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1

Analytical Reference Standards and Supplemental Data for Pesticides and Other Organic Compounds.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: List of available pesticide standards and ordering information; Compounds deleted from 1978 stock and name changes; List of non-pesticide organic chemical standards; Safe handling of primary reference standards; Preparation and storage of refere...

M. Beroza R. L. Caswell

1980-01-01

2

Organic solvents, silicon-containing compounds and pesticides  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental\\/industrial exposure to heavy metals, light hydrocarbons, pesticides and siliconcontaining compounds all have\\u000a been associated with the development and\\/or progression of renal failure. Exposure to heavy metals, more particularly lead,\\u000a cadmium and mercury has been linked with the development of acute or chronic renal failure. The current literature also contains\\u000a a growing body of information linking solvent exposure with renal

Monique M. Elseviers; Muhammed Yaqoob; Marc E. Broe

3

Volatile organic compound and pesticide data in public water-supply reservoirs and wells, Texas, 1999-2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

To provide data for the Texas Source-Water Assessment and Protection Program, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a synoptic survey of 48 public water-supply reservoirs and 174 public water-supply wells during 1999?2001. The surface-water samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds and soluble pesticides. The ground-water samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds and soluble pesticides, as well as nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen and tritium. One or more volatile organic compounds were detected in 75 percent of the reservoirs and in 9 percent of the wells. Methyl tert-butyl ether was detected most frequently in reservoirs, and toluene was detected most frequently in wells. One or more pesticides were detected in 96 percent of the reservoirs and in 33 percent of the wells. Atrazine or its breakdown product deethylatrazine was the most frequently detected pesticide. Volatile organic compounds and pesticides were not detected at concentrations exceeding the maximum contaminant level allowed in drinking water. The only constituent sampled for that exceeded its maximum contaminant level (10 milligrams per liter) was nitrate nitrogen (in 8 percent of the 174 wells).

Mahler, Barbara J.; Gary, M. O.; Canova, M. G.; Strom, Eric W.; Fahlquist, Lynne; Dorsey, Michael E.

2002-01-01

4

Occurrence of selected volatile organic compounds and soluble pesticides in Texas public water-supply source waters, 1999-2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 1999?2001, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission, collected samples of untreated water from 48 public water-supply reservoirs and 174 public water-supply wells. The samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and soluble pesticides; in addition, well samples were analyzed for nitrite plus nitrate and tritium. This fact sheet summarizes the findings of the source-water sampling and analyses. Both VOCs and pesticides were detected much more frequently in surface water than in ground water. The only constituent detected at concentrations exceeding the maximum contaminant level for drinking water was nitrate. These results will be used in the Texas Source-Water Assessment Program to evaluate the susceptibility of public water-supply source waters to contamination.

Mahler, Barbara June; Canova, Michael G.; Gary, Marcus O.

2002-01-01

5

Metals, pesticides, and semivolatile organic compounds in sediment in Valley Forge National Historical Park, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Schuylkill River flows through Valley Forge National Historical Park in Lower Providence and West Norriton Townships in Montgomery County, Pa. The concentration of selected metals, pesticides, semivolatile organic compounds, and total carbon in stream-bottom sediments from Valley Forge National Historical Park were determined for samples collected once at 12 sites in and around the Schuylkill River. Relatively low concentrations of arsenic, chromium, copper, and lead were detected in all samples. The concentrations of these metals are similar to concentrations in other stream-bottom sediment samples collected in the region. The concentrations of iron, manganese, and zinc were elevated in samples from four sites in the Schuylkill River, and the concentration of mercury was elevated in a sample from an impoundment along the river. The organophosphorus insecticide diazinon was detected in relatively low concentrations in half of the 12 samples analyzed. The organo-chlorine insecticide DDE was detected in all 12 samples analyzed; dieldrin was detected in 10 samples, chlordane, DDD, and DDT were detected in 9 samples, and heptachlor epoxide was detected in one sample. The concentrations of organo-chlorine and organophosphorus insecticides were relatively low and similar to concentrations in samples collected in the region. Detectable concentrations of 17 semivolatile organic compounds were measured in the 12 samples analyzed. The most commonly detected compounds were fluoranthene, phenanthrene, and pyrene. The maximum concentration detected was 4,800 micrograms per kilogram of phenanthrene. The highest concentrations of compounds were detected in Lamb Run, a small tributary to the Schuylkill River with headwaters in an industrial corporate center. The concentration of compounds in the Schuylkill River below Lamb Run is higher than the Schuylkill River above Lamb Run, indicating that sediment from Lamb Run is increasing the concentration of semivolatile organic compounds in sediment from the Schuylkill River. Concentrations of semivolatile organic compounds are lower in sediment from the Schuylkill River below Myer?s Run than above Myer?s Run because of the addition of relatively clean sediment from Myer?s Run. Samples collected from the floodplain, impounding basin, and wetland along the Schuylkill River contained the lowest concen-trations of semivolatile organic compounds. Detectable concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB?s) were measured in 11 of the 12 samples analyzed. The maximum PCB concentration was 37 micrograms per kilogram. Sediment samples from Lamb Run contained the highest concentrations of semivolatile organic compounds and PCB?s.

Reif, Andrew G.; Sloto, Ronald A.

1997-01-01

6

Surface-water-quality assessment of the Yakima River basin, Washington; distribution of pesticides and other organic compounds in water, sediment, and aquatic biota, 1987-91; with a section on dissolved organic carbon in the Yakima River basin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 1987-91, chemical data were collected for pesticides and other organic compounds in surface water, streambed sediment, suspended sediment, agricultural soil, and aquatic biota to determine the occurrence, distribution, transport, and fate of organic compounds in the Yakima River basin in Washington. The report describes the chemical and physical properties of the compounds most frequently detected in the water column; organochlorine compounds including DDT, organophosphorus compounds, thiocarbamate and sulfite compounds, acetamide and triazine compounds, and chlorophenoxy-acetic acid and benzoic compounds. Concentrations are evaluated relative to chronic-toxicity water quality criteria and guidelines for the protection of human health and freshwater aquatic life.

Rinella, Joseph F.; McKenzie, Stuart W.; Crawford, J. Kent; Foreman, William T.; Fuhrer, Gregory J.; Morace, Jennifer L.; Aiken, George R.

1999-01-01

7

Occurrence of Selected Pharmaceuticals, Personal-Care Products, Organic Wastewater Compounds, and Pesticides in the Lower Tallapoosa River Watershed near Montgomery, Alabama, 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Synthetic and natural organic compounds derived from agricultural operations, residential development, and treated and untreated sanitary and industrial wastewater discharges can contribute contaminants to surface and ground waters. To determine the occurrence of these compounds in the lower Tallapoosa River watershed, Alabama, new laboratory methods were used that can detect human and veterinary antibiotics; pharmaceuticals; and compounds found in personal-care products, food additives, detergents and their metabolites, plasticizers, and other industrial and household products in the environment. Well-established methods for detecting 47 pesticides and 19 pesticide degradates also were used. In all, 186 different compounds were analyzed by using four analytical methods. The lower Tallapoosa River serves as the water-supply source for more than 100,000 customers of the Montgomery Water Works and Sanitary Sewer Board. Source-water protection is a high priority for the Board, which is responsible for providing safe drinking water. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Montgomery Water Works and Sanitary Sewer Board, conducted this study to provide baseline data that could be used to assess the effects of agriculture and residential development on the occurrence of selected organic compounds in the lower Tallapoosa River watershed. Twenty samples were collected at 10 sites on the Tallapoosa River and its tributaries. Ten samples were collected in April 2005 during high base streamflow, and 10 samples were collected in October 2005 when base streamflow was low. Thirty-two of 186 compounds were detected in the lower Tallapoosa River watershed. Thirteen compounds, including atrazine, 2-chloro-4-isopropylamino-6-amino-s-triazine (CIAT), hexazinone, metalaxyl, metolachlor, prometryn, prometon, simazine, azithromycin, oxytetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, and tylosin, had measurable concentrations above their laboratory reporting levels. Concentrations were estimated for an additional 19 compounds that were detected below their laboratory reporting levels. The two most frequently detected compounds were the pesticides atrazine (19 of 20 samples) and simazine (13 of 20 samples). Tylosin, a veterinary antibiotic, was detected in 8 of 20 samples. Other compounds frequently detected at very low concentrations included CIAT and hexazinone (a degradate of atrazine and a pesticide, respectively); camphor (derived from personal-care products or flavorants), para-cresol (various uses including solvent, wood preservative, and in household cleaning products), and N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET, an insect repellent).

Oblinger, Carolyn J.; Gill, Amy C.; McPherson, Ann K.; Meyer, Michael T.; Furlong, Edward T.

2007-01-01

8

Pesticide toxicity index for freshwater aquatic organisms  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program is designed to assess current water-quality conditions, changes in water quality over time, and the effects of natural and human factors on water quality for the Nation's streams and ground-water resources. For streams, one of the most difficult parts of the assessment is to link chemical conditions to effects on aquatic biota, particularly for pesticides, which tend to occur in streams as complex mixtures with strong seasonal patterns. A Pesticide Toxicity Index (PTI) was developed that combines pesticide exposure of aquatic biota (measured concentrations of pesticides in stream water) with toxicity estimates (standard endpoints from laboratory bioassays) to produce a single index value for a sample or site. The development of the PTI was limited to pesticide compounds routinely measured in NAWQA studies and to toxicity data readily available from existing databases. Qualifying toxicity data were found for one or more types of test organisms for 75 of the 83 pesticide compounds measured in NAWQA samples, but with a wide range of bioassays per compound (1 to 65). There were a total of 2,824 bioassays for the 75 compounds, including 287 48-hour EC50 values (concentration at which 50 percent of test organisms exhibit a nonlethal response) for freshwater cladocerans, 585 96-hour LC50 values (concentration lethal to 50 percent of test organisms) for freshwater benthic invertebrates, and 1,952 96-hour LC50 values for freshwater fish. The PTI for a particular sample is the sum of toxicity quotients (measured concentration divided by the median toxicity concentration from bioassays) for each detected pesticide. The PTI can be calculated for specific groups of pesticides and for specific taxonomic groups.While the PTI does not determine whether water in a sample is toxic, its values can be used to rank or compare the toxicity of samples or sites on a relative basis for use in further analysis or additional assessments. The PTI approach may be useful as a basis for comparing the potential significance of pesticides in different streams on a common basis, for evaluating relations between pesticide exposure and observed biological conditions, and for prioritizing where further studies are most needed.

Munn, Mark D.; Gilliom, Robert J.

2001-01-01

9

Occurrence and distribution of volatile organic compounds and pesticides in ground water in relation to hydrogeologic characteristics and land use in the Santa Ana basin, southern California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents an evaluation of the occurrence and distribution of VOCs and pesticides in the Santa Ana ground-water basins in relation to two types of explanatory factors: hydrogeologic characteristics and land use. The Santa Ana Basin is subdivided into the San Jacinto, the Inland, and the Coastal ground-water basins. Most wells sampled were deep and used for public supply. Data from regional studies were used to evaluate the occurrence and distribution of pesticides and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in relation to hydrogeologic characteristics and land uses that could potentially explain variations between basins. Additional data from special studies (flow path and aquifer susceptibility) were used to evaluate potential factors affecting water quality for individual basins. The hydrogeologic characteristics evaluated in this report were hydrogeologic setting, ground-water age, depth to the top of the well screen (top of well perforations), and proximity to engineered recharge facilities. Urban land use, agricultural land use, and population density were characterized within a 500-meter radius of sampled wells and at the basin scale. Aquifers in the San Jacinto Basin are generally unconfined, and major land-use categories are urban (33 percent), agricultural (37 percent), and undeveloped (25 percent). Recharge is primarily from the overlying landscape, but engineered recharge is locally important in the Hemet area. VOCs and pesticides were detected more frequently in younger ground water (less than 50 years old) than in older ground water, and more frequently in shallower wells than deeper wells; the numbers of VOCs and pesticides detected also were significantly higher in the younger ground water and in the shallower wells. In the Hemet area of the San Jacinto Basin, VOCs and pesticides were detected more frequently in wells proximal to engineered recharge facilities than in distal wells. These patterns illustrate the importance of proximity to sources of recharge in relation to the occurrence and distribution of VOCs and pesticides in ground water. Aquifers in the Inland Basin also are generally unconfined, and the major land-use category is urban (58 percent), with lesser amounts of agricultural (13 percent) and undeveloped (28 percent) land. Recharge is from engineered facilities that utilize local runoff and imported water and from vertical infiltration. VOCs and pesticides were detected more frequently in younger ground water than in older ground water, and more frequently in shallower wells than deeper wells. The number of VOCs detected per well also was significantly higher in the younger ground water and in the shallower wells. Several solvent plumes extending between 5 and 10 kilometers illustrate the large distances that contaminants travel in basins with intensive use of ground water. Aquifers in the Coastal Basin, in contrast to the other basins, are generally confined. Land use in the basin is largely urban (80 percent), with lesser amounts of agricultural (7 percent) and undeveloped (12 percent) land. Recharge is primarily from engineered facilities that utilize water diverted from the Santa Ana River and imported water. Consequently, VOCs and pesticides were detected more frequently in wells proximal to engineered recharge facilities than in distal wells. These compounds were also detected more frequently in the unconfined area than in the confined area of the basin. In the confined area, the numbers of VOCs and pesticides detected per well were not significantly different in wells with shallower and deeper screens. This distribution reflects the dominance of lateral flow and insulation from overlying land use in the confined aquifers of the Coastal Basin. In the unconfined area of the Coastal Basin, the numbers of VOCs and pesticides detected per well were significantly higher in shallower wells than in deeper wells. VOC and pesticide detections were not statist

Hamlin, Scott N.; Belitz, Kenneth; Johnson, Tyler

2005-01-01

10

Water-quality assessment of South-Central Texas : descriptions and comparisons of nutrients, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds at three intensive fixed sites, 1996-98  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-quality samples were collected during April 1996-April 1998 at three intensive fixed sites in the San Antonio region of the South-Central Texas study unit as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The sampling strategy for the intensive fixed-site assessment is centered on obtaining information about the occurrence and seasonal patterns of selected constituents including nutrients, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds. The three sites selected to determine the effects of agriculture and urbanization on surface-water quality in the study unit are Medina River at LaCoste (agriculture indicator site), Salado Creek (lower station) at San Antonio (urban indicator site), and San Antonio River near Elmendorf (integrator site).Concentrations of two nutrients, dissolved nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen and total phosphorus, were largest at the integrator site, which is downstream of municipal wastewater treatment plants. Nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen concentrations at this site often exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinking water. All total phosphorus concentrations at the site exceeded the EPA recommended maximum concentration for streams not discharging directly into reservoirs. Nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen concentrations at the integrator site tended to be smaller, and total phosphorus concentrations at the urban site tended to be larger in samples collected during stormflow than during base flow. The most detections and largest concentrations of three pesticides (atrazine, diazinon, and prometon) were in samples collected at the urban site. Some pesticide concentrations at the agriculture site showed a seasonal pattern of increasing concentrations during spring, the peak application season. Four pesticides (atrazine, deethylatrazine, diazinon, and prometon) were detected in at least 38 percent of samples collected at all three sites. The concentrations of all detected pesticides that have an MCL were less than the MCL at the three sites. More volatile organic compounds (VOC) were detected at the urban indicator site than at the agriculture indicator site, mostly likely because more sources are located in urbanized areas. The most VOCs detected and the largest concentrations of two VOCs (chloroform and tetrahydrofuran) were in samples from the integrator site. More VOCs were detected in samples collected at the integrator site during stormflow than during base flow. The concentrations of all detected VOCs that have an MCL were less than the MCL at the three sites.

Ging, Patricia B.

1999-01-01

11

Metals, Pesticides, and Semivolatile Organic Compounds in Sediment in Valley Forge National Historical Park, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents the results of chemical analyses of sediment samples from 12 sites in Valley Forge National Historical Park. Each site was sampled once, and samples were analyzed for selected metals, pesticides, total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's...

A. G. Reif R. A. Sloto

1997-01-01

12

Compound specific isotope analysis of organophosphorus pesticides.  

PubMed

Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) has been established as a tool to study the environmental fate of a wide range of contaminants. In this study, CSIA was developed to analyse the stable carbon isotope signatures of the widely used organophosphorus pesticides: dichlorvos, omethoate and dimethoate. The linearity of the GC-C-IRMS system was tested for target pesticides and led to an acceptable isotope composition within the uncertainty of the instrument. In order to assess the accuracy of the developed method, the effect of the evaporation procedure on measured carbon isotope composition (?(13)C) values was studied and showed that concentration by evaporation of solvents had no significant isotope effect. The CSIA was then applied to investigate isotope fractionation of the hydrolysis and photolysis of selected pesticides. The carbon isotope fractionation of tested pesticides was quantified by the Rayleigh model, which revealed a bulk enrichment factor (?) of -0.2±0.1‰ for hydrolysis of dichlorvos, -1.0±0.1‰ and -3.7±1.1‰ for hydrolysis and photolysis of dimethoate respectively. This study is a first step towards the application of CSIA to trace the transport and degradation of organophosphorus pesticides in the environment. PMID:24997952

Wu, Langping; Yao, Jun; Trebse, Polonca; Zhang, Ning; Richnow, Hans H

2014-09-01

13

Comparison of nitrate, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds in samples from monitoring and public-supply wells, Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system, southern New Jersey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The number and total concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) per sample were significantly greater in water from public-supply wells than in water from shallow and moderate-depth monitoring wells in the surficial Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system in the Glassboro area of southern New Jersey. In contrast, concentrations of nitrate (as nitrogen) and the number and total concentration of pesticides per sample were statistically similar in samples from shallow and moderate-depth monitoring wells and those from public-supply wells. VOCs in ground water typically are derived from point sources, which commonly exist in urban areas and which result in spatially variable contaminant concentrations near the water table. Because larger volumes of water are withdrawn from public-supply wells than from monitoring wells, their contributing areas are larger and, therefore, they are more likely to intercept water flowing from VOC point sources. Additionally, public-supply wells intercept flow paths that span a large temporal interval. Public-supply wells in the Glassboro study area withdraw water flowing along short paths, which contains VOCs that recently entered the aquifer system, and water flowing along relatively long paths, which contains VOCs that originated from the degradation of parent compounds or that are associated with past land uses. Because the volume of water withdrawn from monitoring wells is small and because shallow monitoring wells are screened near the water table, they generally intercept only relatively short flow paths. Therefore, samples from these wells represent relatively recent, discrete time intervals and contain both fewer VOCs and a lower total VOC concentration than samples from public-supply wells. Nitrate and pesticides in ground water typically are derived from nonpoint sources, which commonly are found in both agricultural and urban areas and typically result in lowlevel, relatively uniform concentrations near the water table. Because nonpoint sources are diffuse and because processes such as degradation or sorption/dispersion do not occur at rates sufficient to prevent detection of these constituents in parts of the aquifer used for domestic and public supply in the study area, concentrations of nitrate and pesticides and numbers of pesticide compounds are likely to be similar in samples from shallow monitoring wells and samples from public-supply wells. Results of a comparison of (1) the general characteristics of, and water-quality data from, public-supply wells in the Glassboro study area to available data from public-supply wells screened in the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system outside the study area, and (2) land-use settings, soil characteristics, and aquifer properties in and outside the study area indicate that the findings of this study likely are applicable to the entire extent of the Kirkwood- Cohansey aquifer system in southern New Jersey.

Stackelberg, Paul E.; Kauffman, L. J.; Baehr, A. L.; Ayers, M. A.

2000-01-01

14

Pesticide Effects on Nontarget Organisms1  

Microsoft Academic Search

This guide addresses the effects of various types of pesticides on nontarget organisms, including natural enemies and beneficial organisms such as honey bees, wildlife, fish, and nontarget plants. Pesticides are an integral part of agriculture and Florida's climate fosters an environment conducive to major pest outbreaks throughout the year. Our environment also is favorable for the development and presence of

Frederick M. Fishel

15

Pesticide toxicity index for freshwater aquatic organisms, 2nd edition  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program is designed to assess current water-quality conditions, changes in water quality over time, and the effects of natural and human factors on water quality for the Nation's streams and ground-water resources. For streams, one of the most difficult parts of the assessment is to link chemical conditions to effects on aquatic biota, particularly for pesticides, which tend to occur in streams as complex mixtures with strong seasonal patterns. A Pesticide Toxicity Index (PTI) was developed that combines pesticide exposure of aquatic biota (measured concentrations of pesticides in stream water) with acute toxicity estimates (standard endpoints from laboratory bioassays) to produce a single index value for a sample or site. The development of the PTI was limited to pesticide compounds routinely measured in NAWQA studies and to toxicity data readily available from existing databases. Qualifying toxicity data were found for one or more types of test organisms for 124 of the 185 pesticide compounds measured in NAWQA samples, but with a wide range of available bioassays per compound (1 to 232). In the databases examined, there were a total of 3,669 bioassays for the 124 compounds, including 398 48-hour EC50 values (concentration at which 50 percent of test organisms exhibit a sublethal response) for freshwater cladocerans, 699 96-hour LC50 values (concentration lethal to 50 percent of test organisms) for freshwater benthic invertebrates, and 2,572 96-hour LC50 values for freshwater fish. The PTI for a particular sample is the sum of toxicity quotients (measured concentration divided by the median toxicity concentration from bioassays) for each detected pesticide, and thus, is based on the concentration addition model of pesticide toxicity. The PTI can be calculated for specific groups of pesticides and for specific taxonomic groups. Although the PTI does not determine whether water in a sample is toxic to aquatic organisms, its values can be used to rank or compare the toxicity of samples or sites on a relative basis for use in further analysis or additional assessments. The PTI approach may be useful as a basis for comparing the potential significance of pesticides in different streams on a common basis, for evaluating relations between pesticide exposure and observed biological conditions, and for prioritizing where further studies are most needed.

Munn, Mark D.; Gilliom, Robert J.; Moran, Patrick W.; Nowell, Lisa H.

2006-01-01

16

Measurement and estimated health risks of semivolatile organic compounds (PCBs, PAHs, pesticides, and phthalates) in ambient air at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Air samples for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorinated pesticides, phthalate plasticizers, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were collected at three Hanford Site locations (300-Area South Gate, southeast of 200-East Area, and a background location near Rattlesnake Springs). Samples were collected using high-volume air samplers equipped with a glass fiber filter and polyurethane foam plug sampling train. Target compounds were extracted from the sampling trains and analyzed using capillary gas chromatography with either electron capture detection or mass selective detection. Twenty of the 28 PCB congeners analyzed were found above the detection limits, with 8 of the congeners accounting for over 80% of the average PCB concentrations. The average sum of all individual PCB congeners ranged from 500-740 pg/m{sup 3}, with little apparent difference between the sampling locations. Twenty of the 25 pesticides analyzed were found above the detection limits, with endosulfan I, endosulfan II, and methoxychlor having the highest average concentrations. With the exception of the endosulfans, all other average pesticide concentrations were below 100 pg/m{sup 3}. There was little apparent difference between the air concentrations of pesticides measured at each location. Sixteen of the 18 PAHs analyzed were found above the detection limit. Phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, fluorene, chrysene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, and naphthalene were the only PAHs with average concentrations above 100 pg/m{sup 3}. Overall, the 300 Area had higher average PAH concentrations compared to the 200-East Area and the background location at Rattlesnake Springs; however, the air concentrations at the 300-Area also are influenced by sources on the Hanford Site and from nearby communities.

Patton, G.W.; Cooper, A.T.; Blanton, M.L.; Lefkovitz, L.F.; Gilfoil, T.J.

1997-09-01

17

Organic Compounds Database  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Colby College Department of Chemistry offers the Organic Compounds Database, which was compiled by Harold Bell of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute. Visitors can search by the compounds melting point, boiling point, index of refraction, molecular weight, formula, absorption wavelength, mass spectral peak, chemical type, and by partial name. Once entered, results are returned with basically the same type of information that can be searched, plus any other critical information. References are provided for the close to 2500 organic compounds included in the database; yet, because the site was last modified in 1995, varying the data may be required to fully authenticate its accuracy.

Bell, Harold M.

2000-01-01

18

Surface-water-quality assessment of the upper Illinois River Basin in Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin; pesticides and other synthetic organic compounds in water, sediment, and biota, 1975-90  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The distribution of pesticides and other synthetic organic compounds in water, sediment, and biota in the upper Illinois River Basin in Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin was examined from 1987 through 1990 as part of the pilot National Water-Quality Assesssment Program conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey. Historical data for water and sediment collected from 1975 through 1986 were similar to data collected from 1987 through 1990. Some compounds were detected in concentrations that exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water-quality criteria. Results from pesticide sampling at four stations in 1988 and 1989 identified several agricultural pesticides that were detected more frequently and at higher concentrations in urban areas than in agricultural areas. Results from herbicide sampling at 17 stations in the Kankakee and Iroquois River Basins in 1990 indicated that atrazine concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant level for drinking water during runoff periods. Results from sampling for volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in water indicate that, with one exception, all stations at which more than one compound was detected were within 2 miles downstream from the nearest point source. Detections at two stations in the Chicago urban area accounted for 37 percent of the total number of detections. Concentrations of tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and 1,2-dichlorethane from stations in the Des Plaines River Basin exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant level for drinking water in one and two samples from the two stations in the Chicago area. Phenols and pentachlorophenols were detected most frequently in the Des Plaines River Basin where point-source discharges were common. Phenol concentrations were significantly different among the Des Plaines, Kankakee, and Fox River Basins. Phenols and pentachlorophenols never exceeded the general use and secondary contact standards. Results from a 1989 synoptic survey of semivolatile organic compounds in sediment indicate that these compounds were detected most frequently at sites in the Chicago urban area. Of the 17 stations at which 10 or more compounds were detected, 14 were located in the Des Plaines River subbasin, and 1 was on the Illinois River mainstem. As was the case with organic compounds in water, each of these sites was located within 2 miles downstream from point sources. Biota samples were collected and analyzed for organochlorines and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in 1989 and 1990. The most commonly detected compound in both years was p,p'-DDE. National Academy of Science recommendations for chlordane and dieldrin for protection of predators were exceeded in 19 and 10 samples, respectively, when the 1989 and 1990 data were combined. In the nine fish-fillet samples collected in 1989, concentrations exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency fish-tissue criteria in nine fillets for p,p'-DDE and five fillets for dieldrin.

Sullivan, Daniel J.; Stinson, Troy W.; Crawford, J. Kent; Schmidt, Arthur R.; Colman, John A.

1998-01-01

19

Organic carbon normalisation of PCB, PAH and pesticide concentrations in suspended solids  

Microsoft Academic Search

The equilibrium partitioning concept for hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) predicts that organic carbon (OC) normalised or organic matter (OM) normalised HOC concentrations are approximately the same for different solid types sampled at the same time from the same surface water. This hypothesis was tested for polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) and pesticide concentrations in settling solids (sediment trap) and suspended

Albert A. Koelmans; Frits Gillissen; Willeke Makatita; Mark Van Den Berg

1997-01-01

20

Organic compounds in meteorites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The problem of whether organic compounds originated in meteorites as a primary condensate from a solar gas or whether they were introduced as a secondary product into the meteorite during its residence in a parent body is examined by initially attempting to reconstruct the physical conditions during condensation (temperature, pressure, time) from clues in the inorganic matrix of the meteorite. The condensation behavior of carbon under these conditions is then analyzed on the basis of thermodynamic calculations, and compounds synthesized in model experiments on the condensation of carbon are compared with those actually found in meteorites. Organic compounds in meteorites seem to have formed by catalytic reactions of carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and ammonia in the solar nebula at 360 to 400 K temperature and about 3 to 7.6 microtorr pressure. The onset of these reactions was triggered by the formation of suitable catalysts (magnetite, hydrated silicates) at these temperatures.

Anders, E.; Hayatsu, R.; Studier, M. H.

1973-01-01

21

40 CFR 455.30 - Applicability; description of the metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. 455.30 Section...Metallo-Organic Pesticide Chemicals Manufacturing Subcategory § 455.30 Applicability...metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. The provisions...

2013-07-01

22

40 CFR 158.2174 - Experimental use permit microbial pesticides nontarget organisms and environmental fate data...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...experimental use permit microbial pesticides nontarget organisms and environmental... TableâEUP Microbial Pesticides Nontarget Organisms and Environmental...1, 5 885.4380 Honey bee testing R R R R ...requirements for microbial pesticides nontarget organism...

2009-07-01

23

40 CFR 158.2174 - Experimental use permit microbial pesticides nontarget organisms and environmental fate data...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...experimental use permit microbial pesticides nontarget organisms and environmental... TableâEUP Microbial Pesticides Nontarget Organisms and Environmental...1, 5 885.4380 Honey bee testing R R R R ...requirements for microbial pesticides nontarget organism...

2010-07-01

24

Pesticide sorption on geologic material of varying organic carbon content.  

PubMed

Sorption of three pesticides on geologic material ranging in organic carbon content from 0.33 to 6.9 g kg-1 was measured in soil columns using a miscible displacement technique. An octanol-water partitioning model was shown to be inappropriate for predicting sorption of the less hydrophobic pesticides on the low organic carbon materials. PMID:3255290

Bouchard, D C; Wood, A L

1988-09-01

25

Organic compounds in meteorites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent studies of carbonaceous chondrites provide evidence that certain organic compounds are indigenous and the result of an abiotic, chemical synthesis. The results of several investigators have established the presence of amino acids and precursors, mono- and dicarboxylic acids, N-heterocycles, and hydrocarbons as well as other compounds. For example, studies of the Murchison and Murray meteorites have revealed the presence of at least 40 amino acids with nearly equal abundances of D and L isomers. The population consists of both protein and nonprotein amino acids including a wide variety of linear, cyclic, and polyfunctional types. Results show a trend of decreasing concentration with increasing carbon number, with the most abundant being glycine (41 n Moles/g). These and other results to be reviewed provide persuasive support for the theory of chemical evolution and provide the only natural evidence for the protobiological subset of molecules from which life on earth may have arisen.

Lawless, J. G.

1980-01-01

26

40 CFR 158.2060 - Biochemical pesticides nontarget organisms and environmental fate data requirements table.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...nontarget organisms and the pesticide is to be applied on...nontarget organisms and the pesticide is to be applied in a passive...phytotoxicants, i.e. , herbicides, desiccants, defoliants...environmental concentration of the pesticide in the aquatic...

2010-07-01

27

Identification and measurement of chlorinated organic pesticides in water by electron-capture gas chromatography  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Pesticides, in minute quantities, may affect the regimen of streams, and because they may concentrate in sediments, aquatic organisms, and edible aquatic foods, their detection and their measurement in the parts-per-trillion range are considered essential. In 1964 the U.S. Geological Survey at Menlo Park, Calif., began research on methods for monitoring pesticides in water. Two systems were selected--electron-capture gas chromatography and microcoulometric-titration gas chromatography. Studies on these systems are now in progress. This report provides current information on the development and application of an electron-capture gas chromatographic procedure. This method is a convenient and extremely sensitive procedure for the detection and measurement of organic pesticides having high electron affinities, notably the chlorinated organic pesticides. The electron-affinity detector is extremely sensitive to these substances but it is not as sensitive to many other compounds. By this method, the chlorinated organic pesticide may be determined on a sample of convenient size in concentrations as low as the parts-per-trillion range. To insure greater accuracy in the identifications, the pesticides reported were separated and identified by their retention times on two different types of gas chromatographic columns.

Lamar, William L.; Goerlitz, Donald F.; Law, LeRoy M.

1965-01-01

28

Choosing Organic Pesticides over Synthetic Pesticides May Not Effectively Mitigate Environmental Risk in Soybeans  

PubMed Central

Background Selection of pesticides with small ecological footprints is a key factor in developing sustainable agricultural systems. Policy guiding the selection of pesticides often emphasizes natural products and organic-certified pesticides to increase sustainability, because of the prevailing public opinion that natural products are uniformly safer, and thus more environmentally friendly, than synthetic chemicals. Methodology/Principal Findings We report the results of a study examining the environmental impact of several new synthetic and certified organic insecticides under consideration as reduced-risk insecticides for soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) control, using established and novel methodologies to directly quantify pesticide impact in terms of biocontrol services. We found that in addition to reduced efficacy against aphids compared to novel synthetic insecticides, organic approved insecticides had a similar or even greater negative impact on several natural enemy species in lab studies, were more detrimental to biological control organisms in field experiments, and had higher Environmental Impact Quotients at field use rates. Conclusions/Significance These data bring into caution the widely held assumption that organic pesticides are more environmentally benign than synthetic ones. All pesticides must be evaluated using an empirically-based risk assessment, because generalizations based on chemical origin do not hold true in all cases.

Bahlai, Christine A.; Xue, Yingen; McCreary, Cara M.; Schaafsma, Arthur W.; Hallett, Rebecca H.

2010-01-01

29

[Cytogenetic activity of metabolites of pesticides representing different classes of chemical compounds].  

PubMed

The cytogenetic activity of some substances formed in agricultural plants during metabolism of pesticides of four classes of chemical compounds was studied in the culture of human peripheric blood lymphocytes. Metabolites were shown either to have mutagenic properties similar to those of the initial compounds (ziramtetramethylthiourea, both being mutagens; captan-phthalimide, both possessing no cytogenetic activity) or to be considerably transformed in comparison with them as a result of deactivation (benomile-MBC) or activation (betanal-MHPC) processes. The latter variant if being determined for the genetic hazard of the pesticide necessitates to take into account data on the mutagenic character of those metabolites which really might enter the human organism. PMID:3705167

Pilinskaia, M A

1986-01-01

30

Potential Antimalarial Organic Sulfur Compounds.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In an attempt to develop useful antimalarial medicinal agents, a series of twenty two organic sulfur compounds were synthesized which were analogous in structure to 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl sulfone an effective antimalarial. Fifteen of these compounds were N-...

K. K. Andersen J. Bhattacharyya S. K. Mukhopadhyay

1969-01-01

31

Recolonization of estuarine organisms: effects of microcosm size and pesticides  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two six-week laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate effects of pesticides and microcosm size on benthic estuarine\\u000a macroinvertebrate recolonization. Sediments fortified with the pesticides (fenvalerate: controls, 5 (low) and 50 µg g?1 wet sediment (high); endosulfan: controls, 1 (low) and 10 µg g?1 wet sediment (high)) were fine-grained, organically rich (approximately 3.5% organic carbon and 22% dry weight) material.\\u000a Relative

David A. Flemer; Roman S. Stanley; Barbara F. Ruth; Charles M. Bundrick; Paul H. Moody; James C. Moore

1995-01-01

32

40 CFR 158.2150 - Microbial pesticides nontarget organisms and environmental fate data requirements table.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...nontarget organisms and environmental fate data requirements table. 158.2150 Section...AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Microbial...studies. 15. Required if, after an analysis of the microbial pesticide's ability to...

2010-07-01

33

40 CFR 158.2150 - Microbial pesticides nontarget organisms and environmental fate data requirements table.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...nontarget organisms and environmental fate data requirements table. 158.2150 Section...AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Microbial...studies. 15. Required if, after an analysis of the microbial pesticide's ability to...

2009-07-01

34

40 CFR Table 1 to Part 455 - List of Organic Pesticide Active Ingredients  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...List of Organic Pesticide Active Ingredients EPA census code Pesticide code Pesticide name CAS No. 1 10501 Dicofol [1,1-Bis(chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethanol] 00115-32-2 2 51501 Maleic Hydrazide...

2009-01-01

35

Potential toxicity of pesticides measured in midwestern streams to aquatic organisms  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Society is becoming increasingly aware of the value of healthy aquatic ecosystems as well as the effects that man's activities have on those ecosystems. In recent years, many urban and industrial sources of contamination have been reduced or eliminated. The agricultural community also has worked towards reducing off-site movement of agricultural chemicals, but their use in farming is still growing. A small fraction, estimated at <1 to 2% of the pesticides applied to crops are lost from fields and enter nearby streams during rainfall events. In many cases aquatic organisms are exposed to mixtures of chemicals, which may lead to greater non-target risk than that predicted based on traditional risk assessments for single chemicals. We evaluated the potential toxicity of environmental mixtures of 5 classes of pesticides using concentrations from water samples collected from ???50 sites on midwestern streams during late spring or early summer runoff events in 1989 and 1998. Toxicity index values are calculated as the concentration of the compound in the sample divided by the EC50 or LC50 of an aquatic organism. These index values are summed within a pesticide class and for all classes to determine additive pesticide class and total pesticide toxicity indices. Toxicity index values greater than 1.0 indicate probable toxicity of a class of pesticides measured in a water sample to aquatic organisms. Results indicate that some samples had probable toxicity to duckweed and green algae, but few are suspected of having significant toxicity to bluegill sunfish or chorus frogs.

Battaglin, W.; Fairchild, J.

2002-01-01

36

Widespread detection of N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide in U.S. streams: Comparison with concentrations of pesticides, personal care products, and other organic wastewater compounds  

USGS Publications Warehouse

One of the most frequently detected organic chemicals in a nationwide study concerning the effects of wastewater on stream water quality conducted in the year 2000 was the widely used insect repellant N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET). It was detected at levels of 0.02 ??g/L or greater in 73% of the stream sites sampled, with the selection of sampling sites being biased toward streams thought to be subject to wastewater contamination (i.e., downstream from intense urbanization and livestock production). Although DEET frequently was detected at all sites, the median concentration was low (0.05 ??g/L). The highest concentrations of DEET were found in streams from the urban areas (maximum concentration, 1.1 ??g/L). The results of the present study suggest that the movement of DEET to streams through wastewater-treatment systems is an important mechanism that might lead to the exposure of aquatic organisms to this chemical. ?? 2005 SETAC.

Sandstrom, M. W.; Kolpin, D. W.; Thurman, E. M.; Zaugg, S. D.

2005-01-01

37

Bioconcentration, Bioaccumulation, and Metabolism of Pesticides in Aquatic Organisms  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a From the viewpoint of protecting the natural environment, aquatic ecotoxicological assessment of new pesticides and many existing\\u000a ones has increasingly become more important. To assess the impact of pesticides on aquatic organisms, international authorities\\u000a (utilizing OECD and USEPA testing guidelines) require completion of many acute and chronic ecotoxicological studies. Among\\u000a such studies is testing to measure the potential for bioconcentration.

Toshiyuki Katagi

38

Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Meteorites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Carbonaceous meteorites are relatively enriched in soluble organic compounds. To date, these compounds provide the only record available to study a range of organic chemical processes in the early Solar System chemistry. The Murchison meteorite is the best-characterized carbonaceous meteorite with respect to organic chemistry. The study of its organic compounds has related principally to aqueous meteorite parent body chemistry and compounds of potential importance for the origin of life. Among the classes of organic compounds found in Murchison are amino acids, amides, carboxylic acids, hydroxy acids, sulfonic acids, phosphonic acids, purines and pyrimidines (Table 1). Compounds such as these were quite likely delivered to the early Earth in asteroids and comets. Until now, polyhydroxylated compounds (polyols), including sugars (polyhydroxy aldehydes or ketones), sugar alcohols, sugar acids, etc., had not been identified in Murchison. Ribose and deoxyribose, five-carbon sugars, are central to the role of contemporary nucleic acids, DNA and RNA. Glycerol, a three-carbon sugar alcohol, is a constituent of all known biological membranes. Due to the relative lability of sugars, some researchers have questioned the lifetime of sugars under the presumed conditions on the early Earth and postulated other (more stable) compounds as constituents of the first replicating molecules. The identification of potential sources and/or formation mechanisms of pre-biotic polyols would add to the understanding of what organic compounds were available, and for what length of time, on the ancient Earth.

Cooper, Grorge

2001-01-01

39

PERSISTENT PERFLUORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have gained notoriety in the recent past. Global distribution of PFCs in wildlife, environmental samples and humans has sparked a recent increase in new investigations concerning PFCs. Historically PFCs have been used in a wide variety of consume...

40

Sorption of hydrophobic pesticides on a Mediterranean soil affected by wastewater, dissolved organic matter and salts.  

PubMed

Irrigation with treated wastewaters as an alternative in countries with severe water shortage may influence the sorption of pesticides and their environmental effects, as wastewater contains higher concentrations of suspended and dissolved organic matter and inorganic compounds than freshwater. We have examined the sorption behaviour of three highly hydrophobic pesticides (the herbicide pendimethalin and the insecticides ?-cypermethrin and deltamethrin) on a Mediterranean agricultural soil using the batch equilibration method. We considered wastewater, extracts from urban sewage sludge with different dissolved organic carbon contents, and inorganic salt solutions, using Milli Q water as a control. All pesticides were strongly retained by soil although some sorption occurred on the walls of the laboratory containers, especially when wastewater and inorganic salt solutions were used. The calculation of distribution constants by measuring pesticide concentrations in soil and solution indicated that pendimethalin sorption was not affected whereas ?-cypermethrin and deltamethrin retention were significantly enhanced (ca. 5 and 2 times, respectively) when wastewater or salt solutions were employed. We therefore conclude that the increased sorption of the two pesticides caused by wastewater cannot be only the result of its dissolved organic carbon content, but also of the simultaneous presence of inorganic salts in the solution. PMID:20980092

Rodríguez-Liébana, José A; Mingorance, Ma Dolores; Peña, Aránzazu

2011-03-01

41

Organic Compounds in Stardust  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The successful return of the STARDUST spacecraft provides a unique opportunity to investigate the nature and distribution of organic matter in cometary dust particles collected from Comet 81P/Wild-2. Analysis of individual cometary impact tracks in silica aerogel using the technique of two-step laser mass spectrometry (L2MS) demonstrates the presence of complex aromatic organic matter. While concerns remain as to the organic purity of the aerogel collection medium and the thermal effects associated with hypervelocity capture, the majority of the observed organic species appear indigenous to the impacting particles and are hence of cometary origin. While the aromatic fraction of the total organic matter present is believed to be small, it is notable in that it appears to be N-rich. Spectral analysis in combination with instrumental detection sensitivities suggest that N is incorporated predominantly in the form of aromatic nitriles (R-C N). While organic species in the STARDUST samples do share some similarities with those present in the matrices of carbonaceous chondrites, the closest match is found with stratospherically collected interplanetary dust particles. These findings are consistent with the notion that a fraction of interplanetary dust is of cometary origin. The presence of complex organic N-containing species in comets has astrobiological implications since comets are likely to have contributed to the prebiotic chemical inventory of both the Earth and Mars.

McKay, David S.; Clemett. Simon J.; Sandford, Scott A.; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Hoerz, Fredrich

2011-01-01

42

Semivolatile organic compounds in indoor environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are ubiquitous in indoor environments, redistributing from their original sources to all indoor surfaces. Exposures resulting from their indoor presence contribute to detectable body burdens of diverse SVOCs, including pesticides, plasticizers, and flame retardants. This paper critically examines equilibrium partitioning of SVOCs among indoor compartments. It proceeds to evaluate kinetic constraints on sorptive partitioning to organic matter on fixed surfaces and airborne particles. Analyses indicate that equilibrium partitioning is achieved faster for particles than for typical indoor surfaces; indeed, for a strongly sorbing SVOC and a thick sorptive reservoir, equilibrium partitioning is never achieved. Mass-balance considerations are used to develop physical-science-based models that connect source- and sink-rates to airborne concentrations for commonly encountered situations, such as the application of a pesticide or the emission of a plasticizer or flame retardant from its host material. Calculations suggest that many SVOCs have long indoor persistence, even after the primary source is removed. If the only removal mechanism is ventilation, moderately sorbing compounds ( Koa > 10 10) may persist indoors for hundreds to thousands of hours, while strongly sorbing compounds ( Koa > 10 12) may persist for years. The paper concludes by applying the newly developed framework to explore exposure pathways of building occupants to indoor SVOCs. Accumulation of SVOCs as a consequence of direct air-to-human transport is shown to be potentially large, with a maximum indoor-air processing rate of 10-20 m 3/h for SVOC uptake by human skin, hair and clothing. Levels on human skin calculated with a simple model of direct air-to-skin transfer agree remarkably well with levels measured in dermal hand wipes for SVOCs possessing a wide range of octanol-air partition coefficients.

Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, William W.

43

Polar organic chemical integrative samplers for pesticides monitoring: Impacts of field exposure conditions.  

PubMed

This study focuses on how Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers (POCIS) work in real environmental conditions. A selection of 23 polar pesticides and 8 metabolites were investigated by exposure of triplicates of integrative samplers in two rivers in France for successive 14-day periods. The pesticides and metabolites were trapped not only in Oasis HLB sorbent but also in the polyethersulfone (PES) membrane of the POCIS. The distribution of pesticides depended on the molecular structure. The use of the Performance Reference Compound (PRC) is also discussed here. The impact of some environmental parameters and exposure setup on the transfer of pesticides in POCIS sorbent was studied: river flow rate, biofouling on membranes, sampler holding design and position in the stream. Results show a significant impact of river flow velocity on PRC desorption, especially for values higher than 4cm·s(-1). Some fouling was observed on the PES membrane which could potentially have an impact on molecule accumulation in the POCIS. Finally, the positioning of the sampler in the river did not have significant effects on pesticide accumulation, when perpendicular exposures were used (sampler positioning in front of the water flow). The POCIS with PRC correction seems to be a suitable tool for estimating time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations, for all the molecules except for one of the nine pesticides analyzed in these two French rivers. PMID:24830931

Lissalde, Sophie; Mazzella, Nicolas; Mazellier, Patrick

2014-08-01

44

Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)  

MedlinePLUS

... carbonless copy paper, graphics and craft materials including glues and adhesives, permanent markers, and photographic solutions. Organic ... day. The hazards include exposure to chemicals from glues, polishes, removers, and other salon products; muscle strains ...

45

Thermodynamics of organic compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research program consisted of an integrated and interrelated effort of basic and applied research in chemical thermodynamics and thermochemistry. Knowledge of variation of physical and thermodynamic properties with molecular structure was used to select compounds for study that because of high ring strain or unusual steric effects may have good energy characteristics per unit volume or per unit mass and thus be useful in the synthesis of high energy fuels. These materials were synthesized, and their thermodynamic properties were evaluated. In cooperation with researcher at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, ramjet fuels currently in use were subjected to careful thermodynamic evaluation by measurements of heat capacity, enthalpy of combustion and vapor pressure. During the last year of this effort, seven kerosene-type fuels produced by British Petroleum and seven jet fuels produced from shale oil were studied.

Gammon, B. E.; Smith, N. K.

1982-11-01

46

[Energies of organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

The enthalpy of reduction of lactones to the corresponding diols has been determined, allowing the enthaipies of formation of the lactones to be determined. Results of this study agree well with data obtained for enthalpies of hydrolysis of the lactones. We have begun the measurement of the enthalpies of reduction of norbornanones, and we have shown that it is possible to determine the difference in energy between the exo and endo forms of the product alcohols by measuring the equilibrium constant as a function of temperature. The study of the enthalpies of hydration of carbonyl compounds has continued, and the enthalpies of hydrolysis of the corresponding ketals is being determined. The study of the enthalpies of hydration of alkenes is nearly completed, and the rearrangement reactions which were uncovered are being investigated.

Wiberg, K.B.

1991-12-31

47

Energies of organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

The enthalpy of reduction of lactones to the corresponding diols has been determined, allowing the enthalpies of formation of the lactones to be determined. The results of this study agree well with the data we have obtained for the enthalpies of hydrolysis of the lactones. We have begun the measurement of the enthalpies of reduction of norbornanones, and we have shown that it is possible to determine the difference in energy between the exo and endo forms of the product alcohols by measuring the equilibrium constant as a function of temperature. The study of the enthalpies of hydration of carbonly compounds has continued, and the enthalpies of hydrolysis of the corresponding ketals is being determined. The study of the enthalpies of hydration of alkenes is nearly completed, and the rearrangement reactions which were uncovered are being investigated.

