Science.gov

Sample records for oriented wavefront sensor

  1. Feasibility study of a layer-oriented wavefront sensor for solar telescopes: reply.

    PubMed

    Marino, Jose; Wöger, Friedrich

    2014-11-10

    We appreciate the thoughtful comments by Kellerer [Appl. Opt.53, 7643 (2014)10.1364/AO.53.007643] to our recent study [Appl. Opt.53, 685 (2014)10.1364/AO.53.000685] in which we evaluate the practicability of a layer-oriented wavefront sensing approach suggested for use in solar multiconjugate adaptive optics. After careful review of Kellerer's comment, we remain cautious about the feasibility of a solar-layer-oriented Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. However, we strongly encourage further analysis and proof-of-concept work that addresses the difficulties outlined in our original paper and that demonstrates the operating principles behind such an instrument. PMID:25402985

  2. Custom-oriented wavefront sensor for human eye properties measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galetskiy, Sergey; Letfullin, Renat; Dubinin, Alex; Cherezova, Tatyana; Belyakov, Alexey; Kudryashov, Alexis

    2005-12-01

    The problem of correct measurement of human eye aberrations is very important with the rising widespread of a surgical procedure for reducing refractive error in the eye, so called, LASIK (laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis). In this paper we show capabilities to measure aberrations by means of the aberrometer built in our lab together with Active Optics Ltd. We discuss the calibration of the aberrometer and show invalidity to use for the ophthalmic calibration purposes the analytical equation based on thin lens formula. We show that proper analytical equation suitable for calibration should have dependence on the square of the distance increment and we illustrate this both by experiment and by Zemax Ray tracing modeling. Also the error caused by inhomogeneous intensity distribution of the beam imaged onto the aberrometer's Shack-Hartmann sensor is discussed.

  3. Feasibility study of a layer-oriented wavefront sensor for solar telescopes: comment.

    PubMed

    Kellerer, Aglaé

    2014-11-10

    The future generation of telescopes will be equipped with multi-conjugate adaptive-optics (MCAO) systems in order to obtain high angular resolution over large fields of view. MCAO comes in two flavors: star- and layer-oriented. Existing solar MCAO systems rely exclusively on the star-oriented approach. Earlier we suggested a method to implement the layer-oriented approach, and in view of recent concerns by Marino and Wöger [Appl. Opt.53, 685 (2014)10.1364/AO.53.000685APOPAI1559-128X], we now explain the proposed scheme in further detail. We note that in any layer-oriented system one sensor is conjugated to the pupil and the others are conjugated to higher altitudes. For the latter, not all the sensing surface is illuminated by the entire field of view. The successful implementation of nighttime layer-oriented systems shows that the field reduction is no crucial limitation. In the solar approach the field reduction is directly noticeable because it causes vignetting of the Shack-Hartmann subaperture images. It can be accounted for by a suitable adjustment of the algorithms to calculate the local wavefront slopes. We discuss a further concern related to the optical layout of a layer-oriented solar system. PMID:25402984

  4. Wavefront reconstruction using smartphone based wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenyu; Zhan, Qiwen

    2015-11-01

    Smartphone camera system has the capability of being integrated into powerful field-sensing tools, capturing data and sharing these data with computing servers or cloud experts. The purpose of this work is to implement a wavefront sensor based on the smartphone platform, which has many potential applications in thin-films and bio-related sensing areas. To overcome problems caused by traditional wavefront curvature sensing setups, distorted micro-gratings are designed and introduced into the system in the dual role of both beam splitter and defocuser. The new design is capable of capturing two images of different levels of defocus in a single shot, which are then used as the input data to reconstruct the wavefront. Through testing with generated known spherical wavefronts, the smartphone based wavefront sensor has demonstrated decent system resolution and wavefront sensing accuracy.

  5. Wavefront image sensor chip.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiquan; Ren, Jian; Tearney, Guillermo J; Yang, Changhuei

    2010-08-01

    We report the implementation of an image sensor chip, termed wavefront image sensor chip (WIS), that can measure both intensity/amplitude and phase front variations of a light wave separately and quantitatively. By monitoring the tightly confined transmitted light spots through a circular aperture grid in a high Fresnel number regime, we can measure both intensity and phase front variations with a high sampling density (11 microm) and high sensitivity (the sensitivity of normalized phase gradient measurement is 0.1 mrad under the typical working condition). By using WIS in a standard microscope, we can collect both bright-field (transmitted light intensity) and normalized phase gradient images. Our experiments further demonstrate that the normalized phase gradient images of polystyrene microspheres, unstained and stained starfish embryos, and strongly birefringent potato starch granules are improved versions of their corresponding differential interference contrast (DIC) microscope images in that they are artifact-free and quantitative. Besides phase microscopy, WIS can benefit machine recognition, object ranging, and texture assessment for a variety of applications. PMID:20721059

  6. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOEpatents

    Neal, Daniel R.; Alford, W. J.; Gruetzner, James K.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed.

  7. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOEpatents

    Neal, D.R.; Alford, W.J.; Gruetzner, J.K.

    1999-08-10

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed. 21 figs.

  8. Wavefront modifier with integrated sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Mike; Laycock, Leslie; Rowe, Duncan; Cairns, Lee

    2009-09-01

    We present a novel method for integrating a wavefront sensor into a deformable mirror. This development should simplify the design of laser and electro-optic systems, and lead to smart mirrors which need no external control systems. In operation, a small fraction of the incident light is transmitted through the mirror coating and is sampled by a Hartmann Mask. Options include open loop, traditional closed loop or fully integrated operation whereby the wavefront sensor is used to provide direct feedback to the mirror actuators, enabling automatic alignment or phase conjugation.

  9. Broadband, Common-path, Interferometric Wavefront Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, James Kent (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid sensors comprising Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor (S-HWFS) and Zernike Wavefront Sensor (Z-WFS) capabilities are presented. The hybrid sensor includes a Z-WFS optically arranged in-line with a S-HWFS such that the combined wavefront sensor operates across a wide dynamic range and noise conditions. The Z-WFS may include the ability to introduce a dynamic phase shift in both transmissive and reflective modes.

  10. Wavefront sensor and wavefront corrector matching in adaptive optics

    PubMed Central

    Dubra, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Matching wavefront correctors and wavefront sensors by minimizing the condition number and mean wavefront variance is proposed. The particular cases of two continuous-sheet deformable mirrors and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor with square packing geometry are studied in the presence of photon noise, background noise and electronics noise. Optimal number of lenslets across each actuator are obtained for both deformable mirrors, and a simple experimental procedure for optimal alignment is described. The results show that high-performance adaptive optics can be achieved even with low cost off-the-shelf Shack-Hartmann arrays with lenslet spacing that do not necessarily match those of the wavefront correcting elements. PMID:19532513

  11. One-Dimensional Wavefront Sensor Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-04-25

    This software analyzes one-dimensional wavefront sensor data acquired with any of several data acquisition systems. It analyzes the data to determine centroids, wavefront slopes and overall wavefront error. The data can be displayed in many formats, with plots of various parameters vs time and position, including computer generated movies. Data can also be exported for use by other programs.

  12. x-y curvature wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Cagigal, Manuel P; Valle, Pedro J

    2015-04-15

    In this Letter, we propose a new curvature wavefront sensor based on the principles of optical differentiation. The theoretically modeled setup consists of a diffractive optical mask placed at the intermediate plane of a classical two-lens coherent optical processor. The resulting image is composed of a number of local derivatives of the entrance pupil function whose proper combination provides the wavefront curvature. In contrast to the common radial curvature sensors, this one is able to provide the x and y wavefront curvature maps simultaneously. The sensor offers other additional advantages like having high spatial resolution, adjustable dynamic range, and not being sensitive to misalignment. PMID:25872040

  13. Scalable analog wavefront sensor with subpixel resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Michael

    2006-06-01

    Standard Shack-Hartman wavefront sensors use a CCD element to sample position and distortion of a target or guide star. Digital sampling of the element and transfer to a memory space for subsequent computation adds significant temporal delay, thus, limiting the spatial frequency and scalability of the system as a wavefront sensor. A new approach to sampling uses information processing principles in an insect compound eye. Analog circuitry eliminates digital sampling and extends the useful range of the system to control a deformable mirror and make a faster, more capable wavefront sensor.

  14. Generalised optical differentiation wavefront sensor: a sensitive high dynamic range wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Haffert, S Y

    2016-08-22

    Current wavefront sensors for high resolution imaging have either a large dynamic range or a high sensitivity. A new kind of wavefront sensor is developed which can have both: the Generalised Optical Differentiation wavefront sensor. This new wavefront sensor is based on the principles of optical differentiation by amplitude filters. We have extended the theory behind linear optical differentiation and generalised it to nonlinear filters. We used numerical simulations and laboratory experiments to investigate the properties of the generalised wavefront sensor. With this we created a new filter that can decouple the dynamic range from the sensitivity. These properties make it suitable for adaptive optic systems where a large range of phase aberrations have to be measured with high precision. PMID:27557179

  15. Curvature sensor for ocular wavefront measurement.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Doutón, Fernando; Pujol, Jaume; Arjona, Montserrat; Luque, Sergio O

    2006-08-01

    We describe a new wavefront sensor for ocular aberration determination, based on the curvature sensing principle, which adapts the classical system used in astronomy for the living eye's measurements. The actual experimental setup is presented and designed following a process guided by computer simulations to adjust the design parameters for optimal performance. We present results for artificial and real young eyes, compared with the Hartmann-Shack estimations. Both methods show a similar performance for these cases. This system will allow for the measurement of higher order aberrations than the currently used wavefront sensors in situations in which they are supposed to be significant, such as postsurgery eyes. PMID:16832447

  16. 2D Wavefront Sensor Analysis and Control

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-02-19

    This software is designed for data acquisition and analysis of two dimensional wavefront sensors. The software includes data acquisition and control functions for an EPIX frame grabber to acquire data from a computer and all the appropriate analysis functions necessary to produce and display intensity and phase information. This software is written in Visual Basic for windows.

  17. Specialized wavefront sensors for adaptive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, D.R.; Mansell, J.D.; Gruetzner, J.K.

    1995-08-01

    The performance of an adaptive optical system is strongly dependent upon correctly measuring the wavefront of the arriving light. The most common wavefront measurement techniques used to date are the shearing interferometer and the Shack-Hartmann sensor. Shack-Hartmann sensors rely on the use of lenslet arrays to sample the aperture appropriately. These have traditionally been constructed using ULM or step and repeat technology, and more recently with binary optics technology. Diffractive optics fabrication methodology can be used to remove some of the limitations of the previous technologies and can allow for low-cost production of sophisticated elements. We have investigated several different specialized wavefront sensor configurations using both Shack-Hartmann and shearing interferometer principles. We have taken advantage of the arbitrary nature of these elements to match pupil shapes of detector and telescope aperture and to introduce magnification between the lenslet array and the detector. We have fabricated elements that facilitate matching the sampling to the current atmospheric conditions. The sensors were designed using a far-field diffraction model and a photolithography layout program. They were fabricated using photolithography and RIE etching. Several different designs will be presented with some experimental results from a small-scale adaptive optics brass-board.

  18. LINC-NIRVANA: mechanical challanges of the MCAO wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soci, Roberto; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Herbst, Thomas M.; Farinato, Jacopo; Gaessler, Wolfgang; Baumeister, Harald; Rohloff, Ralf-Rainer; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Xu, Wenli; Andersen, David R.; Egner, Sebastian E.; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Lombini, Matteo; Ebert, Monica; Boehm, Armin; Muench, Norbert; Xompero, Marco

    2004-10-01

    Several multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems using the layer-oriented approach are under construction and will soon be tested at different facilities in several instruments. One of these instruments is LINC-NIRVANA, a Fizeau interferometer for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). This instrument uses a ground layer wavefront sensor (GWS) and a combined mid-high layer wavefront sensor (MHWS) with different fields of view (concept of multiple field of view), a 2-6 arcmin annular ring for the GWS and a 2 arcmin diameter central field of view for the MHWS. Both sensors are Pyramid wavefront sensors which optically co-add light from multiple natural guide stars. The opto-mechanical problems concerning these sensors are related to the fast focal ratio of the beam on the pyramids coupled with the available pixelscale of detectors. This leads to very tight requirements on the moving systems (linear stages) for the star enlargers (SE) used to pick off the light of individual stars. As there are 40 star enlargers in the overall system, additional efforts were put into the alignment system of the optics of the star enlargers and the reduction in size of the star enlargers to minimize the distance between available guide stars.

  19. Extended scene wavefront sensor for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomer, Thierry; Ravel, Karen; Corlay, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    The spatial resolution of optical monitoring satellites increases continuously and it is more and more difficult to satisfy the stability constraints of the instrument. The compactness requirements induce high sensitivity to drift during storage and launching. The implementation of an active loop for the control of the performances for the telescope becomes essential, in the same way of astronomy telescopes on ground. The active loop requires disposing of informations in real time of optical distortions of the wavefront, due to mirror deformations. It is the role of the Shack-Hartmann wave front sensor studied by Sodern. It is located in the focal plane of the telescope, in edge of field of view, in order not to disturb acquisition by the main instrument. Its particular characteristic, compared to a traditional wavefront sensor is not only to work on point source as star image, but also on extended scenes, as those observed by the instrument. The exit pupil of the telescope is imaged on a micro lenses array by a relay optics. Each element of the micro lenses array generates a small image, drifted by the local wavefront slope. The processing by correlation between small images allows to measure local slope and to recover the initial wavefront deformation according to Zernike decomposition. Sodern has realized the sensor dimensioning and has studied out the comparison of various algorithms of images correlation making it possible to measure the local slopes of the wave front. Simulations, taking into account several types of detectors, enabled to compare the performances of these solutions and a choice of detector was carried out. This article describes the state of progress of the work done so far. It shows the result of the comparisons on the choice of the detector, the main features of the sensor definition and the performances obtained.

  20. A Wavefront Sensor to Detect Dim Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateen, M.; Guyon, O.; Hart, M.; Codona, J.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we present the progress made towards building the non-linear Curvature wavefront sensor (nlCWFS) to be used in an adaptive optics system for the direct imaging of exoplanets without the use of a laser guide star (LGS). Commonly used wavefront sensors such as the Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) do a good job of reconstructing high order modes but due to design limitations are poor at reconstructing low order modes. The nlCWFS is able to use the full spatial coherence of the pupil allowing it to reconstruct all spatial frequencies equally well. The nlCWFS senses at the diffraction limit as opposed to the SHWFS which senses at the seeing limit. This awards the nlCWFS a gain in flux of (D/r0)2. In this paper we present results from putting the nlCWFS on the 6.5m MMT Observatory and detail the progress being made to build the nlCWFS for the 1.5 m Air Force Research Laboratory/RDS Optics Division telescope.

  1. Improvements to the modal holographic wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanpeng; Lambert, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    The Zernike coefficients of a light wavefront can be calculated directly by intensity ratios of pairs of spots in the reconstructed image plane of a holographic wavefront sensor (HWFS). However, the response curve of the HWFS heavily depends on the position and size of the detector for each spot and the distortions introduced by other aberrations. In this paper, we propose a method to measure the intensity of each spot by setting a threshold to select effective pixels and using the weighted average intensity within a selected window. Compared with using the integral intensity over a small window for each spot, we show through a numerical simulation that the proposed method reduces the dependency of the HWFS's response curve on the selection of the detector window. We also recorded a HWFS on a holographic plate using a blue laser and demonstrated its capability to detect the strength of encoded Zernike terms in an aberrated beam. PMID:27140379

  2. A multi-tiered wavefront sensor using binary optics

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, D.R.; Warren, M.E.; Gruetzner, J.K.; Smith, T.G.; Rosenthal, R.R.; McKechnie, T.S.

    1994-05-01

    Wavefront sensors have been used to make measurements in fluid- dynamics and for closed loop control of adaptive optics. In most common Shack-Hartmann wavefront wavefront sensors, the light is broken up into series of rectangular or hexagonal apertures that divide the light into a series of focal spots. The position of these focal spots is used to determine the wavefront slopes over each subaperture. Using binary optics technology, we have developed a hierarchical or fractal wavefront sensor that divides the subapertures up on a more optimal fashion. We have demonstrated this concept for up to four tiers and developed the wavefront reconstruction methods for both segmented adaptive optics and continous wavefront measurement.

  3. Detecting higher-order wavefront errors with an astigmatic hybrid wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Barwick, Shane

    2009-06-01

    The reconstruction of wavefront errors from measurements over subapertures can be made more accurate if a fully characterized quadratic surface can be fitted to the local wavefront surface. An astigmatic hybrid wavefront sensor with added neural network postprocessing is shown to have this capability, provided that the focal image of each subaperture is sufficiently sampled. Furthermore, complete local curvature information is obtained with a single image without splitting beam power. PMID:19488150

  4. Pyramidal Wavefront Sensor Demonstrator at INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Olivier; Véran, Jean-Pierre; Anctil, Geneviève; Bourqui, Pascal; Châteauneuf, François; Gauvin, Jonny; Goyette, Philippe; Lagacé, François; Turbide, Simon; Wang, Min

    2014-08-01

    Wavefront sensing is one of the key elements of an Adaptive Optics System. Although Shack-Hartmann WFS are the most commonly used whether for astronomical or biomedical applications, the high-sensitivity and large dynamic-range of the Pyramid-WFS (P-WFS) technology is promising and needs to be further investigated for proper justification in future Extremely Large Telescopes (ELT) applications. At INO, center for applied research in optics and technology transfer in Quebec City, Canada, we have recently set to develop a Pyramid wavefront sensor (P-WFS), an option for which no other research group in Canada had any experience. A first version had been built and tested in 2013 in collaboration with NRC-HIA Victoria. Here we present a second iteration of demonstrator with an extended spectral range, fast modulation capability and low-noise, fast-acquisition EMCCD sensor. The system has been designed with compactness and robustness in mind to allow on-sky testing at Mont Mégantic facility, in parallel with a Shack- Hartmann sensor so as to compare both options.

  5. Bottlenecks of the wavefront sensor based on the Talbot effect.

    PubMed

    Podanchuk, Dmytro; Kovalenko, Andrey; Kurashov, Vitalij; Kotov, Myhaylo; Goloborodko, Andrey; Danko, Volodymyr

    2014-04-01

    Physical constraints and peculiarities of the wavefront sensing technique, based on the Talbot effect, are discussed. The limitation on the curvature of the measurable wavefront is derived. The requirements to the Fourier spectrum of the periodic mask are formulated. Two kinds of masks are studied for their performance in the wavefront sensor. It is shown that the boundary part of the mask aperture does not contribute to the initial data for wavefront restoration. It is verified by experiment and computer simulation that the performance of the Talbot sensor, which meets established conditions, is similar to that of the Shack-Hartmann sensor. PMID:24787208

  6. Pyramid wavefront sensor for image quality evaluation of optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhendong

    2015-08-01

    When the pyramid wavefront sensor is used to evaluate the imaging quality, placed at the focal plane of the aberrated optical system e.g., a telescope, it splits the light into four beams. Four images of the pupil are created on the detector and the detection signals of the pyramid wavefront sensor are calculated with these four intensity patterns, providing information on the derivatives of the aberrated wavefront. Based on the theory of the pyramid wavefront sensor, we are going to develop simulation software and a wavefront detector which can be used to test the imaging quality of the telescope. In our system, the subpupil image intensity through the pyramid sensor is calculated to obtain the aberration of wavefront where the piston, tilt, defocus, spherical, coma, astigmatism and other high level aberrations are separately represented by Zernike polynomials. The imaging quality of the optical system is then evaluated by the subsequent wavefront reconstruction. The performance of our system is to be checked by comparing with the measurements carried out using Puntino wavefront instrument (the method of SH wavefront sensor). Within this framework, the measurement precision of pyramid sensor will be discussed as well through detailed experiments. In general, this project would be very helpful both in our understanding of the principle of the wavefront reconstruction and its future technical applications. So far, we have produced the pyramid and established the laboratory setup of the image quality detecting system based on this wavefront sensor. Preliminary results are obtained, in that we have obtained the intensity images of the four pupils. Additional work is needed to analyze the characteristics of the pyramid wavefront sensor.

  7. The NGS Pyramid wavefront sensor for ERIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, A.; Antichi, J.; Quirós-Pacheco, F.; Esposito, S.; Carbonaro, L.; Agapito, G.; Biliotti, V.; Briguglio, R.; Di Rico, G.; Dolci, M.; Ferruzzi, D.; Pinna, E.; Puglisi, A.; Xompero, M.; Marchetti, E.; Fedrigo, E.; Le Louarn, M.; Conzelmann, R.; Delabre, B.; Amico, P.; Hubin, N.

    2014-07-01

    ERIS is the new Single Conjugate Adaptive Optics (AO) instrument for VLT in construction at ESO with the collaboration of Max-Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, ETH-Institute for Astronomy and INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri. The ERIS AO system relies on a 40×40 sub-aperture Pyramid Wavefront Sensor (PWFS) for two operating modes: a pure Natural Guide Star high-order sensing for high Strehl and contrast correction and a low-order visible sensing in support of the Laser Guide Star AO mode. In this paper we present in detail the preliminary design of the ERIS PWFS that is developed under the responsibility of INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri in collaboration with ESO.

  8. The Gemini Planet Imager Calibration Wavefront Sensor Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Burruss, Rick S.; Bartos, Randall D.; Trinh, Thang Q.; Pueyo, Laurent A.; Fregoso, Santos F.; Angione, John R.; Shelton, J. Chris

    2010-01-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager is an extreme adaptive optics system that will employ an apodized-pupil coronagraph to make direct detections of faint companions of nearby stars to a contrast level of the 10(exp -7) within a few lambda/D of the parent star. Such high contrasts from the ground require exquisite wavefront sensing and control both for the AO system as well as for the coronagraph. Un-sensed non-common path phase and amplitude errors after the wavefront sensor dichroic but before the coronagraph would lead to speckles which would ultimately limit the contrast. The calibration wavefront system for GPI will measure the complex wavefront at the system pupil before the apodizer and provide slow phase corrections to the AO system to mitigate errors that would cause a loss in contrast. The calibration wavefront sensor instrument for GPI has been built. We will describe the instrument and its performance.

  9. Hybrid curvature and modal wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shihao; Haist, Tobias; Dietrich, Tom; Osten, Wolfgang

    2014-09-01

    The crosstalk effect considerably limits the capability of holography-based modal wavefront sensing (HMWS) when measuring wavefronts with large aberrations. In this contribution, we introduce a curvature-based measurement technique into HMWS to extend the dynamic range and the sensitivity of HMWS via a compact holographic design. If the input aberrations are large, the dominating aberration modes are first detected via curvature sensing and compensated using a wavefront correcting device, e.g. a membrane mirror. The system then switches to HMWS to obtain better sensitivity and accuracy with reduced aberrations. Different approaches for the reconstruction of the wavefront have been tested and extensive simulations for different aberrations have been analyzed.

  10. Adaptive wavefront sensor based on the Talbot effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podanchuk, Dmytro V.; Kurashov, Vitaliy N.; Kovalenko, Andrey V.; Dan'ko, Volodymyr P.; Kotov, Myhailo M.; Goloborodko, Nataliya S.

    2015-11-01

    The possibilities of wavefront curvature measuring by Talbot sensor are theoretically and experimentally investigated. A new method of wavefront aberrations measurement is proposed and demonstrated. It is based on the observation of the Talbot effect when the diffraction grating is adapted to the wavefront curvature of the analyzed wave. Herewith, the observation plane stay fixed and corresponds to the Talbot length for a plane wave. It is shown that the measurement range can be made several times wider, with the help of the adaptive Talbot sensor, by retaining the required angular sensitivity. A possibility of self-reproduction of the rectangular grating (with different periods along the axes) by the astigmatic wavefront is experimentally demonstrated. The possibility of the experimental realization of the adaptive Talbot sensor using the dynamic spatial light modulator is demonstrated.

  11. High frame-rate, large field wavefront sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Avicola, K.; Salmon, J.T.; Brase, J.; Waltjen, K.; Presta, R. ); Balch, K.S. )

    1992-03-01

    A two-stage intensified 192 {times} 239 pixel imager developed by Eastman Kodak for motion analysis was used to construct a 1 kHz frame-rate Hartmann wavefront sensor. The sensor uses a monolithic array of lenslets with a focal length that is adjusted by an index fluid between the convex surface and an optical flat. The accuracy of the calculated centroid position, which is related to wavefront measurement accuracy, was obtained as a function of spot power and spot size. The sensor was then dynamically tested at a 1 kHz frame-rate with a 9 {times} 9 lenslet array and a fast steering mirror, which swept a plane wavefront across the wavefront sensor. An 8 cm diameter subaperture will provide a return signal (589 nm) level of about 1000 photons/ms using the AVLIS 1 kW laser (stretched pulse) as guide star source, which is sufficient to yield a wavefront measurement of better than {gamma}/10 rms. If an area of 6 {times} 6 pixels per Hartmann spot were allocated, this wavefront sensor could support a 32 {times} 32, or 1024, element deformable mirror.

  12. Optical differentiation wavefront sensor based on binary pixelated transmission filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, J.; Travinsky, A.; Ding, G.; Dorrer, C.

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution wavefront sensors are used in a wide range of applications. The Shack-Hartmann sensor is the industry standard and mostly used for this kind of analysis. However, with this sensor the analysis can only be performed for narrowband radiation, the recoverable curvature of the wavefront slopes is also restricted by the size of a single lens in the microlens array. The high-resolution Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor (>128×128) is also significantly expensive. The optical differentiation wavefront sensor, on the other hand, consists of only simple and therefore inexpensive components, offers greater signal to noise ratio, allows for high-resolution analysis of wavefront curvature, and is potentially capable of performing broadband measurements. When a transmission mask with linear attenuation along a spatial direction modulates the far field of an optical wave, the spatial wavefront slope along that direction can be recovered from the fluence in the near field after modulation. With two orthogonal measurements one can recover the complete wavefront of the optical wave. In this study the characteristics of such a wavefront sensor are investigated when the linear transmission modulation is implemented with a pixelated binary filter. Such a filter can be produced as a gray-scale quasi-continuous transmission pattern constructed using arrays of small (e.g., 10-micron) transparent or opaque pixels and therefore it can simply be fabricated by conventional lithography techniques. Simulations demonstrate the potential ability of such a pixelated filter to match the performance of a filter with continuously varying transmission, while offering the advantage of better transmission control and reduction of fabrication costs.

  13. One dimensional wavefront distortion sensor comprising a lens array system

    DOEpatents

    Neal, D.R.; Michie, R.B.

    1996-02-20

    A 1-dimensional sensor for measuring wavefront distortion of a light beam as a function of time and spatial position includes a lens system which incorporates a linear array of lenses, and a detector system which incorporates a linear array of light detectors positioned from the lens system so that light passing through any of the lenses is focused on at least one of the light detectors. The 1-dimensional sensor determines the slope of the wavefront by location of the detectors illuminated by the light. The 1 dimensional sensor has much greater bandwidth that 2 dimensional systems. 8 figs.

  14. One dimensional wavefront distortion sensor comprising a lens array system

    DOEpatents

    Neal, Daniel R.; Michie, Robert B.

    1996-01-01

    A 1-dimensional sensor for measuring wavefront distortion of a light beam as a function of time and spatial position includes a lens system which incorporates a linear array of lenses, and a detector system which incorporates a linear array of light detectors positioned from the lens system so that light passing through any of the lenses is focused on at least one of the light detectors. The 1-dimensional sensor determines the slope of the wavefront by location of the detectors illuminated by the light. The 1 dimensional sensor has much greater bandwidth that 2 dimensional systems.

  15. Response analysis of holography-based modal wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shihao; Haist, Tobias; Osten, Wolfgang; Ruppel, Thomas; Sawodny, Oliver

    2012-03-20

    The crosstalk problem of holography-based modal wavefront sensing (HMWS) becomes more severe with increasing aberration. In this paper, crosstalk effects on the sensor response are analyzed statistically for typical aberrations due to atmospheric turbulence. For specific turbulence strength, we optimized the sensor by adjusting the detector radius and the encoded phase bias for each Zernike mode. Calibrated response curves of low-order Zernike modes were further utilized to improve the sensor accuracy. The simulation results validated our strategy. The number of iterations for obtaining a residual RMS wavefront error of 0.1λ is reduced from 18 to 3. PMID:22441478

  16. Ophthalmic Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor Applications - Oral Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most common applications of the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor is to measure the human eye. There are a number of instruments that have been designed for this purpose and are used extensively in laser refractive surgery. While conceptually the sensor is similar to those used for astronomy applications, there are key differences adaptive optic and measurement sensors. These sensors have led to a range of applications and diagnostics that are providing key new information about how the eye functions.

  17. Comparison of wavefront sensor models for simulation of adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiwen; Enmark, Anita; Owner-Petersen, Mette; Andersen, Torben

    2009-10-26

    The new generation of extremely large telescopes will have adaptive optics. Due to the complexity and cost of such systems, it is important to simulate their performance before construction. Most systems planned will have Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. Different mathematical models are available for simulation of such wavefront sensors. The choice of wavefront sensor model strongly influences computation time and simulation accuracy. We have studied the influence of three wavefront sensor models on performance calculations for a generic, adaptive optics (AO) system designed for K-band operation of a 42 m telescope. The performance of this AO system has been investigated both for reduced wavelengths and for reduced r(0) in the K band. The telescope AO system was designed for K-band operation, that is both the subaperture size and the actuator pitch were matched to a fixed value of r(0) in the K-band. We find that under certain conditions, such as investigating limiting guide star magnitude for large Strehl-ratios, a full model based on Fraunhofer propagation to the subimages is significantly more accurate. It does however require long computation times. The shortcomings of simpler models based on either direct use of average wavefront tilt over the subapertures for actuator control, or use of the average tilt to move a precalculated point spread function in the subimages are most pronounced for studies of system limitations to operating parameter variations. In the long run, efficient parallelization techniques may be developed to overcome the problem. PMID:19997286

  18. Miniaturized Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors for starbugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Michael; Richards, Samuel; Zheng, Jessica; Lawrence, Jon; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Argyros, Alexander; Alcalde, Belen

    2014-07-01

    The ability to position multiple miniaturized wavefront sensors precisely over large focal surfaces are advantageous to multi-object adaptive optics. The Australian Astronomical Observatory (AAO) has prototyped a compact and lightweight Shack-Hartmann wavefront-sensor that fits into a standard Starbug parallel fibre positioning robot. Each device makes use of a polymer coherent fibre imaging bundle to relay an image produced by a microlens array placed at the telescope focal plane to a re-imaging camera mounted elsewhere. The advantages of the polymer fibre bundle are its high-fill factor, high-throughput, low weight, and relatively low cost. Multiple devices can also be multiplexed to a single lownoise camera for cost efficiencies per wavefront sensor. The use of fibre bundles also opens the possibility of applications such as telescope field acquisition, guiding, and seeing monitors to be positioned by Starbugs. We present the design aspects, simulations and laboratory test results.

  19. Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor with adaptive holographic lenslet array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podanchuk, Dmytro V.; Dan'ko, Volodymyr P.; Goloborodko, Andrey A.; Sutyagina, Natalia S.

    2009-10-01

    The method of the dynamic range expansion of the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor is discussed. It's based on the use of nonlinear dual focus holographic lenslet arrays with the aberration precompensation. The data concerning the optical setup and the technique of adaptive lenslet array producing based on nonlinear holographic recording phenomenon are represented. On the example of spherical wavefronts it is shown, that the use of three lenslet arrays with different amount of the aberration precompensation allows expanding approximately in five times the dynamic range of the sensor four times greater with preserving the specified sensitivity in comparison with the corresponding refractive lenslet array.

