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Sample records for organic compounds pesticides

  1. ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN ORGANOPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDE MANUFACTURING WASTEWATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Preliminary survey information on the organophosphorus pesticide industry wastewater streams and analytical methods to monitor levels of organic compounds present in these streams are presented. The identification and quantification of organophosphorus compounds was emphasized, b...

  2. Organic Pesticide Ingredients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control a pest Integrated Pest Management What are pesticides? Herbicides Disinfectants Fungicides Insecticides Natural and Biological Pesticides ... Other types of pesticides Disponible en español Organic Pesticide Ingredients Organic foods are not necessarily pesticide-free. ...

  3. Pesticides and volatile organic compounds in shallow urban groundwater of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, Dana W.; Squillace, Paul J.; Zogorski, John S.; Barbash, Jack E.

    1997-01-01

    The widespread use of pesticides and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) over the past half century has led to their detection in many hydrologic systems in the United States. However, few systematic investigations of occurrences have been carried out over multistate regions using a consistent study design. Nine urban studies of shallow groundwater have been conducted to date as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Pesticide compounds were detected in 48.6% of the 208 urban wells sampled. Sixteen different pesticide compounds were detected in samples from these wells. Prometon was by far the most frequently detected pesticide compound, being found in 8 of the 9 urban studies. VOCs were detected in 53.4% of the 208 urban wells sampled, with 36 different VOC compounds being found. Measured VOC concentrations exceeded current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water regulations in 19 wells. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), a common fuel oxygenate, was the most frequently detected VOC for this study.

  4. Denver's Urban Ground-Water Quality: Nutrients, Pesticides, and Volatile Organic Compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bruce, Breton W.

    1995-01-01

    A recent study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) under the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program characterized the ground-water quality in a part of the Denver, Colorado, metropolitan area. The study provides an assessment of water-quality conditions in an alluvial aquifer that drains into the South Platte River. Thirty wells randomly distributed in residential, commercial, and industrial land-use settings were sampled once in 1993 for a broad range of compounds. Nutrients, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds (VOC's), all of which are generally associated with human activities, frequently were detected in the urban wells sampled. Nutrients and VOC's occasionally exceeded drinking-water standards.

  5. Volatile organic compound and pesticide data in public water-supply reservoirs and wells, Texas, 1999-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, Barbara J.; Gary, M.O.; Canova, M.G.; Strom, Eric W.; Fahlquist, Lynne; Dorsey, Michael E.

    2002-01-01

    To provide data for the Texas Source-Water Assessment and Protection Program, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a synoptic survey of 48 public water-supply reservoirs and 174 public water-supply wells during 1999?2001. The surface-water samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds and soluble pesticides. The ground-water samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds and soluble pesticides, as well as nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen and tritium. One or more volatile organic compounds were detected in 75 percent of the reservoirs and in 9 percent of the wells. Methyl tert-butyl ether was detected most frequently in reservoirs, and toluene was detected most frequently in wells. One or more pesticides were detected in 96 percent of the reservoirs and in 33 percent of the wells. Atrazine or its breakdown product deethylatrazine was the most frequently detected pesticide. Volatile organic compounds and pesticides were not detected at concentrations exceeding the maximum contaminant level allowed in drinking water. The only constituent sampled for that exceeded its maximum contaminant level (10 milligrams per liter) was nitrate nitrogen (in 8 percent of the 174 wells).

  6. Water-quality data for nutrients, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds in near-surface aquifers of the midcontinental United States, 1992-1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.; Zichelle, K.E.; Thurman, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    Water samples were collected from 175 wells in 12 Midcontinental States (Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin) from 1992 through 1994 to determine the spatial distribution of nutrients, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds in ground water, and to document the potential effects of the historic flooding that occurred during 1993 on ground- water quality. Concentrations of nitrate greater than the 0.05 mg/L reporting limit were found in 69.1 percent of the water samples, and nitrate concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant limit of 10 mg/L in 9.6 percent of the 249 samples analyzed for nitrate. Pesticides or pesticide metabolites were detected in 72.4 percent of the 210 pesticide analyses, and 28 different compounds were found. Concentrations of multiple pesticide compounds above analytical reporting limits were found in water from about 60 percent of the wells sampled. Although pesticides were frequently detected, only one sample had a pesticide concentration that exceeded a maximum contaminant level for drinking water. The most frequently detected compounds, however, were pesticide metabolites for which maximum contaminant levels have not yet been established. Volatile organic compounds were detected in 13.5 percent of the 155 samples analyzed for these compounds. Only one sample had concentrations of volatile organic compounds that exceeded a maximum contaminant level for drinking water.

  7. Data for selected pesticides and volatile organic compounds for wells in the western San Joaquin Valley, California, February to July 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neil, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    During February to July 1985, water samples were collected from 55 wells in the western San Joaquin Valley, California, for chemical analysis to determine if 20 selected pesticides and 26 volatile organic compounds were present. Twenty-six of the sampled wells are completed in the shallow unconfined regional aquifer and 29 wells are completed in the deep confined regional aquifer. Water from six of the sampled wells, four of which are completed in the shallow unconfined aquifer, contained detectable levels of the pesticides or volatile organic compounds. Four samples contained a single pesticide, one sample contained two pesticides, and one sample contained 5.9 microgm/liter of toluene, a volatile organic compound. Five of the six pesticides detected were triazine herbicides; the maximum concentration was 0.2 microgm/liter. Four samples with detectable concentrations of triazine herbicides are from wells used for domestic water supply; however, drinking-water standards have not been established for triazine herbicides. (USGS)

  8. Occurrence of nitrate, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds in the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system, southern New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stackelberg, Paul E.; Hopple, Jessica A.; Kauffman, Leon J.

    1997-01-01

    Water samples were collected from a network of 72 shallow monitoring wells to assess the chemical quality of recently recharged ground water in the surficial Kirkwood- Cohansey aquifer system of southern New Jersey. The wells are randomly distributed among agricultural, urban, and undeveloped areas to provide data representative of chemical conditions of ground water underlying each of these land-use settings. Samples were analyzed for nutrients, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds (VOC?s). Concentrations of nitrate were highest in agricultural areas, where the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 10 mg/L (milligrams per liter) as nitrogen was exceeded in 60 percent of the samples. Concentrations of nitrate were intermediate in urban areas, where the 10-mg/L concentration was exceeded in only 1 of 44 samples. All concentrations in samples from undeveloped areas were less than 1.0 mg/L. Pesticides and VOC?s were frequently detected; however, concentrations were low and rarely exceeded established or proposed USEPA or N.J. Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) drinking-water regulations. With the exception of the agricultural pesticide dinoseb, established regulations are at least 2.9 times the maximum concentration for pesticides and at least 5 times the maximum concentration for VOC?s reported in the samples from the 72- well network. Investigations by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are ongoing in southern New Jersey to evaluate the (1) presence and concentration of pesticide-degradation byproducts in shallow ground water; (2) presence and movement of nitrate, pesticides, and VOC?s in the atmosphere, streams, unsaturated zone, and aquifers; (3) transport and fate of these compounds as they migrate deeper into the aquifer system; and (4) implications of these findings for the integrity of the regional water supply.

  9. Fate of selected pesticides, estrogens, progestogens and volatile organic compounds during artificial aquifer recharge using surface waters.

    PubMed

    Kuster, Marina; Díaz-Cruz, Silvia; Rosell, Mònica; López de Alda, Miren; Barceló, Damià

    2010-05-01

    The artificial recharge of aquifers has become a valuable tool to increase water resources for drinking water production in many countries. In this work a total of 41 organic pollutants belonging to the classes of pesticides, estrogens, progestogens and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been monitored in the water from two artificial recharge plants located in Sweden and Denmark. The results from two sampling campaigns performed in each plant indicate good chemical status of the source water, as the contaminants detected were present at very low levels, far from those established in the legislation as maximum admissible concentrations (when existing) and far from those considered as a risk. Thus, of the 17 pesticides investigated, BAM (2,6-dichlorobenzamide), desethylatrazine, simazine, atrazine, terbuthylazine, diuron, metolachlor, and diazinon were the only compounds detected, and total pesticides levels were below 25ng L(-1), respectively. Estrone-3-sulfate was the only estrogen detected, at concentrations lower than 0.5ng L(-1). Progestogens were not found in any sample. Detected VOCs (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and trichloroethylene) were below 0.04microg L(-1). The efficiency of elimination of these organic contaminants was poor as no significant decrease in their concentrations was observed through the recharge process. PMID:20226495

  10. [Pollution characteristics and health risk assessment of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in pesticide factory].

    PubMed

    Tan, Bing; Wang, Tie-Yu; Pang, Bo; Zhu, Zhao-Yun; Wang, Dao-Han; Lü, Yong-Long

    2013-12-01

    A method for determining volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air by summa canister collecting and gas chromatography/ mass spectroscopy detecting was adopted. Pollution condition and characteristics of VOCs were discussed in three representative pesticide factories in Zhangjiakou City, Hebei Province. Meanwhile, an internationally recognized four-step evaluation model of health risk assessment was applied to preliminarily assess the health risk caused by atmospheric VOCs in different exposure ways, inhalation and dermal exposure. Results showed that serious total VOCs pollution existed in all factories. Concentrations of n-hexane (6161.90-6910.00 microg x m(-3)), benzene (126.00-179.30 microg x m(-3)) and 1,3-butadiene (115.00-177.30 microg x m(-3)) exceeded the Chronic Inhalation Reference Concentrations recommended by USEPA, corresponding to 700, 30 and 2 microg x m(-3), respectively. Concentration of dichloromethane (724.00 microg x m(-3)) in factory B was also higher than the reference concentration (600 microg x m(-3)). Results of health risk assessment indicated that non-carcinogenic risk indexes of VOCs ranged from 1.00E-04 to 1.00E + 00 by inhalation exposure, and 1.00E-09 to 1.00E-05 by dermal exposure. Risk indexes of n-hexane and dichloromethane by inhalation exposure in all factories exceeded 1, and risk index of benzene by inhalation in factory B was also higher than 1. Carcinogenic risk indexes exposed to VOCs ranged from 1.00E-08 to 1.00E-03 by inhalation exposure and 1. oo00E -13 to 1.00E-08 by dermal exposure. Cancer risk of 1,3-butadiene by inhalation exceeded 1.0E-04, which lead to definite risk, and those of benzene by inhalation also exceeded the maximum allowable level recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (5.0E-05). The risks of dermal exposure presented the same trend as inhalation exposure, but the level was much lower than that of inhalation exposure. Thus, inhalation exposure of atmospheric VOCs was the

  11. Occurrence of selected volatile organic compounds and soluble pesticides in Texas public water-supply source waters, 1999-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, Barbara June; Canova, Michael G.; Gary, Marcus O.

    2002-01-01

    During 1999?2001, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission, collected samples of untreated water from 48 public water-supply reservoirs and 174 public water-supply wells. The samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and soluble pesticides; in addition, well samples were analyzed for nitrite plus nitrate and tritium. This fact sheet summarizes the findings of the source-water sampling and analyses. Both VOCs and pesticides were detected much more frequently in surface water than in ground water. The only constituent detected at concentrations exceeding the maximum contaminant level for drinking water was nitrate. These results will be used in the Texas Source-Water Assessment Program to evaluate the susceptibility of public water-supply source waters to contamination.

  12. Volatile organic compounds in pesticide formulations: Assessing methods to predict contributions to ground-level ozone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmental scientists have primarily focused on the fate, transport, and toxicity of pesticide active ingredients, but relatively little research has been conducted to examine the environmental fate of pesticide inactive ingredients, sometimes termed formulants or inerts. Many formulants are vol...

  13. Relations between Land Use and Organochlorine Pesticides, PCBs, and Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds in Streambed Sediment and Fish on the Island of Oahu, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brasher, A.M.D.; Wolff, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    Bed-sediment and/or fish samples were collected from 27 sites around the island of Oahu (representing urban, agricultural, mixed, and forested land use) to determine the occurrence and distribution of hydrophobic organic compounds including organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs). Of the 28 organochlorine compounds analyzed in the fish, 14 were detected during this study. Nineteen of the 31 organochlorine compounds and 40 of the 65 SVOCs were detected in the sediment. Urban sites had the highest number of detections and tended to have the highest concentrations of pesticides. Chlordane compounds were the most frequently detected constituents at urban sites, followed by dieldrin, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and DDT compounds. PAHs were the most frequently detected constituents in watersheds with mixed (urban and agricultural) land use. The only pesticides detected at agricultural sites were DDT and its degradation products, DDD and DDE. No pesticides or PCBs were detected at the forested sites, but a few ubiquitous SVOCs were found in sediments at some forested sites. In general, concentrations of the most frequently detected pesticides were higher in fish than in sediment. Following a trend that has been observed elsewhere in the nation, concentrations of most organochlorine pesticides and PCBs are decreasing in Hawaii.

  14. Metals, pesticides, and semivolatile organic compounds in sediment in Valley Forge National Historical Park, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reif, Andrew G.; Sloto, Ronald A.

    1997-01-01

    The Schuylkill River flows through Valley Forge National Historical Park in Lower Providence and West Norriton Townships in Montgomery County, Pa. The concentration of selected metals, pesticides, semivolatile organic compounds, and total carbon in stream-bottom sediments from Valley Forge National Historical Park were determined for samples collected once at 12 sites in and around the Schuylkill River. Relatively low concentrations of arsenic, chromium, copper, and lead were detected in all samples. The concentrations of these metals are similar to concentrations in other stream-bottom sediment samples collected in the region. The concentrations of iron, manganese, and zinc were elevated in samples from four sites in the Schuylkill River, and the concentration of mercury was elevated in a sample from an impoundment along the river. The organophosphorus insecticide diazinon was detected in relatively low concentrations in half of the 12 samples analyzed. The organo-chlorine insecticide DDE was detected in all 12 samples analyzed; dieldrin was detected in 10 samples, chlordane, DDD, and DDT were detected in 9 samples, and heptachlor epoxide was detected in one sample. The concentrations of organo-chlorine and organophosphorus insecticides were relatively low and similar to concentrations in samples collected in the region. Detectable concentrations of 17 semivolatile organic compounds were measured in the 12 samples analyzed. The most commonly detected compounds were fluoranthene, phenanthrene, and pyrene. The maximum concentration detected was 4,800 micrograms per kilogram of phenanthrene. The highest concentrations of compounds were detected in Lamb Run, a small tributary to the Schuylkill River with headwaters in an industrial corporate center. The concentration of compounds in the Schuylkill River below Lamb Run is higher than the Schuylkill River above Lamb Run, indicating that sediment from Lamb Run is increasing the concentration of semivolatile organic

  15. Surface-water-quality assessment of the Yakima River basin, Washington; distribution of pesticides and other organic compounds in water, sediment, and aquatic biota, 1987-91; with a section on dissolved organic carbon in the Yakima River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rinella, Joseph F.; McKenzie, Stuart W.; Crawford, J. Kent; Foreman, William T.; Fuhrer, Gregory J.; Morace, Jennifer L.; Aiken, George R.

    1999-01-01

    During 1987-91, chemical data were collected for pesticides and other organic compounds in surface water, streambed sediment, suspended sediment, agricultural soil, and aquatic biota to determine the occurrence, distribution, transport, and fate of organic compounds in the Yakima River basin in Washington. The report describes the chemical and physical properties of the compounds most frequently detected in the water column; organochlorine compounds including DDT, organophosphorus compounds, thiocarbamate and sulfite compounds, acetamide and triazine compounds, and chlorophenoxy-acetic acid and benzoic compounds. Concentrations are evaluated relative to chronic-toxicity water quality criteria and guidelines for the protection of human health and freshwater aquatic life.

  16. Occurrence and distribution of pesticides and volatile organic compounds in ground water and surface water in Central Arizona Basins, 1996-98, and their relation to land use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gellenbeck, Dorinda J.; Anning, David W.

    2002-01-01

    Samples of ground water and surface water from the Sierra Vista subbasin, the Upper Santa Cruz Basin, and the West Salt River Valley were collected and analyzed to determine the occurrence and distribution of pesticides and volatile organic compounds in central Arizona. The study was done during 1996-98 within the Central Arizona Basins study unit of the National Water-Quality Assessment program. This study included 121 wells and 4 surface-water sites in the 3 basins and the analyses of samples from 4 sites along the Santa Cruz River that were part of a separate study. Samples were collected from 121 wells and 3 surface-water sites for pesticide analyses, and samples were collected from 109 wells and 3 surface-water sites for volatile organic compound analyses. Certain pesticides detected in ground water and surface water can be related specifically to agricultural or urban uses; others can be related to multiple land uses. Effects from historical agriculture are made evident by detections of DDE in ground-water and surface-water samples collected in the West Salt River Valley and detections of atrazine and deethylatrazine in the ground water in the Upper Santa Cruz Basin. Effects from present agriculture are evident in the seasonal variability in concentrations of pre-emergent pesticides in surface-water samples from the West Salt River Valley. Several detections of DDE and dieldrin in surface water were higher than established water-quality limits. Effects of urban land use are made evident by detections of volatile organic compounds in ground water and surface water from the West Salt River Valley. Detections of volatile organic compounds in surface water from the Santa Cruz River near Nogales, Arizona, also are indications of the effects of urban land use. One detection of tetrachloroethene in ground water was higher than established water-quality limits. Water reuse is an important conservation technique in the Southwest; however, the reuse of water provides a

  17. Occurrence of Selected Pharmaceuticals, Personal-Care Products, Organic Wastewater Compounds, and Pesticides in the Lower Tallapoosa River Watershed near Montgomery, Alabama, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oblinger, Carolyn J.; Gill, Amy C.; McPherson, Ann K.; Meyer, Michael T.; Furlong, Edward T.

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic and natural organic compounds derived from agricultural operations, residential development, and treated and untreated sanitary and industrial wastewater discharges can contribute contaminants to surface and ground waters. To determine the occurrence of these compounds in the lower Tallapoosa River watershed, Alabama, new laboratory methods were used that can detect human and veterinary antibiotics; pharmaceuticals; and compounds found in personal-care products, food additives, detergents and their metabolites, plasticizers, and other industrial and household products in the environment. Well-established methods for detecting 47 pesticides and 19 pesticide degradates also were used. In all, 186 different compounds were analyzed by using four analytical methods. The lower Tallapoosa River serves as the water-supply source for more than 100,000 customers of the Montgomery Water Works and Sanitary Sewer Board. Source-water protection is a high priority for the Board, which is responsible for providing safe drinking water. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Montgomery Water Works and Sanitary Sewer Board, conducted this study to provide baseline data that could be used to assess the effects of agriculture and residential development on the occurrence of selected organic compounds in the lower Tallapoosa River watershed. Twenty samples were collected at 10 sites on the Tallapoosa River and its tributaries. Ten samples were collected in April 2005 during high base streamflow, and 10 samples were collected in October 2005 when base streamflow was low. Thirty-two of 186 compounds were detected in the lower Tallapoosa River watershed. Thirteen compounds, including atrazine, 2-chloro-4-isopropylamino-6-amino-s-triazine (CIAT), hexazinone, metalaxyl, metolachlor, prometryn, prometon, simazine, azithromycin, oxytetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, and tylosin, had measurable concentrations above their laboratory reporting levels

  18. Occurrence and distribution of volatile organic compounds and pesticides in ground water in relation to hydrogeologic characteristics and land use in the Santa Ana basin, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamlin, Scott N.; Belitz, Kenneth; Johnson, Tyler D.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the occurrence and distribution of VOCs and pesticides in the Santa Ana ground-water basins in relation to two types of explanatory factors: hydrogeologic characteristics and land use. The Santa Ana Basin is subdivided into the San Jacinto, the Inland, and the Coastal ground-water basins. Most wells sampled were deep and used for public supply. Data from regional studies were used to evaluate the occurrence and distribution of pesticides and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in relation to hydrogeologic characteristics and land uses that could potentially explain variations between basins. Additional data from special studies (flow path and aquifer susceptibility) were used to evaluate potential factors affecting water quality for individual basins. The hydrogeologic characteristics evaluated in this report were hydrogeologic setting, ground-water age, depth to the top of the well screen (top of well perforations), and proximity to engineered recharge facilities. Urban land use, agricultural land use, and population density were characterized within a 500-meter radius of sampled wells and at the basin scale. Aquifers in the San Jacinto Basin are generally unconfined, and major land-use categories are urban (33 percent), agricultural (37 percent), and undeveloped (25 percent). Recharge is primarily from the overlying landscape, but engineered recharge is locally important in the Hemet area. VOCs and pesticides were detected more frequently in younger ground water (less than 50 years old) than in older ground water, and more frequently in shallower wells than deeper wells; the numbers of VOCs and pesticides detected also were significantly higher in the younger ground water and in the shallower wells. In the Hemet area of the San Jacinto Basin, VOCs and pesticides were detected more frequently in wells proximal to engineered recharge facilities than in distal wells. These patterns illustrate the importance of proximity to sources

  19. Pesticide toxicity index for freshwater aquatic organisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munn, Mark D.; Gilliom, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program is designed to assess current water-quality conditions, changes in water quality over time, and the effects of natural and human factors on water quality for the Nation's streams and ground-water resources. For streams, one of the most difficult parts of the assessment is to link chemical conditions to effects on aquatic biota, particularly for pesticides, which tend to occur in streams as complex mixtures with strong seasonal patterns. A Pesticide Toxicity Index (PTI) was developed that combines pesticide exposure of aquatic biota (measured concentrations of pesticides in stream water) with toxicity estimates (standard endpoints from laboratory bioassays) to produce a single index value for a sample or site. The development of the PTI was limited to pesticide compounds routinely measured in NAWQA studies and to toxicity data readily available from existing databases. Qualifying toxicity data were found for one or more types of test organisms for 75 of the 83 pesticide compounds measured in NAWQA samples, but with a wide range of bioassays per compound (1 to 65). There were a total of 2,824 bioassays for the 75 compounds, including 287 48-hour EC50 values (concentration at which 50 percent of test organisms exhibit a nonlethal response) for freshwater cladocerans, 585 96-hour LC50 values (concentration lethal to 50 percent of test organisms) for freshwater benthic invertebrates, and 1,952 96-hour LC50 values for freshwater fish. The PTI for a particular sample is the sum of toxicity quotients (measured concentration divided by the median toxicity concentration from bioassays) for each detected pesticide. The PTI can be calculated for specific groups of pesticides and for specific taxonomic groups.While the PTI does not determine whether water in a sample is toxic, its values can be used to rank or compare the toxicity of samples or sites on a relative basis for use in further analysis or

  20. Water-quality assessment of South-Central Texas : descriptions and comparisons of nutrients, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds at three intensive fixed sites, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ging, Patricia B.

    1999-01-01

    Water-quality samples were collected during April 1996-April 1998 at three intensive fixed sites in the San Antonio region of the South-Central Texas study unit as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The sampling strategy for the intensive fixed-site assessment is centered on obtaining information about the occurrence and seasonal patterns of selected constituents including nutrients, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds. The three sites selected to determine the effects of agriculture and urbanization on surface-water quality in the study unit are Medina River at LaCoste (agriculture indicator site), Salado Creek (lower station) at San Antonio (urban indicator site), and San Antonio River near Elmendorf (integrator site).Concentrations of two nutrients, dissolved nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen and total phosphorus, were largest at the integrator site, which is downstream of municipal wastewater treatment plants. Nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen concentrations at this site often exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinking water. All total phosphorus concentrations at the site exceeded the EPA recommended maximum concentration for streams not discharging directly into reservoirs. Nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen concentrations at the integrator site tended to be smaller, and total phosphorus concentrations at the urban site tended to be larger in samples collected during stormflow than during base flow. The most detections and largest concentrations of three pesticides (atrazine, diazinon, and prometon) were in samples collected at the urban site. Some pesticide concentrations at the agriculture site showed a seasonal pattern of increasing concentrations during spring, the peak application season. Four pesticides (atrazine, deethylatrazine, diazinon, and prometon) were detected in at least 38 percent of samples collected at all three sites. The concentrations of all

  1. Nitrate, volatile organic compounds, and pesticides in ground water--a summary of selected studies from New Jersey and Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clawges, Rick M.; Stackelberg, Paul E.; Ayers, Mark A.; Vowinkel, Eric F.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the ground-water systems in the unconsolidated sand and gravel aquifers of the Coastal Plain of New Jersey and Long Island and in the fractured bedrock and valley-fill aquifers of northern New Jersey; summarizes current knowledge about the occurrence and distribution of nitrate, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and pesticides in these systems; and explains why some ground-water systems are more vulnerable to comtamination than others. Although the vulnerability of ground water to contamination from the land surface is influenced by many factors, the degree of aquifer confinement, the depth of the well, and the surrounding land use are key factors. Unconfined aquifers generally are much more vulnerable to contamination than confined aquifers. For a well in a confined aquifer, the farther the well is from the unconfined area, the less vulnerable it is to contamination. Generally, the deeper the well, the less vulnerable it is to contamination. Finally, because human activities greatly affect the quality of water that recharges an aquifer, the amount and type of land use in the area that contributes water to the well is a key factor in determining vulnerability. Nitrate contamination of ground water typically occurs in agricultural and residential areas, especially where the aquifer is very permeable and unconfined and nitrogen-fertilizer use is high. In New Jersey and on Long Island, concentrations of nitrate exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) more often than those of VOCs or pesticides. Nitrate contamination generally is associated with nonpoint sources. VOC contamination of ground water occurs primarily in urban areas, especially in mixed urban and industrial areas where chemicals are used. In general, VOC concentrations are low and do not exceed MCLs. High concentrations of VOCs generally are associated with point sources. Pesticide contamination of ground water occurs in some agricultural and

  2. Data on dissolved pesticides and volatile organic compounds in surface and ground waters in the San Joaquin-Tulare basins, California, water years 1992-1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinsey, Willie B.; Johnson, Mark V.; Gronberg, JoAnn M.

