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Sample records for orchid dendrobium thyrsiflorum

  1. Somatic Embryogenesis in Two Orchid Genera (Cymbidium, Dendrobium).

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jaime A Teixeira; Winarto, Budi

    2016-01-01

    The protocorm-like body (PLB) is the de facto somatic embryo in orchids. Here we describe detailed protocols for two orchid genera (hybrid Cymbidium Twilight Moon 'Day Light' and Dendrobium 'Jayakarta', D. 'Gradita 31', and D. 'Zahra FR 62') for generating PLBs. These protocols will most likely have to be tweaked for different cultivars as the response of orchids in vitro tends to be dependent on genotype. In addition to primary somatic embryogenesis, secondary (or repetitive) somatic embryogenesis is also described for both genera. The use of thin cell layers as a sensitive tissue assay is outlined for hybrid Cymbidium while the protocol outlined is suitable for bioreactor culture of D. 'Zahra FR 62'. PMID:26619873

  2. Transformation of Dendrobium orchid using particle bombardment of protocorms.

    PubMed

    Kuehnle, A R; Sugii, N

    1992-08-01

    Transformed dendrobium orchids (Dendrobium x Jaquelyn Thomas hybrids) were recovered from protocorms bombarded by particles coated with the plasmid pGA482GG/cpPRV4, which contains the plant expressible Nos-NPT II and papaya ringspot virus (PRV) coat protein (CP) genes. Approximately 280 protocorms from four crosses were bombarded and potentially transformed tissues were identified by growth and green color on half-strength Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 2% sucrose and 50-100 mg 1(-1) kanamycin sulfate. Kanamycin concentrations that prevented growth of nontransformed tissues could not be used for long-term selection because such levels suppressed the regeneration of potentially transformed tissues. PCR and restriction analysis 21 months after treatment found 13 of 13 plants from two crosses, which appeared kanamycin-tolerant, to contain the Nos-NPT II gene, while only one of these plants carried the vector-linked PRV CP-gene. These results support use of particle bombardment for transformation of this important ornamental monocot. PMID:24201595

  3. Multiple shoot induction from axillary bud cultures of the medicinal orchid, Dendrobium longicornu

    PubMed Central

    Dohling, Stadwelson; Kumaria, Suman; Tandon, Pramod

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Dendrobium longicornu, commonly known as the ‘Long-horned Dendrobium’, is an endangered and medicinally important epiphytic orchid. Over-exploitation and habitat destruction seriously threaten this orchid in Northeast India. Our objective was to develop an efficient protocol for the mass propagation of D. longicornu using axillary bud segments. Methodology and principal results Axillary buds cultured in Murashige and Skoog semi-solid medium supplemented with α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA), 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) and 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) readily developed into plantlets. These formed either directly from shoot buds or from intermediary protocorm-like bodies (PLBs). The maximum explant response (86.6 %) was obtained in medium supplemented with NAA at 30 µM, while the maximum number of shoots (4.42) and maximum bud-forming capacity (3.51) were observed in medium containing 15 µM BAP and 5 µM NAA in combination. Protocorm-like bodies were obtained when the medium contained 2,4-D. The maximum number of explants forming PLBs (41.48 %) was obtained in medium containing 15 µM BAP and 15 µM 2,4-D. Well-developed plantlets obtained after 20–25 weeks of culture were acclimatized and eventually transferred to the greenhouse. Over 60 % of these survived to form plants ∼3–4 cm tall after 90 days in glasshouse conditions using a substrate of crushed brick and charcoal, shredded bark and moss. Conclusions The method described can readily be used for the rapid and large-scale regeneration of D. longicornu. Its commercial adoption would reduce the collection of this medicinally important and increasingly rare orchid from the wild. PMID:23136638

  4. A transcriptome-wide, organ-specific regulatory map of Dendrobium officinale, an important traditional Chinese orchid herb.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yijun; Yu, Dongliang; Xue, Jie; Lu, Jiangjie; Feng, Shangguo; Shen, Chenjia; Wang, Huizhong

    2016-01-01

    Dendrobium officinale is an important traditional Chinese herb. Here, we did a transcriptome-wide, organ-specific study on this valuable plant by combining RNA, small RNA (sRNA) and degradome sequencing. RNA sequencing of four organs (flower, root, leaf and stem) of Dendrobium officinale enabled us to obtain 536,558 assembled transcripts, from which 2,645, 256, 42 and 54 were identified to be highly expressed in the four organs respectively. Based on sRNA sequencing, 2,038, 2, 21 and 24 sRNAs were identified to be specifically accumulated in the four organs respectively. A total of 1,047 mature microRNA (miRNA) candidates were detected. Based on secondary structure predictions and sequencing, tens of potential miRNA precursors were identified from the assembled transcripts. Interestingly, phase-distributed sRNAs with degradome-based processing evidences were discovered on the long-stem structures of two precursors. Target identification was performed for the 1,047 miRNA candidates, resulting in the discovery of 1,257 miRNA--target pairs. Finally, some biological meaningful subnetworks involving hormone signaling, development, secondary metabolism and Argonaute 1-related regulation were established. All of the sequencing data sets are available at NCBI Sequence Read Archive (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sra/). Summarily, our study provides a valuable resource for the in-depth molecular and functional studies on this important Chinese orchid herb. PMID:26732614

  5. A transcriptome-wide, organ-specific regulatory map of Dendrobium officinale, an important traditional Chinese orchid herb

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yijun; Yu, Dongliang; Xue, Jie; Lu, Jiangjie; Feng, Shangguo; Shen, Chenjia; Wang, Huizhong

    2016-01-01

    Dendrobium officinale is an important traditional Chinese herb. Here, we did a transcriptome-wide, organ-specific study on this valuable plant by combining RNA, small RNA (sRNA) and degradome sequencing. RNA sequencing of four organs (flower, root, leaf and stem) of Dendrobium officinale enabled us to obtain 536,558 assembled transcripts, from which 2,645, 256, 42 and 54 were identified to be highly expressed in the four organs respectively. Based on sRNA sequencing, 2,038, 2, 21 and 24 sRNAs were identified to be specifically accumulated in the four organs respectively. A total of 1,047 mature microRNA (miRNA) candidates were detected. Based on secondary structure predictions and sequencing, tens of potential miRNA precursors were identified from the assembled transcripts. Interestingly, phase-distributed sRNAs with degradome-based processing evidences were discovered on the long-stem structures of two precursors. Target identification was performed for the 1,047 miRNA candidates, resulting in the discovery of 1,257 miRNA--target pairs. Finally, some biological meaningful subnetworks involving hormone signaling, development, secondary metabolism and Argonaute 1-related regulation were established. All of the sequencing data sets are available at NCBI Sequence Read Archive (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sra/). Summarily, our study provides a valuable resource for the in-depth molecular and functional studies on this important Chinese orchid herb. PMID:26732614

  6. In vitro propagation of Dendrobium macrostachyum Lindl.--a threatened orchid.

    PubMed

    Pyati, A N; Murthy, H N; Hahn, E J; Paek, K Y

    2002-05-01

    In vitro propagation of Dendrobium macrostachyum, a threatened and endemic species was achieved through nodal explants. The nodal explants were cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) basal medium and MS medium supplemented with N6-benzyladenine (BA-2.22, 4.44 and 8.88 microM), Kinetin (KN-2.32, 4.65, and 9.29 microM) and Coconut water (CW, 5, 10 and 15%) individually or in combination with 2.69 microM alpha-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA). Axillary shoots were induced directly from nodal explants in medium containing BA, KN or CW. Optimal shoot induction (6 shoots/explant) was attained from nodal explants cultured on medium supplemented with 15% CW. Well developed shoots rooted at an average 5 roots per shoot in half strength MS medium devoid of any growth regulators. PMID:12622215

  7. Genetic stability and phytochemical analysis of the in vitro regenerated plants of Dendrobium nobile Lindl., an endangered medicinal orchid

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Paromik; Kumaria, Suman; Diengdoh, Reemavareen; Tandon, Pramod

    2014-01-01

    An efficient genetically stable regeneration protocol with increased phytochemical production has been established for Dendrobium nobile, a highly prized orchid for its economic and medicinal importance. Protocorm like bodies (PLBs) were induced from the pseudostem segments using thidiazuron (TDZ; 1.5 mg/l), by-passing the conventional auxin–cytokinin complement approach for plant regeneration. Although, PLB induction was observed at higher concentrations of TDZ, plantlet regeneration from those PLBs was affected adversely. The best rooting (5.41 roots/shoot) was achieved in MS medium with 1.5 mg/l TDZ and 0.25% activated charcoal. Plantlets were successfully transferred to a greenhouse with a survival rate of 84.3%, exhibiting normal development. Genetic stability of the regenerated plants was investigated using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism markers which detected 97% of genetic fidelity among the regenerants. The PIC values of RAPD and SCoT primers were recorded to be 0.92 and 0.76 and their Rp values ranged between 3.66 and 10, and 4 and 12 respectively. The amplification products of the regenerated plants showed similar banding patterns to that of the mother plant thus demonstrating the homogeneity of the micropropagated plants. A comparative phytochemical analysis among the mother and the micropropagated plants showed a higher yield of secondary metabolites. The regeneration protocol developed in this study provides a basis for ex-situ germplasm conservation and also harnesses the various secondary metabolite compounds of medicinal importance present in D. nobile. PMID:25606433

  8. Genetic stability and phytochemical analysis of the in vitro regenerated plants of Dendrobium nobile Lindl., an endangered medicinal orchid.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Paromik; Kumaria, Suman; Diengdoh, Reemavareen; Tandon, Pramod

    2014-12-01

    An efficient genetically stable regeneration protocol with increased phytochemical production has been established for Dendrobium nobile, a highly prized orchid for its economic and medicinal importance. Protocorm like bodies (PLBs) were induced from the pseudostem segments using thidiazuron (TDZ; 1.5 mg/l), by-passing the conventional auxin-cytokinin complement approach for plant regeneration. Although, PLB induction was observed at higher concentrations of TDZ, plantlet regeneration from those PLBs was affected adversely. The best rooting (5.41 roots/shoot) was achieved in MS medium with 1.5 mg/l TDZ and 0.25% activated charcoal. Plantlets were successfully transferred to a greenhouse with a survival rate of 84.3%, exhibiting normal development. Genetic stability of the regenerated plants was investigated using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism markers which detected 97% of genetic fidelity among the regenerants. The PIC values of RAPD and SCoT primers were recorded to be 0.92 and 0.76 and their Rp values ranged between 3.66 and 10, and 4 and 12 respectively. The amplification products of the regenerated plants showed similar banding patterns to that of the mother plant thus demonstrating the homogeneity of the micropropagated plants. A comparative phytochemical analysis among the mother and the micropropagated plants showed a higher yield of secondary metabolites. The regeneration protocol developed in this study provides a basis for ex-situ germplasm conservation and also harnesses the various secondary metabolite compounds of medicinal importance present in D. nobile. PMID:25606433

  9. Overexpression of an Orchid (Dendrobium nobile) SOC1/TM3-Like Ortholog, DnAGL19, in Arabidopsis Regulates HOS1-FT Expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ru; Pan, Ting; Liang, Wei-Qi; Gao, Lan; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Li, Hong-Qing; Liang, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Flowering in the appropriate season is critical for successful reproduction in angiosperms. The orchid species, Dendrobium nobile, requires vernalization to achieve flowering in the spring, but the underlying regulatory network has not been identified to date. The MADS-box transcription factor DnAGL19 was previously identified in a study of low-temperature treated D. nobile buds and was suggested to regulate vernalization-induced flowering. In this study, phylogenetic analysis of DnAGL9 and the MADS-box containing proteins showed that DnAGL19 is phylogenetically closely related to the SOC1-like protein from orchid Dendrobium Chao Parya Smile, DOSOC1. The orchid clade closed to but is not included into the SOC1-1/TM3 clades associated with either eudicots or monocots, suggesting that DnAGL19 is an SOC1-1/TM3-like ortholog. DnAGL19 was found to be highly expressed in pseudobulbs, leaves, roots, and axillary buds but rarely in flowers, and to be substantially upregulated in axillary buds by prolonged low-temperature treatments. Overexpression of DnAGL19 in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in a small but significantly reduced time to bolting, suggesting that flowering time was slightly accelerated under normal growth conditions. Consistent with this, the A. thaliana APETELA1 (AP1) gene was expressed at an earlier stage in transgenic lines than in wild type plants, while the FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene was suppressed, suggesting that altered regulations on these transcription factors caused the weak promotion of flowering. HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENE 1 (HOS1) was slightly activated under the same conditions, suggesting that the HOS1-FT module may be involved in the DnAGL19-related network. Under vernalization conditions, FT expression was significantly upregulated, whereas HOS1 expression in the transgenic A. thaliana has a level similar to that in wild type. Taken together, these results suggest that DnAGL19 controls the action of the HOS1-FT module

  10. Overexpression of an Orchid (Dendrobium nobile) SOC1/TM3-Like Ortholog, DnAGL19, in Arabidopsis Regulates HOS1-FT Expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Ru; Pan, Ting; Liang, Wei-Qi; Gao, Lan; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Li, Hong-Qing; Liang, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Flowering in the appropriate season is critical for successful reproduction in angiosperms. The orchid species, Dendrobium nobile, requires vernalization to achieve flowering in the spring, but the underlying regulatory network has not been identified to date. The MADS-box transcription factor DnAGL19 was previously identified in a study of low-temperature treated D. nobile buds and was suggested to regulate vernalization-induced flowering. In this study, phylogenetic analysis of DnAGL9 and the MADS-box containing proteins showed that DnAGL19 is phylogenetically closely related to the SOC1-like protein from orchid Dendrobium Chao Parya Smile, DOSOC1. The orchid clade closed to but is not included into the SOC1-1/TM3 clades associated with either eudicots or monocots, suggesting that DnAGL19 is an SOC1-1/TM3-like ortholog. DnAGL19 was found to be highly expressed in pseudobulbs, leaves, roots, and axillary buds but rarely in flowers, and to be substantially upregulated in axillary buds by prolonged low-temperature treatments. Overexpression of DnAGL19 in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in a small but significantly reduced time to bolting, suggesting that flowering time was slightly accelerated under normal growth conditions. Consistent with this, the A. thaliana APETELA1 (AP1) gene was expressed at an earlier stage in transgenic lines than in wild type plants, while the FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene was suppressed, suggesting that altered regulations on these transcription factors caused the weak promotion of flowering. HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENE 1 (HOS1) was slightly activated under the same conditions, suggesting that the HOS1-FT module may be involved in the DnAGL19-related network. Under vernalization conditions, FT expression was significantly upregulated, whereas HOS1 expression in the transgenic A. thaliana has a level similar to that in wild type. Taken together, these results suggest that DnAGL19 controls the action of the HOS1-FT module

  11. Effect of plasmolysis on protocorm-like bodies of Dendrobium Bobby Messina orchid following cryopreservation with encapsulation-dehydration method.

    PubMed

    Antony, Jessica Jeyanthi James; Mubbarakh, Safiah Ahmad; Mahmood, Maziah; Subramaniam, Sreeramanan

    2014-02-01

    Histological observation and scanning electron microscopy analyses in Dendrobium Bobby Messina indicates the cellular process of cryopreserved protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) was different comparative to non-cryopreserved PLBs. The cellular process was not only modified by the freezing and thawing effect but also due to the dehydration process itself during the cryopreservation procedure. Histological observation in Dendrobium Bobby Messina in encapsulation-dehydration method indicated that the degree of plasmolysis causes more cellular changes to the cryopreserved PLBs comparative to non-cryopreserved and stock culture PLBs. These results revealed higher amount of homogenous cell population and denser cytoplasm in cryopreserved PLBs. Histological analysis also revealed more voluminous nucleus in cryopreserved PLBs comparative to non-cryopreserved PLBs and PLBs stock culture. In contrast, scanning electron microscope analysis showed severe damages in cryopreserved PLBs and non-cryopreserved PLBs comparative to the PLBs stock culture which in return could be the possible reason of no regrowth in encapsulation-dehydration method. Damages incurred were on top part, side part, and at the stomata of the PLBs. Histological observation and scanning electron microscopy analyses in Dendrobium Bobby Messina indicates that the degree of plasmolysis causes changes in the cellular process of PLBs from cryopreserved PLBs was different comparative to non-cryopreserved PLBs. PMID:24218184

  12. An effective nutrient medium for asymbiotic seed germination and large-scale in vitro regeneration of Dendrobium hookerianum, a threatened orchid of northeast India

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sumi; Kumaria, Suman; Tandon, Pramod

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Dendrobium hookerianum is a rare and threatened epiphytic orchid of northeast India. Prospects for conservation would be strengthened by developing an in vitro method for mass propagation. Seeds are minute and difficult to use directly in the field for this purpose, being non-endospermous with a low nutrient content and dependent on a specific fungus for germination and early seedling development. Although produced in large numbers (2–3 million per capsule), <5 % germinate naturally in the wild. Our objective was to develop a rapid and successful method for in vitro propagation based on an initial in vitro asymbiotic seed germination step that achieved high percentages. Methodology Effects of four different media, i.e. (i) Murashige and Skoog (MS), (ii) Mitra et al., (iii) Knudson (KC) and (iv) Gamborg et al. (B5), were evaluated for large-scale multiplication by asymbiotic seed germination. Seedling leaf number, shoot number, shoot length, root number and root length were scored. After 7–8 months, large numbers of well-rooted plantlets were transferred to a glasshouse in thermocol pots containing compost. Six different composts based on broken brick and charcoal were compared for their ability to support further development over 90 days of hardening. Principal results The fastest and highest percentage seed germination was achieved using MS medium. Seeds on MS medium germinated in 3–4 weeks compared with 7–8 weeks on B5 medium. Seedling development was also superior on MS medium. The inclusion of plant growth regulators was unnecessary. Compost comprising broken brick and charcoal with an upper layer of moss was found to be the most suitable for the survival of transferred plantlets. Ninety per cent survival of plantlets was achieved 90 days after transfer to a glasshouse. Conclusions The use of MS culture medium is well suited for the mass multiplication of D. hookerianum plants intended for re-introducing this threatened orchid into

  13. Dendrobium micropropagation: a review.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jaime A Teixeira; Cardoso, Jean Carlos; Dobránszki, Judit; Zeng, Songjun

    2015-05-01

    Dendrobium is one of the largest and most important (ornamentally and medicinally) orchid genera. Tissue culture is now an established method for the effective propagation of members of this genus. This review provides a detailed overview of the Dendrobium micropropagation literature. Through a chronological analysis, aspects such as explant, basal medium, plant growth regulators, culture conditions and final organogenic outcome are chronicled in detail. This review will allow Dendrobium specialists to use the information that has been documented to establish, more efficiently, protocols for their own germplasm and to improve in vitro culture conditions based on the optimized parameters detailed in this review. Not only will this expand the use for mass propagation, but will also allow for the conservation of important germplasm. Information on the in vitro responses of Dendrobium for developing efficient protocols for breeding techniques based on tissue culture, such as polyploidization, somatic hybridization, isolation of mutants and somaclonal variants and for synthetic seed and bioreactor technology, or for genetic transformation, is discussed in this review. This is the first such review on this genus and represents half a decade of literature dedicated to Dendrobium micropropagation. PMID:26046143

  14. In vitro conservation of Dendrobium germplasm.

    PubMed

    Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Zeng, Songjun; Galdiano, Renato Fernandes; Dobránszki, Judit; Cardoso, Jean Carlos; Vendrame, Wagner A

    2014-09-01

    Dendrobium is a large genus in the family Orchidaceae that exhibits vast diversity in floral characteristics, which is of considerable importance to orchid breeders, biotechnologists and collectors. Native species have high value as a result of their medicinal properties, while their hybrids are important as ornamental commodities, either as cut flowers or potted plants and are thus veritable industrial crops. Thus, preservation of Dendrobium germplasm is valuable for species conservation, breeding programs and the floriculture industry. Cryopreservation represents the only safe, efficient and cost-effective long-term storage option to facilitate the conservation of genetic resources of plant species. This review highlights 16 years of literature related to the preservation of Dendrobium germplasm and comprises the most comprehensive assessment of thorough studies performed to date, which shows reliable and reproducible results. Air-drying, encapsulation-dehydration, encapsulation-vitrification, vitrification and droplet-vitrification are the current cryopreservation methodologies that have been used to cryopreserve Dendrobium germplasm. Mature seeds, pollen, protoplasts, shoot primordia, protocorms and somatic embryos or protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) have been cryopreserved with different levels of success. Encapsulation-vitrification and encapsulation-dehydration are the most used protocol, while PLBs represent the main explant explored. PMID:24845051

  15. Asymbiotic in vitro seed propagation of Dendrobium.

    PubMed

    Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Tsavkelova, Elena A; Ng, Tzi Bun; Parthibhan, S; Dobránszki, Judit; Cardoso, Jean Carlos; Rao, M V; Zeng, Songjun

    2015-10-01

    The ability to germinate orchids from seeds in vitro presents a useful and viable method for the propagation of valuable germplasm, maintaining the genetic heterogeneity inherent in seeds. Given the ornamental and medicinal importance of many species within the genus Dendrobium, this review explores in vitro techniques for their asymbiotic seed germination. The influence of abiotic factors (such as temperature and light), methods of sterilization, composition of basal media, and supplementation with organic additives and plant growth regulators are discussed in context to achieve successful seed germination, protocorm formation, and further seedling growth and development. This review provides both a basis for the selection of optimal conditions, and a platform for the discovery of better ones, that would allow the development of new protocols and the exploration of new hypotheses for germination and conservation of Dendrobium seeds and seedlings. PMID:26183950

  16. Australian orchids and the doctors they commemorate.

    PubMed

    Pearn, John H

    2013-01-21

    Botanical taxonomy is a repository of medical biographical information. Such botanical memorials include the names of some indigenous orchids of Australia. By searching reference texts and journals relating to Australian botany and Australian orchidology, as well as Australian and international medical and botanical biographical texts, I identified 30 orchids indigenous to Australia whose names commemorate doctors and other medical professionals. Of these, 24 have names that commemorate a total of 16 doctors who worked in Australia. The doctors and orchids I identified include: doctor-soldiers Richard Sanders Rogers (1862-1942), after whom the Rogers' Greenhood (Pterostylis rogersii) is named, and Robert Brown (1773-1858), after whom the Purple Enamel Orchid (Elythranthera brunonis) is named; navy surgeon Archibald Menzies (1754-1842), after whom the Hare Orchid (Leptoceras menziesii) is named; radiologist Hugo Flecker (1884-1957) after whom the Slender Sphinx Orchid (Cestichis fleckeri) is named; and general medical practitioner Hereward Leighton Kesteven (1881-1964), after whom the Kesteven's Orchid (Dendrobium kestevenii) is named. Biographic references in scientific names of plants comprise a select but important library of Australian medical history. Such botanical taxonomy commemorates, in an enduring manner, clinicians who have contributed to biology outside clinical practice. PMID:23330773

  17. Orchid Fever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Phillip

    2004-01-01

    Exotic, captivating, and seductive, orchids have long fascinated plant lovers. They first attracted the attention of Westerners in the 17th century, when explorers brought back samples from South America and Asia. By the mid-1800s, orchid collecting had reached a fever pitch, not unlike that of the Dutch tulip craze of the 1630s, with rich (and…

  18. Comparative molecular cytogenetics of major repetitive sequence families of three Dendrobium species (Orchidaceae) from Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Rabeya; Alam, Sheikh Shamimul; Menzel, Gerhard; Schmidt, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Dendrobium species show tremendous morphological diversity and have broad geographical distribution. As repetitive sequence analysis is a useful tool to investigate the evolution of chromosomes and genomes, the aim of the present study was the characterization of repetitive sequences from Dendrobium moschatum for comparative molecular and cytogenetic studies in the related species Dendrobium aphyllum, Dendrobium aggregatum and representatives from other orchid genera. Methods In order to isolate highly repetitive sequences, a c0t-1 DNA plasmid library was established. Repeats were sequenced and used as probes for Southern hybridization. Sequence divergence was analysed using bioinformatic tools. Repetitive sequences were localized along orchid chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Key Results Characterization of the c0t-1 library resulted in the detection of repetitive sequences including the (GA)n dinucleotide DmoO11, numerous Arabidopsis-like telomeric repeats and the highly amplified dispersed repeat DmoF14. The DmoF14 repeat is conserved in six Dendrobium species but diversified in representative species of three other orchid genera. FISH analyses showed the genome-wide distribution of DmoF14 in D. moschatum, D. aphyllum and D. aggregatum. Hybridization with the telomeric repeats demonstrated Arabidopsis-like telomeres at the chromosome ends of Dendrobium species. However, FISH using the telomeric probe revealed two pairs of chromosomes with strong intercalary signals in D. aphyllum. FISH showed the terminal position of 5S and 18S–5·8S–25S rRNA genes and a characteristic number of rDNA sites in the three Dendrobium species. Conclusions The repeated sequences isolated from D. moschatum c0t-1 DNA constitute major DNA families of the D. moschatum, D. aphyllum and D. aggregatum genomes with DmoF14 representing an ancient component of orchid genomes. Large intercalary telomere-like arrays suggest chromosomal

  19. Advances in Dendrobium molecular research: Applications in genetic variation, identification and breeding.

    PubMed

    Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Jin, Xiaohua; Dobránszki, Judit; Lu, Jiangjie; Wang, Huizhong; Zotz, Gerhard; Cardoso, Jean Carlos; Zeng, Songjun

    2016-02-01

    Orchids of the genus Dendrobium are of great economic importance in global horticultural trade and in Asian traditional medicine. For both areas, research yielding solid information on taxonomy, phylogeny, and breeding of this genus are essential. Traditional morphological and cytological characterization are used in combination with molecular results in classification and identification. Markers may be useful when used alone but are not always reliable in identification. The number of species studied and identified by molecular markers is small at present. Conventional breeding methods are time-consuming and laborious. In the past two decades, promising advances have been made in taxonomy, phylogeny and breeding of Dendrobium species due to the intensive use of molecular markers. In this review, we focus on the main molecular techniques used in 121 published studies and discuss their importance and possibilities in speeding up the breeding of new cultivars and hybrids. PMID:26493228

  20. Pseudopollen in Dendrobium unicum Seidenf. (Orchidaceae): Reward or Deception?

    PubMed Central

    DAVIES, K. L.; TURNER, M. P.

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims In 1987, Kjellsson and Rasmussen described the labellar trichomes of Dendrobium unicum Seidenf. and proposed that these hairs function as pseudopollen. Pseudopollen is a mealy material that superficially resembles pollen, is usually laden with food substances and is formed when labellar hairs either fragment into individual cells or become detached from the labellum. However, the trichomes of D. unicum are very different from pseudopollen‐forming hairs found in other orchid genera such as Maxillaria and Polystachya. Moreover, Kjellsson and Rasmussen were unable to demonstrate the presence of food substances within these trichomes and argued that even in the absence of food substances, the hairs, in that they superficially resemble pollen, can still attract insects by deceit. The aim of this paper is to investigate whether the labellar trichomes of D. unicum contain food reserves and thus reward potential pollinators or whether they are devoid of foods and attract insects solely by mimicry. • Methods Light microscopy, histochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. • Key Results Dendrobium unicum produces pseudopollen. Pseudopollen here, however, differs from that previously described for other orchid genera in that the pseudopollen‐forming trichomes consist of a stalk cell and a ‘head’ of component cells that separate at maturity, in contrast to Maxillaria and some Polystachya spp. where pseudopollen is formed by the fragmentation of moniliform hairs. Moreover, the pseudopollen of Maxillaria and Polystachya largely contains protein, whereas in D. unicum the main food substance is starch. • Conclusions Flowers of D. unicum, rather than attracting insects solely by deceit may also reward potential pollinators. PMID:15159216

  1. Orchid flowers tolerance to gamma-radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Olivia Kimiko

    2000-03-01

    Cut flowers are fresh goods that may be treated with fumigants such as methyl bromide to meet the needs of the quarantine requirements of importing countries. Irradiation is a non-chemical alternative to substitute the methyl bromide treatment of fresh products. In this research, different cut orchids were irradiated to examine their tolerance to gamma-rays. A 200 Gy dose did inhibit the Dendrobium palenopsis buds from opening, but did not cause visible damage to opened flowers. Doses of 800 and 1000 Gy were damaging because they provoked the flowers to drop from the stem. Cattleya irradiated with 750 Gy did not show any damage, and were therefore eligible for the radiation treatment. Cymbidium tolerated up to 300 Gy and above this dose dropped prematurely. On the other hand, Oncydium did not tolerate doses above 150 Gy.

  2. Symbiotic in vitro seed propagation of Dendrobium: fungal and bacterial partners and their influence on plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Tsavkelova, Elena A; Zeng, Songjun; Ng, Tzi Bun; Parthibhan, S; Dobránszki, Judit; Cardoso, Jean Carlos; Rao, M V

    2015-07-01

    The genus Dendrobium is one of the largest genera of the Orchidaceae Juss. family, although some of its members are the most threatened today. The reason why many species face a vulnerable or endangered status is primarily because of anthropogenic interference in natural habitats and commercial overexploitation. The development and application of modern techniques and strategies directed towards in vitro propagation of orchids not only increases their number but also provides a viable means to conserve plants in an artificial environment, both in vitro and ex vitro, thus providing material for reintroduction. Dendrobium seed germination and propagation are challenging processes in vivo and in vitro, especially when the extreme specialization of these plants is considered: (1) their biotic relationships with pollinators and mycorrhizae; (2) adaptation to epiphytic or lithophytic life-styles; (3) fine-scale requirements for an optimal combination of nutrients, light, temperature, and pH. This review also aims to summarize the available data on symbiotic in vitro Dendrobium seed germination. The influence of abiotic factors as well as composition and amounts of different exogenous nutrient substances is examined. With a view to better understanding how to optimize and control in vitro symbiotic associations, a part of the review describes the strong biotic relations of Dendrobium with different associative microorganisms that form microbial communities with adult plants, and also influence symbiotic seed germination. The beneficial role of plant growth-promoting bacteria is also discussed. PMID:25940846

  3. The Dendrobium catenatum Lindl. genome sequence provides insights into polysaccharide synthase, floral development and adaptive evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Xu, Qing; Bian, Chao; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Yeh, Chuan-Ming; Liu, Ke-Wei; Yoshida, Kouki; Zhang, Liang-Sheng; Chang, Song-Bin; Chen, Fei; Shi, Yu; Su, Yong-Yu; Zhang, Yong-Qiang; Chen, Li-Jun; Yin, Yayi; Lin, Min; Huang, Huixia; Deng, Hua; Wang, Zhi-Wen; Zhu, Shi-Lin; Zhao, Xiang; Deng, Cao; Niu, Shan-Ce; Huang, Jie; Wang, Meina; Liu, Guo-Hui; Yang, Hai-Jun; Xiao, Xin-Ju; Hsiao, Yu-Yun; Wu, Wan-Lin; Chen, You-Yi; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Luo, Yi-Bo; Van de Peer, Yves; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Orchids make up about 10% of all seed plant species, have great economical value, and are of specific scientific interest because of their renowned flowers and ecological adaptations. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of a lithophytic orchid, Dendrobium catenatum. We predict 28,910 protein-coding genes, and find evidence of a whole genome duplication shared with Phalaenopsis. We observed the expansion of many resistance-related genes, suggesting a powerful immune system responsible for adaptation to a wide range of ecological niches. We also discovered extensive duplication of genes involved in glucomannan synthase activities, likely related to the synthesis of medicinal polysaccharides. Expansion of MADS-box gene clades ANR1, StMADS11, and MIKC*, involved in the regulation of development and growth, suggests that these expansions are associated with the astonishing diversity of plant architecture in the genus Dendrobium. On the contrary, members of the type I MADS box gene family are missing, which might explain the loss of the endospermous seed. The findings reported here will be important for future studies into polysaccharide synthesis, adaptations to diverse environments and flower architecture of Orchidaceae. PMID:26754549

  4. Seedling development and evaluation of genetic stability of cryopreserved Dendrobium hybrid mature seeds.

    PubMed

    Galdiano, Renato Fernandes; de Macedo Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes; de Faria, Ricardo Tadeu; Vendrame, Wagner Aparecido

    2014-03-01

    Vitrification, a simple, fast, and recommended cryopreservation method for orchid germplasm conservation, was evaluated for Dendrobium hybrid "Dong Yai" mature seeds. The genetic stability of regenerated seedlings was also evaluated using flow cytometry. Mature seeds from this hybrid were submitted to plant vitrification solution (PVS2) for 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6 h at 0 °C. Subsequently, they were plunged into liquid nitrogen (LN) at -196 °C for 1 h and recovered in half-strength Murashige and Skoog culture medium (1/2 MS), and seed germination was evaluated after 30 days. Seeds directly submitted to LN did not germinate after cryopreservation. Seeds treated with PVS2 between 1 and 3 h presented the best germination (between 51 and 58%), although longer exposure to PVS2 returned moderated germination (39%). Germinated seeds were further subcultured in P-723 culture medium and developed whole seedlings in vitro after 180 days, with no abnormal characteristics, diseases, or nutritional deficiencies. Seedlings were successfully acclimatized under greenhouse conditions with over 80% survival. Flow cytometry analysis revealed no chromosomal changes on vitrified seedlings, as well as seedlings germinated from the control treatment (direct exposure to LN). These findings indicate that vitrification is a feasible and safe germplasm cryopreservation method for commercial Dendrobium orchid hybrid conservation. PMID:24402568

  5. The Dendrobium catenatum Lindl. genome sequence provides insights into polysaccharide synthase, floral development and adaptive evolution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Xu, Qing; Bian, Chao; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Yeh, Chuan-Ming; Liu, Ke-Wei; Yoshida, Kouki; Zhang, Liang-Sheng; Chang, Song-Bin; Chen, Fei; Shi, Yu; Su, Yong-Yu; Zhang, Yong-Qiang; Chen, Li-Jun; Yin, Yayi; Lin, Min; Huang, Huixia; Deng, Hua; Wang, Zhi-Wen; Zhu, Shi-Lin; Zhao, Xiang; Deng, Cao; Niu, Shan-Ce; Huang, Jie; Wang, Meina; Liu, Guo-Hui; Yang, Hai-Jun; Xiao, Xin-Ju; Hsiao, Yu-Yun; Wu, Wan-Lin; Chen, You-Yi; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Luo, Yi-Bo; Van de Peer, Yves; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Orchids make up about 10% of all seed plant species, have great economical value, and are of specific scientific interest because of their renowned flowers and ecological adaptations. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of a lithophytic orchid, Dendrobium catenatum. We predict 28,910 protein-coding genes, and find evidence of a whole genome duplication shared with Phalaenopsis. We observed the expansion of many resistance-related genes, suggesting a powerful immune system responsible for adaptation to a wide range of ecological niches. We also discovered extensive duplication of genes involved in glucomannan synthase activities, likely related to the synthesis of medicinal polysaccharides. Expansion of MADS-box gene clades ANR1, StMADS11, and MIKC(*), involved in the regulation of development and growth, suggests that these expansions are associated with the astonishing diversity of plant architecture in the genus Dendrobium. On the contrary, members of the type I MADS box gene family are missing, which might explain the loss of the endospermous seed. The findings reported here will be important for future studies into polysaccharide synthesis, adaptations to diverse environments and flower architecture of Orchidaceae. PMID:26754549

  6. Fusarium Wilt of Orchids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium wilt of orchids is highly destructive and economically limiting to the production of quality orchids that has steadily increased in many production facilities. Important crops such as phalaenopsis, cattleyas, and oncidiums appear to be especially susceptible to certain Fusarium species. Fu...

  7. Transitions between self-compatibility and self-incompatibility and the evolution of reproductive isolation in the large and diverse tropical genus Dendrobium (Orchidaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Fabio; Cafasso, Donata; Cozzolino, Salvatore; Scopece, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The evolution of interspecific reproductive barriers is crucial to understanding species evolution. This study examines the contribution of transitions between self-compatibility (SC) and self-incompatibility (SI) and genetic divergence in the evolution of reproductive barriers in Dendrobium, one of the largest orchid genera. Specifically, it investigates the evolution of pre- and postzygotic isolation and the effects of transitions between compatibility states on interspecific reproductive isolation within the genus. Methods The role of SC and SI changes in reproductive compatibility among species was examined using fruit set and seed viability data available in the literature from 86 species and ∼2500 hand pollinations. The evolution of SC and SI in Dendrobium species was investigated within a phylogenetic framework using internal transcribed spacer sequences available in GenBank. Key Results Based on data from crossing experiments, estimations of genetic distance and the results of a literature survey, it was found that changes in SC and SI significantly influenced the compatibility between species in interspecific crosses. The number of fruits produced was significantly higher in crosses in which self-incompatible species acted as pollen donor for self-compatible species, following the SI × SC rule. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian tests did not reject transitions from SI to SC and from SC to SI across the Dendrobium phylogeny. In addition, postzygotic isolation (embryo mortality) was found to evolve gradually with genetic divergence, in agreement with previous results observed for other plant species, including orchids. Conclusions Transitions between SC and SI and the gradual accumulation of genetic incompatibilities affecting postzygotic isolation are important mechanisms preventing gene flow among Dendrobium species, and may constitute important evolutionary processes contributing to the high levels of species diversity in this

  8. Metabolic Analysis of Medicinal Dendrobium officinale and Dendrobium huoshanense during Different Growth Years

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Qing; Jiao, Chunyan; Sun, Shiwei; Song, Cheng; Cai, Yongping; Lin, Yi; Fan, Honghong; Zhu, Yanfang

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics technology has enabled an important method for the identification and quality control of Traditional Chinese Medical materials. In this study, we isolated metabolites from cultivated Dendrobium officinale and Dendrobium huoshanense stems of different growth years in the methanol/water phase and identified them using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). First, a metabolomics technology platform for Dendrobium was constructed. The metabolites in the Dendrobium methanol/water phase were mainly sugars and glycosides, amino acids, organic acids, alcohols. D. officinale and D. huoshanense and their growth years were distinguished by cluster analysis in combination with multivariate statistical analysis, including principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). Eleven metabolites that contributed significantly to this differentiation were subjected to t-tests (P<0.05) to identify biomarkers that discriminate between D. officinale and D. huoshanense, including sucrose, glucose, galactose, succinate, fructose, hexadecanoate, oleanitrile, myo-inositol, and glycerol. Metabolic profiling of the chemical compositions of Dendrobium species revealed that the polysaccharide content of D. huoshanense was higher than that of D. officinale, indicating that the D. huoshanense was of higher quality. Based on the accumulation of Dendrobium metabolites, the optimal harvest time for Dendrobium was in the third year. This initial metabolic profiling platform for Dendrobium provides an important foundation for the further study of secondary metabolites (pharmaceutical active ingredients) and metabolic pathways. PMID:26752292

  9. Molecular phylogenetics and character evolution of morphologically diverse groups, Dendrobium section Dendrobium and allies

    PubMed Central

    Takamiya, Tomoko; Wongsawad, Pheravut; Sathapattayanon, Apirada; Tajima, Natsuko; Suzuki, Shunichiro; Kitamura, Saki; Shioda, Nao; Handa, Takashi; Kitanaka, Susumu; Iijima, Hiroshi; Yukawa, Tomohisa

    2014-01-01

    It is always difficult to construct coherent classification systems for plant lineages having diverse morphological characters. The genus Dendrobium, one of the largest genera in the Orchidaceae, includes ∼1100 species, and enormous morphological diversification has hindered the establishment of consistent classification systems covering all major groups of this genus. Given the particular importance of species in Dendrobium section Dendrobium and allied groups as floriculture and crude drug genetic resources, there is an urgent need to establish a stable classification system. To clarify phylogenetic relationships in Dendrobium section Dendrobium and allied groups, we analysed the macromolecular characters of the group. Phylogenetic analyses of 210 taxa of Dendrobium were conducted on DNA sequences of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of 18S–26S nuclear ribosomal DNA and the maturase-coding gene (matK) located in an intron of the plastid gene trnK using maximum parsimony and Bayesian methods. The parsimony and Bayesian analyses revealed 13 distinct clades in the group comprising section Dendrobium and its allied groups. Results also showed paraphyly or polyphyly of sections Amblyanthus, Aporum, Breviflores, Calcarifera, Crumenata, Dendrobium, Densiflora, Distichophyllae, Dolichocentrum, Holochrysa, Oxyglossum and Pedilonum. On the other hand, the monophyly of section Stachyobium was well supported. It was found that many of the morphological characters that have been believed to reflect phylogenetic relationships are, in fact, the result of convergence. As such, many of the sections that have been recognized up to this point were found to not be monophyletic, so recircumscription of sections is required. PMID:25107672

  10. [Dendrobium officinale stereoscopic cultivation method].

    PubMed

    Si, Jin-Ping; Dong, Hong-Xiu; Liao, Xin-Yan; Zhu, Yu-Qiu; Li, Hui

    2014-12-01

    The study is aimed to make the most of available space of Dendrobium officinale cultivation facility, reveal the yield and functional components variation of stereoscopic cultivated D. officinale, and improve quality, yield and efficiency. The agronomic traits and yield variation of stereoscopic cultivated D. officinale were studied by operating field experiment. The content of polysaccharide and extractum were determined by using phenol-sulfuric acid method and 2010 edition of "Chinese Pharmacopoeia" Appendix X A. The results showed that the land utilization of stereoscopic cultivated D. officinale increased 2.74 times, the stems, leaves and their total fresh or dry weight in unit area of stereoscopic cultivated D. officinale were all heavier than those of the ground cultivated ones. There was no significant difference in polysaccharide content between stereoscopic cultivation and ground cultivation. But the extractum content and total content of polysaccharide and extractum were significantly higher than those of the ground cultivated ones. In additional, the polysaccharide content and total content of polysaccharide and extractum from the top two levels of stereoscopic culture matrix were significantly higher than that of the ones from the other levels and ground cultivation. Steroscopic cultivation can effectively improves the utilization of space and yield, while the total content of polysaccharides and extractum were significantly higher than that of the ground cultivated ones. The significant difference in Dendrobium polysaccharides among the plants from different height of stereo- scopic culture matrix may be associated with light factor. PMID:25911804

  11. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities and the total protein content of protocorm-like bodies of Dendrobium sonia-28 subjected to vitrification.

    PubMed

    Poobathy, Ranjetta; Sinniah, Uma Rani; Xavier, Rathinam; Subramaniam, Sreeramanan

    2013-07-01

    Dendrobium sonia-28 is an important ornamental orchid in the Malaysian flower industry. However, the genus faces both low germination rates and the risk of producing heterozygous progenies. Cryopreservation is currently the favoured long-term storage method for orchids with propagation problems. Vitrification, a frequently used cryopreservation technique, involves the application of pretreatments and cryoprotectants to protect and recover explants during and after storage in liquid nitrogen. However, cryopreservation may cause osmotic injuries and toxicity to cryopreserved explants from the use of highly concentrated additives, and cellular injuries from thawing, devitrification and ice formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), occurring during dehydration and cryopreservation, may also cause membrane damage. Plants possess efficient antioxidant systems such as the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) enzymes to scavenge ROS during low temperature stress. In this study, protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) of Dendrobium sonia-28 were assayed for the total protein content, and both SOD and CAT activities, at each stage of a vitrification exercise to observe for deleterious stages in the protocol. The results indicated that cryopreserved PLBs of Dendrobium sonia-28 underwent excessive post-thawing oxidative stress due to decreased levels of the CAT enzyme at the post-thawing recovery stage, which contributed to the poor survival rates of the cryopreserved PLBs. PMID:23640259

  12. Antitumor Activity of Ethanolic Extract of Dendrobium formosum in T-Cell Lymphoma: An In Vitro and In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Ritika; Koch, Biplob

    2014-01-01

    Dendrobium, a genus of orchid, was found to possess useful therapeutic activities like anticancer, hypoglycaemic, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, hepatoprotective, antioxidant, and neuroprotective activities. The study was aimed to evaluate the anticancer property of the ethanolic extract of Dendrobium formosum on Dalton's lymphoma. In vitro cytotoxicity was determined by MTT assay, apoptosis was determined by fluorescence microscopy, and cell cycle progression was analysed using flow cytometry; in vivo antitumor activity was performed in Dalton's lymphoma bearing mice. The IC50 value of ethanolic extract was obtained at 350 μg/mL in Dalton's lymphoma cells. Fluorescence microscopy analysis showed significant increase in apoptotic cell death in dose- and time-dependent manner which was further confirmed through the resulting DNA fragmentation. Further, flow cytometry analysis showed that the ethanolic extract arrests the cells in G2/M phase of the cell cycle. The in vivo anticancer activity study illustrates significant increase in the survival time of Dalton's lymphoma bearing mice on treatment with ethanolic extract when compared to control. These results substantiate the antitumor properties of ethanolic extract of Dendrobium formosum and suggest an alternative in treatment of cancer. Further studies are required regarding the isolation and characterization of bioactive components along with the analysis of molecular mechanism involved. PMID:24959588

  13. Establishment of an efficient in vitro regeneration protocol for rapid and mass propagation of Dendrobium chrysotoxum Lindl. using seed culture.

    PubMed

    Nongdam, Potshangbam; Tikendra, Leimapokpam

    2014-01-01

    An efficient in vitro regeneration protocol from seed culture has been established successfully for Dendrobium chrysotoxum, an epiphytic orchid having tremendous ornamental and medicinal values. Seed germination response was encouraging in Mitra (M) medium enriched with different combinations of auxins and cytokinins. Medium supplemented with 0.4% activated charcoal (AC), 2 mg/L 6-benzyl amino purine (BAP), and 2 mg/L indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) produced best seed germination percentage in 2 weeks of culture. Incorporation of higher concentration of kinetin (KN) or BAP in combination with low auxin in medium induced pronounced shooting and leaf formation. Reduction in leaf development was evident when cytokinins exist singly in medium indicating synergistic effect of auxin and cytokinin in leaf induction. Presence of elevated level of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) or 1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) with low cytokinin content in medium generated more in vitro rooting, though IBA was found to be more effective in rooting induction as compared to NAA. The in vitro protocol for asymbiotic seed germination developed from the present investigation can be used for rapid mass propagation of this highly important Dendrobium orchid species. PMID:25401154

  14. Establishment of an Efficient In Vitro Regeneration Protocol for Rapid and Mass Propagation of Dendrobium chrysotoxum Lindl. Using Seed Culture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An efficient in vitro regeneration protocol from seed culture has been established successfully for Dendrobium chrysotoxum, an epiphytic orchid having tremendous ornamental and medicinal values. Seed germination response was encouraging in Mitra (M) medium enriched with different combinations of auxins and cytokinins. Medium supplemented with 0.4% activated charcoal (AC), 2 mg/L 6-benzyl amino purine (BAP), and 2 mg/L indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) produced best seed germination percentage in 2 weeks of culture. Incorporation of higher concentration of kinetin (KN) or BAP in combination with low auxin in medium induced pronounced shooting and leaf formation. Reduction in leaf development was evident when cytokinins exist singly in medium indicating synergistic effect of auxin and cytokinin in leaf induction. Presence of elevated level of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) or 1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) with low cytokinin content in medium generated more in vitro rooting, though IBA was found to be more effective in rooting induction as compared to NAA. The in vitro protocol for asymbiotic seed germination developed from the present investigation can be used for rapid mass propagation of this highly important Dendrobium orchid species. PMID:25401154

  15. Two strategies by epiphytic orchids for maintaining water balance: thick cuticles in leaves and water storage in pseudobulbs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shi-Jian; Sun, Mei; Yang, Qiu-Yun; Ma, Ren-Yi; Zhang, Jiao-Lin; Zhang, Shi-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Epiphytes are an important component of tropical and subtropical flora, and serve vital ecological functions in forest hydrology and nutrient fluxes. However, they often encounter water deficits because there is no direct contact between their roots and the soil. The strategies employed by epiphytes for maintaining water balance in relatively water-limited habitats are not completely understood. In the present study, we investigated the anatomical traits, water loss rates, and physiology of leaves and pseudobulbs of four Dendrobium species with different pseudobulb morphologies to understand the roles of leaf and pseudobulb in maintaining water balance of epiphytic orchids. Our results showed that two species (D. chrysotoxum and D. officinale), with lower rates of water loss, have thicker leaves and upper cuticles, but lower epidermal thickness and leaf dry mass per area. In contrast, the other two species (D. chrysanthum and D. crystallinum) with thinner cuticles and higher rates of water loss, have less tissue density and greater saturated water contents in their pseudobulbs. Therefore, our results indicate that these latter two species may resist drought by storing water in the pseudobulbs to compensate for their thin cuticles and rapid water loss through the leaves. Under the same laboratory conditions, excised pseudobulbs with attached leaves had lower rates of water loss when compared with samples comprising only excised leaves. This implies that epiphytic orchids utilize two different strategies for sustaining water balance: thick cuticles to conserve water in leaves and water storage in pseudobulbs. Our results also show that Dendrobium species with thin cuticles tend to have pseudobulbs with high water storage capacity that compensates for their faster rates of water loss. These outcomes contribute to our understanding of the adaptive water-use strategies in Dendrobium species, which is beneficial for the conservation and cultivation of epiphytic orchids

  16. Two strategies by epiphytic orchids for maintaining water balance: thick cuticles in leaves and water storage in pseudobulbs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shi-Jian; Sun, Mei; Yang, Qiu-Yun; Ma, Ren-Yi; Zhang, Jiao-Lin; Zhang, Shi-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Epiphytes are an important component of tropical and subtropical flora, and serve vital ecological functions in forest hydrology and nutrient fluxes. However, they often encounter water deficits because there is no direct contact between their roots and the soil. The strategies employed by epiphytes for maintaining water balance in relatively water-limited habitats are not completely understood. In the present study, we investigated the anatomical traits, water loss rates, and physiology of leaves and pseudobulbs of four Dendrobium species with different pseudobulb morphologies to understand the roles of leaf and pseudobulb in maintaining water balance of epiphytic orchids. Our results showed that two species (D. chrysotoxum and D. officinale), with lower rates of water loss, have thicker leaves and upper cuticles, but lower epidermal thickness and leaf dry mass per area. In contrast, the other two species (D. chrysanthum and D. crystallinum) with thinner cuticles and higher rates of water loss, have less tissue density and greater saturated water contents in their pseudobulbs. Therefore, our results indicate that these latter two species may resist drought by storing water in the pseudobulbs to compensate for their thin cuticles and rapid water loss through the leaves. Under the same laboratory conditions, excised pseudobulbs with attached leaves had lower rates of water loss when compared with samples comprising only excised leaves. This implies that epiphytic orchids utilize two different strategies for sustaining water balance: thick cuticles to conserve water in leaves and water storage in pseudobulbs. Our results also show that Dendrobium species with thin cuticles tend to have pseudobulbs with high water storage capacity that compensates for their faster rates of water loss. These outcomes contribute to our understanding of the adaptive water-use strategies in Dendrobium species, which is beneficial for the conservation and cultivation of epiphytic orchids

  17. A new bibenzyl from Dendrobium secundum.

    PubMed

    Sritularak, Boonchoo; Duangrak, Natthacha; Likhitwitayawuid, Kittisak

    2011-01-01

    From the aerial parts of Dendrobium secundum, a new bibenzyl, namely 4,5,4'-trihydroxy-3,3'-dimethoxybibenzyl, was isolated, along with four known compounds which included brittonin A, moscatilin, syringaresinol, and ferulic acid. All of these isolates showed appreciable DPPH free radical scavenging potential, except for brittonin A, which was devoid of activity. PMID:21812336

  18. Three new bibenzyl derivatives from Dendrobium nobile.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue; Gao, Hao; Wang, Nai-Li; Yao, Xin-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Three new bibenzyl derivatives have been isolated from the stems of Dendrobium nobile Lindl. (Orchidaceae). Their structures were established as 4,5-dihydroxy-3,3',alpha-trimethoxybibenzyl (1), 4,4'-dihydroxy-3,3',5,alpha-tetramethoxybibenzyl (2) and 4-hydroxy-3,3',4',5,alpha-pentamethoxybibenzyl (3) on the basis of spectroscopic analysis. PMID:16753791

  19. [Artificial cultivation modes for Dendrobium officinale].

    PubMed

    Si, Jin-Ping; Yu, Qiao-Xian; Song, Xian-Shui; Shao, Wei-Jiang

    2013-02-01

    Since the beginning of the new century, the artificial cultivation of Dendrobium officinale has made a breakthrough progress. This paper systematically expounds key technologies, main features and cautions of the cultivation modes e.g. bionic-facility cultivation, the original ecological cultivation, and potting cultivation for D. officinale, which can provide useful information for the development and improvement of D. officinale industry. PMID:23713268

  20. DOH1, a Class 1 knox Gene, Is Required for Maintenance of the Basic Plant Architecture and Floral Transition in Orchid

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hao; Yang, Shu Hua; Goh, Chong Jin

    2000-01-01

    We report here the isolation and identification of an orchid homeobox gene, DOH1, from Dendrobium Madame Thong-In. Analyses of its sequence and genomic organization suggest that DOH1 may be the only class 1 knox gene in the genome. DOH1 mRNA accumulates in meristem-rich tissues, and its expression is greatly downregulated during floral transition. In situ hybridization analysis demonstrates that DOH1 is also expressed in the incipient leaf primordia and is later detected in the same region of the inflorescence apex, as in DOMADS1. Overexpression of DOH1 in orchid plants completely suppresses shoot organization and development. Transgenic orchid plants expressing antisense mRNA for DOH1 show multiple shoot apical meristem (SAM) formations and early flowering. In addition, both the sense and antisense transformants exhibit defects in leaf development. These findings suggest that DOH1 plays a key role in maintaining the basic plant architecture of orchid through control of the formation and development of the SAM and shoot structure. Investigations of DOMADS1 expression in the SAM during floral transition reveal that the precocious flowering phenotype exhibited by DOH1 antisense transformants is coupled with the early onset of DOMADS1 expression. This fact, together with the reciprocal expression of DOH1 and DOMADS1 during floral transition, indicates that downregulation of DOH1 in the SAM is required for floral transition in orchid and that DOH1 is a possible upstream regulator of DOMADS1. PMID:11090215

  1. Four new bibenzyl derivatives from Dendrobium candidum.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wang, Chun-Lan; Wang, Ya-Jun; Wang, Fang-Fei; Guo, Shun-Xing; Yang, Jun-Shan; Xiao, Pei-Gen

    2009-09-01

    Four new bibenzyl derivatives, namely, dendrocandins F-I (1-4), were isolated from the stems of Dendrobium candidum. Their structures were elucidated by the analysis of spectroscopic data. Dendrocandins F and G represent the fourth and fifth example of bisbibenzyl derivates with a dibenzopyran ring between two units, respectively. Dendrocandin H represents the first example of a bibenzyl derivative formed by a bibenzyl and a 1,4-phenanthraquinone unit via a dibenzopyran ring. Compounds 1-4 were examined for antioxidant activity by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay. PMID:19721264

  2. Eight new bibenzyl derivatives from Dendrobium candidum.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wang, Chun-Lan; Zhao, Hai-Jun; Guo, Shun-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Eight bibenzyl derivatives, namely dendrocandins J-Q (1-8), were isolated from the stems of Dendrobium candidum. Their structures were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR experiments and mass spectrometry. Compounds 1-8 were examined for antioxidant activity by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging assay, and the IC50 values were 36.8, 70.2, 45.0, 60.5, 87.6, 50.4, 22.3, and 30.3 μM, respectively. PMID:25355458

  3. Ethylene and pollination decrease transcript abundance of an ethylene receptor gene in Dendrobium petals.

    PubMed

    Thongkum, Monthathip; Burns, Parichart; Bhunchoth, Anjana; Warin, Nuchnard; Chatchawankanphanich, Orawan; van Doorn, Wouter G

    2015-03-15

    We studied the expression of a gene encoding an ethylene receptor, called Ethylene Response Sensor 1 (Den-ERS1), in the petals of Dendrobium orchid flowers. Transcripts accumulated during the young floral bud stage and declined by the time the flowers had been open for several days. Pollination or exposure to exogenous ethylene resulted in earlier flower senescence, an increase in ethylene production and a lower Den-ERS1 transcript abundance. Treatment with 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), an inhibitor of the ethylene receptor, decreased ethylene production and resulted in high transcript abundance. The literature indicates two kinds of ethylene receptor genes with regard to the effects of ethylene. One group shows ethylene-induced down-regulated transcription, while the other has ethylene-induced up-regulation. The present gene is an example of the first group. The 5' flanking region showed binding sites for Myb and myb-like, homeodomain, MADS domain, NAC, TCP, bHLH and EIN3-like transcription factors. The binding site for the EIN3-like factor might explain the ethylene effect on transcription. A few other transcription factors (RAV1 and NAC) seem also related to ethylene effects. PMID:25590685

  4. Role of Auxin in Orchid Development

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Stacey D.; Luna, Lila J.; Gamage, Roshan N.

    2014-01-01

    Auxin's capacity to regulate aspects of plant development has been well characterized in model plant systems. In contrast, orchids have received considerably less attention, but the realization that many orchid species are endangered has led to culture-based propagation studies which have unveiled some functions for auxin in this system. This mini-review summarizes the many auxin-mediated developmental responses in orchids that are consistent with model systems; however, it also brings to the forefront auxin responses that are unique to orchid development, namely protocorm formation and ovary/ovule maturation. With regard to shoot establishment, we also assess auxin's involvement in orchid germination, PLB formation, and somatic embryogenesis. Further, it makes evident that auxin flow during germination of the undifferentiated, but mature, orchid embryo mirrors late embryogenesis of typical angiosperms. Also discussed is the use of orchid protocorms in future phytohormone studies to better understand the mechanisms behind meristem formation and organogenesis. PMID:25482818

  5. Role of auxin in orchid development.

    PubMed

    Novak, Stacey D; Luna, Lila J; Gamage, Roshan N

    2014-01-01

    Auxin's capacity to regulate aspects of plant development has been well characterized in model plant systems. In contrast, orchids have received considerably less attention, but the realization that many orchid species are endangered has led to culture-based propagation studies which have unveiled some functions for auxin in this system. This mini-review summarizes the many auxin-mediated developmental responses in orchids that are consistent with model systems; however, it also brings to the forefront auxin responses that are unique to orchid development, namely protocorm formation and ovary/ovule maturation. With regard to shoot establishment, we also assess auxin's involvement in orchid germination, PLB formation, and somatic embryogenesis. Further, it makes evident that auxin flow during germination of the undifferentiated, but mature, orchid embryo mirrors late embryogenesis of typical angiosperms. Also discussed is the use of orchid protocorms in future phytohormone studies to better understand the mechanisms behind meristem formation and organogenesis. PMID:25482818

  6. Role of Auxin in orchid development.

    PubMed

    Darling-Novak, Stacey; Luna, Lila J; Gamage, Roshan N

    2014-08-25

    Auxin's capacity to regulate aspects of plant development has been well characterized in model plant systems. In contrast, orchids have received considerably less attention, but the realization that many orchid species are endangered has led to culture-based propagation studies which have unveiled some functions for auxin in this system. This mini-review summarizes the many auxin-mediated developmental responses in orchids that are consistent with model systems; however, it also brings to the forefront auxin responses that are unique to orchid development, namely protocorm formation and ovary/ovule maturation. With regard to shoot establishment, we also assess auxin's involvement in orchid germination, PLB formation, and somatic embryogenesis. Further, it makes evident that auxin flow during germination of the undifferentiated, but mature, orchid embryo mirrors late embryogenesis of typical angiosperms. Also discussed is the use of orchid protocorms in future phytohormone studies to better understand the mechanisms behind meristem formation and organogenesis. PMID:25153202

  7. [Some worries about Dendrobium officinale industry].

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Lu, Juan; Chen, Xi

    2013-02-01

    In recent years, with the continuous development of the industry of Dendrobium officinale, the technological alliance on CEEUSRO has been established. However, many problems also exposed with the rapid expansion of the industry, such as weak basic research, single species of the product, lack of in-depth studies and difficult to guarantee the quality. Industrial foam was gradually formed. To guard against the D. officinale becoming another "Puer Tea" , the authors believe that the key to sustainable development of the industry is enterprises and research institutes should strengthen basic research, speed up development of application of integrated innovations, government should strengthen guidance, regulate the operation of the market, then protect the quality of D. officinale in the market. PMID:23713266

  8. Two novel bibenzyls from Dendrobium trigonopus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiang-Miao; Chen, Ji-Jun; Yu, Hong; Zhao, You-Xing; Zhou, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Two novel bibenzyl trigonopols A (1) and B (2), together with seven known compounds, gigantol (3), tristin (4), moscatin (5), hircinol (6), naringenin (7), 3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-2-propen-1-ol (8), and ( - )-syringaresinol (9), have been isolated from the stems of Dendrobium trigonopus, of which compounds 6, 8, and 9 were isolated for the first time from this species. The structures of two new compounds were elucidated as threo-22-(17-hydroxyl-9-(3-hydroxyl-4-methoxy-phenethyl)-13,16,18-trimethoxy-21H-benzo[c]chromen-21-yl)ethane-22, 23-diol (1) and 9-(4-hydroxyl-3-methoxy-phenethyl)-17-(21-hydroxyl-20-methoxy-phenyl)chroman-11, 16-diol (2) on the basis of spectroscopic methods. Trigonopol A was found to exhibit antiplatelet aggregation activity in vitro with 67.55% inhibitory ration at 1.4337 x 10(- 3) M. PMID:18636377

  9. Five new compounds from Dendrobium longicornu.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiang-Miao; Chen, Ji-Jun; Yu, Hong; Zhao, You-Xing; Zhou, Jun

    2008-04-01

    A novel bibenzyl, a new bibenzyl, two new phenanthrenes, and a new lignin glycoside, namely longicornuol A (1), 4-[2-(3-hdroxyphenol)-1-methoxyethyl]-2,6-dimethoxyphenol (2), 5-hydroxy-7-methoxy-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene-1,4-dione (3), 7-methoxy-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene-2,4,5-triol (4) and erythro-1-(4-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-3-methoxyphenyl)-2-[4-(3-hydroxypropyl)-2,6-dimethoxyphenoxy]-1,3-propanediol ( 5), together with 14 known compounds, were isolated from the stems of Dendrobium longicornu. All structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods (NMR, MS, UV and IR). Anti-platelet aggregation activities of compounds 1 - 5 were also tested. PMID:18543150

  10. Three new bibenzyl derivatives from Dendrobium candidum.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wang, Chun-Lan; Wang, Ya-Jun; Guo, Shun-Xing; Yang, Jun-Shan; Chen, Xiao-Mei; Xiao, Pei-Gen

    2009-02-01

    Three new compounds were isolated from the stems of Dendrobium candidum: (S)-3,4,4'-trihydroxy-5,alpha-dimethoxybibenzyl (1), named dendrocandin C; (S)-3,4,4'-trihydroxy-5-methoxy-alpha-ethoxybibenzyl (2), named dendrocandin D; and 3,3',4,4'-tetrahydroxy-5-methoxybibenzyl (3), named dendrocandin E. Their structures were elucidated by 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy. The isolated compounds exhibited potent antioxidant activity in the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging test, with IC(50) values of 34.2, 34.5, and 15.6 microM for compounds 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Vitamin C was used as positive control with IC(50) 23.2 microM. PMID:19182417

  11. Five new phenolic compounds from Dendrobium aphyllum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dan; Liu, Liang-Yan; Cheng, Zhong-Quan; Xu, Feng-Qing; Fan, Wei-Wei; Zi, Cheng-Ting; Dong, Fa-Wu; Zhou, Jun; Ding, Zhong-Tao; Hu, Jiang-Miao

    2015-01-01

    One new phenanthrene, aphyllone A (1) and four new bibenzyl derivatives, aphyllone B (2) and aphyllals C-D (3-5), together with nine known compounds (6-14), were isolated from the stems of Dendrobium aphyllum (Roxb.) C. E. Fischer. The structures of these new compounds were elucidated by means of extensive spectroscopic analyses, and the absolute configuration of compound 1 was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction and quantum calculations. Compounds 6, 8 and 14 inhibited NO production at the concentration of 25 μM in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells with the inhibition (%) of 32.48, 35.68, and 38.50. Compound 2 possessed significant DPPH radical scavenging activity with scavenging percentage of 87.97% at the concentration of 100 μg/mL. PMID:25447160

  12. [Progress and countermeasures of Dendrobium officinale breeding].

    PubMed

    Si, Jin-Ping; He, Bo-wei; Yu, Qiao-xian

    2013-02-01

    The standandized cultivation of Chinese medicinal materials is based on variety. With the rapid development of Dendrobium officinale industry and increasing demand of improved varieties, many studies have concentrated on the variety breeding of D. officinale and subsequently achieved remarkable success. This paper systematically expounds the research progress of D. officinale breeding, e. g. the collection and differentiated evaluation for germplasm, theory and practice for variety breeding, tissue culture and efficient production with low-carbon for germchit, and DNA molecular marker-assisted breeding, and then indicates the main problems of the current breeding of D. officinale. Furthermore, the priorities and keys for the further breeding of D. officinale have been pointed out. PMID:23713267

  13. Further advances in orchid mycorrhizal research.

    PubMed

    Dearnaley, John D W

    2007-09-01

    Orchid mycorrhizas are mutualistic interactions between fungi and members of the Orchidaceae, the world's largest plant family. The majority of the world's orchids are photosynthetic, a small number of species are myco-heterotrophic throughout their lifetime, and recent research indicates a third mode (mixotrophy) whereby green orchids supplement their photosynthetically fixed carbon with carbon derived from their mycorrhizal fungus. Molecular identification studies of orchid-associated fungi indicate a wide range of fungi might be orchid mycobionts, show common fungal taxa across the globe and support the view that some orchids have specific fungal interactions. Confirmation of mycorrhizal status requires isolation of the fungi and restoration of functional mycorrhizas. New methods may now be used to store orchid-associated fungi and store and germinate seed, leading to more efficient culture of orchid species. However, many orchid mycorrhizas must be synthesised before conservation of these associations can be attempted in the field. Further gene expression studies of orchid mycorrhizas are needed to better understand the establishment and maintenance of the interaction. These data will add to efforts to conserve this diverse and valuable association. PMID:17582535

  14. Orchid conservation: making the links.

    PubMed

    Fay, Michael F; Pailler, Thierry; Dixon, Kingsley W

    2015-09-01

    Orchidaceae, one of the largest families of flowering plants, present particular challenges for conservation, due in great part to their often complex interactions with mycorrhizal fungi, pollinators and host trees. In this Highlight, we present seven papers focusing on orchids and their interactions and other factors relating to their conservation. PMID:26311710

  15. An orchid bee naturalizes in Florida; implications for orchids and other plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An orchid bee, Euglossa viridissima, from Mexico and Central America was detected in southern Florida in 2003 and now has become locally abundant. Orchid bees are important pollinators of diverse plants in their native tropical America which suggests that the naturalized orchid bee could become an i...

  16. The complete chloroplast genome of the Dendrobium strongylanthum (Orchidaceae: Epidendroideae).

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Chen, Chen; Wang, Zhe-Zhi

    2016-07-01

    Complete chloroplast genome sequence is very useful for studying the phylogenetic and evolution of species. In this study, the complete chloroplast genome of Dendrobium strongylanthum was constructed from whole-genome Illumina sequencing data. The chloroplast genome is 153 058 bp in length with 37.6% GC content and consists of two inverted repeats (IRs) of 26 316 bp. The IR regions are separated by large single-copy region (LSC, 85 836 bp) and small single-copy (SSC, 14 590 bp) region. A total of 130 chloroplast genes were successfully annotated, including 84 protein coding genes, 38 tRNA genes, and eight rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the chloroplast genome of Dendrobium strongylanthum is related to that of the Dendrobium officinal. PMID:26153739

  17. Gigantol, a bibenzyl from Dendrobium draconis, inhibits the migratory behavior of non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Charoenrungruang, Sopanya; Chanvorachote, Pithi; Sritularak, Boonchoo; Pongrakhananon, Varisa

    2014-06-27

    Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death due to its high metastasis potential. The process of cancer migration is an early step that is required for successful metastasis. The discovery and development of natural compounds for cancer therapy have garnered increasing attention in recent years. Gigantol (1) is a bibenzyl compound derived from the Thai orchid, Dendrobium draconis. It exhibits significant cytotoxic activity against several cancer cell lines; however, until recently, the role of 1 on tumor metastasis has not been characterized. This study demonstrates that 1 suppresses the migratory behavior of non-small cell lung cancer H460 cells. Western blot analysis reveals that 1 down-regulates caveolin-1 (Cav-1), activates ATP-dependent tyrosine kinase (phosphorylated Akt at Ser 473), and cell division cycle 42 (Cdc42), thereby suppressing filopodia formation. The inhibitory effect of 1 on cell movement is also exhibited in another lung cancer cell line, H292, but not in normal human keratinocytes (HaCat). The inhibitory activity of 1 on lung cancer migration suggests that this compound may be suitable for further development for the treatment of cancer metastasis. PMID:24844664

  18. Comparison of photosynthesis and fluorescent parameters between Dendrobium officinale and Dendrobium loddigesii

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhi-Rong; Zhu, Nan-Nan; Cheng, Li-Li; Yang, Chun-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the photosynthesis and fluorescent parameters between Dendrobium officinale and Dendrobium loddigesii, based on which to provide helpful information for the artificial cultivation of these cultivars. Methods: Seeds were placed on the MS medium supplemented with 0.2 mg/L NAA, 2% (w/v) sucrose, 15% (v/v) potato extracts and powered agar (pH 5.8). Two months after germination, seedlings (n = 10) were transferred onto rooting medium containing MS medium supplemented with 0.5 mg/L NAA, 3% (w/v) sucrose, 20% (v/v) potato extracts and 1‰ (w/v) activated carbon (pH 5.8) in a glass bottle (6.5 cm in diameter and 9.5 cm in height) with a white transparent plastic cap. Chlorophyll content was determined using the UV-Vis spectrophotometric method. In addition, rates of oxygen evolution and uptake were measured. The chlorophyll fluorescence was determined at room temperature using PAM 2000 chlorophyll fluorometer (Heinz Walz GmbH, Germany). Results: From month 5 to month 10, the overall contents of both chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b were higher in D. loddigesii compared with those in D. officinale. No statistical differences were observed in the apparent photosynthetic rate (APR) between D. loddigesii and D. officinale. No statistical difference was noticed in the Fo, Fm and Fv between D. loddigesii and D. officinale (P > 0.05). Significant increase was noticed in the oxygen consuming in PSI in month-8 and month-10 compared with that of month-6 in D. loddigesii. Nevertheless, in the D. officinale, the oxygen consuming in PSI in month-6 was remarkably increased with those of month-8 and month-10, respectively. Conclusions: The photosynthesis and fluorescence parameters varied in the seedling of D. loddigesii and D. officinale. Such information could contribute to the artificial cultivation of these cultivars. PMID:26550239

  19. Orchid pollination by sexual deception: pollinator perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gaskett, A C

    2011-02-01

    The extraordinary taxonomic and morphological diversity of orchids is accompanied by a remarkable range of pollinators and pollination systems. Sexually deceptive orchids are adapted to attract specific male insects that are fooled into attempting to mate with orchid flowers and inadvertently acting as pollinators. This review summarises current knowledge, explores new hypotheses in the literature, and introduces some new approaches to understanding sexual deception from the perspective of the duped pollinator. Four main topics are addressed: (1) global patterns in sexual deception, (2) pollinator identities, mating systems and behaviours, (3) pollinator perception of orchid deceptive signals, and (4) the evolutionary implications of pollinator responses to orchid deception, including potential costs imposed on pollinators by orchids. A global list of known and putative sexually deceptive orchids and their pollinators is provided and methods for incorporating pollinator perspectives into sexual deception research are provided and reviewed. At present, almost all known sexually deceptive orchid taxa are from Australia or Europe. A few sexually deceptive species and genera are reported for New Zealand and South Africa. In Central and Southern America, Asia, and the Pacific many more species are likely to be identified in the future. Despite the great diversity of sexually deceptive orchid genera in Australia, pollination rates reported in the literature are similar between Australian and European species. The typical pollinator of a sexually deceptive orchid is a male insect of a species that is polygynous, monandrous, haplodiploid, and solitary rather than social. Insect behaviours involved in the pollination of sexually deceptive orchids include pre-copulatory gripping of flowers, brief entrapment, mating, and very rarely, ejaculation. Pollinator behaviour varies within and among pollinator species. Deception involving orchid mimicry of insect scent signals is

  20. Frozen beauty: The cryobiotechnology of orchid diversity.

    PubMed

    Popova, Elena; Kim, Haeng Hoon; Saxena, Praveen Kumar; Engelmann, Florent; Pritchard, Hugh W

    2016-01-01

    Orchids (Orchidaceae) are one of the most diverse plant groups on the planet with over 25,000 species. For over a century, scientists and horticulturalists have been fascinated by their complex floral morphology, pollinator specificity and multiple ethnobotanical uses, including as food, flavourings, medicines, ornaments, and perfumes. These important traits have stimulated world-wide collection of orchid species, often for the commercial production of hybrids and leading to frequent overexploitation. Increasing human activities and global environmental changes are also accelerating the threat of orchid extinction in their natural habitats. In order to improve gene conservation strategies for these unique species, innovative developments of cryopreservation methodologies are urgently needed based on an appreciation of low temperature (cryo) stress tolerance, the stimulation of recovery growth of plant tissues in vitro and on the 'omics' characterization of the targeted cell system (biotechnology). The successful development and application of such cryobiotechnology now extends to nearly 100 species and commercial hybrids of orchids, underpinning future breeding and species conservation programmes. In this contribution, we provide an overview of the progress in cryobanking of a range of orchid tissues, including seeds, pollen, protocorms, protocorm-like bodies, apices excised from in vitro plants, cell suspensions, rhizomes and orchid fungal symbionts. We also highlight future research needs. PMID:26792590

  1. Rapid authentication of different ages of tissue-cultured and wild Dendrobium huoshanense as well as wild Dendrobium henanense using FTIR and 2D-COS IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nai-Dong; Chen, Nai-Fu; Li, Jun; Cao, Cai-Yun; Wang, Jin-Mei

    2015-12-01

    The accumulating of pharmaceutical chemicals in medicinal plants would greatly be affected by their ages and establishing a fast quality-identification method to evaluate the similarity of medicinal herbs at different cultivated ages is a critical step for assurance of quality and safety in the TCM industry. In this work, tri-step IR macro-fingerprinting and 2D-COS IR spectrum techniques combined with statistical pattern recognition were applied for discrimination and similarity evaluation of different ages of tissue-cultured and wild Dendrobium huoshanense C. Z. Tang et S. J. Cheng as well as Dendrobium henanense J.L.Lu et L.X Gao. Both tissue-cultured and wild D. huoshanense were easily differentiated from D. henanense by FTIR and SD-IR spectra, while it's quite difficult to discriminate different cultivated years of the three investigated Dendrobiums. In 2D-COS IR spectra, 1-5 auto-peaks with different indensity and positions were located in the region 1160-1030 cm-1 of the twelve Dendrobium samples and thus could be used to identify Dendrobium samples at different ages. Principle component analysis (PCA) of synchronous 2D-COS data showed that the twelve samples were effectively identified and evaluated. The results indicated that the tri-step infrared macro-fingerprinting combined with PCA method was suitable to differentiate the cultivated ages of Dendrobiums with species and orgins rapidly and nondestructively.