  20. Hartmann wavefront sensors and their application at FLASH.

    PubMed

    Keitel, Barbara; Plönjes, Elke; Kreis, Svea; Kuhlmann, Marion; Tiedtke, Kai; Mey, Tobias; Schäfer, Bernd; Mann, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Different types of Hartmann wavefront sensors are presented which are usable for a variety of applications in the soft X-ray spectral region at FLASH, the free-electron laser (FEL) in Hamburg. As a typical application, online measurements of photon beam parameters during mirror alignment are reported on. A compact Hartmann sensor, operating in the wavelength range from 4 to 38 nm, was used to determine the wavefront quality as well as aberrations of individual FEL pulses during the alignment procedure. Beam characterization and alignment of the focusing optics of the FLASH beamline BL3 were performed with λ(13.5 nm)/116 accuracy for wavefront r.m.s. (w(rms)) repeatability, resulting in a reduction of w(rms) by 33% during alignment. PMID:26698044

  1. Phase unwrapping with a virtual Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Akondi, Vyas; Falldorf, Claas; Marcos, Susana; Vohnsen, Brian

    2015-10-01

    The use of a spatial light modulator for implementing a digital phase-shifting (PS) point diffraction interferometer (PDI) allows tunability in fringe spacing and in achieving PS without the need for mechanically moving parts. However, a small amount of detector or scatter noise could affect the accuracy of wavefront sensing. Here, a novel method of wavefront reconstruction incorporating a virtual Hartmann-Shack (HS) wavefront sensor is proposed that allows easy tuning of several wavefront sensor parameters. The proposed method was tested and compared with a Fourier unwrapping method implemented on a digital PS PDI. The rewrapping of the Fourier reconstructed wavefronts resulted in phase maps that matched well the original wrapped phase and the performance was found to be more stable and accurate than conventional methods. Through simulation studies, the superiority of the proposed virtual HS phase unwrapping method is shown in comparison with the Fourier unwrapping method in the presence of noise. Further, combining the two methods could improve accuracy when the signal-to-noise ratio is sufficiently high. PMID:26480061

  2. Adaptive Full Aperture Wavefront Sensor Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, William G.

    1997-01-01

    This grant and the work described was in support of a Seven Segment Demonstrator (SSD) and review of wavefront sensing techniques proposed by the Government and Contractors for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) Program. A team developed the SSD concept. For completeness, some of the information included in this report has also been included in the final report of a follow-on contract (H-27657D) entitled "Construction of Prototype Lightweight Mirrors". The original purpose of this GTRI study was to investigate how various wavefront sensing techniques might be most effectively employed with large (greater than 10 meter) aperture space based telescopes used for commercial and scientific purposes. However, due to changes in the scope of the work performed on this grant and in light of the initial studies completed for the NGST program, only a portion of this report addresses wavefront sensing techniques. The wavefront sensing techniques proposed by the Government and Contractors for the NGST were summarized in proposals and briefing materials developed by three study teams including NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, TRW, and Lockheed-Martin. In this report, GTRI reviews these approaches and makes recommendations concerning the approaches. The objectives of the SSD were to demonstrate functionality and performance of a seven segment prototype array of hexagonal mirrors and supporting electromechanical components which address design issues critical to space optics deployed in large space based telescopes for astronomy and for optics used in spaced based optical communications systems. The SSD was intended to demonstrate technologies which can support the following capabilities: Transportation in dense packaging to existing launcher payload envelopes, then deployable on orbit to form a space telescope with large aperture. Provide very large (greater than 10 meters) primary reflectors of low mass and cost. Demonstrate the capability to form a segmented primary or

  3. AIS wavefront sensor: a robust optical test of exposure tools using localized wavefront curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Ryan; Zhou, Xibin; Goldstein, Michael; Ashworth, Dominic; Cummings, Kevin; Fan, Yu-Jen; Shroff, Yashesh; Denbeaux, Greg; Kandel, Yudhi; Naulleau, Patrick

    2014-04-01

    We present an update of the AIS wavefront sensor, a diagnostic sensor set for insertion in the upgraded 0.5 NA SEMATECH Albany and Berkeley METs. AIS works by using offset monopole illumination to probe localized regions of the test optic pupil. Variations in curvature manifest as focus shifts, which are measured using a photodiode- based grating-on- grating contrast monitor, and the wavefront aberrations are reconstructed using a least-squares approach. We present results from an optical prototype of AIS demonstrating an accuracy of better than λ/30 rms for Zernike polynomials Z4 through Z10. We also discuss integration strategies and requirements as well as specifications on system alignment.

  4. Performance and Results of the NAOS Visible Wavefront Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, P.; Dorn, R. J.; Rousset, G.; Cavadore, C.; Charton, J.; Cumani, C.; Fusco, T.; Hubin, N.; Kern, P.; Lizon, J. L.; Magnard, Y.; Puget, P.; Rabaud, D.; Rabou, P.; Stadler, E.

    The Nasmyth Adaptive Optics System (NAOS) was installed in December 2001 on the Nasmyth focus of the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT). It includes two wavefront sensors: one operates at IR wavelengths, the other at visible wavelengths. This paper describes the NAOS visible wavefront sensor based on a Shack-Hartmann principle. This wavefront sensor unit includes: 1) A continuous flow liquid nitrogen cryostat and a low noise fast readout CCD camera controlled by the ESO new generation CCD system FIERA using a fast frame rate EEV/Marconi CCD-50. This 128´128 pixels split frame transfer device has a readout noise of 3 e- at 50 Kpix/sec/port. FIERA provides remotely controlled readout modes with optional binning, windowing and flexible integration time. 2) Two remotely exchangeable micro-lens arrays (14´14 and 7´7 micro-lenses) cooled to the CCD temperature ( -100 °C). The CCD array is directly located in the micro lenses focal plane, only a few millimeters apart without any relay optics. Additional opto-mechanical functions are also provided (atmospheric dispersion compensator, flux level control, field of view limitation). On-sky performances of the wavefront sensor are presented. Adaptive optics corrections were obtained with a reference star as faint as visible magnitude 17. The maximum achievable band-path is 35 Hz at 0 dB for the open loop transfer function.

  5. Wavefront response matrix for closed-loop adaptive optics system based on non-modulation pyramid wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianxin; Bai, Fuzhong; Ning, Yu; Li, Fei; Jiang, Wenhan

    2012-06-01

    Pyramid wavefront sensor (PWFS) is a kind of wavefront sensor with high spatial resolution and high energy utilization. In this paper an adaptive optics system with PWFS as wavefront sensor and liquid-crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) as wavefront corrector is built in the laboratory. The wavefront response matrix is a key element in the close-loop operation. It can be obtained by measuring the real response to given aberrations, which is easily contaminated by noise and influenced by the inherent aberration in the optical system. A kind of analytic solution of response matrix is proposed, with which numerical simulation and experiment are also implemented to verify the performance of closed-loop correction of static aberration based on linear reconstruction theory. Results show that this AO system with the proposed matrix can work steadily in closed-loop operation.

  6. A miniature curvature wavefront sensor with coherent fiber image bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jessica; Richards, Samuel; Goodwin, Michael; Lawrence, Jon; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Argyros, Alexander

    2014-08-01

    A miniature curvature wavefront sensor with a coherent fiber image bundle is proposed in which a miniature lateral displacement beamsplitter is designed to obtain the intra- and extra- focus images from a telescope simultaneously at its exit. The two images are received and relayed by two coherent fiber image bundles. The relayed images are then re-imaged to one camera and processed to obtain the input wavefront at telescope pupil. The whole device is quite compact and can be driven by a "Starbug" fiber positioning device currently under development within the Australian Astronomical Observatory. In this paper, the performance of the proposed sensor is investigated in details by applying a simulated atmospheric turbulence at the telescope pupil plane. We study the offset distance of two image measurement planes, fiber core size, fiber fill factor and the magnitude of natural guide star effects to its performance. This study provides guidance to the sensor design.

  7. Performance and results of the NAOS visible wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, Philippe; Rousset, Gérard; Dorn, Reinhold J.; Cavadore, Cyril; Charton, Julien; Cumani, Claudio; Fusco, Thierry; Hubin, Norbert N.; Kern, Pierre Y.; Lizon, Jean-Luis; Magnard, Yves; Puget, Pascal; Rabaud, Didier; Rabou, Patrick; Stadler, Eric

    2003-02-01

    The NAOS adaptive optics system was installed in December 2001 on the Nasmyth focus of the ESO VLT. It includes two wavefront sensors: one is working at IR wavelength analysis and the other at visible wavelengths. This paper describes the NAOS Visible Wave Front Sensor based on a Shack-Hartman principle and its performances as measured on the sky. This wavefront sensor includes within a continuous flow liquid nitrogen cryostat: 1) a low noise fast readout CCD camera controlled by the ESO new generation CCD system FIERA using a fast frame rate EEV/Marconi CCD-50 focal plane array. This 128×128 pixels focal plane array has a readout noise of 3 e- at 50 kilopixel/sec/port. FIERA provides remotely controlled readout modes with optional binning, windowing and flexible integration time. 2) two remotely exchangeable micro-lens arrays (14×14 and 7×7 micro-lenses) cooled at the CCD temperature ( -100 °C) within the cryostat. The CCD array is directly located in the micro lenses focal plane at a few millimeters apart without relay optics. 3) Additional opto-mechanical functions are also provided (atmospheric dispersion compensator, flux level control, field of view limitation). On sky performances of the wavefront sensor are presented. Adaptive Optics corrections was obtained with a reference star as faint as a visible magnitude 17 with a band-path of 40 Hz in close loop.

  8. One dimensional wavefront sensor development for tomographic flow measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, D.; Pierson, R.; Chen, E.

    1995-08-01

    Optical diagnostics are extremely useful in fluid mechanics because they generally have high inherent bandwidth, and are non-intrusive. However, since optical probe measurements inherently integrate all information along the optical path, it is often difficult to isolate out-of-plane components in 3-dimensional flow events. It is also hard to make independent measurements of internal flow structure. Using an arrangement of one-dimensional wavefront sensors, we have developed a system that uses tomographic reconstruction to make two-dimensional measurements in an arbitrary flow. These measurements provide complete information in a plane normal to the flow. We have applied this system to the subsonic free jet because of the wide range of flow scales available. These measurements rely on the development of a series of one-dimensional wavefront sensors that are used to measure line-integral density variations in the flow of interest. These sensors have been constructed using linear CCD cameras and binary optics lenslet arrays. In designing these arrays, we have considered the coherent coupling between adjacent lenses and have made comparisons between theory and experimental noise measurements. The paper will present examples of the wavefront sensor development, line-integral measurements as a function of various experimental parameters, and sample tomographic reconstructions.

  9. Myopic aberrations: Simulation based comparison of curvature and Hartmann Shack wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basavaraju, Roopashree M.; Akondi, Vyas; Weddell, Stephen J.; Budihal, Raghavendra Prasad

    2014-02-01

    In comparison with a Hartmann Shack wavefront sensor, the curvature wavefront sensor is known for its higher sensitivity and greater dynamic range. The aim of this study is to numerically investigate the merits of using a curvature wavefront sensor, in comparison with a Hartmann Shack (HS) wavefront sensor, to analyze aberrations of the myopic eye. Aberrations were statistically generated using Zernike coefficient data of 41 myopic subjects obtained from the literature. The curvature sensor is relatively simple to implement, and the processing of extra- and intra-focal images was linearly resolved using the Radon transform to provide Zernike modes corresponding to statistically generated aberrations. Simulations of the HS wavefront sensor involve the evaluation of the focal spot pattern from simulated aberrations. Optical wavefronts were reconstructed using the slope geometry of Southwell. Monte Carlo simulation was used to find critical parameters for accurate wavefront sensing and to investigate the performance of HS and curvature sensors. The performance of the HS sensor is highly dependent on the number of subapertures and the curvature sensor is largely dependent on the number of Zernike modes used to represent the aberration and the effective propagation distance. It is shown that in order to achieve high wavefront sensing accuracy while measuring aberrations of the myopic eye, a simpler and cost effective curvature wavefront sensor is a reliable alternative to a high resolution HS wavefront sensor with a large number of subapertures.

  10. Adaptive wavefront sensor based on the Talbot phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Podanchuk, Dmytro V; Goloborodko, Andrey A; Kotov, Myhailo M; Kovalenko, Andrey V; Kurashov, Vitalij N; Dan'ko, Volodymyr P

    2016-04-20

    A new adaptive method of wavefront sensing is proposed and demonstrated. The method is based on the Talbot self-imaging effect, which is observed in an illuminating light beam with strong second-order aberration. Compensation of defocus and astigmatism is achieved with an appropriate choice of size of the rectangular unit cell of the diffraction grating, which is performed iteratively. A liquid-crystal spatial light modulator is used for this purpose. Self-imaging of rectangular grating in the astigmatic light beam is demonstrated experimentally. High-order aberrations are detected with respect to the compensated second-order aberration. The comparative results of wavefront sensing with a Shack-Hartmann sensor and the proposed sensor are adduced. PMID:27140122

  11. On Sky Test of the Pyramid Wavefront Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghedina, Adriano; Cecconi, Massimo; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Farinato, Jacopo; Baruffolo, Andrea; Crimi, Giuseppe; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Esposito, Simone; Fini, Luca; Ghigo, Mauro; Marchetti, Enrico; Niero, Tiziano; Puglisi, Alfio

    2003-02-01

    The Adaptive Optics for the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo module (namely AdOpt@TNG) implements the pyramid wavefront sensor as a unique feature. This allows to get valuable information on its performance on the sky. An updated overview of the results obtained so far is shown, including a discussion on the sources of errors in the closed loop operation, distinguishing them between the ones specific of the pyramid wavefront sensor and the one more related to the system as a whole. This system allows also for a number of experiments and check of the sensitivity of such a wavefront sensor, especially in comparison with other types of sensing units. The ways to accomplish such an experiment in a convincing way are shown along with the first results obtained so far. Finally, we describe how and up to which extent a number of practical problems encountered in the near past can be solved implementing the recent new ideas on the pyramid theme, many of which popped up from our "lessons learned".

  12. Development of a Pyramid Wave-front Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hadi, Kacem; Vignaux, Mael; Fusco, Thierry

    2013-12-01

    Within the framework of the E-ELT studies, several laboratories are involved on some instruments: HARMONY with its ATLAS adaptive optics [AO] system, EAGLE or EPICS. Most of the AO systems will probably integrate one or several pyramidal wavefront sensors, PWFS (R. Ragazzoni [1]). The coupling in an AO loop and the control in laboratory (then on sky) of this type of sensor is fundamental for the continuation of the projects related to OA systems on the E-ELT. LAM (Laboratory of Astrophysics of Marseille) is involved in particular in the VLT-SPHERE, ATLAS, EPICS projects. For the last few years, our laboratory has been carrying out different R&D activities in AO instrumentation for ELTs. An experimental AO bench is designed and being developed to allow the validation of new wave-front sensing and control concepts [2]. One the objectives of this bench, is the experimental validation of a pyramid WFS. Theoretical investigations on its behavior have been already made. The world's fastest and most sensitive camera system (OCAM2) has been recently developed at LAM (J.L Gach [3], First Light Imaging). Conjugating this advantage with the pyramid concept, we plan to demonstrate a home made Pyramid sensor for Adaptive Optics whose the speed and the precision are the key points. As a joint collaboration with ONERA and Shaktiware, our work aims at the optimization (measurement process, calibration and operation) in laboratory then on the sky of a pyramid sensor dedicated to the first generation instruments for ELTs. The sensor will be implemented on the ONERA ODISSEE AO bench combining thus a pyramid and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. What would give the possibility to compare strictly these two WFS types and make this bench unique in France and even in Europe. Experimental work on laboratory demonstration is undergoing. The status of our development will presented at the conference.

  13. Aligning a more than 100 degrees of freedom wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marafatto, Luca; Bergomi, Maria; Brunelli, Alessandro; Dima, Marco; Farinato, Jacopo; Farisato, Giancarlo; Lessio, Luigi; Magrin, Demetrio; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Viotto, Valentina; Bertram, Thomas; Bizenberger, Peter; Brangier, Matthieu; Briegel, Florian; Conrad, Albert; De Bonis, Fulvio; Herbst, Tom; Hofferbert, Ralph; Kittmann, Frank; Kürster, Martin; Meschke, Daniel; Mohr, Lars; Rohloff, Ralf-Rainer

    2012-07-01

    LINC-NIRVANA is the Fizeau beam combiner for the LBT, with the aim to retrieve the sensitivity of a 12m telescope and the spatial resolution of a 22.8m one. Despite being only one of the four wavefront sensors of a layer-oriented MCAO system, the GWS, which is retrieving the deformation introduced by the lower atmosphere, known to be the main aberration source, reveals a noticeable internal opto-mechanical complexity. The presence of 12 small devices used to select up to the same number of NGSs, with 3 optical components each, moving in a wide annular 2'-6' arcmin Field of View and sending the light to a common pupil re-imager, and the need to obtain and keep a very good super-imposition of the pupil images on the CCD camera, led to an overall alignment procedure in which more than a hundred of degrees of freedom have to be contemporary adjusted. The rotation of the entire WFS to compensate for the sky movement, moreover, introduces a further difficulty both in the alignment and in ensuring the required pupil superposition stability. A detailed description of the alignment procedure is presented here, together with the lessons learned managing the complexity of such a WFS, which led to considerations regarding future instruments, like a possible review of numerical versus optical co-add approach, above all if close to zero read-out noise detectors will be soon available. Nevertheless, the GWS AIV has been carried out and the system will be soon mounted at LBT to perform what is called the Pathfinder experiment, which consists in ground-layer correction, taking advantage of the Adaptive Secondary deformable Mirror.

  14. A Phase-Shifting Zernike Wavefront Sensor for the Palomar P3K Adaptive Optics System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Crawford, Sam; Loya, Frank; Moore, James

    2012-01-01

    A phase-shifting Zernike wavefront sensor has distinct advantages over other types of wavefront sensors. Chief among them are: 1) improved sensitivity to low-order aberrations and 2) efficient use of photons (hence reduced sensitivity to photon noise). We are in the process of deploying a phase-shifting Zernike wavefront sensor to be used with the realtime adaptive optics system for Palomar. Here we present the current state of the Zernike wavefront sensor to be integrated into the high-order adaptive optics system at Mount Palomar's Hale Telescope.

  15. Phase-Shifting Zernike Interferometer Wavefront Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Rao, Shanti; Jensen-Clem, Rebecca M.

    2011-01-01

    The canonical Zernike phase-contrast technique transforms a phase object in one plane into an intensity object in the conjugate plane. This is done by applying a static pi/2 phase shift to the central core (approx. lambda/diameter) of the PSF which is intermediate between the input and output plane. Here we present a new architecture for this sensor. First, the optical system is simple and all reflective, and second the phase shift in the central core of the PSF is dynamic and can be made arbitrarily large. This common-path, all-reflective design makes it minimally sensitive to vibration, polarization and wavelength. We review the theory of operation, describe the optical system, summarize numerical simulations and sensitivities and review results from a laboratory demonstration of this novel instrument.

  16. Phase-Shifting Zernike Interferometer Wavefront Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Rao, Shanti; Jensen-Clemb, Rebecca M.; Serabyn, Gene

    2011-01-01

    The canonical Zernike phase-contrast technique1,2,3,4 transforms a phase object in one plane into an intensity object in the conjugate plane. This is done by applying a static pi/2 phase shift to the central core (approx. lambda/D) of the PSF which is intermediate between the input and output planes. Here we present a new architecture for this sensor. First, the optical system is simple and all reflective. Second, the phase shift in the central core of the PSF is dynamic and or arbitrary size. This common-path, all-reflective design makes it minimally sensitive to vibration, polarization and wavelength. We review the theory of operation, describe the optical system, summarize numerical simulations and sensitivities and review results from a laboratory demonstration of this novel instrument

  17. Wavefront detection method of a single-sensor based adaptive optics system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chongchong; Hu, Lifa; Xu, Huanyu; Wang, Yukun; Li, Dayu; Wang, Shaoxin; Mu, Quanquan; Yang, Chengliang; Cao, Zhaoliang; Lu, Xinghai; Xuan, Li

    2015-08-10

    In adaptive optics system (AOS) for optical telescopes, the reported wavefront sensing strategy consists of two parts: a specific sensor for tip-tilt (TT) detection and another wavefront sensor for other distortions detection. Thus, a part of incident light has to be used for TT detection, which decreases the light energy used by wavefront sensor and eventually reduces the precision of wavefront correction. In this paper, a single Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor based wavefront measurement method is presented for both large amplitude TT and other distortions' measurement. Experiments were performed for testing the presented wavefront method and validating the wavefront detection and correction ability of the single-sensor based AOS. With adaptive correction, the root-mean-square of residual TT was less than 0.2 λ, and a clear image was obtained in the lab. Equipped on a 1.23-meter optical telescope, the binary stars with angle distance of 0.6″ were clearly resolved using the AOS. This wavefront measurement method removes the separate TT sensor, which not only simplifies the AOS but also saves light energy for subsequent wavefront sensing and imaging, and eventually improves the detection and imaging capability of the AOS. PMID:26367988

  18. Holographic imaging with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hai; Soloviev, Oleg; Wilding, Dean; Pozzi, Paolo; Verhaegen, Michel; Vdovin, Gleb

    2016-06-27

    A high-resolution Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor has been used for coherent holographic imaging, by computer reconstruction and propagation of the complex field in a lensless imaging setup. The resolution of the images obtained with the experimental data is in a good agreement with the diffraction theory. Although a proper calibration with a reference beam improves the image quality, the method has a potential for reference-less holographic imaging with spatially coherent monochromatic and narrowband polychromatic sources in microscopy and imaging through turbulence. PMID:27410536

  19. Motion blurred image restoration based on Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yuhua; Dong, Wende; Feng, Huajun; Xu, Zhihai; Li, Qi

    2012-10-01

    When relative motion between the target and the camera occurs, the captured images would be blurred. Due to the arbitrariness of the motion, it is of great difficulty to restore the degraded images. In this paper, a new method based on Hartmann-Shack Wavefront Sensor is proposed to deblur the degraded image of the extended target caused by arbitrary motion. Relevant theoretical analysis is given and a corresponding experimental system is built. During the exposure time, image sequences are obtained by the Hartmann-Shack Wavefront Sensor to calculate the displacement vectors, from which the Point Spread Function (PSF) is estimated to restore the blurred image. Experimental results show that the proposed method can efficiently restore the degraded image of the target. So the application of Hartmann-Shack Wavefront Sensor can be extended to detect the motion of target, which means we can deal with wavefront distortion and motion blur using Hartmann-Shack Wavefront Sensor simultaneously.

  20. A laser guide star wavefront sensor bench demonstrator for TMT.

    PubMed

    Lardiere, Olivier; Conan, Rodolphe; Bradley, Colin; Jackson, Kate; Herriot, Glen

    2008-04-14

    Sodium laser guide stars (LGSs) allow, in theory, Adaptive Optics (AO) systems to reach a full sky coverage, but they have their own limitations. The artificial star is elongated due to the sodium layer thickness, and the temporal and spatial variability of the sodium atom density induces changing errors on wavefront measurements, especially with Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) for which the LGS elongation is larger. In the framework of the Thirty-Meter-Telescope project (TMT), the AO-Lab of the University of Victoria (UVic) has built an LGS-simulator test bed in order to assess the performance of new centroiding algorithms for LGS Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (SH-WFS). The design of the LGS-bench is presented, as well as laboratory SH-WFS images featuring 29x29 radially elongated spots, simulated for a 30-m pupil. The errors induced by the LGS variations, such as focus and spherical aberrations, are characterized and discussed. This bench is not limited to SH-WFS and can serve as an LGS-simulator test bed to any other LGS-AO projects for which sodium layer fluctuations are an issue. PMID:18542656

  1. Dual-mode wavefront detection sensor based on liquid crystal microlens array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Pan, Fan; Liu, Kan; Wu, Yuntao; Zhang, Yanduo; Xie, Xiaolin

    2014-10-01

    Based on a proposed electrically tunable liquid crystal (LC) micro-lens array (MLA) instead of a commonly used microlens array with fixed focal length in a conventional type, a new prototyped Shack-Hartmann sensor is reported. The LCMLA with 128 × 128 elements is fabricated by the methods of photolithography and hydrochloric acid etching. Composed of the proposed LC-MLA and a CCD, a new type Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor is got. This kind sensor can solve problems of the tradition wavefront sensor that the larger measurement range and high measurement accurate can't be realized by the same device. Except for adaptive switching the two working modes, this wavefront sensor also has a dual-mode imaging feature with obtaining wavefront information of the target and it's two-dimensional optical intensity image at the same time. In order to verify it's characteristics, an extreme experiment is designed, which introduces a distortion wavefront. At this circumstanc, the traditional wavefront sensor can't get anything. However, with proposed wavefront sensor, this situation can be solved by adjusting the applied voltage of LC-MLA to change it's focal length. With a reconstruction method, the three-dimensional information of the wavefront can be got. At the same time, the two-dimensional optical intensity image is also got. From the experiments, we can prove that it can effectively improve detection sensitivity and dynamic measurement range of wavefront. Results of the prototype demonstrated qualitatively verify this feasibility. This kind new type wavefront sensor will have a wide variety of applications in adaptive optics.

  2. Design and fabrication of a pyramid wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Aina; Yao, Jun; Cai, Dongmei; Ren, Hao

    2010-07-01

    A new pyramid wavefront sensor (PWFS), which utilizes a reflective pyramid mirror instead of a refractive pyramid prism at the focus of a telescope, is presented. As a key optical component in this PWFS, the pyramid mirror requires accurate microfabrication for excellent quality of the tip, the turned edges, and the surfaces. The moving mask lithography process is proposed for its economic, simple, and precise control to make the cross-sectional shape of the structure. The completed pyramid mirror has a square base of 1-mm length and four side facets inclined to the base at 3.7 deg. The sizes of the pyramid tip and turned edges are both about 6 μm, which show excellent aspects of sharpening-tip and knife-edges. The root mean square of four facets is approximately 70 nm, and the maximum profile deviation is 0.2 μm.

  3. A very wide field wavefront sensor for a very narrow field interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viotto, V.; Ragazzoni, R.; Arcidiacono, C.; Bergomi, M.; Brunelli, A.; Dima, M.; Farinato, J.; Gentile, G.; Magrin, D.; Cosentino, G.; Diolaiti, E.; Foppiani, I.; Lombini, M.; Schreiber, L.; Bertram, T.; Bizenberger, P.; De Bonis, F.; Gässler, W.; Herbst, T.; Kuerster, M.; Meschke, D.; Mohr, L.; Rohloff, R.-R.

    2010-07-01

    The LINC-NIRVANA wavefront sensors are in their AIT phase. The first Ground-layerWavefront Sensor (GWS) is shaping in the Adaptive Optics laboratory of the Astronomical Observatory of Padova, while both the Mid- High Wavefront Sensors (MHWSs) have been aligned and tested as stand-alone units in the Observatory of Bologna (MHWS#1 aligned to LINC-NIRVANA post focal relay optics). LINC-NIRVANA is a Fizeau infrared interferometer equipped with advanced, MultiConjugated Adaptive Optics (MCAO) for the Large Binocular Telescope. The aim of the instrument is to allow true interferometric imagery over a 10" square Field of View (FoV), getting the sensitivity of a 12m telescope and the spatial resolution of a 22.8m one. Thanks to the MCAO concept, LINC-NIRVANA will use up to 20 Natural Guide Stars (NGS) which are divided, according to Layer-Oriented Multiple Field of View technique, between the GWSs and the MHWSs. To find such a large number of references, the AO systems will use a wide FoV of 6' in diameter and the light coming from the references used by each WFS will optically sum on its CCD camera. The MHWSs will detect the deformations due to the high layers and will select up to 8 NGSs in the inner 2' FoV. The GWSs, instead, will reconstruct the deformations introduced by the lower atmosphere, which was found out to be the main source of seeing. Their peculiarity is the highest number of references (up to 12) ever used in a single instrument, selected in an annular 2'-6' FoV.

  4. Wavefront sensors and algorithms for adaptive optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, V. P.; Botygina, N. N.; Emaleev, O. N.; Konyaev, P. A.

    2010-07-01

    The results of recent works related to techniques and algorithms for wave-front (WF) measurement using Shack-Hartmann sensors show their high efficiency in solution of very different problems of applied optics. The goal of this paper was to develop a sensitive Shack-Hartmann sensor with high precision WF measurement capability on the base of modern technology of optical elements making and new efficient methods and computational algorithms of WF reconstruction. The Shack-Hartmann sensors sensitive to small WF aberrations are used for adaptive optical systems, compensating the wave distortions caused by atmospheric turbulence. A high precision Shack-Hartmann WF sensor has been developed on the basis of a low-aperture off-axis diffraction lens array. The device is capable of measuring WF slopes at array sub-apertures of size 640×640 μm with an error not exceeding 4.80 arcsec (0.15 pixel), which corresponds to the standard deviation equal to 0.017λ at the reconstructed WF with wavelength λ . Also the modification of this sensor for adaptive system of solar telescope using extended scenes as tracking objects, such as sunspot, pores, solar granulation and limb, is presented. The software package developed for the proposed WF sensors includes three algorithms of local WF slopes estimation (modified centroids, normalized cross-correlation and fast Fourierdemodulation), as well as three methods of WF reconstruction (modal Zernike polynomials expansion, deformable mirror response functions expansion and phase unwrapping), that can be selected during operation with accordance to the application.

  5. Improving the Sensitivity of Astronomical Curvature Wavefront Sensor Using Dual-Stroke Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyon, Olivier; Blain, Celia; Takami, Hideki; Hayano, Yutaka; Hattori, Masayuki; Watanabe, Makoto

    2008-06-01

    Curvature wavefront sensors measure wavefront phase aberration by acquiring two intensity images on either side of the pupil plane. Low-order adaptive optics (AO) systems using curvature wavefront sensing (CWFS) have proved to be highly efficient for astronomical applications: they are more sensitive, use fewer detector elements, and achieve, for the same number of actuators, higher Strehl ratios than AO systems using more traditional Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. In higher-order systems, however, curvature wavefront sensors lose sensitivity to low spatial frequencies wavefront aberrations. This effect, often described as "noise propagation," limits the usefulness of curvature wavefront sensing for high-order AO systems and/or large telescopes. In this paper, we first explain how this noise propagation effect occurs and then show that this limitation can be overcome by acquiring four defocused images of the pupil instead of two. This solution can be implemented without significant technology development and can run with a simple linear wavefront reconstruction algorithm at >kHz speed. We have successfully demonstrated in the laboratory that the four conjugation planes can be sequentially obtained at >kHz speed using a speaker-vibrating membrane assembly commonly used in current curvature AO systems. Closed loop simulations show that implementing this scheme is equivalent to making the guide star 1 to 1.5 magnitude brighter for the configuration tested (188 actuator elements on 8-m telescope). Higher sensitivity gains are expected on curvature systems with higher number of actuators.

  6. A kind of wavefront curvature sensor with diffraction grating and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hongbin; Li, Gang; Huang, Fuyu; Liu, Jie; Wang, Yuanbo

    2009-11-01

    The basic principle of wavefront curvature sensor (WFS) is described, and the strongpoints and shortcomings of traditional schemes are analyzed. As a novel WFS, the wavefront curvature sensor comprising a diffraction grating (DGWFS), which consist a defocus grating and lens, and can measure the light intensity distribution at the two defocused spots simultaneity, has the advantage of realization easily, adjustment expediently, low cost, and so on. The DGWFS has a wide application in astronomy, measurement, laser, optical component testing etc. Its principle is analyzed. Two kinds of phase retrieval arithmetics of wavefront curvature sensor are analyzed by comparison. Besides, the latest applications of wavefront curvature sensor are generally presented. Finally a novel method for measurement on solid-state laser thermal lens utilizing DGWFS is presented.

  7. The guider and wavefront curvature sensor subsystem for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riot, Vincent J.; Arndt, Kirk; Claver, Chuck; Doherty, Peter E.; Gilmore, D. K.; Hascall, Patrick A.; Herrmann, Sven; Kotov, Ivan; O'Connor, Paul; Sebag, Jacques; Stubbs, Christopher W.; Warner, Michael

    2014-08-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope instrument include four guiding and wavefront sensing subsystems called corner raft subsystems, in addition to the main science array of 189 4K x 4K CCDs. These four subsystems are placed at the four corners of the instrumented field of view. Each wavefront/guiding subsystem comprises a pair of 4K x 4K guide sensors, capable of producing 9 frames/second, and a pair of offset 2K x 4K wavefront curvature sensors from which the images are read out at the cadence of the main camera system, providing 15 sec integrations. These four guider/wavefront corner rafts are mechanically and electrically isolated from the science sensor rafts and can be installed or removed independently from any other focal plane subsystem. We present the implementation of this LSST subsystem detailing both hardware and software development and status.

  8. Aliasing in a Hartmann wavefront sensor at x-ray wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poyneer, Lisa A.; Bauman, Brian; Macintosh, Bruce

    2012-10-01

    The Hartmann Sensor is a simple and well-established method to interrogate wavefront quality. Recently the Hartmann sensor has been used at very short wavelengths, including the extreme UV. Here we consider the Hartmann sensor and its ability to measure the wavefront of an x-ray beam. We use both analytic methods and a wave-optics, Fresnel-diffraction simulation. The Hartmann sensor samples the wavefront, which means that it is susceptible to aliasing (the non-linear phenomenon where high-spatial frequency components are incorrectly measured as low-spatial frequency components). Our analysis shows that aliasing is more severe in the Hartmann sensor than in the corresponding (optical) Shack-Hartmann. Aliasing worsens as Hartmann hole size shrinks. The wave-optics simulations show that for reasonable optics-polishing errors and Hartmann mask design, aliasing errors can be of the same magnitude as the phase that is to be measured.