    2005-01-01

    This report contains pesticide, volatile organic compound, major ion, nutrient, tritium, stable isotope, organic carbon, and trace-metal data collected from 149 ground-water wells, and pesticide data collected from 39 surface-water stream sites in the San Joaquin Valley of California. Included with the ground-water data are field measurements of pH, specific conductance, alkalinity, temperature, and dissolved oxygen. This report describes data collection procedures, analytical methods, quality assurance, and quality controls used by the National Water-Quality Assessment Program to ensure data reliability. Data contained in this report were collected during a four year period by the San Joaquin?Tulare Basins Study Unit of the United States Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Surface-water-quality data collection began in April 1992, with sampling done three times a week at three sites as part of a pilot study conducted to provide background information for the surface-water-study design. Monthly samples were collected at 10 sites for major ions and nutrients from January 1993 to March 1995. Additional samples were collected at four of these sites, from January to December 1993, to study spatial and temporal variability in dissolved pesticide concentrations. Samples for several synoptic studies were collected from 1993 to 1995. Ground-water-quality data collection was restricted to the eastern alluvial fans subarea of the San Joaquin Valley. Data collection began in 1993 with the sampling of 21 wells in vineyard land-use settings. In 1994, 29 wells were sampled in almond land-use settings and 9 in vineyard land-use settings; an additional 11 wells were sampled along a flow path in the eastern Fresno County vineyard land-use area. Among the 79 wells sampled in 1995, 30 wells were in the corn, alfalfa, and vegetable land-use setting, and 1 well was in the vineyard land-use setting; an additional 20 were flow-path wells. Also sampled in 1995

  3. Comparison of nitrate, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds in samples from monitoring and public-supply wells, Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system, southern New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stackelberg, Paul E.; Kauffman, L.J.; Baehr, A.L.; Ayers, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    The number and total concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) per sample were significantly greater in water from public-supply wells than in water from shallow and moderate-depth monitoring wells in the surficial Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system in the Glassboro area of southern New Jersey. In contrast, concentrations of nitrate (as nitrogen) and the number and total concentration of pesticides per sample were statistically similar in samples from shallow and moderate-depth monitoring wells and those from public-supply wells. VOCs in ground water typically are derived from point sources, which commonly exist in urban areas and which result in spatially variable contaminant concentrations near the water table. Because larger volumes of water are withdrawn from public-supply wells than from monitoring wells, their contributing areas are larger and, therefore, they are more likely to intercept water flowing from VOC point sources. Additionally, public-supply wells intercept flow paths that span a large temporal interval. Public-supply wells in the Glassboro study area withdraw water flowing along short paths, which contains VOCs that recently entered the aquifer system, and water flowing along relatively long paths, which contains VOCs that originated from the degradation of parent compounds or that are associated with past land uses. Because the volume of water withdrawn from monitoring wells is small and because shallow monitoring wells are screened near the water table, they generally intercept only relatively short flow paths. Therefore, samples from these wells represent relatively recent, discrete time intervals and contain both fewer VOCs and a lower total VOC concentration than samples from public-supply wells. Nitrate and pesticides in ground water typically are derived from nonpoint sources, which commonly are found in both agricultural and urban areas and typically result in lowlevel, relatively uniform concentrations near the water table

  4. Interaction of pesticides with natural organic material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Burcar, P.J.; Goldberg, M.C.

    1969-01-01

    Two examples of the interaction of pesticides with natural organic materials have been investigated. Sodium humate solubilizes DDT in water and humic acid strongly sorbs 2,4,5-T. These two types of interactions are indicative of the types that one would expect when any organic pesticide is applied to a natural soil-water system.

  5. Pesticide toxicity index for freshwater aquatic organisms, 2nd edition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munn, Mark D.; Gilliom, Robert J.; Moran, Patrick W.; Nowell, Lisa H.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program is designed to assess current water-quality conditions, changes in water quality over time, and the effects of natural and human factors on water quality for the Nation's streams and ground-water resources. For streams, one of the most difficult parts of the assessment is to link chemical conditions to effects on aquatic biota, particularly for pesticides, which tend to occur in streams as complex mixtures with strong seasonal patterns. A Pesticide Toxicity Index (PTI) was developed that combines pesticide exposure of aquatic biota (measured concentrations of pesticides in stream water) with acute toxicity estimates (standard endpoints from laboratory bioassays) to produce a single index value for a sample or site. The development of the PTI was limited to pesticide compounds routinely measured in NAWQA studies and to toxicity data readily available from existing databases. Qualifying toxicity data were found for one or more types of test organisms for 124 of the 185 pesticide compounds measured in NAWQA samples, but with a wide range of available bioassays per compound (1 to 232). In the databases examined, there were a total of 3,669 bioassays for the 124 compounds, including 398 48-hour EC50 values (concentration at which 50 percent of test organisms exhibit a sublethal response) for freshwater cladocerans, 699 96-hour LC50 values (concentration lethal to 50 percent of test organisms) for freshwater benthic invertebrates, and 2,572 96-hour LC50 values for freshwater fish. The PTI for a particular sample is the sum of toxicity quotients (measured concentration divided by the median toxicity concentration from bioassays) for each detected pesticide, and thus, is based on the concentration addition model of pesticide toxicity. The PTI can be calculated for specific groups of pesticides and for specific taxonomic groups. Although the PTI does not determine whether water in a sample is

  6. Occurrence of pharmaceutical compounds and pesticides in aquatic systems.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rey, Maria; Tapie, Nathalie; Le Menach, Karyn; Dévier, Marie-Hélène; Budzinski, Hélène; Bebianno, Maria João

    2015-07-15

    This paper deals with the detection and quantification of APIs and other priority substances in the Arade River estuary (Portugal) providing the usefulness of Polar Organic Compound Integrative Samplers (POCIS). Thirteen APIs were detected whose variation was site and time dependent. Caffeine was at the highest concentration (804±209 ng/L) followed by theophylline (184±44 ng/L). Other APIs were analgesic, anticonvulsant, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-lipidemic, anxiolytic and antidepressants. Twenty pesticides comprising atrazine, diuron, isoproturon, terbutryn and simazine included in the Water Framework Directive priority list were also site and time dependent. Carbendazim occurred at the highest concentration (45±18 ng/L at site 1) but atrazine, diuron, isoproturon and simazine levels were below the Environmental Quality Standards. Although the summer impact was unclear, the results highlighted POCIS suitability for profiling these contaminants. This is to our knowledge the first study concerning APIs and pesticides in this area. PMID:25998726

  7. Measurement and estimated health risks of semivolatile organic compounds (PCBs, PAHs, pesticides, and phthalates) in ambient air at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, G.W.; Cooper, A.T.; Blanton, M.L.; Lefkovitz, L.F.; Gilfoil, T.J.

    1997-09-01

    Air samples for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorinated pesticides, phthalate plasticizers, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were collected at three Hanford Site locations (300-Area South Gate, southeast of 200-East Area, and a background location near Rattlesnake Springs). Samples were collected using high-volume air samplers equipped with a glass fiber filter and polyurethane foam plug sampling train. Target compounds were extracted from the sampling trains and analyzed using capillary gas chromatography with either electron capture detection or mass selective detection. Twenty of the 28 PCB congeners analyzed were found above the detection limits, with 8 of the congeners accounting for over 80% of the average PCB concentrations. The average sum of all individual PCB congeners ranged from 500-740 pg/m{sup 3}, with little apparent difference between the sampling locations. Twenty of the 25 pesticides analyzed were found above the detection limits, with endosulfan I, endosulfan II, and methoxychlor having the highest average concentrations. With the exception of the endosulfans, all other average pesticide concentrations were below 100 pg/m{sup 3}. There was little apparent difference between the air concentrations of pesticides measured at each location. Sixteen of the 18 PAHs analyzed were found above the detection limit. Phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, fluorene, chrysene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, and naphthalene were the only PAHs with average concentrations above 100 pg/m{sup 3}. Overall, the 300 Area had higher average PAH concentrations compared to the 200-East Area and the background location at Rattlesnake Springs; however, the air concentrations at the 300-Area also are influenced by sources on the Hanford Site and from nearby communities.

  8. Pesticide Fact Sheet Number 103: cadmium pesticide compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    The document contains up-to-date chemical information, including a summary of the Agency's regulatory position and rationale, on a specific pesticide or group of pesticides. A Fact Sheet is issued after one of the following actions has occurred. (1) Issuance or reissuance of a registration standard, (2) Issuance of each special review document, (3) Registration of a significantly changed use pattern, (4) Registration of a new chemical, or (5) An immediate need for information to resolve controversial issues relating to a specific chemical or use pattern.

  9. Surface-water-quality assessment of the upper Illinois River Basin in Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin; pesticides and other synthetic organic compounds in water, sediment, and biota, 1975-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Daniel J.; Stinson, Troy W.; Crawford, J. Kent; Schmidt, Arthur R.; Colman, John A.

    1998-01-01

    The distribution of pesticides and other synthetic organic compounds in water, sediment, and biota in the upper Illinois River Basin in Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin was examined from 1987 through 1990 as part of the pilot National Water-Quality Assesssment Program conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey. Historical data for water and sediment collected from 1975 through 1986 were similar to data collected from 1987 through 1990. Some compounds were detected in concentrations that exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water-quality criteria. Results from pesticide sampling at four stations in 1988 and 1989 identified several agricultural pesticides that were detected more frequently and at higher concentrations in urban areas than in agricultural areas. Results from herbicide sampling at 17 stations in the Kankakee and Iroquois River Basins in 1990 indicated that atrazine concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant level for drinking water during runoff periods. Results from sampling for volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in water indicate that, with one exception, all stations at which more than one compound was detected were within 2 miles downstream from the nearest point source. Detections at two stations in the Chicago urban area accounted for 37 percent of the total number of detections. Concentrations of tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and 1,2-dichlorethane from stations in the Des Plaines River Basin exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant level for drinking water in one and two samples from the two stations in the Chicago area. Phenols and pentachlorophenols were detected most frequently in the Des Plaines River Basin where point-source discharges were common. Phenol concentrations were significantly different among the Des Plaines, Kankakee, and Fox River Basins. Phenols and pentachlorophenols never exceeded the general use and secondary contact standards

  10. Organic compounds in concrete from demolition works.

    PubMed

    Van Praagh, M; Modin, H; Trygg, J

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to verify the effect of physically removing the outer surface of contaminated concrete on total contents and on potential mobility of pollutants by means of leaching tests. Reclaimed concrete from 3 industrial sites in Sweden were included: A tar impregnated military storage, a military tar track-depot, as well as concrete constructions used for disposing of pesticide production surplus and residues. Solid materials and leachates from batch and column leaching tests were analysed for metals, Cl, F, SO4, DOC and contents of suspected organic compounds (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAH, and pesticides/substances for pesticide production such as phenoxy acids, chlorophenols and chlorocresols, respectively). In case of PAH contaminated concrete, results indicate that removing 1 or 5 mm of the surface lead to total concentrations below the Swedish guidelines for recycling of aggregates and soil in groundwork constructions. 3 out of 4 concrete samples contaminated with pesticides fulfilled Swedish guidelines for contaminated soil. Results from batch and column leaching tests indicated, however, that concentrations above environmental quality standards for certain PAH and phenoxy acids, respectively, might occur at site when the crushed concrete is recycled in groundwork constructions. As leaching tests engaged in the study deviated from leaching test standards with a limited number of samples, the potential impact of the leaching tests' equipment on measured PAH and pesticide leachate concentrations has to be evaluated in future work. PMID:26164853

  11. Organic compounds in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    Recent studies of carbonaceous chondrites provide evidence that certain organic compounds are indigenous and the result of an abiotic, chemical synthesis. The results of several investigators have established the presence of amino acids and precursors, mono- and dicarboxylic acids, N-heterocycles, and hydrocarbons as well as other compounds. For example, studies of the Murchison and Murray meteorites have revealed the presence of at least 40 amino acids with nearly equal abundances of D and L isomers. The population consists of both protein and nonprotein amino acids including a wide variety of linear, cyclic, and polyfunctional types. Results show a trend of decreasing concentration with increasing carbon number, with the most abundant being glycine (41 n Moles/g). These and other results to be reviewed provide persuasive support for the theory of chemical evolution and provide the only natural evidence for the protobiological subset of molecules from which life on earth may have arisen.

  12. Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACMT Recognition Awards Annual Scientific Meeting Travel Scholarships Pesticides Public Health > Public > Toxicology FAQ's > Pesticides Pesticides What are pesticides ? How do pesticides work ? How ...

  13. Pesticide residues in imported, organic, and "suspect" fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Winter, Carl K

    2012-05-01

    Consumers are frequently urged to avoid imported foods as well as specific fruits and vegetables due to health concerns from pesticide residues and are often encouraged to choose organic fruits and vegetables rather than conventional forms. Studies have demonstrated that while organic fruits and vegetables have lower levels of pesticide residues than do conventional fruits and vegetables, pesticide residues are still frequently detected on organic fruits and vegetables; typical dietary consumer exposure to pesticide residues from conventional fruits and vegetables does not appear to be of health significance. Similarly, research does not demonstrate that imported fruits and vegetables pose greater risks from pesticide residues than do domestic fruits and vegetables or that specific fruits and vegetables singled out as being the most highly contaminated by pesticides should be avoided in their conventional forms. PMID:22335627

  14. Pesticide sorption on geologic material of varying organic carbon content.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, D C; Wood, A L

    1988-09-01

    Sorption of three pesticides on geologic material ranging in organic carbon content from 0.33 to 6.9 g kg-1 was measured in soil columns using a miscible displacement technique. An octanol-water partitioning model was shown to be inappropriate for predicting sorption of the less hydrophobic pesticides on the low organic carbon materials. PMID:3255290

  15. Leaching of chloride, sulphate, heavy metals, dissolved organic carbon and phenolic organic pesticides from contaminated concrete.

    PubMed

    Van Praagh, M; Modin, H

    2016-10-01

    Concrete samples from demolition waste of a former pesticide plant in Sweden were analysed for total contents and leachate concentrations of potentially hazardous inorganic substances, TOC, phenols, as well as for pesticide compounds such as phenoxy acids, chlorophenols and chlorocresols. Leachates were produced by means of modified standard column leaching tests and pH-stat batch tests. Due to elevated contents of chromium and lead, as well as due to high chloride concentrations in the first leachate from column tests at L/S 0.1, recycling of the concrete as a construction material in groundworks is likely to be restricted according to Swedish guidelines. The studied pesticide compounds appear to be relatively mobile at the materials own pH>12, 12, 9 and 7. Potential leaching of pesticide residues from recycled concrete to ground water and surface water might exceed water quality guidelines for the remediation site and the EU Water Framework Directive. Results of this study stress the necessity to systematically study the mechanism behind mobility of organic contaminants from alkaline construction and demolition wastes rather than rely on total content limit values. PMID:27449537

  16. Compound specific isotope analysis to investigate pesticide degradation in lysimeter experiments at field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabenko, Evgenia; Elsner, Martin; Bakkour, Rani; Hofstetter, Thomas; Torrento, Clara; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The frequent detection of organic micropollutants such as pesticides, consumer care products or pharmaceuticals in water is an increasing concern for human and ecosystem health. Degradation analysis of these compounds can be challenging in complex systems due to the fact that metabolites are not always found and mass balances frequently cannot be closed. Many abiotic and biotic degradation pathways cause, however, distinct isotope fractionation, where light isotopes are transferred preferentially from the reactant to the product pool (normal isotope fractionation). Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of multiple elements is a particularly powerful method to evaluate organic micropollutant transformation, because it can even give pathway-specific isotope fractionation (1,2). Available CSIA field studies, however, have focused almost exclusively on volatile petroleum and chlorinated hydrocarbons, which are present in high concentrations in the environment and can be extracted easily from water for GC-IRMS analysis. In the case of micropollutants, such as pesticides, CSIA in more challenging since it needs to be conducted at lower concentrations and requires pre-concentration, purification and high chromatographic performance (3). In this study we used lysimeters experiments to analyze transformation of atrazine, acetochlor, metolachlor and chloridazone by studying associated isotope fractionation. The project combines a) analytical method development for CSIA, b) identification of pathways of micropollutant degradation and c) quantification of transformation processes under field condition. The pesticides were applied both, at the soil surface and below the top soil under field-relevant concentrations in May 2014. After typical irrigation of the lysimeters, seepage water was collected in 50L bottles and stored for further SPE and CSIA. Here we present the very first result of a) analytical method development, b) improvement of SPE methods for complex pesticide

  17. 40 CFR Table 1 to Part 455 - List of Organic Pesticide Active Ingredients

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false List of Organic Pesticide Active...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS PESTICIDE CHEMICALS Pt. 455, Table 1 Table 1 to Part 455—List of Organic Pesticide Active Ingredients EPA census code Pesticide code Pesticide name CAS No. 1 10501 Dicofol...

  18. Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Grorge

    2001-01-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are relatively enriched in soluble organic compounds. To date, these compounds provide the only record available to study a range of organic chemical processes in the early Solar System chemistry. The Murchison meteorite is the best-characterized carbonaceous meteorite with respect to organic chemistry. The study of its organic compounds has related principally to aqueous meteorite parent body chemistry and compounds of potential importance for the origin of life. Among the classes of organic compounds found in Murchison are amino acids, amides, carboxylic acids, hydroxy acids, sulfonic acids, phosphonic acids, purines and pyrimidines (Table 1). Compounds such as these were quite likely delivered to the early Earth in asteroids and comets. Until now, polyhydroxylated compounds (polyols), including sugars (polyhydroxy aldehydes or ketones), sugar alcohols, sugar acids, etc., had not been identified in Murchison. Ribose and deoxyribose, five-carbon sugars, are central to the role of contemporary nucleic acids, DNA and RNA. Glycerol, a three-carbon sugar alcohol, is a constituent of all known biological membranes. Due to the relative lability of sugars, some researchers have questioned the lifetime of sugars under the presumed conditions on the early Earth and postulated other (more stable) compounds as constituents of the first replicating molecules. The identification of potential sources and/or formation mechanisms of pre-biotic polyols would add to the understanding of what organic compounds were available, and for what length of time, on the ancient Earth.

  19. Widespread detection of N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide in U.S. streams: Comparison with concentrations of pesticides, personal care products, and other organic wastewater compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sandstrom, M.W.; Kolpin, D.W.; Thurman, E.M.; Zaugg, S.D.

    2005-01-01

    One of the most frequently detected organic chemicals in a nationwide study concerning the effects of wastewater on stream water quality conducted in the year 2000 was the widely used insect repellant N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET). It was detected at levels of 0.02 μg/L or greater in 73% of the stream sites sampled, with the selection of sampling sites being biased toward streams thought to be subject to wastewater contamination (i.e., downstream from intense urbanization and livestock production). Although DEET frequently was detected at all sites, the median concentration was low (0.05 μg/L). The highest concentrations of DEET were found in streams from the urban areas (maximum concentration, 1.1 μg/L). The results of the present study suggest that the movement of DEET to streams through wastewater-treatment systems is an important mechanism that might lead to the exposure of aquatic organisms to this chemical.

  20. Identification and measurement of chlorinated organic pesticides in water by electron-capture gas chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamar, William L.; Goerlitz, Donald F.; Law, LeRoy M.

    1965-01-01

    Pesticides, in minute quantities, may affect the regimen of streams, and because they may concentrate in sediments, aquatic organisms, and edible aquatic foods, their detection and their measurement in the parts-per-trillion range are considered essential. In 1964 the U.S. Geological Survey at Menlo Park, Calif., began research on methods for monitoring pesticides in water. Two systems were selected--electron-capture gas chromatography and microcoulometric-titration gas chromatography. Studies on these systems are now in progress. This report provides current information on the development and application of an electron-capture gas chromatographic procedure. This method is a convenient and extremely sensitive procedure for the detection and measurement of organic pesticides having high electron affinities, notably the chlorinated organic pesticides. The electron-affinity detector is extremely sensitive to these substances but it is not as sensitive to many other compounds. By this method, the chlorinated organic pesticide may be determined on a sample of convenient size in concentrations as low as the parts-per-trillion range. To insure greater accuracy in the identifications, the pesticides reported were separated and identified by their retention times on two different types of gas chromatographic columns.

  1. PERSISTENT PERFLUORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have gained notoriety in the recent past. Global distribution of PFCs in wildlife, environmental samples and humans has sparked a recent increase in new investigations concerning PFCs. Historically PFCs have been used in a wide variety of consume...

  2. Organic Compounds in Stardust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David S.; Clemett. Simon J.; Sandford, Scott A.; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Hoerz, Fredrich

    2011-01-01

    The successful return of the STARDUST spacecraft provides a unique opportunity to investigate the nature and distribution of organic matter in cometary dust particles collected from Comet 81P/Wild-2. Analysis of individual cometary impact tracks in silica aerogel using the technique of two-step laser mass spectrometry (L2MS) demonstrates the presence of complex aromatic organic matter. While concerns remain as to the organic purity of the aerogel collection medium and the thermal effects associated with hypervelocity capture, the majority of the observed organic species appear indigenous to the impacting particles and are hence of cometary origin. While the aromatic fraction of the total organic matter present is believed to be small, it is notable in that it appears to be N-rich. Spectral analysis in combination with instrumental detection sensitivities suggest that N is incorporated predominantly in the form of aromatic nitriles (R-C N). While organic species in the STARDUST samples do share some similarities with those present in the matrices of carbonaceous chondrites, the closest match is found with stratospherically collected interplanetary dust particles. These findings are consistent with the notion that a fraction of interplanetary dust is of cometary origin. The presence of complex organic N-containing species in comets has astrobiological implications since comets are likely to have contributed to the prebiotic chemical inventory of both the Earth and Mars.

  3. Organophosphorus Compounds in Organic Electronics.

    PubMed

    Shameem, Muhammad Anwar; Orthaber, Andreas

    2016-07-25

    This Minireview describes recent advances of organophosphorus compounds as opto-electronic materials in the field of organic electronics. The progress of (hetero-) phospholes, unsaturated phosphanes, and trivalent and pentavalent phosphanes since 2010 is covered. The described applications of organophosphorus materials range from single molecule sensors, field effect transistors, organic light emitting diodes, to polymeric materials for organic photovoltaic applications. PMID:27276233

  4. Potential toxicity of pesticides measured in midwestern streams to aquatic organisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.; Fairchild, J.

