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Sample records for oriented molecular assemblies

  1. Orientational Order of Molecular Assemblies on Inorganic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Jaehun; Saville, Dudley; Li, Je-Luen; Schniepp, Hannes; Car, Roberto; Aksay, Ilhan

    2006-03-01

    Surfactant micelles form oriented arrays on crystalline substrates such as HOPG (Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite) although registration is unexpected since the template unit cell is small compared to the size of a rod-like micelle. In addition, with atomic force microscopy, we show that orientational ordering is a dynamic, multi-molecule process. Interaction energy calculations based on molecular simulations reveal that orientational energy differences on a molecular scale are too small to explain matters. However, treating the cooperative processes as a balance between van der Waals torque on a large, rod-like micellar assembly and Brownian motion shows that orientation is favored. Our study provides a physical insight on regulation of self-assembly structures at small length scale.

  2. Self-assembly and separation of nematic colloids through photo-patterned molecular orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chenhui; Guo, Yubing; Conklin, Christopher; Viñals, Jorge; Shiyanovskii, Sergij; Wei, Qi-Huo; Lavrentovich, Oleg; Oleg D. Lavrentovich Team; Jorge Viñals Collaboration

    Design and control of particles self-assembly is an important theme in colloidal science. Dispersions of colloids in a nematic liquid crystal (LC) show a diversity of self-assembled structures guided by long-range interactions. Here we describe a versatile approach to control colloidal structures through surface-patterned molecular orientation and dynamic processes of LC-enabled electrokinetics (LCEK). In presence of the electric field, the surface-imprinted pattern of molecular orientation triggers LCEK flows which transport the colloidal aggregates to specified locations. The aggregation is directed by the director gradients. Colloids that differ in surface anchoring or shape are guided into different areas of the cell, thus being sorted. The dynamic approach to control colloidal systems through LCEK in cells with patterned director field opens the opportunities in the microfluidic and lab on a chip applications. This work was supported by NSF grants DMR-1507637 , DMS-1434185 and CMMI-1436565.

  3. Orientational nanoparticle assemblies and biosensors.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei; Xu, Liguang; Wang, Libing; Kuang, Hua; Xu, Chuanlai

    2016-05-15

    Assemblies of nanoparticles (NPs) have regional correlated properties with new features compared to individual NPs or random aggregates. The orientational NP assembly contributes greatly to the collective interaction of individual NPs with geometrical dependence. Therefore, orientational NPs assembly techniques have emerged as promising tools for controlling inorganic NPs spatial structures with enhanced interesting properties. The research fields of orientational NP assembly have developed rapidly with characteristics related to the different methods used, including chemical, physical and biological techniques. The current and potential applications, important challenges remain to be investigated. An overview of recent developments in orientational NPs assemblies, the multiple strategies, biosensors and challenges will be discussed in this review. PMID:26708241

  4. PM-IRRAS Determination of Molecular Orientation of Phosphonic Acid Self-Assembled Monolayers on Indium Zinc Oxide.

    PubMed

    Sang, Lingzi; Mudalige, Anoma; Sigdel, Ajaya K; Giordano, Anthony J; Marder, Seth R; Berry, Joseph J; Pemberton, Jeanne E

    2015-05-26

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of phosphonic acids (PAs) on transparent conductive oxide (TCO) surfaces can facilitate improvement in TCO/organic semiconductor interface properties. When ordered PA SAMs are formed on oxide substrates, interface dipole and electronic structure are affected by the functional group properties, orientation, and binding modes of the modifiers. Choosing octylphosphonic acid (OPA), F13-octylphosphonic acid (F13OPA), pentafluorophenyl phosphonic acid (F5PPA), benzyl phosphonic acid (BnPA), and pentafluorobenzyl phosphonic acid (F5BnPA) as a representative group of modifiers, we report polarization modulation-infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) of binding and molecular orientation on indium-doped zinc oxide (IZO) substrates. Considerable variability in molecular orientation and binding type is observed with changes in PA functional group. OPA exhibits partially disordered alkyl chains but on average the chain axis is tilted ∼57° from the surface normal. F13OPA tilts 26° with mostly tridentate binding. The F5PPA ring is tilted 23° from the surface normal with a mixture of bidentate and tridentate binding; the BnPA ring tilts 31° from normal with a mixture of bidentate and tridentate binding, and the F5BnPA ring tilts 58° from normal with a majority of bidentate with some tridenate binding. These trends are consistent with what has been observed previously for the effects of fluorination on orientation of phosphonic acid modifiers. These results from PM-IRRAS are correlated with recent results on similar systems from near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Overall, these results indicate that both surface binding geometry and intermolecular interactions play important roles in dictating the orientation of PA modifiers on TCO surfaces. This work also establishes PM-IRRAS as a routine method for SAM orientation determination on complex oxide substrates

  5. Fragment oriented molecular shapes.

    PubMed

    Hain, Ethan; Camacho, Carlos J; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-05-01

    Molecular shape is an important concept in drug design and virtual screening. Shape similarity typically uses either alignment methods, which dynamically optimize molecular poses with respect to the query molecular shape, or feature vector methods, which are computationally less demanding but less accurate. The computational cost of alignment can be reduced by pre-aligning shapes, as is done with the Volumetric-Aligned Molecular Shapes (VAMS) method. Here, we introduce and evaluate fragment oriented molecular shapes (FOMS), where shapes are aligned based on molecular fragments. FOMS enables the use of shape constraints, a novel method for precisely specifying molecular shape queries that provides the ability to perform partial shape matching and supports search algorithms that function on an interactive time scale. When evaluated using the challenging Maximum Unbiased Validation dataset, shape constraints were able to extract significantly enriched subsets of compounds for the majority of targets, and FOMS matched or exceeded the performance of both VAMS and an optimizing alignment method of shape similarity search. PMID:27085751

  6. Conformation-dependent Molecular Orientation Deduced from First-principles Modeling of Oligo(ethylene glycol)-terminated and Amide Group Containing Alkanethiolates Self-assembled on Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malysheva, L.; Onipko, A.; Valiokas, R.; Liedberg, B.

    2005-09-01

    We report orientation angles for the alkyl chain, amide group, and oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) portion within self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of OEG-terminated and amide containing alkanethiolates which, depending on the OEG length and substrate temperature, display unique conformations — all-trans or helical. Optimized geometries of the molecular constituents, characteristic vibration frequencies and transition dipole moments are obtained by using DFT methods with gradient corrections. These ab initio data are subsequently used to simulate infrared reflection-absorption (RA) spectra associated with different conformations and orientations. The obtained results have generated a deeper knowledge of the internal SAM structure, which is crucial for understanding phase and folding characteristics, interaction with water and ultimately the protein repellent properties of OEG-containing SAMs.

  7. Study of the Packing Density and Molecular Orientation of Bimolecular Self-Assembled Monolayers of Aromatic and Aliphatic Organosilanes on Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Smith,M.; Efimenko, K.; Fischer, D.; Lappi, S.; Kilpatrick, P.; Genzer, J.

    2007-01-01

    Bimolecular self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of aromatic and aliphatic chlorosilanes were self-assembled onto silica, and their characteristics were established by contact angle measurement, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Three aromatic constituents (phenyltrichlorosilane, benzyltrichlorosilane, and phenethyltrichlorosilane) were studied in combination with four aliphatic coadsorbates (butyltrichlorosilane, butyldimethylchlorosilane, octadecyltrichlorosilane, and octadecyldimethylchlorosilane). Our results demonstrate that whereas SAMs made of trichlorinated organosilanes are densely packed, SAMs prepared from monochlorinated species are less dense and poorly ordered. In mixed systems, trichlorinated aromatics and trichlorinated aliphatics formed SAMs with highly tunable compositions; their surfaces were compositionally homogeneous with no large-scale domain separation. The homogeneous nature of the resulting SAM was a consequence of the formation of in-plane siloxane linkages among neighboring molecules. In contrast, when mixing monochlorinated aliphatics with trichlorinated aromatics, molecular segregation occurred. Although the two shortest aromatic species did not display significant changes in orientation upon mixing with aliphatics, the aromatic species with the longest polymethylene spacer, phenethyltrichlorosilane, displayed markedly different orientation behavior in mixtures of short- and long-chain aliphatics.

  8. Cooperative synchronized assemblies enhance orientation discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Samonds, Jason M.; Allison, John D.; Brown, Heather A.; Bonds, A. B.

    2004-01-01

    There is no clear link between the broad tuning of single neurons and the fine behavioral capabilities of orientation discrimination. We recorded from populations of cells in the cat visual cortex (area 17) to examine whether the joint activity of cells can support finer discrimination than found in individual responses. Analysis of joint firing yields a substantial advantage (i.e., cooperation) in fine-angle discrimination. This cooperation increases to more considerable levels as the population of an assembly is increased. The cooperation in a population of six cells provides encoding of orientation with an information advantage that is at least 2-fold in terms of requiring either fewer cells or less time than independent coding. This cooperation suggests that correlated or synchronized activity can increase information. PMID:15096595

  9. Cobalt(II) metal-organic framework micro-nanoparticles: Molecular self-assembly from layers to micropores showing the conjunctive orientation of carboxyl groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jing; Li, Xiaoqi; Xu, Zhen-liang; Xu, Haitao

    2015-08-01

    Cobalt metal-organic framework (MOF) materials CoL(1,4-chdc)·mH2O (1,4-chdc = 1,4-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid, L1 = 1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethylene, and m = 0 for 1Co; L2 = 1,4-bis(4-pyridyl)-2,3-diaza-1,3-butadiene and m = 2 for 2Co) were assembled in a MeOH-H2O solvent system. They crystallized in a monoclinic system with space group P2(1)/c, Z = 4, a = 9.479(4) Å, b = 13.704(6) Å, c = 14.455(6) Å, and β = 99.424(6)° for 1Co, and a = 14.349(11) Å, b = 12.088(9) Å, c = 26.62(2) Å, and β = 97.255(11)° for 2Co. It was shown that N-ligand can regulate and control the conjunctive orientation of carboxyl groups in these MOFs; thus, the MOFs exhibited structures that ranged from layers to micropores. Furthermore, the micro-nanoparticles of 1Co and 2Co were investigated for new potential applications of micro-nano MOFs.

  10. Visualization Software for Molecular Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Thomas D; Ferrin, Thomas E

    2007-01-01

    Summary Software for viewing three-dimensional models and maps of viruses, ribosomes, filaments and other molecular assemblies is advancing on many fronts. New developments include molecular representations that offer better control over level of detail, lighting that improves the perception of depth, and two-dimensional projections that simplify data interpretation. Programmable graphics processors offer quality, speed and visual effects not previously possible, while 3D printers, haptic interaction devices, and auto-stereo displays show promise in more naturally engaging our senses. Visualization methods are developed by diverse groups of researchers with differing goals: experimental biologists, database developers, computer scientists, and package developers. We survey recent developments and problems faced by the developer community in bringing innovative visualization methods into widespread use. PMID:17728125

  11. Efficient molecular mechanics simulations of the folding, orientation, and assembly of peptides in lipid bilayers using an implicit atomic solvation model

    PubMed Central

    Bordner, Andrew J.; Zorman, Barry; Abagyan, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins comprise a significant fraction of the proteomes of sequenced organisms and are the targets of approximately half of marketed drugs. However, in spite of their prevalence and biomedical importance, relatively few experimental structures are available due to technical challenges. Computational simulations can potentially address this deficit by providing structural models of membrane proteins. Solvation within the spatially heterogeneous membrane/solvent environment provides a major component of the energetics driving protein folding and association within the membrane. We have developed an implicit solvation model for membranes that is both computationally efficient and accurate enough to enable molecular mechanics predictions for the folding and association of peptides within the membrane. We derived the new atomic solvation model parameters using an unbiased fitting procedure to experimental data and have applied it to diverse problems in order to test its accuracy and to gain insight into membrane protein folding. First, we predicted the positions and orientations of peptides and complexes within the lipid bilayer and compared the simulation results with solid-state NMR structures. Next, we performed folding simulations for a series of host-guest peptides with varying propensities to form alpha helices in a hydrophobic environment and compared the structures with experimental measurements. We were also able to successfully predict the structures of amphipathic peptides as well as the structures for dimeric complexes of short hexapeptides that have experimentally characterized propensities to form beta sheets within the membrane. Finally, we compared calculated relative transfer energies with data from experiments measuring the effects of mutations on the free energies of translocon-mediated insertion of proteins into lipid bilayers and of combined folding and membrane insertion of a beta barrel protein. PMID:21904908

  12. Rigorous theory of molecular orientational nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Chong Hoon; Kim, Gun Yeup

    2015-01-01

    Classical statistical mechanics of the molecular optics theory proposed by Buckingham [A. D. Buckingham and J. A. Pople, Proc. Phys. Soc. A 68, 905 (1955)] has been extended to describe the field induced molecular orientational polarization effects on nonlinear optics. In this paper, we present the generalized molecular orientational nonlinear optical processes (MONLO) through the calculation of the classical orientational averaging using the Boltzmann type time-averaged orientational interaction energy in the randomly oriented molecular system under the influence of applied electric fields. The focal points of the calculation are (1) the derivation of rigorous tensorial components of the effective molecular hyperpolarizabilities, (2) the molecular orientational polarizations and the electronic polarizations including the well-known third-order dc polarization, dc electric field induced Kerr effect (dc Kerr effect), optical Kerr effect (OKE), dc electric field induced second harmonic generation (EFISH), degenerate four wave mixing (DFWM) and third harmonic generation (THG). We also present some of the new predictive MONLO processes. For second-order MONLO, second-order optical rectification (SOR), Pockels effect and difference frequency generation (DFG) are described in terms of the anisotropic coefficients of first hyperpolarizability. And, for third-order MONLO, third-order optical rectification (TOR), dc electric field induced difference frequency generation (EFIDFG) and pump-probe transmission are presented.

  13. Rigorous theory of molecular orientational nonlinear optics

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Chong Hoon Kim, Gun Yeup

    2015-01-15

    Classical statistical mechanics of the molecular optics theory proposed by Buckingham [A. D. Buckingham and J. A. Pople, Proc. Phys. Soc. A 68, 905 (1955)] has been extended to describe the field induced molecular orientational polarization effects on nonlinear optics. In this paper, we present the generalized molecular orientational nonlinear optical processes (MONLO) through the calculation of the classical orientational averaging using the Boltzmann type time-averaged orientational interaction energy in the randomly oriented molecular system under the influence of applied electric fields. The focal points of the calculation are (1) the derivation of rigorous tensorial components of the effective molecular hyperpolarizabilities, (2) the molecular orientational polarizations and the electronic polarizations including the well-known third-order dc polarization, dc electric field induced Kerr effect (dc Kerr effect), optical Kerr effect (OKE), dc electric field induced second harmonic generation (EFISH), degenerate four wave mixing (DFWM) and third harmonic generation (THG). We also present some of the new predictive MONLO processes. For second-order MONLO, second-order optical rectification (SOR), Pockels effect and difference frequency generation (DFG) are described in terms of the anisotropic coefficients of first hyperpolarizability. And, for third-order MONLO, third-order optical rectification (TOR), dc electric field induced difference frequency generation (EFIDFG) and pump-probe transmission are presented.

  14. Oriented assembly of polyhedral plasmonic nanoparticle clusters

    PubMed Central

    Henzie, Joel; Andrews, Sean C.; Ling, Xing Yi; Li, Zhiyong; Yang, Peidong

    2013-01-01

    Shaped colloids can be used as nanoscale building blocks for the construction of composite, functional materials that are completely assembled from the bottom up. Assemblies of noble metal nanostructures have unique optical properties that depend on key structural features requiring precise control of both position and connectivity spanning nanometer to micrometer length scales. Identifying and optimizing structures that strongly couple to light is important for understanding the behavior of surface plasmons in small nanoparticle clusters, and can result in highly sensitive chemical and biochemical sensors using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). We use experiment and simulation to examine the local surface plasmon resonances of different arrangements of Ag polyhedral clusters. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy shows that monodisperse, atomically smooth Ag polyhedra can self-assemble into uniform interparticle gaps that result in reproducible SERS enhancement factors from assembly to assembly. We introduce a large-scale, gravity-driven assembly method that can generate arbitrary nanoparticle clusters based on the size and shape of a patterned template. These templates enable the systematic examination of different cluster arrangements and provide a means of constructing scalable and reliable SERS sensors. PMID:23569275

  15. Photoswitchable gel assembly based on molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Harada, Akira

    2012-01-01

    The formation of effective and precise linkages in bottom-up or top-down processes is important for the development of self-assembled materials. Self-assembly through molecular recognition events is a powerful tool for producing functionalized materials. Photoresponsive molecular recognition systems can permit the creation of photoregulated self-assembled macroscopic objects. Here we demonstrate that macroscopic gel assembly can be highly regulated through photoisomerization of an azobenzene moiety that interacts differently with two host molecules. A photoregulated gel assembly system is developed using polyacrylamide-based hydrogels functionalized with azobenzene (guest) or cyclodextrin (host) moieties. Reversible adhesion and dissociation of the host gel from the guest gel may be controlled by photoirradiation. The differential affinities of α-cyclodextrin or β-cyclodextrin for the trans-azobenzene and cis-azobenzene are employed in the construction of a photoswitchable gel assembly system. PMID:22215078

  16. Photoswitchable gel assembly based on molecular recognition

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Harada, Akira

    2012-01-01

    The formation of effective and precise linkages in bottom-up or top-down processes is important for the development of self-assembled materials. Self-assembly through molecular recognition events is a powerful tool for producing functionalized materials. Photoresponsive molecular recognition systems can permit the creation of photoregulated self-assembled macroscopic objects. Here we demonstrate that macroscopic gel assembly can be highly regulated through photoisomerization of an azobenzene moiety that interacts differently with two host molecules. A photoregulated gel assembly system is developed using polyacrylamide-based hydrogels functionalized with azobenzene (guest) or cyclodextrin (host) moieties. Reversible adhesion and dissociation of the host gel from the guest gel may be controlled by photoirradiation. The differential affinities of α-cyclodextrin or β-cyclodextrin for the trans-azobenzene and cis-azobenzene are employed in the construction of a photoswitchable gel assembly system. PMID:22215078

  17. Fundamentals and application of ordered molecular assemblies to affinity biosensing.

    PubMed

    Matharu, Zimple; Bandodkar, Amay Jairaj; Gupta, Vinay; Malhotra, Bansi Dhar

    2012-02-01

    Organization of biomolecules in two/three dimensional assemblies has recently aroused much interest in nanobiotechnology. In this context, the development of techniques for controlling spatial arrangement and orientation of the desired molecules to generate highly-ordered nanostructures in the form of a mono/multi layer is considered highly significant. The studies of monolayer films to date have focused on three distinct methods of preparation: (i) the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique, involving the transfer of a monolayer assembled at the gas-liquid interface; (ii) self-assembly at the liquid-solid interface, based on spontaneous adsorption of desired molecules from a solution directly onto a solid surface; and (iii) Layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly at a liquid-solid interface, based on inter-layer electrostatic attractions for fabrication of multilayers. A variety of monolayers have been utilized to fabricate biomolecular electronic devices including biosensors. The composition of a monolayer based matrix has been found to influence the activity(ies) of biomolecule(s). We present comprehensive and critical analysis of ordered molecular assemblies formed by LB and self-assembly with potential applications to affinity biosensing. This critical review on fundamentals and application of ordered molecular assemblies to affinity biosensing is likely to benefit researchers working in this as well as related fields of research (401 references). PMID:22105315

  18. Computing by molecular self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Jonoska, Nataša; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2012-01-01

    The paper reviews two computing models by DNA self-assembly whose proof of principal have recently been experimentally confirmed. The first model incorporates DNA nano-devices and triple crossover DNA molecules to algorithmically arrange non-DNA species. This is achieved by simulating a finite-state automaton with output where golden nanoparticles are assembled to read-out the result. In the second model, a complex DNA molecule representing a graph emerges as a solution of a computational problem. This supports the idea that in molecular self-assembly computing, it may be necessary to develop the notion of shape processing besides the classical approach through symbol processing. PMID:23919130

  19. Molecular Motors and Synaptic Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qian; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2016-01-01

    Proper synaptic function requires the seamless integration of the transport, assembly, and regulation of synaptic components and structures. Inasmuch as the synapse is often distant from the neuronal cell body, newly synthesized synaptic proteins, the precursors of synaptic vesicles, active zone compartments, channels and receptors, and mitochondria, must be transported along lengthy neuronal processes to participate in synaptogenesis. Neuronal transport is mediated by motor proteins that associate with their cargoes via adaptors (or receptors) and that travel along the cytoskeleton network within the neuronal processes. Thus, the identity of membranous protein cargoes and the specificity of motor-cargo interactions are critical for correctly targeting cargoes and properly assembling synapses in developing neurons and in remodeling synapses of mature neurons in response to neuronal activity. In this article, the authors review recent progress in characterizing microtubule- and actin-based motor proteins that are involved in delivering synaptic components and discuss potential mechanisms underlying the formation of motor- receptor-cargo complexes that contribute to synaptogenesis and activity-induced synaptic plasticity. PMID:19218232

  20. Chemical designs of functional photoactive molecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qifan; Luo, Zhouyang; Cai, Kang; Ma, Yuguo; Zhao, Dahui

    2014-06-21

    Molecular assemblies with well-defined structures capable of photo-induced electron transfer and charge transport or photochemical reactions are reviewed. Hierarchical supramolecular architectures, which assemble the modular units into specific spatial arrangements and facilitate them to work cooperatively, are vital for the achievement of photo-functions in these systems. The chemical design of molecular building blocks and noncovalent interactions exploited to realize supramolecular organizations are particularly discussed. Reviewing and recapitulating the chemical evolution traces of these accomplished systems will hopefully delineate certain fundamental design principles and guidelines useful for developing more advanced functions in the future. PMID:24492680

  1. Adaptive soft molecular self-assemblies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Andong; Shi, Wenyue; Huang, Jianbin; Yan, Yun

    2016-01-14

    Adaptive molecular self-assemblies provide possibility of constructing smart and functional materials in a non-covalent bottom-up manner. Exploiting the intrinsic properties of responsiveness of non-covalent interactions, a great number of fancy self-assemblies have been achieved. In this review, we try to highlight the recent advances in this field. The following contents are focused: (1) environmental adaptiveness, including smart self-assemblies adaptive to pH, temperature, pressure, and moisture; (2) special chemical adaptiveness, including nanostructures adaptive to important chemicals, such as enzymes, CO2, metal ions, redox agents, explosives, biomolecules; (3) field adaptiveness, including self-assembled materials that are capable of adapting to external fields such as magnetic field, electric field, light irradiation, and shear forces. PMID:26509717

  2. Direct Assembly of Large Arrays of Oriented Conducting Polymer Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Liang; Liu, Jun; Windisch, Charles F.; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Lin, Yuehe

    2002-10-04

    Although oriented carbon nanotubes, oriented nanowires of metals, semiconductors and oxides have attracted wide attention, there have been few reports on oriented polymer nanostructures such as nanowires. In this paper we report the assembly of large arrays of oriented nanowires through controlled nucleation and growth during a stepwise electrochemical deposition process in which a large number of nuclei were first deposited on the substrate using a large current density. After the initial nucleation, the current density was reduced step by step to grow the oriented nanowires from the nucleation sites created in the first step. A very different morphology was also demonstrated by first depositing a monolayer of close-packed colloidal spheres using a similar step-wise deposition process. As a result, the polymer nanofibers grew from the spheres in a radial fashion and formed the continuous three-dimensional network of nanofibers in the film. The principles of control nucleation and growth in electrochemical deposition investigated in this paper should be applicable to other electrical conducting and electrochemical active materials, including metals and conducting oxides. We also hope the oriented electroactive polymer nanostructure will open the door for new applications, such as miniaturized biosensors.

  3. Self assembled monolayers on silicon for molecular electronics.

    PubMed

    Aswal, D K; Lenfant, S; Guerin, D; Yakhmi, J V; Vuillaume, D

    2006-05-24

    We present an overview of various aspects of the self-assembly of organic monolayers on silicon substrates for molecular electronics applications. Different chemical strategies employed for grafting the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanes having different chain lengths on native oxide of Si or on bare Si have been reviewed. The utility of different characterization techniques in determination of the thickness, molecular ordering and orientation, surface coverage, growth kinetics and chemical composition of the SAMs has been discussed by choosing appropriate examples. The metal counterelectrodes are an integral part of SAMs for measuring their electrical properties as well as using them for molecular electronic devices. A brief discussion on the variety of options available for the deposition of metal counterelectrodes, that is, soft metal contacts, vapor deposition and soft lithography, has been presented. Various theoretical models, namely, tunneling (direct and Fowler-Nordheim), thermionic emission, Poole-Frenkel emission and hopping conduction, used for explaining the electronic transport in dielectric SAMs have been outlined and, some experimental data on alkane SAMs have been analyzed using these models. It has been found that short alkyl chains show excellent agreement with tunneling models; while more experimental data on long alkyl chains are required to understand their transport mechanism(s). Finally, the concepts and realization of various molecular electronic components, that is, diodes, resonant tunnel diodes, memories and transistors, based on appropriate architecture of SAMs comprising of alkyl chains (sigma- molecule) and conjugated molecules (pi-molecule) have been presented. PMID:17761249

  4. Designed self-assembly of molecular necklaces.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki-Min; Kim, Soo-Young; Heo, Jungseok; Whang, Dongmok; Sakamoto, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Kim, Kimoon

    2002-03-13

    This paper reports an efficient strategy to synthesize molecular necklaces, in which a number of small rings are threaded onto a large ring, utilizing the principles of self-assembly and coordination chemistry. Our strategy involves (1) threading a molecular "bead" with a short "string" to make a pseudorotaxane and then (2) linking the pseudorotaxanes with a metal complex with two cis labile ligands acting as an "angle connector" to form a cyclic product (molecular necklace). A 4- or 3-pyridylmethyl group is attached to each end of 1,4-diaminobutane or 1,5-diaminopentane to produce the short "strings" (C4N4(2+), C4N3(2+), C5N4(2+), and C5N3(2+)), which then react with a cucurbituril (CB) "bead" to form stable pseudorotaxanes (PR44(2+), PR43(2+), PR54(2+), and PR53(2+), respectively). The reaction of the pseudorotaxanes with Pt(en)(NO(3))(2) (en = ethylenediamine) produces a molecular necklace [4]MN, in which three molecular "beads" are threaded on a triangular framework, and/or a molecular necklace [5]MN, in which four molecular "beads" are threaded on a square framework. Under refluxing conditions, the reaction with PR44(2+) or PR54(2+) yields exclusively [4]MN (MN44T or MN54T, respectively), whereas that with PR43(2+) or PR53(2+) produces exclusively [5]MN (MN43S or MN53S, respectively). The products have been characterized by various methods including X-ray crystallography. At lower temperatures, on the other hand, the reaction with PR44(2+) or PR54(2+) affords both [4]MN and [5]MN. The supermolecules reported here are the first series of molecular necklaces obtained as thermodynamic products. The overall structures of the molecular necklaces are strongly influenced by the structures of pseudorotaxane building blocks, which is discussed in detail on the basis of the X-ray crystal structures. The temperature dependence of the product distribution observed in this self-assembly process is also discussed. PMID:11878967

  5. Free-volume hole relaxation in molecularly oriented glassy polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Zhiyong; Trexler, Morgana; Wu, Fei; Jean, Yan-Ching; Van Horn, J. David

    2014-02-01

    The free-volume hole relaxation in polycarbonate and poly(methyl methacrylate) with different levels of molecular orientation was studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy at variable pressures. The molecular orientation was achieved through a simple shear process performed at different temperatures and extrusion rates. It has been demonstrated that the β relaxation is largely responsible for the free-volume hole anisotropy after simple shear orientation. Upon the removal of mechanical force, the deformation of the free volume is mostly reversible at temperatures much lower than the glass transition. No strong correlation between macroscopic deformation and the free-volume hole deformation was found regardless of molecular orientation.

  6. Free-volume hole relaxation in molecularly oriented glassy polymers.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhiyong; Trexler, Morgana; Wu, Fei; Jean, Yan-Ching; Van Horn, J David

    2014-02-01

    The free-volume hole relaxation in polycarbonate and poly(methyl methacrylate) with different levels of molecular orientation was studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy at variable pressures. The molecular orientation was achieved through a simple shear process performed at different temperatures and extrusion rates. It has been demonstrated that the β relaxation is largely responsible for the free-volume hole anisotropy after simple shear orientation. Upon the removal of mechanical force, the deformation of the free volume is mostly reversible at temperatures much lower than the glass transition. No strong correlation between macroscopic deformation and the free-volume hole deformation was found regardless of molecular orientation. PMID:25353498

  7. Self-Assembly and Orientation of Hydrogen-Bonded Oligothiophene Polymorphs at Liquid-Membrane-Liquid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tevis, Ian D; Palmer, Liam C; Herman, David J; Murray, Ian P; Stone, David A; Stupp, Samuel I

    2012-03-15

    One of the challenges in organic systems with semiconducting function is the achievement of molecular orientation over large scales. We report here on the use of self-assembly kinetics to control long-range orientation of a quarterthiophene derivative designed to combine intermolecular π-π stacking and hydrogen bonding among amide groups. Assembly of these molecules in the solution phase is prevented by the hydrogen-bond-accepting solvent tetrahydrofuran, whereas formation of H-aggregates is facilitated in toluene. Rapid evaporation of solvent in a solution of the quarterthiophene in a 2:1:1 mixture of 1,4-dioxane/tetrahydrofuran/toluene leads to self-assembly of kinetically trapped mats of bundled fibers. In great contrast, slow drying in a toluene atmosphere leads to the homogeneous nucleation and growth of ordered structures shaped as rhombohedra or hexagonal prisms depending on concentration. Furthermore, exceedingly slow delivery of toluene from a high molecular weight polymer solution into the system through a porous aluminum oxide membrane results in the growth of highly oriented hexagonal prisms perpendicular to the interface. The amide groups of the compound likely adsorb onto the polar aluminum oxide surface and direct the self-assembly pathway toward heterogeneous nucleation and growth to form hexagonal prisms. We propose that the oriented prismatic polymorph results from the synergy of surface interactions rooted in hydrogen bonding on the solid membrane and the slow kinetics of self-assembly. These observations demonstrate how self-assembly conditions can be used to guide the supramolecular energy landscape to generate vastly different structures. These fundamental principles allowed us to grow oriented prismatic assemblies on transparent indium-doped tin oxide electrodes, which are of interest in organic electronics.

  8. Cellulose microfibril assembly and orientation in higher plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, S.C.; Maclachlan, G.A.; Brown, R.M. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Freeze-fractured plasma membranes of seedlings of Zea mays L., Burpee's Snowcross, and Pisum sativum L., variety Alsaka, contain terminal complex structures and the impressions of microfibrils from the newest cell wall layer.Terminal complex subunits are on the exoplasmic fracture (EF) face, and rosette subunits are on the protoplasmic fracture (PF) face of the membrane. The association of terminal complexes and rosettes with microfibril tips and their association with newly deposited groups of microfibrils is indirect evidence for their role in microfibril assembly. Microtubules may be responsible for certain orientations of microfibrils, particularly the formation of bands of microfibrils in newly deposited wall layers. However, microfibril orienting mechanisms are more complex, involving factors still present during colchicine treatment. Since UDP-glucose is thought to be a precursor of cellulose microfibrils in higher plant cells, EM radioautography was used to determine the site of incorporation of glucose. However, under the conditions used, glucose was only incorporated from UDP-glucose at the surface of cut or damaged pea stem cells, i.e., in vitro. Thus, incorporation of glucose from UDP-glucose was not useful for probing the patterns of cellulose microfibril synthesis in vivo. 18 references, 8 figures.

  9. Orientational order and translational dynamics of magnetic particle assemblies in liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Peroukidis, Stavros D; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2016-08-10

    Implementing extensive molecular dynamics simulations we explore the organization of magnetic particle assemblies (clusters) in a uniaxial liquid crystalline matrix comprised of rodlike particles. The magnetic particles are modelled as soft dipolar spheres with diameter significantly smaller than the width of the rods. Depending on the dipolar strength coupling the magnetic particles arrange into head-to-tail configurations forming various types of clusters including rings (closed loops) and chains. In turn, the liquid crystalline matrix induces long range orientational ordering to these structures and promotes their diffusion along the director of the phase. Different translational dynamics are exhibited as the liquid crystalline matrix transforms either from isotropic to nematic or from nematic to smectic state. This is caused due to different collective motion of the magnetic particles into various clusters in the anisotropic environments. Our results offer a physical insight for understanding both the structure and dynamics of magnetic particle assemblies in liquid crystalline matrices. PMID:27460190

  10. Photonic properties of organic molecular assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggins, Kevin Edward

    1997-12-01

    This work attempts to characterize various photonic properties of spontaneously created organic molecular objects. A novel diacetylene monomer was synthesized and found to polymerize forming two-dimensional supramolecular assemblies. The two-dimensional structure self assembles when UV light generates polydiacetylene comb polymers. The material forms blue solid thin films which have been characterized by x-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and Raman scattering. The photopolymerization rate of the monomer was followed by Raman scattering and was shown to be of second order. A reaction rate threshold was observed between 300 and 400mW of incident 647.1nm laser radiation where the reaction rate increased substantially. The material generates high third order nonlinear optical signals and have remarkable photochemical stability to 1064nm radiation from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Upon heating to 62oC, the material turns bright red reversibly while maintaining its two-dimensional structure, characterized by differential scanning calorimetry. Heating to 180oC results in an irreversible color change to bright orange characterized by UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometry. Variable temperature sum frequency generation experiments show that the third harmonic generation signals retain much of their original intensity through the thermochromic transitions. A system of novel rodcoil materials self assembles into mushroom-shaped supramolecular objects. These nanophase separated aggregates form oblique-plane superlattices exhibiting long-range order. The superlattice is composed of isolated crystallized rod domains surrounded by amorphous coil which form from simple solvent casting techniques. Second harmonic generation was used to confirm the polar head-to-tail stacking of the aggregates and to determine the average physical tilt of (5/pm 5)o of the aggregates relative to the film plane. A novel chiral oligomer synthesized in our group gave rise to interesting phase behavior

  11. Effect of molecular orientation on the elastic constants of polypropylene.

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S. R.; Renusch, D. P.; Grimsditch, M.; Materials Science Division; Amoco Polymers Research & Development

    2000-03-07

    The Brillouin spectroscopic measurements of elastic properties of polypropylene films fabricated by different processing techniques are described. We find that the elastic symmetry and the associated elastic constants are dependent on the molecular orientation brought about by the processing conditions used to produce the films. We have shown that Brillouin scattering techniques can successfully be used to track the molecular orientation induced by uniaxial stretching. We find a direct correspondence between the Brillouin measurements and optical birefringence measurements, illustrating that molecular orientation plays a dominant role in determining the mechanical anisotropy in these materials.

  12. On-chip molecular electronic plasmon sources based on self-assembled monolayer tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Wei; Wang, Tao; Chu, Hong-Son; Wu, Lin; Liu, Rongrong; Sun, Song; Phua, Wee Kee; Wang, Lejia; Tomczak, Nikodem; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-04-01

    Molecular electronic control over plasmons offers a promising route for on-chip integrated molecular plasmonic devices for information processing and computing. To move beyond the currently available technologies and to miniaturize plasmonic devices, molecular electronic plasmon sources are required. Here, we report on-chip molecular electronic plasmon sources consisting of tunnel junctions based on self-assembled monolayers sandwiched between two metallic electrodes that excite localized plasmons, and surface plasmon polaritons, with tunnelling electrons. The plasmons originate from single, diffraction-limited spots within the junctions, follow power-law distributed photon statistics, and have well-defined polarization orientations. The structure of the self-assembled monolayer and the applied bias influence the observed polarization. We also show molecular electronic control of the plasmon intensity by changing the chemical structure of the molecules and by bias-selective excitation of plasmons using molecular diodes.

  13. Molecular assembly of botulinum neurotoxin progenitor complexes.

    PubMed

    Benefield, Desirée A; Dessain, Scott K; Shine, Nancy; Ohi, Melanie D; Lacy, D Borden

    2013-04-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is produced by Clostridium botulinum and associates with nontoxic neurotoxin-associated proteins to form high-molecular weight progenitor complexes (PCs). The PCs are required for the oral toxicity of BoNT in the context of food-borne botulism and are thought to protect BoNT from destruction in the gastrointestinal tract and aid in absorption from the gut lumen. The PC can differ in size and protein content depending on the C. botulinum strain. The oral toxicity of the BoNT PC increases as the size of the PC increases, but the molecular architecture of these large complexes and how they contribute to BoNT toxicity have not been elucidated. We have generated 2D images of PCs from strains producing BoNT serotypes A1, B, and E using negative stain electron microscopy and single-particle averaging. The BoNT/A1 and BoNT/B PCs were observed as ovoid-shaped bodies with three appendages, whereas the BoNT/E PC was observed as an ovoid body. Both the BoNT/A1 and BoNT/B PCs showed significant flexibility, and the BoNT/B PC was documented as a heterogeneous population of assembly/disassembly intermediates. We have also determined 3D structures for each serotype using the random conical tilt approach. Crystal structures of the individual proteins were placed into the BoNT/A1 and BoNT/B PC electron density maps to generate unique detailed models of the BoNT PCs. The structures highlight an effective platform that can be engineered for the development of mucosal vaccines and the intestinal absorption of oral biologics. PMID:23509303

  14. Molecular engineering and characterization of self-assembled biorecognition surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Sheng

    The development of molecular engineering techniques for the fabrication of biomaterial surfaces is of importance in the field of biomaterials. It offers opportunities for better understanding of biological processes on material surfaces and rational design of contemporary biomaterials. Our work in this area aims to develop novel engineering strategies to design biorecognition surfaces via self-assembly and surface derivatization. Fundamental issues regarding self-assembled monolayer (SAM) structure, formation kinetics, and chemical derivatization were investigated systematically using electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and contact angle measurements. Novel engineering concepts based on multifunctionality and statistical pattern matching were introduced and applied to develop biomimetic surfaces. Our study illustrated that molecules underwent structural transition and orientation development during self-assembly formation, from a disordered, low-density, more liquid-like structure to a highly ordered, closed-packed crystalline-like structure. Surface properties, such as wettability and the reactivity of outermost functional groups can be related to film structure, packing density, as well as molecular orientation. Given the order and organization of SAMs, the accessibility and reactivity of the outermost functional groups, reaction kinetics, stoichiometry, and SAMs stability were studied systematically by surface derivatization of trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA). The TFAA derivatization reactions exhibited rapid kinetics on the hydroxyl-terminated SAMs. The data from complementary surface analytical techniques consistently indicated a nearly complete surface reaction. Biomimetic surfaces were made by random immobilization of amino acid of arginine (R), glycine (G), and aspartic acid (D) on well-defined SAMs

  15. Molecular assembly at bare semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuiness, Christine L.

    The formation of well-organized monolayers with highly reproducible structures by solution self assembly of octadecanethiol (ODT) on GaAs (001) and (011) surfaces at ambient temperature through rigorous control of assembly conditions is demonstrated. Using TOF-SIMs and HRXPS measurements, it is shown that ODT molecules form a direct S-GaAs attachment with little to no substrate oxidation and exhibit an overall thermal stability up to ˜100°C, lower than the same monolayers on Au{111} surfaces. Detailed characterization using a combination of ellipsometry, liquid drop contact angles, atomic force microscopy, near edge x-ray absorption fine structure, infrared spectroscopy and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy probes reveal a structure with conformationally ordered alkyl chains tilted 14 +/-1° from the surface normal with a 43 +/-5° twist, a highly oleophobic and hydrophobic ambient surface. On GaAs (111A) surfaces, the ODT monolayers also form a direct S-GaAs attachment with little to no substrate oxidation but the final monolayer structure is more disordered, with the alkyl chains tilted 25 +/-5° from surface normal with a 45 +/-5° twist, resulting in a less oleophobic and hydrophobic ambient surface. Further, in contrast to previously reported results with Na2S9H2O treatments, Raman scattering measurements reveal that the ODT monolayers do not significantly modify the near-surface electronic structure of GaAs. Analysis of the tilt angle and film thickness data in conjunction with grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements show that the monolayers form structures with a significant mismatch of the average adsorbate molecule spacings with the spacings of intrinsic GaAs crystal lattices. For the square surface lattices of GaAs (001) and (011), ODT monolayers are observed to form pseudo-hcp structures. On the hcp surface lattice of GaAs (111A) however, the monolayers form a true hcp structure. This suggests that formation of the monolayers is driven

  16. Mechanoresponsive Luminescent Molecular Assemblies: An Emerging Class of Materials.

    PubMed

    Sagara, Yoshimitsu; Yamane, Shogo; Mitani, Masato; Weder, Christoph; Kato, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    The possibility to change the molecular assembled structures of organic and organometallic materials through mechanical stimulation is emerging as a general and powerful concept for the design of functional materials. In particular, the photophysical properties such as photoluminescence color, quantum yield, and emission lifetime of organic and organometallic fluorophores can significantly depend on the molecular packing, enabling the development of molecular materials with mechanoresponsive luminescence characteristics. Indeed, an increasing number of studies have shown in recent years that mechanical force can be utilized to change the molecular arrangement, and thereby the optical response, of luminescent molecular assemblies of π-conjugated organic or organometallic molecules. Here, the development of such mechanoresponsive luminescent (MRL) molecular assemblies consisting of organic or organometallic molecules is reviewed and emerging trends in this research field are summarized. After a brief introduction of mechanoresponsive luminescence observed in molecular assemblies, the concept of "luminescent molecular domino" is introduced, before molecular materials that show turn-on/off of photoluminescence in response to mechanical stimulation are reviewed. Mechanically stimulated multicolor changes and water-soluble MRL materials are also highlighted and approaches that combine the concept of MRL molecular assemblies with other materials types are presented in the last part of this progress report. PMID:26461848

  17. An autonomous molecular assembler for programmable chemical synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Wenjing; Muscat, Richard A.; McKee, Mireya L.; Milnes, Phillip J.; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Bath, Jonathan; Davis, Benjamin G.; Brown, Tom; O'Reilly, Rachel K.; Turberfield, Andrew J.

    2016-06-01

    Molecular machines that assemble polymers in a programmed sequence are fundamental to life. They are also an achievable goal of nanotechnology. Here, we report synthetic molecular machinery made from DNA that controls and records the formation of covalent bonds. We show that an autonomous cascade of DNA hybridization reactions can create oligomers, from building blocks linked by olefin or peptide bonds, with a sequence defined by a reconfigurable molecular program. The system can also be programmed to achieve combinatorial assembly. The sequence of assembly reactions and thus the structure of each oligomer synthesized is recorded in a DNA molecule, which enables this information to be recovered by PCR amplification followed by DNA sequencing.

  18. Control of liquid crystal molecular orientation using ultrasound vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Satoki; Koyama, Daisuke; Shimizu, Yuki; Emoto, Akira; Nakamura, Kentaro; Matsukawa, Mami

    2016-03-01

    We propose a technique to control the orientation of nematic liquid crystals using ultrasound and investigate the optical characteristics of the oriented samples. An ultrasonic liquid crystal cell with a thickness of 5-25 μm and two ultrasonic lead zirconate titanate transducers was fabricated. By exciting the ultrasonic transducers, the flexural vibration modes were generated on the cell. An acoustic radiation force to the liquid crystal layer was generated, changing the molecular orientation and thus the light transmission. By modulating the ultrasonic driving frequency and voltage, the spatial distribution of the molecular orientation of the liquid crystals could be controlled. The distribution of the transmitted light intensity depends on the thickness of the liquid crystal layer because the acoustic field in the liquid crystal layer is changed by the orientational film.

  19. Molecular self-assembly on two-dimensional atomic crystals: insights from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yinghe; Wu, Qisheng; Chen, Qian; Wang, Jinlan

    2015-11-19

    van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy of ultrathin organic films on two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals has become a sovereign area because of their unique advantages in organic electronic devices. However, the dynamic mechanism of the self-assembly remains elusive. Here, we visualize the nanoscale self-assembly of organic molecules on graphene and boron nitride monolayer from a disordered state to a 2D lattice via molecular dynamics simulation for the first time. It is revealed that the assembly toward 2D ordered structures is essentially the minimization of the molecule-molecule interaction, that is, the vdW interaction in nonpolar systems and the vdW and Coulomb interactions in polar systems that are the decisive factors for the formation of the 2D ordering. The role of the substrate is mainly governing the array orientation of the adsorbates. The mechanisms unveiled here are generally applicable to a broad class of organic thin films via vdW epitaxy. PMID:26523464

  20. Orientational anisotropy in simulated vapor-deposited molecular glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubimov, Ivan; Antony, Lucas; Walters, Diane M.; Ediger, M. D.; Rodney, David; Pablo, Juan J. de

    2015-09-07

    Enhanced kinetic stability of vapor-deposited glasses has been established for a variety of glass organic formers. Several recent reports indicate that vapor-deposited glasses can be orientationally anisotropic. In this work, we present results of extensive molecular simulations that mimic a number of features of the experimental vapor deposition process. The simulations are performed on a generic coarse-grained model and an all-atom representation of N,N′-bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N′-diphenylbenzidine (TPD), a small organic molecule whose vapor-deposited glasses exhibit considerable orientational anisotropy. The coarse-grained model adopted here is found to reproduce several key aspects reported in experiments. In particular, the molecular orientation of vapor-deposited glasses is observed to depend on substrate temperature during deposition. For a fixed deposition rate, the molecular orientation in the glasses changes from isotropic, at the glass transition temperature, T{sub g}, to slightly normal to the substrate at temperatures just below T{sub g}. Well below T{sub g}, molecular orientation becomes predominantly parallel to the substrate. The all-atom model is used to confirm some of the equilibrium structural features of TPD interfaces that arise above the glass transition temperature. We discuss a mechanism based on distinct orientations observed at equilibrium near the surface of the film, which get trapped within the film during the non-equilibrium process of vapor deposition.

  1. Magnetotactic molecular architectures from self-assembly of β-peptide foldamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sunbum; Kim, Beom Jin; Lim, Hyung-Kyu; Kang, Kyungtae; Yoo, Sung Hyun; Gong, Jintaek; Yoon, Eunyoung; Lee, Juno; Choi, Insung S.; Kim, Hyungjun; Lee, Hee-Seung

    2015-10-01

    The design of stimuli-responsive self-assembled molecular systems capable of undergoing mechanical work is one of the most important challenges in synthetic chemistry and materials science. Here we report that foldectures, that is, self-assembled molecular architectures of β-peptide foldamers, uniformly align with respect to an applied static magnetic field, and also show instantaneous orientational motion in a dynamic magnetic field. This response is explained by the amplified anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibilities as a result of the well-ordered molecular packing of the foldectures. In addition, the motions of foldectures at the microscale can be translated into magnetotactic behaviour at the macroscopic scale in a way reminiscent to that of magnetosomes in magnetotactic bacteria. This study will provide significant inspiration for designing the next generation of biocompatible peptide-based molecular machines with applications in biological systems.

  2. Magnetotactic molecular architectures from self-assembly of β-peptide foldamers

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Sunbum; Kim, Beom Jin; Lim, Hyung-Kyu; Kang, Kyungtae; Yoo, Sung Hyun; Gong, Jintaek; Yoon, Eunyoung; Lee, Juno; Choi, Insung S.; Kim, Hyungjun; Lee, Hee-Seung

    2015-01-01

    The design of stimuli-responsive self-assembled molecular systems capable of undergoing mechanical work is one of the most important challenges in synthetic chemistry and materials science. Here we report that foldectures, that is, self-assembled molecular architectures of β-peptide foldamers, uniformly align with respect to an applied static magnetic field, and also show instantaneous orientational motion in a dynamic magnetic field. This response is explained by the amplified anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibilities as a result of the well-ordered molecular packing of the foldectures. In addition, the motions of foldectures at the microscale can be translated into magnetotactic behaviour at the macroscopic scale in a way reminiscent to that of magnetosomes in magnetotactic bacteria. This study will provide significant inspiration for designing the next generation of biocompatible peptide-based molecular machines with applications in biological systems. PMID:26510658

  3. Photocatalytic water oxidation by molecular assemblies based on cobalt catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xu; Li, Fei; Li, Hua; Zhang, Biaobiao; Yu, Fengshou; Sun, Licheng

    2014-09-01

    Chromophore-catalyst molecular assemblies towards visible light-driven water oxidation were synthesized by covalent integration of a light-harvesting complex [Ru(bpy)3](2+) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) and a Co4O4 cubane water oxidation catalyst. The two components were assembled either in linear or macrocyclic configurations. In the presence of the sacrificial reagent, the Ru-Co metallocycle exhibits remarkable photocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution, which is one order of magnitude higher than that of a multicomponent system and exceeds that of a linear assembly by a factor of five, offering access to highly active photocatalyst through molecular design. PMID:25111070

  4. Numerical optimization of laser fields to control molecular orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Haj-Yedder, A.; Auger, A.; Dion, C.M.; Cances, E.; Le Bris, C.; Keller, A.; Atabek, O.

    2002-12-01

    A thorough numerical illustration of an optimal control scenario dealing with the laser-induced orientation of a diatomic molecule (LiF) is presented. Special emphasis is laid on the definition of the various targets dealing with different orientation characteristics, identified in terms of maximum efficiency (i.e., molecular axis direction closest to the direction of the laser polarization vector), maximum duration (i.e., the time interval during which this orientation is maintained), or of a compromise between efficiency and duration. Excellent postpulse orientation is achieved by sudden, intense pulses. Thermal effects are also studied with an extension of the control scenarios to Boltzmann averaged orientation dynamics at T=5 K.

  5. Laser-field-free three-dimensional molecular orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Daisuke; Mun, Je Hoi; Minemoto, Shinichirou; Sakai, Hirofumi

    2016-07-01

    Laser-field-free three-dimensional orientation, corresponding to the complete control of spatial directions of asymmetric top molecules, is achieved with combined weak electrostatic and elliptically polarized laser fields with an 8-ns turnon and a 150-fs turnoff, which is shaped by a plasma shutter. Rotationally cold 3,4-dibromothiophene molecules are used as a sample, and their lower-lying rotational states are selected by a molecular deflector to increase the degrees of orientation. After the rapid turnoff of the pump pulse, higher degrees of orientation are maintained for 5-10 ps, which is long enough for various applications including electronic stereodynamics in molecules with femtosecond pulses.

  6. Molecular Orientation of Liquid Crystals on Topographic Nanopatterns.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seong Ho; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2016-07-13

    Controlling the orientation of building blocks in soft matter on the substrate has been a big challenge in material sciences. We have controlled the molecular orientation of liquid crystal (LC) materials on the porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) film having hexagonal pore arrays on the top surface. In our method, anchoring conditions can be varied by changing the pore size (Dp) and the porosity (P). As a proof-of-concept, the orientation of smectic A (SmA) structure at different anchoring conditions was successfully controlled in a sandwich cell consisting of AAO and a glass substrate, which has not been successfully controlled by conventional methods. PMID:27322013

  7. Self-assembly of supramolecular chiral insulated molecular wire.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun; Numata, Munenori; Bae, Ah-Hyun; Sakurai, Kazuo; Shinkai, Seiji

    2005-04-01

    Supramolecular chiral insulated molecular wire was constructed by self-assembly of a neutral one-dimensional schizophyllan host and a water-soluble polythiophene guest. The work presented here will not only open a door to a new application of polysaccharides but also provide an important clue to prepare stable supramolecular insulated molecular wires with one-handed helical structure. PMID:15796500

  8. Molecular alignment and orientation with a hybrid Raman scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustard, Philip J.; Lausten, R.; Sussman, Benjamin J.

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate a scheme for the preparation of molecular alignment and angular momentum orientation using a hybrid combination of two limits of Raman scattering. First a weak, impulsive pump pulse initializes the system via the nonresonant dynamic Stark effect. Then, having overcome the influence of the vacuum fluctuations, an amplification pulse selectively enhances the initial coherences by transient stimulated Raman scattering, generating alignment and angular momentum orientation of molecular hydrogen. The amplitude and phase of the resulting coherent dynamics are experimentally probed, indicating an amplification factor of 4.5. An analytic theory is developed to model the dynamics.

  9. Electric Field Assisted Assembly of Perpendicular Oriented NanorodSuperlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Kevin M.; Mastroianni, Alex; Stancil, Kimani A.; Liu,Haitao; Alivisatos, Paul A.

    2006-04-10

    We observe the assembly of CdS nanorod superlattices by thecombination of a DC electric field and solvent evaporation. In eachelectric field (1 V/um) assisted assembly, CdS nanorods (5 x 30 nm)suspended initially in toluene were observed to align perpendicularly tothe substrate. Azimuthal alignment along the nanorod crystal faces andthe presence of stacking faults indicate that both 2D and 3D assemblieswere formed by a process of controlled super crystal growth.

  10. Harnessing Surface Dislocation Networks for Molecular Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Karsten

    2009-03-01

    The controlled fabrication of functional wafer-based nano-arrays is one of the ultimate quests in current nanotechnologies. Well-ordered misfit dislocation networks of ultrathin metal films are viable candidates for the growth of two- dimensional ordered cluster arrays in the nanometer regime. Such bottom-up processes can be very complex, involving collective effects from a large number of atoms. Unraveling the fundamental forces that drive these self-assembly processes requires detailed experimental information at the atomic level of large ensembles of hundreds to thousands of atoms. The combination of variable temperature measurements from our home-built STM correlated with 2D Frenkel-Kontorova models based on first-principle interaction parameters is used to explain how uniform arrays can form with the strain in the thin film as the driving force responsible for the surface self-assembly process. This process is generally applicable to assemble many molecular species thus opening avenues towards complex self-assembled structures based on a lock-and-key type approach. Moreover, when increasing the molecular coverage and/or decreasing the strain in the thin film the intermolecular interactions will eventually dominate the elastic effects and dictate the self-assembly process via molecular structure and functionality. We will show that controlling this delicate balance leads to a richness of structures, ranging from disperse ordered arrays of molecular clusters to patterned self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of functionalized fullerenes and methanethiol.

  11. Structural investigations of oriented membrane assemblies by FTIR-ATR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fringeli, Urs Peter; Goette, Jeannette; Reiter, Gerald; Siam, Monira; Baurecht, Dieter

    1998-06-01

    In situ attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy is presented as an adequate tool for studying molecular structure and function of biomembranes. In this article emphasis was directed to the production of suitable model bilayer membranes for optimum mimicking of natural biomembranes, and to special FTIR ATR techniques to achieve enhanced selectivity as well as time resolved information on complex membrane assemblies. In this context, the preparation of supported bilayers according to the LB/vesicle method is presented and the use of such model membranes to build more complex assemblies, e.g. with creatine kinase, a surface bound enzyme, and alkaline phosphatase, a membrane anchored enzyme. A comprehensive summary of equations used for quantitative ATR spectroscopy is given and applied to determine the surface concentration and orientation of membrane bound molecules. The use of supported bilayers for drug membrane interaction studies is demonstrated by the local anesthetic dibucaine. Besides of structural information's, such studies result also thermodynamic date, such as adsorption isotherm and partition coefficient. A special ATR set-up for more precise background compensation is presented enabling the conversion of a single beam spectrometer into a pseudo double beam spectrometer. This optical component may be placed in the sample compartment of the spectrometer, and is referred to as single-beam-sample-reference (SBSR) attachment. Finally, a short theoretical introduction into time resolved modulation spectroscopy is given. Temperature modulated excitation of reversible conformational changes in the polypeptide poly-L-lysine and the enzyme RNase are shown as examples.

  12. Molecular orientation of rhodamine dyes on surfaces of layered silicates.

    PubMed

    Bujdák, Juraj; Iyi, Nobuo

    2005-03-17

    Films of the layered silicates fluorohectorite (FH) and saponite (Sap) with various rhodamine dyes were prepared. The dyes with acidic as well as large hydrophobic groups in their molecule were not adsorbed on the surface of FH, which was interpreted in terms of high charge density on the surface of this silicate. All adsorbed dyes formed similar forms, such as isolated cations and H-type molecular aggregates, which were characterized by different spectral properties. Polarized ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy was used for the characterization of the molecular orientation of dye chromophores on the silicate surface. The isolated dye cations and species, which absorbed light at the low energy part of the spectra, were only slightly tilted with respect to the plane of the silicate surface. The cations forming H-aggregates and absorbing light at low wavelengths were oriented in a nearly perpendicular fashion. The nearly perpendicular orientation was observed as a strong increase of dichroic ratio with film tilting. The orientation of the cations in H-aggregates depends partially on the structure of the dye molecule, namely, on the type of amino group (primary, secondary, or tertiary) in the dye molecule. The type of amino groups probably plays a role in the suitable orientation of dye cations for effective electrostatic interaction between the cations and the negatively charged siloxane surface. X-ray powder diffraction could not distinguish dye phases of dye monomers and molecular aggregates. PMID:16851539

  13. Molecular Orientation in Two Component Vapor-Deposited Glasses: Effect of Substrate Temperature and Molecular Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Charles; Jiang, Jing; Walters, Diane; Ediger, Mark

    Vapor-deposited glasses are widely investigated for use in organic electronics including the emitting layers of OLED devices. These materials, while macroscopically homogenous, have anisotropic packing and molecular orientation. By controlling this orientation, outcoupling efficiency can be increased by aligning the transition dipole moment of the light-emitting molecules parallel to the substrate. Light-emitting molecules are typically dispersed in a host matrix, as such, it is imperative to understand molecular orientation in two-component systems. In this study we examine two-component vapor-deposited films and the orientations of the constituent molecules using spectroscopic ellipsometry, UV-vis and IR spectroscopy. The role of temperature, composition and molecular shape as it effects molecular orientation is examined for mixtures of DSA-Ph in Alq3 and in TPD. Deposition temperature relative to the glass transition temperature of the two-component mixture is the primary controlling factor for molecular orientation. In mixtures of DSA-Ph in Alq3, the linear DSA-Ph has a horizontal orientation at low temperatures and slight vertical orientation maximized at 0.96Tg,mixture, analogous to one-component films.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations on PGLa using NMR orientational constraints.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Ulrich; Witter, Raiker

    2015-11-01

    NMR data obtained by solid state NMR from anisotropic samples are used as orientational constraints in molecular dynamics simulations for determining the structure and dynamics of the PGLa peptide within a membrane environment. For the simulation the recently developed molecular dynamics with orientational constraints technique (MDOC) is used. This method introduces orientation dependent pseudo-forces into the COSMOS-NMR force field. Acting during a molecular dynamics simulation these forces drive molecular rotations, re-orientations and folding in such a way that the motional time-averages of the tensorial NMR properties are consistent with the experimentally measured NMR parameters. This MDOC strategy does not depend on the initial choice of atomic coordinates, and is in principle suitable for any flexible and mobile kind of molecule; and it is of course possible to account for flexible parts of peptides or their side-chains. MDOC has been applied to the antimicrobial peptide PGLa and a related dimer model. With these simulations it was possible to reproduce most NMR parameters within the experimental error bounds. The alignment, conformation and order parameters of the membrane-bound molecule and its dimer were directly derived with MDOC from the NMR data. Furthermore, this new approach yielded for the first time the distribution of segmental orientations with respect to the membrane and the order parameter tensors of the dimer systems. It was demonstrated the deuterium splittings measured at the peptide to lipid ratio of 1/50 are consistent with a membrane spanning orientation of the peptide. PMID:26358333

  15. Engineering and Assembly of Protein Modules into Functional Molecular Systems.

    PubMed

    Hirschi, Stephan; Stauffer, Mirko; Harder, Daniel; Müller, Daniel J; Meier, Wolfgang; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology approaches range from the introduction of unique features into organisms to the assembly of isolated biomacromolecules or synthetic building blocks into artificial biological systems with biomimetic or completely novel functionalities. Simple molecular systems can be based on containers on the nanoscale that are equipped with tailored functional modules for various applications in healthcare, industry or biological and medical research. The concept, or vision, of assembling native or engineered proteins and/or synthetic components as functional modules into molecular systems is discussed. The main focus is laid on the engineering of energizing modules generating chemical energy, transport modules using this energy to translocate molecules between compartments of a molecular system, and catalytic modules (bio-)chemically processing the molecules. Further key aspects of this discourse are possible approaches for the assembly of simple nanofactories and their applications in biotechnology and medical health. PMID:27363367

  16. An autonomous molecular assembler for programmable chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Wenjing; Muscat, Richard A; McKee, Mireya L; Milnes, Phillip J; El-Sagheer, Afaf H; Bath, Jonathan; Davis, Benjamin G; Brown, Tom; O'Reilly, Rachel K; Turberfield, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    Molecular machines that assemble polymers in a programmed sequence are fundamental to life. They are also an achievable goal of nanotechnology. Here, we report synthetic molecular machinery made from DNA that controls and records the formation of covalent bonds. We show that an autonomous cascade of DNA hybridization reactions can create oligomers, from building blocks linked by olefin or peptide bonds, with a sequence defined by a reconfigurable molecular program. The system can also be programmed to achieve combinatorial assembly. The sequence of assembly reactions and thus the structure of each oligomer synthesized is recorded in a DNA molecule, which enables this information to be recovered by PCR amplification followed by DNA sequencing. PMID:27219697

  17. Easy creation of polymeric systems for molecular dynamics with Assemble!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degiacomi, Matteo T.; Erastova, Valentina; Wilson, Mark R.

    2016-05-01

    We present Assemble!, a program greatly simplifying the preparation of molecular dynamics simulations of polymeric systems. The program is controlled either via command line or an intuitive Graphical User Interface, and runs on all major operating systems. Assemble! allows the creation of a desired system of polymer chains from constituent monomers, packs the chains into a box according to the required concentration and returns all the files needed for simulation with Gromacs. We illustrate the capabilities of Assemble! by demonstrating the easy preparation of a 300 monomers-long polyisoprene in hexane, and a heterogeneous mixture of polybutadiene.

  18. The art and science of self-assembling molecular machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-López, Marcos; Preece, Jon A.; Fraser Stoddart, J.

    1996-09-01

    In this review, we show how noncovalent bonding interactions between 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron rich aromatic ring systems (e.g. hydroquinone) and the 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron deficient tetracationic cyclophane, cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) can be used to self-assemble novel molecular architectures which are not only interesting to us, because of their fascinating topologies, but also because they have the potential to be developed into molecular structures with switchable properties on the nanometre scale. The high efficiency observed in the self-assembly of a [2]catenane, and its dynamic properties in solution, represent the first step in the design and self-assembly of other molecular assemblies better suited for the study of molecular switching processes. Therefore, a series of [2]rotaxanes, mechanically-interlocked molecular compounds, consisting of a linear 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron rich dumbbell-shaped component and the 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron deficient tetracationic cyclophane as the cyclic component, have been self-assembled and evaluated. All of the so-called molecular shuttles show translational isomerism and one of them, comprising benzidine and biphenol recognition sites as the non-degenerate 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron rich sites, shows molecular switching properties when it is perturbed by external stimuli, such as electrons and protons. The versatility of our approach to nanoscale molecular switches is proven by the description of a series of molecular assemblies and supramolecular arrays, consisting of 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron rich and 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron deficient components, which display molecular switching properties when they are influenced by external stimuli that are photochemical, electrochemical and/or chemical in nature. However, the molecular switching phenomena take place in the solution state. Therefore, finally we describe how simple molecular structures can be ordered on to a solid

  19. Role of molecular orientational anisotropy in the chiral resolution of enantiomers in adsorbed overlayers.

    PubMed

    Szabelski, Paweł; Woszczyk, Aleksandra

    2012-07-31

    Separation of chiral molecules using achiral inputs is an interesting alternative to traditional techniques based on the chiral recognition mechanism. In this article we propose a lattice gas Monte Carlo model of two-dimensional chiral segregation induced by breaking of molecular orientational symmetry. Simulations were performed on a square lattice for rigid chain molecules composed of four and five identical segments. Mirror-image flat chain conformations resulting in different enantiomeric pairs were considered for each probe molecule. The enantiomers were assumed to interact via short-ranged segment-segment interaction potential limited to nearest neighbors on the lattice. We considered two qualitatively different situations in which (1) the molecules were allowed to rotate on the surface and adopt any of the four planar orientations and (2) the rotation was blocked, so that only one planar orientation was possible. The results obtained for the racemic overlayers showed clearly that the orientational symmetry breaking can induce spontaneous segregation of the enantiomers into large enantiopure domains. However, this effect was observed only for molecules with sufficiently long linear fragment. In the case of kinked bulky molecules a mixed assembly was formed, demonstrating the role of molecular shape in the orientationally biased segregation of enantiomers in adsorbed films. The insights from this study can be useful in developing strategies for 2D chiral separations in which external directional fields are used. PMID:22747234

  20. A novel orientation and position measuring system for large & medium scale precision assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuhe; Qiu, Yongrong; Chen, Yanxiang; Guan, Kaisen

    2014-11-01

    In the field of precision assembly of large & medium scale, the orientation and position measurement system is quite demanding. In this paper a novel measuring system, consisting of four motorized stages, a laser rangefinder, an autocollimator and a camera is proposed to assist precision assembly. Through the design of coaxial optical system, the autocollimator is integrated with a laser rangefinder into a collimation rangefinder, which is used for measuring orientation and position synchronously. The laser spot is adopted to guide autocollimation over a large space and assist the camera in finding collimated measurand. The mathematical models and practical calibration methods for measurement are elaborated. The preliminary experimental results agree with the methods currently being used for orientation and position measurement. The measuring method provides an alternative choice for the metrology in precision assembly.

  1. Task oriented nonlinear control laws for telerobotic assembly operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. A.; Ward, L. S.; Elia, C. F.

    1987-01-01

    The goal of this research is to achieve very intelligent telerobotic controllers which are capable of receiving high-level commands from the human operator and implementing them in an adaptive manner in the object/task/manipulator workspace. Initiatives by the authors at Integrated Systems, Inc. to identify and develop the key technologies necessary to create such a flexible, highly programmable, telerobotic controller are presented. The focus of the discussion is on the modeling of insertion tasks in three dimensions and nonlinear implicit force feedback control laws which incorporate tool/workspace constraints. Preliminary experiments with dual arm beam assembly in 2-D are presented.

  2. Assembly of oriented zeolite monolayers and thin films on polymeric surfaces via hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Liu, Xiufeng; Zhang, Baoquan; Zhu, Huiming

    2008-10-21

    The b-oriented monolayers of microsized silicalite-1 crystals have been manually assembled on glass plate supported poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), chitosan, and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thin films via hydrogen bonding with much enhanced binding strength and satisfactory degrees of coverage and close packing. The exerted pressure and rubbing time in the manual assembly do not affect the binding strength of the silicalite-1 monolayer on the glass plate supported polymeric film. This manual assembly has been further applied to fabricate zeolite monolayers on commercially available Plexiglas surfaces and b-oriented multilayered films of silicalite-1 crystals on glass plates. The assembly method established in this study provides a feasible way to produce zeolite monolayers on polymer-modified solid substrates and Plexiglas and to fabricate zeolite-polymer composite membranes by means of the layer-by-layer technique. PMID:18785711

  3. Molecular assemblies as protective barriers and adhesion promotion interlayer

    DOEpatents

    King, David E.; Czanderna, Alvin W.; Kennedy, Cheryl E.

    1996-01-01

    A protective diffusion barrier having adhesive qualifies for metalized surfaces is provided by a passivating agent having the formula HS--(CH.sub.2).sub.11 --COOH Which forms a very dense, transparent organized molecular assembly or layer that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack metal surfaces.

  4. Molecular assemblies as protective barriers and adhesion promotion interlayer

    DOEpatents

    King, D.E.; Czanderna, A.W.; Kennedy, C.E.

    1996-01-30

    A protective diffusion barrier having adhesive qualities for metalized surfaces is provided by a passivating agent having the formula HS--(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}--COOH which forms a very dense, transparent organized molecular assembly or layer that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack metal surfaces. 8 figs.

  5. Mechanically induced luminescence changes in molecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Sagara, Yoshimitsu; Kato, Takashi

    2009-11-01

    Altering the shape and properties of a material through external factors such as heat, light, pressure, pH, electric or magnetic fields, or the introduction of a guest molecule, is an attractive prospect. In this Perspective, piezochromic luminescent materials - which change the colour of their luminescence in response to mechanical stimuli - are described. Such piezochromism has been observed for a few molecular materials that contain luminescent cores in liquid-crystalline and crystalline solid states, as well as for polymeric materials doped with dyes. These changes in photoluminescent colour can be activated by various types of mechanical pressure such as shearing, grinding or elongation, which can trigger different mechanisms of producing the colour. Such stimuli-responsive materials have potential for various applications, including sensors, memory and displays. PMID:21378953

  6. Ligand Pose and Orientational Sampling in Molecular Docking

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Ryan G.; Carchia, Michael; Sterling, Teague; Irwin, John J.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular docking remains an important tool for structure-based screening to find new ligands and chemical probes. As docking ambitions grow to include new scoring function terms, and to address ever more targets, the reliability and extendability of the orientation sampling, and the throughput of the method, become pressing. Here we explore sampling techniques that eliminate stochastic behavior in DOCK3.6, allowing us to optimize the method for regularly variable sampling of orientations. This also enabled a focused effort to optimize the code for efficiency, with a three-fold increase in the speed of the program. This, in turn, facilitated extensive testing of the method on the 102 targets, 22,805 ligands and 1,411,214 decoys of the Directory of Useful Decoys - Enhanced (DUD-E) benchmarking set, at multiple levels of sampling. Encouragingly, we observe that as sampling increases from 50 to 500 to 2000 to 5000 to 20000 molecular orientations in the binding site (and so from about 1×1010 to 4×1010 to 1×1011 to 2×1011 to 5×1011 mean atoms scored per target, since multiple conformations are sampled per orientation), the enrichment of ligands over decoys monotonically increases for most DUD-E targets. Meanwhile, including internal electrostatics in the evaluation ligand conformational energies, and restricting aromatic hydroxyls to low energy rotamers, further improved enrichment values. Several of the strategies used here to improve the efficiency of the code are broadly applicable in the field. PMID:24098414

  7. Chloroaluminum phthalocyanine thin films: chemical reaction and molecular orientation.

    PubMed

    Latteyer, Florian; Peisert, Heiko; Uihlein, Johannes; Basova, Tamara; Nagel, Peter; Merz, Michael; Schuppler, Stefan; Chassé, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    The chemical transformation of the polar chloroaluminum phthalocyanine, AlClPc, to μ-(oxo)bis(phthalocyaninato)aluminum(III), (PcAl)2O, in thin films on indium tin oxide is studied and its influence on the molecular orientation is discussed. The studies were conducted using complementary spectroscopic techniques: Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. In addition, density functional theory calculations were performed in order to identify specific vibrations and to monitor the product formation. The thin films of AlClPc were annealed in controlled environmental conditions to obtain (PcAl)2O. It is shown that the chemical transformation in the thin films can proceed only in the presence of water. The influence of the reaction and the annealing on the molecular orientation was studied with Raman spectroscopy and NEXAFS spectroscopy in total electron yield and partial electron yield modes. The comparison of the results obtained from these techniques allows the determination of the molecular orientation of the film as a function of the probing depth. PMID:23494276

  8. Colloid-guided assembly of oriented 3D neuronal networks

    PubMed Central

    Pautot, Sophie; Wyart, Claire; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2009-01-01

    A central challenge in neuroscience is to understand the formation and function of three-dimensional (3D) neuronal networks. In vitro studies have been mainly limited to measurements of small numbers of neurons connected in two dimensions. Here we demonstrate the use of colloids as moveable supports for neuronal growth, maturation, transfection and manipulation, where the colloids serve as guides for the assembly of controlled 3D, millimeter-sized neuronal networks. Process growth can be guided into layered connectivity with a density similar to what is found in vivo. The colloidal superstructures are optically transparent, enabling remote stimulation and recording of neuronal activity using layer-specific expression of light-activated channels and indicator dyes. The modular approach toward in vitro circuit construction provides a stepping stone for applications ranging from basic neuroscience to neuron-based screening of targeted drugs. PMID:18641658

  9. Molecular mechanism of bacterial type 1 and P pili assembly.

    PubMed

    Busch, Andreas; Phan, Gilles; Waksman, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    The formation of adhesive surface structures called pili or fimbriae ('bacterial hair') is an important contributor towards bacterial pathogenicity and persistence. To fight often chronic or recurrent bacterial infections such as urinary tract infections, it is necessary to understand the molecular mechanism of the nanomachines assembling such pili. Here, we focus on the so far best-known pilus assembly machinery: the chaperone-usher pathway producing the type 1 and P pili, and highlight the most recently acquired structural knowledge. First, we describe the subunits' structure and the molecular role of the periplasmic chaperone. Second, we focus on the outer-membrane usher structure and the catalytic mechanism of usher-mediated pilus biogenesis. Finally, we describe how the detailed understanding of the chaperone-usher pathway at a molecular level has paved the way for the design of a new generation of bacterial inhibitors called 'pilicides'. PMID:25624519

  10. Molecular Origins of Thermal Transitions in Polyelectrolyte Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Erol; Zhang, Yanpu; Antila, Hanne S.; Lutkenhaus, Jodie L.; Sammalkorpi, Maria; Aalto Team; Texas A&M Team

    2015-03-01

    Polyelectrolyte (PE) multilayers and complexes formed from oppositely charged polymers can exhibit extraordinary superhydrophobicity, mechanical strength and responsiveness resulting in applications ranging functional membranes, optics, sensors and drug delivery. Depending on the assembly conditions, PE assemblies may undergo a thermal transition from glassy to soft behavior under heating. Our earlier work using thermal analysis measurements shows a distinct thermal transition for PE layer-by-layer (LbL) systems assembled with added salt but no analogous transition in films assembled without added salt or dry systems. These findings raise interesting questions on the nature of the thermal transition; here, we explore its molecular origins through characterization of the PE aggregates by temperature-controlled all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We show via molecular simulations the thermal transition results from the existence of an LCST (lower critical solution temperature) in the PE systems: the diffusion behavior, hydrogen bond formation, and bridging capacity of water molecules plasticizing the complex changes at the transition temperature. We quantify the behavior, map its chemistry specificity through comparison of strongly and weakly charged PE complexes, and connect the findings to our interrelated QCM-D experiments.