  9. A Broad-Band Phase-Contrast Wave-Front Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, Eric; Wallace, J. Kent

    2005-01-01

    A broadband phase-contrast wave-front sensor has been proposed as a real-time wave-front sensor in an adaptive-optics system. The proposed sensor would offer an alternative to the Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensors now used in high-order adaptive-optics systems of some astronomical telescopes. Broadband sensing gives higher sensitivity than does narrow-band sensing, and it appears that for a given bandwidth, the sensitivity of the proposed phase-contrast sensor could exceed that of a Shack-Hartmann sensor. Relative to a Shack-Hartmann sensor, the proposed sensor may be optically and mechanically simpler. As described below, an important element of the principle of operation of a phase-contrast wave-front sensor is the imposition of a 90deg phase shift between diffracted and undiffracted parts of the same light beam. In the proposed sensor, this phase shift would be obtained by utilizing the intrinsic 90 phase shift between the transmitted and reflected beams in an ideal (thin, symmetric) beam splitter. This phase shift can be characterized as achromatic or broadband because it is 90deg at every wavelength over a broad wavelength range.

  10. Wavefront Sensing with the Fine Guidance Sensor for James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. Scott; Aronstein, David; Dean, Bruce H.; Howard,Joe; Shiri, Ron

    2008-01-01

    An analysis is presented that utilizes the Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) for focal-plane wavefront sensing (WFS) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). WFS with FGS increases the number of wavefront measurements taken in field of the telescope, but has many challenges over the other JWST instruments that make it unique, such as; less sampling of the Point Spread Function (PSF), a smaller diversity-defocus range, a smaller image detector size, and a polychromatic object or source. Additionally, presented is an analysis of sampling for wavefront sensing. Results are shown based on simulations of flight and the cryogenic optical testing at NASA Johnson Space Center.

  11. Wavefront-sensor-based electron density measurements for laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Plateau, Guillaume; Matlis, Nicholas; Geddes, Cameron; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; van Mourik, Reinier; Leemans, Wim

    2010-02-20

    Characterization of the electron density in laser produced plasmas is presented using direct wavefront analysis of a probe laser beam. The performance of a laser-driven plasma-wakefield accelerator depends on the plasma wavelength, hence on the electron density. Density measurements using a conventional folded-wave interferometer and using a commercial wavefront sensor are compared for different regimes of the laser-plasma accelerator. It is shown that direct wavefront measurements agree with interferometric measurements and, because of the robustness of the compact commercial device, have greater phase sensitivity, straightforward analysis, improving shot-to-shot plasma-density diagnostics.

  12. Wavefront reconstruction of an optical vortex by a Hartmann-Shack sensor.

    PubMed

    Starikov, F A; Kochemasov, G G; Kulikov, S M; Manachinsky, A N; Maslov, N V; Ogorodnikov, A V; Sukharev, S A; Aksenov, V P; Izmailov, I V; Kanev, F Yu; Atuchin, V V; Soldatenkov, I S

    2007-08-15

    Reconstruction the phase front of a vortex laser beam is conducted by use of a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor. The vortex beam in the form of the Laguerre-Gaussian LG(0)(1) mode is generated with the help of a spiral phase plate. The new reconstruction technique based on measured wavefront gradients allows one to restore the singular phase surface with good accuracy, whereas the conventional least-squares approach fails. PMID:17700762

  13. Pyramid wavefront sensor aboard AdOpt@TNG and beyond: a status report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragazzoni, Roberto; Esposito, Simone; Ghedina, Adriano; Baruffolo, Andrea; Cecconi, Massimo; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Farinato, Jacopo; Fini, Luca; Marchetti, Enrico; Puglisi, Alfio; Tordi, Massimiliano; Vernet-Viard, Elise

    2002-02-01

    The concept of Pyramid Wavefront sensor has been introduced as a more compact and flexible alternative to Shack--Hartmann wavefront sensing. In the past five years, however, such a novel concept promised a much larger sensitivity and an inherent easiness to be implemented in a multiple reference wavefront sensor. AdOptTNG, a natural guide star based adaptive optics module implemented at the 3.5m TNG telescope is equipped with such a sensor. We report here on the updated status, including on-sky experimental verification of various of the several features of such a sensor. We discuss the results obtained, their scalability and the lessons learned in building, aligning and operating it. Some comparison with theoretical and laboratory-based result, is also tentatively reported.

  14. The CAFADIS camera: a new tomographic wavefront sensor for Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, J. M.; Femenía, B.; Montilla, I.; Rodríguez-Ramos, L. F.; Marichal-Hernández, J. G.; Lüke, J. P.; López, R.; Díaz, J. J.; Martín, Y.

    The CAFADIS camera is a new wavefront sensor (WFS) patented by the Universidad de La Laguna. CAFADIS is a system based on the concept of plenoptic camera originally proposed by Adelson and Wang [Single lens stereo with a plenoptic camera, IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence 14 (1992)] and its most salient feature is its ability to simultaneously measuring wavefront maps and distances to objects [Wavefront and distance measurements using the CAFADIS camera, in Astronomical telescopes, Marseille (2008)]. This makes of CAFADIS an interesting alternative for LGS-based AO systems as it is capable of measuring from an LGS-beacon the atmospheric turbulence wavefront and simultaneously the distance to the LGS beacon thus removing the need of a NGS defocus sensor to probe changes in distance to the LGS beacon due to drifts of the mesospheric Na layer. In principle, the concept can also be employed to recover 3D profiles of the Na Layer allowing for optimizations of the measurement of the distance to the LGS-beacon. Currently we are investigating the possibility of extending the plenoptic WFS into a tomographic wavefront sensor. Simulations will be shown of a plenoptic WFS when operated within an LGS-based AO system for the recovery of wavefront maps at different heights. The preliminary results presented here show the tomographic ability of CAFADIS.

  15. Simple broadband implementation of a phase contrast wavefront sensor for adaptive optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, E. E.; Wallace, J. K.

    2004-01-01

    The most critical element of an adaptive optics system is its wavefront sensor, which must measure the closed-loop difference between the corrected wavefront and an ideal template at high speed, in real time, over a dense sampling of the pupil. Most high-order systems have used Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors, but a novel approach based on Zernike's phase contrast principle appears promising. In this paper we discuss a simple way to achromatize such a phase contrast wavefront sensor, using the pi/2 phase difference between reflected and transmitted rays in a thin, symmetric beam splitter. We further model the response at a range of wavelengths to show that the required transverse dimension of the focal-plane phase-shifting spot, nominally lambda/D, may not be very sensitive to wavelength, and so in practice additional optics to introduce wavelength-dependent transverse magnification achromatizing this spot diameter may not be required. A very simple broadband implementation of the phase contrast wavefront sensor results.

  16. End-To-End performance test of the LINC-NIRVANA Wavefront-Sensor system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berwein, Juergen; Bertram, Thomas; Conrad, Al; Briegel, Florian; Kittmann, Frank; Zhang, Xiangyu; Mohr, Lars

    2011-09-01

    LINC-NIRVANA is an imaging Fizeau interferometer, for use in near infrared wavelengths, being built for the Large Binocular Telescope. Multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) increases the sky coverage and the field of view over which diffraction limited images can be obtained. For its MCAO implementation, Linc-Nirvana utilizes four total wavefront sensors; each of the two beams is corrected by both a ground-layer wavefront sensor (GWS) and a high-layer wavefront sensor (HWS). The GWS controls the adaptive secondary deformable mirror (DM), which is based on an DSP slope computing unit. Whereas the HWS controls an internal DM via computations provided by an off-the-shelf multi-core Linux system. Using wavefront sensor data collected from a prior lab experiment, we have shown via simulation that the Linux based system is sufficient to operate at 1kHz, with jitter well below the needs of the final system. Based on that setup we tested the end-to-end performance and latency through all parts of the system which includes the camera, the wavefront controller, and the deformable mirror. We will present our loop control structure and the results of those performance tests.

  17. Wavefront sensor testing in hypersonic flows using a laser-spark guide star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Daniel R.; Armstrong, Darrell J.; Hedlund, Eric; Lederer, Melissa; Collier, Arnold S.; Spring, Charles; Gruetzner, James K.; Hebner, Gregory A.; Mansell, Justin D.

    1997-11-01

    The flight environment of next-generation theater missile defense interceptors involves hypersonic speeds that place severe aero-thermodynamic loads on missile components including the windows used for optical seekers. These heating effects can lead to significant boresight error and aberration. Ground-based tests are required to characterize these effects. We have developed methods to measure aberrations in seeker windows using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Light from a laser or other source with a well known wavefront is passed through the window and falls on the sensor. The sensor uses an array of micro-lenses to generate a grid of focal spots on a CCD detector. The positions of the focal spots provide a measure of the wavefront slope over each micro-lens. The wavefront is reconstructed by integrating the slopes, and analyzed to characterize aberrations. During flight, optical seekers look upstream through a window at 'look angles' angles near 0 degrees relative to the free stream flow. A 0 degree angle corresponds to large angles approaching 90 degrees when measured relative to the normal of the window, and is difficult to simulate using conventional techniques to illuminate the wavefront sensor during wind tunnel tests. For this reason, we developed a technique using laser- induced optical breakdown that allows arbitrary look angles down to 0 degrees.

  18. End-to-end Coronagraphic Modeling Including a Low-order Wavefront Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krist, John E.; Trauger, John T.; Unwin, Stephen C.; Traub, Wesley A.

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate space-based coronagraphic techniques, end-to-end modeling is necessary to simulate realistic fields containing speckles caused by wavefront errors. Real systems will suffer from pointing errors and thermal and motioninduced mechanical stresses that introduce time-variable wavefront aberrations that can reduce the field contrast. A loworder wavefront sensor (LOWFS) is needed to measure these changes at a sufficiently high rate to maintain the contrast level during observations. We implement here a LOWFS and corresponding low-order wavefront control subsystem (LOWFCS) in end-to-end models of a space-based coronagraph. Our goal is to be able to accurately duplicate the effect of the LOWFS+LOWFCS without explicitly evaluating the end-to-end model at numerous time steps.

  19. Time series analysis of Adaptive Optics wave-front sensor telemetry data

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A; Palmer, D

    2004-03-22

    Time series analysis techniques are applied to wave-front sensor telemetry data from the Lick Adaptive Optics System. For 28 fully-illuminated subapertures, telemetry data of 4096 consecutive slope estimates for each subaperture are available. The primary problem is performance comparison of alternative wave-front sensing algorithms. Using direct comparison of data in open loop and closed-loop trials, we analyze algorithm performance in terms of gain, noise and residual power. We also explore the benefits of multi-input Wiener filtering and analyze the open-loop and closed-loop spatial correlations of the sensor measurements.

  20. An Optical Wavefront Sensor Based on a Double Layer Microlens Array

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Vinna; Wei, Hsiang-Chun; Hsieh, Hsin-Ta; Su, Guo-Dung John

    2011-01-01

    In order to determine light aberrations, Shack-Hartmann optical wavefront sensors make use of microlens arrays (MLA) to divide the incident light into small parts and focus them onto image planes. In this paper, we present the design and fabrication of long focal length MLA with various shapes and arrangements based on a double layer structure for optical wavefront sensing applications. A longer focal length MLA could provide high sensitivity in determining the average slope across each microlens under a given wavefront, and spatial resolution of a wavefront sensor is increased by numbers of microlenses across a detector. In order to extend focal length, we used polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) above MLA on a glass substrate. Because of small refractive index difference between PDMS and MLA interface (UV-resin), the incident light is less refracted and focused in further distance. Other specific focal lengths could also be realized by modifying the refractive index difference without changing the MLA size. Thus, the wavefront sensor could be improved with better sensitivity and higher spatial resolution. PMID:22346643

  1. An ocular wavefront sensor based on binary phase element: design and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Sanjay Kumar; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Sharma, Anurag

    2012-07-01

    A modal wavefront sensor for ocular aberrations exhibits two main advantages compared to a conventional Shack-Hartmann sensor. As the wavefront is detected in the Fourier plane, the method is robust against local loss of information (e.g. local opacity of ocular lens as in the case of cataract), and is not dependent on the spatial distribution of wavefront sampling. We have proposed a novel method of wavefront sensing for ocular aberrations that directly detects the strengths of Zernike aberrations. A multiplexed Fourier computer-generated hologram has been designed as the binary phase element (BPE) for the detection of second-order and higher-order ocular aberrations (HOAs). The BPE design has been validated by comparing the simulated far-field pattern with the experimental results obtained by displaying it on a spatial light modulator. Simulation results have demonstrated the simultaneous wavefront detection with an accuracy better that ∼λ/30 for a measurement range of ±2.1λ with reduced cross-talk. Sensor performance is validated by performing a numerical experiment using the City data set for test waves containing second-order and HOAs and measurement errors of 0.065 µm peak-to-valley (PV) and 0.08 µm (PV) have been obtained, respectively.

  2. Improving Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor by using sub-wavelength annular apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hao-Jung; Chung, Ming-Han; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2014-03-01

    Out of the many wavefront sensing techniques, Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor remains the most popular and the most versatile. Its optical configuration utilized a micro-lens array to measure the directivity of the light beam associated with each micro-lens. In this design, smaller size of micro-lens leads to angular resolution improvement. However, smaller size micro-lens typically is associated to shorter depth of focus, which makes it difficult to focus on sensor array properly. In addition, the size of micro-lens array is limited by the diffraction limit. In today's technology, micro-lens with dimensions in size of a few hundred of microns is possible. This dimension posts the limitation of the angular resolution possible for Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor. To alleviate the compromise between the angular resolution and the depth of focus, a sub-wavelength annular aperture (SAA) structure was developed to generate Bessel light beams. That is, the SAA performs similar functions as that of the micro lens array in traditional wave front sensors. It is shown that this design maintains a sub-wavelength focusing capability while achieves tens of micron depth of focus in the far-field region, which leads to an improved wavefront sensor. Both simulation and experimental results are detailed.

  3. The extraction of spot signal in Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor based on sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanyan; Xu, Wentao; Chen, Suting; Ge, Junxiang; Wan, Fayu

    2016-07-01

    Several techniques have been used with Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors to determine the local wave-front gradient across each lenslet. While the centroid error of Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor is relatively large since the skylight background and the detector noise. In this paper, we introduce a new method based on sparse representation to extract the target signal from the background and the noise. First, an over complete dictionary of the spot signal is constructed based on two-dimensional Gaussian model. Then the Shack-Hartmann image is divided into sub blocks. The corresponding coefficients of each block is computed in the over complete dictionary. Since the coefficients of the noise and the target are large different, then extract the target by setting a threshold to the coefficients. Experimental results show that the target can be well extracted and the deviation, RMS and PV of the centroid are all smaller than the method of subtracting threshold.

  4. Two-Sided Pyramid Wavefront Sensor in the Direct Phase Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Phillion, D; Baker, K

    2006-04-12

    The two-sided pyramid wavefront sensor has been extensively simulated in the direct phase mode using a wave optics code. The two-sided pyramid divides the focal plane so that each half of the core only interferes with the speckles in its half of the focal plane. A relayed image of the pupil plane is formed at the CCD camera for each half. Antipodal speckle pairs are separated so that a pure phase variation causes amplitude variations in the two images. The phase is reconstructed from the difference of the two amplitudes by transforming cosine waves into sine waves using the Hilbert transform. There are also other corrections which have to be applied in Fourier space. The two-sided pyramid wavefront sensor performs extremely well: After two or three iterations, the phase error varies purely in y. The two-sided pyramid pair enables the phase to be completely reconstructed. Its performance has been modeled closed loop with atmospheric turbulence and wind. Both photon noise and read noise were included. The three-sided and four-sided pyramid wavefront sensors have also been studied in direct phase mode. Neither performs nearly as well as does the two-sided pyramid wavefront sensor.

  5. Influence of aperture size on wavefront sensor based on the Talbot effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podanchuk, Dmytro V.; Kotov, Myhailo M.; Goloborodko, Andrey A.; Kurashov, Vitalij N.; Dan'ko, Volodymyr P.; Kurashov, Andrey V.

    2013-12-01

    The self-imaging phenomenon, or the Talbot effect, is diffraction and interference effect for coherent light that is transmitted through infinite grating or other periodic structure. But in practice, intensity distribution is reproduced with some distortions due to finite size of a grating. The influence of aperture effects on quality of wavefront reconstruction by the sensor based on the Talbot effect is considered in this work. 2D binary and gray-scale amplitude gratings with different periods and form of holes were used as the input element of the sensor. Computer simulation for different aberrations and varying aperture size was performed. The experimental results of comparative analysis of wavefront measurements by the diffraction Talbot sensor with a finite aperture and the Shack-Hartman sensor are presented.

  6. Concepts, laboratory, and telescope test results of the plenoptic camera as a wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Ramos, L. F.; Montilla, I.; Fernández-Valdivia, J. J.; Trujillo-Sevilla, J. L.; Rodríguez-Ramos, J. M.

    2012-07-01

    The plenoptic camera has been proposed as an alternative wavefront sensor adequate for extended objects within the context of the design of the European Solar Telescope (EST), but it can also be used with point sources. Originated in the field of the Electronic Photography, the plenoptic camera directly samples the Light Field function, which is the four - dimensional representation of all the light entering a camera. Image formation can then be seen as the result of the photography operator applied to this function, and many other features of the light field can be exploited to extract information of the scene, like depths computation to extract 3D imaging or, as it will be specifically addressed in this paper, wavefront sensing. The underlying concept of the plenoptic camera can be adapted to the case of a telescope by using a lenslet array of the same f-number placed at the focal plane, thus obtaining at the detector a set of pupil images corresponding to every sampled point of view. This approach will generate a generalization of Shack-Hartmann, Curvature and Pyramid wavefront sensors in the sense that all those could be considered particular cases of the plenoptic wavefront sensor, because the information needed as the starting point for those sensors can be derived from the plenoptic image. Laboratory results obtained with extended objects, phase plates and commercial interferometers, and even telescope observations using stars and the Moon as an extended object are presented in the paper, clearly showing the capability of the plenoptic camera to behave as a wavefront sensor.

  7. Development and verification of the non-linear curvature wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateen, Mala

    Adaptive optics (AO) systems have become an essential part of ground-based telescopes and enable diffraction-limited imaging at near-IR and mid-IR wavelengths. For several key science applications the required wavefront quality is higher than what current systems can deliver. For instance obtaining high quality diffraction-limited images at visible wavelengths requires residual wavefront errors to be well below 100 nm RMS. High contrast imaging of exoplanets and disks around nearby stars requires high accuracy control of low-order modes that dominate atmospheric turbulence and scatter light at small angles where exoplanets are likely to be found. Imaging planets using a high contrast coronagraphic camera, as is the case for the Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet Research (SPHERE) on the Very Large Telescope (VLT), and the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI), requires even greater wavefront control accuracy. My dissertation develops a highly sensitive non-linear Curvature Wavefront Sensor (nlCWFS) that can deliver diffraction-limited (lambda/D) images, in the visible, by approaching the theoretical sensitivity limit imposed by fundamental physics. The nlCWFS is derived from the successful curvature wavefront sensing concept but uses a non-linear reconstructor in order to maintain sensitivity to low spatial frequencies. The nlCWFS sensitivity makes it optimal for extreme AO and visible AO systems because it utilizes the full spatial coherence of the pupil plane as opposed to conventional sensors such as the Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor (SHWFS) which operate at the atmospheric seeing limit (lambda/r0). The difference is equivalent to a gain of (D/r0)2 in sensitivity, for the lowest order mode, which translates to the nlCWFS requiring that many fewer photons. When background limited the nlCWFS sensitivity scales as D4, a combination of D 2 gain due to the diffraction limit and D 2 gain due to telescope's collecting power. Whereas conventional wavefront sensors only

  8. Applications of variable focus liquid lenses for curvature wave-front sensors in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes-Fernández, J.; Cuevas, S.; Alvarez-Nuñez, L. C.; Watson, A. M.

    2014-08-01

    Curvature wavefront sensors obtain the wave-front aberrations from two defocused intensity images at each side of the pupil plane. Typically, when high modulation speeds are required, as it is the case with Adaptive Optics, that defocusing is done with a fast vibrating membrane mirror. We propose an alternative defocusing mechanism based on an electrowetting variable focus liquid lens. The use of such lenses may perform the required focus modulation without the need of extra moving parts, reducing the overall size of the system.

  9. The low-order wavefront sensor for the PICTURE-C mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendillo, Christopher B.; Brown, Joshua; Martel, Jason; Howe, Glenn A.; Hewasawam, Kuravi; Finn, Susanna C.; Cook, Timothy A.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Douglas, Ewan S.; Mawet, Dimitri; Guyon, Olivier; Singh, Garima; Lozi, Julien; Cahoy, Kerri L.; Marinan, Anne D.

    2015-09-01

    The PICTURE-C mission will fly a 60 cm off-axis unobscured telescope and two high-contrast coronagraphs in successive high-altitude balloon flights with the goal of directly imaging and spectrally characterizing visible scattered light from exozodiacal dust in the interior 1-10 AU of nearby exoplanetary systems. The first flight in 2017 will use a 10-4 visible nulling coronagraph (previously flown on the PICTURE sounding rocket) and the second flight in 2019 will use a 10-7 vector vortex coronagraph. A low-order wavefront corrector (LOWC) will be used in both flights to remove time-varying aberrations from the coronagraph wavefront. The LOWC actuator is a 76-channel high-stroke deformable mirror packaged on top of a tip-tilt stage. This paper will detail the selection of a complementary high-speed, low-order wavefront sensor (LOWFS) for the mission. The relative performance and feasibility of several LOWFS designs will be compared including the Shack-Hartmann, Lyot LOWFS, and the curvature sensor. To test the different sensors, a model of the time-varying wavefront is constructed using measured pointing data and inertial dynamics models to simulate optical alignment perturbations and surface deformation in the balloon environment.

  10. Zernike wavefront sensor modeling development for LOWFS on WFIRST-AFTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Wallace, J. Kent; Shi, Fang

    2015-09-01

    WFIRST-AFTA design makes use of an existing 2.4m telescope for direct imaging of exoplanets. To maintain the high contrast needed for the coronagraph, wavefront error (WFE) of the optical system needs to be continuously sensed and controlled. Low Order Wavefront Sensing (LOWFS) uses the rejected starlight from an immediate focal plane to sense wavefront changes (mostly thermally induced low order WFE) by combining the LOWFS mask (a phase plate located at the small center region with reflective layer) with the starlight rejection masks, i.e. Hybrid Lyot Coronagraph (HLC)'s occulter or Shaped Pupil Coronagraph (SPC)'s field stop. Zernike wavefront sensor (ZWFS) measures phase via the phase-contrast method and is known to be photon noise optimal for measuring low order aberrations. Recently, ZWFS was selected as the baseline LOWFS technology on WFIST/AFTA for its good sensitivity, accuracy, and its easy integration with the starlight rejection mask. In this paper, we review the theory of ZWFS operation, describe the ZWFS algorithm development, and summarize various numerical sensitivity studies on the sensor performance. In the end, the predicted sensor performance on SPC and HLC configurations are presented.

  11. FPGA-based slope computation for ELTs adaptive optics wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Ramos, L. F.; Díaz Garcia, J. J.; Piqueras Meseguer, J. J.; Martin Hernando, Y.; Rodríguez Ramos, J. M.

    2008-07-01

    ELTs laser guide stars wavefront sensors are planned to have specifically developed sensor chips, which will probably include readout logic and D/A conversion, followed by a powerful FPGA slope computer located very close to it, but not inside for flexibility and simplicity reasons. This paper presents the architecture of an FPGA-based wavefront slope computer, capable of handling the sensor output stream in a massively parallel approach. It will feature the ability of performing dark and flat field correction, the flexibility needed for allocating complex processing schemes, the capability of undertaking all computations expected to be performed at maximum speed, even though they were not strictly related to the calculation of the slopes, and the necessary housekeeping controls to properly command it and evaluate its behaviour. Feasibility using today's technology is evaluated, clearly showing its viability, together with an analysis of the amount of external memory, power consumption and printed circuit board space needed.

  12. History of the Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor and its impact in ophthalmic optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwiegerling, Jim

    2014-09-01

    The Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor is a technology that was developed at the Optical Sciences Center at the University of Arizona in the late 1960s. It is a robust technique for measuring wavefront error that was originally developed for large telescopes to measure errors induced by atmospheric turbulence. The Shack Hartmann sensor has evolved to become a relatively common non-interferometric metrology tool in a variety of fields. Its broadest impact has been in the area of ophthalmic optics where it is used to measure ocular aberrations. The data the Shack Hartmann sensor provides enables custom LASIK treatments, often enhancing visual acuity beyond normal levels. In addition, the Shack Hartmann data coupled with adaptive optics systems enables unprecedented views of the retina. This paper traces the evolution of the technology from the early use of screen-type tests, to the incorporation of lenslet arrays and finally to one of its modern applications, measuring the human eye.

  13. Electron density characterization by use of a broadband x-ray-compatible wave-front sensor.

    PubMed

    Baker, K L; Brase, J; Kartz, M; Olivier, S S; Sawvel, B; Tucker, J

    2003-02-01

    The use of a Hartmann wave-front sensor to accurately measure the line-integrated electron density gradients formed in laser-produced and z-pinch plasma experiments is examined. This wave-front sensor may be used with a soft-x-ray laser as well as with incoherent line emission at multikilovolt x-ray energies. This diagnostic is significantly easier to use than interferometery and moiré deflectometry, both of which have been demonstrated with soft-x-ray lasers. This scheme is experimentally demonstrated in the visible region by use of a Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor and a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator to simulate a phase profile that could occur when an x-ray probe passes through a plasma. The merits of using a Hartmann sensor include a wide dynamic range, broadband or low-coherence-length light capability, high x-ray efficiency, two-dimensional gradient determination, multiplexing capability, and experimental simplicity. Hartmann sensors could also be utilized for wavelength testing of extreme-ultraviolet lithography components and x-ray phase imaging of biological specimens. PMID:12656314

  14. Analysis of stellar interferometers as wave-front sensors.

    PubMed

    Hénault, François

    2005-08-01

    The basic principle and theoretical relationships of an original method are presented that allow the wave-front errors of a ground or spaceborne telescope to be retrieved when its main pupil is combined with a second, decentered reference optical arm. The measurement accuracy of such a telescope-interferometer is then estimated by means of various numerical simulations, and good performance is demonstrated, except in limited areas near the telescope pupil's rim. In particular, it permits direct phase evaluation (thus avoiding the use of first- or second-order derivatives), which will be of special interest for the cophasing of segmented mirrors in future giant-telescope projects. Finally, the useful practical domain of the method is defined, which seems to be better suited for periodic diagnostics of space- or ground-based telescopes or to real-time scientific observations in some specific cases (e.g., the central star in instruments that search for extrasolar planets). PMID:16075886

  15. Amplitude and phase beam characterization using a two-dimensional wavefront sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, D.R.; Alford, W.J.; Gruetzner, J.K.; Warren, M.E.

    1996-09-01

    We have developed a two-dimensional Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor that uses binary optic lenslet arrays to directly measure the wavefront slope (phase gradient) and amplitude of the laser beam. This sensor uses an array of lenslets that dissects the beam into a number of samples. The focal spot location of each of these lenslets (measured by a CCD camera) is related to the incoming wavefront slope over the lenslet. By integrating these measurements over the laser aperture, the wavefront or phase distribution can be determined. Since the power focused by each lenslet is also easily determined, this allows a complete measurement of the intensity and phase distribution of the laser beam. Furthermore, all the information is obtained in a single measurement. Knowing the complete scalar field of the beam allows the detailed prediction of the actual beam`s characteristics along its propagation path. In particular, the space- beamwidth product M{sup 2}, can be obtained in a single measurement. The intensity and phase information can be used in concert with information about other elements in the optical train to predict the beam size, shape, phase and other characteristics anywhere in the optical train. We present preliminary measurements of an Ar{sup +} laser beam and associated M{sup 2} calculations.

  16. Depth aberrations characterization in linear and nonlinear microscopy schemes using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviles-Espinosa, Rodrigo; Andilla, Jordi; Porcar-Guezenec, Rafael; Levecq, Xavier; Artigas, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2012-03-01

    The performance of imaging devices such as linear and nonlinear microscopes (NLM) can be limited by the optical properties of the imaged sample. Such an important aspect has already been described using theoretical models due to the difficulties of implementing a direct wavefront sensing scheme. However, these only stand for simple interfaces and cannot be generalized to biological samples given its structural complexity. This has leaded to the development of sensor-less adaptive optics (AO) implementations. In this approach, aberrations are iteratively corrected trough an image related parameter (aberrations are not measured), being prone of causing sample damage. In this work, we perform a practical implementation of a Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor to compensate for sample induced aberrations, demonstrating its applicability in linear and NLM. We perform an extensive analysis of wavefront distortion effects through different depths employing phantom samples. Aberration effects originated by the refractive index mismatch and depth are quantified using the linear and nonlinear guide-star concept. More over we analyze offaxis aberrations in NLM, an important aspect that is commonly overlooked. In this case spherical aberration behaves similarly to the wavefront error compared with the on-axis case. Finally we give examples of aberration compensation using epi-fluorescence and nonlinear microscopy.

  17. Semiconductor sensor for optically measuring polarization rotation of optical wavefronts using rare earth iron garnets

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, Paul G.

    2002-01-01

    Described are the design of a rare earth iron garnet sensor element, optical methods of interrogating the sensor element, methods of coupling the optical sensor element to a waveguide, and an optical and electrical processing system for monitoring the polarization rotation of a linearly polarized wavefront undergoing external modulation due to magnetic field or electrical current fluctuation. The sensor element uses the Faraday effect, an intrinsic property of certain rare-earth iron garnet materials, to rotate the polarization state of light in the presence of a magnetic field. The sensor element may be coated with a thin-film mirror to effectively double the optical path length, providing twice the sensitivity for a given field strength or temperature change. A semiconductor sensor system using a rare earth iron garnet sensor element is described.

  18. Efficient implementation of a projection-based wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, John; Cain, Stephen C.; Mantica, Peter

    2002-12-01

    In this paper, a new wave front sensor design that utilizes the benefits of image projections is described and analyzed. The projection-based wave front sensor is similar to a Shack-Hartman type wave front sensor, but uses a correlation algorithm as opposed to a centroiding algorithm to estimate optical tilt. This allows the projection-based wave front sensor to estimate optical tilt parameters while guiding off of point sources and extended objects at very low signal to noise ratios. The implementation of the projection-based wave front sensor is described in detail showing important signal processing steps on and off of the focal plane array of the sensor. In this paper the design is tested in simulation for speed and accuracy by processing simulated astronomical data. These simulations demonstrate the accuracy of the projection-based wave front sensor and its superior performance to that of the traditional Shack-Hartman wave front sensor. Timing analysis is presented which shows how the collection and processing of image projections is computationally efficient and lends itself to a wave front sensor design that can produce adaptive optical control signals at speeds of up to 500 hz.

  19. On-instrument wavefront sensor design for the TMT infrared imaging spectrograph (IRIS) update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Jennifer; Reshetov, Vladimir; Atwood, Jenny; Pazder, John; Wooff, Bob; Loop, David; Saddlemyer, Leslie; Moore, Anna M.; Larkin, James E.

    2014-08-01

    The first light instrument on the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) project will be the InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). IRIS will be mounted on a bottom port of the facility AO instrument NFIRAOS. IRIS will report guiding information to the NFIRAOS through the On-Instrument Wavefront Sensor (OIWFS) that is part of IRIS. This will be in a self-contained compartment of IRIS and will provide three deployable wavefront sensor probe arms. This entire unit will be rotated to provide field de-rotation. Currently in our preliminary design stage our efforts have included: prototyping of the probe arm to determine the accuracy of this critical component, handling cart design and reviewing different types of glass for the atmospheric dispersion.

  20. Phase grating wavefront curvature sensor based on liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Li, Xiaoyang; Yang, Xu

    2015-08-01

    The phase grating wavefront curvature sensor based on liquid crystal spatial light modulator is introduced. A close-loop phase retrieval method based on Eigen functions of Laplacian is proposed, and its accuracy and efficiency are analyzed through numerical experiments of atmospheric phase retrieval. The results show that the close-loop phase retrieval method has a high accuracy. Moreover, it is stable regardless of modal cross coupling.