    2002-01-01

    Society is becoming increasingly aware of the value of healthy aquatic ecosystems as well as the effects that man's activities have on those ecosystems. In recent years, many urban and industrial sources of contamination have been reduced or eliminated. The agricultural community also has worked towards reducing off-site movement of agricultural chemicals, but their use in farming is still growing. A small fraction, estimated at <1 to 2% of the pesticides applied to crops are lost from fields and enter nearby streams during rainfall events. In many cases aquatic organisms are exposed to mixtures of chemicals, which may lead to greater non-target risk than that predicted based on traditional risk assessments for single chemicals. We evaluated the potential toxicity of environmental mixtures of 5 classes of pesticides using concentrations from water samples collected from ???50 sites on midwestern streams during late spring or early summer runoff events in 1989 and 1998. Toxicity index values are calculated as the concentration of the compound in the sample divided by the EC50 or LC50 of an aquatic organism. These index values are summed within a pesticide class and for all classes to determine additive pesticide class and total pesticide toxicity indices. Toxicity index values greater than 1.0 indicate probable toxicity of a class of pesticides measured in a water sample to aquatic organisms. Results indicate that some samples had probable toxicity to duckweed and green algae, but few are suspected of having significant toxicity to bluegill sunfish or chorus frogs.

  5. The Determination of Pesticidal and Non-Pesticidal Organotin Compounds by in situ Ethylation and Capillary Gas Chromatography with Pulsed Flame Photometric Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concurrent determination of pesticidal and non-pesticidal organotin compounds in several water matrices, using a simultaneous in situ ethylation and liquid-liquid extraction followed by splitless injection mode capillary gas chromatography with pulsed flame photometric detect...

  6. The Determination of Pesticidal and Non-Pesticidal Organotin Compounds in Water Matrices by in situ Ethylation and Gas Chromatography with Pulsed Flame Photometric Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concurrent determination of pesticidal and non-pesticidal organotin compounds in several water matrices, using a simultaneous in situ ethylation and liquid-liquid extraction followed by splitless injection mode capillary gas chromatography with pulsed flame photometric detect...

  7. Semivolatile organic compounds in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, William W.

    Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are ubiquitous in indoor environments, redistributing from their original sources to all indoor surfaces. Exposures resulting from their indoor presence contribute to detectable body burdens of diverse SVOCs, including pesticides, plasticizers, and flame retardants. This paper critically examines equilibrium partitioning of SVOCs among indoor compartments. It proceeds to evaluate kinetic constraints on sorptive partitioning to organic matter on fixed surfaces and airborne particles. Analyses indicate that equilibrium partitioning is achieved faster for particles than for typical indoor surfaces; indeed, for a strongly sorbing SVOC and a thick sorptive reservoir, equilibrium partitioning is never achieved. Mass-balance considerations are used to develop physical-science-based models that connect source- and sink-rates to airborne concentrations for commonly encountered situations, such as the application of a pesticide or the emission of a plasticizer or flame retardant from its host material. Calculations suggest that many SVOCs have long indoor persistence, even after the primary source is removed. If the only removal mechanism is ventilation, moderately sorbing compounds ( Koa > 10 10) may persist indoors for hundreds to thousands of hours, while strongly sorbing compounds ( Koa > 10 12) may persist for years. The paper concludes by applying the newly developed framework to explore exposure pathways of building occupants to indoor SVOCs. Accumulation of SVOCs as a consequence of direct air-to-human transport is shown to be potentially large, with a maximum indoor-air processing rate of 10-20 m 3/h for SVOC uptake by human skin, hair and clothing. Levels on human skin calculated with a simple model of direct air-to-skin transfer agree remarkably well with levels measured in dermal hand wipes for SVOCs possessing a wide range of octanol-air partition coefficients.

  8. Relationships between pesticides and organic carbon fractions in sediments of the Danshui River estuary and adjacent coastal areas of Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chin-Chang; Gong, Gwo-Ching; Chen, Hung-Yu; Hsieh, Hwey-Lian; Santschi, Peter H; Wade, Terry L; Sericano, Jose L

    2007-07-01

    In order to understand the fate of pesticides in marine environments, concentrations of pesticides and different carbonaceous fractions were determined for surface sediments in the Danshui River and nearby coastal areas of Taiwan. The major compounds detected were tetrachlorobenzene, HCHs, chlordane, aldrin, DDDs, DDEs and DDTs. Total concentrations of pesticides in the sediments ranged from not detectable to 23 ng g(-1), with the maximum value detected near the discharge point of the marine outfall from the Pali sewage treatment plant. These results confirm that pesticides persist in estuarine and nearby coastal environments of the Danshui River well after their ban. Concentrations of total pesticides significantly correlate with concentrations of total organic carbon and black carbon in these sediments, suggesting that total organic carbon and black carbon regulate the distribution of trace organic pollutants in fluvial and coastal marine sediments. PMID:17395347

  9. Biodegradation of halogenated organic compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, G R; Chapalamadugu, S

    1991-01-01

    In this review we discuss the degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons by microorganisms, emphasizing the physiological, biochemical, and genetic basis of the biodegradation of aliphatic, aromatic, and polycyclic compounds. Many environmentally important xenobiotics are halogenated, especially chlorinated. These compounds are manufactured and used as pesticides, plasticizers, paint and printing-ink components, adhesives, flame retardants, hydraulic and heat transfer fluids, refrigerants, solvents, additives for cutting oils, and textile auxiliaries. The hazardous chemicals enter the environment through production, commercial application, and waste. As a result of bioaccumulation in the food chain and groundwater contamination, they pose public health problems because many of them are toxic, mutagenic, or carcinogenic. Although synthetic chemicals are usually recalcitrant to biodegradation, microorganisms have evolved an extensive range of enzymes, pathways, and control mechanisms that are responsible for catabolism of a wide variety of such compounds. Thus, such biological degradation can be exploited to alleviate environmental pollution problems. The pathways by which a given compound is degraded are determined by the physical, chemical, and microbiological aspects of a particular environment. By understanding the genetic basis of catabolism of xenobiotics, it is possible to improve the efficacy of naturally occurring microorganisms or construct new microorganisms capable of degrading pollutants in soil and aquatic environments more efficiently. Recently a number of genes whose enzyme products have a broader substrate specificity for the degradation of aromatic compounds have been cloned and attempts have been made to construct gene cassettes or synthetic operons comprising these degradative genes. Such gene cassettes or operons can be transferred into suitable microbial hosts for extending and custom designing the pathways for rapid degradation of recalcitrant

  10. Biodegradation of halogenated organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, G R; Chapalamadugu, S

    1991-03-01

    In this review we discuss the degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons by microorganisms, emphasizing the physiological, biochemical, and genetic basis of the biodegradation of aliphatic, aromatic, and polycyclic compounds. Many environmentally important xenobiotics are halogenated, especially chlorinated. These compounds are manufactured and used as pesticides, plasticizers, paint and printing-ink components, adhesives, flame retardants, hydraulic and heat transfer fluids, refrigerants, solvents, additives for cutting oils, and textile auxiliaries. The hazardous chemicals enter the environment through production, commercial application, and waste. As a result of bioaccumulation in the food chain and groundwater contamination, they pose public health problems because many of them are toxic, mutagenic, or carcinogenic. Although synthetic chemicals are usually recalcitrant to biodegradation, microorganisms have evolved an extensive range of enzymes, pathways, and control mechanisms that are responsible for catabolism of a wide variety of such compounds. Thus, such biological degradation can be exploited to alleviate environmental pollution problems. The pathways by which a given compound is degraded are determined by the physical, chemical, and microbiological aspects of a particular environment. By understanding the genetic basis of catabolism of xenobiotics, it is possible to improve the efficacy of naturally occurring microorganisms or construct new microorganisms capable of degrading pollutants in soil and aquatic environments more efficiently. Recently a number of genes whose enzyme products have a broader substrate specificity for the degradation of aromatic compounds have been cloned and attempts have been made to construct gene cassettes or synthetic operons comprising these degradative genes. Such gene cassettes or operons can be transferred into suitable microbial hosts for extending and custom designing the pathways for rapid degradation of recalcitrant

  11. 40 CFR 455.30 - Applicability; description of the metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. 455.30 Section 455.30 Protection of...) PESTICIDE CHEMICALS Metallo-Organic Pesticide Chemicals Manufacturing Subcategory § 455.30 Applicability; description of the metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. The provisions of...

  12. 40 CFR 455.30 - Applicability; description of the metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. 455.30 Section 455.30 Protection of...) PESTICIDE CHEMICALS Metallo-Organic Pesticide Chemicals Manufacturing Subcategory § 455.30 Applicability; description of the metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. The provisions of...

  13. 40 CFR 455.30 - Applicability; description of the metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. 455.30 Section 455.30 Protection of...) PESTICIDE CHEMICALS Metallo-Organic Pesticide Chemicals Manufacturing Subcategory § 455.30 Applicability; description of the metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. The provisions of...

  14. Extraterrestrial Organic Compounds in Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botta, Oliver; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Many organic compounds or their precursors found in meteorites originated in the interstellar or circumstellar medium and were later incorporated into planetesimals during the formation of the solar system. There they either survived intact or underwent further processing to synthesize secondary products on the meteorite parent body. The most distinct feature of CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites, two types of stony meteorites, is their high carbon content (up to 3% of weight), either in the form of carbonates or of organic compounds. The bulk of the organic carbon consists of an insoluble macromolecular material with a complex structure. Also present is a soluble organic fraction, which has been analyzed by several separation and analytical procedures. Low detection limits can be achieved by derivatization of the organic molecules with reagents that allow for analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. The CM meteorite Murchison has been found to contain more than 70 extraterrestrial amino acids and several other classes of compounds including carboxylic acids, hydroxy carboxylic acids, sulphonic and phosphonic acids, aliphatic, aromatic and polar hydrocarbons, fullerenes, heterocycles as well as carbonyl compounds, alcohols, amines and amides. The organic matter was found to be enriched in deuterium, and distinct organic compounds show isotopic enrichments of carbon and nitrogen relative to terrestrial matter.

  15. Chemical reactions of organic compounds on clay surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Soma, Y; Soma, M

    1989-01-01

    Chemical reactions of organic compounds including pesticides at the interlayer and exterior surfaces of clay minerals and with soil organic matter are reviewed. Representative reactions under moderate conditions possibly occurring in natural soils are described. Attempts have been made to clarify the importance of the chemical nature of molecules, their structures and their functional groups, and the Brönsted or Lewis acidity of clay minerals. PMID:2533556

  16. Biomedical Compounds from Marine organisms

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Rajeev Kumar; Zi-rong, Xu

    2004-01-01

    The Ocean, which is called the ‘mother of origin of life’, is also the source of structurally unique natural products that are mainly accumulated in living organisms. Several of these compounds show pharmacological activities and are helpful for the invention and discovery of bioactive compounds, primarily for deadly diseases like cancer, acquired immuno-deficiency syndrome (AIDS), arthritis, etc., while other compounds have been developed as analgesics or to treat inflammation, etc. The life-saving drugs are mainly found abundantly in microorganisms, algae and invertebrates, while they are scarce in vertebrates. Modern technologies have opened vast areas of research for the extraction of biomedical compounds from oceans and seas.

  17. Bioconcentration, bioaccumulation, and metabolism of pesticides in aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Katagi, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    The ecotoxicological assessment of pesticide effects in the aquatic environment should normally be based on a deep knowledge of not only the concentration of pesticides and metabolites found but also on the influence of key abiotic and biotic processes that effect rates of dissipation. Although the bioconcentration and bioaccumulation potentials of pesticides in aquatic organisms are conveniently estimated from their hydrophobicity (represented by log K(ow), it is still indispensable to factor in the effects of key abiotic and biotic processes on such pesticides to gain a more precise understanding of how they may have in the natural environment. Relying only on pesticide hydrophobicity may produce an erroneous environmental impact assessment. Several factors affect rates of pesticide dissipation and accumulation in the aquatic environment. Such factors include the amount and type of sediment present in the water and type of diet available to water-dwelling organisms. The particular physiological behavior profiles of aquatic organisms in water, such as capacity for uptake, metabolism, and elimination, are also compelling factors, as is the chemistry of the water. When evaluating pesticide uptake and bioconcentration processes, it is important to know the amount and nature of bottom sediments present and the propensity that the stuffed aquatic organisms have to absorb and process xenobiotics. Extremely hydrophobic pesticides such as the organochlorines and pyrethroids are susceptible to adsorb strongly to dissolved organic matter associated with bottom sediment. Such absorption reduces the bioavailable fraction of pesticide dissolved in the water column and reduces the probable ecotoxicological impact on aquatic organisms living the water. In contrast, sediment dweller may suffer from higher levels of direct exposure to a pesticide, unless it is rapidly degraded in sediment. Metabolism is important to bioconcentration and bioaccumulation processes, as is

  18. Sulfated compounds from marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Kornprobst, J M; Sallenave, C; Barnathan, G

    1998-01-01

    More than 500 sulfated compounds have been isolated from marine organisms so far but most of them originate from two phyla only, Spongia and Echinodermata. The sulfated compounds are presented according to the phyla they have been identified from and to their chemical structures. Biological activities, when available, are also given. Macromolecules have also been included in this review but without structural details. PMID:9530808

  19. Photochemical dimerization of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, R.H.; Brown, S.H.; Muedas, C.A.; Ferguson, R.R.

    1992-04-14

    This patent describes improvement in a Group IIb photosensitized vapor phase dimerization of an organic compound in which a gaseous mixture of a Group IIB metal and the organic compound is irradiated in a reaction zone with a photosensitizing amount of radiant energy. The improvement comprises: a continuous stream of the gaseous mixture is passed as a vapor phase in a single pass through the reaction zone at a temperature at which the thus-produced dimer condenses immediately upon the formation thereof; the starting gaseous mixture comprises hydrogen and two ethylenically unsaturated compounds selected from the group consisting of alkenes of at least six carbon atoms, unsaturated nitriles, unsaturated epoxides, unsaturated silanes, unsaturated amines, unsaturated phosphines, and fluorinated alkenes; the gaseous mixture comprises nitrous oxide and the organic compound is a saturated compound with C-H bond strengths greater than 100 kcal/mol or a mixture of the saturated compound and an alkene; or the starting gaseous comprises an activating amount of hydrogen and the dimerization is a dehydrodimerization or cross-dimerization of a saturated hydrocarbon.

  20. Sorption of hydrophobic pesticides on a Mediterranean soil affected by wastewater, dissolved organic matter and salts.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Liébana, José A; Mingorance, Ma Dolores; Peña, Aránzazu

    2011-03-01

    Irrigation with treated wastewaters as an alternative in countries with severe water shortage may influence the sorption of pesticides and their environmental effects, as wastewater contains higher concentrations of suspended and dissolved organic matter and inorganic compounds than freshwater. We have examined the sorption behaviour of three highly hydrophobic pesticides (the herbicide pendimethalin and the insecticides α-cypermethrin and deltamethrin) on a Mediterranean agricultural soil using the batch equilibration method. We considered wastewater, extracts from urban sewage sludge with different dissolved organic carbon contents, and inorganic salt solutions, using Milli Q water as a control. All pesticides were strongly retained by soil although some sorption occurred on the walls of the laboratory containers, especially when wastewater and inorganic salt solutions were used. The calculation of distribution constants by measuring pesticide concentrations in soil and solution indicated that pendimethalin sorption was not affected whereas α-cypermethrin and deltamethrin retention were significantly enhanced (ca. 5 and 2 times, respectively) when wastewater or salt solutions were employed. We therefore conclude that the increased sorption of the two pesticides caused by wastewater cannot be only the result of its dissolved organic carbon content, but also of the simultaneous presence of inorganic salts in the solution. PMID:20980092

  1. Students' Categorizations of Organic Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domin, Daniel S.; Al-Masum, Mohammad; Mensah, John

    2008-01-01

    Categorization is a fundamental psychological ability necessary for problem solving and many other higher-level cognitive tasks. In organic chemistry, students must establish groupings of different chemical compounds in order not only to solve problems, but also to understand course content. Classic models of categorization emphasize similarity as…

  2. Pesticides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherma, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    This review is devoted to methods for the determination of residues of pesticides and some related industrial chemicals. Topics include: residue methods, sampling, chromatography, organochlorine pesticides, organophosphorus pesticides, carbamate insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, pyrethrins, fumigants, and related chemicals. (MVL)

  3. Volatile Organic Compounds in Uremia

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Luzia; Slodzinski, Rafael; Jankowski, Joachim; Zidek, Walter; Westhoff, Timm H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although “uremic fetor” has long been felt to be diagnostic of renal failure, the compounds exhaled in uremia remain largely unknown so far. The present work investigates whether breath analysis by ion mobility spectrometry can be used for the identification of volatile organic compounds retained in uremia. Methods Breath analysis was performed in 28 adults with an eGFR ≥60 ml/min per 1.73 m2, 26 adults with chronic renal failure corresponding to an eGFR of 10–59 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and 28 adults with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) before and after a hemodialysis session. Breath analysis was performed by ion mobility spectrometryafter gas-chromatographic preseparation. Identification of the compounds of interest was performed by thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results Breath analyses revealed significant differences in the spectra of patients with and without renal failure. Thirteen compounds were chosen for further evaluation. Some compounds including hydroxyacetone, 3-hydroxy-2-butanone and ammonia accumulated with decreasing renal function and were eliminated by dialysis. The concentrations of these compounds allowed a significant differentiation between healthy, chronic renal failure with an eGFR of 10–59 ml/min, and ESRD (p<0.05 each). Other compounds including 4-heptanal, 4-heptanone, and 2-heptanone preferentially or exclusively occurred in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Conclusion Impairment of renal function induces a characteristic fingerprint of volatile compounds in the breath. The technique of ion mobility spectrometry can be used for the identification of lipophilic uremic retention molecules. PMID:23049998

  4. Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cause harm to crops, people, or animals. Pesticides can help get rid of them. Pesticides are not just insect killers. They also include ... mildew, germs, and more. Many household products contain pesticides. Pesticides can protect your health by killing germs, ...

  5. AUTOMATED ANALYSIS OF AQUEOUS SAMPLES CONTAINING PESTICIDES, ACIDIC/BASIC/NEUTRAL SEMIVOLATILES AND VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION COUPLED IN-LINE TO LARGE VOLUME INJECTION GC/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data is presented on the development of a new automated system combining solid phase extraction (SPE) with GC/MS spectrometry for the single-run analysis of water samples containing a broad range of organic compounds. The system uses commercially available automated in-line 10-m...

  6. Biofiltration of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Malhautier, Luc; Khammar, Nadia; Bayle, Sandrine; Fanlo, Jean-Louis

    2005-07-01

    The removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated airstreams has become a major air pollution concern. Improvement of the biofiltration process commonly used for the removal of odorous compounds has led to a better control of key parameters, enabling the application of biofiltration to be extended also to the removal of VOCs. Moreover, biofiltration, which is based on the ability of micro-organisms to degrade a large variety of compounds, proves to be economical and environmentally viable. In a biofilter, the waste gas is forced to rise through a layer of packed porous material. Thus, pollutants contained in the gaseous effluent are oxidised or converted into biomass by the action of microorganisms previously fixed on the packing material. The biofiltration process is then based on two principal phenomena: (1) transfer of contaminants from the air to the water phase or support medium, (2) bioconversion of pollutants to biomass, metabolic end-products, or carbon dioxide and water. The diversity of biofiltration mechanisms and their interaction with the microflora mean that the biofilter is defined as a complex and structured ecosystem. As a result, in addition to operating conditions, research into the microbial ecology of biofilters is required in order better to optimise the management of such biological treatment systems. PMID:15803311

  7. Toxicity of halogenated organic compounds. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning health and environmental effects of halogenated organic compounds. Topics include laboratory and field investigations regarding bioaccumulation and concentration, metabolic aspects, and specific site studies in industrial and commercial operations. Pesticides, solvents, and a variety of industrial compounds are discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.; Bomstad, Theresa M.; Sorini-Wong, Susan S.; Wong, Gregory K.

    2011-03-01

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  9. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.; Bomstad, Theresa M.; Sorini-Wong, Susan S.

    2009-02-10

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  10. Perfluorinated Compounds, Polychlorinated Biphenyls, and Organochlorine Pesticide Contamination in Composite Food Samples from Dallas, Texas, USA

    PubMed Central

    Schecter, Arnold; Colacino, Justin; Haffner, Darrah; Patel, Keyur; Opel, Matthias; Päpke, Olaf; Birnbaum, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this article is to extend our previous studies of persistent organic pollutant (POP) contamination of U.S. food by measuring perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), organochlorine pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in composite food samples. This study is part of a larger study reported in two articles, the other of which reports levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and hexabromocyclododecane brominated flame retardants in these composite foods [Schecter et al. 2010. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclodecane (HBCD) in composite U.S. food samples, Environ Health Perspect 118:357–362]. Methods In this study we measured concentrations of 32 organochlorine pesticides, 7 PCBs, and 11 PFCs in composite samples of 31 different types of food (310 individual food samples) purchased from supermarkets in Dallas, Texas (USA), in 2009. Dietary intake of these chemicals was calculated for an average American. Results Contamination varied greatly among chemical and food types. The highest level of pesticide contamination was from the dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) metabolite p,p′- dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene, which ranged from 0.028 ng/g wet weight (ww) in whole milk yogurt to 2.3 ng/g ww in catfish fillets. We found PCB congeners (28, 52, 101, 118, 138, 153, and 180) primarily in fish, with highest levels in salmon (PCB-153, 1.2 ng/g ww; PCB-138, 0.93 ng/g ww). For PFCs, we detected perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in 17 of 31 samples, ranging from 0.07 ng/g in potatoes to 1.80 ng/g in olive oil. In terms of dietary intake, DDT and DDT metabolites, endosulfans, aldrin, PCBs, and PFOA were consumed at the highest levels. Conclusion Despite product bans, we found POPs in U.S. food, and mixtures of these chemicals are consumed by the American public at varying levels. This suggests the need to expand testing of food for chemical contaminants. PMID:20146964

  11. 40 CFR 455.30 - Applicability; description of the metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. 455.30 Section 455.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS PESTICIDE CHEMICALS Metallo-Organic Pesticide Chemicals Manufacturing Subcategory § 455.30 Applicability; description of...

  12. 40 CFR 455.30 - Applicability; description of the metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. 455.30 Section 455.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS PESTICIDE CHEMICALS Metallo-Organic Pesticide Chemicals Manufacturing Subcategory § 455.30 Applicability; description of...

  13. 40 CFR Table 1 to Part 455 - List of Organic Pesticide Active Ingredients

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false List of Organic Pesticide Active Ingredients 1 Table 1 to Part 455 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS PESTICIDE CHEMICALS Pt. 455, Table 1 Table 1 to Part 455—List of Organic Pesticide Active Ingredients EPA census...

  14. Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... and rats. Because of the widespread use of agricultural chemicals in food production, people are exposed to ... effects of these pesticide residues. Results from the Agricultural Health Study, an ongoing study of pesticide exposures ...

  15. Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... are applied during farming and how much pesticide residue can remain in foods sold in stores. Exposure ... to pesticides at work should carefully clean any residue from their skin and remove their clothes and ...

  16. THE DETERMINATION OF NON-PESTICIDAL AND PESTICIDAL ORGANOTIN COMPOUNDS IN WATER BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH [PULSED] FLAME PHOTOMETRIC DETECTION (GS/PFPD): THE EFFECTS OF "MASS" DISCRIMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary gas chromatography with GC/PFPD was used in the development of analytical methodology for determining both non-pesticidal and pesticidal organotin compounds in drinking water and other aqueous matrices. The method involves aqueous ethylation of organotin analytes with ...

  17. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

    1995-08-29

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

  18. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, Gregory D.; Moore, Glenn A.; Stone, Mark L.; Reagen, William K.

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

  19. Temperature dependence on the pesticide sampling rate of polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS).

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Yoshinori; Nagai, Takashi; Inao, Keiya; Ono, Junko; Aiko, Nobuyuki; Ohtsuka, Nobutoshi; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Tanimori, Shinji

    2016-10-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to determine the sampling rates of pesticides for the polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) used in Japan. The concentrations of pesticides in aquatic environments were estimated from the accumulated amounts of pesticide on POCIS, and the effect of water temperature on the pesticide sampling rates was evaluated. The sampling rates of 48 pesticides at 18, 24, and 30 °C were obtained, and this study confirmed that increasing trend of sampling rates was resulted with increasing water temperature for many pesticides. PMID:27305429

  20. Occurrence and distribution of pesticide compounds in surface water of the Santa Ana basin, California, 1998-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kent, Robert; Belitz, Kenneth; Altmann, Andrea J.; Wright, Michael T.; Mendez, Gregory O.