Not Available

1990-01-01

48

Pesticides.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This review is devoted to methods for the determination of residues of pesticides and some related industrial chemicals. Topics include: residue methods, sampling, chromatography, organochlorine pesticides, organophosphorus pesticides, carbamate insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, pyrethrins, fumigants, and related chemicals. (MVL)

Sherma, Joseph

1989-01-01

49

Photoprotective compounds from marine organisms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The substantial loss in the stratospheric ozone layer and consequent increase in solar ultraviolet radiation on the earth’s\\u000a surface have augmented the interest in searching for natural photoprotective compounds in organisms of marine as well as freshwater\\u000a ecosystems. A number of photoprotective compounds such as mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), scytonemin, carotenoids and\\u000a several other UV-absorbing substances of unknown chemical structure

Rajesh P. Rastogi; Richa; Rajeshwar P. Sinha; Shailendra P. Singh; Donat-P. Häder

2010-01-01

50

Pesticide bioconcentration modelling for fruit trees  

Microsoft Academic Search

The model presented allows simulating the pesticide concentration evolution in fruit trees and estimating the pesticide bioconcentration factor in fruits. Pesticides are non-ionic organic compounds that are degraded in soils cropped with woody species, fruit trees and other perennials. The model allows estimating the pesticide uptake by plants through the water transpiration stream and also the time in which maximum

Lourival Costa Paraíba

2007-01-01

51

Pesticide Use and Toxicology in Relation to Wildlife: Organophosphorus and Carbamate Compounds,  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

More than 89 million acre-treatments of organophorsphorus and carbamate pesticides are applied each year within the United States. These compounds are applied to agricultural lands, rangelands, and forests in every region of the country and in every State...

G. J. Smith

1987-01-01

52

Photoprotective compounds from marine organisms.  

PubMed

The substantial loss in the stratospheric ozone layer and consequent increase in solar ultraviolet radiation on the earth's surface have augmented the interest in searching for natural photoprotective compounds in organisms of marine as well as freshwater ecosystems. A number of photoprotective compounds such as mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), scytonemin, carotenoids and several other UV-absorbing substances of unknown chemical structure have been identified from different organisms. MAAs form the most common class of UV-absorbing compounds known to occur widely in various marine organisms; however, several compounds having UV-screening properties still need to be identified. The synthesis of scytonemin, a predominant UV-A-photoprotective pigment, is exclusively reported in cyanobacteria. Carotenoids are important components of the photosynthetic apparatus that serve both light-harvesting and photoprotective functions, either by direct quenching of the singlet oxygen or other toxic reactive oxygen species or by dissipating the excess energy in the photosynthetic apparatus. The production of photoprotective compounds is affected by several environmental factors such as different wavelengths of UVR, desiccation, nutrients, salt concentration, light as well as dark period, and still there is controversy about the biosynthesis of various photoprotective compounds. Recent studies have focused on marine organisms as a source of natural bioactive molecules having a photoprotective role, their biosynthesis and commercial application. However, there is a need for extensive work to explore the photoprotective role of various UV-absorbing compounds from marine habitats so that a range of biotechnological and pharmaceutical applications can be found. PMID:20401734

Rastogi, Rajesh P; Richa; Sinha, Rajeshwar P; Singh, Shailendra P; Häder, Donat-P

2010-06-01

53

Low volatile organic compound paints  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increasingly stringent air emission standards in various states has dictated the elimination of engineering finishes which are derived from high volatile organic compound (VOC) paint chemistries. In July 1989, Allied-Signal, Inc., Kansas City Division, Kansas City, Missouri, voluntarily closed its paint facility, due to non-compliance with local air emission standards. The following details the materials selection and evaluations which led

1991-01-01

54

[Biosensors for detecting organic compounds. II. Sensors for carbohydrates, aromatic, heterocyclic and other organic compounds].  

PubMed

The use of biosensors for detecting aromatic compounds (aniline, hydroquinone, phenol, and N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine), heterocyclic compounds (adenosine, AMP, ATP, bilirubin, hypoxanthine, guanine, inosine, inosine 5'-phosphate, xanthine, creatinine, uric acid, and NAD), carbohydrates (glucose, galactose, lactose, maltose, and sucrose), vitamins, antibiotics, steroids, mutagens, and organophosphorous pesticides is discussed. Basic metrological characteristics of these biosensors are reviewed. PMID:9566290

Sorochinski?, V V; Kurganov, B I

1998-01-01

55

Volatile organic compound sensor system  

DOEpatents

Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY); Bomstad, Theresa M. (Waxahachie, TX); Sorini-Wong, Susan S. (Laramie, WY); Wong, Gregory K. (Laramie, WY)

2011-03-01

56

Volatile organic compound sensor system  

DOEpatents

Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY) [Laramie, WY; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY); Bomstad, Theresa M. (Laramie, WY) [Laramie, WY; Sorini-Wong, Susan S. (Laramie, WY) [Laramie, WY

2009-02-10

57

Organic compounds in carbonaceous meteorites.  

PubMed

The carbonaceous chondrite meteorites are fragments of asteroids that have remained relatively unprocessed since the formation of the solar system 4.6 billion years ago. These carbon-rich objects contain a variety of extraterrestrial organic molecules that constitute a record of chemical evolution prior to the origin of life. Compound classes include aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, amino acids, carboxylic acids, sulfonic acids, phosphonic acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, sugars, amines, amides, nitrogen heterocycles, sulfur heterocycles and a relatively abundant high molecular weight macromolecular material. Structural and stable isotopic characteristics suggest that a number of environments may have contributed to the organic inventory, including interstellar space, the solar nebula and the asteroidal meteorite parent body. This review covers work published between 1950 and the present day and cites 193 references. PMID:12137279

Sephton, Mark A

2002-06-01

58

Detection of pesticide model compounds in ethanolic and aqueous microdroplets by nonlinear Raman spectroscopy.  

PubMed

Pesticide model compounds are detected in microdroplets by means of in situ nonlinear Raman spectroscopy. The chloro- and nitro-substituted aromatics are dissolved in ethanol as well as in water. Their vibrational spectroscopic fingerprint, that is, Raman bands characteristic of the functional groups attached to the aromatic system, is determined in bulk medium by linear Raman spectroscopy. As a result of the concept of group vibrations, the chosen compounds can be regarded as representatives for a whole class of pesticides containing these residues. External seeding of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is applied for the detection of these group vibrations of the pesticide model compounds. This technique can be utilized for in situ diagnostics and a noninvasive vibrational spectroscopic analysis of the chemical composition of microdroplets with natural or anthropogenic origin. PMID:11467566

Schlücker, S; Roman, V; Kiefer, W; Popp, J

2001-07-01

59

Electroreduction of Halogenated Organic Compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The electroreductive cleavage of the carbon-halogen bond in halogenated organic compounds has been extensively studied for more than 70 years, since it is prodromal to a large variety of synthetic applications in organic electrochemistry. Over the years the research interest have progressively included the environmental applications, since several organic halocompounds are known to have (or have had) a serious environmental impact because of their (present or past) wide use as cleaning agents, herbicides, cryogenic fluids, reagents (e.g. allyl and vinyl monomers) for large production materials, etc. Recent studies have also demonstrated the wide spread out- and in-door-presence of volatile organic halides, although at low level, in connexion with residential and non-residential (e.g. stores, restaurants and transportation) activities. In this context, the detoxification of emissions to air, water and land by the selective removal of the halogen group represents a valid treatment route, which, although not leading to the complete mineralization of the pollutants, produces less harmful streams to be easily treated by electrochemical or conventional techniques. The electroreduction process is analysed and discussed in terms of electrode material, reaction medium, cell design and operation, and of substrate classification.

Rondinini, Sandra; Vertova, Alberto

60

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOEpatents

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moore, Glenn A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Reagen, William K. (Stillwater, MN)

1995-01-01

61

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOEpatents

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

1995-08-29

62

Phthalates, alkylphenols, pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, and other endocrine-disrupting compounds in indoor air and dust.  

PubMed

Chemicals identified as endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) have widespread consumer uses, yet little is known about indoor exposure. We sampled indoor air and dust in 120 homes, analyzing for 89 organic chemicals identified as EDCs. Fifty-two compounds were detected in air and 66 were detected in dust. These are the first reported measures in residential environments for over 30 of the compounds, including several detected at the highest concentrations. The number of compounds detected per home ranged from 13 to 28 in air and from 6 to 42 in dust. The most abundant compounds in air included phthalates (plasticizers, emulsifiers), o-phenylphenol (disinfectant), 4-nonylphenol (detergent metabolite), and 4-tert-butylphenol (adhesive) with typical concentrations in the range of 50-1500 ng/m3. The penta- and tetrabrominated diphenyl ethers (flame retardants) were frequently detected in dust, and 2,3-dibromo-1-propanol, the carcinogenic intermediate of a flame retardant banned in 1977, was detected in air and dust. Twenty-three pesticides were detected in air and 27 were detected in dust, the most abundant being permethrins and the synergist piperonyl butoxide. The banned pesticides heptachlor, chlordane, methoxychlor, and DDT were also frequently detected, suggesting limited indoor degradation. Detected concentrations exceeded government health-based guidelines for 15 compounds, but no guidelines are available for 28 compounds, and existing guidelines do not consider endocrine effects. This study provides a basis for prioritizing toxicology and exposure research for individual EDCs and mixtures and provides new tools for exposure assessment in health studies. PMID:14594359

Rudel, Ruthann A; Camann, David E; Spengler, John D; Korn, Leo R; Brody, Julia G

2003-10-15

63

Use of raw or incubated organic wastes as amendments in reducing pesticide leaching through soil columns.  

PubMed

Soil amendment with organic wastes is becoming a widespread management practice since it can effectively solve the problems of uncontrolled waste accumulation and improve soil quality. However, when simultaneously applied with pesticides, organic wastes can significantly modify the environmental behaviour of these compounds. This study evaluated the effect of sewage sludges (SS), grape marc (GM) and spent mushroom substrates (SMS) on the leaching of linuron, diazinon and myclobutanil in packed columns of a sandy soil with low organic matter (OM) content (<1%). Soil plus amendments had been incubated for one month (1 m) or 12 months (12 m). Data from the experimental breakthrough curves (BTCs) were fitted to the one-dimensional transport model CXTFIT 2.1. All three amendments reduced leaching of linuron and myclobutanil relative to unamended soil. SMS was the most effective in reducing leaching of these two compounds independent of whether soil was incubated for 1 m or 12 m. Soil amendments increased retardation coefficients (Rexp) by factors of 3 to 5 for linuron, 2 to 4 for diazinon and 3 to 5 for myclobutanil relative to unamended soil. Leaching of diazinon was relatively little affected by soil amendment compared to the other two compounds and both SS and SMS amendment with 1m incubation resulted in enhanced leaching of diazinon. The leaching data for linuron and myclobutanil were well described by CXTFIT (mean square error, MSE<4.9·10(-7) and MSE<7.0·10(-7), respectively) whereas those of diazinon were less well fitted (MSE<2.1·10(-6)). The BTCs for pesticides were similar in soils incubated for one month or one year, indicating that the effect of amendment on leaching persists over relatively long periods of time. PMID:23835069

Marín-Benito, J M; Brown, C D; Herrero-Hernández, E; Arienzo, M; Sánchez-Martín, M J; Rodríguez-Cruz, M S

2013-10-01

64

Vapor Adsorption of Volatile Organic Compounds Using Organically Modified Clay  

Microsoft Academic Search

Organically modified clay was used to adsorb volatile organic compounds from a gaseous phase. The organoclay was prepared by adsorbing hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) on the surface of montmorillonite particles. Two volatile organic compounds (VOCs), chlorobenzene and trichloroethylene, were adsorbed to the organoclay using a fixed adsorption bed. The adsorption was carried out at various inlet concentrations of gaseous VOCs in a

2008-01-01

65

Equilibrium tritium isotope effect in organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

Experimental vibrational frequencies and a previously developed method for calculating equilibrium tritium (T) isotope effects are used to compose tables of {beta}-factors for T/H substitution of most organic compounds. The data presented enable the equilibrium T isotope effect to be sufficiently accurately estimated for most organic compounds.

Knyazev, D.A.; Myasoedov, N.F.; Bochkarev, A.V.

1995-01-01

66

A Reconnaissance of selected organic compounds in streams in tribal lands in Central Oklahoma, January-February 2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey worked in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma on two separate reconnaissance projects carried out concurrently. Both projects entailed the use of passive samplers as a sampling methodology to investigate the detection of selected organic compounds at stream sites in jurisdictional areas of several tribes in central Oklahoma during January-February 2009. The focus of the project with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was the detection of pesticides and pesticide metabolites using Semipermeable Membrane Devices at five stream sites in jurisdictional areas of several tribes. The project with the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma focused on the detection of pesticides, pesticide metabolites, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyl compounds, and synthetic organic compounds using Semipermeable Membrane Devices and Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers at two stream sites adjacent to the Kickapoo tribal lands. The seven stream sites were located in central Oklahoma on the Cimarron River, Little River, North Canadian River, Deep Fork, and Washita River. Extracts from SPMDs submerged at five stream sites, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, were analyzed for 46 pesticides and 6 pesticide metabolites. Dacthal, a pre-emergent herbicide, was detected at all five sites. Pendimethalin, also a pre-emergent, was detected at one site. The insecticides chlorpyrifos and dieldrin were detected at three sites and p,p'-DDE, a metabolite of the insecticide DDT, also was detected at three sites. SPMDs and POCIS were submerged at the upstream edge and downstream edge of the Kickapoo tribal boundaries. Both sites are downstream from the Oklahoma City metropolitan area and multiple municipal wastewater treatment plants. Extracts from the passive samplers were analyzed for 62 pesticides, 10 pesticide metabolites, 3 polychlorinated biphenyl compounds, 35 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and 49 synthetic organic compounds. Ten pesticides and four pesticide metabolites were detected at the upstream site and seven pesticides and four pesticide metabolites were detected at the downstream site. Pesticides detected at both sites were atrazine, chlorpyrifos, dacthal, dieldrin, metolachlor, pendimethalin, and trans-nonachlor. Additionally at the upstream site, heptachlor, pentachlorophenol, and prometon were detected. The pesticide metabolites p,p'-DDE, cis-chlordane, and trans-chlordane also were detected at both sites. Polychlorinated biphenyl compounds aroclor-1016/1242, aroclor-1254, and aroclor-1260 were detected at both sites. The upstream site had 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon detections and the downstream site had 8 detections. Because of chromatographic interference during analysis, a positive identification of 17 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons could not be made. Consequently, there may have been a greater number of these compounds detected at both sites. A total of 36 synthetic organic compounds were detected at the two sites adjacent to the Kickapoo tribal lands. The upstream site had 21 synthetic organic compound detections: three detergent metabolites, two fecal indicators, three flame retardants, seven industrial compounds, five compounds related to personal care products, and beta-sitosterol, a plant sterol. Fifteen synthetic organic compounds were detected at the downstream site and included: one fecal indicator, three flame retardants, six industrial compounds, and five compounds related to personal care products.

Becker, Carol J.

2010-01-01

67

Pesticidal properties of parthenin (from Parthenium hysterophorus) and related compounds.  

PubMed

Eleven sesquiterpene lactone derivatives of parthenin (1), obtained from wild feverfew, Parthenium hysterophorus, were prepared by chemical and photochemical transformations. The compounds tested were a pyrazoline adduct (2) of parthenin, its cyclopropyl (3) and propenyl (4) derivatives, anhydroparthenin (5), a dihydro-deoxygenated product (6), a formate (7) and its corresponding alcohol (8) and acetate (9), a rearranged product (10), lactone (11) and hemiacetal (12). All these derivatives, along with parthenin, were tried for their antifeedant action against sixth-instar larvae of Spodoptera litura, for insecticidal activity against the adults of store grain pest Callosobruchus maculatus, for phytotoxic activity against Cassia tora, and for nematicidal activity against the juvenile stage-II (J2) of the root knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. Antifeedent bioassay revealed that parthenin is moderately antifeedant. Among the derivatives, the saturated lactone (11) was found to be about 2.25 times more active than parthenin. The pyrazoline adduct (2) was found to be the most effective as an insecticide, with LC50 values after 24, 48 and 72 h of 96, 43 and 32 mg litre-1, respectively, which are comparable with neem extract. Compound 4 was found to be the most effective inhibitor of germination and seedling growth of C tora, with ID50 values for germination, plumule length and radicle length of 136, 326 and 172 compared with 364, 738 and 427 mg litre-1, respectively, for parthenin. Compound 10 was found to be the most effective in terms of nematicidal activity. The LC50 values for this compound were 273 and 104 mg litre-1, respectively, after 48 and 72 h compared with 862 and 512 mg litre-1 observed for parthenin after 48 and 72 h. PMID:11455638

Datta, S; Saxena, D B

2001-01-01

68

ORGANIC PESTICIDE MODIFICATION OF SPECIES INTERACTIONS USING ANNUAL PLANT COMMUNITIES  

EPA Science Inventory

A method is proposed and tested for assessing multispecies responses to three pesticides (atrazine, 2,4,D and malathion). Pesticides were applied at two concentrations, mon model plant communities grown in raised beds using soil containing a natural weed bank. over by species was...

69

Liquid–Liquid Extraction for Sample Preparation prior to Gas Chromatography and Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry Determination of Herbicide and Pesticide Compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Liquid–liquid extraction (LLE), compared with solid-phase extraction (SPE), has been found to be effective for the isolation of herbicide and pesticide organic compounds from industrial wastewater samples and also from complex matrices. LLE was followed by concentration in a Kuderna–Danish evaporator, and the final analytical determination was carried out on a capillary gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer. The

Bashir M. Mahara; J. Borossay; K. Torkos

1998-01-01

70

Electrolytic Reduction of Organic Compounds.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The final report describes very briefly the results of efforts to achieve selective, electrochemical reductions of organic molecules containing various functional groups. In all cases the electrolytic cell was a simple three-neck flask equipped with two p...

R. A. Benkeser

1970-01-01

71

[Studies on adsorption of the organic phosphorus pesticide with the macroporous resin].  

PubMed

Macroporous adsorbing resins prepared by styrene are selected as absorbent in the static and dynamic adsorption experiments of organic phosphorus pesticide. These resins are attempted to be applied in blood purification to detoxify and save the patient's life. PMID:11211815

Li, G; Yang, B; Li, C; Chen, Y; Guo, X; He, B; Zhang, Y; Dai, R

2000-12-01

72

A PILOT STUDY OF CHILDREN'S TOTAL EXPOSURE TO PERSISTENT PESTICIDES AND OTHER PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (CTEPP)  

EPA Science Inventory

The Pilot Study of Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Organic Pollutants (CTEPP) investigated the aggregate exposures of 257 preschool children and their primary adult caregivers to pollutants commonly detected in their everyday environments. ...

73

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOEpatents

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1994-06-14

74

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOEpatents

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1994-01-01

75

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOEpatents

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1993-01-01

76

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOEpatents

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 figures.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1993-09-07

77

Linear and non-linear relationships mapping the Henry’s law parameters of organic pesticides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work aims to predict the air to water partitioning for 96 organic pesticides by means of the Quantitative Structure-Property Relationships Theory. After performing structural feature selection with Genetics Algorithms and Replacement Method linear approaches, it is found that among the most important molecular features appears the Moriguchi octanol-water partition coefficient, and higher lipophilicities would lead to compounds having higher Henry's law constants. We also compare the statistical performance achieved by four fully-connected Feed-Forward Multilayer Perceptrons Artificial Neural Networks. The statistical results found reveal that the best performing model uses the Levenberg-Marquardt with Bayesian regularization (BR) weighting function for achieving the most accurate predictions.

Goodarzi, Mohammad; Ortiz, Erlinda V.; Coelho, Leandro dos S.; Duchowicz, Pablo R.

2010-08-01

78

BIORESTORATION OF AQUIFERS CONTAMINATED WITH ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

Techniques available to remediate ground water contaminated with organic compounds. These include physical containment, in situ treatment with chemicals or microbes, and withdrawal and treatment via various forms of physical, chemical, or biological processes. (Copyright (c) CRC ...

79

Microwave spectra of some volatile organic compounds  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A computer-controlled microwave (MRR) spectrometer was used to catalog reference spectra for chemical analysis. Tables of absorption frequency, peak absorption intensity, and integrated intensity are included for 26 volatile organic compounds, all but one of which contain oxygen.

White, W. F.

1975-01-01

80

Biogeochemical processes governing exposure and uptake of organic pollutant compounds in aquatic organisms.  

PubMed Central

This paper reviews current knowledge of biogeochemical cycles of pollutant organic chemicals in aquatic ecosystems with a focus on coastal ecosystems. There is a bias toward discussing chemical and geochemical aspects of biogeochemical cycles and an emphasis on hydrophobic organic compounds such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorinated organic compounds used as pesticides. The complexity of mixtures of pollutant organic compounds, their various modes of entering ecosystems, and their physical chemical forms are discussed. Important factors that influence bioavailability and disposition (e.g., organism-water partitioning, uptake via food, food web transfer) are reviewed. These factors include solubilities of chemicals; partitioning of chemicals between solid surfaces, colloids, and soluble phases; variables rates of sorption, desorption; and physiological status of organism. It appears that more emphasis on considering food as a source of uptake and bioaccumulation is important in benthic and epibenthic ecosystems when sediment-associated pollutants are a significant source of input to an aquatic ecosystem. Progress with mathematical models for exposure and uptake of contaminant chemicals is discussed briefly.

Farrington, J W

1991-01-01

81

Volatile organic compounds of Schenella pityophilus.  

PubMed

Volatile organic compounds of Schenella pityophilus have been identified via solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Ten compounds have been identified, in which 3-methylthio-1-propene was the most significant component. Some other components were previously identified in Tuber aestivum and Tuber melanosporum. PMID:22236093

D'Auria, Maurizio; Racioppi, Rocco; Rana, Gian Luigi

2013-01-01

82

PERFLUORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUND EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT RESEARCH  

EPA Science Inventory

A wide range of perfluorinated organic compounds (PFCs) has been used in a variety of industrial processes and consumer products. The most commonly studied PFCs include perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), but there are many more compounds in this c...

83

Organic pollutants in precipitation: monitoring of pesticides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the region of Trier (Germany)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Organic pollutants are nowadays part of our environment and they can be found in every compartment, though in different levels of concentration. Studies which are related to the content of these substances in precipitation deal with very low concentration levels which, nevertheless, cannot be ignored. The city of Trier, with nearly 100,000 inhabitants, is located at the river Moselle, in south-west Germany, and is one of the main centres of the vinicultural area of the Moselle-Saar-Ruwer, where pesticides, among them many fungicides, are widely used. In this study, rain samples were weekly collected, from July 1999 till December 2000, in nine different sites, and two classes of compounds were investigated: PAHs and pesticides, with a particular attention on selected fungicides. Sampling sites were selected in order to evaluate the dispersion of pollutants in relation to their main sources, therefore urban sites were chosen as well as industrial and rural sites. Such a monitoring plan allowed an investigation on the spatial and temporal variation of typology and amount of the detected substances. As a result, urban sites, relatively far from vinicultural areas, showed to be contaminated by pesticides; on the other hand, samples collected in open land areas showed different levels of contamination by PAHs. Pesticides could be detected only during the application time (spring and summer), while PAHs, due to the characteristics of the emitting sources, could be detected during the whole period of monitoring.

De Rossi, Chiara; Bierl, Reinhard; Riefstahl, Jens

84

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOEpatents

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1993-01-01

85

The Effect of an Organic Pesticide on Mortality and Learning in Africanized Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L.) in Brasil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seven experiments were conducted. First, the influence of the consumption of different concentrations of the organic pesticide Bioganic ® on mortality was assessed at 11 different time intervals in Africanized honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) as was direct application of the pesticide to the abdomen. Results indicated that the pesticide was not lethal to bees regardless of concentration at any

Charles I. Abramson; Jordan B. Singleton; Maritza K. Wilson; Paulo A. Wanderley

2006-01-01

86

Possible complex organic compounds on Mars.  

PubMed

It is suggested that primitive Mars had somehow similar environments as primitive Earth. If life was born on the primitive earth using organic compounds which were produced from the early Earth environment, the same types of organic compounds were also formed on primitive Mars. Such organic compounds might have been preserved on Mars still now. We are studying possible organic formation on primitive and present Mars. A gaseous mixture of CO2, CO, N2 and H2O with various mixing ratios were irradiated with high energy protons (major components of cosmic rays). Hydrogen cyanide and formaldehyde were detected among volatile products, and yellow-brown-colored water-soluble non-volatile substances were produced, which gave amino acids after acid-hydrolysis. Major part of "amino acid precursors" were not simple molecules like aminonitriles, but complex compounds which eluted earlier than free amino acids in cation-exchange HPLC. These organic compounds should be major targets in the future Mars mission. Strategy for the detection of the complex organics on Mars will be discussed. PMID:11541335

Kobayashi, K; Sato, T; Kajishima, S; Kaneko, T; Ishikawa, Y; Saito, T

1997-01-01

87

Photocatalytic oxidation of organic compounds on Mars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ultraviolet-stimulated catalytic oxidation is proposed as a mechanism for the destruction of organic compounds on Mars. The process involves the presence of gaseous oxygen, UV radiation, and a catalyst (titanium dioxide), and all three of these have been found to be present in the Martian environment. Therefore it seems plausible that UV-stimulated oxidation of organics is responsible for degrading organic molecules into inorganic end products.

Chun, S. F. S.; Pang, K. D.; Cutts, J. A.; Ajello, J. M.

1978-01-01

88

Compendium of methods for the determination of toxic organic compounds in ambient air  

SciTech Connect

Determination of toxic organic compounds in ambient air is a complex task, primarily because of the wide variety of compounds of interest and the lack of standardized sampling and analysis procedures. This compendium of methods was prepared to provide current, peer-reviewed procedures in a standardized, written format for measuring toxic organic pollutants of primary importance in ambient air. The various methods provide both sampling and analytical procedures for a variety of pollutants, including pesticides, PCBs, formaldehyde and other aldehydes, phosgene, n-nitrosodimethylamine, cresol/phenol, dioxin, non-speciated non-methane organic compounds, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and various other volatile nonpolar organic compounds. The compendium is a consolidation and republishing of Methods T01-105 from the original Compendium (EPA 600/4-84-041), Methods T06-T09 from the First Supplement (EPA-600/4-87-006), and T010-T014 from the Second Supplement (EPA-600/4-89/018).

Riggin, R.M.; Winberry, W.T.; Murphy, N.T.

1988-06-01

89

Reflectance spectroscopy of organic compounds: 1. Alkanes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Reflectance spectra of the organic compounds comprising the alkane series are presented from the ultraviolet to midinfrared, 0.35 to 15.5 /??m. Alkanes are hydrocarbon molecules containing only single carbon-carbon bonds, and are found naturally on the Earth and in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Saturn's moon, Titan. This paper presents the spectral properties of the alkanes as the first in a series of papers to build a spectral database of organic compounds for use in remote sensing studies. Applications range from mapping the environment on the Earth, to the search for organic molecules and life in the solar system and throughout the. universe. We show that the spectral reflectance properties of organic compounds are rich, with major diagnostic spectral features throughout the spectral range studied. Little to no spectral change was observed as a function of temperature and only small shifts and changes in the width of absorption bands were observed between liquids and solids, making remote detection of spectral properties throughout the solar system simpler. Some high molecular weight organic compounds contain single-bonded carbon chains and have spectra similar to alkanes even ' when they fall into other families. Small spectral differences are often present allowing discrimination among some compounds, further illustrating the need to catalog spectral properties for accurate remote sensing identification with spectroscopy.

Clark, R. N.; Curchin, J. M.; Hoefen, T. M.; Swayze, G. A.

2009-01-01

90

Characterization of racemization of chiral pesticides in organic solvents and water  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eight chiral pesticides, which were selected to cover different pesticide species and origins of chirality, were investigated to explore their chiral stability in organic solvents and water. Profenophos, fenamiphos, quizalofop-ethyl, dichlorprop-methyl (DCPP-methyl) and acetochlor were showed stable under all test conditions. However, significant racemization was observed for malathion, phenthoate and fenpropathrin in methanol, ethanol and water, but not in n-hexane,

Zhaoyang Li; Tong Wu; Qiaoling Li; Bingzhu Zhang; Weixiao Wang; Jingyin Li

2010-01-01

91

Air Pollution Emissions Associated with Nonsynthetic Hydrocarbon Applications for Pesticidal Purposes in California. Volume II.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents the results of a survey of the use of nonsynthetic hydrocarbon (NSHC) pesticides in California during 1977 and the associated volatile organic compound emissions. An estimated 225.2 million pounds of NSHC pesticide products were used ...

S. Leung R. Peter W. Reed R. Johnson T. Ling

1980-01-01

92

Air Pollution Emissions Associated with Nonsynthetic Hydrocarbon Applications for Pesticidal Purposes in California. Volume III - Appendices.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents the results of a survey of the use of nonsynthetic hydrocarbon (NSHC) pesticides in California during 1977 and the associated volatile organic compound emissions. An estimated 225.2 million pounds of NSHC pesticide products were used ...

S. Leung R. Peter W. Reed R. Johnson T. Ling

1980-01-01

93

Priority organic compounds in wastewater effluents from the Mediterranean and Atlantic basins of Andalusia (Spain).  

PubMed

A comprehensive survey of the occurrence of organic compounds in 30 wastewater (WW) effluent samples from 21 urban wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) from both secondary and tertiary treatments was carried out in the Mediterranean and Atlantic basins of the Andalusia region (south of Spain). For each sample, a total of 226 compounds including pesticides and some transformation products, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phenolic compounds and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were monitored with the aim of evaluating their occurrence in urban WW effluents. Compounds belonging to each class were detected. Among pesticides, insecticides such as clorfenvinphos and diazinon as well as herbicides such as diuron, sebuthylazine, terbuthylazine and terbuthylazine desethyl were the most frequently detected. The ubiquity of some compounds such as fluorene, phenanthrene and pyrene was also demonstrated. The compounds evaluated were detected at low concentrations (in general below 1 ?g L(-1)), except 4-tert-octylphenol, which was detected at extremely high concentrations (up to 443 ?g L(-1)). PAHs and VOCs were the compounds most frequently detected in the assayed samples, and they are the main sources of contamination in WWTPs, as well as some herbicides and transformation products. PMID:24141237

Barco-Bonilla, Nieves; Romero-González, Roberto; Plaza-Bolaños, Patricia; Martínez Vidal, José Luis; Castro, Antonio J; Martín, Isabel; Salas, Juan José; Frenich, Antonia Garrido

2013-12-01

94

Analyzing method on biogenic volatile organic compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to analyze biogenic volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere, an automated gas chromatography is developed and employed at the laboratory of National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) during January to July, 2000. A small refrigerator was used so as to remove water in the air sample from gas line, and get accurate concentrations of volatile organic compounds. At 5degreesC, good water removing efficiency can be obtained at controlled flow rate. Air samples were collected around the building of Mesa Lab. of NCAR and analyzed by this gas chromatography system. This paper reports this gas chromatography system and results of air samples. The experimental results show that this gas chromatography system has a good reproducibility and stability, and main interesting volatile organic compounds such as isoprene, monoterpenes have an evident diurnal variation.

Bai, J. H.; Wang, M. X.; Hu, F.; Greenberg, J. P.; Guenther, A. B.

2002-02-01

95

Catalyst for Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Disclosed is a process for oxidizing volatile organic compounds to carbon dioxide and water with the minimal addition of energy. A mixture of the volatile organic compound and an oxidizing agent (e.g. ambient air containing the volatile organic compound) is exposed to a catalyst which includes a noble metal dispersed on a metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state. Especially good results are obtained when the noble metal is platinum, and the metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state is tin oxide. A promoter (i.e., a small amount of an oxide of a transition series metal) may be used in association with the tin oxide to provide very beneficial results.

Wood, George M. (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Kielin, Erik J. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Schyryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); DAmbrosia, Christine M. (Inventor)

2000-01-01

96

Origin of organic compounds in carbonaceous chondrites.  

PubMed

Carbonaceous chondrites, a class of primitive meteorite, have long been known to contain their complement of carbon largely in the form of organic, i.e., hydrocarbon-related, matter. Both discrete organic compounds and an insoluble, macromolecular material are present. Several characteristics of these materials provide evidence for their abiotic origin. The principal formation hypotheses have invoked chemistry occurring either in the solar nebula or on the parent body. However, recent stable isotope analyses of the meteorite carboxylic acids and amino acids indicate that they may be related to interstellar cloud compounds. These results suggest a formation scheme in which interstellar compounds were incorporated into the parent body and subsequently converted to the present suite of meteorite organics by the hydrothermal process believed to have formed the clay minerals of the meteorite matrix. PMID:11537361

Cronin, J R

1989-01-01

97

Origin of organic compounds in carbonaceous chondrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbonaceous chondrites, a class of primitive meteorite, have long been known to contain their complement of carbon largely in the form of organic, i.e., hydrocarbon-related, matter. Both discrete organic compounds and an insoluble, macromolecular material are present. Several characteristics of these materials provide evidence for their abiotic origin. The principal formation hypothesis have invoked chemistry occurring either in the solar nebula or on the parent body. However, recent stable isotope analyses of the meteorite carboxylic acids and amino acids indicate that they may be related to interstellar cloud compounds. These results suggest a formation scheme in which interstellar compounds were incorporated into the parent body and subsequently converted to the present suite of meteorite organics by the hydrothermal process believed to have formed the clay minerals of the meteorite matrix.

Cronin, J. R.

98

Sulfate minerals and organic compounds on Mars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Strong evidence for evaporitic sulfate minerals such as gypsum and jarosite has recently been found on Mars. Although organic molecules are often codeposited with terrestrial evaporitic minerals, there have been no systematic investigations of organic components in sulfate minerals. We report here the detection of organic material, including amino acids and their amine degradation products, in ancient terrestrial sulfate minerals. Amino acids and amines appear to be preserved for geologically long periods in sulfate mineral matrices. This suggests that sulfate minerals should be prime targets in the search for organic compounds, including those of biological origin, on Mars.

Aubrey, Andrew; Cleaves, H. James; Chalmers, John H.; Skelley, Alison M.; Mathies, Richard A.; Grunthaner, Frank J.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Bada, Jeffrey L.

2006-05-01

99

Metastable Equilibria Among Aqueous Organic Compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Metastable equilibrium states exist when reactions among a subset of compounds in a chemical system are reversible even though other irreversible reactions exist in the same system. The existence of metastable equilibrium among organic compounds was initially detected by comparing ratios of organic acid concentrations reported for oil-field brines (Shock, 1988, Geology 16, 886-890; Shock, 1989, Geology 17, 572-573), and calculating the same ratios for likely oxidation states determined by mineral assemblages and mixtures of hydrocarbons in coexisting petroleum (Shock, 1994, in: The Role of Organic Acids in Geological Processes, Springer). This led to the notion of extending the concept of metastable equilibrium states to explicitly account for petroleum compositions (Helgeson et al., 1993, GCA, 57, 3295-3339), which eventually yielded the concept of hydrolytic disproportionation of kerogens to produce petroleum and CO2(g) (Helgeson et al., 2009, GCA, 73, 594-695). Experimental tests of metastable equilibrium among organic compounds began with the identification of reversible reactions between alkanes and alkenes that are dependent on the H2 fugacity of the experimental system (Seewald, 1994, Nature 370, 285-287). These were followed with a comprehensive series of long-term experiments leading to the hypothesis that reversible reactions include alkanes, alkenes, alcohol, aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids (e.g., Seewald, 2001, GCA 65, 1641-1664; 2003, Nature 426, 327-333; McCollom & Seewald, 2003, GCA 67, 3645-3664). We have conducted sets of hydrothermal organic transformation experiments that test the extent to which these reactions are indeed reversible using aromatic and cyclic compounds. Results demonstrate reversibility for reactions among dibenzyl ketone, 1,3-diphenyl-2-propanol, 1,3-diphenylpropene and 1,3-diphenylpropane, as well as among methylcyclohexanes, methylcyclohexenes, methylcyclohexanols, methylcyclohexanones and methylcyclohexadienes. The compounds chosen for study include structural features that provide mechanistic insight into the reactions. By including cyclic and aromatic compounds, these results expand the diversity of organic compounds that react reversibly in geochemical processes. It follows that metastable equilibria among organic compounds may be inescapable during hydrothermal alteration and petroleum generation.

Shock, E.; Shipp, J.; Yang, Z.; Gould, I. R.

2011-12-01

100

Attitudes towards organic foods and risk\\/benefit perception associated with pesticides  

Microsoft Academic Search

A sample of 947 subjects completed a questionnaire assessing attitudes and beliefs towards the consumption of organic fruits and vegetables. A section of the questionnaire was aimed at assessing the role of trust on perception of risks and benefits associated with pesticides on foods. The subjects tended to hold positive attitudes towards eating fruits and vegetables produced by organic agriculture.

Anna Saba; Federico Messina

2003-01-01

101

Ultraviolet radiation absorbing compounds in marine organisms  

SciTech Connect

Studies on the biological effects of solar ultraviolet radiations are becoming increasingly common, in part due to recent interest in the Antarctic ozone hole and in the perceived potential for global climate change. Marine organisms possess many strategies for ameliorating the potentially damaging effects of UV-B (280-320 nm) and the shorter wavelengths of UV-A (320-400nm). One mechanism is the synthesis of bioaccumulation of ultraviolet radiation absorbing compounds. Several investigators have noted the presence of absorbing compounds in spectrophotometer scans of extracts from a variety of marine organisms, particularly algae and coelenterates containing endosymbiotic algae. The absorbing compounds are often mycosporine-like amino acids. Thirteen mycosporine-like amino acids have already been described, and several others have recently been detected. Although, the mycosporine-like amino acids are widely distributed. these compounds are by no means the only type of UV-B absorbing compounds which has been identified. Coumarins from green algae, quinones from sponges, and indoles from a variety of sources are laternative examples which are documented in the natural products literature. When the biological impact of solar ultraviolet radiation is assessed, adequate attention must be devoted to the process of photoadaptation, including the accumulation of ultraviolet radiation absorbing compounds.

Chalker, B.E.; Dunlap, W.C. (Australian Inst. of Marine Science, Queensland (Australia))

1990-01-09

102

Global Exposure Modelling of Semivolatile Organic Compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Organic compounds which are persistent and toxic as the agrochemicals ?-hexachlorocyclohexane (?-HCH, lindane) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) pose a hazard for the ecosystems. These compounds are semivolatile, hence multicompartmental substances and subject to long-range transport (LRT) in atmosphere and ocean. Being lipophilic, they accumulate in exposed organism tissues and biomagnify along food chains. The multicompartmental global fate and LRT of DDT and lindane in the atmosphere and ocean have been studied using application data for 1980, on a decadal scale using a model based on the coupling of atmosphere and (for the first time for these compounds) ocean General Circulation Models (ECHAM5 and MPI-OM). The model system encompasses furthermore 2D terrestrial compartments (soil and vegetation) and sea ice, a fully dynamic atmospheric aerosol (HAM) module and an ocean biogeochemistry module (HAMOCC5). Large mass fractions of the compounds are found in soil. Lindane is also found in comparable amount in ocean. DDT has the longest residence time in almost all compartments. The sea ice compartment locally almost inhibits volatilization from the sea. The air/sea exchange is also affected , up to a reduction of 35 % for DDT by partitioning to the organic phases (suspended and dissolved particulate matter) in the global oceans. Partitioning enhances vertical transport in the sea. Ocean dynamics are found to be more significant for vertical transport than sinking associated with particulate matter. LRT in the global environment is determined by the fast atmospheric circulation. Net meridional transport taking place in the ocean is locally effective mostly via western boundary currents, upon applications at mid- latitudes. The pathways of the long-lived semivolatile organic compounds studied include a sequence of several cycles of volatilisation, transport in the atmosphere, deposition and transport in the ocean (multihopping substances). Multihopping is more significant for DDT than for lindane. It enhances the LRT potential for both compounds.

Guglielmo, F.; Lammel, G.; Maier-Reimer, E.

2008-12-01

103

Semivolatile organic compounds in the ambient air of Denver, Colorado  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A filter-polyurethane foam plug high volume air sampler was used to collect the particle (P) and vapor (V) phases of four classes of semivolatile organic compounds (SOC) in Denver, CO: n-alkanes. polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and organochlorine pesticides. The carbon preference index (CPI) of n-alkanes in the V or P phases alone was skewed by temperature-dependent V/P partitioning; a combined gaseous + particulate CPI was preferred. The CPI suggested that the alkanes in Denver air were predominently petrogenic. Total PCB were calculated as the sum of individual congeners and also as Aroclor equivalents, with good agreement between the two methods. Apparent V/P distributions of these compound classes were expressed as A(TSP)/F, were A and F are the adsorbent- and filter-retained SOC concentrations (ng m -3) and TSP is the total suspended particle concentration (?g m -3). Values of A(TSP)/F were related to the average sampling temperature ( T, K) through: log [ A( TSP)/ F] = m/ T + b. Fitted log A(TSP)/F at 5°C correlated well with pL0 at 5°C, the SOC liquid vapor pressure. No differences were observed in partitioning behavior among the four SOC types.

Foreman, William T.; Bidleman, Terry F.

104

Organic photosensitive devices using subphthalocyanine compounds  

DOEpatents

An organic photosensitive optoelectronic device, having a donor-acceptor heterojunction of a donor-like material and an acceptor-like material and methods of making such devices is provided. At least one of the donor-like material and the acceptor-like material includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound; and/or the device optionally has at least one of a blocking layer or a charge transport layer, where the blocking layer and/or the charge transport layer includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound.

Rand, Barry (Princeton, NJ) [Princeton, NJ; Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI) [Ann Arbor, MI; Mutolo, Kristin L. (Hollywood, CA) [Hollywood, CA; Mayo, Elizabeth (Alhambra, CA) [Alhambra, CA; Thompson, Mark E. (Anaheim Hills, CA) [Anaheim Hills, CA

2011-07-05

105

Characterization and determination of organic compounds in the mutagenic XAD-2 extracts of drinking water.  

PubMed

Amberlite XAD-2 extracts, which exhibit mutagenicity in the Ames assays, of drinking water sampled each month during the period from April 1988 to March 1989 were studied in order to characterize and determine the organic pollutants. The major organic pollutants were phthalate ester plasticizers such as dibutyl and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate. Several polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the organocholorine pesticide oxadiazon were also identified to be present at low concentrations. The XAD-extractable and chromatographable organic pollutants were found to be composed of PAHs with a mean concentration of 0.136 micrograms/l(ca. 10% of the total amount of organic compounds detected), phthalates with a mean value of 0.405 micrograms/l(ca. 30%) and other compounds with a mean value of 0.845 micrograms/l(ca. 60%). The concentrations and compositions of these organic pollutants were correlated with the effective rainfall content of the river and with the water temperature. PMID:1744208

Onodera, S

1991-09-20

106

Study on the distribution of organic carbon in soil fractions and its reaction potential of binding the pesticides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

STUDY ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC CARBON IN SOIL FRACTIONS AND ITS REACTION POTENTIAL OF BINDING THE PESTICIDES **SUMITRA ROY1, SANKHAJIT ROY1, *ASHIM CHOWDHURY2, SASWATI PRADHAN2 and PETER BURAUEL3 1Department of Agricultural Chemicals, Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalay, Mohanpur, West Bengal, India. 2Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Soil Science, University of Calcutta, West Bengal, India. 3Institute of Chemical Dynamics & Geosphere, FZ-Juelich, Germany. *Correspondence: ashimkly@hotmail.com **Research work carried out as DAAD Sandwich research fellow at FZ- Juelich, Germany Soil is the ultimate sink of all selectively applied pesticides. In addition to the basic physicochemical data of an active ingredient, the fate of the various compounds is largely determined by the type of application. Finally, pesticide and their metabolites, as well as structural elements, remain in the native carbon reserves of the soil or are sorbed & fixed to clay minerals and clay- humus complexes. Soil organic matter (SOM) and the soil microbial community are the crucial components which regulate soil processes and contribute towards the stability of the soil ecosystem. It is an energy source for biological mineralization processes, functions as a buffer and participates in chemical reaction. Knowledge is essential to understand the extent to which the SOM influences the mobilization and immobilization processes of foreign substance in soil and the substance transport and pollutant decomposition in soil. The freshly incorporated organic matter undergoes mineralization and the non mineralized carbon fraction is of special relevance with respect to soil stability in general and decisive for the fate and particular the persistence of xenobiotics in soil. The biological and physicochemical interactions establishing equilibrium between the organic matter bound, fixed or complexed to the soil matrix and that dissolve in the soil solution must be understood in detail to realize soil and groundwater conservation. The radio-tracer technology emerged as the latest technology in agriculture, which helps in studying the translocation of pesticide along with the organic matter and furthermore, the distribution of the pesticide in the soil phases. For the elucidation of these relationships and distribution of organic carbon in soil fractions and its reaction potential of binding the pesticides, the present laboratory study was undertaken using 14C-enriched and non labeled maize straw as a source of fresh SOM in different soil fractions vis-à-vis its effect on distribution of 14C-labeled benazolin and non labeled benazolin (a selective, post emergence herbicide) as a xenobiotics throughout the soil system. To determine the turnover of SOM fractionation of top layer of the both the benazolin treated soil column was done followed by determination of 14C content in four different soil phases obtained from fraction, characterization of different phase and identification of the metabolites with TLC, HPLC and GC-MS. The result clearly indicated that where soil columns received non- labeled maize straw and 14C-benazolin as well as 14C-labeled maize straw and nonlabeled benazolin; the unit weight distribution study of radioactivity in benazolin followed the decreasing trend in different phases in following order of electrolyte>colloidal> micro aggregate > sediment phases respectively. The percentage distribution of maize straw (fresh organic matter) was also found highest in electrolyte phase followed the same order as in the case of benazolin. It was observed in phase-wise distribution study that radioactivity either of 14C-maize straw or 14C-benazolin was mostly concentrated in the sediment phase followed by micro aggregate, colloidal and electrolyte phase. From this it was clear that the soil columns, which received maize straw, have bound the pesticide benazolin and hindered the translocation to the lower layers leading to higher percentage of recovered radioactivity at top layer. Thus, these two results can be correlated in

Chowdhury, Ashim

2010-05-01

107

Selected phenolic compounds in cultivated plants: ecologic functions, health implications, and modulation by pesticides.  

PubMed Central

Phenolic compounds are widely distributed in the plant kingdom. Plant tissues may contain up to several grams per kilogram. External stimuli such as microbial infections, ultraviolet radiation, and chemical stressors induce their synthesis. The phenolic compounds resveratrol, flavonoids, and furanocoumarins have many ecologic functions and affect human health. Ecologic functions include defense against microbial pathogens and herbivorous animals. Phenolic compounds may have both beneficial and toxic effects on human health. Effects on low-density lipoproteins and aggregation of platelets are beneficial because they reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. Mutagenic, cancerogenic, and phototoxic effects are risk factors of human health. The synthesis of phenolic compounds in plants can be modulated by the application of herbicides and, to a lesser extent, insecticides and fungicides. The effects on ecosystem functioning and human health are complex and cannot be predicted with great certainty. The consequences of the combined natural and pesticide-induced modulating effects for ecologic functions and human health should be further evaluated.

Daniel, O; Meier, M S; Schlatter, J; Frischknecht, P

1999-01-01

108

Selected phenolic compounds in cultivated plants: ecologic functions, health implications, and modulation by pesticides.  