  1. Phase retrieval using a modified Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor with defocus.

    PubMed

    Li, Changwei; Li, Bangming; Zhang, Sijiong

    2014-02-01

    This paper proposes a modified Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for phase retrieval. The sensor is revamped by placing a detector at a defocused plane before the focal plane of the lenslet array of the Shack-Hartmann sensor. The algorithm for phase retrieval is an optimization with initial Zernike coefficients calculated by the conventional phase reconstruction of the Shack-Hartmann sensor. Numerical simulations show that the proposed sensor permits sensitive, accurate phase retrieval. Furthermore, experiments tested the feasibility of phase retrieval using the proposed sensor. The surface irregularity for a flat mirror was measured by the proposed method and a Veeco interferometer, respectively. The irregularity for the mirror measured by the proposed method is in very good agreement with that measured using the Veeco interferometer. PMID:24514178

  2. Integration and bench testing for the GRAVITY Coudé IR adaptive optics (CIAO) wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deen, C.; Yang, P.; Huber, A.; Suarez-Valles, M.; Hippler, S.; Brandner, W.; Gendron, E.; Clénet, Y.; Kendrew, S.; Glauser, A.; Klein, R.; Laun, W.; Lenzen, R.; Neumann, U.; Panduro, J.; Ramos, J.; Rohloff, R.-R.; Salzinger, A.; Zimmerman, N.; Henning, T.; Perraut, K.; Perrin, G.; Straubmeier, C.; Amorim, A.; Eisenhauer, F.

    2014-08-01

    GRAVITY, a second generation instrument for the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI), will provide an astrometric precision of order 10 micro-arcseconds, an imaging resolution of 4 milli-arcseconds, and low/medium resolution spectro-interferometry. These improvements to the VLTI represent a major upgrade to its current infrared interferometric capabilities, allowing detailed study of obscured environments (e.g. the Galactic Center, young dusty planet-forming disks, dense stellar cores, AGN, etc...). Crucial to the final performance of GRAVITY, the Coudé IR Adaptive Optics (CIAO) system will correct for the effects of the atmosphere at each of the VLT Unit Telescopes. CIAO consists of four new infrared Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (WFS) and associated real-time computers/software which will provide infrared wavefront sensing from 1.45-2.45 microns, allowing AO corrections even in regions where optically bright reference sources are scarce. We present here the latest progress on the GRAVITY wavefront sensors. We describe the adaptation and testing of a light-weight version of the ESO Standard Platform for Adaptive optics Real Time Applications (SPARTA-Light) software architecture to the needs of GRAVITY. We also describe the latest integration and test milestones for construction of the initial wave front sensor.

  3. Performance comparison between Shack-Hartmann and astigmatic hybrid wavefront sensors.

    PubMed

    Barwick, Shane

    2009-12-20

    Simulations on Kolmogorov phase screens are employed to compare the relative performance of an astigmatic hybrid wavefront sensor (AHS) to that of a Shack-Hartmann sensor (SHS). The AHS is shown to improve phase reconstruction accuracy when the subaperture phase contains significant energy in curvature modes and a moderate to high number of photons are collected. Dual use of the AHS and SHS may extend enhanced reconstruction to low signal levels. The AHS is also shown to have a small benefit for tilt-only reconstruction when the beam has sufficient power. PMID:20029599

  4. Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor with large dynamic range by adaptive spot search method.

    PubMed

    Shinto, Hironobu; Saita, Yusuke; Nomura, Takanori

    2016-07-10

    A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) that consists of a microlens array and an image sensor has been used to measure the wavefront aberrations of human eyes. However, a conventional SHWFS has finite dynamic range depending on the diameter of the each microlens. The dynamic range cannot be easily expanded without a decrease of the spatial resolution. In this study, an adaptive spot search method to expand the dynamic range of an SHWFS is proposed. In the proposed method, spots are searched with the help of their approximate displacements measured with low spatial resolution and large dynamic range. By the proposed method, a wavefront can be correctly measured even if the spot is beyond the detection area. The adaptive spot search method is realized by using the special microlens array that generates both spots and discriminable patterns. The proposed method enables expanding the dynamic range of an SHWFS with a single shot and short processing time. The performance of the proposed method is compared with that of a conventional SHWFS by optical experiments. Furthermore, the dynamic range of the proposed method is quantitatively evaluated by numerical simulations. PMID:27409319

  5. The AOLI low-order non-linear curvature wavefront sensor: laboratory and on-sky results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crass, Jonathan; King, David; MacKay, Craig

    2014-08-01

    Many adaptive optics (AO) systems in use today require the use of bright reference objects to determine the effects of atmospheric distortions. Typically these systems use Shack-Hartmann Wavefront sensors (SHWFS) to distribute incoming light from a reference object between a large number of sub-apertures. Guyon et al. evaluated the sensitivity of several different wavefront sensing techniques and proposed the non-linear Curvature Wavefront Sensor (nlCWFS) offering improved sensitivity across a range of orders of distortion. On large ground-based telescopes this can provide nearly 100% sky coverage using natural guide stars. We present work being undertaken on the nlCWFS development for the Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager (AOLI) project. The wavefront sensor is being developed as part of a low-order adaptive optics system for use in a dedicated instrument providing an AO corrected beam to a Lucky Imaging based science detector. The nlCWFS provides a total of four reference images on two photon-counting EMCCDs for use in the wavefront reconstruction process. We present results from both laboratory work using a calibration system and the first on-sky data obtained with the nlCWFS at the 4.2 metre William Herschel Telescope, La Palma. In addition, we describe the updated optical design of the wavefront sensor, strategies for minimising intrinsic effects and methods to maximise sensitivity using photon-counting detectors. We discuss on-going work to develop the high speed reconstruction algorithm required for the nlCWFS technique. This includes strategies to implement the technique on graphics processing units (GPUs) and to minimise computing overheads to obtain a prior for a rapid convergence of the wavefront reconstruction. Finally we evaluate the sensitivity of the wavefront sensor based upon both data and low-photon count strategies.

  6. Hough transform used on the spot-centroiding algorithm for the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, Chou-Min; Huang, Kuang-Yuh; Chang, Elmer

    2016-01-01

    An approach to the spot-centroiding algorithm for the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS) is presented. The SHWS has a common problem, in that while measuring high-order wavefront distortion, the spots may exceed each of the subapertures, which are used to restrict the displacement of spots. This artificial restriction may limit the dynamic range of the SHWS. When using the SHWS to measure adaptive optics or aspheric lenses, the accuracy of the traditional spot-centroiding algorithm may be uncertain because the spots leave or cross the confined area of the subapertures. The proposed algorithm combines the Hough transform with an artificial neural network, which requires no confined subapertures, to increase the dynamic range of the SHWS. This algorithm is then explored in comprehensive simulations and the results are compared with those of the existing algorithm.

  7. Optimized microlens-array geometry for Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, O. G.; de Lima Monteiro, D. W.; Costa, R. F. O.

    2014-04-01

    This work presents the fabrication and test of microlens arrays for Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor, which were optimized, in terms of geometry, to be applied to the ophthalmic context. The optimization procedure was previously proposed by the authors and comprised the minimization of the wavefront reconstruction error through the use of genetic algorithm. The results indicated that arrays with 10 and 16 suitably located lenses could perform as good as those with a larger number of microlenses (25 or 36) in a rectangular geometry. In the present work, the sequence consisted in fabricating molds in silicon of the optimized array geometries; replicating the molds on polymer; and testing the final arrays on an optical bench, to comparatively assess the performance of the fabricated arrays. In general, final results corroborate with the ones predicted by simulations.

  8. Performance simulation of the ERIS pyramid wavefront sensor module in the VLT adaptive optics facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirós-Pacheco, Fernando; Agapito, Guido; Riccardi, Armando; Esposito, Simone; Le Louarn, Miska; Marchetti, Enrico

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the performance analysis based on numerical simulations of the Pyramid Wavefront sensor Module (PWM) to be included in ERIS, the new Adaptive Optics (AO) instrument for the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF). We have analyzed the performance of the PWM working either in a low-order or in a high-order wavefront sensing mode of operation. We show that the PWM in the high-order sensing mode can provide SR > 90% in K band using bright guide stars under median seeing conditions (0.85 arcsec seeing and 15 m/s of wind speed). In the low-order sensing mode, the PWM can sense and correct Tip-Tilt (and if requested also Focus mode) with the precision required to assist the LGS observations to get an SR > 60% and > 20% in K band, using up to a ~16.5 and ~19.5 R-magnitude guide star, respectively.

  9. Wavefront sensor for the ESA-GAIA mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vosteen, L. L. A.; Draaisma, F.; van Werkhoven, W. P.; van Riel, L. J. M.; Mol, M. H.; den Ouden, G.

    2009-08-01

    TNO developed a Wave Front Sensor (WFS) instrument for the GAIA mission. This Wave Front Sensor will be used to monitor the wave front errors of the two main telescopes mounted on the GAIA satellite, which may be corrected by a 5-degree of freedom (DOF) mechanism during operation. The GAIA-WFS will operate over a broad wavelength (450 to 900 nm) and under cryogenic conditions (130 to 200 K operation temperature). The WFS uses an all reflective, a-thermal design and is of the type of Shack-Hartmann. The boundary condition for the design is that the focal plane of the WFS is the same plane as the focal plane of the GAIA telescopes. The spot pattern generated after a micro lens array (MLA) by a star is compared to the pattern of one of the three calibration sources that is included in the WFS, allowing in flight calibration. We show the robust and lightweight opto mechanical design that is optimised for launch and cryogenic operation. Furthermore we give details on its alignment and commissioning. The WFS can measure wave front distortions in the order of lambda/1000, and determines the focal plane with an accuracy of 50 μm.

  10. Improved artificial bee colony algorithm for wavefront sensor-less system in free space optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Chaojun; Han, Xiang'e.

    2015-10-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) technology is an effective way to alleviate the effect of turbulence on free space optical communication (FSO). A new adaptive compensation method can be used without a wave-front sensor. Artificial bee colony algorithm (ABC) is a population-based heuristic evolutionary algorithm inspired by the intelligent foraging behaviour of the honeybee swarm with the advantage of simple, good convergence rate, robust and less parameter setting. In this paper, we simulate the application of the improved ABC to correct the distorted wavefront and proved its effectiveness. Then we simulate the application of ABC algorithm, differential evolution (DE) algorithm and stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm to the FSO system and analyze the wavefront correction capabilities by comparison of the coupling efficiency, the error rate and the intensity fluctuation in different turbulence before and after the correction. The results show that the ABC algorithm has much faster correction speed than DE algorithm and better correct ability for strong turbulence than SPGD algorithm. Intensity fluctuation can be effectively reduced in strong turbulence, but not so effective in week turbulence.

  11. Dual-mode photosensitive arrays based on the integration of liquid crystal microlenses and CMOS sensors for obtaining the intensity images and wavefronts of objects.

    PubMed

    Tong, Qing; Lei, Yu; Xin, Zhaowei; Zhang, Xinyu; Sang, Hongshi; Xie, Changsheng

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we present a kind of dual-mode photosensitive arrays (DMPAs) constructed by hybrid integration a liquid crystal microlens array (LCMLA) driven electrically and a CMOS sensor array, which can be used to measure both the conventional intensity images and corresponding wavefronts of objects. We utilize liquid crystal materials to shape the microlens array with the electrically tunable focal length. Through switching the voltage signal on and off, the wavefronts and the intensity images can be acquired through the DMPAs, sequentially. We use white light to obtain the object's wavefronts for avoiding losing important wavefront information. We separate the white light wavefronts with a large number of spectral components and then experimentally compare them with single spectral wavefronts of typical red, green and blue lasers, respectively. Then we mix the red, green and blue wavefronts to a composite wavefront containing more optical information of the object. PMID:26906768

  12. Development of a pyramidal wavefront sensor test-bench at INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turbide, Simon; Wang, Min; Gauvin, Jonny; Martin, Olivier; Savard, Maxime; Bourqui, Pascal; Veran, Jean-Pierre; Deschenes, William; Anctil, Genevieve; Chateauneuf, François

    2013-12-01

    The key technical element of the adaptive optics in astronomy is the wavefront sensing (WFS). One of the advantages of the pyramid wavefront sensor (P-WFS) over the widely used Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor seems to be the increased sensitivity in closed-loop applications. A high-sensitivity and large dynamic-range WFS, such as P-WFS technology, still needs to be further investigated for proper justification in future Extremely Large Telescopes application. At INO, we have recently carried out the optical design, testing and performance evaluation of a P-WFS bench setup. The optical design of the bench setup mainly consists of the super-LED fiber source, source collimator, spatial light modulator (SLM), relay lenses, tip-tilt mirror, Fourier-transforming lens, and a four-faceted glass pyramid with a large vertex angle as well as pupil re-imaged optics. The phase-only SLM has been introduced in the bench setup to generate atmospheric turbulence with a maximum phase shift of more than 2π at each pixel (256 grey levels). Like a modified Foucault knife-edge test, the refractive pyramid element is used to produce four images of the entrance pupil on a CCD camera. The Fourier-transforming lens, which is used before the pyramid prism, is designed for telecentric output to allow dynamic modulation (rotation of the beam around the pyramid-prism center) from a tip-tilt mirror. Furthermore, a P-WFS diffraction-based model has been developed. This model includes most of the system limitations such as the SLM discrete voltage steps and the CCD pixel pitch. The pyramid effects (edges and tip) are considered as well. The modal wavefront reconstruction algorithm relies on the construction of an interaction matrix (one for each modulation's amplitude). Each column of the interaction matrix represents the combination of the four pupil images for a given wavefront aberration. The nice agreement between the data and the model suggest that the limitation of the system is not the P

  13. Status report of PYRAMIR: a near-infrared pyramid wavefront sensor for ALFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Joana B.; Feldt, Markus; Wagner, Karl; Bizenberger, Peter; Hippler, Stefan; Baumeister, Harald; Stumpf, Micaela; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Esposito, Simone; Henning, Thomas

    2004-10-01

    A new wavefront sensor based on the pyramid principle is being built at MPIA, with the objective of integration in the Calar Alto adaptive optics system ALFA. This sensor will work in the near-infrared wavelength range (J, H and K bands). We present here an update of this project, named PYRAMIR, which will have its first light in some months. Along with the description of the optical design, we discuss issues like the image quality and chromatic effects due to band sensing. We will show the characterization of the tested pyramidal components as well as refer to the difficulties found in the manufacturing process to meet our requirements. Most of the PYRAMIR instrument parts are kept inside a liquid nitrogen cooled vacuum dewar to reduce thermic radiation. The mechanical design of the cold parts is described here. To gain experience, a laboratory pyramid wavefront sensor was set up, with its optical design adapted to PYRAMIR. Different tests were already performed. The electronic and control systems were designed to integrate in the existing ALFA system. We give a description of the new components. An update on the future work is presented.

  14. Characterization of synthetic reconstructors for the pyramid wavefront sensor unit of LBTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, V.; Vaitheeswaran, V.; Codona, J.; Hinz, P.; Durney, O.; Esposito, S.; Pinna, E.; Puglisi, A.

    2010-07-01

    We present progress and results for the pyramid wavefront sensor unit on the Large Binocular Telescope's Interferometer (LBTI). The system is a clone of the pyramid sensor unit developed at Arcetri Observatory for the LUCIFER instrument. We discuss the performance of simulated reconstructors during preliminary on-sky testing at the MMT. These reconstructors were generated with the code AOSim2, a customizable end-to-end simulator of a telescope and its AO system. We used the 3-5μm imager Clio to take fast exposures at 3.8μm, from which we calculated Strehl Ratios (SR) for each pyramid configuration and for the Shack-Hartmann (SH) system currently installed. We obtained instantaneous SR as high as 60% for the pyramid as compared to 65% mean for the SH.We identify improvements which will increase the SR in future implementations. These tests demonstrate the feasibility of commissioning a pyramid wavefront sensor on LBTI using a synthetic reconstructor.

  15. Time-resolved quantitative-phase microscopy of laser-material interactions using a wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Gallais, Laurent; Monneret, Serge

    2016-07-15

    We report on a simple and efficient technique based on a wavefront sensor to obtain time-resolved amplitude and phase images of laser-material interactions. The main interest of the technique is to obtain quantitative self-calibrated phase measurements in one shot at the femtosecond time-scale, with high spatial resolution. The technique is used for direct observation and quantitative measurement of the Kerr effect in a fused silica substrate and free electron generation by photo-ionization processes in an optical coating. PMID:27420506

  16. Dual-mode photosensitive arrays based on integration of liquid crystal microlenses and CMOS sensors for obtaining intensity images and wavefronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Qing; Lei, Yu; Zhang, Xinyu; Xie, Changsheng

    2015-09-01

    As we all know, because the index of refraction of the conventional microlens array (MLA) is not variable, the wavefront sensor based on the conventional MLA can only obtain the intensity image with low-resolution when it is used to measure the wavefront information simultaneously. In this paper, we use the dual-mode photosensitive arrays based on the liquid crystal (LC) MLA and CMOS sensors to obtain both intensity images with high-resolution and wavefronts. The dual-mode photosensitive arrays can work between an imaging mode and a wavefront sensor mode by switching the voltage off and on. In the experiment, we compare the composite wavefront of the object exposured in a white light with the wavefronts of the same object in tricolor laser. Because using the monochromatic light to measure the wavefront of an object may loss some information, it is a better method to use the white light for obtaining the wavefront information of the single object in the black background. We also discussed how to mix the wavefronts of the red green and blue laser to make the mixed wavefront which is closer to the composite wavefront.

  17. Guaranteeing Failsafe Operation of Extended-Scene Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erikin

    2009-01-01

    A Shack-Hartmann sensor (SHS) is an optical instrument consisting of a lenslet array and a camera. It is widely used for wavefront sensing in optical testing and astronomical adaptive optics. The camera is placed at the focal point of the lenslet array and points at a star or any other point source. The image captured is an array of spot images. When the wavefront error at the lenslet array changes, the position of each spot measurably shifts from its original position. Determining the shifts of the spot images from their reference points shows the extent of the wavefront error. An adaptive cross-correlation (ACC) algorithm has been developed to use scenes as well as point sources for wavefront error detection. Qualifying an extended scene image is often not an easy task due to changing conditions in scene content, illumination level, background, Poisson noise, read-out noise, dark current, sampling format, and field of view. The proposed new technique based on ACC algorithm analyzes the effects of these conditions on the performance of the ACC algorithm and determines the viability of an extended scene image. If it is viable, then it can be used for error correction; if it is not, the image fails and will not be further processed. By potentially testing for a wide variety of conditions, the algorithm s accuracy can be virtually guaranteed. In a typical application, the ACC algorithm finds image shifts of more than 500 Shack-Hartmann camera sub-images relative to a reference sub -image or cell when performing one wavefront sensing iteration. In the proposed new technique, a pair of test and reference cells is selected from the same frame, preferably from two well-separated locations. The test cell is shifted by an integer number of pixels, say, for example, from m= -5 to 5 along the x-direction by choosing a different area on the same sub-image, and the shifts are estimated using the ACC algorithm. The same is done in the y-direction. If the resulting shift

  18. Tests and evaluation of a variable focus liquid lens for curvature wavefront sensors in astronomy.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Fernández, Jorge; Cuevas, Salvador; Álvarez-Nuñez, Luis C; Watson, Alan

    2013-10-20

    Curvature wavefront sensors (WFSs), which obtain the wavefront aberrations from two defocused intensity images at each side of the pupil plane, have shown to be highly efficient for astronomical applications. We propose here an alternative defocusing mechanism for curvature sensors, based on an electrowetting-based variable focus liquid lens. Typically, the sampling rates of a WFS for active optics are of the order of 0.01 Hz, and the focus modulation can be done by simply moving the detector back and forth. On the other hand, adaptive optics may require speeds of up to several hundred hertz, and the modulation is then done by using a fast vibrating membrane mirror. We believe variable focus liquid lenses may be able to perform this focus modulation, reducing the overall size of the system and without the need of extra moving parts. We have done a full characterization of the Varioptic Arctic 416 liquid lens, and we have evaluated its potential performance in different curvature configurations. PMID:24216579

  19. Expansion of dynamic range in Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor using dual microlens array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinto, Hironobu; Saita, Yusuke; Nomura, Takanori

    2015-12-01

    A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) which consists of a microlens array and an image sensor has been used to measure the wavefront aberrations in various fields owing to its advantages such as simple configuration. However, a conventional SHWFS has the finite dynamic range. The dynamic range cannot be expanded without sacrificing the spatial resolution and the sensitivity in a conventional SHWFS. In this study, the SHWFS using a dual microlens array to solve the problem is proposed. In the proposed method, an astigmatic microlens is arranged at the center of a group of 2 x 2 spherical microlenses. A pattern image including spots and linear patterns is obtained at the focal plane by the dual microlens array. The pattern image can be separated into two images as if two microlens array with different diameter were used by discriminating spots from linear patterns with the pattern matching technique. The proposed method enables to expand the dynamic range of an SHWFS by using the separated two images. The performance of the proposed method is confirmed by the numerical simulation for measuring a spherical wave.

  20. Effects of differential wavefront sensor bias drifts on high contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadakuni, Naru; Macintosh, Bruce A.; Palmer, David W.; Poyneer, Lisa A.; Max, Claire E.; Savransky, Dmitry; Thomas, Sandrine J.; Cardwell, Andrew; Goodsell, Stephen; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale; Rantakyrö, Fredrik; Serio, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is a new facility, extreme adaptive optics (AO), coronagraphic instrument, currently being integrated onto the 8-meter Gemini South telescope, with the ultimate goal of directly imaging extrasolar planets. To achieve the contrast required for the desired science, it is necessary to quantify and mitigate wavefront error (WFE). A large source of potential static WFE arises from the primary AO wavefront sensor (WFS) detector's use of multiple readout segments with independent signal chains including on-chip preamplifiers and external amplifiers. Temperature changes within GPI's electronics cause drifts in readout segments' bias levels, inducing an RMS WFE of 1.1 nm and 41.9 nm over 4.44 degrees Celsius, for magnitude 4 and 11 stars, respectively. With a goal of <2 nm of static WFE, these are significant enough to require remedial action. Simulations imply a requirement to take fresh WFS darks every 2 degrees Celsius of temperature change, for a magnitude 6 star; similarly, for a magnitude 7 star, every 1 degree Celsius of temperature change. For sufficiently dim stars, bias drifts exceed the signal, causing a large initial WFE, and the former periodic requirement practically becomes an instantaneous/continuous one, making the goal of <2 nm of static WFE very difficult for stars of magnitude 9 or fainter. In extreme cases, this can cause the AO loops to destabilize due to perceived nonphysical wavefronts, as some of the WFS's Shack-Hartmann quadcells are split between multiple readout segments. Presented here is GPI's AO WFS geometry, along with detailed steps in the simulation used to quantify bias drift related WFE, followed by laboratory and on sky results, and concluded with possible methods of remediation.

  1. Iteratively Weighted Centroiding for Shack-Hartmann Wave-Front Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K L; Moallem, M M

    2007-02-28

    Several techniques have been used with Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors to determine the local wave-front gradient across each lenslet. In this article we introduce an iterative weighted technique which is specifically targeted for open-loop applications such as aberrometers and metrology. In this article the iterative centroiding technique is compared to existing techniques such as center-of-mass with thresholding, weighted center-of-gravity, matched filter and cross-correlation. Under conditions of low signal-to-noise ratio, the iterative weighted centroiding algorithm is demonstrated to produce a lower variance in the reconstructed phase than existing techniques. The iteratively weighted algorithm was also compared in closed-loop and demonstrated to have the lowest error variance along with the weighted center-of-gravity, however, the iteratively weighted algorithm removes the bulk of the aberration in roughly half the iterations than the weighted center-of-gravity algorithm. This iterative weighted algorithm is also well suited to applications such as guiding on telescopes.

  2. Auto gain control of EMCCD in Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhaoyi; Li, Dayu; Hu, Lifa; Mu, QuanQuan; Cao, Zhaoliang; Wang, Yukun; Wang, Shaoxin; Xuan, Li

    2016-12-01

    Electron multiplying charge-coupled-device (EMCCD) applied in Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (S-H WFS) makes the wavefront sensing more efficient for adaptive optics (AO). However when the brightness of the observed target changes in large ranges in a few minutes, a fixed electron multiplying (EM) gain may not be optimum. Thus an auto-gain-control (AGC) method based on the spots image of the S-H WFS is proposed. The designed control value is the average value of the maximum signals of all the light spots in a frame. It has been demonstrated in the experiments that the control value is sensitive to the change of the target brightness, and is stable in the presence of detecting noises and turbulence influence. The goal value for control is predetermined based on the linear relation of the signal with the EM gain and the number of photons collected in sub-apertures. The conditions of the self-protection of the EMCCD are also considered for the goal value. Simulations and experiments indicate that the proposed control method is efficient, and keeps the sensing in a high SNR which reaches the upper SNR limit when sensing with EMCCD. The self-protection of the EMCCD is avoided during the whole sensing process.

  3. Focal plane wavefront sensor achromatization: The multireference self-coherent camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorme, J. R.; Galicher, R.; Baudoz, P.; Rousset, G.; Mazoyer, J.; Dupuis, O.

    2016-04-01

    Context. High contrast imaging and spectroscopy provide unique constraints for exoplanet formation models as well as for planetary atmosphere models. But this can be challenging because of the planet-to-star small angular separation (<1 arcsec) and high flux ratio (>105). Recently, optimized instruments like VLT/SPHERE and Gemini/GPI were installed on 8m-class telescopes. These will probe young gazeous exoplanets at large separations (≳1 au) but, because of uncalibrated phase and amplitude aberrations that induce speckles in the coronagraphic images, they are not able to detect older and fainter planets. Aims: There are always aberrations that are slowly evolving in time. They create quasi-static speckles that cannot be calibrated a posteriori with sufficient accuracy. An active correction of these speckles is thus needed to reach very high contrast levels (>106-107). This requires a focal plane wavefront sensor. Our team proposed a self coherent camera, the performance of which was demonstrated in the laboratory. As for all focal plane wavefront sensors, these are sensitive to chromatism and we propose an upgrade that mitigates the chromatism effects. Methods: First, we recall the principle of the self-coherent camera and we explain its limitations in polychromatic light. Then, we present and numerically study two upgrades to mitigate chromatism effects: the optical path difference method and the multireference self-coherent camera. Finally, we present laboratory tests of the latter solution. Results: We demonstrate in the laboratory that the multireference self-coherent camera can be used as a focal plane wavefront sensor in polychromatic light using an 80 nm bandwidth at 640 nm (bandwidth of 12.5%). We reach a performance that is close to the chromatic limitations of our bench: 1σ contrast of 4.5 × 10-8 between 5 and 17 λ0/D. Conclusions: The performance of the MRSCC is promising for future high-contrast imaging instruments that aim to actively minimize the

  4. Determining the phase and amplitude distortion of a wavefront using a plenoptic sensor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chensheng; Ko, Jonathan; Davis, Christopher C

    2015-05-01

    We have designed a plenoptic sensor to retrieve phase and amplitude changes resulting from a laser beam's propagation through atmospheric turbulence. Compared with the commonly restricted domain of (-π,π) in phase reconstruction by interferometers, the reconstructed phase obtained by the plenoptic sensors can be continuous up to a multiple of 2π. When compared with conventional Shack-Hartmann sensors, ambiguities caused by interference or low intensity, such as branch points and branch cuts, are less likely to happen and can be adaptively avoided by our reconstruction algorithm. In the design of our plenoptic sensor, we modified the fundamental structure of a light field camera into a mini Keplerian telescope array by accurately cascading the back focal plane of its object lens with a microlens array's front focal plane and matching the numerical aperture of both components. Unlike light field cameras designed for incoherent imaging purposes, our plenoptic sensor operates on the complex amplitude of the incident beam and distributes it into a matrix of images that are simpler and less subject to interference than a global image of the beam. Then, with the proposed reconstruction algorithms, the plenoptic sensor is able to reconstruct the wavefront and a phase screen at an appropriate depth in the field that causes the equivalent distortion on the beam. The reconstructed results can be used to guide adaptive optics systems in directing beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, we will show the theoretical analysis and experimental results obtained with the plenoptic sensor and its reconstruction algorithms. PMID:26366923

  5. Time-resolved deformation measurement of Yb:YAG thin disk using wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyla, Michal; Nagisetty, Shiva S.; Severova, Patricie; Miura, Taisuke; Mann, Klaus; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas

    2015-03-01

    Even though thin-disk medium mounted on a diamond substrate is generally used for high average power operation, we found that the pulsed pumping of the Yb:YAG thin-disk mounded on a copper-tungsten heatsink could improve both optical-to-optical O-O efficiency and beam quality. We are expecting that the increase of O-O efficiency is caused by the suppression of ASE. However, the mechanism of beam quality improvement is not clear. We developed a precise measurement system of thin-disk deformations based on a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor. Investigating thin-disk dynamics under pulsed pumping can help to greatly improve the mode matching and allow obtaining higher output energy.

  6. Improving the performance of a pyramid wavefront sensor with modal sensitivity compensation.

    PubMed

    Korkiakoski, Visa; Vérinaud, Christophe; Le Louarn, Miska

    2008-01-01

    We describe a solution to increase the performance of a pyramid wavefront sensor (P-WFS) under bad seeing conditions. We show that most of the issues involve a reduced sensitivity that depends on the magnitude of the high frequency atmospheric distortions. We demonstrate in end-to-end closed loop adaptive optics simulations that with a modal sensitivity compensation method a high-order system with a nonmodulated P-WFS is robust in conditions with the Fried parameter r 0 at 0.5 microm in the range of 0.05-0.10 m. We also show that the method makes it possible to use a modal predictive control system to reach a total performance improvement of 0.06-0.45 in Strehl ratio at 1.6 microm. Especially at r 0=0.05 m the gain is dramatic. PMID:18157280

  7. Experience with wavefront sensor and deformable mirror interfaces for wide-field adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, A. G.; Atkinson, D.; Bharmal, N. A.; Bitenc, U.; Brangier, M.; Buey, T.; Butterley, T.; Cano, D.; Chemla, F.; Clark, P.; Cohen, M.; Conan, J.-M.; de Cos, F. J.; Dickson, C.; Dipper, N. A.; Dunlop, C. N.; Feautrier, P.; Fusco, T.; Gach, J. L.; Gendron, E.; Geng, D.; Goodsell, S. J.; Gratadour, D.; Greenaway, A. H.; Guesalaga, A.; Guzman, C. D.; Henry, D.; Holck, D.; Hubert, Z.; Huet, J. M.; Kellerer, A.; Kulcsar, C.; Laporte, P.; Le Roux, B.; Looker, N.; Longmore, A. J.; Marteaud, M.; Martin, O.; Meimon, S.; Morel, C.; Morris, T. J.; Myers, R. M.; Osborn, J.; Perret, D.; Petit, C.; Raynaud, H.; Reeves, A. P.; Rousset, G.; Sanchez Lasheras, F.; Sanchez Rodriguez, M.; Santos, J. D.; Sevin, A.; Sivo, G.; Stadler, E.; Stobie, B.; Talbot, G.; Todd, S.; Vidal, F.; Younger, E. J.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in adaptive optics (AO) have led to the implementation of wide field-of-view AO systems. A number of wide-field AO systems are also planned for the forthcoming Extremely Large Telescopes. Such systems have multiple wavefront sensors of different types, and usually multiple deformable mirrors (DMs). Here, we report on our experience integrating cameras and DMs with the real-time control systems of two wide-field AO systems. These are CANARY, which has been operating on-sky since 2010, and DRAGON, which is a laboratory AO real-time demonstrator instrument. We detail the issues and difficulties that arose, along with the solutions we developed. We also provide recommendations for consideration when developing future wide-field AO systems.

  8. An SLM-based Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for aberration correction in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Richard W.; Wright, Amanda J.; Padgett, Miles J.

    2010-12-01

    Holographic optical tweezers allow the creation of multiple optical traps in 3D configurations through the use of dynamic diffractive optical elements called spatial light modulators (SLMs). We show that, in addition to controlling traps, the SLM in a holographic tweezers system can be both the principal element of a wavefront sensor and the corrective element in a closed-loop adaptive optics system. This means that aberrations in such systems can be estimated and corrected without altering the experimental setup. Aberrations are estimated using the Shack-Hartmann method, where an array of spots is projected into the sample plane and the distortion of this array is used to recover the aberration. The system can recover aberrations of up to ten wavelengths peak-peak, and is sensitive to aberrations much smaller than a wavelength. The spot pattern could also be analysed by eye, as a tool for aligning the system.