  2. Colour mimicry and sexual deception by Tongue orchids (Cryptostylis).

    PubMed

    Gaskett, A C; Herberstein, M E

    2010-01-01

    Typically, floral colour attracts pollinators by advertising rewards such as nectar, but how does colour function when pollinators are deceived, unrewarded, and may even suffer fitness costs? Sexually deceptive orchids are pollinated only by male insects fooled into mating with orchid flowers and inadvertently transferring orchid pollinia. Over long distances, sexually deceptive orchids lure pollinators with counterfeit insect sex pheromones, but close-range deception with colour mimicry is a tantalising possibility. Here, for the first time, we analyse the colours of four sexually deceptive Cryptostylis orchid species and the female wasp they mimic (Lissopimpla excelsa, Ichneumonidae), from the perspective of the orchids' single, shared pollinator, male Lissopimpla excelsa. Despite appearing different to humans, the colours of the orchids and female wasps were effectively identical when mapped into a hymenopteran hexagonal colour space. The orchids and wasps reflected predominantly red-orange wavelengths, but UV was also reflected by raised bumps on two orchid species and by female wasp wings. The orchids' bright yellow pollinia contrasted significantly with their overall red colour. Orchid deception may therefore involve accurate and species-specific mimicry of wavelengths reflected by female wasps, and potentially, exploitation of insects' innate attraction to UV and yellow wavelengths. In general, mimicry may be facilitated by exploiting visual vulnerabilities and evolve more readily at the peripheries of sensory perception. Many sexually deceptive orchids are predominantly red, green or white: colours that are all potentially difficult for hymenoptera to detect or distinguish from the background. PMID:19798479

  3. Linnaean sources and concepts of orchids

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Charlie; Cribb, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Background Linnaeus developed a robust system for naming plants and a useful, if mechanical, system for classifying them. His binomial nomenclature proved the catalyst for the rapid development of our knowledge of orchids, with his work on the family dating back to 1737 in the first edition of his Genera Plantarum. His first work devoted to orchids, indeed the first monograph of the family, was published in 1740 and formed the basis for his account in Species Plantarum, published in 1753, in which he gave a binomial name to each species. Given the overwhelming number of orchids, he included surprisingly few – only 62 mostly European species – in Species Plantarum, his seminal work on the plants of the world. This reflects the European origin of modern botany and the concentration of extra-European exploration on other matters, such as conquest, gold and useful plants. Nevertheless, the scope of Linnaeus' work is broad, including plants from as far afield as India, Japan, China and the Philippines to the east, and eastern Canada, the West Indies and northern South America to the west. In his later publications he described and named a further 45 orchids, mostly from Europe, South Africa and the tropical Americas. Scope The philosophical basis of Linnaeus' work on orchids is discussed and his contribution to our knowledge of the family assessed. His generic and species concepts are considered in the light of current systematic ideas, but his adoption of binomial nomenclature for all plants is his lasting legacy. PMID:19182221

  4. General unknown screening, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of Dendrobium macrostachyum Lindl.

    PubMed Central

    Sukumaran, Nimisha Pulikkal; Yadav, R. Hiranmai

    2016-01-01

    Context: D. macrostachyum is an epiphytic orchid abundant in Southern India and is reported for pain relief in folklore. Aims: The objective of the present study was to determine in vitro free radical scavenging and anti-inflammatory activity of D. macrostachyum and to perform LCMS based metabolic profiling of the plant. Settings and Design: Sequential stem and leaf extracts were assessed for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity by in vitro methods. Materials and Methods: The antioxidant activity determined by assays based on the decolourization of the radical monocation of DPPH, ABTS and reducing power. Total amount of phenolics for quantitative analysis of antioxidative components was estimated. In vitro anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using protein denaturation assay, membrane stabilization assay and proteinase inhibitory activity. Methanolic extract of plant was subjected to LCMS. Results: The stem ethanolic extracts exhibited significant IC50 value of 10.21, 31.54 and 142.97 μg/ml respectively for DPPH, ABTS radical scavenging and reducing power activity. The ethanol and water extract was highly effective as albumin denaturation inhibitors (IC50 = 114.13 and 135.818 μg/ml respectively) and proteinase inhibitors (IC50 = 72.49 and 129.681 μg/ml respectively). Membrane stabilization was also noticeably inhibited by the stem ethanolic extract among other extracts (IC50 = 89.33 μg/ml) but comparatively lower to aspirin standard (IC50 = 83.926 μg/ml). The highest total phenol content was exhibited by ethanolic stem and leaf extracts respectively at 20 and 16 mg of gallic acid equivalents of dry extract. On LCMS analysis 20 constituents were identified and it included chemotaxonomic marker for Dendrobium species. Conclusions: The results showed a relatively high concentration of phenolics, high scavenger activity and high anti-inflammatory activity of the stem extract compared to the leaf extract. The results indicate that the plant can be a

  5. Darwin teleologist? Design in The orchids.

    PubMed

    Hoquet, Thierry

    2010-02-01

    Focusing on "The Orchids," this article aims at disentangling the concepts of teleology, design and natural theology. It refers to several contemporary critics of Darwin (Kölliker, Argyll, Royer, Candolle, Delpino) to challenge Huxley's interpretation that Darwin's system was "a deathblow" to teleology. "The Orchids" seems rather to be a "flank-movement" (Gray): it departs from the Romantic theories of transmutation and the "imaginary examples" of the Origin; it focuses on empirical data and on teleological structures. Although Darwin refers to natural selection, his readers mock him for his fascination for delicate morphological contrivances and co-adaptations - a sign that he was inescapably lured to finality. Some even suggested that his system was a "theodicy". In the history of Darwinism, "The Orchids" reveals "another" quite unexpected and heterodox Darwin: freed from the hypothetical fancies of the Origin, and even suggesting a new kind of physico-theology. PMID:20338528

  6. Orchidstra: an integrated orchid functional genomics database.

    PubMed

    Su, Chun-lin; Chao, Ya-Ting; Yen, Shao-Hua; Chen, Chun-Yi; Chen, Wan-Chieh; Chang, Yao-Chien Alex; Shih, Ming-Che

    2013-02-01

    A specialized orchid database, named Orchidstra (URL: http://orchidstra.abrc.sinica.edu.tw), has been constructed to collect, annotate and share genomic information for orchid functional genomics studies. The Orchidaceae is a large family of Angiosperms that exhibits extraordinary biodiversity in terms of both the number of species and their distribution worldwide. Orchids exhibit many unique biological features; however, investigation of these traits is currently constrained due to the limited availability of genomic information. Transcriptome information for five orchid species and one commercial hybrid has been included in the Orchidstra database. Altogether, these comprise >380,000 non-redundant orchid transcript sequences, of which >110,000 are protein-coding genes. Sequences from the transcriptome shotgun assembly (TSA) were obtained either from output reads from next-generation sequencing technologies assembled into contigs, or from conventional cDNA library approaches. An annotation pipeline using Gene Ontology, KEGG and Pfam was built to assign gene descriptions and functional annotation to protein-coding genes. Deep sequencing of small RNA was also performed for Phalaenopsis aphrodite to search for microRNAs (miRNAs), extending the information archived for this species to miRNA annotation, precursors and putative target genes. The P. aphrodite transcriptome information was further used to design probes for an oligonucleotide microarray, and expression profiling analysis was carried out. The intensities of hybridized probes derived from microarray assays of various tissues were incorporated into the database as part of the functional evidence. In the future, the content of the Orchidstra database will be expanded with transcriptome data and genomic information from more orchid species. PMID:23324169

  7. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Dendrobium officinale.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei; Zhou, Hong; Qian, Jun; Xu, Haibin; Shao, Qingsong; Li, Yonghua; Yao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The complete chloroplast sequence of Dendrobium officinale, an endangered and economically important traditional Chinese medicine, was reported and characterized. The genome size is 152,018 bp, with 37.5% GC content. A pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 26,284 bp are separated by a large single-copy region (LSC, 84,944 bp) and a small single-copy region (SSC, 14,506 bp). The complete cp DNA contains 83 protein-coding genes, 39 tRNA genes and 8 rRNA genes. Fourteen genes contained one or two introns. PMID:25103425

  8. Cytotoxic and Antimigratory Activities of Phenolic Compounds from Dendrobium brymerianum

    PubMed Central

    Klongkumnuankarn, Pornprom; Busaranon, Kesarin; Chanvorachote, Pithi; Sritularak, Boonchoo; Jongbunprasert, Vichien; Likhitwitayawuid, Kittisak

    2015-01-01

    Chromatographic separation of a methanol extract prepared from the whole plant of Dendrobium brymerianum led to the isolation of eight phenolic compounds. Among the isolated compounds (1–8), moscatilin (1), gigantol (3), lusianthridin (4), and dendroflorin (6) showed appreciable cytotoxicity against human lung cancer cell lines with IC50 values of 196.7, 23.4, 65.0, and 125.8 μg/mL, respectively, and exhibited antimigratory property at nontoxic concentrations. This study is the first report on the biological activities of this plant. PMID:25685168

  9. [Molecular characterization of a HMG-CoA reductase gene from a rare and endangered medicinal plant, Dendrobium officinale].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Wang, Ji-Tao; Zhang, Da-Wei; Zhang, Gang; Guo, Shun-Xing

    2014-03-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate in mavalonic acid pathway, which is the first committed step for isoprenoid biosynthesis in plants. However, it still remains unclear whether HGMR gene plays a role in the isoprenoid biosynthesis in Dendrobium officinale, an endangered epiphytic orchid species. In the present study, a HMGR encoding gene, designed as DoHMGR1 (GenBank accession JX272632), was identified from D. officinale using the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) methods, for the first time. The full length cDNA of DoHMGR1 was 2 071 bp in length and encoded a 562-aa protein with a molecular weight of 59.73 kD and an isoelectric point (pI) of 6.18. The deduced DoHMGR1 protein, like other HMGR proteins, constituted four conserved domains (63-561, 147-551, 268-383 and 124-541) and two transmembrane motifs (42-64 and 85-107). Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that DoHMGR1 had high identity (67%-89%) to a number of HMGR genes from various plants and was closely related to Vanda hybrid cultivar, rice and maize monocots. Real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis revealed that DoHMGR1 was expressed in the three included organs. The transcripts were the most abundant in the roots with 2.13 fold over that in the leaves, followed by that in the stems with 1.98 fold. Molecular characterization of DoHMGR1 will be useful for further functional elucidation of the gene involving in isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway in D. officinale. PMID:24961116

  10. Molecular Identification of Dendrobium Species (Orchidaceae) Based on the DNA Barcode ITS2 Region and Its Application for Phylogenetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shangguo; Jiang, Yan; Wang, Shang; Jiang, Mengying; Chen, Zhe; Ying, Qicai; Wang, Huizhong

    2015-01-01

    The over-collection and habitat destruction of natural Dendrobium populations for their commercial medicinal value has led to these plants being under severe threat of extinction. In addition, many Dendrobium plants are similarly shaped and easily confused during the absence of flowering stages. In the present study, we examined the application of the ITS2 region in barcoding and phylogenetic analyses of Dendrobium species (Orchidaceae). For barcoding, ITS2 regions of 43 samples in Dendrobium were amplified. In combination with sequences from GenBank, the sequences were aligned using Clustal W and genetic distances were computed using MEGA V5.1. The success rate of PCR amplification and sequencing was 100%. There was a significant divergence between the inter- and intra-specific genetic distances of ITS2 regions, while the presence of a barcoding gap was obvious. Based on the BLAST1, nearest distance and TaxonGAP methods, our results showed that the ITS2 regions could successfully identify the species of most Dendrobium samples examined; Second, we used ITS2 as a DNA marker to infer phylogenetic relationships of 64 Dendrobium species. The results showed that cluster analysis using the ITS2 region mainly supported the relationship between the species of Dendrobium established by traditional morphological methods and many previous molecular analyses. To sum up, the ITS2 region can not only be used as an efficient barcode to identify Dendrobium species, but also has the potential to contribute to the phylogenetic analysis of the genus Dendrobium. PMID:26378526

  11. Molecular Identification of Dendrobium Species (Orchidaceae) Based on the DNA Barcode ITS2 Region and Its Application for Phylogenetic Study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shangguo; Jiang, Yan; Wang, Shang; Jiang, Mengying; Chen, Zhe; Ying, Qicai; Wang, Huizhong

    2015-01-01

    The over-collection and habitat destruction of natural Dendrobium populations for their commercial medicinal value has led to these plants being under severe threat of extinction. In addition, many Dendrobium plants are similarly shaped and easily confused during the absence of flowering stages. In the present study, we examined the application of the ITS2 region in barcoding and phylogenetic analyses of Dendrobium species (Orchidaceae). For barcoding, ITS2 regions of 43 samples in Dendrobium were amplified. In combination with sequences from GenBank, the sequences were aligned using Clustal W and genetic distances were computed using MEGA V5.1. The success rate of PCR amplification and sequencing was 100%. There was a significant divergence between the inter- and intra-specific genetic distances of ITS2 regions, while the presence of a barcoding gap was obvious. Based on the BLAST1, nearest distance and TaxonGAP methods, our results showed that the ITS2 regions could successfully identify the species of most Dendrobium samples examined; Second, we used ITS2 as a DNA marker to infer phylogenetic relationships of 64 Dendrobium species. The results showed that cluster analysis using the ITS2 region mainly supported the relationship between the species of Dendrobium established by traditional morphological methods and many previous molecular analyses. To sum up, the ITS2 region can not only be used as an efficient barcode to identify Dendrobium species, but also has the potential to contribute to the phylogenetic analysis of the genus Dendrobium. PMID:26378526

  12. Similarity Evaluation of Different Origins and Species of Dendrobiums by GC-MS and FTIR Analysis of Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nai-Dong; Chen, Nai-Fu; Li, Jun; Cao, Cai-Yun; Wang, Jin-Mei; Huang, He-Ping

    2015-01-01

    GC-MS method combined with FTIR techniques by the analysis of polysaccharide was applied to evaluate the similarity between wild (W) and tissue-cultured (TC) Dendrobium huoshanense (DHS), Dendrobium officinale (DO), and Dendrobium moniliforme (DM) as well as 3 wild Dendrobium spp.: Dendrobium henanense (DHN), Dendrobium loddigesii (DL), and Dendrobium crepidatum (DC). Eight monosaccharides involving xylose, arabinose, rhamnose, glucose, mannose, fructose, galactose, and galacturonic acid were identified in the polysaccharide from each Dendrobium sample while the contents of the monosugars varied remarkably across origins and species. Further similarity evaluation based on GC-MS data showed that the rcor values of different origins of DHS, DO, and DM were 0.831, 0.865, and 0.884, respectively, while the rcor values ranged from 0.475 to 0.837 across species. FTIR files of the polysaccharides revealed that the similarity coefficients between W and TC-DHS, DO, and DM were 88.7%, 86.8%, and 88.5%, respectively, in contrast to the similarity coefficients varying from 57.4% to 82.6% across species. These results suggested that the structures of polysaccharides between different origins of the investigated Dendrobiums might be higher than what we had supposed. PMID:26539215

  13. Evaluation of Chemical Constituents and Important Mechanism of Pharmacological Biology in Dendrobium Plants

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Yau; Ng, Tzi Bun; Yao, Ren Ming; Shi, Jun; Xu, Kai; Sze, Stephen Cho Wing; Zhang, Kalin Yanbo

    2015-01-01

    Dendrobium species, commonly known as “Shihu” or “Huangcao,” represents the second largest genus of Orchidaceae, which are used commonly as tonic herbs and healthy food in many Asian countries. The aim of this paper is to review the history, chemistry, and pharmacology of different Dendrobium species on the basis of the latest academic literatures found in Google Scholar, PubMed, Sciencedirect, Scopus, and SID. PMID:25945114

  14. Colour mimicry and sexual deception by Tongue orchids ( Cryptostylis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskett, A. C.; Herberstein, M. E.

    2010-01-01

    Typically, floral colour attracts pollinators by advertising rewards such as nectar, but how does colour function when pollinators are deceived, unrewarded, and may even suffer fitness costs? Sexually deceptive orchids are pollinated only by male insects fooled into mating with orchid flowers and inadvertently transferring orchid pollinia. Over long distances, sexually deceptive orchids lure pollinators with counterfeit insect sex pheromones, but close-range deception with colour mimicry is a tantalising possibility. Here, for the first time, we analyse the colours of four sexually deceptive Cryptostylis orchid species and the female wasp they mimic ( Lissopimpla excelsa, Ichneumonidae), from the perspective of the orchids’ single, shared pollinator, male Lissopimpla excelsa. Despite appearing different to humans, the colours of the orchids and female wasps were effectively identical when mapped into a hymenopteran hexagonal colour space. The orchids and wasps reflected predominantly red-orange wavelengths, but UV was also reflected by raised bumps on two orchid species and by female wasp wings. The orchids’ bright yellow pollinia contrasted significantly with their overall red colour. Orchid deception may therefore involve accurate and species-specific mimicry of wavelengths reflected by female wasps, and potentially, exploitation of insects’ innate attraction to UV and yellow wavelengths. In general, mimicry may be facilitated by exploiting visual vulnerabilities and evolve more readily at the peripheries of sensory perception. Many sexually deceptive orchids are predominantly red, green or white: colours that are all potentially difficult for hymenoptera to detect or distinguish from the background.

  15. Collection and trade of wild-harvested orchids in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Wild orchids are illegally harvested and traded in Nepal for use in local traditional medicine, horticulture, and international trade. This study aims to: 1) identify the diversity of species of wild orchids in trade in Nepal; 2) study the chain of commercialization from collector to client and/or export; 3) map traditional knowledge and medicinal use of orchids; and 4) integrate the collected data to propose a more sustainable approach to orchid conservation in Nepal. Methods Trade, species diversity, and traditional use of wild-harvested orchids were documented during field surveys of markets and through interviews. Trade volumes and approximate income were estimated based on surveys and current market prices. Orchid material samples were identified to species level using a combination of morphology and DNA barcoding. Results Orchid trade is a long tradition, and illegal export to China, India and Hong Kong is rife. Estimates show that 9.4 tons of wild orchids were illegally traded from the study sites during 2008/2009. A total of 60 species of wild orchids were reported to be used in traditional medicinal practices to cure at least 38 different ailments, including energizers, aphrodisiacs and treatments of burnt skin, fractured or dislocated bones, headaches, fever and wounds. DNA barcoding successfully identified orchid material to species level that remained sterile after culturing. Conclusions Collection of wild orchids was found to be widespread in Nepal, but illegal trade is threatening many species in the wild. Establishment of small-scale sustainable orchid breeding enterprises could be a valuable alternative for the production of medicinal orchids for local communities. Critically endangered species should be placed on CITES Appendix I to provide extra protection to those species. DNA barcoding is an effective method for species identification and monitoring of illegal cross-border trade. PMID:24004516

  16. Anti-inflammatory phenanthrene derivatives from stems of Dendrobium denneanum.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan; Wang, Fei; Yang, Li-Juan; Chun, Ze; Bao, Jin-Ku; Zhang, Guo-Lin

    2013-11-01

    Cultivated Dendrobium denneanum has been substituted for other endangered Dendrobium species in recent years, but there have been few studies regarding either its chemical constituents or pharmacological effects. In this study, three phenanthrene glycosides, three 9,10-dihydrophenanthrenes, two 9,10-dihydrophenanthrenes glycosides, and four known phenanthrene derivatives, were isolated from the stems of D. denneanum. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of MS and NMR spectroscopic data. Ten compounds were found to inhibit nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells with IC50 values of 0.7-41.5 μM, and exhibited no cytotoxicity in RAW264.7, HeLa, or HepG2 cells. Additionally, it was found that 2,5-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-phenanthrene 2-O-β-d-glucopyranoside, and 5-methoxy-2,4,7,9S-tetrahydroxy-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene suppressed LPS-induced expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) inhibited phosphorylation of p38, JNK as well as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and inhibitory kappa B-α (IκBα). This indicated that both compounds exert anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting MAPKs and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathways. PMID:24042064

  17. [Bibenzyl from Dendrobium inhibits angiogenesis and its underlying mechanism].

    PubMed

    Gong, Chen-Yuan; Lu, Bin; Yang, Li; Wang, Lei; Ji, Li-Li

    2013-03-01

    Bibenzyl is a type of active compounds abundant in Dendrobium. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of six bibenzyls isolated from Dendrobium species on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced tube formation in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). All those bibenzyls inhibited VEGF-induced tube formation at 10 micromol x L(-1) except tristin, and of which moscatilin was found to have the strongest activity at the same concentration. The lowest effective concentration of moscatilin was 1 micromol x L(-1). Further results showed that moscatilin inhibited VEGF-induced capillary-like tube formation on HUVECs in a concentration-dependent manner. Western blotting results showed that moscatilin also inhibited VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR2 (Flk-1/KDR) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Further results showed that moscatilin inhibited VEGF-induced activation of c-Raf and MEK1/2, which are both upstream signals of ERK1/2. Taken together, results presented here demonstrated that moscatilin inhibited angiogenesis via blocking the activation of VEGFR2 (Flk-1/KDR) and c-Raf-MEK1/2-ERK1/2 signals. PMID:23724644

  18. A new 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene from Dendrobium moniliforme.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ningdong; Yang, Guangyu; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Lijun; Chen, Yegao

    2016-01-01

    A new 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene,1,5-dihydroxy-3,4,7-trimethoxy-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (1) was isolated and identified from the whole plants of Dendrobium moniliforme, as well as 24 known compounds including hircinol (2), (2R*,3S*)-3-hydroxymethyl-9-methoxy-2-(4'-hydroxy-3',5'-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-phenanthro[4,3-b]furan-5,11-diol (3), diospyrosin (4), aloifol I (5), moscatilin (6), 3,4'-dihydroxy-3',4,5-trimethoxybibenzyl (7), gigantol (8), 3,3'-dihydroxy-4,5-dimethoxybibenzyl (9), longicornuol A (10), N-trans-cinnamoyltyramine (11), paprazine (12), N-trans-feruloyl 3'-O-methyldopamine (13), moupinamide (14), dihydroconiferyl dihydro-p-coumarate (15), dihydrosinapyl dihydro-p-coumarate (16), 3-isopropyl-5-acetoxycyclohexene-2-one-1 (17), p-hydroxybenzaldehyde (18), vanillin (19), p-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid (20), vanillic acid (21), protocatechuic acid (22), (+)-syringaresinol (23), β-sitosterol (24) and daucosterol (25). Compounds 3, 4, 13, 16, 17 and 20 were isolated from the Dendrobium genus for the first time, and compounds 2, 5, 7, 9-12, 14, 15, 18, 21 and 22 were originally obtained from D. moniliforme. PMID:26132274

  19. Controlling slugs and snails in orchids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Slugs and snails are pests of orchids, preferring tender plant tissues such as flowers and root tips. Unlike many insect pests which feed only on certain types of plants, most species of slugs and snails are generalists, feeding on green plants, algae, fungi, decaying plant matter, or decaying anima...

  20. Discrimination of the rare medicinal plant Dendrobium officinale based on naringenin, bibenzyl, and polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaomei; Wang, Fangfei; Wang, Yunqiang; Li, Xuelan; Wang, Airong; Wang, Chunlan; Guo, Shunxing

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a method for discriminating Dendrobium officinale from four of its close relatives Dendrobium chrysanthum, Dendrobium crystallinum, Dendrobium aphyllum and Dendrobium devonianum based on chemical composition analysis. We analyzed 62 samples of 24 Dendrobium species. High performance liquid chromatography analysis confirmed that the four low molecular weight compounds 4',5,7-trihydroxyflavanone (naringenin), 3,4-dihydroxy-4',5-dime-thoxybibenzyl (DDB-2), 3',4-dihydroxy-3,5'-dimethoxybibenzyl (gigantol), and 4,4'-dihydroxy-3,3',5-trimethoxybibenzy (moscatilin), were common in the genus. The phenol-sulfuric acid method was used to quantify polysaccharides, and the monosaccharide composition of the polysaccharides was determined by gas chromatography. Stepwise discriminant analysis was used to differentiate among the five closely related species based on the chemical composition analysis. This proved to be a simple and accurate approach for discriminating among these species. The results also showed that the polysaccharide content, the amounts of the four low molecular weight compounds, and the mannose to glucose ratio, were important factors for species discriminant. Therefore, we propose that a chemical analysis based on quantification of naringenin, bibenzyl, and polysaccharides is effective for identifying D. officinale. PMID:23233224

  1. Diversity and Taxonomy of Endophytic Xylariaceous Fungi from Medicinal Plants of Dendrobium (Orchidaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juan; Zhang, Li-Chun; Xing, Yong-Mei; Wang, Yun-Qiang; Xing, Xiao-Ke; Zhang, Da-Wei; Liang, Han-Qiao; Guo, Shun-Xing

    2013-01-01

    Dendrobium spp. are traditional Chinese medicinal plants, and the main effective ingredients (polysaccharides and alkaloids) have pharmacologic effects on gastritis infection, cancer, and anti-aging. Previously, we confirmed endophytic xylariaceous fungi as the dominant fungi in several Dendrobium species of tropical regions from China. In the present study, the diversity, taxonomy, and distribution of culturable endophytic xylariaceous fungi associated with seven medicinal species of Dendrobium (Orchidaceae) were investigated. Among the 961 endophytes newly isolated, 217 xylariaceous fungi (morphotaxa) were identified using morphological and molecular methods. The phylogenetic tree constructed using nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS), large subunit of ribosomal DNA (LSU), and beta-tubulin sequences divided these anamorphic xylariaceous isolates into at least 18 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The diversity of the endophytic xylariaceous fungi in these seven Dendrobium species was estimated using Shannon and evenness indices, with the results indicating that the dominant Xylariaceae taxa in each Dendrobium species were greatly different, though common xylariaceous fungi were found in several Dendrobium species. These findings implied that different host plants in the same habitats exhibit a preference and selectivity for their fungal partners. Using culture-dependent approaches, these xylariaceous isolates may be important sources for the future screening of new natural products and drug discovery. PMID:23472167

  2. Identification and Characterization of Three Orchid MADS-Box Genes of the AP1/AGL9 Subfamily during Floral Transition1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hao; Goh, Chong Jin

    2000-01-01

    Gene expressions associated with in vitro floral transition in an orchid hybrid (Dendrobium grex Madame Thong-In) were investigated by differential display. One clone, orchid transitional growth related gene 7 (otg7), encoding a new MADS-box gene, was identified to be specifically expressed in the transitional shoot apical meristem (TSAM). Using this clone as a probe, three orchid MADS-box genes, DOMADS1, DOMADS2, and DOMADS3, were subsequently isolated from the TSAM cDNA library. Phylogenetic analyses show that DOMADS1 and DOMADS2 are new members of the AGL2 subfamily and SQUA subfamily, respectively. DOMADS3 contains the signature amino acids as with the members in the independent OSMADS1 subfamily separated from the AGL2 subfamily. All three of the DOMADS genes were expressed in the TSAM during floral transition and later in mature flowers. DOMADS1 RNA was uniformly expressed in both of the inflorescence meristem and the floral primordium and later localized in all of the floral organs. DOMADS2 showed a novel expression pattern that has not been previously characterized for any other MADS-box genes. DOMADS2 transcript was expressed early in the 6-week-old vegetative shoot apical meristem in which the obvious morphological change to floral development had yet to occur. It was expressed throughout the process of floral transition and later in the columns of mature flowers. The onset of DOMADS3 transcription was in the early TSAM at the stage before the differentiation of the first flower primordium. Later, DOMADS3 transcript was only detectable in the pedicel tissues. Our results suggest that the DOMADS genes play important roles in the process of floral transition. PMID:10938351

  3. Defining western prairie fringed orchid (Platanthera praeclara) habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudson, Michael David

    Terrestrial orchids are at the forefront of the discussion about anthropogenically-driven extinction with more species threatened globally than any other plant family, mostly because of loss of habitat. The Western Prairie Fringed Orchid ( Platanthera praeclara) is a threatened species found on the Sheyenne National Grassland in southeast North Dakota, USA. This conservation area that is a vital refuge for this species is subject to management for multiple uses including livestock grazing and recreation. Orchids are subject to continuous monitoring, but knowledge of the relationship between landscape indicators and orchid locations is limited. Research is needed to provide a greater understanding of the landscape relative to orchid habitat to develop conservation management strategies suited to dealing with threats arising from future interactions between land management and use, and climate change. The spatial distribution of orchid habitat was defined using a suite of indicators that characterize topography, moisture, and vegetation cover and compared with orchid point-based field observations. High resolution infrared imagery, a LiDAR-derived DEM, and well observations were used to characterize landscape properties. The NDVI (a measure of vegetation cover), the Topographic Wetness Index (TWI: a measure of moisture on the landscape), the Topographic Position Index (TPI: a measure of position on the landscape), and the depth to groundwater (a measure of the depth from the land surface to the groundwater surface) provided the best set of indicators of orchid habitat. Comparison between orchid locations and landscape indicators identified orchid metrics (+/-2 sigma) used to classify landscape indicators which were combined to create orchid habitat maps. This study supports that distribution of orchid habitat are influenced by the selected landscape indicators, each providing important information to the analysis. Comparison of orchid metrics with groundwater

  4. Bioactive bibenzyl derivatives and fluorenones from Dendrobium nobile.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue; Xu, Jie-Kun; Wang, Jue; Wang, Nai-Li; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Kitanaka, Sumumu; Yao, Xin-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the 60% ethanol extract of the stems of Dendrobium nobile using the DPPH assay led to the isolation of two new bibenzyl derivatives, nobilin D (1) and nobilin E (2), and a new fluorenone, nobilone (3), together with seven known compounds (4-10). Their structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic analyses. Compounds 1, 2, 4, 7, 8, and 10 exhibited significant antioxidant activity higher than or equivalent to vitamin C in the DPPH assay, and compounds 1, 3, 4, and 7-10 displayed higher antioxidant activity than vitamin C in the ORAC assay. Compounds 1, 2, and 10 also exhibited stronger inhibitory effects on NO production than resveratrol. PMID:17253844

  5. Cytotoxic bibenzyl dimers from the stems of Dendrobium fimbriatum Hook.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng-Qing; Xu, Fang-Cheng; Hou, Bo; Fan, Wei-Wei; Zi, Cheng-Ting; Li, Yan; Dong, Fa-Wu; Liu, Yu-Qing; Sheng, Jun; Zuo, Zhi-Li; Hu, Jiang-Miao

    2014-11-15

    The bioassay-guided chemical investigation of the stems of Dendrobium fimbriatum Hook led to the isolation of seven first reported bibenzyl dimers with a linkage of a methylene moiety, fimbriadimerbibenzyls A-G (1-7), together with a new dihydrophenanthrene derivative (S)-2,4,5,9-tetrahydroxy-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (8) and thirteen known compounds (9-21). The structure of the new compound was established by spectroscopic analysis. Biological evaluation of bibenzyl derivatives against five human cell lines indicated that seven of those compounds exhibited broad-spectrum and cytotoxic activities with IC50 values ranging from 2.2 to 21.2 μM. Those rare bibenzyl dimers exhibited cytotoxic activities in vitro and the cytotoxicity decreased as the number of oxygen-containing groups in the structure decreases. PMID:25316316

  6. Saprotrophic fungal mycorrhizal symbionts in achlorophyllous orchids

    PubMed Central

    Martos, Florent; Perry, Brian A; Padamsee, Mahajabeen; Roy, Mélanie; Pailler, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    Mycoheterotrophic plants are achlorophyllous plants that obtain carbon from their mycorrhizal fungi. They are usually considered to associate with fungi that are (1) specific of each mycoheterotrophic species and (2) mycorrhizal on surrounding green plants, which are the ultimate carbon source of the entire system. Here we review recent works revealing that some mycoheterotrophic plants are not fungal-specific, and that some mycoheterotrophic orchids associate with saprophytic fungi. A re-examination of earlier data suggests that lower specificity may be less rare than supposed in mycoheterotrophic plants. Association between mycoheterotrophic orchids and saprophytic fungi arose several times in the evolution of the two partners. We speculate that this indirectly illustrates why transition from saprotrophy to mycorrhizal status is common in fungal evolution. Moreover, some unexpected fungi occasionally encountered in plant roots should not be discounted as ‘molecular scraps’, since these facultatively biotrophic encounters may evolve into mycorrhizal symbionts in some other plants. PMID:20061806

  7. Pollinator deception in the orchid mantis.

    PubMed

    O'Hanlon, James C; Holwell, Gregory I; Herberstein, Marie E

    2014-01-01

    Mimicry has evolved in contexts such as camouflage, predator deterrence, luring of prey, and pollinator attraction. Mimicry of flowers has until now been demonstrated only in angiosperms, yet it has been hypothesized that the Malaysian orchid mantis Hymenopus coronatus mimics a flower to attract pollinators as prey. Despite the popularity of this charismatic insect, this long-discussed hypothesis has never been experimentally investigated. We found that, as predicted for mimicry, the color of H. coronatus is indistinguishable from the color of sympatric flowers for hymenopteran pollinators. Field experiments show that isolated mantises attract wild pollinators at a rate even higher than flowers and capture these pollinators as prey items. After more than a century of conjecture, we provide the first experimental evidence of pollinator deception in the orchid mantis and the first description of a unique predatory strategy that has not been documented in any other animal species. PMID:24334741

  8. Sex and the Catasetinae (Darwin's favourite orchids).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Escobar, Oscar Alejandro; Gottschling, Marc; Whitten, W Mark; Salazar, Gerardo; Gerlach, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Two sexual systems are predominant in Catasetinae (Orchidaceae), namely protandry (which has evolved in other orchid lineages as well) and environmental sex determination (ESD) being a unique trait among Orchidaceae. Yet, the lack of a robust phylogenetic framework for Catasetinae has hampered deeper insights in origin and evolution of sexual systems. To investigate the origins of protandry and ESD in Catasetinae, we sequenced nuclear and chloroplast loci from 77 species, providing the most extensive data matrix of Catasetinae available so far with all major lineages represented. We used Maximum Parsimony, Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian methods to infer phylogenetic relationships and evolution of sexual systems. Irrespectively of the methods used, Catasetinae were monophyletic in molecular phylogenies, with all established generic lineages and their relationships resolved and highly supported. According to comparative reconstruction approaches, the last common ancestor of Catasetinae was inferred as having bisexual flowers (i.e., lacking protandry and ESD as well), and protandry originated once in core Catasetinae (comprising Catasetum, Clowesia, Cycnoches, Dressleria and Mormodes). In addition, three independent gains of ESD are reliably inferred, linked to corresponding loss of protandry within core Catasetinae. Thus, prior gain of protandry appears as the necessary prerequisite for gain of ESD in orchids. Our results contribute to a comprehensive evolutionary scenario for sexual systems in Catasetinae and more generally in orchids as well. PMID:26708054

  9. Discrimination and similarity evaluation of tissue-cultured and wild Dendrobium species using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nai-dong; Chen, Han; Li, Jun; Sang, Mang-mang; Ding, Shen; Yu, Hao

    2015-04-01

    The FTIR method was applied to evaluate the similarity of tissue-cultured and wild Dendrobium huoshanense C.Z. Tang et S.J. Cheng, Dendrobium officinale Kimura et Migo and Dendrobium moniliforme (Linn.) Sw and discriminate different Dendrobium species, especially D. huoshanense and its main goldbrick Dendrobium henanense J.L. Lu et L.X. Gao. Despite the general pattern of the IR spectra, different intensities, shapes and peak positions were found in the IR spectra of these samples, especially in the range of 1800-600 cm-1, which could be used to discriminate them. The methanol, aqueous extracting procedure and the second derivative transformation obviously enlarged the tiny spectral differences among these samples. The similarity evaluation based on the IR spectra and the second derivative IR spectrum revealed that the similarity of the methanol extracts between tissue-cultured and wild Dendrobiums might be lower than that between different Dendrobium species. The similarities of the powders and aqueous extracts between tissue-cultured and wild Dendrobiums were higher than those between different Dendrobium species. The further principal component analysis showed that the first three components explained 99.7%, 87.7% and 85.1% of data variance for powder, methanol extract and aqueous extract, respectively, demonstrating a good discrimination between samples. Our research suggested that the variations of secondary metabolites between different origins of the investigated Dendrobiums might be higher than what we had supposed. Tissue culture techniques were widely used in the conversation of rare and endangered medicinal amedica, however, our study suggested that the chemical constituents of tissue-cultured plants might be quite different from their wild correspondences.

  10. Epiphytism and pollinator specialization: drivers for orchid diversity?

    PubMed Central

    Gravendeel, Barbara; Smithson, Ann; Slik, Ferry J W; Schuiteman, Andre

    2004-01-01

    Epiphytes are a characteristic component of tropical rainforests. Out of the 25,000 orchid species currently known to science, more than 70% live in tree canopies. Understanding when and how these orchids diversified is vital to understanding the history of epiphytic biomes. We investigated whether orchids managed to radiate so explosively owing to their predominantly epiphytic habit and/or their specialized pollinator systems by testing these hypotheses from a statistical and phylogenetic standpoint. For the first approach, species numbers of 100 randomly chosen epiphytic and terrestrial genera were compared. Furthermore, the mean number of pollinators per orchid species within the five subfamilies was calculated and correlated with their time of diversification and species richness. In the second approach, molecular epiphytic orchid phylogenies were screened for clades with specific suites of epiphytic adaptations. Epiphytic genera were found to be significantly richer in species than terrestrial genera both for orchids and non-orchids. No evidence was found for a positive association between pollinator specialization and orchid species richness. Repeated associations between a small body size, short life cycle and specialized clinging roots of twig epiphytes in Bulbophyllinae and Oncidiinae were discovered. The development of twig epiphytism in the first group seems repeatedly correlated with speciation bursts. PMID:15519970

  11. Orchid conservation in the biodiversity hotspot of southwestern China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Chen, Jin; Corlett, Richard T; Fan, XuLi; Yu, DongLi; Yang, HongPei; Gao, JiangYun

    2015-12-01

    Xishuangbanna is on the northern margins of tropical Asia in southwestern China and has the largest area of tropical forest remaining in the country. It is in the Indo-Burma hotspot and contains 16% of China's vascular flora in <0.2% of the country's total area (19,690 km(2) ). Rapid expansion of monoculture crops in the last 20 years, particularly rubber, threatens this region's exceptional biodiversity. To understand the effects of land-use change and collection on orchid species diversity and determine protection priorities, we conducted systematic field surveys, observed markets, interviewed orchid collectors, and then determined the conservation status of all orchids. We identified 426 orchid species in 115 genera in Xishuangbanna: 31% of all orchid species that occur in China. Species richness was highest at 1000-1200 m elevation. Three orchid species were assessed as possibly extinct in the wild, 15 as critically endangered, 82 as endangered, 124 as vulnerable, 186 as least concern, and 16 as data deficient. Declines over 20 years in harvested species suggested over-collection was the major threat, and utility value (i.e., medicinal or ornamental value) was significantly related to endangerment. Expansion of rubber tree plantations was less of a threat to orchids than to other taxa because only 75 orchid species (17.6%) occurred below the 1000-m-elevation ceiling for rubber cultivation, and most of these (46) occurred in nature reserves. However, climate change is projected to lift this ceiling to around 1300 m by 2050, and the limited area at higher elevations reduces the potential for upslope range expansion. The Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden is committed to achieving zero plant extinctions in Xishuangbanna, and orchids are a high priority. Appropriate in and ex situ conservation strategies, including new protected areas and seed banking, have been developed for every threatened orchid species and are being implemented. PMID:26372504

  12. Discrimination and chemical phylogenetic study of seven species of Dendrobium using infrared spectroscopy combined with cluster analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Congpei; He, Tao; Chun, Ze

    2013-04-01

    Dendrobium is a commonly used and precious herb in Traditional Chinese Medicine. The high biodiversity of Dendrobium and the therapeutic needs require tools for the correct and fast discrimination of different Dendrobium species. This study investigates Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy followed by cluster analysis for discrimination and chemical phylogenetic study of seven Dendrobium species. Despite the general pattern of the IR spectra, different intensities, shapes, peak positions were found in the IR spectra of these samples, especially in the range of 1800-800 cm-1. The second derivative transformation and alcoholic extracting procedure obviously enlarged the tiny spectral differences among these samples. The results indicated each Dendrobium species had a characteristic IR spectra profile, which could be used to discriminate them. The similarity coefficients among the samples were analyzed based on their second derivative IR spectra, which ranged from 0.7632 to 0.9700, among the seven Dendrobium species, and from 0.5163 to 0.9615, among the ethanol extracts. A dendrogram was constructed based on cluster analysis the IR spectra for studying the chemical phylogenetic relationships among the samples. The results indicated that D. denneanum and D. crepidatum could be the alternative resources to substitute D. chrysotoxum, D. officinale and D. nobile which were officially recorded in Chinese Pharmacopoeia. In conclusion, with the advantages of high resolution, speediness and convenience, the experimental approach can successfully discriminate and construct the chemical phylogenetic relationships of the seven Dendrobium species.

  13. Transcriptome Analysis of Dendrobium officinale and its Application to the Identification of Genes Associated with Polysaccharide Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianxia; He, Chunmei; Wu, Kunlin; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A.; Zeng, Songjun; Zhang, Xinhua; Yu, Zhenming; Xia, Haoqiang; Duan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Dendrobium officinale is one of the most important Chinese medicinal herbs. Polysaccharides are one of the main active ingredients of D. officinale. To identify the genes that maybe related to polysaccharides synthesis, two cDNA libraries were prepared from juvenile and adult D. officinale, and were named Dendrobium-1 and Dendrobium-2, respectively. Illumina sequencing for Dendrobium-1 generated 102 million high quality reads that were assembled into 93,881 unigenes with an average sequence length of 790 base pairs. The sequencing for Dendrobium-2 generated 86 million reads that were assembled into 114,098 unigenes with an average sequence length of 695 base pairs. Two transcriptome databases were integrated and assembled into a total of 145,791 unigenes. Among them, 17,281 unigenes were assigned to 126 KEGG pathways while 135 unigenes were involved in fructose and mannose metabolism. Gene Ontology analysis revealed that the majority of genes were associated with metabolic and cellular processes. Furthermore, 430 glycosyltransferase and 89 cellulose synthase genes were identified. Comparative analysis of both transcriptome databases revealed a total of 32,794 differential expression genes (DEGs), including 22,051 up-regulated and 10,743 down-regulated genes in Dendrobium-2 compared to Dendrobium-1. Furthermore, a total of 1142 and 7918 unigenes showed unique expression in Dendrobium-1 and Dendrobium-2, respectively. These DEGs were mainly correlated with metabolic pathways and the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. In addition, 170 DEGs belonged to glycosyltransferase genes, 37 DEGs were related to cellulose synthase genes and 627 DEGs encoded transcription factors. This study substantially expands the transcriptome information for D. officinale and provides valuable clues for identifying candidate genes involved in polysaccharide biosynthesis and elucidating the mechanism of polysaccharide biosynthesis. PMID:26904032

  14. The use of orchids in Chinese medicine

    PubMed Central

    Bulpitt, Christopher J; Li, Yan; Bulpitt, Pauline F; Wang, Jiguang

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the therapeutic uses of five Chinese medicines that contain orchids are discussed, together with a brief report of some of the animal experimentation undertaken. The impression that these preparations have no therapeutic use may be incorrect. However, herbal preparations have not usually been subject to the rigorous characterization and standardization necessary for clinical study, and persuading practitioners that substances in use for many centuries still need to be tested in randomized controlled clinical trials is proving a significant challenge. PMID:18065708

  15. Germination and seedling establishment in orchids: a complex of requirements

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Hanne N.; Dixon, Kingsley W.; Jersáková, Jana; Těšitelová, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Background Seedling recruitment is essential to the sustainability of any plant population. Due to the minute nature of seeds and early-stage seedlings, orchid germination in situ was for a long time practically impossible to observe, creating an obstacle towards understanding seedling site requirements and fluctuations in orchid populations. The introduction of seed packet techniques for sowing and retrieval in natural sites has brought with it important insights, but many aspects of orchid seed and germination biology remain largely unexplored. Key Considerations The germination niche for orchids is extremely complex, because it is defined by requirements not only for seed lodging and germination, but also for presence of a fungal host and its substrate. A mycobiont that the seedling can parasitize is considered an essential element, and a great diversity of Basidiomycota and Ascomycota have now been identified for their role in orchid seed germination, with fungi identifiable as imperfect Rhizoctonia species predominating. Specificity patterns vary from orchid species employing a single fungal lineage to species associating individually with a limited selection of distantly related fungi. A suitable organic carbon source for the mycobiont constitutes another key requirement. Orchid germination also relies on factors that generally influence the success of plant seeds, both abiotic, such as light/shade, moisture, substrate chemistry and texture, and biotic, such as competitors and antagonists. Complexity is furthermore increased when these factors influence seeds/seedling, fungi and fungal substrate differentially. Conclusions A better understanding of germination and seedling establishment is needed for conservation of orchid populations. Due to the obligate association with a mycobiont, the germination niches in orchid species are extremely complex and varied. Microsites suitable for germination can be small and transient, and direct observation is difficult

  16. Molecular characterization of natural orchid in South slopes of Mount Merapi, Sleman regency, Yogyakarta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdiani, Defika I.; Devi, Fera L.; Koentjana, Johan P.; Milasari, Asri F.; Nur'aini, Indah; Semiarti, Endang

    2015-09-01

    Natural orchid is one of the most important tropical biodiversity. In Indonesia there are ± 6000 species out of 30000 orchids species in the world, of which there are ± 60 species at Mount Merapi. Repetitive eruption of Merapi have wiped out the biodiversity of orchids, therefore the efforts to conserve the orchids and to establish the database of natural orchids in Mount Merapi are needed. The orchid's database can be created based on DNA analysis, and establish barcoding DNA. DNA-barcodes can be used as molecular markers. The different character of morphology usually shows different pattern in DNA fragments. This research aims to characterize the phenotype and genotype of natural orchids of Mt. Merapi based on morphology and the structure of DNA in trnL-F intergenic region of chloroplasts DNA of orchid. Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) technique was used to characterize the molecular types of orchids in silico of intergenic space area of orchid chloroplast. In this study, 11 species of orchids were characterized based on morphological and molecular characters. The molecular characters were obtained from trnL-F intergenic region of leaves chloroplasts. The data indicates that there is a conserve DNA pattern in all orchids and the distinctive characters of some orchids. In this study, based on trnL-F intergenic region of chloroplast genome, the phylogenetic tree revealed that 11 species of orchids at Mt. Merapi can be grouped into 2 clades, that matched with morphological characters.

  17. Terrestrial orchid conservation in the age of extinction

    PubMed Central

    Swarts, Nigel D.; Dixon, Kingsley W.

    2009-01-01

    Background Conservation through reserves alone is now considered unlikely to achieve protection of plant species necessary to mitigate direct losses of habitat and the pervasive impact of global climate change. Assisted translocation/migration represent new challenges in the face of climate change; species, particularly orchids, will need artificial assistance to migrate from hostile environments, across ecological barriers (alienated lands such as farmlands and built infrastructure) to new climatically buffered sites. The technology and science to underpin assisted migration concepts are in their infancy for plants in general, and orchids, with their high degree of rarity, represent a particularly challenging group for which these principles need to be developed. It is likely that orchids, more than any other plant family, will be in the front-line of species to suffer large-scale extinction events as a result of climate change. Scope The South West Australian Floristic Region (SWAFR) is the only global biodiversity hotspot in Australia and represents an ideal test-bed for development of orchid conservation principles. Orchids comprise 6 % of all threatened vascular plants in the SWAFR, with 76 out of the 407 species known for the region having a high level of conservation risk. The situation in the SWAFR is a portent of the global crisis in terrestrial orchid conservation, and it is a region where innovative conservation solutions will be required if the impending wave of extinction is to be averted. Major threatening processes are varied, and include land clearance, salinity, burning, weed encroachment, disease and pests. This is compounded by highly specialized pollinators (locally endemic native invertebrates) and, in the most threatened groups such as hammer orchids (Drakaea) and spider orchids (Caladenia), high levels of mycorrhizal specialization. Management and development of effective conservation strategies for SWAFR orchids require a wide range of

  18. [Primary study on photosynthetic characteristics of Dendrobium nobile].

    PubMed

    Su, Wenhua; Zhang, Guangfei

    2003-03-01

    With LiCor-6400 Portable Photosynthesis System, carbon dioxide exchange pattern for leaves of Dendrobium nobile during 24 hours were studied in sunny day and rainy day, and the variation of CO2 exchange rate to light intensity was analysed. The results showed that in sunny day D. nobile absorbed CO2 in all day except at midday, at noon photorespiration took place. The CO2 exchange pattern was similar to Crassulacean Acid Metabolism(CAM). In rainy day CO2 uptake was in all day, at night CO2 uptake was monitored at 21:00, then CO2 released from 23:00 to dawn. Light saturation point was 1000 mumol/m2s. Over light saturation point photosynthesis, photoinhibition of photosynthesis will be induced by high-light. Exposed to high-light, the light saturation point and the CO2 uptake velocity would be decreased. With variation of environmental factors, photosynthetic pathway in D. nobile could change from CAM to C3 photosynthetic metabolism. It may be one of main reasons for D. nobile to adapt to the shade-requiring environment, the slow growth and rareness in nature. PMID:12856465

  19. Orchid phylogenomics and multiple drivers of their extraordinary diversification

    PubMed Central

    Givnish, Thomas J.; Spalink, Daniel; Ames, Mercedes; Lyon, Stephanie P.; Hunter, Steven J.; Zuluaga, Alejandro; Iles, William J. D.; Clements, Mark A.; Arroyo, Mary T. K.; Leebens-Mack, James; Endara, Lorena; Kriebel, Ricardo; Neubig, Kurt M.; Whitten, W. Mark; Williams, Norris H.; Cameron, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    Orchids are the most diverse family of angiosperms, with over 25 000 species, more than mammals, birds and reptiles combined. Tests of hypotheses to account for such diversity have been stymied by the lack of a fully resolved broad-scale phylogeny. Here, we provide such a phylogeny, based on 75 chloroplast genes for 39 species representing all orchid subfamilies and 16 of 17 tribes, time-calibrated against 17 angiosperm fossils. A supermatrix analysis places an additional 144 species based on three plastid genes. Orchids appear to have arisen roughly 112 million years ago (Mya); the subfamilies Orchidoideae and Epidendroideae diverged from each other at the end of the Cretaceous; and the eight tribes and three previously unplaced subtribes of the upper epidendroids diverged rapidly from each other between 37.9 and 30.8 Mya. Orchids appear to have undergone one significant acceleration of net species diversification in the orchidoids, and two accelerations and one deceleration in the upper epidendroids. Consistent with theory, such accelerations were correlated with the evolution of pollinia, the epiphytic habit, CAM photosynthesis, tropical distribution (especially in extensive cordilleras), and pollination via Lepidoptera or euglossine bees. Deceit pollination appears to have elevated the number of orchid species by one-half but not via acceleration of the rate of net diversification. The highest rate of net species diversification within the orchids (0.382 sp sp−1 My−1) is 6.8 times that at the Asparagales crown. PMID:26311671

  20. In vitro propagation of Paphiopedilum orchids.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Songjun; Huang, Weichang; Wu, Kunlin; Zhang, Jianxia; da Silva, Jaime A Teixeira; Duan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Paphiopedilum is one of the most popular and rare orchid genera. Members of the genus are sold and exhibited as pot plants and cut flowers. Wild populations of Paphiopedilum are under the threat of extinction due to over-collection and loss of suitable habitats. A reduction in their commercial value through large-scale propagation in vitro is an option to reduce pressure from illegal collection, to attempt to meet commercial needs and to re-establish threatened species back into the wild. Although they are commercially propagated via asymbiotic seed germination, Paphiopedilum are considered to be difficult to propagate in vitro, especially by plant regeneration from tissue culture. This review aims to cover the most important aspects and to provide an up-to-date research progress on in vitro propagation of Paphiopedilum and to emphasize the importance of further improving tissue culture protocols for ex vitro-derived explants. PMID:25582733

  1. Phenanthrene derivatives from the orchid Coelogyne cristata.

    PubMed

    Majumder, P L; Sen, S; Majumder, S

    2001-10-01

    Coeloginanthridin, a 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene derivative, and coeloginanthrin, the corresponding phenanthrene analogue, were isolated from the orchid Coelogyne cristata which earlier afforded coelogin (1a) and coeloginin (1b). The structures of coeloginanthridin and coeloginanthrin were established as 3,5,7-trihydroxy-1,2-dimethoxy-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (2a) and 3,5,7-trihydroxy-1,2-dimethoxyphenanthrene (2c), respectively, from spectral and chemical evidence including the conversion of coeloginanthridin triacetate (2b) to coeloginanthrin triacetate (2d) by dehydrogenation with DDQ. In the light of earlier reports on structurally similar compounds, 2a and 2c may have biological activities of phytoalexins and endogenous plant growth regulators. PMID:11576602

  2. 76 FR 78008 - Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings and Orchid Cellmark Inc.; Analysis of Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ... Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings and Orchid Cellmark Inc.; Analysis of Proposed Agreement... section below. Write ``LabCorp/Orchid, File No. 111 0155'' on your comment, and file your comment online... January 9, 2012. Write ''LabCorp/Orchid, File No. 111 0155'' on your comment. Your comment--including...

  3. New Workflows for Born-Digital Assets: Managing Charles E. Bracker's Orchid Photographs Collection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurford, Amanda A.; Runyon, Carolyn F.

    2011-01-01

    Charles E. Bracker was a professor of botany and plant pathology at Purdue University from 1964 to 1999. His late wife, Anri, was an orchid enthusiast who began collecting and housing orchids in the 1980s. In 2009, Bracker's 30,000 digital orchid photographs were donated to Ball State University Libraries, where both of this article's authors…

  4. Donkey orchid symptomless virus: a viral 'platypus' from Australian terrestrial orchids.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Stephen J; Li, Hua; Jones, Michael G K

    2013-01-01

    Complete and partial genome sequences of two isolates of an unusual new plant virus, designated Donkey orchid symptomless virus (DOSV) were identified using a high-throughput sequencing approach. The virus was identified from asymptomatic plants of Australian terrestrial orchid Diuris longifolia (Common donkey orchid) growing in a remnant forest patch near Perth, western Australia. DOSV was identified from two D. longifolia plants of 264 tested, and from at least one plant of 129 Caladenia latifolia (pink fairy orchid) plants tested. Phylogenetic analysis of the genome revealed open reading frames (ORF) encoding seven putative proteins of apparently disparate origins. A 69-kDa protein (ORF1) that overlapped the replicase shared low identity with MPs of plant tymoviruses (Tymoviridae). A 157-kDa replicase (ORF2) and 22-kDa coat protein (ORF4) shared 32% and 40% amino acid identity, respectively, with homologous proteins encoded by members of the plant virus family Alphaflexiviridae. A 44-kDa protein (ORF3) shared low identity with myosin and an autophagy protein from Squirrelpox virus. A 27-kDa protein (ORF5) shared no identity with described proteins. A 14-kDa protein (ORF6) shared limited sequence identity (26%) over a limited region of the envelope glycoprotein precursor of mammal-infecting Crimea-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (Bunyaviridae). The putative 25-kDa movement protein (MP) (ORF7) shared limited (27%) identity with 3A-like MPs of members of the plant-infecting Tombusviridae and Virgaviridae. Transmissibility was shown when DOSV systemically infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Structure and organization of the domains within the putative replicase of DOSV suggests a common evolutionary origin with 'potexvirus-like' replicases of viruses within the Alphaflexiviridae and Tymoviridae, and the CP appears to be ancestral to CPs of allexiviruses (Alphaflexiviridae). The MP shares an evolutionary history with MPs of dianthoviruses, but the other putative

  5. Donkey Orchid Symptomless Virus: A Viral ‘Platypus’ from Australian Terrestrial Orchids

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Stephen J.; Li, Hua; Jones, Michael G. K.

    2013-01-01

    Complete and partial genome sequences of two isolates of an unusual new plant virus, designated Donkey orchid symptomless virus (DOSV) were identified using a high-throughput sequencing approach. The virus was identified from asymptomatic plants of Australian terrestrial orchid Diuris longifolia (Common donkey orchid) growing in a remnant forest patch near Perth, western Australia. DOSV was identified from two D. longifolia plants of 264 tested, and from at least one plant of 129 Caladenia latifolia (pink fairy orchid) plants tested. Phylogenetic analysis of the genome revealed open reading frames (ORF) encoding seven putative proteins of apparently disparate origins. A 69-kDa protein (ORF1) that overlapped the replicase shared low identity with MPs of plant tymoviruses (Tymoviridae). A 157-kDa replicase (ORF2) and 22-kDa coat protein (ORF4) shared 32% and 40% amino acid identity, respectively, with homologous proteins encoded by members of the plant virus family Alphaflexiviridae. A 44-kDa protein (ORF3) shared low identity with myosin and an autophagy protein from Squirrelpox virus. A 27-kDa protein (ORF5) shared no identity with described proteins. A 14-kDa protein (ORF6) shared limited sequence identity (26%) over a limited region of the envelope glycoprotein precursor of mammal-infecting Crimea-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (Bunyaviridae). The putative 25-kDa movement protein (MP) (ORF7) shared limited (27%) identity with 3A-like MPs of members of the plant-infecting Tombusviridae and Virgaviridae. Transmissibility was shown when DOSV systemically infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Structure and organization of the domains within the putative replicase of DOSV suggests a common evolutionary origin with ‘potexvirus-like’ replicases of viruses within the Alphaflexiviridae and Tymoviridae, and the CP appears to be ancestral to CPs of allexiviruses (Alphaflexiviridae). The MP shares an evolutionary history with MPs of dianthoviruses, but the other putative

  6. Bioguided fractionation and isolation of free radical scavenging components from in vitro propagated chinese medicinal plants Dendrobium tosaense Makino and Dendrobium moniliforme SW.

    PubMed

    Lo, Shu-Fung; Mulabagal, Vanisree; Chen, Chung-Li; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Tsay, Hsin-Sheng

    2004-11-17

    This study was performed to investigate the free radical scavenging active components from in vitro propagated medicinal herbs of the genus Dendrobium, namely, Dendrobium tosaense Makino and Dendrobium moniliforme SW, using a 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical antioxidative assay. Seeds of the capsules derived after 12 weeks of hand-pollination germinated asymbiotically (50-74%) on half-strength Murashige and Skoog's (MS) basal medium with 3% sucrose and solidified with 0.9% Difco agar. Active growth in the germinated seedlings was achieved by reculturing on full-strength MS basal medium supplemented with 8% banana homogenate, 8% potato homogenate, 8% coconut water, 1.5% sucrose, and 0.9% Difco agar. Healthy plantlets transferred to plastic trays containing moss or moss and tree fern successfully acclimatized (84-100%) in the greenhouse. Extracts were prepared from plants grown in the greenhouse for a period of 6 months. Methanolic extracts of D. tosaense and D. moniliforme scavenged DPPH at 95.9 and 83.4%, respectively, at a concentration of 0.4 mg/mL. Therefore, methanolic solubles of D. tosaense and D. moniliforme were subjected to bioguided fractionation and separation by column chromatographic methods individually. After chromatographic separation of these crude extracts, the obtained fractions (Dm 1, Dm 2, Dm 3, Dt 1, Dt 2, and Dt 3) were tested for their activity. Among them, fractions Dm 2 and Dt 1 showed significant antioxidant activity by DPPH radical antioxidative assay. Active fractions were purified further by column chromatography and resulted in identification of the antioxidant components alkyl ferulates from D. moniliforme and quercetin from D. tosaense. PMID:15537296

  7. Stemflow: A Source of Nutrients in some Naturally Growing Epiphytic Orchids of the Sikkim Himalaya.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, O P; Sharma, E; Palni, L M

    1995-01-01

    A study on five naturally growing epiphytic orchids viz., Bulbophyllum affine Lindl., Coelogyne ochracea Lindl., Otochilus porrecta Lindl., Cirrhopetalum cornutum Lindl. and C. cornutum (var.) was carried out in the subtropical belt of Sikkim Himalaya. Stemflow leachates formed the main source of ammonium-N and nitrate-N for uptake by these orchids. Phosphorus concentration in the tissues of these orchids was high. Phosphate-P from stemflow does not seem to be a regular source of phosphorus for these orchids. Absorption/desorption results indicate that organic-N from stemflow leachates is not utilized by these orchids. PMID:21247907

  8. Stemflow: A Source of Nutrients in some Naturally Growing Epiphytic Orchids of the Sikkim Himalaya

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, O. P.; Sharma, E.; Palni, L. M. S.

    1995-01-01

    A study on five naturally growing epiphytic orchids viz., Bulbophyllum affine Lindl., Coelogyne ochracea Lindl., Otochilus porrecta Lindl., Cirrhopetalum cornutum Lindl. and C. cornutum (var.) was carried out in the subtropical belt of Sikkim Himalaya. Stemflow leachates formed the main source of ammonium-N and nitrate-N for uptake by these orchids. Phosphorus concentration in the tissues of these orchids was high. Phosphate-P from stemflow does not seem to be a regular source of phosphorus for these orchids. Absorption/desorption results indicate that organic-N from stemflow leachates is not utilized by these orchids. PMID:21247907

  9. Independent, specialized invasions of ectomycorrhizal mutualism by two nonphotosynthetic orchids

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, D. Lee; Bruns, Thomas D.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the mycorrhizal associations of two nonphotosynthetic orchids from distant tribes within the Orchidaceae. The two orchids were found to associate exclusively with two distinct clades of ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetous fungi over wide geographic ranges. Yet both orchids retained the internal mycorrhizal structure typical of photosynthetic orchids that do not associate with ectomycorrhizal fungi. Restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis of two ribosomal regions along with fungal isolation provided congruent, independent evidence for the identities of the fungal symbionts. All 14 fungal entities that were associated with the orchid Cephalanthera austinae belonged to a clade within the Thelephoraceae, and all 18 fungal entities that were associated with the orchid Corallorhiza maculata fell within the Russulaceae. Restriction fragment length polymorphism and single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of ectomycorrhizal tree roots collected adjacent to Cephalanthera showed that (i) the fungi associated internally with Cephalanthera also form typical external ectomycorrhizae and that (ii) ectomycorrhizae formed by other Basidiomycetes were abundant where the orchid grows but these fungi did not associate with the orchid. This is the first proof of ectomycorrhizal epiparasitism in nature by an orchid. We argue that these orchids are cheaters because they do not provide fixed carbon to associated fungi. This view suggests that mycorrhizae, like other ancient mutualisms, are susceptible to cheating. The extreme specificity in these orchids relative to other ectomycorrhizal plants agrees with trends seen in more conventional parasites. PMID:9114020

  10. Start codon targeted (SCoT) and target region amplification polymorphism (TRAP) for evaluating the genetic relationship of Dendrobium species.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shangguo; He, Refeng; Yang, Sai; Chen, Zhe; Jiang, Mengying; Lu, Jiangjie; Wang, Huizhong

    2015-08-10

    Two molecular marker systems, start codon targeted (SCoT) and target region amplification polymorphism (TRAP), were used for genetic relationship analysis of 36 Dendrobium species collected from China. Twenty-two selected SCoT primers produced 337 loci, of which 324 (96%) were polymorphic, whereas 13 TRAP primer combinations produced a total of 510 loci, with 500 (97.8%) of them being polymorphic. An average polymorphism information content of 0.953 and 0.983 was detected using the SCoT and TRAP primers, respectively, showing that a high degree of genetic diversity exists among Chinese Dendrobium species. The partition of clusters in the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean dendrogram and principal coordinate analysis plot based on the SCoT and TRAP markers was similar and clustered the 36 Dendrobium species into four main groups. Our results will provide useful information for resource protection and will also be useful to improve the current Dendrobium breeding programs. Our results also demonstrate that SCoT and TRAP markers are informative and can be used to evaluate genetic relationships between Dendrobium species. PMID:25936992

  11. A Modified ABCDE Model of Flowering in Orchids Based on Gene Expression Profiling Studies of the Moth Orchid Phalaenopsis aphrodite

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ann-Ying; Chen, Chun-Yi; Chang, Yao-Chien Alex; Chao, Ya-Ting; Shih, Ming-Che

    2013-01-01

    Previously we developed genomic resources for orchids, including transcriptomic analyses using next-generation sequencing techniques and construction of a web-based orchid genomic database. Here, we report a modified molecular model of flower development in the Orchidaceae based on functional analysis of gene expression profiles in Phalaenopsis aphrodite (a moth orchid) that revealed novel roles for the transcription factors involved in floral organ pattern formation. Phalaenopsis orchid floral organ-specific genes were identified by microarray analysis. Several critical transcription factors including AP3, PI, AP1 and AGL6, displayed distinct spatial distribution patterns. Phylogenetic analysis of orchid MADS box genes was conducted to infer the evolutionary relationship among floral organ-specific genes. The results suggest that gene duplication MADS box genes in orchid may have resulted in their gaining novel functions during evolution. Based on these analyses, a modified model of orchid flowering was proposed. Comparison of the expression profiles of flowers of a peloric mutant and wild-type Phalaenopsis orchid further identified genes associated with lip morphology and peloric effects. Large scale investigation of gene expression profiles revealed that homeotic genes from the ABCDE model of flower development classes A and B in the Phalaenopsis orchid have novel functions due to evolutionary diversification, and display differential expression patterns. PMID:24265826

  12. Deceived by orchids: sex, science, fiction and Darwin.

    PubMed

    Endersby, Jim

    2016-06-01

    Between 1916 and 1927, botanists in several countries independently resolved three problems that had mystified earlier naturalists - including Charles Darwin: how did the many species of orchid that did not produce nectar persuade insects to pollinate them? Why did some orchid flowers seem to mimic insects? And why should a native British orchid suffer 'attacks' from a bee? Half a century after Darwin's death, these three mysteries were shown to be aspects of a phenomenon now known as pseudocopulation, whereby male insects are deceived into attempting to mate with the orchid's flowers, which mimic female insects; the males then carry the flower's pollen with them when they move on to try the next deceptive orchid. Early twentieth-century botanists were able to see what their predecessors had not because orchids (along with other plants) had undergone an imaginative re-creation: Darwin's science was appropriated by popular interpreters of science, including the novelist Grant Allen; then H.G. Wells imagined orchids as killers (inspiring a number of imitators), to produce a genre of orchid stories that reflected significant cultural shifts, not least in the presentation of female sexuality. It was only after these changes that scientists were able to see plants as equipped with agency, actively able to pursue their own, cunning reproductive strategies - and to outwit animals in the process. This paper traces the movement of a set of ideas that were created in a context that was recognizably scientific; they then became popular non-fiction, then popular fiction, and then inspired a new science, which in turn inspired a new generation of fiction writers. Long after clear barriers between elite and popular science had supposedly been established in the early twentieth century, they remained porous because a variety of imaginative writers kept destabilizing them. The fluidity of the boundaries between makers, interpreters and publics of scientific knowledge was a highly

  13. Identification of medicinal Dendrobium species by phylogenetic analyses using matK and rbcL sequences.

    PubMed

    Asahina, Haruka; Shinozaki, Junichi; Masuda, Kazuo; Morimitsu, Yasujiro; Satake, Motoyoshi

    2010-04-01

    Species identification of five Dendrobium plants was conducted using phylogenetic analysis and the validity of the method was verified. Some Dendrobium plants (Orchidaceae) have been used as herbal medicines but the difficulty in identifying their botanical origin by traditional methods prevented their full modern utilization. Based on the emerging field of molecular systematics as a powerful classification tool, a phylogenetic analysis was conducted using sequences of two plastid genes, the maturase-coding gene (matK) and the large subunit of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-coding gene (rbcL), as DNA barcodes for species identification of Dendrobium plants. We investigated five medicinal Dendrobium species, Dendrobium fimbriatum, D. moniliforme, D. nobile, D. pulchellum, and D. tosaense. The phylogenetic trees constructed from matK data successfully distinguished each species from each other. On the other hand, rbcL, as a single-locus barcode, offered less species discriminating power than matK, possibly due to its being present with little variation. When results using matK sequences of D. officinale that was deposited in the DNA database were combined, D. officinale and D. tosaense showed a close genetic relationship, which brought us closer to resolving the question of their taxonomic identity. Identification of the plant source as well as the uniformity of the chemical components is critical for the quality control of herbal medicines and it is important that the processed materials be validated. The methods presented here could be applied to the analysis of processed Dendrobium plants and be a promising tool for the identification of botanical origins of crude drugs. PMID:20140532

  14. Carbon and nitrogen gain during the growth of orchid seedlings in nature.

    PubMed

    Stöckel, Marcus; Těšitelová, Tamara; Jersáková, Jana; Bidartondo, Martin I; Gebauer, Gerhard

    2014-04-01

    For germination and establishment, orchids depend on carbon (C) and nutrients supplied by mycorrhizal fungi. As adults, the majority of orchids then appear to become autotrophic. To compare the proportional C and nitrogen (N) gain from fungi in mycoheterotrophic seedlings and in adults, here we examined in the field C and N stable isotope compositions in seedlings and adults of orchids associated with ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi. Using a new highly sensitive approach, we measured the isotope compositions of seedlings and adults of four orchid species belonging to different functional groups: fully and partially mycoheterotrophic orchids associated with narrow or broad sets of ectomycorrhizal fungi, and two adult putatively autotrophic orchids associated exclusively with saprotrophic fungi. Seedlings of orchids associated with ectomycorrhizal fungi were enriched in (13) C and (15) N similarly to fully mycoheterotrophic adults. Seedlings of saprotroph-associated orchids were also enriched in (13) C and (15) N, but unexpectedly their enrichment was significantly lower, making them hardly distinguishable from their respective adult stages and neighbouring autotrophic plants. We conclude that partial mycoheterotrophy among saprotroph-associated orchids cannot be identified unequivocally based on C and N isotope compositions alone. Thus, partial mycoheterotrophy may be much more widely distributed among orchids than hitherto assumed. PMID:24444001

  15. Preliminary findings on identification of mycorrhizal fungi from diverse orchids in the Central Highlands of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Yokoya, Kazutomo; Zettler, Lawrence W; Kendon, Jonathan P; Bidartondo, Martin I; Stice, Andrew L; Skarha, Shannon; Corey, Laura L; Knight, Audrey C; Sarasan, Viswambharan

    2015-11-01

    The Orchid flora of Madagascar is one of the most diverse with nearly 1000 orchid taxa, of which about 90% are endemic to this biodiversity hotspot. The Itremo Massif in the Central Highlands of Madagascar with a Highland Subtropical climate range encompasses montane grassland, igneous and metamorphic rock outcrops, and gallery and tapia forests. Our study focused on identifying culturable mycorrhizae from epiphytic, lithophytic, and terrestrial orchid taxa to understand their diversity and density in a spatial matrix that is within the protected areas. We have collected both juvenile and mature roots from 41 orchid taxa for isolating their orchid mycorrhizal fungi (OMF), and to culture, identify, and store in liquid nitrogen for future studies. Twelve operational taxonomic units (OTUs), of three known orchid mycorrhizal genera, were recognized by analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of 85 isolates, and, by comparing with GenBank database entries, each OTU was shown to have closely related fungi that were also found as orchid associates. Orchid and fungal diversity were greater in gallery forests and open grasslands, which is very significant for future studies and orchid conservation. As far as we know, this is the first ever report of detailed identification of mycorrhizal fungi from Madagascar. This study will help start to develop a programme for identifying fungal symbionts from this unique biodiversity hotspot, which is undergoing rapid ecosystem damage and species loss. The diversity of culturable fungal associates, their density, and distribution within the Itremo orchid hotspot areas will be discussed. PMID:25771863

  16. Native and exotic earthworms affect orchid seed loss

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Melissa K.; Parker, Kenneth L.; Szlavecz, Katalin; Whigham, Dennis F.

    2013-01-01

    Non-native earthworms have invaded ecosystems around the world but have recently received increased attention as they invaded previously earthworm-free habitats in northern North America. Earthworms can affect plants by ingesting seeds and burying them in the soil. These effects can be negative or positive but are expected to become increasingly negative with decreasing seed size. Orchids have some of the smallest seeds of any plants, so we hypothesized that earthworm consumption of seeds would decrease seed viability and lead to burial of ingested seeds. We used a combination of mesocosms and field measurements to determine whether native and non-native earthworms would affect Goodyera pubescens seed germination by decreasing seed viability through digestion or burial. To determine soil depths at which seed burial would decrease chances of germination, we used field measurements of the abundance of mycorrhizal fungi needed for G. pubescens germination at different soil depths. We found that the combined effects of earthworm ingestion and burial would be expected to result in a loss of 49 % of orchid seeds in mature forests and 68 % of those in successional forests over an average year. Differences in seed ingestion and burial among soils from mature and successional forests were probably driven by differences in their ability to support earthworm biomass and not by differences in earthworm behaviour as a function of soil type. The combined effects of earthworm ingestion and burial have the potential to result in substantial loss of orchid seeds, particularly in successional forests. This effect may slow the ability of orchids to recolonize forests as they proceed through succession. Determining whether this strong effect of earthworms on G. pubescens viability and germination also applies to other orchid species awaits further testing.

  17. Two new dendrocandins with neurite outgrowth-promoting activity from Dendrobium officinale.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Liu, Shou-Jin; Luo, Huai-Rong; Cui, Juan; Zhou, Jun; Wang, Xuan-Jun; Sheng, Jun; Hu, Jiang-Miao

    2015-01-01

    Two new bibenzyl derivatives, dendrocandin T (1) and dendrocandin U (2), together with eight known bibenzyls, were isolated from the stems of Dendrobium officinale. Those compounds were sent for the first time for central nervous system-related bioassay and the results indicated that compounds 3, 4, and 5 have a certain degree of neurite outgrowth-promoting activity, and compounds 1, 2, 6, and 7 also have weak activity. The results indicated that D. officinale used as health food and traditional Chinese medicine "Tiepi Shihu" has a health function of neurotrophic effects. PMID:25289696

  18. In vitro and in vivo antioxidant activity of a water-soluble polysaccharide from dendrobium denneanum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, A.; Ge, Z.; Fan, Y.; Chun, Z.; Jin, He X.

    2011-01-01

    The water-soluble crude polysaccharide (DDP) obtained from the aqueous extracts of the stem of Dendrobium denneanum through hot water extraction followed by ethanol precipitation, was found to have an average molecular weight (Mw) of about 484.7 kDa. Monosaccharide analysis revealed that DDP was composed of arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucose and galactose in a molar ratio of 1.00:2.66:8.92:34.20:10.16. The investigation of antioxidant activity both in vitro and in vivo showed that DDP is a potential antioxidant. ?? 2011.

  19. Diversity of mycorrhizal fungi of terrestrial orchids: compatibility webs, brief encounters, lasting relationships and alien invasions.

    PubMed

    Bonnardeaux, Yumiko; Brundrett, Mark; Batty, Andrew; Dixon, Kingsley; Koch, John; Sivasithamparam, K

    2007-01-01

    The diversity of mycorrhizal fungi associated with an introduced weed-like South African orchid (Disa bracteata) and a disturbance-intolerant, widespread, native West Australian orchid (Pyrorchis nigricans) were compared by molecular identification of the fungi isolated from single pelotons. Molecular identification revealed both orchids were associated with fungi from diverse groups in the Rhizoctonia complex with worldwide distribution. Symbiotic germination assays confirmed the majority of fungi isolated from pelotons were mycorrhizal and a factorial experiment uncovered complex webs of compatibility between six terrestrial orchids and 12 fungi from Australia and South Africa. Two weed-like (disturbance-tolerant rapidly spreading) orchids - D. bracteata and the indigenous Australian Microtis media, had the broadest webs of mycorrhizal fungi. In contrast, other native orchids had relatively small webs of fungi (Diuris magnifica and Thelymitra crinita), or germinated exclusively with their own fungus (Caladenia falcata and Pterostylis sanguinea). Orchids, such as D. bracteata and M. media, which form relationships with diverse webs of fungi, had apparent specificity that decreased with time, as some fungi had brief encounters with orchids that supported protocorm formation but not subsequent seedling growth. The interactions between orchid mycorrhizal fungi and their hosts are discussed. PMID:17289365

  20. Coexisting orchid species have distinct mycorrhizal communities and display strong spatial segregation.

    PubMed

    Jacquemyn, Hans; Brys, Rein; Merckx, Vincent S F T; Waud, Michael; Lievens, Bart; Wiegand, Thorsten

    2014-04-01

    Because orchids are dependent on mycorrhizal fungi for germination and establishment of seedlings, differences in the mycorrhizal communities associating with orchids can be expected to mediate the abundance, spatial distribution and coexistence of terrestrial orchids in natural communities. We assessed the small-scale spatial distribution of seven orchid species co-occurring in 25 × 25 m plots in two Mediterranean grasslands. In order to characterize the mycorrhizal community associating with each orchid species, 454 pyrosequencing was used. The extent of spatial clustering was assessed using techniques of spatial point pattern analysis. The community of mycorrhizal fungi consisted mainly of members of the Tulasnellaceae, Thelephoraceae and Ceratobasidiaceae, although sporadically members of the Sebacinaceae, Russulaceae and Cortinariaceae were observed. Pronounced differences in mycorrhizal communities were observed between species, whereas strong clustering and significant segregation characterized the spatial distribution of orchid species. However, spatial segregation was not significantly related to phylogenetic dissimilarity of fungal communities. Our results indicate that co-occurring orchid species have distinctive mycorrhizal communities and show strong spatial segregation, suggesting that mycorrhizal fungi are important factors driving niche partitioning in terrestrial orchids and may therefore contribute to orchid coexistence. PMID:24325257

  1. Four new orchid species from the Lengguru fold belt, West Papua, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Juswara, Lina; Schuiteman, André; Droissart, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Bulbophyllum leucoglossum, Dendrobium centrosepalum, Dendrobium taeniocaule, and Taeniophyllum pyriforme are here described as new species, based on herbarium specimens collected from the Lengguru fold-and-thrust belt in the West Papua Bird's neck, Indonesian New Guinea. All four novelties were found growing in submontane forest (elevation > 1000 m a.s.l.) on limestone karst. Information concerning the distribution and habitat for these taxa is provided along with diagnostic features, line drawings, high resolution photographs, and a map of collecting localities. More field studies are required to find additional populations of these new species, in order to better characterize their habitat, ecology and conservation status. PMID:27081349

  2. Four new orchid species from the Lengguru fold belt, West Papua, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Juswara, Lina; Schuiteman, André; Droissart, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bulbophyllum leucoglossum, Dendrobium centrosepalum, Dendrobium taeniocaule, and Taeniophyllum pyriforme are here described as new species, based on herbarium specimens collected from the Lengguru fold-and-thrust belt in the West Papua Bird’s neck, Indonesian New Guinea. All four novelties were found growing in submontane forest (elevation > 1000 m a.s.l.) on limestone karst. Information concerning the distribution and habitat for these taxa is provided along with diagnostic features, line drawings, high resolution photographs, and a map of collecting localities. More field studies are required to find additional populations of these new species, in order to better characterize their habitat, ecology and conservation status. PMID:27081349

  3. Two mycoheterotrophic orchids from Thailand tropical dipterocarpacean forests associate with a broad diversity of ectomycorrhizal fungi

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Mélanie; Watthana, Santi; Stier, Anna; Richard, Franck; Vessabutr, Suyanee; Selosse, Marc-André

    2009-01-01

    Background Mycoheterotrophic plants are considered to associate very specifically with fungi. Mycoheterotrophic orchids are mostly associated with ectomycorrhizal fungi in temperate regions, or with saprobes or parasites in tropical regions. Although most mycoheterotrophic orchids occur in the tropics, few studies have been devoted to them, and the main conclusions about their specificity have hitherto been drawn from their association with ectomycorrhizal fungi in temperate regions. Results We investigated three Asiatic Neottieae species from ectomycorrhizal forests in Thailand. We found that all were associated with ectomycorrhizal fungi, such as Thelephoraceae, Russulaceae and Sebacinales. Based on 13C enrichment of their biomass, they probably received their organic carbon from these fungi, as do mycoheterotrophic Neottieae from temperate regions. Moreover, 13C enrichment suggested that some nearby green orchids received part of their carbon from fungi too. Nevertheless, two of the three orchids presented a unique feature for mycoheterotrophic plants: they were not specifically associated with a narrow clade of fungi. Some orchid individuals were even associated with up to nine different fungi. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that some green and mycoheterotrophic orchids in tropical regions can receive carbon from ectomycorrhizal fungi, and thus from trees. Our results reveal the absence of specificity in two mycoheterotrophic orchid-fungus associations in tropical regions, in contrast to most previous studies of mycoheterotrophic plants, which have been mainly focused on temperate orchids. PMID:19682351

  4. Mycorrhizal fungal diversity and community composition in a lithophytic and epiphytic orchid.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xiaoke; Gai, Xuege; Liu, Qiang; Hart, Miranda M; Guo, Shunxing

    2015-05-01

    Some orchid species are present as epiphytes and lithophytes in the same habitat, but little is known about the differences of their mycorrhizal fungal communities. We used Coelogyne viscosa, which occurs both as an epiphyte and a lithophyte, as a study system to investigate orchid mycorrhizal fungal communities in lithophytes and epiphytes in Xishuangbanna National Nature Reserve (Yunnan Province, China). Twenty-three fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from 18 sampling sites were identified. Results indicated that mycorrhizal fungal community composition was different between epi- and lithophytes. When we analyzed the Tulasnellaceae and Sebacinales communities separately, we found that the Sebacinales fungal communities were significantly different in the two growth habitats, but the Tulasnellaceae fungal communities were not. Our results provide evidence for distinct orchid mycorrhiza fungal communities depending on the growth habitat of the orchid. Consistent with some recent investigations of mycorrhizal fungus community composition, this study suggests that for one orchid, growth habitat affects mycorrhizal symbioses. PMID:25319065

  5. On the success of a swindle: pollination by deception in orchids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiestl, Florian P.