  11. Liquid crystalline collagen: a self-assembled morphology for the orientation of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, John E; Fuller, Gerald G

    2009-03-01

    We report the creation of collagen films having a cholesteric banding structure with an orientation that can be systematically controlled. The action of hydrodynamic flow and rapid desiccation was used to influence the orientation of collagen fibrils, producing a film with a twisted plywood architecture. Adult human fibroblasts cultured on these substrates orient in the direction of the flow deposition, and filopodia are extended onto individual bands. Atomic force microscopy reveals the assembly of 30 nm collagen fibrils into the uniform cholesteric collagen films with a periodic surface relief. The generation of collagen with a reticular, "basket-weave" morphology when using lower concentrations is also discussed. PMID:19437784

  12. Faunus: An object oriented framework for molecular simulation

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Mikael; Trulsson, Martin; Persson, Björn

    2008-01-01

    Background We present a C++ class library for Monte Carlo simulation of molecular systems, including proteins in solution. The design is generic and highly modular, enabling multiple developers to easily implement additional features. The statistical mechanical methods are documented by extensive use of code comments that – subsequently – are collected to automatically build a web-based manual. Results We show how an object oriented design can be used to create an intuitively appealing coding framework for molecular simulation. This is exemplified in a minimalistic C++ program that can calculate protein protonation states. We further discuss performance issues related to high level coding abstraction. Conclusion C++ and the Standard Template Library (STL) provide a high-performance platform for generic molecular modeling. Automatic generation of code documentation from inline comments has proven particularly useful in that no separate manual needs to be maintained. PMID:18241331

  13. Molecular orientation of tropoelastin is determined by surface hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Le Brun, Anton P; Chow, John; Bax, Daniel V; Nelson, Andrew; Weiss, Anthony S; James, Michael

    2012-02-13

    Tropoelastin is the precursor of the extracellular protein elastin and is utilized in tissue engineering and implant technology by adapting the interface presented by surface-bound tropoelastin. The preferred orientation of the surface bound protein is relevant to biointerface interactions, as the C-terminus of tropoelastin is known to be a binding target for cells. Using recombinant human tropoelastin we monitored the binding of tropoelastin on hydrophilic silica and on silica made hydrophobic by depositing a self-assembled monolayer of octadecyl trichlorosilane. The layered organization of deposited tropoelastin was probed using neutron and X-ray reflectometry under aqueous and dried conditions. In a wet environment, tropoelastin retained a solution-like structure when adsorbed on silica but adopted a brush-like structure when on hydrophobized silica. The orientation of the surface-bound tropoelastin was investigated using cell binding assays and it was found that the C-terminus of tropoelastin faced the bulk solvent when bound to the hydrophobic surface, but a mixture of orientations was adopted when tropoelastin was bound to the hydrophilic surface. Drying the tropoelastin-coated surfaces irreversibly altered these protein structures for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. PMID:22176209

  14. Effect of contact angle on the orientation, stability, and assembly of dense floating cubes.

    PubMed

    Daniello, Robert; Khan, Kashan; Donnell, Michael; Rothstein, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, the effect of contact angle, density, and size on the orientation, stability, and assembly of floating cubes was investigated. All the cubes tested were more dense than water. Floatation occurred as a result of capillary stresses induced by deformation of the air-water interface. The advancing contact angle of the bare acrylic cubes was measured to be 85°. The contact angle of the cubes was increased by painting the cubes with a commercially available superhydrophobic paint to reach an advancing contact angle of 150°. Depending on their size, density, and contact angle, the cubes were observed to float in one of three primary orientations: edge up, vertex up, and face up. An experimental apparatus was built such that the sum of the gravitational force, buoyancy force, and capillary forces could be measured using a force transducer as a function of cube position as it was lowered through the air-water interface. Measurements showed that the maximum capillary forces were always experienced for the face up orientation. However, when floatation was possible in the vertex up orientation, it was found to be the most stable cube orientation because it had the lowest center of gravity. A series of theoretical predictions were performed for the cubes floating in each of the three primary orientations to calculate the net force on the cube. The theoretical predictions were found to match the experimental measurements well. A cube stability diagram of cube orientation as a function of cube contact angle and size was prepared from the predictions of theory and found to match the experimental observations quite well. The assembly of cubes floating face up and vertex up were also studied for assemblies of two, three, and many cubes. Cubes floating face up were found to assemble face-to-face and form regular square lattice patterns with no free interface between cubes. Cubes floating vertex up were found to assemble in a variety of different arrangements

  15. Effect of contact angle on the orientation, stability, and assembly of dense floating cubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniello, Robert; Khan, Kashan; Donnell, Michael; Rothstein, Jonathan P.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, the effect of contact angle, density, and size on the orientation, stability, and assembly of floating cubes was investigated. All the cubes tested were more dense than water. Floatation occurred as a result of capillary stresses induced by deformation of the air-water interface. The advancing contact angle of the bare acrylic cubes was measured to be 85°. The contact angle of the cubes was increased by painting the cubes with a commercially available superhydrophobic paint to reach an advancing contact angle of 150°. Depending on their size, density, and contact angle, the cubes were observed to float in one of three primary orientations: edge up, vertex up, and face up. An experimental apparatus was built such that the sum of the gravitational force, buoyancy force, and capillary forces could be measured using a force transducer as a function of cube position as it was lowered through the air-water interface. Measurements showed that the maximum capillary forces were always experienced for the face up orientation. However, when floatation was possible in the vertex up orientation, it was found to be the most stable cube orientation because it had the lowest center of gravity. A series of theoretical predictions were performed for the cubes floating in each of the three primary orientations to calculate the net force on the cube. The theoretical predictions were found to match the experimental measurements well. A cube stability diagram of cube orientation as a function of cube contact angle and size was prepared from the predictions of theory and found to match the experimental observations quite well. The assembly of cubes floating face up and vertex up were also studied for assemblies of two, three, and many cubes. Cubes floating face up were found to assemble face-to-face and form regular square lattice patterns with no free interface between cubes. Cubes floating vertex up were found to assemble in a variety of different arrangements

  16. Design and Fabrication of Molecular Assemblies of Conductive Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Josephine Ho-Wah

    Two new methods of fabricating multilayer Langmuir -Blodgett (LB) thin films of electrically conductive polyaniline and a novel method of constructing molecular assemblies of polyaniline via the spontaneous adsorption (SA) technique were developed. Quantitative transmission/reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, polarized ultraviolet -visible spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques were used to examine the structure and composition of multilayer thin films. In the structural study of LB films fabricated from 3-octadecyl pyrrole (3-ODP), 3-octadecanoyl pyrrole (3-ODOP) and polypyrrole/3-ODOP (PPY/3-ODOP), the level of order and orientation were found to be affected by the intermolecular and intramolecular interactions between molecules. For the manipulation of polyaniline using the LB technique, stable and easily transferrable LB monolayers were formed at the air-water interface by mixing polyaniline in its emeraldine-base form (PANb) with two processing aids. Films fabricated from the PANb/StA mixture were found to be phase separated with domains of polyaniline and stearic acid while those from the PANb/PI blend were found to be miscible. Both polyaniline LB films were rendered conductive by doping with 1 M HCl or HCl vapor. Multilayer polyaniline films were also constructed via a SA process. The multilayer buildup of doped polyaniline and sulfonated polystyrene (PANi/SPS) is facilitated by the electrostatic attraction between the delocalized positive -charged defects along the PANi backbone and the negative charges present in the ionizable pendant sulfonic acid groups of the SPS. Uniform multilayer thin films with thicknesses between 20 A and 100 A were constructed on different surfaces with complex topologies. Conductivities in the level of 0.1-1 S/cm were achieved by doping the multilayer PANi/SPS films with 1 M HCl. This level of conductivity was achieved by films with as few as 4 layers of PANi/SPS, that is, films with thicknesses of about

  17. Photon-Regulated DNA-Enzymatic Nanostructures by Molecular Assembly

    PubMed Central

    You, Mingxu; Wang, Ruo-Wen; Zhang, Xiaobing; Chen, Yan; Wang, Kelong; Peng, Lu; Tan, Weihong

    2011-01-01

    Future smart nanostructures will have to rely on molecular assembly for unique or advanced desired functions. For example, the evolved ribosome in nature is one example of functional self-assembly of nucleic acids and proteins employed in nature to perform specific tasks. Artificial self-assembled nanodevices have also been developed to mimic key biofunctions, and various nucleic acid- and protein-based functional nanoassemblies have been reported. However, functionally regulating these nanostructures is still a major challenge. Here we report a general approach to fine-tune the catalytic function of DNA-enzymatic nanosized assemblies by taking advantage of the trans-cis isomerization of azobenzene molecules. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to precisely modulate the structures and functions of an enzymatic assembly based on light-induced DNA scaffold switching. Via photocontrolled DNA conformational switching, the proximity of multiple enzyme catalytic centers can be adjusted, as well as the catalytic efficiency of cofactor-mediated DNAzymes. We expect that this approach will lead to the advancement of DNA-enzymatic functional nanostructures in future biomedical and analytical applications. PMID:22098552

  18. Molecular Motions in Functional Self-Assembled Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Dhotel, Alexandre; Chen, Ziguang; Delbreilh, Laurent; Youssef, Boulos; Saiter, Jean-Marc; Tan, Li

    2013-01-01

    The construction of “smart” materials able to perform specific functions at the molecular scale through the application of various stimuli is highly attractive but still challenging. The most recent applications indicate that the outstanding flexibility of self-assembled architectures can be employed as a powerful tool for the development of innovative molecular devices, functional surfaces and smart nanomaterials. Structural flexibility of these materials is known to be conferred by weak intermolecular forces involved in self-assembly strategies. However, some fundamental mechanisms responsible for conformational lability remain unexplored. Furthermore, the role played by stronger bonds, such as coordination, ionic and covalent bonding, is sometimes neglected while they can be employed readily to produce mechanically robust but also chemically reversible structures. In this review, recent applications of structural flexibility and molecular motions in self-assembled nanostructures are discussed. Special focus is given to advanced materials exhibiting significant performance changes after an external stimulus is applied, such as light exposure, pH variation, heat treatment or electromagnetic field. The crucial role played by strong intra- and weak intermolecular interactions on structural lability and responsiveness is highlighted. PMID:23348927

  19. Edge-to-Edge Oriented Self-Assembly of ReS2 Nanoflakes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Wang, Wenjie; Kong, Xin; Mendes, Rafael G; Fang, Liwen; Xue, Yinghui; Xiao, Yao; Rümmeli, Mark H; Chen, Shengli; Fu, Lei

    2016-09-01

    The self-assembly of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, an emerging research area, still remains largely unexplored. The strong interlayer attraction between 2D nanosheets leads to face-to-face stacking rather than edge-to-edge coupling. We demonstrate, for the first time, how one can induce and control an edge-to-edge self-assembly process for 2D nanomaterials. The extremely weak van der Waals coupling and strong anisotropy of ReS2 allow us to realize an oriented self-assembly (OSA) process. The aspect ratio of the resulting ReS2 nanoscrolls can be well controlled. In addition, we perform simulations to further explain and confirm the OSA process, demonstrating its great potential to be expanded as a general edge-to-edge self-assembly process suitable for other 2D nanomaterials. PMID:27547983

  20. Shape-controlled orientation and assembly of colloids with sharp edges in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Beller, Daniel A; Gharbi, Mohamed A; Liu, Iris B

    2015-02-14

    The assembly of colloids in nematic liquid crystals via topological defects has been extensively studied for spherical particles, and investigations of other colloid shapes have revealed a wide array of new assembly behaviors. We show, using Landau-de Gennes numerical modeling, that nematic defect configurations and colloidal assembly can be strongly influenced by fine details of colloid shape, in particular the presence of sharp edges. For cylinder, microbullet, and cube colloid geometries, we obtain the particles' equilibrium alignment directions and effective pair interaction potentials as a function of simple shape parameters. We find that defects pin at sharp edges, and that the colloid consequently orients at an oblique angle relative to the far-field nematic director that depends on the colloid's shape. This shape-dependent alignment, which we confirm in experimental measurements, raises the possibility of selecting self-assembly outcomes for colloids in liquid crystals by tuning particle geometry. PMID:25523158

  1. Mechanical Characterization of Molecular Assemblies at Oil/Water Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wa

    The self-assembly of charged molecules in liquid phases and their ability to form functional layers at immiscible interfaces are areas of great interest. However, the implementation of these assemblies is often limited by a lack of understanding of the detailed assembly mechanisms. In order to enhance the performance of interfacial assemblies it is essential to be able to characterize the physical and mechanical properties of assembled layers, as well as develop model systems that will allow us to examine the factors that govern their interaction with the surrounding environment. The key purpose of this thesis is to develop an understanding of some of the important factors influencing interfacial assemblies at immiscible liquid interfaces. The first portion of the work involves mechanical characterization of interfacial layers formed by large amphiphilic molecules. The study of block and gradient copolymers, reveals the effect of copolymer sequence distribution on the ability of these molecules to form interfacial assemblies. Specifically, the unique network structure formed by gradient copolymers at oil/water interfaces enables us to create a robust membrane at the interface by ionic crosslinking. The second part of this thesis explores smaller molecule assemblies at liquid interfaces, including commonly used commercial surfactant (span 80) and nano particles (graphene oxide). Both studies demonstrate an interesting correlation between molecular structure and overall properties of the assembled layers. Factors such as interfacial density, particle sizes and pH can greatly influence the structure of the assembled layers, resulting in interesting phenomena such as spontaneous emulsification, wrinkling and layer collapse. The bulk of the oil/water interface study was performed using axisymmetric drop shape analysis (DSA), which successfully quantifies the mechanical tension in the interfacial layer. This analysis was further extended by a development of a double

  2. Complex molecular assemblies at hand via interactive simulations.

    PubMed

    Delalande, Olivier; Férey, Nicolas; Grasseau, Gilles; Baaden, Marc

    2009-11-30

    Studying complex molecular assemblies interactively is becoming an increasingly appealing approach to molecular modeling. Here we focus on interactive molecular dynamics (IMD) as a textbook example for interactive simulation methods. Such simulations can be useful in exploring and generating hypotheses about the structural and mechanical aspects of biomolecular interactions. For the first time, we carry out low-resolution coarse-grain IMD simulations. Such simplified modeling methods currently appear to be more suitable for interactive experiments and represent a well-balanced compromise between an important gain in computational speed versus a moderate loss in modeling accuracy compared to higher resolution all-atom simulations. This is particularly useful for initial exploration and hypothesis development for rare molecular interaction events. We evaluate which applications are currently feasible using molecular assemblies from 1900 to over 300,000 particles. Three biochemical systems are discussed: the guanylate kinase (GK) enzyme, the outer membrane protease T and the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors complex involved in membrane fusion. We induce large conformational changes, carry out interactive docking experiments, probe lipid-protein interactions and are able to sense the mechanical properties of a molecular model. Furthermore, such interactive simulations facilitate exploration of modeling parameters for method improvement. For the purpose of these simulations, we have developed a freely available software library called MDDriver. It uses the IMD protocol from NAMD and facilitates the implementation and application of interactive simulations. With MDDriver it becomes very easy to render any particle-based molecular simulation engine interactive. Here we use its implementation in the Gromacs software as an example. PMID:19353597

  3. Molecular Microbial Analyses of the Mars Exploration Rovers Assembly Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; LaDuc, Myron T.; Newcombe, David; Kempf, Michael J.; Koke, John. A.; Smoot, James C.; Smoot, Laura M.; Stahl, David A.

    2004-01-01

    During space exploration, the control of terrestrial microbes associated with robotic space vehicles intended to land on extraterrestrial solar system bodies is necessary to prevent forward contamination and maintain scientific integrity during the search for life. Microorganisms associated with the spacecraft assembly environment can be a source of contamination for the spacecraft. In this study, we have monitored the microbial burden of air samples of the Mars Exploration Rovers' assembly facility at the Kennedy Space Center utilizing complementary diagnostic tools. To estimate the microbial burden and identify potential contaminants in the assembly facility, several microbiological techniques were used including culturing, cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, DNA microarray analysis, and ATP assays to assess viable microorganisms. Culturing severely underestimated types and amounts of contamination since many of the microbes implicated by molecular analyses were not cultivable. In addition to the cultivation of Agrobacterium, Burkholderia and Bacillus species, the cloning approach retrieved 16s rDNA sequences of oligotrophs, symbionts, and y-proteobacteria members. DNA microarray analysis based on rational probe design and dissociation curves complemented existing molecular techniques and produced a highly parallel, high resolution analysis of contaminating microbial populations. For instance, strong hybridization signals to probes targeting the Bacillus species indicated that members of this species were present in the assembly area samples; however, differences in dissociation curves between perfect-match and air sample sequences showed that these samples harbored nucleotide polymorphisms. Vegetative cells of several isolates were resistant when subjected to treatments of UVC (254 nm) and vapor H202 (4 mg/L). This study further validates the significance of non-cultivable microbes in association with spacecraft assembly facilities, as our analyses have

  4. Response of liquid scintillator assemblies as a function of angular orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, S. F.; Scarpelli, M.; Miller, E.; Clarke, S. D.; Pozzi, S. A.

    2014-06-01

    Liquid scintillator detector assemblies contain an inert nitrogen expansion volume to allow for expansion of the liquid with changing temperature. Measurements and Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations are performed to study the dependence of pulse height distribution shapes as a function of detector angle for two liquid scintillators assemblies filled with 97% organic-liquid cocktail and a 3% expansion volume. A 12.7-cm diameter by 12.7-cm long and a 7.6-cm diameter by 9.1-cm long EJ-309 liquid scintillator assemblies are investigated using a 137Cs gamma-ray source. Aside from the differences in dimensions, the detector assemblies also differed in the design of the active detector volume: there is no light guide in the 12.7-cm-diameter detector assembly, whereas the 7.6-cm-diameter detector contains a BK7 light guide between the scintillation liquid and optical coupling to the photomultiplier tube. Results for the 12.7-cm-diameter detector show a decrease in the position of the Compton edge ranges from 4% to 40% at detector orientations where the expansion volume exists between scintillating medium and the photomultiplier tube. Results for the 7.6-cm-diameter detector show that the position of the Compton edge is relatively unaffected at all detector orientations due to the presence of light guide.

  5. Enhanced Rates of Photoinduced Molecular Orientation in a Series of Molecular Glassy Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Snell, Kristen E; Hou, Renjie; Ishow, Eléna; Lagugné-Labarthet, François

    2015-07-01

    Photoinduced orientation in a series of molecular glasses made of small push-pull azo derivatives is dynamically investigated for the first time. Birefringence measurements at 632.8 nm are conducted with a temporal resolution of 100 ms to probe the fast rate of the azo orientation induced under polarized light and its temporal stability over several consecutive cycles. To better evaluate the influence of the azo chemical substituents and their electronic properties on the orientation of the whole molecule, a series of push-pull azo derivatives involving a triphenylaminoazo core substituted with distinct electron-withdrawing moieties is studied. All resulting thin films are probed using polarization modulation infrared spectroscopy that yields dynamical linear dichroism measurements during a cycle of orientation followed by relaxation. We show here in particular that the orientation rates of small molecule-based azo materials are systematically increased up to 7-fold compared to those of a reference polymer counterpart. For specific compounds, the percentage of remnant orientation is also higher, which makes these materials of great interest and promising alternatives to azobenzene-containing polymers for a variety of applications requiring a fast response and absolute control over the molecular weight. PMID:26072966

  6. Molecular mobility in self-assembled dendritic chromophore glasses.

    PubMed

    Knorr, Daniel B; Zhou, Xing-Hua; Shi, Zhengwei; Luo, Jingdong; Jang, Sei-Hum; Jen, Alex K-Y; Overney, René M

    2009-10-29

    Increasing complexity in bottom-up molecular designs of amorphous structures with multiple relaxation modes demands an integrated and cognitive design approach, where chemical synthesis is guided by both analytical tools and theoretical simulations. In particular, this is apparent for novel organic second-order nonlinear optical materials of self-assembling molecular glasses involving dendritic arene stabilization moieties (phenyl, naphthyl, and anthryl) with electro-optical activities above 300 pm/V. In this study, nanoscale thermo-mechanical analyses yield direct insight into the molecular enthalpic and entropic relaxation modes. Arene-perfluoroarene interactions for coarse self-assembly are found to impose three phase relaxation regimes, with intermediate regimes of 8-15 degrees C in width and apparent activation energies between 40 and 60 kcal/mol to be the most effective for poling. Energetic analyses based on intrinsic friction microscopy (IFA) identify increasing temporal stability with increasing arene size for the low-temperature regime. Electric field poling efficiency is found to be inversely proportional to entropic cooperative contributions that can make up 80% of the overall apparent relaxation energy for the high-temperature regime. The origin for the activation energies below the incipient glass transition temperature, based on complementary molecular dynamic simulations, is tied primarily to noncovalent interactions between chromophore (dipole), dendritic (quadrupole) moieties, and combinations thereof. PMID:19780549

  7. Molecular Self-Assembly Driven by London Dispersion Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guo; Cooper, Valentino R; Cho, Jun-Hyung; Du, Shixuan; Gao, Hongjun; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2011-01-01

    The nature and strength of intermolecular interactions are crucial to a variety of kinetic and dynamic processes at surfaces. Whereas strong chemisorption bonds are known to facilitate molecular binding, the importance of the weaker yet ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions remains elusive in most cases. Here we use first-principles calculations combined with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to unambiguously demonstrate the vital role that vdW interactions play in molecular self-assembly, using styrene nanowire growth on silicon as a prototypical example. We find that, only when the London dispersion forces are included, accounting for the attractive parts of vdW interactions, can the effective intermolecular interaction be reversed from being repulsive to attractive. Such attractive interactions, in turn, ensure the preferred growth of long wires under physically realistic conditions as observed experimentally. We further propose a cooperative scheme, invoking the application of an electric field and the selective creation of Si dangling bonds, to drastically improve the ordered arrangement of the molecular structures. The present study represents a significant step forward in the fundamental understanding and precise control of molecular self-assembly guided by London dispersion forces.

  8. Molecular-level assemblies on metal oxide surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schoonover, J.R.; Bignozzi, C.; Meyer, T.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to explore molecular-level assemblies based on polypyridyl transition metal complexes attached to metal oxide surfaces to provide the basis for applications such as energy conversion and electricity generation, photoremediation of hazardous waste, chemical sensors, and optical storage and photorefractive devices for communications and optical computing. We have elucidated the fundamental factors that determine the photochemistry and photophysics of a series of these photoactive inorganic complexes in solution and on metal oxide substrates by exploiting our unique transient laser capabilities. This data is being utilized to design and fabricate molecular-level photonic devices. The rich chemistry of transition metal polypyridyl complexes can be utilized to prepare molecular assemblies having well-defined redox or excited-state properties that can be finely tuned to produce desired materials properties. We plan to explore other novel applications such as photorefractive switches and optical sensors using this molecular engineering approach.

  9. A Molecular Switch for the Orientation of Epithelial Cell Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, David M.; Roignot, Julie; Datta, Anirban; Overeem, Arend W.; Kim, Minji; Yu, Wei; Peng, Xiao; Eastburn, Dennis J.; Ewald, Andrew J.; Werb, Zena; Mostov, Keith E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The formation of epithelial tissues containing lumens requires not only the apical-basolateral polarization of cells, but also the coordinated orientation of this polarity such that the apical surfaces of neighboring cells all point toward the central lumen. Defects in extracellular matrix (ECM) signaling lead to inverted polarity so that the apical surfaces face the surrounding ECM. We report a molecular switch mechanism controlling polarity orientation. ECM signals through a β1-integrin/FAK/p190RhoGAP complex to down-regulate a RhoA/ROCK/Ezrin pathway at the ECM interface. PKCβII phosphorylates the apical identity-promoting Podocalyxin/NHERF1/Ezrin complex, removing Podocalyxin from the ECM-abutting cell surface and initiating its transcytosis to an apical membrane initiation site for lumen formation. Inhibition of this switch mechanism results in the retention of Podocalyxin at the ECM interface and the development instead of collective front-rear polarization and motility. Thus, ECM-derived signals control the morphogenesis of epithelial tissues by controlling the collective orientation of epithelial polarization. PMID:25307480

  10. Molecular Self-Assembly into One-Dimensional Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    PALMER, LIAM C.; STUPP, SAMUEL I.

    2008-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Self-assembly of small molecules into one-dimensional nanostructures offers many potential applications in electronically and biologically active materials. The recent advances discussed in this Account demonstrate how researchers can use the fundamental principles of supramolecular chemistry to craft the size, shape, and internal structure of nanoscale objects. In each system described here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to study the assembly morphology. Circular dichroism, nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and optical spectroscopy provided additional information about the self-assembly behavior in solution at the molecular level. Dendron rod–coil molecules self-assemble into flat or helical ribbons. They can incorporate electronically conductive groups and can be mineralized with inorganic semiconductors. To understand the relative importance of each segment in forming the supramolecular structure, we synthetically modified the dendron, rod, and coil portions. The self-assembly depended on the generation number of the dendron, the number of hydrogen-bonding functions, and the length of the rod and coil segments. We formed chiral helices using a dendron–rod–coil molecule prepared from an enantiomerically enriched coil. Because helical nanostructures are important targets for use in biomaterials, nonlinear optics, and stereoselective catalysis, researchers would like to precisely control their shape and size. Tripeptide-containing peptide lipid molecules assemble into straight or twisted nanofibers in organic solvents. As seen by AFM, the sterics of bulky end groups can tune the helical pitch of these peptide lipid nanofibers in organic solvents. Furthermore, we demonstrated the potential for pitch control using trans-to-cis photoisomerization of a terminal azobenzene group. Other molecules called peptide amphiphiles (PAs) are known to assemble in water into cylindrical nanostructures that

  11. Molecular simulations of assembly of functionalized spherical nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifpour, Arezou

    Precise assembly of nanoparticles is crucial for creating spatially engineered materials that can be used for photonics, photovoltaic, and metamaterials applications. One way to control nanoparticle assembly is by functionalizing the nanoparticle with ligands, such as polymers, DNA, and proteins, that can manipulate the interactions between the nanoparticles in the medium the particles are placed in. This thesis research aims to design ligands to provide a new route to the programmable assembly of nanoparticles. We first investigate using Monte Carlo simulation the effect of copolymer ligands on nanoparticle assembly. We first study a single nanoparticle grafted with many copolymer chains to understand how monomer sequence (e.g. alternating ABAB, or diblock AxBx) and chemistry of the copolymers affect the grafted chain conformation at various particle diameters, grafting densities, copolymer chain lengths, and monomer-monomer interactions in an implicit small molecule solvent. We find that the size of the grafted chain varies non-monotonically with increasing blockiness of the monomer sequence for a small particle diameter. From this first study, we selected the two sequences with the most different chain conformations---alternating and diblock---and studied the effect of the sequence and a range of monomer chemistries of the copolymer on the characteristics of assembly of multiple copolymer-functionalized nanoparticles. We find that the alternating sequence produces nanoclusters that are relatively isotropic, whereas diblock sequence tends to form anisotropic structures that are smaller and more compact when the block closer to the surface is attractive and larger loosely held together clusters when the outer block is attractive. Next, we conduct molecular dynamics simulations to study the effect of DNA ligands on nanoparticle assembly. Specifically we investigate the effect of grafted DNA strand composition (e.g. G/C content, placement and sequence) and

  12. Role of redox centre in charge transport investigated by novel self-assembled conjugated polymer molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zongrui; Dong, Huanli; Li, Tao; Hviid, Rune; Zou, Ye; Wei, Zhongming; Fu, Xiaolong; Wang, Erjing; Zhen, Yonggang; Nørgaard, Kasper; Laursen, Bo W.; Hu, Wenping

    2015-06-01

    Molecular electronics describes a field that seeks to implement electronic components made of molecular building blocks. To date, few studies have used conjugated polymers in molecular junctions despite the fact that they potentially transport charge more efficiently than the extensively investigated small-molecular systems. Here we report a novel type of molecular tunnelling junction exploring the use of conjugated polymers, which are self-assembled into ultrathin films in a distinguishable `planar' manner from the traditional vertically oriented small-molecule monolayers. Electrical measurements on the junctions reveal molecular-specific characteristics of the polymeric molecules in comparison with less conjugated small molecules. More significantly, we decorate redox-active functionality into polymeric backbones, demonstrating a key role of redox centre in the modulation of charge transport behaviour via energy level engineering and external stimuli, and implying the potential of employing tailor-made polymeric components as alternatives to small molecules for future molecular-scale electronics.

  13. Molecular pathways for defect annihilation in directed self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Hur, Su-Mi; Thapar, Vikram; Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo; Khaira, Gurdaman; Segal-Peretz, Tamar; Rincon-Delgadillo, Paulina A; Li, Weihua; Müller, Marcus; Nealey, Paul F; de Pablo, Juan J

    2015-11-17

    Over the last few years, the directed self-assembly of block copolymers by surface patterns has transitioned from academic curiosity to viable contender for commercial fabrication of next-generation nanocircuits by lithography. Recently, it has become apparent that kinetics, and not only thermodynamics, plays a key role for the ability of a polymeric material to self-assemble into a perfect, defect-free ordered state. Perfection, in this context, implies not more than one defect, with characteristic dimensions on the order of 5 nm, over a sample area as large as 100 cm(2). In this work, we identify the key pathways and the corresponding free energy barriers for eliminating defects, and we demonstrate that an extraordinarily large thermodynamic driving force is not necessarily sufficient for their removal. By adopting a concerted computational and experimental approach, we explain the molecular origins of these barriers and how they depend on material characteristics, and we propose strategies designed to overcome them. The validity of our conclusions for industrially relevant patterning processes is established by relying on instruments and assembly lines that are only available at state-of-the-art fabrication facilities, and, through this confluence of fundamental and applied research, we are able to discern the evolution of morphology at the smallest relevant length scales-a handful of nanometers-and present a view of defect annihilation in directed self-assembly at an unprecedented level of detail. PMID:26515095

  14. Molecular gated transistors: Role of self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaya, O.; Halpern, E.; Khamaisi, B.; Shaked, M.; Usherenko, Y.; Shalev, G.; Doron, A.; Levy, I.; Rosenwaks, Y.

    2010-07-01

    In order to understand the biosensing mechanism of field-effect based biosensors and optimize their performance, the effect of each of its molecular building block must be understood. In this work the gating effect of self-assembled linker molecules on field-effect transistor was studied in detail. We have combined Kelvin probe force microscopy, current-voltage measurements, capacitance-voltage measurements, equivalent circuit modeling and device simulations in order to trace the mechanism of silicon-on-insulator biological field-effect transistors. The measurements were conducted on the widely used linker molecules (3-aminopropyl)-trimethoxysilane (APTMS) and 11-aminoundecyl-triethoxysilane (AUTES), which were self-assembled on ozone activated silicon oxide surface covering the transistor channel. In a dry environment, the work function of the modified silicon oxide decreased by more than 1.5 eV, and the transistor threshold voltage increased by about 30 V following the self-assembly. A detailed analysis indicates that these changes are due to negative induced charges on the top dielectric layer, and an effective dipole due to the polar monolayer. However, the self-assembly did not change the silicon flat-band voltage when in contact with an electrolyte. This is attributed to electrostatic screening by the electrolyte.

  15. Molecular pathways for defect annihilation in directed self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Su-Mi; Thapar, Vikram; Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo; Khaira, Gurdaman; Segal-Peretz, Tamar; Rincon-Delgadillo, Paulina A.; Li, Weihua; Müller, Marcus; Nealey, Paul F.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few years, the directed self-assembly of block copolymers by surface patterns has transitioned from academic curiosity to viable contender for commercial fabrication of next-generation nanocircuits by lithography. Recently, it has become apparent that kinetics, and not only thermodynamics, plays a key role for the ability of a polymeric material to self-assemble into a perfect, defect-free ordered state. Perfection, in this context, implies not more than one defect, with characteristic dimensions on the order of 5 nm, over a sample area as large as 100 cm2. In this work, we identify the key pathways and the corresponding free energy barriers for eliminating defects, and we demonstrate that an extraordinarily large thermodynamic driving force is not necessarily sufficient for their removal. By adopting a concerted computational and experimental approach, we explain the molecular origins of these barriers and how they depend on material characteristics, and we propose strategies designed to overcome them. The validity of our conclusions for industrially relevant patterning processes is established by relying on instruments and assembly lines that are only available at state-of-the-art fabrication facilities, and, through this confluence of fundamental and applied research, we are able to discern the evolution of morphology at the smallest relevant length scales—a handful of nanometers—and present a view of defect annihilation in directed self-assembly at an unprecedented level of detail. PMID:26515095

  16. Molecular pathways for defect annihilation in directed self-assembly.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hur, Su-Mi; Thapar, Vikram; Ramirez-Hernandez, Abelardo; Khaira, Gurdaman S.; Segal-Peretz, Tamar; Rincon-Delgadillo, Paulina A.; Li, Weihua; Muller, Marcus; Nealey, Paul F.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-11-17

    Over the last few years, the directed self-assembly of block copolymers by surface patterns has transitioned from academic curiosity to viable contender for commercial fabrication of next-generation nanocircuits by lithography. Recently, it has become apparent that kinetics, and not only thermodynamics, plays a key role for the ability of a polymeric material to self-assemble into a perfect, defect-free ordered state. Perfection, in this context, implies not more than one defect, with characteristic dimensions on the order of 5 nm, over a sample area as large as 100 cm2. In this work, we identify the key pathways and the corresponding free-energymore » barriers for eliminating defects, and we demonstrate that an extraordinarily large thermodynamic driving force is not necessarily sufficient for their removal. By adopting a concerted computational and experimental approach, we explain the molecular origins of these barriers, how they depend on material characteristics, and we propose strategies designed to over-come them. The validity of our conclusions for industrially-relevant patterning processes is established by relying on instruments and assembly lines that are only available at state-of-the-art fabrication facilities and, through this confluence of fundamental and applied research, we are able to discern the evolution of morphology at the smallest relevant length scales - a handful of nanometers -, and present a view of defect annihilation in directed self-assembly at an unprecedented level of detail.« less

  17. Molecular assembly for high-performance bivalent nucleic acid inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngmi; Cao, Zehui; Tan, Weihong

    2008-04-15

    It is theorized that multivalent interaction can result in better affinity and selectivity than monovalent interaction in the design of high-performance ligands. Accordingly, biomolecular engineers are increasingly taking advantage of multivalent interactions to fabricate novel molecular assemblies, resulting in new functions for ligands or enhanced performance of existing ligands. Substantial efforts have been expended in using small molecules or epitopes of antibodies for designing multifunctional or better-performing ligands. However, few attempts to use nucleic acid aptamers as functional domains have been reported. In this study, we explore the design of bivalent nucleic acid ligands by using thrombin and its aptamers as the model by which to evaluate its functions. By assembling two thrombin-binding aptamers with optimized design parameters, this assembly has resulted in the successful development of a nucleic acid-based high-performance bivalent protein inhibitor. Our experimentation proved (i) that the simultaneous binding of two aptamers after linkage achieved 16.6-fold better inhibition efficiency than binding of the monovalent ligand and (ii) that such an improvement originated from changes in the kinetics of the binding interactions, with a k(off) rate approximately 1/50 as fast. In addition, the newly generated aptamer assembly is an excellent anticoagulant reagent when tested with different samples. Because this optimized ligand design offers a simple and noninvasive means of accomplishing higher performance from known functional aptamers, it holds promise as a potent antithrombin agent in the treatment of various diseases related to abnormal thrombin activities. PMID:18398007

  18. Molecular pathways for defect annihilation in directed self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Su-Mi; Thapar, Vikram; Ramirez-Hernandez, Abelardo; Khaira, Gurdaman S.; Segal-Peretz, Tamar; Rincon-Delgadillo, Paulina A.; Li, Weihua; Muller, Marcus; Nealey, Paul F.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-11-17

    Over the last few years, the directed self-assembly of block copolymers by surface patterns has transitioned from academic curiosity to viable contender for commercial fabrication of next-generation nanocircuits by lithography. Recently, it has become apparent that kinetics, and not only thermodynamics, plays a key role for the ability of a polymeric material to self-assemble into a perfect, defect-free ordered state. Perfection, in this context, implies not more than one defect, with characteristic dimensions on the order of 5 nm, over a sample area as large as 100 cm2. In this work, we identify the key pathways and the corresponding free-energy barriers for eliminating defects, and we demonstrate that an extraordinarily large thermodynamic driving force is not necessarily sufficient for their removal. By adopting a concerted computational and experimental approach, we explain the molecular origins of these barriers, how they depend on material characteristics, and we propose strategies designed to over-come them. The validity of our conclusions for industrially-relevant patterning processes is established by relying on instruments and assembly lines that are only available at state-of-the-art fabrication facilities and, through this confluence of fundamental and applied research, we are able to discern the evolution of morphology at the smallest relevant length scales - a handful of nanometers -, and present a view of defect annihilation in directed self-assembly at an unprecedented level of detail.

  19. Stable doping of carbon nanotubes via molecular self assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.; Chen, Y.; Podzorov, V.; Cook, A.; Zakhidov, A.

    2014-10-14

    We report a novel method for stable doping of carbon nanotubes (CNT) based on methods of molecular self assembly. A conformal growth of a self-assembled monolayer of fluoroalkyl trichloro-silane (FTS) at CNT surfaces results in a strong increase of the sheet conductivity of CNT electrodes by 60–300%, depending on the CNT chirality and composition. The charge carrier mobility of undoped partially aligned CNT films was independently estimated in a field-effect transistor geometry (~100 cm²V⁻¹s⁻¹). The hole density induced by the FTS monolayer in CNT sheets is estimated to be ~1.8 ×10¹⁴cm⁻². We also show that FTS doping of CNT anodes greatly improves the performance of organic solar cells. This large and stable doping effect, easily achieved in large-area samples, makes this approach very attractive for applications of CNTs in transparent and flexible electronics.

  20. Molecular assembly and organic film growth on complex intermetallic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mahboob, Abdullah; Sharma, Hem Raj; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Ledieu, Julian; Fournée, Vincent; McGrath, Ronan

    We extensively studied the role of molecular symmetry and symmetry/structures of wide ranges of substrate-surfaces from non-periodic to periodic to quasi-crystalline in nucleation, growth and phase transition in films made of organic molecular materials. Recently, most interest in quasicrystals is due to the generalization of aperiodic ordering to several classes of systems. Compared to periodic materials, these provide a closer approximation to an isotropic first Brillouin zone, which is of great importance to the design of new functional materials. Here, we present results obtained from our ongoing study of interface mediated molecular assembly extended on complex intermetallic surfaces with specific examples of C60 and Zn-phthalocyanine on quasicrystalline and approximant surfaces. We employed in-situ real-time low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) for investigation of the processes in assembly and film growth and post-growth STM study and DFT calculations to understand structural details and growth mechanism. Research were carried out in part at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Lab, USA; partly at Institut Jean Lamour, Université de Lorraine, France; and partly at the Surface Science Research Centre, University of Liverpool, UK.

  1. Orientational disorder: A key to understand polarity of molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulliger, J.; Brahimi, K.; Burgener, M.; Dulcevscaia, G.

    2014-12-01

    Polarity of molecular crystals is understood here as a result of 180° orientational disorder of asymmetrical building blocks. Symmetry arguments based on (i) a single rotational degree of freedom, (ii) the finite size of crystals and (iii) interactions in between asymmetrical molecules lead to the conclusion that such crystals should express a bi-polar (∞/∞m) average state of zero polarity. This basic property of molecular crystals is exemplified by forming solid solutions of 4-iodo-4‧-nitro-biphenyl (INBP) and symmetrical bi-phenyls (BP: A-π-A, D-π-D; A: acceptor; D: donor). Monte Carlo simulations based on a layer-by-layer growth model predict a reversal of the bi-polar state of pure INBP by forming a solid solution of (INBP)1-x(D-π-D)x. In the case of the addition of A-π-A reversal as found for pure INBP is promoted, i.e. needs less growth steps (layers) to be accomplished. Real crystals representing solid solutions were grown from 2-butanon solutions using symmetrical BPs. Scanning pyroelectric microscopy confirmed the qualitative behavior seen in Monte Carlo simulations. These findings represent an experimentum crucis supporting the general validity of the theory of stochastic polarity formation applied to single component or solid solution molecular crystals.

  2. Influence of Molecular Shape on Molecular Orientation and Stability of Vapor-Deposited Organic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Diane M.; Johnson, Noah D.; Ediger, M. D.

    Physical vapor deposition is commonly used to prepare active layers in organic electronics. Recently, it has been shown that molecular orientation and packing can be tuned by changing the substrate temperature during deposition, while still producing macroscopically homogeneous films. These amorphous materials can be highly anisotropic when prepared with low substrate temperatures, and they can exhibit exceptional kinetic stability; films retain their favorable packing when heated to high temperatures. Here, we study the influence of molecular shape on molecular orientation and stability. We investigate disc-shaped molecules, such as TCTA and m-MTDATA, nearly spherical molecules, such as Alq3, and linear molecules covering a broad range of aspect ratios, such as p-TTP and BSB-Cz. Disc-shaped molecules have preferential horizontal orientation when deposited at low substrate temperatures, and their orientation can be tuned by changing the substrate temperature. Alq3 forms stable, amorphous films that are optically isotropic when vapor deposited over a broad range of substrate temperatures. This work may guide the choice of material and deposition conditions for vapor-deposited films used in organic electronics and allow for more efficient devices to be fabricated.

  3. Nanostructure and molecular mechanics of spider dragline silk protein assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Keten, Sinan; Buehler, Markus J.

    2010-01-01

    Spider silk is a self-assembling biopolymer that outperforms most known materials in terms of its mechanical performance, despite its underlying weak chemical bonding based on H-bonds. While experimental studies have shown that the molecular structure of silk proteins has a direct influence on the stiffness, toughness and failure strength of silk, no molecular-level analysis of the nanostructure and associated mechanical properties of silk assemblies have been reported. Here, we report atomic-level structures of MaSp1 and MaSp2 proteins from the Nephila clavipes spider dragline silk sequence, obtained using replica exchange molecular dynamics, and subject these structures to mechanical loading for a detailed nanomechanical analysis. The structural analysis reveals that poly-alanine regions in silk predominantly form distinct and orderly beta-sheet crystal domains, while disorderly regions are formed by glycine-rich repeats that consist of 31-helix type structures and beta-turns. Our structural predictions are validated against experimental data based on dihedral angle pair calculations presented in Ramachandran plots, alpha-carbon atomic distances, as well as secondary structure content. Mechanical shearing simulations on selected structures illustrate that the nanoscale behaviour of silk protein assemblies is controlled by the distinctly different secondary structure content and hydrogen bonding in the crystalline and semi-amorphous regions. Both structural and mechanical characterization results show excellent agreement with available experimental evidence. Our findings set the stage for extensive atomistic investigations of silk, which may contribute towards an improved understanding of the source of the strength and toughness of this biological superfibre. PMID:20519206

  4. Molecularly Oriented Polymeric Thin Films for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, Catharine C.; Stoakley, Diane M.; St.Clair, Anne K.

    1997-01-01

    The increased commitment from NASA and private industry to the exploration of outer space and the use of orbital instrumentation to monitor the earth has focused attention on organic polymeric materials for a variety of applications in space. Some polymeric materials have exhibited short-term (3-5 yr) space environmental durability; however, future spacecraft are being designed with lifetimes projected to be 10-30 years. This gives rise to concern that material property change brought about during operation may result in unpredicted spacecraft performance. Because of their inherent toughness and flexibility, low density, thermal stability, radiation resistance and mechanical strength, aromatic polyimides have excellent potential use as advanced materials on large space structures. Also, there exists a need for high temperature (200-300 C) stable, flexible polymeric films that have high optical transparency in the 300-600nm range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Polymers suitable for these space applications were fabricated and characterized. Additionally, these polymers were molecularly oriented to further enhance their dimensional stability, stiffness, elongation and strength. Both unoriented and oriented polymeric thin films were also cryogenically treated to temperatures below -184 C to show their stability in cold environments and determine any changes in material properties.

  5. Controllable Orientation of Ester-Group-Induced Intermolecular Halogen Bonding in a 2D Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Zha, Bao; Dong, Meiqiu; Miao, Xinrui; Miao, Kai; Hu, Yi; Wu, Yican; Xu, Li; Deng, Wenli

    2016-08-18

    Halogen bonding with high specificity and directionality in the geometry has proven to be an important type of noncovalent interaction to fabricate and control 2D molecular architectures on surfaces. Herein, we first report how the orientation of the ester substituent for thienophenanthrene derivatives (5,10-DBTD and 5,10-DITD) affects positive charge distribution of halogens by density functional theory, thus determining the formation of an intermolecular halogen bond and different self-assembled patterns by scanning tunneling microscopy. The system presented here mainly includes heterohalogen X···O═C and X···S halogen bonds, H···Br and H···O hydrogen bonds, and I···I interaction, where the directionality and strength of such weak bonds determine the molecular arrangement by varying the halogen substituent. This study provides a detailed understanding of the role of ester orientation, concentration, and solvent effects on the formation of halogen bonds and proves relevant for identification of multiple halogen bonding in supramolecular chemistry. PMID:27482936

  6. Dipolar Self-Assembling in Mixtures of Propylene Carbonate and Dimethyl Sulfoxide as Revealed by the Orientational Entropy.

    PubMed

    Płowaś, Iwona; Świergiel, Jolanta; Jadżyn, Jan

    2016-08-18

    This article presents the results of static dielectric studies performed on mixtures of two strongly polar liquids important from a technological point of view: propylene carbonate (PC) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The dielectric data were analyzed in terms of the molar orientational entropy increment induced by the probing electric field. It was found that the two polar liquids in the neat state reveal quite different molecular organization in terms of dipole-dipole self-assembling: PC exhibits a dipolar coupling of the head-to-tail type, whereas in DMSO one observes extreme restriction of dipolar association in any form. In PC + DMSO mixtures, the disintegration of the dipolar ensembles of PC molecules takes place and the progress of that process is strictly proportional to the concentration of DMSO. The static permittivity of mixtures of such differently self-organized liquids exhibits a positive deviation from the additive rule and the deviation develops symmetrically within the concentration scale. PMID:27458791

  7. Molecular self assembly on optical fiber-based fluorescence sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayyagari, Madhu S. R.; Gao, Harry H.; Bihari, Bipin; Chittibabu, Kethinni G.; Kumar, Jayant; Marx, Kenneth A.; Kaplan, David L.; Tripathy, Sukant K.

    1994-03-01

    We discuss the molecular self-assembly on optical fibers in which a novel method for protein attachment to the sensing tip of the fiber is used. Our objective is to assemble a conjugated polythiophene copolymer as an attachment vehicle. Subsequent attachment of the photodynamic phycobiliprotein serves as the fluorescence probe element. Following our earlier experiments from Langmuir-Blodgett deposition of these polymeric materials as thin films on glass substrates, we extended the technique to optical fibers. First, the bare fiber surface is silanized with a C18 silane compound. The copolymer (3-undecylthiophene-co-3- methanolthiophene, biotinylated at the methanol moiety) assembly on the fiber is carried out presumable through van der Waals interactions between the hydrophobic fiber surface and the undecyl alkyl chains on the polymer backbone. A conjugated Str-PE (streptavidin covalently attached to phycoerythrin) complex is then attached to the copolymer via the conventional biotin-streptavidin interaction. The conjugated polymer not only supports the protein but, in principle, may help to transduce the signal generated by phycoerythrin to the fiber. Our results from fluorescence intensity measurements proved the efficacy of this system. An improved methodology is also sought to more strongly attach the conjugated copolymer to the fiber surface, and a covalent scheme is developed to polymerize and biotinylate polythiophene in situ on the fiber surface.

  8. Functionality in Electrospun Nanofibrous Membranes Based on Fiber's Size, Surface Area, and Molecular Orientation

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hidetoshi; Tanioka, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    Electrospinning is a versatile method for forming continuous thin fibers based on an electrohydrodynamic process. This method has the following advantages: (i) the ability to produce thin fibers with diameters in the micrometer and nanometer ranges; (ii) one-step forming of the two- or three-dimensional nanofiber network assemblies (nanofibrous membranes); and (iii) applicability for a broad spectrum of molecules, such as synthetic and biological polymers and polymerless sol-gel systems. Electrospun nanofibrous membranes have received significant attention in terms of their practical applications. The major advantages of nanofibers or nanofibrous membranes are the functionalities based on their nanoscaled-size, highly specific surface area, and highly molecular orientation. These functionalities of the nanofibrous membranes can be controlled by their fiber diameter, surface chemistry and topology, and internal structure of the nanofibers. This report focuses on our studies and describes fundamental aspects and applications of electrospun nanofibrous membranes. PMID:24957735

  9. Molecular mechanics methods for individual carbon nanotubes and nanotube assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhardt, Oliver; Wallmersperger, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Since many years, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been considered for a wide range of applications due to their outstanding mechanical properties. CNTs are tubular structures, showing a graphene like hexagonal lattice. Our interest in the calculation of the mechanical properties is motivated by several applications which demand the knowledge of the material behavior. One application in which the knowledge of the material behavior is vital is the CNT based fiber. Due to the excellent stiffness and strength of the individual CNTs, these fibers are expected to be a promising successor for state of the art carbon fibers. However, the mechanical properties of the fibers fall back behind the properties of individual CNTs. It is assumed that this gap in the properties is a result of the van-der-Waals interactions of the individual CNTs within the fiber. In order to understand the mechanical behavior of the fibers we apply a molecular mechanics approach. The mechanical properties of the individual CNTs are investigated by using a modified structural molecular mechanics approach. This is done by calculating the properties of a truss-beam element framework representing the CNT with the help of a chemical force field. Furthermore, we also investigate the interactions of CNTs arranged in basic CNT assemblies, mimicking the ones in a simple CNT fiber. We consider the van-der-Waals interactions in the structure and calculate the potential surface of the CNT assemblies.

  10. Orientational dynamics of colloidal ribbons self-assembled from microscopic magnetic ellipsoids.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Pedrero, Fernando; Cebers, Andrejs; Tierno, Pietro

    2016-04-20

    We combine experiments and theory to investigate the orientational dynamics of dipolar ellipsoids, which self-assemble into elongated ribbon-like structures due to the presence of a permanent magnetic moment, perpendicular to the long axis in each particle. Monodisperse hematite ellipsoids are synthesized via the sol-gel technique and arrange into ribbons in the presence of static or time-dependent magnetic fields. We find that under an oscillating field, the ribbons reorient perpendicular to the field direction, in contrast with the behaviour observed under a static field. This observation is explained theoretically by treating a chain of interacting ellipsoids as a single particle with orientational and demagnetizing field energy. The model allows us to describe the orientational behaviour of the chain and captures well its dynamics at different strengths of the actuating field. The understanding of the complex dynamics and assembly of anisotropic magnetic colloids is a necessary step for controlling the structure formation, which has direct applications in different fluid-based microscale technologies. PMID:26936015

  11. Collaborated measurement of three-dimensional position and orientation errors of assembled miniature devices with two vision systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Wei; Luo, Yi; Yang, Weimin; Chen, Liang

    2013-01-01

    In assembly of miniature devices, the position and orientation of the parts to be assembled should be guaranteed during or after assembly. In some cases, the relative position or orientation errors among the parts can not be measured from only one direction using visual method, because of visual occlusion or for the features of parts located in a three-dimensional way. An automatic assembly system for precise miniature devices is introduced. In the modular assembly system, two machine vision systems were employed for measurement of the three-dimensionally distributed assembly errors. High resolution CCD cameras and high position repeatability precision stages were integrated to realize high precision measurement in large work space. The two cameras worked in collaboration in measurement procedure to eliminate the influence of movement errors of the rotational or translational stages. A set of templates were designed for calibration of the vision systems and evaluation of the system's measurement accuracy.

  12. De Novo Transcriptome Assembly of Pummelo and Molecular Marker Development

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Mei; Yang, Xiaoming; Li, Hang; Su, Shiying; Yi, Hualin; Chai, Lijun; Deng, Xiuxin

    2015-01-01

    Pummelo (Citrus grandis) is an important fruit crop worldwide because of its nutritional value. To accelerate the pummelo breeding program, it is essential to obtain extensive genetic information and develop relative molecular markers. Here, we obtained a 12-Gb transcriptome dataset of pummelo through a mixture of RNA from seven tissues using Illumina pair-end sequencing, assembled into 57,212 unigenes with an average length of 1010 bp. The annotation and classification results showed that a total of 39,584 unigenes had similar hits to the known proteins of four public databases, and 31,501 were classified into 55 Gene Ontology (GO) functional sub-categories. The search for putative molecular markers among 57,212 unigenes identified 10,276 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and 64,720 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). High-quality primers of 1174 SSR loci were designed, of which 88.16% were localized to nine chromosomes of sweet orange. Of 100 SSR primers that were randomly selected for testing, 87 successfully amplified clear banding patterns. Of these primers, 29 with a mean PIC (polymorphic information content) value of 0.52 were effectively applied for phylogenetic analysis. Of the 20 SNP primers, 14 primers, including 54 potential SNPs, yielded target amplifications, and 46 loci were verified via Sanger sequencing. This new dataset will be a valuable resource for molecular biology studies of pummelo and provides reliable information regarding SNP and SSR marker development, thus expediting the breeding program of pummelo. PMID:25799271

  13. Smart dust: self-assembling, self-orienting photonic crystals of porous Si.

    PubMed

    Link, Jamie R; Sailor, Michael J

    2003-09-16

    Micrometer-sized one-dimensional photonic crystals of porous Si that spontaneously assemble, orient, and sense their local environment are prepared. The photonic crystals are generated by electrochemically etching two discrete porous multilayered dielectric mirrors into Si, one on top of the other. The first mirror is chemically modified by hydrosilylation with dodecene before the etching of the second mirror, which is prepared with an optical reflectivity spectrum that is distinct from the first. The entire film is removed from the substrate, and the second mirror is then selectively modified by mild thermal oxidation. The films are subsequently fractured into small particles by sonication. The chemically asymmetric particles spontaneously align at an organic liquid-water interface, with the hydrophobic side oriented toward the organic phase and the hydrophilic side toward the water. Sensing is accomplished when liquid at the interface infuses into the porous mirrors, inducing predictable shifts in the optical spectra of both mirrors. PMID:12947036

  14. Two-stages of chiral selectivity in the molecular self-assembly of tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guisinger, Nathan

    Both chirality and molecular assembly are essential and key components to life. In this study we explore the molecular assembly of the amino acid tryptophan (both L- and D- chiralities) on Cu(111). Our investigation utilizes low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy to observe resulting assemblies at the molecular scale. We find that depositing a racemic mixture of both L- and D- tryptophan results in the assembly of basic 6 molecule ``Lego'' structures that are enantiopure. These enantiopure ``Legos'' further assemble into 1-dimensional chains one block at a time. These resulting chains are also enantiopure with chiral selectivity occurring at two stages of assembly. Utilizing scanning tunneling spectroscopy we are able to probe the electronic structure of the chiral Legos that give insight into the root of the observed selectivity. Two-stages of chiral selectivity in the molecular self-assembly of tryptophan.

  15. A self-assembling lanthanide molecular nanoparticle for optical imaging†

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Katherine A.; Yang, Xiaoping; Schipper, Desmond; Hall, Justin W.; DePue, Lauren J.; Gnanam, Annie J.; Arambula, Jonathan F.; Jones, Jessica N.; Swaminathan, Jagannath; Dieye, Yakhya; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Chandler, Don J.; Marcotte, Edward M.; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Ehrlich, Lauren I. R.; Jones, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Chromophores that incorporate f-block elements have considerable potential for use in bioimaging applications because of their advantageous photophysical properties compared to organic dye, which are currently widely used. We are developing new classes of lanthanide-based self-assembling molecular nanoparticles as reporters for imaging and as multi-functional nanoprobes or nanosensors for use with biological samples. One class of these materials, which we call lanthanide “nano-drums”, are homogeneous 4d–4f clusters approximately 25 to 30 Å in diameter. These are capable of emitting from the visible to near-infrared wavelengths. Here, we present the synthesis, crystal structure, photophysical properties and comparative cytotoxicity data for a 32 metal Eu-Cd nano-drum [Eu8Cd24L12(OAc)48] (1). We also explored the imaging capabilities of this nano-drum using epifluorescence, TIRF, and two-photon microscopy platforms. PMID:25512085

  16. Self-assembled molecular corrals on a semiconductor surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrin, S.; Harikumar, K. R.; Jones, R. V.; Li, N.; McNab, I. R.; Polanyi, J. C.; Sloan, P. A.; Waqar, Z.; Yang, J.(S. Y.); Ayissi, S.; Hofer, W. A.

    2006-03-01

    Nano-corrals for capturing surface electrons are of interest in molecular electronics. Here we show that haloalkane molecules, e.g., 1-chlorododecane, physisorbed on Si(1 1 1)-(7 × 7) self-assemble to form dimers stable to 100 °C which corral silicon adatoms. Corral size is shown to be governed by the haloalkane chain-length. Spectroscopic and theoretical evidence shows that the haloalkane dimer induces electron transfer to the corralled adatom, shifting its energy levels by ˜1 eV. Isolation of a labile pre-cursor points to a model for corral formation which combines mobility with immobility; monomers diffusing in a mobile vertical state meet and convert to the immobile horizontal dimers constituting the corrals.

  17. Advantages of Catalysis in Self-Assembled Molecular Capsules.

    PubMed

    Catti, Lorenzo; Zhang, Qi; Tiefenbacher, Konrad

    2016-06-27

    Control over the local chemical environment of a molecule can be achieved by encapsulation in supramolecular host systems. In supramolecular catalysis, this control is used to gain advantages over classical homogeneous catalysis in bulk solution. Two of the main advantages concern influencing reactions in terms of substrate and product selectivity. Due to size and/or shape recognition, substrate selective conversion can be realized. Additionally, noncovalent interactions with the host environment facilitate alternative reaction pathways and can yield unusual products. This Concept article discusses and highlights literature examples utilizing self-assembled molecular capsules to achieve catalytic transformations displaying a high degree of substrate and/or product selectivity. Furthermore, the advantage of supramolecular hosts in multicatalyst tandem reactions is covered. PMID:27150251

  18. Structural Assembly of Molecular Complexes Based on Residual Dipolar Couplings

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, Konstantin; O’Leary, Dianne P.; Fushman, David

    2010-01-01

    We present and evaluate a rigid-body molecular docking method, called PATIDOCK, that relies solely on the three-dimensional structure of the individual components and the experimentally derived residual dipolar couplings (RDC) for the complex. We show that, given an accurate ab initio predictor of the alignment tensor from a protein structure, it is possible to accurately assemble a protein-protein complex by utilizing the RDC’s sensitivity to molecular shape to guide the docking. The proposed docking method is robust against experimental errors in the RDCs and computationally efficient. We analyze the accuracy and efficiency of this method using experimental or synthetic RDC data for several proteins, as well as synthetic data for a large variety of protein-protein complexes. We also test our method on two protein systems for which the structure of the complex and steric-alignment data are available (Lys48-linked diubiquitin and a complex of ubiquitin and a ubiquitin-associated domain) and analyze the effect of flexible unstructured tails on the outcome of docking. The results demonstrate that it is fundamentally possible to assemble a protein-protein complex based solely on experimental RDC data and the prediction of the alignment tensor from three-dimensional structures. Thus, despite the purely angular nature of residual dipolar couplings, they can be converted into intermolecular distance/translational constraints. Additionally we show a method for combining RDCs with other experimental data, such as ambiguous constraints from interface mapping, to further improve structure characterization of the protein complexes. PMID:20550109

  19. Topological defects in liquid crystals as templates for molecular self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Miller, Daniel S.; Bukusoglu, Emre; de Pablo, Juan J.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2016-01-01

    Topological defects in liquid crystals (LCs) have been widely used to organize colloidal dispersions and template polymerization, leading to a range of assemblies, elastomers and gels. However, little is understood about molecular-level assembly processes within defects. Here, we report that nanoscopic environments defined by LC topological defects can selectively trigger processes of molecular self-assembly. By using fluorescence microscopy, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy and super-resolution optical microscopy, we observed signatures of molecular self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules in topological defects, including cooperativity, reversibility and controlled growth. We also show that nanoscopic o-rings synthesized from Saturn-ring disclinations and other molecular assemblies templated by defects can be preserved by using photocrosslinkable amphiphiles. Our results reveal that, in analogy to other classes of macromolecular templates such as polymer-surfactant complexes, topological defects in LCs are a versatile class of three-dimensional, dynamic and reconfigurable templates that can direct processes of molecular self-assembly.

  20. Self-Assembly of Graphene Single Crystals with Uniform Size and Orientation: The First 2D Super-Ordered Structure.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Mengqi; Wang, Lingxiang; Liu, Jinxin; Zhang, Tao; Xue, Haifeng; Xiao, Yao; Qin, Zhihui; Fu, Lei

    2016-06-29

    The challenges facing the rapid developments of highly integrated electronics, photonics, and microelectromechanical systems suggest that effective fabrication technologies are urgently needed to produce ordered structures using components with high performance potential. Inspired by the spontaneous organization of molecular units into ordered structures by noncovalent interactions, we succeed for the first time in synthesizing a two-dimensional superordered structure (2DSOS). As demonstrated by graphene, the 2DSOS was prepared via self-assembly of high-quality graphene single crystals under mutual electrostatic force between the adjacent crystals assisted by airflow-induced hydrodynamic forces at the liquid metal surface. The as-obtained 2DSOS exhibits tunable periodicity in the crystal space and outstanding uniformity in size and orientation. Moreover, the intrinsic property of each building block is preserved. With simplicity, scalability, and continuously adjustable feature size, the presented approach may open new territory for the precise assembly of 2D atomic crystals and facilitate its application in structurally derived integrated systems. PMID:27313075

  1. SHG microscopy excited by polarization controlled beam for three-dimensional molecular orientation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiki, K.; Hashimoto, M.; Araki, T.

    2006-08-01

    We have developed a second-harmonic-generation (SGH) microscope to observe the three-dimensional molecular orientation with three-dimensional high spatial resolution using a polarization mode converter. The mode converter consists of a parallel-aligned nematic-liquid-crystal spatial-light-modulator (PAL-SLM) and quarter-waveplates, and converts a incident linearly polarized beam to orthogonal linearly polarized beams or radially polarized beam. We combined the mode converter with SHG microscope to obtain the local information of the three-dimensional molecular orientation. We demonstrated the detection of three-dimensional molecular orientation of collagen fiber in human Achilles' tendon. For high precision three-dimensional molecular orientation measurement, we propose a technique to calibrate the dependence of SHG detection efficiencies on molecular orientation using a liposome.

  2. Applications of molecular self-assembly in tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Daniel Anton

    This thesis studied the application of three self-assembling molecular systems, as potential biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. Cholesteryl-(L-lactic acid)n molecules form thermotropic liquid crystals, which could be coated onto the inner and outer pores of biodegradable PLLA scaffolds, while retaining the lamellar order of the neat material. Primary bovine chondrocytes were cultured on these structures, demonstrating improved attachment and extended retention of phenotype on the C-LA-coated scaffolds. No difference in fibronectin adsorption to C-LA and PLLA surfaces was observed, suggesting a strong role for cholesterol in influencing cell phenotype. A family of peptide-amphiphiles, bearing the "RGD" adhesion sequence from fibronectin, was also assessed in the contexts of cartilage and bladder repair. These molecules self-assemble into one-dimensional fibers, with diameters of 6--8 nm, and lengths of 500 nm or greater. Chondrocytes were seeded and cultured on covalently-crosslinked PA gels and embedded within calcium-triggered PA gels. Cells became dormant over time, but remained viable, suggesting an inappropriate display of the adhesion sequence to cells. A family of "branched" PA molecules with lysine dendron headgroups was designed, in an effort to increase the spatial separation between molecules in the assembled state, and to theoretically improve epitope accessibility. These molecules coated reliably onto PGA fiber scaffolds, and dramatically increased the attachment of human bladder smooth muscle cells, possibly through better epitope display or electrostatic attraction. They also formed strong gels with several negatively-charged biologically-relevant macromolecules. In a third system, amphiphilic segmented dendrimers based on phenylene vinylene and L-lysine entered cells through an endocytic pathway with no discernible toxic effect on cell proliferation or morphology. These amphiphiles formed complex aggregates in aqueous solution, likely

  3. Estimation of the mutual orientation and intermolecular interaction of C12Ex from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Velinova, Maria; Tsoneva, Yana; Ivanova, Anela; Tadjer, Alia

    2012-04-26

    Nonionic surfactants, such as poly(ethylene glycol) alkyl ethers (abbreviated as CyEx) show a rich phase behavior in aqueous solution, i.e., they form micellar, lamellar, cubic, and so forth phases depending on experimental parameters such as the hydrophobic and hydrophilic chain lengths, temperature, or concentration. The aim of the present study is to determine the nature of the preaggregates, which are inferred to exist before the actual self-assembly process in aqueous solution, and to assess the aptitude to their formation. The target molecules are C12E3, C12E4 and C12E5, surfactants of moderate water solubility. Coarse-grained and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (NPT/293 K) of two molecules of each species with explicit water in periodic boundary conditions are carried out to estimate the mutual orientation and the interaction between the surfactants in their dimers. The force fields are MARTINI and Amber99, the latter with self-derived parameters for the ether groups. The change in the orientation and distance between the molecules in the dimers are discussed based on different structural parameters. In addition, the interaction between the surfactants is evaluated from quantum chemistry calculations in terms of binding energy for the average structures from the cluster analysis. The solvent-solute interaction is quantified by the mean number of hydrogen bonds formed between them. On the basis of combined analysis, a series of different structures for subsequent study of the possible self-assembly patterns of C12E3, C12E4, and C12E5 is outlined. PMID:22448734

  4. Directed self-assembly of mesoscopic electronic components into sparse arrays with controlled orientation using diamagnetic levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, Anton; Lu, James J.-Q.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a directed self-assembly (DSA) approach for assembling small electronic components, such as semiconductor dies, into sparse 2D arrays using diamagnetic levitation. The dies attached to a diamagnetic layer can be levitated at a room temperature over a stage made of magnets arranged in a checkerboard pattern. By selecting a proper die design, levitation height, and vibration pattern of the magnetic stage we assemble the dies into a regular 2D array with a specific lateral and vertical orientation of the dies. The assembled dies are transferred to a receiving substrate using capillary force.

  5. Structural Investigations of Surfaces and Orientation-SpecificPhenomena in Nanocrystals and Their Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Aruguete, Deborah Michiko

    2006-06-17

    Studies of colloidal nanocrystals and their assemblies are presented. Two of these studies concern the atomic-level structural characterization of the surfaces, interfaces, and interiors present in II-VI semiconductor nanorods. The third study investigates the crystallographic arrangement of cobalt nanocrystals in self-assembled aggregates. Crystallographically-aligned assemblies of colloidal CdSe nanorods are examined with linearly-polarized Se-EXAFS spectroscopy, which probes bonding along different directions in the nanorod. This orientation-specific probe is used, because it is expected that the presence of specific surfaces in a nanorod might cause bond relaxations specific to different crystallographic directions. Se-Se distances are found to be contracted along the long axis of the nanorod, while Cd-Se distances display no angular dependence, which is different from the bulk. Ab-initio density functional theory calculations upon CdSe nanowires indicate that relaxations on the rod surfaces cause these changes. ZnS/CdS-CdSe core-shell nanorods are studied with Se, Zn, Cd, and S X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). It is hypothesized that there are two major factors influencing the core and shell structures of the nanorods: the large surface area-to-volume ratio, and epitaxial strain. The presence of the surface may induce bond rearrangements or relaxations to minimize surface energy; epitaxial strain might cause the core and shell lattices to contract or expand to minimize strain energy. A marked contraction of Zn-S bonds is observed in the core-shell nanorods, indicating that surface relaxations may dominate the structure of the nanorod (strain might otherwise drive the Zn-S lattice to accommodate the larger CdS or CdSe lattices via bond expansion). EXAFS and X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicate that Cd-Se bond relaxations might be anisotropic, an expected phenomenon for a rod-shaped nanocrystal. Ordered self-assembled aggregates of cobalt nanocrystals are

  6. Structural investigations of surfaces and orientation-specific phenomena in nanocrystals and their assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aruguete, Deborah Michiko

    Studies of colloidal nanocrystals and their assemblies are presented. Two of these studies concern the atomic-level structural characterization of the surfaces, interfaces, and interiors present in II-VI semiconductor nanorods. The third study investigates the crystallographic arrangement of cobalt nanocrystals in self-assembled aggregates. Crystallographically-aligned assemblies of colloidal CdSe nanorods are examined with linearly-polarized Se-EXAFS spectroscopy, which probes bonding along different directions in the nanorod. This orientation-specific probe is used, because it is expected that the presence of specific surfaces in a nanorod might cause bond relaxations specific to different crystallographic directions. Se-Se distances are found to be contracted along the long axis of the nanorod, while Cd-Se distances display no angular dependence, which is different from the bulk. Ab-initio density functional theory calculations upon CdSe nanowires indicate that relaxations on the rod surfaces cause these changes. ZnS/CdS-CdSe core-shell nanorods are studied with Se, Zn, Cd, and S X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). It is hypothesized that there are two major factors influencing the core and shell structures of the nanorods: the large surface area-to-volume ratio, and epitaxial strain. The presence of the surface may induce bond rearrangements or relaxations to minimize surface energy, epitaxial strain might cause the core and shell lattices to contract or expand to minimize strain energy. A marked contraction of Zn-S bonds is observed in the core-shell nanorods, indicating that surface relaxations may dominate the structure of the nanorod (strain might otherwise drive the Zn-S lattice to accommodate the larger US or CdSe lattices via bond expansion). EXAFS and X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicate that Cd-Se bond relaxations might be anisotropic, an expected phenomenon for a rod-shaped nanocrystal. Ordered self-assembled aggregates of cobalt nanocrystals are

  7. Molecular relaxations, molecular orientation, and the friction characteristics of polyimide films. [wear characteristics of polymeric lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    The friction characteristics of polyimide films bonded to metallic substrates were studied from 25 to 500 C. These results were interpreted in terms of molecular orientation and thermomechanical data obtained by torsional braid analysis (TBA). A large friction transition was found to occur at 40 + or - 10 C in a dry argon atmosphere (10 ppm H2O). It was postulated that the mechanical stresses of sliding transform or reorder the molecules on the surface into a configuration conducive to easy shear, such as an extended chain. The molecular relaxation which occurs in this temperature region appears to give the molecules the necessary freedom for this reordering process to occur. The effects of velocity, reversibility, and thermal prehistory on the friction properties of polyimide were also studied.