    2005-01-01

    A study of the occurrence and distribution of pesticide compounds in surface water of the highly urbanized Santa Ana Basin, California, was done as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA). One-hundred and forty-eight samples were collected from 23 sites, and analyzed for pesticide compounds during the study period from November 1998 to September 2001. Sixty-six different pesticide compounds were detected at varying frequencies and concentrations, and one or more pesticides were detected in 92 percent of the samples. All pesticide concentrations were below maximum levels permitted in drinking water. However, two compounds-diazinon and diuron-exceeded nonenforceable drinking water health-advisory levels in at least one stream sample, and five compounds exceeded guidelines to protect aquatic life-carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, lindane, and malathion. Twenty-two pesticide compounds were detected in at least 25 percent of the samples collected from any one fixed site. These are identified as 'major' pesticide compounds and are emphasized in this report. The degree to which pesticides were used in the basin, as well as their physical-chemical properties, are important explanatory factors in stream pesticide occurrence, and most pesticides probably enter streams with urban runoff. Stormflow substantially increases urban runoff, and storm effects on stream pesticide concentrations sometimes persist for several days or weeks after the storm. Water sources other than urban runoff also deliver pesticide compounds to surface water in the basin. For example, atrazine may enter streams in gaining reaches where ground water carries high loads as a result of historical use in the basin. Also, the data suggest that lindane, and perhaps bromacil, are present in treated wastewater, the predominant source of water to streams in the Santa Ana Basin.

  1. 40 CFR 180.1127 - Biochemical pesticide plant floral volatile attractant compounds: cinnamaldehyde, cinnamyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Biochemical pesticide plant floral volatile attractant compounds: cinnamaldehyde, cinnamyl alcohol, 4-methoxy cinnamaldehyde, 3-phenyl propanol, 4-methoxy phenethyl alcohol, indole, and 1,2,4-trimethoxybenzene; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1127 Section...

  2. 40 CFR Table 3 to Part 455 - Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Pretreatment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient... STANDARDS PESTICIDE CHEMICALS Pt. 455, Table 3 Table 3 to Part 455—Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Pretreatment Standards for New Sources (PSNS) Pesticide...

  3. 40 CFR Table 3 to Part 455 - Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Pretreatment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient... STANDARDS (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE CHEMICALS Pt. 455, Table 3 Table 3 to Part 455—Organic Pesticide Active...) Pesticide kg/kkg (lb/1,000 lb) pounds of pollutant per 1000 lbs product Daily maximum shall not...

  4. 40 CFR Table 3 to Part 455 - Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Pretreatment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient... STANDARDS (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE CHEMICALS Pt. 455, Table 3 Table 3 to Part 455—Organic Pesticide Active...) Pesticide kg/kkg (lb/1,000 lb) pounds of pollutant per 1000 lbs product Daily maximum shall not...

  5. 40 CFR Table 3 to Part 455 - Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Pretreatment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient... STANDARDS (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE CHEMICALS Pt. 455, Table 3 Table 3 to Part 455—Organic Pesticide Active...) Pesticide kg/kkg (lb/1,000 lb) pounds of pollutant per 1000 lbs product Daily maximum shall not...

  6. 40 CFR Table 3 to Part 455 - Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Pretreatment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient... STANDARDS PESTICIDE CHEMICALS Pt. 455, Table 3 Table 3 to Part 455—Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Pretreatment Standards for New Sources (PSNS) Pesticide...

  7. The MCRA model for probabilistic single-compound and cumulative risk assessment of pesticides.

    PubMed

    van der Voet, Hilko; de Boer, Waldo J; Kruisselbrink, Johannes W; Goedhart, Paul W; van der Heijden, Gerie W A M; Kennedy, Marc C; Boon, Polly E; van Klaveren, Jacob D

    2015-05-01

    Pesticide risk assessment is hampered by worst-case assumptions leading to overly pessimistic assessments. On the other hand, cumulative health effects of similar pesticides are often not taken into account. This paper describes models and a web-based software system developed in the European research project ACROPOLIS. The models are appropriate for both acute and chronic exposure assessments of single compounds and of multiple compounds in cumulative assessment groups. The software system MCRA (Monte Carlo Risk Assessment) is available for stakeholders in pesticide risk assessment at mcra.rivm.nl. We describe the MCRA implementation of the methods as advised in the 2012 EFSA Guidance on probabilistic modelling, as well as more refined methods developed in the ACROPOLIS project. The emphasis is on cumulative assessments. Two approaches, sample-based and compound-based, are contrasted. It is shown that additional data on agricultural use of pesticides may give more realistic risk assessments. Examples are given of model and software validation of acute and chronic assessments, using both simulated data and comparisons against the previous release of MCRA and against the standard software DEEM-FCID used by the Environmental Protection Agency in the USA. It is shown that the EFSA Guidance pessimistic model may not always give an appropriate modelling of exposure. PMID:25455888

  8. Pesticide Toxicity Index: a tool for assessing potential toxicity of pesticide mixtures to freshwater aquatic organisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowell, Lisa H.; Norman, Julia E.; Moran, Patrick W.; Martin, Jeffrey D.; Stone, Wesley W.

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide mixtures are common in streams with agricultural or urban influence in the watershed. The Pesticide Toxicity Index (PTI) is a screening tool to assess potential aquatic toxicity of complex pesticide mixtures by combining measures of pesticide exposure and acute toxicity in an additive toxic-unit model. The PTI is determined separately for fish, cladocerans, and benthic invertebrates. This study expands the number of pesticides and degradates included in previous editions of the PTI from 124 to 492 pesticides and degradates, and includes two types of PTI for use in different applications, depending on study objectives. The Median-PTI was calculated from median toxicity values for individual pesticides, so is robust to outliers and is appropriate for comparing relative potential toxicity among samples, sites, or pesticides. The Sensitive-PTI uses the 5th percentile of available toxicity values, so is a more sensitive screening-level indicator of potential toxicity. PTI predictions of toxicity in environmental samples were tested using data aggregated from published field studies that measured pesticide concentrations and toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia in ambient stream water. C. dubia survival was reduced to ≤ 50% of controls in 44% of samples with Median-PTI values of 0.1–1, and to 0% in 96% of samples with Median-PTI values > 1. The PTI is a relative, but quantitative, indicator of potential toxicity that can be used to evaluate relationships between pesticide exposure and biological condition.

  9. Methods of making organic compounds by metathesis

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, Timothy W.; Kaido, Hiroki; Lee, Choon Woo; Pederson, Richard L.; Schrodi, Yann; Tupy, Michael John

    2015-09-01

    Described are methods of making organic compounds by metathesis chemistry. The methods of the invention are particularly useful for making industrially-important organic compounds beginning with starting compositions derived from renewable feedstocks, such as natural oils. The methods make use of a cross-metathesis step with an olefin compound to produce functionalized alkene intermediates having a pre-determined double bond position. Once isolated, the functionalized alkene intermediate can be self-metathesized or cross-metathesized (e.g., with a second functionalized alkene) to produce the desired organic compound or a precursor thereto. The method may be used to make bifunctional organic compounds, such as diacids, diesters, dicarboxylate salts, acid/esters, acid/amines, acid/alcohols, acid/aldehydes, acid/ketones, acid/halides, acid/nitriles, ester/amines, ester/alcohols, ester/aldehydes, ester/ketones, ester/halides, ester/nitriles, and the like.

  10. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1993-09-07

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 figures.

  11. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1994-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  12. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1994-06-14

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  13. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1989-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  14. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  15. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1989-07-18

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  16. A Reconnaissance of selected organic compounds in streams in tribal lands in Central Oklahoma, January-February 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, Carol J.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey worked in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma on two separate reconnaissance projects carried out concurrently. Both projects entailed the use of passive samplers as a sampling methodology to investigate the detection of selected organic compounds at stream sites in jurisdictional areas of several tribes in central Oklahoma during January-February 2009. The focus of the project with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was the detection of pesticides and pesticide metabolites using Semipermeable Membrane Devices at five stream sites in jurisdictional areas of several tribes. The project with the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma focused on the detection of pesticides, pesticide metabolites, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyl compounds, and synthetic organic compounds using Semipermeable Membrane Devices and Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers at two stream sites adjacent to the Kickapoo tribal lands. The seven stream sites were located in central Oklahoma on the Cimarron River, Little River, North Canadian River, Deep Fork, and Washita River. Extracts from SPMDs submerged at five stream sites, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, were analyzed for 46 pesticides and 6 pesticide metabolites. Dacthal, a pre-emergent herbicide, was detected at all five sites. Pendimethalin, also a pre-emergent, was detected at one site. The insecticides chlorpyrifos and dieldrin were detected at three sites and p,p'-DDE, a metabolite of the insecticide DDT, also was detected at three sites. SPMDs and POCIS were submerged at the upstream edge and downstream edge of the Kickapoo tribal boundaries. Both sites are downstream from the Oklahoma City metropolitan area and multiple municipal wastewater treatment plants. Extracts from the passive samplers were analyzed for 62 pesticides, 10 pesticide metabolites, 3 polychlorinated biphenyl compounds, 35

  17. Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2013-03-19

    Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

  18. Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2010-09-07

    Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

  19. Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2012-10-23

    Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

  20. Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heindel JJ, Zoeller RT. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and human disease. In: Jameson JL, ed. Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 153. Karr CJ, Solomon GM, Brock-Utne AC. Health effects of common home, lawn, and garden pesticides. Pediatr ...

  1. Microwave spectra of some volatile organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    A computer-controlled microwave (MRR) spectrometer was used to catalog reference spectra for chemical analysis. Tables of absorption frequency, peak absorption intensity, and integrated intensity are included for 26 volatile organic compounds, all but one of which contain oxygen.

  2. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AS EXPOSURE BIOMARKERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alveolar breath sampling and analysis can be extremely useful in exposure assessment studies involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Over recent years scientists from the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Exposure Research Laboratory have developed and refined...

  3. (CHINA) PERFLUORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUND EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide range of perfluorinated organic compounds (PFCs) has been used in a variety of industrial processes and consumer products. The most commonly studied PFCs include perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), but there are many more compounds in this c...

  4. Volatile organic compound emissions from silage systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a precursor to smog, emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere is an environmental concern in some regions. The major source from farms is silage, with emissions coming from the silo face, mixing wagon, and feed bunk. The major compounds emitted are alcohols with other impor...

  5. PERFLUORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUND EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide range of perfluorinated organic compounds (PFCs) has been used in a variety of industrial processes and consumer products. The most commonly studied PFCs include perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), but there are many more compounds in this c...

  6. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOCS) CHAPTER 31.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The term "volatile organic compounds' (VOCs) was originally coined to refer, as a class, to carbon-containing chemicals that participate in photochemical reactions in the ambient (outdoor) are. The regulatory definition of VOCs used by the U.S. EPA is: Any compound of carbon, ex...

  7. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1993-01-05

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70 C and 500 C and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

  8. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

  9. Clean process to destroy arsenic-containing organic compounds with recovery of arsenic

    DOEpatents

    Upadhye, R.S.; Wang, F.T.

    1996-08-13

    A reduction method is provided for the treatment of arsenic-containing organic compounds with simultaneous recovery of pure arsenic. Arsenic-containing organic compounds include pesticides, herbicides, and chemical warfare agents such as Lewisite. The arsenic-containing compound is decomposed using a reducing agent. Arsine gas may be formed directly by using a hydrogen-rich reducing agent, or a metal arsenide may be formed using a pure metal reducing agent. In the latter case, the arsenide is reacted with an acid to form arsine gas. In either case, the arsine gas is then reduced to elemental arsenic. 1 fig.

  10. Clean process to destroy arsenic-containing organic compounds with recovery of arsenic

    DOEpatents

    Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Wang, Francis T.

    1996-01-01

    A reduction method is provided for the treatment of arsenic-containing organic compounds with simultaneous recovery of pure arsenic. Arsenic-containing organic compounds include pesticides, herbicides, and chemical warfare agents such as Lewisite. The arsenic-containing compound is decomposed using a reducing agent. Arsine gas may be formed directly by using a hydrogen-rich reducing agent, or a metal arsenide may be formed using a pure metal reducing agent. In the latter case, the arsenide is reacted with an acid to form arsine gas. In either case, the arsine gas is then reduced to elemental arsenic.

  11. EXPOSURE OF AMPHIBIANS TO SEMI-VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN THE SIERRA NEVADA MOUNTAINS AND CALIFORNIA CASCADES: RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TADPOLE TISSUE AND SEDIMENT CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pesticides and other semi-volatile organic compounds (SOCs) undergo regional and longrange atmospheric transport. One such example is the transport of current-use pesticides from the intensely cultivated Central Valley of California into the adjacent Sierra Nevada and Cascade Mou...

  12. Regulatory Off-Gas Analysis from the Evaporation of Hanford Simulated Waste Spiked with Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, H.H.

    2001-03-28

    The purposes of this work were to: (1) develop preliminary operating data such as expected concentration endpoints for flow sheet development and evaporator design, and (2) examine the regulatory off-gas emission impacts from the evaporation of relatively organic-rich Hanford Tank 241-AN-107 Envelope C waste simulant containing 14 volatile, semi-volatile and pesticide organic compounds potentially present in actual Hanford RPP waste.

  13. Atmospheric Chemistry of Micrometeoritic Organic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kress, M. E.; Belle, C. L.; Pevyhouse, A. R.; Iraci, L. T.

    2011-01-01

    Micrometeorites approx.100 m in diameter deliver most of the Earth s annual accumulation of extraterrestrial material. These small particles are so strongly heated upon atmospheric entry that most of their volatile content is vaporized. Here we present preliminary results from two sets of experiments to investigate the fate of the organic fraction of micrometeorites. In the first set of experiments, 300 m particles of a CM carbonaceous chondrite were subject to flash pyrolysis, simulating atmospheric entry. In addition to CO and CO2, many organic compounds were released, including functionalized benzenes, hydrocarbons, and small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In the second set of experiments, we subjected two of these compounds to conditions that simulate the heterogeneous chemistry of Earth s upper atmosphere. We find evidence that meteor-derived compounds can follow reaction pathways leading to the formation of more complex organic compounds.

  14. Biogeochemical processes governing exposure and uptake of organic pollutant compounds in aquatic organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Farrington, J W

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews current knowledge of biogeochemical cycles of pollutant organic chemicals in aquatic ecosystems with a focus on coastal ecosystems. There is a bias toward discussing chemical and geochemical aspects of biogeochemical cycles and an emphasis on hydrophobic organic compounds such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorinated organic compounds used as pesticides. The complexity of mixtures of pollutant organic compounds, their various modes of entering ecosystems, and their physical chemical forms are discussed. Important factors that influence bioavailability and disposition (e.g., organism-water partitioning, uptake via food, food web transfer) are reviewed. These factors include solubilities of chemicals; partitioning of chemicals between solid surfaces, colloids, and soluble phases; variables rates of sorption, desorption; and physiological status of organism. It appears that more emphasis on considering food as a source of uptake and bioaccumulation is important in benthic and epibenthic ecosystems when sediment-associated pollutants are a significant source of input to an aquatic ecosystem. Progress with mathematical models for exposure and uptake of contaminant chemicals is discussed briefly. PMID:1904812

  15. 40 CFR Table 2 to Part 455 - Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient Effluent Limitations Best Available Technology Economically...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS PESTICIDE CHEMICALS Pt. 455, Table 2 Table 2 to Part 455—Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient Effluent Limitations Best Available Technology Economically...

  16. 40 CFR Table 2 to Part 455 - Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient Effluent Limitations Best Available Technology Economically...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE CHEMICALS Pt. 455, Table 2 Table 2 to Part 455—Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient Effluent Limitations Best Available...

  17. 40 CFR Table 2 to Part 455 - Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient Effluent Limitations Best Available Technology Economically...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE CHEMICALS Pt. 455, Table 2 Table 2 to Part 455—Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient Effluent Limitations Best Available...

  18. 40 CFR Table 2 to Part 455 - Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient Effluent Limitations Best Available Technology Economically...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE CHEMICALS Pt. 455, Table 2 Table 2 to Part 455—Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient Effluent Limitations Best Available...

  19. 40 CFR Table 2 to Part 455 - Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient Effluent Limitations Best Available Technology Economically...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS PESTICIDE CHEMICALS Pt. 455, Table 2 Table 2 to Part 455—Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient Effluent Limitations Best Available Technology Economically...

  20. Photocatalytic oxidation of organic compounds on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, S. F. S.; Pang, K. D.; Cutts, J. A.; Ajello, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Ultraviolet-stimulated catalytic oxidation is proposed as a mechanism for the destruction of organic compounds on Mars. The process involves the presence of gaseous oxygen, UV radiation, and a catalyst (titanium dioxide), and all three of these have been found to be present in the Martian environment. Therefore it seems plausible that UV-stimulated oxidation of organics is responsible for degrading organic molecules into inorganic end products.

  1. ORGANIC PESTICIDE MODIFICATION OF SPECIES INTERACTIONS USING ANNUAL PLANT COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method is proposed and tested for assessing multispecies responses to three pesticides (atrazine, 2,4,D and malathion). Pesticides were applied at two concentrations, mon model plant communities grown in raised beds using soil containing a natural weed bank. over by species was...

  2. Reflectance spectroscopy of organic compounds: 1. Alkanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.; Curchin, J.M.; Hoefen, T.M.; Swayze, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Reflectance spectra of the organic compounds comprising the alkane series are presented from the ultraviolet to midinfrared, 0.35 to 15.5 /??m. Alkanes are hydrocarbon molecules containing only single carbon-carbon bonds, and are found naturally on the Earth and in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Saturn's moon, Titan. This paper presents the spectral properties of the alkanes as the first in a series of papers to build a spectral database of organic compounds for use in remote sensing studies. Applications range from mapping the environment on the Earth, to the search for organic molecules and life in the solar system and throughout the. universe. We show that the spectral reflectance properties of organic compounds are rich, with major diagnostic spectral features throughout the spectral range studied. Little to no spectral change was observed as a function of temperature and only small shifts and changes in the width of absorption bands were observed between liquids and solids, making remote detection of spectral properties throughout the solar system simpler. Some high molecular weight organic compounds contain single-bonded carbon chains and have spectra similar to alkanes even ' when they fall into other families. Small spectral differences are often present allowing discrimination among some compounds, further illustrating the need to catalog spectral properties for accurate remote sensing identification with spectroscopy.

  3. MODIFICATION AND EVALUATION OF A HIGH-VOLUME AIR SAMPLER FOR PESTICIDES AND SEMIVOLATILE INDUSTRIAL ORGANIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previously we reported the development and evaluation of a high-volume air sampler for pesticides and other semivolatile industrial organic chemicals (1). This sampler has proved useful for monitoring airborne pesticides associated with agricultural applications (2) and polychlor...

  4. Catalyst for Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, George M. (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Kielin, Erik J. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Schyryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); DAmbrosia, Christine M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for oxidizing volatile organic compounds to carbon dioxide and water with the minimal addition of energy. A mixture of the volatile organic compound and an oxidizing agent (e.g. ambient air containing the volatile organic compound) is exposed to a catalyst which includes a noble metal dispersed on a metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state. Especially good results are obtained when the noble metal is platinum, and the metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state is tin oxide. A promoter (i.e., a small amount of an oxide of a transition series metal) may be used in association with the tin oxide to provide very beneficial results.

  5. A PILOT STUDY OF CHILDREN'S TOTAL EXPOSURE TO PERSISTENT PESTICIDES AND OTHER PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (CTEPP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pilot Study of Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Organic Pollutants (CTEPP) investigated the aggregate exposures of 257 preschool children and their primary adult caregivers to pollutants commonly detected in their everyday environments. ...

  6. Nonaqueous battery with organic compound cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaji, A.; Yamaki, J.

    1981-02-17

    A battery embodying this invention comprises: an anode including an anode-active material formed of one metal selected from the Group IA metals or preferably lithium metal; a cathode including a cathode-active material formed of metal or metal-free organic compounds having a phthalocyanine function or organic compounds having a porphin function; and an electrolyte prepared from a material which is chemically stable to the cathode and anode materials and permits the migration of the ion of the anode metal to the cathode for electrochemical reaction with the cathode-active material.

  7. Compound-Specific Stable Isotope Fractionation of Pesticides and Pharmaceuticals in a Mesoscale Aquifer Model.

    PubMed

    Schürner, Heide K V; Maier, Michael P; Eckert, Dominik; Brejcha, Ramona; Neumann, Claudia-Constanze; Stumpp, Christine; Cirpka, Olaf A; Elsner, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) receives increasing interest for its ability to detect natural degradation of pesticides and pharmaceuticals. Despite recent laboratory studies, CSIA investigations of such micropollutants in the environment are still rare. To explore the certainty of information obtainable by CSIA in a near-environmental setting, a pulse of the pesticide bentazone, the pesticide metabolite 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM), and the pharmaceuticals diclofenac and ibuprofen was released into a mesoscale aquifer with quasi-two-dimensional flow. Concentration breakthrough curves (BTC) of BAM and ibuprofen demonstrated neither degradation nor sorption. Bentazone was transformed but did not sorb significantly, whereas diclofenac showed both degradation and sorption. Carbon and nitrogen CSIA could be accomplished in similar concentrations as for "traditional" priority pollutants (low μg/L range), however, at the cost of uncertainties (0.4-0.5‰ (carbon), 1‰ (nitrogen)). Nonetheless, invariant carbon and nitrogen isotope values confirmed that BAM was neither degraded nor sorbed, while significant enrichment of (13)C and in particular (15)N corroborated transformation of diclofenac and bentazone. Retardation of diclofenac was reflected in additional (15)N sorption isotope effects, whereas isotope fractionation of transverse dispersion could not be identified. These results provide a benchmark on the performance of CSIA to monitor the reactivity of micropollutants in aquifers and may guide future efforts to accomplish CSIA at even lower concentrations (ng/L range). PMID:27100740

  8. Regulatory Off-Gas Analysis from the Evaporation of Hanford Simulated Waste Spiked with Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Calloway, T.B. Jr.

    2003-10-23

    After strontium/transuranics removal by precipitation followed by cesium/technetium removal by ion exchange, remaining low activity waste in the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant is to be concentrated by evaporation prior to being mixed with glass formers and vitrified. To provide a technical basis to permit the waste treatment facility, a relatively organic-rich Hanford Tank 241-AN-107 waste simulant was spiked with 14 target volatile, semi-volatile and pesticide compounds, and evaporated under vacuum in a bench-scale natural circulation evaporator fitted with an industrial stack off-gas sampler at the Savannah River Technology Center. An evaporator material balance for the target organics was calculated by combining liquid stream mass and analytical data with off-gas emissions estimates obtained using EPA SW-846 Methods. Volatile and light semi-volatile organic compounds in the waste simulant were found to largely exit through the condenser vent, while heavier semi-volatiles and pesticides generally remain in the evaporator concentrate. An OLI Environmental Simulation Program evaporator model successfully predicted operating conditions and the experimental distribution of the fed target organics exiting in the concentrate, condensate and off-gas streams with the exception of a few semi-volatile and pesticide compounds. Comparison with Henry's Law predictions suggests the OLI ESP model is constrained by available literature data.

  9. Regulatory off-gas analysis from the evaporation of Hanford simulated waste spiked with organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroshi H; Calloway, T Bond; Ferrara, Daro M; Choi, Alexander S; White, Thomas L; Gibson, Luther V; Burdette, Mark A

    2004-10-01

    After strontium/transuranics removal by precipitation followed by cesium/technetium removal by ion exchange, the remaining low-activity waste in the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant is to be concentrated by evaporation before being mixed with glass formers and vitrified. To provide a technical basis to permit the waste treatment facility, a relatively organic-rich Hanford Tank 241-AN-107 waste simulant was spiked with 14 target volatile, semi-volatile, and pesticide compounds and evaporated under vacuum in a bench-scale natural circulation evaporator fitted with an industrial stack off-gas sampler at the Savannah River National Laboratory. An evaporator material balance for the target organics was calculated by combining liquid stream mass and analytical data with off-gas emissions estimates obtained using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-846 Methods. Volatile and light semi-volatile organic compounds (<220 degrees C BP, >1 mm Hg vapor pressure) in the waste simulant were found to largely exit through the condenser vent, while heavier semi-volatiles and pesticides generally remain in the evaporator concentrate. An OLI Environmental Simulation Program (licensed by OLI Systems, Inc.) evaporator model successfully predicted operating conditions and the experimental distribution of the fed target organics exiting in the concentrate, condensate, and off-gas streams, with the exception of a few semi-volatile and pesticide compounds. Comparison with Henry's Law predictions suggests the OLI Environmental Simulation Program model is constrained by available literature data. PMID:15540577

  10. Chlorinated organic compounds in urban river sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Soma, Y.; Shiraishi, H.; Inaba, K.