    2005-06-01

    A standing enigma in pollination ecology is the evolution of pollinator attraction without offering reward in about one third of all orchid species. Here I review concepts of pollination by deception, and in particular recent findings in the pollination syndromes of food deception and sexual deception in orchids. Deceptive orchids mimic floral signals of rewarding plants (food deception) or mating signals of receptive females (sexual deception) to attract pollen vectors. In some food deceptive orchids, similarities in the spectral reflectance visible to the pollinator in a model plant and its mimic, and increased reproductive success of the mimic in the presence of the model have been demonstrated. Other species do not mimic specific model plants but attract pollinators with general attractive floral signals. In sexually deceptive orchids, floral odor is the key trait for pollinator attraction, and behaviorally active compounds in the orchids are identical to the sex pheromone of the pollinator species. Deceptive orchids often show high variability in floral signals, which may be maintained by negative frequency-dependent selection, since pollinators can learn and subsequently avoid common deceptive morphs more quickly than rare ones. The evolution of obligate deception in orchids seems paradoxical in the light of the typically lower fruit set than in rewarding species. Pollination by deception, however, can reduce self-pollination and encourage pollen flow over longer distances, thus promoting outbreeding. Although some food deceptive orchids are isolated through postzygotic reproductive barriers, sexually deceptive orchids lack post-mating barriers and species isolation is achieved via specific pollinator attraction. Recent population genetic and phylogenetic investigations suggest gene-flow within subgeneric clades, but pollinator-mediated selection may maintain species-specific floral traits.

  6. A polysaccharide from Dendrobium huoshanense prevents hepatic inflammatory response caused by carbon tetrachloride

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Chang-Cheng; Zha, Xue-Qiang; Luo, Jian-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Dendrobium huoshanense is a precious herbal medicine in China, which exhibits a variety of restorative and therapeutic effects. This study aimed at investigating the hepatoprotective effects of a polysaccharide (DHP1A) isolated from D. huoshanense via water extraction, diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) cellulose anion exchange and size exclusion chromatography. The animal experiment indicated that the oral administration of DHP1A obviously reduced the levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine in the serum of mice treated with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), suggesting the hepatoprotective potential of this polysaccharide. Moreover, DHP1A decreased the expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, CD68 and phosphorylated IκBα (p-IκBα) in the CCl4-treated mice. These results revealed that the hepatoprotective effect of DHP1A was partly attributed to its anti-inflammatory action. PMID:26019626

  7. [Elucidating hypoglycemic mechanism of Dendrobium nobile through auxiliary elucidation system for traditional Chinese medicine mechanism].

    PubMed

    Li, Man-man; Zhang, Bai-xia; He, Shuai-bing; Zheng, Rao; Zhang, Yan-ling; Wang, Yun

    2015-10-01

    To build the Dendrobium nobile -T2DM network, and elucidate the molecular mechanism of D. nobile to type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Collect the chemical composition of D. nobile and the targets on T2DM by retrieving database and documents, build the network of D. nobile to T2DM using the entity grammar systems inference rules. The molecular mechanism of D. nobile to T2DM includes: (1) regulating lipid metabolism by lowering triglyceride; (2) reducing insulin resistance; (3) protecting islet cells; (4) promoting the glucose-dependent insulin tropic peptide (GIP) secretion; (5) inhibiting calcium channel. Under the guidance of network pharmacology, through entity grammar systems inference rules we elucidate the molecular mechanism of D. nobile to T2DM, and provide the basis for the further development of health care products based on D. nobile. PMID:26975089

  8. [Study on suitable harvest time of Dendrobium officinale in Yunnan province].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shan-bao; Zhou, Ke-jun; Zhang, Zhen; Lu, Rui-rui; Li, Xian; Li, Xiao-hua

    2015-09-01

    In order to determine the suitable harvest time of Dendrobium officinale from different regions in Yunnan province, the drying rate, mannose and glucose peak area ratio, extract, contents of polysaccharide and mannose of D. officinale samples collected from six producing areas in Ynnnan province were determined. The results indicate that drying rate and the contents of polysaccharide and mannose arrived the peak from January to April, extract reached a higher content from September to December, and mannose and glucose peak area ratio from October to February of the coming met the requirment of the Chinese Pharmacopoeia. Hence, the suitable harvesting time of D. officinale in Yunnan province is from December to February of the coming year,according to the experimental results and the request of the Chinese Pharmacopoeia. PMID:26983198

  9. Bioactive Phenanthrene and Bibenzyl Derivatives from the Stems of Dendrobium nobile.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xue-Ming; Zheng, Cai-Juan; Gan, Li-She; Chen, Guang-Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Song, Xiao-Ping; Li, Gao-Nan; Sun, Chong-Ge

    2016-07-22

    A new enantiomeric pair of spirodiketones, (+)- and (-)-denobilone A (1 and 2), three new phenanthrene derivatives (3-5), and three new biphenanthrenes (22-24), along with 11 known phenanthrene derivatives (6-16), five known bibenzyl derivatives (17-21), and four known biphenanthrenes (25-28), were isolated from Dendrobium nobile. The structures of 1-5 and 22-24 were elucidated using comprehensive spectroscopic methods. (+)-Denobilone and (-)-denobilone A (1 and 2) were isolated as a pair of enantiomers by chiral HPLC. The absolute configurations of (+)- and (-)-denobilone A (1 and 2) were determined by comparing their experimental and calculated electronic circular dichroism spectra. The absolute configuration of denobilone B (3) was determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The inhibitory activities of all compounds against nine phytopathogenic fungi and three cancer cell lines were evaluated. PMID:27310249

  10. [Effects of tree species on polysaccharides content of epiphytic Dendrobium officinale].

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying-Ying; Zhu, Yan; Si, Jin-Ping; Liu, Jing-Jing; Wu, Cheng-Yong; Li, Hui

    2014-11-01

    To reveals the effects of tree species on polysaccharides content of epiphytic Dendrobium officinale. The polysaccharides content of D. officinale attached to living tress in wild or stumps in bionic-facility was determined by phenol-sulfuric acid method. There were extremely significant differences of polysaccharides content of D. officinale attached to different tree species, but the differences had no relationship with the form and nutrition of barks. The polysaccharides content of D. officinale mainly affected by the light intensity of environment, so reasonable illumination favored the accumulation of polysaccharides. Various polysaccharides content of D. officinal from different attached trees is due to the difference of light regulation, but not the form and nutrition of barks. PMID:25775797

  11. Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Structural Identification of Sesquiterpene Alkaloids from the Stems of Dendrobium nobile Using LC-QToF.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Hong; Avula, Bharathi; Abe, Naohito; Wei, Feng; Wang, Mei; Ma, Shuang-Cheng; Ali, Zulfiqar; Elsohly, Mahmoud A; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2016-05-01

    Dendrobium nobile is one of the fundamental herbs in traditional Chinese medicine. Sesquiterpene alkaloids are the main active components in this plant. Due to weak ultraviolet absorption and low content in D. nobile, these sesquiterpene alkaloids have not been extensively studied using chromatographic methods. Herein, tandem mass spectrometry combined with liquid chromatography separation provides a tool for the identification and characterization of the alkaloids from D. nobile. A total of nine sesquiterpene alkaloids were characterized by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. These alkaloids can be classified into two subgroups that are represented by dendrobine and nobilonine. Tandem mass spectrometric studies revealed the fragmentation pathways of these two subgroup alkaloids that were used for the identification and characterization of other alkaloids in D. nobile. Characterization of these alkaloids using accurate mass and diagnostic fragments provided a reliable methodology for the analysis of D. nobile by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The limit of detection was defined as the signal-to-noise ratio equal to 3 : 1. Limits of detection of dendrobine and nobilonine were less than 30 ng/mL. The developed method was applied for the analysis of various Dendrobium species and related dietary supplements. Alkaloids were identified from D. nobile, but not detected from commercial samples including 13 other Dendrobium species and the 7 dietary supplements. PMID:27054915

  12. Orchid Species Richness along Elevational and Environmental Gradients in Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi-Bao; Chen, Wen-Yun; Huang, Jia-Lin; Bi, Ying-Feng; Yang, Xue-Fei

    2015-01-01

    The family Orchidaceae is not only one of the most diverse families of flowering plants, but also one of the most endangered plant taxa. Therefore, understanding how its species richness varies along geographical and environmental gradients is essential for conservation efforts. However, such knowledge is rarely available, especially on a large scale. We used a database extracted from herbarium records to investigate the relationships between orchid species richness and elevation, and to examine how elevational diversity in Yunnan Province, China, might be explained by mid-domain effect (MDE), species-area relationship (SAR), water-energy dynamics (WED), Rapoport's Rule, and climatic variables. This particular location was selected because it is one of the primary centers of distribution for orchids. We recorded 691 species that span 127 genera and account for 88.59% of all confirmed orchid species in Yunnan. Species richness, estimated at 200-m intervals along a slope, was closely correlated with elevation, peaking at 1395 to 1723 m. The elevational pattern of orchid richness was considerably shaped by MDE, SAR, WED, and climate. Among those four predictors, climate was the strongest while MDE was the weakest for predicting the elevational pattern of orchid richness. Species richness showed parabolic responses to mean annual temperature (MAT) and mean annual precipitation (MAP), with maximum richness values recorded at 13.7 to 17.7°C for MAT and 1237 to 1414 mm for MAP. Rapoport's Rule also helped to explain the elevational pattern of species richness in Yunnan, but those influences were not entirely uniform across all methods. These results suggested that the elevational pattern of orchid species richness in Yunnan is collectively shaped by several mechanisms related to geometric constraints, size of the land area, and environments. Because of the dominant role of climate in determining orchid richness, our findings may contribute to a better understanding of

  13. Mycorrhizal preference promotes habitat invasion by a native Australian orchid: Microtis media

    PubMed Central

    De Long, Jonathan R.; Swarts, Nigel D.; Dixon, Kingsley W.; Egerton-Warburton, Louise M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Mycorrhizal specialization has been shown to limit recruitment capacity in orchids, but an increasing number of orchids are being documented as invasive or weed-like. The reasons for this proliferation were examined by investigating mycorrhizal fungi and edaphic correlates of Microtis media, an Australian terrestrial orchid that is an aggressive ecosystem and horticultural weed. Methods Molecular identification of fungi cultivated from M. media pelotons, symbiotic in vitro M. media seed germination assays, ex situ fungal baiting of M. media and co-occurring orchid taxa (Caladenia arenicola, Pterostylis sanguinea and Diuris magnifica) and soil physical and chemical analyses were undertaken. Key Results It was found that: (1) M. media associates with a broad taxonomic spectrum of mycobionts including Piriformospora indica, Sebacina vermifera, Tulasnella calospora and Ceratobasidium sp.; (2) germination efficacy of mycorrhizal isolates was greater for fungi isolated from plants in disturbed than in natural habitats; (3) a higher percentage of M. media seeds germinate than D. magnifica, P. sanguinea or C. arenicola seeds when incubated with soil from M. media roots; and (4) M. media–mycorrhizal fungal associations show an unusual breadth of habitat tolerance, especially for soil phosphorus (P) fertility. Conclusions The findings in M. media support the idea that invasive terrestrial orchids may associate with a diversity of fungi that are widespread and common, enhance seed germination in the host plant but not co-occurring orchid species and tolerate a range of habitats. These traits may provide the weedy orchid with a competitive advantage over co-occurring orchid species. If so, invasive orchids are likely to become more broadly distributed and increasingly colonize novel habitats. PMID:23275632

  14. Phylogeny and biology of neotropical orchid bees (Euglossini).

    PubMed

    Cameron, Sydney A

    2004-01-01

    Orchid bees (Euglossini), noted for their brilliant iridescence, are elusive pollinators throughout the American tropics. Males are especially important in the pollination of some orchids, from which they collect aromatic fragrances thought to play a role in territorial display and courtship. The tribe contains approximately 190 described species divided among five genera, distributed from Mexico to central Argentina. Relatively intense study of their biology in the 1960s through the mid-1980s shed light on their nesting biology, chemical ecology, and classification. Vigorous taxonomic research led to the naming of many new species, revisions, and checklists, but phylogenetic studies were scarce. In the two decades following the last comprehensive review, phylogenetic research has resulted in new hypotheses of generic relationships, and further examination of male display has led to additional interpretations. Females in natural and artificial nesting cavities have revealed social interactions and additional details of parasitism within the nest. This review emphasizes areas in need of more study, particularly phylogeny, phylogeography, chemosensory ecology, and comparative behavior, and highlights how historical context can guide future research. PMID:14651469

  15. Functional Expression of an Orchid Fragrance Gene in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Adelene Ai Lian; Abdullah, Janna O.; Abdullah, Mohd Puad; Shafee, Norazizah; Rahim, Raha A.

    2012-01-01

    Vanda Mimi Palmer (VMP), an orchid hybrid of Vanda tesselata and Vanda Tan Chay Yan is a highly scented tropical orchid which blooms all year round. Previous studies revealed that VMP produces a variety of isoprenoid volatiles during daylight. Isoprenoids are well known to contribute significantly to the scent of most fragrant plants. They are a large group of secondary metabolites which may possess valuable characteristics such as flavor, fragrance and toxicity and are produced via two pathways, the mevalonate (MVA) pathway or/and the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. In this study, a sesquiterpene synthase gene denoted VMPSTS, previously isolated from a floral cDNA library of VMP was cloned and expressed in Lactococcus lactis to characterize the functionality of the protein. L. lactis, a food grade bacterium which utilizes the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid production was found to be a suitable host for the characterization of plant terpene synthases. Through recombinant expression of VMPSTS, it was revealed that VMPSTS produced multiple sesquiterpenes and germacrene D dominates its profile. PMID:22408409

  16. Functional expression of an orchid fragrance gene in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Song, Adelene Ai Lian; Abdullah, Janna O; Abdullah, Mohd Puad; Shafee, Norazizah; Rahim, Raha A

    2012-01-01

    Vanda Mimi Palmer (VMP), an orchid hybrid of Vanda tesselata and Vanda Tan Chay Yan is a highly scented tropical orchid which blooms all year round. Previous studies revealed that VMP produces a variety of isoprenoid volatiles during daylight. Isoprenoids are well known to contribute significantly to the scent of most fragrant plants. They are a large group of secondary metabolites which may possess valuable characteristics such as flavor, fragrance and toxicity and are produced via two pathways, the mevalonate (MVA) pathway or/and the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. In this study, a sesquiterpene synthase gene denoted VMPSTS, previously isolated from a floral cDNA library of VMP was cloned and expressed in Lactococcus lactis to characterize the functionality of the protein. L. lactis, a food grade bacterium which utilizes the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid production was found to be a suitable host for the characterization of plant terpene synthases. Through recombinant expression of VMPSTS, it was revealed that VMPSTS produced multiple sesquiterpenes and germacrene D dominates its profile. PMID:22408409

  17. Orchid biology: from Linnaeus via Darwin to the 21st century

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Michael F.; Chase, Mark W.

    2009-01-01

    Orchidaceae are the largest family of flowering plants, with at least 24 000 species, and perhaps better than any other family of flowering plants, orchids represent the extreme specializations that are possible. As a result, they have long fascinated luminaries of the botanical world including Linnaeus and Darwin, but the size of the family has historically been an impediment to their study. Specifically, the lack of detailed information about relationships within the family made it difficult to formulate explicit evolutionary hypotheses for such a large group, but the advent of molecular systematics has revolutionized our understanding of the orchids. Their complex life histories make orchids particularly vulnerable to environmental change, and as result many are now threatened with extinction. In this Special Issue we present a series of 20 papers on orchid biology ranging from phylogenetics, floral evolutionary development, taxonomy, mycorrhizal associations, pollination biology, population genetics and conservation. PMID:19654223

  18. Are orchid bees at risk? First comparative survey suggests declining populations of forest-dependent species.

    PubMed

    Nemésio, A

    2013-05-01

    The two largest Atlantic Forest remnants in the state of Espírito Santo, eastern Brazil, namely 'Reserva Biológica de Sooretama' (REBIO Sooretama) and 'Reserva Natural Vale' (RNV), were surveyed for their orchid-bee faunas. Seventeen scent baits were used to attract orchid-bee males. Three-thousand, two hundred and twenty-five males belonging to 24 species were actively collected with insect nets during 100 hours in March, April and December, 2009. In comparison with a previous study in the same area twelve years before, it is evident that the abundance of all forest-dependent orchid bees analysed declined around 50%, and it was statistically significant (P = 0.022) for Euglossa marianae Nemésio, 2011, the most sensitive to anthropogenic disturbances of all Atlantic Forest orchid bees. On the other hand, the abundance of populations of species tolerant to open or disturbed areas rose. Possible explanations are discussed. PMID:23917564

  19. Taxonomic turmoil down-under: recent developments in Australian orchid systematics

    PubMed Central

    Hopper, Stephen D.

    2009-01-01

    Background The issue of determining the most appropriate rank for each accepted taxon fuels ongoing controversy throughout systematics. The particularly marked escalation of such issues in modern Australian orchid systematics merits examination, not only because of wider implications in taxonomy but also because of direct effects on studies of comparative biology and conservation management. Scope This paper briefly reviews the causes of recent taxonomic turmoil for Australian orchids and outlines new research opportunities and conservation implications arising from an improved understanding of their molecular phylogenetics. Conclusions DNA sequencing and intensified field work have contributed towards a much improved understanding of Australian orchid systematics. Great progress has been made in discerning monophyletic groups or clades. Fresh interpretations of morphological evolution have been made possible by comparisons with the results of DNA analyses. Significant conceptual shifts from polymorphic species concepts to biological and phylogenetic concepts have also elevated the discovery and description of new species. Consequently, over the past decade, the number of Australian orchid species recognized by taxonomists has risen from approx. 900 to 1200. Similarly, the number of genera recognized by some taxonomists has increased from 110 to 192, resulting in 45% of Australian species/subspecies being assigned a new generic epithet since 2000. At higher taxonomic levels, much of the recent controversy in Australian orchid systematics reflects a divergence in views about where to split and assign formal names within unequivocally monophyletic groups. Differences regarding typification in the case of Caladenia have added additional confusion and complexity. However, new insights into and research opportunities concerning speciation processes in orchids have arisen from the wealth of new data and discrimination of species. Robustly supported molecular analyses of

  20. Mixotrophy of Platanthera minor, an orchid associated with ectomycorrhiza-forming Ceratobasidiaceae fungi.

    PubMed

    Yagame, Takahiro; Orihara, Takamichi; Selosse, Marc-André; Yamato, Masahide; Iwase, Koji

    2012-01-01

    • We investigated the fungal symbionts and carbon nutrition of a Japanese forest photosynthetic orchid, Platanthera minor, whose ecology suggests a mixotrophic syndrome, that is, a mycorrhizal association with ectomycorrhiza (ECM)-forming fungi and partial exploitation of fungal carbon. • We performed molecular identification of symbionts by PCR amplifications of the fungal ribosomal DNA on hyphal coils extracted from P. minor roots. We tested for a (13)C and (15)N enrichment characteristic of mixotrophic plants. We also tested the ectomycorrhizal abilities of orchid symbionts using a new protocol of direct inoculation of hyphal coils onto roots of Pinus densiflora seedlings. • In phylogenetic analyses, most isolated fungi were close to ECM-forming Ceratobasidiaceae clades previously detected from a few fully heterotrophic orchids or environmental ectomycorrhiza surveys. The direct inoculation of fungal coils of these fungi resulted in ectomycorrhiza formation on P. densiflora seedlings. Stable isotope analyses indicated mixotrophic nutrition of P. minor, with fungal carbon contributing from 50% to 65%. • This is the first evidence of photosynthetic orchids associated with ectomycorrhizal Ceratobasidiaceae taxa, confirming the evolution of mixotrophy in the Orchideae orchid tribe, and of ectomycorrhizal abilities in the Ceratobasidiaceae. Our new ectomycorrhiza formation technique may enhance the study of unculturable orchid mycorrhizal fungi. PMID:21995447

  1. Trait evolution in the slipper orchid paphiopedilum (Orchidaceae) in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng-Ping; Huang, Jia-Lin; Zhang, Shi-Bao

    2016-01-01

    The well-known orchid genus Paphiopedilum has attracted much attention from biologists because of its diverse floral traits. Although these traits have been thoroughly described, little is known about their evolutionary trajectory. In this study, we explored their evolutionary patterns and trajectory through phylogenetic analyses and close observations, and 10 characters in 21 Chinese species mapped onto an existing phylogenetic tree. Lip shape, staminode shape, petal shape, and petal width are relatively congruent with molecular phylogenies, thereby validating the existing traditional classification system. All four of those characters, along with flower number, are strongly conserved, and are significantly affected by phylogeny. By contrast, flower color (including that of the dorsal sepal, lip, and petal) is significantly convergent among those examined species and less affected by phylogeny. Therefore, this character is independent of evolution and mainly influenced by environmental factors. All of these characters are key, classical indicators when distinguishing among species within the subgenera Brachypetalum and Paphiopedilum. PMID:26855188

  2. Cuticular Hydrocarbons of Orchid Bees Males: Interspecific and Chemotaxonomy Variation

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Aline Borba; do Nascimento, Fábio Santos

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have investigated the composition of compounds that cover the cuticle in social insects, but few studies have focused on solitary bees. Cuticular hydrocarbons may provide a tool for chemotaxonomy, and perhaps they can be used as a complement to morphology and genetic characters in phylogenetic studies. Orchid bees (Tribe Euglossini) are a highly diverse group of Neotropical bees with more than 200 species. Here, the cuticular hydrocarbons of 17 species were identified and statistical analysis revealed 108 compounds, which allowed for the taxonomic classification according to the genera. The most significant compounds discriminating the four genera were (Z)-9-pentacosene, (Z,Z)-pentatriacontene-3, (Z)-9-tricosene, and (Z)-9-heptacosene. The analyses demonstrated the potential use of CHCs to identify different species. PMID:26713612

  3. Trait evolution in the slipper orchid Paphiopedilum (Orchidaceae) in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng-Ping; Huang, Jia-Lin; Zhang, Shi-Bao

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The well-known orchid genus Paphiopedilum has attracted much attention from biologists because of its diverse floral traits. Although these traits have been thoroughly described, little is known about their evolutionary trajectory. In this study, we explored their evolutionary patterns and trajectory through phylogenetic analyses and close observations, and 10 characters in 21 Chinese species mapped onto an existing phylogenetic tree. Lip shape, staminode shape, petal shape, and petal width are relatively congruent with molecular phylogenies, thereby validating the existing traditional classification system. All four of those characters, along with flower number, are strongly conserved, and are significantly affected by phylogeny. By contrast, flower color (including that of the dorsal sepal, lip, and petal) is significantly convergent among those examined species and less affected by phylogeny. Therefore, this character is independent of evolution and mainly influenced by environmental factors. All of these characters are key, classical indicators when distinguishing among species within the subgenera Brachypetalum and Paphiopedilum. PMID:26855188

  4. Olfactory specialization for perfume collection in male orchid bees.

    PubMed

    Mitko, Lukasz; Weber, Marjorie G; Ramirez, Santiago R; Hedenström, Erik; Wcislo, William T; Eltz, Thomas

    2016-05-15

    Insects rely on the olfactory system to detect a vast diversity of airborne molecules in their environment. Highly sensitive olfactory tuning is expected to evolve when detection of a particular chemical with great precision is required in the context of foraging and/or finding mates. Male neotropical orchid bees (Euglossini) collect odoriferous substances from multiple sources, store them in specialized tibial pouches and later expose them at display sites, presumably as mating signals to females. Previous analysis of tibial compounds among sympatric species revealed substantial chemical disparity in chemical composition among lineages with outstanding divergence between closely related species. Here, we tested whether specific perfume phenotypes coevolve with matching olfactory adaptations in male orchid bees to facilitate the location and harvest of species-specific perfume compounds. We conducted electroantennographic (EAG) measurements on males of 15 sympatric species in the genus Euglossa that were stimulated with 18 compounds present in variable proportions in male hind tibiae. Antennal response profiles were species-specific across all 15 species, but there was no conspicuous differentiation between closely related species. Instead, we found that the observed variation in EAG activity follows a Brownian motion model of trait evolution, where the probability of differentiation increases proportionally with lineage divergence time. However, we identified strong antennal responses for some chemicals that are present as major compounds in the perfume of the same species, thus suggesting that sensory specialization has occurred within multiple lineages. This sensory specialization was particularly apparent for semi-volatile molecules ('base note' compounds), thus supporting the idea that such compounds play an important role in chemical signaling of euglossine bees. Overall, our study found no close correspondence between antennal responses and behavioral

  5. Phytotoxic activity of bibenzyl derivatives from the orchid Epidendrum rigidum.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Romero, Yanet; Acevedo, Laura; Sánchez, María de los Angeles; Shier, W Thomas; Abbas, Hamed K; Mata, Rachel

    2005-08-10

    A whole plant chloroform-methanol extract of the orchid Epidendrum rigidum inhibited radicle growth of Amaranthus hypochondriacus seedlings (IC50 = 300 microg/mL). Bioassay-guided fractionation furnished four phytotoxins, namely, gigantol (1), batatasin III (2), 2,3-dimethoxy-9,10-dihydrophenathrene-4,7-diol (9), and 3,4,9-trimethoxyphenanthrene-2,5-diol (11), along with the known flavonoids apigenin, vitexin, and isovetin and the triterterpenoids 24,24-dimethyl-9,19-cyclolanostane-25-en-3beta-ol (14) and 24-methyl-9,19-cyclolanostane-25-en-3beta-ol (15). Stilbenoids 1, 2, 9, and 11 inhibited radicle growth of A. hypochondriacus with IC50 values of 0.65, 0.1, 0.12, and 5.9 microM, respectively. Foliar application of gigantol (1) at 1 microM to 4 week old seedlings of A. hypochondriacus reduced shoot elongation by 69% and fresh weight accumulation by 54%. Bibenzyls 1 and 2, as well as synthetic analogues 4'-hydroxy-3,3',5-trimethoxybibenzyl (3), 3,3',4',5-tetramethoxybibenzyl (4), 3,4'-dihydroxy-5-methoxybibenzyl (5), 3'-O-methylbatatasin III (6), 3,3',5-trihydroxybibenzyl (7), and 3,4',5-trihydroxybibenzyl (8), were tested for phytotoxicity in axenic cultures of the small aquatic plant Lemna pausicostata. All bibenzyls derivatives except 7 and 8 inhibited growth and increased cellular leakage with IC50 values of 89.9-180 and 89.9-166 microM, respectively. The natural and synthetic bibenzyls showed marginal cytotoxicity on animal cells. The results suggest that orchid bibenzyls may be good lead compounds for the development of novel herbicidal agents. PMID:16076106

  6. Orchid-pollinator interactions and potential vulnerability to biological invasion.

    PubMed

    Chupp, Adam D; Battaglia, Loretta L; Schauber, Eric M; Sipes, Sedonia D

    2015-01-01

    Mutualistic relationships between plants and their pollinators have played a major role in the evolution of biodiversity. While the vulnerability of these relationships to environmental change is a major concern, studies often lack a framework for predicting impacts from emerging threats (e.g. biological invasions). The objective of this study was to determine the reliance of Platanthera ciliaris (orange-fringed orchid) on Papilio palamedes (Palamedes swallowtail butterfly) for pollination and the relative availability of alternative pollinators. Recent declines of P. palamedes larval host plants due to laurel wilt disease (LWD) could endanger P. ciliaris populations that rely heavily on this butterfly for pollination. We monitored pollinator visitation and fruit set and measured nectar spur lengths of P. ciliaris flowers and proboscis lengths of its floral visitors in Jackson County, MS, USA. Papilio palamedes was the primary visitor with minimal visitation by Phoebis sennae (cloudless sulfur butterfly). Lengths of P. ciliaris nectar spurs were similar to proboscis lengths of both pollinator species. Fruit set was moderate with access to pollinators (55 ± 10.8 %), yet failed (0 %) when pollinators were excluded. Visitation increased with inflorescence size, but there was no such pattern in fruit set, indicating that fruit set was not limited by pollinator visitation within the range of visitation rates we observed. Our results are supported by historical data that suggest P. palamedes and P. sennae are important pollinators of P. ciliaris. Although P. sennae may provide supplemental pollination service, this is likely constrained by habitat preferences that do not always overlap with those of P. cilaris. Observed declines of P. palamedes due to LWD could severely limit the reproductive success and persistence of P. ciliaris and similar orchid species populations. This empirical-based prediction is among the first to document exotic forest pests and pathogens as

  7. Species distribution modelling for conservation of an endangered endemic orchid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsiao-Hsuan; Wonkka, Carissa L.; Treglia, Michael L.; Grant, William E.; Smeins, Fred E.; Rogers, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Concerns regarding the long-term viability of threatened and endangered plant species are increasingly warranted given the potential impacts of climate change and habitat fragmentation on unstable and isolated populations. Orchidaceae is the largest and most diverse family of flowering plants, but it is currently facing unprecedented risks of extinction. Despite substantial conservation emphasis on rare orchids, populations continue to decline. Spiranthes parksii (Navasota ladies' tresses) is a federally and state-listed endangered terrestrial orchid endemic to central Texas. Hence, we aimed to identify potential factors influencing the distribution of the species, quantify the relative importance of each factor and determine suitable habitat for future surveys and targeted conservation efforts. We analysed several geo-referenced variables describing climatic conditions and landscape features to identify potential factors influencing the likelihood of occurrence of S. parksii using boosted regression trees. Our model classified 97 % of the cells correctly with regard to species presence and absence, and indicated that probability of existence was correlated with climatic conditions and landscape features. The most influential variables were mean annual precipitation, mean elevation, mean annual minimum temperature and mean annual maximum temperature. The most likely suitable range for S. parksii was the eastern portions of Leon and Madison Counties, the southern portion of Brazos County, a portion of northern Grimes County and along the borders between Burleson and Washington Counties. Our model can assist in the development of an integrated conservation strategy through: (i) focussing future survey and research efforts on areas with a high likelihood of occurrence, (ii) aiding in selection of areas for conservation and restoration and (iii) framing future research questions including those necessary for predicting responses to climate change. Our model could also

  8. Recent advances in traditional plant drugs and orchids.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jin-Ming; Goh, Ngoh-Khang; Chia, Lian-Sai; Chia, Tet-Fatt

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to review recent advances in plant drug research and developments in orchid study, in an attempt to provide useful references for plant drug studies. Plants have been used as medicine for millennia. Out of estimated 250 000 to 350 000 plant species identified so far, about 35 000 are used worldwide for medicinal purposes. It has been confirmed by WHO that herbal medicines serve the health needs of about 80 percent of the world's population; especially for millions of people in the vast rural areas of developing countries. Meanwhile, consumers in developed countries are becoming disillusioned with modern healthcare and are seeking alternatives. The recent resurgence of plant remedies results from several factors: 1) the effectiveness of plant medicines; 2) the side effect of most modern drugs; and 3) the development of science and technology. It has been estimated that in the mid-1990s over 200 companies and research organizations worldwide are screening plant and animal compounds for medicinal properties. Actually, several important drugs used in modern medicine have come from medicinal plant studies, eg, taxol/paclitaxel, vinblastine, vincristine, topotecan, irinotecan, etoposide, teniposide, etc. As for drugs derived from orchids, some novel discoveries, both in phytochemical and pharmacological properties, were reported by some universities. However, studies on plants are very limited. Only about a third of the million or so species of higher plants have been identified and named by scientists. Of those named, only a tiny fraction has been studied. Nowadays the linking of the indigenous knowledge of medicinal plants to modern research activities provides a new approach, which makes the rate of discovery of drugs much more effective than with random collection. PMID:12511224

  9. [Variation of polysaccharides and alcohol-soluble extracts content of Dendrobium officinale].

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiao-xian; Guo, Ying-ying; Si, Jin-ping; Wu, Ling-shang; Wang, Lin-hua

    2014-12-01

    To reveal the variation of polysaccharides and alcohol-soluble extract contents of Dendrobium officinale, the polysaccharides and alcohol-soluble extracts contents of three D. officinale strains were determined by phenol-sulfuric acid method and hot-dip method, respectively. The results showed that the contents of polysaccharides and alcohol-soluble extracts and their total content were significantly different among D. officinale samples collected in different periods, and the variations were closely related to the phenology of D. officinale. Additionally, the quality variation of polysaccharides was closely related to the flowering of D. officinale, while the alcohol-soluble extracts was closely associated to the formation and germination of buds. According to the dynamic variation of these two compounds, it is more reasonable to harvest D. officinale at biennials pre-bloom than at specific harvesting month considering polysaccharides content. It is better to harvest before the germination of buds considering alcohol-soluble extracts. While with regards to both polysaccharides and alcohol-soluble extract, it is better to harvest this plant at the period from the sprouting to pre-bloom next year. PMID:25898575

  10. Polysaccharide of Dendrobium huoshanense activates macrophages via toll-like receptor 4-mediated signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Xie, Song-Zi; Hao, Ran; Zha, Xue-Qiang; Pan, Li-Hua; Liu, Jian; Luo, Jian-Ping

    2016-08-01

    The present work aimed at investigating the pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and immunostimulatory mechanism of a purified Dendrobium huoshanense polysaccharide (DHP). We found that DHP could bind to the surface of macrophages and stimulate macrophages to secrete NO, TNF-α and IL-1β. To unravel the mechanism for the binding of DHP to macrophages, flow cytometry, confocal laser-scanning microscopy, affinity electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE and western blotting were employed to verify the type of PRR responsible for the recognition of DHP by RAW264.7 macrophages and peritoneal macrophages of C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ macrophages. Results showed that toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) was an essential receptor for macrophages to directly bind DHP. Further, the phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, Akt and p38 were observed to be time-dependently promoted by DHP, as well as the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65. These results suggest that DHP activates macrophages via its direct binding to TLR4 to trigger TLR4 signaling pathways. PMID:27112877

  11. Dendrobium officinale Prevents Early Complications in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shao-Zhen; Liang, Chu-Yan; Liu, Hua-Zhen; Zhu, Dong-Mei; Wu, Ya-Yun; Liang, Jian; Zhao, Ya; Guo, Jian-Ru; Huang, Song; Lai, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background. Dendrobium officinale (DO) Kimura et Migo is a precious Chinese herb that is considered beneficial for health due to its antioxidant and antidiabetes properties, and so on. In this research, we try to determine the preventive effect of DO on the early complications of STZ-induced diabetic rats. Methods. Type 1 diabetic rats were produced with a single intraperitoneal injection of STZ (50 mg/kg). DO (1 g/kg/day) was then orally administered for 5 weeks. Blood glucose, TC, TG, BUN, CREA, and GSH-PX levels were determined, and electroretinographic activity and hypoalgesia were investigated. Pathological sections of the eyes, hearts, aortas, kidneys, and livers were analyzed. Results. Treatment with DO significantly attenuated the serum levels of TC, TG, BUN, and CREA, markedly increased the amplitudes of ERG a- and b-waves and Ops, and reduced the hypoalgesia and histopathological changes of vital organs induced by hyperglycemia. The protective effect of DO in diabetic rats may be associated with its antioxidant activity, as evidenced by the marked increase in the serum level of glutathione peroxidase. However, DO had no significant effect on blood glucose levels and bodyweight of diabetic rats. Conclusions. DO supplementation is an effective treatment to prevent STZ-induced diabetic complications. PMID:27034693

  12. [Effect of strains and parts on amino acids of Dendrobium officinale].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen-peng; Guo, Ying-ying; Iu, Jing-jing; Si, Jin-ping; Wu, Ling-shang; Zhang, Xin-feng

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the paper is to reveals the variations of Dendrobium officinale amino acids in different strains and parts for breeding excellent varieties, and providing scientific basis for the expanding of medicinal or edible parts. The contents of 17 amino acids in 11 strains of D. officinale were determined by hydrochloric acid hydrolysis method. The total amino acids content of leaves was from 6.76 to 7.97 g per 100 g, and the stems was from 1.61 to 2.44 g per 100 g. As the content of amino acids in leaves was significantly higher than that of stems, and the composition was close to the ideal protein standard proposed by FAO/WHO. The leaves of D. officinale had the good prospect for the development of functional foods. The 9 x 66 strain which with high yield and polysaccharide content had the highest amino acids content both in stems and leaves, indicated crossbreeding could improve the quality of varieties. Compared the amino acids content of D. officinale in two main harvest periods, the harvest time has a significant impact on amino acids content of D. officinale. This study demonstrates that the harvesting time of D. officinale stems is suitable for leaves as well, which is the period before bolssom. PMID:26281581

  13. Intestinal immunomodulating activity and structural characterization of a new polysaccharide from stems of Dendrobium officinale.

    PubMed

    Xie, Song-Zi; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Dan-Dan; Zha, Xue-Qiang; Pan, Li-Hua; Luo, Jian-Ping

    2016-06-15

    A homogeneous polysaccharide fraction (DOP-W3-b) with a high intestinal immunomodulating activity was obtained from the stems of Dendrobium officinale through a bioactivity-guided sequential isolation procedure based on the screening of Peyer's patch-mediated immunomodulating activity. Oral administration experiments of mice showed that DOP-W3-b could effectively regulate intestinal mucosal immune activity by changing intestinal mucosal structures, promoting the secretions of cytokines from Peyer's patches (PPs) and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs), and increasing the production of secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) in the lamina propria. Structure analysis indicated that DOP-W3-b was composed of mannose and glucose in a molar ratio of 4.5 with a relatively low molecular weight of 1.543 × 10(4) Da, and its repeat unit contained a backbone consisting of β-(1→4)-d-Manp, β-(1→4)-d-Glcp and β-(1→3,6)-d-Manp residues, a branch consisting of β-(1→4)-d-Manp, β-(1→4)-d-Glcp and terminal β-d-Glcp, and O-acetyl groups attached to O-2 of β-(1→4)-d-Manp. These results suggested that DOP-W3-b was a new polysaccharide with an essential potential for modulating body's immune functions. PMID:27225227

  14. Preventive effect of Dendrobium candidum Wall. ex Lindl. on activated carbon-induced constipation in mice

    PubMed Central

    WANG, RUI; SUN, PENG; ZHOU, YALIN; ZHAO, XIN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Dendrobium candidum Wall. ex Lindl. (D. candidum) on activated carbon-induced constipation in ICR mice. ICR mice were orally administered D. candidum for 9 days. Body weight, defecation status, gastrointestinal (GI) transit and defecation times, in addition to the levels of motilin (MTL), gastrin (Gas), endothelin (ET), somatostatin (SS), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), substance P (SP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in serum were used to evaluate the preventive effects of D. candidum on constipation. The laxative drug bisacodyl acted as a positive control. The time to the first defecation of a black stool for the normal, control, bisacodyl-treated (100 mg/kg), 200 and 400 mg/kg D. candidum-treated mice was 84, 202, 126, 161 and 142 min, respectively. Following the consumption of 200 and 400 mg/kg D. candidum or bisacodyl (100 mg/kg), the GI transit was reduced to 57.7, 74.6 and 90.2%, respectively, of the transit in normal mice. The serum levels of MTL, Gas, ET, AChE, SP and VIP were significantly increased and the serum levels of SS were reduced in the mice treated with D. candidum compared with those in the untreated control mice (P<0.05). These results demonstrate that D. candidum has preventive effects on constipation in mice, and a greater functional activity was observed when a higher concentration was administered. PMID:25574235

  15. Dendrobium chrysotoxum Lindl. Alleviates Diabetic Retinopathy by Preventing Retinal Inflammation and Tight Junction Protein Decrease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zengyang; Gong, Chenyuan; Lu, Bin; Yang, Li; Sheng, Yuchen; Ji, Lili; Wang, Zhengtao

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus. This study aimed to observe the alleviation of the ethanol extract of Dendrobium chrysotoxum Lindl. (DC), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, on DR and its engaged mechanism. After DC (30 or 300 mg/kg) was orally administrated, the breakdown of blood retinal barrier (BRB) in streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic rats was attenuated by DC. Decreased retinal mRNA expression of tight junction proteins (including occludin and claudin-1) in diabetic rats was also reversed by DC. Western blot analysis and retinal immunofluorescence staining results further confirmed that DC reversed the decreased expression of occludin and claudin-1 proteins in diabetic rats. DC reduced the increased retinal mRNA expressions of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin- (IL-) 6, and IL-1β in diabetic rats. In addition, DC alleviated the increased 1 and phosphorylated p65, IκB, and IκB kinase (IKK) in diabetic rats. DC also reduced the increased serum levels of TNFα, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-6, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-12, IL-2, IL-3, and IL-10 in diabetic rats. Therefore, DC can alleviate DR by inhibiting retinal inflammation and preventing the decrease of tight junction proteins, such as occludin and claudin-1. PMID:25685822

  16. Antiproliferative effect of Dendrobium catenatum Lindley polypeptides against human liver, gastric and breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qiuping; Qiu, Daoshou; Liu, Xiaojin; Zhang, Lei; Cai, Shike; Zhang, Xuewu

    2015-05-01

    Dendrobium catenatum Lindley is a precious plant with both dietary and medicinal applications. However, the antiproliferative activity of D. catenatum-derived peptides has not been investigated. In this study, the whole proteins of D. catenatum were extracted, hydrolysis with three proteases (alcalase 2.4L, alcalase 37017 and trypsin) was performed, and gel filtration chromatography was employed to obtain nine fractions. Fraction A3 possessed the best antiproliferative activity in vitro, with percentage inhibitions of 73.38%, 78.91% and 86.8% against HepG-2, SGC-7901 and MCF-7 cancer cells, respectively, and an inhibition of only 5.52% against L-O2 normal liver cells at 500 μg mL(-1). Subsequently, mass spectrometry revealed the existence of 10 alcalase-derived peptides in fraction A3, and the sequences of the three most abundant peptides were determined by de novo sequencing as: RHPFDGPLLPPGD, RCGVNAFLPKSYLVHFGWKLLFHFD and KPEEVGGAGDRWTC. Moreover, these peptides were synthesized and their antiproliferative activities in vitro were also confirmed. This suggests that fraction A3 may be promising for use in food and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:25811957

  17. Chemical properties and antioxidant activity of a water-soluble polysaccharide from Dendrobium officinale.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qiu-Lian; Tang, Zhuan-Hui; Zhang, Xue-Feng; Zhong, Yong-Hong; Yao, Su-Zhi; Wang, Li-Sheng; Lin, Cui-Wu; Luo, Xuan

    2016-08-01

    In this report, a water-soluble polysaccharide was obtained from the dried stems of Dendrobium officinale Kimura et Migo by hot-water (70-75°C) extraction and 85% ethanol precipitation, and successively purification by DEAE-cellulose anion-exchange chromatography and gel-permeation chromatography. The D. officinale polysaccharide (DOP) has a molecular weight of 8500Da. Monosaccharide composition analysis reveals that DOP is composed of mannose, glucose, and arabinose with a trace of galacturonic acid in a molar ratio of 6.2:2.3:2.1:0.1. Periodate oxidation-smith degradation and 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy analysis suggest the predominance of mannose and glucose, and it contains a 2-O-acetylglucomannan and (1→4)-linked-β-d-mannopyranosyl and (1→4)-linked-β-d-glucopyranosyl residues. Atomic force microscope shows that DOP mainly exists as rod-shaped chains, supporting high degrees of polymerization. The antioxidant activities of the polysaccharide in vitro assay indicate that DOP has good scavenging activity of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, higher scavenging activity of hydroxyl radical, and metal chelating activities. PMID:27131730

  18. [Quantitive variation of polysaccharides and alcohol-soluble extracts in F1 generation of Dendrobium officinale].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Jing-Jing; Wu, Ling-Shang; Si, Jin-Ping; Guo, Ying-Ying; Yu, Jie; Wang, Lin-Hua

    2013-11-01

    Using phenol-sulfuric acid method and hot-dip method of alcohol-soluble extracts, the contents of polysaccharides and alcohol-soluble extracts in 11 F1 generations of Dendrobium officinale were determined. The results showed that the polysaccharides contents in samples collected in May and February were 32.89%-43.07% and 25.77%-35.25%, respectively, while the extracts contents were 2.81%-4.85% and 7.90%-17.40%, respectively. They were significantly different among families. The content of polysaccharides in offspring could be significantly improved by hybridization between parents with low and high polysaccharides contents, and the hybrid vigor was obvious. Cross breeding was an effective way for breeding new varieties with higher polysaccharides contents. Harvest time would significantly affect the contents of polysaccharides and alcohol-soluble extracts. The contents of polysaccharides in families collected in May were higher than those of polysaccharides in families collected in February, but the extracts content had the opposite variation. The extents of quantitative variation of polysaccharides and alcohol-soluble extracts were different among families, and each family had its own rules. It would be significant in giving full play to their role as the excellent varieties and increasing effectiveness by studying on the quantitative accumulation regularity of polysaccharides and alcohol-soluble extracts in superior families (varieties) of D. officinale to determine the best harvesting time. PMID:24494555

  19. [Field experiment of F1 generation and superior families selection of Dendrobium officinale].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Si, Jin-Ping; Wu, Ling-Shang; Guo, Ying-Ying; Yu, Jie; Wang, Lin-Hua

    2013-11-01

    Based on randomized block design of experiment, agronomic traits and yields of 14 F1 generations of Dendrobium officinale were determined. The results showed that the differences in agronomic traits and yields among families were significant, and the hybrid vigor was obvious. Families of 6b x 2a, 9 x 66 and 78 x 69 were selected with the remarkable superiority of yields, agronomic traits and product customization. Correlation analysis between agronomic traits and yields showed that plant height, stem diameter, leaf number, blade length and blade width were all significantly correlated with biological yields and economic yields. Among which, stem diameter, leaf number and blade length were the most significant, and an optimal linear regression model could be established. When the number of shoots was fewer than 4.5, both biological yields and economic yields increased with the increasing number of shoots, but it could not much affect yields when the number of shoots was larger than 4.5. Shoots number, stem diameter and leaf index were basic stability when compared biennial traits to annual, which could be used for early selection. PMID:24558865

  20. Dendrobium officinale Prevents Early Complications in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shao-zhen; Liang, Chu-yan; Liu, Hua-zhen; Zhu, Dong-mei; Wu, Ya-yun; Liang, Jian; Zhao, Ya; Guo, Jian-ru; Huang, Song; Lai, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background. Dendrobium officinale (DO) Kimura et Migo is a precious Chinese herb that is considered beneficial for health due to its antioxidant and antidiabetes properties, and so on. In this research, we try to determine the preventive effect of DO on the early complications of STZ-induced diabetic rats. Methods. Type 1 diabetic rats were produced with a single intraperitoneal injection of STZ (50 mg/kg). DO (1 g/kg/day) was then orally administered for 5 weeks. Blood glucose, TC, TG, BUN, CREA, and GSH-PX levels were determined, and electroretinographic activity and hypoalgesia were investigated. Pathological sections of the eyes, hearts, aortas, kidneys, and livers were analyzed. Results. Treatment with DO significantly attenuated the serum levels of TC, TG, BUN, and CREA, markedly increased the amplitudes of ERG a- and b-waves and Ops, and reduced the hypoalgesia and histopathological changes of vital organs induced by hyperglycemia. The protective effect of DO in diabetic rats may be associated with its antioxidant activity, as evidenced by the marked increase in the serum level of glutathione peroxidase. However, DO had no significant effect on blood glucose levels and bodyweight of diabetic rats. Conclusions. DO supplementation is an effective treatment to prevent STZ-induced diabetic complications. PMID:27034693

  1. The importance of associations with saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi among fully mycoheterotrophic orchids is currently under-estimated: novel evidence from sub-tropical Asia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yung-I; Yang, Chih-Kai; Gebauer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Most fully mycoheterotrophic (MH) orchids investigated to date are mycorrhizal with fungi that simultaneously form ectomycorrhizas with forest trees. Only a few MH orchids are currently known to be mycorrhizal with saprotrophic, mostly wood-decomposing, fungi instead of ectomycorrhizal fungi. This study provides evidence that the importance of associations between MH orchids and saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi is currently under-estimated. Methods Using microscopic techniques and molecular approaches, mycorrhizal fungi were localized and identified for seven MH orchid species from four genera and two subfamilies, Vanilloideae and Epidendroideae, growing in four humid and warm sub-tropical forests in Taiwan. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope natural abundances of MH orchids and autotrophic reference plants were used in order to elucidate the nutritional resources utilized by the orchids. Key Results Six out of the seven MH orchid species were mycorrhizal with either wood- or litter-decaying saprotrophic fungi. Only one orchid species was associated with ectomycorrhizal fungi. Stable isotope abundance patterns showed significant distinctions between orchids mycorrhizal with the three groups of fungal hosts. Conclusions Mycoheterotrophic orchids utilizing saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi as a carbon and nutrient source are clearly more frequent than hitherto assumed. On the basis of this kind of nutrition, orchids can thrive in deeply shaded, light-limiting forest understoreys even without support from ectomycorrhizal fungi. Sub-tropical East Asia appears to be a hotspot for orchids mycorrhizal with saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi. PMID:26113634

  2. In vitro Antioxidant of a Water-Soluble Polysaccharide from Dendrobium fimhriatum Hook.var.oculatum Hook

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Aoxue; Fan, Yijun

    2011-01-01

    A water-soluble crude polysaccharide (DFHP) obtained from the aqueous extracts of the stem of Dendrobium fimhriatum Hook.var.oculatum Hook through hot water extraction followed by ethanol precipitation, was found to have an average molecular weight (Mw) of about 209.3 kDa. Monosaccharide analysis revealed that DFHP was composed of mannose, glucose and galactose in a content ratio of 37.52%; 43.16%; 19.32%. The investigation of antioxidant activity in vitro showed that DFHP is a potential antioxidant. PMID:21747725

  3. Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Structural Identification of Sesquiterpene alkaloids from the stems of dendrobium nobile using LC-QToF3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dendrobium nobile is one of the fundamental herbs in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Sesquiterpene alkaloids are the main active components in this plant. Due to weak ultraviolet absorption and low content in D. nobile, these sesquiterpene alkaloids have not been extensively studied using chroma...

  4. Orchid Species Richness along Elevational and Environmental Gradients in Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shi-Bao; Chen, Wen-Yun; Huang, Jia-Lin; Bi, Ying-Feng; Yang, Xue-Fei

    2015-01-01

    The family Orchidaceae is not only one of the most diverse families of flowering plants, but also one of the most endangered plant taxa. Therefore, understanding how its species richness varies along geographical and environmental gradients is essential for conservation efforts. However, such knowledge is rarely available, especially on a large scale. We used a database extracted from herbarium records to investigate the relationships between orchid species richness and elevation, and to examine how elevational diversity in Yunnan Province, China, might be explained by mid-domain effect (MDE), species–area relationship (SAR), water–energy dynamics (WED), Rapoport’s Rule, and climatic variables. This particular location was selected because it is one of the primary centers of distribution for orchids. We recorded 691 species that span 127 genera and account for 88.59% of all confirmed orchid species in Yunnan. Species richness, estimated at 200-m intervals along a slope, was closely correlated with elevation, peaking at 1395 to 1723 m. The elevational pattern of orchid richness was considerably shaped by MDE, SAR, WED, and climate. Among those four predictors, climate was the strongest while MDE was the weakest for predicting the elevational pattern of orchid richness. Species richness showed parabolic responses to mean annual temperature (MAT) and mean annual precipitation (MAP), with maximum richness values recorded at 13.7 to 17.7°C for MAT and 1237 to 1414 mm for MAP. Rapoport’s Rule also helped to explain the elevational pattern of species richness in Yunnan, but those influences were not entirely uniform across all methods. These results suggested that the elevational pattern of orchid species richness in Yunnan is collectively shaped by several mechanisms related to geometric constraints, size of the land area, and environments. Because of the dominant role of climate in determining orchid richness, our findings may contribute to a better

  5. Independent recruitment of saprotrophic fungi as mycorrhizal partners by tropical achlorophyllous orchids.

    PubMed

    Martos, Florent; Dulormne, Maguy; Pailler, Thierry; Bonfante, Paola; Faccio, Antonella; Fournel, Jacques; Dubois, Marie-Pierre; Selosse, Marc-André

    2009-11-01

    Mycoheterotrophic orchids have adapted to shaded forest understory by shifting to achlorophylly and receiving carbon from their mycorrhizal fungi. In temperate forests, they associate in a highly specific way with fungi forming ectomycorrhizas on nearby trees, and exploiting tree photosynthates. However, many rainforests lack ectomycorrhizal fungi, and there is evidence that some tropical Asiatic species associate with saprotrophic fungi. To investigate this in different geographic and phylogenetic contexts, we identified the mycorrhizal fungi supporting two tropical mycoheterotrophic orchids from Mascarene (Indian Ocean) and Caribbean islands. We tested their possible carbon sources by measuring natural nitrogen ((15)N) and carbon ((13)C) abundances. Saprotrophic basidiomycetes were found: Gastrodia similis associates with a wood-decaying Resinicium (Hymenochaetales); Wullschlaegelia aphylla associates with both litter-decaying Gymnopus and Mycena species, whose rhizomorphs link orchid roots to leaf litter. The (15)N and (13)C abundances make plausible food chains from dead wood to G. similis and from dead leaves to W. aphylla. We propose that temperature and moisture in rainforests, but not in most temperate forests, may favour sufficient saprotrophic activity to support development of mycoheterotrophs. By enlarging the spectrum of mycorrhizal fungi and the level of specificity in mycoheterotrophic orchids, this study provides new insights on orchid and mycorrhizal biology in the tropics. PMID:19694964

  6. Types of Pollen Dispersal Units in Orchids, and their Consequences for Germination and Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Pacini, Ettore; Hesse, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The various pollen dispersal units (PDU) found in orchids are discussed together with possible evolutionary trends and the consequences for germination and fertilization. Orchids with monad and tetrad pollen form more complex dispersal units by means of pollenkitt, elastoviscin, a callosic wall, common walls or a combination of these. Evolutionary trends include (1) from pollenkitt to elastoviscin; (2) from monad to tetrads and multiples of tetrads; (3) from partially dehydrated (<30 %) to partially hydrated (>30 %) pollen; and (4) from monad pollen to PDUs with many pollen grains. The biological consequences concern both male and female reproductive systems. Some features of the male side are present in all orchids irrespective of the pollen dispersal unit, whereas other characters are found only in orchids with pollinia; the same applies for the female counterpart. Pollen grains of orchids with pollinia germinate at least 24 h after pollination because the pollen grains/tetrads must swell and make space for the growth of pollen tubes. PMID:12102520

  7. Perspectives on MADS-box expression during orchid flower evolution and development.

    PubMed

    Mondragón-Palomino, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    The diverse morphology of orchid flowers and their complex, often deceptive strategies to become pollinated have fascinated researchers for a long time. However, it was not until the 20th century that the ontogeny of orchid flowers, the genetic basis of their morphology and the complex phylogeny of Orchidaceae were investigated. In parallel, the improvement of techniques for in vitro seed germination and tissue culture, together with studies on biochemistry, physiology, and cytology supported the progress of what is now a highly productive industry of orchid breeding and propagation. In the present century both basic research in orchid flower evo-devo and the interest for generating novel horticultural varieties have driven the characterization of many members of the MADS-box family encoding key regulators of flower development. This perspective summarizes the picture emerging from these studies and discusses the advantages and limitations of the comparative strategy employed so far. I address the growing role of natural and horticultural mutants in these studies and the emergence of several model species in orchid evo-devo and genomics. In this context, I make a plea for an increasingly integrative approach. PMID:24065980

  8. Mycorrhizal compatibility and symbiotic reproduction of Gavilea australis, an endangered terrestrial orchid from south Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Fracchia, Sebastián; Aranda-Rickert, Adriana; Flachsland, Eduardo; Terada, Graciela; Sede, Silvana

    2014-11-01

    Gavilea australis is a terrestrial orchid endemic from insular south Argentina and Chile. Meeting aspects of mycorrhizal fungi identity and compatibility in this orchid species is essential for propagation and conservation purposes. These knowledge represent also a first approach to elucidate the mycorrhizal specificity of this species. In order to evaluate both the mycorrhizal compatibility and the symbiotic seed germination of G. australis, we isolated and identified its root endophytic fungal strains as well as those from two sympatric species: Gavilea lutea and Codonorchis lessonii. In addition, we tested two other strains isolated from allopatric terrestrial orchid species from central Argentina. All fungal strains formed coilings and pelotons inside protocorms and promoted, at varying degrees, seed germination, and protocorm development until seedlings had two to three leaves. These results suggest a low mycorrhizal specificity of G. australis and contribute to a better knowledge of the biology of this orchid as well as of other sympatric Patagonian orchid species, all of them currently under serious risk of extinction. PMID:24777596

  9. Perspectives on MADS-box expression during orchid flower evolution and development

    PubMed Central

    Mondragón-Palomino, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    The diverse morphology of orchid flowers and their complex, often deceptive strategies to become pollinated have fascinated researchers for a long time. However, it was not until the 20th century that the ontogeny of orchid flowers, the genetic basis of their morphology and the complex phylogeny of Orchidaceae were investigated. In parallel, the improvement of techniques for in vitro seed germination and tissue culture, together with studies on biochemistry, physiology, and cytology supported the progress of what is now a highly productive industry of orchid breeding and propagation. In the present century both basic research in orchid flower evo-devo and the interest for generating novel horticultural varieties have driven the characterization of many members of the MADS-box family encoding key regulators of flower development. This perspective summarizes the picture emerging from these studies and discusses the advantages and limitations of the comparative strategy employed so far. I address the growing role of natural and horticultural mutants in these studies and the emergence of several model species in orchid evo-devo and genomics. In this context, I make a plea for an increasingly integrative approach. PMID:24065980

  10. Changes in Orchid Bee Communities Across Forest-Agroecosystem Boundaries in Brazilian Atlantic Forest Landscapes.

    PubMed

    De Aguiar, Willian Moura; Sofia, Silvia H; Melo, Gabriel A R; Gaglianone, Maria Cristina

    2015-12-01

    Deforestation has dramatically reduced the extent of Atlantic Forest cover in Brazil. Orchid bees are key pollinators in neotropical forest, and many species are sensitive to anthropogenic interference. In this sense understanding the matrix permeability for these bees is important for maintaining genetic diversity and pollination services. Our main objective was to assess whether the composition, abundance, and diversity of orchid bees in matrices differed from those in Atlantic forest. To do this we sampled orchid bees at 4-mo intervals from 2007 to 2009 in remnants of Atlantic Forest, and in the surrounding pasture and eucalyptus matrices. The abundance, richness, and diversity of orchid bees diminished significantly from the forest fragment toward the matrix points in the eucalyptus and pasture. Some common or intermediate species in the forest areas, such as Eulaema cingulata (F.) and Euglossa fimbriata Moure, respectively, become rare species in the matrices. Our results show that the orchid bee community is affected by the matrices surrounding the forest fragments. They also suggest that connections between forest fragments need to be improved using friendly matrices that can provide more favorable conditions for bees and increase their dispersal between fragments. PMID:26314032

  11. A bibenzyl from Dendrobium ellipsophyllum inhibits migration in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chaotham, Chatchai; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2015-10-01

    Metastatic cancer cells have been shown to have aggressive behaviors accounting for the high incidence of chemotherapeutic failure and mortality. Because migration and invasion are crucial behaviors for cancer cell dissemination, promising compounds exhibiting potential antimigration effects are of interest for metastasis-based therapeutic approaches. This study aimed to evaluate the activity of a bibenzyl, 4,5,4'-trihydroxy-3,3'-dimethoxybibenzyl (TDB), isolated from Dendrobium ellipsophyllum Tang and Wang, in the suppression of migration in human lung cancer cells. TDB at nontoxic concentrations (1 and 5 µM) significantly inhibited the motility of lung cancer cells in scratch-wound assay. Chemotaxis-induced migration and invasion assays also revealed that the cell motility dramatically diminished in the cells treated with 1-5 µM TDB. Western blot analysis provided the underlying molecular mechanism, showing that TDB reduced such cell migration and invasion by decreasing migration-regulating proteins, including integrins αv, α4, β1, β3 and β5, as well as downstream signaling proteins, such as activated focal adhesion kinase (pFAK), activated Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1-GTP) and cell division control protein 42 (Cdc42). As the presence of cellular protrusion, called filopodia, has been indicated as a hallmark of migrating cells, we showed that the reduction of the mentioned proteins correlated well with the disappearance of filopodia. In summary, this study demonstrates the promising activity of TDB and its mechanism in the inhibition of lung cancer cell migration, which might be useful for encouraging the development of this compound for antimetastatic approaches. PMID:26109451

  12. Daldionin, an Unprecedented Binaphthyl Derivative, and Diverse Polyketide Congeners from a Fungal Orchid Endophyte.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Emma C; Jumpathong, Juangjun; Lumyong, Saisamorn; Voigt, Kerstin; Hertweck, Christian

    2016-03-18

    Thailand possesses a rich diversity of orchid species that, in turn, live in symbiosis with a wide variety of fungi. Such endophytes have the potential to produce secondary metabolites with bioactivity against orchid and/or human pathogens. The orchid-associated fungal strain Daldinia eschscholtzii was found to produce a diverse range of aromatic polyketides including the new naphthalene derivatives daldionin, nodulones B and C, and daldinones F and G along with eight known compounds. Daldionin possesses an unprecedented oxane-linked binaphthyl ring system. These compounds demonstrate the high diversity of structural variations that are constructed during fungal biosynthesis, and the results include important observations concerning the biosynthesis of binaphthyl derivatives. Daldionin was found to have weak antiproliferative activity against HUVEC and K-562 cell lines. All but one of the isolated compounds showed moderate antimicrobial activity towards at least one of the four tested microbial strains. PMID:26880363

  13. Are carbon and nitrogen exchange between fungi and the orchid Goodyera repens affected by irradiance?

    PubMed Central

    Liebel, Heiko T.; Bidartondo, Martin I.; Gebauer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The green orchid Goodyera repens has been shown to transfer carbon to its mycorrhizal partner, and this flux may therefore be affected by light availability. This study aimed to test whether the C and N exchange between plant and fungus is dependent on light availability, and in addition addressed the question of whether flowering and/or fruiting individuals of G. repens compensate for changes in leaf chlorophyll concentration with changes in C and N flows from fungus to plant. Methods The natural abundances of stable isotopes of plant C and N were used to infer changes in fluxes between orchid and fungus across natural gradients of irradiance at five sites. Mycorrhizal fungi in the roots of G. repens were identified by molecular analyses. Chlorophyll concentrations in the leaves of the orchid and of reference plants were measured directly in the field. Key Results Leaf δ13C values of G. repens responded to changes in light availability in a similar manner to autotrophic reference plants, and different mycorrhizal fungal associations also did not affect the isotope abundance patterns of the orchid. Flowering/fruiting individuals had lower leaf total N and chlorophyll concentrations, which is most probably explained by N investments to form flowers, seeds and shoot. Conclusions The results indicate that mycorrhizal physiology is relatively fixed in G. repens, and changes in the amount and direction of C flow between plant and fungus were not observed to depend on light availability. The orchid may instead react to low-light sites through increased clonal growth. The orchid does not compensate for low leaf total N and chlorophyll concentrations by using a 13C- and 15N-enriched fungal source. PMID:25538109

  14. Conservation Value and Permeability of Neotropical Oil Palm Landscapes for Orchid Bees

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, George; Jha, Shalene; Vega, Andres; Gilbert, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    The proliferation of oil palm plantations has led to dramatic changes in tropical landscapes across the globe. However, relatively little is known about the effects of oil palm expansion on biodiversity, especially in key ecosystem-service providing organisms like pollinators. Rapid land use change is exacerbated by limited knowledge of the mechanisms causing biodiversity decline in the tropics, particularly those involving landscape features. We examined these mechanisms by undertaking a survey of orchid bees, a well-known group of Neotropical pollinators, across forest and oil palm plantations in Costa Rica. We used chemical baits to survey the community in four regions: continuous forest sites, oil palm sites immediately adjacent to forest, oil palm sites 2km from forest, and oil palm sites greater than 5km from forest. We found that although orchid bees are present in all environments, orchid bee communities diverged across the gradient, and community richness, abundance, and similarity to forest declined as distance from forest increased. In addition, mean phylogenetic distance of the orchid bee community declined and was more clustered in oil palm. Community traits also differed with individuals in oil palm having shorter average tongue length and larger average geographic range size than those in the forest. Our results indicate two key features about Neotropical landscapes that contain oil palm: 1) oil palm is selectively permeable to orchid bees and 2) orchid bee communities in oil palm have distinct phylogenetic and trait structure compared to communities in forest. These results suggest that conservation and management efforts in oil palm-cultivating regions should focus on landscape features. PMID:24147137

  15. Conservation value and permeability of neotropical oil palm landscapes for orchid bees.

    PubMed

    Livingston, George; Jha, Shalene; Vega, Andres; Gilbert, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    The proliferation of oil palm plantations has led to dramatic changes in tropical landscapes across the globe. However, relatively little is known about the effects of oil palm expansion on biodiversity, especially in key ecosystem-service providing organisms like pollinators. Rapid land use change is exacerbated by limited knowledge of the mechanisms causing biodiversity decline in the tropics, particularly those involving landscape features. We examined these mechanisms by undertaking a survey of orchid bees, a well-known group of Neotropical pollinators, across forest and oil palm plantations in Costa Rica. We used chemical baits to survey the community in four regions: continuous forest sites, oil palm sites immediately adjacent to forest, oil palm sites 2 km from forest, and oil palm sites greater than 5 km from forest. We found that although orchid bees are present in all environments, orchid bee communities diverged across the gradient, and community richness, abundance, and similarity to forest declined as distance from forest increased. In addition, mean phylogenetic distance of the orchid bee community declined and was more clustered in oil palm. Community traits also differed with individuals in oil palm having shorter average tongue length and larger average geographic range size than those in the forest. Our results indicate two key features about Neotropical landscapes that contain oil palm: 1) oil palm is selectively permeable to orchid bees and 2) orchid bee communities in oil palm have distinct phylogenetic and trait structure compared to communities in forest. These results suggest that conservation and management efforts in oil palm-cultivating regions should focus on landscape features. PMID:24147137

  16. Stable Epigenetic Effects Impact Adaptation in Allopolyploid Orchids (Dactylorhiza: Orchidaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Paun, Ovidiu; Bateman, Richard M.; Fay, Michael F.; Hedrén, Mikael; Civeyrel, Laure; Chase, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetic information includes heritable signals that modulate gene expression but are not encoded in the primary nucleotide sequence. We have studied natural epigenetic variation in three allotetraploid sibling orchid species (Dactylorhiza majalis s.str, D. traunsteineri s.l., and D. ebudensis) that differ radically in geography/ecology. The epigenetic variation released by genome doubling has been restructured in species-specific patterns that reflect their recent evolutionary history and have an impact on their ecology and evolution, hundreds of generations after their formation. Using two contrasting approaches that yielded largely congruent results, epigenome scans pinpointed epiloci under divergent selection that correlate with eco-environmental variables, mainly related to water availability and temperature. The stable epigenetic divergence in this group is largely responsible for persistent ecological differences, which then set the stage for species-specific genetic patterns to accumulate in response to further selection and/or drift. Our results strongly suggest a need to expand our current evolutionary framework to encompass a complementary epigenetic dimension when seeking to understand population processes that drive phenotypic evolution and adaptation. PMID:20551043

  17. Micropropagation of terrestrial orchids, Anoectochilus sikkimensis and Anoectochilus regalis.

    PubMed

    Gangaprasad, A; Latha, P G; Seeni, S

    2000-02-01

    Two horticulturally important jewel orchids of the genus Anoectochilus were successfully micropropagated. Isolated nodes of A. sikkimensis collected from Sikkim in Eastern Himalayas and subsequently reared under nursery conditions and A. regalis collected from Western Ghats in Southern India were cultured for 12 weeks on Woody Plant Medium (WPM) to produce a maximum of 4.8 and 5.6 callus--free axillary shoots respectively at 95 and 98% efficiency. During reculture of the explants from in vitro raised shoots under the same conditions, the total number of shoots obtained from the nodes (21.4) and shoot tips (8.2) of A. regalis were significantly higher than those hardy and slow growing shoots of A. sikkimensis (12.3 and 4.3) respectively. Shoots (4-6 cm) were rooted in medium containing NAA (2.70 microM) and activated charcoal (0.2%). The rooted plants established at 95-98% rate in community pots after hardening. After 6 months, green house adapted community potted plants of A. regalis were transferred to natural forest habitat locally with 95 and 70% survival respectively after 12 months. The plants, established in community pots and native forest habitat were free from any morphological and growth defects. PMID:11218831

  18. Hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of orchid-like MnO 2 nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xueliang; Li, Wenjie; Chen, Xiangying; Shi, Chengwu

    2006-12-01

    Orchid-like Cr-doped MnO 2 nanostructures have been synthesized via a hydrothermal method, using KClO 3 as the oxidant. The as-obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Results show that the morphologies of orchid-like MnO 2 are made up of nanorods. The influences of chromium in the solution on the morphology of the products are discussed. The electrochemical characterization was carried out by cyclic voltammetry, which indicated that the products were excellent electrode material for super-capacitor.

  19. [Orchids from coffee-plantations in mexico: an alternative for the sustainable use of tropical ecosystems].

    PubMed

    Espejo Sema, Adolfo; López-Ferrari, Ana Rosa; Jiménez Machorro, Rolando; Sánchez Saldaña, Luis

    2005-01-01

    Life form, endemism, conservation status, and horticultural interest are detailed for orchid species associated to shade coffee-plantations in Mexico. About 11% of the orchid taxa (214 species) found in these agroecosystems are in the Mexican list of species requiring some form of protection. Almost 40% of the species are of horticultural interest. The importance of promoting shaded coffee plantations as an alternative to the conservation of primary plant communities in Mexican and other tropical regions is clear. Long term management plans are recommended. PMID:17354421

  20. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in Epidendrum puniceoluteum, an endemic orchid from the Atlantic Rainforest.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, F; Santos, M O; Palma-Silva, C; Barros, F; Meyer, D; Salatino, A; Souza, A P; Cozzolino, S

    2008-09-01

    Epidendrum puniceoluteum is an endemic orchid of Atlantic Rainforest, restricted to few populations only due to the destruction and fragmentation of its native habitat. Here, we report on the development of 10 microsatellite markers isolated from this orchid species. Genetic variability was characterized in two distant populations from Brazil coast. The number of alleles observed for each locus ranged from two to 12 and with an average of 6.4 alleles per locus. These microsatellites should be valuable tools for studying both fine-scale genetic structure of scattered E. puniceoluteum population and patterns will be useful genetic markers for other closely related taxa. PMID:21585988

  1. Stable isotope signatures confirm carbon and nitrogen gain through ectomycorrhizas in the ghost orchid Epipogium aphyllum Swartz.

    PubMed

    Liebel, H T; Gebauer, G

    2011-03-01

    Epipogium aphyllum is a rare Eurasian achlorophyllous forest orchid known to associate with fungi that form ectomycorrhizas, while closely related orchids of warm humid climates depend on wood- or litter-decomposer fungi. We conducted (13) C and (15) N stable isotope natural abundance analyses to identify the organic nutrient source of E. aphyllum from Central Norway. These data for orchid shoot tissues, in comparison to accompanying autotrophic plants, document C and N flow from ectomycorrhizal fungi to the orchid. DNA data from fungal pelotons in the orchid root cortex confirm the presence of Inocybe and Hebeloma, which are both fungi that form ectomycorrhizas. The enrichment factors for (13) C and (15) N of E. aphyllum are used to calculate a new overall average enrichment factor for mycoheterotrophic plants living in association with ectomycorrhizal fungi (ε(13) C ± 1 SD of 7.2 ± 1.6 ‰ and ε(15) N ± 1 SD of 12.8 ± 3.9 ‰). These can be used to estimate the fungal contribution to organic nutrient uptake by partially mycoheterotrophic plants where fully mycoheterotrophic plants are lacking. N concentrations in orchid tissue were unusually high and significantly higher than in accompanying autotrophic leaf samples. This may be caused by N gain of E. aphyllum from obligate ectomycorrhizal fungi. We show that E. aphyllum is an epiparasitic mycoheterotrophic orchid that depends on ectomycorrhizal Inocybe and Hebeloma to obtain C and N through a tripartite system linking mycoheterotrophic plants through fungi with forest trees. PMID:21309973

  2. Atractiellomycetes belonging to the ‘rust’ lineage (Pucciniomycotina) form mycorrhizae with terrestrial and epiphytic neotropical orchids

    PubMed Central

    Kottke, Ingrid; Suárez, Juan Pablo; Herrera, Paulo; Cruz, Dario; Bauer, Robert; Haug, Ingeborg; Garnica, Sigisfredo

    2010-01-01

    Distinctive groups of fungi are involved in the diverse mycorrhizal associations of land plants. All previously known mycorrhiza-forming Basidiomycota associated with trees, ericads, liverworts or orchids are hosted in Agaricomycetes, Agaricomycotina. Here we demonstrate for the first time that Atractiellomycetes, members of the ‘rust’ lineage (Pucciniomycotina), are mycobionts of orchids. The mycobionts of 103 terrestrial and epiphytic orchid individuals, sampled in the tropical mountain rainforest of Southern Ecuador, were identified by sequencing the whole ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and part of 28S rDNA. Mycorrhizae of 13 orchid individuals were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Simple septal pores and symplechosomes in the hyphal coils of mycorrhizae from four orchid individuals indicated members of Atractiellomycetes. Molecular phylogeny of sequences from mycobionts of 32 orchid individuals out of 103 samples confirmed Atractiellomycetes and the placement in Pucciniomycotina, previously known to comprise only parasitic and saprophytic fungi. Thus, our finding reveals these fungi, frequently associated to neotropical orchids, as the most basal living basidiomycetes involved in mycorrhizal associations of land plants. PMID:20007181

  3. Population dynamics of epiphytic orchids in a metapopulation context

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Manuela; Hülber, Karl; Hietz, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Populations of many epiphytes show a patchy distribution where clusters of plants growing on individual trees are spatially separated and may thus function as metapopulations. Seed dispersal is necessary to (re)colonize unoccupied habitats, and to transfer seeds from high- to low-competition patches. Increasing dispersal distances, however, reduces local fecundity and the probability that seeds will find a safe site outside the original patch. Thus, there is a conflict between seed survival and colonization. Methods Populations of three epiphytic orchids were monitored over three years in a Mexican humid montane forest and analysed with spatially averaged and with spatially explicit matrix metapopulation models. In the latter, population dynamics at the scale of the subpopulations (epiphytes on individual host trees) are based on detailed stage-structured observations of transition probabilities and trees are connected by a dispersal function. Key Results Population growth rates differed among trees and years. While ignoring these differences, and averaging the population matrices over trees, yields negative population growth, metapopulation models predict stable or growing populations because the trees that support growing subpopulations determine the growth of the metapopulation. Stochastic models which account for the differences among years differed only marginally from deterministic models. Population growth rates were significantly lower, and extinctions of local patches more frequent in models where higher dispersal results in reduced local fecundity compared with hypothetical models where this is not the case. The difference between the two models increased with increasing mean dispersal distance. Though recolonization events increased with dispersal distance, this could not compensate the losses due to reduced local fecundity. Conclusions For epiphytes, metapopulation models are useful to capture processes beyond the level of the single

  4. Genome size diversity in orchids: consequences and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, I. J.; Kahandawala, I.; Suda, J.; Hanson, L.; Ingrouille, M. J.; Chase, M. W.; Fay, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    Background The amount of DNA comprising the genome of an organism (its genome size) varies a remarkable 40 000-fold across eukaryotes, yet most groups are characterized by much narrower ranges (e.g. 14-fold in gymnosperms, 3- to 4-fold in mammals). Angiosperms stand out as one of the most variable groups with genome sizes varying nearly 2000-fold. Nevertheless within angiosperms the majority of families are characterized by genomes which are small and vary little. Species with large genomes are mostly restricted to a few monocots families including Orchidaceae. Scope A survey of the literature revealed that genome size data for Orchidaceae are comparatively rare representing just 327 species. Nevertheless they reveal that Orchidaceae are currently the most variable angiosperm family with genome sizes ranging 168-fold (1C = 0·33–55·4 pg). Analysing the data provided insights into the distribution, evolution and possible consequences to the plant of this genome size diversity. Conclusions Superimposing the data onto the increasingly robust phylogenetic tree of Orchidaceae revealed how different subfamilies were characterized by distinct genome size profiles. Epidendroideae possessed the greatest range of genome sizes, although the majority of species had small genomes. In contrast, the largest genomes were found in subfamilies Cypripedioideae and Vanilloideae. Genome size evolution within this subfamily was analysed as this is the only one with reasonable representation of data. This approach highlighted striking differences in genome size and karyotype evolution between the closely related Cypripedium, Paphiopedilum and Phragmipedium. As to the consequences of genome size diversity, various studies revealed that this has both practical (e.g. application of genetic fingerprinting techniques) and biological consequences (e.g. affecting where and when an orchid may grow) and emphasizes the importance of obtaining further genome size data given the considerable

  5. Floral adaptation to local pollinator guilds in a terrestrial orchid

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mimi; Gross, Karin; Schiestl, Florian P.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Studies of local floral adaptation in response to geographically divergent pollinators are essential for understanding floral evolution. This study investigated local pollinator adaptation and variation in floral traits in the rewarding orchid Gymnadenia odoratissima, which spans a large altitudinal gradient and thus may depend on different pollinator guilds along this gradient. Methods Pollinator communities were assessed and reciprocal transfer experiments were performed between lowland and mountain populations. Differences in floral traits were characterized by measuring floral morphology traits, scent composition, colour and nectar sugar content in lowland and mountain populations. Key Results The composition of pollinator communities differed considerably between lowland and mountain populations; flies were only found as pollinators in mountain populations. The reciprocal transfer experiments showed that when lowland plants were transferred to mountain habitats, their reproductive success did not change significantly. However, when mountain plants were moved to the lowlands, their reproductive success decreased significantly. Transfers between populations of the same altitude did not lead to significant changes in reproductive success, disproving the potential for population-specific adaptations. Flower size of lowland plants was greater than for mountain flowers. Lowland plants also had significantly higher relative amounts of aromatic floral volatiles, while the mountain plants had higher relative amounts of other floral volatiles. The floral colour of mountain flowers was significantly lighter compared with the lowland flowers. Conclusions Local pollinator adaptation through pollinator attraction was shown in the mountain populations, possibly due to adaptation to pollinating flies. The mountain plants were also observed to receive pollination from a greater diversity of pollinators than the lowland plants. The different floral

  6. Element-tracing of mineral matters in Dendrobium officinale using ICP-MS and multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Nannan; Han, Shen; Yang, Chunning; Qu, Jixu; Sun, Zhirong; Liu, Wenjie; Zhang, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    Rare studies have been performed to trace the mineral elements in Dendrobium officinale. In this study, we aim to trace the mineral elements in D. officinale collected from ten geographical locations in China. ICP-MS system was used for simultaneous determination of mineral elements. Principal component analysis was performed using the obtained data in the quantification of mineral contents. Cluster analysis was performed using the Ward's method. Several of essential microelments were detected in D. officinale, including ferrum (Fe), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and vanadium (V). Among these elements, three elements (i.e. Fe, Mn and Zn) were highly and simultaneously detected in the D. officinale collected from the ten locations. The level of Ni was positively associated with that of Zn (r = 0.986, P < 0.01). The level of titanium (Ti) was positively associated with that of V (r = 0.669, P < 0.05), and negatively associated with Cr (r = -0.710, P < 0.05). In addition, the level of Mn was positively associated with that of barium (r = 0.749, P < 0.05). Further, the level of Fe was positively associated with that of Ni (r = 0.664, P < 0.05), Zn (r = 0.742, P < 0.05), and rare earth elements (r = 0.847, P < 0.01), respectively. Three eigenvalues explained about 86.60 % of the total variance, which contributed significantly to the explanation of cumulative variance. Cluster analysis indicated the cultivars were categorized into 3 clusters. Ni, Zn, Fe, Cr, Ti and rare earth elements were designated as the characteristic elements. Cultivars collected from Yulin, Menghai, and Shaoguan ranked the top 3 in the comprehensive scores, indicating the content of the mineral elements was comparatively higher in these locations. PMID:27429889

  7. Ectomycorrhizal Inocybe species associate with the mycoheterotrophic orchid Epipogium aphyllum but not its asexual propagules

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Melanie; Yagame, Takahiro; Yamato, Masahide; Iwase, Koji; Heinz, Christine; Faccio, Antonella; Bonfante, Paola; Selosse, Marc-Andre

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Epipogium aphyllum is a Eurasian achlorophyllous, mycoheterotrophic forest orchid. Due to its rarity, it is often protected, and its biology is poorly known. The identity and pattern of colonization of fungal associates providing carbon to this orchid have not been studied previously. Methods Using samples from 34 individuals from 18 populations in Japan, Russia and France, the following were investigated: (a) colonization patterns of fungal associates of E. aphyllum by microscopy; (b) their identity by PCR amplification of nuclear ribosomal ITS carried out on rhizome fragments and hyphal pelotons. Results and Conclusions Microscopic investigations revealed that thick rhizomes were densely colonized by fungi bearing clamp-connections and dolipores, i.e. basidiomycetes. Molecular analysis identified Inocybe species as exclusive symbionts of 75 % of the plants investigated and, more rarely, other basidiomycetes (Hebeloma, Xerocomus, Lactarius, Thelephora species). Additionally, ascomycetes, probably endophytes or parasites, were sometimes present. Although E. aphyllum associates with diverse species from Inocybe subgenera Mallocybe and Inocybe sensu stricto, no evidence for cryptic speciation in E. aphyllum was found. Since basidiomycetes colonizing the orchid are ectomycorrhizal, surrounding trees are probably the ultimate carbon source. Accordingly, in one population, ectomycorrhizae sampled around an individual orchid revealed the same fungus on 11·2 % of tree roots investigated. Conversely, long, thin stolons bearing bulbils indicated active asexual multiplication, but these propagules were not colonized by fungi. These findings are discussed in the framework of ecology and evolution of mycoheterotrophy. PMID:19155220

  8. Convergent evolution of floral signals underlies the success of Neotropical orchids

    PubMed Central

    Papadopulos, Alexander S. T.; Powell, Martyn P.; Pupulin, Franco; Warner, Jorge; Hawkins, Julie A.; Salamin, Nicolas; Chittka, Lars; Williams, Norris H.; Whitten, W. Mark; Loader, Deniz; Valente, Luis M.; Chase, Mark W.; Savolainen, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    The great majority of plant species in the tropics require animals to achieve pollination, but the exact role of floral signals in attraction of animal pollinators is often debated. Many plants provide a floral reward to attract a guild of pollinators, and it has been proposed that floral signals of non-rewarding species may converge on those of rewarding species to exploit the relationship of the latter with their pollinators. In the orchid family (Orchidaceae), pollination is almost universally animal-mediated, but a third of species provide no floral reward, which suggests that deceptive pollination mechanisms are prevalent. Here, we examine floral colour and shape convergence in Neotropical plant communities, focusing on certain food-deceptive Oncidiinae orchids (e.g. Trichocentrum ascendens and Oncidium nebulosum) and rewarding species of Malpighiaceae. We show that the species from these two distantly related families are often more similar in floral colour and shape than expected by chance and propose that a system of multifarious floral mimicry—a form of Batesian mimicry that involves multiple models and is more complex than a simple one model–one mimic system—operates in these orchids. The same mimetic pollination system has evolved at least 14 times within the species-rich Oncidiinae throughout the Neotropics. These results help explain the extraordinary diversification of Neotropical orchids and highlight the complexity of plant–animal interactions. PMID:23804617

  9. Convergent evolution of floral signals underlies the success of Neotropical orchids.

    PubMed

    Papadopulos, Alexander S T; Powell, Martyn P; Pupulin, Franco; Warner, Jorge; Hawkins, Julie A; Salamin, Nicolas; Chittka, Lars; Williams, Norris H; Whitten, W Mark; Loader, Deniz; Valente, Luis M; Chase, Mark W; Savolainen, Vincent

    2013-08-22

    The great majority of plant species in the tropics require animals to achieve pollination, but the exact role of floral signals in attraction of animal pollinators is often debated. Many plants provide a floral reward to attract a guild of pollinators, and it has been proposed that floral signals of non-rewarding species may converge on those of rewarding species to exploit the relationship of the latter with their pollinators. In the orchid family (Orchidaceae), pollination is almost universally animal-mediated, but a third of species provide no floral reward, which suggests that deceptive pollination mechanisms are prevalent. Here, we examine floral colour and shape convergence in Neotropical plant communities, focusing on certain food-deceptive Oncidiinae orchids (e.g. Trichocentrum ascendens and Oncidium nebulosum) and rewarding species of Malpighiaceae. We show that the species from these two distantly related families are often more similar in floral colour and shape than expected by chance and propose that a system of multifarious floral mimicry--a form of Batesian mimicry that involves multiple models and is more complex than a simple one model-one mimic system--operates in these orchids. The same mimetic pollination system has evolved at least 14 times within the species-rich Oncidiinae throughout the Neotropics. These results help explain the extraordinary diversification of Neotropical orchids and highlight the complexity of plant-animal interactions. PMID:23804617

  10. Naturalized orchid bee pollinates resin reward flowers in Florida: novel and known mutualism.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Females of an orchid bee, Euglossa viridissima, recently naturalized in southern Florida, routinely collect resin to construct their brood cells from the flowers of two Clusia and two Dalechampia species. The bee pollinates three of these species including: 1) the newly naturalized D. scandens, whic...