  9. Time-resolved measurement of thermally induced aberrations in a cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG slab with a wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikocinski, P.; Novak, O.; Smrz, M.; Pilar, J.; Jambunathan, V.; Jelínková, H.; Endo, A.; Lucianetti, A.; Mocek, T.

    2016-04-01

    The time-resolved measurements of thermally induced wavefront aberrations in a cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG crystal are presented in dependence on temperature in the range between 250 and 130 K under non-lasing condition. A wavefront sensor was utilized to determine the wavefront aberrations. The wavefront distortions were experimentally studied for a cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG crystal in detail for the first time. The wavefront aberrations were significantly reduced at cryogenic temperatures including defocus which was the dominant aberration and which was responsible for the so-called thermal lensing effect. We found that defocus aberration is caused not only by thermally induced effects (responsible for thermal lens), but also by electronically induced change in the refractive index due to excitation of ion activators which is responsible for the electronic lensing. Nevertheless, at pumping intensity of 6.3 kW/cm2 and repetition rate of 100 Hz thermal effects were the dominant one. In addition, an improvement in the Strehl ratio along with an increase in absorbed pump energy was observed while the temperature of the gain medium was decreased. The measurements clearly show the advantages of cryogenic cooling of laser-active media for beam quality improvement.

  10. Using partial sensor information to orient parts

    SciTech Connect

    Akella, S.; Mason, M.T.

    1999-10-01

    Parts orienting, the process of bringing parts in initially unknown orientations to a goal orientation, is an important aspect of automated assembly. The most common industrial orienting systems are vibratory bowl feeders, which use the shape and mass properties of parts to orient them. Bowl feeders rely on a sequence of mechanical operations and typically do not use sensors. In this paper, the authors describe the use of partial information sensors along with a sequence of pushing operations to eliminate uncertainty in the orientation of parts. The authors characterize the shorter execution lengths of sensor-based plans and show that sensor-based plans are more powerful than sensorless plans in that they can bring a larger class of parts to distinct orientations. The authors characterize the relation among part shape, orientability; and recognizability to identify conditions under which a single plan can orient and recognize multiple part shapes. Although part shape determines the results of the actions and the sensed information, the authors establish that differences in part shape do not always lead to differences in part behavior. The authors show that for any convex polygon, there exists an infinite set of nonsimilar convex polygons that behave identically under linear normal pushes. Furthermore, there exists a infinite set of nonsimilar convex polygons whose behavior cannot be distinguished even with diameter sensing after each push. They authors have implemented several planners and demonstrated generated plans in experiments.

  11. Integration and laboratory characterization of the ARGOS laser guide star wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busoni, Lorenzo; Bonaglia, Marco; Carbonaro, Luca; Mazzoni, Tommaso; Antichi, Jacopo; Esposito, Simone; Orban De Xivry, Gilles; Rabien, Sebastian

    2013-12-01

    The integration status of the ARGOS wavefront sensors is presented. ARGOS is the laser guide star AO program for the LBT. It will implement a Ground Layer AO correction for the instruments LUCI, an infrared imaging and spectrograph camera, using 3 pulsed low-altitudes Rayleigh beacons for each LBT's eye. It profits of the LBT's adaptive secondary mirrors and of FLAO's pyramid unit for NGS sensing. Each LGS is independently stabilized for on-sky jitter and range-gated using custom Pockels cells and then sensed by a 15x15 SH sensor. The 3 pupil images are reimaged on a single lenslet array and a single detector. In the WFS are also installed 3 patrol cameras for the acquisition of the laser beacons, a system for the stabilization of the pupil images on the lenslet array and an internal source for calibration purposes. The two units are now completing the integration phase in Arcetri premises. We describe the characterization of the units and the closed-loop test realized using a deformable MEMS mirror.

  12. Revisiting the comparison between the Shack-Hartmann and the pyramid wavefront sensors via the Fisher information matrix.

    PubMed

    Plantet, C; Meimon, S; Conan, J-M; Fusco, T

    2015-11-01

    Exoplanet direct imaging with large ground based telescopes requires eXtreme Adaptive Optics that couples high-order adaptive optics and coronagraphy. A key element of such systems is the high-order wavefront sensor. We study here several high-order wavefront sensing approaches, and more precisely compare their sensitivity to noise. Three techniques are considered: the classical Shack-Hartmann sensor, the pyramid sensor and the recently proposed LIFTed Shack-Hartmann sensor. They are compared in a unified framework based on precise diffractive models and on the Fisher information matrix, which conveys the information present in the data whatever the estimation method. The diagonal elements of the inverse of the Fisher information matrix, which we use as a figure of merit, are similar to noise propagation coefficients. With these diagonal elements, so called "Fisher coefficients", we show that the LIFTed Shack-Hartmann and pyramid sensors outperform the classical Shack-Hartmann sensor. In photon noise regime, the LIFTed Shack-Hartmann and modulated pyramid sensors obtain a similar overall noise propagation. The LIFTed Shack-Hartmann sensor however provides attractive noise properties on high orders. PMID:26561131

  13. Numerical research of measurements of Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor according to the parameters of its optical parts and the intensity of turbulent distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goleneva, N. V.; Lavrinov, V.; Lavrinova, L. N.

    2015-11-01

    The wavefront sensor of Hartmann type consists of two parts: the optical and algorithmic. The parameters of the optical part of the sensor may vary. Since the time of "frozen" turbulence due to the Fried's length and to the cross wind transport turbulent distortion speed, the measurement Shack-Hartmann sensor depend on the intensity of turbulent distortions. In this paper are presented the results of the analysis of the measurements of the sensor according to the size of lens array and to the intensity of turbulent distortions. The analysis is performed on basis of a numerical model of the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and on Kolmogorov's turbulence model.

  14. Measuring the shape of membrane mirror based on Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ying; Yang, Bin; Tang, Minxue; Chen, Xinhua

    2013-12-01

    Compared with traditional mirrors, a membrane mirror made of flexible film material has the advantages of folding and deployable, lightweight, low cost and etc, and it is prospected to be used as large aperture space optical elements. In order to solve the problem of measuring the shape of the membrane mirror, a method based on the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing has been studied in this paper. The Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing system and the principle of wavefront detection are introduced firstly. In this system, the measured wavefront is collected by the microlens of the lenslets and focus on the CCD, the light spot coordinate offsets relative to the ideal spots are got and then the wavefront can be reconstructed. Secondly, according to the optical properties of a membrane mirror, the membrane mirror wavefront detection system has been designed and established. The preprocessing of the light spot image of the testing wavefront focused by the microlens array, the determination of the centroid coordination and the algorithm of wavefront reconstruction modal based on Zernike polynomials are researched and a program for reconstructing the wavefront is written with in Matlab. When measuring, in order to eliminate the influence of other optical components in the detection system on the testing wavefront, a standard plane mirror is used to calibrate the system. A glass planar mirror made of glass with a diameter of 50mm and a known distribution of surface shape is used to verify the feasibility of the test system and the correction of the algorithm. Finally, the wavefront of a membrane mirror with a diameter of 85mm is measured and the errors are analyzed. It provides a means of measuring the shape of membrane mirror.

  15. An adjustable, high sensitivity, wide dynamic range two channel wave-front sensor based on moiré deflectometry.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Saifollah; Dashti, M; Ramaprakash, Anamparambu N

    2010-11-01

    An adjustable, high sensitivity, wide dynamic range two channel wave-front sensor based on moiré deflectometry has been constructed for measuring distortions of light wave-front transmitted through the atmosphere. In this approach, a slightly divergent laser beam is passed through the turbulent ground level atmosphere and then a beam-splitter divides it into two beams. The beams pass through a pair of moiré deflectometers which are installed parallel and close together. From deviations in the moiré fringes we calculate the two orthogonal components of angle of arrival at each location across the wave-front. The deviations have been deduced in successive frames which allows evolution of the wave-front shape to be determined. The dynamic range and sensitivity of detection are adjustable by merely changing the separation of the gratings and the angle between the rulings of the gratings in both of channels. The spatial resolution of the method is also adjustable by means of bright, dark, and virtual traces for given moiré fringes without paying a toll in the measurement precision. PMID:21164736

  16. Embedded sensor having an identifiable orientation

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Thomas E.; Nelson, Drew V.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method is described wherein a sensor, such as a mechanical strain sensor, embedded in a fiber core, is "flagged" to identify a preferred orientation of the sensor. The identifying "flag" is a composite material, comprising a plurality of non-woven filaments distributed in a resin matrix, forming a small planar tab. The fiber is first subjected to a stimulus to identify the orientation providing the desired signal response, and then sandwiched between first and second layers of the composite material. The fiber, and therefore, the sensor orientation is thereby captured and fixed in place. The process for achieving the oriented fiber includes, after identifying the fiber orientation, carefully laying the oriented fiber onto the first layer of composite, moderately heating the assembled layer for a short period in order to bring the composite resin to a "tacky" state, heating the second composite layer as the first, and assembling the two layers together such that they merge to form a single consolidated block. The consolidated block achieving a roughly uniform distribution of composite filaments near the embedded fiber such that excess resin is prevented from "pooling" around the periphery of the fiber.

  17. Improved shift estimates on extended Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townson, M. J.; Kellerer, A.; Saunter, C. D.

    2015-10-01

    An important factor which affects performance of solar adaptive optics (AO) systems is the accuracy of tracking an extended object in the wavefront sensor. The accuracy of a centre-of-mass approach to image shift measurement depends on the parameters applied in thresholding the recorded image; however, there exists no analytical prediction for these parameters for extended objects. Motivated by this we present a new method for exploring the parameter space of image shift measurement algorithms, and apply this to optimize the parameters of the algorithm. Using a thresholded, windowed centre of mass, we are able to improve centroid accuracy compared to the typical parabolic fitting approach by a factor of 3 in a signal-to-noise regime typical for solar AO. Exploration of the parameters occurs after initial image cross-correlation with a reference image, so does not require regeneration of correlation images. The results presented employ methods which can be used in real-time to estimate the error on centroids, allowing the system to use real data to optimize parameters, without needing to enter a separate calibration mode. This method can also be applied outside of solar AO to any field which requires the tracking of an extended object.

  18. Performance evaluation of a SCAO system for a 42-m telescope using the pyramid wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea; Le Louarn, Miska

    2010-07-01

    We perform simulations of a single-conjugated adaptive optics (SCAO) system for an E-ELT-like telescope using a pyramid wavefront sensor (PWFS) and an on-axis NGS. The advantage of this WFS has already been demonstrated, being currently preferred in many AO systems where high signal sensitivity is critical. The main objective of this work is to evaluate the performance of such SCAO system under different control parameters (loop gain, modulation, truncated SVD mode), sensing wavelengths, atmospheric coherence scales and NGS magnitudes. Always adopting K as the science band, we have verified that the overall performance tends to be poorer as the sensing wavelength becomes shorter. The loop gain optimal range is dependent on the SVD truncation threshold used to build the command matrix, and a non-modulated PWFS produces in general poorer results when compared to modulated cases, being this especially true for the R- sensing band. The default atmospheric model adopted was a von Karman with r0=0.13m (at 500nm) and outer scale of 25m, but poorer and better seeing conditions have also been tested. The long-exposure Strehls are better in larger modulations. The telescope pupil has a central obstruction of 28% but no spiders were included. We also show results for the incidence of different photon fluxes at the PWFS detector.

  19. The ARGOS wavefront sensor pnCCD camera for an ELT: characteristics, limitations and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Xivry, G. Orban; Ihle, S.; Ziegleder, J.; Barl, L.; Hartmann, R.; Rabien, S.; Soltau, H.; Strueder, L.

    2011-09-01

    From low-order to high-order AO, future wave front sensors on ELTs require large, fast, and low-noise detectors with high quantum efficiency and low dark current. While a detector for a high-order Shack-Hartmann WFS does not exist yet, the current CCD technology pushed to its limits already provides several solutions for the ELT AO detector requirements. One of these devices is the new WFS pnCCD camera of ARGOS, the Ground-Layer Adaptive Optics system (GLAO) for LUCIFER at LBT. Indeed, with its 264x264 pixels, 48 mu m pixel size and 1kHz frame rate, this camera provides a technological solution to different needs of the AO systems for ELTs, such as low-order but as well possibly higher order correction using pyramid wavefront sensing. In this contribution, we present the newly developped WFS pnCCD camera of ARGOS and how it fulfills future detector needs of AO on ELTs.

  20. Wavefront sensor for the Large Binocular Telescope laser guide star facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busoni, L.; Esposito, S.; Rabien, S.; Haug, M.; Ziegleder, J.; Hölzl, G.

    2008-07-01

    A laser guide star facility is currently being planned for the LBT. The first step of the program aims at the implementation of a ground layer adaptive optics (GLAO) system tailored on the wide-field imager / multi-object spectrograph LUCIFER having a 4x4' FoV. The current design is based on multiple Rayleigh guide stars arranged in a 2-5 arcmin angular radius constellation. A future update path toward small-field diffraction limited performances is foreseen using a hybrid system of sodium and Rayleigh beacons promising lower power requirements for the sodium laser. In this paper we present the estimated performances for both the GLAO and the hybrid implementations and we introduce the wavefront sensors opto-mechanical design . Simulations of the GLAO system show an expected gain in FWHM and encircled energy of 1.5-3 (depending on atmospheric turbulence profiles) with a FWHM variation over LUCIFER FoV below 10% and point out the role of such a GLAO system as PSF stabilizer both over the FoV and with respect to seeing temporal variations. Results of simulations for the hybrid configurations will be presented.

  1. Compared performance of different centroiding algorithms for high-pass filtered laser guide star Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lardière, Olivier; Conan, Rodolphe; Clare, Richard; Bradley, Colin; Hubin, Norbert

    2010-07-01

    Variations of the sodium layer altitude and atom density profile induce errors on laser-guide-star (LGS) adaptive optics systems. These errors must be mitigated by (i), optimizing the LGS wavefront sensor (WFS) and the centroiding algorithm, and (ii), by adding a high-pass filter on the LGS path and a low-bandwidth natural-guide-star WFS. In the context of the ESO E-ELT project, five centroiding algorithms, namely the centre-of-gravity (CoG), the weighted CoG, the matched filter, the quad-cell and the correlation, have been evaluated in closedloop on the University of Victoria LGS wavefront sensing test bed. Each centroiding algorithm performance is compared for a central versus side-launch laser, different fields of view, pixel sampling, and LGS flux.

  2. Reduction in the amount of crosstalk with reduced number of focal spot rows in a grating array based zonal wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Biswajit; Boruah, Bosanta R.

    2015-06-01

    The Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS), named after Johannes Franz Hartmann and Roland Shack, is one of the most well-known and popularly used optical wavefront sensor that finds numerous applications in various optical technologies. SHWS samples the incident wavefront by means of a lenslet array to produce an array of regular 2D array of focal spots on the detector plane of a digital camera, in the case of an unaberrated plane wavefront. If the incident wavefront is aberrated or deviates from a plane wavefront, the respective focal spots get shifted from its reference positions corresponding to the regular grid. If the incident wavefront aberration increases or has a very large curvature, the focal spot of one lenslet may enter the detector sub-aperture of the nearby lenslet. Thus, the SHWS has a limited dynamic range that is restricted to aberrations which do not allow the sub-images to be displaced out from their own detector sub-array. It makes the SHWS sensitive to cross-talk when higher order aberrations are present thereby unavoidably a ecting the wavefront estimation process. The array of tiny lenses of the SHWS can be replaced by an array of gratings followed by a focusing lens, generating an array of focal spots which is similar to that as in the case of a SHWS. In this paper, the spatial frequency of such a grating array based zonal wavefront sensor is configured to produce lesser number of rows of focal spots. The reduction in the number of focal spot rows reduces the amount of cross talk in the vertical direction. In this paper we present preliminary experimental results to demonstrate the above stated reduction in crosstalk.

  3. Sensor Localization from Distance and Orientation Constraints.

    PubMed

    Porta, Josep M; Rull, Aleix; Thomas, Federico

    2016-01-01

    The sensor localization problem can be formalized using distance and orientation constraints, typically in 3D. Local methods can be used to refine an initial location estimation, but in many cases such estimation is not available and a method able to determine all the feasible solutions from scratch is necessary. Unfortunately, existing methods able to find all the solutions in distance space can not take into account orientations, or they can only deal with one- or two-dimensional problems and their extension to 3D is troublesome. This paper presents a method that addresses these issues. The proposed approach iteratively projects the problem to decrease its dimension, then reduces the ranges of the variable distances, and back-projects the result to the original dimension, to obtain a tighter approximation of the feasible sensor locations. This paper extends previous works introducing accurate range reduction procedures which effectively integrate the orientation constraints. The mutual localization of a fleet of robots carrying sensors and the position analysis of a sensor moved by a parallel manipulator are used to validate the approach. PMID:27428977

  4. Sensor Localization from Distance and Orientation Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Porta, Josep M.; Rull, Aleix; Thomas, Federico

    2016-01-01

    The sensor localization problem can be formalized using distance and orientation constraints, typically in 3D. Local methods can be used to refine an initial location estimation, but in many cases such estimation is not available and a method able to determine all the feasible solutions from scratch is necessary. Unfortunately, existing methods able to find all the solutions in distance space can not take into account orientations, or they can only deal with one- or two-dimensional problems and their extension to 3D is troublesome. This paper presents a method that addresses these issues. The proposed approach iteratively projects the problem to decrease its dimension, then reduces the ranges of the variable distances, and back-projects the result to the original dimension, to obtain a tighter approximation of the feasible sensor locations. This paper extends previous works introducing accurate range reduction procedures which effectively integrate the orientation constraints. The mutual localization of a fleet of robots carrying sensors and the position analysis of a sensor moved by a parallel manipulator are used to validate the approach. PMID:27428977

  5. Implementation of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for the measurement of embryo-induced aberrations using fluorescent microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azucena, Oscar; Kubby, Joel; Crest, Justin; Cao, Jian; Sullivan, William; Kner, Peter; Gavel, Donald; Dillon, Daren; Olivier, Scot

    2009-02-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) improves the quality of astronomical imaging systems by using real time measurement of the turbulent medium in the optical path using a guide star (natural or artificial) as a point source reference beacon. AO has also been applied to vision science to improve the current view of the human eye. This paper will address our current research focused on the improvement of fluorescent microscopy for biological imaging utilizing current AO technology. A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS) was used to measure the aberration introduced by a Drosophila Melanogaster embryo with an implanted 1 micron fluorescent bead that serves as a point source reference beacon. The measurements show an average peak-to-valley and root-mean-square (RMS) wavefront error of 0.77 micrometers and 0.15 micrometers, respectively. The Zernike coefficients have been measured for these aberrations which indicate that the correction of the first 14 Zernike coefficients should be sufficient to correct the aberrations we have obtained. These results support the utilization of SHWS for biological imaging applications and that a MEMS deformable mirror with 1 micron of stroke and 100 actuators will be sufficient to correct these aberrations. The design, assembly and initial results for the use of a MEMS deformable mirror, SHWS and implanted fluorescent reference beacon for wavefront correction will also be discussed.

  6. Improving centroiding by super-resolution reconstruction of sodium layer density in Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors.

    PubMed

    Mello, Alexandre J T S; Pipa, Daniel R

    2016-05-10

    Adaptive optics in the new generation of large telescopes, over 24 m in diameter, present new challenges. One of them is spot elongation in Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors when using laser guide stars. The laser brightness depends on the sodium layer density profile, and this is reproduced in the format of an elongated spot. The pattern of the spot is a problem for centroiding techniques, and knowledge of the sodium layer profile is essential for adequate centroiding. In this work, we propose a super-resolution reconstruction technique that combines the information available in various low-resolution elongated spots over the sub-apertures of the sensor to obtain a high-resolution sodium layer density profile that can be used as a reference in centroiding. This is achieved with the information available in the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor only, dispensing with external measurements. Finally, we present simulation results of an iterative method that yields a super-resolved sodium layer density profile jointly with improved centroiding. PMID:27168279

  7. Development of an ELT XAO testbed using a Mach-Zehnder wavefront sensor: calibration of the deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacroix, Christian; Langlois, Maud P.; Loupias, Magali; Thiébaut, Eric; Adjali, Louisa; Leger, Jonathan; Tallon, Michel

    2015-09-01

    Extreme adaptive optics (XAO) encounters severe difficulties to cope with the high speed (<1kHz), high accuracy and high order requirements for future extremely large telescopes. An innovative high order adaptive optics system using a self-referenced Mach-Zehnder wavefront sensor (MZWFS) allows counteracting these limitations. This sensor estimates very accurately the wavefront phase at small spatial scale by measuring intensity differences between two outputs, with a λ/4 path length difference between its two legs, but is limited in dynamic range due to phase ambiguity. During the past few years, such an XAO system has been studied by our team in the framework of 8-meter class telescopes. In this work, we report on our latest results with the XAO testbed recently installed in our lab, and dedicated to high contrast imaging with 30m-class telescopes (such as the E-ELT or the TMT). After reminding the principle of a MZWFS and describing the optical layout of our experiment, we will show the results of the assessment of the woofer-tweeter phase correctors, i.e., a Boston Micromachine continuous membrane deformable mirror (DM) and a Boulder Nonlinear Systems liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM). In particular, we will detail the calibration of the DM using Zygo interferometer metrology. Our method consists in the precise measurement of the membrane deformation while applying a constant deformation to 9 out of 140 actuators at the same time. By varying the poke voltage across the DM operating range, we propose a simple but efficient way of modeling the DM influence function using a Gaussian model. Finally, we show the DM flattening on the MZWFS allowing to compensate for low order aberrations. This work is carried out in synergy with the validation of fast iterative wavefront reconstruction algorithms, and the optimal treatment of phase ambiguities in order to mitigate the dynamical range limitation of such an MZWFS.

  8. Use of the LIGA process for the production of pyramid wavefront sensors for adaptive optics in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghigo, Mauro; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Perennes, Frederic; Ragazzoni, Roberto

    2003-12-01

    Nowadays many groups in the world are developing adaptive optics (AO) systems for the real time correction of the aberrations introduced by the turbolence of the atmosphere in the field of view of the astronomical telescopes. The Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor has been often used for the detection of the optical aberrations but over the past few years an alternative wavefront sensor with pyramidic shape has being developed. The properties of this sensor have been extensively investigated both theoretically and experimentally (for example in the AO module of the Italian "Telescopio Nazionale Galileo"). Important features of this pyramidal sensor are that it offers the advantage of either variable gain against the wavefront deformation and tunable sampling of the telescope pupil. These features translate into a considerable gain in the limiting magnitude of the reference star when compared to the classical Shack-Hartmann sensor. The manufacturing of single pyramid prototypes has been initially accomplished using the classical figuring and polishing technique, a time consuming procedure. Since the multi-conjugated adaptive optics (MCAO) that are under study, foresee the use of a large number of identical pyramids, it has been investigated and developed an alternative method for the mass production of this optical component. Using a lithography-dedicated beamline already operating at the ELETTRA Synchrotron in Trieste, a manufacturing technique has been implemented that uses a process named LIGA [Lithography, electroplating (German: Galvanik) and molding (German: Abformung)]. With this method is it possible to create a master pyramid made of a polymeric material and having the characteristics requested. The master is then used to create a metallic mold by means of electroforming. In the end the mold is used for the molding of a number of identical pyramids made in a suitable amorphous optical polymer, using the technique of the hot embossing. This technique produce

  9. Approach for Improving the Integrated Sensor Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitishita, E.; Ercolin Filho, L.; Graça, N.; Centeno, J.

    2016-06-01

    The direct determination of exterior orientation parameters (EOP) of aerial images via integration of the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and GPS is often used in photogrammetric mapping nowadays. The accuracies of the EOP depend on the accurate parameters related to sensors mounting when the job is performed (offsets of the IMU relative to the projection centre and the angles of boresigth misalignment between the IMU and the photogrammetric coordinate system). In principle, when the EOP values do not achieve the required accuracies for the photogrammetric application, the approach, known as Integrated Sensor Orientation (ISO), is used to refine the direct EOP. ISO approach requires accurate Interior Orientation Parameters (IOP) and standard deviation of the EOP under flight condition. This paper investigates the feasibility of use the in situ camera calibration to obtain these requirements. The camera calibration uses a small sub block of images, extracted from the entire block. A digital Vexcel UltraCam XP camera connected to APPLANIX POS AVTM system was used to get two small blocks of images that were use in this study. The blocks have different flight heights and opposite flight directions. The proposed methodology improved significantly the vertical and horizontal accuracies of the 3D point intersection. Using a minimum set of control points, the horizontal and vertical accuracies achieved nearly one image pixel of resolution on the ground (GSD). The experimental results are shown and discussed.

  10. Lyot-based low order wavefront sensor: implementation on the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics System and its laboratory performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Garima; Guyon, Olivier; Baudoz, Pierre; Jovanovich, Nemanja; Martinache, Frantz; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Serabyn, Eugene; Kuhn, Jonas G.

    2014-08-01

    High throughput, low inner working angle (IWA) phase masks coronagraphs are essential to directly image and characterize (via spectroscopy) earth-like planets. However, the performance of low-IWA coronagraphs is limited by residual pointing errors and other low-order modes. The extent to which wavefront aberrations upstream of the coronagraph are corrected and calibrated drives coronagraphic performance. Addressing this issue is essential for preventing coronagraphic leaks, thus we have developed a Lyot-based low order wave front sensor (LLOWFS) to control the wavefront aberrations in a coronagraph. The LLOWFS monitors the starlight rejected by the coronagraphic mask using a reflective Lyot stop in the downstream pupil plane. The early implementation of LLOWFS at LESIA, Observatoire de Paris demonstrated an open loop measurement accuracy of 0.01 λ/D for tip-tilt at 638 nm when used in conjunction with a four quadrant phase mask (FQPM) in the laboratory. To further demonstrate our concept, we have installed the reflective Lyot stops on the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme AO (SCExAO) system at the Subaru Telescope and modified the system to support small IWA phase mask coronagraphs (< 1λ/D) on-sky such as FQPM, eight octant phase mask, vector vortex coronagraph and the phase induced amplitude apodization complex phase mask coronagraph with a goal of obtaining milli arc-second pointing accuracy. Laboratory results have shown the measurement of tip, tilt, focus, oblique and right astigmatism at 1.55 μm for the vector vortex coronagraph. Our initial on-sky result demonstrate the closed loop accuracy of < 7 x 10-3 λ/D at 1.6 μm for tip, tilt and focus aberrations with the vector vortex coronagraph.

  11. Curvature-Based Wavefront Sensor for Use on Extended, Arbitrary, Low-Contract Scenes Final Technical Report August 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBonte, Barry J.

    2004-01-01

    A small amount of work has been done on this project; the strategy to be adopted has been better defined, though no experimental work has been started. 1) Wavefront error signals: The best choice appears use a lenslet array at a pupil image to produce defocused image pairs for each subaperture. Then use the method proposed by Molodij et al. to produce subaperture curvature signals. Basically, this method samples a moderate number of locations in the image where the value of the image Laplacian is high, then taking the curvature signal from the difference of the Laplacians of the extrafocal images at those locations. The tip-tilt error is obtained from the temporal dependence of the first spatial derivatives of an in-focus image, at selected locations where these derivatives are significant. The wavefront tilt can be obtained from the full-aperture image. 2) Extrafocal image generation: The important aspect here is to generate symmetrically defocused images, with dynamically adjustable defocus. The adjustment is needed because larger defocus is required before the feedback loop is closed, and at times when the seeing is worse. It may be that the usual membrane mirror is the best choice, though other options should be explored. 3) Detector: Since the proposed sensor is to work on solar granulation, rather than a point source, an array detector for each subaperture is required. A fast CMOS camera such as that developed by the National Solar Observatory would be a satisfactory choice. 4) Processing: Processing requirements have not been defined in detail, though significantly fewer operations per cycle are required than for a correlation tracker.

  12. Utilization of the Wavefront Sensor and Short-exposure Images for Simultaneous Estimation of Quasi-static Aberration and Exoplanet Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazin, Richard A.

    2013-04-01

    Heretofore, the literature on exoplanet detection with coronagraphic telescope systems has paid little attention to the information content of short exposures and methods of utilizing the measurements of adaptive optics wavefront sensors. This paper provides a framework for the incorporation of the wavefront sensor measurements in the context of observing modes in which the science camera takes millisecond exposures. In this formulation, the wavefront sensor measurements provide a means to jointly estimate the static speckle and the planetary signal. The ability to estimate planetary intensities in as little as a few seconds has the potential to greatly improve the efficiency of exoplanet search surveys. For simplicity, the mathematical development assumes a simple optical system with an idealized Lyot coronagraph. Unlike currently used methods, in which increasing the observation time beyond a certain threshold is useless, this method produces estimates whose error covariances decrease more quickly than inversely proportional to the observation time. This is due to the fact that the estimates of the quasi-static aberrations are informed by a new random (but approximately known) wavefront every millisecond. The method can be extended to include angular (due to diurnal field rotation) and spectral diversity. Numerical experiments are performed with wavefront data from the AEOS Adaptive Optics System sensing at 850 nm. These experiments assume a science camera wavelength λ of 1.1 μ, that the measured wavefronts are exact, and a Gaussian approximation of shot-noise. The effects of detector read-out noise and other issues are left to future investigations. A number of static aberrations are introduced, including one with a spatial frequency exactly corresponding the planet location, which was at a distance of ≈3λ/D from the star. Using only 4 s of simulated observation time, a planetary intensity, of ≈1 photon ms-1, and a stellar intensity of ≈105 photons ms-1

  13. UTILIZATION OF THE WAVEFRONT SENSOR AND SHORT-EXPOSURE IMAGES FOR SIMULTANEOUS ESTIMATION OF QUASI-STATIC ABERRATION AND EXOPLANET INTENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Frazin, Richard A.

    2013-04-10

    Heretofore, the literature on exoplanet detection with coronagraphic telescope systems has paid little attention to the information content of short exposures and methods of utilizing the measurements of adaptive optics wavefront sensors. This paper provides a framework for the incorporation of the wavefront sensor measurements in the context of observing modes in which the science camera takes millisecond exposures. In this formulation, the wavefront sensor measurements provide a means to jointly estimate the static speckle and the planetary signal. The ability to estimate planetary intensities in as little as a few seconds has the potential to greatly improve the efficiency of exoplanet search surveys. For simplicity, the mathematical development assumes a simple optical system with an idealized Lyot coronagraph. Unlike currently used methods, in which increasing the observation time beyond a certain threshold is useless, this method produces estimates whose error covariances decrease more quickly than inversely proportional to the observation time. This is due to the fact that the estimates of the quasi-static aberrations are informed by a new random (but approximately known) wavefront every millisecond. The method can be extended to include angular (due to diurnal field rotation) and spectral diversity. Numerical experiments are performed with wavefront data from the AEOS Adaptive Optics System sensing at 850 nm. These experiments assume a science camera wavelength {lambda} of 1.1 {mu}, that the measured wavefronts are exact, and a Gaussian approximation of shot-noise. The effects of detector read-out noise and other issues are left to future investigations. A number of static aberrations are introduced, including one with a spatial frequency exactly corresponding the planet location, which was at a distance of Almost-Equal-To 3{lambda}/D from the star. Using only 4 s of simulated observation time, a planetary intensity, of Almost-Equal-To 1 photon ms{sup -1

  14. Workflow-Oriented Cyberinfrastructure for Sensor Data Analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, J. A.; Rajasekar, A.; Moore, R. W.; Vernon, F.

