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Sample records for organic carbon iron

  1. Selective stabilization of aliphatic organic carbon by iron oxide

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Dinesh; Yang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Stabilization of organic matter in soil is important for natural ecosystem to sequestrate carbon and mitigate greenhouse gas emission. It is largely unknown what factors govern the preservation of organic carbon in soil, casting shadow on predicting the response of soil to climate change. Iron oxide was suggested as an important mineral preserving soil organic carbon. However, ferric minerals are subject to reduction, potentially releasing iron and decreasing the stability of iron-bound organic carbon. Information about the stability of iron-bound organic carbon in the redox reaction is limited. Herein, we investigated the sorptive interactions of organic matter with hematite and reductive release of hematite-bound organic matter. Impacts of organic matter composition and conformation on its sorption by hematite and release during the reduction reaction were analyzed. We found that hematite-bound aliphatic carbon was more resistant to reduction release, although hematite preferred to sorb more aromatic carbon. Resistance to reductive release represents a new mechanism that aliphatic soil organic matter was stabilized by association with iron oxide. Selective stabilization of aliphatic over aromatic carbon can greatly contribute to the widely observed accumulation of aliphatic carbon in soil, which cannot be explained by sorptive interactions between minerals and organic matter. PMID:26061259

  2. Iron-sulfur-carbon relationships in organic-carbon-rich sequences I: Cretaceous Western Interior seaway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, W.E.; Arthur, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Cretaceous marine strata deposited in shallow to intermediate depths in the Western Interior seaway of North America show considerable variation in organic-carbon enrichment and degree of pyrite formation. The extreme range of paleoceanographic and depositional conditions that occurred in this seaway provide a unique opportunity to examine the effects of iron-, carbon-, and sulfur-limitation on pyrite formation in one region over about 30 my. Ternary diagrams of the system Fe-S-OC, together with some measure of the reactivity of organic matter (pyrolysis hydrogen index), provide a rapid means of recognizing iron-, carbon-, and sulfur-limitation on pyrite formation in a series of samples from a single lithologic unit. Iron limitation is indicated by a concentration of data along a line of constant S/Fe ratio on a Fe-S-OC ternary diagram. Carbon limitation is indicated by a concentration of data along a line of constant S/OC ratio. Sulfur-limitation is suggested by the lack of a systematic Fe-S-OC relationship and residual organic matter that is high in abundance and reactivity. -from Authors

  3. Entrapment of ancient and modern organic carbon by iron on the Eurasian Arctic Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvado, Joan A.; Tesi, Tommaso; Semiletov, Igor P.; Dudarev, Oleg V.; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2015-04-01

    Given the potential for climate-carbon feedbacks in the Siberian-Arctic land-ocean system, there is a need for improved understanding of carbon cycle processes (Vonk et al., 2012). The entrapment of organic carbon in sediments is a key factor to attenuate the outgassing of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. In this context, there is a pressing need to understand the mechanisms that control preservation and accumulations of organic carbon in marine sediments. Recently, the role of iron oxides in the preservation of organic matter globally has been outlined (Lalonde et al., 2012). In the present study, the composition of organic carbon associated to reactive iron (OC-Fe) on the Eurasian Arctic Shelf is evaluated. For this purpose, sediment cores and grab samples were collected in the shelves of the Kara Sea, Laptev Sea and East Siberian Sea from 9 to 69 m water depth. Experiments were conducted to extract the OC-Fe from the sediments by applying a citrate-dithionite iron reduction method -accurately control corrected- and analyze the δ13C, % OC and Δ14C of the bulk and iron-associated fractions. The results show that 11.0 ± 5.5% of organic carbon in surface-sediments of the Siberian Arctic Shelf is attached to reactive iron. The Δ14C and δ13C signatures presented sharply contrasting offsets between the sedimentary bulk and the OC-Fe. The OC-Fe is much younger than the OC-bulk in the eastern East Siberian Sea and older in the Laptev Sea. The same offsets were observed using a dual-carbon endmember mixing model showing that the iron fraction is mainly composed by young marine plankton organic carbon in the eastern East Siberian Sea and pre-aged thawing permafrost in the Laptev Sea. Overall, it seems that (i) some of this pre-aged organic carbon still remains bound to iron oxides after permafrost thawing and (ii) the iron oxides are transferring dissolved organic carbon to the sediment. This study presents the first analyses of Δ14C ever done in the OC

  4. Effects of iron-aluminium oxides and organic carbon on aggregate stability of bauxite residues.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Li, Yubing; Xue, Shengguo; Hartley, William; Wu, Hao

    2016-05-01

    In order to successfully establish vegetation on bauxite residue, properties such as aggregate structure and stability require improvement. Spontaneous plant colonization on the deposits in Central China over the last 20 years has revealed that natural processes may improve the physical condition of bauxite residues. Samples from three different stacking ages were selected to determine aggregate formation and stability and its relationship with iron-aluminium oxides and organic carbon. The residue aggregate particles became coarser in both dry and wet sieving processes. The mean weight diameter (MWD) and geometry mean diameter (GMD) increased significantly, and the proportion of aggregate destruction (PAD) decreased. Natural stacking processes could increase aggregate stability and erosion resistant of bauxite residues. Free iron oxides and amorphous aluminium oxides were the major forms in bauxite residues, but there was no significant correlation between the iron-aluminium oxides and aggregate stability. Aromatic-C, alkanes-C, aliphatic-C and alkenes-C were the major functional groups present in the residues. With increasing stacking age, total organic carbon content and aggregate-associated organic carbon both increased. Alkanes-C, aliphatic-C and alkenes-C increased and were mainly distributed in macro-aggregates, whereas aromatic-C was mainly distributed in <0.05-mm aggregates. Organic carbon stability in micro-aggregates was higher than that in macro-aggregates and became more stable. Organic carbon contents in total residues, and within different aggregate sizes, were all negatively correlated with PAD. It indicated that organic materials had a more significant effect on macro-aggregate stability and the effects of iron-aluminium oxides maybe more important for stability of micro-aggregates. PMID:26832865

  5. Enhancing zero valent iron based natural organic matter removal by mixing with dispersed carbon cathodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Keller, Jurg; Gernjak, Wolfgang

    2016-04-15

    Former studies have shown that adding granular activated carbon (GAC) cathodes could enhance the overall performance of the zero valent iron (ZVI) process for organics removal. The present study evaluates for the first time the performance of such an enhanced ZVI process to remove natural organic matter (NOM), an important water quality parameter in drinking water. Lab-scale batch tests were conducted with surface reservoir feed water from a drinking water plant. In the GAC enhanced ZVI process dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and UV254 were reduced by 61±3% and 70±2%, respectively, during 24h treatment corresponding to 1.8min empty bed contact time. The process was superior to ZVI alone, particularly during the earlier stages of the process due to the synergistically increased iron dissolution rate. Besides GAC, graphite and anthracite also prove to be suitable and potentially more cost-effective options as cathode materials for the enhanced ZVI process, whereby electrically conductive graphite clearly outperformed anthracite. The dominant mechanisms in terms of NOM removal from surface water were found to be coagulation following iron dissolution and adsorption in the case of employing GAC. Oxidation was also occurring to a lesser degree, converting some non-biodegradable into biodegradable DOC. PMID:26808400

  6. Distinct iron isotope signatures in suspended matter in the northern Baltic Sea; implications for cycling of organic carbon and phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingri, Johan; Conrad, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    Two distinct groups of iron isotope signatures can be identified both in river water and in the Bothnian Bay, northern Baltic Sea. Particles and colloids with negative iron isotope signatures (enriched in the light isotope) are mobilised in the riparian zone during high discharge. Due to high concentration of DOC the oxidation of Fe(II) is incomplete, and un-oxidised Fe(II) is associated with Fe(III)-OH and OC (organic carbon), forming Fe(II,III)-OC colloids, and particles, with a negative iron isotope signature. Colloidal iron with a negative signature is a labile fraction that transforms during freshwater transport. Photo reduction of Fe(II,III)-OC particles and colloids will release Fe(II) and reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II), and formed Fe(II) is oxidised forming Fe(III)-OH colloids with a heavy iron isotope signature. Phosphorus and organic carbon are to different extent associated to these two suspended iron complexes during transport and early diagenesis. Flocculation of negative Fe(II,III)-OC colloids produce negative Fe(II,III)-OC particles, without changes in the isotopic composition. Most of the suspended iron is rapidly removed below 1.0 psu, due to flocculation and sedimentation. Negative Fe(II,III)-OC particles may serve as an efficient 'rusty sink' for organic carbon, when deposited in the coastal zone.

  7. Variation in stable carbon isotopes in organic matter from the Gunflint Iron Formation. [Precambrian rock analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghoorn, E. S.; Knoll, A. H.; Dembicki, H., Jr.; Meinschein, W. G.

    1977-01-01

    Results are presented for an isotopic analysis of the kerogen separated from 15 samples of the Gunflint Iron Formation, Ontario, and the conformably overlying Rove Formation. Reasons for which the Gunflint Iron Formation is suitable for such a study of a single Precambrian formation are identified. The general geology of the formation is outlined along with sample selection, description, and preparation. Major conclusions are that the basal Gunflint algal chert and shale facies are depleted in C-13 relative to the chert-carbonate and taconite facies, that differences in the delta C-13 values between Gunflint facies correlate with marked differences in their biological source materials as evidenced by their respective microbiotas, that the anthraxolites are anomalously depleted in C-13 relative to the kerogen of their encompassing cherts and shales, and that the effects of igneous intrusion and concomitant thermal alteration are shown by a marked loss of C-12 at the contact. The demonstration that not all kerogens are isotopically alike stresses the importance of facies data to the interpretation of C-13/C-12 ratios of ancient organic matter.

  8. Biogeochemistry of Two Types of Permeable Reafctive Barriers, Organic Carbon and Iron-bearing Organic Carbon for Mine Drainage treatment: Column experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Q.; Blowes, D

    2009-01-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are an alternative technology to treat mine drainage containing sulfate and heavy metals. Two column experiments were conducted to assess the suitability of an organic carbon (OC) based reactive mixture and an Fe{sup 0}-bearing organic carbon (FeOC) based reactive mixture, under controlled groundwater flow conditions. The organic carbon mixture contains about 30% (volume) organic carbon (composted leaf mulch) and 70% (volume) sand and gravel. The Fe{sup 0}-bearing organic carbon mixture contains 10% (volume) zero-valent iron, 20% (volume) organic carbon, 10% (volume) limestone, and 60% (volume) sand and gravel. Simulated groundwater containing 380 ppm sulfate, 5 ppm As, and 0.5 ppm Sb was passed through the columns at flow rates of 64 (the OC column) and 62 (the FeOC column) ml d{sup -1}, which are equivalent to 0.79 (the OC column) and 0.78 (the FeOC column) pore volumes (PVs) per week or 0.046 m d{sup -1} for both columns. The OC column showed an initial sulfate reduction rate of 0.4 {mu}mol g (OC){sup -1} d{sup -1} and exhausted its capacity to promote sulfate reduction after 30 PVs, or 9 months of flow. The FeOC column sustained a relatively constant sulfate reduction rate of 0.9 {mu}mol g (OC){sup -1} d{sup -1} for at least 65 PVs (17 months). In the FeOC column, the {delta}34S values increase with the decreasing sulfate concentration. The {delta}34S fractionation follows a Rayleigh fractionation model with an enrichment factor of 21.6%. The performance decline of the OC column was caused by the depletion of substrate or electron donor. The cathodic production of H{sub 2} by anaerobic corrosion of Fe probably sustained a higher level of SRB activity in the FeOC column. These results suggest that zero-valent iron can be used to provide an electron donor in sulfate reducing PRBs. A sharp increase in the {delta}13C value of the dissolved inorganic carbon and a decrease in the concentration of HCO{sub 3}{sup -} indicate that

  9. Sorption of high explosives to water-dispersible clay: influence of organic carbon, aluminosilicate clay, and extractable iron.

    PubMed

    Dontsova, Katerina M; Hayes, Charolett; Pennington, Judith C; Porter, Beth

    2009-01-01

    Explosives in soils can present environmental problems for military installations. Fine, mobile particles represent the most reactive fraction of the soil and, therefore, are expected to adsorb explosives and potentially facilitate their transport. The objective of this study was to determine the relative significance of phyllosilicate clay, organic matter, and two forms of extractable iron in adsorption of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) by the colloidal water-dispersible clay (WDC) fraction of the soil. The WDC fraction of two mineral and one organic soil was separated and then treated to remove organic carbon (OC) and several forms of iron (Fe(o), oxalate extractable, and Fe(d), dithionite-citrate extractable). Adsorption coefficients were determined for whole soils, untreated, and treated WDC. For mineral soils, adsorption of TNT and RDX on the WDC was greater than on the whole soil. The presence of OC increased explosives sorption by WDC. When OC was removed, iron interfered with TNT sorption. In the presence of OC, removal of Fe(o) decreased RDX adsorption and increased TNT adsorption indicating different adsorption mechanisms. Organic carbon was a more significant indicator of explosives adsorption by WDC than clays or iron oxides and hydroxides. Therefore, OC is the most likely medium for facilitated transport of TNT and RDX. PMID:19465721

  10. Distributions of Manganese, Iron, and Manganese-Oxidizing Bacteria In Lake Superior Sediments of Different Organic Carbon Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Laurie L.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of oxygen, soluble and particulate manganese and iron, organic carbon and nitrogen were examined in Lake Superior sediment cores, along with the distribution and abundance of heterotrophic and manganese oxidizing bacteria. Analyses were performed using cores collected with the submersible Johnson Sea Link II. Three cores, exhibiting a range of organic carbon content, were collected from the deepest basin in Lake Superior and the north and south ends of the Caribou trough, and brought to the surface for immediate analysis. Minielectrode profiles of oxygen concentration of the three cores were carried out using a commercially available minielectrode apparatus. Oxygen depletion to less than 1% occurred within 4 cm of the surface for two of the cores, but not until approximately 15 cm for the core from the south basin of the Caribou trough. The three cores exhibited very different profiles of soluble, as well as leachable, manganese and iron, suggesting different degrees of remobilization of these metals in the sediments. Vertical profiles of viable bacteria and Mn oxidizing bacteria, determined by plating and counting, showed that aerobic (and facultatively aerobic) heterotrophic bacteria were present at the highest concentrations near the surface and decreased steadily with depth, while Mn oxidizing bacteria were concentrations primarily at and above the oxic/anoxic interface. Soluble manganese in the pore waters, along with abundant organic carbon, appeared to enhance the presence of manganese oxidizing bacteria, even below the oxic/anoxic interface. Profiles of solid-phase leachable manganese suggested a microbial role in manganese reprecipitation in these sediments.

  11. Activated carbons impregnated with iron oxide nanoparticles for enhanced removal of bisphenol A and natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Park, Hak-Soon; Koduru, Janardhan Reddy; Choo, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Byungwhan

    2015-04-01

    The removal of bisphenol A (BPA) is important for the provision of safe drinking water, but its removal in the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) is challenging. Thus, the present study involved the fabrication and characterization of powdered activated carbons impregnated with iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPACs) with respect to the simultaneous removal of BPA and NOM. The number of Fe ions loaded into the PAC pores was optimized in terms of exposure time. Impregnation with iron oxide reduced the surface area and pore volume, but the pore size was maintained. IONPAC adsorbents had considerably greater sorption capabilities for BPA and NOM compared to native, bare PAC particles. The adsorption capacities of BPA and NOM were in the following sequence: bare PACiron oxides (e.g., hydroxyl groups) and organics (e.g., phenolic/carboxyl groups). Iron oxide impregnation enabled the BPA uptake to be maintained in the presence of NOM, indicating that the hybrid adsorbent provided synergistic adsorption characteristics for BPA and NOM. Although the solution pH had a negligible impact on BPA uptake, the ionic strength showed a significant effect, particularly in the presence of divalent Ca ions. PMID:25594935

  12. Organic carbon remobilized from thawing permafrost is resequestered by reactive iron on the Eurasian Arctic Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvadó, Joan A.; Tesi, Tommaso; Andersson, August; Ingri, Johan; Dudarev, Oleg V.; Semiletov, Igor P.; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2015-10-01

    Given the potential for permafrost carbon (PF/C)-climate feedbacks in the Siberian-Arctic land-ocean system, there is a need for understanding the fate of thawed-out PF/C. Here we show that the sequestration of OC by reactive iron (OC-Fe) ranges between 0.5 and 22% on the Eurasian Arctic Shelf, with higher values in the Kara Sea (KS) (18 ± 6%) and the Laptev Sea (LS) (14 ± 4%). The Δ14C/δ13C signatures of the OC-Fe are substantially older and more terrestrial than the bulk sediment OC in the LS but younger and more dominated by marine plankton sources in the East Siberian Sea (ESS). Statistical source apportionment modeling reveal that reactive iron phases resequestered 15 ± 5% of thawing PF/C in the LS and 6.4 ± 5% in the ESS, derived from both coastal erosion of ice complex deposit and thawing topsoil. This Fe-associated trap of PF/C constitutes a reduction of the degradation/outgassing and thus also an attenuation of the PF/C-climate feedback.

  13. Iron, phytoplankton growth, and the carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Street, Joseph H; Paytan, Adina

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all living organisms. Iron is required for the synthesis of chlorophyll and of several photosynthetic electron transport proteins and for the reduction of CO2, SO4(2-), and NO3(-) during the photosynthetic production of organic compounds. Iron concentrations in vast areas of the ocean are very low (<1 nM) due to the low solubility of iron in oxic seawater. Low iron concentrations have been shown to limit primary production rates, biomass accumulation, and ecosystem structure in a variety of open-ocean environments, including the equatorial Pacific, the subarctic Pacific and the Southern Ocean and even in some coastal areas. Oceanic primary production, the transfer of carbon dioxide into organic carbon by photosynthetic plankton (phytoplankton), is one process by which atmospheric CO2 can be transferred to the deep ocean and sequestered for long periods of time. Accordingly, iron limitation of primary producers likely plays a major role in the global carbon cycle. It has been suggested that variations in oceanic primary productivity, spurred by changes in the deposition of iron in atmospheric dust, control atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and hence global climate, over glacial-interglacial timescales. A contemporary application of this "iron hypothesis" promotes the large-scale iron fertilization of ocean regions as a means of enhancing the ability of the ocean to store anthropogenic CO2 and mitigate 21st century climate change. Recent in situ iron enrichment experiments in the HNLC regions, however, cast doubt on the efficacy and advisability of iron fertilization schemes. The experiments have confirmed the role of iron in regulating primary productivity, but resulted in only small carbon export fluxes to the depths necessary for long-term sequestration. Above all, these experiments and other studies of iron biogeochemistry over the last two decades have begun to illustrate the great complexity of the ocean system. Attempts to

  14. Metal organic frameworks derived porous lithium iron phosphate with continuous nitrogen-doped carbon networks for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Gu, Junjie; Zhang, Jinli; Yu, Feng; Dong, Lutao; Nie, Ning; Li, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) nanoparticles embedded in the continuous interconnected nitrogen-doped carbon networks (LFP/N-CNWs) is an optimal architecture to fast electron and Li+ conduction. This paper, for the first time, reports a reasonable design and successful preparation of porous hierarchical LFP/N-CNWs composites using unique Fe-based metal organic framework (MIL-100(Fe)) as both template and starting material of Fe and C. Such nitrogen-doped carbon networks (N-CNWs) surrounding the lithium iron phosphate nanoparticles facilitate the transfer of Li+ and electrons throughout the electrodes, which significantly decreases the internal resistance for the electrodes and results in the efficient utilization of LiFePO4. The synthesized LFP/N-CNWs composites possess a porous structure with an amazing surface area of 129 m2 g-1, considerably enhanced electrical conductivities of 7.58 × 10-2 S cm-1 and Li+ diffusion coefficient of 8.82 × 10-14 cm2 s-1, thereby delivering excellent discharge capacities of 161.5 and 93.6 mAh·g-1 at 0.1C and 20C, respectively.

  15. Iron(III)-reduction in a low-organic-carbon brackish-marine system

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, L.K.; Macquaker, J.H.S.; Marshallf, J.D.

    2006-05-15

    Siderite rhizocretions are generally considered to be an indicator of fresh-water conditions. The presence of siderite rhizocretions with a marine{delta}{sup 18}O isotope signature in the Rutland Formation, Ketton, U.K. seems to contradict this belief. Commonly, in marine settings pyrite is more prevalent than siderite because of the high concentrations of sulfate in seawater. The Rutland Formation is a fine-grained mixed carbonate-clastic succession with interbedded coals that was deposited in marginal marine conditions. Analysis of siderite revealed that it was chemically zoned, predated pyrite, and has an average {delta}{sup 18}O signature of +0.44 parts per thousand. This siderite is interpreted as having precipitated during early diagenesis from brackish to marine porewaters containing low concentrations of bioavailable organic matter. Despite the porewaters being dominantly marine, under conditions of restricted organic-matter quality and/or quantity Fe(III)-reducing bacteria can outcompete sulfate-reducing bacteria for the organic substrate, resulting in the precipitation of siderite at the expense of pyrite.

  16. Reactive-transport modeling of iron diagenesis and associated organic carbon remineralization in a Florida (USA) subterranean estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roy, Moutusi; Martin, Jonathan B.; Smith, Christopher G.; Cable, Jaye E.

    2011-01-01

    Iron oxides are important terminal electron acceptors for organic carbon (OC) remineralization in subterranean estuaries, particularly where oxygen and nitrate concentrations are low. In Indian River Lagoon, Florida, USA, terrestrial Fe-oxides dissolve at the seaward edge of the seepage face and flow upward into overlying marine sediments where they precipitate as Fe-sulfides. The dissolved Fe concentrations vary by over three orders of magnitude, but Fe-oxide dissolution rates are similar across the 25-m wide seepage face, averaging around 0.21 mg/cm2/yr. The constant dissolution rate, but differing concentrations, indicate Fe dissolution is controlled by a combination of increasing lability of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and slower porewater flow velocities with distance offshore. In contrast, the average rate constants of Fe-sulfide precipitation decrease from 21.9 × 10-8 s-1 to 0.64 × 10-8 s-1 from the shoreline to the seaward edge of the seepage face as more oxygenated surface water circulates through the sediment. The amount of OC remineralized by Fe-oxides varies little across the seepage face, averaging 5.34 × 10-2 mg/cm2/yr. These rates suggest about 3.4 kg of marine DOC was remineralized in a 1-m wide, shore-perpendicular strip of the seepage face as the terrestrial sediments were transgressed over the past 280 years. During this time, about 10 times more marine solid organic carbon (SOC) accumulated in marine sediments than were removed from the underlying terrestrial sediments. Indian River Lagoon thus appears to be a net sink for marine OC.

  17. Novel mode of microbial energy metabolism: organic carbon oxidation coupled to dissimilatory reduction of iron or manganese.

    PubMed

    Lovley, D R; Phillips, E J

    1988-06-01

    A dissimilatory Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-reducing microorganism was isolated from freshwater sediments of the Potomac River, Maryland. The isolate, designated GS-15, grew in defined anaerobic medium with acetate as the sole electron donor and Fe(III), Mn(IV), or nitrate as the sole electron acceptor. GS-15 oxidized acetate to carbon dioxide with the concomitant reduction of amorphic Fe(III) oxide to magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)). When Fe(III) citrate replaced amorphic Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor, GS-15 grew faster and reduced all of the added Fe(III) to Fe(II). GS-15 reduced a natural amorphic Fe(III) oxide but did not significantly reduce highly crystalline Fe(III) forms. Fe(III) was reduced optimally at pH 6.7 to 7 and at 30 to 35 degrees C. Ethanol, butyrate, and propionate could also serve as electron donors for Fe(III) reduction. A variety of other organic compounds and hydrogen could not. MnO(2) was completely reduced to Mn(II), which precipitated as rhodochrosite (MnCO(3)). Nitrate was reduced to ammonia. Oxygen could not serve as an electron acceptor, and it inhibited growth with the other electron acceptors. This is the first demonstration that microorganisms can completely oxidize organic compounds with Fe(III) or Mn(IV) as the sole electron acceptor and that oxidation of organic matter coupled to dissimilatory Fe(III) or Mn(IV) reduction can yield energy for microbial growth. GS-15 provides a model for how enzymatically catalyzed reactions can be quantitatively significant mechanisms for the reduction of iron and manganese in anaerobic environments. PMID:16347658

  18. Tropical forest soil microbial communities couple iron and carbon biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Dubinsky, E.A.; Silver, W.L.; Firestone, M.K.

    2009-10-15

    We report that iron-reducing bacteria are primary mediators of anaerobic carbon oxidation in upland tropical soils spanning a rainfall gradient (3500 - 5000 mm yr-1) in northeast Puerto Rico. The abundant rainfall and high net primary productivity of these tropical forests provide optimal soil habitat for iron-reducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria. Spatially and temporally dynamic redox conditions make iron-transforming microbial communities central to the belowground carbon cycle in these wet tropical forests. The exceedingly high abundance of iron-reducing bacteria (up to 1.2 x 10{sup 9} cells per gram soil) indicated that they possess extensive metabolic capacity to catalyze the reduction of iron minerals. In soils from the higher rainfall sites, measured rates of ferric iron reduction could account for up to 44 % of organic carbon oxidation. Iron reducers appeared to compete with methanogens when labile carbon availability was limited. We found large numbers of bacteria that oxidize reduced iron at sites with high rates of iron reduction and large numbers of iron-reducers. the coexistence of large populations of ironreducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria is evidence for rapid iron cycling between its reduced and oxidized states, and suggests that mutualistic interactions among these bacteria ultimately fuel organic carbon oxidation and inhibit CH4 production in these upland tropical forests.

  19. Variations of iron flux and organic carbon remineralization in a subterranean estuary caused by interannual variations in recharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roy, Moutusi; Martin, Jonathan B.; Cable, Jaye E.; Smith, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    We determine the inter-annual variations in diagenetic reaction rates of sedimentary iron (Fe ) in an east Florida subterranean estuary and evaluate the connection between metal fluxes and recharge to the coastal aquifer. Over the three-year study period (from 2004 to 2007), the amount of Fe-oxides reduced at the study site decreased from 192 g/yr to 153 g/yr and associated organic carbon (OC) remineralization decreased from 48 g/yr to 38 g/yr. These reductions occurred although the Fe-oxide reduction rates remained constant around 1 mg/cm2/yr. These results suggest that changes in flow rates of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) related to changes in precipitation may be important to fluxes of the diagenetic reaction products. Rainfall at a weather station approximately 5 km from the field area decreased from 12.6 cm/month to 8.4 cm/month from 2004 to 2007. Monthly potential evapotranspiration (PET) calculated from Thornthwaite’s method indicated potential evapotranspiration cycled from about 3 cm/month in the winter to about 15 cm/month in the summer so that net annual recharge to the aquifer decreased from 40 cm in 2004 to -10 cm in 2007. Simultaneously, with the decrease in recharge of groundwater, freshwater SGD decreased by around 20% and caused the originally 25 m wide freshwater seepage face to decrease in width by about 5 m. The smaller seepage face reduced the area under which Fe-oxides were undergoing reductive dissolution. Consequently, the observed decrease in Fe flux is controlled by hydrology of the subterranean estuary. These results point out the need to better understand linkages between temporal variations in diagenetic reactions and changes in flow within subterranean estuaries in order to accurately constrain their contribution to oceanic fluxes of solutes from subterranean estuaries.

  20. Sorption of dissolved organic carbon by hydrous aluminum and iron oxides occurring at the confluence of deer creek with the Snake River, Summit County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKnight, Diane M.; Bencala, K.E.; Zellweger, G.W.; Aiken, G.R.; Feder, G.L.; Thorn, K.A.

    1992-01-01

    Organic solute sorption by hydrous iron and aluminum oxides was studied in an acidic, metal-enriched stream (the Snake River) at its confluence with a pristine stream (Deer Creek). From 1979 to 1986, typically 40% of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was removed from solution by sorption onto aluminum and iron oxides, which precipitate as the two streamwaters mix. Upstream DOC concentrations, which increase during snowmelt, were identified as the most significant variables in a multiple regression for determining the DOC concentration below the confluence, and the extent of Al and Fe precipitation was much less significant. On hourly timescales, removal of Al and Fe varied erratically but DOC removal was steady, indicating that "sorbable" organic solutes are sorbed either by precipitating oxides or by oxides on the streambed. Characterization of two reactive DOC fractions (fulvic and hydrophilic acids) showed that sorption results in chemical fractionation. Molecules with greater contents of aromatic moieties, carboxylic acid groups, and amino acid residues were preferentially sorbed, which is consistent with the ligand exchange-surface complexation model.

  1. Carbon in iron phases under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Skorodumova, N. V.; Belonoshko, A. B.; Johansson, B.; Ahuja, R.

    2005-11-01

    The influence of carbon impurities on the properties of iron phases (bcc, hcp, dhcp, fcc) has been studied using the first-principles projector augmented-wave (PAW) method for a wide pressure range. It is shown that the presence of ~6 at. % of interstitial carbon has a little effect on the calculated structural sequence of the iron phases under high pressure. The bcc -> hcp transition both for pure iron and iron containing carbon takes place around 9 GPa. According to the enthalpies comparison, the solubility of carbon into the iron solid is decreased by high pressure. The coexistence of iron carbide (Fe3C) + pure hcp Fe is most stable phase at high pressure compared with other phases. Based on the analysis of the pressure-density dependences for Fe3C and hcp Fe, we suggest that there might be some fraction of iron carbide present in the core.

  2. Promotion and nucleation of carbonate precipitation during microbial iron reduction.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Z; Tice, M M

    2014-07-01

    Iron-bearing early diagenetic carbonate cements are common in sedimentary rocks, where they are thought to be associated with microbial iron reduction. However, little is yet known about how local environments around actively iron-reducing cells affect carbonate mineral precipitation rates and compositions. Precipitation experiments with the iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were conducted to examine the potential role of cells in promoting precipitation and to explore the possible range of precipitate compositions generated in varying fluid compositions. Actively iron-reducing cells induced increased carbonate mineral saturation and nucleated precipitation on their poles. However, precipitation only occurred when calcium was present in solution, suggesting that cell surfaces lowered local ferrous iron concentrations by adsorption or intracellular iron oxide precipitation even as they locally raised pH. Resultant precipitates were a range of thermodynamically unstable calcium-rich siderites that would likely act as precursors to siderite, calcite, or even dolomite in nature. By modifying local pH, providing nucleation sites, and altering metal ion concentrations around cell surfaces, iron-reducing micro-organisms could produce a wide range of carbonate cements in natural sediments. PMID:24862734

  3. Impact of Organic Carbon Electron Donors on Microbial Community Development under Iron- and Sulfate-Reducing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Man Jae; O'Loughlin, Edward J; Boyanov, Maxim I; Brulc, Jennifer M; Johnston, Eric R; Kemner, Kenneth M; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A

    2016-01-01

    Although iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in subsurface environments have crucial roles in biogeochemical cycling of C, Fe, and S, how specific electron donors impact the compositional structure and activity of native iron- and/or sulfate-reducing communities is largely unknown. To understand this better, we created bicarbonate-buffered batch systems in duplicate with three different electron donors (acetate, lactate, or glucose) paired with ferrihydrite and sulfate as the electron acceptors and inoculated them with subsurface sediment as the microbial inoculum. Sulfate and ferrihydrite reduction occurred simultaneously and were faster with lactate than with acetate. 16S rRNA-based sequence analysis of the communities over time revealed that Desulfotomaculum was the major driver for sulfate reduction coupled with propionate oxidation in lactate-amended incubations. The reduction of sulfate resulted in sulfide production and subsequent abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite. In contrast, glucose promoted faster reduction of ferrihydrite, but without reduction of sulfate. Interestingly, the glucose-amended incubations led to two different biogeochemical trajectories among replicate bottles that resulted in distinct coloration (white and brown). The two outcomes in geochemical evolution might be due to the stochastic evolution of the microbial communities or subtle differences in the initial composition of the fermenting microbial community and its development via the use of different glucose fermentation pathways available within the community. Synchrotron-based x-ray analysis indicated that siderite and amorphous Fe(II) were formed in the replicate bottles with glucose, while ferrous sulfide and vivianite were formed with lactate or acetate. These data sets reveal that use of different C utilization pathways projects significant changes in microbial community composition over time that uniquely impact both the geochemistry and mineralogy of subsurface environments

  4. Impact of Organic Carbon Electron Donors on Microbial Community Development under Iron- and Sulfate-Reducing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Man Jae; O’Loughlin, Edward J.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Brulc, Jennifer M.; Johnston, Eric R.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.

    2016-01-01

    Although iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in subsurface environments have crucial roles in biogeochemical cycling of C, Fe, and S, how specific electron donors impact the compositional structure and activity of native iron- and/or sulfate-reducing communities is largely unknown. To understand this better, we created bicarbonate-buffered batch systems in duplicate with three different electron donors (acetate, lactate, or glucose) paired with ferrihydrite and sulfate as the electron acceptors and inoculated them with subsurface sediment as the microbial inoculum. Sulfate and ferrihydrite reduction occurred simultaneously and were faster with lactate than with acetate. 16S rRNA-based sequence analysis of the communities over time revealed that Desulfotomaculum was the major driver for sulfate reduction coupled with propionate oxidation in lactate-amended incubations. The reduction of sulfate resulted in sulfide production and subsequent abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite. In contrast, glucose promoted faster reduction of ferrihydrite, but without reduction of sulfate. Interestingly, the glucose-amended incubations led to two different biogeochemical trajectories among replicate bottles that resulted in distinct coloration (white and brown). The two outcomes in geochemical evolution might be due to the stochastic evolution of the microbial communities or subtle differences in the initial composition of the fermenting microbial community and its development via the use of different glucose fermentation pathways available within the community. Synchrotron-based x-ray analysis indicated that siderite and amorphous Fe(II) were formed in the replicate bottles with glucose, while ferrous sulfide and vivianite were formed with lactate or acetate. These data sets reveal that use of different C utilization pathways projects significant changes in microbial community composition over time that uniquely impact both the geochemistry and mineralogy of subsurface environments

  5. Surface-Plasmon-Enhanced Photodriven CO2 Reduction Catalyzed by Metal-Organic-Framework-Derived Iron Nanoparticles Encapsulated by Ultrathin Carbon Layers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huabin; Wang, Tao; Wang, Junjie; Liu, Huimin; Dao, Thang Duy; Li, Mu; Liu, Guigao; Meng, Xianguang; Chang, Kun; Shi, Li; Nagao, Tadaaki; Ye, Jinhua

    2016-05-01

    Highly efficient utilization of solar light with an excellent reduction capacity is achieved for plasmonic Fe@C nanostructures. By carbon layer coating, the optimized catalyst exhibits enhanced selectivity and stability applied to the solar-driven reduction of CO2 into CO. The surface-plasmon effect of iron particles is proposed to excite CO2 molecules, and thereby facilitates the final reaction activity. PMID:27001900

  6. Iron cycling at corroding carbon steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason S; McBeth, Joyce M; Ray, Richard I; Little, Brenda J; Emerson, David

    2013-01-01

    Surfaces of carbon steel (CS) exposed to mixed cultures of iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) and dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) in seawater media under aerobic conditions were rougher than surfaces of CS exposed to pure cultures of either type of microorganism. The roughened surface, demonstrated by profilometry, is an indication of loss of metal from the surface. In the presence of CS, aerobically grown FeOB produced tight, twisted helical stalks encrusted with iron oxides. When CS was exposed anaerobically in the presence of FeRB, some surface oxides were removed. However, when the same FeOB and FeRB were grown together in an aerobic medium, FeOB stalks were less encrusted with iron oxides and appeared less tightly coiled. These observations suggest that iron oxides on the stalks were reduced and solubilized by the FeRB. Roughened surfaces of CS and denuded stalks were replicated with culture combinations of different species of FeOB and FeRB under three experimental conditions. Measurements of electrochemical polarization resistance established different rates of corrosion of CS in aerobic and anaerobic media, but could not differentiate rate differences between sterile controls and inoculated exposures for a given bulk concentration of dissolved oxygen. Similarly, total iron in the electrolyte could not be used to differentiate treatments. The experiments demonstrate the potential for iron cycling (oxidation and reduction) on corroding CS in aerobic seawater media. PMID:24093730

  7. Binding of dinitrogen to an iron-sulfur-carbon site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čorić, Ilija; Mercado, Brandon Q.; Bill, Eckhard; Vinyard, David J.; Holland, Patrick L.

    2015-10-01

    Nitrogenases are the enzymes by which certain microorganisms convert atmospheric dinitrogen (N2) to ammonia, thereby providing essential nitrogen atoms for higher organisms. The most common nitrogenases reduce atmospheric N2 at the FeMo cofactor, a sulfur-rich iron-molybdenum cluster (FeMoco). The central iron sites that are coordinated to sulfur and carbon atoms in FeMoco have been proposed to be the substrate binding sites, on the basis of kinetic and spectroscopic studies. In the resting state, the central iron sites each have bonds to three sulfur atoms and one carbon atom. Addition of electrons to the resting state causes the FeMoco to react with N2, but the geometry and bonding environment of N2-bound species remain unknown. Here we describe a synthetic complex with a sulfur-rich coordination sphere that, upon reduction, breaks an Fe-S bond and binds N2. The product is the first synthetic Fe-N2 complex in which iron has bonds to sulfur and carbon atoms, providing a model for N2 coordination in the FeMoco. Our results demonstrate that breaking an Fe-S bond is a chemically reasonable route to N2 binding in the FeMoco, and show structural and spectroscopic details for weakened N2 on a sulfur-rich iron site.

  8. Iron traps terrestrially derived dissolved organic matter at redox interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Thomas; Zak, Dominik; Biester, Harald; Dittmar, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Reactive iron and organic carbon are intimately associated in soils and sediments. However, to date, the organic compounds involved are uncharacterized on the molecular level. At redox interfaces in peatlands, where the biogeochemical cycles of iron and dissolved organic matter (DOM) are coupled, this issue can readily be studied. We found that precipitation of iron hydroxides at the oxic surface layer of two rewetted fens removed a large fraction of DOM via coagulation. On aeration of anoxic fen pore waters, >90% of dissolved iron and 27 ± 7% (mean ± SD) of dissolved organic carbon were rapidly (within 24 h) removed. Using ultra-high-resolution MS, we show that vascular plant-derived aromatic and pyrogenic compounds were preferentially retained, whereas the majority of carboxyl-rich aliphatic acids remained in solution. We propose that redox interfaces, which are ubiquitous in marine and terrestrial settings, are selective yet intermediate barriers that limit the flux of land-derived DOM to oceanic waters. PMID:23733946

  9. Iron traps terrestrially derived dissolved organic matter at redox interfaces.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Thomas; Zak, Dominik; Biester, Harald; Dittmar, Thorsten

    2013-06-18

    Reactive iron and organic carbon are intimately associated in soils and sediments. However, to date, the organic compounds involved are uncharacterized on the molecular level. At redox interfaces in peatlands, where the biogeochemical cycles of iron and dissolved organic matter (DOM) are coupled, this issue can readily be studied. We found that precipitation of iron hydroxides at the oxic surface layer of two rewetted fens removed a large fraction of DOM via coagulation. On aeration of anoxic fen pore waters, >90% of dissolved iron and 27 ± 7% (mean ± SD) of dissolved organic carbon were rapidly (within 24 h) removed. Using ultra-high-resolution MS, we show that vascular plant-derived aromatic and pyrogenic compounds were preferentially retained, whereas the majority of carboxyl-rich aliphatic acids remained in solution. We propose that redox interfaces, which are ubiquitous in marine and terrestrial settings, are selective yet intermediate barriers that limit the flux of land-derived DOM to oceanic waters. PMID:23733946

  10. Soil Iron Content as a Predictor of Carbon and Nutrient Mobilization in Rewetted Fens

    PubMed Central

    Emsens, Willem-Jan; Aggenbach, Camiel J. S.; Schoutens, Ken; Smolders, Alfons J. P.; Zak, Dominik; van Diggelen, Rudy

    2016-01-01

    Rewetted, previously drained fens often remain sources rather than sinks for carbon and nutrients. To date, it is poorly understood which soil characteristics stimulate carbon and nutrient mobilization upon rewetting. Here, we assess the hypothesis that a large pool of iron in the soil negatively affects fen restoration success, as flooding-induced iron reduction (Fe3+ to Fe2+) causes a disproportionate breakdown of organic matter that is coupled with a release of inorganic compounds. We collected intact soil cores in two iron-poor and two iron-rich drained fens, half of which were subjected to a rewetting treatment while the other half was kept drained. Prolonged drainage led to the mobilization of nitrate (NO3-, > 1 mmol L-1) in all cores, regardless of soil iron content. In the rewetted iron-rich cores, a sharp increase in pore water iron (Fe) concentrations correlated with concentrations of inorganic carbon (TIC, > 13 mmol L-1) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC, > 16 mmol L-1). Additionally, ammonium (NH4+) accumulated up to phytotoxic concentrations of 1 mmol L-1 in the pore water of the rewetted iron-rich cores. Disproportionate mobilization of Fe, TIC, DOC and NH4+ was absent in the rewetted iron-poor cores, indicating a strong interaction between waterlogging and iron-mediated breakdown of organic matter. Concentrations of dissolved phosphorus (P) rose slightly in all cores upon rewetting, but remained low throughout the experiment. Our results suggest that large pools of iron in the top soil of drained fens can hamper the restoration of the fen’s sink-service for ammonium and carbon upon rewetting. We argue that negative effects of iron should be most apparent in fens with fluctuating water levels, as temporary oxygenation allows frequent regeneration of Fe3+. We conclude that rewetting of iron-poor fens may be more feasible for restoration. PMID:27050837

  11. Soil Iron Content as a Predictor of Carbon and Nutrient Mobilization in Rewetted Fens.

    PubMed

    Emsens, Willem-Jan; Aggenbach, Camiel J S; Schoutens, Ken; Smolders, Alfons J P; Zak, Dominik; van Diggelen, Rudy

    2016-01-01

    Rewetted, previously drained fens often remain sources rather than sinks for carbon and nutrients. To date, it is poorly understood which soil characteristics stimulate carbon and nutrient mobilization upon rewetting. Here, we assess the hypothesis that a large pool of iron in the soil negatively affects fen restoration success, as flooding-induced iron reduction (Fe3+ to Fe2+) causes a disproportionate breakdown of organic matter that is coupled with a release of inorganic compounds. We collected intact soil cores in two iron-poor and two iron-rich drained fens, half of which were subjected to a rewetting treatment while the other half was kept drained. Prolonged drainage led to the mobilization of nitrate (NO3-, > 1 mmol L-1) in all cores, regardless of soil iron content. In the rewetted iron-rich cores, a sharp increase in pore water iron (Fe) concentrations correlated with concentrations of inorganic carbon (TIC, > 13 mmol L-1) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC, > 16 mmol L-1). Additionally, ammonium (NH4+) accumulated up to phytotoxic concentrations of 1 mmol L-1 in the pore water of the rewetted iron-rich cores. Disproportionate mobilization of Fe, TIC, DOC and NH4+ was absent in the rewetted iron-poor cores, indicating a strong interaction between waterlogging and iron-mediated breakdown of organic matter. Concentrations of dissolved phosphorus (P) rose slightly in all cores upon rewetting, but remained low throughout the experiment. Our results suggest that large pools of iron in the top soil of drained fens can hamper the restoration of the fen's sink-service for ammonium and carbon upon rewetting. We argue that negative effects of iron should be most apparent in fens with fluctuating water levels, as temporary oxygenation allows frequent regeneration of Fe3+. We conclude that rewetting of iron-poor fens may be more feasible for restoration. PMID:27050837

  12. Photochemical flocculation of terrestrial dissolved organic matter and iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helms, John R.; Mao, Jingdong; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Abdulla, Hussain; Mopper, Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) rich water samples (Great Dismal Swamp, Virginia) were 0.1-μm filtered and UV-irradiated in a solar simulator for 30 days. During the irradiation, pH increased, particulate organic matter (POM) and particulate iron formed. After 30 days, 7% of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was converted to POC while 75% was remineralized. Approximately 87% of the iron was removed from the dissolved phase after 30 days, but iron did not flocculate until a major fraction of DOM was removed by photochemical degradation and flocculation (>10 days); thus, during the initial 10 days, there were sufficient organic ligands present or the pH was low enough to keep iron in solution. Nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies indicated that photochemically flocculated POM was more aliphatic than the residual non-flocculated DOM. Photochemically flocculated POM was also enriched in amide functionality, while carbohydrate-like material was resistant to both photochemical degradation and flocculation. Abiotic photochemical flocculation likely removes a significant fraction of terrestrial DOM from the upper water column between headwaters and the ocean, but has previously been ignored. Preliminary evidence suggests that this process may significantly impact the transport of DOM and POM in ocean margin environments including estuaries.

  13. Fabrication of Iron-Containing Carbon Materials From Graphite Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-cheh

    1996-01-01

    Carbon materials containing iron alloy, iron metal, iron oxide or iron halide were fabricated. Typical samples of these metals were estimated to contain 1 iron atom per 3.5 to 5 carbon atoms. Those carbon materials containing iron alloy, iron metal, and/or Fe3O4 were magnetic. The kinetics of the fabrication process were studied by exposing graphite fluoride (CF(0.68)) to FeCl3 over a 280 to 420 C temperature range. Between 280 and 295 C, FeCl3 quickly entered the structure of CF(0.68), broke the carbon-fluorine bonds, and within 10 to 30 min, completely converted it to carbon made up of graphite planes between which particles of crystalline FeF3 and noncrystalline FeCl3 were located. Longer reaction times (e.g., 28 hr) or higher reaction temperatures (e.g., 420 C) produced materials containing graphite, a FeCl3-graphite intercalation compound, FeCl2(center dot)4H2O, and FeCl2(center dot)2H2O. These products were further heat treated to produce iron-containing carbon materials. When the heating temperature was kept in the 750 to 850 C range, and the oxygen supply was kept at the optimum level, the iron halides in the carbon structure were converted to iron oxides. Raising the heat to temperatures higher than 900 C reduced such iron oxides to iron metal. The kinetics of these reactions were used to suggest processes for fabricating carbon materials containing iron alloy. Such processes were then tested experimentally. In one of the successful trial runs, commercially purchased CF(0.7) powder was used as the reactant, and NiO was added during the final heating to 1200 C as a source of both nickel and oxygen. The product thus obtained was magnetic and was confirmed to be a nickel-iron alloy in carbon.

  14. Preservation of iron(II) by carbon-rich matrices in a hydrothermal plume

    SciTech Connect

    Toner, Brandy M.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Manganini, Steven J.; Santelli, Cara M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Moffett, James W.; Rouxel, Olivier; German, Christopher R.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2008-09-20

    Hydrothermal venting associated with mid-ocean ridge volcanism is globally widespread. This venting is responsible for a dissolved iron flux to the ocean that is approximately equal to that associated with continental riverine runoff. For hydrothermal fluxes, it has long been assumed that most of the iron entering the oceans is precipitated in inorganic forms. However, the possibility of globally significant fluxes of iron escaping these mass precipitation events and entering open-ocean cycles is now being debated, and two recent studies suggest that dissolved organic ligands might influence the fate of hydrothermally vented metals. Here we present spectromicroscopic measurements of iron and carbon in hydrothermal plume particles at the East Pacific Rise mid-ocean ridge. We show that organic carbon-rich matrices, containing evenly dispersed iron(II)-rich materials, are pervasive in hydrothermal plume particles. The absence of discrete iron(II) particles suggests that the carbon and iron associate through sorption or complexation. We suggest that these carbon matrices stabilize iron(II) released from hydrothermal vents in the region, preventing its oxidation and/or precipitation as insoluble minerals. Our findings have implications for deep-sea biogeochemical cycling of iron, a widely recognized limiting nutrient in the oceans.

  15. Synthesis and properties of a novel structural binder utilizing the chemistry of iron carbonation.

    PubMed

    Das, Sumanta; Souliman, Beshoy; Stone, David; Neithalath, Narayanan

    2014-06-11

    This paper explores, for the first time, the possibility of carbonating waste metallic iron powder to develop sustainable binder systems for concrete. The fundamental premise of this work is that metallic iron will react with aqueous CO2 under controlled conditions to form complex iron carbonates which have binding capabilities. Chosen additives containing silica and alumina are added to facilitate iron dissolution and to obtain beneficial rheological and later-age properties. Water is generally only a medium for mass transfer in these systems thereby making the common reaction schemes in portland cement concretes inapplicable. The compressive and flexural strengths of the chosen iron-based binder systems increase with carbonation duration and the specimens carbonated for 4 days exhibit mechanical properties that are comparable to those of companion ordinary portland cement systems that are most commonly used as the binder in building and infrastructural construction. The influence of the additives, carbonation duration, and the air curing duration after carbonation are explored in detail. Thermogravimetric analysis demonstrate the presence of an organic carbonate complex (the dissolution agent used to dissolve iron is organic), the amount of which increases with carbonation duration. Thermal analysis also confirms the participation of some amount of limestone powder in the reaction product formation. The viability of this binder type for concrete applications is proved in this study. PMID:24840162

  16. Total organic carbon analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godec, Richard G.; Kosenka, Paul P.; Smith, Brian D.; Hutte, Richard S.; Webb, Johanna V.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    The development and testing of a breadboard version of a highly sensitive total-organic-carbon (TOC) analyzer are reported. Attention is given to the system components including the CO2 sensor, oxidation reactor, acidification module, and the sample-inlet system. Research is reported for an experimental reagentless oxidation reactor, and good results are reported for linearity, sensitivity, and selectivity in the CO2 sensor. The TOC analyzer is developed with gravity-independent components and is designed for minimal additions of chemical reagents. The reagentless oxidation reactor is based on electrolysis and UV photolysis and is shown to be potentially useful. The stability of the breadboard instrument is shown to be good on a day-to-day basis, and the analyzer is capable of 5 sample analyses per day for a period of about 80 days. The instrument can provide accurate TOC and TIC measurements over a concentration range of 20 ppb to 50 ppm C.

  17. Iron hydroxy carbonate formation in zerovalent iron permeable reactive barriers: Characterization and evaluation of phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkin, Richard T.; Lee, T.R.

    2010-10-22

    Predicting the long-term potential of permeable reactive barriers for treating contaminated groundwater relies on understanding the endpoints of biogeochemical reactions between influent groundwater and the reactive medium. Iron hydroxy carbonate (chukanovite) is frequently observed as a secondary mineral precipitate in granular iron PRBs. Mineralogical characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy on materials collected from three field-based PRBs in the US (East Helena, MT; Elizabeth City, NC; Denver Federal Center, CO). These PRBs were installed to treat a range of contaminants, including chlorinated organics, hexavalent chromium, and arsenic. Results obtained indicate that chukanovite is a prevalent secondary precipitate in the PRBs. Laboratory experiments on high-purity chukanovite separates were carried out to constrain the room-temperature solubility for this mineral. An estimated Gibbs energy of formation ({Delta}{sub f}G{sup o}) for chukanovite is - 1174.4 {+-} 6 kJ/mol. A mineral stability diagram is consistent with observations from the field. Water chemistry from the three reactive barriers falls inside the predicted stability field for chukanovite, at inorganic carbon concentrations intermediate to the stability fields of siderite and ferrous hydroxide. These new data will aid in developing better predictive models of mineral accumulation in zerovalent iron PRBs.

  18. Iron hydroxy carbonate formation in zerovalent iron permeable reactive barriers: characterization and evaluation of phase stability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tony R; Wilkin, Richard T

    2010-07-30

    Predicting the long-term potential of permeable reactive barriers for treating contaminated groundwater relies on understanding the endpoints of biogeochemical reactions between influent groundwater and the reactive medium. Iron hydroxy carbonate (chukanovite) is frequently observed as a secondary mineral precipitate in granular iron PRBs. Mineralogical characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy on materials collected from three field-based PRBs in the US (East Helena, MT; Elizabeth City, NC; Denver Federal Center, CO). These PRBs were installed to treat a range of contaminants, including chlorinated organics, hexavalent chromium, and arsenic. Results obtained indicate that chukanovite is a prevalent secondary precipitate in the PRBs. Laboratory experiments on high-purity chukanovite separates were carried out to constrain the room-temperature solubility for this mineral. An estimated Gibbs energy of formation (Delta(f)G degrees) for chukanovite is -1174.4 +/- 6 kJ/mol. A mineral stability diagram is consistent with observations from the field. Water chemistry from the three reactive barriers falls inside the predicted stability field for chukanovite, at inorganic carbon concentrations intermediate to the stability fields of siderite and ferrous hydroxide. These new data will aid in developing better predictive models of mineral accumulation in zerovalent iron PRBs. PMID:20554346

  19. The Iron Metallome in Eukaryotic Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Dlouhy, Adrienne C.; Outten, Caryn E.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is focused on the iron metallome in eukaryotes at the cellular and subcellular level, including properties, utilization in metalloproteins, trafficking, storage, and regulation of these processes. Studies in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells will be highlighted. The discussion of iron properties will center on the speciation and localization of intracellular iron as well as the cellular and molecular mechanisms for coping with both low iron bioavailability and iron toxicity. The section on iron metalloproteins will emphasize heme, iron-sulfur cluster, and non-heme iron centers, particularly their cellular roles and mechanisms of assembly. The section on iron uptake, trafficking, and storage will compare methods used by yeast and mammalian cells to import iron, how this iron is brought into various organelles, and types of iron storage proteins. Regulation of these processes will be compared between yeast and mammalian cells at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational levels. PMID:23595675

  20. In-Situ Regeneration of Saturated Granular Activated Carbon by an Iron Oxide Nanocatalyst

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) can remove trace organic pollutants and natural organic matter (NOM) from industrial and municipal waters. This paper evaluates an iron nanocatalyst approach, based on Fenton-like oxidation reactions, to regenerate spent GAC within a packed bed con...

  1. Responses of Sugar Beet Roots to Iron Deficiency. Changes in Carbon Assimilation and Oxygen Use1

    PubMed Central

    López-Millán, Ana Flor; Morales, Fermín; Andaluz, Sofía; Gogorcena, Yolanda; Abadía, Anunciación; Rivas, Javier De Las; Abadía, Javier

    2000-01-01

    Different root parts with or without increased iron-reducing activities have been studied in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient control sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. Monohil hybrid). The distal root parts of iron-deficient plants, 0 to 5 mm from the root apex, were capable to reduce Fe(III)-chelates and contained concentrations of flavins near 700 μm, two characteristics absent in the 5 to 10 mm sections of iron-deficient plants and the whole root of iron-sufficient plants. Flavin-containing root tips had large pools of carboxylic acids and high activities of enzymes involved in organic acid metabolism. In iron-deficient yellow root tips there was a large increase in carbon fixation associated to an increase in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity. Part of this carbon was used, through an increase in mitochondrial activity, to increase the capacity to produce reducing power, whereas another part was exported via xylem. Root respiration was increased by iron deficiency. In sugar beet iron-deficient roots flavins would provide a suitable link between the increased capacity to produce reduced nucleotides and the plasma membrane associated ferric chelate reductase enzyme(s). Iron-deficient roots had a large oxygen consumption rate in the presence of cyanide and hydroxisalycilic acid, suggesting that the ferric chelate reductase enzyme is able to reduce oxygen in the absence of Fe(III)-chelates. PMID:11027736

  2. Parameterized electronic description of carbon cohesion in iron grain boundaries.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, Nicholas; Madsen, Georg K H; Drautz, Ralf

    2014-04-01

    We employ a recently developed iron-carbon orthogonal tight-binding model in calculations of carbon in iron grain boundaries. We use the model to evaluate the properties of carbon near and on the Σ5 (3 1 0)[0 0 1] symmetric tilt grain boundary (GB) in iron, and calculations show that a carbon atom lowers the GB energy by 0.29 eV/atom in accordance with DFT. Carbon segregation to the GB is analyzed, and we find an energy barrier of 0.92 eV for carbon to segregate to the carbon-free interface while segregation to a fully filled interface is disfavored. Local volume (via Voronoi tessellation), magnetic, and electronic effects are correlated with atomic energy changes, and we isolate two different mechanisms governing carbon's behavior in iron: a volumetric strain which increases the energy of carbon in interstitial α iron and a non-strained local bonding which stabilizes carbon at the GB. PMID:24651649

  3. Synthesis of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles via solid state reduction of iron oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bystrzejewski, M.

    2011-06-15

    The encapsulation of iron nanoparticles in protective carbon cages leads to unique hybrid core-shell nanomaterials. Recent literature reports suggest that such nanocomposites can be obtained in a relatively simple process involving the solid state carbothermal reduction of iron oxide nanoparticles. This approach is very attractive because it does not require advanced equipment and consumes less energy in comparison to widely used plasma methods. The presented more-in-depth study shows that the carbothermal approach is sensitive to temperature and the process yield strongly depends on the morphology and crystallinity of the carbon material used as a reductant. - Graphical abstract: Reduction of iron oxide nanoparticles by carbon black at 1200 deg. C yields well crystallized carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles. Highlights: > Carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles were synthesized by carbothermal reduction of iron oxide nanoparticles. > The process has the highest selectivity at 1200 C. > Lower temperatures result in iron oxide nanoparticles wrapped in carbon matrix. > The encapsulation rate of Fe at 1200 deg. C was found to be 15%.

  4. Chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon and colour reduction in slaughterhouse wastewater by unmodified and iron-modified clinoptilolite-rich tuff.

    PubMed

    Torres-Pérez, J; Solache-Ríos, M; Martínez-Miranda, V

    2014-01-01

    In this study, reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD), colour, and total organic carbon in effluents from a slaughterhouse in central Mexico was performed using clinoptilolite-rich tuff. The experimental parameters considered were initial concentration of the adsorbate, pH, adsorbent dosage, and contact time. Surface morphology of the materials was tested by using scanning electron microscopy. Specific surface area was analysed by using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and phase composition was analysed by using X-ray diffraction. The experimental adsorption data were fitted to the first- and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. The highest COD removal was observed in slightly acidic pH conditions. The maximum reduction efficiency of COD was accomplished with unmodified clinoptilolite-rich tuff at a contact time of 1440 min. In these conditions, the adsorbent was efficient for treating wastewater from a slaughterhouse. Moreover, after several regeneration cycles with Fenton reagent or hydrogen peroxide, the regenerated zeolite with H2O2 (3%) showed the best reduction efficiencies. PMID:24701954

  5. Dynamic behavior of iron forms in rapid reduction of carbon-coated iron ore

    SciTech Connect

    Sugawara, Katsuyasu; Morimoto, Koji; Sugawara, T.; Dranoff, J.S.

    1999-03-01

    As a part of a fundamental study of the kinetics of rapid smelting reduction of iron oxide with solid carbon, particles of carbon-coated iron ore were prepared by heating a mixture of iron ore and phenolphthalein (a model compound of coal tar) at 773 K in a nitrogen stream. The reduction behavior of the carbon-coated iron ore particles during rapid heating was studied using a drop-tube reactor at temperatures from 1,073 to 1,773 K. The reduction extent increased rapidly with the beginning of melting at temperatures over 1,650 K, reaching 60% at 1,773 within 0.7 s. The observed changes in the distribution of iron states in the particles were successfully simulated.

  6. Iron-carbonate interaction at Earth's core-mantle boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, S. M.; Badro, J.; Nabiei, F.; Prakapenka, V.; Gillet, P.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon storage and flux in the deep Earth are moderated by oxygen fugacity and interactions with iron-bearing phases. The amount of carbon stored in Earth's mantle versus the core depends on carbon-iron chemistry at the core-mantle boundary. Oxidized carbonates subducted from Earth's surface to the lowermost mantle may encounter reduced Fe0 metal from disproportionation of Fe2+ in lower mantle silicates or mixing with the core. To understand the fate of carbonates in the lowermost mantle, we have performed experiments on sandwiches of single-crystal (Ca0.6Mg0.4)CO3 dolomite and Fe foil in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell at lower mantle conditions of 49-110 GPa and 1800-2500 K. Syntheses were conducted with in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction to identify phase assemblages. After quench to ambient conditions, samples were sectioned with a focused Ga+ ion beam for composition analysis with transmission electron microscopy. At the centers of the heated spots, iron melted and reacted completely with the carbonate to form magnesiowüstite, iron carbide, diamond, magnesium-rich carbonate and calcium carbonate. In samples heated at 49 and 64 GPa, the two carbonates exhibit a eutectoid texture. In the sample heated at 110 GPa, the carbonates form rounded ~150-nm-diameter grains with a higher modal proportion of interspersed diamonds. The presence of reduced iron in the deep lower mantle and core-mantle boundary region will promote the formation of diamonds in carbonate-bearing subducted slabs. The complete reaction of metallic iron to oxides and carbides in the presence of mantle carbonate supports the formation of these phases at the Earth's core-mantle boundary and in ultra-low velocity zones.

  7. Iron Hydroxy Carbonate Formation in Zerovalent Iron Permeable Reactive Barriers: Characterization and Evaluation of Phase Stability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predicting the long-term potential of permeable reactive barriers for treating contaminated groundwater relies on understanding the endpoints of biogeochemical reactions between influent groundwater and the reactive medium. Iron hydroxy carbonate (chukanovite) is frequently obs...

  8. Organics Synthesized Using Iron-Grain Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, N. M.; Cody, G. D.; Nuth, J. A., III

    2003-01-01

    We use Fischer-Tropsch type (FTT) synthesis to produce hydrocarbons by hydrogenating carbon monoxide via catalytic reactions. The products of these reactions have been studied using 'natural' catalysts and calculations of the efficiency of FTT synthesis in the Solar Nebula suggest that these types of reactions could make significant contributions to the composition of material near three AU. We coat Fe-silicate grains with organic material using FTT synthesis to simulate the chemistry in the early Solar Nebula. In our experimental setup, we roughly model a nebular environment where grains are successively transported from hot to cold regions of the nebula. In other words, the starting gases and FTT products are continuously circulated through the grains at high temperature with intervals of cooling. Organics generated in this manner could represent the carbonaceous material incorporated in comets and meteorites. We analyze the resulting organics and present the results.

  9. Iron-carbon compacts and process for making them

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell

    2000-01-01

    The present invention includes iron-carbon compacts and a process for making them. The process includes preparing a slurry comprising iron powder, furfuryl alcohol, and a polymerization catalyst for initiating the polymerization of the furfuryl alcohol into a resin, and heating the slurry to convert the alcohol into the resin. The resulting mixture is pressed into a green body and heated to form the iron-carbon compact. The compact can be used as, or machined into, a magnetic flux concentrator for an induction heating apparatus.

  10. Insight into the Iron-Molybdenum Cofactor of Nitrogenase from Synthetic Iron Complexes with Sulfur, Carbon, and Hydride Ligands.

    PubMed

    Čorić, Ilija; Holland, Patrick L

    2016-06-15

    Nitrogenase enzymes are used by microorganisms for converting atmospheric N2 to ammonia, which provides an essential source of N atoms for higher organisms. The active site of the molybdenum-dependent nitrogenase is the unique carbide-containing iron-sulfur cluster called the iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMoco). On the FeMoco, N2 binding is suggested to occur at one or more iron atoms, but the structures of the catalytic intermediates are not clear. In order to establish the feasibility of different potential mechanistic steps during biological N2 reduction, chemists have prepared iron complexes that mimic various structural aspects of the iron sites in the FeMoco. This reductionist approach gives mechanistic insight, and also uncovers fundamental principles that could be used more broadly for small-molecule activation. Here, we discuss recent results and highlight directions for future research. In one direction, synthetic iron complexes have now been shown to bind N2, break the N-N triple bond, and produce ammonia catalytically. Carbon- and sulfur-based donors have been incorporated into the ligand spheres of Fe-N2 complexes to show how these atoms may influence the structure and reactivity of the FeMoco. Hydrides have been incorporated into synthetic systems, which can bind N2, reduce some nitrogenase substrates, and/or reductively eliminate H2 to generate reduced iron centers. Though some carbide-containing iron clusters are known, none yet have sulfide bridges or high-spin iron atoms like the FeMoco. PMID:27171599

  11. IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document surveys the effects of organic and inorganic iron that are relevant to humans and their environment. The biology and chemistry of iron are complex and only partially understood. Iron participates in oxidation reduction processes that not only affect its geochemical m...

  12. Iron-mediated stabilization of soil carbon amplifies the benefits of ecological restoration in degraded lands.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lucas C R; Doane, Timothy A; Corrêa, Rodrigo S; Valverde, Vinicius; Pereira, Engil I P; Horwath, William R

    2015-07-01

    Recent observations across a 14-year restoration chronosequence have shown an unexpected accumulation of soil organic carbon in strip-mined areas of central Brazil. This was attributed to the rapid plant colonization that followed the incorporation of biosolids into exposed regoliths, but the specific mechanisms involved in the stabilization of carbon inputs from the vegetation remained unclear. Using isotopic and elemental analyses, we tested the hypothesis that plant-derived carbon accumulation was triggered by the formation of iron-coordinated complexes, stabilized into physically protected (occluded) soil fractions. Confirming this hypothesis, we identified a fast formation of microaggregates shortly after the application of iron-rich biosolids, which was characterized by a strong association between pyrophosphate-extractable iron and plant-derived organic matter. The formation of microaggregates preceded the development of macroaggregates, which drastically increased soil carbon content (-140 Mg C/ha) a few years after restoration. Consistent with previous theoretical work, iron-coordinated organic complexes served as nuclei for aggregate formation, reflecting the synergistic effect of biological, chemical, and physical mechanisms of carbon stabilization in developing soils. Nevertheless, iron was not the only factor affecting soil carbon content. The highest carbon accumulation was observed during the period of highest plant diversity (> 30 species; years 3-6), declining significantly with the exclusion of native species by invasive grasses (years 9-14). Furthermore, the increasing dominance of invasive grasses was associated with a steady decline in the concentration of soil nitrogen and phosphorus per unit of accumulated carbon. These results demonstrate the importance of interdependent ecological and biogeochemical processes, and the role of soil-plant interactions in determining the success of restoration efforts. In contrast with previous but

  13. Hydrogen storage and carbon dioxide capture in an iron-based sodalite-type metal-organic framework (Fe-BTT) discovered via high-throughput methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sumida, Kenji; Horike, Satoshi; Kaye, Steven S; Herm, Zoey R; Queen, Wendy L; Brown, Craig M; Grandjean, Fernande; Long, Gary J; Dailly, Anne; Long, Jeffrey R

    2010-01-01

    Using high-throughput instrumentation to screen conditions, the reaction between FeCl₂ and H₃BTT∙2HCl (BTT3- = 1,3,5-benzenetristetrazolate) in a mixture of DMF and DMSO was found to afford Fe₃[(Fe₄Cl)₃(BTT)₈]₂∙22DMF∙32DMSO∙11H₂O. This compound adopts a porous three-dimensional framework structure consisting of square [Fe₄Cl]7+ units linked via triangular BTT3- bridging ligands to give an anionic 3,8-net. Mössbauer spectroscopy carried out on a DMF-solvated version of the material indicated the framework to contain high-spin Fe2+ with a distribution of local environments and confirmed the presence of extra-framework iron cations. Upon soaking the compound in methanol and heating at 135 °C for 24 h under dynamic vacuum, most of the solvent is removed to yield Fe₃[(Fe₄Cl)₃(BTT)₈(MeOH)₄]₂ (Fe-BTT), a microporous solid with a BET surface area of 2010 m2 g-1 and open Fe2+ coordination sites. Hydrogen adsorption data collected at 77 K show a steep rise in the isotherm, associated with an initial isosteric heat of adsorption of 11.9 kJ mol-1, leading to a total storage capacity of 1.1 wt% and 8.4 g L-1 at 100 bar and 298 K. Powder neutron diffraction experiments performed at 4 K under various D₂ loadings enabled identification of ten different adsorption sites, with the strongest binding site residing just 2.17(5) Å from the framework Fe2+ cation. Inelastic neutron scattering spectra are consistent with the strong rotational hindering of the H₂ molecules at low loadings, and further reveal the catalytic conversion of ortho-H₂ to para-H₂ by the paramagnetic iron centers. The exposed Fe2+ cation sites within Fe-BTT also lead to the selective adsorption of CO₂ over N₂, with isotherms collected at 298 K indicating uptake ratios of 30.7 and 10.8 by weight at 0.1 and 1.0 bar, respectively.

  14. Carbon content of austenite in austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.

    1998-06-05

    The development of austempered ductile iron (ADI) is a major achievement in cast iron technology. The austempering heat treatment enables the ductile cast iron containing mainly strong bainitic ferrite and ductile carbon-enriched austenite, with some martensite transforms from austenite during cooling down to room temperature. A key factor controlling the stability of the retained austenite can be evaluated soundly using the thermodynamics principles. It is the purpose here to demonstrate that the data of ADI from numerous sources have a similar trend.

  15. Kinetics of Carbon Dissolution of Coke in Molten Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Dongik; Kim, Yumkyum; Shin, Minsoo; Lee, Joonho

    2012-12-01

    The effect of temperature on the dissolution rate of carbon from coke in molten iron was investigated using a sampling technique in the temperature range of 1723 K to 1923 K (1450 °C to 1650 °C). The dissolution rate of carbon from coke in molten iron increased as the temperature increased. At 1923 K (1650 °C), the rate-determining step was the mass transfer of carbon in the boundary layer adjacent to the metal-carbon interface. At 1723 K (1450 °C), the rate-determining step changed from the mass transfer to the interfacial chemical reaction as the reaction proceeded. At 1823 K (1550 °C), both reaction steps affected the apparent reaction rates. Sulfur dissolution did not affect the carbon dissolution rates in molten iron, so it was considered that the sulfur adsorption at the metal/coke interface was not so significant. The apparent activation energy of the carbon dissolution of coke in molten iron was estimated to be 442 kJ/mol.