    1995-12-31

    Among anthropogenic chemicals, many chlorinated organic compounds have been used as insecticides and detected frequently as contaminants in urban river sediments so far. However, the number and total amount of chemicals produced commercially and used are increasing year by year, though each amount of chemicals is not so high. New types of contaminants in the environment may be detected by the use of newly developed chemicals. Chlorinated organic compounds in the urban river sediments around Tokyo and Kyoto, large cities in Japan, were surveyed and recent trends of contaminants were studied. Contaminants of the river sediments in industrial areas had a variety, but PCB (polychlorinated biphenyls) was detected in common in industrial areas. Concentration of PCB related well to the number of factories on both sides of rivers, although the use of PCB was stopped 20 years ago. In domestic areas, Triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)-phenol) and Triclocarban (3,4,4{prime}-trichlorocarbanilide)(both are contained in soap or shampoo for fungicides), p-dichlorobenzene (insecticides for wears) and TCEP(tris-chloroethyl phosphate) were detected. EOX(extracted organic halogen) in the sediments was 5 to 10 times of chlorinated organic compounds detected by GC/MS. Major part of organic halogen was suggested to be included in chlorinated organics formed by bleaching or sterilization.

  11. Analysis of current-use pesticides in aquatic and terrestrial organisms collected throughout California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Kuivila, Kathyrn M.

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of pesticides are applied concurrently in agricultural and urban areas and transported off site dissolved in water and bound to sediments. But the exposure of aquatic and terrestrial organisms to current-use pesticides and the resulting effects are not well understood. One approach is to directly analyze tissue concentrations of contaminants. The overall objective of this study was to develop a sensitive method to analyze current-use pesticides with a wide range of Kow's in tissue to better understand the accumulation of these contaminants in different aquatic and terrestrial organisms. This method was then used to analyze current-use pesticides in tissues from a variety of organisms from sites with different land-use practices.

  12. Catalytic Destruction Of Toxic Organic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed process disposes of toxic organic compounds in contaminated soil or carbon beds safely and efficiently. Oxidizes toxic materials without producing such other contaminants as nitrogen oxides. Using air, fuel, catalysts, and steam, system consumes less fuel and energy than decontamination processes currently in use. Similar process regenerates carbon beds used in water-treatment plants.

  13. Global Exposure Modelling of Semivolatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmo, F.; Lammel, G.; Maier-Reimer, E.

    2008-12-01

    Organic compounds which are persistent and toxic as the agrochemicals γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH, lindane) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) pose a hazard for the ecosystems. These compounds are semivolatile, hence multicompartmental substances and subject to long-range transport (LRT) in atmosphere and ocean. Being lipophilic, they accumulate in exposed organism tissues and biomagnify along food chains. The multicompartmental global fate and LRT of DDT and lindane in the atmosphere and ocean have been studied using application data for 1980, on a decadal scale using a model based on the coupling of atmosphere and (for the first time for these compounds) ocean General Circulation Models (ECHAM5 and MPI-OM). The model system encompasses furthermore 2D terrestrial compartments (soil and vegetation) and sea ice, a fully dynamic atmospheric aerosol (HAM) module and an ocean biogeochemistry module (HAMOCC5). Large mass fractions of the compounds are found in soil. Lindane is also found in comparable amount in ocean. DDT has the longest residence time in almost all compartments. The sea ice compartment locally almost inhibits volatilization from the sea. The air/sea exchange is also affected , up to a reduction of 35 % for DDT by partitioning to the organic phases (suspended and dissolved particulate matter) in the global oceans. Partitioning enhances vertical transport in the sea. Ocean dynamics are found to be more significant for vertical transport than sinking associated with particulate matter. LRT in the global environment is determined by the fast atmospheric circulation. Net meridional transport taking place in the ocean is locally effective mostly via western boundary currents, upon applications at mid- latitudes. The pathways of the long-lived semivolatile organic compounds studied include a sequence of several cycles of volatilisation, transport in the atmosphere, deposition and transport in the ocean (multihopping substances). Multihopping is

  14. A model-based assessment of the potential use of compound-specific stable isotope analysis in river monitoring of diffuse pesticide pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, S. R.; van Meerveld, H. J.; Waterloo, M. J.; Broers, H. P.; van Breukelen, B. M.

    2013-11-01

    Compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) has, in combination with model-assisted interpretation, proven to be a valuable approach to quantify the extent of organic contaminant degradation in groundwater systems. CSIA data may also provide insights into the origin and transformation of diffuse pollutants, such as pesticides and nitrate, at the catchment scale. While CSIA methods for pesticides have increasingly become available, they have not yet been deployed to interpret isotope data of pesticides in surface water. We applied a coupled subsurface-surface reactive transport model (HydroGeoSphere) at the hillslope scale to investigate the usefulness of CSIA in the assessment of pesticide degradation. We simulated the transport and transformation of a pesticide in a hypothetical but realistic two-dimensional hillslope transect. The steady-state model results illustrate a strong increase of isotope ratios at the hillslope outlet, which resulted from degradation and long travel times through the hillslope during average hydrological conditions. In contrast, following an extreme rainfall event that induced overland flow, the simulated isotope ratios dropped to the values of soil water in the pesticide application area. These results suggest that CSIA can help to identify rainfall-runoff events that entail significant pesticide transport to the stream via surface runoff. Simulations with daily rainfall and evapotranspiration data and one pesticide application per year resulted in small seasonal variations of concentrations and isotope ratios at the hillslope outlet, which fell within the uncertainty range of current CSIA methods. This implies a good reliability of in-stream isotope data in the absence of transport via surface runoff or other fast transport routes, since the time of measurement appears to be of minor importance for the assessment of pesticide degradation. The analysis of simulated isotope ratios also allowed quantification of the contribution of

  15. Organic photosensitive devices using subphthalocyanine compounds

    DOEpatents

    Rand, Barry; Forrest, Stephen R.; Mutolo, Kristin L.; Mayo, Elizabeth; Thompson, Mark E.

    2011-07-05

    An organic photosensitive optoelectronic device, having a donor-acceptor heterojunction of a donor-like material and an acceptor-like material and methods of making such devices is provided. At least one of the donor-like material and the acceptor-like material includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound; and/or the device optionally has at least one of a blocking layer or a charge transport layer, where the blocking layer and/or the charge transport layer includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound.

  16. Compound-specific stable isotope analysis of pesticides: a combined monitoring and modeling approach to assess pesticide fate and degradation at catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Breukelen, B. M.; Lutz, S.; Van der Velde, Y.; Elsayed, O. F.; LeFrancq, M.; Payraudeau, S.; Imfeld, G.

    2014-12-01

    Compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) has proven useful in asessing the fate of groundwater contamination. However, although evidence of diffuse pesticide degradation is crucial, and CSIA methods have been developed for several pesticides, there is a clear lack of field CSIA data of pesticides. This study now presents the first analysis of field CSIA data from a 47-ha agricultural headwater catchment (Alteckendorf, Alsace, France) in the period March to August 2012. Measured stream concentrations of the two investigated chloroacetanilide herbicides (S-metolachlor and acetochlor) were highest (65 μg/L) following an intense rainfall event in the first month after herbicide application. Carbon isotope ratios increased with more than 2 ‰ in 3 months, which indicates the occurrence of herbicide degradation during transport to the stream. Previously, field CSIA data have also been simulated with reactive transport models to evaluate degradation of groundwater contaminants. This study now presents such a model-assisted interpretation of CSIA data for the first time at catchment scale, which aims at exploring the added value of CSIA in monitoring and modelling of pesticide pollution. The conceptual mathematical model succeeded in reproducing the general trend in concentrations and carbon isotope ratios of metolachlor. It also allowed for the quantification of metolachlor degradation (above 70 % during the study period), and yielded a mass export of 1.8 % of the applied pesticide, which is in agreement with the measured pesticide export. The field concentration and CSIA data informed the model building by indicating the importance of overland flow, and slow pesticide degradation in groundwater compared to the upper soil zone. Moreover, incorporation of the field CSIA data into model calibration slightly reduced model uncertainty in the quantification of pesticide degradation. We suggest that a finer temporal CSIA resolution than possible in this study

  17. [Determination of organic phosphorus pesticide residues in scallion by gas chromatography coupled with microwave clean-up].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Li, An; Li, Haiyan; Tong, Kexing; Zhou, Lili; Zhou, Huimin; Zhao, Tong

    2007-05-01

    A method for the determination of organic phosphorus pesticide residues is described. It covers 25 residues in scallion including dichlorvos, ethoprophos, phorate, diazinon, disulfoton, dimethoate, pirimiphos-methyl, chlorpyrifos, malathion, fenitrothion, parathion, chlorfenvinphos, ethion, EPN, dyfonate, chlorpyrifos-methyl, parathion-methyl, fenthion, quinalphos, gardona, methidathion, carbophenothion, phosmet, phosalone, and coumaphos. After the scallion samples were heated for 30 s in microwave oven, the residues were extracted with acetonitrile, and then the organic phase was salted out from the matrix. As a result, most of the interfering impurities were abolished in the heating process. In this study, these pesticides were categorized into two groups for analysis. The gas chromatographic analysis was performed on a capillary column (DB-1701, 30 m x 0.25 mm x 0.25 microm) and determined with a flame photometric detector. Linear correlation coefficients of the 25 organic phosphorus pesticides were not lower than 0.991 0 and the linear ranges for most of the compounds were between 0.1 to 5.0 mg/L. The detection limits were between 0.025 and 0.200 mg/L. In recovery study, average recoveries ranged from 85.2% to 119.6% at the fortification levels of 0.05, 0.2 and 0.5 mg/kg and the relative standard deviations were in the range of 2.1% and 14.8%. The method is a simple, rapid and highly efficient one to determine organic phosphorus pesticide residues in scallion. PMID:17679438

  18. Climate impacts of biogenic organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Kamalika; Gordon, Hamish; Almeida, Joao; Rap, Alex; Scott, Catherine; Pringle, Kirsty; Carslaw, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Currently the most uncertain driver of climate change, impact of anthropogenic aerosols on earth's radiative balance depends significantly on estimates of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), representation of the pre-industrial atmosphere among others. Nearly 90% of aerosols in the tropics are organic in nature of which a major part comes from biogenic sources. About 45% of the CCN in the atmosphere are formed in-situ via nucleation. Understanding the role of biogenic organic compounds in particle formation and their subsequent growth is hence imperative in order to quantify the climate impact of aerosols. The CLOUD experiment at CERN, which measures particle formation and growth rates in a uniquely clean chamber under atmospherically relevant conditions, found evidence of a nucleation mechanism involving only biogenic organic compounds. This mechanism significantly changes our pre-industrial estimates. The experimental results have been parameterized and included in a global aerosol microphysics model, GLOMAP, to quantify the impact of pure biogenic nucleation on CCN formation and their climatic impact. Further the treatment of secondary organic compounds in GLOMAP has been improved and the sensitivity of our estimates of radiative forcing to the same has been evaluated.

  19. Analysis of industrial contaminants in indoor air: part 1. Volatile organic compounds, carbonyl compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Barro, Ruth; Regueiro, Jorge; Llompart, María; Garcia-Jares, Carmen

    2009-01-16

    This article reviews recent literature on the analysis of industrial contaminants in indoor air in the framework of the REACH project, which is mainly intended to improve protection of human health and the environment from the risks of more than 34 millions of chemical substances. Industrial pollutants that can be found in indoor air may be of very different types and origin, belonging to the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) categories. Several compounds have been classified into the priority organic pollutants (POPs) class such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/PCDFs) and related polychlorinated compounds, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Many of these compounds are partially associated to the air gas phase, but also to the suspended particulate matter. Furthermore, settled dust can act as a concentrator for the less volatile pollutants and has become a matrix of great concern for indoors contamination. Main literature considered in this review are papers from the last 10 years reporting analytical developments and applications regarding VOCs, aldehydes and other carbonyls, PCBs, PCDDs, PCDFs, and PAHs in the indoor environment. Sample collection and pretreatment, analyte extraction, clean-up procedures, determination techniques, performance results, as well as compound concentrations in indoor samples, are summarized and discussed. Emergent contaminants and pesticides related to the industrial development that can be found in indoor air are reviewed in a second part in this volume. PMID:19019381

  20. Toxic organic compounds from energy production

    SciTech Connect

    Hites, R.A.

    1991-09-20

    The US Department of Energy's Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) has supported work in our laboratory since 1977. The general theme of this program has been the identification of potentially toxic organic compounds associated with various combustion effluents, following the fates of these compounds in the environment, and improving the analytical methodology for making these measurements. The projects currently investigation include: an improved sampler for semi-volatile compounds in the atmosphere; the wet and dry deposition of dioxins and furans from the atmosphere; the photodegradation and mobile sources of dioxins and furans; and the bioaccumulation of PAH by tree bark. These projects are all responsive to OHER's interest in the pathways and mechanisms by which energy-related agents move through and are modified by the atmosphere''. The projects on gas chromatographic and liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry are both responsive to OHER's interest in new and more sensitive technologies for chemical measurements''. 35 refs., 9 figs.

  1. Late stage trifluoromethylthiolation strategies for organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Barata-Vallejo, Sebastian; Bonesi, Sergio; Postigo, Al

    2016-07-26

    Substitution by the CF3S group allows for an increase in lipophilicity and electron-withdrawing properties along with an improvement in the bioavailability of medicinal targets; consequently, the late stage introduction of CF3S moieties into medicinal scaffolds is a sought-after strategy in synthetic organic chemistry. Different newly-developed electrophilic and nucleophilic reagents are used to effect the trifluoromethylthiolation of (hetero)aromatic compounds, aliphatic compounds (alkyl, alkenyl, alkynyl substrates), the trifluoromethylthiolation at the α- and β-carbonyl positions, and heteroatoms (N- and S-). Such reactions can involve homolytic substitutions, or functional-group substitutions (ipso). Addition reactions of electrophilic reagents to double and triple bonds followed by ring-cyclizations will be shown to yield relevant CF3S-substituted heteroaromatic compounds with relevant pharmacological action. PMID:27354317

  2. Organochlorine compounds and current-use pesticides in snow and lake sediment in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, and Glacier National Park, Montana, 2002-03

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mast, M. Alisa; Foreman, William T.; Skaates, Serena V.

    2006-01-01

    and DDD are degradation products of DDT (p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane), which is a well-documented, persistent organochlorine insecticide that has been banned from use in the United States since 1972. Detected concentrations were very low, ranging from 0.12 to 4.7 micrograms per kilogram, and probably pose little threat to aquatic organisms in park lakes. DDD and DDE concentrations in a sediment core from Mills Lake in Rocky Mountain National Park indicate that atmospheric deposition of DDT and possibly other banned organochlorine compounds to high-elevation parks has been in decline since the 1970s. Commonly detected current-use pesticides in lake sediments included dacthal and endosulfan sulfate, which ranged in concentrations from 0.11 to 0.26 micrograms per kilogram for dacthal and 0.12 to 1.2 micrograms per kilogram for endosulfan sulfate. Both compounds were found in nearly all the snow samples, confirming that some current-use pesticides entering high-elevation aquatic ecosystems through atmospheric deposition are accumulating in lake sediments and potentially in aquatic biota.

  3. Organic compounds in star forming regions.

    PubMed

    Kochina, O; Wiebe, D

    2014-09-01

    The influence of complex dust composition on the general chemical evolution of a prestellar core and the content of complex organic compounds is studied. It is shown that various component groups respond differently to the presence of a small dust population. At early stages the difference is determined primarily by changes in the balance of photo processes due to effective absorption of ultraviolet photons by small dust grains of the second population and collisional reactions with dust particles. At later stages differences are also caused by the growing dominance of additional reaction channels related to surface organic synthesis. PMID:25515345

  4. Selected phenolic compounds in cultivated plants: ecologic functions, health implications, and modulation by pesticides.

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, O; Meier, M S; Schlatter, J; Frischknecht, P

    1999-01-01

    Phenolic compounds are widely distributed in the plant kingdom. Plant tissues may contain up to several grams per kilogram. External stimuli such as microbial infections, ultraviolet radiation, and chemical stressors induce their synthesis. The phenolic compounds resveratrol, flavonoids, and furanocoumarins have many ecologic functions and affect human health. Ecologic functions include defense against microbial pathogens and herbivorous animals. Phenolic compounds may have both beneficial and toxic effects on human health. Effects on low-density lipoproteins and aggregation of platelets are beneficial because they reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. Mutagenic, cancerogenic, and phototoxic effects are risk factors of human health. The synthesis of phenolic compounds in plants can be modulated by the application of herbicides and, to a lesser extent, insecticides and fungicides. The effects on ecosystem functioning and human health are complex and cannot be predicted with great certainty. The consequences of the combined natural and pesticide-induced modulating effects for ecologic functions and human health should be further evaluated. PMID:10229712

  5. Metabolic Reactions among Organic Sulfur Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte, M.; Rogers, K.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfur is central to the metabolisms of many organisms that inhabit extreme environments. Numerous authors have addressed the energy available from a variety of inorganic sulfur redox pairs. Less attention has been paid, however, to the energy required or gained from metabolic reactions among organic sulfur compounds. Work in this area has focused on the oxidation of alkyl sulfide or disulfide to thiol and formaldehyde, e.g. (CH3)2S + H2O yields CH3SH + HCHO + H2, eventually resulting in the formation of CO2 and SO4(-2). It is also found that reactions among thiols and disulfides may help control redox disequilibria between the cytoplasm and the periplasm. Building on our earlier efforts for thiols, we have compiled and estimated thermodynamic properties for alkyl sulfides. We are investigating metabolic reactions among various sulfur compounds in a variety of extreme environments, ranging from sea floor hydrothermal systems to organic-rich sludge. Using thermodynamic data and the revised HKF equation of state, along with constraints imposed by the geochemical environments sulfur-metabolizing organisms inhabit, we are able to calculate the amount of energy available to these organisms.

  6. Compositional space boundaries for organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Lobodin, Vladislav V; Marshall, Alan G; Hsu, Chang Samuel

    2012-04-01

    An upper elemental compositional boundary for fossil hydrocarbons has previously been established as double-bond equivalents (i.e., DBE = rings plus double bonds) not exceeding 90% of the number of carbons. For heteroatom-containing fossil compounds, the 90% rule still applies if each N atom is counted as a C atom. The 90% rule eliminates more than 10% of the possible elemental compositions at a given mass for fossil database molecules. However, some synthetic compounds can fall outside the upper boundary defined for naturally occurring compounds. Their inclusion defines an "absolute" upper boundary as DBE (rings plus double bonds to carbon) equal to carbon number plus one, and applies to all organic compounds including fullerenes and other molecules containing no hydrogen. Finally, the DBE definition can fail for molecules with particular atomic valences. Therefore, we also present a generalized DBE definition that includes atomic valence to enable calculation of the correct total number of rings, double bonds, and triple bonds for heteroatom-containing compounds. PMID:22376063

  7. Rate coefficients of hydroxyl radical reactions with pesticide molecules and related compounds: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnárovits, László; Takács, Erzsébet

    2014-03-01

    Rate coefficients published in the literature on hydroxyl radical reactions with pesticides and related compounds are discussed together with the experimental methods and the basic reaction mechanisms. Recommendations are made for the most probable values. Most of the molecules whose rate coefficients are discussed have aromatic ring: their rate coefficients are in the range of 2×109-1×1010 mol-1 dm3 s-1. The rate coefficients show some variation with the electron withdrawing-donating nature of the substituent on the ring. The rate coefficients for triazine pesticides (simazine, atrazine, prometon) are all around 2.5×109 mol-1 dm3 s-1. The values do not show variation with the substituent on the s-triazine ring. The rate coefficients for the non-aromatic molecules which have C=C double bonds or several C-H bonds may also be above 1×109 mol-1 dm3 s-1. However, the values for molecules without C=C double bonds or several C-H bonds are in the 1×107-1×109 mol-1 dm3 s-1 range.

  8. Study on the distribution of organic carbon in soil fractions and its reaction potential of binding the pesticides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Ashim

    2010-05-01

    STUDY ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC CARBON IN SOIL FRACTIONS AND ITS REACTION POTENTIAL OF BINDING THE PESTICIDES **SUMITRA ROY1, SANKHAJIT ROY1, *ASHIM CHOWDHURY2, SASWATI PRADHAN2 and PETER BURAUEL3 1Department of Agricultural Chemicals, Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalay, Mohanpur, West Bengal, India. 2Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Soil Science, University of Calcutta, West Bengal, India. 3Institute of Chemical Dynamics & Geosphere, FZ-Juelich, Germany. *Correspondence: ashimkly@hotmail.com **Research work carried out as DAAD Sandwich research fellow at FZ- Juelich, Germany Soil is the ultimate sink of all selectively applied pesticides. In addition to the basic physicochemical data of an active ingredient, the fate of the various compounds is largely determined by the type of application. Finally, pesticide and their metabolites, as well as structural elements, remain in the native carbon reserves of the soil or are sorbed & fixed to clay minerals and clay- humus complexes. Soil organic matter (SOM) and the soil microbial community are the crucial components which regulate soil processes and contribute towards the stability of the soil ecosystem. It is an energy source for biological mineralization processes, functions as a buffer and participates in chemical reaction. Knowledge is essential to understand the extent to which the SOM influences the mobilization and immobilization processes of foreign substance in soil and the substance transport and pollutant decomposition in soil. The freshly incorporated organic matter undergoes mineralization and the non mineralized carbon fraction is of special relevance with respect to soil stability in general and decisive for the fate and particular the persistence of xenobiotics in soil. The biological and physicochemical interactions establishing equilibrium between the organic matter bound, fixed or complexed to the soil matrix and that dissolve in the soil solution must be understood in detail to realize

  9. Formation of highly oxidized multifunctional organic compounds from anthropogenic volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molteni, Ugo; Baltensperger, Urs; Bianchi, Federico; Dommen, Josef; El Haddad, Imad; Frege, Carla; Klein, Felix; Rossi, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that highly oxidized multifunctional organic compounds (HOMs) from biogenic volatile organic compounds are important for new particle formation and early particle growth (e.g., Ehn et al., 2014). The formation mechanism has extensively been studied for biogenic precursors like alpha-pinene and was shown to proceed through an initial reaction with either OH radicals or ozone followed by radical propagation in a mechanism that involves O2 attack and hydrogen abstraction (Crounse et al., 2013). While the same processes can be expected for anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (AVOC), few studies have investigated these so far. Here we present the formation of HOMs from a variety of aromatic compounds after reaction with OH. All the compounds analyzed show HOM formation. AVOC could therefore play an important role in new particle formation events that have been detected in urban areas. References Crounse, J.D. et al., Autoxidation of organic compounds in the atmosphere. J. Phys.Chem. Lett. 4, 3513-3520 (2013). Ehn, M., et al. A large source of low-volatility secondary organic aerosol, Nature 506, 476-479 (2014).