    2015-12-01

    Sensor streams comprise an increasingly large part of Earth Science data. Analytics based on sensor data require an easy way to perform operations such as acquisition, conversion to physical units, metadata linking, sensor fusion, analysis and visualization on distributed sensor streams. Furthermore, embedding real-time sensor data into scientific workflows is of growing interest. We have implemented a scalable networked architecture that can be used to dynamically access packets of data in a stream from multiple sensors, and perform synthesis and analysis across a distributed network. Our system is based on the integrated Rule Oriented Data System (irods.org), which accesses sensor data from the Antelope Real Time Data System (brtt.com), and provides virtualized access to collections of data streams. We integrate real-time data streaming from different sources, collected for different purposes, on different time and spatial scales, and sensed by different methods. iRODS, noted for its policy-oriented data management, brings to sensor processing features and facilities such as single sign-on, third party access control lists ( ACLs), location transparency, logical resource naming, and server-side modeling capabilities while reducing the burden on sensor network operators. Rich integrated metadata support also makes it straightforward to discover data streams of interest and maintain data provenance. The workflow support in iRODS readily integrates sensor processing into any analytical pipeline. The system is developed as part of the NSF-funded Datanet Federation Consortium (datafed.org). APIs for selecting, opening, reaping and closing sensor streams are provided, along with other helper functions to associate metadata and convert sensor packets into NetCDF and JSON formats. Near real-time sensor data including seismic sensors, environmental sensors, LIDAR and video streams are available through this interface. A system for archiving sensor data and metadata in Net

  15. Wavefront Compensation Segmented Mirror Sensing and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, David C.; Lou, John Z.; Kissil, Andrew; Bradford, Charles M.; Woody, David; Padin, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The primary mirror of very large submillimeter-wave telescopes will necessarily be segmented into many separate mirror panels. These panels must be continuously co-phased to keep the telescope wavefront error less than a small fraction of a wavelength, to ten microns RMS (root mean square) or less. This performance must be maintained continuously across the full aperture of the telescope, in all pointing conditions, and in a variable thermal environment. A wavefront compensation segmented mirror sensing and control system, consisting of optical edge sensors, Wavefront Compensation Estimator/Controller Soft ware, and segment position actuators is proposed. Optical edge sensors are placed two per each segment-to-segment edge to continuously measure changes in segment state. Segment position actuators (three per segment) are used to move the panels. A computer control system uses the edge sensor measurements to estimate the state of all of the segments and to predict the wavefront error; segment actuator commands are computed that minimize the wavefront error. Translational or rotational motions of one segment relative to the other cause lateral displacement of the light beam, which is measured by the imaging sensor. For high accuracy, the collimator uses a shaped mask, such as one or more slits, so that the light beam forms a pattern on the sensor that permits sensing accuracy of better than 0.1 micron in two axes: in the z or local surface normal direction, and in the y direction parallel to the mirror surface and perpendicular to the beam direction. Using a co-aligned pair of sensors, with the location of the detector and collimated light source interchanged, four degrees of freedom can be sensed: transverse x and y displacements, as well as two bending angles (pitch and yaw). In this approach, each optical edge sensor head has a collimator and an imager, placing one sensor head on each side of a segment gap, with two parallel light beams crossing the gap. Two sets

  16. Advanced Wavefront Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Brase, J M; Avicola, K; Thompson, C A; Kartz, M W; Winters, S; Hartley, R; Wihelmsen, J; Dowla, F V; Carrano, C J; Bauman, B J; Pennington, D M; Lande, D; Sawvel, R M; Silva, D A; Cooke, J B; Brown, C G

    2001-02-21

    this project, work was performed in four areas (1) advanced modeling tools for deformable mirrors (2) low-order wavefront correctors with Alvarez lenses, (3) a direct phase measuring heterdyne wavefront sensor, and (4) high-spatial-frequency wavefront control using spatial light modulators.

  17. Breadboard Testing of a Phase Conjugate Engine with an Interferometric Wave-Front Sensor and a MEMS-Based Spatial Light Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, J; Olsen, J; Minden, M L; Gavel, D; Baker, K L; Stappaerts, E A; Wilks, S C; Silva, D A; Olivier, S S; Young, P E; Kartz, M W; Flath, L M; Azucena, O

    2003-12-08

    Laboratory breadboard results of a high-speed adaptive optics system are presented. The wave-front sensor for the adaptive optics system is based on a quadrature interferometer, which directly measures the turbulence induced phase aberrations. The laboratory experiments were conducted using Kolmogorov phase screens to simulate atmospheric phase distortions with the characterization of these plates presented below. The spatial light modulator used in the phase conjugate engine was a MEMS-based piston-only correction device with 1024 actuators. The overall system achieved correction speeds in excess of 800 hz and Strehl ratios greater than 0.5 with the Kolmogorov phase screens.

  18. Autonomous Quality Control of Joint Orientation Measured with Inertial Sensors.

    PubMed

    Lebel, Karina; Boissy, Patrick; Nguyen, Hung; Duval, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Clinical mobility assessment is traditionally performed in laboratories using complex and expensive equipment. The low accessibility to such equipment, combined with the emerging trend to assess mobility in a free-living environment, creates a need for body-worn sensors (e.g., inertial measurement units-IMUs) that are capable of measuring the complexity in motor performance using meaningful measurements, such as joint orientation. However, accuracy of joint orientation estimates using IMUs may be affected by environment, the joint tracked, type of motion performed and velocity. This study investigates a quality control (QC) process to assess the quality of orientation data based on features extracted from the raw inertial sensors' signals. Joint orientation (trunk, hip, knee, ankle) of twenty participants was acquired by an optical motion capture system and IMUs during a variety of tasks (sit, sit-to-stand transition, walking, turning) performed under varying conditions (speed, environment). An artificial neural network was used to classify good and bad sequences of joint orientation with a sensitivity and a specificity above 83%. This study confirms the possibility to perform QC on IMU joint orientation data based on raw signal features. This innovative QC approach may be of particular interest in a big data context, such as for remote-monitoring of patients' mobility. PMID:27399701

  19. Wavefront reconstruction from tangential and sagittal curvature.

    PubMed

    Canales, Javier; Barbero, Sergio; Portilla, Javier; López-Alonso, José Manuel

    2014-12-10

    In a previous contribution [Appl. Opt.51, 8599 (2012)], a coauthor of this work presented a method for reconstructing the wavefront aberration from tangential refractive power data measured using dynamic skiascopy. Here we propose a new regularized least squares method where the wavefront is reconstructed not only using tangential but also sagittal curvature data. We prove that our new method provides improved quality reconstruction for typical and also for highly aberrated wavefronts, under a wide range of experimental error levels. Our method may be applied to any type of wavefront sensor (not only dynamic skiascopy) able to measure either just tangential or tangential plus sagittal curvature data. PMID:25608069

  20. ARGOS wavefront sensing: from detection to correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orban de Xivry, Gilles; Bonaglia, M.; Borelli, J.; Busoni, L.; Connot, C.; Esposito, S.; Gaessler, W.; Kulas, M.; Mazzoni, T.; Puglisi, A.; Rabien, S.; Storm, J.; Ziegleder, J.

    2014-08-01

    Argos is the ground-layer adaptive optics system for the Large Binocular Telescope. In order to perform its wide-field correction, Argos uses three laser guide stars which sample the atmospheric turbulence. To perform the correction, Argos has at disposal three different wavefront sensing measurements : its three laser guide stars, a NGS tip-tilt, and a third wavefront sensor. We present the wavefront sensing architecture and its individual components, in particular: the finalized Argos pnCCD camera detecting the 3 laser guide stars at 1kHz, high quantum efficiency and 4e- noise; the Argos tip-tilt sensor based on a quad-cell avalanche photo-diodes; and the Argos wavefront computer. Being in the middle of the commissioning, we present the first wavefront sensing configurations and operations performed at LBT, and discuss further improvements in the measurements of the 3 laser guide star slopes as detected by the pnCCD.

  1. Autonomous Quality Control of Joint Orientation Measured with Inertial Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lebel, Karina; Boissy, Patrick; Nguyen, Hung; Duval, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Clinical mobility assessment is traditionally performed in laboratories using complex and expensive equipment. The low accessibility to such equipment, combined with the emerging trend to assess mobility in a free-living environment, creates a need for body-worn sensors (e.g., inertial measurement units—IMUs) that are capable of measuring the complexity in motor performance using meaningful measurements, such as joint orientation. However, accuracy of joint orientation estimates using IMUs may be affected by environment, the joint tracked, type of motion performed and velocity. This study investigates a quality control (QC) process to assess the quality of orientation data based on features extracted from the raw inertial sensors’ signals. Joint orientation (trunk, hip, knee, ankle) of twenty participants was acquired by an optical motion capture system and IMUs during a variety of tasks (sit, sit-to-stand transition, walking, turning) performed under varying conditions (speed, environment). An artificial neural network was used to classify good and bad sequences of joint orientation with a sensitivity and a specificity above 83%. This study confirms the possibility to perform QC on IMU joint orientation data based on raw signal features. This innovative QC approach may be of particular interest in a big data context, such as for remote-monitoring of patients’ mobility. PMID:27399701

  2. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy in the human eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, Heidi; Sredar, Nripun; Queener, Hope; Li, Chaohong; Porter, Jason

    2011-07-01

    Wavefront sensor noise and fidelity place a fundamental limit on achievable image quality in current adaptive optics ophthalmoscopes. Additionally, the wavefront sensor `beacon' can interfere with visual experiments. We demonstrate real-time (25 Hz), wavefront sensorless adaptive optics imaging in the living human eye with image quality rivaling that of wavefront sensor based control in the same system. A stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm directly optimized the mean intensity in retinal image frames acquired with a confocal adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). When imaging through natural, undilated pupils, both control methods resulted in comparable mean image intensities. However, when imaging through dilated pupils, image intensity was generally higher following wavefront sensor-based control. Despite the typically reduced intensity, image contrast was higher, on average, with sensorless control. Wavefront sensorless control is a viable option for imaging the living human eye and future refinements of this technique may result in even greater optical gains.

  3. Large viewing field wavefront sensing by using a lightfield system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yang; Zhang, Xuanzhe; Ma, Haotong; Ning, Yu; Wang, Rui; Xu, Xiaojun

    2013-09-01

    To overcome the shortcomings of Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, we developed a lightfield wavefront detection system, which is able to complete the large field of view, multi-perspective wavefront detection in a single photographic exposure. The lightfield wavefront detection system includes an imaging primary mirror, a lenslet array and a photosensitive device. The lenslet array is located on the imaging plane of the imaging primary mirror and the photosensitive device is located on the focal plane of the lenslet array. In this system, each lenslet reimages the aperture and forms a low-resolution image of the aperture. Compared with the Shack-Hartmann sensor, this lightfield measuring method can obtain imaging arrays in different perspectives. By comparing the array information with the standard information, we can obtain the slope matrix of the wavefront in different perspectives and restore the wavefront in a large field of view. Based on Fourier optics, we built the corresponding theoretical model and simulation system. By busing Meade telescope, turbulent phase screen, lenslet array and CCD camera, we founded the experimental lightfield wavefront measuring system. Numerical simulation results and experimental results show that this wavefront measuring method can effectively achieve the wavefront aberration information. This wavefront measurement method can realize the multi-perspective wavefront measurement, which is expected to solve the problem of large viewing field wavefront detection, and can be used for adaptive optics in giant telescopes.

  4. Validating Knowledge-Based Framework through Mission-Oriented Sensors Array and Smart Sensor Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Douglas; Pires, Rayner M.; Branco, Kalinka R. L. J. C.

    2015-09-01

    This paper addresses the problem of using Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) in critical embedded systems, mainly in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). We present the use of a SOA approach to provide the integration of the payload in the UAV. The integration is provided by a plug and play protocol named Smart Sensor Protocol (SSP) that validates the SOA approach.

  5. Real-time wavefront control for the PALM-3000 high order adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Tuan N.; Bouchez, Antonin H.; Dekany, Richard G.; Shelton, Jean C.; Troy, Mitchell; Angione, John R.; Burruss, Rick S.; Cromer, John L.; Guiwits, Stephen R.; Roberts, Jennifer E.

    2008-07-01

    We present a cost-effective scalable real-time wavefront control architecture based on off-the-shelf graphics processing units hosted in an ultra-low latency, high-bandwidth interconnect PC cluster environment composed of modules written in the component-oriented language of nesC. We demonstrate the architecture is capable of supporting the most computation and memory intensive wavefront reconstruction method (vector-matrix-multiply) at frame rates up to 2 KHz with latency under 250 μs for the PALM-3000 adaptive optics systems, a state-of-the-art upgrade on the 5.1 meter Hale Telescope that consists of a 64x64 subaperture Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a 3368 active actuator high order deformable mirror in series with a 349 actuator "woofer" DM. This architecture can easily scale up to support larger AO systems at higher rates and lower latency.

  6. Real-Time Wavefront Control for the PALM-3000 High Order Adaptive Optics System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Tuan N.; Bouchez, Antonin H.; Dekany, Richard G.; Guiwits, Stephen R.; Roberts, Jennifer E.; Troy, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    We present a cost-effective scalable real-time wavefront control architecture based on off-the-shelf graphics processing units hosted in an ultra-low latency, high-bandwidth interconnect PC cluster environment composed of modules written in the component-oriented language of nesC. The architecture enables full-matrix reconstruction of the wavefront at up to 2 KHz with latency under 250 us for the PALM-3000 adaptive optics systems, a state-of-the-art upgrade on the 5.1 meter Hale Telescope that consists of a 64 x 64 subaperture Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a 3368 active actuator high order deformable mirror in series with a 241 active actuator tweeter DM. The architecture can easily scale up to support much larger AO systems at higher rates and lower latency.

  7. Wavefront Measurement for Laser-Guiding Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, S.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Sokollik, T.; van Tilborg, J.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Toth, Cs.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-04

    The wavefront of a short laser pulse after interaction in a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) was measured to diagnose laser-guiding quality. Experiments were performed on a 100 TW class laser at the LOASIS facility of LBNL using a hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide. Laser-guiding with a pre-formed plasma channel allows the laser pulse to propagate over many Rayleigh lengths at high intensity and is crucial to accelerate electrons to the highest possible energy. Efficient coupling of laser energy into the plasma is realized when the laser and the channel satisfy a matched guiding condition, in which the wavefront remains flat within the channel. Using a wavefront sensor, the laser-guiding quality was diagnosed based on the wavefront of the laser pulse exiting the plasma channel. This wavefront diagnostic will contribute to achieving controlled, matched guiding in future experiments.

  8. Wavefront Measurement for Laser-Guiding Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    University of Chicago; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Shiraishi, S.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Sokollik, T.; Tilborg, J. van; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Toth, Cs.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    The wavefront of a short laser pulse after interaction in a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) was measured to diagnose laser-guiding quality. Experiments were performed on a 100 TW class laser at the LOASIS facility of LBNL using a hydrogenfilled capillary discharge waveguide. Laser-guiding with a pre-formed plasma channel allows the laser pulse to propagate over many Rayleigh lengths at high intensity and is crucial to accelerate electrons to the highest possible energy. Efficient coupling of laser energy into the plasma is realized when the laser and the channel satisfy a matched guiding condition, in which the wavefront remains flat within the channel. Using a wavefront sensor, the laser-guiding quality was diagnosed based on the wavefront of the laser pulse exiting the plasma channel. This wavefront diagnostic will contribute to achieving controlled, matched guiding in future experiments.

  9. Wavefront Measurement in Ophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molebny, Vasyl

    Wavefront sensing or aberration measurement in the eye is a key problem in refractive surgery and vision correction with laser. The accuracy of these measurements is critical for the outcome of the surgery. Practically all clinical methods use laser as a source of light. To better understand the background, we analyze the pre-laser techniques developed over centuries. They allowed new discoveries of the nature of the optical system of the eye, and many served as prototypes for laser-based wavefront sensing technologies. Hartmann's test was strengthened by Platt's lenslet matrix and the CCD two-dimensional photodetector acquired a new life as a Hartmann-Shack sensor in Heidelberg. Tscherning's aberroscope, invented in France, was transformed into a laser device known as a Dresden aberrometer, having seen its reincarnation in Germany with Seiler's help. The clinical ray tracing technique was brought to life by Molebny in Ukraine, and skiascopy was created by Fujieda in Japan. With the maturation of these technologies, new demands now arise for their wider implementation in optometry and vision correction with customized contact and intraocular lenses.

  10. Image restoration using aberration taken by a Hartmann wavefront sensor on extended object, towards real-time deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darudi, Ahmad; Bakhshi, Hadi; Asgari, Reza

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we present the results of image restoration using the data taken by a Hartmann sensor. The aberration is measure by a Hartmann sensor in which the object itself is used as reference. Then the Point Spread Function (PSF) is simulated and used for image reconstruction using the Lucy-Richardson technique. A technique is presented for quantitative evaluation the Lucy-Richardson technique for deconvolution.

  11. Erratum: "Utilization of the Wavefront Sensor and Short-exposure Images for Simultaneous Estimation of Quasi-static Aberration and Exoplanet Intensity" (ApJ, 767, 21)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazin, Richard A.

    2016-04-01

    This paper first demonstrates analytically that, at millisecond timescales, the adaptive optics system in a ground-based telescope will maintain the faint planetary emission nearly constant in time, while the speckle intensity at the planet’s location will undergo wild fluctuations. Then, it presents a method for the simultaneous determination of the image of an exo-planetary system and pupil-plane aberrations that are not corrected by the adaptive optics system (so-called “non-common path aberrations”), which cause a confounding speckle background. The central idea of the method is to take simultaneous millisecond exposures in both the wavefront sensor and science camera, and then perform statistical inference procedures to determine both the aberrations and planetary image. The statistical inference is based on a Taylor expansion of an exponential containing the aberration function. While the first order terms given in the paper are correct, it is missing some second-order terms, which are important when the aberrations are large enough so that a first order expansion is not adequate. Since the numerical experiments used small aberrations, this correction has little effect on the results.

  12. Two-channel algorithm for single-shot, high-resolution measurement of optical wavefronts using two image sensors.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Jin; Okamoto, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Atsushi; Takabayashi, Masanori; Tomita, Akihisa

    2015-10-10

    We propose a two-channel holographic diversity interferometer (2ch-HDI) system for single-shot and highly accurate measurements of complex amplitude fields with a simple optical setup. In this method, two phase-shifted interference patterns are generated, without requiring a phase-shifting device, by entering a circularly polarized reference beam into a polarizing beam splitter, and the resulting patterns are captured simultaneously using two image sensors. However, differences in the intensity distributions of the two image sensors may lead to serious measurement errors. Thus, we also develop a two-channel algorithm optimized for the 2ch-HDI to compensate for these differences. Simulation results show that this algorithm can compensate for such differences in the intensity distributions in the two image sensors. Experimental results confirm that the combination of the 2ch-HDI and the calculation algorithm significantly enhances measurement accuracy. PMID:26479799

  13. Wavefront sensing and correction with the Gemini Planet Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S.; Poyneer, L.; Savransky, D.; Macintosh, B.; Hartung, M.; Dillon, D.; Gavel, D.; Dunn, Jennifer; Wallace, K.; Palmer, D.; De Rosa, Robert

    2012-07-01

    High-contrast imaging is a growing observational technique aimed at discovering and characterizing extrasolar planets. The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is designed to achieve contrast ratios of 10-6 - 10-7 and requires unprecedented wavefront correction and coronagraphic control of diffraction. G PI is a facility instrument now undergoing integration and testing and is scheduled for first light on the 8-m Gemini South telescope towards the end of 2012. In this paper, we focus on the wavefront sensing and correction aspects of the instrument. To measure the wavefront, GPI combines a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a high-accuracy infrared interferometric wavefront calibration system. The Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor uses 1700 subapertures to precisely sample the wavefront at 1.5 kHz and features a spatial filter to prevent aliasing. The wavefront calibration system measures the slower temporal frequency errors as well as non-common path aberrations. The wavefront correction is performed using a two-stage adaptive optics system employing a 9x9 piezoelectric deformable mirror and a 43x43 actuators MEMS deformable mirror operating in a woofer-tweeter configuration. Finally, an image sharpening technique is used to further increase the contrast of the final image. In this paper, we describe the three wavefront sensing methods and how we combine their respective information to achieve the best possible contrast.

  14. A First Order Wavefront Estimation Algorithm for P1640 Calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhaia, C.; Vasisht, G.; Shao, M.; Lockhart, T.; Cady, E.; Oppenheimer, B.; Burruss, R.; Roberts, J.; Beichman, C.; Brenner, D.; Crepp, J.; Dekany, R.; Hinkley, S.; Hillenbrand, L.; Parry, I.; Pueyo, L.; Rice, E.; Roberts, L. C. Jr.; Sivaramakrishnan, A.; Soummer, R.; Vescelus, F.; Wallace, K.; Zimmerman, N.

    2012-01-01

    P1640 calibrator is a wavefront sensor working with the P1640 coronagraph and the Palomar 3000 actuator adaptive optics system (P3K) at the Palomar 200 inch Hale telescope. It measures the wavefront by interfering post-coronagraph light with a reference beam formed by low-pass filtering the blocked light from the coronagraph focal plane mask. The P1640 instrument has a similar architecture to the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) and its performance is currently limited by the quasi-static speckles due to non-common path wavefront errors, which comes from the non-common path for the light to arrive at the AO wavefront sensor and the coronagraph mask. By measuring the wavefront after the coronagraph mask, the non-common path wavefront error can be estimated and corrected by feeding back the error signal to the deformable mirror (DM) of the P3K AO system. Here, we present a first order wavefront estimation algorithm and an instrument calibration scheme used in experiments done recently at Palomar observatory. We calibrate the P1640 calibrator by measuring its responses to poking DM actuators with a sparse checkerboard pattern at different amplitudes. The calibration yields a complex normalization factor for wavefront estimation and establishes the registration of the DM actuators at the pupil camera of the P1640 calibrator, necessary for wavefront correction. Improvement of imaging quality after feeding back the wavefront correction to the AO system demonstrated the efficacy of the algorithm.

  15. Deconvolution of partially compensated solar images from additional wavefront sensing.

    PubMed

    Miura, Noriaki; Oh-Ishi, Akira; Kuwamura, Susumu; Baba, Naoshi; Ueno, Satoru; Nakatani, Yoshikazu; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi

    2016-04-01

    A technique for restoring solar images partially compensated with adaptive optics is developed. An additional wavefront sensor is installed in an adaptive optics system to acquire residual wavefront information simultaneously to a solar image. A point spread function is derived from the wavefront information and used to deconvolve the solar image. Successful image restorations are demonstrated when the estimated point spread functions have relatively high Strehl ratios. PMID:27139647

  16. Real-time turbulence profiling with a pair of laser guide star Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors for wide-field adaptive optics systems on large to extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Gilles, L; Ellerbroek, B L

    2010-11-01

    Real-time turbulence profiling is necessary to tune tomographic wavefront reconstruction algorithms for wide-field adaptive optics (AO) systems on large to extremely large telescopes, and to perform a variety of image post-processing tasks involving point-spread function reconstruction. This paper describes a computationally efficient and accurate numerical technique inspired by the slope detection and ranging (SLODAR) method to perform this task in real time from properly selected Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor measurements accumulated over a few hundred frames from a pair of laser guide stars, thus eliminating the need for an additional instrument. The algorithm is introduced, followed by a theoretical influence function analysis illustrating its impulse response to high-resolution turbulence profiles. Finally, its performance is assessed in the context of the Thirty Meter Telescope multi-conjugate adaptive optics system via end-to-end wave optics Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:21045893

  17. Wavefront Control for Extreme Adaptive Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A

    2003-07-16

    Current plans for Extreme Adaptive Optics systems place challenging requirements on wave-front control. This paper focuses on control system dynamics, wave-front sensing and wave-front correction device characteristics. It may be necessary to run an ExAO system after a slower, low-order AO system. Running two independent systems can result in very good temporal performance, provided specific design constraints are followed. The spatially-filtered wave-front sensor, which prevents aliasing and improves PSF sensitivity, is summarized. Different models of continuous and segmented deformable mirrors are studied. In a noise-free case, a piston-tip-tilt segmented MEMS device can achieve nearly equivalent performance to a continuous-sheet DM in compensating for a static phase aberration with use of spatial filtering.

  18. Relaying an optical wavefront

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Vawter, G. Allen

    2007-03-06

    A wavefront rely devices samples an incoming optical wavefront at different locations, optically relays the samples while maintaining the relative position of the samples and the relative phase between the samples. The wavefront is reconstructed due to interference of the samples. Devices can be designed for many different wavelengths, including for example the ultraviolet, visible, infrared and even longer wavelengths such as millimeter waves. In one application, the device function as a telescope but with negligible length.

  19. Comparison between iterative wavefront control algorithm and direct gradient wavefront control algorithm for adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Sheng-Yi; Liu, Wen-Jin; Chen, Shan-Qiu; Dong, Li-Zhi; Yang, Ping; Xu, Bing

    2015-08-01

    Among all kinds of wavefront control algorithms in adaptive optics systems, the direct gradient wavefront control algorithm is the most widespread and common method. This control algorithm obtains the actuator voltages directly from wavefront slopes through pre-measuring the relational matrix between deformable mirror actuators and Hartmann wavefront sensor with perfect real-time characteristic and stability. However, with increasing the number of sub-apertures in wavefront sensor and deformable mirror actuators of adaptive optics systems, the matrix operation in direct gradient algorithm takes too much time, which becomes a major factor influencing control effect of adaptive optics systems. In this paper we apply an iterative wavefront control algorithm to high-resolution adaptive optics systems, in which the voltages of each actuator are obtained through iteration arithmetic, which gains great advantage in calculation and storage. For AO system with thousands of actuators, the computational complexity estimate is about O(n2) ˜ O(n3) in direct gradient wavefront control algorithm, while the computational complexity estimate in iterative wavefront control algorithm is about O(n) ˜ (O(n)3/2), in which n is the number of actuators of AO system. And the more the numbers of sub-apertures and deformable mirror actuators, the more significant advantage the iterative wavefront control algorithm exhibits. Project supported by the National Key Scientific and Research Equipment Development Project of China (Grant No. ZDYZ2013-2), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11173008), and the Sichuan Provincial Outstanding Youth Academic Technology Leaders Program, China (Grant No. 2012JQ0012).

  20. Study of an instrument for sensing errors in a telescope wavefront

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, L. J.; Shack, R. V.; Slater, P. N.

    1974-01-01

    Focal plane sensors for determining the error in a telescope wavefront were investigated. The construction of three candidate test instruments and their evaluation in terms of small wavefront error aberration measurements are described. A laboratory wavefront simulator was designed and fabricated to evaluate the test instruments. The laboratory wavefront error simulator was used to evaluate three tests; a Hartmann test, a polarization shearing interferometer test, and an interferometric Zernike test.

  1. Study of an instrument for sensing errors in a telescope wavefront

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, L. J.; Shack, R. V.; Slater, D. N.

    1973-01-01

    Partial results are presented of theoretical and experimental investigations of different focal plane sensor configurations for determining the error in a telescope wavefront. The coarse range sensor and fine range sensors are used in the experimentation. The design of a wavefront error simulator is presented along with the Hartmann test, the shearing polarization interferometer, the Zernike test, and the Zernike polarization test.

  2. Phase discrepancy induced from least squares wavefront reconstruction of wrapped phase measurements with high noise or large localized wavefront gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbock, Michael J.; Hyde, Milo W.

    2012-10-01

    Adaptive optics is used in applications such as laser communication, remote sensing, and laser weapon systems to estimate and correct for atmospheric distortions of propagated light in real-time. Within an adaptive optics system, a reconstruction process interprets the raw wavefront sensor measurements and calculates an estimate for the unwrapped phase function to be sent through a control law and applied to a wavefront correction device. This research is focused on adaptive optics using a self-referencing interferometer wavefront sensor, which directly measures the wrapped wavefront phase. Therefore, its measurements must be reconstructed for use on a continuous facesheet deformable mirror. In testing and evaluating a novel class of branch-point- tolerant wavefront reconstructors based on the post-processing congruence operation technique, an increase in Strehl ratio compared to a traditional least squares reconstructor was noted even in non-scintillated fields. To investigate this further, this paper uses wave-optics simulations to eliminate many of the variables from a hardware adaptive optics system, so as to focus on the reconstruction techniques alone. The simulation results along with a discussion of the physical reasoning for this phenomenon are provided. For any applications using a self-referencing interferometer wavefront sensor with low signal levels or high localized wavefront gradients, understanding this phenomena is critical when applying a traditional least squares wavefront reconstructor.

  3. Phase Contrast Wavefront Sensing for Adaptive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, E. E.; Wallace, J. K.; Bloemhof, E. E.

    2004-01-01

    Most ground-based adaptive optics systems use one of a small number of wavefront sensor technologies, notably (for relatively high-order systems) the Shack-Hartmann sensor, which provides local measurements of the phase slope (first-derivative) at a number of regularly-spaced points across the telescope pupil. The curvature sensor, with response proportional to the second derivative of the phase, is also sometimes used, but has undesirable noise propagation properties during wavefront reconstruction as the number of actuators becomes large. It is interesting to consider the use for astronomical adaptive optics of the "phase contrast" technique, originally developed for microscopy by Zemike to allow convenient viewing of phase objects. In this technique, the wavefront sensor provides a direct measurement of the local value of phase in each sub-aperture of the pupil. This approach has some obvious disadvantages compared to Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing, but has some less obvious but substantial advantages as well. Here we evaluate the relative merits in a practical ground-based adaptive optics system.

  4. Enhancements in Uav Flight Control and Sensor Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäumker, M.; Przybilla, H.-J.; Zurhorst, A.

    2013-08-01

    The acquisition of photogrammetric image data by means of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) has developed in recent years to an interesting new measurement method especially for small to medium sizes of objects. In addition the latest developments in the field of navigation systems (GNSS), of inertial sensors and other sensors in combination with powerful and easy to program microcontrollers have made a major contribution to this. In particular, the development of MEMS sensors has triggered the boom of the UAV and has given decisively influence and it is still going on. The integration of sensors on a single board not only enables a cost-effective manufacturing and mass production, but also the use in accordance with small, lightweight UAV. The latest developments on a 50 mm × 50 mm-sized circuit board combine the sensors and the microcontroller for the flight control and flight navigation. Both the board and the microcontroller are easy to program and maintain several interfaces for connecting additional sensors, such as GNSS, ultrasonic sensors and telemetry. This article presents the UAV system of the Bochum University of Applied Sciences, the used sensors and the obtained results for accurate georeferencing.

  5. Wavefront control for the Gemini Planet Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A; Veran, J; Dillon, D; Severson, S; Macintosh, B

    2006-04-14

    The wavefront control strategy for the proposed Gemini Planet Imager, an extreme adaptive optics coronagraph for planet detection, is presented. Two key parts of this strategy are experimentally verified in a testbed at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics, which features a 32 x 32 MEMS device. Detailed analytic models and algorithms for Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor alignment and calibration are presented. It is demonstrated that with these procedures, the spatially filtered WFS and the Fourier Transform reconstructor can be used to flatten to the MEMS to 1 nm RMS in the controllable band. Performance is further improved using the technique of modifying the reference slopes using a measurement of the static wavefront error in the science leg.

  6. A novel method for assessing the 3-D orientation accuracy of inertial/magnetic sensors.

    PubMed

    Faber, Gert S; Chang, Chien-Chi; Rizun, Peter; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2013-10-18

    A novel method for assessing the accuracy of inertial/magnetic sensors is presented. The method, referred to as the "residual matrix" method, is advantageous because it decouples the sensor's error with respect to Earth's gravity vector (attitude residual error: pitch and roll) from the sensor's error with respect to magnetic north (heading residual error), while remaining insensitive to singularity problems when the second Euler rotation is close to ±90°. As a demonstration, the accuracy of an inertial/magnetic sensor mounted to a participant's forearm was evaluated during a reaching task in a laboratory. Sensor orientation was measured internally (by the inertial/magnetic sensor) and externally using an optoelectronic measurement system with a marker cluster rigidly attached to the sensor's enclosure. Roll, pitch and heading residuals were calculated using the proposed novel method, as well as using a common orientation assessment method where the residuals are defined as the difference between the Euler angles measured by the inertial sensor and those measured by the optoelectronic system. Using the proposed residual matrix method, the roll and pitch residuals remained less than 1° and, as expected, no statistically significant difference between these two measures of attitude accuracy was found; the heading residuals were significantly larger than the attitude residuals but remained below 2°. Using the direct Euler angle comparison method, the residuals were in general larger due to singularity issues, and the expected significant difference between inertial/magnetic sensor attitude and heading accuracy was not present. PMID:24016678

  7. Tomographic wavefront correction for the LSST

    SciTech Connect

    Phillion, D W; Olivier, S S; Baker, K; Seppala, L; Hvisc, S

    2006-05-03

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is a three mirror modified Paul-Baker design with an 8.4m primary, a 3.4m secondary, and a 5.0m tertiary followed by a 3-element refractive corrector producing a 3.5 degree field of view. This design produces image diameters of <0.3 arcsecond 80% encircled energy over its full field of view. The image quality of this design is sufficient to ensure that the final images produced by the telescope will be limited by the atmospheric seeing at an excellent astronomical site. In order to maintain this image quality, the deformations and rigid body motions of the three large mirrors must be actively controlled to minimize optical aberrations. By measuring the optical wavefront produced by the telescope at multiple points in the field, mirror deformations and rigid body motions that produce a good optical wavefront across the entire field may be determined. We will describe the details of the techniques for obtaining these solutions. We will show that, for the expected mirror deformations and rigid body misalignments, the solutions that are found using these techniques produce an image quality over the field that is close to optimal. We will discuss how many wavefront sensors are needed and the tradeoffs between the number of wavefront sensors, their layout and noise sensitivity.