  16. Enriched Iron(III)-Reducing Bacterial Communities are Shaped by Carbon Substrate and Iron Oxide Mineralogy

    PubMed Central

    Lentini, Christopher J.; Wankel, Scott D.; Hansel, Colleen M.

    2012-01-01

    Iron (Fe) oxides exist in a spectrum of structures in the environment, with ferrihydrite widely considered the most bioavailable phase. Yet, ferrihydrite is unstable and rapidly transforms to more crystalline Fe(III) oxides (e.g., goethite, hematite), which are poorly reduced by model dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms. This begs the question, what processes and microbial groups are responsible for reduction of crystalline Fe(III) oxides within sedimentary environments? Further, how do changes in Fe mineralogy shape oxide-hosted microbial populations? To address these questions, we conducted a large-scale cultivation effort using various Fe(III) oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite, hematite) and carbon substrates (glucose, lactate, acetate) along a dilution gradient to enrich for microbial populations capable of reducing Fe oxides spanning a wide range of crystallinities and reduction potentials. While carbon source was the most important variable shaping community composition within Fe(III)-reducing enrichments, both Fe oxide type and sediment dilution also had a substantial influence. For instance, with acetate as the carbon source, only ferrihydrite enrichments displayed a significant amount of Fe(III) reduction and the well-known dissimilatory metal reducer Geobacter sp. was the dominant organism enriched. In contrast, when glucose and lactate were provided, all three Fe oxides were reduced and reduction coincided with the presence of fermentative (e.g., Enterobacter spp.) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (e.g., Desulfovibrio spp.). Thus, changes in Fe oxide structure and resource availability may shift Fe(III)-reducing communities between dominantly metal-respiring to fermenting and/or sulfate-reducing organisms which are capable of reducing more recalcitrant Fe phases. These findings highlight the need for further targeted investigations into the composition and activity of speciation-directed metal-reducing populations within natural environments. PMID

  17. Iron-carbon composites for the remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunkara, Bhanu Kiran

    This research is focused on engineering submicron spherical carbon particles as effective carriers/supports for nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles to address the in situ remediation of soil and groundwater chlorinated contaminants. Chlorinated hydrocarbons such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) form a class of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) toxic contaminants in soil and groundwater. The in situ injection of NZVI particles to reduce DNAPLs is a potentially simple, cost-effective, and environmentally benign technology that has become a preferred method in the remediation of these compounds. However, unsupported NZVI particles exhibit ferromagnetism leading to particle aggregation and loss in mobility through the subsurface. This work demonstrates two approaches to prepare carbon supported NZVI (iron-carbon composites) particles. The objective is to establish these iron-carbon composites as extremely useful materials for the environmental remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons and suitable materials for the in situ injection technology. This research also demonstrates that it is possible to vary the placement of iron nanoparticles either on the external surface or within the interior of carbon microspheres using a one-step aerosol-based process. The simple process of modifying iron placement has significant potential applications in heterogeneous catalysis as both the iron and carbon are widely used catalysts and catalyst supports. Furthermore, the aerosol-based process is applied to prepare new class of supported catalytic materials such as carbon-supported palladium nanoparticles for ex situ remediation of contaminated water. The iron-carbon composites developed in this research have multiple functionalities (a) they are reactive and function effectively in reductive dehalogenation (b) they are highly adsorptive thereby bringing the chlorinated compound to the proximity of the reactive sites and also serving as adsorption

  18. The Rusty Sink: Iron Promotes the Preservation of Organic Matter in Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalonde, K. M.; Mucci, A.; Moritz, A.; Ouellet, A.; Gelinas, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The biogeochemical cycles of iron (Fe) and organic carbon (OC) are strongly interlinked. In oceanic waters, organic ligands have been shown to control the concentration of dissolved Fe [1], whereas in soils, solid Fe phases provide a sheltering and preservative effect for organic matter [2]. Until now however, the role of iron in the preservation of OC in sediments has not been clearly established. Here we show that 21.5 ± 8.6% of the OC in sediments is directly bound to reactive iron phases, which promote the preservation of OC in sediments. Iron-bound OC represents a global mass of 19 to 45 × 10^15 g of OC in surface marine sediments. This pool of OC is different from the rest of sedimentary OC, with 13C and nitrogen-enriched organic matter preferentially bound to Fe which suggests that biochemical fractionation occurs with OC-Fe binding. Preferential binding also affects the recovery of high molecular weight lipid biomarkers and acidic lignin oxidation products, changing the environmental message of proxies derived from these biomarkers. [1] Johnson, K. S., Gordon, R. M. & Coale, K. H. What controls dissolved iron in the world ocean? Marine Chemistry 57, 137-161 (1997). [2] Kaiser, K. & Guggenberger, G. The role of DOM sorption to mineral surfaces in the preservation of organic matter in soils. Organic Geochemistry 31, 711-725 (2000).

  19. Cold catalytic recovery of loaded activated carbon using iron oxide-based nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bach, Altai; Zelmanov, Grigory; Semiat, Raphael

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach for the recovery of spent activated carbon by an advanced oxidation process using iron oxide-based nanocatalysts was proposed and investigated. Model organic contaminants, such as ethylene glycol and phenol, were chosen for this study as water pollutants. It was shown that there are several advantages in using catalytic oxidation recovery of activated carbon with iron oxide-based nanocatalysts: low temperature reactivity of catalytic recovery without heating; and a relatively large number of adsorption-recovery cycles, without a reduction in the adsorptive properties of the virgin activated carbon or without a performance decrease from the first adsorption-recovery cycle of the new modified adsorptive properties of the activated carbon. The catalytic recovery takes place without ultraviolet light or any visible radiation sources. Results show a high efficiency of catalytic recovery of spent activated carbon using iron oxide-based nanocatalysts. A 97-99% efficiency of spent activated carbon catalytic regeneration was achieved under chosen conditions after 15-20 min of reaction. The process may be also considered as cold in situ recovery of active carbon. PMID:17826818

  20. Synthetic effect between iron oxide and sulfate mineral on the anaerobic transformation of organic substance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tian-Hu; Wang, Jin; Zhou, Yue-Fei; Yue, Zheng-Bo; Xie, Qiao-Qin; Pan, Min

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic effect between sulfate minerals (gypsum) and iron oxide (hematite) on the anaerobic transformation of organic substance was investigated in the current study. The results showed that gypsum was completely decomposed while hematite was partially reduced. The mineral phase analysis results showed that FeS and CaCO3 was the major mineralization product. Methane generation process was inhibited and inorganic carbon contents in the precipitates were enhanced compared to the control without hematite and gypsum. The inorganic carbon content increased with the increasing of hematite dosages. Co-addition of sulfate minerals and iron oxide would have a potential application prospect in the carbon sequestration area and reduction of the greenhouse gas release. The results would also reveal the role of inorganic mineral in the global carbon cycle. PMID:24189378

  1. Synthesis of carbon-coated iron nanoparticles by detonation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Guilei; Li, Xiaojie; Wang, Qiquan; Yan, Honghao

    2010-05-15

    Carbon-coated iron nanoparticles were synthesized by detonating a mixture of ferrocene, naphthalene and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in an explosion vessel under low vacuum conditions (8.1 kPa). The RDX functioned as an energy source for the decomposition of ferrocene and naphthalene. The carbon-coated iron nanoparticles were formed as soot-like deposits on the inner surface of the reactor, which were characterized by XRD, TEM, HRTEM, Raman spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. And a portion of the detonation soot was treated with hydrochloric acid. The product was carbon-coated nanoparticles in perfect core-shell structures with graphitic shells and bcc-Fe cores. The detonation technique offers an energy-saving route to the synthesis of carbon-coated nanomaterials.

  2. Carbonates of the Gunflint Banded Iron Formation as Analogs of Martian Carbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pun, A.; Papike, J. J.; Shearer, C. K.

    2001-01-01

    Terrestrial iron formations preserve remnants of life on Earth and may serve as analogs for identifying evidence of biologic activity in martian rocks. We report on the petrography, mineralogy and trace-element abundances of carbonates of the Gunflint banded iron formation. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Stabilization of Organic Matter by Interactions with Iron Oxides: Relative Importance of Sorption vs. Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Berhe, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Persistence of organic matter in soil is largely determined by the environmental conditions that organic compounds encounter in the environment. The most important stabilization mechanisms for carbon in soil include chemical and physical association of organic compounds with soil minerals. However, to date, we don't have a complete understanding of the relative contribution of each process to carbon stabilization, especially under different soil conditions. To develop better process-level understanding of these stabilization mechanisms, the relative importance of chemical vs. physical mechanisms of carbon stabilization facilitated by iron oxides at different soil solution conditions using a variety of advanced approaches including electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy is determined. Our preliminary results suggest that aggregation may be the dominant process in mineral-organic associations. These results improve our understanding of factors that regulate persistence of organic matter in soil system.

  4. Carbonate petrography, kerogen distribution, and carbon and oxygen isotope variations in an early Proterozoic transition from limestone to iron-formation deposition, Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Beukes, N J; Klein, C; Kaufman, A J; Hayes, J M

    1990-01-01

    The transition zone comprises Campbellrand microbialaminated (replacing "cryptalgalaminate") limestone and shale, with minor dolomite, conformably overlain by the Kuruman Iron Formation of which the basal part is characterized by siderite-rich microbanded iron-formation with minor magnetite and some hematite-containing units. The iron-formation contains subordinate intraclastic and microbialaminated siderite mesobands and was deposited in deeper water than the limestones. The sequence is virtually unaltered with diagenetic mineral assemblages reflecting a temperature interval of about 110 degrees to 170 degrees C and pressures of 2 kbars. Carbonate minerals in the different rock types are represented by primary micritic precipitates (now recrystallized to microsparite), early precompactional sparry cements and concretions, deep burial limpid euhedral sparites, and spar cements precipitated from metamorphic fluids in close contact with diabase sills. Paragenetic pathways of the carbonate minerals are broadly similar in all lithofacies with kerogen intimately associated with them. Kerogen occurs as pigmentation in carbonate crystals, as reworked organic detritus in clastic-textured carbonate units, and as segregations of kerogen pigment around late diagenetic carbonate crystals. Locally kerogen may also be replaced by carbonate spar. Carbon isotope compositions of the carbonate minerals and kerogen are dependent on their mode of occurrence and on the composition of the dominant carbonate species in a specific lithofacies. Integration of sedimentary, petrographic, geochemical, and isotopic results makes it possible to distinguish between depositional, early diagenetic, deep burial, and metamorphic effects on the isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals and the kerogen in the sequence. Major conclusions are that deep burial thermal decarboxylation led to 13C depletion in euhedral ferroan sparites and 13C enrichment in kerogen (organic carbon). Metamorphic

  5. Carbonate petrography, kerogen distribution, and carbon and oxygen isotope variations in an early Proterozoic transition from limestone to iron-formation deposition, Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beukes, N. J.; Klein, C.; Kaufman, A. J.; Hayes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The transition zone comprises Campbellrand microbialaminated (replacing "cryptalgalaminate") limestone and shale, with minor dolomite, conformably overlain by the Kuruman Iron Formation of which the basal part is characterized by siderite-rich microbanded iron-formation with minor magnetite and some hematite-containing units. The iron-formation contains subordinate intraclastic and microbialaminated siderite mesobands and was deposited in deeper water than the limestones. The sequence is virtually unaltered with diagenetic mineral assemblages reflecting a temperature interval of about 110 degrees to 170 degrees C and pressures of 2 kbars. Carbonate minerals in the different rock types are represented by primary micritic precipitates (now recrystallized to microsparite), early precompactional sparry cements and concretions, deep burial limpid euhedral sparites, and spar cements precipitated from metamorphic fluids in close contact with diabase sills. Paragenetic pathways of the carbonate minerals are broadly similar in all lithofacies with kerogen intimately associated with them. Kerogen occurs as pigmentation in carbonate crystals, as reworked organic detritus in clastic-textured carbonate units, and as segregations of kerogen pigment around late diagenetic carbonate crystals. Locally kerogen may also be replaced by carbonate spar. Carbon isotope compositions of the carbonate minerals and kerogen are dependent on their mode of occurrence and on the composition of the dominant carbonate species in a specific lithofacies. Integration of sedimentary, petrographic, geochemical, and isotopic results makes it possible to distinguish between depositional, early diagenetic, deep burial, and metamorphic effects on the isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals and the kerogen in the sequence. Major conclusions are that deep burial thermal decarboxylation led to 13C depletion in euhedral ferroan sparites and 13C enrichment in kerogen (organic carbon). Metamorphic

  6. Formation of magnetite and iron-rich carbonates by thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C.; Liu, S.; Roh, Y.; Cole, D.; Phelps, T.; Vali, H.; Kirschvink, J.L.; Onsttot, T.; McKay, D.

    1997-06-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to study the formation of iron minerals by a thermophilic (45 to 75 C) fermentative iron-reducing bacterial culture (TOR39) obtained from the deep subsurface. Using amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide as an electron acceptor and glucose as an electron donor, TOR39 produced magnetite and iron-rich carbonates at conditions consistent, on a thermodynamic basis, with Eh ({minus}200 mV to {minus}415 mV) and pH (6.2 to 7.7) values determined for these experiments. Analyses of the precipitating solid phases by X-ray diffraction showed that the starting amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide was nearly completely converted to magnetite and Fe-rich carbonate after 20 days of incubation. Increasing bicarbonate concentration in the chemical milieu resulted in increased proportions of siderite relative to magnetite and the addition of MgCl{sub 2} caused the formation of magnesium-rich carbonate in addition to siderite. The results suggest that the TOR39 bacterial culture may have the capacity to form magnetite and iron-rich carbonates in a variety of geochemical conditions. These results may have significant implications for studying the past biogenic activities in the Martian meteorite ALH84001.

  7. Formation of magnetite and iron-rich carbonates by thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuanlun; Vali, Hojatollah; Liu, Shi; Roh, Yul; Cole, Dave; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Onstott, Tullis C.; McKay, David S.; Phelps, Tommy J.

    1997-07-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to study the formation of iron minerals by a thermophilic (45 - 75 degree(s)C) fermentative iron-reducing bacterial culture (TOR39) obtained from the deep subsurface. Using amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide as an electron acceptor and glucose as an electron donor, TOR39 produced magnetite and iron-rich carbonates at conditions consistent, on a thermodynamic basis, with Eh (-200 mV to -415 mV) and pH (6.2 to 7.7) values determined for these experiments. Analyses of the precipitating solid phases by X-ray diffraction showed that the starting amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide was nearly completely converted to magnetite and Fe-rich carbonate after 20 days of incubation. Increasing bicarbonate concentration in the chemical milieu resulted in increased proportions of siderite relative to magnetite and the addition of MgCl2 caused the formation of magnesium-rich carbonate in addition to siderite. The results suggest that the TOR39 bacterial culture may have the capacity to form magnetite and iron-rich carbonates in a variety of geochemical conditions. These results may have significant implications for studying the past biogenic activities in the Martian meteorite ALH84001.

  8. Synthesis of amorphous carbon nanofibers using iron nanoparticles as catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mokhtar; Ramana, G. Venkata; Padya, Balaji; Srikanth, V. V. S. S.; Jain, P. K.

    2013-06-01

    Amongst various carbon nanomaterials, carbon nanofibers (CNFs) have lately attracted considerable interest as a promising reinforcement in polymer matrix composites. CNFs are often synthesized using copper nanoparticles as catalysts and by using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). In this work iron (Fe) nanoparticles are used as catalysts to synthesize amorphous carbon nanofibers. This owes significance since Fe nanoparticles often lead to tubes rather than fibers. Fe nanoparticles (size ˜30-60nm) are prepared by first mixing an appropriate quantity of potassium sodium tartrate tetrahydrate salt with iron (II) chloride dehydrate to obtain iron tartrate and then dried and heated in vacuum oven at about 250°C to remove tartrate. In a subsequent step, CNFs are obtained by using CVD. Acetylene was used as the carbon source in the CVD process. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy show the formation of nanofibers whose diameter is dependent on the size of Fe catalysts. Raman scattering from the fibers show that they are made up of carbon and are amorphous.

  9. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1991-01-10

    Although promoted cobalt and iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis of gasoline feedstock were first developed more than three decades ago, a major technical problem still limiting the commercial use of these catalysts today is carbon deactivation. This report describes recent progress in a fundamental, three-year investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for FT synthesis, the objectives of which are to: determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation over a range of CO concentrations, CO:H{sub 2} ratios, and temperatures; and model the rates of deactivation of the same catalysts in fixed-bed reactors. To accomplish the above objectives, the project is divided into the following tasks: (1) determine the kinetics of reaction and of carbon deactivation during CO hydrogenation on Fe and Fe/K catalysts coated on monolith bodies. (2) Determine the reactivities and types of carbon deposited during reaction on the same catalysts from temperature-programmed-surface-reaction spectroscopy (TPSR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Determine the types of iron carbides formed at various temperatures and H{sub 2}/CO ratios using x-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy. (3) Develop mathematical deactivation models which include heat and mass transport contributions for FT synthesis is packed-bed reactors. Progress to date is described. 48 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. The elements just beyond iron - Formation during explosive carbon burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, J. P.; Schramm, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Pridmore-Brown, D.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that the details of the synthesis of the elements just beyond iron are unclear. Thus, a reexamination of the role played by neutron-capture reactions during explosive carbon burning is indicated. A description is given of calculations of explosive carbon-burning nucleosynthesis using a complete neutron capture (n-process) computer code with a network extending from Cr through Zr and including not only (n,gamma), (gamma,n) reactions and beta-decay but also (p,n), (n,p), (p,gamma), and (p,alpha) reactions. Initial conditions indicative of the composition of a massive star following core helium burning were selected, and a comparison is made with conditions similar to those used by Howard et al. (1972). It is found that neutron reactions during explosive carbon burning are an important source for the elements just beyond iron.

  11. Natural organic matter and iron export from the Tanner Moor, Austria

    PubMed Central

    Jirsa, Franz; Neubauer, Elisabeth; Kittinger, Richard; Hofmann, Thilo; Krachler, Regina; von der Kammer, Frank; Keppler, Bernhard K.

    2013-01-01

    Samples from a pristine raised peat bog runoff in Austria, the Tannermoor creek, were analysed for their iron linked to natural organic matter (NOM) content. Dissolved organic carbon < 0.45 μm (DOC) was 41–64 mg L−1, iron 4.4–5.5 mg L−1. Samples were analysed applying asymmetric field flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) coupled to UV–vis absorption, fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The samples showed an iron peak associated with the NOM peak, one sample exhibiting a second peak of iron independent from the NOM peak. As highland peat bogs with similar climatic conditions and vegetation to the Tanner Moor are found throughout the world, including areas adjacent to the sea, we examined the behaviour of NOM and iron in samples brought to euhaline (35‰) conditions with artificial sea salt. The enhanced ionic strength reduced NOM by 53% and iron by 82%. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) of the samples at sea-like salinity revealed two major fractions of NOM associated with different iron concentrations. The larger one, eluting sharply after the upper exclusion limits of 4000–5000 g mol−1, seems to be most important for iron chelating. The results outline the global importance of sub-mountainous and mountainous raised peat bogs as a source of iron chelators to the marine environment at sites where such peat bogs release their run-offs into the sea. PMID:23805012

  12. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    ... organ failure, coma, convulsions, and death. Child-proof packaging and warning labels on iron supplements have greatly ... levodopa that the body absorbs, making it less effective. Levodopa, found in Sinemet® and Stalevo®, is used ...

  13. Uniform yolk-shell iron sulfide-carbon nanospheres for superior sodium-iron sulfide batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-Xiao; Yang, Jianping; Chou, Shu-Lei; Liu, Hua Kun; Zhang, Wei-Xian; Zhao, Dongyuan; Dou, Shi Xue

    2015-01-01

    Sodium-metal sulfide battery holds great promise for sustainable and cost-effective applications. Nevertheless, achieving high capacity and cycling stability remains a great challenge. Here, uniform yolk-shell iron sulfide-carbon nanospheres have been synthesized as cathode materials for the emerging sodium sulfide battery to achieve remarkable capacity of ∼ 545 mA h g(-1) over 100 cycles at 0.2 C (100 mA g(-1)), delivering ultrahigh energy density of ∼ 438 Wh kg(-1). The proven conversion reaction between sodium and iron sulfide results in high capacity but severe volume changes. Nanostructural design, including of nanosized iron sulfide yolks (∼ 170 nm) with porous carbon shells (∼ 30 nm) and extra void space (∼ 20 nm) in between, has been used to achieve excellent cycling performance without sacrificing capacity. This sustainable sodium-iron sulfide battery is a promising candidate for stationary energy storage. Furthermore, this spatially confined sulfuration strategy offers a general method for other yolk-shell metal sulfide-carbon composites. PMID:26507613

  14. Uniform yolk-shell iron sulfide-carbon nanospheres for superior sodium-iron sulfide batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun-Xiao; Yang, Jianping; Chou, Shu-Lei; Liu, Hua Kun; Zhang, Wei-Xian; Zhao, Dongyuan; Dou, Shi Xue

    2015-10-01

    Sodium-metal sulfide battery holds great promise for sustainable and cost-effective applications. Nevertheless, achieving high capacity and cycling stability remains a great challenge. Here, uniform yolk-shell iron sulfide-carbon nanospheres have been synthesized as cathode materials for the emerging sodium sulfide battery to achieve remarkable capacity of ~545 mA h g-1 over 100 cycles at 0.2 C (100 mA g-1), delivering ultrahigh energy density of ~438 Wh kg-1. The proven conversion reaction between sodium and iron sulfide results in high capacity but severe volume changes. Nanostructural design, including of nanosized iron sulfide yolks (~170 nm) with porous carbon shells (~30 nm) and extra void space (~20 nm) in between, has been used to achieve excellent cycling performance without sacrificing capacity. This sustainable sodium-iron sulfide battery is a promising candidate for stationary energy storage. Furthermore, this spatially confined sulfuration strategy offers a general method for other yolk-shell metal sulfide-carbon composites.

  15. Uniform yolk-shell iron sulfide–carbon nanospheres for superior sodium–iron sulfide batteries

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun-Xiao; Yang, Jianping; Chou, Shu-Lei; Liu, Hua Kun; Zhang, Wei-xian; Zhao, Dongyuan; Dou, Shi Xue

    2015-01-01

    Sodium–metal sulfide battery holds great promise for sustainable and cost-effective applications. Nevertheless, achieving high capacity and cycling stability remains a great challenge. Here, uniform yolk-shell iron sulfide–carbon nanospheres have been synthesized as cathode materials for the emerging sodium sulfide battery to achieve remarkable capacity of ∼545 mA h g−1 over 100 cycles at 0.2 C (100 mA g−1), delivering ultrahigh energy density of ∼438 Wh kg−1. The proven conversion reaction between sodium and iron sulfide results in high capacity but severe volume changes. Nanostructural design, including of nanosized iron sulfide yolks (∼170 nm) with porous carbon shells (∼30 nm) and extra void space (∼20 nm) in between, has been used to achieve excellent cycling performance without sacrificing capacity. This sustainable sodium–iron sulfide battery is a promising candidate for stationary energy storage. Furthermore, this spatially confined sulfuration strategy offers a general method for other yolk-shell metal sulfide–carbon composites. PMID:26507613

  16. Iron carbonates in the Earth's lower mantle: reality or imagination?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerantola, V.; McCammon, C. A.; Merlini, M.; Bykova, E.; Kupenko, I.; Ismailova, L.; Chumakov, A. I.; Kantor, I.; Dubrovinsky, L. S.; Prescher, C.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonates play a fundamental role in the recycling of carbon inside our planet due to their presence in oceanic slabs that sink through the Earth's interior. Through this process, iron carbonates are potential stable carbon-bearing minerals in the deep mantle in part due to spin crossover of ferrous iron. Our goal is to identify which minerals may be the dominant carriers of carbon into the deep mantle at the relevant conditions of fO2, P and T. All experiments were performed using synthetic FeCO3 and MgFeCO3 single crystals in laser heated diamond anvil cells up to 100 GPa and 3000 K in order to simulate the conditions prevailing in the Earth's lower mantle. Transformation and decomposition products of the original carbonates were characterized at different synchrotron facilities by means of single-crystal XRD, synchrotron Mössbauer source spectroscopy and XANES techniques. At deep lower mantle conditions, we observed the transformation of FeCO3 to two new HP-carbonate structures, monoclinic Fe22+Fe23+C4O13 and trigonal Fe43+(CO4)3, both characterized by the presence of CO4 tetrahedra with different degrees of polymerization. At shallower depths in the lower mantle where temperatures are lower following the geotherm, Fe-carbonates decompose to different Fe-oxides instead of new HP-carbonates. However, at slab temperatures several hundred degrees lower than the surrounding mantle, carbonates could be stabilized until reaching conditions that trigger their transformation to HP-structures. We postulate that Fe-rich carbonates could exist in regions down to the core-mantle boundary in the proximity of subducting slabs, i.e., a "cold" environment with relatively high fO2.

  17. Effect of carbon content on friction and wear of cast irons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments were conducted with cast irons and wrought steels containing various amounts of carbon in the alloy structure in contact with 52100 steel. Gray cast irons were found to exhibit lower friction and wear characteristics than white cast irons. Further, gray cast iron wear was more sensitive to carbon content than was white. Wear with gray cast iron was linearly related to load, and friction was found to be sensitive to relative humidity and carbon content. The form, in which the carbon is present in the alloy, is more important, as the carbon content and no strong relationship seems to exist between hardness of these ferrous alloys and wear.

  18. Iron-Containing Carbon Materials Fabricated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Development of high-strength, lightweight materials for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding at low frequencies may be possible if the carbon fibers used in these composites can be made to have ferromagnetic properties. One way to obtain such fibers is by inserting small ferromagnetic particles into the fiber structure.

  19. Microbial Synthesis of Iron Sulfide (FeS) and Iron Carbonate (FeCO3) Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yumi; Lee, Yuri; Roh, Yul

    2015-08-01

    This study examined mineral transformations during anoxic bioreduction of iron hydroxide and iron oxyhydroxysulfate found in acid mine drainage (AMD) into iron sulfide (FeS) and siderite (FeCO3) nanoparticles. Glucose (10 mM) was inoculated into AMD to stimulate indigenous bacterial growth for bioreduction of Fe(III)-containing minerals. Changes in microbial, geochemical, and mineralogical characteristics were monitored via 16S rRNA, XRD, SEM-EDX, TEM-EDX, ICP-AES, and IC analyses. The AMD was found to be rich in elements, including Fe, Al, Mn, Na, and S (SO4), and had a pH of 5.2. The mineral contents mainly consisted of Fe(III)-containing minerals, such as schwertmannite [Fe8O8 (OH)8-2x(SO4)x · nH2O] and akaganeite [β-FeO(OH)]. During anoxic bioreduction of AMD, the Fe(III)-containing minerals were transformed by indigenous iron-reducing bacteria (e.g., Geobactersp.) into Fe(II)-containing minerals, such as iron sulfide (FeS) and iron carbonate, siderite (FeCO3), within 3-4 days. The microbially-formed iron sulfide (FeS) and siderite (FeCO3) were of 40-60 nm and 10 nm-3 µm in size, respectively. These results not only show that indigenous iron-reducing bacteria in AMD can aid or accelerate formation of Fe(II)-containing minerals when under anoxic environments, but can also offer a simple method for microbial synthesis of nano-sized Fe(II)-containing minerals that can be used as catalysts for environmental remediation by recycling AMD. PMID:26369153

  20. Tracing iron-fueled microbial carbon production within the hydrothermal plume at the Loihi seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Sarah A.; Hansman, Roberta L.; Sessions, Alex L.; Nakamura, Ko-ichi.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2011-10-01

    The Loihi hydrothermal plume provides an opportunity to investigate iron (Fe) oxidation and microbial processes in a system that is truly Fe dominated and distinct from mid-ocean ridge spreading centers. The lack of hydrogen sulfide within the Loihi hydrothermal fluids and the presence of an oxygen minimum zone at this submarine volcano's summit, results in a prolonged presence of reduced Fe within the dispersing non-buoyant plume. In this study, we have investigated the potential for microbial carbon fixation within the Loihi plume. We sampled for both particulate and dissolved organic carbon in hydrothermal fluids, microbial mats growing around vents, and the dispersing plume, and carried out stable carbon isotope analysis on the particulate fraction. The δ13C values of the microbial mats ranged from -23‰ to -28‰, and are distinct from those of deep-ocean particulate organic carbon (POC). The mats and hydrothermal fluids were also elevated in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) compared to background seawater. Within the hydrothermal plume, DOC and POC concentrations were elevated and the isotopic composition of POC within the plume suggests mixing between background seawater POC and a 13C-depleted hydrothermal component. The combination of both DOC and POC increasing in the dispersing plume that cannot solely be the result of entrainment and DOC adsorption, provides strong evidence for in-situ microbial productivity by chemolithoautotrophs, including a likelihood for iron-oxidizing microorganisms.

  1. Adsorbent 2D and 3D carbon matrices with protected magnetic iron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreño, N. L. V.; Escote, M. T.; Valentini, A.; McCafferty, L.; Stolojan, V.; Beliatis, M.; Mills, C. A.; Rhodes, R.; Smith, C. T. G.; Silva, S. R. P.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the synthesis of two and three dimensional carbonaceous sponges produced directly from graphene oxide (GO) into which functionalized iron nanoparticles can be introduced to render it magnetic. This simple, low cost procedure, wherein an iron polymeric resin precursor is introduced into the carbon framework, results in carbon-based materials with specific surface areas of the order of 93 and 66 m2 g-1, compared to approx. 4 m2 g-1 for graphite, decorated with ferromagnetic iron nanoparticles giving coercivity fields postulated to be 216 and 98 Oe, values typical for ferrite magnets, for 3.2 and 13.5 wt% Fe respectively. The strongly magnetic iron nanoparticles are robustly anchored to the GO sheets by a layer of residual graphite, on the order of 5 nm, formed during the pyrolysis of the precursor material. The applicability of the carbon sponges is demonstrated in their ability to absorb, store and subsequently elute an organic dye, Rhodamine B, from water as required. It is possible to regenerate the carbon-iron hybrid material after adsorption by eluting the dye with a solvent to which it has a high affinity, such as ethanol. The use of a carbon framework opens the hybrid materials to further chemical functionalization, for enhanced chemical uptake of contaminants, or co-decoration with, for example, silver nanoparticles for bactericidal properties. Such analytical properties, combined with the material's magnetic character, offer solutions for environmental decontamination at land and sea, wastewater purification, solvent extraction, and for the concentration of dilute species.

  2. Adsorbent 2D and 3D carbon matrices with protected magnetic iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Carreño, N L V; Escote, M T; Valentini, A; McCafferty, L; Stolojan, V; Beliatis, M; Mills, C A; Rhodes, R; Smith, C T G; Silva, S R P

    2015-11-01

    We report on the synthesis of two and three dimensional carbonaceous sponges produced directly from graphene oxide (GO) into which functionalized iron nanoparticles can be introduced to render it magnetic. This simple, low cost procedure, wherein an iron polymeric resin precursor is introduced into the carbon framework, results in carbon-based materials with specific surface areas of the order of 93 and 66 m(2) g(-1), compared to approx. 4 m(2) g(-1) for graphite, decorated with ferromagnetic iron nanoparticles giving coercivity fields postulated to be 216 and 98 Oe, values typical for ferrite magnets, for 3.2 and 13.5 wt% Fe respectively. The strongly magnetic iron nanoparticles are robustly anchored to the GO sheets by a layer of residual graphite, on the order of 5 nm, formed during the pyrolysis of the precursor material. The applicability of the carbon sponges is demonstrated in their ability to absorb, store and subsequently elute an organic dye, Rhodamine B, from water as required. It is possible to regenerate the carbon-iron hybrid material after adsorption by eluting the dye with a solvent to which it has a high affinity, such as ethanol. The use of a carbon framework opens the hybrid materials to further chemical functionalization, for enhanced chemical uptake of contaminants, or co-decoration with, for example, silver nanoparticles for bactericidal properties. Such analytical properties, combined with the material's magnetic character, offer solutions for environmental decontamination at land and sea, wastewater purification, solvent extraction, and for the concentration of dilute species. PMID:26441224

  3. Seasonal variation in soil organic carbon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic carbon in soil is most often measured at a single point in time, under the assumption that the major pools of organic carbon change so slowly that variation over weeks or months will be insignificant. The validity of this assumption has implications for accurate comparison of soil carbon bet...

  4. Role of Iron Oxyhydrates in Accumulation and Stabilization of Soil Organic Matter in Rice Paddy: Case Studies from China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, G.; Lu, H.; Sun, J.; Li, L.; Liu, X.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, X.; Cheng, K.

    2014-12-01

    Iron is an important element in soils, often in forms either of crystalline mineral or amorphous colloids upon redox cycling in hydromorphic soils. However, role of iron particularly via oxyhydrates in organic matter dynamics n rice soils has been not yet well assessed. Rice paddy soils of China have been recognized as a unique type of Anthrosols mostly with iron accumulation and dynamic movement in soil profile through long term hydroagric management. Soil organic matter contents of rice soils are shown significantly correlated with the contents of free or amorphous iron oxyhydrates. And organic matter accumulation in young rice soils followed iron oxyhydrate content changes as rice cultivation proceed, which could be often traced by the changes in iron oxyhydrate-bound OC fractions. The importance of association of OC with iron oxyhydrates is known by the fact that organic carbon was not related to total free iron oxyhydrates in wetland but in rice soil shifted from the wetlands, with OC contents much higher in rice soils than in the precedent wetland soil. This could be attributed to the chemical binding of OC to oxyhydrate surface, contributing to the stabilization of newly sequestered OC. This has been again confirmed by lab incubation studies, where total mineralization of OC has been found significantly lower in iron-oxyhrate rich soil than in iron-oxyhrate poor soils. This effect has been further explored in an incubation study with experimental warming that the temperature dependence of OC mineralization of rice soils from a long term fertilizer treated trial was linked to the abundance of iron oxyhydrate content, varying with the long term management practice. Initial carbon sequestration in rice soil subject to new carbon input was promoted by the iron oxyhydrates in the soil, showing a fast increase in iron hydrate-bound OC in the initial stage. The bound OC exerted further stabilization through enhanced humification to form residual OC fraction in long

  5. Adsorption of dissolved natural organic matter by modified activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Dastgheib, Seyed A; Karanfil, Tanju

    2005-06-01

    Adsorption of dissolved natural organic matter (DOM) by virgin and modified granular activated carbons (GACs) was studied. DOM samples were obtained from two water treatment plants before (i.e., raw water) and after coagulation/flocculation/sedimentation processes (i.e., treated water). A granular activated carbon (GAC) was modified by high temperature helium or ammonia treatment, or iron impregnation followed by high temperature ammonia treatment. Two activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were also used, with no modification, to examine the effect of carbon porosity on DOM adsorption. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA(254)) were employed to characterize the DOMs before and after adsorption. Iron-impregnated (HDFe) and ammonia-treated (HDN) activated carbons showed significantly higher DOM uptakes than the virgin GAC. The enhanced DOM uptake by HDFe was due to the presence of iron species on the carbon surface. The higher uptake of HDN was attributed to the enlarged carbon pores and basic surface created during ammonia treatment. The SEC and SUVA(254) results showed no specific selectivity in the removal of different DOM components as a result of carbon modification. The removal of DOM from both raw and treated waters was negligible by ACF10, having 96% of its surface area in pores smaller than 1 nm. Small molecular weight (MW) DOM components were preferentially removed by ACF20H, having 33% of its surface area in 1--3 nm pores. DOM components with MWs larger than 1600, 2000, and 2700 Da of Charleston raw, Charleston-treated, and Spartanburg-treated waters, respectively, were excluded from the pores of ACF20H. In contrast to carbon fibers, DOM components from entire MW range were removed from waters by virgin and modified GACs. PMID:15927230

  6. Removal of trichloroethylene by zerovalent iron/activated carbon derived from agricultural wastes.

    PubMed

    Su, Yuh-fan; Cheng, Yu-ling; Shih, Yang-hsin

    2013-11-15

    Activated carbon (AC) and zerovalent iron (ZVI) have been widely used in the adsorption and dehalogenation process, respectively, for the removal of organic compounds in environmental treatments. This study aims to prepare ZVI/AC derived from an agricultural waste, coir pith, through simple one-step pyrolysis. The effect of activation temperature and time on the surface area, iron content, and zerovalent iron ratio of ZVI/AC was systemically investigated. The results indicated that the activation of AC by FeSO4 significantly increased surface area of AC and distributed elemental iron over the AC. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of ZVI/AC revealed that zerovalent iron was present. As compared to AC without FeSO4 activation, ZVI/AC increased the trichloroethylene removal rate constant by 7 times. The dechlorination ability of ZVI/AC was dominated by the zerovalent iron content. We have shown that lab-made ZVI/AC from coir pith can effectively adsorb and dehalogenate the chlorinated compounds in water. PMID:23994578

  7. Sulfur reactions and cryptic cross-linkages to oxygen, iron, and carbon cyclin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druschel, G.; Kafantaris, F. C. A.; Fike, D. A.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Dvorski, S.; Oduro, H.

    2014-12-01

    Sulfur speciation in any setting is controlled by a complex series of redox reactions, polymerization, and complexation reactions that are affected by both biotic and abiotic processes. Additionally there are several crossroads of reactions with oxygen, carbon, and iron in which polysulfide molecules serve as a key reaction component that affects not only sulfur speciation, but the speciation, solubility, and bioavailability of these elements as well. Utilizing a combination of analytical approaches including electrochemistry, spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and chromatography, we have started to unravel the interconnections between sulfur and other key elements, and how microorganisms may be either direct or indirect contributors to these chemical and mineralogical signatures. In microbial mats, we have observed microbial production of significant hydrogen peroxide under UV-stressed conditions. This peroxide interaction with hydrogen sulfide changes the kinetics and the pathways of abiotic sulfur reactions, potentially affecting the overall bioavailability and isotopic fractionations for specific reactions via a change in the linkage between oxygen and sulfur cycling. In systems containing significant iron, we have observed the production of an electroactive form of ferrous iron and sulfide (FeS(aq)) that is of a size that can be described between a dissolved molecular cluster and a small nanoparticle. This FeS(aq) can be a significant fraction of the dissolved iron or sulfide in a system, and is a key part of both the solubility of iron and sulfur and the pathways potentially important for pyritization reactions. In systems where we investigate the links between sulfur and carbon, laboratory and field experiments indicate a wide range of large and more reduced organic compounds are highly reactive towards polysulfide. Utilizing Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry in conjunction with electrochemistry and chromatography, we are seeing a

  8. Fouling of carbon steel heat exchanger caused by iron bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Starosvetsky, J.; Armon, R.; Starosvetsky, D. ); Groysman, A.

    1999-01-01

    A carbon steel heat exchanger installed in a reverse osmosis unit failed after 1 1/2 years from start-up as a result of tubes, lids, tube sheets, and connection pipes clogging from rust deposits. Chemical analysis of cooling water and scraped precipitates, as well laboratory screening of the deposits for bacteria, revealed that activity of iron-oxidizing bacteria present in cooling water could lead to heat exchanger blockage.

  9. Comparison of methods for the removal of organic carbon and extraction of chromium, iron and manganese from an estuarine sediment standard and sediment from the Calcasieu River estuary, Louisiana, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, N.S.; Hatcher, S.A.; Demas, C.

    1992-01-01

    U.S. National Bureau of Standards (NBS) estuarine sediment 1646 from the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, and surface sediment collected at two sites in the Calcasieu River estuary, Louisiana, were used to evaluate the dilute hydrochloric acid extraction of Cr, Fe and Mn from air-dried and freeze-dried samples that had been treated by one of three methods to remove organic carbon. The three methods for the oxidation and removal of organic carbon were: (1) 30% hydrogen peroxide; (2) 30% hydrogen peroxide plus 0.25 mM pyrophosphate; and (3) plasma oxidation (low-temperature ashing). There was no statistically significant difference at the 95% confidence level between air- and freeze-dried samples with respect to the percent of organic carbon removed by the three methods. Generally, there was no statistically significant difference at the 95% confidence level between air- and freeze-dried samples with respect to the concentration of Cr, Fe and Mn that was extracted, regardless of the extraction technique that was used. Hydrogen peroxide plus pyrophosphate removed the most organic carbon from sediment collected at the site in the Calcasieu River that was upstream from industrial outfalls. Plasma oxidation removed the most organic carbon from the sediment collected at a site in the Calcasieu River close to industrial outfalls and from the NBS estuarine sediment sample. Plasma oxidation merits further study as a treatment for removal of organic carbon. Operational parameters can be chosen to limit the plasma oxidation of pyrite which, unlike other Fe species, will not be dissolved by dilute hydrochloric acid. Preservation of pyrite allows the positive identification of Fe present as pyrite in sediments. ?? 1992.

  10. Soil organic carbon across scales.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Sharon M; Angers, Denis A; Holden, Nicholas M; McBratney, Alex B

    2015-10-01

    Mechanistic understanding of scale effects is important for interpreting the processes that control the global carbon cycle. Greater attention should be given to scale in soil organic carbon (SOC) science so that we can devise better policy to protect/enhance existing SOC stocks and ensure sustainable use of soils. Global issues such as climate change require consideration of SOC stock changes at the global and biosphere scale, but human interaction occurs at the landscape scale, with consequences at the pedon, aggregate and particle scales. This review evaluates our understanding of SOC across all these scales in the context of the processes involved in SOC cycling at each scale and with emphasis on stabilizing SOC. Current synergy between science and policy is explored at each scale to determine how well each is represented in the management of SOC. An outline of how SOC might be integrated into a framework of soil security is examined. We conclude that SOC processes at the biosphere to biome scales are not well understood. Instead, SOC has come to be viewed as a large-scale pool subjects to carbon flux. Better understanding exists for SOC processes operating at the scales of the pedon, aggregate and particle. At the landscape scale, the influence of large- and small-scale processes has the greatest interaction and is exposed to the greatest modification through agricultural management. Policy implemented at regional or national scale tends to focus at the landscape scale without due consideration of the larger scale factors controlling SOC or the impacts of policy for SOC at the smaller SOC scales. What is required is a framework that can be integrated across a continuum of scales to optimize SOC management. PMID:25918852

  11. Iron-Doped Carbon Aerogels: Novel Porous Substrates for Direct Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Steiner, S. A.; Baumann, T. F.; Kong, J.; Satcher, J. H.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2007-02-20

    We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K{sup +}-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe{sup 2+}- or Fe{sup 3+}-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH{sub 4} (1000 sccm), H{sub 2} (500 sccm), and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for 10 minutes, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled ({approx}25 nm in diameter and up to 4 mm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs were grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 C.

  12. Iron-doped carbon aerogels: novel porous substrates for direct growth of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Stephen A; Baumann, Theodore F; Kong, Jing; Satcher, Joe H; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2007-04-24

    We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K+-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe2+- or Fe3+-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO2, and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD, and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH4 (1000 sccm), H2 (500 sccm), and C2H4 (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 degrees C for 10 min, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled (approximately 25 nm in diameter and up to 4 microm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs was grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 degrees C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 degrees C. PMID:17381146

  13. Iron-Doped Carbon Aerogels: Novel Porous Substrates for Direct Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, S A; Baumann, T F; Kong, J; Satcher, J H; Dresselhaus, M S

    2007-02-15

    We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K{sup +}-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe{sup 2+}- or Fe{sup 3+}-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH{sub 4} (1000 sccm), H{sub 2} (500 sccm), and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for 10 minutes, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled ({approx}25 nm in diameter and up to 4 mm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs were grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 C.

  14. Pulsed Plasma Synthesis of Iron and Nickel Nanoparticles Coated by Carbon for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullaeva, Zhypargul; Omurzak, Emil; Iwamoto, Chihiro; Ihara, Hirotaka; Subban Ganapathy, Hullathy; Sulaimankulova, Saadat; Koinuma, Michio; Mashimo, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Fe and Ni magnetic nanoparticles coated by carbon were synthesized between the Fe-Fe and Ni-Ni metal electrodes, submerged in ethanol using pulsed plasma in a liquid method. Iron coated carbon (Fe@C) nanoparticles have an average size of 32 nm, and Ni@C nanoparticles are 40 nm. Obtained samples exhibit a well-defined crystalline structure of the inner Fe and Ni cores, encapsulated in the graphitic carbon coatings. Cytotoxicity studies performed on the MCF-7 (breast cancer) cell line showed small toxicity about 88-74% at 50 µg/mL of Fe@C and Ni@C nanoparticles, which can be significant criteria for use them in medical cancer treatment. In addition, appropriate sizes, good magnetic properties and well-organized graphitic carbon coatings are highlight merits of Fe@C and Ni@C nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed plasma.

  15. Photochemical Flocculation of Terrestrial Dissolved Organic Matter (tDOM) and Iron: Mechanisms and Geochemical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mopper, K.; Helms, J. R.; Mao, J.; Abdulla, H. A.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2013-12-01

    Photoflocculation of DOM has received relatively little attention. No previous studies have examined the chemical composition of the flocs nor investigated the coagulation mechanisms. We observed that, after 30 days of simulated solar UV irradiation of 0.1-um filtered Great Dismal Swamp (Virginia) water, 7.1% of the DOC was converted to POC while 75% was remineralized. Approximately 87% of the iron was removed from the dissolved phase after 30 days, but iron did not flocculate until a major fraction of DOM was removed by photochemical degradation and flocculation (>10 days); thus, during the initial 10 days, there were sufficient organic ligands present and/or the pH was low enough to keep iron in solution. Although photoflocculation of iron did eventually occur, it is not clear if iron is required for the initial flocculation of DOM. Using NMR and FT-IR techniques, we found that photochemically flocculated POM was enriched in aliphatics and amide functionality relative to the residual non-flocculated DOM, while carbohydrate-like material was neither photochemical degraded nor flocculated. Based on this spectroscopic evidence, we propose several mechanisms for the formation of the flocs during irradiation. We also speculate that abiotic photochemical flocculation may remove a significant fraction of tDOM and iron from the upper water column between headwaters and the ocean, including estuaries. Fig. 1. Concentrations of dissolved (gray), particulate (black), and adsorbed (white) material as a function of irradiation time: (a) organic carbon, (b) absorption at 300 nm, (c) total iron by atomic absorption, and (d) total nitrogen. Error bars represent the combined standard deviations of the 'total,' 'dissolved,' and 'adsorbed' terms from which the 'particulate' term was calculated. Total nitrogen was not determined for the 'adsorbed' material

  16. Surface Reactivity of Core Shell Iron-Iron Oxide Nanoclusters towards Breakdown of Carbon Tetrachloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarsem S., Maninder K.; Qiang, You; Kim, Hongseok; Amonette, James E.; Baer, Donald R.

    2012-02-01

    Zero-valent iron (ZVI) is one of the technologies for groundwater remediation to reduce contaminants by removal of mobile chlorinated hydrocarbons. Iron-Iron oxide (Fe/Fe3O4) nanoclusters (NCs) made in our laboratory using cluster deposition technique have enhanced reactivity towards targeted contaminants due to the presence of ZVI protected by a passivated oxide shell. Here, we investigate the effectiveness of the Fe/Fe3O4 NCs in reducing carbon tetrachloride (CT) under laboratory conditions. The reactivity of the NCs was investigated by conducting unbuffered aqueous batch experiments to reduce CT at room temperature. Initial results show that 80% of the degradation of CT resulted in the formation of dichloromethane (DCM) and chloroform (CF); the remainder likely followed a competing pathway to yield nonhazardous products such as CO. The production of undesirable hydrogenated products such as DCM and CF suggests that the dominant reaction pathway occurs through hydrogen (H) atom transfer via H atoms generated by corrosion of the iron. Comparative experiments with ZVI NCs prepared by other methods are underway and the results will be reported. Future work is to analyze and understand factors that control the reaction pathways between desirable and undesirable products.

  17. Electrochemistry of Simple Organometallic Models of Iron-Iron Hydrogenases in Organic Solvent and Water.

    PubMed

    Gloaguen, Frederic

    2016-01-19

    Synthetic models of the active site of iron-iron hydrogenases are currently the subjects of numerous studies aimed at developing H2-production catalysts based on cheap and abundant materials. In this context, the present report offers an electrochemist's view of the catalysis of proton reduction by simple binuclear iron(I) thiolate complexes. Although these complexes probably do not follow a biocatalytic pathway, we analyze and discuss the interplay between the reduction potential and basicity and how these antagonist properties impact the mechanisms of proton-coupled electron transfer to the metal centers. This question is central to any consideration of the activity at the molecular level of hydrogenases and related enzymes. In a second part, special attention is paid to iron thiolate complexes holding rigid and unsaturated bridging ligands. The complexes that enjoy mild reduction potentials and stabilized reduced forms are promising iron-based catalysts for the photodriven evolution of H2 in organic solvents and, more importantly, in water. PMID:26641526

  18. Soil Organic Carbon Input from Urban Turfgrasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Turfgrass is a major vegetation type in the urban and suburban environment. Management practices such as species selection, irrigation, and mowing may affect carbon (C) input and storage in these systems. Research was conducted to determine the rate of soil organic carbon (SOC) changes, soil carbon ...

  19. Soil Organic Carbon Input from Urban Turfgrasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Turfgrass is a major vegetation type in the urban and suburban environment. Management practices such as species selection, irrigation, and mowing may affect carbon input and storage in these systems. Research was conducted to determine the rate of soil organic carbon (SOC) changes, soil carbon sequ...

  20. Voronoi analysis of the short–range atomic structure in iron and iron–carbon melts

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, Andrey; Mirzoev, Alexander

    2015-08-17

    In this work, we simulated the atomic structure of liquid iron and iron–carbon alloys by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. Voronoi analysis was used to highlight changes in the close environments of Fe atoms as carbon concentration in the melt increases. We have found, that even high concentrations of carbon do not affect short–range atomic order of iron atoms — it remains effectively the same as in pure iron melts.

  1. Iron nanoparticles embedded in carbon films: structural and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashayekhi, Fatemeh; Shafiekhani, Azizollah; Sebt, Seyed Ali

    2016-06-01

    In the present work amorphous hydrogenated carbon films with sputtered iron nanoparticles (Fe NPs @ a-C:H) were deposited by co-deposition of RF-sputtering and RF-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition methods using acetylene gas and iron target on quartz and silicon substrates. Samples were prepared in different initial pressures and during constant deposition time. The crystalline structure of Fe NPs @ a-C:H was studied using X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction patterns. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis presents that increasing the initial pressure decreases the atomic ratio of Fe/C and the sp3-hybridized carbon content in prepared samples. The transmission electron microscope image shows the encapsulated Fe NPs in carbon films. The optical properties and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of samples were studied using UV-visible spectrophotometry, which is shown that increasing of Fe content decreases the intensity of LSPR peak and increases the optical band gap.

  2. Iron Catalyst Chemistry in High Pressure Carbon Monoxide Nanotube Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Povitsky, Alexander; Dateo, Christopher; Gokcen, Tahir; Smalley, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) technique for producing single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) is analyzed using a chemical reaction model coupled with properties calculated along streamlines. Streamline properties for mixing jets are calculated by the FLUENT code using the k-e turbulent model for pure carbon monixide. The HiPco process introduces cold iron pentacarbonyl diluted in CO, or alternatively nitrogen, at high pressure, ca. 30 atmospheres into a conical mixing zone. Hot CO is also introduced via three jets at angles with respect to the axis of the reactor. Hot CO decomposes the Fe(CO)5 to release atomic Fe. Cluster reaction rates are from Krestinin, et aI., based on shock tube measurements. Another model is from classical cluster theory given by Girshick's team. The calculations are performed on streamlines that assume that a cold mixture of Fe(CO)5 in CO is introduced along the reactor axis. Then iron forms clusters that catalyze the formation of SWNTs from the Boudouard reaction on Fe-containing clusters by reaction with CO. To simulate the chemical process along streamlines that were calculated by the fluid dynamics code FLUENT, a time history of temperature and dilution are determined along streamlines. Alternative catalyst injection schemes are also evaluated.

  3. Microstructure and properties of pure iron/copper composite cladding layers on carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Long; Huang, Yong-xian; Lü, Shi-xiong; Huang, Ti-fang; Lü, Zong-liang

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, pure iron/copper composite metal cladding was deposited onto carbon steel by tungsten inert gas welding. The study focused on interfacial morphological, microstructural, and mechanical analyses of the composite cladding layers. Iron liquid-solid-phase zones were formed at copper/steel and iron interfaces because of the melting of the steel substrate and iron. Iron concentrated in the copper cladding layer was observed to exhibit belt, globule, and dendrite morphologies. The appearance of iron-rich globules indicated the occurrence of liquid phase separation (LPS) prior to solidification, and iron-rich dendrites crystallized without the occurrence of LPS. The maximum microhardness of the iron/steel interface was lower than that of the copper/steel interface because of the diffusion of elemental carbon. All samples fractured in the cladding layers. Because of a relatively lower strength of the copper layer, a short plateau region appeared when shear movement was from copper to iron.

  4. Resistive switching in iron-oxide-filled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cava, Carlos E; Persson, Clas; Zarbin, Aldo J G; Roman, Lucimara S

    2014-01-01

    Iron-oxide-filled carbon nanotubes exhibit an intriguing charge bipolarization behavior which allows the material to be applied in resistive memory devices. Raman analysis conducted with an electric field applied in situ shows the Kohn anomalies and a strong modification of the electronic properties related to the applied voltage intensity. In addition, the I(D)/I(G) ratio indicated the reversibility of this process. The electrical characterization indicated an electronic transport governed by two main kinds of charge hopping, one between the filling and the nanotube and the other between the nanotube shells. PMID:24201829

  5. Development of carbon composite iron ore micropellets by using the microfines of iron ore and carbon-bearing materials in iron making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Jagannath; Ghorai, Satadal; Das, Avimanyu

    2015-02-01

    Iron ore microfines and concentrate have very limited uses in sintering processes. They are used in pelletization; however, this process is cost intensive. Furthermore, the microfines of non-coking coal and other carbon-bearing materials, e.g., blast-furnace flue dust (BFD) and coke fines, are not used extensively in the metallurgical industry because of operational difficulties and handling problems. In the present work, to utilize these microfines, coal composite iron oxide micropellets (2-6 mm in size) were produced through an innovative technique in which lime and molasses were used as binding materials in the micropellets. The micropellets were subsequently treated with CO2 or the industrial waste gas to induce the chemical bond formation. The results show that, at a very high carbon level of 22wt% (38wt% coal), the cold crushing strength and abrasion index of the micropellets are 2.5-3 kg/cm2 and 5wt%-9wt%, respectively; these values indicate that the pellets are suitable for cold handling. The developed micropellets have strong potential as a heat source in smelting reduction in iron making and sintering to reduce coke breeze. The micropellets produced with BFD and coke fines (8wt%-12wt%) were used in iron ore sintering and were observed to reduce the coke breeze consumption by 3%-4%. The quality of the produced sinter was at par with that of the conventional blast-furnace sinter.

  6. Nitrogen controlled iron catalyst phase during carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Bayer, Bernhard C.; Baehtz, Carsten; Kidambi, Piran R.; Weatherup, Robert S.; Caneva, Sabina; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Hofmann, Stephan; Mangler, Clemens; Kotakoski, Jani; Meyer, Jannik C.; Goddard, Caroline J. L.

    2014-10-06

    Close control over the active catalyst phase and hence carbon nanotube structure remains challenging in catalytic chemical vapor deposition since multiple competing active catalyst phases typically co-exist under realistic synthesis conditions. Here, using in-situ X-ray diffractometry, we show that the phase of supported iron catalyst particles can be reliably controlled via the addition of NH{sub 3} during nanotube synthesis. Unlike polydisperse catalyst phase mixtures during H{sub 2} diluted nanotube growth, nitrogen addition controllably leads to phase-pure γ-Fe during pre-treatment and to phase-pure Fe{sub 3}C during growth. We rationalize these findings in the context of ternary Fe-C-N phase diagram calculations and, thus, highlight the use of pre-treatment- and add-gases as a key parameter towards controlled carbon nanotube growth.

  7. Mobility of organic carbon from incineration residues

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Holger Svensson, Malin

    2008-07-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) may affect the transport of pollutants from incineration residues when landfilled or used in geotechnical construction. The leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash and air pollution control residue (APC) from the incineration of waste wood was investigated. Factors affecting the mobility of DOC were studied in a reduced 2{sup 6-1} experimental design. Controlled factors were treatment with ultrasonic radiation, full carbonation (addition of CO{sub 2} until the pH was stable for 2.5 h), liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio, pH, leaching temperature and time. Full carbonation, pH and the L/S ratio were the main factors controlling the mobility of DOC in the bottom ash. Approximately 60 weight-% of the total organic carbon (TOC) in the bottom ash was available for leaching in aqueous solutions. The L/S ratio and pH mainly controlled the mobilization of DOC from the APC residue. About 93 weight-% of TOC in the APC residue was, however, not mobilized at all, which might be due to a high content of elemental carbon. Using the European standard EN 13 137 for determination of total organic carbon (TOC) in MSWI residues is inappropriate. The results might be biased due to elemental carbon. It is recommended to develop a TOC method distinguishing between organic and elemental carbon.

  8. Missing Iron-Oxidizing Acidophiles Highly Sensitive to Organic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ueoka, Nagayoshi; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    The genus Acidithiobacillus includes iron-oxidizing lithoautotrophs that thrive in acidic mine environments. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is a representative species and has been extensively studied for its application to the bioleaching of precious metals. In our attempts to cultivate the type strain of A. ferrooxidans (ATCC 23270T), repeated transfers to fresh inorganic media resulted in the emergence of cultures with improved growth traits. Strains were isolated from the resultant culture by forming colonies on inorganic silica-gel plates. A representative isolate (strain NU-1) was unable to form colonies on agarose plates and was more sensitive to organics, such as glucose, than the type strain of A. ferrooxidans. Strain NU-1 exhibited superior growth traits in inorganic iron media to those of other iron-oxidizing acidithiobacilli, suggesting its potential for industrial applications. A draft genome of NU-1 uncovered unique features in catabolic enzymes, indicating that this strain is not a mutant of the A. ferrooxidans type strain. Our results indicate that the use of inorganic silica-gel plates facilitates the isolation of as-yet-unexamined iron-oxidizing acidithiobacilli from environmental samples and enrichment cultures. PMID:27356527

  9. CARBON MONOXIDE REVERSIBLY DISRUPTS IRON HOMEOSTATIS AND RESPIRATORY EPITHELIAL CELLS FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron dissociation from heme is a major factor in iron metabolism and cellular concentrations of the metal correlate inversely with the expression of heme oxygenase (HO). We tested the hypothesis that 1) exposure to a product of HO, carbon monoxide (CO), disturbs iron homeostas...

  10. Resistive switching in iron-oxide-filled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cava, Carlos E.; Persson, Clas; Zarbin, Aldo J. G.; Roman, Lucimara S.

    2013-12-01

    Iron-oxide-filled carbon nanotubes exhibit an intriguing charge bipolarization behavior which allows the material to be applied in resistive memory devices. Raman analysis conducted with an electric field applied in situ shows the Kohn anomalies and a strong modification of the electronic properties related to the applied voltage intensity. In addition, the ID/IG ratio indicated the reversibility of this process. The electrical characterization indicated an electronic transport governed by two main kinds of charge hopping, one between the filling and the nanotube and the other between the nanotube shells.Iron-oxide-filled carbon nanotubes exhibit an intriguing charge bipolarization behavior which allows the material to be applied in resistive memory devices. Raman analysis conducted with an electric field applied in situ shows the Kohn anomalies and a strong modification of the electronic properties related to the applied voltage intensity. In addition, the ID/IG ratio indicated the reversibility of this process. The electrical characterization indicated an electronic transport governed by two main kinds of charge hopping, one between the filling and the nanotube and the other between the nanotube shells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr04320g

  11. Mossbauer effect in the ion-implanted iron-carbon alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, K. S.

    1976-01-01

    The concentration dependence of Mossbauer effect in four carbon ion-implanted iron absorbers, which contain carbon as the solute atoms, has been investigated over the range of concentration 0.05 through 1 atomic percent. The specimens were prepared by implanting carbon atoms on each reference iron foil with four different bombarding energies of 250 keV, 160 keV, 140 keV and 80 keV, respectively. Thus, the specimen contains a uniform dosage of carbon atoms which penetrated up to 3,000 A depth of the reference iron. In the measurement of Mossbauer spectra, the backscattering conversion electron counting geometry was used. Typical results of Mossbauer parameters of iron-carbon alloys show that the isomer shift, quadrupole shift, the effective hyperfine splitting of Fe-57, and the intensity ratio exhibit a large variation with the increase of carbon concentration in the environment of iron atoms.

  12. Degradation of carbon tetrachloride in the presence of zero-valent iron.

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, J. S.; Rose, C.; LaFreniere, L.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-01-01

    Efforts to achieve the decomposition of carbon tetrachloride through anaerobic and aerobic bioremediation and chemical transformation have met with limited success because of the conditions required and the formation of hazardous intermediates. Recently, particles of zero-valent iron (ZVI) have been used with limited success for in situ remediation of carbon tetrachloride. We studied a modified microparticulate product that combines controlled-release carbon with ZVI for stimulation of in situ chemical reduction of persistent organic compounds in groundwater. With this product, a number of physical, chemical, and microbiological processes were combined to create very strongly reducing conditions that stimulate rapid, complete dechlorination of organic solvents. In principle, the organic component of ZVI microparticles is nutrient rich and hydrophilic and has high surface area capable of supporting the growth of bacteria in the groundwater environment. In our experiments, we found that as the bacteria grew, oxygen was consumed, and the redox potential decreased to values reaching -600 mV. The small modified ZVI particles provide substantial reactive surface area that, in these conditions, directly stimulates chemical dechlorination and cleanup of the contaminated area without accumulation of undesirable breakdown products. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of ZVI microparticles in reducing carbon tetrachloride under laboratory and field conditions. Changes in concentrations and in chemical and physical parameters were monitored to determine the role of the organic products in the reductive dechlorination reaction. Laboratory and field studies are presented.

  13. Closed system Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over meteoritic iron, iron ore and nickel-iron alloy. [deuterium-carbon monoxide reaction catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nooner, D. W.; Gibert, J. M.; Gelpi, E.; Oro, J.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were performed in which meteoritic iron, iron ore and nickel-iron alloy were used to catalyze (in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis) the reaction of deuterium and carbon monoxide in a closed vessel. Normal alkanes and alkenes and their monomethyl substituted isomers and aromatic hydrocarbons were synthesized. Iron oxide and oxidized-reduced Canyon Diablo used as Fischer-Tropsch catalysts were found to produce aromatic hydrocarbons in distributions having many of the features of those observed in carbonaceous chondrites, but only at temperatures and reaction times well above 300 C and 6-8 h.

  14. Carbon-depleted outer core revealed by sound velocity measurements of liquid iron-carbon alloy.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yoichi; Imada, Saori; Hirose, Kei; Komabayashi, Tetsuya; Ozawa, Haruka; Tateno, Shigehiko; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Kuwayama, Yasuhiro; Baron, Alfred Q R

    2015-01-01

    The relative abundance of light elements in the Earth's core has long been controversial. Recently, the presence of carbon in the core has been emphasized, because the density and sound velocities of the inner core may be consistent with solid Fe7C3. Here we report the longitudinal wave velocity of liquid Fe84C16 up to 70 GPa based on inelastic X-ray scattering measurements. We find the velocity to be substantially slower than that of solid iron and Fe3C and to be faster than that of liquid iron. The thermodynamic equation of state for liquid Fe84C16 is also obtained from the velocity data combined with previous density measurements at 1 bar. The longitudinal velocity of the outer core, about 4% faster than that of liquid iron, is consistent with the presence of 4-5 at.% carbon. However, that amount of carbon is too small to account for the outer core density deficit, suggesting that carbon cannot be a predominant light element in the core. PMID:26596912

  15. A carbon budget for a naturally iron fertilized bloom in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Paul J.; Sanders, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Subantarctic islands in the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (HNLC) Southern Ocean are natural sources of iron and stimulate blooms in their proximity, such as the one observed close to the Crozet Islands (52°E, 46°S). During 2004/2005, particulate organic carbon (POC) export was measured using the 234Th technique in the Crozet bloom and compared with an HNLC control region. Initial results showed that iron release had no effect on daily POC export rates, thus any iron-driven enhancement in POC export was due to a longer export phase in the bloom region when compared to the control region. The duration of the export event was empirically estimated by closing the silicon budget, thus allowing seasonal POC export to be calculated by applying the export duration to the daily rates of POC export. This yields a seasonal estimate of POC export that is 3.6 times larger (range 1.9-7.1) in the iron-fertilized region than in the HNLC control region. These estimates of POC export were then compared to independent estimates of organic matter storage in the upper ocean, which are significant in both the HNLC and control regions. Overall, integrated POC export was significantly (approximately 50%) lower than estimated seasonal new production, the fraction of production that is supported by inputs of new nutrients. Finally, the sequestration efficiency, the numerical relationship between the supply of the limiting nutrient, iron, and the key ecosystem function of POC export at 100 m, is estimated to be 16,790 mol:mol.

  16. Luminescence turn-on/off sensing of biological iron by carbon dots in transferrin.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Arpan; Chatterjee, Surajit; Khorwal, Vijaykant; Mukherjee, Tushar Kanti

    2016-02-21

    Iron is a key nutrient as well as a potential toxin for almost all living organisms. In mammalian cells, serum transferrin (Tf) is responsible for iron transport and its iron overload/deficiency causes various diseases. Therefore, closely regulated iron homeostasis is extremely essential for cellular metabolism. In the present article we report the pH-dependent luminescence turn-on/off sensing of bound Fe(3+) ions of serum Tf by carbon dots (CDs) with the help of photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), circular dichroism (CD) and PL imaging techniques. At physiological pH (7.4), the intrinsic luminescence of CDs gets quenched in the presence of Tf as a consequence of ground-state association, which is driven by favorable electrostatic interactions between negatively charged CDs (-25.45 ± 1.23 mV) and positively charged Fe(3+) ions of Tf. The estimated detection limit of Tf by CDs at physiological pH is found to be 1.82 μM (signal-to-noise ratio of 3), which is much lower than the in vivo plasma concentration of Tf (∼25-35 μM). Various thermodynamic parameters have been evaluated by using the van't Hoff equation. Importantly, the secondary structure of Tf remains unaltered upon association with CDs. However, at pH 3.5, no such luminescence quenching of CDs has been observed in the presence of Tf due to the lack of ground-state interactions between positively charged (+17.63 ± 0.84 mV) CDs and Tf. Furthermore, the results from UV-Vis and far-UV CD measurements revealed a significant conformational change of Tf at pH 3.5 relative to pH 7.4, which triggers the subsequent release of bound iron from Tf. PL microscopy of individual CD revealed significant luminescence quenching at the single particle level, which further supports the non-emissive ground-state complexation at pH 7.4. Our present results show that these chemically synthesized water-dispersed CDs have the ability to selectively sense the bound iron from

  17. Iron-catalysed cross-coupling of organolithium compounds with organic halides

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhenhua; Liu, Qiang; Peng, Xiao-Shui; Wong, Henry N. C.

    2016-01-01

    In past decades, catalytic cross-coupling reactions between organic halides and organometallic reagents to construct carbon–carbon bond have achieved a tremendous progress. However, organolithium reagents have rarely been used in cross-coupling reactions, due mainly to their high reactivity. Another limitation of this transformation using organolithium reagents is how to control reactivity with excellent selectivity. Although palladium catalysis has been applied in this field recently, the development of an approach to replace catalytic systems of noble metals with nonprecious metals is currently in high demand. Herein, we report an efficient synthetic protocol involving iron-catalysed cross-coupling reactions employing organolithium compounds as key coupling partners to unite aryl, alkyl and benzyl fragments and also disclose an efficient iron-catalysed release-capture ethylene coupling with isopropyllithium. PMID:26847602

  18. Carbon nanotube electrodes in organic transistors.

    PubMed

    Valitova, Irina; Amato, Michele; Mahvash, Farzaneh; Cantele, Giovanni; Maffucci, Antonio; Santato, Clara; Martel, Richard; Cicoira, Fabio

    2013-06-01

    The scope of this Minireview is to provide an overview of the recent progress on carbon nanotube electrodes applied to organic thin film transistors. After an introduction on the general aspects of the charge injection processes at various electrode-semiconductor interfaces, we discuss the great potential of carbon nanotube electrodes for organic thin film transistors and the recent achievements in the field. PMID:23639944

  19. Magnetorheological characteristics of carbon nanotube wrapped carbonyl iron particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fei Fei; Choi, Byung Il; Choi, Hyoung Jin

    2009-02-01

    Carbonyl iron (CI) based magnetorheological (MR) fluid exhibits serious dispersion defect in general due to large density mismatch between CI particles and continuous medium, which restricts further MR application. Thus, various strategies were explored either to reduce the density or to prevent CI particle aggregation. Among them, polymer coating technology becomes more prevalent due to favorable morphology obtained and effective decrease in density by introducing polymeric shell; nevertheless, coating polymer on the surface of CI particles is always influenced by the selected grafting agent, mole ratio of reactant or the temperature of reaction. In this work, considering self-assembling trend of carbon nanotube (CNT) which exhibits similar density with polymer but better magnetic property due to the iron catalyst, we constructed a dense nest composed of CNT on the surface of CI particles by using 4-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) as a grafting agent under sonication. Thickness and morphology of the CNT nest were found to be related with sonication duration via SEM/TEM images. MR performances (yield stress behavior, shear viscosity) of the CI/CNT particles based MR fluid were investigated via controlled shear rate and controlled shear stress methods. Finally, sedimentation observation was checked to be improved.

