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Sample records for order correlation network

  1. Machine learning using a higher order correlation network

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.C.; Doolen, G.; Chen, H.H.; Sun, G.Z.; Maxwell, T.; Lee, H.Y.

    1986-01-01

    A high-order correlation tensor formalism for neural networks is described. The model can simulate auto associative, heteroassociative, as well as multiassociative memory. For the autoassociative model, simulation results show a drastic increase in the memory capacity and speed over that of the standard Hopfield-like correlation matrix methods. The possibility of using multiassociative memory for a learning universal inference network is also discussed. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Interplay between Graph Topology and Correlations of Third Order in Spiking Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Stojan; Rotter, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The study of processes evolving on networks has recently become a very popular research field, not only because of the rich mathematical theory that underpins it, but also because of its many possible applications, a number of them in the field of biology. Indeed, molecular signaling pathways, gene regulation, predator-prey interactions and the communication between neurons in the brain can be seen as examples of networks with complex dynamics. The properties of such dynamics depend largely on the topology of the underlying network graph. In this work, we want to answer the following question: Knowing network connectivity, what can be said about the level of third-order correlations that will characterize the network dynamics? We consider a linear point process as a model for pulse-coded, or spiking activity in a neuronal network. Using recent results from theory of such processes, we study third-order correlations between spike trains in such a system and explain which features of the network graph (i.e. which topological motifs) are responsible for their emergence. Comparing two different models of network topology-random networks of Erdős-Rényi type and networks with highly interconnected hubs-we find that, in random networks, the average measure of third-order correlations does not depend on the local connectivity properties, but rather on global parameters, such as the connection probability. This, however, ceases to be the case in networks with a geometric out-degree distribution, where topological specificities have a strong impact on average correlations. PMID:27271768

  3. Interplay between Graph Topology and Correlations of Third Order in Spiking Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Jovanović, Stojan

    2016-01-01

    The study of processes evolving on networks has recently become a very popular research field, not only because of the rich mathematical theory that underpins it, but also because of its many possible applications, a number of them in the field of biology. Indeed, molecular signaling pathways, gene regulation, predator-prey interactions and the communication between neurons in the brain can be seen as examples of networks with complex dynamics. The properties of such dynamics depend largely on the topology of the underlying network graph. In this work, we want to answer the following question: Knowing network connectivity, what can be said about the level of third-order correlations that will characterize the network dynamics? We consider a linear point process as a model for pulse-coded, or spiking activity in a neuronal network. Using recent results from theory of such processes, we study third-order correlations between spike trains in such a system and explain which features of the network graph (i.e. which topological motifs) are responsible for their emergence. Comparing two different models of network topology—random networks of Erdős-Rényi type and networks with highly interconnected hubs—we find that, in random networks, the average measure of third-order correlations does not depend on the local connectivity properties, but rather on global parameters, such as the connection probability. This, however, ceases to be the case in networks with a geometric out-degree distribution, where topological specificities have a strong impact on average correlations. PMID:27271768

  4. Sparse low-order interaction network underlies a highly correlated and learnable neural population code

    PubMed Central

    Ganmor, Elad; Segev, Ronen; Schneidman, Elad

    2011-01-01

    Information is carried in the brain by the joint activity patterns of large groups of neurons. Understanding the structure and function of population neural codes is challenging because of the exponential number of possible activity patterns and dependencies among neurons. We report here that for groups of ~100 retinal neurons responding to natural stimuli, pairwise-based models, which were highly accurate for small networks, are no longer sufficient. We show that because of the sparse nature of the neural code, the higher-order interactions can be easily learned using a novel model and that a very sparse low-order interaction network underlies the code of large populations of neurons. Additionally, we show that the interaction network is organized in a hierarchical and modular manner, which hints at scalability. Our results suggest that learnability may be a key feature of the neural code. PMID:21602497

  5. Effects of high-order correlations on personalized recommendations for bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Zhou, Tao; Che, Hong-An; Wang, Bing-Hong; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, we introduce a modified collaborative filtering (MCF) algorithm, which has remarkably higher accuracy than the standard collaborative filtering. In the MCF, instead of the cosine similarity index, the user-user correlations are obtained by a diffusion process. Furthermore, by considering the second-order correlations, we design an effective algorithm that depresses the influence of mainstream preferences. Simulation results show that the algorithmic accuracy, measured by the average ranking score, is further improved by 20.45% and 33.25% in the optimal cases of MovieLens and Netflix data. More importantly, the optimal value λ depends approximately monotonously on the sparsity of the training set. Given a real system, we could estimate the optimal parameter according to the data sparsity, which makes this algorithm easy to be applied. In addition, two significant criteria of algorithmic performance, diversity and popularity, are also taken into account. Numerical results show that as the sparsity increases, the algorithm considering the second-order correlation can outperform the MCF simultaneously in all three criteria.

  6. Correlation in business networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souma, Wataru; Aoyama, Hideaki; Fujiwara, Yoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Kaizoji, Taisei

    2006-10-01

    This paper considers business networks. Through empirical study, we show that business networks display characteristics of small-world networks and scale-free networks. In this paper, we characterize firms as sales and bankruptcy probabilities. A correlation between sales and a correlation between bankruptcy probabilities in business networks are also considered. The results reveal that the correlation between sales depends strongly on the type of network, whereas the correlation between bankruptcy probabilities does so only weakly.

  7. Correlational Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Chandar, Sarath; Khapra, Mitesh M; Larochelle, Hugo; Ravindran, Balaraman

    2016-02-01

    Common representation learning (CRL), wherein different descriptions (or views) of the data are embedded in a common subspace, has been receiving a lot of attention recently. Two popular paradigms here are canonical correlation analysis (CCA)-based approaches and autoencoder (AE)-based approaches. CCA-based approaches learn a joint representation by maximizing correlation of the views when projected to the common subspace. AE-based methods learn a common representation by minimizing the error of reconstructing the two views. Each of these approaches has its own advantages and disadvantages. For example, while CCA-based approaches outperform AE-based approaches for the task of transfer learning, they are not as scalable as the latter. In this work, we propose an AE-based approach, correlational neural network (CorrNet), that explicitly maximizes correlation among the views when projected to the common subspace. Through a series of experiments, we demonstrate that the proposed CorrNet is better than AE and CCA with respect to its ability to learn correlated common representations. We employ CorrNet for several cross-language tasks and show that the representations learned using it perform better than the ones learned using other state-of-the-art approaches. PMID:26654210

  8. Lagged correlation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curme, Chester

    Technological advances have provided scientists with large high-dimensional datasets that describe the behaviors of complex systems: from the statistics of energy levels in complex quantum systems, to the time-dependent transcription of genes, to price fluctuations among assets in a financial market. In this environment, where it may be difficult to infer the joint distribution of the data, network science has flourished as a way to gain insight into the structure and organization of such systems by focusing on pairwise interactions. This work focuses on a particular setting, in which a system is described by multivariate time series data. We consider time-lagged correlations among elements in this system, in such a way that the measured interactions among elements are asymmetric. Finally, we allow these interactions to be characteristically weak, so that statistical uncertainties may be important to consider when inferring the structure of the system. We introduce a methodology for constructing statistically validated networks to describe such a system, extend the methodology to accommodate interactions with a periodic component, and show how consideration of bipartite community structures in these networks can aid in the construction of robust statistical models. An example of such a system is a financial market, in which high frequency returns data may be used to describe contagion, or the spreading of shocks in price among assets. These data provide the experimental testing ground for our methodology. We study NYSE data from both the present day and one decade ago, examine the time scales over which the validated lagged correlation networks exist, and relate differences in the topological properties of the networks to an increasing economic efficiency. We uncover daily periodicities in the validated interactions, and relate our findings to explanations of the Epps Effect, an empirical phenomenon of financial time series. We also study bipartite community

  9. Correlation dimension of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Lacasa, Lucas; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús

    2013-04-19

    We propose a new measure to characterize the dimension of complex networks based on the ergodic theory of dynamical systems. This measure is derived from the correlation sum of a trajectory generated by a random walker navigating the network, and extends the classical Grassberger-Procaccia algorithm to the context of complex networks. The method is validated with reliable results for both synthetic networks and real-world networks such as the world air-transportation network or urban networks, and provides a computationally fast way for estimating the dimensionality of networks which only relies on the local information provided by the walkers. PMID:23679650

  10. Higher-order organization of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Benson, Austin R; Gleich, David F; Leskovec, Jure

    2016-07-01

    Networks are a fundamental tool for understanding and modeling complex systems in physics, biology, neuroscience, engineering, and social science. Many networks are known to exhibit rich, lower-order connectivity patterns that can be captured at the level of individual nodes and edges. However, higher-order organization of complex networks--at the level of small network subgraphs--remains largely unknown. Here, we develop a generalized framework for clustering networks on the basis of higher-order connectivity patterns. This framework provides mathematical guarantees on the optimality of obtained clusters and scales to networks with billions of edges. The framework reveals higher-order organization in a number of networks, including information propagation units in neuronal networks and hub structure in transportation networks. Results show that networks exhibit rich higher-order organizational structures that are exposed by clustering based on higher-order connectivity patterns. PMID:27387949

  11. Theory of correlations in stochastic neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Iris; Sompolinsky, Haim

    1994-10-01

    One of the main experimental tools in probing the interactions between neurons has been the measurement of the correlations in their activity. In general, however, the interpretation of the observed correlations is difficult since the correlation between a pair of neurons is influenced not only by the direct interaction between them but also by the dynamic state of the entire network to which they belong. Thus a comparison between the observed correlations and the predictions from specific model networks is needed. In this paper we develop a theory of neuronal correlation functions in large networks comprising several highly connected subpopulations and obeying stochastic dynamic rules. When the networks are in asynchronous states, the cross correlations are relatively weak, i.e., their amplitude relative to that of the autocorrelations is of order of 1/N, N being the size of the interacting populations. Using the weakness of the cross correlations, general equations that express the matrix of cross correlations in terms of the mean neuronal activities and the effective interaction matrix are presented. The effective interactions are the synaptic efficacies multiplied by the gain of the postsynaptic neurons. The time-delayed cross-correlation matrix can be expressed as a sum of exponentially decaying modes that correspond to the (nonorthogonal) eigenvectors of the effective interaction matrix. The theory is extended to networks with random connectivity, such as randomly dilute networks. This allows for a comparison between the contribution from the internal common input and that from the direct interactions to the correlations of monosynaptically coupled pairs. A closely related quantity is the linear response of the neurons to external time-dependent perturbations. We derive the form of the dynamic linear response function of neurons in the above architecture in terms of the eigenmodes of the effective interaction matrix. The behavior of the correlations and the

  12. Percolation on correlated random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliari, E.; Cioli, C.; Guadagnini, E.

    2011-09-01

    We consider a class of random, weighted networks, obtained through a redefinition of patterns in an Hopfield-like model, and, by performing percolation processes, we get information about topology and resilience properties of the networks themselves. Given the weighted nature of the graphs, different kinds of bond percolation can be studied: stochastic (deleting links randomly) and deterministic (deleting links based on rank weights), each mimicking a different physical process. The evolution of the network is accordingly different, as evidenced by the behavior of the largest component size and of the distribution of cluster sizes. In particular, we can derive that weak ties are crucial in order to maintain the graph connected and that, when they are the most prone to failure, the giant component typically shrinks without abruptly breaking apart; these results have been recently evidenced in several kinds of social networks.

  13. Robustness of networks of networks with degree-degree correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byungjoon; Canals, Santiago; Makse, Hernan

    Many real-world complex systems ranging from critical infrastructure and transportation networks to living systems including brain and cellular networks are not formed by an isolated network but by a network of networks. Randomly coupled networks with interdependency between different networks may easily result in abrupt collapse. Here, we seek a possible explanation of stable functioning in natural networks of networks including functional brain networks. Specifically, we analyze the robustness of networks of networks focused on one-to-many interconnections between different networks and degree-degree correlation. Implication of the network robustness on functional brain networks of rats is also discussed.

  14. Quantum correlations with no causal order

    PubMed Central

    Oreshkov, Ognyan; Costa, Fabio; Brukner, Časlav

    2012-01-01

    The idea that events obey a definite causal order is deeply rooted in our understanding of the world and at the basis of the very notion of time. But where does causal order come from, and is it a necessary property of nature? Here, we address these questions from the standpoint of quantum mechanics in a new framework for multipartite correlations that does not assume a pre-defined global causal structure but only the validity of quantum mechanics locally. All known situations that respect causal order, including space-like and time-like separated experiments, are captured by this framework in a unified way. Surprisingly, we find correlations that cannot be understood in terms of definite causal order. These correlations violate a 'causal inequality' that is satisfied by all space-like and time-like correlations. We further show that in a classical limit causal order always arises, which suggests that space-time may emerge from a more fundamental structure in a quantum-to-classical transition. PMID:23033068

  15. Modeling Higher-Order Correlations within Cortical Microcolumns

    PubMed Central

    Köster, Urs; Sohl-Dickstein, Jascha; Gray, Charles M.; Olshausen, Bruno A.

    2014-01-01

    We statistically characterize the population spiking activity obtained from simultaneous recordings of neurons across all layers of a cortical microcolumn. Three types of models are compared: an Ising model which captures pairwise correlations between units, a Restricted Boltzmann Machine (RBM) which allows for modeling of higher-order correlations, and a semi-Restricted Boltzmann Machine which is a combination of Ising and RBM models. Model parameters were estimated in a fast and efficient manner using minimum probability flow, and log likelihoods were compared using annealed importance sampling. The higher-order models reveal localized activity patterns which reflect the laminar organization of neurons within a cortical column. The higher-order models also outperformed the Ising model in log-likelihood: On populations of 20 cells, the RBM had 10% higher log-likelihood (relative to an independent model) than a pairwise model, increasing to 45% gain in a larger network with 100 spatiotemporal elements, consisting of 10 neurons over 10 time steps. We further removed the need to model stimulus-induced correlations by incorporating a peri-stimulus time histogram term, in which case the higher order models continued to perform best. These results demonstrate the importance of higher-order interactions to describe the structure of correlated activity in cortical networks. Boltzmann Machines with hidden units provide a succinct and effective way to capture these dependencies without increasing the difficulty of model estimation and evaluation. PMID:24991969

  16. Correlated genotypes in friendship networks

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, James H.; Settle, Jaime E.; Christakis, Nicholas A.

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that humans tend to associate with other humans who have similar characteristics, but it is unclear whether this tendency has consequences for the distribution of genotypes in a population. Although geneticists have shown that populations tend to stratify genetically, this process results from geographic sorting or assortative mating, and it is unknown whether genotypes may be correlated as a consequence of nonreproductive associations or other processes. Here, we study six available genotypes from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to test for genetic similarity between friends. Maps of the friendship networks show clustering of genotypes and, after we apply strict controls for population stratification, the results show that one genotype is positively correlated (homophily) and one genotype is negatively correlated (heterophily). A replication study in an independent sample from the Framingham Heart Study verifies that DRD2 exhibits significant homophily and that CYP2A6 exhibits significant heterophily. These unique results show that homophily and heterophily obtain on a genetic (indeed, an allelic) level, which has implications for the study of population genetics and social behavior. In particular, the results suggest that association tests should include friends’ genes and that theories of evolution should take into account the fact that humans might, in some sense, be metagenomic with respect to the humans around them. PMID:21245293

  17. Higher-Order Neural Networks Recognize Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Max B.; Spirkovska, Lilly; Ochoa, Ellen

    1996-01-01

    Networks of higher order have enhanced capabilities to distinguish between different two-dimensional patterns and to recognize those patterns. Also enhanced capabilities to "learn" patterns to be recognized: "trained" with far fewer examples and, therefore, in less time than necessary to train comparable first-order neural networks.

  18. Representing higher-order dependencies in networks

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Wickramarathne, Thanuka L.; Chawla, Nitesh V.

    2016-01-01

    To ensure the correctness of network analysis methods, the network (as the input) has to be a sufficiently accurate representation of the underlying data. However, when representing sequential data from complex systems, such as global shipping traffic or Web clickstream traffic as networks, conventional network representations that implicitly assume the Markov property (first-order dependency) can quickly become limiting. This assumption holds that, when movements are simulated on the network, the next movement depends only on the current node, discounting the fact that the movement may depend on several previous steps. However, we show that data derived from many complex systems can show up to fifth-order dependencies. In these cases, the oversimplifying assumption of the first-order network representation can lead to inaccurate network analysis results. To address this problem, we propose the higher-order network (HON) representation that can discover and embed variable orders of dependencies in a network representation. Through a comprehensive empirical evaluation and analysis, we establish several desirable characteristics of HON, including accuracy, scalability, and direct compatibility with the existing suite of network analysis methods. We illustrate how HON can be applied to a broad variety of tasks, such as random walking, clustering, and ranking, and we demonstrate that, by using it as input, HON yields more accurate results without any modification to these tasks. PMID:27386539

  19. Entropy and order in urban street networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, Agust; Mohajeri, Nahid

    2013-11-01

    Many complex networks erase parts of their geometry as they develop, so that their evolution is difficult to quantify and trace. Here we introduce entropy measures for quantifying the complexity of street orientations and length variations within planar networks and apply them to the street networks of 41 British cities, whose geometric evolution over centuries can be explored. The results show that the street networks of the old central parts of the cities have lower orientation/length entropies - the streets are more tightly ordered and form denser networks - than the outer and more recent parts. Entropy and street length increase, because of spreading, with distance from the network centre. Tracing the 400-year evolution of one network indicates growth through densification (streets are added within the existing network) and expansion (streets are added at the margin of the network) and a gradual increase in entropy over time.

  20. Measuring and modeling correlations in multiplex networks.

    PubMed

    Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2015-09-01

    The interactions among the elementary components of many complex systems can be qualitatively different. Such systems are therefore naturally described in terms of multiplex or multilayer networks, i.e., networks where each layer stands for a different type of interaction between the same set of nodes. There is today a growing interest in understanding when and why a description in terms of a multiplex network is necessary and more informative than a single-layer projection. Here we contribute to this debate by presenting a comprehensive study of correlations in multiplex networks. Correlations in node properties, especially degree-degree correlations, have been thoroughly studied in single-layer networks. Here we extend this idea to investigate and characterize correlations between the different layers of a multiplex network. Such correlations are intrinsically multiplex, and we first study them empirically by constructing and analyzing several multiplex networks from the real world. In particular, we introduce various measures to characterize correlations in the activity of the nodes and in their degree at the different layers and between activities and degrees. We show that real-world networks exhibit indeed nontrivial multiplex correlations. For instance, we find cases where two layers of the same multiplex network are positively correlated in terms of node degrees, while other two layers are negatively correlated. We then focus on constructing synthetic multiplex networks, proposing a series of models to reproduce the correlations observed empirically and/or to assess their relevance. PMID:26465526

  1. Measuring and modeling correlations in multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2015-09-01

    The interactions among the elementary components of many complex systems can be qualitatively different. Such systems are therefore naturally described in terms of multiplex or multilayer networks, i.e., networks where each layer stands for a different type of interaction between the same set of nodes. There is today a growing interest in understanding when and why a description in terms of a multiplex network is necessary and more informative than a single-layer projection. Here we contribute to this debate by presenting a comprehensive study of correlations in multiplex networks. Correlations in node properties, especially degree-degree correlations, have been thoroughly studied in single-layer networks. Here we extend this idea to investigate and characterize correlations between the different layers of a multiplex network. Such correlations are intrinsically multiplex, and we first study them empirically by constructing and analyzing several multiplex networks from the real world. In particular, we introduce various measures to characterize correlations in the activity of the nodes and in their degree at the different layers and between activities and degrees. We show that real-world networks exhibit indeed nontrivial multiplex correlations. For instance, we find cases where two layers of the same multiplex network are positively correlated in terms of node degrees, while other two layers are negatively correlated. We then focus on constructing synthetic multiplex networks, proposing a series of models to reproduce the correlations observed empirically and/or to assess their relevance.

  2. Ghost imaging with thermal light by third-order correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Yanfeng; Han Shensheng

    2007-10-15

    Ghost imaging with classical incoherent light by third-order correlation is investigated. We discuss the similarities and the differences between ghost imaging by third-order correlation and by second-order correlation, and analyze the effect from each correlation part of the third-order correlation function on the imaging process. It is shown that the third-order correlated imaging includes richer correlated imaging effects than the second-order correlated one, while the imaging information originates mainly from the correlation of the intensity fluctuations between the test detector and each reference detector, as does ghost imaging by second-order correlation.

  3. Earthquake correlations and networks: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna Mohan, T. R.; Revathi, P. G.

    2011-04-15

    We quantify the correlation between earthquakes and use the same to extract causally connected earthquake pairs. Our correlation metric is a variation on the one introduced by Baiesi and Paczuski [M. Baiesi and M. Paczuski, Phys. Rev. E 69, 066106 (2004)]. A network of earthquakes is then constructed from the time-ordered catalog and with links between the more correlated ones. A list of recurrences to each of the earthquakes is identified employing correlation thresholds to demarcate the most meaningful ones in each cluster. Data pertaining to three different seismic regions (viz., California, Japan, and the Himalayas) are comparatively analyzed using such a network model. The distribution of recurrence lengths and recurrence times are two of the key features analyzed to draw conclusions about the universal aspects of such a network model. We find that the unimodal feature of recurrence length distribution, which helps to associate typical rupture lengths with different magnitude earthquakes, is robust across the different seismic regions. The out-degree of the networks shows a hub structure rooted on the large magnitude earthquakes. In-degree distribution is seen to be dependent on the density of events in the neighborhood. Power laws, with two regimes having different exponents, are obtained with recurrence time distribution. The first regime confirms the Omori law for aftershocks while the second regime, with a faster falloff for the larger recurrence times, establishes that pure spatial recurrences also follow a power-law distribution. The crossover to the second power-law regime can be taken to be signaling the end of the aftershock regime in an objective fashion.

  4. Percolation of secret correlations in a network

    SciTech Connect

    Leverrier, Anthony; Garcia-Patron, Raul

    2011-09-15

    In this work, we explore the analogy between entanglement and secret classical correlations in the context of large networks--more precisely, the question of percolation of secret correlations in a network. It is known that entanglement percolation in quantum networks can display a highly nontrivial behavior depending on the topology of the network and on the presence of entanglement between the nodes. Here we show that this behavior, thought to be of a genuine quantum nature, also occurs in a classical context.

  5. The Correlation Fractal Dimension of Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingyuan; Liu, Zhenzhen; Wang, Mogei

    2013-05-01

    The fractality of complex networks is studied by estimating the correlation dimensions of the networks. Comparing with the previous algorithms of estimating the box dimension, our algorithm achieves a significant reduction in time complexity. For four benchmark cases tested, that is, the Escherichia coli (E. Coli) metabolic network, the Homo sapiens protein interaction network (H. Sapiens PIN), the Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein interaction network (S. Cerevisiae PIN) and the World Wide Web (WWW), experiments are provided to demonstrate the validity of our algorithm.

  6. Correlated edge overlaps in multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Gareth J.; Bianconi, Ginestra; da Costa, Rui A.; Dorogovtsev, Sergey N.; Mendes, José F. F.

    2016-07-01

    We develop the theory of sparse multiplex networks with partially overlapping links based on their local treelikeness. This theory enables us to find the giant mutually connected component in a two-layer multiplex network with arbitrary correlations between connections of different types. We find that correlations between the overlapping and nonoverlapping links markedly change the phase diagram of the system, leading to multiple hybrid phase transitions. For assortative correlations we observe recurrent hybrid phase transitions.

  7. Correlated edge overlaps in multiplex networks.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Gareth J; Bianconi, Ginestra; da Costa, Rui A; Dorogovtsev, Sergey N; Mendes, José F F

    2016-07-01

    We develop the theory of sparse multiplex networks with partially overlapping links based on their local treelikeness. This theory enables us to find the giant mutually connected component in a two-layer multiplex network with arbitrary correlations between connections of different types. We find that correlations between the overlapping and nonoverlapping links markedly change the phase diagram of the system, leading to multiple hybrid phase transitions. For assortative correlations we observe recurrent hybrid phase transitions. PMID:27575144

  8. Network robustness of multiplex networks with interlayer degree correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byungjoon; Yi, Su Do; Lee, Kyu-Min; Goh, K.-I.

    2014-04-01

    We study the robustness properties of multiplex networks consisting of multiple layers of distinct types of links, focusing on the role of correlations between degrees of a node in different layers. We use generating function formalism to address various notions of the network robustness relevant to multiplex networks, such as the resilience of ordinary and mutual connectivity under random or targeted node removals, as well as the biconnectivity. We found that correlated coupling can affect the structural robustness of multiplex networks in diverse fashion. For example, for maximally correlated duplex networks, all pairs of nodes in the giant component are connected via at least two independent paths and network structure is highly resilient to random failure. In contrast, anticorrelated duplex networks are on one hand robust against targeted attack on high-degree nodes, but on the other hand they can be vulnerable to random failure.

  9. Change Point Detection in Correlation Networks

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Ian; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka

    2016-01-01

    Many systems of interacting elements can be conceptualized as networks, where network nodes represent the elements and network ties represent interactions between the elements. In systems where the underlying network evolves, it is useful to determine the points in time where the network structure changes significantly as these may correspond to functional change points. We propose a method for detecting change points in correlation networks that, unlike previous change point detection methods designed for time series data, requires minimal distributional assumptions. We investigate the difficulty of change point detection near the boundaries of the time series in correlation networks and study the power of our method and competing methods through simulation. We also show the generalizable nature of the method by applying it to stock price data as well as fMRI data. PMID:26739105

  10. Using Neural Networks to Describe Tracer Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lary, D. J.; Mueller, M. D.; Mussa, H. Y.

    2003-01-01

    Neural networks are ideally suited to describe the spatial and temporal dependence of tracer-tracer correlations. The neural network performs well even in regions where the correlations are less compact and normally a family of correlation curves would be required. For example, the CH4-N2O correlation can be well described using a neural network trained with the latitude, pressure, time of year, and CH4 volume mixing ratio (v.m.r.). In this study a neural network using Quickprop learning and one hidden layer with eight nodes was able to reproduce the CH4-N2O correlation with a correlation co- efficient of 0.9995. Such an accurate representation of tracer-tracer correlations allows more use to be made of long-term datasets to constrain chemical models. Such as the dataset from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) which has continuously observed CH4, (but not N2O) from 1991 till the present. The neural network Fortran code used is available for download.

  11. Synchronization from Second Order Network Connectivity Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liqiong; Beverlin, Bryce; Netoff, Theoden; Nykamp, Duane Q.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate how network structure can influence the tendency for a neuronal network to synchronize, or its synchronizability, independent of the dynamical model for each neuron. The synchrony analysis takes advantage of the framework of second order networks, which defines four second order connectivity statistics based on the relative frequency of two-connection network motifs. The analysis identifies two of these statistics, convergent connections, and chain connections, as highly influencing the synchrony. Simulations verify that synchrony decreases with the frequency of convergent connections and increases with the frequency of chain connections. These trends persist with simulations of multiple models for the neuron dynamics and for different types of networks. Surprisingly, divergent connections, which determine the fraction of shared inputs, do not strongly influence the synchrony. The critical role of chains, rather than divergent connections, in influencing synchrony can be explained by their increasing the effective coupling strength. The decrease of synchrony with convergent connections is primarily due to the resulting heterogeneity in firing rates. PMID:21779239

  12. Modular networks of word correlations on Twitter

    PubMed Central

    Mathiesen, Joachim; Yde, Pernille; Jensen, Mogens H.

    2012-01-01

    Complex networks are important tools for analyzing the information flow in many aspects of nature and human society. Using data from the microblogging service Twitter, we study networks of correlations in the occurrence of words from three different categories, international brands, nouns and US major cities. We create networks where the strength of links is determined by a similarity measure based on the rate of co-occurrences of words. In comparison with the null model, where words are assumed to be uncorrelated, the heavy-tailed distribution of pair correlations is shown to be a consequence of groups of words representing similar entities. PMID:23139863

  13. Higher-order aggregate networks in the analysis of temporal networks: path structures and centralities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtes, Ingo; Wider, Nicolas; Garas, Antonios

    2016-03-01

    Despite recent advances in the study of temporal networks, the analysis of time-stamped network data is still a fundamental challenge. In particular, recent studies have shown that correlations in the ordering of links crucially alter causal topologies of temporal networks, thus invalidating analyses based on static, time-aggregated representations of time-stamped data. These findings not only highlight an important dimension of complexity in temporal networks, but also call for new network-analytic methods suitable to analyze complex systems with time-varying topologies. Addressing this open challenge, here we introduce a novel framework for the study of path-based centralities in temporal networks. Studying betweenness, closeness and reach centrality, we first show than an application of these measures to time-aggregated, static representations of temporal networks yields misleading results about the actual importance of nodes. To overcome this problem, we define path-based centralities in higher-order aggregate networks, a recently proposed generalization of the commonly used static representation of time-stamped data. Using data on six empirical temporal networks, we show that the resulting higher-order measures better capture the true, temporal centralities of nodes. Our results demonstrate that higher-order aggregate networks constitute a powerful abstraction, with broad perspectives for the design of new, computationally efficient data mining techniques for time-stamped relational data.

  14. Coevolution and Correlated Multiplexity in Multiplex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Yeol; Goh, K.-I.

    2013-08-01

    Distinct channels of interaction in a complex networked system define network layers, which coexist and cooperate for the system’s function. Towards understanding such multiplex systems, we propose a modeling framework based on coevolution of network layers, with a class of minimalistic growing network models as working examples. We examine how the entangled growth of coevolving layers can shape the network structure and show analytically and numerically that the coevolution can induce strong degree correlations across layers, as well as modulate degree distributions. We further show that such a coevolution-induced correlated multiplexity can alter the system’s response to the dynamical process, exemplified by the suppressed susceptibility to a social cascade process.

  15. Order Parameters for Two-Dimensional Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatz, Forrest; Bultheel, Adhemar; Egami, Takeshi

    2007-10-01

    We derive methods that explain how to quantify the amount of order in ``ordered'' and ``highly ordered'' porous arrays. Ordered arrays from bee honeycomb and several from the general field of nanoscience are compared. Accurate measures of the order in porous arrays are made using the discrete pair distribution function (PDF) and the Debye-Waller Factor (DWF) from 2-D discrete Fourier transforms calculated from the real-space data using MATLAB routines. An order parameter, OP3, is defined from the PDF to evaluate the total order in a given array such that an ideal network has the value of 1. When we compare PDFs of man-made arrays with that of our honeycomb we find OP3=0.399 for the honeycomb and OP3=0.572 for man's best hexagonal array. The DWF also scales with this order parameter with the least disorder from a computer-generated hexagonal array and the most disorder from a random array. An ideal hexagonal array normalizes a two-dimensional Fourier transform from which a Debye-Waller parameter is derived which describes the disorder in the arrays. An order parameter S, defined by the DWF, takes values from [0, 1] and for the analyzed man-made array is 0.90, while for the honeycomb it is 0.65. This presentation describes methods to quantify the order found in these arrays.