  8. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) wavefront control system

    SciTech Connect

    Van Atta, L; Bliss, E; Bruns, D; Feldman, M; Grey, A; Henesian, M; J; Koch, J; LaFiandra, C; Lawson; Sacks, R; Salmon, T; Toeppen, J; Winters, S; Woods, B; Zacharias, R

    1998-08-17

    A wavefront control system will be employed on NIF to correct beam aberrations that otherwise would limit the minimum target focal spot size. For most applications, NIF requires a focal spot that is a few times the diffraction limit. Sources of aberrations that must be corrected include prompt pump-induced distortions in the laser slabs, thermal distortions in the laser slabs from previous shots, manufacturing figure errors in the optics, beam off-axis effects, gas density variations, and gravity, mounting, and coating- induced optic distortions. The NIF Wavefront Control System consists of five subsystems: 1) a deformable mirror, 2) a wavefront sensor, 3) a computer controller, 4) a wavefront reference system, and 5) a system of fast actuators to allow the wavefront control system to operate to within one second of the laser shot. The system includes the capability for in situ calibrations and operates in closed loop prior to the shot. Shot wavefront data is recorded. This paper describes the function, realization, and performance of each wavefront control subsystem. Subsystem performance will be characterized by computer models and by test results. The focal spot improvement in the NIF laser system effected by the wavefront control system will be characterized through computer models.

  9. Sensor-oriented feature usability evaluation in fingerprint segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Yin, Yilong; Yang, Gongping

    2013-06-01

    Existing fingerprint segmentation methods usually process fingerprint images captured by different sensors with the same feature or feature set. We propose to improve the fingerprint segmentation result in view of an important fact that images from different sensors have different characteristics for segmentation. Feature usability evaluation, which means to evaluate the usability of features to find the personalized feature or feature set for different sensors to improve the performance of segmentation. The need for feature usability evaluation for fingerprint segmentation is raised and analyzed as a new issue. To address this issue, we present a decision-tree-based feature-usability evaluation method, which utilizes a C4.5 decision tree algorithm to evaluate and pick the best suitable feature or feature set for fingerprint segmentation from a typical candidate feature set. We apply the novel method on the FVC2002 database of fingerprint images, which are acquired by four different respective sensors and technologies. Experimental results show that the accuracy of segmentation is improved, and time consumption for feature extraction is dramatically reduced with selected feature(s).

  10. Body sensor network-based strapdown orientation estimation: application to human locomotion.

    PubMed

    Misgeld, Berno J E; Rüschen, Daniel; Kim, Saim; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2013-06-01

    In this contribution, inertial and magnetic sensors are considered for real-time strapdown orientation tracking of human limb or robotic segment orientation. By using body sensor network integrated triaxial gyrometer, accelerometer, and magnetometer measurements, two orientation estimation filters are presented and subsequently designed for bias insensitive tracking of human gait. Both filters use quaternions for rotation representation, where preprocessing accelerometer and magnetometer data is conducted with the quaternion based estimation algorithm (QUEST) as a reference filter input. This results in a significant reduction of the complexity and calculation cost on the body sensor network. QUEST-based preprocessed attitude data is used for the designed extended Kalman filter (EKF) and a new complementary sliding mode observer. EKF-QUEST and complementary sliding mode observer are designed and tested in simulations and subsequently validated with a reference motion tracking system in treadmill tests. PMID:24187297

  11. Application of L3 technology to wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulloch, Simon M.

    2004-10-01

    The new L3 Technology CCDs from E2V combine sub-electron read noise with high pixel rates. This makes them ideal candidates for wavefront sensing. ING's NAOMI adaptive optics instrument is currently limited by the readout noise of its wavefront sensor CCDs. Upgrading to L3 detectors has the potential to give a large increase in performance; simulations suggest a 2 magnitude improvement to the guide star limit. At ING we have explored the behaviour of various L3 devices in applications ranging from fast photometry, fast spectroscopy through to wavefront sensing. The investigations have been done using our own cryogenic cameras containing L3 devices coupled to an SDSU controller. An integral Peltier packaged CCD60 has also been purchased specifically for the WFS upgrade. This paper describes the progress we have made to date on the L3 wavefront sensor upgrade and our future plans for its use with a Rayleigh laser beacon.

  12. Wavefront sensing, control, and pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Thomas; Sevaston, George; Agronin, Michael; Bely, Pierre; Colavita, Mark; Clampin, Mark; Harvey, James; Idell, Paul; Sandler, Dave; Ulmer, Melville

    1992-01-01

    A majority of future NASA astrophysics missions from orbiting interferometers to 16-m telescopes on the Moon have, as a common requirement, the need to bring light from a large entrance aperture to the focal plane in a way that preserves the spatial coherence properties of the starlight. Only by preserving the phase of the incoming wavefront, can many scientific observations be made, observations that range from measuring the red shift of quasi-stellar objects (QSO's) to detecting the IR emission of a planet in orbit around another star. New technologies for wavefront sensing, control, and pointing hold the key to advancing our observatories of the future from those already launched or currently under development. As the size of the optical system increases, either to increase the sensitivity or angular resolution of the instrument, traditional technologies for maintaining optical wavefront accuracy become prohibitively expensive or completely impractical. For space-based instruments, the low mass requirement and the large temperature excursions further challenge existing technologies. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is probably the last large space telescope to rely on passive means to keep its primary optics stable and the optical system aligned. One needs only look to the significant developments in wavefront sensing, control, and pointing that have occurred over the past several years to appreciate the potential of this technology for transforming the capability of future space observatories. Future developments in space-borne telescopes will be based in part on developments in ground-based systems. Telescopes with rigid primary mirrors much larger than 5 m in diameter are impractical because of gravity loading. New technologies are now being introduced, such as active optics, that address the scale problem and that allow very large telescopes to be built. One approach is a segmented design such as that being pioneered by the W.M. Keck telescope now under

  13. PIYAS-proceeding to intelligent service oriented memory allocation for flash based data centric sensor devices in wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Sanam Shahla; Chung, Tae-Sun

    2010-01-01

    Flash memory has become a more widespread storage medium for modern wireless devices because of its effective characteristics like non-volatility, small size, light weight, fast access speed, shock resistance, high reliability and low power consumption. Sensor nodes are highly resource constrained in terms of limited processing speed, runtime memory, persistent storage, communication bandwidth and finite energy. Therefore, for wireless sensor networks supporting sense, store, merge and send schemes, an efficient and reliable file system is highly required with consideration of sensor node constraints. In this paper, we propose a novel log structured external NAND flash memory based file system, called Proceeding to Intelligent service oriented memorY Allocation for flash based data centric Sensor devices in wireless sensor networks (PIYAS). This is the extended version of our previously proposed PIYA [1]. The main goals of the PIYAS scheme are to achieve instant mounting and reduced SRAM space by keeping memory mapping information to a very low size of and to provide high query response throughput by allocation of memory to the sensor data by network business rules. The scheme intelligently samples and stores the raw data and provides high in-network data availability by keeping the aggregate data for a longer period of time than any other scheme has done before. We propose effective garbage collection and wear-leveling schemes as well. The experimental results show that PIYAS is an optimized memory management scheme allowing high performance for wireless sensor networks. PMID:22315541

  14. MOSAIC: a new wavefront metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Christopher; Naulleau, Patrick

    2009-02-02

    MOSAIC is a new wavefront metrology that enables complete wavefront characterization from print or aerial image based measurements. Here we describe MOSAIC and verify its utility with a model-based proof of principle.

  15. Fiber coupler end face wavefront surface metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compertore, David C.; Ignatovich, Filipp V.; Marcus, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    Despite significant technological advances in the field of fiber optic communications, one area remains surprisingly `low-tech': fiber termination. In many instances it involves manual labor and subjective visual inspection. At the same time, high quality fiber connections are one of the most critical parameters in constructing an efficient communication link. The shape and finish of the fiber end faces determines the efficiency of a connection comprised of coupled fiber end faces. The importance of fiber end face quality becomes even more critical for fiber connection arrays and for in the field applications. In this article we propose and demonstrate a quantitative inspection method for the fiber connectors using reflected wavefront technology. The manufactured and polished fiber tip is illuminated by a collimated light from a microscope objective. The reflected light is collected by the objective and is directed to a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. A set of lenses is used to create the image of the fiber tip on the surface of the sensor. The wavefront is analyzed by the sensor, and the measured parameters are used to obtain surface properties of the fiber tip, and estimate connection loss. For example, defocus components in the reflected light indicate the presence of bow in the fiber end face. This inspection method provides a contact-free approach for quantitative inspection of fiber end faces and for estimating the connection loss, and can potentially be integrated into a feedback system for automated inspection and polishing of fiber tips and fiber tip arrays.

  16. Estimating Orientation Using Magnetic and Inertial Sensors and Different Sensor Fusion Approaches: Accuracy Assessment in Manual and Locomotion Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Bergamini, Elena; Ligorio, Gabriele; Summa, Aurora; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Cappozzo, Aurelio; Sabatini, Angelo Maria

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic and inertial measurement units are an emerging technology to obtain 3D orientation of body segments in human movement analysis. In this respect, sensor fusion is used to limit the drift errors resulting from the gyroscope data integration by exploiting accelerometer and magnetic aiding sensors. The present study aims at investigating the effectiveness of sensor fusion methods under different experimental conditions. Manual and locomotion tasks, differing in time duration, measurement volume, presence/absence of static phases, and out-of-plane movements, were performed by six subjects, and recorded by one unit located on the forearm or the lower trunk, respectively. Two sensor fusion methods, representative of the stochastic (Extended Kalman Filter) and complementary (Non-linear observer) filtering, were selected, and their accuracy was assessed in terms of attitude (pitch and roll angles) and heading (yaw angle) errors using stereophotogrammetric data as a reference. The sensor fusion approaches provided significantly more accurate results than gyroscope data integration. Accuracy improved mostly for heading and when the movement exhibited stationary phases, evenly distributed 3D rotations, it occurred in a small volume, and its duration was greater than approximately 20 s. These results were independent from the specific sensor fusion method used. Practice guidelines for improving the outcome accuracy are provided. PMID:25302810

  17. Estimating orientation using magnetic and inertial sensors and different sensor fusion approaches: accuracy assessment in manual and locomotion tasks.

    PubMed

    Bergamini, Elena; Ligorio, Gabriele; Summa, Aurora; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Cappozzo, Aurelio; Sabatini, Angelo Maria

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic and inertial measurement units are an emerging technology to obtain 3D orientation of body segments in human movement analysis. In this respect, sensor fusion is used to limit the drift errors resulting from the gyroscope data integration by exploiting accelerometer and magnetic aiding sensors. The present study aims at investigating the effectiveness of sensor fusion methods under different experimental conditions. Manual and locomotion tasks, differing in time duration, measurement volume, presence/absence of static phases, and out-of-plane movements, were performed by six subjects, and recorded by one unit located on the forearm or the lower trunk, respectively. Two sensor fusion methods, representative of the stochastic (Extended Kalman Filter) and complementary (Non-linear observer) filtering, were selected, and their accuracy was assessed in terms of attitude (pitch and roll angles) and heading (yaw angle) errors using stereophotogrammetric data as a reference. The sensor fusion approaches provided significantly more accurate results than gyroscope data integration. Accuracy improved mostly for heading and when the movement exhibited stationary phases, evenly distributed 3D rotations, it occurred in a small volume, and its duration was greater than approximately 20 s. These results were independent from the specific sensor fusion method used. Practice guidelines for improving the outcome accuracy are provided. PMID:25302810

  18. Job-Oriented Basic Skills (JOBS) Program for the Acoustic Sensor Operations Strand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    U'Ren, Paula Kabance; Baker, Meryl S.

    An effort was undertaken to develop a job-oriented basic skills curriculum appropriate for the acoustic sensor operations area, which includes members of four ratings: ocean systems technician, aviation antisubmarine warfare operator, sonar technician (surface), and sonar technician (submarine). Analysis of the job duties of the four ratings…

  19. WISDOM: wheelchair inertial sensors for displacement and orientation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pansiot, J.; Zhang, Z.; Lo, B.; Yang, G. Z.

    2011-10-01

    Improved wheelchair design in recent years has significantly increased the mobility of people with disabilities, which has also enhanced the competitive advantage of wheelchair sports. For the latter, detailed assessment of biomechanical factors influencing individual performance and team tactics requires real-time wireless sensing and data modelling. In this paper, we propose the use of a miniaturized wireless wheel-mounted inertial sensor for wheelchair motion monitoring and tracking in an indoor sport environment. Based on a combined use of 3D microelectromechanical system (MEMS) gyroscopes and 2D MEMS accelerometers, the proposed system provides real-time velocity, heading, ground distance covered and motion trajectory of the wheelchair across the sports court. The proposed system offers a number of advantages compared to existing platforms in terms of size, weight and ease of installation. Beyond sport applications, it also has important applications for training and rehabilitation for people with disabilities.

  20. Intelligent sensor positioning and orientation through constructive neural network-embedded INS/GPS integration algorithms.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Chang, Hsiu-Wen

    2010-01-01

    Mobile mapping systems have been widely applied for acquiring spatial information in applications such as spatial information systems and 3D city models. Nowadays the most common technologies used for positioning and orientation of a mobile mapping system include a Global Positioning System (GPS) as the major positioning sensor and an Inertial Navigation System (INS) as the major orientation sensor. In the classical approach, the limitations of the Kalman Filter (KF) method and the overall price of multi-sensor systems have limited the popularization of most land-based mobile mapping applications. Although intelligent sensor positioning and orientation schemes consisting of Multi-layer Feed-forward Neural Networks (MFNNs), one of the most famous Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), and KF/smoothers, have been proposed in order to enhance the performance of low cost Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) INS/GPS integrated systems, the automation of the MFNN applied has not proven as easy as initially expected. Therefore, this study not only addresses the problems of insufficient automation in the conventional methodology that has been applied in MFNN-KF/smoother algorithms for INS/GPS integrated systems proposed in previous studies, but also exploits and analyzes the idea of developing alternative intelligent sensor positioning and orientation schemes that integrate various sensors in more automatic ways. The proposed schemes are implemented using one of the most famous constructive neural networks--the Cascade Correlation Neural Network (CCNNs)--to overcome the limitations of conventional techniques based on KF/smoother algorithms as well as previously developed MFNN-smoother schemes. The CCNNs applied also have the advantage of a more flexible topology compared to MFNNs. Based on the experimental data utilized the preliminary results presented in this article illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed schemes compared to smoother algorithms as well as the MFNN

  1. Novel approach to ambulatory assessment of human segmental orientation on a wearable sensor system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Liu, Tao; Shibata, Kyoko; Inoue, Yoshio; Zheng, Rencheng

    2009-12-11

    A new method using a double-sensor difference based algorithm for analyzing human segment rotational angles in two directions for segmental orientation analysis in the three-dimensional (3D) space was presented. A wearable sensor system based only on triaxial accelerometers was developed to obtain the pitch and yaw angles of thigh segment with an accelerometer approximating translational acceleration of the hip joint and two accelerometers measuring the actual accelerations on the thigh. To evaluate the method, the system was first tested on a 2 degrees of freedom mechanical arm assembled out of rigid segments and encoders. Then, to estimate the human segmental orientation, the wearable sensor system was tested on the thighs of eight volunteer subjects, who walked in a straight forward line in the work space of an optical motion analysis system at three self-selected speeds: slow, normal and fast. In the experiment, the subject was assumed to walk in a straight forward way with very little trunk sway, skin artifacts and no significant internal/external rotation of the leg. The root mean square (RMS) errors of the thigh segment orientation measurement were between 2.4 degrees and 4.9 degrees during normal gait that had a 45 degrees flexion/extension range of motion. Measurement error was observed to increase with increasing walking speed probably because of the result of increased trunk sway, axial rotation and skin artifacts. The results show that, without integration and switching between different sensors, using only one kind of sensor, the wearable sensor system is suitable for ambulatory analysis of normal gait orientation of thigh and shank in two directions of the segment-fixed local coordinate system in 3D space. It can then be applied to assess spatio-temporal gait parameters and monitoring the gait function of patients in clinical settings. PMID:19748624

  2. Analysis of active alignment control of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope wide-field corrector using Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hanshin; Hart, Michael; Hill, Gary J.; Rafal, M. D.

    2010-07-01

    One of the key aspects of the Wide-Field Upgrade (WFU) for the 10m Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) is the use of wavefront sensing (WFS) to close the loop of active alignment control of the new four-mirror Wide-Field Corrector (WFC), as it tracks sidereal motion, with respect to the fixed spherical segmented primary mirror. This makes the telescope pupil dynamically change in shape. This is a unique challenge to the WFS on the HET, in addition to various influences of seeing, primary mirror segment errors, and dynamic deflection of the internal optical components of the WFC. We conducted extensive simulations to understand the robustness of the WFS in the face of these errors and the results of these analyses are discussed in this paper.

  3. The Wavefront Control System for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Van Atta, L; Perez, M; Zacharias, R; Rivera, W

    2001-10-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires that pulses from each of the 192 laser beams be positioned on target with an accuracy of 50 {micro}m rms. Beam quality must be sufficient to focus a total of 1.8 MJ of 0.351-{micro}m light into a 600-{micro}m-diameter volume. An optimally flat beam wavefront can achieve this pointing and focusing accuracy. The control system corrects wavefront aberrations by performing closed-loop compensation during laser alignment to correct for gas density variations. Static compensation of flashlamp-induced thermal distortion is established just prior to the laser shot. The control system compensates each laser beam at 10 Hz by measuring the wavefront with a 77-lenslet Hartmann sensor and applying corrections with a 39-actuator deformable mirror. The distributed architecture utilizes SPARC AXi computers running Solaris to perform real-time image processing of sensor data and PowerPC-based computers running VxWorks to compute mirror commands. A single pair of SPARC and PowerPC processors accomplishes wavefront control for a group of eight beams. The software design uses proven adaptive optic control algorithms that are implemented in a multi-tasking environment to economically control the beam wavefronts in parallel. Prototype tests have achieved a closed-loop residual error of 0.03 waves rms. aberrations, the spot size requirement and goal could not be met without a wavefront control system.

  4. Advanced Techniques for Fourier Transform Wavefront Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A

    2002-08-05

    The performance of Fourier transform (FT) reconstructors in large adaptive optics systems with Shack-Hartmann sensors and a deformable mirror is analyzed. FT methods, which are derived for point-based geometries, are adapted for use on the continuous systems. Analysis and simulation show how to compensate for effects such as misalignment of the deformable mirror and wavefront sensor gain. Further filtering methods to reduce noise and improve performance are presented. All these modifications can be implemented at the filtering stage, preserving the speed of FT reconstruction. Simulation of a large system shows how compensated FT methods can have equivalent or better performance to slower vector-matrix-multiply reconstructions.

  5. Sensor Webs with a Service-Oriented Architecture for On-demand Science Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandl, Daniel; Ungar, Stephen; Ames, Troy; Justice, Chris; Frye, Stuart; Chien, Steve; Tran, Daniel; Cappelaere, Patrice; Derezinsfi, Linda; Paules, Granville; Di, Liping; Kolitz, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the work being managed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Information System Division (ISD) under a NASA Earth Science Technology Ofice (ESTO) Advanced Information System Technology (AIST) grant to develop a modular sensor web architecture which enables discovery of sensors and workflows that can create customized science via a high-level service-oriented architecture based on Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) web service standards. These capabilities serve as a prototype to a user-centric architecture for Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS). This work builds and extends previous sensor web efforts conducted at NASA/GSFC using the Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) satellite and other low-earth orbiting satellites.

  6. Zonal wavefront estimation using an array of hexagonal grating patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, Biswajit E-mail: brboruah@iitg.ernet.in; Boruah, Bosanta R. E-mail: brboruah@iitg.ernet.in

    2014-10-15

    Accuracy of Shack-Hartmann type wavefront sensors depends on the shape and layout of the lenslet array that samples the incoming wavefront. It has been shown that an array of gratings followed by a focusing lens provide a substitution for the lensslet array. Taking advantage of the computer generated holography technique, any arbitrary diffraction grating aperture shape, size or pattern can be designed with little penalty for complexity. In the present work, such a holographic technique is implemented to design regular hexagonal grating array to have zero dead space between grating patterns, eliminating the possibility of leakage of wavefront during the estimation of the wavefront. Tessellation of regular hexagonal shape, unlike other commonly used shapes, also reduces the estimation error by incorporating more number of neighboring slope values at an equal separation.

  7. Zonal wavefront estimation using an array of hexagonal grating patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Biswajit; Boruah, Bosanta R.

    2014-10-01

    Accuracy of Shack-Hartmann type wavefront sensors depends on the shape and layout of the lenslet array that samples the incoming wavefront. It has been shown that an array of gratings followed by a focusing lens provide a substitution for the lensslet array. Taking advantage of the computer generated holography technique, any arbitrary diffraction grating aperture shape, size or pattern can be designed with little penalty for complexity. In the present work, such a holographic technique is implemented to design regular hexagonal grating array to have zero dead space between grating patterns, eliminating the possibility of leakage of wavefront during the estimation of the wavefront. Tessellation of regular hexagonal shape, unlike other commonly used shapes, also reduces the estimation error by incorporating more number of neighboring slope values at an equal separation.

  8. Study of a Solar Sensor for use in Space Vehicle Orientation Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Paul R.

    1961-01-01

    The solar sensor described herein may be used for a variety of space operations requiring solar orientation. The use of silicon solar cells as the sensing elements provides the sensor with sufficient capability to withstand the hazards of a space environment. A method of arranging the cells in a sensor consists simply of mounting them at a large angle to the base. The use of an opaque shield placed between the cells and perpendicular to the base enhances the small-angle sensitivity while adding slightly to the bulk of the sensor. The difference in illumination of these cells as the result of an oblique incidence of the light rays from the reference source causes an electrical error signal which, when used in a battery-bridge circuit, requires a minimum of electrical processing for use in a space-vehicle orientation control system. An error which could occur after prolonged operation of the sensor is that resulting from asymmetrical aging of opposite cells. This could be periodically corrected with a balance potentiometer. A more routine error in the sensor is that produced by reflected earth radiation. This error may be eliminated over a large portion of the operation time by restricting the field of view and, consequently, the capture capability. A more sophisticated method of eliminating this error is to use separate sensors, for capture and fine pointing, along with a switching device. An experimental model has been constructed and tested to yield an output sensitivity of 1.2 millivolts per second of arc with a load resistance of 1,000 ohms and a reference light source of approximately 1,200 foot-candles delivered at the sensor.

  9. Orientation and depth estimation for femoral components using image sensor, magnetometer and inertial sensors in THR surgeries.

    PubMed

    Jiyang Gao; Shaojie Su; Hong Chen; Zhihua Wang

    2015-08-01

    Malposition of the acetabular and femoral component has long been recognized as an important cause of dislocation after total hip replacement (THR) surgeries. In order to help surgeons improve the positioning accuracy of the components, a visual-aided system for THR surgeries that could estimate orientation and depth of femoral component is proposed. The sensors are fixed inside the femoral prosthesis trial and checkerboard patterns are printed on the internal surface of the acetabular prosthesis trial. An extended Kalman filter is designed to fuse the data from inertial sensors and the magnetometer orientation estimation. A novel image processing algorithm for depth estimation is developed. The algorithms have been evaluated under the simulation with rotation quaternion and translation vector and the experimental results shows that the root mean square error (RMSE) of the orientation estimation is less then 0.05 degree and the RMSE for depth estimation is 1mm. Finally, the femoral head is displayed in 3D graphics in real time to help surgeons with the component positioning. PMID:26736858

  10. Application of Service Oriented Architecture for Sensors and Actuators in District Heating Substations

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Jonas; Kyusakov, Rumen; Mäkitaavola, Henrik; Delsing, Jerker

    2014-01-01

    Hardwired sensor installations using proprietary protocols found in today's district heating substations limit the potential usability of the sensors in and around the substations. If sensor resources can be shared and re-used in a variety of applications, the cost of sensors and installation can be reduced, and their functionality and operability can be increased. In this paper, we present a new concept of district heating substation control and monitoring, where a service oriented architecture (SOA) is deployed in a wireless sensor network (WSN), which is integrated with the substation. IP-networking is exclusively used from sensor to server; hence, no middleware is needed for Internet integration. Further, by enabling thousands of sensors with SOA capabilities, a System of Systems approach can be applied. The results of this paper show that it is possible to utilize SOA solutions with heavily resource-constrained embedded devices in contexts where the real-time constrains are limited, such as in a district heating substation. PMID:25196165

  11. Application of service oriented architecture for sensors and actuators in district heating substations.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Jonas; Kyusakov, Rumen; Mäkitaavola, Henrik; Delsing, Jerker

    2014-01-01

    Hardwired sensor installations using proprietary protocols found in today's district heating substations limit the potential usability of the sensors in and around the substations. If sensor resources can be shared and re-used in a variety of applications, the cost of sensors and installation can be reduced, and their functionality and operability can be increased. In this paper, we present a new concept of district heating substation control and monitoring, where a service oriented architecture (SOA) is deployed in a wireless sensor network (WSN), which is integrated with the substation. IP-networking is exclusively used from sensor to server; hence, no middleware is needed for Internet integration. Further, by enabling thousands of sensors with SOA capabilities, a System of Systems approach can be applied. The results of this paper show that it is possible to utilize SOA solutions with heavily resource-constrained embedded devices in contexts where the real-time constrains are limited, such as in a district heating substation. PMID:25196165

  12. Highly sensitive and doubly orientated selective molecularly imprinted electrochemical sensor for Cu(2.).

    PubMed

    Li, Jianping; Zhang, Lianming; Wei, Ge; Zhang, Yun; Zeng, Ying

    2015-07-15

    Studies on molecularly imprinted electrochemical sensors for metal ions determination have been widely reported. However, the sensitivity and selectivity of the sensors needs to be improved urgently. In the current work, a novel molecularly imprinted electrochemical sensor was originally developed for selective determination of ultratrace Cu(2+) by combining the metal-ligand chelate orientated recognition with enzyme amplification effect. The detection relied on a competition reaction between Cu(2+)-glycine (Cu-Gly) and horse radish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled Cu-Gly on the imprinted polymer membrane modified electrode. The sensitivity of this sensor was promoted by enzyme amplification. Selectivity was improved by the double-specificity derived from ligand-to-metal ion and metal-ligand chelate orientated recognition of 3D imprinted cavities. This technique was quantitatively sensitive to Cu(2+) concentrations ranging from 0.5nmol/L to 30nmol/L, with a detection limit of 42.4pmol/L. which was lower than those in most of the reported methods. The allowable amounts of interference ions were higher when it compared to other common molecularly imprinted sensors. Moreover, the results of assaying several real samples have proven its feasibility for practical applications. PMID:25771304

  13. Binary hologram based high speed zonal wavefront sensing with reduced estimation time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Biswajit; Boruah, Bosanta R.

    2016-03-01

    Reduced wavefront estimation time in a Shack-Hartmann type wavefront sensor plays an important role in any high speed application of the sensor. Exploiting computer generated holography technique, one can generate an array of binary diffraction grating pattern to produce an array of focal spots, similar to that in a Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS). The transmittance functions of each of such a grating pattern can be configured to produce a one dimensional (1D) array of focal spots of a desired order. In this paper, we show that the formation of 1D array, further facilitates in the process of single indexed wavefront estimation in its true sense that considerably reduces the wavefront estimation time.

  14. SAPHIRA detector for infrared wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finger, Gert; Baker, Ian; Alvarez, Domingo; Ives, Derek; Mehrgan, Leander; Meyer, Manfred; Stegmeier, Jörg; Weller, Harald J.

    2014-08-01

    The only way to overcome the CMOS noise barrier of near infrared sensors used for wavefront sensing and fringe tracking is the amplification of the photoelectron signal inside the infrared pixel by means of the avalanche gain. In 2007 ESO started a program at Selex to develop near infrared electron avalanche photodiode arrays (eAPD) for wavefront sensing and fringe tracking. In a first step the cutoff wavelength was reduced from 4.5 micron to 2.5 micron in order to verify that the dark current scales with the bandgap and can be reduced to less than one electron/ms, the value required for wavefront sensing. The growth technology was liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) with annular diodes based on the loophole interconnect technology. The arrays required deep cooling to 40K to achieve acceptable cosmetic performance at high APD gain. The second step was to develop a multiplexer tailored to the specific application of the GRAVITY instrument wavefront sensors and the fringe tracker. The pixel format is 320x256 pixels. The array has 32 parallel video outputs which are arranged in such a way that the full multiplex advantage is available also for small subwindows. Nondestructive readout schemes with subpixel sampling are possible. This reduces the readout noise at high APD gain well below the subelectron level at frame rates of 1 KHz. The third step was the change of the growth technology from liquid phase epitaxy to metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). This growth technology allows the band structure and doping to be controlled on a 0.1μm scale and provides more flexibility for the design of diode structures. The bandgap can be varied for different layers of Hg(1-x)CdxTe. It is possible to make heterojunctions and apply solid state engineering techniques. The change to MOVPE resulted in a dramatic improvement in the cosmetic quality with 99.97 % operable pixels at an operating temperature of 85K. Currently this sensor is deployed in the 4 wavefront sensors and in the

  15. Advanced Wavefront Sensing and Control Testbed (AWCT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Fang; Basinger, Scott A.; Diaz, Rosemary T.; Gappinger, Robert O.; Tang, Hong; Lam, Raymond K.; Sidick, Erkin; Hein, Randall C.; Rud, Mayer; Troy, Mitchell

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Wavefront Sensing and Control Testbed (AWCT) is built as a versatile facility for developing and demonstrating, in hardware, the future technologies of wave front sensing and control algorithms for active optical systems. The testbed includes a source projector for a broadband point-source and a suite of extended scene targets, a dispersed fringe sensor, a Shack-Hartmann camera, and an imaging camera capable of phase retrieval wavefront sensing. The testbed also provides two easily accessible conjugated pupil planes which can accommodate the active optical devices such as fast steering mirror, deformable mirror, and segmented mirrors. In this paper, we describe the testbed optical design, testbed configurations and capabilities, as well as the initial results from the testbed hardware integrations and tests.

  16. Orientation-Dependent Displacement Sensor Using an Inner Cladding Fiber Bragg Grating.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tingting; Qiao, Xueguang; Rong, Qiangzhou; Bao, Weijia

    2016-01-01

    An orientation-dependent displacement sensor based on grating inscription over a fiber core and inner cladding has been demonstrated. The device comprises a short piece of multi-cladding fiber sandwiched between two standard single-mode fibers (SMFs). The grating structure is fabricated by a femtosecond laser side-illumination technique. Two well-defined resonances are achieved by the downstream both core and cladding fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The cladding resonance presents fiber bending dependence, together with a strong orientation dependence because of asymmetrical distribution of the "cladding" FBG along the fiber cross-section. PMID:27626427

  17. inertial orientation tracker having automatic drift compensation using an at rest sensor for tracking parts of a human body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foxlin, Eric M. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A self contained sensor apparatus generates a signal that corresponds to at least two of the three orientational aspects of yaw, pitch and roll of a human-scale body, relative to an external reference frame. A sensor generates first sensor signals that correspond to rotational accelerations or rates of the body about certain body axes. The sensor may be mounted to the body. Coupled to the sensor is a signal processor for generating orientation signals relative to the external reference frame that correspond to the angular rate or acceleration signals. The first sensor signals are impervious to interference from electromagnetic, acoustic, optical and mechanical sources. The sensors may be rate sensors. An integrator may integrate the rate signal over time. A drift compensator is coupled to the rate sensors and the integrator. The drift compensator may include a gravitational tilt sensor or a magnetic field sensor or both. A verifier periodically measures the orientation of the body by a means different from the drift sensitive sate sensors. The verifier may take into account characteristic features of human motion, such as stillness periods. The drift compensator may be, in part, a Kalman filter, which may utilize statistical data about human head motion.

  18. Flexible piezoelectric pressure sensors using oriented aluminum nitride thin films prepared on polyethylene terephthalate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Morito; Morofuji, Yukari; Kamohara, Toshihiro; Nishikubo, Keiko; Tsubai, Masayoshi; Fukuda, Osamu; Ueno, Naohiro

    2006-12-01

    We have investigated the high sensitive piezoelectric response of c-axis oriented aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films prepared on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films. The AlN films were deposited using a radio frequency magnetron sputtering method at temperatures close to room temperature. The c axes of the AlN films were perpendicularly oriented to the PET film surfaces. The sensor consisting of the AlN and PET films is flexible like PET films and the electrical charge is linearly proportional to the stress within a wide range from 0to8.5MPa. The sensor can respond to the frequencies from 0.3 to over 100Hz and measures a clear human pulse wave form by holding the sensor between thumb and middle finger. The resolution of the pulse wave form is comparable to a sphygmomanometer at stress levels of 10kPa. We think that the origin of the high performance of the sensor is the deflection effect, the thin thickness and high elastic modulus of the AlN layer, and the thin thickness and low elastic modulus of the PET film.