  8. Self-assembly of multilevel branched rutile-type TiO2 structures via oriented lateral and twin attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Vanja; Javornik, Uroš; Plavec, Janez; Podgornik, Aleš; Rečnik, Aleksander

    2016-04-01

    Recent breakthrough of novel hierarchic materials, orchestrated through oriented attachment of crystal subunits, opened questions on what is the mechanism of their self-assembly. Using rutile-type TiO2, synthesized by hydrothermal reaction of Ti(IV)-butoxide in highly acidic aqueous medium, we uncovered the key processes controlling this nonclassical crystallization process. Formation of complex branched mesocrystals of rutile is accomplished by oriented assembly of precipitated fibers along the two low-energy planes, i.e. {110} and {101}, resulting in lateral attachment and twinning. Phase analysis of amorphous material enclosed in pockets between imperfectly assembled rutile fibers clearly shows harmonic ordering resembling that of the adjacent rutile structure. To our understanding this may be the first experimental evidence indicating the presence of electromagnetic force-fields that convey critical structural information through which oriented attachment of nanocrystals is made possible.

  9. Self-assembly of multilevel branched rutile-type TiO2 structures via oriented lateral and twin attachment

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Vanja; Javornik, Uroš; Plavec, Janez; Podgornik, Aleš; Rečnik, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthrough of novel hierarchic materials, orchestrated through oriented attachment of crystal subunits, opened questions on what is the mechanism of their self-assembly. Using rutile-type TiO2, synthesized by hydrothermal reaction of Ti(IV)-butoxide in highly acidic aqueous medium, we uncovered the key processes controlling this nonclassical crystallization process. Formation of complex branched mesocrystals of rutile is accomplished by oriented assembly of precipitated fibers along the two low-energy planes, i.e. {110} and {101}, resulting in lateral attachment and twinning. Phase analysis of amorphous material enclosed in pockets between imperfectly assembled rutile fibers clearly shows harmonic ordering resembling that of the adjacent rutile structure. To our understanding this may be the first experimental evidence indicating the presence of electromagnetic force-fields that convey critical structural information through which oriented attachment of nanocrystals is made possible. PMID:27063110

  10. Molecular self-assembly for biological investigations and nanoscale lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheunkar, Sarawut

    Small, diffusible molecules when recognized by their binding partners, such as proteins and antibodies, trigger enzymatic activity, cell communication, and immune response. Progress in analytical methods enabling detection, characterization, and visualization of biological dynamics at the molecular level will advance our exploration of complex biological systems. In this dissertation, analytical platforms were fabricated to capture membrane-associated receptors, which are essential proteins in cell signaling pathways. The neurotransmitter serotonin and its biological precursor were immobilized on gold substrates coated with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of oligo(ethylene glycol)alkanethiols and their reactive derivatives. The SAM-coated substrates present the biologically selective affinity of immobilized molecules to target native membrane-associated receptors. These substrates were also tested for biospecificity using antibodies. In addition, small-molecule-functionalized platforms, expressing neurotransmitter pharmacophores, were employed to examine kinetic interactions between G-protein-coupled receptors and their associated neurotransmitters. The binding interactions were monitored using a quartz crystal microbalance equipped with liquid-flow injection. The interaction kinetics of G-protein-coupled serotonin 1A receptor and 5-hydroxytyptophan-functionalized surfaces were studied in a real-time, label-free environment. Key binding parameters, such as equilibrium dissociation constants, binding rate constants, and dissociative half-life, were extracted. These parameters are critical for understanding and comparing biomolecular interactions in modern biomedical research. By integrating self-assembly, surface functionalization, and nanofabrication, small-molecule microarrays were created for high-throughput screening. A hybrid soft-lithography, called microcontact insertion printing, was used to pattern small molecules at the dilute scales necessary for highly

  11. Gold nanoparticles assembled with dithiocarbamate-anchored molecular wires

    PubMed Central

    Reeler, Nini E. A.; Lerstrup, Knud A.; Somerville, Walter; Speder, Jozsef; Petersen, Søren V.; Laursen, Bo W.; Arenz, Matthias; Qiu, Xiaohui; Vosch, Tom; Nørgaard, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    A protocol for the bottom-up self-assembly of nanogaps is developed through molecular linking of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Two π-conjugated oligo(phenylene ethynylene) molecules (OPE) with dithiocarbamate anchoring groups are used as ligands for the AuNPs. OPE-4S with a dithiocarbamate in each end of the molecule and a reference molecule OPE-2S with only a single dithiocarbamate end group. The linking mechanism of OPE-4S is investigated by using a combination of TEM, UV-Vis absorption and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as well as studying the effect of varying the OPE-4S to AuNP concentration ratio. UV-Vis absorption confirms the formation of AuNP aggregates by the appearance of an extended plasmon band (EPB) for which the red shift and intensity depend on the OPE-4S:AuNP ratio. SERS confirms the presence of OPE-4S and shows a gradual increase of the signal intensity with increasing OPE-4S:AuNP ratios up to a ratio of about 4000, after which the SERS intensity does not increase significantly. For OPE-2S, no linking is observed below full coverage of the AuNPs indicating that the observed aggregate formation at high OPE-2S:AuNP ratios, above full AuNP coverage, is most likely of a physical nature (van der Waals forces or π-π interactions). PMID:26471461

  12. Gold nanoparticles assembled with dithiocarbamate-anchored molecular wires.

    PubMed

    Reeler, Nini E A; Lerstrup, Knud A; Somerville, Walter; Speder, Jozsef; Petersen, Søren V; Laursen, Bo W; Arenz, Matthias; Qiu, Xiaohui; Vosch, Tom; Nørgaard, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    A protocol for the bottom-up self-assembly of nanogaps is developed through molecular linking of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Two π-conjugated oligo(phenylene ethynylene) molecules (OPE) with dithiocarbamate anchoring groups are used as ligands for the AuNPs. OPE-4S with a dithiocarbamate in each end of the molecule and a reference molecule OPE-2S with only a single dithiocarbamate end group. The linking mechanism of OPE-4S is investigated by using a combination of TEM, UV-Vis absorption and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as well as studying the effect of varying the OPE-4S to AuNP concentration ratio. UV-Vis absorption confirms the formation of AuNP aggregates by the appearance of an extended plasmon band (EPB) for which the red shift and intensity depend on the OPE-4S:AuNP ratio. SERS confirms the presence of OPE-4S and shows a gradual increase of the signal intensity with increasing OPE-4S:AuNP ratios up to a ratio of about 4000, after which the SERS intensity does not increase significantly. For OPE-2S, no linking is observed below full coverage of the AuNPs indicating that the observed aggregate formation at high OPE-2S:AuNP ratios, above full AuNP coverage, is most likely of a physical nature (van der Waals forces or π-π interactions). PMID:26471461

  13. Molecular Architecture of  Yeast Chromatin Assembly Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daegeun; Setiaputra, Dheva; Jung, Taeyang; Chung, Jaehee; Leitner, Alexander; Yoon, Jungmin; Aebersold, Ruedi; Hebert, Hans; Yip, Calvin K.; Song, Ji-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin Assembly Complex 1 (CAF-1) is a major histone chaperone involved in deposition of histone H3 and H4 into nucleosome. CAF-1 is composed of three subunits; p150, p60 and p48 for human and Cac1, Cac2 and Cac3 for yeast. Despite of its central role in chromatin formation, structural features of the full CAF-1 in complex with histones and other chaperones have not been well characterized. Here, we dissect molecular architecture of yeast CAF-1 (yCAF-1) by cross-linking mass spectrometry (XL-MS) and negative stain single-particle electron microscopy (EM). Our work revealed that Cac1, the largest subunit of yCAF-1, might serve as a major histone binding platform linking Cac2 and Cac3. In addition, EM analysis showed that yCAF-1 adopts a bilobal shape and Cac1 connecting Cac2 and Cac3 to generate a platform for binding histones. This study provides the first structural glimpse of the full CAF-1 complex and a structural framework to understand histone chaperoning processes. PMID:27221973

  14. Molecular Architecture of  Yeast Chromatin Assembly Factor 1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daegeun; Setiaputra, Dheva; Jung, Taeyang; Chung, Jaehee; Leitner, Alexander; Yoon, Jungmin; Aebersold, Ruedi; Hebert, Hans; Yip, Calvin K; Song, Ji-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin Assembly Complex 1 (CAF-1) is a major histone chaperone involved in deposition of histone H3 and H4 into nucleosome. CAF-1 is composed of three subunits; p150, p60 and p48 for human and Cac1, Cac2 and Cac3 for yeast. Despite of its central role in chromatin formation, structural features of the full CAF-1 in complex with histones and other chaperones have not been well characterized. Here, we dissect molecular architecture of yeast CAF-1 (yCAF-1) by cross-linking mass spectrometry (XL-MS) and negative stain single-particle electron microscopy (EM). Our work revealed that Cac1, the largest subunit of yCAF-1, might serve as a major histone binding platform linking Cac2 and Cac3. In addition, EM analysis showed that yCAF-1 adopts a bilobal shape and Cac1 connecting Cac2 and Cac3 to generate a platform for binding histones. This study provides the first structural glimpse of the full CAF-1 complex and a structural framework to understand histone chaperoning processes. PMID:27221973

  15. Controlling Molecular Motion, Assembly and Coupling as a Step towards Molecular Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Colin James

    changes in the supramolecular self-assembly of thioethers. Chapter 9 details how the ordering and length of surface-bound hydrogen-bonded chains of methanol are dictated by the underlying surface and examines an unreported chiral meta-stable methanol hexamer. Single-molecule measurements can answer many of the current questions in the field of molecular machines and lead to control of molecular motion. Development of mechanisms to direct molecular motion and to couple this motion to external systems is crucial for the rational design of new molecular machinery with functionalities such as mass transport, propulsion, separations, sensing, signaling and chemical reactions.

  16. Molecular Composite Coatings on Nafion Using Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Lefaux, Christophe J; Kim, Byoung-Suhk; Venkat, Narayanan; Mather, Patrick T

    2015-05-20

    Controlled growth of nanometer-scale multilayered coatings of negatively charged sulfonated poly(benzobisimidazole) (SPBI), complexed with positively charged poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP) on quartz, and Nafion membrane as substrates has been explored. Both polymers, SPBI and P2VP, possess a net charge in methanol as a result of the dissolution of SPBI by complexation with triethylamine (TEA) and the protonation of P2VP with HCl, respectively, and thereby can form a multilayered molecular composite of alternating anionic SPBI and cationic P2VP via an electrostatic layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly. UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry was used to monitor the buildup and growth rate of such SPBI/P2VP multilayer films. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the roughness and thickness of the resulting SPBI/P2VP multilayers. As a result, it was found that a steady-state linear growth regime for the LbL self-assembled SPBI/P2VP multilayer films and coatings onto quartz and Nafion membranes was observed after completion of the first few deposition cycles, indicating the successful formation of the SPBI/P2VP multilayered assembly in methanol solutions. In addition, the SPBI/P2VP multilayer films in the perpendicular direction (flat view) demonstrated isotropic orientation distribution on the Nafion membrane, while the SPBI/P2VP multilayer films examined by X-ray scattering in the parallel direction (edge view) revealed anisotropic orientation, the combined observations indicating confinement of SPBI rods to the plane of the coating. We further found that the SPBI/P2VP multilayer coated Nafion possesses good thermal stability, as indicated by isothermal gravimetric analysis at 310 °C, and it was further observed that SPBI/P2VP multilayer coatings using the LbL self-assembly technique on Nafion membrane significantly increased the membrane stiffness, despite the small coating thickness employed. PMID:25923689

  17. Etomica: an object-oriented framework for molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Andrew J; Kofke, David A

    2015-03-30

    We describe the design of an object-oriented library of software components that are suitable for constructing simulations of systems of interacting particles. The emphasis of the discussion is on the general design of the components and how they interact, and less on details of the programming interface or its implementation. Example code is provided as an aid to understanding object-oriented programming structures and to demonstrate how the framework is applied. PMID:25565378

  18. Oriented assembled TiO2 hierarchical nanowire arrays with fast electron transport properties.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xia; He, Dongqing; Yang, Jie; Zhu, Kai; Feng, Xinjian

    2014-01-01

    Developing high surface area nanostructured electrodes with rapid charge transport is essential for artificial photosynthesis, solar cells, photocatalysis, and energy storage devices. Substantial research efforts have been recently focused on building one-dimensional (1D) nanoblocks with fast charge transport into three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical architectures. However, except for the enlargement in surface area, there is little experimental evidence of fast electron transport in these 3D nanostructure-based solar cells. In this communication, we report single-crystal-like 3D TiO2 branched nanowire arrays consisting of 1D branch epitaxially grown from the primary trunk. These 3D branched nanoarrays not only demonstrate 71% enlargement in large surface area (compared with 1D nanowire arrays) but also exhibit fast charge transport property (comparable to that in 1D single crystal nanoarrays), leading to 52% improvement in solar conversion efficiency. The orientated 3D assembly strategy reported here can be extended to assemble other metal oxides with one or multiple components and thus represents a critical avenue toward high-performance optoelectronics. PMID:24628675

  19. Substrate temperature controls molecular orientation in two-component vapor-deposited glasses.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J; Walters, D M; Zhou, D; Ediger, M D

    2016-04-01

    Vapor-deposited glasses can be anisotropic and molecular orientation is important for organic electronics applications. In organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), for example, the orientation of dye molecules in two-component emitting layers significantly influences emission efficiency. Here we investigate how substrate temperature during vapor deposition influences the orientation of dye molecules in a model two-component system. We determine the average orientation of a linear blue light emitter 1,4-di-[4-(N,N-diphenyl)amino]styryl-benzene (DSA-Ph) in mixtures with aluminum-tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq3) by spectroscopic ellipsometry and IR dichroism. We find that molecular orientation is controlled by the ratio of the substrate temperature during deposition and the glass transition temperature of the mixture. These findings extend recent results for single component vapor-deposited glasses and suggest that, during vapor deposition, surface mobility allows partial equilibration towards orientations preferred at the free surface of the equilibrium liquid. PMID:26922903

  20. Mechanisms of two-color laser-induced field-free molecular orientation.

    PubMed

    Spanner, Michael; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Frumker, Eugene; Corkum, Paul

    2012-09-14

    Two mechanisms of two-color (ω+2ω) laser-induced field-free molecular orientation, based on the hyperpolarizability and ionization depletion, are explored and compared. The CO molecule is used as a computational example. While the hyperpolarizability mechanism generates small amounts of orientation at intensities below the ionization threshold, ionization depletion quickly becomes the dominant mechanism as soon as ionizing intensities are reached. Only the ionization mechanism leads to substantial orientation (e.g., on the order of ≳0.1). For intensities typical of laser-induced molecular alignment and orientation experiments, the two mechanisms lead to robust, characteristic timings of the field-free orientation wave-packet revivals relative to the alignment revivals and the revival time. The revival timings can be used to detect the active orientation mechanism experimentally. PMID:23005623

  1. Oriented growth of porphyrin-based molecular wires on ionic crystals analysed by nc-AFM

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerli, Lars; Kawai, Shigeki; Meyer, Ernst; Fendt, Leslie-Anne; Diederich, Francois

    2011-01-01

    Summary The growth of molecular assemblies at room temperature on insulating surfaces is one of the main goals in the field of molecular electronics. Recently, the directed growth of porphyrin-based molecular wires on KBr(001) was presented. The molecule–surface interaction associated with a strong dipole moment of the molecules was sufficient to bind them to the surface; while a stabilization of the molecular assemblies was reached due to the intermolecular interaction by π–π binding. Here, we show that the atomic structure of the substrate can control the direction of the wires and consequently, complex molecular assemblies can be formed. The electronic decoupling of the molecules by one or two monolayers of KBr from the Cu(111) substrate is found to be insufficient to enable comparable growth conditions to bulk ionic materials. PMID:21977413

  2. Influence of spherical assembly of copper ferrite nanoparticles on magnetic properties: orientation of magnetic easy axis.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Biplab K; Bhattacharjee, Kaustav; Dey, Abhishek; Ghosh, Chandan K; Chattopadhyay, Kalyan K

    2014-06-01

    The magnetic properties of copper ferrite (CuFe2O4) nanoparticles prepared via sol-gel auto combustion and facile solvothermal method are studied focusing on the effect of nanoparticle arrangement. Randomly oriented CuFe2O4 nanoparticles (NP) are obtained from the sol-gel auto combustion method, while the solvothermal method allows us to prepare iso-oriented uniform spherical ensembles of CuFe2O4 nanoparticles (NS). X-ray diffractometry (XRD), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), infra-red (IR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) are used to investigate the composition, microstructure and magnetic properties of as-prepared ferrite nanoparticles. The field-dependent magnetization measurement for the NS sample at low temperature exhibits a step-like rectangular hysteresis loop (M(R)/M(S) ~ 1), suggesting cubic anisotropy in the system, whereas for the NP sample, typical features of uniaxial anisotropy (M(R)/M(S) ~ 0.5) are observed. The coercive field (HC) for the NS sample shows anomalous temperature dependence, which is correlated with the variation of effective anisotropy (K(E)) of the system. A high-temperature enhancement of H(C) and K(E) for the NS sample coincides with a strong spin-orbit coupling in the sample as evidenced by significant modification of Cu/Fe-O bond distances. The spherical arrangement of nanocrystals at mesoscopic scale provokes a high degree of alignment of the magnetic easy axis along the applied field leading to a step-like rectangular hysteresis loop. A detailed study on the temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropy of the system is carried out, emphasizing the influence of the formation of spherical iso-oriented assemblies. PMID:24714977

  3. Examples of Molecular Self-Assembly at Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Whitelam, Stephen

    2015-10-14

    The self-assembly of molecules at surfaces can be caused by a range of physical mechanisms. Assembly can be driven by intermolecular forces, or molecule-surface forces, or both; it can result in structures that are in equilibrium or that are kinetically trapped. Here we review examples of self-assembly at surfaces focusing on a physical understanding of what causes patterns seen in experiment. Some apparently disparate systems can be described in similar physical terms, indicating that simple factors - such as the geometry and energy scale of intermolecular binding - are key to understanding the self-assembly of those systems. PMID:25873520

  4. Molecular microbial diversity of a spacecraft assembly facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, K.; Satomi, M.; Chung, S.; Kern, R.; Koukol, R.; Basic, C.; White, D.

    2001-01-01

    In ongoing investigations to map and archive the microbial footprints in various components of the spacecraft and its accessories, we have examined the microbial populations of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Spacecraft Assembly Facility (JPL-SAF). Witness plates made up of spacecraft materials, some painted with spacecraft qualified paints, were exposed for approximately 7 to 9 months at JPL-SAF and examined the particulate materials collected for the incidence of total cultivable aerobic heterotrophs and heat-tolerant (80 degrees C for 15-min.) spore-formers. The results showed that the witness plates coated with spacecraft qualified paints attracted more dust particles than the non-coated stainless steel witness plates. Among the four paints tested, witness plates coated with NS43G accumulated the highest number of particles, and hence attracted more cultivable microbes. The conventional microbiological examination revealed that the JPL-SAF harbors mainly Gram-positive microbes and mostly spore-forming Bacillus species. Most of the isolated microbes were heat resistant to 80 degrees C and proliferate at 60 degrees C. The phylogenetic relationships among 23 cultivable heat-tolerant microbes were examined using a battery of morphological, physiological, molecular and chemotaxonomic characterizations. By 16S rDNA sequence analysis, the isolates fell into seven clades: Bacillus licheniformis, B. pumilus, B. cereus, B. circulans, Staphylococcus capitis, Planococcus sp. and Micrococcus lylae. In contrast to the cultivable approach, direct DNA isolation, cloning and 16S rDNA sequencing analysis revealed equal representation of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms.

  5. Nanoimprint-Induced Molecular Orientation in Semiconducting Polymer Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Hlaing, H.; Ocko, B.; Lu, X.; Hofmann, T.; Yager, K.G.; Black, C.T.

    2011-09-01

    The morphology and orientation of thin films of the polymer poly-3(hexylthiophene) - important parameters influencing electronic and photovoltaic device performance - have been significantly altered through nanoimprinting with 100 nm spaced grooves. Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering studies demonstrate the excellent fidelity of the pattern transfer, while wide-angle scattering convincingly shows an imprinting-induced {pi}-{pi} reorientation and polymer backbone alignment along the imprinted grooves. Surprisingly, temperature-dependent scattering measurements indicate that the imprinted induced orientation and alignment remain intact even at temperatures where the imprinted topographical features nearly vanish.

  6. Ordered nanocolumn-array organic semiconductor thin films with controllable molecular orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bingchu; Duan, Haichao; Zhou, Conghua; Gao, Yongli; Yang, Junliang

    2013-12-01

    Ordered nanocolumn-array phthalocynine semiconductor thin films with controllable molecular orientation were fabricated by combining molecular template growth (MTG) and glancing angle deposition (GLAD) techniques. The pre-deposited planar perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic-3,4,9,10-dianhydride (PTCDA) molecular template layer induces phthalocynine molecules arrange with a lying-down molecular orientation, in which the π-π stacking is vertical to the substrate improving the charge transport along the vertical direction; While the GLAD technique supports the formation of nanocolumn-array thin films, supplying a much larger exposed surface area than the conventional compact thin films. The ordered nanocolumn-array thin films with controllable molecular orientation fabricated by combining MTG and GLAD techniques show the potentials to fabricate ordered bulk heterojunction for improving the performance in organic photovoltaics.

  7. Molecular orientation effect on the differential cross sections for the electron-impact double ionization of oriented water molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, C.; Dal Cappello, C.; Oubaziz, D.; Aouchiche, H.; Popov, Yu. V.

    2010-03-15

    Double ionization of isolated water molecules fixed in space is here investigated in a theoretical approach based on the first Born approximation. Secondary electron angular distributions are reported for particular (e,3e) kinematical conditions and compared in terms of shape and magnitude. Strong dependence of the fivefold differential cross sections on the molecular target orientation is clearly observed in (e,3-1e) as well as (e,3e) channels. Furthermore, for the major part of the kinematics considered, we identified the different mechanisms involved in the double ionization of water molecule, namely, the direct shake-off process as well as the two-step1 process. They are both discussed and analyzed with respect to the molecular target orientation.

  8. Contesting Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation at the ICAE Sixth World Assembly: "Difference" Is a Fundamental Human Right."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    Gives a brief history of the field of international adult education regarding sexual orientation, including events at the Sixth World Assembly. Presents 13 strategies for the elimination of homophobia and discrimination. Asserts that difference is a fundamental human right. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

  9. Propargyl Vinyl Ethers and Tertiary Skipped Diynes: Two Pluripotent Molecular Platforms for Diversity-Oriented Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Tejedor, David; López-Tosco, Sara; Méndez-Abt, Gabriela; Cotos, Leandro; García-Tellado, Fernando

    2016-04-19

    During the last years, we have been involved in the development of a diversity-oriented synthetic strategy aimed at transforming simple, linear, and densely functionalized molecular platforms into collections of topologically diverse scaffolds incorporating biologically relevant structural motifs such as N- and O- heterocycles, multifunctionalized aromatic rings, fused macrocycles, etc. The strategy merges the concepts of pluripotency (the property of an array of chemical functionalities to express different chemical outcomes under different chemical environments) and domino chemistry (chemistry based on processes involving two or more bond-forming transformations that take place while the initial reaction conditions are maintained, with the subsequent reaction resulting as a consequence of the functionality installed in the previous one) to transform common multifunctional substrates into complex and diverse molecular frameworks. This design concept constitutes the ethos of the so-called branching cascade strategy, a branch of diversity-oriented synthesis focused on scaffold diversity generation. Two pluripotent molecular platforms have been extensively studied under this merging (branching) paradigm: C4-O-C3 propargyl vinyl ethers (PVEs) and C7 tertiary skipped diynes (TSDs). These are conveniently constructed from simple and commercially available raw materials (alkyl propiolates, ketones, aldehydes, acid chlorides) through multicomponent manifolds (ABB' three-component reaction for PVEs; A2BB' four-component reaction for TSDs) or a simple two-step procedure (for PVEs). Their modular origin facilitates their structural/functional diversification without increasing the number of synthetic steps for their assembly. These two pluripotent molecular platforms accommodate a well-defined and dense array of through-bond/through-space interrelated functionalities on their structures, which defines their primary reactivity principles and establishes the reactivity profile

  10. An energy investigation into 1D/2D oriented-attachment assemblies of 1D Ag nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Lv, Weiqiang; Yang, Xuemei; Wang, Wei; Niu, Yinghua; Liu, Zhongping; He, Weidong

    2014-09-15

    In the field of oriented-attachment crystal growth, one-dimensional nanocrystals are frequently employed as building blocks to synthesize two-dimensional or large-aspect-ratio one-dimensional nanocrystals. Despite recent extensive experimental advances, the underlying inter-particle interaction in the synthesis still remains elusive. In this report, using Ag as a platform, we investigate the van der Waals interactions associated with the side-by-side and end-to-end assemblies of one-dimensional nanorods. The size, aspect ratio, and inter-particle separation of the Ag precursor nanorods are found to have dramatically different impacts on the van der Waals interactions in the two types of assemblies. Our work facilitates the fundamental understanding of the oriented-attachment assembling mechanism based on one-dimensional nanocrystals. PMID:24954815

  11. Role of ionization in orientation dependence of molecular high-order harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. J.; Hu, Bambi

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the orientation dependence of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) from O2 and CO2 molecules using the strong-field approximation (SFA). Our simulations reveal the important modulation of the ionization to the HHG orientation dependence, especially at larger orientation angles. By virtue of a simplified model arising from the SFA, we show that this modulation can be read from the harmonic order where the HHG spectra at different orientation angles intersect. These results give suggestions on probing the molecular structure and dynamics using HHG.

  12. Vapor deposition of a smectic liquid crystal: highly anisotropic, homogeneous glasses with tunable molecular orientation.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Jaritza; Jiang, Jing; Gujral, Ankit; Huang, Chengbin; Yu, Lian; Ediger, M D

    2016-03-01

    Physical vapor deposition (PVD) has been used to prepare glasses of itraconazole, a smectic A liquid crystal. Glasses were deposited onto subtrates at a range of temperatures (Tsubstrate) near the glass transition temperature (Tg), with Tsubstrate/Tg ranging from 0.70 to 1.02. Infrared spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry were used to characterize the molecular orientation using the orientational order parameter, Sz, and the birefringence. We find that the molecules in glasses deposited at Tsubstrate = Tg are nearly perpendicular to the substrate (Sz = +0.66) while at lower Tsubstrate molecules are nearly parallel to the substrate (Sz = -0.45). The molecular orientation depends on the temperature of the substrate during preparation, allowing layered samples with differing orientations to be readily prepared. In addition, these vapor-deposited glasses are macroscopically homogeneous and molecularly flat. We interpret the combination of properties obtained for vapor-deposited glasses of itraconazole to result from a process where molecular orientation is determined by the structure and dynamics at the free surface of the glass during deposition. Vapor deposition of liquid crystals is likely a general approach for the preparation of highly anisotropic glasses with tunable molecular orientation for use in organic electronics and optoelectronics. PMID:26875700

  13. Ultrafast electron transfer at organic semiconductor interfaces: Importance of molecular orientation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ayzner, Alexander L.; Nordlund, Dennis; Kim, Do -Hwan; Bao, Zhenan; Toney, Michael F.

    2014-12-04

    Much is known about the rate of photoexcited charge generation in at organic donor/acceptor (D/A) heterojunctions overaged over all relative arrangements. However, there has been very little experimental work investigating how the photoexcited electron transfer (ET) rate depends on the precise relative molecular orientation between D and A in thin solid films. This is the question that we address in this work. We find that the ET rate depends strongly on the relative molecular arrangement: The interface where the model donor compound copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximatelymore » 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. Our results suggest that the D/A electronic coupling is significantly enhanced in the face-on case, which agrees well with theoretical predictions, underscoring the importance of controlling the relative interfacial molecular orientation.« less

  14. Ultrafast electron transfer at organic semiconductor interfaces: Importance of molecular orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Ayzner, Alexander L.; Nordlund, Dennis; Kim, Do -Hwan; Bao, Zhenan; Toney, Michael F.

    2014-12-04

    Much is known about the rate of photoexcited charge generation in at organic donor/acceptor (D/A) heterojunctions overaged over all relative arrangements. However, there has been very little experimental work investigating how the photoexcited electron transfer (ET) rate depends on the precise relative molecular orientation between D and A in thin solid films. This is the question that we address in this work. We find that the ET rate depends strongly on the relative molecular arrangement: The interface where the model donor compound copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximately 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. Our results suggest that the D/A electronic coupling is significantly enhanced in the face-on case, which agrees well with theoretical predictions, underscoring the importance of controlling the relative interfacial molecular orientation.

  15. Ultrafast Electron Transfer at Organic Semiconductor Interfaces: Importance of Molecular Orientation.

    PubMed

    Ayzner, Alexander L; Nordlund, Dennis; Kim, Do-Hwan; Bao, Zhenan; Toney, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Much is known about the rate of photoexcited charge generation in at organic donor/acceptor (D/A) heterojunctions overaged over all relative arrangements. However, there has been very little experimental work investigating how the photoexcited electron transfer (ET) rate depends on the precise relative molecular orientation between D and A in thin solid films. This is the question that we address in this work. We find that the ET rate depends strongly on the relative molecular arrangement: The interface where the model donor compound copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximately 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. Our results suggest that the D/A electronic coupling is significantly enhanced in the face-on case, which agrees well with theoretical predictions, underscoring the importance of controlling the relative interfacial molecular orientation. PMID:26263084

  16. Quantitative Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Molecular Surfaces and Interfaces: Lineshape, Polarization and Orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongfei; Velarde, Luis; Gan, Wei; Fu, Li

    2015-04-01

    Sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) can provide detailed information and understanding of molecular vibrational spectroscopy, orientational and conformational structure, and interactions of molecular surfaces and interfaces, through quantitative measurement and analysis. In this review, we present the current status and discuss the main developments on the measurement of intrinsic SFG spectral lineshape, formulations for polarization measurement and orientation analysis of the SFG-VS spectra. The main focus is to present a coherent formulation and discuss the main concepts or issues that can help to make SFG-VS a quantitative analytical and research tool in revealing the chemistry and physics of complex molecular surface and interface.

  17. Computer Simulation for Molecular Orientation of Vanadyl Phthalocyanine in Epitaxial Form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tada, Hirokazu; Mashiko, Shinro

    1995-07-01

    Molecular orientation of vanadyl phthalocyanine (VOPc) adsorbed on KBr and KCl was studied by molecular mechanics simulation. A VOPc molecule with an oxygen atom oriented upward with respect to the substrate surface was found to be more stable than that oriented downward. The central vanadium atom preferred to stay on potassium cations rather than on halogen anions, which is contrary to our expectation. The lattices optimized in this study agree well with the experimental results. In the epitaxial form on KBr and KCl, the angle between the [100] axis of the substrates and the molecular axis passing through two bridge-nitrogen atoms was 39° and 45°, respectively. The dovetail molecular packing was observed on KCl, while some voids existed between molecules in the optimized packing on KBr.

  18. Topological defects in liquid crystals as templates for molecular self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Miller, Daniel; Bukusoglu, Emre; de Pablo, Juan; Abbott, Nicholas

    Topological defects in liquid crystals (LCs) have been widely used to organize colloidal dispersions and template polymerizations, leading to a range of elastomers and gels with complex mechanical and optical properties. However, little is understood about molecular-level assembly processes within defects. This presentation will describe an experimental study that reveals that nanoscopic environments defined by LC defects can selectively trigger processes of molecular self-assembly. By using fluorescence microscopy, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy and super-resolution optical microscopy, key signatures of molecular self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules in topological defects are observed - including cooperativity, reversibility, and controlled growth of the molecular assemblies. By using polymerizable amphiphiles, we also demonstrate preservation of molecular assemblies templated by defects, including nanoscopic o-rings synthesized from Saturn-ring disclinations. Our results reveal that topological defects in LCs are a versatile class of three-dimensional, dynamic and reconfigurable templates can direct processes of molecular self-assembly in a manner that is strongly analogous to other classes of macromolecular templates.

  19. Influence of solute-solvent coordination on the orientational relaxation of ion assemblies in polar solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Minbiao; Hartsock, Robert W.; Sung, Zheng; Gaffney, Kelly J.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the rotational dynamics of lithium thiocyanate (LiNCS) dissolved in various polar solvents with time and polarization resolved vibrational spectroscopy. LiNCS forms multiple distinct ionic structures in solution that can be distinguished with the CN stretch vibrational frequency of the different ionic assemblies. By varying the solvent and the LiNCS concentration, the number and type of ionic structures present in solution can be controlled. Control of the ionic structure provides control over the volume, shape, and dipole moment of the solute, critical parameters for hydrodynamic and dielectric continuum models of friction. The use of solutes with sizes comparable to or smaller than the solvent molecules also helps amplify the sensitivity of the measurement to the short-ranged solute-solvent interaction. The measured orientational relaxation dynamics show many clear and distinct deviations from simple hydrodynamic behavior. All ionic structures in all solvents exhibit multi-exponential relaxation dynamics that do not scale with the solute volume. For Lewis base solvents such as benzonitrile, dimethyl carbonate, and ethyl acetate, the observed dynamics strongly show the effect of solute-solvent complex formation. For the weak Lewis base solvent nitromethane, we see no evidence for solute-solvent complex formation, but still see strong deviation from the predictions of simple hydrodynamic theory.

  20. Universality and specificity in molecular orientation in anisotropic gels prepared by diffusion method.

    PubMed

    Maki, Yasuyuki; Furusawa, Kazuya; Yasuraoka, Sho; Okamura, Hideki; Hosoya, Natsuki; Sunaga, Mari; Dobashi, Toshiaki; Sugimoto, Yasunobu; Wakabayashi, Katsuzo

    2014-08-01

    Molecular orientation in anisotropic gels of chitosan, Curdlan and DNA obtained by dialysis of those aqueous solutions in gelation-inducing solutions was investigated. In this diffusion method (or dialysis method), the gel formation was induced by letting small molecules diffuse in or out of the polymer solutions through the surface. For the gels of DNA and chitosan, the polymer chains aligned perpendicular to the diffusion direction. The same direction of molecular orientation was observed for the Curdlan gel prepared in the dialysis cell. On the other hand, a peculiar nature was observed for the Curdlan gel prepared in the dialysis tube: the molecular orientation was perpendicular to the diffusion direction in the outermost layer of the gel, while the orientation was parallel to the diffusion direction in the inner translucent layer. The orientation parallel to the diffusion direction is attributed to a small deformation of the inner translucent layer caused by a slight shrinkage of the central region after the gel formation. At least near the surface of the gel, the molecular orientation perpendicular to the diffusion direction is a universal characteristic for the gels prepared by the diffusion method. PMID:24751255

  1. Bulk and Surface Molecular Orientation Distribution in Injection-molded Liquid Crystalline Polymers: Experiment and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, J.; Burghardt, W; Bubeck, R; Burgard, S; Fischer, D

    2010-01-01

    Bulk and surface distributions of molecular orientation in injection-molded plaques of thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers (TLCPs) have been studied using a combination of techniques, coordinated with process simulations using the Larson-Doi 'polydomain' model. Wide-angle X-ray scattering was used to map out the bulk orientation distribution. Fourier Transform Infrared Attenuated Total Reflectance (FTIR-ATR) and Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) were utilized to probe the molecular orientation states to within about {approx}5 {micro}m and {approx}2 nm, respectively, of the sample surface. These noninvasive, surface-sensitive techniques yield reasonable self-consistency, providing complementary validation of the robustness of these methods. An analogy between Larson-Doi and fiber orientation models has allowed the first simulations of TLCP injection molding. The simulations capture many fine details in the bulk orientation distribution across the sample plaque. Direct simulation of surface orientation at the level probed by FTIR-ATR and NEXAFS was not possible due to the limited spatial resolution of the simulations. However, simulation results extracted from the shear-dominant skin region are found to provide a qualitatively accurate indicator of surface orientation. Finally, simulations capture the relation between bulk and surface orientation states across the different regions of the sample plaque.

  2. Polyribosomes Are Molecular 3D Nanoprinters That Orchestrate the Assembly of Vault Particles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomes are molecular machines that function in polyribosome complexes to translate genetic information, guide the synthesis of polypeptides, and modulate the folding of nascent proteins. Here, we report a surprising function for polyribosomes as a result of a systematic examination of the assembly of a large ribonucleoprotein complex, the vault particle. Structural and functional evidence points to a model of vault assembly whereby the polyribosome acts like a 3D nanoprinter to direct the ordered translation and assembly of the multi-subunit vault homopolymer, a process which we refer to as polyribosome templating. Structure-based mutagenesis and cell-free in vitro expression studies further demonstrated the critical importance of the polyribosome in vault assembly. Polyribosome templating prevents chaos by ensuring efficiency and order in the production of large homopolymeric protein structures in the crowded cellular environment and might explain the origin of many polyribosome-associated molecular assemblies inside the cell. PMID:25354757

  3. Regulating the Rate of Molecular Self-Assembly for Targeting Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Du, Xuewen; Xu, Bing

    2016-05-01

    Besides tight and specific ligand-receptor interactions, the rate regulation of the formation of molecular assemblies is one of fundamental features of cells. But the latter receives little exploration for developing anticancer therapeutics. Here we show that a simple molecular design of the substrates of phosphatases-tailoring the number of phosphates on peptidic substrates-is able to regulate the rate of molecular self-assembly of the enzyme reaction product. Such a rate regulation allows selective inhibition of osteosarcoma cells over hepatocytes, which promises to target cancer cells in a specific organ. Moreover, our result reveals that the direct measurement of the rate of the self-assembly in a cell-based assay provides precise assessment of the cell targeting capability of self-assembly. This work, as the first report establishing rate regulation of a multiple-step process to inhibit cells selectively, illustrates a fundamentally new approach for controlling the fate of cells. PMID:27062481

  4. Topological defects in liquid crystals as templates for molecular self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Miller, Daniel S; Bukusoglu, Emre; de Pablo, Juan J; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2016-01-01

    Topological defects in liquid crystals (LCs) have been widely used to organize colloidal dispersions and template polymerization, leading to a range of assemblies, elastomers and gels. However, little is understood about molecular-level assembly processes within defects. Here, we report that nanoscopic environments defined by LC topological defects can selectively trigger processes of molecular self-assembly. By using fluorescence microscopy, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy and super-resolution optical microscopy, we observed signatures of molecular self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules in topological defects, including cooperativity, reversibility and controlled growth. We also show that nanoscopic o-rings synthesized from Saturn-ring disclinations and other molecular assemblies templated by defects can be preserved by using photocrosslinkable amphiphiles. Our results reveal that, in analogy to other classes of macromolecular templates such as polymer-surfactant complexes, topological defects in LCs are a versatile class of three-dimensional, dynamic and reconfigurable templates that can direct processes of molecular self-assembly. PMID:26390324

  5. Zebrafish vimentin: molecular characterization, assembly properties and developmental expression.

    PubMed

    Cerdà, J; Conrad, M; Markl, J; Brand, M; Herrmann, H

    1998-11-01

    To provide a basis for the investigation of the intermediate filament (IF) protein vimentin in one of the most promising experimental vertebrate systems, the zebrafish (Danio rerio), we have isolated a cDNA clone of high sequence identity to and with the characteristic features of human vimentin. Using this clone we produced recombinant zebrafish vimentin and studied its assembly behaviour. Unlike other vimentins, zebrafish vimentin formed unusually thick filaments when assembled at temperatures below 21 degrees C. At 37 degrees C few filaments were observed, which often also terminated in aggregated masses, indicating that its assembly was severely disturbed at this temperature. Between 21 and 34 degrees C apparently normal IFs were generated. By viscometry, the temperature optimum of assembly was determined to be around 28 degrees C. At this temperature, zebrafish vimentin partially rescued, in mixing experiments, the temperature-dependent assembly defect of trout vimentin. Therefore it is apparently able to "instruct" the misorganized trout vimentin such that it can enter normal IFs. This feature, that assembly is best at the normal body temperature of various species, puts more weight on the assumption that vimentin is vital for some aspects of generating functional adult tissues. Remarkably, like in most other vertebrates, zebrafish vimentin appears to be an abundant factor in the lens and the retina as well as transiently, during development, in various parts of the central and peripheral nervous system. Therefore, promising cell biological investigations may now be performed with cells involved in the generation of the vertebrate eye and brain, and, in particular, the retina. Moreover, the power of genetics of the zebrafish system may be employed to investigate functional properties of vimentin in vivo. PMID:9860133

  6. StrateGene: object-oriented programming in molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Carhart, R E; Cash, H D; Moore, J F

    1988-03-01

    This paper describes some of the ways that object-oriented programming methodologies have been used to represent and manipulate biological information in a working application. When running on a Xerox 1100 series computer, StrateGene functions as a genetic engineering workstation for the management of information about cloning experiments. It represents biological molecules, enzymes, fragments, and methods as classes, subclasses, and members in a hierarchy of objects. These objects may have various attributes, which themselves can be defined and classified. The attributes and their values can be passed from the classes of objects down to the subclasses and members. The user can modify the objects and their attributes while using them. New knowledge and changes to the system can be incorporated relatively easily. The operations on the biological objects are associated with the objects themselves. This makes it easier to invoke them correctly and allows generic operations to be customized for the particular object. PMID:3164229

  7. Photoreactive self-assembled monolayer for the stabilization of tilt orientation of a director in vertically aligned nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Oh, Su Yeon; Kang, Shin-Woong

    2013-12-16

    Photo-reactive self-assembled monolayer (PR-SAM) is employed to mediate alignment of liquid crystals (LC) and stabilize the tilt orientation of a nematic director for a vertically aligned liquid crystal. Bifunctional PR-SAM formed by silane coupling reaction to oxide surfaces efficiently induces a homeotropic alignment and stabilizes LC director by the photo-polymerization under applied electric field. As a result, the substantial enhancement of electro-optic performance has been achieved after the PR-SAM assisted stabilization of tilt orientation of director. This approach for pretilt stabilization has multifarious advantages over the conventional PSVA. PMID:24514711

  8. Molecular Arrangement in Self-Assembled Azobenzene-Containing Thiol Monolayers at the Individual Domain Level Studied through Polarized Near-Field Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chaigneau, Marc; Picardi, Gennaro; Ossikovski, Razvigor

    2011-01-01

    6-[4-(phenylazo)phenoxy]hexane-1-thiol self-assembled monolayers deposited on a gold surface form domain-like structures possessing a high degree of order with virtually all the molecules being identically oriented with respect to the surface plane. We show that, by using polarized near-field Raman spectroscopy, it is possible to derive the Raman scattering tensor of the ordered layer and consequently, the in-plane molecular orientation at the individual domain level. More generally, this study extends the application domain of the near-field Raman scattering selection rules from crystals to ordered organic structures. PMID:21541056

  9. Molecular Self-Assembly Strategy for Generating Catalytic Hybrid Polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Ikezoe, Yasuhiro; Pike, Douglas H.; Nanda, Vikas; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Recently, catalytic peptides were introduced that mimicked protease activities and showed promising selectivity of products even in organic solvents where protease cannot perform well. However, their catalytic efficiency was extremely low compared to natural enzyme counterparts presumably due to the lack of stable tertiary fold. We hypothesized that assembling these peptides along with simple hydrophobic pockets, mimicking enzyme active sites, could enhance the catalytic activity. Here we fused the sequence of catalytic peptide CP4, capable of protease and esterase-like activities, into a short amyloidogenic peptide fragment of Aβ. When the fused CP4-Aβ construct assembled into antiparallel β-sheets and amyloid fibrils, a 4.0-fold increase in the hydrolysis rate of p-nitrophenyl acetate (p-NPA) compared to neat CP4 peptide was observed. The enhanced catalytic activity of CP4-Aβ assembly could be explained both by pre-organization of a catalytically competent Ser-His-acid triad and hydrophobic stabilization of a bound substrate between the triad and p-NPA, indicating that a design strategy for self-assembled peptides is important to accomplish the desired functionality. PMID:27116246

  10. Molecular self-assembly strategy for generating catalytic hybrid polypeptides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maeda, Yoshiaki; Fang, Justin; Ikezoe, Yasuhiro; Pike, Douglas H.; Nanda, Vikas; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2016-04-26

    Recently, catalytic peptides were introduced that mimicked protease activities and showed promising selectivity of products even in organic solvents where protease cannot perform well. However, their catalytic efficiency was extremely low compared to natural enzyme counterparts presumably due to the lack of stable tertiary fold. We hypothesized that assembling these peptides along with simple hydrophobic pockets, mimicking enzyme active sites, could enhance the catalytic activity. Here we fused the sequence of catalytic peptide CP4, capable of protease and esterase-like activities, into a short amyloidogenic peptide fragment of Aβ. When the fused CP4-Aβ construct assembled into antiparallel β- sheets and amyloidmore » fibrils, a 4.0-fold increase in the hydrolysis rate of p-nitrophenyl acetate (p-NPA) compared to neat CP4 peptide was observed. Furthermore, the enhanced catalytic activity of CP4-Aβ assembly could be explained both by pre-organization of a catalytically competent Ser-His-acid triad and hydrophobic stabilization of a bound substrate between the triad and p-NPA, indicating that a design strategy for self-assembled peptides is important to accomplish the desired functionality.« less

  11. Molecular Self-Assembly Strategy for Generating Catalytic Hybrid Polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yoshiaki; Fang, Justin; Ikezoe, Yasuhiro; Pike, Douglas H; Nanda, Vikas; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Recently, catalytic peptides were introduced that mimicked protease activities and showed promising selectivity of products even in organic solvents where protease cannot perform well. However, their catalytic efficiency was extremely low compared to natural enzyme counterparts presumably due to the lack of stable tertiary fold. We hypothesized that assembling these peptides along with simple hydrophobic pockets, mimicking enzyme active sites, could enhance the catalytic activity. Here we fused the sequence of catalytic peptide CP4, capable of protease and esterase-like activities, into a short amyloidogenic peptide fragment of Aβ. When the fused CP4-Aβ construct assembled into antiparallel β-sheets and amyloid fibrils, a 4.0-fold increase in the hydrolysis rate of p-nitrophenyl acetate (p-NPA) compared to neat CP4 peptide was observed. The enhanced catalytic activity of CP4-Aβ assembly could be explained both by pre-organization of a catalytically competent Ser-His-acid triad and hydrophobic stabilization of a bound substrate between the triad and p-NPA, indicating that a design strategy for self-assembled peptides is important to accomplish the desired functionality. PMID:27116246

  12. Molecular Assemblies, Genes and Genomics Integrated Efficiently (MAGGIE)

    SciTech Connect

    Baliga, Nitin S

    2011-05-26

    Final report on MAGGIE. We set ambitious goals to model the functions of individual organisms and their community from molecular to systems scale. These scientific goals are driving the development of sophisticated algorithms to analyze large amounts of experimental measurements made using high throughput technologies to explain and predict how the environment influences biological function at multiple scales and how the microbial systems in turn modify the environment. By experimentally evaluating predictions made using these models we will test the degree to which our quantitative multiscale understanding wilt help to rationally steer individual microbes and their communities towards specific tasks. Towards this end we have made substantial progress towards understanding evolution of gene families, transcriptional structures, detailed structures of keystone molecular assemblies (proteins and complexes), protein interactions, biological networks, microbial interactions, and community structure. Using comparative analysis we have tracked the evolutionary history of gene functions to understand how novel functions evolve. One level up, we have used proteomics data, high-resolution genome tiling microarrays, and 5' RNA sequencing to revise genome annotations, discover new genes including ncRNAs, and map dynamically changing operon structures of five model organisms: For Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, Pyrococcus furiosis, Sulfolobus solfataricus, Methanococcus maripaludis and Haiobacterium salinarum NROL We have developed machine learning algorithms to accurately identify protein interactions at a near-zero false positive rate from noisy data generated using tagfess complex purification, TAP purification, and analysis of membrane complexes. Combining other genome-scale datasets produced by ENIGMA (in particular, microarray data) and available from literature we have been able to achieve a true positive rate as high as 65% at almost zero false positives when

  13. Crystal orientation mechanism of ZnTe epilayers formed on different orientations of sapphire substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Nakasu, T. Yamashita, S.; Aiba, T.; Hattori, S.; Sun, W.; Taguri, K.; Kazami, F.; Kobayashi, M.

    2014-10-28

    The electrooptic effect in ZnTe has recently attracted research attention, and various device structures using ZnTe have been explored. For application to practical terahertz wave detector devices based on ZnTe thin films, sapphire substrates are preferred because they enable the optical path alignment to be simplified. ZnTe/sapphire heterostructures were focused upon, and ZnTe epilayers were prepared on highly mismatched sapphire substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Epitaxial relationships between the ZnTe thin films and the sapphire substrates with their various orientations were investigated using an X-ray diffraction pole figure method. (0001) c-plane, (1-102) r-plane, (1-100) m-plane, and (11-20) a-plane oriented sapphire substrates were used in this study. The epitaxial relationship between ZnTe and c-plane sapphire was found to be (111) ZnTe//(0001) sapphire with an in-plane orientation relationship of [−211] ZnTe//[1-100] sapphire. It was found that the (211)-plane ZnTe layer was grown on the m-plane of the sapphire substrates, and the (100)-plane ZnTe layer was grown on the r-plane sapphire. When the sapphire substrates were inclined from the c-plane towards the m-axis direction, the orientation of the ZnTe thin films was then tilted from the (111)-plane to the (211)-plane. The c-plane of the sapphire substrates governs the formation of the (111) ZnTe domain and the ZnTe epilayer orientation. These crystallographic features were also related to the atom arrangements of ZnTe and sapphire.

  14. Crystal orientation mechanism of ZnTe epilayers formed on different orientations of sapphire substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakasu, T.; Yamashita, S.; Aiba, T.; Hattori, S.; Sun, W.; Taguri, K.; Kazami, F.; Kobayashi, M.

    2014-10-01

    The electrooptic effect in ZnTe has recently attracted research attention, and various device structures using ZnTe have been explored. For application to practical terahertz wave detector devices based on ZnTe thin films, sapphire substrates are preferred because they enable the optical path alignment to be simplified. ZnTe/sapphire heterostructures were focused upon, and ZnTe epilayers were prepared on highly mismatched sapphire substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Epitaxial relationships between the ZnTe thin films and the sapphire substrates with their various orientations were investigated using an X-ray diffraction pole figure method. (0001) c-plane, (1-102) r-plane, (1-100) m-plane, and (11-20) a-plane oriented sapphire substrates were used in this study. The epitaxial relationship between ZnTe and c-plane sapphire was found to be (111) ZnTe//(0001) sapphire with an in-plane orientation relationship of [-211] ZnTe//[1-100] sapphire. It was found that the (211)-plane ZnTe layer was grown on the m-plane of the sapphire substrates, and the (100)-plane ZnTe layer was grown on the r-plane sapphire. When the sapphire substrates were inclined from the c-plane towards the m-axis direction, the orientation of the ZnTe thin films was then tilted from the (111)-plane to the (211)-plane. The c-plane of the sapphire substrates governs the formation of the (111) ZnTe domain and the ZnTe epilayer orientation. These crystallographic features were also related to the atom arrangements of ZnTe and sapphire.

  15. Tuning Open-Circuit Voltage in Organic Solar Cells with Molecular Orientation.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Brent; Awartani, Omar; Kline, R Joseph; McAfee, Terry; Ade, Harald; O'Connor, Brendan T

    2015-06-24

    The role of molecular orientation of a polar conjugated polymer in polymer-fullerene organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells is investigated. A planar heterojunction (PHJ) OPV cell composed of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) is used as a model system to isolate the effect of the interfacial orientation on the photovoltaic properties. The molecular orientation of the aggregate P3HT relative to the PCBM layer is varied from highly edge-on (conjugated ring plane perpendicular to the interface plane) to appreciably face-on (ring plane parallel to the interface). It is found that as the P3HT stacking becomes more face-on there is a positive correlation to the OPV open-circuit voltage (V(OC)), attributed to a shift in the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy level of P3HT. In addition, the PHJ OPV cell with a broad P3HT stacking orientation distribution has a V(OC) comparable to an archetypal bulk heterojunction (BHJ) device. These results suggest that, in the BHJ OPV cell, the hole energy level in the charge transfer state is defined in part by the orientation distribution of the P3HT at the interface with PCBM. Finally, the photoresponses of the devices are also shown to have a dependence on P3HT stacking orientation. PMID:26027430

  16. Effects of substrate orientation on the growth of InSb nanostructures by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. Y.; Torfi, A.; Pei, C.; Wang, W. I.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the effects of substrate orientation on InSb quantum structure growth by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are presented. Motivated by the observation that (411) evolves naturally as a stable facet during MBE crystal growth, comparison studies have been carried out to investigate the effects of the crystal orientation of the underlying GaSb substrate on the growth of InSb by MBE. By depositing InSb on a number of different substrate orientations, namely: (100), (311), (411), and (511), a higher nanostructure density was observed on the (411) surface compared with the other orientations. This result suggests that the (411) orientation presents a superior surface in MBE growth to develop a super-flat GaSb buffer surface, naturally favorable for nanostructure growth.

  17. Effect of horizontal molecular orientation on triplet-exciton diffusion in amorphous organic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawabe, T.; Takasu, I.; Yonehara, T.; Ono, T.; Yoshida, J.; Enomoto, S.; Amemiya, I.; Adachi, C.

    2012-09-01

    Triplet harvesting is a candidate technology for highly efficient and long-life white OLEDs, where green or red phosphorescent emitters are activated by the triplet-excitons diffused from blue fluorescent emitters. We examined two oxadiazole-based electron transport materials with different horizontal molecular orientation as a triplet-exciton diffusion layer (TDL) in triplet-harvesting OLEDs. The device characteristics and the transient electroluminescent analyses of the red phosphorescent emitter showed that the triplet-exciton diffusion was more effective in the highly oriented TDL. The results are ascribed to the strong orbital overlap between the oriented molecules, which provides rapid electron exchange (Dexter energy transfer) in the TDL.

  18. Unforeseen distance-dependent SERS spectroelectrochemistry from surface-tethered Nile Blue: the role of molecular orientation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Andrew J; Willets, Katherine A

    2016-08-15

    Covalent immobilization of redox-active dyes is an important strategy to evaluate structure-activity relationships in nanoscale electrochemistry by using optical readouts such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Here we investigate the role of the tether length in the SERS spectroelectrochemistry of surface-attached Nile Blue. Differential pulse voltammetry and a potential-dependent SERS derivative analysis reveal that the Nile Blue molecules adopt a different orientation with respect to the electrode surface as the number of carbons in a carboxylic acid-terminated alkanethiol monolayer is varied, which leads to unique SERS spectroelectrochemical behaviors. We use the relative molecular orientations and spectral characteristics to propose a model in which tethers shorter than the length of the molecule limit molecular motion under electrochemical perturbation, but tethers longer than the length of the molecule allow dye intercalation into the hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer, producing an unexpected decrease in the SERS intensity when the molecule is in the oxidized form. PMID:27337143

  19. Optimization of sub-cells orientation for assembly of a high-quality transmission sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Wei-Jei; Ho, Cheng-Fang; Yu, Zong-Ru; Huang, Chien-Yao; Kuo, Ching-Hsiang; Hsu, Wei-Yao

    2015-10-01

    The transmission sphere (TS) provides a high-quality reference wavefront which is common path with a test wavefront to generate interference fringes in a Fizeau interferometer. The optical path difference (OPD) of the reference wavefront should be controlled within peak-to-valley (PV) 5 λ (λ=0.6328 um), because too large OPD makes interference fringes distorted. Therefore, the tolerance analysis of the reference wavefront is very critical. Because the surface irregularity of lens can change the phase of a wavefront, surface deformation after mounting highly impacts on the wavefront error. For large optics, such as φ 6-inch in this study, surface deformation dominates the quality of the reference wavefront. For minimizing surface deformation after mounting, semi-kinematic mounting technology is used in sub-cells design to avoid over-constraint forces and unpredictable deformation. Then, the deformation due to gravity force of each surface can be constrained around PV 0.3 λ with Zernike trefoil in vertical setup TS; however, the superposition of the distorted wavefront may deteriorate the optical performance. A method of optimizing orientation of each lens around optical axis is presented in this paper. Sub-cells are designed to be rotational around optical axis respectively. The wavefront error of the reference beam of the worst case is improved significantly after optimization. Consequently, the method can effectively reduce the difficulty of lenses fabrication and mounting, and then the specification of the surface irregularity can be lower for cost saving. Based on the optimization in our study, a good reference wavefront can be acquired without any tight tolerance or complicated assembly.

  20. Cellular automata with object-oriented features for parallel molecular network modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hao; Wu, Yinghui; Huang, Sui; Sun, Yan; Dhar, Pawan

    2005-06-01

    Cellular automata are an important modeling paradigm for studying the dynamics of large, parallel systems composed of multiple, interacting components. However, to model biological systems, cellular automata need to be extended beyond the large-scale parallelism and intensive communication in order to capture two fundamental properties characteristic of complex biological systems: hierarchy and heterogeneity. This paper proposes extensions to a cellular automata language, Cellang, to meet this purpose. The extended language, with object-oriented features, can be used to describe the structure and activity of parallel molecular networks within cells. Capabilities of this new programming language include object structure to define molecular programs within a cell, floating-point data type and mathematical functions to perform quantitative computation, message passing capability to describe molecular interactions, as well as new operators, statements, and built-in functions. We discuss relevant programming issues of these features, including the object-oriented description of molecular interactions with molecule encapsulation, message passing, and the description of heterogeneity and anisotropy at the cell and molecule levels. By enabling the integration of modeling at the molecular level with system behavior at cell, tissue, organ, or even organism levels, the program will help improve our understanding of how complex and dynamic biological activities are generated and controlled by parallel functioning of molecular networks. Index Terms-Cellular automata, modeling, molecular network, object-oriented. PMID:16117022

  1. Orientation Dependence in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Shocked Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Germann, Timothy C.; Holian, Brad Lee; Lomdahl, Peter S.; Ravelo, Ramon

    2000-06-05

    We use multimillion-atom molecular dynamics simulations to study shock wave propagation in fcc crystals. As shown recently, shock waves along the <100> direction form intersecting stacking faults by slippage along {l_brace}111{r_brace} close-packed planes at sufficiently high shock strengths. We find even more interesting behavior of shocks propagating in other low-index directions: for the <111> case, an elastic precursor separates the shock front from the slipped (plastic) region. Shock waves along the <110> direction generate a leading solitary wave train, followed (at sufficiently high shock speeds) by an elastic precursor, and then a region of complex plastic deformation. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  2. Molecular orientation of silane at the surface of colloidal silica.

    PubMed

    Söderholm, K J; Shang, S W

    1993-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the silica-silane bond formation present at the filler interface of dental composites. Diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy was used, and the spectra of pyrogenic silica (Cab-O-Sil) treated with different concentrations of gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) were analyzed. The outcome of the study suggested that the gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) molecules oriented parallel to the colloidal silica surface (Cab-O-Sil) and formed two types of bonds. One of these bonds was a siloxane bridge formed by a condensation reaction between the silanol groups of both the silica surface and the hydrolyzed silane. Water formed during this reaction and soon became recaptured by the silanol groups of the silica surface. These water molecules were not available for additional hydrolyzation reactions of the unhydrolyzed silane under the experimental conditions. The intensity of the isolated OH-groups decreased because of this reaction. Simultaneous with the condensation reaction, the carbonyl group of the MPS molecule formed hydrogen bonds. This hydrogen bond formation resulted in a peak shift of the carbonyl band from 1718-1720 cm-1 to 1700-1702 cm-1. This hydrogen bond formation also occurred with the isolated OH-groups. After consumption of the isolated OH-groups, no additional surface reaction occurred because no further OH-groups were available for additional condensation reactions or hydrogen bond formation. The findings suggest that the amount of silane needed for filler treatment depends on the number of isolated OH-groups available on the filler surface. PMID:8388415

  3. A molecular mechanism of mitotic centrosome assembly in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Conduit, Paul T; Richens, Jennifer H; Wainman, Alan; Holder, James; Vicente, Catarina C; Pratt, Metta B; Dix, Carly I; Novak, Zsofia A; Dobbie, Ian M; Schermelleh, Lothar; Raff, Jordan W

    2014-01-01

    Centrosomes comprise a pair of centrioles surrounded by pericentriolar material (PCM). The PCM expands dramatically as cells enter mitosis, but it is unclear how this occurs. In this study, we show that the centriole protein Asl initiates the recruitment of DSpd-2 and Cnn to mother centrioles; both proteins then assemble into co-dependent scaffold-like structures that spread outwards from the mother centriole and recruit most, if not all, other PCM components. In the absence of either DSpd-2 or Cnn, mitotic PCM assembly is diminished; in the absence of both proteins, it appears to be abolished. We show that DSpd-2 helps incorporate Cnn into the PCM and that Cnn then helps maintain DSpd-2 within the PCM, creating a positive feedback loop that promotes robust PCM expansion around the mother centriole during mitosis. These observations suggest a surprisingly simple mechanism of mitotic PCM assembly in flies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03399.001 PMID:25149451

  4. Vacuum sublimed α ,ω-dihexylsexithiophene thin films: Correlating electronic structure and molecular orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duhm, S.; Salzmann, I.; Koch, N.; Fukagawa, H.; Kataoka, T.; Hosoumi, S.; Nebashi, K.; Kera, S.; Ueno, N.

    2008-08-01

    In order to correlate the molecular orientation of organic thin films with charge injection barriers at organic/metal interfaces, the electronic structure and molecular orientation of vacuum sublimed thin films of α ,ω-dihexylsexithiophene (DH6T) on the substrates Ag(111), highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), and tetratetracontane (TTC) precovered Ag(111) were investigated. Results from metastable atom electron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction were used to derive growth models (including molecular orientation and conformation) of DH6T on the different substrates. On Ag(111), DH6T exhibits a transition from lying molecules in the monolayer/bilayer range to almost standing upright molecules in multilayers. This is accompanied by a shift of the molecular energy levels to a lower binding energy by 0.65 eV with respect to the vacuum level. The unit cell of standing DH6T on lying DH6T on Ag(111) is estimated to be similar to the DH6T bulk phase. On HOPG, DH6T grows in the bulk phase with lying orientation, starting already from the monolayer coverage. DH6T on TTC precovered Ag(111) grows in an almost lying orientation and a conformation that allows a strong overlap of the hexyl chains of DH6T with the alkyl chains of TTC. In all cases, the electronic structure and, particulary, the ionization energy of DH6T is dependent on the orientation of DH6T, i.e., lying DH6T has higher ionization energy than standing DH6T.

  5. Recent emergence of photon upconversion based on triplet energy migration in molecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Nobuhiro; Kimizuka, Nobuo

    2016-04-01

    An emerging field of triplet energy migration-based photon upconversion (TEM-UC) is reviewed. Highly efficient photon upconversion has been realized in a wide range of chromophore assemblies, such as non-solvent liquids, ionic liquids, amorphous solids, gels, supramolecular assemblies, molecular crystals, and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The control over their assembly structures allows for unexpected air-stability and maximum upconversion quantum yield at weak solar irradiance that has never been achieved by the conventional molecular diffusion-based mechanism. The introduction of the "self-assembly" concept offers a new perspective in photon upconversion research and triplet exciton science, which show promise for numerous applications ranging from solar energy conversion to chemical biology. PMID:26947379

  6. The spindle assembly checkpoint promotes chromosome bi-orientation: A novel Mad1 role in chromosome alignment.

    PubMed

    Akera, Takashi; Watanabe, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Faithful chromosome segregation relies on dynamic interactions between spindle microtubules and chromosomes. Especially, all chromosomes must be aligned at the equator of the spindle to establish bi-orientation before they start to segregate. The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) monitors this process, inhibiting chromosome segregation until all chromosomes achieve bi-orientation. The original concept of 'checkpoints' was proposed as an external surveillance system that does not play an active role in the process it monitors. However, accumulating evidence from recent studies suggests that SAC components do play an active role in chromosome bi-orientation. In this review, we highlight a novel Mad1 role in chromosome alignment, which is the first conserved mechanism that links the SAC and kinesin-mediated chromosome gliding. PMID:26752263

  7. Orientation and morphology of self-assembled oligothiophene semiconductors and development of hybrid nanostructures for photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tevis, Ian David

    This dissertation examines the self-assembly of electronically active small molecules for heterojunction photovoltaic devices and the synthesis of nanoscale hybrid materials with a focus on orientation and morphology. A hairpin-shaped self-assembling molecule featuring two semiconducting sexithiophene arms connected through a diamidocyclohexane linker was found to form p-type semiconducting nanowires through H-aggregation as well as J-aggregated bundles. This molecule was incorporated into heterojunction photovoltaics with phenyl-(C61/C71)-butyric acid methyl ester through spin-coating. The sexithiophene assembled during drying to form a percolating network of nanowires and fullerenes. Thermal annealing enhanced efficiencies by increasing domain sizes and organizing the fullerenes into the groves of the nanofibers to produce 0.48% efficient devices. A p-type quarterthiophene derivative was designed and synthesized to assemble through pi-pi stacking and hydrogen bonding and its assembly was explored. Solutions of the quarterthiophene drop-cast on poly(tetrafluoroethylene) dried quickly to form bundled fibers parallel to the substrate. Slower drying and higher concentrations led to the formation of rhombohedra and randomly oriented hexagonal prisms, respectively. Liquid-liquid interfacial precipitation was used with a porous aluminum oxide membrane between a solution of quarterthiophene and toluene to orient the hexagonal prisms perpendicular to the membrane. Depositing the molecule from solution onto a UV/Ozone treated transparent conducting oxide subtrated affored prisms and sheets with perpendicular pi-pi stacking was anisotropy observed by 2D-GISAXS. This perpendicular pi-pi stacking orientation and sheet formation on a planar electrode shortens charge transport distances and minimizes film defects, which could lead to improved photovoltaic devices. Interpenetrating donor and acceptor hybrid materials with perpendicular orientation for enhanced morphological

  8. The Nodes of Ranvier: Molecular Assembly and Maintenance.

    PubMed

    Rasband, Matthew N; Peles, Elior

    2016-03-01

    Action potential (AP) propagation in myelinated nerves requires clustered voltage gated sodium and potassium channels. These channels must be specifically localized to nodes of Ranvier where the AP is regenerated. Several mechanisms have evolved to facilitate and ensure the correct assembly and stabilization of these essential axonal domains. This review highlights the current understanding of the axon intrinsic and glial extrinsic mechanisms that control the formation and maintenance of the nodes of Ranvier in both the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS). PMID:26354894

  9. Following the nanostructural molecular orientation guidelines for sulfur versus thiophene units in small molecule photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yu Jin; Park, Chan Eon

    2016-03-01

    In bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaics, particularly those using small molecules, electron donor and/or electron acceptor materials form a distributed network in the photoactive layer where critical photo-physical processes occur. Extensive research has recently focused on the importance of sulfur atoms in the small molecules. Little is known about the three-dimensional orientation of these sulfur atom-containing molecules. Herein, we report on our research concerning the heterojunction textures of the crystalline molecular orientation of small compounds having sulfur-containing units in the side chains, specifically, compounds known as DR3TSBDT that contain the alkylthio group and DR3TBDTT that does not. The improved performance of the DR3TBDTT-based devices, particularly in the photocurrent and the fill factor, was attributed to the large population of donor compound crystallites with a favorable face-on orientation along the perpendicular direction. This orientation resulted in efficient charge transport and a reduction in charge recombination. These findings underscore the great potential of small-molecule solar cells and suggest that even higher efficiencies can be achieved through materials development and molecular orientation control.In bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaics, particularly those using small molecules, electron donor and/or electron acceptor materials form a distributed network in the photoactive layer where critical photo-physical processes occur. Extensive research has recently focused on the importance of sulfur atoms in the small molecules. Little is known about the three-dimensional orientation of these sulfur atom-containing molecules. Herein, we report on our research concerning the heterojunction textures of the crystalline molecular orientation of small compounds having sulfur-containing units in the side chains, specifically, compounds known as DR3TSBDT that contain the alkylthio group and DR3TBDTT that does not

  10. Detection of Alzheimer's amyloid beta aggregation by capturing molecular trails of individual assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Vestergaard, Mun'delanji Hamada, Tsutomu; Saito, Masato; Yajima, Yoshifumi; Kudou, Monotori; Tamiya, Eiichi; Takagi, Masahiro

    2008-12-12

    Assembly of Amyloid beta (A{beta}) peptides, in particular A{beta}-42 is central to the formation of the amyloid plaques associated with neuro-pathologies such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Molecular assembly of individual A{beta}-42 species was observed using a simple fluorescence microscope. From the molecular movements (aka Brownian motion) of the individual peptide assemblies, we calculated a temporal evolution of the hydrodynamic radius (R{sub H}) of the peptide at physiological temperature and pH. The results clearly show a direct relationship between R{sub H} of A{beta}-42 and incubation period, corresponding to the previously reported peptide's aggregation kinetics. The data correlates highly with in solution-based label-free electrochemical detection of the peptide's aggregation, and A{beta}-42 deposited on a solid surface and analysed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first analysis and characterisation of A{beta} aggregation based on capturing molecular trails of individual assemblies. The technique enables both real-time observation and a semi-quantitative distribution profile of the various stages of A{beta} assembly, at microM peptide concentration. Our method is a promising candidate for real-time observation and analysis of the effect of other pathologically-relevant molecules such as metal ions on pathways to A{beta} oligomerisation and aggregation. The method is also a promising screening tool for AD therapeutics that target A{beta} assembly.

  11. Control of molecular orientation in TTF TCNQ co-evaporated films by applying an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, N. A.; Fujimura, M.; Kuniyoshi, S.; Kudo, K.; Hara, M.; Tanaka, K.

    1998-06-01

    We have investigated the effect of an electric field on the molecular orientation of tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) co-evaporated films, using an optical microscope, a scanning tunnelling microscope and X-ray diffraction. It is found that with an electric field applied TTF-TCNQ grows with the b-axis parallel to the electric field.

  12. Tunable molecular orientation and elevated thermal stability of vapor-deposited organic semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Diane M.; Lyubimov, Ivan; de Pablo, Juan J.; Ediger, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Physical vapor deposition is commonly used to prepare organic glasses that serve as the active layers in light-emitting diodes, photovoltaics, and other devices. Recent work has shown that orienting the molecules in such organic semiconductors can significantly enhance device performance. We apply a high-throughput characterization scheme to investigate the effect of the substrate temperature (Tsubstrate) on glasses of three organic molecules used as semiconductors. The optical and material properties are evaluated with spectroscopic ellipsometry. We find that molecular orientation in these glasses is continuously tunable and controlled by Tsubstrate/Tg, where Tg is the glass transition temperature. All three molecules can produce highly anisotropic glasses; the dependence of molecular orientation upon substrate temperature is remarkably similar and nearly independent of molecular length. All three compounds form “stable glasses” with high density and thermal stability, and have properties similar to stable glasses prepared from model glass formers. Simulations reproduce the experimental trends and explain molecular orientation in the deposited glasses in terms of the surface properties of the equilibrium liquid. By showing that organic semiconductors form stable glasses, these results provide an avenue for systematic performance optimization of active layers in organic electronics. PMID:25831545

  13. Molecular orientation in soft matter thin films studied by resonant soft X-ray reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Mezger, Markus; Jerome, Blandine; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Valvidares, Manuel; Gullikson, Eric; Giglia, Angelo; Mahne, Nicola; Nannarone, Stefano

    2011-01-12

    We present a technique to study depth profiles of molecular orientation in soft matter thin films with nanometer resolution. The method is based on dichroism in resonant soft X-ray reflectivity using linear s- and p-polarization. It combines the chemical sensitivity of Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy to specific molecular bonds and their orientation relative to the polarization of the incident beam with the precise depth profiling capability of X-ray reflectivity. We demonstrate these capabilities on side chain liquid crystalline polymer thin films with soft X-ray reflectivity data at the carbon K edge. Optical constants of the anisotropic refractive index ellipsoid were obtained from a quantitative analysis using the Berreman formalism. For films up to 50 nm thickness we find that the degree of orientation of the long axis exhibits no depth variation and isindependent of the film thickness.