  11. ORCHID - a computer simulation of the reliability of an NDE inspection system

    SciTech Connect

    Moles, M.D.C.

    1987-03-01

    CANDU pressurized heavy water reactors contain several hundred horizontally-mounted zirconium alloy pressure tubes. Following a pressure tube failure, a pressure tube inspection system called CIGARette was rapidly designed, manufactured and put in operation. Defects called hydride blisters were found to be the cause of the failure, and were detected using a combination of eddy current and ultrasonic scans. A number of improvements were made to CIGARette during the inspection period. The ORCHID computer program models the operation of the delivery system, eddy current and ultrasonic systems by imitating the on-reactor decision-making procedure. ORCHID predicts that during the early stage of development, less than one blistered tube in three would be detected, while less than one in two would be detected in the middle development stage. However, ORCHID predicts that during the late development stage, probability of detection will be over 90%, primarily due to the inclusion of axial ultrasonic scans (a procedural modification). Rotational and axial slip could severely reduce probability of detection. Comparison of CIGARette's inspection data with ORCHID's predictions indicate that the latter are compatible with the actual inspection results, through the numbers are small and data uncertain. It should be emphasized that the CIGARette system has been essentially replaced with the much more reliable CIGAR system.

  12. Pollinator Behaviour on a Food-Deceptive Orchid Calypso bulbosa and Coflowering Species

    PubMed Central

    Tuomi, Juha; Lämsä, Juho; Wannas, Lauri; Abeli, Thomas; Jäkäläniemi, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Food deception as a pollination strategy has inspired many studies over the last few decades. Pollinator deception has evolved in many orchids possibly to enhance outcrossing. Food-deceptive orchids usually have low pollinator visitation rates as compared to rewarding species. They may benefit in visitations from the presence (magnet-species hypothesis) or, alternatively, absence of coflowering rewarding species (competition hypothesis). We present data on pollinator visitations on a deceptive, terrestrial orchid Calypso bulbosa, a species with a single flower per plant and whose flowering period partly overlaps with rewarding, early flowering willows (Salix sp.) and later-flowering bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus). When surveying inactive bumblebee queens on willows in cool weather, about 7% of them carried Calypso pollinia. Most common bumblebee species appeared to visit and thus pollinate Calypso. Bumblebees typically visited one to three Calypso flowers before flying away, providing some support for the outcrossing hypothesis. We conclude that, regarding the pollinations strategy, both magnet-species and competition hypotheses have a role in the pollination of Calypso, but on different spatial scales. On a large scale rewarding species are important for attracting pollinators to a given region, but on a small scale absence of competition ensures sufficient pollination rate for the deceptive orchid. PMID:25861675

  13. Conservation Genetics of an Endangered Lady’s Slipper Orchid: Cypripedium japonicum in China

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xin; Li, Quan-Jian; Liu, Fen; Gong, Mao-Jiang; Wang, Cai-Xia; Tian, Min

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge about the population genetic variation of the endangered orchid, Cypripedium japonicum, is conducive to the development of conservation strategies. Here, we examined the levels and partitioning of inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) diversity (109 loci) in five populations of this orchid to gain insight into its genetic variation and population structure in Eastern and Central China. It harbored considerably lower levels of genetic diversity both at the population (percentage of polymorphic loci (PPL) = 11.19%, Nei’s gene diversity (H) = 0.0416 and Shannon’s information index (I) = 0.0613) and species level (PPL = 38.53%, H = 0.1273 and I = 0.1928) and a significantly higher degree of differentiation among populations (the proportion of the total variance among populations (Φpt) = 0.698) than those typical of ISSR-based studies in other orchid species. Furthermore, the Nei’s genetic distances between populations were independent of the corresponding geographical distances. Two main clusters are shown in an arithmetic average (UPGMA) dendrogram, which is in agreement with the results of principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) analysis and the STRUCTURE program. In addition, individuals within a population were more similar to each other than to those in other populations. Based on the genetic data and our field survey, the development of conservation management for this threatened orchid should include habitat protection, artificial gene flow and ex situ measures. PMID:24983476

  14. Genome Assembly of Citrus Leprosis Virus Nuclear Type Reveals a Close Association with Orchid Fleck Virus

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Andrew; Otero-Colina, Gabriel; Wei, Gang; Choudhary, Nandlal; Achor, Diann; Shao, Jonathan; Levy, Laurene; Nakhla, Mark K.; Hollingsworth, Charla R.; Hartung, John S.; Schneider, William L.

    2013-01-01

    The complete genome of citrus leprosis virus nuclear type (CiLV-N) was identified by small RNA sequencing utilizing leprosis-affected citrus samples collected from the state of Querétaro, Mexico. The nucleotide identity and phylogenetic analysis indicate that CiLV-N is very closely related to orchid fleck virus, which typically infects Cymbidium species. PMID:23887919

  15. Integrative taxonomy of the fly orchid group: insights from chemical ecology.

    PubMed

    Joffard, Nina; Buatois, Bruno; Schatz, Bertrand

    2016-10-01

    Several authors have recently stressed the need to develop an integrative approach in taxonomy, but studies applying such an approach to Mediterranean orchids are scarce. In sexually deceptive orchids from the taxonomically difficult genus Ophrys, pollination is specific and performed by male insects attracted to the flowers by sex pheromone-mimicking floral scents. Floral compounds are therefore of primary importance for reproductive isolation and species delimitations in this genus. In the fly orchid group, molecular, morphological, and ecological characters have been extensively studied, but a comprehensive survey of floral scents is still lacking. In the present study, the blends of floral compounds of its three members, Ophrys insectifera, Ophrys aymoninii, and Ophrys subinsectifera, were extracted and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 107 compounds were found, with a majority of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons. Significant differentiation, both qualitative and quantitative, was found among the three taxa. This result, pooled with those from the literature, forms a comprehensive and congruent dataset that allows us to elucidate the taxonomic rank of the three members of the fly orchid group. PMID:27614455

  16. A tale of two orchids: comparative reproductive development in Vanilla and Phalaenopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The orchid family of flowering plants (Orchidaceae) represents the largest, most diverse, and most successful family of flowering plants in the world yet they are one of the most understudied groups from a molecular and genomic perspective. To further the long-term goal of developing enabling genom...

  17. Estimating the extent and structure of trade in horticultural orchids via social media.

    PubMed

    Hinsley, Amy; Lee, Tamsin E; Harrison, Joseph R; Roberts, David L

    2016-10-01

    The wildlife trade is a lucrative industry involving thousands of animal and plant species. The increasing use of the internet for both legal and illegal wildlife trade is well documented, but there is evidence that trade may be emerging on new online technologies such as social media. Using the orchid trade as a case study, we conducted the first systematic survey of wildlife trade on an international social-media website. We focused on themed forums (groups), where people with similar interests can interact by uploading images or text (posts) that are visible to other group members. We used social-network analysis to examine the ties between 150 of these orchid-themed groups to determine the structure of the network. We found 4 communities of closely linked groups based around shared language. Most trade occurred in a community that consisted of English-speaking and Southeast Asian groups. In addition to the network analysis, we randomly sampled 30 groups from the whole network to assess the prevalence of trade in cultivated and wild plants. Of 55,805 posts recorded over 12 weeks, 8.9% contained plants for sale, and 22-46% of these posts pertained to wild-collected orchids. Although total numbers of posts about trade were relatively small, the large proportion of posts advertising wild orchids for sale supports calls for better monitoring of social media for trade in wild-collected plants. PMID:26991837

  18. First record of the orchid bee genus Eufriesea Cockerell (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Euglossini) in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new species of orchid bee, Eufriesea aenigma Griswold and Herndon, is described from the Guadalupe Mountains of western Texas and southeastern New Mexico, USA. This is the first record for Eufriesea from the USA and extends its apparent range well beyond its previous, entirely tropical boundaries...

  19. Occurrence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens as a systemic endophyte of vanilla orchids.

    PubMed

    White, James F; Torres, Mónica S; Sullivan, Raymond F; Jabbour, Rabih E; Chen, Qiang; Tadych, Mariusz; Irizarry, Ivelisse; Bergen, Marshall S; Havkin-Frenkel, Daphna; Belanger, Faith C

    2014-11-01

    We report the occurrence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens in vanilla orchids (Vanilla phaeantha) and cultivated hybrid vanilla (V. planifolia × V. pompona) as a systemic bacterial endophyte. We determined with light microscopy and isolations that tissues of V. phaeantha and the cultivated hybrid were infected by a bacterial endophyte and that shoot meristems and stomatal areas of stems and leaves were densely colonized. We identified the endophyte as B. amyloliquefaciens using DNA sequence data. Since additional endophyte-free plants and seed of this orchid were not available, additional studies were performed on surrogate hosts Amaranthus caudatus, Ipomoea tricolor, and I. purpurea. Plants of A. caudatus inoculated with B. amyloliquefaciens demonstrated intracellular colonization of guard cells and other epidermal cells, confirming the pattern observed in the orchids. Isolations and histological studies suggest that the bacterium may penetrate deeply into developing plant tissues in shoot meristems, forming endospores in maturing tissues. B. amyloliquefaciens produced fungal inhibitors in culture. In controlled experiments using morning glory seedlings we showed that the bacterium promoted seedling growth and reduced seedling necrosis due to pathogens. We detected the gene for phosphopantetheinyl transferase (sfp), an enzyme in the pathway for production of antifungal lipopeptides, and purified the lipopeptide "surfactin" from cultures of the bacterium. We hypothesize that B. amyloliquefaciens is a robust endophyte and defensive mutualist of vanilla orchids. Whether the symbiosis between this bacterium and its hosts can be managed to protect vanilla crops from diseases is a question that should be evaluated in future research. PMID:25060609

  20. The Doctrine of Signatures, Materia Medica of Orchids, and the Contributions of Doctor - Orchidologists.

    PubMed

    Pearn, John

    2012-12-01

    The heritage of medicine is written in many forms. One repository is to be found in the history of orchids, the world's largest family of flowering plants. Orchids were so named by Theophrastus (c.372-288 BC) who recorded their medicinal use as an aphrodisiac and the promoter of virility, in the context of the Doctrine of Signatures. Such use endured for millennia, and was recorded both by Paracelsus (1493-1551) and Linnaeus (1707-1778). The history of orchidology and medicine are entwined in four domains: (a) orchids and their historical materia medica, within the paradigm of the Doctrine of Signatures; (b) the enduring and extensive contemporary medicinal and culinary use of orchids such as Vanilla and salep extracts of Orchis; (c) the scientific contributions of doctors as orchidologists; and (d) the heritage of more than a hundred doctors' names in the scientific etymology of the Orchidaceae family. Prominent orchidologists have included the Scottish doctor-soldier and botanist, Robert Brown (1773-1858); the Director of the State Herbarium at Leyden and the Rijks Museum, Carl Ludwig Blume (1796-1862); and Dr William Sterling MD (1888-1967). Among the more than 1250 genus names (and 33,000 species) of orchids are the names of more than a hundred doctors, their lives and works perpetuated in the scientific etymology of this family of exotic, beautiful, flamboyant, intriguing and often expensive flowers. Generic names record the lives and works of such as Aristotle (384-322BC) in Aristotelia Loureiro 1790; Cadet de Gassicourt (1769-1821) in Cadetia Gaudichaud 1826; Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817-1911) in Sirhookera O. Kuntze 1891; and Dr Theodore Daniel Vrydag Zynen (fl. 1820-1850) in Vrydagzynea Blume 1858. One of the principal horticultural genera of orchids, Brassavola, records the life and work of the Ferrara and Padua physician and botanist, Antonio Musa Brassavola (1500-1555). The first Slipper Orchid bred as a hybrid, Paphiopedilum harrisianum (by John

  1. Transcriptome-wide analysis of the MADS-box gene family in the orchid Erycina pusilla.

    PubMed

    Lin, Choun-Sea; Hsu, Chen-Tran; Liao, De-Chih; Chang, Wan-Jung; Chou, Ming-Lun; Huang, Yao-Ting; Chen, Jeremy J W; Ko, Swee-Suak; Chan, Ming-Tsair; Shih, Ming-Che

    2016-01-01

    Orchids exhibit a range of unique flower shapes and are a valuable ornamental crop. MADS-box transcription factors are key regulatory components in flower initiation and development. Changing the flower shape and flowering time can increase the value of the orchid in the ornamental horticulture industry. In this study, 28 MADS-box genes were identified from the transcriptome database of the model orchid Erycina pusilla. The full-length genomic sequences of these MADS-box genes were obtained from BAC clones. Of these, 27 were MIKC-type EpMADS (two truncated forms) and one was a type I EpMADS. Eleven EpMADS genes contained introns longer than 10 kb. Phylogenetic analysis classified the 24 MIKC(c) genes into nine subfamilies. Three specific protein motifs, AG, FUL and SVP, were identified and used to classify three subfamilies. The expression profile of each EpMADS gene correlated with its putative function. The phylogenetic analysis was highly correlated with the protein domain identification and gene expression results. Spatial expression of EpMADS6, EpMADS12 and EpMADS15 was strongly detected in the inflorescence meristem, floral bud and seed via in situ hybridization. The subcellular localization of the 28 EpMADS proteins was also investigated. Although EpMADS27 lacks a complete MADS-box domain, EpMADS27-YFP was localized in the nucleus. This characterization of the orchid MADS-box family genes provides useful information for both orchid breeding and studies of flowering and evolution. PMID:25917508

  2. Terrestrial orchids in a tropical forest: best sites for abundance differ from those for reproduction.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Melissa; Ackerman, James D

    2015-03-01

    Suitable habitat for a species is often modeled by linking its distribution patterns with landscape characteristics. However, modeling the relationship between fitness and landscape characteristics is less common. In this study we take a novel approach towards species distribution modeling (SDM) by investigating factors important not only for species occurrence, but also abundance and physical size, as well as fitness measures. We used the Neotropical terrestrial orchid Prescottia stachyodes as our focal species, and compiled geospatial information on habitat and neighboring plants for use in a two-part conditional SDM that accounted for zero inflation and reduced spatial autocorrelation bias. First, we modeled orchid occurrence, and then within suitable sites we contrasted habitat characteristics important for orchid abundance as compared to plant size. We then tested possible fitness implications, informed by analyses of allometric scaling of reproductive effort and lamina area, as well as size-density relationships in areas of P. stachyodes co-occurrence. We determined that orchid presence was based on a combination of biotic and abiotic factors (indicator species, diffuse solar radiation). Within these sites, P. stachyodes abundance was higher on flat terrain, with fine, moderately well-drained soil, and areas without other native orchids, whereas plant size was greater in less rocky areas. In turn, plant size determined reproductive effort, with floral display height proportionate to lamina area (more photosynthates); however, allometric scaling of flower quantity suggests a higher energy cost for production, or maintenance, of flowers. Overall, habitat factors most important for abundance differed from those for size (and thus reproductive effort), suggesting that sites optimal for either recruitment or survival may not be the primary source of seeds. For plots with multiple P. stachyodes plants, size-density relationships differed depending on the size class

  3. Niche analysis and conservation of the orchids of east Macedonia (NE Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiftsis, Spyros; Tsiripidis, Ioannis; Karagiannakidou, Vassiliki; Alifragis, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    The orchid family is one of the largest in the flowering plant kingdom and includes a lot of rare, threatened or endangered species. The determination of plant species niche is considered fundamental for their conservation. Two parameters closely related with species niche are niche marginality and breadth. The first parameter is a measure of how typical or atypical a species niche is within an area, while the second is a measure of species tolerance. This study deals with niche analysis of the orchids of east Macedonia (NE Greece). Factors that are known to determine species distribution on a regional scale, such as altitude, aspect, habitat type, bedrock type and soil properties (acidity, organic matter, and phosphorus content) were used as explanatory variables. Geographical coordinates were also employed in order to explore spatial patterns in orchid distribution. Niche analysis was carried out using the Outlying Mean Index (OMI) analysis. Out of the total data of 55 taxa that were analyzed, 41 had a significant marginal niche compared with the average niche of the study area. Altitude, soil acidity and certain habitat types were found to be the most important factors in determining orchid distribution. Five different species groups were distinguished on the basis of their ecological preferences and niche breadth. Species niche marginality and breadth, the amplitude of their geographical distribution, the size of their populations and the rareness and conservation status of their habitats were taken into account in order to set conservation priorities for the orchids in the study area. The above characteristics combined with intuitive criteria (e.g. geographical distribution, endemicity) for the species with a small number of occurrences could form a sound basis for setting conservation priorities.

  4. Orchids and Bee's Knees: Investigating the Euglossine Syndrome with Gas Chromatography/Fourier Transform Infrared GC/FT-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, Gregory L.; Williams, N. H...; Whitten, W. M.

    1985-12-01

    The GC/FT-IR analysis of a fragrance obtained from a Gongora tricolor orchid is described. The significance of this type of analysis is explained in terms of the elucidation of the complex relationship between orchids and bees known as "The Euglossine Syndrome". The fragrance sample was found to contain p-cresol, p-methylanisole and a variety of terpenoids, including myrcene, cineole, limonene, cymene, ipsdienol, and an olefinic product which appears to be the dehydration product of ipsdienol.

  5. ESTs Analysis Reveals Putative Genes Involved in Symbiotic Seed Germination in Dendrobium officinale

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Da-Wei; Hsiao, Yu-Yun; Guo, Shun-Xing

    2013-01-01

    Dendrobiumofficinale (Orchidaceae) is one of the world’s most endangered plants with great medicinal value. In nature, D. officinale seeds must establish symbiotic relationships with fungi to germinate. However, the molecular events involved in the interaction between fungus and plant during this process are poorly understood. To isolate the genes involved in symbiotic germination, a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library of symbiotically germinated D. officinale seeds was constructed. From this library, 1437 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were clustered to 1074 Unigenes (including 902 singletons and 172 contigs), which were searched against the NCBI non-redundant (NR) protein database (E-value cutoff, e-5). Based on sequence similarity with known proteins, 579 differentially expressed genes in D. officinale were identified and classified into different functional categories by Gene Ontology (GO), Clusters of orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. The expression levels of 15 selected genes emblematic of symbiotic germination were confirmed via real-time quantitative PCR. These genes were classified into various categories, including defense and stress response, metabolism, transcriptional regulation, transport process and signal transduction pathways. All transcripts were upregulated in the symbiotically germinated seeds (SGS). The functions of these genes in symbiotic germination were predicted. Furthermore, two fungus-induced calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), which were upregulated 6.76- and 26.69-fold in SGS compared with un-germinated seeds (UGS), were cloned from D. officinale and characterized for the first time. This study provides the first global overview of genes putatively involved in D. officinale symbiotic seed germination and provides a foundation for further functional research regarding symbiotic relationships in orchids. PMID:23967335

  6. Growth Promotion-Related miRNAs in Oncidium Orchid Roots Colonized by the Endophytic Fungus Piriformospora indica

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuling; Chen, Peng-Jen; Xu, Xuming; Oelmüller, Ralf; Yeh, Kai-Wun; Lai, Zhongxiong

    2014-01-01

    Piriformospora indica, an endophytic fungus of Sebacinales, colonizes the roots of a wide range of host plants and establishes various benefits for the plants. In this work, we describe miRNAs which are upregulated in Oncidium orchid roots after colonization by the fungus. Growth promotion and vigorous root development were observed in Oncidium hybrid orchid, while seedlings were colonized by P. indica. We performed a genome-wide expression profiling of small RNAs in Oncidium orchid roots either colonized or not-colonized by P. indica. After sequencing, 24,570,250 and 24744,141 clean reads were obtained from two libraries. 13,736 from 17,036,953 unique sequences showed homology to either 86 miRNA families described in 41 plant species, or to 46 potential novel miRNAs, or to 51 corresponding miRNA precursors. The predicted target genes of these miRNAs are mainly involved in auxin signal perception and transduction, transcription, development and plant defense. The expression analysis of miRNAs and target genes demonstrated the regulatory functions they may participate in. This study revealed that growth stimulation of the Oncidium orchid after colonization by P. indica includes an intricate network of miRNAs and their targets. The symbiotic function of P. indica on Oncidium orchid resembles previous findings on Chinese cabbage. This is the first study on growth regulation and development of Oncidium orchid by miRNAs induced by the symbiotic fungus P. indica. PMID:24409313

  7. Tropical Epiphytic Orchids as an Object of Space Botany Investigations and a Design Element for Spacecraft Flight Decks and Orbital Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherevchenko, T. M.; Zaimenko, N. V.

    Epiphytic orchids are shown to be more stable in a long stay on board an orbital station than terrestrial species. Simulations revealed that the activity of native growth stimulators (free auxins and gibberellines) under the prolonged clinostating conditions varied in epiphytic orchids to a lesser extent than in terrestrial orchids. This factor, together with a weaker geotropic reaction, seems to be a cause of their stability in microgravitation conditions. The authors found also that orchids with the monopodial type of shoot system branching are less stable at microgravity than the sympodial species.

  8. Evolution and diversity of floral scent chemistry in the euglossine bee-pollinated orchid genus Gongora

    PubMed Central

    Hetherington-Rauth, Molly C.; Ramírez, Santiago R.

    2016-01-01

    •Background and Aims Animal-pollinated angiosperms have evolved a variety of signalling mechanisms to attract pollinators. Floral scent is a key component of pollinator attraction, and its chemistry modulates both pollinator behaviour and the formation of plant–pollinator networks. The neotropical orchid genus Gongora exhibits specialized pollinator associations with male orchid bees (Euglossini). Male bees visit orchid flowers to collect volatile chemical compounds that they store in hind-leg pouches to use subsequently during courtship display. Hence, Gongora floral scent compounds simultaneously serve as signalling molecules and pollinator rewards. Furthermore, because floral scent acts as the predominant reproductive isolating barrier among lineages, it has been hypothesized that chemical traits are highly species specific. A comparative analysis of intra- and inter-specific variation of floral scent chemistry was conducted to investigate the evolutionary patterns across the genus. •Methods Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to analyse the floral scent of 78 individuals belonging to 28 different species of Gongora from two of the three major lineages sampled across the neotropical region. Multidimensional scaling and indicator value analyses were implemented to investigate the patterns of chemical diversity within and among taxonomic groups at various geographic scales. Additionally, pollinator observations were conducted on a sympatric community of Gongora orchids exhibiting distinct floral scent phenotypes. •Key Results A total of 83 floral volatiles, mainly terpenes and aromatic compounds, were detected. Many of the identified compounds are common across diverse angiosperm families (e.g. cineole, eugenol, β-ocimene, β-pinene and terpinen-4-ol), while others are relatively rare outside euglossine bee-pollinated orchid lineages. Additionally, 29 volatiles were identified that are known to attract and elicit collection behaviour

  9. Large-Range Movements of Neotropical Orchid Bees Observed via Radio Telemetry

    PubMed Central

    Wikelski, Martin; Moxley, Jerry; Eaton-Mordas, Alexander; López-Uribe, Margarita M.; Holland, Richard; Moskowitz, David; Roubik, David W.; Kays, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Neotropical orchid bees (Euglossini) are often cited as classic examples of trapline-foragers with potentially extensive foraging ranges. If long-distance movements are habitual, rare plants in widely scattered locations may benefit from euglossine pollination services. Here we report the first successful use of micro radio telemetry to track the movement of an insect pollinator in a complex and forested environment. Our results indicate that individual male orchid bees (Exaerete frontalis) habitually use large rainforest areas (at least 42–115 ha) on a daily basis. Aerial telemetry located individuals up to 5 km away from their core areas, and bees were often stationary, for variable periods, between flights to successive localities. These data suggest a higher degree of site fidelity than what may be expected in a free living male bee, and has implications for our understanding of biological activity patterns and the evolution of forest pollinators. PMID:20520813

  10. Cross-amplification and characterization of microsatellite loci for the Neotropical orchid genus Epidendrum

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    In this study we tested the cross-amplification of 33 microsatellite loci previously developed for two closely related Neotropical orchid genera (Epidendrum and Laelia). A set of ten loci were polymorphic across five examined species (20 individuals each) with 2 to 15 alleles per locus. The mean expected and observed heterozygosity (average across species) ranged from 0.34 to 0.82 and from 0.27 to 0.85, respectively. In addition we tested all loci in 35 species representative of the genus Epidendrum. Of these, 26 loci showed successful amplification. Cross-application of these loci represent a potential source of co-dominant markers for evolutionary, ecological and conservation studies in this important orchid genus. PMID:21637689

  11. Comparison of orchid and OCD modeling SO{sub x} release in the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, D.C.; Burns, D.S.; Steorts, W.L.

    1996-10-01

    Two atmospheric chemistry and transport models are used to investigate the atmospheric behavior of SO{sub x} in the Gulf of Mexico. SO{sub x} emissions from a location about 30 miles offshore in the Gulf of Mexico will be modeled with ENSCO`s Short-range Layered Atmospheric Model (SLAM) and the EPA and Material Management Service (MMS) sanctioned Offshore and Coastal Dispersion Model (OCD). The atmospheric chemistry associated with SLAM is modeled using ENSCO`s ORganic CHemistry Integrated Dispersion Model (ORCHID) and has been developed from the Carbon Bond Mechanism (CBM-IV) to characterize the behavior of SO{sub x} compounds in the environment. Model runs from both ORCHID and OCD will be presented and compared. Predicted SO{sub x} concentrations will be compared with actual data gathered from the MMS`s SO{sub x} air quality study in 1993.

  12. Some results from studies on the effects of weightlessness on the growth of epiphytic orchids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherevchenko, T. M.; Mayko, T. K.

    1983-01-01

    Epidendrum orchids were placed in a Malakhit-2 micro-greenhouse aboard the Soyuz-36-Salyut-6 space station to test their growth under weightless conditions. Growth occurred but was less than in control plants left on Earth; cells were smaller and parenchymal development slowed in all tissues. Stems, roots, and leaves were smaller. The number of stomas on the leaves was about the same as in the controls, but, because of the smaller leaf size, there were more per unit area. A modeling experiment using a clinostat revealed a large decrease in gibberellin activity and auxin activity. It was assumed that weightlessness primarily affects gibberellin biosynthesis, inhibiting cell growth. Reestablishment of growth compound activity upon return of the plants to Earth was indicated by the fact that the orchids resumed growth thereafter.

  13. Effect of simulated microgravitation on phytohormones and cell structure of tropical orchids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherevchenko, T.; Zaimenko, N.; Majko, T.; Sytnjanskaja, N.

    When studing the effect of two month clinostating on the phytohormonal system of orchids with different types of shoot system branching and different shoot morphology, it was determined that, as a result of simulated microgravitation, endogenous growth regulators changed less in the species with sympodial branching than in species with monopodial branching and without pseudobulbs. Stimulators prevail in the balance of growth regulators in species of the first type and inhibitors in species of the second type. Besides this, comparative analysis of structural organization of juvenile leaf surface tissue of tested orchids was carried out. Variability of size, number and structure of stomatal organization were found according to species belonging to each branching type after clinostating. Electronic microscope studies show some structural peculiarities of epidermal and mesophilous cells.

  14. Bioguided identification of antifungal and antiproliferative compounds from the Brazilian orchid Miltonia flavescens Lindl.

    PubMed

    Porte, Leticia F; Santin, Silvana M O; Chiavelli, Lucas U R; Silva, Cleuza C; Faria, Terezinha J; Faria, Ricardo T; Ruiz, Ana L T G; Carvalho, João E; Pomini, Armando M

    2014-01-01

    The Orchidaceae family is appreciated worldwide for the beauty of its flowers, and hundreds of species of this family occur in Brazil. Yet little is known about the potential of orchids for therapeutic application. We have investigated bioactive compounds produced by the South Brazilian orchid Miltonia flavescens Lindl. Bioguided studies with the fungus Cladosporium herbarum allowed the identification of hydrocinnamic acid as the active antifungal compound. In addition, the chloroform fraction exhibited an interesting activity against human cancer cells, and 5,7-dihydroxy-6,4'-dimethoxyflavone isolated from this fraction was found to be active against seven human cancer cell lines, including NCI/ADR-RES ovary sarcoma, with an IC50 value of 2.6 microg/mL. This is the first report on the cytostatic activity of this flavone against human ovary sarcoma. PMID:24772822

  15. In planta transformation method for T-DNA transfer in orchids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiarti, Endang; Purwantoro, Aziz; Mercuriani, Ixora S.; Anggriasari, Anida M.; Jang, Seonghoe; Suhandono, Sony; Machida, Yasunori; Machida, Chiyoko

    2014-03-01

    Transgenic plant technology is an efficient tool to study the function of gene(s) in plant. The most popular and widely used technique is Agrobacterium-mediated transformation in which cocultivation was done by immersing the plant tissues/organ in overnight bacterial cultured for about 30 minutes to one hour under in vitro condition. In this experiment, we developed more easier technique that omitted the in vitro step during cocultivation with Agrobacterium, namely in planta transformation method. Pollinaria (compact pollen mass of orchid) of Phalaenopsis amabilis and Spathoglottis plicata orchids were used as target explants that were immersed into bacterial culture for 30 minutes, then dried up the pollinaria, the transformed pollinaria was used to pollinate orchid flowers. The T-DNA used for this experiments were Ubipro∷PaFT/A. tumefaciens GV3101 for P. amabilis and MeEF1α2 pro∷GUS/ A. tumefaciens LBA 4404 for S.plicata. Seeds that were produced from pollinated flowers were grown onto 10 mg/l hygromicin containing NP (New Phalaenopsis) medium. The existance of transgene in putative transformant protocorm (developing orchid embryo) genome was confirmed using PCR with specific primers of either PaFT or GUS genes. Histochemical GUS assay was also performed to the putative transformants. The result showed that transformation frequencies were 2.1 % in P. amabilis, and 0,53% in S. plicata. These results indicates that in planta transformation method could be used for Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation, with advantage easier and more secure work from contaminants than that of the in vitro method.

  16. A garden of orchids: a generalized Harper equation at quadratic irrational frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestel, B. D.; Osbaldestin, A. H.

    2004-10-01

    We consider a generalized Harper equation at quadratic irrational flux, showing, in the strong coupling limit, the fluctuations of the exponentially decaying eigenfunctions are governed by the dynamics of a renormalization operator on a renormalization strange set. This work generalizes previous analyses which have considered only the golden mean case. Projections of the renormalization strange sets are illustrated analogous to the 'orchid' present in the golden mean case.

  17. Intraspecific Geographic Variation of Fragrances Acquired by Orchid Bees in Native and Introduced Populations

    PubMed Central

    Eltz, Thomas; Fritzsch, Falko; Pemberton, Robert; Pringle, Elizabeth G.; Tsutsui, Neil D.

    2010-01-01

    Male orchid bees collect volatiles, from both floral and non-floral sources, that they expose as pheromone analogues (perfumes) during courtship display. The chemical profile of these perfumes, which includes terpenes and aromatic compounds, is both species-specific and divergent among closely related lineages. Thus, fragrance composition is thought to play an important role in prezygotic reproductive isolation in euglossine bees. However, because orchid bees acquire fragrances entirely from exogenous sources, the chemical composition of male perfumes is prone to variation due to environmental heterogeneity across habitats. We used Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) to characterize the perfumes of 114 individuals of the green orchid bee (Euglossa aff. viridissima) sampled from five native populations in Mesoamerica and two naturalized populations in the southeastern United States. We recorded a total of 292 fragrance compounds from hind-leg extracts, and found that overall perfume composition was different for each population. We detected a pronounced chemical dissimilarity between native (Mesoamerica) and naturalized (U.S.) populations that was driven both by proportional differences of common compounds as well as the presence of a few chemicals unique to each population group. Despite these differences, our data also revealed remarkable qualitative consistency in the presence of several major fragrance compounds across distant populations from dissimilar habitats. In addition, we demonstrate that naturalized bees are attracted to and collect large quantities of triclopyr 2-butoxyethyl ester, the active ingredient of several commercially available herbicides. By comparing incidence values and consistency indices across populations, we identify putative functional compounds that may play an important role in courtship signaling in this species of orchid bee. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10886

  18. Intraspecific geographic variation of fragrances acquired by orchid bees in native and introduced populations.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Santiago R; Eltz, Thomas; Fritzsch, Falko; Pemberton, Robert; Pringle, Elizabeth G; Tsutsui, Neil D

    2010-08-01

    Male orchid bees collect volatiles, from both floral and non-floral sources, that they expose as pheromone analogues (perfumes) during courtship display. The chemical profile of these perfumes, which includes terpenes and aromatic compounds, is both species-specific and divergent among closely related lineages. Thus, fragrance composition is thought to play an important role in prezygotic reproductive isolation in euglossine bees. However, because orchid bees acquire fragrances entirely from exogenous sources, the chemical composition of male perfumes is prone to variation due to environmental heterogeneity across habitats. We used Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) to characterize the perfumes of 114 individuals of the green orchid bee (Euglossa aff. viridissima) sampled from five native populations in Mesoamerica and two naturalized populations in the southeastern United States. We recorded a total of 292 fragrance compounds from hind-leg extracts, and found that overall perfume composition was different for each population. We detected a pronounced chemical dissimilarity between native (Mesoamerica) and naturalized (U.S.) populations that was driven both by proportional differences of common compounds as well as the presence of a few chemicals unique to each population group. Despite these differences, our data also revealed remarkable qualitative consistency in the presence of several major fragrance compounds across distant populations from dissimilar habitats. In addition, we demonstrate that naturalized bees are attracted to and collect large quantities of triclopyr 2-butoxyethyl ester, the active ingredient of several commercially available herbicides. By comparing incidence values and consistency indices across populations, we identify putative functional compounds that may play an important role in courtship signaling in this species of orchid bee. PMID:20623328

  19. Why are orchid flowers so diverse? Reduction of evolutionary constraints by paralogues of class B floral homeotic genes

    PubMed Central

    Mondragón-Palomino, Mariana; Theißen, Günter

    2009-01-01

    Background The nearly 30 000 species of orchids produce flowers of unprecedented diversity. However, whether specific genetic mechanisms contributed to this diversity is a neglected topic and remains speculative. We recently published a theory, the ‘orchid code’, maintaining that the identity of the different perianth organs is specified by the combinatorial interaction of four DEF-like MADS-box genes with other floral homeotic genes. Scope Here the developmental and evolutionary implications of our theory are explored. Specifically, it is shown that all frequent floral terata, including all peloric types, can be explained by monogenic gain- or-loss-of-function mutants, changing either expression of a DEF-like or CYC-like gene. Supposed dominance or recessiveness of mutant alleles is correlated with the frequency of terata in both cultivation and nature. Our findings suggest that changes in DEF- and CYC-like genes not only underlie terata but also the natural diversity of orchid species. We argue, however, that true changes in organ identity are rare events in the evolution of orchid flowers, even though we review some likely cases. Conclusions The four DEF paralogues shaped floral diversity in orchids in a dramatic way by modularizing the floral perianth based on a complex series of sub- and neo-functionalization events. These genes may have eliminated constraints, so that different kinds of perianth organs could then evolve individually and thus often in dramatically different ways in response to selection by pollinators or by genetic drift. We therefore argue that floral diversity in orchids may be the result of an unprecedented developmental genetic predisposition that originated early in orchid evolution. PMID:19141602

  20. The Anther Steps onto the Stigma for Self-Fertilization in a Slipper Orchid

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xin-Ju; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Hsiao, Yu-Yun; Huang, Jie; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2012-01-01

    Background Due to the spatial separation between male and female pollen grains from the anther of most flowering plants, including orchids, pollens are transported by wind or animals and deposited onto the receptive surface of the stigma of a different plant. However, self-pollination is common in pollinating animal-scarce habitats. In such habitats, self-pollinations require the assistance of a pollinating agent (e.g., wind, gravity, or floral assembly) to transport the pollen grains from the anther onto its own stigma. Methodology/Principal Findings Based on observations on floral morphology and flowering phenology, tests of the breeding system, and a comparison of pollination mechanisms, a new self-pollination process was discovered in the hermaphroditic (i.e., possessing spatially separated male and female organs) flower of a slipper orchid, Paphiopedilum parishii. The anther changes from a solid to a liquid state and directly steps onto the stigma surface without the aid of any pollinating agent or floral assembly. Conclusions The mode of self-pollination discussed here is a new addition to the broad range of genetic and morphological mechanisms that have evolved in flowering plants to ensure their reproductive success. The present self-contained pollination mechanism is a possible adaptation to the insect-scarce habitat of the orchid. PMID:22649529

  1. NIR-assisted orchid virus therapy using urchin bimetallic nanomaterials in phalaenopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shin-Yu; Cheng, Liang-Chien; Chen, Chieh-Wei; Lee, Po-Han; Yu, Fengjiao; Zhou, Wuzong; Liu, Ru-Shi; Do, Yi-Yin; Huang, Pung-Ling

    2013-12-01

    The use of nanoparticles has drawn special attention, particularly in the treatment of plant diseases. Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV) and Odontoglossum ring spot virus (ORSV) are the most prevalent and serious diseases that affect the development of the orchid industry. In this study we treated nanoparticles as a strategy for enhancing the resistance of orchids against CymMV and ORSV. After chitosan-modified gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) were injected into Phalaenopsis leaves, the injected leaves were exposed to 980 nm laser for light-heat conversion. To evaluate virus elimination in the treated Phalaenopsis leaves, the transcripts of coat protein genes and the production of viral proteins were assessed by reverse transcription-Polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The expression of coat protein genes for both CymMV and ORSV was significantly lower in the chitosan-modified Au NP-treated Phalaenopsis leaves than in the control. Similarly, the amount of coat proteins for both viruses in the Phalaenopsis leaves was lower than that in the control (without nanoparticle injection). We propose that the temperature increase in the chitosan-modified Au NP-treated Phalaenopsis tissues after laser exposure reduces the viral population, consequently conferring resistance against CymMV and ORSV. Our findings suggest that the application of chitosan-modified Au NPs is a promising new strategy for orchid virus therapy.

  2. Evolutionary history of PEPC genes in green plants: Implications for the evolution of CAM in orchids.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hua; Zhang, Liang-Sheng; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Zheng, Bao-Qiang; Liu, Zhong-Jian; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) gene is the key enzyme in CAM and C4 photosynthesis. A detailed phylogenetic analysis of the PEPC family was performed using sequences from 60 available published plant genomes, the Phalaenopsis equestris genome and RNA-Seq of 15 additional orchid species. The PEPC family consists of three distinct subfamilies, PPC-1, PPC-2, and PPC-3, all of which share a recent common ancestor in chlorophyte algae. The eudicot PPC-1 lineage separated into two clades due to whole genome duplication (WGD). Similarly, the monocot PPC-1 lineage also divided into PPC-1M1 and PPC-1M2 through an ancient duplication event. The monocot CAM- or C4-related PEPC originated from the clade PPC-1M1. WGD may not be the major driver for the performance of CAM function by PEPC, although it increased the number of copies of the PEPC gene. CAM may have evolved early in monocots, as the CAM-related PEPC of orchids originated from the monocot ancient duplication, and the earliest CAM-related PEPC may have evolved immediately after the diversification of monocots, with CAM developing prior to C4. Our results represent the most complete evolutionary history of PEPC genes in green plants to date and particularly elucidate the origin of PEPC in orchids. PMID:26493226

  3. Microsatellite primers for two threatened orchids in Florida: Encyclia tampensis and Cyrtopodium punctatum (Orchidaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Weremijewicz, Joanna; Almonte, Jasmin I.; Hilaire, Vanessa S.; Lopez, Frank D.; Lu, Stephen H.; Marrero, Sarah M.; Martinez, Catherine M.; Zarate, Edson A.; Lam, Ana K.; Ferguson, Samantha A. N.; Petrakis, Nicolas Z.; Peeples, Kelsey A.; Taylor, Ebony D.; Leon, Natalie M.; Valdes, Carolina; Hass, Michael; Reeve, Andrew B.; Palow, Danielle T.; Downing, Jason L.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: The Million Orchid Project at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden is an initiative to propagate native orchids for reintroduction into Miami’s urban landscapes. The aim of this study was to develop microsatellites for Encyclia tampensis and Cyrtopodium punctatum (Orchidaceae). Methods and Results: Ten microsatellites were developed for each species. For E. tampensis sampled from the natural population, allele numbers ranged from one to four, with an average observed heterozygosity (Ho) of 0.314 and average expected heterozygosity (He) of 0.281. For the individuals from cultivation, allele numbers ranged from one to six, with an average Ho of 0.35 and an average He of 0.224. For C. punctatum, allele numbers ranged from one to three, with an average Ho of 0.257 and an average He of 0.272. Conclusions: These microsatellites will be used to assess the genetic diversity of natural and cultivated populations with the intention of guiding genetic breeding under the Million Orchid Project. PMID:27144103

  4. The osmotic property and fluorescent tracer movement of developing orchid embryos of Phaius tankervilliae (Aiton) Bl.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung-I; Yeung, Edward C

    2010-12-01

    The suspensor plays an active role during the early embryo development of flowering plants. In orchids, the suspensor cells are highly vacuolated without structural specializations, and the possible mechanism(s) that enable the suspensor to serve as the nutrient uptake site is virtually unknown. Here, we used the fluorescent tracer CFDA to characterize the pathway for symplastic transport in the suspensor cells of developing embryos and to provide direct visual evidence that the orchid suspensor has unique physiological properties. The embryo proper uptakes the fluorescent dye through the suspensor. CF could first be detected throughout the suspensor cell and then subsequently in the embryo proper. A plasmolysis experiment clearly indicates that suspensor cells have a more negative osmotic potential than the adjoining testa cells. It is proposed that the preferential entry of CFDA into the suspensor cell of the Nun orchid is aided by the more negative osmotic potential of the suspensor than neighboring cells, providing a driving force for the uptake of water from the apoplast into the symplast. PMID:20467876

  5. Floral visual signal increases reproductive success in a sexually deceptive orchid

    PubMed Central

    Streinzer, Martin; Paulus, Hannes F.; Spaethe, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Sexually deceptive orchids mimic signals emitted by female insects in order to attract mate-searching males. Specific attraction of the targeted pollinator is achieved by sex pheromone mimicry, which constitutes the major attraction channel. In close vicinity of the flower, visual signals may enhance attraction, as was shown recently in the sexually deceptive orchid Ophrys heldreichii. Here, we conducted an in situ manipulation experiment in two populations of O. heldreichii on Crete to investigate whether the presence/absence of the conspicuous pink perianth affects reproductive success in two natural orchid populations. We estimated reproductive success of three treatment groups (with intact, removed and artificial perianth) throughout the flowering period as pollinaria removal (male reproductive success) and massulae deposition (female reproductive success). Reproductive success was significantly increased by the presence of a strong visual signal—the conspicuous perianth—in one study population, however, not in the second, most likely due to the low pollinator abundance in the latter population. This study provides further evidence that the coloured perianth in O. heldreichii is adaptive and thus adds to the olfactory signal to maximise pollinator attraction and reproductive success. PMID:23750181

  6. Cloning and characterization of a PI-like MADS-box gene in Phalaenopsis orchid.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bin; Hexige, Saiyin; Zhang, Tian; Pittman, Jon K; Chen, Donghong; Ming, Feng

    2007-11-30

    The highly evolved flowers of orchids have colorful sepals and fused columns that offer an opportunity to discover new genes involved in floral development in monocotyledon species. In this investigation, we cloned and characterized the homologous PISTALLATA-like (PI-like) gene PhPI15 (Phalaenopsis PI STILLATA # 15), from the Phalaenopsis hybrid cultivar. The protein sequence encoded by PhPI15 contains a typical PI-motif. Its sequence also formed a subclade with other monocot PI-type genes in phylogenetic analysis. Southern analysis showed that PhPI15 was present in the Phalaenopsis orchid genome as a single copy. Furthermore, it was expressed in all the whorls of the Phalaenopsis flower, while no expression was detected in vegetative organs. The flowers of transgenic tobacco plants ectopically expressing PhPI15 showed male-sterile phenotypes. Thus, as a Class-B MADS-box gene, PhPI15 specifies floral organ identity in orchids. PMID:18047777

  7. First description of necrosis in leaves and pseudo-bulbs of Oncidium orchids caused by Burkholderia gladioli in São Paulo State, Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A necrosis of orchid leaves and pseudobulbs was observed in a commercial orchid nursery in Mogi das Cruzes, Sao Paulo, Brazil. The symptoms were water-soaked, brown lesions that can develop into large areas of necrosis that extend throughout the entire plant, ultimately causing death. Bacteria were...

  8. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of specific polysaccharides in Dendrobium huoshanense by using saccharide mapping and chromatographic methods.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yong; Chen, Ling-Xiao; Han, Bang-Xing; Wu, Ding-Tao; Cheong, Kit-Leong; Chen, Nai-Fu; Zhao, Jing; Li, Shao-Ping

    2016-09-10

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of specific polysaccharides from ten batches of Dendrobium huoshanense were performed using high performance size exclusion chromatography coupled with multi-angle laser light scattering and refractive index detector (HPSEC-MALLS-RID), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and saccharide mapping based on polysaccharides analysis by using carbohydrate gel electrophoresis (PACE) and high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC). Results showed that molecular weights, the radius of gyrations, and contents of specific polysaccharides in D. huoshanense were ranging from 1.16×10(5) to 2.17×10(5)Da, 38.8 to 52.1nm, and 9.9% to 19.9%, respectively. Furthermore, the main monosaccharide compositions were Man and Glc. Indeed, the main glycosidic linkages were β-1,4-Manp and β-1,4-Glcp, and substituted with acetyl groups at O-2 and O-3 of 1,4-linked Manp. Moreover, results showed that PACE and HPTLC fingerprints of partial acidic and enzymatic hydrolysates of specific polysaccharides were similar, which are helpful to better understand the specific polysaccharides in D. huoshanense and beneficial to improve their quality control. These approaches could also be routinely used for quality control of polysaccharides in other medicinal plants. PMID:27424197

  9. [Comparison on polysaccharide content and PMP-HPLC fingerprints of polysaccharide in stems and leaves of Dendrobium officinale].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Gui-Fen; Pang, Min-Xia; Chen, Su-Hong; Lv, Gui-Yuan; Yan, Mei-Qiu

    2014-03-01

    In order to provide scientific basics for exploitation and sufficient application of Dendrobium officinale leaves resources, the phenol-sulfuric acid method was applied to determine the polysaccharide content. The monosaccharides were derivated by PMP and the derivatives were identified by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS(n) and the contents of mannose and glucose were determined simultaneously. Similarity evaluation system for chromatographic fingerprint of traditional Chinese medicine (2004A) was employed to generate the mean chromatogram and similarity analysis of the samples was carried out. The results demonstrated that polysaccharide content, monosaccharide compositions and composition ratio had an obvious difference between stems and leaves. The polysaccharide content of stems was higher than that of leaves. Monosaccharide composition in leaf was significantly different from that in stem. The polysaccharide from stems was composed of mannose and glucose, however the polysaccharide of leaves was acid heteropolysaccharide and was mainly composed of five monosaccharides, including mannose, galacturonic acid, glucose, galactose and arabinose. The similarity value of the 14 batches was above 0.9, indicating that similarity of fingerprints among different samples was high. The study can provide evidence for expanding the medicinal parts of D. officinale. PMID:25204167

  10. (±)-Homocrepidine A, a Pair of Anti-inflammatory Enantiomeric Octahydroindolizine Alkaloid Dimers from Dendrobium crepidatum.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yang; Zhang, Chaofeng; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Yue; Feng, Deqiang; Zhang, Mian; Xie, Haifeng

    2016-01-22

    A pair of racemic indolizidine enantiomers, (±)-homocrepidine A (1), and a piperidine derivative, homocrepidine B (2), were isolated from Dendrobium crepidatum along with the known alkaloid crepidine (3). The racemic mixture of 1 was separated into a pair of enantiomers, (+)-1 and (-)-1, by HPLC using a chiral chromatographic substrate, which represents the first successful example of resolving indolizidine racemic mixtures. The absolute configurations of (+)-1 and (-)-1 were assigned from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. The evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity with LPS-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages revealed that (+)-1 strongly inhibited the production of nitric oxide (IC50, 3.6 μM) and significantly decreased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, while (-)-1 and (±)-1 only had moderate inhibitory effects (IC50, 22.8 and 14.7 μM). Compound 2 showed moderate anti-inflammatory activity (IC50, 27.6 μM). PMID:26710212

  11. Characterization of the alkaline/neutral invertase gene in Dendrobium officinale and its relationship with polysaccharide accumulation.

    PubMed

    Gao, F; Cao, X F; Si, J P; Chen, Z Y; Duan, C L

    2016-01-01

    Dendrobium officinale is one of the most well-known traditional Chinese medicines, and polysaccharide is its main active ingredient. Many studies have investigated the synthesis and accumulation mechanisms of polysaccharide, but until recently, little was known about the molecular mechanism of how polysaccharide is synthesized because no related genes have been cloned. In this study, we cloned an alkaline/neutral invertase gene from D. officinale (DoNI) by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method. DoNI was 2231 bp long and contained an open reading frame that predicted a 62.8-kDa polypeptide with 554-amino acid residues. An alkaline/neutral invertase conserved domain was predicted from this deduced amino acid sequence, and DoNI had a similar deduced amino acid sequence to Setaria italica and Oryza brachyantha. We also found that DoNI expression in different tissues was closely related to DoNI activity, and more importantly, polysaccharide level. Our results indicate that DoNI is associated with polysaccharide accumulation in D. officinale. PMID:27173310

  12. Growth-promoting Sphingomonas paucimobilis ZJSH1 associated with Dendrobium officinale through phytohormone production and nitrogen fixation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Suijuan; Zhang, Xinghai; Cao, Zhaoyun; Zhao, Kaipeng; Wang, Sai; Chen, Mingxue; Hu, Xiufang

    2014-01-01

    Growth-promoting Sphingomonas paucimobilis ZJSH1, associated with Dendrobium officinale, a traditional Chinese medicinal plant, was characterized. At 90 days post-inoculation, strain ZJSH1 significantly promoted the growth of D. officinale seedlings, with increases of stems by 8.6% and fresh weight by 7.5%. Interestingly, the polysaccharide content extracted from the inoculated seedlings was 0.6% higher than that of the control. Similar growth promotion was observed with the transplants inoculated with strain ZJSH1. The mechanism of growth promotion was attributed to a combination of phytohormones and nitrogen fixation. Strain ZJSH1 was found using the Kjeldahl method to have a nitrogen fixation activity of 1.15 mg l−1, which was confirmed by sequencing of the nifH gene. Using high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, strain ZJSH1 was found to produce various phytohormones, including salicylic acid (SA), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), Zeatin and abscisic acid (ABA). The growth curve showed that strain ZJSH1 grew well in the seedlings, especially in the roots. Accordingly, much higher contents of SA, ABA, IAA and c-ZR were detected in the inoculated seedlings, which may play roles as both phytohormones and ‘Systemic Acquired Resistance’ drivers. Nitrogen fixation and secretion of plant growth regulators (SA, IAA, Zeatin and ABA) endow S. paucimobilis ZJSH1 with growth-promoting properties, which provides a potential for application in the commercial growth of D. officinale. PMID:25142808

  13. The loci recommended as universal barcodes for plants on the basis of floristic studies may not work with congeneric species as exemplified by DNA barcoding of Dendrobium species

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Based on the testing of several loci, predominantly against floristic backgrounds, individual or different combinations of loci have been suggested as possible universal DNA barcodes for plants. The present investigation was undertaken to check the applicability of the recommended locus/loci for congeneric species with Dendrobium species as an illustrative example. Results Six loci, matK, rbcL, rpoB, rpoC1, trnH-psbA spacer from the chloroplast genome and ITS, from the nuclear genome, were compared for their amplification, sequencing and species discrimination success rates among multiple accessions of 36 Dendrobium species. The trnH-psbA spacer could not be considered for analysis as good quality sequences were not obtained with its forward primer. Among the tested loci, ITS, recommended by some as a possible barcode for plants, provided 100% species identification. Another locus, matK, also recommended as a universal barcode for plants, resolved 80.56% species. ITS remained the best even when sequences of investigated loci of additional Dendrobium species available on the NCBI GenBank (93, 33, 20, 18 and 17 of ITS, matK, rbcL, rpoB and rpoC1, respectively) were also considered for calculating the percent species resolution capabilities. The species discrimination of various combinations of the loci was also compared based on the 36 investigated species and additional 16 for which sequences of all the five loci were available on GenBank. Two-locus combination of matK+rbcL recommended by the Plant Working Group of Consortium for Barcoding of Life (CBOL) could discriminate 86.11% of 36 species. The species discriminating ability of this barcode was reduced to 80.77% when additional sequences available on NCBI were included in the analysis. Among the recommended combinations, the barcode based on three loci - matK, rpoB and rpoC1- resolved maximum number of species. Conclusions Any recommended barcode based on the loci tested so far, is not likely to

  14. Exotic and indigenous viruses infect wild populations and captive collections of temperate terrestrial orchids (Diuris species) in Australia.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Stephen J; Li, Hua; Dixon, Kingsley W; Richards, Helen; Jones, Michael G K

    2013-01-01

    Four species of Diuris temperate terrestrial orchids from wild and captive populations were tested for the presence of polyadenylated RNA viruses. The genomes of three exotic viruses were determined: two potyviruses, Bean yellow mosaic virus and Ornithogalum mosaic virus, and the polerovirus Turnip yellows virus. The genomes of five indigenous viruses were detected, including four novel species. They were the potyvirus Blue squill virus A, another potyvirus, two proposed capilloviruses, and a partitivirus. Partitivirus infection is of interest as this group of viruses is also associated with endophytic fungi (mycorrhizae) that are necessary for the germination, growth, development of many terrestrial orchids. Sequence divergence data indicate post-European, pre-European, and endemic origins for these viruses via inoculum from introduced and native plants. The implications of the findings of this study for orchid conservation, and particularly reintroduction programs where viruses may be spread inadvertently to wild populations from infected propagation sources, are discussed. PMID:23089850

  15. Solitary invasive orchid bee outperforms co-occurring native bees to promote fruit set of an invasive Solanum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Pemberton, Robert W

    2009-03-01

    Our understanding of the effects of introduced invasive pollinators on plants has been exclusively drawn from studies on introduced social bees. One might expect, however, that the impacts of introduced solitary bees, with much lower population densities and fewer foragers, would be small. Yet little is known about the potential effects of naturalized solitary bees on the environment. We took advantage of the recent naturalization of an orchid bee, Euglossa viridissima, in southern Florida to study the effects of this solitary bee on reproduction of Solanum torvum, an invasive shrub. Flowers of S. torvum require specialized buzz pollination. Through timed floral visitor watches and two pollination treatments (control and pollen supplementation) at three forest edge and three open area sites, we found that the fruit set of S. torvum was pollen limited at the open sites where the native bees dominate, but was not pollen limited at the forest sites where the invasive orchid bees dominate. The orchid bee's pollination efficiency was nearly double that of the native halictid bees, and was also slightly higher than that of the native carpenter bee. Experiments using small and large mesh cages (to deny or allow E. viridissima access, respectively) at one forest site indicated that when the orchid bee was excluded, the flowers set one-quarter as many fruit as when the bee was allowed access. The orchid bee was the most important pollinator of the weed at the forest sites, which could pose additional challenges to the management of this weed in the fragmented, endangered tropical hardwood forests in the region. This specialized invasive mutualism may promote populations of both the orchid bee and this noxious weed. Invasive solitary bees, particularly species that are specialized pollinators, appear to have more importance than has previously been recognized. PMID:19066971

  16. Desiccation tolerance, longevity and seed-siring ability of entomophilous pollen from UK native orchid species

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Timothy R.; Seaton, Philip T.; Pritchard, Hugh W.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Pollinator-limited seed-set in some terrestrial orchids is compensated for by the presence of long-lived flowers. This study tests the hypothesis that pollen from these insect-pollinated orchids should be desiccation tolerant and relatively long lived using four closely related UK terrestrial species; Anacamptis morio, Dactylorhiza fuchsii, D. maculata and Orchis mascula. Methods Pollen from the four species was harvested from inflorescences and germinated in vitro, both immediately and also after drying to simulate interflower transit. Their tolerance to desiccation and short-term survival was additionally assessed after 3 d equilibration at a range of relative humidities (RHs), and related to constructed sorption isotherms (RH vs. moisture content, MC). Ageing of D. fuchsii pollen was further tested over 2 months against temperature and RH, and the resultant survival curves were subjected to probit analysis, and the distribution of pollen death in time (σ) was determined. The viability and siring ability, following artificial pollinations, were determined in D. fuchsii pollen following storage for 6 years at –20 °C. Key Results The pollen from all four species exhibited systematic increases in germinability and desiccation tolerance as anthesis approached, and pollen from open flowers generally retained high germinability. Short-term storage revealed sensitivity to low RH, whilst optimum survival occurred at comparable RHs in all species. Similarly, estimated pollen life spans (σ) at differing temperatures were longest under the dry conditions. Despite a reduction in germination and seeds per capsule, long-term storage of D. fuchsii pollen did not impact on subsequent seed germination in vitro. Conclusions Substantial pollen desiccation tolerance and life span of the four entomophilous orchids reflects a resilient survival strategy in response to unpredictable pollinator visitation, and presents an alternative approach to germplasm

  17. Weak trophic links between a crab-spider and the effective pollinators of a rewardless orchid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero, Carolina; Corley, Juan C.; Aizen, Marcelo A.

    2015-01-01

    Sit and wait predators hunting on flowers are considered to be exploiters of plant-pollinator mutualisms. Several studies have shown that plant-pollinator interactions can be highly susceptible to the impact of a third trophic level, via consumptive (direct) and non-consumptive (indirect) effects that alter pollinator behavior and, ultimately, plant fitness. However, most flowering plants attract a wide array of flower visitors, from which only a subset will be effective pollinators. Hence, a negative effect of an ambush predator on plant fitness should be expected only when: (i) the effective pollinators are part of the predators' diet and/or (ii) the non-consumptive effects of predator presence (e.g. dead prey) alter the behavior of effective pollinators and pollen movement among individual plants. We analyzed the direct and indirect effects of a crab-spider (Misumenops pallidus), on the pollination and reproductive success of Chloraea alpina, a Patagonian rewardless orchid. Our results indicate that most of the flower visitors do not behave as effective pollinators and most effective pollinators were not observed as prey for the crab-spider. In terms of non-consumptive effects, inflorescences with and without spiders and/or dead-prey did not vary the frequency of flower visitors, nor pollinia removal or deposition. Hence, it is not surprising that M. pallidus has a neutral effect on pollinia removal and deposition as well as on fruit and seed set. Similar to other rewardless orchids, the low reproductive success of C. alpina (∼6% fruit set) was associated with the limited number of visits by effective pollinators. Negative top-down effects of a flower-visitor predator on plant pollination may not be anticipated without studying the direct and indirect effects of this predator on the effective pollinators. In pollination systems where effective pollinators visited flowers erratically, such as in deceptive orchids, we expect weak or no effect of predators on

  18. Responses to simulated nitrogen deposition by the neotropical epiphytic orchid Laelia speciosa.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Álvarez, Edison A; Lindig-Cisneros, Roberto; de la Barrera, Erick

    2015-01-01

    Potential ecophysiological responses to nitrogen deposition, which is considered to be one of the leading causes for global biodiversity loss, were studied for the endangered endemic Mexican epiphytic orchid, Laelia speciosa, via a shadehouse dose-response experiment (doses were 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40, and 80 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) in order to assess the potential risk facing this orchid given impending scenarios of nitrogen deposition. Lower doses of nitrogen of up to 20 kg N ha yr(-1), the dose that led to optimal plant performance, acted as fertilizer. For instance, the production of leaves and pseudobulbs were respectively 35% and 36% greater for plants receiving 20 kg N ha yr(-1) than under any other dose. Also, the chlorophyll content and quantum yield peaked at 0.66 ± 0.03 g m(-2) and 0.85 ± 0.01, respectively, for plants growing under the optimum dose. In contrast, toxic effects were observed at the higher doses of 40 and 80 kg N ha yr(-1). The δ (13)C for leaves averaged -14.7 ± 0.2‰ regardless of the nitrogen dose. In turn, δ (15)N decreased as the nitrogen dose increased from 0.9 ± 0.1‰ under 2.5 kg N ha(-1)yr(-1) to -3.1 ± 0.2‰ under 80 kg N ha(-1)yr(-1), indicating that orchids preferentially assimilate NH4 (+) rather than NO3 (-) of the solution under higher doses of nitrogen. Laelia speciosa showed a clear response to inputs of nitrogen, thus, increasing rates of atmospheric nitrogen deposition can pose an important threat for this species. PMID:26131375

  19. Effects of pollination limitation and seed predation on female reproductive success of a deceptive orchid.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Ryan P; Arnold, Paige M; Michaels, Helen J

    2014-01-01

    For many species of conservation significance, multiple factors limit reproduction. This research examines the contributions of plant height, number of flowers, number of stems, pollen limitation and seed predation to female reproductive success in the deceit-pollinated orchid, Cypripedium candidum. The deceptive pollination strategy employed by many orchids often results in high levels of pollen limitation. While increased floral display size may attract pollinators, C. candidum's multiple, synchronously flowering stems could promote selfing and also increase attack by weevil seed predators. To understand the joint impacts of mutualists and antagonists, we examined pollen limitation, seed predation and the effects of pollen source over two flowering seasons (2009 and 2011) in Ohio. In 2009, 36 pairs of plants size-matched by flower number, receiving either supplemental hand or open pollination, were scored for fruit maturation, mass of seeds and seed predation. Pollen supplementation increased proportion of flowers maturing into fruit, with 87 % fruit set when hand pollinated compared with 46 % for naturally pollinated flowers. Inflorescence height had a strong effect, as taller inflorescences had higher initial fruit set, while shorter stems had higher predation. Seed predation was seen in 73 % of all fruits. A parallel 2011 experiment that included a self-pollination treatment and excluded seed predators found initial and final fruit set were higher in the self and outcross pollination treatments than in the open-pollinated treatment. However, seed mass was higher in both open pollinated and outcross pollination treatments compared with hand self-pollinated. We found greater female reproductive success for taller flowering stems that simultaneously benefited from increased pollination and reduced seed predation. These studies suggest that this species is under strong reinforcing selection to increase allocation to flowering stem height. Our results may help

  20. Responses to simulated nitrogen deposition by the neotropical epiphytic orchid Laelia speciosa

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Álvarez, Edison A.; Lindig-Cisneros, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Potential ecophysiological responses to nitrogen deposition, which is considered to be one of the leading causes for global biodiversity loss, were studied for the endangered endemic Mexican epiphytic orchid, Laelia speciosa, via a shadehouse dose-response experiment (doses were 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40, and 80 kg N ha−1 yr−1) in order to assess the potential risk facing this orchid given impending scenarios of nitrogen deposition. Lower doses of nitrogen of up to 20 kg N ha yr−1, the dose that led to optimal plant performance, acted as fertilizer. For instance, the production of leaves and pseudobulbs were respectively 35% and 36% greater for plants receiving 20 kg N ha yr−1 than under any other dose. Also, the chlorophyll content and quantum yield peaked at 0.66 ± 0.03 g m−2 and 0.85 ± 0.01, respectively, for plants growing under the optimum dose. In contrast, toxic effects were observed at the higher doses of 40 and 80 kg N ha yr−1. The δ13C for leaves averaged −14.7 ± 0.2‰ regardless of the nitrogen dose. In turn, δ15N decreased as the nitrogen dose increased from 0.9 ± 0.1‰ under 2.5 kg N ha−1yr−1 to −3.1 ± 0.2‰ under 80 kg N ha−1yr−1, indicating that orchids preferentially assimilate NH4+ rather than NO3− of the solution under higher doses of nitrogen. Laelia speciosa showed a clear response to inputs of nitrogen, thus, increasing rates of atmospheric nitrogen deposition can pose an important threat for this species. PMID:26131375

  1. Uptake of ant-derived nitrogen in the myrmecophytic orchid Caularthron bilamellatum

    PubMed Central

    Gegenbauer, Christian; Mayer, Veronika E.; Zotz, Gerhard; Richter, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Mutualistic ant–plant associations are common in a variety of plant families. Some myrmecophytic plants, such as the epiphytic orchid Caularthron bilamellatum, actively form hollow structures that provide nesting space for ants (myrmecodomatia), despite a substantial loss of water-storage tissue. This study aimed at assessing the ability of the orchid to take up nitrogen from ant-inhabited domatia as possible trade-off for the sacrifice of potential water storage capacity. Methods Nitrogen uptake capabilities and uptake kinetics of 15N-labelled compounds (NH4+, urea and l -glutamine) were studied in field-grown Caularthron bilamellatum plants in a tropical moist forest in Panama. Plants were either labelled directly, by injecting substrates into the hollow pseudobulbs or indirectly, by labelling of the associated ants in situ. Key Results Caularthron bilamellatum plants were able to take up all tested inorganic and organic nitrogen forms through the inner surface of the pseudobulbs. Uptake of NH4+ and glutamine followed Michaelis–Menten kinetics, but urea uptake was not saturable up to 2 mm. 15N-labelled compounds were rapidly translocated and incorporated into vegetative and reproductive structures. By labelling ants with 15N in situ, we were able to prove that ants transfer N to the plants under field conditions. Conclusions Based on 15N labelling experiments we were able to demonstrate, for the first time, that a myrmecophytic orchid is capable of actively acquiring different forms of nitrogen from its domatia and that nutrient flux from ants to plants does indeed occur under natural conditions. This suggests that beyond anti-herbivore protection host plants benefit from ants by taking up nitrogen derived from ant debris. PMID:22778148

  2. Effects of pollination limitation and seed predation on female reproductive success of a deceptive orchid

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Ryan P.; Arnold, Paige M.; Michaels, Helen J.

    2014-01-01

    For many species of conservation significance, multiple factors limit reproduction. This research examines the contributions of plant height, number of flowers, number of stems, pollen limitation and seed predation to female reproductive success in the deceit-pollinated orchid, Cypripedium candidum. The deceptive pollination strategy employed by many orchids often results in high levels of pollen limitation. While increased floral display size may attract pollinators, C. candidum's multiple, synchronously flowering stems could promote selfing and also increase attack by weevil seed predators. To understand the joint impacts of mutualists and antagonists, we examined pollen limitation, seed predation and the effects of pollen source over two flowering seasons (2009 and 2011) in Ohio. In 2009, 36 pairs of plants size-matched by flower number, receiving either supplemental hand or open pollination, were scored for fruit maturation, mass of seeds and seed predation. Pollen supplementation increased proportion of flowers maturing into fruit, with 87 % fruit set when hand pollinated compared with 46 % for naturally pollinated flowers. Inflorescence height had a strong effect, as taller inflorescences had higher initial fruit set, while shorter stems had higher predation. Seed predation was seen in 73 % of all fruits. A parallel 2011 experiment that included a self-pollination treatment and excluded seed predators found initial and final fruit set were higher in the self and outcross pollination treatments than in the open-pollinated treatment. However, seed mass was higher in both open pollinated and outcross pollination treatments compared with hand self-pollinated. We found greater female reproductive success for taller flowering stems that simultaneously benefited from increased pollination and reduced seed predation. These studies suggest that this species is under strong reinforcing selection to increase allocation to flowering stem height. Our results may help

  3. Golden mean renormalization for a generalized Harper equation: The Ketoja-Satija orchid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestel, B. D.; Osbaldestin, A. H.

    2004-12-01

    We provide a rigorous analysis of the fluctuations of localized eigenstates in a generalized Harper equation with golden mean flux and with next-nearest-neighbor interactions. For next-nearest-neighbor interaction above a critical threshold, these self-similar fluctuations are characterized by orbits of a renormalization operator on a universal strange attractor, whose projection was dubbed the "orchid" by Ketoja and Satija [Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 2762 (1995)]. We show that the attractor is given essentially by an embedding of a subshift of finite type, and give a description of its periodic orbits.

  4. An overview of the Phalaenopsis orchid genome through BAC end sequence analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Phalaenopsis orchids are popular floral crops, and development of new cultivars is economically important to floricultural industries worldwide. Analysis of orchid genes could facilitate orchid improvement. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) end sequences (BESs) can provide the first glimpses into the sequence composition of a novel genome and can yield molecular markers for use in genetic mapping and breeding. Results We used two BAC libraries (constructed using the BamHI and HindIII restriction enzymes) of Phalaenopsis equestris to generate pair-end sequences from 2,920 BAC clones (71.4% and 28.6% from the BamHI and HindIII libraries, respectively), at a success rate of 95.7%. A total of 5,535 BESs were generated, representing 4.5 Mb, or about 0.3% of the Phalaenopsis genome. The trimmed sequences ranged from 123 to 1,397 base pairs (bp) in size, with an average edited read length of 821 bp. When these BESs were subjected to sequence homology searches, it was found that 641 (11.6%) were predicted to represent protein-encoding regions, whereas 1,272 (23.0%) contained repetitive DNA. Most of the repetitive DNA sequences were gypsy- and copia-like retrotransposons (41.9% and 12.8%, respectively), whereas only 10.8% were DNA transposons. Further, 950 potential simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were discovered. Dinucleotides were the most abundant repeat motifs; AT/TA dimer repeats were the most frequent SSRs, representing 253 (26.6%) of all identified SSRs. Microsynteny analysis revealed that more BESs mapped to the whole-genome sequences of poplar than to those of grape or Arabidopsis, and even fewer mapped to the rice genome. This work will facilitate analysis of the Phalaenopsis genome, and will help clarify similarities and differences in genome composition between orchids and other plant species. Conclusion Using BES analysis, we obtained an overview of the Phalaenopsis genome in terms of gene abundance, the presence of repetitive DNA and SSR markers

  5. Symbiotic seed germination and protocorm development of Aa achalensis Schltr., a terrestrial orchid endemic from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Sebastián, Fracchia; Vanesa, Silvani; Eduardo, Flachsland; Graciela, Terada; Silvana, Sede

    2014-01-01

    Aa achalensis is an endangered terrestrial orchid endemic from Argentina. In vitro symbiotic seed germination was evaluated for its propagation. Five different fungal strains were isolated from this species: two Rhizoctonia-like related to Thanatephorus cucumeris and three ascomicetaceous fungi belonging to Phialophora graminicola and one to an uncultured Pezizaceae. All five isolates promoted seed germination being one T. cucumeris strain the most effective. After 16 weeks of growth, 30% of A. achalensis protocorms developed until seedlings with two/four leaves in this treatment. These findings open an opportunity to the knowledge and preservation of this species. PMID:23780616

  6. [Visitation of orchid by Melipona capixaba Moure & Camargo (Hymenoptera: Apidae), bee threatened with extinction].

    PubMed

    Resende, Helder C; Barros, Fábio de; Campos, Lúcio A O; Fernandes-Salomão, Tânia M

    2008-01-01

    The stingless bee Melipona capixaba Moure & Camargo is a species restricted to the Atlantic forest in the Domingos Martins, Conceição do Castelo, Venda Nova do Imigrante and Afonso Cláudio County, in the Espírito Santo State, Brazil. Despite its cological importance as pollinator few studies have examined the ecology and biology of this bee. This note relates a case of the M. capixaba workers carrying pollinarium attached to the scuttellum. The pollinaria were identified as belonging to the orchid subtribe Maxillariinae species possibly of the genus Maxillaria sensu lato or Xylobium. PMID:19061051

  7. Solitary invasive orchid bee outperforms co-occurring native bees to promote fruit set in an invasive Solanum.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the potential effects of naturalized solitary or semi-social bees on the environment. We took advantage of the recent naturalization of an orchid bee, Euglossa viridissima, in southern Florida to study the effects of this semi-social bee on reproduction of Solanum torvum, an in...