  10. Environmental exposure to pesticides and cancer risk in multiple human organ systems.

    PubMed

    Parrón, Tesifón; Requena, Mar; Hernández, Antonio F; Alarcón, Raquel

    2014-10-15

    There is growing evidence on the association between long-term exposure to pesticides in occupational settings and an elevated rate of chronic diseases, including different types of cancer. However, data on non-occupational exposures are scarce to draw any conclusion. The objective of this study was to investigate the putative associations of environmental pesticide exposures in the general population with several cancer sites and to discuss potential carcinogenic mechanisms by which pesticides develop cancer. A population-based case-control study was conducted among people residing in 10 Health districts from Andalusia (South Spain) to estimate the risk of cancer at different sites. Health districts were categorized into areas of high and low environmental pesticide exposure based on two quantitative criteria: number of hectares devoted to intensive agriculture and pesticide sales per capita. The study population consisted of 34,205 cancer cases and 1,832,969 age and health district matched controls. Data were collected by computerized hospital records (minimum dataset) between 1998 and 2005. Prevalence rates and the risk of cancer at most organ sites were significantly higher in districts with greater pesticide use related to those with lower pesticide use. Conditional logistic regression analyses showed that the population living in areas with high pesticide use had an increased risk of cancer at all sites studied (odds ratios between 1.15 and 3.45) with the exception of Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The results of this study support and extend previous evidence from occupational studies indicating that environmental exposure to pesticides may be a risk factor for different types of cancer at the level of the general population. PMID:24269242

  11. Pressure of non-professional use of pesticides on operators, aquatic organisms and bees in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Fevery, Davina; Houbraken, Michael; Spanoghe, Pieter

    2016-04-15

    Various studies focus on professional pesticide use, whereas pressure of non-professional use on human and the environment is often neglected. In this study, an attempt was made to estimate the pressure of non-professional use of pesticides on operators, aquatic organisms and bees in Belgium based on sales figures and by using three exposure models. A classification in non-professional use was made based on type of pesticide, application method and on intensity of non-professional use. Pressure of non-professional use on operators is highest for intensive operators, caused by the use of insecticides in an aerosol spray can. Pressure of non-professional pesticides on aquatic life is mainly generated by the use of herbicides. The aerosol spray induces the highest pressure whereas the trigger application hardly affects operator and environmental exposure. The ordinary non-professional user generates most pressure on aquatic organisms. Pressure of non-professional pesticides on bees is mainly caused by the use of insecticides, especially the active substance imidacloprid in combination with the aerosol spray can application method applied by an intensive operator. In general, both total usage (kg) and pressure of pesticides decreased for the period 2005 to 2012 due to efforts made by the government and industry. The results of this study suggest to pay special attention to aerosol spray applications and the non-professional use of insecticides. PMID:26845187

  12. The brown mussel Perna perna (L., 1758) as a sentinel species for chlorinated pesticide and dioxin-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Galvao, Petrus; Henkelmann, Bernhard; Longo, Renan; Torres, João Paulo Machado; Malm, Olaf; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2015-09-01

    To contribute to the use of the tropical brown mussel Perna perna as a sentinel species for organochlorine pesticides (OCP) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), the present study reports data on the toxicokinetics of these compounds in P. perna. Specifically, the authors present data on OCP and PCB bioaccumulation for eight sampling months from three bays (SE Brazil) and two transplant experiments (each 1 month long). Although seasonality is observed in the total lipid content of the whole soft tissue, with summer samples showing higher values, no such seasonality is observed in the OCP and PCB concentrations bioaccumulated by the mussel P. perna. Because no seasonal effect is observed in the annual OCP and PCB concentrations bioaccumulated by P. perna, the use of this species as a sentinel organism to monitor organochlorinated compounds is encouraged. One month of transplantation is not enough to allow the transplanted specimens to reach the concentrations observed in animals reared at the destination site. Nevertheless, P. perna showed a clear tendency to depurate the DDT metabolites p,p'-DDD and p,p'-DDE after 1 month of transplantation. PMID:25943516

  13. Self assembly properties of primitive organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deamer, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    A central event in the origin of life was the self-assembly of amphiphilic, lipid-like compounds into closed microenvironments. If a primitive macromolecular replicating system could be encapsulated within a vesicular membrane, the components of the system would share the same microenvironment, and the result would be a step toward true cellular function. The goal of our research has been to determine what amphiphilic molecules might plausibly have been available on the early Earth to participate in the formation of such boundary structures. To this end, we have investigated primitive organic mixtures present in carbonaceous meteorites such as the Murchison meteorite, which contains 1-2 percent of its mass in the form of organic carbon compounds. It is likely that such compounds contributed to the inventory of organic carbon on the prebiotic earth, and were available to participate in chemical evolution leading to the emergence of the first cellular life forms. We found that Murchison components extracted into non-polar solvent systems are surface active, a clear indication of amphiphilic character. One acidic fraction self-assembles into vesicular membranes that provide permeability barriers to polar solutes. Other evidence indicates that the membranes are bimolecular layers similar to those formed by contemporary membrane lipids. We conclude that bilayer membrane formation by primitive amphiphiles on the early Earth is feasible. However, only a minor fraction of acidic amphiphiles assembles into bilayers, and the resulting membranes require narrowly defined conditions of pH and ionic composition to be stable. It seems unlikely, therefore, that meteoritic infall was a direct source of membrane amphiphiles. Instead, the hydrocarbon components and their derivatives more probably would provide an organic stock available for chemical evolution. Our current research is directed at possible reactions which would generate substantial quantities of membranogenic

  14. The Atmospheric Fate of Organic Nitrogen Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borduas, Nadine

    Organic nitrogen compounds are present in our atmosphere from biogenic and anthropogenic sources and have impacts on air quality and climate. Due to recent advances in instrumentation, these compounds are being detected in the gas and particle phases, raising questions as to their source, processing and sinks in the environment. With their recently identified role as contributors to aerosol formation and growth, their novel large scale use as solvents in carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology and their emissions from cigarette smoke, it is now important to address the gaps in our understanding of the fate of organic nitrogen. Experimentally and theoretically, I studied the chemical atmospheric fate of specific organic nitrogen compounds in the amine, amide and isocyanate families, yielding information that can be used in chemical transport models to assess the fate of this emerging class of atmospheric molecules. I performed kinetic laboratory studies in a smog chamber to measure the room temperature rate coefficient for reaction with the hydroxyl radical of monoethanolamine, nicotine, and five different amides. I employed online-mass spectrometry techniques to quantify the oxidation products. I found that amines react quickly with OH radicals with lifetimes of a few hours under sunlit conditions, producing amides as oxidation products. My studies on amides revealed that they have much longer lifetimes in the atmosphere, ranging from a few hours to a week. Photo-oxidation of amides produces isocyanates and I investigated these mechanisms in detail using ab initio calculations. Furthermore, I experimentally measured isocyanic acid's Henry's Law constant as well as its hydrolysis rate constants to better understand its sinks in the atmosphere. Finally, I re-examined the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of organic nitrogen molecules for improved model parameterizations.

  15. Antiandrogenic activity and metabolism of the organophosphorus pesticide fenthion and related compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Shigeyuki; Suzuki, Tomoharu; Ohta, Shigeru; Fujimoto, Nariaki

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the endocrine-disrupting actions of the organophosphorus pesticide fenthion and related compounds and the influence of metabolic transformation on the activities of these compounds. Fenthion acted as an antagonist of the androgenic activity of dihydrotestosterone (10(-7)M) in the concentration range of 10(-6)-10(-4)M in an androgen-responsive element-luciferase reporter-responsive assay using NIH3T3 cells. The antiandrogenic activity of fenthion was similar in magnitude to that of flutamide. Fenthion also tested positive in the Hershberger assay using castrated male rats. Marked estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities of fenthion and related compounds were not observed in MCF-7 cells. When fenthion was incubated with rat liver microsomes in the presence of NADPH, the antiandrogenic activity markedly decreased, and fenthion sulfoxide was detected as a major metabolite. The oxidase activity toward fenthion was exhibited by cytochrome P450 and flavin-containing monooxygenase. Fenthion sulfoxide was negative in the screening test for antiandrogens, as was fenthion sulfone. However, when fenthion sulfoxide was incubated with liver cytosol in the presence of 2-hydroxypyrimidine, an electron donor of aldehyde oxidase, the extract of the incubation mixture exhibited antiandrogenic activity. In this case, fenthion was detected as a major metabolite of the sulfoxide. Metabolic interconversion between fenthion and fenthion sulfoxide in the body seems to maintain the antiandrogenic activity. PMID:12676606

  16. Anthropogenic Organic Compounds in Ground Water and Finished Water of Community Water Systems near Dayton, Ohio, 2002-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Mary Ann

    2007-01-01

    Source water for 15 community-water-system (CWS) wells in the vicinity of Dayton, Ohio, was sampled to evaluate the occurrence of 258 anthropogenic compounds (AOCs). At least one AOC was detected in 12 of the 15 samples. Most samples contained a mixture of compounds (average of four compounds per sample). The compounds that were detected in more than 30 percent of the samples included three volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (trichloroethene, chloroform, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane) and four pesticides or pesticide breakdown products (prometon, simazine, atrazine, and deethylatrazine). In general, VOCs were detected at higher concentrations than pesticides were; among the VOCs, the maximum detected concentration was 4.8 ?g/L (for trichloroethene), whereas among the pesticides, the maximum detected concentration was 0.041 ?g/L (for atrazine). During a later phase of the study, samples of source water from five CWS wells were compared to samples of finished water associated with each well. In general, VOC detections were higher in finished water than in source water, primarily due to the occurrence of trihalomethanes, which are compounds that can form during the treatment process. In contrast, pesticide detections were relatively similar between source- and finished-water samples. To assess the human-health relevance of the data, concentrations of AOCs were compared to their respective human-health benchmarks. For pesticides, the maximum detected concentrations were at least 2 orders of magnitude less than the benchmark values. However, three VOCs - trichloroethene, carbon tetrachloride, and tetrachloromethane - were detected at concentrations that approach human-health benchmarks and therefore may warrant inclusion in a low-concentration, trends monitoring program.

  17. Organic compounds in White River water used for public supply near Indianapolis, Indiana, 2002-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lathrop, Tim; Moran, Dan

    2011-01-01

    The National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) characterized the occurrence of 277 organic compounds in source water (stream water collected before treatment) and finished water (treated water before distribution) from the White River North treatment plant, one of several community water systems that use the White River as its primary water supply (fig. 1). Samples were collected at least monthly during 2002-05 and included 30 source- and 13 finished-water samples. The samples were analyzed for pesticides and selected pesticide degradates (or 'breakdown products'), solvents, gasoline hydrocarbons, disinfection by-products, personal-care and domestic-use products, and other organic compounds. Community water systems are required to monitor for compounds regulated under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Most of the compounds tested in this study are not regulated under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) federal drinking-water standards (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2007a). The White River study is part of the ongoing Source Water-Quality Assessment (SWQA) investigation of community water systems that withdraw from rivers across the United States. More detailed information and references on the sampling-design methodology, specific compounds monitored, and the national study are described by Carter and others (2007).

  18. Effect-based assessment of persistent organic pollutant and pesticide dumpsite using mammalian CALUX reporter cell lines.

    PubMed

    Pieterse, B; Rijk, I J C; Simon, E; van Vugt-Lussenburg, B M A; Fokke, B F H; van der Wijk, M; Besselink, H; Weber, R; van der Burg, B

    2015-10-01

    A combined chemical and biological analysis of samples from a major obsolete pesticide and persistent organic pollutant (POP) dumpsite in Northern Tajikistan was carried out. The chemical analytical screening focused on a range of prioritized compounds and compounds known to be present locally. Since chemical analytics does not allow measurements of hazards in complex mixtures, we tested the use of a novel effect-based approach using a panel of quantitative high-throughput CALUX reporter assays measuring distinct biological effects relevant in hazard assessment. Assays were included for assessing effects related to estrogen, androgen, and progestin signaling, aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated signaling, AP1 signaling, genotoxicity, oxidative stress, chemical hypoxia, and ER stress. With this panel of assays, we first quantified the biological activities of the individual chemicals measured in chemical analytics. Next, we calculated the expected sum activity by these chemicals in the samples of the pesticide dump site and compared the results with the measured CALUX bioactivity of the total extracts of these samples. The results showed that particularly endocrine disruption-related effects were common among the samples. This was consistent with the toxicological profiles of the individual chemicals that dominated these samples. However, large discrepancies between chemical and biological analysis were found in a sample from a burn place present in this site, with biological activities that could not be explained by chemical analysis. This is likely to be caused by toxic combustion products or by spills of compounds that were not targeted in the chemical analysis. PMID:26022396

  19. Biogenic volatile organic compounds - small is beautiful

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, S. M.; Asensio, D.; Li, Q.; Penuelas, J.

    2012-12-01

    While canopy and regional scale flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs) are essential to obtain an integrated picture of total compound reaching the atmosphere, many fascinating and important emission details are waiting to be discovered at smaller scales, in different ecological and functional compartments. We concentrate on bVOCs below ground to <2m above ground level. Emissions at leaf scale are well documented and widely presented, and are not discussed here. Instead we describe some details of recent research on rhizosphere bVOCs, and bVOCs associated with pollination of flowers. Although bVOC emissions from soil surfaces are small, bVOCs are exuded by roots of some plant species, and can be extracted from decaying litter. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the rhizosphere provide a specialised carbon source for micro-organisms, helping to define the micro-organism community structure, and impacting on nutrient cycles which are partly controlled by microorganisms. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the soil system could also affect the aboveground structure of ecosystems because of their role in plant defence strategies and as mediating chemicals in allelopathy. A gradient of monoterpene concentration was found in soil around Pinus sylvestris and Pinus halepensis, decreasing with distance from the tree. Some compounds (α-pinene, sabinene, humulene and caryophyllene) in mineral soil were linearly correlated with the total amount of each compound in the overlying litter, indicating that litter might be the dominant source of these compounds. However, α-pinene did not fall within the correlation, indicating a source other than litter, probably root exudates. We also show that rhizosphere bVOCs can be a carbon source for soil microbes. In a horizontal gradient from Populus tremula trees, microbes closest to the tree trunk were better enzymatically equipped to metabolise labeled monoterpene substrate. Monoterpenes can also increase the

  20. In vivo tracing of organochloride and organophosphorus pesticides in different organs of hydroponically grown malabar spinach (Basella alba L.).

    PubMed

    Qiu, Junlang; Chen, Guosheng; Xu, Jianqiao; Luo, Erlun; Liu, Yan; Wang, Fuxin; Zhou, Hong; Liu, Yuan; Zhu, Fang; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2016-10-01

    An in vivo uptake and elimination tracing study based on solid phase microextraction (SPME) was conducted to investigate the accumulation, persistence and distribution of organochloride pesticides (OCPs) and organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) in malabar spinach (Basella alba L.) plants. Uptake and elimination of the pesticides were traced in leaves, stems and roots of living malabar spinach plants. Root concentration factor (RCF), distribution concentration factor (DCF) and transpiration stream concentration factor (TSCF) were calculated based on the in vivo tracing data. The tracing data showed that the OCPs were much more accumulative and persistent than the OPPs in roots, while they were similarly accumulative and persistent in leaves and stems. RCF values of the OPPs or OCPs were likely to increase with the increase in LogKow values except fenthion. Obtained DCF values indicated that OPPs and OCPs were more accumulative in the organs containing more lipids. TSCF values showed that the translocation of OPPs and OCPs from roots to foliage was firstly dependent on the hydrophobicity of the compounds, but also significantly affected by the water solubility. This is the first study of generating RCF, DCF and TSCF data in living plants by in vivo sampling method, which provides a foundation to promote the application of in vivo SPME and improve understanding of contaminant behaviors in living plants. PMID:27209519

  1. Organochlorine pesticide distribution in an organic production system for cow's milk in Chiapas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Murga, María N; Gutiérrez, Rey; Vega, Salvador; Pérez, José J; Ortiz, Rutilio; Schettino, Beatriz; Yamasaki, Alberto; Ruíz, Jorge L

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of organochlorine pesticides in samples of forage, soil, water, and milk in four units of an organic production system for cow´s milk (samples of forage, milk, soil, and water) in Tecpatan, Chiapas, Mexico. The organochlorine pesticides were extracted from forage, soil and water based on the USEPA (2005) guideline and from milk based on the IDF 1991 guideline. The pesticides were identified and quantified by gas chromatography with electron capture detector (CG-ECD). In general, the highest average concentration of total pesticides was found in the samples of milk and forage (311 ± 328 and 116.5 ±77 ng g(-1) respectively). Although, the production systems analyzed are organic, organochlorine pesticides were detected in all environmental samples (forage, soil, water, and organic milk). Although no values surpassed the defined limits of Mexican and International regulation it is advisable that a monitoring program of contaminants in these production systems is continued. PMID:27228789

  2. A method of isolating organic compounds present in water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calder, G. V.; Fritz, J.; Junk, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Water sample is passed through a column containing macroreticular resin, which absorbs only nonionic organic compounds. These compounds are selectively separated using aqueous eluents of varying pH, or completely exuded with small amount of an organic eluent.

  3. Palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of bio-oils and organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hu, Jianli; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.

    2008-09-16

    The invention provides palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of bio-oils and certain organic compounds. Experimental results have shown unexpected and superior results for palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of organic compounds typically found in bio-oils.

  4. Palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of bio-oils and organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C [Kennewick, WA; Hu, Jianli [Richland, WA; Hart,; Todd, R [Kennewick, WA; Neuenschwander, Gary G [Burbank, WA

    2011-06-07

    The invention provides palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of bio-oils and certain organic compounds. Experimental results have shown unexpected and superior results for palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of organic compounds typically found in bio-oils.

  5. Organic and conventional fertilisation procedures on the nitrate, antioxidants and pesticide content in parts of vegetables.

    PubMed

    Lima, G P P; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Bernhard, A B; Pirozzi, D C Z; Fleuri, L F; Vianello, F

    2012-01-01

    Different parts of plant foods are generally discarded by consumers such as peel, stalk and leaves, which could however possess a nutritional value. However, few studies have analysed the composition of these marginal foods. The phenolic compound, flavonoid, polyamine, nitrate and pesticide contents of parts of vegetables that are usually discarded--but which were cultivated according to conventional and non-conventional procedures--were analysed to provide suggestions on how to improve the consumption of these parts and to reduce the production of urban solid waste. Few, but significant, differences between the two manuring procedures were observed. Higher nitrate content and the presence of organochlorine pesticides were found in conventional cultivated papaya peel, lemon balm leaves, jack fruit pulp, and beet stalk and peel. Discarded parts of plant foods such as stalk, leaves and peels can be used as a source of antioxidant compounds, such as phenolic compounds. PMID:24779784

  6. Synthetic organic compounds and their transformation products in groundwater: occurrence, fate and mitigation.

    PubMed

    Postigo, Cristina; Barceló, Damià

    2015-01-15

    Groundwater constitutes the main source of public drinking water supply in many regions. Thus, the contamination of groundwater resources by organic chemicals is a matter of growing concern because of its potential effects on public health. The present manuscript compiles the most recent works related to the study of synthetic organic compounds (SOCs) in groundwater, with special focus on the occurrence of contaminants not or barely covered by previously published reviews, e.g., pesticide and pharmaceutical transformation products, lifestyle products, and industrial chemicals such as corrosion inhibitors, brominated and organophosphate flame retardants, plasticizers, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Moreover, the main challenges in managed aquifer recharge, i.e., reclaimed water injection and infiltration, and riverbank filtration, regarding natural attenuation of organic micropollutants are discussed, and insights into the future chemical quality of groundwater are provided. PMID:24974362

  7. Concentrations of organochlorine pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and perfluorinated compounds in the atmosphere of North Greenland.

    PubMed

    Bossi, Rossana; Vorkamp, Katrin; Skov, Henrik

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and neutral per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) have been measured at Villum Research Station, Station Nord (North Greenland) in the period 2008-2013. Atmospheric concentrations of OCPs at the same site have been previously reported for the years 2008-2010. The detection frequency and the average concentrations of OCPs have not significantly changed since the previous study. PBDE congeners (∑13PBDEs) were measured for the first time in North Greenland at concentrations similar to those observed for other remote sites, confirming that these compounds are ubiquitous in the Northern Hemisphere. The ∑13PBDEs concentration ranged from not detected (n.d.) to 6.26 pg m(-3). The BDE congeners found in more than 30% of the samples were BDE-17, BDE-28, BDE-47, BDE-71, BDE-99 and BDE-100. Also for neutral PFAS we present for the first time a multiyear series of measurements for North Greenland. The average sum of the seven measured neutral PFAS (∑7PFAS) ranged from 1.82 to 32.1 pg m(-3). The most abundant compound was 8:2 FTOH (44% of ∑7PFAS), followed by 6:2 FTOH and 10:2 FTOH. Perfluoroalkyl sulfonamides (FOSA) and perfluoroalkyl sulfonamidoethanols (FOSE) were also detected but at much lower concentrations than FTOHs. Temporal trends were investigated for all measured compounds but no significant trend in concentration was observed. Monthly average concentrations for the six years were calculated for each compound and the seasonal variation was investigated. Some OCPs and FTOHs showed seasonal variations, and in most cases a maximum was found during summer. PMID:26809479

  8. Volatile Organic Compound Analysis in Istanbul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćapraz, Ö.; Deniz, A.; Öztürk, A.; Incecik, S.; Toros, H.; Coşkun, M.

    2012-04-01

    Volatile Organic Compound Analysis in Istanbul Ö. Çapraz1, A. Deniz1,3, A. Ozturk2, S. Incecik1, H. Toros1 and, M. Coskun1 (1) Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Department of Meteorology, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey. (2) Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Chemical and Metallurgical, Chemical Engineering, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey. (3) Marmara Clean Air Center, Ministry of Environment and Urbanization, Nişantaşı, 34365, İstanbul, Turkey. One of the major problems of megacities is air pollution. Therefore, investigations of air quality are increasing and supported by many institutions in recent years. Air pollution in Istanbul contains many components that originate from a wide range of industrial, heating, motor vehicle, and natural emissions sources. VOC, originating mainly from automobile exhaust, secondhand smoke and building materials, are one of these compounds containing some thousands of chemicals. In spite of the risks to human health, relatively little is known about the levels of VOC in Istanbul. In this study, ambient air quality measurements of 32 VOCs including hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons and carbonyls were conducted in Kağıthane (Golden Horn) region in Istanbul during the winter season of 2011 in order to develop the necessary scientific framework for the subsequent developments. Kağıthane creek valley is the source part of the Golden Horn and one of the most polluted locations in Istanbul due to its topographical form and pollutant sources in the region. In this valley, horizontal and vertical atmospheric motions are very weak. The target compounds most commonly found were benzene, toluene, xylene and ethyl benzene. Concentrations of total hydrocarbons ranged between 1.0 and 10.0 parts per billion, by volume (ppbv). Ambient air levels of halogenated hydrocarbons appeared to exhibit unique spatial variations and no single factor seemed to explain trends for this group of

  9. Tyrosinase inhibition organic phase biosensor for triazinic and benzotriazinic pesticide analysis (part two).

    PubMed

    Campanella, L; Dragone, R; Lelo, D; Martini, E; Tomassetti, M

    2006-02-01

    Several triazine pesticides, such as atrazine, are much more soluble in several organic solvents, such as chloroform, than in water. Our recent research was aimed at analyzing this class of pesticides using tyrosinase OPEE (organic phase enzyme electrodes), exploiting their inhibiting action on the tyrosinase enzyme when operating in water-saturated chloroform medium. In this work we studied the response of a tyrosinase inhibition enzyme sensor to several triazinic (simazine, propazine, terbuthylazine) and benzotriazinic (azinphos-ethyl and azinphos-methyl) pesticides (LOD=0.5x10(-9) mol l(-1)). Recovery trials were also performed in vegetal matrixes (corn, barley, lentils). Lastly, the effect of the solvent (chloroform or water) on the inhibition process was investigated via Hill's equation and the diffusion of analyte from the solvent to the enzyme membrane. PMID:16328240

  10. Study on the distribution of organic carbon in soil fractions and its reaction potential of binding the pesticides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Ashim

    2010-05-01

    STUDY ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC CARBON IN SOIL FRACTIONS AND ITS REACTION POTENTIAL OF BINDING THE PESTICIDES **SUMITRA ROY1, SANKHAJIT ROY1, *ASHIM CHOWDHURY2, SASWATI PRADHAN2 and PETER BURAUEL3 1Department of Agricultural Chemicals, Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalay, Mohanpur, West Bengal, India. 2Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Soil Science, University of Calcutta, West Bengal, India. 3Institute of Chemical Dynamics & Geosphere, FZ-Juelich, Germany. *Correspondence: ashimkly@hotmail.com **Research work carried out as DAAD Sandwich research fellow at FZ- Juelich, Germany Soil is the ultimate sink of all selectively applied pesticides. In addition to the basic physicochemical data of an active ingredient, the fate of the various compounds is largely determined by the type of application. Finally, pesticide and their metabolites, as well as structural elements, remain in the native carbon reserves of the soil or are sorbed & fixed to clay minerals and clay- humus complexes. Soil organic matter (SOM) and the soil microbial community are the crucial components which regulate soil processes and contribute towards the stability of the soil ecosystem. It is an energy source for biological mineralization processes, functions as a buffer and participates in chemical reaction. Knowledge is essential to understand the extent to which the SOM influences the mobilization and immobilization processes of foreign substance in soil and the substance transport and pollutant decomposition in soil. The freshly incorporated organic matter undergoes mineralization and the non mineralized carbon fraction is of special relevance with respect to soil stability in general and decisive for the fate and particular the persistence of xenobiotics in soil. The biological and physicochemical interactions establishing equilibrium between the organic matter bound, fixed or complexed to the soil matrix and that dissolve in the soil solution must be understood in detail to realize

  11. Organic foods contain higher levels of certain nutrients, lower levels of pesticides, and may provide health benefits for the consumer.

