edges and hydrophobic surfaces. Adsorption onto them appears to involve three stages; specifically, a hydrophilic interaction between hydrophilic groups on the molecules and the talc edges, followed by hydrophobic interactions between the molecules and the talc surfaces, and finally by formation of multilayers. PMID:20850132

  4. Coffee as an Antidote to Knowledge Stickiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, Deborah; Phillips, Diane

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the concept of space and its role in both knowledge creation and overcoming knowledge stickiness. Aristotelian concepts of "freedom to" and "freedom from" are used to reconceptualise space. Informal and formal spaces, concepts and places are discussed as both specific locations and as gaps providing space for knowledge…

  5. Planets, Stars, and Orbs, The Medieval Cosmos, 1200-1687

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Edward

    Medieval cosmology was a fusion of pagan Greek ideas and biblical descriptions of the world, especially the creation account in Genesis. Planets, Stars, and Orbs describes medieval conceptions of the cosmos as understood by scholastic theologians and natural philosophers in the universities of western Europe from the thirteenth to the seventeenth centuries. Not only are the major ideas and arguments of medieval cosmology described and analysed, but much attention is paid to the responses of scholastic natural philosophers of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries to the challenges posed by the new science and astronomy as represented by Copernicus, Tycho Brahe, Galileo and Kepler.

  6. The allometry of CNS size and consequences of miniaturization in orb-weaving and cleptoparasitic spiders.

    PubMed

    Quesada, Rosannette; Triana, Emilia; Vargas, Gloria; Douglass, John K; Seid, Marc A; Niven, Jeremy E; Eberhard, William G; Wcislo, William T

    2011-11-01

    Allometric studies of the gross neuroanatomy of adults from nine species of spiders from six web-weaving families (Orbicularia), and nymphs from six of these species, show that very small spiders resemble other small animals in having disproportionately larger central nervous systems (CNSs) relative to body mass when compared with large-bodied forms. Small spiderlings and minute adult spiders have similar relative CNS volumes. The relatively large CNS of a very small spider occupies up to 78% of the cephalothorax volume. The CNSs of very small spiders extend into their coxae, occupying as much as 26% of the profile area of the coxae of an Anapisona simoni spiderling (body mass < 0.005 mg). Such modifications occur both in species with minute adults, and in tiny spiderlings of species with large-bodied adults. In at least one such species, Leucauge mariana, the CNS of the spiderling extends into a prominent ventral bulge of the sternum. Tiny spiders also have reduced neuronal cell body diameters. The adults of nearly all orbicularian spiders weave prey capture webs, as do the spiderlings, beginning with second instar nymphs. Comparable allometric relations occur in adults of both orb-weaving and cleptoparasitic species, indicating that this behavioral difference is not reflected in differences in gross CNS allometry. PMID:22036838

  7. Reconstructing web evolution and spider diversification in the molecular era

    PubMed Central

    Blackledge, Todd A.; Scharff, Nikolaj; Coddington, Jonathan A.; Szüts, Tamas; Wenzel, John W.; Hayashi, Cheryl Y.; Agnarsson, Ingi

    2009-01-01

    The evolutionary diversification of spiders is attributed to spectacular innovations in silk. Spiders are unique in synthesizing many different kinds of silk, and using silk for a variety of ecological functions throughout their lives, particularly to make prey-catching webs. Here, we construct a broad higher-level phylogeny of spiders combining molecular data with traditional morphological and behavioral characters. We use this phylogeny to test the hypothesis that the spider orb web evolved only once. We then examine spider diversification in relation to different web architectures and silk use. We find strong support for a single origin of orb webs, implying a major shift in the spinning of capture silk and repeated loss or transformation of orb webs. We show that abandonment of costly cribellate capture silk correlates with the 2 major diversification events in spiders (1). Replacement of cribellate silk by aqueous silk glue may explain the greater diversity of modern orb-weaving spiders (Araneoidea) compared with cribellate orb-weaving spiders (Deinopoidea) (2). Within the “RTA clade,” which is the sister group to orb-weaving spiders and contains half of all spider diversity, >90% of species richness is associated with repeated loss of cribellate silk and abandonment of prey capture webs. Accompanying cribellum loss in both groups is a release from substrate-constrained webs, whether by aerially suspended webs, or by abandoning webs altogether. These behavioral shifts in silk and web production by spiders thus likely played a key role in the dramatic evolutionary success and ecological dominance of spiders as predators of insects. PMID:19289848

  8. Catapulting tentacles in a sticky carnivorous plant.

    PubMed

    Poppinga, Simon; Hartmeyer, Siegfried Richard Heinrich; Seidel, Robin; Masselter, Tom; Hartmeyer, Irmgard; Speck, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Among trapping mechanisms in carnivorous plants, those termed 'active' have especially fascinated scientists since Charles Darwin's early works because trap movements are involved. Fast snap-trapping and suction of prey are two of the most spectacular examples for how these plants actively catch animals, mainly arthropods, for a substantial nutrient supply. We show that Drosera glanduligera, a sundew from southern Australia, features a sophisticated catapult mechanism: Prey animals walking near the edge of the sundew trigger a touch-sensitive snap-tentacle, which swiftly catapults them onto adjacent sticky glue-tentacles; the insects are then slowly drawn within the concave trap leaf by sticky tentacles. This is the first detailed documentation and analysis of such catapult-flypaper traps in action and highlights a unique and surprisingly complex mechanical adaptation to carnivory. PMID:23049849

  9. Catapulting Tentacles in a Sticky Carnivorous Plant

    PubMed Central

    Poppinga, Simon; Hartmeyer, Siegfried Richard Heinrich; Seidel, Robin; Masselter, Tom; Hartmeyer, Irmgard; Speck, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Among trapping mechanisms in carnivorous plants, those termed ‘active’ have especially fascinated scientists since Charles Darwin’s early works because trap movements are involved. Fast snap-trapping and suction of prey are two of the most spectacular examples for how these plants actively catch animals, mainly arthropods, for a substantial nutrient supply. We show that Drosera glanduligera, a sundew from southern Australia, features a sophisticated catapult mechanism: Prey animals walking near the edge of the sundew trigger a touch-sensitive snap-tentacle, which swiftly catapults them onto adjacent sticky glue-tentacles; the insects are then slowly drawn within the concave trap leaf by sticky tentacles. This is the first detailed documentation and analysis of such catapult-flypaper traps in action and highlights a unique and surprisingly complex mechanical adaptation to carnivory. PMID:23049849

  10. Sticky foam technology for less-than-lethal force situations

    SciTech Connect

    Goolsby, T.D.

    1994-08-01

    Sticky foam is an extremely tacky, tenacious material used to entangle and impair an individual. It was developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the late 1970`s for usage in nuclear safeguards and security applications. In late 1992, the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the research arm of the Department of Justice, began a project with SNL to determine the applicability of sticky foam for law enforcement usage. The objectives of the project were to develop a dispenser capable of firing sticky foam, to conduct an extensive toxicology review of sticky foam (formulation SF-283), to test the developed dispenser and sticky foam effectiveness on SNL volunteers acting out prison and law enforcement scenarios, and to have the dispenser and sticky foam further evaluated by correctional representatives. This paper discusses the results of the project.

  11. Sticky foam as a less-than-lethal technology

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, S.H.

    1996-12-31

    Sandia National Labs (SNL) in 1994 completed a project funded by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) to determine the applicability of sticky foam for correctional applications. Sticky foam is an extremely tacky, tenacious material used to block, entangle, and impair individuals. The NIJ project developed a gun capable of firing multiple shots of sticky foam, tested the gun and sticky foam effectiveness on SNL volunteers acting out prison and law enforcement scenarios, and had the gun and sticky foam evaluated by correctional representatives. Based on the NIJ project work, SNL supported the Marine Corps Mission, Operation United Shield, with sticky foam guns and supporting equipment to assist in the withdrawal of UN Peacekeepers from Somalia. Prior to the loan of the equipment, the Marines were given training in sticky foam characterization, toxicology, safety issues, cleanup and waste disposal, use limitations, use protocol and precautions, emergency facial clean-up, skin cleanup, gun filling, targeting and firing, and gun cleaning. The Marine Corps successfully used the sticky foam guns as part of that operation. This paper describes these recent developments of sticky foam for non-lethal uses and some of the lessons learned from scenario and application testing.

  12. Effects of kaolin particle films on the life span of an orb-weaver spider.

    PubMed

    Benhadi-Marín, Jacinto; Pereira, José Alberto; Santos, Sónia A P

    2016-02-01

    Araniella cucurbitina (Araneae: Araneidae) is a widespread orb-weaver spider commonly found in agroecosystems. Mineral particle films such as kaolin, due to their protective or anti-feeding action, can represent an alternative to pesticides, especially in organic farming systems, but little is known about its effects on A. cucurbitina. Therefore, we tested the effect of kaolin sprays on the life span of A. cucurbitina under laboratory conditions. Four treatments were tested encompassing different exposure routes. Thus, kaolin sprays were applied on (i) the surface, (ii) the prey (fly), (iii) the spider and (iv) both spider & prey. A control group was tested with water in each treatment. Results showed that sprays of kaolin significantly affected the survival of A. curcubitina when applications were done on the surface and on both spider & prey registering a reduction of 48% and 56%, respectively. Spiders in control obtained higher probability of reaching alive at the end of the assay than those treated with kaolin. Differences observed can be explained by the feeding behavior of the species and may depend on the consumption of the web by the spider and the ratio spider/fly for body size. PMID:26432533

  13. ORBS: A reduction software for SITELLE and SpiOMM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    ORBS merges, corrects, transforms and calibrates interferometric data cubes and produces a spectral cube of the observed region for analysis. It is a fully automatic data reduction software for use with SITELLE (installed at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope) and SpIOMM (a prototype attached to the Observatoire du Mont Mégantic); these imaging Fourier transform spectrometers obtain a hyperspectral data cube which samples a 12 arc-minutes field of view into 4 millions of visible spectra. ORBS is highly parallelized; its core classes (ORB) have been designed to be used in a suite of softwares for data analysis (ORCS and OACS), data simulation (ORUS) and data acquisition (IRIS).

  14. [Life and works of academician L.A. Orbeli (in honor of 130th year anniversary)].

    PubMed

    Astvatsaturov, A E

    2012-01-01

    This work is dedicated to academician L.A. Orbeli, collaborator of legendary Ivan Pavlov, his talented entourage. It provides background information about Orbeli family and the destiny of the three Orbeli brothers, leading scientists who have made significant contributions to science and practice. It reminds us about dramatic events which made great harm to research work of our biologists, medical workers and their use of genetics in their country. One can also find some facts of adherence to principles and dedication to science which are useful for young scientists who are facing salvation of anti-crisis problems of global scale. PMID:23530429

  15. Exploring the shock response of spider webs.

    PubMed

    Tietsch, V; Alencastre, J; Witte, H; Torres, F G

    2016-03-01

    Spider orb-webs are designed to allow for quick energy absorption as well as the constraint of drastic oscillations occurring upon prey impact. Studies on spider silk illustrate its impressive mechanical properties and its capacity to be used as technical fibers in composite materials. Models have previously been used to study the mechanical properties of different silk fibers, but not the behavior of the spider web as a whole. Full spider webs have been impacted by a projectile and the transverse displacement was measured by means of a laser interferometer. The damping and stiffness of the entire webs were quantified considering the orb-web as a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system. The amplitude, the period duration, and the energy dissipation of the oscillations have also been reported from the experiments. The analysis of the energy dissipation confirmed that the webs of orb-web spiders are optimized for the capture of a single or few large prey, rather than several small prey. The experiments also confirmed that the overall stiffness of the web displayed a non-linear behavior. Such non-linearity was also observed in the damping characteristics of the webs studied. PMID:26651062

  16. Sticky foam as a less-than-lethal technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Steven H.

    1997-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in 1994 completed a project funded by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) to determine the applicability of sticky foam for correctional applications. Sticky foam is an extremely tacky, tenacious material used to block, entangle, and impair individuals. The NIJ project developed a gun capable of firing multiple shots of sticky foam, tested the gun and sticky foam effectiveness on SNL volunteers acting out prison and law enforcement scenarios, and had the gun and sticky foam evaluated by correctional representatives. Based on the NIJ project work, SNL supported the Marine Corps Mission, Operation United Shield, with sticky foam guns and supporting equipment to assist in the withdrawal of UN Peacekeepers from Somalia. Prior to the loan of the waste disposal, use limitations, use protocol and precautions, emergency facial clean-up, skin clean-up, gun filling, targeting and firing, and gun cleaning. The Marine Corps successfully used the sticky foam guns as part of that operation. This paper describes these recent developments of sticky foam for non-lethal uses and some of the lessons learned from scenario and application testing.

  17. Alleviating cotton stickiness-experience and future research topics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Though cotton stickiness is manifested only in a small percentage of the world cotton crop, its presence can adversely affect every aspect of the cotton textile industry from production to yarn manufacturing. Reductions in production efficiency due to the presence of stickiness at the mill may be v...

  18. OrbView-3 Technical Performance Evaluation 2005: Modulation Transfer Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    The Technical performance evaluation of OrbView-3 using the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) is presented. The contents include: 1) MTF Results and Methodology; 2) Radiometric Calibration Methodology; and 3) Relative Radiometric Assessment Results

  19. Geolocation Accuracy Evaluations of OrbView-3, EROS-A, and SPOT-5 Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bresnahan, Paul

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation evaluates absolute geolocation accuracy of OrbView-3, EROS-A, and SPOT-5 by comparing test imagery-derived ground coordinates to Ground Control Points using SOCET set photogrammetric software.

  20. Radiometric Characterization of the IKONOS, QuickBird, and OrbView-3 Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holekamp, Kara

    2007-01-01

    The NASA team of University of Arizona, South Dakota State University, and NASA SSC produce consistent results. The OrbView calibration coefficients do not appear to agree well with the NASA team estimate (approx. 20% difference). Discussions with GeoEye (TradeMark) (formerly ORBIMAGE(Registered TradeMark)) personnel are ongoing to update the calibration coefficients. The NASA team will continue to assess OrbView radiometric accuracy.

  1. The Aggregate Supply Curve: Keynes and Downwardly Sticky Money Wages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Paul

    1985-01-01

    Keynes's explanation of both the rationale underlying downwardly sticky money wages and the consequences this phenomenon has for macroeconomic theory are reviewed. An aggregate supply curve appropriate to today's economy is then interpreted. (Author/RM)

  2. Molecular Basis of Orb2 Amyloidogenesis and Blockade of Memory Consolidation.

    PubMed

    Hervás, Rubén; Li, Liying; Majumdar, Amitabha; Fernández-Ramírez, María Del Carmen; Unruh, Jay R; Slaughter, Brian D; Galera-Prat, Albert; Santana, Elena; Suzuki, Mari; Nagai, Yoshitaka; Bruix, Marta; Casas-Tintó, Sergio; Menéndez, Margarita; Laurents, Douglas V; Si, Kausik; Carrión-Vázquez, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids are ordered protein aggregates that are typically associated with neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive impairment. By contrast, the amyloid-like state of the neuronal RNA binding protein Orb2 in Drosophila was recently implicated in memory consolidation, but it remains unclear what features of this functional amyloid-like protein give rise to such diametrically opposed behaviour. Here, using an array of biophysical, cell biological and behavioural assays we have characterized the structural features of Orb2 from the monomer to the amyloid state. Surprisingly, we find that Orb2 shares many structural traits with pathological amyloids, including the intermediate toxic oligomeric species, which can be sequestered in vivo in hetero-oligomers by pathological amyloids. However, unlike pathological amyloids, Orb2 rapidly forms amyloids and its toxic intermediates are extremely transient, indicating that kinetic parameters differentiate this functional amyloid from pathological amyloids. We also observed that a well-known anti-amyloidogenic peptide interferes with long-term memory in Drosophila. These results provide structural insights into how the amyloid-like state of the Orb2 protein can stabilize memory and be nontoxic. They also provide insight into how amyloid-based diseases may affect memory processes. PMID:26812143

  3. Molecular Basis of Orb2 Amyloidogenesis and Blockade of Memory Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Amitabha; Fernández-Ramírez, María del Carmen; Unruh, Jay R.; Slaughter, Brian D.; Galera-Prat, Albert; Santana, Elena; Suzuki, Mari; Nagai, Yoshitaka; Bruix, Marta; Casas-Tintó, Sergio; Menéndez, Margarita; Laurents, Douglas V.; Si, Kausik; Carrión-Vázquez, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids are ordered protein aggregates that are typically associated with neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive impairment. By contrast, the amyloid-like state of the neuronal RNA binding protein Orb2 in Drosophila was recently implicated in memory consolidation, but it remains unclear what features of this functional amyloid-like protein give rise to such diametrically opposed behaviour. Here, using an array of biophysical, cell biological and behavioural assays we have characterized the structural features of Orb2 from the monomer to the amyloid state. Surprisingly, we find that Orb2 shares many structural traits with pathological amyloids, including the intermediate toxic oligomeric species, which can be sequestered in vivo in hetero-oligomers by pathological amyloids. However, unlike pathological amyloids, Orb2 rapidly forms amyloids and its toxic intermediates are extremely transient, indicating that kinetic parameters differentiate this functional amyloid from pathological amyloids. We also observed that a well-known anti-amyloidogenic peptide interferes with long-term memory in Drosophila. These results provide structural insights into how the amyloid-like state of the Orb2 protein can stabilize memory and be nontoxic. They also provide insight into how amyloid-based diseases may affect memory processes. PMID:26812143

  4. Sticky bomb detection with other implications for vehicle security.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R. G.; Vetrone, J.; Warner, J. S.

    2010-01-01

    A 'sticky bomb' is a type of improvised explosive device (IED) placed on a motor vehicle by (for example) a terrorist. The bomb is typically attached with adhesive ('duct') tape, or with magnets. This paper reports some preliminary results for a very rudimentary demonstration of two techniques for detecting the placement of a sticky bomb on a motor vehicle. The two techniques are tire pressure and magnetic measurements. There are other possible security applications for these techniques as well.

  5. Web-building time in a spider: preliminary applications of ultrasonic detection.

    PubMed

    Ramousse, R; Davis, F

    1976-12-01

    Data collection on time and length of building in orb-weaving spiders has suffered from absence of light during construction and inconvenient hours. A simple apparatus is described which permits recording of the spiders' movements as they disturb an ultrasonic field. By varying onset and length of dark periods for two animals at even temperature and by registering the building periods for 127 webs, a definite influence of the light-dark cycle can be identified: there is a strong preference for building webs in the dark; this is superimposed on the circadian rhythm of orb-web construction. One of the spiders always built earlier than the other. PMID:14677594

  6. Sticky fingers: Adhesive properties of human fingertips.

    PubMed

    Spinner, Marlene; Wiechert, Anke B; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2016-02-29

    Fingertip friction is a rather well studied subject. Although the phenomenon of finger stickiness is known as well, the pull-off force and the adhesive strength of human finger tips have never been previously quantified. For the first time, we provided here characterization of adhesive properties of human fingers under natural conditions. Human fingers can generate a maximum adhesive force of 15mN on a smooth surface of epoxy resin. A weak correlation of the adhesive force and the normal force was found on all test surfaces. Up to 300mN load, an increase of the normal force leads to an increase of the adhesive force. On rough surfaces, the adhesive strength is significantly reduced. Our data collected from untreated hands give also an impression of an enormous scattering of digital adhesion depending on a large set of inter-subject variability and time-dependent individual factors (skin texture, moisture level, perspiration). The wide inter- and intra-individual range of digital adhesion should be considered in developing of technical and medical products. PMID:26892897

  7. OpenOrb: Open-source asteroid orbit computation software including statistical ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granvik, M.; Virtanen, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Muinonen, K.

    2009-01-01

    We are making an open-source asteroid orbit computation software package called OpenOrb publicly available. OpenOrb is built on a well-established Bayesian inversion theory, which means that it is to a large part complementary to orbit-computation packages currently available. In particular, OpenOrb is the first package that contains tools for rigorously estimating the uncertainties resulting from the inverse problem of computing orbital elements using scarce astrometry. In addition to the well-known least-squares method, OpenOrb also contains both Monte-Carlo (MC) and Markov-Chain MC (MCMC; Oszkiewicz et al. [2009]) versions of the statistical ranging method. Ranging allows the user to obtain sampled, non-Gaussian orbital-element probability-density functions and is therefore optimized for cases where the amount of astrometry is scarce or spans a relatively short time interval. Ranging-based methods have successfully been applied to a variety of different problems such as rigorous ephemeris prediction, orbital element distribution studies for transneptunian objects, the computation of invariant collision probabilities between near-Earth objects and the Earth, detection of linkages between astrometric asteroid observations within an apparition as well as between apparitions, and in the rigorous analysis of the impact of orbital arc length and/or astrometric uncertainty on the uncertainty of the resulting orbits. Tools for making ephemeris predictions and for classifying objects based on their orbits are also available in OpenOrb. As an example, we use OpenOrb in the search for candidate retrograde and/or high-inclination objects similar to 2008 KV42 in the known population of transneptunian objects that have an observational time span shorter than 30 days.

  8. An adulticidal sticky ovitrap for sampling container-breeding mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Scott A; Long, Sharron; Hart, Alistair; Webb, Cameron E; Russell, Richard C

    2003-09-01

    The efficacy of a standard ovitrap and an ovitrap featuring an internal wall covered by a polybutylene adhesive was compared in field studies in Cairns, Australia. The sticky ovitrap was as effective as the standard ovitrap in detecting Aedes aegypti, with 67.5% and 64% of traps positive for Ae. aegypti, respectively. Significantly higher numbers of Ae. aegypti were collected by traps set outside rather than inside premises. Sticky ovitraps also readily collected Ochlerotatus notoscriptus and, especially, Culex quinquefasciatus. With a 10X hand lens, mosquitoes of these species could readily be identified in traps set for 3 and 7 days. The sticky ovitraps were comparable in cost and as time efficient as standard ovitraps. The greatest advantage of the sticky ovitrap is the collection of adult female mosquitoes, negating the need to rear larvae for identification and providing a faster, more direct measure of the effectiveness of ovipositional attractants than egg counts. Finally, we demonstrated that sticky ovitraps, being adulticidal, have potential as a supplementary control measure, especially for quarantine programs designed to prevent the import and export of container-breeding vector mosquitoes at sea- and airports. PMID:14524545

  9. Two new species of the orb-weaving spider genus Alpaida (Araneae, Araneidae) from Peru.

    PubMed

    Deza, Mariajosé; Andía, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Two new species of the orb-weaving spider genus Alpaida O. P.-Cambridge, 1889 are described and illustrated; Alpaida losamigos n. sp. based on females from Madre de Dios, and Alpaida penca n. sp. based on females and males from Cajamarca. PMID:25081147

  10. In search of ice-stream sticky spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alley, Richard B.

    1993-01-01

    The form drag of large bedrock bumps sticking into the base of an ice stream can produce effective 'sticky spots' supporting large basal shear stress. Bedrock regions surrounded by lubricating till at the same topographic level can cause sticky spots, but tend to collect lubricating water and thus are unlikely to support a shear stress of more than a few tenths of a bar unless they contain abundant large bumps. Raised regions on the ice-air surface also can cause moderate increases in the shear stress supported on the bed beneath. Surveys of large-scale bedrock roughness, strain grids across the margins of ice-surface highs, and possibly, water-pressure measurements in regions of thin or zero till would help identify and characterize sticky spots.