  8. Virus-induced gene silencing unravels multiple transcription factors involved in floral growth and development in Phalaenopsis orchids

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ming-Hsien; Pan, Zhao-Jun; Lai, Pei-Han; Lu, Hsiang-Chia; Yeh, Hsin-Hung; Hsu, Chia-Chi; Wu, Wan-Lin; Chung, Mei-Chu; Wang, Shyh-Shyan; Chen, Wen-Huei; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Orchidaceae, one of the largest angiosperm families, has significant commercial value. Isolation of genes involved in orchid floral development and morphogenesis, scent production, and colouration will advance knowledge of orchid flower formation and facilitate breeding new varieties to increase the commercial value. With high-throughput virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), this study identified five transcription factors involved in various aspects of flower morphogenesis in the orchid Phalaenopsis equestris. These genes are PeMADS1, PeMADS7, PeHB, PebHLH, and PeZIP. Silencing PeMADS1 and PebHLH resulted in reduced flower size together with a pelaloid column containing petal-like epidermal cells and alterations of epidermal cell arrangement in lip lateral lobes, respectively. Silencing PeMADS7, PeHB, and PeZIP alone resulted in abortion of the first three fully developed flower buds of an inflorescence, which indicates the roles of the genes in late flower development. Furthermore, double silencing PeMADS1 and PeMADS6, C- and B-class MADS-box genes, respectively, produced a combinatorial phenotype with two genes cloned in separate vectors. Both PeMADS1 and PeMADS6 are required to ensure the normal development of the lip and column as well as the cuticle formation on the floral epidermal cell surface. Thus, VIGS allows for unravelling the interaction between two classes of MADS transcription factors for dictating orchid floral morphogenesis. PMID:23956416

  9. Evidence for novel and specialized mycorrhizal parasitism: the orchid Gastrodia confusa gains carbon from saprotrophic Mycena

    PubMed Central

    Ogura-Tsujita, Yuki; Gebauer, Gerhard; Hashimoto, Toshimasa; Umata, Hidetaka; Yukawa, Tomohisa

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the physiological ecology of the Asian non-photosynthetic orchid Gastrodia confusa. We revealed its mycorrhizal partners by using molecular identification and identified its ultimate nutritional source by analysing carbon and nitrogen natural stable isotope abundances. Molecular identification using internal transcribed spacer and large subunit nrDNA sequences showed that G. confusa associates with several species of litter- and wood-decomposer Mycena fungi. The carbon and nitrogen isotope signatures of G. confusa were analysed together with photosynthetic plant reference samples and samples of the ectomycorrhizal epiparasite Monotropa uniflora. We found that G. confusa was highly enriched in 13C but not greatly in 15N, while M. uniflora was highly enriched in both 13C and 15N. The 13C and 15N signatures of G. confusa were the closest to those of the fruit bodies of saprotrophic fungi. Our results demonstrate for the first time using molecular and mass-spectrometric approaches that myco-heterotrophic plants gain carbon through parasitism of wood or litter decaying fungi. Furthermore, we demonstrate that, several otherwise free-living non-mycorrhizal, Mycena can be mycorrhizal partners of orchids. PMID:19004757

  10. Orchids mimic green-leaf volatiles to attract prey-hunting wasps for pollination.

    PubMed

    Brodmann, Jennifer; Twele, Robert; Francke, Wittko; Hölzler, Gerald; Zhang, Qing-He; Ayasse, Manfred

    2008-05-20

    An outstanding feature of orchids is the diversity of their pollination systems [1]. Most remarkable are those species that employ chemical deceit for the attraction of pollinators [2]. The orchid Epipactis helleborine is a typical wasp flower, exhibiting physiological and morphological adaptations for the attraction of pollinating social wasps [3]. As noted by Darwin [1], this species is almost entirely overlooked by other potential pollinators, despite a large nectar reward. Therefore, the mechanism for the attraction of pollinating social wasps was something of a mystery. By using a combination of behavioral experiments, electrophysiological investigations, and chemical analyses, we demonstrate for the first time that the flowers of E. helleborine and E. purpurata emit green-leaf volatiles (GLVs), which are attractive to foragers of the social wasps Vespula germanica and V. vulgaris. GLVs, emitted by damaged plant tissues, are known to guide parasitic wasps to their hosts [4]. Several E. helleborine GLVs that induced response in the antennae of wasps were also emitted by cabbage leaves infested with caterpillars (Pieris brassicae), which are common prey items for wasps [5]. This is the first example in which GLVs have been implicated in chemical mimicry for the attraction of pollinating insects. PMID:18472423

  11. Enfleurage, lipid recycling and the origin of perfume collection in orchid bees

    PubMed Central

    Eltz, Thomas; Zimmermann, Yvonne; Haftmann, Jenny; Twele, Robert; Francke, Wittko; Quezada-Euan, J. Javier G; Lunau, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Enfleurage, the extraction of elusive floral scents with the help of a lipophilic carrier (grease), is widely used in the perfume industry. Male neotropical orchid bees (Euglossini), which accumulate exogenous fragrances as pheromone analogues, use a similar technique. To collect fragrances, the bees apply large amounts of straight-chain lipids to odoriferous surfaces from their cephalic labial glands, which dissolve the volatiles, and the mixture is then transferred to voluminous hind-leg pockets. Here, we show that males do in fact operate a lipid conveyor belt to accumulate and concentrate their perfume. From the hind-leg pockets of caged male Euglossa viridissima, deuterated derivatives of carrier lipids were consecutively sequestered, shuttled back to the labial glands and reused on consecutive bouts of fragrance collection. Such lipid cycling is instrumental in creating complex perfume bouquets. Furthermore, we found that labial glands of male orchid bees are strikingly similar to those of scent-marking male bumblebees in terms of size, form and structure. This, and a prominent overlap in secretory products, led us to propose that perfume collection evolved from scent-marking in ancestral corbiculate bees. PMID:17848369

  12. Analysis of the TCP genes expressed in the inflorescence of the orchid Orchis italica

    PubMed Central

    De Paolo, Sofia; Gaudio, Luciano; Aceto, Serena

    2015-01-01

    TCP proteins are plant-specific transcription factors involved in many different processes. Because of their involvement in a large number of developmental pathways, their roles have been investigated in various plant species. However, there are almost no studies of this transcription factor family in orchids. Based on the available transcriptome of the inflorescence of the orchid Orchis italica, in the present study we identified 12 transcripts encoding TCP proteins. The phylogenetic analysis showed that they belong to different TCP classes (I and II) and groups (PCF, CIN and CYC/TB1), and that they display a number of conserved motifs when compared with the TCPs of Arabidopsis and Oryza. The presence of a specific cleavage site for the microRNA miRNA319, an important post-transcriptional regulator of several TCP genes in other species, was demonstrated for one transcript of O. italica, and the analysis of the expression pattern of the TCP transcripts in different inflorescence organs and in leaf tissue suggests that some TCP transcripts of O. italica exert their role only in specific tissues, while others may play multiple roles in different tissues. In addition, the evolutionary analysis showed a general purifying selection acting on the coding region of these transcripts. PMID:26531864

  13. Pollinator specificity drives strong prepollination reproductive isolation in sympatric sexually deceptive orchids.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Michael R; Peakall, Rod

    2014-06-01

    Few studies have quantified the full range of pre- and postzygotic barriers that limit introgression between closely related plant species. Here, we assess the strength of four isolating mechanisms operating between two morphologically similar and very closely related sympatric orchid taxa, Chiloglottis valida and C. aff. jeanesii. Each taxon sexually attracts its specific wasp pollinator via distinct floral volatile chemistry. Behavioral experiments with flowers and synthetic versions of their floral volatiles confirmed that very strong pollinator isolation is mediated by floral odor chemistry. However, artificially placing flowers of the two taxa in contact proximity revealed the potential for rare interspecific pollination. Although we found hybrid vigor in F1 hybrids produced by hand-crossing, genetic analysis at both nuclear and chloroplast loci showed significant and moderate-to-strong genetic differentiation between taxa. A Bayesian clustering method for the detection of introgression at nuclear loci failed to find any evidence for hybridization across 571 unique genotypes at one site of sympatry. Rather than inhibiting gene flow, postpollination barriers surveyed here show no contribution to overall reproductive isolation. This demonstrates the primacy of pollinators in maintaining species boundaries in these orchids, which display one of the strongest known examples of prepollination floral isolation. PMID:24527666

  14. Rampant Gene Loss in the Underground Orchid Rhizanthella gardneri Highlights Evolutionary Constraints on Plastid Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Delannoy, Etienne; Fujii, Sota; Colas des Francs-Small, Catherine; Brundrett, Mark; Small, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Since the endosymbiotic origin of chloroplasts from cyanobacteria 2 billion years ago, the evolution of plastids has been characterized by massive loss of genes. Most plants and algae depend on photosynthesis for energy and have retained ∼110 genes in their chloroplast genome that encode components of the gene expression machinery and subunits of the photosystems. However, nonphotosynthetic parasitic plants have retained a reduced plastid genome, showing that plastids have other essential functions besides photosynthesis. We sequenced the complete plastid genome of the underground orchid, Rhizanthella gardneri. This remarkable parasitic subterranean orchid possesses the smallest organelle genome yet described in land plants. With only 20 proteins, 4 rRNAs, and 9 tRNAs encoded in 59,190 bp, it is the least gene-rich plastid genome known to date apart from the fragmented plastid genome of some dinoflagellates. Despite numerous differences, striking similarities with plastid genomes from unrelated parasitic plants identify a minimal set of protein-encoding and tRNA genes required to reside in plant plastids. This prime example of convergent evolution implies shared selective constraints on gene loss or transfer. PMID:21289370

  15. Factors affecting reproductive success in three entomophilous orchid species in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Vojtkó, Anna E; Sonkoly, Judit; Lukács, Balázs András; Molnár V, Attila

    2015-06-01

    The reproductive success of orchids is traditionally estimated by determining the fruit-set of individuals. Here, we investigated both the fruit and the seed production of three orchid species and the factors that may affect individual fruit-set, like pollination strategy, individual traits or the annual amount of precipitation. The species [Dactylorhiza sambucina (L.) Soó, Dactylorhiza majalis (Rchb.) P. F. Hunt & Summerhayes and Platanthera bifolia (L.) L. C. M. Richard] were studied in three consecutive years (2010-2012) in the Bükk Mountains, Hungary. All three species were proved to be non-autogamous by a bagging experiment. Data analyses showed significant differences between seed numbers but not between fruit-sets of species. There was no statistical difference in individual reproductive success between wet and dry years, however, the effect of the annual amount of precipitation is significant on the population level. Comparison of published fruit-set data revealed accordance with our results in P. bifolia, but not in D. sambucina and D. majalis. We assume that the surprisingly high fruit-set values of the two Dactylorhiza species may be due to the fact that the pollination crisis reported from Western European countries is not an actual problem in the Bükk Mountains, Hungary. PMID:26081278

  16. Endangered edible orchids and vulnerable gatherers in the context of HIV/AIDS in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Tanzania is a wild orchid biodiversity hotspot and has a high prevalence of HIV/AIDS. The wild orchids in the study are endemic and protected by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species. Every year, however, between 2.2 and 4.1 million orchid plants consumed in Zambia are estimated as originating from Tanzania. This research examines the differences between HIV/AIDS wild edible orchid gatherers and non-HIV/AIDS gatherers with regards to the frequency of gathering, salience in naming the various orchids, gathering knowledge acquisition and perceptions regarding the current state of abundance of the edible species. Methods Data was collected through interviews with 224 individuals in the Makete District of Tanzania close to the boarder of Zambia. Free-listings were conducted and Sutrup's Cultural Significance Index (CSI) constructed. The independent t-test was used to compare the differences in gathering frequencies between affected and non-affected gatherers. A multiple comparison of the 4 subgroups (affected adults and children, and non-affected adults and children) in gathering frequencies was done with a one way ANOVA test and its post hoc test. To examine the difference between affected and non-affected gatherers difference in source of gathering knowledge, a chi square test was run. Results Forty two vernacular names of gathered orchid species were mentioned corresponding to 7 botanical species belongs to genera Disa, Satyrium, Habenaria, Eulophia and Roeperocharis. Ninety-seven percent of HIV/AIDS affected households state that orchid gathering is their primary economic activity compared to non-HIV/AIDS affected households at 9.7 percent. The HIV/AIDS affected gathered significantly more often than the non-affected. AIDS orphans, however, gathered most frequently. Gatherers perceive a decreasing trend of abundance of 6 of the 7 species. Gathering activities were mainly performed in age based peer groups. The results revealed a

  17. Bird Pollination in an Angraecoid Orchid on Reunion Island (Mascarene Archipelago, Indian Ocean)

    PubMed Central

    MICHENEAU, CLAIRE; FOURNEL, JACQUES; PAILLER, THIERRY

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Although numerous angraecoid orchids in Madagascar display typical sphingophilous syndrome (i.e. white, nectariferous, long-spurred flowers, producing a strong scent at the crepuscule that is attractive to moths), three species of Angraecum in Reunion, belonging to the endemic section Hadrangis, have atypical unscented and short-spurred flowers. The aim of the study was to investigate the implication of plant–pollinator interaction on the evolution of floral morphology of these peculiar island floral forms. • Methods The flower morphology of A. striatum (one of the three section Hadrangis species) was investigated by performing a set of floral measures, and the reproductive biology was investigated by a set of hand pollination experiments. Natural pollinators were observed by means of a digital video camera. Pollinator efficiency (pollen removal and deposition) and reproductive success (fruit set) were quantified once a week in natural field conditions during the 2005 flowering season (i.e. from January to March). • Key Results The orchid is self-compatible but requires a pollinator to achieve fruit set. Only one pollinator was observed, the endemic white-eye Zosterops borbonicus (Zosteropidae). These birds perched on inflorescences, and probed most fresh-looking flowers on each plant for nectar. Nectar was both abundant (averaging 7·7 µL) and dilute (averaging 9·7 % sugar in sucrose equivalents). Birds were mostly active between 0830 and 0930 h. Visits to plants were extremely short, lasting from 9 to 27 s. At the study site, 60·9 % of flowers had pollen removed, and 46·4 % had pollinia deposited on stigmas. The proportion of flowers that initiated a fruit averaged 20·6 % in natural conditions. • Conclusions For the first time, a bird-pollinated orchid is described from a sub-tribe that is mainly specialized for moth pollination. This study documents a morphological shift in flowers in response to pollinator

  18. RNA-Seq SSRs of Moth Orchid and Screening for Molecular Markers across Genus Phalaenopsis (Orchidaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Shium; Chang, Chia-Hung; Chiang, Yu-Chung; Chou, Chang-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Background The moth orchid (Phalaenopsis species) is an ornamental crop that is highly commercialized worldwide. Over 30,000 cultivars of moth orchids have been registered at the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS). These cultivars were obtained by artificial pollination of interspecific hybridization. Therefore, the identification of different cultivars is highly important in the worldwide market. Methods/Results We used Illumina sequencing technology to analyze an important species for breeding, Phalaenopsis aphrodite subsp. formosana and develop the expressed sequence tag (EST)-simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. After de novo assembly, the obtained sequence covered 29.1 Mb, approximately 2.2% of the P. aphrodite subsp. formosana genome (1,300 Mb), and a total of 1,439 EST-SSR loci were detected. SSR occurs in the exon region, including the 5’ untranslated region (UTR), coding region (CDS), and 3’UTR, on average every 20.22 kb. The di- and tri-nucleotide motifs (51.49% and 35.23%, respectively) were the two most frequent motifs in the P. aphrodite subsp. formosana. To validate the developed EST-SSR loci and to evaluate the transferability to the genus Phalaenopsis, thirty tri-nucleotide motifs of the EST-SSR loci were randomly selected to design EST-SSR primers and to evaluate the polymorphism and transferability across 22 native Phalaenopsis species that are usually used as parents for moth orchid breeding. Of the 30 EST-SSR loci, ten polymorphic and transferable SSR loci across the 22 native taxa can be obtained. The validated EST-SSR markers were further proven to discriminate 12 closely related Phalaenopsis cultivars. The results show that it is not difficult to obtain universal SSR markers by transcriptome deep sequencing in Phalaenopsis species. Conclusions This study supported that transcriptome analysis based on deep sequencing is a powerful tool to develop SSR loci in non-model species. A large number of EST-SSR loci can be isolated, and about 33

  19. In vitro propagation by asymbiotic seed germination and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity studies of tissue culture raised plants of three medicinally important species of dendrobium.

    PubMed

    Lo, Shu-Fung; Nalawade, Satish Manohar; Mulabagal, Vanisree; Matthew, Susan; Chen, Chung-Li; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Tsay, Hsin-Sheng

    2004-05-01

    A simple and efficient plant propagation system has been developed by asymbiotic germination of seeds in three medicinally important Dendrobium species, namely, Dendrobium tosaense, Dendrobium moniliforme, and Dendrobium linawianum. Plants obtained from natural habitats were grown in the greenhouse. The flowers were hand pollinated. Seeds of the capsules derived after 12 weeks of hand-pollination germinated asymbiotically (50-74%) on half strength Murashige and Skoog's (MS) basal medium with 3% sucrose and solidified with 0.9% Difco agar. Active growth in the germinated seedlings was achieved by re-culturing on full strength MS basal medium supplemented with 8% banana homogenate, 8% potato homogenate, 8% coconut water, 1.5% sucrose and 0.9% Difco agar. Healthy plantlets, transferred to plastic trays containing moss or moss and tree fern, successfully acclimatized (84-100%) in the greenhouse. A marked varied response was observed in the free radical scavenging activity of methanolic extracts of in vitro propagated plants, on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical using a UV spectrophotometer assay. Methanolic extracts were prepared by dissolving the powdered plant material, obtained from six months old in vitro propagated plants, each about 5 g, in boiling methanol. The percentage of scavenging effect of D. tosaense extract was 95.9% at 0.4 mg/ml concentration, whereas D. monoliforme, and D. linawianum extracts scavenged 83.4% and 92.3%, respectively, at a concentration of 0.4 mg/ml. All the extracts scavenged DPPH radical significantly in a concentration dependent manner. PMID:15133256

  20. Cymbidium chlorotic mosaic virus, a new sobemovirus isolated from a spring orchid (Cymbidium goeringii) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hideki; Takemoto, Shogo; Maruyama, Kazuyuki; Chiba, Sotaro; Andika, Ida Bagus; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2015-08-01

    Cymbidium chlorotic mosaic virus (CyCMV), isolated from a spring orchid (Cymbidium goeringii), was characterized molecularly. CyCMV isometric virions comprise a single, positive-strand RNA genome of 4,083 nucleotides and 30-kDa coat protein. The virus genome contains five overlapping open reading frames with a genomic organization similar to that of sobemoviruses. BLAST searches and phylogenetic analysis revealed that CyCMV is most closely related to papaya lethal yellowing virus, a proposed dicot-infecting sobemovirus (58.8 % nucleotide sequence identity), but has a relatively distant relationship to monocot-infecting sobemoviruses, with only modest sequence identities. This suggests that CyCMV is a new monocot-infecting member of the floating genus Sobemovirus. PMID:26025156

  1. Photoperiod and temperature effects on in vitro growth and flowering of P. pusilla, an epiphytic orchid.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Ana Paula A; Figueiredo-Ribeiro Rd, Rita de Cássia L; Kerbauy, Gilberto B

    2004-05-01

    Psygmorchis pusilla Dodson and Dressler, an epiphytic orchid, has been shown to be an interesting model to study in vitro flower formation. In the present study, the effects of photoperiod and temperature on vegetative and reproductive development were investigated. Although photoperiod had limited effects on leaf number, an etiolating process was verified in darkness and a higher growth was detected under long days. A positive relationship was observed between long days and floral spike formation. However, plant incubation under 20 h photoperiod or longer days negatively affected floral bud development, inhibiting anthesis and reducing flower longevity. Higher soluble sugar and starch levels were detected in plants cultivated under long days, while chlorophyll and carotenoids contents were negatively affected under these conditions. Plants showed great sensitivity to temperature variations; 27 degrees C being the most adequate for growth, leaf and floral spike formation. Temperatures of 22 and 32 degrees C were not appropriate for in vitro development of P. pusilla. PMID:15191744

  2. Thuniopsis: A New Orchid Genus and Phylogeny of the Tribe Arethuseae (Orchidaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hai-Fei; Wen, Tie-Long; Li, Shi-Jin

    2015-01-01

    An investigation of a questionable orchid led to the discovery of a new genus and species Thuniopsis cleistogama, endemic to Yunnan province, China. It is characterized by having a subglobose corm, a spike-like (racemose) inflorescence, half opened and spurless flowers, a collar-shaped stigma and subglobose capsules. Based on DNA sequence data from three gene regions (nuclear ribosomal ITS, chloroplast matK and trnL), we investigated its phylogenetic position within the tribe Arethuseae. Phylogenies using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference support the recognition of Thuniopsis as a distinct genus, and suggest its close relationship to the genera Bletilla, Dilochia, and Thunia. The new genus is circumscribed and a description and illustrations of the new species are provided. The phylogenetic relationships among the genera in Arethuseae are accessed. Moreover, our phylogeny also shed light on the phylogenetic positions of several genera which, to date, remain uncertain. PMID:26244769

  3. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellite loci for the endangered orchid Cypripedium japonicum (Orchidaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yumi; Izuno, Ayako; Isagi, Yuji; Kurosawa, Takahide; Kaneko, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Twenty-six microsatellite markers were developed for the endangered orchid Cypripedium japonicum (Orchidaceae) to estimate the clonal diversity and genetic structure of the remaining populations in Japan. Methods and Results: Microsatellite loci of C. japonicum were isolated using Ion Personal Genome Machine (PGM) sequencing. The primer sets were tested on 55 ramets sampled from two populations in Japan. Sixteen loci showed polymorphism in at least one population, with two to five alleles per locus. Observed and expected heterozygosities for the two populations ranged from 0.00 to 0.92 and 0.00 to 0.71, respectively. Conclusions: The microsatellite markers developed here provide a useful tool to analyze clonal structure and sexual regeneration status and will help to manage the remaining genetic variation within C. japonicum. PMID:26949576

  4. Genetic Diversity and Population Differentiation of Calanthe tsoongiana, a Rare and Endemic Orchid in China

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xin; Wang, Cai-xia; Tian, Min

    2013-01-01

    Calanthe tsoongiana is a rare terrestrial orchid endemic to China, and this species has experienced severe habitat loss and fragmentation. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers were employed to assess the genetic diversity and differentiation of six populations of C. tsoongiana. Based on 124 discernible fragments yielded by eleven selected primers, high genetic diversity was revealed at the species level; however, genetic diversity at the population level was relatively low. High-level genetic differentiation among populations was detected based on analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA), indicating potential limited gene flow. No significant relationship was observed between genetic and geographic distances among the sampled populations. These results suggested that restricted gene flow might be due to habitat fragmentation and reduced population size as a result of human activities. Based on the findings, several conservation strategies were proposed for the preservation of this threatened species. PMID:24129175

  5. Flower development of Phalaenopsis orchid involves functionally divergent SEPALLATA-like genes

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhao-Jun; Chen, You-Yi; Du, Jian-Syun; Chen, Yun-Yu; Chung, Mei-Chu; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Wang, Chun-Neng; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    The Phalaenopsis orchid produces complex flowers that are commercially valuable, which has promoted the study of its flower development. E-class MADS-box genes, SEPALLATA (SEP), combined with B-, C- and D-class MADS-box genes, are involved in various aspects of plant development, such as floral meristem determination, organ identity, fruit maturation, seed formation and plant architecture. Four SEP-like genes were cloned from Phalaenopsis orchid, and the duplicated PeSEPs were grouped into PeSEP1/3 and PeSEP2/4. All PeSEPs were expressed in all floral organs. PeSEP2 expression was detectable in vegetative tissues. The study of protein–protein interactions suggested that PeSEPs may form higher order complexes with the B-, C-, D-class and AGAMOUS LIKE6-related MADS-box proteins to determine floral organ identity. The tepal became a leaf-like organ when PeSEP3 was silenced by virus-induced silencing, with alterations in epidermis identity and contents of anthocyanin and chlorophyll. Silencing of PeSEP2 had minor effects on the floral phenotype. Silencing of the E-class genes PeSEP2 and PeSEP3 resulted in the downregulation of B-class PeMADS2-6 genes, which indicates an association of PeSEP functions and B-class gene expression. These findings reveal the important roles of PeSEP in Phalaenopsis floral organ formation throughout the developmental process by the formation of various multiple protein complexes. PMID:24571782

  6. Identification and characterization of the microRNA transcriptome of a moth orchid Phalaenopsis aphrodite.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ya-Ting; Su, Chun-Lin; Jean, Wen-Han; Chen, Wan-Chieh; Chang, Yao-Chien Alex; Shih, Ming-Che

    2014-03-01

    Orchids display unique phenotypes, functional characteristics and ecological adaptations that are not found in model plants. In this study, we aimed to characterize the microRNA (miRNA) transcriptome and identify species- and tissue-specific miRNAs in Phalaenopsis aphrodite. After data filtering and cleanup, a total of 59,387,374 reads, representing 1,649,996 unique reads, were obtained from four P. aphrodite small RNA libraries. A systematic bioinformatics analysis pipeline was developed that can be used for miRNA and precursor mining, and target gene prediction in non-model plants. A total of 3,251 unique reads for 181 known plant miRNAs (belonging to 88 miRNA families), 23 new miRNAs and 91 precursors were identified. All the miRNA star sequences (miRNA*), the complementary strands of miRNA that from miRNA/miRNA* duplexes, of the predicted new miRNAs were detected in our small RNA libraries, providing additional evidence for their existence as new miRNAs in P. aphrodite. Furthermore, 240 potential miRNA-targets that appear to be involved in many different biological activities and molecular functions, especially transcription factors, were identified, suggesting that miRNAs can impact multiple processes in P. aphrodite. We also verified the cleavage sites for six targets using RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of 5' ends assay. The results provide valuable information about the composition, expression and function of miRNA in P. aphrodite, and will aid functional genomics studies of orchids. PMID:24173913

  7. Mycorrhizal specificity, preference, and plasticity of six slipper orchids from South Western China.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li; Yang, Zhu L; Li, Shu-Yun; Hu, Hong; Huang, Jia-Lin

    2010-11-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi of six endangered species, Paphiopedilum micranthum, Paphiopedilum armeniacum, Paphiopedilum dianthum, Cypripedium flavum, Cypripedium guttatum, and Cypripedium tibeticum, from two closely related genera in the Orchidaceae from Southwestern China, were characterized using the nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and part of the large subunit gene of mitochondrial rDNA (mtLSU) sequences. The most frequently detected fungi belonged to the Tulasnellaceae. These fungi were represented by 25 ITS sequence types and clustered into seven major clades in the phylogenetic analysis of 5.8S sequences. Species of Paphiopedilum and Cypripedium shared no fungal ITS sequence types in common, but their fungal taxa sometimes occurred in the same major clade of the 5.8S phylogenetic tree. Although it had several associated fungal ITS sequence types in a studied plot, each orchid species had in general only a single dominant type. The fungal sequence type spectra of different species of Paphiopedilum from similar habitats sometimes overlapped; however, the dominant sequence types differed among the species and so did the sequence-type spectra within Cypripedium. Orchids of P. micranthum and P. armeniacum transplanted from the field and grown in two greenhouses had a greater number of mycorrhizal associations than those sampled directly from the field. Root specimens from P. micranthum taken from the greenhouses were preferably associated with mycobionts of the Tulasnella calospora complex, while those from the field had mycorrhizal associations of other tulasnelloid taxa. Such plasticity in mycorrhizal associations makes ex situ conservation or even propagation by means of mycorrhization of axenically grown seedlings possible. PMID:20217434

  8. Amino Acid Change in an Orchid Desaturase Enables Mimicry of the Pollinator's Sex Pheromone.

    PubMed

    Sedeek, Khalid E M; Whittle, Edward; Guthörl, Daniela; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Shanklin, John; Schlüter, Philipp M

    2016-06-01

    Mimicry illustrates the power of selection to produce phenotypic convergence in biology [1]. A striking example is the imitation of female insects by plants that are pollinated by sexual deception of males of the same insect species [2-4]. This involves mimicry of visual, tactile, and chemical signals of females [2-7], especially their sex pheromones [8-11]. The Mediterranean orchid Ophrys exaltata employs chemical mimicry of cuticular hydrocarbons, particularly the 7-alkenes, in an insect sex pheromone to attract and elicit mating behavior in its pollinators, males of the cellophane bee Colletes cunicularius [11-13]. A difference in alkene double-bond positions is responsible for reproductive isolation between O. exaltata and closely related species, such as O. sphegodes [13-16]. We show that these 7-alkenes are likely determined by the action of the stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein desaturase (SAD) homolog SAD5. After gene duplication, changes in subcellular localization relative to the ancestral housekeeping desaturase may have allowed proto-SAD5's reaction products to undergo further biosynthesis to both 7- and 9-alkenes. Such ancestral coproduction of two alkene classes may have led to pollinator-mediated deleterious pleiotropy. Despite possible evolutionary intermediates with reduced activity, amino acid changes at the bottom of the substrate-binding cavity have conferred enzyme specificity for 7-alkene biosynthesis by preventing the binding of longer-chained fatty acid (FA) precursors by the enzyme. This change in desaturase function enabled the orchid to perfect its chemical mimicry of pollinator sex pheromones by escape from deleterious pleiotropy, supporting a role of pleiotropy in determining the possible trajectories of adaptive evolution. PMID:27212404

  9. Seasonal cycles, phylogenetic assembly, and functional diversity of orchid bee communities

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Santiago R; Hernández, Carlos; Link, Andres; López-Uribe, Margarita M

    2015-01-01

    Neotropical rainforests sustain some of the most diverse terrestrial communities on Earth. Euglossine (or orchid) bees are a diverse lineage of insect pollinators distributed throughout the American tropics, where they provide pollination services to a staggering diversity of flowering plant taxa. Elucidating the seasonal patterns of phylogenetic assembly and functional trait diversity of bee communities can shed new light into the mechanisms that govern the assembly of bee pollinator communities and the potential effects of declining bee populations. Male euglossine bees collect, store, and accumulate odoriferous compounds (perfumes) to subsequently use during courtship display. Thus, synthetic chemical baits can be used to attract and monitor euglossine bee populations. We conducted monthly censuses of orchid bees in three sites in the Magdalena valley of Colombia – a region where Central and South American biotas converge – to investigate the structure, diversity, and assembly of euglossine bee communities through time in relation to seasonal climatic cycles. In particular, we tested the hypothesis that phylogenetic community structure and functional trait diversity changed in response to seasonal rainfall fluctuations. All communities exhibited strong to moderate phylogenetic clustering throughout the year, with few pronounced bursts of phylogenetic overdispersion that coincided with the transition from wet-to-dry seasons. Despite the heterogeneous distribution of functional traits (e.g., body size, body mass, and proboscis length) and the observed seasonal fluctuations in phylogenetic diversity, we found that functional trait diversity, evenness, and divergence remained constant during all seasons in all communities. However, similar to the pattern observed with phylogenetic diversity, functional trait richness fluctuated markedly with rainfall in all sites. These results emphasize the importance of considering seasonal fluctuations in community assembly

  10. Flower development of Phalaenopsis orchid involves functionally divergent SEPALLATA-like genes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhao-Jun; Chen, You-Yi; Du, Jian-Syun; Chen, Yun-Yu; Chung, Mei-Chu; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Wang, Chun-Neng; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2014-05-01

    The Phalaenopsis orchid produces complex flowers that are commercially valuable, which has promoted the study of its flower development. E-class MADS-box genes, SEPALLATA (SEP), combined with B-, C- and D-class MADS-box genes, are involved in various aspects of plant development, such as floral meristem determination, organ identity, fruit maturation, seed formation and plant architecture. Four SEP-like genes were cloned from Phalaenopsis orchid, and the duplicated PeSEPs were grouped into PeSEP1/3 and PeSEP2/4. All PeSEPs were expressed in all floral organs. PeSEP2 expression was detectable in vegetative tissues. The study of protein-protein interactions suggested that PeSEPs may form higher order complexes with the B-, C-, D-class and AGAMOUS LIKE6-related MADS-box proteins to determine floral organ identity. The tepal became a leaf-like organ when PeSEP3 was silenced by virus-induced silencing, with alterations in epidermis identity and contents of anthocyanin and chlorophyll. Silencing of PeSEP2 had minor effects on the floral phenotype. Silencing of the E-class genes PeSEP2 and PeSEP3 resulted in the downregulation of B-class PeMADS2-6 genes, which indicates an association of PeSEP functions and B-class gene expression. These findings reveal the important roles of PeSEP in Phalaenopsis floral organ formation throughout the developmental process by the formation of various multiple protein complexes. PMID:24571782

  11. Adding Perches for Cross-Pollination Ensures the Reproduction of a Self-Incompatible Orchid

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Qiang; Rao, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Ting; Tang, Guang-Da; Huang, Lai-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Outcrossing is known to carry genetic advantages in comparison with inbreeding. In many cases, flowering plants develop a self-incompatibility mechanism, along with a floral component adaptation mechanism, to avoid self-pollination and to promote outbreeding. Orchids commonly have a lip in their flower that functions as the a visiting plate for insect pollinators. Aside from the lip, however, many species (including Coelogyne rigida) have sheaths around the axis of inflorescence. The function of these sheaths remains unknown, and has long been a puzzle to researchers. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the function of these sheaths in relation to the lip and the pollinators, as well as their role in the modes of pollination and reproduction of Coelogyne rigida in 30 flowering populations of orchids in the limestone area of Southeast Yunnan, China. We found that self-incompatible C. rigida developed specialized bird perches around the basal axis of inflorescence to attract sunbirds and to complement their behavioral tendency to change foraging locations frequently. This self-incompatibility mechanism operates separately from the floral component adaptation mechanism. This mechanism thus prevents bees from repeatedly visiting the floral lip of the same plant which, in turn, results in autogamy. In this way, instead of preventing autogamy, C. rigida responds to these negative effects through a highly efficient cross-pollination method that successfully transfers pollen to different plants. Conclusions The proposed method ensures reproductive success, while offsetting the infertile self-pollination by insects, thereby reducing mating costs and addressing the lack of cross-pollination. The adaptation provides a novel and striking example of structural adaptation that promotes cross-pollination in angiosperms. PMID:23308277

  12. Reassessing the temporal evolution of orchids with new fossils and a Bayesian relaxed clock, with implications for the diversification of the rare South American genus Hoffmannseggella (Orchidaceae: Epidendroideae)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The temporal origin and diversification of orchids (family Orchidaceae) has been subject to intense debate in the last decade. The description of the first reliable fossil in 2007 enabled a direct calibration of the orchid phylogeny, but little attention has been paid to the potential influence of dating methodology in obtaining reliable age estimates. Moreover, two new orchid fossils described in 2009 have not yet been incorporated in a molecular dating analysis. Here we compare the ages of major orchid clades estimated under two widely used methods, a Bayesian relaxed clock implemented in BEAST and Penalized Likelihood implemented in r8s. We then perform a new family-level analysis by integrating all 3 available fossils and using BEAST. To evaluate how the newly estimated ages may influence the evolutionary interpretation of a species-level phylogeny, we assess divergence times for the South American genus Hoffmannseggella (subfam. Epidendroideae), for which we present an almost complete phylogeny (40 out of 41 species sampled). Results Our results provide additional support that all extant orchids shared a most recent common ancestor in the Late Cretaceous (~77 million years ago, Ma). However, we estimate the crown age of the five orchid subfamilies to be generally (~1-8 Ma) younger than previously calculated under the Penalized Likelihood algorithm and using a single internal fossil calibration. The crown age of Hoffmannseggella is estimated here at ~11 Ma, some 3 Ma more recently than estimated under Penalized Likelihood. Conclusions Contrary to recent suggestions that orchid diversification began in a period of global warming, our results place the onset of diversification of the largest orchid subfamilies (Orchidoideae and Epidendroideae) in a period of global cooling subsequent to the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum. The diversification of Hoffmannseggella appears even more correlated to late Tertiary climatic fluctuations than previously suggested

  13. Effects of Droplet-Vitrification Cryopreservation Based on Physiological and Antioxidant Enzyme Activities of Brassidium Shooting Star Orchid

    PubMed Central

    Rahmah, Safrina; Ahmad Mubbarakh, Safiah; Soo Ping, Khor

    2015-01-01

    Protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) of Brassidium Shooting Star orchid were successfully cryopreserved using droplet-vitrification method. Vitrification based cryopreservation protocol is comprised of preculture, osmoprotection, cryoprotection, cooling, rewarming, and growth recovery and each and every step contributes to the achievement of successful cryopreservation. In order to reveal the lethal and nonlethal damage produced by cryopreservation, histological observation, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and biochemical analysis were carried out in both cryopreserved and noncryopreserved PLBs of Brassidium Shooting Star orchid comparing with the control PLBs stock culture. Histological and scanning electron microscopy analyses displayed structural changes in cryopreserved PLBs due to the impact of cryoinjury during exposure to liquid nitrogen. Total soluble protein significantly increased throughout the dehydration process and the highest value was achieved when PLBs were stored in liquid nitrogen. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and catalase (CAT) showed the highest enzyme activities in both dehydration and cryostorage treatments indicating that stress level of PLBs was high during these stages. PMID:25861687

  14. Effects of droplet-vitrification cryopreservation based on physiological and antioxidant enzyme activities of Brassidium shooting star orchid.

    PubMed

    Rahmah, Safrina; Ahmad Mubbarakh, Safiah; Soo Ping, Khor; Subramaniam, Sreeramanan

    2015-01-01

    Protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) of Brassidium Shooting Star orchid were successfully cryopreserved using droplet-vitrification method. Vitrification based cryopreservation protocol is comprised of preculture, osmoprotection, cryoprotection, cooling, rewarming, and growth recovery and each and every step contributes to the achievement of successful cryopreservation. In order to reveal the lethal and nonlethal damage produced by cryopreservation, histological observation, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and biochemical analysis were carried out in both cryopreserved and noncryopreserved PLBs of Brassidium Shooting Star orchid comparing with the control PLBs stock culture. Histological and scanning electron microscopy analyses displayed structural changes in cryopreserved PLBs due to the impact of cryoinjury during exposure to liquid nitrogen. Total soluble protein significantly increased throughout the dehydration process and the highest value was achieved when PLBs were stored in liquid nitrogen. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and catalase (CAT) showed the highest enzyme activities in both dehydration and cryostorage treatments indicating that stress level of PLBs was high during these stages. PMID:25861687

  15. Three 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Synthase Genes Regulated by Primary and Secondary Pollination Signals in Orchid Flowers1

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Anhthu Q.; Neill, Sharman D. O'

    1998-01-01

    The temporal and spatial expression patterns of three 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase genes were investigated in pollinated orchid (Phalaenopsis spp.) flowers. Pollination signals initiate a cascade of development events in multiple floral organs, including the induction of ethylene biosynthesis, which coordinates several postpollination developmental responses. The initiation and propagation of ethylene biosynthesis is regulated by the coordinated expression of three distinct ACC synthase genes in orchid flowers. One ACC synthase gene (Phal-ACS1) is regulated by ethylene and participates in amplification and interorgan transmission of the pollination signal, as we have previously described in a related orchid genus. Two additional ACC synthase genes (Phal-ACS2 and Phal-ACS3) are expressed primarily in the stigma and ovary of pollinated orchid flowers. Phal-ACS2 mRNA accumulated in the stigma within 1 h after pollination, whereas Phal-ACS1 mRNA was not detected until 6 h after pollination. Similar to the expression of Phal-ACS2, the Phal-ACS3 gene was expressed within 2 h after pollination in the ovary. Exogenous application of auxin, but not ACC, mimicked pollination by stimulating a rapid increase in ACC synthase activity in the stigma and ovary and inducing Phal-ACS2 and Phal-ACS3 mRNA accumulation in the stigma and ovary, respectively. These results provide the basis for an expanded model of interorgan regulation of three ACC synthase genes that respond to both primary (Phal-ACS2 and Phal-ACS3) and secondary (Phal-ACS1) pollination signals. PMID:9449850

  16. Evolution of the climatic tolerance and postglacial range changes of the most primitive orchids (Apostasioideae) within Sundaland, Wallacea and Sahul

    PubMed Central

    Mystkowska, Katarzyna; Kras, Marta; Dudek, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    The location of possible glacial refugia of six Apostasioideae representatives is estimated based on ecological niche modeling analysis. The distribution of their suitable niches during the last glacial maximum (LGM) is compared with their current potential and documented geographical ranges. The climatic factors limiting the studied species occurrences are evaluated and the niche overlap between the studied orchids is assessed and discussed. The predicted niche occupancy profiles and reconstruction of ancestral climatic tolerances suggest high level of phylogenetic niche conservatism within Apostasioideae.

  17. The effects of smoke derivatives on in vitro seed germination and development of the leopard orchid Ansellia africana.

    PubMed

    Papenfus, H B; Naidoo, D; Pošta, M; Finnie, J F; Van Staden, J

    2016-03-01

    Plant-derived smoke and smoke-isolated compounds stimulate germination in seeds from over 80 genera. It has also been reported that smoke affects overall plant vigour and has a stimulatory effect on pollen growth. The effect of smoke on orchid seeds, however, has not been assessed. In South Africa, orchid seeds from several genera may be exposed to smoke when they are released from their seedpods. It is therefore possible that smoke may affect their germination and growth. Therefore, the effects of smoke [applied as smoke-water (SW)] and two smoke-derived compounds, karrikinolide (KAR1 ) and trimethylbutenolide (TMB), were investigated on the germination and growth of orchid seeds in vitro. The effect of SW, KAR1 and TMB were investigated on the endangered epiphytic orchid, Ansellia africana, which is indigenous to tropical areas of Africa. Smoke-water, KAR1 and TMB were infused in half-strength MS medium. The number of germinated seeds and number of seeds and protocorm bodies to reach predetermined developmental stages were recorded on a weekly basis using a dissecting microscope for a 13-week period. Infusing SW 1:250 (v:v) into half-strength MS medium significantly increased the germination rate index (GRI) and the development rate index (DRI) of the A. africana seeds. All the SW treatments significantly increased the number of large protocorm bodies at the final stage of development. Infusing KAR1 into the growing medium had no significant effect on germination or development of the seeds. The TMB treatment, however, significantly reduced the GRI and DRI of A. africana seeds. PMID:26206372

  18. Three 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase genes regulated by primary and secondary pollination signals in orchid flowers.

    PubMed

    Bui, A Q; O'Neill, S D

    1998-01-01

    The temporal and spatial expression patterns of three 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase genes were investigated in pollinated orchid (Phalaenopsis spp.) flowers. Pollination signals initiate a cascade of development events in multiple floral organs, including the induction of ethylene biosynthesis, which coordinates several postpollination developmental responses. The initiation and propagation of ethylene biosynthesis is regulated by the coordinated expression of three distinct ACC synthase genes in orchid flowers. One ACC synthase gene (Phal-ACS1) is regulated by ethylene and participates in amplification and interorgan transmission of the pollination signal, as we have previously described in a related orchid genus. Two additional ACC synthase genes (Phal-ACS2 and Phal-ACS3) are expressed primarily in the stigma and ovary of pollinated orchid flowers. Phal-ACS2 mRNA accumulated in the stigma within 1 h after pollination, whereas Phal-ACS1 mRNA was not detected until 6 h after pollination. Similar to the expression of Phal-ACS2, the Phal-ACS3 gene was expressed within 2 h after pollination in the ovary. Exogenous application of auxin, but not ACC, mimicked pollination by stimulating a rapid increase in ACC synthase activity in the stigma and ovary and inducing Phal-ACS2 and Phal-ACS3 mRNA accumulation in the stigma and ovary, respectively. These results provide the basis for an expanded model of interorgan regulation of three ACC synthase genes that respond to both primary (Phal-ACS2 and Phal-ACS3) and secondary (Phal-ACS1) pollination signals. PMID:9449850

  19. Speciation via floral heterochrony and presumed mycorrhizal host switching of endemic butterfly orchids on the Azorean archipelago.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Richard M; Rudall, Paula J; Bidartondo, Martin I; Cozzolino, Salvatore; Tranchida-Lombardo, Valentina; Carine, Mark A; Moura, Mónica

    2014-06-01

    • Premise of the study: Most orchid species native to the Macaronesian islands reflect immigration from western Europe or North Africa followed by anagenesis. The only putative exception is the butterfly orchids (Platanthera) of the Azores, where three species apparently reflect at least one cladogenetic speciation event. This multidisciplinary study explores the origin, speciation, phenotypic, and genotypic cohesion of these Azorean species and their mainland relatives.• Methods: Plants of Platanthera from 30 localities spanning all nine Azorean islands were compared with those of four continental European relatives for 38 morphometric characters; substantial subsets were also analyzed for plastid microsatellites, and for nrITS of both the orchids and their mycorrhizae.• Key results: Although the three Azorean and four mainland species are all readily distinguished morphometrically using several floral characters, and hybridization appears rare, divergence in ITS and especially plastid sequences is small. Despite occupying similar laurisilva habitats, the Azorean species differ radically in the identities and diversity of their mycorrhizal partners; specialism apparently increases rarity.• Conclusions: Although morphological evidence suggests two invasions of the islands from NW Africa and/or SW Europe, ITS data imply only one. As the molecular data are unable to distinguish among the potential mainland ancestors, two scenarios of relationship are explored that imply different ancestors. Both scenarios require both anagenetic and cladogenetic speciation events, involving homoplastic shifts in overall flower size and (often substantial) changes in the relative dimensions of individual floral organs. Limited genotypic divergence among the three species compared with greater phenotypic divergence suggests comparatively recent speciation. Mycorrhizae may be the most critical factor dictating the respective ecological tolerances, and thus the relative

  20. Effect of nectar supplementation on male and female components of pollination success in the deceptive orchid Dactylorhiza sambucina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jersáková, Jana; Johnson, Steven D.; Kindlmann, Pavel; Pupin, Anne-Charlotte

    2008-05-01

    Many orchids lack floral nectar rewards and therefore rely on deception to attract pollinators. To determine the effect that a mutation for nectar production would have on overall pollination success of the deceptive orchid Dactylorhiza sambucina, we recorded pollen deposition and removal in flowers of plants that had either been supplemented with an artificial nectar solution or left unmanipulated as controls. Nectar supplementation resulted in significant increases in the proportion of flowers pollinated, regardless of morph colour and the density of plants supplemented in the population. However, nectar supplementation had a significant positive effect on pollinaria removal only for the yellow morph in one experiment in which a low proportion of plants were supplemented. Thus a mutation for nectar production would have a positive effect on overall pollination success in D. sambucina, particularly the female component. The observed patterns are discussed in relation to other factors, such as cross-pollination and the reallocation of nectar resources for other plant functions, which are traditionally considered to shape the rewardless strategies of orchids.

  1. Functional Significance of Labellum Pattern Variation in a Sexually Deceptive Orchid (Ophrys heldreichii): Evidence of Individual Signature Learning Effects

    PubMed Central

    Stejskal, Kerstin; Streinzer, Martin; Dyer, Adrian; Paulus, Hannes F.; Spaethe, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Mimicking female insects to attract male pollinators is an important strategy in sexually deceptive orchids of the genus Ophrys, and some species possess flowers with conspicuous labellum patterns. The function of the variation of the patterns remains unresolved, with suggestions that these enhance pollinator communication. We investigated the possible function of the labellum pattern in Ophrys heldreichii, an orchid species in which the conspicuous and complex labellum pattern contrasts with a dark background. The orchid is pollinated exclusively by males of the solitary bee, Eucera berlandi. Comparisons of labellum patterns revealed that patterns within inflorescences are more similar than those of other conspecific plants. Field observations showed that the males approach at a great speed and directly land on flowers, but after an unsuccessful copulation attempt, bees hover close and visually scan the labellum pattern for up to a minute. Learning experiments conducted with honeybees as an accessible model of bee vision demonstrated that labellum patterns of different plants can be reliably learnt; in contrast, patterns of flowers from the same inflorescence could not be discriminated. These results support the hypothesis that variable labellum patterns in O. heldreichii are involved in flower-pollinator communication which would likely help these plants to avoid geitonogamy. PMID:26571020

  2. Temporal variation in mycorrhizal diversity and carbon and nitrogen stable isotope abundance in the wintergreen meadow orchid Anacamptis morio.

    PubMed

    Ercole, Enrico; Adamo, Martino; Rodda, Michele; Gebauer, Gerhard; Girlanda, Mariangela; Perotto, Silvia

    2015-02-01

    Many adult orchids, especially photoautotrophic species, associate with a diverse range of mycorrhizal fungi, but little is known about the temporal changes that might occur in the diversity and functioning of orchid mycorrhiza during vegetative and reproductive plant growth. Temporal variations in the spectrum of mycorrhizal fungi and in stable isotope natural abundance were investigated in adult plants of Anacamptis morio, a wintergreen meadow orchid. Anacamptis morio associated with mycorrhizal fungi belonging to Tulasnella, Ceratobasidium and a clade of Pezizaceae (Ascomycetes). When a complete growing season was investigated, multivariate analyses indicated significant differences in the mycorrhizal fungal community. Among fungi identified from manually isolated pelotons, Tulasnella was more common in autumn and winter, the pezizacean clade was very frequent in spring, and Ceratobasidium was more frequent in summer. By contrast, relatively small variations were found in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stable isotope natural abundance, A. morio samples showing similar (15)N enrichment and (13)C depletion at the different sampling times. These observations suggest that, irrespective of differences in the seasonal environmental conditions, the plant phenological stages and the associated fungi, the isotopic content in mycorrhizal A. morio remains fairly constant over time. PMID:25382295

  3. Armament Imbalances: Match and Mismatch in Plant-Pollinator Traits of Highly Specialized Long-Spurred Orchids

    PubMed Central

    Moré, Marcela; Amorim, Felipe W.; Benitez-Vieyra, Santiago; Medina, A. Martin; Sazima, Marlies; Cocucci, Andrea A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Some species of long-spurred orchids achieve pollination by a close association with long-tongued hawkmoths. Among them, several Habenaria species present specialized mechanisms, where pollination success depends on the attachment of pollinaria onto the heads of hawkmoths with very long proboscises. However, in the Neotropical region such moths are less abundant than their shorter-tongued relatives and are also prone to population fluctuations. Both factors may give rise to differences in pollinator-mediated selection on floral traits through time and space. Methodology/Principal Findings We characterized hawkmoth assemblages and estimated phenotypic selection gradients on orchid spur lengths in populations of three South American Habenaria species. We examined the match between hawkmoth proboscis and flower spur lengths to determine whether pollinators may act as selective agents on flower morphology. We found significant directional selection on spur length only in Habenaria gourlieana, where most pollinators had proboscises longer than the mean of orchid spur length. Conclusions/Significance Phenotypic selection is dependent on the mutual match between pollinator and flower morphologies. However, our findings indicate that pollinator-mediated selection may vary through time and space according to local variations in pollinator assemblages. PMID:22848645

  4. Pollination system and the effect of inflorescence size on fruit set in the deceptive orchid Cephalanthera falcata.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Kenji; Naito, Risa S; Fukushima, Shigeki; Kawakita, Atsushi; Kato, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    Larger inflorescences in reward-producing plants can benefit plants by increasing both pollinator attraction and the duration of visits by individual pollinators. However, ultimately, inflorescence size is determined by the balance between the benefits of large inflorescences and the increased cost of geitonogamy. At present, little is known about the relationship between inflorescence size and fecundity in deceptive plants. Given that pollinators are likely to leave inflorescences lacking rewards quickly, it seems unlikely that longer pollinator visits and the risk of geitonogamy would be strong selective pressures in these species, which indicates that pollinator attraction might be the most important factor influencing their inflorescence size. Here we examined the pollination ecology of the deceptive orchid Cephalanthera falcata in order to clarify the effects of inflorescence size on the fruit set of this non-rewarding species. Field observations of the floral visitors showed that C. falcata is pollinated by the andrenid bee Andrena aburana, whilst pollination experiments demonstrated that this orchid species is neither autogamous nor apogamous, but is strongly pollinator dependent. Three consecutive years of field observations revealed that fruit set was positively correlated with the number of flowers per inflorescence. These results provide strong evidence that the nectarless orchid C. falcata benefits from producing larger inflorescences that attract a greater number of innate pollinators. Large inflorescences may have a greater positive effect on fruit set in deceptive plants because a growing number of studies suggest that fruit set in reward-producing plants is usually unaffected by display size. PMID:25801274

  5. Using Ecological Niche Models and Niche Analyses to Understand Speciation Patterns: The Case of Sister Neotropical Orchid Bees

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Daniel P.; Vilela, Bruno; De Marco, Paulo; Nemésio, André

    2014-01-01

    The role of past connections between the two major South American forested biomes on current species distribution has been recognized a long time ago. Climatic oscillations that further separated these biomes have promoted parapatric speciation, in which many species had their continuous distribution split, giving rise to different but related species (i.e., different potential distributions and realized niche features). The distribution of many sister species of orchid bees follow this pattern. Here, using ecological niche models and niche analyses, we (1) tested the role of ecological niche differentiation on the divergence between sister orchid-bees (genera Eulaema and Eufriesea) from the Amazon and Atlantic forests, and (2) highlighted interesting areas for new surveys. Amazonian species occupied different realized niches than their Atlantic sister species. Conversely, species of sympatric but distantly related Eulaema bees occupied similar realized niches. Amazonian species had a wide potential distribution in South America, whereas Atlantic Forest species were more limited to the eastern coast of the continent. Additionally, we identified several areas in need of future surveys. Our results show that the realized niche of Atlantic-Amazonian sister species of orchid bees, which have been previously treated as allopatric populations of three species, had limited niche overlap and similarity. These findings agree with their current taxonomy, which treats each of those populations as distinct valid species. PMID:25422941

  6. On the value of nuclear and mitochondrial gene sequences for reconstructing the phylogeny of vanilloid orchids (Vanilloideae, Orchidaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Kenneth M.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Most molecular phylogenetic studies of Orchidaceae have relied heavily on DNA sequences from the plastid genome. Nuclear and mitochondrial loci have only been superficially examined for their systematic value. Since 40% of the genera within Vanilloideae are achlorophyllous mycoheterotrophs, this is an ideal group of orchids in which to evaluate non-plastid gene sequences. Methods Phylogenetic reconstructions for Vanilloideae were produced using independent and combined data from the nuclear 18S, 5·8S and 26S rDNA genes and the mitochondrial atpA gene and nad1b-c intron. Key Results These new data indicate placements for genera such as Lecanorchis and Galeola, for which plastid gene sequences have been mostly unavailable. Nuclear and mitochondrial parsimony jackknife trees are congruent with each other and previously published trees based solely on plastid data. Because of high rates of sequence divergence among vanilloid orchids, even the short 5·8S rDNA gene provides impressive levels of resolution and support. Conclusions Orchid systematists are encouraged to sequence nuclear and mitochondrial gene regions along with the growing number of plastid loci available. PMID:19251715

  7. Discovery of pyrazines as pollinator sex pheromones and orchid semiochemicals: implications for the evolution of sexual deception.

    PubMed

    Bohman, Björn; Phillips, Ryan D; Menz, Myles H M; Berntsson, Ben W; Flematti, Gavin R; Barrow, Russell A; Dixon, Kingsley W; Peakall, Rod

    2014-08-01

    Sexually deceptive orchids employ floral volatiles to sexually lure their specific pollinators. How and why this pollination system has evolved independently on multiple continents remains unknown, although preadaptation is considered to have been important. Understanding the chemistry of sexual deception is a crucial first step towards solving this mystery. The combination of gas chromatography-electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD), GC-MS, synthesis and field bioassays allowed us to identify the volatiles involved in the interaction between the orchid Drakaea glyptodon and its sexually attracted male thynnine wasp pollinator, Zaspilothynnus trilobatus. Three alkylpyrazines and one novel hydroxymethyl pyrazine were identified as the sex pheromone of Z. trilobatus and are also used by D. glyptodon for pollinator attraction. Given that our findings revealed a new chemical system for plants, we surveyed widely across representative orchid taxa for the presence of these compounds. With one exception, our chemical survey failed to detect pyrazines in related genera. Collectively, no evidence for preadaptation was found. The chemistry of sexual deception is more diverse than previously known. Our results suggest that evolutionary novelty may have played a key role in the evolution of sexual deception and highlight the value of investigating unusual pollination systems for advancing our understanding of the role of chemistry in evolution. PMID:24697806

  8. The velamen protects photosynthetic orchid roots against UV-B damage, and a large dated phylogeny implies multiple gains and losses of this function during the Cenozoic.

    PubMed

    Chomicki, Guillaume; Bidel, Luc P R; Ming, Feng; Coiro, Mario; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Yaofeng; Baissac, Yves; Jay-Allemand, Christian; Renner, Susanne S

    2015-02-01

    UV-B radiation damage in leaves is prevented by epidermal UV-screening compounds that can be modulated throughout ontogeny. In epiphytic orchids, roots need to be protected against UV-B because they photosynthesize, sometimes even replacing the leaves. How orchid roots, which are covered by a dead tissue called velamen, avoid UV-B radiation is currently unknown. We tested for a UV-B protective function of the velamen using gene expression analyses, mass spectrometry, histochemistry, and chlorophyll fluorescence in Phalaenopsis × hybrida roots. We also investigated its evolution using comparative phylogenetic methods. Our data show that two paralogues of the chalcone synthase (CHS) gene family are UV-B-induced in orchid root tips, triggering the accumulation of two UV-B-absorbing flavonoids and resulting in effective protection of the photosynthetic root cortex. Phylogenetic and dating analyses imply that the two CHS lineages duplicated c. 100 million yr before the rise of epiphytic orchids. These findings indicate an additional role for the epiphytic orchid velamen previously thought to function solely in absorbing water and nutrients. This new function, which fundamentally differs from the mechanism of UV-B avoidance in leaves, arose following an ancient duplication of CHS, and has probably contributed to the family's expansion into the canopy during the Cenozoic. PMID:25345817

  9. Molecular phylogeny and evolutionary history of the Eurasiatic orchid genus Himantoglossum s.l. (Orchidaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Sramkó, Gábor; Attila, Molnár V.; Hawkins, Julie A.; Bateman, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Lizard orchids of the genus Himantoglossum include many of Eurasia's most spectacular orchids, producing substantial spikes of showy flowers. However, until recently the genus had received only limited, and entirely traditional, systematic study. The aim of the current work was to provide a more robust molecular phylogeny in order to better understand the evolutionary relationships among species of particular conservation concern. Methods All putative species of Himantoglossum s.l. were sampled across its geographical range. A large subsample of the 153 populations studied contributed to an initial survey of nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (nrITS) ribotypes. Smaller subsets were then sequenced for four plastid regions and the first intron of the low-copy-number nuclear gene LEAFY. Rooted using Steveniella as outgroup, phylogenetic trees were generated using parsimony and Bayesian methods from each of the three datasets, supplemented with a ribotype network. Key Results The resulting trees collectively determined the order of branching of the early divergent taxa as Himantoglossum comperianum > H. robertianum group > H. formosum, events that also involved significant morphological divergence. Relaxed molecular clock dating suggested that these divergences preceded the Pleistocene glaciations (the origin of the H. robertianum group may have coincided with the Messinian salinity crisis) and occurred in Asia Minor and/or the Caucasus. Among more controversial taxa of the H. hircinum-jankae clade, which are only subtly morphologically divergent, topological resolution was poorer and topological incongruence between datasets was consequently greater. Conclusions Plastid sequence divergence is broadly consistent with prior, morphologically circumscribed taxa and indicates a division between H. hircinum–adriaticum to the west of the Carpathians and H. jankae–caprinum (plus local endemics) to the east, a distinction also suggested by nr

  10. Divergent Adaptive Strategies by Two Co-occurring Epiphytic Orchids to Water Stress: Escape or Avoidance?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Hu, Hong; Zhang, Shi-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Due to the fluctuating water availability in the arboreal habitat, epiphytic plants are considered vulnerable to climate change and anthropogenic disturbances. Although co-occurring taxa have been observed divergent adaptive performances in response to drought, the underlying physiological and morphological mechanisms by which epiphyte species cope with water stress remain poorly understood. In the present study, two co-occurring epiphytic orchids with different phenologies were selected to investigate their drought-resistance performances. We compared their functional traits, and monitored their physiological performances in a 25-days of drought treatment. In contrast to the deciduous species Pleione albiflora, the evergreen species Coelogyne corymbosa had different root anatomical structures and higher values for saturated water content of pseudobulbs. Moreover, plants of C. corymbosa had thicker leaves and epidermis, denser veins and stomata, and higher values for leaf mass per unit area and the time required to dry saturated leaves to 70% relative water content. However, samples from that species had lower values for net photosynthetic rate (A n), stomatal length and chlorophyll content per unit dry mass. Nevertheless, due to greater capacity for water storage and conservation, C. corymbosa maintained higher A n, stomatal conductance (g s), and instantaneous water-use efficiency during severe drought period, and their values for leaf water potential were higher after the water stress treatment. By Day 10 after irrigation was restarted, only C. corymbosa plants recovered their values for A n and g s to levels close to those calculated prior to the imposition of water stress. Our results suggest that the different performance responding to drought and re-watering in two co-occurring epiphytic orchids is related to water-related traits and these two species have divergent adaptive mechanisms. Overall, C. corymbosa demonstrates drought avoidance by enhancing water

  11. Demographic analysis of dormancy and survival in the terrestrial orchid Cypripedium reginae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kery, Marc; Gregg, Katharine B.

    2004-01-01

    1. We use capture-recapture models to estimate the fraction of dormant ramets, survival and state transition rates, and to identify factors affecting these rates, for the terrestrial orchid Cypripedium reginae. We studied two populations in West Virginia, USA, for 11 years and investigated relationships between grazing and demography. Abe Run's population was small, with moderate herbivory by deer and relatively constant population size. The population at Big Draft was of medium size, with heavy deer grazing, and a sharply declining number of flowering plants up to the spring before our study started, when the population was fenced. 2. We observed dormant episodes lasting from 1 to 4 years. At Abe Run and Big Draft, 32.5% and 7.4% of ramets, respectively, were dormant at least once during the study period for an average of 1.6 and 1.3 years, respectively. We estimated the annual fraction of ramets in the dormant state at 12.3% (95% CI 9.5-15.8%) at Abe Run and at 1.8% (95% CI 1.2-2.6%) at Big Draft. Transition rates between the dormant, vegetative and flowering life-states did not vary between years in either population. Most surviving ramets remained in the same state from one year to the next. Survival rates were constant at Abe Run (0.96, 95% CI 0.93-0.97), but varied between years at Big Draft (0.89-0.99, mean 0.95). 3. At Big Draft, we found neither a temporal trend in survival after cessation of grazing, nor relationships between survival and the number of spring frost days or cumulative precipitation during the current or the previous 12 months. However, analysis of precipitation on a 3-month basis revealed a positive relationship between survival and precipitation during the spring (March-May) of the previous year. 4. Relationship between climate and the population dynamics of orchids may have to be studied with a fine temporal resolution, and considering possible time lags. Capture-recapture modelling provides a comprehensive and flexible framework for

  12. Divergent Adaptive Strategies by Two Co-occurring Epiphytic Orchids to Water Stress: Escape or Avoidance?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Hu, Hong; Zhang, Shi-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Due to the fluctuating water availability in the arboreal habitat, epiphytic plants are considered vulnerable to climate change and anthropogenic disturbances. Although co-occurring taxa have been observed divergent adaptive performances in response to drought, the underlying physiological and morphological mechanisms by which epiphyte species cope with water stress remain poorly understood. In the present study, two co-occurring epiphytic orchids with different phenologies were selected to investigate their drought-resistance performances. We compared their functional traits, and monitored their physiological performances in a 25-days of drought treatment. In contrast to the deciduous species Pleione albiflora, the evergreen species Coelogyne corymbosa had different root anatomical structures and higher values for saturated water content of pseudobulbs. Moreover, plants of C. corymbosa had thicker leaves and epidermis, denser veins and stomata, and higher values for leaf mass per unit area and the time required to dry saturated leaves to 70% relative water content. However, samples from that species had lower values for net photosynthetic rate (An), stomatal length and chlorophyll content per unit dry mass. Nevertheless, due to greater capacity for water storage and conservation, C. corymbosa maintained higher An, stomatal conductance (gs), and instantaneous water-use efficiency during severe drought period, and their values for leaf water potential were higher after the water stress treatment. By Day 10 after irrigation was restarted, only C. corymbosa plants recovered their values for An and gs to levels close to those calculated prior to the imposition of water stress. Our results suggest that the different performance responding to drought and re-watering in two co-occurring epiphytic orchids is related to water-related traits and these two species have divergent adaptive mechanisms. Overall, C. corymbosa demonstrates drought avoidance by enhancing water

  13. A pollinator shift explains floral divergence in an orchid species complex in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Craig I.; Johnson, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Floral diversification driven by shifts between pollinators has been one of the key explanations for the radiation of angiosperms. According to the Grant–Stebbins model of pollinator-driven speciation, these shifts result in morphologically distinct ‘ecotypes’ which may eventually become recognizable as species. The current circumscription of the food-deceptive southern African orchid Eulophia parviflora encompasses a highly variable monophyletic species complex. In this study, two forms were identified within this complex that differ in distribution, floral morphology, scent chemistry and phenology, and a test was made of whether these differences represent adaptations for different pollinators. Methods and Results Multivariate analysis of floral and vegetative traits revealed that there are at least two discrete morphological forms in the species complex. Field observations revealed that each form is pollinated by a different insect species, and thus represent distinct ecotypes. The early-flowering coastal form which has long spurs and floral scent dominated by sesquiterpene compounds is pollinated exclusively by the long-tongued bee Amegilla fallax (Apidae, Anthophorinae), while the late-flowering inland form with short spurs and floral scent dominated by benzenoid compounds is pollinated exclusively by the beetle Cyrtothyrea marginalis (Cetoniinae; Scarabaeidae). Choice experiments in a Y-maze olfactometer showed that beetles are preferentially attracted to the scent of the short-spurred form. A spur-shortening experiment showed that long spurs are required for effective pollination of the bee-pollinated form. Although it was initially thought likely that divergence occurred across a geographical pollinator gradient, plants of the long-spurred form were effectively pollinated when transplanted to an inland locality outside the natural coastal range of this form. Thus, the underlying geographical basis for the evolution of ecotypes in

  14. Overexpression of PaFT gene in the wild orchid Phalaenopsis amabilis (L.) Blume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiarti, Endang; Mercuriani, Ixora S.; Rizal, Rinaldi; Slamet, Agus; Utami, Bekti S.; Bestari, Ida A.; Aziz-Purwantoro, Moeljopawiro, S.; Jang, Soenghoe; Machida, Y.; Machida, C.

    2015-09-01

    To shorten vegetative stage and induce transition from vegetative to reproductive stage in orchids, we overexpressed Phalaenopsis amabilis Flowering LocusT (PaFT) gene under the control of Ubiquitin promoter into protocorm of Indonesian Wild Orchid Phalaenopsis amabilis (L.) Blume. The dynamic expression of vegetative gene Phalaenopsis Homeobox1 (POH1) and flowering time gene PaFT has been analyzed. Accumulation of mRNA was detected in shoot and leaves of both transgenic and non transgenic plants by using Reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) with specific gene primers for POH1 and PaFT in 24 months old plants. To analyze the POH1 and PaFT genes, three pairs of degenerate primers PaFT degF1R1, F2R2 and F3R3 that amplified 531 bp PaFT cDNA were used. We detected 700 bp PaFTcDNA from leaves and shoots of transgenic plants, but not in NT plants. POH1 mRNA was detected in plants. PaFT protein consists of Phospatidyl Ethanolamine-Binding Protein (PEBP) in interval base 73-483 and CETS family protein at base 7-519, which are important motif for transmembrane protein. We inserted Ubipro::PaFT/pGAS101 into P. amabilis protocorm using Agrobacterium. Analysis of transgenic plants showed that PaFTmRNA was accumulated in leaves of 12 months after sowing, although it is not detected in non transgeic plants. Compare to the wild type (NT plants), ectopic expression of PaFT shows alter phenotype as follows: 31% normal, 19% with short-wavy leaves, 5% form rosette leaves and 45% produced multishoots. Analysis of protein profiles of trasgenic plants showed that a putative PaFT protein (MW 19,7 kDa) was produced in 1eaves and shoots.This means that at 12 months, POH1 gene expression gradually decreased/negatively regulated, the expression of PaFT gene was activated, although there is no flower initiation yet. Some environmental factors might play a role to induce inflorescens. This experiment is in progress.

  15. Spatial patterns of photosynthesis in thin- and thick-leaved epiphytic orchids: unravelling C3–CAM plasticity in an organ-compartmented way

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Maria Aurineide; Matiz, Alejandra; Cruz, Aline Bertinatto; Matsumura, Aline Tiemi; Takahashi, Cassia Ayumi; Hamachi, Leonardo; Félix, Lucas Macedo; Pereira, Paula Natália; Latansio-Aidar, Sabrina Ribeiro; Aidar, Marcos Pereira Marinho; Demarco, Diego; Freschi, Luciano; Mercier, Helenice; Kerbauy, Gilberto Barbante

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims A positive correlation between tissue thickness and crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) expression has been frequently suggested. Therefore, this study addressed the question of whether water availability modulates photosynthetic plasticity in different organs of two epiphytic orchids with distinct leaf thickness. Methods Tissue morphology and photosynthetic mode (C3 and/or CAM) were examined in leaves, pseudobulbs and roots of a thick-leaved (Cattleya walkeriana) and a thin-leaved (Oncidium ‘Aloha’) epiphytic orchid. Morphological features were studied comparing the drought-induced physiological responses observed in each organ after 30 d of either drought or well-watered treatments. Key Results Cattleya walkeriana, which is considered a constitutive CAM orchid, displayed a clear drought-induced up-regulation of CAM in its thick leaves but not in its non-leaf organs (pseudobulbs and roots). The set of morphological traits of Cattleya leaves suggested the drought-inducible CAM up-regulation as a possible mechanism of increasing water-use efficiency and carbon economy. Conversely, although belonging to an orchid genus classically considered as performing C3 photosynthesis, Oncidium ‘Aloha’ under drought seemed to express facultative CAM in its roots and pseudobulbs but not in its leaves, indicating that such photosynthetic responses might compensate for the lack of capacity to perform CAM in its thin leaves. Morphological features of Oncidium leaves also indicated lower efficiency in preventing water and CO2 losses, while aerenchyma ducts connecting pseudobulbs and leaves suggested a compartmentalized mechanism of nighttime carboxylation via phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) (pseudobulbs) and daytime carboxylation via Rubisco (leaves) in drought-exposed Oncidium plants. Conclusions Water availability modulated CAM expression in an organ-compartmented manner in both orchids studied. As distinct regions of the same orchid could perform

  16. Strong pollinator-mediated selection for increased flower brightness and contrast in a deceptive orchid.

    PubMed

    Sletvold, Nina; Trunschke, Judith; Smit, Mart; Verbeek, Jeffrey; Ågren, Jon

    2016-03-01

    Contrasting flower color patterns that putatively attract or direct pollinators toward a reward are common among angiosperms. In the deceptive orchid Anacamptis morio, the lower petal, which makes up most of the floral display, has a light central patch with dark markings. Within populations, there is pronounced variation in petal brightness, patch size, amount of dark markings, and contrast between patch and petal margin. We tested whether pollinators mediate selection on these color traits and on morphology (plant height, number of flowers, corolla size, spur length), and whether selection is consistent with facilitated or negative frequency-dependent pollination. Pollinators mediated strong selection for increased petal brightness (Δβpoll = 0.42) and contrast (Δβpoll = 0.51). Pollinators also tended to mediate stabilizing selection on brightness (Δγpoll = -0.27, n.s.) favoring the most common phenotype in the population. Selection for reduced petal brightness among hand-pollinated plants indicated a fitness cost associated with brightness. The results demonstrate that flower color traits influence pollination success and seed production in A. morio, indicating that they affect attractiveness to pollinators, efficiency of pollen transfer, or both. The documented selection is consistent with facilitated pollination and selection for color convergence toward cooccurring rewarding species. PMID:26878831

  17. Revision of the orchid bee subgenus Euglossella (Hymenoptera, Apidae), Part I, The decorata species group

    PubMed Central

    Hinojosa-Díaz, Ismael A.; Engel, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Euglossella, one of the most distinctive subgenera of orchid bees of the genus Euglossa, is composed of two characteristic assemblages of species, one of them comprising bees bearing the strongly metallic integument trademark of the genus (viridis species group), and the other consisting of bees with a brown integument shaded with metallic iridescence (decorata species group). Here we provide the first of two parts of a revision of Euglossella, providing diagnostic definitions for the subgenus, the decorata species group, and all the species included therein. Six species are included in the decorata group, one new: Euglossa (Euglossella) aurantia, sp. n.; Euglossa (Euglossella) apiformis Schrottky, resurrected status; Euglossa (Euglossella) decorata Smith, revised status; Euglossa (Euglossella) singularis Mocsáry, revised status; Euglossa (Euglossella) cosmodora Hinojosa-Díaz and Engel; and Euglossa (Euglossella) perpulchra Moure and Schlindwein. Euglossa meliponoides Ducke and Euglossa urarina Hinojosa-Díaz and Engel are newly synonymized under Euglossa decorata, Euglossa decorata ruficauda Cockerell is synonymized under Euglossa singularis, and a neotype is designated for Euglossa apiformis. PMID:22144858

  18. Cuticular Hydrocarbons as Potential Close Range Recognition Cues in Orchid Bees.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, Tamara; Ramírez, Santiago R; Weber, Marjorie Gail; Eltz, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Male Neotropical orchid bees collect volatile chemicals from their environment and compose species-specific volatile signals, which are subsequently exposed during courtship display. These perfumes are hypothesized to serve as attractants and may play a role in female mate choice. Here, we investigated the potential of cuticular hydrocarbons as additional recognition cues. The cuticular hydrocarbons of males of 35 species belonging to four of the five extant euglossine bee genera consisted of aliphatic hydrocarbons ranging in chain lengths between 21 and 37 C-atoms in distinct compositions, especially between sympatric species of similar coloring and size, for all but one case. Cleptoparasitic Exaerete spp. had divergent profiles, with major compounds predominantly constituted by longer hydrocarbon chains (>30 C-atoms), which may represent an adaptation to the parasitic life history ("chemical insignificance"). Phylogenetic comparative analyses imply that the chemical profiles exhibited by Exaerete spp. are evolutionarily divergent from the rest of the group. Female hydrocarbon profiles were not identical to male profiles in the investigated species, with either partial or complete separation between sexes in multivariate analyses. Sexually dimorphic hydrocarbon profiles are assumed to be the basis for sex recognition in a number of insects, and thus may supplement the acquired perfume phenotypes in chemical information transfer. Overall, cuticular hydrocarbons meet the requirements to function as intraspecific and intersexual close range recognition signals; behavioral experiments are needed to determine their potential involvement in mate recognition. PMID:26573208

  19. Pollinator shifts and the evolution of spur length in the moth-pollinated orchid Platanthera bifolia

    PubMed Central

    Boberg, Elin; Alexandersson, Ronny; Jonsson, Magdalena; Maad, Johanne; Ågren, Jon; Nilsson, L. Anders

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Plant–pollinator interactions are thought to have shaped much of floral evolution. Yet the relative importance of pollinator shifts and coevolutionary interactions for among-population variation in floral traits in animal-pollinated species is poorly known. This study examined the adaptive significance of spur length in the moth-pollinated orchid Platanthera bifolia. Methods Geographical variation in the length of the floral spur of P. bifolia was documented in relation to variation in the pollinator fauna across Scandinavia, and a reciprocal translocation experiment was conducted in south-east Sweden between a long-spurred woodland population and a short-spurred grassland population. Key Results Spur length and pollinator fauna varied among regions and habitats, and spur length was positively correlated with the proboscis length of local pollinators. In the reciprocal translocation experiment, long-spurred woodland plants had higher pollination success than short-spurred grassland plants at the woodland site, while no significant difference was observed at the grassland site. Conclusions The results are consistent with the hypothesis that optimal floral phenotype varies with the morphology of the local pollinators, and that the evolution of spur length in P. bifolia has been largely driven by pollinator shifts. PMID:24169591

  20. Stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturases are associated with floral isolation in sexually deceptive orchids

    SciTech Connect

    Schluter, P.M.; Shanklin, J.; Xu, S.; Gagliardini, V.; Whittle, E.; Grossniklaus, U.; Schiestl, F. P.

    2011-04-05

    The orchids Ophrys sphegodes and O. exaltata are reproductively isolated from each other by the attraction of two different, highly specific pollinator species. For pollinator attraction, flowers chemically mimic the pollinators sex pheromones, the key components of which are alkenes with different double-bond positions. This study identifies genes likely involved in alkene biosynthesis, encoding stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase (SAD) homologs. The expression of two isoforms, SAD1 and SAD2, is flower-specific and broadly parallels alkene production during flower development. SAD2 shows a significant association with alkene production, and in vitro assays show that O. sphegodes SAD2 has activity both as an 18:0-ACP {Delta}{sup 9} and a 16:0-ACP {Delta}{sup 4} desaturase. Downstream metabolism of the SAD2 reaction products would give rise to alkenes with double-bonds at position 9 or position 12, matching double-bond positions observed in alkenes in the odor bouquet of O. sphegodes. SAD1 and SAD2 show evidence of purifying selection before, and positive or relaxed purifying selection after gene duplication. By contributing to the production of species-specific alkene bouquets, SAD2 is suggested to contribute to differential pollinator attraction and reproductive isolation among these species. Taken together, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that SAD2 is a florally expressed barrier gene of large phenotypic effect and, possibly, a genic target of pollinator-mediated selection.

  1. Fertilizing ability of cryopreserved pollinia of Luisia macrantha, an endemic orchid of Western Ghats.

    PubMed

    Ajeeshkumar, S; Decruse, S W

    2013-01-01

    A successful protocol for long-term preservation of pollinia of Luisia macrantha Blatter and McCann., an endemic and endangered orchid of Western Ghats has been devised through different pollen cryopreservation methods and by confirming fertilizing ability. Pollinia subjected to 0-30 min dehydration at 27 +/- 67 percent in desiccated controls and 54 percent in LN treated samples. The treated pollinia retained fertilizing ability, giving 100 percent fruit set upon sib-mating. Pollinia dried under charged silica gel for 120 min gave 51 - 52 percent pollen germination, in LN treated and desiccated control samples. Exposure to vitrification solution (PVS2) was optimized at 10 min to achieve 57 percent and 56 percent germination in control and LN treated samples, respectively. These pollinia exhibited 51 percent pollen germination after 668 days storage in LN. Cryopreserved pollinia (10 min PVS2) used for hybridization with Vanda tessellata gave 87 percent fruit set and 21 percent viable seeds. The viable seeds germinated and developed into healthy seedlings. Thus cryopreservation has been proved useful for the successful storage of L. macrantha germplasm and their utilization in breeding. PMID:23435707

  2. Nonrandom seedling establishment corresponds with distance-dependent decline in mycorrhizal abundance in two terrestrial orchids.