    PubMed

    Crinnion, Walter J

    2010-04-01

    The multi-billion dollar organic food industry is fueled by consumer perception that organic food is healthier (greater nutritional value and fewer toxic chemicals). Studies of the nutrient content in organic foods vary in results due to differences in the ground cover and maturity of the organic farming operation. Nutrient content also varies from farmer to farmer and year to year. However, reviews of multiple studies show that organic varieties do provide significantly greater levels of vitamin C, iron, magnesium, and phosphorus than non-organic varieties of the same foods. While being higher in these nutrients, they are also significantly lower in nitrates and pesticide residues. In addition, with the exception of wheat, oats, and wine, organic foods typically provide greater levels of a number of important antioxidant phytochemicals (anthocyanins, flavonoids, and carotenoids). Although in vitro studies of organic fruits and vegetables consistently demonstrate that organic foods have greater antioxidant activity, are more potent suppressors of the mutagenic action of toxic compounds, and inhibit the proliferation of certain cancer cell lines, in vivo studies of antioxidant activity in humans have failed to demonstrate additional benefit. Clear health benefits from consuming organic dairy products have been demonstrated in regard to allergic dermatitis. PMID:20359265

  12. A review of the tissue residue approach for organic and organometallic compounds in aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Anne E; Barron, Mace G; Beckvar, Nancy; Driscoll, Susan B Kane; Meador, James P; Parkerton, Tom F; Preuss, Thomas G; Steevens, Jeffery A

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the tissue residue approach (TRA) for toxicity assessment as it applies to organic chemicals and some organometallic compounds (Sn, Hg, and Pb) in aquatic organisms. Specific emphasis was placed on evaluating key factors that influence interpretation of critical body residue (CBR) toxicity metrics including data quality issues, lipid dynamics, choice of endpoints, processes that alter toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics, phototoxicity, species- and life stage-specific sensitivities, and biotransformation. The vast majority of data available on TRA is derived from laboratory studies of acute lethal responses to organic toxicants exhibiting baseline toxicity. Application of the TRA to various baseline toxicants as well as substances with specific modes of action via receptor-mediated processes, such as chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, and organometallics is discussed, as is application of TRA concepts in field assessments of tissue residues. In contrast to media-based toxicity relationships, CBR values tend to be less variable and less influenced by factors that control bioavailability and bioaccumulation, and TRA can be used to infer mechanisms of toxic action, evaluate the toxicity of mixtures, and interpret field data on bioaccumulated toxicants. If residue-effects data are not available, body residues can be estimated, as has been done using the target lipid model for baseline toxicants, to derive critical values for risk assessment. One of the primary unresolved issues complicating TRA for organic chemicals is biotransformation. Further work on the influence of biotransformation, a better understanding of contaminant lipid interactions, and an explicit understanding of the time dependency of CBRs and receptor-mediated toxicity are all required to advance this field. Additional residue-effects data on sublethal endpoints, early life stages, and a wider range of legacy and emergent contaminants will be needed to improve the ability

  13. 40 CFR 158.2174 - Experimental use permit microbial pesticides nontarget organisms and environmental fate data...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Freshwater invertebrate toxicity/pathogenicity NR R R R NR NR NR NR TGAI 1, 2, 3 885.4300 Nontarget... exposure. Freshwater invertebrates are preferred for invertebrate testing. 3. Required when there will be significant exposure to aquatic organisms (fish and invertebrates). 4. Required if the microbial pesticide...

  14. 40 CFR 158.2174 - Experimental use permit microbial pesticides nontarget organisms and environmental fate data...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Freshwater invertebrate toxicity/pathogenicity NR R R R NR NR NR NR TGAI 1, 2, 3 885.4300 Nontarget... exposure. Freshwater invertebrates are preferred for invertebrate testing. 3. Required when there will be significant exposure to aquatic organisms (fish and invertebrates). 4. Required if the microbial pesticide...

  15. 40 CFR 158.2174 - Experimental use permit microbial pesticides nontarget organisms and environmental fate data...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Freshwater invertebrate toxicity/pathogenicity NR R R R NR NR NR NR TGAI 1, 2, 3 885.4300 Nontarget... exposure. Freshwater invertebrates are preferred for invertebrate testing. 3. Required when there will be significant exposure to aquatic organisms (fish and invertebrates). 4. Required if the microbial pesticide...

  16. 40 CFR 158.2174 - Experimental use permit microbial pesticides nontarget organisms and environmental fate data...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Freshwater invertebrate toxicity/pathogenicity NR R R R NR NR NR NR TGAI 1, 2, 3 885.4300 Nontarget... exposure. Freshwater invertebrates are preferred for invertebrate testing. 3. Required when there will be significant exposure to aquatic organisms (fish and invertebrates). 4. Required if the microbial pesticide...

  17. 40 CFR 158.2174 - Experimental use permit microbial pesticides nontarget organisms and environmental fate data...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Freshwater invertebrate toxicity/pathogenicity NR R R R NR NR NR NR TGAI 1, 2, 3 885.4300 Nontarget... exposure. Freshwater invertebrates are preferred for invertebrate testing. 3. Required when there will be significant exposure to aquatic organisms (fish and invertebrates). 4. Required if the microbial pesticide...

  18. Computational assessment of organic photovoltaic candidate compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borunda, Mario; Dai, Shuo; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Amador-Bedolla, Carlos; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2015-03-01

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells are emerging as a possible renewable alternative to petroleum based resources and are needed to meet our growing demand for energy. Although not as efficient as silicon based cells, OPV cells have as an advantage that their manufacturing cost is potentially lower. The Harvard Clean Energy Project, using a cheminformatic approach of pattern recognition and machine learning strategies, has ranked a molecular library of more than 2.6 million candidate compounds based on their performance as possible OPV materials. Here, we present a ranking of the top 1000 molecules for use as photovoltaic materials based on their optical absorption properties obtained via time-dependent density functional theory. This computational search has revealed the molecular motifs shared by the set of most promising molecules.

  19. Alkaline dechlorination of chlorinated volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, B.; Siegrist, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    The vast majority of contaminated sites in the United States and abroad are contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE), trichloroethane (TCA), and chloroform. These VOCs are mobile and persistent in the subsurface and present serious health risks at trace concentrations. The goal of this project was to develop a new chemical treatment system that can rapidly and effectively degrade chlorinated VOCs. The system is based on our preliminary findings that strong alkalis such as sodium hydroxide (NaOH) can absorb and degrade TCE. The main objectives of this study were to determine the reaction rates between chlorinated VOCs, particularly TCE, and strong alkalis, to elucidate the reaction mechanisms and by-products, to optimize the chemical reactions under various experimental conditions, and to develop a laboratory bench- scale alkaline destruction column that can be used to destroy vapor- phase TCE.

  20. IRRADIATION METHOD OF CONVERTING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    DOEpatents

    Allen, A.O.; Caffrey, J.M. Jr.

    1960-10-11

    A method is given for changing the distribution of organic compounds from that produced by the irradiation of bulk alkane hydrocarbons. This method consists of depositing an alkane hydrocarbon on the surface of a substrate material and irradiating with gamma radiation at a dose rate of more than 100,000 rads. The substrate material may be a metal, metal salts, metal oxides, or carbons having a surface area in excess of 1 m/sup 2//g. The hydrocarbons are deposited in layers of from 0.1 to 10 monolayers on the surfaces of these substrates and irradiated. The product yields are found to vary from those which result from the irradiation of bulk hydrocarbons in that there is an increase in the quantity of branched hydrocarbons.

  1. Extraction of organic compounds from solid samples

    SciTech Connect

    Junk, G.A.; Richard, J.J.

    1986-04-01

    Pyridine, benzene, cyclohexane, methylene chloride, dimethyl sulfoxide, dimethylformamide, and n-methylpyrrolidone have been compared for the extraction of polycyclic organic materials (POMs) from urban air, diesel, and stack particulate samples. Both sonic and Soxhlet techniques have been examined for both natural environmental particulates and particulates spiked with selected POMs. The extraction results vary for different polycyclic compounds adsorbed on different solid matrices, so no single solvent or extraction technique could be unambiguously recommended. However, comparative average results for 14 compounds spiked onto fly ash at 0.1, 0.25, and 1.0 ..mu..g/g showed pyridine to have 1.5 times more extraction efficiency than benzene. These and other reported results suggest that pyridine deserves more attention as an extractant for particulate samples. In separate tests, recoveries of POMs from fly ash were not improved by deactivation with aqueous solutions of ammonium hydroxide, thiocyanate and carbonate, and sodium nitrite prior to the extraction. 39 references, 5 tables.

  2. ITCT 2K2: Trans-Pacific Transport of Anthropogenic Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonich, S. L.; Killin, R.; Hauser, C.; Wilson, G.

    2002-12-01

    During Spring 2002, high volume air samples were collected for anthropogenic semi-volatile organic compounds (SOCs) at Cheeka Peak Observatory as part of the ITCT 2K2 and PHOBEA2 campaigns. The samples were analyzed for a wide range of SOCs, including organochlorine pesticides, current use pesticides, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, in both the atmospheric gas and particulate phases. An Accelerated Solvent Extraction system was used to clean and extract the polyurethane foam plugs that were used to trap gas-phase SOCs and to extract glass fiber filters that were used to trap particulate-phase SOCs. The concentration of SOCs in the air samples was correlated with air trajectories, and the concentration of other air pollutants, in an attempt to distinguish between Asian and North American source emissions.

  3. Quantitative effects of some pesticides on certain physiological groups of micro-organisms in soil.

    PubMed

    Makawi, A A; Abdel-Nasser, M; Abdel-Moneim, A A

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative effects of temik (insecticide and nematocide), orthocide (fungicide), or treflan (herbicide), added to soil at field rate application, on counts of certain desirable soil microorganisms were studied. In the presence of any of the pesticides, counts of aerobic cellulose-decomposers were either stimulated or depressed. Despite the temporarily slight stimulation, observed in some instances of the initial periods, the effect of any pesticide on counts of Azotobacter, N-fixing clostridia, and ammonifiers was subsequently depressive. The period of retardation or stimulation differed according to the chemical composition of the pesticides and physiological properties of micro-organisms. However, the autotrophic nitrifying bacteria, especially ammonium-oxidizers, seemed to be more sensitive and their counts in treated in treated soil were sharply depressed. PMID:494851

  4. Sediment contamination of residential streams in the metropolitan kansas city area, USA: Part I. distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and pesticide-related compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tao, J.; Huggins, D.; Welker, G.; Dias, J.R.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Murowchick, J.B.

    2010-01-01

    This is the first part of a study that evaluates the influence of nonpoint-source contaminants on the sediment quality of five streams within the metropolitan Kansas City area, central United States. Surficial sediment was collected in 2003 from 29 sites along five streams with watersheds that extend from the core of the metropolitan area to its development fringe. Sediment was analyzed for 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 3 common polychlorinated biphenyl mixtures (Aroclors), and 25 pesticide-related compounds of eight chemical classes. Multiple PAHs were detected at more than 50% of the sites, and concentrations of total PAHs ranged from 290 to 82,150 ??g/kg (dry weight). The concentration and frequency of detection of PAHs increased with increasing urbanization of the residential watersheds. Four- and five-ring PAH compounds predominated the PAH composition (73-100%), especially fluoranthene and pyrene. The PAH composition profiles along with the diagnostic isomer ratios [e.g., anthracene/(anthracene + phenanthrene), 0.16 ?? 0.03; fluoranthene/(fluoranthene + pyrene), 0.55 ?? 0.01)] indicate that pyrogenic sources (i.e., coal-tar-related operations or materials and traffic-related particles) may be common PAH contributors to these residential streams. Historical-use organochlorine insecticides and their degradates dominated the occurrences of pesticide-related compounds, with chlordane and dieldrin detected in over or nearly 50% of the samples. The occurrence of these historical organic compounds was associated with past urban applications, which may continue to be nonpoint sources replenishing local streams. Concentrations of low molecular weight (LMW; two or three rings) and high molecular weight (HMW; four to six rings) PAHs covaried along individual streams but showed dissimilar distribution patterns between the streams, while the historical pesticide-related compounds generally increased in concentration downstream. Correlations were noted

  5. Estimating Pesticide Exposure from Dietary Intake and Organic Food Choices: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    PubMed Central

    Beresford, Shirley A.A.; Fenske, Richard A.; Fitzpatrick, Annette L.; Lu, Chensheng; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; Kaufman, Joel D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Organophosphate pesticide (OP) exposure to the U.S. population is dominated by dietary intake. The magnitude of exposure from diet depends partly on personal decisions such as which foods to eat and whether to choose organic food. Most studies of OP exposure rely on urinary biomarkers, which are limited by short half-lives and often lack specificity to parent compounds. A reliable means of estimating long-term dietary exposure to individual OPs is needed to assess the potential relationship with adverse health effects. Objectives We assessed long-term dietary exposure to 14 OPs among 4,466 participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, and examined the influence of organic produce consumption on this exposure. Methods Individual-level exposure was estimated by combining information on typical intake of specific food items with average OP residue levels on those items. In an analysis restricted to a subset of participants who reported rarely or never eating organic produce (“conventional consumers”), we assessed urinary dialkylphosphate (DAP) levels across tertiles of estimated exposure (n = 480). In a second analysis, we compared DAP levels across subgroups with differing self-reported organic produce consumption habits (n = 240). Results Among conventional consumers, increasing tertile of estimated dietary OP exposure was associated with higher DAP concentrations (p < 0.05). DAP concentrations were also significantly lower in groups reporting more frequent consumption of organic produce (p < 0.02). Conclusions Long-term dietary exposure to OPs was estimated from dietary intake data, and estimates were consistent with DAP measurements. More frequent consumption of organic produce was associated with lower DAPs. Citation Curl CL, Beresford SA, Fenske RA, Fitzpatrick AL, Lu C, Nettleton JA, Kaufman JD. 2015. Estimating pesticide exposure from dietary intake and organic food choices: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Environ

  6. Organic compounds in meteorites and their origins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayatsu, R.; Anders, E.

    1981-01-01

    The current investigation represents an extensively updated version of a review conducted by Anders et al. (1973). The investigation takes into account the literature through mid-1980. It is pointed out that Type 1 carbonaceous chondrites (C1) contain 6% of their cosmic complement of carbon, mainly in the form of organic matter. Most authors now agree that this material represents primitive prebiotic matter. The principal questions remaining are what abiotic processes formed the organic matter, and to what extent these processes took place in locales other than the solar nebula, such as interstellar clouds or meteorite parent bodes. The problem is approached in three stages. It is attempted to reconstruct the physical conditions during condensation from the clues contained in the inorganic matrix of the meteorite. The condensation behavior of carbon under these conditions is determined on the basis of thermodynamic calculations. Model experiments on the condensation of carbon are performed, and the synthesized compounds are compared with those actually found in meteorites.

  7. Efficiency of conventional drinking-water-treatment processes in removal of pharmaceuticals and other organic compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stackelberg, P.E.; Gibs, J.; Furlong, E.T.; Meyer, M.T.; Zaugg, S.D.; Lippincott, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    Samples of water and sediment from a conventional drinking-water-treatment (DWT) plant were analyzed for 113 organic compounds (OCs) that included pharmaceuticals, detergent degradates, flame retardants and plasticizers, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), fragrances and flavorants, pesticides and an insect repellent, and plant and animal steroids. 45 of these compounds were detected in samples of source water and 34 were detected in samples of settled sludge and (or) filter-backwash sediments. The average percent removal of these compounds was calculated from their average concentration in time-composited water samples collected after clarification, disinfection (chlorination), and granular-activated-carbon (GAC) filtration. In general, GAC filtration accounted for 53% of the removal of these compounds from the aqueous phase; disinfection accounted for 32%, and clarification accounted for 15%. The effectiveness of these treatments varied widely within and among classes of compounds; some hydrophobic compounds were strongly oxidized by free chlorine, and some hydrophilic compounds were partly removed through adsorption processes. The detection of 21 of the compounds in 1 or more samples of finished water, and of 3 to 13 compounds in every finished-water sample, indicates substantial but incomplete degradation or removal of OCs through the conventional DWT process used at this plant. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Tritium labeling of organic compounds deposited on porous structures

    DOEpatents

    Ehrenkaufer, Richard L. E.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Hembree, Wylie C.

    1979-01-01

    An improved process for labeling organic compounds with tritium is carried out by depositing the selected compound on the extensive surface of a porous structure such as a membrane filter and exposing the membrane containing the compound to tritium gas activated by the microwave discharge technique. The labeled compound is then recovered from the porous structure.

  9. Molecular classification of pesticides including persistent organic pollutants, phenylurea and sulphonylurea herbicides.

    PubMed

    Torrens, Francisco; Castellano, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide residues in wine were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Retentions are modelled by structure-property relationships. Bioplastic evolution is an evolutionary perspective conjugating effect of acquired characters and evolutionary indeterminacy-morphological determination-natural selection principles; its application to design co-ordination index barely improves correlations. Fractal dimensions and partition coefficient differentiate pesticides. Classification algorithms are based on information entropy and its production. Pesticides allow a structural classification by nonplanarity, and number of O, S, N and Cl atoms and cycles; different behaviours depend on number of cycles. The novelty of the approach is that the structural parameters are related to retentions. Classification algorithms are based on information entropy. When applying procedures to moderate-sized sets, excessive results appear compatible with data suffering a combinatorial explosion. However, equipartition conjecture selects criterion resulting from classification between hierarchical trees. Information entropy permits classifying compounds agreeing with principal component analyses. Periodic classification shows that pesticides in the same group present similar properties; those also in equal period, maximum resemblance. The advantage of the classification is to predict the retentions for molecules not included in the categorization. Classification extends to phenyl/sulphonylureas and the application will be to predict their retentions. PMID:24905607

  10. Trace organic compounds in rain—II. Gas scavenging of neutral organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligocki, Mary P.; Leuenberger, Christian; Pankow, James F.

    Concurrent rain and air sampling was conducted for seven rain events in Portland, Oregon during February through to April of 1984. Concentration data are presented for a number of neutral organic compounds for both the rain-dissolved phase and the atmospheric gas phase. The ambient temperature averaged 8°C. Measured gas scavenging ratios ranged from 3 for tetrachloroethene to 10 5 for dibutylphthalate, and were generally 3-6 times higher than those calculated from Henry's Law constant ( H) values at 25°C taken from the literature. This discrepancy was due to the inappropriateness of applying 25°C H data at 5-10°C. Indeed, excellent agreement between the measured and predicted gas scavenging ratios was found for several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons for which temperature-dependent H data were available. These results demonstrate that equilibrium between rain and the atmospheric gas phase is attained for non-reactive neutral organic compounds.

  11. GLOBAL INVENTORY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS FORM ANTHROPOGENIC SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a global inventory anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions that includes a separate inventory for each of seven pollutant groups--paraffins, olefins, aromatics, formaldehyde, other aldehydes, other aromatics, and marginally reactive compounds....

  12. Effect of organic species on the solar detoxification of water polluted with pesticides.

    PubMed

    Soler, J; Santos-Juanes, L; Miró, P; Vicente, R; Arques, A; Amat, A M

    2011-04-15

    The effect of organic species on a solar-driven photo-Fenton treatment of a mixture of pesticides (methyl-oxydemethon, methidathion, carbaryl and dimethoate) has been studied in this paper. Triethoxyisododecyl alcohol, acetophenone and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) have been used as examples of surfactants, solvents and complexing agents, respectively. An inhibitory effect on mineralization as well as on the elimination of the pesticides was observed in the case of the aliphatic surfactants, most probably due to the competition between the pesticides and the added organic matter for reaction with the relatively unselective hydroxyl radical. A methodology combining chemical analyses and bioassays was tested in order to explore the applicability of coupling a photo-Fenton process with a biological treatment in the presence of the surfactant. Despite the complexity of the mixture under study, a reliable monitoring of the process was accomplished; the biocompatibility of the mixture was enhanced and the optimal irradiation intensity was achieved just after complete removal of the pesticides. PMID:21353387

  13. Breath measurements as volatile organic compound biomarkers.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, L; Buckley, T; Pellizzari, E; Gordon, S

    1996-01-01

    A brief review of the uses of breath analysis in studies of environmental exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is provided. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's large-scale Total Exposure Assessment Methodology Studies have measured concentrations of 32 target VOCs in the exhaled breath of about 800 residents of various U.S. cities. Since the previous 12-hr integrated personal air exposures to the same chemicals were also measured, the relation between exposure and body burden is illuminated. Another major use of the breath measurements has been to detect unmeasured pathways of exposure; the major impact of active smoking on exposure to benzene and styrene was detected in this way. Following the earlier field studies, a series of chamber studies have provided estimates of several important physiological parameters. Among these are the fraction, f, of the inhaled chemical that is exhaled under steady-state conditions and the residence times. tau i in several body compartments, which may be associated with the blood (or liver), organs, muscle, and fat. Most of the targeted VOCs appear to have similar residence times of a few minutes, 30 min, several hours, and several days in the respective tissue groups. Knowledge of these parameters can be helpful in estimating body burden from exposure or vice versa and in planning environmental studies, particularly in setting times to monitor breath in studies of the variation with time of body burden. Improvements in breath methods have made it possible to study short-term peak exposure situations such as filling a gas tank or taking a shower in contaminated water. PMID:8933027

  14. Pesticide mobility and leachate toxicity in two abandoned mine soils. Effect of organic amendments.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Liébana, José Antonio; Mingorance, M Dolores; Peña, Aránzazu

    2014-11-01

    Abandoned mine areas, used in the past for the extraction of minerals, constitute a degraded landscape which needs to be reintegrated to productive or leisure activities. However these soils, mainly composed by silt or sand and with low organic matter content, are vulnerable to organic and inorganic pollutants posing a risk to the surrounding ecosystems and groundwater. Soils from two mining areas from Andalusia were evaluated: one from Nerva (NCL) in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (SW Andalusia) and another one from the iron Alquife mine (ALQ) (SE Andalusia). To improve soil properties and fertility two amendments, stabilised sewage sludge (SSL) and composted sewage sludge (CSL), were selected. The effect of amendment addition on the mobility of two model pesticides, thiacloprid and fenarimol, was assessed using soil columns under non-equilibrium conditions. Fenarimol, more hydrophobic than thiacloprid, only leached from native ALQ, a soil with lower organic carbon (OC) content than NCL (0.21 and 1.4%, respectively). Addition of amendments affected differently pesticide mobility: thiacloprid in the leachates was reduced by 14% in NCL-SSL and by 4% in ALQ-CSL. Soil OC and dissolved OC were the parameters which explained pesticide residues in soil. Chemical analysis revealed that leachates from the different soil columns did not contain toxic element levels, except As in NCL soil. Finally ecotoxicological data showed moderate toxicity in the initial leachates, with an increase coinciding with pesticide maximum concentration. The addition of SSL slightly reduced the toxicity towards Vibrio fischeri, likely due to enhanced retention of pesticides by amended soils. PMID:25169870

  15. Soil amino compound and carbohydrate contents influenced by organic amendments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Amino compounds (i. e. amino acids and sugars), and carbohydrates are labile organic components and contribute to the improvement of soil fertility and quality. Animal manure and other organic soil amendments are rich in both amino compounds and carbohydrates, hence organic soil amendments might af...