  20. Effect of natural iron fertilization on carbon sequestration in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Stéphane; Quéguiner, Bernard; Armand, Leanne; Belviso, Sauveur; Bombled, Bruno; Bopp, Laurent; Bowie, Andrew; Brunet, Christian; Brussaard, Corina; Carlotti, François; Christaki, Urania; Corbière, Antoine; Durand, Isabelle; Ebersbach, Frederike; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Garcia, Nicole; Gerringa, Loes; Griffiths, Brian; Guigue, Catherine; Guillerm, Christophe; Jacquet, Stéphanie; Jeandel, Catherine; Laan, Patrick; Lefèvre, Dominique; Lo Monaco, Claire; Malits, Andrea; Mosseri, Julie; Obernosterer, Ingrid; Park, Young-Hyang; Picheral, Marc; Pondaven, Philippe; Remenyi, Thomas; Sandroni, Valérie; Sarthou, Géraldine; Savoye, Nicolas; Scouarnec, Lionel; Souhaut, Marc; Thuiller, Doris; Timmermans, Klaas; Trull, Thomas; Uitz, Julia; van Beek, Pieter; Veldhuis, Marcel; Vincent, Dorothée; Viollier, Eric; Vong, Lilita; Wagener, Thibaut

    2007-04-01

    The availability of iron limits primary productivity and the associated uptake of carbon over large areas of the ocean. Iron thus plays an important role in the carbon cycle, and changes in its supply to the surface ocean may have had a significant effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations over glacial-interglacial cycles. To date, the role of iron in carbon cycling has largely been assessed using short-term iron-addition experiments. It is difficult, however, to reliably assess the magnitude of carbon export to the ocean interior using such methods, and the short observational periods preclude extrapolation of the results to longer timescales. Here we report observations of a phytoplankton bloom induced by natural iron fertilization-an approach that offers the opportunity to overcome some of the limitations of short-term experiments. We found that a large phytoplankton bloom over the Kerguelen plateau in the Southern Ocean was sustained by the supply of iron and major nutrients to surface waters from iron-rich deep water below. The efficiency of fertilization, defined as the ratio of the carbon export to the amount of iron supplied, was at least ten times higher than previous estimates from short-term blooms induced by iron-addition experiments. This result sheds new light on the effect of long-term fertilization by iron and macronutrients on carbon sequestration, suggesting that changes in iron supply from below-as invoked in some palaeoclimatic and future climate change scenarios-may have a more significant effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations than previously thought.

  1. Effect of natural iron fertilization on carbon sequestration in the Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Blain, Stéphane; Quéguiner, Bernard; Armand, Leanne; Belviso, Sauveur; Bombled, Bruno; Bopp, Laurent; Bowie, Andrew; Brunet, Christian; Brussaard, Corina; Carlotti, François; Christaki, Urania; Corbière, Antoine; Durand, Isabelle; Ebersbach, Frederike; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Garcia, Nicole; Gerringa, Loes; Griffiths, Brian; Guigue, Catherine; Guillerm, Christophe; Jacquet, Stéphanie; Jeandel, Catherine; Laan, Patrick; Lefèvre, Dominique; Lo Monaco, Claire; Malits, Andrea; Mosseri, Julie; Obernosterer, Ingrid; Park, Young-Hyang; Picheral, Marc; Pondaven, Philippe; Remenyi, Thomas; Sandroni, Valérie; Sarthou, Géraldine; Savoye, Nicolas; Scouarnec, Lionel; Souhaut, Marc; Thuiller, Doris; Timmermans, Klaas; Trull, Thomas; Uitz, Julia; van Beek, Pieter; Veldhuis, Marcel; Vincent, Dorothée; Viollier, Eric; Vong, Lilita; Wagener, Thibaut

    2007-04-26

    The availability of iron limits primary productivity and the associated uptake of carbon over large areas of the ocean. Iron thus plays an important role in the carbon cycle, and changes in its supply to the surface ocean may have had a significant effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations over glacial-interglacial cycles. To date, the role of iron in carbon cycling has largely been assessed using short-term iron-addition experiments. It is difficult, however, to reliably assess the magnitude of carbon export to the ocean interior using such methods, and the short observational periods preclude extrapolation of the results to longer timescales. Here we report observations of a phytoplankton bloom induced by natural iron fertilization--an approach that offers the opportunity to overcome some of the limitations of short-term experiments. We found that a large phytoplankton bloom over the Kerguelen plateau in the Southern Ocean was sustained by the supply of iron and major nutrients to surface waters from iron-rich deep water below. The efficiency of fertilization, defined as the ratio of the carbon export to the amount of iron supplied, was at least ten times higher than previous estimates from short-term blooms induced by iron-addition experiments. This result sheds new light on the effect of long-term fertilization by iron and macronutrients on carbon sequestration, suggesting that changes in iron supply from below--as invoked in some palaeoclimatic and future climate change scenarios--may have a more significant effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations than previously thought. PMID:17460670

  2. Worldwide organic soil carbon and nitrogen data

    SciTech Connect

    Zinke, P.J.; Stangenberger, A.G.; Post, W.M.; Emanual, W.R.; Olson, J.S.

    1986-09-01

    The objective of the research presented in this package was to identify data that could be used to estimate the size of the soil organic carbon pool under relatively undisturbed soil conditions. A subset of the data can be used to estimate amounts of soil carbon storage at equilibrium with natural soil-forming factors. The magnitude of soil properties so defined is a resulting nonequilibrium values for carbon storage. Variation in these values is due to differences in local and geographic soil-forming factors. Therefore, information is included on location, soil nitrogen content, climate, and vegetation along with carbon density and variation.

  3. The role of iron and reactive oxygen in the degradation of dissolved organic matter draining permafrost soils (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cory, R. M.; Page, S. E.; Kling, G. W.; Sander, M.; Harrold, K. H.; McNeill, K.

    2013-12-01

    As the permafrost boundary deepens from climate warming it will create conditions for redox reactions between soil-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) and iron where those conditions did not previously exist. These new conditions will facilitate the transformation of DOM, and the overarching question is whether the pathway to CO2 released to the atmosphere or the export of DOM to coastal oceans will be favored. Our findings suggest that in either dark soils or sunlit surface waters, the presence of iron promotes the degradation of DOM to CO2. Evidence in support of iron-mediated oxidation of DOM to CO2 includes (1) strong positive correlations between iron and formation of hydroxyl radical (●OH), a highly reactive oxygen species implicated in DOM mineralization, (2) complete oxidation of DOM in the presence of high iron concentrations, and (3) loss of permafrost-derived DOM and iron from a thermokarst-impacted lake over time. For example, iron and DOM-rich soils or surface waters had the highest dark or photochemical ●OH formation respectively, both consistent with a dark or light Fenton source of ●OH and subsequent oxidation of DOM by ●OH. Photo-oxidation of DOM to CO2 was favored over partial photo-oxidation in surface waters characterized by high DOM and dissolved iron concentrations, consistent with photochemical reactions mediated by iron. Changes in DOM quality and quantity over time in a lake receiving permafrost carbon via a landslide (thermokarst slump) were also consistent with iron-mediated photodegradation of DOM. Given differences in DOM degradation across tundra ecosystems varying in iron, along with the abundance of water-logged soils supplying reduced iron to soil water or shallow streams, preliminary calculations at the landscape scale indicate that iron-mediated mineralization of DOM in soils and surface waters may be at least as important to carbon cycling as is bacterial respiration of DOM in the water column of streams and lakes

  4. Organic solvent regeneration of granular activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, W. H.; Suidan, M. T.; Roller, M. A.; Kim, B. R.; Gould, J. P.

    1982-09-01

    The use of activated carbon for the treatment of industrial waste-streams was shown to be an effective treatment. The high costs associated with the replacement or thermal regeneration of the carbon have prohibited the economic feasibility of this process. The in situ solvent regeneration of activated carbon by means of organic solvent extraction was suggested as an economically alternative to thermal regeneration. The important aspects of the solvent regeneration process include: the physical and chemical characteristics of the adsorbent, the pore size distribution and energy of adsorption associated with the activated carbon; the degree of solubility of the adsorbate in the organic solvent; the miscibility of the organic solvent in water; and the temperature at which the generation is performed.

  5. Iron encapsulated in boron and nitrogen codoped carbon nanotubes as synergistic catalysts for Fenton-like reaction.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yunjin; Chen, Hao; Qin, Jiacheng; Wu, Guodong; Lian, Chao; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Shaobin

    2016-09-15

    Iron nanoparticles (NPs) encapsulated in B, N-codoped carbon nanotubes (Fe@C-BN) as heterogeneous Fenton-like catalysts were obtained by a simple and scalable pyrolysis method, and their performances were examined in the oxidative degradation of various organics in the presence of the different oxidants. The results showed that organic dyes can be effectively degraded by Fe@C-BN in the presence of peroxymonosulfate. Calcination temperature and mass of iron salt significantly affected the structures and performances of the catalysts. The effects of several reaction conditions, such as initial dye concentration, oxidant type (peroxymonosulfate, peroxydisulfate, and H2O2) and dosage, initial pH, inorganic anions, reaction temperature and dye types on oxidation as well as the stability of the composite were extensively evaluated in view of the practical applications. Through the investigation of reaction processes, HO(·) and SO4(·-) radicals were identified using quenching experiments. Owing to the synergistic effects between the iron NPs and B, N-doped carbon, Fe@C-BN catalysts intrinsically display an excellent catalytic activity for Fenton-like reaction. This study gives new insights into the design and preparation of iron NPs encapsulated in B, N-codoped carbon nanotubes as an effective strategy to enhance the overall catalytic activity. PMID:27267476

  6. Quantum oscillations and ferromagnetic hysteresis observed in iron filled multiwall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Barzola-Quiquia, J; Klingner, N; Krüger, J; Molle, A; Esquinazi, P; Leonhardt, A; Martínez, M T

    2012-01-13

    We report on the electrical transport properties of single multiwall carbon nanotubes with and without an iron filling as a function of temperature and magnetic field. For the iron filled nanotubes the magnetoresistance shows a magnetic behavior induced by iron, which can be explained by taking into account a contribution of s-d hybridization. In particular, ferromagnetic-like hysteresis loops were observed up to 50 K for the iron filled multiwall carbon nanotubes. The magnetoresistance shows quantum interference phenomena such as universal conductance fluctuations and weak localization effects. PMID:22155967

  7. Fe, C, and O isotope compositions of banded iron formation carbonates demonstrate a major role for dissimilatory iron reduction in ~2.5 Ga marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Adriana; Johnson, Clark M.; Beard, Brian L.; Valley, John W.; Roden, Eric E.; Spicuzza, Michael J.; Beukes, Nicolas J.

    2010-05-01

    Combined Fe, C, and O isotope measurements of ~ 2.5 Ga banded iron formation (BIF) carbonates from the Kuruman Iron Formation and underlying BIF and platform Ca-Mg carbonates of the Gamohaan Formation, South Africa, constrain the biologic and abiologic formation pathways in these extensive BIF deposits. Vertical intervals of up to 100 m were sampled in three cores that cover a lateral extent of ~ 250 km. BIF Fe carbonates have significant Fe isotope variability ( δ56Fe = + 1 to - 1‰) and relatively low δ13C (down to - 12‰) and δ18O values ( δ18O ~ + 21‰). In contrast, Gamohaan and stratigraphically-equivalent Campbellrand Ca-Mg carbonates have near-zero δ13C values and higher δ18O values. These findings argue against siderite precipitation from seawater as the origin of BIF Fe-rich carbonates. Instead, the C, O, and Fe isotope compositions of BIF Fe carbonates reflect authigenic pathways of formation in the sedimentary pile prior to lithification, where microbial dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) was the major process that controlled the C, O, and Fe isotope compositions of siderite. Isotope mass-balance reactions indicate that the low- δ13C and low- δ18O values of BIF siderite, relative to those expected for precipitation from seawater, reflect inheritance of C and O isotope compositions of precursor organic carbon and ferric hydroxide that were generated in the photic zone and deposited on the seafloor. Carbon-Fe isotope relations suggest that BIF Fe carbonates formed through two end-member pathways: low- δ13C, low- δ56Fe Fe carbonates formed from remobilized, low- δ56Fe aqueous Fe 2+ produced by partial DIR of iron oxide, whereas low- δ13C, high- δ56Fe Fe carbonates formed by near-complete DIR of high- δ56Fe iron oxides that were residual from prior partial DIR. An important observation is the common occurrence of iron oxide inclusions in the high- δ56Fe siderite, supporting a model where such compositions reflect DIR "in place" in the soft

  8. Influence of Carbon Sources and Electron Shuttles on Ferric Iron Reduction by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    SciTech Connect

    Dr Robin Gerlach; Erin K. Field; Sridhar Viamajala; Brent M. Peyton; William A. Apel; Al B. Cunningham

    2011-09-01

    Microbially reduced iron minerals can reductively transform a variety of contaminants including heavy metals, radionuclides, chlorinated aliphatics, and nitroaromatics. A number of Cellulomonas spp. strains, including strain ES6, isolated from aquifer samples obtained at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington, have been shown to be capable of reducing Cr(VI), TNT, natural organic matter, and soluble ferric iron [Fe(III)]. This research investigated the ability of Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to reduce solid phase and dissolved Fe(III) utilizing different carbon sources and various electron shuttling compounds. Results suggest that Fe(III) reduction by and growth of strain ES6 was dependent upon the type of electron donor, the form of iron present, and the presence of synthetic or natural organic matter, such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) or humic substances. This research suggests that Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 could play a significant role in metal reduction in the Hanford subsurface and that the choice of carbon source and organic matter addition can allow for independent control of growth and iron reduction activity.

  9. A carbonyl iron/carbon fiber material for electromagnetic wave absorption.

    PubMed

    Youh, Meng-Jey; Wu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Wang-Hua; Chiu, Sheng-Cheng; Huang, Chien-Fa; Yu, Hsin-Chih; Hsu, Jen-Sung; Li, Yuan-Yao

    2011-03-01

    A carbonyl iron/carbon fiber material consisting of carbon fibers grown on micrometer-sized carbonyl iron sphere, was synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using a mixture of C2H2 and H2. The hollow-core carbon fibers (outer diameter: 140 nm and inner diameter: 40 nm) were composed of well-ordered graphene layers which were almost parallel to the long axis of the fibers. A composite (2 mm thick) consisting of the carbonyl iron/carbon fibers and epoxy resin demonstrated excellent electromagnetic (EM) wave absorption. Minimum reflection losses of -36 dB (99.95% of EM wave absorption) at 7.6 GHz and -32 dB (99.92% of EM wave absorption) at 34.1 GHz were achieved. The well-dispersed and network-like carbon fibers in the resin matrix affected the dielectric loss of the EM wave while the carbonyl iron affected the magnetic loss. PMID:21449387

  10. The Organization of Controller Motifs Leading to Robust Plant Iron Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Agafonov, Oleg; Selstø, Christina Helen; Thorsen, Kristian; Xu, Xiang Ming; Drengstig, Tormod; Ruoff, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential element needed by all organisms for growth and development. Because iron becomes toxic at higher concentrations iron is under homeostatic control. Plants face also the problem that iron in the soil is tightly bound to oxygen and difficult to access. Plants have therefore developed special mechanisms for iron uptake and regulation. During the last years key components of plant iron regulation have been identified. How these components integrate and maintain robust iron homeostasis is presently not well understood. Here we use a computational approach to identify mechanisms for robust iron homeostasis in non-graminaceous plants. In comparison with experimental results certain control arrangements can be eliminated, among them that iron homeostasis is solely based on an iron-dependent degradation of the transporter IRT1. Recent IRT1 overexpression experiments suggested that IRT1-degradation is iron-independent. This suggestion appears to be misleading. We show that iron signaling pathways under IRT1 overexpression conditions become saturated, leading to a breakdown in iron regulation and to the observed iron-independent degradation of IRT1. A model, which complies with experimental data places the regulation of cytosolic iron at the transcript level of the transcription factor FIT. Including the experimental observation that FIT induces inhibition of IRT1 turnover we found a significant improvement in the system’s response time, suggesting a functional role for the FIT-mediated inhibition of IRT1 degradation. By combining iron uptake with storage and remobilization mechanisms a model is obtained which in a concerted manner integrates iron uptake, storage and remobilization. In agreement with experiments the model does not store iron during its high-affinity uptake. As an iron biofortification approach we discuss the possibility how iron can be accumulated even during high-affinity uptake. PMID:26800438

  11. Organic carbon biostimulates rapid rhizodegradation of perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Yifru, Dawit D; Nzengung, Valentine A

    2008-12-01

    Previous hydroponics and field studies identified phytodegradation and rhizodegradation as the two main mechanisms by which plants metabolize perchlorate. Plant uptake and phytodegradation of perchlorate is a slower and undesired process that poses ecological risks resulting from phytoaccumulation of some fraction of the perchlorate. Meanwhile, rhizodegradation is a more rapid and favored process involving perchlorate-degrading bacteria utilizing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as a carbon and energy (electron) source to rapidly degrade perchlorate to innocuous chloride. In the present study, rhizodegradation of perchlorate by willow trees (Salix nigra) was biostimulated using electron sources obtained from natural and artificial carbon sources. In bioreactors provided with carbon sources as 500 mg/L DOC, 25 to 40 mg/L of initial perchlorate concentrations were removed to below the ion chromatography method detection limit of 2 microg/L in approximately 9 d. For planted controls provided with no electron donors, the time required for the complete removal of the same doses of perchlorate was up to 70 d. Enhancement of rhizodegradation by organic carbon reduced the phytoaccumulated fraction of perchlorate by an order of magnitude from approximately 430 to 20 mg/kg. The implication of the present study is that the high fraction uptake and phytoaccumulation of perchlorate in agricultural products and the recycling of perchlorate into the ecosystem can be significantly curtailed by supplying electron donors derived from organic carbon sources to the root zone of plants. PMID:18593217

  12. Geochemical modeling of iron, sulfur, oxygen and carbon in a coastal plain aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, C.J.; Schoonen, M.A.A.; Candela, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    Fe(III) reduction in the Magothy aquifer of Long Island, NY, results in high dissolved-iron concentrations that degrade water quality. Geochemical modeling was used to constrain iron-related geochemical processes and redox zonation along a flow path. The observed increase in dissolved inorganic carbon is consistent with the oxidation of sedimentary organic matter coupled to the reduction of O2 and SO4/2- in the aerobic zone, and to the reduction of SO4/2- in the anaerobic zone; estimated rates of CO2 production through reduction of Fe(III) were relatively minor by comparison. The rates of CO2 production calculated from dissolved inorganic carbon mass transfer (2.55 x 10-4 to 48.6 x 10-4 mmol 1-1 yr-1) generally were comparable to the calculated rates of CO2 production by the combined reduction of O2, Fe(III) and SO4/2- (1.31 x 10-4 to 15 x 10-4 mmol 1-1 yr-1). The overall increase in SO4/2- concentrations along the flow path, together with the results of mass-balance calculations, and variations in ??34S values along the flow path indicate that SO4/2- loss through microbial reduction is exceeded by SO4/2- gain through diffusion from sediments and through the oxidation of FeS2. Geochemichal and microbial data on cores indicate that Fe(III) oxyhydroxide coatings on sediment grains in local, organic carbon- and SO4/2- -rich zones have localized SO4/2- -reducing zones in which the formation of iron disulfides been depleted by microbial reduction and resulted in decreases dissolved iron concentrations. These localized zones of SO4/2- reduction, which are important for assessing zones of low dissolved iron for water-supply development, could be overlooked by aquifer studies that rely only on groundwater data from well-water samples for geochemical modeling. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.Fe(III) reduction in the Magothy aquifer of Long Island, NY, results in high dissolved-iron concentrations that degrade water quality. Geochemical modeling was used to constrain iron

  13. Susceptibility of Permafrost Soil Organic Carbon under Warming Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Wullschleger, S. D.; Liang, L.; Graham, D. E.; Gu, B.

    2015-12-01

    Degradation of soil organic carbon (SOC) that has been stored in permafrost is a key concern under warming climate because it could provide a positive feedback. Studies and conceptual models suggest that SOC degradation is largely controlled by the decomposability of SOC, but it is unclear exactly what portions of SOC are susceptible to rapid breakdown and what mechanisms may be involved in SOC degradation. Using a suite of analytical techniques, we examined the dynamic consumption and production of labile SOC compounds, including sugars, alcohols, and small molecular weight organic acids in incubation experiments (up to 240 days at either -2 or 8 °C) with a tundra soil under anoxic conditions, where SOC respiration and iron(III) reduction were monitored. We observe that sugars and alcohols are main components in SOC accounting for initial rapid release of CO2 and CH4 through anaerobic fermentation, whereas the fermentation products such as acetate and formate are subsequently utilized as primary substrates for methanogenesis. Iron(III) reduction is correlated to acetate production and methanogenesis, suggesting its important roles as an electron acceptor in tundra SOC respiration. These observations corroborate strongly with the glucose addition during incubation, in which rapid CO2 and CH4 production is observed concurrently with rapid production and consumption of organics such as acetate. Thus, the biogeochemical processes we document here are pertinent to understanding the accelerated SOC decomposition with temperature and could provide basis for model predicting feedbacks to climate warming in the Arctic.

  14. Functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes containing traces of iron as new negative MRI contrast agents for in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Doan, Bich-Thuy; Seguin, Johanne; Breton, Marie; Le Beherec, Ronan; Bessodes, Michel; Rodríguez-Manzo, Julio A; Banhart, Florian; Beloeil, Jean-Claude; Scherman, Daniel; Richard, Cyrille

    2012-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) containing traces of iron oxide were functionalized by noncovalent lipid-PEG or covalent carboxylic acid function to supply new efficient MRI contrast agents for in vitro and in vivo applications. Longitudinal (r(1)) and transversal (r(2)) water proton relaxivities were measured at 300 MHz, showing a stronger T(2) feature as an MRI contrast agent (r(2)/r(1)  = 190 for CO(2) H functionalisation). The r(2) relaxivity was demonstrated to be correlated to the presence of iron oxide in the SWNT-carboxylic function COOH, in comparison to iron-free ones. Biodistribution studies on mice after a systemic injection showed a negative MRI contrast in liver, suggesting the presence of the nanotubes in this organ until 48 h after i.v. injection. The presence of carbon nanotubes in liver was confirmed after ex vivo carbon extraction. Finally, cytotoxicity studies showed no apparent effect owing to the presence of the carbon nanotubes. The functionalized carbon nanotubes were well tolerated by the animals at the dose of 10 µg g(-1) body weight. PMID:22434627

  15. Fertilization increases paddy soil organic carbon density*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shao-xian; Liang, Xin-qiang; Luo, Qi-xiang; Fan, Fang; Chen, Ying-xu; Li, Zu-zhang; Sun, Huo-xi; Dai, Tian-fang; Wan, Jun-nan; Li, Xiao-jun

    2012-01-01

    Field experiments provide an opportunity to study the effects of fertilization on soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration. We sampled soils from a long-term (25 years) paddy experiment in subtropical China. The experiment included eight treatments: (1) check, (2) PK, (3) NP, (4) NK, (5) NPK, (6) 7F:3M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+30% organic N), (7) 5F:5M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+50% organic N), (8) 3F:7M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+70% organic N). Fertilization increased SOC content in the plow layers compared to the non-fertilized check treatment. The SOC density in the top 100 cm of soil ranged from 73.12 to 91.36 Mg/ha. The SOC densities of all fertilizer treatments were greater than that of the check. Those treatments that combined inorganic fertilizers and organic amendments had greater SOC densities than those receiving only inorganic fertilizers. The SOC density was closely correlated to the sum of the soil carbon converted from organic amendments and rice residues. Carbon sequestration in paddy soils could be achieved by balanced and combined fertilization. Fertilization combining both inorganic fertilizers and organic amendments is an effective sustainable practice to sequestrate SOC. PMID:22467369

  16. Synthesis of lithium iron phosphate/carbon microspheres by using polyacrylic acid coated iron phosphate nanoparticles derived from iron(III) acrylate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongwei; He, Yan-Bing; Chu, Xiaodong; Ding, Zhaojun; Li, Baohua; He, Jianfu; Du, Hongda; Qin, Xianying; Kang, Feiyu

    2015-03-01

    Lithium iron phosphate/carbon (LiFePO4 /C) microspheres with high rate and cycling performance are synthesized from iron phosphate/polyacrylic acid (FePO4 /PAA) nanoparticles. Iron(III) acrylate is used as a precursor for both the iron and carbon sources. FePO4 nanoparticles are first produced by a coprecipitation reaction. The byproduct, acrylic acid ions, is polymerized in situ to form a uniform PAA layer on the surface of the FePO4 nanoparticles. The as-prepared LiFePO4 /C microspheres are composed of primary nanoparticles with sizes of 40-50 nm. The nanoparticles are fully coated with a thin, uniform carbon layer derived from the decomposition of the PAA layer. The uniform carbon-coating layer cooperates with interstitial and boundary carbon derived from sucrose successfully to construct an excellent interconnecting conductive network in the microspheres. As a result of the unique structure, the as-prepared LiFePO4 /C microspheres display both high electronic and ionic conductivities, which contribute to their high rate performance (162.9 mAh g(-1) at 0.1C and 126.1 mAh g(-1) at 5C) and excellent cycling stability (97.1% of capacity retention after 500 cycles at 5C/5C). PMID:25469674

  17. Correlation between carbon activity and carbon content in α-iron in liquid sodium negative electrode of liquid metal battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sang Hun; Lee, Jeong Hyeon; Lee, Jung Ki; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2015-11-01

    Non-metallic elements such as carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen in liquid sodium exert a significant effect on the material behaviour of cell construction materials in liquid metal battery systems. Austenitic Fe-18%Cr-8%Ni foil and α-iron foil are equilibrated at 550 °C in sodium, and, subsequently, the concentration of carbon in the foils is analysed. A new relationship has been obtained between carbon activity and carbon concentration in α-iron foil, and is compared with the previously developed ones involving 304 SS foil reference samples. An equilibrium method has been developed to measure the activity of carbon in liquid sodium by using α-iron with this new expression. The results show similar values to those obtained with the 304 SS foil reference samples.

  18. Magnetic graphene-carbon nanotube iron nanocomposites as adsorbents and antibacterial agents for water purification.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Virender K; McDonald, Thomas J; Kim, Hyunook; Garg, Vijayendra K

    2015-11-01

    One of the biggest challenges of the 21st century is to provide clean and affordable water through protecting source and purifying polluted waters. This review presents advances made in the synthesis of carbon- and iron-based nanomaterials, graphene-carbon nanotubes-iron oxides, which can remove pollutants and inactivate virus and bacteria efficiently in water. The three-dimensional graphene and graphene oxide based nanostructures exhibit large surface area and sorption sites that provide higher adsorption capacity to remove pollutants than two-dimensional graphene-based adsorbents and other conventional adsorbents. Examples are presented to demonstrate removal of metals (e.g., Cu, Pb, Cr(VI), and As) and organics (e.g., dyes and oil) by grapheme-based nanostructures. Inactivation of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species (e.g., Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) is also shown. A mechanism involving the interaction of adsorbents and pollutants is briefly discussed. Magnetic graphene-based nanomaterials can easily be separated from the treated water using an external magnet; however, there are challenges in implementing the graphene-based nanotechnology in treating real water. PMID:26498500

  19. Magnetorheology of iron associated magnetic metal-organic framework nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Xue Mei; Liu, Ying Dan; Choi, Hyoung Jin

    2015-05-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with zeolite-like structured materials have interesting characteristics because of their high surface areas and pore volumes. Among the various MOFs reported thus far, Fe-BTC was chosen as an additive to improve the dispersion stability of soft-magnetic carbonyl iron particle-based magnetorheological (MR) fluids. The morphology of the Fe-BTC additive was examined by TEM, and the behavior of the MR particles dispersed in silicone oil was examined using a rotational rheometer. With a typical magnetic property, the Fe-BTC additive added MR fluid showed similar MR behavior with that of the CI based MR fluid while its improved dispersion stability was observed.

  20. Comparison of Carbon XANES Spectra from an Iron Sulfide from Comet Wild 2 with an Iron Sulfide Interplanetary Dust Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirick, S.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Sanford, S. A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Messenger, Nakamura K.; Jacobsen, C.

    2008-01-01

    Among one of the first particles removed from the aerogel collector from the Stardust sample return mission was an approx. 5 micron sized iron sulfide. The majority of the spectra from 5 different sections of this particle suggests the presence of aliphatic compounds. Due to the heat of capture in the aerogel we initially assumed these aliphatic compounds were not cometary but after comparing these results to a heated iron sulfide interplanetary dust particle (IDP) we believe our initial interpretation of these spectra was not correct. It has been suggested that ice coating on iron sulfides leads to aqueous alteration in IDP clusters which can then lead to the formation of complex organic compounds from unprocessed organics in the IDPs similar to unprocessed organics found in comets [1]. Iron sulfides have been demonstrated to not only transform halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons but also enhance the bonding of rubber to steel [2,3]. Bromfield and Coville (1997) demonstrated using Xray photoelectron spectroscopy that "the surface enhancement of segregated sulfur to the surface of sulfided precipitated iron catalysts facilitates the formation of a low-dimensional structure of extraordinary properties" [4]. It may be that the iron sulfide acts in some way to protect aliphatic compounds from alteration due to heat.

  1. The placenta: the forgotten essential organ of iron transport.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chang; Fleming, Mark D

    2016-07-01

    Optimal iron nutrition in utero is essential for development of the fetus and helps establish birth iron stores adequate to sustain growth in early infancy. In species with hemochorial placentas, such as humans and rodents, iron in the maternal circulation is transferred to the fetus by directly contacting placental syncytiotrophoblasts. Early kinetic studies provided valuable data on the initial uptake of maternal transferrin, an iron-binding protein, by the placenta. However, the remaining steps of iron trafficking across syncytiotrophoblasts and through the fetal endothelium into the fetal blood remain poorly characterized. Over the last 20 years, identification of transmembrane iron transporters and the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin has greatly expanded the knowledge of cellular iron transport and its regulation by systemic iron status. In addition, emerging human and animal data demonstrating comprised fetal iron stores in severe maternal iron deficiency challenge the classic dogma of exclusive fetal control over the transfer process and indicate that maternal and local signals may play a role in regulating this process. This review compiles current data on the kinetic, molecular, and regulatory aspects of placental iron transport and considers new questions and knowledge gaps raised by these advances. PMID:27261274

  2. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  3. How to Enhance Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimizing crop yields and reducing soil erosion can enhance soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration. The influence of management practices on crop residue C and N inputs to the soil, SOC sequestration, and NO3-N leaching potential under irrigated, continuous crop production in northern Texas was e...

  4. CARBON ADSORPTION ISOTHERMS FOR TOXIC ORGANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An experimental protocol for measuring the activated carbon adsorption isotherm was developed and applied to a wide range of organic compounds. Methods for treatment of the isotherm data and a standard format for presentation of results are shown. In the early phase of the study ...

  5. Subduction of Organic Carbon into the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, T. A.; Malinverno, A.

    2015-12-01

    Seafloor sediments approach active subduction zones with small amounts (generally < 1 dry weight %) of organic carbon, but this small concentration nonetheless constitutes a significant flux over geological time with respect to the size, isotopic composition and electron balance of the carbosphere. In order to quantify the flux of organic carbon into subduction zones, we have examined carbon concentration and density measurements provided by successive drilling programs (DSDP, ODP, IODP) for cores that sample complete sediment sections to basement near deep sea trenches. An interpolation scheme compensates for sparse or non-uniform analyses, and a weighted bulk concentration is calculated for organic carbon (OC) and inorganic carbonate (IC) for each site. When multiplied by the sediment thickness, the trench length and the convergence velocity, a subducted mass flux can be obtained. Sites with the greatest concentration of OC include those that pass beneath regions of high biological productivity (such as the Eastern Equatorial Pacific) and those that receive terrigenous turbidites (e.g., Indus and Begal Fans, Gulf of Alaska, Cascadia, etc). Together, terrigenous turbidites make up about 60% of the global subducted sediment (GLOSS), and thus have a strong control on the concentration of OC in GLOSS. Sites dominated by terrigenous turbidites have 0.4 wt% OC on average (1sd = 0.1 wt%), and GLOSS is very similar, yielding about 6 MtC/yr OC subducted globally. This flux is enough to subduct the entire surface pool of OC every 2.6 Ga, which if not returned, or returned in a more oxidized form, could contribute to a significant rise in oxygen at the surface of the Earth. Seemingly fortuitously, the OC/total carbon fraction in GLOSS is 20%, very near the long term average required to maintain the isotopic composition of marine carbonates at ~ 0 per mil d13C over much of Earth history.

  6. Microwave-assisted combustion synthesis of nano iron oxide/iron-coated activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica, with arsenic adsorption studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combustion synthesis of iron oxide/iron coated carbons such as activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber and silica is described. The reactions were carried out in alumina crucibles using a Panasonic kitchen microwave with inverter technology, and the reaction process was com...

  7. Organic Matter Mineralization with Reduction of Ferric Iron in Anaerobic Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Lovley, Derek R.; Phillips, Elizabeth J. P.

    1986-01-01

    The potential for ferric iron reduction with fermentable substrates, fermentation products, and complex organic matter as electron donors was investigated with sediments from freshwater and brackish water sites in the Potomac River Estuary. In enrichments with glucose and hematite, iron reduction was a minor pathway for electron flow, and fermentation products accumulated. The substitution of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide for hematite in glucose enrichments increased iron reduction 50-fold because the fermentation products could also be metabolized with concomitant iron reduction. Acetate, hydrogen, propionate, butyrate, ethanol, methanol, and trimethylamine stimulated the reduction of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide in enrichments inoculated with sediments but not in uninoculated or heat-killed controls. The addition of ferric iron inhibited methane production in sediments. The degree of inhibition of methane production by various forms of ferric iron was related to the effectiveness of these ferric compounds as electron acceptors for the metabolism of acetate. The addition of acetate or hydrogen relieved the inhibition of methane production by ferric iron. The decrease of electron equivalents proceeding to methane in sediments supplemented with amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides was compensated for by a corresponding increase of electron equivalents in ferrous iron. These results indicate that iron reduction can outcompete methanogenic food chains for sediment organic matter. Thus, when amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides are available in anaerobic sediments, the transfer of electrons from organic matter to ferric iron can be a major pathway for organic matter decomposition. PMID:16347032

  8. Organic matter mineralization with reduction of ferric iron in anaerobic sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1986-04-01

    The potential for ferric iron reduction with fermentable substrates, fermentation products, and complex organic matter as electron donors was investigated with sediments from freshwater and brackish water sites in the Potomac River Estuary. In enrichments with glucose and hematite, iron reduction was a minor pathway for electron flow, and fermentation products accumulated. The substitution of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide for hematite in glucose enrichments increased iron reduction 50-fold because the fermentation products could also be metabolized with concomitant iron reduction. Acetate, hydrogen, propionate, butyrate, ethanol, methanol, and trimethylamine stimulated the reduction of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide in enrichments inoculated with sediments but not in uninoculated or heat-killed controls. The addition of ferric iron inhibited methane production in sediments. The degree of inhibition of methane production by various forms of ferric iron was related to the effectiveness of these ferric compounds as electron acceptors for the metabolism of acetate. The addition of acetate or hydrogen relieved the inhibition of methane production by ferric iron. The decrease of electron equivalents proceeding to methane in sediments supplemented with amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides was compensated for by a corresponding increase of electron equivalents in ferrous iron. These results indicate that iron reduction can out compete methanogenic food chains for sediment organic matter. Thus, when amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides are available in anaerobic sediments, the transfer of electrons from organic matter to ferric iron can be a major pathway for organic matter decomposition.

  9. Organic matter mineralization with reduction of ferric iron in anaerobic sediments.

    PubMed

    Lovley, D R; Phillips, E J

    1986-04-01

    The potential for ferric iron reduction with fermentable substrates, fermentation products, and complex organic matter as electron donors was investigated with sediments from freshwater and brackish water sites in the Potomac River Estuary. In enrichments with glucose and hematite, iron reduction was a minor pathway for electron flow, and fermentation products accumulated. The substitution of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide for hematite in glucose enrichments increased iron reduction 50-fold because the fermentation products could also be metabolized with concomitant iron reduction. Acetate, hydrogen, propionate, butyrate, ethanol, methanol, and trimethylamine stimulated the reduction of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide in enrichments inoculated with sediments but not in uninoculated or heat-killed controls. The addition of ferric iron inhibited methane production in sediments. The degree of inhibition of methane production by various forms of ferric iron was related to the effectiveness of these ferric compounds as electron acceptors for the metabolism of acetate. The addition of acetate or hydrogen relieved the inhibition of methane production by ferric iron. The decrease of electron equivalents proceeding to methane in sediments supplemented with amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides was compensated for by a corresponding increase of electron equivalents in ferrous iron. These results indicate that iron reduction can outcompete methanogenic food chains for sediment organic matter. Thus, when amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides are available in anaerobic sediments, the transfer of electrons from organic matter to ferric iron can be a major pathway for organic matter decomposition. PMID:16347032

  10. Thick-shelled, grazer-protected diatoms decouple ocean carbon and silicon cycles in the iron-limited Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

    PubMed

    Assmy, Philipp; Smetacek, Victor; Montresor, Marina; Klaas, Christine; Henjes, Joachim; Strass, Volker H; Arrieta, Jesús M; Bathmann, Ulrich; Berg, Gry M; Breitbarth, Eike; Cisewski, Boris; Friedrichs, Lars; Fuchs, Nike; Herndl, Gerhard J; Jansen, Sandra; Krägefsky, Sören; Latasa, Mikel; Peeken, Ilka; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Scharek, Renate; Schüller, Susanne E; Steigenberger, Sebastian; Webb, Adrian; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter

    2013-12-17

    Diatoms of the iron-replete continental margins and North Atlantic are key exporters of organic carbon. In contrast, diatoms of the iron-limited Antarctic Circumpolar Current sequester silicon, but comparatively little carbon, in the underlying deep ocean and sediments. Because the Southern Ocean is the major hub of oceanic nutrient distribution, selective silicon sequestration there limits diatom blooms elsewhere and consequently the biotic carbon sequestration potential of the entire ocean. We investigated this paradox in an in situ iron fertilization experiment by comparing accumulation and sinking of diatom populations inside and outside the iron-fertilized patch over 5 wk. A bloom comprising various thin- and thick-shelled diatom species developed inside the patch despite the presence of large grazer populations. After the third week, most of the thinner-shelled diatom species underwent mass mortality, formed large, mucous aggregates, and sank out en masse (carbon sinkers). In contrast, thicker-shelled species, in particular Fragilariopsis kerguelensis, persisted in the surface layers, sank mainly empty shells continuously, and reduced silicate concentrations to similar levels both inside and outside the patch (silica sinkers). These patterns imply that thick-shelled, hence grazer-protected, diatom species evolved in response to heavy copepod grazing pressure in the presence of an abundant silicate supply. The ecology of these silica-sinking species decouples silicon and carbon cycles in the iron-limited Southern Ocean, whereas carbon-sinking species, when stimulated by iron fertilization, export more carbon per silicon. Our results suggest that large-scale iron fertilization of the silicate-rich Southern Ocean will not change silicon sequestration but will add carbon to the sinking silica flux. PMID:24248337

  11. Thick-shelled, grazer-protected diatoms decouple ocean carbon and silicon cycles in the iron-limited Antarctic Circumpolar Current

    PubMed Central

    Assmy, Philipp; Smetacek, Victor; Montresor, Marina; Klaas, Christine; Henjes, Joachim; Strass, Volker H.; Arrieta, Jesús M.; Bathmann, Ulrich; Berg, Gry M.; Breitbarth, Eike; Cisewski, Boris; Friedrichs, Lars; Fuchs, Nike; Herndl, Gerhard J.; Jansen, Sandra; Krägefsky, Sören; Latasa, Mikel; Peeken, Ilka; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Scharek, Renate; Schüller, Susanne E.; Steigenberger, Sebastian; Webb, Adrian; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Diatoms of the iron-replete continental margins and North Atlantic are key exporters of organic carbon. In contrast, diatoms of the iron-limited Antarctic Circumpolar Current sequester silicon, but comparatively little carbon, in the underlying deep ocean and sediments. Because the Southern Ocean is the major hub of oceanic nutrient distribution, selective silicon sequestration there limits diatom blooms elsewhere and consequently the biotic carbon sequestration potential of the entire ocean. We investigated this paradox in an in situ iron fertilization experiment by comparing accumulation and sinking of diatom populations inside and outside the iron-fertilized patch over 5 wk. A bloom comprising various thin- and thick-shelled diatom species developed inside the patch despite the presence of large grazer populations. After the third week, most of the thinner-shelled diatom species underwent mass mortality, formed large, mucous aggregates, and sank out en masse (carbon sinkers). In contrast, thicker-shelled species, in particular Fragilariopsis kerguelensis, persisted in the surface layers, sank mainly empty shells continuously, and reduced silicate concentrations to similar levels both inside and outside the patch (silica sinkers). These patterns imply that thick-shelled, hence grazer-protected, diatom species evolved in response to heavy copepod grazing pressure in the presence of an abundant silicate supply. The ecology of these silica-sinking species decouples silicon and carbon cycles in the iron-limited Southern Ocean, whereas carbon-sinking species, when stimulated by iron fertilization, export more carbon per silicon. Our results suggest that large-scale iron fertilization of the silicate-rich Southern Ocean will not change silicon sequestration but will add carbon to the sinking silica flux. PMID:24248337

  12. The Quest for Organic Carbon on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eigenbrode, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    We are entering an era of Mars exploration in which organic carbon detection, characterization, and structural identification will be key to addressing some of the outstanding science objectives of the Mars Exploration Program. Success of these missions will depend on technical, scientific, and strategic elements--all of which are strongly determined based on terrestrial experience and knowledge of organic matter formation, concentration, and preservation. Analog studies including Precambrian sediments, modern endolithic communities, and experiments help us fine-tune these approaches, but we also need to expect the unexpected. This presentation will provide perspective on the challenges of detecting organic carbon on Mars, how we may achieve such detections with the in situ instruments, such as the SAM (Science Analysis at Mars) instrument suite onboard Curiosity, the rover for the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory mission.

  13. Carbonate-Iron Interaction: Kinetic Approach for Carbonate Subduction Down to the Mantle Transition Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martirosyan, N.; Yoshino, T.; Shatskiy, A.; Litasov, K. D.; Chanyshev, A.

    2015-12-01

    One of the principal redox exchange reactions at the slab-mantle interface during subduction is CaCO3-Fe0 interaction. Using uniaxial press multianvil apparatus, we investigate this reaction at temperatures from 650 to 1400 °C, and pressures from 4 to 16 GPa. These conditions are representative for the PT path of the slab from the surface to the mantle transition zone. Based on our results, redox reaction can be written as: 3 CaCO3 (aragonite) + 13 Fe0 (metal) = Fe7C3 (carbide) + 3 CaFe2O3 (Ca-wüstite). It is a diffusion-controlled process with the reaction rate constant (k) being log-linear in 1/T. The experimental results allow to calculate the length scale over which the reaction kinetics between aragonite and metallic iron is likely effective. Using relatively simple relationship between the characteristic distance of diffusion as a function of k and duration of the process, we estimate the length scale of the reaction for time scales 4-16 Myr, which corresponds to subduction rates of 2-8 cm/year from 250 km (metal-saturation boundary) to 470 km, for different slab PT-profiles. Assuming that carbonates are in a direct contact with iron, the maximum degree of carbonate reduction can be evaluated using the results of our study and the data on CO2 distribution in altered oceanic basalts. The estimates suggest that up to 0.5, 12, and 20 vol. % of carbonates can be reduced in such case during subduction down to the mantle transition zone at the conditions of cold, medium and hot geotherms, respectively. The sluggish kinetics of established CaCO3-Fe0 interaction suggests that even over the entire history of the Earth, carbonates could survive during subduction from metal saturation boundary near 250 km depth, down to the transition zone, and presumably to the lower mantle.

  14. Catalytic effect of different forms of iron in purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomoko; Inoue, Sakae; Ando, Yoshinori

    2010-06-01

    In the arc plasma jet (APJ) method, a large amount of soot including single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be produced in a short time. However, as-grown soot contains a lot of impurities, such as metallic particles used as catalyst and amorphous carbon. Hence it is necessary to purify the soot to obtain pure SWNTs. The biggest problem in purifying APJ-SWNTs is how to remove the thick amorphous carbon covering the catalyst metal particles. By refluxing APJ-SWNTs in hydrogen peroxide using iron particle as catalyst, it can be purified. The added fine particle of pure iron is found to be effective. Then, we examine whether SWNTs can be purified more effectively by adding solution containing the Fe ion instead of the iron particle. We used iron (III) nitrate nonahydrate, hydrogen peroxide decomposing agent which contains catalase and ammonium iron (II) sulfate hexahydrate. In the case of iron (III) nitrate and catalase, purification effect is not obvious. Under these conditions hydrogen peroxide was decomposed into H2O and O2, and the hydroxyl radical was not generated. On the other hand, ammonium iron (II) sulfate is effective. Because of existence of Fe2+ in solution Fenton's reaction takes place. Reaction rate is increased at high temperature. Therefore, APJ-SWNT is purified more effectively if refluxed in hydrogen peroxide using ammonium iron (II) sulfate as catalyst. PMID:20355392

  15. Evidence for Localization of Reaction Upon Reduction of Carbon Tetrachloride by Granular Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, Daniel J.; Lea, Alan S.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Baer, Donald R.; Miehr, R.; Tratnyek, Paul G.

    2002-10-01

    The distribution of reaction sites on iron particles exposed to water containing carbon tetrachloride has been examined by measuring the locations of reaction products. The uniformity or localization of reaction sites has implications for understanding and modeling the reduction of environmental contaminants by iron in ground water systems. Granular iron surfaces similar to those being used for environmental remediation applications were studied using surfaces analysis techniques to develop an understanding of the physical and chemical structure of the surface and oxide films. Scanning Auger microscopy and imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry revealed that granular iron exposed to carbon tetrachloride-saturated water exhibits chloride-enriched regions occurred at pits rather than on the passive oxide film on the metal. Understanding the nature of the local solute reduction sites will play an important role in modeling the kinetics of reaction at passive iron oxide films in environmental systems.

  16. Organically complexed iron enhances bioavailability of antimony to maize (Zea mays) seedlings in organic soils.

    PubMed

    Ptak, Corey; McBride, Murray

    2015-12-01

    Antimony (Sb) is a metalloid belonging to group 15 of the periodic table. Chemical similarities between arsenic (As) and Sb produce concerns about potential health effects of Sb and enrichment in the environment. Antimony is found in oxic environments predominately as an oxyanionic species, antimonite (Sb[OH](6-)). As a result of its net negative charge, Sb[OH](6-) was not initially predicted to have strong interactions with natural organic matter. Oxyanionic species could bind the negatively charged organic matter via a ternary complexation mechanism, in which cationic metals mediate the strong association between organic matter functional groups and oxyanions. However, these interactions are poorly understood in how they influence the bioavailability of oxyanionic contaminants to plants. Iron (Fe) additions to organic soils have been found to increase the number of organically complexed Fe sites suitable for Sb exchange, resulting in a reduced bioavailable fraction of Sb. The bioavailability of Sb to maize seedlings as a function of organically complexed Fe was examined using a greenhouse study. A significant increase in plant tissue Sb was observed as organically complexed Fe increased, which was not predicted by methods commonly used to assess bioavailable Sb. Extraction of soils with organic acids common to the maize rhizosphere suggested that organic acid exudation can readily mobilize Sb bound by organic Fe complexes. PMID:26076768

  17. Organic carbon transport in the Columbia River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahm, Clifford N.; Gregory, Stanley V.; Kilho Park, P.

    1981-12-01

    Total organic carbon (TOC) levels in the Columbia River measured monthly from May 1973 to December 1974 ranged from a maximum of 270 μmol l -1 during late spring and early summer to a minimum of 150 μmol l -1 during late autumn. Sampling locations were directly behind the spillway at the Bonneville Dam, 230 km upstream, and at Kalama, Washington, 128km upstream from the river mouth. The average annual TOC contribution from the Columbia River drainage to the north-eastern Pacific is 4·9×10 10 mol with an average concentration of approximately 195μmol l -1. Of this TOC annual export, 89% is dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and 11% is particulate organic carbon (OOC). The TOC and DOC levels were most highly correlated with increased oxygen saturation and dischange, while POC correlated more closely to high instream primary productivy as indicated by higher pH and oxygen supersaturation. Variability of DOC in the main channel of the Columbia River from Portland, Oregon, to the estuary during a June 1974 cruise was minimal. The DOC concentrations ranged from 221-260 μmol l -1 with no significant upstream or downstream gradients. Diel variation also was slight, varying randomly during 24h between 235-257 μmol l -1. The relative annual constancy of the DOC is indicative of the refractory nature of a significant proportion of the dissolved organic load of the Columbia River.

  18. Pore- and micro-structural characterization of a novel structural binder based on iron carbonation

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sumanta; Stone, David; Convey, Diana; Neithalath, Narayanan

    2014-12-15

    The pore- and micro-structural features of a novel binding material based on the carbonation of waste metallic iron powder are reported in this paper. The binder contains metallic iron powder as the major ingredient, followed by additives containing silica and alumina to facilitate favorable reaction product formation. Compressive strengths sufficient for a majority of concrete applications are attained. The material pore structure is investigated primarily through mercury intrusion porosimetry whereas electron microscopy is used for microstructural characterization. Reduction in the overall porosity and the average pore size with an increase in carbonation duration from 1 day to 4 days is noticed. The pore structure features are used in predictive models for gas and moisture transport (water vapor diffusivity and moisture permeability) through the porous medium which dictates its long-term durability when used in structural applications. Comparisons of the pore structure with those of a Portland cement paste are also provided. The morphology of the reaction products in the iron-based binder, and the distribution of constituent elements in the microstructure are also reported. - Highlights: • Carbonation of iron produces a dense microstructure. • Pore volume in iron carbonate lower, critical size higher than those in OPC pastes • Reaction product contains iron, carbon, silicon, aluminum and calcium. • Power-law for porosity-moisture permeability relationship was established.

  19. Worldwide organic soil carbon and nitrogen data

    SciTech Connect

    Zinke, P.J.; Stangenberger, A.G.; Post, W.M.; Emanuel, W.R.; Olson, J.S.

    1984-05-01

    A compilation of soil carbon and nitrogen storage data for more than 3500 soil profiles from under natural vegetation or relatively undisturbed sites is presented in this report. A summary table of the carbon and nitrogen storage in a pedon of surface cubic meter for each soil profile, as well as location, elevation, climate, parent material, and vegetation information, are presented. The data were used to determine average carbon and nitrogen storage on land surfaces of the world. Calculations were also made of storage related to climatic classifications, ecosystem clasifications, and latitudinal increments from the equator to 75/sup 0/. Carbon (kg.m/sup -3/) varies from 2 in hot dry climates, through 10 in many cold dry or seasonally moist (warm or hot) climates, to more than 30 in wet alpine or subpolar climates. Nitrogen storage, an order of magnitude smaller than carbon storage in soils, shows broad parallels but exceeds 1600 g.m/sup -3/ for subtropical/tropical premontane or lower montane soils, as well as alpine or subpolar wet soils. Such limiting conditions, defined by a balance of income and loss rates for mature soil profiles, also explain much of the variation among major ecosystem complexes whose soils are partly disturbed, incompletely recovered, or imperfectly known regarding their maturity and stability. Classifying profiles into Holdridge life zones and using appropriate life zone areas, we estimate 1309 x 10/sup 15/ g carbon and 92 x 10/sup 15/ g nitrogen in the world's soils. Alternatively, using average organic carbon and nitrogen densities from one degree latitude bands multiplied by the earth's surface area in the respective bands, we arrive at 1728 x 10/sup 15/ g of carbon and 117 x 10/sup 15/ g of nitrogen. Inadequacies that lead to the disparate estimates are discussed. 123 references, 5 figures, 7 tables.

  20. Binding of Iron(III) to Organic Soils: Exafs Spectroscopy And Chemical Equilibrium Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafsson, J.P.; Persson, I.; Kleja, D.B.; Schaik, J.W.J.van

    2007-07-09

    The complexation of iron(III) to soil organic matter is important for the binding of trace metals in natural environments because of competition effects. In this study, we used extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to characterize the binding mode for iron(III) in two soil samples from organic mor layers, one of which was also treated with iron(III). In most cases the EXAFS spectra had three significant contributions, inner-core Fe-O/N interactions at about 2.02(2) angstroms, Fe-C interactions in the second scattering shell at 3.00(4) angstroms, and a mean Fe-Fe distance at 3.37(3) angstroms. One untreated sample showed features typical for iron (hydr)oxides; however, after treatment of iron(III) the EXAFS spectrum was dominated by organically complexed iron. The presence of a Fe-Fe distance in all samples showed that the major part of the organically complexed iron was hydrolyzed, most likely in a mixture of complexes with an inner core of (O{sub 5}Fe){sub 2}O and (O{sub 5}Fe){sub 3}O. These results were used to constrain a model for metal-humic complexation, the Stockholm Humic Model (SHM). The model was able to describe iron(III) binding very well at low pH considering only one dimeric iron(III)-humic complex. The competition effect on trace metals was also well described.

  1. Inhibition of catecholamine secretion by iron-rich and iron-deprived multiwalled carbon nanotubes in chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Gavello, Daniela; Fenoglio, Ivana; Fubini, Bice; Cesano, Federico; Premoselli, Federica; Renna, Annamaria; Carbone, Emilio; Carabelli, Valentina

    2013-12-01

    The assay of the toxic effects of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on human health is a stringent need in view of their expected increasing exploitation in industrial and biomedical applications. Most studies so far have been focused on lung toxicity, as the respiratory tract is the main entry of airborne particulate, but there is also recent evidence on the existence of toxic effects of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on neuronal and neuroendocrine cells (Belyanskaya et al., 2009; Xu et al., 2009; Gavello et al., 2012). Commercial MWCNTs often contain large amounts of metals deriving from the catalyst used during their synthesis. Since metals, particularly iron, may contribute to the toxicity of MWCNTs, we compared here the effects of two short MWCNTs samples (<5μm length), differing only in their iron content (0.5 versus 0.05% w/w) on the secretory responses of neurotransmitters in mouse chromaffin cells. We found that both iron-rich (MWCNT+Fe) and iron-deprived (MWCNT-Fe) samples enter chromaffin cells after 24h exposure, even though incorporation was attenuated in the latter case (40% versus 78% of cells). As a consequence of MWCNT+Fe or MWCNT-Fe exposure (50-263μg/ml, 24h), catecholamine secretion of chromaffin cells is drastically impaired because of the decreased Ca(2+)-dependence of exocytosis, reduced size of ready-releasable pool and lowered rate of vesicle release. On the contrary, both MWCNTs were ineffective in changing the kinetics of neurotransmitter release of single chromaffin granules and their quantal content. Overall, our data indicate that both MWCNT samples dramatically impair secretion in chromaffin cells, thus uncovering a true depressive action of CNTs mainly associated to their structure and degree of aggregation. This cellular "loss-of-function" is only partially attenuated in iron-deprived samples, suggesting a minor role of iron impurities on MWCNTs toxicity in chromaffin cells exocytosis. PMID:23999117

  2. Properties and effects of remaining carbon from waste plastics gasifying on iron scale reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongmin; Chen, Shuwen; Miao, Xincheng; Yuan, Hao

    2011-06-01

    The carbonous activities of three kinds of carbon-bearing materials gasified from plastics were tested with coal coke as reference. The results showed that the carbonous activities of these remaining carbon-bearing materials were higher than that of coal-coke. Besides, the fractal analyses showed that the porosities of remaining carbon-bearing materials were higher than that of coal-coke. It revealed that these kinds of remaining carbon-bearing materials are conducive to improve the kinetics conditions of gas-solid phase reaction in iron scale reduction. PMID:25084574

  3. [Effects of different fertilizer application on soil active organic carbon].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Gui-Long; Ji, Yan-Yan; Li, Gang; Chang, Hong; Yang, Dian-Lin

    2013-01-01

    The variation characteristics of the content and components of soil active organic carbon under different fertilizer application were investigated in samples of calcareous fluvo-aquic soil from a field experiment growing winter wheat and summer maize in rotation in the North China Plain. The results showed that RF (recommended fertilization), CF (conventional fertilization) and NPK (mineral fertilizer alone) significantly increased the content of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon by 24.92-38.63 mg x kg(-1) and 0.94-0.58 mg x kg(-1) respectively compared to CK (unfertilized control). The soil dissolved organic carbon content under OM (organic manure) increased greater than those under NPK and single fertilization, soil easily oxidized organic carbon content under OM and NPK increased greater than that under single chemical fertilization. OM and NPK showed no significant role in promoting the soil microbial biomass carbon, but combined application of OM and NPK significantly increased the soil microbial biomass carbon content by 36.06% and 20.69%, respectively. Soil easily oxidized organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon accounted for 8.41% - 14.83%, 0.47% - 0.70% and 0.89% - 1.20% of the total organic carbon (TOC), respectively. According to the results, the fertilizer application significantly increased the proportion of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon, but there was no significant difference in the increasing extent of dissolved organic carbon. The RF and CF increased the proportion of soil easily oxidized organic carbon greater than OM or NPK, and significantly increased the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. OM or RF had no significant effect on the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. Therefore, in the field experiment, appropriate application of organic manure and chemical fertilizers played an important role for the increase of soil active organic carbon

  4. Methylation of secondary amines with dialkyl carbonates and hydrosilanes catalysed by iron complexes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jianxia; Darcel, Christophe; Sortais, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-11-25

    Methylation of secondary amines was achieved using dimethyl carbonate or diethyl carbonate as the C1 source under the catalysis of well-defined half-sandwich iron complexes bearing an N-heterocyclic carbene ligand. The reaction proceeded under mild conditions in the presence of hydrosilanes as the reductants, and the amines were obtained with good to excellent isolated yields. PMID:25285339

  5. Trace-Element Analyses of Carbonate Minerals in the Gunflint Banded Iron Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pun, Aurora; Papike, James J.; Shearer, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the petrography, mineralogy and trace-element abundances of individual carbonate grains in the Early Proterozoic Gunflint BIF (Banded Iron Formation). Trace-element data may be used as environmental recorders of the fluid evolution from which the various carbonate phases precipitated. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Temporal fluctuations in grain size, organic materials and iron concentrations in intertidal surface sediment of San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomson-Becker, E. A.; Luoma, S.N.

    1985-01-01

    The physical and chemical characteristics of the oxidized surface sediment in an estuary fluctuate temporally in response to physical forces and apparently-fluctuating inputs. These characteristics, which include grain size and concentrations of organic materials and iron, will influence both trace-metal geochemistry and bioavailability. Temporal trends in the abundance of fine particles, total organic carbon content (TOC), absorbance of extractable organic material (EOM), and concentration of extractable iron in the sediment of San Francisco Bay were assessed using data sets containing approximately monthly samples for periods of two to seven years. Changes in wind velocity and runoff result in monthly changes in the abundance of fine particles in the intertidal zone. Fine-grained particles are most abundant in the late fall/early winter when runoff is elevated and wind velocities are low; particles are coarser in the summer when runoff is low and wind velocities are consistently high. Throughout the bay, TOC is linearly related to fine particle abundance (r = 0.61). Temporal variability occurs in this relationship, as particles are poor in TOC relative to percent of fine particles in the early rainy season. Iron-poor particles also appear to enter the estuary during high runoff periods; while iron is enriched on particle surfaces in the summer. Concentrations of extractable iron and absorbance of EOM vary strongly from year to year. Highest absorbances of EOM occurred in the first year following the drought in 1976-77, and in 1982 and 1983 when river discharge was unusually high. Extractable-iron concentrations were also highest in 1976-77, but were very low in 1982 and 1983. ?? 1985 Dr W. Junk Publishers.

  7. Natural organic matter enhanced mobility of nano zerovalent iron.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Richard L; Johnson, Graham O'Brien; Nurmi, James T; Tratnyek, Paul G

    2009-07-15

    Column studies showed that the mobility of nanometer-sized zerovalent iron (nZVI) through granular media is greatly increased in the presence of natural organic matter (NOM). At NOM concentrations of 20 mg/L or greater, the nZVI was highly mobile during transport experiments in 0.15-m long columns packed with medium sand. Below 20 mg/L NOM, mobility of the nZVI was less; however, even at 2 mg/L the nZVI showed significantly increased mobility compared to the no-NOM case. Spectrophotometric and aggregation studies of nZVI suspensions in the presence of NOM suggest that sorption of the NOM onto the nZVI, resulting in a reduced sticking coefficient, may be the primary mechanism of enhanced mobility. Modeling the mobility of nZVI in porous media with filtration theory is challenging, but calibration of a simple model with experimental results from the column experiments reported here allows simulation of transport distances during injection. The simulation results show that the increased mobility due to NOM combined with the decrease in mobility due to decreased velocity with distance from an injection well could produce an injection zone that is wide enough to be useful for remediation but small enough to avoid reaching unwanted receptors. PMID:19708381

  8. Environmental Controls of Soil Organic Carbon in Soils Across Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesada, Carlos Alberto; Paz, Claudia; Phillips, Oliver; Nonato Araujo Filho, Raimundo; Lloyd, Jon

    2015-04-01

    (kaolinitic) and thus the clay plus silt fraction was the best correlate for SOC but with crystalline iron oxides (dithionite-citrate minus ammonium oxalate - oxalic acid extractable iron) being also correlated to SOC in these soils (R2 = 0.74). Most of SOC in these soils was found on the clay+silt fraction and in stable, clay rich aggregates. However, SOC of high activity clays and other less weathered soils such as Alisols, Cambisols and Plinthosols showed no correlation with particle size or iron oxides, being mostly stabilized by aluminium complexes. We found SOC of these soils to be better explained by a three way interaction among soil pH, carbon quality and dithionite-citrate extractable Al (R2 = 0.85). Consistent with this observation, SOC in the less weathered soils was mostly found in the colloidal fraction (75%). SOC of Podzols and Arenosols on the other hand had only a small but significant influence from their clay plus silt fraction (R2 = 0.31), with particulate organic matter accounting for most of its SOC.

  9. Iron silicide root formation in carbon nanotubes grown by microwave PECVD.

    PubMed

    AuBuchon, Joseph F; Daraio, Chiara; Chen, Li-Han; Gapin, Andrew I; Jin, Sungho

    2005-12-29

    Aligned carbon nanotubes have been grown using microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The carbon nanotubes are nucleated from iron catalyst particles which, during growth, remain adherent to the silicon substrates. By analysis with high-resolution electron microscopy, we observe iron silicide roots penetrating into the silicon substrate at the interface of the catalyst particles and the substrate, thus providing strong adhesion of the carbon nanotubes onto the substrate. The iron silicide roots assist in the attachment of the catalyst particles to the substrate and play a role in the evolution of the catalyst particle morphology and resulting base growth mode. Carbon nanotubes grown by microwave PECVD could exhibit superior electrical and thermal transport properties over other PECVD processes, so an understanding of the growth mechanism is important for utilization in device applications. PMID:16375415

  10. Enhanced terrestrial carbon preservation promoted by reactive iron in deltaic sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Michael R.; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Gélinas, Yves; Allison, Mead A.; Twilley, Robert R.

    2016-02-01

    We examined the role of reactive iron (FeR) in preserving organic carbon (OC) across a subaerial chronosequence of the Wax Lake Delta, a prograding delta within the Mississippi River Delta complex. We found that ~15.0% of the OC was bound to FeR, and the dominant binding mechanisms varied from adsorption in the youngest subaerial region to coprecipitation at the older, vegetated sites. The δ13C of the iron-associated OC was more negative than the total OC (mean = -2.6‰), indicating greater preference for terrestrial material and/or compounds with more negative δ13C values. However, only the adsorbed OC displayed preferential binding of lignin phenols. We estimate that ~8% of the OC initially deposited in deltaic systems is bound to FeR (equivalent to 6 × 1012 gC yr-1), and this percentage increases postdepositionally, as coprecipitation of FeR and OC allows for an even greater amount of OC to be bound to FeR.

  11. Dispersion and separation of nanostructured carbon in organic solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landi, Brian J. (Inventor); Raffaelle, Ryne P. (Inventor); Ruf, Herbert J. (Inventor); Evans, Christopher M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to dispersions of nanostructured carbon in organic solvents containing alkyl amide compounds and/or diamide compounds. The invention also relates to methods of dispersing nanostructured carbon in organic solvents and methods of mobilizing nanostructured carbon. Also disclosed are methods of determining the purity of nanostructured carbon.

  12. Origin and fate of particulate and dissolved organic matter in a naturally iron-fertilized region of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, L.; Caparros, J.; Leblanc, K.; Obernosterer, I.

    2014-10-01

    Natural iron fertilization of high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) waters induces annually occurring spring phytoplankton blooms off Kerguelen Islands (Southern Ocean). To examine the origin and fate of particulate and dissolved organic matter (POM and DOM), D- and L-amino acids (AA) were quantified at bloom and HNLC stations. Total hydrolysable AA accounted for 21-25% of surface particulate organic carbon (%POCAA) at the bloom sites, but for 10% at the HNLC site. A marked decrease in %POCAA with depth was observed at the most productive stations leading to values between 3 and 5% below 300 m depth. AA contributed to only 0.9-4.4% of dissolved organic carbon (%DOCAA) at all stations. The only consistent vertical trend was observed at the most productive station (A3-2) where %DOCAA decreased from ∼2% in the surface waters to 0.9% near 300 m. These AA yields and other markers revealed that POM and DOM were more rapidly altered or mineralized at the bloom sites compared to the HNLC site. Different molecular markers indicated that POM mostly originated from diatoms and bacteria. The estimated average proportion of POM from intact phytoplankton cells in surface waters was 45% at the bloom station A3-2, but 14% at the HNLC site. Estimates based on D-AA yields indicated that ∼15% of POM and ∼30% of DOM was of bacterial origin (cells and cell fragments) at all stations. Surprisingly, the DOM in HNLC waters appeared less altered than the DOM from the bloom, had slightly higher dissolved AA concentrations, and showed no sign of alteration within the water column. Unfavorable conditions for bacterial degradation in HNLC regions can explain these findings. In contrast, large inputs of labile organic molecules and iron, likely stimulate the degradation of organic matter (priming effect) and the production of more recalcitrant DOM (microbial carbon pump) during iron-fertilized blooms.

  13. Linking carbon and iron cycles by investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids from peat-draining rivers - Scotland as model for high-latitude rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Deborah; Crocket, Kirsty; Brand, Tim; Stutter, Marc; Wilson, Clare; Schröder, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Linking carbon and iron cycles by investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids from peat-draining rivers - Scotland as model for high-latitude rivers Wood, D.A¹, Crocket, K², Brand, T², Stutter, M³, Wilson, C¹ & Schröder, C¹ ¹Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA ²Scottish Association for Marine Science, University of the Highlands and Islands, Dunbeg, Oban, PA37 1QA ³James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH The biogeochemical iron cycle exerts significant control on the carbon cycle¹. Iron is a limiting nutrient in large areas of the world's oceans and its bioavailability controls CO2 uptake by marine photosynthesizing microorganisms. While atmospheric iron inputs to the open ocean have been extensively measured, global river inputs have likely been underestimated because most major world rivers exhibit extensive iron removal by flocculation and sedimentation during seawater mixing. Iron minerals and organic matter mutually stabilise each other², which results in a 'rusty carbon sink' in sediments³ on the one hand but may also enhance transport beyond the salinity gradient on the other. Humic-rich, high latitude rivers have a higher iron-carrying capacity⁴‑⁶ but are underrepresented in iron flux calculations. The West Coast sea lochs in Scotland are fed by predominantly peatland drainage catchments, and the rivers entering the sea lochs carry a high load of organic matter. The short distance between many of these catchments and the coastal ocean facilitates source-to-sea research investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids providing a good analogue for similar high latitude fjordic systems. We use SeaFAST+ICP-MS and Mössbauer spectroscopy to survey trace metal concentrations, with emphasis on iron concentrations, speciation and mineralogy, across salinity gradients. In combination with ultra-filtration techniques, this allows

  14. Versatile and Biomass Synthesis of Iron-based Nanoparticles Supported on Carbon Matrix with High Iron Content and Tunable Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Dongmao; Shi, Sheldon Q; Jiang, Dongping; Che, Wen; Gai, Zheng; Howe, Jane Y; More, Karren Leslie; Arockiasamy, Antonyraj

    2012-01-01

    Iron-based nanoparticles supported on carbon (FeNPs{at}C) have enormous potential for environmental applications. Reported is a biomass-based method for FeNP{at}C synthesis that involves pyrolysis of bleached wood fiber pre-mixed with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. This method allows synthesis of iron-based nanoparticles with tunable chemical reactivity by changing the pyrolysis temperature. The FeNP{at}C synthesized at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 C (FeNP{at}C-500) reacts violently (pyrophoric) when exposed to air, while FeNP{at}C prepared at 800 C (FeNP{at}C-800) remains stable in ambient condition for at least 3 months. The FeNPs in FeNP{at}C-800 are mostly below 50 nm in diameter and are surrounded by carbon. The immediate carbon layer (within 5-15 nm radius) on the FeNPs is graphitized. Proof-of-concept environmental applications of FeNPs{at}C-800 were demonstrated by Rhodamine 6G and arsenate (V) removal from water. This biomass-based method provides an effective way for iron-based nanoparticle fabrication and biomass utilization.

  15. Black Carbon Contribution to Organic Carbon Stocks in Urban Soil.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Jill L; Stott, Iain; Potter, Jonathan; Lopez-Capel, Elisa; Manning, David A C; Gaston, Kevin J; Leake, Jonathan R

    2015-07-21

    Soil holds 75% of the total organic carbon (TOC) stock in terrestrial ecosystems. This comprises ecosystem-derived organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC), a recalcitrant product of the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass. Urban topsoils are often enriched in BC from historical emissions of soot and have high TOC concentrations, but the contribution of BC to TOC throughout the urban soil profile, at a regional scale is unknown. We sampled 55 urban soil profiles across the North East of England, a region with a history of coal burning and heavy industry. Through combined elemental and thermogravimetic analyses, we found very large total soil OC stocks (31-65 kg m(-2) to 1 m), exceeding typical values reported for UK woodland soils. BC contributed 28-39% of the TOC stocks, up to 23 kg C m(-2) to 1 m, and was affected by soil texture. The proportional contribution of the BC-rich fraction to TOC increased with soil depth, and was enriched in topsoil under trees when compared to grassland. Our findings establish the importance of urban ecosystems in storing large amounts of OC in soils and that these soils also capture a large proportion of BC particulates emitted within urban areas. PMID:26114917

  16. Initial Characterization of Carbon Metabolism in Iron Oxidizing Microbial Communities of Acidic Hot Springs in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuzer, H. W.; Jennings, R. D.; Whitmore, L.; Inskeep, W. P.; Moran, J.

    2012-12-01

    Norris Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park is home to several acidic, sulfidic hot springs. Visual inspection of the springs reveals distinct geochemical regions starting with a sulfur deposition zone followed by a transition to iron oxide deposition downstream. The microbial communities in the iron oxidation zones are dominated by Archaea, including several members that appear to define previously unrecognized taxa. Abiotic iron oxidation rates are very slow at these temperatures (typically ~ 65-70 oC) and pH's (typically ~3). Therefore, the relatively rapid iron oxide deposition rate strongly suggests the process is microbially mediated, and an organism previously isolated from these springs, Metallosphaera yellowstonensis, has been shown to oxide iron in culture. M. yellowstonensis has been observed in the all microbial communities analyzed in the iron oxidizing zones of these springs, though metagenomic profiling suggests it constitutes only ~20% of the community membership. When we began our studies of C flow in the iron-oxidizing community, no C source had been demonstrated. Observed potential carbon sources in the springs include dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, and methane, as well as random inputs of heterotrophic carbon in the forms of insect carcasses, pine needles, and animal scat. The temperatures in the iron oxidation zones are above the photosynthetic upper temperature limit, thus precluding photosynthetic-based autotrophy within the community itself. We are employing geochemical and stable isotope techniques to assess carbon inventories in the system. We have demonstrated that M. yellowstonensis as well as excised samples of iron oxide mat communities can fix CO2, and our estimated isotopic fractionation factor is consistent with the 3-hydroxypropionate 4-hydroxybutyrate pathway. Genes of this pathway have been identified in the M. yellowstonensis genome. We have tentatively identified small amounts of organic compounds

  17. Kinetics of iron import into developing mouse organs determined by a pup-swapping method.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Barlas, Mirza Nofil; McCormick, Sean P; Lindahl, Lora S; Lindahl, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of dietary iron import into various organs of mice were evaluated using a novel pup-swapping approach. Newborn pups whose bodies primarily contained (56)Fe or (57)Fe were swapped at birth such that each nursed on milk containing the opposite isotope. A pup from each litter was euthanized weekly over a 7-week period. Blood plasma was obtained, and organs were isolated typically after flushing with Ringer's buffer. (56)Fe and (57)Fe concentrations were determined for organs and plasma; organ volumes were also determined. Mössbauer spectra of equivalent (57)Fe-enriched samples were used to quantify residual blood in organs; this fraction was excluded from later analysis. Rates of import into brain, spleen, heart, and kidneys were highest during the first 2 weeks of life. In contrast, half of iron in the newborn liver exited during that time, and influx peaked later. Two mathematical models were developed to analyze the import kinetics. The only model that simulated the data adequately assumed that an iron-containing species enters the plasma and converts into a second species and that both are independently imported into organs. Consistent with this, liquid chromatography with an on-line ICP-MS detector revealed numerous iron species in plasma besides transferrin. Model fitting required that the first species, assigned to non-transferrin-bound iron, imports faster into organs than the second, assigned to transferrin-bound-iron. Non-transferrin-bound iron rather than transferrin-bound-iron appears to play the dominant role in importing iron into organs during early development of healthy mice. PMID:25371212

  18. PHOTOCHEICAL PRODUCTION OF HYDROXYL RADICAL IN NATURAL WATER - THE ROLE OF IRON AND DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photochemical hydroxyl radical (OH) production was measured in several natural waters to investigate the importance of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and iron-CDOM complexes as sources of OH. High rates of OH photoproduction in highly colored, iron-rich, acidic waters a...

  19. ORGANIC EMISSIONS FROM IRON ORE SINTERING PLANTS: DETERMINATION OF CAUSES AND METHODS OF ABATEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a laboratory study to develop basic information on the emission of organics from iron ore sinter beds. Samples of sinter bed mix components (including several types of iron ore fines, blast furnace flue dust, rolling mill scale, anthracite coal, and li...

  20. The reduction of iron oxides by volatiles in a rotary hearth furnace process: Part II. The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, I.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2006-04-15

    The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composite pellets with hydrogen at 900{sup o}C to 1000{sup o}C was studied. Compared to hydrogen, the reduction by carbon was negligible at 900 degrees C and below. However, significant carbon oxidation of the iron oxide/graphite pellets by H{sub 2O generated from the reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} by H-2 was observed. At higher temperatures, reduction by carbon complicates the overall reduction mechanism, with the iron oxide/graphite composite pellet found to be more reactive than the iron oxide/char composite pellet. From the scanning electron micrographs, partially reduced composite pellets showed a typical topochemical interface with an intermediate region between an oxygen-rich unreacted core and an iron-rich outer shell. To determine the possibility of reduction by volatiles, a layer of iron oxide powders was spread on top of a high volatile containing bituminous coal and heated inside a reactor using infra-red radiation. By separating the individual reactions involved for an iron oxide/coal mixture where a complex set of reactions occur simultaneously, it was possible to determine the sole effect of volatile reduction. It was found that the light reducing gases evolve initially and react with the iron oxide, with complex hydrocarbons evolving at the later stages. The volatiles caused about 20 to 50% reduction of the iron oxide.

  1. The reduction of iron oxides by volatiles in a rotary hearth furnace process: Part II. The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, I.; Fruehan, R. J.

    2006-04-01

    The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composite pellets with hydrogen at 900 °C to 1000 °C was studied. Compared to hydrogen, the reduction by carbon was negligible at 900 °C and below. However, significant carbon oxidation of the iron oxide/graphite pellets by H2O generated from the reduction of Fe2O3 by H2 was observed. At higher temperatures, reduction by carbon complicates the overall reduction mechanism, with the iron oxide/graphite composite pellet found to be more reactive than the iron oxide/char composite pellet. From the scanning electron micrographs, partially reduced composite pellets showed a typical topochemical interface with an intermediate region between an oxygen-rich unreacted core and an iron-rich outer shell. To determine the possibility of reduction by volatiles, a layer of iron oxide powders was spread on top of a high volatile containing bituminous coal and heated inside a reactor using infra-red radiation. By separating the individual reactions involved for an iron oxide/coal mixture where a complex set of reactions occur simultaneously, it was possible to determine the sole effect of volatile reduction. It was found that the light reducing gases evolve initially and react with the iron oxide, with complex hydrocarbons evolving at the later stages. The volatiles caused about 20 to 50 pct reduction of the iron oxide.

  2. Upgrading and dephosphorization of Western Australian iron ore using reduction roasting by adding sodium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, De-qing; Chun, Tie-jun; Pan, Jian; Lu, Li-ming; He, Zhen

    2013-06-01

    The technology of direct reduction by adding sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) and magnetic separation was developed to treat Western Australian high phosphorus iron ore. The iron ore and reduced product were investigated by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. It is found that phosphorus exists within limonite in the form of solid solution, which cannot be removed through traditional ways. During reduction roasting, Na2CO3 reacts with gangue minerals (SiO2 and Al2O3), forming aluminum silicate-containing phosphorus and damaging the ore structure, which promotes the separation between iron and phosphorus during magnetic separation. Meanwhile, Na2CO3 also improves the growth of iron grains, increasing the iron grade and iron recovery. The iron concentrate, assaying 94.12wt% Fe and 0.07wt% P at the iron recovery of 96.83% and the dephosphorization rate of 74.08%, is obtained under the optimum conditions. The final product (metal iron powder) after briquetting can be used as the burden for steelmaking by an electric arc furnace to replace scrap steel.

  3. Site-Specific Carbon Isotopes in Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, A.; Eiler, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Natural organic molecules exhibit a wide range of internal site-specific isotope variation (i.e., molecules with same isotopic substitution type but different site). Such variations are generally unconstrained by bulk isotopic measurements. If known, site-specific variations might constrain temperatures of equilibrium, mechanisms of formation or consumption reactions, and possibly other details. For example, lipids can exhibit carbon isotope differences of up to 30‰ between adjacent carbon sites as a result of fractionations arising during decarboxylation of pyruvate and other steps in lipid biosynthesis(1). We present a method for site-specific carbon isotope analysis of propane, based on high-resolution, multi-collector gas source mass spectrometry, using a novel prototype instrument - the Thermo MAT 253 Ultra. This machine has an inlet system and electron bombardment ion source resembling those in conventional stable isotope gas source mass spectrometers, and the energy filter, magnet, and detector array resembling those in multi-collector ICPMS and TIMS. The detector array has 7 detector positions, 6 of which are movable, and each of which can collect ions with either a faraday cup (read through amplifiers ranging from 107-1012 ohms) or an SEM. High mass resolving power (up to 27,000, MRP = M/dM definition) is achieved through a narrow entrance slit, adjustable from 250 to 5 μm. Such resolution can cleanly separate isobaric interferences between isotopologues of organic molecules having the same cardinal mass (e.g., 13CH3 and 12CH2D). We use this technology to analyze the isotopologues and fragments of propane, and use such data to solve for the site-specific carbon isotope fractionation. By measuring isotopologues of both the one-carbon (13CH3) and the two-carbon (13C12CH4) fragment ion, we can solve for both bulk δ13C and the difference in δ13C between the terminal and central carbon position. We tested this method by analyzing mixtures between natural

  4. Epitaxial Approaches to Carbon Nanotube Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismach, Ariel

    Carbon nanotubes have unique electronic, mechanical, optical and thermal properties, which make them ideal candidates as building blocks in nano-electronic and electromechanical systems. However, their organization into well-defined geometries and arrays on surfaces remains a critical challenge for their integration into functional nanosystems. In my PhD, we developed a new approach for the organization of carbon nanotubes directed by crystal surfaces. The principle relies on the guided growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by atomic features presented on anisotropic substrates. We identified three different modes of surface-directed growth (or 'nanotube epitaxy'), in which the growth of carbon nanotubes is directed by crystal substrates: We first observed the nanotube unidirectional growth along atomic steps ('ledge-directed epitaxy') and nanofacets ('graphoepitaxy') on the surface of miscut C-plane sapphire and quartz. The orientation along crystallographic directions ('lattice-directed epitaxy') was subsequently observed by other groups on different crystals. We have proposed a "wake growth" mechanism for the nanotube alignment along atomic steps and nanofacets. In this mechanism, the catalyst nanoparticle slides along the step or facet, leaving the nanotube behind as a wake. In addition, we showed that the combination of surface-directed growth with external forces, such as electric-field and gas flow, can lead to the simultaneous formation of complex nanotube structures, such as grids and serpentines. The "wake growth" model, which explained the growth of aligned nanotubes, could not explain the formation of nanotube serpentines. For the latter, we proposed a "falling spaghetti" mechanism, in which the nanotube first grows by a free-standing process, aligned in the direction of the gas flow, then followed by absorption on the stepped surface in an oscillatory manner, due to the competition between the drag force caused by the gas flow on the suspended

  5. Urban Tree Effects on Soil Organic Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Jill L.; O'Sullivan, Odhran S.; Inger, Richard; Potter, Jonathan; McHugh, Nicola; Gaston, Kevin J.; Leake, Jonathan R.

    2014-01-01

    Urban trees sequester carbon into biomass and provide many ecosystem service benefits aboveground leading to worldwide tree planting schemes. Since soils hold ∼75% of ecosystem organic carbon, understanding the effect of urban trees on soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil properties that underpin belowground ecosystem services is vital. We use an observational study to investigate effects of three important tree genera and mixed-species woodlands on soil properties (to 1 m depth) compared to adjacent urban grasslands. Aboveground biomass and belowground ecosystem service provision by urban trees are found not to be directly coupled. Indeed, SOC enhancement relative to urban grasslands is genus-specific being highest under Fraxinus excelsior and Acer spp., but similar to grasslands under Quercus robur and mixed woodland. Tree cover type does not influence soil bulk density or C∶N ratio, properties which indicate the ability of soils to provide regulating ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling and flood mitigation. The trends observed in this study suggest that genus selection is important to maximise long-term SOC storage under urban trees, but emerging threats from genus-specific pathogens must also be considered. PMID:25003872

  6. Urban tree effects on soil organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Jill L; O'Sullivan, Odhran S; Inger, Richard; Potter, Jonathan; McHugh, Nicola; Gaston, Kevin J; Leake, Jonathan R

    2014-01-01

    Urban trees sequester carbon into biomass and provide many ecosystem service benefits aboveground leading to worldwide tree planting schemes. Since soils hold ∼75% of ecosystem organic carbon, understanding the effect of urban trees on soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil properties that underpin belowground ecosystem services is vital. We use an observational study to investigate effects of three important tree genera and mixed-species woodlands on soil properties (to 1 m depth) compared to adjacent urban grasslands. Aboveground biomass and belowground ecosystem service provision by urban trees are found not to be directly coupled. Indeed, SOC enhancement relative to urban grasslands is genus-specific being highest under Fraxinus excelsior and Acer spp., but similar to grasslands under Quercus robur and mixed woodland. Tree cover type does not influence soil bulk density or C∶N ratio, properties which indicate the ability of soils to provide regulating ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling and flood mitigation. The trends observed in this study suggest that genus selection is important to maximise long-term SOC storage under urban trees, but emerging threats from genus-specific pathogens must also be considered. PMID:25003872

  7. Recent Applications of Acyclic (Diene)iron Complexes and (Dienyl)iron Cations in Organic Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Subhabrata

    2009-01-01

    Complexation of (tricarbonyl)iron to an acyclic diene serves to protect the ligand against oxidation, reduction and cycloaddition reactions while the steric bulk of this adjunct serves to direct the approach reagents to unsaturated groups attached to the diene onto the face opposite to iron. Furthermore, the Fe(CO)3 moiety can serve to stabilize carbocation centers adjacent to the diene (i.e. pentadienyl-iron cations). Recent applications of these reactivities to the synthesis of polyene, cyclopropane, cycloheptadiene and cyclohexenone containing natural products or analogs will be presented. PMID:21709767

  8. Transport and cycling of iron and hydrogen peroxide in a freshwater stream: Influence of organic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, D.T.; Runkel, R.L.; McKnight, Diane M.; Voelker, B.M.; Kimball, B.A.; Carraway, E.R.

    2003-01-01

    An in-stream injection of two dissolved organic acids (phthalic and aspartic acids) was performed in an acidic mountain stream to assess the effects of organic acids on Fe photoreduction and H2O2 cycling. Results indicate that the fate of Fe is dependent on a net balance of oxidative and reductive processes, which can vary over a distance of several meters due to changes in incident light and other factors. Solution phase photoreduction rates were high in sunlit reaches and were enhanced by the organic acid addition but were also limited by the amount of ferric iron present in the water column. Fe oxide photoreduction from the streambed and colloids within the water column resulted in an increase in the diurnal load of total filterable Fe within the experimental reach, which also responded to increases in light and organic acids. Our results also suggest that Fe(II) oxidation increased in response to the organic acids, with the result of offsetting the increase in Fe(II) from photoreductive processes. Fe(II) was rapidly oxidized to Fe(III) after sunset and during the day within a well-shaded reach, presumably through microbial oxidation. H2O 2, a product of dissolved organic matter photolysis, increased downstream to maximum concentrations of 0.25 ??M midday. Kinetic calculations show that the buildup of H2O2 is controlled by reaction with Fe(III), but this has only a small effect on Fe(II) because of the small formation rates of H2O2 compared to those of Fe(II). The results demonstrate the importance of incorporating the effects of light and dissolved organic carbon into Fe reactive transport models to further our understanding of the fate of Fe in streams and lakes.

  9. Carbon-14 dating of an iron bloom associated with the voyages of Sir Martin Frobisher

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, E.V.; Harbottle, G.; Stoenner, R.W. Washburn, W.; Olin, J.S.; Fitzhugh, W.

    1982-01-01

    This paper recounts the history of the iron bloom associated with the English Elizabethan explorer Sir Martin Frobisher who made 3 voyages to the North American mainland in the 1570's. Specifically the paper deals with the use of proportional counters in carbon-14 dating of the Frobisher iron bloom which is located at the Smithsonian Institution. The procedures for preparing the samples for counting are described. (KRM)

  10. Preparation and properties of a novel iron-coated carbon fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Zhang, Baoshan; Xu, Weidong; Shi, Yingbing; Jiang, Zhengsheng; Zhou, Ningsheng; Gu, Benxing; Lu, Huaixian

    2003-01-01

    A novel iron-coated carbon fiber has been fabricated by electrochemical method. Magnetic properties, complex permeability, and complex permitivity have been measured. It is found that the sample has a low coercive force. By doping a few fibers to general absorbers (carbonyl iron), the complex permeability and permitivity of composites achieved a rise without the obvious increase of filling density. This result shows that the doping of fibers to general absorber will effectively decrease the thickness of the microwave absorption layer.

  11. Green Carbon, Black Carbon, White Carbon: Simultaneous Differentiation Between Soil Organic Matter, Pyrogenic Carbon and Carbonates Using Thermal Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, A. F.; Peltre, C.; Chan, J.; Baumgartl, T.; Erskine, P.; Apesteguía, M.; Virto, I.

    2014-12-01

    Quantification of soil carbon stocks and fluxes continues to be an important endeavor in assessments of soil quality, and more broadly in assessments of ecosystem functioning. The quantification of soil carbon in alkaline, carbonate-containing soils, such as those found in Mediterranean areas, is complicated by the need to differentiate between organic carbon (OC) and inorganic carbon (IC), which continues to present methodological challenges. Acidification is frequently used to eliminate carbonates prior to soil OC quantification, but when performed in the liquid phase, can promote the dissolution and loss of a portion of the OC. Acid fumigation (AF) is increasingly preferred for carbonate removal, but its effectiveness is difficult to assess using conventional elemental and isotopic analyses. The two-step approach is time, labor and cost intensive, and generates additional uncertainties from the calculations. Quantification of the actively cycling pool of soil organic C (SOC) in many soils is further complicated by the potential presence of more recalcitrant/stable forms such as pyrogenic or black carbon (BC) derived from incomplete combustion of vegetation, or even geogenic carbon such as coal. The wide spectrum of materials currently considered BC makes its quantification challenging. The chemical method using benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCAs) as markers of condensed aromatic structures indicative of pyrogenic C is highly time, labor and cost intensive, and can generate artifacts. Several research groups are now developing method for the simultaneous identification and quantification of these various forms of soil carbon using thermal analysis techniques such as thermogravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry and evolved gas analysis. The objective of this presentation is to provide a general overview and specific examples of the current progress and technical challenges in this evolving methodology.

  12. Methods development for total organic carbon accountability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Brian L.; Kilgore, Melvin V., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the efforts completed during the contract period beginning November 1, 1990 and ending April 30, 1991. Samples of product hygiene and potable water from WRT 3A were supplied by NASA/MSFC prior to contract award on July 24, 1990. Humidity condensate samples were supplied on August 3, 1990. During the course of this contract chemical analyses were performed on these samples to qualitatively determine specific components comprising, the measured organic carbon concentration. In addition, these samples and known standard solutions were used to identify and develop methodology useful to future comprehensive characterization of similar samples. Standard analyses including pH, conductivity, and total organic carbon (TOC) were conducted. Colorimetric and enzyme linked assays for total protein, bile acid, B-hydroxybutyric acid, methylene blue active substances (MBAS), urea nitrogen, ammonia, and glucose were also performed. Gas chromatographic procedures for non-volatile fatty acids and EPA priority pollutants were also performed. Liquid chromatography was used to screen for non-volatile, water soluble compounds not amenable to GC techniques. Methods development efforts were initiated to separate and quantitate certain chemical classes not classically analyzed in water and wastewater samples. These included carbohydrates, organic acids, and amino acids. Finally, efforts were initiated to identify useful concentration techniques to enhance detection limits and recovery of non-volatile, water soluble compounds.

  13. Recovery of iron from zinc leaching residue by selective reduction roasting with carbon.

    PubMed

    Li, Mi; Peng, Bing; Chai, Liyuan; Peng, Ning; Yan, Huan; Hou, Dongke

    2012-10-30

    The recovery of iron from zinc leaching residue by selective reduction roasting with carbon was studied. The effects of roasting temperature, duration time and mass ratio of carbon to residue on decomposition of ZnFe(2)O(4), iron recovery and iron grade were investigated based on thermodynamic calculation and phase composition analysis of zinc leaching residue. 58.6% of iron grade in magnetic concentrate and 68.4% of iron recovery were achieved after the residue roasted at 750°C for 1h under carbon to residue mass ratio of 4%. The phase composition of roasted residue indicated that the ZnFe(2)O(4) decomposed in four stages: reduction of ZnFe(2)O(4) to ZnO and Fe(3)O(4), reduction of Fe(3)O(4) to FeO, formation of Fe(0.85-x)Zn(x)O and reduction of FeO to Fe. A technological process for simultaneously recovering iron and zinc from zinc leaching residue is proposed. PMID:22975260

  14. Computational studies of small carbon and iron-carbon systems relevant to carbon nanotube growth.

    PubMed

    Duan, Haiming; Rosén, Arne; Harutyunyan, Avetik; Curtarolo, Stefano; Bolton, Kim

    2008-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that dimers and longer carbon strings are more stable than individual atoms on Fe(111) surfaces. It is therefore necessary to consider the formation of these species on the metal surfaces and their effect on the mechanism of single-walled nanotube (SWNT) growth. The good agreement between the trends (energies and structures) obtained using DFT and those based on the Brenner and AIREBO models indicate that these analytic models provide adequate descriptions of the supported carbon systems needed for valid molecular dynamics simulations of SWNT growth. In contrast, the AIREBO model provides a better description of the relative energies for isolated carbon species, and this model is preferred over the Brenner potential when simulating SWNT growth in the absence of metal particles. However, the PM3 semiempirical model appears to provide an even better description for these systems and, given sufficient computer resources, direct dynamics methods based on this model may be preferred. PMID:19198360

  15. Nitrogen-doped carbon-supported cobalt-iron oxygen reduction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Zelenay, Piotr; Wu, Gang

    2014-04-29

    A Fe--Co hybrid catalyst for oxygen reaction reduction was prepared by a two part process. The first part involves reacting an ethyleneamine with a cobalt-containing precursor to form a cobalt-containing complex, combining the cobalt-containing complex with an electroconductive carbon supporting material, heating the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material under conditions suitable to convert the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material into a cobalt-containing catalyst support. The second part of the process involves polymerizing an aniline in the presence of said cobalt-containing catalyst support and an iron-containing compound under conditions suitable to form a supported, cobalt-containing, iron-bound polyaniline species, and subjecting said supported, cobalt-containing, iron bound polyaniline species to conditions suitable for producing a Fe--Co hybrid catalyst.

  16. Variability of organic and elemental carbon, water soluble organic carbon, and isotopes in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, K. F.; Lee, S. C.; Cao, J. J.; Li, Y. S.; Chow, J. C.; Watson, J. G.; Fung, K.

    2006-10-01

    To determine the levels and variations of carbonaceous aerosol in Hong Kong, PM2.5 and PM10 samples were collected by high volume (Hi-vol) samplers at three monitoring stations (representing middle-scale roadside, urban-, and regional-scale environments) during winter (November 2000 to February 2001) and summer (June 2001 to August 2001) periods. The highest concentrations of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) were found at the middle-scale roadside site with the lowest at the regional-scale site. The percentages of WSOC in total carbon at these sites were inversely correlated with their concentrations (i.e., the highest percentages of WSOC were observed at the regional-scale site). A high WSOC fraction may be associated with aged aerosol because of the secondary formation by photochemical oxidation of organic precursors of anthropogenic pollutants during transport. The annual average of isotope abundances (δ13C) of OC and EC were -26.9±0.5‰ and -25.6±0.1‰, respectively. There were no notable differences for seasonal distributions of carbon isotopic composition, consistent with motor vehicle emissions being the main source contributors of carbonaceous aerosol in Hong Kong. OC 13C abundances at the regional-scale site were higher than those at the middle-scale roadside and urban sites, consistent with secondary organic aerosols of biogenic origin.

  17. Variability of organic and elemental carbon, water soluble organic carbon, and isotopes in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, K. F.; Lee, S. C.; Cao, J. J.; Li, Y. S.; Chow, J. C.; Watson, J. G.; Fung, K.

    2006-06-01

    To determine the levels and variations of carbonaceous aerosol in Hong Kong, PM2.5 and PM10 samples were collected by high volume (Hi-vol) samplers at three monitoring stations (representing middle-scale roadside, urban-, and regional-scale environments) during winter (November 2000 to February 2001) and summer (June 2001 to August 2001) periods. The highest concentrations of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) were found at the middle-scale roadside site with the lowest at the regional-scale site. The percentages of WSOC in total carbon at these sites were inversely correlated with their concentrations (i.e., the highest percentages of WSOC were observed at the regional-scale site). A high WSOC fraction may be associated with aged aerosol because of the secondary formation by photochemical oxidation of organic precursors of anthropogenic pollutants during transport. The annual average of isotope abundances (δ13C) of OC and EC were -26.9±0.5 and -25.6±0.1, respectively. There were no notable differences for seasonal distributions of carbon isotopic composition, consistent with motor vehicle emissions being the main source contributors of carbonaceous aerosol in Hong Kong. OC 13C abundances at the regional-scale site were higher than those at the middle-scale roadside and urban sites, consistent with secondary organic aerosols of biogenic origin.

  18. Energy of interaction between carbon impurities in paramagnetic γ-iron

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomareva, A. V.; Gornostyrev, Yu. N.; Abrikosov, I. A.

    2015-04-15

    The energies of interaction between carbon impurity atoms in paramagnetic fcc iron (austenite) are calculated using electron density functional theory. Point defects in the paramagnetic matrix are described using a statistical approach that takes into account local magnetic fluctuations and atomic relaxation in the environment of impurity atoms. It is shown that, in addition to local deformations, magnetism significantly contributes to the energies of dissolution and interaction of carbon atoms. The values of the carbon-carbon interaction energy are indicative of a significant repulsion between these atoms in the first and second coordination spheres. The results of calculations are consistent with estimates obtained from experimental data on the activity of carbon impurity atoms in iron.

  19. Transport of carbon colloid supported nanoscale zero-valent iron in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Jan; Meißner, Tobias; Potthoff, Annegret; Oswald, Sascha E.

    2014-08-01

    Injection of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) has recently gained great interest as emerging technology for in-situ remediation of chlorinated organic compounds from groundwater systems. Zero-valent iron (ZVI) is able to reduce organic compounds and to render it to less harmful substances. The use of nanoscale particles instead of granular or microscale particles can increase dechlorination rates by orders of magnitude due to its high surface area. However, classical nZVI appears to be hampered in its environmental application by its limited mobility. One approach is colloid supported transport of nZVI, where the nZVI gets transported by a mobile colloid. In this study transport properties of activated carbon colloid supported nZVI (c-nZVI; d50 = 2.4 μm) are investigated in column tests using columns of 40 cm length, which were filled with porous media. A suspension was pumped through the column under different physicochemical conditions (addition of a polyanionic stabilizer and changes in pH and ionic strength). Highest observed breakthrough was 62% of the injected concentration in glass beads with addition of stabilizer. Addition of mono- and bivalent salt, e.g. more than 0.5 mM/L CaCl2, can decrease mobility and changes in pH to values below six can inhibit mobility at all. Measurements of colloid sizes and zeta potentials show changes in the mean particle size by a factor of ten and an increase of zeta potential from - 62 mV to - 80 mV during the transport experiment. However, results suggest potential applicability of c-nZVI under field conditions.

  20. The Speciation of Particulate Iron and Carbon in the East Pacific Rise 15oS Near-field Hydrothermal Plume and Underlying Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, B. M.; Lam, P. J.; Nicholas, S. L.; Ohnemus, D.; Hoffman, C. L.; Fitzsimmons, J. N.; Sherrell, R. M.; German, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Particulate iron and carbon speciation were measured for water column and sediment samples collected at the East Pacific Rise ridge axis (15oS; Station 18) and approximately 80 km down-current (Station 20) during the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect cruise. Water column particles were collected by in situ filtration (0.2 micron, polycarbonate) from above, within, and below the hydrothermal plume. Water column samples were handled in an anaerobic chamber and stored frozen under inert gas shipboard, and protected from ambient oxygen during analysis. The flocculant, top-layer of the sediments was sampled shipboard under ambient conditions and stored frozen until analysis. Iron and carbon speciation were measured using X-ray microprobe (10.3.2) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) instruments at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA. Iron (1s and 2p) and carbon (1s) X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and imaging for particles revealed that: (1) in comparison to the above plume sample, organic carbon is abundant in particles within and below the plume, as well as in surface sediments; (2) iron sulfides are not detectable in any water column sample investigated so far; (3) the fraction of non-sulfide reduced iron is highest in the below plume samples; and (4) the below plume sample is rich in free-living microbial cells.

  1. Cu Binding to Iron Oxide-Organic Matter Coprecipitates in Solid and Dissolved Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, T. M.; Koenigsmark, F.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that Cu is released from wetlands following storm events. Assymetrical field flow field fractionation (AF4) analyses as well as total and dissolved metal concentration measurements suggest iron oxide-organic matter complexes control Cu retention and release. Coprecipitation products of Fe oxide and organic matter were prepared under conditions similar to the wetland to assess Cu partitioning to and availability from solid phases that settle from solution as well as phases remaining suspended. Cu coprecipitation and sorption to organomineral precipitation solids formed at different Fe:organic carbon (OC) ratios were compared for net Cu removal and extractability. As more humic acid was present during precipitation of Fe, TEM images indicated smaller Fe oxide particles formed within an organic matrix as expected. In coprecipitation reactions, as the ratio of Fe:OC decreased, more Cu was removed from solution at pH 5.5 and below. However, in sorption reactions, there was an inhibition of Cu removal at low OC concentrations. As the pH increased from 5.5 to 7 and as solution phase OC concentration increased, more Cu remained dissolved in both coprecipitation and sorption reactions. The addition of Ca2+, glycine, histidine and citric acid or lowering the pH resulted in more extractable Cu from the coprecipitation compared with the sorption reactions. The variations in Cu extraction were likely due to a combination of a more amorphous structure in CPT products, and the relative abundance of available Fe oxide or OC binding sites. Suspended Fe oxide-organic matter coprecipitates were assessed using AF4 coupled to online TOC analysis and ICP-MS. In laboratory prepared samples, Cu was observed in a mixture of small 1-5 nm colloids of Fe oxide-organic matter precipitates, but the majority was observed in larger organic matter colloids and were not UV absorbing, suggesting more aliphatic carbon materials. In field samples, up to 60% of the dissolved Cu

  2. High rates of organic carbon burial in fjord sediments globally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Richard W.; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Allison, Mead; Savage, Candida; Galy, Valier

    2015-06-01

    The deposition and long-term burial of organic carbon in marine sediments has played a key role in controlling atmospheric O2 and CO2 concentrations over the past 500 million years. Marine carbon burial represents the dominant natural mechanism of long-term organic carbon sequestration. Fjords--deep, glacially carved estuaries at high latitudes--have been hypothesized to be hotspots of organic carbon burial, because they receive high rates of organic material fluxes from the watershed. Here we compile organic carbon concentrations from 573 fjord surface sediment samples and 124 sediment cores from nearly all fjord systems globally. We use sediment organic carbon content and sediment delivery rates to calculate rates of organic carbon burial in fjord systems across the globe. We estimate that about 18 Mt of organic carbon are buried in fjord sediments each year, equivalent to 11% of annual marine carbon burial globally. Per unit area, fjord organic carbon burial rates are one hundred times as large as the global ocean average, and fjord sediments contain twice as much organic carbon as biogenous sediments underlying the upwelling regions of the ocean. We conclude that fjords may play an important role in climate regulation on glacial-interglacial timescales.

  3. Carbon- and Nitrogen-Based Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sakaushi, Ken; Antonietti, Markus

    2015-06-16

    This Account provides an overview of organic, covalent, porous frameworks and solid-state materials mainly composed of the elements carbon and nitrogen. The structures under consideration are rather diverse and cover a wide spectrum. This Account will summarize current works on the synthetic concepts leading toward those systems and cover the application side where emphasis is set on the exploration of those systems as candidates for unusual high-performance catalysis, electrocatalysis, electrochemical energy storage, and artificial photosynthesis. These issues are motivated by the new global energy cycles and the fact that sustainable technologies should not be based on rare and expensive resources. We therefore present the strategic design of functionality in cost-effective, affordable artificial materials starting from a spectrum of simple synthetic options to end up with carbon- and nitrogen-based porous frameworks. Following the synthetic strategies, we demonstrate how the electronic structure of polymeric frameworks can be tuned and how this can modify property profiles in a very unexpected fashion. Covalent triazine-based frameworks (CTFs), for instance, showed both enormously high energy and high power density in lithium and sodium battery systems. Other C,N-based organic frameworks, such as triazine-based graphitic carbon nitride, are suggested to show promising band gaps for many (photo)electrochemical reactions. Nitrogen-rich carbonaceous frameworks, which are developed from C,N-based organic framework strategies, are highlighted in order to address their promising electrocatalytic properties, such as in the hydrogen evolution reaction, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and oxygen evolution reaction (OER). With careful design, those materials can be multifunctional catalysts, such as a bifunctional ORR/OER electrocatalyst. Although the majority of new C,N-based materials are still not competitive with the best (usually nonsustainable candidates) for each

  4. Relative contribution of iron reduction to sediments organic matter mineralization in contrasting habitats of a shallow eutrophic freshwater lake.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mo; Jiang, He-Long

    2016-06-01

    Iron reduction is one of the important organic matter (OM) mineralization pathway in sediments. Here we investigated the rates and the relative contribution of iron reduction to OM mineralization in Zhushan bay (ZSB, cyanobacterial bloom biomass (CBB)-dominated habitats) and East Taihu Lake (ETL, submerged macrophypes (SM)-dominated habitats) of Lake Taihu, China. Anaerobic microcosm incubation revealed that the rate of iron reduction at ZSB (4.42 μmol cm(-3) d(-1)) in summer was almost 1.5 times higher than at ETL (3.13 μmol cm(-3) d(-1)). Iron reduction accounted for 66.5% (ZSB) and 31.8% (ETL) of total anaerobic carbon mineralization, respectively. No detectable methanogenesis was found at ZSB, while methanogenesis was responsible for 16.7% of total anaerobic respiration in sediments of ETL. Geochemical analysis of solid phase constituents indicated that ZSB surface sediments experienced highly oxidizing conditions with much higher amorphous Fe(III) (71 mmol m(-2)) than ETL (11 mmol m(-2)). Conversely, AVS inventories at ETL (38 mmol m(-2)) were up to 30 times higher than at ZSB (1.27 mmol m(-2)), indicating significant sulfate reduction in sediments of ETL. Overall results suggested that varying carbon sources and distinct geochemical characterizations of the sediments in contrasting habitats significantly influenced the rate of iron reduction and the pathway of C mineralization in a large freshwater lake. PMID:27038578

  5. Storage of Organic and Inorganic Carbon in Human Settlements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churkina, G.

    2009-12-01

    It has been shown that urban areas have carbon density comparable with tropical forest. Carbon density of urban areas may be even higher, because the density of organic carbon only was taking into account. Human settlements store carbon in two forms such as organic and inorganic. Carbon is stored in organic form in living biomass such as trees, grasses or in artifacts derived from biomass such as wooden furniture, building structures, paper, clothes and shoes made from natural materials. Inorganic carbon or fossil carbon, meanwhile, is primarily stored in objects fabricated by people like concrete, plastic, asphalt, and bricks. The key difference between organic and inorganic forms of carbon is how they return to the gaseous state. Organic carbon can be returned to the atmosphere without applying additional artificial energy through decomposition of organic matter, whereas energy input such as burning is needed to release inorganic carbon. In this study I compare inorganic with organic carbon storage, discuss their carbon residence time, decomposition rates, and possible implications for carbon emissions.

  6. Understanding drivers of the export of dissolved organic carbon from a German headwater catchment using Generalised Additive Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selle, Benny; Musolff, Andreas; Tittel, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    In the literature, several causes of recently increasing concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in headwaters across eastern North America and northern and central Europe have been debated. One likely driver of the widespread increase of DOC concentrations since the early 1990s are decreasing depositions of acid rain resulting in an increased solubility of organic carbon compounds including humic acids. Here, we tested the hypothesis if the reduced availability of nitrate stimulated the microbial reduction of ferric iron soil minerals and the mobilisation of DOC. Forested catchments are relatively unaffected by agricultural and urban nitrate inputs. In these catchments, decreasing depositions often resulted in a reduced availability of nitrate, which are preferred electron acceptors in microbial decomposition processes. As ferric iron minerals act as efficient sorbents of organic compounds in soils its reduction may cause a release of humic substances and hence an export of DOC. To test this hypothesis, time series of DOC, dissolved iron and nitrate from a forested headwater catchment in Germany were examined using Generalised Additive Models. We found that rising DOC concentrations most likely resulted from a reductive dissolution of iron(III) minerals in soils and the associated mobilisation of adsorbed organic carbon. Phosphate, which can trigger undesired algal growth and is also known to be adsorbed by particulate iron(III), was released as well.

  7. OCoc- from Ocean Colour to Organic Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, B.; Overduin, P. P.; Schirrmeister, L.; Lantuit, H.; Doerffer, R.

    2009-12-01

    Enhanced permafrost warming and increased arctic river discharges have heightened concern about the input of terrigenous matter into Arctic coastal waters. The ‘OCoc-from Ocean Colour to Organic Carbon’ project (IPY-project 1176), funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG), is an Ocean Colour study joined with the Arctic Coastal Dynamics ACD network and Arctic Circum-polar Coastal Observatory Network ACCO-Net (IPY-project 90). OCoc uses Ocean Colour satellite data for synoptical monitoring of organic matter fluxes from fluvial and coastal sources. Initial results from German-Russian expeditions at the southeastern Laptev Sea Coast (Arctic Siberia, Russia) in August 2008 and August 2009 are presented. Large parts of this coastal zone are characterized by highly erosive organic-rich material. Ocean Colour MERIS Reduced Resolution (RR)-LIB data of the have been processed towards optical aquatic parameters using Beam-Visat4.2 and the MERIS case2 regional processor for coastal application (C2R). Calculated aquatic parameters are absorption and backscattering coefficients, apparent optical properties such as the first attenuation depth (‘Z90’) and calculated concentrations of chlorophyll, total suspended matter and coloured dissolved organic matter absorption from the water leaving reflectances. Initial comparisons with expedition data (Secchi depths, cDOM) show that the MERIS-C2R optical parameters ’total absorption’ and the first attenuation depth, ’Z90’, seem adequately to represent true conditions. High attenuation values in the spectral blue wavelength range may serve as tracer for the organic-rich terrigenous input. The synoptic information of Ocean Colour products will provide valuable spatial and dynamical information on the Organic Carbon and sediment fluxes from the Siberian permafrost coast.

  8. The catalytic activity of the iron-coated pumice particles used as heterogeneous catalysts in the oxidation of natural organic matter by H2O2.

    PubMed

    Alver, Alper; Karaarslan, Mihrican; Kılıç, Ahmet

    2016-08-01

    The oxidative removal of natural organic matter (NOM) from waters was investigated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and iron-coated pumice particles in heterogeneous catalytic oxidation process (HCOP). Removal of trihalomethane (THM) precursors, which is formed THM by the reacts with chloride, was performed with the hydroxyl radicals. Coating the original pumice particles with iron oxides significantly enhanced the removal of NOM with peroxide. The studies were carried out in two sections: (1) decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in pure water with iron-coated pumice and (2) oxidation of THM Precursor (NOM) by hydrogen peroxide with iron-coated pumice. The monitored parameters in this study include dissolved organic carbon and trihalomethanes formation potential. The results show that iron-coated pumice catalyst significantly increased the removal efficiency of NOM in the HCOP. The results show that iron-coated pumice catalyst significantly increased the removal efficiency of NOM in the HCOP. Results show that the oxidation of NOM and remaining NOM with H2O2 is improved by the addition of iron-coated pumice particles which activate the H2O2 molecule, leading to the formation of hydroxyl radicals in a Fenton-like process. PMID:26881482

  9. Fate of Organic Micropollutants during Hydrothermal Carbonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, B.; Baskyr, I.; Pörschmann, J.; Kopinke, F.-D.

    2012-04-01

    The hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is an exothermic process, in which biomass in an aqueous suspension is transformed into a bituminous coal-like material (hydrochar) at temperatures between 180-250°C and under moderate pressure. With these process conditions, little gas is generated (1-5%), and a fraction of the organic carbon is dissolved in the aqueous phase (10-30%) but the largest part is obtained as solid char. The respective yields and the molecular composition depend on the choice of educts and the process conditions, such as temperature, pH-value, and reaction time. Various biomass-educts have recently been studied, such as waste materials from agriculture, brewer's spent grains, sewage sludge, as well as wood and paper materials. Besides their use for energy generation, the hydrochars have also been investigated as soil amendments. Prior to addition of the chars to soil, these should be free of toxic components that could be released into the environment as harmful organic pollutants. Herein, the potential for the degradation of trace organic pollutants, such as pesticides and pharmaceuticals, under typical HTC conditions will be presented. The degradation of selected organic pollutants with different polarity and hydrophobicity was investigated. Scope and limitations of the degradation potential of the HTC are discussed on examples of micro pollutants such as hormones, residues of pharmaceuticals and personal care products including their metabolites, and pesticides. We will show that the target analytes are partially and in some cases completely degraded. The degree of degradation depends on the HTC process conditions such as reaction temperature and time, the solution pH value, the presence of catalysts or additional reagents. The biotic and abiotic degradation of chlorinated organic compounds, in particular chlorinated aromatics, has been a well-known environmental problem and remains a challenging issue for the development of a HTC process for

  10. Dissolved organic carbon in rainwater: Glassware decontamination and sample preservation and volatile organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, M. L. A. M.; Nogueira, R. F. P.; Dametto, P. R.; Francisco, J. G.; Coelho, C. H.

    The efficiency of different methods for the decontamination of glassware used for the analysis of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was tested using reported procedures as well as new ones proposed in this work. A Fenton solution bath (1.0 mmol L -1 Fe 2+ and 100 mmol L -1 H 2O 2) for 1 h or for 30 min employing UV irradiation showed to combine simplicity, low cost and high efficiency. Using the optimized cleaning procedure, the DOC for stored UV-irradiated ultra-pure water reached concentrations below the limit of detection (0.19 μmol C L -1). Filtered (0.7 μm) rain samples maintained the DOC integrity for at least 7 days when stored at 4 °C. The volatile organic carbon (VOC) fraction in the rain samples collected at two sites in São Paulo state (Brazil) ranged from 0% to 56% of their total DOC content. Although these high-VOC concentrations may be derived from the large use of ethanol fuel in Brazil, our results showed that when using the high-temperature catalytic oxidation technique, it is essential to measure DOC rather than non-purgeble organic carbon to estimate organic carbon, since rainwater composition can be quite variable, both geographically and temporally.

  11. Organic carbon-14 in the Amazon River system

    SciTech Connect

    Hedges, J.I.; Ertel, J.R.; Quay, P.D.; Grootes, P.M.; Richey, J.E.; Devol, A.H.; Farwell, G.W.; Schmidt, F.W.; Salati, E.

    1986-03-07

    Coarse and fine suspended particulate organic materials and dissolved humic and fulvic acids transported by the Amazon River all contain bomb-produced carbon-14, indicating relatively rapid turnover of the parent carbon pools. However, the carbon-14 contents of these coexisting carbon forms are measurably different and may reflect varying degrees of retention by soils in the drainage basin. 20 references, 1 table.

  12. Oxygen, carbon, and sulfur segregation in annealed and unannealed zerovalent iron substrates.

    PubMed

    Papastavros, Efthimia; Shea, Patrick J; Langell, Marjorie A

    2004-12-21

    Finely ground and pretreated iron substrates known as "zerovalent iron" or "Fe0" are used as reductants in the environmental remediation of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the composition of their surfaces significantly affects their reactivity. Samples of unannealed and annealed (heat-treated under H2/N2) zerovalent iron were analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Surface concentration of the iron and of the impurities observed by XPS and AES, carbon, chlorine, sulfur, and oxygen, were measured before and after soaking in trichloroethylene (TCE) and in water saturated with TCE (H2O/TCE) to simulate chlorocarbon remediation conditions. Samples pretreated by annealing at high temperature under H2 contained less iron carbide. The carbide contaminant was evident in both iron and carbon XPS spectra, with binding energies of 709.0 and 283.3 eV for the Fe 2p3/2 and C 1s, respectively. The annealed Fe0 surface also contained more sulfur. The carbide concentration was essentially unchanged by TCE and H2O/TCE exposure, whereas the sulfur decreased in proportion to chlorine adsorption following the dechlorination reaction. While oxygen concentration is initially lower on the annealed substrate surface, it rapidly increased during the model TCE remediative treatment process and thus does not represent a significant effect of the annealing process on surface reactivity. PMID:15595777

  13. Understanding and assessing the feasibility of ocean iron fertilization to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buesseler, K.; Lampitt, R. S.; de Baar, H. J.; Blain, S.; Chai, F.; Coale, K. H.; Dai, M.; Karl, D. M.; Leinen, M.; Lohan, M. C.; Rothstein, L.; Trull, T. W.; Whaley, D.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Zhou, M.

    2011-12-01

    Regardless of the strategy for fossil fuel use, atmospheric CO2 is predicted to increase and then decrease such that after 10,000 years, levels will still be much higher than pre-industrial. The objectives of geoengineering CO2 reduction techniques are to reduce the rate of CO2 increase and the height of the CO2 peak. Because the oceans represent such a large reservoir of carbon, small perturbations of the system could cause large changes to carbon flows. The objective of ocean carbon sequestration would be to encourage the oceans to take up carbon at a faster rate than they currently do but with predictable and acceptable consequences. From iron addition experiments in the laboratory and in the open ocean and from studies where there are natural additions of iron to the ocean several conclusions can be drawn. Relief of iron stress increases the biomass of marine phytoplankton and as a consequence reduces surface water CO2. This leads to increased export of carbon from the upper ocean and probably enhanced sequestration in the deep ocean. However, the experiments were not planned from the perspective of geoengineering and conclusions about the potential of this approach as a means of reducing atmospheric CO2 have large uncertainties. In addition, few experiments have addressed the unintended consequences of deliberate additions. This has been a major focus of recent discussion of a risk assessment framework for experimentation by the London Convention and London Protocol. Given the uncertainties, there is an urgent requirement to carry out more studies on ocean iron fertilization with three clear objectives 1: To develop coupled global scale computation models so that predictions can become more reliable and so that in situ experiments are effective. 2: To carry out experiments on a sufficiently large scale and duration to determine the extent, efficiencies and time scales of carbon sequestration. 3: To explore the consequences of ocean iron fertilization, and not

  14. Melting Behavior and Chemical Properties of the Iron-Carbon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakapenka, V.; Kantor, I.; Kubo, A.; Kuznetsov, A.; Dera, P.; Rivers, M.; Sutton, S.

    2008-12-01

    One of the most challenging experiments related to the laser heating technique in the diamond anvil cell (DAC) is an unambiguous x-ray based detection of melting by recording high quality diffuse x-ray scattering from molten materials at high pressure. Employing a newly developed, advanced, flat top laser heating system at GSECARS, we were able to perform on-line melting experiments at pressures up to 60 GPa. The capability to maintain the molten sample in the DAC for a relatively long time (at least 60 s) allowed us to collect high quality x-ray scattering data suitable for structure analysis even from low-Z molten materials, such as Si, Ge, Fe, Fe3C, Fe7C3 etc. In this work, we focused on the melting behavior and chemical properties of the iron-carbon system at pressures up to ~170 GPa studied with on-line micro x-ray diffraction in a double sided laser heated DAC at GSECARS (Sector 13, APS). Iron carbides (Fe3C, Fe7C3) were synthesized in- situ in the DAC from various mixtures of Fe and C powders with different atomic ratios. We have found that the chemical reaction between iron and carbon takes place independent of the structure of starting phases of iron (fcc or hcp) and carbon (graphite or diamond). The reaction temperature increased gradually from ~1000 K to ~1700 K as pressure increased from 6 GPa to 155 GPa. The melting temperature of iron carbide was found to be systematically lower than for iron by ~300-400 degrees in the pressure range 20-60 GPa. The experimentally measured structure factor and related pair distribution function of iron carbide melt were analyzed and compared with pure iron data at related pressures. High- pressure, high-temperature stability of iron carbide phases at the relevant Earth's mantle-core conditions and physical/chemical properties of iron-carbon melts provide important constraints on models of the formation of D" layer and interactions at the core mantle boundary. Implications of these results for the composition and

  15. Effect of carbon on stress corrosion cracking and anodic oxidation of iron in NaOH solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Flis, J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret

    2008-06-01

    Anodic behaviour of decarburised iron and of quenched Fe–C materials with up to 0.875 wt% C was examined in 8.5 M NaOH at 100 °C to explain the role of carbon in caustic stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of plain steels. Removal of carbon from Armco iron strongly reduced its intergranular SCC. Slip steps on grains did not initiate cracks. It has been shown that carbon at low contents deteriorates the passivation of iron, whereas at high contents it promotes the formation of magnetite. High resistance to SCC of high carbon steels can be explained by an intense formation of magnetite on these steels.

  16. Ocean iron cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Philip W.

    Interest in the biogeochemical cycle of iron has grown rapidly over the last two decades, due to the potential role of this element in modulating global climate in the geological past and ocean productivity in the present day. This trace metal has a disproportionately large effect (1 × 105 C:Fe) on photosynthetic carbon fixation by phytoplankton. In around one third of the open ocean, so-called high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions, the resident phytoplankton have low growth rates despite an abundance of plant nutrients. This is due to the low supply of iron. Iron is present in the ocean in three phases, dissolved, colloidal, and particulate (biogenic and lithogenic). However, iron chemistry is complex with interactions between chemistry and biology such as the production of iron-binding siderophores by oceanic bacteria. This results in the interplay of inorganic chemistry, photochemistry, and organic complexation. Sources of new iron include dust deposition, upwelling of iron-rich deep waters, and the resuspension and lateral transport of sediments. Sinks for iron are mainly biological as evidenced by the vertical nutrient-like profile for dissolved iron in the ocean. Iron is rapidly recycled by the upper ocean biota within a so-called "ferrous wheel." The fe ratio [(new iron)/(new + regenerated iron)] provides an index of the relative supply of iron to the biota by new versus recycled iron. Over the last 15 years, interest in the potential role of iron in shaping climate in the geological past resulted in some of the most ambitious experiments in oceanography: large-scale (i.e., 50-1000 km2) iron enrichment of HNLC waters. They have provided valuable insights into how iron supply influences the biogeochemical cycles of elements such as carbon, sulfur, silicon, nitrogen, and phosphate.

  17. Carbon supported Nano-Iron for environmental remediation: Transport observations using column tests, magnet resonance imaging and synchrotron tomography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, J.; Oswald, S. E.; Mackenzie, K.

    2012-04-01

    The use of nano-zerovalent iron (nZVI) for environmental remediation is a promising new technique for in situ remediation of contaminated groundwater. Due to its high surface area and high reactivity, nZVI is able to dechlorinate organic contaminants and render them harmless. Limited mobility, however, due to fast aggregation and sedimentation of nZVI, restricts the practical applicability for source and plume remediation. Carbo-Iron is a newly developed composite material consisting of activated carbon particles (d50 about 500 nm) that act as carrier for nZVI particles. Together with a polyanionic stabilizer (CMC) Carbo-Iron is able to form a stable injectable suspension. These particles are designed to combine the mobility of activated carbon and the reactivity of nZVI. Various methods were used to observe and describe transport properties, with a focus on column tests and tomographic methods: Column tests were performed in chromatography columns of 40 and 60 cm length, filled with sand grains or glass beads. Results indicate high mobility and breakthrough after addition of CMC, but changing transport properties at different pH and ionic strength. Magnet Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Synchrotron Imaging are technologies of growing interest in observing flow and transport in porous media. Even though both methods are based on different physical principles, both are sensible to iron loads in colloids and allow two- and three-dimensional reconstruction and visualization. Therefore both methods may principally be suitable for observing Carbo-Iron in porous media and might give information complementary to other experimental investigations. A suitable MRI method was developed using a medical MRI. The method based on T1 weighted measurement with short repetition time (TR = 7.0 ms) and echo time (TE = 2.95 ms) can detect different particle concentrations in a porous medium. The synchrotron tomography method used an energy rich (13 keV) parallel X-ray beam to collect

  18. A method for quantifying bioavailable organic carbon in aquifer sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rectanus, H.V.; Widdowson, M.; Novak, J.; Chapelle, F.

    2005-01-01

    The fact that naturally occurring microorganisms can biodegrade PCE and TCE allows the use of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a remediation strategy at chlorinated solvent-contaminated sites. Research at numerous chlorinated solvent sites indicates an active dechlorinating microbial population coupled with an ample supply of organic carbon are conditions needed to sustain reductive dechlorination. A series of extraction experiments was used to compare the ability of the different extractants to remove organic carbon from aquifer sediments. The different extractants included pyrophosphate, sodium hydroxide, and polished water. Pyrophosphate served as a mild extractant that minimally alters the organic structure of the extracted material. Three concentrations (0.1, 0.5, and 1%) of pyrophosphate extracted 18.8, 24.9, and 30.8% of sediment organic carbon, respectively. Under alkali conditions (0.5 N NaOH), which provided the harshest extractant, 30.7% of the sediment organic carbon was recovered. Amorphous organic carbon, measured by potassium persulfate oxidization, consisted of 44.6% of the sediment organic carbon and served as a baseline control for maximum carbon removal. Conversely, highly purified water provided a minimal extraction control and extracted 5.7% of the sediment organic carbon. The removal of organic carbon was quantified by aqueous TOC in the extract and residual sediment organic carbon content. Characterization of the organic carbon extracts by compositional analysis prior and after exposure to the mixed culture might indicate the type organic carbon and functional groups used and/or generated by the organisms. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 8th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium (Baltimore, MD 6/6-9/2005).

  19. Evidence for 13-carbon enrichment in oxalic acid via iron catalyzed photolysis in aqueous phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the effect of photochemical aging on the stable carbon isotopic ratio (δ13C) of oxalic acid (OxA), a dominant organic species in atmospheric aerosols, we conducted a laboratory photolysis of OxA under H2O2-Fe3+(Fe2+)-UV system in aqueous phase and measured δ13C of remaining OxA. Our results showed that a significant photolysis of OxA occurred with OH radical but the isotopic fractionation of OxA was insignificant. In contrast, in the presence of Fe3+ (Fe2+), we found a significant enrichment of 13C in remaining OxA. We also found that kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of OxA largely depends on photochemical age (irradiation time) and concentration ratios of OxA to iron; 3.20 ± 0.49‰ (2.18 ± 1.18‰) and 21.62 ± 5.41‰ in 90 min and 180 min irradiation, in which OxA and Fe3+ (Fe2+) ratios were 50:1 and 200:1, respectively. The enrichment of 13C in remaining OxA was more significant during the photolysis catalyzed by Fe3+ (7‰) than by Fe2+ (3‰) in 90 min irradiation when OxA and iron ratios are the same (50:1). This study provides a laboratory evidence for the isotopic enrichment of 13C in OxA with photochemical aging. This approach is useful for better interpretation of atmospheric isotopic measurements in terms of the extent of atmospheric processing of aerosols.

  20. Iron Amendment and Fenton Oxidation of MTBE-Spent Granular Activated Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton-driven regeneration of Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-spent granular activated carbon (GAC) involves Fe amendment to the GAC to catalyze H2O2 reactions and to enhance the rate of MTBE oxidation and GAC regeneration. Four forms of iron (ferric sulfate, ferric chloride, fer...

  1. Oxygen and carbon isotope geochemistry of the Krivoy rog iron formation, Ukranian SSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, E. C.; Ahmad, S. N.

    1981-04-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotope analyses of samples from three mines in the Krivoy Rog iron formation, Ukranian SSR, are reported here. Maximum and minimum quartz-magnetite fractionation values ( Δ QM) and inferred temperature range in degrees centrigrade for each mine are:

  2. Cobalt and iron oxides dispersed onto activated carbons: The size effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankina, G. V.; Chernavskii, P. A.; Kazak, V. O.; Lunin, V. V.

    2015-06-01

    The effect the nature of activated carbons prepared from natural renewable resources has on the metal particle size in cobalt- and iron-containing systems that can be used as catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) is studied. The highest dispersity is observed for the Co3O4-WS (wood sawdust) system. The average particle size is 9.5 nm.

  3. Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part I. Estimation of the rate constants

    SciTech Connect

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2008-12-15

    A new ironmaking concept using iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets has been proposed, which involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) and an iron bath smelter. This part of the research focuses on studying the two primary chemical kinetic steps. Efforts have been made to experimentally measure the kinetics of the carbon gasification by CO{sub 2} and wustite reduction by CO by isolating them from the influence of heat- and mass-transport steps. A combined reaction model was used to interpret the experimental data and determine the rate constants. Results showed that the reduction is likely to be influenced by the chemical kinetics of both carbon oxidation and wustite reduction at the temperatures of interest. Devolatilized wood-charcoal was observed to be a far more reactive form of carbon in comparison to coal-char. Sintering of the iron-oxide at the high temperatures of interest was found to exert a considerable influence on the reactivity of wustite by virtue of altering the internal pore surface area available for the reaction. Sintering was found to be predominant for highly porous oxides and less of an influence on the denser ores. It was found using an indirect measurement technique that the rate constants for wustite reduction were higher for the porous iron-oxide than dense hematite ore at higher temperatures (> 1423 K). Such an indirect mode of measurement was used to minimize the influence of sintering of the porous oxide at these temperatures.

  4. Effects of calcium carbonate and hydroxyapatite on zinc and iron retention in postmenopausal women

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson-Hughes, B.; Seligson, F.H.; Hughes, V.A.

    1986-07-01

    We measured the effect of calcium carbonate and hydroxyapatite on whole-body retention of zinc-65 in 11 and iron-59 in 13 healthy, postmenopausal women. In a single-blind, controlled, crossover study, each subject, on three occasions, ingested a standard test meal supplemented with iron-59 or zinc-65 and capsules containing placebo or 500 mg elemental calcium as calcium carbonate or hydroxyapatite. Whole-body countings were performed prior to, 30 min after, and 2 wk after each meal. Mean (SEM) zinc retention was 18.1 +/- 1.0% with placebo (control) and did not vary significantly with calcium carbonate (110.0 +/- 8.6% of control) or hydroxyapatite (106.0 +/- 7.9% of control). Iron retention, 6.3 +/- 2.0% with placebo, was significantly reduced with both calcium carbonate (43.3 +/- 8.8% of control, p = 0.002) and hydroxyapatite (45.9 +/- 10.0% of control, p = 0.003). Iron absorption may be significantly reduced when calcium supplements are taken with meals.

  5. Computer simulation of cascade damage in -iron with carbon in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Calder, Andrew F; Bacon, David J; Barashev, Aleksandr; Osetsky, Nickolai

    2008-01-01

    Computer simulation of cascade damage in -iron with carbon in solution Original Research Article Journal of Nuclear Materials, Volume 382, Issues 2 3, 1 December 2008, Pages 91-95 Andrew F. Calder, David J. Bacon, Alexander V. Barashev, Yuri N. Osetsky

  6. Soil Organic Carbon Degradation, Barrow, 2013-2014

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gu, Baohua; Yang, Ziming

    2015-03-30

    This dataset provides information about soil organic carbon decomposition in Barrow soil incubation studies. The soil cores were collected from low-center polygon (Area A) and were incubated in the laboratory at different temperatures for up to 60 days. Transformations of soil organic carbon were characterized by UV and FT-IR, and small organic acids in water-soluble carbons were quantified by ion chromatography during the incubation

  7. Removal of 2-ClBP from soil-water system using activated carbon supported nanoscale zerovalent iron.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Yu, Tian; Han, Xiaolin; Ying, Weichi

    2016-09-01

    We explored the feasibility and removal mechanism of removing 2-chlorobiphenyl (2-ClBP) from soil-water system using granular activated carbon (GAC) impregnated with nanoscale zerovalent iron (reactive activated carbon or RAC). The RAC samples were successfully synthesized by the liquid precipitation method. The mesoporous GAC based RAC with low iron content (1.32%) exhibited higher 2-ClBP removal efficiency (54.6%) in the water phase. The result of Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model implied that the different molecular structures between 2-ClBP and trichloroethylene (TCE) resulted in more difference in dechlorination reaction rates on RAC than adsorption capacities. Compared to removing 2-ClBP in the water phase, RAC removed the 2-ClBP more slowly in the soil phase due to the significant external mass transfer resistance. However, in the soil phase, a better removal capacity of RAC was observed than its base GAC because the chemical dechlorination played a more important role in total removal process for 2-ClBP. This important result verified the effectiveness of RAC for removing 2-ClBP in the soil phase. Although reducing the total RAC removal rate of 2-ClBP, soil organic matter (SOM), especially the soft carbon, also served as an electron transfer medium to promote the dechlorination of 2-ClBP in the long term. PMID:27593281

  8. Study of Organic and Inorganic Binders on Strength of Iron Oxide Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Urvashi; Kawatra, S. Komar; Eisele, Timothy C.

    2013-08-01

    Bentonite is a predominant binder used in iron ore pelletization. However, the presence of a high content of silica and alumina in bentonite is considered undesirable for ironmaking operations. The objective of this study was to identify the alternatives of bentonite for iron ore pelletization. To achieve this goal, different types of organic and inorganic binders were utilized to produce iron oxide pellets. The quality of these iron oxide pellets was compared with pellets made using bentonite. All pellets were tested for physical strength at different stages of pelletization to determine their ability to survive during shipping and handling. The results show that organic binders such as lactose monohydrate, hemicellulose, and sodium lignosulfonate can provide sufficient strength to indurated pellets.

  9. Carbon and iron ion radiation-induced cytotoxicity and transformation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhaozong; Ware, Jeffrey H.; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2011-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to characterize carbon and iron ion radiation-induced adverse biological effects in terms of toxicity and transformation in vitro. HTori-3 human thyroid epithelial cells were irradiated with 0.3-GeV/n (13.6 KeV/µm) carbon ions and 1-GeV/n (150 KeV/µm) iron ions, both of which represent high-mass, high atomic number (Z) and high-energy particles known as HZE particles, as well as γ-rays. The survival of the irradiated cells was determined by a clonogenic survival assay. The yield of colonies growing in soft agar was used as a surrogate endpoint biomarker for transformation in vitro. The results showed that HZE particles and γ-ray radiations are effective in increasing the yield of anchorage-independent colonies. Based on the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values in the clonogenic survival assays, 0.3-GeV/n carbon ions and 1-GeV/n iron ions were 2.9 and 2.4 times, respectively, as effective as γ-rays at killing the irradiated HTori-3 cells. At a dose of 200 cGy, 0.3-GeV/n carbon ions and 1-GeV/n iron ions were found to be 3.5 and 7.3 times, respectively, as effective as γ-rays at inducing anchorage-independent growth. These results suggest that the carcinogenic potential of 0.3-GeV/n carbon ions, as represented by the ability to induce anchorage-independent growth, may be lower than that of 1-GeV/n iron ions. PMID:22866150

  10. Visible-light-driven photocatalytic water oxidation catalysed by iron-based metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Yu; Toyao, Takashi; Miyahara, Kenta; Zakary, Lionet; Van, Dang Do; Kamata, Yusuke; Kim, Tae-Ho; Lee, Soo Wohn; Matsuoka, Masaya

    2016-04-14

    An iron-based metal-organic framework, MIL-101(Fe), promotes photocatalytic water oxidation to produce oxygen from aqueous silver nitrate solution under visible-light irradiation. The finely dispersed iron-oxo clusters embedded as nodes of the porous framework would contribute importantly to the efficient promotion of the reaction as compared to bulk hematite (α-Fe2O3). PMID:26996996

  11. A field investigation on transport of carbon-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Busch, J; Meißner, T; Potthoff, A; Bleyl, S; Georgi, A; Mackenzie, K; Trabitzsch, R; Werban, U; Oswald, S E

    2015-10-01

    The application of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) for subsurface remediation of groundwater contaminants is a promising new technology, which can be understood as alternative to the permeable reactive barrier technique using granular iron. Dechlorination of organic contaminants by zero-valent iron seems promising. Currently, one limitation to widespread deployment is the fast agglomeration and sedimentation of nZVI in colloidal suspensions, even more so when in soils and sediments, which limits the applicability for the treatment of sources and plumes of contamination. Colloid-supported nZVI shows promising characteristics to overcome these limitations. Mobility of Carbo-Iron Colloids (CIC) - a newly developed composite material based on finely ground activated carbon as a carrier for nZVI - was tested in a field application: In this study, a horizontal dipole flow field was established between two wells separated by 5.3m in a confined, natural aquifer. The injection/extraction rate was 500L/h. Approximately 1.2kg of CIC was suspended with the polyanionic stabilizer carboxymethyl cellulose. The suspension was introduced into the aquifer at the injection well. Breakthrough of CIC was observed visually and based on total particle and iron concentrations detected in samples from the extraction well. Filtration of water samples revealed a particle breakthrough of about 12% of the amount introduced. This demonstrates high mobility of CIC particles and we suggest that nZVI carried on CIC can be used for contaminant plume remediation by in-situ formation of reactive barriers. PMID:25864966

  12. The structural-phase state of iron-carbon coatings formed by the ultradispersed particles

    SciTech Connect

    Manakova, Irina A. Ozernoy, Alexey N. Tuleushev, Yuriy Zh. Vereshchak, Mikhail F. Volodin, Valeriy N. Zhakanbayev, Yeldar A.

    2014-10-27

    The methods of nuclear gamma-resonance spectroscopy, elemental microanalysis, and X-ray diffraction were used to study nanoscale coatings. The samples were prepared by magnetron sputtering of carbon and iron particles. They alternately were deposited on monocrystalline silicon or polycrystalline corundum substrate moving relative to the plasma flows in the form of sublayers with a thickness of less than 0.6 nm up to the total thickness of 150-500 nm. Solid solutions with the carbon concentrations of up to 7.5, 12.0, 17.6, and 23.9 at% were produced by co-precipitation of ultradispersed particles of iron and carbon. Using method of conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, we detected the anisotropy of orientation of magnetic moments of iron atoms due to texturing of the formed coatings. The deviation of the crystallite orientation from the average value depends on the degree of carbonization. At 550°C, the pearlite eutectic α‐Fe(C)+Fe{sub 3}C is formed from the amorphous structure without formation of intermediate carbides. The relative content of cementite correlates with the amount of carbon in the coating. The formation of the solid solutions-alloys directly during the deposition process confirms the theory of thermal-fluctuation melting of small particles.

  13. The structural-phase state of iron-carbon coatings formed by the ultradispersed particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manakova, Irina A.; Ozernoy, Alexey N.; Tuleushev, Yuriy Zh.; Vereshchak, Mikhail F.; Volodin, Valeriy N.; Zhakanbayev, Yeldar A.

    2014-10-01

    The methods of nuclear gamma-resonance spectroscopy, elemental microanalysis, and X-ray diffraction were used to study nanoscale coatings. The samples were prepared by magnetron sputtering of carbon and iron particles. They alternately were deposited on monocrystalline silicon or polycrystalline corundum substrate moving relative to the plasma flows in the form of sublayers with a thickness of less than 0.6 nm up to the total thickness of 150-500 nm. Solid solutions with the carbon concentrations of up to 7.5, 12.0, 17.6, and 23.9 at% were produced by co-precipitation of ultradispersed particles of iron and carbon. Using method of conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, we detected the anisotropy of orientation of magnetic moments of iron atoms due to texturing of the formed coatings. The deviation of the crystallite orientation from the average value depends on the degree of carbonization. At 550°C, the pearlite eutectic α- Fe ( C )+ Fe3C is formed from the amorphous structure without formation of intermediate carbides. The relative content of cementite correlates with the amount of carbon in the coating. The formation of the solid solutions-alloys directly during the deposition process confirms the theory of thermal-fluctuation melting of small particles.

  14. [Organic Carbon and Elemental Carbon in Forest Biomass Burning Smoke].