  14. An Elaborate Supramolecular Assembly for a Smart Nanodevice for Ratiometric Molecular Recognition and Logic Gates.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yu-Jie; Wu, Wen-Yu; Chen, Hao; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Hao-Li; Liu, Liang-Liang; Shao, Xing-Xin; Shan, Chang-Fu; Liu, Wei-Sheng; Tang, Yu

    2016-06-01

    Ingenious approaches to supramolecular assembly for fabricating smart nanodevices is one of the more significant topics in nanomaterials research. Herein, by using surface quaternized cationic carbon dots (CDots) as the assembly and fluorescence platform, anionic sulfonatocalix[4]arene with modifiable lower and upper rims as a connector, as well as in situ coordination of Tb(3+) ions, we propose an elaborate supramolecular assembly strategy for the facile fabrication of a multifunctional nanodevice. The dynamic equilibrium characteristics of the supramolecular interaction can eventually endow this nanodevice with functions of fluorescent ratiometric molecular recognition and as a nano-logic gate with two output channels. PMID:27106796

  15. Fabrication and Characterization of Oriented Carbon Atom Wires Assembled on Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Xue,K.H.; Wu,L.; Chen, S.-P.; Wanga, L.X.; Wei, R.-B.; Xu, S.-M.; Cui, L.; Mao, B.-W.; Tian, Z.-Q.; Zen, C.-H.; Sun, S.-G.; Zhu, Y.-M.

    2009-02-17

    Carbon atom wires (CAWs) are of the sp-hybridized allotrope of carbon. To augment the extraordinary features based on sp-hybridization, we developed an approach to make CAWs be self-assembled and orderly organized on Au substrate. The self-assembling process was investigated in situ by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM). The properties of the assembled film were characterized by voltammetry, Raman spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and the contact angle measurements. Experimental results indicated that the assembled CAW film was of the good structural integrity and well organized, with the sp-hybridized features enhanced.

  16. Molecular mechanisms underlying KVS-1-MPS-1 complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Sesti, Federico

    2007-11-01

    Formation of heteromeric complexes between voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels and accessory (beta) subunits is a widespread means to generate heterogeneity of K(+) current in the nervous system. Here we investigate the principles that determine the interactions of Caenorhabditis elegans MPS-1, a bifunctional beta-subunit that possesses kinase activity, with Kv channels. MPS-1 belongs to the evolutionarily conserved family of KCNE beta-subunits that modulate the functional properties of a variety of Kv channels and that, when defective, can cause congenital and acquired disease in Homo sapiens. In Chinese hamster ovary cells, MPS-1 forms stable complexes with different alpha-subunits. The transmembrane domain of MPS-1 is necessary and sufficient for MPS-1 complex formation. The hydropathicity of the transmembrane domain is an important factor controlling MPS-1 assembly. A highly hydrophobic MPS-1 mutant fails to interact with its endogenous channel partners when transgenically expressed in living worms. The hydropathic mechanism does not require specific points of contact between interacting proteins. This may allow MPS-1 to assemble with various Kv channels, presumably modifying the electrical properties of each. PMID:17604313

  17. Method of assembly of molecular-sized nets and scaffolding

    DOEpatents

    Michl, Josef; Magnera, Thomas F.; David, Donald E.; Harrison, Robin M.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods and starting materials for forming molecular-sized grids or nets, or other structures based on such grids and nets, by creating molecular links between elementary molecular modules constrained to move in only two directions on an interface or surface by adhesion or bonding to that interface or surface. In the methods of this invention, monomers are employed as the building blocks of grids and more complex structures. Monomers are introduced onto and allowed to adhere or bond to an interface. The connector groups of adjacent adhered monomers are then polymerized with each other to form a regular grid in two dimensions above the interface. Modules that are not bound or adhered to the interface are removed prior to reaction of the connector groups to avoid undesired three-dimensional cross-linking and the formation of non-grid structures. Grids formed by the methods of this invention are useful in a variety of applications, including among others, for separations technology, as masks for forming regular surface structures (i.e., metal deposition) and as templates for three-dimensional molecular-sized structures.

  18. Method of assembly of molecular-sized nets and scaffolding

    DOEpatents

    Michl, J.; Magnera, T.F.; David, D.E.; Harrison, R.M.

    1999-03-02

    The present invention relates to methods and starting materials for forming molecular-sized grids or nets, or other structures based on such grids and nets, by creating molecular links between elementary molecular modules constrained to move in only two directions on an interface or surface by adhesion or bonding to that interface or surface. In the methods of this invention, monomers are employed as the building blocks of grids and more complex structures. Monomers are introduced onto and allowed to adhere or bond to an interface. The connector groups of adjacent adhered monomers are then polymerized with each other to form a regular grid in two dimensions above the interface. Modules that are not bound or adhered to the interface are removed prior to reaction of the connector groups to avoid undesired three-dimensional cross-linking and the formation of non-grid structures. Grids formed by the methods of this invention are useful in a variety of applications, including among others, for separations technology, as masks for forming regular surface structures (i.e., metal deposition) and as templates for three-dimensional molecular-sized structures. 9 figs.

  19. ADVANCED HEAT EXCHANGERS USING TUNABLE NANOSCALE-MOLECULAR ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect

    Kwang J. Kim; Thomas W. Bell; Srinivas Vemuri; Sailaja Govindaraju

    2004-01-01

    Steam condensation heat transfer on smooth horizontal tubes and enhanced tubes (TURBO-CDI and TURBO-CSL) along with nanoscale hydrophobic coated tubes was studied experimentally. Hydrophobic coatings have been created through self-assembled mono layers (SAMs) on copper alloy (99.9% Cu, 0.1% P) surfaces to enhance steam condensation through dropwise condensation. In general, a SAM system with a long-chain, hydrophobic group is nano-resistant, meaning that such a system forms a protective hydrophobic layer with negligible heat transfer resistance but a much stronger bond. When compared to complete filmwise condensation, the SAM coating on a plain tube increased the condensation heat transfer rate by a factor of 3 for copper alloy surfaces, under vacuum pressure (33.86 kPa) and by a factor of about 8 times when operated at atmospheric pressure (101 kPa). Lifetime of maintaining dropwise condensation is greatly dependent on the processing conditions.

  20. Chemical vapor deposition graphene as structural template to control interfacial molecular orientation of chloroaluminium phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying Mao, Hong; Wang, Rui; Wang, Yu; Chao Niu, Tian; Qiang Zhong, Jian; Yang Huang, Ming; Chen Qi, Dong; Ping Loh, Kian; Thye Shen Wee, Andrew; Chen, Wei

    2011-08-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene has been used as an effective structural template to manipulate molecular orientation of organic thin film of chloroaluminium phthalocyanine (ClAlPc) on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode. As revealed by in-situ near-edge x-ray adsorption fine structure measurement, ClAlPc molecules on the CVD graphene modified ITO electrode adopt a well-aligned lying-down configuration with their molecular π-plane nearly parallel to the electrode surface, in contrast to the random orientation of ClAlPc molecules on the bare ITO electrode. This lying-down configuration results in an optimized stacking of the molecular π-plane perpendicular to the electrode surface and hence facilitates efficient charge transport along this direction.

  1. Self-assembled molecular films incorporating a ligand

    DOEpatents

    Bednarski, Mark D.; Wilson, Troy E.; Mastandra, Mark S.

    1996-01-01

    Functionalized monomers are presented which can be used in the fabrication of molecular films for controlling adhesion, detection of receptor-ligand binding and enzymatic reactions; new coatings for lithography; and for semiconductor materials. The monomers are a combination of a ligand, a linker, optionally including a polymerizable group, and a surface attachment group. The processes and an apparatus for making films from these monomers, as well as methods of using the films are also provided.

  2. Self-assembled molecular films incorporating a ligand

    DOEpatents

    Bednarski, M.D.; Wilson, T.E.; Mastandra, M.S.

    1996-04-23

    Functionalized monomers are presented which can be used in the fabrication of molecular films for controlling adhesion, detection of receptor-ligand binding and enzymatic reactions; new coatings for lithography; and for semiconductor materials. The monomers are a combination of a ligand, a linker, optionally including a polymerizable group, and a surface attachment group. The processes and an apparatus for making films from these monomers, as well as methods of using the films are also provided. 7 figs.

  3. Directed Self-Assembly of Micron-Sized Gold Nanoplatelets into Oriented Flexible Stacks with Tunable Interplate Distance.

    PubMed

    Vutukuri, Hanumantha Rao; Badaire, Stéphane; de Winter, D A Matthijs; Imhof, Arnout; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2015-08-12

    A growing demand for control over the interparticle spacing and the orientation of anisotropic metallic particles into self-assembled structures is fuelled by their use in potential applications such as in plasmonics, catalysis, sensing, and optoelectronics. Here, we present an improved high yield synthesis method to fabricate micron- and submicron-sized gold nanoplatelets with a thickness less than 20 nm using silver nanoplatelets as seeds. By tuning the depth of the secondary minimum in the DLVO interaction potential between these particles, we are able to assemble the platelets into dynamic and flexible stacks containing thousands of platelets arranged face-to-face with well-defined spacing. Moreover, we demonstrate that the length of the stacks, and the interplate distance can be controlled between tens and hundreds of nm with the ionic strength. We use a high frequency external electric field to control the orientation of the stacks and direct the stacks into highly organized 2D and 3D assemblies that strongly polarize light. PMID:26237212

  4. Following the nanostructural molecular orientation guidelines for sulfur versus thiophene units in small molecule photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Jin; Park, Chan Eon

    2016-03-31

    In bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaics, particularly those using small molecules, electron donor and/or electron acceptor materials form a distributed network in the photoactive layer where critical photo-physical processes occur. Extensive research has recently focused on the importance of sulfur atoms in the small molecules. Little is known about the three-dimensional orientation of these sulfur atom-containing molecules. Herein, we report on our research concerning the heterojunction textures of the crystalline molecular orientation of small compounds having sulfur-containing units in the side chains, specifically, compounds known as that contain the alkylthio group and that does not. The improved performance of the -based devices, particularly in the photocurrent and the fill factor, was attributed to the large population of donor compound crystallites with a favorable face-on orientation along the perpendicular direction. This orientation resulted in efficient charge transport and a reduction in charge recombination. These findings underscore the great potential of small-molecule solar cells and suggest that even higher efficiencies can be achieved through materials development and molecular orientation control. PMID:26987868

  5. A Molecular Toolkit to Visualize Native Protein Assemblies in the Context of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Brian L.; Winton, Carly E.; Demmert, Andrew C.; Tanner, Justin R.; Bowman, Sam; Karageorge, Vasilea; Patel, Kaya; Sheng, Zhi; Kelly, Deborah F.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new molecular toolkit to investigate protein assemblies natively formed in the context of human disease. The system employs tunable microchips that can be decorated with switchable adaptor molecules to select for target proteins of interest and analyze them using molecular microscopy. Implementing our new streamlined microchip approach, we could directly visualize BRCA1 gene regulatory complexes from patient-derived cancer cells for the first time. PMID:26395823

  6. Directed nanoscale self-assembly of molecular wires interconnecting nodal points using Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Boscoboinik, A. M.; Manzi, S. J.; Tysoe, W. T.; Pereyra, V. D.; Boscoboinik, J. A.

    2015-09-10

    The influence of directing agents in the self-assembly of molecular wires to produce two-dimensional electronic nanoarchitectures is studied here using a Monte Carlo approach to simulate the effect of arbitrarily locating nodal points on a surface, from which the growth of self-assembled molecular wires can be nucleated. This is compared to experimental results reported for the self-assembly of molecular wires when 1,4-phenylenediisocyanide (PDI) is adsorbed on Au(111). The latter results in the formation of (Au-PDI)n organometallic chains, which were shown to be conductive when linked between gold nanoparticles on an insulating substrate. The present study analyzes, by means of stochastic methods, the influence of variables that affect the growth and design of self-assembled conductive nanoarchitectures, such as the distance between nodes, coverage of the monomeric units that leads to the formation of the desired architectures, and the interaction between the monomeric units. As a result, this study proposes an approach and sets the stage for the production of complex 2D nanoarchitectures using a bottom-up strategy but including the use of current state-of-the-art top-down technology as an integral part of the self-assembly strategy.

  7. Organization of Inorganic Nanomaterials via Programmable DNA Self-Assembly and Peptide Molecular Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Joshua D.; LaBean, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    An interesting alternative to top-down nanofabrication is to imitate biology, where nanoscale materials frequently integrate organic molecules for self-assembly and molecular recognition with ordered, inorganic minerals to achieve mechanical, sensory, or other advantageous functions. Using biological systems as inspiration, researchers have sought to mimic the nanoscale composite materials produced in nature. Here, we describe a combination of self-assembly, molecular recognition, and templating, relying on an oligonucleotide covalently conjugated to a high-affinity gold-binding peptide. After integration of the peptide-coupled DNA into a self-assembling superstructure, the templated peptides recognize and bind gold nanoparticles. In addition to providing new ways of building functional multi-nanoparticle systems, this work provides experimental proof that a single peptide molecule is sufficient for immobilization of a nanoparticle. This molecular construction strategy, combining DNA assembly and peptide recognition, can be thought of as programmable, granular, artificial biomineralization. We also describe the important observation that the addition of 1–2% Tween 20 surfactant to the solution during gold particle binding allows the gold nanoparticles to remain soluble within the magnesium containing DNA assembly buffer under conditions that usually lead to the aggregation and precipitation of the nanoparticles. PMID:21314176

  8. Directed nanoscale self-assembly of molecular wires interconnecting nodal points using Monte Carlo simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boscoboinik, A. M.; Manzi, S. J.; Tysoe, W. T.; Pereyra, V. D.; Boscoboinik, J. A.

    2015-09-10

    The influence of directing agents in the self-assembly of molecular wires to produce two-dimensional electronic nanoarchitectures is studied here using a Monte Carlo approach to simulate the effect of arbitrarily locating nodal points on a surface, from which the growth of self-assembled molecular wires can be nucleated. This is compared to experimental results reported for the self-assembly of molecular wires when 1,4-phenylenediisocyanide (PDI) is adsorbed on Au(111). The latter results in the formation of (Au-PDI)n organometallic chains, which were shown to be conductive when linked between gold nanoparticles on an insulating substrate. The present study analyzes, by means of stochasticmore » methods, the influence of variables that affect the growth and design of self-assembled conductive nanoarchitectures, such as the distance between nodes, coverage of the monomeric units that leads to the formation of the desired architectures, and the interaction between the monomeric units. As a result, this study proposes an approach and sets the stage for the production of complex 2D nanoarchitectures using a bottom-up strategy but including the use of current state-of-the-art top-down technology as an integral part of the self-assembly strategy.« less

  9. Molecular Architecture and Assembly of the Eukaryotic Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Tomko, Robert J.; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome system is responsible for most cellular quality-control and regulatory protein degradation. Its substrates, which are usually modified by polymers of ubiquitin, are ultimately degraded by the 26S proteasome. This 2.6 MDa protein complex is separated into a barrel-shaped proteolytic 20S core particle (CP) of 28 subunits capped on one or both ends by a 19S regulatory particle (RP) comprising at least 19 subunits. The RP coordinates substrate recognition, removal of substrate polyubiquitin chains, and substrate unfolding and translocation into the CP for degradation. While many atomic structures of the CP have been determined, the RP has resisted high-resolution analysis. Recently, however, a combination of cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), biochemical analysis, and crystal structure determination of several RP subunits has yielded a near-atomic resolution view of much of the complex. Major new insights into chaperone-assisted proteasome assembly have also recently been made. Here we review these novel findings. PMID:23495936

  10. Sample handling for kinetics and molecular assembly in flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sklar, L.A. |; Seamer, L.C.; Kuckuck, F.; Prossnitz, E.; Edwards, B.; Posner, G.

    1998-07-01

    Flow cytometry discriminates particle associated fluorescence from the fluorescence of the surrounding medium. It permits assemblies of macromolecular complexes on beads or cells to be detected in real-time with precision and specificity. The authors have investigated two types of robust sample handling systems which provide sub-second resolution and high throughput: (1) mixers which use stepper-motor driven syringes to initiate chemical reactions in msec time frames; and (2) flow injection controllers with valves and automated syringes used in chemical process control. In the former system, the authors used fast valves to overcome the disparity between mixing 100 {micro}ls of sample in 100 msecs and delivering sample to a flow cytometer at 1 {micro}l/sec. Particles were detected within 100 msec after mixing, but turbulence was created which lasted for 1 sec after injection of the sample into the flow cytometer. They used optical criteria to discriminate particles which were out of alignment due to the turbulent flow. Complex sample handling protocols involving multiple mixing steps and sample dilution have also been achieved. With the latter system they were able to automate sample handling and delivery with intervals of a few seconds. The authors used a fluidic approach to defeat turbulence caused by sample introduction. By controlling both sheath and sample with individual syringes, the period of turbulence was reduced to {approximately} 200 msecs. Automated sample handling and sub-second resolution should permit broad analytical and diagnostic applications of flow cytometry.

  11. Precise Characterisation of Molecular Orientation in a Single Crystal Field-Effect Transistor Using Polarised Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wood, Sebastian; Rigas, Grigorios-Panagiotis; Zoladek-Lemanczyk, Alina; Blakesley, James C; Georgakopoulos, Stamatis; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Shkunov, Maxim; Castro, Fernando A

    2016-01-01

    Charge transport in organic semiconductors is strongly dependent on the molecular orientation and packing, such that manipulation of this molecular packing is a proven technique for enhancing the charge mobility in organic transistors. However, quantitative measurements of molecular orientation in micrometre-scale structures are experimentally challenging. Several research groups have suggested polarised Raman spectroscopy as a suitable technique for these measurements and have been able to partially characterise molecular orientations using one or two orientation parameters. Here we demonstrate a new approach that allows quantitative measurements of molecular orientations in terms of three parameters, offering the complete characterisation of a three-dimensional orientation. We apply this new method to organic semiconductor molecules in a single crystal field-effect transistor in order to correlate the measured orientation with charge carrier mobility measurements. This approach offers the opportunity for micrometre resolution (diffraction limited) spatial mapping of molecular orientation using bench-top apparatus, enabling a rational approach towards controlling this orientation to achieve optimum device performance. PMID:27619423

  12. Molecular-Orientation-Induced Rapid Roughening and Morphology Transition in Organic Semiconductor Thin-Film Growth

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junliang; Yim, Sanggyu; Jones, Tim S.

    2015-01-01

    We study the roughening process and morphology transition of organic semiconductor thin film induced by molecular orientation in the model of molecular semiconductor copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine (F16CuPc) using both experiment and simulation. The growth behaviour of F16CuPc thin film with the thickness, D, on SiO2 substrate takes on two processes divided by a critical thickness: (1) D ≤ 40 nm, F16CuPc thin films are composed of uniform caterpillar-like crystals. The kinetic roughening is confirmed during this growth, which is successfully analyzed by Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) model with scaling exponents α = 0.71 ± 0.12, β = 0.36 ± 0.03, and 1/z = 0.39 ± 0.12; (2) D > 40 nm, nanobelt crystals are formed gradually on the caterpillar-like crystal surface and the film growth shows anomalous growth behaviour. These new growth behaviours with two processes result from the gradual change of molecular orientation and the formation of grain boundaries, which conversely induce new molecular orientation, rapid roughening process, and the formation of nanobelt crystals. PMID:25801646

  13. Self-Assembly of One-Dimensional Nanocrystal Superlattice Chains Mediated by Molecular Clusters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianfeng; Lv, Longfei; Ji, Li; Guo, Guannan; Liu, Limin; Han, Dandan; Wang, Biwei; Tu, Yaqi; Hu, Jianhua; Yang, Dong; Dong, Angang

    2016-03-16

    Self-assembly of nanocrystal (NC) building blocks into mesoscopic superstructures with well-defined symmetry and geometry is essential for creating new materials with rationally designed properties. Despite the tremendous progress in colloidal assembly, it remains a fundamental challenge to assemble isotropic spherical NCs into one-dimensional (1D) ordered superstructures. Here, we report a new and general methodology that utilizes molecular clusters to induce the anisotropic assembly of NCs in solution, yielding polymer-like, single-NC-wide linear chains comprising as many as ∼1000 close-packed NCs. This cluster-assisted assembly process is applicable to various metallic, semiconductor, and magnetic NCs of different sizes and shapes. Mechanistic investigation reveals that the solvent-induced association of clusters plays a key role in driving the anisotropic assembly of NCs. Our work opens a solution-based route for linearly assembling NCs and represents an important step toward the bottom-up construction of 1D ordered NC superstructures. PMID:26936281

  14. Molecular Recognition: Use of Metal-Containing Molecular Clefts for Supramolecular Self-Assembly and Host-Guest Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, James D.; Bosnich, Brice

    2008-10-03

    Molecular clefts consisting of a rigid spacer linked to two parallel cofacially disposed terpy-M-X (M = Pd{sup 2+}, Pt{sup 2+}) units, which can vary in separation from 6.6 to 7.2 {angstrom}, have been used as molecular receptors and for self-assembly with linear and triangular linkers to produce rectangles and trigonal prisms, respectively. Aromatic molecules form multiple host-guest adducts with the molecular cleft receptors and with the rectangles and trigonal prisms. Planar complexes of Pt{sup 2+} also form host-guest adducts. The forces that control this molecular recognition, namely, {pi}-{pi} interactions, charge-induced dipole interactions, charge-charge forces, weak metal-metal interactions and solvation effects, are discussed and assigned to the various adducts.

  15. Critical CuI buffer layer surface density for organic molecular crystal orientation change

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Kwangseok; Kim, Jong Beom; Lee, Dong Ryeol; Kim, Hyo Jung; Lee, Hyun Hwi

    2015-01-21

    We have determined the critical surface density of the CuI buffer layer inserted to change the preferred orientation of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) crystals grown on the buffer layer. X-ray reflectivity measurements were performed to obtain the density profiles of the buffer layers and out-of-plane and 2D grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction measurements were performed to determine the preferred orientations of the molecular crystals. Remarkably, it was found that the preferred orientation of the CuPc film is completely changed from edge-on (1 0 0) to face-on (1 1 −2) by a CuI buffer layer with a very low surface density, so low that a large proportion of the substrate surface is bare.

  16. Anisotropic Molecular Orientation of Poly [4, 4'-oxydiphenylene- 1, 2, 3, 4-cyclobutanetetracarboximide] Films Irradiated by Linearly Polarized UV Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Kenji; Usami, Kiyoaki; Araya, Takeshi; Ushioda, Sukekatsu

    1999-12-01

    We have investigated the anisotropic molecular orientation of poly [4, 4'-oxydiphenylene-1, 2, 3, 4-cyclobutanetetracarboximide] (CBDA-ODA) films induced by irradiation with linearly polarized ultraviolet light (LPUVL). The molecular orientation was monitored by measuring the polarized infrared (IR) absorption spectra of a 10-nm-thick film. The anisotropy of the molecular orientation exceeded that of a rubbed film with the same film thickness. From the LPUVL exposure dependence of IR absorption we found that preferential cleavage occurs to the cyclobutane ring in the polyimide backbone structure oriented parallel to the polarization direction of LPUVL. Then the orientation of the cleaved polyimide molecule is randomized. We conclude that the large anisotropy of the LPUVL-exposed film is caused by the anisotropic cleavage of the cyclobutane rings and the orientational randomization of the cleaved polyimide molecules.

  17. Dynamics of Molecular Orientation Observed Using Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy during Deposition of Pentacene on Graphite.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Han; Kwon, Soonnam

    2016-04-19

    A real-time method to observe both the structural and the electronic configuration of an organic molecule during deposition is reported for the model system of pentacene on graphite. Structural phase transition of the thin films as a function of coverage is monitored by using in situ angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) results to observe the change of the electronic configuration at the same time. A photoemission theory that uses independent atomic center approximations is introduced to identify the molecular orientation from the ARPES technique. This study provides a practical insight into interpreting ARPES data regarding dynamic changes of molecular orientation during initial growth of molecules on a well-defined surface. PMID:26999332

  18. Self-assembly of intramolecular charge-transfer compounds into functional molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongjun; Liu, Taifeng; Liu, Huibiao; Tian, Mao-Zhong; Li, Yuliang

    2014-04-15

    Highly polarized compounds exhibiting intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) are used widely as nonlinear optical (NLO) materials and red emitters and in organic light emitting diodes. Low-molecular-weight donor/acceptor (D/A)-substituted ICT compounds are ideal candidates for use as the building blocks of hierarchically structured, multifunctional self-assembled supramolecular systems. This Account describes our recent studies into the development of functional molecular systems with well-defined self-assembled structures based on charge-transfer (CT) interactions. From solution (sensors) to the solid state (assembled structures), we have fully utilized intrinsic and stimulus-induced CT interactions to construct these functional molecular systems. We have designed some organic molecules capable of ICT, with diversity and tailorability, that can be used to develop novel self-assembled materials. These ICT organic molecules are based on a variety of simple structures such as perylene bisimide, benzothiadiazole, tetracyanobutadiene, fluorenone, isoxazolone, BODIPY, and their derivatives. The degree of ICT is influenced by the nature of both the bridge and the substituents. We have developed new methods to synthesize ICT compounds through the introduction of heterocycles or heteroatoms to the π-conjugated systems or through extending the conjugation of diverse aromatic systems via another aromatic ring. Combining these ICT compounds featuring different D/A units and different degrees of conjugation with phase transfer methodologies and solvent-vapor techniques, we have self-assembled various organic nanostructures, including hollow nanospheres, wires, tubes, and ribbonlike architectures, with controllable morphologies and sizes. For example, we obtained a noncentrosymmetric microfiber structure that possessed a permanent dipole along its fibers' long axis and a transition dipole perpendicular to it; the independent NLO responses of this material can be separated and

  19. Rational peptide design for functional materials via molecular self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Karthikan

    Supra-molecular self-assembly of rationally designed peptides is a promising approach to construct functional materials. This thesis specifically focuses on hydrogels, an important class of materials with potential for applications in tissue engineering, drug delivery and micro-fluidic systems. The objective is to design short peptides that would specifically adopt a stimulus dependent conformation that is strongly amenable to self-assembly resulting in material formation. With this concept the rational design of a 20 amino acid peptide (MAX1) that folds into an amphiphilic beta-hairpin structure and then self-assembles to form a rigid hydrogel under alkaline conditions is presented. The molecular level conformation of MAX1 was characterized using circular dichroism and FTIR spectroscopies. The mesoscale structure of the hydrogel assessed using confocal and transmission electron micron microscopies and neutron scattering techniques shows that peptide self-assembly results in the formation of fibrils that are homogeneously 3 nm in diameter. The mechanical properties of the hydrogel probed using oscillatory rheology shows that MAX1 forms a stiff hydrogel. Since the self-assembly process is coupled to the intra-molecularly folded state of the peptide, stimulus responsiveness can be specifically engineered into the sequence by rational design. This was demonstrated in the design of peptides that form hydrogels in response to a specific stimulus such as temperature, pH or ionic strength. The significance of peptide design in the context of self-assembly and its relationship to the nanostructure was studied by designing a series of peptides derived from MAX1. Evolving from these studies is an understanding of the relationship between molecular level peptide structure and the nanoscale supra-molecular morphology. Based on this, it has been shown that alternate morphologies distinct from those observed with the gel forming peptides, such as non-twisting laminates or tube

  20. Molecular assemblies and membrane domains in multivesicular endosome dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Falguieres, Thomas; Luyet, Pierre-Philippe; Gruenberg, Jean

    2009-05-15

    Along the degradation pathway, endosomes exhibit a characteristic multivesicular organization, resulting from the budding of vesicles into the endosomal lumen. After endocytosis and transport to early endosomes, activated signaling receptors are incorporated into these intralumenal vesicles through the action of the ESCRT machinery, a process that contributes to terminate signaling. Then, the vesicles and their protein cargo are further transported towards lysosomes for degradation. Evidence also shows that intralumenal vesicles can undergo 'back-fusion' with the late endosome limiting membrane, a route exploited by some pathogens and presumably followed by proteins and lipids that need to be recycled from within the endosomal lumen. This process depends on the late endosomal lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid and its putative effector Alix/AIP1, and is presumably coupled to the invagination of the endosomal limiting membrane at the molecular level via ESCRT proteins. In this review, we discuss the intra-endosomal transport routes in mammalian cells, and in particular the different mechanisms involved in membrane invagination, vesicle formation and fusion in a space inaccessible to proteins known to control intracellular membrane traffic.

  1. Molecular assemblies and membrane domains in multivesicular endosome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Falguières, Thomas; Luyet, Pierre-Philippe; Gruenberg, Jean

    2009-05-15

    Along the degradation pathway, endosomes exhibit a characteristic multivesicular organization, resulting from the budding of vesicles into the endosomal lumen. After endocytosis and transport to early endosomes, activated signaling receptors are incorporated into these intralumenal vesicles through the action of the ESCRT machinery, a process that contributes to terminate signaling. Then, the vesicles and their protein cargo are further transported towards lysosomes for degradation. Evidence also shows that intralumenal vesicles can undergo "back-fusion" with the late endosome limiting membrane, a route exploited by some pathogens and presumably followed by proteins and lipids that need to be recycled from within the endosomal lumen. This process depends on the late endosomal lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid and its putative effector Alix/AIP1, and is presumably coupled to the invagination of the endosomal limiting membrane at the molecular level via ESCRT proteins. In this review, we discuss the intra-endosomal transport routes in mammalian cells, and in particular the different mechanisms involved in membrane invagination, vesicle formation and fusion in a space inaccessible to proteins known to control intracellular membrane traffic. PMID:19133258

  2. Controlling Nanostructures by Templated Templates: Inheriting Molecular Orientation in Binary Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Tobias; Witte, Gregor

    2015-09-16

    Precise preparation strategies are required to fabricate molecular nanostructures of specific arrangement. In bottom-up approaches, where nanostructures are gradually formed by piecing together individual parts to the final structure, the self-ordering mechanisms of the involved structures are utilized. In order to achieve the desired structures regarding morphology, grain size, and orientation of the individual moieties, templates can be applied, which influence the formation process of subsequent structures. However, this strategy is of limited use for complex architectures because the templates only influence the structure formation at the interface between the template and the first compound. Here, we discuss the implementation of so-called templated templates and analyze to what extent orientations of the initial layers are inherited in the top layers of another compound to enable structural control in binary heterostructures. For that purpose, we prepared crystalline templates of the organic semiconductors pentacene and perfluoropentacene in different exclusive orientations. We observe that for templates of both individual materials the molecular orientation is inherited in the top layers of the respective counterpart. This behavior is also observed for various other molecules, indicating the robustness of this approach. PMID:26305339

  3. Photodissociation of laboratory oriented molecules: Revealing molecular frame properties of nonaxial recoil

    SciTech Connect

    Brom, Alrik J. van den; Rakitzis, T. Peter; Janssen, Maurice H.M.

    2004-12-15

    We report the photodissociation of laboratory oriented OCS molecules. A molecular beam of OCS molecules is hexapole state-selected and spatially oriented in the electric field of a velocity map imaging lens. The oriented OCS molecules are dissociated at 230 nm with the linear polarization set at 45 deg. to the orientation direction of the OCS molecules. The CO({nu}=0,J) photofragments are quantum state-selectively ionized by the same 230 nm pulse and the angular distribution is measured using the velocity map imaging technique. The observed CO({nu}=0,J) images are strongly asymmetric and the degree of asymmetry varies with the CO rotational state J. From the observed asymmetry in the laboratory frame we can directly extract the molecular frame angles between the final photofragment recoil velocity and the permanent dipole moment and the transition dipole moment. The data for CO fragments with high rotational excitation reveal that the dissociation dynamics is highly nonaxial, even though conventional wisdom suggests that the nearly limiting {beta} parameter results from fast axial recoil dynamics. From our data we can extract the relative contribution of parallel and perpendicular transitions at 230 nm excitation.

  4. High-Throughput Analysis of Molecular Orientation on Surfaces by NEXAFS Imaging of Curved Sample Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Baio, Joe E.; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A.; Weidner, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy provides detailed information about the orientation and alignment of thin films. NEXAFS is a synchrotron-based technique—the availability of beam-time per user is typically limited to no more than a few weeks per year. The limited availability is currently a true barrier for using NEXAFS in combinatorial studies of molecular alignment. We have recently demonstrated how large area full field NEXAFS imaging allows users to pursue combinatorial studies of surface chemistry. Now we report an extension of this approach which allows the acquisition of orientation information from a single NEXAFS image. An array with 80 elements (samples), containing eight series of different surface modifications, was mounted on a curved substrate allowing the collection of NEXAFS spectra with a range of orientations with respect to the X-ray beam. Images collected from this array show how hyperspectral NEXAFS data collected from curved surfaces can be used for high-throughput molecular orientation analysis. PMID:25046426

  5. Extended orientational correlation study for molecular liquids containing distorted tetrahedral molecules: application to methylene halides.

    PubMed

    Pothoczki, Szilvia; Temleitner, László; Pusztai, László

    2010-04-28

    The method of Rey [Rey, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 164506 (2007)] for describing how molecules orient toward each other in systems with perfect tetrahedral molecules is extended to the case of distorted tetrahedral molecules of c(2v) symmetry by means of introducing 28 subgroups. Additionally, the original analysis developed for perfect tetrahedral molecules, based on six groups, is adapted for molecules with imperfect tetrahedral shape. Deriving orientational correlation functions have been complemented with detailed analyses of dipole-dipole correlations. This way, (up to now) the most complete structure determination can be carried out for such molecular systems. In the present work, these calculations have been applied for particle configurations resulting from reverse Monte Carlo computer modeling. These particle arrangements are fully consistent with structure factors from neutron and x-ray diffraction measurements. Here we present a complex structural study for methylene halide (chloride, bromide, and iodide) molecular liquids, as possibly the best representative examples. It has been found that the most frequent orientations of molecules are of the 2:2 type over the entire distance range in these liquids. Focusing on the short range orientation, neighboring molecules turn toward each other with there "H,Y"-"H,Y" (Y: Cl, Br, I) edges, apart from CH(2)Cl(2) where the H,H-H,Cl arrangement is the most frequent. In general, the structure of methylene chloride appears to be different from the structure of the other two liquids. PMID:20441292

  6. Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of GaAs on (631) Oriented Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz Hernandez, Esteban; Rojas Ramirez, Juan-Salvador; Contreras Hernandez, Rocio; Lopez Lopez, Maximo; Pulzara Mora, Alvaro; Mendez Garcia, Victor H.

    2007-02-09

    In this work, we report the study of the homoepitaxial growth of GaAs on (631) oriented substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). We observed the spontaneous formation of a high density of large scale features on the surface. The hilly like features are elongated towards the [-5, 9, 3] direction. We show the dependence of these structures with the growth conditions and we present the possibility of to create quantum wires structures on this surface.

  7. Mapping molecular orientational distributions for biological sample in 3D (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HE, Wei; Ferrand, Patrick; Richter, Benjamin; Bastmeyer, Martin; Brasselet, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    Measuring molecular orientation properties is very appealing for scientists in molecular and cell biology, as well as biomedical research. Orientational organization at the molecular scale is indeed an important brick to cells and tissues morphology, mechanics, functions and pathologies. Recent work has shown that polarized fluorescence imaging, based on excitation polarization tuning in the sample plane, is able to probe molecular orientational order in biological samples; however this applies only to information in 2D, projected in the sample plane. To surpass this limitation, we extended this approach to excitation polarization tuning in 3D. The principle is based on the decomposition of any arbitrary 3D linear excitation in a polarization along the longitudinal z-axis, and a polarization in the transverse xy-sample plane. We designed an interferometer with one arm generating radial polarization light (thus producing longitudinal polarization under high numerical aperture focusing), the other arm controlling a linear polarization in the transverse plane. The amplitude ratio between the two arms can vary so as to get any linear polarized excitation in 3D at the focus of a high NA objective. This technique has been characterized by polarimetry imaging at the back focal plane of the focusing objective, and modeled theoretically. 3D polarized fluorescence microscopy is demonstrated on actin stress fibers in non-flat cells suspended on synthetic polymer structures forming supporting pillars, for which heterogeneous actin orientational order could be identified. This technique shows a great potential in structural investigations in 3D biological systems, such as cell spheroids and tissues.

  8. Monte Carlo study of the molecular mechanisms of surface-layer protein self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Horejs, Christine; Mitra, Mithun K; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2011-03-28

    The molecular mechanisms guiding the self-assembly of proteins into functional or pathogenic large-scale structures can be only understood by studying the correlation between the structural details of the monomer and the eventual mesoscopic morphologies. Among the myriad structural details of protein monomers and their manifestations in the self-assembled morphologies, we seek to identify the most crucial set of structural features necessary for the spontaneous selection of desired morphologies. Using a combination of the structural information and a Monte Carlo method with a coarse-grained model, we have studied the functional protein self-assembly into S(surface)-layers, which constitute the crystallized outer most cell envelope of a great variety of bacterial cells. We discover that only few and mainly hydrophobic amino acids, located on the surface of the monomer, are responsible for the formation of a highly ordered anisotropic protein lattice. The coarse-grained model presented here reproduces accurately many experimentally observed features including the pore formation, chemical description of the pore structure, location of specific amino acid residues at the protein-protein interfaces, and surface accessibility of specific amino acid residues. In addition to elucidating the molecular mechanisms and explaining experimental findings in the S-layer assembly, the present work offers a tool, which is chemical enough to capture details of primary sequences and coarse-grained enough to explore morphological structures with thousands of protein monomers, to promulgate design rules for spontaneous formation of specific protein assemblies. PMID:21456703

  9. Monte Carlo study of the molecular mechanisms of surface-layer protein self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horejs, Christine; Mitra, Mithun K.; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2011-03-01

    The molecular mechanisms guiding the self-assembly of proteins into functional or pathogenic large-scale structures can be only understood by studying the correlation between the structural details of the monomer and the eventual mesoscopic morphologies. Among the myriad structural details of protein monomers and their manifestations in the self-assembled morphologies, we seek to identify the most crucial set of structural features necessary for the spontaneous selection of desired morphologies. Using a combination of the structural information and a Monte Carlo method with a coarse-grained model, we have studied the functional protein self-assembly into S(surface)-layers, which constitute the crystallized outer most cell envelope of a great variety of bacterial cells. We discover that only few and mainly hydrophobic amino acids, located on the surface of the monomer, are responsible for the formation of a highly ordered anisotropic protein lattice. The coarse-grained model presented here reproduces accurately many experimentally observed features including the pore formation, chemical description of the pore structure, location of specific amino acid residues at the protein-protein interfaces, and surface accessibility of specific amino acid residues. In addition to elucidating the molecular mechanisms and explaining experimental findings in the S-layer assembly, the present work offers a tool, which is chemical enough to capture details of primary sequences and coarse-grained enough to explore morphological structures with thousands of protein monomers, to promulgate design rules for spontaneous formation of specific protein assemblies.

  10. Subtle balance of tropoelastin molecular shape and flexibility regulates dynamics and hierarchical assembly.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Giselle C; Tarakanova, Anna; Baldock, Clair; Wise, Steven G; Buehler, Markus J; Weiss, Anthony S

    2016-02-01

    The assembly of the tropoelastin monomer into elastin is vital for conferring elasticity on blood vessels, skin, and lungs. Tropoelastin has dual needs for flexibility and structure in self-assembly. We explore the structure-dynamics-function interplay, consider the duality of molecular order and disorder, and identify equally significant functional contributions by local and global structures. To study these organizational stratifications, we perturb a key hinge region by expressing an exon that is universally spliced out in human tropoelastins. We find a herniated nanostructure with a displaced C terminus and explain by molecular modeling that flexible helices are replaced with substantial β sheets. We see atypical higher-order cross-linking and inefficient assembly into discontinuous, thick elastic fibers. We explain this dysfunction by correlating local and global structural effects with changes in the molecule's assembly dynamics. This work has general implications for our understanding of elastomeric proteins, which balance disordered regions with defined structural modules at multiple scales for functional assembly. PMID:26998516

  11. Subtle balance of tropoelastin molecular shape and flexibility regulates dynamics and hierarchical assembly

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Giselle C.; Tarakanova, Anna; Baldock, Clair; Wise, Steven G.; Buehler, Markus J.; Weiss, Anthony S.

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of the tropoelastin monomer into elastin is vital for conferring elasticity on blood vessels, skin, and lungs. Tropoelastin has dual needs for flexibility and structure in self-assembly. We explore the structure-dynamics-function interplay, consider the duality of molecular order and disorder, and identify equally significant functional contributions by local and global structures. To study these organizational stratifications, we perturb a key hinge region by expressing an exon that is universally spliced out in human tropoelastins. We find a herniated nanostructure with a displaced C terminus and explain by molecular modeling that flexible helices are replaced with substantial β sheets. We see atypical higher-order cross-linking and inefficient assembly into discontinuous, thick elastic fibers. We explain this dysfunction by correlating local and global structural effects with changes in the molecule’s assembly dynamics. This work has general implications for our understanding of elastomeric proteins, which balance disordered regions with defined structural modules at multiple scales for functional assembly. PMID:26998516

  12. Understanding Molecular Interactions within Chemically Selective Layered Polymer Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Gary J. Blanchard

    2009-06-30

    This work focuses on two broad issues. These are (1) the molecular origin of the chemical selectivity achieved with ultrathin polymer multilayers, and (2) how the viscoelastic properties of the polymer layers are affected by exposure to solvent and analytes. These issues are inter-related, and to understand them we need to design experiments that probe both the energetic and kinetic aspects of interfacial adsorption processes. This project focuses on controling the chemical structure, thickness, morphology and sequential ordering of polymer layers bound to interfaces using maleimide-vinyl ether and closely related alternating copolymerization chemistry and efficient covalent cross-linking reactions that allow for layer-by-layer polymer deposition. This chemistry has been developed during the funding cycle of this Grant. We have measure the equilibrium constants for interactions between specific layers within the polymer interfaces and size-controlled, surface-functionalized gold nanoparticles. The ability to control both size and functionality of gold nanoparticle model analytes allows us to evaluate the average “pore size” that characterizes our polymer films. We have measured the “bulk” viscosity and shear modulus of the ultrathin polymer films as a function of solvent overlayer identity using quartz crystal microbalance complex impedance measurements. We have measured microscopic viscosity at specific locations within the layered polymer interfaces with time-resolved fluorescence lifetime and depolarization techniques. We combine polymer, cross-linking and nanoparticle synthetic expertise with a host of characterization techniques, including QCM gravimetry and complex impedance analysis, steady state and time-resolved spectroscopies.

  13. Pre-Assembly of Near-Infrared Fluorescent Multivalent Molecular Probes for Biological Imaging.

    PubMed

    Peck, Evan M; Battles, Paul M; Rice, Douglas R; Roland, Felicia M; Norquest, Kathryn A; Smith, Bradley D

    2016-05-18

    A programmable pre-assembly method is described and shown to produce near-infrared fluorescent molecular probes with tunable multivalent binding properties. The modular assembly process threads one or two copies of a tetralactam macrocycle onto a fluorescent PEGylated squaraine scaffold containing a complementary number of docking stations. Appended to the macrocycle periphery are multiple copies of a ligand that is known to target a biomarker. The structure and high purity of each threaded complex was determined by independent spectrometric methods and also by gel electrophoresis. Especially helpful were diagnostic red-shift and energy transfer features in the absorption and fluorescence spectra. The threaded complexes were found to be effective multivalent molecular probes for fluorescence microscopy and in vivo fluorescence imaging of living subjects. Two multivalent probes were prepared and tested for targeting of bone in mice. A pre-assembled probe with 12 bone-targeting iminodiacetate ligands produced more bone accumulation than an analogous pre-assembled probe with six iminodiacetate ligands. Notably, there was no loss in probe fluorescence at the bone target site after 24 h in the living animal, indicating that the pre-assembled fluorescent probe maintained very high mechanical and chemical stability on the skeletal surface. The study shows how this versatile pre-assembly method can be used in a parallel combinatorial manner to produce libraries of near-infrared fluorescent multivalent molecular probes for different types of imaging and diagnostic applications, with incremental structural changes in the number of targeting groups, linker lengths, linker flexibility, and degree of PEGylation. PMID:27088305

  14. Designed self-assembly of molecular necklaces using host-stabilized charge-transfer interactions.

    PubMed

    Ko, Young Ho; Kim, Kyungpil; Kang, Jin-Koo; Chun, Hyungphil; Lee, Jae Wook; Sakamoto, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Fettinger, James C; Kim, Kimoon

    2004-02-25

    A novel approach to the noncovalent synthesis of molecular necklaces successfully led to the first quantitative self-assembly of a molecular necklace [6]MN, in which five small rings are threaded on a large ring, from 10 components. Our strategy involves the host-guest complex formation between the molecular host cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) and a guest molecule in which an electron donor and an electron acceptor unit are connected by a rigid linker with a proper angle, to form a cyclic oligomer through the host-stabilized intermolecular charge-transfer (CT) complex formation. In the structure of the molecular necklace [6]MN, five molecules of the guest form a cyclic framework by the intermolecular CT interactions, on which five CB[8] molecules are threaded with an arrangement reminiscent of a five-fold propeller. The molecular necklace measures approximately 3.7 nm in diameter and approximately 1.8 nm in thickness. PMID:14971915

  15. Synthetic Molecular Machines for Active Self-Assembly: Prototype Algorithms, Designs, and Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabby, Nadine L.

    Computer science and electrical engineering have been the great success story of the twentieth century. The neat modularity and mapping of a language onto circuits has led to robots on Mars, desktop computers and smartphones. But these devices are not yet able to do some of the things that life takes for granted: repair a scratch, reproduce, regenerate, or grow exponentially fast--all while remaining functional. This thesis explores and develops algorithms, molecular implementations, and theoretical proofs in the context of "active self-assembly" of molecular systems. The long-term vision of active self-assembly is the theoretical and physical implementation of materials that are composed of reconfigurable units with the programmability and adaptability of biology's numerous molecular machines. En route to this goal, we must first find a way to overcome the memory limitations of molecular systems, and to discover the limits of complexity that can be achieved with individual molecules. One of the main thrusts in molecular programming is to use computer science as a tool for figuring out what can be achieved. While molecular systems that are Turing-complete have been demonstrated [Winfree, 1996], these systems still cannot achieve some of the feats biology has achieved. One might think that because a system is Turing-complete, capable of computing "anything," that it can do any arbitrary task. But while it can simulate any digital computational problem, there are many behaviors that are not "computations" in a classical sense, and cannot be directly implemented. Examples include exponential growth and molecular motion relative to a surface. Passive self-assembly systems cannot implement these behaviors because (a) molecular motion relative to a surface requires a source of fuel that is external to the system, and (b) passive systems are too slow to assemble exponentially-fast-growing structures. We call these behaviors "energetically incomplete" programmable

  16. Manipulation of Self-Assembled Nanostructure Dimensions in Molecular Janus Particles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Luo, Jiancheng; Shan, Wenpeng; Guo, Dong; Wang, Jing; Hsu, Chih-Hao; Huang, Mingjun; Zhang, Wei; Lotz, Bernard; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Liu, Tianbo; Yue, Kan; Cheng, Stephen Z D

    2016-07-26

    The ability to manipulate self-assembly of molecular building blocks is the key to achieving precise "bottom-up" fabrications of desired nanostructures. Herein, we report a rational design, facile synthesis, and self-assembly of a series of molecular Janus particles (MJPs) constructed by chemically linking α-Keggin-type polyoxometalate (POM) nanoclusters with functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) cages. Diverse nanostructures were obtained by tuning secondary interactions among the building blocks and solvents via three factors: solvent polarity, surface functionality of POSS derivatives, and molecular topology. Self-assembled morphologies of KPOM-BPOSS (B denotes isobutyl groups) were found dependent on solvent polarity. In acetonitrile/water mixtures with a high dielectric constant, colloidal nanoparticles with nanophase-separated internal lamellar structures quickly formed, which gradually turned into one-dimensional nanobelt crystals upon aging, while stacked crystalline lamellae were dominantly observed in less polar methanol/chloroform solutions. When the crystallizable BPOSS was replaced with noncrystallizable cyclohexyl-functionalized CPOSS, the resulting KPOM-CPOSS also formed colloidal spheres; however, it failed to further evolve into crystalline nanobelt structures. In less polar solvents, KPOM-CPOSS crystallized into isolated two-dimensional nanosheets, which were composed of two inner crystalline layers of Keggin POM covered by two monolayers of amorphous CPOSS. In contrast, self-assembly of KPOM-2BPOSS was dominated by crystallization of the BPOSS cages, which was hardly sensitive to solvent polarity. The BPOSS cages formed the crystalline inner bilayer, sandwiched by two outer layers of Keggin POM clusters. These results illustrate a rational strategy to purposely fabricate self-assembled nanostructures with diverse dimensionality from MJPs with controlled molecular composition and topology. PMID:27337531

  17. Programmable concatenation of conductively linked gold nanorods using molecular assembly and femtosecond irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Jake; Flom, Steve; Naciri, Jawad; Ratna, Banahalli

    The ability to tune the resonant frequency in plasmonic nanostructures is fundamental to developing novel optical properties and ensuing materials. Recent theoretical insights show that the plasmon resonance can be exquisitely controlled through the conductive concatenation of plasmonic nanoparticles. Furthermore these charge transfer systems may mimic complex and hard to build nanostructures. Here we experimentally demonstrate a directed molecular assembly approach to controllably concatenate gold nanorods end to end into discrete linear structures, bridged with gold nanojunctions, using femtosecond laser light. By utilizing high throughput and nanometer resolution this approach offers a pragmatic assembly strategy for charge transfer plasmonic systems.

  18. Long-range orientational order, local-field anisotropy, and mean molecular polarizability in liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Aver'yanov, E. M.

    2009-01-15

    The problems on the relation of the mean effective molecular polarizability {gamma}-bar to the long-range orientational order of molecules (the optical anisotropy of the medium) in uniaxial and biaxial liquid crystals, the local anisotropy on mesoscopic scales, and the anisotropy of the Lorentz tensor L and the local-field tensor f are formulated and solved. It is demonstrated that the presence of the long-range orientational order of molecules in liquid crystals imposes limitations from below on the molecular polarizability {gamma}-bar, which differs for uniaxial and biaxial liquid crystals. The relation between the local anisotropy and the molecular polarizability {gamma}-bar is investigated for calamitic and discotic uniaxial liquid crystals consisting of lath- and disk-shaped molecules. These liquid crystals with identical macroscopic symmetry differ in the local anisotropy and the relationships between the components L{sub parallel} < L{sub perpendicular} , f{sub parallel} < f{sub perpendicular} (calamitic) and L{sub parallel} > L{sub perpendicular} , f{sub parallel} > f{sub perpendicular} (discotic) for an electric field oriented parallel and perpendicular to the director. The limitations from below and above on the molecular polarizability {gamma}-bar due to the anisotropy of the tensors L and f are established for liquid crystals of both types. These limitations indicate that the molecular polarizability {gamma}-bar depends on the phase state and the temperature. The factors responsible for the nonphysical consequences of the local-field models based on the approximation {gamma}-bar = const are revealed. The theoretical inferences are confirmed by the experimental data for a number of calamitic nematic liquid crystals with different values of birefringence and the discotic liquid crystal Col{sub ho}.

  19. Monitoring intermediate filament assembly by small-angle x-ray scattering reveals the molecular architecture of assembly intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Sokolova, Anna V.; Kreplak, Laurent; Wedig, Tatjana; Mücke, Norbert; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Herrmann, Harald; Aebi, Ueli; Strelkov, Sergei V.

    2006-01-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs), along with microtubules, microfilaments, and associated cross-bridging proteins, constitute the cytoskeleton of metazoan cells. While crystallographic data on the dimer representing the elementary IF “building block” have recently become available, little structural detail is known about both the mature IF architecture and its assembly pathway. Here, we have applied solution small-angle x-ray scattering to investigate the in vitro assembly of a 53-kDa human IF protein vimentin at pH 8.4 by systematically varying the ionic strength conditions, and complemented these experiments by electron microscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation. While a vimentin solution in 5 mM Tris·HCl (pH 8.4) contains predominantly tetramers, addition of 20 mM NaCl induces further lateral assembly evidenced by the shift of the sedimentation coeficient and yields a distinct octameric intermediate. Four octamers eventually associate into unit-length filaments (ULFs) that anneal longitudinally. Based on the small-angle x-ray scattering experiments supplemented by crystallographic data and additional structural constraints, 3D molecular models of the vimentin tetramer, octamer, and ULF were constructed. Within each of the three oligomers, the adjacent dimers are aligned exclusively in an approximately half-staggered antiparallel A11 mode with a distance of 3.2–3.4 nm between their axes. The ULF appears to be a dynamic and a relatively loosely packed structure with a roughly even mass distribution over its cross-section. PMID:17050693

  20. Molecular and electronic structure of osmium complexes confined to Au(111) surfaces using a self-assembled molecular bridge.

    PubMed

    de la Llave, Ezequiel; Herrera, Santiago E; Adam, Catherine; Méndez De Leo, Lucila P; Calvo, Ernesto J; Williams, Federico J

    2015-11-14

    The molecular and electronic structure of Os(II) complexes covalently bonded to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au(111) surfaces was studied by means of polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopies, scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. Attachment of the Os complex to the SAM proceeds via an amide covalent bond with the SAM alkyl chain 40° tilted with respect to the surface normal and a total thickness of 26 Å. The highest occupied molecular orbital of the Os complex is mainly based on the Os(II) center located 2.2 eV below the Fermi edge and the LUMO molecular orbital is mainly based on the bipyridine ligands located 1.5 eV above the Fermi edge. PMID:26567676

  1. Molecular and electronic structure of osmium complexes confined to Au(111) surfaces using a self-assembled molecular bridge

    SciTech Connect

    Llave, Ezequiel de la; Herrera, Santiago E.; Adam, Catherine; Méndez De Leo, Lucila P.; Calvo, Ernesto J.; Williams, Federico J.

    2015-11-14

    The molecular and electronic structure of Os(II) complexes covalently bonded to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au(111) surfaces was studied by means of polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopies, scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. Attachment of the Os complex to the SAM proceeds via an amide covalent bond with the SAM alkyl chain 40° tilted with respect to the surface normal and a total thickness of 26 Å. The highest occupied molecular orbital of the Os complex is mainly based on the Os(II) center located 2.2 eV below the Fermi edge and the LUMO molecular orbital is mainly based on the bipyridine ligands located 1.5 eV above the Fermi edge.

  2. Molecular and electronic structure of osmium complexes confined to Au(111) surfaces using a self-assembled molecular bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Llave, Ezequiel; Herrera, Santiago E.; Adam, Catherine; Méndez De Leo, Lucila P.; Calvo, Ernesto J.; Williams, Federico J.

    2015-11-01

    The molecular and electronic structure of Os(II) complexes covalently bonded to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au(111) surfaces was studied by means of polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopies, scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. Attachment of the Os complex to the SAM proceeds via an amide covalent bond with the SAM alkyl chain 40° tilted with respect to the surface normal and a total thickness of 26 Å. The highest occupied molecular orbital of the Os complex is mainly based on the Os(II) center located 2.2 eV below the Fermi edge and the LUMO molecular orbital is mainly based on the bipyridine ligands located 1.5 eV above the Fermi edge.

  3. Self-assembled molecular rafts at liquid|liquid interfaces for four-electron oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Olaya, Astrid J; Schaming, Delphine; Brevet, Pierre-Francois; Nagatani, Hirohisa; Zimmermann, Tomas; Vanicek, Jiri; Xu, Hai-Jun; Gros, Claude P; Barbe, Jean-Michel; Girault, Hubert H

    2012-01-11

    The self-assembly of the oppositely charged water-soluble porphyrins, cobalt tetramethylpyridinium porphyrin (CoTMPyP(4+)) and cobalt tetrasulphonatophenyl porphyrin (CoTPPS(4-)), at the interface with an organic solvent to form molecular "rafts", provides an excellent catalyst to perform the interfacial four-electron reduction of oxygen by lipophilic electron donors such as tetrathiafulvalene (TTF). The catalytic activity and selectivity of the self-assembled catalyst toward the four-electron pathway was found to be as good as that of the Pacman type cofacial cobalt porphyrins. The assembly has been characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, Surface Second Harmonic Generation, and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Density functional theory calculations confirm the possibility of formation of the catalytic CoTMPyP(4+)/ CoTPPS(4-) complex and its capability to bind oxygen. PMID:22107335

  4. Self-assembly of mixed lipids into bicelles and vesicles: molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Hari; Wang, Zilu; Dormidontova, Elena

    Formation of complex supramolecular nanostructures, such as micelles, bicelles, vesicles (liposomes) etc. via self-assembly of simple molecules has provided a new pathway for the design and development of effective drug carriers. Solid nanoparticles or functional biopolymers, such as RNA, DNA, peptides can be encapsulated into these carriers for controlled delivery or selective targeting. We performed coarse grained molecular dynamics simulation using the MARTINI force field to study the self-assembly of a binary surfactant mixture composed of long and short phospholipids, DPPC and DHPC, in the ratio 3:1. We found that at low temperature lipids self-assemble into a bicelle (nanodisc) with the longer lipid mainly forming the interior and short lipid the rim of the bicelle. At higher temperature the nanodisc transforms into a vesicle with homogeneously distributed lipids. The structural changes of these nanodiscs and vesicles imposed by gold nanoparticle encapsulation and pegylation will be addressed.

  5. Parity-selective enhancement of field-free molecular orientation in an intense two-color laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Hyeok; Nam, Chang Hee; Kim, Hyung Taek; Kim, Chul Min; Lee, Jongmin

    2011-12-15

    We investigated the characteristics of molecular orientation induced by a nonresonant two-color femtosecond laser field. By analyzing the rotational dynamics of asymmetric linear molecules, we revealed that the critical parameter in characterizing the molecular orientation was the hyperpolarizability of molecules that selected the excitation paths of rotational states between parity-changing and parity-conserving transitions. Especially, in the case of molecules with small hyperpolarizability, a significant enhancement of orientation was achieved at the half-rotational period, instead of the full-rotational period. This deeper understanding of the hyperpolarizability-dependent characteristics of molecular orientation in a two-color scheme can provide an effective method to achieve significantly enhanced field-free orientation for various polar molecules.

  6. Monitoring molecular orientational order in NLO push-pull based polymeric films via photoacoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Zúñiga, V.; Castañeda-Guzmán, R.; Morales-Saavedra, O. G.; Pérez-Martínez, A. L.; Ogawa, T.

    2011-12-01

    The pulsed-laser photoacoustic-technique (PLPA) was implemented to characterize molecular orientational order and anisotropy in push-pull poled polymeric films as function of temperature and laser polarization. Traditionally, photoacoustic signals are considered to be directly proportional to the linear optical absorption in amorphous media. In this work, however, it is shown that photoacoustic signals can also be highly sensitive to the material anisotropy when convenient polarization dependent photoacoustic analyses are performed. Thus, variation of the molecular orientation in organic films, comprising rod-like polar chromophores, can be unambiguously monitored via rms-analyses performed on the amplitude of the generated opto-acoustical PLPA-signals as function of the incident laser polarization. This result can be useful for the characterization of organic-based nonlinear optical (NLO) poled films and, in general, in studies of anisotropic materials. In fact, in this work we were able to accurately determine the molecular order parameter ( ϕ) of a NLO-active spin-coated polymeric film containing optically active push-pull chromophores. These molecules, previously oriented via an electrical-poling procedure, are capable to exhibit strong second harmonic generation (SHG) effects. The PLPA-measurements were systematically compared to the linear UV-vis optical absorbance spectra while heating the poled film sample in order to monitor the thermally induced molecular disorder, so that the order parameter may be photo-acoustically evaluated via the PLPA-signals generated from the poled to the unpoled film phase. These PLPA-experiments were performed taking into account the UV-vis reference spectra for calibration and comparison purposes in the evaluation of the order parameter. A significant advantage of the PLPA-technique over commonly used optical spectral methodologies is its convenient applicability in samples exhibiting poor or null optical transmission.

  7. Transient molecular orientation and rheology in flow aligning thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Ugaz, Victor M.; Burghardt, Wesley R.; Zhou, Weijun; Kornfield, Julia A.

    2001-09-01

    Quantitative measurements of molecular orientation and rheology are reported for various transient shear flows of a nematic semiflexible copolyether. Unlike the case of lyotropic liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs), whose structure and rheology in shear are dominated by director tumbling, this material exhibits flow aligning behavior. The observed behavior is quite similar to that seen in a copolyester that we have recently studied [Ugaz and Burghardt (1998)], suggesting that flow aligning dynamics may predominate in main-chain thermotropes that incorporate significant chain flexibility. Since the flow aligning regime has received little attention in previous attempts to model the rheology of textured, polydomain LCPs, we attempt to determine whether available models are capable of predicting the orientation and stress response of this class of LCP. We first examine the predictions of the polydomain Ericksen model, an adaptation of Ericksen's transversely isotropic fluid model which accounts for the polydomain distribution of director orientation while neglecting distortional elasticity. This simple model captures a number of qualitative and quantitative features associated with the evolution of orientation and stress during shear flow inception, but cannot cope with reversing flows. To consider the possible role of distortional elasticity in the re-orientation dynamics upon reversal, we evaluate the mesoscopically averaged domain theory of Larson and Doi [Larson and Doi (1991)], which incorporates a phenomenological description of distortional elastic effects. To date, their approach to account for polydomain structure has only been applied to describe tumbling LCPs. We find that it captures the qualitative transient orientation response to flow reversals, but is less successful in describing the evolution of stresses. This is linked to the decoupling approximation adopted during the model's development. Finally, a modified polydomain Ericksen model is introduced

  8. Molecular Self-Assembly of Short Aromatic Peptides: From Biology to Nanotechnology and Material Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazit, Ehud

    2013-03-01

    The formation of ordered amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of several diseases of unrelated origin. In spite of grave clinical consequence, the mechanism of amyloid formation is not fully understood. We have suggested, based on experimental and bioinformatic analysis, that aromatic interactions may provide energetic contribution as well as order and directionality in the molecular-recognition and self-association processes that lead to the formation of these assemblies. This is in line with the well-known central role of aromatic-stacking interactions in self-assembly processes. Our works on the mechanism of aromatic peptide self-assembly, lead to the discovery that the diphenylalanine recognition motif self-assembles into peptide nanotubes with a remarkable persistence length. Other aromatic homodipeptides could self-assemble in nano-spheres, nano-plates, nano-fibrils and hydrogels with nano-scale order. We demonstrated that the peptide nanostructures have unique chemical, physical and mechanical properties including ultra-rigidity as aramides, semi-conductive, piezoelectric and non-linear optic properties. We also demonstrated the ability to use these peptide nanostructures as casting mold for the fabrication of metallic nano-wires and coaxial nano-cables. The application of the nanostructures was demonstrated in various fields including electrochemical biosensors, tissue engineering, and molecular imaging. Finally, we had developed ways for depositing of the peptide nanostructures and their organization. We had use inkjet technology as well as vapour deposition methods to coat surface and from the peptide ``nano-forests''. We recently demonstrated that even a single phenylalanine amino-acid can form well-ordered fibrilar assemblies.

  9. State-space reduction and equivalence class sampling for a molecular self-assembly model.

    PubMed

    Packwood, Daniel M; Han, Patrick; Hitosugi, Taro

    2016-07-01

    Direct simulation of a model with a large state space will generate enormous volumes of data, much of which is not relevant to the questions under study. In this paper, we consider a molecular self-assembly model as a typical example of a large state-space model, and present a method for selectively retrieving 'target information' from this model. This method partitions the state space into equivalence classes, as identified by an appropriate equivalence relation. The set of equivalence classes H, which serves as a reduced state space, contains none of the superfluous information of the original model. After construction and characterization of a Markov chain with state space H, the target information is efficiently retrieved via Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. This approach represents a new breed of simulation techniques which are highly optimized for studying molecular self-assembly and, moreover, serves as a valuable guideline for analysis of other large state-space models. PMID:27493765

  10. Telechelic Star Polymers as Self-Assembling Units from the Molecular to the Macroscopic Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capone, Barbara; Coluzza, Ivan; LoVerso, Federica; Likos, Christos N.; Blaak, Ronald

    2012-12-01

    By means of multiscale molecular simulations, we show that telechelic-star polymers are a simple, robust, and tunable system, which hierarchically self-assembles into soft-patchy particles and mechanically stabilizes selected, open crystalline structures. The self-aggregating patchy behavior can be fully controlled by the number of arms per star and by the fraction of attractive monomeric units at the free ends of the arms. Such self-assembled soft-patchy particles while forming, upon augmenting density, gel-like percolating networks, preserve properties as particle size, number, and arrangement of patches per particle. In particular, we demonstrate that the flexibility inherent in the soft-patchy particles brings forward a novel mechanism that leads to the mechanical stability of diamond and simple cubic crystals over a wide range of densities, and for molecular sizes ranging from about 10 nm up to the micrometer scale.

  11. DNA hybridization in nanostructural molecular assemblies enables detection of gene mutations without a fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Tatsuo; Park, Lian-Chun; Shinohara, Toshimitsu; Goto, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a simple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) analysis utilizing DNA hybridization in nanostructural molecular assemblies. The novel technique enables the detection of a single-base mismatch in a DNA sequence without a fluorescent probe. This report describes for the first time that DNA hybridization occurs in the nanostructural molecular assemblies (termed reverse micelles) formed in an organic medium. The restricted nanospace in the reverse micelles amplifies the differences in the hybridization rate between mismatched and perfectly matched DNA probes. For a model system, we hybridized a 20-mer based on the p53 gene sequence to 20-mer complementary oligonucleotides with various types of mismatches. Without any DNA labeling or electrochemical apparatus, we successfully detected the various oligonucleotide mismatches by simply measuring the UV absorbance at 260 nm. PMID:14715007

  12. Five-vertex Archimedean surface tessellation by lanthanide-directed molecular self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Écija, David; Urgel, José I.; Papageorgiou, Anthoula C.; Joshi, Sushobhan; Auwärter, Willi; Seitsonen, Ari P.; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; Fischer, Sybille; Vijayaraghavan, Saranyan; Reichert, Joachim; Barth, Johannes V.

    2013-01-01

    The tessellation of the Euclidean plane by regular polygons has been contemplated since ancient times and presents intriguing aspects embracing mathematics, art, and crystallography. Significant efforts were devoted to engineer specific 2D interfacial tessellations at the molecular level, but periodic patterns with distinct five-vertex motifs remained elusive. Here, we report a direct scanning tunneling microscopy investigation on the cerium-directed assembly of linear polyphenyl molecular linkers with terminal carbonitrile groups on a smooth Ag(111) noble-metal surface. We demonstrate the spontaneous formation of fivefold Ce–ligand coordination motifs, which are planar and flexible, such that vertices connecting simultaneously trigonal and square polygons can be expressed. By tuning the concentration and the stoichiometric ratio of rare-earth metal centers to ligands, a hierarchic assembly with dodecameric units and a surface-confined metal–organic coordination network yielding the semiregular Archimedean snub square tiling could be fabricated. PMID:23576764

  13. State-space reduction and equivalence class sampling for a molecular self-assembly model

    PubMed Central

    Han, Patrick; Hitosugi, Taro

    2016-01-01

    Direct simulation of a model with a large state space will generate enormous volumes of data, much of which is not relevant to the questions under study. In this paper, we consider a molecular self-assembly model as a typical example of a large state-space model, and present a method for selectively retrieving ‘target information’ from this model. This method partitions the state space into equivalence classes, as identified by an appropriate equivalence relation. The set of equivalence classes H, which serves as a reduced state space, contains none of the superfluous information of the original model. After construction and characterization of a Markov chain with state space H, the target information is efficiently retrieved via Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. This approach represents a new breed of simulation techniques which are highly optimized for studying molecular self-assembly and, moreover, serves as a valuable guideline for analysis of other large state-space models. PMID:27493765

  14. Role of Bassoon and Piccolo in Assembly and Molecular Organization of the Active Zone

    PubMed Central

    Gundelfinger, Eckart D.; Reissner, Carsten; Garner, Craig C.

    2016-01-01

    Bassoon and Piccolo are two very large scaffolding proteins of the cytomatrix assembled at the active zone (CAZ) where neurotransmitter is released. They share regions of high sequence similarity distributed along their entire length and seem to share both overlapping and distinct functions in organizing the CAZ. Here, we survey our present knowledge on protein-protein interactions and recent progress in understanding of molecular functions of these two giant proteins. These include roles in the assembly of active zones (AZ), the localization of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) in the vicinity of release sites, synaptic vesicle (SV) priming and in the case of Piccolo, a role in the dynamic assembly of the actin cytoskeleton. Piccolo and Bassoon are also important for the maintenance of presynaptic structure and function, as well as for the assembly of CAZ specializations such as synaptic ribbons. Recent findings suggest that they are also involved in the regulation activity-dependent communication between presynaptic boutons and the neuronal nucleus. Together these observations suggest that Bassoon and Piccolo use their modular structure to organize super-molecular complexes essential for various aspects of presynaptic function. PMID:26793095

  15. Precise Molecular Fission and Fusion: Quantitative Self-Assembly and Chemistry of a Metallo-Cuboctahedron.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ting-Zheng; Guo, Kai; Guo, Zaihong; Gao, Wen-Yang; Wojtas, Lukasz; Ning, Guo-Hong; Huang, Mingjun; Lu, Xiaocun; Li, Jing-Yi; Liao, Sheng-Yun; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Moorefield, Charles N; Saunders, Mary Jane; Cheng, Stephen Z D; Wesdemiotis, Chrys; Newkome, George R

    2015-08-01

    Inspiration for molecular design and construction can be derived from mathematically based structures. In the quest for new materials, the adaptation of new building blocks can lead to unexpected results. Towards these ends, the quantitative single-step self-assembly of a shape-persistent, Archimedean-based building block, which generates the largest molecular sphere (a cuboctahedron) that has been unequivocally characterized by synchrotron X-ray analysis, is described. The unique properties of this new construct give rise to a dilution-based transformation into two identical spheres (octahedra) each possessing one half of the molecular weight of the parent structure; concentration of this octahedron reconstitutes the original cuboctahedron. These chemical phenomena are reminiscent of biological fission and fusion processes. The large 6 nm cage structure was further analyzed by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and collision cross-section analysis. New routes to molecular encapsulation can be envisioned. PMID:26094872

  16. A 1-D Model of the 4 Bed Molecular Sieve of the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, Robert; Knox, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Developments to improve system efficiency and reliability for water and carbon dioxide separation systems on crewed vehicles combine sub-scale systems testing and multi-physics simulations. This paper describes the development of COMSOL simulations in support of the Life Support Systems (LSS) project within NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program. Specifically, we model the 4 Bed Molecular Sieve (4BMS) of the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) operating on the International Space Station (ISS).

  17. Molecular layer-by-layer assembled thin-film composite membranes for water desalination.

    PubMed

    Gu, Joung-Eun; Lee, Seunghye; Stafford, Christopher M; Lee, Jong Suk; Choi, Wansuk; Kim, Bo-Young; Baek, Kyung-Youl; Chan, Edwin P; Chung, Jun Young; Bang, Joona; Lee, Jung-Hyun

    2013-09-14

    Molecular layer-by-layer (mLbL) assembled thin-film composite membranes fabricated by alternating deposition of reactive monomers on porous supports exhibit both improved salt rejection and enhanced water flux compared to traditional reverse osmosis membranes prepared by interfacial polymerization. Additionally, the well-controlled structures achieved by mLbL deposition further lead to improved antifouling performance. PMID:23847127

  18. Molecular self-assembly approaches for supramolecular electronic and organic electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, Hin-Lap

    Molecular self-assembly represents an efficient bottom-up strategy to generate structurally well-defined aggregates of semiconducting pi-conjugated materials. The capability of tuning the chemical structures, intermolecular interactions and nanostructures through molecular engineering and novel materials processing renders it possible to tailor a large number of unprecedented properties such as charge transport, energy transfer and light harvesting. This approach does not only benefit traditional electronic devices based on bulk materials, but also generate a new research area so called "supramolecular electronics" in which electronic devices are built up with individual supramolecular nanostructures with size in the sub-hundred nanometers range. My work combined molecular self-assembly together with several novel materials processing techniques to control the nucleation and growth of organic semiconducting nanostructures from different type of pi-conjugated materials. By tailoring the interactions between the molecules using hydrogen bonds and pi-pi stacking, semiconducting nanoplatelets and nanowires with tunable sizes can be fabricated in solution. These supramolecular nanostructures were further patterned and aligned on solid substrates through printing and chemical templating methods. The capability to control the different hierarchies of organization on surface provides an important platform to study their structural-induced electronic properties. In addition to using molecular self-assembly to create different organic nanostructures, functional self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formed by spontaneous chemisorption on surfaces was used to tune the interfacial property in organic solar cells. Devices showed dramatically improved performance when appropriate SAMs were applied to optimize the contact property for efficiency charge collection.