    PubMed

    Waud, Michael; Wiegand, Thorsten; Brys, Rein; Lievens, Bart; Jacquemyn, Hans

    2016-07-01

    In plant species that critically rely on mycorrhizal symbionts for germination and seedling establishment, distance-dependent decline of mycorrhizal fungi in the soil can be hypothesized to lead to significant spatial clustering as a result of nonrandom spatial patterns of seedling establishment. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the abundance and distribution of mycorrhizal fungi in the soil and how they relate to spatial patterns of adults and seedling recruitment in two related orchid species. We combined assessments of spatial variation in fungal abundance using quantitative PCR (qPCR) with spatial point pattern analyses based on long-term demographic data and cluster point process models. qPCR analyses showed that fungal abundance declined rapidly with distance from the adult host plants. Spatial point pattern analyses showed that successful recruitment in both species was clustered significantly around adult plants and that the decline in the neighborhood density of recruits around adults coincided with the decline of fungal abundance around adult plants. Overall, these results indicate that the distribution and abundance of fungal associates in the soil may have a strong impact on the aboveground distribution of its partner. PMID:26876007

  3. Flowering synchrony and floral display size affect pollination success in a deceit-pollinated tropical orchid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Tabla, Victor; Vargas, Carlos F.

    2007-07-01

    ue to frequency-dependent negative selection, a strong relationship between reproductive phenology traits and pollination success is expected in deceit-pollinated species. This paper assesses the effects of floral display size on both female (fruit production) and male (pollen removal) pollination success in a population of the deceit-pollinated tropical orchid Myrmecophila christinae during two consecutive years (1998-1999). Low pollen removal (˜9% of total flowers) and fruit production values (˜3% of total flowers) were recorded during both years. As expected, binary logistic regressions showed a significant negative effect of floral synchrony, and a positive effect of floral display size on both male and female success, although these effects varied across years. Pollination rates in the field and in hand pollinations suggest a doubling in pollinator abundance between years. Results suggest that floral display size and flowering synchrony are of adaptive value for M. christinae. However, between-year fluctuations might indicate that reproductive phenology traits in deceit-pollinated species undergo fluctuating selection regimes among years and are probably linked to short-term changes in environmental (abiotic and biotic) conditions.

  4. In vitro propagation of threatened terrestrial orchid, Malaxis khasiana Soland ex. Swartz through immature seed culture.

    PubMed

    Deb, Chitta Ranjan; Temjensangba

    2006-09-01

    Rapid in vitro propagation of the terrestrial orchid, M. khasiana through immature seed culture was achieved. Immature seeds of 8-9 week after pollination (WAP) cultured on MS medium (2% sucrose) supplemented with 500 mgl(-1) casein-hydrolysate and 1 microM N6-benzyladenine (BA) exhibited germination of 75% seeds after 107 days of culture and subsequently supported the development of PLBs. Subsequent culture on MS medium enriched with 6 microM of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), 18 microM each of BA and kinetin induced multiple shoots and plantlets. Transfer of PLBs to MS medium with 0.1% activated charcoal (AC) facilitated rapid proliferation of PLBs, while AC at 0.2% favored shoot bud induction and rhizome enlargement. The plantlets, developed on medium with IAA, BA and kinetin, after hardening in vitro for 8-10 weeks were planted in community pots and transferred to poly-house. The plantlets showed 65% survival under field conditions. PMID:16999034

  5. Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of the Recalcitrant Vanda Kasem's Delight Orchid with Higher Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gnasekaran, Pavallekoodi; James Antony, Jessica Jeyanthi; Uddain, Jasim; Subramaniam, Sreeramanan

    2014-01-01

    The presented study established Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation using protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) for the production of transgenic Vanda Kasem's Delight Tom Boykin (VKD) orchid. Several parameters such as PLB size, immersion period, level of wounding, Agrobacterium density, cocultivation period, and concentration of acetosyringone were tested and quantified using gusA gene expression to optimize the efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of VKD's PLBs. Based on the results, 3-4 mm PLBs wounded by scalpel and immersed for 30 minutes in Agrobacterium suspension of 0.8 unit at A600nm produced the highest GUS expression. Furthermore, cocultivating infected PLBs for 4 days in the dark on Vacin and Went cocultivation medium containing 200 𝜇M acetosyringone enhanced the GUS expression. PCR analysis of the putative transformants selected in the presence of 250 mg/L cefotaxime and 30 mg/L geneticin proved the presence of wheatwin1, wheatwin2, and nptII genes. PMID:24977213

  6. Ultrafiltration coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography and quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for screening lipase binders from different extracts of Dendrobium officinale.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yi; Cai, Hao; Li, Weidong; Cai, Baochang

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatic lipase plays essential roles in the digestion, transport, and processing of dietary lipids in humans. Inhibition of pancreatic lipase leading to the decrease of lipid absorption may be used for treating obesity. In the present study, a new approach of ultrafiltration coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography and quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry was established for rapidly detecting lipase binders from different extracts of medicinal plants. Rutin, a model inhibitor of lipase, was selected to optimize the screening conditions, including ion strength, temperature, pH, and incubation time. Meanwhile, the specificity of the approach was investigated by using denatured lipase and inactive compound emodin. The optimal screening conditions were as follows: ion strength 75 mM, temperature 37 °C, pH 7.4, and incubation time 10 min. Furthermore, linearity, accuracy, precision, and matrix effect of the approach were well validated. Finally, lipase binders were screened from different extracts of Dendrobium officinale by applying the established approach and were subsequently subjected to traditional lipase inhibitory assay. Eleven lipase inhibitors were identified, eight of which, namely naringenine, vicenin II, schaftoside, isoschaftoside, isoquercetrin, kaempferol 3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, vitexin 2″-O-glucoside, and vitexin 2″-O-rhamnoside, were reported for the first time. In addition, docking experiments were performed to determine the preferred binding sites of these new lipase inhibitors. PMID:26018630

  7. Inhibitory effects of Dendrobium candidum Wall ex Lindl. on azoxymethane- and dextran sulfate sodium-induced colon carcinogenesis in C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    WANG, QIANG; SUN, PENG; LI, GUIJIE; ZHU, KAI; WANG, CUN; ZHAO, XIN

    2014-01-01

    Dendrobium candidum Wall ex Lindl. was purchased for the evaluation of azoxymethane (AOM)- and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colon carcinogenesis in C57BL/6 mice. The body weights of the AOM- and DSS-induced colon cancer control groups were lighter than those of the untreated mice. D. candidum increased the body weights of the mice compared with the control group, and reduced the levels of the serum proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-12, TNF-α and IFN-γ, compared with the colon cancer control group. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses of the apoptotic-related genes, bax, bcl-2, caspase-3 and caspase-9, were performed in the colon tissues. The high-concentration D. candidum group showed a significant increase in the mRNA and protein expression levels of bax, caspase-3 and caspase-9 and decreased expression levels of bcl-2 compared with the control group. These results indicate that D. candidum Wall ex Lindl. exhibits preventive effects against colon carcinogenesis in mice. PMID:24396476

  8. Simultaneous determination of phenols (bibenzyl, phenanthrene, and fluorenone) in Dendrobium species by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao; Xu, Luoshan

    2006-02-01

    A new method of analysis of 11 phenols, including five bibenzyls, three phenanthrenes, and three fluorenones, using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-diode array detection (DAD) was described. The separation of 11 phenols was effected by RP-HPLC (Beckman Coulter ODS column, 5 microm, 250 mm x 4.6 mm) using linear gradient elution systems of acetonitrile-1/1000 trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). Satisfactory separation of these compounds was obtained in less than 45 min. The method was validated for linearity, repeatability, limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ). Good results were obtained with respect to repeatability (relative standard deviation (RSD)<3.5%) and recovery (85.77-104.92%). The developed method was applied to the simultaneous determination of 11 phenols from totally 31 Dendrobium species (mainly of medicinal plants) as well as other four samples from the similar genera as Pholidota, Flickingeria and Bulbophyllum. The range of the total amounts of bibenzyl, phenanthrene and fluorenone were found to from trace: 4.00, not detected (nd): 0.42 and nd: 0.24 microg mg(-1), respectively. PMID:16378617

  9. The effects of daily supplementation of Dendrobium huoshanense polysaccharide on ethanol-induced subacute liver injury in mice by proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Yu; Luo, Jian-Ping; Chen, Rui; Zha, Xue-Qiang; Wang, He

    2014-09-01

    Polysaccharides isolated from edible Dendrobium huoshanense have been shown to possess a hepatoprotection function for selenium- and carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury. In this study, we investigated the preventive effects of daily supplementation with an homogeneous polysaccharide (DHP) purified from D. huoshanense on ethanol-induced subacute liver injury in mice and its potential mechanisms in liver protection by a proteomic approach. DHP was found to effectively depress the increased ratio of liver weight to body weight, reduce the elevated levels of serum aspartate aminotransferase, total cholesterol, total bilirubin and low density lipoprotein, and alleviate hepatic steatosis in mice with ethanol-induced subacute liver injury. Hepatic proteomics analysis performed by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS) revealed that cystathionine beta-synthase (Cbs) and D-lactate dehydrogenase (Ldhd) were two key proteins regulated by daily DHP intervention, which may assist in correcting the abnormal hepatic methionine metabolism pathway and decreasing the level of hepatic methylglyoxal generated from disordered metabolic pathways caused by ethanol. Our data suggest that DHP can protect liver function from alcoholic injury with complicated molecular mechanisms involving regulation of Cbs and Ldhd. PMID:24933018

  10. Effect of Pesticide Exposure on Immunological, Hematological and Biochemical Parameters in Thai Orchid Farmers—A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Aroonvilairat, Soraya; Kespichayawattana, Wannapa; Sornprachum, Thiwaree; Chaisuriya, Papada; Siwadune, Taweeratana; Ratanabanangkoon, Kavi

    2015-01-01

    Various studies have found that many Thai orchid farmers used excessive amounts of pesticides without proper protective gear, but no toxicological study has been made. This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the immunological, hematological and biochemical statuses of these farmers. Sixty four orchid farmers and 60 controls were studied. Plasma cholinesterase activity, the percentage and absolute number of B lymphocytes (CD19+) were significantly lower in the farmers group (3966.32 ± 1165.48 U/L, 11.61 ± 4.09% and 312.26 ± 164.83 cells/mm3, respectively) as compared to those of controls (5048.85 ± 1139.40 U/L, 14.32 ± 4.23%, 420.34 ± 195.18 cells/mm3, respectively). There was a statistically significant higher level of serum IgE among the orchid farmers (0.031 ± 0.011 mg/dL vs. 0.018 ± 0.007 mg/dL) but not IgG, IgA and IgM, levels. Serum lysozyme level, lymphocyte proliferative responses to mitogens, hematological parameters and kidney function test, were not significantly different between the two groups. The liver function profiles showed significantly lower levels of albumin and serum protein in the farmer group. Thus frequent pesticide exposure resulted in subtle changes of some biological parameters. These changes, though may not be clinically significant, strongly indicated that caution in handing pesticides by these farmers is warranted. PMID:26024358

  11. Floral colour signal increases short-range detectability of a sexually deceptive orchid to its bee pollinator.

    PubMed

    Streinzer, Martin; Paulus, Hannes F; Spaethe, Johannes

    2009-05-01

    Orchids of the genus Ophrys are pollinated by males of solitary bees and wasps through sexual deception. The flowers mimic the behaviourally active compounds of the sex pheromone of receptive females and thus attract males that seek to copulate. Odour is the main attractant while visual stimuli have been assumed so far to play only a minor role. In contrast to most species of the genus, Heldreich's orchid Ophrys heldreichii, which is pollinated by males of the long-horned bee Tetralonia berlandi, possesses a bright pink perianth that appears conspicuous to a human observer. We investigated the role of this floral colour signal in pollinator attraction. We filmed approach flights of male bees to flowers in which we removed the original perianth and in which we substituted the perianth with an artificial one of a particular selected colour. At distances >30 cm, male search time correlated only with wind speed but not with the spectral parameters of the perianth, i.e. chromatic and green receptor-specific contrast. By contrast, in the close range (<30 cm), where the perianth subtends a visual angle of at least 5 deg. to the bee's eye, search time decreased with increasing green receptor contrast between perianth and background; however, no correlation with chromatic contrast or wind speed was found. Our results indicate that pollinators are first attracted by olfactory signals from a distance. Once in the vicinity of the flower where spatial vision of the males is sufficient, they are guided exclusively by vision. However, it can be expected that possession of a ;non-private' colour signal would increase the risk of pollen loss in sexually deceptive orchids by accidentally attracting non-specific flower visitors. We therefore discuss the occurrence of colour signals in the genus Ophrys in respect to the species-specific visual system of the pollinators. PMID:19376957

  12. High levels of effective long-distance dispersal may blur ecotypic divergence in a rare terrestrial orchid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gene flow and adaptive divergence are key aspects of metapopulation dynamics and ecological speciation. Long-distance dispersal is hard to detect and few studies estimate dispersal in combination with adaptive divergence. The aim of this study was to investigate effective long-distance dispersal and adaptive divergence in the fen orchid (Liparis loeselii (L.) Rich.). We used amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP)-based assignment tests to quantify effective long-distance dispersal at two different regions in Northwest Europe. In addition, genomic divergence between fen orchid populations occupying two distinguishable habitats, wet dune slacks and alkaline fens, was investigated by a genome scan approach at different spatial scales (continental, landscape and regional) and based on 451 AFLP loci. Results We expected that different habitats would contribute to strong divergence and restricted gene flow resulting in isolation-by-adaptation. Instead, we found remarkably high levels of effective long-distance seed dispersal and low levels of adaptive divergence. At least 15% of the assigned individuals likely originated from among-population dispersal events with dispersal distances up to 220 km. Six (1.3%) ‘outlier’ loci, potentially reflecting local adaptation to habitat-type, were identified with high statistical support. Of these, only one (0.22%) was a replicated outlier in multiple independent dune-fen population comparisons and thus possibly reflecting truly parallel divergence. Signals of adaptation in response to habitat type were most evident at the scale of individual populations. Conclusions The findings of this study suggest that the homogenizing effect of effective long-distance seed dispersal may overwhelm divergent selection associated to habitat type in fen orchids in Northwest Europe. PMID:24998243

  13. Seven New Complete Plastome Sequences Reveal Rampant Independent Loss of the ndh Gene Family across Orchids and Associated Instability of the Inverted Repeat/Small Single-Copy Region Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Michael J.; Neubig, Kurt M.; Williams, Norris H.; Whitten, W. Mark; Kim, Joo-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Earlier research has revealed that the ndh loci have been pseudogenized, truncated, or deleted from most orchid plastomes sequenced to date, including in all available plastomes of the two most species-rich subfamilies, Orchidoideae and Epidendroideae. This study sought to resolve deeper-level phylogenetic relationships among major orchid groups and to refine the history of gene loss in the ndh loci across orchids. The complete plastomes of seven orchids, Oncidium sphacelatum (Epidendroideae), Masdevallia coccinea (Epidendroideae), Sobralia callosa (Epidendroideae), Sobralia aff. bouchei (Epidendroideae), Elleanthus sodiroi (Epidendroideae), Paphiopedilum armeniacum (Cypripedioideae), and Phragmipedium longifolium (Cypripedioideae) were sequenced and analyzed in conjunction with all other available orchid and monocot plastomes. Most ndh loci were found to be pseudogenized or lost in Oncidium, Paphiopedilum and Phragmipedium, but surprisingly, all ndh loci were found to retain full, intact reading frames in Sobralia, Elleanthus and Masdevallia. Character mapping suggests that the ndh genes were present in the common ancestor of orchids but have experienced independent, significant losses at least eight times across four subfamilies. In addition, ndhF gene loss was correlated with shifts in the position of the junction of the inverted repeat (IR) and small single-copy (SSC) regions. The Orchidaceae have unprecedented levels of homoplasy in ndh gene presence/absence, which may be correlated in part with the unusual life history of orchids. These results also suggest that ndhF plays a role in IR/SSC junction stability. PMID:26558895

  14. Helvolic acid, an antibacterial nortriterpenoid from a fungal endophyte, Xylaria sp. of orchid Anoectochilus setaceus endemic to Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Ratnaweera, Pamoda B.; Williams, David E.; de Silva, E. Dilip; Wijesundera, Ravi L.C.; Dalisay, Doralyn S.; Andersen, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    An endophytic fungus was isolated from surface sterilized leaf segments of Anoectochilus setaceus, an orchid endemic to Sri Lanka, and was identified as Xylaria sp. by morphological characters and DNA sequencing. Bioassay-guided chromatographic fractionation of the organic extract of a laboratory culture of this fungus led to the isolation of the known antibacterial helvolic acid. Helvolic acid was active against the Gram-positive bacteria, Bacillus subtilis [minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC), 2 μg mL−1] and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MIC, 4 μg mL−1). PMID:24772371

  15. Carrion mimicry in a South African orchid: flowers attract a narrow subset of the fly assemblage on animal carcasses

    PubMed Central

    van der Niet, Timotheüs; Hansen, Dennis M.; Johnson, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Although pollination of plants that attract flies by resembling their carrion brood and food sites has been reported in several angiosperm families, there has been very little work done on the level of specificity in carrion mimicry systems and the importance of plant cues in mediating such specialization. Specificity may be expected, as carrion-frequenting flies often exploit different niches, which has been interpreted as avoidance of interspecific competition. Interactions between the orchid Satyrium pumilum and a local assemblage of carrion flies were investigated, and the functional significance of floral traits, especially scent, tested. Pollination success and the incidence of pollinator-mediated self-pollination were measured and these were compared with values for orchids with sexual- and food-deceptive pollination systems. Methods and Key Results Observations of insect visitation to animal carcasses and to flowers showed that the local assemblage of carrion flies was dominated by blow flies (Calliphoridae), house flies (Muscidae) and flesh flies (Sarcophagidae), but flowers of the orchid were pollinated exclusively by flesh flies, with a strong bias towards females that sometimes deposited live larvae on flowers. A trend towards similar partitioning of fly taxa was found in an experiment that tested the effect of large versus small carrion quantities on fly attraction. GC-MS analysis showed that floral scent is dominated by oligosulfides, 2-heptanone, p-cresol and indole, compounds that also dominate carrion scent. Flesh flies did not distinguish between floral and carrion scent in a choice experiment using olfactory cues only, which also showed that scent alone is responsible for fly attraction. Pollination success was relatively high (31·5 % of flowers), but tracking of stained pollinia also revealed that a relatively high percentage (46 %) of pollen deposited on stigmas originates from the same plant. Conclusions Satyrium pumilum

  16. Helvolic acid, an antibacterial nortriterpenoid from a fungal endophyte, Xylaria sp. of orchid Anoectochilus setaceus endemic to Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Ratnaweera, Pamoda B; Williams, David E; de Silva, E Dilip; Wijesundera, Ravi L C; Dalisay, Doralyn S; Andersen, Raymond J

    2014-03-01

    An endophytic fungus was isolated from surface sterilized leaf segments of Anoectochilus setaceus, an orchid endemic to Sri Lanka, and was identified as Xylaria sp. by morphological characters and DNA sequencing. Bioassay-guided chromatographic fractionation of the organic extract of a laboratory culture of this fungus led to the isolation of the known antibacterial helvolic acid. Helvolic acid was active against the Gram-positive bacteria, Bacillus subtilis [minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC), 2 μg mL(-1)] and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MIC, 4 μg mL(-1)). PMID:24772371

  17. Vanillin - Bioconversion and Bioengineering of the most popular plant flavour and its de novo biosynthesis in the vanilla orchid.

    PubMed

    Gallage, Nethaji J; Moeller, Birger Lindberg

    2014-09-30

    During recent years, biotechnology derived production of flavours and fragrances have expanded rapidly. The world's most popular flavour vanillin is no exception. This review outlines the current state of biotechnology-based vanillin synthesis with the use of ferulic acid, eugenol and glucose as substrates and bacteria, fungi and yeasts as microbial production hosts. The elucidated de novo biosynthetic pathway of vanillin in the vanilla orchid and the possible applied uses of this new knowledge in the biotechnology derived and pod-based vanillin industries are also highlighted. PMID:25270669

  18. Vanillin-bioconversion and bioengineering of the most popular plant flavor and its de novo biosynthesis in the vanilla orchid.

    PubMed

    Gallage, Nethaji J; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, biotechnology-derived production of flavors and fragrances has expanded rapidly. The world's most popular flavor, vanillin, is no exception. This review outlines the current state of biotechnology-based vanillin synthesis with the use of ferulic acid, eugenol, and glucose as substrates and bacteria, fungi, and yeasts as microbial production hosts. The de novo biosynthetic pathway of vanillin in the vanilla orchid and the possible applied uses of this new knowledge in the biotechnology-derived and pod-based vanillin industries are also highlighted. PMID:25578271

  19. Observational Research in Childhood Infectious Diseases (ORChID): a dynamic birth cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Stephen Bernard; Ware, Robert S; Cook, Anne L; Maguire, Frances A; Whiley, David M; Bialasiewicz, Seweryn; Mackay, Ian M; Wang, David; Sloots, Theo P; Nissen, Michael D; Grimwood, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Even in developed economies infectious diseases remain the most common cause of illness in early childhood. Our current understanding of the epidemiology of these infections is limited by reliance on data from decades ago performed using low-sensitivity laboratory methods, and recent studies reporting severe, hospital-managed disease. Methods and analysis The Observational Research in Childhood Infectious Diseases (ORChID) study is an ongoing study enrolling a dynamic birth cohort to document the community-based epidemiology of viral respiratory and gastrointestinal infections in early childhood. Women are recruited antenatally, and their healthy newborn is followed for the first 2 years of life. Parents keep a daily symptom diary for the study child, collect a weekly anterior nose swab and dirty nappy swab and complete a burden diary when a child meets pre-defined illness criteria. Specimens will be tested for a wide range of viruses by real-time PCR assays. Primary analyses involves calculating incidence rates for acute respiratory illness (ARI) and acute gastroenteritis (AGE) for the cohort by age and seasonality. Control material from children when they are without symptoms will allow us to determine what proportion of ARIs and AGE can be attributed to specific pathogens. Secondary analyses will assess the incidence and shedding duration of specific respiratory and gastrointestinal pathogens. Ethics and dissemination This study is approved by The Human Research Ethics Committees of the Children's Health Queensland Hospital and Health Service, the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital and The University of Queensland. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT01304914. PMID:23117571

  20. Floral odour chemistry defines species boundaries and underpins strong reproductive isolation in sexually deceptive orchids

    PubMed Central

    Peakall, Rod; Whitehead, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The events leading to speciation are best investigated in systems where speciation is ongoing or incomplete, such as incipient species. By examining reproductive barriers among incipient sister taxa and their congeners we can gain valuable insights into the relative timing and importance of the various barriers involved in the speciation process. The aim of this study was to identify the reproductive barriers among sexually deceptive orchid taxa in the genus Chiloglottis. Methods The study targeted four closely related taxa with varying degrees of geographic overlap. Chemical, morphological and genetic evidence was combined to explore the basis of reproductive isolation. Of primary interest was the degree of genetic differentiation among taxa at both nuclear and chloroplast DNA markers. To objectively test whether or not species boundaries are defined by the chemistry that controls pollinator specificity, genetic analysis was restricted to samples of known odour chemistry. Key Results Floral odour chemical analysis was performed for 600+ flowers. The three sympatric taxa were defined by their specific chiloglottones, the semiochemicals responsible for pollinator attraction, and were found to be fully cross-compatible. Multivariate morphometric analysis could not reliably distinguish among the four taxa. Although varying from very low to moderate, significant levels of genetic differentiation were detected among all pairwise combinations of taxa at both nuclear and chloroplast loci. However, the levels of genetic differentiation were lower than expected for mature species. Critically, a lack of chloroplast DNA haplotype sharing among the morphologically indistinguishable and most closely related taxon pair confirmed that chemistry alone can define taxon boundaries. Conclusions The results confirmed that pollinator isolation, mediated by specific pollinator attraction, underpins strong reproductive isolation in these taxa. A combination of large

  1. Rock outcrop orchids reveal the genetic connectivity and diversity of inselbergs of northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Because of their fragmented nature, inselberg species are interesting biological models for studying the genetic consequences of disjoint populations. Inselbergs are commonly compared with oceanic islands, as most of them display a marked ecological isolation from the surrounding area. The isolation of these rock outcrops is reflected in the high number of recorded endemic species and the strong floristic differences between individual inselbergs and adjacent habitats. We examined the genetic connectivity of orchids Epidendrum cinnabarinum and E. secundum adapted to Neotropical inselbergs of northeastern Brazil. Our goals were to identify major genetic divergences or disjunctions across the range of the species and to investigate potential demographic and evolutionary mechanisms leading to lineage divergence in Neotropical mountain ecosystems. Results Based on plastid markers, high genetic differentiation was found for E. cinnabarinum (FST = 0.644) and E. secundum (FST = 0.636). Haplotypes were not geographically structured in either taxon, suggesting that restricted gene flow and genetic drift may be significant factors influencing the diversification of these inselberg populations. Moreover, strong differentiation was found between populations over short spatial scales, indicating substantial periods of isolation among populations. For E. secundum, nuclear markers indicated higher gene flow by pollen than by seeds. Conclusions The comparative approach adopted in this study contributed to the elucidation of patterns in both species. Our results confirm the ancient and highly isolated nature of inselberg populations. Both species showed similar patterns of genetic diversity and structure, highlighting the importance of seed-restricted gene flow and genetic drift as drivers of plant diversification in terrestrial islands such as inselbergs. PMID:24629134

  2. Adding Biotic Interactions into Paleodistribution Models: A Host-Cleptoparasite Complex of Neotropical Orchid Bees

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Daniel Paiva; Varela, Sara; Nemésio, André; De Marco, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Orchid bees compose an exclusive Neotropical pollinators group, with bright body coloration. Several of those species build their own nests, while others are reported as nest cleptoparasites. Here, the objective was to evaluate whether the inclusion of a strong biotic interaction, such as the presence of a host species, improved the ability of species distribution models (SDMs) to predict the geographic range of the cleptoparasite species. The target species were Aglae caerulea and its host species Eulaema nigrita. Additionally, since A. caerulea is more frequently found in the Amazon rather than the Cerrado areas, a secondary objective was to evaluate whether this species is increasing or decreasing its distribution given South American past and current climatic conditions. SDMs methods (Maxent and Bioclim), in addition with current and past South American climatic conditions, as well as the occurrences for A. caerulea and E. nigrita were used to generate the distribution models. The distribution of A. caerulea was generated with and without the inclusion of the distribution of E. nigrita as a predictor variable. The results indicate A. caerulea was barely affected by past climatic conditions and the populations from the Cerrado savanna could be at least 21,000 years old (the last glacial maximum), as well as the Amazonian ones. On the other hand, in this study, the inclusion of the host-cleptoparasite interaction complex did not statistically improve the quality of the produced models, which means that the geographic range of this cleptoparasite species is mainly constrained by climate and not by the presence of the host species. Nonetheless, this could also be caused by unknown complexes of other Euglossini hosts with A. caerulea, which still are still needed to be described by science. PMID:26069956

  3. Dynamic distribution patterns of ribosomal DNA and chromosomal evolution in Paphiopedilum, a lady's slipper orchid

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Paphiopedilum is a horticulturally and ecologically important genus of ca. 80 species of lady's slipper orchids native to Southeast Asia. These plants have long been of interest regarding their chromosomal evolution, which involves a progressive aneuploid series based on either fission or fusion of centromeres. Chromosome number is positively correlated with genome size, so rearrangement processes must include either insertion or deletion of DNA segments. We have conducted Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) studies using 5S and 25S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) probes to survey for rearrangements, duplications, and phylogenetically-correlated variation within Paphiopedilum. We further studied sequence variation of the non-transcribed spacers of 5S rDNA (5S-NTS) to examine their complex duplication history, including the possibility that concerted evolutionary forces may homogenize diversity. Results 5S and 25S rDNA loci among Paphiopedilum species, representing all key phylogenetic lineages, exhibit a considerable diversity that correlates well with recognized evolutionary groups. 25S rDNA signals range from 2 (representing 1 locus) to 9, the latter representing hemizygosity. 5S loci display extensive structural variation, and show from 2 specific signals to many, both major and minor and highly dispersed. The dispersed signals mainly occur at centromeric and subtelomeric positions, which are hotspots for chromosomal breakpoints. Phylogenetic analysis of cloned 5S rDNA non-transcribed spacer (5S-NTS) sequences showed evidence for both ancient and recent post-speciation duplication events, as well as interlocus and intralocus diversity. Conclusions Paphiopedilum species display many chromosomal rearrangements - for example, duplications, translocations, and inversions - but only weak concerted evolutionary forces among highly duplicated 5S arrays, which suggests that double-strand break repair processes are dynamic and ongoing. These results make the genus

  4. The Dual Function of Orchid Bee Ocelli as Revealed by X-Ray Microtomography.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Gavin J; Ribi, Willi; Bech, Martin; Bodey, Andrew J; Rau, Christoph; Steuwer, Axel; Warrant, Eric J; Baird, Emily

    2016-05-23

    Visually guided flight control in the rainforest is arguably one of the most complex insect behaviors: illumination varies dramatically depending on location [1], and the densely cluttered environment blocks out most of the sky [2]. What visual information do insects sample for flight control in this habitat? To begin answering this question, we determined the visual fields of the ocelli-thought to play a role in attitude stabilization of some flying insects [3-5]-of an orchid bee, Euglossa imperialis. High-resolution 3D models of the ocellar system from X-ray microtomography were used for optical ray tracing simulations. Surprisingly, these showed that each ocellus possesses two distinct visual fields-a focused monocular visual field suitable for detecting features elevated above the horizon and therefore assisting with flight stabilization [3-5] and, unlike other ocelli investigated to date [4, 6, 7], a large trinocular fronto-dorsal visual field shared by all ocelli. Histological analyses show that photoreceptors have similar orientations within each ocellus and are likely to be sensitive to polarized light, as in some other hymenopterans [7, 8]. We also found that the average receptor orientation is offset between the ocelli, each having different axes of polarization sensitivity relative to the head. Unlike the eyes of any other insect described to date, this ocellar system meets the requirements of a true polarization analyzer [9, 10]. The ocelli of E. imperialis could provide sensitive compass information for navigation in the rainforest and, additionally, provide cues for visual discrimination or flight control. PMID:27112298

  5. Genetic variability within and among populations of an invasive, exotic orchid

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Sueme; Rodrigues, Jucelene Fernandes; Alves-Pereira, Alessandro; Pansarin, Emerson Ricardo; Veasey, Elizabeth Ann

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that invasive species are of great evolutionary interest because of their success in colonizing and spreading into new areas, the factors underlying this success often remain obscure. In this sense, studies on population genetics and phylogenetic relationships of invasive species could offer insights into mechanisms of invasions. Originally from Africa, the terrestrial orchid Oeceoclades maculata, considered an invasive plant, is the only species of the genus throughout the Americas. Considering the lack of information on population genetics of this species, the aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity and structure of Brazilian populations of O. maculata. We used 13 inter-simple sequence repeat primers to assess the genetic diversity of 152 individuals of O. maculata distributed in five sampled sites from three Brazilian states (São Paulo, Mato Grosso and Paraná). Low diversity was found within samples, with estimates of the Shannon index (H) ranging from 0.0094 to 0.1054 and estimates of Nei's gene diversity (He) ranging from 0.0054 to 0.0668. However, when evaluated together, the sampling locations showed substantially higher diversity estimates (H = 0.3869, He = 0.2556), and most of the genetic diversity was found among populations (ΦST = 0.933). Both clustering and principal coordinate analysis indicate the existence of five distinct groups, corresponding to the sampled localities, and which were also recovered in the Bayesian analysis. A substructure was observed in one of the localities, suggesting a lack of gene flow even between very small distances. The patterns of genetic structure found in this study may be understood considering the interaction of several probable reproductive strategies with its history of colonization involving possible genetic drift, selective pressures and multiple introductions. PMID:26162896

  6. Colour-scent associations in a tropical orchid: three colours but two odours.

    PubMed

    Delle-Vedove, Roxane; Juillet, Nicolas; Bessière, Jean-Marie; Grison, Claude; Barthes, Nicolas; Pailler, Thierry; Dormont, Laurent; Schatz, Bertrand

    2011-06-01

    Colour and scent are the major pollinator attractants to flowers, and their production may be linked by shared biosynthetic pathways. Species with polymorphic floral traits are particularly relevant to study the joint evolution of floral traits. We used in this study the tropical orchid Calanthe sylvatica from Réunion Island. Three distinct colour varieties are observed, presenting lilac, white or purple flowers, and named respectively C. sylvaticavar.lilacina (hereafter referred as var. lilacina), C. sylvaticavar. alba (var. alba) and C. sylvatica var. purpurea (var. purpurea). We investigated the composition of the floral scent produced by these colour varieties using the non-invasive SPME technique in the wild. Scent emissions are dominated by aromatic compounds. Nevertheless, the presence of the terpenoid (E)-4,8-dimethylnona-1,3,7-triène (DMNT) is diagnostic of var. purpurea, with the volatile organic compounds (VOC) produced by some individuals containing up to 60% of DMNT. We evidence specific colour-scent associations in C. sylvatica, with two distinct scent profiles in the three colour varieties: the lilacina-like profile containing no or very little DMNT (<2%) and the purpurea-like profile containing DMNT (>2%). Calanthe sylvatica var. alba individuals group with one or the other scent profile independently of their population of origin. We suggest that white-flowered individuals have evolved at least twice, once from var. lilacina and at least once from var. purpurea after the colonisation of la Réunion. White-flowered individuals may have been favoured by the particular pollinator fauna characterising the island. These flowering varieties of C. sylvatica, which display three colours but two scents profiles prove that colour is not always a good indicator of odour and that colour-scent associations may be complex, depending on pollination ecology of the populations concerned. PMID:21377705

  7. Labellar Micromorphology of Two Euglossine-pollinated Orchid Genera; Scuticaria Lindl. and Dichaea Lindl.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Kevin L.; Stpiczyńska, Malgorzata

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Until recently, there was no consensus regarding the phylogenetic relationships of the Neotropical orchid genera Scuticaria Lindl. and Dichaea Lindl. However, recent evidence derived from both gross morphological and molecular studies supports the inclusion of Scuticaria and Dichaea in sub-tribes Maxillariinae and Zygopetalinae, respectively. The present paper describes the labellar micromorphology of both genera and seeks to establish whether labellar characters support the assignment of Scuticaria and Dichaea to these sub-tribes. Methods The labella of four species of Scuticaria and 14 species of Dichaea were examined using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and their micromorphology was compared with that of representative species of Maxillariinae sensu lato and Zygopetalinae (Huntleya clade). Key Results and Conclusions In most specimens of Scuticaria examined, the papillose labella bear uniseriate, multicellular, unbranched trichomes. However, in S. steelii (Lindl.) Lindl., branched hairs may also be present and some trichomes may fragment and form pseudopollen. Multicellular, leaf-like scales were also present in one species of Scuticaria. Similar, unbranched hairs are present in certain species of Maxillaria Ruiz & Pav. (Maxillariinae sensu stricto) and Chaubardia Rchb.f. (Huntleya clade). As yet, moniliform, pseudopollen-forming hairs have not been observed for Zygopetalinae, but their presence in Scuticaria steelii, Maxillaria and Heterotaxis Lindl. supports the placing of Scuticaria in Maxillariinae. As other genera are sampled, the presence of branched hairs, hitherto unknown for Maxillariinae sensu lato, may prove to be a useful character in taxonomy and phylogenetic studies. Euglossophily occurs in Dichaea, as well as Chondrorhyncha Lindl. and Pescatorea Rchb.f. (Huntleya clade), and all three genera tend to lack distinctive labellar features. Instead, lip micromorphology is relatively simple and glabrous or

  8. Microsatellite-based genetic diversity patterns in disjunct populations of a rare orchid.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Madhav; Richards, Matt; Sharma, Jyotsna

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the patterns of genetic diversity and structure in seven disjunct populations of a rare North American orchid, Cypripedium kentuckiense by including populations that represented the periphery and the center of the its range. Eight nuclear and two chloroplast microsatellites were used. Genetic diversity was low across the sampled populations of C. kentuckiense based on both nuclear (average An = 4.0, Ho = 0.436, He = 0.448) and cpDNA microsatellites (average An = 1.57, Nh = 1.57 and H = 0.133). The number of private alleles ranged from one to four per population with a total of 17 private alleles detected at five nuclear microsatellites. One private allele at one cpDNA microsatellite was also observed. Although the absolute values for nuclear microsatellite based population differentiation were low (Fst = 0.075; ϕPT = 0.24), they were statistically significant. Pairwise Fst values ranged from 0.038 to 0.123 and each comparison was significant. We also detected isolation by distance with nDNA microsatellites based on the Mantel test (r(2) = 0.209, P = 0.05). STRUCTURE analysis and the neighbor joining trees grouped the populations similarly whereby the geographically proximal populations were genetically similar. Our data indicate that the species is genetically depauperate but the diversity is distributed more or less equally across its range. Population differentiation and isolation by distance were detectable, which indicates that genetic isolation is beginning to manifest itself across the range in this rare species. PMID:26481007

  9. Genetic variability within and among populations of an invasive, exotic orchid.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Sueme; Rodrigues, Jucelene Fernandes; Alves-Pereira, Alessandro; Pansarin, Emerson Ricardo; Veasey, Elizabeth Ann

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that invasive species are of great evolutionary interest because of their success in colonizing and spreading into new areas, the factors underlying this success often remain obscure. In this sense, studies on population genetics and phylogenetic relationships of invasive species could offer insights into mechanisms of invasions. Originally from Africa, the terrestrial orchid Oeceoclades maculata, considered an invasive plant, is the only species of the genus throughout the Americas. Considering the lack of information on population genetics of this species, the aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity and structure of Brazilian populations of O. maculata. We used 13 inter-simple sequence repeat primers to assess the genetic diversity of 152 individuals of O. maculata distributed in five sampled sites from three Brazilian states (São Paulo, Mato Grosso and Paraná). Low diversity was found within samples, with estimates of the Shannon index (H) ranging from 0.0094 to 0.1054 and estimates of Nei's gene diversity (He) ranging from 0.0054 to 0.0668. However, when evaluated together, the sampling locations showed substantially higher diversity estimates (H = 0.3869, He = 0.2556), and most of the genetic diversity was found among populations (ΦST = 0.933). Both clustering and principal coordinate analysis indicate the existence of five distinct groups, corresponding to the sampled localities, and which were also recovered in the Bayesian analysis. A substructure was observed in one of the localities, suggesting a lack of gene flow even between very small distances. The patterns of genetic structure found in this study may be understood considering the interaction of several probable reproductive strategies with its history of colonization involving possible genetic drift, selective pressures and multiple introductions. PMID:26162896

  10. The Threat of Captivity: Hollywood and the Sexualization of Race Relations in "The Girls of the White Orchid" and "The Bitter Tea of General Yen."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchetti, Gina

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the captivity tale as an outgrowth of two fundamental contradictions within patriarchal ideology. Considers American popular thought in relation to this tale. Relates xenophobia in the 1980s to the sexual and racial politics of "The Girls of the White Orchid." Discusses the racial, sexual, and textual ambivalence in "The Bitter Tea of…

  11. Genome sequencing and transposon mutagenesis of Burkholderia seminalis TC3.4.2R3 identify genes contributing to suppression of orchid necrosis caused by B. gladioli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty six strains of Burkholderia spp. isolated from sugarcane were evaluated for biological control of leaf and pseudobulb necrosis of orchid caused by B. gladioli. Twenty nine of the sugarcane strains suppressed the disease in greenhouse assays. We generated a draft genomic sequence of one suppr...

  12. Rare white-flowered morphs increase the reproductive success of common purple morphs in a food-deceptive orchid.

    PubMed

    Dormont, L; Delle-Vedove, R; Bessière, J-M; Hossaert-Mc Key, M; Schatz, B

    2010-01-01

    How floral colour polymorphism can be maintained in evolutionary time is still debated. In rewardless orchids, it is unknown whether rare white-flowered morphs differ in scent chemistry from pigmented morphs, and whether such intraspecific variation in floral signals may have an impact on reproductive success. We compared the chemical composition of floral volatiles emitted by white- and purple-flowered morphs of Orchis mascula, and recorded the fruit set of both colour morphs. We also used white ping-pong balls to mimic white-flowered morphs in field bioassays. We found that colour polymorphism was not associated with floral odour polymorphism. Surprisingly, when populations of purple-flowered plants included a few white-flowered individuals, the fruit set of the purple morph increased significantly (from 6 to 27%), while that of the white morph remained low. We obtained the same fourfold increase in fruit set when using ping-pong balls as visual lures, demonstrating the association between colour variation and fruit set, and the key role of visual signals in pollinator attraction. Our results are incompatible with negative frequency-dependent selection, a hypothesis invoked to explain colour polymorphism in other rewardless orchids. We propose several hypotheses to explain the maintenance of white morphs in O. mascula. PMID:19825015

  13. Scent emission profiles from Darwin's orchid--Angraecum sesquipedale: Investigation of the aldoxime metabolism using clustering analysis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Lasse Janniche; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2015-12-01

    The display of scent is crucial for plants in attracting pollinating insects to flowers and ensuring successful pollination and reproduction. The large number of aldoxime volatile species present in the scent of the Madagascan orchid Angraecum sesquipedale has been suggested to play a primary role in attracting the sphingid moth Xanthopan morgani praedicta. By solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), we monitored the scent release from different flowers of a single orchid, day and night throughout the entire flowering period. In separate experiments, the diurnal release was monitored in 3h intervals and the tissue specific release from the different floral parts was tracked. Numerous novel compounds related to the aldoxime metabolism not previously detected in A. sesquipedale were identified and positioned into a proposed pathway for aldoxime metabolism. From the results, we hypothesize that (E/Z)-phenylacetaldoxime and its derivatives could be important attractants for the pollinating moth X. morgani praedicta. By applying an untargeted Partitioning Around Medoids (PAM) cluster analysis to the metabolite profiles in the scent, the proposed pathways for the formation of aldoximes were substantiated. With this study, we demonstrate the powerful utility of a bioinformatics tool to aid in the elucidation of the routes of formation for volatiles and provide a benchmark and guidelines for future detailed observations of hawkmoth pollination of Angraecum species, and in particular A. sesquipedale, in the wild. PMID:26603277

  14. RNA interference-based gene silencing of phytoene synthase impairs growth, carotenoids, and plastid phenotype in Oncidium hybrid orchid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Xin; Chiou, Chung-Yi; Shen, Chin-Hui; Chen, Peng-Jen; Liu, Yao-Chung; Jian, Chin-Der; Shen, Xiao-Lan; Shen, Fu-Quan; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2014-01-01

    Phytoene synthase (PSY) is the first rate-limiting regulatory enzyme in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway. In order to modify the floral color pattern by reducing carotenoid contents, a phytoene synthase-RNAi construct was delivered into protocorm-like body (PLB) of Oncidium hybrid orchid. The transgenic orchids show down-regulated level of PSY and geranyl synthase gene. They displayed semi-dwarf phenotype and brilliant green leaves. The microscopic anatomy revealed development-arrested plastids with rare grana. The total carotenoid content was decreased and the efficiency of the photosynthetic electron transport was declined. The chlorophyll level and the expression of chlorophyll biosynthetic genes, such as OgGLUTR and OgCS were dramatically reduced. HPLC analysis showed that the endogenous level of gibberellic acid and abscisic acid in the dwarf transformants are 4-fold lower than in wild type plants. In addition, chilling tolerance of the transgenic Oncidium plants was reduced. The data showed that down-regulation of PSY resulted in alterations of gene expression in enzymes involved in many metabolic pathways, such as carotenoid, gibberellic acid, abscisic acid and chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway as well as causes predominant defects in plant growth and development. PMID:25221736

  15. Bayesian Estimates of Transition Probabilities in Seven Small Lithophytic Orchid Populations: Maximizing Data Availability from Many Small Samples

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Raymond L.; McCarthy, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Predicting population dynamics for rare species is of paramount importance in order to evaluate the likelihood of extinction and planning conservation strategies. However, evaluating and predicting population viability can be hindered from a lack of data. Rare species frequently have small populations, so estimates of vital rates are often very uncertain due to lack of data. We evaluated the vital rates of seven small populations from two watersheds with varying light environment of a common epiphytic orchid using Bayesian methods of parameter estimation. From the Lefkovitch matrices we predicted the deterministic population growth rates, elasticities, stable stage distributions and the credible intervals of the statistics. Populations were surveyed on a monthly basis between 18–34 months. In some of the populations few or no transitions in some of the vital rates were observed throughout the sampling period, however, we were able to predict the most likely vital rates using a Bayesian model that incorporated the transitions rates from the other populations. Asymptotic population growth rate varied among the seven orchid populations. There was little difference in population growth rate among watersheds even though it was expected because of physical differences as a result of differing canopy cover and watershed width. Elasticity analyses of Lepanthes rupestris suggest that growth rate is more sensitive to survival followed by growth, shrinking and the reproductive rates. The Bayesian approach helped to estimate transition probabilities that were uncommon or variable in some populations. Moreover, it increased the precision of the parameter estimates as compared to traditional approaches. PMID:25068598

  16. Taxonomic and functional characterisation of fungi from the Sebacina vermifera complex from common and rare orchids in the genus Caladenia.

    PubMed

    Wright, Magali M; Cross, Rob; Cousens, Roger D; May, Tom W; McLean, Cassandra B

    2010-08-01

    The terrestrial orchid genus Caladenia contains many species which are threatened with extinction. They have highly specific associations with Sebacina vermifera and closely related fungi, and conservation of these terrestrial orchids, in part, relies on symbiotic propagation to produce plants for reintroduction and ex situ conservation collections. However, little is known of the diversity of mycorrhizal fungi associating with natural populations. Here, restriction fragment polymorphism analysis, internal transcribed spacer and nuclear large subunit sequencing and symbiotic seed germination were used to investigate the taxonomic and functional diversity of fungal isolates from single populations of six endangered Caladenia species and one common species across the same biogeographic range. Fifty-nine fungal isolates were collected for investigation including ten isolates from the six endangered species Caladenia audasii, Caladenia amoena, Caladenia sp. aff. fragrantissima (Central Victoria), Caladenia sp. aff. patersonii, Caladenia rosella and Caladenia orientalis and 49 isolates from six populations of the common species Caladenia tentaculata. While the common species associated with three distinct S. vermifera-like taxa, the six endangered species were restricted to one of these fungal taxa. No direct relationship between the taxonomic identity of the fungi and their ability to stimulate seed germination was observed; however, the majority of the fungi isolated from the Caladenia species were capable of germinating seed in vitro, indicating their mycorrhizal status and potential for symbiotic propagation in conservation programmes. PMID:20054590

  17. Raising the Sugar Content – Orchid Bees Overcome the Constraints of Suction Feeding through Manipulation of Nectar and Pollen Provisions

    PubMed Central

    Pokorny, Tamara; Lunau, Klaus; Eltz, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Unlike most other bees, the long-tongued orchid bees ingest nectar using suction feeding. Although long tongues allow exploitation of flowers with deep spurs, the energy intake rate is optimal at 10–20% lower nectar sugar concentrations compared to that of lapping bees. This constraint might be compensated by a higher digestive throughput. Additionally, orchid bees might evaporate water from regurgitated droplets of crop contents. We found male Euglossa championi (n = 10) and Euglossa dodsoni (n = 12) to regularly regurgitate droplets of crop content to the base of their proboscis, generating a fluid film between the proximal parts of the galeae, glossa and labial palps. Rhythmic movements of the proboscis may help to increase convection. There was a significant change in sugar concentration between the initially imbibed solution and the resulting crop content (P<0.05) and the time individual bees had engaged in this liquid exposure behavior was positively correlated with the resulting crop sugar concentration. Female Euglossa townsendi and Euglossa viridissima showed the same behavior. Additionally, they manipulated their nectar-enriched pollen provisions for extensive periods of time before deposition in brood cells. The deposited pollen loads (n = 14) showed a significantly higher sugar concentration than the sugar-water available to the bees (P<0.001). Thus, both male and female euglossines show behaviors that promote evaporative water loss from nectar. We suggest that the behaviors have evolved in concert with suction feeding on dilute nectar from deep floral tubes. PMID:25422945

  18. Is floral divergence sufficient to maintain species boundaries upon secondary contact in Mediterranean food-deceptive orchids?

    PubMed Central

    Zitari, A; Scopece, G; Helal, A N; Widmer, A; Cozzolino, S

    2012-01-01

    Analyzing the processes that determine whether species boundaries are maintained on secondary contact may shed light on the early phase of speciation. In Anacamptis morio and Anacamptis longicornu, two Mediterranean orchid sister-species, we used molecular and morphological analyses, together with estimates of pollination success and experimental crosses, to assess whether floral isolation can shelter the species' genomes from genetic admixture on secondary contact. We found substantial genetic and morphological homogenization in sympatric populations in combination with an apparent lack of postmating isolation. We further detected asymmetric introgression in the sympatric populations and an imbalance in cytotype representation, which may be due either to a difference in flowering phenology or else be a consequence of cytonuclear incompatibilities. Estimates of genetic clines for markers across sympatric zones revealed markers that significantly deviated from neutral expectations. We observed a significant correlation between spur length and reproductive success in sympatric populations, which may suggest that directional selection is the main cause of morphological differentiation in this species pair. Our results suggest that allopatric divergence has not led to the evolution of sufficient reproductive isolation to prevent genomic admixture on secondary contact in this orchid species pair. PMID:21792224

  19. Non-specific symbiotic germination of Cynorkis purpurea (Thouars) Kraezl., a habitat-specific terrestrial orchid from the Central Highlands of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Rafter, M; Yokoya, K; Schofield, E J; Zettler, L W; Sarasan, V

    2016-08-01

    Orchids, particularly terrestrial taxa, rely mostly on basidiomycete fungi in the Cantharellales and Sebacinales that trigger the process of seed germination and/or initiate the full development of the seedling. During the course of development, orchids may associate with the same fungus, or they may enlist other types of fungi for their developmental needs leading to resilience in a natural setting. This study examined in vitro seed germination and seedling developmental behavior of Cynorkis purpurea, a terrestrial orchid from the Central Highlands of Madagascar. This species is mostly restricted to gallery forests in the Itremo Massif, in moist substrate between rocks bordering streams. The main objective was to understand the influence of diverse mycorrhizal fungi on seed germination and further development of C. purpurea. The study aims to compare symbiotic versus asymbiotic germination and seedling development with seeds and fungi collected from a 13-km(2) area in the Itremo region. Seeds collected from the wild were sown with diverse orchid mycorrhizal fungi (OMF) spanning 12 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in three genera (Tulasnella, Ceratobasidium, and Sebacina) acquired from different habitats. Treatments were assessed in terms of the percentage of germinated seeds and fully developed seedlings against those in asymbiotic control media treatments. Overall, OMF significantly improved seedling development within the 12-week experiment period. Sebacina as a genus was the most effective at promoting seedling development of C. purpurea, as well as having the ability to enter into successful symbiotic relationships with orchids of different life forms; this new knowledge may be especially useful for orchid conservation practiced in tropical areas like Madagascar. A Sebacina isolate from an epiphytic seedling of Polystachya concreta was the most effective at inducing rapid seedling development and was among the five that outperformed fungi isolated from roots

  20. Challenges of flow-cytometric estimation of nuclear genome size in orchids, a plant group with both whole-genome and progressively partial endoreplication.

    PubMed

    Trávníček, Pavel; Ponert, Jan; Urfus, Tomáš; Jersáková, Jana; Vrána, Jan; Hřibová, Eva; Doležel, Jaroslav; Suda, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear genome size is an inherited quantitative trait of eukaryotic organisms with both practical and biological consequences. A detailed analysis of major families is a promising approach to fully understand the biological meaning of the extensive variation in genome size in plants. Although Orchidaceae accounts for ∼10% of the angiosperm diversity, the knowledge of patterns and dynamics of their genome size is limited, in part due to difficulties in flow cytometric analyses. Cells in various somatic tissues of orchids undergo extensive endoreplication, either whole-genome or partial, and the G1-phase nuclei with 2C DNA amounts may be lacking, resulting in overestimated genome size values. Interpretation of DNA content histograms is particularly challenging in species with progressively partial endoreplication, in which the ratios between the positions of two neighboring DNA peaks are lower than two. In order to assess distributions of nuclear DNA amounts and identify tissue suitable for reliable estimation of nuclear DNA content, we analyzed six different tissue types in 48 orchid species belonging to all recognized subfamilies. Although traditionally used leaves may provide incorrect C-values, particularly in species with progressively partial endoreplication, young ovaries and pollinaria consistently yield 2C and 1C peaks of their G1-phase nuclei, respectively, and are, therefore, the most suitable parts for genome size studies in orchids. We also provide new DNA C-values for 22 orchid genera and 42 species. Adhering to the proposed methodology would allow for reliable genome size estimates in this largest plant family. Although our research was limited to orchids, the need to find a suitable tissue with dominant 2C peak of G1-phase nuclei applies to all endopolyploid species. PMID:25929591

  1. The Multifaceted Effects of Polysaccharides Isolated from Dendrobium huoshanense on Immune Functions with the Induction of Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist (IL-1ra) in Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Juway; Chang, Ya-Jen; Yang, Wen-Bin; Yu, Alice L.; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2014-01-01

    Dendrobium huoshanense is a valuable and versatile Chinese herbal medicine with the anecdotal claims of cancer prevention and anti-inflammation. However, its immunological activities are limited to in vitro studies on a few cytokines and immune cell functions. First, we investigated the effects of polysaccharides isolated from DH (DH-PS) on inducing a panel of cytokines/chemokines in mice in vivo and human in vitro. We found that DH polysaccharides (DH-PS) induced TH1, TH2, inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in mouse in vivo and human cells in vitro. Secondly, we demonstrated that DH-PS expanded mouse splenocytes in vivo including CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, B cells, NK cells, NKT cells, monocytes/macrophages, granulocytes and regulatory T cells. Notably, DH-PS induced an anti-inflammatory molecule, IL-1ra, in mouse and human immune cells, especially monocytes. The serum level of IL-1ra elicited by the injection of DH-PS was over 10 folds of IL-1β, suggesting that DH-PS-induced anti-inflammatory activities might over-ride the inflammatory ones mediated by IL-1β. The signaling pathways of DH-PS-induced IL-1ra production was shown to involve ERK/ELK, p38 MAPK, PI3K and NFκB. Finally, we observed that IL-1ra level induced by DH-PS was significantly higher than that by F3, a polysaccharide extract isolated from another popular Chinese herbal medicine, Ganoderma lucidum. These results indicated that DH-PS might have potential applications for ameliorating IL-1-induced pathogenic conditions. PMID:24705413

  2. A de novo floral transcriptome reveals clues into Phalaenopsis orchid flower development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-Zhi; Lin, Chih-Peng; Cheng, Ting-Chi; Chang, Bill Chia-Han; Cheng, Shu-Yu; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lee, Chen-Yu; Chin, Shih-Wen; Chen, Fure-Chyi

    2015-01-01

    Phalaenopsis has a zygomorphic floral structure, including three outer tepals, two lateral inner tepals and a highly modified inner median tepal called labellum or lip; however, the regulation of its organ development remains unelucidated. We generated RNA-seq reads with the Illumina platform for floral organs of the Phalaenopsis wild-type and peloric mutant with a lip-like petal. A total of 43,552 contigs were obtained after de novo assembly. We used differentially expressed gene profiling to compare the transcriptional changes in floral organs for both the wild-type and peloric mutant. Pair-wise comparison of sepals, petals and labellum between peloric mutant and its wild-type revealed 1,838, 758 and 1,147 contigs, respectively, with significant differential expression. PhAGL6a (CUFF.17763), PhAGL6b (CUFF.17763.1), PhMADS1 (CUFF.36625.1), PhMADS4 (CUFF.25909) and PhMADS5 (CUFF.39479.1) were significantly upregulated in the lip-like petal of the peloric mutant. We used real-time PCR analysis of lip-like petals, lip-like sepals and the big lip of peloric mutants to confirm the five genes' expression patterns. PhAGL6a, PhAGL6b and PhMADS4 were strongly expressed in the labellum and significantly upregulated in lip-like petals and lip-like sepals of peloric-mutant flowers. In addition, PhAGL6b was significantly downregulated in the labellum of the big lip mutant, with no change in expression of PhAGL6a. We provide a comprehensive transcript profile and functional analysis of Phalaenopsis floral organs. PhAGL6a PhAGL6b, and PhMADS4 might play crucial roles in the development of the labellum in Phalaenopsis. Our study provides new insights into how the orchid labellum differs and why the petal or sepal converts to a labellum in Phalaenopsis floral mutants. PMID:25970572

  3. A De Novo Floral Transcriptome Reveals Clues into Phalaenopsis Orchid Flower Development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian-Zhi; Lin, Chih-Peng; Cheng, Ting-Chi; Chang, Bill Chia-Han; Cheng, Shu-Yu; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lee, Chen-Yu; Chin, Shih-Wen; Chen, Fure-Chyi

    2015-01-01

    Phalaenopsis has a zygomorphic floral structure, including three outer tepals, two lateral inner tepals and a highly modified inner median tepal called labellum or lip; however, the regulation of its organ development remains unelucidated. We generated RNA-seq reads with the Illumina platform for floral organs of the Phalaenopsis wild-type and peloric mutant with a lip-like petal. A total of 43,552 contigs were obtained after de novo assembly. We used differentially expressed gene profiling to compare the transcriptional changes in floral organs for both the wild-type and peloric mutant. Pair-wise comparison of sepals, petals and labellum between peloric mutant and its wild-type revealed 1,838, 758 and 1,147 contigs, respectively, with significant differential expression. PhAGL6a (CUFF.17763), PhAGL6b (CUFF.17763.1), PhMADS1 (CUFF.36625.1), PhMADS4 (CUFF.25909) and PhMADS5 (CUFF.39479.1) were significantly upregulated in the lip-like petal of the peloric mutant. We used real-time PCR analysis of lip-like petals, lip-like sepals and the big lip of peloric mutants to confirm the five genes’ expression patterns. PhAGL6a, PhAGL6b and PhMADS4 were strongly expressed in the labellum and significantly upregulated in lip-like petals and lip-like sepals of peloric-mutant flowers. In addition, PhAGL6b was significantly downregulated in the labellum of the big lip mutant, with no change in expression of PhAGL6a. We provide a comprehensive transcript profile and functional analysis of Phalaenopsis floral organs. PhAGL6a PhAGL6b, and PhMADS4 might play crucial roles in the development of the labellum in Phalaenopsis. Our study provides new insights into how the orchid labellum differs and why the petal or sepal converts to a labellum in Phalaenopsis floral mutants. PMID:25970572

  4. Systematic revision of Platanthera in the Azorean archipelago: not one but three species, including arguably Europe’s rarest orchid

    PubMed Central

    Rudall, Paula J.; Moura, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims. The Macaronesian islands represent an excellent crucible for exploring speciation. This dominantly phenotypic study complements a separate genotypic study, together designed to identify and circumscribe Platanthera species (butterfly-orchids) on the Azores, and to determine their geographic origin(s) and underlying speciation mechanism(s). Methods. 216 individuals of Platanthera from 30 Azorean localities spanning all nine Azorean islands were measured for 38 morphological characters, supported by light and scanning electron microscopy of selected flowers. They are compared through detailed multivariate and univariate analyses with four widespread continental European relatives in the P. bifolia-chlorantha aggregate, represented by 154 plants from 25 populations, and with the highly misleading original taxonomic descriptions. Physiographic and ecological data were also recorded for each study population. Key Results. Despite limited genetic divergence, detailed phenotypic survey reveals not one or two but three discrete endemic species of Platanthera that are readily distinguished using several characters, most floral: P. pollostantha (newly named, formerly P. micrantha) occupies the widest range of habitats and altitudes and occurs on all nine islands; P. micrantha (formerly P. azorica) occurs on eight islands but is restricted to small, scattered populations in laurisilva scrub; the true P. azorica appears confined to a single volcanigenic ridge on the central island of São Jorge. Conclusions. Although hybridity seems low, the excess of phenotypic over genotypic divergence suggests comparatively recent speciation. The most probable of several credible scenarios is that Azorean Platantheras represent a single migration to the archipelago of airborne seed from ancestral population(s) located in southwest Europe rather than North America, originating from within the P. bifolia-chlorantha aggregate. We hypothesise that an initial anagenetic

  5. Systematic revision of Platanthera in the Azorean archipelago: not one but three species, including arguably Europe's rarest orchid.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Richard M; Rudall, Paula J; Moura, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims. The Macaronesian islands represent an excellent crucible for exploring speciation. This dominantly phenotypic study complements a separate genotypic study, together designed to identify and circumscribe Platanthera species (butterfly-orchids) on the Azores, and to determine their geographic origin(s) and underlying speciation mechanism(s). Methods. 216 individuals of Platanthera from 30 Azorean localities spanning all nine Azorean islands were measured for 38 morphological characters, supported by light and scanning electron microscopy of selected flowers. They are compared through detailed multivariate and univariate analyses with four widespread continental European relatives in the P. bifolia-chlorantha aggregate, represented by 154 plants from 25 populations, and with the highly misleading original taxonomic descriptions. Physiographic and ecological data were also recorded for each study population. Key Results. Despite limited genetic divergence, detailed phenotypic survey reveals not one or two but three discrete endemic species of Platanthera that are readily distinguished using several characters, most floral: P. pollostantha (newly named, formerly P. micrantha) occupies the widest range of habitats and altitudes and occurs on all nine islands; P. micrantha (formerly P. azorica) occurs on eight islands but is restricted to small, scattered populations in laurisilva scrub; the true P. azorica appears confined to a single volcanigenic ridge on the central island of São Jorge. Conclusions. Although hybridity seems low, the excess of phenotypic over genotypic divergence suggests comparatively recent speciation. The most probable of several credible scenarios is that Azorean Platantheras represent a single migration to the archipelago of airborne seed from ancestral population(s) located in southwest Europe rather than North America, originating from within the P. bifolia-chlorantha aggregate. We hypothesise that an initial anagenetic

  6. Complete genome sequence of Habenaria mosaic virus, a new potyvirus infecting a terrestrial orchid (Habenaria radiata) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hideki; Maeda, Takanori; Gara, I Wayan; Chiba, Sotaro; Maruyama, Kazuyuki; Tamada, Tetsuo; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The complete genomic sequence of Habenaria mosaic virus (HaMV), which infects terrestrial orchids (Habenaria radiata), has been determined. The genome is composed of 9,499 nucleotides excluding the 3'-terminal poly(A) tail, encoding a large polyprotein of 3,054 amino acids with the genomic features typical of a potyvirus. Putative proteolytic cleavage sites were identified by sequence comparison to those of known potyviruses. The HaMV polyprotein showed 58 % amino acid sequence identity to that encoded by the most closely related potyvirus, tobacco vein banding mosaic virus. Phylogenetic analysis of the polyprotein amino acid sequence and its coding sequences confirmed that HaMV formed a cluster with the chilli veinal mottle virus group, most of which infect solanaceous plants. These results suggest that HaMV is a distinct member of the genus Potyvirus. PMID:23857506

  7. The production of a key floral volatile is dependent on UV light in a sexually deceptive orchid

    PubMed Central

    Falara, Vasiliki; Amarasinghe, Ranamalie; Poldy, Jacqueline; Pichersky, Eran; Barrow, Russell A.; Peakall, Rod

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Plants use a diverse range of visual and olfactory cues to advertize to pollinators. Australian Chiloglottis orchids employ one to three related chemical variants, all 2,5-dialkylcyclohexane-1,3-diones or ‘chiloglottones’ to sexually attract their specific male pollinators. Here an investigation was made of the physiological aspects of chiloglottone synthesis and storage that have not previously been examined. Methods The location of chiloglottone production was determined and developmental and diurnal changes by GC-MS analysis of floral tissue extracts was monitored in two distantly related Chiloglottis species. Light treatment experiments were also performed using depleted flowers to evaluate if sunlight is required for chiloglottone production; which specific wavelengths of light are required was also determined. Key Results Chiloglottone production only occurs in specific floral tissues (the labellum calli and sepals) of open flowers. Upon flower opening chiloglottone production is rapid and levels remain more or less stable both day and night, and over the 2- to 3-week lifetime of the flower. Furthermore, it was determined that chiloglottone production requires continuous sunlight, and determined the optimal wavelengths of sunlight in the UV-B range (with peak of 300 nm). Conclusions UV-B light is required for the synthesis of chiloglottones – the semiochemicals used by Chiloglottis orchids to sexually lure their male pollinators. This discovery appears to be the first case to our knowledge where plant floral odour production depends on UV-B radiation at normal levels of sunlight. In the future, identification of the genes and enzymes involved, will allow us to understand better the role of UV-B light in the biosynthesis of chiloglottones. PMID:23091095

  8. A Low Glutathione Redox State Couples with a Decreased Ascorbate Redox Ratio to Accelerate Flowering in Oncidium Orchid.

    PubMed

    Chin, Dan-Chu; Hsieh, Chia-Chi; Lin, Hsin-Yi; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2016-02-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays multiple roles in plants, including stress defense and regulation of growth/development. Previous studies have demonstrated that the ascorbate (AsA) redox state is involved in flowering initiation in Oncidium orchid. In this study, we discovered that a significantly decreased GSH content and GSH redox ratio are correlated with a decline in the AsA redox state during flowering initiation and high ambient temperature-induced flowering. At the same time, the expression level and enzymatic activity of GSH redox-regulated genes, glutathione reductase (GR1), and the GSH biosynthesis genes γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1) and glutathione synthase (GSH2), are down-regulated. Elevating dehydroascorbate (DHA) content in Oncidium by artificial addition of DHA resulted in a decreased AsA and GSH redox ratio, and enhanced dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) activity. This demonstrated that the lower GSH redox state could be influenced by the lower AsA redox ratio. Moreover, exogenous application of buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), to inhibit GSH biosynthesis, and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), to decrease the GSH redox ratio, also caused early flowering. However, spraying plants with GSH increased the GSH redox ratio and delayed flowering. Furthermore, transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing Oncidium GSH1, GSH2 and GR1 displayed a high GSH redox ratio as well as delayed flowering under high ambient temperature treatment, while pad2, cad2 and gr1 mutants exhibited early flowering and a low GSH redox ratio. In conclusion, our results provide evidence that the decreased GSH redox state is linked to the decline in the AsA redox ratio and mediated by down-regulated expression of GSH metabolism-related genes to affect flowering time in Oncidium orchid. PMID:26738548

  9. Phenology and Phenotypic Natural Selection on the Flowering Time of a Deceit-pollinated Tropical Orchid, Myrmecophila christinae

    PubMed Central

    PARRA-TABLA, VÍCTOR; VARGAS, CARLOS F.

    2004-01-01

    • Background and aims. Flowering phenology is described and the effect of flowering time on pollination success is evaluated in the deceit-pollinated tropical orchid, Myrmecophila christinae. It was expected that, due to this species' deceit pollination strategy and low observed pollinator visit rate, there would be a higher probability of natural selection events favouring individuals flowering away from the population flowering peak. • Methods. The study covers two consecutive years and four populations of M. christinae located along the north coast of the Yucatán Peninsula. For phenological and pollination success data, a total of 110 individuals were monitored weekly in 1998, and 83 individuals in 1999, during all the flowering and fruiting season. • Key results. The results showed significant differences in the probability of donating and receiving pollen throughout the flowering season. The probability of receiving or donating pollen increased the further an individual flowering was from the flowering peak. Regression analysis showed directional and disruptive phenotypic natural selection gradients, suggesting the presence of selection events unfavourable to flowering during flowering peak, for both male success (pollen removal) and female success (fruit production). However, the intensity and significance of the natural selection events varied between populations from year to year. The variation between seasons and populations was apparently due to variations in the density of reproductive individuals in each population and each season. • Conclusions. As in other deceit-pollinated orchids, natural selection in M. christinae favours individuals flowering early or late in relation to population peak flowering. However, results also suggested a fluctuating regime of selective events act on flowering time of M. christinae. PMID:15205176

  10. The effect of clinorotation on structural and functional organization of assimilative tissues, cells and growth regulator activity in orchids of different age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherevchenko, T.; Zaimenko, N.; Sitnyanska, N.; Majko, T.; Grishko, M. M.

    Ultrastructural analyses of assimilative tissues of the orchids, Cymbidium hybridum and Doritis pulcherrima, show that, in plants of different age, chloroplasts differ in structure and stage of membrane system development. Variability was found in the number, size and electron density of plastoglobuli, and in the orientation and length of thylakoid membranes. We consider significant the increase of the plastoglobuli which completely fill the stroma of chloroplasts in cells of old leaves and, under conditions of clinorotation (using a horizontal clinostat at 3 r.p.m.), are able to block membrane function. In the early stages of orchid plant development, the content of substances with auxin-like activity (as judged by bioassay) in the leaves was low, but increased with age. Clinorotation resulted in a sharp decrease of their content. There was a concomitant increase in the content of growth inhibitors of a phenolic nature.

  11. Investigation of the potential for long-range transport of mercury to the Everglades using the organic chemistry integrated dispersion (ORCHID) model

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, D.S.; Kienzle, M.A.; Ferris, D.C.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this study is to identify potential long-range sources of mercury within the southeast region of the United States. Preliminary results of a climatological study using the Short-range Layered Atmospheric Model (SLAM) transport model from a select source in the southeast U.S. are presented. The potential for long-range transport from Oak Ridge, Tennessee to Florida is discussed. The transport and transformation of mercury during periods of favorable transport to south Florida is modeled using the Organic Chemistry Integrated Dispersion (ORCHID) model, which contains the transport model used in the climatology study. SLAM/ORCHID results indicate the potential for mercury reaching southeast Florida from the source and the atmospheric oxidation of mercury during transport.

  12. Dendrobium candidum inhibits MCF-7 cells proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and regulating key biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jing; Guo, Yidi; Fu, Xueqi; Wang, Yongsen; Liu, Ye; Huo, Bo; Sheng, Jun; Hu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is one of the most frequently occurring cancers in women. In recent years, Dendrobium candidum has played a part in antihyperthyroidism and anticancer drugs. This study aims to examine the antitumor effect of D. candidum on breast cancer. Methods Human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and normal breast epithelial cell line MCF10A were used to observe the effects of D. candidum treatment on human breast cancer. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was employed to examine the cell proliferation of the MCF-7 and MCF10A cells. Western blot analysis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were used to detect the key molecules and biomarkers in breast cancer pathology. Cell cycle was analyzed by using Becton Dickinson FACScan cytofluorometer. Results The results indicated that D. candidum significantly decreased cell viability at different concentrations compared to the control group (P<0.05). D. candidum-treated MCF-7 cells in the G2/M phase was significantly increased compared to the control group (P<0.05). The messenger RNA levels of estrogen receptor alpha, IGFBP2, IGFBP4, and GATA3 were significantly decreased, and the messenger RNA and protein levels of ELF5, p53, p21, p18, CDH1, CDH2, and p12 were significantly increased, compared to the control group (P<0.05). The protein levels of estrogen receptor alpha, PGR, GATA3, and Ki67 were significantly decreased and the protein levels of p53 and ELF5 were significantly increased compared to the control group (P<0.05). The general apoptosis biomarker, Bcl-2, was significantly decreased and the Bax was significantly increased compared to the control group (P<0.05). In contrast to that in MCF-7, D. candidum does not affect cell proliferation at any concentration and any time points in normal breast epithelial cells, MCF10A cells. Conclusion D. candidum could decrease the cell viability of MCF-7 cells by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and

  13. Variation in nutrient-acquisition patterns by mycorrhizal fungi of rare and common orchids explains diversification in a global biodiversity hotspot

    PubMed Central

    Nurfadilah, Siti; Swarts, Nigel D.; Dixon, Kingsley W.; Lambers, Hans; Merritt, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Many terrestrial orchids have an obligate requirement for mycorrhizal associations to provide nutritional support from germination to establishment. This study will investigate the ability of orchid mycorrhizal fungi (OMF) to utilize a variety of nutrient sources in the nutrient-impoverished (low organic) soils of the Southwest Australian Floristic Region (SWAFR) in order to effectively compete, survive and sustain the orchid host. Methods Mycorrhizal fungi representing key OMF genera were isolated from three common and widespread species: Pterostylis recurva, Caladenia flava and Diuris corymbosa, and one rare and restricted species: Drakaea elastica. The accessibility of specific nutrients was assessed by comparing growth including dry biomass of OMF in vitro on basal CN MMN liquid media. Key Results Each of the OMF accessed and effectively utilized a wide variety of nutrient compounds, including carbon (C) sources, inorganic and organic nitrogen (N) and inorganic and organic phosphorus (P). The nutrient compounds utilized varied between the genera of OMF, most notably sources of N. Conclusions These results suggest that OMF can differentiate between niches (micro-niche specialization) in a constrained, highly resource-limited environment such as the SWAFR. Phosphorus is the most limited macronutrient in SWAFR soils and the ability to access phytate by OMF indicates a characterizing functional capacity of OMF from the SWAFR. Furthermore, compared with OMF isolated from the rare D. elastica, OMF associating with the common P. recurva produced far greater biomass over a wider variety of nutritional sources. This suggests a broader tolerance for habitat variation providing more opportunities for the common orchid for recruitment and establishment at a site. PMID:23532043

  14. Recurrent polymorphic mating type variation in Madagascan Bulbophyllum species (Orchidaceae) exemplifies a high incidence of auto-pollination in tropical orchids

    PubMed Central

    Gamisch, Alexander; Fischer, Gunter A; Comes, Hans Peter

    2014-01-01

    The transition from outcrossing to self-fertilization is one of the most common evolutionary changes in angiosperms. The orchid family exemplifies this evolutionary trend but, because of a general lack of large-scale surveys on auto-pollination in orchid taxa, the incidence and modes of auto-pollination among (sub)tropical orchids remain poorly known. In the present study, we assessed the frequency and mode of auto-pollination within and among species of a largely monophyletic group of Madagascan Bulbophyllum. The capacity for autonomous fruit set was investigated by bagging experiments in the greenhouse and the field, complemented with detailed floral micromorphological studies of the gynostemium. Our survey comprises 393 accessions, representing at least 78 species, and thus approximately 37% of the species diversity of the genus in the Madagascan region. Our studies revealed that mating type is directly related to gynostemium structure, most often involving the presence or absence of a physical barrier termed ‘rostellum’. As a novel and unexpected finding, we identified eight species of a single lineage of Madagascan Bulbophyllum (termed ‘clade C’), in which auto-pollinating morphs (selfers), either lacking a rostellum or (rarely) possessing a stigmatic rostellum, co-exist with their pollinator-dependent conspecifics (outcrossers). We hypothesize that auto-pollination via rostellum abortion has a simple genetic basis, and probably evolved rapidly and recurrently by subtle changes in the timing of rostellum development (heterochrony). Thus, species of clade C may have an intrinsic genetic and developmental lability toward auto-pollination, allowing rapid evolutionary response under environmental, perhaps human-disturbed conditions favouring reproductive assurance. Overall, these findings should stimulate further research on the incidence, evolution, and maintenance of mating type variation in tropical orchids, as well as how they adapt(ed) to changing

  15. A macro-ecological perspective on crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) photosynthesis evolution in Afro-Madagascan drylands: Eulophiinae orchids as a case study.

    PubMed

    Bone, Ruth E; Smith, J Andrew C; Arrigo, Nils; Buerki, Sven

    2015-10-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) photosynthesis is an adaptation to water and atmospheric CO2 deficits that has been linked to diversification in dry-adapted plants. We investigated whether CAM evolution can be associated with the availability of new or alternative niches, using Eulophiinae orchids as a case study. Carbon isotope ratios, geographical and climate data, fossil records and DNA sequences were used to: assess the prevalence of CAM in Eulophiinae orchids; characterize the ecological niche of extant taxa; infer divergence times; and estimate whether CAM is associated with niche shifts. CAM evolved in four terrestrial lineages during the late Miocene/Pliocene, which have uneven diversification patterns. These lineages originated in humid habitats and colonized dry/seasonally dry environments in Africa and Madagascar. Additional key features (variegation, heterophylly) evolved in the most species-rich CAM lineages. Dry habitats were also colonized by a lineage that includes putative mycoheterotrophic taxa. These findings indicate that the switch to CAM is associated with environmental change. With its suite of adaptive traits, this group of orchids represents a unique opportunity to study the adaptations to dry environments, especially in the face of projected global aridification. PMID:26192467

  16. Origin and mechanism of crassulacean acid metabolism in orchids as implied by comparative transcriptomics and genomics of the carbon fixation pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangsheng; Chen, Fei; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Zhang, Yong-Qiang; Niu, Shance; Xiong, Jin-Song; Lin, Zhenguo; Cheng, Zong-Ming Max; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2016-04-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is a CO2 fixation pathway that maximizes water-use efficiency (WUE), compared with the C3/C4 CO2 pathway, which permits CAM plants to adapt to arid environments. The CAM pathway provides excellent opportunities to genetically design plants, especially bioenergy crops, with a high WUE and better photosynthetic performance than C3/C4 in arid environments. The information available on the origin and evolution of CAM is scant, however. Here, we analyzed transcriptomes from 13 orchid species and two existing orchid genomes, covering CAM and C3 plants, with an emphasis on comparing 13 gene families involved in the complete carbon fixation pathway. The dosage of the core photosynthesis-related genes plays no substantial role in the evolution of CAM in orchids; however, CAM may have evolved primarily by changes at the transcription level of key carbon fixation pathway genes. We proposed that in both dark and light, CO2 is primarily fixed and then released through two metabolic pathways via known genes, such as PPC1, PPDK and PPCK. This study reports a comprehensive comparison of carbon fixation pathway genes across different photosynthetic plants, and reveals the importance of the level of expression of key genes in the origin and evolution of CAM. PMID:26959080

  17. Antagonistic activity of endo-β-1,3-glucanase from a novel isolate, Streptomyces sp. 9X166, against black rot in orchids.