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke; Liu, Gang; Zhou, Li-min; Li, Jiu-hai; Xu, Hui; Wu, Dan; Hong, Lei; Chen, Hui-yu; Yang, Wei-zong

    2015-06-01

    Ten kinds of trees were selected for preparing dry and wet stick samples. Concentrations of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) in particular matter produced by sticks samples in the flaming and smoldering were analyzed through the Thermal Optical Carbon Analyzer (Model 2001A). The results showed that mean values of OC (EF(OC)), EC (EF(EC)), PM (EF(PM)) emission factors were 6.8, 2.1, 16.5 g x kg(-1) in the dry stick flaming smoke, 57.5, 11.1, 130.9 g x kg(-1) in the dry stick smoldering smoke, 13.6, 3.3, 30.5 g x kg(-1) in the wet stick flaming smoke, 57.6, 9.6, 125.6 g x kg(-1) in the wet stick smoldering smoke. Compared to the flaming condition, EF(OC), EF(EC), EF(PM), were much higher in the smoldering condition. In the flaming condition, EF(OC), EF(EC), EF(PM) had positive correlations with the moisture content. The mean values of OC/PM, EC/PM, TC/PM (TC = OC + EC) were 45%, 10%, 55%, and the mass fractions of OC was much higher in smoldering condition than those in flaming condition, but the mass fractions of EC was lower in the smoldering condition. Compared to dry sticks, the smoke of wet sticks combustion had higher mass fractions of OC and lower mass fractions of EC. The mean value of OC/EC was 3.3 (2.5-5.2) in the dry stick flaming smoke, and was 5.2 (4.3-6.3) in the dry stick smoldering smoke, in the wet stick flaming smoke was 4.1 (3.1-5.3), and was 6.2 (4.2-8.4) in the wet stick smoldering smoke. Compared to the flaming condition, the mean value of OC/EC was higher in the smoldering condition, and the mean value of OC/EC was much higher in high moisture content stick combustion smoke. The correlation coefficient between OC and EC was 0.985 in dry stick combustions, and was 0.915 in wet stick combustions. So, based on the flaming and smoldering condition, the correlation between OC and EC was significant in different moisture contents of sticks. PMID:26387300

  15. Transient Dissolved Organic Carbon Through Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Y.; Hornberger, G. M.; Kaplan, L. A.; Newbold, J. D.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Tsang, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an important constituent of soil solution that plays a role in many chemical and biological processes in soils; it is also an important energy source for bacteria in the soil ecosystem. Hydrology has a significant control on the transport and fate of dissolved organic carbon in the soil but mechanisms that affect said transport are not well understood. In particular, dynamic information on DOC transport through forest soils on short time scales (one or two precipitation event) is lacking at present. DOC is a very complex mix of organic compounds. A key to quantifying DOC dynamics is to establish useful approximations for behavior of this complex mixture. Biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) is an important part of DOC. It is reported that between 12 and 44% of DOC released from the forest floor can be decomposed in solutions by indigenous microbes. In our study, we considered how DOC, BDOC, and flow interact in soil columns. In-situ soil cores with two different lengths were installed under a mixed deciduous canopy. The effects of artificial rain on DOC and BDOC transport were examined by dripping nano pure water amended with bromide on the top of soil cores and sampling the water collected at the bottom of the cores for DOC and BDOC. We used plug-flow biofilm reactors to measure the BDOC concentration. It is likely that reduced rates of decomposition in dry soils will cause microbial products of DOC to accumulate; hence DOC concentration should be high at the first flush of rain and decline as the event proceeds. The experimental results show the expected pattern, that is, the first samples we collected always had the highest DOC and BDOC concentrations. The concentrations tend to decline through the simulated precipitation event. Application of a second “storm” forty minutes after the cessation of the first application of water resulted in effluent DOC concentration increasing a small amount initially and then

  16. Temperature Dependence of Photodegradation of Dissolved Organic Matter to Dissolved Inorganic Carbon and Particulate Organic Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Porcal, Petr; Dillon, Peter J.; Molot, Lewis A.

    2015-01-01

    Photochemical transformation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) has been studied for more than two decades. Usually, laboratory or “in-situ” experiments are used to determine photodegradation variables. A common problem with these experiments is that the photodegradation experiments are done at higher than ambient temperature. Five laboratory experiments were done to determine the effect of temperature on photochemical degradation of DOM. Experimental results showed strong dependence of photodegradation on temperature. Mathematical modeling of processes revealed that two different pathways engaged in photochemical transformation of DOM to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) strongly depend on temperature. Direct oxidation of DOM to DIC dominated at low temperatures while conversion of DOM to intermediate particulate organic carbon (POC) prior to oxidation to DIC dominated at high temperatures. It is necessary to consider this strong dependence when the results of laboratory experiments are interpreted in regard to natural processes. Photodegradation experiments done at higher than ambient temperature will necessitate correction of rate constants. PMID:26106898

  17. Aligned carbon nanotubes catalytically grown on iron-based nanoparticles obtained by laser-induced CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Normand, F.; Cojocaru, C. S.; Ersen, O.; Legagneux, P.; Gangloff, L.; Fleaca, C.; Alexandrescu, R.; Dumitrache, F.; Morjan, I.

    2007-12-01

    Iron-based nanoparticles are prepared by a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. They are characterized as body-centered Fe and Fe 2O 3 (maghemite/magnetite) particles with sizes ≤5 and 10 nm, respectively. The Fe particles are embedded in a protective carbon matrix. Both kind of particles are dispersed by spin-coating on SiO 2/Si(1 0 0) flat substrates. They are used as catalyst to grow carbon nanotubes by a plasma- and filaments-assisted catalytic CVD process (PE-HF-CCVD). Vertically oriented and thin carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown with few differences between the two samples, except the diameter in relation to the initial size of the iron particles, and the density. The electron field emission of these samples exhibit quite interesting behavior with a low turn-on voltage at around 1 V/μm.

  18. Mercury remediation in wetland sediment using zero-valent iron and granular activated carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, Ariel S.; Huntington, Thomas G.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.; Amirbahman, Aria

    2016-01-01

    Wetlands are hotspots for production of toxic methylmercury (MeHg) that can bioaccumulate in the food web. The objective of this study was to determine whether the application of zero-valent iron (ZVI) or granular activated carbon (GAC) to wetland sediment could reduce MeHg production and bioavailability to benthic organisms. Field mesocosms were installed in a wetland fringing Hodgdon Pond (Maine, USA), and ZVI and GAC were applied. Pore-water MeHg concentrations were lower in treated compared with untreated mesocosms; however, sediment MeHg, as well as total Hg (THg), concentrations were not significantly different between treated and untreated mesocosms, suggesting that smaller pore-water MeHg concentrations in treated sediment were likely due to adsorption to ZVI and GAC, rather than inhibition of MeHg production. In laboratory experiments with intact vegetated sediment clumps, amendments did not significantly change sediment THg and MeHg concentrations; however, the mean pore-water MeHg and MeHg:THg ratios were lower in the amended sediment than the control. In the laboratory microcosms, snails (Lymnaea stagnalis) accumulated less MeHg in sediment treated with ZVI or GAC. The study results suggest that both GAC and ZVI have potential for reducing MeHg bioaccumulation in wetland sediment.

  19. Mercury remediation in wetland sediment using zero-valent iron and granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ariel S; Huntington, Thomas G; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C; Amirbahman, Aria

    2016-05-01

    Wetlands are hotspots for production of toxic methylmercury (MeHg) that can bioaccumulate in the food web. The objective of this study was to determine whether the application of zero-valent iron (ZVI) or granular activated carbon (GAC) to wetland sediment could reduce MeHg production and bioavailability to benthic organisms. Field mesocosms were installed in a wetland fringing Hodgdon Pond (Maine, USA), and ZVI and GAC were applied. Pore-water MeHg concentrations were lower in treated compared with untreated mesocosms; however, sediment MeHg, as well as total Hg (THg), concentrations were not significantly different between treated and untreated mesocosms, suggesting that smaller pore-water MeHg concentrations in treated sediment were likely due to adsorption to ZVI and GAC, rather than inhibition of MeHg production. In laboratory experiments with intact vegetated sediment clumps, amendments did not significantly change sediment THg and MeHg concentrations; however, the mean pore-water MeHg and MeHg:THg ratios were lower in the amended sediment than the control. In the laboratory microcosms, snails (Lymnaea stagnalis) accumulated less MeHg in sediment treated with ZVI or GAC. The study results suggest that both GAC and ZVI have potential for reducing MeHg bioaccumulation in wetland sediment. PMID:26874318

  20. Magnetically anisotropic additive for scalable manufacturing of polymer nanocomposite: iron-coated carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Namiko; Manohara, Harish; Platzman, Ellen

    2016-02-01

    Novel nanoparticles additives for polymer nanocomposites were prepared by coating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with ferromagnetic iron (Fe) layers, so that their micro-structures can be bulk-controlled by external magnetic field application. Application of magnetic fields is a promising, scalable method to deliver bulk amount of nanocomposites while maintaining organized nanoparticle assembly throughout the uncured polymer matrix. In this work, Fe layers (˜18 nm thick) were deposited on CNTs (˜38 nm diameter and ˜50 μm length) to form thin films with high aspect ratio, resulting in a dominance of shape anisotropy and thus high coercivity of ˜50-100 Oe. The Fe-coated CNTs were suspended in water and applied with a weak magnetic field of ˜75 G, and yet preliminary magnetic assembly was confirmed. Our results demonstrate that the fabricated Fe-coated CNTs are magnetically anisotropic and effectively respond to magnetic fields that are ˜103 times smaller than other existing work (˜105 G). We anticipate this work will pave the way for effective property enhancement and bulk application of CNT-polymer nanocomposites, through controlled micro-structure and scalable manufacturing.

  1. Does Iron Fertilization Lead to Enhanced Carbon Sequestration? A Synthesis of Polar Star Results.

    SciTech Connect

    Buesseler, K.O.

    2002-12-01

    This research synthesized activities related to work conducted as part of the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) which investigated the effects of iron fertilization on enhanced carbon sequestration. The primary interest was in the fate of sinking particles which carry carbon to the deep ocean, where it can be sequestered from the atmosphere for >100-1000 year time scales. This was accomplished through direct measurements of thorium-234, a naturally occurring particle reactive radionuclide that traces shallow particle export; SF6 measurements to track the position of the Fe fertilized region; and the collection of ancillary data and samples to augment the study of major C, nutrient and elemental budgets as well as appropriate samples for biological study. Results of this work show a small, but progressively increasing flux of particulate organic C to depth as a consequence of Fe fertilization. This is the first data set to show any effect of Fe fertilization on C sequestration in the Southern Ocean. The changes in particle export during SOFeX are significant, but only possible to detect given what is arguably the largest 234Th data set ever collected as part of an oceanographic experiment. Most prior 234Th studies, simply use a steady-state approximation and ignore advective and diffusive fluxes in the calculation of 234Th fluxes. High resolution time-series of average 0-50m 234Th activities in and out of the Southern patch find a clear steady decrease in 234Th flux that is slightly larger in vs. out of the Fe fertilized patch. This decrease must be included in the full 234Th flux calculation and the deliberate tagging of this water mass with SF6 combined with time-series sampling allowed for a careful evaluation of this non-steady state (NSS) term. Likewise, the addition of SF6 allows for the evaluation of vertical exchange (via the gradient of SF6 below the patch) and dilution effects (after correction for atmospheric losses). In most set tings these physical

  2. Biological carbon precursor to diagenetic siderite with spherical structures in iron formations.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Inga; Konhauser, Kurt O; Papineau, Dominic; Bekker, Andrey; Kappler, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    During deposition of Precambrian iron formation, the combined sedimentation of ferrihydrite and phytoplankton biomass should have facilitated Fe(III) reduction during diagenesis. However, the only evidence for this reaction in iron formations is the iron and carbon isotope values preserved in the authigenic ferrous iron-containing minerals. Here we show experimentally that spheroidal siderite, which is preserved in many iron formation and could have been precursor to rhombohedral or massive siderite, forms by reacting ferrihydrite with glucose (a proxy for microbial biomass) at pressure and temperature conditions typical of diagenesis (170 °C and 1.2 kbar). Depending on the abundance of siderite, we found that it is also possible to draw conclusions about the Fe(III):C ratio of the initial ferrihydrite-biomass sediment. Our results suggest that spherical to rhombohedral siderite structures in deep-water, Fe-oxide iron formation can be used as a biosignature for photoferrotrophy, whereas massive siderite reflects high cyanobacterial biomass loading in highly productive shallow-waters. PMID:23612282

  3. Low-carbon transition of iron and steel industry in China: carbon intensity, economic growth and policy intervention.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing; Li, Xiao; Qiao, Yuanbo; Shi, Lei

    2015-02-01

    As the biggest iron and steel producer in the world and one of the highest CO2 emission sectors, China's iron and steel industry is undergoing a low-carbon transition accompanied by remarkable technological progress and investment adjustment, in response to the macroeconomic climate and policy intervention. Many drivers of the CO2 emissions of the iron and steel industry have been explored, but the relationships between CO2 abatement, investment and technological expenditure, and their connections with the economic growth and governmental policies in China, have not been conjointly and empirically examined. We proposed a concise conceptual model and an econometric model to investigate this crucial question. The results of regression, Granger causality test and impulse response analysis indicated that technological expenditure can significantly reduce CO2 emissions, and that investment expansion showed a negative impact on CO2 emission reduction. It was also argued with empirical evidence that a good economic situation favored CO2 abatement in China's iron and steel industry, while achieving CO2 emission reduction in this industrial sector did not necessarily threaten economic growth. This shed light on the dispute over balancing emission cutting and economic growth. Regarding the policy aspects, the year 2000 was found to be an important turning point for policy evolution and the development of the iron and steel industry in China. The subsequent command and control policies had a significant, positive effect on CO2 abatement. PMID:25662248

  4. Formation and transformation of a short range ordered iron carbonate precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dideriksen, Knud; Frandsen, Cathrine; Bovet, Nicolas; Wallace, Adam F.; Sel, Ozlem; Arbour, Tyler; Navrotsky, Alexandra; De Yoreo, James J.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-09-01

    Fe(II)-carbonates, such as siderite, form in environments where O2 is scarce, e.g., during marine sediment diagenesis, corrosion and possibly CO2 sequestration, but little is known about their formation pathways. We show that early precipitates from carbonate solutions containing 0.1 M Fe(II) with varying pH produced broad peaks in X-ray diffraction and contained dominantly Fe and CO3 when probed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Reduced pair distribution function (PDF) analysis shows only peaks corresponding to interatomic distances below 15 Å, reflecting a material with no long range structural order. Moreover, PDF peak positions differ from those for known iron carbonates and hydroxides. Mössbauer spectra also deviate from those expected for known iron carbonates and suggest a less crystalline structure. These data show that a previously unidentified iron carbonate precursor phase formed. Its coherent scattering domains determined from PDF analysis are slightly larger than for amorphous calcium carbonate, suggesting that the precursor could be nanocrystalline. Replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of Fe-carbonate polynuclear complexes yield PDF peak positions that agree well with those from experiments, offering the possibility that the material is a condensate of such complexes, assembled in a relatively unorganised fashion. If this is the case, the material could be nearly amorphous, rather than being composed of well defined nanocrystals. PDF measurements of samples ageing in solution coupled with refinement with the software PDFgui show that the material transforms to siderite or siderite/chukanovite mixtures within hours and that the transformation rate depends on pH. The identified Fe-carbonate precursor may potentially form during anaerobic corrosion or bacterial Fe reduction.

  5. Synthesis, structure, and magnetic properties of iron and nickel nanoparticles encapsulated into carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurin, V. A.; Yermakov, A. Ye.; Uimin, M. A.; Mysik, A. A.; Shchegoleva, N. N.; Gaviko, V. S.; Maikov, V. V.

    2014-02-01

    Nanocomposites based on iron and nickel particles encapsulated into carbon (Fe@C and Ni@C), with an average size of the metal core in the range from 5 to 20 nm and a carbon shell thickness of approximately 2 nm, have been prepared by the gas-phase synthesis method in a mixture of argon and butane. It has been found using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Mössbauer spectroscopy that iron nanocomposites prepared in butane, apart from the carbon shell, contain the following phases: iron carbide (cementite), α-Fe, and γ-Fe. The phase composition of the Fe@C nanocomposite correlates with the magnetization of approximately 100 emu/g at room temperature. The replacement of butane by methane as a carbon source leads to another state of nanoparticles: no carbon coating is formed, and upon subsequent contact with air, the Fe3O4 oxide shell is formed on the surface of nanoparticles. Nickel-based nanocomposites prepared in butane, apart from pure nickel in the metal core, contain the supersaturated metastable solid solution Ni(C) and carbon coating. The Ni(C) solid solution can decompose both during the synthesis and upon the subsequent annealing. The completeness and degree of decomposition depend on the synthesis regime and the size of nickel nanoparticles: the smaller is the size of nanoparticles, the higher is the degree of decomposition into pure nickel and carbon. The magnetization of the Ni@C nanocomposites is determined by several contributions, for example, the contribution of the magnetic solid solution Ni(C) and the contribution of the nonmagnetic carbon coating; moreover, some contribution to the magnetization can be caused by the superparamagnetic behavior of nanoparticles.

  6. Carbon accumulation in arid croplands of northwest China: pedogenic carbonate exceeding organic carbon

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiujun; Wang, Jiaping; Xu, Minggang; Zhang, Wenju; Fan, Tinglu; Zhang, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Soil carbonate (SIC) exceeds organic carbon (SOC) greatly in arid lands, thus may be important for carbon sequestration. However, field data for quantifying carbonate accumulation have been lacking. This study aims to improve our understanding of SIC dynamics and its role in carbon sequestration. We analyzed two datasets of SOC and SIC and their 13C compositions , one with over 100 soil samples collected recently from various land uses in the Yanqi Basin, Xinjiang, and the other with 18 archived soil samples from a long-term experiment (LTE) in Pingliang, Gansu. The data from the Yanqi Basin showed that SOC had a significant relationship with SIC and pedogenic carbonate (PIC); converting shrub land to cropland increased PIC stock by 5.2 kg C m−2, which was 3.6 times of that in SOC stock. The data from the LTE showed greater accumulation of PIC (21–49 g C m−2 year−1) than SOC (10–39 g C m−2 year−1) over 0–20 cm. Our study points out that intensive cropping in the arid and semi-arid regions leads to an increase in both SOC and PIC. Increasing SOC through straw organic amendments enhances PIC accumulation in the arid cropland of northwestern China. PMID:26091554

  7. Carbon accumulation in arid croplands of northwest China: pedogenic carbonate exceeding organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiujun; Wang, Jiaping; Xu, Minggang; Zhang, Wenju; Fan, Tinglu; Zhang, Juan

    2015-06-01

    Soil carbonate (SIC) exceeds organic carbon (SOC) greatly in arid lands, thus may be important for carbon sequestration. However, field data for quantifying carbonate accumulation have been lacking. This study aims to improve our understanding of SIC dynamics and its role in carbon sequestration. We analyzed two datasets of SOC and SIC and their 13C compositions , one with over 100 soil samples collected recently from various land uses in the Yanqi Basin, Xinjiang, and the other with 18 archived soil samples from a long-term experiment (LTE) in Pingliang, Gansu. The data from the Yanqi Basin showed that SOC had a significant relationship with SIC and pedogenic carbonate (PIC); converting shrub land to cropland increased PIC stock by 5.2 kg C m-2, which was 3.6 times of that in SOC stock. The data from the LTE showed greater accumulation of PIC (21-49 g C m-2 year-1) than SOC (10-39 g C m-2 year-1) over 0-20 cm. Our study points out that intensive cropping in the arid and semi-arid regions leads to an increase in both SOC and PIC. Increasing SOC through straw organic amendments enhances PIC accumulation in the arid cropland of northwestern China.

  8. Carbon accumulation in arid croplands of northwest China: pedogenic carbonate exceeding organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiujun; Wang, Jiaping; Xu, Minggang; Zhang, Wenju; Fan, Tinglu; Zhang, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Soil carbonate (SIC) exceeds organic carbon (SOC) greatly in arid lands, thus may be important for carbon sequestration. However, field data for quantifying carbonate accumulation have been lacking. This study aims to improve our understanding of SIC dynamics and its role in carbon sequestration. We analyzed two datasets of SOC and SIC and their (13)C compositions , one with over 100 soil samples collected recently from various land uses in the Yanqi Basin, Xinjiang, and the other with 18 archived soil samples from a long-term experiment (LTE) in Pingliang, Gansu. The data from the Yanqi Basin showed that SOC had a significant relationship with SIC and pedogenic carbonate (PIC); converting shrub land to cropland increased PIC stock by 5.2 kg C m(-2), which was 3.6 times of that in SOC stock. The data from the LTE showed greater accumulation of PIC (21-49 g C m(-2) year(-1)) than SOC (10-39 g C m(-2) year(-1)) over 0-20 cm. Our study points out that intensive cropping in the arid and semi-arid regions leads to an increase in both SOC and PIC. Increasing SOC through straw organic amendments enhances PIC accumulation in the arid cropland of northwestern China. PMID:26091554

  9. Carbon diffusion in solid iron as function of pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagno, V.; Crispin, K. L.; Fei, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The knowledge of carbon diffusion in metallic iron is of importance for both industrial and geological applications. In industry the diffusion properties of carbon apply to the massive production of steel through carburizing and galvanization processes at high temperature with the aim to improve the hardness and rust resistance of such materials. In geoscience the diffusion of carbon in metallic phases at high pressure and temperature is important for determining the rate of reactions and crystal growth of carbide phases likely coexisting with mantle silicates. Due to a small atomic radius, carbon is expected to dissolve by interstitial diffusion in solid metals. However, to date there are no experimental data available to understand the role that pressure plays on the mobilization of carbon through solid iron. Further, for light elements such as carbon or sulfur the activation energy is assumed to be lower than in case of lattice diffusion. However, with increasing pressure the activation volume must be taken into account to better understand diffusion processes at the atomic scale. We performed experiments using multianvil and piston cylinder devices at pressures between 1.5 and 6 GPa and temperature of 700-1200°C. Experiments were carried out using cylindrical glassy carbon sandwiched between layers of pure iron rods of known thickness enclosed in MgO capsule. Analytical techniques included FE-SEM for textural observation and accurate analyses of the interface between layers, while concentration profiles were measured using the electron microprobe with an optimized standardization procedure. Concentration profiles of carbon in iron were computed to determine the diffusion coefficients based on Fick's second law formulation assuming isotropic one dimension diffusion. Preliminary results confirm the positive temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient for carbon widely discussed in literature. However, our results also show that a significant increase in

  10. Serum albumin forms a lactoferrin-like soluble iron-binding complex in presence of hydrogen carbonate ions.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroshi M; Urazono, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Toshiya

    2014-02-15

    The iron-lactoferrin complex is a common food ingredient because of its iron-solubilizing capability in the presence of hydrogen carbonate ions. However, it is unclear whether the formation of a stable iron-binding complex is limited to lactoferrin. In this study, we investigated the effects of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on iron solubility and iron-catalyzed lipid oxidation in the presence of hydrogen carbonate ions. BSA could solubilize >100-fold molar equivalents of iron at neutral pH, exceeding the specific metal-binding property of BSA. This iron-solubilizing capability of BSA was impaired by thermally denaturing BSA at ≥ 70 °C for 10 min at pH 8.5. The resulting iron-BSA complex inhibited iron-catalyzed oxidation of soybean oil in a water-in-oil emulsion measured using the Rancimat test. Our study is the first to show that BSA, like lactoferrin, forms a soluble iron-binding complex in the presence of hydrogen carbonate ions. PMID:24128453

  11. Erosion of soil organic carbon: implications for carbon sequestration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Oost, Kristof; Van Hemelryck, Hendrik; Harden, Jennifer W.

    2009-01-01

    Agricultural activities have substantially increased rates of soil erosion and deposition, and these processes have a significant impact on carbon (C) mineralization and burial. Here, we present a synthesis of erosion effects on carbon dynamics and discuss the implications of soil erosion for carbon sequestration strategies. We demonstrate that for a range of data-based parameters from the literature, soil erosion results in increased C storage onto land, an effect that is heterogeneous on the landscape and is variable on various timescales. We argue that the magnitude of the erosion term and soil carbon residence time, both strongly influenced by soil management, largely control the strength of the erosion-induced sink. In order to evaluate fully the effects of soil management strategies that promote carbon sequestration, a full carbon account must be made that considers the impact of erosion-enhanced disequilibrium between carbon inputs and decomposition, including effects on net primary productivity and decomposition rates.

  12. Origin and fate of particulate and dissolved organic matter in a naturally iron-fertilized region of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, L.; Caparros, J.; Leblanc, K.; Obernosterer, I.

    2015-01-01

    Natural iron fertilization of high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) waters induces annually occurring spring phytoplankton blooms off the Kerguelen Islands (Southern Ocean). To examine the origin and fate of particulate and dissolved organic matter (POM and DOM), D- and L-amino acids (AA) were quantified at bloom and HNLC stations. Total hydrolyzable AA accounted for 21-25% of surface particulate organic carbon (%POCAA) at the bloom sites, but for 10% at the HNLC site. A marked decrease in %POCAA with depth was observed at the most productive stations leading to values between 3 and 5% below 300 m depth. AA contributed to only 0.9-4.4% of dissolved organic carbon (%DOCAA) at all stations. The only consistent vertical trend was observed at the most productive station (A3-2) where %DOCAA decreased from ~ 2% in the surface waters to 0.9% near 300 m. These AA yields revealed that POM and DOM were more rapidly altered or mineralized at the bloom sites compared to the HNLC site. Alteration state was also assessed by trends in C / N ratio, %D-AA and degradation index. Different molecular markers indicated that POM mostly originated from diatoms and bacteria. The estimated average proportion of POM from intact phytoplankton cells in surface waters was 45% at the bloom station A3-2, but 14% at the HNLC site. Estimates based on D-AA yields indicated that ~ 15% of POM and ~ 30% of DOM was of bacterial origin (cells and cell fragments) at all stations. Surprisingly, the DOM in HNLC waters appeared less altered than the DOM from the bloom, had slightly higher dissolved AA concentrations, and showed no sign of alteration within the water column. Unfavorable conditions for bacterial degradation in HNLC regions can explain these findings. In contrast, large inputs of labile organic molecules and iron likely stimulate the degradation of organic matter (priming effect) and the production of more recalcitrant DOM (microbial carbon pump) during iron-fertilized blooms.

  13. Pesticide sorption on geologic material of varying organic carbon content.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, D C; Wood, A L

    1988-09-01

    Sorption of three pesticides on geologic material ranging in organic carbon content from 0.33 to 6.9 g kg-1 was measured in soil columns using a miscible displacement technique. An octanol-water partitioning model was shown to be inappropriate for predicting sorption of the less hydrophobic pesticides on the low organic carbon materials. PMID:3255290

  14. Black Carbon in Estuarine and Coastal Ocean Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannino, Antonio; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of high-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter (DOM) from two estuaries in the northwest Atlantic Ocean reveals that black carbon (BC) is a significant component of previously uncharacterized DOM, suggesting that river-estuary systems are important exporters of recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon to the ocean.

  15. Friction induced surface activity of some simple organic chlorides and hydrocarbons with iron.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Sliding friction studies were conducted on an iron surface with exposure of that surface to various hydrocarbons and organic chlorides. The hydrocarbons included ethane, ethylene, ethyl chloride, methyl chloride and vinyl chloride. Auger cylindrical-mirror analysis was used to follow interactions of the hydrocarbon and organic chlorides with the iron surface. Results with vinyl chloride indicate friction-induced surface reactivity, adsorption to surface oxides, friction sensitivity to concentration and polymerization. Variation in the loads employed influence adsorption and, accordingly, friction. Unlike results with ethyl and vinyl chloride, friction-induced surface reactivity was not observed with ethane and ethylene.

  16. The effect of iron loading and iron chelation on the innate immune response and subclinical organ injury during human endotoxemia: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    van Eijk, Lucas T; Heemskerk, Suzanne; van der Pluijm, Rob W; van Wijk, Susanne M; Peters, Wilbert H M; van der Hoeven, Johannes G; Kox, Matthijs; Swinkels, Dorine W; Pickkers, Peter

    2014-03-01

    In this double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial involving 30 healthy male volunteers we investigated the acute effects of iron loading (single dose of 1.25 mg/kg iron sucrose) and iron chelation therapy (single dose of 30 mg/kg deferasirox) on iron parameters, oxidative stress, the innate immune response, and subclinical organ injury during experimental human endotoxemia. The administration of iron sucrose induced a profound increase in plasma malondialdehyde 1 h after administration (433±37% of baseline; P<0.0001), but did not potentiate the endotoxemia-induced increase in malondialdehyde, as was seen 3 h after endotoxin administration in the placebo group (P=0.34) and the iron chelation group (P=0.008). Endotoxemia resulted in an initial increase in serum iron levels and transferrin saturation that was accompanied by an increase in labile plasma iron, especially when transferrin saturation reached levels above 90%. Thereafter, serum iron decreased to 51.6±9.7% of baseline at T=8 h in the placebo group versus 84±15% and 60.4±8.9% of baseline at 24 h in the groups treated with iron sucrose and deferasirox, respectively. No significant differences in the endotoxemia-induced cytokine response (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-1RA), subclinical vascular injury and kidney injury were observed between groups. However, vascular reactivity to noradrenalin was impaired in the 6 subjects in whom labile plasma iron was elevated during endotoxemia as opposed to those in whom no labile plasma iron was detected (P=0.029). In conclusion, a single dose of iron sucrose does not affect the innate immune response in a model of experimental human endotoxemia, but may impair vascular reactivity when labile plasma iron is formed. (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier:01349699). PMID:24241495

  17. Organic carbon hidden in urban ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Jill L.; Davies, Zoe G.; McHugh, Nicola; Gaston, Kevin J.; Leake, Jonathan R.

    2012-01-01

    Urbanization is widely presumed to degrade ecosystem services, but empirical evidence is now challenging these assumptions. We report the first city-wide organic carbon (OC) budget for vegetation and soils, including under impervious surfaces. Urban soil OC storage was significantly greater than in regional agricultural land at equivalent soil depths, however there was no significant difference in storage between soils sampled beneath urban greenspaces and impervious surfaces, at equivalent depths. For a typical U.K. city, total OC storage was 17.6 kg m−2 across the entire urban area (assuming 0 kg m−2 under 15% of land covered by buildings). The majority of OC (82%) was held in soils, with 13% found under impervious surfaces, and 18% stored in vegetation. We reveal that assumptions underpinning current national estimates of ecosystem OC stocks, as required by Kyoto Protocol signatories, are not robust and are likely to have seriously underestimated the contributions of urban areas. PMID:23236585

  18. Organic carbon accumulation in Brazilian mangal sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Christian J.; Smoak, Joseph M.; Sanders, Luciana M.; Sathy Naidu, A.; Patchineelam, Sambasiva R.

    2010-12-01

    This study reviews the organic carbon (OC) accumulation rates in mangrove forests, margins and intertidal mudflats in geographically distinct areas along the Brazilian coastline (Northeastern to Southern). Our initial results indicate that the mangrove forests in the Northeastern region of Brazil are accumulating more OC (353 g/m 2/y) than in the Southeastern areas (192 g/m 2/y) being that the sediment accumulation rates, 2.8 and 2.5 mm/y, and OC content ˜7.1% and ˜5.8% (dry sediment weight) were contributing factors to the discrepancies between the forests. The intertidal mudflats on the other hand showed substantially greater OC accumulation rates, sedimentation rates and content 1129 g/m 2/y and 234 g/m 2/y; 7.3 and 3.4 mm/y; 10.3% and ˜2.7% (OC of dry sediment weight content), respectively, in the Northeastern compared to the Southeastern region. Mangrove forests in the South-Southeastern regions of Brazil may be more susceptible to the rising sea level, as they are geographically constricted by the vast mountain ranges along the coastline.

  19. Tracing organic compounds in aerobically altered methane-derived carbonate pipes (Gulf of Cadiz, SW Iberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merinero, Raúl; Ruiz-Bermejo, Marta; Menor-Salván, César; Lunar, Rosario; Martínez-Frías, Jesús

    2012-07-01

    The primary geochemical process at methane seeps is anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), performed by methanotrophic archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The molecular fingerprints (biomarkers) of these chemosynthetic microorganisms can be preserved in carbonates formed through AOM. However, thermal maturity and aerobic degradation can change the original preserved compounds, making it difficult to establish the relation between AOM and carbonate precipitation. Here we report a study of amino acid and lipid abundances in carbonate matrices of aerobically altered pipes recovered from the seafloor of the Gulf of Cadiz (SW Iberian Peninsula). This area is characterized by a complex tectonic regime that supports numerous cold seeps. Studies so far have not determined whether the precipitation of carbonate pipes in the Gulf of Cadiz is a purely chemical process or whether microbial communities are involved. Samples from this site show signs of exposure to oxygenated waters and of aerobic alteration, such as oxidation of authigenic iron sulfides. In addition, the degradation index, calculated from the relative abundance of preserved amino acids, indicates aerobic degradation of organic matter. Although crocetane was the only lipid identified from methanotrophic archaea, the organic compounds detected (n-alkanes, regular isoprenoids and alcohols) are compatible with an origin from AOM coupled with bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) and subsequent aerobic degradation. We establish a relation among AOM, BSR and pipe formation in the Gulf of Cadiz through three types of analysis: (1) stable carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of carbonate minerals; (2) carbonate microfabrics; and (3) mineralogical composition. Our results suggest that carbonate pipes may form through a process similar to the precipitation of vast amounts of carbonate pavements often found at cold seeps. Our approach suggests that some organic compound patterns, in combination with additional

  20. Net carbon flux in organic and conventional olive production systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeid Mohamad, Ramez; Verrastro, Vincenzo; Bitar, Lina Al; Roma, Rocco; Moretti, Michele; Chami, Ziad Al

    2014-05-01

    Agricultural systems are considered as one of the most relevant sources of atmospheric carbon. However, agriculture has the potentiality to mitigate carbon dioxide mainly through soil carbon sequestration. Some agricultural practices, particularly fertilization and soil management, can play a dual role in the agricultural systems regarding the carbon cycle contributing to the emissions and to the sequestration process in the soil. Good soil and input managements affect positively Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) changes and consequently the carbon cycle. The present study aimed at comparing the carbon footprint of organic and conventional olive systems and to link it to the efficiency of both systems on carbon sequestration by calculating the net carbon flux. Data were collected at farm level through a specific and detailed questionnaire based on one hectare as a functional unit and a system boundary limited to olive production. Using LCA databases particularly ecoinvent one, IPCC GWP 100a impact assessment method was used to calculate carbon emissions from agricultural practices of both systems. Soil organic carbon has been measured, at 0-30 cm depth, based on soil analyses done at the IAMB laboratory and based on reference value of SOC, the annual change of SOC has been calculated. Substracting sequestrated carbon in the soil from the emitted on resulted in net carbon flux calculation. Results showed higher environmental impact of the organic system on Global Warming Potential (1.07 t CO2 eq. yr-1) comparing to 0.76 t CO2 eq. yr-1 in the conventional system due to the higher GHG emissions caused by manure fertilizers compared to the use of synthetic foliar fertilizers in the conventional system. However, manure was the main reason behind the higher SOC content and sequestration in the organic system. As a resultant, the organic system showed higher net carbon flux (-1.7 t C ha-1 yr-1 than -0.52 t C ha-1 yr-1 in the conventional system reflecting higher efficiency as a

  1. Variability in carbon isotope fractionation of trichloroethene during degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron: Effects of inorganic anions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunde; Zhou, Aiguo; Gan, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoqian

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis has the potential to be used for assessing the performance of in situ remediation of organic contaminants. Successful application of this isotope technique requires understanding the magnitude and variability in carbon isotope fractionation associated with the reactions under consideration. This study investigated the influence of inorganic anions (sulfate, bicarbonate, and chloride) on carbon isotope fractionation of trichloroethene (TCE) during its degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron. The results demonstrated that the significant carbon isotope fractionation (enrichment factors ε ranging from -3.4±0.3 to -4.3±0.3‰) was independent on the zero-iron dosage, sulfate concentration, and bicarbonate concentration. However, the ε values (ranging from -7.0±0.4 to -13.6±1.2‰) were dependent on the chloride concentration, indicating that chloride could significantly affect carbon isotope fractionation during TCE degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron. The dependence of ε values on chloride concentration, indicated that TCE degradation mechanisms may be different from the degradation mechanism caused by sulfate radical (SO4(-)). Ignoring the effect of chloride on ε value may cause numerous uncertainties in quantitative assessment of the performance of the in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). PMID:26784392

  2. Evaluation of residual iron in carbon nanotubes purified by acid treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, E. R.; Antunes, E. F.; Botelho, E. C.; Baldan, M. R.; Corat, E. J.

    2011-11-01

    A detailed analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was carried out on multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) surfaces after non-oxidative and oxidative purification treatments in liquid-phase. The MWCNT were produced by pyrolysis of camphor and ferrocene, that provides a high yield but with high iron contamination (∼15% wt). The elimination and/or oxidation of iron nanoparticles were monitored by Fe2p and O1s core level. Oxygen-based functional groups attachment was also investigated by C1s fitting. The effectiveness of each treatment in iron removal was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The integrity of the MWCNT structure was verified by Raman spectroscopy (RS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A purity degree higher than 98% was achieved only with non-oxidative treatments using sonification process.

  3. A general approach towards carbon nanotube and iron oxide coaxial architecture and its lithium storage capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Ni, Jiangfeng; Wang, Wencong; Li, Liang

    2015-12-01

    Coaxial architectures consisting of metal oxide and carbon nanotube are promising for many energy applications due to their synergetic interaction. The engineering and development of coaxial structures through a simple approach are highly desirable but remain a challenge. Herein, we present a general and facile ethylene glycol bath approach to fabricate coaxial architectures in which the metal oxide component is sandwiched by carbon nanotube and amorphous carbon. These unique architectures can serve as efficient electrode for lithium storage. The internal carbon nanotube allows rapid electron transport, while the external amorphous carbon acts as flexible buffer to accommodate volume variation upon lithium uptake. When evaluated in lithium cells, the carbon nanotube and iron oxide coaxial material exhibits a remarkable electrochemical lithium storage. It affords a capacity of 1083 mAh g-1 over 60 cycles, and retains 529 mAh g-1 at a high rate of 5 A g-1, drastically outperforming the pure iron oxide counterpart. This facile approach is in principle applicable to constructing other coaxial electrodes, and thus holds great potential in the manipulation of battery materials for lithium storage application.

  4. Organic Ligands And The Dissolution Of Iron- Laden Dust In Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RS, S. T.; Sander, S.; Boyd, P. W.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospherically supplied dust deposition has proven to be a critical source of iron (Fe) to high nitrate - low chlorophyll (HNLC) oceanic regions. The low solubility (Ksp = 2 x 10-39) of the hydrolysis species of Fe (Fe (III) oxyhydroxide solids) renders Fe to become less bioavailable. Fe is kept in the dissolved form by organic ligands above this solubility limit. The dissolution of Fe (III) bearing minerals in the presence of siderophores has been the subject of numerous recent studies. For our study, different dust dissolution experiments were carried out on Australian dust and iron minerals (goethite and lepidocrocite) using surface ocean water from different latitudes collected during the GEOTRACES Pacific ocean cruise in June 2011 and Iron Cycle III - Spring Bloom voyage in September 2012 to determine the effect of the presence or absence of siderophore (desferrioxamine B (DFB)), oxalate and light on the dissolution of Fe from dust. Short- and long- term dissolution experiments were performed at ambient seawater pH. Iron species were measured by electrochemical methods or chemiluminescence, and HPLC-ESI-MS was used to study structural changes of the organic ligands. In all cases iron dissolution was observed, with the largest increase being observed in the presence of DFB and light. Addition of the weak ligand and electron donor oxalate had no significant effect on the dissolution. The results indicate that light and the complexing capacity of the ligands critically affects the dissolution process. Preliminary results show that a maximum dissolved iron concentration was reached three hours after the addition of the dust, which subsequently decreased again. This observation might be due to the onsetting precipitation of iron. We will also present results from an artificial iron-mineral dissolution experiment conducted under comparable conditions.

  5. Inferring Absorbing Organic Carbon Content from AERONET Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arola, A.; Schuster, G.; Myhre, G.; Kazadzis, S.; Dey, S.; Tripathi, S. N.

    2011-01-01

    Black carbon, light-absorbing organic carbon (often called brown carbon) and mineral dust are the major light-absorbing aerosols. Currently the sources and formation of brown carbon aerosol in particular are not well understood. In this study we estimated globally the amount of light absorbing organic carbon and black carbon from AERONET measurements. We find that the columnar absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon) levels in biomass burning regions of South-America and Africa are relatively high (about 15-20 magnesium per square meters during biomass burning season), while the concentrations are significantly lower in urban areas in US and Europe. However, we estimated significant absorbing organic carbon amounts from the data of megacities of newly industrialized countries, particularly in India and China, showing also clear seasonality with peak values up to 30-35 magnesium per square meters during the coldest season, likely caused by the coal and biofuel burning used for heating. We also compared our retrievals with the modeled organic carbon by global Oslo CTM for several sites. Model values are higher in biomass burning regions than AERONET-based retrievals, while opposite is true in urban areas in India and China.

  6. Organic carbon inventories in natural and restored Ecuadorian mangrove forests

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, John F.; Benninger, Larry; Alperin, Marc; de Dios Morales, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Mangroves can capture and store organic carbon and their protection and therefore their restoration is a component of climate change mitigation. However, there are few empirical measurements of long-term carbon storage in mangroves or of how storage varies across environmental gradients. The context dependency of this process combined with geographically limited field sampling has made it difficult to generalize regional and global rates of mangrove carbon sequestration. This has in turn hampered the inclusion of sequestration by mangroves in carbon cycle models and in carbon offset markets. The purpose of this study was to estimate the relative carbon capture and storage potential in natural and restored mangrove forests. We measured depth profiles of soil organic carbon content in 72 cores collected from six sites (three natural, two restored, and one afforested) surrounding Muisne, Ecuador. Samples up to 1 m deep were analyzed for organic matter content using loss-on-ignition and values were converted to organic carbon content using an accepted ratio of 1.72 (g/g). Results suggest that average soil carbon storage is 0.055 ± 0.002 g cm−3 (11.3 ± 0.8% carbon content by dry mass, mean ± 1 SE) up to 1 m deep in natural sites, and 0.058 ± 0.002 g cm−3 (8.0 ± 0.3%) in restored sites. These estimates are concordant with published global averages. Evidence of equivalent carbon stocks in restored and afforested mangrove patches emphasizes the carbon sink potential for reestablished mangrove systems. We found no relationship between sediment carbon storage and aboveground biomass, forest structure, or within-patch location. Our results demonstrate the long-term carbon storage potential of natural mangroves, high effectiveness of mangrove restoration and afforestation, a lack of predictability in carbon storage strictly based on aboveground parameters, and the need to establish standardized protocol for quantifying mangrove sediment carbon stocks. PMID:24883249

  7. Organic carbon inventories in natural and restored Ecuadorian mangrove forests.

    PubMed

    DelVecchia, Amanda G; Bruno, John F; Benninger, Larry; Alperin, Marc; Banerjee, Ovik; de Dios Morales, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Mangroves can capture and store organic carbon and their protection and therefore their restoration is a component of climate change mitigation. However, there are few empirical measurements of long-term carbon storage in mangroves or of how storage varies across environmental gradients. The context dependency of this process combined with geographically limited field sampling has made it difficult to generalize regional and global rates of mangrove carbon sequestration. This has in turn hampered the inclusion of sequestration by mangroves in carbon cycle models and in carbon offset markets. The purpose of this study was to estimate the relative carbon capture and storage potential in natural and restored mangrove forests. We measured depth profiles of soil organic carbon content in 72 cores collected from six sites (three natural, two restored, and one afforested) surrounding Muisne, Ecuador. Samples up to 1 m deep were analyzed for organic matter content using loss-on-ignition and values were converted to organic carbon content using an accepted ratio of 1.72 (g/g). Results suggest that average soil carbon storage is 0.055 ± 0.002 g cm(-3) (11.3 ± 0.8% carbon content by dry mass, mean ± 1 SE) up to 1 m deep in natural sites, and 0.058 ± 0.002 g cm(-3) (8.0 ± 0.3%) in restored sites. These estimates are concordant with published global averages. Evidence of equivalent carbon stocks in restored and afforested mangrove patches emphasizes the carbon sink potential for reestablished mangrove systems. We found no relationship between sediment carbon storage and aboveground biomass, forest structure, or within-patch location. Our results demonstrate the long-term carbon storage potential of natural mangroves, high effectiveness of mangrove restoration and afforestation, a lack of predictability in carbon storage strictly based on aboveground parameters, and the need to establish standardized protocol for quantifying mangrove sediment carbon stocks. PMID:24883249

  8. Failure analysis of blistered organic coatings on gray iron castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tianen, Matthew N.

    This study investigates the blistering failure of a two part coating consisting of talc-filled polyester resin and polyurethane primer on large gray iron castings. Surface metallography was performed and failed coating was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Corrosion products were found inside of coating blisters. The proposed blistering mechanism is osmosis as a result of soluble species produced by the corrosion. It was believed that excessively thin primer layers resulted in a poor barrier to permeation of water, leading to blisters, and that a basecoat containing a corrosion inhibitor like zinc phosphate would reduce blistering. These hypotheses were tested with designed experiments using environmental testing in humidity and submersion environments. Thicker primer layers resulted in significant reductions in blistering and prolonged the time required before blister formation. A basecoat containing zinc phosphate was not found to be effective at reducing blistering in this coating system.

  9. The effect of carbon type on arsenic and trichloroethylene removal capabilities of iron (hydr)oxide nanoparticle-impregnated granulated activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Anne Marie; Hristovski, Kiril D; Möller, Teresia; Westerhoff, Paul; Sylvester, Paul

    2010-11-15

    This study investigates the impact of the type of virgin granular activated carbon (GAC) media used to synthesize iron (hydr)oxide nanoparticle-impregnated granular activated carbon (Fe-GAC) on its properties and its ability to remove arsenate and organic trichloroethylene (TCE) from water. Two Fe-GAC media were synthesized via a permanganate/ferrous ion synthesis method using bituminous and lignite-based virgin GAC. Data obtained from an array of characterization techniques (pore size distribution, surface charge, etc.) in correlation with batch equilibrium tests, and continuous flow modeling suggested that GAC type and pore size distribution control the iron (nanoparticle) contents, Fe-GAC synthesis mechanisms, and contaminant removal performances. Pore surface diffusion model calculations predicted that lignite Fe-GAC could remove ∼6.3 L g(-1) dry media and ∼4 L g(-1) dry media of water contaminated with 30 μg L(-1) TCE and arsenic, respectively. In contrast, the bituminous Fe-GAC could remove only ∼0.2 L/g dry media for TCE and ∼2.8 L/g dry media for As of the same contaminated water. The results show that arsenic removal capability is increased while TCE removal is decreased as a result of Fe nanoparticle impregnation. This tradeoff is related to several factors, of which changes in surface properties and pore size distributions appeared to be the most dominant. PMID:20688429

  10. Biogeochemical Iron Cycling in Subalpine Wetlands: Impact of Root Derived Organic Matter from the Molecular to the Field Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borch, T.; Marsh, A.; Rhoades, C.; Hubbard, R. M.; Elder, K.; Kelly, E. F.

    2011-12-01

    Intensification of hydrologic regimes due to climate change will have important impacts on biogeochemical processes and ecosystem services, but quantifying these impacts experimentally remains a key challenge for Earth scientists. Iron (Fe) is the 4th most abundant element of the Earth's crust, and Fe (hydr)oxide minerals can account for a significant amount of the bulk mass of soils. In contrast to lab-synthesized ferrihydrite (Fhy), natural ferrihydrite is often formed in the presence of plant derived humic substances (HS). Despite the abundant presence of HS coated Fhy and Fhy-HS coprecipitates in natural systems, there is a significant gap in our understanding of how plant derived carbon influence the crystal structure and reactivity of Fe (hydr)oxides. The goal of this presentation is to illustrate one approach to quantification of the potential impacts of changes in soil moisture (redox conditions) as well as adsorbed or coprecipitated HS on the biogeochemical cycling of iron in subalpine wetlands with different hydrology based on lab and field studies. We found that that humic substances both adsorbed to and coprecipitated with iron oxides (i.e., ferrihydrite) influenced both the bioreduction kinetics (by Shewanalla putrefaciens) and the secondary iron mineral phases formed (based on synchrotron radiation-based X-ray absorption analysis). The ferrihydrite reduction kinetics was influenced in a non-linear fashion showing little impact of low HS concentrations but significantly increased total Fe(II) production at high HS concentration. Both adsorbed and coprecipitated HS appeared to limit goethite (FeOOH) formation but favor the formation of ferrous bearing iron phases. These changes are likely due to changes in surface charge, specific surface area, or crystal structure. Thus, the effect of plant derived organic matter on microbial iron mineral transformation and reactivity has to be included in the framework of environmental iron biogeochemistry. The

  11. Organic carbon flow in a swamp-stream ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    An annual organic carbon budget is presented for an 8-km segment of Creeping Swamp, an undisturbed, third-order swamp-stream in the Coastal Plain of North Carolina, USA. Annual input of organic carbon (588 gC/m/sup 2/) was 96% allochthonous and was dominated by leaf litter inputs (36%) and fluvial, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) inputs (31%). Although the swamp-stream was primarily heterotrophic, autochthonous organic carbon input, primarily from filamentous algae, was important during February and March when primary production/ecosystem respiration (P/R) ratios of the flooded portions were near one. Annual output of organic carbon via fluvial processes (214 gC/m/sup 2/), 95% as DOC, was 36% of total annual inputs, indicating that the swamp-stream segment ecosystem was 64% efficient at retaining organic carbon. Organic carbon dynamics in the Creeping Swamp segment were compared to those reported for upland stream segments using indices of organic matter processing suggested by Fisher (1977) and a loading potential index suggested here. Creeping Swamp, while loading at a high rate, retains a much larger portion of its organic carbon inputs than two upland streams. Despite the high degree of retention and oxidation of organic inputs to Creeping Swamp, there is a net annual fluvial export of 21 gC/m/sup 2/, mostly in the dissolved form. Watersheds drained by swamp-streams in the southeastern United States are thought to have large organic carbon exports compared to upland forested drainages, because the stream network covers a much greater proportion of the total watershed area.

  12. Investigation of reductive dechlorination supported by natural organic carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rectanus, H.V.; Widdowson, M.A.; Chapelle, F.H.; Kelly, C.A.; Novak, J.T.

    2007-01-01

    Because remediation timeframes using monitored natural attenuation may span decades or even centuries at chlorinated solvent sites, new approaches are needed to assess the long-term sustainability of reductive dechlorination in ground water systems. In this study, extraction procedures were used to investigate the mass of indigenous organic carbon in aquifer sediment, and experiments were conducted to determine if the extracted carbon could support reductive dechlorination of chloroethenes. Aquifer sediment cores were collected from a site without an anthropogenic source of organic carbon where organic carbon varied from 0.02% to 0.12%. Single extraction results showed that 1% to 28% of sediment-associated organic carbon and 2% to 36% of the soft carbon were removed depending on nature and concentration of the extracting solution (Nanopure water; 0.1%, 0.5%, and 1.0% sodium pyrophosphate; and 0.5 N sodium hydroxide). Soft carbon is defined as organic carbon oxidized with potassium persulfate and is assumed to serve as a source of biodegradable carbon within the aquifer. Biodegradability studies demonstrated that 20% to 40% of extracted organic carbon was biodegraded aerobically and anaerobically by soil microorganisms in relatively brief tests (45 d). A five-step extraction procedure consisting of 0.1% pyrophosphate and base solutions was investigated to quantify bioavailable organic carbon. Using the extracted carbon as the sole electron donor source, tetrachloroethene was transformed to cis-1,2- dichloroethene and vinyl chloride in anaerobic enrichment culture experiments. Hydrogen gas was produced at levels necessary to sustain reductive dechlorination (>1 nM). ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  13. Remediation of Nitrate-contaminated Groundwater by a Mixture of Iron and Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guoxin; Liu, Fei; Jin, Aifang; Qin, Xiaopeng

    2010-11-01

    Nitrate contamination in groundwater has become a major environmental and health problem worldwide. The aim of the present study is to remediate groundwater contaminated by nitrate and develop potential reactive materials to be used in PRBs (Permeable Reactive Barriers). A new approach was proposed for abiotic groundwater remediation by reactive materials of iron chips and granular activated carbon particles. Batch tests were conducted and remediation mechanisms were discussed. The results show that nitrate decreases from 86.31 to 33.79 mgṡL-1 under the conditions of near neutral pH and reaction time of 1h. The combination of iron chips and activated carbon particles is cost-effective and suitable for further use as denitrification media in PRBs. Nitrogen species don't change significantly with the further increase in reaction time (>1 h). The iron-activated carbon-water-nitrate system tends to be steady-state. Small amounts of ammonium and nitrite (0.033-0.039 and 0.14-3.54 mgṡL-1, respectively) appear at reaction time from 0 h to 5 h. There is no substantial accumulation of nitrogen products in the system. The removal rate of nitrate only reaches 16.11% by sole iron chips at reaction time of 5 h, while 63.57% by the mixture of iron chips and activated carbon particles. There is significantly synergistic and promotive effect of mixing the two different types of materials on nitrate treatment. Fe/C ratio (1/1.5-1/2.5) doesn't cause dramatically different residual nitrate concentrations (24.09-26.70 mgṡL-1). Nitrate can't be limitlessly decreased with decreasing Fe/C ratio. The concomitant occurrences of chemical reduction, galvanic cell reaction, electrophoretic accumulation, chemical coagulation, and physical adsorption are all responsible for the overall nitrate removal by iron allied with activated carbon. To accurately quantify various nitrogen species, further studies on adsorption mechanisms of nitrite and nitrate are needed.

  14. A new iron-based carbon monoxide oxidation catalyst: structure-activity correlation.

    PubMed

    Schoch, Roland; Huang, Heming; Schünemann, Volker; Bauer, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    A new iron-based catalyst for carbon monoxide oxidation, as a potential substitute for precious-metal systems, has been prepared by using a facile impregnation method with iron tris-acetylacetonate as a precursor on γ-Al2 O3 . Light-off and full conversion temperatures as low as 235 and 278 °C can be reached. However, the catalytic activity strongly depends on the loading; lower loadings perform better than higher ones. The different activities can be explained by variations of the structures formed. The structures are thoroughly characterized by a multimethodic approach by using X-ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface areas, and Mössbauer spectroscopy combined with diffuse reflectance UV/Vis and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Consequently, isolated tetrahedrally coordinated Fe(3+) centers and phases of AlFeO3 are identified as structural requirements for high activity in the oxidation of carbon monoxide. PMID:25212843

  15. Acetone Sensing Properties of a Gas Sensor Composed of Carbon Nanotubes Doped With Iron Oxide Nanopowder

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Qiulin; Fang, Jiahua; Liu, Wenyi; Xiong, Jijun; Zhang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide (Fe2O3) nanopowder was prepared by a precipitation method and then mixed with different proportions of carbon nanotubes. The composite materials were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. A fabricated heater-type gas sensor was compared with a pure Fe2O3 gas sensor under the influence of acetone. The effects of the amount of doping, the sintering temperature, and the operating temperature on the response of the sensor and the response recovery time were analyzed. Experiments show that doping of carbon nanotubes with iron oxide effectively improves the response of the resulting gas sensors to acetone gas. It also reduces the operating temperature and shortens the response recovery time of the sensor. The response of the sensor in an acetone gas concentration of 80 ppm was enhanced, with good repeatability. PMID:26569253

  16. Iron and carbon monoxide attenuate degradation of plasmatic coagulation by Crotalus atrox venom.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G; Boyer, Leslie V

    2016-07-01

    Hypofibrinogenemia is an important clinical consequence following envenomation by Crotalus species, usually attenuated or prevented by administration of antivenom. It has been determined that iron and carbon monoxide (CO) enhance fibrinogen as a thrombin substrate, likely secondary to conformational changes in molecular structure. We tested the hypothesis that pretreatment of plasma with iron and CO could attenuate the effects of exposure to Crotalus atrox venom. Human plasma was exposed to 0 to 10 μmol/l ferric chloride (iron source) and 0 to 100 μmol/l CO-releasing molecule-2 (CO source) followed by exposure to 0 to 0.5 μg/ml venom for 5 to 20 min. Changes in coagulation kinetics were determined with thrombelastography. Iron and CO significantly attenuated venom-mediated degradation of plasmatic coagulation in terms of onset time, velocity of clot growth and final clot strength. Further preclinical investigation of iron and CO administration as a 'bridge-to-antivenom' to preserve plasmatic coagulation is justified. PMID:26575491

  17. Reactive adsorption of SO2 on activated carbons with deposited iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Arcibar-Orozco, Javier A; Rangel-Mendez, J Rene; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2013-02-15

    The effect of iron particle size anchored on the surface of commercial activated carbon on the removal of SO(2) from a gas phase was studied. Nanosize iron particles were deposited using forced hydrolysis of FeCl(3) with or without H(3)PO(4) as a capping agent. Dynamic adsorption experiments were carried out on either dry or pre-humidified materials and the adsorption capacities were calculated. The surface of the initial and exhausted materials was extensively characterized by microscopic, porosity, thermogravimetric and surface chemistry. The results indicate that the SO(2) adsorption capacity increased two and half times after the prehumidification process owing to the formation of H(2)SO(4) in the porous system. Iron species enhance the SO(2) adsorption capacity only when very small nanoparticles are deposited on the pore walls as a thin layer. Large iron nanoparticles block the ultramicropores decreasing the accessibility of the active sites and consuming oxygen that rest adsorption centers for SO(2) molecules. Iron nanoparticles of about 3-4 nm provide highly dispersed adsorption sites for SO(2) molecules and thus increase the adsorption capacity of about 80%. Fe(2)(SO(4))(3) was detected on the surface of exhausted samples. PMID:23333487

  18. Effect Of Reaction Environments On The Reactivity Of PCB (2-Chlorobiphenyl) Over Activated Carbon Impregnated With Palladized Iron

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with palladized iron nanoparticles has been developed to treat polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). In this study, we evaluated the effects of various reaction environments on the adsorption-mediated dechlorination of 2-chlorobiphenyl (2-...

  19. Effects Of Aging And Oxidation Of Palladized Iron Embedded In Activated Carbon On The Dechlorination Of 2-Chlorobiphenyl

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with palladized iron has been developed to effectively treat polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the environment by coupling adsorption and dechlorination of PCBs. In this study, we addressed the dechlorination reactivity and capacity ...

  20. Temporal evolution of organic carbon concentrations in Swiss lakes: trends of allochthonous and autochthonous organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Murillo, J C; Filella, M

    2015-07-01

    Evaluation of time series of organic carbon (OC) concentrations in lakes is useful for monitoring some of the effects of global change on lakes and their catchments. Isolating the evolution of autochthonous and allochthonous lake OC might be a useful way to differentiate between drivers of soil and photosynthetic OC related changes. However, there are no temporal series for autochthonous and allochthonous lake OC. In this study, a new approach has been developed to construct time series of these two categories of OC from existing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) data. First, temporal series (longer than ten years) of OC have been compiled for seven big Swiss lakes and another 27 smaller ones and evaluated by using appropriate non-parametric statistical methods. Subsequently, the new approach has been applied to construct time series of autochthonous and allochthonous lake OC in the seven big lakes. Doing this was possible because long term series of DOC concentrations at different depths are available for these lakes. Organic carbon concentrations generally increase in big lakes and decrease in smaller ones, although only in some cases are these trends statistically significant. The magnitude of the observed changes is generally small in big lakes (<1% annual change) and larger in smaller lakes. Autochthonous DOC concentrations in big lakes increase or decrease depending on the lake and the station but allochthonous DOC concentrations generally increase. This pattern is consistent with an increase in the OC input from the lakes' catchments and/or an increase in the refractoriness of the OC in question, and with a temporal evolution of autochthonous DOC depending on the degree of recovery from past eutrophication of each particular lake. In small lakes, OC dynamics are mainly driven by decreasing biological productivity, which in many, but not all cases, outweighs the probable increase of allochthonous OC. PMID:25782080

  1. A new nanoscale metastable iron phase in carbon steels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tianwei; Zhang, Danxia; Liu, Qing; Zheng, Yanjun; Su, Yanjing; Zhao, Xinqing; Yin, Jiang; Song, Minghui; Ping, Dehai

    2015-01-01

    Metastable ω phase is common in body-centred cubic (bcc) metals and alloys, including high-alloying steels. Recent theoretical calculations also suggest that the ω structure may act as an intermediate phase for face-centred cubic (fcc)-to-bcc transformation. Thus far, the role of the ω phase played in fcc-bcc martensitic transformation in carbon steels has not been reported. In previous investigations on martensitic carbon steels, extra electron diffraction spots were frequently observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and these spots were historically ascribed to the diffraction arising from either internal twins or carbides. In this paper, an intensive TEM investigation revealed that the extra spots are in fact attributed to the metastable ω phase in particle-like morphology with an overall size of several or dozens of nanometres. The strict orientation relationships between the ω phase and the ferrite matrix are in good agreement with those of the hexagonal (P6/mmm) ω phase in other bcc metals and alloys. The identification of the ω phase as well as the extra diffraction spots might provide a clue to help understand the physical mechanism of martensitic transformation in steels. PMID:26503890

  2. A new nanoscale metastable iron phase in carbon steels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianwei; Zhang, Danxia; Liu, Qing; Zheng, Yanjun; Su, Yanjing; Zhao, Xinqing; Yin, Jiang; Song, Minghui; Ping, Dehai

    2015-01-01

    Metastable ω phase is common in body-centred cubic (bcc) metals and alloys, including high-alloying steels. Recent theoretical calculations also suggest that the ω structure may act as an intermediate phase for face-centred cubic (fcc)-to-bcc transformation. Thus far, the role of the ω phase played in fcc-bcc martensitic transformation in carbon steels has not been reported. In previous investigations on martensitic carbon steels, extra electron diffraction spots were frequently observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and these spots were historically ascribed to the diffraction arising from either internal twins or carbides. In this paper, an intensive TEM investigation revealed that the extra spots are in fact attributed to the metastable ω phase in particle-like morphology with an overall size of several or dozens of nanometres. The strict orientation relationships between the ω phase and the ferrite matrix are in good agreement with those of the hexagonal (P6/mmm) ω phase in other bcc metals and alloys. The identification of the ω phase as well as the extra diffraction spots might provide a clue to help understand the physical mechanism of martensitic transformation in steels. PMID:26503890

  3. Reduction of Iron-Oxide-Carbon Composites: Part I. Estimation of the Rate Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    A new ironmaking concept using iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets has been proposed, which involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) and an iron bath smelter. This part of the research focuses on studying the two primary chemical kinetic steps. Efforts have been made to experimentally measure the kinetics of the carbon gasification by CO2 and wüstite reduction by CO by isolating them from the influence of heat- and mass-transport steps. A combined reaction model was used to interpret the experimental data and determine the rate constants. Results showed that the reduction is likely to be influenced by the chemical kinetics of both carbon oxidation and wüstite reduction at the temperatures of interest. Devolatilized wood-charcoal was observed to be a far more reactive form of carbon in comparison to coal-char. Sintering of the iron-oxide at the high temperatures of interest was found to exert a considerable influence on the reactivity of wüstite by virtue of altering the internal pore surface area available for the reaction. Sintering was found to be predominant for highly porous oxides and less of an influence on the denser ores. It was found using an indirect measurement technique that the rate constants for wüstite reduction were higher for the porous iron-oxide than dense hematite ore at higher temperatures (>1423 K). Such an indirect mode of measurement was used to minimize the influence of sintering of the porous oxide at these temperatures.

  4. Adsorption of selected volatile organic vapors on multiwall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yang-hsin; Li, Mei-syue

    2008-06-15

    Carbon nanotubes are expected to play an important role in sensing, pollution treatment and separation techniques. This study examines the adsorption behaviors of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), n-hexane, benzene, trichloroethylene and acetone on two multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), CNT1 and CNT2. Among these VOCs, acetone exhibits the highest adsorption capacity. The highest adsorption enthalpies and desorption energies of acetone were also observed. The strong chemical interactions between acetone and both MWCNTs may be the result from chemisorption on the topological defects. The adsorption heats of trichloroethylene, benzene, and n-hexane are indicative of physisorption on the surfaces of both MWCNTs. CNT2 presents a higher adsorption capacity than CNT1 due to the existence of an exterior amorphous carbon layer on CNT2. The amorphous carbon enhances the adsorption capacity of organic chemicals on carbon nanotubes. The morphological and structure order of carbon nanotubes are the primary affects on the adsorption process of organic chemicals. PMID:17980962

  5. Direct simulation of resistivity recovery experiments in carbon-doped α-iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, T.; Fu, Chu Chun; Joly, L.; Bocquet, J. L.; Caturla, M. J.; Willaime, F.

    2011-12-01

    We present the simulation of resistivity recovery experiments in carbon-doped α-iron over the whole range of temperatures investigated experimentally (from 77 to 600 K). The binding of carbon atoms with both vacancies and self-interstitial atoms has been investigated by density functional theory calculations. The results have then been used in two complementary kinetic models, event-based kinetic Monte Carlo and cluster dynamics, in order to achieve both accuracy and computational efficiency. We show that good agreement is obtained with experiments and that it is possible to identify the elemental mechanisms responsible for the recovery stages.

  6. Total phosphorus content of river sediments in relationship to calcium, iron and organic matter concentrations.

    PubMed

    House, William A; Denison, Frank H

    2002-01-23

    Data on the total concentrations of phosphorus, calcium, iron and organic matter in surface bed-sediments taken from rivers in the Thames catchment (Wey, Blackwater, Thame and Kennet), the River Swale in Yorkshire (data excludes the organic matter content) as well as the headwaters of the Great Ouse, are collated and compared. Total concentrations of phosphorus, iron and calcium range from 1.7-649, 12-8,333 and 9-4,605 micromol g(-1) (dry weight), respectively, with organic matter in the range of 0.6-19% by dry weight. For the Wey, Blackwater and Great Ouse, sewage inflows had no detectable effect on the sediment concentrations of total calcium, iron and organic matter whereas for the Blackwater and Great Ouse, the total phosphorus contents of the sediment were higher downstream of the effluent input in comparison with a less impacted upstream location. Relationships between the total phosphorus content of the sediments and contents of iron, calcium and organic matter indicated marked differences between the rivers. Although the organic matter content of the sediments was found to be a significant predictor for the total phosphorus concentration for the Blackwater and Great Ouse, the total iron content was also useful for the Blackwater and total calcium for the Great Ouse. It is postulated that this difference is a result of the sediment processes that are known to occur in these two systems, i.e. co-precipitation of phosphate with calcite in the Great Ouse and the formation of vivianite in anoxic sediments of the Blackwater. PMID:11846078

  7. Iron reduction and carbon dynamics during redox fluctuations in soil slurries from Luquillo CZO (Puerto Rico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcellos, D.; Silver, W. L.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Thompson, A.

    2015-12-01

    Iron minerals play an important role in the dynamics of nutrients and soil carbon in tropical ecosystems. Because soils often experience fluctuations between oxic and anoxic conditions (redox fluctuations) the pool of reactive Fe(III) phases is under continuous flux. The oxidation of soluble Fe(II) during oxic conditions can generate Fe(III) phase of variable crystallinity with potentially different susceptibility to Fe(III) reduction during subsequent anoxic periods. We hypothesize that the coupled rates of iron reduction and carbon mineralization will respond to differences in the frequency of redox shifts and the length of the oxic and anoxic periods (Tao(oxic) and Tao(anoxic). To test this, we subjected soil from the upper 15 cm of the Bisley watershed in the Luquillo critical zone observatory (LCZO), Puerto Rico, to five redox fluctuations scenarios. The treatments included either a fixed anoxic period of 6 d with oxic periods of 8, 24, and 72 h (3 treatments); or a fixed anoxic period of 2 d with oxic periods of 8 or 24 h (2 treatments). Results from a preliminary experiment indicated iron reduction rates increased when the oxic period was decreased below 10 h. We are completing analysis of the full dataset from the experiment above and will present Fe(II) concentrations and gas phase concentrations (CO2 emissions). Results from this experiment will further constrain the type of redox dynamics that influence soil Fe reduction and carbon mineralization.

  8. Influence of carbonate ions on europium sorption onto iron-oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, T.; Tsukamoto, M.

    1997-12-31

    The sorption behavior of europium onto two iron-oxides, goethite and magnetite, focused on the effect of carbonate species concentration was investigated in 0.01 M NaClO{sub 4} solution by the batch method over a pH range of 4 to 11. It was found that sorption of europium was enhanced in the higher concentration solution of carbonate species for both materials. The zeta-potential of goethite in the solutions including sodium bicarbonate was also measured to estimate the effect of sorbed carbonate species. Experimental results and model calculation suggest that the production of surface carboxylic group FeOCOO{sup {minus}} by the sorption of carbonate species lowered the zeta-potential and enhanced europium sorption.

  9. Microscopic insight into the bilateral formation of carbon spirals from a symmetric iron core

    PubMed Central

    Shiozawa, Hidetsugu; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Stangl, Andreas; Cox, David C.; Silva, S. Ravi P.; Rümmeli, Mark H.; Pichler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Mirrored carbon-spirals have been produced from pressured ferrocene via the bilateral extrusion of the spiral pairs from an iron core. A parametric plot of the surface geometry displays the fractal growth of the conical helix made with the logarithmic spiral. Electron microscopy studies show the core is a crystalline cementite which grows and transforms its shape from spherical to biconical as it extrudes two spiralling carbon arms. In a cross section along the arms we observe graphitic flakes arranged in a herringbone structure, normal to which defects propagate. Local-wave-pattern analysis reveals nanoscale defect patterns of two-fold symmetry around the core. The data suggest that the bilateral growth originates from a globular cementite crystal with molten surfaces and the nano-defects shape emerging hexagonal carbon into a fractal structure. Understanding and knowledge obtained provide a basis for the controlled production of advanced carbon materials with designed geometries. PMID:23670649

  10. VAPOR PHASE MERCURY SORPTION BY ORGANIC SULFIDE MODIFIED BIMETALLIC IRON-COPPER NANOPARTICLE AGGREGATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Novel organic sulfide modified bimetallic iron-copper nanoparticle aggregate sorbent materials have been synthesized for removing elemental mercury from vapor streams at elevated temperatures (120-140 °C). Silane based (disulfide silane and tetrasulfide silane) and alkyl sulfide ...