  16. Node Survival in Networks under Correlated Attacks.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yan; Armbruster, Dieter; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    We study the interplay between correlations, dynamics, and networks for repeated attacks on a socio-economic network. As a model system we consider an insurance scheme against disasters that randomly hit nodes, where a node in need receives support from its network neighbors. The model is motivated by gift giving among the Maasai called Osotua. Survival of nodes under different disaster scenarios (uncorrelated, spatially, temporally and spatio-temporally correlated) and for different network architectures are studied with agent-based numerical simulations. We find that the survival rate of a node depends dramatically on the type of correlation of the disasters: Spatially and spatio-temporally correlated disasters increase the survival rate; purely temporally correlated disasters decrease it. The type of correlation also leads to strong inequality among the surviving nodes. We introduce the concept of disaster masking to explain some of the results of our simulations. We also analyze the subsets of the networks that were activated to provide support after fifty years of random disasters. They show qualitative differences for the different disaster scenarios measured by path length, degree, clustering coefficient, and number of cycles. PMID:25932635

  17. Node Survival in Networks under Correlated Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yan; Armbruster, Dieter; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    We study the interplay between correlations, dynamics, and networks for repeated attacks on a socio-economic network. As a model system we consider an insurance scheme against disasters that randomly hit nodes, where a node in need receives support from its network neighbors. The model is motivated by gift giving among the Maasai called Osotua. Survival of nodes under different disaster scenarios (uncorrelated, spatially, temporally and spatio-temporally correlated) and for different network architectures are studied with agent-based numerical simulations. We find that the survival rate of a node depends dramatically on the type of correlation of the disasters: Spatially and spatio-temporally correlated disasters increase the survival rate; purely temporally correlated disasters decrease it. The type of correlation also leads to strong inequality among the surviving nodes. We introduce the concept of disaster masking to explain some of the results of our simulations. We also analyze the subsets of the networks that were activated to provide support after fifty years of random disasters. They show qualitative differences for the different disaster scenarios measured by path length, degree, clustering coefficient, and number of cycles. PMID:25932635

  18. Learning Bayesian Networks from Correlated Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Harold; Monti, Stefano; Montano, Monty; Steinberg, Martin H.; Perls, Thomas T.; Sebastiani, Paola

    2016-05-01

    Bayesian networks are probabilistic models that represent complex distributions in a modular way and have become very popular in many fields. There are many methods to build Bayesian networks from a random sample of independent and identically distributed observations. However, many observational studies are designed using some form of clustered sampling that introduces correlations between observations within the same cluster and ignoring this correlation typically inflates the rate of false positive associations. We describe a novel parameterization of Bayesian networks that uses random effects to model the correlation within sample units and can be used for structure and parameter learning from correlated data without inflating the Type I error rate. We compare different learning metrics using simulations and illustrate the method in two real examples: an analysis of genetic and non-genetic factors associated with human longevity from a family-based study, and an example of risk factors for complications of sickle cell anemia from a longitudinal study with repeated measures.

  19. Competing Orders in Strongly Correlated Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Ganesh

    Systems with competing orders are of great interest in condensed matter physics. When two phases have comparable energies, novel interplay effects such can be induced by tuning an appropriate parameter. In this thesis, we study two problems of competing orders - (i) ultracold atom gases with competing superfluidity and Charge Density Wave (CDW) orders, and (ii) low dimensional antiferromagnets with Neel order competing against various disordered ground states. In the first part of the thesis, we study the attractive Hubbard model which could soon be realized in ultracold atom experiments. Close to half-filling, the superfluid ground state competes with a low-lying CDW phase. We study the collective excitations of the superfluid using the Generalized Random Phase Approximation (GRPA) and strong-coupling spin wave analysis. The competing CDW phase manifests as a roton-like excitation. We characterize the collective mode spectrum, setting benchmarks for experiments. We drive competition between orders by imposing superfluid flow. Superflow leads to various instabilities: in particular, we find a dynamical instability associated with CDW order. We also find a novel dynamical incommensurate instability analogous to exciton condensation in semiconductors. In the second part, inspired by experiments on Bi3Mn 4O12(NO3)(BMNO), we first study the interlayer dimer state in spin-S bilayer antiferromagnets. At a critical bilayer coupling strength, condensation of triplet excitations leads to Neel order. In describing this transition, bond operator mean field theory suffers from systematic deviations. We bridge these deviations by taking into account corrections arising from higher spin excitations. The interlayer dimer state shows a field induced Neel transition, as seen in BMNO. Our results are relevant to the quantitative modelling of spin-S dimerized systems. We then study the J1 - J2 model on the honeycomb lattice with frustrating next-nearest neighbour exchange. For J2 >J1

  20. High-order correlation of chaotic bosons and fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong-Chao

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically study the high-order correlation functions of chaotic bosons and fermions. Based on the different parity of the Stirling number, the products of the first-order correlation functions are well classified and employed to represent the high-order correlation function. The correlation of bosons conduces a bunching effect, which will be enhanced as order N increases. Different from bosons, the anticommutation relation of fermions leads to the parity of the Stirling number, which thereby results in a mixture of bunching and antibunching behaviors in high-order correlation. By further investigating third-order ghost diffraction and ghost imaging, the differences between the high-order correlations of bosons and fermions are discussed in detail. A larger N will dramatically improve the ghost image quality for bosons, but a good strategy should be carefully chosen for the fermionic ghost imaging process due to its complex correlation components.

  1. Dynamics on modular networks with heterogeneous correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Melnik, Sergey; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.; Gleeson, James P.

    2014-06-15

    We develop a new ensemble of modular random graphs in which degree-degree correlations can be different in each module, and the inter-module connections are defined by the joint degree-degree distribution of nodes for each pair of modules. We present an analytical approach that allows one to analyze several types of binary dynamics operating on such networks, and we illustrate our approach using bond percolation, site percolation, and the Watts threshold model. The new network ensemble generalizes existing models (e.g., the well-known configuration model and Lancichinetti-Fortunato-Radicchi networks) by allowing a heterogeneous distribution of degree-degree correlations across modules, which is important for the consideration of nonidentical interacting networks.

  2. A Novel Higher Order Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuxiang

    2010-05-01

    In this paper a new Higher Order Neural Network (HONN) model is introduced and applied in several data mining tasks. Data Mining extracts hidden patterns and valuable information from large databases. A hyperbolic tangent function is used as the neuron activation function for the new HONN model. Experiments are conducted to demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of the new HONN model, when compared with several conventional Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models: Feedforward ANN with the sigmoid activation function; Feedforward ANN with the hyperbolic tangent activation function; and Radial Basis Function (RBF) ANN with the Gaussian activation function. The experimental results seem to suggest that the new HONN holds higher generalization capability as well as abilities in handling missing data.

  3. Characterizing the intrinsic correlations of scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Brito, J. B.; Sampaio Filho, C. I. N.; Moreira, A. A.; Andrade, J. S.

    2016-08-01

    When studying topological or dynamical properties of random scale-free networks, it is tacitly assumed that degree-degree correlations are not present. However, simple constraints, such as the absence of multiple edges and self-loops, can give rise to intrinsic correlations in these structures. In the same way that Fermionic correlations in thermodynamic systems are relevant only in the limit of low temperature, the intrinsic correlations in scale-free networks are relevant only when the extreme values for the degrees grow faster than the square root of the network size. In this situation, these correlations can significantly affect the dependence of the average degree of the nearest neighbors of a given vertex on this vertices degree. Here, we introduce an analytical approach that is capable to predict the functional form of this property. Moreover, our results indicate that random scale-free network models are not self-averaging, that is, the second moment of their degree distribution may vary orders of magnitude among different realizations. Finally, we argue that the intrinsic correlations investigated here may have profound impact on the critical properties of random scale-free networks.

  4. Quantifying higher-order correlations in a neuronal pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montangie, Lisandro; Montani, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    Recent experiments involving a relatively large population of neurons have shown a very significant amount of higher-order correlations. However, little is known of how these affect the integration and firing behavior of a population of neurons beyond the second order statistics. To investigate how higher-order inputs statistics can shape beyond pairwise spike correlations and affect information coding in the brain, we consider a neuronal pool where each neuron fires stochastically. We develop a simple mathematically tractable model that makes it feasible to account for higher-order spike correlations in a neuronal pool with highly interconnected common inputs beyond second order statistics. In our model, correlations between neurons appear from q-Gaussian inputs into threshold neurons. The approach constitutes the natural extension of the Dichotomized Gaussian model, where the inputs to the model are just Gaussian distributed and therefore have no input interactions beyond second order. We obtain an exact analytical expression for the joint distribution of firing, quantifying the degree of higher-order spike correlations, truly emphasizing the functional aspects of higher-order statistics, as we account for beyond second order inputs correlations seen by each neuron within the pool. We determine how higher-order correlations depend on the interaction structure of the input, showing that the joint distribution of firing is skewed as the parameter q increases inducing larger excursions of synchronized spikes. We show how input nonlinearities can shape higher-order correlations and enhance coding performance by neural populations.

  5. Weak pairwise correlations imply strongly correlated network states in a neural population

    PubMed Central

    Schneidman, Elad; Berry, Michael J.; Segev, Ronen; Bialek, William

    2006-01-01

    Biological networks have so many possible states that exhaustive sampling is impossible. Successful analysis thus depends on simplifying hypotheses, but experiments on many systems hint that complicated, higher-order interactions among large groups of elements have an important role. Here we show, in the vertebrate retina, that weak correlations between pairs of neurons coexist with strongly collective behaviour in the responses of ten or more neurons. We find that this collective behaviour is described quantitatively by models that capture the observed pairwise correlations but assume no higher-order interactions. These maximum entropy models are equivalent to Ising models, and predict that larger networks are completely dominated by correlation effects. This suggests that the neural code has associative or error-correcting properties, and we provide preliminary evidence for such behaviour. As a first test for the generality of these ideas, we show that similar results are obtained from networks of cultured cortical neurons. PMID:16625187

  6. Degree correlations in signed social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciotti, Valerio; Bianconi, Ginestra; Capocci, Andrea; Colaiori, Francesca; Panzarasa, Pietro

    2015-03-01

    We investigate degree correlations in two online social networks where users are connected through different types of links. We find that, while subnetworks in which links have a positive connotation, such as endorsement and trust, are characterized by assortative mixing by degree, networks in which links have a negative connotation, such as disapproval and distrust, are characterized by disassortative patterns. We introduce a class of simple theoretical models to analyze the interplay between network topology and the superimposed structure based on the sign of links. Results uncover the conditions that underpin the emergence of the patterns observed in the data, namely the assortativity of positive subnetworks and the disassortativity of negative ones. We discuss the implications of our study for the analysis of signed complex networks.

  7. Sampling networks with prescribed degree correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Genio, Charo; Bassler, Kevin; Erdos, Péter; Miklos, István; Toroczkai, Zoltán

    2014-03-01

    A feature of a network known to affect its structural and dynamical properties is the presence of correlations amongst the node degrees. Degree correlations are a measure of how much the connectivity of a node influences the connectivity of its neighbours, and they are fundamental in the study of processes such as the spreading of information or epidemics, the cascading failures of damaged systems and the evolution of social relations. We introduce a method, based on novel mathematical results, that allows the exact sampling of networks where the number of connections between nodes of any given connectivity is specified. Our algorithm provides a weight associated to each sample, thereby allowing network observables to be measured according to any desired distribution, and it is guaranteed to always terminate successfully in polynomial time. Thus, our new approach provides a preferred tool for scientists to model complex systems of current relevance, and enables researchers to precisely study correlated networks with broad societal importance. CIDG acknowledges support by the European Commission's FP7 through grant No. 288021. KEB acknowledges support from the NSF through grant DMR?1206839. KEB, PE, IM and ZT acknowledge support from AFSOR and DARPA through grant FA?9550-12-1-0405.

  8. Learning Bayesian Networks from Correlated Data

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Harold; Monti, Stefano; Montano, Monty; Steinberg, Martin H.; Perls, Thomas T.; Sebastiani, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Bayesian networks are probabilistic models that represent complex distributions in a modular way and have become very popular in many fields. There are many methods to build Bayesian networks from a random sample of independent and identically distributed observations. However, many observational studies are designed using some form of clustered sampling that introduces correlations between observations within the same cluster and ignoring this correlation typically inflates the rate of false positive associations. We describe a novel parameterization of Bayesian networks that uses random effects to model the correlation within sample units and can be used for structure and parameter learning from correlated data without inflating the Type I error rate. We compare different learning metrics using simulations and illustrate the method in two real examples: an analysis of genetic and non-genetic factors associated with human longevity from a family-based study, and an example of risk factors for complications of sickle cell anemia from a longitudinal study with repeated measures. PMID:27146517

  9. Learning Bayesian Networks from Correlated Data.

    PubMed

    Bae, Harold; Monti, Stefano; Montano, Monty; Steinberg, Martin H; Perls, Thomas T; Sebastiani, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Bayesian networks are probabilistic models that represent complex distributions in a modular way and have become very popular in many fields. There are many methods to build Bayesian networks from a random sample of independent and identically distributed observations. However, many observational studies are designed using some form of clustered sampling that introduces correlations between observations within the same cluster and ignoring this correlation typically inflates the rate of false positive associations. We describe a novel parameterization of Bayesian networks that uses random effects to model the correlation within sample units and can be used for structure and parameter learning from correlated data without inflating the Type I error rate. We compare different learning metrics using simulations and illustrate the method in two real examples: an analysis of genetic and non-genetic factors associated with human longevity from a family-based study, and an example of risk factors for complications of sickle cell anemia from a longitudinal study with repeated measures. PMID:27146517

  10. Higher order correlation beams in atmosphere under strong turbulence conditions.

    PubMed

    Avetisyan, H; Monken, C H

    2016-02-01

    Higher order correlation beams, that is, two-photon beams obtained from the process of spontaneous parametric down-conversion pumped by Hermite-Gauss or Laguerre-Gauss beams of any order, can be used to encode information in many modes, opening the possibility of quantum communication with large alphabets. In this paper we calculate, analytically, the fourth-order correlation function for the Hermite-Gauss and Laguerre-Gauss coherent and partially coherent correlation beams propagating through a strong turbulent medium. We show that fourth-order correlation functions for correlation beams have, under certain conditions, expressions similar to those of intensities of classical beams and are degraded by turbulence in a similar way as the classical beams. Our results can be useful in establishing limits for the use of two-photon beams in quantum communications with larger alphabets under atmospheric turbulence. PMID:26906808

  11. Irreducible many-body correlations in topologically ordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Zeng, Bei; Zhou, D. L.

    2016-02-01

    Topologically ordered systems exhibit large-scale correlation in their ground states, which may be characterized by quantities such as topological entanglement entropy. We propose that the concept of irreducible many-body correlation (IMC), the correlation that cannot be implied by all local correlations, may also be used as a signature of topological order. In a topologically ordered system, we demonstrate that for a part of the system with holes, the reduced density matrix exhibits IMCs which become reducible when the holes are removed. The appearance of these IMCs then represents a key feature of topological phase. We analyze the many-body correlation structures in the ground state of the toric code model in external magnetic fields, and show that the topological phase transition is signaled by the IMCs.

  12. athena: Tree code for second-order correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilbinger, Martin; Bonnett, Christopher; Coupon, Jean

    2014-02-01

    athena is a 2d-tree code that estimates second-order correlation functions from input galaxy catalogues. These include shear-shear correlations (cosmic shear), position-shear (galaxy-galaxy lensing) and position-position (spatial angular correlation). Written in C, it includes a power-spectrum estimator implemented in Python; this script also calculates the aperture-mass dispersion. A test data set is available.

  13. High-order resting-state functional connectivity network for MCI classification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaobo; Zhang, Han; Gao, Yue; Wee, Chong-Yaw; Li, Gang; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-09-01

    Brain functional connectivity (FC) network, estimated with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI) technique, has emerged as a promising approach for accurate diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the conventional FC network is essentially low-order in the sense that only the correlations among brain regions (in terms of RS-fMRI time series) are taken into account. The features derived from this type of brain network may fail to serve as an effective disease biomarker. To overcome this drawback, we propose extraction of novel high-order FC correlations that characterize how the low-order correlations between different pairs of brain regions interact with each other. Specifically, for each brain region, a sliding window approach is first performed over the entire RS-fMRI time series to generate multiple short overlapping segments. For each segment, a low-order FC network is constructed, measuring the short-term correlation between brain regions. These low-order networks (obtained from all segments) describe the dynamics of short-term FC along the time, thus also forming the correlation time series for every pair of brain regions. To overcome the curse of dimensionality, we further group the correlation time series into a small number of different clusters according to their intrinsic common patterns. Then, the correlation between the respective mean correlation time series of different clusters is calculated to represent the high-order correlation among different pairs of brain regions. Finally, we design a pattern classifier, by combining features of both low-order and high-order FC networks. Experimental results verify the effectiveness of the high-order FC network on disease diagnosis. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3282-3296, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27144538

  14. Clustering and information in correlation based financial networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onnela, J.-P.; Kaski, K.; Kertész, J.

    2004-03-01

    Networks of companies can be constructed by using return correlations. A crucial issue in this approach is to select the relevant correlations from the correlation matrix. In order to study this problem, we start from an empty graph with no edges where the vertices correspond to stocks. Then, one by one, we insert edges between the vertices according to the rank of their correlation strength, resulting in a network called asset graph. We study its properties, such as topologically different growth types, number and size of clusters and clustering coefficient. These properties, calculated from empirical data, are compared against those of a random graph. The growth of the graph can be classified according to the topological role of the newly inserted edge. We find that the type of growth which is responsible for creating cycles in the graph sets in much earlier for the empirical asset graph than for the random graph, and thus reflects the high degree of networking present in the market. We also find the number of clusters in the random graph to be one order of magnitude higher than for the asset graph. At a critical threshold, the random graph undergoes a radical change in topology related to percolation transition and forms a single giant cluster, a phenomenon which is not observed for the asset graph. Differences in mean clustering coefficient lead us to conclude that most information is contained roughly within 10% of the edges.

  15. Dynamic functional network connectivity using distance correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudas, Jorge; Guaje, Javier; Demertzi, Athena; Heine, Lizette; Tshibanda, Luaba; Soddu, Andrea; Laureys, Steven; Gómez, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Investigations about the intrinsic brain organization in resting-state are critical for the understanding of healthy, pathological and pharmacological cerebral states. Recent studies on fMRI suggest that resting state activity is organized on large scale networks of coordinated activity, in the so called, Resting State Networks (RSNs). The assessment of the interactions among these functional networks plays an important role for the understanding of different brain pathologies. Current methods to quantify these interactions commonly assume that the underlying coordination mechanisms are stationary and linear through the whole recording of the resting state phenomena. Nevertheless, recent evidence suggests that rather than stationary, these mechanisms may exhibit a rich set of time-varying repertoires. In addition, these approaches do not consider possible non-linear relationships maybe linked to feed-back communication mechanisms between RSNs. In this work, we introduce a novel approach for dynamical functional network connectivity for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) resting activity, which accounts for non-linear dynamic relationships between RSNs. The proposed method is based on a windowed distance correlations computed on resting state time-courses extracted at single subject level. We showed that this strategy is complementary to the current approaches for dynamic functional connectivity and will help to enhance the discrimination capacity of patients with disorder of consciousness.

  16. Inferring correlation networks from genomic survey data.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Jonathan; Alm, Eric J

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing based techniques, such as 16S rRNA gene profiling, have the potential to elucidate the complex inner workings of natural microbial communities - be they from the world's oceans or the human gut. A key step in exploring such data is the identification of dependencies between members of these communities, which is commonly achieved by correlation analysis. However, it has been known since the days of Karl Pearson that the analysis of the type of data generated by such techniques (referred to as compositional data) can produce unreliable results since the observed data take the form of relative fractions of genes or species, rather than their absolute abundances. Using simulated and real data from the Human Microbiome Project, we show that such compositional effects can be widespread and severe: in some real data sets many of the correlations among taxa can be artifactual, and true correlations may even appear with opposite sign. Additionally, we show that community diversity is the key factor that modulates the acuteness of such compositional effects, and develop a new approach, called SparCC (available at https://bitbucket.org/yonatanf/sparcc), which is capable of estimating correlation values from compositional data. To illustrate a potential application of SparCC, we infer a rich ecological network connecting hundreds of interacting species across 18 sites on the human body. Using the SparCC network as a reference, we estimated that the standard approach yields 3 spurious species-species interactions for each true interaction and misses 60% of the true interactions in the human microbiome data, and, as predicted, most of the erroneous links are found in the samples with the lowest diversity. PMID:23028285

  17. Inferring Correlation Networks from Genomic Survey Data

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Jonathan; Alm, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing based techniques, such as 16S rRNA gene profiling, have the potential to elucidate the complex inner workings of natural microbial communities - be they from the world's oceans or the human gut. A key step in exploring such data is the identification of dependencies between members of these communities, which is commonly achieved by correlation analysis. However, it has been known since the days of Karl Pearson that the analysis of the type of data generated by such techniques (referred to as compositional data) can produce unreliable results since the observed data take the form of relative fractions of genes or species, rather than their absolute abundances. Using simulated and real data from the Human Microbiome Project, we show that such compositional effects can be widespread and severe: in some real data sets many of the correlations among taxa can be artifactual, and true correlations may even appear with opposite sign. Additionally, we show that community diversity is the key factor that modulates the acuteness of such compositional effects, and develop a new approach, called SparCC (available at https://bitbucket.org/yonatanf/sparcc), which is capable of estimating correlation values from compositional data. To illustrate a potential application of SparCC, we infer a rich ecological network connecting hundreds of interacting species across 18 sites on the human body. Using the SparCC network as a reference, we estimated that the standard approach yields 3 spurious species-species interactions for each true interaction and misses 60% of the true interactions in the human microbiome data, and, as predicted, most of the erroneous links are found in the samples with the lowest diversity. PMID:23028285

  18. Accelerating coordination in temporal networks by engineering the link order

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Social dynamics on a network may be accelerated or decelerated depending on which pairs of individuals in the network communicate early and which pairs do later. The order with which the links in a given network are sequentially used, which we call the link order, may be a strong determinant of dynamical behaviour on networks, potentially adding a new dimension to effects of temporal networks relative to static networks. Here we study the effect of the link order on linear coordination (i.e., synchronisation) dynamics. We show that the coordination speed considerably depends on specific orders of links. In addition, applying each single link for a long time to ensure strong pairwise coordination before moving to a next pair of individuals does not often enhance coordination of the entire network. We also implement a simple greedy algorithm to optimise the link order in favour of fast coordination. PMID:26916093

  19. Accelerating coordination in temporal networks by engineering the link order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Naoki

    2016-02-01

    Social dynamics on a network may be accelerated or decelerated depending on which pairs of individuals in the network communicate early and which pairs do later. The order with which the links in a given network are sequentially used, which we call the link order, may be a strong determinant of dynamical behaviour on networks, potentially adding a new dimension to effects of temporal networks relative to static networks. Here we study the effect of the link order on linear coordination (i.e., synchronisation) dynamics. We show that the coordination speed considerably depends on specific orders of links. In addition, applying each single link for a long time to ensure strong pairwise coordination before moving to a next pair of individuals does not often enhance coordination of the entire network. We also implement a simple greedy algorithm to optimise the link order in favour of fast coordination.

  20. Weak value amplification via second-order correlated technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Cui; Jing-Zheng, Huang; Xiang, Liu; Gui-Hua, Zeng

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new framework combining weak measurement and second-order correlated technique. The theoretical analysis shows that weak value amplification (WVA) experiment can also be implemented by a second-order correlated system. We then build two-dimensional second-order correlated function patterns for achieving higher amplification factor and discuss the signal-to-noise ratio influence. Several advantages can be obtained by our proposal. For instance, detectors with high resolution are not necessary. Moreover, detectors with low saturation intensity are available in WVA setup. Finally, type-one technical noise can be effectively suppressed. Project supported by the Union Research Centre of Advanced Spaceflight Technology (Grant No. USCAST2013-05), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61170228, 61332019, and 61471239), and the High-Tech Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2013AA122901).

  1. Analyzing complex networks through correlations in centrality measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan Ronqui, José Ricardo; Travieso, Gonzalo

    2015-05-01

    Many real world systems can be expressed as complex networks of interconnected nodes. It is frequently important to be able to quantify the relative importance of the various nodes in the network, a task accomplished by defining some centrality measures, with different centrality definitions stressing different aspects of the network. It is interesting to know to what extent these different centrality definitions are related for different networks. In this work, we study the correlation between pairs of a set of centrality measures for different real world networks and two network models. We show that the centralities are in general correlated, but with stronger correlations for network models than for real networks. We also show that the strength of the correlation of each pair of centralities varies from network to network. Taking this fact into account, we propose the use of a centrality correlation profile, consisting of the values of the correlation coefficients between all pairs of centralities of interest, as a way to characterize networks. Using the yeast protein interaction network as an example we show also that the centrality correlation profile can be used to assess the adequacy of a network model as a representation of a given real network.

  2. Social networking profile correlates of schizotypy

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Elizabeth A.; Bailey, Drew H.; Cicero, David C.; Kerns, John G.

    2015-01-01

    Social networking sites, such as Facebook, are extremely popular and have become a primary method for socialization and communication. Despite a report of increased use among those on the schizophrenia-spectrum, few details are known about their actual practices. In the current research, undergraduate participants completed measures of schizotypy and personality, and provided access to their Facebook profiles. Information from the profiles were then systematically coded and compared to the questionnaire data. As predicted, social anhedonia (SocAnh) was associated with a decrease in social participation variables, including a decrease in number of friends and number of photos, and an increase in length of time since communication with a friend, but SocAnh was also associated with an increase in profile length. Also, SocAnh was highly correlated with extraversion. Relatedly, extraversion uniquely predicted the number of friends and photos and length of time since communication with a friend. In addition, perceptual aberration/magical ideation (PerMag) was associated with an increased number of “black outs” on Facebook profile print-outs, a measure of paranoia. Overall, results from this naturalistic-like study show that SocAnh and extraversion are associated with decreased social participation and PerMag with increased paranoia related to information on social networking sites. PMID:22796101

  3. Social networking profile correlates of schizotypy.

    PubMed

    Martin, Elizabeth A; Bailey, Drew H; Cicero, David C; Kerns, John G

    2012-12-30

    Social networking sites, such as Facebook, are extremely popular and have become a primary method for socialization and communication. Despite a report of increased use among those on the schizophrenia-spectrum, few details are known about their actual practices. In the current research, undergraduate participants completed measures of schizotypy and personality, and provided access to their Facebook profiles. Information from the profiles were then systematically coded and compared to the questionnaire data. As predicted, social anhedonia (SocAnh) was associated with a decrease in social participation variables, including a decrease in number of friends and number of photos, and an increase in length of time since communication with a friend, but SocAnh was also associated with an increase in profile length. Also, SocAnh was highly correlated with extraversion. Relatedly, extraversion uniquely predicted the number of friends and photos and length of time since communication with a friend. In addition, perceptual aberration/magical ideation (PerMag) was associated with an increased number of "black outs" on Facebook profile print-outs, a measure of paranoia. Overall, results from this naturalistic-like study show that SocAnh and extraversion are associated with decreased social participation and PerMag with increased paranoia related to information on social networking sites. PMID:22796101

  4. Bagging and boosting negatively correlated neural networks.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Monirul; Yao, Xin; Shahriar Nirjon, S M Shahriar; Islam, Muhammad Asiful; Murase, Kazuyuki

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, we propose two cooperative ensemble learning algorithms, i.e., NegBagg and NegBoost, for designing neural network (NN) ensembles. The proposed algorithms incrementally train different individual NNs in an ensemble using the negative correlation learning algorithm. Bagging and boosting algorithms are used in NegBagg and NegBoost, respectively, to create different training sets for different NNs in the ensemble. The idea behind using negative correlation learning in conjunction with the bagging/boosting algorithm is to facilitate interaction and cooperation among NNs during their training. Both NegBagg and NegBoost use a constructive approach to automatically determine the number of hidden neurons for NNs. NegBoost also uses the constructive approach to automatically determine the number of NNs for the ensemble. The two algorithms have been tested on a number of benchmark problems in machine learning and NNs, including Australian credit card assessment, breast cancer, diabetes, glass, heart disease, letter recognition, satellite, soybean, and waveform problems. The experimental results show that NegBagg and NegBoost require a small number of training epochs to produce compact NN ensembles with good generalization. PMID:18558541

  5. Functional Cortical Network in Alpha Band Correlates with Social Bargaining

    PubMed Central

    Billeke, Pablo; Zamorano, Francisco; Chavez, Mario; Cosmelli, Diego; Aboitiz, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Solving demanding tasks requires fast and flexible coordination among different brain areas. Everyday examples of this are the social dilemmas in which goals tend to clash, requiring one to weigh alternative courses of action in limited time. In spite of this fact, there are few studies that directly address the dynamics of flexible brain network integration during social interaction. To study the preceding, we carried out EEG recordings while subjects played a repeated version of the Ultimatum Game in both human (social) and computer (non-social) conditions. We found phase synchrony (inter-site-phase-clustering) modulation in alpha band that was specific to the human condition and independent of power modulation. The strength and patterns of the inter-site-phase-clustering of the cortical networks were also modulated, and these modulations were mainly in frontal and parietal regions. Moreover, changes in the individuals’ alpha network structure correlated with the risk of the offers made only in social conditions. This correlation was independent of changes in power and inter-site-phase-clustering strength. Our results indicate that, when subjects believe they are participating in a social interaction, a specific modulation of functional cortical networks in alpha band takes place, suggesting that phase synchrony of alpha oscillations could serve as a mechanism by which different brain areas flexibly interact in order to adapt ongoing behavior in socially demanding contexts. PMID:25286240

  6. Theory-independent limits on correlations from generalized Bayesian networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, Joe; Lal, Raymond; Pusey, Matthew F.

    2014-11-01

    Bayesian networks provide a powerful tool for reasoning about probabilistic causation, used in many areas of science. They are, however, intrinsically classical. In particular, Bayesian networks naturally yield the Bell inequalities. Inspired by this connection, we generalize the formalism of classical Bayesian networks in order to investigate non-classical correlations in arbitrary causal structures. Our framework of ‘generalized Bayesian networks’ replaces latent variables with the resources of any generalized probabilistic theory, most importantly quantum theory, but also, for example, Popescu-Rohrlich boxes. We obtain three main sets of results. Firstly, we prove that all of the observable conditional independences required by the classical theory also hold in our generalization; to obtain this, we extend the classical d-separation theorem to our setting. Secondly, we find that the theory-independent constraints on probabilities can go beyond these conditional independences. For example we find that no probabilistic theory predicts perfect correlation between three parties using only bipartite common causes. Finally, we begin a classification of those causal structures, such as the Bell scenario, that may yield a separation between classical, quantum and general-probabilistic correlations.

  7. Extracting spatial information from networks with low-order eigenvectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucuringu, Mihai; Blondel, Vincent D.; Van Dooren, Paul

    2013-03-01

    We consider the problem of inferring meaningful spatial information in networks from incomplete information on the connection intensity between the nodes of the network. We consider two spatially distributed networks: a population migration flow network within the US, and a network of mobile phone calls between cities in Belgium. For both networks we use the eigenvectors of the Laplacian matrix constructed from the link intensities to obtain informative visualizations and capture natural geographical subdivisions. We observe that some low-order eigenvectors localize very well and seem to reveal small geographically cohesive regions that match remarkably well with political and administrative boundaries. We discuss possible explanations for this observation by describing diffusion maps and localized eigenfunctions. In addition, we discuss a possible connection with the weighted graph cut problem, and provide numerical evidence supporting the idea that lower-order eigenvectors point out local cuts in the network. However, we do not provide a formal and rigorous justification for our observations.

  8. Pump power dependence of second order correlation in nondegenerate SPDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Charles; Kanner, Gary

    2009-08-01

    We observed the second order correlation peak for nondegenerate spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC) of a pulsed pump at 532 nm into 810 nm and 1550 nm entangled beams. We used a Si avalanche photodiode (APD) to detect the 810 nm photons, and an InGaAs APD to detect those at 1550 nm. We defined both a visibility and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) based on the data, which were obtained at various pump powers. In contrast to classical imaging systems, for which SNR increases monotonically with transmitted power, the SNR for the correlation peak in our setup exhibited a gradual decay as the pump power increased. We derived an empirical relation for the SNR, which was inversely proportional to the square root of pump power.

  9. Analysis of community structure in networks of correlated data

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, S.; Jensen, P.; Arenas, A.

    2008-12-25

    We present a reformulation of modularity that allows the analysis of the community structure in networks of correlated data. The new modularity preserves the probabilistic semantics of the original definition even when the network is directed, weighted, signed, and has self-loops. This is the most general condition one can find in the study of any network, in particular those defined from correlated data. We apply our results to a real network of correlated data between stores in the city of Lyon (France).

  10. Optical-Correlator Neural Network Based On Neocognitron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Stoner, William W.

    1994-01-01

    Multichannel optical correlator implements shift-invariant, high-discrimination pattern-recognizing neural network based on paradigm of neocognitron. Selected as basic building block of this neural network because invariance under shifts is inherent advantage of Fourier optics included in optical correlators in general. Neocognitron is conceptual electronic neural-network model for recognition of visual patterns. Multilayer processing achieved by iteratively feeding back output of feature correlator to input spatial light modulator and updating Fourier filters. Neural network trained by use of characteristic features extracted from target images. Multichannel implementation enables parallel processing of large number of selected features.

  11. Collapse of ordered spatial pattern in neuronal network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xinlin; Wang, Chunni; Ma, Jun; Ren, Guodong

    2016-06-01

    Spatiotemporal systems can emerge some regular spatial patterns due to self organization or under external periodical pacing while external attack or intrinsic collapse can destroy the regularity in the spatial system. For an example, the electrical activities of neurons in nervous system show regular spatial distribution under appropriate coupling and connection. It is believed that distinct regularity could be induced in the media by appropriate forcing or feedback, while a diffusive collapse induced by continuous destruction can cause breakdown of the media. In this paper, the collapse of ordered spatial distribution is investigated in a regular network of neurons (Morris-Lecar, Hindmarsh-Rose) in two-dimensional array. A stable target wave is developed regular spatial distribution emerges by imposing appropriate external forcing with diversity, or generating heterogeneity (parameter diversity in space). The diffusive invasion could be produced by continuous parameter collapse or switch in local area, e.g, the diffusive poisoning in ion channels of potassium in Morris-Lecar neurons causes breakdown in conductance of channels. It is found that target wave-dominated regularity can be suppressed when the collapsed area is diffused in random. Statistical correlation functions for sampled nodes (neurons) are defined to detect the collapse of ordered state by series analysis.

  12. Frustration and chiral orderings in correlated electron systems.

    PubMed

    Batista, Cristian D; Lin, Shi-Zeng; Hayami, Satoru; Kamiya, Yoshitomo

    2016-08-01

    The term frustration refers to lattice systems whose ground state cannot simultaneously satisfy all the interactions. Frustration is an important property of correlated electron systems, which stems from the sign of loop products (similar to Wilson products) of interactions on a lattice. It was early recognized that geometric frustration can produce rather exotic physical behaviors, such as macroscopic ground state degeneracy and helimagnetism. The interest in frustrated systems was renewed two decades later in the context of spin glasses and the emergence of magnetic superstructures. In particular, Phil Anderson's proposal of a quantum spin liquid ground state for a two-dimensional lattice S  =  1/2 Heisenberg magnet generated a very active line of research that still continues. As a result of these early discoveries and conjectures, the study of frustrated models and materials exploded over the last two decades. Besides the large efforts triggered by the search of quantum spin liquids, it was also recognized that frustration plays a crucial role in a vast spectrum of physical phenomena arising from correlated electron materials. Here we review some of these phenomena with particular emphasis on the stabilization of chiral liquids and non-coplanar magnetic orderings. In particular, we focus on the ubiquitous interplay between magnetic and charge degrees of freedom in frustrated correlated electron systems and on the role of anisotropy. We demonstrate that these basic ingredients lead to exotic phenomena, such as, charge effects in Mott insulators, the stabilization of single magnetic vortices, as well as vortex and skyrmion crystals, and the emergence of different types of chiral liquids. In particular, these orderings appear more naturally in itinerant magnets with the potential of inducing a very large anomalous Hall effect. PMID:27376461

  13. Frustration and chiral orderings in correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Cristian D.; Lin, Shi-Zeng; Hayami, Satoru; Kamiya, Yoshitomo

    2016-08-01

    The term frustration refers to lattice systems whose ground state cannot simultaneously satisfy all the interactions. Frustration is an important property of correlated electron systems, which stems from the sign of loop products (similar to Wilson products) of interactions on a lattice. It was early recognized that geometric frustration can produce rather exotic physical behaviors, such as macroscopic ground state degeneracy and helimagnetism. The interest in frustrated systems was renewed two decades later in the context of spin glasses and the emergence of magnetic superstructures. In particular, Phil Anderson’s proposal of a quantum spin liquid ground state for a two-dimensional lattice S  =  1/2 Heisenberg magnet generated a very active line of research that still continues. As a result of these early discoveries and conjectures, the study of frustrated models and materials exploded over the last two decades. Besides the large efforts triggered by the search of quantum spin liquids, it was also recognized that frustration plays a crucial role in a vast spectrum of physical phenomena arising from correlated electron materials. Here we review some of these phenomena with particular emphasis on the stabilization of chiral liquids and non-coplanar magnetic orderings. In particular, we focus on the ubiquitous interplay between magnetic and charge degrees of freedom in frustrated correlated electron systems and on the role of anisotropy. We demonstrate that these basic ingredients lead to exotic phenomena, such as, charge effects in Mott insulators, the stabilization of single magnetic vortices, as well as vortex and skyrmion crystals, and the emergence of different types of chiral liquids. In particular, these orderings appear more naturally in itinerant magnets with the potential of inducing a very large anomalous Hall effect.

  14. Binary higher order neural networks for realizing Boolean functions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Yang, Jie; Wu, Wei

    2011-05-01

    In order to more efficiently realize Boolean functions by using neural networks, we propose a binary product-unit neural network (BPUNN) and a binary π-ς neural network (BPSNN). The network weights can be determined by one-step training. It is shown that the addition " σ," the multiplication " π," and two kinds of special weighting operations in BPUNN and BPSNN can implement the logical operators " ∨," " ∧," and " ¬" on Boolean algebra 〈Z(2),∨,∧,¬,0,1〉 (Z(2)={0,1}), respectively. The proposed two neural networks enjoy the following advantages over the existing networks: 1) for a complete truth table of N variables with both truth and false assignments, the corresponding Boolean function can be realized by accordingly choosing a BPUNN or a BPSNN such that at most 2(N-1) hidden nodes are needed, while O(2(N)), precisely 2(N) or at most 2(N), hidden nodes are needed by existing networks; 2) a new network BPUPS based on a collaboration of BPUNN and BPSNN can be defined to deal with incomplete truth tables, while the existing networks can only deal with complete truth tables; and 3) the values of the weights are all simply -1 or 1, while the weights of all the existing networks are real numbers. Supporting numerical experiments are provided as well. Finally, we present the risk bounds of BPUNN, BPSNN, and BPUPS, and then analyze their probably approximately correct learnability. PMID:21427020

  15. Quantifying the connectivity of a network: The network correlation function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzel, Baruch; Biham, Ofer

    2009-10-01

    Networks are useful for describing systems of interacting objects, where the nodes represent the objects and the edges represent the interactions between them. The applications include chemical and metabolic systems, food webs as well as social networks. Lately, it was found that many of these networks display some common topological features, such as high clustering, small average path length (small-world networks), and a power-law degree distribution (scale-free networks). The topological features of a network are commonly related to the network’s functionality. However, the topology alone does not account for the nature of the interactions in the network and their strength. Here, we present a method for evaluating the correlations between pairs of nodes in the network. These correlations depend both on the topology and on the functionality of the network. A network with high connectivity displays strong correlations between its interacting nodes and thus features small-world functionality. We quantify the correlations between all pairs of nodes in the network, and express them as matrix elements in the correlation matrix. From this information, one can plot the correlation function for the network and to extract the correlation length. The connectivity of a network is then defined as the ratio between this correlation length and the average path length of the network. Using this method, we distinguish between a topological small world and a functional small world, where the latter is characterized by long-range correlations and high connectivity. Clearly, networks that share the same topology may have different connectivities, based on the nature and strength of their interactions. The method is demonstrated on metabolic networks, but can be readily generalized to other types of networks.

  16. Order and correlation contributions to the entropy of hydrophobic solvation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Maoyuan; Besford, Quinn Alexander; Mulvaney, Thomas; Gray-Weale, Angus

    2015-03-21

    The entropy of hydrophobic solvation has been explained as the result of ordered solvation structures, of hydrogen bonds, of the small size of the water molecule, of dispersion forces, and of solvent density fluctuations. We report a new approach to the calculation of the entropy of hydrophobic solvation, along with tests of and comparisons to several other methods. The methods are assessed in the light of the available thermodynamic and spectroscopic information on the effects of temperature on hydrophobic solvation. Five model hydrophobes in SPC/E water give benchmark solvation entropies via Widom's test-particle insertion method, and other methods and models are tested against these particle-insertion results. Entropies associated with distributions of tetrahedral order, of electric field, and of solvent dipole orientations are examined. We find these contributions are small compared to the benchmark particle-insertion entropy. Competitive with or better than other theories in accuracy, but with no free parameters, is the new estimate of the entropy contributed by correlations between dipole moments. Dipole correlations account for most of the hydrophobic solvation entropy for all models studied and capture the distinctive temperature dependence seen in thermodynamic and spectroscopic experiments. Entropies based on pair and many-body correlations in number density approach the correct magnitudes but fail to describe temperature and size dependences, respectively. Hydrogen-bond definitions and free energies that best reproduce entropies from simulations are reported, but it is difficult to choose one hydrogen bond model that fits a variety of experiments. The use of information theory, scaled-particle theory, and related methods is discussed briefly. Our results provide a test of the Frank-Evans hypothesis that the negative solvation entropy is due to structured water near the solute, complement the spectroscopic detection of that solvation structure by

  17. Order and correlation contributions to the entropy of hydrophobic solvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Maoyuan; Besford, Quinn Alexander; Mulvaney, Thomas; Gray-Weale, Angus

    2015-03-01

    The entropy of hydrophobic solvation has been explained as the result of ordered solvation structures, of hydrogen bonds, of the small size of the water molecule, of dispersion forces, and of solvent density fluctuations. We report a new approach to the calculation of the entropy of hydrophobic solvation, along with tests of and comparisons to several other methods. The methods are assessed in the light of the available thermodynamic and spectroscopic information on the effects of temperature on hydrophobic solvation. Five model hydrophobes in SPC/E water give benchmark solvation entropies via Widom's test-particle insertion method, and other methods and models are tested against these particle-insertion results. Entropies associated with distributions of tetrahedral order, of electric field, and of solvent dipole orientations are examined. We find these contributions are small compared to the benchmark particle-insertion entropy. Competitive with or better than other theories in accuracy, but with no free parameters, is the new estimate of the entropy contributed by correlations between dipole moments. Dipole correlations account for most of the hydrophobic solvation entropy for all models studied and capture the distinctive temperature dependence seen in thermodynamic and spectroscopic experiments. Entropies based on pair and many-body correlations in number density approach the correct magnitudes but fail to describe temperature and size dependences, respectively. Hydrogen-bond definitions and free energies that best reproduce entropies from simulations are reported, but it is difficult to choose one hydrogen bond model that fits a variety of experiments. The use of information theory, scaled-particle theory, and related methods is discussed briefly. Our results provide a test of the Frank-Evans hypothesis that the negative solvation entropy is due to structured water near the solute, complement the spectroscopic detection of that solvation structure by

  18. Order and correlation contributions to the entropy of hydrophobic solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Maoyuan; Besford, Quinn Alexander; Mulvaney, Thomas; Gray-Weale, Angus

    2015-03-21

    The entropy of hydrophobic solvation has been explained as the result of ordered solvation structures, of hydrogen bonds, of the small size of the water molecule, of dispersion forces, and of solvent density fluctuations. We report a new approach to the calculation of the entropy of hydrophobic solvation, along with tests of and comparisons to several other methods. The methods are assessed in the light of the available thermodynamic and spectroscopic information on the effects of temperature on hydrophobic solvation. Five model hydrophobes in SPC/E water give benchmark solvation entropies via Widom’s test-particle insertion method, and other methods and models are tested against these particle-insertion results. Entropies associated with distributions of tetrahedral order, of electric field, and of solvent dipole orientations are examined. We find these contributions are small compared to the benchmark particle-insertion entropy. Competitive with or better than other theories in accuracy, but with no free parameters, is the new estimate of the entropy contributed by correlations between dipole moments. Dipole correlations account for most of the hydrophobic solvation entropy for all models studied and capture the distinctive temperature dependence seen in thermodynamic and spectroscopic experiments. Entropies based on pair and many-body correlations in number density approach the correct magnitudes but fail to describe temperature and size dependences, respectively. Hydrogen-bond definitions and free energies that best reproduce entropies from simulations are reported, but it is difficult to choose one hydrogen bond model that fits a variety of experiments. The use of information theory, scaled-particle theory, and related methods is discussed briefly. Our results provide a test of the Frank-Evans hypothesis that the negative solvation entropy is due to structured water near the solute, complement the spectroscopic detection of that solvation structure by

  19. CORRELATION PROFILES AND MOTIFS IN COMPLEX NETWORKS.

    SciTech Connect

    MASLOV,S.SNEPPEN,K.ALON,U.

    2004-01-16

    Networks have recently emerged as a unifying theme in complex systems research [1]. It is in fact no coincidence that networks and complexity are so heavily intertwined. Any future definition of a complex system should reflect the fact that such systems consist of many mutually interacting components. These components are far from being identical as say electrons in systems studied by condensed matter physics. In a truly complex system each of them has a unique identity allowing one to separate it from the others. The very first question one may ask about such a system is which other components a given component interacts with? This information system wide can be visualized as a graph, whose nodes correspond to individual components of the complex system in question and edges to their mutual interactions. Such a network can be thought of as a backbone of the complex system. Of course, system's dynamics depends not only on the topology of an underlying network but also on the exact form of interaction of components with each other, which can be very different in various complex systems. However, the underlying network may contain clues about the basic design principles and/or evolutionary history of the complex system in question. The goal of this article is to provide readers with a set of useful tools that would help to decide which features of a complex network are there by pure chance alone, and which of them were possibly designed or evolved to their present state.

  20. On degree-degree correlations in multilayer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Arruda, Guilherme Ferraz; Cozzo, Emanuele; Moreno, Yamir; Rodrigues, Francisco A.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a generalization of the concept of assortativity based on the tensorial representation of multilayer networks, covering the definitions given in terms of Pearson and Spearman coefficients. Our approach can also be applied to weighted networks and provides information about correlations considering pairs of layers. By analyzing the multilayer representation of the airport transportation network, we show that contrasting results are obtained when the layers are analyzed independently or as an interconnected system. Finally, we study the impact of the level of assortativity and heterogeneity between layers on the spreading of diseases. Our results highlight the need of studying degree-degree correlations on multilayer systems, instead of on aggregated networks.

  1. Reconstruction of evolved dynamic networks from degree correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karalus, Steffen; Krug, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    We study the importance of local structural properties in networks which have been evolved for a power-law scaling in their Laplacian spectrum. To this end, the degree distribution, two-point degree correlations, and degree-dependent clustering are extracted from the evolved networks and used to construct random networks with the prescribed distributions. In the analysis of these reconstructed networks it turns out that the degree distribution alone is not sufficient to generate the spectral scaling and the degree-dependent clustering has only an indirect influence. The two-point correlations are found to be the dominant characteristic for the power-law scaling over a broader eigenvalue range.

  2. Correlation between crystalline order and vitrification in colloidal monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamborini, Elisa; Royall, C. Patrick; Cicuta, Pietro

    2015-05-01

    We investigate experimentally the relationship between local structure and dynamical arrest in a quasi-2d colloidal model system which approximates hard discs. We introduce polydispersity to the system to suppress crystallisation. Upon compression, the increase in structural relaxation time is accompanied by the emergence of local hexagonal symmetry. Examining the dynamical heterogeneity of the system, we identify three types of motion: ‘zero-dimensional’ corresponding to β-relaxation, ‘one-dimensional’ or stringlike motion and ‘2D’ motion. The dynamic heterogeneity is correlated with the local order, that is to say locally hexagonal regions are more likely to be dynamically slow. However, we find that lengthscales corresponding to dynamic heterogeneity and local structure do not appear to scale together approaching the glass transition.

  3. Image Segmentation Using Higher-Order Correlation Clustering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungwoong; Yoo, Chang D; Nowozin, Sebastian; Kohli, Pushmeet

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a hypergraph-based image segmentation framework is formulated in a supervised manner for many high-level computer vision tasks. To consider short- and long-range dependency among various regions of an image and also to incorporate wider selection of features, a higher-order correlation clustering (HO-CC) is incorporated in the framework. Correlation clustering (CC), which is a graph-partitioning algorithm, was recently shown to be effective in a number of applications such as natural language processing, document clustering, and image segmentation. It derives its partitioning result from a pairwise graph by optimizing a global objective function such that it simultaneously maximizes both intra-cluster similarity and inter-cluster dissimilarity. In the HO-CC, the pairwise graph which is used in the CC is generalized to a hypergraph which can alleviate local boundary ambiguities that can occur in the CC. Fast inference is possible by linear programming relaxation, and effective parameter learning by structured support vector machine is also possible by incorporating a decomposable structured loss function. Experimental results on various data sets show that the proposed HO-CC outperforms other state-of-the-art image segmentation algorithms. The HO-CC framework is therefore an efficient and flexible image segmentation framework. PMID:26352230

  4. Effect of correlations on controllability transition in network control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Sen; Wang, Xu-Wen; Wang, Bing-Hong; Jiang, Luo-Luo

    2016-04-01

    The network control problem has recently attracted an increasing amount of attention, owing to concerns including the avoidance of cascading failures of power-grids and the management of ecological networks. It has been proven that numerical control can be achieved if the number of control inputs exceeds a certain transition point. In the present study, we investigate the effect of degree correlation on the numerical controllability in networks whose topological structures are reconstructed from both real and modeling systems, and we find that the transition point of the number of control inputs depends strongly on the degree correlation in both undirected and directed networks with moderately sparse links. More interestingly, the effect of the degree correlation on the transition point cannot be observed in dense networks for numerical controllability, which contrasts with the corresponding result for structural controllability. In particular, for directed random networks and scale-free networks, the influence of the degree correlation is determined by the types of correlations. Our approach provides an understanding of control problems in complex sparse networks.

  5. Effect of correlations on controllability transition in network control

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Sen; Wang, Xu-Wen; Wang, Bing-Hong; Jiang, Luo-Luo

    2016-01-01

    The network control problem has recently attracted an increasing amount of attention, owing to concerns including the avoidance of cascading failures of power-grids and the management of ecological networks. It has been proven that numerical control can be achieved if the number of control inputs exceeds a certain transition point. In the present study, we investigate the effect of degree correlation on the numerical controllability in networks whose topological structures are reconstructed from both real and modeling systems, and we find that the transition point of the number of control inputs depends strongly on the degree correlation in both undirected and directed networks with moderately sparse links. More interestingly, the effect of the degree correlation on the transition point cannot be observed in dense networks for numerical controllability, which contrasts with the corresponding result for structural controllability. In particular, for directed random networks and scale-free networks, the influence of the degree correlation is determined by the types of correlations. Our approach provides an understanding of control problems in complex sparse networks. PMID:27063294

  6. On-line lower-order modeling via neural networks.

    PubMed

    Ho, H F; Rad, A B; Wong, Y K; Lo, W L

    2003-10-01

    This paper presents a novel method to determine the parameters of a first-order plus dead-time model using neural networks. The outputs of the neural networks are the gain, dominant time constant, and apparent time delay. By combining this algorithm with a conventional PI or PID controller, we also present an adaptive controller which requires very little a priori knowledge about the plant under control. The simplicity of the scheme for real-time control provides a new approach for implementing neural network applications for a variety of on-line industrial control problems. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and adaptive property of the proposed scheme. PMID:14582882

  7. Fractional-order LβCα filter circuit network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Zheng; Qian, Jing; Chen, Di-Yi; Herbert, H. C. Iu

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we introduce the new fundamentals of the conventional LC filter circuit network in the fractional domain. First, we derive the general formulae of the impedances for the conventional and fractional-order filter circuit network. Based on this, the impedance characteristics and phase characteristics with respect to the system variables of the filter circuit network are studied in detail, which shows the greater flexibility of the fractional-order filter circuit network in design. Moreover, from the point of view of the filtering property, we systematically study the effects of the filter units and fractional orders on the amplitude-frequency characteristics and phase-frequency characteristics. In addition, numerical tables of the cut-off frequency are presented. Finally, two typical examples are presented to promote the industrial applications of the fractional-order filter circuit network. Numerical simulations are presented to verify the theoretical results introduced in this paper. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51469011).

  8. Neural network post-processing of grayscale optical correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Thomas T; Hughlett, Casey L.; Zhoua, Hanying; Chao, Tien-Hsin; Hanan, Jay C.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present the use of a radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) as a post-processor to assist the optical correlator to identify the objects and to reject false alarms. Image plane features near the correlation peaks are extracted and fed to the neural network for analysis. The approach is capable of handling large number of object variations and filter sets. Preliminary experimental results are presented and the performance is analyzed.

  9. Explicitly correlated local second-order perturbation theory with a frozen geminal correlation factor.

    PubMed

    Manby, Frederick R; Werner, Hans-Joachim; Adler, Thomas B; May, Andrew J

    2006-03-01

    The recently introduced MP2-R122*A(loc) and LMP2-R122*A(loc) methods are modified to use a short-range correlation factor expanded as a fixed linear combination of Gaussian geminals. Density fitting is used to reduce the effort for integral evaluation, and local approximations are introduced to improve the scaling of the computational resources with molecular size. The MP2-F122*A(loc) correlation energies converge very rapidly with respect to the atomic orbital basis set size. Already with the aug-cc-pVTZ basis the correlation energies computed for a set of 21 small molecules are found to be within 0.5% of the MP2 basis set limit. Furthermore the short-range correlation factor leads to an improved convergence of the resolution of the identity, and eliminates problems with long-range errors in density fitting caused by the linear r12 factor. The DF-LMP2-F122*A(loc) method is applied to compute second-order correlation energies for molecules with up to 49 atoms and more than 1600 basis functions. PMID:16526841

  10. Correlated Networks of Magnetic and Inertial Sensors to Study Transient Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhivun, Elena; Gnome Collaboration; Nose Collaboration; Urban Magnetometer Network Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We describe several new collaborative efforts to develop networks of magnetometers (the GNOME and Urban Magnetometer Network collaborations), atom interferometers (NOSE), and other precision sensors. These networks use geographically separated, time-synchronized sensors to search for correlated transient signals. The Global Network of Optical Magnetometers to search for Exotic physics (GNOME) searches for nuclear and electron spin couplings to various exotic fields generated by astrophysical sources. The UC Network Of Sensors for Exotic physics (NOSE) searches for dark matter and dark energy by detecting the influence of a background field of ultra-light particles with a network of various sensors such as atom interferometers, novel solid-state acceleration sensors, and GNOME magnetometers. The Urban Magnetometer Network project characterizes and determines the origin of the ambient field fluctuations, in order to to improve magnetic anomalies detection and extract maximal information from magnetic signals in the city environment. Global Network of Optical Magnetometers.

  11. Bond Order Correlations in the 2D Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Conrad; Abu Asal, Sameer; Yang, Shuxiang; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark

    We use the dynamical cluster approximation to study the bond correlations in the Hubbard model with next nearest neighbor (nnn) hopping to explore the region of the phase diagram where the Fermi liquid phase is separated from the pseudogap phase by the Lifshitz line at zero temperature. We implement the Hirsch-Fye cluster solver that has the advantage of providing direct access to the computation of the bond operators via the decoupling field. In the pseudogap phase, the parallel bond order susceptibility is shown to persist at zero temperature while it vanishes for the Fermi liquid phase which allows the shape of the Lifshitz line to be mapped as a function of filling and nnn hopping. Our cluster solver implements NVIDIA's CUDA language to accelerate the linear algebra of the Quantum Monte Carlo to help alleviate the sign problem by allowing for more Monte Carlo updates to be performed in a reasonable amount of computation time. Work supported by the NSF EPSCoR Cooperative Agreement No. EPS-1003897 with additional support from the Louisiana Board of Regents.

  12. The correlation of metrics in complex networks with applications in functional brain networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Wang, H.; de Haan, W.; Stam, C. J.; Van Mieghem, P.

    2011-11-01

    An increasing number of network metrics have been applied in network analysis. If metric relations were known better, we could more effectively characterize networks by a small set of metrics to discover the association between network properties/metrics and network functioning. In this paper, we investigate the linear correlation coefficients between widely studied network metrics in three network models (Bárabasi-Albert graphs, Erdös-Rényi random graphs and Watts-Strogatz small-world graphs) as well as in functional brain networks of healthy subjects. The metric correlations, which we have observed and theoretically explained, motivate us to propose a small representative set of metrics by including only one metric from each subset of mutually strongly dependent metrics. The following contributions are considered important. (a) A network with a given degree distribution can indeed be characterized by a small representative set of metrics. (b) Unweighted networks, which are obtained from weighted functional brain networks with a fixed threshold, and Erdös-Rényi random graphs follow a similar degree distribution. Moreover, their metric correlations and the resultant representative metrics are similar as well. This verifies the influence of degree distribution on metric correlations. (c) Most metric correlations can be explained analytically. (d) Interestingly, the most studied metrics so far, the average shortest path length and the clustering coefficient, are strongly correlated and, thus, redundant. Whereas spectral metrics, though only studied recently in the context of complex networks, seem to be essential in network characterizations. This representative set of metrics tends to both sufficiently and effectively characterize networks with a given degree distribution. In the study of a specific network, however, we have to at least consider the representative set so that important network properties will not be neglected.

  13. Characterization of Diblock Copolymer Order-Order Transitions in Semidilute Aqueous Solution Using Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Christopher G; Lovett, Joseph R; Madsen, Jeppe; Armes, Steven P; Geoghegan, Mark

    2015-09-01

    The temperature and pH-dependent diffusion of poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)-block-poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate) nanoparticles prepared via polymerization-induced self-assembly in water is characterized using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Lowering the solution temperature or raising the solution pH induces a worm-to-sphere transition and hence an increase in diffusion coefficient by a factor of between four and eight. FCS enables morphological transitions to be monitored at relatively high copolymer concentrations (10% w/w) compared to those required for dynamic light scattering (0.1% w/w). This is important because such transitions are reversible at the former concentration, whereas they are irreversible at the latter. Furthermore, the FCS data suggest that the thermal transition takes place over a very narrow temperature range (less than 2 °C). These results demonstrate the application of FCS to characterize order-order transitions, as opposed to order-disorder transitions. PMID:26096738

  14. Correlations between weights and overlap in ensembles of weighted multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menichetti, Giulia; Remondini, Daniel; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2014-12-01

    Multiplex networks describe a large number of systems ranging from social networks to the brain. These multilayer structure encode information in their structure. This information can be extracted by measuring the correlations present in the multiplex networks structure, such as the overlap of the links in different layers. Many multiplex networks are also weighted, and the weights of the links can be strongly correlated with the structural properties of the multiplex network. For example, in multiplex network formed by the citation and collaboration networks between PRE scientists it was found that the statistical properties of citations to coauthors differ from the one of citations to noncoauthors, i.e., the weights depend on the overlap of the links. Here we present a theoretical framework for modeling multiplex weighted networks with different types of correlations between weights and overlap. To this end, we use the framework of canonical network ensembles, and the recently introduced concept of multilinks, showing that null models of a large variety of network structures can be constructed in this way. In order to provide a concrete example of how this framework apply to real data we consider a multiplex constructed from gene expression data of healthy and cancer tissues.

  15. Traffic-driven epidemic spreading in correlated networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Han-Xin; Tang, Ming; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    In spite of the extensive previous efforts on traffic dynamics and epidemic spreading in complex networks, the problem of traffic-driven epidemic spreading on correlated networks has not been addressed. Interestingly, we find that the epidemic threshold, a fundamental quantity underlying the spreading dynamics, exhibits a nonmonotonic behavior in that it can be minimized for some critical value of the assortativity coefficient, a parameter characterizing the network correlation. To understand this phenomenon, we use the degree-based mean-field theory to calculate the traffic-driven epidemic threshold for correlated networks. The theory predicts that the threshold is inversely proportional to the packet-generation rate and the largest eigenvalue of the betweenness matrix. We obtain consistency between theory and numerics. Our results may provide insights into the important problem of controlling and/or harnessing real-world epidemic spreading dynamics driven by traffic flows.

  16. Functional Alterations in Order Short-Term Memory Networks in Adults With Dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Martinez Perez, Trecy; Poncelet, Martine; Salmon, Eric; Majerus, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Dyslexia is characterized not only by reading impairment but also by short-term memory (STM) deficits, and this particularly for the retention of serial order information. Here, we explored the functional neural correlates associated with serial order STM performance of adults with dyslexia for verbal and visual STM tasks. Relative to a group of age-matched controls, the dyslexic group showed abnormal activation in a network associated with order STM encompassing the right intraparietal and superior frontal sulcus, and this for both verbal and visual order STM conditions. This study highlights long-lasting alterations in non-language neural substrates and processes in dyslexia. PMID:27043828

  17. Infinitely robust order and local order-parameter tulips in Apollonian networks with quenched disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, C. Nadir; Hinczewski, Michael; Berker, A. Nihat

    2009-06-01

    For a variety of quenched random spin systems on an Apollonian network, including ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic bond percolation and the Ising spin glass, we find the persistence of ordered phases up to infinite temperature over the entire range of disorder. We develop a renormalization-group technique that yields highly detailed information, including the exact distributions of local magnetizations and local spin-glass order parameters, which turn out to exhibit, as function of temperature, complex and distinctive tulip patterns.

  18. Flow distributions and spatial correlations in human brain capillary networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorthois, Sylvie; Peyrounette, Myriam; Larue, Anne; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2015-11-01

    The vascular system of the human brain cortex is composed of a space filling mesh-like capillary network connected upstream and downstream to branched quasi-fractal arterioles and venules. The distribution of blood flow rates in these networks may affect the efficiency of oxygen transfer processes. Here, we investigate the distribution and correlation properties of blood flow velocities from numerical simulations in large 3D human intra-cortical vascular network (10000 segments) obtained from an anatomical database. In each segment, flow is solved from a 1D non-linear model taking account of the complex rheological properties of blood flow in microcirculation to deduce blood pressure, blood flow and red blood cell volume fraction distributions throughout the network. The network structural complexity is found to impart broad and spatially correlated Lagrangian velocity distributions, leading to power law transit time distributions. The origins of this behavior (existence of velocity correlations in capillary networks, influence of the coupling with the feeding arterioles and draining veins, topological disorder, complex blood rheology) are studied by comparison with results obtained in various model capillary networks of controlled disorder. ERC BrainMicroFlow GA615102, ERC ReactiveFronts GA648377.

  19. Effective and Efficient Correlation Analysis with Application to Market Basket Analysis and Network Community Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duan, Lian

    2012-01-01

    Finding the most interesting correlations among items is essential for problems in many commercial, medical, and scientific domains. For example, what kinds of items should be recommended with regard to what has been purchased by a customer? How to arrange the store shelf in order to increase sales? How to partition the whole social network into…

  20. The Software Correlator of the Chinese VLBI Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Weimin; Quan, Ying; Shu, Fengchun; Chen, Zhong; Chen, Shanshan; Wang, Weihua; Wang, Guangli

    2010-01-01

    The software correlator of the Chinese VLBI Network (CVN) has played an irreplaceable role in the CVN routine data processing, e.g., in the Chinese lunar exploration project. This correlator will be upgraded to process geodetic and astronomical observation data. In the future, with several new stations joining the network, CVN will carry out crustal movement observations, quick UT1 measurements, astrophysical observations, and deep space exploration activities. For the geodetic or astronomical observations, we need a wide-band 10-station correlator. For spacecraft tracking, a realtime and highly reliable correlator is essential. To meet the scientific and navigation requirements of CVN, two parallel software correlators in the multiprocessor environments are under development. A high speed, 10-station prototype correlator using the mixed Pthreads and MPI (Massage Passing Interface) parallel algorithm on a computer cluster platform is being developed. Another real-time software correlator for spacecraft tracking adopts the thread-parallel technology, and it runs on the SMP (Symmetric Multiple Processor) servers. Both correlators have the characteristic of flexible structure and scalability.

  1. Infinitely Robust Order and Local Order-Parameter Tulips in Apollonian Networks with Quenched Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadir Kaplan, C.; Hinczewski, Michael; Berker, A. Nihat

    2009-03-01

    For a variety of quenched random spin systems on an Apollonian network, including ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic bond percolation and the Ising spin glass, we find the persistence of ordered phases up to infinite temperature over the entire range of disorder.[1] We develop a renormalization-group technique that yields highly detailed information, including the exact distributions of local magnetizations and local spin-glass order parameters, which turn out to exhibit, as function of temperature, complex and distinctive tulip patterns. [1] C.N. Kaplan, M. Hinczewski, and A.N. Berker, arXiv:0811.3437v1 [cond-mat.dis-nn] (2008).

  2. Higher-Order Synaptic Interactions Coordinate Dynamics in Recurrent Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Brendan; MacLean, Jason N.

    2016-01-01

    Linking synaptic connectivity to dynamics is key to understanding information processing in neocortex. Circuit dynamics emerge from complex interactions of interconnected neurons, necessitating that links between connectivity and dynamics be evaluated at the network level. Here we map propagating activity in large neuronal ensembles from mouse neocortex and compare it to a recurrent network model, where connectivity can be precisely measured and manipulated. We find that a dynamical feature dominates statistical descriptions of propagating activity for both neocortex and the model: convergent clusters comprised of fan-in triangle motifs, where two input neurons are themselves connected. Fan-in triangles coordinate the timing of presynaptic inputs during ongoing activity to effectively generate postsynaptic spiking. As a result, paradoxically, fan-in triangles dominate the statistics of spike propagation even in randomly connected recurrent networks. Interplay between higher-order synaptic connectivity and the integrative properties of neurons constrains the structure of network dynamics and shapes the routing of information in neocortex. PMID:27542093

  3. Higher-Order Synaptic Interactions Coordinate Dynamics in Recurrent Networks.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Brendan; MacLean, Jason N

    2016-08-01

    Linking synaptic connectivity to dynamics is key to understanding information processing in neocortex. Circuit dynamics emerge from complex interactions of interconnected neurons, necessitating that links between connectivity and dynamics be evaluated at the network level. Here we map propagating activity in large neuronal ensembles from mouse neocortex and compare it to a recurrent network model, where connectivity can be precisely measured and manipulated. We find that a dynamical feature dominates statistical descriptions of propagating activity for both neocortex and the model: convergent clusters comprised of fan-in triangle motifs, where two input neurons are themselves connected. Fan-in triangles coordinate the timing of presynaptic inputs during ongoing activity to effectively generate postsynaptic spiking. As a result, paradoxically, fan-in triangles dominate the statistics of spike propagation even in randomly connected recurrent networks. Interplay between higher-order synaptic connectivity and the integrative properties of neurons constrains the structure of network dynamics and shapes the routing of information in neocortex. PMID:27542093

  4. A generative spike train model with time-structured higher order correlations

    PubMed Central

    Trousdale, James; Hu, Yu; Shea-Brown, Eric; Josić, Krešimir

    2013-01-01

    Emerging technologies are revealing the spiking activity in ever larger neural ensembles. Frequently, this spiking is far from independent, with correlations in the spike times of different cells. Understanding how such correlations impact the dynamics and function of neural ensembles remains an important open problem. Here we describe a new, generative model for correlated spike trains that can exhibit many of the features observed in data. Extending prior work in mathematical finance, this generalized thinning and shift (GTaS) model creates marginally Poisson spike trains with diverse temporal correlation structures. We give several examples which highlight the model's flexibility and utility. For instance, we use it to examine how a neural network responds to highly structured patterns of inputs. We then show that the GTaS model is analytically tractable, and derive cumulant densities of all orders in terms of model parameters. The GTaS framework can therefore be an important tool in the experimental and theoretical exploration of neural dynamics. PMID:23908626

  5. Correlations between Community Structure and Link Formation in Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; He, Jia-Lin; Kapoor, Komal; Srivastava, Jaideep

    2013-01-01

    Background Links in complex networks commonly represent specific ties between pairs of nodes, such as protein-protein interactions in biological networks or friendships in social networks. However, understanding the mechanism of link formation in complex networks is a long standing challenge for network analysis and data mining. Methodology/Principal Findings Links in complex networks have a tendency to cluster locally and form so-called communities. This widely existed phenomenon reflects some underlying mechanism of link formation. To study the correlations between community structure and link formation, we present a general computational framework including a theory for network partitioning and link probability estimation. Our approach enables us to accurately identify missing links in partially observed networks in an efficient way. The links having high connection likelihoods in the communities reveal that links are formed preferentially to create cliques and accordingly promote the clustering level of the communities. The experimental results verify that such a mechanism can be well captured by our approach. Conclusions/Significance Our findings provide a new insight into understanding how links are created in the communities. The computational framework opens a wide range of possibilities to develop new approaches and applications, such as community detection and missing link prediction. PMID:24039818

  6. Correlated gene expression supports synchronous activity in brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Richiardi, Jonas; Altmann, Andre; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Chang, Catie; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J.; Bokde, Arun L.W.; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Lemaître, Hervé; Mann, Karl F.; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W.; Smolka, Michael N.; Spanagel, Rainer; Ströhle, Andreas; Schumann, Gunter; Hawrylycz, Mike; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Greicius, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    During rest, brain activity is synchronized between different regions widely distributed throughout the brain, forming functional networks. However, the molecular mechanisms supporting functional connectivity remain undefined. We show that functional brain networks defined with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging can be recapitulated by using measures of correlated gene expression in a post mortem brain tissue data set. The set of 136 genes we identify is significantly enriched for ion channels. Polymorphisms in this set of genes significantly affect resting-state functional connectivity in a large sample of healthy adolescents. Expression levels of these genes are also significantly associated with axonal connectivity in the mouse. The results provide convergent, multimodal evidence that resting-state functional networks correlate with the orchestrated activity of dozens of genes linked to ion channel activity and synaptic function. PMID:26068849

  7. Probing non local order parameters in highly correlated Bose insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Ehud

    2008-03-01

    Ground states of integer spin chains are known since the late 80's to sustain highly non local order described by infinite string operators of the spins. Such states defy the usual Landau theory description and can be considered simple prototypes of topological order. Recently we showed that spinless Bose insulators with nearest neighbor or longer range repulsion in one dimension can exhibit similar string order in terms of the boson density [1]. The tunability of cold atomic systems would allow much more flexibility in probing the non local order than spin systems do. For example the bosons can be tuned across a quantum phase transition between the exotic insulator, which we term Haldane insulator, and the usual Mott insulator. Investigating how the transition responds to external perturbations lends direct access to properties of the string order parameter. I will demonstrate this with several new results obtained from a field theoretic description of the phases and confirmed by numerical calculations using DMRG. Particularly revealing of the unusual character of the string order is the prediction that any external perturbation, which breaks the lattice inversion symmetry, would eliminate the distinction between the Haldane and Mott phases and allow a fully gapped adiabatic connection between them. This is remarkable given that neither phase involves spontaneous breaking of lattice inversion symmetry. We also predict that inter-chain tunneling destroys the direct phase transition between the two insulators by establishing an intermediate superfluid phase. Finally I will discuss how the new phases and phase transitions may be realized and probed in actual experiments with ultra cold atoms or polar molecules. [1] E. G. Dalla Torre, E. Berg and E. Altman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 260401 (2006)

  8. Robustness of onionlike correlated networks against targeted attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanizawa, Toshihiro; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2012-04-01

    Recently, it was found by Schneider [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USAPNASA60027-842410.1073/pnas.1009440108 108, 3838 (2011)], using simulations, that scale-free networks with “onion structure” are very robust against targeted high degree attacks. The onion structure is a network where nodes with almost the same degree are connected. Motivated by this work, we propose and analyze, based on analytical considerations, an onionlike candidate for a nearly optimal structure against simultaneous random and targeted high degree node attacks. The nearly optimal structure can be viewed as a set of hierarchically interconnected random regular graphs,the degrees and populations of whose nodes are specified by the degree distribution. This network structure exhibits an extremely assortative degree-degree correlation and has a close relationship to the “onion structure.” After deriving a set of exact expressions that enable us to calculate the critical percolation threshold and the giant component of a correlated network for an arbitrary type of node removal, we apply the theory to the cases of random scale-free networks that are highly vulnerable against targeted high degree node removal. Our results show that this vulnerability can be significantly reduced by implementing this onionlike type of degree-degree correlation without much undermining the almost complete robustness against random node removal. We also investigate in detail the robustness enhancement due to assortative degree-degree correlation by introducing a joint degree-degree probability matrix that interpolates between an uncorrelated network structure and the onionlike structure proposed here by tuning a single control parameter. The optimal values of the control parameter that maximize the robustness against simultaneous random and targeted attacks are also determined. Our analytical calculations are supported by numerical simulations.

  9. Theoretical scheme of thermal-light many-ghost imaging by Nth-order intensity correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yingchuan; Kuang Leman

    2011-05-15

    In this paper, we propose a theoretical scheme of many-ghost imaging in terms of Nth-order correlated thermal light. We obtain the Gaussian thin lens equations in the many-ghost imaging protocol. We show that it is possible to produce N-1 ghost images of an object at different places in a nonlocal fashion by means of a higher order correlated imaging process with an Nth-order correlated thermal source and correlation measurements. We investigate the visibility of the ghost images in the scheme and obtain the upper bounds of the visibility for the Nth-order correlated thermal-light ghost imaging. It is found that the visibility of the ghost images can be dramatically enhanced when the order of correlation becomes larger. It is pointed out that the many-ghost imaging phenomenon is an observable physical effect induced by higher order coherence or higher order correlations of optical fields.

  10. Spatially correlated heterogeneous aspirations to enhance network reciprocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Jun; Nakata, Makoto; Hagishima, Aya; Ikegaya, Naoki

    2012-02-01

    Perc & Wang demonstrated that aspiring to be the fittest under conditions of pairwise strategy updating enhances network reciprocity in structured populations playing 2×2 Prisoner's Dilemma games (Z. Wang, M. Perc, Aspiring to the fittest and promoted of cooperation in the Prisoner's Dilemma game, Physical Review E 82 (2010) 021115; M. Perc, Z. Wang, Heterogeneous aspiration promotes cooperation in the Prisoner's Dilemma game, PLOS one 5 (12) (2010) e15117). Through numerical simulations, this paper shows that network reciprocity is even greater if heterogeneous aspirations are imposed. We also suggest why heterogeneous aspiration fosters network reciprocity. It distributes strategy updating speed among agents in a manner that fortifies the initially allocated cooperators' clusters against invasion. This finding prompted us to further enhance the usual heterogeneous aspiration cases for heterogeneous network topologies. We find that a negative correlation between degree and aspiration level does extend cooperation among heterogeneously structured agents.

  11. Synchronization, quantum correlations and entanglement in oscillator networks

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, Gonzalo; Galve, Fernando; Giorgi, Gian Luca; Hernández-García, Emilio; Zambrini, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    Synchronization is one of the paradigmatic phenomena in the study of complex systems. It has been explored theoretically and experimentally mostly to understand natural phenomena, but also in view of technological applications. Although several mechanisms and conditions for synchronous behavior in spatially extended systems and networks have been identified, the emergence of this phenomenon has been largely unexplored in quantum systems until very recently. Here we discuss synchronization in quantum networks of different harmonic oscillators relaxing towards a stationary state, being essential the form of dissipation. By local tuning of one of the oscillators, we establish the conditions for synchronous dynamics, in the whole network or in a motif. Beyond the classical regime we show that synchronization between (even unlinked) nodes witnesses the presence of quantum correlations and entanglement. Furthermore, synchronization and entanglement can be induced between two different oscillators if properly linked to a random network. PMID:23486526

  12. Effects of degree correlations on the explosive synchronization of scale-free networks.

    PubMed

    Sendiña-Nadal, I; Leyva, I; Navas, A; Villacorta-Atienza, J A; Almendral, J A; Wang, Z; Boccaletti, S

    2015-03-01

    We study the organization of finite-size, large ensembles of phase oscillators networking via scale-free topologies in the presence of a positive correlation between the oscillators' natural frequencies and the network's degrees. Under those circumstances, abrupt transitions to synchronization are known to occur in growing scale-free networks, while the transition has a completely different nature for static random configurations preserving the same structure-dynamics correlation. We show that the further presence of degree-degree correlations in the network structure has important consequences on the nature of the phase transition characterizing the passage from the phase-incoherent to the phase-coherent network state. While high levels of positive and negative mixing consistently induce a second-order phase transition, moderate values of assortative mixing, such as those ubiquitously characterizing social networks in the real world, greatly enhance the irreversible nature of explosive synchronization in scale-free networks. The latter effect corresponds to a maximization of the area and of the width of the hysteretic loop that differentiates the forward and backward transitions to synchronization. PMID:25871161

  13. Synchronization of fractional-order linear complex networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junwei; Zeng, Caibin

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we concentrate on the synchronization problem of fractional-order complex networks with general linear dynamics under connected topology. By introducing a pseudo-state transformation, the problem is converted into an equivalent simultaneous stabilization problem of independent subsystems, which is characterized by nonzero eigenvalues of the Laplacian matrix. Then, sufficient conditions in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) for synchronization are established, which can be easily solved by efficient convex optimization algorithms. Finally, three examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:25467542

  14. Default Mode and Executive Networks Areas: Association with the Serial Order in Divergent Thinking.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Jarmo; Numminen, Jussi; Hlushchuk, Yevhen; Antell, Henrik; Taatila, Vesa; Suomala, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    Scientific findings have suggested a two-fold structure of the cognitive process. By using the heuristic thinking mode, people automatically process information that tends to be invariant across days, whereas by using the explicit thinking mode people explicitly process information that tends to be variant compared to typical previously learned information patterns. Previous studies on creativity found an association between creativity and the brain regions in the prefrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex, the default mode network and the executive network. However, which neural networks contribute to the explicit mode of thinking during idea generation remains an open question. We employed an fMRI paradigm to examine which brain regions were activated when participants (n = 16) mentally generated alternative uses for everyday objects. Most previous creativity studies required participants to verbalize responses during idea generation, whereas in this study participants produced mental alternatives without verbalizing. This study found activation in the left anterior insula when contrasting idea generation and object identification. This finding suggests that the insula (part of the brain's salience network) plays a role in facilitating both the central executive and default mode networks to activate idea generation. We also investigated closely the effect of the serial order of idea being generated on brain responses: The amplitude of fMRI responses correlated positively with the serial order of idea being generated in the anterior cingulate cortex, which is part of the central executive network. Positive correlation with the serial order was also observed in the regions typically assigned to the default mode network: the precuneus/cuneus, inferior parietal lobule and posterior cingulate cortex. These networks support the explicit mode of thinking and help the individual to convert conventional mental models to new ones. The serial order correlated

  15. Nanostructural Units in Disordered Network-Forming Materials and the Origin of Intermediate Range Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massobrio, C.

    Disordered network-forming materials are characterized by structural order extending well beyond the first shell of neighbors. For these reasons, reliable atomic-scale modeling is ideally suited to complement experiments in the search of the microscopic origins of this behavior. A key to understand why these systems have specific structural properties is to focus on the nanostructural units by which they are composed. By analyzing the role played by these units, one is able to put forth a valuable rationale accounting for the occurrence of intermediate range order. In this review, we present recent results obtained via first-principles molecular dynamics on a set of disordered network-forming materials, with special emphasis on the prototypical system GeSe2. In a short introduction we begin with explicit examples of differences, at the structure factor and pair correlation level, between networks exhibiting intermediate range order and those purely disordered at any length scale. Concerning our theoretical approach, we rely on density functional theory and first-principles molecular dynamics to follow the time trajectories at finite temperature of these networks and obtain statistical averages to be compared with the experimental quantities. Specific methodological issues pertaining to the simulation of disordered materials are analyzed in detail (size of the computational cell, role of exchange-correlation functional, and production of an amorphous phase). Then, three specific points are addressed by considering both experimental and simulation results: first, the atomic-scale signature of intermediate range order as it manifests itself via the appearance of the first sharp diffraction peak in the total neutron structure factor; second, the correlation existing between fluctuations of concentration on the intermediate distances scale and the shape taken by the partial structure factors; and third, the establishment of the nanostructural units responsible for the

  16. Disorder overtakes order in information concentration over quantum networks

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhu, R.; Pradhan, Saurabh; Sen, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2011-10-15

    We consider different classes of quenched disordered quantum XY spin chains, including a quantum XY spin glass and a quantum XY model with a random transverse field, and investigate the behavior of genuine multiparty entanglement in the ground states of these models. We find that there are distinct ranges of the disorder parameter that give rise to a higher genuine multiparty entanglement than in the corresponding systems without disorder: an order-from-disorder phenomenon in genuine multiparty entanglement. Moreover, we show that such a disorder-induced advantage in the genuine multiparty entanglement is useful: It is almost certainly accompanied by a order-from-disorder phenomenon for a multiport quantum dense coding capacity with the same ground state used as a multiport quantum network.

  17. Conditions for Viral Influence Spreading through Multiplex Correlated Social Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yanqing; Havlin, Shlomo; Makse, Hernán A.

    2014-04-01

    A fundamental problem in network science is to predict how certain individuals are able to initiate new networks to spring up "new ideas." Frequently, these changes in trends are triggered by a few innovators who rapidly impose their ideas through "viral" influence spreading, producing cascades of followers and fragmenting an old network to create a new one. Typical examples include the rise of scientific ideas or abrupt changes in social media, like the rise of Facebook to the detriment of Myspace. How this process arises in practice has not been conclusively demonstrated. Here, we show that a condition for sustaining a viral spreading process is the existence of a multiplex-correlated graph with hidden "influence links." Analytical solutions predict percolation-phase transitions, either abrupt or continuous, where networks are disintegrated through viral cascades of followers, as in empirical data. Our modeling predicts the strict conditions to sustain a large viral spreading via a scaling form of the local correlation function between multilayers, which we also confirm empirically. Ultimately, the theory predicts the conditions for viral cascading in a large class of multiplex networks ranging from social to financial systems and markets.

  18. Network Connectivity for Permanent, Transient, Independent, and Correlated Faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Allan L.; Sicher, Courtney; henry, Courtney

    2012-01-01

    This paper develops a method for the quantitative analysis of network connectivity in the presence of both permanent and transient faults. Even though transient noise is considered a common occurrence in networks, a survey of the literature reveals an emphasis on permanent faults. Transient faults introduce a time element into the analysis of network reliability. With permanent faults it is sufficient to consider the faults that have accumulated by the end of the operating period. With transient faults the arrival and recovery time must be included. The number and location of faults in the system is a dynamic variable. Transient faults also introduce system recovery into the analysis. The goal is the quantitative assessment of network connectivity in the presence of both permanent and transient faults. The approach is to construct a global model that includes all classes of faults: permanent, transient, independent, and correlated. A theorem is derived about this model that give distributions for (1) the number of fault occurrences, (2) the type of fault occurrence, (3) the time of the fault occurrences, and (4) the location of the fault occurrence. These results are applied to compare and contrast the connectivity of different network architectures in the presence of permanent, transient, independent, and correlated faults. The examples below use a Monte Carlo simulation, but the theorem mentioned above could be used to guide fault-injections in a laboratory.

  19. Clinical Risk Prediction by Exploring High-Order Feature Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Hu, Jianying

    2014-01-01

    Clinical risk prediction is one important problem in medical informatics, and logistic regression is one of the most widely used approaches for clinical risk prediction. In many cases, the number of potential risk factors is fairly large and the actual set of factors that contribute to the risk is small. Therefore sparse logistic regression is proposed, which can not only predict the clinical risk but also identify the set of relevant risk factors. The inputs of logistic regression and sparse logistic regression are required to be in vector form. This limits the applicability of these models in the problems when the data cannot be naturally represented vectors (e.g., medical images are two-dimensional matrices). To handle the cases when the data are in the form of multi-dimensional arrays, we propose HOSLR: High-Order Sparse Logistic Regression, which can be viewed as a high order extension of sparse logistic regression. Instead of solving one classification vector as in conventional logistic regression, we solve for K classification vectors in HOSLR (K is the number of modes in the data). A block proximal descent approach is proposed to solve the problem and its convergence is guaranteed. Finally we validate the effectiveness of HOSLR on predicting the onset risk of patients with Alzheimer’s disease and heart failure. PMID:25954428

  20. Cascade Error Projection with Low Bit Weight Quantization for High Order Correlation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Tuan A.; Daud, Taher

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we reinvestigate the solution for chaotic time series prediction problem using neural network approach. The nature of this problem is such that the data sequences are never repeated, but they are rather in chaotic region. However, these data sequences are correlated between past, present, and future data in high order. We use Cascade Error Projection (CEP) learning algorithm to capture the high order correlation between past and present data to predict a future data using limited weight quantization constraints. This will help to predict a future information that will provide us better estimation in time for intelligent control system. In our earlier work, it has been shown that CEP can sufficiently learn 5-8 bit parity problem with 4- or more bits, and color segmentation problem with 7- or more bits of weight quantization. In this paper, we demonstrate that chaotic time series can be learned and generalized well with as low as 4-bit weight quantization using round-off and truncation techniques. The results show that generalization feature will suffer less as more bit weight quantization is available and error surfaces with the round-off technique are more symmetric around zero than error surfaces with the truncation technique. This study suggests that CEP is an implementable learning technique for hardware consideration.

  1. Detecting Distributed Network Traffic Anomaly with Network-Wide Correlation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonglin, Li; Guangmin, Hu; Xingmiao, Yao; Dan, Yang

    2008-12-01

    Distributed network traffic anomaly refers to a traffic abnormal behavior involving many links of a network and caused by the same source (e.g., DDoS attack, worm propagation). The anomaly transiting in a single link might be unnoticeable and hard to detect, while the anomalous aggregation from many links can be prevailing, and does more harm to the networks. Aiming at the similar features of distributed traffic anomaly on many links, this paper proposes a network-wide detection method by performing anomalous correlation analysis of traffic signals' instantaneous parameters. In our method, traffic signals' instantaneous parameters are firstly computed, and their network-wide anomalous space is then extracted via traffic prediction. Finally, an anomaly is detected by a global correlation coefficient of anomalous space. Our evaluation using Abilene traffic traces demonstrates the excellent performance of this approach for distributed traffic anomaly detection.

  2. Using higher-order Markov models to reveal flow-based communities in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salnikov, Vsevolod; Schaub, Michael T.; Lambiotte, Renaud

    2016-03-01

    Complex systems made of interacting elements are commonly abstracted as networks, in which nodes are associated with dynamic state variables, whose evolution is driven by interactions mediated by the edges. Markov processes have been the prevailing paradigm to model such a network-based dynamics, for instance in the form of random walks or other types of diffusions. Despite the success of this modelling perspective for numerous applications, it represents an over-simplification of several real-world systems. Importantly, simple Markov models lack memory in their dynamics, an assumption often not realistic in practice. Here, we explore possibilities to enrich the system description by means of second-order Markov models, exploiting empirical pathway information. We focus on the problem of community detection and show that standard network algorithms can be generalized in order to extract novel temporal information about the system under investigation. We also apply our methodology to temporal networks, where we can uncover communities shaped by the temporal correlations in the system. Finally, we discuss relations of the framework of second order Markov processes and the recently proposed formalism of using non-backtracking matrices for community detection.

  3. Using higher-order Markov models to reveal flow-based communities in networks

    PubMed Central

    Salnikov, Vsevolod; Schaub, Michael T.; Lambiotte, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Complex systems made of interacting elements are commonly abstracted as networks, in which nodes are associated with dynamic state variables, whose evolution is driven by interactions mediated by the edges. Markov processes have been the prevailing paradigm to model such a network-based dynamics, for instance in the form of random walks or other types of diffusions. Despite the success of this modelling perspective for numerous applications, it represents an over-simplification of several real-world systems. Importantly, simple Markov models lack memory in their dynamics, an assumption often not realistic in practice. Here, we explore possibilities to enrich the system description by means of second-order Markov models, exploiting empirical pathway information. We focus on the problem of community detection and show that standard network algorithms can be generalized in order to extract novel temporal information about the system under investigation. We also apply our methodology to temporal networks, where we can uncover communities shaped by the temporal correlations in the system. Finally, we discuss relations of the framework of second order Markov processes and the recently proposed formalism of using non-backtracking matrices for community detection. PMID:27029508

  4. Using higher-order Markov models to reveal flow-based communities in networks.

    PubMed

    Salnikov, Vsevolod; Schaub, Michael T; Lambiotte, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Complex systems made of interacting elements are commonly abstracted as networks, in which nodes are associated with dynamic state variables, whose evolution is driven by interactions mediated by the edges. Markov processes have been the prevailing paradigm to model such a network-based dynamics, for instance in the form of random walks or other types of diffusions. Despite the success of this modelling perspective for numerous applications, it represents an over-simplification of several real-world systems. Importantly, simple Markov models lack memory in their dynamics, an assumption often not realistic in practice. Here, we explore possibilities to enrich the system description by means of second-order Markov models, exploiting empirical pathway information. We focus on the problem of community detection and show that standard network algorithms can be generalized in order to extract novel temporal information about the system under investigation. We also apply our methodology to temporal networks, where we can uncover communities shaped by the temporal correlations in the system. Finally, we discuss relations of the framework of second order Markov processes and the recently proposed formalism of using non-backtracking matrices for community detection. PMID:27029508

  5. Complementary Characteristics of Correlation Patterns in Morphometric Correlation Networks of Cortical Thickness, Surface Area, and Gray Matter Volume

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin-Ju; Kwon, Hunki; Lee, Jong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Morphometric correlation networks of cortical thickness, surface area, and gray matter volume have statistically different structural topology. However, there is no report directly describing their correlation patterns in view of interregional covariance. Here, we examined the characteristics of the correlation patterns in three morphometric networks of cortical thickness, surface area, and gray matter volume using a Venn diagram concept across 314 normal subjects. We found that over 60% of all nonoverlapping correlation patterns emerged with divergent unique patterns, while there were 10% of all common edges in ipsilateral and homotopic regions among the three morphometric correlation networks. It was also found that the network parameters of the three networks were different. Our findings showed that correlation patterns of the network itself can provide complementary information when compared with network properties. We demonstrate that morphometric correlation networks of distinct structural phenotypes have different correlation patterns and different network properties. This finding implies that the topology of each morphometric correlation network may reflect different aspects of each morphometric descriptor. PMID:27226000

  6. Complementary Characteristics of Correlation Patterns in Morphometric Correlation Networks of Cortical Thickness, Surface Area, and Gray Matter Volume.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin-Ju; Kwon, Hunki; Lee, Jong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Morphometric correlation networks of cortical thickness, surface area, and gray matter volume have statistically different structural topology. However, there is no report directly describing their correlation patterns in view of interregional covariance. Here, we examined the characteristics of the correlation patterns in three morphometric networks of cortical thickness, surface area, and gray matter volume using a Venn diagram concept across 314 normal subjects. We found that over 60% of all nonoverlapping correlation patterns emerged with divergent unique patterns, while there were 10% of all common edges in ipsilateral and homotopic regions among the three morphometric correlation networks. It was also found that the network parameters of the three networks were different. Our findings showed that correlation patterns of the network itself can provide complementary information when compared with network properties. We demonstrate that morphometric correlation networks of distinct structural phenotypes have different correlation patterns and different network properties. This finding implies that the topology of each morphometric correlation network may reflect different aspects of each morphometric descriptor. PMID:27226000

  7. Dopaminergic correlates of metabolic network activity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Holtbernd, Florian; Ma, Yilong; Peng, Shichun; Schwartz, Frank; Timmermann, Lars; Kracht, Lutz; Fink, Gereon R; Tang, Chris C; Eidelberg, David; Eggers, Carsten

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with distinct metabolic covariance patterns that relate to the motor and cognitive manifestations of the disorder. It is not known, however, how the expression of these patterns relates to measurements of nigrostriatal dopaminergic activity from the same individuals. To explore these associations, we studied 106 PD subjects who underwent cerebral PET with both (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and (18) F-fluoro-L-dopa (FDOPA). Expression values for the PD motor- and cognition-related metabolic patterns (PDRP and PDCP, respectively) were computed for each subject; these measures were correlated with FDOPA uptake on a voxel-by-voxel basis. To explore the relationship between dopaminergic function and local metabolic activity, caudate and putamen FDOPA PET signal was correlated voxel-wise with FDG uptake over the entire brain. PDRP expression correlated with FDOPA uptake in caudate and putamen (P < 0.001), while PDCP expression correlated with uptake in the anterior striatum (P < 0.001). While statistically significant, the correlations were only of modest size, accounting for less than 20% of the overall variation in these measures. After controlling for PDCP expression, PDRP correlations were significant only in the posterior putamen. Of note, voxel-wise correlations between caudate/putamen FDOPA uptake and whole-brain FDG uptake were significant almost exclusively in PDRP regions. Overall, the data indicate that PDRP and PDCP expression correlates significantly with PET indices of presynaptic dopaminergic functioning obtained in the same individuals. Even so, the modest size of these correlations suggests that in PD patients, individual differences in network activity cannot be explained solely by nigrostriatal dopamine loss. PMID:26037537

  8. Correlation and network analysis of global financial indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sunil; Deo, Nivedita

    2012-08-01

    Random matrix theory (RMT) and network methods are applied to investigate the correlation and network properties of 20 financial indices. The results are compared before and during the financial crisis of 2008. In the RMT method, the components of eigenvectors corresponding to the second largest eigenvalue form two clusters of indices in the positive and negative directions. The components of these two clusters switch in opposite directions during the crisis. The network analysis uses the Fruchterman-Reingold layout to find clusters in the network of indices at different thresholds. At a threshold of 0.6, before the crisis, financial indices corresponding to the Americas, Europe, and Asia-Pacific form separate clusters. On the other hand, during the crisis at the same threshold, the American and European indices combine together to form a strongly linked cluster while the Asia-Pacific indices form a separate weakly linked cluster. If the value of the threshold is further increased to 0.9 then the European indices (France, Germany, and the United Kingdom) are found to be the most tightly linked indices. The structure of the minimum spanning tree of financial indices is more starlike before the crisis and it changes to become more chainlike during the crisis. The average linkage hierarchical clustering algorithm is used to find a clearer cluster structure in the network of financial indices. The cophenetic correlation coefficients are calculated and found to increase significantly, which indicates that the hierarchy increases during the financial crisis. These results show that there is substantial change in the structure of the organization of financial indices during a financial crisis.

  9. Correlation and network analysis of global financial indices.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Deo, Nivedita

    2012-08-01

    Random matrix theory (RMT) and network methods are applied to investigate the correlation and network properties of 20 financial indices. The results are compared before and during the financial crisis of 2008. In the RMT method, the components of eigenvectors corresponding to the second largest eigenvalue form two clusters of indices in the positive and negative directions. The components of these two clusters switch in opposite directions during the crisis. The network analysis uses the Fruchterman-Reingold layout to find clusters in the network of indices at different thresholds. At a threshold of 0.6, before the crisis, financial indices corresponding to the Americas, Europe, and Asia-Pacific form separate clusters. On the other hand, during the crisis at the same threshold, the American and European indices combine together to form a strongly linked cluster while the Asia-Pacific indices form a separate weakly linked cluster. If the value of the threshold is further increased to 0.9 then the European indices (France, Germany, and the United Kingdom) are found to be the most tightly linked indices. The structure of the minimum spanning tree of financial indices is more starlike before the crisis and it changes to become more chainlike during the crisis. The average linkage hierarchical clustering algorithm is used to find a clearer cluster structure in the network of financial indices. The cophenetic correlation coefficients are calculated and found to increase significantly, which indicates that the hierarchy increases during the financial crisis. These results show that there is substantial change in the structure of the organization of financial indices during a financial crisis. PMID:23005819

  10. Exploring the miRNA Regulatory Network Using Evolutionary Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Obermayer, Benedikt; Levine, Erel

    2014-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation by miRNAs is a widespread and highly conserved phenomenon in metazoans, with several hundreds to thousands of conserved binding sites for each miRNA, and up to two thirds of all genes under miRNA regulation. At the same time, the effect of miRNA regulation on mRNA and protein levels is usually quite modest and associated phenotypes are often weak or subtle. This has given rise to the notion that the highly interconnected miRNA regulatory network exerts its function less through any individual link and more via collective effects that lead to a functional interdependence of network links. We present a Bayesian framework to quantify conservation of miRNA target sites using vertebrate whole-genome alignments. The increased statistical power of our phylogenetic model allows detection of evolutionary correlation in the conservation patterns of site pairs. Such correlations could result from collective functions in the regulatory network. For instance, co-conservation of target site pairs supports a selective benefit of combinatorial regulation by multiple miRNAs. We find that some miRNA families are under pronounced co-targeting constraints, indicating a high connectivity in the regulatory network, while others appear to function in a more isolated way. By analyzing coordinated targeting of different curated gene sets, we observe distinct evolutionary signatures for protein complexes and signaling pathways that could reflect differences in control strategies. Our method is easily scalable to analyze upcoming larger data sets, and readily adaptable to detect high-level selective constraints between other genomic loci. We thus provide a proof-of-principle method to understand regulatory networks from an evolutionary perspective. PMID:25299225

  11. Innovation diffusion equations on correlated scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertotti, M. L.; Brunner, J.; Modanese, G.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a heterogeneous network structure into the Bass diffusion model, in order to study the diffusion times of innovation or information in networks with a scale-free structure, typical of regions where diffusion is sensitive to geographic and logistic influences (like for instance Alpine regions). We consider both the diffusion peak times of the total population and of the link classes. In the familiar trickle-down processes the adoption curve of the hubs is found to anticipate the total adoption in a predictable way. In a major departure from the standard model, we model a trickle-up process by introducing heterogeneous publicity coefficients (which can also be negative for the hubs, thus turning them into stiflers) and a stochastic term which represents the erratic generation of innovation at the periphery of the network. The results confirm the robustness of the Bass model and expand considerably its range of applicability.

  12. Modeling network correlations in cortical tissue from juvenile human epileptics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Jonathan Paul

    Models of neural tissue can make predictions about a real neural network, but these predictions rely on the data to determine parameters. Hence, the model is only as good as the data. I collected in vitro data removed from juvenile humans with refractory epilepsy, and found human-specific spatial and temporal dynamics that are not found in rats. I will first describe the general characteristics of the human data in comparison with rat data, and my attempts to model these differences with three popular models of neural networks: branching, pair-wise maximum entropy, and a forest fire model. I will describe three key discoveries from this exploration: first, spatial dynamics are more easily satisfied than temporal in both the rat and human tissue, second temporal correlations are not captured by the branching or the maximum entropy model, and thirdly, strong temporal correlations can be accounted for with the addition of a parameter in the forest fire model. Finally I will suggest new questions that this research has revealed about human tissue, and models of neural networks.

  13. Bose-Einstein or HBT Correlation Signals of a Second Order QCD Phase Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Csoergo, T.; Hegyi, S.; Novak, T.; Zajc, W. A.

    2006-04-11

    For particles emerging from a second order QCD phase transition, we show that a recently introduced shape parameter of the Bose-Einstein correlation function, the Levy index of stability equals to the correlation exponent -- one of the critical exponents that characterize the behaviour of the matter in the vicinity of the second order phase transition point. Hence the shape of the Bose-Einstein / HBT correlation functions, when measured as a function of bombarding energy and centrality in various heavy ion reactions, can be utilized to locate experimentally the second order phase transition and the critical end point of the first order phase transition line in QCD.

  14. NASF transposition network: A computing network for unscrambling p-ordered vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    The viewpoints of design, programming, and application of the transportation network (TN) is presented. The TN is a programmable combinational logic network that connects 521 memory modules to 512 processors. The unscrambling of p-ordered vectors to 1-ordered vectors in one cycle is described. The TN design is based upon the concept of cyclic groups from abstract algebra and primitive roots and indices from number theory. The programming of the TN is very simple, requiring only 20 bits: 10 bits for offset control and 10 bits for barrel switch shift control. This simple control is executed by the control unit (CU), not the processors. Any memory access by a processor must be coordinated with the CU and wait for all other processors to come to a synchronization point. These wait and synchronization events can be a degradation in performance to a computation. The TN application is for multidimensional data manipulation, matrix processing, and data sorting, and can also perform a perfect shuffle. Unlike other more complicated and powerful permutation networks, the TN cannot, if possible at all, unscramble non-p-ordered vectors in one cycle.

  15. Using second-order generalized estimating equations to model heterogeneous intraclass correlation in cluster randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Crespi, Catherine M.; Wong, Weng Kee; Mishra, Shiraz I.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY In cluster randomized trials, it is commonly assumed that the magnitude of the correlation among subjects within a cluster is constant across clusters. However, the correlation may in fact be heterogeneous and depend on cluster characteristics. Accurate modeling of the correlation has the potential to improve inference. We use second-order generalized estimating equations to model heterogeneous correlation in cluster randomized trials. Using simulation studies we show that accurate modeling of heterogeneous correlation can improve inference when the correlation is high or varies by cluster size. We apply the methods to a cluster randomized trial of an intervention to promote breast cancer screening. PMID:19109804

  16. BRAIN NETWORKS. Correlated gene expression supports synchronous activity in brain networks.

    PubMed

    Richiardi, Jonas; Altmann, Andre; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Chang, Catie; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Lemaître, Hervé; Mann, Karl F; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W; Smolka, Michael N; Spanagel, Rainer; Ströhle, Andreas; Schumann, Gunter; Hawrylycz, Mike; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Greicius, Michael D

    2015-06-12

    During rest, brain activity is synchronized between different regions widely distributed throughout the brain, forming functional networks. However, the molecular mechanisms supporting functional connectivity remain undefined. We show that functional brain networks defined with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging can be recapitulated by using measures of correlated gene expression in a post mortem brain tissue data set. The set of 136 genes we identify is significantly enriched for ion channels. Polymorphisms in this set of genes significantly affect resting-state functional connectivity in a large sample of healthy adolescents. Expression levels of these genes are also significantly associated with axonal connectivity in the mouse. The results provide convergent, multimodal evidence that resting-state functional networks correlate with the orchestrated activity of dozens of genes linked to ion channel activity and synaptic function. PMID:26068849

  17. Estimating individual contribution from group-based structural correlation networks.

    PubMed

    Saggar, Manish; Hosseini, S M Hadi; Bruno, Jennifer L; Quintin, Eve-Marie; Raman, Mira M; Kesler, Shelli R; Reiss, Allan L

    2015-10-15

    Coordinated variations in brain morphology (e.g., cortical thickness) across individuals have been widely used to infer large-scale population brain networks. These structural correlation networks (SCNs) have been shown to reflect synchronized maturational changes in connected brain regions. Further, evidence suggests that SCNs, to some extent, reflect both anatomical and functional connectivity and hence provide a complementary measure of brain connectivity in addition to diffusion weighted networks and resting-state functional networks. Although widely used to study between-group differences in network properties, SCNs are inferred only at the group-level using brain morphology data from a set of participants, thereby not providing any knowledge regarding how the observed differences in SCNs are associated with individual behavioral, cognitive and disorder states. In the present study, we introduce two novel distance-based approaches to extract information regarding individual differences from the group-level SCNs. We applied the proposed approaches to a moderately large dataset (n=100) consisting of individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS; n=50) and age-matched typically developing individuals (TD; n=50). We tested the stability of proposed approaches using permutation analysis. Lastly, to test the efficacy of our method, individual contributions extracted from the group-level SCNs were examined for associations with intelligence scores and genetic data. The extracted individual contributions were stable and were significantly related to both genetic and intelligence estimates, in both typically developing individuals and participants with FXS. We anticipate that the approaches developed in this work could be used as a putative biomarker for altered connectivity in individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:26162553

  18. Inferring cultural regions from correlation networks of given baby names

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomorski, Mateusz; Krawczyk, Małgorzata J.; Kułakowski, Krzysztof; Kwapień, Jarosław; Ausloos, Marcel

    2016-03-01

    We report investigations on the statistical characteristics of the baby names given between 1910 and 2010 in the United States of America. For each year, the 100 most frequent names in the USA are sorted out. For these names, the correlations between the names profiles are calculated for all pairs of states (minus Hawaii and Alaska). The correlations are used to form a weighted network which is found to vary mildly in time. In fact, the structure of communities in the network remains quite stable till about 1980. The goal is that the calculated structure approximately reproduces the usually accepted geopolitical regions: the Northeast, the South, and the "Midwest + West" as the third one. Furthermore, the dataset reveals that the name distribution satisfies the Zipf law, separately for each state and each year, i.e. the name frequency f ∝r-α, where r is the name rank. Between 1920 and 1980, the exponent α is the largest one for the set of states classified as 'the South', but the smallest one for the set of states classified as "Midwest + West". Our interpretation is that the pool of selected names was quite narrow in the Southern states. The data is compared with some related statistics of names in Belgium, a country also with different regions, but having quite a different scale than the USA. There, the Zipf exponent is low for young people and for the Brussels citizens.

  19. STOCK Market Differences in Correlation-Based Weighted Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Janghyuk; Lee, Junghoon; Chang, Woojin

    We examined the sector dynamics of Korean stock market in relation to the market volatility. The daily price data of 360 stocks for 5019 trading days (from January, 1990 to August, 2008) in Korean stock market are used. We performed the weighted network analysis and employed four measures: the average, the variance, the intensity, and the coherence of network weights (absolute values of stock return correlations) to investigate the network structure of Korean stock market. We performed regression analysis using the four measures in the seven major industry sectors and the market (seven sectors combined). We found that the average, the intensity, and the coherence of sector (subnetwork) weights increase as market becomes volatile. Except for the "Financials" sector, the variance of sector weights also grows as market volatility increases. Based on the four measures, we can categorize "Financials," "Information Technology" and "Industrials" sectors into one group, and "Materials" and "Consumer Discretionary" sectors into another group. We investigated the distributions of intrasector and intersector weights for each sector and found the differences in "Financials" sector are most distinct.

  20. Pulse transmission receiver with higher-order time derivative pulse correlator

    DOEpatents

    Dress, Jr., William B.; Smith, Stephen F.

    2003-09-16

    Systems and methods for pulse-transmission low-power communication modes are disclosed. A pulse transmission receiver includes: a higher-order time derivative pulse correlator; a demodulation decoder coupled to the higher-order time derivative pulse correlator; a clock coupled to the demodulation decoder; and a pseudorandom polynomial generator coupled to both the higher-order time derivative pulse correlator and the clock. The systems and methods significantly reduce lower-frequency emissions from pulse transmission spread-spectrum communication modes, which reduces potentially harmful interference to existing radio frequency services and users and also simultaneously permit transmission of multiple data bits by utilizing specific pulse shapes.

  1. Medium range order and structural relaxation in As–Se network glasses through FSDP analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Golovchak, R.; Lucas, P.; Oelgoetz, J.; Kovalskiy, A.; York-Winegar, J.; Saiyasombat, Ch.; Shpotyuk, O.; Feygenson, M.; Neuefeind, J.; Jain, H.

    2015-03-01

    Synchrotron X-ray diffraction and neutron scattering studies are performed on As–Se glasses in two states: as-prepared (rejuvenated) and aged for ~27 years. The first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) obtained from the structure factor data as a function of composition and temperature indicates that the cooperative processes that are responsible for structural relaxation do not affect FSDP. The results are correlated with the composition dependence of the complex heat capacity of the glasses and concentration of different structural fragments in the glass network. The comparison of structural information shows that density fluctuations, which were thought previously to have a significant contribution to FSDP, have much smaller effect than the cation–cation correlations, presence of ordered structural fragments or cage molecules.

  2. Higher-Order Correlations in Non-Stationary Parallel Spike Trains: Statistical Modeling and Inference

    PubMed Central

    Staude, Benjamin; Grün, Sonja; Rotter, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The extent to which groups of neurons exhibit higher-order correlations in their spiking activity is a controversial issue in current brain research. A major difficulty is that currently available tools for the analysis of massively parallel spike trains (N >10) for higher-order correlations typically require vast sample sizes. While multiple single-cell recordings become increasingly available, experimental approaches to investigate the role of higher-order correlations suffer from the limitations of available analysis techniques. We have recently presented a novel method for cumulant-based inference of higher-order correlations (CuBIC) that detects correlations of higher order even from relatively short data stretches of length T = 10–100 s. CuBIC employs the compound Poisson process (CPP) as a statistical model for the population spike counts, and assumes spike trains to be stationary in the analyzed data stretch. In the present study, we describe a non-stationary version of the CPP by decoupling the correlation structure from the spiking intensity of the population. This allows us to adapt CuBIC to time-varying firing rates. Numerical simulations reveal that the adaptation corrects for false positive inference of correlations in data with pure rate co-variation, while allowing for temporal variations of the firing rates has a surprisingly small effect on CuBICs sensitivity for correlations. PMID:20725510

  3. A unified view on weakly correlated recurrent networks

    PubMed Central

    Grytskyy, Dmytro; Tetzlaff, Tom; Diesmann, Markus; Helias, Moritz

    2013-01-01

    The diversity of neuron models used in contemporary theoretical neuroscience to investigate specific properties of covariances in the spiking activity raises the question how these models relate to each other. In particular it is hard to distinguish between generic properties of covariances and peculiarities due to the abstracted model. Here we present a unified view on pairwise covariances in recurrent networks in the irregular regime. We consider the binary neuron model, the leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) model, and the Hawkes process. We show that linear approximation maps each of these models to either of two classes of linear rate models (LRM), including the Ornstein–Uhlenbeck process (OUP) as a special case. The distinction between both classes is the location of additive noise in the rate dynamics, which is located on the output side for spiking models and on the input side for the binary model. Both classes allow closed form solutions for the covariance. For output noise it separates into an echo term and a term due to correlated input. The unified framework enables us to transfer results between models. For example, we generalize the binary model and the Hawkes process to the situation with synaptic conduction delays and simplify derivations for established results. Our approach is applicable to general network structures and suitable for the calculation of population averages. The derived averages are exact for fixed out-degree network architectures and approximate for fixed in-degree. We demonstrate how taking into account fluctuations in the linearization procedure increases the accuracy of the effective theory and we explain the class dependent differences between covariances in the time and the frequency domain. Finally we show that the oscillatory instability emerging in networks of LIF models with delayed inhibitory feedback is a model-invariant feature: the same structure of poles in the complex frequency plane determines the population power

  4. Pulse shape measurement by a non-collinear third-order correlation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priebe, G.; Janulewicz, K. A.; Redkorechev, V. I.; Tümmler, J.; Nickles, P. V.

    2006-03-01

    A third-order correlator suitable for detailed shape measurements of picosecond laser pulses has been developed. The working principle in both the single shot and the scanning mode is based on detection of the phase-matched difference frequency non-collinear generated signal in a non-linear crystal. This third-order OPA correlator was applied for the characterization of the specifically shaped picosecond laser pulses from the MBI CPA Nd: glass laser system.

  5. A Maximum Entropy Test for Evaluating Higher-Order Correlations in Spike Counts

    PubMed Central

    Onken, Arno; Dragoi, Valentin; Obermayer, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Evaluating the importance of higher-order correlations of neural spike counts has been notoriously hard. A large number of samples are typically required in order to estimate higher-order correlations and resulting information theoretic quantities. In typical electrophysiology data sets with many experimental conditions, however, the number of samples in each condition is rather small. Here we describe a method that allows to quantify evidence for higher-order correlations in exactly these cases. We construct a family of reference distributions: maximum entropy distributions, which are constrained only by marginals and by linear correlations as quantified by the Pearson correlation coefficient. We devise a Monte Carlo goodness-of-fit test, which tests - for a given divergence measure of interest - whether the experimental data lead to the rejection of the null hypothesis that it was generated by one of the reference distributions. Applying our test to artificial data shows that the effects of higher-order correlations on these divergence measures can be detected even when the number of samples is small. Subsequently, we apply our method to spike count data which were recorded with multielectrode arrays from the primary visual cortex of anesthetized cat during an adaptation experiment. Using mutual information as a divergence measure we find that there are spike count bin sizes at which the maximum entropy hypothesis can be rejected for a substantial number of neuronal pairs. These results demonstrate that higher-order correlations can matter when estimating information theoretic quantities in V1. They also show that our test is able to detect their presence in typical in-vivo data sets, where the number of samples is too small to estimate higher-order correlations directly. PMID:22685392

  6. Intergenerational Correlations in Educational Attainment: Birth Order and Family Size Effects Using Canadian Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sen, Anindya; Clemente, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    We exploit the 1986, 1994, and 2001 waves of the Canadian general social surveys in order to estimate intergenerational correlations in education. The use of these specific data is important because of available information on the final educational attainment of survey respondents and both parents, as well as family size and birth order. OLS…

  7. The dynamic correlation between degree and betweenness of complex network under attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Tingyuan; Guo, Zheng; Zhao, Kun; Lu, Zhe-Ming

    2016-09-01

    Complex networks are often subjected to failure and attack. Recent work has addressed the resilience of complex networks to either random or intentional deletion of nodes or links. Here we simulate the breakdown of the small-world network and the scale-free network under node failure or attacks. We analyze and discuss the dynamic correlation between degree and betweenness in the process of attack. The simulation results show that the correlation for scale-free network obeys a power law distribution until the network collapses, while it represents irregularly for small-world network.

  8. Adaption of the temporal correlation coefficient calculation for temporal networks (applied to a real-world pig trade network).

    PubMed

    Büttner, Kathrin; Salau, Jennifer; Krieter, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The average topological overlap of two graphs of two consecutive time steps measures the amount of changes in the edge configuration between the two snapshots. This value has to be zero if the edge configuration changes completely and one if the two consecutive graphs are identical. Current methods depend on the number of nodes in the network or on the maximal number of connected nodes in the consecutive time steps. In the first case, this methodology breaks down if there are nodes with no edges. In the second case, it fails if the maximal number of active nodes is larger than the maximal number of connected nodes. In the following, an adaption of the calculation of the temporal correlation coefficient and of the topological overlap of the graph between two consecutive time steps is presented, which shows the expected behaviour mentioned above. The newly proposed adaption uses the maximal number of active nodes, i.e. the number of nodes with at least one edge, for the calculation of the topological overlap. The three methods were compared with the help of vivid example networks to reveal the differences between the proposed notations. Furthermore, these three calculation methods were applied to a real-world network of animal movements in order to detect influences of the network structure on the outcome of the different methods. PMID:27026862

  9. Photoinduced melting of magnetic order in the correlated electron insulator NdNiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caviglia, A. D.; Först, M.; Scherwitzl, R.; Khanna, V.; Bromberger, H.; Mankowsky, R.; Singla, R.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Lee, W. S.; Krupin, O.; Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Dakovski, G. L.; Minitti, M. P.; Robinson, J.; Scagnoli, V.; Wilkins, S. B.; Cavill, S. A.; Gibert, M.; Gariglio, S.; Zubko, P.; Triscone, J.-M.; Hill, J. P.; Dhesi, S. S.; Cavalleri, A.

    2013-12-01

    Using ultrafast resonant soft x-ray diffraction, we demonstrate photoinduced melting of antiferromagnetic order in the correlated electron insulator NdNiO3. Time-dependent analysis of the resonant diffraction spectra allows us to follow the temporal evolution of the charge imbalance between adjacent Ni sites. A direct correlation between the melting of magnetic order and charge rebalancing is found. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the magnetic ordering on the Ni and Nd sites, which are locked together in equilibrium, become decoupled during this nonthermal process.

  10. Networked Fusion Filtering from Outputs with Stochastic Uncertainties and Correlated Random Transmission Delays.

    PubMed

    Caballero-Águila, Raquel; Hermoso-Carazo, Aurora; Linares-Pérez, Josefa

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the distributed and centralized fusion filtering problems in sensor networked systems with random one-step delays in transmissions. The delays are described by Bernoulli variables correlated at consecutive sampling times, with different characteristics at each sensor. The measured outputs are subject to uncertainties modeled by random parameter matrices, thus providing a unified framework to describe a wide variety of network-induced phenomena; moreover, the additive noises are assumed to be one-step autocorrelated and cross-correlated. Under these conditions, without requiring the knowledge of the signal evolution model, but using only the first and second order moments of the processes involved in the observation model, recursive algorithms for the optimal linear distributed and centralized filters under the least-squares criterion are derived by an innovation approach. Firstly, local estimators based on the measurements received from each sensor are obtained and, after that, the distributed fusion filter is generated as the least-squares matrix-weighted linear combination of the local estimators. Also, a recursive algorithm for the optimal linear centralized filter is proposed. In order to compare the estimators performance, recursive formulas for the error covariance matrices are derived in all the algorithms. The effects of the delays in the filters accuracy are analyzed in a numerical example which also illustrates how some usual network-induced uncertainties can be dealt with using the current observation model described by random matrices. PMID:27338387

  11. Networked Fusion Filtering from Outputs with Stochastic Uncertainties and Correlated Random Transmission Delays

    PubMed Central

    Caballero-Águila, Raquel; Hermoso-Carazo, Aurora; Linares-Pérez, Josefa

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the distributed and centralized fusion filtering problems in sensor networked systems with random one-step delays in transmissions. The delays are described by Bernoulli variables correlated at consecutive sampling times, with different characteristics at each sensor. The measured outputs are subject to uncertainties modeled by random parameter matrices, thus providing a unified framework to describe a wide variety of network-induced phenomena; moreover, the additive noises are assumed to be one-step autocorrelated and cross-correlated. Under these conditions, without requiring the knowledge of the signal evolution model, but using only the first and second order moments of the processes involved in the observation model, recursive algorithms for the optimal linear distributed and centralized filters under the least-squares criterion are derived by an innovation approach. Firstly, local estimators based on the measurements received from each sensor are obtained and, after that, the distributed fusion filter is generated as the least-squares matrix-weighted linear combination of the local estimators. Also, a recursive algorithm for the optimal linear centralized filter is proposed. In order to compare the estimators performance, recursive formulas for the error covariance matrices are derived in all the algorithms. The effects of the delays in the filters accuracy are analyzed in a numerical example which also illustrates how some usual network-induced uncertainties can be dealt with using the current observation model described by random matrices. PMID:27338387

  12. State-Space Analysis of Time-Varying Higher-Order Spike Correlation for Multiple Neural Spike Train Data

    PubMed Central

    Shimazaki, Hideaki; Amari, Shun-ichi; Brown, Emery N.; Grün, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Precise spike coordination between the spiking activities of multiple neurons is suggested as an indication of coordinated network activity in active cell assemblies. Spike correlation analysis aims to identify such cooperative network activity by detecting excess spike synchrony in simultaneously recorded multiple neural spike sequences. Cooperative activity is expected to organize dynamically during behavior and cognition; therefore currently available analysis techniques must be extended to enable the estimation of multiple time-varying spike interactions between neurons simultaneously. In particular, new methods must take advantage of the simultaneous observations of multiple neurons by addressing their higher-order dependencies, which cannot be revealed by pairwise analyses alone. In this paper, we develop a method for estimating time-varying spike interactions by means of a state-space analysis. Discretized parallel spike sequences are modeled as multi-variate binary processes using a log-linear model that provides a well-defined measure of higher-order spike correlation in an information geometry framework. We construct a recursive Bayesian filter/smoother for the extraction of spike interaction parameters. This method can simultaneously estimate the dynamic pairwise spike interactions of multiple single neurons, thereby extending the Ising/spin-glass model analysis of multiple neural spike train data to a nonstationary analysis. Furthermore, the method can estimate dynamic higher-order spike interactions. To validate the inclusion of the higher-order terms in the model, we construct an approximation method to assess the goodness-of-fit to spike data. In addition, we formulate a test method for the presence of higher-order spike correlation even in nonstationary spike data, e.g., data from awake behaving animals. The utility of the proposed methods is tested using simulated spike data with known underlying correlation dynamics. Finally, we apply the methods

  13. State-space analysis of time-varying higher-order spike correlation for multiple neural spike train data.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Hideaki; Amari, Shun-Ichi; Brown, Emery N; Grün, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Precise spike coordination between the spiking activities of multiple neurons is suggested as an indication of coordinated network activity in active cell assemblies. Spike correlation analysis aims to identify such cooperative network activity by detecting excess spike synchrony in simultaneously recorded multiple neural spike sequences. Cooperative activity is expected to organize dynamically during behavior and cognition; therefore currently available analysis techniques must be extended to enable the estimation of multiple time-varying spike interactions between neurons simultaneously. In particular, new methods must take advantage of the simultaneous observations of multiple neurons by addressing their higher-order dependencies, which cannot be revealed by pairwise analyses alone. In this paper, we develop a method for estimating time-varying spike interactions by means of a state-space analysis. Discretized parallel spike sequences are modeled as multi-variate binary processes using a log-linear model that provides a well-defined measure of higher-order spike correlation in an information geometry framework. We construct a recursive Bayesian filter/smoother for the extraction of spike interaction parameters. This method can simultaneously estimate the dynamic pairwise spike interactions of multiple single neurons, thereby extending the Ising/spin-glass model analysis of multiple neural spike train data to a nonstationary analysis. Furthermore, the method can estimate dynamic higher-order spike interactions. To validate the inclusion of the higher-order terms in the model, we construct an approximation method to assess the goodness-of-fit to spike data. In addition, we formulate a test method for the presence of higher-order spike correlation even in nonstationary spike data, e.g., data from awake behaving animals. The utility of the proposed methods is tested using simulated spike data with known underlying correlation dynamics. Finally, we apply the methods

  14. Neural network guided search control in partial order planning

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, T.

    1996-12-31

    The development of efficient search control methods is an active research topic in the field of planning. Investigation of a planning program integrated with a neural network (NN) that assists in search control is underway, and has produced promising preliminary results.

  15. Scalability of Asynchronous Networks Is Limited by One-to-One Mapping between Effective Connectivity and Correlations

    PubMed Central

    van Albada, Sacha Jennifer; Helias, Moritz; Diesmann, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Network models are routinely downscaled compared to nature in terms of numbers of nodes or edges because of a lack of computational resources, often without explicit mention of the limitations this entails. While reliable methods have long existed to adjust parameters such that the first-order statistics of network dynamics are conserved, here we show that limitations already arise if also second-order statistics are to be maintained. The temporal structure of pairwise averaged correlations in the activity of recurrent networks is determined by the effective population-level connectivity. We first show that in general the converse is also true and explicitly mention degenerate cases when this one-to-one relationship does not hold. The one-to-one correspondence between effective connectivity and the temporal structure of pairwise averaged correlations implies that network scalings should preserve the effective connectivity if pairwise averaged correlations are to be held constant. Changes in effective connectivity can even push a network from a linearly stable to an unstable, oscillatory regime and vice versa. On this basis, we derive conditions for the preservation of both mean population-averaged activities and pairwise averaged correlations under a change in numbers of neurons or synapses in the asynchronous regime typical of cortical networks. We find that mean activities and correlation structure can be maintained by an appropriate scaling of the synaptic weights, but only over a range of numbers of synapses that is limited by the variance of external inputs to the network. Our results therefore show that the reducibility of asynchronous networks is fundamentally limited. PMID:26325661

  16. The Network of Counterparty Risk: Analysing Correlations in OTC Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Nanumyan, Vahan; Garas, Antonios; Schweitzer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Counterparty risk denotes the risk that a party defaults in a bilateral contract. This risk not only depends on the two parties involved, but also on the risk from various other contracts each of these parties holds. In rather informal markets, such as the OTC (over-the-counter) derivative market, institutions only report their aggregated quarterly risk exposure, but no details about their counterparties. Hence, little is known about the diversification of counterparty risk. In this paper, we reconstruct the weighted and time-dependent network of counterparty risk in the OTC derivatives market of the United States between 1998 and 2012. To proxy unknown bilateral exposures, we first study the co-occurrence patterns of institutions based on their quarterly activity and ranking in the official report. The network obtained this way is further analysed by a weighted k-core decomposition, to reveal a core-periphery structure. This allows us to compare the activity-based ranking with a topology-based ranking, to identify the most important institutions and their mutual dependencies. We also analyse correlations in these activities, to show strong similarities in the behavior of the core institutions. Our analysis clearly demonstrates the clustering of counterparty risk in a small set of about a dozen US banks. This not only increases the default risk of the central institutions, but also the default risk of peripheral institutions which have contracts with the central ones. Hence, all institutions indirectly have to bear (part of) the counterparty risk of all others, which needs to be better reflected in the price of OTC derivatives. PMID:26335223

  17. The Network of Counterparty Risk: Analysing Correlations in OTC Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Nanumyan, Vahan; Garas, Antonios; Schweitzer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Counterparty risk denotes the risk that a party defaults in a bilateral contract. This risk not only depends on the two parties involved, but also on the risk from various other contracts each of these parties holds. In rather informal markets, such as the OTC (over-the-counter) derivative market, institutions only report their aggregated quarterly risk exposure, but no details about their counterparties. Hence, little is known about the diversification of counterparty risk. In this paper, we reconstruct the weighted and time-dependent network of counterparty risk in the OTC derivatives market of the United States between 1998 and 2012. To proxy unknown bilateral exposures, we first study the co-occurrence patterns of institutions based on their quarterly activity and ranking in the official report. The network obtained this way is further analysed by a weighted k-core decomposition, to reveal a core-periphery structure. This allows us to compare the activity-based ranking with a topology-based ranking, to identify the most important institutions and their mutual dependencies. We also analyse correlations in these activities, to show strong similarities in the behavior of the core institutions. Our analysis clearly demonstrates the clustering of counterparty risk in a small set of about a dozen US banks. This not only increases the default risk of the central institutions, but also the default risk of peripheral institutions which have contracts with the central ones. Hence, all institutions indirectly have to bear (part of) the counterparty risk of all others, which needs to be better reflected in the price of OTC derivatives. PMID:26335223

  18. Correlation network analysis for multi-dimensional data in stocks market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemilari, Mansooreh; Djauhari, Maman Abdurachman

    2015-07-01

    This paper shows how the concept of vector correlation can appropriately measure the similarity among multivariate time series in stocks network. The motivation of this paper is (i) to apply the RV coefficient to define the network among stocks where each of them is represented by a multivariate time series; (ii) to analyze that network in terms of topological structure of the stocks of all minimum spanning trees, and (iii) to compare the network topology between univariate correlation based on r and multivariate correlation network based on RV coefficient.

  19. Ordering spatiotemporal chaos in complex thermosensitive neuron networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yubing; Xu, Bo; Xu, Qiang; Yang, Chuanlu; Ren, Tingqi; Hou, Zhonghuai; Xin, Houwen

    2006-04-01

    We have studied the effect of random long-range connections in chaotic thermosensitive neuron networks with each neuron being capable of exhibiting diverse bursting behaviors, and found stochastic synchronization and optimal spatiotemporal patterns. For a given coupling strength, the chaotic burst-firings of the neurons become more and more synchronized as the number of random connections (or randomness) is increased and, rather, the most pronounced spatiotemporal pattern appears for an optimal randomness. As the coupling strength is increased, the optimal randomness shifts towards a smaller strength. This result shows that random long-range connections can tame the chaos in the neural networks and make the neurons more effectively reach synchronization. Since the model studied can be used to account for hypothalamic neurons of dogfish, catfish, etc., this result may reflect the significant role of random connections in transferring biological information.

  20. Use of the particle swarm optimization algorithm for second order design of levelling networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yetkin, Mevlut; Inal, Cevat; Yigit, Cemal Ozer

    2009-08-01

    The weight problem in geodetic networks can be dealt with as an optimization procedure. This classic problem of geodetic network optimization is also known as second-order design. The basic principles of geodetic network optimization are reviewed. Then the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is applied to a geodetic levelling network in order to solve the second-order design problem. PSO, which is an iterative-stochastic search algorithm in swarm intelligence, emulates the collective behaviour of bird flocking, fish schooling or bee swarming, to converge probabilistically to the global optimum. Furthermore, it is a powerful method because it is easy to implement and computationally efficient. Second-order design of a geodetic levelling network using PSO yields a practically realizable solution. It is also suitable for non-linear matrix functions that are very often encountered in geodetic network optimization. The fundamentals of the method and a numeric example are given.

  1. Non-local bias contribution to third-order galaxy correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel, J.; Hoffmann, K.; Gaztañaga, E.

    2015-10-01

    We study halo clustering bias with second- and third-order statistics of halo and matter density fields in the Marenostrum Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (MICE) Grand Challenge simulation. We verify that two-point correlations deliver reliable estimates of the linear bias parameters at large scales, while estimations from the variance can be significantly affected by non-linear and possibly non-local contributions to the bias function. Combining three-point auto- and cross-correlations we find, for the first time in configuration space, evidence for the presence of such non-local contributions. These contributions are consistent with predicted second-order non-local effects on the bias functions originating from the dark matter tidal field. Samples of massive haloes show indications of bias (local or non-local) beyond second order. Ignoring non-local bias causes 20-30 and 5-10 per cent overestimation of the linear bias from three-point auto- and cross-correlations, respectively. We study two third-order bias estimators that are not affected by second-order non-local contributions. One is a combination of three-point auto- and cross-correlations. The other is a combination of third-order one- and two-point cumulants. Both methods deliver accurate estimations of the linear bias. Ignoring non-local bias causes higher values of the second-order bias from three-point correlations. Our results demonstrate that third-order statistics can be employed for breaking the growth-bias degeneracy.

  2. Noise Correlation Spectroscopy of the Broken Order of a Mott Insulating Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Guarrera, V.; Fabbri, N.; Fallani, L.; Fort, C.; Stam, K. M. R. van der; Inguscio, M.

    2008-06-27

    We use a two-color lattice to break the homogeneous site occupation of an atomic Mott insulator of bosonic {sup 87}Rb. We detect the disruption of the ordered Mott domains via noise correlation analysis of the atomic density distribution after time of flight. The appearance of additional correlation peaks evidences the redistribution of the atoms into a strongly inhomogeneous insulating state, in quantitative agreement with the predictions.

  3. Correlation Network Analysis Applied to Complex Biofilm Communities

    PubMed Central

    Duran-Pinedo, Ana E.; Paster, Bruce; Teles, Ricardo; Frias-Lopez, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of the human microbiome makes it difficult to reveal organizational principles of the community and even more challenging to generate testable hypotheses. It has been suggested that in the gut microbiome species such as Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron are keystone in maintaining the stability and functional adaptability of the microbial community. In this study, we investigate the interspecies associations in a complex microbial biofilm applying systems biology principles. Using correlation network analysis we identified bacterial modules that represent important microbial associations within the oral community. We used dental plaque as a model community because of its high diversity and the well known species-species interactions that are common in the oral biofilm. We analyzed samples from healthy individuals as well as from patients with periodontitis, a polymicrobial disease. Using results obtained by checkerboard hybridization on cultivable bacteria we identified modules that correlated well with microbial complexes previously described. Furthermore, we extended our analysis using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM), which includes a large number of bacterial species, among them uncultivated organisms present in the mouth. Two distinct microbial communities appeared in healthy individuals while there was one major type in disease. Bacterial modules in all communities did not overlap, indicating that bacteria were able to effectively re-associate with new partners depending on the environmental conditions. We then identified hubs that could act as keystone species in the bacterial modules. Based on those results we then cultured a not-yet-cultivated microorganism, Tannerella sp. OT286 (clone BU063). After two rounds of enrichment by a selected helper (Prevotella oris OT311) we obtained colonies of Tannerella sp. OT286 growing on blood agar plates. This system-level approach would open the possibility of manipulating microbial

  4. Higher-order statistics correlation stacking for DC electrical data in the wavelet domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinghe; He, Zhanxiang; Liu, Qing Huo

    2013-12-01

    DC (direct current) electrical and shallow seismic methods are indispensable to the near surface geophysical exploration, but the near surface areas are very difficult environments for any geophysical exploration due to the random noise caused by near surface inhomogeneities. As a new algorithm based on higher-order statistics theory, the higher-order correlation stacking algorithm for seismic data smoothing in the wavelet domain has been developed and applied efficiently to filter some correlation noise that the conventional second-order correlation stacking could not inhibit. In this paper, this higher-order statistics correlation stacking technology is presented for DC electrical data in wavelet domain. Taking into account the single section and multiple section data, we present two new formulations of correlation stacking for DC electrical data. Synthetic examples with Gaussian noise are designed to analyze the overall efficiency of the new algorithm and to determine its efficacy. Meanwhile, comparison with the traditional least-squares optimization inversion method for field examples from electrical imaging surveys and time-domain IP measurement in China shows its significant advantages. The quality of the new algorithm also has been assessed by physical simulation experiments. This new technology in DC electrical exploration measurements provides a new application in engineering and mining investigation.

  5. Role of Weak Measurements on States Ordering and Monogamy of Quantum Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ming-Liang; Fan, Heng; Tian, Dong-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The information-theoretic definition of quantum correlation, e.g., quantum discord, is measurement dependent. By considering the more general quantum measurements, weak measurements, which include the projective measurement as a limiting case, we show that while weak measurements can enable one to capture more quantumness of correlation in a state, it can also induce other counterintuitive quantum effects. Specifically, we show that the general measurements with different strengths can impose different orderings for quantum correlations of some states. It can also modify the monogamous character for certain classes of states as well which may diminish the usefulness of quantum correlation as a resource in some protocols. In this sense, we say that the weak measurements play a dual role in defining quantum correlation.

  6. Quantum Effects in Higher-Order Correlators of a Quantum-Dot Spin Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtold, A.; Li, F.; Müller, K.; Simmet, T.; Ardelt, P.-L.; Finley, J. J.; Sinitsyn, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    We measure time correlators of a spin qubit in an optically active quantum dot beyond the second order. Such higher-order correlators are shown to be directly sensitive to pure quantum effects that cannot be explained within the classical framework. They allow direct determination of ensemble and quantum dephasing times, T2* and T2, using only repeated projective measurements and without the need for coherent spin control. Our method enables studies of purely quantum behavior in solid state systems, including tests of the Leggett-Garg type of inequalities that rule out local hidden variable interpretation of the quantum-dot spin dynamics.

  7. Quantum Effects in Higher-Order Correlators of a Quantum-Dot Spin Qubit.

    PubMed

    Bechtold, A; Li, F; Müller, K; Simmet, T; Ardelt, P-L; Finley, J J; Sinitsyn, N A

    2016-07-01

    We measure time correlators of a spin qubit in an optically active quantum dot beyond the second order. Such higher-order correlators are shown to be directly sensitive to pure quantum effects that cannot be explained within the classical framework. They allow direct determination of ensemble and quantum dephasing times, T_{2}^{*} and T_{2}, using only repeated projective measurements and without the need for coherent spin control. Our method enables studies of purely quantum behavior in solid state systems, including tests of the Leggett-Garg type of inequalities that rule out local hidden variable interpretation of the quantum-dot spin dynamics. PMID:27447523

  8. Effects of random rewiring on the degree correlation of scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jing; Wang, Sheng-Jun; Jusup, Marko; Wang, Zhen

    2015-10-01

    Random rewiring is used to generate null networks for the purpose of analyzing the topological properties of scale-free networks, yet the effects of random rewiring on the degree correlation are subject to contradicting interpretations in the literature. We comprehensively analyze the degree correlation of randomly rewired scale-free networks and show that random rewiring increases disassortativity by reducing the average degree of the nearest neighbors of high-degree nodes. The effect can be captured by the measures of the degree correlation that consider all links in the network, but not by analogous measures that consider only links between degree peers, hence the potential for contradicting interpretations. We furthermore find that random and directional rewiring affect the topology of a scale-free network differently, even if the degree correlation of the rewired networks is the same. Consequently, the network dynamics is changed, which is proven here by means of the biased random walk.

  9. Effects of random rewiring on the degree correlation of scale-free networks

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Jing; Wang, Sheng-Jun; Jusup, Marko; Wang, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Random rewiring is used to generate null networks for the purpose of analyzing the topological properties of scale-free networks, yet the effects of random rewiring on the degree correlation are subject to contradicting interpretations in the literature. We comprehensively analyze the degree correlation of randomly rewired scale-free networks and show that random rewiring increases disassortativity by reducing the average degree of the nearest neighbors of high-degree nodes. The effect can be captured by the measures of the degree correlation that consider all links in the network, but not by analogous measures that consider only links between degree peers, hence the potential for contradicting interpretations. We furthermore find that random and directional rewiring affect the topology of a scale-free network differently, even if the degree correlation of the rewired networks is the same. Consequently, the network dynamics is changed, which is proven here by means of the biased random walk. PMID:26482005

  10. Hierarchical neural networks for the storage of correlated memories

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, V.; Dasgupta, C. )

    1991-08-01

    A class of hierarchical neural network models introduced by Dotsenko for the storage and associative recall of strongly correlated memories is studied analytically and numerically. In these models, patterns stored in higher levels of the hierarchy represent generalized categories and those stored in lower levels describe finer details. The authors first show that the models originally proposed by Dotsenko have a serious flaw: they are not able to detect or correct errors in categorization that may be present in the input. They then describe three different models that attempt to overcome this shortcoming of the original models. In the first model, the interaction between different levels of the hierarchy has the form of an external field conjugate to memories stored in the lower level. In the second model, a three-spin interaction term is included in addition to the usual binary interactions of the Hopfield type. The third model makes use of a time-delay mechanism to induce, if necessary, transitions between memory states and their complements. Detailed analytical and numerical studies of the performance of these models are presented. All three models are able to detect and also to correct, in varying degrees, any error in categorization that may be present in the input pattern.

  11. Hierarchical neural networks for the storage of correlated memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Varsha; Dasgupta, Chandan

    1991-08-01

    A class of hierarchical neural network models introduced by Dotsenko for the storage and associative recall of strongly correlated memories is studied analytically and numerically. In these models, patterns stored in higher levels of the hierarchy represent generalized categories and those stored in lower levels describe finer details. We first show that the models originally proposed by Dotsenko have a serious flaw: they are not able to detect or correct errors in categorization which may be present in the input. We then describe three different models which attempt to overcome this shortcoming of the original models. In the first model, the interaction between different levels of the hierarchy has the form of an external field conjugate to memories stored in the lower level. In the second model, a three-spin interaction term is included in addition to the usual binary interactions of the Hopfield type. The third model makes use of a time delay mechanism to induce, if necessary, transitions between memory states and their complements. Detailed analytical and numerical studies of the performance of these models are presented. Our analysis shows that all three models are able to detect and also to correct in varying degrees any error in categorization that may be present in the input pattern.

  12. Observation of correlated particle-hole pairs and string order in low-dimensional Mott insulators.

    PubMed

    Endres, M; Cheneau, M; Fukuhara, T; Weitenberg, C; Schauss, P; Gross, C; Mazza, L; Bañuls, M C; Pollet, L; Bloch, I; Kuhr, S

    2011-10-14

    Quantum phases of matter are characterized by the underlying correlations of the many-body system. Although this is typically captured by a local order parameter, it has been shown that a broad class of many-body systems possesses a hidden nonlocal order. In the case of bosonic Mott insulators, the ground state properties are governed by quantum fluctuations in the form of correlated particle-hole pairs that lead to the emergence of a nonlocal string order in one dimension. By using high-resolution imaging of low-dimensional quantum gases in an optical lattice, we directly detect these pairs with single-site and single-particle sensitivity and observe string order in the one-dimensional case. PMID:21998381

  13. A unified data representation theory for network visualization, ordering and coarse-graining

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, István A.; Mizsei, Réka; Csermely, Péter

    2015-01-01

    Representation of large data sets became a key question of many scientific disciplines in the last decade. Several approaches for network visualization, data ordering and coarse-graining accomplished this goal. However, there was no underlying theoretical framework linking these problems. Here we show an elegant, information theoretic data representation approach as a unified solution of network visualization, data ordering and coarse-graining. The optimal representation is the hardest to distinguish from the original data matrix, measured by the relative entropy. The representation of network nodes as probability distributions provides an efficient visualization method and, in one dimension, an ordering of network nodes and edges. Coarse-grained representations of the input network enable both efficient data compression and hierarchical visualization to achieve high quality representations of larger data sets. Our unified data representation theory will help the analysis of extensive data sets, by revealing the large-scale structure of complex networks in a comprehensible form. PMID:26348923

  14. A unified data representation theory for network visualization, ordering and coarse-graining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, István A.; Mizsei, Réka; Csermely, Péter

    2015-09-01

    Representation of large data sets became a key question of many scientific disciplines in the last decade. Several approaches for network visualization, data ordering and coarse-graining accomplished this goal. However, there was no underlying theoretical framework linking these problems. Here we show an elegant, information theoretic data representation approach as a unified solution of network visualization, data ordering and coarse-graining. The optimal representation is the hardest to distinguish from the original data matrix, measured by the relative entropy. The representation of network nodes as probability distributions provides an efficient visualization method and, in one dimension, an ordering of network nodes and edges. Coarse-grained representations of the input network enable both efficient data compression and hierarchical visualization to achieve high quality representations of larger data sets. Our unified data representation theory will help the analysis of extensive data sets, by revealing the large-scale structure of complex networks in a comprehensible form.

  15. Hidden topological order and its correlation with glass-forming ability in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. W.; Li, M. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Liu, K. X.

    2015-01-01

    Unlike the well-defined long-range periodic order that characterizes crystals, so far the inherent atomic packing mode in glassy solids remains mysterious. Based on molecular dynamics simulations, here we find medium-range atomic packing orders in metallic glasses, which are hidden in the diffraction data in terms of structure factors or pair correlation functions. The analysis of the hidden orders in various metallic glasses indicates that the glassy and crystalline solids share a nontrivial structural homology in short-to-medium range, and the hidden orders are formulated by inheriting partial crystalline orders during glass formation. As the number of chemical components increases, more hidden orders are often developed in a metallic glass and entangled topologically. We use this phenomenon to explain the geometric frustration in glass formation and the glass-forming ability of metallic alloys.

  16. Hidden topological order and its correlation with glass-forming ability in metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z W; Li, M Z; Wang, W H; Liu, K X

    2015-01-01

    Unlike the well-defined long-range periodic order that characterizes crystals, so far the inherent atomic packing mode in glassy solids remains mysterious. Based on molecular dynamics simulations, here we find medium-range atomic packing orders in metallic glasses, which are hidden in the diffraction data in terms of structure factors or pair correlation functions. The analysis of the hidden orders in various metallic glasses indicates that the glassy and crystalline solids share a nontrivial structural homology in short-to-medium range, and the hidden orders are formulated by inheriting partial crystalline orders during glass formation. As the number of chemical components increases, more hidden orders are often developed in a metallic glass and entangled topologically. We use this phenomenon to explain the geometric frustration in glass formation and the glass-forming ability of metallic alloys. PMID:25580857

  17. The Ordered Network Structure of M≥8 Earthquakes and its Prediction for the Ordered Pair Great Earthquakes in Mainland China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Ke-Pei; Zhao, Kai

    2014-04-01

    According to the statistical data, a total of 23 M ≥ 8 earthquakes occurred in Mainland China from 1303 to 2012. The seismic activity of M ≥ 8 earthquakes has showed an obvious self-organized orderliness. It should be remarked especially that there were three ordered pairs of M ≥8 earthquakes occurred in West China during 1902 - 2001, of which the time interval in each pair of two earthquakes was four years. This is a unique and rare earthquake example in earthquake history of China and the world. In the guidance of the information forecasting theory of Wen-Bo Weng, based on previous research results, combining ordered analysis with complex network technology, this paper focuses on the summary of the ordered network structure of M ≥ 8 earthquakes, supplements new information, constructs and further optimizes the 2D- and 3D-ordered network structure of M ≥ 8 earthquakes to make prediction research. At last, a new prediction opinion is presented that the future ordered pair of great earthquakes will probably occur around 2022 and 2026 in Mainland China.

  18. Polyakov loop and correlator of Polyakov loops at next-to-next-to-leading order

    SciTech Connect

    Brambilla, Nora; Vairo, Antonio; Ghiglieri, Jacopo; Petreczky, Peter

    2010-10-01

    We study the Polyakov loop and the correlator of two Polyakov loops at finite temperature in the weak-coupling regime. We calculate the Polyakov loop at order g{sup 4}. The calculation of the correlator of two Polyakov loops is performed at distances shorter than the inverse of the temperature and for electric screening masses larger than the Coulomb potential. In this regime, it is accurate up to order g{sup 6}. We also evaluate the Polyakov-loop correlator in an effective field theory framework that takes advantage of the hierarchy of energy scales in the problem and makes explicit the bound-state dynamics. In the effective field theory framework, we show that the Polyakov-loop correlator is at leading order in the multipole expansion the sum of a color-singlet and a color-octet quark-antiquark correlator, which are gauge invariant, and compute the corresponding color-singlet and color-octet free energies.

  19. Projective synchronization of fractional-order memristor-based neural networks.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hai-Bo; Cao, Jin-De

    2015-03-01

    This paper investigates the projective synchronization of fractional-order memristor-based neural networks. Sufficient conditions are derived in the sense of Caputo's fractional derivation and by combining a fractional-order differential inequality. Two numerical examples are given to show the effectiveness of the main results. The results in this paper extend and improve some previous works on the synchronization of fractional-order neural networks. PMID:25463390

  20. Computer Simulation for Calculating the Second-Order Correlation Function of Classical and Quantum Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Facao, M.; Lopes, A.; Silva, A. L.; Silva, P.

    2011-01-01

    We propose an undergraduate numerical project for simulating the results of the second-order correlation function as obtained by an intensity interference experiment for two kinds of light, namely bunched light with Gaussian or Lorentzian power density spectrum and antibunched light obtained from single-photon sources. While the algorithm for…

  1. Extension of local-type inequality for the higher order correlation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Suyama, Teruaki; Yokoyama, Shuichiro E-mail: shu@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2011-07-01

    For the local-type primordial perturbation, it is known that there is an inequality between the bispectrum and the trispectrum. By using the diagrammatic method, we develop a general formalism to systematically construct the similar inequalities up to any order correlation function. As an application, we explicitly derive all the inequalities up to six and eight-point functions.

  2. Analysis of Entanglement Length and Segmental Order Parameter in Polymer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, M.; Sommer, J.-U.

    2010-04-01

    The tube model of entangled chains is applied to compute segment fluctuations and segmental orientational order in polymer networks. The entanglement length Ne is extracted directly from monomer fluctuations without constructing a primitive path. Sliding motion of monomers along the tube axis leads to reduction of segmental order along the chain. For network strands of length N≫Ne, the average segmental order decreases ˜(NeN)-1/2 in marked contrast to the 1/Ne contribution of entanglements to network elasticity. As a consequence, network modulus is not proportional to segmental order in entangled polymer networks. Monte Carlo simulations over a wide range of molecular weights are in quantitative agreement with our theoretical predictions. The impact of entanglements on these properties is directly tested by comparing with simulations where entanglement constraints are switched off.

  3. Non-local Coulomb correlations in metals close to a charge order insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, Jaime

    2008-03-01

    Recent extensions of dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) to clusters either in its real space (CDMFT) or momentum space versions (DCA) have become important tools for the description of electronic properties of low dimensional strongly correlated systems. In contrast to single site DMFT, short range correlation effects on electronic properties of systems close to the Mott transition can be analyzed. We have investigated the charge ordering transition induced by the nearest-neighbor Coulomb repulsion V in the 1/4-filled extended Hubbard model using CDMFT. We find a transition to a strongly renormalized charge ordered Fermi liquid at VCO and a metal-to- insulator transition at VMI>VCO. Short range antiferromagnetism occurs concomitantly with the CO transition. Approaching the charge ordered insulator, V

  4. Hidden String Order in a Hole Superconductor with Extended Correlated Hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhajlany, Ravindra W.; Grzybowski, Przemysław R.; Stasińska, Julia; Lewenstein, Maciej; Dutta, Omjyoti

    2016-06-01

    Ultracold fermions in one-dimensional, spin-dependent nonoverlapping optical lattices are described by a nonstandard Hubbard model with next-nearest-neighbor correlated hopping. In the limit of a kinetically constraining value of the correlated hopping equal to the normal hopping, we map the invariant subspaces of the Hamiltonian exactly to free spinless fermion chains of varying lengths. As a result, the system exactly manifests spin-charge separation and we obtain the system properties for arbitrary filling: ground state collective order characterized by a spin gap, which can be ascribed to an unconventional critical hole superconductor associated with finite long range nonlocal string order. We study the system numerically away from the integrable point and show the persistence of both long range string order and spin gap for appropriate parameters as well as a transition to a ferromagnetic state.

  5. Spatial Distribution Characteristics of Healthcare Facilities in Nanjing: Network Point Pattern Analysis and Correlation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jianhua; Qian, Tianlu; Xi, Changbai; Rui, Yikang; Wang, Jiechen

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distribution of urban service facilities is largely constrained by the road network. In this study, network point pattern analysis and correlation analysis were used to analyze the relationship between road network and healthcare facility distribution. The weighted network kernel density estimation method proposed in this study identifies significant differences between the outside and inside areas of the Ming city wall. The results of network K-function analysis show that private hospitals are more evenly distributed than public hospitals, and pharmacy stores tend to cluster around hospitals along the road network. After computing the correlation analysis between different categorized hospitals and street centrality, we find that the distribution of these hospitals correlates highly with the street centralities, and that the correlations are higher with private and small hospitals than with public and large hospitals. The comprehensive analysis results could help examine the reasonability of existing urban healthcare facility distribution and optimize the location of new healthcare facilities. PMID:27548197

  6. Spatial Distribution Characteristics of Healthcare Facilities in Nanjing: Network Point Pattern Analysis and Correlation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jianhua; Qian, Tianlu; Xi, Changbai; Rui, Yikang; Wang, Jiechen

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distribution of urban service facilities is largely constrained by the road network. In this study, network point pattern analysis and correlation analysis were used to analyze the relationship between road network and healthcare facility distribution. The weighted network kernel density estimation method proposed in this study identifies significant differences between the outside and inside areas of the Ming city wall. The results of network K-function analysis show that private hospitals are more evenly distributed than public hospitals, and pharmacy stores tend to cluster around hospitals along the road network. After computing the correlation analysis between different categorized hospitals and street centrality, we find that the distribution of these hospitals correlates highly with the street centralities, and that the correlations are higher with private and small hospitals than with public and large hospitals. The comprehensive analysis results could help examine the reasonability of existing urban healthcare facility distribution and optimize the location of new healthcare facilities. PMID:27548197

  7. Revisiting node-based SIR models in complex networks with degree correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Cao, Jinde; Alofi, Abdulaziz; AL-Mazrooei, Abdullah; Elaiw, Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we consider two growing networks which will lead to the degree-degree correlations between two nearest neighbors in the network. When the network grows to some certain size, we introduce an SIR-like disease such as pandemic influenza H1N1/09 to the population. Due to its rapid spread, the population size changes slowly, and thus the disease spreads on correlated networks with approximately fixed size. To predict the disease evolution on correlated networks, we first review two node-based SIR models incorporating degree correlations and an edge-based SIR model without considering degree correlation, and then compare the predictions of these models with stochastic SIR simulations, respectively. We find that the edge-based model, even without considering degree correlations, agrees much better than the node-based models incorporating degree correlations with stochastic SIR simulations in many respects. Moreover, simulation results show that for networks with positive correlation, the edge-based model provides a better upper bound of the cumulative incidence than the node-based SIR models, whereas for networks with negative correlation, it provides a lower bound of the cumulative incidence.

  8. Self-assembled DNA-cationic-lipid complexes: Two-dimensional smectic ordering, correlations, and interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salditt, T.; Koltover, I.; Rädler, J. O.; Safinya, C. R.

    1998-07-01

    We report a synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) study of the mutilayered, self-assembled structure (complex) that is formed by mixing DNA with cationic liposomes. In these complexes the DNA is confined between charged lipid bilayers and orders as a two-dimensional (2D) smectic liquid crystal. The power-law bilayer-bilayer correlations of the 3D multilayer smectic liquid crystal, which are coupled to the 2D lattice of DNA chains, are found to deviate significantly from those described by the standard Caillé model of smectic-A phases. To model the DNA ordering, the 2D smectic correlation function and the corresponding structure factor are derived from the smectic Hamiltonian in harmonic approximation. The resulting line shape is then fitted to the DNA correlation peak. It is found that for samples of higher d, short-range correlations between the DNA in adjacent sheets have to be assumed to explain the data. From the least-square fitting, the 2D DNA interchain compressibility modulus B is extracted as a function of d and discussed in view of different possible microscopic interactions responsible for the ordering.

  9. Multilabel image classification via high-order label correlation driven active learning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bang; Wang, Yang; Chen, Fang

    2014-03-01

    Supervised machine learning techniques have been applied to multilabel image classification problems with tremendous success. Despite disparate learning mechanisms, their performances heavily rely on the quality of training images. However, the acquisition of training images requires significant efforts from human annotators. This hinders the applications of supervised learning techniques to large scale problems. In this paper, we propose a high-order label correlation driven active learning (HoAL) approach that allows the iterative learning algorithm itself to select the informative example-label pairs from which it learns so as to learn an accurate classifier with less annotation efforts. Four crucial issues are considered by the proposed HoAL: 1) unlike binary cases, the selection granularity for multilabel active learning need to be fined from example to example-label pair; 2) different labels are seldom independent, and label correlations provide critical information for efficient learning; 3) in addition to pair-wise label correlations, high-order label correlations are also informative for multilabel active learning; and 4) since the number of label combinations increases exponentially with respect to the number of labels, an efficient mining method is required to discover informative label correlations. The proposed approach is tested on public data sets, and the empirical results demonstrate its effectiveness. PMID:24723538

  10. Charge-correlation effects in calculations of atomic short-range order in metallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinski, F. J.; Staunton, J. B.; Johnson, D. D.

    1998-06-01

    The ``local'' chemical environment that surrounds an atom directly influences its electronic charge density. These atomic charge correlations play an important role in describing the Coulomb and total energies for random substitutional alloys. Although the electronic structure may be well represented by a single-site theory, such as the coherent potential approximation, the electrostatic energy is not as well represented when these charge correlations are ignored. For metals, including the average effect from the charge correlation coming from only the nearest-neighbor shell has been shown to be sufficient to determine accurately the energy of formation. In this paper, we incorporate such charge correlations into the concentration-wave approach for calculating the atomic short-range order in random (substitutional) alloys. We present changes within the formalism, and apply the resulting equations to equiatomic nickel platinum. By including these effects, we obtain significantly better agreement with experimental data. In fact, particular to NiPt, a consequence of the charge correlation is a screening which cancels much of the electrostatic contribution to the energy and thus to the atomic short-range order, resulting in agreement with a picture originally outlined using only ``band-energy'' contributions.

  11. Approach to the glass transition studied by higher order correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacevic, N.; Glotzer, S. C.

    2003-08-01

    We present a theoretical framework based on a higher order density correlation function, analogous to that used to investigate spin glasses, to describe dynamical heterogeneities in simulated glass-forming liquids. These higher order correlation functions are a four-point, time-dependent density correlation function g4(r,t) and a corresponding 'structure factor' S4(q,t) which measure the spatial correlations between the local liquid density at two points in space, each at two different times. g4(r,t) and S4(q,t) were extensively studied via molecular dynamics simulations of a binary Lennard-Jones mixture approaching the mode coupling temperature from above in Franz et al (1999 Phil. Mag. B 79 1827), Donati et al (2002 J. Non-Cryst. Solids 307 215), Glotzer et al (2000 J. Chem. Phys. 112 509), Lacevic et al (2002 Phys. Rev. E 66 030101), Lacevic et al (2003 J. Chem. Phys. submitted) and Lacevic (2003 Dissertation The Johns Hopkins University). Here, we examine the contribution to g4(r,t), S4(q,t) and the corresponding dynamical correlation length, as well as the corresponding order parameter Q(t) and generalized susceptibility chi4(t), from localized particles. We show that the dynamical correlation length xi4SS(t) of localized particles has a maximum as a function of time t, and the value of the maximum of xi4SS(t) increases steadily in the temperature range approaching the mode coupling temperature from above.

  12. Effects of correlated Gaussian noise on the mean firing rate and correlations of an electrically coupled neuronal network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaojuan; Perc, Matjaž; Lu, Qishao; Kurths, Jürgen

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we examine the effects of correlated Gaussian noise on a two-dimensional neuronal network that is locally modeled by the Rulkov map. More precisely, we study the effects of the noise correlation on the variations of the mean firing rate and the correlations among neurons versus the noise intensity. Via numerical simulations, we show that the mean firing rate can always be optimized at an intermediate noise intensity, irrespective of the noise correlation. On the other hand, variations of the population coherence with respect to the noise intensity are strongly influenced by the ratio between local and global Gaussian noisy inputs. Biological implications of our findings are also discussed.

  13. Kohn–Sham exchange-correlation potentials from second-order reduced density matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Cuevas-Saavedra, Rogelio; Staroverov, Viktor N.; Ayers, Paul W.

    2015-12-28

    We describe a practical algorithm for constructing the Kohn–Sham exchange-correlation potential corresponding to a given second-order reduced density matrix. Unlike conventional Kohn–Sham inversion methods in which such potentials are extracted from ground-state electron densities, the proposed technique delivers unambiguous results in finite basis sets. The approach can also be used to separate approximately the exchange and correlation potentials for a many-electron system for which the reduced density matrix is known. The algorithm is implemented for configuration-interaction wave functions and its performance is illustrated with numerical examples.

  14. 77 FR 36305 - Stream Communications Network & Media, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Stream Communications Network & Media, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading June 14, 2012. It... concerning the securities of Stream Communications Network & Media, Inc. because it has not filed...

  15. 76 FR 28117 - Order of Suspension of Trading; City Network, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Order of Suspension of Trading; City Network, Inc. May 11, 2011. It appears to the Securities and... City Network, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports since the period ended September...

  16. Scaled Opposite Spin Second Order Moller-Plesset Correlation Energy: An Economical Electronic Structure Method

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yousung; Lochan, Rohini C.; Dutoi, Anthony D.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2004-08-02

    A simplified approach to treating the electron correlation energy is suggested in which only the alpha-beta component of the second order Moller-Plesset energy is evaluated, and then scaled by an empirical factor which is suggested to be 1.3. This scaled opposite spin second order energy (SOS-MP2) yields results for relative energies and derivative properties that are statistically improved over the conventional MP2 method. Furthermore, the SOS-MP2 energy can be evaluated without the 5th order computational steps associated with MP2 theory, even without exploiting any spatial locality. A 4th order algorithm is given for evaluating the opposite spin MP2 energy using auxiliary basis expansions, and a Laplace approach, and timing comparisons are given.

  17. Order parameter, correlation functions, and fidelity susceptibility for the BCS model in the thermodynamic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Araby, Omar; Baeriswyl, Dionys

    2014-04-01

    The exact ground state of the reduced BCS Hamiltonian is investigated numerically for large system sizes and compared with the BCS ansatz. A "canonical" order parameter is found to be equal to the largest eigenvalue of Yang's reduced density matrix in the thermodynamic limit. Moreover, the limiting values of the exact analysis agree with those obtained for the BCS ground state. Exact results for the ground-state energy, level occupations, and a pseudospin-pseudospin correlation function are also found to converge to the BCS values already for relatively small system sizes. However, discrepancies persist for a pair-pair correlation function, for interlevel correlations of occupancies and for the fidelity susceptibility, even for large system sizes where these quantities have visibly converged to well-defined limits. Our results indicate that there exist nonperturbative corrections to the BCS predictions in the thermodynamic limit.

  18. Transport on weighted networks: When the correlations are independent of the degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasco, José J.; Gonçalves, Bruno

    2007-12-01

    Most real-world networks are weighted graphs with the weight of the edges reflecting the relative importance of the connections. In this work, we study nondegree dependent correlations between edge weights, generalizing thus the correlations beyond the degree dependent case. We propose a simple method to introduce weight-weight correlations in topologically uncorrelated graphs. This allows us to test different measures to discriminate between the different correlation types and to quantify their intensity. We also discuss here the effect of weight correlations on the transport properties of the networks, showing that positive correlations dramatically improve transport. Finally, we give two examples of real-world networks (social and transport graphs) in which weight-weight correlations are present.

  19. Correlation between contrast sensitivity and higher-order aberration based on pupil diameter after cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Takefumi; Negishi, Kazuno; Ohnuma, Kazuhiko; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between contrast sensitivity and calculated higher-order aberrations based on individual natural pupil diameter after cataract surgery. Methods This prospective study included 120 eyes from 92 patients who were randomized to receive one of four lenses, including three aspheric lenses (Acrysof SN60WF, Tecnis ZA9000, and Hoya Py60AD) and one spherical lens (Acrysof SN60AT). Contrast sensitivity, higher-order aberrations of the whole eye, and pupil diameter under photopic and mesopic conditions were measured 1 month postoperatively. Higher-order aberrations were decomposed into Zernike coefficients, calculated according to individual pupil diameter. The correlation between higher-order aberrations and contrast sensitivity was evaluated. Results There were no significant differences in contrast sensitivity function between the four types of lenses under photopic conditions. However, the contrast sensitivity function and area under log contrast sensitivity function in the aspheric lenses were significantly better than in the spherical lens under mesopic conditions. Under mesopic conditions, spherical aberration in eyes with aspheric lenses was significantly lower than in eyes with spherical lenses (P < 0.05). Under photopic conditions, coma aberration had a significant negative correlation with contrast sensitivity at 12 cycles/degree. Under mesopic conditions, spherical aberration had a significant negative correlation with contrast sensitivity at 3, 6, and 12 cycles/degree with glare, and with contrast sensitivity at 6 and 18 cycles/degree without glare. Conclusion In terms of influence on visual function, coma aberration may be more significant under photopic conditions and spherical aberration under mesopic conditions. PMID:22205829

  20. Correlation Between Channel Profile and Plan View Drainage Network Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelef, E.; Hilley, G. E.

    2011-12-01

    This research explores the relationship between the plan-view network and profile geometry of channels using high-resolution digital topography and numerical models. In particular, we study the relations between plan-view morphometrics of the channel network and the mechanics of land-shaping processes as reflected by channel profile concavity. This analysis addresses one of the long-standing questions in geomorphology relating to the mechanistic significance of various plan-view channel network geometry measures. Statistically based studies suggest that Hortonian measures of channel network architecture (e.g. bifurcation ratio, area ratio, and length ratio) describe virtually all possible network geometries, and hence are not diagnostic when evaluating the origins of the geometry of a particular network. Our analyses of high resolution DEMs that capture different channel profile concavities (i.e debris flow vs. fluvial flows), as well as the topography of landscapes produced by process-based numerical models affirms this conclusion and indicates that Hortonian measures, as well as Hack exponent, are insensitive to channel concavity. In contrast, channel frequency (number of channel segments per area) appears to provide a measure that is sensitive to channel concavity. As such, channel frequency appears to discern between landscapes dominated by different land-shaping processes that produce different channel profile concavities. In the context of headword growing networks, the observed relations between concavity and channel frequency can be modeled through the coupled effect of concavity and surface roughness on the competition between headword growing channels. Our results suggest that the plan-view geometry of channel networks does not simply arise from random deflection of channels that once joined, cannot separate, but rather reflects the underlying processes that incise through rock and transport mass through the channel network

  1. Seeing the unseen: Second-order correlation learning in 7- to 11-month-olds.

    PubMed

    Yermolayeva, Yevdokiya; Rakison, David H

    2016-07-01

    We present four experiments with the object-examining procedure that investigated 7-, 9-, and 11-month-olds' ability to associate two object features that were never presented simultaneously. In each experiment, infants were familiarized with a number of 3D objects that incorporated different correlations among the features of those objects and the body of the objects (e.g., Part A and Body 1, and Part B and Body 1). Infants were then tested with objects with a novel body that either possessed both of the parts that were independently correlated with one body during familiarization (e.g., Part A and B on Body 3) or that were attached to two different bodies during familiarization. The experiments demonstrate that infants as young as 7months of age are capable of this kind of second-order correlation learning. Furthermore, by at least 11months of age infants develop a representation for the object that incorporates both of the features they experienced during training. We suggest that the ability to learn second-order correlations represents a powerful but as yet largely unexplored process for generalization in the first years of life. PMID:27038738

  2. Hanbury Brown-Twiss interferometry and second-order correlations of inflaton quanta

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2011-01-15

    The quantum theory of optical coherence is applied to the scrutiny of the statistical properties of the relic inflaton quanta. After adapting the description of the quantized scalar and tensor modes of the geometry to the analysis of intensity correlations, the normalized degrees of first-order and second-order coherence are computed in the concordance paradigm and are shown to encode faithfully the statistical properties of the initial quantum state. The strongly bunched curvature phonons are not only super-Poissonian but also superchaotic. Testable inequalities are derived in the limit of large-angular scales and can be physically interpreted in the light of the tenets of Hanbury Brown-Twiss interferometry. The quantum mechanical results are compared and contrasted with different situations including the one where intensity correlations are the result of a classical stochastic process. The survival of second-order correlations (not necessarily related to the purity of the initial quantum state) is addressed by defining a generalized ensemble where super-Poissonian statistics is an intrinsic property of the density matrix and turns out to be associated with finite volume effects which are expected to vanish in the thermodynamic limit.

  3. Correlations, hierarchies and networks of the world’s automotive companies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocakaplan, Yusuf; Doğan, Şerafettin; Deviren, Bayram; Keskin, Mustafa

    2013-06-01

    We investigate, within the scope of econophysics, the correlations, hierarchies and networks of the world’s automotive companies over the 2003-2010 period by using the concept of a minimal spanning tree (MST) and hierarchical tree (HT). We derive a hierarchical organization and construct the MSTs and HTs for the 2003-2010 period and illustrate how the MSTs and their associated HTs developed over time. These periods are divided into two subperiods, such as 2003-2006 and 2007-2010, in order to test various time-windows and understand the temporal evolution of the correlation structure over time. We perform the bootstrap techniques to investigate a value of the statistical reliability to the links of the MSTs. We also use average linkage cluster analysis (ALCA) to observe the cluster structure more clearly in HTs. From the structural topologies of these trees, we identify different clusters of companies according to their geographical proximity and economic ties. Our results show that some companies are more important within the network, due to a tighter connection with other companies. We also find that these important companies play a predominant role in the world’s automotive industry.

  4. Quantum correlation with sandwiched relative entropies: Advantageous as order parameter in quantum phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Misra, Avijit; Biswas, Anindya; Pati, Arun K; Sen De, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2015-05-01

    Quantum discord is a measure of quantum correlations beyond the entanglement-separability paradigm. It is conceptualized by using the von Neumann entropy as a measure of disorder. We introduce a class of quantum correlation measures as differences between total and classical correlations, in a shared quantum state, in terms of the sandwiched relative Rényi and Tsallis entropies. We compare our results with those obtained by using the traditional relative entropies. We find that the measures satisfy all the plausible axioms for quantum correlations. We evaluate the measures for shared pure as well as paradigmatic classes of mixed states. We show that the measures can faithfully detect the quantum critical point in the transverse quantum Ising model and find that they can be used to remove an unquieting feature of nearest-neighbor quantum discord in this respect. Furthermore, the measures provide better finite-size scaling exponents of the quantum critical point than the ones for other known order parameters, including entanglement and information-theoretic measures of quantum correlations. PMID:26066137

  5. Design constraints for third-order PLL nodes in master-slave clock distribution networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, A. M.; Rigon, A. G.; Ferreira, A. A.; Piqueira, José R. C.

    2010-09-01

    Clock signal distribution in telecommunication commercial systems usually adopts a master-slave architecture, with a precise time basis generator as a master and phase-locked loops (PLLs) as slaves. In the majority of the networks, second-order PLLs are adopted due to their simplicity and stability. Nevertheless, in some applications better transient responses are necessary and, consequently, greater order PLLs need to be used, in spite of the possibility of bifurcations and chaotic attractors. Here a master-slave network with third-order PLLs is analyzed and conditions for the stability of the synchronous state are derived, providing design constraints for the node parameters, in order to guarantee stability and reachability of the synchronous state for the whole network. Numerical simulations are carried out in order to confirm the analytical results.

  6. Percolation in interdependent and interconnected networks: Abrupt change from second- to first-order transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yanqing; Ksherim, Baruch; Cohen, Reuven; Havlin, Shlomo

    2011-12-01

    Robustness of two coupled networks systems has been studied separately only for dependency coupling [Buldyrev , Nature (London)NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature08932 464, 1025 (2010)] and only for connectivity coupling [Leicht and D’Souza, e-print arXiv:0907.0894]. Here we study, using a percolation approach, a more realistic coupled networks system where both interdependent and interconnected links exist. We find rich and unusual phase-transition phenomena including hybrid transition of mixed first and second order, i.e., discontinuities like in a first-order transition of the giant component followed by a continuous decrease to zero like in a second-order transition. Moreover, we find unusual discontinuous changes from second-order to first-order transition as a function of the dependency coupling between the two networks.

  7. Percolation in interdependent and interconnected networks: abrupt change from second- to first-order transitions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanqing; Ksherim, Baruch; Cohen, Reuven; Havlin, Shlomo

    2011-12-01

    Robustness of two coupled networks systems has been studied separately only for dependency coupling [Buldyrev et al., Nature (London) 464, 1025 (2010)] and only for connectivity coupling [Leicht and D'Souza, e-print arXiv:0907.0894]. Here we study, using a percolation approach, a more realistic coupled networks system where both interdependent and interconnected links exist. We find rich and unusual phase-transition phenomena including hybrid transition of mixed first and second order, i.e., discontinuities like in a first-order transition of the giant component followed by a continuous decrease to zero like in a second-order transition. Moreover, we find unusual discontinuous changes from second-order to first-order transition as a function of the dependency coupling between the two networks. PMID:22304164

  8. nth-order photon correlation spectroscopy: From theory and instrumentation to intermittency in granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemieux, Pierre-Anthony

    This dissertation proceeds in two steps. It first extends traditional dynamic light scattering techniques by introducing intensity correlation of higher-order. It then investigates the intermittency transition in granular flow using this newly developed formalism. The intermittency transition occurs when a granular system relaxes intermittently despite being driven continuously. It is of practical importance as granular materials play a crucial role in geophysical phenomena and industry. It is of theoretical importance as similar behavior has been observed other systems such as colloidal glasses and foams near the onset of jamming. In order to study such flows we need to simultaneously capture the fast single-grain dynamics and the much slower collective intermittency. For this, we turn to dynamic light scattering techniques. In these techniques, the dynamic properties of the medium are extracted from a second-order quantity, the intensity auto-correlation g(2). This approach is limited to systems where the scattered electric field is a Gaussian random variable, and breaks down when the scattering sites are few or correlated. We first demonstrate that intensity correlations functions g (n) of higher-order can be used to both detect non-Gaussian scattering processes, and extract information not available in g (2) alone. The g(n) are experimentally measured by a combination of a commercial correlator and a custom-designed digital delay line. This approach is first tested in prototypical experimental situations, then specialized to the study of intermittent dynamics. We then introduce a model system for the study of granular flows near the intermittency transition, in the form of a granular heap by the steady addition of grains at its top. Using the higher-order light intensity framework we obtain the first continuous picture of granular dynamics across the intermittency transition. We find that microscopic gain dynamics during an avalanche are similar to those in the

  9. Point model equations for neutron correlation counting: Extension of Böhnel's equations to any order

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Croft, Stephen; Santi, Peter

    2015-06-15

    Various methods of autocorrelation neutron analysis may be used to extract information about a measurement item containing spontaneously fissioning material. The two predominant approaches being the time correlation analysis (that make use of a coincidence gate) methods of multiplicity shift register logic and Feynman sampling. The common feature is that the correlated nature of the pulse train can be described by a vector of reduced factorial multiplet rates. We call these singlets, doublets, triplets etc. Within the point reactor model the multiplet rates may be related to the properties of the item, the parameters of the detector, and basic nuclear data constants by a series of coupled algebraic equations – the so called point model equations. Solving, or inverting, the point model equations using experimental calibration model parameters is how assays of unknown items is performed. Currently only the first three multiplets are routinely used. In this work we develop the point model equations to higher order multiplets using the probability generating functions approach combined with the general derivative chain rule, the so called Faà di Bruno Formula. Explicit expression up to 5th order are provided, as well the general iterative formula to calculate any order. This study represents the first necessary step towards determining if higher order multiplets can add value to nondestructive measurement practice for nuclear materials control and accountancy.

  10. Point model equations for neutron correlation counting: Extension of Böhnel's equations to any order

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Favalli, Andrea; Croft, Stephen; Santi, Peter

    2015-06-15

    Various methods of autocorrelation neutron analysis may be used to extract information about a measurement item containing spontaneously fissioning material. The two predominant approaches being the time correlation analysis (that make use of a coincidence gate) methods of multiplicity shift register logic and Feynman sampling. The common feature is that the correlated nature of the pulse train can be described by a vector of reduced factorial multiplet rates. We call these singlets, doublets, triplets etc. Within the point reactor model the multiplet rates may be related to the properties of the item, the parameters of the detector, and basic nuclearmore » data constants by a series of coupled algebraic equations – the so called point model equations. Solving, or inverting, the point model equations using experimental calibration model parameters is how assays of unknown items is performed. Currently only the first three multiplets are routinely used. In this work we develop the point model equations to higher order multiplets using the probability generating functions approach combined with the general derivative chain rule, the so called Faà di Bruno Formula. Explicit expression up to 5th order are provided, as well the general iterative formula to calculate any order. This study represents the first necessary step towards determining if higher order multiplets can add value to nondestructive measurement practice for nuclear materials control and accountancy.« less

  11. Point model equations for neutron correlation counting: Extension of Böhnel's equations to any order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favalli, Andrea; Croft, Stephen; Santi, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Various methods of autocorrelation neutron analysis may be used to extract information about a measurement item containing spontaneously fissioning material. The two predominant approaches being the time correlation analysis (that make use of a coincidence gate) methods of multiplicity shift register logic and Feynman sampling. The common feature is that the correlated nature of the pulse train can be described by a vector of reduced factorial multiplet rates. We call these singlets, doublets, triplets etc. Within the point reactor model the multiplet rates may be related to the properties of the item, the parameters of the detector, and basic nuclear data constants by a series of coupled algebraic equations - the so called point model equations. Solving, or inverting, the point model equations using experimental calibration model parameters is how assays of unknown items is performed. Currently only the first three multiplets are routinely used. In this work we develop the point model equations to higher order multiplets using the probability generating functions approach combined with the general derivative chain rule, the so called Faà di Bruno Formula. Explicit expression up to 5th order are provided, as well the general iterative formula to calculate any order. This work represents the first necessary step towards determining if higher order multiplets can add value to nondestructive measurement practice for nuclear materials control and accountancy.

  12. DEFINING THE PLAYERS IN HIGHER-ORDER NETWORKS: PREDICTIVE MODELING FOR REVERSE ENGINEERING FUNCTIONAL INFLUENCE NETWORKS

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Jason E.; Costa, Michelle N.; Stevens, S.L.; Stenzel-Poore, Mary; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.

    2011-01-20

    A difficult problem that is currently growing rapidly due to the sharp increase in the amount of high-throughput data available for many systems is that of determining useful and informative causative influence networks. These networks can be used to predict behavior given observation of a small number of components, predict behavior at a future time point, or identify components that are critical to the functioning of the system under particular conditions. In these endeavors incorporating observations of systems from a wide variety of viewpoints can be particularly beneficial, but has often been undertaken with the objective of inferring networks that are generally applicable. The focus of the current work is to integrate both general observations and measurements taken for a particular pathology, that of ischemic stroke, to provide improved ability to produce useful predictions of systems behavior. A number of hybrid approaches have recently been proposed for network generation in which the Gene Ontology is used to filter or enrich network links inferred from gene expression data through reverse engineering methods. These approaches have been shown to improve the biological plausibility of the inferred relationships determined, but still treat knowledge-based and machine-learning inferences as incommensurable inputs. In this paper, we explore how further improvements may be achieved through a full integration of network inference insights achieved through application of the Gene Ontology and reverse engineering methods with specific reference to the construction of dynamic models of transcriptional regulatory networks. We show that integrating two approaches to network construction, one based on reverse-engineering from conditional transcriptional data, one based on reverse-engineering from in situ hybridization data, and another based on functional associations derived from Gene Ontology, using probabilities can improve results of clustering as evaluated by a

  13. Correlation-driven charge order at the interface between a Mott and a band insulator.

    PubMed

    Pentcheva, Rossitza; Pickett, Warren E

    2007-07-01

    To study digital Mott insulator LaTiO3 and band insulator SrTiO3 interfaces, we apply correlated band theory within the local density approximation including a Hubbard U to (n, m) multilayers, 1ordering, and Ti3+ dxy-orbital ordering, with antiferromagnetic exchange coupling between the spins in the interface layer. Lattice relaxations lead to conducting behavior by shifting (slightly but importantly) the lower Hubbard band, but the charge and orbital order is robust against relaxation. PMID:17678179

  14. Optimization of thermal ghost imaging: high-order correlations vs. background subtraction.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kam Wai C; O'Sullivan, Malcolm N; Boyd, Robert W

    2010-03-15

    We compare the performance of high-order thermal ghost imaging with that of conventional (that is, lowest-order) thermal ghost imaging for different data processing methods. Particular attention is given to high-order thermal ghost imaging with background normalization and conventional ghost imaging with background subtraction. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the ghost image is used as the figure of merit for the comparison.We find analytically that the CNR of the normalized high-order ghost image is inversely proportional to the square root of the number of transmitting pixels of the object. This scaling law is independent of the exponents used in calculating the high-order correlation and is the same as that of conventional ghost imaging with background subtraction. We find that no data processing procedure performs better than lowest-order ghost imaging with background subtraction. Our results are found to be able to explain the observations of a recent experiment [Chen et al., arXiv:0902.3713v3 [quant-ph

  15. Higher-order local and non-local correlations for 1D strongly interacting Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandani, EJKP; Römer, Rudolf A.; Tan, Shina; Guan, Xi-Wen

    2016-05-01

    The correlation function is an important quantity in the physics of ultracold quantum gases because it provides information about the quantum many-body wave function beyond the simple density profile. In this paper we first study the M-body local correlation functions, g M , of the one-dimensional (1D) strongly repulsive Bose gas within the Lieb–Liniger model using the analytical method proposed by Gangardt and Shlyapnikov (2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 010401; 2003 New J. Phys. 5 79). In the strong repulsion regime the 1D Bose gas at low temperatures is equivalent to a gas of ideal particles obeying the non-mutual generalized exclusion statistics with a statistical parameter α =1-2/γ , i.e. the quasimomenta of N strongly interacting bosons map to the momenta of N free fermions via {k}i≈ α {k}iF with i=1,\\ldots ,N. Here γ is the dimensionless interaction strength within the Lieb–Liniger model. We rigorously prove that such a statistical parameter α solely determines the sub-leading order contribution to the M-body local correlation function of the gas at strong but finite interaction strengths. We explicitly calculate the correlation functions g M in terms of γ and α at zero, low, and intermediate temperatures. For M = 2 and 3 our results reproduce the known expressions for g 2 and g 3 with sub-leading terms (see for instance (Vadim et al 2006 Phys. Rev. A 73 051604(R); Kormos et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 210404; Wang et al 2013 Phys. Rev. A 87 043634). We also express the leading order of the short distance non-local correlation functions < {{{\\Psi }}}\\dagger ({x}1)\\cdots {{{\\Psi }}}\\dagger ({x}M){{\\Psi }}({y}M)\\cdots {{\\Psi }}({y}1)> of the strongly repulsive Bose gas in terms of the wave function of M bosons at zero collision energy and zero total momentum. Here {{\\Psi }}(x) is the boson annihilation operator. These general formulas of the higher-order local and non-local correlation functions of the 1D Bose gas provide new insights into the

  16. Electron correlation effects and density analysis of the first-order hyperpolarizability of neutral guanine tautomers.

    PubMed

    Alparone, Andrea

    2013-08-01

    Dipole moments (μ), charge distributions, and static electronic first-order hyperpolarizabilities (β(μ)) of the two lowest-energy keto tautomers of guanine (7H and 9H) were determined in the gas phase using Hartree-Fock, Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2 and MP4), and DFT (PBE1PBE, B97-1, B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP) methods with Dunning's correlation-consistent aug-cc-pVDZ and d-aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets. The most stable isomer 7H exhibits a μ value smaller than that of the 9H form by a factor of ca. 3.5. The β μ value of the 9H tautomer is strongly dependent on the computational method employed, as it dramatically influences the β(μ) (9H)/β(μ) (7H) ratio, which at the highest correlated MP4/aug-cc-pVDZ level is predicted to be ca. 5. The Coulomb-attenuating hybrid exchange-correlation CAM-B3LYP method is superior to the conventional PBE1PBE, B3LYP, and B97-1 functionals in predicting the β(μ) values. Differences between the largest diagonal hyperpolarizability components were clarified through hyperpolarizability density analyses. Dipole moment and first-order hyperpolarizability are molecular properties that are potentially useful for distinguishing the 7H from the 9H tautomer. PMID:23605138

  17. Synchronization of fractional-order complex-valued neural networks with time delay.

    PubMed

    Bao, Haibo; Park, Ju H; Cao, Jinde

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with the problem of synchronization of fractional-order complex-valued neural networks with time delays. By means of linear delay feedback control and a fractional-order inequality, sufficient conditions are obtained to guarantee the synchronization of the drive-response systems. Numerical simulations are provided to show the effectiveness of the obtained results. PMID:27268259

  18. Unveiling correlations between financial variables and topological metrics of trading networks: Evidence from a stock and its warrant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming-Xia; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, Wen-Jie; Xiong, Xiong; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2015-02-01

    Traders develop and adopt different trading strategies attempting to maximize their profits in financial markets. These trading strategies not only result in specific topological structures in trading networks, which connect the traders with the pairwise buy-sell relationships, but also have potential impacts on market dynamics. Here, we present a detailed analysis on how the market behaviors are correlated with the structures of traders in trading networks based on audit trail data for the Baosteel stock and its warrant at the transaction level from 22 August 2005 to 23 August 2006. In our investigation, we divide each trade day into 48 rolling time windows with a length of 5 min, construct a trading network within each window, and obtain a time series of over 11,600 trading networks. We find that there are strongly simultaneous correlations between the topological metrics (including network centralization, assortative index, and average path length) of trading networks that characterize the patterns of order execution and the financial variables (including return, volatility, intertrade duration, and trading volume) for the stock and its warrant. Our analysis may shed new lights on how the microscopic interactions between elements within complex system affect the system's performance.

  19. Stability and synchronization of memristor-based fractional-order delayed neural networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liping; Wu, Ranchao; Cao, Jinde; Liu, Jia-Bao

    2015-11-01

    Global asymptotic stability and synchronization of a class of fractional-order memristor-based delayed neural networks are investigated. For such problems in integer-order systems, Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional is usually constructed, whereas similar method has not been well developed for fractional-order nonlinear delayed systems. By employing a comparison theorem for a class of fractional-order linear systems with time delay, sufficient condition for global asymptotic stability of fractional memristor-based delayed neural networks is derived. Then, based on linear error feedback control, the synchronization criterion for such neural networks is also presented. Numerical simulations are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results. PMID:26282374

  20. Relative ordering of square-norm distance correlations in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Song, Xue-Ke; Ye, Liu

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the square-norm distance correlation dynamics of the Bell-diagonal states under different local decoherence channels, including phase flip, bit flip, and bit-phase flip channels by employing the geometric discord (GD) and its modified geometric discord (MGD), as the measures of the square-norm distance correlations. Moreover, an explicit comparison between them is made in detail. The results show that there is no distinct dominant relative ordering between them. Furthermore, we obtain that the GD just gradually deceases to zero, while MGD initially has a large freezing interval, and then suddenly changes in evolution. The longer the freezing interval, the less the MGD is. Interestingly, it is shown that the dynamic behaviors of the two geometric discords under the three noisy environments for the Werner-type initial states are the same.

  1. Accuracy of electronic wave functions in quantum Monte Carlo: The effect of high-order correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chien-Jung; Umrigar, C. J.; Nightingale, M. P.

    1997-08-01

    Compact and accurate wave functions can be constructed by quantum Monte Carlo methods. Typically, these wave functions consist of a sum of a small number of Slater determinants multiplied by a Jastrow factor. In this paper we study the importance of including high-order, nucleus-three-electron correlations in the Jastrow factor. An efficient algorithm based on the theory of invariants is used to compute the high-body correlations. We observe significant improvements in the variational Monte Carlo energy and in the fluctuations of the local energies but not in the fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo energies. Improvements for the ground states of physical, fermionic atoms are found to be smaller than those for the ground states of fictitious, bosonic atoms, indicating that errors in the nodal surfaces of the fermionic wave functions are a limiting factor.

  2. Higher-order neural network software for distortion invariant object recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Max B.; Spirkovska, Lilly

    1991-01-01

    The state-of-the-art in pattern recognition for such applications as automatic target recognition and industrial robotic vision relies on digital image processing. We present a higher-order neural network model and software which performs the complete feature extraction-pattern classification paradigm required for automatic pattern recognition. Using a third-order neural network, we demonstrate complete, 100 percent accurate invariance to distortions of scale, position, and in-plate rotation. In a higher-order neural network, feature extraction is built into the network, and does not have to be learned. Only the relatively simple classification step must be learned. This is key to achieving very rapid training. The training set is much smaller than with standard neural network software because the higher-order network only has to be shown one view of each object to be learned, not every possible view. The software and graphical user interface run on any Sun workstation. Results of the use of the neural software in autonomous robotic vision systems are presented. Such a system could have extensive application in robotic manufacturing.

  3. Correlation Function Analysis of Fiber Networks: Implications for Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez-Garcia, Jorge; Braginsky, Leonid; Shklover, Valery; Lawson, John W.

    2011-01-01

    The heat transport in highly porous fiber structures is investigated. The fibers are supposed to be thin, but long, so that the number of the inter-fiber connections along each fiber is large. We show that the effective conductivity of such structures can be found from the correlation length of the two-point correlation function of the local conductivities. Estimation of the parameters, determining the conductivity, from the 2D images of the structures is analyzed.

  4. Default Network Deactivations Are Correlated with Psychopathic Personality Traits

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Tong; Gheytanchi, Anahita; Aziz-Zadeh, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Background The posteromedial cortex (PMC) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) are part of a network of brain regions that has been found to exhibit decreased activity during goal-oriented tasks. This network is thought to support a baseline of brain activity, and is commonly referred to as the “default network”. Although recent reports suggest that the PMC and mPFC are associated with affective, social, and self-referential processes, the relationship between these default network components and personality traits, especially those pertaining to social context, is poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings In the current investigation, we assessed the relationship between PMC and mPFC deactivations and psychopathic personality traits using fMRI and a self-report measure. We found that PMC deactivations predicted traits related to egocentricity and mPFC deactivations predicted traits related to decision-making. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that the PMC and mPFC are associated with processes involving self-relevancy and affective decision-making, consistent with previous reports. More generally, these findings suggest a link between default network activity and personality traits. PMID:20830290

  5. Orientational order of the lamellipodial actin network as demonstrated in living motile cells.

    PubMed

    Verkhovsky, Alexander B; Chaga, Oleg Y; Schaub, Sébastien; Svitkina, Tatyana M; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Borisy, Gary G

    2003-11-01

    Lamellipodia of crawling cells represent both the motor for cell advance and the primary building site for the actin cytoskeleton. The organization of actin in the lamellipodium reflects actin dynamics and is of critical importance for the mechanism of cell motility. In previous structural studies, the lamellipodial actin network was analyzed primarily by electron microscopy (EM). An understanding of lamellipodial organization would benefit significantly if the EM data were complemented and put into a kinetic context by establishing correspondence with structural features observable at the light microscopic level in living cells. Here, we use an enhanced phase contrast microscopy technique to visualize an apparent long-range diagonal actin meshwork in the advancing lamellipodia of living cells. Visualization of this meshwork permitted a correlative light and electron microscopic approach that validated the underlying organization of lamellipodia. The linear features in the light microscopic meshwork corresponded to regions of greater actin filament density. Orientation of features was analyzed quantitatively and compared with the orientation of actin filaments at the EM level. We infer that the light microscopic meshwork reflects the orientational order of actin filaments which, in turn, is related to their branching angle. PMID:13679520

  6. Orientational Order of the Lamellipodial Actin Network as Demonstrated in Living Motile CellsV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Verkhovsky, Alexander B.; Chaga, Oleg Y.; Schaub, Sébastien; Svitkina, Tatyana M.; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Borisy, Gary G.

    2003-01-01

    Lamellipodia of crawling cells represent both the motor for cell advance and the primary building site for the actin cytoskeleton. The organization of actin in the lamellipodium reflects actin dynamics and is of critical importance for the mechanism of cell motility. In previous structural studies, the lamellipodial actin network was analyzed primarily by electron microscopy (EM). An understanding of lamellipodial organization would benefit significantly if the EM data were complemented and put into a kinetic context by establishing correspondence with structural features observable at the light microscopic level in living cells. Here, we use an enhanced phase contrast microscopy technique to visualize an apparent long-range diagonal actin meshwork in the advancing lamellipodia of living cells. Visualization of this meshwork permitted a correlative light and electron microscopic approach that validated the underlying organization of lamellipodia. The linear features in the light microscopic meshwork corresponded to regions of greater actin filament density. Orientation of features was analyzed quantitatively and compared with the orientation of actin filaments at the EM level. We infer that the light microscopic meshwork reflects the orientational order of actin filaments which, in turn, is related to their branching angle. PMID:13679520

  7. Communication: Explicitly correlated four-component relativistic second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Ten-no, Seiichiro; Yamaki, Daisuke

    2012-10-01

    We propose explicitly correlated Ansatz for four-component relativistic methods within the framework of the no-pair approximation. Kinetically balanced geminal basis is derived to satisfy the cusp conditions in the non-relativistic limit based on the Lévy-Leblend-like equation. Relativistic variants of strong-orthogonality projection operator (Ansätze 2α and 2β) suitable for practical calculations are introduced by exploiting the orthogonal complement of the large-component basis. A pilot implementation is performed for the second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory. PMID:23039576

  8. Next-to-leading order perturbative QCD corrections to baryon correlators in matter

    SciTech Connect

    Groote, S.; Koerner, J. G.; Pivovarov, A. A.

    2008-08-01

    We compute the next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD corrections to the correlators of nucleon interpolating currents in relativistic nuclear matter. The main new result is the calculation of the O({alpha}{sub s}) perturbative corrections to the coefficient functions of the vector quark condensate in matter. This condensate appears in matter due to the violation of Lorentz invariance. The NLO perturbative QCD corrections turn out to be large which implies that the NLO corrections must be included in a sum rule analysis of the properties of both bound nucleons and relativistic nuclear matter.

  9. Assessing Higher-Order Thinking Using a Networked Portfolio System with Peer Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Eric Zhi-Feng; Zhuo, Yi-Chin; Yuan, Shyan-Ming

    2004-01-01

    In the past, the quantitative evidences of portfolio assessment have been explored under online instruction. Liu, Lin, and Yuan provide a long-term measure of peer-self, peer-instructor and self-instructor correlation coefficients under networked innovative assessment procedures. Analytical results indicated that undergraduate students could…

  10. Automatic angle measurement of a 2D object using optical correlator-neural networks hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manivannan, N.; Neil, M. A. A.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper a novel method is proposed and demonstrated for automatic rotation angle measurement of a 2D object using a hybrid architecture, consisting of a 4f optical correlator with a binary phase only multiplexed matched filter and a single layer neural network. The hybrid set-up can be considered as a two-layer perceptron-like neural network; an optical correlator is the first layer and the standard single layer neural network is the second layer. The training scheme used to train the hybrid architecture is a combination of a Direct Binary Search algorithm, to train the optical correlator, and an Error Back Propagation algorithm, to train the neural network. The aim is to perform the major information processing by the optical correlator with a small additional processing by the neural network stage. This allows the system to be used for real-time applications as optics has the inherent ability to process information in a parallel manner at high speed. The neural network stage gives an extra dimension of freedom so that complicated tasks like automatic rotation angle measurement can be achieved. Results of both computer simulation and experimental set-up are presented for rotation angle measurement of an English alphabetic character as a 2D object. The experimental set-up consists of a real optical correlator using two spatial light modulators for both input and frequency plane representations and a PC based model of a single layer network.

  11. Effects of gender, birth order, and other correlates on childhood mortality in China.

    PubMed

    Choe, M K; Hao, H; Wang, F

    1995-01-01

    Using data from the 1988 Two-Per-Thousand Survey of Fertility and Birth Control, this paper examines the effects of gender, birth order, and other correlates of childhood mortality in China. Controlling for family-level factors, childhood mortality is found to be associated with the child's gender and birth order. Among firstborn children the difference between male and female childhood mortality is not statistically significant, but among others, female children between ages 1 and 5 experience higher mortality than male children. Childhood mortality is slightly higher for children who have older brothers only than for those who have older sisters only, and it is highest for those who have both older brothers and sisters. Other factors affecting childhood mortality in China include mortality of older siblings, birth interval, urban/rural residence, mother's level of education, and mother's occupation. All interactive effects between gender and family-level characteristics are found to be statistically insignificant. PMID:7481920

  12. Substrate stiffness-modulated registry phase correlations in cardiomyocytes map structural order to coherent beating.

    PubMed

    Dasbiswas, K; Majkut, S; Discher, D E; Safran, Samuel A

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments show that both striation, an indication of the structural registry in muscle fibres, as well as the contractile strains produced by beating cardiac muscle cells can be optimized by substrate stiffness. Here we show theoretically how the substrate rigidity dependence of the registry data can be mapped onto that of the strain measurements. We express the elasticity-mediated structural registry as a phase-order parameter using a statistical physics approach that takes the noise and disorder inherent in biological systems into account. By assuming that structurally registered myofibrils also tend to beat in phase, we explain the observed dependence of both striation and strain measurements of cardiomyocytes on substrate stiffness in a unified manner. The agreement of our ideas with experiment suggests that the correlated beating of heart cells may be limited by the structural order of the myofibrils, which in turn is regulated by their elastic environment. PMID:25597833

  13. Substrate stiffness-modulated registry phase correlations in cardiomyocytes map structural order to coherent beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasbiswas, K.; Majkut, S.; Discher, D. E.; Safran, Samuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments show that both striation, an indication of the structural registry in muscle fibres, as well as the contractile strains produced by beating cardiac muscle cells can be optimized by substrate stiffness. Here we show theoretically how the substrate rigidity dependence of the registry data can be mapped onto that of the strain measurements. We express the elasticity-mediated structural registry as a phase-order parameter using a statistical physics approach that takes the noise and disorder inherent in biological systems into account. By assuming that structurally registered myofibrils also tend to beat in phase, we explain the observed dependence of both striation and strain measurements of cardiomyocytes on substrate stiffness in a unified manner. The agreement of our ideas with experiment suggests that the correlated beating of heart cells may be limited by the structural order of the myofibrils, which in turn is regulated by their elastic environment.

  14. Pinning synchronization of fractional-order complex networks with Lipschitz-type nonlinear dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junwei; Ma, Qinghua; Chen, Aimin; Liang, Zhipeng

    2015-07-01

    This paper deals with pinning synchronization problem of fractional-order complex networks with Lipschitz-type nonlinear nodes and directed communication topology. We first reformulate the problem as a global asymptotic stability problem by describing network evolution in terms of error dynamics. Then, a novel frequency domain approach is developed by using Laplace transform, algebraic graph theory and generalized Gronwall inequality. We show that pinning synchronization can be ensured if the extended network topology contains a spanning tree and the coupling strength is large enough. Furthermore, we provide an easily testable criterion for global pinning synchronization depending on fractional-order, network topology, oscillator dynamics and state feedback. Numerical simulations are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical analysis. PMID:25721408

  15. Disentangling the Relationship of the Australian Marsupial Orders Using Retrotransposon and Evolutionary Network Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Gallus, Susanne; Janke, Axel; Kumar, Vikas; Nilsson, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    The ancestors to the Australian marsupials entered Australia around 60 (54–72) Ma from Antarctica, and radiated into the four living orders Peramelemorphia, Dasyuromorphia, Diprotodontia, and Notoryctemorphia. The relationship between the four Australian marsupial orders has been a long-standing question, because different phylogenetic studies have not been able to consistently reconstruct the same topology. Initial in silico analysis of the Tasmanian devil genome and experimental screening in the seven marsupial orders revealed 20 informative transposable element insertions for resolving the inter- and intraordinal relationships of Australian and South American orders. However, the retrotransposon insertions support three conflicting topologies regarding Peramelemorphia, Dasyuromorphia, and Notoryctemorphia, indicating that the split between the three orders may be best understood as a network. This finding is supported by a phylogenetic reanalysis of nuclear gene sequences, using a consensus network approach that allows depicting hidden phylogenetic conflict, otherwise lost when forcing the data into a bifurcating tree. The consensus network analysis agrees with the transposable element analysis in that all possible topologies regarding Peramelemorphia, Dasyuromorphia, and Notoryctemorphia in a rooted four-taxon topology are equally well supported. In addition, retrotransposon insertion data support the South American order Didelphimorphia being the sistergroup to all other living marsupial orders. The four Australian orders originated within 3 Myr at the Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary. The rapid divergences left conflicting phylogenetic information in the genome possibly generated by incomplete lineage sorting or introgressive hybridization, leaving the relationship among Australian marsupial orders unresolvable as a bifurcating process millions of years later. PMID:25786431

  16. Disentangling the relationship of the Australian marsupial orders using retrotransposon and evolutionary network analyses.

    PubMed

    Gallus, Susanne; Janke, Axel; Kumar, Vikas; Nilsson, Maria A

    2015-04-01

    The ancestors to the Australian marsupials entered Australia around 60 (54-72) Ma from Antarctica, and radiated into the four living orders Peramelemorphia, Dasyuromorphia, Diprotodontia, and Notoryctemorphia. The relationship between the four Australian marsupial orders has been a long-standing question, because different phylogenetic studies have not been able to consistently reconstruct the same topology. Initial in silico analysis of the Tasmanian devil genome and experimental screening in the seven marsupial orders revealed 20 informative transposable element insertions for resolving the inter- and intraordinal relationships of Australian and South American orders. However, the retrotransposon insertions support three conflicting topologies regarding Peramelemorphia, Dasyuromorphia, and Notoryctemorphia, indicating that the split between the three orders may be best understood as a network. This finding is supported by a phylogenetic reanalysis of nuclear gene sequences, using a consensus network approach that allows depicting hidden phylogenetic conflict, otherwise lost when forcing the data into a bifurcating tree. The consensus network analysis agrees with the transposable element analysis in that all possible topologies regarding Peramelemorphia, Dasyuromorphia, and Notoryctemorphia in a rooted four-taxon topology are equally well supported. In addition, retrotransposon insertion data support the South American order Didelphimorphia being the sistergroup to all other living marsupial orders. The four Australian orders originated within 3 Myr at the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary. The rapid divergences left conflicting phylogenetic information in the genome possibly generated by incomplete lineage sorting or introgressive hybridization, leaving the relationship among Australian marsupial orders unresolvable as a bifurcating process millions of years later. PMID:25786431

  17. Relational correlates of interpersonal citizenship behavior: a social network perspective.

    PubMed

    Bowler, Wm Matthew; Brass, Daniel J

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the role of social network ties in the performance and receipt of interpersonal citizenship behavior (ICB), one form of organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). A field study involving 141 employees of a manufacturing firm provided evidence that social network ties are related to the performance and receipt of ICB. Results support hypothesized relationships, which are based on social exchange theory, suggesting strength of friendship is related to performance and receipt of ICB. Support was also found for impression management-based hypotheses suggesting that asymmetric influence and 3rd-party influence are related to the performance and receipt of ICB. These relationships were significant when controlling for job satisfaction, commitment, procedural justice, hierarchical level, demographic similarity, and job similarity. Implications and directions for future research are addressed. PMID:16435939

  18. Second-order Kohn-Sham perturbation theory: correlation potential for atoms in a cavity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Engel, Eberhard

    2005-12-01

    Second-order perturbation theory based on the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian leads to an implicit density functional for the correlation energy E(c) (MP2), which is explicitly dependent on both occupied and unoccupied Kohn-Sham single-particle orbitals and energies. The corresponding correlation potential v(c) (MP2), which has to be evaluated by the optimized potential method, was found to be divergent in the asymptotic region of atoms, if positive-energy continuum states are included in the calculation [Facco Bonetti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 2241 (2001)]. On the other hand, Niquet et al., [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 9504 (2003)] showed that v(c) (MP2) has the same asymptotic -alpha(2r(4)) behavior as the exact correlation potential, if the system under study has a discrete spectrum only. In this work we study v(c) (MP2) for atoms in a spherical cavity within a basis-set-free finite differences approach, ensuring a completely discrete spectrum by requiring hard-wall boundary conditions at the cavity radius. Choosing this radius sufficiently large, one can devise a numerical continuation procedure which allows to normalize v(c) (MP2) consistent with the standard choice v(c)(r-->infinity)=0 for free atoms, without modifying the potential in the chemically relevant region. An important prerequisite for the success of this scheme is the inclusion of very high-energy virtual states. Using this technique, we have calculated v(c) (MP2) for all closed-shell and spherical open-shell atoms up to argon. One finds that v(c) (MP2) reproduces the shell structure of the exact correlation potential very well but consistently overestimates the corresponding shell oscillations. In the case of spin-polarized atoms one observes a strong interrelation between the correlation potentials of the two spin channels, which is completely absent for standard density functionals. However, our results also demonstrate that E(c) (MP2) can only serve as a first step towards the construction of a suitable

  19. Dynamical analysis of memristor-based fractional-order neural networks with time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xueli; Yu, Yongguang; Wang, Hu; Hu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the memristor-based fractional-order neural networks with time delay are analyzed. Based on the theories of set-value maps, differential inclusions and Filippov’s solution, some sufficient conditions for asymptotic stability of this neural network model are obtained when the external inputs are constants. Besides, uniform stability condition is derived when the external inputs are time-varying, and its attractive interval is estimated. Finally, numerical examples are given to verify our results.

  20. Ring Correlations in Two-Dimensional (2D) Random Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadjadi, Mahdi; Thorpe, M. F.

    Amorphous materials can be characterized by their ring structure. Recently, two experimental groups imaged bilayers of vitreous silica at atomic resolution which provides a direct access to the ring structure of a 2D glass. It has been shown that experimental samples have various ring statistics, obey Aboav-Weaire law and have a distinct area law. In this work, we study correlations between rings as a function of their size and topological separation. We show that correlation is medium-range and vanishes when the separation is about three rings apart. We also present a generalization of the Aboav-Weaire law.

  1. Reduced-Order Modeling for Flutter/LCO Using Recurrent Artificial Neural Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Weigang; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2012-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the efficacy of a recurrent artificial neural network to provide a high fidelity time-dependent nonlinear reduced-order model (ROM) for flutter/limit-cycle oscillation (LCO) modeling. An artificial neural network is a relatively straightforward nonlinear method for modeling an input-output relationship from a set of known data, for which we use the radial basis function (RBF) with its parameters determined through a training process. The resulting RBF neural network, however, is only static and is not yet adequate for an application to problems of dynamic nature. The recurrent neural network method [1] is applied to construct a reduced order model resulting from a series of high-fidelity time-dependent data of aero-elastic simulations. Once the RBF neural network ROM is constructed properly, an accurate approximate solution can be obtained at a fraction of the cost of a full-order computation. The method derived during the study has been validated for predicting nonlinear aerodynamic forces in transonic flow and is capable of accurate flutter/LCO simulations. The obtained results indicate that the present recurrent RBF neural network is accurate and efficient for nonlinear aero-elastic system analysis

  2. A generalized LSTM-like training algorithm for second-order recurrent neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Monner, Derek; Reggia, James A.

    2011-01-01

    The Long Short Term Memory (LSTM) is a second-order recurrent neural network architecture that excels at storing sequential short-term memories and retrieving them many time-steps later. LSTM’s original training algorithm provides the important properties of spatial and temporal locality, which are missing from other training approaches, at the cost of limiting it’s applicability to a small set of network architectures. Here we introduce the Generalized Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM-g) training algorithm, which provides LSTM-like locality while being applicable without modification to a much wider range of second-order network architectures. With LSTM-g, all units have an identical set of operating instructions for both activation and learning, subject only to the configuration of their local environment in the network; this is in contrast to the original LSTM training algorithm, where each type of unit has its own activation and training instructions. When applied to LSTM architectures with peephole connections, LSTM-g takes advantage of an additional source of back-propagated error which can enable better performance than the original algorithm. Enabled by the broad architectural applicability of LSTM-g, we demonstrate that training recurrent networks engineered for specific tasks can produce better results than single-layer networks. We conclude that LSTM-g has the potential to both improve the performance and broaden the applicability of spatially and temporally local gradient-based training algorithms for recurrent neural networks. PMID:21803542

  3. Quality assessment of remote sensing image fusion using feature-based fourth-order correlation coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Dan; Liu, Jun; Chen, Kai; Li, Huali; Liu, Ping; Chen, Huijuan; Qian, Jing

    2016-04-01

    In remote sensing fusion, the spatial details of a panchromatic (PAN) image and the spectrum information of multispectral (MS) images will be transferred into fused images according to the characteristics of the human visual system. Thus, a remote sensing image fusion quality assessment called feature-based fourth-order correlation coefficient (FFOCC) is proposed. FFOCC is based on the feature-based coefficient concept. Spatial features related to spatial details of the PAN image and spectral features related to the spectrum information of MS images are first extracted from the fused image. Then, the fourth-order correlation coefficient between the spatial and spectral features is calculated and treated as the assessment result. FFOCC was then compared with existing widely used indices, such as Erreur Relative Globale Adimensionnelle de Synthese, and quality assessed with no reference. Results of the fusion and distortion experiments indicate that the FFOCC is consistent with subjective evaluation. FFOCC significantly outperforms the other indices in evaluating fusion images that are produced by different fusion methods and that are distorted in spatial and spectral features by blurring, adding noise, and changing intensity. All the findings indicate that the proposed method is an objective and effective quality assessment for remote sensing image fusion.

  4. Orientational ordering in hard rectangles: The role of three-body correlations.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ratón, Yuri; Velasco, Enrique; Mederos, Luis

    2006-07-01

    We investigate the effect of three-body correlations on the phase behavior of hard rectangle two-dimensional fluids. The third virial coefficient B3 is incorporated via an equation of state that recovers scaled particle theory for parallel hard rectangles. This coefficient, a functional of the orientational distribution function, is calculated by Monte Carlo integration, using an accurate parametrized distribution function, for various particle aspect ratios in the range of 1-25. A bifurcation analysis of the free energy calculated from the obtained equation of state is applied to find the isotropic (I)-uniaxial nematic (N(u)) and isotropic-tetratic nematic (N(t)) spinodals and to study the order of these phase transitions. We find that the relative stability of the N(t) phase with respect to the isotropic phase is enhanced by the introduction of B3. Finally, we have calculated the complete phase diagram using a variational procedure and compared the results with those obtained from scaled particle theory and with Monte Carlo simulations carried out for hard rectangles with various aspect ratios. The predictions of our proposed equation of state as regards the transition densities between the isotropic and orientationally ordered phases for small aspect ratios are in fair agreement with simulations. Also, the critical aspect ratio below which the N(t) phase becomes stable is predicted to increase due to three-body correlations, although the corresponding value is underestimated with respect to simulation. PMID:16863310

  5. Polygonal Web Representation for Higher Order Correlation Functions of Consistent Polygonal Markov Fields in the Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Tomasz

    2010-08-01

    We consider polygonal Markov fields originally introduced by Arak in 4th USSR-Japan Symposium on Probability Theory and Mathematical Statistics, Abstracts of Communications, 1982; Arak and Surgailis in Probab. Theory Relat. Fields 80:543-579, 1989. Our attention is focused on fields with nodes of order two, which can be regarded as continuum ensembles of non-intersecting contours in the plane, sharing a number of salient features with the two-dimensional Ising model. The purpose of this paper is to establish an explicit stochastic representation for the higher-order correlation functions of polygonal Markov fields in their consistency regime. The representation is given in terms of the so-called crop functionals (defined by a Möbius-type formula) of polygonal webs which arise in a graphical construction dual to that giving rise to polygonal fields. The proof of our representation formula goes by constructing a martingale interpolation between the correlation functions of polygonal fields and crop functionals of polygonal webs.

  6. Stability analysis of memristor-based fractional-order neural networks with different memductance functions.

    PubMed

    Rakkiyappan, R; Velmurugan, G; Cao, Jinde

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the problem of the existence, uniqueness and uniform stability of memristor-based fractional-order neural networks (MFNNs) with two different types of memductance functions is extensively investigated. Moreover, we formulate the complex-valued memristor-based fractional-order neural networks (CVMFNNs) with two different types of memductance functions and analyze the existence, uniqueness and uniform stability of such networks. By using Banach contraction principle and analysis technique, some sufficient conditions are obtained to ensure the existence, uniqueness and uniform stability of the considered MFNNs and CVMFNNs with two different types of memductance functions. The analysis results establish from the theory of fractional-order differential equations with discontinuous right-hand sides. Finally, four numerical examples are presented to show the effectiveness of our theoretical results. PMID:25861402

  7. Correlation between hierarchical structure of crystal networks and macroscopic performance of mesoscopic soft materials and engineering principles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Naibo; Liu, Xiang Yang

    2015-11-01

    This review examines how the concepts and ideas of crystallization can be extended further and applied to the field of mesoscopic soft materials. It concerns the structural characteristics vs. the macroscopic performance, and the formation mechanism of crystal networks. Although this subject can be discussed in a broad sense across the area of mesoscopic soft materials, our main focus is on supramolecular materials, spider and silkworm silks, and biominerals. First, the occurrence of a hierarchical structure, i.e. crystal network and domain network structures, will facilitate the formation kinetics of mesoscopic phases and boost up the macroscopic performance of materials in some cases (i.e. spider silk fibres). Second, the structure and performance of materials can be correlated in some way by the four factors: topology, correlation length, symmetry/ordering, and strength of association of crystal networks. Moreover, four different kinetic paths of crystal network formation are identified, namely, one-step process of assembly, two-step process of assembly, mixed mode of assembly and foreign molecule mediated assembly. Based on the basic mechanisms of crystal nucleation and growth, the formation of crystal networks, such as crystallographic mismatch (or noncrystallographic) branching (tip branching and fibre side branching) and fibre/polymeric side merging, are reviewed. This facilitates the rational design and construction of crystal networks in supramolecular materials. In this context, the (re-)construction of a hierarchical crystal network structure can be implemented by thermal, precipitate, chemical, and sonication stimuli. As another important class of soft materials, the unusual mechanical performance of spider and silkworm silk fibres are reviewed in comparison with the regenerated silk protein derivatives. It follows that the considerably larger breaking stress and unusual breaking strain of spider silk fibres vs. silkworm silk fibres can be interpreted

  8. Characteristics of Venture Capital Network and Its Correlation with Regional Economy: Evidence from China

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yonghong; Zhang, Qi; Shan, Lifei; Li, Sai-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Financial networks have been extensively studied as examples of real world complex networks. In this paper, we establish and study the network of venture capital (VC) firms in China. We compute and analyze the statistical properties of the network, including parameters such as degrees, mean lengths of the shortest paths, clustering coefficient and robustness. We further study the topology of the network and find that it has small-world behavior. A multiple linear regression model is introduced to study the relation between network parameters and major regional economic indices in China. From the result of regression, we find that, economic aggregate (including the total GDP, investment, consumption and net export), upgrade of industrial structure, employment and remuneration of a region are all positively correlated with the degree and the clustering coefficient of the VC sub-network of the region, which suggests that the development of the VC industry has substantial effects on regional economy in China. PMID:26340555

  9. Characteristics of Venture Capital Network and Its Correlation with Regional Economy: Evidence from China.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yonghong; Zhang, Qi; Shan, Lifei; Li, Sai-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Financial networks have been extensively studied as examples of real world complex networks. In this paper, we establish and study the network of venture capital (VC) firms in China. We compute and analyze the statistical properties of the network, including parameters such as degrees, mean lengths of the shortest paths, clustering coefficient and robustness. We further study the topology of the network and find that it has small-world behavior. A multiple linear regression model is introduced to study the relation between network parameters and major regional economic indices in China. From the result of regression, we find that, economic aggregate (including the total GDP, investment, consumption and net export), upgrade of industrial structure, employment and remuneration of a region are all positively correlated with the degree and the clustering coefficient of the VC sub-network of the region, which suggests that the development of the VC industry has substantial effects on regional economy in China. PMID:26340555

  10. N(th)-order correlation functions of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Ashley Jacob

    I present the correlation function measurements and analysis I have conducted with SDSS data. I have focused my measurements on angular N -point area- averaged correlation functions ( o N ([straight theta]) ) and auto-correlation functions (o 2 ([straight theta])) of galaxies. The measured o N ([straight theta]) are used to calculate the projected, s N , and real space, S N , hierarchical amplitudes. I have used SDSS DR3 data to show that the measurements are robust against the systematic effects of reddening and seeing, and to determine that large differences exist in the higher-order clustering of early- and late-type galaxies--quantified in terms of bias parameters. Using photometric redshift catalogs from SDSS DR5 data, I have created two volume limited samples of galaxies, allowing me to measure o N ([straight theta]) as a function of type, redshift, and luminosity. I have found that the higher-order bias of early-type galaxies does not vary significantly with changes in either redshift or luminosity, as c 2, early is consistent with 0.09 for all measurements. I have shown that the higher-order clustering of late-type galaxies shows dramatic differences for galaxies selected with redshifts above and below z = 0.3. Using LRGs photometrically selected from SDSS DR5, I have measured the 2nd-order bias tern, c 2 , using both o 2 ([straight theta]) and s 3 , and I have combined these measurements to determine that the normalization of the matter power spectrum at 8 h -1 Mpc, s 8 , is 0.79 ± 0.05 and c 2, LRG = 0.09 ± 0.04--consistent with the DR5 early-type results. I have calculated o 2 ([straight theta]) of galaxies from SDSS DR5 to constrain the HOD of galaxies as a function of type. I found that a new model that separated early- and late- type galaxies into different dark matter halos as much as possible was required to allow good fits to the measurements. Throughout, my findings are interpreted with respect to both the evolution of structure formation and