  19. Molecular codes for neuronal individuality and cell assembly in the brain.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    The brain contains an enormous, but finite, number of neurons. The ability of this limited number of neurons to produce nearly limitless neural information over a lifetime is typically explained by combinatorial explosion; that is, by the exponential amplification of each neuron's contribution through its incorporation into "cell assemblies" and neural networks. In development, each neuron expresses diverse cellular recognition molecules that permit the formation of the appropriate neural cell assemblies to elicit various brain functions. The mechanism for generating neuronal assemblies and networks must involve molecular codes that give neurons individuality and allow them to recognize one another and join appropriate networks. The extensive molecular diversity of cell-surface proteins on neurons is likely to contribute to their individual identities. The clustered protocadherins (Pcdh) is a large subfamily within the diverse cadherin superfamily. The clustered Pcdh genes are encoded in tandem by three gene clusters, and are present in all known vertebrate genomes. The set of clustered Pcdh genes is expressed in a random and combinatorial manner in each neuron. In addition, cis-tetramers composed of heteromultimeric clustered Pcdh isoforms represent selective binding units for cell-cell interactions. Here I present the mathematical probabilities for neuronal individuality based on the random and combinatorial expression of clustered Pcdh isoforms and their formation of cis-tetramers in each neuron. Notably, clustered Pcdh gene products are known to play crucial roles in correct axonal projections, synaptic formation, and neuronal survival. Their molecular and biological features induce a hypothesis that the diverse clustered Pcdh molecules provide the molecular code by which neuronal individuality and cell assembly permit the combinatorial explosion of networks that supports enormous processing capability and plasticity of the brain. PMID:22518100

  20. Exploiting orientation-selective DEER: determining molecular structure in systems containing Cu(ii) centres.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Alice M; Jones, Michael W; Lovett, Janet E; Gaule, Thembanikosi G; McPherson, Michael J; Dilworth, Jonathan R; Timmel, Christiane R; Harmer, Jeffrey R

    2016-02-17

    Orientation-selective DEER (Double Electron-Electron Resonance) measurements were conducted on a series of rigid and flexible molecules containing Cu(ii) ions. A system with two rigidly held Cu(ii) ions was afforded by the protein homo-dimer of copper amine oxidase from Arthrobacter globiformis. This system provided experimental DEER data between two Cu(ii) ions with a well-defined distance and relative orientation to assess the accuracy of the methodology. Evaluation of orientation-selective DEER (os DEER) on systems with limited flexibility was probed using a series of porphyrin-based Cu(ii)-nitroxide and Cu(ii)-Cu(ii) model systems of well-defined lengths synthesized for this project. Density functional theory was employed to generate molecular models of the conformers for each porphyrin-based Cu(ii) dimer studied. Excellent agreement was found between DEER traces simulated using these computed conformers and the experimental data. The performance of different parameterised structural models in simulating the experimental DEER data was also investigated. The results of this analysis demonstrate the degree to which the DEER data define the relative orientation of the two Cu(ii) ions and highlight the need to choose a parameterised model that captures the essential features of the flexibility (rotational freedom) of the system being studied. PMID:26837391

  1. Molecular design driving tetraporphyrin self-assembly on graphite: a joint STM, electrochemical and computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Garah, M.; Santana Bonilla, A.; Ciesielski, A.; Gualandi, A.; Mengozzi, L.; Fiorani, A.; Iurlo, M.; Marcaccio, M.; Gutierrez, R.; Rapino, S.; Calvaresi, M.; Zerbetto, F.; Cuniberti, G.; Cozzi, P. G.; Paolucci, F.; Samorì, P.

    2016-07-01

    Tuning the intermolecular interactions among suitably designed molecules forming highly ordered self-assembled monolayers is a viable approach to control their organization at the supramolecular level. Such a tuning is particularly important when applied to sophisticated molecules combining functional units which possess specific electronic properties, such as electron/energy transfer, in order to develop multifunctional systems. Here we have synthesized two tetraferrocene-porphyrin derivatives that by design can selectively self-assemble at the graphite/liquid interface into either face-on or edge-on monolayer-thick architectures. The former supramolecular arrangement consists of two-dimensional planar networks based on hydrogen bonding among adjacent molecules whereas the latter relies on columnar assembly generated through intermolecular van der Waals interactions. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) at the solid-liquid interface has been corroborated by cyclic voltammetry measurements and assessed by theoretical calculations to gain multiscale insight into the arrangement of the molecule with respect to the basal plane of the surface. The STM analysis allowed the visualization of these assemblies with a sub-nanometer resolution, and cyclic voltammetry measurements provided direct evidence of the interactions of porphyrin and ferrocene with the graphite surface and offered also insight into the dynamics within the face-on and edge-on assemblies. The experimental findings were supported by theoretical calculations to shed light on the electronic and other physical properties of both assemblies. The capability to engineer the functional nanopatterns through self-assembly of porphyrins containing ferrocene units is a key step toward the bottom-up construction of multifunctional molecular nanostructures and nanodevices.Tuning the intermolecular interactions among suitably designed molecules forming highly ordered self-assembled monolayers is a viable approach to

  2. Fluorescence characteristics of size-fractionated dissolved organic matter: implications for a molecular assembly based structure?

    PubMed

    Romera-Castillo, Cristina; Chen, Meilian; Yamashita, Youhei; Jaffé, Rudolf

    2014-05-15

    Surface freshwater samples from Everglades National Park, Florida, were used to investigate the size distributions of natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) and associated fluorescence characteristics along the molecular weight continuum. Samples were fractionated using size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and characterized by spectroscopic means, in particular Excitation-Emission Matrix fluorescence modeled with parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC). Most of the eight components obtained from PARAFAC modeling were broadly distributed across the DOM molecular weight range, and the optical properties of the eight size fractions for all samples studied were quite consistent among each other. Humic-like components presented a similar distribution in all the samples, with enrichment in the middle molecular weight range. Some variability in the relative distribution of the different humic-like components was observed among the different size fractions and among samples. The protein like fluorescence, although also generally present in all fractions, was more variable but generally enriched in the highest and lowest molecular weight fractions. These observations are in agreement with the hypothesis of a supramolecular structure for DOM, and suggest that DOM fluorescence characteristics may be controlled by molecular assemblies with similar optical properties, distributed along the molecular weight continuum. This study highlights the importance of studying the molecular structure of DOM on a molecular size distribution perspective, which may have important implications in understanding the environmental dynamics such materials. PMID:24602859

  3. Assembly of a Functional Beta Interferon Enhanceosome Is Dependent on ATF-2–c-jun Heterodimer Orientation

    PubMed Central

    Falvo, James V.; Parekh, Bhavin S.; Lin, Charles H.; Fraenkel, Ernest; Maniatis, Tom

    2000-01-01

    Heterodimeric transcription factors, including the basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) protein ATF-2–c-jun, are well-characterized components of an enhanceosome that mediates virus induction of the human beta interferon (IFN-β) gene. Here we report that within the IFN-β enhanceosome the ATF-2–c-jun heterodimer binds in a specific orientation, which is required for assembly of a complex between ATF-2–c-jun and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3). We demonstrate that correct orientation of the ATF-2–c-jun binding site is required for virus induction of the IFN-β gene and for IRF-3-dependent activation of a composite ATF-2– c-jun–IRF site in the IFN-β promoter. We also show that in vitro the DNA-bound ATF-2–c-jun heterodimer adopts a fixed orientation upon the binding of IRF-3 at an adjacent site in the IFN-β enhancer and that the DNA-binding domain of IRF-3 is sufficient to mediate this effect. In addition, we show that the DNA-binding domain of ATF-2 is necessary and sufficient for selective protein-protein interactions with IRF-3. Strikingly, in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments with IFN-β reporter constructs reveal that recruitment of IRF-3 to the IFN-β promoter upon virus infection is dependent on the orientation of the ATF-2–c-jun heterodimer binding site. These observations demonstrate functional and physical cooperativity between the bZIP and IRF transcription factor families and illustrate the critical role of heterodimeric transcription factors in formation of the IFN-β enhanceosome. PMID:10848607

  4. Self-assembly of [3]catenanes and a [4]molecular necklace based on a cryptand/paraquat recognition motif.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yang; Wang, Shu-Ping; Zhu, Bin; Cook, Timothy R; Wu, Jing; Li, Shijun; Stang, Peter J

    2015-06-01

    Hierarchical self-assembly centered on metallacyclic scaffolds greatly facilitates the construction of mechanically interlocked structures. The formation of two [3]catenanes and one [4]molecular necklace is presented by utilizing the orthogonality of coordination-driven self-assembly and crown ether-based cryptand/paraquat derivative complexation. The threaded [3]catenanes and [4]molecular necklace were fabricated by using ten and nine total molecular components, respectively, from four and three unique species in solution, respectively. In all cases single supramolecular ensembles were obtained, attesting to the high degree of structural complexity made possible via self-assembly approaches. PMID:25996900

  5. Structure Prediction of Self-Assembled Dye Aggregates from Cryogenic Transmission Electron Microscopy, Molecular Mechanics, and Theory of Optical Spectra

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) studies suggest that TTBC molecules self-assemble in aqueous solution to form single-walled tubes with a diameter of about 35 Å. In order to reveal the arrangement and mutual orientations of the individual molecules in the tube, we combine information from crystal structure data of this dye with a calculation of linear absorbance and linear dichroism spectra and molecular dynamics simulations. We start with wrapping crystal planes in different directions to obtain tubes of suitable diameter. This set of tube models is evaluated by comparing the resulting optical spectra with experimental data. The tubes that can explain the spectra are investigated further by molecular dynamics simulations, including explicit solvent molecules. From the trajectories of the most stable tube models, the short-range ordering of the dye molecules is extracted and the optimization of the structure is iteratively completed. The final structural model is a tube of rings with 6-fold rotational symmetry, where neighboring rings are rotated by 30° and the transition dipole moments of the chromophores form an angle of 74° with respect to the symmetry axis of the tube. This model is in agreement with cryo-TEM images and can explain the optical spectra, consisting of a sharp red-shifted J-band that is polarized parallel to to the symmetry axis of the tube and a broad blue-shifted H-band polarized perpendicular to this axis. The general structure of the homogeneous spectrum of this hybrid HJ-aggregate is described by an analytical model that explains the difference in redistribution of oscillator strength inside the vibrational manifolds of the J- and H-bands and the relative intensities and excitation energies of those bands. In addition to the particular system investigated here, the present methodology can be expected to aid the structure prediction for a wide range of self-assembled dye aggregates.

  6. Molecular insights into diphenylalanine nanotube assembly: all-atom simulations of oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Joohyun; Mills, Carolyn E; Shell, M Scott

    2013-04-18

    Self-assembling peptides represent a growing class of inexpensive, environmentally benign, nanostructured materials. In particular, diphenylalanine (FF) self-assembles into nanotubes with remarkable strength and thermal stability that have found use in a wide variety of applications, including as sacrificial templates and scaffolds for structuring inorganic materials and as interfacial "nanoforests" for superhydrophobic surfaces and high-performance supercapacitors and biosensors. However, little is known about the assembly mechanisms of FF nanotubes or the forces underlying their stability. Here, we perform a variety of molecular dynamics simulations on both zwitterionic and capped (uncharged) versions of the FF peptide to understand the early stages of self-assembly. We compare these results to simulations of the proposed nanotube X-ray crystal structure. When comparing the zwitterionic and uncharged FF peptides, we find that, while electrostatic interactions steer the former into more ordered dimers and trimers, the hydrophobic side chain interactions play a strong role in determining the structures of larger oligomers. Simulations of the crystal structure fragment also suggest that the strongest interactions occur between side chains, not between the charged termini that form salt bridges. We conclude that the amphiphilic nature of FF is key to understanding its self-assembly, and that the early precursors to nanotube structures are likely to involve substantial hydrophobic clustering, rather than hexamer ring motifs as has been previously suggested. PMID:23521630

  7. Effect of Zn(2+) ions on the assembly of amylin oligomers: insight into the molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wineman-Fisher, Vered; Miller, Yifat

    2016-08-01

    Amylin is an endocrine hormone and is a member of the family of amyloid peptides and proteins that emerge as potential scaffolds by self-assembly processes. Zn(2+) ions can bind to amylin peptides to form self-assembled Zn(2+)-amylin oligomers. In the current work the binding sites of Zn(2+) ions in the self-assembled amylin oligomers at various concentrations of zinc have been investigated. Our results yield two conclusions. First, in the absence of Zn(2+) ions polymorphic states (i.e. various classes of amylin oligomers) are obtained, but when Zn(2+) ions bind to amylin peptides to form Zn(2+)-amylin oligomers, the polymorphism is decreased, i.e. Zn(2+) ions bind only to specific classes of amylin. At low concentrations of Zn(2+) ions the polymorphism is smaller than at high concentrations. Second, the structural features of the self-assembled amylin oligomers are not affected by the presence of Zn(2+) ions. This study proposes new molecular mechanisms of the self-assembly of Zn(2+)-amylin oligomers. PMID:27425207

  8. Synthesis and assembly of gold nanoparticles in organized molecular films of gemini amphiphiles.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ling; Jiao, Tifeng; Liu, Minghua

    2008-10-21

    Generation and assembly of gold nanostructures were investigated in the organized molecular films of a series of gemini amphiphiles. The chloroauric acid, dissolved in the aqueous subphase, was incorporated into the monolayers of the gemini amphiphiles containing ethyleneamine spacers through an interfacial assembly. The in situ formed complex monolayers were transferred onto solid substrates, and gold nanoparticles were generated in the film by a chemical or photochemical reduction. Discrete gold nanoparticles with an absorption maximum at 550 nm were generated in the films by photoirradiation, while different gold nanostructures were obtained by chemical reduction. Depending on the chemical reductant, various shape and assembly of gold nanostructures were obtained. When reduced by hydroquinone, a tree-branched assembly of the nanoparticles was obtained and the film showed a broad band centered at around 900 nm. When NaBH 4 was applied, crooked nanowires or assembly of nanoparticles were obtained, depending on concentration, and the film showed absorption at 569 or 600 nm. Furthermore, by combining the photochemical and chemical reduction methods, i.e., the chloroaurate ion-incorporated film was initially irradiated with UV light and then subjected to chemical reduction, the optical absorption of the formed gold nanostructures can be regulated. PMID:18823092

  9. Self-assembly of Spherical Macroions in Solution: A Coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhuonan; Liu, Tianbo; Tsige, Mesfin

    2015-03-01

    Macroions (such as polyoxometalates) in solution can form a stable hollow spherical super-molecular structure called blackberry when they have moderate surface charge density and size (1-10 nm). Depending on the surface charge density of macroions, the size of the blackberry can be from 20 to more than 100 nm. Other macroions such as dendrimers can also self-assemble into similar super-molecular structure in solution. Existing theories such as Debye-Hückel and DLVO theories cannot explain this phenomenon and we are not aware of any other theory that can explain this. Previous studies using all-atom Molecular Dynamics simulations have shown identical macroions forming oligomers mediated by counterions. Due to the limitations in all-atom simulation and available computational capabilities, these studies handled only small systems with simple macroions, leading to less conclusive but still relevant results on the self-assembly behavior. To overcome these limitations, in this work large-scale coarse-grained modeling of macroions in solution is used. In order to understand the origin of the attractive force that is responsible for the self-assembly of macroions, different types of macroions in different solution conditions are studied. This work was supported by NSF Grant DMR0847580.

  10. A slippery molecular assembly allows water as a self-erasable security marker

    PubMed Central

    Thirumalai, Rajasekaran; Mukhopadhyay, Rahul Dev; Praveen, Vakayil K.; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2015-01-01

    Protection of currency and valuable documents from counterfeit continues to be a challenge. While there are many embedded security features available for document safety, they are not immune to forgery. Fluorescence is a sensitive property, which responds to external stimuli such as solvent polarity, temperature or mechanical stress, however practical use in security applications is hampered due to several reasons. Therefore, a simple and specific stimuli responsive security feature that is difficult to duplicate is of great demand. Herein we report the design of a fluorescent molecular assembly on which water behaves as a self-erasable security marker for checking the authenticity of documents at point of care. The underlying principle involves the disciplined self-assembly of a tailor-made fluorescent molecule, which initially form a weak blue fluorescence (λem = 425 nm, Φf = 0.13) and changes to cyan emission (λem = 488 nm,Φf = 0.18) in contact with water due to a reversible molecular slipping motion. This simple chemical tool, based on the principles of molecular self-assembly and fluorescence modulation, allows creation of security labels and optically masked barcodes for multiple documents authentication. PMID:25940779

  11. Self-assembly of high molecular weight polypeptide copolymers studied via diffusion limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    Meier, Christoph; Wu, Yuzhou; Pramanik, Goutam; Weil, Tanja

    2014-01-13

    The assembly of high molecular weight polypeptides into complex architectures exhibiting structural complexity ranging from the nano- to the mesoscale is of fundamental importance for various protein-related diseases but also hold great promise for various nano- and biotechnological applications. Here, the aggregation of partially unfolded high molecular weight polypeptides into multiscale fractal structures is investigated by means of diffusion limited aggregation and atomic force microscopy. The zeta potential, the hydrodynamic radius, and the obtained fractal morphologies were correlated with the conformation of the polypeptide backbones as obtained from circular dichroism measurements. The polypeptides are modified with polyethylene oxide side chains to stabilize the polypeptides and to normalize intermolecular interactions. The modification with the hydrophobic thioctic acid alters the folding of the polypeptide backbone, resulting in a change in solution aggregation and fractal morphology. We found that a more compact folding results in dense and highly branched structures, whereas a less compact folded polypeptide chain yields a more directional assembly. Our results provide first evidence for the role of compactness of polypeptide folding on aggregation. Furthermore, the mesoscale-structured biofilms were used to achieve a hierarchical protein assembly, which is demonstrated by deposition of Rhodamine-labeled HSA with the preassembled fractal structures. These results contribute important insights to the fundamental understanding of the aggregation of high molecular weight polypeptides in general and provide opportunities to study nanostructure-related effects on biological systems such as adhesion, proliferation, and the development of, for example, neuronal cells. PMID:24354281

  12. Molecular design driving tetraporphyrin self-assembly on graphite: a joint STM, electrochemical and computational study.

    PubMed

    El Garah, M; Santana Bonilla, A; Ciesielski, A; Gualandi, A; Mengozzi, L; Fiorani, A; Iurlo, M; Marcaccio, M; Gutierrez, R; Rapino, S; Calvaresi, M; Zerbetto, F; Cuniberti, G; Cozzi, P G; Paolucci, F; Samorì, P

    2016-07-14

    Tuning the intermolecular interactions among suitably designed molecules forming highly ordered self-assembled monolayers is a viable approach to control their organization at the supramolecular level. Such a tuning is particularly important when applied to sophisticated molecules combining functional units which possess specific electronic properties, such as electron/energy transfer, in order to develop multifunctional systems. Here we have synthesized two tetraferrocene-porphyrin derivatives that by design can selectively self-assemble at the graphite/liquid interface into either face-on or edge-on monolayer-thick architectures. The former supramolecular arrangement consists of two-dimensional planar networks based on hydrogen bonding among adjacent molecules whereas the latter relies on columnar assembly generated through intermolecular van der Waals interactions. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) at the solid-liquid interface has been corroborated by cyclic voltammetry measurements and assessed by theoretical calculations to gain multiscale insight into the arrangement of the molecule with respect to the basal plane of the surface. The STM analysis allowed the visualization of these assemblies with a sub-nanometer resolution, and cyclic voltammetry measurements provided direct evidence of the interactions of porphyrin and ferrocene with the graphite surface and offered also insight into the dynamics within the face-on and edge-on assemblies. The experimental findings were supported by theoretical calculations to shed light on the electronic and other physical properties of both assemblies. The capability to engineer the functional nanopatterns through self-assembly of porphyrins containing ferrocene units is a key step toward the bottom-up construction of multifunctional molecular nanostructures and nanodevices. PMID:27376633

  13. Bond orientation properties in lipid molecules of membranes: molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, Alexander L.; Lyubartsev, Alexander P.

    2014-05-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out for 16 different fully hydrated phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers, having 16 or 18 carbon atoms in fully saturated sn - 1 chain and from 18 to 22 carbon atoms in sn - 2 chain with different degree of unsaturation, with the purpose to investigate the effect of unsaturation on physical properties of lipid bilayers. Special attention has been paid to profiles of C-C and C-H bond order parameters of lipid molecules and the orientational fluctuations of these bond vectors. It was shown that the study of anisotropy degree of bond orientations probability distributions allows distinguishing extended regions with different types of angular fluctuations of bonds in a membrane formed by lipid molecules with unsaturated chains.

  14. Highly sensitive and doubly orientated selective molecularly imprinted electrochemical sensor for Cu(2.).

    PubMed

    Li, Jianping; Zhang, Lianming; Wei, Ge; Zhang, Yun; Zeng, Ying

    2015-07-15

    Studies on molecularly imprinted electrochemical sensors for metal ions determination have been widely reported. However, the sensitivity and selectivity of the sensors needs to be improved urgently. In the current work, a novel molecularly imprinted electrochemical sensor was originally developed for selective determination of ultratrace Cu(2+) by combining the metal-ligand chelate orientated recognition with enzyme amplification effect. The detection relied on a competition reaction between Cu(2+)-glycine (Cu-Gly) and horse radish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled Cu-Gly on the imprinted polymer membrane modified electrode. The sensitivity of this sensor was promoted by enzyme amplification. Selectivity was improved by the double-specificity derived from ligand-to-metal ion and metal-ligand chelate orientated recognition of 3D imprinted cavities. This technique was quantitatively sensitive to Cu(2+) concentrations ranging from 0.5nmol/L to 30nmol/L, with a detection limit of 42.4pmol/L. which was lower than those in most of the reported methods. The allowable amounts of interference ions were higher when it compared to other common molecularly imprinted sensors. Moreover, the results of assaying several real samples have proven its feasibility for practical applications. PMID:25771304

  15. Localization and orientation of heavy-atom cluster compounds in protein crystals using molecular replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Dahms, Sven O. Kuester, Miriam; Streb, Carsten; Roth, Christian; Sträter, Norbert; Than, Manuel E.

    2013-02-01

    A new approach is presented that allows the efficient localization and orientation of heavy-atom cluster compounds used in experimental phasing by a molecular replacement procedure. This permits the calculation of meaningful phases up to the highest resolution of the diffraction data. Heavy-atom clusters (HA clusters) containing a large number of specifically arranged electron-dense scatterers are especially useful for experimental phase determination of large complex structures, weakly diffracting crystals or structures with large unit cells. Often, the determination of the exact orientation of the HA cluster and hence of the individual heavy-atom positions proves to be the critical step in successful phasing and subsequent structure solution. Here, it is demonstrated that molecular replacement (MR) with either anomalous or isomorphous differences is a useful strategy for the correct placement of HA cluster compounds. The polyoxometallate cluster hexasodium α-metatungstate (HMT) was applied in phasing the structure of death receptor 6. Even though the HA cluster is bound in alternate partially occupied orientations and is located at a special position, its correct localization and orientation could be determined at resolutions as low as 4.9 Å. The broad applicability of this approach was demonstrated for five different derivative crystals that included the compounds tantalum tetradecabromide and trisodium phosphotungstate in addition to HMT. The correct placement of the HA cluster depends on the length of the intramolecular vectors chosen for MR, such that both a larger cluster size and the optimal choice of the wavelength used for anomalous data collection strongly affect the outcome.

  16. Oriented-assembly of hollow FePt nanochains with tunable catalytic and magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jialong; Xia, Tianyu; Wang, Shouguo; Yang, Guang; Dong, Bowen; Wang, Chao; Ma, Qidi; Sun, Young; Wang, Rongming

    2016-06-01

    Hollow nanoparticles with large surface areas exhibit a lot of advantages for applications such as catalysis and energy storage. Furthermore, their performance can be manipulated by their deliberate assemblies. Dispersive hollow FePt nanospheres have been assembled into one-dimensional hollow FePt nanochains under the magnetic fields at room temperature. Based on the activation of galvanic replacement at different reaction stages, the size of hollow FePt nanochains can be deliberately manipulated varying from 20 nm to 300 nm, together with the length changing from 200 nm to 10 μm. The competition between movement of paramagnetic Fe3+ ions and shape recovering due to thermal fluctuations plays a critical effect on the structure of contact area between hollow nanospheres, leading to perforative structures. Compared with commercial Pt/C, well aligned hollow FePt nanochains show greatly enhanced catalytic activities in the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) due to more favorable mass flow. Magnetic measurements indicate that the magnetic properties including Curie temperature and saturation magnetization can be tuned by the control of the size and shape of hollow nanochains.Hollow nanoparticles with large surface areas exhibit a lot of advantages for applications such as catalysis and energy storage. Furthermore, their performance can be manipulated by their deliberate assemblies. Dispersive hollow FePt nanospheres have been assembled into one-dimensional hollow FePt nanochains under the magnetic fields at room temperature. Based on the activation of galvanic replacement at different reaction stages, the size of hollow FePt nanochains can be deliberately manipulated varying from 20 nm to 300 nm, together with the length changing from 200 nm to 10 μm. The competition between movement of paramagnetic Fe3+ ions and shape recovering due to thermal fluctuations plays a critical effect on the structure of contact area between hollow nanospheres, leading to perforative

  17. Aqueous Self-Assembly of Non-Ionic Bottlebrush Block Copolymer Surfactants with Tunable Molecular Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzayev, Javid

    2015-03-01

    Polymer amphiphiles provide a robust and versatile platform for the fabrication of nanostructured soft matter. In this research, we explore a new class of polymer surfactants based on comb-like bottlebrush architecture as highly tunable molecular building blocks for aqueous self-assembly. Excluded volume interactions between densely grafted polymer side chains in the bottlebrush architecture are alleviated by backbone stretching, which leads to the formation of shape-persistent cylindrical macromolecules whose molecular dimensions can be precisely tailored during chemical synthesis. Amphiphilic bottlebrush block copolymers containing hydrophobic polylactide (PLA) and hydrophilic poly(oligoethylene oxide methacrylate) (PEO) side chains of various lengths were synthesized by a combination of controlled radical and ring-opening polymerizations. In dilute aqueous solutions, bottlebrush surfactants rapidly assembled into spherical, cylindrical and bilayer aggregates, as visualized by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). Depending on the compositional side chain asymmetry, the formation of spherical micelles with different sizes and dispersities was observed. The molecular shape-dependent assembly was analyzed with help of a packing parameter (p) computed from the molecular composition data akin to small molecule surfactants, with most uniform spherical aggregates observed for bottlebrush amphiphiles with p close to 0.3. The formation of highly uniform micelles and the presence of a rich morphological diagram with relatively narrow compositional windows were attributed to the lack of conformational freedom in bottlebrush surfactants. Similarly, the unusual formation of cylindrical micelles with long aspect ratios for such high molecular weight amphiphiles was attributed to their inability to stabilize morphological defects, such as Y-junctions, with large deviations from mean curvature. Financial support for this work was provided by the National

  18. Oriented-assembly of hollow FePt nanochains with tunable catalytic and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jialong; Xia, Tianyu; Wang, Shouguo; Yang, Guang; Dong, Bowen; Wang, Chao; Ma, Qidi; Sun, Young; Wang, Rongming

    2016-06-01

    Hollow nanoparticles with large surface areas exhibit a lot of advantages for applications such as catalysis and energy storage. Furthermore, their performance can be manipulated by their deliberate assemblies. Dispersive hollow FePt nanospheres have been assembled into one-dimensional hollow FePt nanochains under the magnetic fields at room temperature. Based on the activation of galvanic replacement at different reaction stages, the size of hollow FePt nanochains can be deliberately manipulated varying from 20 nm to 300 nm, together with the length changing from 200 nm to 10 μm. The competition between movement of paramagnetic Fe(3+) ions and shape recovering due to thermal fluctuations plays a critical effect on the structure of contact area between hollow nanospheres, leading to perforative structures. Compared with commercial Pt/C, well aligned hollow FePt nanochains show greatly enhanced catalytic activities in the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) due to more favorable mass flow. Magnetic measurements indicate that the magnetic properties including Curie temperature and saturation magnetization can be tuned by the control of the size and shape of hollow nanochains. PMID:26971675

  19. New orientations in the stereographic triangle for self-assembled faceting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez-Camacho, R.; Méndez-García, V. H.; López-López, M.; Cruz-Hernández, E.

    2016-06-01

    Energetically unstable crystalline surfaces, among their uses, can be templates for the growth of periodic arrays of one-dimensional (1D) nanoscale structures. However, few studies have explored self-assembled faceting on high-index (HI) planes inside the stereographic triangle, and extant studies have not produced any criteria for encouraging the formation of one-dimensional periodic arrays. In this Letter, by analyzing the MBE growth of homoepitaxial facets on (631)A GaAs, a HI plane inside the triangle, we present a criteria to produce highly uniform 1D periodic arrays on unexplored surfaces. These families of planes are those belonging to the lines connecting the energetically stable HI GaAs (11 5 2) plane with any of the (100), (110), and (111) planes at the corners of the stereographic triangle. This novel strategy can lead to new possibilities in self-assembling 1D structures and manipulating physical properties, which in turn may result in new HI- and 1D-based experiments and devices.

  20. Molecular Ordering of Poly(3-hexylthiophene) on Self-Assembled Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yimer, Yeneneh; Tsige, Mesfin

    2014-03-01

    The molecular ordering of semiconducting polymers such as Poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) at surfaces and interfaces has significant influence on the performance of organic solar cell devices. The charge-carrier transport and the charge collection at the electrodes strongly depend on the molecular ordering of P3HT at interfaces. Molecular ordering of P3HT can be tuned by varying the substrate surface chemistry and film processing conditions. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and validated force field parameters, we have investigated the molecular ordering of P3HT on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of n-alkanethiols with varying end-functional groups and spacer length. In this study we elucidate the dependence of the molecular ordering of P3HT (edge-on or face-on conformation) on the surface chemistry of SAMs. Moreover, we investigated the effect of solvent on the molecular ordering of P3HT on SAMs surfaces. Understanding the correlation between P3HT morphology and surface chemistry will help in designing P3HT-based solar devices with better efficiency. This work is supported by the NSF (DMR0847580).

  1. Theory of two-dimensional self-assembly of Janus colloids: crystallization and orientational ordering.

    PubMed

    Shin, Homin; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2014-01-14

    We study the rich crystalline phase behavior of amphiphilic spherical Janus colloids using a new formulation of self-consistent phonon theory that includes coupled translational and rotational entropic and enthalpic contributions to the free energy. In contrast to homogeneous spheres, broken rotational symmetry can result in more exotic crystals that possess distinct orientational patterns, and also plastic crystals. Ground states are identified based on the compatibility between the patch geometry of particles (e.g., patch coverage, number, shape) and lattice symmetry. We derive the explicit coupled self-consistent equations for translational and rotational localization parameters for effectively 2-dimensional dense monolayers of Janus crystals. The equations are numerically solved for a given crystal symmetry, thermodynamic state, and patch orientational order, and the thermodynamic stability of different phases is determined. For hexagonal packing, we predict with increasing temperature or decreasing attraction strength the possibility of a phase sequence of maximally bonded zigzag stripe, trimer, and rotationally disordered plastic crystal phases (or a phase sequence of trimer, dimer, and plastic crystal), which depends sensitively on particle chemical composition (Janus balance) and pressure. The role of rotational entropy in stabilizing the intermediate trimer (or dimer) phase at intermediate temperatures and high pressures is discussed in detail. Evolution of the center-of-mass vibrational and rotational amplitudes with thermodynamic state and Janus balance is also determined. PMID:24651877

  2. Self-assembled molecular wires of discotic liquid crystal formed with the crucial contribution of solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji Hyun; Kim, Kyung Ho; Sosa Vargas, Lydia; Takanishi, Yoichi; Kim, Youn Sang; Yamamoto, Jun; Shimizu, Yo; Park, Yung Woo; Lagerwall, Jan Pf; Scalia, Giusy

    The self-organization of discotic liquid crystal molecules allows the spontaneous formation of well-aligned and tens of micrometer long molecular wires. In this work, we present a study based on hexapentyloxytriphenylene (HAT5) to investigate the molecular wire formation mechanism induced by solvents with selected characteristics, including chemical structure, boiling point, vapor pressure, and surface tension. The aromaticity in solvents such as toluene and benzene promotes the assembly into very long and thin wires entering into the structures, while chain-like solvents promotes more disordered structures. This finding allows a guided formation of different nanostructures from the same type of molecules just by choosing the type of solvent according to the need. Raman spectroscopy supports the idea of an active role of aromatic solvents entering into the molecular structure between discotic molecules with good quality intermolecular order. Highly aligned molecular wires bridging electrodes on SiO2 substrate show a clearly higher electrical conductivity compared to disorganized aggregates and bare HAT5. DLS and X-ray scattering were also used to investigate films and solutions. We finally discuss possible mechanisms behind the hierarchical assembly of the nanowires. NRF.

  3. Role of Surfactant Molecular Structure on Self Assembly: Aqueous SDBS on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suttipong, Manaswee; Thompson, John R.; Tummala, Naga Rajesh; Kitiyanan, Boonyarach; Striolo, Alberto

    2011-03-01

    Stabilizing aqueous dispersions of carbon nanotubes mono-dispersed in diameter and chirality remains elusive. Surfactants have proven useful in deploying ultra-centrifugation techniques, but the molecular mechanism responsible for their effectiveness remains not fully understood. Based on a number of recent molecular simulation results, including those from our group, it appears that the morphology of the self-assembled surfactant aggregates on the carbon nanotubes strongly affects the effective potential of mean force between pairs of interacting carbon nanotubes. In this work we explore the effect of surfactant molecular structure on the properties of aqueous surfactant self-assembled aggregates. We employ equilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We consider the surfactant SDBS (sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate) with benzene ring located on the fifth or on the twelfth carbon atom in the tail, and the surfactant AOT [sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate]. The simulations are conducted at room conditions for different surface coverages on (6,6), (12,12), and (20,20) single walled carbon nanotubes. These new results will help us identify the surfactant properties that allow us to manipulate nanotube-nanotube effective interactions. Research supported by the Department of Energy via CANTEC.

  4. Quick synthesis of highly aligned or randomly oriented nanofibrous structures composed of C60 molecules via self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosu, Shunji; Fukuda, Takahiro; Maekawa, Toru

    2013-06-01

    Assemblies, which are composed of nanoparticles such as nanofibres, have been intensively studied in recent years. This has particularly been the case in the field of biomedicine, where the aim is to develop efficient methodologies for capturing and separating target biomolecules and cells and/or encouraging bio-chemical reactions, utilizing the extremely high surface area to volume ratio of assemblies. There is an urgent need for the development of a quick synthesis method of forming nanofibrous structures on the surface of biomedical microchips and devices for the investigation of the interactions between biomolecules/cells and the nanostructures. Here, we produce nanofibrous structures composed of C60 molecules, which are aligned in one direction or randomly oriented, by dissolving C60 molecules and sulphur in benzene and evaporating a droplet of the solution on a glass substrate under appropriate conditions. The synthesis time is as short as 30 s. Sulphur is extracted and nanofibres are crystallized by leaving them in supercritical carbon dioxide.

  5. Rotating-polarization CARS microscopy: combining chemical and molecular orientation sensitivity.

    PubMed

    de Vito, Giuseppe; Bifone, Angelo; Piazza, Vincenzo

    2012-12-31

    Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) is a non-linear process in which the energy difference of a pair of incoming photons matches the energy of the vibrational mode of a molecular bond of interest. This phonon population is coherently probed by a third photon and anti-Stokes radiation is emitted. Here a novel approach to CARS microscopy is presented yielding the intensity of the anti-Stokes emission, the directionality the molecular bonds of interest, and their average orientation. Myelinated axons in fixed mouse-brain slices have been imaged by RP-CARS. We were able to detect the local average direction of the acylic chains of membrane phospholipids and their spatial anisotropy. This novel method may impact the study of healthy brain circuitry as well as demyelinating diseases or other pathological states associated with altered neural connectivity. PMID:23388764

  6. EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH AND ORIENTATION ON MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Heitsch, Fabian; Hartmann, Lee W.; Stone, James M.

    2009-04-10

    We present a set of numerical simulations addressing the effects of magnetic field strength and orientation on the flow-driven formation of molecular clouds. Fields perpendicular to the flows sweeping up the cloud can efficiently prevent the formation of massive clouds but permit the buildup of cold, diffuse filaments. Fields aligned with the flows lead to substantial clouds, whose degree of fragmentation and turbulence strongly depends on the background field strength. Adding a random field component leads to a 'selection effect' for molecular cloud formation: high column densities are only reached at locations where the field component perpendicular to the flows is vanishing. Searching for signatures of colliding flows should focus on the diffuse, warm gas, since the cold gas phase making up the cloud will have lost the information about the original flow direction because the magnetic fields redistribute the kinetic energy of the inflows.

  7. Molecularly self-assembled nucleic acid nanoparticles for targeted in vivo siRNA delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyukjin; Lytton-Jean, Abigail K. R.; Chen, Yi; Love, Kevin T.; Park, Angela I.; Karagiannis, Emmanouil D.; Sehgal, Alfica; Querbes, William; Zurenko, Christopher S.; Jayaraman, Muthusamy; Peng, Chang G.; Charisse, Klaus; Borodovsky, Anna; Manoharan, Muthiah; Donahoe, Jessica S.; Truelove, Jessica; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2012-06-01

    Nanoparticles are used for delivering therapeutics into cells. However, size, shape, surface chemistry and the presentation of targeting ligands on the surface of nanoparticles can affect circulation half-life and biodistribution, cell-specific internalization, excretion, toxicity and efficacy. A variety of materials have been explored for delivering small interfering RNAs (siRNAs)--a therapeutic agent that suppresses the expression of targeted genes. However, conventional delivery nanoparticles such as liposomes and polymeric systems are heterogeneous in size, composition and surface chemistry, and this can lead to suboptimal performance, a lack of tissue specificity and potential toxicity. Here, we show that self-assembled DNA tetrahedral nanoparticles with a well-defined size can deliver siRNAs into cells and silence target genes in tumours. Monodisperse nanoparticles are prepared through the self-assembly of complementary DNA strands. Because the DNA strands are easily programmable, the size of the nanoparticles and the spatial orientation and density of cancer-targeting ligands (such as peptides and folate) on the nanoparticle surface can be controlled precisely. We show that at least three folate molecules per nanoparticle are required for optimal delivery of the siRNAs into cells and, gene silencing occurs only when the ligands are in the appropriate spatial orientation. In vivo, these nanoparticles showed a longer blood circulation time (t1/2 ~ 24.2 min) than the parent siRNA (t1/2 ~ 6 min).

  8. Self-Assembly and Horizontal Orientation Growth of VO2 Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chun; Guo, Hua; Amini, Abbas; Liu, Kai; Fu, Deyi; Zou, Jian; Song, Haisheng

    2014-01-01

    Single-crystalline vanadium dioxide (VO2) nanostructures have attracted an intense research interest recently because of their unique single-domain metal-insulator phase transition property. Synthesis of these nanostructures in the past was limited in density, alignment, or single-crystallinity. The assembly of VO2 nanowires (NWs) is desirable for a “bottom-up” approach to the engineering of intricate structures using nanoscale building blocks. Here, we report the successful synthesis of horizontally aligned VO2 NWs with a dense growth mode in the [1-100]quartz direction of a polished x-cut quartz surface using a simple vapor transport method. Our strategy of controlled growth of VO2 NWs promisingly paves the way for designing novel metal-insulator transition devices based on VO2 NWs. PMID:24965899

  9. Synthesis and characterization of self-assembled c-axis oriented Bi2Sr3Co2O(y) thin films by the sol-gel method.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuebin; Tang, Xianwu; Shi, Dongqi; Jian, Hongbin; Lei, Hechang; Yeoh, Wai Kong; Zhao, Bangchuan; Yang, Jie; Li, Qi; Zheng, Rongkun; Dou, Shixue; Sun, Yuping

    2011-10-01

    Bi(2)Sr(3)Co(2)O(y) thin films are prepared on SrTiO(3) (100), (110) and (111) single crystal substrates using the sol-gel method. All the thin films are c-axis oriented regardless of the orientation of the substrate suggesting self-assembled c-axis orientation, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results give evidence of coexistence of Co(3+) and Co(2+) ions in the derived films. Transmission electronic microscopy observations reveal that all samples are c-axis oriented with no obvious differences for different samples, and the c-axis lattice constant is determined as ~15 Å suggesting the misfit structure. A phenomenological thermodynamic phase diagram for self-assembled c-axis orientation is established for misfit cobaltate-based films using chemical solution deposition. All samples behave like semiconductors due to the coexistence of Co(3+)/Co(2+) ions, and the resistivity at 350 K is ~47, 39 and 17 mΩ cm for the thin films on SrTiO(3) (100), (110) and (111), respectively, whereas the Seebeck coefficient at 300 K is 97, 89 and 77 μV K(-1). The successful attainment of Bi(2)Sr(3)Co(2)O(y) thin films with self-assembled c-axis orientation will provide an effective prototype for investigation of growth mechanisms in complex oxide thin films with a misfit structure. PMID:21850346

  10. Orientation and Mg Incorporation of Calcite Grown on Functionalized Self-Assembled Monolayers: A Synchrotron X-ray Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak,S.; DiMasi, E.; Han, Y.; Aizenberg, J.; Kuzmenko, I.

    2005-01-01

    Calcite crystals were nucleated from MgCl2/CaCl2 solutions onto functionalized self-assembled monolayers adsorbed onto E-beam evaporated Au films. Synchrotron X-ray scattering studies of the crystals reveal new information about preferred orientation and Mg incorporation. The Au [111] axis is distributed within 2.6 degrees of the film surface normal, but the oriented crystals may be tilted up to 6 degrees away from this axis. For low Mg{sup 2+} content, SO{sub 3}--functionalized films nucleated primarily near the (106) calcite face, odd-chain-length carboxylic acid terminated alkanethiol films nucleated near the (012) face, and even-chain-length carboxylic acid terminated alkanethiol films nucleated near the (113) face. [Mg{sup 2+}]/[Ca{sup 2+}] concentration ratios (n) of 2 and greater defeated this preferred orientation and created a powder texture. Diffraction patterns within the layer plane from the coarse calcite powders indicated a shift to higher 2 accompanied by peak broadening with increasing n. For 0.5 < n < 3.5, a double set of calcite peaks is observed, showing that two distinct Mg calcite phases form: one of comparatively lower Mg content, derived from the templated crystals, and a Mg-rich phase derived from amorphous precursor particles. According to the refinement of lattice parameters, Mg incorporation of up to 18 mol % occurs for n = 4, independent of film functionality. We discuss the differences between the differently functionalized monolayers and also introduce the hypothesis that two separate routes to Mg calcite formation occur in this system.

  11. Diffusive and re-orientation dynamics in lyotropic gels of self-assembled organic nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegart, Lutz; Wiegart, Pierre; Caronna, Chiara

    2012-02-01

    It is known that dispersing lithocholic bile acid (LCA) in aqueous solutions of sodium hydroxide or ammonia leads to the formation of organic nanotubes with well-defined diameters on the nanometer scale. The suspensions appear to be tunable from liquid- to solid-like via the LCA concentration. The length of the tubes is decreasing as a function of temperature, favoring the formation of a phase where the tubes form hexagonally ordered bundles for an appropriate LCA concentration and temperature. In the present study, we have used X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (XCPS) to probe the diffusive dynamics of the nanotubes in these lyotropic gels under various conditions (concentration, counter ion, temperature). The multispeckle analysis of the coherent scattering pattern reveals domains in the sample with differing diffusive dynamics. The re-orientation process of different domains of nanotube bundles into a preferred parallel alignment has been observed.

  12. Assembly of Oriented Virus Arrays by Chemo-Selective Ligation Methods and Nanolithography Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Camarero, J A; Cheung, C L; Lin, T; Johnson, J E; Weeks, B L; Noy, A; De Yoreo, J J

    2002-12-02

    The present work describes our ongoing efforts towards the creation of nano-scaled ordered arrays of protein/virus covalently attached to site-specific chemical linkers patterned by different nanolithograpy techniques. We will present a new and efficient solid-phase approach for the synthesis of chemically modified long alkyl-thiols. These compounds can be used to introduce chemoselective reacting groups onto gold and silicon-based surfaces. Furthermore, these modified thiols have been used to create nanometric patterns by using different nanolithography techniques. We will show that these patterns can react chemoselectively with proteins and/or virus which have been chemically or recombinantly modified to contain complementary chemical groups at specific positions thus resulting in the oriented attachment of the protein or virus to the surface.

  13. Iptycene-derived crown ether hosts for molecular recognition and self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying; Meng, Zheng; Ma, Ying-Xian; Chen, Chuan-Feng

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Synthetic macrocyclic hosts have played key roles in the development of host-guest chemistry. Crown ethers are a class of macrocyclic molecules with unique flexible structures. They have served as the first generation of synthetic hosts, and researchers have extensively studied them in molecular recognition. However, the flexible structures of simple crown ethers and their relatively limited modes of complexation with guests have limited the further applications of these molecules. In recent years, researchers have moved toward fabricating interlocking molecules, supramolecular polymers, and other assemblies with specific structures and properties. Therefore, researchers have developed more complex crown ether-based macrocyclic hosts with multicavity structures and multicomplexation modes that provide more diverse and sophisticated host-guest systems. In this Account, we summarize our research on the synthesis and characterization of iptycene-derived crown ether hosts, their use as host molecules, and their applications in self-assembled complexes. Iptycenes including triptycenes and pentiptycenes are a class of aromatic compounds with unique rigid three-dimensional structures. As a result, they are promising building blocks for the synthesis of novel macrocyclic hosts and the construction of novel self-assembled complexes with specific structures and properties. During the last several years, we have designed and synthesized a new class of iptycene-derived crown ether hosts including macrotricyclic polyethers, molecular tweezer-like hosts, and tritopic tris(crown ether) hosts, which are all composed of rigid iptycene building blocks linked by flexible crown ether chains. We have examined the complexation behavior of these hosts with different types of organic guest molecules. Unlike with conventional crown ethers, the combination of iptycene moieties and crown ether chains provides the iptycene-derived crown ether hosts with complexation properties

  14. The molecular chaperone calnexin facilitates folding and assembly of class I histocompatibility molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Vassilakos, A; Cohen-Doyle, M F; Peterson, P A; Jackson, M R; Williams, D B

    1996-01-01

    Calnexin, a membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum, is generally thought to function as a molecular chaperone, based on indirect or correlative evidence. To examine calnexin's functions more directly, we reconstituted the assembly of class I histocompatibility molecules in the absence or presence of calnexin in Drosophila melanogaster cells. Calnexin enhanced the assembly of class I heavy chains with beta 2-microglobulin as much as 5-fold. The improved assembly appeared largely due to more efficient folding of heavy chains, as evidenced by increased reactivity with a conformation-sensitive monoclonal antibody and by a reduction in the level of aggregates. Similar findings were obtained in mouse or human cells when the interaction of calnexin with class I heavy chains was prevented by treatment with the oligosaccharide processing inhibitor castanospermine. The ability of calnexin to facilitate castanospermine. The ability of calnexin to facilitate heavy chain folding and to prevent the formation of aggregates provides compelling evidence that calnexin functions as a bona fide molecular chaperone. Images PMID:8612572

  15. Molecular self-assembly on graphene on SiO2 and h-BN substrates.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, Päivi; Hämäläinen, Sampsa K; Banerjee, Kaustuv; Häkkinen, Pasi; Ijäs, Mari; Harju, Ari; Liljeroth, Peter

    2013-07-10

    One of the suggested ways of controlling the electronic properties of graphene is to establish a periodic potential modulation on it, which could be achieved by self-assembly of ordered molecular lattices. We have studied the self-assembly of cobalt phthalocyanines (CoPc) on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown graphene transferred onto silicon dioxide (SiO2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrates. Our scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments show that, on both substrates, CoPc forms a square lattice. However, on SiO2, the domain size is limited by the corrugation of graphene, whereas on h-BN, single domain extends over entire terraces of the underlying h-BN. Additionally, scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) measurements suggest that CoPc molecules are doped by the substrate and that the level of doping varies from molecule to molecule. This variation is larger on graphene on SiO2 than on h-BN. These results suggest that graphene on h-BN is an ideal substrate for the study of molecular self-assembly toward controlling the electronic properties of graphene by engineered potential landscapes. PMID:23786613

  16. Self-Assembly of Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane-Based Giant Molecular Shape Amphiphiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiwen; Cheng, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    A series of giant molecular shape amphiphiles based on functional polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) particles was designed and synthesized. The supramolecualr structures of these assemblies along with the resulting ordered structures are fully investigated to determine their structure-property relationships. For example, functional POSS cages with different surface chemistry and sizes were employed to construct dumbbell- and snowman-like molecular Janus particles with various symmetry breakings. These particles could self-organize into hierarchically ordered supramolecular structures in the bulk. Another illustrating example is a series of novel giant surfactants, lipids and gemini surfactants possessing a hydrophilic POSS head and polymer or alkyl chain tails. Diverse architectures of this class of materials have been constructed and their self-assembly processes in solution and bulk state have been discussed. This set of research results not only has general implications in the basic physical principles underlying their self-assembly behaviors, but also create unique materials for developing advanced technologies by combining the properties of hybrid materials

  17. Influence of crystallographic orientation and anisotropy on Kapitza conductance via classical molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duda, J. C.; Kimmer, C. J.; Soffa, W. A.; Zhou, X. W.; Jones, R. E.; Hopkins, P. E.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the influence of crystallographic orientation and anisotropy on local phonon density of states, phonon transmissivity, and Kapitza conductance at interfaces between Lennard-Jones solids via classical molecular dynamics simulations. In agreement with prior works, we find that the Kapitza conductance at an interface between two face-centered cubic materials is independent of crystallographic orientation. On the other hand, at an interface between a face-centered cubic material and a tetragonal material, the Kapitza conductance is strongly dependent on the relative orientation of the tetragonal material, albeit this dependence is subject to the overlap in vibrational spectra of the cubic and tetragonal materials. Furthermore, we show that interactions between acoustic phonons in the cubic material and optical phonons in the tetragonal material can lead to the interface exhibiting greater "thermal anisotropy" as compared to that of the constituent materials. Finally, it is noted that the relative match or mismatch between the Debye temperatures of two materials comprising an interface does not serve an accurate gauge of the efficiency of interfacial thermal transport when those materials have different crystal structures.

  18. Localization and orientation of heavy-atom cluster compounds in protein crystals using molecular replacement

    PubMed Central

    Dahms, Sven O.; Kuester, Miriam; Streb, Carsten; Roth, Christian; Sträter, Norbert; Than, Manuel E.

    2013-01-01

    Heavy-atom clusters (HA clusters) containing a large number of specifically arranged electron-dense scatterers are especially useful for experimental phase determination of large complex structures, weakly diffracting crystals or structures with large unit cells. Often, the determination of the exact orientation of the HA cluster and hence of the individual heavy-atom positions proves to be the critical step in successful phasing and subsequent structure solution. Here, it is demonstrated that molecular replacement (MR) with either anomalous or isomorphous differences is a useful strategy for the correct placement of HA cluster compounds. The polyoxometallate cluster hexasodium α-metatungstate (HMT) was applied in phasing the structure of death receptor 6. Even though the HA cluster is bound in alternate partially occupied orientations and is located at a special position, its correct localization and orientation could be determined at resolutions as low as 4.9 Å. The broad applicability of this approach was demonstrated for five different derivative crystals that included the compounds tantalum tetradeca­bromide and trisodium phosphotungstate in addition to HMT. The correct placement of the HA cluster depends on the length of the intramolecular vectors chosen for MR, such that both a larger cluster size and the optimal choice of the wavelength used for anomalous data collection strongly affect the outcome. PMID:23385464

  19. In vitro reconstruction of hybrid arterial media with molecular and cellular orientations.

    PubMed

    Kanda, K; Matsuda, T

    1994-01-01

    A hybrid medial tissue composed of a type I collagen gel, into which smooth muscle cells (SMCs) derived from bovine aortic media were 3-dimensionally (3D) embedded, was constructed around an elastomeric silicone tube (outer diameter: 8 mm). Subsequently, hybrid tissues thus prepared were subjected to three modes of mechanical stimulation in the medium: one was subjected to flotation with no disturbance (isotonic control), the second was kept isometrically (static stress) and the third was subjected to continuous periodic stretch by inflation of the embedded silicone tube which stimulated arterial pulsation (dynamic stress, amplitude: 5% in inner diameter; frequency: 60 RPM). After a 5-day culture period, hybrid tissues were morphologically investigated. In control gels, polygonal SMCs and extracellular collagen fiber bundles were randomly oriented. On the other hand, upon static or dynamic stress loading, bipolar spindle-shaped SMCs and dense collagen fiber bundles were aligned circumferentially around the silicone tube, which proceeded with time. The orientations of SMCs and collagen fibers were more prominent in dynamically stressed hybrid tissues than those in statistically stressed ones. The pulsatile stress-loaded hybrid medial tissue mimicked the media of native muscular arteries in terms of cellular and molecular orientations. PMID:7881764

  20. Synthetic Molecular Machines for Active Self-Assembly: Prototype Algorithms, Designs, and Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabby, Nadine L.

    Computer science and electrical engineering have been the great success story of the twentieth century. The neat modularity and mapping of a language onto circuits has led to robots on Mars, desktop computers and smartphones. But these devices are not yet able to do some of the things that life takes for granted: repair a scratch, reproduce, regenerate, or grow exponentially fast--all while remaining functional. This thesis explores and develops algorithms, molecular implementations, and theoretical proofs in the context of "active self-assembly" of molecular systems. The long-term vision of active self-assembly is the theoretical and physical implementation of materials that are composed of reconfigurable units with the programmability and adaptability of biology's numerous molecular machines. En route to this goal, we must first find a way to overcome the memory limitations of molecular systems, and to discover the limits of complexity that can be achieved with individual molecules. One of the main thrusts in molecular programming is to use computer science as a tool for figuring out what can be achieved. While molecular systems that are Turing-complete have been demonstrated [Winfree, 1996], these systems still cannot achieve some of the feats biology has achieved. One might think that because a system is Turing-complete, capable of computing "anything," that it can do any arbitrary task. But while it can simulate any digital computational problem, there are many behaviors that are not "computations" in a classical sense, and cannot be directly implemented. Examples include exponential growth and molecular motion relative to a surface. Passive self-assembly systems cannot implement these behaviors because (a) molecular motion relative to a surface requires a source of fuel that is external to the system, and (b) passive systems are too slow to assemble exponentially-fast-growing structures. We call these behaviors "energetically incomplete" programmable

  1. Modeling of DNA-Mediated Self-Assembly from Anisotropic Nanoparticles: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millan, Jaime; Girard, Martin; Brodin, Jeffrey; O'Brien, Matt; Mirkin, Chad; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    The programmable selectivity of DNA recognition constitutes an elegant scheme to self-assemble a rich variety of superlattices from versatile nanoscale building blocks, where the natural interactions between building blocks are traded by complementary DNA hybridization interactions. Recently, we introduced and validated a scale-accurate coarse-grained model for a molecular dynamics approach that captures the dynamic nature of DNA hybridization events and reproduces the experimentally-observed crystallization behavior of various mixtures of spherical DNA-modified nanoparticles. Here, we have extended this model to robustly reproduce the assembly of nanoparticles with the anisotropic shapes observed experimentally. In particular, we are interested in two different particle types: (i) regular shapes, namely the cubic and octahedral polyhedra shapes commonly observed in gold nanoparticles, and (ii) irregular shapes akin to those exhibited by enzymes. Anisotropy in shape can provide an analog to the atomic orbitals exhibited by conventional atomic crystals. We present results for the assembly of enzymes or anisotropic nanoparticles and the co-assembly of enzymes and nanoparticles.

  2. Molecular and biophysical characterization of assembly-starter units of human vimentin.

    PubMed

    Mücke, Norbert; Wedig, Tatjana; Bürer, Andrea; Marekov, Lyuben N; Steinert, Peter M; Langowski, Jörg; Aebi, Ueli; Herrmann, Harald

    2004-06-25

    We have developed an assembly protocol for the intermediate filament (IF) protein vimentin based on a phosphate buffer system, which enables the dynamic formation of authentic IFs. The advantage of this physiological buffer is that analysis of the subunit interactions by chemical cross-linking of internal lysine residues becomes feasible. By this system, we have analyzed the potential interactions of the coiled-coil rod domains with one another, which are assumed to make a crucial contribution to IF formation and stability. We show that headless vimentin, which dimerizes under low salt conditions, associates into tetramers of the A(22)-type configuration under assembly conditions, indicating that one of the effects of increasing the ionic strength is to favor coil 2-coil 2 interactions. Furthermore, in order to obtain insight into the molecular interactions that occur during the first phase of assembly of full-length vimentin, we employed a temperature-sensitive variant of human vimentin, which is arrested at the "unit-length filament" (ULF) state at room temperature, but starts to elongate upon raising the temperature to 37 degrees C. Most importantly, we demonstrate by cross-linking analysis that ULF formation predominantly involves A(11)-type dimer-dimer interactions. The presence of A(22) and A(12) cross-linking products in mature IFs, however, indicates that major rearrangements do occur during the longitudinal annealing and radial compaction steps of IF assembly. PMID:15184025

  3. 4-D reconstruction of fluorescence molecular tomography using re-assembled measurement data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; He, Xiaowe; Yan, Zhuangzhi; Lu, Hongbing

    2015-01-01

    Challenges remain in the reconstruction of dynamic (4-D) fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT). In our previous work, we implemented a fully 4-D FMT reconstruction approach using Karhunen-Loève (KL) transformation. However, in the reconstruction processes, the input data were scan-by-scan fluorescence projections. As a result, the reconstruction interval is limited by the data acquisition time for scanning one circle projections, leading to a long time (typically >1 min). In this paper, we propose a new method to reduce the reconstruction interval of dynamic FMT imaging, which is achieved by re-assembling the acquired fluorescence projection sequence. Further, to eliminate the temporal correlations within measurement data, the re-assembled projection sequence is reconstructed by the KL-based method. The numerical simulation and in vivo experiments are performed to evaluate the performance of the method. The experimental results indicate that after re-assembling measurement data, the reconstruction interval can be greatly reduced (~2.5 sec/frame). In addition, the proposed re-assembling method is helpful for improving reconstruction quality of the KL-based method. PMID:26114022

  4. Size-matching effect on inorganic nanosheets: control of distance, alignment, and orientation of molecular adsorption as a bottom-up methodology for nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shinsuke; Shimada, Tetsuya; Ishida, Yohei; Fujimura, Takuya; Masui, Dai; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Eguchi, Miharu; Inoue, Haruo

    2013-02-19

    We have been investigating complexes composed of nanolayered materials with anionic charges such as clay nanosheets and dye molecules such as cationic porphyrins. It was found that the structure of dye assembly on the layered materials can be effectively controlled by the use of electrostatic host-guest interaction. The intermolecular distance, the molecular orientation angle, the segregation/integration behavior, and the immobilization strength of the dyes can be controlled in the clay-dye complexes. The mechanism to control these structural factors has been discussed and was established as a size-matching effect. Unique photochemical reactions such as energy transfer through the use of this methodology have been examined. Almost 100% efficiency of the energy-transfer reaction was achieved in the clay-porphyrin complexes as a typical example for an artificial light-harvesting system. Control of the molecular orientation angle is found to be useful in regulating the energy-transfer efficiency and in preparing photofunctional materials exhibiting solvatochromic behavior. Through our study, clay minerals turned out to serve as protein-like media to control the molecular position, modify the properties of the molecule, and provide a unique environment for chemical reactions. PMID:23343172

  5. Electron diffraction studies of molecular ordering and orientation in phospholipid monolayer domains.

    PubMed Central

    Hui, S W; Yu, H

    1993-01-01

    The molecular order and orientation of phase separated domains in monolayers of DP(Me)PE and DP(Me)2PE were determined by electron diffraction. Dark and bright fluorescent domains at the air-water interface were observed by fluorescence microscopy. The monolayers were transferred to Formvar coated electron microscope grids for electron diffraction studies. The positions of domains on the marker grids were recorded in fluorescence micrographs, which were used as guide maps to locate these domains in the electron microscope. Selected area electron diffraction patterns were obtained from predetermined areas within and outside the dark domains. Sharp hexagonal diffraction patterns were recorded from dark domains, and diffuse diffraction rings from bright areas in between dark domains. The diffraction results indicated that the dark domains and bright areas were comprised of lipid molecules in solid and fluid states, respectively. The orientation of diffraction patterns from adjacent locations within a dark domains changed gradually, indicating a continuous bending of the molecular packing lattice vector within these domains. Orientation directors in U-shaped DP(Me)2PE domains followed the turn of the arm; no vortex nor branching was indicated by electron diffraction. Directors branching from the "stem" of highly invaginated DP(Me)PE domains usually occurred at twinning angles of n pi/3 from the stem director, which would minimize packing defects in the development of thinner branches. Electron diffraction from local areas of individual domains proved that dark fluorescent domains were solid ones, and that pseudo-long range order existed in these solid domains. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:8431539

  6. Studies of molecular monolayers at air-liquid interfaces by second harmonic generation: question of orientational phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Rasing, T.; Shen, Y.R.; Kim, M.W.; Grubb, S.; Bock, J.

    1985-06-01

    Insoluble molecular monolayers at gas-liquid interfaces provide an insight to the understanding of surfactants, wetting, microemulsions and membrane structures and offer a possibility to study the rich world of 2-dimensional phase transitions. In the interpretation of the observed properties of these systems various assumptions about the molecular orientation are often made, but so far few clear experimental data exist. In this paper we will show how optical second harmonic generation (SHG) can be used to measure the molecular orientation of monolayers of surfactant molecules at water-air interfaces. By simultaneously measuring the surface pressure versus surface molecular area we can show for the first time that the observed liquid condensed-liquid expanded transition is an orientational phase transition. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  7. The Role of Molecular Dipole Orientation in Single-Molecule Fluorescence Microscopy and Implications for Super-Resolution Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Backlund, Mikael P.; Lew, Matthew D.; Backer, Adam S.; Sahl, Steffen J.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous methods for determining the orientation of single-molecule transition dipole moments from microscopic images of the molecular fluorescence have been developed in recent years. At the same time, techniques that rely on nanometer-level accuracy in the determination of molecular position, such as single-molecule super-resolution imaging, have proven immensely successful in their ability to access unprecedented levels of detail and resolution previously hidden by the optical diffraction limit. However, the level of accuracy in the determination of position is threatened by insufficient treatment of molecular orientation. Here we review a number of methods for measuring molecular orientation using fluorescence microscopy, focusing on approaches that are most compatible with position estimation and single-molecule super-resolution imaging. We highlight recent methods based on quadrated pupil imaging and on double-helix point spread function microscopy and apply them to the study of fluorophore mobility on immunolabeled microtubules. PMID:24382708

  8. Emergent Molecular Recognition through Self-Assembly: Unexpected Selectivity for Hyaluronic Acid among Glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Takao; Roy, Bappaditya; Yoshihara, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Junji; Yamamoto, Tatsuhiro; Shinkai, Seiji

    2016-05-01

    Oligophenylenevinylene (OPV)-based fluorescent (FL) chemosensors exhibiting linear FL responses toward polyanions were designed. Their application to FL sensing of glycosaminoglycans (heparin: HEP, chondroitin 4-sulfate: ChS, and hyaluronic acid: HA) revealed that the charge density encoded as the unit structure directs the mode of OPV self-assembly: H-type aggregate for HEP with 16-times FL increase and J-type aggregate for HA with 93-times FL increase, thus unexpectedly achieving the preferential selectivity for HA in contrast to the conventional HEP selective systems. We have found that the integral magnitude of three factors consisting of binding mechanism, self-assembly, and FL response can amplify the structural information on the target input into the characteristic FL output. This emergent property has been used for a novel molecular recognition system that realizes unconventional FL sensing of HA, potentially applicable to the clinical diagnosis of cancer-related diseases. PMID:27060601

  9. Dynamic self-assembly of non-Brownian spheres studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvente, O.; Salazar-Cruz, M.; Peñuñuri, F.; Ruiz-Suárez, J. C.

    2016-02-01

    Granular self-assembly of confined non-Brownian spheres under gravity is studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Starting from a disordered phase, dry or cohesive spheres organize, by vibrational annealing, into body-centered-tetragonal or face-centered-cubic structures, respectively. During the self-assembling process, isothermal and isodense points are observed. The existence of such points indicates that both granular temperature and packing fraction undergo an inversion process that may be in the core of crystal nucleation. Around the isothermal point, a sudden growth of granular clusters having the maximum coordination number takes place, indicating the outcome of a first-order phase transition. We propose a heuristic equation that successfully describes the dynamic evolution of the local packing fraction in terms of the local granular temperature, along the entire crystallization process.

  10. DNA self-assembly-driven positioning of molecular components on nanopatterned surfaces.

    PubMed

    Szymonik, M; Davies, A G; Wälti, C

    2016-09-30

    We present a method for the specific, spatially targeted attachment of DNA molecules to lithographically patterned gold surfaces-demonstrated by bridging DNA strands across nanogap electrode structures. An alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer was employed as a molecular resist, which could be selectively removed via electrochemical desorption, allowing the binding of thiolated DNA anchoring oligonucleotides to each electrode. After introducing a bridging DNA molecule with single-stranded ends complementary to the electrode-tethered anchoring oligonucleotides, the positioning of the DNA molecule across the electrode gap, driven by self-assembly, occurred autonomously. This demonstrates control of molecule positioning with resolution limited only by the underlying patterned structure, does not require any alignment, is carried out entirely under biologically compatible conditions, and is scalable. PMID:27559837

  11. Composite film polarizer based on the oriented assembly of electrospun nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhongliang; Ma, Zhijun; Peng, Mingying; He, Xin; Zhang, Hang; Li, Yang; Qiu, Jianrong

    2016-04-01

    Polarizers are widely applied in antiglare glasses, planner displays, photography filters and optical communications, etc. In this investigation, we propose a new strategy for the preparation of a flexible film polarizer based on the electrospinning technique. An aligned assembly of polyvinyl acetate (PVA) nanofibers was electrospun and collected by a fast-rotating drum, then soaked in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) solution and dried thoroughly to obtain a transparent PVA-PMMA composite film polarizer. The morphology, structure and optical performance of the PVA nanofibers and the film polarizers were characterized with a scanning electron microscope, UV-vis-IR spectrometer and polarized Raman spectra, etc. The PVA-PMMA film polarizer demonstrated efficient polarizing activity toward visible and near-infrared light, while keeping fair transparency in the range of 400-1400 nm. Due to the protection from the hydrophobic PMMA matrix, the PVA-PMMA film polarizers show high moisture resistance, making it applicable in a humid environment. Considering the scalability and versatility of the strategy employed here, the PVA-PMMA film polarizer prepared could replace the conventional film polarizers in a wide range of applications.

  12. Composite film polarizer based on the oriented assembly of electrospun nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhongliang; Ma, Zhijun; Peng, Mingying; He, Xin; Zhang, Hang; Li, Yang; Qiu, Jianrong

    2016-04-01

    Polarizers are widely applied in antiglare glasses, planner displays, photography filters and optical communications, etc. In this investigation, we propose a new strategy for the preparation of a flexible film polarizer based on the electrospinning technique. An aligned assembly of polyvinyl acetate (PVA) nanofibers was electrospun and collected by a fast-rotating drum, then soaked in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) solution and dried thoroughly to obtain a transparent PVA-PMMA composite film polarizer. The morphology, structure and optical performance of the PVA nanofibers and the film polarizers were characterized with a scanning electron microscope, UV-vis-IR spectrometer and polarized Raman spectra, etc. The PVA-PMMA film polarizer demonstrated efficient polarizing activity toward visible and near-infrared light, while keeping fair transparency in the range of 400-1400 nm. Due to the protection from the hydrophobic PMMA matrix, the PVA-PMMA film polarizers show high moisture resistance, making it applicable in a humid environment. Considering the scalability and versatility of the strategy employed here, the PVA-PMMA film polarizer prepared could replace the conventional film polarizers in a wide range of applications. PMID:26894877

  13. Capturing the embryonic stages of self-assembly - design rules for molecular computation.

    PubMed

    Nirmalraj, Peter N; Thompson, Damien; Riel, Heike E

    2015-01-01

    The drive towards organic computing is gaining momentum. Interestingly, the building blocks for such architectures is based on molecular ensembles extending from nucleic acids to synthetic molecules. Advancement in this direction requires devising precise nanoscopic experiments and model calculations to decipher the mechanisms governing the integration of a large number of molecules over time at room-temperature. Here, we report on ultrahigh-resolution scanning tunnelling microscopic measurements to register the motion of molecules in the absence of external stimulus in liquid medium. We observe the collective behavior of individual molecules within a swarm which constantly iterate their position to attain an energetically favourable site. Our approach provides a consistent pathway to register molecular self-assembly in sequential steps from visualising thermodynamically driven repair of defects up until the formation of a stable two-dimensional configuration. These elemental findings on molecular surface dynamics, self-repair and intermolecular kinetic pathways rationalised by atom-scale simulations can be explored for developing new models in algorithmic self-assembly to realisation of evolvable hardware. PMID:25960364

  14. Capturing the embryonic stages of self-assembly - design rules for molecular computation

    PubMed Central

    Nirmalraj, Peter N.; Thompson, Damien; Riel, Heike E.

    2015-01-01

    The drive towards organic computing is gaining momentum. Interestingly, the building blocks for such architectures is based on molecular ensembles extending from nucleic acids to synthetic molecules. Advancement in this direction requires devising precise nanoscopic experiments and model calculations to decipher the mechanisms governing the integration of a large number of molecules over time at room-temperature. Here, we report on ultrahigh-resolution scanning tunnelling microscopic measurements to register the motion of molecules in the absence of external stimulus in liquid medium. We observe the collective behavior of individual molecules within a swarm which constantly iterate their position to attain an energetically favourable site. Our approach provides a consistent pathway to register molecular self-assembly in sequential steps from visualising thermodynamically driven repair of defects up until the formation of a stable two-dimensional configuration. These elemental findings on molecular surface dynamics, self-repair and intermolecular kinetic pathways rationalised by atom-scale simulations can be explored for developing new models in algorithmic self-assembly to realisation of evolvable hardware. PMID:25960364

  15. Molecular transport through nanoporous silicon nitride membranes produced from self-assembling block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Franck; Blondiaux, Nicolas; Bojko, Alexandre; Pugin, Raphaël

    2012-09-28

    To achieve fast and selective molecular filtration, membrane materials must ideally exhibit a thin porous skin and a high density of pores with a narrow size distribution. Here, we report the fabrication of nanoporous silicon nitride membranes (NSiMs) at the full wafer scale using a versatile process combining block copolymer (BCP) self-assembly and conventional photolithography/etching techniques. In our method, self-assembled BCP micelles are used as templates for creating sub-100 nm nanopores in a thin low-stress silicon nitride layer, which is then released from the underlying silicon wafer by etching. The process yields 100 nm thick free-standing NSiMs of various lateral dimensions (up to a few mm(2)). We show that the membranes exhibit a high pore density, while still retaining excellent mechanical strength. Permeation experiments reveal that the molecular transport rate across NSiMs is up to 16-fold faster than that of commercial polymeric membranes. Moreover, using dextran molecules of various molecular weights, we also demonstrate that size-based separation can be achieved with a very good selectivity. These new silicon nanosieves offer a relevant technological alternative to commercially available ultra- and microfiltration membranes for conducting high resolution biomolecular separations at small scales. PMID:22899238

  16. Molecular self-assembly in substituted alanine derivatives: XRD, Hirshfeld surfaces and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajalakshmi, Periasamy; Srinivasan, Navaneethakrishnan; Sivaraman, Gandhi; Razak, Ibrahim Abdul; Rosli, Mohd Mustaqim; Krishnakumar, Rajaputi Venkatraman

    2014-06-01

    The molecular assemblage in the crystal structures of three modified chiral amino acids, two of which are isomeric D- and L-pairs boc-L-benzothienylalanine (BLA), boc-D-benzothienylalanine (BDA) and the other boc-D-naphthylalanine (NDA) differing from this pair very slightly in the chemical modification introduced, is accurately described. The aggregation of amino acid molecules is similar in all the crystals and may be described as a twisted double helical ladder in which two complementary long helical chains formed through O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds are interconnected through the characteristic head-to-tail N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds. Thus the molecular aggregation enabled through classical hydrogen bonds may be regarded as a mimic of the characteristic double helical structure of DNA. Also, precise structural information involving these amino acid molecules with lower symmetry exhibiting higher trigonal symmetry in their self-assembly is expected to throw light on the nature and strength of intermolecular interactions and their role in self-assembly of molecular aggregates, which are crucial in developing new or at least supplement existing crystal engineering strategies. Single crystal X-ray analysis and their electronic structures were calculated at the DFT level with a detailed analysis of Hirshfeld surfaces and fingerprint plots facilitating a comparison of intermolecular interactions in building different supramolecular architectures.