  11. Graphitization of Organic Material in a Progressively Metamorphosed Precambrian Iron Formation.

    PubMed

    French, B M

    1964-11-13

    Organic matter in the sedimentary Biwabik iron formation in northern Minnesota shows a progressive increase in crystallinity where the formation is metamorphosed by the intrusive Duluth gabbro complex. X-ray diffraction of acid-insoluble residues shows that there is a complete range in crystallinity, from amorphous material in the unmetamorphosed sediments to completely crystalline graphite adjacent to the gabbro. PMID:17777057

  12. DNA-Based Synthesis and Assembly of Organized Iron Oxide Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomutov, Gennady B.

    Organized bio-inorganic and hybrid bio-organic-inorganic nanostructures consisting of iron oxide nanoparticles and DNA complexes have been formed using methods based on biomineralization, interfacial and bulk phase assembly, ligand exchange and substitution, Langmuir-Blodgett technique, DNA templating and scaffolding. Interfacially formed planar DNA complexes with water-insoluble amphiphilic polycation or intercalator Langmuir monolayers were prepared and deposited on solid substrates to form immobilized DNA complexes. Those complexes were then used for the synthesis of organized DNA-based iron oxide nanostructures. Planar net-like and circular nanostructures of magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were obtained via interaction of cationic colloid magnetite nanoparticles with preformed immobilized DNA/amphiphilic polycation complexes of net-like and toroidal morphologies. The processes of the generation of iron oxide nanoparticles in immobilized DNA complexes via redox synthesis with various iron sources of biological (ferritin) and artificial (FeCl3) nature have been studied. Bulk-phase complexes of magnetite nanoparticles with biomolecular ligands (DNA, spermine) were formed and studied. Novel nano-scale organized bio-inorganic nanostructures - free-floating sheet-like spermine/magnetite nanoparticle complexes and DNA/spermine/magnetite nanoparticle complexes were synthesized in bulk aqueous phase and the effect of DNA molecules on the structure of complexes was discovered.

  13. Reductive transformation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene: roles of iron and natural organic matter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the effects of redox-active and iron-coordinating functional groups within natural organic matter (NOM) on the electron transfer interactions between Fe(II) and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), an energetic residue often encountered in aqueous environments as a propellant compon...

  14. Selective microwave absorption of iron-rich carbon nanotube composites.

    PubMed

    Gui, Xuchun; Wang, Kunlin; Cao, Anyuan; Wei, Jinquan; Lv, Ruitao; Kang, Feiyu; Shu, Qinke; Jia, Yi; Wu, Dehai

    2010-03-01

    We report on high selectivity of microwave absorption by controlling the concentration of carbon nanotubes in polymer composites and matching the dielectric loss and magnetic loss through encapsulation of crystalline Fe nanorods inside nanotubes. The reflection loss reached more than 10 dB (> 90% absorption) by loading nanotubes at concentrations of 1 wt% to 10 wt% into the composites, and the frequencies corresponding to the maximum loss can be tailored throughout the range of 2 to 18 GHz by changing the concentration. A maximum absorption capability (75 dB x GHz) was observed at a CNT loading of about 4.5 wt%. The crystalline structure of encapsulated Fe nanorods can be modified to enhance the reflection loss. Control of absorption selectivity by modifying the structure and concentration of nanoscale fillers could facilitate potential higher-frequency applications (e.g., radar absorbing) of nanocomposites. PMID:20355578

  15. Structure and Strength of Iron-Copper-Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boshko, Oleh; Dashevskyi, Mykola; Mykhaliuk, Olga; Ivanenko, Kateryna; Hamamda, Smail; Revo, Sergiy

    2016-02-01

    Nanocomposite materials of the Fe-Cu system with/without small addition of carbon nanotubes have been synthesized by mechanochemical activation of elemental Fe and Cu powders in a high-energy planetary ball mill and have been examined by the X-ray diffraction method, SEM and the thermopower methods; the tensile strength of the materials obtained has been estimated. The metastable (Fe, Cu) supersaturated solid solution is formed in the Fe-Cu nanocomposites during milling process. The coherent scattering block size of the materials obtained is decreased with increase of milling time. The duration of mechanochemical activation affects the physical properties of nanocomposites studied. Addition of a small amount of nanotubes into Fe-Cu charge results in a significant increase of strength of the Fe-Cu (4:1) + CNT nanocomposite materials (NCMs) obtained.

  16. Structure and Strength of Iron-Copper-Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Boshko, Oleh; Dashevskyi, Mykola; Mykhaliuk, Olga; Ivanenko, Kateryna; Hamamda, Smail; Revo, Sergiy

    2016-12-01

    Nanocomposite materials of the Fe-Cu system with/without small addition of carbon nanotubes have been synthesized by mechanochemical activation of elemental Fe and Cu powders in a high-energy planetary ball mill and have been examined by the X-ray diffraction method, SEM and the thermopower methods; the tensile strength of the materials obtained has been estimated. The metastable (Fe, Cu) supersaturated solid solution is formed in the Fe-Cu nanocomposites during milling process. The coherent scattering block size of the materials obtained is decreased with increase of milling time. The duration of mechanochemical activation affects the physical properties of nanocomposites studied. Addition of a small amount of nanotubes into Fe-Cu charge results in a significant increase of strength of the Fe-Cu (4:1) + CNT nanocomposite materials (NCMs) obtained. PMID:26858160

  17. Important role for organic carbon in subduction-zone fluids in the deep carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sverjensky, Dimitri A.; Stagno, Vincenzo; Huang, Fang

    2014-12-01

    Supercritical aqueous fluids link subducting plates and the return of carbon to Earth's surface in the deep carbon cycle. The amount of carbon in the fluids and the identities of the dissolved carbon species are not known, which leaves the deep carbon budget poorly constrained. Traditional models, which assume that carbon exists in deep fluids as dissolved gas molecules, cannot predict the solubility and ionic speciation of carbon in its silicate rock environment. Recent advances enable these limitations to be overcome when evaluating the deep carbon cycle. Here we use the Deep Earth Water theoretical model to calculate carbon speciation and solubility in fluids under upper mantle conditions. We find that fluids in equilibrium with mantle peridotite minerals generally contain carbon in a dissolved gas molecule form. However, fluids in equilibrium with diamonds and eclogitic minerals in the subducting slab contain abundant dissolved organic and inorganic ionic carbon species. The high concentrations of dissolved carbon species provide a mechanism to transport large amounts of carbon out of the subduction zone, where the ionic carbon species may influence the oxidation state of the mantle wedge. Our results also identify novel mechanisms that can lead to diamond formation and the variability of carbon isotopic composition via precipitation of the dissolved organic carbon species in the subduction-zone fluids.

  18. Labile organic carbon stocks and mineral-organic matter associations in soil: Role of anticipated changes in rainfall pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berhe, A.; Banfield, J. F.

    2008-12-01

    Anticipated changes in climate are expected to have significant effect on biogeochemical cycling of essential elements in the critical zone. In California, over the next 100 years, a significant shift in rainfall amount and timing is expected. There is currently a disagreement whether the anticipated increase in rainfall will fall as either additional winter rain or result in extension of the rainy season into late spring and early summer months. Here we present results from a field rainfall addition experiment that was setup to test the effects of increased amount of rainfall (20% over ambient) and timing (no addition = control, increased rainfall in the rainy season = winter addition, or increased rainfall during late spring and early summer = spring addition treatment). Specifically, in this presentation, we will discuss results from work looking into changes in amount and biochemical composition of free light soil organic matter fraction (fLF, <1.7g/cm3 in 0-5 and 5-10cm soil depths) and association of soil organic matter storage with Fe and Al oxides in soil (top 50cm soil). We found that the two treatments, winter vs. spring addition, have different effects on carbon storage and association of organic matter with iron and aluminum oxides in soil. Extension of the rainy season into late spring and summer months results in significant increase (20-40%) in the fraction of carbon that is stored as fLF, which was not observed in the winter treatment. Increase of rainfall amount during the already wet rainy season (winter addition treatment) leads to important changes in relationship of organic carbon with soil mineral that are critical for SOM stabilization. More than 35% of the variability in soil carbon storage in the control and spring treatments is explained by dithionite extractable (pedogenic) Fe, compared to <0.01% in the winter treatment plot. Similarly, more than 26% and 41% of the variability in carbon storage is explained by poorly crystalline iron and

  19. Carbon dioxide hydrogenation to aromatic hydrocarbons by using an iron/iron oxide nanocatalyst

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Jim; Shrestha, Tej B; Thapa, Prem S; Moore, David; Wu, Xiaorong; Ikenberry, Myles; Troyer, Deryl L; Wang, Donghai; Hohn, Keith L

    2014-01-01

    Summary The quest for renewable and cleaner energy sources to meet the rapid population and economic growth is more urgent than ever before. Being the most abundant carbon source in the atmosphere of Earth, CO2 can be used as an inexpensive C1 building block in the synthesis of aromatic fuels for internal combustion engines. We designed a process capable of synthesizing benzene, toluene, xylenes and mesitylene from CO2 and H2 at modest temperatures (T = 380 to 540 °C) employing Fe/Fe3O4 nanoparticles as catalyst. The synthesis of the catalyst and the mechanism of CO2-hydrogenation will be discussed, as well as further applications of Fe/Fe3O4 nanoparticles in catalysis. PMID:24991513

  20. Carbon dioxide hydrogenation to aromatic hydrocarbons by using an iron/iron oxide nanocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongwang; Hodgson, Jim; Shrestha, Tej B; Thapa, Prem S; Moore, David; Wu, Xiaorong; Ikenberry, Myles; Troyer, Deryl L; Wang, Donghai; Hohn, Keith L; Bossmann, Stefan H

    2014-01-01

    The quest for renewable and cleaner energy sources to meet the rapid population and economic growth is more urgent than ever before. Being the most abundant carbon source in the atmosphere of Earth, CO2 can be used as an inexpensive C1 building block in the synthesis of aromatic fuels for internal combustion engines. We designed a process capable of synthesizing benzene, toluene, xylenes and mesitylene from CO2 and H2 at modest temperatures (T = 380 to 540 °C) employing Fe/Fe3O4 nanoparticles as catalyst. The synthesis of the catalyst and the mechanism of CO2-hydrogenation will be discussed, as well as further applications of Fe/Fe3O4 nanoparticles in catalysis. PMID:24991513

  1. SAMPLING DURATION DEPENDENCE OF SEMI-CONTINUOUS ORGANIC CARBON MEASUREMENTS ON STEADY STATE SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Semi-continuous organic carbon concentrations were measured through several experiments of statically generated secondary organic aerosol formed by hydrocarbon + NOx irradiations. Repeated, randomized measurements of these steady state aerosols reveal decreases in the observed c...

  2. Direct Biohydrometallurgical Extraction of Iron from Ore

    SciTech Connect

    T.C. Eisele

    2005-10-01

    A completely novel approach to iron extraction was investigated, based on reductive leaching of iron by anaerobic bacteria. Microorganisms were collected from an anaerobic bog where natural seepage of dissolved iron was observed. This mixed culture was used to reduce insoluble iron in a magnetite ore to the soluble ferrous (Fe{sup +2}) state. While dissolution rates were slow, concentrations of dissolved iron as high as 3487 mg/l could be reached if sufficient time was allowed. A factorial study of the effects of trace nutrients and different forms of organic matter indicated that the best dissolution rates and highest dissolved iron concentrations were achieved using soluble carbohydrate (sucrose) as the bacterial food source, and that nutrients other than nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and acetate were not necessary. A key factor in reaching high levels of dissolved iron was maintaining a high level of carbon dioxide in solution, since the solubility of iron carbonates increases markedly as the quantity of dissolved carbon dioxide increases. Once the iron is dissolved, it has been demonstrated that the ferrous iron can then be electroplated from solution, provided that the concentration of iron is sufficiently high and the hydrogen ion concentration is sufficiently low. However, if the leaching solution is electrolyzed directly, organic matter precipitates at the cathode along with the metallic iron. To prevent this problem, the ferrous iron should be separated from the bulk solution in a more concentrated, purified form. One route to accomplishing this is to take advantage of the change in solubility of ferrous iron as a function of carbon dioxide concentration. By cycling the concentration of carbon dioxide in solution, it is possible to produce an iron-rich concentrate that should be suitable for electrolysis. This represents the first viable hydrometallurgical method for leaching iron directly from ore and producing metallic iron.

  3. Organic chemistry of Murchison meteorite: Carbon isotopic fractionation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, G. U.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Cronin, J. R.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual organic compounds of meteoritic origin remains unknown, as most reported carbon isotopic ratios are for bulk carbon or solvent extractable fractions. The researchers managed to determine the carbon isotopic ratios for individual hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids isolated from a Murchison sample by a freeze-thaw-ultrasonication technique. The abundances of monocarboxylic acids and saturated hydrocarbons decreased with increasing carbon number and the acids are more abundant than the hydrocarbon with the same carbon number. For both classes of compounds, the C-13 to C-12 ratios decreased with increasing carbon number in a roughly parallel manner, and each carboxylic acid exhibits a higher isotopic number than the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms. These trends are consistent with a kinetically controlled synthesis of higher homologues for lower ones.

  4. Iron Redox Dynamics in Humid Tropical Forest Soils: Carbon Stabilization vs. Degradation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S. J.; Silver, W. L.; Hammel, K.

    2015-12-01

    Most terrestrial soils exhibit a patchwork of oxygen (O2) availability that varies over spatial scales of microsites to catenas to landscapes, and over temporal scales of minutes to seasons. Oxygen fluctuations often drive microbial iron (Fe) reduction and abiotic/biotic Fe oxidation at the microsite scale, contributing to anaerobic carbon (C) mineralization and changes in soil physical and chemical characteristics, especially the dissolution and precipitation of short-range ordered Fe phases thought to stabilize C. Thus, O2 fluctuations and Fe redox cycling may have multiple nuanced and opposing impacts on different soil C pools, illustrated by recent findings from Fe-rich Oxisols and Ultisols in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. Spatial patterns in surface soil C stocks at the landscape scale correlated strongly (R2 = 0.98) with concentrations of reduced Fe (Fe(II)), reflecting constitutive differences in reducing conditions within and among sites that promote C accumulation in mineral soil horizons. Similarly, turnover times of a decadal-cycling pool of mineral-associated organic matter increased with Fe(II) across a catena, possibly reflecting the role of anaerobic microsites in long-term C stabilization. However, two different indices of short-range order Fe showed highly significant opposing relationships (positive and negative) with spatial variation in soil C concentrations, possibly reflecting a dual role of Fe in driving C stabilization via co-precipitation, and C solubilization and loss following dissimilatory Fe reduction. Consistent with the field data, laboratory incubations demonstrated that redox fluctuations can increase the contribution of biochemically recalcitrant C (lignin) to soil respiration, whereas addition of short-range order Fe dramatically suppressed lignin mineralization but had no impact on bulk soil respiration. Thus, understanding spatial and temporal patterns of Fe redox cycling may provide insight into explaining the

  5. Organic carbon isotope constraints on the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reservoir at the Cryogenian-Ediacaran transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ganqing; Wang, Xinqiang; Shi, Xiaoying; Zhang, Shihong; Xiao, Shuhai; Dong, Jin

    2010-10-01

    Prominent negative carbonate carbon isotope (δ 13C carb) anomalies from some Ediacaran successions are accompanied by invariant or decoupled organic carbon isotope (δ 13C org) values and have been interpreted as resulting from the remineralization of a large dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reservoir capable of buffering carbon isotopes of organic matter. This inferred oceanic DOC reservoir was thought to have initiated with the onset of Cryogenian glaciations (ca. 720 Ma) and lasted for millions of years until the late Ediacaran Period (< 560 Ma). Carbon isotope analyses of the basal Doushantuo Formation (ca. 635 Ma) in south China reveal that (1) the cap carbonate has δ 13C org around -26‰ (VPDB) and relatively low Δδ 13C (22 ± 2‰) and (2) the overlying organic-rich black shale and shaly dolostone have more negative δ 13C org (-28‰ to -35‰) and higher Δδ 13C (28‰-30‰). Both δ 13C carb and δ 13C org show a + 6‰ shift within a 4-m-thick interval overlying the Doushantuo cap carbonate. The δ 13C org values of the cap carbonate are associated with low TOC (mostly < 0.1%); their paleoceanographic significance requires further tests in other Ediacaran basins. The co-varying positive shift in δ 13C carb and δ 13C org following cap carbonate deposition is best interpreted as resulting from a rapid increase in organic carbon burial, which may have resulted in the rise of oxygen and heralded the first appearance of animals a few meters above the Doushantuo cap carbonate. The data suggest that a large oceanic DOC reservoir did not exist in the early Ediacaran ocean. Excess oceanic DOC required to explain the Ediacaran Shuram and upper Doushantuo δ 13C excursions, if it existed, had to be developed during the Ediacaran Period after cap carbonate deposition.

  6. Soil organic carbon enrichment of dust emissions: Magnitude, mechanisms and its implications for the carbon cycle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil erosion is an important component of the global carbon cycle. However, little attention has been given to the role of aeolian processes in influencing soil organic carbon (SOC) flux and the release of greenhouse gasses, such as carbon-dioxide (CO2), to the atmosphere. Understanding the magnitu...

  7. Limits to soil carbon stability; Deep, ancient soil carbon decomposition stimulated by new labile organic inputs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil carbon (C) pools store about one-third of the total terrestrial organic carbon. Deep soil C pools (below 1 m) are thought to be stable due to their low biodegradability, but little is known about soil microbial processes and carbon dynamics below the soil surface, or how global change might aff...

  8. [Effects of Chinese fir litter on soil organic carbon decomposition and microbial biomass carbon].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Si-Long; Zhang, Wei-Dong

    2013-09-01

    By using 13C stable isotope tracer technique, this paper studied the effects of Chinese fir litter addition on the soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition, microbial biomass carbon, and dissolved organic carbon in 0-5 cm and 40-45 cm layers. The decomposition rate of SOC in 40-45 cm layer was significantly lower than that in 0-5 cm layer, but the priming effect induced by the Chinese fir litter addition showed an opposite trend. The Chinese fir litter addition increased the soil total microbial biomass carbon and the microbial biomass carbon derived from native soil significantly, but had less effects on the soil dissolved organic carbon. Turning over the subsoil to the surface of the woodland could accelerate the soil carbon loss in Chinese fir plantation due to the priming effect induced by the litters. PMID:24417093

  9. Evaluation of organic carbon analyzers for space application. [for water reclamation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The state-of-the-art technology for organic carbon analysis in space applications is evaluated. An investigation into total organic carbon (TOC) analysis has identified a variety of schemes which include different methods for: (1) separation of inorganic carbon from organic carbon and/or differentiation of inorganic carbon from organic carbon; (2) reaction of organic carbon to form a quantifiable species; and (3) detection and measurement of that species. Each method option is discussed.

  10. Carbon nanotube-based organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Malti; Srivastava, Ritu; Lal, C.; Kamalasanan, M. N.; Tanwar, L. S.

    2009-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes; revolutionary and fascinating from the materials point of view and exceedingly sensational from a research point of view; are standing today at the threshold between inorganic electronics and organic electronics and posing a serious challenge to the big daddies of these two domains in electronics i.e., silicon and indium tin oxide (ITO). In the field of inorganic electronics, carbon nanotubes offer advantages such as high current carrying capacity, ballistic transport, absence of dangling bonds, etc. and on the other hand, in the field of organic electronics, carbon nanotubes offer advantages such as high conductivity, high carrier mobility, optical transparency (in visible and IR spectral ranges), flexibility, robustness, environmental resistance, etc. and hence, they are seriously being considered as contenders to silicon and ITO. This review traces the origin of carbon nanotubes in the field of organic electronics (with emphasis on organic light emitting diodes) and moves on to cover the latest advances in the field of carbon nanotube-based organic light emitting diodes. Topics that are covered within include applications of multi-wall nanotubes and single-wall nanotubes in organic light emitting diodes. Applications of carbon nanotubes as hole-transport layers, as electron-transport layers, as transparent electrodes, etc. in organic light emitting diodes are discussed and the daunting challenges facing this progressive field today are brought into the limelight.

  11. Effects of magnetic field intensity on carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron in γ-Fe temperature region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Duan, Guosheng; Zhao, Xiang

    2015-03-01

    Effects of magnetic field intensity on carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron in the γ-Fe temperature region were investigated using carburizing technology. The carbon penetration profiles from the iron surface to interior were measured by field emission electron probe microanalyzer. The carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron carburized with different magnetic field intensities was calculated according to the Fick's second law. It was found that the magnetic field intensity could obviously affect the carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron in the γ-Fe temperature region, and the carbon diffusion coefficient decreased obviously with the enhancement of magnetic field intensity, when the magnetic field intensity was higher than 1 T, the carbon diffusion coefficient in field annealed specimen was less than half of that of the nonfield annealed specimen, further enhancing the magnetic field intensity, the carbon diffusion coefficient basically remains unchanged. The stiffening of lattice due to field-induced magnetic ordering was responsible for an increase in activation barrier for jumping carbon atoms. The greater the magnetic field intensity, the stronger the inhibiting effect of magnetic field on carbon diffusion.

  12. A reduced organic carbon component in martian basalts.

    PubMed

    Steele, A; McCubbin, F M; Fries, M; Kater, L; Boctor, N Z; Fogel, M L; Conrad, P G; Glamoclija, M; Spencer, M; Morrow, A L; Hammond, M R; Zare, R N; Vicenzi, E P; Siljeström, S; Bowden, R; Herd, C D K; Mysen, B O; Shirey, S B; Amundsen, H E F; Treiman, A H; Bullock, E S; Jull, A J T

    2012-07-13

    The source and nature of carbon on Mars have been a subject of intense speculation. We report the results of confocal Raman imaging spectroscopy on 11 martian meteorites, spanning about 4.2 billion years of martian history. Ten of the meteorites contain abiotic macromolecular carbon (MMC) phases detected in association with small oxide grains included within high-temperature minerals. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were detected along with MMC phases in Dar al Gani 476. The association of organic carbon within magmatic minerals indicates that martian magmas favored precipitation of reduced carbon species during crystallization. The ubiquitous distribution of abiotic organic carbon in martian igneous rocks is important for understanding the martian carbon cycle and has implications for future missions to detect possible past martian life. PMID:22628557

  13. Iron catalyst chemistry in modeling a high-pressure carbon monoxide nanotube reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Povitsky, Alexander; Dateo, Christopher; Gokcen, Tahir; Willis, Peter A.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2003-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) technique for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is analyzed with the use of a chemical reaction model coupled with flow properties calculated along streamlines, calculated by the FLUENT code for pure carbon monoxide. Cold iron pentacarbonyl, diluted in CO at about 30 atmospheres, is injected into a conical mixing zone, where hot CO is also introduced via three jets at 30 degrees with respect to the axis. Hot CO decomposes the Fe(CO)5 to release atomic Fe. Then iron nucleates and forms clusters that catalyze the formation of SWNTs by a disproportionation reaction (Boudouard) of CO on Fe-containing clusters. Alternative nucleation rates are estimated from the theory of hard sphere collision dynamics with an activation energy barrier. The rate coefficient for carbon nanotube growth is estimated from activation energies in the literature. The calculated growth was found be about an order of magnitude greater than measured, regardless of the nucleation rate. A study of cluster formation in an incubation zone prior to injection into the reactor shows that direct dimer formation from Fe atoms is not as important as formation via an exchange reaction of Fe with CO in FeCO.

  14. How deep is deep enough? Ocean iron fertilization and carbon sequestration in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, J.; Popova, E. E.; Yool, A.; Srokosz, M.; Lampitt, R. S.; Blundell, J. R.

    2014-04-01

    Artificial ocean iron fertilization (OIF) enhances phytoplankton productivity and is being explored as a means of sequestering anthropogenic carbon within the deep ocean. To be considered successful, carbon should be exported from the surface ocean and isolated from the atmosphere for an extended period (e.g., the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's standard 100 year time horizon). This study assesses the impact of deep circulation on carbon sequestered by OIF in the Southern Ocean, a high-nutrient low-chlorophyll region known to be iron stressed. A Lagrangian particle-tracking approach is employed to analyze water mass trajectories over a 100 year simulation. By the end of the experiment, for a sequestration depth of 1000 m, 66% of the carbon had been reexposed to the atmosphere, taking an average of 37.8 years. Upwelling occurs predominately within the Antarctic Circumpolar Current due to Ekman suction and topography. These results emphasize that successful OIF is dependent on the physical circulation, as well as the biogeochemistry.

  15. Iron catalyst chemistry in modeling a high-pressure carbon monoxide nanotube reactor.

    PubMed

    Scott, Carl D; Povitsky, Alexander; Dateo, Christopher; Gökçen, Tahir; Willis, Peter A; Smalley, Richard E

    2003-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) technique for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is analyzed with the use of a chemical reaction model coupled with flow properties calculated along streamlines, calculated by the FLUENT code for pure carbon monoxide. Cold iron pentacarbonyl, diluted in CO at about 30 atmospheres, is injected into a conical mixing zone, where hot CO is also introduced via three jets at 30 degrees with respect to the axis. Hot CO decomposes the Fe(CO)5 to release atomic Fe. Then iron nucleates and forms clusters that catalyze the formation of SWNTs by a disproportionation reaction (Boudouard) of CO on Fe-containing clusters. Alternative nucleation rates are estimated from the theory of hard sphere collision dynamics with an activation energy barrier. The rate coefficient for carbon nanotube growth is estimated from activation energies in the literature. The calculated growth was found be about an order of magnitude greater than measured, regardless of the nucleation rate. A study of cluster formation in an incubation zone prior to injection into the reactor shows that direct dimer formation from Fe atoms is not as important as formation via an exchange reaction of Fe with CO in FeCO. PMID:12908231

  16. Floodplain Organic Carbon Storage in the Central Yukon River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lininger, K.; Wohl, E.

    2014-12-01

    Floodplain storage of organic carbon is an important aspect of the global carbon cycle that is not well understood or quantified. Although it is understood that rivers transport organic carbon to the ocean, little is known about the quantity of stored carbon in boreal floodplains and the influence of fluvial processes on this storage. We present results on total organic carbon (TOC) content within the floodplains of two rivers, the Dall River and Preacher Creek, in the central Yukon River Basin in the Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge of Alaska. The results indicate that organic carbon storage is influenced by fluvial disturbance and grain size. The Dall River, which contains a large amount of floodplain carbon, is meandering and incised, with well-developed floodplain soils, a greater percentage of relatively old floodplain surfaces and a slower floodplain turnover time, and finer grain sizes. Preacher Creek stores less TOC, transports coarser grain sizes, and has higher rates of avulsion and floodplain turnover time. Within the floodplain of a particular river, large spatial heterogeneity in TOC content also exists as a function of depositional environment and age and vegetation community of the site. In addition, saturated regions of the floodplains, such as abandoned channels and oxbow lakes, contain more TOC compared to drier floodplain environments. Frozen alluvial soils likely contain carbon that could be released into the environment with melting permafrost, and thus quantifying the organic carbon content in the active layer of floodplain soils could provide insight into the characteristics of the permafrost beneath. The hydrology in these regions is changing due to permafrost melt, and floodplain areas usually saturated could be dried out, causing breakdown and outgassing of carbon stored in previously saturated soils. Ongoing work will result in a first-order estimate of active-layer floodplain carbon storage for the central Yukon River Basin.

  17. Determining carbon-carbon connectivities in natural abundance organic powders using dipolar couplings.

    PubMed

    Dekhil, Myriam; Mollica, Giulia; Bonniot, Tristan Texier; Ziarelli, Fabio; Thureau, Pierre; Viel, Stéphane

    2016-06-30

    We present a solid-state NMR methodology capable of investigating the carbon skeleton of natural abundance organic powders. The methodology is based on the (13)C-(13)C dipolar coupling interaction and allows carbon-carbon connectivities to be unambiguously established for a wide range of organic solids. This methodology is particularly suitable for disordered solids, such as natural or synthetic macromolecules, which cannot be studied using conventional diffraction or NMR techniques. PMID:27319808

  18. Anomalous 13C enrichment in modern marine organic carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arthur, M.A.; Dean, W.E.; Claypool, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Marine organic carbon is heavier isotopically (13C enriched) than most land-plant or terrestrial organic C1. Accordingly, ??13C values of organic C in modern marine sediments are routinely interpreted in terms of the relative proportions of marine and terrestrial sources of the preserved organic matter2,3. When independent geochemical techniques are used to evaluate the source of organic matter in Cretaceous or older rocks, those rocks containing mostly marine organic C are found typically to have lighter (more-negative) ??13C values than rocks containing mostly terrestrial organic C. Here we conclude that marine photosynthesis in mid-Cretaceous and earlier oceans generally resulted in a greater fractionation of C isotopes and produced organic C having lighter ??13C values. Modern marine photosynthesis may be occurring under unusual geological conditions (higher oceanic primary production rates, lower PCO2) that limit dissolved CO2 availability and minimize carbon isotope fractionation4. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  19. TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON DETERMINATIONS IN NATURAL AND CONTAMINATED AQUIFER MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantifying the total organic carbon (TOC) content of soils and aquifer materials is essential for understanding subsurface chemistry during environmental site characterization. ontaminant fate and transport, microbial ecology, and effective treatment methodology are all influenc...

  20. Unimodal response of fish yield to dissolved organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Finstad, Anders G; Helland, Ingeborg P; Ugedal, Ola; Hesthagen, Trygve; Hessen, Dag O

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate a contrasting effect of terrestrial coloured dissolved organic material on the secondary production of boreal nutrient poor lakes. Using fish yield from standardised brown trout gill-net catches as a proxy, we show a unimodal response of lake secondary productivity to dissolved organic carbon (DOC). This suggests a trade-off between positive and negative effects, where the initial increase may hinge upon several factors such as energy subsidising, screening of UV-radiation or P and N load being associated with organic carbon. The subsequent decline in production with further increase in DOC is likely associated with light limitations of primary production. We also show that shallow lakes switch from positive to negative effects at higher carbon loads than deeper lakes. These results underpin the major role of organic carbon for structuring productivity of boreal lake ecosystems. PMID:24165396

  1. PREDICTING PREFERENTIAL ADSORPTION OF ORGANICS BY ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Preferential adsorption of organic compounds onto activated carbon from dilute aqueous solutions was studied to develop a comprehensive theoretical basis for predicting adsorption of multicomponent solutes. The research program investigates why some solutes are strong adsorbers, ...

  2. In-Lake Processes Offset Increased Terrestrial Inputs of Dissolved Organic Carbon and Color to Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Stephan J.; Kothawala, Dolly; Futter, Martyn N.; Liungman, Olof; Tranvik, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Increased color in surface waters, or browning, can alter lake ecological function, lake thermal stratification and pose difficulties for drinking water treatment. Mechanisms suggested to cause browning include increased dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and iron concentrations, as well as a shift to more colored DOC. While browning of surface waters is widespread and well documented, little is known about why some lakes resist it. Here, we present a comprehensive study of Mälaren, the third largest lake in Sweden. In Mälaren, the vast majority of water and DOC enters a western lake basin, and after approximately 2.8 years, drains from an eastern basin. Despite 40 years of increased terrestrial inputs of colored substances to western lake basins, the eastern basin has resisted browning over this time period. Here we find the half-life of iron was far shorter (0.6 years) than colored organic matter (A420 ; 1.7 years) and DOC as a whole (6.1 years). We found changes in filtered iron concentrations relate strongly to the observed loss of color in the western basins. In addition, we observed a substantial shift from colored DOC of terrestrial origin, to less colored autochthonous sources, with a substantial decrease in aromaticity (-17%) across the lake. We suggest that rapid losses of iron and colored DOC caused the limited browning observed in eastern lake basins. Across a wider dataset of 69 Swedish lakes, we observed greatest browning in acidic lakes with shorter retention times (< 1.5 years). These findings suggest that water residence time, along with iron, pH and colored DOC may be of central importance when modeling and projecting changes in brownification on broader spatial scales. PMID:23976946

  3. India's iron and steel industry: Productivity, energy efficiency and carbon emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, Katja; Sathaye, Jayant

    1998-10-01

    Historical estimates of productivity growth in India's iron and steel sector vary from indicating an improvement to a decline in the sector's productivity. The variance may be traced to the time period of study, source of data for analysis, and type of indices and econometric specifications used for reporting productivity growth. The authors derive both growth accounting and econometric estimates of productivity growth for this sector. Their results show that over the observed period from 1973--74 to 1993--94 productivity declined by 1.71{percent} as indicated by the Translog index. Calculations of the Kendrick and Solow indices support this finding. Using a translog specification the econometric analysis reveals that technical progress in India's iron and steel sector has been biased towards the use of energy and material, while it has been capital and labor saving. The decline in productivity was caused largely by the protective policy regarding price and distribution of iron and steel as well as by large inefficiencies in public sector integrated steel plants. Will these trends continue into the future, particularly where energy use is concerned? Most likely they will not. The authors examine the current changes in structure and energy efficiency undergoing in the sector. Their analysis shows that with the liberalization of the iron and steel sector, the industry is rapidly moving towards world-best technology, which will result in fewer carbon emissions and more efficient energy use in existing and future plants.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of magnetically active carbon nanofiber/iron oxide composites with hierarchical pore structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panels, Jeanne E.; Lee, Jinwoo; Park, Kang Yeol; Kang, Seung Yeon; Marquez, Manuel; Wiesner, Ulrich; Lak Joo, Yong

    2008-11-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) solution containing the iron oxide precursor iron (III) acetylacetonate (AAI) was electrospun and thermally treated to produce electrically conducting, magnetic carbon nanofiber mats with hierarchical pore structures. The morphology and material properties of the resulting multifunctional nanofiber mats including the surface area and the electric and magnetic properties were examined using various characterization techniques. Scanning electron microscopy images show that uniform fibers were produced with a fiber diameter of ~600 nm, and this uniform fiber morphology is maintained after graphitization with a fiber diameter of ~330 nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman studies reveal that both graphite and Fe3O4 crystals are formed after thermal treatment, and graphitization can be enhanced by the presence of iron. A combination of XRD and transmission electron microscopy experiments reveals the formation of pores with graphitic nanoparticles in the walls as well as the formation of magnetite nanoparticles distributed throughout the fibers. Physisorption experiments show that the multifunctional fiber mats exhibit a high surface area (200-400 m2 g-1) and their pore size is dependent on the amount of iron added and graphitization conditions. Finally, we have demonstrated that the fibers are electrically conducting as well as magnetically active.

  5. Real World of Industrial Chemistry: Organic Chemicals from Carbon Monoxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Kenneth E.; Kolb, Doris

    1983-01-01

    Carbon Monoxide obtained from coal may serve as the source for a wide variety of organic compounds. Several of these compounds are discussed, including phosgene, benzaldehyde, methanol, formic acid and its derivatives, oxo aldehydes, acrylic acids, and others. Commercial reactions of carbon monoxide are highlighted in a table. (JN)

  6. Coupled iron, sulfur and carbon isotope evidences for arsenic enrichment in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanxin; Xie, Xianjun; Johnson, Thomas M.; Lundstrom, Craig C.; Ellis, Andre; Wang, Xiangli; Duan, Mengyu; Li, Junxia

    2014-11-01

    It is generally accepted that microbial processes play a key role in the mobilization and enrichment of arsenic (As) in groundwater. However, the detailed mechanism of the metabolic processes remain poorly understand. We apply isotopic measurements of iron (δ56Fe vs. IRMM-14), sulfur (δ34SSO4 vs. V-CDT) and carbon (δ13CDIC vs. V-PDB) to an experimental field plot in the Datong Basin, northern China. An array of monitoring wells was installed in a ≈1700-m2 plot in which high concentrations of As, ranging from 4.76 to 469.5 μg/L, were detected in the groundwater. The measured range of δ34SSO4 values from 10.0‰ to 24.7‰ indicates the prevalence of microbial sulfate reduction within aquifers. The range of δ56Fe values measured in the groundwater suggests microbial Fe(III) reduction and the occurrence of isotopic exchange between Fe(II)aq and FeS precipitation. The low δ13CDIC values (up to -33.6‰) measured in groundwater are evidences for the microbial oxidation of organic matter, which is interpreted as the light carbon pool within the aquifer sediments. The high As (As > 50 μg/L) groundwater, which has higher δ34SSO4 and δ56Fe values and lower δ13C values, indicates the following: (1) microbial reduction of sulfate causes the mobilization of As through HS- abiotic reduction of Fe(III) minerals and/or formation of As-sulfur components; and (2) direct microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxides, hydroxides and oxyhydroxides cannot increase As concentrations to greater than 50 μg/L. Re-oxidation of Fe-sufide explains how sample C1-2 can have a high As concentration and low δ34SSO4 and high δ56Fe values. The results provide new insight into the mechanism of As enrichment in groundwater.

  7. Computer Simulation of Cascade Damage in α-Iron with Carbon in Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew, Calder F; Bacon, David J; Barashev, Aleksandr; Osetskiy, Yury N

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation method is used to investigate defect production by displacement cascades in iron with carbon (C) in solution. This is the first study of cascade damage in a metal containing interstitial solute. Iron is of particular interest because of the use of ferritic steels in plant for nuclear power generation. Cascades are simulated with energy in the range 5 to 20keV in iron at either 100 or 600K containing carbon with concentration in the range 0 to 1at%. C in solution has no discernible effect on the number of defects produced in cascades under any of the conditions simulated, nor on the clustered fraction of either self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) or vacancies. However, significant fractions of single SIAs and vacancies are trapped by C in the cascade process, irrespective of cascade energy. The fraction is independent of temperature for vacancies, but increases strongly with temperature for SIAs: this is a consequence of the higher mobility of the SIA.

  8. Influences of iron and calcium carbonate on wastewater treatment performances of algae based reactors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhimiao; Song, Xinshan; Wang, Wei; Xiao, Yanping; Gong, Zhijie; Wang, Yuhui; Zhao, Yufeng; Chen, Yu; Mei, Mengyuan

    2016-09-01

    The influences of iron and calcium carbonate (CaCO3) addition in wastewater treatments reactors performance were investigated. Adding different concentrations of Fe(3+) (5, 10, 30 and 50mmol/m(3)), iron and CaCO3 powder led to changes in algal characteristics and physico-chemical and microbiological properties. According to the investigation results, nutrient removal efficiency in algae based reactors was obviously increased by the addition of 10mmol/m(3) Fe(3+), iron (5mmol/m(3)) and CaCO3 powder (0.2gm(-3)) and the removal efficiencies of BOD5, TN, and TP in Stage 2 were respectively increased by 28%, 8.9%, and 22%. The improvements in physico-chemical performances were verified by microbial community tests (bacteria quantity, activity and community measured in most probable number, extracellular enzymes activity, and Biolog Eco Plates). Microbial variations indicated the coexistence of Fe ions and carbonate-bicarbonate, which triggered the synergistic effect of physico-chemical action and microbial factors in algae based reactors. PMID:27214163

  9. Removal of crystal violet from water by magnetically modified activated carbon and nanomagnetic iron oxide.

    PubMed

    Hamidzadeh, Soheila; Torabbeigi, Marzieh; Shahtaheri, Seyed Jamaleddin

    2015-01-01

    Magnetically modified activated carbon, which synthesized by nanomagnetic iron oxide, was used for fast and effective removal of Crystal Violet from aqueous solutions. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of nano-adsorbent showed that the average sizes of adsorbent are less than 100 nm. The various parameters, affecting on adsorption process, were examined including pH and temperature of dye solution, dose of adsorbent, and contact time. Then, thermodynamic parameters of sorption were calculated. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were used to fit the resulting data. Adsorption kinetics was consistent with a pseudo second order equation. Thermodynamic parameters of adsorption, ∆H(0), and ∆S(0) were calculated. Also, for further investigations, nano magnetic iron oxides was synthesized and used as adsorbent. Sorption capacities were depending on the temperature varied from 44.7 to 67.1 mg/g and from 12.7 to 16.5 mg/g for magnetically modified activated carbon and nanomagnetic iron oxide, respectively. PMID:25699186

  10. On the synthesis and magnetic properties of multiwall carbon nanotube-superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, T. N.; Reena Mary, A. P.; Shaijumon, M. M.; Ci, Lijie; Ajayan, P. M.; Anantharaman, M. R.

    2009-02-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) possessing an average inner diameter of 150 nm were synthesized by template assisted chemical vapor deposition over an alumina template. Aqueous ferrofluid based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) was prepared by a controlled co-precipitation technique, and this ferrofluid was used to fill the MWCNTs by nanocapillarity. The filling of nanotubes with iron oxide nanoparticles was confirmed by electron microscopy. Selected area electron diffraction indicated the presence of iron oxide and graphitic carbon from MWCNTs. The magnetic phase transition during cooling of the MWCNT-SPION composite was investigated by low temperature magnetization studies and zero field cooled (ZFC) and field cooled experiments. The ZFC curve exhibited a blocking at ~110 K. A peculiar ferromagnetic ordering exhibited by the MWCNT-SPION composite above room temperature is because of the ferromagnetic interaction emanating from the clustering of superparamagnetic particles in the constrained volume of an MWCNT. This kind of MWCNT-SPION composite can be envisaged as a good agent for various biomedical applications.

  11. Black carbon and organic matter stabilization in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, J.; Liang, B.; Sohi, S.; Gaunt, J.

    2007-12-01

    Interaction with minerals is key to stabilization of organic matter in soils. Stabilization is commonly perceived to occur due to entrapment in pore spaces, encapsulation within aggregates or interaction with mineral surfaces. Typically only interactions between organic matter and minerals are considered in such a model. Here we demonstrate that black carbon may act very similar to minerals in soil in that it enhances the stabilization of organic matter. Mineralization of added organic matter was slower and incorporation into intra-aggregate fractions more rapid in the presence of black carbon. Added double-labeled organic matter was recovered in fractions with high amounts of black carbon. Synchrotron-based near-edge x-ray fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy coupled to scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) suggested a possible interaction of microorganisms with black carbon surfaces and metabolization of residues. These findings suggest a conceptual model that includes carbon-carbon interactions and by-passing for more rapid stabilization of litter into what is commonly interpreted as stable carbon pools.

  12. Maturation of organic matter during experimental simulation of carbonate diagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J.; Bush, P.R.; Clarke, B.A. )

    1989-09-01

    An earlier investigation involving the simulation of the early stages of diagenesis of carbonate ooids has been extended to include skeletal carbonates and carbonate mud. The experiments, lasting up to 70 days at elevated hydrostatic pressure and temperatures of 180{degree}-210{degree}C, used natural sea water and recent calcitic and aragonitic carbonate materials collected from Florida Bay and the Bahamas. The results give insight into the processes of maturation and diagenesis of the organic and inorganic fractions. Analysis of the organic fraction, both before and after the experiments, gives indicates of possible pathways of maturation during early diagenesis. A small amount of data is also available on the fate of sugars and amino acids in the system. Overall, the experiments closely approximate the natural system. Reactions occurring in the inorganic components are closely allied to those in the organic fraction. Indeed, two of the critical factors in early carbonate diagenesis are the amount and quality of organic matter and the shape, size, and nature of the carbonate grains. Changes in the carbonate fraction taking place during and after the experiments have been deduced by monitoring the pore fluid chemistry and by analyzing the final solid product. These results are discussed briefly and related to changes in the organic phase.

  13. Isotopic compositions of carbonates and organic carbon from upper Proterozoic successions in Namibia: stratigraphic variation and the effects of diagenesis and metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A. J.; Hayes, J. M.; Knoll, A. H.; Germs, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    Proterozoic seawater. Within the Damara basin, carbon-isotopic compositions of carbonates provide a potentially useful tool for the correlation of units between the Kalahari and Congo cratons. Carbonates depleted in 13C were deposited during and immediately following three separate glacial episodes in Namibia. The correspondence between ice ages and negative delta 13C excursions may reflect the effects of lowered sea levels; enhanced circulation of deep, cold, O2-rich seawater; and/or the upwelling of 13C-depleted deep water. Iron-formation is additionally associated with one of the glacial horizons, the Chuos tillite. Carbon-13 enriched isotopic abundances in immediately pre-glacial carbonates suggest that oceanographic conditions favored high rates of organic burial. It is likely that marine waters were stratified, with deep waters anoxic. A prolonged period of ocean stratification would permit the build-up of ferrous iron, probably from hydrothermal sources. At the onset of glaciation, upwelling would have brought 13C-depleted and iron-rich deep water onto shallow shelves where contact with cold, oxygenated surface waters led to the precipitation of ferric iron.

  14. Isotopic compositions of carbonates and organic carbon from upper Proterozoic successions in Namibia: stratigraphic variation and the effects of diagenesis and metamorphism.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, A J; Hayes, J M; Knoll, A H; Germs, G J

    1991-01-01

    Proterozoic seawater. Within the Damara basin, carbon-isotopic compositions of carbonates provide a potentially useful tool for the correlation of units between the Kalahari and Congo cratons. Carbonates depleted in 13C were deposited during and immediately following three separate glacial episodes in Namibia. The correspondence between ice ages and negative delta 13C excursions may reflect the effects of lowered sea levels; enhanced circulation of deep, cold, O2-rich seawater; and/or the upwelling of 13C-depleted deep water. Iron-formation is additionally associated with one of the glacial horizons, the Chuos tillite. Carbon-13 enriched isotopic abundances in immediately pre-glacial carbonates suggest that oceanographic conditions favored high rates of organic burial. It is likely that marine waters were stratified, with deep waters anoxic. A prolonged period of ocean stratification would permit the build-up of ferrous iron, probably from hydrothermal sources. At the onset of glaciation, upwelling would have brought 13C-depleted and iron-rich deep water onto shallow shelves where contact with cold, oxygenated surface waters led to the precipitation of ferric iron. PMID:11538647

  15. Investigation of organic carbon transformation in soils of dominant dissolved organic carbon source zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pissarello, Anna; Miltner, Anja; Oosterwoud, Marieke; Fleckenstein, Jan; Kästner, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    Over the past 20 years both a decrease in soil organic matter (SOM) and an increase in the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in surface water bodies, including drinking water reservoirs, have been recorded in the northern hemisphere. This development has severe consequences for soil fertility and for drinking water purification. As both processes occur simultaneously, we assume that microbial SOM degradation, which transforms SOM into CO2 and DOC, is a possible source of the additional DOC in the surface water. In addition we speculate that both processes are initially triggered by physical mechanisms, resulting in a modification of the organic matter solubility equilibria and thus in higher SOM availability and DOC mobilization. The general hypothesis of the study is therefore that SOM loss and DOC increase are combined consequences of enhanced microbial degradation of SOM and that this is a result of climate variations and global change, e.g. the increase of the temperature, the alteration of the water regime (i.e. increase of the frequency of drying and rewetting cycles and a higher number of heavy rain events), but also the decrease of the atmospheric acid deposition resulting in an increase of soil pH values. The general goal of the study is the identification of the dominant processes and controlling factors involved in soil microbial carbon turnover and mobilization of DOC in soils from catchment areas that contribute DOC to the receiving waters and the downstream Rappbode reservoir, which showed a pronounced increase in DOC concentration in recent years. This reservoir is the source of drinking water for about one million people in northern Germany. Preliminary screening experiments, consisting of 65-day soil batch incubation experiments, have been conducted in order to select the parameters (and the parameter ranges) of relevance for further in-depth experiments. During the experiments, different soil systems were exposed to different

  16. Hierarchically-Porous Carbon Derived from a Large-Scale Iron-based Organometallic Complex for Versatile Energy Storage.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chao-Ying; Li, Huan-Huan; Wang, Hai-Feng; Sun, Hai-Zhu; Wu, Xing-Long; Zhang, Jing-Ping

    2016-06-22

    Inspired by the preparation of the hierarchically-porous carbon (HPC) derived from metal organic frameworks (MOFs) for energy storage, in this work, a simple iron-based metal- organic complex (MOC), which was simpler and cheaper compared with the MOF, was selected to achieve versatile energy storage. The intertwined 1 D nanospindles and enriched-oxygen doping of the HPC was obtained after one-step carbonization of the MOC. When employed in lithium-ion batteries, the HPC exhibited reversible capacity of 778 mA h g(-1) after 60 cycles at 50 mA g(-1) . Moreover, the HPC maintained a capacity of 188 mA h g(-1) after 400 cycles at 100 mA g(-1) as the anode material in a sodium-ion battery. In addition, the HPC served as the cathode matrix for evaluation of a lithium-sulfur battery. The general preparation process of the HPC is commercial, which is responsible for the large-scale production for its practical application. PMID:27219476

  17. Expeditious organic-free assembly: morphologically controlled synthesis of iron oxides using microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Jiahui; Varma, Rajender S.

    2013-08-01

    A microwave hydrothermal method is developed for the synthesis of iron oxides, α-Fe2O3, β-FeOOH, and the junction of α-Fe2O3-β-FeOOH. This method is absolutely organic-free, and various structures could be obtained simply by changing the use of the iron source and NaOH. The as-prepared sea urchin-like β-FeOOH exhibits excellent catalytic performance for the degradation of methylene blue (MB) in the presence of H2O2.A microwave hydrothermal method is developed for the synthesis of iron oxides, α-Fe2O3, β-FeOOH, and the junction of α-Fe2O3-β-FeOOH. This method is absolutely organic-free, and various structures could be obtained simply by changing the use of the iron source and NaOH. The as-prepared sea urchin-like β-FeOOH exhibits excellent catalytic performance for the degradation of methylene blue (MB) in the presence of H2O2. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: XRD patterns and the reaction profile of the microwave system. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02663a

  18. Carbon isotopic studies of organic matter in Precambrian rocks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehler, D. Z.; Schopf, J. W.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    A survey has been undertaken of the carbon composition of the total organic fraction of a suite of Precambrian sediments to detect isotopic trends possibly correlative with early evolutionary events. Early Precambrian cherts of the Fig Tree and upper and middle Onverwacht groups of South Africa were examined for this purpose. Reduced carbon in these cherts was found to be isotopically similar to photosynthetically produced organic matter of younger geological age. Reduced carbon in lower Onverwacht cherts was found to be anomalously heavy; it is suggested that this discontinuity may reflect a major event in biological evolution.

  19. Competitive adsorption, displacement, and transport of organic matter on iron oxide: II. Displacement and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, B; Mehlhorn, T.L.; Liang, Liyuan

    1996-08-01

    The competitive interactions between organic matter compounds and mineral surfaces are poorly understood, yet these interactions may play a significant role in the stability and co-transport of mineral colloids and/or environmental contaminants. In this study, the processes of competitive adsorption, displacement, and transport of Suwannee River natural organic matter (SR-NOM) are investigated with several model organic compounds in packed beds of iron oxide-coated quartz columns. Results demonstrated that strongly-binding organic compounds are competitively adsorbed and displace those weakly-bound organic compounds along the flow path. Among the four organic compounds studied, polyacrylic acid (PAA) appeared to be the most competitive, whereas SR-NOM was more competitive than phthalic and salicylic acids. A diffuse adsorption and sharp desorption front (giving an appearance of irreversible adsorption) of the SR-NOM breakthrough curves are explained as being a result of the competitive time-dependent adsorption and displacement processes between different organic components within the SR-NOM. The stability and transport of iron oxide colloids varied as one organic component competitively displaces another. Relatively large quantities of iron oxide colloids are transported when the more strongly-binding PAA competitively displaces the weakly-binding SR-NOM or when SR-NOM competitively displaces phthalic and salicylic acids. Results of this study suggest that the chemical composition and hence the functional behavior of NOM (e.g., in stabilizing mineral colloids and in complexing contaminants) can change along its flow path as a result of the dynamic competitive interactions between heterogeneous NOM subcomponents. Further studies are needed to better define and quantify these NOM components as well as their roles in contaminant partitioning and transport. 37 refs., 10 figs.

  20. [Relationships between soil organic carbon and environmental factors in gully watershed of the Loess Plateau].

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-Rong; Shao, Ming-An; Gao, Jian-Lun

    2008-10-01

    Understanding the distribution of organic carbon fractions in soils and their relationships with environmental factors are very important for appraising soil organic carbon status and assessing carbon cycling in the Loess Plateau. In this research, through field investigation and laboratory analysis, we studied the relationships between soil organic carbon and environmental factors in a gully watershed of the Loess Plateau. The environmental factors are landforms, land use conditions and soil types. The results showed that total soil organic carbon presented less variance, while high labile organic carbon presented greater variance. The variation coefficients of them are 34% and 43%, respectively, indicating that the variability of organic carbon in soils increased with the increasing of their activities. Total soil organic carbon, labile organic carbon, middle and high labile organic carbon were highly interrelated and presented similar distribution trend with environmental factors. Among different landforms, land uses, and soil types, the highest contents of organic carbon in different fractions were observed in plateau land, forest and farm lands, and black loessial soils, while the lowest contents of them were observed in gully bottom, grass land, and rubified soils, respectively. The relationships between organic carbon and environmental factors indicate that environmental factors not only directly influence the distribution of soil organic carbon, but also indirectly influence them through affecting the relationships among organic carbon fractions. The relationship between total organic carbon and labile organic carbon responses rapidly to environmental factors, while that between middle labile organic carbon and high labile organic carbon responses slowly to environmental factors. PMID:19143389

  1. Adsorption and photodegradation of methylene blue by iron oxide impregnated on granular activated carbons in an oxalate solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadirova, Zukhra C.; Katsumata, Ken-ichi; Isobe, Toshihiro; Matsushita, Nobuhiro; Nakajima, Akira; Okada, Kiyoshi

    2013-11-01

    The photocatalytic adsorbents BAU-OA, BAU-CL and BAU-HA with varying iron oxide content (9-10 mass%) were prepared by heat treatment at 250 °C from commercial activated carbon (BAU) impregnated with iron oxalate, chloride, tris-benzohydroxamate, respectively. The XRD patterns showed amorphous structure in the BAU-CL sample (SBET 50 m2/g) and low crystallinity (as FeOOH and Fe2O3 phases) in the BAU-HA and BAU-OA samples (SBET 4 and 111 m2/g, respectively). The methylene blue adsorption capacities was decreased in order of BAU-OA < BAU-CL < BAU-HA sample and the adsorption followed Langmuir model. The apparent MB photodegradation rate constant (kapp) was increased in same order BAU-HA < BAU-CL < BAU-OA under the standard experimental conditions (initial MB concentrations 0.015-0.025 mM; sample content - 10 mg/l; initial oxalic acid concentration - 0.43 mM; pH 3-4; UV illumination). The process included high efficiency combination of adsorption, heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis under UV and solar lights illumination without addition of hydrogen peroxide. The detoxification of water sample containing organic dyes was confirmed after combined sorption-photocatalytic treatment.

  2. Effect of accelerated carbonation and zero valent iron on metal leaching from bottom ash.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, M; Andreas, L; Lagerkvist, A

    2016-05-01

    About 85% of the ashes produced in Sweden originated from the incineration of municipal solid waste and biofuel. The rest comes from the thermal treatment of recycled wood, peat, charcoal and others. About 68% of all ashes annually produced in Sweden are used for constructions on landfills, mainly slopes, roads and embankments, and only 3% for construction of roads and working surfaces outside the landfills (SCB, 2013). Since waste bottom ash (BA) often has similar properties to crushed bedrock or gravel, it could be used for road constructions to a larger extent. However, the leaching of e.g. Cr, Cu, Mo, Pb and Zn can cause a threat to the surrounding environment if the material is used as it is. Carbonation is a commonly used pre-treatment method, yet it is not always sufficient. As leaching from aged ash is often controlled by adsorption to iron oxides, increasing the number of Fe oxide sorption sites can be a way to control the leaching of several critical elements. The importance of iron oxides as sorption sites for metals is known from both mineralogical studies of bottom ash and from the remediation of contaminated soil, where iron is used as an amendment. In this study, zero valent iron (Fe(0)) was added prior to accelerated carbonation in order to increase the number of adsorption sites for metals and thereby reduce leaching. Batch, column and pHstat leaching tests were performed and the leaching behaviour was evaluated with multivariate data analysis. It showed that leaching changed distinctly after the tested treatments, in particular after the combined treatment. Especially, the leaching of Cr and Cu clearly decreased as a result of accelerated carbonation. The combination of accelerated carbonation with Fe(0) addition reduced the leaching of Cr and Cu even further and reduced also the leaching of Mo, Zn, Pb and Cd compared to untreated BA. Compared with only accelerated carbonation, the Fe(0) addition significantly reduced the leaching of Cr, Cu and Mo

  3. Low temperature charge transport and microwave absorption of carbon coated iron nanoparticles–polymer composite films

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, V.

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ► Carbon coated Fe nanoparticle–PVC composite films were prepared by solution casting method. ► A low electrical percolation threshold of 2.2 was achieved. ► The low temperature electrical conductivity follows variable range hopping type conduction. ► An EMI shielding of 18 dB was achieved in 200 micron thick film. -- Abstract: In this paper, the low temperature electrical conductivity and microwave absorption properties of carbon coated iron nanoparticles–polyvinyl chloride composite films are investigated for different filler fractions. The filler particles are prepared by the pyrolysis of ferrocene at 980 °C and embedded in polyvinyl chloride matrix. The high resolution transmission electron micrographs of the filler material have shown a 5 nm thin layer graphitic carbon covering over iron particles. The room temperature electrical conductivity of the composite film changes by 10 orders of magnitude with the increase of filler concentration. A percolation threshold of 2.2 and an electromagnetic interference shielding efficiency (EMI SE) of ∼18.6 dB in 26.5–40 GHz range are observed for 50 wt% loading. The charge transport follows three dimensional variable range hopping conduction.

  4. Deep carbon export from a Southern Ocean iron-fertilized diatom bloom.

    PubMed

    Smetacek, Victor; Klaas, Christine; Strass, Volker H; Assmy, Philipp; Montresor, Marina; Cisewski, Boris; Savoye, Nicolas; Webb, Adrian; d'Ovidio, Francesco; Arrieta, Jesús M; Bathmann, Ulrich; Bellerby, Richard; Berg, Gry Mine; Croot, Peter; Gonzalez, Santiago; Henjes, Joachim; Herndl, Gerhard J; Hoffmann, Linn J; Leach, Harry; Losch, Martin; Mills, Matthew M; Neill, Craig; Peeken, Ilka; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Sachs, Oliver; Sauter, Eberhard; Schmidt, Maike M; Schwarz, Jill; Terbrüggen, Anja; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter

    2012-07-19

    Fertilization of the ocean by adding iron compounds has induced diatom-dominated phytoplankton blooms accompanied by considerable carbon dioxide drawdown in the ocean surface layer. However, because the fate of bloom biomass could not be adequately resolved in these experiments, the timescales of carbon sequestration from the atmosphere are uncertain. Here we report the results of a five-week experiment carried out in the closed core of a vertically coherent, mesoscale eddy of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, during which we tracked sinking particles from the surface to the deep-sea floor. A large diatom bloom peaked in the fourth week after fertilization. This was followed by mass mortality of several diatom species that formed rapidly sinking, mucilaginous aggregates of entangled cells and chains. Taken together, multiple lines of evidence-although each with important uncertainties-lead us to conclude that at least half the bloom biomass sank far below a depth of 1,000 metres and that a substantial portion is likely to have reached the sea floor. Thus, iron-fertilized diatom blooms may sequester carbon for timescales of centuries in ocean bottom water and for longer in the sediments. PMID:22810695

  5. Arsenic removal by modified activated carbons with iron hydro(oxide) nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Vitela-Rodriguez, Alma Veronica; Rangel-Mendez, Jose Rene

    2013-01-15

    Different activated carbons modified with iron hydro(oxide) nanoparticles were tested for their ability to adsorb arsenic from water. Adsorption isotherms were determined at As (V) concentrations < 1 ppm, with varying pH (6, 7, 8) and temperature (25 and 35 °C). Also, competition effect of anions on the As (V) adsorption capacity was evaluated using groundwater. The surface areas of the modified activated carbons ranged from 632 m(2) g(-1) to 1101 m(2) g(-1), and their maximum arsenic adsorption capacity varied from 370 μg g(-1) to 1250 μg g(-1). Temperature had no significant effect on arsenic adsorption; however, arsenic adsorption decreased 32% when the solution pH increased from 6 to 8. In addition, when groundwater was used in the experiments, the arsenic adsorption considerably decreased due to the presence of competing anions (mainly SO(4)(2-), Cl(-) and F(-)) for active sites. The data from kinetic studies fitted well to the pseudo-second-order model (r(2) = 0.98-0.99). The results indicated that sample CAZ-M had faster kinetics than the other two materials in the first 10 min. However, sample F400-M was only 5.5% slower than CAZ-M. The results of this study show that iron modified activated carbons are efficient adsorbents for arsenic at concentrations lower than 300 μg L(-1). PMID:23146335

  6. Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part III. Shrinkage of composite pellets during reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2008-12-15

    This article involves the evaluation of the volume change of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets and its implications on reduction kinetics under conditions prevalent in a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) that were simulated in the laboratory. The pellets, in general, were found to shrink considerably during the reduction due to the loss of carbon and oxygen from the system, sintering of the iron-oxide, and formation of a molten slag phase at localized regions inside the pellets due to the presence of binder and coal/wood-charcoal ash at the reduction temperatures. One of the shortcomings of the RHF ironmaking process has been the inability to use multiple layers of composite pellets because of the impediment in heat transport to the lower layers of a multilayer bed. However, pellet shrinkage was found to have a strong effect on the reduction kinetics by virtue of enhancing the external heat transport to the lower layers. The volume change of the different kinds of composite pellets was studied as a function of reduction temperature and time. The estimation of the change in the amount of external heat transport with varying pellet sizes for a particular layer of a multilayer bed was obtained by conducting heat-transfer tests using inert low-carbon steel spheres. It was found that if the pellets of the top layer of the bed shrink by 30 pct, the external heat transfer to the second layer increases by nearly 6 times.

  7. Reduction of Iron-Oxide-Carbon Composites: Part III. Shrinkage of Composite Pellets during Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    This article involves the evaluation of the volume change of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets and its implications on reduction kinetics under conditions prevalent in a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) that were simulated in the laboratory. The pellets, in general, were found to shrink considerably during the reduction due to the loss of carbon and oxygen from the system, sintering of the iron-oxide, and formation of a molten slag phase at localized regions inside the pellets due to the presence of binder and coal/wood-charcoal ash at the reduction temperatures. One of the shortcomings of the RHF ironmaking process has been the inability to use multiple layers of composite pellets because of the impediment in heat transport to the lower layers of a multilayer bed. However, pellet shrinkage was found to have a strong effect on the reduction kinetics by virtue of enhancing the external heat transport to the lower layers. The volume change of the different kinds of composite pellets was studied as a function of reduction temperature and time. The estimation of the change in the amount of external heat transport with varying pellet sizes for a particular layer of a multilayer bed was obtained by conducting heat-transfer tests using inert low-carbon steel spheres. It was found that if the pellets of the top layer of the bed shrink by 30 pct, the external heat transfer to the second layer increases by nearly 6 times.

  8. Preparation of carbon-coated iron nanofluid and its application in radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiguang; Zhang, Haiyan; Chen, Minshan; Zhang, Yaojun; Huang, Junting; Xu, Zuowen; Wang, Wenguang

    2015-05-01

    Carbon-coated iron nanoparticles (Fe@C CCINs) were synthesized by carbon arc discharge method and were studied via X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that CCINs have good core-shell structure and are in size of 40-50 nm. Also, carbon-coated iron nanofluid (CCINs-nanofluid) was prepared via two-step method by dispersing as-prepared CCINs and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) into physiological saline. Its dispersion stability and thermal conductivity were detected by gravity sedimentation method and Hotdisk thermal constant analyzer respectively. The results indicated that CCINs-nanofluid possesses good dispersity and stability. Moreover, CCINs-nanofluid showed enhanced thermal conductivity compared with its base fluid physiological saline. The enhancement of thermal conductivity even reaches 41%. Additionally, CCINs-nanofluid injection aided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) was carried out. The relation between tissue temperature and ablation time revealed that by injecting CCINs-nanofluid into pork livers during RFA, target tissue temperatures were less than 100°C. Dissected pork livers showed that there was little or no tissue charring around the ablation probe. Results of ablation area calculation showed that the ablation area of CCINs-nanofluid injection aided RFA was 67% larger than that of saline injection aided RFA, indicating that a larger-volume tumor tissue necrosis at a single session can be achieved by CCINs-nanofluid injection aided RFA. PMID:25171467

  9. COSOLVENT EFFECTS ON ORGANIC CHEMICAL PARTITIONING TO SEDIMENT ORGANIC CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption-desorption hysteresis, slow desorption kinetics and resultant bioavailability, and other nonideal phenomena have been attributed to the differing sorptive characteristics of the natural organic polymers associated with soils and sediments. The objectives of this study we...

  10. The influence of carbon content in the borided Fe-alloys on the microstructure of iron borides

    SciTech Connect

    Kulka, M. . E-mail: coolka@sol.put.poznan.pl; Pertek, A. . E-mail: pertek@sol.put.poznan.pl; Klimek, L. . E-mail: kemilk@p.lodz.pl

    2006-04-15

    This paper presents the results of Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction (EBSD) analyses of the borided layers produced on substrate of varying carbon content. Two types of materials were investigated: borided Armco iron of very low carbon content and borocarburized chromium- and nickel-based steels of high carbon content beneath iron borides. The tetragonal phase Fe{sub 2}B was identified in all materials studied. It was difficult to obtain an EBSD pattern from iron boride (FeB) because of its presence at low depths below the surface, and because of the rounded corners of the specimens. EBSD provided information on the orientation of Fe{sub 2}B crystals. In case of the low-carbon Armco iron the crystallographic orientation was constant along the full length of the Fe{sub 2}B needle. The EBSPs obtained from borocarburized steel indicate that the crystallographic orientation of the Fe{sub 2}B phase changes along the length of the needle. This is the result of hindered boron diffusion due to boriding of the carburized substrate. The increased resistance to friction wear of borocarburized layers arises from two reasons. One is the decreased microhardness gradient between the iron borides and the substrate, which causes a decrease in the brittleness of the iron borides and an improved distribution of internal stresses in the diffusion layer. The second is the changeable crystallographic orientation of iron borides, which leads to the lower texture and porosity of borided layers. These advantageous properties of the borocarburized layer can be obtained if the carbon content beneath the iron borides is no more than about 1.0-1.2 wt.% C.

  11. Carbon aging mechanisms and effects on retention of organic iodides

    SciTech Connect

    Hyder, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The activated carbon used to treat the off-gas from the Savannah River Plant prodution reactor building was studied to determine the chemical changes occurring in this carbon during its service life. The carbon is a coconut-shell charcoal impregnated with 1% triethylenediamine (TEDA) and 2% KI. It was known that during its 30-month service life the carbon becomes more acidic and less effective for retaining iodine in organic form. The study showed that the most important change occurring in the carbon is the reaction of KI to give other chemical forms of iodine. The reacted iodine is unavailable for exchange with alkyl iodides. The results suggest that the carbon reacts with KI to form organic compounds, but small amounts of oxidized iodine may also be presnt. There is also evidence that some iodide is lost from the carbon altogether. The TEDA impregnant is lost from the carbon very quickly, and has no importance after a few months. The specific reactions by which the impregnant is lost have not been identified. However, mathematical analysis shows that the carbon performance data are consistent with the reaction of iodide impregnant with impurities in the air flowing through the carbon bed. Additional mathematical analysis, based on electron microscopic observation of the carbon particles, indicates that the external surfaces of the carbon are mainly responsible for their effectiveness in retaining iodine. Consequently, the condition of the impregnants on a relatively small fraction of the carbon surface can have a large effect on its performance. 4 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Carbon Solubility in Silicon-Iron-Bearing Metals during Core Formation on Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Ross, D. Kent; Rapp, Jennifer F.; Danielson, Lisa R.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Righter, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Recent results obtained from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft showed the surface of Mercury has high S abundances (approximately 4 wt%) and low Iron(II) Oxide abundances (less than 2 wt%). Based on these extreme values, the oxygen fugacity of Mercury's surface materials was estimated to be approximately 3 to 7 log(sub 10) units below the IW buffer (Delta IW-3 to Delta IW-7). This highly reducing nature of the planet has resulted in a large core and relatively thin mantle, extending to only approximately 420 km depth (corresponding to a core-mantle boundary pressure of approximately 4-7 GPa) within the planet. Furthermore, MESSENGER results have suggested the presence of carbon on the surface of the planet. Previous experimental results from have also suggested the possibility of a primary floatation crust on Mercury composed of graphite, produced after a global magma ocean event. With these exotic conditions of this compositional end-member planet, it begs the question, what is the core composition of Mercury? Although no definitive conclusion has been reached, previous studies have made advances towards answering this question. Riner et al. and Chen et al. looked at iron sulfide systems and implemented various crystallization and layered core scenarios to try and determine the composition and structure of Mercury's core. Malavergne et al. examined core crystallization scenarios in the presence of sulfur and silicon. Hauck et al. used the most recent geophysical constraints from the MESSENGER spacecraft to model the internal structure of Mercury, including the core, in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. More recently, Chabot et al. conducted a series of metal-silicate partitioning experiments in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. These results showed the core of Mercury has the potential to contain more than 15 wt% silicon. However, with the newest results from MESSENGER's low altitude campaign, carbon is another

  13. Carbon Mineralizability Determines Interactive Effects on Mineralization of Pyrogenic Organic Matter and Soil Organic Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Whitman, Thea L.; Zhu, Zihua; Lehmann, Johannes C.