  19. Study of optimal wavefront sensing with elongated laser guide stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S. J.; Adkins, S.; Gavel, D.; Fusco, T.; Michau, V.

    2008-06-01

    Over the past decade, adaptive optics (AO) has become an established method for overcoming the effects of atmospheric turbulence on both astronomical imaging and spectroscopic observations. These systems are now beginning to make extensive use of laser guide star (LGS) techniques to improve performance and provide increased sky coverage. Sodium LGS AO employs one or more lasers at 589-nm wavelength to produce an artificial guide star through excitation of sodium atoms in the mesosphere (90 km altitude). Because of its dependence on the abundance and distribution of sodium atoms in the mesosphere, this approach has its own unique set of difficulties not seen with natural stars. The sodium layer exhibits time-dependent variations in density and altitude, and since it is at a finite range, the LGS images become elongated due to the thickness of the layer and the offset between the laser projection point and the subapertures of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS). Elongation causes the LGS image to be spread out resulting in a decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio which, in turn, leads to an increase in SHWFS measurement error and therefore an increased error in wavefront phase reconstruction. To address the problem of elongation, and also to provide a higher level of readout performance and reduced readout noise, a new type of charge-coupled device (CCD) is now under development for Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing called the polar coordinate CCD. In this device, discrete imaging arrays are provided in each SHWFS subaperture and the size, shape and orientation of each discrete imaging array are adjusted to optimally sample the LGS image. The device is referred to as the polar coordinate CCD because the location of each imager is defined by a polar coordinate system centred on the laser guide star projection point. This concept is especially suited to Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) where the effect of perspective elongation is a significant factor. In this

  20. Accurate estimation of human body orientation from RGB-D sensors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wu; Zhang, Yongdong; Tang, Sheng; Tang, Jinhui; Hong, Richang; Li, Jintao

    2013-10-01

    Accurate estimation of human body orientation can significantly enhance the analysis of human behavior, which is a fundamental task in the field of computer vision. However, existing orientation estimation methods cannot handle the various body poses and appearances. In this paper, we propose an innovative RGB-D-based orientation estimation method to address these challenges. By utilizing the RGB-D information, which can be real time acquired by RGB-D sensors, our method is robust to cluttered environment, illumination change and partial occlusions. Specifically, efficient static and motion cue extraction methods are proposed based on the RGB-D superpixels to reduce the noise of depth data. Since it is hard to discriminate all the 360 (°) orientation using static cues or motion cues independently, we propose to utilize a dynamic Bayesian network system (DBNS) to effectively employ the complementary nature of both static and motion cues. In order to verify our proposed method, we build a RGB-D-based human body orientation dataset that covers a wide diversity of poses and appearances. Our intensive experimental evaluations on this dataset demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method. PMID:23893759

  1. Direct-Solve Image-Based Wavefront Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    A method of wavefront sensing (more precisely characterized as a method of determining the deviation of a wavefront from a nominal figure) has been invented as an improved means of assessing the performance of an optical system as affected by such imperfections as misalignments, design errors, and fabrication errors. The method is implemented by software running on a single-processor computer that is connected, via a suitable interface, to the image sensor (typically, a charge-coupled device) in the system under test. The software collects a digitized single image from the image sensor. The image is displayed on a computer monitor. The software directly solves for the wavefront in a time interval of a fraction of a second. A picture of the wavefront is displayed. The solution process involves, among other things, fast Fourier transforms. It has been reported to the effect that some measure of the wavefront is decomposed into modes of the optical system under test, but it has not been reported whether this decomposition is postprocessing of the solution or part of the solution process.

  2. Measurement of wavefront distortions by the method of aperture sounding with spatially separated channels

    SciTech Connect

    Prilepskiy, Boris V; Alikhanov, Alexey N; Berchenko, Evgeniy A; Kiselev, Vladimir Yu; Narusbek, Ernest A; Filatov, Aleksander S

    2005-08-31

    Features of the formation of signals in wavefront sensors with the single-frequency light wave phase modulation and spatial separation of control channels are considered. Analysis is performed for sensors in which phase modulation is governed by a controlled element located in the pupil of the optical system of a sensor or in the focal plane of the objective of this system. Peculiarities of the signal formation for a tilted wavefront are considered separately for internal points of the exit pupil in the case of light wave phase modulation in the pupil. It is shown that a signal at the modulation frequency in these wavefront sensors for points located far from the pupil boundaries is determined by the wavefront curvature. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  3. Maximum-likelihood methods in wavefront sensing: stochastic models and likelihood functions

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Dainty, Christopher; Lara, David

    2008-01-01

    Maximum-likelihood (ML) estimation in wavefront sensing requires careful attention to all noise sources and all factors that influence the sensor data. We present detailed probability density functions for the output of the image detector in a wavefront sensor, conditional not only on wavefront parameters but also on various nuisance parameters. Practical ways of dealing with nuisance parameters are described, and final expressions for likelihoods and Fisher information matrices are derived. The theory is illustrated by discussing Shack–Hartmann sensors, and computational requirements are discussed. Simulation results show that ML estimation can significantly increase the dynamic range of a Shack–Hartmann sensor with four detectors and that it can reduce the residual wavefront error when compared with traditional methods. PMID:17206255

  4. Megapixel wavefront correctors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bifano, Thomas G.; Bierden, Paul A.; Zhu, Hao; Cornelissen, Steven; Kim, Jin Hong

    2004-10-01

    Optical-quality microelectromechanical deformable mirrors (DMs) and spatial light modulators (SLMs) are described. With such mirrors, the shape of the reflective surface can be modified dynamically to control an optical wavefront. A principal application is to compensate for aberrations and thereby improve image resolution in telescopes or microscopes: a process known as adaptive optics. μDMs are an enabling component for adaptive optics. Over several years, researchers at Boston University and Boston Micromachines Corporation have developed manufacturing processes that allow production of continuous and segmented deformable mirrors. We have produced mirror arrays with up to 22,500 actuators, 3.5μm of useful stroke, tens of picometer position repeatability, >98% reflectivity, and flatness better than 15nm RMS. Challenges to manufacturing optical quality micromachined mirrors in particular have been addressed: reducing surface roughness, increasing reflectivity, and eliminating post-release curvature in the mirror. These silicon based deformable mirrors can modulate spatial and temporal features of an optical wavefront, and have applications in imaging, beam-forming, and optical communication systems. New developments in DM design are discussed, and manufacturing approaches to microamachined DM and SLM production are presented, and designs that will permit scaling to millions of actuators are introduced.

  5. Wavefront error simulator for evaluating optical testing instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    A wavefront error simulator has been designed and fabricated to evaluate experimentally test instrumentation for the Large Space Telescope (LST) program. The principal operating part of the simulator is an aberration generator that introduces low-order aberrations of several waves magnitude with an incremented adjustment capability of lambda/100. Each aberration type can be introduced independently with any desired spatial orientation.

  6. Common-Path Interferometric Wavefront Sensing for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, James Kent

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an optical configuration for a common-path phase-shifting interferometric wavefront sensor.1 2 This sensor has a host of attractive features which make it well suited for space-based adaptive optics. First, it is strictly reflective and therefore operates broadband, second it is common mode and therefore does not suffer from systematic errors (like vibration) that are typical in other interferometers, third it is a phase-shifting interferometer and therefore benefits from both the sensitivity of interferometric sensors as well as the noise rejection afforded by synchronous detection. Unlike the Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor, it has nearly uniform sensitivity to all pupil modes. Optical configuration, theory and simulations for such a system will be discussed along with predicted performance.

  7. Correcting the wavefront aberration of membrane mirror based on liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Wei, Yin; Chen, Xinhua; Tang, Minxue

    2014-11-01

    Membrane mirror with flexible polymer film substrate is a new-concept ultra lightweight mirror for space applications. Compared with traditional mirrors, membrane mirror has the advantages of lightweight, folding and deployable, low cost and etc. Due to the surface shape of flexible membrane mirror is easy to deviate from the design surface shape, it will bring wavefront aberration to the optical system. In order to solve this problem, a method of membrane mirror wavefront aberration correction based on the liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LCSLM) will be studied in this paper. The wavefront aberration correction principle of LCSLM is described and the phase modulation property of a LCSLM is measured and analyzed firstly. Then the membrane mirror wavefront aberration correction system is designed and established according to the optical properties of a membrane mirror. The LCSLM and a Hartmann-Shack sensor are used as a wavefront corrector and a wavefront detector, respectively. The detected wavefront aberration is calculated and converted into voltage value on LCSLM for the mirror wavefront aberration correction by programming in Matlab. When in experiment, the wavefront aberration of a glass plane mirror with a diameter of 70 mm is measured and corrected for verifying the feasibility of the experiment system and the correctness of the program. The PV value and RMS value of distorted wavefront are reduced and near diffraction limited optical performance is achieved. On this basis, the wavefront aberration of the aperture center Φ25 mm in a membrane mirror with a diameter of 200 mm is corrected and the errors are analyzed. It provides a means of correcting the wavefront aberration of membrane mirror.

  8. JWST Wavefront Control Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Shahram Ron; Aronstein, David L.

    2011-01-01

    A Matlab-based toolbox has been developed for the wavefront control and optimization of segmented optical surfaces to correct for possible misalignments of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) using influence functions. The toolbox employs both iterative and non-iterative methods to converge to an optimal solution by minimizing the cost function. The toolbox could be used in either of constrained and unconstrained optimizations. The control process involves 1 to 7 degrees-of-freedom perturbations per segment of primary mirror in addition to the 5 degrees of freedom of secondary mirror. The toolbox consists of a series of Matlab/Simulink functions and modules, developed based on a "wrapper" approach, that handles the interface and data flow between existing commercial optical modeling software packages such as Zemax and Code V. The limitations of the algorithm are dictated by the constraints of the moving parts in the mirrors.

  9. FPGA-accelerated adaptive optics wavefront control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauch, S.; Reger, J.; Reinlein, C.; Appelfelder, M.; Goy, M.; Beckert, E.; Tünnermann, A.

    2014-03-01

    The speed of real-time adaptive optical systems is primarily restricted by the data processing hardware and computational aspects. Furthermore, the application of mirror layouts with increasing numbers of actuators reduces the bandwidth (speed) of the system and, thus, the number of applicable control algorithms. This burden turns out a key-impediment for deformable mirrors with continuous mirror surface and highly coupled actuator influence functions. In this regard, specialized hardware is necessary for high performance real-time control applications. Our approach to overcome this challenge is an adaptive optics system based on a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) with a CameraLink interface. The data processing is based on a high performance Intel Core i7 Quadcore hard real-time Linux system. Employing a Xilinx Kintex-7 FPGA, an own developed PCie card is outlined in order to accelerate the analysis of a Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor. A recently developed real-time capable spot detection algorithm evaluates the wavefront. The main features of the presented system are the reduction of latency and the acceleration of computation For example, matrix multiplications which in general are of complexity O(n3 are accelerated by using the DSP48 slices of the field-programmable gate array (FPGA) as well as a novel hardware implementation of the SHWFS algorithm. Further benefits are the Streaming SIMD Extensions (SSE) which intensively use the parallelization capability of the processor for further reducing the latency and increasing the bandwidth of the closed-loop. Due to this approach, up to 64 actuators of a deformable mirror can be handled and controlled without noticeable restriction from computational burdens.

  10. Coating-induced wavefront aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiley, Daniel J.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1992-12-01

    The coatings which are used on telescope mirrors and other optical interfaces can have a profound effect on the image quality formed by an optical system. This paper evaluates the defocus and astigmatism which are caused by the s- and p-phase shifts of coatings. These coating-induced wavefront aberrations are usually insignificant, but can, under certain circumstances, overshadow the geometric wavefront aberrations of the system. The wavefront aberrations induced by reflection-enhanced coatings on an f/1.5 Cassegrain telescope are numerically evaluated as an example.

  11. Wavefront optimized nonlinear microscopy of ex vivo human retinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualda, Emilio J.; Bueno, Juan M.; Artal, Pablo

    2010-03-01

    A multiphoton microscope incorporating a Hartmann-Shack (HS) wavefront sensor to control the ultrafast laser beam's wavefront aberrations has been developed. This instrument allowed us to investigate the impact of the laser beam aberrations on two-photon autofluorescence imaging of human retinal tissues. We demonstrated that nonlinear microscopy images are improved when laser beam aberrations are minimized by realigning the laser system cavity while wavefront controlling. Nonlinear signals from several human retinal anatomical features have been detected for the first time, without the need of fixation or staining procedures. Beyond the improved image quality, this approach reduces the required excitation power levels, minimizing the side effects of phototoxicity within the imaged sample. In particular, this may be important to study the physiology and function of the healthy and diseased retina.

  12. Application of geometric phase to wavefront sensing for astronomical adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemhof, E. E.

    2014-02-01

    Modern adaptive optics systems give high performance, both in terms of Strehl ratio (degree of correction) and corrected field of view. Arguably the most important subsystem is the wavefront sensor, which measures the deviation from flatness of the incident wavefront that has been perturbed by the turbulent atmosphere, and commands an actuated mirror to compensate. An aspect of the wavefront sensor essential to achieving high sensitivity is that it perform over a broad spectral bandwidth; operation without correction for guide star color is also desirable. With this in mind, wavefront sensors are considered that make use of the geometric (or topological) phase, which has the property that the value of the phase is independent of wavelength. Conceptual system designs and advantages are discussed.

  13. Direct observation of binding stress-induced crystalline orientation change in piezoelectric plate sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Shih, Wei-Heng; Shih, Wan Y.

    2016-03-01

    We have examined the mechanism of the detection resonance frequency shift, Δf/f, of a 1370 μm long and 537 μm wide [Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3]0.65[PbTiO3]0.35 (PMN-PT) piezoelectric plate sensor (PEPS) made of a 8-μm thick PMN-PT freestanding film. The Δf/f of the PEPS was monitored in a three-step binding model detections of (1) binding of maleimide-activated biotin to the sulfhydryl on the PEPS surface followed by (2) binding of streptavidin to the bound biotin and (3) subsequent binding of biotinylated probe deoxyribonucleic acid to the bound streptavidin. We used a PMN-PT surrogate made of the same 8-μm thick PMN-PT freestanding film that the PEPS was made of but was about 1 cm in length and width to carry out crystalline orientation study using X-ray diffraction (XRD) scan around the (002)/(200) peaks after each of the binding steps. The result of the XRD studies indicated that each binding step caused the crystalline orientation of the PMN-PT thin layer to switch from the vertical (002) orientation to the horizontal (200) orientation, and most of the PEPS detection Δf/f was due to the change in the lateral Young's modulus of the PMN-PT thin layer as a result of the crystalline orientation change.

  14. Wavefront reconstruction by modal decomposition.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Christian; Naidoo, Darryl; Flamm, Daniel; Schmidt, Oliver A; Forbes, Andrew; Duparré, Michael

    2012-08-27

    We propose a new method to determine the wavefront of a laser beam based on modal decomposition by computer-generated holograms. The hologram is encoded with a transmission function suitable for measuring the amplitudes and phases of the modes in real-time. This yields the complete information about the optical field, from which the Poynting vector and the wavefront are deduced. Two different wavefront reconstruction options are outlined: reconstruction from the phase for scalar beams, and reconstruction from the Poynting vector for inhomogeneously polarized beams. Results are compared to Shack-Hartmann measurements that serve as a reference and are shown to reproduce the wavefront and phase with very high fidelity. PMID:23037024

  15. Relative Orientation and Position Detections Based on an RGB-D Sensor and Dynamic Cooperation Strategies for Jumping Sensor Nodes Recycling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Yang, Xi; Song, Guang-Ming; Chen, Tian-Yuan; Zhang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents relative orientation and position detection methods for jumping sensor nodes (JSNs) recycling. The methods are based on motion captures of the JSNs by an RGB-D sensor mounted on a carrier robot and the dynamic cooperation between the carrier and the JSNs. A disc-like label with two different colored sides is mounted on the top of the JSNs. The RGB-D sensor can detect the motion of the label to calculate the orientations and positions of the JSNs and the carrier relative to each other. After the orientations and positions have been detected, the JSNs jump into a cabin mounted on the carrier in dynamic cooperation with the carrier for recycling. The performances of the proposed methods are tested with a prototype system. The results show that the carrier can detect a JSN from up to 2 m away and sense its relative orientation and position successfully. The errors of the JSN's orientation and position detections relative to the carrier could be reduced to the values smaller than 1° and 1 cm, respectively, by using the dynamic cooperation strategies. The proposed methods in this paper could also be used for other kinds of mobile sensor nodes and multi-robot systems. PMID:26393589

  16. Relative Orientation and Position Detections Based on an RGB-D Sensor and Dynamic Cooperation Strategies for Jumping Sensor Nodes Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Yang, Xi; Song, Guang-Ming; Chen, Tian-Yuan; Zhang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents relative orientation and position detection methods for jumping sensor nodes (JSNs) recycling. The methods are based on motion captures of the JSNs by an RGB-D sensor mounted on a carrier robot and the dynamic cooperation between the carrier and the JSNs. A disc-like label with two different colored sides is mounted on the top of the JSNs. The RGB-D sensor can detect the motion of the label to calculate the orientations and positions of the JSNs and the carrier relative to each other. After the orientations and positions have been detected, the JSNs jump into a cabin mounted on the carrier in dynamic cooperation with the carrier for recycling. The performances of the proposed methods are tested with a prototype system. The results show that the carrier can detect a JSN from up to 2 m away and sense its relative orientation and position successfully. The errors of the JSN’s orientation and position detections relative to the carrier could be reduced to the values smaller than 1° and 1 cm, respectively, by using the dynamic cooperation strategies. The proposed methods in this paper could also be used for other kinds of mobile sensor nodes and multi-robot systems. PMID:26393589

  17. Modal wavefront reconstruction over general shaped aperture by numerical orthogonal polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jingfei; Li, Xinhua; Gao, Zhishan; Wang, Shuai; Sun, Wenqing; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Qun

    2015-03-01

    In practical optical measurements, the wavefront data are recorded by pixelated imaging sensors. The closed-form analytical base polynomial will lose its orthogonality in the discrete wavefront database. For a wavefront with an irregularly shaped aperture, the corresponding analytical base polynomials are laboriously derived. The use of numerical orthogonal polynomials for reconstructing a wavefront with a general shaped aperture over the discrete data points is presented. Numerical polynomials are orthogonal over the discrete data points regardless of the boundary shape of the aperture. The performance of numerical orthogonal polynomials is confirmed by theoretical analysis and experiments. The results demonstrate the adaptability, validity, and accuracy of numerical orthogonal polynomials for estimating the wavefront over a general shaped aperture from regular boundary to an irregular boundary.

  18. Wavefront aberration measurements and corrections through thick tissue using fluorescent microsphere reference beacons

    PubMed Central

    Azucena, Oscar; Crest, Justin; Cao, Jian; Sullivan, William; Kner, Peter; Gavel, Donald; Dillon, Daren; Olivier, Scot; Kubby, Joel

    2010-01-01

    We present a new method to directly measure and correct the aberrations introduced when imaging through thick biological tissue. A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor is used to directly measure the wavefront error induced by a Drosophila embryo. The wavefront measurements are taken by seeding the embryo with fluorescent microspheres used as “artificial guide-stars.” The wavefront error is corrected in ten millisecond steps by applying the inverse to the wavefront error on a micro-electro-mechanical deformable mirror in the image path of the microscope. The results show that this new approach is capable of improving the Strehl ratio by 2 times on average and as high as 10 times when imaging through 100 μm of tissue. The results also show that the isoplanatic half-width is approximately 19 μm resulting in a corrected field of view 38 μm in diameter around the guide-star. PMID:20721137

  19. Retrieval of Ocean Bottom and Downhole Seismic sensors orientation using integrated MEMS gyroscope and direct rotation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, A.; D'Anna, G.

    2014-12-01

    The absolute orientation of the horizontal components of ocean bottom or downhole seismic sensors are generally unknown. Almost all the methods proposed to overcome this issue are based on the post-processing of the acquired signals and so the results are strongly dependent on the nature, quantity and quality of the acquired data. We have carried out several test to evaluate the ability of retrieve sensor orientation using integrated low cost MEMS gyroscope. Our tests have shown that the tested MEMS gyroscope (the model 1044_0-3/3/3 Phidget Spatial Precision High Resolution) can be used to measure angular displacement and therefore to retrieve the absolute orientation of the horizontal components of a sensor that has been subjected to rotation in the horizontal plane. A correct processing of the acquired signals permit to retrieve, for rotation at angular rate between 0 and 180° s-1, angular displacement with error less 2°.

  20. Wavefront Derived Refraction and Full Eye Biometry in Pseudophakic Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xinjie; Banta, James T.; Ke, Bilian; Jiang, Hong; He, Jichang; Liu, Che; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess wavefront derived refraction and full eye biometry including ciliary muscle dimension and full eye axial geometry in pseudophakic eyes using spectral domain OCT equipped with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Methods Twenty-eight adult subjects (32 pseudophakic eyes) having recently undergone cataract surgery were enrolled in this study. A custom system combining two optical coherence tomography systems with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor was constructed to image and monitor changes in whole eye biometry, the ciliary muscle and ocular aberration in the pseudophakic eye. A Badal optical channel and a visual target aligning with the wavefront sensor were incorporated into the system for measuring the wavefront-derived refraction. The imaging acquisition was performed twice. The coefficients of repeatability (CoR) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were calculated. Results Images were acquired and processed successfully in all patients. No significant difference was detected between repeated measurements of ciliary muscle dimension, full-eye biometry or defocus aberration. The CoR of full-eye biometry ranged from 0.36% to 3.04% and the ICC ranged from 0.981 to 0.999. The CoR for ciliary muscle dimensions ranged from 12.2% to 41.6% and the ICC ranged from 0.767 to 0.919. The defocus aberrations of the two measurements were 0.443 ± 0.534 D and 0.447 ± 0.586 D and the ICC was 0.951. Conclusions The combined system is capable of measuring full eye biometry and refraction with good repeatability. The system is suitable for future investigation of pseudoaccommodation in the pseudophakic eye. PMID:27010674

  1. Closed-loop focal plane wavefront control with the SCExAO instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinache, Frantz; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Guyon, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Aims: This article describes the implementation of a focal plane based wavefront control loop on the high-contrast imaging instrument SCExAO (Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics). The sensor relies on the Fourier analysis of conventional focal-plane images acquired after an asymmetric mask is introduced in the pupil of the instrument. Methods: This absolute sensor is used here in a closed-loop to compensate for the non-common path errors that normally affects any imaging system relying on an upstream adaptive optics system.This specific implementation was used to control low-order modes corresponding to eight zernike modes (from focus to spherical). Results: This loop was successfully run on-sky at the Subaru Telescope and is used to offset the SCExAO deformable mirror shape used as a zero-point by the high-order wavefront sensor. The paper details the range of errors this wavefront-sensing approach can operate within and explores the impact of saturation of the data and how it can be bypassed, at a cost in performance. Conclusions: Beyond this application, because of its low hardware impact, the asymmetric pupil Fourier wavefront sensor (APF-WFS) can easily be ported in a wide variety of wavefront sensing contexts, for ground- as well space-borne telescopes, and for telescope pupils that can be continuous, segmented or even sparse. The technique is powerful because it measures the wavefront where it really matters, at the level of the science detector.

  2. Spatially continuous six-degrees-of-freedom position and orientation sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danisch, Lee A.; Englehart, Kevin; Trivett, Andrew

    1999-02-01

    This paper describes SHAPE TAPE, a thin array of fiber optic curvature sensor laminated on a ribbon substrate, arranged to sense bend and twist. The resulting signals are used to build a 3D computer model containing six degrees of freedom position and orientation information for any location along the ribbon. The tape can be used to derive dynamic or static shape information from objects to which it is attached or scanned over. This is particularly useful where attachment is only partial, since shape tape 'knows where it is' relative to a starting location. Measurements can be performed where cameras cannot see, without the use of magnetic fields. Applications include simulation, film animation, computer aided design, robotics, biomechanics, and crash testing.

  3. Real-time physiological monitoring with distributed networks of sensors and object-oriented programming techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmann, William P.; Pranger, L. Alex; Bogucki, Mary S.

    1998-05-01

    Remote monitoring of physiologic data from individual high- risk workers distributed over time and space is a considerable challenge. This is often due to an inadequate capability to accurately integrate large amounts of data into usable information in real time. In this report, we have used the vertical and horizontal organization of the 'fireground' as a framework to design a distributed network of sensors. In this system, sensor output is linked through a hierarchical object oriented programing process to accurately interpret physiological data, incorporate these data into a synchronous model and relay processed data, trends and predictions to members of the fire incident command structure. There are several unique aspects to this approach. The first includes a process to account for variability in vital parameter values for each individual's normal physiologic response by including an adaptive network in each data process. This information is used by the model in an iterative process to baseline a 'normal' physiologic response to a given stress for each individual and to detect deviations that indicate dysfunction or a significant insult. The second unique capability of the system orders the information for each user including the subject, local company officers, medical personnel and the incident commanders. Information can be retrieved and used for training exercises and after action analysis. Finally this system can easily be adapted to existing communication and processing links along with incorporating the best parts of current models through the use of object oriented programming techniques. These modern software techniques are well suited to handling multiple data processes independently over time in a distributed network.

  4. Hybrid Architecture Active Wavefront Sensing and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Dean, Bruce; Hyde, Tupper

    2010-01-01

    A method was developed for performing relatively high-speed wavefront sensing and control to overcome thermal instabilities in a segmented primary mirror telescope [e.g., James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) at L2], by using the onboard fine guidance sensor (FGS) to minimize expense and complexity. This FGS performs centroiding on a bright star to feed the information to the pointing and control system. The proposed concept is to beam split the image of the guide star (or use a single defocused guide star image) to perform wavefront sensing using phase retrieval techniques. Using the fine guidance sensor star image for guiding and fine phasing eliminates the need for other, more complex ways of achieving very accurate sensing and control that is needed for UV-optical applications. The phase retrieval occurs nearly constantly, so passive thermal stability over fourteen days is not required. Using the FGS as the sensor, one can feed segment update information to actuators on the primary mirror that can update the primary mirror segment fine phasing with this frequency. Because the thermal time constants of the primary mirror are very slow compared to this duration, the mirror will appear extremely stable during observations (to the level of accuracy of the sensing and control). The sensing can use the same phase retrieval techniques as the JWST by employing an additional beam splitter, and having each channel go through a weak lens (one positive and one negative). The channels can use common or separate detectors. Phase retrieval can be performed onboard. The actuation scheme would include a coarse stage able to achieve initial alignment of several millimeters of range (similar to JWST and can use a JWST heritage sensing approach in the science camera) and a fine stage capable of continual updates.

  5. Curvature wavefront sensing for the large synoptic survey telescope.

    PubMed

    Xin, Bo; Claver, Chuck; Liang, Ming; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan; Angeli, George; Shipsey, Ian

    2015-10-20

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will use an active optics system (AOS) to maintain alignment and surface figure on its three large mirrors. Corrective actions fed to the LSST AOS are determined from information derived from four curvature wavefront sensors located at the corners of the focal plane. Each wavefront sensor is a split detector such that the halves are 1 mm on either side of focus. In this paper, we describe the extensions to published curvature wavefront sensing algorithms needed to address challenges presented by the LSST, namely the large central obscuration, the fast f/1.23 beam, off-axis pupil distortions, and vignetting at the sensor locations. We also describe corrections needed for the split sensors and the effects from the angular separation of different stars providing the intrafocal and extrafocal images. Lastly, we present simulations that demonstrate convergence, linearity, and negligible noise when compared to atmospheric effects when the algorithm extensions are applied to the LSST optical system. The algorithm extensions reported here are generic and can easily be adapted to other wide-field optical systems including similar telescopes with large central obscuration and off-axis curvature sensing. PMID:26560396

  6. Curvature wavefront sensing for the large synoptic survey telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Bo; Claver, Chuck; Liang, Ming; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan; Angeli, George; Shipsey, Ian

    2015-10-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will use an active optics system (AOS) to maintain alignment and surface figure on its three large mirrors. Corrective actions fed to the LSST AOS are determined from information derived from 4 curvature wavefront sensors located at the corners of the focal plane. Each wavefront sensor is a split detector such that the halves are 1mm on either side of focus. In this paper we describe the extensions to published curvature wavefront sensing algorithms needed to address challenges presented by the LSST, namely the large central obscuration, the fast f/1.23 beam, off-axis pupil distortions, and vignetting at the sensor locations. We also describe corrections needed for the split sensors and the effects from the angular separation of different stars providing the intra- and extra-focal images. Lastly, we present simulations that demonstrate convergence, linearity, and negligible noise when compared to atmospheric effects when the algorithm extensions are applied to the LSST optical system. The algorithm extensions reported here are generic and can easily be adapted to other wide-field optical systems including similar telescopes with large central obscuration and off-axis curvature sensing.

  7. Experimental assessment of the matched filter for laser guide star wavefront sensing.

    PubMed

    Conan, Rodolphe; Lardière, Olivier; Herriot, Glen; Bradley, Colin; Jackson, Kate

    2009-02-20

    Laser guide star wavefront sensing comes with several limitations. When imaged with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, the laser guide star is seen as extended sources elongated in the directions given by the lenslet locations and the laser axis. A test bed has been built in the Adaptive Optics Laboratory of the University of Victoria that reproduces this effect as seen on extremely large telescopes. A new wavefront sensing algorithm, the matched filter, has been implemented and its performance assessed with the test bed. Its ability to mitigate laser guide star aberrations by tracking the sodium layer fluctuations in a closed loop adaptive optics system is shown. PMID:23567582

  8. Wavefront measurement made by an off-the-shelf laser-scanning pico projector.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Wei; Liang, Chao-Wen; Chen, Sheng-Hui

    2015-10-01

    Focal plane testing methods such as the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and phase-shifting deflectometry are valuable tools for optical testing. In this study, we propose a novel wavefront slope testing method that uses a scanning galvo laser, in which a single-mode Gaussian beam scans the pupils of the tested optics in the system. In addition, the ray aberration is reconstructed by the four-step phase-shifting measurement by modulating the angular domain. The measured wavefront is verified by a Fizeau interferometer in terms of Zernike polynomials. PMID:26479659

  9. SOMM: A New Service Oriented Middleware for Generic Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks Based on Code Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Faghih, Mohammad Mehdi; Moghaddam, Mohsen Ebrahimi

    2011-01-01

    Although much research in the area of Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks (WMSNs) has been done in recent years, the programming of sensor nodes is still time-consuming and tedious. It requires expertise in low-level programming, mainly because of the use of resource constrained hardware and also the low level API provided by current operating systems. The code of the resulting systems has typically no clear separation between application and system logic. This minimizes the possibility of reusing code and often leads to the necessity of major changes when the underlying platform is changed. In this paper, we present a service oriented middleware named SOMM to support application development for WMSNs. The main goal of SOMM is to enable the development of modifiable and scalable WMSN applications. A network which uses the SOMM is capable of providing multiple services to multiple clients at the same time with the specified Quality of Service (QoS). SOMM uses a virtual machine with the ability to support mobile agents. Services in SOMM are provided by mobile agents and SOMM also provides a t space on each node which agents can use to communicate with each other. PMID:22346646

  10. SOMM: A new service oriented middleware for generic wireless multimedia sensor networks based on code mobility.

    PubMed

    Faghih, Mohammad Mehdi; Moghaddam, Mohsen Ebrahimi

    2011-01-01

    Although much research in the area of Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks (WMSNs) has been done in recent years, the programming of sensor nodes is still time-consuming and tedious. It requires expertise in low-level programming, mainly because of the use of resource constrained hardware and also the low level API provided by current operating systems. The code of the resulting systems has typically no clear separation between application and system logic. This minimizes the possibility of reusing code and often leads to the necessity of major changes when the underlying platform is changed. In this paper, we present a service oriented middleware named SOMM to support application development for WMSNs. The main goal of SOMM is to enable the development of modifiable and scalable WMSN applications. A network which uses the SOMM is capable of providing multiple services to multiple clients at the same time with the specified Quality of Service (QoS). SOMM uses a virtual machine with the ability to support mobile agents. Services in SOMM are provided by mobile agents and SOMM also provides a t space on each node which agents can use to communicate with each other. PMID:22346646