  11. Spermatid Cyst Polarization in Drosophila Depends upon apkc and the CPEB Family Translational Regulator orb2

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuwa; Tyagi, Sanjay; Schedl, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Mature Drosophila sperm are highly polarized cells—on one side is a nearly 2 mm long flagellar tail that comprises most of the cell, while on the other is the sperm head, which carries the gamete's genetic information. The polarization of the sperm cells commences after meiosis is complete and the 64-cell spermatid cyst begins the process of differentiation. The spermatid nuclei cluster to one side of the cyst, while the flagellar axonemes grows from the other. The elongating spermatid bundles are also polarized with respect to the main axis of the testis; the sperm heads are always oriented basally, while the growing tails extend apically. This orientation within the testes is important for transferring the mature sperm into the seminal vesicles. We show here that orienting cyst polarization with respect to the main axis of the testis depends upon atypical Protein Kinase C (aPKC), a factor implicated in polarity decisions in many different biological contexts. When apkc activity is compromised in the male germline, the direction of cyst polarization within this organ is randomized. Significantly, the mechanisms used to spatially restrict apkc activity to the apical side of the spermatid cyst are different from the canonical cross-regulatory interactions between this kinase and other cell polarity proteins that normally orchestrate polarization. We show that the asymmetric accumulation of aPKC protein in the cyst depends on an mRNA localization pathway that is regulated by the Drosophila CPEB protein Orb2. orb2 is required to properly localize and activate the translation of apkc mRNAs in polarizing spermatid cysts. We also show that orb2 functions not only in orienting cyst polarization with respect to the apical-basal axis of the testis, but also in the process of polarization itself. One of the orb2 targets in this process is its own mRNA. Moreover, the proper execution of this orb2 autoregulatory pathway depends upon apkc. PMID:24830287

  12. Tools made of ice facilitate forming of soft, sticky materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. E.; Ramsey, J. G., Jr.; Schinbeckler, K. D.

    1969-01-01

    Tools made of ice facilitate the forming or shaping of materials that are soft and sticky in the uncured state. The low-temperature of the ice slows the curing of the material, extending the working time available before setup. Handling problems are eliminated because the material does not adhere to the tool, and the melting ice serves as a lubricant.

  13. Stability of sticky particle dynamics and related scalar conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutsinga, Octave

    2009-06-01

    We show the stability of the sticky particle forward flow (x, s, t) [↦]{phi} (x, s, Pt, ut) w.r.t. perturbations of the initial mass distribution P0 and velocity function u0. Then, we deduce the stability of related scalar conservation laws and pressureless gas system.

  14. Mechanism for stickiness suppression during extreme events in Hamiltonian systems.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Taline Suellen; Galuzio, Paulo Paneque; Prado, Thiago de Lima; Viana, Ricardo Luiz; Szezech, José Danilo; Lopes, Sergio Roberto

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we study how hyperbolic and nonhyperbolic regions in the neighborhood of a resonant island perform an important role allowing or forbidding stickiness phenomenon around islands in conservative systems. The vicinity of the island is composed of nonhyperbolic areas that almost prevent the trajectory to visit the island edge. For some specific parameters tiny channels are embedded in the nonhyperbolic area that are associated to hyperbolic fixed points localized in the neighborhood of the islands. Such channels allow the trajectory to be injected in the inner portion of the vicinity. When the trajectory crosses the barrier imposed by the nonhyperbolic regions, it spends a long time abandoning the vicinity of the island, since the barrier also prevents the trajectory from escaping from the neighborhood of the island. In this scenario the nonhyperbolic structures are responsible for the stickiness phenomena and, more than that, the strength of the sticky effect. We show that those properties of the phase space allow us to manipulate the existence of extreme events (and the transport associated to it) responsible for the nonequilibrium fluctuation of the system. In fact we demonstrate that by monitoring very small portions of the phase space (namely, ≈1×10(-5)% of it) it is possible to generate a completely diffusive system eliminating long-time recurrences that result from the stickiness phenomenon. PMID:26172768

  15. Colored Sticky Traps to Selectively Survey Thrips in Cowpea Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Tang, L D; Zhao, H Y; Fu, B L; Han, Y; Liu, K; Wu, J H

    2016-02-01

    The bean flower thrips, Megalurothrips usitatus (Bagrall) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), is an important pest of legume crops in South China. Yellow, blue, or white sticky traps are currently recommended for monitoring and controlling thrips, but it is not known whether one is more efficient than the other or if selectivity could be optimized by trap color. We investigated the response of thrips and beneficial insects to different-colored sticky traps on cowpea, Vigna unguiculata. More thrips were caught on blue, light blue, white, and purple traps than on yellow, green, pink, gray, red, or black traps. There was a weak correlation on the number of thrips caught on yellow traps and survey from flowers (r = 0.139), whereas a strong correlation was found for blue traps and thrips' survey on flowers (r = 0.929). On commercially available sticky traps (Jiaduo®), two and five times more thrips were caught on blue traps than on white and yellow traps, respectively. Otherwise, capture of beneficial insects was 1.7 times higher on yellow than on blue traps. The major natural enemies were the predatory ladybird beetles (63%) and pirate bugs Orius spp. (29%), followed by a number of less representative predators and parasitoids (8%). We conclude the blue sticky trap was the best to monitor thrips on cowpea in South China. PMID:26429578

  16. Mechanism for stickiness suppression during extreme events in Hamiltonian systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Taline Suellen; Galuzio, Paulo Paneque; Prado, Thiago de Lima; Viana, Ricardo Luiz; Szezech, José Danilo; Lopes, Sergio Roberto

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we study how hyperbolic and nonhyperbolic regions in the neighborhood of a resonant island perform an important role allowing or forbidding stickiness phenomenon around islands in conservative systems. The vicinity of the island is composed of nonhyperbolic areas that almost prevent the trajectory to visit the island edge. For some specific parameters tiny channels are embedded in the nonhyperbolic area that are associated to hyperbolic fixed points localized in the neighborhood of the islands. Such channels allow the trajectory to be injected in the inner portion of the vicinity. When the trajectory crosses the barrier imposed by the nonhyperbolic regions, it spends a long time abandoning the vicinity of the island, since the barrier also prevents the trajectory from escaping from the neighborhood of the island. In this scenario the nonhyperbolic structures are responsible for the stickiness phenomena and, more than that, the strength of the sticky effect. We show that those properties of the phase space allow us to manipulate the existence of extreme events (and the transport associated to it) responsible for the nonequilibrium fluctuation of the system. In fact we demonstrate that by monitoring very small portions of the phase space (namely, ≈1 ×10-5% of it) it is possible to generate a completely diffusive system eliminating long-time recurrences that result from the stickiness phenomenon.

  17. Determinants of natural mating success in the cannibalistic orb-web spider Argiope bruennichi.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Stefanie M; Welke, Klaas W; Schneider, Jutta M

    2012-01-01

    Monogynous mating systems (low male mating rates) occur in various taxa and have evolved several times independently in spiders. Monogyny is associated with remarkable male mating strategies and predicted to evolve under a male-biased sex ratio. While male reproductive strategies are well documented and male mating rates are easy to quantify, especially in sexually cannibalistic species, female reproductive strategies, the optimal female mating rate, and the factors that affect the evolution of female mating rates are still unclear. In this study, we examined natural female mating rates and tested the assumption of a male-biased sex ratio and female polyandry in a natural population of Argiope bruennichi in which we controlled female mating status prior to observations. We predicted variation in female mating frequencies as a result of spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the distribution of mature females and males. Females had a low average mating rate of 1.3 and the majority copulated only once. Polyandry did not entirely result from a male-biased sex-ratio but closely matched the rate of male bigamy. Male activity and the probability of polyandry correlated with factors affecting pheromone presence such as virgin females' density. We conclude that a strong sex ratio bias and high female mating rates are not necessary components of monogynous mating systems as long as males protect their paternity effectively and certain frequencies of bigyny stabilise the mating system. PMID:22319628

  18. Determinants of Natural Mating Success in the Cannibalistic Orb-Web Spider Argiope bruennichi

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Stefanie M.; Welke, Klaas W.; Schneider, Jutta M.

    2012-01-01

    Monogynous mating systems (low male mating rates) occur in various taxa and have evolved several times independently in spiders. Monogyny is associated with remarkable male mating strategies and predicted to evolve under a male-biased sex ratio. While male reproductive strategies are well documented and male mating rates are easy to quantify, especially in sexually cannibalistic species, female reproductive strategies, the optimal female mating rate, and the factors that affect the evolution of female mating rates are still unclear. In this study, we examined natural female mating rates and tested the assumption of a male-biased sex ratio and female polyandry in a natural population of Argiope bruennichi in which we controlled female mating status prior to observations. We predicted variation in female mating frequencies as a result of spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the distribution of mature females and males. Females had a low average mating rate of 1.3 and the majority copulated only once. Polyandry did not entirely result from a male-biased sex-ratio but closely matched the rate of male bigamy. Male activity and the probability of polyandry correlated with factors affecting pheromone presence such as virgin females' density. We conclude that a strong sex ratio bias and high female mating rates are not necessary components of monogynous mating systems as long as males protect their paternity effectively and certain frequencies of bigyny stabilise the mating system. PMID:22319628

  19. ORBS: A data reduction software for the imaging Fourier transform spectrometers SpIOMM and SITELLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, T.; Drissen, L.; Joncas, G.

    2012-09-01

    SpIOMM (Spectromètre-Imageur de l'Observatoire du Mont Mégantic) is still the only operational astronomical Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS) capable of obtaining the visible spectrum of every source of light in a field of view of 12 arc-minutes. Even if it has been designed to work with both outputs of the Michelson interferometer, up to now only one output has been used. Here we present ORBS (Outils de Réduction Binoculaire pour SpIOMM/SITELLE), the reduction software we designed in order to take advantage of the two output data. ORBS will also be used to reduce the data of SITELLE (Spectromètre-Imageur pour l' Étude en Long et en Large des raies d' Émissions) { the direct successor of SpIOMM, which will be in operation at the Canada-France- Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) in early 2013. SITELLE will deliver larger data cubes than SpIOMM (up to 2 cubes of 34 Go each). We thus have made a strong effort in optimizing its performance efficiency in terms of speed and memory usage in order to ensure the best compliance with the quality characteristics discussed with the CFHT team. As a result ORBS is now capable of reducing 68 Go of data in less than 20 hours using only 5 Go of random-access memory (RAM).

  20. Simple Model for the Mechanics of Spider Webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyanagi, Yuko; Okumura, Ko

    2010-01-01

    We propose a simple model to describe spider orb webs. The model has a formal analytical solution when no thread elements are broken. When the radial threads are sufficiently strong compared to the spiral threads, the model is free of stress concentrations even when a few spiral threads are broken. This is in contrast with what occurs in common elastic materials. According to our model, spiders can increase the number of spiral threads to make a dense web (to catch small insects) or adjust the number of radial threads (to adapt to environmental conditions or reduce the cost of making the web) without reducing the damage tolerance of the web.

  1. Project O.R.B (Operation Reef Ball): Creating Artificial Reefs, Educating the Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Project O.R.B. (Operation Reef Ball) team at South Plantation High School's Everglades Restoration & Environmental Science Magnet Program is trying to help our ailing south Florida coral reefs by constructing, deploying, and monitoring designed artificial reefs. Students partnered with the Reef Ball Foundation, local concrete companies, state parks, Girl Scouts, Sea Scouts, local universities and environmental agencies to construct concrete reef balls, each weighing approximately 500 lbs (227 kg). Students then deployed two artificial reefs consisting of over 30 concrete reef balls in two sites previously permitted for artificial reef deployment. One artificial reef was placed approximately 1.5 miles (2.4 km) offshore of Golden Beach in Miami-Dade County with the assistance of Florida Atlantic University and their research vessel. A twin reef was deployed at the mouth of the river in Oleta River State Park in Miami. Monitoring and maintenance of the sites is ongoing with semi-annual reports due to the Reef Ball Foundation and DERM (Department of Environmental Resource Management) of Miami-Dade County. A second goal of Project O.R.B. is aligned with the Florida Local Action Strategy, the Southeast Florida Coral Reef Initiative, and the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force, all of which point out the importance of awareness and education as key components to the health of our coral reefs. Project O.R.B. team members developed and published an activity book targeting elementary school students. Outreach events incorporate cascade learning where high school students teach elementary and middle school students about various aspects of coral reefs through interactive "edu-tainment" modules. Attendees learn about water sampling, salinity, beach erosion, surface runoff, water cycle, ocean zones, anatomy of coral, human impact on corals, and characteristics of a well-designed artificial reef. Middle school students snorkel on the artificial reef to witness first-hand the success

  2. OHIO RIVER BASIN ENERGY STUDY: AIR QUALITY AND RELATED IMPACTS. VOLUME I. DOCUMENTATION IN SUPPORT OF KEY ORBES AIR QUALITY FINDINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report was prepared as part of the Ohio River Basin Energy Study (ORBES), a multi-disciplinary research program supported by the Environmental Protection Agency. The extensive air quality analysis undertaken for the ORBES included examination of pollutant emissions and resul...

  3. The Drosophila CPEB Protein Orb2 Has a Novel Expression Pattern and Is Important for Asymmetric Cell Division and Nervous System Function

    PubMed Central

    Hafer, Nathaniel; Xu, Shuwa; Bhat, Krishna Moorthi; Schedl, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding (CPEB) proteins bind mRNAs to regulate their localization and translation. While the first CPEBs discovered were germline specific, subsequent studies indicate that CPEBs also function in many somatic tissues including the nervous system. Drosophila has two CPEB family members. One of these, orb, plays a key role in the establishment of polarity axes in the developing egg and early embryo, but has no known somatic functions or expression outside of the germline. Here we characterize the other Drosophila CPEB, orb2. Unlike orb, orb2 mRNA and protein are found throughout development in many different somatic tissues. While orb2 mRNA and protein of maternal origin are distributed uniformly in early embryos, this pattern changes as development proceeds and by midembryogenesis the highest levels are found in the CNS and PNS. In the embryonic CNS, Orb2 appears to be concentrated in cell bodies and mostly absent from the longitudinal and commissural axon tracts. In contrast, in the adult brain, the protein is seen in axonal and dendritic terminals. Lethal effects are observed for both RNAi knockdowns and orb2 mutant alleles while surviving adults display locomotion and behavioral defects. We also show that orb2 funtions in asymmetric division of stem cells and precursor cells during the development of the embryonic nervous system and mesoderm. PMID:21900268

  4. A sticky situation: the unexpected stability of malaria elimination.

    PubMed

    Smith, David L; Cohen, Justin M; Chiyaka, Christinah; Johnston, Geoffrey; Gething, Peter W; Gosling, Roly; Buckee, Caroline O; Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Hay, Simon I; Tatem, Andrew J

    2013-08-01

    Malaria eradication involves eliminating malaria from every country where transmission occurs. Current theory suggests that the post-elimination challenges of remaining malaria-free by stopping transmission from imported malaria will have onerous operational and financial requirements. Although resurgent malaria has occurred in a majority of countries that tried but failed to eliminate malaria, a review of resurgence in countries that successfully eliminated finds only four such failures out of 50 successful programmes. Data documenting malaria importation and onwards transmission in these countries suggests malaria transmission potential has declined by more than 50-fold (i.e. more than 98%) since before elimination. These outcomes suggest that elimination is a surprisingly stable state. Elimination's 'stickiness' must be explained either by eliminating countries starting off qualitatively different from non-eliminating countries or becoming different once elimination was achieved. Countries that successfully eliminated were wealthier and had lower baseline endemicity than those that were unsuccessful, but our analysis shows that those same variables were at best incomplete predictors of the patterns of resurgence. Stability is reinforced by the loss of immunity to disease and by the health system's increasing capacity to control malaria transmission after elimination through routine treatment of cases with antimalarial drugs supplemented by malaria outbreak control. Human travel patterns reinforce these patterns; as malaria recedes, fewer people carry malaria from remote endemic areas to remote areas where transmission potential remains high. Establishment of an international resource with backup capacity to control large outbreaks can make elimination stickier, increase the incentives for countries to eliminate, and ensure steady progress towards global eradication. Although available evidence supports malaria elimination's stickiness at moderate

  5. Temperature dependence of diffusion properties of soft sticky dipole water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ming-Liang; Brooks, Bernard R.; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2006-04-01

    The isobaric diffusivities for the soft sticky dipole water model between 230 and 330 K were studied in molecular dynamics simulations using Ewald summations for the long-range interactions. This simple single-point, angularly dependent model with parameters optimized at room temperature reproduces the experimental diffusion rates over a wide range of temperatures better than multi-point models. Its ability to reproduce the unusual temperature dependence of the diffusivities of supercooled water indicates the tetrahedral nature of water is important. Moreover, comparisons with other models indicate more tetrahedral potentials correlate with increasing the so-called Angell critical temperature and decreasing power of the temperature dependence.

  6. An orb-weaver spider exploits an ant–acacia mutualism for enemy-free space

    PubMed Central

    Styrsky, John D

    2014-01-01

    Exploiters of protection mutualisms are assumed to represent an important threat for the stability of those mutualisms, but empirical evidence for the commonness or relevance of exploiters is limited. Here, I describe results from a manipulative study showing that an orb-weaver spider, Eustala oblonga, inhabits an ant-acacia for protection from predators. This spider is unique in the orb-weaver family in that it associates closely with both a specific host plant and ants. I tested the protective effect of acacia ants on E. oblonga by comparing spider abundance over time on acacias with ants and on acacias from which entire ant colonies were experimentally removed. Both juvenile and adult spider abundance significantly decreased over time on acacias without ants. Concomitantly, the combined abundance of potential spider predators increased over time on acacias without ants. These results suggest that ant protection of the ant-acacia Acacia melanocerus also protects the spiders, thus supporting the hypothesis that E. oblonga exploits the ant–acacia mutualism for enemy-free space. Although E. oblonga takes advantage of the protection services of ants, it likely exacts little to no cost and should not threaten the stability of the ant–acacia mutualism. Indeed, the potential threat of exploiter species to protection mutualisms in general may be limited to species that exploit the material rewards traded in such mutualisms rather than the protection services. PMID:24558583

  7. Synaptic Orb2A Bridges Memory Acquisition and Late Memory Consolidation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Krüttner, Sebastian; Traunmüller, Lisa; Dag, Ugur; Jandrasits, Katharina; Stepien, Barbara; Iyer, Nirmala; Fradkin, Lee G; Noordermeer, Jasprina N; Mensh, Brett D; Keleman, Krystyna

    2015-06-30

    To adapt to an ever-changing environment, animals consolidate some, but not all, learning experiences to long-term memory. In mammals, long-term memory consolidation often involves neural pathway reactivation hours after memory acquisition. It is not known whether this delayed-reactivation schema is common across the animal kingdom or how information is stored during the delay period. Here, we show that, during courtship suppression learning, Drosophila exhibits delayed long-term memory consolidation. We also show that the same class of dopaminergic neurons engaged earlier in memory acquisition is also both necessary and sufficient for delayed long-term memory consolidation. Furthermore, we present evidence that, during learning, the translational regulator Orb2A tags specific synapses of mushroom body neurons for later consolidation. Consolidation involves the subsequent recruitment of Orb2B and the activity-dependent synthesis of CaMKII. Thus, our results provide evidence for the role of a neuromodulated, synapse-restricted molecule bridging memory acquisition and long-term memory consolidation in a learning animal. PMID:26095367

  8. Basal characteristics of the main sticky spot on the ice plain of Whillans Ice Stream, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luthra, Tarun; Anandakrishnan, Sridhar; Winberry, J. Paul; Alley, Richard B.; Holschuh, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the processes that affect streaming ice flow and the mass balance of glaciers and ice sheets requires sound knowledge of their subglacial environments. Previous studies have shown that an extensive deformable subglacial sediment layer favors fast ice-stream flow. However, areas of high basal drag, termed sticky spots, are of particular interest because they inhibit the fast flow of the overriding ice. The stick-slip behavior of Whillans Ice Stream (WIS) is perhaps the most conspicuous manifestation of a subglacial sticky spot. We present new ice-thickness and seismic-reflection measurements collected over the main sticky spot in the ice plain of WIS, allowing us to elucidate its role in the behavior of the ice stream. Ice-thickness and surface-elevation data show that the sticky spot occupies a subglacial topographic high. Water flow in response to the hydrological potential gradient will be routed around the sticky spot if effective pressures are similar on the sticky spot and elsewhere. The seismic experiment imaged a laterally continuous basal layer approximately 6 m thick, having compressional wave velocities of greater than 1800 m s-1 and density greater than 1800 kg m-3, indicative of a till layer that is stiffer than corresponding till beneath well-lubricated parts of the ice stream. This layer likely continues to deform under the higher shear stress of the sticky spot, and some water may be pumped up onto the sticky spot during motion events.

  9. Measurement of Sticky Point Temperature of Coffee Powder with a Rheometer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sticky point temperature (Ts) measurement for hygroscopic food and biomaterial powders is traditionally performed with complex glass instruments. This property is used to characterize material stickiness, which substantially affects the flow and physical behavior of powders. In this research study w...