    2014-10-31

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is a critical and active pool in the global C cycle, and the addition of pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) has been shown to change SOC cycling, increasing or decreasing mineralization rates (often referred to as priming). We adjusted the amount of easily mineralizable C in the soil, through 1-day and 6-month pre-incubations, and in PyOM made from maple wood at 350°C, through extraction. We investigated the impact of these adjustments on C mineralization interactions, excluding pH and nutrient effects and minimizing physical effects. We found short-term increases (+20-30%) in SOC mineralization with PyOM additions in the soil pre-incubated for 6 months. Over the longer term, both the 6-month and 1-day pre-incubated soils experienced net ~10% decreases in SOC mineralization with PyOM additions. This was possibly due to stabilization of SOC on PyOM surfaces, suggested by nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry. Additionally, the duration of pre-incubation affected priming interactions, indicating that there may be no optimal pre-incubation time for SOC mineralization studies. We show conclusively that relative mineralizability of SOC in relation to PyOM-24 C is an important determinant of the effect of PyOM additions on SOC mineralization.

  14. Soil organic carbon mining versus priming - controls of soil organic carbon stocks along a management gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanes, M. Carmen; Reinsch, Sabine; Glanville, Helen C.; Jones, Davey L.; Carreira, José A.; Pastrana, David N.; Emmett, Bridget A.

    2015-04-01

    Soil carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) are assumed to be connected stoichiometrically and C:N(:P) ratios are frequently used to interpret the soils nutrient status. However, plants are capable of initiating the supply of nutrients by releasing rhizodeposits into the soil, thereby stimulating soil organic matter decomposition mediated by the rhizosphere microbial community. To test the relative importance of the two mechanisms across a fertility gradient in the UK we carried out a laboratory experiment. Intact soil cores from two depths (0-15 cm and 85-100 cm) were incubated and C, N and P were added in all possible combinations resulting in a total of 216 soil cores. Soil respiration was measured (1 h incubation, 10 oC) nine times over a 2 week period. Preliminary results indicate that all soils were C limited at the surface as measured as increased soil CO2 efflux. N additions increased soil respiration only marginally, whereas C+N stimulated microbial activity on the surface, and was even more pronounced in the deeper soil layer. Belowground responses to C+P were small and even smaller for N+P but similar for both soil depths. Our results indicate nutrient controls on soil organic matter turnover differ not only across a management/fertility gradient but also vertically down the soil profile.

  15. Binding and transport of rare earth elements by organic and iron-rich nanocolloids in Alaskan rivers, as revealed by field-flow fractionation and ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolpe, Björn; Guo, Laodong; Shiller, Alan M.

    2013-04-01

    Water samples were collected from six small rivers in the Yukon River basin in central Alaska to examine the role of nanocolloids (0.5-40 nm) in the dynamics and transport of rare earth elements (REEs) in northern high latitude watersheds influenced by permafrost. Total dissolved (<0.45 μm) concentrations and the 'nanocolloidal size distributions' (0.5-40 nm) of UV-absorbing dissolved organic matter, Fe, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu were determined by on-line coupling of flow field-flow fractionation (FFF) with a UV-absorbance detector and ICP-MS. Total dissolved and nanocolloidal concentrations of the REEs co-varied with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in all rivers and between spring flood and late summer baseflow. The nanocolloidal size distributions indicated the presence of three major components of nanocolloids: the 0.5-3 nm 'fulvic-rich nanocolloids' occurring throughout the sampling season, the 'organic/iron-rich nanocolloids' residing in the <8 nm size range during the spring flood, and the 4-40 nm iron-rich nanocolloids occurring during summer baseflow. REEs associated with all the three components of nanocolloids, but the proportions associated with the fulvic-rich nanocolloids during summer baseflow increased with increasing REE molar mass, which is consistent with the increase in stability of organic REE-complexes with increasing REE molar mass. Normalization of the measured REE-concentrations with the average REE-concentrations of the upper continental crust revealed a dynamic change in the physicochemical fractionation of REEs. During the spring flood, REE-binding in all the rivers was dominated by the <8 nm organic/iron-rich nanocolloids, likely being eroded from the upper organic-rich soil horizon by the strong surface runoff of snowmelt water. During the summer, the REE-binding in rivers with large groundwater input was dominated by small (<0.5 nm) organic and/or inorganic complexes, while lower proportions of the REEs

  16. Organic farming enhances soil carbon and its benefits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing soil carbon through systematic agricultural practices provides an array of societal and farmer/producer benefits. Organic methods have been utilized for over 6000 years to conserve soil, water, energy, and biological resources. Many of the benefits of organic technologies identified in ...

  17. Microbial Contribution to Organic Carbon Sequestration in Mineral Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil productivity and sustainability are dependent on soil organic matter (SOM). Our understanding on how organic inputs to soil from microbial processes become converted to SOM is still limited. This study aims to understand how microbes affect carbon (C) sequestration and the formation of recalcit...

  18. First discovery of the organic materials in deep-sea iron cosmic spherule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanchang, Peng; Peicang, XU

    1993-01-01

    The dust impact mass analyzer (PUMA) carried by the spacecraft Vega 1, Vega 2 and Giotto has provided the first direct measurements of the physical and chemical properties of cometary dust. The results indicate that most of the cometary dust particles are rich in light elements such as H, C, N, and O, suggesting the validity of models that describe the cometary dust as including organic material. Up to now, there were none found with the organic material from the deep-sea cosmic spherules. We have determined this from the deep-sea iron cosmic spherules collected from the North Pacific. An iron cosmic spherule (382 microns in diameter) was determined by the Laser Raman Microprobe.

  19. [The organic carbon--issues of hygienic regulation and harmonization].

    PubMed

    Kuz'mina, E A; Kuznetsov, E O; Smagina, N V; Slyshkina, T V; Akramov, R L; Brusnitsina, L A; Nitsak, G B; Nikonova, S V

    2013-01-01

    This study is devoted to the investigation of possibility to use the total organic carbon as regulated index in drinking water as well as to the issues of hygienic regulation and harmonizing this index with the standards of other countries. Basing on the results of 3 years lasting investigation carried out by Municipal Unitary Enterprise "Vodokanal" of Yekaterinburg city permits to propose as the most informative and reliable index of the presence of organic substances in drinking water the content of total organic carbon in comparison with currently regulated permanganate oxidability, chemical and biochemical oxygen consumption. PMID:24624824

  20. Multiband microwave absorption films based on defective multiwalled carbon nanotubes added carbonyl iron/acrylic resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Chen, Changxin; Pan, Xiaoyan; Ni, Yuwei; Zhang, Song; Huang, Jie; Chen, Da; Zhang, Yafei

    2009-05-01

    Defective multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were introduced to the carbonyl iron (CI) based composites to improve its microwave absorption by a simple ultrasonic mixing process. The electromagnetic parameters were measured in the 2-18 GHz range. Microwave absorption of CI based composites with 2 mm in thickness was evidently enhanced by adding as little as 1.0 wt% defective MWCNTs with two well separated absorption peaks exceeding -20 dB, as compared with that of pure CI based and defective MWCNTs composites. The enhancement mechanism is thought due to the interaction and better electromagnetic match between defective MWCNTs and ferromagnetic CI particles.

  1. Carbon-11 radiolabeling of iron-oxide nanoparticles for dual-modality PET/MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ramesh; Xu, Youwen; Kim, Sung Won; Schueller, Michael J.; Alexoff, David; Smith, S. David; Wang, Wei; Schlyer, David

    2013-07-01

    Dual-modality imaging, using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) simultaneously, is a powerful tool to gain valuable information correlating structure with function in biomedicine. The advantage of this dual approach is that the strengths of one modality can balance the weaknesses of the other. However, success of this technique requires developing imaging probes suitable for both. Here, we report on the development of a nanoparticle labeling procedure via covalent bonding with carbon-11 PET isotope. Carbon-11 in the form of [11C]methyl iodide was used as a methylation agent to react with carboxylic acid (-COOH) and amine (-NH2) functional groups of ligands bound to the nanoparticles (NPs). The surface coating ligands present on superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIO NPs) were radiolabeled to achieve dual-modality PET/MR imaging capabilities. The proof-of-concept dual-modality PET/MR imaging using the radiolabeled SPIO NPs was demonstrated in an in vivo experiment.Dual-modality imaging, using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) simultaneously, is a powerful tool to gain valuable information correlating structure with function in biomedicine. The advantage of this dual approach is that the strengths of one modality can balance the weaknesses of the other. However, success of this technique requires developing imaging probes suitable for both. Here, we report on the development of a nanoparticle labeling procedure via covalent bonding with carbon-11 PET isotope. Carbon-11 in the form of [11C]methyl iodide was used as a methylation agent to react with carboxylic acid (-COOH) and amine (-NH2) functional groups of ligands bound to the nanoparticles (NPs). The surface coating ligands present on superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIO NPs) were radiolabeled to achieve dual-modality PET/MR imaging capabilities. The proof-of-concept dual-modality PET/MR imaging using the radiolabeled

  2. Hematite Core Nanoparticles with Carbon Shell: Potential for Environmentally Friendly Production from Iron Mining Sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stević, Dragana; Mihajlović, Dijana; Kukobat, Radovan; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Sagisaka, Kento; Kaneko, Katsumi; Atlagić, Suzana Gotovac

    2016-02-01

    Hematite nanoparticles with amorphous, yet relatively uniform carbon shell, were produced based exclusively on the waste sludge from the iron mine as the raw material. The procedure for acid digestion-based purification of the sludge with the full recovery of acid vapors and the remaining non-toxic rubble is described. Synthesis of the hematite nanoparticles was performed by the arrested precipitation method with cationic surfactant. The particles were thoroughly characterized and the potential of their economical production for the battery industry is indicated.

  3. Effects of iron-reducing bacteria on carbon steel corrosion induced by thermophilic sulfate-reducing consortia.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Cantero, Eduardo; Peña-Cabriales, Juan José

    2014-02-28

    Four thermophilic bacterial species, including the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacillus sp. G2 and the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfotomaculum sp. SRB-M, were employed to integrate a bacterial consortium. A second consortium was integrated with the same bacteria, except for Geobacillus sp. G2. Carbon steel coupons were subjected to batch cultures of both consortia. The corrosion induced by the complete consortium was 10 times higher than that induced by the second consortium, and the ferrous ion concentration was consistently higher in iron-reducing consortia. Scanning electronic microscopy analysis of the carbon steel surface showed mineral films colonized by bacteria. The complete consortium caused profuse fracturing of the mineral film, whereas the non-iron-reducing consortium did not generate fractures. These data show that the iron-reducing activity of Geobacillus sp. G2 promotes fracturing of mineral films, thereby increasing steel corrosion. PMID:24225375

  4. Growth of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Injection CVD Using Cyclopentadienyliron Dicarbonyl Dimer and Cyclooctatetraene Iron Tricarbonyl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Jerry D.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Gennett, Thomas; Landi, Brian J.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2004-01-01

    Preferential oriented multiwalled carbon nanotubes were prepared by the injection chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method using either cyclopentadienyliron dicarbonyl dimer or cycloctatetraene iron tricarbonyl as the iron catalyst source. The catalyst precursors were dissolved in toluene as the carrier solvent for the injections. The concentration of the catalyst was found to influence both the growth of the nanotubes as well as the amount of iron in the deposited material. As deposited the multiwalled carbon nanotubes contained as little as 2.8% iron by weight. The material was deposited onto tantalum foil and fused silica substrates. The nanotubes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. This synthetic route provides a simple and scalable method to deposit MWNTs with a low defect density, low metal content and preferred orientation.

  5. Effect of reaction environments on the reactivity of PCB (2-chlorobiphenyl) over activated carbon impregnated with palladized iron.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeok; Al-Abed, Souhail R

    2010-07-15

    Reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with palladized iron nanoparticles has been developed to treat polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). In this study, we evaluated the effects of various reaction environments on the adsorption-mediated dechlorination of 2-chlorobiphenyl (2-ClBP) in the RAC system. The results were discussed in close connection to the implementation issue of the RAC system for the remediation of contaminated sites with PCBs. Adsorption event of 2-ClBP onto RAC limited the overall performance under condition with a 2-ClBP/RAC mass ratio of less than 1.0x10(-4) above which dechlorination of 2-ClBP adsorbed to RAC was the reaction rate-determining step. Acidic and basic conditions were harmful to 2-ClBP adsorption and iron stability while neutral pH showed the highest adsorption-promoted dechlorination of 2-ClBP and negligible metal leaching. Coexisting natural organic matter (NOM) slightly inhibited 2-ClBP adsorption onto RAC due to the partial partitioning of 2-ClBP into NOM in the liquid phase while the 2-ClBP absorbed into NOM, which also tended to adsorb onto RAC, was less available for the dechlorination reaction. Common anions slowed down 2-ClBP adsorption but adsorbed 2-ClBP was almost simultaneously dechlorinated. Some exceptions included strong inhibitory effect of carbonate species on 2-ClBP adsorption and severe detrimental effect of sulfite on 2-ClBP dechlorination. Results on treatment of 2-ClBP spiked to actual sediment supernatants implied site-specific reactivity of RAC. PMID:20388583

  6. Carbon monoxide hydrogenation over rhenium-iron oxide catalysts and their characterization by soft X-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Komlyama, M.; Tsunoda, T.; Ogino, Y.

    1986-03-01

    Rhenium-iron oxide catalysts, prepared by the conventional impregnation technique and activated by reduction under various conditions, gave higher selectivities to oxygenates (mainly alcohols) in carbon monoxide hydrogenation than the control iron oxide (magnetite) catalysts. Bulk-sensitive soft X-ray spectroscopy (SXS) along with X-ray diffraction and Mossbauer spectroscopy found that in rhenium-iron oxide catalysts iron oxide is in the form of an intermediate phase represented as (1 - x)Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/.xFe/sub 8/3/O/sub 4/; between Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ and ..gamma..-Fe/sub 2//O/sub 3/. The extent of the formation of this intermediate phase was correlated with the oxygenate selectivities of the rhenium-iron oxide catalysts. The usefulness of SXS in characterizing bulk of solid catalysts was demonstrated.

  7. Analyses of residual iron in carbon nanotubes produced by camphor/ferrocene pyrolysis and purified by high temperature annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, E. F.; de Resende, V. G.; Mengui, U. A.; Cunha, J. B. M.; Corat, E. J.; Massi, M.

    2011-07-01

    A detailed analysis of iron-containing phases in multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) powder was carried out. The MWCNTs were produced by camphor/ferrocene and purified by high temperature annealing in an oxygen-free atmosphere (N2 or VC). Thermogravimetric analysis, Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy enabled the evaluation of the residual iron in MWCNTs after purification. The VC treatments provided MWCNTs with a purity degree higher than 99%. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy revealed a significant improvement in graphitic ordering after thermal annealing. A brief description of the mechanism of iron removal was included. We highlight the mobility of iron atoms through graphitic sheets and the large contact angle of iron clusters formed on MWCNT surfaces at high temperatures.

  8. Modeling the diffusion effects through the iron carbonate layer in the carbon dioxide corrosion of carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rajappa, S.; Zhang, R.; Gopal, M.

    1998-12-31

    A mechanistic model was developed for predicting carbon dioxide corrosion rates of carbon steel pipes in multiphase flow conditions. The model incorporates the chemistry, thermodynamics of carbon dioxide dissolution, multiphase mass transfer, electrochemical kinetics on the metal surface and the presence of a corrosion product film. The predicted corrosion rates show good agreement with the experimental results.

  9. Organic carbon leaching behavior from incinerator bottom ash.

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, A L; Okuda, T; Nishijima, W; Okada, M

    2006-09-21

    The understanding of the leaching behavior of organic carbon from incinerator bottom ash is an important aspect for the control of organic carbon emissions from landfills in order to minimize their potential risk to the environment. The leaching behavior of organic carbon from incinerator bottom ash samples, obtained from two different solid waste sources, as well as the effects of calcium (Ca) on organic carbon (DOC) leaching associated with pH were therefore investigated in this paper. The effect of pH on the leaching of DOC and other major elements from bottom ash was ascertained through pH-stat leaching experiments. Column leaching experiments were carried out to evaluate the dependence of the leached amount of DOC on Ca leaching. It was found that the bottom ash produced by incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) was composed of two DOC fractions: DOC leached independent (fraction I) of Ca leaching, observed at alkaline-neutral pH, and DOC leached dependent (fraction II) on Ca leaching, observed at acid pH. However, the bottom ash produced by incineration of industrial solid waste (ISW) was composed of only DOC fraction I. The addition of calcium oxide during incineration and the differences in the paper to plastic ratio in the physical composition of the solid wastes incinerated would explain the distinct organic carbon leaching behaviors of bottom ash samples. PMID:16675109

  10. Potential Influence of Perchlorate on Organic Carbon in Martian Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oze, C.; Vithanage, M. S.; Kumarathilaka, P. R.; Indraratne, S.; Horton, T. W.

    2014-12-01

    Perchlorate is a strong oxidizer present at elevated concentrations in surface martian regolith. Chemical and isotopic modification of potential organic carbon with perchlorate in martian regolith during H2O(l) interactions is unknown. Here we assess the relationship between martian levels of perchlorate and organic carbon present in life harbouring geologic material from Earth. These materials represent chemical (i.e., processed serpentine soils from Sri Lanka) and temperature (i.e., hydrothermal jarosite/goethite deposit from White Island, New Zealand) extremes to where life exists on Earth. Preliminary evidence demonstrates that organic carbon decreases and δ13C values are modified for ultramafic sediment in both perchlorate kinetic and incubation experiments. In hydrothermal jarosite/goethite with microbial communities present, total and organic carbon is maintained and little modification in δ13C values is apparent. These preliminary results suggest that surface hydrothermal deposits with mineralogically 'protected' organic carbon are preferable sites to assess the potential of life on Mars.

  11. One-step synthesis of nitrogen-iron coordinated carbon nanotube catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woongchul; Yang, Gang; Kim, Suk Lae; Liu, Peng; Sue, Hung-Jue; Yu, Choongho

    2016-05-01

    Prohibitively expensive precious metal catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) have been one of the major hurdles in a wide use of electrochemical cells. Recent significant efforts to develop precious metal free catalysts have resulted in excellent catalytic activities. However, complicated and time-consuming synthesis processes have negated the cost benefit. Moreover, detailed analysis about catalytically active sites and the role of each element in these high-performance catalysts containing nanomaterials for large surface areas are often lacking. Here we report a facile one-step synthesis method of nitrogen-iron coordinated carbon nanotube (CNT) catalysts without precious metals. Our catalysts show excellent long-term stability and onset ORR potential comparable to those of other precious metal free catalysts, and the maximum limiting current density from our catalysts is larger than that of the Pt-based catalysts. We carry out a series of synthesis and characterization experiments with/without iron and nitrogen in CNT, and identify that the coordination of nitrogen and iron in CNT plays a key role in achieving the excellent catalytic performances. We anticipate our one-step process could be used for mass production of precious metal free electrocatalysts for a wide range of electrochemical cells including fuel cells and metal-air batteries.

  12. Iron-phthalocyanine immobilized on activated carbon black: A selective catalyst for alkane oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Parton, R.F.; Neys, P.E.; Jacobs, P.A.

    1996-12-01

    Carbon black is tested as a support for iron-phthalocyanine within the frame of the oxidation of hydrocarbons with t-butyl-hydroperoxide as oxygen donor. The increased hydrophobicity of the carrier surface, with respect to zeolite Y, changes the adsorption behavior of the components in the reaction mixture towards the alkane. A major improvement in the oxidation conversion and efficiency of cyclohexane has been established. Furthermore, the kinetic isotope effect and the reactivity order of secondary and tertiary carbon atoms measured with adamantane provide evidence for an {open_quotes}oxygen rebound{close_quotes} reaction mechanism, a non-free-radical oxidation pathway where the metallo-complex is responsible for the hydrogen abstraction. 40 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Organics on Titan : Carbon Rings and Carbon Cycles (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.

    2010-12-01

    The photochemical conversion of methane into heavier organics which would cover Titan’s surface has been a principal motif of Titan science for the last 4 decades. Broadly, this picture has held up against Cassini observations, but organics on Titan turn out to have some surprising characteristics. First, the surface deposits of organics are segregated into at least two distinct major reservoirs - equatorial dune sands and polar seas. Second, the rich array of compounds detected as ions and molecules even 1000km above Titan’s surface has proven much more complex than expected, including two-ring anthracene and compounds with m/z>1000. Radar and near-IR mapping shows that Titan’s vast dunefields, covering >10% of Titan’s surface, contain ~0.3 million km^3 of material. This material is optically dark and has a low dielectric constant, consistent with organic particulates. Furthermore, the dunes are associated with a near-IR spectral signature attributed to aromatic compounds such as benzene, which has been sampled in surprising abundance in Titan’s upper atmosphere. The polar seas and lakes of ethane (and presumably at least some methane) may have a rather lower total volume than the dune sands, and indeed may contain little more, if any, methane than the atmosphere itself. The striking preponderance of liquid deposits in the north, notably the 500- and 1000-km Ligeia and Kraken, contrasts with the apparently shallow and shrinking Ontario Lacus in the south, and perhaps attests to volatile migration on astronomical (Croll-Milankovich) timescales as well as seasonal methane transport. Against this appealing picture, many questions remain. What is the detailed composition of the seas, and can chemistry in a nonpolar solvent yield compounds of astrobiological interest ? Are there ‘groundwater’ reservoirs of methane seething beneath the surface, perhaps venting to form otherwise improbable equatorial clouds? And what role, if any, do clathrates play today

  14. Stream bed organic carbon and biotic integrity.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Allochthonous organic matter provides a basis for some stream ecosystems. Channel incision, which is a common result of anthropogenic impacts on watersheds and stream channels, may deplete stream bed C stores due to erosion, less frequent hydrologic exchanges between stream and floodplain, and remov...

  15. Soil organic carbon sequestration with conservation management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The southeastern USA has approximately 111 million acres (45 Mha) in agricultural production. This extensive land resource has the potential to sequester soil organic C (SOC), especially following historical conversion of land, first from native forest to intensively cultivated cropland and more re...

  16. Influence of carbonization methods on the aromaticity of pyrogenic dissolved organic carbon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) components of soil amendments such as biochar will influence the fundamental soil chemistry including the metal speciation, nutrient availability, and microbial activity. Quantitative correlation is necessary between (i) pyrogenic DOC components of varying aromaticity...

  17. Final Report: The Impact of Carbonate on Surface Protonation, Electron Transfer and Crystallization Reactions in Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, David Adams

    2013-07-02

    This project addresses key issues of importance in the geochemical behavior of iron oxides and in the geochemical cycling of carbon and iron. For Fe, we are specifically studying the influence of carbonate on electron transfer reactions, solid phase transformations, and the binding of carbonate to reactive sites on the edges of particles. The emphasis on carbonate arises because it is widely present in the natural environment, is known to bind strongly to oxide surfaces, is reactive on the time scales of interest, and has a speciation driven by acid-base reactions. The geochemical behavior of carbonate strongly influences global climate change and CO{sub 2} sequestration technologies. Our goal is to answer key questions with regards to specific site binding, electron transfer reactions, and crystallization reactions of iron oxides that impact both the geochemical cycling of iron and CO{sub 2} species. Our work is focused on the molecular level description of carbonate chemistry in solution including the prediction of isotope fractionation factors. We have also done work on critical atmospheric species.

  18. Modeling methane production by iron-bearing carbonate minerals in hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Norman, D.

    2005-12-01

    We measured methane and other major volatiles in fluid inclusions from gold deposits such as Lone Tree, Getchell, Twin Creeks, and Pipeline Carlin-type gold deposits in Nevada by bulk analysis using quadrupole mass spectrometry. Ore-stage fluids are characterized by CO2/CH4 ratios that typically are < 10. Fluid inclusion methane concentrations generally are between 0.1 and 0.5 mol.%; other gaseous species show much wider ranges in composition. Also we commonly measure CO2/CH4 ratios of 10 or less in geothermal fluid inclusions. Similar ratios are reported in some black smokers. Few geothermal systems in production have CH4 in other than trace amounts. Giggenbach (1997) demonstrates that CO2/CH4 ratio in geothermal fluids in equilibrium with granite should vary positively with temperature, but we see no such variation and some fluid inclusion CO2/CH4 in granite-hosted inclusions ratios are an order of magnitude higher than calculated by Giggenbach (1997). This raises the question about the fluid inclusion gas measurements. We have looked at explanations for measurement of fluid inclusion methane that include preferential trapping of hydrocarbon compounds, concentration of methane by boiling, and contamination, but none can explain in all cases the methane concentrations measured. Hence we have modeled geothermal fluid rock reactions using Geochemists Workbench to demonstrate that methane can be a result of fluid-rock reactions. For gold ore wall rocks, we assume that wall rock includes iron-bearing carbonate minerals, epidote, and biotite. For geothermal systems, we assumed fluids with 1 mol.% CO2 and salinity of 1 %. We modeled the reaction of iron-bearing carbonate minerals, epidote, and biotite with the fluid between 100 and 300 °C. The reaction released ferrous iron, and the released ferrous iron is oxidized and precipitated as hematite or magnetite. The precipitation of hematite or magnetite produced acid and the acid dissolved calcite increasing CO2

  19. Single-shell carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles: synthesis and high electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Tavakkoli, Mohammad; Kallio, Tanja; Reynaud, Olivier; Nasibulin, Albert G; Johans, Christoffer; Sainio, Jani; Jiang, Hua; Kauppinen, Esko I; Laasonen, Kari

    2015-04-01

    Efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) through effective and inexpensive electrocatalysts is a valuable approach for clean and renewable energy systems. Here, single-shell carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles (SCEINs) decorated on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are introduced as a novel highly active and durable non-noble-metal catalyst for the HER. This catalyst exhibits catalytic properties superior to previously studied nonprecious materials and comparable to those of platinum. The SCEIN/SWNT is synthesized by a novel fast and low-cost aerosol chemical vapor deposition method in a one-step synthesis. In SCEINs the single carbon layer does not prevent desired access of the reactants to the vicinity of the iron nanoparticles but protects the active metallic core from oxidation. This finding opens new avenues for utilizing active transition metals such as iron in a wide range of applications. PMID:25683139

  20. Chemistry of organic carbon in soil with relationship to the global carbon cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Post, W.M. III

    1988-01-01

    Various ecosystem disturbances alter the balances between production of organic matter and its decomposition and therefore change the amount of carbon in soil. The most severe perturbation is conversion of natural vegetation to cultivated crops. Conversion of natural vegetation to cultivated crops results in a lowered input of slowly decomposing material which causes a reduction in overall carbon levels. Disruption of soil matrix structure by cultivation leads to lowered physical protection of organic matter resulting in an increased net mineralization rate of soil carbon. Climate change is another perturbation that affects the amount and composition of plant production, litter inputs, and decomposition regimes but does not affect soil structure directly. Nevertheless, large changes in soil carbon storage are probable with anticipated CO2 induced climate change, particularly in northern latitudes where anticipated climate change will be greatest (MacCracken and Luther 1985) and large amounts of soil organic matter are found. It is impossible, given the current state of knowledge of soil organic matter processes and transformations to develop detailed process models of soil carbon dynamics. Largely phenomenological models appear to be developing into predictive tools for understanding the role of soil organic matter in the global carbon cycle. In particular, these models will be useful in quantifying soil carbon changes due to human land-use and to anticipated global climate and vegetation changes. 47 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Iron limitation in the Western Interior Seaway during the Late Cretaceous OAE 3 and its role in phosphorus recycling and enhanced organic matter preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessin, Allyson; Sheldon, Nathan D.; Hendy, Ingrid; Chappaz, Anthony

    2016-09-01

    The sedimentary record of the Coniacian-Santonian Oceanic Anoxic Event 3 (OAE 3) in the North American Western Interior Seaway is characterized by a prolonged period of enhanced organic carbon (OC) burial. This study investigates the role of Fe in enhancing organic matter preservation and maintaining elevated primary productivity to sustain black shale deposition within the Coniacian-Santonian-aged Niobrara Formation in the USGS #1 Portland core. Iron speciation results indicate the development of a reactive Fe limitation coeval with reduced bioturbation and increased organic matter preservation, suggesting that decreased sulfide buffering by reactive Fe may have promoted enhanced organic matter preservation at the onset of OAE 3. An Fe limitation would also provide a feedback mechanism to sustain elevated primary productivity through enhanced phosphorus recycling. Additionally our results demonstrate inconsistencies between Fe-based and trace metal redox reconstructions. Iron indices from the Portland core indicate a single stepwise change, whereas the trace metal redox proxies indicate fluctuating redox conditions during and after OAE 3. Using Fe speciation to reconstruct past redox conditions may be complicated by a number of factors, including Fe sequestration in diagenetic carbonate phases and efficient sedimentary pyrite formation in a system with limited Fe supply and high levels of export production.

  2. Water equivalent thickness values of materials used in beams of protons, helium, carbon and iron ions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Taddei, Phillip J; Fitzek, Markus M; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2010-01-01

    Heavy charged particle beam radiotherapy for cancer is of increasing interest because it delivers a highly conformal radiation dose to the target volume. Accurate knowledge of the range of a heavy charged particle beam after it penetrates a patient’s body or other materials in the beam line is very important and is usually stated in terms of the water equivalent thickness (WET). However, methods of calculating WET for heavy charged particle beams are lacking. Our objective was to test several simple analytical formulas previously developed for proton beams for their ability to calculate WET values for materials exposed to beams of protons, helium, carbon and iron ions. Experimentally measured heavy charged particle beam ranges and WET values from an iterative numerical method were compared with the WET values calculated by the analytical formulas. Inmost cases, the deviations were within 1 mm. We conclude that the analytical formulas originally developed for proton beams can also be used to calculate WET values for helium, carbon and iron ion beams with good accuracy. PMID:20371908

  3. Removal of Trace Arsenic to Meet Drinking Water Standards Using Iron Oxide Coated Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Ntim, Susana Addo; Mitra, Somenath

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the removal of trace level arsenic to meet drinking water standards using an iron oxide-multi-walled carbon nanotube (Fe-MWCNT) hybrid as a sorbent. The synthesis was facilitated by the high degree of nanotube functionalization using a microwave assisted process, and a controlled assembly of iron oxide was possible where the MWCNT served as an effective support for the oxide. In the final product, 11 % of the carbon atoms were attached to Fe. The Fe-MWCNT was effective in arsenic removal to below the drinking water standard levels of 10 µg L−1. The absorption capacity of the composite was 1723 µg g−1 and 189 µg g−1 for As(III) and As(V) respectively. The adsorption of As(V) on Fe-MWCNT was faster than that of As(III). The pseudo-second order rate equation was found to effectively describe the kinetics of arsenic adsorption. The adsorption isotherms for As(III) and As(V) fitted both the Langmuir and Freundlich models. PMID:21625394

  4. Water equivalent thickness values of materials used in beams of protons, helium, carbon and iron ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Taddei, Phillip J; Fitzek, Markus M; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2010-05-01

    Heavy charged particle beam radiotherapy for cancer is of increasing interest because it delivers a highly conformal radiation dose to the target volume. Accurate knowledge of the range of a heavy charged particle beam after it penetrates a patient's body or other materials in the beam line is very important and is usually stated in terms of the water equivalent thickness (WET). However, methods of calculating WET for heavy charged particle beams are lacking. Our objective was to test several simple analytical formulas previously developed for proton beams for their ability to calculate WET values for materials exposed to beams of protons, helium, carbon and iron ions. Experimentally measured heavy charged particle beam ranges and WET values from an iterative numerical method were compared with the WET values calculated by the analytical formulas. In most cases, the deviations were within 1 mm. We conclude that the analytical formulas originally developed for proton beams can also be used to calculate WET values for helium, carbon and iron ion beams with good accuracy. PMID:20371908

  5. Advanced landfill leachate treatment using iron-carbon microelectrolysis- Fenton process: Process optimization and column experiments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liqun; Yang, Qi; Wang, Dongbo; Li, Xiaoming; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Zhijun; Deng, Yongchao; Liu, Jun; Yi, Kaixin

    2016-11-15

    A novel hydrogen peroxide-enhanced iron-carbon (Fe-C) microelectrolysis reactor was proposed for the pretreatment of mature landfill leachate. This reactor, combining microelectrolysis with Fenton process, revealed high treatment efficiency. The operating variables, including Fe-C dosage, H2O2 concentration and initial pH, were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM), regarding the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency and biochemical oxygen demand: chemical oxygen demand (BOD5/COD) as the responses. The highest COD removal (74.59%) and BOD5/COD (0.50) was obtained at optimal conditions of Fe-C dosage 55.72g/L, H2O2 concentration 12.32mL/L and initial pH 3.12. Three-dimensional excitation and emission matrix (3D-EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular weight (MW) distribution demonstrated that high molecular weight fractions such as refractory fulvic-like substances in leachate were effectively destroyed during the combined processes, which should be attributed to the combination oxidative effect of microelectrolysis and Fenton. The fixed-bed column experiments were performed and the breakthrough curves at different flow rates were evaluated to determine the practical applicability of the combined process. All these results show that the hydrogen peroxide-enhanced iron-carbon (Fe-C) microelectrolysis reactor is a promising and efficient technology for the treatment of mature landfill leachate. PMID:27450338

  6. Origin of conductivity crossover in entangled multiwalled carbon nanotube networks filled by iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimowa, George; Linganiso, Ella C.; Churochkin, Dmitry; Coville, Neil J.; Bhattacharyya, Somnath

    2011-11-01

    A realistic transport model showing the interplay of the hopping transport between the outer shells of iron-filled entangled multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), and the diffusive transport through the inner part of the tubes, as a function of the filling percentage, is developed. This model is based on low-temperature electrical resistivity and magneto-resistance (MR) measurements. The conductivity at low temperatures showed a crossover from Efros-Shklovski variable range hopping (VRH) to Mott VRH in three dimensions (3D) between the neighboring tubes as the iron weight percentage is increased from 11% to 19% in the MWNTs. The MR in the hopping regime is strongly dependent on temperature as well as magnetic field and shows both positive and negative signs, which are discussed in terms of wave-function shrinkage and quantum-interference effects, respectively. A further increase of the iron percentage from 19% to 31% gives a conductivity crossover from Mott VRH to 3D weak localization (WL). This change is ascribed to the formation of long iron nanowires at the core of the nanotubes, which yields a long dephasing length (e.g., 30 nm) at the lowest measured temperature. Although the overall transport in this network is described by a 3D WL model, the weak temperature dependence of inelastic scattering length expressed as Lφ ˜ T-0.3 suggests the possibility for the presence of one-dimensional channels in the network due to the formation of long Fe nanowires inside the tubes, which might introduce an alignment in the random structure.

  7. Maximum organic carbon limits at different melter feed rates (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, A.S.

    1995-12-31

    This report documents the results of a study to assess the impact of varying melter feed rates on the maximum total organic carbon (TOC) limits allowable in the DWPF melter feed. Topics discussed include: carbon content; feed rate; feed composition; melter vapor space temperature; combustion and dilution air; off-gas surges; earlier work on maximum TOC; overview of models; and the results of the work completed.

  8. Iron-rich nanoparticle encapsulated, nitrogen doped porous carbon materials as efficient cathode electrocatalyst for microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guolong; Zhu, Youlong; Lu, Lu; Xu, Kongliang; Wang, Heming; Jin, Yinghua; Jason Ren, Zhiyong; Liu, Zhenning; Zhang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Developing efficient, readily available, and sustainable electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in neutral medium is of great importance to practical applications of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Herein, a porous nitrogen-doped carbon material with encapsulated Fe-based nanoparticles (Fe-Nx/C) has been developed and utilized as an efficient ORR catalyst in MFCs. The material was obtained through pyrolysis of a highly porous organic polymer containing iron(II) porphyrins. The characterizations of morphology, crystalline structure and elemental composition reveal that Fe-Nx/C consists of well-dispersed Fe-based nanoparticles coated by N-doped graphitic carbon layer. ORR catalytic performance of Fe-Nx/C has been evaluated through cyclic voltammetry and rotating ring-disk electrode measurements, and its application as a cathode electrocatalyst in an air-cathode single-chamber MFC has been investigated. Fe-Nx/C exhibits comparable or better performance in MFCs than 20% Pt/C, displaying higher cell voltage (601 mV vs. 591 mV), maximum power density (1227 mW m-2 vs. 1031 mW m-2) and Coulombic efficiency (50% vs. 31%). These findings indicate that Fe-Nx/C is more tolerant and durable than Pt/C in a system with bacteria metabolism and thus holds great potential for practical MFC applications.

  9. Remote Sensing to Support Monitoring of Soil Organic Carbon (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNairn, H.; Pacheco, A.

    2009-12-01

    Soil organic carbon is fundamental to the sustainability of agricultural soils and soils play an important role in the global carbon balance. Estimating soil carbon levels and monitoring changes in these levels over time requires extensive data on climate, soil properties, land cover and land management. Remote sensing technologies are capable of providing some of the data needed in modeling soil organic carbon concentrations and in tracking changes in soil carbon. The characteristics of the vegetation cover influence the amount of organic matter in the soil and cultivation impacts the rate of organic matter decomposition. Consequently land management decisions, which include cropping and tillage practices, play a vital role in determining soil carbon levels. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) has developed several methods to map land management practices from multispectral and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite sensors. These include identification of crops grown, estimation of crop residue cover left post-harvest and identification of tillage activities. Optical and SAR data are capable of identifying crop types to accuracies consistently above 85%. Knowledge of crop type also provides information needed to establish biomass levels and residue type, both of which influence the amounts and decomposition rates of organic matter. Scientists with AAFC have also extensively validated a method to estimate percent residue cover using spectral unmixing analysis applied to multispectral satellite data. Percentages for corn, soybean and small grain residues can be estimated to accuracies of 83%, 80% and 82%, respectively. Tillage activity influences residue decomposition and AAFC is investigating methods to identify tillage occurrence using advanced polarimetric SAR information. This presentation will provide an overview of methods and results from research ongoing at AAFC. The potential contribution of these remote sensing approaches to support wide area carbon

  10. Charcoal bed operation for optimal organic carbon removal

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, C.M.; Scala, F.R.

    1995-05-01

    Historically, evaporation, reverse osmosis or charcoal-demineralizer systems have been used to remove impurities in liquid radwaste processing systems. At Nine Mile point, we recently replaced our evaporators with charcoal-demineralizer systems to purify floor drain water. A comparison of the evaporator to the charcoal-demineralizer system has shown that the charcoal-demineralizer system is more effective in organic carbon removal. We also show the performance data of the Granulated Activated Charcoal (GAC) vessel as a mechanical filter. Actual data showing that frequent backflushing and controlled flow rates through the GAC vessel dramatically increases Total Organic Carbon (TOC) removal efficiency. GAC vessel dramatically increases Total Organic Carbon (TOC) removal efficiency. Recommendations are provided for operating the GAC vessel to ensure optimal performance.

  11. Enhanced Fenton-like removal of nitrobenzene via internal microelectrolysis in nano zerovalent iron/activated carbon composite.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sihai; Wu, Yaoguo; Yao, Hairui; Lu, Cong; Zhang, Chengjun

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency of Fenton-like catalysis using nano zerovalent iron (nZVI) is limited by nZVI aggregation and activity loss due to inactive ferric oxide forming on the nZVI surface, which hinders electron transfer. A novel iron-carbon composite catalyst consisting of nZVI and granular activated carbon (GAC), which can undergo internal iron-carbon microelectrolysis spontaneously, was successfully fabricated by the adsorption-reduction method. The catalyst efficiency was evaluated in nitrobenzene (NB) removal via the Fenton-like process (H2O2-nZVI/GAC). The results showed that nZVI/GAC composite was good for dispersing nZVI on the surface of GAC, which permitted much better removal efficiency (93.0%) than nZVI (31.0%) or GAC (20.0%) alone. Moreover, iron leaching decreased from 1.28 to 0.58 mg/L after reaction of 240 min and the oxidation kinetic of the Fenton-like reaction can be described well by the second-order reaction kinetic model (R2=0.988). The composite catalyst showed sustainable catalytic ability and GAC performed as a medium for electron transfer in internal iron-carbon microelectrolysis to promote Fe2+ regeneration and Fe3+/Fe2+ cycles. Therefore, this study represents an important method to design a low cost and high efficiency Fenton-like catalyst in practical application. PMID:26744946

  12. Size and Promoter Effects on Stability of Carbon-Nanofiber-Supported Iron-Based Fischer–Tropsch Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis converts synthesis gas from alternative carbon resources, including natural gas, coal, and biomass, to hydrocarbons used as fuels or chemicals. In particular, iron-based catalysts at elevated temperatures favor the selective production of C2–C4 olefins, which are important building blocks for the chemical industry. Bulk iron catalysts (with promoters) were conventionally used, but these deactivate due to either phase transformation or carbon deposition resulting in disintegration of the catalyst particles. For supported iron catalysts, iron particle growth may result in loss of catalytic activity over time. In this work, the effects of promoters and particle size on the stability of supported iron nanoparticles (initial sizes of 3–9 nm) were investigated at industrially relevant conditions (340 °C, 20 bar, H2/CO = 1). Upon addition of sodium and sulfur promoters to iron nanoparticles supported on carbon nanofibers, initial catalytic activities were high, but substantial deactivation was observed over a period of 100 h. In situ Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that after 20 h time-on-stream, promoted catalysts attained 100% carbidization, whereas for unpromoted catalysts, this was around 25%. In situ carbon deposition studies were carried out using a tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM). No carbon laydown was detected for the unpromoted catalysts, whereas for promoted catalysts, carbon deposition occurred mainly over the first 4 h and thus did not play a pivotal role in deactivation over 100 h. Instead, the loss of catalytic activity coincided with the increase in Fe particle size to 20–50 nm, thereby supporting the proposal that the loss of active Fe surface area was the main cause of deactivation. PMID:27330847

  13. Yucca Mountain Area Saturated Zone Dissolved Organic Carbon Isotopic Data

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, James; Decker, David; Patterson, Gary; Peterman, Zell; Mihevc, Todd; Larsen, Jessica; Hershey, Ronald

    2007-06-25

    Groundwater samples in the Yucca Mountain area were collected for chemical and isotopic analyses and measurements of water temperature, pH, specific conductivity, and alkalinity were obtained at the well or spring at the time of sampling. For this project, groundwater samples were analyzed for major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) performed all the fieldwork on this project including measurement of water chemistry field parameters and sample collection. The major ions dissolved in the groundwater, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were analyzed by the USGS. All preparation and processing of samples for DOC carbon isotopic analyses and geochemical modeling were performed by the Desert Research Institute (DRI). Analysis of the DOC carbon dioxide gas produced at DRI to obtain carbon-13 and carbon-14 values was conducted at the University of Arizona Accelerator Facility (a NSHE Yucca Mountain project QA qualified contract facility). The major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of DIC were used in geochemical modeling (NETPATH) to determine groundwater sources, flow paths, mixing, and ages. The carbon isotopes of DOC were used to calculate groundwater ages that are independent of DIC model corrected carbon-14 ages. The DIC model corrected carbon-14 calculated ages were used to evaluate groundwater travel times for mixtures of water including water beneath Yucca Mountain. When possible, groundwater travel times were calculated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient sample sites. DOC carbon-14 groundwater ages were also calculated for groundwaters in the Yucca Mountain area. When possible, groundwater travel times were estimated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient groundwater sample sites using the DOC calculated

  14. Raman spectroscopy: Caution when interpreting organic carbon from oxidising environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brolly, Connor; Parnell, John; Bowden, Stephen

    2016-02-01

    Oxidation on Mars is primarily caused by the high influx of cosmic and solar radiation which interacts with the Martian surface. The evidence of this can be seen in the ubiquitous red colouration of the Martian sediment. This radiation will destroy most signals of life in the top few metres of the Martian surface. If organic carbon (one of the building blocks of life) is present within the accessible Martian sediments, it is very likely that it will have experienced some oxidation. ESA's ExoMars mission set to fly in 2018, has on board a miniaturised Raman spectrometer. As Raman spectroscopy is sensitive to carbonaceous material and will be primarily used to characterise organics, it is essential that the effect oxidation has on the Raman carbon signal is assessed. Oxidised carbonaceous shales were analysed using Raman spectroscopy to assess this issue. Results show that haematite has a band which occurs in the same frequency as the carbon D band, which cannot be distinguished from each other. This can lead to a misidentification of the carbon D band and a misinterpretation of the carbon order. Consequently, caution must be taken when applying Raman spectroscopy for organic carbon analysis in oxidised terrestrial and extraterrestrial environments, including on Mars.

  15. Fluvial organic carbon losses from a Bornean blackwater river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, S.; Gauci, V.; Evans, C. D.; Page, S. E.

    2010-11-01

    The transport of carbon from terrestrial ecosystems such as peatlands into rivers and out to the oceans plays an important role in the carbon cycle because it provides a link between the terrestrial and marine carbon cycles. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) were analysed from the source to the mouth of the River Sebangau in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia during the dry and wet seasons in 2008/2009 and an annual total organic carbon (TOC) flux estimated. DOC concentrations were higher and POC concentrations lower in the wet season compared to the dry season. As seen in other tropical blackwater rivers, DOC concentration is consistently around 10 times greater than POC concentration. We estimate the annual TOC flux discharged to the Java Sea to be 0.46 Tg year-1 comprising of 93% (0.43 Tg) DOC and 7% (0.03 Tg) POC. This equates to a fluvial TOC loss flux per unit area over the entire Sebangau catchment of 88 g C m-2 yr-1. When extrapolating this TOC loss flux to the peat covered area of Indonesia (206 950 km2), we estimate a TOC loss of 18.2 Tg C yr-1 or ~10% of current estimates of the global annual riverine DOC discharge into the ocean.

  16. Fluvial organic carbon losses from a Bornean blackwater river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, S.; Gauci, V.; Page, S.; Evans, C.; Limin, S.

    2010-12-01

    The transport of carbon from terrestrial ecosystems such as peatlands into rivers and out to the oceans plays an important role in the carbon cycle because it provides a link between the terrestrial and marine carbon cycles. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) were analysed from the source to the mouth of the River Sebangau in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia during the dry and wet seasons in 2008/2009 and an annual total organic carbon (TOC) flux estimated. DOC concentrations were higher and POC concentrations lower in the wet season compared to the dry season. As seen in other tropical blackwater rivers, DOC concentration is consistently around 10 times greater than POC concentration. We estimate the annual TOC flux discharged to the Java Sea to be 0.46 Tg year-1 comprising of 93% (0.43 Tg) DOC and 7% (0.03 Tg) POC. This equates to a fluvial TOC loss flux per unit area over the entire Sebangau catchment of 88g C m-2 yr-1. When extrapolating the Sebangau catchment TOC loss flux (88g C m-2 yr-1) to the peat covered area of Indonesia (206,950 km2), we calculate a TOC loss of 18.2 Tg C yr-1 or ~10% of current estimates of the global annual riverine DOC discharge into the ocean.

  17. Factors influencing organic carbon preservation in marine sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    The organic matter that escapes decomposition is buried and preserved in marine sediments, with much debate as to whether the amount depends on bottom-water O2 concentration. One group argues that decomposition is more efficient with O2, and hence, organic carbon will be preferentially oxidized in its presence, and preserved in its absence. Another group argues that the kinetics of organic matter decomposition are similar in the presence and absence of O2, and there should be no influence of O2 on preservation. A compilation of carbon preservation shows that both groups are right, depending on the circumstances of deposition. At high rates of deposition, such as near continental margins, little difference in preservation is found with varying bottom-water O2. It is important that most carbon in these sediments decomposes by anaerobic pathways regardless of bottom-water O2. Hence, little influence of bottom-water O2 on preservation would, in fact, be expected. As sedimentation rate drops, sediments deposited under oxygenated bottom water become progressively more aerobic, while euxinic sediments remain anaerobic. Under these circumstances, the relative efficiencies of aerobic and anaerobic decomposition could affect preservation. Indeed, enhanced preservation is observed in low-O2 and euxinic environments. To explore in detail the factors contributing to this enhanced carbon preservation, aspects of the biochemistries of the aerobic and anaerobic process are reviewed. Other potential influences on preservation are also explored. Finally, a new model for organic carbon decomposition, the "pseudo-G" model, is developed. This model couples the degradation of refractory organic matter to the overall metabolic activity of the sediment, and has consequences for carbon preservation due to the mixing together of labile and refractory organic matter by bioturbation.

  18. Pathways of organic carbon oxidation in three continental margin sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, D. E.; Jorgensen, B. B.; Fossing, H.; Glud, R.; Gundersen, J.; Ramsing, N. B.; Thamdrup, B.; Hansen, J. W.; Nielsen, L. P.; Hall, P. O.

    1993-01-01

    We have combined several different methodologies to quantify rates of organic carbon mineralization by the various electron acceptors in sediments from the coast of Denmark and Norway. Rates of NH4+ and Sigma CO2 liberation sediment incubations were used with O2 penetration depths to conclude that O2 respiration accounted for only between 3.6-17.4% of the total organic carbon oxidation. Dentrification was limited to a narrow zone just below the depth of O2 penetration, and was not a major carbon oxidation pathway. The processes of Fe reduction, Mn reduction and sulfate reduction dominated organic carbon mineralization, but their relative significance varied depending on the sediment. Where high concentrations of Mn-oxide were found (3-4 wt% Mn), only Mn reduction occurred. With lower Mn oxide concentrations more typical of coastal sediments, Fe reduction and sulfate reduction were most important and of a similar magnitude. Overall, most of the measured O2 flux into the sediment was used to oxidized reduced inorganic species and not organic carbon. We suspect that the importance of O2 respiration in many coastal sediments has been overestimated, whereas metal oxide reduction (both Fe and Mn reduction) has probably been well underestimated.

  19. Erosion of organic carbon in the Arctic as a geological carbon dioxide sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Robert G.; Galy, Valier; Gaillardet, Jérôme; Dellinger, Mathieu; Bryant, Charlotte; O'Regan, Matt; Gröcke, Darren R.; Coxall, Helen; Bouchez, Julien; Calmels, Damien

    2015-08-01

    Soils of the northern high latitudes store carbon over millennial timescales (thousands of years) and contain approximately double the carbon stock of the atmosphere. Warming and associated permafrost thaw can expose soil organic carbon and result in mineralization and carbon dioxide (CO2) release. However, some of this soil organic carbon may be eroded and transferred to rivers. If it escapes degradation during river transport and is buried in marine sediments, then it can contribute to a longer-term (more than ten thousand years), geological CO2 sink. Despite this recognition, the erosional flux and fate of particulate organic carbon (POC) in large rivers at high latitudes remains poorly constrained. Here, we quantify the source of POC in the Mackenzie River, the main sediment supplier to the Arctic Ocean, and assess its flux and fate. We combine measurements of radiocarbon, stable carbon isotopes and element ratios to correct for rock-derived POC. Our samples reveal that the eroded biospheric POC has resided in the basin for millennia, with a mean radiocarbon age of 5,800 +/- 800 years, much older than the POC in large tropical rivers. From the measured biospheric POC content and variability in annual sediment yield, we calculate a biospheric POC flux of teragrams of carbon per year from the Mackenzie River, which is three times the CO2 drawdown by silicate weathering in this basin. Offshore, we find evidence for efficient terrestrial organic carbon burial over the Holocene period, suggesting that erosion of organic carbon-rich, high-latitude soils may result in an important geological CO2 sink.

  20. Erosion of organic carbon in the Arctic as a geological carbon dioxide sink.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Robert G; Galy, Valier; Gaillardet, Jérôme; Dellinger, Mathieu; Bryant, Charlotte; O'Regan, Matt; Gröcke, Darren R; Coxall, Helen; Bouchez, Julien; Calmels, Damien

    2015-08-01

    Soils of the northern high latitudes store carbon over millennial timescales (thousands of years) and contain approximately double the carbon stock of the atmosphere. Warming and associated permafrost thaw can expose soil organic carbon and result in mineralization and carbon dioxide (CO2) release. However, some of this soil organic carbon may be eroded and transferred to rivers. If it escapes degradation during river transport and is buried in marine sediments, then it can contribute to a longer-term (more than ten thousand years), geological CO2 sink. Despite this recognition, the erosional flux and fate of particulate organic carbon (POC) in large rivers at high latitudes remains poorly constrained. Here, we quantify the source of POC in the Mackenzie River, the main sediment supplier to the Arctic Ocean, and assess its flux and fate. We combine measurements of radiocarbon, stable carbon isotopes and element ratios to correct for rock-derived POC. Our samples reveal that the eroded biospheric POC has resided in the basin for millennia, with a mean radiocarbon age of 5,800 ± 800 years, much older than the POC in large tropical rivers. From the measured biospheric POC content and variability in annual sediment yield, we calculate a biospheric POC flux of 2.2(+1.3)(-0.9) teragrams of carbon per year from the Mackenzie River, which is three times the CO2 drawdown by silicate weathering in this basin. Offshore, we find evidence for efficient terrestrial organic carbon burial over the Holocene period, suggesting that erosion of organic carbon-rich, high-latitude soils may result in an important geological CO2 sink. PMID:26245581

  1. Correlating organic carbon concentration and composition with mineralogy in deep-sea pelagic sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D.; Estes, E. R.; Hansel, C. M.; Anderson, C. H.; Murray, R. W.; Dyar, M. D.; Nordlund, D.; Wankel, S. D.; Spivack, A. J.; Sauvage, J.; McKinley, C. C.; Homola, K.; Present, T. M.; D'Hondt, S.

    2015-12-01

    remineralization. The persistence of iron(III) phases and presence of clays such as illite could provide protection of organic carbon at depth. Differences among the sites and with depth point to mineralogical controls on the amount and type of carbon preserved, which may point to mineral-hosted carbon as a dominant control on the subsurface biosphere.

  2. Enhanced cathode performance of nano-sized lithium iron phosphate composite using polytetrafluoroethylene as carbon precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avci, Ercan

    2014-12-01

    Herein we report a facile and efficient solid state synthesis of carbon coated lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4/C) cathode material achieved through the pyrolysis of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The current investigation is comparatively analyzed with the results of the composites of LiFePO4/C (LFP/C) synthesized using polystyrene-block-polybutadiene (PS-b-PBD), polyethyhylene (PE) and sucrose as carbon precursors. The optimized LFP/CPTFE composite is synthesized at 700 °C using 10 wt.% PTFE. The composite exhibits remarkable improvement in capacity, cyclability and rate capability compared to those of LFP/C synthesized using (PS-b-PBD), PE and sucrose. The specific discharge capacities as high as 166 mA h g-1 (theoretical capacity: 170 mA h g-1) at 0.2 C and 114 mA h g-1 at 10 C rates were achieved with LFP/CPTFE. In addition, the composite exhibits a long-term cycling stability with the capacity loss of only 11.4% after 1000 cycles. PTFE shifts the size distribution of the composite to nanometer scale (approximately 120 nm), however the addition of sucrose and other polymers do not have such an effect. According to TEM and XPS analysis, LFP/CPTFE particles are mostly coated with a few nanometers thick carbon layer forming a core-shell structure. Residual carbon does not contain fluorine.

  3. Carbon Isotopic Heterogeneity of Graphite in the San Juan Mass of the Campo Del Cielo IAB Iron Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maruoka, T.; Kurat, G.; Zinner, E.; Varela, M. E.; Ametrano, S. J.

    2003-01-01

    The origin of IAB iron meteorites is still a matter of debate. It is generally believed that iron meteorites originated from molten cores in small planetesimals because the fractionation trend of trace elements (e.g., Ir, Ge, Ga, etc. vs. Ni) for most iron meteorites can be more or less explained by fractional crystallization from metal melts. However, this process cannot produce trace element characteristics of the IAB (and other) iron meteorites. To explain these trace element abundance patterns, several models have been proposed. Although most of these models require a high temperature, clear evidence has recently been obtained for a sub-solidus formation of IAB iron meteorites from noble gas analyses. Moreover, heterogeneous distributions of some trace elements in metal and other phases also suggest a low temperature origin of at least some IAB iron meteorites. Here we use the carbon isotopic compositions of graphite to constrain the origin of IAB iron meteorites. Our data confirm a possible low temperature origin of IAB iron meteorites.

  4. Importance of Boreal Rivers in Providing Iron to Marine Waters

    PubMed Central

    Kritzberg, Emma S.; Bedmar Villanueva, Ana; Jung, Marco; Reader, Heather E.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports increasing iron concentrations in rivers draining into the Baltic Sea. Given the decisive role of iron to the structure and biogeochemical function of aquatic ecosystems, this trend is likely one with far reaching consequences to the receiving system. What those consequences may be depends on the fate of the iron in estuarine mixing. We here assess the stability of riverine iron by mixing water from seven boreal rivers with artificial sea salts. The results show a gradual loss of iron from suspension with increasing salinity. However, the capacity of the different river waters to maintain iron in suspension varied greatly, i.e. between 1 and 54% of iron was in suspension at a salinity of 30. The variability was best explained by iron:organic carbon ratios in the riverine waters – the lower the ratio the more iron remained in suspension. Water with an initially low iron:organic carbon ratio could keep even higher than ambient concentrations of Fe in suspension across the salinity gradient, as shown in experiments with iron amendments. Moreover, there was a positive relationship between the molecular size of the riverine organic matter and the amount of iron in suspension. In all, the results point towards a remarkably high transport capacity of iron from boreal rivers, suggesting that increasing concentrations of iron in river mouths may result in higher concentrations of potentially bioavailable iron in the marine system. PMID:25233197

  5. Mechanisms controlling adsorption of natural organic matter on surfactant-modified iron oxide-coated sand.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chunli; Shang, Chii

    2010-06-01

    Mechanisms contributing to the adsorption of natural organic matter (NOM) on surfactant-modified iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS) were explored by microscopic surface characterization techniques and adsorption tests. Electrostatic interactions that were thought to be from the positively charged, surface-coated surfactant, hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium (HDTMA), seemed to be unimportant, likely because the outward-pointing tail groups of the surface-coated HDTMA monolayers hindered the interactions. Improved hydrophobic interactions followed by ligand exchange are believed to be the dominant mechanisms. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force analysis with chemically modified tips was used to explore the adsorption mechanisms between NOM and IOCS, where an iron oxide-coated mica surface was utilized as a substitute for the IOCS surface. It demonstrates the changes of pull-on forces and the increases in hydrophobic interactions from the modification of IOCS with HDTMA. PMID:20457463

  6. Cost effective tools for soil organic carbon monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Keith; Aynekulu, Ermias

    2013-04-01

    There is increasing demand for data on soil properties at fine spatial resolution to support management and planning decisions. Measurement of soil organic carbon has attracted much interest because (i) soil organic carbon is widely cited as a useful indicator of soil condition and (ii) of the importance of soil carbon in the global carbon cycle and climate mitigation strategies. However in considering soil measurement designs there has been insufficient attention given to careful analysis of the specific decisions that the measurements are meant to support and on what measurements have high information value for decision-making. As a result, much measurement effort may be wasted or focused on the wrong variables. A cost-effective measurement is one that reduces risk in decisions and does not cost more than the societal returns to additional evidence. A key uncertainty in measuring soil carbon as a soil condition indicator is what constitutes a good or bad level of carbon on a given soil. A measure of soil organic carbon concentration may have limited value for informing management decisions without the additional information required to interpret it, and so expending further efforts on improving measurements to increase precision may then have no value to improving the decision. Measuring soil carbon stock changes for carbon trading purposes requires high levels of measurement precision but there is still large uncertainty on whether the costs of measurement exceed the benefits. Since the largest cost component in soil monitoring is often travel to the field and physically sampling soils, it is generally cost-effective to meet multiple objectives by analysing a number of properties on a soil sample. Diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy is playing a key role in allowing multiple soil properties to be determined rapidly and at low cost. The method provides estimation of multiple soil properties (e.g. soil carbon, texture and mineralogy) in one measurement

  7. [Soil organic carbon fractionation methods and their applications in farmland ecosystem research: a review].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo; Cao, Zhi-ping; Hu, Chan-juan

    2011-07-01

    Soil organic carbon is of heterogeneity in components. The active components are sensitive to agricultural management, while the inert components play an important role in carbon fixation. Soil organic carbon fractionation mainly includes physical, chemical, and biological fractionations. Physical fractionation is to separate the organic carbon into active and inert components based on the density, particle size, and its spatial distribution; chemical fractionation is to separate the organic carbon into various components based on the solubility, hydrolizability, and chemical reactivity of organic carbon in a variety of extracting agents. In chemical fractionation, the dissolved organic carbon is bio-available, including organic acids, phenols, and carbohydrates, and the acid-hydrolyzed organic carbon can be divided into active and inert organic carbons. Simulated enzymatic oxidation by using KMnO4 can separate organic carbon into active and non-active carbon. Biological fractionation can differentiate microbial biomass carbon and potential mineralizable carbon. Under different farmland management practices, the chemical composition and pool capacity of soil organic carbon fractions will have different variations, giving different effects on soil quality. To identify the qualitative or quantitative relationships between soil organic carbon components and carbon deposition, we should strengthen the standardization study of various fractionation methods, explore the integrated application of different fractionation methods, and sum up the most appropriate organic carbon fractionation method or the appropriate combined fractionation methods for different farmland management practices. PMID:22007474

  8. Light absorption by organic carbon from wood combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Bond, T. C.

    2009-09-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols affect the radiative balance of the Earth by absorbing and scattering light. While BC is highly absorbing, some organic compounds also have significant absorption, which is greater at near-ultraviolet and blue wavelengths. To the extent that OC absorbs visible light, it may be a non-negligible contributor to direct aerosol radiative forcing. In this work, we examine absorption by primary OC emitted from solid fuel pyrolysis. We provide absorption spectra of this material, which can be related to the imaginary refractive index. This material has polar character but is not fully water-soluble: more than 92% was extractable by methanol or acetone, compared with 73% for water and 52% for hexane. Water-soluble organic carbon contributed to light absorption at both ultraviolet and visible wavelengths. However, a larger portion came from organic carbon that is extractable only by methanol. The spectra of water-soluble organic carbon are similar to others in the literature. We compared spectra for material generated with different wood type, wood size and pyrolysis temperature. Higher wood temperature is the main factor creating organic aerosol with higher absorption, causing about a factor of four increase in mass-normalized absorption at visible wavelengths. A simple model suggests that, despite the absorption, both high-temperature and low-temperature carbon have negative climate forcing over a surface with average albedo.

  9. The influence of organic carbon flux on benthic foraminiferal proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corliss, B. H.; Sun, X.; Brown, C. W.; Showers, W. J.

    2005-12-01

    During the last 30 years, deep-sea benthic foraminifera have been widely used in reconstructing environmental conditions in the deep sea. Initial suggestions of faunal-water mass associations were never substantiated and, instead, organic carbon flux was identified as a primary influence on species and assemblage patterns. Organic carbon flux also impacts the chemistry of deep water masses and is reflected in the stable isotopic and trace element composition of a number of deep-sea taxa. The timing of delivery of organic carbon can also have an affect on foraminiferal chemistry. Carbon-13 data of Holocene Epistominella exigua from the North Atlantic show a 0.9 per mil change over 60 degrees of latitude that can be correlated to seasonality of productivity, based on a comparison of SeaWIFS satellite imagery. Seasonality and mean annual primary productivity do not affect the carbon-13 of Planulina wuellerstorfi in the North Atlantic, although P. wuellerstorfi exhibits significant variability. Our results suggest that the carbon-13 of E. exigua in conjunction with P. wuellerstorfi can be used to reconstruct seasonality of primary productivity. These findings raise the possibility that other geochemical proxies influenced by particle flux from the surface may be affected by periodic flux events that create phytodetritus layers and change the chemistry of the microhabitats occupied by some benthic foraminiferal species. Existing studies suggest that organic carbon flux and seasonality of flux influence both faunal and geochemical signals from benthic foraminiferal. These relationships can be used to reconstruct primary productivity and seasonality, in addition to deep-water circulation, and illustrate the importance of incorporating ecological information in the interpretation of geochemical data from deep sea taxa.

  10. Semicontinuous automated measurement of organic carbon in atmospheric aerosol samples.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chao; Rashinkar, Shilpa M; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2010-02-15

    A fully automated measurement system for ambient aerosol organic carbon, capable of unattended operation over extended periods, is described. Particles are collected in a cyclone with water as the collection medium. The collected sample is periodically aspirated by a syringe pump into a holding loop and then delivered to a wet oxidation reactor (WOR). Acid is added, and the WOR is purged to measure dissolved CO(2) or inorganic carbonates (IC) as evolved CO(2). The IC background can often be small and sufficiently constant to be corrected for, without separate measurement, by a blank subtraction. The organic material is now oxidized stepwise or in one step to CO(2). The one-step oxidation involves UV-persulfate treatment in the presence of ozone. This treatment converts organic carbon (OC) to CO(2), but elemental carbon is not oxidized. The CO(2) is continuously purged from solution and collected by two sequential miniature diffusion scrubbers (DSs), a short DS preceding a longer one. Each DS consists of a LiOH-filled porous hydrophobic membrane tube with terminal stainless steel tubes that function as conductance-sensing electrodes. As CO(2) is collected by the LiOH-filled DSs, hydroxide is converted into carbonate and the resulting decrease in conductivity is monitored. The simultaneous use of the dual short and long DS units bearing different concentrations of LiOH permits both good sensitivity and a large dynamic range. The limit of detection (LOD, S/N = 3) is approximately 140 ng of C. With a typical sampling period of 30 min at a sampling rate of 30 L/min, this corresponds to an LOD of 160 ng/m(3). The approach also provides information on the ease of oxidation of the carbonaceous aerosol and hence the nature of the carbon contained therein. Ambient aerosol organic carbon data are presented. PMID:20092351

  11. A Versatile Iron-Tannin-Framework Ink Coating Strategy to Fabricate Biomass-Derived Iron Carbide/Fe-N-Carbon Catalysts for Efficient Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing; Liang, Yan; Hu, Yaoxin; Kong, Biao; Simon, George P; Zhang, Jin; Jiang, San Ping; Wang, Huanting

    2016-01-22

    The conversion of biomass into valuable carbon composites as efficient non-precious metal oxygen-reduction electrocatalysts is attractive for the development of commercially viable polymer electrolyte membrane fuel-cell technology. Herein, a versatile iron-tannin-framework ink coating strategy is developed to fabricate cellulose-derived Fe3 C/Fe-N-C catalysts using commercial filter paper, tissue, or cotton as a carbon source, an iron-tannin framework as an iron source, and dicyandiamide as a nitrogen source. The oxygen reduction performance of the resultant Fe3C/Fe-N-C catalysts shows a high onset potential (i.e. 0.98 V vs the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)), and large kinetic current density normalized to both geometric electrode area and mass of catalysts (6.4 mA cm(-2) and 32 mA mg(-1) at 0.80 V vs RHE) in alkaline condition. This method can even be used to prepare efficient catalysts using waste carbon sources, such as used polyurethane foam. PMID:26661901

  12. Catalytic Coupling of Carbon Dioxide with Terpene Scaffolds: Access to Challenging Bio-Based Organic Carbonates.

    PubMed

    Fiorani, Giulia; Stuck, Moritz; Martín, Carmen; Belmonte, Marta Martínez; Martin, Eddy; Escudero-Adán, Eduardo C; Kleij, Arjan W

    2016-06-01

    The challenging coupling of highly substituted terpene oxides and carbon dioxide into bio-based cyclic organic carbonates catalyzed by Al(aminotriphenolate) complexes is reported. Both acyclic as well as cyclic terpene oxides were used as coupling partners, showing distinct reactivity/selectivity behavior. Whereas cyclic terpene oxides showed excellent chemoselectivity towards the organic carbonate product, acyclic substrates exhibited poorer selectivities owing to concomitant epoxide rearrangement reactions and the formation of undesired oligo/polyether side products. Considering the challenging nature of these coupling reactions, the isolated yields of the targeted bio-carbonates are reasonable and in most cases in the range 50-60 %. The first crystal structures of tri-substituted terpene based cyclic carbonates are reported and their stereoconnectivity suggests that their formation proceeds through a double inversion pathway. PMID:27159151

  13. Removal of As(V) using iron oxide impregnated carbon prepared from Tamarind hull.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Abhijit; Agarwal, Vaibhav; De, Sirshendu; Basu, Jayanta K

    2010-08-01

    Iron oxide impregnated tamarind hull carbon (IOITHC) was developed for use as an adsorbent for the removal of As(V) from water. Tamarind hull was used as the source of carbonaceous material, which was first treated with ferric chloride and ammonium hydroxide solutions with successive calcination at 873-974 K in a muffle furnace for 1 h to prepare an arsenic adsorbent. The B.E.T surface area of IOITHC was found to be 304.6 m(2) g(-1) and the average iron content in the adsorbent was found to be 7 wt%. The point of zero charge (pH(zpc)) of IOITHC was found to be 6.9. As(V) and arsenic (as total) adsorption on IOITHC were investigated in batch mode using As(V) spiked distilled water and real contaminated groundwater (CGW). The effects of speed of agitation, adsorbent particle size, temperature, pH of the solution, and concentration of the adsorbate on the adsorption process were investigated. The maximum adsorption capacity of about 1.2 mg g(-1) As(V) was achieved. The removal of As(V) on IOITHC was compared with the untreated tamarind hull carbon as well as with the activated commercial carbon and IOITHC was found to be better adsorbent. Arsenic adsorption from arsenic contaminated groundwater (CGW) on IOITHC in batch mode indicates that 98% removal was achieved for adsorbent loading of 3.0 g L(-1) with initial arsenic concentration of 264 microg L(-1). Desorption study of arsenic from As(V)-loaded IOITHC was performed using aqueous solution in the pH range of 3 to 12. PMID:20563914

  14. Primary Iron- and Manganese-Carbonate Deposition in the Palaeoproterozoic Hotazel Formation, South Africa, and Implications for the Great Oxidation Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mhlanga, X. R.; Tsikos, H.; Boyce, A.; Lyons, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    The Palaeoproterozoic Hotazel Formation in the Transvaal Supergroup of South Africa represents an unusual sequence of banded iron formation interbedded with Mn-rich layers, in the form of three sedimentary cycles. The sequence has been interpreted as the product of cyclic Fe and Mn deposition in a marine environment that post-dated the first major event of atmosphere oxygenation at ~2.3Ga, known as Great Oxidation Event (GOE), despite the fact that geochronological constrains for the Hotazel rocks are still conjectural. The Hotazel deposits are thought to represent the products of anaerobic redox processes involving organic carbon and high-valence Fe/Mn-precursor species in the diagenetic environment; key evidence for such processes is provided by the low δ13C values of Fe- and Mn-rich carbonates contained in the Hotazel rocks (average δ13C: -9.6 per mil), which also typify other BIFs of the world. Here we show that the bulk carbonate fraction of the Hotazel Formation displays characteristically invariant carbon isotope signatures across large portions of the stratigraphy, irrespective of changes in bulk modal mineralogy, carbonate mineral chemistry, bulk Fe/Mn ratio or oxidation state of the rocks. This is inconsistent with traditional diagenetic models and points to a common and isotopically homogeneous source of dissolved carbon for carbonate formation in the Hotazel strata. The possibility emerges that the carbonate fraction in the Hotazel rocks initially precipitated as primary particles out of the ambient oceanic water-column, in response to processes of organic carbon cycling by Fe(III) and possibly Mn(IV) oxy-hydroxide species generated at the photic zone. Such a model precludes major atmosphere and shallow ocean oxygenation as a driver for primary oxide formation at post-GOE times, and suggests that the Hotazel deposits may in fact represent a highly evolved - chemically, isotopically and possibly biologically - marine environment that predated the GOE.