PubMed

Phenolic compounds are widely distributed in the plant kingdom. Plant tissues may contain up to several grams per kilogram. External stimuli such as microbial infections, ultraviolet radiation, and chemical stressors induce their synthesis. The phenolic compounds resveratrol, flavonoids, and furanocoumarins have many ecologic functions and affect human health. Ecologic functions include defense against microbial pathogens and herbivorous animals. Phenolic compounds may have both beneficial and toxic effects on human health. Effects on low-density lipoproteins and aggregation of platelets are beneficial because they reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. Mutagenic, cancerogenic, and phototoxic effects are risk factors of human health. The synthesis of phenolic compounds in plants can be modulated by the application of herbicides and, to a lesser extent, insecticides and fungicides. The effects on ecosystem functioning and human health are complex and cannot be predicted with great certainty. The consequences of the combined natural and pesticide-induced modulating effects for ecologic functions and human health should be further evaluated. PMID:10229712

Daniel, O; Meier, M S; Schlatter, J; Frischknecht, P

1999-02-01

109

Rate coefficients of hydroxyl radical reactions with pesticide molecules and related compounds: A review  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rate coefficients published in the literature on hydroxyl radical reactions with pesticides and related compounds are discussed together with the experimental methods and the basic reaction mechanisms. Recommendations are made for the most probable values. Most of the molecules whose rate coefficients are discussed have aromatic ring: their rate coefficients are in the range of 2×109-1×1010 mol-1 dm3 s-1. The rate coefficients show some variation with the electron withdrawing-donating nature of the substituent on the ring. The rate coefficients for triazine pesticides (simazine, atrazine, prometon) are all around 2.5×109 mol-1 dm3 s-1. The values do not show variation with the substituent on the s-triazine ring. The rate coefficients for the non-aromatic molecules which have C=C double bonds or several C-H bonds may also be above 1×109 mol-1 dm3 s-1. However, the values for molecules without C=C double bonds or several C-H bonds are in the 1×107-1×109 mol-1 dm3 s-1 range.

Wojnárovits, László; Takács, Erzsébet

2014-03-01

110

Microbiological degradation of atmospheric organic compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Until now, aerosol transformation was assumed to be via chemical or physical processes. Here we present evidence that an important class of organic aerosols - dicarboxylic acids (DCA) - can be efficiently transformed by existing airborne microbes (bacteria and fungi) in the boundary layer. Isotopic studies indicate that microbiological entities transform and use DCA as nutrients. Several observed products are toxicants or pathogens. Identified volatile products indicate that DCA can be recycled back to the atmosphere via microbiological processes. Thus, biodegradation could be an important atmospheric transformation pathway for organic compounds.

Ariya, Parisa A.; Nepotchatykh, Oleg; Ignatova, Olga; Amyot, Marc

2002-11-01

111

Risk assessment of organic pesticides pollution in surface water of Hangzhou.  

PubMed

Advances in research on pollution of organic pesticides (OPs) in surface water, pollution survey and risk assessments of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) of surface water in Hangzhou are conducted. Total concentrations of dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) and hexachloride-benzene (HCH) in surface water were observed to be 0-0.270 microg/L and 0-0.00625 microg/L respectively. DDE, as a metabolite of DDT and many species of OPP(S) were determined in some samples of surface water. Parathion, the main pollutant among OPPs in surface water of Hangzhou, was observed to be 0-0.445 microg/L. Based on these experimental results, health risk assessments on the organic pollution are developed. It is observed that the total risk "R (T)" at present time of surface water in Hangzhou is mainly contributed by organophosphorus pesticides, especially Parathion; HCH and DDT are not the main contaminants; on the contrary, organophosphorous pesticides, especially Parathion, must be of concern at the present time. PMID:16917719

Sun, Q; Zhu, L; Dong, M

2006-06-01

112

Chemicapacitive microsensors for volatile organic compound detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

A low-cost, low-power volatile organic compound (VOC) sensor has been constructed from an array of micromachined parallel-plate capacitors. The sensor has demonstrated detection of many VOCs well below the lower explosive limits and could be used in industrial leak monitoring applications or for homeland defense. In place of a standard dielectric, the individual capacitors were filled with selectively absorbing polymers.

S. V. Patel; T. E. Mlsna; B. Fruhberger; E. Klaassen; S. Cemalovic; D. R. Baselt

2003-01-01

113

Reflectance spectroscopy of organic compounds: 1. Alkanes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reflectance spectra of the organic compounds comprising the alkane series are presented from the ultraviolet to midinfrared, 0.35 to 15.5 mum. Alkanes are hydrocarbon molecules containing only single carbon-carbon bonds, and are found naturally on the Earth and in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Saturn's moon, Titan. This paper presents the spectral properties of the alkanes as the

Roger N. Clark; John M. Curchin; Todd M. Hoefen; Gregg A. Swayze

2009-01-01

114

Reflectance spectroscopy of organic compounds: 1. Alkanes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reflectance spectra of the organic compounds comprising the alkane series are presented from the ultraviolet to midinfrared, 0.35 to 15.5 ?m. Alkanes are hydrocarbon molecules containing only single carbon-carbon bonds, and are found naturally on the Earth and in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Saturn's moon, Titan. This paper presents the spectral properties of the alkanes as the

Roger N. Clark; John M. Curchin; Todd M. Hoefen; Gregg A. Swayze

2009-01-01

115

Organic foods contain higher levels of certain nutrients, lower levels of pesticides, and may provide health benefits for the consumer.  

PubMed

The multi-billion dollar organic food industry is fueled by consumer perception that organic food is healthier (greater nutritional value and fewer toxic chemicals). Studies of the nutrient content in organic foods vary in results due to differences in the ground cover and maturity of the organic farming operation. Nutrient content also varies from farmer to farmer and year to year. However, reviews of multiple studies show that organic varieties do provide significantly greater levels of vitamin C, iron, magnesium, and phosphorus than non-organic varieties of the same foods. While being higher in these nutrients, they are also significantly lower in nitrates and pesticide residues. In addition, with the exception of wheat, oats, and wine, organic foods typically provide greater levels of a number of important antioxidant phytochemicals (anthocyanins, flavonoids, and carotenoids). Although in vitro studies of organic fruits and vegetables consistently demonstrate that organic foods have greater antioxidant activity, are more potent suppressors of the mutagenic action of toxic compounds, and inhibit the proliferation of certain cancer cell lines, in vivo studies of antioxidant activity in humans have failed to demonstrate additional benefit. Clear health benefits from consuming organic dairy products have been demonstrated in regard to allergic dermatitis. PMID:20359265

Crinnion, Walter J

2010-04-01

116

SAMPLING METHODOLOGY FOR AIRBORNE SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC POLLUTANTS USING POLYURETHANE FOAMS (COLLECTION, PESTICIDES, VOLATILE)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Indoor and ambient air organic pollutants have been gaining attention because they have been measured at levels with possible health effects. Studies have shown that most airborne polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides and many polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are present in the free vapor state. The purpose of this research was to extend recent investigative work with polyurethane foam (PUF) as

FRANK DAVID STEVENS

1984-01-01

117

NEAR CRITICAL CO2 EXTRACTION OF HAZARDOUS ORGANICS FROM ACRYLONITRILE, PESTICIDE AND STEEL MILL WASTES  

EPA Science Inventory

Near critical carbon dioxide was used to extract hazardous organic chemicals from three aqueous waste streams in a pilot plant scale continuous liquid-liquid extraction system. Extractions were performed on waste streams representative of actual streams from steel, pesticide, and...

118

PESTICIDE SORPTION ON GEOLOGIC MATERIAL OF VARYING ORGANIC CARBON CONTENT (JOURNAL VERSION)  

EPA Science Inventory

Sorption of three pesticides on geologic material ranging in organic carbon content from 0.33 to 6.9 g/kg was measured in soil columns using a miscible displacement technique. An octanol-water partitioning model was shown to be inappropriate for predicting sorption of the less hy...

119

Organic compounds in White River water used for public supply near Indianapolis, Indiana, 2002-05  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) characterized the occurrence of 277 organic compounds in source water (stream water collected before treatment) and finished water (treated water before distribution) from the White River North treatment plant, one of several community water systems that use the White River as its primary water supply (fig. 1). Samples were collected at least monthly during 2002-05 and included 30 source- and 13 finished-water samples. The samples were analyzed for pesticides and selected pesticide degradates (or 'breakdown products'), solvents, gasoline hydrocarbons, disinfection by-products, personal-care and domestic-use products, and other organic compounds. Community water systems are required to monitor for compounds regulated under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Most of the compounds tested in this study are not regulated under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) federal drinking-water standards (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2007a). The White River study is part of the ongoing Source Water-Quality Assessment (SWQA) investigation of community water systems that withdraw from rivers across the United States. More detailed information and references on the sampling-design methodology, specific compounds monitored, and the national study are described by Carter and others (2007).

Lathrop, Tim; Moran, Dan

2011-01-01

120

Self assembly properties of primitive organic compounds  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A central event in the origin of life was the self-assembly of amphiphilic, lipid-like compounds into closed microenvironments. If a primitive macromolecular replicating system could be encapsulated within a vesicular membrane, the components of the system would share the same microenvironment, and the result would be a step toward true cellular function. The goal of our research has been to determine what amphiphilic molecules might plausibly have been available on the early Earth to participate in the formation of such boundary structures. To this end, we have investigated primitive organic mixtures present in carbonaceous meteorites such as the Murchison meteorite, which contains 1-2 percent of its mass in the form of organic carbon compounds. It is likely that such compounds contributed to the inventory of organic carbon on the prebiotic earth, and were available to participate in chemical evolution leading to the emergence of the first cellular life forms. We found that Murchison components extracted into non-polar solvent systems are surface active, a clear indication of amphiphilic character. One acidic fraction self-assembles into vesicular membranes that provide permeability barriers to polar solutes. Other evidence indicates that the membranes are bimolecular layers similar to those formed by contemporary membrane lipids. We conclude that bilayer membrane formation by primitive amphiphiles on the early Earth is feasible. However, only a minor fraction of acidic amphiphiles assembles into bilayers, and the resulting membranes require narrowly defined conditions of pH and ionic composition to be stable. It seems unlikely, therefore, that meteoritic infall was a direct source of membrane amphiphiles. Instead, the hydrocarbon components and their derivatives more probably would provide an organic stock available for chemical evolution. Our current research is directed at possible reactions which would generate substantial quantities of membranogenic amphiphiles. One possibility is photochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons.

Deamer, D. W.

1991-01-01

121

Production of volatile organic compounds by mycobacteria.  

PubMed

The need for improved rapid diagnostic tests for tuberculosis disease has prompted interest in the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex bacteria. We have investigated VOCs emitted by Mycobacterium bovis BCG grown on Lowenstein-Jensen media using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry and thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Compounds observed included dimethyl sulphide, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, butanone, 2-methyl-1-butanol, methyl 2-methylbutanoate, 2-phenylethanol and hydrogen sulphide. Changes in levels of acetaldehyde, methanol and ammonia were also observed. The compounds identified are not unique to M. bovis BCG, and further studies are needed to validate their diagnostic value. Investigations using an ultra-rapid gas chromatograph with a surface acoustic wave sensor (zNose) demonstrated the presence of 2-phenylethanol (PEA) in the headspace of cultures of M. bovis BCG and Mycobacterium smegmatis, when grown on Lowenstein-Jensen supplemented with glycerol. PEA is a reversible inhibitor of DNA synthesis. It is used during selective isolation of gram-positive bacteria and may also be used to inhibit mycobacterial growth. PEA production was observed to be dependent on growth of mycobacteria. Further study is required to elucidate the metabolic pathways involved and assess whether this compound is produced during in vivo growth of mycobacteria. PMID:22224870

McNerney, Ruth; Mallard, Kim; Okolo, Phyllis Ifeoma; Turner, Claire

2012-03-01

122

Organic-solvent-free extraction method for determination of carbamate and carbamoyloxime pesticides in soil and sediment samples.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the usefulness of monochloroacetic acid buffer (MCAAB) for extracting several carbamate/carbamoyloxime pesticides from a silt-loam soil and sediment, and an organic clay soil. The MCAAB extraction method, relative to acetonitrile and methanol extractants, was more accurate and precise for extraction of aldicarb, aldicarb sulfoxide, aldicarb sulfone, oxamyl, methomyl, carbofuran, 3-hydroxy-carbofuran, and propoxur; with recoveries ranging from 78.8% to 121.1%. Recoveries of carbaryl and methiocarb ranged from 0% to 64.1%. The MCCAB extraction method did not perform well for extraction of most compounds from the organic clay soil, with recoveries ranging from 0% to 66.7%. PMID:19771381

Lu, Hai; Lin, Youjian; Wilson, P Chris

2009-11-01

123

Human Semen Quality in Relation to Dietary Pesticide Exposure and Organic Diet  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   The objective of the study was to corroborate or refute the hypothesis that farmers having a high intake of organic grown\\u000a commodities have a high semen quality due to their expected lower level of dietary pesticides intake. Food frequency data\\u000a and semen were collected from 256 farmers (171 traditional farmers and 85 organic farmers, overall participation rate: 32%)\\u000a who

R. K. Juhler; S. B. Larsen; O. Meyer; N. D. Jensen; M. Spanò; A. Giwercman; J. P. Bonde

1999-01-01

124

Adsorption of organic compounds by microbial biomass  

SciTech Connect

The adsorption of hazardous organic compounds such as phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 2-nitrophenol, chlorobenzene, and ethylbenzene onto two types of inactive microbial biomass (activated sludge and nitrifying bacteria) was studied. The adsorption isotherms could be expressed by the Freundlich adsorption isotherm and were found to be nearly linear over the range of concentrations (50-200 mg/l) studied. Desorption studies showed that the adsorption process was partially reversible. Heat of sorption was estimated and indicate that the biosorption process involves a physical rather than a chemical mechanism. The adsorptive capacity of biomass is about two to three orders of magnitude less than activated carbon. In bisolute systems, the uptake of each solute is reduced in the presence of a second solute, but the combined adsorptive capacity was greater than that for either of the individual substances from its pure solution. The compound with higher octanol/water partition coefficient was observed to be more favorably adsorbed. In the case of activated carbon, the more hydrophobic compound was observed to be more favorably adsorbed. The uptake of each solute is reduced, when the initial concentration of other solute is increased. In multi-solute systems, the equilibrium capacity for each solute is reduced significantly in the presence of other solutes and the effect of competition become more pronounced with the increase in number of solutes in solution. The overall adsorption capacity of biomass was barely affected by the presence of more solutes in solution. Live and inactive biomass do not exhibit the same level of biosorptive uptake, and the differences appear to depend on the specific organic compound.

Selvakumar, A.

1988-01-01

125

ANALYTICAL METHODS DEVELOPED FOR THE CHILDREN'S TOTAL EXPOSURES TO PERSISTENT PESTICIDES AND OTHER PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (CTEPP) STUDY  

EPA Science Inventory

The Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Organic Pollutants (CTEPP) study was designed by the U.S. EPA to collect data on young children's exposures to pesticides and other pollutants in their everyday environments in support of the Food Quality...

126

Water-quality assessment of the Ozark Plateaus study unit, Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma; organic compounds in surface water, bed sediment, and biological tissue, 1992-95  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Organic-compound samples, including pesticides and semi-volatiles, were collected from 1992-95 at 43 surface-water and 27 bed-sediment and biological-tissue sampling sites within the Ozark Plateaus National Water-Quality Assessment Program study unit. Most surface-water, bed-sediment, and biological-tissue sites have drainage basins predominantly in the Springfield and Salem Plateaus. At most surface-water sampling sites, one to three pesticide samples were collected in the spring and early summer of 1994 and 1995; two sites had additional samples collected either weekly, biweekly, or monthly from February 1994 through December 1994. At most bed-sediment and biological-tissue sampling sites, a single organic-compounds sample was collected. Agricultural pesticide use was approximately 4.9 million pounds of active ingredients per year from 1987-91 in the study unit and was generally greatest in the Springfield and Salem Plateaus pasturelands and in the Osage Plains and Mississippi Alluvial Plain cropland areas. The most frequently applied pesticide in the study unit was 2,4-D. Atrazine was the second most frequently applied pesticide. Corn, pasture, rice, sorghum, and soybeans received approximately 85 percent of the pesticides applied within the study unit. The highest pesticide application rate occurred on these crops in the Mississippi Alluvial and Osage Plains. Pastureland was the crop type that received the greatest amount of pesticides in 53 of the 96 counties in the study unit. The most commonly detected herbicide (63 samples) in surface water was atrazine. Five other pesticides--desethylatrazine, tebuthiuron, prometon, metolachlor, and simazine--were detected in 15 or more samples. The most commonly detected insecticide (13 samples) was p,p'-DDE. Two other insecticides, diazinon and cis-permethrin, were detected in seven or more samples. Pesticides were detected at 39 surface-water sites; samples collected at Yocum Creek near Oak Grove, Ark. had the most pesticide detections (13). Seventeen other sites had samples with six or more pesticide detections. Analysis of pesticide data collected at surface-water sites indicates that the largest variety of different pesticides detected (18) was in small, agricultural drainage basins; the largest percentage of detections of a single pesticide (about 80) was in medium, agricultural basins. Pesticide concentrations were small, and in most cases, at or near the detection limit. Maximum concentrations ranged from 0.001 to 0.007 micrograms per liter (mg/L) at small, forest sites; 0.001 to 0.029 mg/L at medium, forest sites; 0.001 to 0.079 mg/L at small, agricultural sites; and 0.003 to 0.29 mg/L at medium, agricultural sites. Pesticides were detected significantly more often in medium, agricultural basins in the Springfield Plateau. The most commonly detected (13 samples) organic compound in bed sediment, in concentrations noticeably above background levels, was 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene; the maximum concentration of 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene was 130 micrograms per kilogram. Seventeen or more compounds were detected in bed-sediment samples collected at three sites. Four compounds were detected in biological-tissue samples: p,p'-DDT in Corbicula fluminea (Asiatic clam) tissue collected at the Osage River near St. Thomas, Mo. and cis-chlordane, trans-chlordane, and trans-nonachlor in C. fluminea tissue collected at the James River near Boaz, Mo. Organic compounds collected at surface-water, bed-sediment, or biological-tissue sampling sites were not detected in concentrations that exceeded any health criteria or standards. Based on this information, organic compounds do not pose any widespread or persistent problems in the study unit.

Bell, Richard W.; Davis, Jerri V.; Femmer, Suzanne R.; Joseph, Robert L.

1997-01-01

127

Preparing Soil Samples for Volatile Organic Compound Analysis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Three equilibrium headspace and three solvent extraction methods of preparing soil samples for determining volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were compared. Soil samples were spiked with five gasoline range aromatic compounds and four chlorinated compounds...

A. D. Hewitt

1997-01-01

128

A review of the tissue residue approach for organic and organometallic compounds in aquatic organisms.  

PubMed

This paper reviews the tissue residue approach (TRA) for toxicity assessment as it applies to organic chemicals and some organometallic compounds (Sn, Hg, and Pb) in aquatic organisms. Specific emphasis was placed on evaluating key factors that influence interpretation of critical body residue (CBR) toxicity metrics including data quality issues, lipid dynamics, choice of endpoints, processes that alter toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics, phototoxicity, species- and life stage-specific sensitivities, and biotransformation. The vast majority of data available on TRA is derived from laboratory studies of acute lethal responses to organic toxicants exhibiting baseline toxicity. Application of the TRA to various baseline toxicants as well as substances with specific modes of action via receptor-mediated processes, such as chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, and organometallics is discussed, as is application of TRA concepts in field assessments of tissue residues. In contrast to media-based toxicity relationships, CBR values tend to be less variable and less influenced by factors that control bioavailability and bioaccumulation, and TRA can be used to infer mechanisms of toxic action, evaluate the toxicity of mixtures, and interpret field data on bioaccumulated toxicants. If residue-effects data are not available, body residues can be estimated, as has been done using the target lipid model for baseline toxicants, to derive critical values for risk assessment. One of the primary unresolved issues complicating TRA for organic chemicals is biotransformation. Further work on the influence of biotransformation, a better understanding of contaminant lipid interactions, and an explicit understanding of the time dependency of CBRs and receptor-mediated toxicity are all required to advance this field. Additional residue-effects data on sublethal endpoints, early life stages, and a wider range of legacy and emergent contaminants will be needed to improve the ability to use TRA for organic and organometallic compounds. PMID:21184569

McElroy, Anne E; Barron, Mace G; Beckvar, Nancy; Driscoll, Susan B Kane; Meador, James P; Parkerton, Tom F; Preuss, Thomas G; Steevens, Jeffery A

2011-01-01

129

Biogenic volatile organic compounds - small is beautiful  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While canopy and regional scale flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs) are essential to obtain an integrated picture of total compound reaching the atmosphere, many fascinating and important emission details are waiting to be discovered at smaller scales, in different ecological and functional compartments. We concentrate on bVOCs below ground to <2m above ground level. Emissions at leaf scale are well documented and widely presented, and are not discussed here. Instead we describe some details of recent research on rhizosphere bVOCs, and bVOCs associated with pollination of flowers. Although bVOC emissions from soil surfaces are small, bVOCs are exuded by roots of some plant species, and can be extracted from decaying litter. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the rhizosphere provide a specialised carbon source for micro-organisms, helping to define the micro-organism community structure, and impacting on nutrient cycles which are partly controlled by microorganisms. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the soil system could also affect the aboveground structure of ecosystems because of their role in plant defence strategies and as mediating chemicals in allelopathy. A gradient of monoterpene concentration was found in soil around Pinus sylvestris and Pinus halepensis, decreasing with distance from the tree. Some compounds (?-pinene, sabinene, humulene and caryophyllene) in mineral soil were linearly correlated with the total amount of each compound in the overlying litter, indicating that litter might be the dominant source of these compounds. However, ?-pinene did not fall within the correlation, indicating a source other than litter, probably root exudates. We also show that rhizosphere bVOCs can be a carbon source for soil microbes. In a horizontal gradient from Populus tremula trees, microbes closest to the tree trunk were better enzymatically equipped to metabolise labeled monoterpene substrate. Monoterpenes can also increase the degradation rate in soil of the persistant organic pollutants, likely acting as analogues for the cometabo-lism of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) Flowers of a ginger species (Alpinia kwangsiensis) and a fig species (Ficus hispida) showed different bVOC signals pre- and post pollination. For Ficus hispida, there are three floral stages of a fig-wasp dependency mechanism: receptive, post pollinator and interfloral. Of 28 compounds detected, transcaryophyllene with trans-?-farnesene were the most important at the receptor stage, trans-caryophyllene was the most abundant at the post-pollinator stage, and isoprene was the most abundant in the interfloral stage. Alpinia kwangsiensis presents two morphologies for the reproductive parts of the flower. The "anaflexistyle" morphology has the flower style lowered in the morning and raised in the afternoon. This is reversed for the "cataflexistyle" morphology. The bVOC mixture emitted by each morphology in morning and afternoon was complex. However for compounds showing a difference (cis-ocimene and Z + E epoxy -ocimene), the emissions from the anaflexistyle were greater than from the cataflexistyle, and were greater in the afternoon compared with the morning emissions. Where large flowering plant species are abundant, big changes in monoterpene emissions at < 2m above ground level over relatively small periods of time during pollination are likely to be missed in larger scale integrated flux measurements.

Owen, S. M.; Asensio, D.; Li, Q.; Penuelas, J.

2012-12-01

130

Organic Compounds Evaporating from Building Materials into Indoor Atmosphere.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Volatile organic compounds evaporating from building materials produce odor to indoor atmosphere and may cause health hazards. The latest publications on organic compounds emitted by building and interior finish materials have been reviewed. These publica...

S. Jaemsae A. Kivistoe M. Ojala K. Saarela M. Waeaenaenen

1986-01-01

131

Palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of bio-oils and organic compounds  

DOEpatents

The invention provides palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of bio-oils and certain organic compounds. Experimental results have shown unexpected and superior results for palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of organic compounds typically found in bio-oils.

Elliott, Douglas C [Kennewick, WA; Hu, Jianli [Richland, WA; Hart,; Todd, R [Kennewick, WA; Neuenschwander, Gary G [Burbank, WA

2011-06-07

132

Volatile Organic Compound Analysis in Istanbul  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volatile Organic Compound Analysis in Istanbul Ö. Çapraz1, A. Deniz1,3, A. Ozturk2, S. Incecik1, H. Toros1 and, M. Coskun1 (1) Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Department of Meteorology, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey. (2) Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Chemical and Metallurgical, Chemical Engineering, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey. (3) Marmara Clean Air Center, Ministry of Environment and Urbanization, Ni?anta??, 34365, ?stanbul, Turkey. One of the major problems of megacities is air pollution. Therefore, investigations of air quality are increasing and supported by many institutions in recent years. Air pollution in Istanbul contains many components that originate from a wide range of industrial, heating, motor vehicle, and natural emissions sources. VOC, originating mainly from automobile exhaust, secondhand smoke and building materials, are one of these compounds containing some thousands of chemicals. In spite of the risks to human health, relatively little is known about the levels of VOC in Istanbul. In this study, ambient air quality measurements of 32 VOCs including hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons and carbonyls were conducted in Ka??thane (Golden Horn) region in Istanbul during the winter season of 2011 in order to develop the necessary scientific framework for the subsequent developments. Ka??thane creek valley is the source part of the Golden Horn and one of the most polluted locations in Istanbul due to its topographical form and pollutant sources in the region. In this valley, horizontal and vertical atmospheric motions are very weak. The target compounds most commonly found were benzene, toluene, xylene and ethyl benzene. Concentrations of total hydrocarbons ranged between 1.0 and 10.0 parts per billion, by volume (ppbv). Ambient air levels of halogenated hydrocarbons appeared to exhibit unique spatial variations and no single factor seemed to explain trends for this group of compounds. N-octane, 3-methylheptane, n-nonane, 2,3,4-trimethylpentane and n-hexane parameters ranged between 3 ppbv and maximum value of 10 ppbv. The other VOC parameters are measured below 3 ppbv value. At participating urban locations for the year of data considered, levels of carbonyls were higher than the level of the other organic compound groups, suggesting that emissions from motor vehicles and photochemical reactions strongly in?uence ambient air concentrations of carbonyls. Of the most prevalent carbonyls, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were the dominant compounds, ranging from 1.5-7.4 ppbv for formaldehyde, to 0.8-2.7 ppbv for acetaldehyde. Keywords: Air quality, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC), industry, meteorology, urban, Ka??thane, ?stanbul. Acknowledgment: This work was part of the TUJJB-TUMEHAP-01-10 and Turkish Scientific and Technical Research Council Project No: 109Y132.

?apraz, Ö.; Deniz, A.; Öztürk, A.; Incecik, S.; Toros, H.; Co?kun, M.

2012-04-01

133

Molecular classification of pesticides including persistent organic pollutants, phenylurea and sulphonylurea herbicides.  

PubMed

Pesticide residues in wine were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Retentions are modelled by structure-property relationships. Bioplastic evolution is an evolutionary perspective conjugating effect of acquired characters and evolutionary indeterminacy-morphological determination-natural selection principles; its application to design co-ordination index barely improves correlations. Fractal dimensions and partition coefficient differentiate pesticides. Classification algorithms are based on information entropy and its production. Pesticides allow a structural classification by nonplanarity, and number of O, S, N and Cl atoms and cycles; different behaviours depend on number of cycles. The novelty of the approach is that the structural parameters are related to retentions. Classification algorithms are based on information entropy. When applying procedures to moderate-sized sets, excessive results appear compatible with data suffering a combinatorial explosion. However, equipartition conjecture selects criterion resulting from classification between hierarchical trees. Information entropy permits classifying compounds agreeing with principal component analyses. Periodic classification shows that pesticides in the same group present similar properties; those also in equal period, maximum resemblance. The advantage of the classification is to predict the retentions for molecules not included in the categorization. Classification extends to phenyl/sulphonylureas and the application will be to predict their retentions. PMID:24905607

Torrens, Francisco; Castellano, Gloria

2014-01-01

134

Alternatives to Automotive Consumer Products That Use Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) and/or Chlorinated Organic Compound Solvents. Addendum.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This addendum to the document entitled 'Alternatives to Automotive Consumer Products that use Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) and/or Chlorinated Organic Compound Solvents' presents the questionnaires that were filled out by the staff of the Institute for...

D. Wolf J. Zavadil M. Morris

2004-01-01

135

Simultaneous determination of pesticides, biopesticides and mycotoxins in organic products applying a quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe extraction procedure and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method for the simultaneous determination of pesticides, biopesticides and mycotoxins from organic products was developed. Extraction of more than 90 compounds was evaluated and performed by using a modified QuEChERS-based (acronym of Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe) sample preparation procedure. The method was based on a single extraction with acidified acetonitrile, followed by partitioning with salts, avoiding

R. Romero-González; A. Garrido Frenich; J. L. Martínez Vidal; O. D. Prestes; S. L. Grio

2011-01-01

136

Effect of Endocrine Disruptor Pesticides: A Review  

PubMed Central

Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) are compounds that alter the normal functioning of the endocrine system of both wildlife and humans. A huge number of chemicals have been identified as endocrine disruptors, among them several pesticides. Pesticides are used to kill unwanted organisms in crops, public areas, homes and gardens, and parasites in medicine. Human are exposed to pesticides due to their occupations or through dietary and environmental exposure (water, soil, air). For several years, there have been enquiries about the impact of environmental factors on the occurrence of human pathologies. This paper reviews the current knowledge of the potential impacts of endocrine disruptor pesticides on human health.

Mnif, Wissem; Hassine, Aziza Ibn Hadj; Bouaziz, Aicha; Bartegi, Aghleb; Thomas, Olivier; Roig, Benoit

2011-01-01

137

Sediment contamination of residential streams in the metropolitan kansas city area, USA: Part I. distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and pesticide-related compounds  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This is the first part of a study that evaluates the influence of nonpoint-source contaminants on the sediment quality of five streams within the metropolitan Kansas City area, central United States. Surficial sediment was collected in 2003 from 29 sites along five streams with watersheds that extend from the core of the metropolitan area to its development fringe. Sediment was analyzed for 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 3 common polychlorinated biphenyl mixtures (Aroclors), and 25 pesticide-related compounds of eight chemical classes. Multiple PAHs were detected at more than 50% of the sites, and concentrations of total PAHs ranged from 290 to 82,150 ??g/kg (dry weight). The concentration and frequency of detection of PAHs increased with increasing urbanization of the residential watersheds. Four- and five-ring PAH compounds predominated the PAH composition (73-100%), especially fluoranthene and pyrene. The PAH composition profiles along with the diagnostic isomer ratios [e.g., anthracene/(anthracene + phenanthrene), 0.16 ?? 0.03; fluoranthene/(fluoranthene + pyrene), 0.55 ?? 0.01)] indicate that pyrogenic sources (i.e., coal-tar-related operations or materials and traffic-related particles) may be common PAH contributors to these residential streams. Historical-use organochlorine insecticides and their degradates dominated the occurrences of pesticide-related compounds, with chlordane and dieldrin detected in over or nearly 50% of the samples. The occurrence of these historical organic compounds was associated with past urban applications, which may continue to be nonpoint sources replenishing local streams. Concentrations of low molecular weight (LMW; two or three rings) and high molecular weight (HMW; four to six rings) PAHs covaried along individual streams but showed dissimilar distribution patterns between the streams, while the historical pesticide-related compounds generally increased in concentration downstream. Correlations were noted between LMW and HMW PAHs for most of the streams and between historical-use organochlorine compounds and total organic carbon and clay content of sediments for one of the streams (Brush Creek). Stormwater runoff transport modes are proposed to describe how the two groups of contaminants migrated and distributed in the streambed. ?? 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

Tao, J.; Huggins, D.; Welker, G.; Dias, J. R.; Ingersoll, C. G.; Murowchick, J. B.

2010-01-01

138

A quantitative determination of organophosphate pesticides in organic solvents  

Microsoft Academic Search

An amperometric acetylcholinesterase (AChE) biosensor based on thiocholine-hexacyanoferrate reaction was developed for the analysis of OPCs in pure organic solvents. The enzyme (AChE) was co-immobilized with an electron mediator, Prussian Blue, on the surface of a graphite electrode. The effect of organic solvents on acetylcholinesterase activity was estimated in the presence of polar (hydrophilic) and non-polar (hydrophobic) organic solvents in

E Wilkins; M Carter; J Voss; D Ivnitski

2000-01-01

139

CTEPP OVERVIEW: A PILOT STUDY OF CHILDREN'S TOTAL EXPOSURE TO PERSISTENT PESTICIDES AND OTHER PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS  

EPA Science Inventory

The research study, "Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Organic Pollutants," (CTEPP) is a pilot-scale project involving about 260 children in their everyday surroundings. The objectives of CTEPP are twofold: (1) To measure the agg...

140

Alkaline dechlorination of chlorinated volatile organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

The vast majority of contaminated sites in the United States and abroad are contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE), trichloroethane (TCA), and chloroform. These VOCs are mobile and persistent in the subsurface and present serious health risks at trace concentrations. The goal of this project was to develop a new chemical treatment system that can rapidly and effectively degrade chlorinated VOCs. The system is based on our preliminary findings that strong alkalis such as sodium hydroxide (NaOH) can absorb and degrade TCE. The main objectives of this study were to determine the reaction rates between chlorinated VOCs, particularly TCE, and strong alkalis, to elucidate the reaction mechanisms and by-products, to optimize the chemical reactions under various experimental conditions, and to develop a laboratory bench- scale alkaline destruction column that can be used to destroy vapor- phase TCE.

Gu, B.; Siegrist, R.L.

1996-06-01

141

Cadmium: Position Document 2/3. Notice of Preliminary Determination to Cancel Registrations and Deny Applications for All Pesticide Products that Contain Cadmium Compounds; Notice of Availability of Technical Support Document and Draft Notice of Intent to Cancel.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Cadmium compounds are contained as active ingredients in pesticides and fungicides. The Position Document addresses the risks and benefits of pesticide products containing the subject active ingredient. The Agency has determined that the use of products c...

1977-01-01

142

EPIDEMIOLOGY OF SUICIDES AMONG WORKERS EXPOSED OCCUPATIONALLY TO ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS, ORGANIC SOLVENTS AND PESTICIDES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary. We present an epidemiological study on a possible association between suicide and occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields, pesticides and organic solvents. A total of 7,512 deaths within the period 1994-2002 were analyzed. The assessment of occupational exposure was based on the job title reported in death certificates and medical protocols. The exposed group comprised 5,762 deaths (1,890 workers exposed

Aleksandra Arizanovi?

2004-01-01

143

Acetylcholinesterase-polyaniline biosensor investigation of organophosphate pesticides in selected organic solvents  

Microsoft Academic Search

The behavior of an amperometric organic-phase biosensor consisting of a gold electrode modified first with a mercaptobenzothiazole self-assembled monolayer, followed by electropolymerization of polyaniline in which acetylcholinesterase as enzyme was immobilized, has been developed and evaluated for organophosphorous pesticide detection. The voltammetric results have shown that the formal potential shifts anodically as the Au\\/MBT\\/PANI\\/AChE\\/PVAc thick-film biosensor responded to acetylthiocholine substrate

Vernon S. Somerset; Michael J. Klink; Priscilla G. L. Baker; Emmanuel I. Iwuoha

2007-01-01

144

Effect of washing treatments on pesticide residues and antioxidant compounds in Yuja ( Citrus junos Sieb ex Tanaka)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the removal efficiency of pesticide residues and microorganisms, and changes of the amount of antioxidant\\u000a compounds on yuja (Citrus junos Sieb ex Tanaka) by various washing methods. The washing methods were mechanical washing (MW), mechanical washing after soaking\\u000a in SAcEW, strong acidic electrolyzed water (SAcEW+MW), and soaking detergent solution (DW), with a tap water washing (TW)\\u000a as

Jung-Min Sung; Ki-Hyun Kwon; Jong-Hoon Kim; Jin-Woong Jeong

2011-01-01

145

Pesticide bioconcentration modelling for fruit trees.  

PubMed

The model presented allows simulating the pesticide concentration evolution in fruit trees and estimating the pesticide bioconcentration factor in fruits. Pesticides are non-ionic organic compounds that are degraded in soils cropped with woody species, fruit trees and other perennials. The model allows estimating the pesticide uptake by plants through the water transpiration stream and also the time in which maximum pesticide concentration occur in the fruits. The equation proposed presents the relationships between bioconcentration factor (BCF) and the following variables: plant water transpiration volume (Q), pesticide transpiration stream concentration factor (TSCF), pesticide stem-water partition coefficient (K(Wood,W)), stem dry biomass (M) and pesticide dissipation rate in the soil-plant system (k(EGS)). The modeling started and was developed from a previous model "Fruit Tree Model" (FTM), reported by Trapp and collaborators in 2003, to which was added the hypothesis that the pesticide degradation in the soil follows a first order kinetic equation. The FTM model for pesticides (FTM-p) was applied to a hypothetic mango plant cropping (Mangifera indica) treated with paclobutrazol (growth regulator) added to the soil. The model fitness was evaluated through the sensitivity analysis of the pesticide BCF values in fruits with respect to the model entry data variability. PMID:17092536

Paraíba, Lourival Costa

2007-01-01

146

Selected trace-element and synthetic-organic compound data for streambed sediment from the Clark Fork-Pend Oreille and Spokane River basins, Montana, Idaho, and Washington, 1998  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Most of the analytical results for synthetic organic compounds were reported as either estimated or non-detected values. Phthalates and polycyclic aro­matic hydrocarbons were the most frequently detected classes of synthetic organic compounds in streambed sediment. Organochlorine pesticide residues were detected at two sites. Polychlorinated biphenyls were detected at one site.

Beckwith, Michael A.

2002-01-01

147

Evaluation of soil contamination in intensive agricultural areas by pesticides and organic pollutants: south-eastern Spain as a case study.  

PubMed

A comprehensive survey of the occurrence and fate of pesticides and organic contaminants in soils from an intensive agricultural area devoted to horticultural production in plastic-based greenhouses has been performed to determine if the operation under integrated pest management practices has contributed to reduce the levels of these compounds. Almería province (south-eastern Spain) was selected for the case study. 38 agricultural soil samples (each sample corresponds to an independent private greenhouse) of areas working under integrated pest management (IPM) programs have been analyzed in order to evaluate their contamination fate. Sampling was designed to cover an area of about 400 km(2). Pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), phenolic compounds and di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) were monitored. The obtained results were compared to other studies reported in Spain and Europe. Among relevant persistent pesticides, DDTs and endosulfans were mainly found and the results indicated historical application, although recent application of endosulfan was rarely detected. PAHs were also found but to a lesser extent and derived from pyrogenic sources. DEHP levels were considerably higher in comparison to the other monitored analytes. The evaluation revealed that despite the use of IPM programs, pesticide and organic contaminants are still being detected in this type of agricultural soil, although at relatively low concentration levels. In general, the contamination rate was similar or lower in comparison to other agricultural areas from nearby regions or countries. However, further monitoring studies should be carried out to establish the possible reduction in contamination by the selected compounds. PMID:22370656

Plaza-Bolaños, Patricia; Padilla-Sánchez, Juan Antonio; Garrido-Frenich, Antonia; Romero-González, Roberto; Martínez-Vidal, José Luis

2012-04-01

148

Organic compounds in meteorites and their origins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The current investigation represents an extensively updated version of a review conducted by Anders et al. (1973). The investigation takes into account the literature through mid-1980. It is pointed out that Type 1 carbonaceous chondrites (C1) contain 6% of their cosmic complement of carbon, mainly in the form of organic matter. Most authors now agree that this material represents primitive prebiotic matter. The principal questions remaining are what abiotic processes formed the organic matter, and to what extent these processes took place in locales other than the solar nebula, such as interstellar clouds or meteorite parent bodes. The problem is approached in three stages. It is attempted to reconstruct the physical conditions during condensation from the clues contained in the inorganic matrix of the meteorite. The condensation behavior of carbon under these conditions is determined on the basis of thermodynamic calculations. Model experiments on the condensation of carbon are performed, and the synthesized compounds are compared with those actually found in meteorites.

Hayatsu, R.; Anders, E.

1981-01-01

149

Relative energy of organic compounds II. Halides, nitrogen, and sulfur compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

The energies of the following types of compounds are characterized by their calculated relative enthalpies: alkyl, alkenyl,\\u000a and aryl halides; carboxylic acid halides; carbonyl halides; amines; carboxylic acid amides; hydrazine derivatives; nitriles;\\u000a heteroaromatic compounds; nitro-compounds; organic nitrites and nitrates; organic sulfides; thiols; disulfides; sulfoxides;\\u000a sulfones; organic sulfites and sulfates; and selected inorganic compounds. Stabilization energy of pyrrol and thiophene has

Árpád Furka

2009-01-01

150

Toxicological assessment of isomeric pesticides: a strategy for testing of chiral organophosphorus (OP) compounds for delayed polyneuropathy in a regulatory setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many compounds, including some pesticides, contain structural centres of asymmetry, which convey the property of a type of stereoisomerism known as chirality. Such compounds can exist in two or more forms, depending on the number of chiral atoms and are termed stereoisomers or enantiomers. Stereoisomers of a particular compound can have different biological properties; one such of particular importance for

Jon M. Battershill; Philippa M. Edwards; Martin K. Johnson

2004-01-01

151

GLOBAL INVENTORY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS FORM ANTHROPOGENIC SOURCES  

EPA Science Inventory

The report describes a global inventory anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions that includes a separate inventory for each of seven pollutant groups--paraffins, olefins, aromatics, formaldehyde, other aldehydes, other aromatics, and marginally reactive compounds....

152

ACUTE TOXICITY OF SELECTED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS TO FATHEAD MINNOWS  

EPA Science Inventory

Static nonrenewal laboratory bioassays were conducted with 26 organic compounds commonly used by industry. The selected compounds represented the five following chemical classes: acids, alcohols, hydrocarbons, ketones and aldehydes, and phenols. Juvenile fathead minnows (Pimephal...

153

Molecular Models of Volatile Organic Compounds  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This month's Featured Molecules come from the Report from Other Journals column, Nature: Our Atmosphere in the Year of Planet Earth, and the summary found there of the paper by Lelieveld et al. (1, 2) Added to the collection are several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted by a variety of plants. The term VOCs is a common one in environmental chemistry, and is interpreted quite broadly, typically referring to any organic molecule with a vapor pressure sufficiently high to allow for part-per-billion levels in the atmosphere. Common VOCs include methane (the most prevalent VOC), benzene and benzene derivatives, chlorinated hydrocarbons, and many others. The source may be natural, as in the case of the plant emissions, or anthropogenic, as in the case of a molecule such as the gasoline additive methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).The oxidation of isoprene in the atmosphere has been a source of interest for many years. Several primary oxidation products are included in the molecule collection, although a number of isomeric forms are also possible (3).The area of VOCs provides innumerable topics for students research papers and projects at all levels of the curriculum from high-school chemistry through the undergraduate courses in chemistry and environmental science. Along the way students have the opportunity for exposure to fields such as epidemiology and toxicology, that may be new to them, but are of increasing importance in the environmental sciences. The MTBE story is an interesting one for students to discover, as it once again emphasizes the role that unintended consequences play in life. An exploration of the sources, structures, reactivity, health and environmental effects and ultimate fate of various VOCs reinforces in students minds just how interconnected the chemistry of the environment is, a lesson that bears repeating frequently.

154

Breath measurements as volatile organic compound biomarkers.  

PubMed Central

A brief review of the uses of breath analysis in studies of environmental exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is provided. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's large-scale Total Exposure Assessment Methodology Studies have measured concentrations of 32 target VOCs in the exhaled breath of about 800 residents of various U.S. cities. Since the previous 12-hr integrated personal air exposures to the same chemicals were also measured, the relation between exposure and body burden is illuminated. Another major use of the breath measurements has been to detect unmeasured pathways of exposure; the major impact of active smoking on exposure to benzene and styrene was detected in this way. Following the earlier field studies, a series of chamber studies have provided estimates of several important physiological parameters. Among these are the fraction, f, of the inhaled chemical that is exhaled under steady-state conditions and the residence times. tau i in several body compartments, which may be associated with the blood (or liver), organs, muscle, and fat. Most of the targeted VOCs appear to have similar residence times of a few minutes, 30 min, several hours, and several days in the respective tissue groups. Knowledge of these parameters can be helpful in estimating body burden from exposure or vice versa and in planning environmental studies, particularly in setting times to monitor breath in studies of the variation with time of body burden. Improvements in breath methods have made it possible to study short-term peak exposure situations such as filling a gas tank or taking a shower in contaminated water.

Wallace, L; Buckley, T; Pellizzari, E; Gordon, S

1996-01-01

155

Dissolved pesticides, dissolved organic carbon, and water-quality characteristics in selected Idaho streams, April--December 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-quality samples were collected from April through December 2010 from four streams in Idaho and analyzed for a suite of pesticides, including fungicides, by the U.S. Geological Survey. Water samples were collected from two agricultural and two nonagricultural (control) streams approximately biweekly from the beginning of the growing season (April) through the end of the calendar year (December). Samples were analyzed for 90 pesticides using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Twenty-three pesticides, including 8 fungicides, 10 herbicides, 3 insecticides, and 2 pesticide degradates, were detected in 45 water samples. The most frequently detected compounds in the two agricultural streams and their detection frequencies were metolachlor, 96 percent; azoxystrobin, 79 percent; boscalid, 79 percent; atrazine, 46 percent; pendimethalin, 33 percent; and trifluralin, 33 percent. Dissolved-pesticide concentrations ranged from below instrumental limits of detection (0.5-1.0 nanograms per liter) to 771 nanograms per liter (hexazinone). The total number of pesticides detected in any given water sample ranged from 0 to 11. Only three pesticides (atrazine, fipronil, and simazine) were detected in samples from the control streams during the sampling period.

Reilly, Timothy J.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Wilson, Emma R.; Battaglin, William A.

2012-01-01

156

Soluble organic compounds in the Tagish Lake meteorite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The C2 ungrouped Tagish Lake meteorite preserves a range of lithologies, reflecting variable degrees of parent-body aqueous alteration. Here, we report on soluble organic compounds, including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, monocarboxylic acids, and amino acids, found within specimens representative of the range of aqueous alteration. We find that differences in soluble organic compounds among the lithologies may be explained by oxidative, fluid-assisted alteration, primarily involving the derivation of soluble organic compounds from macromolecular material. In contrast, amino acids probably evolved from precursor molecules, albeit in parallel with other soluble organic compounds. Our results demonstrate the role of parent-body alteration in the modification of organic matter and generation of prebiotic compounds in the early solar system, and have implications for interpretation of the complement of soluble organic compounds in carbonaceous chondrites.

Hilts, Robert W.; Herd, Christopher D. K.; Simkus, Danielle N.; Slater, Greg F.

2014-04-01

157

Mechanochemical synthesis of organic compounds and composites with their participation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The results of experimental studies in the mechanochemical synthesis of organic compounds and composites with their participation published over the last 15 years are described systematically. The key reactions of organic compounds are considered: synthesis of the salts of organic acids, acylation, substitution, dehalogenation, esterification, hydrometallation and other reactions. Primary attention is devoted to systems and compounds that cannot be obtained by traditional chemistry methods.

Lyakhov, Nikolai Z.; Grigorieva, Tatiana F.; Barinova, Antonina P.; Vorsina, I. A.

2010-05-01

158

Separation of Organic Compounds from Surfactant Solutions: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review summarizes the recent development in separation of emulsified organic compounds from surfactant solutions for surfactant reuse and\\/or surfactant?contaminant disposal. Three major principles have been employed for separating organic compounds and\\/or surfactants from aqueous solutions, namely, organic compound inter?phase mass transfer, surfactant micelle removal, and manipulation of surfactant solution phase behavior. Details of these principles and their applications are

Hefa Cheng; David A. Sabatini

2007-01-01

159

Secondary organic aerosol from biogenic volatile organic compound mixtures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields from the ozonolysis of a Siberian fir needle oil (SFNO), a Canadian fir needle oil (CFNO), and several SOA precursor mixtures containing reactive and non-reactive volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were investigated. The use of precursor mixtures more completely describes the atmosphere where many VOCs exist. The addition of non-reactive VOCs such as bornyl acetate, camphene, and borneol had very little to no effect on SOA yields. The oxidation of VOC mixtures with VOC mass percentages similar to the SFNO produced SOA yields that became more similar to the SOA yield from SFNO as the complexity and concentration of VOCs within the mixture became more similar to overall SFNO composition. The SOA yield produced by the oxidation of CFNO was within the error of the SOA yield produced by the oxidation of SFNO at a similar VOC concentration. The SOA yields from SFNO were modeled using the volatility basis set (VBS), which predicts the SOA yields for a given mass concentration of mixtures containing similar VOCs.