  10. Fecundity increase supports adaptive radiation hypothesis in spider web evolution

    PubMed Central

    Coddington, Jonathan A; Agnarsson, Ingi

    2009-01-01

    Identifying the mechanisms driving adaptive radiations is key to explaining the diversity of life. The extreme reliance of spiders upon silk for survival provides an exceptional system in which to link patterns of diversification to adaptive changes in silk use. Most of the world’s 41,000 species of spiders belong to two apical lineages of spiders that exhibit quite different silk ecologies, distinct from their ancestors. Orb spiders spin highly stereotyped webs that are suspended in air and utilize a chemical glue to make them adhesive. RTA clade spiders mostly abandoned silk capture webs altogether. We recently proposed that these two clades present very different evolutionary routes of achieving the same key innovation—escape from the constraints imposed by spinning webs that contain a relatively costly type of physically adhesive cribellate silk. Here, we test the prediction that orb and RTA clade spiders are not only more diverse, but also have higher fecundity than other spiders. We show that RTA clade spiders average 23% higher fecundity and orb spiders average 123% higher fecundity than their ancestors. This supports a functional link between the adaptive escape from cribellate silk and increased resource allocation to reproduction in spiders. PMID:20195450

  11. Tuning the instrument: sonic properties in the spider's web.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, B; Soler, A; Siviour, C R; Zaera, R; Vollrath, F

    2016-09-01

    Spider orb webs are multifunctional, acting to absorb prey impact energy and transmit vibratory information to the spider. This paper explores the links between silk material properties, propagation of vibrations within webs and the ability of the spider to control and balance web function. Combining experimental and modelling approaches, we contrast transverse and longitudinal wave propagation in the web. It emerged that both transverse and longitudinal wave amplitude in the web can be adjusted through changes in web tension and dragline silk stiffness, i.e. properties that can be controlled by the spider. In particular, we propose that dragline silk supercontraction may have evolved as a control mechanism for these multifunctional fibres. The various degrees of active influence on web engineering reveals the extraordinary ability of spiders to shape the physical properties of their self-made materials and architectures to affect biological functionality, balancing trade-offs between structural and sensory functions. PMID:27605164

  12. Physical characterization of the liquid adhesive from orb-weaving spiders.

    PubMed

    Torres, Fernando G; Troncoso, Omar P; Cavalie, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Orb-weaving spiders produce bioadhesives that are used to capture their prey. In this paper, the physical properties of these adhesives are characterised. The liquid adhesive from Argiope argentata spiders has been studied and the morphological properties of the droplets, including size, shape and volume were determined. An estimation of viscosity and Young's modulus using atomic force microscopy has also been carried out. Morphological characterization confirmed that the liquid adhesive displayed a typical beads-on-a-string (BOAS) morphology on the silk fibres. The experimental data confirmed that the elastic modulus of the liquid adhesive from A. argentata was in the range 20-100kPa which is in agreement with the Dahlquist criterion for adhesives. PMID:24268267

  13. Spiders that decorate their webs at higher frequency intercept more prey and grow faster

    PubMed Central

    Li, Daiqin

    2005-01-01

    Many orb-weaving spiders decorate their webs with extra, bright white, ultraviolet light reflecting silk. Previous studies suggest that these decorations increase a spider's foraging efficiency by improving web attractiveness, which is known as the prey-attraction hypothesis. One assumption of this hypothesis is that individuals which decorate their webs at a higher frequency are expected to have a higher growth rate. Using a decoration-building orb-weaving spider, Argiope versicolor, I show a strong positive relationship between the growth rate in terms of weight gain and the frequency of decoration-building, as well as the rate of insect interception. This is the first study to reveal a fitness consequence of decorating behaviour in spiders. PMID:16096085

  14. Overexpression of a homopeptide repeat-containing bHLH protein gene (OrbHLH001) from Dongxiang Wild Rice confers freezing and salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Guo, Siyi; Zhao, Yuan; Chen, Dazhou; Chong, Kang; Xu, Yunyuan

    2010-09-01

    Dongxiang Wild Rice (Oryza rufipogon) is the northernmost wild rice in the world known to date and has extremely high cold tolerance and many other adversity-resistant properties. To identify the genes responsible for the high stress tolerance, we isolated and characterized a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein gene OrbHLH001 from Dongxiang Wild Rice. The gene encodes an ICE1-like protein containing multiple homopeptide repeats. Expression of OrbHLH001 is induced by salt stress and is predominant in the shoots of wild rice seedlings. Overexpression of OrbHLH001 enhanced the tolerance to freezing and salt stresses in transgenic Arabidopsis. Examination of the expression of cold-responsive genes in transgenic Arabidopsis showed that the function of OrbHLH001 differs from that of ICE1 and is independent of a CBF/DREB1 cold-response pathway. PMID:20559833

  15. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor from wild rice (OrbHLH2) improves tolerance to salt- and osmotic stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Li, Fei; Wang, Jin-Lan; Ma, Yun; Chong, Kang; Xu, Yun-yuan

    2009-08-15

    Salt stress adversely affects plant growth and development. Some plants reduce the damage of high-salt stress by expressing a series of salt-responsive genes. Studies of the molecular mechanism of the salt-stress response have focused on the characterization of components involved in signal perception and transduction. In the present work, we cloned and characterized a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) encoding gene, OrbHLH2, from wild rice (Oryza rufipogon), which encodes a homologue protein of ICE1 in Arabidopsis. OrbHLH2 protein localized in the nucleus. Overexpression of OrbHLH2 in Arabidopsis conferred increased tolerance to salt and osmotic stress, and the stress-responsive genes DREB1A/CBF3, RD29A, COR15A and KIN1 were upregulated in transgenic plants. Abscisic acid (ABA) treatment showed a similar effect on the seed germination or transcriptional expression of stress-responsive genes in both wild type and OrbHLH2-overexpressed plants, which implies that OrbHLH2 does not depend on ABA in responding to salt stress. OrbHLH2 may function as a transcription factor and positively regulate salt-stress signals independent of ABA in Arabidopsis, which provides some useful data for improving salt tolerance in crops. PMID:19324458

  16. Removal of Wax and Stickies from OCC by Flotation

    SciTech Connect

    M. R. Doshi; J. Dyer

    2000-01-31

    Laboratory research indicates that wax is amenable to removal by froth flotation provided it is free or detached from the fiber. The only effective means, at this time, of maximizing detachment of wax is through the use of low consistency pulping at temperatures above the melting point of wax. Wax removal from WCC through washing, flotation, or a combination of both was approximately 90% in these laboratory studies, indicating that not all of the wax is detached from fibers. These results were summarized in Annual Report 1, December 1, 1997 to November 30, 1998. Pilot trials were conducted in which the authors simulated a conventional OCC repulping process with and without flotation. Additional aggressive washing and water clarification were also examined during the study. The inclusion of flotation in the OCC stock preparation system significantly improved the removal of wax spots and extractable material from the furnish. Based on this study, the authors predict that a compact flotation system with 2 lb surfactant/ton of fiber would improve the OCC pulp quality with regard to wax spots by 60% and would not negatively affect strength properties. Flotation losses would be in the 2-5% range. Two mill trials were conducted during the last quarter of the project. One trial was carried out at Green Bay Packaging, Green Bay, WI, and a second trial was conducted at Menasha Corporation, Otsego, MI. A 250-liter Voith Sulzer Ecocell was used to evaluate the removal of wax and stickies from the OCC processing systems at these two mills. The inclusion of flotation in the OCC stock preparation system significantly improved the removal of wax spots from the furnish. The data indicate that flotation was more effective in removing wax and stickies than reverse cleaners. The mill trials have demonstrated that flotation can be substituted for or replace existing reverse cleaning systems and, in some cases, can replace dispersion systems. In this manner, the use of flotation can

  17. A sticky situation: the unexpected stability of malaria elimination

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David L.; Cohen, Justin M.; Chiyaka, Christinah; Johnston, Geoffrey; Gething, Peter W.; Gosling, Roly; Buckee, Caroline O.; Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Hay, Simon I.; Tatem, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Malaria eradication involves eliminating malaria from every country where transmission occurs. Current theory suggests that the post-elimination challenges of remaining malaria-free by stopping transmission from imported malaria will have onerous operational and financial requirements. Although resurgent malaria has occurred in a majority of countries that tried but failed to eliminate malaria, a review of resurgence in countries that successfully eliminated finds only four such failures out of 50 successful programmes. Data documenting malaria importation and onwards transmission in these countries suggests malaria transmission potential has declined by more than 50-fold (i.e. more than 98%) since before elimination. These outcomes suggest that elimination is a surprisingly stable state. Elimination's ‘stickiness’ must be explained either by eliminating countries starting off qualitatively different from non-eliminating countries or becoming different once elimination was achieved. Countries that successfully eliminated were wealthier and had lower baseline endemicity than those that were unsuccessful, but our analysis shows that those same variables were at best incomplete predictors of the patterns of resurgence. Stability is reinforced by the loss of immunity to disease and by the health system's increasing capacity to control malaria transmission after elimination through routine treatment of cases with antimalarial drugs supplemented by malaria outbreak control. Human travel patterns reinforce these patterns; as malaria recedes, fewer people carry malaria from remote endemic areas to remote areas where transmission potential remains high. Establishment of an international resource with backup capacity to control large outbreaks can make elimination stickier, increase the incentives for countries to eliminate, and ensure steady progress towards global eradication. Although available evidence supports malaria elimination's stickiness at moderate

  18. The Arabic original of (ps.) Māshā'allāh's Liber de orbe: its date and authorship.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Taro

    2015-06-01

    Liber de orbe, attributed to Māshā'allāh (d. c.815), a court astrologer of the Abbasid dynasty, was one of the earliest Latin sources of Aristotelian physics. Until recently, its Arabic original could not be identified among Arabic works. Through extensive examination of Arabic manuscripts on exact sciences, I found two manuscripts containing the Arabic text of this Latin work, although neither of them is ascribed to Māshā'allāh: Berlin, Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin, Ms. or. oct. 273, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania University Library, MS LJS 439. In this paper, I describe these two manuscripts in great detail, so that I confirm their originality of the Liber de orbe, and then by analysing the contents of the Arabic text, I deny the attribution to Māshā'allāh, and identify the title and author as Book on the Configuration of the Orb by Dūnash ibn Tamīm, a disciple of Isaac Israeli (c.855-c.955). PMID:25921684

  19. ORBS, ORCS, OACS, a Software Suite for Data Reduction and Analysis of the Hyperspectral Imagers SITELLE and SpIOMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, T.; Drissen, L.; Joncas, G.

    2015-09-01

    SITELLE (installed in 2015 at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope) and SpIOMM (a prototype attached to the Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic) are the first Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometers (IFTS) capable of obtaining a hyperspectral data cube which samples a 12 arc minutes field of view into four millions of visible spectra. The result of each observation is made up of two interferometric data cubes which need to be merged, corrected, transformed and calibrated in order to get a spectral cube of the observed region ready to be analysed. ORBS is a fully automatic data reduction software that has been entirely designed for this purpose. The data size (up to 68 Gb for larger science cases) and the computational needs have been challenging and the highly parallelized object-oriented architecture of ORBS reflects the solutions adopted which made possible to process 68 Gb of raw data in less than 11 hours using 8 cores and 22.6 Gb of RAM. It is based on a core framework (ORB) that has been designed to support the whole software suite for data analysis (ORCS and OACS), data simulation (ORUS) and data acquisition (IRIS). They all aim to provide a strong basis for the creation and development of specialized analysis modules that could benefit the scientific community working with SITELLE and SpIOMM.

  20. Facebook Influence among Incoming College Freshmen: Sticky Cues and Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Jonathan; Zhang, Chong; Eickhoff, Jens; Moreno, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol displays on Facebook are ever-present and can be socially desirable for college students. As problematic drinking is a concern for college students, this research sought to understand how different types of information on a Facebook page influence likelihood to drink. Telephone interviews were conducted with 338 incoming college freshmen from two large national universities. Data were obtained from a vignette prompt which presented a scenario in which a senior college student’s Facebook profile displayed wall-posts, pictures, and status updates that were drinking-related or pro-social in nature. Participants were asked to report intention to drink alcohol with that student if together at a party. Findings supported the hypotheses: wall-posts were most influential (the stickiest), followed by pictures, followed by status updates. Findings provide additional empirical support for established online impression formation patterns, and additionally provide evidence that virtual cues are being ingrained as schema in interpersonal communication. These results are discussed in relation to the conception of “sticky cues” in impression formation. PMID:25328264

  1. A Simple ``Sticky Disc'' Model for Crystalline and Amorphous Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, Adrian; Chubynsky, Nikita; Naumis, Gerardo; Thorpe, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we study the structural and thermodynamic behavior of a simple one component network forming model made up of ``sticky discs.'' Central and bond bending forces was included, modeling such interactions as a simple square well radial and angular three body term in the potential respectively. The main feature of this model is the ability to form crystalline and amorphous networks upon cooling, similar to that obtained using the so called WWW methodology to describe the network of some vitreous structures [1]. With the ``pebble game'' algorithm [2], we evaluate the number of degrees of freedom and the amount of stress in both the amorphous and crystalline structures. We discuss the connection between the configurational entropy (associated with the topology) and the degrees of freedom. Other effects such as elasticity of these structures are also discussed. 1. Wooten, F., Winer, K. and Weaire, D., Phys. Rev. Lett., 54 1392- 1395 (1985). 2. Jacobs, D.J. and Thorpe, M.F., Phys. Rev. Lett., 75 4051- 4054 (1995).

  2. Facebook Influence among Incoming College Freshmen: Sticky Cues and Alcohol.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Jonathan; Zhang, Chong; Eickhoff, Jens; Moreno, Megan

    2014-02-01

    Alcohol displays on Facebook are ever-present and can be socially desirable for college students. As problematic drinking is a concern for college students, this research sought to understand how different types of information on a Facebook page influence likelihood to drink. Telephone interviews were conducted with 338 incoming college freshmen from two large national universities. Data were obtained from a vignette prompt which presented a scenario in which a senior college student's Facebook profile displayed wall-posts, pictures, and status updates that were drinking-related or pro-social in nature. Participants were asked to report intention to drink alcohol with that student if together at a party. Findings supported the hypotheses: wall-posts were most influential (the stickiest), followed by pictures, followed by status updates. Findings provide additional empirical support for established online impression formation patterns, and additionally provide evidence that virtual cues are being ingrained as schema in interpersonal communication. These results are discussed in relation to the conception of "sticky cues" in impression formation. PMID:25328264

  3. The Stickiness of Micrometer-sized Water-ice Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, B.; Blum, J.

    2015-01-01

    Water ice is one of the most abundant materials in dense molecular clouds and in the outer reaches of protoplanetary disks. In contrast to other materials (e.g., silicates), water ice is assumed to be stickier due to its higher specific surface energy, leading to faster or more efficient growth in mutual collisions. However, experiments investigating the stickiness of water ice have been scarce, particularly in the astrophysically relevant micrometer-sized region and at low temperatures. In this work, we present an experimental setup to grow aggregates composed of μm-sized water-ice particles, which we used to measure the sticking and erosion thresholds of the ice particles at different temperatures between 114 K and 260 K. We show with our experiments that for low temperatures (below ~210 K), μm-sized water-ice particles stick below a threshold velocity of 9.6 m s-1, which is approximately 10 times higher than the sticking threshold of μm-sized silica particles. Furthermore, erosion of the grown ice aggregates is observed for velocities above 15.3 m s-1. A comparison of the experimentally derived sticking threshold with model predictions is performed to determine important material properties of water ice, i.e., the specific surface energy and the viscous relaxation time. Our experimental results indicate that the presence of water ice in the outer reaches of protoplanetary disks can enhance the growth of planetesimals by direct sticking of particles.

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome of orb-weaving spider Araneus ventricosus (Araneae: Araneidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng-Liang; Li, Chao; Fang, Wen-Yuan; Yu, Xiao-Ping

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of an orb-weaving spider Araneus ventricosus was determined. It is a circular molecule of 14,617 bp in length and contains a standard set of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs and a control region. The A + T content of the overall base composition of majority strand (J-strand) is 73.4% (T: 38.5%; C: 10.1%; A: 34.9%; G: 16.5%). Among protein-coding genes, one gene (COI) begins with TTA, two (ATP6 and ND4) start with ATA, three (COII, COIII and ND6) begin with ATT and other seven genes use ATT as initiation codon. COIII and ND3 end with an incomplete stop codon (T), and ND1, ND2 and Cytb are terminated with TAG, while all other genes end with TAA as stop codon. Two regions including tandem repeats were found in the control region (D-loop): a 106 bp sequence tandemly repeated twice and a 195 bp sequence tandemly repeated twice with a partial third (120 bp). PMID:25329288

  5. Potential of yellow sticky traps for lady beetle survey in cotton.

    PubMed

    Parajulee, M N; Slosser, J E

    2003-02-01

    A 2-yr study was conducted to investigate the potential of using yellow sticky traps to survey lady beetles in cotton and to quantify seasonal activity patterns. The performance of sticky traps was compared with that of a 2-cycle vacuum sampler. The most common lady beetle species captured by sticky traps and vacuum sampler in cotton were Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville and Scymnus loewii Mulsant. Sticky traps captured significantly more of both species of lady beetles, had greater capture efficiency, and more effectively detected lady beetles compared with the vacuum sampler. These data indicate that the sticky trap can be a valuable tool in monitoring lady beetle populations in cotton. In the second part of this study, a year-round survey of lady beetle populations in the periphery of a cotton farm using sticky traps showed that lady beetles remained active throughout the year in the Texas Rolling Plains, but the activity was influenced by winter severity. Over a 2-yr period, H. convergens, S. loewii, Coccinella septempunctata (L.), and Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant) comprised 89.6, 8.2, 1.9, and 0.3% of the specimens, respectively. Sticky trap captures were affected by year, trap height, and cropping season. Traps placed at 0.75 m above ground captured significantly more (80%) lady beetles than traps placed at 1.50 m (20%) above ground; traps at 0.75 m above ground also detected the rarer species while the traps at 1.50 m above ground detected only the abundant species. Trap captures were higher during the noncotton season (November to April) compared with the cotton season (May to October). A significant positive correlation between cotton aphid abundance during the growing season and H. convergens abundance during the following noncotton season was also detected, indicating a significant movement of H. convergens from cotton to the periphery of the farm to seek refuge after cotton termination. PMID:12650368

  6. THE STICKINESS OF MICROMETER-SIZED WATER-ICE PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Gundlach, B.; Blum, J.

    2015-01-01

    Water ice is one of the most abundant materials in dense molecular clouds and in the outer reaches of protoplanetary disks. In contrast to other materials (e.g., silicates), water ice is assumed to be stickier due to its higher specific surface energy, leading to faster or more efficient growth in mutual collisions. However, experiments investigating the stickiness of water ice have been scarce, particularly in the astrophysically relevant micrometer-sized region and at low temperatures. In this work, we present an experimental setup to grow aggregates composed of μm-sized water-ice particles, which we used to measure the sticking and erosion thresholds of the ice particles at different temperatures between 114 K and 260 K. We show with our experiments that for low temperatures (below ∼210 K), μm-sized water-ice particles stick below a threshold velocity of 9.6 m s{sup –1}, which is approximately 10 times higher than the sticking threshold of μm-sized silica particles. Furthermore, erosion of the grown ice aggregates is observed for velocities above 15.3 m s{sup –1}. A comparison of the experimentally derived sticking threshold with model predictions is performed to determine important material properties of water ice, i.e., the specific surface energy and the viscous relaxation time. Our experimental results indicate that the presence of water ice in the outer reaches of protoplanetary disks can enhance the growth of planetesimals by direct sticking of particles.

  7. Sticky Particles: Modeling Rigid Aggregates in Dense Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrine, Randall P.; Richardson, D. C.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2008-09-01

    We present progress on our study of planetary ring dynamics. We use local N-body simulations to examine small patches of dense rings in which self-gravity and mutual collisions dominate the dynamics of the ring material. We use the numerical code pkdgrav to model the motions of 105-7 ring particles, using a sliding patch model with modified periodic boundary conditions. The exact nature of planetary ring particles is not well understood. If covered in a frost-like layer, such irregular surfaces may allow for weak cohesion between colliding particles. Thus we have recently added new functionality to our model, allowing "sticky particles” to lock into rigid aggregates while in a rotating reference frame. This capability allows particles to adhere to one another, forming irregularly shaped aggregates that move as rigid bodies. (The bonds between particles can subsequently break, given sufficient stress.) These aggregates have greater strength than gravitationally bound "rubble piles,” and are thus able to grow larger and survive longer under similar stresses. This new functionality allows us to explore planetary ring properties and dynamics in a new way, by self-consistently forming (and destroying) non-spherical aggregates and moonlets via cohesive forces, while in a rotating frame, subjected to planetary tides. (We are not aware of any similar implementations in other existing models.) These improvements allow us to study the many effects that particle aggregation may have on the rings, such as overall ring structure; wake formation; equilibrium properties of non-spherical particles, like pitch angle, orientation, shape, size distribution, and spin; and the surface properties of the ring material. We present test cases and the latest results from this new model. This work is supported by a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship.

  8. Formaldehyde-induced acentric chromosome fragments and chromosome stickiness in Chortophaga neuroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Dowd, M.A.; Gaulden, M.E.; Proctor, B.L.; Seibert, G.B.

    1986-01-01

    Embryos of the grasshopper Chortophaga viridifasciata were exposed in vitro to formaldehyde (FA), as formalin, at concentrations ranging from 10/sup -8/ M (0.0003 ppm) to 10/sup -3/ M (30 ppm) at 38/sup 0/C. A low frequency of distinct acentric chromosome fragments was observed in the neuroblasts after 1 hr exposure to 7.5 x 10/sup -4/ or 10/sup -3/ M FA plus 3 hr recovery, but not at lower concentrations, even with 4 hr exposure. Neuroblasts with sticky chromosomes were observed at 10/sup -4/, 7.5 x 10/sup -4/, and 10/sup -3/ M FA, the percent of cells with slight, moderate, or severe stickiness varying with FA concentrations. Fragments were associated with the sticky chromosomes. It is concluded that the distinct acentric fragments induced by FA result from breakage at a single sticky point (slight stickiness) between separating sister chromatids. The chromosome effects observed probably result from the action of daughter products that are formed by the interaction of FA with culture medium components, especially the fetal calf serum.

  9. Short unligated sticky ends enable the observation of circularised DNA by atomic force and electron microscopies.

    PubMed

    Révet, B; Fourcade, A

    1998-05-01

    A comparative study of the stabilisation of DNA sticky ends by divalent cations was carried out by atomic force microscopy (AFM), electron microscopy and agarose gel electrophoresis. At room temperature, molecules bearing such extremities are immediately oligomerised or circularised by addition of Mg2+or Ca2+. This phenomenon, more clearly detected by AFM, requires the presence of uranyl salt, which stabilises the structures induced by Mg2+or Ca2+. DNA fragments were obtained by restriction enzymes producing sticky ends of 2 or 4 nucleotides (nt) in length with different guanine plus cytosine (GC) contents. The stability of the pairing is high when ends of 4 nt display a 100% GC-content. In that case, 95% of DNA fragments are maintained circular by the divalent cations, although 2 nt GC-sticky ends are sufficient for a stable pairing. DNA fragments with one blunt end and the other sticky appear as dimers in the presence of Mg2+. Dimerisation was analysed by varying the lengths and concentrations of DNA fragments, the base composition of the sticky ends, and also the temperature. Our observation provides a new powerful tool for construction of inverted dimers, and circularisation, ligation analysis or short bases sequence interaction studies. PMID:9547265

  10. Mirid (Hemiptera: Heteroptera) specialists of sticky plants: adaptations, interactions, and ecological implications.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Alfred G; Krimmel, Billy A

    2015-01-01

    Sticky plants-those having glandular trichomes (hairs) that produce adhesive, viscous exudates-can impede the movement of, and entrap, generalist insects. Disparate arthropod groups have adapted to these widespread and taxonomically diverse plants, yet their interactions with glandular hosts rarely are incorporated into broad ecological theory. Ecologists and entomologists might be unaware of even well-documented examples of insects that are sticky-plant specialists. The hemipteran family Miridae (more specifically, the omnivorous Dicyphini: Dicyphina) is the best-known group of arthropods that specializes on sticky plants. In the first synthesis of relationships with glandular plants for any insect family, we review mirid interactions with sticky hosts, including their adaptations (behavioral, morphological, and physiological) and mutualisms with carnivorous plants, and the ecological and agricultural implications of mirid-sticky plant systems. We propose that mirid research applies generally to tritrophic interactions on trichome-defended plants, enhances an understanding of insect-plant interactions, and provides information useful in managing crop pests. PMID:25564742

  11. Spatial control of translation repression and polarized growth by conserved NDR kinase Orb6 and RNA-binding protein Sts5

    PubMed Central

    Nuñez, Illyce; Rodriguez Pino, Marbelys; Wiley, David J; Das, Maitreyi E; Chen, Chuan; Goshima, Tetsuya; Kume, Kazunori; Hirata, Dai; Toda, Takashi; Verde, Fulvia

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins contribute to the formation of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granules by phase transition, but regulatory mechanisms are not fully understood. Conserved fission yeast NDR (Nuclear Dbf2-Related) kinase Orb6 governs cell morphogenesis in part by spatially controlling Cdc42 GTPase. Here we describe a novel, independent function for Orb6 kinase in negatively regulating the recruitment of RNA-binding protein Sts5 into RNPs to promote polarized cell growth. We find that Orb6 kinase inhibits Sts5 recruitment into granules, its association with processing (P) bodies, and degradation of Sts5-bound mRNAs by promoting Sts5 interaction with 14-3-3 protein Rad24. Many Sts5-bound mRNAs encode essential factors for polarized cell growth, and Orb6 kinase spatially and temporally controls the extent of Sts5 granule formation. Disruption of this control system affects cell morphology and alters the pattern of polarized cell growth, revealing a role for Orb6 kinase in the spatial control of translational repression that enables normal cell morphogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14216.001 PMID:27474797

  12. Spatial control of translation repression and polarized growth by conserved NDR kinase Orb6 and RNA-binding protein Sts5.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, Illyce; Rodriguez Pino, Marbelys; Wiley, David J; Das, Maitreyi E; Chen, Chuan; Goshima, Tetsuya; Kume, Kazunori; Hirata, Dai; Toda, Takashi; Verde, Fulvia

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins contribute to the formation of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granules by phase transition, but regulatory mechanisms are not fully understood. Conserved fission yeast NDR (Nuclear Dbf2-Related) kinase Orb6 governs cell morphogenesis in part by spatially controlling Cdc42 GTPase. Here we describe a novel, independent function for Orb6 kinase in negatively regulating the recruitment of RNA-binding protein Sts5 into RNPs to promote polarized cell growth. We find that Orb6 kinase inhibits Sts5 recruitment into granules, its association with processing (P) bodies, and degradation of Sts5-bound mRNAs by promoting Sts5 interaction with 14-3-3 protein Rad24. Many Sts5-bound mRNAs encode essential factors for polarized cell growth, and Orb6 kinase spatially and temporally controls the extent of Sts5 granule formation. Disruption of this control system affects cell morphology and alters the pattern of polarized cell growth, revealing a role for Orb6 kinase in the spatial control of translational repression that enables normal cell morphogenesis. PMID:27474797

  13. A New Stratified Sampling Procedure which Decreases Error Estimation of Varroa Mite Number on Sticky Boards.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, A; Durand, E; Maisonnasse, A; Vallon, J; Le Conte, Y

    2015-06-01

    A new procedure of stratified sampling is proposed in order to establish an accurate estimation of Varroa destructor populations on sticky bottom boards of the hive. It is based on the spatial sampling theory that recommends using regular grid stratification in the case of spatially structured process. The distribution of varroa mites on sticky board being observed as spatially structured, we designed a sampling scheme based on a regular grid with circles centered on each grid element. This new procedure is then compared with a former method using partially random sampling. Relative error improvements are exposed on the basis of a large sample of simulated sticky boards (n=20,000) which provides a complete range of spatial structures, from a random structure to a highly frame driven structure. The improvement of varroa mite number estimation is then measured by the percentage of counts with an error greater than a given level. PMID:26470273

  14. Roles of water and solids composition in the control of glass transition and stickiness of milk powders.

    PubMed

    Silalai, Nattiga; Roos, Yrjö H

    2010-06-01

    Plasticization and glass transition of amorphous components in food powders often result in stickiness and caking. The glass transition temperature (T(g)) of milk powders was measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and a viscometer method was used to determine sticky-point temperatures. Water sorption isotherms were established for varying solids compositions. Lactose contents were analyzed by high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAE-PAD) and proteins were identified using SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis. Solids composition and water affected both the T(g) and stickiness behavior. Stickiness was governed by carbohydrates and water plasticization. At low protein contents, precrystallization of lactose decreased the sticky point temperature, but increasing protein content in all milk powders decreased stickiness at all water activities. The results showed that glass transition can be used to describe time-dependent stickiness and crystallization phenomena, and it can be used as a parameter to control and reduce stickiness of dairy solids with various compositions. PMID:20629875

  15. Comparisons of minicard ratings to ion chromatography sugar profiles in cotton fiber water extract and minicard sticky spot material

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Specific levels and ratios of the carbohydrates melezitose and trehalulose deposited on the surface of cotton fibers are indicators of whitefly or aphid contamination. These deposits could cause stickiness problems during cotton ginning and textile processing. The concept of cotton stickiness is hi...