  17. Selective self-assembly of molecular clusters with designed sizes on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Li, Qing; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Pan, Minghu

    2014-03-01

    The self-assembly of ``magic'' molecular clusters on various substrates provides a new arena for studies of surface nanocatalysis and molecular electronics. Here we present the self-assembly of phenylacetylene molecules on Cu(100) by a combined low-temperature STM and in-depth density functional theory investigation. We observe the molecules form distinct tetramer clusters on Cu(100) at 40 K. Each cluster has a four-fold symmetry and consists of four molecules. A delicate balance of intramolecular and dipole-dipole interactions between clusters maintains this magic tetramer configuration on Cu(100). The strong interaction between the molecules and the copper surface creates an anchor at each adsorption site. Through comparison with our previous observed hexamer (six-molecule) clusters on Au(111), we conclude that the epitaxial relationship between the molecules and metal surfaces is crucial in defining magic numbers of surface-supported molecular clusters under weak intermolecular interaction. This research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is sponsored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by the Scientific User Facilities Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy.

  18. Synthesis and Self-Assembly Behaviors of Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Based Giant Molecular Shape Amphiphiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Kan; Yu, Xinfei; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Cheng, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    Recently, our group has focus on the synthesis and characterization of novel giant molecular shape amphiphiles (GMSAs) based on functionalized molecular nanoparticles (MNPs), such as polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS), tethered with polymeric tails. A general synthetic method via the combination of sequential ?click? reactions has been developed and several model GMSAs with various tail lengths and distinct molecular topologies, which can be referred as the ?giant surfactants?, ?giant lipids?, ?giant gemini surfactants?, and ?giant bolaform surfactants? etc., have been demonstrated. Studies on their self-assembly behaviors in the bulk have revealed the formation of different ordered mesophase structures with feature sizes around 10 nanometers, which have been investigated in detail by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) technique and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These findings have general implications on understanding the underlying principles of self-assembly behaviors of GMSAs, and might have potential applications in nano-patterning technology. This work is supported by NSF (DMR-0906898) and the Joint-Hope Foundation.

  19. ESR study of molecular orientation and dynamics of TEMPO derivatives in CLPOT 1D nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Furuhashi, Yuta; Nakagawa, Haruka; Asaji, Tetsuo

    2016-08-01

    The molecular orientations and dynamics of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxyl (TEMPO) radical derivatives with large substituent groups at the 4-position (4-X-TEMPO) in the organic one-dimensional nanochannels within the nanosized molecular template 2,4,6-tris(4-chlorophenoxy)-1,3,5-triazine (CLPOT) were examined using ESR. The concentrations of guest radicals, including 4-methoxy-TEMPO (MeO-TEMPO) or 4-oxo-TEMPO (TEMPONE), in the CLPOT nanochannels in each inclusion compound (IC) were reduced by co-including 4-substituted-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine (4-R-TEMP) compounds at a ratio of 1 : 30-1 : 600. At higher temperatures, the guest radicals in each IC underwent anisotropic rotational diffusion in the CLPOT nanochannels. The rotational diffusion activation energy, Ea , associated with MeO-TEMPO or TEMPONE in the CLPOT nanochannels (6-7 kJ mol(-1) ), was independent of the size and type of substituent group and was similar to the Ea values obtained for TEMPO and 4- hydroxy-TEMPO (TEMPOL) in our previous study. However, in the case in which TEMP was used as a guest compound for dilution (spacer), the tilt of the rotational axis to the principal axis system of the g-tensor, and the rotational diffusion correlation time, τR , of each guest radical in the CLPOT nanochannels were different from the case with other 4-R-TEMP. These results indicate the possibility of controlling molecular orientation and dynamics of guest radicals in CLPOT ICs through the appropriate choice of spacer. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27001507

  20. General strategy for self-assembly of highly oriented nanocrystalline semiconducting polymers with high mobility.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chan; Kyaw, Aung Ko Ko; Perez, Louis A; Patel, Shrayesh; Wang, Ming; Grimm, Bruno; Bazan, Guillermo C; Kramer, Edward J; Heeger, Alan J

    2014-05-14

    Solution processable semiconducting polymers with excellent film forming capacity and mechanical flexibility are considered among the most progressive alternatives to conventional inorganic semiconductors. However, the random packing of polymer chains and the disorder of the polymer matrix typically result in low charge transport mobilities (10(-5)-10(-2) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)). These low mobilities compromise their performance and development. Here, we present a strategy, by utilizing capillary action, to mediate polymer chain self-assembly and unidirectional alignment on nanogrooved substrates. We designed a sandwich tunnel system separated by functionalized glass spacers to induce capillary action for controlling the polymer nanostructure, crystallinity, and charge transport. Using capillary action, we demonstrate saturation mobilities with average values of 21.3 and 18.5 cm(2) V(-1 )s(-1) on two different semiconducting polymers at a transistor channel length of 80 μm. These values are limited by the source-drain contact resistance, Rc. Using a longer channel length of 140 μm where the contact resistance is less important, we measured μh = 36.3 cm(2) v(-1) s(-1). Extrapolating to infinite channel length where Rc is unimportant, the intrinsic mobility for poly[4-(4,4-dihexadecyl-4H-cyclopenta[1,2-b:5,4-b']dithiophen-2-yl)-alt-[1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-c]pyridine] (Mn = 140 kDa) at this degree of chain alignment and structural order is μh ≈ 47 cm(2 )v(-1) s(-1). Our results create a promising pathway toward high performance, solution processable, and low-cost organic electronics. PMID:24712578

  1. Self assembled molecular monolayers on high surface area materials as molecular getters

    DOEpatents

    King, D.E.; Herdt, G.C.; Czanderna, A.W.

    1997-01-07

    The present invention relates to a gettering material that may be used as a filtration medium to remove pollutants from the environment. The gettering material comprises a high surface area material having a metal surface that chemically bonds n-alkanethiols in an organized manner thereby forming a molecular monolayer over the metal surface. The n-alkanethiols have a free functional group that interacts with the environment thereby binding specific pollutants that may be present. The gettering material may be exposed to streams of air in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems or streams of water to remove specific pollutants from either medium. 9 figs.

  2. Self assembled molecular monolayers on high surface area materials as molecular getters

    DOEpatents

    King, David E.; Herdt, Gregory C.; Czanderna, Alvin W.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to a gettering material that may be used as a filtration medium to remove pollutants from the environment. The gettering material comprises a high surface area material having a metal surface that chemically bonds n-alkanethiols in an organized manner thereby forming a molecular monolayer over the metal surface. The n-alkanethiols have a free functional group that interacts with the environment thereby binding specific pollutants that may be present. The gettering material may be exposed to streams of air in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems or streams of water to remove specific pollutants from either medium.

  3. Positional isomers of cyanostilbene: two-component molecular assembly and multiple-stimuli responsive luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Guoling; Yan, Dongpeng

    2014-05-01

    An understanding of the aggregates and properties of positional isomers can not only uncover how a slight difference in molecular structure alter crystal packing and bulk solid-state properties, but also plays an important role in developing new types of molecule-based functional materials. Herein, we report a study of the molecular packing and static/dynamic luminescence properties of three cyanostilbene (CS)-based isomers (CS1, CS2, CS3) within their single- and two-component molecular solids. Changing the positions of the cyano substitutents in the CS isomers has a marked influence on their packing modes and luminescent properties. Moreover, two-component CS-based materials have been constructed, which exhibit tunable conformations and packing fashions, as well as fluorescence properties, which differ from the pristine CS solids. The CS-based two-component molecular materials show solvent-responsive luminescence due to the dynamic disassembly of the samples. Moreover, it was found that the system based on CS2 and octafluoronaphthalene shows reversible photochromic fluorescence upon alternating light illumination and grinding. Such co-assembly procedures provide a facile way to fabricate patterned luminescent film materials. Therefore, this work not only affords new insight into the relationship between isomers and luminescence from molecular and supramolecular perspectives, but provides an effective strategy to develop multiple-stimuli-responsive luminescent materials.

  4. Molecular self-assemblies might discriminate the diffusion of chiral molecules.

    PubMed

    Galstian, Tigran; Allahverdyan, Karen

    2015-06-01

    Biological tissue has many self-aligned anisotropic molecular organizations, which are able to undergo reversible orientational deformations and spatially transfer them. At the same time, the majority of drugs and many biologically important molecules contain chiral centers. It is therefore important to understand the factors affecting the diffusion of chiral molecules in such elastic environments. We experimentally study the diffusion of chiral molecules in a nematic liquid crystal host representing the model of biological tissue. The analogy of Cano's quantization effect is observed (due to the gradient of the chiral dopant) and used to estimate the corresponding diffusion coefficients. It is shown that thanks to the collective orientational correlation of host molecules the diffusion of chiral dopants is noticeably reduced (by a factor of ≈1.6) for the case of rigid alignment of host molecules compared to the case when the same matrix is free to adjust that alignment. PMID:25902722

  5. Orientation, interaction and laser assisted self-assembly of organic single-crystal micro-sheets in a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Rasna, M V; Zuhail, K P; Ramudu, U V; Chandrasekar, R; Dontabhaktuni, J; Dhara, Surajit

    2015-10-14

    Colloidal self-assembly has been one of the major driving themes in material science to obtain functional and advanced optical materials with complex architecture. Most of the nematic colloids reported so far are based on the optically isotropic spherical microparticles. We study organic single crystal micro-sheets and investigate their orientation, interaction and directed assembly in a nematic liquid crystal. The micro-sheets induce planar surface anchoring of the liquid crystal. The elasticity mediated pair interaction of micro-sheets shows quadrupolar characteristics. The average orientation angle of the micro-sheets in a planar cell and the angle between two micro-sheets in a homeotropic cell are supported by the Landau-de Gennes Q-tensor modeling. The self-assembly of the micro-sheets is assisted by a laser tweezer to form larger two-dimensional structures which have the potential for application of colloids in photonics. PMID:26299670

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of ferrocene-terminated self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Goujon, F; Bonal, C; Limoges, B; Malfreyt, P

    2010-05-20

    The present work describes our studies of the Fc(CH(2))(12)S-/C(10)S-Au monolayers to provide a more detailed molecular description. Molecular dynamics simulations of these mixed monolayers are carried out in conditions close to the electrochemical ones. For this purpose, a supporting electrolyte is added (NaClO(4) 1 M) and the electron transfer process is modeled through molecular simulations of ferrocene both in its neutral (initial state) and oxidized form (final state). The heterogeneity of the surface, that is, "clustered " or "isolated" ferrocene moieties, has been considered for the ferrocenylalkylthiolates using the same grafting densities. The structural properties (density profiles and angular distributions) are described in terms of redox induced orientation changes by comparison between the initial and final states. It is established that this orientation change due to the oxidation of the ferrocene to the ferrocenium is mainly observed in the random system, and it is less pronounced in the cluster system. Finally, the energy contributions underline the role played by the supporting electrolyte. PMID:20411913

  7. Molecular organization, localization and orientation of antifungal antibiotic amphotericin B in a single lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Grudzinski, Wojciech; Sagan, Joanna; Welc, Renata; Luchowski, Rafal; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2016-01-01

    Amphotericin B is a popular antifungal antibiotic, a gold standard in treatment of systemic mycotic infections, due to its high effectiveness. On the other hand, applicability of the drug is limited by its considerable toxicity to patients. Biomembranes are a primary target of physiological activity of amphotericin B and both the pharmacologically desired and toxic side effects of the drug relay on its molecular organization in the lipid phase. In the present work, molecular organization, localization and orientation of amphotericin B, in a single lipid bilayer system, was analysed simultaneously, thanks to application of a confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of giant unilamellar vesicles. The results show that the presence of sterols, in the lipid phase, promotes formation of supramolecular structures of amphotericin B and their penetration into the membrane hydrophobic core. The fact that such an effect is substantially less pronounced in the case of cholesterol than ergosterol, the sterol of fungal membranes, provides molecular insight into the selectivity of the drug. PMID:27620838

  8. Unoccupied electronic structure and molecular orientation of rubrene; from evaporated films to single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueba, T.; Park, J.; Terawaki, R.; Watanabe, Y.; Yamada, T.; Munakata, T.

    2016-07-01

    Two-photon photoemission (2PPE) spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) have been performed for rubrene single crystals and evaporated thin films on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The changes in the 2PPE intensity from the single crystals by the polarization of the light and by the angle of the light incident plane against the crystalline axes indicate that the molecular arrangement on the surface is similar to that in the bulk crystal. On the other hand, in the case of evaporated films, the polarization dependence of 2PPE indicates that the tetracene backbone becomes standing upright as the thickness increases. In spite of the alignment of molecules, the broadened 2PPE spectral features for thick films suggest that the films are amorphous and molecules are in largely different environments. The film structures are confirmed by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) derived levels of the single crystal are shifted by + 0.18 and - 0.20 eV, respectively, from those of the 0.8 ML film. The shifts are attributed to the packing density of molecules. It is shown that the unoccupied electronic structure is more sensitively affected by the film structure than the occupied electronic structure.

  9. Modeling and Bio molecular Self-assembly via Molecular Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakesh, L.

    2009-09-01

    Surfactants like materials can be used to increase the solubility of poorly soluble drugs in water and to increase drug bioavailability. A typical case study will be demonstrated using DPD simulation to model the distribution of anti-inflammatory drug molecules. Computer simulation is a convenient approach to understand drug distribution and solubility concepts without much wastage and costly experiments in the laboratory. Often in molecular dynamics (MD) the atoms are represented explicitly and the equation of motion as described by Newtonian dynamics is integrated explicitly. MD has been used to study spontaneous formation of micelles by hydrophobic molecules with amphiphilic head groups in bulk water, as well as stability of pre-configured micelles and membranes. DPD is a state-of the- art mesoscale simulation, it is a more recent molecular dynamics technique, originally developed for simulating complex fluids but lately also applied to membrane dynamics, hemodynamic in biomedical applications. Such fluids pervade industrial research from paints to pharmaceuticals and from cosmetics to the controlled release of drugs. Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) can provide structural and dynamic properties of fluids in equilibrium, under shear or confined to narrow cavities, at length- and time-scales beyond the scope of traditional atomistic molecular dynamics simulation methods. Mesoscopic particles are used to represent clusters of molecules. The interaction conserves mass and momentum and as a consequence the dynamics is consistent with Navier-Stokes equations. In addition to the conservative forces, stochastic drive and dissipation is introduced to represent internal degrees of freedom in the mesoscopic particles. In this research, an initial study is being conducted using the aqueous solubilization of the nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory drug is studied theoretically in micellar solution of nonionic (dodecyl hexa(ethylene oxide), C12E6) surfactants possessing the

  10. Molecular Self-Assembly in a Poorly Screened Environment: F4TCNQ on Graphene/BN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a scanning tunneling microscopy and noncontact atomic force microscopy study of close-packed 2D islands of tetrafluorotetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ) molecules at the surface of a graphene layer supported by boron nitride. While F4TCNQ molecules are known to form cohesive 3D solids, the intermolecular interactions that are attractive for F4TCNQ in 3D are repulsive in 2D. Our experimental observation of cohesive molecular behavior for F4TCNQ on graphene is thus unexpected. This self-assembly behavior can be explained by a novel solid formation mechanism that occurs when charged molecules are placed in a poorly screened environment. As negatively charged molecules coalesce, the local work function increases, causing electrons to flow into the coalescing molecular island and increase its cohesive binding energy. PMID:26482218

  11. Efficient assembly of threaded molecular machines for sequence-specific synthesis.

    PubMed

    De Bo, Guillaume; Kuschel, Sonja; Leigh, David A; Lewandowski, Bartosz; Papmeyer, Marcus; Ward, John W

    2014-04-16

    We report on an improved strategy for the preparation of artificial molecular machines that can pick up and assemble reactive groups in sequence by traveling along a track. In the new approach a preformed rotaxane synthon is attached to the end of an otherwise fully formed strand of building blocks. This "rotaxane-capping" protocol is significantly more efficient than the "final-step-threading" method employed previously and enables the synthesis of threaded molecular machines that operate on extended oligomer, and potentially polymer, tracks. The methodology is exemplified through the preparation of a machine that adds four amino acid building blocks from a strand in sequence, featuring up to 20-membered ring native chemical ligation transition states. PMID:24678971

  12. Surface cis Effect: Influence of an Axial Ligand on Molecular Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Knaak, Thomas; Gopakumar, Thiruvancheril G; Schwager, Bettina; Tuczek, Felix; Robles, Roberto; Lorente, Nicolás; Berndt, Richard

    2016-06-22

    Adding ligands to molecules can have drastic and unforeseen consequences in the final products of a reaction. Recently a surface trans effect due to the weakening of a molecule-surface bond was reported. Here, we show a surface cis effect where an axial ligand at adsorbed transition-metal complexes enables lateral bonding among the molecules. In the absence of this ligand, the intermolecular interaction is repulsive and supramolecular patterns are not observed. Fe-tetramethyl-tetraazaannulene on Au(111) was investigated using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy along with density functional theory calculations. At low coverages, the molecules remain isolated. Exposure to CO leads to axial CO bonding and induces reordering into extended clusters of chiral molecular trimers. The changed self-assembly pattern is due to a CO-induced modification of the molecular structure and the corresponding charge transfer between the molecule and the substrate, which in turn changes the lateral intermolecular forces. PMID:27233351

  13. Structural and electronic characterization of self-assembled molecular nanoarchitectures by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gulino, Antonino

    2013-02-01

    Molecular monolayers and similar nanoarchitectures are indicative of the promising future of nanotechnology. Therefore, many scientists recently devoted their efforts to the synthesis, characterization, and properties of mono- and multilayer-based systems. In this context, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is an important technique for the in-depth chemical and structural characterization of nanoscopic systems. In fact, it is a surface technique suitable for probing thicknesses of the same order of the photoelectron inelastic mean free paths (a few tens of ångströms) and allows one to immediately obtain qualitative and quantitative data, film thickness, surface coverage, molecule footprint, oxidation states, and presence of functional groups. Nevertheless, other techniques are important in obtaining a complete spectroscopic characterization of the investigated systems. Therefore, in the present review we report on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of self-assembled molecular mono- and multilayer materials including some examples on which other characterization techniques produced important results. PMID:23014858

  14. Concepts for the Formation of Molecular Nanostructures: Self-Assembly and SPM Manipulation -- A Combined Approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Thomas A.

    1996-03-01

    We(Work performed in collaboration with J.K. Gimzewski and R. R. Schlittler, IBM Rüschlikon, and C. Joachim and Hao Tang, CNRS Toulouse,) (Supported by the BBW of Switzerland through the ESPRIT basic research program PRONANO (8523). ) demonstrate the controlled generation of molecular nanostructures based on specific chemical synthesis and well-controlled epitaxial growth. Such structures, assembled in parallel by growth kinetics, can be modified selectively by manipulating individual molecules using different modes of the scanning tunneling microscope. The influence of molecular structure on such properties as mobility, conformational adaptation to the substrate, and the current/voltage (I/V) characteristic are compared for porphyrin molecules with different substituents. Numerical simulations are related to experimentally accessible parameters. The resulting rules and concepts are to be generalized and applied to the design of nanostructures having more specific functional properties.

  15. Molecular orientation of copper phthalocyanine thin films on different monolayers of fullerene on SiO{sub 2} or highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chenggong; Wang, Congcong; Liu, Xiaoliang; Xu, Xumei; Li, Youzhen; Xie, Fangyan; Gao, Yongli

    2015-03-23

    The interface electronic structures of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) have been studied using ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy as different monolayers of C{sub 60} were inserted between CuPc and a SiO{sub 2} or highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrate. The results show that CuPc has standing up configuration with one monolayer of C{sub 60} insertion on SiO{sub 2} while lying down on HOPG, indicating that the insertion layer propagates the CuPc-substrate interaction. Meanwhile, CuPc on more than one monolayers of C{sub 60} on different substrates show that the substrate orientation effect quickly vanished. Our study elucidates intriguing molecular interactions that manipulate molecular orientation and donor-acceptor energy level alignment.

  16. Folding and self-assembly of polypeptides: Dynamics and thermodynamics from molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluitt, Aaron Michael

    Empowered by their exquisite three-dimensional structures, or "folds," proteins carry out biological tasks with high specificity, efficiency, and fidelity. The fold that optimizes biological function represents a stable configuration of the constituent polypeptide molecule(s) under physiological conditions. Proteins and polypeptides are not static, however: battered by thermal motion, they explore a distribution of folds that is determined by the sequence of amino acids, the presence and identity of other molecules, and the thermodynamic conditions. In this dissertation, we apply molecular simulation techniques to the study of two polypeptides that have unusually diffuse distributions of folds under physiological conditions: polyglutamine (polyQ) and islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). Neither polyQ nor IAPP adopts a predominant fold in dilute aqueous solution, but at sufficient concentrations, both are prone to self-assemble into stable, periodic, and highly regular aggregate structures known as amyloid. The appearance of amyloid deposits of polyQ in the brain, and of IAPP in the pancreas, are associated with Huntington's disease and type 2 diabetes, respectively. A molecular view of the mechanism(s) by which polyQ and IAPP fold and self-assemble will enhance our understanding of disease pathogenesis, and it has the potential to accelerate the development of therapeutics that target early-stage aggregates. Using molecular simulations with spatial and temporal resolution on the atomic scale, we present analyses of the structural distributions of polyQ and IAPP under various conditions, both in and out of equilibrium. In particular, we examine amyloid fibers of polyQ, the IAPP dimer in solution, and single IAPP fragments at a lipid bilayer. We also benchmark the molecular models, or "force fields," available for such studies, and we introduce a novel simulation algorithm.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of electric-field-induced self-assembly of diblock copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiuzhi; Xu, Rui; Kan, Di; He, Xuehao

    2016-06-01

    The self-assembly of block copolymers under an external electric field was studied with a coarse-grained polarizable model that hybridizes the conventional polymeric coarse-grained model and Drude oscillator. The polarizability of the coarse-grained polymeric segment was reflected by the Drude oscillator. Applying this model, the alignment of the lamellar phase of the block copolymer melt under an external electric field was observed and the dynamic coupling information between chain polarization and interface orientation induced by the external electric field was obtained. It is demonstrated that the alignment of the lamellar structure along the electric field direction results from the polarizability difference of the polymer components. Finally, the transitions of phase structures of the block copolymer under an external electric field, from spherical phase to cylindrical phase, from gyroid structure to cylindrical phase, and from gyroid structure to lamellae phase were simulated. The specific evolution pathways were shown.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of electric-field-induced self-assembly of diblock copolymers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiuzhi; Xu, Rui; Kan, Di; He, Xuehao

    2016-06-21

    The self-assembly of block copolymers under an external electric field was studied with a coarse-grained polarizable model that hybridizes the conventional polymeric coarse-grained model and Drude oscillator. The polarizability of the coarse-grained polymeric segment was reflected by the Drude oscillator. Applying this model, the alignment of the lamellar phase of the block copolymer melt under an external electric field was observed and the dynamic coupling information between chain polarization and interface orientation induced by the external electric field was obtained. It is demonstrated that the alignment of the lamellar structure along the electric field direction results from the polarizability difference of the polymer components. Finally, the transitions of phase structures of the block copolymer under an external electric field, from spherical phase to cylindrical phase, from gyroid structure to cylindrical phase, and from gyroid structure to lamellae phase were simulated. The specific evolution pathways were shown. PMID:27334188

  19. Transcriptome analysis of Capsicum annuum varieties Mandarin and Blackcluster: assembly, annotation and molecular marker discovery.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yul-Kyun; Tripathi, Swati; Kim, Jeong-Ho; Cho, Young-Il; Lee, Hye-Eun; Kim, Do-Sun; Woo, Jong-Gyu; Cho, Myeong-Cheoul

    2014-01-10

    Next generation sequencing technologies have proven to be a rapid and cost-effective means to assemble and characterize gene content and identify molecular markers in various organisms. Pepper (Capsicum annuum L., Solanaceae) is a major staple vegetable crop, which is economically important and has worldwide distribution. High-throughput transcriptome profiling of two pepper cultivars, Mandarin and Blackcluster, using 454 GS-FLX pyrosequencing yielded 279,221 and 316,357 sequenced reads with a total 120.44 and 142.54Mb of sequence data (average read length of 431 and 450 nucleotides). These reads resulted from 17,525 and 16,341 'isogroups' and were assembled into 19,388 and 18,057 isotigs, and 22,217 and 13,153 singletons for both the cultivars, respectively. Assembled sequences were annotated functionally based on homology to genes in multiple public databases. Detailed sequence variant analysis identified a total of 9701 and 12,741 potential SNPs which eventually resulted in 1025 and 1059 genotype specific SNPs, for both the varieties, respectively, after examining SNP frequency distribution for each mapped unigenes. These markers for pepper will be highly valuable for marker-assisted breeding and other genetic studies. PMID:24125952

  20. Molecularly-mediated assemblies of plasmonic nanoparticles for Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy applications.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Luca; Graham, Duncan

    2012-11-01

    In recent years, Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) has experienced a tremendous increase of attention in the scientific community, expanding to a continuously wider range of diverse applications in nanoscience, which can mostly be attributed to significant improvements in nanofabrication techniques that paved the way for the controlled design of reliable and effective SERS nanostructures. In particular, the plasmon coupling properties of interacting nanoparticles are extremely intriguing due to the concentration of enormous electromagnetic enhancements at the interparticle gaps. Recently, great efforts have been devoted to develop new nanoparticle assembly strategies in suspension with improved control over hot-spot architecture and cluster structure, laying the foundation for the full exploitation of their exceptional potential as SERS materials in a wealth of chemical and biological sensing. In this review we summarize in an exhaustive and systematic way the state-of-art of plasmonic nanoparticle assembly in suspension specifically developed for SERS applications in the last 5 years, focusing in particular on those strategies which exploited molecular linkers to engineer interparticle gaps in a controlled manner. Importantly, the novel advances in this rather new field of nanoscience are organized into a coherent overview aimed to rationally describe the different strategies and improvements in the exploitation of colloidal nanoparticle assembly for SERS application to real problems. PMID:22833008

  1. Building highly sensitive dye assemblies for biosensing from molecular building blocks.

    PubMed

    Jones, R M; Lu, L; Helgeson, R; Bergstedt, T S; McBranch, D W; Whitten, D G

    2001-12-18

    Fluorescence superquenching is investigated for polyelectrolytes consisting of cyanine dye pendant polylysines ranging in number of polymer repeat units (N(PRU)) from 1 to 900, both in solution and after adsorption onto silica nanoparticles. As N(PRU) increases, the absorption and fluorescence evolve from monomer spectra to red-shifted features indicative of molecular J aggregates. In solution, the superquenching sensitivity toward an anionic electron acceptor increases by more than a millionfold over the N(PRU) range from 1 to 900. The dramatic increase is attributed to enhanced equilibrium constants for binding the quenchers, and the amplified quenching of a delocalized exciton of approximately 100 polymer repeat units. The self-assembly of monomer onto silica and clay nanoparticles leads to formation of J aggregates, and surface-activated superquenching enhanced 10,000x over the monomer in solution, indicating the formation of "self-assembled polymers" on the nanoparticle surface. Utilization of these self-assembled polymers as high-sensitivity biosensors is demonstrated. PMID:11742082

  2. Molecular behavior of DNA origami in higher-order self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Liu, Minghui; Wang, Lei; Nangreave, Jeanette; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2010-09-29

    DNA-based self-assembly is a unique method for achieving higher-order molecular architectures made possible by the fact that DNA is a programmable information-coding polymer. In the past decade, two main types of DNA nanostructures have been developed: branch-shaped DNA tiles with small dimensions (commonly up to ∼20 nm) and DNA origami tiles with larger dimensions (up to ∼100 nm). Here we aimed to determine the important factors involved in the assembly of DNA origami superstructures. We constructed a new series of rectangular-shaped DNA origami tiles in which parallel DNA helices are arranged in a zigzag pattern when viewed along the DNA helical axis, a design conceived in order to relax an intrinsic global twist found in the original planar, rectangular origami tiles. Self-associating zigzag tiles were found to form linear arrays in both diagonal directions, while planar tiles showed significant growth in only one direction. Although the series of zigzag tiles were designed to promote two-dimensional array formation, one-dimensional linear arrays and tubular structures were observed instead. We discovered that the dimensional aspect ratio of the origami unit tiles and intertile connection design play important roles in determining the final products, as revealed by atomic force microscopy imaging. This study provides insight into the formation of higher-order structures from self-assembling DNA origami tiles, revealing their unique behavior in comparison with conventional DNA tiles having smaller dimensions. PMID:20825190

  3. Molecular Behavior of DNA Origami in Higher-Order Self-Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhe; Liu, Minghui; Lei, Wang; Nangreave, Jeanette; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2010-09-08

    DNA-based self-assembly is a unique method for achieving higher-order molecular architectures made possible by the fact that DNA is a programmable information-coding polymer. In the past decade, two main types of DNA nanostructures have been developed: branch-shaped DNA tiles with small dimensions (commonly up to ~20 nm) and DNA origami tiles with larger dimensions (up to ~100 nm). Here we aimed to determine the important factors involved in the assembly of DNA origami superstructures. We constructed a new series of rectangular-shaped DNA origami tiles in which parallel DNA helices are arranged in a zigzag pattern when viewed along the DNA helical axis, a design conceived in order to relax an intrinsic global twist found in the original planar, rectangular origami tiles. Self-associating zigzag tiles were found to form linear arrays in both diagonal directions, while planar tiles showed significant growth in only one direction. Although the series of zigzag tiles were designed to promote two-dimensional array formation, one-dimensional linear arrays and tubular structures were observed instead. We discovered that the dimensional aspect ratio of the origami unit tiles and intertile connection design play important roles in determining the final products, as revealed by atomic force microscopy imaging. This study provides insight into the formation of higher-order structures from self-assembling DNA origami tiles, revealing their unique behavior in comparison with conventional DNA tiles having smaller dimensions.

  4. Impact of molecular orientation on thermal conduction in linear-chain polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Kurabayashi, K.; Goodson, K.E.

    1999-07-01

    Polymer films are serving as passive regions in fast logic circuits and as active regions in organic optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes. Recent data illustrated the strong anisotropy in the thermal conductivity of polyimide films of thickness near one micrometer, with the in-plane value larger by a factor of approximately five. This manuscript extends previous theoretical work on heat conduction in stretched bulk polymers to model the conductivity anisotropy in linear-chain polymer films. Predictions are based on the standard deviation of the angle of molecular orientation with respect to the film in-plane direction, which can be investigated using birefringence data, and the expected conductivity anisotropy in a material with perfectly-aligned strands. The modeling and previous data indicate that the anisotropy factor could increase to a value larger than 10 for polyimide films much thinner than 1 micrometer.

  5. Field-free molecular orientation of 1Σ and 2Π molecules at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehini, R.; Hoque, Md Z.; Faucher, O.; Sugny, D.

    2012-04-01

    We analyze the control of field-free molecular orientation at high temperature by use of a two-color laser bipulse strategy proposed in Zhang [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.83.043410 83, 043410 (2011)]. A general study shows that there exist two types of linear molecules for which a different mechanism has to be used. For molecules with a large hyperpolarizability, a monochromatic laser pre-pulse is applied before the two-color laser pulse at a time close to the rotational period Tr, while for molecules with a small hyperpolarizability, the optimal delay is found close to Tr/4 or 3Tr/4. We extend this analysis to the case of a 2Π molecule such as NO where a similar control strategy can be derived. These control processes are robust against temperature effects.

  6. HackaMol: An Object-Oriented Modern Perl Library for Molecular Hacking on Multiple Scales.

    PubMed

    Riccardi, Demian; Parks, Jerry M; Johs, Alexander; Smith, Jeremy C

    2015-04-27

    HackaMol is an open source, object-oriented toolkit written in Modern Perl that organizes atoms within molecules and provides chemically intuitive attributes and methods. The library consists of two components: HackaMol, the core that contains classes for storing and manipulating molecular information, and HackaMol::X, the extensions that use the core. The core is well-tested, well-documented, and easy to install across computational platforms. The goal of the extensions is to provide a more flexible space for researchers to develop and share new methods. In this application note, we provide a description of the core classes and two extensions: HackaMol::X::Calculator, an abstract calculator that uses code references to generalize interfaces with external programs, and HackaMol::X::Vina, a structured class that provides an interface with the AutoDock Vina docking program. PMID:25793330

  7. Nuclear quadrupole spin-lattice relaxation due to molecular reorientations in crystals with orientational disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriles, C. A.; Pérez, S. C.; Brunetti, A. H.

    1997-08-01

    p-chloronitrobenzene (PCNB) and p-chlorobromobenzene (PCBB) crystallize in the centrosymmetric space group P21/c with two molecules per unit cell. The space lattice will have an equal number of points with molecules facing in opposite directions. As a consequence, these compounds exhibit an orientational rigid disorder. In this work, we have measured the temperature dependence of the chlorine nuclear quadrupole spin-lattice relaxation time (T1), linewidth, and resonance frequency for both compounds for temperatures higher than 80 K. Both compounds exhibit an inhomogeneously broadened line shape and a "normal" Bayer-type temperature dependence of the resonance frequency. The analysis focuses on the identification of the dominant relaxation process at high temperatures (T>240 K in PCNB and T>260 K in PCBB). It is shown that T1(T) reflects the existence of 180° molecular reorientations through a modulation of the crystalline contribution to the electric field gradient.

  8. Lightweight Object Oriented Structure analysis: Tools for building Tools to Analyze Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Romo, Tod D.; Leioatts, Nicholas; Grossfield, Alan

    2014-01-01

    LOOS (Lightweight Object-Oriented Structure-analysis) is a C++ library designed to facilitate making novel tools for analyzing molecular dynamics simulations by abstracting out the repetitive tasks, allowing developers to focus on the scientifically relevant part of the problem. LOOS supports input using the native file formats of most common biomolecular simulation packages, including CHARMM, NAMD, Amber, Tinker, and Gromacs. A dynamic atom selection language based on the C expression syntax is included and is easily accessible to the tool-writer. In addition, LOOS is bundled with over 120 pre-built tools, including suites of tools for analyzing simulation convergence, 3D histograms, and elastic network models. Through modern C++ design, LOOS is both simple to develop with (requiring knowledge of only 4 core classes and a few utility functions) and is easily extensible. A python interface to the core classes is also provided, further facilitating tool development. PMID:25327784

  9. Liquid crystals with patterned molecular orientation as an electrolytic active medium.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chenhui; Guo, Yubing; Conklin, Christopher; Viñals, Jorge; Shiyanovskii, Sergij V; Wei, Qi-Huo; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2015-11-01

    Transport of fluids and particles at the microscale is an important theme in both fundamental and applied science. One of the most successful approaches is to use an electric field, which requires the system to carry or induce electric charges. We describe a versatile approach to generate electrokinetic flows by using a liquid crystal (LC) with surface-patterned molecular orientation as an electrolyte. The surface patterning is produced by photoalignment. In the presence of an electric field, the spatially varying orientation induces space charges that trigger flows of the LC. The active patterned LC electrolyte converts the electric energy into the LC flows and transport of embedded particles of any type (fluid, solid, gaseous) along a predesigned trajectory, posing no limitation on the electric nature (charge, polarizability) of these particles and interfaces. The patterned LC electrolyte exhibits a quadratic field dependence of the flow velocities; it induces persistent vortices of controllable rotation speed and direction that are quintessential for micro- and nanoscale mixing applications. PMID:26651712

  10. Liquid crystals with patterned molecular orientation as an electrolytic active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chenhui; Guo, Yubing; Conklin, Christopher; Viñals, Jorge; Shiyanovskii, Sergij V.; Wei, Qi-Huo; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2015-11-01

    Transport of fluids and particles at the microscale is an important theme in both fundamental and applied science. One of the most successful approaches is to use an electric field, which requires the system to carry or induce electric charges. We describe a versatile approach to generate electrokinetic flows by using a liquid crystal (LC) with surface-patterned molecular orientation as an electrolyte. The surface patterning is produced by photoalignment. In the presence of an electric field, the spatially varying orientation induces space charges that trigger flows of the LC. The active patterned LC electrolyte converts the electric energy into the LC flows and transport of embedded particles of any type (fluid, solid, gaseous) along a predesigned trajectory, posing no limitation on the electric nature (charge, polarizability) of these particles and interfaces. The patterned LC electrolyte exhibits a quadratic field dependence of the flow velocities; it induces persistent vortices of controllable rotation speed and direction that are quintessential for micro- and nanoscale mixing applications.

  11. Molecular orientation sensitive second harmonic microscopy by radially and azimuthally polarized light

    PubMed Central

    Ehmke, Tobias; Nitzsche, Tim Heiko; Knebl, Andreas; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility to switch the z-polarization component of the illumination in the vicinity of the focus of high-NA objective lenses by applying radially and azimuthally polarized incident light. The influence of the field distribution on nonlinear effects was first investigated by the means of simulations. These were performed for high-NA objective lenses commonly used in nonlinear microscopy. Special attention is paid to the influence of the polarization of the incoming field. For linearly, circularly and radially polarized light a considerable polarization component in z-direction is generated by high NA focusing. Azimuthal polarization is an exceptional case: even for strong focusing no z-component arises. Furthermore, the influence of the input polarization on the intensity contributing to the nonlinear signal generation was computed. No distinct difference between comparable input polarization states was found for chosen thresholds of nonlinear signal generation. Differences in signal generation for radially and azimuthally polarized vortex beams were experimentally evaluated in native collagen tissue (porcine cornea). The findings are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions and display the possibility to probe the molecular orientation along the optical axis of samples with known nonlinear properties. The combination of simulations regarding the nonlinear response of materials and experiments with different sample orientations and present or non present z-polarization could help to increase the understanding of nonlinear signal formation in yet unstudied materials. PMID:25071961

  12. Molecular Structure of a Helical ribbon in a Peptide Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Wonmuk; Marini, Davide; Kamm, Roger D.; Zhang, Shuguang

    2002-03-01

    We have studied the molecular structure of nanometer scale helical ribbons observed during self-assembly of the peptide KFE8 (amino acid sequence: FKFEFKFE) (NanoLetters (2002, in press)). By analyzing the hydrogen bonding patterns between neighboring peptide backbones, we constructed a number of possible β-sheets. Using all possible combinations of these, we built helical ribbons with dimensions close to those found experimentally and performed molecular dynamics simulations to identify the most stable structure. Solvation effects were implemented by the analytic continuum electrostatics (ACE) model developed by Schaefer and Karplus (J. Phys. Chem. 100, 1578 (1996)). By applying electrostatic double layer theory, we incorporated the effect of pH by scaling the amount of charge on the sidechains. Our results suggest that the helical ribbon is comprised of a double β-sheet where the inner and the outer helices have distinct hydrogen bonding patterns. Our approach has general applicability to the study of helices formed by the self-assembly of β-sheet forming peptides with various amino acid sequences.

  13. Self-Assembly of Nanoparticle-Surfactant Complexes with Rodlike Micelles: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Sambasivam, Abhinanden; Sangwai, Ashish V; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2016-02-01

    The self-assembly of nanoparticles (NPs) with cationic micelles of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) is known to produce stable nanogels with rich rheological and optical properties. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying this self-assembly process. In an aqueous solution of CTAC surfactants, a negatively charged NP with a zeta potential of less than -45 mV is observed to form a stable vesicular structure in which the particle surface is almost entirely covered with a double layer of surfactants. In comparison, surfactants form a monolayer, or a corona, around an uncharged hydrophobic NP with the tailgroups physically adsorbed onto the particle. In the presence of sodium salicylate salt, such NP-surfactant complexes (NPSCs) interact with rodlike CTAC micelles, resulting in the formation of stable junctions through the opening up of the micelle end-cap followed by surfactant exchange, which is diffusion-limited. The diffusive regime spans several hundred nanoseconds, thereby necessitating MD simulations over microsecond time scales. The energetics of NPSC-micelle complexation is analyzed from the variation in the total pair-potential energy of the structures. PMID:26760445

  14. Assembly and Characterization ofWell-DefinedHigh-Molecular-Weight Poly(p-phenylene) Polymer Brushes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jihua; Dadmun, Mark D; Mays, Jimmy; Messman, Jamie M; Hong, Kunlun; Britt, Phillip F; Sumpter, Bobby G; Alonzo Calderon, Jose E; Kilbey, II, S Michael; Ankner, John Francis; Bredas, Jean-Luc E; Malagoli, Massimo; Deng, Suxiang; Swader, Onome A; Yu, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    The assembly and characterization of well-de ned, end-tethered poly- (p-phenylene) (PPP) brushes having high molecular weight, low polydispersity and high 1,4-stereoregularity are presented. The PPP brushes are formed using a precursor route that relies on either self-assembly or spin coating of high molecular weight (degrees of poly- merizations 54, 146, and 238) end-functionalized poly(1,3-cyclohexadiene) (PCHD) chains from benzene solutions onto silicon or quartz substrates, followed by aromatization of the end-attached PCHD chains on the surface. The approach allows the thickness (grafting density) of the brushes to be easily varied. The dry brushes before and after aromatization are characterized by ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, grazing angle attenuated total re ectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and UV-Vis spectros- copy. The properties of the PPP brushes are compared with those of lms made using oligo- paraphenylenes and with ab initio density functional theory simulations of optical proper- ties. Our results suggest conversion to fully aromatized, end-tetheredPPPpolymerbrusheshaving eective conjugation lengths of 5 phenyl units.

  15. Assembly and Characterization of Well Defined High Molecular Weight Poly(p-phenylene) Polymer Brushes

    SciTech Connect

    Alonzo Calderon, Jose E; Kilbey, II, S Michael; Ankner, John Francis; Britt, Phillip F; Chen, Jihua; Dadmun, Mark D; Deng, Suxiang; Hong, Kunlun; Mays, Jimmy; Messman, Jamie M; Sumpter, Bobby; Swader, Onome A; Yu, Xiang; Bredas, Jean-Luc E; Malagoli, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    The assembly and characterization of well-defined, end-tethered poly(p-phenylene) (PPP) brushes having high molecular weight, low polydispersity and high 1,4-stereoregularity are presented. The PPP brushes are formed using a precursor route that relies on either self-assembly or spin coating of high molecular weight (degrees of polymerizations 54, 146, and 238) end-functionalized poly(1,3-cyclohexadiene) (PCHD) chains from benzene solutions onto silicon or quartz substrates, followed by aromatization of the end-attached PCHD chains on the surface. The approach allows the thickness (grafting density) of the brushes to be easily varied. The dry brushes before and after aromatization are characterized by ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, grazing angle attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The properties of the PPP brushes are compared with those of films made using oligo-paraphenylenes and with ab initio density functional theory simulations of optical properties. Our results suggest conversion to fully aromatized, end-tethered PPP polymer brushes having effective conjugation lengths of 5 phenyl units.

  16. Construction of Supramolecular Assemblies from Self-Organization of Amphiphilic Molecular Isomers.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaohua; Yang, Yuntian; Wang, Yanqiu; Chen, Tie; Jin, Long Yi; Lee, Myongsoo

    2016-08-19

    Amphiphilic coil-rod-coil molecules, incorporating flexible and rigid blocks, have a strong affinity to self-organize into various supramolecular aggregates in bulk and in aqueous solutions. In this paper, we report the self-assembling behavior of amphiphilic coil-rod-coil molecular isomers. These molecules consist of biphenyl and phenyl units connected by ether bonds as the rod segment, and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) with a degree of polymerization of 7 and 12 as the flexible chains. Their aggregation behavior was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, thermal optical polarized microscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results imply that the molecular structure of the rod building block and the length of the PEO chains dramatically influence the creation of supramolecular aggregates in bulk and in aqueous solutions. In the bulk state, these molecules self-organize into a hexagonal perforated lamellar and an oblique columnar structure, respectively, depending on the sequence of the rod building block. In aqueous solution, the molecule with a linear rod segment self-assembles into sheet-like nanoribbons. In contrast, its isomer, with a rod building block substituted at the meta-position of the aryl group, self-organizes into nanofibers. This is achieved through the control of the non-covalent interactions of the rod building blocks. PMID:27348276

  17. Reduction-Triggered Self-Assembly of Nanoscale Molybdenum Oxide Molecular Clusters.

    PubMed

    Yin, Panchao; Wu, Bin; Li, Tao; Bonnesen, Peter V; Hong, Kunlun; Seifert, Soenke; Porcar, Lionel; Do, Changwoo; Keum, Jong Kahk

    2016-08-24

    Understanding the formation mechanism of giant molecular clusters is essential for rational design and synthesis of cluster-based nanomaterials with required morphologies and functionalities. Here, typical synthetic reactions of a 2.9 nm spherical molybdenum oxide cluster, {Mo132} (formula: [Mo(VI)72Mo(V)60O372(CH3COO)30(H2O)72](42-)), with systematically varied reaction parameters have been fully explored to determine the morphologies and concentration of products, reduction of metal centers, and chemical environments of the organic ligands. The growth of these clusters shows a typical sigmoid curve, suggesting a general multistep self-assembly mechanism for the formation of giant molecular clusters. The reaction starts with a lag phase period when partial Mo(VI) centers of molybdate precursors are reduced to form {Mo(V)2(acetate)} structures under the coordination effect of the acetate groups. Once the concentration of {Mo(V)2(acetate)} reaches a critical value, it triggers the co-assembly of Mo(V) and Mo(VI) species into the giant clusters. PMID:27459601

  18. Dragline silk: a fiber assembled with low-molecular-weight cysteine-rich proteins.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thanh; Chuang, Tyler; Lin, Albert; Joo, Hyun; Tsai, Jerry; Crawford, Taylor; Zhao, Liang; Williams, Caroline; Hsia, Yang; Vierra, Craig

    2014-11-10

    Dragline silk has been proposed to contain two main protein constituents, MaSp1 and MaSp2. However, the mechanical properties of synthetic spider silks spun from recombinant MaSp1 and MaSp2 proteins have yet to approach natural fibers, implying the natural spinning dope is missing critical factors. Here we report the discovery of novel molecular constituents within the spinning dope that are extruded into dragline silk. Protein studies of the liquid spinning dope from the major ampullate gland, coupled with the analysis of dragline silk fibers using mass spectrometry, demonstrate the presence of a new family of low-molecular-weight cysteine-rich proteins (CRPs) that colocalize with the MA fibroins. Expression of the CRP family members is linked to dragline silk production, specifically MaSp1 and MaSp2 mRNA synthesis. Biochemical data support that CRP molecules are secreted into the spinning dope and assembled into macromolecular complexes via disulfide bond linkages. Sequence analysis supports that CRP molecules share similarities to members that belong to the cystine slipknot superfamily, suggesting that these factors may have evolved to increase fiber toughness by serving as molecular hubs that dissipate large amounts of energy under stress. Collectively, our findings provide molecular details about the components of dragline silk, providing new insight that will advance materials development of synthetic spider silk for industrial applications. PMID:25259849

  19. Giant spatially-resolved self-assembled donor-acceptor molecular heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guest, Jeffrey R.; Smerdon, Joseph A.; Giebink, Noel C.; Guisinger, Nathan P.; Darancet, Pierre

    Despite theoretical models predicting that rectification ratios (RR) >1000 should be achievable in molecular rectifiers, demonstrations of this have been rare. It has also been extremely challenging to unravel the structure-function relationships on the nanometer length scales that determine their behavior. Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS), we show that RRs >1000 at biases <500 mV are realized in the two-molecule limit for self-assembled donor-acceptor bilayers of pentacene on C60 on Cu. We show that the system behaves as a molecular analog to a Schottky diode due to strong electronic coupling of C60 to the metallic substrate, and electronic transport is dominated by sequential tunneling from semiconducting pentacene to metallic C60. Furthermore, we demonstrate the extreme sensitivity of the low-bias I (V) characteristics to the molecularly-resolved structure of the heterojunction (HJ), which leads to negative differential resistance and ~ 100 × variation in the rectification ratio within 2 nm of the edge of the molecular HJ. Support was provided by the Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences (SISGR Grant DE-FG02-09ER16109).

  20. Template-directed molecular assembly on silicon carbide nanomesh: comparison between CuPc and pentacene.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Wei, Chen; Han, Huang; Xingyu, Gao; Dongchen, Qi; Yuzhan, Wang; Wee, Andrew T S

    2010-02-23

    The template-directed assembly of two planar molecules (copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and pentacene) on SiC nanomesh has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Both molecules are trapped as single molecules in the cells of SiC nanomesh at low coverage. At high coverage, CuPc forms a highly ordered single-molecular array with identical symmetry and periodicity as the substrate, whereas pentacene forms a quasi-amorphous layer due to the random mixture of three different adsorption configurations. This difference in adsorption behavior is attributed to differences in molecular geometries. The measured changes of work functions reveal weak charge transfer between the molecules and substrate. Both molecules are preferentially adsorbed on the SiC nanomesh rather than on graphene. The CuPc single-molecular array possesses good long-range order, large area coverage, and a molecular density of over 3.0 x 10(13) molecules/cm(2). PMID:20050639

  1. Molecular Details of the Yeast Frataxin-Isu1 Interaction during Mitochondrial Fe-S Cluster Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.; Kondapalli, K; Rawat, S; Childs, W; Murugesan, Y; Dancis, A; Stemmler, T

    2010-01-01

    Frataxin, a conserved nuclear-encoded mitochondrial protein, plays a direct role in iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis within the ISC assembly pathway. Humans with frataxin deficiency have Friedreich's ataxia, a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by mitochondrial iron overload and disruption in Fe-S cluster synthesis. Biochemical and genetic studies have shown frataxin interacts with the iron-sulfur cluster assembly scaffold protein (in yeast, there are two, Isu1 and Isu2), indicating frataxin plays a direct role in cluster assembly, possibly by serving as an iron chaperone in the assembly pathway. Here we provide molecular details of how yeast frataxin (Yfh1) interacts with Isu1 as a structural module to improve our understanding of the multiprotein complex assembly that completes Fe-S cluster assembly; this complex also includes the cysteine desulfurase (Nfs1 in yeast) and the accessory protein (Isd11), together in the mitochondria. Thermodynamic binding parameters for protein partner and iron binding were measured for the yeast orthologs using isothermal titration calorimetry. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to provide the molecular details to understand how Yfh1 interacts with Isu1. X-ray absorption studies were used to electronically and structurally characterize how iron is transferred to Isu1 and then incorporated into an Fe-S cluster. These results were combined with previously published data to generate a structural model for how the Fe-S cluster protein assembly complex can come together to accomplish Fe-S cluster assembly.

  2. Molecular orientation distributions during injection molding of liquid crystalline polymers: Ex situ investigation of partially filled moldings

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jun; Burghardt, Wesley R.; Bubeck, Robert A.

    2013-01-10

    The development of molecular orientation in thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers (TLCPs) during injection molding has been investigated using two-dimensional wide-angle X-ray scattering coordinated with numerical computations employing the Larson-Doi polydomain model. Orientation distributions were measured in 'short shot' moldings to characterize structural evolution prior to completion of mold filling, in both thin and thick rectangular plaques. Distinct orientation patterns are observed near the filling front. In particular, strong extension at the melt front results in nearly transverse molecular alignment. Far away from the flow front shear competes with extension to produce complex spatial distributions of orientation. The relative influence of shear is stronger in the thin plaque, producing orientation along the filling direction. Exploiting an analogy between the Larson-Doi model and a fiber orientation model, we test the ability of process simulation tools to predict TLCP orientation distributions during molding. Substantial discrepancies between model predictions and experimental measurements are found near the flow front in partially filled short shots, attributed to the limits of the Hele-Shaw approximation used in the computations. Much of the flow front effect is however 'washed out' by subsequent shear flow as mold filling progresses, leading to improved agreement between experiment and corresponding numerical predictions.

  3. Ultrafast shock compression of self-assembled monolayers: a molecular picture.

    PubMed

    Patterson, James E; Dlott, Dana D

    2005-03-24

    Simulations of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are performed to interpret experimental measurements of ultrafast approximately 1 GPa (volume compression deltaV approximately 0.1) planar shock compression dynamics probed by vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy (Lagutchev, A. S.; Patterson, J. E.; Huang, W.; Dlott, D. D. J. Phys. Chem. B 2005, 109, XXXX). The SAMs investigated are octadecanethiol (ODT) and pentadecanethiol (PDT) on Au(111) and Ag(111) substrates, and benzyl mercaptan (BMT) on Au(111). In the alkane SAMs, SFG is sensitive to the instantaneous orientation of the terminal methyl; in BMT it is sensitive to the phenyl orientation. Computed structures of alkane SAMs are in good agreement with experiment. In alkanes, the energies of gauche defects increase with increasing number and depth below the methyl plane, with the exception of ODT/Au where both single and double gauche defects at the two uppermost dihedrals have similar energies. Simulations of isothermal uniaxial compression of SAM lattices show that chain and methyl tilting is predominant in PDT/Au, ODT/Ag and PDT/Ag, whereas single and double gauche defect formation is predominant in ODT/Au. Time-resolved shock data showing transient SFG signal loss of ODT/Au and PDT/Au are fit by calculations of the terminal group orientations as a function of deltaV and their contributions to the SFG hyperpolarizability. The highly elastic response of PDT/Au results from shock-generated methyl and chain tilting. The viscoelastic response of ODT/Au results from shock generation of single and double gauche defects. Isothermal compression simulations help explain and fit the time dependence of shock spectra but generally underestimate the magnitude of SFG signal loss because they do not include effects of high-strain-rate dynamics and shock front and surface irregularities. PMID:16863164

  4. Molecular Insights into Aqueous NaCl Electrolytes Confined within Vertically-oriented Graphenes.

    PubMed

    Bo, Zheng; Yang, Huachao; Zhang, Shuo; Yang, Jinyuan; Yan, Jianhua; Cen, Kefa

    2015-01-01

    Vertically-oriented graphenes (VGs) are promising active materials for electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs) due to their unique morphological and structural features. This study, for the first time, reports the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on aqueous NaCl electrolytes confined within VG channels with different surface charge densities and channel widths. Simulation results show that the accessibility of ions and the structure of EDLCs are determined by the ion type/size, surface charging, and VG channel width. For relatively narrow VG channels with the same width, the threshold charge density (to compensate the energy penalty for shedding hydration shell) and the dehydration rate of Cl(-) ions are larger than those of Na(+) ions. To achieve the highest ion concentration coefficient, the effective VG channel width should be between the crystal and hydration diameters of the ions. The results are further quantified and elucidated by calculating the electrolyte density profiles. The molecular insights obtained in the current work are useful in guiding the design and fabrication of VGs for advancing their EDLC applications. PMID:26424365

  5. Molecular Insights into Aqueous NaCl Electrolytes Confined within Vertically-oriented Graphenes

    PubMed Central

    Bo, Zheng; Yang, Huachao; Zhang, Shuo; Yang, Jinyuan; Yan, Jianhua; Cen, Kefa

    2015-01-01

    Vertically-oriented graphenes (VGs) are promising active materials for electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs) due to their unique morphological and structural features. This study, for the first time, reports the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on aqueous NaCl electrolytes confined within VG channels with different surface charge densities and channel widths. Simulation results show that the accessibility of ions and the structure of EDLCs are determined by the ion type/size, surface charging, and VG channel width. For relatively narrow VG channels with the same width, the threshold charge density (to compensate the energy penalty for shedding hydration shell) and the dehydration rate of Cl− ions are larger than those of Na+ ions. To achieve the highest ion concentration coefficient, the effective VG channel width should be between the crystal and hydration diameters of the ions. The results are further quantified and elucidated by calculating the electrolyte density profiles. The molecular insights obtained in the current work are useful in guiding the design and fabrication of VGs for advancing their EDLC applications. PMID:26424365

  6. Toward understanding the influence of intermolecular interactions and molecular orientation on the chemical enhancement of SERS.

    PubMed

    Cabalo, Jerry; Guicheteau, Jason A; Christesen, Steven

    2013-09-19

    Implementation of SERS as an analytical technique is limited because the factors that govern the enhancement of individual vibrational modes are not well understood. Although the chemical effect only accounts for up to two orders of magnitude enhancement, it can still have a significant impact on the consistency of chemical spectral signatures. We report on a combined theoretical and experimental study on the benzenethiol on silver and 4-mercaptophenol on silver systems. The primary and unique finding was that for the benzenethiol on silver system the inclusion of interaction between multiple benzenethiol analyte molecules was essential to account for the relative enhancements observed experimentally. An examination of the molecular orbitals showed sharing of electron density across the entire model of multiple benzenethiol molecules mediated by the metal atoms. The addition of multiple 4-mercaptophenol molecules to the theoretical model had little effect on the predicted spectra, and we attribute this to the fact that a much larger model is necessary to replicate the networks of hydrogen bonds. Molecular orientation was also found to affect the predicted spectra, and it was found that an upright position improved agreement between theoretical and experimental spectra. An analysis of the vibrational frequency shifts between the normal Raman spectrum of the neat compound and the SERS spectrum also suggests that both benzenethiol and 4-mercaptophenol are in an upright position. PMID:23961762

  7. Molecular Orientation of Hydroquinone Adsorbed at a Platinum(111) Thin-Layer Electrode.

    PubMed

    Ren; Hubbard

    1999-01-15

    Reported are new findings regarding the molecular orientation of hydroquinone (HQ) adsorbed on Pt surfaces. The packing density of hydroquinone adsorbed from 1 M HClO4 supporting electrolyte has been measured by use of a Pt(111) thin-layer electrode. The packing-density-vs-concentration profiles for hydroquinone, measured by a differential thin-layer electrode method at an ordered Pt(111) surface and at an electrochemically disordered Pt(111) surface, are identical within an experimental error of about 8%. The profiles from this study are similar to the ones obtained previously at an ordered Pt(111) surface by Auger spectroscopy, but they are significantly different from those reported previously for polycrystalline Pt thin-layer electrodes. A procedure based upon displacement of HQ by thiocyanate has been developed as an alternative method for determining the packing density of adsorbed HQ. Both methods afford information regarding the molecular state of HQ adsorbed at the Pt(111) surface. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:9885274

  8. Reduction-Triggered Self-Assembly of Nanoscale Molybdenum Oxide Molecular Clusters

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yin, Panchao; Wu, Bin; Li, Tao; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Hong, Kunlun; Seifert, Soenke; Porcar, Lionel; Do, Changwoo; Keum, Jong Kahk

    2016-07-26

    A 2.9 nm molybdenum oxide cluster {Mo132} (Formula: [MoVI72MoV60O372(CH3COO)30(H2O)72]42-) can be obtained by reducing ammonium molybdate with hydrazine sulfate in weakly acidic CH3COOH/CH3COO- buffers. This reaction has been monitored by time-resolved UV-Vis, 1H-NMR, small angle X-ray/neutron scattering, and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. The growth of {Mo132} cluster shows a typical sigmoid curve, suggesting a multi-step assembly mechanism for this reaction. The reaction starts with a lag phase period when partial MoVI centers of molybdate precursors are reduced to form {MoV2(acetate)} structures under the coordination effect of the acetate groups. Once the concentration of {MoV2(acetate)} reaches a critical value,more » it triggers the assembly of MoV and MoVI species into {Mo132} clusters. Parameters such as the type and amount of reducing agent, the pH, the type of cation, and the type of organic ligand in the reaction buffer, have been studied for the roles they play in the formation of the target clusters.Understanding the formation mechanism of giant molecular clusters is essential for rational design and synthesis of cluster-based nanomaterials with required morphologies and functionalities. Here, typical synthetic reactions of a 2.9 nm spherical molybdenum oxide cluster, {Mo132} (formula: [MoVI72MoV60O372(CH3COO)30(H2O)72]42), with systematically varied reaction parameters have been fully explored to determine the morphologies and concentration of products, reduction of metal centers, and chemical environments of the organic ligands. The growth of these clusters shows a typical sigmoid curve, suggesting a general multistep self-assembly mechanism for the formation of giant molecular clusters. The reaction starts with a lag phase period when partial MoVI centers of molybdate precursors are reduced to form {MoV2(acetate)} structures under the coordination effect of the acetate groups. Once the concentration of {MoV2(acetate)} reaches a

  9. Nanoscale assembly for molecular electronics and in situ characterization during atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Jeong-Seok

    The work in this dissertation consists of a two-part study concerning molecular-based electronics and atomic layer deposition (ALD). As conventional "top-down" silicon-based technology approaches its expected physical and technical limits, researchers have paid considerable attention to "bottom-up" approaches including molecular-based electronics that self assembles molecular components and ALD techniques that deposit thin films with atomic layer control. Reliable fabrication of molecular-based devices and a lack of understanding of the conduction mechanisms through individual molecules still remain critical issues in molecular-based electronics. Nanoparticle/molecule(s)/nanoparticle assemblies of "dimers" and "trimers", consisting of two and three nanoparticles bridged by oligomeric ethynylene phenylene molecules (OPEs), respectively, are successfully synthesized by coworkers and applied to contact nanogap electrodes (< 70 nm) fabricated by an angled metal evaporation technique. We demonstrate successful trapping of nanoparticle dimers across nanogap electrodes by dielectrophoresis at 2 VAC, 1 MHz, and 60 s. The structures can be maintained electrically connected for long periods of time, enabling time- and temperature-dependent current-voltage (I-V) characterization. Conduction mechanisms through independent molecules are investigated by temperature dependent I-V measurements. An Arrhenius plot of log (I) versus 1/T exhibits a change of slope at ˜1.5 V, indicating the transition from direct tunneling to Fowler-Nordheim tunneling. Monitoring of the conductance is also performed in real-time during trapping as well as during other modification and exposure sequences after trapping over short-term and long-term time scales. The real-time monitoring of conductance through dimer structures during trapping offers immediate detection of a specific fault which is ascribed to a loss of active molecules and fusing of the nanoparticles in the junction occurring mostly at a

  10. Room-temperature molecular-resolution characterization of self-assembled organic monolayers on epitaxial graphene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing Hua; Hersam, Mark C

    2009-06-01

    Graphene, a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms, is a promising material for next-generation technology because of its advantageous electronic properties, such as extremely high carrier mobilities. However, chemical functionalization schemes are needed to integrate graphene with the diverse range of materials required for device applications. In this paper, we report self-assembled monolayers of the molecular semiconductor perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) formed on epitaxial graphene grown on the SiC(0001) surface. The molecules possess long-range order with a herringbone arrangement, as shown by ultra-high vacuum scanning tunnelling microscopy at room temperature. The molecular ordering is unperturbed by defects in the epitaxial graphene or atomic steps in the underlying SiC surface. Scanning tunnelling spectra of the PTCDA monolayer show distinct features that are not observed on pristine graphene. The demonstration of robust, uniform organic functionalization of epitaxial graphene presents opportunities for graphene-based molecular electronics and sensors. PMID:21378849

  11. Assembly of bipolar microtubule structures by passive cross-linkers and molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johann, D.; Goswami, D.; Kruse, K.

    2016-06-01

    During cell division, sister chromatids are segregated by the mitotic spindle, a bipolar assembly of interdigitating antiparallel polar filaments called microtubules. The spindle contains the midzone, a stable region of overlapping antiparallel microtubules, that is essential for maintaining bipolarity. Although a lot is known about the molecular players involved, the mechanism underlying midzone formation and maintenance is still poorly understood. We study the interaction of polar filaments that are cross-linked by molecular motors moving directionally and by passive cross-linkers diffusing along microtubules. Using a particle-based stochastic model, we find that the interplay of motors and passive cross-linkers can generate a stable finite overlap between a pair of antiparallel polar filaments. We develop a mean-field theory to study this mechanism in detail and investigate the influence of steric interactions between motors and passive cross-linkers on the overlap dynamics. In the presence of interspecies steric interactions, passive cross-linkers mimic the behavior of molecular motors and stable finite overlaps are generated even for non-cross-linking motors. Finally, we develop a mean-field theory for a bundle of aligned polar filaments and show that they can self-organize into a spindlelike pattern. Our work suggests possible ways as to how cells can generate spindle midzones and control their extensions.

  12. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS): a probe for molecular organisation in self-assembled biomimetic systems.

    PubMed

    Fong, Celesta; Dong, Aurelia W; Hill, Anita J; Boyd, Ben J; Drummond, Calum J

    2015-07-21

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) has been shown to be highly sensitive to conformational, structural and microenvironmental transformations arising from subtle geometric changes in molecular geometry in self-assembling biomimetic systems. The ortho-positronium (oPs) may be considered an active probe that can provide information on intrinsic packing and mobility within low molecular weight solids, viscous liquids, and soft matter systems. In this perspective we provide a critical overview of the literature in this field, including the evolution of analysis software and experimental protocols with commentary upon the practical utility of PALS. In particular, we discuss how PALS can provide unique insight into the macroscopic transport properties of several porous biomembrane-like nanostructures and suggest how this insight may provide information on the release of drugs from these matrices to aid in developing therapeutic interventions. We discuss the potentially exciting and fruitful application of this technique to membrane dynamics, diffusion and permeability. We propose that PALS can provide novel molecular level information that is complementary to conventional characterisation techniques. PMID:25948334

  13. Molecular self-assembly of conducting polymer by Conducting Probe Technique in Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shin-ichi; Ogawa, Kazufumi

    2007-04-01

    A polypyrrole derivative monolayer was investigated for the application as a wire. First, a pyrrole derivative monolayer was prepared by chemically adsorbing (self-assembling) monolayer (CAM) of 6-pyrrolylhexyl-12,12,12-trichloro-12- siladodecanoate (PEN) on a glass substrate. Then, the monolayer was polymerized in the presence of pure water by electrooxidation. The surface characterization of the molecular interaction was investigated by measuring the properties of CAMs attached to the glass substrate in the lateral direction. We formed PEN having polypyrrolyl groups, using Pt-patterned electrodes on glass surfaces and measured the conductance under a small bias voltage, using a conductive cantilever of atomic force microscopy (AFM). The polypyrrole derivative monolayer thus synthesized was covalently bonded to the glass substrate and showed conductivity as high as 3.05..103 S/cm after electro-oxidized. The method of preparing a conductive polymer monolayer by the combining chemical adsorption and electro-oxidation leads to a lot molecular wire to perpendicular to the Pt electrodes, and it is one of the key technologies for molecular devices.

  14. Metal-Directed Self-Assembly of a Polyoxometalate-Based Molecular Triangle: Using Powerful Analytical Tools to Probe the Chemical Structure of Complex Supramolecular Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Izzet, Guillaume; Macdonell, Andrew; Rinfray, Corentin; Piot, Madeleine; Renaudineau, Séverine; Derat, Etienne; Abécassis, Benjamin; Afonso, Carlos; Proust, Anna

    2015-12-21

    A polyoxometalate-based molecular triangle has been synthesized through the metal-driven self-assembly of covalent organic/inorganic hybrid oxo-clusters with remote pyridyl binding sites. The new metallomacrocycle was unambiguously characterized by using a combination of (1)H NMR spectroscopy, 2D diffusion NMR spectroscopy (DOSY), electrospray ionization travelling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (ESI-TWIM-MS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and molecular modelling. The collision cross-sections obtained from TWIM-MS and the hydrodynamic radii derived from DOSY are in good agreement with the geometry-optimized structures obtained by using theoretical calculations. Furthermore, SAXS was successfully employed and proved to be a powerful technique for characterizing such large supramolecular assemblies. PMID:26602994

  15. Hydroxyl and water molecule orientations in trypsin: Comparison to molecular dynamics structures

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, R.S.; Kossiakoff, A.A.

    1994-12-31

    A comparison is presented of experimentally observed hydroxyl and water hydrogens in trypsin determined from neutron density maps with the results of a 140ps molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Experimental determination of hydrogen and deuterium atom positions in molecules as large as proteins is a unique capability of neutron diffraction. The comparison addresses the degree to which a standard force-field approach can adequately describe the local electrostatic and van der Waals forces that determine the orientations of these hydrogens. Neutron densities, derived from 2.1{Angstrom} D{sub 2}O-H{sub 2}O difference Fourier maps, provide a database of 27 well-ordered hydroxyl hydrogens. Most of the simulated hydroxyl orientations are within a standard deviation of the experimentally-observed positions, including several examples in which both the simulation and the neutron density indicate that a hydroxyl group is shifted from a {open_quote}standard{close_quote} rotamer. For the most highly ordered water molecules, the hydrogen distributions calculated from the trajectory were in good agreement with neutron density; simulated water molecules that displayed multiple hydrogen bonding networks had correspondingly broadened neutron density profiles. This comparison was facilitated by development of a method to construct a pseudo 2{Angstrom} density map based on the hydrogen atom distributions from the simulation. The degree of disorder of internal water molecules is shown to result primarily from the electrostatic environment surrounding that water molecule as opposed to the cavity size available to the molecule. A method is presented for comparing the discrete observations sampled in a dynamics trajectory with the time- averaged data obtained from X-ray or neutron diffraction studies. This method is particularly useful for statically-disordered water molecules, in which the average location assigned from a trajectory may represent a site of relatively low occupancy.

  16. Molecular orientational dynamics in solid C70: Investigation by one- and two-dimensional magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, R.; Dabbagh, G.; Vaughan, G. B. M.; Heiney, P. A.; Strongin, R. M.; Cichy, M. A.; Smith, A. B., III

    1993-11-01

    We present the results of 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements that probe molecular orientational dynamics in solid C70 in the temperature range 223-343 K. Orientational dynamics affect the NMR line shapes and spin-lattice relaxation rates by modulating the 13C chemical shift anisotropy (CSA). Motionally averaged CSA line shapes, determined from both one-dimensional and two-dimensional magic angle spinning NMR spectra, and relaxation rates are determined for each of the five inequivalent carbon sites in the C70 molecule. Comparisons of the results for the five sites provide evidence for rapid uniaxial molecular reorientation in the monoclinic (T≤280 K) and rhombohedral (280≤T≤330 K) phases and rapid isotropic reorientation in the face-centered cubic (T≥330 K) phase. The orientational correlation time is roughly 2 ns at 250 K and of the order of 5 ps at 340 K.