Hatfield, Meagan L.; Huff Hartz, Kara E.

2011-04-01

160

Estimating pesticide sampling rates by the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) in the presence of natural organic matter and varying hydrodynamic conditions  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) was calibrated to monitor pesticides in water under controlled laboratory conditions. The effect of natural organic matter (NOM) on the sampling rates (Rs) was evaluated in microcosms containing -1 of total organic carbon (TOC). The effect of hydrodynamics was studied by comparing Rs values measured in stirred (SBE) and quiescent (QBE) batch experiments and a flow-through system (FTS). The level of NOM in the water used in these experiments had no effect on the magnitude of the pesticide sampling rates (p > 0.05). However, flow velocity and turbulence significantly increased the sampling rates of the pesticides in the FTS and SBE compared to the QBE (p < 0.001). The calibration data generated can be used to derive pesticide concentrations in water from POCIS deployed in stagnant and turbulent environmental systems without correction for NOM.

Charlestra, Lucner; Amirbahman, Aria; Courtemanch, David L.; Alvarez, David A.; Patterson, Howard

2012-01-01

161

Oceanic protection of prebiotic organic compounds from UV radiation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is frequently stated that UV light would cause massive destruction of prebiotic organic compounds because of the absence of an ozone layer. The elevated UV flux of the early sun compounds this problem. This applies to organic compounds of both terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin. Attempts to deal with this problem generally involve atmospheric absorbers. We show here that prebiotic organic polymers as well as several inorganic compounds are sufficient to protect oceanic organic molecules from UV degradation. This aqueous protection is in addition to any atmospheric UV absorbers and should be a ubiquitous planetary phenomenon serving to increase the size of planetary habitable zones.

Cleaves, H. J.; Miller, S. L.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

1998-01-01

162

Organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in 12 edible marine organisms from the Adriatic Sea, Italy, Spring 1997  

Microsoft Academic Search

Edible portions of 12 marine organisms from several areas of the Adriatic Sea, Italy, were collected during Spring 1997 and analysed for 32 organochlorine pesticides residues and 27 polychlorobiphenyl congeners. Only eight organochlorine pesticides—hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers, diphenyl-dichloro-trichloroethane (DDT) group, dieldrin—were determined at levels in the range <0.01–19.88 ng g wet weight, with 1,1'-dichloro-2,2'-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethylene (DDE) being the more relevant

A. di Muccio; P. Stefanelli; E. Funari; D. Attard Barbini; T. Generali; P. Pelosi; S. Girolimetti; G. Amendola; F. Vanni; S. di Muccio

2002-01-01

163

Scientists Probe Pesticide Dynamics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizes discussions of a symposium on pesticide environmental dynamics with emphases upon pesticide transport processes, environmental reactions, and partitioning in air, soil, water and living organisms. Indicates that the goal is to attain knowledge enough to predict pesticide behavior and describe pesticide distribution with models and…

Chemical and Engineering News, 1974

1974-01-01

164

Current status and regulatory aspects of pesticides considered to be persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in Taiwan.  

PubMed

Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) are capable of persisting in the environment, transporting between phase media and accumulating to high levels, implying that they could pose a risk of causing adverse effects to human health and the environment. Consequently, most OCPs are designated as persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and even as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). The objective of this paper was to review the current status of pesticide POPs in Taiwan, including aldrin, chlordane, chlordecone, DDT, dieldrin, endrin, heptachlor, hexachlorobenzene, ?/?-hexachlorocyclohexanes, lindane, mirex, pentachloro-benzene, and toxaphene. The information about their environmental properties, banned use, carcinogenic toxicity and environmental levels, can be connected with the regulatory infrastructure, which has been established by the joint-venture of the central competent authorities (i.e., Environmental Protection Administration, Department of Health, Council of Agriculture, and Council of Labor Affairs). The significant progress to be reported is that the residual levels of these pesticide-POPs, ranging from trace amounts to a few ppb, have declined notably in recent years. PMID:21139852

Tsai, Wen-Tien

2010-10-01

165

Current Status and Regulatory Aspects of Pesticides Considered to be Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) in Taiwan  

PubMed Central

Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) are capable of persisting in the environment, transporting between phase media and accumulating to high levels, implying that they could pose a risk of causing adverse effects to human health and the environment. Consequently, most OCPs are designated as persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and even as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). The objective of this paper was to review the current status of pesticide POPs in Taiwan, including aldrin, chlordane, chlordecone, DDT, dieldrin, endrin, heptachlor, hexachlorobenzene, ?/?-hexachlorocyclohexanes, lindane, mirex, pentachloro-benzene, and toxaphene. The information about their environmental properties, banned use, carcinogenic toxicity and environmental levels, can be connected with the regulatory infrastructure, which has been established by the joint-venture of the central competent authorities (i.e., Environmental Protection Administration, Department of Health, Council of Agriculture, and Council of Labor Affairs). The significant progress to be reported is that the residual levels of these pesticide-POPs, ranging from trace amounts to a few ppb, have declined notably in recent years.

Tsai, Wen-Tien

2010-01-01

166

Comparison of pesticides and other compounds in carpet dust samples collected from used vacuum cleaner bags and from a high-volume surface sampler.  

PubMed

Epidemiologic studies of the association between residential pesticide use and cancer risk require an assessment of past pesticide exposures. Pesticide levels in carpet dust are believed to reflect long-term pesticide use. Recent epidemiologic studies have found collection of dust samples using the high-volume surface sampler (HVS3) to be expensive and cumbersome. We compared the levels of pesticides and other compounds in dust obtained from subjects' personal used vacuum cleaner bags to that collected by the HVS3 to see if this simpler method could replace the HVS3 in epidemiologic research. We visited the homes of 15 subjects, took the used bags from their vacuums, and collected carpet dust samples with the HVS3. The samples were analyzed for 42 target compounds: 26 pesticides, 10 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and six polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners using GC/MS in selected ion monitoring mode. The two methods agreed in detecting the presence of the target compounds between 80% and 100% of the time. Neither sampling method was consistently more sensitive. The median target compound concentrations were similar, and a paired t-test showed no significant differences. For many compounds, the concentrations of compounds in the HVS3 samples were higher than those in the used bag samples at the upper end of the concentration ranges. However, the Spearman rank correlation coefficients were 0.85 or higher for most compounds, indicating that homes would be ranked similarly using both methods. Overall, there appears to be no clear difference in the quality of the pesticide, PAH, or PCB concentration data for the two dust collection methods. PMID:9799187

Colt, J S

1998-11-01

167

Hourly, In-Situ Quantitation of Organic Aerosol Marker Compounds.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study was conducted to determine the contribution from various organic aerosol sources downwind of the Los Angeles Air Basin, a region currently out of compliance with air quality standards. Organic marker compounds were measured with hourly time res...

A. H. Goldstein

2008-01-01

168

Basics of compounding: basics of compounding with organic salts.  

PubMed

The purity and form of all ingredients used in compounding, especially of active pharmaceutical ingredients, must be known and considered during formulation. When a prescription is received, it is the responsibility of the pharmacist, and should be routine procedure, to correctly determine whether or not the salt or base/acid form of a drug is to be used as the basis for the dose. This is important information because the bulk substance, or active pharmaceutical ingredient, in a salt form is not 100% active drug. The purpose of the salt form is usually to enhance the solubility of the drug, but it may also enhance and change other attributes of the drug that make it easier to handle and manipulate for producing dosage forms. Resources for the purpose of determining this information include the United States Pharmacopeia, product package insert, and a call to the manufacturer or physician as appropriate. This article discusses compounding with salts and the factors that may affect a final compounded preparation. PMID:23965540

Allen, Loyd V

2010-01-01

169

Nitrated Secondary Organic Tracer Compounds in Biomass Burning Smoke  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Natural and human-initiated biomass burning releases large amounts of gases and particles into the atmosphere, impacting climate, environment and affecting public health. Several hundreds of compounds are emitted from biomass burning and these compounds largely originate from the pyrolysis of biopolymers such as lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose. Some of compounds are known to be specific to biomass burning and widely recognized as tracer compounds that can be used to identify the presence of biomass burning PM. Detailed chemical analysis of biomass burning influenced PM samples often reveals the presence compounds that correlated well with levoglucosan, a known biomass burning tracer compound. In particular, nitrated aromatic compounds correlated very well with levoglucosan, indicating that biomass burning as a source for this class of compounds. In the present study, we present evidence for the presence of biomass burning originating secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) compounds in biomass burning influenced ambient PM. These BSOA compounds are typically nitrated aromatic compounds that are produced in the oxidation of precursor compounds in the presence of NOx. The precursor identification was performed from a series of aerosol chamber experiments. m-Cresol, which is emitted from biomass burning at significant levels, is found to be a major precursor compounds for nitrated BSOA compounds found in the ambient PM. We estimate that the total concentrations of these compounds in the ambient PM are comparable to biogenic SOA compounds in winter months, indicating the BSOA contributes important amounts to the regional organic aerosol loading.

Iinuma, Y.; Böge, O.; Gräfe, R.; Herrmann, H.

2010-12-01

170

SORPTION OF ORGANIC ACID COMPOUNDS TO SEDIMENTS: INITIAL MODEL DEVELOPMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

The adsorption to sediments and soils of selected organic acid compounds was examined as a function of compound and sediment properties. ntrinsic compound properties examined included the dissociation constant (pKa) and hydrophobic character. roperties of the sediment examined in...

171

Rationale for Selection of Pesticides, Herbicides, and Related Compounds from the Hanford SST/DST Waste Considered for Analysis in Support of the Regulatory DQO (Privatization)  

SciTech Connect

Regulated pesticides, herbicides, miticides, and fungicides were evaluated for their potential past and current use at the Hanford Site. The starting list of these compounds is based on regulatory analyte input lists discussed in the Regulatory DQO. Twelve pesticide, herbicide, miticide, and fungicide compounds are identified for analysis in the Hanford SST and DST waste in support of the Regulatory DQO. The compounds considered for additional analyses are non-detected, considered stable in the tank waste matrix, and of higher toxicity/carcinogenicity.

Wiemers, K.D.; Daling, P.; Meier, K.

1999-01-04

172

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in urban atmosphere of Hong Kong  

Microsoft Academic Search

The assessment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has become a major issue of air quality network monitoring in Hong Kong. This study is aimed to identify, quantify and characterize volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in different urban areas in Hong Kong. The spatial distribution, temporal variation as well as correlations of VOCs at five roadside sampling sites were discussed. Twelve VOCs

S. C. Lee; M. Y. Chiu; K. F. Ho; S. C. Zou; Xinming Wang

2002-01-01

173

REACTIVITY OF NITROGENOUS AND OTHER ORGANIC COMPOUNDS WITH AQUEOUS CHLORINE  

EPA Science Inventory

A protocol for determining the chlorine demand of organic compounds was developed and tested. Organics were reacted with chlorine at mole ratios of 1:05, 1:1, and 1:3 at pH values of 6, 7, and 8 over a one week period. Compounds tested were drawn mainly from the EPA Register of O...

174

Organic--Inorganic Layer Compounds: Physical Properties and Chemical Reactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

In contrast with intercalation compounds, which can exist both with and without organic molecules between the planes of inorganic material, `molecular composite' compounds have organic groups covalently or ionically bound to inorganic layers. In such crystals the aim is to combine magnetic or optical properties characteristic of the inorganic solid state, like magnetism and luminescence, with properties found in the

P. Day

1985-01-01

175

DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF SORPTION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN WATER  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chlorinated and brominated volatile organic compounds are among the groundwater pollutants creating major environmental problems. In this study, dynamic behavior of certain volatile organic compounds in water was investigated by using a novel moment technique. Adsorption equilibrium constant and the penetration length of tracers were evaluated by the first absolute and the second central moment expressions derived for a pulse-response

Nail Yasyerli; Ugur Harbili

2008-01-01

176

A Systematic Presentation of Organic Phosphorus and Sulfur Compounds.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Because the names, interrelations, and oxidation levels of the organic compounds of phosphorus and sulfur tend to confuse students, a simple way to organize these compounds has been developed. The system consists of grouping them by oxidation state and extent of carbon substitution. (JN)

Hendrickson, James B.

1985-01-01

177

Temporal Variability Measurement of Specific Volatile Organic Compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methodology was developed to unambiguously determine trace levels of volatile organic compounds as they vary in concentration over a variety of time scales. This capability is important because volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are usually measured by time-integrative techniques that average out peak exposures to insignificance. The specific method presented here involves a preprogrammed sequential syringe sampler that can fill 150-cm

Joachim D. Pleil; William A. McClenny; Karen D. Oliver

1989-01-01

178

METHODS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN DRINKING WATER  

EPA Science Inventory

Thirteen analytical methods for the identification and measurement of organic compounds in drinking water are described in detail. ix of the methods are for volatile organic compounds (VOC's) and certain disinfection byproducts and these methods were cited in the Federal Register...

179

40 CFR 60.452 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.452 Section 60.452 Protection of Environment...Coating: Large Appliances § 60.452 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On or after the date on which the...

2013-07-01

180

40 CFR 60.462 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.462 Section 60.462 Protection of Environment...Coil Surface Coating § 60.462 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) On and after the date on which §...

2013-07-01

181

Volatile organic compound sources for Southern Finland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have several sources, both biogenic and anthropogenic. Emissions of biogenic VOCs in a global scale are estimated to be an order of magnitude higher than anthropogenic ones. However, in densely populated areas and during winter time the anthropogenic VOC emissions dominate over the biogenic ones. The aim of this study was to clarify potential local sources and source areas of VOCs in different seasons. Diurnal behaviour in winter and spring were also compared at two different sites in Finland: SMEAR II and III (Station for Measuring Ecosystem - Atmosphere Relations). SMEAR II is a rural site located in Hyytiälä in Southern Finland 220 km North-West from Helsinki whereas SMEAR III is background urban site located 5 km from the downtown of Helsinki. The volume mixing ratios of VOCs were measured with a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS, Ionicon Analytik GmbH, Austria) during years 2006-2011. Other trace gases such as CO, NOXand SO2 were also measured in both sites and used for source analysis. Source areas for long term VOC measurements were investigated with trajectory analysis and sources for local and regional concentrations were determined by Unmix multivariate receptor model. Forest fires affect air quality and the biggest smoke plumes can be seen in satellite images and even hinder visibility in the plume areas. They provide temporally and spatially well-defined sources that can be used to verify source area estimates. During the measurement periods two different forest fire episodes with several hotspots, happened in Russia. Forest fires which showed up in these measurements were in 2006 near the border of Finland in Vyborg area and 2010 in Moscow area. Forest fire episodes were clearly observed in trajectory analysis for benzene, toluene and methanol and also CO and NOX. In addition to event sources continuous source areas were determined. Anthropogenic local sources seemed to be dominant during winter in both sites. However during spring biogenic influence increased. In addition to source analysis this behaviour was visible in enhanced diurnal cycles of VOCs (Patokoski et al., 2014, in press). We will present important sources and source areas for Southern Finland's concentrations. References: Patokoski, J., Ruuskanen, T.M., Hellén, H., Taipale, R., Grönholm, T., Kajos, M.K., Petäjä, T., Hakola, H., Kulmala, M. & Rinne, J., 2014. Winter to spring transition and diurnal variation of VOCs in Finland at an urban background site and a rural site. Boreal Env. Res. 19. In press.

Patokoski, Johanna; Ruuskanen, Taina M.; Kajos, Maija K.; Taipale, Risto; Rantala, Pekka; Aalto, Juho; Ryyppö, Timo; Hakola, Hannele; Rinne, Janne

2014-05-01

182

QuEChERS sample preparation for the determination of pesticides and other organic residues in environmental matrices: a critical review.  

PubMed

Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe (QuEChERS) is an extraction and clean-up technique originally developed for recovering pesticide residues from fruits and vegetables. Since its introduction, and until December 2013, about 700 papers have been published using the QuEChERS technique, according to a literature overview carried out using SciFinder, Elsevier SciVerse, and Google search engines. Most of these papers were dedicated to pesticide multiresidue analysis in food matrices, and this topic has been thoroughly reviewed over recent years. The QuEChERS approach is now rapidly developing beyond its original field of application to analytes other than pesticides, and matrices other than food, such as biological fluids and non-edible plants, including Chinese medicinal plants. Recently, the QuEChERS concept has spread to environmental applications by analyzing not only pesticides but also other compounds of environmental concern in soil, sediments, and water. To the best of our knowledge, QuEChERS environmental applications have not been reviewed so far; therefore, in this contribution, after a general discussion on the evolution and changes of the original QuEChERS method, a critical survey of the literature regarding environmental applications of conventional and modified QuEChERS methodology is provided. The overall recoveries obtained with QuEChERS and other extraction approaches (e.g., accelerated solvent extraction, ultrasonic solvent extraction, liquid/solid extraction, and soxhlet extraction) were compared, providing evidence for QuEChERS higher recoveries for various classes of compounds, such as biopesticides, chloroalkanes, phenols, and perfluoroalkyl substances. The role of physicochemical properties of soil (i.e., clay and organic carbon content, as well as cation exchange capacity) and target analytes (i.e., log KOW, water solubility, and vapor pressure) were also evaluated in order to interpret recovery and matrix effect data. PMID:24770804

Bruzzoniti, Maria Concetta; Checchini, Leonardo; De Carlo, Rosa Maria; Orlandini, Serena; Rivoira, Luca; Del Bubba, Massimo

2014-07-01

183

Effects of Organic Compounds on Amphibian Reproduction.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Aquatic toxicity tests were conducted with atrazine, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, methylene chloride, trisodium nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and phenol. Each compound was administered to developmental stages of three to five amphibian species. Exposu...

W. J. Birge J. A. Black R. A. Kuehne

1980-01-01

184

Volatile organic compounds from garden waste  

Microsoft Academic Search

About 170 compounds were identified in the headspace or liquid exudate from garden waste. Typical for microbiological growth were branched and straight chain alcohols, carboxylic acids and esters C2–C8. Several of the substances have been identified in early studies of compost For some waste samples the organosulfur compound concentration (C1 and C3 mono-, di- and trisulfides) was ca. 10 mg\\/m3

Ken Wilkins; Kjeld Larsen

1996-01-01

185

Emissions of volatile organic compounds from building materials and consumer products  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

EPA's TEAM Study of personal exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOC) in air and drinking water of 650 residents of seven U.S. cities resulted in the identification of a number of possible sources encountered in peoples' normal daily activities and in their homes. A follow-up EPA study of publicaccess buildings implicated other potential sources of exposure. To learn more about these potential sources, 15 building materials and common consumer products were analyzed using a headspace technique to detect organic emissions and to compare relative amounts. About 10-100 organic compounds were detected offgassing from each material. Four mixtures of materials were then chosen for detailed study: paint on sheetrock; carpet and carpet glue; wallpaper and adhesives; cleansers and a spray pesticide. The materials were applied as normally used, allowed to age 1 week (except for the cleansers and pesticides, which were used normally during the monitoring period), and placed in an environmentally controlled chamber. Organic vapors were collected on Tenax-GC over a 4-h period and analyzed by GC-MS techniques. Emission rates and chamber concentrations were calculated for 17 target chemicals chosen for their toxic, carcinogenic or mutagenic properties. Thirteen of the 17 chemicals were emitted by one or more of the materials. Elevated concentrations of chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, n-decane, n-undecane, p-dichlorobenzene, 1,2-dichloroethane and styrene were produced by the four mixtures of materials tested. For some chemicals, these amounts were sufficient to account for a significant fraction of the elevated concentrations observed in previous indoor air studies. We conclude that common materials found in nearly every home and place of business may cause elevated exposures to toxic chemicals.

Wallace, Lance A.; Pellizzari, Edo; Leaderer, Brian; Zelon, Harvey; Sheldon, Linda

186

Extended structures and physicochemical properties of uranyl-organic compounds.  

PubMed

The ability of uranium to undergo nuclear fission has been exploited primarily to manufacture nuclear weapons and to generate nuclear power. Outside of its nuclear physics, uranium also exhibits rich chemistry, and it forms various compounds with other elements. Among the uranium-bearing compounds, those with a uranium oxidation state of +6 are most common and a particular structural unit, uranyl UO(2)(2+) is usually involved in these hexavalent uranium compounds. Apart from forming solids with inorganic ions, the uranyl unit also bonds to organic molecules to generate uranyl-organic coordination materials. If appropriate reaction conditions are employed, uranyl-organic extended structures (1-D chains, 2-D layers, and 3-D frameworks) can be obtained. Research on uranyl-organic compounds with extended structures allows for the exploration of their rich structural chemistry, and such studies also point to potential applications such as in materials that could facilitate nuclear waste disposal. In this Account, we describe the structural features of uranyl-organic compounds and efforts to synthesize uranyl-organic compounds with desired structures. We address strategies to construct 3-D uranyl-organic frameworks through rational selection of organic ligands and the incorporation of heteroatoms. The UO(2)(2+) species with inactive U?O double bonds usually form bipyramidal polyhedral structures with ligands coordinated at the equatorial positions, and these polyhedra act as primary building units (PBUs) for the construction of uranyl-organic compounds. The geometry of the uranyl ions and the steric arrangements and functionalities of organic ligands can be exploited in the the design of uranyl--organic extended structures, We also focus on the investigation of the promising physicochemical properties of uranyl-organic compounds. Uranyl-organic materials with an extended structure may exhibit attractive properties, such as photoluminescence, photocatalysis, photocurrent, and photovoltaic responses. In particular, the intriguing, visible-light photocatalytic activities of uranyl-organic compounds are potentially applicable in decomposition of organic pollutants and in water-splitting with the irradiation of solar light. We ascribe the photochemical properties of uranyl-organic compounds to the electronic transitions within the U?O bonds, which may be affected by the presence of organic ligands. PMID:21612214

Wang, Kai-Xue; Chen, Jie-Sheng

2011-07-19

187

Interaction of Organophosphate Pesticides and Related Compounds with the Androgen Receptor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identification of several environmental chemicals capable of binding to the androgen receptor (AR) and interfering with its normal function has heightened concern about adverse effects across a broad spectrum of environmental chemicals. We previously demonstrated AR antagonist activity of the organophosphate (OP) pesticide fenitrothion. In this study, we characterized AR activity of analogues of fenitrothion to probe the structural requirements

Hiroto Tamura; Hiromichi Yoshikawa; Kevin W. Gaido; Susan M. Ross; Robert K. DeLisle; William J. Welsh; Ann M. Richard

2002-01-01

188

MANUAL OF ANALYTICAL QUALITY CONTROL FOR PESTICIDES AND RELATED COMPOUNDS IN HUMAN AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES  

EPA Science Inventory

This manual provides the pesticide chemist with a systematic protocol for the quality control of analytical procedures and the problems that arise in the analysis of human or environmental media. It also serves as a guide to the latest and most reliable methodology available for ...

189

Mode of Action Profiles for Pesticide Compounds with Rodent Liver Tumor Outcomes  

EPA Science Inventory

Mode of action (MOA) provides a central framework for assessing human relevance of adverse health outcomes observed in nonclinical safety studies. The goal of this study was to characterize MOA profiles for known rodent liver tumorigens identified from a database of pesticides as...

190

Thermal diffusion desorption for the comprehensive analysis of organic compounds.  

PubMed

Comprehensive analysis of organic compounds is crucial yet challenging considering that information on elements, fragments, and molecules is unavailable simultaneously by current analytical techniques. Additionally, many compounds are insoluble or only dissolve in toxic solvents. A solvent- and matrix-free strategy has been developed which allows the organic compound analyzed in its original form. It utilizes thermal diffusion desorption with the solid analyte irradiated with high energy laser. It is capable of providing explicit elemental, fragmental, and molecular information simultaneously for a variety of organic compounds. Thermal diffusion desorption has many advantages compared to the electrospray and MALDI techniques. The protons that form the protonated molecular ions originate from the analyte itself. All the elements and fragments are also derived from the analyte itself, which provides abundant information and expedites the identification of organic compounds. PMID:24914465

Yin, Zhibin; Wang, Xiaohua; Li, Weifeng; He, Miaohong; Hang, Wei; Huang, Benli

2014-07-01

191

Evaluation of persistent hydrophobic organic compounds in the Columbia River Basin using semipermeable-membrane devices  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Persistent hydrophobic organic compounds are of concern in the Columbia River because they have been correlated with adverse effects on wildlife. We analysed samples from nine main-stem and six tributary sites throughout the Columbia River Basin (Washington and Oregon) for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, and priority-pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Because these compounds may have important biological consequences at aqueous concentrations well below the detection limits associated with conventional sampling methods, we used semipermeable-membrane devices to sample water and achieved parts-per-quintillion detection limits. All of these compound classes were prevalent within the basin, but concentrations of many analytes were highest in the vicinity of Portland-Vancouver, indicating that the Willamette subbasin-and perhaps the urban area in particular-is an important source of these compounds. Data collected during basin low-flow conditions in 1997 and again during basin high-flow conditions in 1998 indicate that in-stream processes such as dilution by relatively clean inflow, and flow through island hyporheic zones may be important mechanisms for attenuating dissolved concentrations of hydrophobic compounds.

McCarthy, K. A.; Gale, R. W.

2001-01-01

192

Evaluation of persistent hydrophobic organic compounds in the Columbia River Basin using semipermeable-membrane devices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Persistent hydrophobic organic compounds are of concern in the Columbia River because they have been correlated with adverse effects on wildlife. We analysed samples from nine main-stem and six tributary sites throughout the Columbia River Basin (Washington and Oregon) for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, and priority-pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Because these compounds may have important biological consequences at aqueous concentrations well below the detection limits associated with conventional sampling methods, we used semipermeable-membrane devices to sample water and achieved parts-per-quintillion detection limits. All of these compound classes were prevalent within the basin, but concentrations of many analytes were highest in the vicinity of Portland-Vancouver, indicating that the Willamette subbasin - and perhaps the urban area in particular - is an important source of these compounds. Data collected during basin low-flow conditions in 1997 and again during basin high-flow conditions in 1998 indicate that in-stream processes such as dilution by relatively clean inflows, and flow through island hyporheic zones may be important mechanisms for attenuating dissolved concentrations of hydrophobic compounds. Published in 2001 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Gale, Robert W.

2001-05-01

193

Nonmethane organic compound monitoring program final report, 1988. Volume 1. Nonmethane organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

In certain areas of the country where the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone is being exceeded, additional measurements of ambient nonmethane organic compounds (NMOC) are needed to assist the affected states in developing revised ozone control strategies. Because of previous difficulty in obtaining accurate NMOC measurements, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has provided monitoring and analytical assistance to these states through Radian Corporation. This assistance began in 1984 and continues through the 1988 NMOC Monitoring Program. Between April 18 and October 30, 1988, Radian analyzed 3,497 ambient air samples, collected at 45 sites. These NMOC analyses were performed by the cryogenic preconcentration, direct flame ionization detection (PDFID) method. Based on 1984, 1985, 1986, and 1987 studies, the method was shown to be precise, accurate, and cost effective relative to the capillary column gas chromatographic, flame ionization detection (GC/FID) method. In 1987 Radian Corporation developed a gas chromatographic multidetector (GC/MD) method to determine the concentration of 38 selected toxic compounds in ambient air. In 1988, air toxic analyses were conducted by GC/MD on ambient air samples taken at 13 sites at which NMOC samples were taken. The 1988 Urban Air Toxics Monitoring Program (UATMP) began in October 1987 at 19 urban sites and extended through September 1988.

McAllister, R.A.; O'Hara, P.L.; Moore, W.H.; Dayton, D.P.; Rice, J.

1988-12-01

194

Organic Compounds in Truckee River Water Used for Public Supply near Reno, Nevada, 2002-05  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Organic compounds studied in this U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessment generally are man-made, including, in part, pesticides, solvents, gasoline hydrocarbons, personal care and domestic-use products, and refrigerants and propellants. Of 258 compounds measured, 28 were detected in at least 1 source water sample collected approximately monthly during 2002-05 at the intake of the Chalk Bluff Treatment Plant, on the Truckee River upstream of Reno, Nevada. The diversity of compounds detected indicate various sources and uses (including wastewater discharge, industrial, agricultural, domestic, and others) and different pathways (including point sources from treated wastewater outfalls upstream of the sampling location, overland runoff, and groundwater discharge) to drinking-water supply intakes. Three compounds were detected in more than 20 percent of the source-water intake samples at low concentrations (less than 0.1 microgram per liter), including caffeine, p-cresol (a wood preservative), and toluene (a gasoline hydrocarbon). Sixteen of the 28 compounds detected in source water also were detected in finished water (after treatment, but prior to distribution; 2004-05). Additionally, two disinfection by-products not detected in source water, bromodichloromethane and dibromochloromethane, were detected in all finished water samples. Two detected compounds, cholesterol and 3-beta-coprostanol, are among five naturally occurring biochemicals analyzed in this study. Concentrations for all detected compounds in source and finished water generally were less than 0.1 microgram per liter and always less than human-health benchmarks, which are available for about one-half of the compounds. Seven compounds (toluene, chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromodichloromethane, bisphenol A, cholesterol, and 3-beta-coprostanol) were measured at concentrations greater than 0.1 microgram per liter. On the basis of this screening-level assessment, adverse effects to human health are expected to be negligible (subject to limitations of available human-health benchmarks).

Thomas, Karen A.

2009-01-01

195

STUDIES OF PRESCHOOL CHILDREN'S EXPOSURES TO PESTICIDES  

EPA Science Inventory

Young children, especially those of the preschool ages, are hypothesized to have greater exposures than do older children or adults to persistent organic pesticides and other persistent organic pollutants, including some compounds that may have endocrine-disrupting effects or d...

196

Anthropogenic Organic Compounds in Ground Water and Finished Water of Community Water Systems in the Greater Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota and Wisconsin, 2004-05  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program, two Source Water-Quality Assessments (SWQAs) were conducted during 2004-05 in unconfined parts of the glacial aquifer system and in unconfined parts of the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer in the Greater Twin Cities metropolitan area of Minnesota and Wisconsin. SWQAs are two-phased sampling activities in the NAWQA Program. The first phase evaluated the occurrence of 265 (258 are included in this report) anthropogenic organic compounds (AOCs) through monitoring source water in 30 of the largest-producing community water system wells completed in the aquifers underlying the Greater Twin Cities metropolitan area. The AOCs included volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides, and other AOCs. During the second phase of the study, 15 of the original community water system wells, those with the greatest number of AOC detections, were resampled along with associated finished water. Results from the first phase of sampling indicated that 40 AOCs were detected, and 83 percent of the samples had at least one detected AOC. Concentrations of AOCs detected in the source water generally were low (defined in this report as concentrations less than 1.0 microgram per liter). Human-health benchmarks for these compounds (Maximum Contaminant Levels for regulated compounds or Health-Based Screening Levels for unregulated compounds, when they existed) typically were not exceeded. Fifteen VOCs were detected in the source-water samples. However, concentrations were low. Seventeen pesticide compounds were detected generally at concentrations less than concentrations for VOCs. Most of the pesticide compounds detected were triazine- or alachlor-parent compounds or their breakdown products. Eight other AOCs were detected in the source-water samples but generally at low concentrations. Results from the second phase of sampling indicated a total of 13 and 12 VOCs were detected in source-water and in finished-water samples, respectively. Most of the VOCs, except for those associated with disinfection by-products, were detected more frequently in source-water samples than in finished- water samples. Concentrations of most VOCs detected in either source water or finished water were less than human-health benchmarks. Twenty-one pesticide compounds were detected in either source water or finished water. Concentrations of detected pesticides in source-water and finished-water samples were low. The most frequently detected compounds in both the source and finished water were triazine-parent pesticides or their breakdown products and breakdown products of alachlor and metolachlor. In general, pesticides, if detected in source water, also were detected in the corresponding finished water. Concentrations of pesticides detected were less than human-health benchmarks in both source and finished water. A total of nine other AOCs were detected in the source-water or finished-water samples, and about the same number of compounds was detected in each of the sample groups in either source water or finished water. Detected concentrations of other AOCs were low. Water-quality results from source-water samples were compared to characterize differences between aquifers. VOC and other AOC detections were more frequent in water from the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer compared to the glacial aquifer. Pesticides, however, were detected more frequently in the glacial aquifer. On the basis of study results, the hydrogeologic setting, land use, and aquifer productivity are important in explaining the occurrence of AOCs in community water system wells. Results of this study indicate that monitoring for pesticides in source water generally indicates the potential occurrence of pesticides in finished water but that this is not necessarily true of VOCs. Additional monitoring is needed to better understand the occurrence of other AOCs in source and finished waters.

Tornes, Lan H.; Stark, James R.; Hoard, Christopher J.; Smith, Erik A.

2007-01-01

197

Enantiomeric and Isotopic Analysis of Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Meteorites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Carbonaceous meteorites are relatively enriched in soluble organic compounds. The Murchison and Murray meteorites contain numerous compounds of interest in the study of early solar system organic chemistry and organic compounds of potential importance for the origin of life. These include: amino acids, amides, carboxylic acids, and polyols. This talk will focus on the enantiomeric and isotopic analysis of individual meteoritic compounds - primarily polyol acids. The analyses will determine if, in addition to certain amino acids from Murchison, another potentially important class of prebiotic compounds also contains enantiomeric excesses, i.e., excesses that could have contributed to the current homochirality of life. Preliminary enantiomeric and isotopic (C- 13) measurements of Murchison glyceric acid show that it is indeed extraterrestrial. C-13 and D isotope analysis of meteoritic sugar alcohols (glycerol, threitol, ribitol, etc.) has shown that they are also indigenous to the meteorite.

Cooper, George

2004-01-01

198

40 CFR 60.492 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for the Beverage Can Surface Coating Industry § 60.492 Standards for volatile organic compounds. On or after the date on...

2013-07-01

199

SYNTHESIZING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TIO2  

EPA Science Inventory

High-value organic compounds have been synthesized successfully from linear and cyclic hydrocarbons, by photocatalytic oxidation using a semiconductor material, titanium dioxide (TiO2). Various hydrocarbons were partially oxgenated in both liquid and gaseous phase reactors usi...

200

40 CFR 60.392 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Automobile and Light Duty Truck Surface Coating Operations § 60.392 Standards for volatile organic compounds. On and...

2013-07-01

201

ESTIMATION OF PHYSIOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BY SPARC  

EPA Science Inventory

The computer program SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses computational algorithms...

202

IMPROVEMENT IN AIR TOXICS METHODS FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

Innovative and customized monitoring methods for air toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are being developed for applications in exposure and trends monitoring. This task addresses the following applications of specific interest: o Contributions to EPA Regional Monit...

203

DEVELOPMENT OF OZONE REACTIVITY SCALES FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

Methods for developing a numerical scale ranking reactivities of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) towards ozone formation were investigated. ffects of small VOC additions on ozone formation (incremental reactivities) were calculated for 140 types of VOCs in model scenarios repre...

204

Determination of individual organic compounds in shale oil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several techniques have been investigated for quantitating individual organic compounds in shale oil. Acid-base extraction and high performance liquid chromatography were emphasized as independent methods of shale oil fractionation. Gas chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and high performance liquid chromatography were used for individual compound quantitation utilizing external and\\/or internal standards or standard addition techniques. The following compounds were measured in

H. S. Hertz; J. M. Brown; S. N. Chesler; F. R. Guenther; L. R. Hilpert; W. E. May; R. M. Parris; S. A. Wise

1980-01-01

205

Toxic organic compounds from energy production: Progress report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The theme of this program has been identifying potentially toxic organic compounds associated with various combustion effluents, following the fates of these compounds in the environment, and improving the analytical methodology for making these measurements. The following have been accomplished: As part of out continuing study of the fate of dioxins we are currently measuring atmospheric concentration of polychlorinated dioxins

Hites

1988-01-01

206

VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS MEASURED IN DEARS PASSIVE SAMPLERS  

EPA Science Inventory

A suite of 27 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were monitored in personal exposures, indoors and outdoors of participant's residences, and at a central community site during the DEARS summer 2004 monitoring season. The list of VOCs focused on compounds typically associated with ...

207

Volatile organic compounds at an urban monitoring station in Korea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measurements of 56 volatile organic compounds (VOC) were undertaken at a monitoring site in Seoul, Korea in 2004. The VOC pollution at the site was evaluated for both functional groups and individual compounds. The highest concentrations for the functional groups were recorded by aromatic (AR: 430ppbC) followed by paraffin (PR), olefin (OF), and alkyne (AK). The mean concentrations of individual

Hang Thi Nguyen; Ki-Hyun Kim; Min-Young Kim

2009-01-01

208

Global observations of oxygenated Volatile Organic Compounds from space  

Microsoft Academic Search

Formaldehyde (HCHO), the smallest aldehyde of the atmosphere and glyoxal (CHO.CHO), the smallest a- dicarbonyl compound, are key intermediate products of the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Due to their short lifetime they are expected to provide valuable information on the global identification of the photochemical hot spots which are attributed to the various emission sources of anthropogenic, biogenic

M. Vrekoussis; F. Wittrock; A. Richter; J. P. Burrows

2008-01-01

209

Adsorption of Organic Compounds on Cottage Grove Sandstone.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The equilibrium adsorption properties of nine organic compounds on the Cottage Grove sandstone were determined at 3,000 psi and two temperatures. The rates of adsorption were calculated for each compound as a function of the concentration of the reactant ...

E. C. Donaldson M. E. Crocker F. S. Manning

1975-01-01

210

Molecular and Enantiomeric Analysis of Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Meteorites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Carbonaceous meteorites are relatively enriched in carbon. Much of this carbon is in the form of soluble organic compounds. The Murchison and Murray meteorites are the best-characterized carbonaceous meteorites with respect to organic chemistry. Their content of organic compounds has led to an initial understanding of early solar system organic chemistry as well as what compounds may have played a role in the origin of life (Cronin and Chang, 1993). Reported compounds include: amino acids, amides, carboxylic acids, sulfonic acids, and polyols. This talk will focus on the molecular and enantiomeric analysis of individual meteoritic compounds: polyol acids; and a newly identified class of meteorite compounds, keto acids, i.e., acetoacetic acid, levulinic acid, etc. Keto acids (including pyruvic) are critically important in all contemporary organisms. They are key intermediates in metabolism and processes such as the citric acid cycle. Using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry we identified individual meteoritic keto acids after derivatization to one or more of the following forms: isopropyl ester (ISP), trimethyIsiIy1 (TMS), tert-butyldimethylsilyl (BDMS). Ongoing analyses will determine if, in addition to certain amino acids from Murchison (Cronin and Pizzarello, 1997), other potentially important prebiotic compounds also contain enantiomeric excesses, i.e., excesses that could have contributed to the current homochirality of life.

Cooper, George

2003-01-01

211

Shock Modifications of Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Chondrite Parent Bodies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Impacts among asteroidal objects would have altered or destroyed pre-existing organic matter in both targets and projectiles to a greater or lesser degree depending upon impact velocities. To begin filling a knowledge gap on the shock metamorphism of organic compounds, we are studying the effects of shock impacts on selected classes of organic compounds utilizing laboratory shock facilities. Our approach is to subject mixtures of organic compounds, embedded in the matrix of the Murchison meteorite, to simulated hypervelocity impacts by firing them into targets at various pressures. The mixtures are then analyzed to determine the amount of each compound that survives as well as to determine if new compounds are being synthesized. The initial compounds added to the matrix (with the exception of thiosulfate). The sulfonic acids were chosen in part because they are relatively abundant in Murchison, relatively stable, and because they and the phosphonic acids are the first well-characterized homologous series of organic sulfur and phosphorus compounds identified in an extraterrestrial material. Experimental procedures were more fully described in the original proposal. A 20 mm gun, with its barrel extending into a vacuum chamber (10-2 torr), was used to launch the projectile containing the sample at approx. 1.6 km/sec (3,600 mi/hr) into the target material. Maximum pressure of impact depend on target/projectile materials. The target was sufficiently thin to assure minimum pressure decay over the total sample thickness.

Cooper, George W.

1998-06-01

212

Validation of user- and environmentally friendly extraction and clean-up methods for compound-specific stable carbon isotope analysis of organochlorine pesticides and their metabolites in soils.  

PubMed

In order to evaluate the potential of compound-specific stable carbon isotope analysis (CSIA) for tracking organochlorine pesticides in soil systems, sample pre-treatment methods have to be developed, which can provide recoveries sufficient for low detection limits without altering the isotope ratio of the target compounds. In this study we tested the compatibility of CSIA with user- and environmentally friendly extraction methods, including the Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe procedure (QuEChERS), Ultrasonic Assisted Extraction (USE) and Focused Ultrasonic Extraction (FUSE), as well as clean-up methods, including sulfuric acid clean-up and Florisil(®) column chromatography for hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and their environmental metabolites (chlorinated benzenes, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene - DDE and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane - DDD) in soils. We optimized the extraction methods for maximum recovery and pre-concentration. At optimal conditions, all extraction methods and clean-up procedures, as well as the pre-concentration of the extract by solvent evaporation, led to insignificant changes in carbon isotope ratios of the target compounds. We modified the USE procedure to increase the volume of withdrawn organic extract, resulting in a higher pre-concentration of the target compounds by the subsequent solvent evaporation step. This Modified Ultrasonic Assisted Extraction (MUSE) was the most suitable procedure, and it was validated for the determination of carbon isotope ratios of the target compounds using two different types of soil matrices. The method could be applied to analyze carbon isotope ratios of HCHs, DDT, and their chlorinated metabolites in soil samples with concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 0.8mg/kg. The analytical uncertainty of MUSE, incorporating both accuracy and precision, was ?0.4‰. PMID:24980091

Ivdra, Natalija; Herrero-Martín, Sara; Fischer, Anko

2014-08-15

213

Transport, behavior, and fate of volatile organic compounds in streams  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are compounds with chemical and physical properties that allow the compounds to move freely between the water and air phases of the environment. VOCs are widespread in the environment because of this mobility. Many VOCs have properties making them suspected or known hazards to the health of humans and aquatic organisms. Consequently, understanding the processes affecting the concentration and distribution VOCs in the environment is necessary. The U.S. Geological Survey selected 55 VOCs for study. This report reviews the characteristics of the various process that could affect the transport, behavior, and fate of these VOCs in streams.

Rathbun, R. E.

1998-01-01

214

REVIEW OF SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR TREATING PESTICIDE-CONTAMINATED SOIL  

EPA Science Inventory

Pesticide contamination results from manufacturing, improper storage, handling, or disposal of pesticides, and from agricultural processes. Since most pesticides are mixtures of different compounds, selecting a remedy for pesticide-contaminated soils can be a complicated process....

215

Biodegradation of organic compounds in vadose zone and aquifer sediments.  

PubMed Central

The microbial processes that occur in the subsurface under a typical Midwest agricultural soil were studied. A 26-m bore was installed in November of 1988 at a site of the Purdue University Agronomy Research Center. Aseptic collections of soil materials were made at 17 different depths. Physical analysis indicated that the site contained up to 14 different strata. The site materials were primarily glacial tills with a high carbonate content. The N, P, and organic C contents of sediments tended to decrease with depth. Ambient water content was generally less than the water content, which corresponds to a -0.3-bar equivalent. No pesticides were detected in the samples, and degradation of added 14C-labeled pesticides (atrazine and metolachlor) was not detected in slurry incubations of up to 128 days. The sorption of atrazine and metolachlor was correlated with the clay content of the sediments. Microbial biomass (determined by direct microscopic count, viable count, and phospholipid assay) in the tills was lower than in either the surface materials or the aquifer located at 25 m. The biodegradation of glucose and phenol occurred rapidly and without a lag in samples from the aquifer capillary fringe, saturated zone, and surface soils. In contrast, lag periods and smaller biodegradation rates were found in the till samples. Subsurface sediments are rich in microbial numbers and activity. The most active strata appear to be transmissive layers in the saturated zone. This implies that the availability of water may limit activity in the profile.

Konopka, A; Turco, R

1991-01-01

216

Semivolatile organic compounds in indoor air and settled dust in 30 French dwellings.  

PubMed

Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are ubiquitous contaminants in indoor environments, emanating from different sources and partitioning among several compartments, including the gas phase, airborne particles, and settled dust. Nevertheless, simultaneous measurements in the three compartments are rarely reported. In this study, we investigated indoor concentrations of a wide range of SVOCs in 30 French dwellings. In settled dust, 40 out of 57 target compounds were detected. The highest median concentrations were measured for phthalates and to a lesser extent for bisphenol A, synthetic musks, some pesticides, and PAHs. Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and diisononyl phthalate (DINP) were the most abundant compounds. A total of 34 target compounds were detected both in the gas phase and airborne particles. The highest concentrations were measured for diisobutyl phthalate (DiBP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), and synthetic musks in the gas phase and for DEHP, DiBP, DBP, and DINP in the airborne particles. This is the first study on the indoor concentrations of a wide range of SVOCs in settled dust, gas phase, and airborne particles collected simultaneously in each dwelling. PMID:24588211

Blanchard, Olivier; Glorennec, Philippe; Mercier, Fabien; Bonvallot, Nathalie; Chevrier, Cécile; Ramalho, Olivier; Mandin, Corinne; Bot, Barbara Le

2014-04-01

217

Vapor-particle partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds: estimates from field collections  

SciTech Connect

Pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), and other semivolatile organic compounds (SOC) exist in air as vapors and are associated with particulate matter. Factors influencing the vapor-to-particle distribution can be obtained from high-volume sampling experiments using a glass-fiber filter to collect particles and an adsorbent trap to collect vapors. Measurements of airborne organochlorine pesticides and PCB in four cities over a wide temperature range were used to estimate apparent partition coefficients A(TSP)/F, where A and F are the adsorbent- and filter-retained SOC concentrations (ng/m/sup 3/) and TSP in the total suspended particle concentration (..mu..g/m/sup 3/). A(TSP)/F were related to the average sampling temperature (T, kelvin) through log(A(TSAP)/F) = m/T + b. Fitted log(A(TSP)/F) at 20/sup 0/C were closely correlated with logp/sup 0//sub L/, the subcooled liquid vapor pressure. Heats of adsorption (..delta..H/sub A/), calculated from slopes m, were at most 2-4 kcal/mol greater than subcooled liquid heats of vaporization (..delta..H/sub VL/) and in most cases indistinguishable from ..delta..H/sub V,L/ at the 95% confidence level. 41 references, 3 figures, 5 tables.

Bidleman, T.F.; Billings, W.N.; Foreman, W.T.

1986-10-01

218

Current-Use Pesticides and Organochlorine Compounds in Precipitation and Lake Sediment from Two High-Elevation National Parks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Current-use pesticides (CUPs) and banned organochlorine compounds (OCCs) were measured in precipitation and lake sediments from two national parks in the Western U.S. to determine their occurrence and distribution in high-elevation environments. CUPs frequently detected in snow were endosulfan, dacthal, and chlorothalonil in concentrations ranging from 0.07 to 2.4 ng/L. Of the OCCs, only chlordane, HCB, and two PCB congeners were detected. Pesticides most frequently detected in rain were atrazine, carbaryl, and dacthal in concentrations from 3.0 to 95 ng/L. Estimated annual deposition rates in one of the parks were 8.4 ?g/m2 for atrazine, 9.9 ?g/m2 for carbaryl, and 2.6 ?g/m2 for dacthal of which over 85% occurred during summer. DDE and DDD were the most frequently detected OCCs in lake sediments. DDD and DDE concentrations in an age dated sediment core suggest that atmospheric deposition of banned OCCs, to high-elevation areas have been in decline since the 1970s. Dacthal and endosulfan sulfate were present in low concentrations (0.11-1.2 ?g/kg) and were the only CUPs detected in lake sediments.