  16. Web Formation - Skylab Student Experiment ED-52

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Judith S. Miles of Lexington High School, Lexington, Massachusetts, proposed skylab student experiment ED-52, Web Formation. This experiment was a study of a spider's behavior in a weightless environment. The geometrical structure of the web of the orb-weaving spider provides a good measure of the condition of its central nervous system. Since the spider senses its own weight to determine the required thickness of web material and uses both the wind and gravity to initiate construction of its web, the lack of gravitational force in Skylab provided a new and different stimulus to the spider's behavioral response. Two common cross spiders, Arabella and Anita, were used for the experiment aboard the Skylab-3 mission. After initial disoriented attempts, both spiders produced almost Earth-like webs once they had adapted to weightlessness. This photograph is of Arabella, a cross spider, in her initial attempt at spirning a web. This picture was taken by the crew of the Skylab 3 mission before Arabella adapted to her new environment.

  17. Electrical resistivity tomography to characterize a karstic Vauclusian spring: Fontaine d'Orbe (Pyrénées, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirieix, C.; Riss, J.; Rey, F.; Prétou, F.; Lastennet, R.

    2014-06-01

    The study site lies on a karst system in the Pyrénées (France) that crosses the Urgonian limestones. Organic matter was dumped on the west bank of the River Vert d'Arette, which polluted a spring (the Fontaine d'Orbe) situated on the east bank. Electrical resistivity tomography was utilised in order to understand the geometry of this karst outlet. After tests with the pole-pole array, the ideal electrode spacing was found to be less than 3 m. A conduit, a little less than 10 m wide, was discovered, which proved to be the terminal conduit of the karst system. It was established that the conduit traverses both banks of the River Vert d'Arette, thus presenting a hydraulic link between the two sides. Moreover, this conduit, which is totally submerged, passes under the riverbed and goes upwards to the spring. In addition to the geophysical measurements, hydrogeological measurements and observations were made. Based on the characterisation of the geometry of the karst network's terminal conduit, and the fact that is completely full of water and inclined, it is concluded that the Fontaine d'Orbe spring is of the Vauclusian variety.

  18. Science 101: Why Don't Spiders Stick to Their Own Webs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2011-01-01

    This article explains why spiders don't stick to their webs. Spiders don't get stuck in their own webs (and they aren't immune to their own glue) because they use a combination of sticky and nonsticky threads (different glands for producing those), and the glue is in droplets that the spider can avoid but the prey can't. The spider's nervous…

  19. A Sticky Stick? The Locus of Morphological Representation in the Lexicon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taft, Marcus; Nguyen-Hoan, Minh

    2010-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the meaning given to an ambiguous word (e.g., "stick") can be biased by the masked presentation of a polymorphemic word derived from that meaning (e.g., "sticky"). No bias in interpretation is observed when the masked prime is a word that is semantically related to the target with no morphological relationship (e.g.,…

  20. Sticky trap and stem-tap sampling protocols for the Asian citrus psyllid (Hemiptera: Psyllidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sampling statistics were obtained to develop a sampling protocol for estimating numbers of adult Diaphorina citri in citrus using two different sampling methods: yellow sticky traps and stem–tap samples. A 4.0 ha block of mature orange trees was stratified into ten 0.4 ha strata and sampled using...

  1. Commercial yellow sticky strips more attractive than yellow boards to western cherry fruit fly (Dipt., Tephritidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bright yellow sticky rectangles made of paper boards were previously identified as the most effective traps for capturing western cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis indifferens Curran (Diptera: Tephritidae). Thin rectangular sheets of yellow plastic allow higher light passage than yellow boards and may b...

  2. A comparison of sticky traps for monitoring Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six types of sticky card traps differing in color and trapping adhesive were evaluated for monitoring Asian citrus psyllid in citrus in the United States (Florida and Texas). Spectral reflectance measurements were taken to categorize the color (wavelength) spectrum of each trap. Three of the traps (...

  3. Web Formation - Skylab Student Experiment ED-52

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This chart describes the Skylab student experiment Web Formation. Judith S. Miles of Lexington High School, Lexington, Massachusetts, proposed a study of the spider's behavior in a weightless environment. The geometrical structure of the web of the orb-weaving spider provides a good measure of the condition of its central nervous system. Since the spider senses its own weight to determine the required thickness of web material and uses both the wind and gravity to initiate construction of its web, the lack of gravitational force in Skylab provided a new and different stimulus to the spider's behavioral response. Two common cross spiders, Arabella and Anita, were used for the experiment aboard the Skylab-3 mission. After initial disoriented attempts, both spiders produced almost Earth-like webs once they had adapted to weightlessness. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  4. Composition and Function of Spider Glues Maintained During the Evolution of Cobwebs.

    PubMed

    Jain, Dharamdeep; Zhang, Ci; Cool, Lydia Rose; Blackledge, Todd A; Wesdemiotis, Chrys; Miyoshi, Toshikazu; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-10-12

    Capture silks are an interesting class of biological glues that help spiders subdue their prey. Viscid capture silk produced by the orb web spiders is a combination of hygroscopic salts that aid in water uptake and interact with adhesive glycoproteins to make them soft and sticky. The orb was a stepping stone to the evolution of new web types, but little is known about the adhesives in these webs. For instance, cobweb spiders evolved from orb-weaving ancestors and utilize glue in specialized sticky gumfoot threads rather than an elastic spiral. Early investigation suggests that gumfoot adhesives are quite different viscid glues because they lack a visible glycoprotein core, act as viscoelastic fluids rather than solids, and are largely invariant to humidity. Here, we use spectroscopic and staining methods to show that the gumfoot silk produced by Latrodectus hesperus (western black widow) is composed of hygroscopic organic salts and water insoluble glycoproteins, similar to viscid silk, in addition to a low concentration of spider coating peptides reported before. Our adhesion studies reveal that the organic salts play an important role in adhesion, similar to that seen in orb web spiders, but modulating function at much lower humidity. Our work shows more similarities in the viscid silk produced by orb web and cobweb spiders than previously anticipated and provide guidelines for developing synthetic adhesives that can work in dry to humid environments. PMID:26322742

  5. The orb-weaving spider genus Chrysometa in Uruguay: distribution and description of a new species (Araneae, Tetragnathidae).

    PubMed

    Simó, Miguel; Álvarez, Luis; Laborda, Álvaro

    2016-01-01

    The spider genus Chrysometa Simon, 1895 comprises 138 species of small (3-5 mm) Neotropical orb-weavers spiders (Nogueira et al. 2011; World Spider Catalogue 2015) mainly associated with arboreal vegetation from intermediate to low altitude forests (Levi 1986). Males of Chrysometa differ from other tetragnathids by having the palpal tibial length approximately as long as its widest point; paracymbium articulated and with several apophyses located at both ends; male cephalic region narrower than in the female and having cymbial ectobasal and ectomedian processes. Females are diagnosed by having femora without trichobothria; abdomen covered with silver guanine patches; a flat epigynum and also by their fertilization ducts originating anteriorly and crossing over the spermathecae (Levi 1986; Alvarez-Padilla & Hormiga 2011). PMID:27395900

  6. Spider web and silk performance landscapes across nutrient space

    PubMed Central

    Blamires, Sean J.; Tseng, Yi-Hsuan; Wu, Chung-Lin; Toft, Søren; Raubenheimer, David; Tso, I.-Min

    2016-01-01

    Predators have been shown to alter their foraging as a regulatory response to recent feeding history, but it remains unknown whether trap building predators modulate their traps similarly as a regulatory strategy. Here we fed the orb web spider Nephila pilipes either live crickets, dead crickets with webs stimulated by flies, or dead crickets without web stimulation, over 21 days to enforce spiders to differentially extract nutrients from a single prey source. In addition to the nutrients extracted we measured web architectures, silk tensile properties, silk amino acid compositions, and web tension after each feeding round. We then plotted web and silk “performance landscapes” across nutrient space. The landscapes had multiple peaks and troughs for each web and silk performance parameter. The findings suggest that N. pilipes plastically adjusts the chemical and physical properties of their web and silk in accordance with its nutritional history. Our study expands the application of the geometric framework foraging model to include a type of predatory trap. Whether it can be applied to other predatory traps requires further testing. PMID:27216252

  7. Spider web and silk performance landscapes across nutrient space.

    PubMed

    Blamires, Sean J; Tseng, Yi-Hsuan; Wu, Chung-Lin; Toft, Søren; Raubenheimer, David; Tso, I-Min

    2016-01-01

    Predators have been shown to alter their foraging as a regulatory response to recent feeding history, but it remains unknown whether trap building predators modulate their traps similarly as a regulatory strategy. Here we fed the orb web spider Nephila pilipes either live crickets, dead crickets with webs stimulated by flies, or dead crickets without web stimulation, over 21 days to enforce spiders to differentially extract nutrients from a single prey source. In addition to the nutrients extracted we measured web architectures, silk tensile properties, silk amino acid compositions, and web tension after each feeding round. We then plotted web and silk "performance landscapes" across nutrient space. The landscapes had multiple peaks and troughs for each web and silk performance parameter. The findings suggest that N. pilipes plastically adjusts the chemical and physical properties of their web and silk in accordance with its nutritional history. Our study expands the application of the geometric framework foraging model to include a type of predatory trap. Whether it can be applied to other predatory traps requires further testing. PMID:27216252

  8. The removal of stickies with modified starch and chitosan--highly cationic and hydrophobic types compared with unmodified ones.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Gudrun; Petzold-Welcke, Katrin; Qi, Haisong; Stengel, Knut; Schwarz, Simona; Heinze, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    The removal of dissolved and colloidal substances (DCS) in paper cycling water, so called stickies, with tailored natural polymers, having cationic as well as hydrophobic groups, was investigated using model suspensions made by the recycling of paper. The sticky content, characterized by the turbidity, the anionic charge, and the total organic carbon content (TOC) was increased by the addition of latex. The dynamic surface tension was established as useful tool for the characterization of the sticky content. The sticky removal using the starch derivatives (with benzyl- as well as ethyl-substituents), from very low up to high cationic charge and N-(benzyl)chitosan was compared. Depending on the properties of the derivatives two possible mechanisms can be found: "charge dominated removal" or "removal dominated by hydrophobicity." It seems that turbidity and TOC are lowered especially due to charge interaction whereas the increase of the surface tension is mainly caused by the hydrophobic character of the modified natural polymers. PMID:22944437

  9. Equation of state of sticky-hard-sphere fluids in the chemical-potential route.

    PubMed

    Rohrmann, René D; Santos, Andrés

    2014-04-01

    The coupling-parameter method, whereby an extra particle is progressively coupled to the rest of the particles, is applied to the sticky-hard-sphere fluid to obtain its equation of state in the so-called chemical-potential route (μ route). As a consistency test, the results for one-dimensional sticky particles are shown to be exact. Results corresponding to the three-dimensional case (Baxter's model) are derived within the Percus-Yevick approximation by using different prescriptions for the dependence of the interaction potential of the extra particle on the coupling parameter. The critical point and the coexistence curve of the gas-liquid phase transition are obtained in the μ route and compared with predictions from other thermodynamics routes and from computer simulations. The results show that the μ route yields a general better description than the virial, energy, compressibility, and zero-separation routes. PMID:24827207

  10. The role of perceived interactivity in virtual communities: building trust and increasing stickiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongwei; Meng, Yuan; Wang, Wei

    2013-03-01

    Although previous research has explored factors affecting trust building in websites, little research has been analysed from the perceived interactivity perspective in virtual communities (VCs). A research model for verifying interactivity antecedents to trust and its impact on member stickiness behaviour is presented. Two social interactivity components and two system interactivity components are, respectively, theorised as process-based antecedents and institution-based antecedents to trust in the model. Data were collected from 310 members of VCs to test the model. The results show that connectedness and reciprocity are important antecedents to trust in members, while responsiveness and active control are important antecedents to trust in systems. The results also indicate that trust has significant influence on the members' duration and retention, which are two dimensions of member stickiness measured in this research. These findings have theoretical implications for online interaction-related literature and critical business implications for practitioners of VCs.

  11. The drag of the tails: Diffusion of sticky nanoparticles in dilute polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuldová, Jitka; Uhlík, Filip; Košovan, Peter

    2015-12-01

    We devise a simple coarse-grained model of a nanoparticle exhibiting attractive interactions with a polymer in good solvent and use Monte Carlo simulations to study how adsorption of the polymer affects the hydrodynamic properties of the nanoparticle. We show that the hydrodynamic radius of the polymer-decorated nanoparticle increases with increasing polymer chain length or concentration. The slowdown of diffusion of the sticky nanoparticles is predicted to occur at polymer concentrations many orders of magnitude below the overlap concentration, in contrast with the case of non-sticky nanoparticles. To rationalize our findings, we employ the concept of trains, loops, and tails, which has been used in earlier theoretical studies of polymer adsorption at interfaces. We show that dominant contribution to the increase of the hydrodynamic radius of the polymer-decorated nanoparticles comes from the tails, which stretch far from the surface. On the contrary, the much more numerous but shorter loops and tails play only a minor role.

  12. Sticky Patches on Lipid Nanoparticles Enable the Selective Targeting and Killing of Untargetable Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Sempkowski, Michelle; Zhu, Charles; Menzenski, Monica Zofia; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; Sofou, Stavroula

    2016-08-23

    Effective targeting by uniformly functionalized nanoparticles is limited to cancer cells expressing at least two copies of targeted receptors per nanoparticle footprint (approximately ≥2 × 10(5) receptor copies per cell); such a receptor density supports the required multivalent interaction between the neighboring receptors and the ligands from a single nanoparticle. To enable selective targeting below this receptor density, ligands on the surface of lipid vesicles were displayed in clusters that were designed to form at the acidic pH of the tumor interstitium. Vesicles with clustered HER2-targeting peptides within such sticky patches (sticky vesicles) were compared to uniformly functionalized vesicles. On HER2-negative breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 {expressing (8.3 ± 0.8) × 10(4) and (5.4 ± 0.9) × 10(4) HER2 copies per cell, respectively}, only the sticky vesicles exhibited detectable specific targeting (KD ≈ 49-69 nM); dissociation (0.005-0.009 min(-1)) and endocytosis rates (0.024-0.026 min(-1)) were independent of HER2 expression for these cells. MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 were killed only by sticky vesicles encapsulating doxorubicin (32-40% viability) or α-particle emitter (225)Ac (39-58% viability) and were not affected by uniformly functionalized vesicles (>80% viability). Toxicities on cardiomyocytes and normal breast cells (expressing HER2 at considerably lower but not insignificant levels) were not observed, suggesting the potential of tunable clustered ligand display for the selective killing of cancer cells with low receptor densities. PMID:27468779

  13. Single-Molecule Imaging of DNAs with Sticky Ends at Water/Fused Silica Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Slavica Isailovic

    2005-12-17

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) was used to study intermolecular interactions of DNAs with unpaired (sticky) ends of different lengths at water/fused silica interface at the single-molecule level. Evanescent field residence time, linear velocity and adsorption/desorption frequency were measured in a microchannel for individual DNA molecules from T7, Lambda, and PSP3 phages at various pH values. The longest residence times and the highest adsorption/desorption frequencies at the constant flow at pH 5.5 were found for PSP3 DNA, followed by lower values for Lambda DNA, and the lowest values for T7 DNA. Since T7, Lambda, and PSP3 DNA molecules contain none, twelve and nineteen unpaired bases, respectively, it was concluded that the affinity of DNAs for the surface increases with the length of the sticky ends. This confirms that hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding interactions between sticky ends and fused-silica surface are driving forces for DNA adsorption at the fused-silica surface. Described single-molecule methodology and results therein can be valuable for investigation of interactions in liquid chromatography, as well as for design of DNA hybridization sensors and drug delivery systems.

  14. Self-Reported Stickiness of Mind-Wandering Affects Task Performance.

    PubMed

    van Vugt, Marieke K; Broers, Nico

    2016-01-01

    When asked to perform a certain task, we typically spend a decent amount of time thinking thoughts unrelated to that task-a phenomenon referred to as "mind-wandering." It is thought that this mind-wandering is driven at least in part by our unfinished goals and concerns. Previous studies have shown that just after presenting a participant with their own concerns, their reports of task-unrelated thinking increased somewhat. However, effects of these concerns on task performance were somewhat inconsistent. In this study we take the opposite approach, and examine whether task performance depends on the self-reported thought content. Specifically, a particularly intriguing aspect of mind-wandering that has hitherto received little attention is the difficulty of disengaging from it, in other words, the "stickiness" of the thoughts. While presenting participants with their own concerns was not associated with clear effects on task performance, we showed that the reports of off-task thinking and variability of response times increased with the amount of self-reported stickiness of thoughts. This suggests that the stickiness of mind-wandering is a relevant variable, and participants are able to meaningfully report on it. PMID:27242636

  15. Improved procedures for in vitro skin irritation testing of sticky and greasy natural botanicals.

    PubMed

    Molinari, J; Eskes, C; Andres, E; Remoué, N; Sá-Rocha, V M; Hurtado, S P; Barrichello, C

    2013-02-01

    Skin irritation evaluation is an important endpoint for the safety assessment of cosmetic ingredients required by various regulatory authorities for notification and/or import of test substances. The present study was undertaken to investigate possible protocol adaptations of the currently validated in vitro skin irritation test methods based on reconstructed human epidermis (RhE) for the testing of plant extracts and natural botanicals. Due to their specific physico-chemical properties, such as lipophilicity, sticky/buttery-like texture, waxy/creamy foam characteristics, normal washing procedures can lead to an incomplete removal of these materials and/or to mechanical damage to the tissues, resulting in an impaired prediction of the true skin irritation potential of the materials. For this reason different refined washing procedures were evaluated for their ability to ensure appropriate removal of greasy and sticky substances while not altering the normal responses of the validated RhE test method. Amongst the different procedures evaluated, the use of a SDS 0.1% PBS solution to remove the sticky and greasy test material prior to the normal washing procedures was found to be the most suitable adaptation to ensure efficient removal of greasy and sticky in-house controls without affecting the results of the negative control. The predictive capacity of the refined SDS 0.1% washing procedure, was investigated by using twelve oily and viscous compounds having known skin irritation effects supported by raw and/or peer reviewed in vivo data. The normal washing procedure resulted in 8 out of 10 correctly predicted compounds as compared to 9 out of 10 with the refined washing procedures, showing an increase in the predictive ability of the assay. The refined washing procedure allowed to correctly identify all in vivo skin irritant materials showing the same sensitivity as the normal washing procedures, and further increased the specificity of the assay from 5 to 6 correct

  16. Electric nets and sticky materials for analysing oviposition behaviour of gravid malaria vectors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about how malaria mosquitoes locate oviposition sites in nature. Such knowledge is important to help devise monitoring and control measures that could be used to target gravid females. This study set out to develop a suite of tools that can be used to study the attraction of gravid Anopheles gambiae s.s. towards visual or olfactory cues associated with aquatic habitats. Methods Firstly, the study developed and assessed methods for using electrocuting nets to analyse the orientation of gravid females towards an aquatic habitat. Electric nets (1m high × 0.5m wide) were powered by a 12V battery via a spark box. High and low energy settings were compared for mosquito electrocution and a collection device developed to retain electrocuted mosquitoes when falling to the ground. Secondly, a range of sticky materials and a detergent were tested to quantify if and where gravid females land to lay their eggs, by treating the edge of the ponds and the water surface. A randomized complete block design was used for all experiments with 200 mosquitoes released each day. Experiments were conducted in screened semi-field systems using insectary-reared An. gambiae s.s. Data were analysed by generalized estimating equations. Results An electric net operated at the highest spark box energy of a 400 volt direct current made the net spark, creating a crackling sound, a burst of light and a burning smell. This setting caught 64% less mosquitoes than a net powered by reduced voltage output that could neither be heard nor seen (odds ratio (OR) 0.46; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.40-0.53, p < 0.001). Three sticky boards (transparent film, glue coated black fly-screen and yellow film) were evaluated as catching devices under electric nets and the transparent and shiny black surfaces were found highly attractive (OR 41.6, 95% CI 19.8 – 87.3, p < 0.001 and OR 28.8, 95% CI 14.5 – 56.8, p < 0.001, respectively) for gravid mosquitoes to land on compared to a

  17. Study of sticky rice-lime mortar technology for the restoration of historical masonry construction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fuwei; Zhang, Bingjian; Ma, Qinglin

    2010-06-15

    Replacing or repairing masonry mortar is usually necessary in the restoration of historical constructions, but the selection of a proper mortar is often problematic. An inappropriate choice can lead to failure of the restoration work, and perhaps even further damage. Thus, a thorough understanding of the original mortar technology and the fabrication of appropriate replacement materials are important research goals. Many kinds of materials have been used over the years in masonry mortars, and the technology has gradually evolved from the single-component mortar of ancient times to hybrid versions containing several ingredients. Beginning in 2450 BCE, lime was used as masonry mortar in Europe. In the Roman era, ground volcanic ash, brick powder, and ceramic chip were added to lime mortar, greatly improving performance. Because of its superior properties, the use of this hydraulic (that is, capable of setting underwater) mortar spread, and it was adopted throughout Europe and western Asia. Perhaps because of the absence of natural materials such as volcanic ash, hydraulic mortar technology was not developed in ancient China. However, a special inorganic-organic composite building material, sticky rice-lime mortar, was developed. This technology was extensively used in important buildings, such as tombs, in urban constructions, and even in water conservancy facilities. It may be the first widespread inorganic-organic composite mortar technology in China, or even in the world. In this Account, we discuss the origins, analysis, performance, and utility in historic preservation of sticky rice-lime mortar. Mortar samples from ancient constructions were analyzed by both chemical methods (including the iodine starch test and the acid attack experiment) and instrumental methods (including thermogravimetric differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared, and scanning electron microscopy). These analytical results show that the ancient masonry

  18. SeaStar (OrbView-2), real-time global color images from space: A status report from orbital imaging corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, C.; Pastrone, M.