  15. Effect of some organic solvent-water mixtures composition on precipitated calcium carbonate in carbonation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopacka-Łyskawa, Donata; Kościelska, Barbara; Karczewski, Jakub

    2015-05-01

    Precipitated calcium carbonate particles were obtained during carbonation of calcium hydroxide slurry with carbon dioxide. Aqueous solutions of isopropyl alcohol, n-butanol and glycerol were used as solvents. Concentration of organic additives in the reactive mixture was from 0% to 20% (vol). Precipitation process were performed in a stirred tank reactor equipped with gas distributor. Multimodal courses of particles size distribution were determined for produced CaCO3 particles. Calcium carbonate as calcite was precipitated in all experiments. The mean Sauter diameter of CaCO3 particles decreased when the concentration of all used organic additives increased. The amount of small particle fraction in the product increased with the increasing concentration of organic solvents. Similar physical properties of used liquid phase resulted in the similar characteristics of obtained particles.

  16. Spatial distribution of soil organic carbon stocks in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, M. P.; Wattenbach, M.; Smith, P.; Meersmans, J.; Jolivet, C.; Boulonne, L.; Arrouays, D.

    2010-11-01

    Soil organic carbon plays a major role in the global carbon budget, and can act as a source or a sink of atmospheric carbon, whereby it can influence the course of climate change. Changes in soil organic soil stocks (SOCS) are now taken into account in international negotiations regarding climate change. Consequently, developing sampling schemes and models for estimating the spatial distribution of SOCS is a priority. The French soil monitoring network has been established on a 16 km × 16 km grid and the first sampling campaign has recently been completed, providing circa 2200 measurements of stocks of soil organic carbon, obtained through an in situ composite sampling, uniformly distributed over the French territory. We calibrated a boosted regression tree model on the observed stocks, modelling SOCS as a function of other variables such as climatic parameters, vegetation net primary productivity, soil properties and land use. The calibrated model was evaluated through cross-validation and eventually used for estimating SOCS for the whole of metropolitan France. Two other models were calibrated on forest and agricultural soils separately, in order to assess more precisely the influence of pedo-climatic variables on soil organic carbon for such soils. The boosted regression tree model showed good predictive ability, and enabled quantification of relationships between SOCS and pedo-climatic variables (plus their interactions) over the French territory. These relationship strongly depended on the land use, and more specifically differed between forest soils and cultivated soil. The total estimate of SOCS in France was 3.260 ± 0.872 PgC for the first 30 cm. It was compared to another estimate, based on the previously published European soil organic carbon and bulk density maps, of 5.303 PgC. We demonstrate that the present estimate might better represent the actual SOCS distributions of France, and consequently that the previously published approach at the European

  17. Understanding drivers of the export of dissolved organic carbon from headwater catchments in Germany using Generalised Additive Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selle, Benny; Tittel, Jörg; Musolff, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    In the literature, several causes of recently increasing concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in headwaters across eastern North America and northern and central Europe have been debated. One likely driver of the widespread increase of DOC concentrations since the early to mid 1990s are decreasing depositions of acid rain resulting in an increased solubility of organic carbon compounds including humic acids. Here, we tested the hypothesis if the reduced availability of both nitrate and sulfate stimulated the reduction of ferric iron soil minerals and the mobilisation of DOC. Decreasing depositions often resulted in a reduced availability of both nitrate and sulphate, which are preferred electron acceptors in microbial decomposition processes. As iron minerals act as efficient sorbents of organic compounds in soils its reduction may have caused a release of humic substances and hence an increasing export of DOC from headwater catchments. To test this hypothesis, time series of DOC, dissolved iron, sulfate and nitrate from several German headwater catchments were examined using Generalised Additive Models. Using this modelling technique, discharge corrected time series of concentrations were represented as a sum of a seasonal and a non-linear trend component. Both, the computed trends and seasonalities supported the redox hypothesis.

  18. Ultrasonic Spraying of Carbon Nanotubes using Organic Solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willey, Anthony; Davis, Robert; Vanfleet, Richard

    2012-10-01

    Because of their unique electrical and mechanical properties, thin films of carbon nanotubes have several potential applications, especially in the fields of organic electronics and photovoltaics. We present a method for spraying thin films of nanotubes that have been suspended in organic solvents N-methyl Pyrollidone (NMP) and N-Cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidone (CHP). The sprayed nanotubes are randomly oriented, and films are transparent, conductive, and mechanically stable.

  19. Standardizing Organic Carbon Measurements for Modern and Geologic Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R. Z.; Yager, J. A.; Rollins, N.; Berelson, W.; West, A. J.; Li, G.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate reconstruction of carbon isotope records (as well as accurate characterization of the modern carbon cycle, e.g., in soils) relies on reliably separating organic carbon (Corg) from carbonate-derived carbon (Ccarb). These fractions are characterized by very different isotope composition, so small carbonate contamination can strongly bias Corg results, and vice versa. Several criteria must be met for accurate %C and d13C analysis. In the case of analyzing Corg, these include: (1) Ccarb must be removed through a process called "decarbonation." (2) Ccarb can be removed by acid dissolution, but if the acid is too strong then the Corg itself may solubilize, causing inaccurate results. (3) The preparation process for decarbonation can also unintentionally add carbon to samples and create a methodological blank that also will bias results. This study tested decarbonation methods with the above criteria in mind. The focus was on (i) heated treatment with weak liquid acid, e.g., 1M HCl ("liquid phase decarbonation") and (ii) heated treatment with vapor from concentrated acid ("vapor phase decarbonation"). Our results confirm that heated treatment is critical to producing reliable records; recalcitrant carbonate phases are not removed during room temperature decarbonation and can bias carbon isotope values. Vapor phase decarbonation may prevent loss in solution that is known to occur using liquid phase methods. However, our results show that blanks must be very carefully monitored and can be a concern during vapor phase treatment. Moreover, we still observe some loss of organics during vapor phase treatment, as evidenced by changes in Corg and d13C with length of reaction time. The length of vapor phase treatment must be carefully considered depending on the type of sample being tested. Overall, our work emphasizes the importance of carefully considering sample-specific decarbonation methodology in order to produce reliable values for %Corg and d13C.

  20. Organic carbon burial efficiency in a large tropical hydroelectric reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, Raquel; Sobek, Sebastian; Kosten, Sarian; Cole, Jonathan; Cardoso, Simone; Roland, Fábio

    2014-05-01

    Because hydroelectric reservoirs receive relatively high inputs of sediments when compared to lakes and oceans, these systems are important sites for organic carbon (OC) accumulation. Nevertheless, the actual magnitude of carbon accumulating in reservoirs is poorly known due to a lack of whole-system studies of carbon burial. Hydroelectric reservoirs are also particularly heterogeneous systems in terms of organic carbon sources and sedimentation rates. Such heterogeneity leads to strong variations on carbon fluxes, even though the effect on OC burial has not yet been discussed. The aim of this paper was to determine the OC burial rate and efficiency in a large tropical reservoir and evaluate the importance of spatial heterogeneity affecting OC burial. Burial rates were determined through a novel approach which combines sediment sample analyses and a seismic survey. Our results confirm the major effect of sedimentation heterogeneity on OC burial efficiency which varied from 9 to 89% in the reservoir. In addition to the river-dam gradient of sedimentation, our data reinforce the importance of basin morphometry in determining the patterns of sediment deposition and carbon accumulation. No carbon accumulation occurred along the margins of the reservoir and irregular bottom morphology leaded to irregular carbon deposition. An integrative analysis, including the reservoir's heterogeneity, indicated that the whole system accumulates 42.2 g C m-2 yr-1 and that roughly 67% of the total OC load to the sediments is actually buried. The data also suggest that the sediment of the reservoir is mainly composed of terrestrial OC and that the heterogeneity in OC sources plays a minor role determining OC burial efficiency, which was strongly determined by sediment accumulation rate. Finally, our results in combination with literature data suggest that the high sedimentation rates cause hydroelectric reservoirs to accumulate carbon more efficiently than lakes, regardless of

  1. Are we overestimating organic carbon concentrations in soils containing inorganic carbon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunliffe, Andrew; Brazier, Richard; Vernon, Ian

    2014-05-01

    The concentration of carbon in soils is often measured via chromatographic analysis of elemental gases following dry combustion of a soil sample. This quantifies total carbon (TC), and, in soils which can be assumed to contain no inorganic carbon (IC), TC can be interpreted as organic carbon (OC). Soils containing IC are commonly subjected to an acid digestion to remove IC, prior to analysis for OC concentration; with IC being assigned as the difference between TC and OC. However, the removal of IC reduces the sample mass. Therefore, analysing acid-washed samples reveals the carbon concentration of the non-inorganic carbon sample mass, rather than the actual sample mass, as is generally assumed. This results in the overestimation of OC concentrations and consequent underestimation of IC concentrations, although TC concentrations are correct. The magnitude of the error is proportional to both IC concentration, and the ratio OC/IC, and consequently is greater in carbonate-rich samples. We present a revised protocol for accurately calculating OC and IC concentrations, using the carbon concentrations of the total sample and the acid-washed sample. The revised protocol is easily applicable to existing data, and corrects a known bias in apportioning carbon between organic and inorganic pools. Propagating the error through an example dataset from a semiarid environment, we find it can make a substantial (>10%) difference to estimated total OC pools. We recommend that this new protocol is used whenever elemental analysers are used to quantify OC concentrations in acid-washed sediments.

  2. [Effects of straw application and earthworm inoculation on soil labile organic carbon].

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-Guang; Li, Hui Xin; Chen, Xiao-Yun; Hu, Feng

    2007-04-01

    A six-year field plot experiment of rice-wheat rotation was conducted to study the effects of straw application and earthworm inoculation on cropland soil organic carbon and labile organic carbon. Five treatments were installed, i.e., CK, straw mulch (M), straw mulch plus earthworm inoculation (ME), incorporated straw with soil (I), and incorporated straw with soil plus earthworm inoculation (IE). The results showed that soil organic carbon content increased significantly after six years straw application, and treatment I was more efficient than treatment M. Earthworm inoculation under straw application had no significant effects on soil organic carbon content. Straw application, whether straw mulch or incorporated straw with soil, increased the content of soil labile organic carbon, and incorporated straw with soil was more beneficial to the increase of the contents of hot water-extractable carbon, potentially mineralizable carbon, acid-extractable carbon, readily oxidizable carbon, particulate organic carbon, and light fraction organic carbon. There was a little relationship between the quantitative variations of soil dissoluble organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon and the patterns of straw application. Among the treatments, the activity of soil organic carbon was decreased in the order of IF > I > M > ME > CK. Straw application pattern was the main factor affecting soil organic carbon and labile organic carbon, while earthworm inoculation was not universally significanfly effective to all kinds of soil labile organic carbon. PMID:17615878

  3. Carbon-bearing iron phases and the carbon isotope composition of the deep Earth

    PubMed Central

    Horita, Juske; Polyakov, Veniamin B.

    2015-01-01

    The carbon budget and dynamics of the Earth’s interior, including the core, are currently very poorly understood. Diamond-bearing, mantle-derived rocks show a very well defined peak at δ13C ≈ −5 ± 3‰ with a very broad distribution to lower values (∼−40‰). The processes that have produced the wide δ13C distributions to the observed low δ13C values in the deep Earth have been extensively debated, but few viable models have been proposed. Here, we present a model for understanding carbon isotope distributions within the deep Earth, involving Fe−C phases (Fe carbides and C dissolved in Fe−Ni metal). Our theoretical calculations show that Fe and Si carbides can be significantly depleted in 13C relative to other C-bearing materials even at mantle temperatures. Thus, the redox freezing and melting cycles of lithosphere via subduction upwelling in the deep Earth that involve the Fe−C phases can readily produce diamond with the observed low δ13C values. The sharp contrast in the δ13C distributions of peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds may reflect differences in their carbon cycles, controlled by the evolution of geodynamical processes around 2.5–3 Ga. Our model also predicts that the core contains C with low δ13C values and that an average δ13C value of the bulk Earth could be much lower than ∼−5‰, consistent with those of chondrites and other planetary body. The heterogeneous and depleted δ13C values of the deep Earth have implications, not only for its accretion−differentiation history but also for carbon isotope biosignatures for early life on the Earth. PMID:25512520

  4. Carbon-bearing iron phases and the carbon isotope composition of the deep Earth.

    PubMed

    Horita, Juske; Polyakov, Veniamin B

    2015-01-01

    The carbon budget and dynamics of the Earth's interior, including the core, are currently very poorly understood. Diamond-bearing, mantle-derived rocks show a very well defined peak at δ(13)C ≈ -5 ± 3‰ with a very broad distribution to lower values (∼-40‰). The processes that have produced the wide δ(13)C distributions to the observed low δ(13)C values in the deep Earth have been extensively debated, but few viable models have been proposed. Here, we present a model for understanding carbon isotope distributions within the deep Earth, involving Fe-C phases (Fe carbides and C dissolved in Fe-Ni metal). Our theoretical calculations show that Fe and Si carbides can be significantly depleted in (13)C relative to other C-bearing materials even at mantle temperatures. Thus, the redox freezing and melting cycles of lithosphere via subduction upwelling in the deep Earth that involve the Fe-C phases can readily produce diamond with the observed low δ(13)C values. The sharp contrast in the δ(13)C distributions of peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds may reflect differences in their carbon cycles, controlled by the evolution of geodynamical processes around 2.5-3 Ga. Our model also predicts that the core contains C with low δ(13)C values and that an average δ(13)C value of the bulk Earth could be much lower than ∼-5‰, consistent with those of chondrites and other planetary body. The heterogeneous and depleted δ(13)C values of the deep Earth have implications, not only for its accretion-differentiation history but also for carbon isotope biosignatures for early life on the Earth. PMID:25512520

  5. Organic matter diagenesis in shallow water carbonate sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingalls, Anitra E.; Aller, Robert C.; Lee, Cindy; Wakeham, Stuart G.

    2004-11-01

    Muddy carbonate deposits near the Dry Tortugas, Florida, are characterized by high organic carbon remineralization rates. However, approximately half of the total sedimentary organic matter potentially supporting remineralization is occluded in CaCO 3 minerals (intracrystalline). While a portion of nonintracrystalline organic matter appears to cycle rapidly, intracrystalline organic matter has an approximately constant concentration with depth, suggesting that as long as its protective mineral matrix is intact, it is not readily remineralized. Organic matter in excess of intracrystalline organic matter that is preserved may have a variety of mineral associations (e.g., intercrystalline, adsorbed or detrital). In surface sediment, aspartic acid contributed ˜22 mole % and ˜50 mole % to nonintracrystalline and intracrystalline pools, respectively. In deeper sediment (1.6-1.7m), the composition of hydrolyzable amino acids in both pools was similar (aspartic acid ˜40 mole %). Like amino acids, intracrystalline and nonintracrystalline fatty acids have different compositions in surface sediments, but are indistinguishable at depth. These data suggest that preserved organic matter in the nonintracrystalline pool is stabilized by its interactions with CaCO 3. Neutral lipids are present in very low abundances in the intracrystalline pool and are extensively degraded in both the intracrystalline and nonintracrystalline pools, suggesting that mineral interactions do not protect these compounds from degradation. The presence of chlorophyll- a, but absence of phytol, in the intracrystalline lipid pool demonstrates that chloropigments are present only in the nonintracrystalline pool. Sedimentary chloropigments decrease with depth at similar rates in Dry Tortugas sediments as found in alumino-silicate sediments from the Long Island Sound, suggesting that chloropigment degradation is largely unaffected by mineral interactions. Overall, however, inclusion and protection of

  6. Organic carbon production, mineralization and preservation on the Peruvian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, A. W.; Sommer, S.; Lomnitz, U.; Montes, I.; Treude, T.; Gier, J.; Hensen, C.; Dengler, M.; Stolpovsky, K.; Bryant, L. D.; Wallmann, K.

    2014-09-01

    Carbon cycling in Peruvian margin sediments (11° S and 12° S) was examined at 16 stations from 74 m on the inner shelf down to 1024 m water depth by means of in situ flux measurements, sedimentary geochemistry and modeling. Bottom water oxygen was below detection limit down to ca. 400 m and increased to 53 μM at the deepest station. Sediment accumulation rates and benthic dissolved inorganic carbon fluxes decreased rapidly with water depth. Particulate organic carbon (POC) content was lowest on the inner shelf and at the deep oxygenated stations (< 5%) and highest between 200 and 400 m in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ, 15-20%). The organic carbon burial efficiency (CBE) was unexpectedly low on the inner shelf (< 20%) when compared to a global database, for reasons which may be linked to the frequent ventilation of the shelf by oceanographic anomalies. CBE at the deeper oxygenated sites was much higher than expected (max. 81%). Elsewhere, CBEs were mostly above the range expected for sediments underlying normal oxic bottom waters, with an average of 51 and 58% for the 11° S and 12° S transects, respectively. Organic carbon rain rates calculated from the benthic fluxes alluded to a very efficient mineralization of organic matter in the water column, with a Martin curve exponent typical of normal oxic waters (0.88 ± 0.09). Yet, mean POC burial rates were 2-5 times higher than the global average for continental margins. The observations at the Peruvian margin suggest that a lack of oxygen does not affect the degradation of organic matter in the water column but promotes the preservation of organic matter in marine sediments.

  7. Organic carbon cycling in landfills: Model for a continuum approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bogner, J.; Lagerkvist, A.

    1997-09-01

    Organic carbon cycling in landfills can be addressed through a continuum model where the end-points are conventional anaerobic digestion of organic waste (short-term analogue) and geologic burial of organic material (long-term analogue). Major variables influencing status include moisture state, temperature, organic carbon loading, nutrient status, and isolation from the surrounding environment. Bioreactor landfills which are engineered for rapid decomposition approach (but cannot fully attain) the anaerobic digester end-point and incur higher unit costs because of their high degree of environmental isolation and control. At the other extreme, uncontrolled land disposal of organic waste materials is similar to geologic burial where organic carbon may be aerobically recycled to atmospheric CO{sub 2}, anaerobically converted to CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} during early diagenesis, or maintained as intermediate or recalcitrant forms into geologic time (> 1,000 years) for transformations via kerogen pathways. A family of improved landfill models are needed at several scales (molecular to landscape) which realistically address landfill processes and can be validated with field data.

  8. Carbonaceous aerosols influencing atmospheric radiation: Black and organic carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    Carbonaceous particles in the atmosphere may both scatter and absorb solar radiation. The fraction associated with the absorbing component is generally referred to as black carbon (BC) and is mainly produced from incomplete combustion processes. The fraction associated with condensed organic compounds is generally referred to as organic carbon (OC) or organic matter and is mainly scattering. Absorption of solar radiation by carbonaceous aerosols may heat the atmosphere, thereby altering the vertical temperature profile, while scattering of solar radiation may lead to a net cooling of the atmosphere/ocean system. Carbonaceous aerosols may also enhance the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the fine particle (D < 2.5 {mu}m) source rates of both OC and BC. The source rates for anthropogenic organic aerosols may be as large as the source rates for anthropogenic sulfate aerosols, suggesting a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The role of BC in decreasing the amount of reflected solar radiation by OC and sulfates is discussed. The total estimated forcing depends on the source estimates for organic and black carbon aerosols which are highly uncertain. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is also described.

  9. Analysis of isotope and organic carbon signatures in hillslope hydrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, Jaromir; Vogel, Tomas; Dohnal, Michal; Jankovec, Jakub; Sanda, Martin; Votrubova, Jana

    2015-04-01

    Headwater catchments are among the most important areas for investigation of isotope and carbon fluxes because their small sizes best enable separation of above- and below ground compartments for improved understanding of the respective transport mechanisms. So far, only few studies utilized stable isotope information in modeling and even fewer linked dissolved carbon fluxes to mixing or transport models. Stable isotopes of water and dissolved organic carbon provide basis for studying transport processes ranging from soil profile scale to hillslope and catchment scale. In this study, stormflow dynamics of oxygen-18 and dissolved organic carbon was analyzed using a physically based modeling approach. One-dimensional dual-continuum vertical flow and transport model, based on Richards and advection-dispersion equations, was used to simulate the subsurface processes during significant rainfall-runoff episodes of a summer season. Water flow and transport of solutes were assumed to take place in two mutually communicating continua, the soil matrix and the network of preferential pathways. Oxygen-18 and dissolved organic carbon were observed in soil water, stormflow discharge in the experimental hillslope trench, and stream discharge at the catchment outlet. In the present study, we analyzed the transformation of input solute signals into signatures observed in the stormflow discharge. The research was supported by the Czech Science Foundation Project No. 14-15201J.

  10. DETERMINATION OF THE ORGANIC MASS TO ORGANIC CARBON RATIO IN IMPROVE SAMPLES. (R831086)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ratio of organic mass (OM) to organic carbon (OC) in PM2.5 aerosols at US national parks in the IMPROVE network was estimated experimentally from solvent extraction of sample filters and from the difference between PM2.5 mass and chemical constituents...

  11. An isotopic study of biogeochemical relationships between carbonates and organic carbon in the Greenhorn Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.; Popp, Brian N.; Takigiku, Ray; Johnson, Marcus W.

    1989-01-01

    Carbon-isotopic compositions of total carbonate, inoceramid carbonate, micritic carbonate, secondary cements, total organic carbon, and geoporphyrins have been measured in 76 different beds within a 17-m interval of a core through the Greenhorn Formation, an interbedded limestone and calcareous shale unit of Cretaceous age from the Western Interior Seaway of North America. Results are considered in terms of variations in the processes of primary production and in secondary processes. It is shown that the porphyrin isotopic record reflects primary isotopic variations more closely than the TOC isotopic record and that, in these sediments, TOC is enriched in C-13 relative to its primary precursor by 0.6 to 2.8 percent. This enrichment is attributed to isotope effects within the consumer foodweb and is associated with respiratory heterotrophy. Variation in this secondary enrichment are correlated with variations in the isotopic composition of marine carbonate.

  12. Primary and Secondary Organic Carbon Downwind of Mexico City

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Cary, R.; Laulainen, Nels S.

    2009-09-18

    In order to study particulate matter transport and transformation in the Megacity environment, fine particulate carbons were measured simultaneously at two supersites, suburban T1 and rural T2, downwind of Mexico City during the MILAGRO field campaign in March 2006. Organic carbon (OC), element carbon (EC), and total carbon (TC=OC+EC) were determined near real-time by the Sunset semi-continuous field analyzer at both sites. The semi-empirical EC tracer method was used to derive primary organic carbon (POC) and secondary organic carbon (SOC). Diurnal variations of primary and secondary carbons were observed at T1 and T2, which resulted from boundary layer inversion and impacted by local traffic patterns. The majority of organic carbons at T1 and T2 were secondary. The SOC% (SOC%=SOC/TC*100%) at T1 ranged from 1.2 - 100% with an average of 80.7 ± 14.4%. The SOC% at T2 ranged from 12.8 - 100% with an average of 80.1 ± 14.0%. The average EC to PM2.5 percentage (ECPM%=EC/PM2.5*100%)) and OCPM% were 6.0 % and 20.0% over the whole sampling time. The POC to PM percentage (POCPM%) and SOCPM% were 3.7% and 16.3%, respectively. The maximum ECPM% was 21.2%, and the maximum OCPM% was 57.2%. The maximum POCPM% was 12.9%, and the maximum SOC% was 49.7%. The SOC and POC during T1 to T2 transfer favourable meteorological conditions showed similar characteristics, which indicated that transport between the two supersites took place. Strong correlations between EC and carbon monoxide (CO) and odd nitrogens (NO and NOx) were observed at T1. This indicated that EC had proximate sources such as local traffic emissions. The EC/CO ratio derived by linear regression analysis when parameters are in μgC/m3 and μg/m3, respectively, was 0.0045. A strong correlation was also seen between OC and SOC vs. the sum of oxidants such as O3 and NO2 or O3, NO2 and SO2, suggesting the secondary nature of carbons observed at T1.

  13. Primary and secondary organic carbon downwind of Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X.-Y.; Cary, R. A.; Laulainen, N. S.

    2009-09-01

    In order to study particulate matter transport and transformation in the Megacity environment, fine particulate carbon was measured simultaneously at two supersites, suburban T1 and rural T2, downwind of Mexico City during the MILAGRO field campaign in March 2006. Organic carbon (OC), element carbon (EC), and total carbon (TC=OC+EC) were determined in near real-time using a Sunset semi-continuous OCEC field analyzer. The semi-empirical EC tracer method was used to derive primary organic carbon (POC) and secondary organic carbon (SOC). Diurnal variations of primary and secondary carbon were observed at T1 and T2, which resulted from boundary layer inversion and impacted by local traffic patterns. The majority of organic carbon particles at T1 and T2 were secondary. The SOCTC% (SOC%=SOC/TC×100%) at T1 ranged from 0.5-93.8% with an average of 63.5±17.2%. The SOCTC% at T2 ranged from 9.3-98.1% with an average of 67.4±12.4%. The average EC to PM2.5 percentage (ECPM%=EC/PM2.5×100%) and OCPM% were 6.0% and 20.0% over the whole sampling time at T1. The POC to PM percentage (POCPM%) and SOCPM% were 3.7% and 16.3%, respectively at the same site. The maximum ECPM% was 21.2%, and the maximum OCPM% was 57.2% at T1. The maximum POCPM% was 12.9%, and the maximum SOCPM% was 49.7% at T1. Comparison of SOC and POC at T1 and T2 showed similar characteristics under favorable meteorological conditions, which indicated that transport from T1 towards T2 took place. Strong correlations between EC and carbon monoxide (CO) and odd nitrogen species (NO and NOx) were observed at T1. This indicated that EC had nearby sources, such as local traffic emissions. The EC/CO ratio derived by linear regression analysis, with units of μg C/m3 and μg/m3, respectively, was 0.004 at T1. Correlations were also seen between OC and SOC vs. the sum of oxidants, such as O3 and NO2, suggesting the secondary nature of carbons observed at T1.

  14. Primary and secondary organic carbon downwind of Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X.-Y.; Cary, R. A.; Laulainen, N. S.

    2009-01-01

    In order to study particulate matter transport and transformation in the Megacity environment, fine particulate carbons were measured simultaneously at two supersites, suburban T1 and rural T2, downwind of Mexico City during the MILAGRO field campaign in March 2006. Organic carbon (OC), element carbon (EC), and total carbon (TC=OC+EC) were determined in near real-time using a Sunset semi-continuous OC/EC field analyzer. The semi-empirical EC tracer method was used to derive primary organic carbon (POC) and secondary organic carbon (SOC). Diurnal variations of primary and secondary carbons were observed at T1 and T2, which resulted from boundary layer inversion and impacted by local traffic patterns. The majority of organic carbon particles at T1 and T2 were secondary. The SOC% (SOC%=SOC/TC×100%) at T1 ranged from 1.2-100% with an average of 80.7±14.4%. The SOC% at T2 ranged from 12.8-100% with an average of 80.1±14.0%. The average EC to PM2.5 percentage (ECPM%=EC/PM2.5×100%) and OCPM% were 6.0% and 20.0% over the whole sampling time at T1. The POC to PM percentage (POCPM%) and SOCPM% were 3.7% and 16.3%, respectively at the same site. The maximum ECPM% was 21.2%, and the maximum OCPM% was 57.2% at T1. The maximum POCPM% was 12.9%, and the maximum SOCPM% was 49.7% at the suburban site. Comparison of SOC and POC at T1 and T2 showed similar characteristics under favorable meteorological conditions, which indicated that transport between the two supersites took place. Strong correlations between EC and carbon monoxide (CO) and odd nitrogen species (NO and NOx) were observed at T1. This indicated that EC had nearby sources, such as local traffic emissions. The EC/CO ratio derived by linear regression analysis, when parameters in μg C/m3 and μg/m3, respectively, was 0.0045 at T1. Correlations were also seen between OC and SOC vs. the sum of oxidants, such as O3 and NO2, suggesting the secondary nature of carbons observed at T1.

  15. Gold catalysts supported on nanosized iron oxide for low-temperature oxidation of carbon monoxide and formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zheng; Zhang, Weidong; Li, Yi; Huang, Zuming; Guo, Huishan; Wu, Feng; Li, Jinjun

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to optimize synthesis of gold catalyst supported on nanosized iron oxide and to evaluate the activity in oxidation of carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. Nanosized iron oxide was prepared from a colloidal dispersion of hydrous iron oxide through a dispersion-precipitation method. Gold was adsorbed onto nanosized iron oxide under self-generated basic conditions. Characterization results indicate that the iron oxide consisted of hematite/maghemite composite with primary particle sizes of 6-8 nm. Gold was highly dispersed on the surface of the support. The catalysts showed good activity in the oxidation of airborne carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. The optimal pH for their synthesis was ∼7. The catalytic performance could be enhanced by extending the adsorption time of gold species on the support within 21 h. The optimized catalyst was capable of achieving complete oxidation of 1% carbon monoxide at -20 °C and 33% conversion of 450 ppm formaldehyde at ambient temperature. The catalyst may be applicable to indoor air purification.

  16. Probing the Interfacial Interaction in Layered-Carbon-Stabilized Iron Oxide Nanostructures: A Soft X-ray Spectroscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Jinyin; Zhao, Guanqi; Gao, Yongjun; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Glans, Per-Anders; Guo, Jinghua; Ma, Ding; Sun, Xu-Hui; Zhong, Jun

    2015-04-22

    We have stabilized the iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) of various sizes on layered carbon materials (Fe-oxide/C) that show excellent catalytic performance. From the characterization of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy (XMCD), a strong interfacial interaction in the Fe-oxide/C hybrids has been observed between the small iron oxide NPs and layered carbon in contrast to the weak interaction in the large iron oxide NPs. The interfacial interaction between the NPs and layered carbon is found to link with the improved catalytic performance. In addition, the Fe L-edge XMCD spectra show that the large iron oxide NPs are mainly γ-Fe2O3 with a strong ferromagnetic property, whereas the small iron oxide NPs with strong interfacial interaction are mainly α-Fe2O3 or amorphous Fe2O3 with a nonmagnetic property. The results strongly suggest that the interfacial interaction plays a key role for the catalytic performance, and the experimental findings may provide guidance toward rational design of high-performance catalysts. PMID:25839786

  17. Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics under Conservation Agricultural Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is a key element in the valuation of natural resources and the evaluation of how management affects soil quality and ecosystem services derived from soil. This paper describes a summary of some recent research aimed at understanding how SOC contributes to (a) various soil ...

  18. Impacts of soil organic carbon on soil physical behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management-induced changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) concentration can affect soil physical behavior. Specifically, removal of crop residues as biofuel may thus adversely affect soil attributes by reducing SOC concentration as crop residues are the main source of SOC. Implications of crop residue...

  19. Redistribution of soil and soil organic carbon on agricultural landscapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patterns of soil organic carbon (SOC) vary widely across the landscape leading to large uncertainties in the SOC budgets for agricultural systems especially for landscapes where water, tillage, and wind erosion redistributes soil and SOC across the landscape. It is often assumed that soil erosion r...

  20. Photoproduction of Carbon Monoxide from Natural Organic Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pioneering studies by Valentine provided early kinetic results that used carbon monoxide (CO) production to evaluate the photodecomposition of aquatic natural organic matter (NOM) . (ES&T 1993 27 409-412). Comparatively few kinetic studies have been conducted of the photodegradat...

  1. Isotope tracers of organic carbon during artificial recharge

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M.L.

    1998-02-09

    This project developed an analytical technique for measuring the isotope abundance for 14C and 13C in total organic carbon (TOC) in order to test whether these measurements can trace TOC interaction with sedimentary material at the bottom of rivers and lakes, soils, and subsurface aquifer rocks.

  2. REMOTE MONITORING OF ORGANIC CARBON IN SURFACE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study shows that the intensity of the Raman normalized fluorescence emission induced in surface waters by ultraviolet radiation can be used to provide a unique remote sensing capability for airborne monitoring the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Trace concen...

  3. Toxicity of Nano-Zero Valent Iron to Freshwater and Marine Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Arturo A.; Garner, Kendra; Miller, Robert J.; Lenihan, Hunter S.

    2012-01-01

    We tested whether three commercial forms (uncoated, organic coating, and iron oxide coating) of nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) are toxic to freshwater and marine organisms, specifically three species of marine phytoplankton, one species of freshwater phytoplankton, and a freshwater zooplankton species (Daphnia magna), because these organisms may be exposed downstream of where nZVI is applied to remediate polluted soil. The aggregation and reactivity of the three types of nZVI varied considerably, which was reflected in their toxicity. Since levels of Fe2+ and Fe3+ increase as the nZVI react, we also evaluated their toxicity independently. All four phytoplankton species displayed decreasing population growth rates, and Daphnia magna showed increasing mortality, in response to increasing levels of nZVI, and to a lesser degree with increasing Fe2+ and Fe3+. All forms of nZVI aggregated in soil and water, especially in the presence of a high concentration of calcium ions in groundwater, thus reducing their transports through the environment. However, uncoated nZVI aggregated extremely rapidly, thus vastly reducing the probability of environmental transport and potential for toxicity. This information can be used to design a risk management strategy to arrest the transport of injected nZVI beyond the intended remediation area, by injecting inert calcium salts as a barrier to transport. PMID:22952836

  4. Potential of zerovalent iron nanoparticles for remediation of environmental organic contaminants in water: a review.

    PubMed

    Raychoudhury, Trishikhi; Scheytt, Traugott

    2013-01-01

    Zerovalent iron (ZVI) has the potential to degrade different organic contaminants. Nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) can reduce the contaminants even more rapidly due to its small size and large specific surface area (SSA), compared to granular ZVI. The main objective of this paper is to assess and compare the potential of NZVI for degradation of different contaminants in water under specific environmental conditions. As a first step, the potential reactive functional groups/bonds associated with different contaminants are identified and possible reaction mechanisms are discussed. Thereafter, the reaction efficiencies of different organic contaminants with NZVI are compared. Mass of ZVI and reaction time required to transform a certain amount of contaminated water are calculated based on literature data. Sources of contaminants in the environment and their environmental occurrences are discussed to understand the potential locations where NZVI could be applied for removal of different contaminants. Overall it is observed that azo-compounds are readily transformed in the presence of NZVI particles. Reaction efficiencies of ZVI for reduction of nitro-organic compounds are also reasonably high. However, halogenated compounds with high molecular weights or complex structures (i.e., iodinated contrast media, DDT, polychlorinated biphenyls, etc.) show lower reaction rates with NZVI compared to the widely studied chlorinated hydrocarbons (i.e., trichloroethylene). PMID:24135090

  5. Higher Molecular Mass Organic Matter Molecules Compete with Orthophosphate for Adsorption to Iron (Oxy)hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Chassé, Alexander W; Ohno, Tsutomu

    2016-07-19

    The competition between orthophosphate and water-extractable organic matter (WEOM) for adsorption to iron (oxy)hydroxide mineral surfaces is an important factor in determining the plant bioavailability of P in soils. Chemical force spectroscopy was used to determine the binding force between orthophosphate and iron (oxy)hydroxide that was coated onto atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips and adsorbed with WEOM. The force measurements were conducted at pH 4.65 and 0.02 M ionic strength which are representative of typical acid soil solutions. The chemical composition of the WEOM was determined by ultrahigh resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry. The results indicate a correlation between aromatic WEOM molecules that are greater than 600 Da and the reduced binding force of orthophosphate to WEOM-adsorbed iron (oxy)hydroxide AFM tips suggesting that the molecular mass of aromatic WEOM molecules plays a critical role in regulating the WEOM-P interactions with surface functional groups of minerals. Based on the results of this study, we show the importance of obtaining a detailed, molecular-scale understanding of soil processes that can help develop better management strategies to reduce waste of limited P resources and adverse environmental impacts. Specifically, soil amendments with greater content of high molecular mass aromatic components may positively affect dissolved P use efficiency in soils by maintaining P in soil solution. PMID:27362894

  6. Iron-Based Nanoparticles for Toxic Organic Degradation: Silica Platform and Green Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Meeks, Noah D.; Smuleac, Vasile; Stevens, Christopher; Bhattacharyya, Dibakar

    2012-01-01

    Iron and iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are finding wide applications for the remediation of various toxic chloro-organic compounds (such as trichloroethylene, TCE), via reductive and oxidative processes. In this study, Fe NPs (30-50 nm) are synthesized by reduction from ferric ions immobilized (by ion exchange) on a platform (two types of sulfonated silica particles), in order to prevent the NP agglomeration. Next, the Fe NPs are oxidized and their effectiveness for the oxidative dechlorination of TCE via the heterogeneous decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to OH• on the surface of the iron oxide NPs was demonstrated. For the reductive approach, the use of ascorbic acid as a “green” reducing agent in conjunction with a secondary metal (Pd) inhibits NP oxidation and agglomeration through surface adsorbed species. The Fe/Pd NPs have been successfully applied for the dechlorination of TCE (kSA, surface-area normalized reaction rate, = 8.1 ×10-4 L/m2h). PMID:22899876

  7. Effect of Iron and Carbon Monoxide on Fibrinogenase-like Degradation of Plasmatic Coagulation by Venoms of Six Agkistrodon Species.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G; Redford, Daniel T; Boyle, Patrick K

    2016-05-01

    Annually, thousands suffer poisonous snakebite, often from defibrinogenating species. It has been demonstrated that iron and carbon monoxide change the ultrastructure of plasma thrombi and improve coagulation kinetics. Thus, this investigation sought to determine whether pre-treatment of plasma with iron and carbon monoxide could attenuate venom-mediated catalysis of fibrinogen obtained from Agkistrodon species with fibrinogenase activity. Human plasma was pre-treated with ferric chloride (0-10 μM) and carbon monoxide-releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2, 0-100 μM) prior to exposure to 0.5-11 μg/ml of six different Agkistrodon species' venom. The amount of venom used for experimentation needed to decrease coagulation function of one or more kinetic parameters by at least 50% of normal values for (e.g. half the normal speed of clot formation). Coagulation kinetics were determined with thrombelastography. All six snake venoms degraded plasmatic coagulation kinetics to a significant extent, especially prolonging the onset to clot formation and diminishing the speed of clot growth. Pre-treatment of plasma with iron and carbon monoxide attenuated these venom-mediated coagulation kinetic changes in a species-specific manner, with some venom effects markedly abrogated while others were only mildly decreased. Further in vitro investigation of other pit viper venoms that possess fibrinogenolytic activity is indicated to identify species amenable to or resistant to iron and carbon monoxide-mediated attenuation of venom-mediated catalysis of fibrinogen. Lastly, future pre-clinical investigation with animal models (e.g. rabbit ear-bleed model) is planned to determine whether iron and carbon monoxide can be used therapeutically after envenomation. PMID:26467642

  8. Spatial distribution of soil organic carbon stocks in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, M. P.; Wattenbach, M.; Smith, P.; Meersmans, J.; Jolivet, C.; Boulonne, L.; Arrouays, D.

    2011-05-01

    Soil organic carbon plays a major role in the global carbon budget, and can act as a source or a sink of atmospheric carbon, thereby possibly influencing the course of climate change. Changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks are now taken into account in international negotiations regarding climate change. Consequently, developing sampling schemes and models for estimating the spatial distribution of SOC stocks is a priority. The French soil monitoring network has been established on a 16 km × 16 km grid and the first sampling campaign has recently been completed, providing around 2200 measurements of stocks of soil organic carbon, obtained through an in situ composite sampling, uniformly distributed over the French territory. We calibrated a boosted regression tree model on the observed stocks, modelling SOC stocks as a function of other variables such as climatic parameters, vegetation net primary productivity, soil properties and land use. The calibrated model was evaluated through cross-validation and eventually used for estimating SOC stocks for mainland France. Two other models were calibrated on forest and agricultural soils separately, in order to assess more precisely the influence of pedo-climatic variables on SOC for such soils. The boosted regression tree model showed good predictive ability, and enabled quantification of relationships between SOC stocks and pedo-climatic variables (plus their interactions) over the French territory. These relationships strongly depended on the land use, and more specifically, differed between forest soils and cultivated soil. The total estimate of SOC stocks in France was 3.260 ± 0.872 PgC for the first 30 cm. It was compared to another estimate, based on the previously published European soil organic carbon and bulk density maps, of 5.303 PgC. We demonstrate that the present estimate might better represent the actual SOC stock distributions of France, and consequently that the previously published approach at the

  9. Carbon export in the naturally iron-fertilized Kerguelen area of the Southern Ocean based on the 234Th approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planchon, F.; Ballas, D.; Cavagna, A.-J.; Bowie, A. R.; Davies, D.; Trull, T.; Laurenceau-Cornec, E. C.; Van Der Merwe, P.; Dehairs, F.

    2015-06-01

    This study examined upper-ocean particulate organic carbon (POC) export using the 234Th approach as part of the second KErguelen Ocean and Plateau compared Study expedition (KEOPS2). Our aim was to characterize the spatial and the temporal variability of POC export during austral spring (October-November 2011) in the Fe-fertilized area of the Kerguelen Plateau region. POC export fluxes were estimated at high productivity sites over and downstream of the plateau and compared to a high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) area upstream of the plateau in order to assess the impact of iron-induced productivity on the vertical export of carbon. Deficits in 234Th activities were observed at all stations in surface waters, indicating early scavenging by particles in austral spring. 234Th export was lowest at the reference station R-2 and highest in the recirculation region (E stations) where a pseudo-Lagrangian survey was conducted. In comparison 234Th export over the central plateau and north of the polar front (PF) was relatively limited throughout the survey. However, the 234Th results support that Fe fertilization increased particle export in all iron-fertilized waters. The impact was greatest in the recirculation feature (3-4 fold at 200 m depth, relative to the reference station), but more moderate over the central Kerguelen Plateau and in the northern plume of the Kerguelen bloom (~2-fold at 200 m depth). The C : Th ratio of large (>53 μm) potentially sinking particles collected via sequential filtration using in situ pumping (ISP) systems was used to convert the 234Th flux into a POC export flux. The C : Th ratios of sinking particles were highly variable (3.1 ± 0.1 to 10.5 ± 0.2 μmol dpm-1) with no clear site-related trend, despite the variety of ecosystem responses in the fertilized regions. C : Th ratios showed a decreasing trend between 100 and 200 m depth suggesting preferential carbon loss relative to 234Th possibly due to heterotrophic degradation and

  10. Electroless deposition of conformal nanoscale iron oxide on carbon nanoarchitectures for electrochemical charge storage.

    PubMed

    Sassin, Megan B; Mansour, Azzam N; Pettigrew, Katherine A; Rolison, Debra R; Long, Jeffrey W

    2010-08-24

    We describe a simple self-limiting electroless deposition process whereby conformal, nanoscale iron oxide (FeO(x)) coatings are generated at the interior and exterior surfaces of macroscopically thick ( approximately 90 microm) carbon nanofoam paper substrates via redox reaction with aqueous K(2)FeO(4). The resulting FeO(x)-carbon nanofoams are characterized as device-ready electrode structures for aqueous electrochemical capacitors and they demonstrate a 3-to-7 fold increase in charge-storage capacity relative to the native carbon nanofoam when cycled in a mild aqueous electrolyte (2.5 M Li(2)SO(4)), yielding mass-, volume-, and footprint-normalized capacitances of 84 F g(-1), 121 F cm(-3), and 0.85 F cm(-2), respectively, even at modest FeO(x) loadings (27 wt %). The additional charge-storage capacity arises from faradaic pseudocapacitance of the FeO(x) coating, delivering specific capacitance >300 F g(-1) normalized to the content of FeO(x) as FeOOH, as verified by electrochemical measurements and in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The additional capacitance is electrochemically addressable within tens of seconds, a time scale of relevance for high-rate electrochemical charge storage. We also demonstrate that the addition of borate to buffer the Li(2)SO(4) electrolyte effectively suppresses the electrochemical dissolution of the FeO(x) coating, resulting in <20% capacitance fade over 1000 consecutive cycles. PMID:20731433

  11. Inorganic carbon and fossil organic carbon are source of bias for quantification of sequestered carbon in mine spoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vindušková, Olga; Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Carbon sequestration in mine soils has been studied as a possibility to mitigate the rising atmospheric CO2 levels and to improve mine soil quality (Vindu\\vsková and Frouz, 2013). Moreover, these soils offer an unique opportunity to study soil carbon dynamics using the chronosequence approach (using a set of sites of different age on similar parent material). However, quantification of sequestered carbon in mine soils is often complicated by fossil organic carbon (e.g., from coal or kerogen) or inorganic carbon present in the spoil. We present a methodology for quantification of both of these common constituents of mine soils. Our recommendations are based on experiments done on post-mining soils in Sokolov basin, Czech Republic. Here, fossil organic carbon is present mainly as kerogen Type I and II and represents 2-6 wt.% C in these soils. Inorganic carbon in these soils is present mainly as siderite (FeCO3), calcite (CaCO3), and dolomite (CaMg(CO3)2). All of these carbonates are often found in the overburden of coal seams thus being a common constituent of post-mining soils in the world. Vindu\\vsková O, Frouz J, 2013. Soil carbon accumulation after open-cast coal and oil shale mining in Northern Hemisphere: a quantitative review. ENVIRONMENTAL EARTH SCIENCES, 69: 1685-1698. Vindu\\vsková O, Dvořáček V, Prohasková A, Frouz J. 2014. Distinguishing recent and fossil organic matter - A critical step in evaluation of post-mining soil development - using near infrared spectroscopy. ECOLOGICAL ENGINEERING. 73: 643-648. Vindu\\vsková O, Sebag D, Cailleau G, Brus J, Frouz J. 2015. Methodological comparison for quantitative analysis of fossil and recently derived carbon in mine soils with high content of aliphatic kerogen. ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY, 89-90:14-22.

  12. Hyperspectral Analysis of Soil Nitrogen, Carbon, Carbonate, and Organic Matter Using Regression Trees

    PubMed Central

    Gmur, Stephan; Vogt, Daniel; Zabowski, Darlene; Moskal, L. Monika

    2012-01-01

    The characterization of soil attributes using hyperspectral sensors has revealed patterns in soil spectra that are known to respond to mineral composition, organic matter, soil moisture and particle size distribution. Soil samples from different soil horizons of replicated soil series from sites located within Washington and Oregon were analyzed with the FieldSpec Spectroradiometer to measure their spectral signatures across the electromagnetic range of 400 to 1,000 nm. Similarity rankings of individual soil samples reveal differences between replicate series as well as samples within the same replicate series. Using classification and regression tree statistical methods, regression trees were fitted to each spectral response using concentrations of nitrogen, carbon, carbonate and organic matter as the response variables. Statistics resulting from fitted trees were: nitrogen R2 0.91 (p < 0.01) at 403, 470, 687, and 846 nm spectral band widths, carbonate R2 0.95 (p < 0.01) at 531 and 898 nm band widths, total carbon R2 0.93 (p < 0.01) at 400, 409, 441 and 907 nm band widths, and organic matter R2 0.98 (p < 0.01) at 300, 400, 441, 832 and 907 nm band widths. Use of the 400 to 1,000 nm electromagnetic range utilizing regression trees provided a powerful, rapid and inexpensive method for assessing nitrogen, carbon, carbonate and organic matter for upper soil horizons in a nondestructive method. PMID:23112620

  13. Hyperspectral analysis of soil nitrogen, carbon, carbonate, and organic matter using regression trees.

    PubMed

    Gmur, Stephan; Vogt, Daniel; Zabowski, Darlene; Moskal, L Monika

    2012-01-01

    The characterization of soil attributes using hyperspectral sensors has revealed patterns in soil spectra that are known to respond to mineral composition, organic matter, soil moisture and particle size distribution. Soil samples from different soil horizons of replicated soil series from sites located within Washington and Oregon were analyzed with the FieldSpec Spectroradiometer to measure their spectral signatures across the electromagnetic range of 400 to 1,000 nm. Similarity rankings of individual soil samples reveal differences between replicate series as well as samples within the same replicate series. Using classification and regression tree statistical methods, regression trees were fitted to each spectral response using concentrations of nitrogen, carbon, carbonate and organic matter as the response variables. Statistics resulting from fitted trees were: nitrogen R(2) 0.91 (p < 0.01) at 403, 470, 687, and 846 nm spectral band widths, carbonate R(2) 0.95 (p < 0.01) at 531 and 898 nm band widths, total carbon R(2) 0.93 (p < 0.01) at 400, 409, 441 and 907 nm band widths, and organic matter R(2) 0.98 (p < 0.01) at 300, 400, 441, 832 and 907 nm band widths. Use of the 400 to 1,000 nm electromagnetic range utilizing regression trees provided a powerful, rapid and inexpensive method for assessing nitrogen, carbon, carbonate and organic matter for upper soil horizons in a nondestructive method. PMID:23112620

  14. The Semiquinone-Iron Complex of Photosystem II: Structural Insights from ESR and Theoretical Simulation; Evidence that the Native Ligand to the Non-Heme Iron Is Carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Nicholas; Jin, Lu; Jaszewski, Adrian; Smith, Paul J.; Krausz, Elmars; Rutherford, A. William; Pace, Ron

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The semiquinone-iron complex of photosystem II was studied using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Two forms of the signal were investigated: 1), the native g ∼ 1.9 form; and 2), the g ∼ 1.84 form, which is well known in purple bacterial reaction centers and occurs in photosystem II when treated with formate. The g ∼ 1.9 form shows low- and high-field edges at g ∼ 3.5 and g < 0.8, respectively, and resembles the g ∼ 1.84 form in terms of shape and width. Both types of ESR signal were simulated using the theoretical approach used previously for the BRC complex, a spin Hamiltonian formalism in which the semiquinone radical magnetically interacts (J ∼ 1 cm−1) with the nearby high-spin Fe2+. The two forms of ESR signal differ mainly by an axis rotation of the exchange coupling tensor (J) relative to the zero-field tensor (D) and a small increase in the zero-field parameter D (∼6 cm−1). Density functional theory calculations were conducted on model semiquinone-iron systems to identify the physical nature of these changes. The replacement of formate (or glutamate in the bacterial reaction centers) by bicarbonate did not result in changes in the coupling environment. However, when carbonate (CO32−) was used instead of bicarbonate, the exchange and zero-field tensors did show changes that matched those obtained from the spectral simulations. This indicates that 1), the doubly charged carbonate ion is responsible for the g ∼ 1.9 form of the semiquinone-iron signal; and 2), carbonate, rather than bicarbonate, is the ligand to the iron. PMID:19804734

  15. Carbon isotope fractionation during reductive dechlorination of TCE in batch experiments with iron samples from reactive barriers.

    PubMed

    Schüth, Christoph; Bill, Markus; Barth, Johannes A C; Slater, Gregory F; Kalin, Robert M

    2003-10-01

    Reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) by zero-valent iron produces a systematic enrichment of 13C in the remaining substrate that can be described using a Rayleigh model. In this study, fractionation factors for TCE dechlorination with iron samples from two permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) were established in batch experiments. Samples included original unused iron as well as material from a barrier in Belfast after almost 4 years of operation. Despite the variety of samples, carbon isotope fractionations of TCE were remarkably similar and seemed to be independent of iron origin, reaction rate, and formation of precipitates on the iron surfaces. The average enrichment factor for all experiments was -10.1 per thousand (+/- 0.4 per thousand). These results indicate that the enrichment factor provides a powerful tool to monitor the reaction progress, and thus the performance, of an iron-reactive barrier over time. The strong fractionation observed may also serve as a tool to distinguish between insufficient residence time in the wall and a possible bypassing of the wall by the plume, which should result in an unchanged isotopic signature of the TCE. Although further work is necessary to apply this stable isotope method in the field, it has potential to serve as a unique monitoring tool for PRBs based on zero-valent iron. PMID:14516939

  16. Efficient organic carbon burial in the Bengal fan sustained by the Himalayan erosional system.

    PubMed

    Galy, Valier; France-Lanord, Christian; Beyssac, Olivier; Faure, Pierre; Kudrass, Hermann; Palhol, Fabien

    2007-11-15

    Continental erosion controls atmospheric carbon dioxide levels on geological timescales through silicate weathering, riverine transport and subsequent burial of organic carbon in oceanic sediments. The efficiency of organic carbon deposition in sedimentary basins is however limited by the organic carbon load capacity of the sediments and organic carbon oxidation in continental margins. At the global scale, previous studies have suggested that about 70 per cent of riverine organic carbon is returned to the atmosphere, such as in the Amazon basin. Here we present a comprehensive organic carbon budget for the Himalayan erosional system, including source rocks, river sediments and marine sediments buried in the Bengal fan. We show that organic carbon export is controlled by sediment properties, and that oxidative loss is negligible during transport and deposition to the ocean. Our results indicate that 70 to 85 per cent of the organic carbon is recent organic matter captured during transport, which serves as a net sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide. The amount of organic carbon deposited in the Bengal basin represents about 10 to 20 per cent of the total terrestrial organic carbon buried in oceanic sediments. High erosion rates in the Himalayas generate high sedimentation rates and low oxygen availability in the Bay of Bengal that sustain the observed extreme organic carbon burial efficiency. Active orogenic systems generate enhanced physical erosion and the resulting organic carbon burial buffers atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, thereby exerting a negative feedback on climate over geological timescales. PMID:18004382

  17. Soil Organic Carbon Loss: An Overlooked Factor in the Carbon Sequestration Potential of Enhanced Mineral Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietzen, Christiana; Harrison, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Weathering of silicate minerals regulates the global carbon cycle on geologic timescales. Several authors have proposed that applying finely ground silicate minerals to soils, where organic acids would enhance the rate of weathering, could increase carbon uptake and mitigate anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Silicate minerals such as olivine could replace lime, which is commonly used to remediate soil acidification, thereby sequestering CO2 while achieving the same increase in soil pH. However, the effect of adding this material on soil organic matter, the largest terrestrial pool of carbon, has yet to be considered. Microbial biomass and respiration have been observed to increase with decreasing acidity, but it is unclear how long the effect lasts. If the addition of silicate minerals promotes the loss of soil organic carbon through decomposition, it could significantly reduce the efficiency of this process or even create a net carbon source. However, it is possible that this initial flush of microbial activity may be compensated for by additional organic matter inputs to soil pools due to increases in plant productivity under less acidic conditions. This study aimed to examine the effects of olivine amendments on soil CO2 flux. A liming treatment representative of typical agricultural practices was also included for comparison. Samples from two highly acidic soils were split into groups amended with olivine or lime and a control group. These samples were incubated at 22°C and constant soil moisture in jars with airtight septa lids. Gas samples were extracted periodically over the course of 2 months and change in headspace CO2 concentration was determined. The effects of enhanced mineral weathering on soil organic matter have yet to be addressed by those promoting this method of carbon sequestration. This project provides the first data on the potential effects of enhanced mineral weathering in the soil environment on soil organic carbon pools.

  18. DESTRUCTION AND REMOVAL OF POHCS (PRINCPAL ORGANIC HAZARDOUS CONSTITUENTS) IN IRON MAKING BLAST FURNACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    At least one steel company utilizes organic waste liquids as a heat and carbon content source to partially replace the coke that is used to charge the blast furnaces. The waste liquids fed to the blast furnace are likely to contain hazardous constituents. Temperature and residenc...

  19. Synthesis of iron-based chemical looping sorbents integrated with pH swing carbon mineral sequestration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Ray; Lee, Dong Hyun; Fan, Liang-Shih; Park, Ah-Hyung Alissa

    2009-12-01

    The previously developed pH swing carbon mineral sequestration immobilizes the gaseous CO2 into a thermodynamically stable solid, MgCO3, using Mg-bearing minerals such as serpentine. This mineral carbonation technology is particularly promising since it generates value-added solid products: high surface area silica, iron oxide, and magnesium carbonate, while providing a safe and permanent storage option for CO2. By carefully controlling the pH of the system, these solids products can be produced with high purity. This study focuses on the synthesis of iron oxide particles as a chemical looping sorbent in order to achieve the integration between carbon capture and storage technologies. Since the solubility of Fe in aqueous phase is relatively low at neutral pH, the effect of the weak acid and chelating agents on the extraction of Fe from serpentine was investigated. The synthesized iron-based chemical looping sorbent was found to be as effective as commercially available iron oxide nanoparticles at converting syngas into high purity H2, while producing a sequestration-ready CO2 stream. PMID:19908801

  20. Latitudinal Gradients in Degradation of Marine Dissolved Organic Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Arnosti, Carol; Steen, Andrew D.; Ziervogel, Kai; Ghobrial, Sherif; Jeffrey, Wade H.

    2011-01-01

    Heterotrophic microbial communities cycle nearly half of net primary productivity in the ocean, and play a particularly important role in transformations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The specific means by which these communities mediate the transformations of organic carbon are largely unknown, since the vast majority of marine bacteria have not been isolated in culture, and most measurements of DOC degradation rates have focused on uptake and metabolism of either bulk DOC or of simple model compounds (e.g. specific amino acids or sugars). Genomic investigations provide information about the potential capabilities of organisms and communities but not the extent to which such potential is expressed. We tested directly the capabilities of heterotrophic microbial communities in surface ocean waters at 32 stations spanning latitudes from 76°S to 79°N to hydrolyze a range of high molecular weight organic substrates and thereby initiate organic matter degradation. These data demonstrate the existence of a latitudinal gradient in the range of complex substrates available to heterotrophic microbial communities, paralleling the global gradient in bacterial species richness. As changing climate increasingly affects the marine environment, changes in the spectrum of substrates accessible by microbial communities may lead to shifts in the location and rate at which marine DOC is respired. Since the inventory of DOC in the ocean is comparable in magnitude to the atmospheric CO2 reservoir, such a change could profoundly affect the global carbon cycle. PMID:22216139

  1. Fossil organic carbon in Siberian Yedoma and thermokarst deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, J.; Schirrmeister, L.; Wetterich, S.

    2011-12-01

    During the late Quaternary, a large pool of organic carbon accumulated in the ice-rich syngenetic frozen deposits and soils preserved in the arctic and subarctic permafrost zone. Because of the potential release of organic carbon from degrading permafrost, the organic-matter (OM) inventory in Yedoma deposits and its degradation features are relevant to current concerns about the effects of global warming. In this context, it is essential to improve the understanding permafrost-stored OM composition and availability. The objective of this study is to develop an approach of OM quantification in frozen deposits including OM quality estimation. We analyzed OM characteristics like total organic carbon content, stable carbon isotopes and carbon-nitrogen ratios. Moreover, lipid biomarkers (alkanes, fatty acids and glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether) and sediment parameters like grain size and bulk density of Yedoma and thermokarst deposits exposed at Duvanny Yar (lower Kolyma River, Siberia) and the west coast of Buor Khaya Peninsula (Laptev Sea, Siberia) were studied. With the biomarker approach it is possible to distinguish deposits which were accumulated and frozen during the Pleistocene and Holocene. Biomarker indices, like the compound specific index, average chain length and tetraether characteristics supply feasible results for past permafrost environments. Late Pleistocene biomarker records indicate cold conditions during the growth/summer period for the late Pleistocene and generally low degradation of the stored OM. In contrast, Holocene thermokarst deposits indicate warmer conditions. The averaged volumetric OM content of the studied Yedoma and thermokarst deposits are greater than 10 kg/m^3 and do not exceed 30 kg/m^3. Given that Yedoma deposits accumulated at relatively fast rates and at low temperatures, the OM underwent a short time of decomposition before it was incorporated into a permanently-frozen state. Consequently, such deposits contain a labile

  2. Long-term effects of dissolved carbonate species on the degradation of trichloroethylene by zerovalent iron.

    PubMed

    Parbs, Anika; Ebert, Markus; Dahmke, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The effect of different concentrations of total inorganic carbon (TIC) and flow rates on the reactivity of iron metal with trichloroethylene (TCE) was studied in column experiments to verify whether concentration or mass flux of TIC is the major key parameter for barrier performance. First-order rate coefficients (kobs) for TCE degradation vary initially between 0.15 and 0.32 h-' and are positively related to TIC influent concentration. Maximal kobs were reached after 164 and 591 PV, varied between 0.55 and 1.1 h(-1), and were positively correlated to the TIC mass flux, followed by a decrease resulting in values similar to the reference system at the end of the experiments. Enhancement of iron corrosion (0.7 to 3.5 mmol kgFe(-1) d(-1) and formation of gas bubbles during the initial experimental phase were observed and were also positively correlated to TIC mass flux. The higher gas bubble formation probably has a more significant effect on porosity than mineral precipitations in Fe0-systems. The results suggest that higher TIC mass fluxes cause a more pronounced acceleration in CHC degradation, but also a faster inhibition in the longer-term. This faster inhibition has serious implication for the design of funnel and gate systems. PMID:17265961

  3. Evaluation of iron-containing carbon nanotubes by near edge X-ray absorption technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, A. G.; Bergmann, C. P.

    2015-10-01

    The synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via Chemical Vapor Deposition method with ferrocene results in CNTs filled with Fe-containing nanoparticles. The present work proposes a novel route to characterize the Fe phases in CNTs inherent to the synthesis process. CNTs were synthesized and, afterwards, the CNTs were heat treated at 1000 °C for 20 min in an inert atmosphere during a thermogravimetric experiment. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) experiments were performed on the CNTs before and after the heat treatment and, also, during the heat treatment, e.g., in situ tests were performed while several Near-Edge X-Ray Absorption (XANES) spectra were collected during the heating of the samples. The XAS technique was successfully applied to evaluate the phases encapsulated by CNTs. Phase transformations of the Fe-based nanoparticles were also observed from iron carbide to metallic iron when the in situ experiments were performed. Results also indicated that the applied synthesis method guarantees that Fe phases are not oxidize. In addition, the results show that heat treatment under inert atmosphere can control which phase remains encapsulated by the CNTs.

  4. Methods to Predict Stresses in Cutting Inserts Brazed Using Iron-Carbon Brazing Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovodov, V. V.; Valentov, A. V.; Retuynskiy, O. Yu; Esekuev, Sh B.

    2016-04-01

    This work describes a method for predicting residual and operating stresses in a flat-form tool insert made of tungsten free carbides brazed using iron-carbon alloy. According to the studies’ results it is concluded that the recommendations relating to the limitation of a melting point of tool brazing alloys (950-1100°C according to different data) are connected with a negative impact on tools as a composite made of dissimilar materials rather than on hard alloys as a tool material. Due to the cooling process stresses inevitably occur in the brazed joint of dissimilar materials, and these stresses increase with the higher solidification temperature of the brazing alloy.

  5. Arsenate removal from water by zero-valent iron/activated carbon galvanic couples.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xiaomin; Li, Rui; Zhao, Bei; Liang, Wenyan

    2010-10-15

    Galvanic couples composed of zero-valent iron and activated carbon (Fe(0)/AC) were investigated for As(V) removal from water. The effects of Fe(0) to AC mass ratio (FCR), solution pH, ionic strength and co-existing anions (phosphate, carbonate, silicate, nitrate, chloride and sulfate) and humic acid (HA) on As(V) removal were evaluated. The results showed that the optimum mass ratio was 1:1, and Fe(0)/AC with this ratio was more effective for As(V) removal than Fe(0) and AC alone at pH of 7 and ion strength of 0.03 M NaCl. The enhanced performance for As(V) removal was fulfilled through an accelerated corrosion process of Fe(0), which meant more corrosion products for efficient As(V) removal. The As(V) removal followed a pseudo-first order reaction. The rate constants (k) for 1:1 Fe(0)/AC and Fe(0) alone were 0.802 and 0.330 h(-1), respectively. Potentiodynamic polarization scans further confirmed that Fe(0) corrosion was promoted when Fe(0) was coupled with AC. Except silicates, other co-existing anions promoted As(V) removal. No reduction form of As (As(III) or As(0)) could be detected on iron corrosion products (ICPs) and in solutions. Identified ICPs included poorly crystallized lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) and magnetite/maghemite (Fe(3)O(4)/gamma-Fe(2)O(3)) for both of Fe(0)/AC and Fe(0) systems. In conclusion, the Fe(0)/AC couple exhibited higher As removal performance than that of Fe(0) alone from water. PMID:20599323

  6. Suboxic diagenesis in banded iron formations.

    PubMed

    Walker, J C

    1984-05-24

    Anomalous isotopic composition has been reported for the carbon in carbonate minerals of banded iron formations. Well studied examples show and enrichment in the light isotope of carbon, 12C. This enrichment presumably reflects unusual circumstances in the deposition of these sedimentary rocks. It is suggested here that the isotopically-light carbonate results from early diagenetic oxidation by bacteria of substantial amounts of isotopically light organic carbon. The electron acceptor that permits oxidation in the absence of free oxygen is presumed to the iron(III) which may have been significantly more abundant in the initial chemical precipitate than in the post-diagenetic sedimentary rock. PMID:11541981

  7. Aqueous adsorption and removal of organic contaminants by carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin-Gang; Zhao, Xiu-Hui; Yang, Hua; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Yang, Qiaoqin; Yu, Lin-Yan; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Chen, Xiao-Qing

    2014-06-01

    Organic contaminants have become one of the most serious environmental problems, and the removal of organic contaminants (e.g., dyes, pesticides, and pharmaceuticals/drugs) and common industrial organic wastes (e.g., phenols and aromatic amines) from aqueous solutions is of special concern because they are recalcitrant and persistent in the environment. In recent years, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gradually applied to the removal of organic contaminants from wastewater through adsorption processes. This paper reviews recent progress (145 studies published from 2010 to 2013) in the application of CNTs and their composites for the removal of toxic organic pollutants from contaminated water. The paper discusses removal efficiencies and adsorption mechanisms as well as thermodynamics and reaction kinetics. CNTs are predicted to have considerable prospects for wider application to wastewater treatment in the future. PMID:24657369

  8. Cyanobacterial reuse of extracellular organic carbon in microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Rhona K; Mayali, Xavier; Lee, Jackson Z; Craig Everroad, R; Hwang, Mona; Bebout, Brad M; Weber, Peter K; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Thelen, Michael P

    2016-05-01

    Cyanobacterial organic matter excretion is crucial to carbon cycling in many microbial communities, but the nature and bioavailability of this C depend on unknown physiological functions. Cyanobacteria-dominated hypersaline laminated mats are a useful model ecosystem for the study of C flow in complex communities, as they use photosynthesis to sustain a more or less closed system. Although such mats have a large C reservoir in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), the production and degradation of organic carbon is not well defined. To identify extracellular processes in cyanobacterial mats, we examined mats collected from Elkhorn Slough (ES) at Monterey Bay, California, for glycosyl and protein composition of the EPS. We found a prevalence of simple glucose polysaccharides containing either α or β (1,4) linkages, indicating distinct sources of glucose with differing enzymatic accessibility. Using proteomics, we identified cyanobacterial extracellular enzymes, and also detected activities that indicate a capacity for EPS degradation. In a less complex system, we characterized the EPS of a cyanobacterial isolate from ES, ESFC-1, and found the extracellular composition of biofilms produced by this unicyanobacterial culture were similar to that of natural mats. By tracing isotopically labeled EPS into single cells of ESFC-1, we demonstrated rapid incorporation of extracellular-derived carbon. Taken together, these results indicate cyanobacteria reuse excess organic carbon, constituting a dynamic pool of extracellular resources in these mats. PMID:26495994

  9. Formation of Intermediate Carbon Phases in Hydrothermal Abiotic Organic Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Q.; Foustoukos, D. I.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2005-12-01

    With high dissolved concentrations of methane and other hydrocarbon species revealed at the Rainbow and Logatchev vent systems on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, it is essential to better understand reaction pathways of abiotic organic synthesis in hydrothermal systems. Thus, we performed a hydrothermal carbon reduction experiment with 13C labeled carbon source at temperature and pressure conditions that approximate those inferred for ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems. Pentlandite, a common alteration mineral phase in subseafloor reaction zones, acted as a potential catalyst. Surface analysis techniques (XPS and ToF-SIMS) were used to characterize intermediate carbon species within this process. Time series dissolved H2 and H2S concentrati