Mast, M. A.; Foreman, W. T.

2007-12-01

219

Analysis of volatile organic compounds from illicit cocaine samples  

SciTech Connect

Detection of illicit cocaine hydrochloride shipments can be improved if there is a greater understanding of the identity and quantity of volatile compounds present. This study provides preliminary data concerning the volatile organic compounds detected in a limited Set of cocaine hydrochloride samples. In all cases, cocaine was one of the major volatile compounds detected. Other tropeines were detected in almost all samples. Low concentrations of compounds that may be residues of processing solvents were observed in some samples. The equilibrium emissivity of. cocaine from cocaine hydrochloride was investigated and a value of 83 parts-per-trillion was determined.

Robins, W.H.; Wright, B.W.

1994-07-01

220

Dissolved Pesticide and Organic Carbon Concentrations Detected in Surface Waters, Northern Central Valley, California, 2001-2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Field and laboratory studies were conducted to determine the effects of pesticide mixtures on Chinook salmon under various environmental conditions in surface waters of the northern Central Valley of California. This project was a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the University of California. The project focused on understanding the environmental factors that influence the toxicity of pesticides to juvenile salmon and their prey. During the periods January through March 2001 and January through May 2002, water samples were collected at eight surface water sites in the northern Central Valley of California and analyzed by the USGS for dissolved pesticide and dissolved organic carbon concentrations. Water samples were also collected by the USGS at the same sites for aquatic toxicity testing by the Aquatic Toxicity Laboratory at the University of California Davis; however, presentation of the results of these toxicity tests is beyond the scope of this report. Samples were collected to characterize dissolved pesticide and dissolved organic carbon concentrations, and aquatic toxicity, associated with winter storm runoff concurrent with winter run Chinook salmon out-migration. Sites were selected that represented the primary habitat of juvenile Chinook salmon and included major tributaries within the Sacramento and San Joaquin River Basins and the Sacramento?San Joaquin Delta. Water samples were collected daily for a period of seven days during two winter storm events in each year. Additional samples were collected weekly during January through April or May in both years. Concentrations of 31 currently used pesticides were measured in filtered water samples using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry at the U.S. Geological Survey's organic chemistry laboratory in Sacramento, California. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations were analyzed in filtered water samples using a Shimadzu TOC-5000A total organic carbon analyzer.

Orlando, James L.; Jacobson, Lisa A.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

2004-01-01

221

Temporal stability of polar organic compounds in stainless steel canisters  

SciTech Connect

Because of considerable interest at US EPA for the collection of polar organic compounds in stainless steel canisters, particularly for the Toxic Air Monitoring Site (TAMS) study, the stability of 10 selected polar organics in canisters was investigated and the results are described in this paper. The polar organic compounds selected for this stability study were: methanol, acetone, isoprene, acrylonitrile, vinyl acetate, methyl ethyl ketone, t-butyl methyl ether, ethyl acetate, n-butanol, and ethyl acrylate. Two nonpolar compounds, methyl chloroform and toluene, shown to be stable in previous work were included in the stability study as controls. The compounds were loaded in unpolished and Summa-polished canisters at parts-per-billion (ppb) levels under dry and humid conditions. The canister samples were analyzed on Days 0, 1, 3, 4, 14, and 31 after loading. The experimental procedures and stability results are summarized briefly.

Pate, B.; Jayanty, R.K.M.; Peterson, M.R. (Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)); Evans, G.F. (Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

1992-04-01

222

INTERACTIONS BETWEEN ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AND CYCLODEXTRIN-CLAY SYSTEMS  

EPA Science Inventory

Computational and experimental techniques are combined in order to better understand interactions involving organic compounds and cyclodextrin (CD)-clay systems. CD-clay systems may have great potential in the containment of organic contaminants in the environment. This study w...

223

BIOCONCENTRATION FACTORS FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN VEGETATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Samples of air and leaves were taken at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas campus and analyzed for volatile organic compounds using vacuum distillation coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The data were used to estimate the bioconcentration of volatile organic compo...

224

Biological aspects of constructing volatile organic compound emission inventories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The: emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from vegetation is subject to numerous biological controls. Past inventories have relied heavily on empirical models which are limited in their ability to simulate the response of organisms to short- and long-term changes in their growth environment. In this review we consider the principal biochemical, physiological and ecological controls over VOC emission with

Ray Fall; Mt Lerdau; Td Sharkey

1995-01-01

225

COMPARISON OF AMBIENT AIR SAMPLING TECHNIQUES FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

A series of fourteen experimental sampling runs were carried out at a field site to collect data from several ambient air monitoring methods for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Ambient air was drawn through a sampling manifold and was continuously spiked with volatile organic ...

226

Polar Organic Compounds in Surface Waters Collected Near Lead-Zinc Mine and Milling Operations in Missouri  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Surface-water samples were collected near a lead mine and mill tailings about 70 miles southwest of St. Louis, Missouri, during the summer of 2006. The purpose of this sampling was to determine if polar organic compounds were present that could be a cause of documented negative impacts to biota downstream. Water samples contained relatively high concentrations of dissolved organic carbon for surface waters (greater than 20 mg/L), but were colorless, which precluded naturally occurring aquatic humic or fulvic acids. Previous analysis indicated that samples were devoid of pesticides and acid/base/neutral extractable semi-volatile organic compounds, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. After isolation by three different types of solid phase extraction, samples were analyzed by electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry. Polar organic compounds commonly used in the milling process, such as alkyl xanthates, were not found; however, xanthate degradation products were detected. Most of the polar organic compounds identified contained sulfonate groups, which are characteristic of some of the reagents used in the milling process. Sulfonate compounds may have low sorption onto soil or sediments and be mobile in the aqueous environment.

Rostad, C. E.; Schmitt, C. J.; Schumacher, J. G.; Leiker, T. J.

2007-12-01

227

Water solubility enhancement of some organic pollutants and pesticides by dissolved humic and fulvic acids  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water solubility enhancements by dissolved humic and fulvic acids from soil and aquatic origins and by synthetic organic polymers have been determined for selected organic pollutants and pesticides (p,p???-DDT, 2,4,5,2???,5???-PCB, 2,4,4???-PCB, 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene, and lindane). Significant solubility enhancements of relatively water-insoluble solutes by dissolved organic matter (DOM) of soil and aquatic origins may be described in terms of a partition-like interaction of the the solutes with the microscopic organic environment of the high-molecular-weight DOM species; the apparent solute solubilities increase linearly with DOM concentration and show no competitive effect between solutes. With a given DOM sample, the solute partition coefficient (Kdom) increases with a decrease of solute solubility (Sw) or with an increase of the solute's octanol-water partition coefficient (Kow). The Kdom values of solutes with soil-derived humic acid are approximately 4 times greater than with soil fulvic acid and 5-7 times greater than with aquatic humic and fulvic acids. The effectiveness of DOM in enhancing solute solubility appears to be largely controlled by the DOM molecular size and polarity. The relative inability of high-molecular-weight poly(acrylic acids) to enhance solute solubility is attributed to their high polarities and extended chain structures that do not permit the formation of a sizable intramolecular nonpolar environment.

Chiou, C. T.; Malcolm, R. L.; Brinton, T. I.; Kile, D. E.

1986-01-01

228

Advantages of online SPE coupled with UPLC/MS/MS for determining the fate of pesticides and pharmaceutical compounds.  

PubMed

Laboratory experimentation is essential for our understanding of the fate and behaviour of pollutants. Many analytical techniques exist, but they all have disadvantages either in terms of sensitivity or of selectivity. The number of samples that can be analysed, the low volume of samples available during the experiment and the need to identify different degradates are all obstacles that new techniques are able to overcome. The work presented here summarizes progress in the field of metrology as concerns online solid phase extraction technology coupled with liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry detection. Recently developed analytical techniques were validated for both 18 pesticides and their degradates and 17 pharmaceuticals and their degradates. Limits of quantification from 20 to 70 ng L(-1) for pharmaceuticals and from 15 to 25 ng L(-1) for pesticides and metabolites have been obtained, with linearity range up to 1 ?g L(-1). The limits of quantification of a few nanograms per litre, the possibility of working on less than 1 mL of sample and the simultaneous quantification of the target products and their transformation products are all advantages that are demonstrated by two environmental applications. The first application concerns the evaluation of ecotoxicological effects of pesticides on aquatic organisms exposed in mesocosms. The second application aims to determine the adsorption constants of pharmaceutical molecules on soils and river sediments. For both applications, the robustness, range of linearity and limit of quantification of the developed analytical methods satisfy the requirements for laboratory experiments conducted under controlled conditions. Specific constraints generated by this type of experiment (adding CaCl2 for the adsorption study and filtration of the water coming from the mesocosms) were not found to limit the use of online SPE. These two preliminary studies show that new experimental fields are possible thanks to online solid phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography. PMID:23907687

Togola, Anne; Baran, Nicole; Coureau, Charlotte

2014-02-01

229

Regulation of renal tubular secretion of organic compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Regulation of renal tubular secretion of organic compounds.BackgroundInformation on the molecular basis underlying organic anion and cation transport in renal tubules has expanded in recent years with the identification and characterization of numerous transporters. However, little is known about the regulation of this transport.MethodsBoth English and Russian language studies dealing with the regulation of organic ion transport by the kidney

Efim B Berkhin; Michael H Humphreys

2001-01-01

230

Factors influencing degradation of pesticides in soil.  

PubMed

Degradation and sorption of six acidic pesticides (2,4-D, dicamba, fluroxypyr, fluazifop-P, metsulfuron-methyl, and flupyrsulfuron-methyl) and four basic pesticides (metribuzin, terbutryn, pirimicarb, and fenpropimorph) were determined in nine temperate soils. Results were submitted to statistical analyses against a wide range of soil and pesticide properties to (i) identify any commonalities in factors influencing rate of degradation and (ii) determine whether there was any link between sorption and degradation processes for the compounds and soils studied. There were some marked differences between the soils in their ability to degrade the different pesticides. The parameters selected to explain variations in degradation rates depended on the soil-pesticide combination. The lack of consistent behavior renders a global approach to prediction of degradation unrealistic. The soil organic carbon content generally had a positive influence on degradation. The relationship between pH and degradation rates depended on the dominant mode of degradation for each pesticide. There were positive relationships between sorption and rate of degradation for metsulfuron-methyl, pirimicarb, and all acidic pesticides considered together (all P < 0.001) and for dicamba and all bases considered together (P < 0.05). No relationship between these processes was observed for the remaining seven individual pesticides. PMID:17488087

Kah, Melanie; Beulke, Sabine; Brown, Colin D

2007-05-30

231

Pesticide use in agriculture.  

PubMed Central

During the last three decades, the use of modern organic synthetic pesticides has increased about 40-fold. Total U.S. production, for domestic and expert use, in 1976 was about 1.4 million pounds. Crops receiving the most intensive application of various pesticides were cotton for insecticides, corn for herbicides, and fruits and vegetables for fungicides. Examination of use trends of pesticides indicates that the volume in pounds of herbicides used on crops is increasing, whereas the quantities of insecticides and fungicides remain stable. New chemical classes of compounds such as the synthetic pyrethroid insecticides are being introduced, but are not yet significant in terms of their share of the market. The increased usage of pesticides, together with knowledge of some of their adverse effects, has alerted the public to the need for regulation. To assist in the regulatory decision-making process, emphasis is being placed on benefit-cost analyses. Additional and improved biological inputs and methodologies are needed to provide accurate analyses.

Ridgway, R L; Tinney, J C; MacGregor, J T; Starler, N J

1978-01-01

232

Improving rubber concrete by waste organic sulfur compounds.  

PubMed

In this study, the use of crumb tyres as additives to concrete was investigated. For some time, researchers have been studying the physical properties of concrete to determine why the inclusion of rubber particles causes the concrete to degrade. Several methods have been developed to improve the bonding between rubber particles and cement hydration products (C-S-H) with the hope of creating a product with an improvement in mechanical strength. In this study, the crumb tyres were treated with waste organic sulfur compounds from a petroleum refining factory in order to modify their surface properties. Organic sulfur compounds with amphiphilic properties can enhance the hydrophilic properties of the rubber and increase the intermolecular interaction forces between rubber and C-S-H. In the present study, a colloid probe of C-S-H was prepared to measure these intermolecular interaction forces by utilizing an atomic force microscope. Experimental results showed that rubber particles treated with waste organic sulfur compounds became more hydrophilic. In addition, the intermolecular interaction forces increased with the adsorption of waste organic sulfur compounds on the surface of the rubber particles. The compressive, tensile and flexural strengths of concrete samples that included rubber particles treated with organic sulfur compound also increased significantly. PMID:19710121

Chou, Liang-Hisng; Lin, Chun-Nan; Lu, Chun-Ku; Lee, Cheng-Haw; Lee, Maw-Tien

2010-01-01

233

GROUNDWATER TRANSPORT OF HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN THE PRESENCE OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER  

EPA Science Inventory

The effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the transport of hydrophobic organic compounds in soil columns were investigated. Three compounds (naphthalene, phenanthrene and DDT) that spanned three orders of magnitude in water solubility were used. Instead of humic matter, mo...

234

Occurrence of pharmaceuticals, hormones, and organic wastewater compounds in Pennsylvania waters, 2006-09  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Concern over the presence of contaminants of emerging concern, such as pharmaceutical compounds, hormones, and organic wastewater compounds (OWCs), in waters of the United States and elsewhere is growing. Laboratory techniques developed within the last decade or new techniques currently under development within the U.S. Geological Survey now allow these compounds to be measured at concentrations in nanograms per liter. These new laboratory techniques were used in a reconnaissance study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, to determine the occurrence of contaminants of emerging concern in streams, streambed sediment, and groundwater of Pennsylvania. Compounds analyzed for in the study are pharmaceuticals (human and veterinary drugs), hormones (natural and synthetic), and OWCs (detergents, fragrances, pesticides, industrial compounds, disinfectants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fire retardants and plasticizers). Reconnaissance sampling was conducted from 2006 to 2009 to identify contaminants of emerging concern in (1) groundwater from wells used to supply livestock, (2) streamwater upstream and downstream from animal feeding operations, (3) streamwater upstream from and streamwater and streambed sediment downstream from municipal wastewater effluent discharges, (4) streamwater from sites within 5 miles of drinking-water intakes, and (5) streamwater and streambed sediment where fish health assessments were conducted. Of the 44 pharmaceutical compounds analyzed in groundwater samples collected in 2006 from six wells used to supply livestock, only cotinine (a nicotine metabolite) and the antibiotics tylosin and sulfamethoxazole were detected. The maximum concentration of any contaminant of emerging concern was 24 nanograms per liter (ng/L) for cotinine, and was detected in a groundwater sample from a Lebanon County, Pa., well. Seven pharmaceutical compounds including acetaminophen, caffeine, carbamazepine, and the four antibiotics tylosin, sulfadimethoxine, sulfamethoxazole, and oxytetracycline were detected in streamwater samples collected in 2006 from six paired stream sampling sites located upstream and downstream from animal-feeding operations. The highest reported concentration of these seven compounds was for the antibiotic sulfamethoxazole (157 ng/L), in a sample from the downstream site on Snitz Creek in Lancaster County, Pa. Twenty-one pharmaceutical compounds were detected in streamwater samples collected in 2006 from five paired stream sampling sites located upstream or downstream from a municipal wastewater-effluent-discharge site. The most commonly detected compounds and maximum concentrations were the anticonvulsant carbamazepine, 276 ng/L; the antihistamine diphenhydramine, 135 ng/L; and the antibiotics ofloxacin, 329 ng/L; sulfamethoxazole, 1,340 ng/L; and trimethoprim, 256 ng/L. A total of 51 different contaminants of emerging concern were detected in streamwater samples collected from 2007 through 2009 at 13 stream sampling sites located downstream from a wastewater-effluent-discharge site. The concentrations and numbers of compounds detected were higher in stream sites downstream from a wastewater-effluent-discharge site than in stream sites upstream from a wastewater-effluent-discharge site. This finding indicates that wastewater-effluent discharges are a source of contaminants of emerging concern; these contaminants were present more frequently in the streambed-sediment samples than in streamwater samples. Antibiotic compounds were often present in both the streamwater and streambed-sediment samples, but many OWCs were present exclusively in the streambed-sediment samples. Compounds with endocrine disrupting potential including detergent metabolites, pesticides, and flame retardants, were present in the streamwater and streambed-sediment samples. Killinger Creek, a stream where wastewater-effluent discharges contribute a large percentage of the total flow, stands out as a stream with particularly high numbers of compound

Reif, Andrew G.; Crawford, J. Kent; Loper, Connie A.; Proctor,Arianne; Manning, Rhonda; Titler, Robert

2012-01-01

235

Volatile organic compounds in Gulf of Mexico sediments  

SciTech Connect

Volatile organic compounds (VOC), concentrations and compositions were documented for estuarine, coastal, shelf, slope, and deep water sediments from the Gulf of Mexico. VOC were measured (detection limit >0.01 ppb) using a closed-loop stripping apparatus with gas chromatography (GC) and flame ionization, flame photometric, and mass spectrometric detectors. The five primary sources of Gulf of Mexico sediment VOC are: (1) planktonic and benthic fauna and flora; (2) terrestrial material from riverine and atmospheric deposition; (3) anthropogenic inputs: (4) upward migration of hydrocarbons; and (5) transport by bottom currents or slumping. Detected organo-sulfur compounds include alkylated sulfides, thiophene, alkylated thiophenes, and benzothiophenes. Benzothiophenes are petroleum related. Low molecular weight organo-sulfur compounds result from the biological oxidation of organic matter. A lack of organosulfur compounds in the reducing environment of the Orca Basin may result from a lack of free sulfides which are necessary for their production.

McDonald, T.J.

1988-01-01

236

Sensing based on Mach-Zehnder interferometer and hydrophobic thin films used on volatile organic compounds detection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents the project, optimization, design details, and fabrication of an optical chemical sensor based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI), fabricated with metal-oxide semiconductor compatible processes and materials. The sensing material is hexamethyldissilazane (HMDS) plasma polymerized thin film, which exhibits hydrophobic characteristics, high resistance to acid or basic solution, and adsorption of polar and nonpolar organic compounds. Both reference and sensor arms of the fabricated MZIs are covered with HMDS thin film in order to keep the device balanced. Different substances, such as water, 2-propanol, and hexane vapors are investigated. The high sensitivity of the MZI structure, associated with refractive index variations of about 10-4, paves the way for a myriad of sensor applications, such as humidity, organic compounds, proteins, antibodies (antigens), enzymes, pesticides, and others. The minimum detectable measurements were 4.6 mg/min for n-hexane and 0.2 mg/min for 2-propanol.

Siarkowski, Acácio Luiz; Hernandez, Leonardo Frois; Borges, Ben-Hur Viana; Morimoto, Nilton Itiro

2012-05-01

237

Corrosion of electrodeposited copper by exposure to volatile organic compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we investigate the corrosive behaviour of various volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on electroplated copper.\\u000a The VOCs we considered were of the following types: (i) aromatic and substituted-aromatic compounds (benzene, toluene and\\u000a ethyl benzene); (ii) a chlorine-substituted hydrocarbon (dichloromethane) and (iii) an aliphatic alcohol (isopropyl alcohol).\\u000a Contamination by VOCs is typical of ULSI (Ultra Large Scale Integration) manufacturing

Lucia D’Urzo; Benedetto Bozzini

2009-01-01

238

Photosynthetic marine organisms as a source of anticancer compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since early human history, plants have served as the most important source of medicinal natural products, and even in the\\u000a “synthetic age” the majority of lead compounds for pharmaceutical development remain of plant origin. In the marine realm,\\u000a algae and seagrasses were amongst the first organisms investigated by marine natural products scientists on their quest for\\u000a novel pharmaceutical compounds. Forty

F. Folmer; M. Jaspars; M. Dicato; M. Diederich

2010-01-01

239

Investigation of evolved paraoxonase-1 variants for prevention of organophosphorous pesticide compound intoxication.  

PubMed

We investigated the ability of the engineered paraoxonase-1 variants G3C9, VII-D11, I-F11, and VII-D2 to afford protection against paraoxon intoxication. Paraoxon is the toxic metabolite of parathion, a common pesticide still in use in many developing countries. An in vitro investigation showed that VII-D11 is the most efficient variant at hydrolyzing paraoxon with a kcat/Km of 2.1 × 10(6) M(-1) min(-1) and 1.6 × 10(6) M(-1) min(-1) for the enzyme expressed via adenovirus infection of 293A cells and mice, respectively. Compared with the G3C9 parent scaffold, VII-D11 is 15- to 20-fold more efficacious at hydrolyzing paraoxon. Coinciding with these results, mice expressing VII-D11 in their blood survived and showed no symptoms against a cumulative 6.3 × LD50 dose of paraoxon, whereas mice expressing G3C9 experienced tremors and only 50% survival. We then determined whether VII-D11 can offer protection against paraoxon when present at substoichiometric concentrations. Mice containing varying concentrations of VII-D11 in their blood (0.2-4.1 mg/ml) were challenged with doses of paraoxon at fixed stoichiometric ratios that constitute up to a 10-fold molar excess of paraoxon to enzyme (1.4-27 × LD50 doses) and were assessed for tremors and mortality. Mice were afforded complete asymptomatic protection below a paraoxon-to-enzyme ratio of 8:1, whereas higher ratios produced tremors and/or mortality. VII-D11 in mouse blood coeluted with high-density lipoprotein, suggesting an association between the two entities. Collectively, these results demonstrate that VII-D11 is a promising candidate for development as a prophylactic catalytic bioscavenger against organophosphorous pesticide toxicity. PMID:24706983

Mata, David G; Rezk, Peter E; Sabnekar, Praveena; Cerasoli, Douglas M; Chilukuri, Nageswararao

2014-06-01

240

Trace element, semivolatile organic, and chlorinated organic compound concentrations in bed sediments of selected streams at Fort Gordon, Georgia, February-April 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A spatial survey of streams was conducted from February to April 2010 to assess the concentrations of major ions, selected trace elements, semivolatile organic compounds, organochlorine pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls associated with the bed sediments of surface waters at Fort Gordon military installation near Augusta, Georgia. This investigation expanded a previous study conducted in May 1998 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Army Environmental and Natural Resources Management Office of the U.S. Army Signal Center and Fort Gordon, that evaluated the streambed sediment quality of selected surface waters at Fort Gordon. The data presented in this report are intended to help evaluate bed sediment quality in relation to guidelines for the protection of aquatic life, and identify temporal trends in trace elements and semivolatile organic compound concentrations at streambed sites previously sampled. Concentrations of 34 major ions and trace elements and 102 semivolatile organic, organochlorine pesticide, and polychlorinated biphenyl compounds were determined in the fine-grained fraction of bed sediment samples collected from 13 of the original 29 sites in the previous study, and 22 additional sites at Fort Gordon. Three of the sites were considered reference sites as they were presumed to be located away from potential sources of contaminants and were selected to represent surface waters flowing onto the fort, and the remaining 32 nonreference sites were presumed to be located within the contamination area at the fort. Temporal trends in trace elements and semivolatile organic compound concentrations also were evaluated at 13 of the 32 nonreference sites to provide an assessment of the variability in the number of detections and concentrations of constituents in bed sediment associated with potential sources, accumulation, and attenuation processes. Major ion and trace element concentrations in fine-grained bed sediment samples from most nonreference sites exceeded concentrations in samples from reference sites at Fort Gordon. Bed sediments from one of the nonreference sites sampled contained the highest concentrations of copper and lead with elevated levels of zinc and chromium relative to reference sites. The percentage change of major ions, trace elements, and total organic carbon that had been detected at sites previously sampled in May 1998 and current bed sediment sites ranged from -4 to 8 percent with an average percentage change of less than 1 percent. Concentrations of major ions and trace elements in bed sediments exceeded probable effect levels for aquatic life (based on the amphipod Hyalella azteca) established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency at 46 and 69 percent of the current and previously sampled locations, respectively. The greatest frequency of exceedances for major ions and trace elements in bed sediments was observed for lead. Concentrations of semivolatile organic compounds, organochlorine pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls were detected in bed sediment samples at 94 percent of the sites currently sampled. Detections of these organic compounds were reported with greater frequency in bed sediments at upstream sampling locations, when compared to downstream locations. The greatest number of detections of these compounds was reported for bed sediment samples collected from two creeks above a lake. The percentage change of semivolatile organic compounds detected at previously sampled and current bed sediment sites ranged from -68 to 100 percent with the greatest percentage increase reported for one of the creeks above the lake. Concentrations of semivolatile organic compounds and polychlorinated biphenyls in bed sediments exceeded aquatic life criteria established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency at three sites. Contaminant compounds exceeding aquatic life criteria included fluoranthene, phenanthrene, anthracene, benzo(a)anthracene

Thomas, Lashun K.; Journey, Celeste A.; Stringfield, Whitney J.; Clark, Jimmy M.; Bradley, Paul M.; Wellborn, John B.; Ratliff, Hagan; Abrahamsen, Thomas A.

2011-01-01

241

Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds  

DOEpatents

A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique. 7 figs.

Vo-Dinh, T.

1987-07-14

242

Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds  

DOEpatents

A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique.

Vo-Dinh, Tuan (625 Gulfwood Rd., Knoxville, TN 37923)

1987-01-01

243

Determination of individual organic compounds in shale oil  

SciTech Connect

Several techniques have been investigated for quantitating individual organic compounds in shale oil. Acid-base extraction and high performance liquid chromatography were emphasized as independent methods of shale oil fractionation. Gas chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and high performance liquid chromatography were used for individual compound quantitation utilizing external and/or internal standards or standard addition techniques. The following compounds were measured in the shale oil: pyrene, fluoranthene, benzo(e)pyrene, benzo(a)pyrene, phenol, o-cresol, acridine, and 2,4,6-trimethylpyridine. Comparable results were obtained by the various methods for extraction and quantitation.

Hertz, H.S.; Brown, J.M.; Chesler,S.N.; Guenther, F.R.; Hilpert, L.R.; May, W.E.; Parris, R.M.; Wise, S.A.

1980-09-01

244

Pesticide Exposure, Safety Issues, and Risk Assessment Indicators  

PubMed Central

Pesticides are widely used in agricultural production to prevent or control pests, diseases, weeds, and other plant pathogens in an effort to reduce or eliminate yield losses and maintain high product quality. Although pesticides are developed through very strict regulation processes to function with reasonable certainty and minimal impact on human health and the environment, serious concerns have been raised about health risks resulting from occupational exposure and from residues in food and drinking water. Occupational exposure to pesticides often occurs in the case of agricultural workers in open fields and greenhouses, workers in the pesticide industry, and exterminators of house pests. Exposure of the general population to pesticides occurs primarily through eating food and drinking water contaminated with pesticide residues, whereas substantial exposure can also occur in or around the home. Regarding the adverse effects on the environment (water, soil and air contamination from leaching, runoff, and spray drift, as well as the detrimental effects on wildlife, fish, plants, and other non-target organisms), many of these effects depend on the toxicity of the pesticide, the measures taken during its application, the dosage applied, the adsorption on soil colloids, the weather conditions prevailing after application, and how long the pesticide persists in the environment. Therefore, the risk assessment of the impact of pesticides either on human health or on the environment is not an easy and particularly accurate process because of differences in the periods and levels of exposure, the types of pesticides used (regarding toxicity and persistence), and the environmental characteristics of the areas where pesticides are usually applied. Also, the number of the criteria used and the method of their implementation to assess the adverse effects of pesticides on human health could affect risk assessment and would possibly affect the characterization of the already approved pesticides and the approval of the new compounds in the near future. Thus, new tools or techniques with greater reliability than those already existing are needed to predict the potential hazards of pesticides and thus contribute to reduction of the adverse effects on human health and the environment. On the other hand, the implementation of alternative cropping systems that are less dependent on pesticides, the development of new pesticides with novel modes of action and improved safety profiles, and the improvement of the already used pesticide formulations towards safer formulations (e.g., microcapsule suspensions) could reduce the adverse effects of farming and particularly the toxic effects of pesticides. In addition, the use of appropriate and well-maintained spraying equipment along with taking all precautions that are required in all stages of pesticide handling could minimize human exposure to pesticides and their potential adverse effects on the environment.

Damalas, Christos A.; Eleftherohorinos, Ilias G.

2011-01-01

245

Enhancement of Photodegradation of Pesticides in Soil by Transport Upward in Evaporating Water.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The research examined the extent of photolysis of three pesticides in soils of differing texture and organic matter content under the influence of evaporating soil water, to evaluate the impact of transport of water soluble compounds on photodegradation a...

G. C. Miller S. G. Donaldson

1997-01-01

246

Raman scattering studies of organic semiconducting charge-transfer compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Organic semiconductors offer the possibility of devices with greater mechanical flexibility and lower production costs compared to existing materials. Reports of carrier mobilities in monomolecular organic semiconductors in the 10-50 cm^2/V-s range and success in fabricating electronic devices from organic materials has increased the interest in their properties for electronic applications. However, the range of properties displayed by the monomolecular crystals is rather narrow. Charge-transfer compounds composed of two different organic molecules in which one acts as a donor and the other as an acceptor may represent the next generation of organic semiconductors. Control of their properties by modification of the molecules or changes in stoichiometry and crystalline structure makes them particularly attractive for a wide range of applications provided that the relationship between the structure and constituents of the compounds and their physical properties can be elucidated. Raman scattering studies of single crystals of two representative charge-transfer compounds, perylene-TCNQ and anthracene-TCNQ, will be presented. Theoretical calculations suggest that these materials have the potential for ambipolar charge transport, and so intermolecular interactions in these compounds are of particular interest.

McNeil, Laurie; Kloc, Christian

2011-03-01

247

Anthropogenic Organic Compounds in Source and Finished Groundwater of Community Water Systems in the Piedmont Physiographic Province, Potomac River Basin, Maryland and Virginia, 2003-04  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A source- and finished-water-quality assessment of groundwater was conducted in the Piedmont Physiographic Province of Maryland and Virginia in the Potomac River Basin during 2003-04 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. This assessment used a two-phased approach to sampling that allowed investigators to evaluate the occurrence of more than 280 anthropogenic organic compounds (volatile organic compounds, pesticides and pesticide degradates, and other anthropogenic organic compounds). Analysis of waters from 15 of the largest community water systems in the study area were included in the assessment. Source-water samples (raw-water samples collected prior to treatment) were collected at the well head. Finished-water samples (raw water that had been treated and disinfected) were collected after treatment and prior to distribution. Phase one samples, collected in August and September 2003, focused on source water. Phase two analyzed both source and finished water, and samples were collected in August and October of 2004. The results from phase one showed that samples collected from the source water for 15 community water systems contained 92 anthropogenic organic compounds (41 volatile organic compounds, 37 pesticides and pesticide degradates, and 14 other anthropogenic organic compounds). The 5 most frequently occurring anthropogenic organic compounds were detected in 11 of the 15 source-water samples. Deethylatrazine, a degradate of atrazine, was present in all 15 samples and metolachlor ethanesulfonic acid, a degradate of metolachlor, and chloroform were present in 13 samples. Atrazine and metolachlor were present in 12 and 11 samples, respectively. All samples contained a mixture of compounds with an average of about 14 compounds per sample. Phase two sampling focused on 10 of the 15 community water systems that were selected for resampling on the basis of occurrence of anthropogenic organic compounds detected most frequently during the first phase. A total of 48 different anthropogenic organic compounds were detected in samples collected from source and finished water. There were a similar number of compounds detected in finished water (41) and in source water (39). The most commonly detected group of anthropogenic organic compounds in finished water was trihalomethanes - compounds associated with the disinfection of drinking water. This group of compounds accounted for 30 percent of the detections in source water and 44 percent of the detections in finished water, and were generally found in higher concentrations in finished water. Excluding trihalomethanes, the number of total detections was about the same in source-water samples (33) as it was in finished-water samples (35). During both phases of the study, two measurements for human-health assessment were used. The first, the Maximum Contaminant Level for drinking water, is set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and represents a legally enforceable maximum concentration of a contaminant permitted in drinking water. The second, the Health-Based Screening Level, was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey, is not legally enforceable, and represents a limit for more chronic exposures. Maximum concentrations for each detected compound were compared with either the Maximum Contaminant Level or the Health-Based Screening Level when available. More than half of the compounds detected had either a Maximum Contaminant Level or a Health-Based Screening Level. A benchmark quotient was set at 10 percent (greater than or equal to 0.1) of the ratio of the detected concentration of a particular compound to its Maximum Contaminant Level, or Health-Based Screening Level. This was considered a threshold for further monitoring. During phase one, when only source water was sampled, seven compounds (chloroform, benzene, acrylonitrile, methylene chloride, atrazine, alachlor, and dieldrin) met or exceeded a benchmark quotient. No de

Banks, William S. L.; Reyes, Betzaida

2009-01-01

248

Removal of organic pollutants by surfactant modified zeolite: comparison between ionizable phenolic compounds and non-ionizable organic compounds.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to examine the adsorption capability and mechanism of hexadecyltrimethylammonium modified zeolite, which was synthesized from coal fly ash, for the removal of ionizable phenolic compounds (phenol, p-chlorophenol and bisphenol A, with different pK(a)) and non-ionizable organic compounds (aniline, nitrobenzene, and naphthalene, with different hydrophobicity). The obtained zeolite was identified as type Na-P1 (Na(6)Al(6)Si(10)O(32)·12H(2)O, JCPDS code 39-0219), which is classified into the gismondine group with a pore size of 3.1 Å × 4.5 Å [100] and 2.8 Å × 4.8 Å [101]. The adsorption of the two kinds of organic compounds was due to loaded surfactant bilayer because modified zeolite showed great ability for the removal of organic chemicals while little adsorption by zeolite was observed. The isotherm data of ionizable compounds fitted well to the Langmuir model but those of non-ionizable chemicals followed a linear equation. Uptake of ionizable compounds depended greatly on pH, increasing at alkaline pH conditions. In contrary, adsorption of non-ionizable chemicals was essentially the same at all pH levels studied. The adsorption of both kinds of organic compounds correlated well to k(ow) value, suggesting that more hydrophobic organic contaminants are more easily retained by modified zeolite. Based on the different adsorption behavior, the uptake of non-ionizable pollutants was thought to be a single partitioning process into the surfactant bilayer. For ionizable compounds, however, interaction of the phenol group(s) with the positively charged "head" of surfactant additionally functions. PMID:22771348

Xie, Jie; Meng, Wenna; Wu, Deyi; Zhang, Zhenjia; Kong, Hainan

2012-09-15

249

Macrophage activity and histopathology of the lymphohematopoietic organs in male Wistar rats orally exposed to single or mixed pesticides.  

PubMed

The noxious effects of low or effective dose exposure to single or mixed pesticides on macrophage activity and the lymphohematopoietic organs were investigated. Male Wistar rats were orally exposed to dichlorvos, dicofol, endosulfan, dieldrin and permethrin, either as single or combined mixtures during a 28-day study containing eight groups: one group received a semipurified diet (non-treated); two groups received a semipurified diet containing low dose mixture (dieldrin 0.025 mg/kg, endosulfan, 0.6 mg/kg, dicofol 0.22 mg/kg, dichlorvos 0.23 mg/kg, permethrin 5 mg/kg) or an effective dose mixture (dichlorvos 2.3 mg/kg, dicofol 2.5 mg/kg, endosulfan 2.9 mg/kg, dieldrin 0.05 mg/kg and permethrin 25.0 mg/kg), respectively; the other five groups received a semipurified diet containing each single pesticide in effective doses. At sacrifice, the thymus, spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes, Payer's patches and bone marrow were removed for histological analysis. Peritoneal macrophages were obtained to determine the phagocytosis and spreading indexes and tumoral necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?), nitric oxide (NO) and H?O? production. Exposure to pesticide mixtures did not alter the percentage of macrophage phagocytosis and spreading, TNF-? production or the NO and H?O? release when compared to the non-treated group. Neither was there any apparent evidence that a pesticide mixture at low or effective doses altered the histological structure of the lymphohematopoietic organs. The findings indicate that short-term treatment with pesticide mixtures did not induce an apparent immunotoxic effect in male Wistar rats. PMID:23581695

De Camargo, Marcela Rodrigues; Barbisan, Luís Fernando; Martinez, Meire França; Da Silva Franchi, Carla Adriene; De Camargo, João Lauro Viana; Spinardi-Barbisan, Ana Lúcia Tozzi

2013-01-01

250

DETERMINING ACTIVE OXIDANT SPECIES REACTING WITH ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES IN CHLORINATED DRINKING WATER  

EPA Science Inventory

Chlorpyrifos (CP) is an organophosphate (OP) pesticide that was used as a model compound to investigate the transformation of OP pesticides at low pH and in the presence of bromide and natural organic matter (NOM) under drinking water treatment conditions. Raman spectroscopy was...

251

The Use of Enhanced Bioremediation at the Savannah River Site to Remediate Pesticides and PCBs  

SciTech Connect

Enhanced bioremediation is quickly developing into an economical and viable technology for the remediation of contaminated soils. Until recently, chlorinated organic compounds have proven difficult to bioremediate. This article reviews the ongoing remediation occurring at the Chemicals, Metals, and Pesticides (CMP) Pits using windrow turners to facilitate microbial degradation of certain pesticides and PCBs.

Beul, R.

2003-09-30

252

Characterization of polar organic compounds and source analysis of fine organic aerosols in Hong Kong  

Microsoft Academic Search

Organic aerosols, as an important fraction of airborne particulate mass, significantly affect the environment, climate, and human health. Compared with inorganic species, characterization of individual organic compounds is much less complete and comprehensive because they number in thousands or more and are diverse in chemical structures. The source contributions of organic aerosols are far from being well understood because they

Yunchun Li

2008-01-01

253

On the flux of oxygenated volatile organic compounds from organic aerosol oxidation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous laboratory and field studies suggest that oxidation of organic aerosols can be a source of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOC). Using measurements of atmospheric oxidants and aerosol size distributions performed on the NASA DC-8 during the INTEX-NA campaign, we estimate the potential magnitude of the continental summertime OVOC flux from organic aerosol oxidation by OH to be as large

Alan J. Kwan; John D. Crounse; Antony D. Clarke; Yohei Shinozuka; Bruce E. Anderson; James H. Crawford; Melody A. Avery; Cameron S. McNaughton; William H. Brune; Hanwant B. Singh; Paul O. Wennberg

2006-01-01

254

Organic compounds as indicators for transport in an urban characterized complex karst system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In northern Hesse (Germany), sediments of the Upper Permian (Zechstein-Formations) are outcropping in a coastal facies along the western rim of the Rhenish Massif. The geologic section is characterized by a sequence of carbonate rocks (carbonates of the Werra-, Staßfurt- and Leine-Formations) and predominantly fine clastic sediments. The carbonate aquifers of the Werra-Formation and the Leine-Formation are used for drinking water abstraction of a provincial town and surrounding communities. Concurrently, the urban area is characterized by industrial and commercial uses. The groundwater flow system is composed of three potential karst aquifers, aquitards and aquicludes within a complex tectonically faulted area. The study area is divided into three spring catchment areas. However, the locations of the subsurface water divides are unknown. Traditional methods to determine the catchment areas (e.g. artificial tracer tests) are difficult to apply, due to a lack of adequate injection points. The presented work deals with the use of organic compounds as indicators for subsurface flow paths. Medical drugs, pesticides, corrosion inhibitors and such typical waste water compounds as caffeine (NÖDLER ET AL. 2010) are observed in approximately fifty groundwater observation points by regular sampling. The seasonal variability of the distribution pattern of organic compounds is low. The most common compounds are atrazine and its metabolites desethylatrazine and desisopropylatrazine, as well as the corrosion inhibitor 1H-benzotriazole. Since these substances are applied in different regions different input functions can be assumed. However, the highest concentrations are detected along a North-orientated axis, which also exhibits the greatest compound variety. This distribution pattern indicates preferential flow and transport pathways in the subsurface. The absence of organic compounds in other parts of the investigation area implies the existence of a water divide between these areas. The occurence of atrazine in groundwater samples denotes the existence of a water component with a transit time of more than 20 years because the use of atrazine as a pesticide has been banned in Germany since 1991. Furthermore, since atrazine and 1H-benzotriazole are found in all investigated aquifers, the presence of hydraulic connections between the aquifers (e.g. associated to faults) is likely. In addition to the long-term flow component, the periodic detection of such antibiotics as erythromycine, after strong recharge events (for example snow-melt events), suggests also the presence of a short-term flow component in the aquifer system. Consequently, the observation of organic compounds is an appropriate method to determine subsurface flow paths within complex aquifer systems. Furthermore, such a method can also be employed in the subsurface to approximate transit times and to identify mixing zones. Lecture NÖDLER, K., LICHA, T., BESTER, B., K. SAUTER, M. (2010): Development of a multi-residue analytical method, based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, for the simultaneous determination of 46 micro-contaminants in aqueous samples.- Journal of Chromatography A, 1217 (2010) 6511-6521.

Reh, R.; Licha, T.; Nödler, K.; Geyer, T.; Sauter, M.

2012-04-01

255

Anthropogenic Organic Compounds in Source and Finished Water from Community Water System Wells in Western and Central Connecticut, 2002-2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A water-quality assessment by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) determined the occurrence of anthropogenic (manmade) organic compounds (AOCs) in water from 15 community water system (CWS) wells and associated finished drinking water. The study, which focused on water from the unconfined glacial stratified aquifer in western and central Connecticut, was conducted as part of the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) Source Water-Quality Assessment (SWQA) project and included analysis of water samples for 88 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), 120 pesticides, and 50 other anthropogenic organic compounds (OAOCs). During Phase I of the study, 25 AOCs were detected (12 VOCs, 10 pesticides, and 3 OAOCs) in source-water samples collected from 15 CWS wells sampled once from October 2002 to May 2003. Although concentrations generally were low (less than 1 microgram per liter), four compounds were detected at higher concentrations in ground water from four wells. The most frequently occurring AOCs were detected in more than half of the samples and included chloroform (87 percent), methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE, 80 percent), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (67 percent), atrazine (60 percent), deethylatrazine (60 percent), perchloroethene (PCE, 53 percent), and simazine (53 percent). Trichloroethene (TCE) was detected in 47 percent of samples. Samples generally contained a mixture of compounds ranging from 2 to 19 detected compounds, with an average of 8 detected compounds per sample. During Phase II of the study, 42 AOCs were detected in source-water samples collected from 10 resampled CWS wells or their associated finished water. Trihalomethanes accounted for most of the VOCs detections with all concentrations less than 1 microgram per liter. Chloroform, the most frequently detected VOC, was found in all source-water and all finished-water samples. As with the Phase I samples, other frequently detected VOCs included MTBE, and the solvents 1,1,1-trichloroethane, PCE, and TCE. Triazine herbicides and their degradation products accounted for most of the detected pesticides.

Trombley, Thoams J.; Brown, Craig J.; Delzer, Gregory C.

2007-01-01

256

INFRARED REMOTE SENSING OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN THE UPPER TROPOSPHERE  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) instrument measures the intensity of atmospheric radiation emitted in the infra-red spectral region at high spectral resolution in five bands ranging from 685 cm-1 to 2410 cm-1. The instrument has an excellent radiometric calibration, allowing the determination of weak features of organic compounds which are present and rather important in the upper

John J. Remedios; Grant Allen; H. Sembhi

2005-01-01

257

AERATION TO REMOVE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM GROUND WATER  

EPA Science Inventory

The interim report presents general information on the use of aeration to remove volatile organic compounds from drinking water for public health reasons. The report illustrates the types of aerators, shows where they are being used, presents a means of estimating aeration perfor...

258

Problems in determining the water solubility of organic compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have been concerned for some time about the reliability of published water solubility data for organic compounds with low solubility. The problem was illustrated by the results of our studies on the solubility of the liquid trichlorobenzene (TCB). We found that the apparent solubility is strongly dependent on the method of introducing the solute into the water (Orr 1980).

A. Bharath; C. Mallard; D. Orr; G. Ozburn; A. Smith

1984-01-01

259

PHOTOTHERMAL DESTRUCTION OF THE VAPOR OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

The results of thermal and photothermal destruction of the vapors of organic compounds were compared by conducting tests in a photothermal detoxification unit. enon are lamp was used as the irradiation source. he tests were conducted on trichlorethylene (TCE), 1,2-dichlorobenzene...

260

PHOTOTHERMAL DESTRUCTION OF THE VAPOR OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

The contamination of subsurface soil and groundwater by volatile organic compounds (VOCS) is a pervasive problem in the United States. n-situ soil vapor extraction (SVE) and ex-situ thermal desorption are the most adapted technologies for the remediation of contaminated soil whil...

261

Reductive amination of oxygen-containing organic compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The data dealing with reductive amination of oxygen-containing organic compounds of different classes are systematised. New data on the amination agents and the catalysts used are presented. The dependence of the reactivity of reagents on their structures is considered. The bibliography includes 249 references.

Tarasevich, Vladimir A.; Kozlov, Nikolai G.

1999-01-01

262

Influence of Ozone on the Photocatalytic Oxidation of Organic Compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation processes using titanium oxide as a photocatalyst are widely discussed topics in research for water and waste water treatment. Oxygen fed into the systems is normally used as oxidizing agent. However few investigations exist concerning the use of ozone as an additional oxidant. In this work the influence of ozone on the photocatalytic degradation of organic compounds

E. Gilbert

2002-01-01

263

Source apportionment of volatile organic compounds in Hong Kong homes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Indoor volatile organic compound (VOC) data obtained in 100 Hong Kong homes were analyzed to investigate the nature of emission sources and their contributions to indoor concentrations. A principal component analysis (PCA) showed that off-gassing of building materials, household products, painted wood products, room freshener, mothballs and consumer products were the major sources of VOCs in Hong Kong homes. The

H. Guo

2011-01-01

264

Metabolism and effects of organic compounds in animals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The knowledge of the metabolism and effects of organic compounds in animals, specifically food-producing animals, are of paramount importance in assessing potential human health hazards. An intensive effort has been directed at detection of chemicals in the environment, determination of their physiological insult and cellular interaction; in particular their carcinogenic and mutagenic induction capability. The chemical exposure of food-producing animals

Eisele

1985-01-01

265

Assessment of volatile organic compound emissions from ecosystems of China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Isoprene, monoterpene, and other volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from grasslands, shrublands, forests, and peatlands in China were characterized to estimate their regional magnitudes and to compare these emissions with those from landscapes of North America, Europe, and Africa. Ecological and VOC emission sampling was conducted at 52 sites centered in and around major research stations located in seven different

L. F. Klinger; Q.-J. Li; A. B. Guenther; J. P. Greenberg; B. Baker; J.-H. Bai

2002-01-01

266

Volatile organic compounds in ambient air of Mumbai—India  

Microsoft Academic Search

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a major group of air pollutants which play a critical role in atmospheric chemistry. These contribute to toxic oxidants which are harmful to ecosystem, human health and atmosphere. The variability of pollutants is an important factor in determining human exposure to these chemicals. Data on levels of VOCs in developing countries, including India, are lacking.The

Anjali Srivastava; A. E. Joseph; S. Devotta

2006-01-01

267

Volatile organic compounds in some urban locations in United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been determined to be human risk factors in urban environments, as well as primary contributors to the formation of photochemical oxidants. Ambient air quality measurements of 54 VOCs including hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons and carbonyls were conducted in or near 13 urban locations in the United States during September 1996 to August 1997. Air samples were

Mahmoud F. Mohamed; Daiwen Kang; Viney P. Aneja

2002-01-01

268

VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND MODEL (VERSION 1.8) (FOR MICROCOMPUTERS)  

EPA Science Inventory

Future emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and costs of their control can be estimated by applying growth factors, emission constraints, control cost functions, and capacity retirement rates to the base line estimates of VOC emissions and industrial VOC source capacity...