    1997-06-01

    Orbital Imaging Corporation (ORBIMAGE), a wholly owned subsidiary of Orbital Sciences Corporation (Orbital), is the exclusive provider of SeaStar (OrbView-2) data to commercial and operational users. This paper will focus on the remote sensing specifications of the SeaStar satellite and the means of distributing the data to commercial and non-commercial users. The SeaStar satellite will be launched in 1997 by Orbital`s Pegasus XL launch vehicle. SeaStar`s Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) sensor is a 1.1 km multispectral sensor designed to distinguish between subtle color variations on the Earth`s surface. The SeaWiFS sensor uses six visible and two near infrared channels for broad area applications such as fishing operations, harmful algae bloom monitoring, sediment monitoring, and agriculture and forestry management. Originally designed to image only open ocean regions, SeaWiFS` imaging capability has evolved to also image land and coastal zone regions. SeaStar image products will be available in near real-time through ORBIMAGE`s digital archive service, OrbNet{sup sm}. The OrbNet Digital Archive will network SeaStar ground receiving stations worldwide to provide fast reliable local, regional and global image-sets via an Internet-based on-line catalog (http://www.orbimage.com).

  19. Localized Translation of gurken/TGF-α mRNA during Axis Specification Is Controlled by Access to Orb/CPEB on Processing Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Alexander; Parton, Richard M.; Rabouille, Catherine; Weil, Timothy T.; Davis, Ilan

    2016-01-01

    Summary In Drosophila oocytes, gurken/TGF-α mRNA is essential for establishing the future embryonic axes. gurken remains translationally silent during transport from its point of synthesis in nurse cells to its final destination in the oocyte, where it associates with the edge of processing bodies. Here we show that, in nurse cells, gurken is kept translationally silent by the lack of sufficient Orb/CPEB, its translational activator. Processing bodies in nurse cells have a similar protein complement and ultrastructure to those in the oocyte, but they markedly less Orb and do not associate with gurken mRNA. Ectopic expression of Orb in nurse cells at levels similar to the wild-type oocyte dorso-anterior corner at mid-oogenesis is sufficient to cause gurken mRNA to associate with processing bodies and translate prematurely. We propose that controlling the spatial distribution of translational activators is a fundamental mechanism for regulating localized translation. PMID:26947065

  20. Overturned folds in ice sheets: Insights from a kinematic model of traveling sticky patches and comparisons with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolovick, Michael J.; Creyts, Timothy T.

    2016-05-01

    Overturned folds are observed in regions of the Greenland ice sheet where driving stress is highly variable. Three mechanisms have been proposed to explain these folds: freezing subglacial water, traveling basal slippery patches, and englacial rheological contrasts. Here we explore how traveling basal sticky patches can produce overturned folds. Transitions from low to high stress cause a tradeoff in ice flow between basal slip and internal deformation that deflects ice stratigraphy vertically. If these transitions move, the slip-deformation tradeoff can produce large folds. Those folds record the integrated effects of time-varying basal slip. To understand how dynamic changes in basal slip influence ice sheet stratigraphy, we develop a kinematic model of ice flow in a moving reference frame that follows a single traveling sticky patch. The ice flow field forms a vortex when viewed in the moving reference frame, and this vortex traps ice above the traveling patch and produces overturned folds. Sticky patches that travel downstream faster produce larger overturned folds. We use the model as an interpretive tool to infer properties of basal slip from three example folds. Our model suggests that the sticky patches underneath these folds propagated downstream at rates between one half and the full ice velocity. The regional flow regime for the smaller two folds requires substantial internal deformation whereas the regime for the largest fold requires substantially more basal slip. The distribution and character of stratigraphic folds reflect the evolution and propagation of individual sticky patches and their effects on ice sheet flow.

  1. The influence of varied gravito-inertial fields on the cardiac response of orb-weaving spiders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finck, A.

    1982-01-01

    The Gz transfer function was described for the orb weaving spider A. sericatus. The functional relationship between the heartrate and the intensity of G is linear in the form of: Y = a Log Gz-1 +k. The heartrate in unrestrained animals was recorded by a laser plethysmograph developed specifically for this purpose. Following a control, sample heartrate were taken postrotation between 1.001 and 1.5 Gz in 6 steps. The underlying distribution of heartrates does not appear significantly different from a Gaussian distribution. A method of varnishing the legs of the spider was developed. This was done in order to compromise the lyriform organs, especially those located on the patellae. The lyriform organ is hypothesized to serve the receptor role in the transduction of gravity related stimuli. In preliminary animals the Gz function, post varnishing of the patellae, appears to be changed in the direction of poorer discrimination. We also observed that the resting heartrate following the varnish procedure is substantially increased.

  2. The complete mitochondrial genome of the orb-weaver spider Cyclosa argenteoalba Boes. et Str. (Araneae: Araneidae).

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Wang, Zheng-Liang; Fang, Wen-Yuan; Yu, Xiao-Ping

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of an orb-weaver spider Cyclosa argenteoalba is determined in this article. The genome encodes the same 37 genes with a length of 14,575 bp as all other metazoan mitogenomes. The A + T content of the majority strand is 73.1%. Among the protein-coding genes, one gene (COI) begins with TTA, three (COII, COIII and ND6) start with ATT, three (ATP6, ND3 and ND4) begin with ATA and other six genes use ATT as initiation codon. All the protein-coding genes end with the canonical termination codons (TAA or TAG), except for ND3 and ND4L, which use an incomplete stop codon (T). Thirteen transfer RNAs genes lack the potential to form the cloverleaf-shaped secondary structure. The A + T-rich region is 1052 bp in length with an A + T content of 68.9%. In the phylogenetic analyses, C. argenteoalba was nested within Araneidae and the species from the superfamily Araneoidea form a momophyletic group. PMID:26017043

  3. Urbanisation at Multiple Scales Is Associated with Larger Size and Higher Fecundity of an Orb-Weaving Spider

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Elizabeth C.; Wilder, Shawn M.; Hochuli, Dieter F.

    2014-01-01

    Urbanisation modifies landscapes at multiple scales, impacting the local climate and changing the extent and quality of natural habitats. These habitat modifications significantly alter species distributions and can result in increased abundance of select species which are able to exploit novel ecosystems. We examined the effect of urbanisation at local and landscape scales on the body size, lipid reserves and ovary weight of Nephila plumipes, an orb weaving spider commonly found in both urban and natural landscapes. Habitat variables at landscape, local and microhabitat scales were integrated to create a series of indexes that quantified the degree of urbanisation at each site. Spider size was negatively associated with vegetation cover at a landscape scale, and positively associated with hard surfaces and anthropogenic disturbance on a local and microhabitat scale. Ovary weight increased in higher socioeconomic areas and was positively associated with hard surfaces and leaf litter at a local scale. The larger size and increased reproductive capacity of N.plumipes in urban areas show that some species benefit from the habitat changes associated with urbanisation. Our results also highlight the importance of incorporating environmental variables from multiple scales when quantifying species responses to landscape modification. PMID:25140809

  4. Web Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fürnkranz, Johannes

    The World-Wide Web provides every internet citizen with access to an abundance of information, but it becomes increasingly difficult to identify the relevant pieces of information. Research in web mining tries to address this problem by applying techniques from data mining and machine learning to Web data and documents. This chapter provides a brief overview of web mining techniques and research areas, most notably hypertext classification, wrapper induction, recommender systems and web usage mining.

  5. Sticky Traps Baited with Synthetic Aggregation Pheromone Predict Fruit Orchard Infestations of Plautia stali (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae).

    PubMed

    Toyama, Masatoshi; Kishimoto, Hidenari; Mishiro, Koji; Nakano, Ryo; Ihara, Fumio

    2015-10-01

    The brown-winged green bug, Plautia stali Scott, mainly reproduces on Japanese cedar or cypress cones in Japanese plantation forests during summer and autumn. It often depletes its food sources in forest habitats and moves to cultivated crops in large numbers. To establish an easy method for assessing the risk of fruit orchard infestation by P. stali, we conducted a 3-yr field survey that monitored the attraction of bugs to the synthetic P. stali aggregation pheromone using a sticky trap. We used a morphological indicator, variable body size depending on food intake, to estimate the nutritional status in nymphs, which showed that nymphs attracted to the synthetic pheromone were starving. Comparisons between increasing changes in the number of stylet sheaths left on the cones by P. stali and the number of trapped nymphs show that monitoring nymphs with the pheromone-baited sticky trap is useful for inferring conditions regarding food resources in forest habitats. The trend toward trapping second instars can provide a timely overview of resource competition for cones. Trapping middle-to-late (third-fifth) instars is a warning that the cones are finally depleted and that there is a high probability that adults will leave the forests and invade the orchards. In addition, trends in trapping adults suggest that there is a potential risk of orchard infestation by the pest and predict the intensity and period of the invasion. The pheromone-baited sticky trap is an easy but useful survey tool for predicting P. stali orchard infestations. PMID:26453725

  6. Radar Studies of the Trunk and `Sticky Spot' of Kamb Ice Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobel, R. W.; Pettersson, R.; Osterhouse, D.; Tulaczyk, S.; Howat, I.

    2005-12-01

    During the 2004-05 Antarctic field season we acquired approximately 275 km of ground-based ice-penetrating radar data on the trunk of Kamb Ice Stream (KIS) as a part of a two-year program of radar and GPS studies examining the possibility of ice stream reactivation. Many of the profiles explore a region of near-stagnant ice, the `sticky spot', in the vicinity of camps occupied by a number of groups from 1986-2000 and which was the focus of extensive borehole studies by Cal Tech in 1996 and 2000. We also investigated an area of the trunk approximately 80 km upstream where repeat laser altimeter profiling revealed an anomalous 4m surface uplift of between 1998-2000 (Spikes, et al., 2003). The radar data image bedrock and internal layer stratigraphy in detail; in many cases the layers are present nearly to the bottom. We have identified a bright layer at about two-thirds to three-fourths of the ice thickness in all profiles. This is likely is the same bright layer that we have detected throughout West Antarctica in ITASE traverses and dated to 17.5 KY (Jacobel and Welch, 2004). We have also produced maps of variations in bed reflectivity that correspond closely (but not identically) with the surface expression of the sticky spot in satellite imagery. Bright areas of the bed are found in the trunk of the ice stream on both sides of the sticky spot and also along the south margin where a layer of liquid water was identified in Cal Tech bore hole 00-01 (Englehart et al., in press). However, the brightest bed reflections are found in the area of anomalous surface uplift. Echoes from near the bed at this location indicate the possible presence of a highly reflective surface off to one side of our profiles. Our bed amplitude studies are augmented by two densely-spaced constant midpoint profiles that enable us to characterize attenuation and e/m wave speed within the ice at locations that are both stagnant and fast-moving. In addition, we have re-imaged fold features in the

  7. A RIAM/lamellipodin–talin–integrin complex forms the tip of sticky fingers that guide cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Lagarrigue, Frederic; Vikas Anekal, Praju; Lee, Ho-Sup; Bachir, Alexia I.; Ablack, Jailal N.; Horwitz, Alan F.; Ginsberg, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    The leading edge of migrating cells contains rapidly translocating activated integrins associated with growing actin filaments that form ‘sticky fingers' to sense extracellular matrix and guide cell migration. Here we utilized indirect bimolecular fluorescence complementation to visualize a molecular complex containing a Mig-10/RIAM/lamellipodin (MRL) protein (Rap1-GTP-interacting adaptor molecule (RIAM) or lamellipodin), talin and activated integrins in living cells. This complex localizes at the tips of growing actin filaments in lamellipodial and filopodial protrusions, thus corresponding to the tips of the ‘sticky fingers.' Formation of the complex requires talin to form a bridge between the MRL protein and the integrins. Moreover, disruption of the MRL protein–integrin–talin (MIT) complex markedly impairs cell protrusion. These data reveal the molecular basis of the formation of ‘sticky fingers' at the leading edge of migrating cells and show that an MIT complex drives these protrusions. PMID:26419705

  8. New antiinflammatory sucrose esters in the natural sticky coating of tomatillo (Physalis philadelphica), an important culinary fruit.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuan-Rui; Khan, Wajid; Bakht, Jehan; Nair, Muraleedharan G

    2016-04-01

    Tomatillo is a popular culinary fruit. The sticky material on its surface, consumed as part of the fruit, has never been investigated. Chemical characterization of sticky material on tomatillo fruits yielded five new sucrose esters, as confirmed by spectroscopic methods. The solvent extract of the sticky material from the whole fresh fruit and pure isolates showed antiinflammatory activity as confirmed by in vitro cyclooxygenase enzymes inhibitory assays. Five sucrose esters isolated at 100 μg/mL (153.8, 138.8, 136.2, 141.6 and 138.8 μM, respectively) inhibited cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 enzymes by 50%. The cyclooxygenase enzyme inhibitory activity of extract and isolates at 100 μg/mL was similar to non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs aspirin, ibuprofen and naproxen, used as positive controls in the assay at 108, 12 and 15 μg/mL (600, 60 and 60 μM), respectively. PMID:26593547

  9. Structural and optical studies on selected web spinning spider silks.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyani, R; Divya, A; Mathavan, T; Asath, R Mohamed; Benial, A Milton Franklin; Muthuchelian, K

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the structural and optical properties in the cribellate silk of the sheet web spider Stegodyphus sarasinorum Karsch (Eresidae) and the combined dragline, viscid silk of the orb-web spiders Argiope pulchella Thorell (Araneidae) and Nephila pilipes Fabricius (Nephilidae). X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR), Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques were used to study these three spider silk species. X-ray diffraction data are consistent with the amorphous polymer network which is arising from the interaction of larger side chain amino acid contributions due to the poly-glycine rich sequences known to be present in the proteins of cribellate silk. The same amorphous polymer networks have been determined from the combined dragline and viscid silk of orb-web spiders. From FTIR spectra the results demonstrate that, cribellate silk of Stegodyphus sarasinorum, combined dragline viscid silk of Argiope pulchella and Nephila pilipes spider silks are showing protein peaks in the amide I, II and III regions. Further they proved that the functional groups present in the protein moieties are attributed to α-helical and side chain amino acid contributions. The optical properties of the obtained spider silks such as extinction coefficients, refractive index, real and imaginary dielectric constants and optical conductance were studied extensively from UV-Vis analysis. The important fluorescent amino acid tyrosine is present in the protein folding was investigated by using fluorescence spectroscopy. This research would explore the protein moieties present in the spider silks which were found to be associated with α-helix and side chain amino acid contributions than with β-sheet secondary structure and also the optical relationship between the three different spider silks are investigated. Successful spectroscopic knowledge of the internal protein structure and optical properties of the spider silks could

  10. Anomalous self-diffusion and sticky Rouse dynamics in associative protein hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shengchang; Wang, Muzhou; Olsen, Bradley D

    2015-03-25

    Natural and synthetic materials based on associating polymers possess diverse mechanical behavior, transport properties and responsiveness to external stimuli. Although much is known about their dynamics on the molecular and macroscopic level, knowledge of self-diffusive dynamics of the network-forming constituents remains limited. Using forced Rayleigh scattering, anomalous self-diffusion is observed in model associating protein hydrogels originating from the interconversion between species that diffuse in both the molecular and associated state. The diffusion can be quantitatively modeled using a two-state model for polymers in the gel, where diffusivity in the associated state is critical to the super diffusive behavior. The dissociation time from bulk rheology measurements was 2-3 orders of magnitude smaller than the one measured by diffusion, because the former characterizes submolecular dissociation dynamics, whereas the latter depicts single protein molecules completely disengaging from the network. Rheological data also show a sticky Rouse-like relaxation at long times due to collective relaxation of large groups of proteins, suggesting mobility of associated molecules. This study experimentally demonstrates a hierarchy of relaxation processes in associating polymer networks, and it is anticipated that the results can be generalized to other associative systems to better understand the relationship of dynamics among sticky bonds, single molecules, and the entire network. PMID:25764061

  11. Evaluating potential sources of variation in Chironomidae catch rates on sticky traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Joshua T.; Muehlbauer, Jeffrey D.; Kennedy, Theodore

    2016-01-01

    Sticky traps are a convenient tool for assessing adult aquatic insect population dynamics, but there are many practical questions about how trap sampling artefacts may affect observed results. Utilising study sites on the Colorado River and two smaller streams in northern Arizona, USA, we evaluated whether catch rates and sex ratios of Chironomidae, a ubiquitous aquatic insect, were affected by spraying traps with insecticide, placing traps at different heights above ground, and placing traps at different locations within a terrestrial habitat patch. We also evaluated temporal variation in Chironomidae counts monthly over a 9-month growing season. We found no significant variation in catch rates or sex ratios between traps treated versus untreated with insecticide, nor between traps placed at the upstream or downstream end of a terrestrial habitat patch. Traps placed near ground level did have significantly higher catch rates than traps placed at 1.5 m, although sex ratios were similar across heights. Chironomidae abundance and sex ratios also varied from month-to-month and seemed to be related to climatic conditions. Our results inform future sticky trap studies by demonstrating that trap height, but not insecticide treatment or precise trap placement within a habitat patch, is an important source of variation influencing catch rates.

  12. Self-Reported Stickiness of Mind-Wandering Affects Task Performance

    PubMed Central

    van Vugt, Marieke K.; Broers, Nico

    2016-01-01

    When asked to perform a certain task, we typically spend a decent amount of time thinking thoughts unrelated to that task–a phenomenon referred to as “mind-wandering.” It is thought that this mind-wandering is driven at least in part by our unfinished goals and concerns. Previous studies have shown that just after presenting a participant with their own concerns, their reports of task-unrelated thinking increased somewhat. However, effects of these concerns on task performance were somewhat inconsistent. In this study we take the opposite approach, and examine whether task performance depends on the self-reported thought content. Specifically, a particularly intriguing aspect of mind-wandering that has hitherto received little attention is the difficulty of disengaging from it, in other words, the “stickiness” of the thoughts. While presenting participants with their own concerns was not associated with clear effects on task performance, we showed that the reports of off-task thinking and variability of response times increased with the amount of self-reported stickiness of thoughts. This suggests that the stickiness of mind-wandering is a relevant variable, and participants are able to meaningfully report on it. PMID:27242636

  13. Analytic solution of two-density integral equations for sticky Janus dumbbells with arbitrary monomer diameters.

    PubMed

    Gazzillo, Domenico; Munaò, Gianmarco; Prestipino, Santi

    2016-06-21

    We study a pure fluid of heteronuclear sticky Janus dumbbells, considered to be the result of complete chemical association between unlike species in an initially equimolar mixture of hard spheres (species A) and sticky hard spheres (species B) with different diameters. The B spheres are particles whose attractive surface layer is infinitely thin. Wertheim's two-density integral equations are employed to describe the mixture of AB dumbbells together with unbound A and B monomers. After Baxter factorization, these equations are solved analytically within the associative Percus-Yevick approximation. The limit of complete association is taken at the end. The present paper extends to the more general, heteronuclear case of A and B species with size asymmetry a previous study by Wu and Chiew [J. Chem. Phys. 115, 6641 (2001)], which was restricted to dumbbells with equal monomer diameters. Furthermore, the solution for the Baxter factor correlation functions qij (αβ)(r) is determined here in a fully analytic way, since we have been able to find explicit analytic expressions for all the intervening parameters. PMID:27334176

  14. Trap height and orientation of yellow sticky traps affect capture of Chaetocnema pulicaria (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Esker, P D; Obrycki, J; Nutter, F W

    2004-02-01

    Field studies were conducted in Iowa during 2001 and 2002 to determine the optimal sampling height and orientation for using yellow sticky cards to monitor populations of Chaetocnema pulicaria Melsheimer, the vector of the bacterial pathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp, stewartii, the causal organism of Stewart's disease of corn, Zea mays L.. Sticky cards were placed at five different heights (0.15, 0.30, 0.45, 0.60, and 0.90 m) and three orientations (horizontal, vertical, and 30 degree angle) at three locations (Ames, Crawfordsville, and Sutherland) in 2001 and two locations (Crawfordsville and Johnston) in 2002. No statistical differences were observed among the placement combinations for individual sampling periods or for the total number of C. pulicaria captured in 2001. In 2002, the 0.30 m and vertical cards captured significantly (1.1-35 times) more C. pulicaria than any other placement combination during sampling throughout August at both Crawfordsville and Johnston. Also, the cumulative number of C. pulicaria captured by the 0.30 m and vertical cards was significantly higher than all other placement combinations. This information is important in the development of sampling protocols to aid growers in making management decisions. These management decisions include where and when to apply foliar insecticides during the corn growing season to control C. pulicaria populations, thereby reducing the risk for Stewart's disease of corn. PMID:14998138

  15. Preparation of Sticky Escherichia coli through Surface Display of an Adhesive Catecholamine Moiety

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joseph P.; Choi, Min-Jung; Kim, Se Hun

    2014-01-01

    Mussels attach to virtually all types of inorganic and organic surfaces in aqueous environments, and catecholamines composed of 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (DOPA), lysine, and histidine in mussel adhesive proteins play a key role in the robust adhesion. DOPA is an unusual catecholic amino acid, and its side chain is called catechol. In this study, we displayed the adhesive moiety of DOPA-histidine on Escherichia coli surfaces using outer membrane protein W as an anchoring motif for the first time. Localization of catecholamines on the cell surface was confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, cell-to-cell cohesion (i.e., cellular aggregation) induced by the displayed catecholamine and synthesis of gold nanoparticles on the cell surface support functional display of adhesive catecholamines. The engineered E. coli exhibited significant adhesion onto various material surfaces, including silica and glass microparticles, gold, titanium, silicon, poly(ethylene terephthalate), poly(urethane), and poly(dimethylsiloxane). The uniqueness of this approach utilizing the engineered sticky E. coli is that no chemistry for cell attachment are necessary, and the ability of spontaneous E. coli attachment allows one to immobilize the cells on challenging material surfaces such as synthetic polymers. Therefore, we envision that mussel-inspired catecholamine yielded sticky E. coli that can be used as a new type of engineered microbe for various emerging fields, such as whole living cell attachment on versatile material surfaces, cell-to-cell communication systems, and many others. PMID:24123747