  16. FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

    2002-06-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated exploratory work towards the development of new field screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of carbon-halogen bonds. Commercially available heated diode and corona discharge leak detectors were procured and evaluated for halogenated VOC response. The units were modified to provide a digital readout of signal related to VOC concentration. Sensor response was evaluated with carbon tetrachloride and tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE), which represent halogenated VOCs with and without double bonds. The response characteristics were determined for the VOCs directly in headspace in Tedlar bag containers. Quantitation limits in air were estimated. Potential interferences from volatile hydrocarbons, such as toluene and heptane, were evaluated. The effect of humidity was studied also. The performance of the new devices was evaluated in the laboratory by spiking soil samples and monitoring headspace for halogenated VOCs. A draft concept of the steps for a new analytical method was outlined. The results of the first year effort show that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work towards the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

  17. Volatile organic compound remedial action project

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) reviews a proposed project that is planned to reduce the levels of volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminants present in the Mound domestic water supply. The potable and industrial process water supply for Mound is presently obtained from a shallow aquifer via on-site production wells. The present levels of VOCs in the water supply drawn from the on-site wells are below the maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) permissible for drinking water under Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA; 40 CFR 141); however, Mound has determined that remedial measures should be taken to further reduce the VOC levels. The proposed project action is the reduction of the VOC levels in the water supply using packed tower aeration (PTA). This document is intended to satisfy the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 and associated Council on Environmental Quality regulations (40 CFR parts 1500 through 1508) as implemented through U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5440.1D and supporting DOE NEPA Guidelines (52 FR 47662), as amended (54 FR 12474; 55 FR 37174), and as modified by the Secretary of Energy Notice (SEN) 15-90 and associated guidance. As required, this EA provides sufficient information on the probable environmental impacts of the proposed action and alternatives to support a DOE decision either to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  18. Bacterial and spontaneous dehalogenation of organic compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Omori, T; Alexander, M

    1978-01-01

    Only 3 of more than 500 soil enrichments contained organisms able to use 1,9-dichlorononane as a sole carbon source. One isolate, a strain of Pseudomonas, grew on the compound and released much of the halogen as chloride. Resting cells dehalogenated 1,9-dichlorononane aerobically but not anaerobically. Pseudomonas sp. grew on and resting cells dehalogenated 1,6-dichlorohexane, 1,5-dichloroheptane, 2-bromoheptanoate, and 1-chloro-, 1-bromo-, and 1-iodoheptane, but the bacterium cometabolized but did not grow on 3-chloropropionate. p-Methylbenzyl alcohol, chloride, and p-methylbenzoate were formed when resting cells were incubated with alpha-chloro-p-xylene; the first two products were also formed in the absence of the bacteria. Similarly, o- and m-methylbenzyl alcohols were generated from the corresponding chlorinated xylenes in the presence or absence of Pseudomonas sp. The formation of m- and p-chlorobenzoic acid from m- and p-chlorobenzyl chloride proceeded only in the presence of the cells, but p-chlorobenzyl alcohol was generated from p-chlorobenzyl chloride even in the absence of the bacterium. These results are discussed in terms of possible mechanisms of dehalogenation. PMID:637547

  19. Controlled field evaluation of water flow rate effects on sampling polar organic compounds using polar organic chemical integrative samplers.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongxia; Vermeirssen, Etiënne L M; Helm, Paul A; Metcalfe, Chris D

    2010-11-01

    The uptake of polar organic contaminants into polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) varies with environmental factors, such as water flow rate. To evaluate the influence of water flow rate on the uptake of contaminants into POCIS, flow-controlled field experiments were conducted with POCIS deployed in channel systems through which treated sewage effluent flowed at rates between 2.6 and 37 cm/s. Both pharmaceutical POCIS and pesticide POCIS were exposed to effluent for 21 d and evaluated for uptake of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and endocrine disrupting substances (EDS). The pesticide POCIS had higher uptake rates for PPCPs and EDS than the pharmaceutical POCIS, but there are some practical advantages to using pharmaceutical POCIS. The uptake of contaminants into POCIS increased with flow rate, but these effects were relatively small (i.e., less than twofold) for most of the test compounds. There was no relationship observed between the hydrophobicity (log octanol/water partition coefficient, log K(OW)) of model compounds and the effects of flow rate on the uptake kinetics by POCIS. These data indicate that water flow rate has a relatively minor influence on the accumulation of PPCPs and EDS into POCIS. PMID:20865700

  20. Method and reaction pathway for selectively oxidizing organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Camaioni, Donald M.; Lilga, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    A method of selectively oxidizing an organic compound in a single vessel comprises: a) combining an organic compound, an acid solution in which the organic compound is soluble, a compound containing two oxygen atoms bonded to one another, and a metal ion reducing agent capable of reducing one of such oxygen atoms, and thereby forming a mixture; b) reducing the compound containing the two oxygen atoms by reducing one of such oxygen atoms with the metal ion reducing agent to, 1) oxidize the metal ion reducing agent to a higher valence state, and 2) produce an oxygen containing intermediate capable of oxidizing the organic compound; c) reacting the oxygen containing intermediate with the organic compound to oxidize the organic compound into an oxidized organic intermediate, the oxidized organic intermediate having an oxidized carbon atom; d) reacting the oxidized organic intermediate with the acid counter ion and higher valence state metal ion to bond the acid counter ion to the oxidized carbon atom and thereby produce a quantity of an ester incorporating the organic intermediate and acid counter ion; and e) reacting the oxidized organic intermediate with the higher valence state metal ion and water to produce a quantity of alcohol which is less than the quantity of ester, the acid counter ion incorporated in the ester rendering the carbon atom bonded to the counter ion less reactive with the oxygen containing intermediate in the mixture than is the alcohol with the oxygen containing intermediate.

  1. Oceanic protection of prebiotic organic compounds from UV radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleaves, H. J.; Miller, S. L.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    It is frequently stated that UV light would cause massive destruction of prebiotic organic compounds because of the absence of an ozone layer. The elevated UV flux of the early sun compounds this problem. This applies to organic compounds of both terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin. Attempts to deal with this problem generally involve atmospheric absorbers. We show here that prebiotic organic polymers as well as several inorganic compounds are sufficient to protect oceanic organic molecules from UV degradation. This aqueous protection is in addition to any atmospheric UV absorbers and should be a ubiquitous planetary phenomenon serving to increase the size of planetary habitable zones.

  2. Rapid dehalogenation of pesticides and organics at the interface of reduced graphene oxide-silver nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Koushik, Dibyashree; Sen Gupta, Soujit; Maliyekkal, Shihabudheen M; Pradeep, T

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports dehalogenation of various organohalides, especially aliphatic halocarbons and pesticides at reduced graphene oxide-silver nanocomposite (RGO@Ag). Several pesticides as well as chlorinated and fluorinated alkyl halides were chosen for this purpose. The composite and the products of degradation were characterized thoroughly by means of various microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. A sequential two-step mechanism involving dehalogenation of the target pollutants by silver nanoparticles followed by adsorption of the degraded compounds onto RGO was revealed. The composite showed unusual adsorption capacity, as high as 1534 mg/g, which facilitated the complete removal of the pollutants. Irrespective of the pollutants tested, a pseudo-second-order rate equation best described the adsorption kinetics. The affinity of the composite manifested chemical differences. The high adsorption capacity and re-usability makes the composite an excellent substrate for purification of water. PMID:26835896

  3. Effect of Endocrine Disruptor Pesticides: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mnif, Wissem; Hassine, Aziza Ibn Hadj; Bouaziz, Aicha; Bartegi, Aghleb; Thomas, Olivier; Roig, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) are compounds that alter the normal functioning of the endocrine system of both wildlife and humans. A huge number of chemicals have been identified as endocrine disruptors, among them several pesticides. Pesticides are used to kill unwanted organisms in crops, public areas, homes and gardens, and parasites in medicine. Human are exposed to pesticides due to their occupations or through dietary and environmental exposure (water, soil, air). For several years, there have been enquiries about the impact of environmental factors on the occurrence of human pathologies. This paper reviews the current knowledge of the potential impacts of endocrine disruptor pesticides on human health. PMID:21776230

  4. Nitrated Secondary Organic Tracer Compounds in Biomass Burning Smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Y.; Böge, O.; Gräfe, R.; Herrmann, H.

    2010-12-01

    Natural and human-initiated biomass burning releases large amounts of gases and particles into the atmosphere, impacting climate, environment and affecting public health. Several hundreds of compounds are emitted from biomass burning and these compounds largely originate from the pyrolysis of biopolymers such as lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose. Some of compounds are known to be specific to biomass burning and widely recognized as tracer compounds that can be used to identify the presence of biomass burning PM. Detailed chemical analysis of biomass burning influenced PM samples often reveals the presence compounds that correlated well with levoglucosan, a known biomass burning tracer compound. In particular, nitrated aromatic compounds correlated very well with levoglucosan, indicating that biomass burning as a source for this class of compounds. In the present study, we present evidence for the presence of biomass burning originating secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) compounds in biomass burning influenced ambient PM. These BSOA compounds are typically nitrated aromatic compounds that are produced in the oxidation of precursor compounds in the presence of NOx. The precursor identification was performed from a series of aerosol chamber experiments. m-Cresol, which is emitted from biomass burning at significant levels, is found to be a major precursor compounds for nitrated BSOA compounds found in the ambient PM. We estimate that the total concentrations of these compounds in the ambient PM are comparable to biogenic SOA compounds in winter months, indicating the BSOA contributes important amounts to the regional organic aerosol loading.

  5. Kinetics of desorption of organic compounds from dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Kopinke, Frank-Dieter; Ramus, Ksenia; Poerschmann, Juergen; Georgi, Anett

    2011-12-01

    This study presents a new experimental technique for measuring rates of desorption of organic compounds from dissolved organic matter (DOM) such as humic substances. The method is based on a fast solid-phase extraction of the freely dissolved fraction of a solute when the solution is flushed through a polymer-coated capillary. The extraction interferes with the solute-DOM sorption equilibrium and drives the desorption process. Solutes which remain sorbed to DOM pass through the extraction capillary and can be analyzed afterward. This technique allows a time resolution for the desorption kinetics from subseconds up to minutes. It is applicable to the study of interaction kinetics between a wide variety of hydrophobic solutes and polyelectrolytes. Due to its simplicity it is accessible for many environmental laboratories. The time-resolved in-tube solid-phase microextraction (TR-IT-SPME) was applied to two humic acids and a surfactant as sorbents together with pyrene, phenanthrene and 1,2-dimethylcyclohexane as solutes. The results give evidence for a two-phase desorption kinetics: a fast desorption step with a half-life of less than 1 s and a slow desorption step with a half-life of more than 1 min. For aliphatic solutes, the fast-desorbing fraction largely dominates, whereas for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as pyrene, the slowly desorbing, stronger-bound fraction is also important. PMID:22035249

  6. Secondary organic aerosol from biogenic volatile organic compound mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatfield, Meagan L.; Huff Hartz, Kara E.

    2011-04-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields from the ozonolysis of a Siberian fir needle oil (SFNO), a Canadian fir needle oil (CFNO), and several SOA precursor mixtures containing reactive and non-reactive volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were investigated. The use of precursor mixtures more completely describes the atmosphere where many VOCs exist. The addition of non-reactive VOCs such as bornyl acetate, camphene, and borneol had very little to no effect on SOA yields. The oxidation of VOC mixtures with VOC mass percentages similar to the SFNO produced SOA yields that became more similar to the SOA yield from SFNO as the complexity and concentration of VOCs within the mixture became more similar to overall SFNO composition. The SOA yield produced by the oxidation of CFNO was within the error of the SOA yield produced by the oxidation of SFNO at a similar VOC concentration. The SOA yields from SFNO were modeled using the volatility basis set (VBS), which predicts the SOA yields for a given mass concentration of mixtures containing similar VOCs.

  7. High Arctic Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollert, Michelle; Buchard, Sebrina; Faubert, Patrick; Michelsen, Anders; Rinnan, Riikka

    2013-04-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emitted from terrestrial vegetation participate in oxidative reactions, affecting the tropospheric ozone concentration and the lifetimes of greenhouse gasses such as methane. Also, they affect the formation of secondary organic aerosols. BVOCs thus provide a strong link between the terrestrial biosphere, the atmosphere and the climate. Global models of BVOC emissions have assumed minimal emissions from the high latitudes due to low temperatures, short growing seasons and sparse vegetation cover. However, measurements from this region of the world are lacking and emissions from the High Arctic have not been published yet. The aim of this study was to obtain the first estimates for BVOC emissions from the High Arctic. Hereby, we wish to add new knowledge to the understanding of global BVOC emissions. Measurements were conducted in NE Greenland (74°30' N, 20°30' W) in four vegetation communities in the study area. These four vegetation communities were dominated by Cassiope tetragona, Salix arctica, Vaccinium uliginosum and Kobresia myosuroides/Dryas octopetela/Salix arctica, respectively. Emissions were measured by enclosure technique and collection of volatiles into adsorbent cartridges in August 2009. The volatiles were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry following thermal desorption. Isoprene showed highest emissions in S. arctica-dominated heath, where it was the dominant single BVOC. However, isoprene emission decreased below detection limit in the end of August when the temperature was at or below 10°C. According to a principal component analysis, monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions were especially associated with C. tetragona-dominated heath. Especially S. arctica and C. tetragona dominated heaths showed distinct patterns of emitted BVOCs. Emissions of BVOC from the studied high arctic heaths were clearly lower than the emissions observed previously in subarctic heaths with more dense vegetation

  8. Phototransformation of pesticides in prairie potholes: effect of dissolved organic matter in triplet-induced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Karpuzcu, M Ekrem; McCabe, Andrew J; Arnold, William A

    2016-02-01

    Photochemical reactions involving a variety of photosensitizers contribute to the abiotic transformation of pesticides in prairie pothole lakes (PPLs). Despite the fact that triplet excited state dissolved organic matter (DOM) enhances phototransformation of pesticides by acting as a photosensitizer, it may also decrease the overall phototransformation rate through various mechanisms. In this study, the effect of DOM on the phototransformation of four commonly applied pesticides in four different PPL waters was investigated under simulated sunlight using photoexcited benzophenone-4-carboxylate as the oxidant with DOM serving as an anti-oxidant. For atrazine and mesotrione, a decrease in phototransformation rates was observed, while phototransformations of metolachlor and isoproturon were not affected by DOM inhibition. Phototransformation rates and the extent of inhibition/enhancement by DOM varied spatially and temporally across the wetlands studied. Characterization of DOM from the sites and different seasons suggested that the DOM type and variations in the DOM structure are important factors controlling phototransformation rates of pesticides in PPLs. PMID:26745785

  9. CTEPP OVERVIEW: A PILOT STUDY OF CHILDREN'S TOTAL EXPOSURE TO PERSISTENT PESTICIDES AND OTHER PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research study, "Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Organic Pollutants," (CTEPP) is a pilot-scale project involving about 260 children in their everyday surroundings. The objectives of CTEPP are twofold: (1) To measure the agg...

  10. Adsorption study of low-cost and locally available organic substances and a soil to remove pesticides from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Raquel; Morillo, José; Usero, José; Vanderlinden, Eva; El Bakouri, Hicham

    2015-01-01

    Sorption and desorption of chlorfenvinphos, chlorpyrifos, simazine and trifluralin on sunflower seed shells, rice husk, composted sewage sludge and an agricultural soil was studied. Film diffusion and sorption pointed to be related with pesticide physicochemical characteristics. Trifluralin and chlorpyrifos were the pesticides which showed the fastest sorption kinetics and the best sorption capacities when sorbed on all organic wastes. Rice husk revealed as the best adsorbent for simazine. Chlorfenvinphos showed comparable adsorption levels for all sorbents. Koc and Kf values suggested that not only the organic matter content but also the nature of the organic matter and other factors, such as physicochemical characteristics of the surface could be play a significant role in pesticide adsorption. Low desorption percentages were detected; nevertheless Kfd and H values reveal a weak and reversible adsorption. The studied organic residues can be used as an effective and alternative adsorbent for removing pesticides, because of their high adsorption capacity, being natural and economic.

  11. POTENTIAL EMISSIONS OF HAZARDOUS ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM SEWAGE SLUDGE INCINERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory thermal decomposition studies were undertaken to evaluate potential organic emissions from sewage sludge incinerators. Precisely controlled thermal decomposition experiments were conducted on sludge spiked with mixtures of hazardous organic compounds, on the mixtures o...

  12. Relative Stabilities of Organic Compounds Using Benson's Additivity Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitale, Dale E.

    1986-01-01

    Shows how the structure-energy principle can be presented in organic chemistry (without having to resort to quantum mechanics) by use of Benson's Additive Rules. Examples of the application to several major classes of organic compounds are given.

  13. Chlorinated organic compounds produced by Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Ntushelo, Khayalethu

    2016-06-01

    Fusarium graminearum, a pathogen of wheat and maize, not only reduces grain yield and degrades quality but also produces mycotoxins in the infected grain. Focus has been on mycotoxins because of the human and animal health hazards associated with them. In addition to work done on mycotoxins, chemical profiling of F. graminearum to identify other compounds produced by this fungus remains critical. With chemical profiling of F. graminearum the entire chemistry of this fungus can be understood. The focus of this work was to identify chlorinated compounds produced by F. graminearum. Various chlorinated compounds were detected and their role in F. graminearum is yet to be understood. PMID:27165533

  14. Photochemical decomposition of organic compounds in water after UV-irradiation: investigation of positive mutagenic effects.

    PubMed

    de Veer, I; Moriske, H J; Rüden, H

    1994-06-01

    It should be investigated whether UV-disinfection of natural and contaminated organic substances in surface and drinking water may generate a positive mutagenic effect. Selected organic pesticides (atrazine, simazine, metobromurone, methabenzthiazurone, dichlorprop) and organic compounds naturally present in water (phenylalanine, tyrosine, polysaccharides) were examined in Ames-test (bacterial strains TA 98 and TA 100) and sister chromatid exchange (SCE)-test (V79 cells) before and after UV-irradiation. UV-irradiation with low- and high-pressure mercury vapor lamps was carried out in parallel experiments. Based on results in Ames- and SCE-test a mutagenic activity was not obtained for all samples, neither before nor after UV-irradiation. PMID:8202921

  15. Comparison of pesticides and other compounds in carpet dust samples collected from used vacuum cleaner bags and from a high-volume surface sampler.

    PubMed Central

    Colt, J S

    1998-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of the association between residential pesticide use and cancer risk require an assessment of past pesticide exposures. Pesticide levels in carpet dust are believed to reflect long-term pesticide use. Recent epidemiologic studies have found collection of dust samples using the high-volume surface sampler (HVS3) to be expensive and cumbersome. We compared the levels of pesticides and other compounds in dust obtained from subjects' personal used vacuum cleaner bags to that collected by the HVS3 to see if this simpler method could replace the HVS3 in epidemiologic research. We visited the homes of 15 subjects, took the used bags from their vacuums, and collected carpet dust samples with the HVS3. The samples were analyzed for 42 target compounds: 26 pesticides, 10 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and six polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners using GC/MS in selected ion monitoring mode. The two methods agreed in detecting the presence of the target compounds between 80% and 100% of the time. Neither sampling method was consistently more sensitive. The median target compound concentrations were similar, and a paired t-test showed no significant differences. For many compounds, the concentrations of compounds in the HVS3 samples were higher than those in the used bag samples at the upper end of the concentration ranges. However, the Spearman rank correlation coefficients were 0.85 or higher for most compounds, indicating that homes would be ranked similarly using both methods. Overall, there appears to be no clear difference in the quality of the pesticide, PAH, or PCB concentration data for the two dust collection methods. Images Figure 1 PMID:9799187

  16. METHODS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thirteen analytical methods for the identification and measurement of organic compounds in drinking water are described in detail. ix of the methods are for volatile organic compounds (VOC's) and certain disinfection byproducts and these methods were cited in the Federal Register...

  17. 40 CFR 60.742 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.742 Section 60.742 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Polymeric Coating of Supporting Substrates Facilities § 60.742 Standards for volatile organic compounds....

  18. 40 CFR 60.712 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.712 Section 60.712 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Magnetic Tape Coating Facilities § 60.712 Standards for volatile organic compounds. Each owner or...

  19. 40 CFR 60.622 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.622 Section 60.622 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Petroleum Dry Cleaners § 60.622 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) Each affected...

  20. 40 CFR 60.452 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.452 Section 60.452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Industrial Surface Coating: Large Appliances § 60.452 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On or...

  1. 40 CFR 60.602 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.602 Section 60.602 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Synthetic Fiber Production Facilities § 60.602 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On and after...

  2. 40 CFR 60.462 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.462 Section 60.462 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Coil Surface Coating § 60.462 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) On and after the date...

  3. 40 CFR 60.622 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.622 Section 60.622 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Petroleum Dry Cleaners § 60.622 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) Each affected...

  4. 40 CFR 60.582 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.582 Section 60.582 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Flexible Vinyl and Urethane Coating and Printing § 60.582 Standard for volatile organic compounds. (a)...

  5. 40 CFR 60.712 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.712 Section 60.712 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Magnetic Tape Coating Facilities § 60.712 Standards for volatile organic compounds. Each owner or...

  6. 40 CFR 60.602 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.602 Section 60.602 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Synthetic Fiber Production Facilities § 60.602 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On and after...

  7. 40 CFR 60.582 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.582 Section 60.582 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Flexible Vinyl and Urethane Coating and Printing § 60.582 Standard for volatile organic compounds. (a)...

  8. 40 CFR 60.462 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.462 Section 60.462 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Coil Surface Coating § 60.462 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) On and after the date...

  9. 40 CFR 60.582 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.582 Section 60.582 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Flexible Vinyl and Urethane Coating and Printing § 60.582 Standard for volatile organic compounds. (a)...

  10. 40 CFR 60.722 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.722 Section 60.722 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... volatile organic compounds. (a) Each owner or operator of any affected facility which is subject to...

  11. 40 CFR 60.722 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.722 Section 60.722 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... volatile organic compounds. (a) Each owner or operator of any affected facility which is subject to...

  12. 40 CFR 60.722 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.722 Section 60.722 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... volatile organic compounds. (a) Each owner or operator of any affected facility which is subject to...

  13. 40 CFR 60.602 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.602 Section 60.602 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Synthetic Fiber Production Facilities § 60.602 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On and after...

  14. 40 CFR 60.712 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.712 Section 60.712 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Magnetic Tape Coating Facilities § 60.712 Standards for volatile organic compounds. Each owner or...

  15. 40 CFR 60.742 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.742 Section 60.742 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Polymeric Coating of Supporting Substrates Facilities § 60.742 Standards for volatile organic compounds....

  16. 40 CFR 60.492 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.492 Section 60.492 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Beverage Can Surface Coating Industry § 60.492 Standards for volatile organic compounds. On or after...

  17. 40 CFR 60.452 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.452 Section 60.452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Industrial Surface Coating: Large Appliances § 60.452 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On or...

  18. 40 CFR 60.492 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.492 Section 60.492 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Beverage Can Surface Coating Industry § 60.492 Standards for volatile organic compounds. On or after...

  19. 40 CFR 60.462 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.462 Section 60.462 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Coil Surface Coating § 60.462 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) On and after the date...

  20. 40 CFR 60.462 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.462 Section 60.462 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Coil Surface Coating § 60.462 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) On and after the date...

  1. 40 CFR 60.722 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.722 Section 60.722 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... volatile organic compounds. (a) Each owner or operator of any affected facility which is subject to...

  2. 40 CFR 60.492 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.492 Section 60.492 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Beverage Can Surface Coating Industry § 60.492 Standards for volatile organic compounds. On or after...

  3. 40 CFR 60.742 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.742 Section 60.742 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Polymeric Coating of Supporting Substrates Facilities § 60.742 Standards for volatile organic compounds....

  4. 40 CFR 60.582 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.582 Section 60.582 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Flexible Vinyl and Urethane Coating and Printing § 60.582 Standard for volatile organic compounds. (a)...

  5. 40 CFR 60.602 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.602 Section 60.602 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Synthetic Fiber Production Facilities § 60.602 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On and after...

  6. 40 CFR 60.622 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.622 Section 60.622 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Petroleum Dry Cleaners § 60.622 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) Each affected...

  7. 40 CFR 60.452 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.452 Section 60.452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Industrial Surface Coating: Large Appliances § 60.452 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On or...

  8. 40 CFR 60.452 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.452 Section 60.452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Industrial Surface Coating: Large Appliances § 60.452 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On or...

  9. 40 CFR 60.622 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.622 Section 60.622 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Petroleum Dry Cleaners § 60.622 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) Each affected...

  10. 40 CFR 60.712 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.712 Section 60.712 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Magnetic Tape Coating Facilities § 60.712 Standards for volatile organic compounds. Each owner or...