269

Catalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds on supported noble metals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are toxic and mainly contribute to the formation of photochemical smog with a consequent remarkable impact to the air quality. A few techniques are available to reduce VOC emission, among them catalytic oxidation is suitable especially for highly diluted VOCs. The development of noble metals and transition metal oxides as catalysts for VOCs oxidation has been

L. F. Liotta

2010-01-01

270

FIELD-DEPLOYABLE MONITORS FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AIR  

EPA Science Inventory

Volatile organic compounds in ambient air are usually estimated by trapping them from air or collecting whole air samples and returning them to a laboratory for analysis by gas chromatography using selective detection. ata do not appear for several days, during which sample integ...

271

Biogeochemistry of Organic Nitrogen Compounds in Seawater and on Particles.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The goal of this research was to increase our understanding of the behavior of biogenic organic nitrogen compounds in the marine environment. Nitrogen is essential to the photosynthetic formation of life in natural waters and is one of the nutrients which...

C. Lee

1992-01-01

272

A global model of natural volatile organic compound emissions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerical assessments of global air quality and potential changes in atmospheric chemical constituents require estimates of the surface fluxes of a variety of trace gas species. We have developed a global model to estimate emissions of volatile organic compounds from natural sources (NVOC). Methane is not considered here and has been reviewed in detail elsewhere. The model has a highly

Alex Guenther; C. Nicholas Hewitt; David Erickson; Ray Fall; Chris Geron; Tom Graedel; Peter Harley; Lee Klinger; Manuel Lerdau; W. A. McKay; Tom Pierce; Bob Scholes; Rainer Steinbrecher; Raja Tallamraju; John Taylor; Pat Zimmerman

1995-01-01

273

Screening of Volatile Organic Compounds in River Sediment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as trichloroethene, toluene and xylenes have been reported to be detected from river water and sediment, because a part of VOCs charged into river can be distributed to river sediment. Fifty-three common VOCs in water have been simultaneously determined with good accuracy and precision by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC\\/MS) with headspace method as

K. Kawata; A. Tanabe; S. Saito; M. Sakai; A. Yasuhara

1997-01-01

274

IDENTIFICATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AN INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER  

EPA Science Inventory

Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used in a survey analysis of organic compounds in an industrial wastewater. Problems in the interpretation of the GC/MS data in effluent from a specialty chemicals plant were addressed. An important feature of the study was the use...

275

Energies of organic compounds. [Polyoxygenated methanes, ketals, orthoesters, cyclopropane derivatives  

SciTech Connect

Automatic reaction calorimeters were developed. Enthalpies of hydration or hydrolysis were determined for polyoxygenated methanes, ketals, acetals, orthoesters, and alkenes. Trifluoroacetolysis of alkenes was carried out. Enthalpies of acetolysis and combustion of cyclopropane derivatives were also determined. Molecular mechanics calculations were carried out for ketones and ketals. Charge distribution in organic compounds were studied. 31 references. (DLC)

Wiberg, K. B.

1980-07-01

276

LEAVES AS INDICATORS OF EXPOSURE TO AIRBORNE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

The concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in leaves is primarily a product of airborne exposures and dependent upon bioconcentration factors and release rates. The bioconcentration factors for VOCs in grass are found to be related to their partitioning between octan...

277

NATIONAL AMBIENT VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOCS) DATA BASE UPDATE, DOCUMENTATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Data on the observed concentrations of three hundred twenty (320) volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were compiled, critically evaluated, and assembled into a relational data base. Ambient (i.e., outdoor) measurements, indoor data, and data collected with personal monitors are inc...

278

Portable acoustic wave sensors for volatile organic compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Portable acoustic wave sensor (PAWS) systems are being developed for real-time, on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOC's). These systems are built around acoustic wave (SAW) devices coated with viscoelastic polymers. Two independent responses of the SAW sensor, wave velocity and wave attenuation, are measured to provide information about the chemical species sorbed by the coating. Rapid, reversible detection of

G. C. Frye; R. W. Cernosek; S. J. Martin

1992-01-01

279

Characterization of total volatile organic compound emissions from paints  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, Homeswest in Western Australia and Murdoch University developed a project to construct low allergen houses (LAH) in a newly developed suburb. All potential volatile organic compound (VOC) emission materials used in LAH are required to be measured before the construction of LAH, to ensure they are low VOCs emission materials. To protect people sensitive to exposure to VOCs it

H. Guo; F. Murray

2000-01-01

280

OXYGENATED ORGANIC COMPOUND CONCENTRATIONS NEAR A ROADWAY IN LITHUANIA, SSR  

EPA Science Inventory

During the period June 1 to June 9, 1989, aldehyde and other oxygenated organic compound concentrations were examined at sites 3, 10, and 80 meters northeast of the Vilnius-Kaunas highway in Lithuania, SSR by collecting 120 liter (1 L/min for 120 min) samples on 2,4-dinitrophenyl...

281

Who Took Jerell's iPod? -- An Organic Compound Mystery  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students learn how to test for triglycerides, glucose, starch, and protein and then use these tests to solve a mystery. The activity reinforces students understanding of the biological functions and food sources of these different types of organic compounds.

Doherty, Jennifer; Waldron, Ingrid

282

Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from soil and litter samples  

Microsoft Academic Search

The production of nonmethane volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by soil microbes is likely to have an important influence on soil ecology and terrestrial biogeochemistry. However, soil VOC production has received relatively little attention, and we do not know how the emissions of microbially-produced VOCs vary across soil and litter types. We collected 40 root-free soil and litter samples from a

Jonathan W. Leff; Noah Fierer

2008-01-01

283

Sorption of Ionizable Organic Compounds to Sediments and Soils.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The sorption of ionizable organic compounds to sediments and saturated soils is examined. The sorption of pentachlorophenol to two sediment silt-clay fractions as a function of pH is described. Sorption of both the neutral and the ionic species was shown ...

C. T. Jafvert E. J. Weber

1991-01-01

284

Environmental monitoring of selected pesticides and organic chemicals in urban stormwater recycling systems using passive sampling techniques.  

PubMed

Water recycling via aquifers has become a valuable tool to augment urban water supplies in many countries. This study reports the first use of passive samplers for monitoring of organic micropollutants in Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR). Five different configurations of passive samplers were deployed in a stormwater treatment wetland, groundwater monitoring wells and a recovery tank to capture a range of polar and non-polar micropollutants present in the system. The passive samplers were analysed for a suite of pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other chemicals. As a result, 17 pesticides and pesticide degradation products, 5 PAHs and 8 other organic chemicals including flame retardants and fragrances were detected in urban stormwater recharging Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) and an Aquifer Storage Transfer and Recovery (ASTR) system. Of the pesticides detected, diuron, metolachlor and chlorpyrifos were generally detected at the highest concentrations in one or more passive samplers, whereas chlorpyrifos, diuron, metolachlor, simazine, galaxolide and triallate were detected in multiple samplers. Fluorene was the PAH detected at the highest concentration and the flame retardant Tris(1-chloro-2-propyl)phosphate was the chemical detected in the greatest abundance at all sites. The passive samplers showed different efficiencies for capture of micropollutants with the Empore disc samplers giving the most reliable results. The results indicate generally low levels of organic micropollutants in the stormwater, as the contaminants detected were present at very low ng/L levels, generally two to four orders of magnitude below the drinking water guidelines (NHMRC, 2011). The efficiency of attenuation of these organic micropollutants during MAR was difficult to determine due to variations in the source water concentrations. Comparisons were made between different samplers, to give a field-based calibration where existing lab-based calibrations were unavailable. PMID:24508567

Page, Declan; Miotli?ski, Konrad; Gonzalez, Dennis; Barry, Karen; Dillon, Peter; Gallen, Christie

2014-03-01

285

Composition of volatile organic compounds in flowers of Astragalus sahendi.  

PubMed

A hydrodistillation sampling method, coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, was used in monitoring the volatile organic compounds in flowers of Astragalus sahendi. Accordingly, a total of 48 compounds were recognised, which were united by their terpenoid or aliphatic skeletons and low molecular weight. Above all, the significant presence of some insect-favoured terpenoid compounds, such as farnesol, cis- and trans-geraniol, alpha-bisabolol, nerolidol isomer, alpha-terpineol, alpha-terpinolene and thymol was significant. These findings confer a better understanding of pollination processes in the giant genus Astragalus. Furthermore, the results add to an increasing quantity of data corroborating the ecologic and evolutionary correlation between the floral bioactive compounds of plant species and their special types of pollinators. PMID:20803377

Movafeghi, A; Delazar, A; Amini, M; Asnaashari, S; Nazifi, E

2010-09-01

286

Analysis of organic compounds in returned comet nucleus samples  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Techniques for analysis of organic compounds in returned comet nucleus samples are described. Interstellar, chondritic and transitional organic components are discussed. Appropriate sampling procedures will be essential to the success of these analyses. It will be necessary to return samples that represent all the various regimes found in the nucleus, e.g., a complete core, volatile components (deep interior), and crustal components (surface minerals, rocks, processed organics such as macromolecular carbon and polymers). Furthermore, sampling, storage, return, and distribution of samples must be done under conditions that preclude contamination of the samples by terrestrial matter.

Cronin, J. R.

1989-01-01

287

Occurrence and accumulation of pesticides and organic contaminants in river sediment, water and clam tissues from the San Joaquin River and tributaries, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A study was conducted in 1992 to assess the effects of anthropogenic activities and land use on the water quality of the San Joaquin River and its major tributaries. This study focused on pesticides and organic contaminants, looking at distributions of contaminants in water, bed and suspended sediment, and the bivalve Corbicula fluminea. Results indicated that this river system is affected by agricultural practices and urban runoff. Sediments from Dry Creek contained elevated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), possibly derived from urban runoff from the city of Modesto; suspended sediments contained elevated amounts of chlordane. Trace levels of triazine herbicides atrazine and simazine were present in water at most sites. Sediments, water, and bivalves from Orestimba Creek, a westside tributary draining agricultural areas, contained the greatest levels of DDT (1,1,1-trichloro-2-2-bis[p-chlorophenyl]ethane), and its degradates DDD (1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis[p-chlorophenyl]ethane), and DDE (1,1-dichloro-2,2- bis[p-chlorophenyl]ethylene). Sediment adsorption co efficients (K(oc)), and bioconcentration factors (BCF) in Corbicula of DDT, DDD, and DDE at Orestimba Creek were greater than predicted values. Streams of the western San Joaquin Valley can potentially transport significant amounts of chlorinated pesticides to the San Joaquin River, the delta, and San Francisco Bay. Organochlorine compounds accumulate in bivalves and sediment and may pose a problem to other biotic species in this watershed.

Pereira, W. E.; Domagalski, J. L.; Hostettler, F. D.; Brown, L. R.; Rapp, J. B.

1996-01-01

288

Pesticides and their effects on wildlife.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

About 560 active ingredients are currently used as pesticides. Applications of these pesticides are made to agricultural lands and other areas inhabited by wildlife. Unfortunately, many agricultural-use pesticides also entail some measure of risk to organ...

C. J. Driver

1994-01-01

289

Occurrence of Organic Wastewater Compounds in Selected Surface-Water Supplies, Triangle Area of North Carolina, 2002-2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Selected organic wastewater compounds, such as household, industrial, and agricultural-use compounds, sterols, pharmaceuticals, and antibiotics, were measured at eight sites classified as drinking-water supplies in the Triangle Area of North Carolina. From October 2002 through July 2005, seven of the sites were sampled twice, and one site was sampled 28 times, for a total of 42 sets of environmental samples. Samples were analyzed for as many as 126 compounds using three laboratory analytical methods. These methods were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey to detect low levels (generally less than or equal to 1.0 microgram per liter) of the target compounds in filtered water. Because analyses were conducted on filtered samples, the results presented in this report may not reflect the total concentration of organic wastewater compounds in the waters that were sampled. Various quality-control samples were used to quality assure the results in terms of method performance and possible laboratory or field contamination. Of the 108 organic wastewater compounds that met method performance criteria, 24 were detected in at least one sample during the study. These 24 compounds included 3 pharmaceutical compounds, 6 fire retardants and plasticizers, 3 antibiotics, 3 pesticides, 6 fragrances and flavorants, 1 disinfectant, and 2 miscellaneous-use compounds, all of which likely originated from a variety of domestic, industrial, and agricultural sources. The 10 most frequently detected compounds included acetyl-hexamethyl tetrahydronaphthalene and hexahydro-hexamethyl cyclopentabenzopyran (synthetic musks that are widely used in personal-care products and are known endocrine disruptors); tri(2-chloroethyl) phosphate, tri(dichloroisopropyl) phosphate, and tributyl phosphate (fire retardants); metolachlor (herbicide); caffeine (nonprescription stimulant); cotinine (metabolite of nicotine); acetaminophen (nonprescription analgesic); and sulfamethoxazole (prescription antibiotic). The occurrence and distribution of organic wastewater compounds varied considerably among sampling sites, but at least one compound was detected at every location. The most organic wastewater compounds (19) were detected at the Neuse River above U.S. 70 at Smithfield, where two-thirds of the total number of samples were collected. The fewest organic wastewater compounds (1) were detected at the Eno River at Hillsborough. The detection of multiple organic wastewater compounds was common, with a median of 3.5 and as many as 12 compounds observed in individual samples. Some compounds, including acetaminophen, cotinine, tri(2-chloroethyl) phosphate, and metolachlor, were detected at numerous sites and in numerous samples, indicating that they are widely distributed in the environment. Other organic wastewater compounds, including acetyl-hexamethyl tetrahydronaphthalene and hexahydro-hexamethyl cyclopentabenzopyran, were detected in numerous samples but at only one location, indicating that sources of these compounds are more site specific. Results indicate that municipal wastewater may be a source of antibiotics and synthetic musks; however, the three sites in this study that are located downstream from wastewater discharges also receive runoff from agricultural, urban, and rural residential lands. Source identification was not an objective of this study. Concentrations of individual compounds generally were less than 0.5 microgram per liter. No concentrations exceeded Federal drinking-water standards or health advisories, nor water-quality criteria established by the State of North Carolina; however, such criteria are available for only a few of the compounds that were studied. Compared with other surface waters that have been sampled across the United States, the Triangle Area water-supply sites had fewer detections of organic wastewater compounds; however, differences in study design and analytical methods used among studies must be considered when mak

Giorgino, M. J.; Rasmussen, R. B.; Pfeifle, C.M .

2007-01-01

290

Measurements of halogenated organic compounds near the tropical tropopause  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The amount of organic chlorine and bromine entering the stratosphere have a direct influence on the magnitude of chlorine and bromine catalyzed ozone losses. Twelve organic chlorine species and five organic bromine species were measured from 12 samples collected near the tropopause between 23.8 deg N and 25.3 deg N during AASE 2. The average mixing ratios of total organic chlorine and total organic bromine were 3.50 +/- 0.06 ppbv and 21.1 +/- 0.8 pptv, respectively. CH3Cl represented 15.1% of the total organic chlorine, with CFC 11 (CCl3F) and CFC 12 (CCl2F2) accounting for 22.6% and 28.2%, respectively, with the remaining 34.1% primarily from CCl4, CH3CCl3, and CFC 113 (CCl2FCClF2). CH3Br represented 54% of the total organic bromine. The 95% confidence intervals of the mixing ratios of all but four of the individual compounds were within the range observed in low and mid-latitude mid-troposphere samples. The four compounds with significantly lower mixing ratios at the tropopause were CHCl3, CH2Cl2, CH2Br2, and CH3CCl3. The lower mixing ratios may be due to entrainment of southern hemisphere air during vertical transport in the tropical region and/or to exchange of air across the tropopause between the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere.

Schauffler, S. M.; Heidt, L. E.; Pollock, W. H.; Gilpin, T. M.; Vedder, J. F.; Solomon, S.; Lueb, R. A.; Atlas, E. L.

1993-01-01

291

Measurements of Halogenated Organic Compounds near the Tropical Tropopause  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The amount of organic chlorine and bromine entering the stratosphere have a direct influence on the magnitude of chlorine and bromine catalyzed ozone losses. Twelve organic chlorine species and five organic bromine species were measured from 12 samples collected near the tropopause between 23.8 deg N and 25.3 deg N during AASE 2. The average mixing ratios of total organic chlorine and total organic bromine were 3.50 +/- 0.06 ppbv and 21.1 +/- 0.8 pptv, respectively. CH3Cl represented 15.1% of the total organic chlorine, with CFC 11 (CCl3F) and CFC 12 (CCl2F2) accounting for 22.6% and 28.2%, respectively, with the remaining 34.1% primarily from CCl4, CH3CCl3, and CFC 113 (CCl2FCClF2). CH3Br represented 54% of the total organic bromine. The 95% confidence intervals of the mixing ratios of all but four of the individual compounds were within the range observed in low and mid-latitude midtroposphere samples. The four compounds with significantly lower mixing ratios at the tropopause were CHCl3, CH2Cl2, CH2Br2, and CH3CCl3. The lower mixing ratios may be due to entrainment of southern hemisphere air during vertical transport in the tropical region and/or to exchange of air across the tropopause between the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere.

Schauffler, S. M.; Heidt, L. E.; Pollock, W. H.; Gilpin, T. M.; Vedder, J. F.; Solomon, S.; Leub, R. A.; Atlas, E. L.

1993-01-01

292

Designed nanostructures of clay for controlled adsorption of organic compounds.  

PubMed

The utilization of smectite clay, swelling layered silicate, as scaffolds for designing functional nanostructures was overviewed. Surface modification of smectites with organoammonium ions has given hydrophobic and microporous nature to uptake nonionic organic contaminants from environments. The states of the adsorbed nonionic organic compounds have been altered and varied by the modification of smectites as shown by the controlled release and specific catalytic reactions. Cationic species have been easily concentrated on smectites from aqueous phase and the states (orientation and distribution) have been controlled by the co-adsorption of both cationic and nonionic species. The functions of smectite-organic intercalation compounds derived from the precisely controlled nanostructures were introduced in this review. PMID:24745206

Okada, Tomohiko; Seki, Yoko; Ogawa, Makoto

2014-03-01

293

Adsorption of Dissolved Organic Compounds from Seawater Onto Sediment and Manganese Nodule Particles.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The removal of dissolved organic compounds from seawater by adsorption onto ferromanganese particles and red clay sediment was investigated. The compounds studied were chosen to represent typical classes of dissolved organic compounds in seawater and cons...

M. R. Petersen D. E. Robertson

1973-01-01

294

Organochlorine pesticide contamination in marine organisms of Yantai coast, northern Yellow Sea of China.  

PubMed

To evaluate the contamination of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in marine organisms and their potential health risk on consumers in the northern Yellow Sea of China, mollusks, wild shrimps, and crabs were collected from the Yantai coast, and the OCP contents in the samples were analyzed and compared. The results indicate that all the samples have been contaminated by OCPs, and OCP concentrations varied in individual species and in sampling sites. Among the studied OCPs, ?HCH and ?DDT concentrations ranged from 0.91 to 13.92 ng g(-1) and from 10.16 to 411.19 ng g(-1), respectively. Meretrix was highly enriched with HCHs, while the highest DDT concentration was found in Crassostrea. For the OCP isomers, ?-HCH was the predominant isomer of HCHs, and p,p'-DDE concentration was much higher than other isomers of DDTs. The concentrations of other OCPs (HCB, t-CHL, endrin, and mirex) were relatively low. For the shrimp and crab samples, Alpheus distinguendus samples accumulated a higher level of HCHs but lower DDTs than Oratosquilla aratoria and Carcinoplax vestitus in all sampling areas. HCHs in the samples of contrast area were not significantly lower than that of the sewage outfall area and port area, whereas DDTs in the samples of contrast area were relatively lower than that of the other two areas. Generally, all the OCP contents in the samples are in the range of the edible hygienic criteria except the total concentration of DDTs in Crassostrea. PMID:24126907

Chen, Jing; Chen, Linlin; Liu, Dongyan; Zhang, Gaosheng

2014-03-01

295

Biodiversity of volatile organic compounds from five French ferns.  

PubMed

Five French ferns belonging to different families were investigated for volatile organic compounds (VOC) by GC-MS using organic solvent extraction. Fifty-five VOC biosynthesized from the shikimic, lipidic and terpenic pathways including monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and carotenoid-type compounds were identified. The main volatile compound of Adiantum capillus-veneris L. (Pteridaceae) was (E)-2-decenal with a plastic or "stink bug" odor. The volatile profiles of Athyrium filix-femina (L.) Roth (Woodsiaceae) and Blechnum spicant (L.) Roth (Blechnaceae) showed similarities, with small amounts of isoprenoids and the same main volatile compounds, i.e., 2-phenylethanal (odor of lilac and hyacinth) and 1-octen-3-ol (mushroom-like odor). The main volatile compound of Dryopteris filix-mas (L.) Schott (Dryopteridaceae) was (E)-nerolidol with a woody or fresh bark note. Polyketides, as acylfilicinic acids, were mainly identified in this fern. Oreopteris limbosperma (Bellardi ex. All.) J. Holub (Thelypteridaceae), well-known for its lemon smell, contained the highest biodiversity of VOC. Eighty percent of the volatiles was issued from the terpenic pathway. The main volatiles were (E)-nerolidol, alpha-terpineol, beta-caryophyllene and other minor monoterpenes (for example, linalool, pinenes, limonene, and gamma-terpinen-7-al). It was also the fern with the highest number of carotenoid-type derivatives, which were identified in large amounts. Our results were of great interest underlying new industrial valorisation for ferns based on their broad spectrum of volatiles. PMID:21121267

Fons, Françoise; Froissard, Didier; Bessière, Jean-Marie; Buatois, Bruno; Rapior, Sylvie

2010-10-01

296

Antimicrobial Pesticides  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This newly launched site from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) offers a variety of resources describing how the EPA regulates antimicrobial pesticides. Antimicrobial pesticides are used in a huge variety of household and commercial products to "disinfect, sanitize, reduce, or mitigate growth or development of microbiological organisms" and to "protect inanimate objects (for example floors and walls), industrial processes or systems, surfaces, water, or other chemical substances from contamination, fouling, or deterioration caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime." Intended mainly for a regulatory audience, the site includes Antimicrobials Science Policy Documents, Antimicrobials Registration Policy Documents, Label Review Manual, Chemical/ Registration Number Indexes, and Antimicrobial PR notices.

297

[Chlorination byproducts formation potentials of typical nitrogenous organic compounds in water].  

PubMed

Twelve typical nitrogenous organic compounds including herbicides, pesticides, amino acids, industrial products etc in polluted raw water were selected to investigate formation of typical carbonaceous and nitrogenous DBPs during chlorination and chloramination. To indentify the formation mechanism of carbonaceous and nitrogenous disinfection byproducts from nitrogenous chemicals, chlorination and chloroamination of urea herbicides, triazine herbicides, amino acid, and other compounds were investigated. As a result, the potential precursors for different DBPs were defined as well. It has been identified that widely used urea herbicides could produce as many as 9 specific DBPs. The chlorotoluron shows highest reactivity and yields chloroform (CF), monochloroacetic acid (MCAA), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), 1,1-dichloro-acetone (1,1-DCP), 1,1,1-trichloro-acetone (1,1,1-TCP), chloropicrin (NTCM), dichloro-acetonitrile (DCAN), dimethylnitrosamine (NDMA). The results indicated that aldicarb and dinoseb are important precursors of CF, DCAA, MCAA, NTCM as well. High concentrations of CF and DCAA were found during L-tryptophan chlorination. Furthermore, DBPs formation pathways and mechanisms were suggested during chlorination and chloramination of chlorotoluron, ametryn, dinoseb L-tryptophan. PMID:21922816

Xu, Qian; Xu, Bin; Qin, Cao; Xia, Sheng-Ji; Gao, Nai-Yun; Tian, Fu-Xiang; Li, Da-Peng

2011-07-01

298

Monitoring of heavy metal and organic compound levels along the Eastern Aegean coast with transplanted mussels.  

PubMed

Within the framework of the MYTITURK project, heavy metals and organic compounds contaminations were assessed in transplanted mussels in eight different bays from the Eastern Aegean coast. Izmir Bay, Canakkale Strait entrance, Saros and Candarli Bay were defined low pollution extent according to Principal Component Analysis taking into metal accumulation. PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons) levels in the range of 29.4-64.2 ng g(-1) (dry weight) indicated that PAH contamination level classified as low along the Aegean coast. Concentrations of Aroclor1254 and 1260 were higher in transplanted mussels from Canakkale Strait Outlet due to industrial activities was originated from Marmara Sea. The organochlorinated pesticides such as heptachlor (<0.4 ng g(-1)), aldrin (<0.30 ng g(-1)), dieldrin (<0.75 ng g(-1)), endrin (<2.3 ng g(-1)) concentrations were homogeneous however, HCB (Hexachlorobenzene) and lindane concentrations were found undetectable level along the coast. DDE/DDT ratio in the caged mussels form Gulluk and Gokova Bay indicated recent DDT (Dikloro difenil trikloroethan) usage in these areas. The residues of organochlorinated compounds in transplanted mussels confirm the long persistence of DDTs. According to world health authorities, the concentration of heavy metals in mussels for the study area can generally be considered not to be at levels posing a health risk except Zn. The levels of POPs indicated that transplanted mussels have a lack of risk for the human health. PMID:23972908

Kucuksezgin, Filiz; Pazi, Idil; Yucel-Gier, Guzel; Akcali, Baris; Galgani, François

2013-11-01

299

Effects of an organochlorine pesticide on different levels of biological organization in Daphnia.  

PubMed

The toxicity of the organochlorine pesticide, endosulfan, to Daphnia carinata was measured at three levels of biological organization: allocation of resources to reproduction, growth and reproductive rates, and population dynamics. The mechanisms by which responses at one level of organization manifest at higher levels are discussed. Two experiments were performed: in the first experiment, groups of Daphnia were exposed to endosulfan at one of three concentrations (0, 40, or 80 microg/liter) and two algal food levels (Selanastrum capricornatum) (1 x 10(5) or 5 x 10(4) cells/ml). Animals were subsampled daily and length, dry weight, egg number, total egg mass, mean egg weight, and timing of reproduction measured. The fraction of available resources that were allocated to reproduction was calculated. In the second experiment, 12 populations of Daphnia were established in flowthrough culture systems. Populations were allowed to grow for 45 days before addition of endosulfan at 0, 40, 80, or 160 microg/liter. Population density, the number of egg-bearing females, and the chlorophyll a concentration in each culture were measured at weekly intervals. The effects of endosulfan on length, dry weight, brood size, and total egg mass were greater at the high food level; however, the timing of reproduction was significantly delayed for the low-food endosulfan-exposed animals. A model is proposed whereby the low-food animals increased the intermolt period to partially offset the costs of endosulfan toxicity. The fraction of available resources allocated to reproduction increased with each instar, although no endosulfan-induced changes could be detected. Daphnia population densities fluctuated in a cyclic manner. Chlorophyll a concentration also fluctuated with peaks coinciding with depressions in the daphnid population density. The effect of endosulfan was to dampen the amplitude of the cycles. PMID:8812193

Barry, M J

1996-08-01

300

Group extraction of organic compounds present in liquid samples  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An extraction device is disclosed comprising a tube containing a substantially inert, chemically non-reactive packing material with a large surface area to volume ratio. A sample which consists of organic compounds dissolved in a liquid, is introduced into the tube. As the sample passes through the packing material it spreads over the material's large surface area to form a thin liquid film which is held on the packing material in a stationary state. A particular group or family of compounds is extractable from the sample by passing a particular solvent system consisting of a solvent and selected reagents through the packing material. The reagents cause optimum conditions to exist for the compounds of the particular family to pass through the phase boundary between the sample liquid and the solvent of the solvent system. Thus, the compounds of the particular family are separated from the sample liquid and become dissolved in the solvent of the solvent system. The particular family of compounds dissolved in the solvent, representing an extract, exits the tube together with the solvent through the tube's nozzle, while the rest of the sample remains on the packing material in a stationary state. Subsequently, a different solvent system may be passed through the packing material to extract another family of compounds from the remaining sample on the packing material.

Jahnsen, Vilhelm J. (Inventor)

1976-01-01

301

Impact of Pesticides as Organic Micro-Pollutants on the Environment and Risks for Mankind  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Because of health concerns, persistence, and long-term environmental effects, the impact of pesticides on agriculture and\\u000a public health has been the subject of considerable research. Organophosphorus pesticides exert their acute effects by inhibiting\\u000a acetylcholinesterase in the nervous system with subsequent accumulation of toxic levels of acetylcholine. Herbicides have\\u000a widely variable toxicity. In addition to acute toxicity from high exposures, there

Faruk Bozoglu

302

Characterization of organochlorine pesticides, brominated flame retardants and dioxin-like compounds in shellfish and eel from Fiji.  

PubMed

This article gives an overview of a range of persistent organic pollutant chemical levels in shellfish (Batissa violacea and Anadara antiquata) species and eel (Gymnothorax flavimarginatus) from Fiji. As there is limited data in published literature to date, this paper reports first data on a range of persistent organic pollutants and highlights the more prominent POP chemicals present in marine biota in Fiji. A significant number of POP chemicals were detected (e.g. 17 PCDD/PCDF, 12dl-PCBs, organochlorine pesticides and brominated flame retardants), the concentrations found were generally low (e.g. parts per billion level). The low levels of contamination are indicative of a low input from long range and short-range transport as well as few local point sources. Also concentrations of POPs in eel and shellfish from Fiji are low in comparison to wild species in other regions and are within acceptable limits for POP chemicals in fish and fishery products set by the European Union. It describes also results of early studies on basic POPs levels in shellfish in several Pacific Island Countries, which generally show relatively low levels. PMID:24568747

Lal, Vincent; Bridgen, Phil; Votadroka, Waisea; Raju, Rupantri; Aalbersberg, William

2014-09-01

303

Organic compounds assessed in Chattahoochee River water used for public supply near Atlanta, Georgia, 2004-05  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An investigation by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program characterized the occurrence of 266 organic compounds in source water and finished water from the Chattahoochee River, which is the main water-supply source for the Atlanta metropolitan area. Source water is stream water collected at a surface-water intake prior to water treatment, and finished water is water that has passed through treatment processes prior to distribution. Samples were collected approximately monthly during 2004-05 and included 15 paired source-water and finished-water samples. Samples were collected during winter-spring high flow and summer-fall low flow, but storm events were not targeted during this Source Water-Quality Assessment (SWQA) study. Samples were analyzed for pesticides and degradates, gasoline hydrocarbons, solvents, disinfection by-products, personal care and domestic-use products, and other organic compounds. Community water systems are required to monitor regulated organic compounds under the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1996 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1998); however, most compounds included in this study are not regulated by Federal drinking-water standards (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2007a). The Chattahoochee River study is part of an ongoing NAWQA investigation of community water systems across the United States. Additional details about the national study are given in Carter and others (2007).

Hughes, W. Brian; Younker, Cristal L.

2011-01-01

304

Biodegradation of organic compounds in vadose zone and aquifer sediments  

SciTech Connect

The microbial processes that occur in the subsurface under a typical Midwest agricultural soil were studied. A 26-m bore was installed in November of 1988 at a site of the Purdue University Agronomy Research Center. Aseptic collections of soil materials were made at 17 different depths. Physical analysis indicated that the site contained up to 14 different strata. The site materials were primarily glacial tills with a high carbonate content. The N,P, and organic C contents of sediments tended to decrease with depth. Ambient water content was generally less than the water content, which corresponds to a -0.3-bar equivalent. No pesticides were detected in slurry incubations of up to 128 days. The sorption of atrazine and metolachlor was correlated with the clay content of the sediments. Microbial biomass (determined by direct microscopic count, viable count, and phospholipid assay) in the tills was lower than in either the surface materials or the aquifer located at 25 m. The biodegradation of glucose and phenol occurred rapidly and without a lag in samples from the aquifer capillary fringe, saturated zone, and surface soils. In contrast, lag periods and smaller biodegradation rates were found in the till samples. Subsurface sediments are rich in microbial numbers and activity. The most active strata appear to be transmissive layers in the saturated zone. This implies that the availability of water may limit activity in the profile.

Konopka, A.; Turco, R. (Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, Indiana (USA))

1991-08-01

305

78 FR 24990 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound Emission...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound Emission Control Measures for...Implementation Plan (SIP), several volatile organic compound (VOC) rules that were submitted...stationary sources, storage of volatile organic liquids, industrial cleaning...

2013-04-29

306

Identification of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and carbonyl compounds in Hong Kong  

Microsoft Academic Search

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and carbonyl compounds are the major organic pollutants in the atmosphere. Emissions from motor vehicles have been one of the primary pollution sources in the metropolitan area of Hong Kong. A 12-month monitoring program for VOCs, PAHs and carbonyl compounds was performed at a roadside urban station at Hong Kong Polytechnic University

K. F. Ho; S. C. Lee

2002-01-01

307

Transfer kinetics of polar organic compounds over polyethersulfone membranes in the passive samplers POCIS and Chemcatcher.  

PubMed

Passive samplers for polar organic compounds often use a polyethersulfone (PES) membrane to retain the particulate sorbent material (e.g., in a POCIS; polar organic chemical integrative sampler) or to reduce the sampling rate and thus extend the kinetic regime (e.g., in a Chemcatcher). The transport kinetics over the PES membrane are evaluated here in a short-term (6 days) and a long-term (32 days) experiment with POCIS and Chemcatchers. Passive samplers were placed in a channel with flowing river water that was spiked with 22 organic chemicals including pharmaceuticals, pesticides and biocides; with logK(ow) (logarithmic octanol-water partitioning coefficient) values between -2.6 and 3.8. Samplers were removed at intervals and membranes and sorbent material were extracted and analyzed with LC-MS/MS. Uptake kinetics of the compounds fell between two extremes: (1) charged chemicals and chemicals of low hydrophobicity did not accumulate in PES and rapidly transferred to the sorbent (e.g., diclofenac) and (2) more hydrophobic chemicals accumulated strongly in the PES and appeared in the sorbent after a lag-phase (e.g., diazinon and diuron). Sorption kinetics were modeled with a three-compartment first-order kinetic model to determine uptake and elimination rate constants and partitioning coefficients. Water PES partitioning coefficients fitted with the model correlated well with experimentally determined values and logK(ow). Sampling rates of Chemcatcher (0.02-0.10 L/d) and POCIS (0.02-0.30 L/d) showed similar patterns and correlated well. Thus the samplers are interchangeable in practical applications. Longer lag-phases may pose problems when calculating time-weighted average aqueous concentrations for short passive sampling windows and for a correct integrative sampling of fluctuating concentrations. PMID:22594693

Vermeirssen, Etiënne L M; Dietschweiler, Conrad; Escher, Beate I; van der Voet, Jürgen; Hollender, Juliane

2012-06-19

308

Identification and Quantification of Volatile Organic Compounds at a Dairy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Livestock operations in the United States are an escalating environmental concern. The increasing density of livestock within a farm results in an increased emission of odorous gases, which have gained considerable attention by the public in recent years (National Research Council (NRC), 2002). Odorous compounds such as ammonia (NH3), volatile organic compounds (VOC's), and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) were reported to have a major effect on the quality of life of local residents living near livestock facilities (NRC, 2002). There has been little data collected related to identification and quantification of gaseous compounds collected from open stall dairy operations in the United States. The research to be presented identifies and quantifies VOCs produced from a dairy operation that contribute to odor and other air quality problems. Many different VOCs were identified in the air downwind of an open lactating cow stall area and near a waste lagoon at the Washington State University dairy using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis techniques. Identified compounds were very diverse and included many alcohols, aldehydes, amines, aromatics, esters, ethers, a fixed gas, halogenated hydrocarbons, hydrocarbons, ketones, other nitrogen containing compounds, sulfur containing compounds, and terpenes. The VOCs directly associated with cattle waste were dependent on ambient temperature, with the highest emissions produced during the summer months. Low to moderate wind speeds were ideal for VOC collection. Concentrations of quantified compounds were mostly below odor detection thresholds found in the literature, however the combined odor magnitude of the large number of compounds detected was most likely above any minimum detection threshold.

Filipy, J.; Mount, G.; Westberg, H.; Rumburg, B.

2003-12-01

309

Contributions of Individual Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds to Secondary Organic Aerosol and Organic Nitrate Formation above a Mixed Forest  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are the largest source of atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons globally. However, uncertainty remains in understanding the fate of BVOCs following emission. BVOCs can be oxidized to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA), CO, and CO2, or be removed from the atmosphere through dry and wet deposition. Further, the formation of organic nitrates through BVOC reaction with OH

K. A. Pratt; L. H. Mielke; P. B. Shepson; A. M. Bryan; A. L. Steiner; D. Helmig

2010-01-01

310

Nonlinear Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Natural Organic Compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Principles of nonlinear laser fluorescence spectroscopy of complicated organic compounds and of the method capable of determining photophysical parameters are considered in this chapter. Special attention is paid to the peculiarities of the method connected with specific photophysical processes in natural organic compounds, especially in proteins, and to the major role of intramolecular energy transfer and presence of localized donor-acceptor pairs (LDAP) of fluorophores within single macromolecules. These facts stimulated the development of models based on the collective states formalism describing fluorescent response of LDAP to pulsed laser excitation. Unique features of the method are illustrated by the example of proteins (proteins with intrinsic fluorescence (HSA, BSA) and fluorescent protein mRFP1) that can be used as fluorescent tags of intracellular processes while their photophysical parameters can be used as the information channel.

Fadeev, Victor V.; Shirshin, Evgeny A.

311

Bibliography on contaminants and solubility of organic compounds in oxygen  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A compilation of a number of document citations is presented which contains information on contaminants in oxygen. Topics covered include contaminants and solubility of organic compounds in oxygen, reaction characteristics of organic compounds with oxygen, and sampling and detection limits of impurities. Each citation in the data bank contains many items of information about the document. Some of the items are title, author, abstract, corporate source, description of figures pertinent to hazards or safety, key references, and descriptors (keywords) by which the document can be retrieved. Each citation includes an evaluation of the technical contents as to being good/excellent, acceptable, or poor. The descriptors used to define the contents of the documents and subsequently used in the computerized search operations were developed for the cryogenic fluid safety by experts in the cryogenics field.

Ordin, P. M. (compiler)

1975-01-01

312

Sugar-Related Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Meteorites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sugars and related polyols are critical components of all organisms and may have been necessary for the origin of life. To date, this class of organic compounds had not been definitively identified in meteorites. This study was undertaken to determine if polyols were present in the early Solar System as constituents of carbonaceous meteorites. Results of analyses of the Murchison and Murray meteorites indicate that formaldehyde and sugar chemistry may be responsible for the presence of a variety of polyols. We conclude that polyols were present on the early Earth through delivery by asteroids and possibly comets.

Cooper, G.; Kimmich, N.; Belisle, W.; Sarinana, J.; Brabham, K.; Garrel, L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

313

PARTITION EQUILIBRIA OF NONIONIC ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BETWEEN SOIL ORGANIC MATTER AND WATER  

EPA Science Inventory

Equilibrium isotherms for the simultaneous uptake of binary nonionic organic compounds from water on soil indicated no competitive effect between the two solutes. The observation supports the hypothesis that partition to the soil organic phase is the primary process for sorption ...

314

Soil sampling and analysis for volatile organic compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concerns over data quality have raised many questions related to sampling soils for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This paper was prepared in response to some of these questions and concerns expressed by Remedial Project Managers (RPMs) and On-Scene Coordinators (OSCs). The following questions are frequently asked:1.Is there a specific device suggested for sampling soils for VOCs?2.Are there significant losses of

T. E. Lewis; A. B. Crockett; R. L. Siegrist

1994-01-01

315

Trees and VOCs: Measuring volatile organic compounds from urban forests  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web site describes a research project to measure volatile organic compounds emitted from species of trees and shrubs found in urban areas. Topics include a description of the project and a section on trees and air quality. A page updated each month or so reports field and lab work on the project. There is also a glossary, profiles of community partners, and profiles of the scientists and students involved in the project.

Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR) at the University of Colorado-Boulder; Research, The N.

316

Artificial Neural Network Electronic Nose for Volatile Organic Compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advanced microsystems that include, sensors, interface-circuits, and pattern-recognition integrated monolithically or in a hybrid module are needed for civilian, military, and space applications. These include: automotive, medical applications, environmental engineering, and manufacturing automation. ASICs with Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) are considered in this paper, with the objective of recognizing air-borne volatile organic compounds, especially alcohols, ethers, esters, halocarbons, NH3, NO2,

Hoda S. Abdel-aty-zohdy

1998-01-01

317

Source characteristics of oxygenated volatile organic compounds and hydrogen cyanide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Airborne trace gas measurements from Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P), Pacific Exploratory Mission (PEM)-Tropics B, and Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment-North America (INTEX-NA) experiments are analyzed to examine the major source factors contributing to the observed variabilities of oxygenated volatile organic compounds and cyanides. The positive matrix factorization method is applied to coincident measurements of 11 chemicals including

Changsub Shim; Yuhang Wang; Hanwant B. Singh; Donald R. Blake; Alex B. Guenther

2007-01-01

318

Improved sensitivity of headspace gas chromatography for organic aromatic compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  The effect of adding an electrolyte and increasing the temperature on the preconcentration of volatile compounds in headspace\\u000a analysis has been investigated. Quantification of the interactive effects of temperature and addition of salt on the vapor\\u000a concentration is of interest for the determination of trace organic impurities in pharmaceutical base materials. This study\\u000a was undertaken to investigate the quantitative effects

A. Naddaf; J. Balla

2000-01-01

319

Portable acoustic wave sensors for volatile organic compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Portable acoustic wave sensor (PAWS) systems are being developed for real-time, on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOC`s). These systems are built around acoustic wave (SAW) devices coated with viscoelastic polymers. Two independent responses of the SAW sensor, wave velocity and wave attenuation, are measured to provide information about the chemical species sorbed by the coating. Rapid, reversible detection of

G. C. Frye; R. W. Cernosek; S. J. Martin

1992-01-01

320

Characterization of total volatile organic compound emissions from paints  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, Homeswest in Western Australia and Murdoch University developed a project to construct low allergen houses (LAH)\\u000a in a newly developed suburb. All potential volatile organic compound (VOC) emission materials used in LAH are required to\\u000a be measured before the construction of LAH, to ensure they are low VOCs emission materials. To protect people sensitive to\\u000a exposure to VOCs it

H. Guo; F. Murray

2000-01-01

321

Degradation of volatile organic compounds with thermally activated persulfate oxidation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the extent and treatability of the degradation of 59 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) listed in the EPA SW-846 Method 8260B with thermally activated persulfate oxidation. Data on the degradation of the 59 VOCs (in mixture) reacted with sodium persulfate in concentrations of 1gl?1 and 5gl?1 and at temperatures of 20°C, 30°C, and 40°C were obtained. The results

Kun-Chang Huang; Zhiqiang Zhao; George E. Hoag; Amine Dahmani; Philip A. Block

2005-01-01

322

Anthropogenic Organic Compounds in Source Water of Nine Community Water Systems that Withdraw from Streams, 2002-05  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Source water, herein defined as stream water collected at a water-system intake prior to water treatment, was sampled at nine community water systems, ranging in size from a system serving about 3,000 people to one that serves about 2 million people. As many as 17 source-water samples were collected at each site over about a 12-month period between 2002 and 2004 for analysis of 258 anthropogenic organic compounds. Most of these compounds are unregulated in drinking water, and the compounds analyzed include pesticides and selected pesticide degradates, gasoline hydrocarbons, personal-care and domestic-use compounds, and solvents. The laboratory analytical methods used in this study have relatively low detection levels - commonly 100 to 1,000 times lower than State and Federal standards and guidelines for protecting water quality. Detections, therefore, do not necessarily indicate a concern to human health but rather help to identify emerging issues and to track changes in occurrence and concentrations over time. About one-half (134) of the compounds were detected at least once in source-water samples. Forty-seven compounds were detected commonly (in 10 percent or more of the samples), and six compounds (chloroform, atrazine, simazine, metolachlor, deethylatrazine, and hexahydrohexamethylcyclopentabenzopyran (HHCB) were detected in more than one-half of the samples. Chloroform was the most commonly detected compound - in every sample (year round) at five sites. Findings for chloroform and the fragrances HHCB and acetyl hexamethyl tetrahydronaphthalene (AHTN) indicate an association between occurrence and the presence of large upstream wastewater discharges in the watersheds. The herbicides atrazine, simazine, and metolachlor also were among the most commonly detected compounds. Degradates of these herbicides, as well as those of a few other commonly occurring herbicides, generally were detected at concentrations similar to or greater than concentrations of the parent compound. Samples typically contained mixtures of two or more compounds. The total number of compounds and their total concentration in samples generally increased with the amount of urban and agricultural land use in a watershed. Annual mean concentrations of all compounds were less than human-health benchmarks. Single-sample concentrations of anthropogenic organic compounds in source water generally were less than 0.1 microgram per liter and less than established human-health benchmarks. Human-health benchmarks used for comparison were U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) for regulated compounds and U.S. Geological Survey Health-Based Screening Levels for unregulated compounds. About one-half of all detected compounds do not have human-health benchmarks or adequate toxicity information for evaluating results in a human-health context. During a second sampling phase (2004-05), source water and finished water (water that has passed through all the treatment processes but prior to distribution) were sampled at eight of the nine community water systems. Water-treatment processes differ among the systems. Specifically, treatment at five of the systems is conventional, typically including steps of coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation, filtration, and disinfection. One water system uses slow sand filtration and disinfection, a second system uses ozone as a preliminary treatment step to conventional treatment, and a third system is a direct filtration treatment plant that uses many of the steps employed in conventional treatment. Most of these treatment steps are not designed specifically to remove the compounds monitored in this study. About two-thirds of the compounds detected commonly in source water were detected at similar frequencies in finished water. Although the water-treatment steps differ somewhat among the eight water systems, the amount of change in concentration of the compounds from source- to finish

Kingsbury, James A.; Delzer, Gregory C.; Hopple, Jessica A.

2008-01-01

323

Three-year study of fenthion and dimethoate pesticides in olive oil from organic and conventional cultivation.  

PubMed

Residues of fenthion and dimethoate pesticides were determined in organic and conventional olive oils by liquid-liquid and solid-phase extractions with subsequent gas chromatography and mass spectrometric analysis. The olive oil samples were collected from Crete during 1997-99. The average concentrations of fenthion in conventional olive oils were 0.1222, 0.145 and 0.1702 mg x kg(-1), and for dimethoate were 0.0226, 0.0264 and 0.0271 mg x kg(-1) for 1997, 1998 and 1999, respectively. The average concentrations of fenthion in organic olive oils were 0.0215, 0.0099 and 0.0035 mg x kg(-1) for 1997, 1998 and 1999, while for dimethoate they were 0.0098, 0.0038 and 0.0010 mg x kg(-1), respectively. All the olive oils contained residue levels lower than the maximum residue levels according to the FAO/WHO Codex Alimentarius. The organic olive oil contained significantly lower concentrations of the two pesticides. The levels of fenthion and dimethoate in organic olive oils exhibited a decreasing trend following the implementation of the new cultivation method. We propose procedures that should be established in the organic cultivation in order to maximize its effectiveness. PMID:12881128

Tsatsakis, A M; Tsakiris, I N; Tzatzarakis, M N; Agourakis, Z B; Tutudaki, M; Alegakis, A K

2003-06-01

324

Identification and quantification of volatile organic compounds from a dairy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that contribute to odor and air quality problems have been identified from the Washington State University Knott Dairy Farm using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Eighty-two VOCs were identified at a lactating cow open stall and 73 were detected from a slurry wastewater lagoon. These compounds included alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, esters, ethers, aromatic hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons, terpenes, other hydrocarbons, amines, other nitrogen containing compounds, and sulfur-containing compounds. The concentration of VOCs directly associated with cattle waste increased with ambient air temperature, with the highest concentrations present during the summer months. Concentrations of most detected compounds were below published odor detection thresholds. Emission rates of ethanol (1026±513 ?g cow -1 s -1) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) (13.8±10.3 ?g cow -1 s -1) were measured from the lactating stall area using an atmospheric tracer method and concentrations were plotted using data over a 2-year period. Emission rates of acetone (3.03±0.85 ng cow -1 s -1), 2-butanone (145±35 ng cow -1 s -1), methyl isobutyl ketone (3.46±1.11 ng cow -1 s -1), 2-methyl-3-pentanone (25.1±8.0 ng cow -1 s -1), DMS (2.19±0.92 ng cow -1 s -1), and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) (16.1±3.9 ng cow -1 s -1) were measured from the slurry waste lagoon using a laboratory emission chamber.