  16. Polydopamine-Decorated Sticky, Water-Friendly, Biodegradable Polycaprolactone Cell Carriers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minhee; Kim, Jung-Suk; Lee, Haeshin; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2016-05-01

    A bioinspired adhesive material, polydopamine (pDA), was employed as an interfacial glue to stably immobilize human neural stem cells (hNSCs) on the external surface of biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL) microspheres, thereby serving as versatile key systems that can be used for cell carriers. The pDA decoration on the PCL microspheres has been resulted in robust hNSC immobilization as well as proliferation on their curved surfaces. The pDA coating has transformed the hydrophobic PCL systems toward water-friendly and sticky characteristics, thereby resulting in full dispersion in aqueous solution and stable adherence onto a wet biological surface. Adeno-associated virus, a safe gene vector capable of effectively regulating cell behaviors, can be decorated on the PCL surfaces and delivered efficiently to hNSCs adhered to the microsphere exteriors. These distinctive multiple benefits of the sticky pDA microspheres can provide core technologies that can boost the therapeutic effects of cell therapy approaches. PMID:26799057

  17. Preparation of sticky Escherichia coli through surface display of an adhesive catecholamine moiety.

    PubMed

    Park, Joseph P; Choi, Min-Jung; Kim, Se Hun; Lee, Seung Hwan; Lee, Haeshin

    2014-01-01

    Mussels attach to virtually all types of inorganic and organic surfaces in aqueous environments, and catecholamines composed of 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (DOPA), lysine, and histidine in mussel adhesive proteins play a key role in the robust adhesion. DOPA is an unusual catecholic amino acid, and its side chain is called catechol. In this study, we displayed the adhesive moiety of DOPA-histidine on Escherichia coli surfaces using outer membrane protein W as an anchoring motif for the first time. Localization of catecholamines on the cell surface was confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, cell-to-cell cohesion (i.e., cellular aggregation) induced by the displayed catecholamine and synthesis of gold nanoparticles on the cell surface support functional display of adhesive catecholamines. The engineered E. coli exhibited significant adhesion onto various material surfaces, including silica and glass microparticles, gold, titanium, silicon, poly(ethylene terephthalate), poly(urethane), and poly(dimethylsiloxane). The uniqueness of this approach utilizing the engineered sticky E. coli is that no chemistry for cell attachment are necessary, and the ability of spontaneous E. coli attachment allows one to immobilize the cells on challenging material surfaces such as synthetic polymers. Therefore, we envision that mussel-inspired catecholamine yielded sticky E. coli that can be used as a new type of engineered microbe for various emerging fields, such as whole living cell attachment on versatile material surfaces, cell-to-cell communication systems, and many others. PMID:24123747

  18. Analytic solution of two-density integral equations for sticky Janus dumbbells with arbitrary monomer diameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazzillo, Domenico; Munaò, Gianmarco; Prestipino, Santi

    2016-06-01

    We study a pure fluid of heteronuclear sticky Janus dumbbells, considered to be the result of complete chemical association between unlike species in an initially equimolar mixture of hard spheres (species A) and sticky hard spheres (species B) with different diameters. The B spheres are particles whose attractive surface layer is infinitely thin. Wertheim's two-density integral equations are employed to describe the mixture of AB dumbbells together with unbound A and B monomers. After Baxter factorization, these equations are solved analytically within the associative Percus-Yevick approximation. The limit of complete association is taken at the end. The present paper extends to the more general, heteronuclear case of A and B species with size asymmetry a previous study by Wu and Chiew [J. Chem. Phys. 115, 6641 (2001)], which was restricted to dumbbells with equal monomer diameters. Furthermore, the solution for the Baxter factor correlation functions qi j α β ( r ) is determined here in a fully analytic way, since we have been able to find explicit analytic expressions for all the intervening parameters.

  19. Opposing actions of septins and Sticky on Anillin promote the transition from contractile to midbody ring

    PubMed Central

    El Amine, Nour; Kechad, Amel; Jananji, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    During cytokinesis, closure of the actomyosin contractile ring (CR) is coupled to the formation of a midbody ring (MR), through poorly understood mechanisms. Using time-lapse microscopy of Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells, we show that the transition from the CR to the MR proceeds via a previously uncharacterized maturation process that requires opposing mechanisms of removal and retention of the scaffold protein Anillin. The septin cytoskeleton acts on the C terminus of Anillin to locally trim away excess membrane from the late CR/nascent MR via internalization, extrusion, and shedding, whereas the citron kinase Sticky acts on the N terminus of Anillin to retain it at the mature MR. Simultaneous depletion of septins and Sticky not only disrupted MR formation but also caused earlier CR oscillations, uncovering redundant mechanisms of CR stability that can partly explain the essential role of Anillin in this process. Our findings highlight the relatedness of the CR and MR and suggest that membrane removal is coordinated with CR disassembly. PMID:24217622

  20. Evaluation of yellow rectangle traps coated with hot melt pressure sensitive adhesive and sticky gel against Rhagoletis indifferens (Diptera:Tephritidae) and the possible influence of yellow colors on captures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sticky yellow rectangle traps have been used for many years to capture Rhagoletis fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae). Traditional yellow sticky traps are coated with a sticky gel (SG) that can leave residues on the hands of users. An alternative to SG on traps are hot melt pressure sensitive adhes...

  1. High-performance spider webs: integrating biomechanics, ecology and behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Harmer, Aaron M. T.; Blackledge, Todd A.; Madin, Joshua S.; Herberstein, Marie E.

    2011-01-01

    Spider silks exhibit remarkable properties, surpassing most natural and synthetic materials in both strength and toughness. Orb-web spider dragline silk is the focus of intense research by material scientists attempting to mimic these naturally produced fibres. However, biomechanical research on spider silks is often removed from the context of web ecology and spider foraging behaviour. Similarly, evolutionary and ecological research on spiders rarely considers the significance of silk properties. Here, we highlight the critical need to integrate biomechanical and ecological perspectives on spider silks to generate a better understanding of (i) how silk biomechanics and web architectures interacted to influence spider web evolution along different structural pathways, and (ii) how silks function in an ecological context, which may identify novel silk applications. An integrative, mechanistic approach to understanding silk and web function, as well as the selective pressures driving their evolution, will help uncover the potential impacts of environmental change and species invasions (of both spiders and prey) on spider success. Integrating these fields will also allow us to take advantage of the remarkable properties of spider silks, expanding the range of possible silk applications from single threads to two- and three-dimensional thread networks. PMID:21036911

  2. Abundance of Asian citrus psyllid on yellow sticky traps in Florida, Puerto Rico, and Texas citrus groves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to obtain information on population dynamics of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), in some managed citrus groves in Florida, Texas and Puerto Rico using yellow sticky traps deployed directly in trees. Four groves were studied in Florida (th...

  3. A wind-oriented sticky trap for evaluating the behavioural response of diabrotica speciosa (germar) to bitter cucurbit extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cucurbitacins attract many species of Luperini leaf beetles, for which they have been studied and applied in traps and toxic baits. Males and females feed avidly on these compounds, but field trials reveal that males are far more attracted to them than females. A wind oriented baited sticky trap was...

  4. An assessment of yellow sticky card traps as indicators of the relative abundance of adult Diaphorina citri in citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yellow sticky card traps were assessed as a tool for estimating infestation levels of adult Diaphorina citri, an important pest of citrus. Weekly trapping was conducted in young and mature trees with traps deployed directly in trees, one trap per tree. In addition, a comparison was made between one ...

  5. Efficacies of commercial sticky yellow rectangles against eight Rhagoletis fly species (Dipt., Tephritidae) in Washington state, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traps are used against Rhagoletis flies (Dipt., Tephritidae) for detection in fly management and ecological studies. Here, the main objective was to identify the most efficacious of five commercial sticky yellow rectangles baited with ammonium carbonate against R. indifferens Curran, R. pomonella (...

  6. Populations of sharpshooters in two citrus groves in east-central Florida as indicated by yellow sticky card traps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three sharpshooter species were captured on yellow sticky card traps in two citrus groves in east-central Florida: Homalodisca insolita, H. vitripennis and Oncometopia nigricans. H. vitripennis and O. nigricans were relatively common and H. vitripennis relatively abundant over a three year period ...

  7. Monitoring insects in sweetpotatoes with sweep net and sticky traps across the Mississippi Delta: a omparative study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect populations in sweetpotato fields in the Mississippi Delta were monitored in 2007 by comparing traditional sweep net sampling with purple and yellow sticky traps. Four sweep net samples each consisting of 25 sweeps were taken weekly from each of four different locations from 2 July to 3 Sept...

  8. Improved removal of sticky and light contaminants from wastepaper. Final report, April 1, 1995--December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, P.; Kelly, A.

    1998-03-01

    Work under this two-year cooperative agreement addresses improved removal of light and sticky contaminants from waste paper. Such contaminants occur in ever-increasing amounts, resulting from glues, labels, book bindings, packaging tapes, etc., all associated with the waste paper stream. Despite various cleaning steps in the paper mill recycling systems, residual contamination remains, causing big problems with the product quality and with paper machine and converting operations. Some grades cannot be recycled at all. Stickies are truly a barrier against increased paper recycling. The stickies problem was attacked in four project segments--three of those have yielded tangible results. One segment has been outstanding in its success; namely, the development of a centrifugal reverse cleaning system consisting of primary and secondary stages, which have unparalleled high efficiency in the removal of light and sticky contaminants. This cleaning system, consists of primary XTREME and secondary XX-Clone units. Another segment of this work, washing wax contaminated old corrugated wastepaper (OCC), also has resulted in the new Xtrax process which was released for sale.

  9. The dsRNA Virus Papaya Meleira Virus and an ssRNA Virus Are Associated with Papaya Sticky Disease.

    PubMed

    Sá Antunes, Tathiana Ferreira; Amaral, Raquel J Vionette; Ventura, José Aires; Godinho, Marcio Tadeu; Amaral, Josiane G; Souza, Flávia O; Zerbini, Poliane Alfenas; Zerbini, Francisco Murilo; Fernandes, Patricia Machado Bueno

    2016-01-01

    Papaya sticky disease, or "meleira", is one of the major diseases of papaya in Brazil and Mexico, capable of causing complete crop loss. The causal agent of sticky disease was identified as an isometric virus with a double stranded RNA (dsRNA) genome, named papaya meleira virus (PMeV). In the present study, PMeV dsRNA and a second RNA band of approximately 4.5 kb, both isolated from latex of papaya plants with severe symptoms of sticky disease, were deep-sequenced. The nearly complete sequence obtained for PMeV dsRNA is 8,814 nucleotides long and contains two putative ORFs; the predicted ORF1 and ORF2 display similarity to capsid proteins and RdRp's, respectively, from mycoviruses tentatively classified in the family Totiviridae. The sequence obtained for the second RNA is 4,515 nucleotides long and contains two putative ORFs. The predicted ORFs 1 and 2 display 48% and 73% sequence identity, respectively, with the corresponding proteins of papaya virus Q, an umbravirus recently described infecting papaya in Ecuador. Viral purification in a sucrose gradient allowed separation of particles containing each RNA. Mass spectrometry analysis indicated that both PMeV and the second RNA virus (named papaya meleira virus 2, PMeV2) were encapsidated in particles formed by the protein encoded by PMeV ORF1. The presence of both PMeV and PMeV2 was confirmed in field plants showing typical symptoms of sticky disease. Interestingly, PMeV was detected alone in asymptomatic plants. Together, our results indicate that sticky disease is associated with double infection by PMeV and PMeV2. PMID:27166626

  10. The dsRNA Virus Papaya Meleira Virus and an ssRNA Virus Are Associated with Papaya Sticky Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sá Antunes, Tathiana Ferreira; Amaral, Raquel J. Vionette; Ventura, José Aires; Godinho, Marcio Tadeu; Amaral, Josiane G.; Souza, Flávia O.; Zerbini, Poliane Alfenas; Zerbini, Francisco Murilo

    2016-01-01

    Papaya sticky disease, or “meleira”, is one of the major diseases of papaya in Brazil and Mexico, capable of causing complete crop loss. The causal agent of sticky disease was identified as an isometric virus with a double stranded RNA (dsRNA) genome, named papaya meleira virus (PMeV). In the present study, PMeV dsRNA and a second RNA band of approximately 4.5 kb, both isolated from latex of papaya plants with severe symptoms of sticky disease, were deep-sequenced. The nearly complete sequence obtained for PMeV dsRNA is 8,814 nucleotides long and contains two putative ORFs; the predicted ORF1 and ORF2 display similarity to capsid proteins and RdRp's, respectively, from mycoviruses tentatively classified in the family Totiviridae. The sequence obtained for the second RNA is 4,515 nucleotides long and contains two putative ORFs. The predicted ORFs 1 and 2 display 48% and 73% sequence identity, respectively, with the corresponding proteins of papaya virus Q, an umbravirus recently described infecting papaya in Ecuador. Viral purification in a sucrose gradient allowed separation of particles containing each RNA. Mass spectrometry analysis indicated that both PMeV and the second RNA virus (named papaya meleira virus 2, PMeV2) were encapsidated in particles formed by the protein encoded by PMeV ORF1. The presence of both PMeV and PMeV2 was confirmed in field plants showing typical symptoms of sticky disease. Interestingly, PMeV was detected alone in asymptomatic plants. Together, our results indicate that sticky disease is associated with double infection by PMeV and PMeV2. PMID:27166626

  11. Gravitational waves, energy and Feynman’s “sticky bead”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooperstock, F. I.

    2015-07-01

    It is noted that in the broader sense, gravitational waves viewed as spacetime curvature which necessarily accompanies electromagnetic waves at the speed of light, are the routine perception of our everyday experience. We focus on the energy issue and Feynman’s “sticky bead” argument which has been regarded as central in supporting the conclusion that gravitational waves carry energy through the vacuum in general relativity. We discuss the essential neglected aspects of his approach which leads to the conclusion that gravitational waves would not cause Feynman’s bead to heat the stick on which it would supposedly rub. This opens the way to an examination of the entire issue of energy in general relativity. We briefly discuss our naturally-defined totally invariant spacetime energy expression for general relativity incorporating the contribution from gravity. When the cosmological term is included in the field equations, our energy expression includes the vacuum energy as required.

  12. Web Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    White, Bebo

    2003-06-23

    Web Engineering is the application of systematic, disciplined and quantifiable approaches to development, operation, and maintenance of Web-based applications. It is both a pro-active approach and a growing collection of theoretical and empirical research in Web application development. This paper gives an overview of Web Engineering by addressing the questions: (a) why is it needed? (b) what is its domain of operation? (c) how does it help and what should it do to improve Web application development? and (d) how should it be incorporated in education and training? The paper discusses the significant differences that exist between Web applications and conventional software, the taxonomy of Web applications, the progress made so far and the research issues and experience of creating a specialization at the master's level. The paper reaches a conclusion that Web Engineering at this stage is a moving target since Web technologies are constantly evolving, making new types of applications possible, which in turn may require innovations in how they are built, deployed and maintained.

  13. Web Service

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/webservices.html MedlinePlus Web Service To use the sharing features on this ... please enable JavaScript. MedlinePlus offers a search-based Web service that provides access to MedlinePlus health topic ...

  14. Influence of sticky trap color and height above ground on capture of alate Elatobium abietinum (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in Sitka spruce plantations.

    PubMed

    Straw, Nigel A; Williams, David T; Green, Gillian

    2011-02-01

    A series of field trials were used to assess the practicality of using sticky traps to monitor populations of green spruce aphid, Elatobium abietinum (Walker), in plantations of Sitka spruce. The highest numbers of alate E. abietinum were caught on sticky traps placed in the upper third of the live canopy at 9-17 m above the ground, whereas low numbers of aphids were caught just below the live canopy or at 2 m above the ground. Trials in 2005 with sticky traps of different colors showed that significantly more alate E. abietinum were caught on yellow, red, and green sticky traps than on white, blue, and black traps. A repeat trial in 2007 resulted in significantly more alate aphids being caught on red sticky traps than on traps of any other color except for green. Attraction to red is unusual among aphids, as aphids are thought not to possess a red-sensitive photoreceptor. The attraction of E. abietinum to red-colored sticky traps suggests that conifer-feeding aphids might have a fundamentally different color response compared with aphids that live on cereals, grasses, or herbaceous plants. Alternatively, the attraction to red might be a physiological artifact related to the presence of red-screening pigments in the aphid's compound eye. PMID:22182620

  15. The Sticky Resting Box, a new tool for studying resting behaviour of Afrotropical malaria vectors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Monitoring densities of adult mosquito populations is a major challenge in efforts to evaluate the epidemiology of mosquito-borne diseases, and their response to vector control interventions. In the case of malaria, collection of outdoor-resting Anophelines is rarely incorporated into surveillance and control, partially due to the lack of standardized collection tools. Such an approach, however, is increasingly important to investigate possible changes in mosquito behaviour in response to the scale up of Insecticide Treated Nets and Indoor Residual Spraying. In this study we evaluated the Sticky Resting Box (SRB) - i.e. a sticky variant of previously investigated mosquito Resting Box, which allows passive collection of mosquitoes entering the box – and compared its performance against traditional methods for indoor and outdoor resting mosquito sampling. Methods Daily collections were carried out in two neighbouring villages of Burkina Faso during rainy season 2011 and dry season 2012 by SRB located indoors and outdoors, and by Back-Pack aspiration inside houses (BP) and in ad hoc built outdoor pit-shelters (PIT). Results Overall, almost 20,000 Culicidae specimens belonging to 16 species were collected and morphologically identified. Malaria vectors included Anopheles coluzzii (53%), An. arabiensis (12%), An. gambiae s.s. (2.0%) and An. funestus (4.5%). The diversity of species collected in the two villages was similar for SRB and PIT collections outdoors, and significantly higher for SRB than for BP indoors. The population dynamics of An. gambiae s.l. mosquitoes, as obtained by SRB-collections was significantly correlated with those obtained by the traditional methods. The predicted mean estimates of An. gambiae s.l. specimens/sampling-unit/night-of-collections was 6- and 5-times lower for SRB than for BP indoors and PIT outdoors, respectively. Conclusions Overall, the daily performance of SRB in terms of number of malaria vectors/trap was lower than

  16. Entomological investigations in a focus of dengue transmission in Cairns, Queensland, Australia, by using the sticky ovitraps.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Scott A; Long, Sharron; Smith, Greg; Pyke, Alyssa; Knox, Tessa B

    2004-01-01

    Sticky ovitraps (patent pending) were used to sample female Aedes aegypti (L.) weekly in a focus of dengue activity in Cairns, Queensland, Australia. In February 2003, transmission of dengue virus serotype 2 began in the suburb of Parramatta Park, peaking in mid-March 2003. This suburb features many older, unscreened houses with high populations of Ae. aegypti. Highest densities (2-3.5 females per trap per week) were obtained during peak dengue transmission (January and February) before mosquito control was initiated. Beginning in late March, female Ae. aegypti collected in sticky ovitraps were tested for dengue viral RNA by using a TaqMan reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay. Dengue viral RNA was detected in six pools of Ae. aegypti collected in late March. The highest minimum infection rate was 116/1000 mosquitoes. After the initiation of larval control (containers treated with S-methoprene or lambda-cyhalothrin) and adult control (interior harborage sites sprayed with lambda-cyhalothrin) in early March, trap collections dropped to <0.5 per trap per week, and no virus was detected in trapped mosquitoes. Human cases subsequently dropped from a high of seven cases per day in mid-March to only sporadic cases in late April, with the final reported onset of 7 May. Sticky ovitraps have potential as a monitoring device for gravid Ae. aegypti and can be used to assess control efficacy and dengue virus activity. A sticky ovitrap index (mean number of female Ae. Aegypti per trap per week) could be useful in gauging the risk of dengue transmission. PMID:14989339

  17. Polydopamine Inter-Fiber Networks: New Strategy for Producing Rigid, Sticky, 3D Fluffy Electrospun Fibrous Polycaprolactone Sponges.

    PubMed

    Choi, Wuyong; Lee, Slgirim; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2016-06-01

    Designing versatile 3D interfaces that can precisely represent a biological environment is a prerequisite for the creation of artificial tissue structures. To this end, electrospun fibrous sponges, precisely mimicking an extracellular matrix and providing highly porous interfaces, have capabilities that can function as versatile physical cues to regenerate various tissues. However, their intrinsic features, such as sheet-like, thin, and weak structures, limit the design of a number of uses in tissue engineering applications. Herein, a highly facile methodology capable of fabricating rigid, sticky, spatially expanded fluffy electrospun fibrous sponges is proposed. A bio-inspired adhesive material, poly(dopamine) (pDA), is employed as a key mediator to provide rigidity and stickiness to the 3D poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) fibrous sponges, which are fabricated using a coaxial electrospinning with polystyrene followed by a selective leaching process. The iron ion induced oxidation of dopamine into pDA networks interwoven with PCL fibers results in significant increases in the rigidity of 3D fibrous sponges. Furthermore, the exposure of catecholamine groups on the fiber surfaces promotes the stable attachment of the sponges on wet organ surfaces and triggers the robust immobilization of biomolecules (e.g., proteins and gene vectors), demonstrating their potential for 3D scaffolds as well as drug delivery vehicles. Because fibrous structures are ubiquitous in the human body, these rigid, sticky, 3D fibrous sponges are good candidates for powerful biomaterial systems that functionally mimic a variety of tissue structures. PMID:26855375

  18. The siren song of a sticky plant: Columbines provision mutualist arthropods by attracting and killing passerby insects.

    PubMed

    LoPresti, E F; Pearse, I S; Charles, G K

    2015-11-01

    Many plants provide predatory arthropods with food or shelter. Glandular trichomes entrap insects and may provision predators with insect carrion, though it has not been clear whether this putative benefit functions with natural amounts of carrion, whether plants actively attract insect "tourists," and how common this provisioning system is. We tested the hypothesis that a sticky columbine (Aquilegia eximia: Ranunculaceae) attracts passerby arthropods (a siren song leading them to their demise); that these entrapped arthropods increased predators on the plant; and that these predators reduced damage to the plant. Sticky traps baited with columbine peduncles entrapped more arthropod carrion than unbaited control traps. Predator abundance correlated positively with carrion abundance observationally, and experimental removal of carrion reduced predator numbers. Experimental removal of carrion also increased damage to reproductive structures, likely due to reductions in predator numbers. This indirect defense may be common; we compiled a list of insect-trapping sticky plants that includes over 110 genera in 49 families, suggesting a widespread convergence of this trait, even in non-carnivorous plants. The ubiquity of this trait combined with these experiments suggest that carrion entrapment should be viewed as a common and active process mediated by the plant for indirect defense. PMID:27070006

  19. Diurnal variation in invertebrate catch rates by sticky traps: Potential for biased indices of piping plover forage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anteau, M.J.; Sherfy, M.H.