  17. Molecular recognition between glyconectins as an adhesion self-assembly pathway to multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Misevic, Gradimir N; Guerardel, Yann; Sumanovski, Lazar T; Slomianny, Marie-Christine; Demarty, Maurice; Ripoll, Camille; Karamanos, Yannis; Maes, Emmanuel; Popescu, Octavian; Strecker, Gerard

    2004-04-01

    The appearance of multicellular forms of life has been tightly coupled to the ability of an organism to retain its own anatomical integrity and to distinguish self from non-self. Large glycoconjugates, which make up the outermost cell surface layer of all Metazoans, are the primary candidates for the primordial adhesion and recognition functions in biological self-assembly systems. Atomic force microscopy experiments demonstrated that the binding strength between a single pair of Porifera cell surface glyconectin 1 glycoconjugates from Microciona prolifera can hold the weight of 1600 cells, proving their adhesion functions. Here, measurement of molecular self-recognition of glyconectins (GNs) purified from three Porifera species was used as an experimental model for primordial xenogeneic self/non-self discrimination. Physicochemical and biochemical characterization of the three glyconectins, their glycans, and peptides using gel electrophoresis, ultracentrifugation, NMR, mass spectrometry, glycosaminoglycan-degrading enzyme treatment, amino acid and carbohydrate analyses, and peptide mapping showed that GNs define a new family of proteoglycan-like molecules exhibiting species-specific structures with complex and repetitive acidic carbohydrate motives different from the classical proteoglycans and mucins. In functional self-assembly color-coded bead, cell, and blotting assays, glyconectins displayed species-specific recognition and adhesion. Affinity-purified monospecific polyclonal antibodies prepared against GN1, -2, and -3 glycans selectively inhibited cell adhesion of the respective sponge species. These results together with species-specific coaggregation of GN carbohydrate-coated beads with cells showed that GN glycans are functional in cell recognition and adhesion. The specificity of carbohydrate-mediated homophilic GN interactions in Porifera approaches the binding selectivity of the evolutionarily advanced immunoglobulin superfamily. Xenoselectivity of

  18. Phase sensitive molecular dynamics of self-assembly glycolipid thin films: A dielectric spectroscopy investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velayutham, T. S.; Ng, B. K.; Gan, W. C.; Majid, W. H. Abd.; Hashim, R.; Zahid, N. I.; Chaiprapa, Jitrin

    2014-08-01

    Glycolipid, found commonly in membranes, is also a liquid crystal material which can self-assemble without the presence of a solvent. Here, the dielectric and conductivity properties of three synthetic glycolipid thin films in different thermotropic liquid crystal phases were investigated over a frequency and temperature range of (10-2-106 Hz) and (303-463 K), respectively. The observed relaxation processes distinguish between the different phases (smectic A, columnar/hexagonal, and bicontinuous cubic Q) and the glycolipid molecular structures. Large dielectric responses were observed in the columnar and bicontinuous cubic phases of the longer branched alkyl chain glycolipids. Glycolipids with the shortest branched alkyl chain experience the most restricted self-assembly dynamic process over the broad temperature range studied compared to the longer ones. A high frequency dielectric absorption (Process I) was observed in all samples. This is related to the dynamics of the hydrogen bond network from the sugar group. An additional low-frequency mechanism (Process II) with a large dielectric strength was observed due to the internal dynamics of the self-assembly organization. Phase sensitive domain heterogeneity in the bicontinuous cubic phase was related to the diffusion of charge carriers. The microscopic features of charge hopping were modelled using the random walk scheme, and two charge carrier hopping lengths were estimated for two glycolipid systems. For Process I, the hopping length is comparable to the hydrogen bond and is related to the dynamics of the hydrogen bond network. Additionally, that for Process II is comparable to the bilayer spacing, hence confirming that this low-frequency mechanism is associated with the internal dynamics within the phase.

  19. Modeling the self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles into fibers using coarse-grained molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lee, One-Sun; Cho, Vince; Schatz, George C

    2012-09-12

    We have studied the self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles (PAs) into a cylindrical micelle fiber starting from a homogeneous mixture of PAs in water using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. Nine independent 16 μs runs all show spontaneous fiber formation in which the PA molecules first form spherical micelles, and then micelles form a three-dimensional network via van der Waals interactions. As the hydrophobic core belonging to the different micelles merge, the three-dimensional network disappears and a fiber having a diameter of ∼80 Å appears. In agreement with atomistic simulation results, water molecules are excluded from the hydrophobic core and penetrate to ∼15 Å away from the axis of fiber. About 66% of the surface of fiber is covered with the IKVAV epitope, and ∼92% of the epitope is exposed to water molecules. PMID:22924639

  20. Surface Molecular Tailoring Using pH-Switchable Supramolecular Dendron-Ligand Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The rational design of materials with tailored properties is of paramount importance for a wide variety of biological, medical, electronic and optical applications. Here we report molecular level control over the spatial distribution of functional groups on surfaces utilizing self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of pH-switchable surface-appended pseudorotaxanes. The supramolecular systems were constructed from a poly(aryl ether) dendron-containing a dibenzo[24]crown-8 (DB24C8) macrocycle and a thiol ligand-containing a dibenzylammonium recognition site and a fluorine end group. The dendron establishes the space (dendritic effect) that each pseudorotaxane occupies on the SAM. Following SAM formation, the dendron is released from the surface by switching off the noncovalent interactions upon pH stimulation, generating surface materials with tailored physical and chemical properties. PMID:24742280

  1. Carbon nanotube self-assembly with lipids and detergent: a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, E. Jayne; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2009-01-01

    The dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in aqueous media is of potential importance in a number of biomedical applications. CNT solubilization has been achieved via the non-covalent adsorption of lipids and detergent onto the tube surface. We use coarse-grained molecular dynamics to study the self-assembly of CNTs with various amphiphiles, namely a bilayer-forming lipid, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), and two species of detergent, dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC) and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). We find that for a low amphiphile/CNT ratio, DPPC, DHPC and LPC all wrap around the CNT. Upon increasing the number of amphiphiles, a transition in adsorption is observed: DPPC encapsulates the CNT within a cylindrical micelle, whilst both DHPC and LPC adsorb onto CNTs in hemimicelles. This study highlights differences in adsorption mechanism of bilayer-forming lipids and detergents on CNTs which may in the future be exploitable to enable enhancement of CNT solubilization whilst minimizing perturbation of cell membrane integrity.

  2. Molecular-like hierarchical self-assembly of monolayers of mixtures of particles

    PubMed Central

    Singh, P.; Hossain, M.; Gurupatham, S. K.; Shah, K.; Amah, E.; Ju, D.; Janjua, M.; Nudurupati, S.; Fischer, I.

    2014-01-01

    We present a technique that uses an externally applied electric field to self-assemble monolayers of mixtures of particles into molecular-like hierarchical arrangements on fluid-liquid interfaces. The arrangements consist of composite particles (analogous to molecules) which are arranged in a pattern. The structure of a composite particle depends on factors such as the relative sizes of the particles and their polarizabilities, and the electric field intensity. If the particles sizes differ by a factor of two or more, the composite particle has a larger particle at its core and several smaller particles form a ring around it. The number of particles in the ring and the spacing between the composite particles depend on their polarizabilities and the electric field intensity. Approximately same sized particles form chains (analogous to polymeric molecules) in which positively and negatively polarized particles alternate. PMID:25510331

  3. Self-Assembly and Molecular Dynamics of Peptide-Functionalized Polyphenylene Dendrimers

    SciTech Connect

    Mondeshki,M.; Milhov, G.; Graf, R.; Spiess, H.; Mullen, K.; Papadopoulos, P.; Gitsas, A.; Floudas, G.

    2006-01-01

    The self-assembly mechanism and the associated molecular dynamics are studied for a series of poly-L-lysine-functionalized polyphenylene dendrimer melts as a function of the core size (generation), functionality, and polypeptide length using X-rays, solid-state NMR, calorimetry, and dielectric spectroscopy. A striking dependence of the polyphenylene self-assembly on the poly-L-lysine length is shown. In addition, the type ({alpha}helix/{beta}-sheet) of peptide secondary structure is controlled by the packing restrictions imposed by the polyphenylene core. We show that constrained poly-L-lysines can adopt different secondary structures from their linear analogues. The dynamic investigation revealed significant mobility associated solely with the polypeptide through three processes: a glass transition, a slower process associated with the relaxation of {alpha}-helical segments, and a glassy mode whose origin could be resolved by site-specific solid-state NMR techniques. Solid-state NMR studies further indicated a mobility gradient in going from the rigid peptide backbone to the side chains.

  4. Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Peptide Amphiphile Self-Assembly into Cylindrical Nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, One-Sun; Stupp, Samuel I.; Schatz, George C.

    2011-01-01

    Relaxation of a self-assembled structure of 144 peptide amphiphile (PA) molecules into cylindrical nanofibers is studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations including explicit water with physiological ion concentration. The PA for these studies includes a hydrophobic alkyl chain that is attached to the N-terminus of the sequence SLSLAAAEIKVAV. The self-assembly is initiated with PA molecules in a roughly cylindrical configuration, as suggested from previous experimental and theoretical investigations, and the cylindrical configuration that results is found to be stable during 40 ns simulations. In the converged structure of the resulting nanofiber, the cylinder radius is ~44 Å, a result that is consistent with experimental results. Water and sodium ions can penetrate into the peptide portion of the fiber but not between the alkyl chains. Even though each PA has an identical sequence, a broad distribution of secondary structure is found in the converged structure of the nanofiber. The β-sheet population for the SLSL and IKV segments of the peptide is ~25%, which is consistent with previous circular dichroism results. We also found that the epitope sequence IKVAV is located on the surface of the nanofiber, as designed for the promotion of the neurite growth. Our findings will be useful for designing new PA fibers that have improved bioactive properties.

  5. Self-assembling of molecular nanowires for enhancing the conducting properties of discotic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji Hyun; Kim, Kyung Ho; Takanishi, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Jun; Park, Yung Woo; Kim, Youn Sang; Scalia, Giusy

    2015-08-01

    The self-organization of discotic liquid crystal molecules in columns has enormous interest for soft nanoelectronic applications. A great advantage of discotic liquid crystal is that defects can be self-annealed in contrast to typical organic materials. Through the overlap of molecular orbitals, the aromatic cores assemble into long range ordered one-dimensional structures. Very thin structured films can be obtained by spin-coating from solution and the resulting morphologies are strongly dependent on the interaction between discotics and solvent molecules. Toluene produces films formed by very long nanowires, spontaneously aligned along a common direction and over fairly large areas. These nanostructured films are a result of the interplay between liquid crystal self-organization and solvent driven assembly. The ordered nanowire structures exhibit improvement in the electrical properties compared to misaligned structures and even to pristine HAT5, deposited without the aid of solvent. In this study we show that the toluene-based deposition of discotic liquid crystals is advantageous because it allows a uniform coverage of the substrate, unlike pristine HAT5 but also thanks to the type of induced structures exhibiting one order of magnitude higher conductivity, in the aligned nanowire films, compared to bare HAT5 ones.

  6. Polymer GARD: computer simulation of covalent bond formation in reproducing molecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Shenhav, Barak; Bar-Even, Arren; Kafri, Ran; Lancet, Doron

    2005-04-01

    The basic Graded Autocatalysis Replication Domain (GARD) model consists of a repertoire of small molecules, typically amphiphiles, which join and leave a non-covalent micelle-like assembly. Its replication behavior is due to occasional fission, followed by a homeostatic growth process governed by the assembly's composition. Limitations of the basic GARD model are its small finite molecular repertoire and the lack of a clear path from a 'monomer world' towards polymer-based living entities. We have now devised an extension of the model (polymer GARD or P-GARD), where a monomer-based GARD serves as a 'scaffold' for oligomer formation, as a result of internal chemical rules. We tested this concept with computer simulations of a simple case of monovalent monomers, whereby more complex molecules (dimers) are formed internally, in a manner resembling biosynthetic metabolism. We have observed events of dimer 'take-over' - the formation of compositionally stable, replication-prone quasi stationary states (composomes) that have appreciable dimer content. The appearance of novel metabolism-like networks obeys a time-dependent power law, reminiscent of evolution under punctuated equilibrium. A simulation under constant population conditions shows the dynamics of takeover and extinction of different composomes, leading to the generation of different population distributions. The P-GARD model offers a scenario whereby biopolymer formation may be a result of rather than a prerequisite for early life-like processes. PMID:16010993

  7. Assembly and molecular order of two-dimensional peptoid nanosheets through the oil–water interface

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Ellen J.; Olivier, Gloria K.; Qian, Menglu; Proulx, Caroline; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Richmond, Geraldine L.

    2014-01-01

    Peptoid nanosheets are a recently discovered class of 2D nanomaterial that form from the self-assembly of a sequence-specific peptoid polymer at an air–water interface. Nanosheet formation occurs first through the assembly of a peptoid monolayer and subsequent compression into a bilayer structure. These bilayer materials span hundreds of micrometers in lateral dimensions and have the potential to be used in a variety of applications, such as in molecular sensors, artificial membranes, and as catalysts. This paper reports that the oil–water interface provides another opportunity for growth of these unique and highly ordered peptoid sheets. The monolayers formed at this interface are found through surface spectroscopic measurements to be highly ordered and electrostatic interactions between the charged moieties, namely carboxylate and ammonium residues, of the peptoid are essential in the ability of these peptoids to form ordered nanosheets at the oil–water interface. Expanding the mechanism of peptoid nanosheet formation to the oil–water interface and understanding the crucial role of electrostatic interactions between peptoid residues in nanosheet formation is essential for increasing the complexity and functionality of these nanomaterials. PMID:25197049

  8. Control of in-plane orientation of phthalocyanine molecular columns using vicinal Si(001)-(2{times}1)-H

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Masakazu; Matsunobe, Takeshi; Tokumoto, Hiroshi

    2001-06-15

    In-plane crystal orientation of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) films formed by organic molecular-beam epitaxy have been successfully controlled by using vicinal Si(001)-(2{times}1)-H as a substrate, containing atomic steps of an approximately 4 nm period. A continuous film was grown at 60{degree}C and the film thickness ranged between 5 and 8 molecular layers. By observing a frictional force image of the film, 90% of the molecular columns were found to align across the substrate step rows. The preferential orientation is considered to be induced by artificial surface lattices, which result from the striped effective contact area between the rigid CuPc crystals and the stair-like surfaces. The anisotropic optical properties of the film have been also confirmed by polarized reflection measurements. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Assembly of supramolecular nanotubes from molecular triangles and 1,2-dihalohydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhichang; Liu, Guoliang; Wu, Yilei; Cao, Dennis; Sun, Junling; Schneebeli, Severin T; Nassar, Majed S; Mirkin, Chad A; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2014-11-26

    Precise control of molecular assembly is a challenging goal facing supramolecular chemists. Herein, we report the highly specific assembly of a range of supramolecular nanotubes from the enantiomeric triangular naphthalenediimide-based macrocycles (RRRRRR)- and (SSSSSS)-NDI-Δ and a class of similar solvents, namely, the 1,2-dihalo-ethanes and -ethenes (DXEs). Three kinds of supramolecular nanotubes are formed from the columnar stacking of NDI-Δ units with a 60° mutual rotation angle as a result of cooperative [C-H···O] interactions, directing interactions of the [X···X]-bonded DXE chains inside the nanotubes and lateral [X···π] or [π···π] interactions. They include (i) semiflexible infinite nanotubes formed in the gel state from NDI-Δ and (E)-1,2-dichloroethene, (ii) rigid infinite nonhelical nanotubes produced in the solid state from NDI-Δ and BrCH2CH2Br, ClCH2CH2Br, and ClCH2CH2I, and (iii) a pair of rigid tetrameric, enantiomeric single-handed (P)- and (M)-helical nanotubes formed in the solid state from the corresponding (RRRRRR)- and (SSSSSS)-NDI-Δ with ClCH2CH2Cl. In case (i), only the electron-rich C═C double bond of (E)-1,2-dichloroethene facilitates the gelation of NDI-Δ. In cases (ii) and (iii), the lengths of anti-DXEs determine the translation of the chirality of NDI-Δ into the helicity of nanotubes. Only ClCH2CH2Cl induces single-handed helicity into the nanotubes. The subtle interplay of noncovalent bonding interactions, resulting from the tiny structural variations involving the DXE guests, is responsible for the diverse and highly specific assembly of NDI-Δ. This research highlights the critical role that guests play in constructing assembled superstructures of hosts and offers a novel approach to creating supramolecular nanotubes. PMID:25357152

  10. Building DNA nanostructures for molecular computation, templated assembly, and biological applications.

    PubMed

    Rangnekar, Abhijit; LaBean, Thomas H

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: DNA is a critical biomolecule well-known for its roles in biology and genetics. Moreover, its double-helical structure and the Watson-Crick pairing of its bases make DNA structurally predictable. This predictability enables design and synthesis of artificial DNA nanostructures by suitable programming of the base sequences of DNA strands. Since the advent of the field of DNA nanotechnology in 1982, a variety of DNA nanostructures have been designed and used for numerous applications. In this Account, we discuss the progress made by our lab which has contributed toward the overall advancement of the field. Tile-based DNA nanostructures are an integral part of structural DNA nanotechnology. These structures are formed using several short, chemically synthesized DNA strands by programming their base sequences so that they self-assemble into desired constructs. Design and assembly of several DNA tiles will be discussed in this Account. Tiles include, for example, TX tiles with three parallel, coplanar duplexes, 4 × 4 cross-tiles with four arms, and weave-tiles with weave-like architecture. Another category of tiles we will present involve multiple parallel duplexes that assemble to form closed tubular structures. All of these tile types have been used to form micrometer-scale one- and two-dimensional arrays and lattices. Origami-based structures constitute another category where a long single-stranded DNA scaffold is folded into desired shapes by association with multiple short staple strands. This Account will describe the efforts by our lab in devising new strategies to improve the maximum size of origami structures. The various DNA nanostructures detailed here have been used in a wide variety of different applications. This Account will discuss the use of DNA tiles for logical computation, encoding information as molecular barcodes, and functionalization for patterning of other nanoscale organic and inorganic materials. Consequently, we have used DNA

  11. Effect of substrate orientation on CdS homoepitaxy by molecular dynamics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Almeida, S.; Chavez, J. J.; Zhou, X. W.; Zubia, D.

    2016-02-10

    CdS homoepitaxy growth was performed by molecular dynamics using different substrate orientations and structures in order to analyze the CdS crystallinity. As anticipated from thermodynamics of homoepitaxy, highly crystalline films with only point defects were obtained on substrates with rectangular surface geometries, including View the MathML source[112¯] zinc blende (ZB), [101¯0] wurtzite (WZ), [112¯0] WZ, [110][110] ZB, [010][010] ZB, and View the MathML source[1101110] ZB. In contrast, films grown on substrates with hexagonal surface geometries, corresponding to the [0001][0001] WZ and [111][111] ZB growth directions, showed structures with a large number of defects including; anti-sites, vacancies, stacking faults, twinning, andmore » polytypism. WZ and ZB transitions and grain boundaries are identified using a lattice identification algorithm and represented graphically in a structural map. A dislocation analysis was performed to detect, identify, and quantify linear defects within the atomistic data. Systematic simulations using different temperatures, deposition rates, and substrate polarities were perform to analyze the trends of dislocation densities on [0001][0001] WZ direction and showed persistent polytypism. As a result, the polytypism observed in the films grown on the substrates with hexagonal surface geometry is attributed to the similar formation energies of the WZ and ZB phases.« less

  12. Dipole moments and orientation polarizabilities of diatomic molecular ions for precision atomic mass measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Michelle; Brown, John M.; Rosmus, Pavel; Linguerri, Roberto; Komiha, Najia; Myers, Edmund G.

    2007-01-01

    In high precision Penning trap mass spectrometry the cyclotron frequency of a polarizable ion is perturbed due to the Stark interaction with the motional electric field. For polar diatomic molecular ions, which have adjacent rotational levels of opposite parity, these shifts can be particularly large—especially for the lowest rotational levels, which are those occupied by ions stored for many hours in cryogenic Penning traps. In order to provide corrections to precision atomic mass measurements, we consider the calculation of orientation polarizabilities of CO+ and the positive ions of the first and second row diatomic hydrides, LiH+ to ArH+ . Dipole moments for these ions have been calculated using the restricted coupled cluster method with perturbative triples and large basis sets. Using these dipoles and an effective Hamiltonian, we have obtained rotational-state dependent polarizabilities of the open-shell diatomic ions CO+ , NH+ , OH+ , FH+ , PH+ , SH+ , and ClH+ . Results are given for those rotational levels that are significantly populated at 4.2K , for magnetic fields up to 10T . For the remaining first and second row hydride cations, polarizabilities at the magnetic fields of interest can be obtained from a simple formula valid for closed-shell molecules. Conversely, in cases where the polarizability shifts can be measured, our results enable experimental determination of dipole moments.

  13. Effect of substrate orientation on CdS homoepitaxy by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, S.; Chavez, J. J.; Zhou, X. W.; Zubia, D.

    2016-05-01

    CdS homoepitaxy growth was performed by molecular dynamics using different substrate orientations and structures in order to analyze the CdS crystallinity. As anticipated from thermodynamics of homoepitaxy, highly crystalline films with only point defects were obtained on substrates with rectangular surface geometries, including [ 11 2 bar ] zinc blende (ZB), [ 10 1 bar 0 ] wurtzite (WZ), [ 11 2 bar 0 ] WZ, [ 110 ] ZB, [ 010 ] ZB, and [1/10 1 1/10 ] ZB. In contrast, films grown on substrates with hexagonal surface geometries, corresponding to the [ 0001 ] WZ and [ 111 ] ZB growth directions, showed structures with a large number of defects including; anti-sites, vacancies, stacking faults, twinning, and polytypism. WZ and ZB transitions and grain boundaries are identified using a lattice identification algorithm and represented graphically in a structural map. A dislocation analysis was performed to detect, identify, and quantify linear defects within the atomistic data. Systematic simulations using different temperatures, deposition rates, and substrate polarities were perform to analyze the trends of dislocation densities on [ 0001 ] WZ direction and showed persistent polytypism. The polytypism observed in the films grown on the substrates with hexagonal surface geometry is attributed to the similar formation energies of the WZ and ZB phases.

  14. [Molecular genetics of satori, a Drosophila mutant with altered sexual orientation].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, D

    2000-02-01

    satori (sat) is a Drosophila mutant in which male sexual orientation changes from heterosexual to homosexual. Another phenotype of the satori mutant is the absence of the male-specific muscle of Lawrence (MOL). The formation of MOL is repressed in females by the action of a female-determinant protein. Transformer (Tra), while a Tra-target doublesex (dsx) has no role in the MOL formation. Molecular cloning of the fruitless (fru) gene responsible for the sat mutation revealed that it encodes a putative transcription factor with a BTB domain and Zn finger motifs, and that the second exon of this gene contains three repeats of the Tra-binding consensus sequence. These observations suggest that fru is a novel target of Tra in the sex determination cascade of Drosophila. MOL formation is known to occur when the sex of the innervating motoneuron is male regardless of the sex of the MOL itself. Taking into account the fact that Fru is preferentially expressed in the nervous system, Fru is likely involved in neuronal sex determination. We hypothesize that the sat mutation feminizes a class of neurons which otherwise promote heterosexual courtship and the formation of the MOL in males. PMID:10890021

  15. Revealing molecular structure and orientation with Stokes vector resolved second harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Nirmal; Hu, Chih-Wei; Qiu, Jianjun; Foreman, Matthew R; Romero, Carlos Macías; Török, Peter; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2014-03-15

    We report on measurements and characterization of polarization properties of Second Harmonic (SH) signals using a four-channel photon counting based Stokes polarimeter. In this way, the critical polarization parameters can be obtained concurrently without the need of repeated image acquisition. The critical polarization parameters, including the degree of polarization (DOP), the degree of linear polarization (DOLP), and the degree of circular polarization (DOCP), are extracted from the reconstructed Stokes vector based SH images in a pixel-by-pixel manner. The measurements are further extended by varying the polarization states of the incident light and recording the resulting Stokes parameters of the SH signal. In turn this allows the molecular structure and orientation of the samples to be determined. Use of Stokes polarimetry is critical in determination of the full polarization state of light, and enables discrimination of material properties not possible with conventional crossed-polarized detection schemes. The combination of SHG microscopy and Stokes polarimeter hence makes a powerful tool to investigate the structural order of targeted specimens. PMID:23891802

  16. Amyloid β-Protein Assembly: The Effect of Molecular Tweezers CLR01 and CLR03

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The early oligomerization of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) has been shown to be an important event in the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Designing small molecule inhibitors targeting Aβ oligomerization is one attractive and promising strategy for AD treatment. Here we used ion mobility spectrometry coupled to mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) to study the different effects of the molecular tweezers CLR01 and CLR03 on Aβ self-assembly. CLR01 was found to bind to Aβ directly and disrupt its early oligomerization. Moreover, CLR01 remodeled the early oligomerization of Aβ42 by compacting the structures of dimers and tetramers and as a consequence eliminated higher-order oligomers. Unexpectedly, the negative-control derivative, CLR03, which lacks the hydrophobic arms of the tweezer structure, was found to facilitate early Aβ oligomerization. Our study provides an example of IMS as a powerful tool to study and better understand the interaction between small molecule modulators and Aβ oligomerization, which is not attainable by other methods, and provides important insights into therapeutic development of molecular tweezers for AD treatment. PMID:25751170

  17. On the optimal design of molecular sensing interfaces with lipid bilayer assemblies - A knowledge based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siontorou, Christina G.

    2012-12-01

    Biosensors are analytic devices that incorporate a biochemical recognition system (biological, biologicalderived or biomimic: enzyme, antibody, DNA, receptor, etc.) in close contact with a physicochemical transducer (electrochemical, optical, piezoelectric, conductimetric, etc.) that converts the biochemical information, produced by the specific biological recognition reaction (analyte-biomolecule binding), into a chemical or physical output signal, related to the concentration of the analyte in the measuring sample. The biosensing concept is based on natural chemoreception mechanisms, which are feasible over/within/by means of a biological membrane, i.e., a structured lipid bilayer, incorporating or attached to proteinaceous moieties that regulate molecular recognition events which trigger ion flux changes (facilitated or passive) through the bilayer. The creation of functional structures that are similar to natural signal transduction systems, correlating and interrelating compatibly and successfully the physicochemical transducer with the lipid film that is self-assembled on its surface while embedding the reconstituted biological recognition system, and at the same time manage to satisfy the basic conditions for measuring device development (simplicity, easy handling, ease of fabrication) is far from trivial. The aim of the present work is to present a methodological framework for designing such molecular sensing interfaces, functioning within a knowledge-based system built on an ontological platform for supplying sub-systems options, compatibilities, and optimization parameters.

  18. Molecular assembly of Clostridium botulinum progenitor M complex of type E

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Eswaramoorthy, Subramaniam; Sun, Jingchuan; Li, Huilin; Singh, Bal Ram; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2015-12-07

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is released as a progenitor complex, in association with a non-toxic-non-hemagglutinin protein (NTNH) and other associated proteins. We have determined the crystal structure of M type Progenitor complex of botulinum neurotoxin E [PTC-E(M)], a heterodimer of BoNT and NTNH. The crystal structure reveals that the complex exists as a tight, interlocked heterodimer of BoNT and NTNH. The crystal structure explains the mechanism of molecular assembly of the complex and reveals several acidic clusters at the interface responsible for association at low acidic pH and disassociation at basic/neutral pH. Furthermore, the similarity of the general architecture betweenmore » the PTC-E(M) and the previously determined PTC-A(M) strongly suggests that the progenitor M complexes of all botulinum serotypes may have similar molecular arrangement, although the neurotoxins apparently can take very different conformation when they are released from the M complex.« less

  19. Molecular assembly of Clostridium botulinum progenitor M complex of type E

    SciTech Connect

    Eswaramoorthy, Subramaniam; Sun, Jingchuan; Li, Huilin; Singh, Bal Ram; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2015-12-07

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is released as a progenitor complex, in association with a non-toxic-non-hemagglutinin protein (NTNH) and other associated proteins. We have determined the crystal structure of M type Progenitor complex of botulinum neurotoxin E [PTC-E(M)], a heterodimer of BoNT and NTNH. The crystal structure reveals that the complex exists as a tight, interlocked heterodimer of BoNT and NTNH. The crystal structure explains the mechanism of molecular assembly of the complex and reveals several acidic clusters at the interface responsible for association at low acidic pH and disassociation at basic/neutral pH. Furthermore, the similarity of the general architecture between the PTC-E(M) and the previously determined PTC-A(M) strongly suggests that the progenitor M complexes of all botulinum serotypes may have similar molecular arrangement, although the neurotoxins apparently can take very different conformation when they are released from the M complex.

  20. Molecular Assembly of Clostridium botulinum progenitor M complex of type E

    PubMed Central

    Eswaramoorthy, Subramaniam; Sun, Jingchuan; Li, Huilin; Singh, Bal Ram; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is released as a progenitor complex, in association with a non-toxic-non-hemagglutinin protein (NTNH) and other associated proteins. We have determined the crystal structure of M type Progenitor complex of botulinum neurotoxin E [PTC-E(M)], a heterodimer of BoNT and NTNH. The crystal structure reveals that the complex exists as a tight, interlocked heterodimer of BoNT and NTNH. The crystal structure explains the mechanism of molecular assembly of the complex and reveals several acidic clusters at the interface responsible for association at low acidic pH and disassociation at basic/neutral pH. The similarity of the general architecture between the PTC-E(M) and the previously determined PTC-A(M) strongly suggests that the progenitor M complexes of all botulinum serotypes may have similar molecular arrangement, although the neurotoxins apparently can take very different conformation when they are released from the M complex. PMID:26639353

  1. Structural changes in a Schiff base molecular assembly initiated by scanning tunneling microscopy tip.

    PubMed

    Tomak, A; Bacaksiz, C; Mendirek, G; Sahin, H; Hur, D; Görgün, K; Senger, R T; Birer, Ö; Peeters, F M; Zareie, H M

    2016-08-19

    We report the controlled self-organization and switching of newly designed Schiff base (E)-4-((4-(phenylethynyl) benzylidene) amino) benzenethiol (EPBB) molecules on a Au (111) surface at room temperature. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) were used to image and analyze the conformational changes of the EPBB molecules. The conformational change of the molecules was induced by using the STM tip while increasing the tunneling current. The switching of a domain or island of molecules was shown to be induced by the STM tip during scanning. Unambiguous fingerprints of the switching mechanism were observed via STM/STS measurements. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering was employed, to control and identify quantitatively the switching mechanism of molecules in a monolayer. Density functional theory calculations were also performed in order to understand the microscopic details of the switching mechanism. These calculations revealed that the molecular switching behavior stemmed from the strong interaction of the EPBB molecules with the STM tip. Our approach to controlling intermolecular mechanics provides a path towards the bottom-up assembly of more sophisticated molecular machines. PMID:27378765

  2. Metamaterial Absorbers for Infrared Detection of Molecular Self-Assembled Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Atsushi; Tanaka, Takuo

    2015-07-01

    The emerging field of plasmonic metamaterials has introduced new degree of freedom to manipulate optical field from nano to macroscopic scale, offering an attractive platform for sensing applications. So far, metamaterial sensor concepts, however, have focused on hot-spot engineering to improve the near-field enhancement, rather than fully exploiting tailored material properties. Here, we present a novel spectroscopic technique based on the metamaterial infrared (IR) absorber allowing for a low-background detection scheme as well as significant plasmonic enhancement. Specifically, we experimentally demonstrate the resonant coupling of plasmonic modes of a metamaterial absorber and IR vibrational modes of a molecular self-assembled monolayer. The metamaterial consisting of an array of Au/MgF2/Au structures exhibits an anomalous absorption at ~3000 cm-1, which spectrally overlaps with C-H stretching vibrational modes. Symmetric/asymmetric C-H stretching modes of a 16-Mercaptohexadecanoic acid monolayer are clearly observed as Fano-like anti-resonance peaks within a broad plasmonic absorption of the metamaterial. Spectral analysis using Fano line-shape fitting reveals the underlying resonant interference in plasmon-molecular coupled systems. Our metamaterial approach achieves the attomole sensitivity with a large signal-to-noise ratio in the far-field measurement, thus may open up new avenues for realizing ultrasensitive IR inspection technologies.

  3. Metamaterial Absorbers for Infrared Detection of Molecular Self-Assembled Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Atsushi; Tanaka, Takuo

    2015-01-01

    The emerging field of plasmonic metamaterials has introduced new degree of freedom to manipulate optical field from nano to macroscopic scale, offering an attractive platform for sensing applications. So far, metamaterial sensor concepts, however, have focused on hot-spot engineering to improve the near-field enhancement, rather than fully exploiting tailored material properties. Here, we present a novel spectroscopic technique based on the metamaterial infrared (IR) absorber allowing for a low-background detection scheme as well as significant plasmonic enhancement. Specifically, we experimentally demonstrate the resonant coupling of plasmonic modes of a metamaterial absorber and IR vibrational modes of a molecular self-assembled monolayer. The metamaterial consisting of an array of Au/MgF2/Au structures exhibits an anomalous absorption at ~ 3000 cm(-1), which spectrally overlaps with C-H stretching vibrational modes. Symmetric/asymmetric C-H stretching modes of a 16-Mercaptohexadecanoic acid monolayer are clearly observed as Fano-like anti-resonance peaks within a broad plasmonic absorption of the metamaterial. Spectral analysis using Fano line-shape fitting reveals the underlying resonant interference in plasmon-molecular coupled systems. Our metamaterial approach achieves the attomole sensitivity with a large signal-to-noise ratio in the far-field measurement, thus may open up new avenues for realizing ultrasensitive IR inspection technologies. PMID:26229011

  4. Animal Hairs as Water-stimulated Shape Memory Materials: Mechanism and Structural Networks in Molecular Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xueliang; Hu, Jinlian

    2016-05-01

    Animal hairs consisting of α-keratin biopolymers existing broadly in nature may be responsive to water for recovery to the innate shape from their fixed deformation, thus possess smart behavior, namely shape memory effect (SME). In this article, three typical animal hair fibers were first time investigated for their water-stimulated SME, and therefrom to identify the corresponding net-points and switches in their molecular and morphological structures. Experimentally, the SME manifested a good stability of high shape fixation ratio and reasonable recovery rate after many cycles of deformation programming under water stimulation. The effects of hydration on hair lateral size, recovery kinetics, dynamic mechanical behaviors and structural components (crystal, disulfide and hydrogen bonds) were then systematically studied. SME mechanisms were explored based on the variations of structural components in molecular assemblies of such smart fibers. A hybrid structural network model with single-switch and twin-net-points was thereafter proposed to interpret the water-stimulated shape memory mechanism of animal hairs. This original work is expected to provide inspiration for exploring other natural materials to reveal their smart functions and natural laws in animals including human as well as making more remarkable synthetic smart materials.

  5. Final Report: Photo-Directed Molecular Assembly of Multifunctional Inorganic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    B.G. Potter, Jr.

    2010-10-15

    This final report details results, conclusions, and opportunities for future effort derived from the study. The work involved combining the molecular engineering of photoactive Ti-alkoxide systems and the optical excitation of hydrolysis and condensation reactions to influence the development of the metal-oxygen-metal network at the onset of material formation. Selective excitation of the heteroleptic alkoxides, coupled with control of alkoxide local chemical environment, enabled network connectivity to be influenced and formed the basis for direct deposition and patterning of Ti-oxide-based materials. The research provided new insights into the intrinsic photoresponse and assembly of these complex, alkoxide molecules. Using a suite of electronic, vibrational, and nuclear spectroscopic probes, coupled with quantum chemical computation, the excitation wavelength and fluence dependence of molecular photoresponse and the nature of subsequent hydrolysis and condensation processes were probed in pyridine-carbinol-based Ti-alkoxides with varied counter ligand groups. Several methods for the patterning of oxide material formation were demonstrated, including the integration of this photoprocessing approach with conventional, dip-coating methodologies.

  6. Polymeric Colloidal Nanostructures Fabricated via Highly Controlled Convective Assembly and Their Use for Molecular Imprinting.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin Chul; Park, Jin Young

    2016-03-23

    In this work, the formation of various polystyrene (PS) colloidal structures on striped PS patterns is demonstrated based on a simple and novel convective assembly method that controls the electrostatic interactions between the PS colloidal particles and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Under the optimal conditions (different withdrawal speeds, channel dimensions, suspension concentrations, etc.), highly ordered structures such as highly close-packed, zigzag, and linear colloidal aggregates are observed. In addition, these colloidal arrangements are used for development of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) sensors with highly improved sensing properties. Using PDMS replicas, three hemispherical poly(methacrylic acid-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) (poly(MAA-EGDMA)) MIP films, including planar MIP and non-imprinted polymer (NIP) films, are photopolymerized for detection of trace atrazine in an aqueous solution. From gravimetric quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements, a non-close-packed MIP film exhibits highest sensing response (Δf = 932 Hz) to atrazine detection among hemispherical MIP films and shows 6.5-fold higher sensing response than the planar MIP film. In addition, the sensitivity of the MIP sensor is equivalent to -119 Hz/(mol L(-1)). From the ratio of slopes of the calibration curves for the hemispherical MIP and NIP films, the imprinting factor (If) is as high as 11.0. The hemispherical MIP film also shows excellent selectivity in comparison with the sensing responses of other analogous herbicides. As a result, this molecular surface imprinting using PS colloidal arrays is highly efficient for herbicide detection. PMID:26938141

  7. Structural changes in a Schiff base molecular assembly initiated by scanning tunneling microscopy tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomak, A.; Bacaksiz, C.; Mendirek, G.; Sahin, H.; Hur, D.; Görgün, K.; Senger, R. T.; Birer, Ö.; Peeters, F. M.; Zareie, H. M.

    2016-08-01

    We report the controlled self-organization and switching of newly designed Schiff base (E)-4-((4-(phenylethynyl) benzylidene) amino) benzenethiol (EPBB) molecules on a Au (111) surface at room temperature. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) were used to image and analyze the conformational changes of the EPBB molecules. The conformational change of the molecules was induced by using the STM tip while increasing the tunneling current. The switching of a domain or island of molecules was shown to be induced by the STM tip during scanning. Unambiguous fingerprints of the switching mechanism were observed via STM/STS measurements. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering was employed, to control and identify quantitatively the switching mechanism of molecules in a monolayer. Density functional theory calculations were also performed in order to understand the microscopic details of the switching mechanism. These calculations revealed that the molecular switching behavior stemmed from the strong interaction of the EPBB molecules with the STM tip. Our approach to controlling intermolecular mechanics provides a path towards the bottom-up assembly of more sophisticated molecular machines.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Discoidal Bilayers Assembled from Truncated Human Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Amy Y.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Phillips, James C.; Sligar, Stephen G.; Schulten, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein A-1 (apo A-1) is the major protein component of high-density lipoproteins. The apo A-1 lipid-binding domain was used as a template for the synthesis of amphipathic helical proteins termed membrane scaffold proteins, employed to self-assemble soluble monodisperse discoidal particles called Nanodiscs. In these particles, membrane scaffold proteins surround a lipid bilayer in a beltlike fashion forming bilayer disks of discrete size and composition. Here we investigate the structure of Nanodiscs through molecular dynamics simulations in which Nanodiscs were built from scaffold proteins of various lengths. The simulations showed planar or deformed Nanodiscs depending on optimal length and alignment of the scaffold proteins. Based on mean surface area per lipid calculations, comparison of small-angle x-ray scattering curves, and the relatively planar shape of Nanodiscs made from truncated scaffold proteins, one can conclude that the first 17 to 18 residues of the 200-residue apo A-1 lipid-binding domain are not involved in formation of the protein “belts” surrounding the lipid bilayer. To determine whether the addition of an integral membrane protein has an effect on the overall structure of a Nanodisc, bacteriorhodopsin was embedded into a Nanodisc and simulated using molecular dynamics, revealing a planar disk with a slightly rectangular shape. PMID:15533924

  9. Metamaterial Absorbers for Infrared Detection of Molecular Self-Assembled Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Atsushi; Tanaka, Takuo

    2015-01-01

    The emerging field of plasmonic metamaterials has introduced new degree of freedom to manipulate optical field from nano to macroscopic scale, offering an attractive platform for sensing applications. So far, metamaterial sensor concepts, however, have focused on hot-spot engineering to improve the near-field enhancement, rather than fully exploiting tailored material properties. Here, we present a novel spectroscopic technique based on the metamaterial infrared (IR) absorber allowing for a low-background detection scheme as well as significant plasmonic enhancement. Specifically, we experimentally demonstrate the resonant coupling of plasmonic modes of a metamaterial absorber and IR vibrational modes of a molecular self-assembled monolayer. The metamaterial consisting of an array of Au/MgF2/Au structures exhibits an anomalous absorption at ~3000 cm−1, which spectrally overlaps with C-H stretching vibrational modes. Symmetric/asymmetric C-H stretching modes of a 16-Mercaptohexadecanoic acid monolayer are clearly observed as Fano-like anti-resonance peaks within a broad plasmonic absorption of the metamaterial. Spectral analysis using Fano line-shape fitting reveals the underlying resonant interference in plasmon-molecular coupled systems. Our metamaterial approach achieves the attomole sensitivity with a large signal-to-noise ratio in the far-field measurement, thus may open up new avenues for realizing ultrasensitive IR inspection technologies. PMID:26229011

  10. Tuning the resonant frequency of resonators using molecular surface self-assembly approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenpeng; Wang, Jingwei; Yu, Yifei; Chang, Ye; Tang, Ning; Qu, Hemi; Wang, Yanyan; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Daihua; Xu, Huaping; Duan, Xuexin

    2015-01-14

    In this work, a new method to tune the resonant frequency of microfabricated resonator using molecular layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly approach is demonstrated. By simply controlling the polymer concentration and the number of layers deposited, precisely tuning the frequency of microfabricated resonators is realized. Due to its selective deposition through specific molecular recognitions, such technique avoids the high-cost and complex steps of conventional semiconductor fabrications and is able to tune individual diced device. Briefly, film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) is used to demonstrate the tuning process and two types of LbL deposition methods are compared. The film thickness and morphology have been characterized by UV-vis reflection spectra, ellipsometer and AFM. As a result, the maximum resonant frequency shift of FBAR reaches more than 20 MHz, meaning 1.4% tunability at least. The minimum frequency shift is nearly 10 kHZ per bilayer, indicating 7 ppm tuning resolution. Pressure cooker test (PCT) is performed to evaluate the reliability of LbL coated FBAR. Furthermore, applications for wireless broadband communication and chemical sensors of LbL coated FBAR have been demonstrated. PMID:25487349

  11. Animal Hairs as Water-stimulated Shape Memory Materials: Mechanism and Structural Networks in Molecular Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xueliang; Hu, Jinlian

    2016-01-01

    Animal hairs consisting of α-keratin biopolymers existing broadly in nature may be responsive to water for recovery to the innate shape from their fixed deformation, thus possess smart behavior, namely shape memory effect (SME). In this article, three typical animal hair fibers were first time investigated for their water-stimulated SME, and therefrom to identify the corresponding net-points and switches in their molecular and morphological structures. Experimentally, the SME manifested a good stability of high shape fixation ratio and reasonable recovery rate after many cycles of deformation programming under water stimulation. The effects of hydration on hair lateral size, recovery kinetics, dynamic mechanical behaviors and structural components (crystal, disulfide and hydrogen bonds) were then systematically studied. SME mechanisms were explored based on the variations of structural components in molecular assemblies of such smart fibers. A hybrid structural network model with single-switch and twin-net-points was thereafter proposed to interpret the water-stimulated shape memory mechanism of animal hairs. This original work is expected to provide inspiration for exploring other natural materials to reveal their smart functions and natural laws in animals including human as well as making more remarkable synthetic smart materials. PMID:27230823

  12. Self-assembled diacetylene molecular wire polymerization on an insulating hexagonal boron nitride (0001) surface.

    PubMed

    Makarova, Marina V; Okawa, Yuji; Verveniotis, Elisseos; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Joachim, Christian; Aono, Masakazu

    2016-09-30

    The electrical characterization of single-polymer chains on a surface is an important step towards novel molecular device development. The main challenge is the lack of appropriate atomically flat insulating substrates for fabricating single-polymer chains. Here, using atomic force microscopy, we demonstrate that the (0001) surface of an insulating hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrate leads to a flat-lying self-assembled monolayer of diacetylene compounds. The subsequent heating or ultraviolet irradiation can initiate an on-surface polymerization process leading to the formation of long polydiacetylene chains. The frequency of photo-polymerization occurrence on h-BN(0001) is two orders of magnitude higher than that on graphite(0001). This is explained by the enhanced lifetime of the molecular excited state, because relaxation via the h-BN is suppressed due to a large band gap. We also demonstrate that on-surface polymerization on h-BN(0001) is possible even after the lithography process, which opens up the possibility of further electrical investigations. PMID:27573286

  13. Molecular Assembly of Clostridium botulinum progenitor M complex of type E.

    PubMed

    Eswaramoorthy, Subramaniam; Sun, Jingchuan; Li, Huilin; Singh, Bal Ram; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is released as a progenitor complex, in association with a non-toxic-non-hemagglutinin protein (NTNH) and other associated proteins. We have determined the crystal structure of M type Progenitor complex of botulinum neurotoxin E [PTC-E(M)], a heterodimer of BoNT and NTNH. The crystal structure reveals that the complex exists as a tight, interlocked heterodimer of BoNT and NTNH. The crystal structure explains the mechanism of molecular assembly of the complex and reveals several acidic clusters at the interface responsible for association at low acidic pH and disassociation at basic/neutral pH. The similarity of the general architecture between the PTC-E(M) and the previously determined PTC-A(M) strongly suggests that the progenitor M complexes of all botulinum serotypes may have similar molecular arrangement, although the neurotoxins apparently can take very different conformation when they are released from the M complex. PMID:26639353

  14. Animal Hairs as Water-stimulated Shape Memory Materials: Mechanism and Structural Networks in Molecular Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xueliang; Hu, Jinlian

    2016-01-01

    Animal hairs consisting of α-keratin biopolymers existing broadly in nature may be responsive to water for recovery to the innate shape from their fixed deformation, thus possess smart behavior, namely shape memory effect (SME). In this article, three typical animal hair fibers were first time investigated for their water-stimulated SME, and therefrom to identify the corresponding net-points and switches in their molecular and morphological structures. Experimentally, the SME manifested a good stability of high shape fixation ratio and reasonable recovery rate after many cycles of deformation programming under water stimulation. The effects of hydration on hair lateral size, recovery kinetics, dynamic mechanical behaviors and structural components (crystal, disulfide and hydrogen bonds) were then systematically studied. SME mechanisms were explored based on the variations of structural components in molecular assemblies of such smart fibers. A hybrid structural network model with single-switch and twin-net-points was thereafter proposed to interpret the water-stimulated shape memory mechanism of animal hairs. This original work is expected to provide inspiration for exploring other natural materials to reveal their smart functions and natural laws in animals including human as well as making more remarkable synthetic smart materials. PMID:27230823

  15. Control over Structure and Function of Peptide Amphiphile Supramolecular Assemblies through Molecular Design and Energy Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantakitti, Faifan

    Supramolecular chemistry is a powerful tool to create a material of a defined structure with tunable properties. This strategy has led to catalytically active, bioactive, and environment-responsive materials, among others, that are valuable in applications ranging from sensor technology to energy and medicine. Supramolecular polymers formed by peptide amphiphiles (PAs) have been especially relevant in tissue regeneration due to their ability to form biocompatible structures and mimic many important signaling molecules in biology. These supramolecular polymers can form nanofibers that create networks which mimic natural extracellular matrices. PA materials have been shown to induce growth of blood vessels, bone, cartilage, and nervous tissue, among others. The work described in this thesis not only studied the relationship between molecular structure and functions of PA assemblies, but also uncovered a powerful link between the energy landscape of their supramolecular self-assembly and the ability of PA materials to interact with cells. In chapter 2, it is argued that fabricating fibrous nanostructures with defined mechanical properties and decoration with bioactive molecules is not sufficient to create a material that can effectively communicate with cells. By systemically placing the fibronectin-derived RGDS epitope at increasing distances from the surface of PA nanofibers through a linker of one to five glycine residues, integrin-mediated RGDS signaling was enhanced. The results suggested that the spatial presentation of an epitope on PA nanofibers strongly influences the bioactivity of the PA substrates. In further improving functionality of a PA-based scaffold to effectively direct cell growth and differentiation, chapter 3 explored the use of a cell microcarrier to compartmentalize and simultaneously tune insoluble and soluble signals in a single matrix. PA nanofibers were incorporated at the surface of the microcarrier in order to promote cell adhesion, while

  16. Self-Assembly, Molecular Ordering, and Charge Mobility in Solution-Processed Ultrathin Oligothiophene Films

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy,A.; Chang, P.; VanDyke, P.; Liu, J.; Frechet, J.; Subramanian, V.; Delongchamp, D.; Sambasivan, S.; Fischer, D.; Lin, E.

    2005-01-01

    Symmetrical {alpha}, {omega}-substituted quarter-(T4), penta-(T5), sexi-(T6), and heptathiophene (T7) oligomers containing thermally removable aliphatic ester solubilizing groups were synthesized, and their UV-vis and thermal characteristics were compared. Spun-cast thin films of each oligomer were examined with atomic force microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy to evaluate the ability of the material to self-assemble from a solution-based process while maintaining complete surface coverage. Films of the T5-T7 oligomers self-assemble into crystalline terraces after thermal annealing with higher temperatures required to affect this transformation as the size of the oligomers increases. A symmetrical {alpha}, {omega}-substituted sexithiophene (T6-acid) that reveals carboxylic acids after thermolysis was also prepared to evaluate the effect of the presence of hydrogen-bonding moieties. The charge transport properties for these materials evaluated in top-contact thin film transistor devices were found to correlate with the observed morphology of the films. Therefore, the T4 and the T6-acid performed poorly because of incomplete surface coverage after thermolysis, while T5-T7 exhibited much higher performance as a result of molecular ordering. Increases in charge mobility correlated to increasing conjugation length with measured mobilities ranging from 0.02 to 0.06 cm2/(V{center_dot}s). The highest mobilities were measured when films of each oligomer had an average thickness between one and two monolayers, indicating that the molecules become exceptionally well-ordered during the thermolysis process. This unprecedented ordering of the solution-cast molecules results in efficient charge mobility rarely seen in such ultrathin films.

  17. HomoFRET fluorescence anisotropy imaging as a tool to study molecular self-assembly in live cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Fiona T S; Kaminski, Clemens F; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S

    2011-02-25

    Molecular self-assembly is a defining feature of numerous biological functions and dysfunctions, ranging from basic cell signalling to diseases mediated by protein aggregation. There is current demand for novel experimental methods to study molecular self-assembly in live cells, and thereby in its physiological context. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorophores of a single type, known as homoFRET, permits noninvasive detection and quantification of molecular clusters in live cells. It can thus provide powerful insights into the molecular physiology of living systems and disease. HomoFRET is detected by measuring the loss of fluorescence anisotropy upon excitation with polarised light. This article reviews recent key developments in homoFRET fluorescence anisotropy imaging for the detection and quantification of molecular self-assembly reactions in biological systems. A summary is given of the current state-of-the-art and case studies are presented of successful implementations, highlighting technical aspects which have to be mastered to bridge the gap between proof-of-concept experiments and biological discoveries. PMID:21344590

  18. Influence of molecular ordering on electrical and friction properties of omega-(trans-4-stilbene)alkylthiol self-assembled monolayers on Au (111)

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Yabing; Liu, Xiaosong; Hendriksen, B.L.M.; Navarro, V.; Park, Jeong Y.; Ratera, Imma; Klopp, J.M.; Edder, C.; Himpsel, Franz J.; Frechet, J.M.J.; Haller, Eugene E.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2010-04-21

    The electrical and friction properties of omega-(trans-4-stilbene)alkylthiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au(111) were investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). The sample surface was uniformly covered with a molecular film consisting of very small grains. Well-ordered and flat monolayer islands were formed after the sample was heated in nitrogen at 120 oC for 1 h. While lattice resolved AFM images revealed a crystalline phase in the islands, the area between islands showed no order. The islands exhibit substantial reduction (50percent) in friction, supporting the existence of good ordering. NEXAFS measurements revealed an average upright molecular orientation in the film, both before and after heating, with a narrower tilt-angle distribution for the heated fim. Conductance-AFM measurements revealed a two orders of magnitude higher conductivity on the ordered islands than on the disordered phase. We propose that the conductance enhancement is a result of a better pi-pi stacking between the trans-stilbene molecular units as a result of improved ordering in islands.

  19. S-Shaped Conformation of the Quaterthiophene Molecular Backbone in Two-Dimensional Bisterpyridine-Derivative Self-Assembled Nanoarchitecture.

    PubMed

    Kervella, Yann; Shilova, Ekaterina; Latil, Sylvain; Jousselme, Bruno; Silly, Fabien

    2015-12-15

    The conformation and the two-dimensional self-assembly of 4'-(3',4″-dihexyloxy-5,2':5',2″:5″,2‴-quaterthien-2,5‴-diyl)-bis(2,2':6',2″-terpyridine) molecules are theoretically and experimentally investigated. This molecular building block forms a hydrogen-bonded chiral supramolecular nanoarchitecture on graphite at the solid/liquid interface. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) shows that the molecule adopts an S-shaped conformation in this structure. DFTB+ calculations reveal that this conformation is not the lowest-energy conformation. The molecular nanoarchitecture appears to be stabilized by hydrogen bonding as well as van der Waals interactions. I-, L-, and D-shaped molecular conformations are, however, locally observed at the domain boundary, but these conformations do not self-assemble into organized 2D structures. PMID:26624809

  20. Molecular orientation and dynamics of flexible polymers in strongly deforming flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilfoil, Maria Lynn

    A method of spatially resolved magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been developed to allow studies of order and dynamics in complex fluids having transverse relaxation times on the order of tens of milliseconds, studies which were otherwise not possible using existing techniques. The model of Doi and Edwards is a microscopic description for stress transmission in concentrated polymer solutions and melts under deformation. Central to the Doi-Edwards model is the dependence of the stress on bond orientational order of the chain segments. Different elements of the segmental alignment tensor for a polymer melt under strong shearing flow are measured here using localized deuterium NMR spectroscopy on a 610K molecular weight poly(dimethyl siloxane) melt in a concentric cylinder Couette rheometric cell. This approach provides a new means of testing the Doi-Edwards model and its refinements, in the important regime far from equilibrium where the entangled polymers exhibit nonlinear viscoelastic behaviour. The same rheo-NMR methodology is also used to test predictions of the model of Leslie and Ericksen which describes director dynamics in semi-flexible rod-like polymers subjected to viscous stresses. Director dynamics are studied in a lyotropic liquid crystal polymer PBLG (300K) in a highly ordered, nematic phase in a planar extensional flow around a stagnation point. In addition, bulk 2H NMR studies are carried out on PBLG under shear, in concentric cylinder Couette and cone and plate rheometric cells. Magnetic alignment (equivalent to the dynamic Freedericksz transition) is investigated in all three cells following deformation. Values are obtained for the Leslie viscosity coefficients alpha2 and alpha3, scaled by the diamagnetic susceptibility. Possible development of mesoscale structure under shear is discussed.

  1. Vernalization of Oriental hybrid lily 'Sorbonne': changes in physiology metabolic activity and molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohua; Wang, Qing; Gu, Jiahui; Lü, Yingmin

    2014-10-01

    Oriental hybrid lily 'Sorbonne' was used to investigate molecular changes during the storage at 4 °C for dormancy-release besides physiology metabolic activity observations. In physiological mechanism, endogenous abscisic acid (ABA) concentration level of lily bulbs decreased as the cold preservation time increased, and it kept at a stable level after being preserved for 35 days. The level of soluble sugars concentrations also changed during the cold preservation time, and it increased as the cold preservation time raised to 49 days then decreased afterward. On molecule level, a new transcriptome providing comprehensive sequence profiling data of variation during dormancy-release in lily was constructed. 34,367 unigenes expressed differentially between the control and the treatment was analyzed. 14 genes including 8 MADS-box family genes, 4 genes related to plant hormone, and 2 DNA methylation genes were selected to identify the levels of their expression by qRT-PCR. Our results show that the decrease of ABA level during cold storage, as well as changes in plant hormone genes was correlated with dormancy-release; MADS-box family genes VRN2, FLC, FT, SOC1 a, as well as LFY, MIKC and ARF, MYB transcription factor were included in lily floral induction and DNA methylation was correlated to lily vernalization under low temperature. According to the results of the present studies, we predicted that plant hormone pathway, energy metabolic pathway, vernalization pathway, and DNA methylation played important roles during vernalization; these data provided the foundation for future studies of vernalization to induce flowering of lily. PMID:24990697

  2. Molecular and functional characterization of the vitellogenin receptor in oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hongkun; Qiao, Hui; Li, Fajun; Fu, Hongtuo; Jiang, Sufei; Zhang, Wenyi; Yan, Yuedi; Xiong, Yiwei; Sun, Shengming; Jin, Shubo; Gong, Yongsheng; Wu, Yan

    2016-04-01

    A complementary DNA (cDNA) that encodes the vitellogenin receptor (VgR) in the oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, was cloned using expressed sequence tag analysis and a rapid amplification of cDNA ends approach. The coding region consists of 5920 base pairs (bp) that encode a 1902 amino acid protein, with a predicted molecular mass of 209 kDa. The coding region is flanked by a 45 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR) and a 166 bp 3'-UTR. The deduced amino acid sequence of the M. nipponense VgR cDNA had typically conserved domains, such as an extracellular, lipoprotein-binding domain, epidermal growth factor-like and O-glycosylation domains, a transmembrane domain and a short C-terminal, cytosolic tail. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) indicated that Mn-VgR is highly expressed in the female ovary. Expression analysis by qPCR demonstrated the larval and ovarian developmental stage-specific expression pattern. As the ovaries developed, the expression level of Mn-VgR gradually increased during the reproductive cycle (stage I), to reach a peak in stage III. Levels then dropped as a new development cycle was entered after reproduction molting. Eyestalk ablation led to a significant increase in the expression of Mn-VgR during the ovarian development stages (P<0.05), when compared with the eyestalk-intact group. The investigation revealed that eyestalk ablation initially affected Mn-VgR expression and then influenced vitellogenesis. In adult females, VgR RNA interference (RNAi) dramatically delayed the maturation of the ovary, in accordance with the gonad somatic index. In addition, Mn-VgR RNAi led to vitellin depletion in the oocytes and the accumulation of vitellin in the hepatopancreas. PMID:26773480

  3. Investigating the Self-Assembly and Nanopatterning Characteristics of Organic Molecular Adlayers on Silicon and Graphene via Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmel, Hunter Jason

    The controlled nanostructuring of matter on the atomic and molecular scale requires deep insight into the complex physical and chemical interactions that occur between adsorbates and surfaces. This dissertation examines the self assembly of molecularly thin organic adlayers on technologically significant nanoelectronic substrates using ultra high vacuum (UHV) scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The three material systems considered in this work are cyclopentene monolayers on silicon, perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PTCDI) adlayers on epitaxial graphene, and PTCDI melamine nanoporous molecular arrays on epitaxial graphene. The nanolithographic properties of each of these organic inorganic hybrid interfaces are extensively characterized at the molecular level. First, the molecularly precise desorption of individual cyclopentene molecules from a saturated organic passivation layer is demonstrated using feedback controlled lithography (FCL), thus achieving sub nanometer patterning resolution and the possibility of generating molecularly abrupt nanostructures on the silicon (100) surface. Second, the exceptional structural and thermal stability of PTCDI adlayers on epitaxial graphene is established using a combination of STM and X ray reflectivity (XRR) measurements. The enhanced stability of the PTCDI adlayer allows it to accommodate sub 5 nanometer voids with molecularly defined boundaries in addition to isolated molecular vacancies at room temperature. Third, a hydrogen bonded molecularly thin organic heteromolecular nanoporous network is generated on epitaxial graphene, formed by the intermixing of PTCDI and melamine. This molecular array exhibits a sub 5 nanometer two dimensional periodicity with hexagonal symmetry and is in atomic registry with the underlying graphene lattice. Overall this thesis explores the richly diverse physical and chemical interactions that promote molecularly precise lithography on nanoelectronic surfaces. In conclusion, the key insights

  4. Molecular dyes used for surgical specimen margin orientation allow for intraoperative optical assessment during breast conserving surgery

    PubMed Central

    McClatchy, David M.; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Kanick, Stephen C.; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Wells, Wendy A.; Barth, Richard J.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A variety of optical techniques utilizing near-infrared (NIR) light are being proposed for intraoperative breast tumor margin assessment. However, immediately following a lumpectomy excision, the margins are inked, which preserves the orientation of the specimen but prevents optical interrogation of the tissue margins. Here, a workflow is proposed that allows for both NIR optical assessment following full specimen marking using molecular dyes which have negligible absorption and scattering in the NIR. The effect of standard surgical inks in contrast to molecular dyes for an NIR signal is shown. Further, the proposed workflow is demonstrated with full specimen intraoperative imaging on all margins directly after the lumpectomy has been excised and completely marked. This work is an important step in the path to clinical feasibility of intraoperative breast tumor margin assessment using NIR optical methods without having to compromise on the current clinical practice of inking resected specimens for margin orientation. PMID:25901654

  5. X-Ray Scattering Investigation of Molecular Orientation During Shear Flow in Model Thermotropic Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugaz, V. M.; Burghardt, W. R.

    1998-03-01

    We describe the use of in-situ x-ray scattering techniques to directly measure the influence of flow on molecular orientation in two different model thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs). These model materials, one a polyester and the other a polyether, are both composed of rigid mesogens randomly copolymerized with flexible spacer chains of two different lengths. This architecture provides both LCPs with an accessible isotropic transition temperature, thereby allowing a well-defined thermal history to be established prior to application of shear flow. We present measurements of molecular orientation in steady shear flow, during relaxation after cessation of shear flow, and in the transient periods during shear flow inception and reversal. These results are then compared with corresponding rheological data, providing a unique opportunity to directly correlate structural and rheological behavior in each material as well as between materials.

  6. Molecular dyes used for surgical specimen margin orientation allow for intraoperative optical assessment during breast conserving surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClatchy, David M., III; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Kanick, Stephen C.; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Wells, Wendy A.; Barth, Richard J., Jr.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2015-04-01

    A variety of optical techniques utilizing near-infrared (NIR) light are being proposed for intraoperative breast tumor margin assessment. However, immediately following a lumpectomy excision, the margins are inked, which preserves the orientation of the specimen but prevents optical interrogation of the tissue margins. Here, a workflow is proposed that allows for both NIR optical assessment following full specimen marking using molecular dyes which have negligible absorption and scattering in the NIR. The effect of standard surgical inks in contrast to molecular dyes for an NIR signal is shown. Further, the proposed workflow is demonstrated with full specimen intraoperative imaging on all margins directly after the lumpectomy has been excised and completely marked. This work is an important step in the path to clinical feasibility of intraoperative breast tumor margin assessment using NIR optical methods without having to compromise on the current clinical practice of inking resected specimens for margin orientation.

  7. Cluster analysis of molecular simulation trajectories for systems where both conformation and orientation of the sampled states are important.

    PubMed

    Abramyan, Tigran M; Snyder, James A; Thyparambil, Aby A; Stuart, Steven J; Latour, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    Clustering methods have been widely used to group together similar conformational states from molecular simulations of biomolecules in solution. For applications such as the interaction of a protein with a surface, the orientation of the protein relative to the surface is also an important clustering parameter because of its potential effect on adsorbed-state bioactivity. This study presents cluster analysis methods that are specifically designed for systems where both molecular orientation and conformation are important, and the methods are demonstrated using test cases of adsorbed proteins for validation. Additionally, because cluster analysis can be a very subjective process, an objective procedure for identifying both the optimal number of clusters and the best clustering algorithm to be applied to analyze a given dataset is presented. The method is demonstrated for several agglomerative hierarchical clustering algorithms used in conjunction with three cluster validation techniques. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27292100

  8. Molecular and mesoscale mechanism for hierarchical self-assembly of dipeptide and porphyrin light-harvesting system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Kang, Yu; Ma, Guanghui; Möhwald, Helmuth; Yan, Xuehai

    2016-06-22

    A multi-scale theoretical investigation of dipeptide-porphyrin co-assembly systems has been carried out to establish such understanding, where two different types of the dipeptides, dilysine (KK(3+)) and diphenylalanine (FF(+)) are compared on tuning the porphyrin organization. Density functional theory results reveal that the electrostatic attraction between different functional groups has significantly strengthened the hydrogen bonds between them, which are considered as the driving force of the self-assembly at the molecular level. All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation further indicates that the formation of the core-shell nanorods is driven and stabilized by the hydrophobic interaction between dipeptides and negatively charged porphyrin (H2TPPS(2-)), where the packed porphyrins stay inside as the core of the nanorods and the hydrophilic groups (amino- and carboxyl-groups) as the shell. With stronger hydrophobicity, FF(+) is more likely to insert into the porphyrin aggregates and build crosslinks than KK(3+). Moreover, dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation suggests equilibrium morphologies with different dipeptides, where KK(3+)-H2TPPS(2-) assembled in fiber bundles, whereas FF(+)-H2TPPS(2-) assembled as microspheres, corresponding to the different packing behavior in MD simulations. The consistency of these results at different scales is discussed. The method used in this work could be extended for studying similar issues in hierarchical self-assembly of building blocks such biomaterials. PMID:27270974

  9. Current rectification by self-assembled molecular quantum dots from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larade, Brian; Bratkovsky, Alexander

    2003-03-01

    We present results of first-principles calculations of the current rectification by self-assembled molecular quantum dots. Molecules of that kind should be synthesized with a central conjugated (narrow band-gap) part, and two peripheral saturated (wide band-gap) barrier groups of substantially different lengths L1 and L_2. The peripheral groups must end with chemical Â"anchorÂ" groups, enabling attachment of the molecule to the electrodes. In such molecules, if they are not longer than about 2-3 nm, the electron transport is likely to proceed by resonant tunneling through molecular orbitals (MO) centered on the conjugated part of the molecule (Â"quantum dotÂ") [1,2]. Generally, either LUMO (lowest unoccupied MO) or HOMO (highest occupied MO) will be most transparent to the tunneling electrons because of their different coupling to electrodes. We have studied (i) single benzene ring C6H6 [2] and (ii) naphthalene C10H8, separated from gold electrodes by alkane chains of different lengths with the use of the non-equilibrium Green's function method and self-consistent density-functional theory. The results show significant changes in electron density and potential distribution in the vicinity of molecule-electrode contact. In the case of a naphthalene quantum dot, separated from electrodes by asymmetric alkane groups (CH2)2 and (CH2)6, the I-V curve shows current rectification on the order of ˜ 10^2. [1] A.M. Bratkovsky and P.E. Kornilovitch, Phys. Rev. B (2002), to be published. [2] P. E. Kornilovitch, A.M. Bratkovsky, and R.S. Williams, Phys. Rev. B 66, 165436 (2002).

  10. Probing self assembly in biological mixed colloids by SANS, deuteration and molecular manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelm, R.P.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Hoffman, A.; Alkan-Onyuksel, H.

    1994-12-31

    Small-angle neutron scattering was used to obtain information on the form and molecular arrangement of particles in mixed colloids of bile salts with phosphatidylcholine, and bile salts with monoolein. Both types of systems showed the same general characteristics. The particle form was highly dependent on total lipid concentration. At the highest concentrations the particles were globular mixed micelles with an overall size of 50{Angstrom}. As the concentration was reduced the mixed micelles elongated, becoming rodlike with diameter about 50{Angstrom}. The rods had a radial core-shell structure in which the phosphatidylcholine or monoolein fatty tails were arranged radially to form the core with the headgroups pointing outward to form the shell. The bile salts were at the interface between the shell and core with the hydrophilic parts facing outward as part of the shell. The lengths of the rods increased and became more polydispersed with dilution. At sufficiently low concentrations the mixed micelles transformed into single bilayer vesicles. These results give insight on the physiological function of bile and on the rules governing the self assembly of bile particles in the hepatic duct and the small intestine.

  11. Amino-terminated biphenylthiol self-assembled monolayers as highly reactive molecular templates

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerbroeker, N.; Waske, P.; Zharnikov, M.

    2015-03-14

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with amino tail groups are of interest due to their ability of coupling further compounds. Such groups can be, in particular, created by electron irradiation of nitro- or nitrile-substituted aromatic SAMs, which provide a basis for chemical nanolithography and the fabrication of functionalized nanomembranes. An estimate of reactivity of the created amino groups requires a reference system of homogeneous, amino-terminated aromatic SAMs, which can also be used as a highly reactive molecular template. Here, we describe the synthesis of 4′-aminobiphenyl-4-thiol (ABPT) and SAMs prepared from this precursor on Au(111). The monolayers were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, which revealed that they are well defined, chemically uniform, densely packed, and highly ordered. To examine the influence of electron irradiation on the reactivity of the terminal amino groups, ABPT SAMs were exposed to low energy (50 eV) electrons up to a dose of 40 mC/cm{sup 2} and, subsequently, immersed in either trifluoroacetic, pentafluoropropionic, or heptafluorobutyric anhydride. Analysing the amount of the attached anhydride species made it possible to determine the percentage of reactive amino groups as well as the effect of steric hindrance upon the coupling reaction. The above results are compared with those obtained for the well-established nitro-substituted biphenylthiol monolayers.

  12. Mass Spectrometry of Self-Assembled Monolayers: A New Tool for Molecular Surface Science

    PubMed Central

    Mrksich, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Most reactions can be performed in solution and on a surface. Yet the challenges faced in applying known reactions or in developing entirely new reactions for modifying surfaces remain formidable. The products of many reactions performed in solution can be characterized in minutes and even products having complex structures can be characterized in hours. When performed on surfaces, even the most basic reactions require a substantial effort—requiring several weeks—to characterize the yields and structures of the products. This contrast stems from the lack of convenient analytical tools that provide rapid information on the structures of molecules attached to a surface. This review describes recent work that has established mass spectrometry as a powerful method for developing and characterizing a broad range of chemical reactions of molecules attached to self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiolates on gold. The SAMDI-TOF mass spectrometry technique will enable a next generation of applications of molecularly defined surfaces to problems in chemistry and biology. PMID:19206542

  13. Mechanical properties of self-assembled Fmoc-diphenylalanine molecular gels.

    PubMed

    Dudukovic, Nikola A; Zukoski, Charles F

    2014-04-22

    We explore the phase diagram and mechanical properties of molecular gels produced from mixing water with a dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution of the aromatic dipeptide derivative fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl-diphenylalanine (Fmoc-FF). Highly soluble in DMSO, Fmoc-FF assembles into fibrous networks that form gels upon addition of water. At high water concentrations, rigid gels can be formed at Fmoc-FF concentrations as low as 0.01 wt %. The conditions are established defining the Fmoc-FF and water concentrations at which gels are formed. Below the gel boundary, the solutions are clear and colorless and have long-term stability. Above the gel boundary, gels are formed with increasing rapidity with increasing water or Fmoc-FF concentrations. A systematic characterization of the effect of Fmoc-FF and water concentrations on the mechanical properties of the gels is presented, demonstrating that the elastic behavior of the gels follows a specific, robust scaling with Fmoc-FF volume fraction. Furthermore, we characterize the kinetics of gelation and demonstrate that these gels are reversible in the sense that they can be disrupted mechanically and rebuild strength over time. PMID:24684510

  14. Naked-eye cadmium sensor: using chromoionophore arrays of Langmuir-Blodgett molecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Deivasigamani; Yuehong, Ma; Nanjo, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Hideyuki

    2007-06-01

    This study demonstrates the possibility of a reversible naked-eye detection method for submicromolar levels of cadmium(II) using the Langmuir-Blodgett (L-B) technique. Molecular assemblies of 4-n-dodecyl-6-(2-thiazolylazo)resorcinol are transferred on precleaned microscopic glass slides, to act as a sensing probe. Isotherm (pi-A) measurements were performed to ensure the films' structural rigidity and homogeneity during sensor fabrication. The sensor surface morphology was characterized using atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The probe membrane exhibits visual color transition, forming a series of reddish-orange to pinkish-purple complexes with cadmium, over a wide concentration range (0.04-44.5 microM). Cadmium response kinetics and the changes in the sensors' intrinsic optical properties were monitored using absorption spectroscopy and further confirmed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A hybrid L-B film composite of poly(vinyl stearate) and poly(vinyl-N-octadecylcarbamate) were investigated for enhancing sensor performance. The sensor was tested for its practical approach to prove its cadmium selectivity and sensitivity amid common matrix constituents using synthetic mixtures and real water samples. Using the sensor strips, the respective lower limits of cadmium detection and quantification are 0.039 and 0.050 microM, as estimated from a normalized linear calibration plot. PMID:17447727

  15. Polymer Gard: Computer Simulation of Covalent Bond Formation in Reproducing Molecular Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenhav, Barak; Bar-Even, Arren; Kafri, Ran; Lancet, Doron

    2005-04-01

    The basic Graded Autocatalysis Replication Domain (GARD) model consists of a repertoire of small molecules, typically amphiphiles, which join and leave a non-covalent micelle-like assembly. Its replication behavior is due to occasional fission, followed by a homeostatic growth process governed by the assembly’ s composition. Limitations of the basic GARD model are its small finite molecular repertoire and the lack of a clear path from a ‘monomer world’ towards polymer-based living entities.We have now devised an extension of the model (polymer GARD or P-GARD), where a monomer-based GARD serves as a ‘scaffold’ for oligomer formation, as a result of internal chemical rules. We tested this concept with computer simulations of a simple case of monovalent monomers, whereby more complex molecules (dimers) are formed internally, in a manner resembling biosynthetic metabolism. We have observed events of dimer ‘take-over’ the formation of compositionally stable, replication-prone quasi stationary states (composomes) that have appreciable dimer content. The appearance of novel metabolism-like networks obeys a time-dependent power law, reminiscent of evolution under punctuated equilibrium. A simulation under constant population conditions shows the dynamics of takeover and extinction of different composomes, leading to the generation of different population distributions. The P-GARD model offers a scenario whereby biopolymer formation may be a result of rather than a prerequisite for early life-like processes.

  16. Enhancement of the efficiency of photocatalytic reduction of protons to hydrogen via molecular assembly.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Zhu; Chen, Bin; Li, Zhi-Jun; Tung, Chen-Ho

    2014-07-15

    Conspectus One of the best solutions for meeting future energy demands is the conversion of water into hydrogen fuel using solar energy. The splitting of water into molecular hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2) using light involves two half-reactions: the oxidation of water to O2 and the reduction of protons to H2. To take advantage of the full range of the solar spectrum, researchers have extensively investigated artificial photosynthesis systems consisting of two photosensitizers and two catalysts with a Z-configuration: one photosensitizer-catalyst pair for H2 evolution and the other for O2 evolution. This type of complete artificial photosynthesis system is difficult to build and optimize; therefore, researchers typically study the reductive half-reaction and the oxidative half-reaction separately. To study the two half-reactions, researchers use a sacrificial electron donor to provide electrons for the reductive half-reaction, and a sacrificial electron acceptor to capture electrons for the oxidative half-reaction. After optimization, they can eliminate the added donors and acceptors as the two half reactions are coupled to a complete photocatalytic water spitting system. Most photocatalytic systems for the H2 evolution half-reaction consist of a photosensitizer, a catalyst, and a sacrificial electron donor. To promote photoinduced electron transfer and photocatalytic H2 production, these three components should be assembled together in a controlled manner. Researchers have struggled to design a photocatalytic system for H2 evolution that uses earth-abundant materials and is both efficient and durable. This Account reviews advances our laboratory has made in the development of new systems for photocatalytic H evolution that uses earth-abundant materials and is both efficient and durable. We used organometallic complexes and quantum-confined semiconductor nanocrystals (QDs) as photosensitizers, and [FeFe]-H2ase mimics and inorganic transition metal salts as catalysts

  17. Molecular assemblies of 4-(hexadecyloxy)-n-(pyridinylmethylene)anilines at the air-water interface and Cu(II)-promoted vesicle formation via metal coordination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Miao, Wangen; Liu, Huijin; Zhang, Xianfeng; Du, Xuezhong

    2010-09-01

    The molecular assemblies of 4-(hexadecyloxy)-N-(pyridinylmethylene)anilines (HPA) at the air-water interface on pure water and aqueous Cu(II) subphases have been investigated using in situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). The Schiff base units were oriented with their long axes almost perpendicular to the water surface, and both imine and pyridinyl nitrogen atoms of the Schiff base units were coordinated to Cu(II) ions together with their geometrical conversions. The alkyl chains in the monolayers were quantitatively determined on the assumption that the HPA monolayers at the air-water interface were composed of sublayers of alkyl chains and Schiff base units, and the chain orientation angle on pure water was 30 +/- 2 degrees and increased to 37 +/- 2 degrees on the aqueous Cu(II) subphase. The HPA amphiphiles could not be dispersed in pure water but could self-organize into vesicles with metal-coordinated headgroups and interdigitated-packed alkyl chains in the presence of Cu(II) ions in aqueous solution. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), UV-vis spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to investigate the aggregate structures and specific properties of the coordinated vesicles. PMID:20698514

  18. Spontaneous orientation-tuning driven by the strain variation in self-assembled ZnO-SrRuO{sub 3} heteroepitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yuanmin; Liu, Ruirui; Zhan, Qian; Chang, Wei Sea; Yu, Rong; Wei, Tzu-Chiao; He, Jr-Hau; Chu, Ying-Hao

    2015-11-09

    Heteroepitaxial ZnO and SrRuO{sub 3} were grown on SrTiO{sub 3} (111) substrates and formed a self-assembled wurtzite-perovskite nanostructure. Spontaneous orientation-tuning of the SrRuO{sub 3} pillars was observed, with the growth direction changing from [111]{sub SRO} to [011]{sub SRO} as the film thickness increased, which is attributed to a misfit strain transition from the biaxial strain imposed by the SrTiO{sub 3} substrate to the vertical strain provided by the ZnO matrix. The [011]-SrRuO{sub 3} and [0001]-ZnO combination presents a favorable matching in the nanocomposite films, resulting in higher charge carrier mobility. This vertically integrated configuration and regulation on the crystallographic orientations are expected to be employed in designing multi-functional nanocomposite systems for applications in electronic devices.

  19. Shape-Dependent Oriented Trapping and Scaffolding of Plasmonic Nanoparticles by Topological Defects for Self-Assembly of Colloidal Dimers in Liquid Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Senyuk, B.; Evans, J. S.; Ackerman, P. J.; Lee, T.; Manna, P.; Vigderman, L.; Zubarey, E. R.; van de Lagemaat, J.; Smalyukh, I. I.

    2012-02-08

    We demonstrate scaffolding of plasmonic nanoparticles by topological defects induced by colloidal microspheres to match their surface boundary conditions with a uniform far-field alignment in a liquid crystal host. Displacing energetically costly liquid crystal regions of reduced order, anisotropic nanoparticles with concave or convex shapes not only stably localize in defects but also self-orient with respect to the microsphere surface. Using laser tweezers, we manipulate the ensuing nanoparticle-microsphere colloidal dimers, probing the strength of elastic binding and demonstrating self-assembly of hierarchical colloidal superstructures such as chains and arrays.

  20. Shape-dependent oriented trapping and scaffolding of plasmonic nanoparticles by topological defects for self-assembly of colloidal dimers in liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Evans, Julian S; Ackerman, Paul J; Lee, Taewoo; Manna, Pramit; Vigderman, Leonid; Zubarev, Eugene R; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate scaffolding of plasmonic nanoparticles by topological defects induced by colloidal microspheres to match their surface boundary conditions with a uniform far-field alignment in a liquid crystal host. Displacing energetically costly liquid crystal regions of reduced order, anisotropic nanoparticles with concave or convex shapes not only stably localize in defects but also self-orient with respect to the microsphere surface. Using laser tweezers, we manipulate the ensuing nanoparticle-microsphere colloidal dimers, probing the strength of elastic binding and demonstrating self-assembly of hierarchical colloidal superstructures such as chains and arrays. PMID:22233163

  1. Control over Structure and Function of Peptide Amphiphile Supramolecular Assemblies through Molecular Design and Energy Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantakitti, Faifan

    Supramolecular chemistry is a powerful tool to create a material of a defined structure with tunable properties. This strategy has led to catalytically active, bioactive, and environment-responsive materials, among others, that are valuable in applications ranging from sensor technology to energy and medicine. Supramolecular polymers formed by peptide amphiphiles (PAs) have been especially relevant in tissue regeneration due to their ability to form biocompatible structures and mimic many important signaling molecules in biology. These supramolecular polymers can form nanofibers that create networks which mimic natural extracellular matrices. PA materials have been shown to induce growth of blood vessels, bone, cartilage, and nervous tissue, among others. The work described in this thesis not only studied the relationship between molecular structure and functions of PA assemblies, but also uncovered a powerful link between the energy landscape of their supramolecular self-assembly and the ability of PA materials to interact with cells. In chapter 2, it is argued that fabricating fibrous nanostructures with defined mechanical properties and decoration with bioactive molecules is not sufficient to create a material that can effectively communicate with cells. By systemically placing the fibronectin-derived RGDS epitope at increasing distances from the surface of PA nanofibers through a linker of one to five glycine residues, integrin-mediated RGDS signaling was enhanced. The results suggested that the spatial presentation of an epitope on PA nanofibers strongly influences the bioactivity of the PA substrates. In further improving functionality of a PA-based scaffold to effectively direct cell growth and differentiation, chapter 3 explored the use of a cell microcarrier to compartmentalize and simultaneously tune insoluble and soluble signals in a single matrix. PA nanofibers were incorporated at the surface of the microcarrier in order to promote cell adhesion, while

  2. Pulse-fluence-specified optimal control simulation with applications to molecular orientation and spin-isomer-selective molecular alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Masataka; Nakashima, Kaoru; Ohtsuki, Yukiyoshi

    2015-12-31

    We propose an optimal control simulation with specified pulse fluence and amplitude. The simulation is applied to the orientation control of CO molecules to examine the optimal combination of THz and laser pulses, and to discriminate nuclear-spin isomers of {sup 14}N{sub 2} as spatially anisotropic distributions.

  3. Self-assembly, redox activity, and charge transport of functional surface nano-architectures by molecular design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomski, Daniel

    Surface-assisted molecular self-assembly is a promising strategy to program the structure and chemical state of atoms and molecules in nano-architectures to achieve a specific function. The experiments described in this thesis demonstrate that the design and programming of basic organic components leads to desired characteristics by self-assembly. The fabrication of uniform single-site metal centers at surfaces, important for high selectivity in next-generation catalysts, was accomplished by coordination to redox non-innocent phenanthroline and tetrazine-based ligands. These examples were the first demonstrating tuning of the metal oxidation state in surface coordination architectures through rational ligand design. The molecular-scale coordination architectures were the first formed from chromium and vanadium, and the first from platinum in a non-porphyrin system. The first mixed valence metal-ligand surface structure was fabricated that attained the same ligand coordination number for all metal sites. A new surface reaction method was demonstrated between an inexpensive sodium chloride reagent and carboxylate ligands. High-temperature, molecular-resolution microscopy and spectroscopy of the ordered metal-organic structures demonstrated thermal stability up to 300 °C, the highest molecular-level thermal stability in organic surface nanostructures yet achieved, making such systems potential candidates for moderate-temperature catalytic reactions. Molecular self-assembly was expanded into organic semiconductor thin films. In a two-component, bi-layered system, hydrogen bonding between carboxylates and carboxylic acid-substituted thiophenes was utilized, yielding the first real-space images of phenyl-thiophene stacking. In a one-component system, multiple donor-acceptor pi-pi contacts between phenyltriazole building blocks accomplished assembly of flat-lying molecules from a surface with molecular-scale precision through more than twenty molecular layers. Sufficient

  4. Study of lnter-Molecular Dynamics within Alkylsiloxane Self-Assembled Monolayer and Elastomer Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Michael

    In this work, molecular motion, and in particular, glassy relaxations are studied in two novel experimental systems. Both experimental systems offer a significant degree of control over molecule-molecule, or group-group (where group refers to a portion of a molecule), interactions by controlling density and the type of inter-molecular interaction. Both systems have rigid elements that decrease the tendency of bulk materials to spontaneously change their density with temperature. Thus, density can be maintained and controlled and the effect of density and temperature can be (at least in part) de-convolved. The goal of this work is to experimentally observe the transition from simple, local relaxations to glassy dynamics as density is increased and to understand how this transition differs as the inter-molecular interactions are altered. In both approaches, the system is fabricated from individual parts where the nature, spacing, and particular arrangement of the parts can be controlled and the resultant changes in molecular motion can be observed. Building up a custom system from parts enables fundamental investigation into the glass transition (as discussed above) and also makes possible the development of materials that have engineered responses as a function of temperature. As a short-hand, we refer to the two systems as the monolayer or SAM (short for Self-Assembled Monolayer) and elastomer approaches. In Chapters 4-7 we discuss results from the monolayer approach. Chapter 8 summarizes results from the elastomer approach. In particular, Chapter 4 introduces you to dielectric spectroscopy and briefly summarizes the previous work by former students in the Clarke group which identified the local and glass relaxations in silane monolayers of substituted alkyl chains as analogous to the local and glassy relaxations in polymeric systems containing phase segregated alkyl chains, and similar to the local and glass modes in poly(ethylene). The remainder of Chapter 4

  5. An automated spin-assisted approach for molecular layer-by-layer assembly of crosslinked polymer thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Edwin P.; Chung, Jun Young; Stafford, Christopher M.; Lee, Jung-Hyun

    2012-11-15

    We present the design of an automated spin-coater that facilitates fabrication of polymer films based on molecular layer-by-layer (mLbL) assembly. Specifically, we demonstrate the synthesis of ultrathin crosslinked fully-aromatic polyamide (PA) films that are chemically identical to polymer membranes used in water desalination applications as measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray reflectivity measurements indicate that the automated mLbL assembly creates films with a constant film growth rate and minimal roughness compared with the traditional interfacial polymerization of PA. This automated spin-coater improves the scalability and sample-to-sample consistency by reducing human involvement in the mLbL assembly.

  6. Theory of third-order spectroscopic methods to extract detailed molecular orientational dynamics for planar surfaces and other uniaxial systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Jun; Fayer, Michael D.

    2014-04-14

    Functionalized organic monolayers deposited on planar two-dimensional surfaces are important systems for studying ultrafast orientational motions and structures of interfacial molecules. Several studies have successfully observed the orientational relaxation of functionalized monolayers by fluorescence depolarization experiments and recently by polarization-resolved heterodyne detected vibrational transient grating (HDTG) experiments. In this article we provide a model-independent theory to extract orientational correlation functions unique to interfacial molecules and other uniaxial systems based on polarization-resolved resonant third-order spectroscopies, such as pump-probe spectroscopy, HDTG spectroscopy, and fluorescence depolarization experiment. It will be shown (in the small beam-crossing angle limit) that five measurements are necessary to completely characterize the monolayer's motions: I{sub ∥}(t) and I{sub ⊥}(t) with the incident beams normal to the surface, I{sub ∥}(t) and I{sub ⊥}(t) with a non-zero incident angle, and a time averaged linear dichroism measurement. Once these measurements are performed, two orientational correlation functions corresponding to in-plane and out-of-plane motions are obtained. The procedure is applicable not only for monolayers on flat surfaces, but any samples with uniaxial symmetry such as uniaxial liquid crystals and aligned planar bilayers. The theory is valid regardless of the nature of the actual molecular motions on interface. We then apply the general results to wobbling-in-a-cone model, in which molecular motions are restricted to a limited range of angles. Within the context of the model, the cone angle, the tilt of the cone relative to the surface normal, and the orientational diffusion constant can be determined. The results are extended to describe analysis of experiments where the beams are not crossing in the small angle limit.

  7. An Experiment-Oriented Approach to Teaching the Kinetic Molecular Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Frank L., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reports an experiment in the teaching of the kinetic molecular theory to nonscience majors by the inquiry method. It allows the student to develop an essentially correct view of gases, liquids, and solids on the atomic or molecular level, and illustrates how one can draw conclusions about the molecular level by simple visual…

  8. Molecular self-assembly routes to optically functional thin films: Electroluminescent multilayer structures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Malinsky, J.E.; Chou, H.

    1998-07-01

    This contribution describes the use of layer-by-layer self-limiting siloxane chemisorption processes to self-assemble structurally regular multilayer organic LED (OLED) devices. Topics discussed include: (1) the synthesis of silyl-functionalized precursor molecules for hole transport layer (HTL), emissive layer (EML), and electron transport layer (ETL) self-assembly, (2) the use of layer-by-layer self-assembly for ITO electrode modification/passivation/hole-electron balancing in a vapor-deposited device, (3) the microstructure/chemical characterization of HTL self-assembly using a prototype triarylamine precursor, (4) fabrication and properties of a hybrid self-assembled + vapor deposited two-layer LED, and (5) fabrication and properties of a fully self-assembled two-layer OLED.

  9. The effect of self-sorting and co-assembly on the mechanical properties of low molecular weight hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colquhoun, Catherine; Draper, Emily R.; Eden, Edward G. B.; Cattoz, Beatrice N.; Morris, Kyle L.; Chen, Lin; McDonald, Tom O.; Terry, Ann E.; Griffiths, Peter C.; Serpell, Louise C.; Adams, Dave J.

    2014-10-01

    Self-sorting in low molecular weight hydrogels can be achieved using a pH triggered approach. We show here that this method can be used to prepare gels with different types of mechanical properties. Cooperative, disruptive or orthogonal assembled systems can be produced. Gels with interesting behaviour can be also prepared, for example self-sorted gels where delayed switch-on of gelation occurs. By careful choice of gelator, co-assembled structures can also be generated, which leads to synergistic strengthening of the mechanical properties.Self-sorting in low molecular weight hydrogels can be achieved using a pH triggered approach. We show here that this method can be used to prepare gels with different types of mechanical properties. Cooperative, disruptive or orthogonal assembled systems can be produced. Gels with interesting behaviour can be also prepared, for example self-sorted gels where delayed switch-on of gelation occurs. By careful choice of gelator, co-assembled structures can also be generated, which leads to synergistic strengthening of the mechanical properties. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Full experimental and synthetic details for the dipeptides, full experimental descriptions, further NMR, single crystal diffraction data, fXRD data and SANS data. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04039b

  10. Supra-molecular assembly of a lumican-derived peptide amphiphile enhances its collagen-stimulating activity.

    PubMed

    Walter, Merlin N M; Dehsorkhi, Ashkan; Hamley, Ian W; Connon, Che J

    2016-02-01

    C16-YEALRVANEVTLN, a peptide amphiphile (PA) incorporating a biologically active amino acid sequence found in lumican, has been examined for its influence upon collagen synthesis by human corneal fibroblasts in vitro, and the roles of supra-molecular assembly and activin receptor-like kinase ALK receptor signaling in this effect were assessed. Cell viability was monitored using the Alamar blue assay, and collagen synthesis was assessed using Sirius red. The role of ALK signaling was studied by receptor inhibition. Cultured human corneal fibroblasts synthesized significantly greater amounts of collagen in the presence of the PA over both 7-day and 21-day periods. The aggregation of the PA to form nanotapes resulted in a notable enhancement in this activity, with an approximately two-fold increase in collagen production per cell. This increase was reduced by the addition of an ALK inhibitor. The data presented reveal a stimulatory effect upon collagen synthesis by the primary cells of the corneal stroma, and demonstrate a direct influence of supra-molecular assembly of the PA upon the cellular response observed. The effects of PA upon fibroblasts were dependent upon ALK receptor function. These findings elucidate the role of self-assembled nanostructures in the biological activity of peptide amphiphiles, and support the potential use of a self-assembling lumican derived PA as a novel biomaterial, intended to promote collagen deposition for wound repair and tissue engineering purposes. PMID:26626506

  11. Molecular orientation of enzymes attached to surfaces through defined chemical linkages at the solid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuwei; Ogorzalek, Tadeusz L; Yang, Pei; Schroeder, McKenna M; Marsh, E Neil G; Chen, Zhan

    2013-08-28

    The immobilization of enzymes on solid supports is widely used in many applications, including biosensors, antifouling coatings, food packaging materials, and biofuel cells. Enzymes tend to lose their activity when in contact with a support surface, a phenomenon that has been attributed to unfavorable orientation and (partial) unfolding. In this work, specific immobilization of 6-phospho-β-galactosidase (β-Gal) on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) containing maleimide end groups and oligo(ethylene glycol) spacer segments was achieved through a unique cysteinyl residue. A systematic means to characterize the interfacial orientation of immobilized enzymes has been developed using a combination of sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and attenuated total reflectance FTIR-spectroscopy. The possible orientations of the immobilized β-Gal were determined and found to be well-correlated with the tested activity of β-Gal. This study will impact the development of an increasingly wide range of devices that use surface-immobilized enzymes as integral components with improved functions, better sensitivity, enhanced stability, and longer shelf life. PMID:23883344

  12. Enhancing Crystalline Structural Orders of Polymer Semiconductors for Efficient Charge Transport via Polymer-Matrix-Mediated Molecular Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yanlian; Deng, Ping; Lin, Ming; Zheng, Xuelin; Zhu, Furong; Ong, Beng S

    2016-08-01

    A facile polymer-matrix-mediated molecular self-assembly of polymer semiconductors into highly crystalline orders for efficient charge transport in organic thin-film transistors is demonstrated. Phenomenal enhancements in field-effect mobility of about one order of magnitude and current on/off ratio of two to three orders of magnitude are realized with polyacrylonitrile-incorporated polymer semiconductor compositions via solution deposition. PMID:27168128

  13. Self-assembled molecular p/n junctions for applications in dye-sensitized solar energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Farnum, Byron H; Wee, Kyung-Ryang; Meyer, Thomas J

    2016-09-01

    The achievement of long-lived photoinduced redox separation lifetimes has long been a central goal of molecular-based solar energy conversion strategies. The longer the redox-separation lifetime, the more time available for useful work to be extracted from the absorbed photon energy. Here we describe a novel strategy for dye-sensitized solar energy applications in which redox-separated lifetimes on the order of milliseconds to seconds can be achieved based on a simple toolkit of molecular components. Specifically, molecular chromophores (C), electron acceptors (A) and electron donors (D) were self-assembled on the surfaces of mesoporous, transparent conducting indium tin oxide nanoparticle (nanoITO) electrodes to prepare both photoanode (nanoITO|-A-C-D) and photocathode (nanoITO|-D-C-A) assemblies. Nanosecond transient-absorption and steady-state photolysis measurements show that the electrodes function microscopically as molecular analogues of semiconductor p/n junctions. These results point to a new chemical strategy for dye-sensitized solar energy conversion based on molecular excited states and electron acceptors/donors on the surfaces of transparent conducting oxide nanoparticle electrodes. PMID:27554411

  14. Probing the Orientation and Conformation of alpha-Helix and beta-Strand Model Peptides on Self-Assembled Monolayers Using Sum Frequency Generation and NEXAFS Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Weidner, T.; Apte, J; Gamble, L; Castner, D

    2010-01-01

    The structure and orientation of amphiphilic {alpha}-helix and {beta}-strand model peptide films on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been studied with sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. The {alpha}-helix peptide is a 14-mer, and the {beta}-strand is a 15-mer of hydrophilic lysine and hydrophobic leucine residues with hydrophobic periodicities of 3.5 and 2, respectively. These periodicities result in the leucine side chains located on one side of the peptides and the lysine side chains on the other side. The SAMs were prepared from the assembly of either carboxylic acid- or methyl-terminated alkyl thiols onto gold surfaces. For SFG studies, the deuterated analog of the methyl SAM was used. SFG vibrational spectra in the C-H region of air-dried peptides films on both SAMs exhibit strong peaks near 2965, 2940, and 2875 cm{sup -1} related to ordered leucine side chains. The orientation of the leucine side chains was determined from the phase of these features relative to the nonresonant gold background. The relative phase for both the {alpha}-helix and {beta}-strand peptides showed that the leucine side chains were oriented away from the carboxylic acid SAM surface and oriented toward the methyl SAM surface. Amide I peaks observed near 1656 cm{sup -1} for the {alpha}-helix peptide confirm that the secondary structure is preserved on both SAMs. Strong linear dichroism related to the amide {pi}* orbital at 400.8 eV was observed in the nitrogen K-edge NEXAFS spectra for the adsorbed {beta}-strand peptides, suggesting that the peptide backbones are oriented parallel to the SAM surface with the side chains pointing toward or away from the interface. For the {alpha}-helix the dichroism of the amide {pi}* is significantly weaker, probably because of the broad distribution of amide bond orientations in the {alpha}-helix secondary structure.

  15. Facile and controllable one-step fabrication of molecularly imprinted polymer membrane by magnetic field directed self-assembly for electrochemical sensing of glutathione.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wanying; Jiang, Guoyi; Xu, Lei; Li, Bingzhi; Cai, Qizhi; Jiang, Huijun; Zhou, Xuemin

    2015-07-30

    Based on magnetic field directed self-assembly (MDSA) of the ternary Fe3O4@PANI/rGO nanocomposites, a facile and controllable molecularly imprinted electrochemical sensor (MIES) was fabricated through a one-step approach for detection of glutathione (GSH). The ternary Fe3O4@PANI/rGO nanocomposites were obtained by chemical oxidative polymerization and intercalation of Fe3O4@PANI into the graphene oxide layers via π-π stacking interaction, followed by reduction of graphene oxide in the presence of hydrazine hydrate. In molecular imprinting process, the pre-polymers, including GSH as template molecule, Fe3O4@PANI/rGO nanocomposites as functional monomers and pyrrole as both cross-linker and co-monomer, was assembled through N-H hydrogen bonds and the electrostatic interaction, and then was rapidly oriented onto the surface of MGCE under the magnetic field induction. Subsequently, the electrochemical GSH sensor was formed by electropolymerization. In this work, the ternary Fe3O4@PANI/rGO nanocomposites could not only provide available functionalized sites in the matrix to form hydrogen bond and electrostatic interaction with GSH, but also afford a promoting network for electron transfer. Moreover, the biomimetic sensing membrane could be controlled more conveniently and effectively by adjusting the magnetic field strength. The as-prepared controllable sensor showed good stability and reproducibility for the determination of GSH with the detection limit reaching 3 nmol L(-1) (S/N = 3). In addition, the highly sensitive and selective biomimetic sensor has been successfully used for the clinical determination of GSH in biological samples. PMID:26320634

  16. Probing the initial stages of molecular organization of oligo(p-phenylenevinylene) assemblies with monolayer protected gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vattakattu R Rajeev; Sajini, Vadukumpulli; Sreeprasad, Theruvakkattil S; Praveen, Vakayil K; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2009-06-01

    Thiol-protected gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been used to probe the initial stages of the molecular organization of oligo(p-phenylenevinylene) (OPV) gelators. The hybrid materials prepared by the self-assembly of OPVs and GNPs are characterized by optical microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. GNPs are located preferentially on the sides of the OPV structures, which implies the presence of alkyl chains at the edges, which makes the assemblies hydrophobic. TEM analyses at the early stages of self-assembly show tapes that have a width of 4 nm, which upon further self-assembly, form fibrils through hydrogen bonding. The experiment was performed with GNPs protected with dodecane and octadecane thiols. The existence of tapes, ribbons, fibrils, and fibers were confirmed by nanoparticle marking. Based on the experimental data, we have proposed a hierarchical model for the self-assembly of OPV molecules. The presence of nanoparticles does not alter the morphology or electronic properties of the OPV structures, as revealed by microscopic and spectroscopic studies. PMID:19462383

  17. Molecular protein adaptor with genetically encoded interaction sites guiding the hierarchical assembly of plasmonically active nanoparticle architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Andreas; Huber, Matthias C.; Cölfen, Helmut; Schiller, Stefan M.

    2015-03-01

    The control over the defined assembly of nano-objects with nm-precision is important to create systems and materials with enhanced properties, for example, metamaterials. In nature, the precise assembly of inorganic nano-objects with unique features, for example, magnetosomes, is accomplished by efficient and reliable recognition schemes involving protein effectors. Here we present a molecular approach using protein-based ‘adaptors/connectors’ with genetically encoded interaction sites to guide the assembly and functionality of different plasmonically active gold nanoparticle architectures (AuNP). The interaction of the defined geometricaly shaped protein adaptors with the AuNP induces the self-assembly of nanoarchitectures ranging from AuNP encapsulation to one-dimensional chain-like structures, complex networks and stars. Synthetic biology and bionanotechnology are applied to co-translationally encode unnatural amino acids as additional site-specific modification sites to generate functionalized biohybrid nanoarchitectures. This protein adaptor-based nano-object assembly approach might be expanded to other inorganic nano-objects creating biohybrid materials with unique electronic, photonic, plasmonic and magnetic properties.

  18. Molecular protein adaptor with genetically encoded interaction sites guiding the hierarchical assembly of plasmonically active nanoparticle architectures.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Andreas; Huber, Matthias C; Cölfen, Helmut; Schiller, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    The control over the defined assembly of nano-objects with nm-precision is important to create systems and materials with enhanced properties, for example, metamaterials. In nature, the precise assembly of inorganic nano-objects with unique features, for example, magnetosomes, is accomplished by efficient and reliable recognition schemes involving protein effectors. Here we present a molecular approach using protein-based 'adaptors/connectors' with genetically encoded interaction sites to guide the assembly and functionality of different plasmonically active gold nanoparticle architectures (AuNP). The interaction of the defined geometricaly shaped protein adaptors with the AuNP induces the self-assembly of nanoarchitectures ranging from AuNP encapsulation to one-dimensional chain-like structures, complex networks and stars. Synthetic biology and bionanotechnology are applied to co-translationally encode unnatural amino acids as additional site-specific modification sites to generate functionalized biohybrid nanoarchitectures. This protein adaptor-based nano-object assembly approach might be expanded to other inorganic nano-objects creating biohybrid materials with unique electronic, photonic, plasmonic and magnetic properties. PMID:25813537

  19. Molecular orientation of asphaltenes and PAH model compounds in Langmuir-Blodgett films using sum frequency generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Andrews, A Ballard; McClelland, Arthur; Korkeila, Oona; Demidov, Alexander; Krummel, Amber; Mullins, Oliver C; Chen, Zhan

    2011-05-17

    Asphaltenes are an important class of compounds in crude oil whose surface activity is important for establishing reservoir rock wettability which impacts reservoir drainage. While many phenomenological interfacial studies with crude oils and asphaltenes have been reported, there is very little known about the molecular level interactions between asphaltenes and mineral surfaces. In this study, we analyze Langmuir-Blodgett films of asphaltenes and related model compounds with sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. In SFG, the polarization of the input (vis, IR) and output (SFG) beams can be varied, which allows the orientation of different functional groups at the interface to be determined. SFG clearly indicates that asphaltene polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are highly oriented in the plane of the interface and that the peripheral alkanes are transverse to the interface. In contrast, model compounds with oxygen functionality have PAHs oriented transverse to the interface. Computational quantum chemistry is used to support corresponding band assignments, enabling robust determination of functional group orientations. PMID:21491945

  20. Boundary conditions for fluids with internal orientational degrees of freedom: Apparent velocity slip associated with the molecular alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Heidenreich, Sebastian; Hess, Siegfried; Ilg, Patrick

    2007-06-15

    Boundary effects are investigated for fluids with internal orientational degrees of freedom such as molecular liquids, thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystals, and polymeric fluids. The orientational degrees of freedom are described by the second rank alignment tensor which is related to the birefringence. We use a standard model to describe the orientational dynamics in the presence of flow, the momentum balance equations, and a constitutive law for the pressure tensor to describe our system. In the spirit of irreversible thermodynamics, boundary conditions are formulated for the mechanical slip velocity and the flux of the alignment. They are set up such that the entropy production at the wall inferred from the entropy flux is positive definite. Even in the absence of a true mechanical slip, the coupling between orientation and flow leads to flow profiles with an apparent slip. This has consequences for the macroscopically measurable effective velocity. In analytical investigations, we consider the simplified case of an isotropic fluid in the Newtonian and stationary flow regime. For special geometries such as plane and cylindrical Couette flow, plane Poiseuille flow, and a flow down an inclined plane, we demonstrate explicitly how the boundary conditions lead to an apparent slip. Furthermore, we discuss the dependence of the effective viscosity and of the effective slip length on the model parameters.

  1. Boundary conditions for fluids with internal orientational degrees of freedom: apparent velocity slip associated with the molecular alignment.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Sebastian; Ilg, Patrick; Hess, Siegfried

    2007-06-01

    Boundary effects are investigated for fluids with internal orientational degrees of freedom such as molecular liquids, thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystals, and polymeric fluids. The orientational degrees of freedom are described by the second rank alignment tensor which is related to the birefringence. We use a standard model to describe the orientational dynamics in the presence of flow, the momentum balance equations, and a constitutive law for the pressure tensor to describe our system. In the spirit of irreversible thermodynamics, boundary conditions are formulated for the mechanical slip velocity and the flux of the alignment. They are set up such that the entropy production at the wall inferred from the entropy flux is positive definite. Even in the absence of a true mechanical slip, the coupling between orientation and flow leads to flow profiles with an apparent slip. This has consequences for the macroscopically measurable effective velocity. In analytical investigations, we consider the simplified case of an isotropic fluid in the Newtonian and stationary flow regime. For special geometries such as plane and cylindrical Couette flow, plane Poiseuille flow, and a flow down an inclined plane, we demonstrate explicitly how the boundary conditions lead to an apparent slip. Furthermore, we discuss the dependence of the effective viscosity and of the effective slip length on the model parameters. PMID:17677352

  2. Molecular orientation distributions in protein films: III. Yeast cytochrome c immobilized on pyridyl disulfide-capped phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Edmiston, P L; Saavedra, S S

    1998-01-01

    Molecular orientation in a hydrated monolayer film of yeast cytochrome c, immobilized via disulfide bonding between Cys-102 and a pyridyl disulfide-capped phospholipid bilayer deposited from an air-water interface onto glass substrates, was investigated. The orientation distribution of the heme groups in the protein film was determined using a combination of absorption linear dichroism, measured in a planarintegrated optical waveguide-attenuated total reflection geometry- and fluorescence anisotropy, measured in a total internal reflection geometry. A gaussian model for the orientation distribution was used to recover the mean heme tilt angle and angular distribution about the mean, which were 40 and 11 degrees, respectively. Additional experiments showed that a large fraction of the cytochrome c was disulfide bonded to the bilayer, which correlates with the high degree of macroscopic order in the protein film. However, a subpopulation of yeast cytochrome c molecules in the film (approximately 30% of the total) appeared to be nonspecifically adsorbed. The orientation distribution of this subpopulation was found to be much broader than the specifically bound fraction. PMID:9533712

  3. Anisotropic orientational motion of molecular adsorbates at the air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Zimdars, D.; Dadap, J.I.; Eisenthal, K.B.; Heinz, T.F.

    1999-04-29

    The ultrafast orientational motions of coumarin 314 (C314) adsorbed at the air/water interface were investigated by time-resolved surface second harmonic generation (TRSHG). The theory and method of using TRSHG to detect both out-of-plane and in-plane orientational motions are discussed. The interfacial solute motions were found to be anisotropic, with differing out-of-plane and in-plane reorientation time constants. This report presents the first direct observation of in-plane orientational motion of a molecule (C314) at the air/water interface using TRSHG. The in-plane reorientation time constant is 600 {+-} 40 ps. The out-of-plane reorientation time constant is 350 {+-} 20 ps. The out-of-plane orientational motion of C314 is similar to the previous results on rhodamine 6G at the air/water interface which indicated increased interfacial friction compared with bulk aqueous solution. The surface reorientation times are 2--3 times slower than the bulk isotropic orientational diffusion time.

  4. Assembly and clinical use of the XCP dental x-ray film holder and orientation devices in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Mamoun, John S

    2011-01-01

    XCP dental x-ray film positioning devices help to increase the dimensional accuracy of dental x-ray images. (XCP stands for "extension cone paralleling." Some dental assistants refer to them as "Rinn" devices, after a company that manufactures them.) The XCP device has a collimator ring that is parallel with the film-holding plane of the x-ray film holder. This positioning helps an assistant to align the plane of the unseen, intraorally located x-ray film parallel with the plane of the cross section of the x-ray beam. XCP devices also help to prevent dental x-ray film cone cuts, since the extraoral collimator ring helps to indicate the boundary of the unseen x-ray film. Unfortunately, the devices can be confusing to assemble because each device consists of three pieces that can be assembled in multiple ways, and there are three types of such devices for anterior, posterior and bitewing radiographs (in addition to a fourth accessory device for taking endodontic radiographs). It can be challenging to determine which piece goes with which type of XCP, and to choose the correct XCP assembly for taking a desired x-ray. This article describes some clinical techniques of assembling XCP radiographic film-holding devices, describes the clinical use of XCP devices, and ways of overcoming intraoral obstacles to device placement. PMID:21443076

  5. Horizontal molecular orientation in solution-processed organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L.; Inoue, M.; Komino, T.; Kim, J.-H.; Ribierre, J. C. E-mail: adachi@cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research , Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi, Fukuoka 819-0395; Japan Science and Technology Agency , ERATO, Adachi Molecular Exciton Engineering Project, c and others

    2015-02-09

    Horizontal orientation of the emission transition dipole moments achieved in glassy vapor-deposited organic thin films leads to an enhancement of the light out-coupling efficiency in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Here, our combined study of variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry and angle dependent photoluminescence demonstrates that such a horizontal orientation can be achieved in glassy spin-coated organic films based on a composite blend of a heptafluorene derivative as a dopant and a 4,4′-bis(N-carbazolyl)-1,1′-biphenyl as a host. Solution-processed fluorescent OLEDs with horizontally oriented heptafluorene emitters were then fabricated and emitted deep blue electroluminescence with an external quantum efficiency as high as 5.3%.

  6. Water-inducing molecular self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules into nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Weiguang; Zhao, Pusu; Song, Jie

    2011-12-15

    Graphical abstract: TPDP nanofibers with smooth surfaces can be obtained by reprecipitation method using ethanol as good solvent and water as poor solvent. In the self-assembly process, during the water adding to the amphiphilic molecules' saturated solution, the amphiphilic molecules firstly assembled into needle-like small rods. With an increase in the self-assembled time, a large number of the nanofibers are produced. The assembly behavior was revealed in the course of direct in situ monitoring of its growth with optical microscopy. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2,3,6,7-Tetramethoxy-9,10-di(4-pyridyl)-9,10-dihydroanthracen (TPDP) was synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TPDP nanofibers can be obtained by reprecipitation method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The assembly behavior was revealed in situ monitoring with optical microscopy. -- Abstract: We present investigations on the microcosmic self-assembly process of new synthesized amphiphilic TPDP molecules. It can be seen that pure TPDP nanofibers with smooth surfaces can be obtained by reprecipitation method using ethanol as good solvent and water as poor solvent. In the self-assembly process, during the water adding to the amphiphilic molecules' saturated solution, the amphiphilic molecules firstly assembled into needle-like small rods. With an increase in the self-assembled time, a large number of the nanofibers are produced. The assembly behavior was revealed in the course of direct in situ monitoring of its growth with optical microscopy. Field emission scanning electron microscopy was adopted to characterize the morphologies of the products.

  7. Kinetic studies of attachment and re-orientation of octyltriethoxysilane for formation of self-assembled monolayer on a silica substrate.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Abshar; Pandey, Lalit M

    2016-11-01

    The present study deals with kinetic studies of the chemical modification for synthesizing a hydrophobic silica surface. Surface silanization (modification) via formation of Self-Assembled Monolayer (SAM) using a short chain triethoxyoctylsilane (TEOS) was carried out under inert atmosphere at room temperature. Fourier transmission infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, water contact angle (WCA) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to investigate surface modification. FTIR analysis in the range from 900-1200cm(-1) and 2850-3000cm(-1) confirmed surface modification and re-orientation of the attached molecules. Kinetic studies of TEOS SAM formation were fitted by Exponential Association function. Kinetic fitting of FTIR data in the range from 900-1200cm(-1) revealed a very fast attachment of TEOS molecules resulting in total surface coverage within 16min whereas re-orientation rate was slow and continued till 512min. Further, change in orientation from lying-down to standing-up state was supported by contact angle analysis. AFM images initially showed small islands of ~20nm, which in-fill with time indicating formation of a smooth monolayer. Our findings indicate that formation of octyl SAM is fast process and completes within 8.5h in contrary to reported 24h in conventional SAM formation protocols. The kinetic fitting data can be explored to design a nanopatterned surface for a specific application. PMID:27524037

  8. A multiscale simulation technique for molecular electronics: design of a directed self-assembled molecular n-bit shift register memory device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambropoulos, Nicholas A.; Reimers, Jeffrey R.; Crossley, Maxwell J.; Hush, Noel S.; Silverbrook, Kia

    2013-12-01

    A general method useful in molecular electronics design is developed that integrates modelling on the nano-scale (using quantum-chemical software) and on the micro-scale (using finite-element methods). It is applied to the design of an n-bit shift register memory that could conceivably be built using accessible technologies. To achieve this, the entire complex structure of the device would be built to atomic precision using feedback-controlled lithography to provide atomic-level control of silicon devices, controlled wet-chemical synthesis of molecular insulating pillars above the silicon, and controlled wet-chemical self-assembly of modular molecular devices to these pillars that connect to external metal electrodes (leads). The shift register consists of n connected cells that read data from an input electrode, pass it sequentially between the cells under the control of two external clock electrodes, and deliver it finally to an output device. The proposed cells are trimeric oligoporphyrin units whose internal states are manipulated to provide functionality, covalently connected to other cells via dipeptide linkages. Signals from the clock electrodes are conveyed by oligoporphyrin molecular wires, and μ-oxo porphyrin insulating columns are used as the supporting pillars. The developed multiscale modelling technique is applied to determine the characteristics of this molecular device, with in particular utilization of the inverted region for molecular electron-transfer processes shown to facilitate latching and control using exceptionally low energy costs per logic operation compared to standard CMOS shift register technology.

  9. Independent saturation of three TrpRS subsites generates a partially assembled state similar to those observed in molecular simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Laowanapiban, Poramaet; Kapustina, Maryna; Vonrhein, Clemens; Delarue, Marc; Koehl, Patrice; Carter Jr., Charles W.

    2009-03-05

    Two new crystal structures of Bacillus stearothermophilus tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) afford evidence that a closed interdomain hinge angle requires a covalent bond between AMP and an occupant of either pyrophosphate or tryptophan subsite. They also are within experimental error of a cluster of structures observed in a nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation showing partial active-site assembly. Further, the highest energy structure in a minimum action pathway computed by using elastic network models for Open and Pretransition state (PreTS) conformations for the fully liganded TrpRS monomer is intermediate between that simulated structure and a partially disassembled structure from a nonequilibrium molecular dynamics trajectory for the unliganded PreTS. These mutual consistencies provide unexpected validation of inferences drawn from molecular simulations.

  10. Highly-oriented molecular arrangements and enhanced magnetic interactions in thin films of CoTTDPz using PTCDA templates.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Keitaro; Nanjo, Chihiro; Awaga, Kunio; Tseng, Hsiang-Han; Robaschik, Peter; Heutz, Sandrine

    2016-07-14

    In the present work, the templating effect of thin layers of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) on the growth of cobalt tetrakis(thiadiazole)porphyrazine (CoTTDPz) thin films was examined. X-ray diffraction and optical absorption spectra indicate that while CoTTDPz forms amorphous thin films on the bare substrates, it forms crystalline thin films on the PTCDA templates, in which the molecular planes of CoTTDPz are considered to be parallel to the substrates. Magnetic measurements reveal a significantly enhanced antiferromagnetic interaction of CoTTDPz in the templated thin films, with values reaching over 13 K. The ability to generate crystalline films and to control their orientation using molecular templates is an important strategy in the fields of organic electronics and spintronics in order to tailor the physical properties of organic thin films to suit their intended application. PMID:27183955

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of peptide adsorption on self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yun; Liu, Meifeng; Zhou, Jian

    2012-08-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the neuromedin-B peptide adsorption on the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of SH(CH2)10N+(CH3)2CH2CH(OH)CH2SO3- (SBT), SH(CH2)10OH and SH(CH2)10CH3. The force-distance profiles show that the surface resistance to peptide adsorption is mainly generated by the water molecules tightly bound to surfaces via hydrogen bonds (hydration water molecules); but surfaces themselves may also set an energy barrier for the approaching peptide. For the SBT-SAM, the surface first exerts a relatively high repulsive force and then a rather week attractive force on the approaching peptide; meanwhile the hydration water molecules exert a strong repulsive force on the peptide. Therefore, SBT-SAM has an excellent performance on resisting protein adsorption. For the OH-SAM and CH3-SAM, surfaces show low or little energy barrier but strong affinity to the peptide; and the hydration water molecules apply merely a repulsive force within a much narrower range and with lower intensity compared with the case for the SBT-SAM. The analysis of structural and dynamical properties of the peptide, surface and water indicates that possible factors contributing to surface resistance include the hydrogen-bond formation capability of surfaces, mobility of water molecules near surfaces, surface packing density and chain flexibility of SAMs. There are a large number of hydrogen bonds formed between the hydration water molecules and the functional groups of the SBT-SAM, which greatly lowers the mobility of water molecules near the surface. This tightly-bound water layer effectively reduces the direct contact between the surface and the peptide. Furthermore, the SBT-SAM also has a high flexibility and a low surface packing density, which allows water molecules to penetrate into the surface to form tightly-bound networks and therefore reduces the affinity between the peptide and the surface. The results show that the protein

  12. Temperature-dependent orientation study of the initial growth of pentacene on amorphous SiO2 by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yuanqi; Tao, Bo; Chen, Jiankui; Yin, Zhouping

    2015-11-01

    Temperature-dependent molecular orientations in the initial growth processes of pentacene on amorphous SiO2 surface with different substrate temperatures have been investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. As the substrate temperature ranges from 270 K to 600 K, there exists a transition behavior for pentacene cluster from the normal-oriented, ordered configuration to the lateral-oriented, disordered one as measured by the decreased average orientation angle and order parameter, showing the significant effect of the substrate temperature on the molecular orientation. The transition behavior is related to the strength relationship between molecule-molecule interactions and molecule-substrate interactions. During the optimal temperature range between 300 K and 350 K, the pentacene molecules tend to form the normal-oriented, well-ordered cluster driven by the dominant molecule-molecule interactions, which is affected by the substrate temperature in a greater degree than the molecule-substrate interactions. When the temperature is lower than 300 K, the ordering of pentacene cluster becomes a little worse. A higher substrate temperature results in the lateral orientation with the weakening of the molecule-molecule interactions. Then the further intensification of molecular thermal motion gradually makes the molecules separate from the cluster or the substrate surface, resulting in the appearance of the undesirable separated configuration.

  13. Molecular simulations of self-assembly processes of amphiphiles in dilute solutions: the challenge for quantitative modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusufi, Arben

    2013-11-01

    We report on two recent developments in molecular simulations of self-assembly processes of amphiphilic solutions. We focus on the determination of micelle formation of ionic surfactants which exhibit the archetype of self-assembling compounds in solution. The first approach is centred on the challenge in predicting micellisation properties through explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations. Even with a coarse-grained (CG) approach and the use of highly optimised software packages run on graphics processing unit hardware, it remains in many cases computationally infeasible to directly extract the critical micelle concentration (cmc). However, combined with a recently presented theoretical mean-field model this task becomes resolved. An alternative approach to study self-assembly is through implicit solvent modelling of the surfactants. Here we review some latest results and present new ones regarding capabilities of such a modelling approach in determining the cmc, and the aggregate structures in the dilute regime, that is currently not accessible through explicit solvent simulations, neither through atomistic nor through CG approaches. A special focus is put on surfactant concentration effects and surfactant correlations quantified by scattering intensities that are compared to recently published small-angle X-ray scattering data.

  14. Recent Progress on Bioinspired Self-Propelled Micro/Nanomotors via Controlled Molecular Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiguang; Lin, Xiankun; Si, Tieyan; He, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    The combination of bottom-up controllable self-assembly technique with bioinspired design has opened new horizons in the development of self-propelled synthetic micro/nanomotors. Over the past five years, a significant advances toward the construction of bioinspired self-propelled micro/nanomotors has been witnessed based on the controlled self-assembly technique. Such a strategy permits the realization of autonomously synthetic motors with engineering features, such as sizes, shapes, composition, propulsion mechanism, and function. The construction, propulsion mechanism, and movement control of synthetic micro/nanomotors in connection with controlled self-assembly in recent research activities are summarized. These assembled nanomotors are expected to have a tremendous impact on current artificial nanomachines in future and hold potential promise for biomedical applications including drug targeted delivery, photothermal cancer therapy, biodetoxification, treatment of atherosclerosis, artificial insemination, crushing kidney stones, cleaning wounds, and removing blood clots and parasites. PMID:27073065

  15. Self-assembly of coordination molecular baskets as inorganic analogues of cyclotriveratrylenes (CTV).

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-Hui; Huang, Hai-Ping; Yu, Shu-Yan; Li, Yi-Zhi; Huang, Hui; Sei, Yoshihisa; Yamaguchi, Kentaro

    2005-07-21

    A [3 + 3] modular self-assembly gives rise to the formation of basket-shaped, crown ether-functionalized, nano-sized trimetallo-macrocycles, which function as structural analogues of cyclotriveratrylenes (CTV). PMID:15995740

  16. The first self-assembled trimetallic lanthanide helicate: different coordination sites in symmetrical molecular architectures.

    PubMed

    Bocquet, Bernard; Bernardinelli, Gérald; Ouali, Nadjet; Floquet, Sebastien; Renaud, Fabien; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Piguet, Claude

    2002-05-01

    A tris-tridentate segmental ligand has been designed for the self-assembly of homotrimetallic triple-stranded lanthanide helicates possessing different coordination sites along the threefold axis. PMID:12123053

  17. Structure of a bacterial virus DNA-injection protein complex reveals a decameric assembly with a constricted molecular channel

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhao, Haiyan; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Matsui, Tsutomu; Lin, Zihan; Liang, Lingfei; Lynn, Anna Y.; Varnado, Brittany; Weiss, Thomas M.; Tang, Liang; Schuch, Raymond

    2016-02-16

    The multi-layered cell envelope structure of Gram-negative bacteria represents significant physical and chemical barriers for short-tailed phages to inject phage DNA into the host cytoplasm. Here we show that a DNA-injection protein of bacteriophage Sf6, gp12, forms a 465-kDa, decameric assembly in vitro. The electron microscopic structure of the gp12 assembly shows a ~150-Å, mushroom-like architecture consisting of a crown domain and a tube-like domain, which embraces a 25-Å-wide channel that could precisely accommodate dsDNA. The constricted channel suggests that gp12 mediates rapid, uni-directional injection of phage DNA into host cells by providing a molecular conduit for DNA translocation. Themore » assembly exhibits a 10-fold symmetry, which may be a common feature among DNA-injection proteins of P22-like phages and may suggest a symmetry mismatch with respect to the 6-fold symmetric phage tail. As a result, the gp12 monomer is highly flexible in solution, supporting a mechanism for translocation of the protein through the conduit of the phage tail toward the host cell envelope, where it assembles into a DNA-injection device.« less

  18. Structure of a Bacterial Virus DNA-Injection Protein Complex Reveals a Decameric Assembly with a Constricted Molecular Channel

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haiyan; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Matsui, Tsutomu; Lin, Zihan; Liang, Lingfei; Lynn, Anna Y.; Varnado, Brittany; Weiss, Thomas M.; Tang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The multi-layered cell envelope structure of Gram-negative bacteria represents significant physical and chemical barriers for short-tailed phages to inject phage DNA into the host cytoplasm. Here we show that a DNA-injection protein of bacteriophage Sf6, gp12, forms a 465-kDa, decameric assembly in vitro. The electron microscopic structure of the gp12 assembly shows a ~150-Å, mushroom-like architecture consisting of a crown domain and a tube-like domain, which embraces a 25-Å-wide channel that could precisely accommodate dsDNA. The constricted channel suggests that gp12 mediates rapid, uni-directional injection of phage DNA into host cells by providing a molecular conduit for DNA translocation. The assembly exhibits a 10-fold symmetry, which may be a common feature among DNA-injection proteins of P22-like phages and may suggest a symmetry mismatch with respect to the 6-fold symmetric phage tail. The gp12 monomer is highly flexible in solution, supporting a mechanism for translocation of the protein through the conduit of the phage tail toward the host cell envelope, where it assembles into a DNA-injection device. PMID:26882199

  19. Structure of a Bacterial Virus DNA-Injection Protein Complex Reveals a Decameric Assembly with a Constricted Molecular Channel.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiyan; Speir, Jeffrey A; Matsui, Tsutomu; Lin, Zihan; Liang, Lingfei; Lynn, Anna Y; Varnado, Brittany; Weiss, Thomas M; Tang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The multi-layered cell envelope structure of Gram-negative bacteria represents significant physical and chemical barriers for short-tailed phages to inject phage DNA into the host cytoplasm. Here we show that a DNA-injection protein of bacteriophage Sf6, gp12, forms a 465-kDa, decameric assembly in vitro. The electron microscopic structure of the gp12 assembly shows a ~150-Å, mushroom-like architecture consisting of a crown domain and a tube-like domain, which embraces a 25-Å-wide channel that could precisely accommodate dsDNA. The constricted channel suggests that gp12 mediates rapid, uni-directional injection of phage DNA into host cells by providing a molecular conduit for DNA translocation. The assembly exhibits a 10-fold symmetry, which may be a common feature among DNA-injection proteins of P22-like phages and may suggest a symmetry mismatch with respect to the 6-fold symmetric phage tail. The gp12 monomer is highly flexible in solution, supporting a mechanism for translocation of the protein through the conduit of the phage tail toward the host cell envelope, where it assembles into a DNA-injection device. PMID:26882199

  20. Spreading of Polymer Films at the Molecular Scale: Conformation, Orientation, and Fractionation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Michael; Nese, Alper; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Sheiko, Sergei

    2009-03-01

    Previously, we have reported that comb-like polymer macromolecules undergo a plug-flow with an insignificant contribution of molecular diffusion (Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 206103, 2004). It was also suggested that the composition of the flowing polymer melt was the same both inside the fluid reservoir (drop) and in the precursor film. This work called into question the macroscopic picture of polymer spreading. Through molecular imaging by AFM, we observe that macromolecules spread at different velocities depending on their size. We show that flow causes the molecules to align perpendicular to the flow direction We have also identified specific molecular conformations, such as hairpins, that become more abundant in spreading films. Lastly, we demonstrate that chain entanglements hinder permeation of long macromolecules from the drop to precursor film. These findings shed light on the molecular mechanism of spreading of polymer melts on natural, i.e. heterogeneous, substrates.

  1. Oriented Attachment of Cytochrome P450 2C9 to a Self-Assembled Monolayer on a Gold Electrode as a Biosensor Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Elizabeth Ann

    Cytochrome P450s (CYPs) are a family of enzymes implicated in the metabolism of drugs in the body. Consequently, P450 reactions are of high interest to the pharmaceutical industry, where lead compounds in drug development are screened as potential substrates of CYPs. The P450 reaction involves electron transfer to an iron heme via NADPH and the electron transfer partner enzyme P450 reductase (CPR). By immobilizing CYPs on an electrode however, NADPH and CPR are potentially no longer needed and the immobilized CYP can act as a biosensor by accepting electrons directly from the electrode. Such a biosensor could be used as an initial screening tool for CYP reactivity of pharmaceuticals in development. In this study, the drug-metabolizing enzyme CYP 2C9 was immobilized to a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on a gold electrode in three different orientations to investigate the effect that orientation has on the direct electrochemistry of CYP and to evaluate oriented attachment of CYP to an electrode as a biosensor design. Three attachment methods were investigated: random attachment via amine coupling to a carboxy-terminated SAM, oriented attachment via C-terminal His-tag coupling to a Ni-NTA-functionalized SAM, and oriented attachment via maleimide/thiol coupling to a maleimide-functionalized SAM. Three 2C9 mutants (R125C, R132C, and K432C) were developed with a single cysteine mutation at the binding site for CPR on the side of the enzyme closest to the heme; attachment of these mutants to a gold electrode via maleimide/thiol coupling would orient the enzyme such that electron transfer occurs on the electrode in the same orientation that it does in vivo with CPR. Therefore, we expected oriented attachment via maleimide/thiol coupling to produce the most electroactive CYP biosensor. Electrochemical analysis and surface characterization of the SAMs on gold electrodes confirmed that electron transfer occurs through the SAMs, and activity assays of the 2C9 electrodes

  2. Fluoropolymer Microstructure and Dynamics: Influence of Molecular Orientation Induced by Uniaxial Drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Daniel; Yin, Chaoqing; Runt, James

    Fluorinated semi-crystalline polymer films are attractive for dielectric film applications due to their chemical inertness, heat resistance, and high thermal stability. In the present investigation we explore the influence of orientation induced by uniaxial drawing on the crystalline microstructure and relaxation processes of poly(ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene) (ETFE), in order to ascertain how morphological control can benefit polymer dielectric design. When drawn below or near the Tg, the crystallinity of the drawn films is unchanged, and oriented amorphous structures and crystalline microfibrils form at high draw ratios. This orientation slows segmental relaxation, reflected by an increase in the dynamic Tg, and also delays the transition to the high temperature crystalline form of ETFE. When drawing above the Tg, the films undergo strain-induced crystallization at high draw ratios. For these films an increase in the dynamic Tg is also observed, in addition to a second segmental relaxation process, appearing as a shoulder on the primary process. We propose that this represents a contribution from a rigid amorphous fraction, having slowed chain dynamics. Supported by Office of Naval Research.

  3. Analysis of Pigment Orientation in Photosystem II at Different Temperatures by Polarization Fluorescence and Molecular Exciton Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, L.; Wei, L.; Luo, X.; Ni, X.; Lu, J.

    2014-05-01

    The effect of temperature on pigment orientation in photosystem II (PSII) was studied by fl uorescence excitation and polarization fl uorescence spectra of spinach thylakoid solution and molecular exciton theory. Experimental results showed that at 15 to 45 °C, the absorption band of chlorophyll a at 436 nm at room tempe rature red-shifted with increased temperature. The excitation spectra intensity reached the maximum at 35 °C but signifi cantly dropped at 65 and 78 °C. The polarization fl uorescence spectra revealed that the fl uorescence peak of PSII did not change at 15 and 45 °C, and the calculated degree of fl uorescence polarization increased with increased temperature. Spectral and molecular exciton theory analyses indicated that temperature affected pigment orientation in PSII, as well as the coupling strength between pigments or pigment and protein, thereby changing photosynthetic effi ciency. These results can serve as a reference for studies on energy absorption, energy transmission, regulation mechanism, and prospective applications in solar cell materials.

  4. Tailoring two-dimensional PTCDA-melamine self-assembled architectures at room temperature by tuning molecular ratio.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaonan; Jonkman, Harry T; Silly, Fabien

    2010-04-23

    Engineering and tuning multi-component supramolecular self-assemblies on surfaces is one of the challenges of nanotechnology. We use scanning tunneling microscopy to investigate the influence of molecular ratio on the self-assembly of PTCDA-melamine structures on Au(111)-(22 x complex square root of 3). Our observations reveal that three different chiral supramolecular networks having a PTCDA:melamine ratio of 3:2, 1:2, 1:4 can be selectively created by tuning the ratio of molecules deposited on the surface. The 1:2 ratio network having melamine in excess has been observed previously but the 1:4 network has not yet been reported. In comparison, the multi-component 3:2 network having PTCDA in excess is a completely new structure. PMID:20348601

  5. Large area orientation films based on graphene oxide self-assembly and low-temperature thermal reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Yongan; Zhao, Jiupeng; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Xianjie; Wu, Jie; Li, Yang; Li, Yao

    2012-10-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) have many outstanding physical and mechanical properties. Uniform and thickness controllable RGO films with large area were prepared by evaporation-induced self-assembly at a liquid/air interface on glass substrates in combination with low temperature thermal reduction at 200 °C. This process has the advantage of good compatibility with flexible and non-flexible substrates. The films are of centimeter scale and their thickness can be controlled. The structural evolution was characterized. The obtained thermal RGO films exhibit excellent optical properties, a high elastic modulus of 76.18 GPa, and a hardness of 6.89 GPa.

  6. Structure determination of a bio-inspired self-assembled light-harvesting antenna by solid-state NMR and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Anjali; Ocakoglu, Kasim; Buda, Francesco; van Marle, Thomas; Holzwarth, Alfred R; de Groot, Huub J M

    2013-09-26

    The molecular stacking of an artificial light-harvesting antenna self-assembled from 3(1)-aminofunctionalized zinc-chlorins was determined by solid-state NMR in combination with quantum-chemical and molecular-mechanics modeling. A library of trial molecular stacking arrangements was generated based on available structural data for natural and semisynthetic homologues of the Zn-chlorins. NMR assignments obtained for the monomer in solution were validated for self-assembled aggregates and refined with (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy data collected from samples with (13)C at natural abundance. Solid-state ring-current shifts for the (1)H provided spatial constraints to determine the molecular overlap. This procedure allows for a discrimination between different self-assembled structures and a classification of the stacking mode in terms of electric dipole alignment and π-π interactions, parameters that determine the functional properties of light-harvesting assemblies and conducting nanowires. The combination with quantum-mechanical modeling then allowed building a low-resolution packing model in silico from molecular stacks. The method allows for moderate disorder and residual polymorphism at the stack or molecular level and is generally applicable to determine molecular packing structures of aromatic molecules with structural asymmetry, such as is commonly provided by functionalized side chains that serve to tune the self-assembly process. PMID:23566216

  7. End to end assembly of CaO and ZnO nanosheets to propeller-shaped architectures by orientation attachment approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Liu, Fang

    2015-06-01

    Inspired by the agitation effect of propellers, heterogeneous propeller- shaped CaO/ZnO architectures were assembled in aqueous solution. Preferred nucleation and growth of CaO and ZnO nuclei resulted in their hexagonal nanosheets, and they were end to end combined into propeller-shaped architectures by oriented rotation and attachment reactions. When propeller-shaped CaO/ZnO product was used as solid base catalyst to synthesize biodiesel, a high biodiesel yield of 97.5% was achieved. The predominant exposure of active O2- on CaO(0 0 2) and ZnO(0 0 0 2) planes in propeller-shaped CaO/ZnO, led to good catalytic activity and high yield of biodiesel.

  8. Electro-molecular Assembly: Electrical Writing of Information into an Erasable Polysaccharide Medium.

    PubMed

    Yan, Kun; Xiong, Yuan; Wu, Si; Bentley, William E; Deng, Hongbing; Du, Yumin; Payne, Gregory F; Shi, Xiao-Wen

    2016-08-01

    We report that information can be written into an erasable hydrogel medium by precisely imposing controlled electrical signals that trigger supramolecular self-assembly. We prepare the medium from a blend of two stimuli-responsive self-assembling polysaccharides agarose (thermally responsive) and chitosan (pH-responsive). Upon cooling the blend, agarose forms the hydrogel medium while the embedded chitosan chains can be induced to self-assemble in response to imposed pH cues. Importantly, these triggering pH-cues can be imposed electrically (by inserted electrodes) enabling complex messages (e.g., self-assembled multilayers) to be written within the hydrogel medium. The reversibility of these self-assembly mechanisms allow the written information, and the medium itself, to be erased. These physicochemical properties enable this dual responsive medium to encrypt information, while the responsiveness of this structural information and the biocompatibility of the medium suggest uses for accessing/reporting information in diverse life science applications, such as foods, cosmetics, medicine, and the environment. PMID:27420779

  9. Molecular modeling of directed self-assembly of block copolymers: Fundamental studies of processing conditions and evolutionary pattern design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaira, Gurdaman Singh

    Rapid progress in the semi-conductor industry has pushed for smaller feature sizes on integrated electronic circuits. Current photo-lithographic techniques for nanofabrication have reached their technical limit and are problematic when printing features small enough to meet future industrial requirements. "Bottom-up'' techniques, such as the directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (BCP), are the primary contenders to compliment current "top-down'' photo-lithography ones. For industrial requirements, the defect density from DSA needs to be less than 1 defect per 10 cm by 10 cm. Knowledge of both material synthesis and the thermodynamics of the self-assembly process are required before optimal operating conditions can be found to produce results adequate for industry. The work present in this thesis is divided into three chapters, each discussing various aspects of DSA as studied via a molecular model that contains the essential physics of BCP self-assembly. Though there are various types of guiding fields that can be used to direct BCPs over large wafer areas with minimum defects, this study focuses only on chemically patterned substrates. The first chapter addresses optimal pattern design by describing a framework where molecular simulations of various complexities are coupled with an advanced optimization technique to find a pattern that directs a target morphology. It demonstrates the first ever study where BCP self-assembly on a patterned substrate is optimized using a three-dimensional description of the block-copolymers. For problems pertaining to DSA, the methodology is shown to converge much faster than the traditional random search approach. The second chapter discusses the metrology of BCP thin films using TEM tomography and X-ray scattering techniques, such as CDSAXS and GISAXS. X-ray scattering has the advantage of being able to quickly probe the average structure of BCP morphologies over large wafer areas; however, deducing the BCP morphology

  10. Kinetic Analysis as a Tool to Distinguish Pathway Complexity in Molecular Assembly: An Unexpected Outcome of Structures in Competition.

    PubMed

    van der Zwaag, Daan; Pieters, Pascal A; Korevaar, Peter A; Markvoort, Albert J; Spiering, A J H; de Greef, Tom F A; Meijer, E W

    2015-10-01

    While the sensitive dependence of the functional characteristics of self-assembled nanofibers on the molecular structure of their building blocks is well-known, the crucial influence of the dynamics of the assembly process is often overlooked. For natural protein-based fibrils, various aggregation mechanisms have been demonstrated, from simple primary nucleation to secondary nucleation and off-pathway aggregation. Similar pathway complexity has recently been described in synthetic supramolecular polymers and has been shown to be intimately linked to their morphology. We outline a general method to investigate the consequences of the presence of multiple assembly pathways, and show how kinetic analysis can be used to distinguish different assembly mechanisms. We illustrate our combined experimental and theoretical approach by studying the aggregation of chiral bipyridine-extended 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxamides (BiPy-1) in n-butanol as a model system. Our workflow consists of nonlinear least-squares analysis of steady-state spectroscopic measurements, which cannot provide conclusive mechanistic information but yields the equilibrium constants of the self-assembly process as constraints for subsequent kinetic analysis. Furthermore, kinetic nucleation-elongation models based on one and two competing pathways are used to interpret time-dependent spectroscopic measurements acquired using stop-flow and temperature-jump methods. Thus, we reveal that the sharp transition observed in the aggregation process of BiPy-1 cannot be explained by a single cooperative pathway, but can be described by a competitive two-pathway mechanism. This work provides a general tool for analyzing supramolecular polymerizations and establishing energetic landscapes, leading to mechanistic insights that at first sight may seem unexpected and counterintuitive. PMID:26354151

  11. Direct Observation of the Dynamics of Self-Assembly of Individual Solvation Layers in Molecularly Confined Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Relat-Goberna, Josep; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi

    2015-06-01

    Confined liquids organize in solidlike layers at the liquid-substrate interface. Here we use force-clamp spectroscopy AFM to capture the equilibrium dynamics between the broken and reformed states of an individual solvation layer in real time. Kinetic measurements demonstrate that the rupture of each individual solvation layer in structured liquids is driven by the rupture of a single interaction for 1-undecanol and by two interactions in the case of the ionic liquid ethylammonium nitrate. Our results provide a first description of the energy landscape governing the molecular motions that drive the packing and self-assembly of each individual liquid layer.

  12. Room temperature infrared photoresponse of self assembled Ge/Si (001) quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Singha, R. K.; Manna, S.; Das, S.; Dhar, A.; Ray, S. K.

    2010-06-07

    We report on the observation of intraband near infrared (approx3.1 mum) and mid infrared (approx6.2 mum) photocurrent response at room temperature using Ge/Si self-assembled quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Due to the bimodal size distribution and SiGe intermixing, distinguishable photoluminescence transitions are observed at 10 K, below and above the optical band gap of bulk Ge. The observed redshift in photocurrent with increasing temperature has been explained by the excitonic electric field originated due to infrared excitation at low temperatures. A good correlation between the spectral photocurrent response and photoluminescence of the quantum dots has been established.

  13. Molecular orientation behavior of chiral nematic liquid crystals based on the presence of blue phases using polarized microscopic FT-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Masanori; Katayama, Norihisa

    2016-07-01

    Study on molecular orientation behavior of highly twisted chiral nematic liquid crystals (N∗LCs) expressing blue phases (BPs) is important for developing new devices. This study examines the change of molecular orientation of N∗LCs due to the presence of BPs. Polarized microscopic FT-IR spectroscopy was used to study the in- and out-of-plane molecular orientations of N∗LCs that undergo a phase transition involving BPs. The band intensity ratio of CN to CH2 stretching modes (CN/CH2) in the IR spectra was used to determine the orientation of N∗LC molecules. The measured spectra indicated that the helical axis of N∗LC molecules was perpendicular to the substrate before heating and inclined on the substrate after cooling the sample which has phase transition from BP I to chiral nematic (N∗). The N∗LC molecule in the cell of rubbed orientation film exhibited the in-plane anisotropy after a heating-cooling ramp only in samples that passed through BP I. These results indicate that the changes of molecular orientation of N∗LC by phase transition are affected by BP I.

  14. Self-assembly of [Et,Et]-bacteriochlorophyll cF on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Möltgen, H; Kleinermanns, K; Jesorka, A; Schaffner, K; Holzwarth, A R

    2002-06-01

    The chlorosomal light-harvesting antennae of green phototrophic bacteria consist of large supramolecular aggregates of bacteriochlorophyll c (BChl c). The supramolecular structure of (3(1)-R/S)-BChl c on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has been investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). On MoS2, we observed single BChl c molecules, dimers or tetramers, depending on the polarity of the solvent. On HOPG, we observed extensive self-assembly of the dimers and tetramers. We propose C=O...H-O...Mg bonding networks for the observed dimer chains, in agreement with former ultraviolet-visible and infrared spectroscopic work. The BChl c moieties in the tetramers are probably linked by four C=O...H-O hydrogen bonds to form a circle and further stabilized by Mg...O-H bondings to underlying BChl c layers. The tetramers form highly ordered, distinct chains and extended two-dimensional networks. We investigated semisynthetic chlorins for comparison by STM but observed that only BChl c self-assembles to well-structured large aggregates on HOPG. The results on the synthetic chlorins support our structure proposition. PMID:12081324

  15. Selective Synthesis of Molecular Borromean Rings: Engineering of Supramolecular Topology via Coordination-Driven Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taegeun; Singh, Nem; Oh, Jihun; Kim, Eun-Hee; Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Hyunuk; Chi, Ki-Whan

    2016-07-13

    Molecular Borromean rings (BRs) is one of the rare topology among interlocked molecules. Template-free synthesis of BRs via coordination-driven self-assembly of tetracene-based Ru(II) acceptor and ditopic pyridyl donors is reported. NMR and single-crystal XRD analysis observed sequential transformation of a fully characterized monomeric rectangle to molecular BRs and vice versa. Crystal structure of BRs revealed that the particular topology was enforced by the appropriate geometry of the metallacycle and multiple parallel-displaced π-π interactions between the donor and tetracene moiety of the acceptor. Computational studies based on density functional theory also supported the formation of BRs through dispersive intermolecular interactions in solution. PMID:27336181

  16. Effects of excluded volume and correlated molecular orientations on Förster resonance energy transfer in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Mino

    2014-04-14

    Förster theory for the survival probability of excited chromophores is generalized to include the effects of excluded volume and orientation correlation in the molecular distribution. An analytical expression for survival probability was derived and written in terms of a few simple elementary functions. Because of the excluded volume, the survival probability exhibits exponential decay at early times and stretched exponential decay at later times. Experimental schemes to determine the size of the molecular excluded volume are suggested. With the present generalization of theory, we analyzed vibrational resonance energy transfer kinetics in neat water. Excluded volume effects prove to be important and slow down the kinetics at early times. The majority of intermolecular resonance energy transfer was found to occur with exponential kinetics, as opposed to the stretched exponential behavior predicted by Förster theory. Quantum yields of intra-molecular vibrational relaxation, intra-, and intermolecular energy transfer were calculated to be 0.413, 0.167, and 0.420, respectively.

  17. Magneto-optical Kerr effect spectroscopy--a sensitive tool for investigating the molecular orientation in organic semiconductor films.

    PubMed

    Bräuer, Björn; Fronk, Michael; Lehmann, Daniel; Zahn, Dietrich R T; Salvan, Georgeta

    2009-11-12

    The detection and control of the molecular growth mode is a key prerequisite for fabricating opto-electronic devices. In this work we present the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) spectroscopy to be a highly sensitive method for the detection of the molecular orientation. On the example of metal free phthalocyanine (H(2)Pc) in thin films, it will be shown that also for diamagnetic molecules a strong magneto-optical response can be expected. The growth mode and thus the intensity of the MOKE signal of H2Pc is strongly influenced by a templating effect using ultrathin layers of 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA). From the MOKE spectra in the energy range from 1.5 to 5.0 eV and the optical constants, the Voigt constant of thin organic films was determined. From the strong in-plane/out-of-plane anisotropy of the optical constants and the value of the Voigt constant the average molecular tilt angle of H2Pc molecules with respect to the substrate plane can be obtained. PMID:19888764

  18. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Self-Assembling Biomolecules and DNA-functionalized Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Vince Y.

    This thesis is organized as following. In Chapter 2, we use fully atomistic MD simulations to study the conformation of DNA molecules that link gold nanoparticles to form nanoparticle superlattice crystals. In Chapter 3, we study the self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles (PAs) into a cylindrical micelle fiber by using CGMD simulations. Compared to fully atomistic MD simulations, CGMD simulations prove to be computationally cost-efficient and reasonably accurate for exploring self-assembly, and are used in all subsequent chapters. In Chapter 4, we apply CGMD methods to study the self-ass