Filipy, Jenny; Rumburg, Brian; Mount, George; Westberg, Hal; Lamb, Brian

325

Speciation of volatile organic compounds from poultry production  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from poultry production are leading source of air quality problems. However, little is known about the speciation and levels of VOCs from poultry production. The objective of this study was the speciation of VOCs from a poultry facility using evacuated canisters and sorbent tubes. Samples were taken during active poultry production cycle and between production cycles. Levels of VOCs were highest in areas with birds and the compounds in those areas had a higher percentage of polar compounds (89%) compared to aliphatic hydrocarbons (2.2%). In areas without birds, levels of VOCs were 1/3 those with birds present and compounds had a higher total percentage of aliphatic hydrocarbons (25%). Of the VOCs quantified in this study, no single sampling method was capable of quantifying more than 55% of compounds and in several sections of the building each sampling method quantified less than 50% of the quantifiable VOCs. Key classes of chemicals quantified using evacuated canisters included both alcohols and ketones, while sorbent tube samples included volatile fatty acids and ketones. The top five compounds made up close to 70% of VOCs and included: 1) acetic acid (830.1 ?g m -3); 2) 2,3-butanedione (680.6 ?g m -3); 3) methanol (195.8 ?g m -3); 4) acetone (104.6 ?g m -3); and 5) ethanol (101.9 ?g m -3). Location variations for top five compounds averaged 49.5% in each section of the building and averaged 87% for the entire building.

Trabue, Steven; Scoggin, Kenwood; Li, Hong; Burns, Robert; Xin, Hongwei; Hatfield, Jerry

2010-09-01

326

Occurrence of selected trace elements and organic compounds and their relation to land use in the Willamette River basin, Oregon, 1992-94  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Between 1992 and 1994, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study of trace elements and organic compounds in the Willamette River Basin, Oregon, as part of the Willamette River Basin Water Quality Study. Low-level analyses were performed for trace elements, volatile organic compounds, organochlorine compounds, and pesticides. Overall, 94 water samples were collected from 40 sites, during predominantly high-flow conditions, representing urban, agricultural, mixed, and forested land uses. Although most observed concentrations were relatively low, some exceedances of water-quality criteria for acute and chronic toxicity and for the protection of human health were observed. Concentrations of chromium, copper, lead, and zinc in unfiltered water were well correlated with concentrations of suspended sediment. The highest trace-element concen-trations generally were found at urban sites that receive a large portion of their runoff from industrial areas, particularly at high suspended-sediment concentrations. In contrast, concentrations of trace elements in some urban streams draining primarily residential areas appeared to approach a maximum as sediment concentrations increased. Whether this difference was due to a difference in the nature of the suspended sediments or to different concentrations in the aqueous phases from the two site types was not addressed. Eight organochlorine compounds were detected at 14 sites. Lindane, dieldrin, and DDT or its metabolites were each detected in about 30 percent of the samples, predominantly in samples collected from agricultural and urban areas. Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) compounds were detected in samples from two urban sites. For samples in which DDT and its metabolites were examined for partitioning, the largest proportion of the mass of DDT and its metabolites was associated with suspended sediment. In contrast, dieldrin and lindane were almost completely (greater than 99 percent) associated with the dissolved phase. Sixty-one of the 94 pesticides analyzed in filtered water were documented to have been used in the basin in 1987; 43 of these were detected at least once during 1992-94. An additional five were detected that were not documented in the 1987 estimates. Although a comparison between the frequency of detected pesticides and 1987 estimates of pesticide usage in the basin showed generally little correlation, some patterns of detections did appear to reflect land use in the basin. Of the 25 most frequently detected pesticides, 3 were found primarily at urban sites, 6 were found primarily at agricultural sites, and 7 were found at all types of sites except forested. The four most commonly detected pesticides in the basin, observed at all except for ested site types, were atrazine, metolachlor, simazine, and diuron. A greater variety of compounds was detected at sites in the northern portion of the basin than in the southern portion of the basin probably because the northern portion has more diverse agricultural practices and a larger urban component. Possible reasons for the lack of agree ment between pesticide detections and pesticide usage estimates include (1) uncertainty in the usage estimates due to spatial and temporal variability or due to changes in agricultural practices since the 1987 estimates were compiled, (2) chemical or biological transformations in the compounds after application, (3) variable hydrologic conditions among sites at the time of sampling, or (4) the ability of laboratory analytical procedures to detect low concentrations of some analytes. Results from repeated samplings at two sites during sequential storms in the fall of 1994 indicated that concentrations and loads of several constituents, including suspended sediment, suspended organic carbon, DDT, metolachlor, and atrazine were highest during peak flows of the first or second significant storms of the fall. Samplings during subsequent storms indicated that instantaneous concentrations and loads wer

Anderson, C. W.; Rinella, F. A.; Rounds, S. A.

1996-01-01

327

Characteristics of the volatile organic compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Site  

SciTech Connect

The Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Program (VOC-Arid ID) is targeted at demonstration and testing of technologies for the evaluation and cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants at arid DOE sites. The initial demonstration site is an area of carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) contamination located near the center of the Hanford Site. The movement of CCl{sub 4} and other volatile organic contaminants in the subsurface is very complex. The problem at the Hanford Site is further complicated by the concurrent discharge of other waste constituents including acids, lard oil, organic phosphates, and transuranic radionuclides. In addition, the subsurface environment is very complex, with large spatial variabilities in hydraulic properties. A thorough understanding of the problem is essential to the selection of appropriate containment, retrieval, and/or in situ remedial technologies. The effectiveness of remedial technologies depends on knowing where the contaminants are, how they are held up in a given physical and chemical subsurface environment; and knowing the physical, chemical, and microbiological changes that are induced by the various remedial technologies.

Last, G.V.; Lenhard, R.J.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Evans, J.C.; Roberson, K.R.; Spane, F.A.; Amonette, J.E.; Rockhold, M.L.

1991-10-01

328

Characterisation of polar organic compounds in fog water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper the results of a systematic liquid chromatographic investigation are described to characterise water-soluble organic compounds in fog. A diode array detector is used to record the UV spectrum of the components during separation and a mass spectrometer is applied to obtain information on the ion masses of the constituents. The combination of UV and mass spectra reveal that the organic carbon content of fog water is distributed among a great number of acidic compounds which have polar functional groups and polyconjugated systems absorbing up to 500 nm. Due to the complexity of the organic fraction in fog water an unresolved hump of ions was recorded by the mass spectrometer from m/ z=100-600 the most intense peaks being detected around m/ z=200-250. Tannin and fulvic acid were also examined under the same conditions. In terms of complexity and ion distribution the mass spectrum of the organic fraction was similar to that of a fulvic acid reference material rather than to that of tannin.

Kiss, Gyula; Varga, Bálint; Gelencsér, András; Krivácsy, Zoltán; Molnár, Ágnes; Alsberg, Tomas; Persson, Linn; Hansson, Hans-Christen; Cristina Facchini, Maria

329

PURE: a web-based decision support system to evaluate pesticide environmental risk for sustainable pest management practices in California.  

PubMed

Farmers, policy makers, and other stakeholders seek tools to quantitatively assess pesticide risks for mitigating pesticide impacts on ecosystem and human health. This paper presents the Pesticide Use Risk Evaluation (PURE) decision support system (DSS) for evaluating site-specific pesticide risks to surface water, groundwater, soil, and air across pesticide active ingredient (AI), pesticide product, and field levels. The risk score is determined by the ratio of the predicted environmental concentrations (PEC) to the toxicity value for selected endpoint organism(s); except that the risk score for the air is calculated using the emission potential (EP), which is a pesticide product property for estimating potential volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by California Environmental Protection Agency (CEPA). The risk scores range from 0 to 100, where 0 represents negligible risk while 100 means the highest risk. The procedure for calculating PEC in surface water was evaluated against monitoring data for 41 pesticide AIs, with a statistically significant correlation coefficient of r=0.82 (p<0.001). In addition, two almond fields in the Central Valley, California were evaluated for pesticide risks as a case study, where the commonly acknowledged high-risk pesticides gained high risk scores. Simazine, one of the most frequently detected pesticides in groundwater, was scored as 74 (the moderate high risk class) to groundwater; and chlorpyrifos, one of the frequently detected pollutants in surface water, was scored as 100 (the high risk class) to surface water. In support of pesticide risk quantitative assessment and use of reduced-risk pesticide selection, the PURE-DSS can be useful to assist growers, pesticide control advisors, and environmental protection organizations in mitigating pesticide use impacts on the environment. PMID:22704897

Zhan, Yu; Zhang, Minghua

2012-08-01

330

Iodination of organic compounds via organoborane intermediates: new methods  

SciTech Connect

The incorporation of iodine into organic molecules can be accomplished through the use of organoboranes as synthetic intermediates. However, the iodination of organoboranes with molecular iodine is not suitable for the efficient incorporation of radioiodine into organic molecules since one-half of the radionuclide is lost as iodide. The iodination of organoboranes, vinylboronic acids and arylboronic acids was studied, using iodine monochloride or sodium iodide/chloramine-T. Both synthetic methods were rapid and efficient methods for iodinating organic substrates, including those with functional groups. The reactions provided maximum utilization of radioiodine in the synthesis of iodine-125 labeled compounds, both in preliminary tracer studies, and in experiments using carrier-free iodine-125.

Gooch, E.E. III

1981-01-01

331

An Assessment of Perfluorinated Organic Compounds and the Potentail Impacts to Water Quality and Biota in Coastal Ecosystems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Urbanized estuaries are well-documented to have elevated contaminant levels in sediments, water and associated biota. Most previous research efforts examining the effects of anthropogenic contamination in urbanized estuaries has focused on persistent priority pollutants, such as trace metals, pesticides, PCBs and PAHs. Recently, concerns have been raised about the occurrence, transport and distribution and effects of emerging contaminants being released into coastal watersheds through upland runoff from both urban and agricultural lands, sewage discharges, industrial releases, and aquaculture. Apalachicola Bay a major estuarine, commercial and recreational seafood resource is the endpoint of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin. Today the river basin encapsulates a vast and evolving expanse of agricultural, urban, industrial, silvaculture, and natural landscapes and activities. The purpose of this study is to monitor the occurrence of an emerging class of compounds (perfluorinated organic compounds) in the Apalachicola Bay watershed. Given the dynamic growth and development up river from the Bay organic substances (lipophillic and water soluble compounds) inputs may be increasing and impacting the ecology of the Bay which compared to other bay areas is at this time relatively pristine. This issue can be investigated utilizing in-situ permeable membrane sampling devices specific for lipophillic and water-soluble compounds in concert with sediment samples. The results may serve as a baseline for the hypothesized increase in inputs coinciding with upstream and coastal development.

Erhunse, A.; Gragg, R.

2006-12-01

332

Interaction of Saharan dust particles with semivolatile organic compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mineral dust particles can be transported over long distances. During transport, mineral dust particles can interact with semi-volatile organic compounds present in the atmosphere, either as local pollution or as photochemical oxidation products of volatile species. Here we report on the interaction of organic species with mineral dust particles from the Sahara over an urban region. The dust samples were collected in Israel during spring 2001, covering several dust storm events. In an integrated, multi-technique study, using Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with energy dispersion system (SEM-EDS) and bulk aerosol analysis (gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry and ion chromatography methods), the organic and inorganic content of mineral dust particles collected during dust storms were studied. Particles were collected on 8-stages impactors for size segregated analysis, by high volume samplers for ion chromatography and GC analysis, on 47 mm PTFE filters for ion chromatography, and on silicon substrates for SEM-EDS analysis. Many mixed inorganic and organic particles were identified by individual particle SEM-EDS analysis of the collected particles. We will present the findings from the SEM analysis exemplifying the existence of the mixed particles. Using direct sample introduction followed by thermal desorption GC/MS and ion chromatography analysis, tracers for urban air pollution, of photochemical degradation products of biogenic volatile organic compounds as well as tracers of biomass burning were probed and quantified. The effect of the dust storms on the size distribution of semi-volatile organics will be discussed. Differences in the redistribution behavior between local pollution, photochemical degradation products and tracers of biomass burning will be highlighted.

Rudich, Y.; Falkovich, A. H.

2001-12-01

333

Selective Sorption of Dissolved Organic Carbon Compounds by Temperate Soils  

SciTech Connect

Physico-chemical sorption of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on soil minerals is one of the major processes of organic carbon (OC) stabilization in soils, especially in deeper layers. The attachment of C on soil solids is related to the reactivity of the soil minerals and the chemistry of the sorbate functional groups, but the sorption studies conducted without controlling microbial activity may overestimate the sorption potential of soil. This study was conducted to examine the sorptive characteristics of a diverse functional groups of simple OC compounds (D-glucose, L-alanine, oxalic acid, salicylic acid, and sinapyl alcohol) on temperate climate soil orders (Mollisols, Ultisols and Alfisols) with and without biological degradative processes. Equilibrium batch experiments were conducted using 0-100 mg C L-1 at a solid-solution ratio of 1:60 for 48 hrs and the sorption parameters were calculated by Langmuir model fitting. The amount of added compounds that remained in the solution phase was detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and total organic C (TOC) analysis. Soil sterilization was performed by -irradiation technique and experiments were repeated to determine the contribution of microbial degradation to apparent sorption. Overall, Ultisols did not show a marked preference for apparent sorption of any of the model compounds, as indicated by a narrower range of maximum sorption capacity (Smax) of 173-527 mg kg soil-1 across compounds. Mollisols exhibited a strong preference for apparent sorption of oxalic acid (Smax of 5290 mg kg soil-1) and sinapyl alcohol (Smax of 2031 mg kg soil-1) over the other compounds. The propensity for sorption of oxalic acid is mainly attributed to the precipitation of insoluble Ca-oxalate due to the calcareous nature of most Mollisol subsoils and its preference for sinapyl alcohol could be linked to the polymerization of this lignin monomer on 2:2 mineral dominated soils. The reactivity of Alfisols to DOC was in between that of Ultisols and Mollisols. HPLC results revealed significantly higher sorption of D-glucose and L-alanine than did TOC results, and duplicate experiments with sterilized soils confirmed that glucose and alanine were mineralized leading to higher apparent sorption values via HPLC. This study demonstrated that three common temperate soil orders experienced differential sorption of simple OC compounds, indicating that sorbate chemistry plays a significant role in the sorptive stabilization of DOC.

Jagadamma, Sindhu [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Phillips, Jana Randolph [ORNL

2012-01-01

334

Microbial cycling of volatile organic sulfur compounds in anoxic environments.  

PubMed

Microbial cycling of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSC) is investigated due to the impact these compounds are thought to have on environmental processes like global temperature control, acid precipitation and the global sulfur cycle. Moreover, in several kinds of industries like composting plants and the paper industry VOSC are released causing odor problems. Waste streams containing these compounds must be treated in order to avoid the release of these compounds to the atmosphere. This paper describes the general mechanisms for the production and degradation of methanethiol (MT) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS), two ubiquitous VOSC in anaerobic environments. Slurry incubations indicated that methylation of sulfide and MT resulting in MT and DMS, respectively, is one of the major mechanisms for VOSC in sulfide-rich anaerobic environments. An anaerobic bacterium that is responsible for the formation of MT and DMS through the anaerobic methylation of H2S and MT was isolated from a freshwater pond after enrichment with syringate as a methyl group donating compound and sole carbon source. In spite of the continuous formation of MT and DMS, steady state concentrations are generally very low. This is due to the microbial degradation of these compounds. Experiments with sulfate-rich and sulfate-amended sediment slurries demonstrated that besides methanogens, sulfate-reducing bacteria can also degrade MT and DMS, provided that sulfate is available. A methanogen was isolated that is able to grow on DMS as the sole carbon source. A large survey of sediments slurries of various origin demonstrated that both isolates are commonly occurring inhabitants of anaerobic environments. PMID:12188577

Lomans, B P; Pol, A; Op den Camp, H J M

2002-01-01

335

Determination of organic nitro compounds using HPLC-UV-PAED  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High-performance liquid chromatography with ultra violet and photo-assisted electrochemical detection (HPLC-UV-PAED) has been applied to the sensitive and selective determination of organic nitro compounds. The system was first developed for the determination of nitro explosives, and PAED has shown superior sensitivity over UV detection for these compounds (i.e., <1 part-per-trillion for HMX). The system also shows enhanced selectivity over the traditional UV method in that two detectors can be used for improved analyte identification. Also, having two detectors permits chemometric resolution of overlapping peaks, and this is not addressed in the UV method. Because this method is applicable to a wide range of nitro explosives, it was predicted that PAED would show the same sensitivity and selectivity toward other types of nitro compounds. Since its development, the system's use has been expanded to include the determination of nitro-containing pharmaceuticals and glycosylated nitro compounds in biological matrices. Model compounds were chosen, specifically nitroglycerin and related compounds and nitrophenyl-glucoside, to represent these classes. PAED showed superior detection limits over low wavelength UV detection for nitroglycerin (PAED = 0.3ppb, UV at 220nm = 48ppb), demonstrating PAED"s applicability to determining nitro-pharmaceuticals. Conversely, UV detection at 220nm proved to be more sensitive than PAED for nitrophenyl-glucoside (UV at 220 = 0.6ppb, PAED = 3.6ppb). However, when nitrophenyl-glucoside was spiked into urine, PAED determination resulted in 99+0.3% recovery, while UV at 220nm resulted in 116+0.2% recovery, suggesting that UV determination may suffer from matrix interference.

Marple, Ronita L.; LaCourse, William R.

2004-10-01

336

Transport, behavior, and fate of volatile organic compounds in streams  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are compounds with chemical and physical properties that allow the compounds to move freely between the water and air phases of the environment. VOCs are widespread in the environment because of this mobility. Many VOCs have properties that make them suspected or known hazards to the health of humans and aquatic organisms. Consequently, understanding the processes affecting the concentration and distribution of VOCs in the environment is necessary. The transport, behavior, and fate of VOCs in streams are determined by combinations of chemical, physical, and biological processes. These processes are volatilization, absorption, wet and dry deposition, microbial degradation, sorption, hydrolysis, aquatic photolysis, oxidation, chemical reaction, biocon-centration, advection, and dispersion. The relative importance of each of these processes depends on the characteristics of the VOC and the stream. The U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program selected 55 VOCs for study. This article reviews the characteristics of the various processes that could affect the transport, behavior, and fate of these VOCs in streams.

Rathbun, R. E.

2000-01-01

337

Characterization of carbonaceous combustion residues: II. Nonpolar organic compounds.  

PubMed

Aromatic and aliphatic fractions of black carbon (BC) solvent extracts were examined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to determine how differences in broad chemical and physical features are correlated with the load, composition, "extractability" and bioavailability of organic compounds. Diesel soot, urban dust and chimney soot had concentrations of n-alkanes >20 microg/g and of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)>8 microg/g. These high levels of solvent-extractable compounds were interpreted as resulting from combustion at temperatures below optimum values for BC formation. PAH concentrations normalized to the amount of soot carbon in chimney soot were close to values for diesel soot. However, the high proportion of polar amorphous organic matter in chimney soot suggests a higher bioavailability for associated PAHs. Carbon black, vegetation fire residues, and straw and wood charcoals had only residual concentrations of n-alkanes (<9 microg/g) and PAHs (<0.2 microg/g). PAH distributions were mostly unspecific, while the overall signature of the aliphatic fraction varied with BC origin. Molecular markers among plant-derived BC included steroid and sesquiterpenoid hydrocarbons. Molecular fingerprints suggest that compounds associated with fossil BC might be more refractory than those associated with plant-derived BC. PMID:12948528

Fernandes, Milena B; Brooks, Peter

2003-11-01

338

[New methods of constructing fluorinated organic compounds and their application].  

PubMed

This review summarizes several effective synthetic methods of fluorinated organic compounds developed by our group. Two topics have been described in this review. The first topic describes novel fluorinations using diethylaminosulfur trifluoride (DAST). The treatment of tertiary cyclopropyl silyl ethers with DAST caused ring opening and produced allylic fluorides. The reaction of DAST with a tertiary cyclobutanol provided a fluorocyclobutane, a (fluoromethyl)cyclopropane or a homoallylic fluoride. DAST reacted with cyclic ketoximes bearing substituent(s) that can stabilize a carbocation to cause the fluorinative fragmentation which produces fluorinated carbonitrile. The second topic describes the novel syntheses of organic compounds containing the difluoromethylene moiety using fluorinated building blocks. The indium-mediated coupling of aldehydes with 3-bromo-3,3-difluoropropene gives alpha,alpha-difluorohomoallylic alcohols in high yields. alpha,alpha-Difluorohomopropargylic alcohols were also obtained from the indium-mediated coupling of aldehydes with alpha-bromo-alpha,alpha-difluoropropargyl compounds. In the presence of a palladium(0) catalyst, several nucleophiles regioselectively reacted with 3-bromo-3,3-difluoropropene at its gamma-position, and reacted with 1-substituted-3-bromo-3,3-difluoropropenes at their alpha-position. (+)-(R)-1-Amino-2,2-difluorocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid was synthesized via the lipase-catalyzed asymmetric acetylation of a pro-chiral diol as a key step. PMID:10774256

Kirihara, M

2000-04-01

339

Distribution and trend of organochlorine pesticides in galicia coast using mussels as bioindicator organisms. Possible relationship to biological parameters.  

PubMed

Contamination of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) such as DDT and its metabolites (?DDs), ?-HCH (hexachlorocyclohexane), HCB (hexachlorobenzene), aldrin, endrin, isodrin and trans-nonachlor were investigated in wild mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) collected from Galician Rías (Rías of Ferrol, A Coruña, Muros, Arousa, Pontevedra and Vigo) during the period 1998-2012. Biological parameters, lipid content, shell length and condition index, were also studied. The OCPs levels in the wild mussel were in the order ?DDs>?-HCH>HCB. The other pesticides, aldrin, endrin, isodrin and trans-nonachlor, were not detected or were below the analytical detection limit. All concentrations found in these samples were below the allowable limits for human consumption (Regulation (EC) no. 396/2005). Univariate analysis confirmed that levels of some compounds presented significant relation with biological parameters. Multivariate analysis of the OCPs levels revealed significantly differences between studied Rías, samples from Ría of Ferrol had the highest levels of these compounds (values of ?DDs ranged from 3.9 to 4.2 ng g(-1) ww) and samples from Ría of Arousa, the lowest levels (values of ?DDs from 1.3 to 2.4 ng g(-1) ww). Temporal trends showed a decrease of OCPs levels along the studied period 1998-2012 in the Galician Rías. PMID:24374186

Carro, N; Cobas, J; García, I; Ignacio, M; Mouteira, A

2014-05-01

340

Analyses of volatile organic compounds from human skin  

PubMed Central

Summary Background Human skin emits a variety of volatile metabolites, many of them odorous. Much previous work has focused upon chemical structure and biogenesis of metabolites produced in the axillae (underarms), which are a primary source of human body odour. Nonaxillary skin also harbours volatile metabolites, possibly with different biological origins than axillary odorants. Objectives To take inventory of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the upper back and forearm skin, and assess their relative quantitative variation across 25 healthy subjects. Methods Two complementary sampling techniques were used to obtain comprehensive VOC profiles, viz., solid-phase micro extraction and solvent extraction. Analyses were performed using both gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and gas chromatography with flame photometric detection. Results Nearly 100 compounds were identified, some of which varied with age. The VOC profiles of the upper back and forearm within a subject were, for the most part, similar, although there were notable differences. Conclusions The natural variation in nonaxillary skin odorants described in this study provides a baseline of compounds we have identified from both endogenous and exogenous sources. Although complex, the profiles of volatile constituents suggest that the two body locations share a considerable number of compounds, but both quantitative and qualitative differences are present. In addition, quantitative changes due to ageing are also present. These data may provide future investigators of skin VOCs with a baseline against which any abnormalities can be viewed in searching for biomarkers of skin diseases.

Gallagher, M.; Wysocki, C.J.; Leyden, J.J.; Spielman, A.I.; Sun, X.; Preti, G.

2008-01-01

341

Volatile organic compound losses from sewage sludge-amended soils  

SciTech Connect

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) applied to soil in sludge have been assumed to disappear quickly and completely. The VOC behavior in sludge-amended soils has been studied previously only in laboratory systems where the sludged soil has been spiked with compounds of interest. Behavior in these systems may not necessarily represent compound behavior in field soils to which contaminated sludge is added. A series of laboratory microcosm experiments were designed therefore to investigate the behavior of toluene, ethyl benzene, o-, m-, and p-xylene applied to soil in contaminated sludge, and factors influencing loss processes. The VOC loss from sludge-amended soil was well described by a simple one step pseudo-first-order model but in certain soils was better described by a two step first-order model. Volatilization was the predominant loss process. Rates of loss depended on sludge application rate, method of sludge application, soil properties, and on compound characteristics. Experiments indicated that spiking sludge-amended soils gave a reasonable indication of VOC loss rates from systems amended with contaminated sludge at least over a period of 23 d. The majority of VOCs applied to soils in sludge volatilizes quickly to the atmosphere over a few to 10s of days with a small fraction lost more slowly. Potential for VOC crop uptake, livestock ingestion, and contamination of ground water is low under routine, managed applications of sewage sludge to agricultural land.

Wilson, S.C.; Jones, K.C.

1999-08-01

342

Volatile organic compounds from a Tuber melanosporum fermentation system.  

PubMed

A total of 59 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were identified from Tuber melanosporum fermentation: 53 from its fermented mycelia and 32 from the fermentation broth. Alcohol-derived compounds were predominant in both the fermentation mycelia and the broth, although long chain fatty acids and isoprenoids were, for the first time, also found in the mycelia. The intense wine bouquet properties of the broth arose from several specific flavor substances, including sulfur compounds, pyrazines, furans and jasmones. Comparing the VOCs identified in this work with those previously reported, our results are more similar to the composition of the Tuber fruiting-body than previous Tuber fermentations. The composition and accumulation of flavor volatiles (e.g., pyrazines, sulfur compounds, and esters) and major constituents (e.g., 3-methyl-1-butanol and 2-phenylethanol) in this fermentation were significantly influenced by the sucrose concentration in the medium. The obtained information could therefore be useful in applications to convert the flavors of truffle mycelia similar to those of the fruiting-body by optimising the fermentation process. PMID:22980851

Li, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Guan; Li, Hong-Mei; Zhong, Jian-Jiang; Tang, Ya-Jie

2012-12-15

343

Racemization and the origin of optically active organic compounds in living organisms  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The organic compounds synthesized in prebiotic experiments are racemic mixtures. A number of proposals have been offered to explain how asymmetric organic compounds formed on the Earth before life arose, with the influence of chiral weak nuclear interactions being the most frequent proposal. This and other proposed asymmetric syntheses give only sight enantiomeric excess and any slight excess will be degraded by racemization. This applies particularly to amino acids where half-lives of 10(5)-10(6) years are to be expected at temperatures characteristic of the Earth's surface. Since the generation of chiral molecules could not have been a significant process under geological conditions, the origins of this asymmetry must have occurred at the time of the origin of life or shortly thereafter. It is possible that the compounds in the first living organisms were prochiral rather than chiral; this is unlikely for amino acids, but it is possible for the monomers of RNA-like molecules.

Bada, J. L.; Miller, S. L.

1987-01-01

344

Organic Compounds in Running Gutter Brook Water Used for Public Supply near Hatfield, Massachusetts, 2003-05  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The 258 organic compounds studied in this U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessment generally are man-made, including pesticides, solvents, gasoline hydrocarbons, personal-care and domestic-use products, and pavement and combustion-derived compounds. Of these 258 compounds, 26 (about 10 percent) were detected at least once among the 31 samples collected approximately monthly during 2003-05 at the intake of a flowthrough reservoir on Running Gutter Brook in Massachusetts, one of several community water systems on tributaries of the Connecticut River. About 81 percent of the watershed is forested, 14 percent is agricultural land, and 5 percent is urban land. In most source-water samples collected at Running Gutter Brook, fewer compounds were detected and their concentrations were low (less than 0.1 micrograms per liter) when compared with compounds detected at other stream sites across the country that drain watersheds that have a larger percentage of agricultural and urban areas. The relatively few compounds detected at low concentrations reflect the largely undeveloped land use at Running Gutter Brook. Despite the absence of wastewater discharge points on the stream, however, the compounds that were detected could indicate different sources and uses (point sources, precipitation, domestic, and agricultural) and different pathways to drinking-water supplies (overland runoff, groundwater discharge, leaking of treated water from distribution lines, and formation during treatment). Six of the 10 compounds detected most commonly (in at least 20 percent of the samples) in source water also were detected commonly in finished water (after treatment but prior to distribution). Concentrations in source and finished water generally were below 0.1 micrograms per liter and always less than humanhealth benchmarks, which are available for about one-half of the compounds detected. On the basis of this screening-level assessment, adverse effects to human health are expected to be negligible (subject to limitations of available humanhealth benchmarks).

Brown, Craig J.; Trombley, Thomas J.

2009-01-01

345

QSPR Modeling of Bioconcentration Factors of Nonionic Organic Compounds.  

PubMed

The terms bioaccumulation and bioconcentration refer to the uptake and build-up of chemicals that can occur in living organisms. Experimental measurement of bioconcentration is time-consuming and expensive, and is not feasible for a large number of chemicals of potential regulatory concern. A highly effective tool depending on a quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) can be utilized to describe the tendency of chemical concentration organisms represented by, the important ecotoxicological parameter, the logarithm of Bio Concentration Factor (log BCF) with molecular descriptors for a large set of non-ionic organic compounds. QSPR models were developed using multiple linear regression, partial least squares and neural networks analyses. Linear and non-linear QSPR models to predict log BCF of the compounds developed for the relevant descriptors. The results obtained offer good regression models having good prediction ability. The descriptors used in these models depend on the volume, connectivity, molar refractivity, surface tension and the presence of atoms accepting H-bonds. PMID:20706622

Deeb, Omar; Khadikar, Padmakar V; Goodarzi, Mohammad

2010-01-01

346

Molar extinction coefficients of solutions of some organic compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Molar extinction coefficients of aqueous solutions of some organic compounds, viz. formamide (CH3NO),N-methylformamide (C2H5NO),NN-dimethylformamide (C3H7NO),NN-dimethylacetamide (C4H9NO), 1,4-dioxane (C4H8O24), succinimide (C4H5NO2) and solutions of acetamide (C2H5NO) and benzoic acid (C7H6O2) in 1,4-dioxane (C4H8O2) have been determined by narrow beam ?-ray transmission method at 81, 356, 511, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV. The experimental\\u000a values of mass attenuation coefficients of these compounds

Kulwant Singh; G. K. Sandhu; B. S. Lark

2004-01-01

347

Fate of Volatile Organic Compounds in Constructed Wastewater Treatment Wetlands  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The fate of volatile organic compounds was evaluated in a wastewater-dependent constructed wetland near Phoenix, AZ, using field measurements and solute transport modeling. Numerically based volatilization rates were determined using inverse modeling techniques and hydraulic parameters established by sodium bromide tracer experiments. Theoretical volatilization rates were calculated from the two-film method incorporating physicochemical properties and environmental conditions. Additional analyses were conducted using graphically determined volatilization rates based on field measurements. Transport (with first-order removal) simulations were performed using a range of volatilization rates and were evaluated with respect to field concentrations. The inverse and two-film reactive transport simulations demonstrated excellent agreement with measured concentrations for 1,4-dichlorobenzene, tetrachloroethene, dichloromethane, and trichloromethane and fair agreement for dibromochloromethane, bromo-dichloromethane, and toluene. Wetland removal efficiencies from inlet to outlet ranged from 63% to 87% for target compounds.

Keefe, S. H.; Barber, L. B.; Runkel, R. L.; Ryan, J. N.

2004-01-01

348

Anthropogenic Organic Compounds in Source Water of Selected Community Water Systems that Use Groundwater, 2002-05  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Source water, defined as groundwater collected from a community water system well prior to water treatment, was sampled from 221 wells during October 2002 to July 2005 and analyzed for 258 anthropogenic organic compounds. Most of these compounds are unregulated in drinking water and include pesticides and pesticide degradates, gasoline hydrocarbons, personal-care and domestic-use products, and solvents. The laboratory analytical methods used in the study have detection levels that commonly are 100 to 1,000 times lower than State and Federal standards and guidelines for protecting water quality. Detections of anthropogenic organic compounds do not necessarily indicate a concern to human health but rather help to identify emerging issues and track changes in occurrence and concentrations over time. Less than one-half (120) of the 258 compounds were detected in at least one source-water sample. Chloroform, in 36 percent of samples, was the most commonly detected of the 12 compounds that were in about 10 percent or more of source-water samples. The herbicides atrazine, metolachlor, prometon, and simazine also were among the commonly detected compounds. The commonly detected degradates of atrazine - deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine - as well as degradates of acetochlor and alachlor, generally were detected at concentrations similar to or greater than concentrations of the parent herbicide. The compounds perchloroethene, trichloroethene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, methyl tert-butyl ether, and cis-1,2-dichloroethene also were detected commonly. The most commonly detected compounds in source-water samples generally were among those detected commonly across the country and reported in previous studies by the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Relatively few compounds were detected at concentrations greater than human-health benchmarks, and 84 percent of the concentrations were two or more orders of magnitude less than benchmarks. Five compounds (perchloroethene, trichloroethene, 1,2-dibromoethane, acrylonitrile, and dieldrin) were detected at concentrations greater than their human-health benchmark. The human-health benchmarks used for comparison were U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) for regulated compounds and Health-Based Screening Levels developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in collaboration with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and other agencies for unregulated compounds. About one-half of all detected compounds do not have human-health benchmarks or adequate toxicity information to evaluate results in a human-health context. Ninety-four source-water and finished-water (water that has passed through all the treatment processes but prior to distribution) sites were sampled at selected community water systems during June 2004 to September 2005. Most of the samples were analyzed for compounds that were detected commonly or at relatively high concentrations during the initial source-water sampling. The majority of the finished-water samples represented water blended with water from one or more other wells. Thirty-four samples were from water systems that did not blend water from sampled wells with water from other wells prior to distribution. The comparison of source- and finished-water samples represents an initial assessment of whether compounds present in source water also are present in finished water and is not intended as an evaluation of water-treatment efficacy. The treatment used at the majority of the community water systems sampled is disinfection, which, in general, is not designed to remove the compounds monitored in this study. Concentrations of all compounds detected in finished water were less than their human-health benchmarks. Two detections of perchloroethene and one detection of trichloroethene in finished water had concentrations within an order of magnitude of the MCL. Concentrations of disinfection by-products were

Hopple, Jessica A.; Delzer, Gregory C.; Kingsbury, James A.

2009-01-01

349

Adsorption of pesticides from water by functionalized organobentonites.  

PubMed

Replacement of natural inorganic cations of clay minerals with organic cations has been proposed as a strategy to improve the adsorptive capacity of clay minerals for organic compounds, including pesticides. The organic cations most commonly used for this purpose have been quaternary ammonium ions containing alkyl or aryl chains without specific functional groups. In this work, we evaluated the ability of two bentonites (SWy-2 and SAz-1) exchanged with four natural organic cations containing diverse functional groups (L-carnitine, L-cysteine ethyl ester, L-cystine dimethyl ester, and thiamine) as adsorbents of pesticides varying in their chemical structures (simazine, hexazinone, triadimefon, alachlor, carbaryl, and imazethapyr). For comparison purposes, the adsorptive properties of two "classical" organobentonites, hexadecyltrimethylammonium- and phenyltrimethylammonium-exchanged bentonites, were also determined. Most organobentonites displayed higher affinity for the pesticides than the untreated bentonites, but the improvement in adsorption capacity varied depending on the characteristics of the pesticide and the interlayer organic cation. Triadimefon, carbaryl, and imazethapyr displayed the highest affinity for carnitine (K(f) = 229-2377)-, thiamine (K(f) = 83-354)-, and cystine (K(f) = 96-100)-treated bentonites, respectively, whereas alachlor was adsorbed similarly by all organobentonites. In general, pesticide adsorption-desorption hysteresis was greater for adsorbents with the highest adsorption capacities. The results demonstrate that selective modification of smectitic clay minerals with natural organic cations containing appropriate functional groups can be a useful strategy to improve their performance for the removal of specific pesticides from the environment. PMID:16159179

Cruz-Guzmán, Marta; Celis, Rafael; Hermosín, M Carmen; Koskinen, William C; Cornejo, Juan

2005-09-21

350

Summary of national standards and guidelines for pesticides in water, bed sediment, and aquatic organisms and their application to water-quality assessments  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Current (1993) national standards and guidelines pertaining to pesticide contaminants in water, bed sediment, and fish and shellfish tissues are summarized to provide a condensed reference source for definitions and current values applicable to pesticides in aquatic environmental media. This report facilitates comparison of measured concen- trations of pesticides in environmental samples with applicable standards and guidelines. For each standard or guideline, the following is provided: (1) Definition, including the underlying assumptions and mathematical derivation; (2) originating agency; (3) statutory authority; (4) regulatory status and, for standards, the agency responsible for enforcing the standard; (5) applicable sampling medium; (6) beneficial use and resource protected, and (7) full citations of published documentation. The report emphasizes the appropriate application on national standards and guidelines to water-quality data on pesticides to aid in assessing potential adverse effects on human health, aquatic organisms, and wildlife. (USGS)

Nowell, Lisa H.; Resek, Elizabeth A.

1994-01-01

351

The interaction between natural organic matter in raw waters and pesticide residues: a three dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3DEEM) fluorescence investigation.  

PubMed

This paper examines the interaction between dissolved natural organic matter and pesticide residues, both of which are found in raw water sources, using three dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3DEEM) fluorescence spectroscopy. It was observed that pesticide residue at 0.1 mg L(-1) formed a complex with humic-like fluorophores that are commonly found in raw water samples. Applying 3DEEM fluorescence to investigate the humic fractions, it was found that identification of changes in water sources was possible, and, importantly, the presence of a number of pesticides was able to be determined. In addition, the formation of this complex, and the influence of soluble cations and anions upon it, was shown to impact the efficiency of analytical extraction procedures for pesticides; however, 3DEEM fluorescence could be an approach to account for such losses. PMID:23752373

Beale, David J; Porter, Nichola A; Roddick, Felicity A

2013-01-01

352

Thermodynamics of Aqueous Organic Sulfur Compounds: A Key to the Organic Geochemistry of Hydrothermal Systems?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Hydrothermal environments are locations of varied geochemistry due to the disequilibrium between vent fluids and seawater. The disequilibrium geochemistry has been hypothesized to include reactions to synthesize organic compounds. Observations of the organic geochemistry of hydrothermal vent sites has received little attention. Experimental simulations of these environments, however, indicate that organic compounds may have difficulty forming in a purely aqueous environment. On the other hand, thiols. thioesters and disulfides have been implicated as reaction intermediates between CO or CO2 in experiments of carbon reduction in hydrothermal environments as well as in a variety of biological processes and other abiotic reactions (Wachtershauser, 1990, OLEB 20, 173; Heinen and Lauwers, 1996, OLEB 26, 13 1, Huber and Wachtershauser, 1997, Science 276, 245; Russell et al., 1998, in Thermophiles: The keys to molecular evolution and the origin of life?). The reduction of CO2 to thiols, for example, is observed using the FeS-H2S/FeS2 couple to provide the reducing power (see Schoonen et al., 1999, OLEB 29, 5). In addition, the enzyme involved in final stage of methanogenesis, coenzyme-M, is itself a thiol. Thus, organic sulfur compounds may hold the key to the organic chemistry leading to the origin of life at high temperatures. Understanding the biochemical processes of microorganisms that can live to temperatures at least as high as 113 C (Blochl et al., 1996, Extremophiles 1, 14) requires knowledge of the properties of the chemical reactions involved. In order to assess the role of aqueous organic sulfur compounds in hydrothermal organic geochemistry, we have been attempting to determine their thermodynamic properties. We have culled the literature to obtain the properties of organic sulfur compounds. We are able to calculate a number of essential properties, such as free energies of formation, from solubility data available in the literature together with standard properties of organic sulfur gases. However, a number of the properties for aqueous organic sulfur compounds have not been experimentally determined. Furthermore, most of thermodynamic data that are available are for 25 C and 1 bar. In order to determine reaction properties to temperatures and pressures appropriate to the hydrothermal conditions in which thermophilic organisms actually live, we use equations of state developed by Helgeson and co-workers (Helgeson et al., 1981, AJS 281, 1249). A key piece of information needed to go up in temperature is the partial molal heat capacity, which is one of the properties for which experimental data are unavailable for nearly all organic sulfur compounds. We have used correlation methods to determine the partial molal heat capacities and volumes of many organic solutes. These estimates allow us to asses the role of organic sulfur compounds during the reduction of carbon in hydrothermal settings. We will present these data, along with examples of the thermodynamic properties of reactions involving aqueous organic sulfur compounds.

Schulte, Mitchell; Rogers, Karyn L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

353

Volatile organic compounds in storm water from a parking lot  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A mass balance approach was used to determine the most important nonpoint source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in storm water from an asphalt parking lot without obvious point sources (e.g., gasoline stations). The parking lot surface and atmosphere are important nonpoint sources of VOCs, with each being important for different VOCs. The atmosphere is an important source of soluble, oxygenated VOCs (e.g., acetone), and the parking lot surface is an important source for the more hydrophobic VOCs (e.g., benzene). VOCs on the parking lot surface appear to be concentrated in oil and grease and organic material in urban particles (e.g., vehicle soot). Except in the case of spills, asphalt does not appear to be an important source of VOCs. The uptake isotherm of gaseous methyl tert-butyl ether on urban particles indicates a mechanism for dry deposition of VOCs from the atmosphere. This study demonstrated that a mass balance approach is a useful means of understanding non-point-source pollution, even for compounds such as VOCs, which are difficult to sample.A mass balance approach was used to determine the most important nonpoint source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in storm water from an asphalt parking lot without obvious point sources (e.g., gasoline stations). The parking lot surface and atmosphere are important nonpoint sources of VOCs, with each being important for different VOCs. The atmosphere is an important source of soluble, oxygenated VOCs (e.g., acetone), and the parking lot surface is an important source for the more hydrophobic VOCs (e.g., benzene). VOCs on the parking lot surface appear to be concentrated in oil and grease and organic material in urban particles (e.g., vehicle soot). Except in the case of spills, asphalt does not appear to be an important source of VOCs. The uptake isotherm of gaseous methyl tert-butyl ether on urban particles indicates a mechanism for dry deposition of VOCs from the atmosphere. This study demonstrated that a mass balance approach is a useful means of understanding non-point-source pollution, even for compounds such as VOCs, which are difficult to sample.

Lopes, T. J.; Fallon, J. D.; Rutherford, D. W.; Hiatt, M. H.

2000-01-01

354

Process for removing an organic compound from water  

DOEpatents

A process for removing organic compounds from water is disclosed. The process involves gas stripping followed by membrane separation treatment of the stripping gas. The stripping step can be carried out using one or multiple gas strippers and using air or any other gas as stripping gas. The membrane separation step can be carried out using a single-stage membrane unit or a multistage unit. Apparatus for carrying out the process is also disclosed. The process is particularly suited for treatment of contaminated groundwater or industrial wastewater.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Kaschemekat, Jurgen (Palo Alto, CA); Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Kamaruddin, Henky D. (San Francisco, CA)

1993-12-28

355

Volatile organic compounds released by the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.  

PubMed

The composition of volatile organic compounds (VOC) released by the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (Hyphomycete: Deuteromycotina) utilizing two different carbon sources was investigated. Analyses were performed by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled to capillary gas chromatography (CGC) and CGC-mass spectrometry (MS). Major components in glucose-grown cultures were diisopropyl naphthalenes, ethanol, and sesquiterpenes. Alkane-grown fungal VOC switched to a fingerprint with prevalence of n-decane. This is the first report on the volatiles released by entomopathogenic fungi. PMID:16733086

Crespo, R; Pedrini, N; Juárez, M P; Dal Bello, G M

2008-01-01

356

Lasing characteristics of vapors of complex organic compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lasing in vapors of complex organic compounds under pumping by laser single pulses is studied theoretically. Attention is given to the chief feature of the gas phase, namely the relationship between the lasing characteristics of the active molecules and the vibrational energy in the ground excited states. It is shown that the drastic growth of the average vibrational energy of active molecules during the pump pulse results in a considerable deterioration of vapor lasing as compared to lasing in solutions. Lasing in POPOP vapors is taken as an example.

Abakumov, G. A.; Vorobev, S. A.; Lademan, Iu.; Simonov, A. P.

1980-02-01

357

The synthesis of organic and inorganic compounds in evolved stars.  

PubMed

Recent isotopic analysis of meteorites and interplanetary dust has identified solid-state materials of pre-solar origin. We can now trace the origin of these inorganic grains to the circumstellar envelopes of evolved stars. Moreover, organic (aromatic and aliphatic) compounds have been detected in proto-planetary nebulae and planetary nebulae, which are the descendants of carbon stars. This implies that molecular synthesis is actively happening in the circumstellar environment on timescales as short as several hundred years. The detection of stellar grains in the Solar System suggests that they can survive their journey through the interstellar medium and that they are a major contributor of interstellar grains. PMID:15329712

Kwok, Sun

2004-08-26

358

Antioxidant combinations of molybdenum complexes and organic sulfur compounds for lubricating oils  

SciTech Connect

An antioxidant additive combination for lubricating oils is prepared by combining (a) a sulfur containing molybdenum compound prepared by reacting an ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and a basic nitrogen compound, with (b) an organic sulfur compound.

deVries, L.; King, J.M.

1983-09-06

359

Assessing Diet as a Modifiable Risk Factor for Pesticide Exposure  

PubMed Central

The effects of pesticides on the general population, largely as a result of dietary exposure, are unclear. Adopting an organic diet appears to be an obvious solution for reducing dietary pesticide exposure and this is supported by biomonitoring studies in children. However, results of research into the effects of organic diets on pesticide exposure are difficult to interpret in light of the many complexities. Therefore future studies must be carefully designed. While biomonitoring can account for differences in overall exposure it cannot necessarily attribute the source. Due diligence must be given to appropriate selection of participants, target pesticides and analytical methods to ensure that the data generated will be both scientifically rigorous and clinically useful, while minimising the costs and difficulties associated with biomonitoring studies. Study design must also consider confounders such as the unpredictable nature of chemicals and inter- and intra-individual differences in exposure and other factors that might influence susceptibility to disease. Currently the most useful measures are non-specific urinary metabolites that measure a range of organophosphate and synthetic pyrethroid insecticides. These pesticides are in common use, frequently detected in population studies and may provide a broader overview of the impact of an organic diet on pesticide exposure than pesticide-specific metabolites. More population based studies are needed for comparative purposes and improvements in analytical methods are required before many other compounds can be considered for assessment.

Oates, Liza; Cohen, Marc

2011-01-01

360

Assessing diet as a modifiable risk factor for pesticide exposure.  