    2010-01-01

    Measuring abundance of invertebrate forage for piping plovers (Charadrius melodus; hereafter plovers), a federally listed species in the USA, is an important component of research and monitoring targeted toward species recovery. Sticky traps are commonly used to passively sample invertebrates, but catch rates may vary diurnally or in response to weather. We examined diurnal variation in catch rates of invertebrates using an experiment on reservoir shoreline and riverine sandbar habitats of the Upper Missouri River in 2006 and 2008. Highest catch rates of large invertebrates (>3 mm) on dry sand habitats occurred during 08:00-11:00 Central Daylight Time (CDT) on the reservoir and 08:00-14:00 CDT on the river. On wet sand habitats, catch rates were lowest during 17:00-20:00 on both the reservoir and the river. Catch rates decreased 24% for every 10 kph increase in wind. Sticky traps deployed continuously for 12 h or more had lower catch rates than four consecutive-composited 3-hour deployments, suggesting that trap effectiveness declined for >3-hour deployments. Thus, if sticky traps are used to index plover forage abundance without controlling for time of day and wind speed, data may be highly variable or estimates could be biased. ?? 2010 Society of Wetland Scientists.

  20. Sensor web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delin, Kevin A. (Inventor); Jackson, Shannon P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A Sensor Web formed of a number of different sensor pods. Each of the sensor pods include a clock which is synchronized with a master clock so that all of the sensor pods in the Web have a synchronized clock. The synchronization is carried out by first using a coarse synchronization which takes less power, and subsequently carrying out a fine synchronization to make a fine sync of all the pods on the Web. After the synchronization, the pods ping their neighbors to determine which pods are listening and responded, and then only listen during time slots corresponding to those pods which respond.

  1. Designing robust alumina nanowires-on-nanopores structures: superhydrophobic surfaces with slippery or sticky water adhesion.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shan; Tian, Dong; Miao, Xinrui; Yang, Xiaojun; Deng, Wenli

    2013-11-01

    Hierarchical alumina surfaces with different morphologies were fabricated by a simple one-step anodization method. These alumina films were fabricated by a new raw material: silica gel plate (aluminum foil with a low purity of 97.17%). The modulation of anodizing time enabled the formation of nanowires-on-nanopores hybrid nanostructures having controllable nanowires topographies through a self-assembly process. The resultant structures were demonstrated to be able to achieve superhydrophobicity without any hydrophobic coating layer. More interestingly, it is found that the as-prepared superhydrophobic alumina surfaces exhibited high contrast water adhesion. Hierarchical alumina film with nanowire bunches-on-nanopores (WBOP) morphology presents extremely slippery property which can obtain a sliding angle (SA) as low as 1°, nanowire pyramids-on-nanopores (WPOP) structure shows strongly sticky water adhesion with the adhesive ability to support 15 μL inverted water droplet at most. The obtained superhydrophobic alumina surfaces show remarkable mechanical durability even treated by crimping or pressing without impact on the water-repellent performance. Moreover, the created surfaces also show excellent resistivity to ice water, boiling water, high temperature, organic solvent and oil contamination, which could expand their usefulness and efficacy in harsh conditions. PMID:23981676

  2. New Approaches to Measuring Sticky Molecules: Improvement of Instrumental Response Times Using Active Passivation.

    PubMed

    Roscioli, J R; Zahniser, M S; Nelson, D D; Herndon, S C; Kolb, C E

    2016-03-10

    A novel method has been developed to improve sampling system response times for nominally "sticky" molecules such as HNO3 and NH3. The method reported here makes use of active, continuous passivation, where the instrument interfaces are continuously exposed to 0.01-1 ppm of fluorinated acidic or basic surfactants. To reduce HNO3 response times, perfluoroheptanoic acid and perfluorobutanesulfonic acid vapors are evaluated as passivation species. 1H,1H-perfluorooctylamine is used to improve NH3 response times. The resulting time responses using the perfluoroalkanoic acids are on the order of 0.4-0.7 s for a 75% quantitative recovery of HNO3, and 1-5 s for 90% recovery. Similar response time improvements are seen in detection of NH3 using perfluorooctylamine (<1 s for a 75% recovery, ∼2 s for 90% recovery). This generally applicable methodology significantly improves the capability of eddy covariance flux and real-time plume-based measurements of highly polar molecules that have historically been hampered by slow response times due to adsorption on sampling system surfaces. The utility of this approach is demonstrated by field measurements of HNO3 eddy covariance fluxes in a central U.S. prairie. PMID:26106902

  3. Proteomic analysis of papaya (Carica papaya L.) displaying typical sticky disease symptoms.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Silas P; Ventura, José A; Aguilar, Clemente; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Almeida, Igor C; Fernandes, Patricia M B; Zingali, Russolina B

    2011-07-01

    Papaya (Carica papaya L.) hosts the only described laticifer-infecting virus (Papaya meleira virus, PMeV), which is the causal agent of papaya sticky disease. To understand the systemic effects of PMeV in papaya, we conducted a comprehensive proteomic analysis of leaf samples from healthy and diseased plants grown under field conditions. First, a reference 2-DE map was established for proteins from healthy samples. A total of 486 reproducible spots were identified, and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS data identified 275 proteins accounting for 159 distinct proteins from 231 spots that were annotated. Second, the differential expression of proteins from healthy and diseased leaves was determined through parallel experiments, using 2-DE and DIGE followed by MALDI-TOF-MS/MS and LC-IonTrap-MS/MS, respectively. Conventional 2-DE analysis revealed 75 differentially expressed proteins. Of those, 48 proteins were identified, with 26 being upregulated (U) and 22 downregulated (D). In general, metabolism-related proteins were downregulated, and stress-responsive proteins were upregulated. This expression pattern was corroborated by the results of the DIGE analysis, which identified 79 differentially expressed proteins, with 23 identified (17 U and 6 D). Calreticulin and the proteasome subunits 20S and RPT5a were shown to be upregulated during infection by both 2-DE and DIGE analyses. These data may help shed light on plant responses against stresses and viral infections. PMID:21630455

  4. Monte Carlo simulations of protein micropatterning in biomembranes: effects of immobile sticky obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Andreas M.; Sevcsik, Eva; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2016-09-01

    Single molecule trajectories of lipids and proteins can yield valuable information about the nanoscopic organization of the plasma membrane itself. The interpretation of such trajectories, however, is complicated, as the mobility of molecules can be affected by the presence of immobile obstacles, and the transient binding of the tracers to these obstacles. We have previously developed a micropatterning approach that allows for immobilizing a plasma membrane protein and probing the diffusional behavior of a putative interaction partner in living cells. Here, we provide guidelines on how this micropatterning approach can be extended to quantify interaction parameters between plasma membrane constituents in their natural environment. We simulated a patterned membrane system and evaluated the effect of different surface densities of patterned immobile obstacles on the relative mobility as well as the surface density of diffusing tracers. In the case of inert obstacles, the size of the obstacle can be assessed from its surface density at the percolation threshold, which in turn can be extracted from the diffusion behavior of the tracer. For sticky obstacles, 2D dissociation constants can be determined from the tracer diffusion or surface density.

  5. Polymer/graphene hybrid aerogel with high compressibility, conductivity, and "sticky" superhydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Han; Zhao, Zongbin; Wan, Wubo; Gogotsi, Yury; Qiu, Jieshan

    2014-03-12

    The idea of extending functions of graphene aerogels and achieving specific applications has aroused wide attention recently. A solution to this challenge is the formation of a hybrid structure where the graphene aerogels are decorated with other functional nanostructures. An infiltration-evaporation-curing strategy has been proposed by the formation of hybrid structure containing poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and compressible graphene aerogel (CGA), where the cellular walls of the CGA are coated uniformly with an integrated polymer layer. The resulting composite shows enhanced compressive strength and a stable Young's modulus that are superior to those of pure CGAs. This unique structure combines the advantages of both components, giving rise to an excellent electromechanical performance, where the bulk resistance repeatedly shows a synchronous and linear response to variation of the volume during compression at a wide range of compressed rates. Furthermore, the foamlike structure delivers a water droplet with "sticky" superhydrophobicity and a size as large as 32 μL that remains tightly pinned to the composite, even when it is turned upside-down. This is the first demonstration of superhydrophobicity with strong adhesion on a foamlike structure. These outstanding properties qualify the PDMS/CGA composites developed here as promising candidates for a wide range of applications such as in sensors, actuators, and materials used for biochemical separation and tissue engineering. PMID:24524309

  6. Reducing the porosity and reflection loss of silicon nanowires by a sticky tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junjun; Huang, Zhifeng

    2015-05-01

    Engineering the porosity of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) is of fundamental importance, and this work introduces a new method for doing so. Metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) of heavily doped Si(100) creates mesoporous silicon nanowires (mp-SiNWs). mp-SiNWs are transferred from the MACE-treated wafer to a sticky tape, leaving residues composed of broken mp-SiNWs and a mesoporous Si layer on the wafer. Then the taped wafer is re-treated by MACE, without changing the etching conditions. The second MACE treatment generates mp-SiNWs that are less porous and longer than those generated by the first MACE treatment, which can be attributed to the difference in the surface topography at the beginning of the etching process. Less porous mp-SiNWs reduce optical scattering from the porous Si skeletons, and vertically protrude on the wafer without aggregation to facilitate optical trapping. Consequently, less porous mp-SiNWs effectively reduce ultraviolet-visible reflection loss.

  7. Sticky superhydrophobic filter paper developed by dip-coating of fluorinated waterborne epoxy emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiangxuan; Wen, Xiufang; Cheng, Jiang; Yang, Zhuoru

    2012-09-01

    A superhydrophobic and superoleophilic coating for oil filter paper was synthesized based on waterborne bisphenol-A novolac epoxy emulsion. The benzoic acid (BA) and maleic anhydride (MA) were used as modification agents to give the epoxy resin hydrophilic groups (carboxyl) and Cdbnd C double bonds. And the fluorinated waterborne epoxy emulsion was prepared by free radical solution polymerization of dodecafluoroheptyl methacrylate (DFMA) monomer. The covalent bound low free energy fluorinated chains in the monomer reduce the surface energy of solidification polymers sufficiently to give rise to superhydrophobic behavior while conserving superoleophilicity. Surfaces prepared show a sticky property, which exhibits a static water contact angle of 152° for a 5 μL droplet that does not slid off even when the sample is held upside down. This synthetic emulsion is simple and convenient as impregnating agent for filter paper, which can be considered as a suitable candidate for various substrates such as cotton textiles, E-glass and artificial fiber, and so on.

  8. Micro-optical elements and optical materials of certain spider webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, D. M.; Naidoo, N.; Little, D. J.

    2012-06-01

    Certain spider webs are composed of several types of micro-optical elements made from transparent optical materials. The silks (radial and capture) are almost exclusively protein. The nearly cylindrical silks have diameters in the range 0.1 to several microns and cross-sectional morphology that is cylindrical-multi-layered,.as studied by transmission electron microscopy, The capture threads are coated with aqueous adhesive that also forms into nearly elliptical micro-lenses (adhesive droplets) mounted on the near cylindrical silks. The remaining elements of the web are the cement junctions tying the radial and the capture threads of the web together. These are irregularly shaped platelets. Progress to date on our research characterizing the optical properties and function of these transparent orb webs has been to interpret the reflection and transmission properties of the elements of the web, and the web as a whole, in natural lighting; to evaluate the optical finish of the surface of the silks and capture droplets; and to measure the principal refractive indices of radial silks using new immersion based methods developed for application to micron-sized, curved optical elements. Here we report the principal refractive indices, birefringence, dispersion and morphology of transparent spider silk subject to various chemical treatments. The morphology is measured using TEM. Insight into the physical origin of the refractive index properties will be discussed.

  9. "Sticky"-Ends-Guided Creation of Functional Hollow Nanopores for Guest Encapsulation and Water Transport.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yanping; Zeng, Huaqiang

    2016-05-17

    characterized, by an experimental-theoretical synergy, a new class of modular, H-bonded, and crescent-shaped oligopyridine amide foldamers, enclosing a sizable cavity of about 2.8 Å in diameter. Matching well with the diameter of water molecules and decorated by interior-pointing H-bond donors (amide H atoms) and acceptors (pyridine N atoms) for water binding, this sizable cavity experimentally proves to be suitable for water recognition. In particular, helically folded oligomers are found to be capable of binding two water molecules that are vertically aligned in parallel with helical axis. However, the existence of two repulsive groups at the two helical ends prevents the formation of 1D hollow tubular cavity, via self-assembly, for encapsulating 1D water chains. Subsequently, we introduced two electrostatically complementary functional groups that act as "sticky" ends at helical ends. These feeble "sticky" ends faithfully and seamlessly align short cavity-containing helices one-dimensionally to create hollow tubular aquapores. To our delight, these aquapores demonstrate their excellent ability of highly selectively hosting a chain of single file H-bonded water molecules and allow for selective transport of both protons and water molecules with exclusion of metal ions including Na(+) and K(+) ions across the lipid membranes. PMID:27074642

  10. Thermo-mechanically coupled subduction using AMR together with a true free surface and sticky air in ASPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraters, Menno; Glerum, Anne; Thieulot, Cedric; Spakman, Wim

    2015-04-01

    ASPECT (Kronbichler et al., 2012), short for Advanced Solver for Problems in Earth's ConvecTion, is a new Finite Element code which was originally designed for thermally driven (mantle) convection and is built on state of the art numerical methods (adaptive mesh refinement, linear and non-linear solver, stabilization of transport dominated processes and a high scalability on multiple processors). Here we present an application of ASPECT to the modelling of fully thermo-mechanically coupled subduction. Our model contains in the case of a true free surface three different compositions: two different crustal compositions, one on top of the subducting plate and one on top of the overriding plate, and a mantle composition. In the case of a free surface through a sticky air layer, a fourth composition representing this sticky air is added. We implemented a viscoplastic rheology using frictional plasticity and a composite viscosity defined by diffusion and dislocation creep. The lithospheric part of the mantle has the same composition as the rest of the mantle but has a higher viscosity because of a lower temperature. The temperature field is implemented in ASPECT as follows: a linear temperature gradient for the lithosphere and an adiabatic geotherm for the sublithospheric mantle. The Initial slab temperature is defined using the analytical solution of McKenzie (1970). The plates can be pushed from the sides of the model, and correspondingly it is possible to define an additional independent mantle in/out flow through the boundaries. We will show a preliminary set of models, highlighting the current codes capabilities, such as the fine tuned use of Adaptive Mesh Refinement in combination with topography development both through a true free surface and sticky air and solving for strongly non-linear rheologies.

  11. Webbing It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandsberg, Jennifer

    1996-01-01

    Provides a quick look at some World Wide Web sites that contain current election year information. Recommends Project Vote Smart, a site with links to online news organizations, the home pages of all presidential candidates, and other political sites. Briefly notes several interactive CD-ROM resources. (MJP)

  12. Differential accumulation of heavy metals by web spiders and ground spiders in an old-field

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, K.J.; Brewer, S.R.; Taylor, D.H. . Dept. of Zoology)

    1994-03-01

    Accumulation of the heavy metals Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn by web spiders (orb weavers: Araneidae) and ground spiders was examined in an old-field that had been subjected to 11 years of nutrient enrichment. The study area consistent of six 0.1-ha plots treated from 1978 to 1988 with municipal sewage sludge containing heavy-metal contaminants, urea-phosphate fertilizer, or left as untreated controls. In 1991 and 1992, heavy-metal concentrations in the soil, ground spiders, and web spiders were measured with a flame AA spectrophotometer. Spiders accumulated Cd, Cu, and Zn to concentrations greater than those present in the soil but did not accumulate Pb. Ground spiders contained significantly higher levels of Cd and Cu than web spiders, whereas web spiders contained slightly greater levels of Pb than ground spiders. No trend between spider guilds was apparent for Zn accumulation. To understand the impact of the application of metal-contaminated municipal sludge on ecosystem, the toxicological effects on the biology and behavior of major biotic components in terrestrial food webs must be known.

  13. A facile prestrain-stick-release assembly of stretchable supercapacitors based on highly stretchable and sticky hydrogel electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qianqiu; Chen, Mingming; Wang, Gengchao; Bao, Hua; Saha, Petr

    2015-06-01

    A facile prestrain-stick-release assembly strategy for the stretchable supercapacitor device is developed based on a novel Na2SO4-aPUA/PAAM hydrogel electrolyte, saving the stretchable rubber base conventionally used. The Na2SO4-aPUA/PAAM hydrogel electrolyte exhibits high stretchability (>1000%), electrical conductivity (0.036 S cm-1) and stickiness. Due to the unique features of the hydrogel electrolyte, the carbon nanotube@MnO2 film electrodes can be firmly stuck to two sides of the prestrained hydrogel electrolyte. Then, by releasing the hydrogel electrolyte, homogenous buckles are formed for the film electrodes to get a full stretchable supercapacitor device. Besides, the high stickiness of the hydrogel electrolyte ensures its strong adhesion with the film electrodes, facilitating ion and electronic transfer of the supercapacitor. As a result, excellent electrochemical performance is achieved with the specific capacitance of 478.6 mF cm-2 at 0.5 mA cm-2 (corresponding to 201.1 F g-1) and capacitance retention of 91.5% after 3000 charging-discharging cycles under 150% strain, which is the best for the stretchable supercapacitors.

  14. Message spreading in networks with stickiness and persistence: Large clustering does not always facilitate large-scale diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Pengbi; Tang, Ming; Wu, Zhi-Xi

    2014-09-01

    Recent empirical studies have confirmed the key roles of complex contagion mechanisms such as memory, social reinforcement, and decay effects in information diffusion and behavior spreading. Inspired by this fact, we here propose a new agent-based model to capture the whole picture of the joint action of the three mechanisms in information spreading, by quantifying the complex contagion mechanisms as stickiness and persistence, and carry out extensive simulations of the model on various networks. By numerical simulations as well as theoretical analysis, we find that the stickiness of the message determines the critical dynamics of message diffusion on tree-like networks, whereas the persistence plays a decisive role on dense regular lattices. In either network, the greater persistence can effectively make the message more invasive. Of particular interest is that our research results renew our previous knowledge that messages can spread broader in networks with large clustering, which turns out to be only true when they can inform a non-zero fraction of the population in the limit of large system size.

  15. Properties, characterization, and decay of sticky rice–lime mortars from the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall (China)

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Ya; Fu, Xuan; Gu, Haibing; Gao, Feng; Liu, Shaojun

    2014-04-01

    Urgent restoration of the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall brings about the need for a study of the formulation and properties of mortars. In the present paper, mortar samples from the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall were characterized in a combination of sheet polarized light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer, thermogravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy. Results show that mortars are mainly built up from inorganic calcium carbonate based organic–inorganic hybrid material with a small amount of sticky rice, which plays a crucial role in forming dense and compact microstructure of mortars and effectively hindering penetration of water and air into mortars. Analysis of decayed products shows that the detrimental soluble salts originates from ambient environment. - Highlights: • Mortars used in the Wugang city wall are a calcium carbonate-sticky rice hybrid bonding material. • Carbonation processing is extremely slow due to dense and compact microstructure of mortars. • Decying of mortars results from the appearance of soluble salt from ambient environment.

  16. Evaluation of some adhesives for collecting Musca domestica and Chrysomya megacephala adults or mosquito larvae in sticky traps.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, S; Yunus, H; Sohadi, R

    1987-07-01

    1. Seven types of water-insoluble adhesives were evaluated in sticky traps for collecting adults of Musca domestica L. and Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) or mosquito larvae (Aedes aegypti (L.) and Culex quinquefasciatus Say). 2. Adhesive viscosity affected the tackiness of the glues and this determined their trapping efficiency in air or water. 3. From the 'Hyvis' range of adhesives tested, 'Hyvis 200' was most effective for trapping adult flies. 4. With 24 h exposure to fourth instar Ae.aegypti larvae in tapwater, submerged plates coated with 'Hyvis 10', 'Hyvis 30' or 'Hyvis 200' formulations trapped the majority of larvae. In polluted water the highest rates of trapping were 17.3% of Ae.aegypti and 18.7% of Cx quinquefasciatus with 'Hyvis 200'. Floating traps were consistently less productive than submerged traps under laboratory conditions. 5. In a heavily polluted natural breeding-site of Cx quinquefasciatus, floating traps were more productive than submerged sticky traps with four of seven adhesives tested, the most efficient being 'Hyvis 200' (4.2 mosquitoes per hour) and Hyvis:polyethylene 90:10 (4.5/h). Despite the relative inefficiency of aquatic traps, emergent adults, pupae and second to fourth instars of larvae were collected quickly from the habitat. PMID:2979541

  17. Why are dunkels sticky? Preschoolers infer functionality and intentional creation for artifact properties learned from generic language.

    PubMed

    Cimpian, Andrei; Cadena, Cristina

    2010-10-01

    Artifacts pose a potential learning problem for children because the mapping between their features and their functions is often not transparent. In solving this problem, children are likely to rely on a number of information sources (e.g., others' actions, affordances). We argue that children's sensitivity to nuances in the language used to describe artifacts is an important, but so far unacknowledged, piece of this puzzle. Specifically, we hypothesize that children are sensitive to whether an unfamiliar artifact's features are highlighted using generic (e.g., "Dunkels are sticky") or non-generic (e.g., "This dunkel is sticky") language. Across two studies, older-but not younger-preschoolers who heard such features introduced via generic statements inferred that they are a functional part of the artifact's design more often than children who heard the same features introduced via non-generic statements. The ability to pick up on this linguistic cue may expand considerably the amount of conceptual information about artifacts that children derive from conversations with adults. PMID:20656283

  18. Trend Analysis of global AOT based on various Polar Orbiting Satellite Observations: MODIS (Terra), MISR (Terra), SeaWiFS (OrbView-2), and MODIS (Aqua)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, J.; Vountas, M.; von Hoyningen-Huene, W.; Chang, D. Y.; Burrows, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Many studies have investigated temporal trends of cloud-free AOTs derived from polar orbiting satellite observations since aerosol retrieval accuracy has been improved substantially. However, only few studies have discussed the fundamental limitation of incomplete sampling originated from frequent cloud disturbance and restricted temporal coverage. Furthermore, the AOT trends derived from various polar orbiting satellite observations are hardly comparable due to different sensor calibration, retrieval accuracy, and cloud screening. Therefore, the present paper integrates various analyses of AOT trends derived from multiple observations (i.e. MODIS-Terra (MOD) from 2000/03 to 2009/12, MISR-Terra (MIS) from 2000/03 to 2010/12, SeaWiFS-OrbView-2 (SEA) from 1998/01 to 2007/12, and MODIS-Aqua (MYD) from 2003/01 to 2008/12) using a weighted least squares regression in order to minimize the above mentioned issues. With high statistical confidence, the weighted trends of MOD AOT (550 nm), MIS AOT (558 nm), SEA AOT (510 nm), and MYD AOT (550 nm) over OECD Europe showed a significant decrease (-0.00274±0.00126, -0.00303±0.00169, -0.00077±0.00044, and -0.00530±0.00304 per year respectively) while increasing over East Asia (+0.00727±0.00385, +0.00673±0.00401, +0.00342±0.00171, and +0.01939±0.00986 per year respectively).

  19. Evaluation and control of the risk of food borne pathogens and spoilage bacteria present in “Awa-Uirou”, a sticky rice cake containing sweet red bean paste

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential for growth of food poisoning or spoilage bacteria in “Awa-Uirou”, a sticky rice cake containing sweet red bean paste was evaluated. The water activity (aw 0.92) was in the range suitable for the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus and Bacillus subtilis. The viable cell cou...

  20. Yellow Sticky Trap Catches of Parasitoids of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in Vegetable Crops and Their Relationship to In-field Populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the relationship of yellow sticky trap captures of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype ‘B’ parasitoids to the local population of parasitoids as measured by leaf samples of parasitized whiteflies and mass-release of parasitoids. Traps were placed in experimental collard and cowpea field ...

  1. Deep Web video

    ScienceCinema

    None Available

    2012-03-28

    To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

  2. Deep Web video

    SciTech Connect

    None Available

    2009-06-01

    To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

  3. Scaling the fractional advective-dispersive equation for numerical evaluation of microbial dynamics in confined geometries with sticky boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, R.; Cushman, J.H.

    2008-06-20

    Microbial motility is often characterized by 'run and tumble' behavior which consists of bacteria making sequences of runs followed by tumbles (random changes in direction). As a superset of Brownian motion, Levy motion seems to describe such a motility pattern. The Eulerian (Fokker-Planck) equation describing these motions is similar to the classical advection-diffusion equation except that the order of highest derivative is fractional, {alpha} element of (0, 2]. The Lagrangian equation, driven by a Levy measure with drift, is stochastic and employed to numerically explore the dynamics of microbes in a flow cell with sticky boundaries. The Eulerian equation is used to non-dimensionalize parameters. The amount of sorbed time on the boundaries is modeled as a random variable that can vary over a wide range of values. Salient features of first passage time are studied with respect to scaled parameters.

  4. Dynamics of associating polymers and the sticky Rouse model: a study by combined dielectric and dynamic mechanical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yangyang; Cosby, Tyler; Sangoro, Joshua

    Reversible association through non-covalent bonding is ubiquitous in the soft matter world. Despite decades of studies, the dynamics of associating polymers have not been well understood. Here we examine the dynamics of butadiene- and isoprene-based model polymeric systems with pairwise association through hydrogen bonding. Compared to ionomers, where reversible crosslinks are typically not well defined, these hydrogen bonding polymers are associated through strictly binary contacts and thus provide a better opportunity to test theoretical ideas. By combining dielectric spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical measurement, we are able to identify both chain and junction dynamics and analyze their motional coupling mechanism. The results are discussed in the context of the sticky Rouse model.

  5. Embodied Agents, E-SQ and Stickiness: Improving Existing Cognitive and Affective Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Diesbach, Pablo Brice

    This paper synthesizes results from two previous studies of embodied virtual agents on commercial websites. We analyze and criticize the proposed models and discuss the limits of the experimental findings. Results from other important research in the literature are integrated. We also integrate concepts from profound, more business-related, analysis that deepens on the mechanisms of rhetoric in marketing and communication, and the possible role of E-SQ in man-agent interaction. We finally suggest a refined model for the impacts of these agents on web site users, and limits of the improved model are commented.

  6. Integrating Land Conservation and Renewable Energy Goals in California: Assessing Land Use and Economic Cost Impacts Using the Optimal Renewable Energy Build-Out (ORB) Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, G. C.; Schlag, N. H.; Cameron, D. R.; Brand, E.; Crane, L.; Williams, J.; Price, S.; Hernandez, R. R.; Torn, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    There is a lack of understanding of the environmental impacts and economic costs of potential renewable energy (RE) siting decisions that achieve ambitious RE targets. Such analyses are needed to inform policy recommendations that minimize potential conflicts between conservation and RE development. We use the state of California's rapid development of utility-scale RE as a case study to examine how possible land use constraints impact the total electricity land area, areas with conservation value, water use, and electricity cost of ambitious RE portfolios. We developed the Optimal Renewable energy Build-out (ORB) model, and used it in conjunction with the Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) Calculator, a RE procurement and transmission planning tool used by utilities within California, to generate environmentally constrained renewable energy potential and assess the cost and siting-associated impacts of wind, solar photovoltaic, concentrating solar power (CSP), and geothermal technologies. We find that imposing environmental constraints on RE development achieves lower conservation impacts and results in development of more fragmented land areas. With increased RE and environmental exclusions, generation becomes more widely distributed across the state, which results in more development on herbaceous agricultural vegetation, grasslands, and developed & urban land cover types. We find land use efficiencies of RE technologies are relatively inelastic to changes in environmental constraints, suggesting that cost-effective substitutions that reduce environmental impact and achieve RE goals is possible under most scenarios and exclusion categories. At very high RE penetration that is limited to in-state development, cost effectiveness decreases substantially under the highest level of environmental constraint due to the over-reliance on solar technologies. This additional cost is removed once the in-state constraint is lifted, suggesting that minimizing both negative

  7. Web Mining for Web Image Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zheng; Wenyin, Liu; Zhang, Feng; Li, Mingjing; Zhang, Hongjiang

    2001-01-01

    Presents a prototype system for image retrieval from the Internet using Web mining. Discusses the architecture of the Web image retrieval prototype; document space modeling; user log mining; and image retrieval experiments to evaluate the proposed system. (AEF)

  8. Web Mining: Machine Learning for Web Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsinchun; Chau, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Presents an overview of machine learning research and reviews methods used for evaluating machine learning systems. Ways that machine-learning algorithms were used in traditional information retrieval systems in the "pre-Web" era are described, and the field of Web mining and how machine learning has been used in different Web mining applications…

  9. Automatic building of a web-like structure based on thermoplastic adhesive.

    PubMed

    Leach, Derek; Wang, Liyu; Reusser, Dorothea; Iida, Fumiya

    2014-09-01

    Animals build structures to extend their control over certain aspects of the environment; e.g., orb-weaver spiders build webs to capture prey, etc. Inspired by this behaviour of animals, we attempt to develop robotics technology that allows a robot to automatically builds structures to help it accomplish certain tasks. In this paper we show automatic building of a web-like structure with a robot arm based on thermoplastic adhesive (TPA) material. The material properties of TPA, such as elasticity, adhesiveness, and low melting temperature, make it possible for a robot to form threads across an open space by an extrusion-drawing process and then combine several of these threads into a web-like structure. The problems addressed here are discovering which parameters determine the thickness of a thread and determining how web-like structures may be used for certain tasks. We first present a model for the extrusion and the drawing of TPA threads which also includes the temperature-dependent material properties. The model verification result shows that the increasing relative surface area of the TPA thread as it is drawn thinner increases the heat loss of the thread, and that by controlling how quickly the thread is drawn, a range of diameters can be achieved from 0.2-0.75 mm. We then present a method based on a generalized nonlinear finite element truss model. The model was validated and could predict the deformation of various web-like structures when payloads are added. At the end, we demonstrate automatic building of a web-like structure for payload bearing. PMID:24960453

  10. Are You Web Literate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darrow, Rob

    1999-01-01

    Defines Web literacy, a subset of information literacy, as the ability to access, search, utilize, communicate, and create information on the World Wide Web. Offers 10 stages toward Web literacy, including using hyperlinks and bookmarks, an information resource for research, creating classroom lessons, guiding student use, and creating Web pages.…

  11. Untangling Your Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs, Norman

    2000-01-01

    Provides an overview of universal Web design and discusses guidelines developed by the Web access initiative (WAI) that focus on the access needs of Web users with disabilities. Highlights include barriers for people with print disabilities or motor impairments; the role of libraries; and resources to assist Web designers. (LRW)

  12. Web data mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibonele, Kasanda J.; Zhang, Yanqing

    2002-03-01

    A web data mining system using granular computing and ASP programming is proposed. This is a web based application, which allows web users to submit survey data for many different companies. This survey is a collection of questions that will help these companies develop and improve their business and customer service with their clients by analyzing survey data. This web application allows users to submit data anywhere. All the survey data is collected into a database for further analysis. An administrator of this web application can login to the system and view all the data submitted. This web application resides on a web server, and the database resides on the MS SQL server.

  13. The Inter-Mammary Sticky Roll: A Novel Technique for Securing a Doppler Ultrasonic Probe to the Precordium for Venous Air Embolism Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wali, Arvin R; Gabel, Brandon C; Khalessi, Alexander A; Sang U, Hoi; Drummond, John C

    2016-01-01

    Venous air embolism is a devastating and potentially life-threatening complication that can occur during neurosurgical procedures. We report the development and use of the “inter-mammary sticky roll,” a technique to reliably secure a precordial Doppler ultrasonic probe to the chest wall during neurosurgical cases that require lateral decubitus positioning. We have found that this noninvasive technique is safe, and effectively facilitates a constant Doppler signal with no additional risk to the patient. PMID:27625905

  14. Web-based tools for real-time assessment of Earthscope's Transportable Array state-of- health: integration of the Antelope Real Time System, RRDtool, AJAX and PHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, R. L.; Lindquist, K. G.; Vernon, F. L.; Davis, G. A.; Eakins, J.; Astiz, L.

    2007-05-01

    Over the past three years the Array Network Facility (ANF) has developed a robust, extensible web-based toolkit for monitoring the state-of-health of Earthscope's Transportable Array. The tools are constructed within a framework of the Antelope Real Time System (ARTS) and the Antelope interface to the PHP Hypertext Processor (PHP), an inline scripting language. Exporting data from Datascope databases and Object Ring Buffer (ORB) packets into XML allows comprehensive client-side interaction via Asynchronous Javascript And XML (AJAX) calls. Navigating and displaying the resultant XML Document Object Model (DOM) trees are done using eXtensible Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT) and PHP's built-in DOM classes. Tools include regional and individual station and event maps, state-of-health statistics, waveform plots, and datalogger monitoring. Combined with real-time graphing of state-of-health parameters from status ORB packets using Round Robin Database Tool (RRDtool), this toolkit allows analysts, station engineers, scientists, and the general public to view, assess, interact with, and download data collected from the 250+ stations in the Transportable Array seismic network. Tools are available at the Array Network Facility website, http:anf.ucsd.edu.

  15. An insect trap as habitat: cohesion-failure mechanism prevents adhesion of Pameridea roridulae bugs to the sticky surface of the plant Roridula gorgonias.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Dagmar; Gorb, Stanislav

    2008-08-01

    The glandular trichomes of the plant Roridula gorgonias release an extremely adhesive, visco-elastic, resinous secretion that traps a variety of insects, including those having a considerable body size. However, the specialized mutualistic mirid bug Pameridea roridulae lives and walks on this sticky plant surface without being trapped. We have sought to reveal the mechanism underlying the apparent non-sticky nature of the cuticle of this bug. In this study, we have visualized intact plant and insect surfaces using cryo-scanning electron microscopy and measured the adhesive properties of the plant secretion on different surfaces. We present a combination of structural and experimental results that suggest that a thick and cohesively weak film of an outermost, epicuticular greasy secretion acts as a ;sloughing-off' layer, preventing the formation of contacts between the sticky plant secretion and the solid insect cuticle. In a comparative study of fresh cuticle fractures of flies representing a typical prey of R. gorgonias, a thin, fragmentary layer of epicuticular grease was revealed. These results indicate that, when trapping prey, the plant adhesive might form proper contact with solid islands of the insect cuticle that are free of epicuticular grease. PMID:18689418

  16. Unusual sequence length-dependent gold nanoparticles aggregation of the ssDNA sticky end and its application for enzyme-free and signal amplified colorimetric DNA detection

    PubMed Central

    He, Hongfei; Dai, Jianyuan; Duan, Zhijuan; Zheng, Baozhan; Meng, Yan; Guo, Yong; Dan Xiao

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the adsorption of short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) on unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is much faster than that for long ssDNA, and thus leads to length-dependent AuNPs aggregation after addition of salt, the color of the solutions sequentially changed from red to blue in accordance with the increase of ssDNA length. However, we found herein that the ssDNA sticky end of hairpin DNA exhibited a completely different adsorption behavior compared to ssDNA, an inverse blue-to-red color variation was observed in the colloid solution with the increase of sticky end length when the length is within a certain range. This unusual sequence length-dependent AuNPs aggregation might be ascribed to the effect of the stem of hairpin DNA. On the basis of this unique phenomenon and catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) based signal amplification, a novel AuNPs-based colorimetric DNA assay with picomolar sensitivity and specificity was developed. This unusual sequence length-dependent AuNPs aggregation of the ssDNA sticky end introduces a new direction for the AuNPs-based colorimetric assays. PMID:27477392

  17. A new tabanid trap applying a modified concept of the old flypaper: linearly polarising sticky black surfaces as an effective tool to catch polarotactic horseflies.

    PubMed

    Egri, Ádám; Blahó, Miklós; Száz, Dénes; Barta, András; Kriska, György; Antoni, Györgyi; Horváth, Gábor

    2013-06-01

    Trapping flies with sticky paper sheets is an ancient method. The classic flypaper has four typical characteristics: (i) its sticky paper is bright (chamois, light yellow or white), (ii) it is strip-shaped, (iii) it hangs vertically, and (iv) it is positioned high (several metres) above ground level. Such flypapers, however, do not trap horseflies (tabanids). There is a great need to kill horseflies with efficient traps because they are vectors of dangerous diseases, and due to their continuous annoyance livestock cannot graze, horses cannot be ridden, and meat and milk production from cattle is drastically reduced. Based on earlier findings on the positive polarotaxis (attraction to linearly polarised light) in tabanid flies and modifying the concept of the old flypaper, we constructed a new horsefly trap called "horseflypaper". In four field experiments we showed that the ideal horseflypaper (i) is shiny black, (ii) has an appropriately large (75×75 cm(2)) surface area, (iii) has sticky black vertical and horizontal surfaces in an L-shaped arrangement, and (iv) its horizontal surface should be at ground level for maximum effectiveness. Using imaging polarimetry, we measured the reflection-polarisation characteristics of this new polarisation tabanid trap. The ideal optical and geometrical characteristics of this trap revealed in field experiments are also explained. The horizontal part of the trap captures water-seeking male and female tabanids, while the vertical part catches host-seeking female tabanids. PMID:23500071

  18. Unusual sequence length-dependent gold nanoparticles aggregation of the ssDNA sticky end and its application for enzyme-free and signal amplified colorimetric DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hongfei; Dai, Jianyuan; Duan, Zhijuan; Zheng, Baozhan; Meng, Yan; Guo, Yong; Dan Xiao

    2016-08-01

    It is known that the adsorption of short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) on unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is much faster than that for long ssDNA, and thus leads to length-dependent AuNPs aggregation after addition of salt, the color of the solutions sequentially changed from red to blue in accordance with the increase of ssDNA length. However, we found herein that the ssDNA sticky end of hairpin DNA exhibited a completely different adsorption behavior compared to ssDNA, an inverse blue-to-red color variation was observed in the colloid solution with the increase of sticky end length when the length is within a certain range. This unusual sequence length-dependent AuNPs aggregation might be ascribed to the effect of the stem of hairpin DNA. On the basis of this unique phenomenon and catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) based signal amplification, a novel AuNPs-based colorimetric DNA assay with picomolar sensitivity and specificity was developed. This unusual sequence length-dependent AuNPs aggregation of the ssDNA sticky end introduces a new direction for the AuNPs-based colorimetric assays.

  19. Label-free quantitative proteomics reveals differentially regulated proteins in the latex of sticky diseased Carica papaya L. plants

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Silas P.; Ventura, José A.; Aguilar, Clemente; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Choi, HyungWon; Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Nohara, Lilian L.; Wermelinger, Luciana S.; Almeida, Igor C.; Zingali, Russolina B.; Fernandes, Patricia M. B.

    2012-01-01

    Papaya meleira virus (PMeV) is so far the only described laticifer-infecting virus, the causal agent of papaya (Carica papaya L.) sticky disease. The effects of PMeV on the laticifers’ regulatory network were addressed here through the proteomic analysis of papaya latex. Using both 1-DE- and 1D-LC-ESI-MS/MS, 160 unique papaya latex proteins were identified, representing 122 new proteins in the latex of this plant. Quantitative analysis by normalized spectral counting revealed 10 down-regulated proteins in the latex of diseased plants, 9 cysteine proteases (chymopapain) and 1 latex serine proteinase inhibitor. A repression of papaya latex proteolytic activity during PMeV infection was hypothesized. This was further confirmed by enzymatic assays that showed a reduction of cysteine-protease-associated proteolytic activity in the diseased papaya latex. These findings are discussed in the context of plant responses against pathogens and may greatly contribute to understand the roles of laticifers in plant stress responses. PMID:22465191

  20. Influence of Sticky Rice and Anionic Polyacrylamide on the Crystallization of Calcium Carbonate in Chinese Organic Sanhetu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Peng, Changsheng; Dai, Min; Gu, Qingbao; Song, Shaoxian

    2015-09-01

    The crystallization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in soil controlled by natural organic material was considered a very important reason to enhance the property of ancient Chinese organic Sanhetu (COS), but how the organic material affected the crystallization of CaCO3 in COS is still unclear. In this paper, a natural organic material (sticky rice, SR) and a synthetic organic material (anionic polyacrylamide, APAM) were selected as additives to investigate their effect on the crystallization of CaCO3. The experimental results showed that the morphology and size of CaCO3 crystals could be affected by the concentration of additives and reaction time, while only the size of CaCO3 crystals could be affected by the concentration of reactant. Although the morphology and size of CaCO3 crystals varied greatly with the variation of additive concentration, reactant concentration and reaction time, the polymorph of CaCO3 crystals were always calcite, according to SEM/EDX, XRD and FTIR analyses. This study may help us to better understand the mechanism of the influence of organic materials on CaCO3 crystallization and properties of COS.

  1. Label-free quantitative proteomics reveals differentially regulated proteins in the latex of sticky diseased Carica papaya L. plants.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Silas P; Ventura, José A; Aguilar, Clemente; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Choi, HyungWon; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Nohara, Lilian L; Wermelinger, Luciana S; Almeida, Igor C; Zingali, Russolina B; Fernandes, Patricia M B

    2012-06-18

    Papaya meleira virus (PMeV) is so far the only described laticifer-infecting virus, the causal agent of papaya (Carica papaya L.) sticky disease. The effects of PMeV on the laticifers' regulatory network were addressed here through the proteomic analysis of papaya latex. Using both 1-DE- and 1D-LC-ESI-MS/MS, 160 unique papaya latex proteins were identified, representing 122 new proteins in the latex of this plant. Quantitative analysis by normalized spectral counting revealed 10 down-regulated proteins in the latex of diseased plants, 9 cysteine proteases (chymopapain) and 1 latex serine proteinase inhibitor. A repression of papaya latex proteolytic activity during PMeV infection was hypothesized. This was further confirmed by enzymatic assays that showed a reduction of cysteine-protease-associated proteolytic activity in the diseased papaya latex. These findings are discussed in the context of plant responses against pathogens and may greatly contribute to understand the roles of laticifers in plant stress responses. PMID:22465191

  2. An Acinetobacter trimeric autotransporter adhesin reaped from cells exhibits its nonspecific stickiness via a highly stable 3D structure

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimoto, Shogo; Nakatani, Hajime; Iwasaki, Keita; Hori, Katsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs), cell surface proteins of Gram-negative bacteria, mediate bacterial adhesion to host cells and extracellular matrix proteins. However, AtaA, a TAA in the nonpathogenic Acinetobacter sp. strain Tol 5, shows nonspecific, high adhesiveness to abiotic material surfaces as well as to biotic surfaces. AtaA is a homotrimer of polypeptides comprising 3,630 amino acids and forms long nanofibers; therefore, it is too large and structurally complex to be produced as a recombinant protein. In this study, we isolated AtaA’s passenger domain (AtaA PSD), which is translocated to the cell surface through the C-terminal transmembrane domain and exhibits biological functions, using a new method. We introduced a protease recognition site and reaped AtaA nanofibers 225 nm in length from the cell surface through proteolytic cleavage with a specific protease. Biochemical and biophysical analyses of the purified native AtaA PSD revealed that it has a stable structure under alkaline and acidic conditions. Temperatures above 80 °C, which disrupted AtaA’s higher-order structure but maintained the full-length AtaA polypeptide, inactivated AtaA’s nonspecific adhesiveness, suggesting that the stickiness of AtaA requires its 3D structure. This finding refutes the widespread but vague speculation that large unfolded polypeptides readily stick to various surfaces. PMID:27305955

  3. Synthesis of flat sticky hydrophobic carbon diamond-like films using atmospheric pressure Ar/CH4 dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincón, R.; Hendaoui, A.; de Matos, J.; Chaker, M.

    2016-06-01

    An Ar/CH4 atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (AP-DBD) was used to synthesize sticky hydrophobic diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on glass surface. The film is formed with plasma treatment duration shorter than 30 s, and water contact angles larger than 90° together with contact angle hysteresis larger than 10° can be achieved. According to Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy analysis, hydrocarbon functional groups are created on the glass substrate, producing coatings with low surface energy (˜35 mJ m-2) with no modification of the surface roughness. To infer the plasma processes leading to the formation of low energy DLC surfaces, optical emission spectroscopy was used. From the results, a direct relationship between the CH species present in the plasma and the carbon concentration in the hydrophobic layer was found, which suggests that the CH species are the precursors of DLC film growth. Additionally, the plasma gas temperature was measured to be below 350 K which highlights the suitability of using AP-DBD to treat thermo-sensitive surfaces.

  4. An Acinetobacter trimeric autotransporter adhesin reaped from cells exhibits its nonspecific stickiness via a highly stable 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Shogo; Nakatani, Hajime; Iwasaki, Keita; Hori, Katsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs), cell surface proteins of Gram-negative bacteria, mediate bacterial adhesion to host cells and extracellular matrix proteins. However, AtaA, a TAA in the nonpathogenic Acinetobacter sp. strain Tol 5, shows nonspecific, high adhesiveness to abiotic material surfaces as well as to biotic surfaces. AtaA is a homotrimer of polypeptides comprising 3,630 amino acids and forms long nanofibers; therefore, it is too large and structurally complex to be produced as a recombinant protein. In this study, we isolated AtaA's passenger domain (AtaA PSD), which is translocated to the cell surface through the C-terminal transmembrane domain and exhibits biological functions, using a new method. We introduced a protease recognition site and reaped AtaA nanofibers 225 nm in length from the cell surface through proteolytic cleavage with a specific protease. Biochemical and biophysical analyses of the purified native AtaA PSD revealed that it has a stable structure under alkaline and acidic conditions. Temperatures above 80 °C, which disrupted AtaA's higher-order structure but maintained the full-length AtaA polypeptide, inactivated AtaA's nonspecific adhesiveness, suggesting that the stickiness of AtaA requires its 3D structure. This finding refutes the widespread but vague speculation that large unfolded polypeptides readily stick to various surfaces. PMID:27305955

  5. Promoting Your Web Site.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raeder, Aggi

    1997-01-01

    Discussion of ways to promote sites on the World Wide Web focuses on how search engines work and how they retrieve and identify sites. Appropriate Web links for submitting new sites and for Internet marketing are included. (LRW)

  6. CERES Web Links

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-21

    ...   Web Links to Relevant CERES Information Relevant information about CERES, CERES references, ... Instrument Working Group Home Page Aerosol Retrieval Web Page  (Center for Satellite Applications and Research) ...

  7. Chemistry on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mounts, Richard D.

    1996-01-01

    Gives an overview of the World Wide Web, describes what is required to access it, and highlights some of the features of interest to chemists such as Web-based chemical databases that feature user-interactive molecular structures and chemical movies. Lists Internet chemistry resources designed for Web browsers and locations for obtaining Web…

  8. Evaluating Web Usability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Jean; Martin, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Web usability focuses on design elements and processes that make web pages easy to use. A website for college students was evaluated for underutilization. One-on-one testing, focus groups, web analytics, peer university review and marketing focus group and demographic data were utilized to conduct usability evaluation. The results indicated that…

  9. Commercial Web Site Links.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelwall, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Discusses business use of the Web and related search engine design issues as well as research on general and academic links before reporting on a survey of the links published by a collection of business Web sites. Results indicate around 66% of Web sites do carry external links, most of which are targeted at a specific purpose, but about 17%…

  10. WWW: Neuroscience Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    The human brain contains an estimated 100 billion neurons, and browsing the Web, one might be led to believe that there's a Web site for every one of those cells. It's no surprise that there are lots of Web sites concerning the nervous system. After all, the human brain is toward the top of nearly everyone's list of favorite organs and of…