    PubMed

    Sakdapetsiri, Chatsuda; Fukuta, Yasuhisa; Aramsirirujiwet, Yaovapa; Shirasaka, Norifumi; Kitpreechavanich, Vichien

    2016-05-01

    A total of 123 actinomycetes was isolated from 12 varieties of wild orchids and screened for potential antagonistic activity against Phytophthora, which causes black rot disease in orchids. In vitro and in vivo experimental results revealed that Streptomyces sp. strain 9X166 showed the highest antagonistic activity; its β-1,3-glucanase production ability was a key mechanism for growth inhibition of the pathogen. PCR amplification and DNA sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene allowed the identification of this strain, with high similarity (99.93%) to the novel species Streptomyces similaensis. The glucanase enzyme, purified to homogeneity by anion exchange and gel filtration chromatography, showed a specific activity of 58 U mg(-1) (a 3.9-fold increase) and yield of 6.4%. The molecular weight, as determined by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration, was approximately 99 and 80 kDa, respectively, suggesting that the enzyme was a monomer. The purified enzyme showed the highest substrate specificity to laminarin, indicating that it was β-1,3-glucanase. The hydrolyzed products of cello-oligosaccharides suggested that this enzyme was endo-type β-1,3-glucanase. Streptomyces sp. 9X166 culture filtrate, possessing β-1,3-glucanase activity, could degrade both freeze-dried and living mycelium. This is the first report on a β-1,3-glucanase-producing Streptomyces sp. that could be an effective biocontrol agent for black rot disease in orchids. PMID:26888054

  18. Differential Expression of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Synthase Genes during Orchid Flower Senescence Induced by the Protein Phosphatase Inhibitor Okadaic Acid1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning Ning; Yang, Shang Fa; Charng, Yee-yung

    2001-01-01

    Applying 10 pmol of okadaic acid (OA), a specific inhibitor of type 1 or type 2A serine/threonine protein phosphatases, to the orchid (Phalaenopsis species) stigma induced a dramatic increase in ethylene production and an accelerated senescence of the whole flower. Aminoethoxyvinylglycine or silver thiosulfate, inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis or action, respectively, effectively inhibited the OA-induced ethylene production and retarded flower senescence, suggesting that the protein phosphatase inhibitor induced orchid flower senescence through an ethylene-mediated signaling pathway. OA treatment induced a differential expression pattern for the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase multigene family. Accumulation of Phal-ACS1 transcript in the stigma, labelum, and ovary induced by OA were higher than those induced by pollination as determined by “semiquantitative” reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In contrast, the transcript levels of Phal-ACS2 and Phal-ACS3 induced by OA were much lower than those induced by pollination. Staurosporine, a protein kinase inhibitor, on the other hand, inhibited the OA-induced Phal-ACS1 expression in the stigma and delayed flower senescence. Our results suggest that a hyper-phosphorylation status of an unidentified protein(s) is involved in up-regulating the expression of Phal-ACS1 gene resulting in increased ethylene production and accelerated the senescence process of orchid flower. PMID:11351088

  19. Floral miniaturisation and autogamy in boreal-arctic plants are epitomised by Iceland’s most frequent orchid, Platanthera hyperborea

    PubMed Central

    Sramkó, Gábor; Rudall, Paula J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims. This paper concludes our series of publications comparing island and mainland speciation in European butterfly-orchids, by studying the morphology, phylogenetics and reproductive biology of the controversial circum-arctic species Platanthera (Limnorchis) hyperborea—the most frequent of seven Icelandic orchids. We draw particular attention to its phylogenetic placement, remarkable reproductive biology and morphological convergence on other Platanthera lineages through floral miniaturisation. Methods. Five populations of P. hyperborea in southwest Iceland were measured for 33 morphological characters and subjected to detailed multivariate and univariate analyses, supported by light and scanning electron microscopy of selected flowers. Representative samples from six populations were sequenced for nrITS and placed in a taxonomically broader phylogenetic matrix derived from previous studies. Key Results . Section Limnorchis consists of three distinct ITS-delimited clades based on P. stricta, P. sparsifolia–limosa–aquilonis and P. dilatata–hyperborea. Within the latter group, supposed species boundaries overlap; instead, the data indicate a crude stepwise series of ribotypic transitions extending eastward from North America to Iceland. Morphometric data failed to identify any taxonomically meaningful partitions among Icelandic P. hyperborea populations, despite the presence of a distinct and apparently plesiomorphic ribotype at the most glacially influenced habitat sampled. Microscopic study of the flowers revealed several distinguishing features (some not previously reported), including resupinate lateral sepals, toothed bract margins, club-shaped papillae shared by both the interior of the labellar spur and the stigmatic surface, and an exceptionally adhesive stigma that is reliably covered in disaggregated pollen masses prior to anthesis; auricles are absent. Conclusions. Ribotypes suggest that Icelandic P. hyperborea represents the

  20. Floral miniaturisation and autogamy in boreal-arctic plants are epitomised by Iceland's most frequent orchid, Platanthera hyperborea.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Richard M; Sramkó, Gábor; Rudall, Paula J

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims. This paper concludes our series of publications comparing island and mainland speciation in European butterfly-orchids, by studying the morphology, phylogenetics and reproductive biology of the controversial circum-arctic species Platanthera (Limnorchis) hyperborea-the most frequent of seven Icelandic orchids. We draw particular attention to its phylogenetic placement, remarkable reproductive biology and morphological convergence on other Platanthera lineages through floral miniaturisation. Methods. Five populations of P. hyperborea in southwest Iceland were measured for 33 morphological characters and subjected to detailed multivariate and univariate analyses, supported by light and scanning electron microscopy of selected flowers. Representative samples from six populations were sequenced for nrITS and placed in a taxonomically broader phylogenetic matrix derived from previous studies. Key Results . Section Limnorchis consists of three distinct ITS-delimited clades based on P. stricta, P. sparsifolia-limosa-aquilonis and P. dilatata-hyperborea. Within the latter group, supposed species boundaries overlap; instead, the data indicate a crude stepwise series of ribotypic transitions extending eastward from North America to Iceland. Morphometric data failed to identify any taxonomically meaningful partitions among Icelandic P. hyperborea populations, despite the presence of a distinct and apparently plesiomorphic ribotype at the most glacially influenced habitat sampled. Microscopic study of the flowers revealed several distinguishing features (some not previously reported), including resupinate lateral sepals, toothed bract margins, club-shaped papillae shared by both the interior of the labellar spur and the stigmatic surface, and an exceptionally adhesive stigma that is reliably covered in disaggregated pollen masses prior to anthesis; auricles are absent. Conclusions. Ribotypes suggest that Icelandic P. hyperborea represents the terminus of a

  1. Experimental fertilization increases amino acid content in floral nectar, fruit set and degree of selfing in the orchid Gymnadenia conopsea.

    PubMed

    Gijbels, Pieter; Ceulemans, Tobias; Van den Ende, Wim; Honnay, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Floral traits have evolved to maximize reproductive success by attracting pollinators and facilitating pollination. Highly attractive floral traits may, however, also increase the degree of self-pollination, which could become detrimental for plant fitness through inbreeding depression. Floral nectar is a trait that is known to strongly mediate pollinator attraction and plant reproductive success, but the particular role of the nectar amino acid (AA) composition is poorly understood. Therefore, we experimentally manipulated the nectar AA composition and abundance of the Lepidoptera-pollinated orchid Gymnadenia conopsea through soil fertilization, and we quantified AA content and AA composition through high performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection. Mixed models were then used to evaluate differences in pollinia removal, fruit set, seed set and degree of selfing between fertilized and control individuals. Selfing rates were estimated using microsatellite markers. We found that fertilized individuals had a significantly higher nectar AA content and an altered AA composition, whereas plant height, number of flowers, nectar volume and sugar concentration remained unchanged. Fertilized individuals also had significantly more pollinia removed and a higher fruit set, whereas control plants that did not receive the fertilization treatment had significantly fewer selfed seeds, and more viable seeds. Although we cannot exclude a role of changes in floral scent following the fertilization treatment, our results strongly suggest a relation among nectar AA composition, fruiting success and selfing rates. Our results also indicate potential consequences of nutrient pollution for plant reproductive success, through the induced changes in nectar AA composition. PMID:26149746

  2. Lineage-Specific Reductions of Plastid Genomes in an Orchid Tribe with Partially and Fully Mycoheterotrophic Species.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan-Lei; Wicke, Susann; Li, Jian-Wu; Han, Yu; Lin, Choun-Sea; Li, De-Zhu; Zhou, Ting-Ting; Huang, Wei-Chang; Huang, Lu-Qi; Jin, Xiao-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The plastid genome (plastome) of heterotrophic plants like mycoheterotrophs and parasites shows massive gene losses in consequence to the relaxation of functional constraints on photosynthesis. To understand the patterns of this convergent plastome reduction syndrome in heterotrophic plants, we studied 12 closely related orchids of three different lifeforms from the tribe Neottieae (Orchidaceae). We employ a comparative genomics approach to examine structural and selectional changes in plastomes within Neottieae. Both leafy and leafless heterotrophic species have functionally reduced plastid genome. Our analyses show that genes for the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase complex, the photosystems, and the RNA polymerase have been lost functionally multiple times independently. The physical reduction proceeds in a highly lineage-specific manner, accompanied by structural reconfigurations such as inversions or modifications of the large inverted repeats. Despite significant but minor selectional changes, all retained genes continue to evolve under purifying selection. All leafless Neottia species, including both visibly green and nongreen members, are fully mycoheterotrophic, likely evolved from leafy and partially mycoheterotrophic species. The plastomes of Neottieae span many stages of plastome degradation, including the longest plastome of a mycoheterotroph, providing invaluable insights into the mechanisms of plastome evolution along the transition from autotrophy to full mycoheterotrophy. PMID:27412609

  3. Exploring the Limits for Reduction of Plastid Genomes: A Case Study of the Mycoheterotrophic Orchids Epipogium aphyllum and Epipogium roseum

    PubMed Central

    Schelkunov, Mikhail I.; Shtratnikova, Viktoria Yu; Nuraliev, Maxim S.; Selosse, Marc-Andre; Penin, Aleksey A.; Logacheva, Maria D.

    2015-01-01

    The question on the patterns and limits of reduction of plastid genomes in nonphotosynthetic plants and the reasons of their conservation is one of the intriguing topics in plant genome evolution. Here, we report sequencing and analysis of plastid genome in nonphotosynthetic orchids Epipogium aphyllum and Epipogium roseum, which, with sizes of 31 and 19 kbp, respectively, represent the smallest plastid genomes characterized by now. Besides drastic reduction, which is expected, we found several unusual features of these “minimal” plastomes: Multiple rearrangements, highly biased nucleotide composition, and unprecedentedly high substitution rate. Only 27 and 29 genes remained intact in the plastomes of E. aphyllum and E. roseum—those encoding ribosomal components, transfer RNAs, and three additional housekeeping genes (infA, clpP, and accD). We found no signs of relaxed selection acting on these genes. We hypothesize that the main reason for retention of plastid genomes in Epipogium is the necessity to translate messenger RNAs (mRNAs) of accD and/or clpP proteins which are essential for cell metabolism. However, these genes are absent in plastomes of several plant species; their absence is compensated by the presence of a functional copy arisen by gene transfer from plastid to the nuclear genome. This suggests that there is no single set of plastid-encoded essential genes, but rather different sets for different species and that the retention of a gene in the plastome depends on the interaction between the nucleus and plastids. PMID:25635040

  4. Disentangling visual and olfactory signals in mushroom-mimicking Dracula orchids using realistic three-dimensional printed flowers.

    PubMed

    Policha, Tobias; Davis, Aleah; Barnadas, Melinda; Dentinger, Bryn T M; Raguso, Robert A; Roy, Bitty A

    2016-05-01

    Flowers use olfactory and visual signals to communicate with pollinators. Disentangling the relative contributions and potential synergies between signals remains a challenge. Understanding the perceptual biases exploited by floral mimicry illuminates the evolution of these signals. Here, we disentangle the olfactory and visual components of Dracula lafleurii, which mimics mushrooms in size, shape, color and scent, and is pollinated by mushroom-associated flies. To decouple signals, we used three-dimensional printing to produce realistic artificial flower molds that were color matched and cast using scent-free surgical silicone, to which we could add scent. We used GC-MS to measure scents in co-occurring mushrooms, and related orchids, and used these scents in field experiments. By combining silicone flower parts with real floral organs, we created chimeras that identified the mushroom-like labellum as a source of volatile attraction. In addition, we showed remarkable overlap in the volatile chemistry between D. lafleurii and co-occurring mushrooms. The characters defining the genus Dracula - a mushroom-like, 'gilled' labellum and a showy, patterned calyx - enhance pollinator attraction by exploiting the visual and chemosensory perceptual biases of drosophilid flies. Our techniques for the manipulation of complex traits in a nonmodel system not conducive to gene silencing or selective breeding are useful for other systems. PMID:26877229

  5. The effects of plant density and nectar reward on bee visitation to the endangered orchid Spiranthes romanzoffiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Karl J.; Stout, Jane C.

    2008-09-01

    Density can affect attraction of pollinators, with rare plants receiving fewer pollinating visits compared with more common co-flowering species. However, if a locally rare species is very attractive in terms of the rewards it offers pollinators, it may be preferentially visited. Spiranthes romanzoffiana is a nectar rewarding, geographically rare, endangered orchid species which forms small populations in Ireland, co-flowering with more common, florally rewarding species. We examined visitation rates to S. romanzoffiana and two nectar rewarding co-flowering species ( Mentha aquatica and Prunella vulgaris) in the west of Ireland. These three plant species were visited by three bee species ( Bombus pascuorum, B. hortorum and Apis mellifera). B. pascuorum was the most common visitor, while A. mellifera was least common. Our results suggest that individual S. romanzoffiana inflorescences compete intraspecifically for visitation from pollinators at high densities. The relationship between visitation to S. romanzoffiana and total floral density appeared to be positive, suggesting interspecific facilitation of pollinator visitation at high densities. Nectar standing crop varied through the season, among species and between open and bagged flowers. Nectar standing crop was not correlated with visitation in S. romanzoffiana. Despite relatively high visitation, S. romanzoffiana produced no mature fruit during this flowering season. The lack of fruit maturation in this species may be a major factor causing its rarity in Europe.

  6. Why Do Floral Perfumes Become Different? Region-Specific Selection on Floral Scent in a Terrestrial Orchid

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Karin; Sun, Mimi; Schiestl, Florian P.

    2016-01-01

    Geographically structured phenotypic selection can lead to adaptive divergence. However, in flowering plants, such divergent selection has rarely been shown, and selection on floral signals is generally little understood. In this study, we measured phenotypic selection on display size, floral color, and floral scent in four lowland and four mountain populations of the nectar-rewarding terrestrial orchid Gymnadenia odoratissima in two years. We also quantified population differences in these traits and pollinator community composition. Our results show positive selection on display size and positive, negative, or absence of selection on different scent compounds and floral color. Selection on the main scent compounds was consistently stronger in the lowlands than in the mountains, and lowland plants emitted higher amounts of most of these compounds. Pollinator community composition also differed between regions, suggesting different pollinators select for differences in floral volatiles. Overall, our study is the first to document consistent regional differences in selection on floral scent, suggesting this pattern of selection is one of the evolutionary forces contributing to regional divergence in floral chemical signaling. PMID:26886766

  7. Why Do Floral Perfumes Become Different? Region-Specific Selection on Floral Scent in a Terrestrial Orchid.

    PubMed

    Gross, Karin; Sun, Mimi; Schiestl, Florian P

    2016-01-01

    Geographically structured phenotypic selection can lead to adaptive divergence. However, in flowering plants, such divergent selection has rarely been shown, and selection on floral signals is generally little understood. In this study, we measured phenotypic selection on display size, floral color, and floral scent in four lowland and four mountain populations of the nectar-rewarding terrestrial orchid Gymnadenia odoratissima in two years. We also quantified population differences in these traits and pollinator community composition. Our results show positive selection on display size and positive, negative, or absence of selection on different scent compounds and floral color. Selection on the main scent compounds was consistently stronger in the lowlands than in the mountains, and lowland plants emitted higher amounts of most of these compounds. Pollinator community composition also differed between regions, suggesting different pollinators select for differences in floral volatiles. Overall, our study is the first to document consistent regional differences in selection on floral scent, suggesting this pattern of selection is one of the evolutionary forces contributing to regional divergence in floral chemical signaling. PMID:26886766

  8. Taxonomy of Atlantic Central African orchids 5. A new species of Angraecum sect. Conchoglossum (Orchidaceae, Angraecinae) from Gabon and Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Ječmenica, Vladimir; Droissart, Vincent; Noret, Nausicaa; Stévart, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent field inventories and taxonomic research in Central Africa have resulted in the discovery of many new orchid species. Five specimens of an apparently new Angraecum species were collected in Gabon and Cameroon. They stand out for their hanging habit and short zig-zag stem. Morphology of leaves and habit is somewhat comparable to Angraecum cultriforme and Angraecum stolzii, two species from East Africa. Flowers of the novelty share the general morphology of Angraecum pyriforme from which the new species is distinguished by being smaller and with a different lip-spur ratio. Here we show that these five specimens represent a new species, described here as Angraecum lanceolatum. The distinguishing traits include thin lanceolate leaves, convolute distally, with a rhombic lip shape. Dichotomous key to four Central African species of sect. Conchoglossum and a table of the diagnostic characters of the seven related Continental African Angraecum taxa are included here. A preliminary assessment of the conservation status of Angraecum lanceolatum is provided, using the IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria. PMID:27081350

  9. Taxonomy of Atlantic Central African orchids 5. A new species of Angraecum sect. Conchoglossum (Orchidaceae, Angraecinae) from Gabon and Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Ječmenica, Vladimir; Droissart, Vincent; Noret, Nausicaa; Stévart, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Recent field inventories and taxonomic research in Central Africa have resulted in the discovery of many new orchid species. Five specimens of an apparently new Angraecum species were collected in Gabon and Cameroon. They stand out for their hanging habit and short zig-zag stem. Morphology of leaves and habit is somewhat comparable to Angraecum cultriforme and Angraecum stolzii, two species from East Africa. Flowers of the novelty share the general morphology of Angraecum pyriforme from which the new species is distinguished by being smaller and with a different lip-spur ratio. Here we show that these five specimens represent a new species, described here as Angraecum lanceolatum. The distinguishing traits include thin lanceolate leaves, convolute distally, with a rhombic lip shape. Dichotomous key to four Central African species of sect. Conchoglossum and a table of the diagnostic characters of the seven related Continental African Angraecum taxa are included here. A preliminary assessment of the conservation status of Angraecum lanceolatum is provided, using the IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria. PMID:27081350

  10. [Variation of the orchid bees community (Hymenoptera: Apidae) in three altered habitats of the Colombian "llano" piedmont].

    PubMed

    Parra-H, Alejandro; Nates-Parra, Guiomar

    2007-01-01

    Orchid bees subsist in vast tropical forest areas because they maintain close relationships with particular plant species in diverse micro-habitats. Based on the relationships among the environment and biological features (food preference, morphologic and ethologic diversity), it is possible to determine habitat quality using the euglossine array. This work proposes the use of this ecological information, in addition to diversity indices, for the evaluation of environmental quality. Fifteen localities in three landscape types (urban, rural and conserved) were sampled in the eastern llanos foothill (Meta, Colombia), between March and December of 2003 using entomological nets, and Cineol and Metil Salicylate as baits. Of the 26 species known to occur in the area, 17 were registered. Eulaema nigrita was the most frequent, while E. speciosa E. bombiformis, Euglossa magnipes, E. cybelia, E. heterosticta, E. singularis and Exaerete frontalis were mostly found in habitats rated "good to acceptable". The vegetation composition and proximity of forest fragments seem to favor some species in disturbed habitats. Relative diversity of bee body shapes and sizes is proportional to habitat quality. PMID:19086396

  11. Lineage-Specific Reductions of Plastid Genomes in an Orchid Tribe with Partially and Fully Mycoheterotrophic Species

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yan-Lei; Wicke, Susann; Li, Jian-Wu; Han, Yu; Lin, Choun-Sea; Li, De-Zhu; Zhou, Ting-Ting; Huang, Wei-Chang; Huang, Lu-Qi; Jin, Xiao-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The plastid genome (plastome) of heterotrophic plants like mycoheterotrophs and parasites shows massive gene losses in consequence to the relaxation of functional constraints on photosynthesis. To understand the patterns of this convergent plastome reduction syndrome in heterotrophic plants, we studied 12 closely related orchids of three different lifeforms from the tribe Neottieae (Orchidaceae). We employ a comparative genomics approach to examine structural and selectional changes in plastomes within Neottieae. Both leafy and leafless heterotrophic species have functionally reduced plastid genome. Our analyses show that genes for the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase complex, the photosystems, and the RNA polymerase have been lost functionally multiple times independently. The physical reduction proceeds in a highly lineage-specific manner, accompanied by structural reconfigurations such as inversions or modifications of the large inverted repeats. Despite significant but minor selectional changes, all retained genes continue to evolve under purifying selection. All leafless Neottia species, including both visibly green and nongreen members, are fully mycoheterotrophic, likely evolved from leafy and partially mycoheterotrophic species. The plastomes of Neottieae span many stages of plastome degradation, including the longest plastome of a mycoheterotroph, providing invaluable insights into the mechanisms of plastome evolution along the transition from autotrophy to full mycoheterotrophy. PMID:27412609

  12. Physical wounding and ethylene stimulated embryogenic stem cell proliferation and plantlet regeneration in protocorm-like bodies of Phalaenopsis orchids.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y-W; Tsai, Y-J; Cheng, T-C; Chen, J-J; Chen, F-C

    2014-01-01

    Phalaenopsis orchids have been regenerated by inducing protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) from etiolated leaf sections. However, the physiological and molecular mechanisms of secondary PLB development and subsequent proliferation have not been explored. Bisectionally cutting primary PLBs resulted in more secondary PLBs at 5 weeks, suggesting an embryogenic stem cell property imposed by wounding of primary PLB tissues. The ethylene precursors ethephon and 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid and the ethylene perception inhibitor silver nitrate increased PLB formation, while aminoethoxyvinylglycine decreased PLB formation. Ethylene content in wounded PLB explants increased over culture time in media containing ethylene precursors or inhibitors. mRNA levels of PhACS2, PhACS3, and PhACO were increased by ethephon and decreased by ethylene inhibitors. Expression of genes in the ethylene signaling pathway was enhanced following ethylene-precursor treatment and was mitigated by ethylene inhibitors during PLB proliferation. Transcription of PhETR and PhEIN3, as well as PhERS, PhCTR, and PhGTP, was significantly increased 12 h after ethylene treatment. Ethylene and physical wounding stimulated secondary PLB formation in Phalaenopsis, probably through ethylene biosynthesis and signal transduction. PMID:25501164

  13. Phytotoxicity and ultrastructural effects of gymnopusin from the orchid Maxillaria densa on duckweed (Lemna pausicostata) frond and root tissues.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Islas, N A; Paul, R N; Shier, W T; Mata, R; Abbas, H K

    2002-09-01

    Two phenanthrene derivatives, characterized as erianthridin (9,10-dihydro-2,7-dihydroxy-3,4-dimethoxyphenanthrene) and gymnopusin (2,7-dihydroxy-3,4,9-trimethoxyphenanthrene), were isolated from an extract of the orchid Maxillaria densa, using phytotoxicity with amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) to guide fractionation. Gymnopusin and erianthridin inhibited radicle elongation of A. hypochondriacus seedlings with IC(50) values of 330 and 58.2 microM, respectively. The phytoxicity of the two phenanthrene derivatives was also assessed on duckweed (Lemna pausicostata), and compared with mammalian toxicity estimated in vitro with four mammalian cell lines. On duckweed, both phenanthrene derivatives caused electrolyte leakage, chlorophyll loss and photobleaching. Ultrastructural examination of duckweed frond and root tissues treated with gymnopusin (100 microM) revealed membrane damage to the tonoplast after 12 h of exposure. Effects on membrane integrity followed a time course similar to that of electrolyte leakage. Both phenanthrene derivatives exhibited moderate cytotoxicity to all mammalian cells tested, which precludes their use as a bioherbicide. PMID:12169307

  14. Spatial variation in pollinator-mediated selection on phenology, floral display and spur length in the orchid Gymnadenia conopsea.

    PubMed

    Chapurlat, Elodie; Ågren, Jon; Sletvold, Nina

    2015-12-01

    Spatial variation in plant-pollinator interactions may cause variation in pollinator-mediated selection on floral traits, but to establish this link conclusively experimental studies are needed. We quantified pollinator-mediated selection on flowering phenology and morphology in four populations of the fragrant orchid Gymnadenia conopsea, and compared selection mediated by diurnal and nocturnal pollinators in two of the populations. Variation in pollinator-mediated selection explained most of the among-population variation in the strength of directional and correlational selection. Pollinators mediated correlational selection on pairs of display traits, and on one display trait and spur length, a trait affecting pollination efficiency. Only nocturnal pollinators selected for longer spurs, and mediated stronger selection on the number of flowers compared with diurnal pollinators in one population. The two types of pollinators caused correlational selection on different pairs of traits and selected for different combinations of spur length and number of flowers. The results demonstrate that spatial variation in interactions with pollinators may result in differences in directional and correlational selection on floral traits in a plant with a semi-generalized pollination system, and suggest that differences in the relative importance of diurnal and nocturnal pollinators can cause variation in selection. PMID:26183369

  15. Protocols for In Vitro Mass Multiplication and Analysis of Medicinally Important Phenolics of a Salep Orchid, Satyrium nepalense D.Don ("Salam Mishri").

    PubMed

    Babbar, Shashi B; Singh, Deepak K

    2016-01-01

    Satyrium nepalense is a rare and threatened medicinal orchid, populations of which in its native habitats are dwindling because of indiscriminate collections and habitat destruction, thus necessitating the development of methods for its in situ and ex situ conservation. Because of non-endospermous nature of the seeds and the immature embryos at seed dispersal stage, orchids cannot be seed-propagated as other plants. Micropropagation, using plant tissue culture techniques, offers an effective method for the multiplication of orchids. In this chapter, a five-step efficient reproducible protocol for large-scale in vitro multiplication of Satyrium nepalense is described. The first step involves asymbiotic germination of seeds isolated from immature green pods and cultured on Mitra's medium (M) gelled with 0.8 % agar and supplemented with 2 % sucrose and 1 % peptone (hereafter referred to as basal medium, BM). On this medium, seeds start germinating after a week of culture. Protocorms developed from the seeds are sub-cultured on BM fortified with 4 μM kinetin (Kn) after 8 weeks, for shoot differentiation and multiplication. The shoots developed on Kn-supplemented medium are transferred to BM alone for their elongation for the same period. The elongated shoots are transferred to the rooting medium, comprising BM supplemented with 0.5 or 1.0 μM indole-3-butyric acid, for further 8 weeks. The regenerated plantlets are transferred to a potting mix of sand and vermiculite (1:1) for acclimatization. The tubers and leaves excised from both in vitro-developed plants and those from their native habitats are analyzed and compared for the contents and concentration of medicinally important phenolics using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), details of which are provided in this chapter. PMID:27108306

  16. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of an Orchid Model Plant Candidate: Erycina pusilla Apply in Tropical Oncidium Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Pan, I-Chun; Liao, Der-Chih; Wu, Fu-Huei; Daniell, Henry; Singh, Nameirakpam Dolendro; Chang, Chen; Shih, Ming-Che; Chan, Ming-Tsair; Lin, Choun-Sea

    2012-01-01

    Oncidium is an important ornamental plant but the study of its functional genomics is difficult. Erycina pusilla is a fast-growing Oncidiinae species. Several characteristics including low chromosome number, small genome size, short growth period, and its ability to complete its life cycle in vitro make E. pusilla a good model candidate and parent for hybridization for orchids. Although genetic information remains limited, systematic molecular analysis of its chloroplast genome might provide useful genetic information. By combining bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones and next-generation sequencing (NGS), the chloroplast (cp) genome of E. pusilla was sequenced accurately, efficiently and economically. The cp genome of E. pusilla shares 89 and 84% similarity with Oncidium Gower Ramsey and Phalanopsis aphrodite, respectively. Comparing these 3 cp genomes, 5 regions have been identified as showing diversity. Using PCR analysis of 19 species belonging to the Epidendroideae subfamily, a conserved deletion was found in the rps15-trnN region of the Cymbidieae tribe. Because commercial Oncidium varieties in Taiwan are limited, identification of potential parents using molecular breeding method has become very important. To demonstrate the relationship between taxonomic position and hybrid compatibility of E. pusilla, 4 DNA regions of 36 tropically adapted Oncidiinae varieties have been analyzed. The results indicated that trnF-ndhJ and trnH-psbA were suitable for phylogenetic analysis. E. pusilla proved to be phylogenetically closer to Rodriguezia and Tolumnia than Oncidium, despite its similar floral appearance to Oncidium. These results indicate the hybrid compatibility of E. pusilla, its cp genome providing important information for Oncidium breeding. PMID:22496851

  17. Turnip mosaic potyvirus probably first spread to Eurasian brassica crops from wild orchids about 1000 years ago.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huy D; Tomitaka, Yasuhiro; Ho, Simon Y W; Duchêne, Sebastián; Vetten, Heinrich-Josef; Lesemann, Dietrich; Walsh, John A; Gibbs, Adrian J; Ohshima, Kazusato

    2013-01-01

    Turnip mosaic potyvirus (TuMV) is probably the most widespread and damaging virus that infects cultivated brassicas worldwide. Previous work has indicated that the virus originated in western Eurasia, with all of its closest relatives being viruses of monocotyledonous plants. Here we report that we have identified a sister lineage of TuMV-like potyviruses (TuMV-OM) from European orchids. The isolates of TuMV-OM form a monophyletic sister lineage to the brassica-infecting TuMVs (TuMV-BIs), and are nested within a clade of monocotyledon-infecting viruses. Extensive host-range tests showed that all of the TuMV-OMs are biologically similar to, but distinct from, TuMV-BIs and do not readily infect brassicas. We conclude that it is more likely that TuMV evolved from a TuMV-OM-like ancestor than the reverse. We did Bayesian coalescent analyses using a combination of novel and published sequence data from four TuMV genes [helper component-proteinase protein (HC-Pro), protein 3(P3), nuclear inclusion b protein (NIb), and coat protein (CP)]. Three genes (HC-Pro, P3, and NIb), but not the CP gene, gave results indicating that the TuMV-BI viruses diverged from TuMV-OMs around 1000 years ago. Only 150 years later, the four lineages of the present global population of TuMV-BIs diverged from one another. These dates are congruent with historical records of the spread of agriculture in Western Europe. From about 1200 years ago, there was a warming of the climate, and agriculture and the human population of the region greatly increased. Farming replaced woodlands, fostering viruses and aphid vectors that could invade the crops, which included several brassica cultivars and weeds. Later, starting 500 years ago, inter-continental maritime trade probably spread the TuMV-BIs to the remainder of the world. PMID:23405136

  18. Are winter-active species vulnerable to climate warming? A case study with the wintergreen terrestrial orchid, Tipularia discolor.

    PubMed

    Marchin, Renée M; Dunn, Robert R; Hoffmann, William A

    2014-12-01

    In the eastern United States, winter temperature has been increasing nearly twice as fast as summer temperature, but studies of warming effects on plants have focused on species that are photosynthetically active in summer. The terrestrial orchid Tipularia discolor is leafless in summer and acquires C primarily in winter. The optimum temperature for photosynthesis in T. discolor is higher than the maximum temperature throughout most of its growing season, and therefore growth can be expected to increase with warming. Contrary to this hypothesis, experimental warming negatively affected reproductive fitness (number of flowering stalks, flowers, fruits) and growth (change in leaf area from 2010 to 2012) in T. discolor. Temperature in June-July was critical for flowering, and mean July temperature greater than 29 °C (i.e., 2.5 °C above ambient) eliminated reproduction. Warming of 1.2 °C delayed flowering by an average of 10 days and fruiting by an average of 5 days. Warming of 4.4 °C reduced relative growth rates by about 60%, which may have been partially caused by the direct effects of temperature on photosynthesis and respiration. Warming indirectly increased vapor pressure deficit (VPD) by 0.2-0.5 kPa, and leaf-to-air VPD over 1.3 kPa restricted stomatal conductance of T. discolor to 10-40% of maximum conductance. These results highlight the need to account for changes in VPD when estimating temperature responses of plant species under future warming scenarios. Increasing temperature in the future will likely be an important limiting factor to the distribution of T. discolor, especially along the southern edge of its range. PMID:25255853

  19. Evidence for Isolation-by-Habitat among Populations of an Epiphytic Orchid Species on a Small Oceanic Island

    PubMed Central

    Mallet, Bertrand; Martos, Florent; Blambert, Laury; Pailler, Thierry; Humeau, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Identifying factors that promote population differentiation is of interest for understanding the early stages of speciation. Gene flow among populations inhabiting different environments can be reduced by geographical distance (isolation-by-distance) or by divergent selection resulting from local adaptation (isolation-by-ecology). Few studies have investigated the influence of these factors in small oceanic islands where the influence of geographic distance is expected to be null but where habitat diversity could have a strong effect on population differentiation. In this study, we tested for the spatial divergence of phenotypes (floral morphology and floral scent) and genotypes (microsatellites) among ten populations of Jumellea rossii, an epiphytic orchid endemic to Réunion growing in three different habitats. We found a significant genetic differentiation between populations that is structured by habitat heterogeneity rather than by geographic distance between populations. These results suggest that ecological factors might reduce gene flow among populations located in different habitats. This pattern of isolation-by-habitat may be the result of both isolation-by-ecology by habitat filtering and asynchrony in flowering phenology. Furthermore, data on floral morphology match these findings, with multivariate analysis grouping populations by habitat type but could be only due to phenotypic plasticity. Indeed floral scent compounds were not significantly different between populations indicating that specific plant-pollinator mutualism does not seem to play a major role in the population differentiation of J. rossii. In conclusion, the results from our study emphasize the importance of habitat diversity of small oceanic islands as a factor of population differentiation. PMID:24498329

  20. Ecology and genetic diversity of the dense-flowered orchid, Neotinea maculata, at the centre and edge of its range

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Karl J.; Scopece, Giovanni; Cozzolino, Salvatore; Fay, Michael F.; Smith, Rhian J.; Stout, Jane C.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Species may occur over a wide geographical range within which populations can display large variation in reproductive success and genetic diversity. Neotinea maculata is a rare orchid of conservation concern at the edge of its range in Ireland, where it occurs in small populations. However, it is relatively common throughout the Mediterranean region. Here, factors that affect rarity of N. maculata in Ireland are investigated by comparing Irish populations with those found in Italy, where it is more common. Methods Vegetation communities, breeding system and genetic diversity were compared using three amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) primer pairs in populations in Ireland and Italy. Vegetation was quantified using quadrats taken along transects in study populations, and hand pollination experiments were performed to assess reliance of N. maculata on pollinators in both Irish and Italian populations. Key Results Neotinea maculata occupies different vegetation communities in Italian and Irish populations. Breeding system experiments show that N. maculata is 100 % autogamous, and there are no differences in fruit and seed production in selfed, outcrossed and unmanipulated plants. AFLP markers revealed that Irish and Italian populations have similar genetic diversity and are distinct from each other. Conclusions Neotinea maculata does not suffer any negative effects of autogamous reproduction; it self-pollinates and sets seed readily in the absence of pollinators. It occupies a variety of habitats in both Ireland and Italy; however, Irish populations are small and rare and should be conserved. This could be due to climatic factors and the absence of suitable soil mycorrhizas to allow recruitment from seed. PMID:18940852

  1. Orchid Fleck Virus Structural Proteins N and P Form Intranuclear Viroplasm-Like Structures in the Absence of Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Sotaro; Andika, Ida Bagus; Maruyama, Kazuyuki; Tamada, Tetsuo; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Orchid fleck virus (OFV) has a unique two-segmented negative-sense RNA genome that resembles that of plant nucleorhabdoviruses. In infected plant cells, OFV and nucleorhabdoviruses induce an intranuclear electron-lucent viroplasm that is believed to be the site for virus replication. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism by which OFV viroplasms are produced in vivo. Among OFV-encoded proteins, the nucleocapsid protein (N) and the putative phosphoprotein (P) were present in nuclear fractions of OFV-infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Transient coexpression of N and P, in the absence of virus infection, was shown to be sufficient for formation of an intranuclear viroplasm-like structure in plant cells. When expressed independently as a fluorescent protein fusion product in uninfected plant cells, N protein accumulated throughout the cell, while P protein accumulated in the nucleus. However, the N protein, when coexpressed with P, was recruited to a subnuclear region to induce a large viroplasm-like focus. Deletion and substitution mutagenesis demonstrated that the P protein contains a nuclear localization signal (NLS). Artificial nuclear targeting of the N-protein mutant was insufficient for formation of viroplasm-like structures in the absence of P. A bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay confirmed interactions between the N and P proteins within subnuclear viroplasm-like foci and interactions of two of the N. benthamiana importin-α homologues with the P protein but not with the N protein. Taken together, our results suggest that viroplasm formation by OFV requires nuclear accumulation of both the N and P proteins, which is mediated by P-NLS, unlike nucleorhabdovirus viroplasm utilizing the NLS on protein N. PMID:23616651

  2. Reticulate evolution and sea-level fluctuations together drove species diversification of slipper orchids (Paphiopedilum) in South-East Asia.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan-Yan; Luo, Yi-Bo; Liu, Zhong-Jian; Wang, Xiao-Quan

    2015-06-01

    South-East Asia covers four of the world's biodiversity hotspots, showing high species diversity and endemism. Owing to the successive expansion and contraction of distribution and the fragmentation by geographical barriers, the tropical flora greatly diversified in this region during the Tertiary, but the evolutionary tempo and mode of species diversity remain poorly investigated. Paphiopedilum, the largest genus of slipper orchids comprising nearly 100 species, is mainly distributed in South-East Asia, providing an ideal system for exploring how plant species diversity was shaped in this region. Here, we investigated the evolutionary history of this genus with eight cpDNA regions and four low-copy nuclear genes. Discordance between gene trees and network analysis indicates that reticulate evolution occurred in the genus. Ancestral area reconstruction suggests that vicariance and long-distance dispersal together led to its current distribution. Diversification rate variation was detected and strongly correlated with the species diversity in subg. Paphiopedilum (~80 species). The shift of speciation rate in subg. Paphiopedilum was coincident with sea-level fluctuations in the late Cenozoic, which could have provided ecological opportunities for speciation and created bridges or barriers for gene flow. Moreover, some other factors (e.g. sympatric distribution, incomplete reproductive barriers and clonal propagation) might also be advantageous for the formation and reproduction of hybrid species. In conclusion, our study suggests that the interplay of reticulate evolution and sea-level fluctuations has promoted the diversification of the genus Paphiopedilum and sheds light into the evolution of Orchidaceae and the historical processes of plant species diversification in South-East Asia. PMID:25847454

  3. Recent range expansion of a terrestrial orchid corresponds with climate-driven variation in its population dynamics.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Sascha; Jacquemyn, Hans; Carey, Peter D; Jongejans, Eelke

    2016-06-01

    The population dynamics and distribution limits of plant species are predicted to change as the climate changes. However, it remains unclear to what extent climate variables affect population dynamics, which vital rates are most sensitive to climate change, and whether the same vital rates drive population dynamics in different populations. In this study, we used long-term demographic data from two populations of the terrestrial orchid Himantoglossum hircinum growing at the northern edge of their geographic range to quantify the influence of climate change on demographic vital rates. Integral projection models were constructed to study how climate conditions between 1991 and 2006 affected population dynamics and to assess how projected future climate change will affect the long-term viability of this species. Based on the parameterised vital rate functions and the observed climatic conditions, one of the studied populations had an average population growth rate above 1 (λ = 1.04), while the other was declining at ca. 3 % year(-1) (λ = 0.97). Variation in temperature and precipitation mainly affected population growth through their effect on survival and fecundity. Based on UK Climate Projection 2009 estimates of future climate conditions for three greenhouse gas emission scenarios, population growth rates are expected to increase in one of the studied populations. Overall, our results indicate that the observed changes in climatic conditions appeared to be beneficial to the long-term survival of the species in the UK and suggest that they may have been the driving force behind the current range expansion of H. hircinum in England. PMID:26932468

  4. Asymbiotic seed germination and in vitro conservation of Coelogyne nervosa A. Rich. an endemic orchid to Western Ghats.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sonia; Augustine, Jomy; Thomas, T Dennis

    2012-07-01

    Coelogyne nervosa is an epiphytic orchid endemic to Western Ghats, South India. The mature seeds of C. nervosa were cultured on ½ MS (Murashige and Skoog), MS, Kn (Knudson) and VW (Vacin and Went) media to evaluate the seed germination response. Of the four basal media used, MS medium supported maximum seed germination. Further experiments to enhance seed germination were done on MS medium supplemented with various concentrations (10, 20, 30 and 40 %) of coconut water (CW). Thirty percent CW gave the highest response in terms of percent seed germination (96), fresh weight (7.2 mg/seedling) and protocorm length (15.2 mm). Since CW containing medium did not support further seedling growth, each seedling was isolated and cultured on MS medium supplemented with either BA (6-benzylaminopurine) or Kin (kinetin) alone (1.0-4.0 mg/l each) or in combination with NAA (1-naphthaleneacetic acid; 0.2-1.0 mg/l). Maximum growth was observed on MS medium supplemented with BA (3.0 mg/l) and NAA (0.5 mg/l). On this medium, the seedlings reached an average length of 3.6 cm with 2.8 well expanded green leaves per seedling. Similarly optimum, healthy, white root induction (3.3 roots/seedlings) was also observed on the same medium. The rooted seedlings were successfully transplanted to pots with 91 % success. The 2-year-old tissue culture derived plants produced normal flowers and fruits. PMID:23814439

  5. Turnip Mosaic Potyvirus Probably First Spread to Eurasian Brassica Crops from Wild Orchids about 1000 Years Ago

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Huy D.; Tomitaka, Yasuhiro; Ho, Simon Y. W.; Duchêne, Sebastián; Vetten, Heinrich-Josef; Lesemann, Dietrich; Walsh, John A.; Gibbs, Adrian J.; Ohshima, Kazusato

    2013-01-01

    Turnip mosaic potyvirus (TuMV) is probably the most widespread and damaging virus that infects cultivated brassicas worldwide. Previous work has indicated that the virus originated in western Eurasia, with all of its closest relatives being viruses of monocotyledonous plants. Here we report that we have identified a sister lineage of TuMV-like potyviruses (TuMV-OM) from European orchids. The isolates of TuMV-OM form a monophyletic sister lineage to the brassica-infecting TuMVs (TuMV-BIs), and are nested within a clade of monocotyledon-infecting viruses. Extensive host-range tests showed that all of the TuMV-OMs are biologically similar to, but distinct from, TuMV-BIs and do not readily infect brassicas. We conclude that it is more likely that TuMV evolved from a TuMV-OM-like ancestor than the reverse. We did Bayesian coalescent analyses using a combination of novel and published sequence data from four TuMV genes [helper component-proteinase protein (HC-Pro), protein 3(P3), nuclear inclusion b protein (NIb), and coat protein (CP)]. Three genes (HC-Pro, P3, and NIb), but not the CP gene, gave results indicating that the TuMV-BI viruses diverged from TuMV-OMs around 1000 years ago. Only 150 years later, the four lineages of the present global population of TuMV-BIs diverged from one another. These dates are congruent with historical records of the spread of agriculture in Western Europe. From about 1200 years ago, there was a warming of the climate, and agriculture and the human population of the region greatly increased. Farming replaced woodlands, fostering viruses and aphid vectors that could invade the crops, which included several brassica cultivars and weeds. Later, starting 500 years ago, inter-continental maritime trade probably spread the TuMV-BIs to the remainder of the world. PMID:23405136

  6. Genome Sequencing and Transposon Mutagenesis of Burkholderia seminalis TC3.4.2R3 Identify Genes Contributing to Suppression of Orchid Necrosis Caused by B. gladioli.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Welington L; Creason, Allison L; Mano, Emy T; Camargo-Neves, Aline A; Minami, Sonia N; Chang, Jeff H; Loper, Joyce E

    2016-06-01

    From a screen of 36 plant-associated strains of Burkholderia spp., we identified 24 strains that suppressed leaf and pseudobulb necrosis of orchid caused by B. gladioli. To gain insights into the mechanisms of disease suppression, we generated a draft genome sequence from one suppressive strain, TC3.4.2R3. The genome is an estimated 7.67 megabases in size, with three replicons, two chromosomes, and the plasmid pC3. Using a combination of multilocus sequence analysis and phylogenomics, we identified TC3.4.2R3 as B. seminalis, a species within the Burkholderia cepacia complex that includes opportunistic human pathogens and environmental strains. We generated and screened a library of 3,840 transposon mutants of strain TC3.4.2R3 on orchid leaves to identify genes contributing to plant disease suppression. Twelve mutants deficient in suppression of leaf necrosis were selected and the transposon insertions were mapped to eight loci. One gene is in a wcb cluster that is related to synthesis of extracellular polysaccharide, a key determinant in bacterial-host interactions in other systems, and the other seven are highly conserved among Burkholderia spp. The fundamental information developed in this study will serve as a resource for future research aiming to identify mechanisms contributing to biological control. PMID:26959838

  7. Interaction networks and the use of floral resources by male orchid bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Euglossini) in a primary rain forests of the Chocó Region (Colombia).

    PubMed

    Ospina-Torres, Rodulfo; Montoya-Pfeiffer, Paula María; Parra-H, Alejandro; Solarte, Victor; Tupac Otero, Joel

    2015-09-01

    Orchid bees are important keystone pollinators from the Neotropics. With the aim to study the relationships between orchid bees and their nectar and aromatic host species, we made systematic samplings of males across two conservation areas in the biogeographic Choc6 Region of Colombia. We used chemical baits to collect 352 male bees during five months. The pollen attached to their bodies was extracted for palynological identification and to estimate interaction networks. The euglossine community consisted of at least 22 species including Eg. maculilabris, Eg. orellana, Eg. championi and Eg. ignita. The male bees were associated with 84 plants but depended on a small group of them (Peperomia spp. and Anthurium spp, as well as species of Solanaceae, Ericaceae and Malpighiaceae) which were widely distributed across the altitudinal gradient, and were available through the year. The resulting interaction networks revealed a typical nested pattern usually found in plant-pollinator interactions, with several rare bee and plant species interaction with a small group of generalist bees and plant species. Albeit, we found variation within networks related to species composition. Such variation may be a consequence of specific differences in plant flowering phenology. PMID:26666122

  8. The mirror crack'd: both pigment and structure contribute to the glossy blue appearance of the mirror orchid, Ophrys speculum.

    PubMed

    Vignolini, Silvia; Davey, Matthew P; Bateman, Richard M; Rudall, Paula J; Moyroud, Edwige; Tratt, Julia; Malmgren, Svante; Steiner, Ullrich; Glover, Beverley J

    2012-12-01

    The Mediterranean orchid genus Ophrys is remarkable for its pseudocopulatory pollination mechanism; naïve male pollinators are attracted to the flowers by olfactory, visual and tactile cues. The most striking visual cue is a highly reflective, blue speculum region at the centre of the labellum, which mimics the corresponding female insect and reaches its strongest development in the mirror orchid, O. speculum. We explored the structure and properties of the much-discussed speculum by scanning and transmission electron microscopic examination of its ultrastructure, visible and ultraviolet (UV) angle-resolved spectrophotometry of the intact tissue, and mass spectrometry of extracted pigments. The speculum contrasts with the surrounding labellar epidermis in being flat-celled with a thick, smooth cuticle. The speculum is extremely glossy, reflecting intense white light in a specular direction, but at more oblique angles it predominantly reflects blue and UV light. Pigments in the speculum, dominantly the cyanidin 3-(3''-malonylglucoside), are less diverse than in the surrounding regions of the labellar epidermis and lack quercetin copigments. Several physical and biochemical processes interact to produce the striking and much-discussed optical effects in these flowers, but the blue colour is not produced by structural means and is not iridescent. PMID:23043621

  9. Ultrasound/microwave-assisted solid-liquid-solid dispersive extraction with high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of neonicotinoid insecticides in Dendrobium officinale.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shuilian; Wu, Huizhen; Li, Zuguang; Wang, Jianmei; Zhang, Hu; Qian, Mingrong

    2015-01-01

    A one-step ultrasound/microwave-assisted solid-liquid-solid dispersive extraction procedure was used for the simultaneous determination of eight neonicotinoids (dinotefuran, nitenpyram, thiamethoxam, clothianidin, imidacloprid, acetamiprid, thiacloprid, imidaclothiz) in dried Dendrobium officinale by liquid chromatography combined with electrospray ionization triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry in multiple reaction monitoring mode. The samples were quickly extracted by acetonitrile and cleaned up by the mixed dispersing sorbents including primary secondary amine, C18 , and carbon-GCB. Parameters that could influence the ultrasound/microwave-assisted extraction efficiency such as microwave irradiation power, ultrasound irradiation power, temperature, and solvent were investigated. Recovery studies were performing well (70.4-113.7%) at three examined spiking levels (10, 50, and 100 μg/kg). Meanwhile, the limits of quantification for the neonicotinoids ranged from 0.87 to 1.92 μg/kg. The method showed good linearity in the concentration range of 1-100 μg/L with correlation coefficients >0.99. This quick and useful analytical method could provide a basis for monitoring neonicotinoid insecticide residues in herbs. PMID:25348589

  10. Effects of life-state on detectability in a demographic study of the terrestrial orchid Cleistes bifaria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kery, M.; Gregg, K.B.

    2003-01-01

    1. Most plant demographic studies follow marked individuals in permanent plots. Plots tend to be small, so detectability is assumed to be one for every individual. However, detectability could be affected by factors such as plant traits, time, space, observer, previous detection, biotic interactions, and especially by life-state. 2. We used a double-observer survey and closed population capture-recapture modelling to estimate state-specific detectability of the orchid Cleistes bifaria in a long-term study plot of 41.2 m2. Based on AICc model selection, detectability was different for each life-state and for tagged vs. previously untagged plants. There were no differences in detectability between the two observers. 3. Detectability estimates (SE) for one-leaf vegetative, two-leaf vegetative, and flowering/fruiting states correlated with mean size of these states and were 0.76 (0.05), 0.92 (0.06), and 1 (0.00), respectively, for previously tagged plants, and 0.84 (0.08), 0.75 (0.22), and 0 (0.00), respectively, for previously untagged plants. (We had insufficient data to obtain a satisfactory estimate of previously untagged flowering plants). 4. Our estimates are for a medium-sized plant in a small and intensively surveyed plot. It is possible that detectability is even lower for larger plots and smaller plants or smaller life-states (e.g. seedlings) and that detectabilities < 1 are widespread in plant demographic studies. 5. State-dependent detectabilities are especially worrying since they will lead to a size- or state-biased sample from the study plot. Failure to incorporate detectability into demographic estimation methods introduces a bias into most estimates of population parameters such as fecundity, recruitment, mortality, and transition rates between life-states. We illustrate this by a simple example using a matrix model, where a hypothetical population was stable but, due to imperfect detection, wrongly projected to be declining at a rate of 8% per year. 6

  11. A simple and efficient protocol for the mass propagation of Cymbidium mastersii: an ornamental orchid of Northeast India

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Padmaja; Paul, Sumi; Das, Meera C.; Kumaria, Suman; Tandon, Pramod

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Cymbidium mastersii is an epiphytic orchid distributed mainly in Northeast India. Owing to its high commercial value in the floricultural industry, natural populations are under threat from over-exploitation. Mass propagation provides an alternative means of satisfying the demand. Unfortunately, conventional propagation is slow and difficult, suggesting in vitro methods for mass multiplication may be more appropriate. The objective of this study was to develop an efficient protocol. Methodology and principal results Four nutrient media were evaluated for seed germination and early protocorm development: Murashige and Skoog (MS), half-strength MS, Knudson ‘C’ (KC), and Vacin and Went (VW). In addition, the effects of plant growth regulators 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP), kinetin (KN), α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) were studied alone and in combination. The maximum percentage seed germination (93.58 ± 0.56) was obtained in MS basal medium after 8–9 weeks of culture. Secondary protocorms (protocorm-like bodies) were developed from primary protocorms on MS medium fortified with different concentrations and combinations of cytokinins (BAP and KN) and auxins (NAA and IBA). The highest numbers of secondary protocorms (20.55 ± 0.62)/primary protocorms were obtained in MS medium supplemented with 5.0 µM BAP and 2.5 µM NAA. The most effective auxin source promoting root production (7.46 ± 0.09 per shoot) was 10.0 µM IBA. The plants were acclimatized effectively (survival percentage 88 %) in a greenhouse using a rooting medium of crushed sterile brick and charcoal (1 : 1 v/v) and vermicompost (leaf litter + cow dung, 1 : 1 v/v). Conclusions An efficient protocol was established for in vitro propagation of C. mastersii using seed as the starting material. The percentage seed germination varied with the composition of the nutrient media and was highest in full-strength MS basal medium. The number of secondary

  12. The pollination of a self-incompatible, food-mimic orchid, Coelogyne fimbriata (Orchidaceae), by female Vespula wasps

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jin; Shi, Jun; Shangguan, Fa-Zhi; Dafni, Amots; Deng, Zhen-Hai; Luo, Yi-Bo

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims The study of specialized interactions between species is crucial to our understanding of processes in evolutionary ecology due to their profound effect on life cycles and diversification. Obligate pollination by a single wasp species is rare in Orchidaceae except in species with sexually deceptive flowers that are pollinated exclusively by male insects. The object of this study was to document pollination of the food-deceptive flowers of Coelogyne fimbriata, a species pollinated exclusively by female wasps. Methods Field observations and experiments were conducted in two populations of C. fimbriata. Floral phenology was recorded, and functional floral architecture was measured. Insect visitors to flowers were observed from 2005 to 2007. Bioassay experiments were conducted to check whether the floral odour attracted pollinators. Natural (insect-mediated) rates of pollinarium removal, pollinium deposition on stigmas, and fruit set were recorded. To determine the importance of cross-pollination, the breeding system was assessed via controlled, hand-pollination experiments. Key Results Two populations of C. fimbriata with fragrant, nectarless flowers are pollinated by females of the same Vespula species (Vespidae, Hymenoptera). Experiments on wasps show that they crawl towards the source of the odour. The flowering period appears to coincide with an annual peak in Vespula colony expansion when additional workers forage for carbohydrates. Rates of pollinarium removal (0·069–0·918) and pollinium deposition on stigmas (0·025–0·695) are extremely variable. However, fruit set in C. fimbriata is always low (0·014–0·069) and appears to be based on self-incompatibility coupled with intraclonal (geitonogamous) deposition of pollinia. Conclusions Coelogyne fimbriata and Steveniella satyrioides are now the only orchid species known to have food-deceptive flowers that are pollinated exclusively by eusocial, worker wasps. In C. fimbriata, floral

  13. Pollination biology in the dioecious orchid Catasetum uncatum: How does floral scent influence the behaviour of pollinators?

    PubMed

    Milet-Pinheiro, Paulo; Navarro, Daniela Maria do Amaral Ferraz; Dötterl, Stefan; Carvalho, Airton Torres; Pinto, Carlos Eduardo; Ayasse, Manfred; Schlindwein, Clemens

    2015-08-01

    Catasetum is a neotropical orchid genus that comprises about 160 dioecious species with a remarkable sexual dimorphism in floral morphology. Flowers of Catasetum produce perfumes as rewards, which are collected only by male euglossine bees. Currently, floral scents are known to be involved in the selective attraction of specific euglossine species. However, sexual dimorphism in floral scent and its eventual role in the pollination of Catasetum species have never been investigated. Here, we have investigated the pollination of Catasetum uncatum and asked: (1) Is floral scent a sexual dimorphic trait? (2) Does pollinarium removal/deposition affect scent emission? (3) Does sexual dimorphism in floral scent and changed scent emission have implications with regard to the behaviour of the pollinators? The frequency and behaviour of floral visitors were observed in non-manipulated flowers (both flower sexes) and in manipulated flowers (pistillate only) in which pollinaria were deposited. Scents of staminate and pistillate flowers (both manipulated and non-manipulated) were collected by using dynamic headspace methods and analysed chemically. Electrophysiological analyses were performed to detect compounds triggering antennal depolarisation in the euglossine species. C. uncatum is pollinated mainly by males of Euglossa nanomelanotricha. Pollinators were more frequent in pistillate than in staminate inflorescences. Bees approaching staminate flowers frequently flew away without visiting them, a behavioural pattern not observed in pistillate flowers. In the chemical analyses, we recorded 99 compounds, 31 of which triggered antennal depolarisation in pollinators. Multivariate analyses with the electrophysiological-active compounds did not detect differences between the scent composition of staminate and pistillate flowers. Pollinarium removal or deposition resulted in diminished scent emission within 24h in staminate and pistillate flowers, respectively. Surprisingly, bees

  14. Improving capacity for evidence-based practice in South East Asia: evaluating the role of research fellowships in the SEA-ORCHID Project

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fellowships are a component of many professional education programs. They provide opportunities to develop skills and competencies in an environment where time is protected and resources and technical support are more readily available. The SEA-ORCHID fellowships program aimed to increase capacity for evidence-based practice and research synthesis, and to encourage fellows to become leaders in these areas. Methods Fellows included doctors, nurses, midwives and librarians working in the maternal and neonatal areas of nine hospitals in South East Asia. Fellowships were undertaken in Australia and involved specific outputs related to evidence-based practice or research synthesis. Training and support was tailored according to the type of output and the fellow's experience and expertise. We evaluated the fellowships program quantitatively and qualitatively through written evaluations, interviews and follow-up of fellowship activities. Results During 2006-07, 23 fellows from Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines undertook short-term fellowships (median four weeks) in Australia. The main outputs were drafts of Cochrane systematic reviews, clinical practice guidelines and protocols for randomised trials, and training materials to support evidence-based practice. Protocols for Cochrane systematic reviews were more likely to be completed than other outcomes. The fellows identified several components that were critical to the program's overall success; these included protected time, tailored training, and access to technical expertise and resources. On returning home, fellows identified a lack of time and limited access to the internet and evidence-based resources as barriers to completing their outputs. The support of colleagues and senior staff was noted as an important enabler of progress, and research collaborators from other institutions and countries were also important sources of support. Conclusions The SEA-ORCHID fellowships program provided

  15. A putative miR172-targeted CeAPETALA2-like gene is involved in floral patterning regulation of the orchid Cymbidium ensifolium.

    PubMed

    Yang, F X; Zhu, G F; Wang, Z; Liu, H L; Huang, D

    2015-01-01

    APETALA2 plays critical roles in establishing meristem and organ identity during plant floral development. In this study, we obtained a CeAP2-like gene by using the mRNA differential display technique to analyze the wild type and a multitepal mutant of the orchid Cymbidium ensifolium. The full-length cDNA encoding the CeAP2-like transcription factor shows significant similarity to the cDNA of AP2 from Erycina pusilla and contains nucleotides complementary to miR172. Using a transient gene expression system of Arabidopsis protoplasts, we found that the accumulation of CeAP2-like protein and transcripts was negatively regulated by miR172, indicating this gene as a putative target of miR172. Northern blotting revealed that CeAP2-like is dominantly expressed in the sepals and petals of the wild-type flower, and shows low expression in the gynostemium. In contrast, the accumulation of CeAP2-like transcripts decreased significantly, especially in the central part of the mutant flower, corresponding to its abnormal petals and the absence of the gynostemium. Furthermore, we found an antagonistic expression pattern between CeAP2-like and AGAMOUS in the wild type, representing A- and C-class genes that specify floral organ fate. However, this antagonistic distribution was modified in the multitepal mutant, and both genes showed lower expression than that in the wild type. This result suggested that the balance between CeAP2-like and AGAMOUS activity was important for the regulation of floral patterning in C. ensifolium. This study represents the first report on a class A gene and its regulatory role for floral development in the orchid C. ensifolium. PMID:26505352

  16. Digital Gene Expression Analysis Based on De Novo Transcriptome Assembly Reveals New Genes Associated with Floral Organ Differentiation of the Orchid Plant Cymbidium ensifolium.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fengxi; Zhu, Genfa

    2015-01-01

    Cymbidium ensifolium belongs to the genus Cymbidium of the orchid family. Owing to its spectacular flower morphology, C. ensifolium has considerable ecological and cultural value. However, limited genetic data is available for this non-model plant, and the molecular mechanism underlying floral organ identity is still poorly understood. In this study, we characterize the floral transcriptome of C. ensifolium and present, for the first time, extensive sequence and transcript abundance data of individual floral organs. After sequencing, over 10 Gb clean sequence data were generated and assembled into 111,892 unigenes with an average length of 932.03 base pairs, including 1,227 clusters and 110,665 singletons. Assembled sequences were annotated with gene descriptions, gene ontology, clusters of orthologous group terms, the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, and the plant transcription factor database. From these annotations, 131 flowering-associated unigenes, 61 CONSTANS-LIKE (COL) unigenes and 90 floral homeotic genes were identified. In addition, four digital gene expression libraries were constructed for the sepal, petal, labellum and gynostemium, and 1,058 genes corresponding to individual floral organ development were identified. Among them, eight MADS-box genes were further investigated by full-length cDNA sequence analysis and expression validation, which revealed two APETALA1/AGL9-like MADS-box genes preferentially expressed in the sepal and petal, two AGAMOUS-like genes particularly restricted to the gynostemium, and four DEF-like genes distinctively expressed in different floral organs. The spatial expression of these genes varied distinctly in different floral mutant corresponding to different floral morphogenesis, which validated the specialized roles of them in floral patterning and further supported the effectiveness of our in silico analysis. This dataset generated in our study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying floral

  17. Digital Gene Expression Analysis Based on De Novo Transcriptome Assembly Reveals New Genes Associated with Floral Organ Differentiation of the Orchid Plant Cymbidium ensifolium

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fengxi; Zhu, Genfa

    2015-01-01

    Cymbidium ensifolium belongs to the genus Cymbidium of the orchid family. Owing to its spectacular flower morphology, C. ensifolium has considerable ecological and cultural value. However, limited genetic data is available for this non-model plant, and the molecular mechanism underlying floral organ identity is still poorly understood. In this study, we characterize the floral transcriptome of C. ensifolium and present, for the first time, extensive sequence and transcript abundance data of individual floral organs. After sequencing, over 10 Gb clean sequence data were generated and assembled into 111,892 unigenes with an average length of 932.03 base pairs, including 1,227 clusters and 110,665 singletons. Assembled sequences were annotated with gene descriptions, gene ontology, clusters of orthologous group terms, the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, and the plant transcription factor database. From these annotations, 131 flowering-associated unigenes, 61 CONSTANS-LIKE (COL) unigenes and 90 floral homeotic genes were identified. In addition, four digital gene expression libraries were constructed for the sepal, petal, labellum and gynostemium, and 1,058 genes corresponding to individual floral organ development were identified. Among them, eight MADS-box genes were further investigated by full-length cDNA sequence analysis and expression validation, which revealed two APETALA1/AGL9-like MADS-box genes preferentially expressed in the sepal and petal, two AGAMOUS-like genes particularly restricted to the gynostemium, and four DEF-like genes distinctively expressed in different floral organs. The spatial expression of these genes varied distinctly in different floral mutant corresponding to different floral morphogenesis, which validated the specialized roles of them in floral patterning and further supported the effectiveness of our in silico analysis. This dataset generated in our study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying floral

  18. Rapid in vitro propagation of the threatened endemic orchid, Ipsea malabarica (Reichb.f.) J D Hook through protocorm-like bodies.

    PubMed

    Martin, K P; Madassery, Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Rapid propagation of I. malabarica (Reichb. f.) J D Hook, an endemic and endangered orchid of the Western Ghats of Kerala, India through conversion of axillary buds to protocorm-like bodies (PLBs), and subsequent plant regeneration was achieved. Growth regulators and sugar displayed significant influence in the induction of PLBs. In vitro derived shoots from field grown rhizomes of Ipsea cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium with 13.3 microM N6-benzyladenine (BA) containing 2% commercial grade sugar turned the axillary buds to PLBs within 25 days, and developed a mean of 33.1 PLBs within 50 days. Kinetin (KIN) did not induce PLBs, but facilitated axillary bud proliferation. Transfer of PLBs on medium having same concentration of BA and sugar facilitated rapid multiplication, and developed a mean of 47.5 PLBs. No decline of PLB proliferation was observed up to 10th subculture. Half strength MS medium with 6.97 microM KIN facilitated conversion of 98% PLBs to plantlets. On this media, a mean of 5.8 roots were also developed per shoot. Shoots developed bulbs during culture were grown to rhizomes. Increase of sugar to 6 or 8% hastened the development of bulbs/rhizomes. Reintroduction of PLB-derived plantlets in the natural habitat i.e. at Vellarimala (at 1300 m height) of the Western Ghats of Kerala was attempted as a means to assist in situ conservation. This is the first report of conversion of axillary buds to PLBs. The protocol enables to surmount the threat of extinction of this endemic and endangered orchid. PMID:16187536

  19. The Analysis of the Inflorescence miRNome of the Orchid Orchis italica Reveals a DEF-Like MADS-Box Gene as a New miRNA Target

    PubMed Central

    Aceto, Serena; Sica, Maria; De Paolo, Sofia; D'Argenio, Valeria; Cantiello, Piergiuseppe; Salvatore, Francesco; Gaudio, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, regulatory non-coding RNAs involved in a wide range of biological processes, from organ development to response to stimuli. In recent years, an increasing number of studies on model plant species have highlighted the evolutionary conservation of a high number of miRNA families and the existence of taxon-specific ones. However, few studies have examined miRNAs in non-model species such as orchids, which are characterized by highly diversified floral structures and pollination strategies. Therefore, we analysed a small RNA library of inflorescence tissue of the Mediterranean orchid Orchis italica to increase the knowledge on miRNAs in a non-model plant species. The high-throughput sequencing and analysis of a small RNA library of inflorescence of O. italica revealed 23 conserved and 161 putative novel miRNA families. Among the putative miRNA targets, experimental validation demonstrated that a DEF-like MADS-box transcript is cleaved by the homolog of miR5179 of O. italica. The presence of conserved miRNA families in the inflorescence of O. italica indicates that the basic developmental flower regulatory mechanisms mediated by miRNAs are maintained through evolution. Because, according to the “orchid code” theory, DEF-like genes exert a key function in the diversification of tepals and lip, the cleavage-mediated inhibitory activity of miR5179 on a OitaDEF-like transcript suggests that, in orchids, miRNAs play an important role in the diversification of the perianth organs. PMID:24832004

  20. A direct assessment of realized seed and pollen flow within and between two isolated populations of the food-deceptive orchid Orchis mascula.

    PubMed

    Helsen, K; Meekers, T; Vranckx, G; Roldán-Ruiz, I; Vandepitte, K; Honnay, O

    2016-01-01

    Gene flow can counteract the loss of genetic diversity caused by genetic drift in small populations. For this reason, clearly understanding gene flow patterns is of the highest importance across fragmented landscapes. However, gene flow patterns are not only dependent upon the degree of spatial isolation of fragmented populations, but are also dependent upon the life-history traits of the species. Indeed, habitat fragmentation effects appear especially unpredictable for food-deceptive orchid species, because of their highly specialised seed and pollen dispersal mechanisms. In this study we used amplified fragment length polymorphism markers and subsequent parentage and spatial autocorrelation analysis to quantify the extent and the patterns of realized gene flow within and between two adjacent fragmented populations of the food-deceptive Orchis mascula. We observed considerable gene flow between both populations, occurring mainly through pollen dispersal. Seed dispersal, on the other hand, was mainly limited to the first few meters from the mother plant in both populations, although at least one among-population seed dispersal event was observed. This, in turn, resulted in a significant spatial genetic structure for both populations. Although genetic diversity was high in both populations and mainly outcrossing occurred, reproductive output was strongly skewed toward a limited number of successful adult plants. These observed patterns are likely due to the different pollinator behaviour associated with food-deceptive plants. We conclude that these populations can be considered viable under their current fragmented state. PMID:25941020

  1. Inhibitory effect of Phalaenopsis orchid extract on WNT1-induced immature melanocyte precursor differentiation in a novel in vitro solar lentigo model.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takaaki; Hasegawa, Seiji; Inoue, Yu; Kunita, Mayumi; Ohsumi, Kazuhisa; Sakaida, Tsutomu; Yashiro, Youichi; Nakata, Satoru

    2016-07-01

    Recently, it has been reported that increased expression of WNT1 accelerates the differentiation of melanocyte stem cells (McSCs) in solar lentigines (SLs), hyperpigmented maculae commonly seen on sun-exposed areas of the skin. In this study, to establish an in vitro SL model, human epidermal squamous carcinoma cell line HSC-1, which expresses higher levels of WNT1 than normal human epidermal keratinocytes, was co-cultured with early passage normal human epidermal melanocytes (NHEMs) as an in vitro McSC model. As a result, mRNA expression levels of melanocyte differentiation-related genes MITF and TYR in NHEMs were significantly increased by co-culturing with HSC-1 cells. Furthermore, Phalaenopsis orchid extract (Phex) inhibited McSCs differentiation by suppressing WNT1 expression via down-regulation of DLX2, a transcriptional activator of WNT1, in HSC-1 cells. Therefore, our finding suggested that extracts such as Phex, which suppresses WNT1 expression, may be useful as a novel treatment of SLs. PMID:26940255

  2. Beyond orchids and dandelions: Testing the 5HTT “risky” allele for evidence of phenotypic capacitance and frequency dependent selection

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Dalton; Rauscher, Emily; Siegal, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    The persistence of behaviorally deleterious genes in the human population poses an interesting question for population genetics: If certain alleles at these loci are deleterious, why have they survived in the population? We consider evidence for phenotypic capacitance and/or frequency dependent selection for an allele that has been putatively shown to have negative associations with human behaviors (the “short” 5-HTT promoter region allele) yet which has persisted in human and non-human primate populations. Using National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health data, we compare sibling and twin variation in depression by 5-HTT genotype (specified in several ways) and investigate sibship-level cross-person gene-gene interactions. In support of the “orchid / dandelion” hypothesis, we find evidence that the short allele increases variation in phenotypes in response to environmental (or genetic) differences (i.e. acts as a perturbation of a phenotypic capacitor). Further, we also find some evidence that the effects of allelic variation at this locus are moderated by the genetic environment of the sibship unit (i.e. may be susceptible to frequency dependent selection). We discuss implications of these findings for genetic models in general, specifically with respect to stable unit treatment value assumption violations (i.e. non-independence of units of analysis). PMID:23701535

  3. Ectopic expression of two MADS box genes from orchid (Oncidium Gower Ramsey) and lily (Lilium longiflorum) alters flower transition and formation in Eustoma grandiflorum.

    PubMed

    Thiruvengadam, Muthu; Yang, Chang-Hsien

    2009-10-01

    Lisianthus [Eustoma grandiflorum (Raf.) Shinn] is a popular cut flower crop throughout the world, and the demand for this plant for cut flowers and potted plants has been increasing worldwide. Recent advances in genetic engineering have enabled the transformation and regeneration of plants to become a powerful tool for improvement of lisianthus. We have established a highly efficient plant regeneration system and Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of E. grandiflorum. The greatest shoot regeneration frequency and number of shoot buds per explant are observed on media supplemented with 6-Benzylaminopurine (BAP) and alpha-Naphthalene acetic acid (NAA). We report an efficient plant regeneration system using leaf explants via organogenesis with high efficiency of transgenic plants (15%) in culture of 11 weeks' duration. Further ectopic expression of two MADS box genes, LMADS1-M from lily (Lilium longiflorum) and OMADS1 from orchid (Oncidium Gower Ramsey), was performed in E. grandiflorum. Conversion of second whorl petals into sepal-like structures and alteration of third whorl stamen formation were observed in the transgenic E. grandiflorum plants ectopically expressing 35S::LMADS1-M. 35S::OMADS1 transgenic E. grandiflorum plants flowered significantly earlier than non-transgenic plants. This is the first report on the ectopic expression of two MADS box genes in E. grandiflorum using a simple and highly efficient gene transfer protocol. Our results reveal the potential for floral modification in E. grandiflorum through genetic transformation. PMID:19639326

  4. Mycorrhizal diversity, seed germination and long-term changes in population size across nine populations of the terrestrial orchid Neottia ovata.