PubMed

The effects of pesticides on the general population, largely as a result of dietary exposure, are unclear. Adopting an organic diet appears to be an obvious solution for reducing dietary pesticide exposure and this is supported by biomonitoring studies in children. However, results of research into the effects of organic diets on pesticide exposure are difficult to interpret in light of the many complexities. Therefore future studies must be carefully designed. While biomonitoring can account for differences in overall exposure it cannot necessarily attribute the source. Due diligence must be given to appropriate selection of participants, target pesticides and analytical methods to ensure that the data generated will be both scientifically rigorous and clinically useful, while minimising the costs and difficulties associated with biomonitoring studies. Study design must also consider confounders such as the unpredictable nature of chemicals and inter- and intra-individual differences in exposure and other factors that might influence susceptibility to disease. Currently the most useful measures are non-specific urinary metabolites that measure a range of organophosphate and synthetic pyrethroid insecticides. These pesticides are in common use, frequently detected in population studies and may provide a broader overview of the impact of an organic diet on pesticide exposure than pesticide-specific metabolites. More population based studies are needed for comparative purposes and improvements in analytical methods are required before many other compounds can be considered for assessment. PMID:21776202

Oates, Liza; Cohen, Marc

2011-06-01

361

Interlaboratory comparisons to determine heavy metals and organic compounds in marine sediments.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes interlaboratory comparisons carried out in 1996 to determine metals and organic compounds in marine sediments. Three samples were used, one reference material for the organic compounds, and for the metals, a reference material and a ...

H. Hovind R. Lichtenthaler

1997-01-01

362

75 FR 2090 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Volatile Organic Compound...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Indiana; Volatile Organic Compound Automobile Refinishing Rules for Indiana AGENCY...submitted amendments to Indiana's automobile refinishing rule for approval into its...approved volatile organic compound (VOC) automobile refinishing rules to all persons...

2010-01-14

363

75 FR 24404 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Volatile Organic Compound...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Indiana; Volatile Organic Compound Automobile Refinishing Rules for Indiana AGENCY...Plan (SIP) amendments to Indiana's automobile refinishing rule. These rule revisions...approved volatile organic compound (VOC) automobile refinishing rules to all persons...

2010-05-05

364

40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. 60.502 Section 60...SOURCES Standards of Performance for Bulk Gasoline Terminals § 60.502 Standard for...Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. On and after the...

2013-07-01

365

EVALUATION OF CRYOGENIC TRAPPING AS A MEANS FOR COLLECTING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AMBIENT AIR  

EPA Science Inventory

The methodology used in reduced temperature preconcentration of volatile organic compounds has been tested using a prototype automated gas chromatographic system. Mixtures of sixteen volatile organic compounds in humidified zero air were passed through a Nafion tube dryer and the...

366

Potential for Finding Evidence of Bio/Organic Compounds in Extraterrestrial Materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Results contribute to improved ability to detect bio/organic compounds and determine their biogenicity, predict which landing sites are most likely to provide evidence for life, and detect bio/organic compounds for decontamination procedures for planetary protection.

Hinman, N. W.; Richardson, C. D.; Aspden, D.; Kouri, K.; Kotler, J. M.; McHenry, L. J.; Scott, J. R.

2010-04-01

367

Cyclodextrin-based microsensors for volatile organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

Host-guest chemistry and self-assembly techniques are being explored to develop species selective thin-films for real-time sensing of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Cyclodextrin (CD) and calixarene (CA) molecules are known to form guest-host inclusion complexes with a variety of organic molecules. Through the control of the cavity size and chemical functionality on the rims of these bucket-like molecules, the binding affinities for formation of inclusion complexes can be controlled and optimized for specific agents. Self-assembly techniques are used to covalently bond these reagent molecules to the surface of acoustic transducers to create dense, highly oriented, and stable thin films. Self-assembly techniques have also been used to fabricate multilayer thin film containing molecular recognition reagents through alternating adsorption of charged species in aqueous solutions. Self-assembly of polymeric molecules of the SAW device was also explored for fabricating species selective interfaces.

Swanson, B.; Johnson, S.; Shi, J.; Yang, Xiaoguang

1997-10-01

368

Anaerobic degradation of organic compounds at high salt concentrations.  

PubMed

A number of obligately anaerobic fermentative bacteria are known to degrade a variety of organic substrates such as sugars, amino acids, and others, in the presence of high salt concentrations (up to 3-4 M) to products such as hydrogen, CO2, acetate and higher fatty acids, and ethanol. Our understanding of the fate of these products in hypersaline environments is still extremely limited. The occurrence of bacterial sulfate reduction is well established at salt concentrations of up to 24%; however, the bacteria involved have not yet been isolated in pure culture, and the range of electron donors used is unknown. Halophilic or halotolerant methanogenic bacteria using hydrogen/CO2 or acetate as energy source are notably absent; methanogenesis under hypersaline conditions is probably limited to such substrates as methanol and methylamines, which cannot be expected to be major products of anaerobic degradation of most organic compounds. PMID:3048206

Oren, A

1988-01-01

369

ORGANIC CATION EFFECTS ON THE SORPTION OF METALS AND NEUTRAL ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ON AQUIFER MATERIAL (JOURNAL VERSION)  

EPA Science Inventory

Sorption of ethylhexadecyldimethylammonium (EHDDMA+), a large organic cation, and three neutral organic compounds (NOC's) on two low organic carbon aquifer materials was studied using a soil batch equilibration technique. EHDDMA+ competed effectively with metals for exchange site...

370

Adsorption of volatile organic compounds in porous metal–organic frameworks functionalized by polyoxometalates  

Microsoft Academic Search

The functionalization of porous metal–organic frameworks (Cu3(BTC)2) was achieved by incorporating Keggin-type polyoxometalates (POMs), and further optimized via alkali metal ion-exchange. In addition to thermal gravimetric analysis, IR, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and powder X-ray diffraction, the adsorption properties were characterized by N2 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) adsorption measurements, including short-chain alcohols (C<4), cyclohexane, benzene, and toluene. The adsorption enthalpies

Feng-Ji Ma; Shu-Xia Liu; Da-Dong Liang; Guo-Jian Ren; Feng Wei; Ya-Guang Chen; Zhong-Min Su

2011-01-01

371

Characterization of selected volatile organic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and carbonyl compounds at a roadside monitoring station  

Microsoft Academic Search

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), PAHs and carbonyl compounds are the major toxic components in Hong Kong. Emissions from motor vehicles have been one of the primary pollution sources in the metropolitan areas throughout Hong Kong for a long time. A 1-yr monitoring program for VOCs, PAHs and carbonyl compounds had been performed at a roadside urban station at Hong Kong

K. F Ho; S. C Lee; Gloria M. Y Chiu

2002-01-01

372

Identifying organic nitrogen compounds in Rocky Mountain National Park aerosols  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nitrogen deposition is an important issue in Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP). While inorganic nitrogen contributions to the ecosystems in this area have been studied, the sources of organic nitrogen are still largely unknown. To better understand the potential sources of organic nitrogen, filter samples were collected and analyzed for organic nitrogen species. Samples were collected in RMNP using a Thermo Fisher Scientific TSP (total suspended particulate) high-volume sampler with a PM2.5 impactor plate from April - November of 2008. The samples presented the opportunity to compare two different methods for identification of individual organic nitrogen species. The first type of analysis was performed with a comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC) system using a nitrogen chemiluminescence detector (NCD). The filter samples were spiked with propanil in dichloromethane to use as an internal standard and were then extracted in water followed by solid phase extraction. The GCxGC system was comprised of a volatility based separation (DB5 column) followed by a polarity based separation (RXI-17 column). A NCD was used to specifically detect nitrogen compounds and remove the complex background matrix. Individual standards were used to identify peaks by comparing retention times. This method has the added benefit of an equimolar response for nitrogen so only a single calibration is needed for all species. In the second analysis, a portion of the same filter samples were extracted in DI water and analyzed with liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy (LC/MS). The separation was performed using a C18 column and a water-methanol gradient elution. Electrospray ionization into a time of flight mass spectrometer was used for detection. High accuracy mass measurement allowed unambiguous assignments of elemental composition of resulting ions. Positive and negative polarities were used since amines tend to show up in positive mode and nitrates in negative. The differences in the number of species and what species are identified between these two methods are important for planning future analyses of organic nitrogen compounds. In addition, these data provide new insight into the potential source of organic nitrogen in RMNP. Using the GCxGC method, 39 organic nitrogen species were detected and 20 were identified. Identified species include several types of amines and phenols. The LC/MS method identified several types of cresols, amines, and nitrates.

Beem, K. B.; Desyaterik, Y.; Ozel, M. Z.; Hamilton, J. F.; Collett, J. L.

2010-12-01

373

Evaluation of the toxicity of cypermethrin pesticide on organs weight loss and some biochemical and histological parameters.  

PubMed

An increase in global food demand has resulted in a significant increase in the use of pesticides in agriculture. Synthetic pyrethroid pesticides account for over 30% of the global pesticide use; Pyrethroid pesticides were used preferably over organochlorines and organophosphates due to their high effectiveness, low toxicity to non-target organisms and easy biodegrability. It has widespread applications in agriculture through the world and as well in Algeria. Cypermethrin is one of the most insecticidal pyrethroids widely used in agriculture regions of Setif. to control wide range of insect pests in a variety of crops. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of cypermethrin (Cyper-Ac 271 g/l from the active substance of the cypermethrin) on hematological, biochemical parameters, body weight loss, and histopathological study of some organs. Male mice weighing 30-40g were used, separated in 5 groups, n=6, two groups controls given vehicle (oil vegetable) and three experimental groups (Cypermetherin and vegetable oil). The animals were gavaged by 1/5 LD50 (LD50 = 485 mg/kg b/w) for 2 and 4 weeks respectively, and with 1/20 LD50 for 12 weeks, then the animals sacrificed at the end of the experiment.. Blood was collected. Enzyme activities were assayed in the plasma samples obtained. Glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), Glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), Alkaline phosphatase (ALPH) and Glucose. Red blood cells, (RBC), and white blood cells (WBC) were calculated too. The samples of liver and kidney were processed for histology. The results indicated a significant increase in transaminases GOT, GPT, and AlP. The decrease in Hb, RBC and WBC which are related to the immunity, this is probably due to cell lyses explain the effect of Cypermetherin on erythropoeisis. cypermethrin treatment exhibited severe histopathological changes, especially in the liver and kideney accompanied by weight loss of some organs. We conclude that cypermethrin induces oxidative stress and modifies biochemical parameters and histological aspects of liver and kidney. PMID:22702208

Dahamna, S; Belguet, A; Bouamra, D; Guendouz, A; Mergham, M; Harzallah, D

2011-01-01

374

Acute pesticide poisoning and pesticide registration in Central America  

Microsoft Academic Search

The International Code of Conduct on the Distribution and Use of Pesticides of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations has been for 20 years the most acknowledged international initiative for reducing negative impact from pesticide use in developing countries. We analyzed pesticide use and poisoning in Central America, particularly in Costa Rica and Nicaragua, and evaluated

Catharina. Wesseling; Marianela Corriols; Viria Bravo

2005-01-01

375

Characterization of polar organic compounds and source analysis of fine organic aerosols in Hong Kong  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Organic aerosols, as an important fraction of airborne particulate mass, significantly affect the environment, climate, and human health. Compared with inorganic species, characterization of individual organic compounds is much less complete and comprehensive because they number in thousands or more and are diverse in chemical structures. The source contributions of organic aerosols are far from being well understood because they can be emitted from a variety of sources as well as formed from photochemical reactions of numerous precursors. This thesis work aims to improve the characterization of polar organic compounds and source apportionment analysis of fine organic carbon (OC) in Hong Kong, which consists of two parts: (1) An improved analytical method to determine monocarboxylic acids, dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids, and dicarbonyls collected on filter substrates has been established. These oxygenated compounds were determined as their butyl ester or butyl acetal derivatives using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The new method made improvements over the original Kawamura method by eliminating the water extraction and evaporation steps. Aerosol materials were directly mixed with the BF 3/BuOH derivatization agent and the extracting solvent hexane. This modification improves recoveries for both the more volatile and the less water-soluble compounds. This improved method was applied to study the abundances and sources of these oxygenated compounds in PM2.5 aerosol samples collected in Hong Kong under different synoptic conditions during 2003-2005. These compounds account for on average 5.2% of OC (range: 1.4%-13.6%) on a carbon basis. Oxalic acid was the most abundant species. Six C2 and C3 oxygenated compounds, namely oxalic, malonic, glyoxylic, pyruvic acids, glyoxal, and methylglyoxal, dominated this suite of oxygenated compounds. More efforts are therefore suggested to focus on these small compounds in understanding the role of oxygenated compounds in aerosol chemistry and physics. By reference to tracers for the major organic aerosol sources, it is deduced that the oxygenated compounds are mainly of secondary origin and direct/indirect contribution from biomass burning could also be important. The chemical composition of these oxygenated species in PM2.5 samples in Hong Kong provide useful information to further ambient and model study in the aspects of chemical formation pathways and speciated organic mass distribution. (2) Source apportionment of PM2.5 organic aerosols in Hong Kong were carried out in two studies. In the first study, chemical characterization and source analysis involved samples collected on high particulate matter (PM) days (avg. PM 2.5 >84 mug m-3) at six general stations and one roadside station from October to December in 2003. Analysis of synoptic weather conditions identified three types of high PM episodes: local, regional transport (RT) and long-range transport (LRT). Roadside samples were discussed separately. Using chemical mass balance (CMB) model, contributions of major primary sources (vehicle exhaust, cooking, biomass burning, cigarette smoke, vegetative detritus, and coal combustion) were estimated, which indicate that vehicle exhaust was the most important primary source, followed by cooking and biomass burning. All primary sources except vegetative detritus had the highest contributions at roadside station, in line with its site characteristics. Primary sources dominated roadside and local samples (>64% of fine OC), while un-apportioned OC (i.e., the difference between measured OC and apportioned primary OC) dominated RT and LRT episodes (>60% of fine OC) and un-apportioned OC had characteristics of secondary OC. In the second study, cold front episodes during winter 2004 and 2005 were targeted to investigate the effect of cold front-related LRT on chemical characteristics and organic aerosol sources of PM2.5 in Hong Kong. In comparison with days under influences of mainly local emissions or RT, cold front LRT brought more organic aerosols attributable

Li, Yunchun

376

Organic Compounds in Potomac River Water Used for Public Supply near Washington, D.C., 2003-05  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Organic compounds studied in this U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessment generally are man-made, including, in part, pesticides, solvents, gasoline hydrocarbons, personal care and domestic-use products, and refrigerants and propellants. A total of 85 of 277 compounds were detected at least once among the 25 samples collected approximately monthly during 2003-05 at the intake of the Washington Aqueduct, one of several community water systems on the Potomac River upstream from Washington, D.C. The diversity of compounds detected indicate a variety of different sources and uses (including wastewater discharge, industrial, agricultural, domestic, and others) and different pathways (including treated wastewater outfalls located upstream, overland runoff, and ground-water discharge) to drinking-water supplies. Seven compounds were detected year-round in source-water intake samples, including selected herbicide compounds commonly used in the Potomac River Basin and in other agricultural areas across the United States. Two-thirds of the 26 compounds detected most commonly in source water (in at least 20 percent of the samples) also were detected most commonly in finished water (after treatment but prior to distribution). Concentrations for all detected compounds in source and finished water generally were less than 0.1 microgram per liter and always less than human-health benchmarks, which are available for about one-half of the detected compounds. On the basis of this screening-level assessment, adverse effects to human health are expected to be negligible (subject to limitations of available human-health benchmarks).

Brayton, Michael J.; Denver, Judith M.; Delzer, Gregory C.; Hamilton, Pixie A.

2008-01-01

377

Comparing Parts with the Whole: Willingness to Pay for Pesticide-Free, Non-GM, and Organic Potatoes and Sweet Corn  

Microsoft Academic Search

Auction experiments were used to investigate demand relationships and willingness to pay (WTP) for four versions of potatoes and sweet corn—conventional, organic, and two parts of organic: no pesticides and non-genetically modified (non-GM). Elasticities showed strong and asymmetric substitute relationships between organic and its parts. Combined premiums of the parts were not significantly different than the whole organic premium, suggesting

John C. Bernard; Daria J. Bernard

2010-01-01

378

Chiral Analyses of Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Meteorites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Contents include the following: 1. Characterization of Tagish Lake organic content. The first two grant years were largely devoted to the molecular and isotopic analyses of Tagish Lake organic composition. This carbonaceous meteorite fell in Canada in the winter of the year 2000, and its exceptional atmospheric entry and subsequent recovery (e. g., the sample was recovered and stored by avoiding hand contact and above freezing temperatures) contributed in providing a rare and pristine extraterrestrial material. 2. Chiral analyses of Murchison and Murray soluble organics. One of the most intriguing finding in regard to soluble meteorite organics is the presence within the amino acid suite of some compounds displaying L-enantiomeric excesses. This configuration is exclusive in the amino acids of terrestrial proteins and the finding has raised speculations of a possible role of amino acids from meteorites in the origin of homochirality on the early Earth. The main objective for this NASA funding was the characterization of enantiomeric excesses in meteorites and we have conducted several studies toward establishing their distribution and indignity.

Pizzarello, Sandra

2004-01-01

379

Volatile organic compounds in selected micro-environments.  

PubMed

A program of sampling for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ambient air was undertaken in selected locations and micro-environments in Perth, Western Australia to characterise concentrations of target VOCs and to determine the relative strength of the contributing sources to ambient air in different micro-environments in a major Australian city. Twenty-seven locations were sampled and, of the forty-one target compounds, 26 VOCs were detected in the samples collected. The highest concentrations were recorded for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes (BTEX), chloroform and styrene. The maximum 12-h toluene and benzene concentrations observed were from a basement carpark and were 24.7 parts per billion (ppb) and 5.6 ppb, respectively. The maximum xylenes concentration was 29.4 ppb and occurred in a nightclub where styrene was also detected. A factor analysis of the data was undertaken. Two key factors emerge that appear to be associated with petroleum and motor vehicles and environmental tobacco smoke. A third significant occurrence was a high concentration of chloroform that was observed at a sports centre complex with a swimming pool text and was uncorrelated with other compounds in the data set. This study indicates that locations associated with motor vehicles and petrol fuel, tobacco and wood smoke and chlorinated water represent the major risks for personal exposure to VOCs in Perth. PMID:16289288

Hinwood, A L; Berko, H N; Farrar, D; Galbally, I E; Weeks, I A

2006-04-01

380

Modeling Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from New Carpets  

SciTech Connect

A simple model is proposed to account for observed emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from new carpets. The model assumes that the VOCs originate predominantly in a uniform slab of polymer backing material. Parameters for the model (the initial concentration of a VOC in the polymer, a diffusion coefficient and an equilibrium polymer/air partition coefficient) are obtained from experimental data produced by a previous chamber study. The diffusion coefficients generally decrease as the molecular weight of the VOCs increase, while the polymer/air partition coefficients generally increase as the vapor pressure of the compounds decrease. In addition, for two of the study carpets that have a styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) backing, the diffusion and partition coefficients are similar to independently reported values for SBR. The results suggest that predictions of VOCs emissions from new carpets may be possible based solely on a knowledge of the physical properties of the relevant compounds and the carpet backing material. However, a more rigorous validation of the model is desirable.

Little, J.C.; Hodgson, A.T.; Gadgil, A.J.

1993-02-01

381

Seasonal changes in concentrations of dissolved pesticides and organic carbon in the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta, California, 1994-1996  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) of California is an ecologically rich and hydrologically complex region that receives runoff from nearly one-quarter of the state. Water-quality studies of surface water in the region have found dissolved pesticides in winter storm runoff at concentrations toxic to some aquatic invertebrates. However, scientists have little information on pesticide concentrations in the Delta on a seasonal timescale or the importance of pesticide contributions from within-Delta sources. Consequently, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study from 1994 to 1996 during which water samples were collected seasonally from 31 sites located within the Delta and on major tributaries to the Delta. Water samples were analyzed for 20 current-use pesticides and dissolved organic carbon. During the study, 11 current-use pesticides were detected; maximum concentrations ranging from 17 ng/L (for trifluralin) to 1,160 ng/L (for metolachlor). The highest concentrations of five pesticides (carbaryl, carbofuran, metolachlor, molinate, and simazine) were greater than 900 ng/L. The greatest number of pesticides was detected in the summer of 1994, whereas the least number were detected in the winter of 1994. The herbicides metolachlor and simazine were the most frequently detected pesticides and were detected in five of the six sampling seasons. The herbicides molinate and EPTC were detected only during the three summer sampling seasons. A comparison of pesticides detected during the spring and summer of 1995 showed some seasonal variability. Comparison of the three summer seasons sampled showed that a larger number of pesticides were detected, and with generally higher maximum concentrations, in 1994 than in 1995 or 1996. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations ranged, over the course of the study, from 1.4 mg/L to 10.4 mg/L, and had a median concentration of 3.8 mg/L. On a seasonal basis, the lowest maximum DOC concentrations occurred during the summer and winter of 1994. The highest median DOC concentration on a seasonal basis occurred in the spring of 1995. This previously unreported data is being published now to provide historical information on pesticide concentrations in the Delta to water managers and the scientific community.

Orlando, James L.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

2006-01-01

382

Anti-photoaging and Photoprotective Compounds Derived from Marine Organisms  

PubMed Central

Marine organisms form a prominent component of the oceanic population, which significantly contribute in the production of cosmeceutical and pharmaceutical molecules with biologically efficient moieties. In addition to the molecules of various biological activities like anti-bacterial, anti-cancerous, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative etc., these organisms also produce potential photoprotective or anti-photoaging agents, which are attracting present day researchers. Continuous exposure to UV irradiation (both UV-A and UV-B) leads to the skin cancer and other photoaging complications, which are typically mediated by the reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated in the oxidative pathways. Many of the anti-oxidative and anti-photoaging compounds have been identified previously, which work efficiently against photodamage of the skin. Recently, marine originated photoprotective or anti-photoaging behavior was observed in the methanol extracts of Corallina pilulifera (CPM). These extracts were found to exert potent antioxidant activity and protective effect on UV-A-induced oxidative stress in human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells by protecting DNA and also by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a key component in photoaging of the skin due to exposure to UV-A. The present review depicts various other photoprotective compounds from algae and other marine sources for further elaborative research and their probable use in cosmeceutical and pharmaceutical industries.

Pallela, Ramjee; Na-Young, Yoon; Kim, Se-Kwon

2010-01-01

383

Evaporation of volatile organic compounds from human skin in vitro.  

PubMed

The specific evaporation rates of 21 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from either human skin or a glass substrate mounted in modified Franz diffusion cells were determined gravimetrically. The diffusion cells were positioned either on a laboratory bench top or in a controlled position in a fume hood, simulating indoor and outdoor environments, respectively. A data set of 54 observations (34 skin and 20 glass) was assembled and subjected to a correlation analysis employing 5 evaporative mass transfer relationships drawn from the literature. Models developed by Nielsen et al. (Prediction of isothermal evaporation rates of pure volatile organic compounds in occupational environments: a theoretical approach based on laminar boundary layer theory. Ann Occup Hyg 1995;39:497-511.) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Peress, Estimate evaporative losses from spills. Chem Eng Prog 2003; April: 32-34.) were found to be the most effective at correlating observed and calculated evaporation rates under the various conditions. The U.S. EPA model was selected for further use based on its simplicity. This is a turbulent flow model based only on vapor pressure and molecular weight of the VOC and the effective air flow rate u. Optimum values of u for the two laboratory environments studied were 0.23 m s(-1) (bench top) and 0.92 m s(-1) (fume hood). PMID:23609116

Gajjar, Rachna M; Miller, Matthew A; Kasting, Gerald B

2013-08-01

384

Insights on Sources, Growth, and Phase Partitioning of Atmospheric Particles from Hourly Measurements of Organic Marker Compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Atmospheric aerosols have adverse affects on human health and have direct and indirect affects on the global radiation balance. In order to implement particle concentration control strategies, we must first understand particle origins. Atmospheric aerosols have both primary sources such as combustion processes and secondary sources such as photochemically driven gas to particle phase partitioning. By monitoring changes in the molecular composition of the organic fraction of atmospheric aerosols, these various sources can be differentiated. Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatography (TAG) is a new in-situ instrument capable of identifying and quantifying organic aerosol chemical composition with one hour time resolution. TAG is fully automated, offering around the clock measurements to determine diurnal, weekly, and seasonal patterns in organic aerosol composition, hence, determining aerosol sources and transformation processes. We report results from ambient measurements made in Southern California during the summer and fall of 2005 as part of the Study of Organic Aerosol at Riverside (SOAR). We use hourly measurements of over 300 individual organic compounds to define both primary and secondary particle sources. The particle sources defined include primary anthropogenic sources such as vehicle emissions, meat cooking, biomass burning, pesticide use, herbicide use, along with primary biogenic sources such as plant emissions and plant waxes. We also explore secondary particle sources (i.e. SOA) formed as a result of the oxidation of biogenic and anthropogenic precursor gases. Comparisons are made between TAG-defined sources and aerosol sources defined using Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) and Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) data. In addition to source apportionment results, we present seasonal changes in ambient phase partitioning of organic compounds as a function of carbon number for multiple compound classes.

Williams, B.; Goldstein, A.; Kreisberg, N.; Hering, S.; Docherty, K.; Jimenez, J.; Shields, L.; Qin, X.; Prather, K.; Ziemann, P.

2007-12-01

385

Sorption of hydrophobic ionizable organic compounds (HIOCs) onto polymeric ion exchangers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the sorption of synthetic organic compounds, such as benzene sulfonate, naphthalene mono- and disulfonates, onto ion exchangers. These organic compounds exist as aromatic anions in aqueous solutions within a wide range of pH and they are referred to as hydrophobic ionizable organic compounds (HIOCs). Characteristically, the HIOCs contain two primary constituents: non-polar aromatic head groups and ionic

Ping Li; Arup K SenGupta

2004-01-01

386

Volatile Organic Compounds in Various Marine Organisms From the Southern North Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concentration levels of 12 priority volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were determined in two species of vertebrates and four species of invertebrates from sampling stations in the southern North Sea, using a modified Tekmar LSC 2000 purge and trap system coupled to gas chromatograph–mass spectrometer (GC–MS). In general, concentration levels of VOCs found in this study were of the same

Patrick Roose; Udo A. Th Brinkman

2000-01-01

387

Atmospheric deposition of semivolatile organic compounds to two forest canopies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, hexachlorobenzene and polychlorinated biphenyls, dibenzo- p-dioxins and dibenzofurans to a coniferous and a deciduous forest canopy was measured by simultaneously sampling bulk deposition below the canopies and in an adjacent clearing for one year. In addition, ambient air was sampled continuously, with separate analysis of the gaseous and particle-bound phases. The deposition of almost all compounds was higher under the forest canopies than in the clearing. The excess deposition to the forest sites was attributable to equilibrium partitioning between the atmosphere and the canopy vegetation, kinetically limited gaseous deposition, or particle-bound deposition. Which of these deposition processes dominated for a given compound was shown to depend on the octanol-air partition coefficient of the chemical and its gas/particle partitioning. Deposition velocities-to our knowledge the first for SOCs to forests-were calculated by dividing the excess deposition by the air concentrations. The gaseous deposition velocities were 0.78 cm s -1 to the coniferous canopy (annual weighted average) and 3.6 cm s -1 to the deciduous canopy (6 month summer average). These values are high compared to deposition velocities to forest canopies that have been measured for inorganic gases, reflecting the fact that lipophilic organic chemicals are taken up by the leaf/needle cuticle and not just via the stomata. The dry particle bound deposition velocities for particle diffusion and impaction were 0.05 and 0.73 cm s -1 for the coniferous and deciduous canopies, respectively. These values are considerably lower than the gaseous deposition velocities, underlining the importance of gaseous deposition for the accumulation of semivolatile organic compounds in forest ecosystems.

Horstmann, Michael; Mclachlan, Michael S.

388

Source apportionment of exposures to volatile organic compounds. I. Evaluation of receptor models using simulated exposure data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Four receptor-oriented source apportionment models were evaluated by applying them to simulated personal exposure data for select volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that were generated by Monte Carlo sampling from known source contributions and profiles. The exposure sources modeled are environmental tobacco smoke, paint emissions, cleaning and/or pesticide products, gasoline vapors, automobile exhaust, and wastewater treatment plant emissions. The receptor models analyzed are chemical mass balance, principal component analysis/absolute principal component scores, positive matrix factorization (PMF), and graphical ratio analysis for composition estimates/source apportionment by factors with explicit restriction, incorporated in the UNMIX model. All models identified only the major contributors to total exposure concentrations. PMF extracted factor profiles that most closely represented the major sources used to generate the simulated data. None of the models were able to distinguish between sources with similar chemical profiles. Sources that contributed <5% to the average total VOC exposure were not identified.

Miller, Shelly L.; Anderson, Melissa J.; Daly, Eileen P.; Milford, Jana B.

389

Single-sided membrane introduction mass spectrometry for on-line determination of semi-volatile organic compounds in air.  

PubMed

Construction, optimization, and testing of a novel single-sided configuration for a semi-permeable [poly(dimethylsiloxane); PDMS] membrane introduction system for mass spectrometry is described. On-line detection of semi-volatile organic compounds of environmental interest is shown, including lindane (a pesticide), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) (an explosive), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) (an antioxidant), 1,2-dichlorobenzene, dimethylmethyl phosphonate (DMMP) (a chemical warfare agent simulant) and naphthalene. The technique has limits of detection in the sub-ppb range. with rise times of 4 to 7 s and fall times of 12 to 36 s and a response that is linear over 4 orders of magnitude (from 0.1 ppb to 1000 ppb for DMMP). The cycle time, from crude air sampling to acquisition of results, is approximately 1 min. No sample preparation is necessary. PMID:11763078

Riter, L S; Takáts, Z; Cooks, R G

2001-11-01

390

Semi-volatile organic compounds at the leaf/atmosphere interface: numerical simulation of dispersal and foliar uptake.  

PubMed

The behaviour of (semi-)volatile organic compounds at the interface between the leaf surface and the atmosphere was investigated by finite-element numerical simulation. Three model systems with increasing complexity and closeness to the real situation were studied. The three-dimensional model systems were translated into appropriate grid structures and diffusive and convective transport in the leaf/atmosphere interface was simulated. Fenpropimorph (cis-4-[3-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-2-methylpropyl]-2,6-dimethylmorpholine) and Kresoxim-methyl ((E)-methyl-2-methoxyimino-2-[2-(o-tolyloxy-methyl)phenyl] acetate) were used as model compounds. The simulation showed that under still and convective conditions the vapours emitted by a point source rapidly form stationary envelopes around the leaves. Vapour concentrations within these unstirred layers depend on the vapour pressure of the compound in question and on its affinity to the lipoid surface layers of the leaf (cuticular waxes, cutin). The rules deduced from the numerical simulation of organic vapour behaviour in the leaf/atmosphere interface are expected to help in assessing how (semi-)volatile plant products (e.g. hormones, pheromones, secondary metabolites) and xenobiotics (e.g. pesticides, pollutants) perform on plant surfaces. PMID:12147732

Riederer, Markus; Daiss, Andreas; Gilbert, Norbert; Köhle, Harald

2002-08-01

391

Occurrence of Pharmaceutical and Other Organic Compounds in Ground Water in Ten Regions of California, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A State-wide assessment of the occurrence of pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and other anthropogenic and natural constituents in ground-water aquifers that are used for public supply is being made as part of the California Ground-Water Assessment and Monitoring Program (http:ca.water.usgs.gov/gama/). During the first three years of the program, a total of 682 wells were sampled in ten areas of California representing a wide range of climatic, land-use, population density, and hydrogeologic conditions. Although the wells were generally deep (greater than 100 meters below land surface), the percent of wells containing at least one pesticide ranged from 15 to 88 in the ten study areas. In contrast, the detection frequency of pharmaceuticals ranged from 5 to 22 percent. Concentrations of pharmaceutical compounds were generally less than 50 parts per trillion. Of the 14 pharmaceutical compounds investigated, only 3 were detected in more than half of the study areas (carbamazapine, acetaminophen, and sulfmethoxazole) and only one was detected in more than 2 percent of the wells (carbamapazine). These 3 compounds have low soil-water partition coefficients (Kd) and are presumably less degradable, with respect to the time of transport to the sampled portion of the aquifer, compared to the other compounds. These 3 compounds are also a subset of the pharmaceuticals that have been detected most frequently in surface water. Several other pharmaceutical compounds that are frequently detected in surface water but not abundant in this study have high Kd values, suggesting sorption onto aquifer solids may limit their sub- surface transport, or have faster degradation rates. The occurrence of pharmaceutical compounds is not well correlated with that of pesticides, but may be related to land-use as the highest detection frequency occurred in the study unit with the highest urban density.

Domagalski, J.; Belitz, K.; Furlong, E. T.

2007-05-01

392

Marine mammal blubber reference and control materials for use in the determination of halogenated organic compounds and fatty acids.  

PubMed

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has a diverse collection of control materials derived from marine mammal blubber, fat, and serum. Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1945 Organics in Whale Blubber was recertified for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, organochlorine pesticides, and polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners. SRM 1945 has also been assigned mass fraction values for compounds not frequently determined in marine samples including toxaphene congeners, coplanar PCBs, and methoxylated PBDE congeners which are natural products. NIST also has assigned mass fraction values, as a result of interlaboratory comparison exercises, for PCB congeners, organochlorine pesticides, PBDE congeners, and fatty acids in six homogenate materials produced from marine mammal blubber or serum. The materials are available from NIST upon request; however, the supply is very limited for some of the materials. The materials include those obtained from pilot whale blubber (Homogenates III and IV), Blainville's beaked whale blubber (Homogenate VII), polar bear fat (Homogenate VI), and California sea lion serum (Marine Mammal Control Material-1 Serum) and blubber (Homogenate V). PMID:20238106

Kucklick, John R; Schantz, Michele M; Pugh, Rebecca S; Porter, Barbara J; Poster, Dianne L; Becker, Paul R; Rowles, Teri K; Leigh, Stefan; Wise, Stephen A

2010-05-01

393

Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds and Oligomers in Secondary Organic Aerosol Formed by Photooxidation of Isoprene  

SciTech Connect

Electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI HR-MS) was used to probe molecular structures of oligomers in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated in laboratory experiments on isoprene photooxidation at low- and high-NOx conditions. Up to 80-90% of the observed products are oligomers and up to 33% are nitrogen-containing organic compounds (NOC). We observe oligomers with up to 8 monomer units in length. Tandem mass spectrometry (MSn) confirms NOC compounds are organic nitrates and elucidates plausible chemical building blocks contributing to oligomer formation. Most organic nitrates are comprised of methylglyceric acid units. Other important multifunctional C2-C5 monomer units are identified including methylglyoxal, hydroxyacetone, hydroxyacetic acid, glycolaldehyde, and 2-methyltetrols. The majority of the NOC oligomers contain only one nitrate moiety resulting in a low average N:C ratio of 0.019. Average O:C ratios of the detected SOA compounds are 0.54 under the low-NOx conditions and 0.83 under the high-NOx conditions. Our results underscore the importance of isoprene photooxidation as a source of NOC in organic particulate matter.

Nguyen, Tran B.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Serguei

2011-07-06

394

Halogenated hydrocarbon pesticides and other volatile organic contaminants provide analytical challenges in global trading.  

PubMed

Protection against infestation of a container cargo by alien species is achieved by mandatory fumigation with pesticides. Most of the effective fumigants are methyl and ethyl halide gases that are highly toxic and are a risk to both human health and the environment. There is a worldwide need for a reliable and robust analytical screening procedure for these volatile chemicals in a multitude of health and environmental scenarios. We have established a highly sensitive broad spectrum mass spectrometry method combined with thermal desorption gas chromatography to detect, identify and quantify volatile pesticide residues. Using this method, 1201 random ambient air samples taken from freight containers arriving at the biggest European ports of Hamburg and Rotterdam were analyzed over a period of two and a half years. This analytical procedure is a valuable strategy to measure air pollution from these hazardous chemicals, to help in the identification of pesticides in the new mixtures/formulations that are being adopted globally and to analyze expired breath samples after suspected intoxication in biomonitoring. PMID:20383375

Budnik, Lygia T; Fahrenholtz, Svea; Kloth, Stefan; Baur, Xaver

2010-04-01

395

Distributions of pesticides and organic contaminants between water and suspended sediment, San Francisco Bay, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Suspended-sediment and water samples were collected from San Francisco Bay in 1991 during low river discharge and after spring rains. All samples were analyzed for organophosphate, carbamate, and organochlorine pesticides; petroleum hydrocarbons; biomarkers; and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. The objectives were to determine the concentrations of these contaminants in water and suspended sediment during two different hydrologic conditions and to determine partition coefficients of the contaminants between water and sediment. Concentrations of hydrophobic contaminants, such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, varied with location of sample collection, riverine discharge, and tidal cycle. Concentrations of hydrophobic contaminants in suspended sediments were highest during low river discharge but became diluted as agricultural soils entered the bay after spring rains. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons defined as dissolved in the water column were not detected. The concentrations sorbed on suspended sediments were variable and were dependent on sediment transport patterns in the bay. In contrast, the relatively hydrophilic organophosphate pesticides, such as chlorpyrifos and diazinon, has a more uniform concentration in suspended sediment. These pesticides were detected only after spring rains. Most of the measured diazinon, at least 98% for all samples, was in the dissolved phase. Measured partition coefficients for diazinon generally were uniform, which suggests that suspended-sediment concentrations were close to equilibrium with dissolved concentrations. The concentration of diazinon sorbed to suspended sediments, at any given sampling site, was driven primarily by the more abundant solution concentration. The concentrations of diazinon sorbed to suspended sediments, therefore, were independent of the patterns of sediment movement. ?? 1993 Estuarine Research Federation.

Domagalski, J. L.; Kuivila, K. M.

1993-01-01

396

Emissions of volatile organic compounds from architectural materials with indoor applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this study were to identify the major organic compounds emitted by some typical building construction and interior finish materials, quantify emissions of organic solvents from representative adhesives that have indoor applications, and evaluate methods for the rapid screening of architectural materials for organic emissions. Organic compounds emitted by 15 building construction and interior finish materials and by

A. T. Hodgson; J. R. Girman; A. S. Newton; A. Winkes

1983-01-01

397

Effect of water saturation in soil organic matter on the partition of organic compounds  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The sorption of benzene, trichloroethylene, and carbon tetrachloride at room temperature from water solution and from vapor on two high-organic-content soils (peat and muck) was determined in order to evaluate the effect of water saturation on the solute partition in soil organic matter (SOM). The uptake of water vapor was similarly determined to define the amounts of water in the saturated soil samples. In such high-organic-content soils the organic vapor sorption and the respective solute sorption from water exhibit linear isotherms over a wide range of relative concentrations. This observation, along with the low BET surface areas of the samples, suggests that partition in the SOM of the samples is the dominant process in the uptake of these liquids. A comparison of the sorption from water solution and from vapor phase shows that water saturation reduces the sorption (partition) efficiency of SOM by ?? 42%; the saturated water content is ??38% by weight of dry SOM. This reduction is relatively small when compared with the almost complete suppression by water of organic compound adsorption on soil minerals. While the effect of water saturation on solute uptake by SOM is much expected in terms of solute partition in SOM, the influence of water on the solubility behavior of polar SOM can be explained only qualitatively by regular solution theory. The results suggest that the major effect of water in a drying-wetting cycle on the organic compound uptake by normal low-organic-content soils (and the associated compound's activity) is the suppression of adsorption by minerals rather than the mitigation of the partition effect in SOM.

Rutherford, D. W.; Chlou, G. T.

1992-01-01

398

Contributions of individual reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds to organic nitrates above a mixed forest  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) can react in the atmosphere to form organic nitrates, which serve as NOx (NO + NO2) reservoirs, impacting ozone and secondary organic aerosol production, the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, and nitrogen availability to ecosystems. To examine the contributions of biogenic emissions and the formation and fate of organic nitrates in a forest environment, we simulated the oxidation of 57 individual BVOCs emitted from a rural mixed forest in Northern Michigan. Of the total simulated organic nitrates, monoterpenes contributed ~70% in the early morning at ~12 m above the forest canopy when isoprene emissions were low. In the afternoon, when vertical mixing and isoprene nitrate production were highest, the simulated contribution of isoprene-derived organic nitrates was greater than 90% at all altitudes, with the concentration of secondary isoprene nitrates increasing with altitude. Key BVOC-oxidant reactions were identified for future laboratory and field investigations into reaction rate constants, yields, and speciation of oxidation products. Forest succession, wherein aspen trees are being replaced by pine and maple trees, was predicted to lead to increased afternoon concentrations of monoterpene-derived organic nitrates. This further underscores the need to understand the formation and fate of these species, which have different chemical pathways and oxidation products compared to isoprene-derived organic nitrates and can lead to secondary organic aerosol formation.

Pratt, K. A.; Mielke, L. H.; Shepson, P. B.; Bryan, A. M.; Steiner, A. L.; Ortega, J.; Daly, R.; Helmig, D.; Vogel, C. S.; Griffith, S.; Dusanter, S.; Stevens, P. S.; Alaghmand, M.

2012-07-01

399

Indoor Volatile Organic Compounds and Chemical Sensitivity Reactions  

PubMed Central

Studies of unexplained symptoms observed in chemically sensitive subjects have increased the awareness of the relationship between neurological and immunological diseases due to exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs). However, there is no direct evidence that links exposure to low doses of VOCs and neurological and immunological dysfunction. We review animal model data to clarify the role of VOCs in neuroimmune interactions and discuss our recent studies that show a relationship between chronic exposure of C3H mice to low levels of formaldehyde and the induction of neural and immune dysfunction. We also consider the possible mechanisms by which VOC exposure can induce the symptoms presenting in patients with a multiple chemical sensitivity.

Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Arashidani, Keiichi; Kunugita, Naoki

2013-01-01

400

Stimulation of transcription on chromatin by polar organic compounds.  

PubMed Central

Polar organic compounds, including DMSO, increase RNA synthesis on isolated chromatin by E. coli RNA polymerase and RNA polymerase II from calf thymus. Transcription is stimulated on chromatin from Friend-virus-infected erythroleukemia cells and from various other sources. Using procedures which inhibit specifically the formation of a stable initiation complex, it is shown that the stimulation does not result from an increase in initiation of both E. coli and the eukaryotic RNA polymerase. After separation of chromatin into template active and inactive fractions, DMSO increases RNA synthesis by a factor of about 1.5 using the template inactive fraction, while stimulation of transcription on the template active portion is lower (factor of 1.2). It is suggested that the effect on RNA synthesis is mediated by a weakening of the apolar interactions between histones in chromatin subunits, releasing transcription partially from the constraints imposed by histones.

Stratling, W H

1976-01-01

401

In situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon and other organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

From supertanker oil spills to the leaking underground storage tank at the corner gas station, contamination from petroleum hydrocarbon fuels and other organic compounds is an environmental concern that affects nearly every small hamlet and major metropolis throughout the world. Moreover, the world`s rivers, estuaries, and oceans are threatened by contamination from petroleum leaks and spills. Fortunately, most petroleum hydrocarbons are amenable to biodegradation, and a considerable body of experience has been built up over the past two decades in applying in situ bioremediation to a variety of contaminants in all media. Good progress is being made in terms of developing innovative, cost-effective in situ approaches to bioremediation. This volume provides a comprehensive guide to the latest technological breakthroughs in both the laboratory and the field, covering such topics as air sparging, cometabolic biodegradation, treatment of MTBE, real-time control systems, nutrient addition, rapid biosensor analysis, multiphase extraction, and accelerated bioremediation.

Alleman, B.C.; Leeson, A. [eds.

1999-10-01

402

Field-usable portable analyzer for chlorinated organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

In 1992, a chemical sensor was developed which showed almost perfect selectivity to vapors of chlorinated solvents. When interfaced to an instrument, a chemical analyzer will be produced that has near- absolute selectivity to vapors of volatile chlorinated organic compounds. TRI has just completed the second of a 2-phase program to develop this new instrument system, which is called the RCL MONITOR. In Phase II, this instrument was deployed in 5 EM40 operations. Phase II applications covered clean-up process monitoring, environmental modeling, routine monitoring, health and safety, and technology validation. Vapor levels between 0 and 100 ppM can be determined in 90 s with a lower detection limit of 0.5 ppM using the hand-portable instrument. Based on the favorable performance of the RCL MONITOR, the commercial instrument was released for commercial sales on Sept. 20, 1996.

Buttner, W.J.; Penrose, W.R.; Stetter, J.R.; Williams, R.D.

1996-12-31

403

Molar extinction coefficients of solutions of some organic compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Molar extinction coefficients of aqueous solutions of some organic compounds, viz. formamide (CH_{3}NO), N-methylformamide (C_{2}H_{5}NO), NN-dimethylformamide (C_{3}H_{7}NO), NN-dimethylacetamide (C_{4}H_{9}NO), 1,4-dioxane (C_{4}H_{8}O_{2}), succinimide (C_{4}H_{5}NO_{2}) and solutions of acetamide (C_{2}H_{5}NO) and benzoic acid (C_{7}H_{6}O_{2}) in 1,4-dioxane (C_{4}H_{8}O_{2}) have been determined by narrow beam gamma-ray transmission method at 81, 356, 511, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV. The experimental values of mass attenuation coefficients

Kulwant Singh; G. K. Sandhu; B. S. Lark

2004-01-01

404

Detection of volatile organic compounds using surface enhanced Raman scattering  

SciTech Connect

The authors present the detection of volatile organic compounds directly in their vapor phase by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. The type of nanopillars is known as the tapered pillars. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of toluene vapor. The results show that SERS signal from a toluene vapor concentration of ppm level can be achieved, and the toluene vapor can be detected within minutes of exposing the SERS substrate to the vapor. A simple adsorption model is developed which gives results matching the experimental data. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors.

Chang, A S; Maiti, A; Ileri, N; Bora, M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Bond, T C

2012-03-22

405

Growth Yields of Bacteria on Selected Organic Compounds  

PubMed Central

Cell yields were determined for two bacterial soil isolants grown aerobically in minimal media on a variety of synthetic organic compounds. 1-Dodecanol, benzoic acid, phenylacetic acid, phenylglyoxylic acid, and diethylene, triethylene, and tetraethylene glycols were tested. Two “biochemicals,” succinate and acetate, were also tested for comparison. Yields were calculated on the basis of grams of cells obtained per mole of substrate utilized, gram atom of carbon utilized, mole of oxygen consumed, and equivalent of “available electrons” in the substrates. This latter value appears to be nearly constant at 3 g of cells per equivalent of “available electrons.” Yields predicted on this basis for other bacteria and for yeasts on other substrates are in fair agreement with reported values.

Mayberry, W. R.; Prochazka, G. J.; Payne, W. J.

1967-01-01

406

Lasing characteristics of vapors of complex organic compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A theoretical investigation is made of laser action in vapors of complex organic compounds pumped by giant laser pulses. Allowance is made for the main feature of the gas phase, namely, a dependence of the spectroscopic and lasing characteristics of the active molecules on the vibrational energy stored in the ground and excited states. It is shown that a possible substantial increase in the average vibrational energy of the active molecules during the pump pulse causes an appreciable deterioration in the lasing characteristics of vapors compared with solutions, even in the most favorable case without induced absorption. An analysis is made using the parameters of a system similar to the experimental values for l,4-bis[2-(5-phenyloxazolyl)]benzene (POPOP) vapor and allowance is made for neutral gases.

Abakumov, G. A.; Vorob'ev, S. A.; Lademann, Jürgen; Simonov, A. P.

1980-02-01

407

Qualitative analysis of volatile organic compounds on biochar.  

PubMed

Qualitative identification of sorbed volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on biochar was conducted by headspace thermal desorption coupled to capillary gas chromatographic-mass spectrometry. VOCs may have a mechanistic role influencing plant and microbial responses to biochar am