    PubMed

    Jacquemyn, Hans; Waud, Michael; Merckx, Vincent S F T; Lievens, Bart; Brys, Rein

    2015-07-01

    In plant species that rely on mycorrhizal symbioses for germination and seedling establishment, seedling recruitment and temporal changes in abundance can be expected to depend on fungal community composition and local environmental conditions. However, disentangling the precise factors that determine recruitment success in species that critically rely on mycorrhizal fungi represents a major challenge. In this study, we used seed germination experiments, 454 amplicon pyrosequencing and assessment of soil conditions to investigate the factors driving changes in local abundance in 28 populations of the orchid Neottia ovata. Comparison of population sizes measured in 2003 and 2013 showed that nearly 60% of the studied populations had declined in size (average growth rate across all populations: -0.01). Investigation of the mycorrhizal fungi in both the roots and soil revealed a total of 68 species of putatively mycorrhizal fungi, 21 of which occurred exclusively in roots, 25 that occurred solely in soil and 22 that were observed in both the soil and roots. Seed germination was limited and significantly and positively related to soil moisture content and soil pH, but not to fungal community composition. Large populations or populations with high population growth rates showed significantly higher germination than small populations or populations declining in size, but no significant relationships were found between population size or growth and mycorrhizal diversity. Overall, these results indicate that temporal changes in abundance were related to the ability of seeds to germinate, but at the same time they provided limited evidence that variation in fungal communities played an important role in determining population dynamics. PMID:25963669

  5. Missense Mutation R338W in ARHGEF9 in a Family with X-linked Intellectual Disability with Variable Macrocephaly and Macro-Orchidism

    PubMed Central

    Long, Philip; May, Melanie M.; James, Victoria M.; Grannò, Simone; Johnson, John P.; Tarpey, Patrick; Stevenson, Roger E.; Harvey, Kirsten; Schwartz, Charles E.; Harvey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Non-syndromal X-linked intellectual disability (NS-XLID) represents a broad group of clinical disorders in which ID is the only clinically consistent manifestation. Although in many cases either chromosomal linkage data or knowledge of the >100 existing XLID genes has assisted mutation discovery, the underlying cause of disease remains unresolved in many families. We report the resolution of a large family (K8010) with NS-XLID, with variable macrocephaly and macro-orchidism. Although a previous linkage study had mapped the locus to Xq12-q21, this region contained too many candidate genes to be analyzed using conventional approaches. However, X-chromosome exome sequencing, bioinformatics analysis and segregation analysis revealed a novel missense mutation (c.1012C>T; p.R338W) in ARHGEF9. This gene encodes collybistin (CB), a neuronal GDP-GTP exchange factor previously implicated in several cases of XLID, as well as clustering of gephyrin and GABAA receptors at inhibitory synapses. Molecular modeling of the CB R338W substitution revealed that this change results in the substitution of a long electropositive side-chain with a large non-charged hydrophobic side-chain. The R338W change is predicted to result in clashes with adjacent amino acids (K363 and N335) and disruption of electrostatic potential and local folding of the PH domain, which is known to bind phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI3P/PtdIns-3-P). Consistent with this finding, functional assays revealed that recombinant CB CB2SH3−R338W was deficient in PI3P binding and was not able to translocate EGFP-gephyrin to submembrane microaggregates in an in vitro clustering assay. Taken together, these results suggest that the R338W mutation in ARHGEF9 is the underlying cause of NS-XLID in this family. PMID:26834553

  6. Comparative histology of floral elaiophores in the orchids Rudolfiella picta (Schltr.) Hoehne (Maxillariinae sensu lato) and Oncidium ornithorhynchum H.B.K. (Oncidiinae sensu lato)

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Kevin L.; Stpiczyńska, Malgorzata

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Floral elaiophores, although widespread amongst orchids, have not previously been described for Maxillariinae sensu lato. Here, two claims that epithelial, floral elaiophores occur in the genus Rudolfiella Hoehne (Bifrenaria clade) are investigated. Presumed elaiophores were compared with those of Oncidiinae Benth. and the floral, resin-secreting tissues of Rhetinantha M.A. Blanco and Heterotaxis Lindl., both genera formerly assigned to Maxillaria Ruiz & Pav. (Maxillariinae sensu stricto). Methods Putative, floral elaiophore tissue of Rudolfiella picta (Schltr.) Hoehne and floral elaiophores of Oncidium ornithorhynchum H.B.K. were examined by means of light microscopy, histochemistry, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Key Results and Conclusions Floral, epithelial elaiophores are present in Rudolfiella picta, indicating, for the first time, that oil secretion occurs amongst members of the Bifrenaria clade (Maxillariinae sensu lato). However, whereas the elaiophore of R. picta is borne upon the labellar callus, the elaiophores of O. ornithorhynchum occur on the lateral lobes of the labellum. In both species, the elaiophore comprises a single layer of palisade secretory cells and parenchymatous, subsecretory tissue. Cell wall cavities are absent from both and there is no evidence of cuticular distension in response to oil accumulation between the outer tangential wall and the overlying cuticle in R. picta. Distension of the cuticle, however, occurs in O. ornithorhynchum. Secretory cells of R. picta contain characteristic, spherical or oval plastids with abundant plastoglobuli and these more closely resemble plastids found in labellar, secretory cells of representatives of Rhetinantha (formerly Maxillaria acuminata Lindl. alliance) than elaiophore plastids of Oncidiinae. In Rhetinantha, such plastids are involved in the synthesis of resin-like material or wax. Despite these differences, the elaiophore anatomy of

  7. Optimising reproductive and child health outcomes by building evidence-based research and practice in South East Asia (SEA-ORCHID): study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Henderson-Smart, David J; Lumbiganon, Pisake; Festin, Mario R; Ho, Jacqueline J; Mohammad, Hakimi; McDonald, Steve J; Green, Sally; Crowther, Caroline A

    2007-01-01

    Background Disorders related to pregnancy and childbirth are a major health issue in South East Asia. They represent one of the biggest health risk differentials between the developed and developing world. Our broad research question is: Can the health of mothers and babies in Thailand, Indonesia, the Philippines and Malaysia be improved by increasing the local capacity for the synthesis of research, implementation of effective interventions, and identification of gaps in knowledge needing further research? Methods/Design The project is a before-after study which planned to benefit from and extend existing regional and international networks. Over five years the project was designed to comprise five phases; pre-study, pre-intervention, intervention, outcome assessment and reporting/dissemination. The study was proposed to be conducted across seven project nodes: four in South East Asia and three in Australia. Each South East Asian study node was planned to be established within an existing department of obstetrics and gynaecology or neonatology and was intended to form the project coordinating centre and focus for evidence-based practice activities within that region. Nine hospitals in South East Asia planned to participate, representing a range of clinical settings. The three project nodes in Australia were intended to provide project support. The intervention was planned to consist of capacity-strengthening activities targeted at three groups: generators of evidence, users of evidence and teachers of evidence. The primary outcome was established as changes in adherence to recommended clinical practices from baseline to completion of the project and impact on health outcomes. Discussion The SEA-ORCHID project was intended to improve care during pregnancy and the perinatal period of mothers and their babies in South East Asia. The possible benefits extend beyond this however, as at the end of this project there is hoped to be an existing network of South East Asian

  8. A δ(15)N assessment of nitrogen deposition for the endangered epiphytic orchid Laelia speciosa from a city and an oak forest in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Álvarez, Edison A; Reyes-García, Casandra; de la Barrera, Erick

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen deposition poses a major threat to global biodiversity. Tropical epiphytic plants are especially at risk given their reliance on atmospheric sources of nutrients. The leaf, pseudobulb, and root carbon and nitrogen content, C:N ratio, as well as the nitrogen isotopic composition were studied for individuals of Laelia speciosa from a city and from an oak forest in Mexico. The nitrogen content of leaves was similar between the city and the oak forest, reaching 1.3 ± 0.2 % (dry mass). The δ(15)N of leaves, pseudobulbs, and roots reached 5.6 ± 0.2 ‰ in the city, values found in sites exposed to industrial and vehicular activities. The δ(15)N for plant from the oak forest amounted to -3.1 ± 0.3 ‰, which is similar to values measured from sites with low industrial activities. Some orchids such as Laelia speciosa produce a single pseudobulb per year, i.e., a water and nutrient storage organ, so the interannual nitrogen deposition was studied by considering the ten most recent pseudobulbs for plants from either site formed between 2003 and 2012. The C:N ratio of the ten most recent pseudobulbs from the oak forest, as well as that of the pseudobulbs formed before 2010 for plants in the city were indistinguishable from each other, averaging 132.4 ± 6.5, while it was lower for the two most recent pseudobulbs in the city. The δ(15)N values of pseudobulbs from the oak forest averaged ‒4.4 ± 0.1 ‰ for the entire series. The δ(15)N ranged from 0.1 ± 1.6 ‰ for the oldest pseudobulb to 4.7 ± 0.2 ‰ for the pseudobulb formed in the city from 2008 onwards. Isotopic analysis and the C:N ratio for L. speciosa revealed that rates of nitrogen deposition were higher in the city than in the forest. The δ(15)N values of series of pseudobulbs showed that it is possible to track nitrogen deposition over multiple years. PMID:27282994

  9. Mycorrhizal fungi of Vanilla: diversity, specificity and effects on seed germination and plant growth.

    PubMed

    Porras-Alfaro, Andrea; Bayman, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are essential for the germination of orchid seeds. However, the specificity of orchids for their mycorrhizal fungi and the effects of the fungi on orchid growth are controversial. Mycorrhizal fungi have been studied in some temperate and tropical, epiphytic orchids, but the symbionts of tropical, terrestrial orchids are still unknown. Here we study diversity, specificity and function of mycorrhizal fungi in Vanilla, a pantropical genus that is both terrestrial and epiphytic. Mycorrhizal roots were collected from four Vanilla species in Puerto Rico, Costa Rica and Cuba. Cultured and uncultured mycorrhizal fungi were identified by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer region of nuclear rDNA (nrITS) and part of the mitochondrial ribosomal large subunit (mtLSU), and by counting number of nuclei in hyphae. Vanilla spp. were associated with a wide range of mycorrhizal fungi: Ceratobasidium, Thanatephorus and Tulasnella. Related fungi were found in different species of Vanilla, although at different relative frequencies. Ceratobasidium was more common in roots in soil and Tulasnella was more common in roots on tree bark, but several clades of fungi included strains from both substrates. Relative frequencies of genera of mycorrhizal fungi differed significantly between cultured fungi and those detected by direct amplification. Ceratobasidium and Tulasnella were tested for effects on seed germination of Vanilla and effects on growth of Vanilla and Dendrobium plants. We found significant differences among fungi in effects on seed germination and plant growth. Effects of mycorrhizal fungi on Vanilla and Dendrobium were similar: a clade of Ceratobasidium had a consistently positive effect on plant growth and seed germination. This clade has potential use in germination and propagation of orchids. Results confirmed that a single orchid species can be associated with several mycorrhizal fungi with different functional consequences for the plant. PMID

  10. Open reduction and internal fixation versus casting for highly comminuted and intra-articular fractures of the distal radius (ORCHID): protocol for a randomized clinical multi-center trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fractures of the distal radius represent the most common fracture in elderly patients, and often indicate the onset of symptomatic osteoporosis. A variety of treatment options is available, including closed reduction and plaster casting, K-wire-stabilization, external fixation and open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) with volar locked plating. The latter is widely promoted by clinicians and hardware manufacturers. Closed reduction and cast stabilization for six weeks is a simple, convenient, and ubiquitously available intervention. In contrast, ORIF requires hospitalization, but allows for functional rehabilitation. Given the lack of randomized controlled trials, it remains unclear whether ORIF leads to better functional outcomes one year after injury than closed reduction and casting. Methods/Design ORCHID (Open reduction and internal fixation versus casting for highly comminuted intra-articular fractures of the distal radius) is a pragmatic, randomized, multi-center, clinical trial with two parallel treatment arms. It is planned to include 504 patients in 15 participating centers throughout Germany over a three-year period. Patients are allocated by a central web-based randomization tool. The primary objective is to determine differences in the Short Form 36 (SF-36) Physical Component Score (PCS) between volar locked plating and closed reduction and casting of intraarticular, comminuted distal radius fractures in patients > 65 years of age one year after the fracture. Secondary outcomes include differences in other SF-36 dimensions, the EuroQol-5D questionnaire, the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) instrument. Also, the range of motion in the affected wrist, activities of daily living, complications (including secondary ORIF and revision surgery), as well as serious adverse events will be assessed. Data obtained during the trial will be used for later health-economic evaluations. The trial architecture involves a central

  11. Purification, Characterization and Biological Activity of Polysaccharides from Dendrobium officinale.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kaiwei; Li, Yunrong; Tao, Shengchang; Wei, Gang; Huang, Yuechun; Chen, Dongfeng; Wu, Chengfeng

    2016-01-01

    Polysaccharide (DOPA) from the stem of D. officinale, as well as two fractions (DOPA-1 and DOPA-2) of it, were isolated and purified by DEAE cellulose-52 and Sephacryl S-300 chromatography, and their structural characteristics and bioactivities were investigated. The average molecular weights of DOPA-1 and DOPA-2 were 394 kDa and 362 kDa, respectively. They were mainly composed of d-mannose, d-glucose, and had a backbone consisting of 1,4-linked β-d-Manp and 1,4-linked β-d-Glcp with O-acetyl groups. Bioactivity studies indicated that both DOPA and its purified fractions (DOPA-1 and DOPA-2) could activate splenocytes and macrophages. The D. officinale polysaccharides had stimulatory effects on splenocytes, T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes, promoting the cell viability and NO production of RAW 264.7 macrophages. Furthermore, DOPA, DOPA-1 and DOPA-2 were found to protect RAW 264.7 macrophages against hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂)-induced oxidative injury by promoting cell viability, suppressing apoptosis and ameliorating oxidative lesions. These results suggested that D. officinale polysaccharides possessed antioxidant activity and mild immunostimulatory activity. PMID:27248989

  12. Moscatilin induces apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe in human esophageal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-An; Chen, Chien-Chih; Shen, Chien-Chang; Chang, Hen-Hong; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2013-10-01

    Moscatilin, a bibenzyl derivative from the orchid Dendrobium loddigesii, has been shown to possess anticancer activity. We examined the effect of moscatilin on human esophageal cancer cells, including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (ADC) cells and its possible mechanisms. Moscatilin suppressed the growth of both the histological cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Morphological changes indicative of apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe were observed following moscatilin treatment. The population of cells in the sub-G1 phase and polyploidy phase significantly increased after treatment. Immunofluorescence revealed multipolar mitosis and subsequent multinucleation in moscatilin-treated cells, indicating the development of mitotic catastrophe. Western blot showed a marked increase in expressions of polo-like kinase 1 and cyclin B1 after exposure to moscatilin. In conclusion, moscatilin inhibits growth and induces apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe in human esophageal SCC- and ADC-derived cell lines, indicating that moscatilin has broad potential against esophageal cancer. PMID:24074296

  13. Moscatilin Induces Apoptosis and Mitotic Catastrophe in Human Esophageal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-An; Chen, Chien-Chih; Shen, Chien-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Moscatilin, a bibenzyl derivative from the orchid Dendrobium loddigesii, has been shown to possess anticancer activity. We examined the effect of moscatilin on human esophageal cancer cells, including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (ADC) cells and its possible mechanisms. Moscatilin suppressed the growth of both the histological cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Morphological changes indicative of apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe were observed following moscatilin treatment. The population of cells in the sub-G1 phase and polyploidy phase significantly increased after treatment. Immunofluorescence revealed multipolar mitosis and subsequent multinucleation in moscatilin-treated cells, indicating the development of mitotic catastrophe. Western blot showed a marked increase in expressions of polo-like kinase 1 and cyclin B1 after exposure to moscatilin. In conclusion, moscatilin inhibits growth and induces apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe in human esophageal SCC- and ADC-derived cell lines, indicating that moscatilin has broad potential against esophageal cancer. PMID:24074296

  14. Escaping immune surveillance in cancer: is denbinobin the panacea?

    PubMed Central

    Magwere, Tapiwanashe

    2009-01-01

    The bane of anti-cancer therapy is usually the development of resistance to apoptosis in malignant cells. Identification of strategies to re-sensitize cancer cells to apoptosis has now become a top priority in anti-cancer research. Denbinobin is a novel, naturally occurring phenathroquinone isolated from orchids of the genus Dendrobium that has remarkable anti-cancer activities demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. Recently denbinobin has been shown to diminish the levels of expression of the decoy receptor-3 and also to act synergistically with Fas ligand to induce apoptosis in a pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line. There is hope that denbinobin could be developed as an adjuvant in combination therapies aimed at killing cancers that rely on decoy receptors to evade the host's immune surveillance. PMID:19664137

  15. Orchids in the Bathroom: Reflections on Relocation Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, William R.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the stress factors involved in moving overseas to teach, or in returning home after an overseas assignment. Includes warning signs of relocation stress, such as becoming fearful of new situations, being reluctant to talk about the move, and finding excessive fault with new people or places. (Contains 15 references.) (NB)

  16. Overlooking the Orchid in Search of the Rose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Charles; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Mount Diablo High School (California) and Pacific Bell's successful partnership is based on (1) willingness of parties to make time commitments; (2) allowing students to develop relationships with business volunteers; (3) patience; (4) constant monitoring; and (5) consideration of how the business partner can help educators achieve their goals for…

  17. The Crimea 96 Conference: An Orchid of the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spain, Victoria

    1997-01-01

    Describes the conference, "Libraries and Associations in the Transient World: New Technologies and New Forms of Cooperation" (3rd, Foros, Crimea, June 1-9, 1996), which aimed to promote cooperation among libraries in Russia, Ukraine, and other former Soviet Union countries. Sidebars list the English-language papers and the names and origins of the…

  18. Pseudopollen in Eria Lindl. Section Mycaranthes Rchb.f. (Orchidaceae)

    PubMed Central

    DAVIES, K. L.; TURNER, M. P.

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Pseudopollen is a whitish, mealy material produced upon the labella of a number of orchid species as labellar hairs either become detached or fragment. Since individual hair cells are rich in protein and starch, it has long been speculated that pseudopollen functions as a reward for visiting insects. Although some 90 years have passed since Beck first described pseudopollen for a small number of Eria spp. currently assigned to section Mycaranthes Rchb.f., we still know little about the character of pseudopollen in this taxon. The use of SEM and histochemistry would re-address this deficit in our knowledge whereas comparison of pseudopollen in Eria (S.E. Asia), Maxillaria (tropical and sub-tropical America), Polystachya (largely tropical Africa and Madagascar) and Dendrobium unicum (Thailand and Laos) would perhaps help us to understand better how this feature may have arisen and evolved on a number of different continents. • Methods Pseudopollen morphology is described using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Hairs were tested for starch, lipid and protein using IKI, Sudan III and the xanthoproteic test, respectively. • Key Results and Conclusions The labellar hairs of all eight representatives of section Mycaranthes examined are identical. They are unicellular, clavate with a narrow ‘stalk’ and contain both protein and starch but no detectable lipid droplets. The protein is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and the starch is confined to amyloplasts. The hairs become detached from the labellar surface and bear raised cuticular ridges and flaky deposits that are presumed to be wax. In that they are unicellular and appear to bear wax distally, the labellar hairs are significantly different from those observed for other orchid species. Comparative morphology indicates that they evolved independently in response to pollinator pressures similar to those experienced by other unrelated pseudopollen-forming orchids on

  19. Moscatilin inhibits lung cancer cell motility and invasion via suppression of endogenous reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Kowitdamrong, Akkarawut; Chanvorachote, Pithi; Sritularak, Boonchoo; Pongrakhananon, Varisa

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death among cancer patients worldwide, and most of them have died from metastasis. Migration and invasion are prerequisite processes associated with high metastasis potential in cancers. Moscatilin, a bibenzyl derivative isolated from the Thai orchid Dendrobium pulchellum, has been shown to have anticancer effect against numerous cancer cell lines. However, little is known regarding the effect of moscatilin on cancer cell migration and invasion. The present study demonstrates that nontoxic concentrations of moscatilin were able to inhibit human nonsmall cell lung cancer H23 cell migration and invasion. The inhibitory effect of moscatilin was associated with an attenuation of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS), in which hydroxyl radical (OH(∙)) was identified as a dominant species in the suppression of filopodia formation. Western blot analysis also revealed that moscatilin downregulated activated focal adhesion kinase (phosphorylated FAK, Tyr 397) and activated ATP-dependent tyrosine kinase (phosphorylated Akt, Ser 473), whereas their parental counterparts were not detectable changed. In conclusion, our results indicate the novel molecular basis of moscalitin-inhibiting lung cancer cell motility and invasion and demonstrate a promising antimetastatic potential of such an agent for lung cancer therapy. PMID:23738332

  20. Moscatilin Inhibits Lung Cancer Cell Motility and Invasion via Suppression of Endogenous Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Kowitdamrong, Akkarawut; Chanvorachote, Pithi; Sritularak, Boonchoo

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death among cancer patients worldwide, and most of them have died from metastasis. Migration and invasion are prerequisite processes associated with high metastasis potential in cancers. Moscatilin, a bibenzyl derivative isolated from the Thai orchid Dendrobium pulchellum, has been shown to have anticancer effect against numerous cancer cell lines. However, little is known regarding the effect of moscatilin on cancer cell migration and invasion. The present study demonstrates that nontoxic concentrations of moscatilin were able to inhibit human nonsmall cell lung cancer H23 cell migration and invasion. The inhibitory effect of moscatilin was associated with an attenuation of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS), in which hydroxyl radical (OH∙) was identified as a dominant species in the suppression of filopodia formation. Western blot analysis also revealed that moscatilin downregulated activated focal adhesion kinase (phosphorylated FAK, Tyr 397) and activated ATP-dependent tyrosine kinase (phosphorylated Akt, Ser 473), whereas their parental counterparts were not detectable changed. In conclusion, our results indicate the novel molecular basis of moscalitin-inhibiting lung cancer cell motility and invasion and demonstrate a promising antimetastatic potential of such an agent for lung cancer therapy. PMID:23738332

  1. Brevipalpus mites Donnadieu (Prostigmata: Tenuipalpidae) associated with ornamental plants in Distrito Federal, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Letícia C; Návia, Denise; Rodrigues, José C V

    2007-01-01

    Brevipalpus mites colonize a great number of fruit and ornamental plants. Mite species belonging to this genus have been associated with many plant viruses. Citrus leprosis (CiLV) is the most economically important virus transmitted by B. phoenicis mites. It has recently been shown that ornamental plant species can be alternative hosts of this virus. The high volume of trade and frequent movement of live ornamental plants make them efficient pest disseminators. Because of this, it is desirable to expand knowledge of potential pests aiming to guide the adoption of quarantine measures. This work reports ornamental plant hosts of Brevipalpus mites in the Distrito Federal (DF), as well the occurrence of symptoms consistent with Brevipalpus-borne plant viruses in these same hosts. Between July and September of 2005, five surveys were carried out in 14 localities within DF. Leaves and branches of fifty-five ornamental plant species were sampled. The species Pithecellobium avaremotemo Mart. is for the first time reported as a host for B. phoenicis (Geijskes), B. californicus Banks and B. obovatus Donnadieu species. Additionally, seven new species are reported as hosts for Brevipalpus within South America. New hosts are also listed for individual mite species. Typical symptoms of Brevipalpus-borne viruses were observed in Ligustrum sinense Lour., Pelargonium hortorum L.H. Bailey, Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L. and orchids (Dendrobium and Oncidium). The results of this work emphasize the potential role of the ornamental plants as vehicles for dissemination of Brevipalpus mites. PMID:17934626

  2. Rumbling Orchids: How To Assess Divergent Evolution Between Chloroplast Endosymbionts and the Nuclear Host.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Escobar, Oscar Alejandro; Balbuena, Juan Antonio; Gottschling, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships inferred from multilocus organellar and nuclear DNA data are often difficult to resolve because of evolutionary conflicts among gene trees. However, conflicting or "outlier" associations (i.e., linked pairs of "operational terminal units" in two phylogenies) among these data sets often provide valuable information on evolutionary processes such as chloroplast capture following hybridization, incomplete lineage sorting, and horizontal gene transfer. Statistical tools that to date have been used in cophylogenetic studies only also have the potential to test for the degree of topological congruence between organellar and nuclear data sets and reliably detect outlier associations. Two distance-based methods, namely ParaFit and Procrustean Approach to Cophylogeny (PACo), were used in conjunction to detect those outliers contributing to conflicting phylogenies independently derived from chloroplast and nuclear sequence data. We explored their efficiency of retrieving outlier associations, and the impact of input data (unit branch length and additive trees) between data sets, by using several simulation approaches. To test their performance using real data sets, we additionally inferred the phylogenetic relationships within Neotropical Catasetinae (Epidendroideae, Orchidaceae), which is a suitable group to investigate phylogenetic incongruence because of hybridization processes between some of its constituent species. A comparison between trees derived from chloroplast and nuclear sequence data reflected strong, well-supported incongruence within Catasetum, Cycnoches, and Mormodes. As a result, outliers among chloroplast and nuclear data sets, and in experimental simulations, were successfully detected by PACo when using patristic distance matrices obtained from phylograms, but not from unit branch length trees. The performance of ParaFit was overall inferior compared to PACo, using either phylograms or unit branch lengths as input data. Because workflows for applying cophylogenetic analyses are not standardized yet, we provide a pipeline for executing PACo and ParaFit as well as displaying outlier associations in plots and trees by using the software R. The pipeline renders a method to identify outliers with high reliability and to assess the combinability of the independently derived data sets by means of statistical analyses. PMID:26430060

  3. Identity and specificity of the fungi forming mycorrhizas with the rare mycoheterotrophic orchid Rhizanthella gardneri.

    PubMed

    Bougoure, Jeremy; Ludwig, Martha; Brundrett, Mark; Grierson, Pauline

    2009-10-01

    Fully subterranean Rhizanthella gardneri (Orchidaceae) is obligately mycoheterotrophic meaning it is nutritionally dependent on the fungus it forms mycorrhizas with. Furthermore, R. gardneri purportedly participates in a nutrient sharing tripartite relationship where its mycorrhizal fungus simultaneously forms ectomycorrhizas with species of Melaleuca uncinata s.l. Although the mycorrhizal fungus of R. gardneri has been morphologically identified as Thanatephorus gardneri (from a single isolate), this identification has been recently questioned. We sought to clarify the identification of the mycorrhizal fungus of R. gardneri, using molecular methods, and to identify how specific its mycorrhizal relationship is. Fungal isolates taken from all sites where R. gardneri is known to occur shared almost identical ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences. The fungal isolate rDNA most closely matched that of other Ceratobasidiales species, particularly within the Ceratobasidium genus. However, interpretation of results was difficult as we found two distinct ITS sequences within all mycorrhizal fungal isolates of R. gardneri that we assessed. All mycorrhizal fungal isolates of R. gardneri readily formed ectomycorrhizas with a range of M. uncinata s.l. species. Consequently, it is likely that R. gardneri can form a nutrient sharing tripartite relationship where R. gardneri is connected to autotrophic M. uncinata s.l. by a common mycorrhizal fungus. These findings have implications for better understanding R. gardneri distribution, evolution and the ecological significance of its mycorrhizal fungus, particularly in relation to nutrient acquisition. PMID:19619652

  4. Are orchids left and dandelions right? Frontal brain activation asymmetry and its sensitivity to developmental context.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Paz; Van Lieshout, Ryan J; Waxman, Jordana A; Boyle, Michael H; Saigal, Saroj; Schmidt, Louis A

    2014-08-01

    To clarify long-standing conceptual and empirical inconsistencies in models describing the relation between frontal brain asymmetry and emotion, we tested a theory of biological sensitivity to context. We examined whether asymmetry of alpha activation in frontal brain regions, as measured by resting electroencephalography, is sensitive to early developmental contexts. Specifically, we investigated whether frontal asymmetry moderates the association between birth weight and adult outcomes. Adults with left frontal asymmetry (LFA) who were born at extremely low birth weight exhibited high levels of attention problems and withdrawn behaviors in their 30s, whereas normal-birth-weight adults with LFA had low levels of these problem behaviors. Adults with right frontal asymmetry (RFA) displayed a relatively moderate amount of problem behavior regardless of birth weight. Our findings suggest that LFA is associated with sensitivity to developmental context and may help explain why LFA is associated with both positive and negative outcomes, whereas RFA seems to be associated with a more canalized process in some contexts. PMID:24966069

  5. Diversity and abundance of orchid bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae, Euglossini) in a tropical rainforest succession.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Claus

    2009-01-01

    Euglossine bee males are easily lured to chemical baits imitating natural fragrances gathered by bees, providing a widely applied measure for estimating the diversity and abundance of euglossines. In here, I report the composition of euglossine bees in three lowland rainforest habitats of Peru, a primary old forest, a reforested and managed forest, and a very disturbed forest. A total of 2,072 males of euglossine were collected, belonging to 33 species and four genera. Although a comparable diversity relative to other studies from the Amazonian region was found, no significant differences among the sampled areas were detected. Perhaps, the short time and low intensity surveys here used (< 3 months) were not good enough indicators of forest disturbance without additional data. Compared to other major studies on the euglossine bee fauna, Loreto is most similar to the species assemblage reported from lowland rainforest in Brazil (Manaus), central Peru (Panguana) and southern Peru (Tambopata). PMID:19347098

  6. Genome assembly of citurs leprosis virus nuclear type reveals a close association with orchid fleck virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus leprosis is a difficult viral disease causing significant damage to citrus fruit in South America and Central America. The disease is marked by dramatic lesions on fruit, leaves and stems resulting in unmarketable product. Citrus leprosis virus cytoplasmic type (CiLV-C) was detected in states...

  7. Reproductive biology of Trichocentrum pumilum: an orchid pollinated by oil-collecting bees.

    PubMed

    Pansarin, E R; Pansarin, L M

    2011-07-01

    The reproductive biology, reward production and pollination mechanism of Trichocentrum pumilum were studied in a gallery forest in the interior of the State of São Paulo, southeast Brazil. The floral visitors and pollination mechanism were recorded, and experimental pollinations were carried out in order to determine the breeding system of this species. Trichocentrum pumilum blooms in spring. Each paniculate inflorescence bears an average of 85 flowers that present a central yellow callus and finger-like trichomes on the lateral lobes of the lip. A lipoidal substance is produced and stored among these trichomes. In the studied population, T. pumilum is exclusively visited and pollinated by two bee species (Tetrapedia diversipes and Lophopedia nigrispinis). Pollinaria are deposited on mouthparts of bees during collection of the lipoidal substance from the lateral lobes of the labellum. Trichocentrum pumilum is self-incompatible and pollinator-limited. Natural fruit set was low (9%, compared to 45% in experimentally cross-pollinated flowers). Potentially viable seed exceed 97% in fruits obtained through cross-pollination and in natural conditions (open pollination). PMID:21668598

  8. Friends or Relatives? Phylogenetics and Species Delimitation in the Controversial European Orchid Genus Ophrys

    PubMed Central

    Devey, Dion S.; Bateman, Richard M.; Fay, Michael F.; Hawkins, Julie A.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Highly variable, yet possibly convergent, morphology and lack of sequence variation have severely hindered production of a robust phylogenetic framework for the genus Ophrys. The aim of this study is to produce this framework as a basis for more rigorous species delimitation and conservation recommendations. Methods Nuclear and plastid DNA sequencing and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) were performed on 85 accessions of Ophrys, spanning the full range of species aggregates currently recognized. Data were analysed using a combination of parsimony and Bayesian tree-building techniques and by principal co-ordinates analysis. Key Results Complementary phylogenetic analyses and ordinations using nuclear, plastid and AFLP datasets identify ten genetically distinct groups (six robust) within the genus that may in turn be grouped into three sections (treated as subgenera by some authors). Additionally, genetic evidence is provided for a close relationship between the O. tenthredinifera, O. bombyliflora and O. speculum groups. The combination of these analytical techniques provides new insights into Ophrys systematics, notably recognition of the novel O. umbilicata group. Conclusions Heterogeneous copies of the nuclear ITS region show that some putative Ophrys species arose through hybridization rather than divergent speciation. The supposedly highly specific pseudocopulatory pollination syndrome of Ophrys is demonstrably ‘leaky’, suggesting that the genus has been substantially over-divided at the species level. PMID:18184645

  9. Phylogenetic Analysis of a 'Jewel Orchid' Genus Goodyera (Orchidaceae) Based on DNA Sequence Data from Nuclear and Plastid Regions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chao; Tian, Huaizhen; Li, Hongqing; Hu, Aiqun; Xing, Fuwu; Bhattacharjee, Avishek; Hsu, Tianchuan; Kumar, Pankaj; Chung, Shihwen

    2016-01-01

    A molecular phylogeny of Asiatic species of Goodyera (Orchidaceae, Cranichideae, Goodyerinae) based on the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and two chloroplast loci (matK and trnL-F) was presented. Thirty-five species represented by 132 samples of Goodyera were analyzed, along with other 27 genera/48 species, using Pterostylis longifolia and Chloraea gaudichaudii as outgroups. Bayesian inference, maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood methods were used to reveal the intrageneric relationships of Goodyera and its intergeneric relationships to related genera. The results indicate that: 1) Goodyera is not monophyletic; 2) Goodyera could be divided into four sections, viz., Goodyera, Otosepalum, Reticulum and a new section; 3) sect. Reticulum can be further divided into two subsections, viz., Reticulum and Foliosum, whereas sect. Goodyera can in turn be divided into subsections Goodyera and a new subsection. PMID:26927946

  10. A synopsis of the orchid weevil genus Orchidophilus Buchanan (Curculionidae, Baridinae), with taxonomic rectifications and description of one new species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six species of the weevil genus Orchidophilus Buchanan are recognized: O. epidendri (Murray) comb. n. (=Acythopeus genuinus Pascoe syn. n., =Baris orchivora Blackburn syn. n., =Apotomorhinus orchidearum Kolbe syn. n.), O. aterrimus (Waterhouse), O. eburifer (Pascoe) comb. n. (=Acythopeus gilvonotatu...

  11. Moscatilin, a bibenzyl derivative from the India orchid Dendrobrium loddigesii, suppresses tumor angiogenesis and growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tsai, An-Chi; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Liao, Cho-Hwa; Guh, Jih-Hwa; Wang, Shih-Wei; Sun, Hui-Lung; Liu, Yi-Nan; Chen, Chien-Chih; Shen, Chien-Chang; Chang, Ya-Ling; Teng, Che-Ming

    2010-06-28

    Attacking angiogenesis is considered an effective strategy for controls the expansion and metastasis of tumors and other related-diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of moscatilin, a bibenzyl derivative, on VEGF and bFGF-induced angiogenesis in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro and in vivo. Moscatilin significantly inhibited growth of lung cancer cell line A549 (NSCLC) and suppressed growth factor-induced neovascularization. In addition, VEGF- and bFGF-induced cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation of HUVECs was markedly inhibited by moscatilin. Western blotting analysis of cell signaling molecules indicated that moscatilin inhibited ERK1/2, Akt, and eNOS signaling pathways in HUVECs. These results suggest that inhibition of angiogenesis by moscatilin may be a major mechanism in cancer therapy. PMID:20056528

  12. Remarkable coexistence of multiple cytotypes of the Gymnadenia conopsea aggregate (the fragrant orchid): evidence from flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Trávníček, Pavel; Kubátová, Barbora; Čurn, Vladislav; Rauchová, Jana; Krajníková, Eva; Jersáková, Jana; Suda, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims One of the prerequisites for polyploid research in natural systems is knowledge of the geographical distribution of cytotypes. Here inter- and intrapopulational ploidy diversity was examined in the Gymnadenia conopsea aggregate in central Europe and potential explanations and evolutionary consequences of the observed spatial patterns investigated. Methods DAPI flow cytometry supplemented by confirmatory chromosome counts was used to determine ploidy in 3581 samples of the G. conopsea aggregate from 43 populations. The fine-scale spatial pattern of cytotype distribution (intra- and interploidy associations) was analysed with univariate and bivariate K-functions. Key Results Gymnadenia tissues undergo a progressively partial endoreplication, which accounts for about 60 % and 75 % of the total genome in G. conopsea and G. densiflora, respectively. Flow cytometric profiles are therefore species-specific and can be used as a marker for rapid and reliable species recognition. Two majority (4x, 8x) and three minority (6x, 10x, 12x) cytotypes were found, often in mixed-ploidy populations (harbouring up to all five different ploidy levels). The scarcity of the minority cytotypes (about 2·7 %) suggests the existence of strong pre- or postzygotic mating barriers. Spatial structure was observed in plots of populations with the highest cytotype variation, including clumping of individuals of the same ploidy and negative association between tetra- and octoploids. Conclusions The remarkable ploidy coexistence in the G. conopsea aggregate has reshaped our perception of intrapopulational ploidy diversity under natural conditions. This system offers unique opportunities for studying processes governing the formation and establishment of polyploids and assessing the evolutionary significance of the various pre- and postzygotic mating barriers that maintain this ploidy mixture. PMID:21059612

  13. In vitro regeneration of Coelogyne nervosa A.Rich. and Eria pseudoclavicaulis Blatt., threatened orchids of Western Ghats, India.

    PubMed

    Shibu, B Sahaya; Wesley, P Servin; Sarmad, Moin; Devi, B Chitra

    2014-06-01

    The seeds of C. nervosa and E. pseudoclavicaulis were germinated asymbiotically on Knudson C (KC) and Schenk and Hildebrandt basal medium (SH). Growth regulators such as 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) individually and in combinations with benzyladenine (BA) and kinetin were used for callus induction from the protocorm like bodies. Coelogyne nervosa showed maximum (90%) callus induction in Knudson C medium supplemented with 2,4-D (2.26 microM) and Eria pseudoclavicaulis showed 60% callus induction in Schenk and Hildebrandt medium supplemented with 2,4-D (2.26 microM). Calli developed a route of production of protocorm-like bodies and eventually developed into plantlets on transfer to growth regulator free half strength basal medium. The well rooted plants were hardened successfully in the potting mixture containing coconut husk, charcoal, and brick pieces in the ratio 2:1:1. PMID:24956897

  14. Multilayer adsorption of Cu(II) and Cd(II) over Brazilian Orchid Tree (Pata-de-vaca) and its adsorptive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgetto, Alexandre de O.; da Silva, Adrielli C. P.; Wondracek, Marcos H. P.; Silva, Rafael I. V.; Velini, Edivaldo D.; Saeki, Margarida J.; Pedrosa, Valber A.; Castro, Gustavo R.

    2015-08-01

    Through very simple and inexpensive processes, pata-de-vaca leaves were turned into a powder and applied as an adsorbent for the uptake of Cu(II) and Cd(II) from water. The material was characterized through SEM, EDX, FTIR and surface area measurement. The material had its point of zero charge determined (5.24), and its adsorption capacity was evaluated as a function of time, pH and metal concentration. The material presented fast adsorption kinetics, reaching adsorption equilibrium in less than 5 min and it had a good correlation with the pseudo-second order kinetic model. Optimum pH for the adsorption of Cu(II) and Cd(II) were found to be in the range from 4 to 5, approximately. In the experiment as a function of the analyte concentration, analogously to gas adsorption, the material presented a type II isotherm, indicating the formation of multilayers for both species. Such behavior was explained with basis in the alternation between cations and anions over the material's surface, and the maximum adsorption capacity, considering the formation of the multilayers were found to be 0.238 mmol L-1 for Cu(II) and 0.113 mmol L-1 for Cd(II).

  15. Genetic Structure Is Associated with Phenotypic Divergence in Floral Traits and Reproductive Investment in a High-Altitude Orchid from the Iron Quadrangle, Southeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Leles, Bruno; Chaves, Anderson V.; Russo, Philip; Batista, João A. N.; Lovato, Maria Bernadete

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the role of Neotropical montane landscapes in shaping genetic connectivity and local adaptation is essential for understanding the evolutionary processes that have shaped the extraordinary species diversity in these regions. In the present study, we examined the landscape genetics, estimated genetic diversity, and explored genetic relationships with morphological variability and reproductive strategies in seven natural populations of Cattleya liliputana (Orchidaceae). Nuclear microsatellite markers were used for genetic analyses. Spatial Bayesian clustering and population-based analyses revealed significant genetic structuring and high genetic diversity (He = 0.733 ± 0.03). Strong differentiation was found between populations over short spatial scales (FST = 0.138, p < 0.001), reflecting the landscape discontinuity and isolation. Monmonier´s maximum difference algorithm, Bayesian analysis on STRUCTURE and principal component analysis identified one major genetic discontinuity between populations. Divergent genetic groups showed phenotypic divergence in flower traits and reproductive strategies. Increased sexual reproductive effort was associated with rock outcrop type and may be a response to adverse conditions for growth and vegetative reproduction. Here we discuss the effect of restricted gene flow, local adaptation and phenotypic plasticity as drivers of population differentiation in Neotropical montane rock outcrops. PMID:25756994

  16. Euglossa williamsi, a new species of orchid bee from the Amazon Basin of Ecuador and Peru, with notes on its taxonomic association and biogeography (Hymenoptera, Apidae)

    PubMed Central

    Hinojosa-Díaz, Ismael A.; Engel, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Euglossa williamsi sp. n. is here described from the lowland Amazonian region in Ecuador and Peru, and as part of a small species assemblage within Euglossa consisting of Euglossa dodsoni Moure and Euglossa obtusa Dressler. An identification key to the males of the group is provided plus detailed figures of the new species and representative illustrations for the others. A brief discussion of the taxonomic and biogeographical implications of the new species is provided. New records in Honduras and Nicaragua are provided for the related Euglossa dodsoni. PMID:22303114

  17. GASTRODIA ANTI-FUNGAL PROTEIN (GAFP) FROM THE ORCHID GASTRODIA ELATA CONFERS RESISTANCE TO MULTIPLE ROOT DISEASE PATHOGENS IN TRANSGENIC TOBACCO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diseases of agricultural crops are caused by pathogens from several higher-order phylogenetic lineages, including Fungi, Straminipila, Eubacteria, and Eetazoa. The lack of broad-spectrum host resistance poses difficulties in managing plant disease without the use of numerous pesticides. Due to its...

  18. [Microscopical examination of leaf sheathes of the Chinese drug "Shihu", herba dendrobii].

    PubMed

    Li, M F; Xu, G J; Xu, L S; Jin, R L; Sha, W L; Luo, J Y

    1989-01-01

    "Shihu", a famous Chinese traditional drug, is used to replenish the vital essence of the lung and stomach, to clear up the excessive heat and to promote the secretion of the body fluid. The commercial crude drugs under the general name "Shihu" are mostly derived from a number of species of the genus Dendrobium. It is difficult to identify exactly the botanical origin of these crude drugs through macroscopical examination. In order to tackle this problem, the leaf sheathes of the stems of 16 species of the genus Dendrobium are examined microscopically and the characteristics of their epidermal cells and calcium oxalate crystals are compared. The diagnostic features found are proved to be useful for the identification of the botanical origin of commercial samples of the "Shihu". In this paper the microscopical characters of 16 Dendrobium species are described with illustration. PMID:2801137

  19. Gravity wave generation in the lower stratosphere due to passage of the typhoon 9426 (Orchid) observed by the MU radar at Shigaraki (34.85°N, 136.10°E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaka, S. K.; Takahashi, M.; Shibagaki, Y.; Yamanaka, M. D.; Fukao, S.

    2003-10-01

    Intense gravity wave activities were investigated in the lower stratosphere during the typhoon 9426. Strong vertical winds were observed just a few hours before the arrival of the typhoon-center at the MU radar site. About 30 min to 1 hour after the typhoon-center had passed, a considerable reduction in vertical wind amplitude was detected. Dominant gravity waves showed time period in the range of 7-8 min, 15 min, and 40-60 min in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. In the vicinity of the central region of the typhoon, a gravity wave was observed, which was monochromatic in nature with a vertical wavelength ˜3 km between 1.5 km and 23 km height. In the lower stratosphere, the horizontal wavelength for the prominent period was detected in the range of 10-15 km (for 15 min wave period) and 25-50 km (for 40-60 min wave period). The vertical wavelength of these waves was examined from 2.5 km to 4.0 km. In the horizontal direction, the intrinsic group velocity was estimated between 9 ± 2 and 11 ± 2 m/s. Near the tropopause, the average direction of group velocity was assessed at about 20° ± 3° from the horizontal. The generation of gravity wave like features, in the lower stratosphere, is believed induced by convection, as the low temperature of the clouds indicates a deep penetration over the radar region as seen in the satellite GMS images.

  20. In vitro propagation and mass scale multiplication of a critically endangered epiphytic orchid, Gastrochilus calceolaris (Buch.-Ham ex J.E.Sm.) D.Don. using immature seeds.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Promila; Piri, Hossein; Vij, S P; Mahant, K C; Chauhan, Shaveta

    2011-09-01

    In vitro asymbiotic seed germination potential of its immature seeds (36 weeks after pollination) of G. calceolaris was successfully tested on three different agar gelled nutrient media i.e. Murashige and Skoog (MS), Mitra et al. (M) and potato dextrose agar (PDA). Seeds germinated within 15.75+/-0.75 to 35.75+/-0.75 days in the three different media. The protocorms developed therefrom subsequently differentiated into first leaf and root primordia, and complete seedlings were obtained within 111.25+/-1.25 to 141.25+/-1.25 days on MS and M media. The protocorms, though failed to differentiate further on basal PDA medium, despite repeated subculturings, incorporation of peptone (P; 1 gl(-1)), yeast extract (YE; 2 gl(-1)) and coconut water (CW; 20%) in the medium proved beneficial in inducing differentiation, in these germinating entities. Additional use of growth additives (P/YE/CW), in general, favoured better germination, protocorm formation and seedling development. The optimal nutritional combination during seed germination, protocorm growth and multiplication and seedling development was found to be CW (10%) enriched MS medium. PMID:21941946

  1. The Gastrodia anti-fungal protein confers increased resistance to Phytophthora root rot and the root-knot nematode in a fruit tree species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Gastrodia Anti-Fungal Protein (GAFP) is a monocot mannose-binding lectin isolated from the Asiatic orchid Gastrodia elata. This protein, among others, enables the orchid to live parasitically off the basidiomycete pathogen Armillaria mellea. GAFP has been shown to confer resistance to transgenic...

  2. Fragrance composition of Dendrophylax lindenii (Orchidaceae) using novel technique applied in situ

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ghost orchid, Dendrophylax lindenii (Lindley) Bentham ex Rolfe (Orchidaceae), is one of North America’s rarest and well-known orchids. Native to Cuba and SW Florida where it frequents shaded swamps as an epiphyte, the species has experienced steady decline. Little information exists on D. linden...

  3. A Comprehensive Review of the Cosmeceutical Benefits of Vanda Species (Orchidaceae).

    PubMed

    Hadi, Hazrina; Razali, Syarifah Nazira Said; Awadh, Ammar Ihsan

    2015-08-01

    Orchidaceae is the largest family of flowering plants with over 35,000 species and 850 genera. About 3300 species of orchids are found in Malaysia and the diversity is highest in the Main, Keledang, Bintang and Tahan Ranges. Apart from being prized for their beauty, orchids have long been used by humans for medicinal purposes. Today the uses of orchids have been expanded to the food and cosmetics industries. Many cosmeceutical companies use orchid extracts as an active ingredient in their products. Previous studies provide riveting insights into the potential uses of orchid extracts as an active agent in cosmetics. This paper describes the cosmeceutical potential of orchids as an anti-aging, and skin moisturizing agent. Orchid extracts from Vanda coerulea and V. teres delay aging caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) following LV irradiation through their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. These extracts also show anti-aging properties by stimulating cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV), which is part of the electron transport chain in mitochondria. Stimulation of cytochrome c oxidase improves the respiratory function of mitochondria in keratinocytes. The presence of mucilage in orchids enables them to maintain skin hydration. Mucilage functions as a moisturizer and emollient due to its high water binding capacity. Additionally, orchid extracts provide skin hydration by stimulating aquaporin 3 (AQP3) and LEKTI protein expression. The presence of AQP3 leads to a five-fold increase in water permeability, which subsequently increases stratum corneum hydration. Increased LEKTI protein expression mediated by orchid extracts reduces the degradation of desmoglein-1 and enhances the structural function of desmosomes, which play important roles in preventing water evaporation. PMID:26434147

  4. The location and translocation of ndh genes of chloroplast origin in the Orchidaceae family.

    PubMed

    Lin, Choun-Sea; Chen, Jeremy J W; Huang, Yao-Ting; Chan, Ming-Tsair; Daniell, Henry; Chang, Wan-Jung; Hsu, Chen-Tran; Liao, De-Chih; Wu, Fu-Huei; Lin, Sheng-Yi; Liao, Chen-Fu; Deyholos, Michael K; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Albert, Victor A; Chou, Ming-Lun; Chen, Chun-Yi; Shih, Ming-Che

    2015-01-01

    The NAD(P)H dehydrogenase complex is encoded by 11 ndh genes in plant chloroplast (cp) genomes. However, ndh genes are truncated or deleted in some autotrophic Epidendroideae orchid cp genomes. To determine the evolutionary timing of the gene deletions and the genomic locations of the various ndh genes in orchids, the cp genomes of Vanilla planifolia, Paphiopedilum armeniacum, Paphiopedilum niveum, Cypripedium formosanum, Habenaria longidenticulata, Goodyera fumata and Masdevallia picturata were sequenced; these genomes represent Vanilloideae, Cypripedioideae, Orchidoideae and Epidendroideae subfamilies. Four orchid cp genome sequences were found to contain a complete set of ndh genes. In other genomes, ndh deletions did not correlate to known taxonomic or evolutionary relationships and deletions occurred independently after the orchid family split into different subfamilies. In orchids lacking cp encoded ndh genes, non cp localized ndh sequences were identified. In Erycina pusilla, at least 10 truncated ndh gene fragments were found transferred to the mitochondrial (mt) genome. The phenomenon of orchid ndh transfer to the mt genome existed in ndh-deleted orchids and also in ndh containing species. PMID:25761566

  5. Birth of space plant growing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mashinskiy, A.; Nechitaylo, G.

    1983-01-01

    The attempts, and successes, to grow plants in space, and get them to fully develop, bloom and produce seeds using orchids are presented. The psychological advantages of the presence of plants onboard space vehicles and space stations is indicated.

  6. 77 FR 34042 - Notice of Receipt of Requests for Amendments to Delete Uses in Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ..., hydroponics, FZB24. tubers, bulbs & corns, interiorscapes, orchids & ferns, & mushroom applications. ] 75624-2 Afla-Guard Aspergillus flavus NRRL Sweet corn & its 21882. commodities. Users of these products...

  7. Asynchronous diversification in a specialized plant-pollinator mutualism.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Santiago R; Eltz, Thomas; Fujiwara, Mikiko K; Gerlach, Günter; Goldman-Huertas, Benjamin; Tsutsui, Neil D; Pierce, Naomi E

    2011-09-23

    Most flowering plants establish mutualistic associations with insect pollinators to facilitate sexual reproduction. However, the evolutionary processes that gave rise to these associations remain poorly understood. We reconstructed the times of divergence, diversification patterns, and interaction networks of a diverse group of specialized orchids and their bee pollinators. In contrast to a scenario of coevolution by race formation, we show that fragrance-producing orchids originated at least three times independently after their fragrance-collecting bee mutualists. Whereas orchid diversification has apparently tracked the diversification of orchids' bee pollinators, bees appear to have depended on the diverse chemical environment of neotropical forests. We corroborated this apparent asymmetrical dependency by simulating co-extinction cascades in real interaction networks that lacked reciprocal specialization. These results suggest that the diversification of insect-pollinated angiosperms may have been facilitated by the exploitation of preexisting sensory biases of insect pollinators. PMID:21940893

  8. Darwin at Orchis Bank: Selection after the Origin.

    PubMed

    Tabb, Kathryn

    2016-02-01

    Darwin's first publication after the Origin of Species was a volume on orchids that expanded on the theory of adaptation through natural selection introduced in his opus. Here I argue that On the Various Contrivances by which British and Foreign Orchids are Fertilised by Insects (1862) is not merely an empirical confirmation of his theory. In response to immediate criticisms of his metaphor of natural selection, Darwin uses Orchids to present adaptation as the result of innumerable natural laws, rather than discrete acts analogous to conscious choices. The means of selection among polliniferous plants cannot be neatly classed under the Origin's categories of artificial, natural, or sexual selection. Along with Darwin's exploration of sexual selection in his later works, Orchids serves to undo the restrictive metaphor so firmly established by the Origin and to win over those of Darwin's contemporaries who were committed advocates of natural law but suspicious of evolution by natural selection. PMID:26694543

  9. Mining from transcriptomes: 315 single-copy orthologous genes concatenated for the phylogenetic analyses of Orchidaceae.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hua; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Lin, Min; Wang, Yan; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2015-09-01

    Phylogenetic relationships are hotspots for orchid studies with controversial standpoints. Traditionally, the phylogenies of orchids are based on morphology and subjective factors. Although more reliable than classic phylogenic analyses, the current methods are based on a few gene markers and PCR amplification, which are labor intensive and cannot identify the placement of some species with degenerated plastid genomes. Therefore, a more efficient, labor-saving and reliable method is needed for phylogenic analysis. Here, we present a method of orchid phylogeny construction using transcriptomes. Ten representative species covering five subfamilies of Orchidaceae were selected, and 315 single-copy orthologous genes extracted from the transcriptomes of these organisms were applied to reconstruct a more robust phylogeny of orchids. This approach provided a rapid and reliable method of phylogeny construction for Orchidaceae, one of the most diversified family of angiosperms. We also showed the rigorous systematic position of holomycotrophic species, which has previously been difficult to determine because of the degenerated plastid genome. We concluded that the method presented in this study is more efficient and reliable than methods based on a few gene markers for phylogenic analyses, especially for the holomycotrophic species or those whose DNA sequences have been difficult to amplify. Meanwhile, a total of 315 single-copy orthologous genes of orchids are offered and more informative loci could be used in the future orchid phylogenetic studies. PMID:26380706

  10. Mining from transcriptomes: 315 single-copy orthologous genes concatenated for the phylogenetic analyses of Orchidaceae

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Hua; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Lin, Min; Wang, Yan; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships are hotspots for orchid studies with controversial standpoints. Traditionally, the phylogenies of orchids are based on morphology and subjective factors. Although more reliable than classic phylogenic analyses, the current methods are based on a few gene markers and PCR amplification, which are labor intensive and cannot identify the placement of some species with degenerated plastid genomes. Therefore, a more efficient, labor-saving and reliable method is needed for phylogenic analysis. Here, we present a method of orchid phylogeny construction using transcriptomes. Ten representative species covering five subfamilies of Orchidaceae were selected, and 315 single-copy orthologous genes extracted from the transcriptomes of these organisms were applied to reconstruct a more robust phylogeny of orchids. This approach provided a rapid and reliable method of phylogeny construction for Orchidaceae, one of the most diversified family of angiosperms. We also showed the rigorous systematic position of holomycotrophic species, which has previously been difficult to determine because of the degenerated plastid genome. We concluded that the method presented in this study is more efficient and reliable than methods based on a few gene markers for phylogenic analyses, especially for the holomycotrophic species or those whose DNA sequences have been difficult to amplify. Meanwhile, a total of 315 single-copy orthologous genes of orchids are offered and more informative loci could be used in the future orchid phylogenetic studies. PMID:26380706

  11. Identity and Specificity of Rhizoctonia-Like Fungi from Different Populations of Liparis japonica (Orchidaceae) in Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Rui; Chen, Xu-Hui; Zhang, Li-Jun; Yu, Xiao-Dan; Qu, Bo; Duan, Ru; Xu, Yu-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Mycorrhizal association is known to be important to orchid species, and a complete understanding of the fungi that form mycorrhizas is required for orchid ecology and conservation. Liparis japonica (Orchidaceae) is a widespread terrestrial photosynthetic orchid in Northeast China. Previously, we found the genetic diversity of this species has been reduced recent years due to habitat destruction and fragmentation, but little was known about the relationship between this orchid species and the mycorrhizal fungi. The Rhizoctonia-like fungi are the commonly accepted mycorrhizal fungi associated with orchids. In this study, the distribution, diversity and specificity of culturable Rhizoctonia-like fungi associated with L. japonica species were investigated from seven populations in Northeast China. Among the 201 endophytic fungal isolates obtained, 86 Rhizoctonia-like fungi were identified based on morphological characters and molecular methods, and the ITS sequences and phylogenetic analysis revealed that all these Rhizoctonia-like fungi fell in the same main clade and were closely related to those of Tulasnella calospora species group. These findings indicated the high mycorrhizal specificity existed in L. japonica species regardless of habitats at least in Northeast China. Our results also supported the wide distribution of this fungal partner, and implied that the decline of L. japonica in Northeast China did not result from high mycorrhizal specificity. Using culture-dependent technology, these mycorrhizal fungal isolates might be important sources for the further utilizing in orchids conservation. PMID:25140872

  12. Proteomic and morphometric study of the in vitro interaction between Oncidium sphacelatum Lindl. (Orchidaceae) and Thanatephorus sp. RG26 (Ceratobasidiaceae).

    PubMed

    López-Chávez, Mariana Yadira; Guillén-Navarro, Karina; Bertolini, Vincenzo; Encarnación, Sergio; Hernández-Ortiz, Magdalena; Sánchez-Moreno, Irene; Damon, Anne

    2016-07-01

    Orchidaceae establish symbiotic relationships with fungi in the Rhizoctonia group, resulting in interactions beneficial to both organisms or in cell destruction in one of them (pathogenicity). Previous studies have focused mostly on terrestrial species with a few, preliminary studies, on epiphytes. To further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in these symbioses, we evaluated the interaction between Oncidium sphacelatum Lindl. and the mycorrhizal fungus Thanatephorus sp. strain RG26 (isolated from a different orchid species) in vitro using morphometric and proteomic analyses. Evidence from the morphometric and microscopic analysis showed that the fungus promoted linear growth and differentiation of orchid protocorms during 98 days interaction. On day 63, protocorm development was evident, so we analyzed the physiological response of both organisms at that moment. Proteome results suggest that orchid development stimulated by the fungus apparently involves cell cycle proteins, purine recycling, ribosome biogenesis, energy metabolism, and secretion that were up-regulated in the orchid; whereas in the fungus, a high expression of proteins implicated in stress response, protein-protein interaction, and saccharides and protein biosynthesis were found in the symbiotic interaction. This is the first work reporting proteins differentially expressed in the epiphytic orchid-fungus interaction and will contribute to the search for molecular markers that will facilitate the study of this symbiosis in both wild orchids and those in danger of extinction. PMID:26732875

  13. Global climate change is confounding species conservation strategies.

    PubMed

    Koopowitz, Harold; Hawkins, Bradford A

    2012-06-01

    Most organisms face similar problems with respect to their conservation in the face of global climate change. Here, we examine probable effects of climate change on the hyperdiverse plant family Orchidaceae. In the 20th century, the major concerns for orchid conservation revolved around unsustainable harvest for the orchid trade and, more importantly, land conversion from natural ecosystems to those unable to support wild orchid populations. Land conversion included logging, fire regimes and forest conversions to agricultural systems. Although those forms of degradation continue, an additional suite of threats has emerged, fueled by global climate change. Global climate change involves more than responses of orchid populations to increases in ambient temperature. Increasing temperature induces secondary effects that can be more significant than simple changes in temperature. Among these new threats are extended and prolonged fire seasons, rising sea levels, increases in cyclonic storms, seasonal climate shifts, changes in orthographic wind dew point and increased drought. The long-term outlook for orchid biodiversity in the wild is dismal, as it is for many animal groups, and we need to start rethinking strategies for conservation in a rapidly changing world. PMID:22691199

  14. Flowers of Cypripedium fargesii (Orchidaceae) fool flat-footed flies (Platypezidae) by faking fungus-infected foliage.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zong-Xin; Li, De-Zhu; Bernhardt, Peter; Wang, Hong

    2011-05-01

    Charles Darwin was fascinated by the orchid-pollinator interactions, but he did not realize that many orchid species are pollinated by deceit. Cypripedium, a model lineage of nonrewarding orchid flowers, is pollinated primarily by bees. Here we present both an example of floral mimesis of fungus-infected foliage in orchids and an example of flat-footed flies (Agathomyia sp.; Platypezidae) as pollen vectors for angiosperms. Cypripedium fargesii is a nectarless, terrestrial, endangered orchid from southwestern China that requires cross-pollination to produce the maximum number of viable embryos. All insects caught entering or leaving the labellum sac were Agathomyia sp. carrying conidia of Cladosporium sp. on their mouthparts and legs, suggesting mycophagy. Blackish hairy spots on the upper surface of foliage may imitate black mold spots, serving as short-term visual lures. Some odor molecules also associated with Cladosporium cultures were isolated in the floral scent. Mimesis of fungus-infected foliage probably represents an overlooked but important option in angiosperm diversification, because there are three to five more Cypripedium spp. in southwestern China with the same mode of floral presentation and black-spotted hairy leaves. PMID:21502502

  15. Variation in Mycorrhizal Associations with Tulasnelloid Fungi among Populations of Five Dactylorhiza Species

    PubMed Central

    Jacquemyn, Hans; Deja, Agnieszka; De hert, Koen; Cachapa Bailarote, Bruno; Lievens, Bart

    2012-01-01

    Background Orchid species rely on mycorrhizal symbioses with fungi to complete their life cycle. Although there is mounting evidence that orchids can associate with several fungi from different clades or families, less is known about the actual geographic distribution of these fungi and how they are distributed across different orchid species within a genus. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated among-population variation in mycorrhizal associations in five species of the genus Dactylorhiza (D. fuchsii, D. incarnata, D. maculata, D. majalis and D. praetermissa) using culture-independent detection and identification techniques enabling simultaneous detection of multiple fungi in a single individual. Mycorrhizal specificity, determined as the number of fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs), and phylogenetic diversity of fungi were compared between species, whereas discriminant analysis was used to compare mycorrhizal spectra across populations and species. Based on a 95% cut-off value in internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence similarity, a total of ten OTUs was identified belonging to three different clades within the Tulasnellaceae. Most OTUs were found in two or more Dactylorhiza species, and some of them were common and widespread, occurring in more than 50% of all sampled populations. Each orchid species associated with at least five different OTUs, whereas most individuals also associated with two or more fungal OTUs at the same time. Phylogenetic diversity, corrected for species richness, was not significantly different between species, confirming the generality of the observed orchid mycorrhizal associations. Conclusions/Significance We found that the investigated species of the genus Dactylorhiza associated with a wide range of fungal OTUs from the Tulasnellaceae, some of which were widespread and common. These findings challenge the idea that orchid rarity is related to mycorrhizal specificity and fungal distribution. PMID:22870305

  16. 33 CFR 110.73b - Indian River at Vero Beach, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...., longitude 80°22′20.6″ W. following the shoreline northward to the northwest point at latitude 27°39′46″ N., longitude 80°22′25.9″ W., thence due east to a point on Orchid Is. at approximately latitude 27°39′46″ N., longitude 80°22′16.2″ W., thence southerly along the shoreline of Orchid Is. to latitude 27°39′32.5″...

  17. 33 CFR 110.73b - Indian River at Vero Beach, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...., longitude 80°22′20.6″ W. following the shoreline northward to the northwest point at latitude 27°39′46″ N., longitude 80°22′25.9″ W., thence due east to a point on Orchid Is. at approximately latitude 27°39′46″ N., longitude 80°22′16.2″ W., thence southerly along the shoreline of Orchid Is. to latitude 27°39′32.5″...

  18. 33 CFR 110.73b - Indian River at Vero Beach, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...., longitude 80°22′20.6″ W. following the shoreline northward to the northwest point at latitude 27°39′46″ N., longitude 80°22′25.9″ W., thence due east to a point on Orchid Is. at approximately latitude 27°39′46″ N., longitude 80°22′16.2″ W., thence southerly along the shoreline of Orchid Is. to latitude 27°39′32.5″...

  19. 33 CFR 110.73b - Indian River at Vero Beach, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...., longitude 80°22′20.6″ W. following the shoreline northward to the northwest point at latitude 27°39′46″ N., longitude 80°22′25.9″ W., thence due east to a point on Orchid Is. at approximately latitude 27°39′46″ N., longitude 80°22′16.2″ W., thence southerly along the shoreline of Orchid Is. to latitude 27°39′32.5″...

  20. As fragile as a bee’s wing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The orchid bee of Brazil’s tropical Atlantic Forest is an incredibly beautiful insect. Some are coppery green; some are iridescent blue, others are like little rainbows, with cobalt blue at the head blending to a rich deep violet at the tip of the abdomen. These jewel-like insects play an enormous ...

  1. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Genes Involved in GA-GID1-DELLA Regulatory Module in Symbiotic and Asymbiotic Seed Germination of Anoectochilus roxburghii (Wall.) Lindl. (Orchidaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Si-Si; Chen, Juan; Li, Shu-Chao; Zeng, Xu; Meng, Zhi-Xia; Guo, Shun-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Anoectochilus roxburghii (Wall.) Lindl. (Orchidaceae) is an endangered medicinal plant in China, also called “King Medicine”. Due to lacking of sufficient nutrients in dust-like seeds, orchid species depend on mycorrhizal fungi for seed germination in the wild. As part of a conservation plan for the species, research on seed germination is necessary. However, the molecular mechanism of seed germination and underlying orchid-fungus interactions during symbiotic germination are poorly understood. In this study, Illumina HiSeq 4000 transcriptome sequencing was performed to generate a substantial sequence dataset of germinating A. roxburghii seed. A mean of 44,214,845 clean reads were obtained from each sample. 173,781 unigenes with a mean length of 653 nt were obtained. A total of 51,514 (29.64%) sequences were annotated, among these, 49 unigenes encoding proteins involved in GA-GID1-DELLA regulatory module, including 31 unigenes involved in GA metabolism pathway, 5 unigenes encoding GID1, 11 unigenes for DELLA and 2 unigenes for GID2. A total of 11,881 genes showed significant differential expression in the symbiotic germinating seed sample compared with the asymbiotic germinating seed sample, of which six were involved in the GA-GID1-DELLA regulatory module, and suggested that they might be induced or suppressed by fungi. These results will help us understand better the molecular mechanism of orchid seed germination and orchid-fungus symbiosis. PMID:26694378

  2. Floral attractants for monitoring pest moths

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many species of moths, including pest species, are known to be attracted to volatile compounds emitted by flowers. Some of the flower species studied included glossy abelia, night-blooming jessamine, three species of Gaura, honeysuckle, lesser butterfly orchid, and Oregongrape. The volatiles relea...

  3. Protocorms and Protocorm-Like Bodies Are Molecularly Distinct from Zygotic Embryonic Tissues in Phalaenopsis aphrodite1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jhun-Chen; Wei, Miao-Ju

    2016-01-01

    The distinct reproductive program of orchids provides a unique evolutionary model with pollination-triggered ovule development and megasporogenesis, a modified embryogenesis program resulting in seeds with immature embryos, and mycorrhiza-induced seed germination. However, the molecular mechanisms that have evolved to establish these unparalleled developmental programs are largely unclear. Here, we conducted comparative studies of genome-wide gene expression of various reproductive tissues and captured the molecular events associated with distinct reproductive programs in Phalaenopsis aphrodite. Importantly, our data provide evidence to demonstrate that protocorm-like body (PLB) regeneration (the clonal regeneration practice used in the orchid industry) does not follow the embryogenesis program. Instead, we propose that SHOOT MERISTEMLESS, a class I KNOTTED-LIKE HOMEOBOX gene, is likely to play a role in PLB regeneration. Our studies challenge the current understanding of the embryonic identity of PLBs. Taken together, the data obtained establish a fundamental framework for orchid reproductive development and provide a valuable new resource to enable the prediction of gene regulatory networks that is required for specialized developmental programs of orchid species. PMID:27338813

  4. The Nose Knows: Biotechnological Production of Vanillin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Remko T.; van Beek, Hugo L.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2012-01-01

    Vanillin, the compound responsible for the well-known vanilla aroma, is almost exclusively produced via a chemical process, with only a small fraction extracted from natural sources, namely, the bean of the orchid "Vanilla planifolia". Research is being done towards a green chemistry process to obtain natural vanillin. A model biotechnological…

  5. Generation and characterization of transgenic plum lines expressing the Gastrodia anti-fungal protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Gastrodia anti-fungal protein (GAFP) is a monocot mannose-binding plant lectin isolated from the Asiatic orchid Gastrodia elata. This lectin has provided documented disease resistance in transgenic tobacco and cotton against several root diseases, but it's potential to confer disease resistance...

  6. Chaotic correlations in barrier billiards with arbitrary barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osbaldestin, A. H.; Adamson, L. N. C.

    2013-06-01

    We study autocorrelation functions in symmetric barrier billiards for golden mean trajectories with arbitrary barriers. Renormalization analysis reveals the presence of a chaotic invariant set and thus that, for a typical barrier, there are chaotic correlations. The chaotic renormalization set is the analogue of the so-called orchid that arises in a generalized Harper equation.

  7. A Collectibles Project: Engaging Students in Authentic Multimodal Research and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moynihan, Karen E.

    2007-01-01

    High school teacher Karen E. Moynihan creates a multimodal project inspired by the creative nonfiction style of "The Orchid Thief" by Susan Orlean. Students choose a collectible item and immerse themselves in the subculture of the collectors. The project includes participation in library and field research, interviews, photography and graphic…

  8. TRANSFER OF ACIDOVORAX AVENAE SUBSPECIES TO MESOTHERMOPHILUS AVENAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bacterium Acidovorax avenae causes disease in a wide range of plants, including, corn, rice, watermelon, melon, pumpkin and orchids. Taxonomic relatedness among strains of plant pathogenic A. avenae subspecies avenae, citrulli, and. cattleyae, and between the plant pathogenic strains and non-phy...

  9. New plant records from Hawai'i Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, Linda W.; Bio, Keali'i F.

    2012-01-01

    The following plant records from the island of Hawai'i include 2 new state records, 6 new island records, 3 new records of naturalized species previously known to be present on the island, and 1 range extension of an orchid recently reported as naturalized. All cited voucher specimens are deposited at BISH.

  10. Regio- and stereoselectivities in plant cell biotransformation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, H.

    1995-12-01

    The ability of plant cultured cells to convert foreign substrates into more useful substances is of considerable interest. Therefore I have studied biotransformation of foreign substrate by plant cell suspension cultures. In this presentation, I report regio- and stereoselectivities in biotransformation of steroids and indole alkaloids and taxol by plant (tobacco, periwinkle, moss, orchid) cell suspension cultures.

  11. Phenylpropanoids from Phragmipedium calurum and their antiproliferative activity

    PubMed Central

    Starks, Courtney M.; Williams, Russell B.; Norman, Vanessa L.; Lawrence, Julie A.; O’Neil-Johnson, Mark; Eldridge, Gary R.

    2012-01-01

    Two new and five known stilbenes and one new alkylresorcinol were isolated from the orchid Phragmipedium calurum during a screen for new anticancer compounds. The compounds were evaluated for antiproliferative activity against multiple human cancer cell lines. Two of the compounds (1 and 7) displayed moderate activity against several cell lines. PMID:22805176

  12. No Rhyme or Reason.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1995-01-01

    Contains a summary of the latest research findings related to the topics of eye development, mimicry, evolution of llamas, hybridization between Arctic wolves and huskies, ultraviolet light and algae, acid rock, orchids and funerals, enzymes that can withstand heat, fungus-killing compounds, chaos theory and the treatment of epileptics, sleep and…

  13. Assembly line plants take root

    SciTech Connect

    Comis, D.; Wood, M.

    1986-04-01

    This paper discussed tissue-culture propagation of sugarcane, apple trees, peach trees, citrus, orchids, data palms, and carrots. Tissue-culture propagation is a term used for a variety of techniques used to grow or genetically modify, preserve, or study plant parts in laboratories, from tissue or even a single cell. The author examined the benefits and commercial applications of this propagation process.

  14. 75 FR 51969 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition to List the Oklahoma...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ...We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce a 90-day finding on a petition to list Calopogon oklahomensis (Oklahoma grass pink orchid) as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act). Based on our review, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that listing the plant species, C.......

  15. Indigenous Empowerment through Collective Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enn, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to an indigenous community that lives in the periphery of Taiwan. The Dao on Orchid Island have had to face serious abuse of their human rights in terms of ecological exploitation and environmental injustice. The article highlights the empowerment of the indigenous group through collective…

  16. Spring Flowers: Harvest of a Sensitive Eye

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Eloise; Levin, Ted

    1978-01-01

    Defining and describing a number of spring flowers, this article includes illustrations and explanations that demonstrate "art and science are born of the same parents". The flowers discussed are skunk cabbage, bellwort, spring beauty, jack-in-the-pulpit, Solomon's seal, wild geranium, showy orchids, moccasin flower, bluets, apple, and Indian…

  17. Protocorms and Protocorm-Like Bodies Are Molecularly Distinct from Zygotic Embryonic Tissues in Phalaenopsis aphrodite.

    PubMed

    Fang, Su-Chiung; Chen, Jhun-Chen; Wei, Miao-Ju

    2016-08-01

    The distinct reproductive program of orchids provides a unique evolutionary model with pollination-triggered ovule development and megasporogenesis, a modified embryogenesis program resulting in seeds with immature embryos, and mycorrhiza-induced seed germination. However, the molecular mechanisms that have evolved to establish these unparalleled developmental programs are largely unclear. Here, we conducted comparative studies of genome-wide gene expression of various reproductive tissues and captured the molecular events associated with distinct reproductive programs in Phalaenopsis aphrodite Importantly, our data provide evidence to demonstrate that protocorm-like body (PLB) regeneration (the clonal regeneration practice used in the orchid industry) does not follow the embryogenesis program. Instead, we propose that SHOOT MERISTEMLESS, a class I KNOTTED-LIKE HOMEOBOX gene, is likely to play a role in PLB regeneration. Our studies challenge the current understanding of the embryonic identity of PLBs. Taken together, the data obtained establish a fundamental framework for orchid reproductive development and provide a valuable new resource to enable the prediction of gene regulatory networks that is required for specialized developmental programs of orchid species. PMID:27338813

  18. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Genes Involved in GA-GID1-DELLA Regulatory Module in Symbiotic and Asymbiotic Seed Germination of Anoectochilus roxburghii (Wall.) Lindl. (Orchidaceae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Si-Si; Chen, Juan; Li, Shu-Chao; Zeng, Xu; Meng, Zhi-Xia; Guo, Shun-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Anoectochilus roxburghii (Wall.) Lindl. (Orchidaceae) is an endangered medicinal plant in China, also called "King Medicine". Due to lacking of sufficient nutrients in dust-like seeds, orchid species depend on mycorrhizal fungi for seed germination in the wild. As part of a conservation plan for the species, research on seed germination is necessary. However, the molecular mechanism of seed germination and underlying orchid-fungus interactions during symbiotic germination are poorly understood. In this study, Illumina HiSeq 4000 transcriptome sequencing was performed to generate a substantial sequence dataset of germinating A. roxburghii seed. A mean of 44,214,845 clean reads were obtained from each sample. 173,781 unigenes with a mean length of 653 nt were obtained. A total of 51,514 (29.64%) sequences were annotated, among these, 49 unigenes encoding proteins involved in GA-GID1-DELLA regulatory module, including 31 unigenes involved in GA metabolism pathway, 5 unigenes encoding GID1, 11 unigenes for DELLA and 2 unigenes for GID2. A total of 11,881 genes showed significant differential expression in the symbiotic germinating seed sample compared with the asymbiotic germinating seed sample, of which six were involved in the GA-GID1-DELLA regulatory module, and suggested that they might be induced or suppressed by fungi. These results will help us understand better the molecular mechanism of orchid seed germination and orchid-fungus symbiosis. PMID:26694378

  19. SEARCHING FOR EXOTIC SPODOPTERA SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used sex pheromone-baited traps to collect native and exotic Spodoptera spp. moths at an orchid nursery in Lake County, FL. Lures for S. eridania, exempta, exigua, frugiperda, littoralis, litura, praefica, and Pseudaletia unipuncta were placed in bucket traps that surrounded the greenhouses of t...

  20. Reproductive isolation and pollination success of rewarding Galearis diantha and non-rewarding Ponerorchis chusua (Orchidaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hai-Qin; Huang, Bao-Qiang; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Kou, Yong; An, De-Jun; Luo, Yi-Bo; Ge, Song

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Increasing evidence challenges the conventional perception that orchids are the most distinct example of floral diversification due to floral or prezygotic isolation. Regarding the relationship between co-flowering plants, rewarding and non-rewarding orchids in particular, few studies have investigated whether non-rewarding plants affect the pollination success of rewarding plants. Here, floral isolation and mutual effects between the rewarding orchid Galearis diantha and the non-rewarding orchid Ponerorchis chusua were investigated. Methods Flowering phenological traits were monitored by noting the opening and wilting dates of the chosen individual plants. The pollinator pool and pollinator behaviour were assessed from field observations. Key morphological traits of the flowers and pollinators were measured directly in the field. Pollinator limitation and interspecific compatibility were evaluated by hand-pollination experiments. Fruit set was surveyed in monospecific and heterospecific plots. Key Results The species had overlapping peak flowering periods. Pollinators of both species displayed a certain degree of constancy in visiting each species, but they also visited other flowers before landing on the focal orchids. A substantial difference in spur size between the species resulted in the deposition of pollen on different regions of the body of the shared pollinator. Hand-pollination experiments revealed that fruit set was strongly pollinator-limited in both species. No significant difference in fruit set was found between monospecific plots and heterospecific plots. Conclusions A combination of mechanical isolation and incomplete ethological isolation eliminates the possibility of pollen transfer between the species. These results do not support either the facilitation or competition hypothesis regarding the effect of nearby rewarding flowers on non-rewarding plants. The absence of a significant effect of non-rewarding P. chusua on

  1. In vivo decontamination of the nerve agent VX using the domestic swine model.

    PubMed

    Misik, Jan; Pavlik, Michal; Novotny, Ladislav; Pavlikova, Ruzena; Chilcott, Robert P; Cabal, Jiri; Kuca, Kamil

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this in vivo study was to assess a new, putatively optimised method for mass casualty decontamination ("ORCHIDS protocol") for effectiveness in removing the chemical warfare agent VX from the skin of anaesthetised, domestic white pigs. ORCHIDS protocol consists of a 1.5-minute shower with a mild detergent (Argos™) supplemented by physical removal. A standard method of wet decontamination was used for comparison. Experimental animals were divided into four groups (A-D). Two groups were exposed to a supra-lethal percutaneous dose (5 × LD(50); 300 μg kg(-1)) of VX for 1 h prior to decontamination with either the ORCHIDS (C) or standard protocol (D). A third (B, positive control) group was exposed but not subject to decontamination. Blank controls (A) received anaesthesia and the corresponding dose of normal saline instead of VX. Observations of the clinical signs of intoxication were supplemented by measurements of whole blood cholinesterase (ChE) performed on samples of arterial blood acquired at 30-minute intervals for the duration of the study (up to 6 h). Untreated (B) animals displayed typical cholinergic signs consistent with VX intoxication (local fasciculation, mastication, salivation, pilo-erection and motor convulsions) and died 165-240 min post exposure. All animals in both decontamination treatment groups (C, D) survived the duration of the study and exhibited less severe signs of cholinergic poisoning. Thus, both the standard and ORCHIDS protocol were demonstrably effective against exposure to the potent nerve agent VX, even after a delay of 1 h. A critical advantage of the ORCHIDS protocol is the relatively short shower duration (1½ min compared to 3 min). In practice, this could substantially improve the rate at which individuals could be decontaminated by emergency responders following exposure to toxic materials such as chemical warfare agents. PMID:22963275

  2. Understanding heterogeneity in the effects of birth weight on adult cognition and wages.

    PubMed

    Justin Cook, C; Fletcher, Jason M

    2015-05-01

    A large economics literature has shown long term impacts of birth weight on adult outcomes, including IQ and earnings that are often robust to sibling or twin fixed effects. We examine potential mechanisms underlying these effects by incorporating findings from the genetics and neuroscience literatures. We use a sample of siblings combined with an "orchids and dandelions hypothesis", where the IQ of genetic dandelions is not affected by in utero nutrition variation but genetic orchids thrive under advantageous conditions and wilt in poor conditions. Indeed, using variation in three candidate genes related to neuroplasticity (APOE, BDNF, and COMT), we find substantial heterogeneity in the associations between birth weight and adult outcomes, where part of the population (i.e., "dandelions") is not affected by birth weight variation. Our results help uncover why birth weight affects adult outcomes. PMID:25770970

  3. Effects of numerical tolerance levels on an atmospheric chemistry model for mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, D.C.; Burns, D.S.; Shuford, J.

    1996-12-31

    A Box Model was developed to investigate the atmospheric oxidation processes of mercury in the environment. Previous results indicated the most important influences on the atmospheric concentration of HgO(g) are (i) the flux of HgO(g) volatilization, which is related to the surface medium, extent of contamination, and temperature, and (ii) the presence of Cl{sub 2} in the atmosphere. The numerical solver which has been incorporated into the ORganic CHemistry Integrated Dispersion (ORCHID) model uses the Livermore Solver of Ordinary Differential Equations (LSODE). In the solution of the ODE`s, LSODE uses numerical tolerances. The tolerances effect computer run time, the relative accuracy of ODE calculated species concentrations and whether or not LSODE converges to a solution using this system of equations. The effects of varying these tolerances on the solution of the box model and the ORCHID model will be discussed.

  4. Pollination by sexual deception-it takes chemistry to work.

    PubMed

    Bohman, Björn; Flematti, Gavin R; Barrow, Russell A; Pichersky, Eran; Peakall, Rod

    2016-08-01

    Semiochemicals are of paramount importance in sexually deceptive plants. These plants sexually lure specific male insects as pollinators by chemical and physical mimicry of the female of the pollinator. The strategy has evolved repeatedly in orchids, with a wide diversity of insect groups exploited. Chemical communication systems confirmed by field bioassays include: alkenes and alkanes in bee pollinated Ophrys species, keto-acid and hydroxy-acids in scoliid wasp pollinated O. speculum, and cyclohexanediones and pyrazines in thynnine wasp pollinated Chiloglottis and Drakaea orchids, respectively. In Ophrys, stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase (SAD) enzymes have been confirmed to control species level variation in alkene double bond position. The production of cyclohexanediones in Chiloglottis unexpectedly depends on UVB light, a phenomenon unknown for other plant specialised metabolites. Potential biosynthetic pathways for other systems are explored, and alternative approaches to further accelerate chemical discovery in sexually deceptive plants are proposed. PMID:27368084

  5. Understanding Heterogeneity in the Effects of Birth Weight on Adult Cognition and Wages

    PubMed Central

    Cook, C. Justin; Fletcher, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    A large economics literature has shown long term impacts of birth weight on adult outcomes, including IQ and earnings that are often robust to sibling or twin fixed effects. We examine potential mechanisms underlying these effects by incorporating findings from the genetics and neuroscience literatures. We use a sample of siblings combined with an “orchids and dandelions hypothesis”, where the IQ of genetic dandelions is not affected by in utero nutrition variation but genetic orchids thrive under advantageous conditions and wilt in poor conditions. Indeed, using variation in three candidate genes related to neuroplasticity (APOE, BDNF, and COMT), we find substantial heterogeneity in the associations between birth weight and adult outcomes, where part of the population (i.e., “dandelions”) is not affected by birth weight variation. Our results help uncover why birth weight affects adult outcomes. PMID:25770970

  6. Telipogon diabolicus (Orchidaceae, Oncidiinae), a new species from southern Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Kolanowska, Marta; Szlachetko, Dariusz L.; Trejo, Ramiro Medina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new species of the orchid genus Telipogon, Telipogon diabolicus, is described and illustrated. The information about its habitat is provided. The novelty resembles Telipogon tabanensis and Telipogon guacamayensis and it is characterized by the translucent flowers, the glabrous, distinctly clawed petals, the transversely elliptic lip, and the gynostemium ornamented with long setose hairs on both sides and shorter hairs at the apex. PMID:27489492

  7. Bulbophyllum pingnanense (Orchidaceae, Epidendroideae, Dendrobiinae), a new species from Fujian, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang-Feng; Lan, Si-Ren; He, Bi-Zhu; Liang, Yi-Chi

    2016-01-01

    A new orchid species, Bulbophyllum pingnanense, is described and illustrated from Fujian, China. It is similar to Bulbophyllum brevipedunculatum and Bulbophyllum albociliatum in vegetative and floral morphology, but it can be distinguished from Bulbophyllum brevipedunculatum by having a longer dorsal sepal with longer white ciliate on margin, longer and lanceolate lateral sepals, and a glabrous lip. It can be distinguished from Bulbophyllum albociliatum by having a shorter inflorescence, and a longer dorsal sepal. PMID:27489491

  8. Briacavatolides D–F, New Briaranes from the Taiwanese Octocoral Briareum excavatum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shang-Kwei; Yeh, Tsun-Tai; Duh, Chang-Yih

    2012-01-01

    In the continued search for novel bioactive substances from the Taiwanese octocoral Briareum excavatum collected at Orchid Island, three new briarane-type diterpenoids, briacavatolides D–F (1–3) were isolated from the acetone extract. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by extensive NMR spectroscopic analysis and physical data. The anti-HCMV (human cytomegalovirus) activity of 1–3 and their cytotoxicity against selected cancer cell lines were evaluated. PMID:23118724

  9. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P.

    1993-08-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts, is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  10. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts