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Sample records for original four-lumen double-balloon

  1. Double-balloon tamponade in the management of postpartum hemorrhage: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Kavak, Salih Burçin; Kavak, Ebru Çelik; Demirel, Ismail; Ilhan, Raşit

    2014-01-01

    To show the efficacy of double-balloon cervical ripening catheter in the management of postpartum hemorrhage originating from the lower segment of the uterus or the upper parts of the vagina. Methods Patients with intractable bleeding from the lower segment of the uterus and the upper parts of the vagina after Cesarean or vaginal deliveries were treated by double-balloon cervical ripening catheter. Results Double-balloon catheter was used in seven patients, and it was properly placed in all of them. No other intervention was needed to control bleeding. Two patients were delivered vaginally, and five patients were delivered by Cesarean section. Length of hospitalization was longer in the vaginal delivery patients (average hospitalization was 12 days in the vaginal delivery patients and 5 days in the Cesarean section patients). The need for blood and blood products transfusion (average of blood and blood products transfusion was 30 U in the vaginal delivery patients and 6 U in the Cesarean patients) was also higher in the vaginal delivery patients. Conclusion Although double-balloon cervical ripening catheter is designed for the induction of labor, it can successfully control intractable bleedings from the lower segment of the uterus and the upper parts of the vagina. This procedure can save patients from undergoing more morbid procedures. PMID:25120367

  2. Double-balloon remodeling for coil embolization of a primitive trigeminal artery variant aneurysm. A case report.

    PubMed

    Takigawa, Tomoji; Suzuki, Kensuke; Sugiura, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Ryotaro; Takano, Issei; Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Hyodo, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe the case of a patient with a wide-necked unruptured aneurysm arising at origin of a persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) variant from the right internal carotid artery (ICA), supplying the territory of the right superior cerebellar artery and the anterior inferior cerebellar artery. To preserve the ICA and the PTA variant, coil embolization of the aneurysm was performed using a double-balloon remodeling technique (HyperForm™ and HyperGlide™ Occlusion Balloon Systems; ev3 Endovascular Inc., Irvine, CA, USA). The association of a PTA variant with an aneurysm is very rare. To our knowledge, this is the first description of the use of coil embolization using double-balloon remodeling to treat a PTA variant aneurysm. This technique permits complete embolization and reduces the risk of cerebral and cerebellar ischemia. PMID:24976091

  3. Inverted Meckel's diverticulum preoperatively diagnosed using double-balloon enteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Takagaki, Kosuke; Osawa, Satoshi; Ito, Tatsuhiro; Iwaizumi, Moriya; Hamaya, Yasushi; Tsukui, Hiroe; Furuta, Takahisa; Wada, Hidetoshi; Baba, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Ken

    2016-05-01

    An inverted Meckel's diverticulum is a rare gastrointestinal congenital anomaly that is difficult to diagnose prior to surgery and presents with anemia, abdominal pain, or intussusception. Here, we report the case of 57-year-old men with an inverted Meckel's diverticulum, who was preoperatively diagnosed using double-balloon enteroscopy. He had repeatedly experienced epigastric pain for 2 mo. Ultrasonography and computed tomography showed intestinal wall thickening in the pelvis. Double-balloon enteroscopy via the anal route was performed for further examination, which demonstrated an approximately 8-cm, sausage-shaped, submucosal tumor located approximately 80 cm proximal to the ileocecal valve. A small depressed erosion was observed at the tip of this lesion. Forceps biopsy revealed heterotopic gastric mucosa. Thus, the patient was diagnosed with an inverted Meckel's diverticulum, and single-incision laparoscopic surgery was performed. This case suggests that an inverted Meckel's diverticulum should be considered as a differential diagnosis for a submucosal tumor in the ileum. Balloon-assisted enteroscopy with forceps biopsy facilitate a precise diagnosis of this condition. PMID:27158212

  4. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Capability of Double-Balloon Enteroscopy in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Akyuz, Umit; Akyuz, Filiz

    2016-01-01

    Advances in technology have facilitated the common use of small-bowel imaging. Intraoperative enteroscopy was the gold standard method for small-bowel imaging. However, noninvasive capsule endoscopy and invasive balloon enteroscopy are currently the main endoscopic procedures that are routinely used for small-bowel pathologies, and the indications for both techniques are similar. Although obstruction is a contraindication for capsule endoscopy, it is not considered to be problematic for double-balloon enteroscopy. The most important advantage of double-balloon enteroscopy is the applicability of therapeutic interventions during the procedure; however, double-balloon enteroscopy has certain advantages as well as disadvantages. PMID:26950010

  5. Urgent double balloon endoscopy provides higher yields than non-urgent double balloon endoscopy in overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Aniwan, Satimai; Viriyautsahakul, Vichai; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Angsuwatcharakon, Phonthep; Kongkam, Pradermchai; Treeprasertsuk, Sombat; Kullavanijaya, Pinit

    2014-01-01

    Background and study aims: In overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OV), double balloon endoscopy (DBE) is recommended as one of the most important investigations as it can provide both diagnosis and treatment. However, there is no set standard on the timing of DBE in OV. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic and therapeutic yields between urgent and non-urgent DBE in patients with OV. Patients and methods: Between January 2006 and February 2013, 120 patients with OV who underwent DBE were retrospectively reviewed. An urgent DBE was defined as DBE performed within 72 h from the last visible gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 74) whereas a non-urgent DBE was defined as DBE performed after 72 h (n = 46). Diagnostic yields, therapeutic impact and clinical outcomes were evaluated. Results: Diagnostic yield in urgent DBE was significantly higher than that in non-urgent DBE (70 % versus 30 %; P < 0.05). Urgent DBE offered significantly more therapies including endoscopic, angiographic embolization, and surgery than non-urgent DBE (54 % versus 15 %; P < 0.001). Endoscopic therapy was performed in 43 % of urgent-DBE patients whereas only 13 % of patients in the other group received endoscopic therapy (P < 0.01). In patients with identified bleeding sources, the rebleeding rate was lower in patients who underwent urgent DBE than in those who underwent non-urgent DBE (10 % versus 29 %, NS). Conclusions: Regarding diagnostic and therapeutic impacts in OV, our retrospective study showed that urgent DBE is better than non-urgent DBE. The recurrent bleeding rate in patients undergoing urgent DBE tended to be lower. PMID:26135267

  6. Bleeding Meckel's diverticulum diagnosed and treated by double-balloon enteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Olafsson, Snorri; Yang, Julie T.; Jackson, Christian S.; Barakat, Mohamad; Lo, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Meckel's diverticulum (MD) is the most common congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The diagnosis of symptomatic MD has been cumbersome. Several case reports been published regarding direct visualization of MD with double balloon enteroscopy (DBE); diagnosing a bleeding MD leading to surgical resection. We report the use of DBE for the treatment of a bleeding MD. PMID:23210023

  7. Successful Removal of a Screw Nail in the Jejunum Using Double-Balloon Enteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Ju; Sim, Myoung Ki; Lee, Sang Wook

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of foreign bodies (FBs) that enter the stomach pass through the gastrointestinal tract spontaneously. When the FB enters the small bowel-beyond the reach of conventional endoscopy-daily radiographs are needed to ensure its safe passage. However, endoscopic intervention is an appropriate management strategy for a sharp-pointed FB, because sharp FBs have a higher risk of intestinal perforation. We describe here a case in which a 1.5-cm, sharp-pointed screw nail in the proximal jejunum was removed successfully by double-balloon enteroscopy from a 19-year-old-male with autism. This case adds to the growing body of evidence demonstrating the value of therapeutic double-balloon enteroscopy in the field of FB ingestion PMID:26473131

  8. Embolization of direct carotid cavernous fistulas with the novel double-balloon technique.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yin; Li, Lin; Tang, Jun; Zhu, Gang; Chen, Zhi

    2016-04-01

    Multiple endovascular management of direct carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) has been widely accepted as a treatment option. Embolization of the fistula with detachable balloons or thrombogenic coil-based occlusion has been the main choice to treat direct CCF, with good safety and efficacy. This study investigated the safety and efficacy of embolization of direct CCF with the novel double-balloon technique. A retrospective review of a prospective database on cerebral vascular disease was performed. We identified a total of five patients presenting with high-flow direct CCF. All patients were managed with transarterial embolization with the novel double-balloon technique. Three of the five patients were treated with two detachable balloons, and a completely occluded fistula with preservation of the internal carotid artery was achieved. Of the remaining two patients treated with more detachable balloons, one patient achieved a perfect outcome and the other one suffered from recurrent fistula due to balloon migration 3 weeks after embolization. During a follow-up period of 12-18 months, no symptoms reoccurred in any patient. Thus, the double-balloon treatment may be a promising method for CCF complete occlusion. This novel technique may bring more benefits in the following two cases: 1). A single inflated detachable balloon fails to completely occlude the CCF, which causing the next balloon can not pass into the fistula. 2). A giant CCF needs more balloons for fistula embolization. PMID:26586136

  9. Single-balloon versus double-balloon bipedicular kyphoplasty for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heng; Sun, Zhenzhong; Wang, Zhiwen; Jiang, Weimin

    2015-04-01

    Twenty-eight patients with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCF) were treated with single-balloon bipedicular kyphoplasty (Group A), and 40 patients were treated with double-balloon bipedicular kyphoplasty (Group B). Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score, vertebral height, and kyphotic angle (KA) were evaluated pre-operatively, post-operatively (3 days after surgery) and at final follow-up. Operative time, X-ray exposure frequency and costs were recorded. The mean operative time and X-ray exposure frequency in Group A were greater than in Group B (p<0.05). Significant improvement of the VAS score was noted in each group, and remained unchanged at final follow-up. Mean increases of anterior and middle height of the fractured vertebral body were 5.14mm and 4.14mm in Group A, respectively, and 6.22mm and 5.06mm in Group B, respectively, and the differences between the groups were statistically significant (p<0.05). Mean reduction of KA was 6.9° in Group A and 8.8° in Group B, which was statistically significant (p<0.05). No statistically significant difference was observed in terms of cement leakage between groups. The mean cost of Group A (US$4202) was significantly less than that of Group B (US$6220) (p<0.001). Single-balloon bipedicular kyphoplasty is a safe and cost-effective surgical method for the treatment of OVCF. It can achieve pain relief comparable with double-balloon bipedicular kyphoplasty. However, double-balloon bipedicular kyphoplasty is more efficacious in terms of the restoration of vertebral height and reduction of KA, and the operative time and X-ray exposure frequency are lower. PMID:25595962

  10. Inverted Meckel’s diverticulum preoperatively diagnosed using double-balloon enteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Takagaki, Kosuke; Osawa, Satoshi; Ito, Tatsuhiro; Iwaizumi, Moriya; Hamaya, Yasushi; Tsukui, Hiroe; Furuta, Takahisa; Wada, Hidetoshi; Baba, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Ken

    2016-01-01

    An inverted Meckel’s diverticulum is a rare gastrointestinal congenital anomaly that is difficult to diagnose prior to surgery and presents with anemia, abdominal pain, or intussusception. Here, we report the case of 57-year-old men with an inverted Meckel’s diverticulum, who was preoperatively diagnosed using double-balloon enteroscopy. He had repeatedly experienced epigastric pain for 2 mo. Ultrasonography and computed tomography showed intestinal wall thickening in the pelvis. Double-balloon enteroscopy via the anal route was performed for further examination, which demonstrated an approximately 8-cm, sausage-shaped, submucosal tumor located approximately 80 cm proximal to the ileocecal valve. A small depressed erosion was observed at the tip of this lesion. Forceps biopsy revealed heterotopic gastric mucosa. Thus, the patient was diagnosed with an inverted Meckel’s diverticulum, and single-incision laparoscopic surgery was performed. This case suggests that an inverted Meckel’s diverticulum should be considered as a differential diagnosis for a submucosal tumor in the ileum. Balloon-assisted enteroscopy with forceps biopsy facilitate a precise diagnosis of this condition. PMID:27158212

  11. Double balloon endoscopy in two hundred fifty cases for the diagnosis and treatment of small intestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Kita, H; Yamamoto, H; Yano, T; Miyata, T; Iwamoto, M; Sunada, K; Arashiro, M; Hayashi, Y; Ido, K; Sugano, K

    2007-04-01

    Double balloon endoscopy is based on a new insertion mode in which two balloons at the distal ends of both an endoscope and an overtube are operated in combination. We have performed 419 enteroscopic examinations in 250 patients using the Fujinon double balloon endoscopy system between September 2000 and October 2005. Total enteroscopy was successfully achieved by the combination of both oral and anal approaches in 55 out of 71 cases in whom total enteroscopy was intended. Of 250 patients, ulcerative and/or erosive lesions were found in 49 cases and tumors/polyps were found in 49 cases. We also found 26 cases of vascular lesion, including angiodysplasia. Endoscopic treatments, including hemostasis using either clipping devices or electro coagulation, polypectomy, endoscopic mucosal resection, balloon dilation, and stent placement was successfully carried out. Double balloon enteroscopy is both feasible and useful technique for the diagnosis as well as treatment of small intestinal disorders. PMID:17450446

  12. Successful Treatment of Early-Stage Jejunum Adenocarcinoma by Endoscopic Mucosal Resection Using Double-Balloon Endoscopy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hirobumi; Yamada, Atsuo; Watabe, Hirotsugu; Kobayashi, Yuka; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Yamaji, Yutaka; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Small bowel adenocarcinoma (SBA) has generally been considered to have a poor prognosis because of nonspecific presentations and difficulties in detection of the disease. The advent of capsule endoscopy (CE) and double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) makes it possible to access to the small intestine for endoscopic interventions. We describe a successful case of early jejunum adenocarcinoma completely resected by endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) using double-balloon endoscopy (DBE). Early diagnosis and EMR using new technologies such as CE and DBE may improve the recognition of this disease that, at present, has a poor prognosis. PMID:22844191

  13. Double-balloon endoscopy and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome: a new look at an old disease.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Stephanie; Snowberger, Noel; Demarco, Daniel

    2006-10-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome is a rare disease characterized by mucocutaneous hyperpigmentation and intestinal hamartomatous polyposis. Life-threatening complications include intestinal obstruction and increased risk of gastrointestinal malignancies. While colonoscopy continues to serve as the gold standard for examination of the colon, newer techniques such as capsule endoscopy and double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) are now being applied to both treatment and surveillance of this disease. Capsule endoscopy serves as a minimally invasive means of locating and characterizing polyps in symptomatic patients but is limited to detection only. DBE allows physicians to visit areas of the small bowel that were previously unreachable by older techniques and to treat lesions that are found. By using DBE to treat polyposis, hemorrhagic ulcers, angiodysplasia, strictures, and cancers, the number of small bowel resections can be decreased in these patients. PMID:17106494

  14. Examining the whole bowel, double balloon enteroscopy: Indications, diagnostic yield and complications

    PubMed Central

    Saygili, Fatih; Saygili, Saba Mukaddes; Oztas, Erkin

    2015-01-01

    Double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) is an advanced type of endoscopic procedure which brings the advantage of reaching the whole small bowel using anterograde or the retrograde route. This procedure is both diagnostic and interventional for a variety of small intestinal diseases, such as vascular lesions, tumors, polyps and involvement of inflammatory bowel diseases. Main indication is the diagnosis and treatment of mid-gastrointestinal bleeding according to the recent published data all over the world. The complication rates seem to be higher than conventional procedures but growing experience is lowering them and improving the procedure to be safe and well tolerated. This review is about the technique, indications, diagnostic importance and complications of DBE according to the literature growing since 2001. PMID:25789095

  15. A case of lymphocytic-plasmacytic jejunitis diagnosed by double-balloon enteroscopy in a dog.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Ignacio; Latorre, Rafael; Soria, Federico; Carballo, Fernando; Lopez-Albors, Octavio; Buendia, Antonio J; Perez-Cuadrado, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    A 3 yr old male English setter dog was presented for evaluation of a 6-wk history of intermittent diarrhea. After standard gastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy showed normal mucosa, double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) was used via both oral and anal approaches. Gross changes consistent with inflammation in the jejunum were seen, and biopsy specimens were obtained. Histologic analysis confirmed a diagnosis of lymphocytic-plasmacytic jejunitis. Clinical remission of the disease occurred after 3 mo of therapy with prednisone, metronidazole, and a novel protein diet. Use of DBE has not been previously reported in dogs with inflammatory bowel disease, and isolated lymphocytic-plasmacytic jejunitis has not been described. The described cases of intestinal inflammatory disease diagnosed by conventional endoscopy were related to pathologic changes in the duodenum, ileum or colon, but not the jejunum. The main advantage of the DBE technique allowed examination of portions of the small intestine (jejunum) that were not commonly accessible by standard endoscopic techniques, and permitted a minimally invasive collection of biopsy samples compared with surgical biopsy. This case highlights the need to consider using DBE in animals with gastrointestinal disorders, whose symptoms are not readily explained by routine tests, conventional endoscopy, and dietary or therapeutic trials. PMID:21673335

  16. Metallic stent insertion with double-balloon endoscopy for malignant afferent loop obstruction.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Masakuni; Ishiyama, Shuhei; Saito, Hiroaki; Ito, Mamoru; Fujiwara, Akiko; Niguma, Takefumi; Yoshioka, Masao; Shiode, Junji

    2015-06-10

    Progress in double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) has allowed for the diagnosis and treatment of disease in the postoperative bowel. For example, a short DBE, which has a 2.8 mm working channel and 152 cm working length, is useful for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in bowel disease patients. However, afferent loop and Roux-limb obstruction, though rare, is caused by postoperative recurrence of biliary tract cancer with intractable complications. Most of the clinical findings involving these complications are relatively nonspecific and include abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, and obstructive jaundice. Treatments by surgery, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, percutaneous enteral stent insertion, and endoscopic therapy have been reported. The general conditions of patients with these complications are poor due to cancer progression; therefore, a less invasive treatment is better. We report on the usefulness of metallic stent insertion using an overtube for afferent loop and Roux-limb obstruction caused by postoperative recurrence of biliary tract cancer under short DBE in two patients with complexly reconstructed intestines. PMID:26078835

  17. Effect of the manipulation of the duodenal papilla during double balloon enteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, Rafael; López-Albors, Octavio; Soria, Federico; Candanosa, Eugenia; Pérez-Cuadrado, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the hypothesis that inflating the balloons in the duodenal papilla determines changes in the biochemical markers of pancreatitis. METHODS: Four groups of pigs were used: Group papilla (GP), the overtube’s balloon was inflated in the area of the papilla; GP + double balloon enteroscopy (GP + DBE), the overtube’s balloon was kept inflated in the area of the papilla for 20 min before a DBE; Group DBE (GDBE), DBE was carried out after insuring the balloon’s inflation far from the pancreatic papilla; and Group control (GC). Serum concentrations of amylase, lipase and C-reactive protein (CRP) were evaluated. Pancreases were processed for histopathology examination. RESULTS: Main changes occurred 24 h after the procedure compared with baseline levels. Amylase levels increased significantly in GP (59.2% higher) and were moderately higher in groups GP + DBE and GDBE (22.7% and 20%, respectively). Lipase increased in GP and GP + DBE, whereas it hardly changed in GDBE and in GC. CRP increased significantly in GP, GP + DBE and GDBE, while no changes were reported for GC. No statistically significant difference between groups GP and GP + DBE was found for the histopathological findings, except for vacuolization and necrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma that was higher in GP than in GP + DBE. CONCLUSION: The manipulation of the duodenal papilla by the inflated overtube’s balloon during DBE causes pancreatic structural damage and increased biochemical markers associated with pancreatitis. PMID:27158201

  18. Usefulness of Double-Balloon Endoscopy in the Postoperative Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Masaki; Abiko, Yukito; Oana, Syuhei; Kudara, Norihiko; Kosaka, Takashi; Chiba, Toshimi; Takikawa, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Sugai, Tamotsu

    2011-01-01

    Background. The small intestine has been considered to be a highly difficult organ to visualize in imaging examinations due to its anatomical location compared with the stomach and the colon. In recent years, many imaging modalities have become available, such as CT enterography, MR enterography, capsule endoscopy (CE), and double-balloon endoscopy (DBE). Patients and Methods. DBE was performed in the postoperative intestines of 91 patients (128 DBE examinations) at Iwate Medical University between 2004 and 2010. There were 61 male and 30 female patients, and their mean age was 69.7 years (range: 30–80 years). Results. A total of 124 DBE examinations were performed with endoscope insertion into the reconstructed intestines. The endoscope reached the blind end in 115 of 124 examinations, (92.7%). There were 17 patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding in whom 30 DBE examinations were performed. The bleeding site was identified in 12 patients (70.6%). Nine patients underwent endoscopic treatment. Hemostasis was achieved in all patients. Conclusion. DBE is very useful modality for the assessment and application of endotherapy to areas of the small bowel which have been altered by surgery. PMID:22194738

  19. Accuracy of community based video capsule endoscopy in patients undergoing follow up double balloon enteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tenembaum, David; Sison, Cristina; Rubin, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine the test characteristics of community based video capsule endoscopy (VCE) in patients undergoing sequential VCE and double balloon enteroscopy (DBE). METHODS: Eighty-nine patients (34 females, 55 males, mean age 66) who underwent both VCE and DBE from 2008-2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Lesions detected at VCE were categorized. Capsule directed DBE followed and included 44 antegrade, 11 retrograde and 34 combined antegrade and retrograde procedures. Lesions detected were compared utilizing the McNemar’s test. RESULTS: Angioectasia detection with VCE was 25% and with DBE 35% (P < 0.03) with a calculated sensitivity and specificity of 58% and 93% respectively. Polyps were detected by VCE in 22% and in DBE 20%, (P = 0.6), with a sensitivity and specificity for VCE of 61% and 87%. Small bowel diverticula were only seen in 1% of VCE but in 12% of DBE patients (P < 0.002) with a calculated sensitivity and specificity of VCE of 9% and 100%. CONCLUSION: VCE would be moderately sensitive and specific overall with considerable variation by lesion. Furthermore, VCE cannot be relied upon to diagnose small bowel diverticula. PMID:23596537

  20. Comparison of Capsule Endoscopy Findings to Subsequent Double Balloon Enteroscopy: A Dual Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Amandeep S; Walker, Andrew J; Benson, Mark E; Soni, Anurag; Guda, Nalini M; Misha, Mehak; Gopal, Deepak V

    2015-01-01

    Background. There has been a growing use of both capsule endoscopy (CE) and double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) to diagnose and treat patients with obscure gastrointestinal blood loss and suspected small bowel pathology. Aim. To compare and correlate sequential CE and DBE findings in a large series of patients at two tertiary level hospitals in Wisconsin. Methods. An IRB approved retrospective study of patients who underwent sequential CE and DBE, at two separate tertiary care academic centers from May 2007 to December 2011, was performed. Results. 116 patients were included in the study. The mean age ± SD was 66.6 ± 13.2 years. There were 56% males and 43.9% females. Measure of agreement between prior capsule and DBE findings was performed using kappa statistics, which gave kappa value of 0.396 with P < 0.001. Also contingency coefficient was calculated and was found to be 0.732 (P < 0.001). Conclusions. Our study showed good overall agreement between DBE and CE. Findings of angioectasia had maximum agreement of 69%. PMID:26420979

  1. Metallic stent insertion with double-balloon endoscopy for malignant afferent loop obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Masakuni; Ishiyama, Shuhei; Saito, Hiroaki; Ito, Mamoru; Fujiwara, Akiko; Niguma, Takefumi; Yoshioka, Masao; Shiode, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Progress in double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) has allowed for the diagnosis and treatment of disease in the postoperative bowel. For example, a short DBE, which has a 2.8 mm working channel and 152 cm working length, is useful for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in bowel disease patients. However, afferent loop and Roux-limb obstruction, though rare, is caused by postoperative recurrence of biliary tract cancer with intractable complications. Most of the clinical findings involving these complications are relatively nonspecific and include abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, and obstructive jaundice. Treatments by surgery, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, percutaneous enteral stent insertion, and endoscopic therapy have been reported. The general conditions of patients with these complications are poor due to cancer progression; therefore, a less invasive treatment is better. We report on the usefulness of metallic stent insertion using an overtube for afferent loop and Roux-limb obstruction caused by postoperative recurrence of biliary tract cancer under short DBE in two patients with complexly reconstructed intestines. PMID:26078835

  2. Comparison of Capsule Endoscopy Findings to Subsequent Double Balloon Enteroscopy: A Dual Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Amandeep S.; Walker, Andrew J.; Benson, Mark E.; Soni, Anurag; Guda, Nalini M.; Misha, Mehak; Gopal, Deepak V.

    2015-01-01

    Background. There has been a growing use of both capsule endoscopy (CE) and double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) to diagnose and treat patients with obscure gastrointestinal blood loss and suspected small bowel pathology. Aim. To compare and correlate sequential CE and DBE findings in a large series of patients at two tertiary level hospitals in Wisconsin. Methods. An IRB approved retrospective study of patients who underwent sequential CE and DBE, at two separate tertiary care academic centers from May 2007 to December 2011, was performed. Results. 116 patients were included in the study. The mean age ± SD was 66.6 ± 13.2 years. There were 56% males and 43.9% females. Measure of agreement between prior capsule and DBE findings was performed using kappa statistics, which gave kappa value of 0.396 with P < 0.001. Also contingency coefficient was calculated and was found to be 0.732 (P < 0.001). Conclusions. Our study showed good overall agreement between DBE and CE. Findings of angioectasia had maximum agreement of 69%. PMID:26420979

  3. Percutaneous Mitral Valve Dilatation: Single Balloon versus Double Balloon - A Finite Element Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schievano, Silvia; Kunzelman, Karyn; Nicosia, Mark; Cochran, R. P.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Khambadkone, Sachin; Bonheoffer, Philipp

    2009-01-01

    Background: Percutaneous mitral valve (MV) dilatation is performed with either a single balloon (SB) or double balloon (DB) technique. The aim of this study was to compare the two balloon system results using the finite element (FE) method. Methods and Results: An established FE model of the MV was modified by fusing the MV leaflet edges at commissure level to simulate a stenotic valve (orifice area=180mm2). A FE model of a 30mm SB (low-pressure, elastomeric balloon) and an 18mm DB system (high-pressure, non-elastic balloon) was created. Both SB and DB simulations resulted in splitting of the commissures and subsequent stenosis dilatation (final MV area=610mm2 and 560mm2 respectively). Stresses induced by the two balloon systems varied across the valve. At the end of inflation, SB showed higher stresses in the central part of the leaflets and at the commissures compared to DB simulation, which demonstrated a more uniform stress distribution. The higher stresses in the SB analysis were due to the mismatch of the round balloon shape with the oval mitral orifice. The commissural split was not easily accomplished with the SB due to its high compliance. The high pressure applied to the DB guaranteed the commissural split even when high forces were required to break the commissure welds. Conclusions: The FE model demonstrated that MV dilatation can be accomplished by both SB and DB techniques. However, the DB method resulted in higher probability of splitting of the fused commissures and less damage caused to the MV leaflets by overstretching.

  4. Double-Balloon Enteroscopy in Elderly Patients: Is It Safe and Useful?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dae Han; Kim, Hyun Gun; Lee, Tae Hee; Lee, Woong Cheul; Kang, Byung Soo; Cho, Jun-Hyung; Jung, Yunho; Kim, Wan Jung; Ko, Bong Min; Cho, Joo Young; Lee, Joon Seong; Lee, Moon Sung

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Providers may be hesitant to perform double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) in the elderly because the increased number of co-morbidities in this population poses a greater risk of complications resulting from sedation. There are limited data on the use of DBE in the elderly. Here, we assessed the safety and efficacy of DBE in the elderly compared to those in younger patients. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 158 patients who underwent 218 DBEs. Patients were divided into an elderly group (age ≥65 years; mean 71.4±5.4; n=34; 41 DBEs) and a younger group (age <65 years; mean 39.5±13.5; n=124; 177 DBEs). Results In both groups, the most common indication for DBE was obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Mucosal lesions (33.3% vs. 60.9%; P=0.002) were the most common finding in both groups, followed by tumors (30.8% vs. 14.1%; P=0.036). The elderly were more likely to receive interventional therapy (51.3% vs. 23.5%; P=0.001). The diagnostic yield of DBE was slightly higher in the elderly group (92.3% vs. 86.5%; P=0.422), but was not statistically significant. The therapeutic success rate of DBE was 100% in the elderly group compared to 87.5% in the younger group (P=0.536). The overall DBE complication rate was 1.8% overall, and this rate did not differ significantly between the groups (2.6% vs. 1.7%; P=0.548). Conclusions DBE is safe and effective in the elderly, and has a high diagnostic yield and high therapeutic success rate. PMID:25374498

  5. Learning curve for double-balloon enteroscopy: Findings from an analysis of 282 procedures

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Hoi-Poh; How, Soon-Hin; Kaffes, Arthur J

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine the learning curves for antegrade double-balloon enteroscopy (aDBE) and retrograde DBE (rDBE) by analyzing the technical success rates. METHODS: A retrospective analysis in a tertiary referral center. This study reviewed all cases from June 2006 to April 2011 with a target lesion in the small-bowel identified by either capsule endoscopy or computed tomography scan posted for DBE examinations. Main outcome measurements were: (1) Technical success of aDBE defined by finding or excluding a target lesion after achieving sufficient length of small bowel intubation; and (2) Technical success for rDBE was defined by either finding the target lesion or achieving stable overtube placement in the ileum. RESULTS: Two hundred and eighty two procedures fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. These procedures were analyzed by blocks of 30 cases. There was no distinct learning curve for aDBE. Technical success rates for rDBE continued to rise over time, although on logistic regression analysis testing for trend, there was no significance (P = 0.09). The odds of success increased by a factor of 1.73 (95% CI: 0.93-3.22) for rDBE. For these data, it was estimated that at least 30-35 cases of rDBE under supervision were needed to achieve a good technical success of more than 75%. CONCLUSION: There was no learning curve for aDBE. Technical success continued to increase over time for rDBE, although a learning curve could not be proven statistically. Approximately 30-35 cases of rDBE will be required for stable overtube intubation in ileum. PMID:22912911

  6. Evaluation of radiation exposure dose at double-balloon endoscopy for the patients with small bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagura, Asuka; Nakamura, Masanao; Watanabe, Osamu; Yamamura, Takeshi; Funasaka, Kohei; Ohno, Eizaburo; Miyahara, Ryoji; Kawashima, Hiroki; Koyama, Shuji; Hinami, Tomoki; Goto, Hidemi; Hirooka, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) is useful for the diagnosis and treatment of small bowel diseases. Although fluoroscopy is used to confirm the position of endoscope at DBE, the endoscopist does not have the knowledge with regard to the radiation exposure dose. In this study, we evaluated the absorbed dose during DBE in patients with suspected or established small bowel diseases. This was a retrospective study in which the estimated fluoroscopic radiation absorbed doses loaded on the small bowel and skin were determined according to the data of the referential X-ray experiment with a human body phantom. The subjects were 415 DBEs preformed in total. The mean small bowel absorbed doses on antegrade and retrograde DBEs were 42.2 and 53.8 mGy, respectively, showing that the organ dose applied in retrograde DBE was significantly higher (P<0.0001). The mean skin absorbed doses of them were 79.2 and 101.0 mGy, respectively, showing that the dose was also significantly higher on retrograde DBE (P<0.0001). Of 27 cases who were applied endoscopic balloon dilation, the mean fluoroscopy time was 16.0 minutes, and mean small bowel and skin absorbed doses were 121.9 and 228.9 mGy, respectively. In conclusion, endoscopist should be careful for reducing the organ exposure dose at DBE, particularly for the lower abdominal region. Abbreviations: Double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE), endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD), endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), double-balloon endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (DBERCP), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) PMID:27578908

  7. A Case of Blind Loop Syndrome Caused by Infection with Giardia duodenalis Diagnosed with Double Balloon Enteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Tomoo; Katsuno, Tatsuro; Mandai, Yasushi; Saito, Masaya; Yoshihama, Sayuri; Saito, Keiko; Minemura, Shoko; Maruoka, Daisuke; Matsumura, Tomoaki; Arai, Makoto; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    A 75-year-old man who had undergone partial gastrectomy was referred to our hospital due to worsening leg edema, loose stools and malnutrition. Double balloon enteroscopy followed by insertion of an indwelling ileus tube was performed to investigate the microbial flora and for washing inside the blind loop. Trophozoites of Giardia were detected in the sampled fluid from the blind loop and DNA analysis disclosed an assemblage of genotype A-II of Giardia duodenalis. Treatment with oral metronidazole was effective. This case emphasizes the importance of a correct diagnosis when treating patients with blind loop syndrome in the digestive tract. PMID:25408630

  8. Different roles of capsule endoscopy and double-balloon enteroscopy in obscure small intestinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Qiu, Chun-Hua; Li, Yi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare the roles of capsule endoscopy (CE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) in the diagnosis of obscure small bowel diseases. METHODS: From June 2009 to December 2014, 88 patients were included in this study; the patients had undergone gastroscopy, colonoscopy, radiological small intestinal barium meal, abdominal computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scan and mesenteric angiography, but their diagnoses were still unclear. The patients with gastrointestinal obstructions, fistulas, strictures, or cardiac pacemakers, as well as pregnant women, and individuals who could not accept the capsule-retention or capsule-removal surgery were excluded. Patients with heart, lung and other vital organ failure diseases were also excluded. Everyone involved in this study had undergone CE and DBE. The results were divided into: (1) the definite diagnosis (the diagnosis was confirmed at least by one of the biopsy, surgery, pathology or the drug treatment effects with follow-up for at least 3 mo); (2) the possible diagnosis (a possible diagnosis was suggested by CE or DBE, but not confirmed by the biopsy, surgery or follow-up drug treatment effects); and (3) the unclear diagnosis (no exact causes were provided by CE and DBE for the disease). The detection rate and the diagnostic yield of the two methods were compared. The difference in the etiologies between CE and DBE was estimated, and the different possible etiologies caused by the age groups were also investigated. RESULTS: CE exhibited a better trend than DBE for diagnosing scattered small ulcers (P = 0.242, Fisher’s test), and small vascular malformations (χ2 = 1.810, P = 0.179, Pearson χ2 test), but with no significant differences, possible due to few cases. However, DBE was better than CE for larger tumors (P = 0.018, Fisher’s test) and for diverticular lesions with bleeding ulcers (P = 0.005, Fisher’s test). All three hemangioma cases diagnosed by DBE in this study (including sponge hemangioma

  9. [Comorbid Meckel's diverticulum and omphalomesenteric cyst evaluated by small bowel series under double-balloon enteroscopy: a case report].

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, Shinichi; Sumida, Yorinobu; Harada, Naohiko; Hata, Yoshitaka; Nakamuta, Makoto; Ikejiri, Koji; Momosaki, Masaya; Takahashi, Shunsuke; Hirahashi, Minako

    2016-04-01

    A 59-year-old man was referred to our hospital for examination of intermittent abdominal pain. Computed tomography scan showed a cystic lesion adjoining the ileum, and small bowel series demonstrated a small bowel diverticulum. Double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) revealed a diverticulum in the ileum and a soft and smooth elevated lesion with a small hole at the base of the diverticulum. Small bowel series under DBE demonstrated that the cystic lesion communicated with the diverticulum through the small hole. The diagnosis was Meckel's diverticulum and an omphalomesenteric cyst. This is the first reported case of a Meckel's diverticulum and omphalomesenteric cyst communicating through a small hole without a fibrous ligament. In addition, precise evaluation was possible by small bowel series and DBE. PMID:27052394

  10. Utility of double-balloon enteroscopy in patients with left ventricular assist devices and obscure overt gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Adam L; Mönkemüller, Klaus; Pamboukian, Salpy V; George, James F; Wilcox, C M; Peter, Shajan

    2014-11-01

    Obscure overt gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) is a challenge in patients with left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). We evaluated the utility and safety of double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) in patients with LVADs in an observational consecutive-patient cohort from a single tertiary referral center. Ten patients with LVADs underwent thirteen DBEs for obscure OGIB. The first OGIB event necessitating DBE occurred after a mean of 512 ± 363 days of LVAD support. All patients underwent DBE, eleven anterograde and two retrograde, with a mean insertion depth 176 ± 85 cm. Diagnostic yield was 69 % with the primary bleeding lesion most frequently found in the mid-bowel. The most common lesions were arteriovenous malformations. Therapeutic yield with argon plasma coagulation (APC), epinephrine injection, and/or hemoclip placement was 89 %. There were no procedure-related complications. DBE in patients with LVADs has good diagnostic yield and high therapeutic yield for obscure OGIB and is safe and well tolerated. PMID:25290096

  11. Multidetector CT Enterography versus Double-Balloon Enteroscopy: Comparison of the Diagnostic Value for Patients with Suspected Small Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qiaozhen; Zhao, Jianping; Liu, Mei; Liao, Guangquan; Chen, Nianjun; Tian, Dean; Wu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To compare the diagnostic value of multidetector CT enterography (MDCTE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) for patients with suspected small bowel diseases. Methods. From January 2009 to January 2014, 190 patients with suspected small bowel diseases were examined with MDCTE and DBE. The characteristics of the patients, detection rates, diagnostic yields, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were described and analyzed. Results. The overall detection rates of DBE and MDCTE were 92.6% and 55.8%, respectively (P<0.05), while the overall diagnostic yields were 83.2% and 33.7%, respectively (P<0.05). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of DBE were all higher than those of MDCTE. DBE had a higher diagnostic yield for OGIB (87.3% versus 20.9%, P<0.05). The diagnostic yields of DBE were higher than those of MDCTE for inflammatory diseases, angioma/angiodysplasia, and diverticulums, while being not for gastrointestinal tumors/polyps. Conclusions. The diagnostic value of DBE for small bowel diseases is better than that of MDCTE as a whole, but if gastrointestinal tumors are suspected, MDCTE is also needed to gain a comprehensive and accurate diagnosis. PMID:26962305

  12. Multidetector CT Enterography versus Double-Balloon Enteroscopy: Comparison of the Diagnostic Value for Patients with Suspected Small Bowel Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Guo, Qiaozhen; Zhao, Jianping; Liu, Mei; Liao, Guangquan; Chen, Nianjun; Tian, Dean; Wu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To compare the diagnostic value of multidetector CT enterography (MDCTE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) for patients with suspected small bowel diseases. Methods. From January 2009 to January 2014, 190 patients with suspected small bowel diseases were examined with MDCTE and DBE. The characteristics of the patients, detection rates, diagnostic yields, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were described and analyzed. Results. The overall detection rates of DBE and MDCTE were 92.6% and 55.8%, respectively (P<0.05), while the overall diagnostic yields were 83.2% and 33.7%, respectively (P<0.05). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of DBE were all higher than those of MDCTE. DBE had a higher diagnostic yield for OGIB (87.3% versus 20.9%, P<0.05). The diagnostic yields of DBE were higher than those of MDCTE for inflammatory diseases, angioma/angiodysplasia, and diverticulums, while being not for gastrointestinal tumors/polyps. Conclusions. The diagnostic value of DBE for small bowel diseases is better than that of MDCTE as a whole, but if gastrointestinal tumors are suspected, MDCTE is also needed to gain a comprehensive and accurate diagnosis. PMID:26962305

  13. A Retrospective Evaluation of the Utility of Capsule Endoscopy and Double-Balloon Endoscopy in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Masanao; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Watanabe, Osamu; Yamamura, Takeshi; Funasaka, Kohei; Ohno, Eizaburo; Kawashima, Hiroki; Miyahara, Ryoji

    2016-01-01

    Background. Although the usefulness of capsule endoscopy (CE) and double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) for the evaluation of Crohn's disease (CD) is established, their capabilities in the differential diagnosis of small bowel stenosis have not been sufficiently addressed. The present study therefore aimed to retrospectively determine the types of patients for whom CE and DBE would confer the most benefit. Patients and Methods. We retrospectively reviewed data from 185 patients with established CD. A change of treatment based on CE or DBE results or successful DBE balloon dilation was defined as clinically useful indication. We then analyzed the factors significantly related to useful and poor indications. Results. CE results were assessed as useful indications in 28 (45%) of 62 patients. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that positive CRP and low IOIBD score are factors significantly related to a useful indication. DBE results were recognized as useful indications in 118 (77%) of 153 patients. Multivariate analysis indicated small bowel stenosis and abdominal pain as factors significantly associated with useful indications. All patients with a poor indication on CE had small bowel stenosis. Conclusions. CE was most useful for patients in clinical remission with positive CRP and without stenosis, whereas DBE was useful for patients with symptoms of stenosis. PMID:26843856

  14. Complimentary Imaging Modalities for Investigating Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Capsule Endoscopy, Double-Balloon Enteroscopy, and Computed Tomographic Enterography

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ye; Wu, Sheng; Qian, Yuting; Wang, Qi; Li, Juanjuan; Tang, Yanping; Bai, Tingting; Wang, Lifu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The complimentary value of computed tomographic enterography (CTE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) combined with capsule endoscopy (CE) was evaluated in the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). Methods. Patients who received CE examinations at Ruijin Hospital between July 2007 and July 2014 with the indication of OGIB were identified, and those who also underwent DBE and/or CTE were included. Their clinical information was retrieved, and results from each test were compared with findings from the other two examinations. Results. The overall diagnostic yield of CE was comparable with DBE (73.9% versus 60.9%) but was significantly higher than the yield of CTE (87% versus 25%, p < 0.001). The diagnostic yield of angiodysplasia at CE was significantly higher than CTE (73% versus 8%, p < 0.001) and DBE (39.1% versus 17.4%, p = 0.013), while no significant difference was found between the three approaches for small bowel tumors. DBE and CTE identified small bowel diseases undetected or undetermined by CE. Conversely, CE improved diagnosis in the cases with negative CTE and DBE, and findings at initial CE directed further diagnosis made by DBE. Conclusions. Combination of the three diagnostic platforms provides complementary value in the diagnosis of OGIB. PMID:26858753

  15. A case of a ruptured submucosal aneurysm of the small intestine identified using double-balloon enteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Hirofumi; Endo, Katsuya; Fujishima, Fumiyoshi; Ohtsuka, Hideo; Naitoh, Takeshi; Kuroha, Masatake; Kimura, Tomoya; Shiga, Hisashi; Kakuta, Yoichi; Kinouchi, Yoshitaka; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-04-01

    A 47-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital urgently with sudden-onset hematochezia. She was temporarily in a state of hemorrhagic shock. As we strongly suspected bleeding from the small intestine, peroral double-balloon enteroscopy was performed, and indicated a 2.0-cm diameter hemispheric elevated lesion in the jejunum. Moreover, a blood clot was observed at the top of the protrusion. The site was marked by injecting India ink, without taking a biopsy specimen, to avoid further hemorrhaging. Subsequently, laparoscopic partial small bowel resection was performed. On histopathological examination, the lesion was found to be a sac-like submucosal arterial aneurysm, with a diameter of 3.5 mm, comprising several small abnormal arteries. The final diagnosis was a ruptured submucosal aneurysm of the small intestine. Ruptured submucosal aneurysms are very rarely observed in the small intestine. Only a few reports have described their endoscopic findings. Our experience indicates that small bowel enteroscopy may be useful for managing ruptured submucosal aneurysms of the small intestine. PMID:26993305

  16. Complimentary Imaging Modalities for Investigating Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Capsule Endoscopy, Double-Balloon Enteroscopy, and Computed Tomographic Enterography.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ye; Wu, Sheng; Qian, Yuting; Wang, Qi; Li, Juanjuan; Tang, Yanping; Bai, Tingting; Wang, Lifu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The complimentary value of computed tomographic enterography (CTE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) combined with capsule endoscopy (CE) was evaluated in the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). Methods. Patients who received CE examinations at Ruijin Hospital between July 2007 and July 2014 with the indication of OGIB were identified, and those who also underwent DBE and/or CTE were included. Their clinical information was retrieved, and results from each test were compared with findings from the other two examinations. Results. The overall diagnostic yield of CE was comparable with DBE (73.9% versus 60.9%) but was significantly higher than the yield of CTE (87% versus 25%, p < 0.001). The diagnostic yield of angiodysplasia at CE was significantly higher than CTE (73% versus 8%, p < 0.001) and DBE (39.1% versus 17.4%, p = 0.013), while no significant difference was found between the three approaches for small bowel tumors. DBE and CTE identified small bowel diseases undetected or undetermined by CE. Conversely, CE improved diagnosis in the cases with negative CTE and DBE, and findings at initial CE directed further diagnosis made by DBE. Conclusions. Combination of the three diagnostic platforms provides complementary value in the diagnosis of OGIB. PMID:26858753

  17. COX-2 inhibitory NSAID-induced multiple stenosis in the small intestine diagnosed by double-balloon endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Yasuaki; Nakamura, Masanao; Watanabe, Osamu; Yamamura, Takeshi; Funasaka, Kohei; Ohno, Eizaburo; Miyahara, Ryoji; Kawashima, Hiroki; Goto, Hidemi; Hirooka, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The patient was a 72 year old man who had been given non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) for two years. He repeatedly developed small intestinal ileus; therefore, he underwent several imaging examinations, but the cause was not identified. He subsequently underwent a double-balloon endoscopy (DBE). The membranous stenoses were detected in the jejunum, and the biopsy specimens were taken during the DBE. The membranous stenoses in the gastrointestinal tract were characteristic of NSAID–induced enteropathy, and he was endoscopically and histopathologically diagnosed with NSAID-induced small intestinal disorder. NSAID administration was withdrawn, and the balloon dilation was conducted for small intestinal stenosis. After that, no small intestinal ileus developed again. Some studies were conducted on the mechanism of NSAID-induced small intestinal dysfunction, but the drug that was administered to the patient was a highly selective NSAID for cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and there are few studies that reported a dysfunctional mechanism induced by this drug. In the tissue sampled by DBE, apoptotic bodies were found; therefore, it was suggested that the stenoses in this case were caused by the COX-2 inhibitor from the relationship between COX-2 inhibition and apoptosis. Further studies are necessary to investigate the mechanism of NSAID enteropathy.

  18. Effectiveness and safety of double-balloon catheter versus intra-amniotic injection of ethacridine lactate for termination of second trimester pregnancy in patients with liver dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Wu, Peng; Zhao, Jie; Feng, Ling; Qiao, Fu-yuan; Zeng, Wan-jiang

    2015-02-01

    Severe liver dysfunction in pregnancy (SLDP) is rare but serious complications with high mortality rate. This study compared the effectiveness and safety of double-balloon catheter versus intra-amniotic injection of ethacridine lactate for the termination of second trimester pregnancy in patients with SLD. A total of 55 patients with indications of labor induction were enrolled and analyzed by retrospective control analysis method. Twenty-three cases adopted Cook double balloon dilation as Cook group, and 32 cases received intra-amniotic injection of ethacridine lactate as EL group. The primary outcome was evaluated by successful abortion rate and the difference in the induction-to-abortion interval. Secondary outcomes included liver function recovery and the frequency of adverse events. Both Cook and EL regimens were effective, with successful abortion rate of 87.0% and 93.8%, respectively (P=0.639). The induction-to-delivery interval was similar between Cook group and EL group (38.1 ± 21.5 vs. 41.3 ± 17.4, P=0.543). The liver disease status was more severe in Cook group than in EL group, but it did not show any significant difference after pregnancy termination between the two groups and the improvement rate also did not show any significant difference. Both treatments were safe and there was no significant difference in bleeding and cervical laceration adverse events between the two groups. Our study firstly compared double-balloon catheter and ethacridine lactate for the induction of labor in women with SLD during second trimester pregnancy. PMID:25673206

  19. A case of penetration of the intestinal wall by a soft-shelled turtle bone successfully removed with double-balloon endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Mizuho; Sekigawa, Kenichiro; Mitsui, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Katsuya; Okubo, Masao; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Hashimoto, Naoaki

    2015-10-01

    A 62-year-old male was admitted to our hospital due to left lower abdominal pain. Three days before admission, he ate seafood in a Japanese restaurant. Two days before admission, he suffered from intermittent left lower abdominal pain. One day before admission, he developed a high fever and subsequently visited our hospital the following day. Localized tenderness and rebound pain were observed in the left lower abdomen, and C-reactive protein was elevated. Computed tomography revealed a linear high-density object in the distal portion of the small intestine accompanied by edema of the wall, suggesting penetration by something like a fishbone. On the ninth hospital day, double-balloon endoscopy was performed via the transanal route. Yellow foreign material was found in the ileum and was then successfully removed with biopsy forceps. The removed material measured 3 mm in width, 3 cm in length and was slightly curved. It proved to be a bone of the forefoot of a soft-shelled turtle, which had been included on the menu of the restaurant. The patient was completely cured and discharged on the 14th hospital day. PMID:26275390

  20. Double-balloon enteroscopy for ERCP in patients with Billroth II anatomy: results of a large series of papillary large-balloon dilation for biliary stone removal

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi-Liang; Liu, Nai-Jen; Tang, Jui-Hsiang; Yu, Ming-Chin; Tsui, Yi-Ning; Hsu, Fang-Yu; Lee, Ching-Song; Lin, Cheng-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Data on double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE)-assisted endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogrphy (ERCP) in patients with Billroth II gastrectomy and the use of endoscopic papillary large-balloon dilation (EPLBD) for the removal of common bile duct stones in Billroth II anatomy are limited. The aims of the study were to evaluate the success of DBE-assisted ERCP in patients with Billroth II gastrectomy and examine the efficacy of EPLBD ( ≥ 10 mm) for the removal of common bile duct stones. Patients and methods: A total of 77 patients with Billroth II gastrectomy in whom standard ERCP had failed underwent DBE-assisted ERCP. DBE success was defined as visualizing the papilla and ERCP success as completing the intended intervention. The clinical results of EPLBD for the removal of common bile duct stones were analyzed. Results: DBE was successful in 73 of 77 patients (95 %), and ERCP success was achieved in 67 of these 73 (92 %). Therefore, the rate of successful DBE-assisted ERCP was 87 % (67 of a total of 77 patients). The reasons for ERCP failure (n = 10) included tumor obstruction (n = 2), adhesion obstruction (n = 2), failed cannulation (n = 3), failed stone removal (n = 2), and bowel perforation (n = 1). Overall DBE-assisted ERCP complications occurred in 5 of 77 patients (6.5 %). A total of 48 patients (34 male, mean age 75.5 years) with common bile duct stones underwent EPLBD. Complete stone removal in the first session was accomplished in 36 patients (75 %); mechanical lithotripsy was required in 1 patient. EPLBD-related mild perforation occurred in 2 patients (4 %). No acute pancreatitis occurred. Conclusions: DBE permits therapeutic ERCP in patients who have a difficult Billroth II gastrectomy with a high success rate and acceptable complication rates. EPLBD is effective and safe for the removal of common bile duct stones in patients with Billroth II anatomy. PMID:26171434

  1. Origins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Provides an annotated list of resources dealing with the theme of origins of life, the universe, and traditions. Includes Web sites, videos, books, audio materials, and magazines with appropriate grade levels and/or subject disciplines indicated; professional resources; and learning activities. (LRW)

  2. Original Misunderstanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holtzman, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Humorist Josh Billings quipped, "About the most originality that any writer can hope to achieve honestly is to steal with good judgment." Billings was harsh in his view of originality, but his critique reveals a tension faced by students every time they write a history paper. Research is the essence of any history paper. Especially in high school,…

  3. Eukaryotic origins

    PubMed Central

    Lake, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The origin of the eukaryotes is a fundamental scientific question that for over 30 years has generated a spirited debate between the competing Archaea (or three domains) tree and the eocyte tree. As eukaryotes ourselves, humans have a personal interest in our origins. Eukaryotes contain their defining organelle, the nucleus, after which they are named. They have a complex evolutionary history, over time acquiring multiple organelles, including mitochondria, chloroplasts, smooth and rough endoplasmic reticula, and other organelles all of which may hint at their origins. It is the evolutionary history of the nucleus and their other organelles that have intrigued molecular evolutionists, myself included, for the past 30 years and which continues to hold our interest as increasingly compelling evidence favours the eocyte tree. As with any orthodoxy, it takes time to embrace new concepts and techniques. PMID:26323753

  4. Original Version

    Cancer.gov

    The EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study Original Version is a free comprehensive multimedia curricula for health professionals caring for persons with cancer and their families. The curricula is available as an online Self-Study Section and as a CD-ROM you can order.

  5. The Origin(s) of Whales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhen, Mark D.

    2010-05-01

    Whales are first found in the fossil record approximately 52.5 million years ago (Mya) during the early Eocene in Indo-Pakistan. Our knowledge of early and middle Eocene whales has increased dramatically during the past three decades to the point where hypotheses of whale origins can be supported with a great deal of evidence from paleontology, anatomy, stratigraphy, and molecular biology. Fossils also provide preserved evidence of behavior and habitats, allowing the reconstruction of the modes of life of these semiaquatic animals during their transition from land to sea. Modern whales originated from ancient whales at or near the Eocene/Oligocene boundary, approximately 33.7 Mya. During the Oligocene, ancient whales coexisted with early baleen whales and early toothed whales. By the end of the Miocene, most modern families had originated, and most archaic forms had gone extinct. Whale diversity peaked in the late middle Miocene and fell thereafter toward the Recent, yielding our depauperate modern whale fauna.

  6. Multiple origins of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, D. M.; Valentine, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    There is some indication that life may have originated readily under primitive earth conditions. If there were multiple origins of life, the result could have been a polyphyletic biota today. Using simple stochastic models for diversification and extinction, we conclude: (1) the probability of survival of life is low unless there are multiple origins, and (2) given survival of life and given as many as 10 independent origins of life, the odds are that all but one would have gone extinct, yielding the monophyletic biota we have now. The fact of the survival of our particular form of life does not imply that it was unique or superior.

  7. The Growth of Originalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bork, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    The latest episode in the long-running struggle for control of the Constitution, and the political power that goes with it, is playing out in the federal courts in California. The contending philosophies are originalism, which holds that the Constitution should be read as it was originally understood by the framers and ratifiers, and the congeries…

  8. Originalism in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forte, David F.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author provides a detailed legal history of originalism and investigates whether, and to what extent, originalism is a part of law school teaching on the Constitution. He shares the results of an examination of the leading constitutional law textbooks used in the top fifty law schools and a selection of responses gathered from…

  9. Chemical Origins of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, J. Lawrence

    1972-01-01

    Reviews ideas and evidence bearing on the origin of life. Shows that evidence to support modifications of Oparin's theories of the origin of biological constituents from inorganic materials is accumulating, and that the necessary components are readily obtained from the simple gases found in the universe. (AL)

  10. The Moon's Origin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadogan, Peter

    1983-01-01

    Presents findings and conclusions about the origin of the moon, favoring the capture hypothesis of lunar origin. Advantage of the hypothesis is that it allows the moon to have been formed elsewhere, specifically in a hotter part of the solar nebula, accounting for chemical differences between earth and moon. (JN)

  11. DNA Replication Origins

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Alan C.; Méchali, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    The onset of genomic DNA synthesis requires precise interactions of specialized initiator proteins with DNA at sites where the replication machinery can be loaded. These sites, defined as replication origins, are found at a few unique locations in all of the prokaryotic chromosomes examined so far. However, replication origins are dispersed among tens of thousands of loci in metazoan chromosomes, thereby raising questions regarding the role of specific nucleotide sequences and chromatin environment in origin selection and the mechanisms used by initiators to recognize replication origins. Close examination of bacterial and archaeal replication origins reveals an array of DNA sequence motifs that position individual initiator protein molecules and promote initiator oligomerization on origin DNA. Conversely, the need for specific recognition sequences in eukaryotic replication origins is relaxed. In fact, the primary rule for origin selection appears to be flexibility, a feature that is modulated either by structural elements or by epigenetic mechanisms at least partly linked to the organization of the genome for gene expression. PMID:23838439

  12. Religion: Origins and Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, John K.

    2004-01-01

    We present the purpose of study of the origins and development of affect-relevant and religion-relevant hypotheses, and conjectured prediction of proto-religious sequences in pre-human anthropoids and primitive human cultures. We anticipate more comprehensive study of modern cultural outcomes of these origins and developments.

  13. [Hypotension from endocrine origin].

    PubMed

    Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Douillard, Claire; Balavoine, Anne-Sophie

    2012-11-01

    Hypotension is defined by a low blood pressure either permanently or only in upright posture (orthostatic hypotension). In contrast to hypertension, there is no threshold defining hypotension. The occurrence of symptoms for systolic and diastolic measurements respectively below 90 and 60 mm Hg establishes the diagnosis. Every acute hypotensive event should suggest shock, adrenal failure or an iatrogenic cause. Chronic hypotension from endocrine origin may be linked to adrenal failure from adrenal or central origin, isolated hypoaldosteronism, pseudohypoaldosteronism, pheochromocytoma, neuro-endocrine tumors (carcinoïd syndrome) or diabetic dysautonomia. Hypotension related to hypoaldosteronism associates low blood sodium and above all high blood potassium levels. They are generally classified according to their primary (hyperreninism) or secondary (hyporeninism) adrenal origin. Isolated primary hypoaldosteronisms are rare in adults (intensive care unit, selective injury of the glomerulosa area) and in children (aldosterone synthase deficiency). Isolated secondary hypoaldosteronism is related to mellitus diabetes complicated with dysautonomia, kidney failure, age, iatrogenic factors, and HIV infections. In both cases, they can be associated to glucocorticoid insufficiency from primary adrenal origin (adrenal failure of various origins with hyperreninism, among which congenital 21 hydroxylase deficiency with salt loss) or from central origin (hypopituitarism with hypo-reninism). Pseudohypoaldosteronisms are linked to congenital (type 1 pseudohypoaldosteronism) or acquired states of resistance to aldosterone. Acquired salt losses from enteric (total colectomy with ileostomy) or renal (interstitial nephropathy, Bartter and Gitelman syndromes…) origin might be responsible for hypotension and are associated with hyperreninism-hyperaldosteronism. Hypotension is a rare manifestation of pheochromocytomas, especially during surgical removal when the patient has not been

  14. Tektites and their origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Questions concerning the tektite distribution are examined, taking into account the Australasian strewn field, the Ivory Coast strewn field, the Moldavite strewn field, the North American strewn field, the Libyan desert glass, the Aouelloul crater glass, and amerikanites. Attention is given to the shapes of tektites, the internal structure of tektites, the physical properties of tektite glass, the chemical composition of tektites, isotopes, fission tracks, cosmic ray tracks, and arguments in favor and against the terrestrial origin of tektites. It is concluded that tektites cannot be terrestrial in origin. They are probably volcanic ejects, of geologically recent epochs, from one or a number of lunar volcanoes.

  15. Origins of Coordinate Searching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgour, Frederick G.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews the origins of post-coordinate searching and emphasizes that the focal point should be on the searcher, not on the item being indexed. Highlights include the history of the term information retrieval; edge notched punch cards; the "peek-a-boo" system; the Uniterm system; and using computers to search for information. (LRW)

  16. Origin of Fire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Ruth, Ed.

    Intended for use with college students, this booklet contains a traditional Hupa story (in Hupa and English) followed by information to aid in a critical literary analysis of the story and topics for student discussion. The introduction explains that "Origin of Fire"--first written down by P.E. Goddard in 1902 and still told by contemporary…

  17. The Origin of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodson, D.

    1975-01-01

    Presents an outline of lectures given on this topic to British secondary students. Man's various ideas about the origin of life are included in three categories: those that consider life to have been created by a Divine Being; those that consider life to have developed from non-living matter; and those that consider life to be eternal. (MLH)

  18. Originality and Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Shaun

    This paper discusses the creative process of one author, a professional author/illustrator of picture books. The paper muses about the meaning of creativity and originality and states inspiration has to do with careful research and looking for a challenge. Creativity is about testing one proposition against another and seeing how things combine…

  19. The Origins of Mass

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-07

    The Higgs boson was discovered in July of 2012 and is generally understood to be the origin of mass. While those statements are true, they are incomplete. It turns out that the Higgs boson is responsible for only about 2% of the mass of ordinary matter. In this dramatic new video, Dr. Don Lincoln of Fermilab tells us the rest of the story.

  20. Conscientiousness: Origins in Childhood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Nancy; Duckworth, Angela L.; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Valiente, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we evaluate developmental and personality research with the aim of determining whether the personality trait of conscientiousness can be identified in children and adolescents. After concluding that conscientiousness does emerge in childhood, we discuss the developmental origins of conscientiousness with a specific focus on…

  1. The Origins of Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-07-30

    The Higgs boson was discovered in July of 2012 and is generally understood to be the origin of mass. While those statements are true, they are incomplete. It turns out that the Higgs boson is responsible for only about 2% of the mass of ordinary matter. In this dramatic new video, Dr. Don Lincoln of Fermilab tells us the rest of the story.

  2. The Origins of Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmandt-Besserat, Denise

    Writing appears to have originated from a modest system of counters or tokens used to keep track of economic goods and transactions. This system of recording appeared in 8000 B. C. in Mesopotamia, or what is now Iraq. The tokens' consistency in shape and size during the next 4,000 years attests to the stability of the agricultural economy and way…

  3. The Origin of Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Sheng Ming

    2012-10-01

    In the natural world, people have discovered four kinds of forces: electromagnetic force, gravitation, weak force, and strong force. Although the gravitation has been discovered more than three hundred years, its mechanism of origin is unclear until today. While investigating the origin of gravitation, I do some experiments discover the moving photons produce gravitation. This discovery shows the origin of gravitation. Meanwhile I do some experiments discover the light interference fringes are produced by the gravitation: my discovery demonstrate light is a particle, but is not a wave-particle duality. Furthermore, applications of this discovery to other moving particles show a similar effect. In a word: the micro particle moving produce gravitation and electromagnetic force. Then I do quantity experiment get a general formula: Reveal the essence of gravitational mass and the essence of electric charge; reveal the origin of gravitation and the essence of matter wave. Along this way, I unify the gravitation and electromagnetic force. Namely I find a natural law that from atomic world to star world play in moving track. See website: https://www.lap-publishing.com/catalog/details/store/gb/book/978-3-8473-2658-8/mechanism-of-interaction-in-moving-matter

  4. Bioenergetics and Life's Origins

    PubMed Central

    Deamer, David; Weber, Arthur L.

    2010-01-01

    Bioenergetics is central to our understanding of living systems, yet has attracted relatively little attention in origins of life research. This article focuses on energy resources available to drive primitive metabolism and the synthesis of polymers that could be incorporated into molecular systems having properties associated with the living state. The compartmented systems are referred to as protocells, each different from all the rest and representing a kind of natural experiment. The origin of life was marked when a rare few protocells happened to have the ability to capture energy from the environment to initiate catalyzed heterotrophic growth directed by heritable genetic information in the polymers. This article examines potential sources of energy available to protocells, and mechanisms by which the energy could be used to drive polymer synthesis. PMID:20182625

  5. The origin of comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, M. E.; Clube, S. V. M.; Napier, W. M.

    Theories of the nature and origin of comets are discussed in a historical review covering the period from ancient times to the present. Consideration is given to the ancient controversy as to the atmospheric or celestial nature of comets, Renaissance theories of comet orbits, superstitions regarding the effects of comets, Kant's (1755) theory of solar-system origin, the nineteenth-century discovery of the relationship between comets and meteor showers, and the continuing solar-system/interstellar debate. Oort's (1950) model of a comet swarm surrounding the solar system is examined in detail; arguments advanced to explain the formation of comets within this model are summarized; and the question of cometary catastrophism is addressed.

  6. Origin of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Ashwini Kumar

    2008-10-01

    The evolution of life has been a big enigma despite rapid advancements in the field of astrobiology, microbiology and genetics in recent years. The answer to this puzzle is as mindboggling as the riddle relating to evolution of the universe itself. Despite the fact that panspermia has gained considerable support as a viable explanation for origin of life on the earth and elsewhere in the universe, the issue, however, remains far from a tangible solution. This paper examines the various prevailing hypotheses regarding origin of life-like abiogenesis, RNA world, iron-sulphur world and panspermia, and concludes that delivery of life-bearing organic molecules by the comets in the early epoch of the earth alone possibly was not responsible for kick-starting the process of evolution of life on our planet.

  7. Endosymbionts and mitochondrial origins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woese, C. R.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility is put forth that the mitochondrion did not originate from an endosymbiosis 1-2 billion years ago involving an aerobic bacterium. Rather, it arose by endosymbiosis in a much earlier anaerobic period and was initially a photosynthetic organelle analogous to the modern chloroplast. This suggestion arises from a reconsideration of the nature of endosymbiosis. It explains the remarkable diversity in mitochondrial information storage and processing systems.

  8. The origin of ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grewe, V.

    2006-05-01

    Highest atmospheric ozone production rates can be found at around 30 km in the tropical stratosphere, leading to ozone mixing ratios of about 10 ppmv. Those stratospheric air masses are then transported to extra-tropical latitudes via the Brewer-Dobson circulation. This is considered the main mechanism to generate mid- and high latitude ozone. By applying the climate-chemistry models E39/C and MAECHAM4/CHEM, this view is investigated in more detail. The origin of ozone in the troposphere and stratosphere is analysed, by incorporating a diagnostics ("marked ozone origin tracers") into the models, which allows to identify the origin of ozone. In most regions the simulated local ozone concentration is dominated by local ozone production, i.e. less than 50% of the ozone at higher latitudes of the stratosphere is produced in the tropics, which conflicts with the idea that the tropics are the global source for stratospheric ozone. Although episodic stratospheric intrusions occur basically everywhere, the main ozone stratosphere-to-troposphere exchange is connected to exchange processes at the sub-tropical jet-stream. The simulated tropospheric influx of ozone amounts to 420 Tg per year, and originates in the Northern Hemisphere from the extra-tropical stratosphere, whereas in the Southern Hemisphere a re-circulation of tropical tropospheric ozone contributes most to the influx of ozone into the troposphere. In the model E39/C, the upper troposphere of both hemispheres is clearly dominated by tropical tropospheric ozone (40%-50%) except for northern summer hemisphere, where the tropospheric contribution (from the tropics as well as from the Northern Hemisphere) does not exceed 20%.

  9. Origin of tektites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Keefe, John A.

    1994-01-01

    The origin of tektites has been obscure because of the following dilemma. The application of physical principles to the data available on tektites points strongly to origin from one or more lunar volcanoes; but few glasses of tektite composition have hitherto been reported from the lunar samples. Instead, the lunar silicic glasses consist chiefly of a material very rich in K2O and poor in MgO. The ratio of K2O/MgO is higher in these glasses than in any tektites reported. The solution of the dilemma seems to come from the study of some recently discovered terrestrial deposits of tektite glass with high values of K2O/MgO at the Cretaceous Tertiary boundary. These glasses are found to be very vulnerable to crystallization into sandine or to alteration to smectite. These end products are known and are more abundant than any terrestrial deposits of tektite glass. It seems possible that, in fact, the moon produces tektite glass, mostly of the high K2O-low MgO type; but on Earth these deposits are destroyed. The much less abundant deposits with lower K and higher Mg are observed because they survive. Other objections to the lunar origin hypothesis appear to be answerable.

  10. Origins of magnetospheric plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, T.E. )

    1991-01-01

    A review is given of recent (1987-1990) progress in understanding of the origins of plasmas in the earth's magnetosphere. In counterpoint to the early supposition that geomagnetic phenomena are produced by energetic plasmas of solar origin, 1987 saw the publication of a provocative argument that accelerated ionospheric plasma could supply all magnetospheric auroral and ring current particles. Significant new developments of existing data sets, as well as the establishment of entirely new data sets, have improved the ability to identify plasma source regions and to track plasma through the magnetospheric system of boundary layers and reservoirs. These developments suggest that the boundary between ionospheric and solar plasmas, once taken to lie at the plasmapause, actually lies much nearer to the magnetopause. Defining this boundary as the surface where solar wind and ionosphere contribute equally to the plasma, it is referred to herein as the 'geopause'. It is now well established that the infusion of ionospheric O(+) plays a major role in the storm-time distention of the magnetotail and inflation of the inner magnetosphere. After more than two decades of observation and debate, the question remains whether magnetosheric are protons of solar or terrestrial origin. 161 refs.

  11. Origins of flower morphology.

    PubMed

    Endress, P K

    2001-08-15

    Flowers evolved in many steps, probably starting long before flowering plants (angiophytes) originated. Certain parts of flowers are conservative and have not changed much during evolution; others are evolutionarily highly plastic. Here conservative features are discussed and an attempt is made to trace them back through their evolutionary history. Microsporangia and ovules (which develop into seeds) are preangiophyte floral elements. Angiospermy, combined with postgenital fusion, was the most prominent key innovation in angiophytes. Angiospermy and thecal organization of stamens originated earlier than all clades of extant angiosperms (the crown group of angiophytes). Differentiation of a perianth into calyx and corolla and syncarpy appeared after the first branching of the basalmost clades of extant angiosperms. Sympetaly and floral tubes as well as tenuinucellar, unitegmic ovules originated as major innovations in the clade that led to asterids. An obvious trend in flower evolution is increased synorganisation of parts, which led to new structures. Fixation of floral organ number and position was a precondition for synorganization. Concomitantly, plasticity changed from number and position of organs to shape of the new structures. Character distribution mapped onto cladograms indicates that key innovations do not appear suddenly, but start with trials and only later become deeply rooted genetically in the organization. This is implied from the common occurrence of reversals in the early history of an innovation. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 291:105-115, 2001. PMID:11479912

  12. The Origin of Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Siddharth; Goyal, Abha

    2007-01-01

    The original description of M-mode echocardiography in 1953, by Inge Edler (1911–2001) and his physicist friend Hellmuth Hertz, marked the beginning of a new diagnostic noninvasive technique. Edler used this technique primarily for the preoperative study of mitral stenosis and diagnosis of mitral regurgitation. His work was carried forward by cardiologists all over the world, who developed Doppler, 2-dimensional, contrast, and transesophageal echocardiography. These are now standard in cardiologic examinations. Edler also influenced neurologists and obstetricians at Lund University (Sweden) to use ultrasound in their fields. For his landmark discovery, Edler is recognized as the “Father of Echocardiography.” PMID:18172524

  13. Origin of Tektites.

    PubMed

    O'keefe, J A; Shute, B E

    1963-03-29

    A comet of the size recently postulated by H. C. Urey would leave a large crater. It is shown, from aerodynamic theory, from observations of distribution around terrestrial impact craters, and from experimental nuclear explosions, that the observed distribution of tektites cannot be the result of impact on the earth, whether cometary or meteoritic. It is further shown, from aerodynamic theory, from observation of a meteor shower, and from study of the breakup of artificial satellites, that the distribution of tektites can be accounted for as a result of fusion stripping of a satellite, as originally suggested by Suess. PMID:17757065

  14. Origin of earth's moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The major geochemical properties of the moon are briefly considered along with the significant facts of the moon's geologic history, and then the three current hypotheses regarding the moon's origin, namely, fission, capture, and binary accretion, are reviewed. The individual merits and improbabilities associated with each mechanism are taken into consideration. Special attention is given to the binary accretion model as the most promising one. In the variants of this model, of crucial importance is the nature of the more general hypothesis assumed for planetary formation from the solar nebula. The two main models differ considerably in the amount of chemical fractionation they allow to accompany planetary formation.

  15. The Origins of Options

    PubMed Central

    Smaldino, Paul E.; Richerson, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Most research on decision making has focused on how human or animal decision makers choose between two or more options, posed in advance by the researchers. The mechanisms by which options are generated for most decisions, however, are not well understood. Models of sequential search have examined the trade-off between continued exploration and choosing one’s current best option, but still cannot explain the processes by which new options are generated. We argue that understanding the origins of options is a crucial but untapped area for decision making research. We explore a number of factors which influence the generation of options, which fall broadly into two categories: psycho-biological and socio-cultural. The former category includes factors such as perceptual biases and associative memory networks. The latter category relies on the incredible human capacity for culture and social learning, which doubtless shape not only our choices but the options available for choice. Our intention is to start a discussion that brings us closer toward understanding the origins of options. PMID:22514515

  16. Origins of Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Czerniak, Bogdan; Dinney, Colin; McConkey, David

    2016-05-23

    Bladder cancer, one of the most frequently occurring human cancers, develops via two tracks referred to as papillary and nonpapillary that correspond to clinically different forms of the disease. Most bladder cancers are chemically induced, with tobacco smoking being the leading risk factor. Recent advances in bladder cancer research have enhanced our understanding of the origin of this disease from urothelial progenitor cells via field effects along papillary/luminal and nonpapillary/basal pathways. Evident from the outset of the disease, the diversity of the luminal and basal pathways, together with cell lineage tracing studies, postulates the origin of molecularly distinct subtypes from different uroprogenitor cells. The molecular mechanisms initiating field effects involve a new class of genes referred to as forerunner (FR) genes that generally map around major tumor suppressors such as RB1. These genes are silenced, predominantly by hypermethylation and less frequently by mutations, and drive the expansion of intraurothelial preneoplastic cells. Different FR genes are involved in various molecular subtypes of bladder cancer and they sensitize the uroprogenitor cells to the development of luminal and basal bladder cancers in animal models. In human bladder cancer, luminal and basal forms have dissimilar clinical behavior and response to conventional and targeted chemotherapeutic manipulations. These new research developments hold the promise of expanding our armamentarium of diagnostic and treatment options for patients with bladder cancer and improving our ability to select patients most likely to respond to a specific therapy. PMID:26907529

  17. 10. Photographic copy of original drawings (originals at Amtrack, Philadelphia, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photographic copy of original drawings (originals at Amtrack, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) PLANS FOR FLOORBEAMS, SWAYS AND RAIL POSTS - Water Street Bridge, US Route 1 spanning Metro-North Commuter Railroad, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  18. 11. Photographic copy of original drawings (originals at Amtrack, Philadelphia, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photographic copy of original drawings (originals at Amtrack, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) END POST AND CHORDS - Water Street Bridge, US Route 1 spanning Metro-North Commuter Railroad, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  19. 2. Photocopy of original photograph (Original in collection of Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of original photograph (Original in collection of Historical Society of Montana) MAIN AND SIDE ELEVATIONS, SHOWING AWNINGS LOWERED OVER PORCH - W. C. Child Ranch, State Highway 279, Helena, Lewis and Clark County, MT

  20. Photocopy of photograph (original located at Mare Island Archives). Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original located at Mare Island Archives). Original photographer unknown. QUARTERS A IN THE SNOW; 1913. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Commandant's Quarters, Walnut Avenue, west side near Eighth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  1. Photocopy of photograph (original located at Mare Island Archives). Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original located at Mare Island Archives). Original photographer unknown. Dry dock 2 with six destroyers; 1922 - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Drydock No. 2, California Avenue, east side near Ninth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  2. Photocopy of photograph (original located at Mare Island Archives). Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original located at Mare Island Archives). Original photographer unknown. Building 253; 1920. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Supply Building, Walnut Avenue, southeast corner of Walnut Avenue & Fifth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  3. Photocopy of photograph (original located at Mare Island Archives). Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original located at Mare Island Archives). Original photographer unknown. Coal sheds with coals; 1906. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Coal Sheds, Waterfront Avenue, northwest corner of Waterfront Avenue & Fourth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  4. Photocopy of photograph (original located at Mare Island Archives). Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original located at Mare Island Archives). Original photographer unknown. View of waterfront during World War II; N.D. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, East of Nave Drive, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  5. Photocopy of photograph (original located at Mare Island Archives). Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original located at Mare Island Archives). Original photographer unknown. View of sawmill after earthquake of 1898. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, East of Nave Drive, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  6. 13. Photocopy of original drawing by Cass Gilbert, 1918 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of original drawing by Cass Gilbert, 1918 (original in possession of NYC Economic Development Corp.) ARMY SUPPLY BASE-PLAN OF CONSTRUCTION PLANT - Brooklyn Army Supply Base, Pier 2, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  7. 15. Photocopy of original drawing by Cass Gilbert, 1918 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photocopy of original drawing by Cass Gilbert, 1918 (original in possession of NYC Economic Development Corp.) TYPICAL DETAILS-PIERS 2, 3, AND 4 - Brooklyn Army Supply Base, Pier 2, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  8. 21. Photocopy of original drawing by Cass Gilbert, 1918 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Photocopy of original drawing by Cass Gilbert, 1918 (original in possession of NYC Economic Development Corp.) ERECTION PLAN-PIER NO. 4 - Brooklyn Army Supply Base, Pier 4, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  9. 19. Photocopy of original drawing by Cass Gilbert, 1918 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Photocopy of original drawing by Cass Gilbert, 1918 (original in possession of NYC Economic Development Corp.) BRIDGES BETWEEN WAREHOUSE A AND PIERS - Brooklyn Army Supply Base, Pier 2, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  10. 14. Photocopy of original drawing by Cass Gilbert, 1918 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopy of original drawing by Cass Gilbert, 1918 (original in possession of NYC Economic Development Corp.) SECTIONS AND DETAILS-PIERS 2, 3, AND 4 - Brooklyn Army Supply Base, Pier 2, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  11. 18. Photocopy of original drawing by Cass Gilbert, 1918 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of original drawing by Cass Gilbert, 1918 (original in possession of NYC Economic Development Corp.) PLANS AND SECTIONS, MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT-PIERS 2, 3, AND 4 - Brooklyn Army Supply Base, Pier 2, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  12. 16. Photocopy of original drawing by Cass Gilbert, 1918 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of original drawing by Cass Gilbert, 1918 (original in possession of NYC Economic Development Corp.) DETAILS OF INSHORE ENDS-PIERS 2, 3, AND 4 - Brooklyn Army Supply Base, Pier 2, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  13. 17. Photocopy of original drawing by Cass Gilbert, 1918 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photocopy of original drawing by Cass Gilbert, 1918 (original in possession of NYC Economic Development Corp.) DETAILS OF OUTSHORE ENDS-PIERS 2, 3, AND 4 - Brooklyn Army Supply Base, Pier 2, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  14. 26. Photocopy of Original Drawing (original in the State of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Photocopy of Original Drawing (original in the State of Michigan Record Center) ELEVATION, COMBINED LIGHT AND TROLLEY STANDARD AND DETAIL OF CAST IRON MANHOLE COVER - Monroe Street Bridge, Spanning River Raisin at Monroe Street, Monroe, Monroe County, MI

  15. 23. Photocopy of Original Drawing (original in the State of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Photocopy of Original Drawing (original in the State of Michigan Record Center) PLAN, SIDE ELEVATION, AND SECTIONAL PLAN FOR PIERS 1, 2, AND 3 - Monroe Street Bridge, Spanning River Raisin at Monroe Street, Monroe, Monroe County, MI

  16. 24. Photocopy of Original Drawing (original in the State of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Photocopy of Original Drawing (original in the State of Michigan Record Center) SECTIONS OF TYPICAL GIRDERS - Monroe Street Bridge, Spanning River Raisin at Monroe Street, Monroe, Monroe County, MI

  17. Photocopy of photograph (original located at Mare Island Archives). Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original located at Mare Island Archives). Original photographer unknown. Dry dock 1 with sailing ship, 1899. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Drydock No. 1, California Avenue, east side near Ninth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  18. Photocopy of photograph (original located at Mare Island Archives). Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original located at Mare Island Archives). Original photographer unknown. Building H1; 1920. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Hospital Headquarters, Johnson Lane, west side at intersection of Johnson Lane & Cossey Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  19. Mechanical origin of aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippiello, E.; Giacco, F.; Marzocchi, W.; Godano, C.; de Arcangelis, L.

    2015-10-01

    Aftershocks are the most striking evidence of earthquake interactions and the physical mechanisms at the origin of their occurrence are still intensively debated. Novel insights stem from recent results on the influence of the faulting style on the aftershock organisation in magnitude and time. Our study shows that the size of the aftershock zone depends on the fault geometry. We find that positive correlations among parameters controlling aftershock occurrence in time, energy and space are a stable feature of seismicity independently of magnitude range and geographic areas. We explain the ensemble of experimental findings by means of a description of the Earth Crust as an heterogeneous elastic medium coupled with a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenosphere. Our results show that heterogeneous stress distribution in an elastic layer combined with a coupling to a viscous flow are sufficient ingredients to describe the physics of aftershock triggering.

  20. Origins of hydration lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication.

  1. The origins of informatics.

    PubMed Central

    Collen, M F

    1994-01-01

    This article summarizes the origins of informatics, which is based on the science, engineering, and technology of computer hardware, software, and communications. In just four decades, from the 1950s to the 1990s, computer technology has progressed from slow, first-generation vacuum tubes, through the invention of the transistor and its incorporation into microprocessor chips, and ultimately, to fast, fourth-generation very-large-scale-integrated silicon chips. Programming has undergone a parallel transformation, from cumbersome, first-generation, machine languages to efficient, fourth-generation application-oriented languages. Communication has evolved from simple copper wires to complex fiberoptic cables in computer-linked networks. The digital computer has profound implications for the development and practice of clinical medicine. PMID:7719803

  2. Conscientiousness: Origins in Childhood?

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Nancy; Duckworth, Angela L.; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Valiente, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we evaluate developmental and personality research with the aim of determining if the personality trait of conscientiousness can be identified in children and adolescents. After concluding that conscientiousness does emerge in childhood, we discuss the developmental origins of conscientiousness with a specific focus on self-regulation, academic motivation, and internalized compliance/internalization of standards. Based on the accumulated body of evidence, we conclude that self-regulation fosters conscientiousness later in life, both directly and via academic motivation and internalized compliance with norms. We argue that elements of conscientiousness are evident by early childhood, self-regulation skills are likely a core developmental component of conscientiousness, and despite the contribution of heredity to the aforementioned aspects of functioning, environmental factors likely contribute to conscientiousness. PMID:23244405

  3. Mechanical origin of aftershocks.

    PubMed

    Lippiello, E; Giacco, F; Marzocchi, W; Godano, C; de Arcangelis, L

    2015-01-01

    Aftershocks are the most striking evidence of earthquake interactions and the physical mechanisms at the origin of their occurrence are still intensively debated. Novel insights stem from recent results on the influence of the faulting style on the aftershock organisation in magnitude and time. Our study shows that the size of the aftershock zone depends on the fault geometry. We find that positive correlations among parameters controlling aftershock occurrence in time, energy and space are a stable feature of seismicity independently of magnitude range and geographic areas. We explain the ensemble of experimental findings by means of a description of the Earth Crust as an heterogeneous elastic medium coupled with a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenosphere. Our results show that heterogeneous stress distribution in an elastic layer combined with a coupling to a viscous flow are sufficient ingredients to describe the physics of aftershock triggering. PMID:26497720

  4. Origins of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Liongue, Clifford; John, Liza B; Ward, Alister

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, involving distinctive antibody- and cell-mediated responses to specific antigens based on "memory" of previous exposure, is a hallmark of higher vertebrates. It has been argued that adaptive immunity arose rapidly, as articulated in the "big bang theory" surrounding its origins, which stresses the importance of coincident whole-genome duplications. Through a close examination of the key molecules and molecular processes underpinning adaptive immunity, this review suggests a less-extreme model, in which adaptive immunity emerged as part of longer evolutionary journey. Clearly, whole-genome duplications provided additional raw genetic materials that were vital to the emergence of adaptive immunity, but a variety of other genetic events were also required to generate some of the key molecules, whereas others were preexisting and simply co-opted into adaptive immunity. PMID:21395512

  5. Mechanical origin of aftershocks

    PubMed Central

    Lippiello, E.; Giacco, F.; Marzocchi, W.; Godano, C.; de Arcangelis, L.

    2015-01-01

    Aftershocks are the most striking evidence of earthquake interactions and the physical mechanisms at the origin of their occurrence are still intensively debated. Novel insights stem from recent results on the influence of the faulting style on the aftershock organisation in magnitude and time. Our study shows that the size of the aftershock zone depends on the fault geometry. We find that positive correlations among parameters controlling aftershock occurrence in time, energy and space are a stable feature of seismicity independently of magnitude range and geographic areas. We explain the ensemble of experimental findings by means of a description of the Earth Crust as an heterogeneous elastic medium coupled with a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenosphere. Our results show that heterogeneous stress distribution in an elastic layer combined with a coupling to a viscous flow are sufficient ingredients to describe the physics of aftershock triggering. PMID:26497720

  6. Origins of hydration lubrication.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication. PMID:25585501

  7. Origin of Sex Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Mauro; Zintzaras, Elias; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2003-10-01

    Why did sex ever arise in the first place? Why it does not disappear in view of the greater efficiency of asexuals? These are clearly two different questions, and we suggest here that the solution for the origin of sex does not necessarily come from theoretical considerations based on currently existing genetic systems. Thus, while we agree with a number of authors in that the emergence of sex (understood as the exchange of genetic material between genomes) is deeply rooted in the origin of life and happened during the very early stages in the transition from individual genes (`replicators') to bacteria-like cells (`reproducers'), we challenge the idea that recombinational repair was the major selective force for the emergence of sex. Taking the stochastic corrector model as a starting point, we provide arguments that question the putative costs of redundancy in primitive protocells. In addition, if genes that cause intragenomic conflict (i.e., parasites) are taken into account, it is certainly wrong to suggest that cellular fusion would be beneficial at the population level (although this strong claim needs some qualifications). However, when a continuous input of deleterious mutations that impair the fitness of the protocell as a whole is considered in the model (in the realistic range in which stable mutant distributions of quasi-species within compartments are established), there are circumstances when sex could be beneficial as a side effect of the dynamic equilibrium between cellular fusion-mutation-selection. The scenario we have explored numerically is fully consistent with the idea that the universal ancestor was not a discrete entity but an ensemble of proto-organisms that exchanged much genetic information.

  8. Actinides and Life's Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Zachary

    2007-12-01

    There are growing indications that life began in a radioactive beach environment. A geologic framework for the origin or support of life in a Hadean heavy mineral placer beach has been developed, based on the unique chemical properties of the lower-electronic actinides, which act as nuclear fissile and fertile fuels, radiolytic energy sources, oligomer catalysts, and coordinating ions (along with mineralogically associated lanthanides) for prototypical prebiotic homonuclear and dinuclear metalloenzymes. A four-factor nuclear reactor model was constructed to estimate how much uranium would have been required to initiate a sustainable fission reaction within a placer beach sand 4.3 billion years ago. It was calculated that about 1-8 weight percent of the sand would have to have been uraninite, depending on the weight percent, uranium enrichment, and quantity of neutron poisons present within the remaining placer minerals. Radiolysis experiments were conducted with various solvents with the use of uranium- and thorium-rich minerals (metatorbernite and monazite, respectively) as proxies for radioactive beach sand in contact with different carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen reactants. Radiation bombardment ranged in duration of exposure from 3 weeks to 6 months. Low levels of acetonitrile (estimated to be on the order of parts per billion in concentration) were conclusively identified in 2 setups and tentatively indicated in a 3rd by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. These low levels have been interpreted within the context of a Hadean placer beach prebiotic framework to demonstrate the promise of investigating natural nuclear reactors as power production sites that might have assisted the origins of life on young rocky planets with a sufficiently differentiated crust/mantle structure. Future investigations are recommended to better quantify the complex relationships between energy release, radioactive grain size, fissionability, reactant phase, phosphorus

  9. Actinides and Life's Origins.

    PubMed

    Adam, Zachary

    2007-12-01

    There are growing indications that life began in a radioactive beach environment. A geologic framework for the origin or support of life in a Hadean heavy mineral placer beach has been developed, based on the unique chemical properties of the lower-electronic actinides, which act as nuclear fissile and fertile fuels, radiolytic energy sources, oligomer catalysts, and coordinating ions (along with mineralogically associated lanthanides) for prototypical prebiotic homonuclear and dinuclear metalloenzymes. A four-factor nuclear reactor model was constructed to estimate how much uranium would have been required to initiate a sustainable fission reaction within a placer beach sand 4.3 billion years ago. It was calculated that about 1-8 weight percent of the sand would have to have been uraninite, depending on the weight percent, uranium enrichment, and quantity of neutron poisons present within the remaining placer minerals. Radiolysis experiments were conducted with various solvents with the use of uraniumand thorium-rich minerals (metatorbernite and monazite, respectively) as proxies for radioactive beach sand in contact with different carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen reactants. Radiation bombardment ranged in duration of exposure from 3 weeks to 6 months. Low levels of acetonitrile (estimated to be on the order of parts per billion in concentration) were conclusively identified in 2 setups and tentatively indicated in a 3(rd) by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. These low levels have been interpreted within the context of a Hadean placer beach prebiotic framework to demonstrate the promise of investigating natural nuclear reactors as power production sites that might have assisted the origins of life on young rocky planets with a sufficiently differentiated crust/mantle structure. Future investigations are recommended to better quantify the complex relationships between energy release, radioactive grain size, fissionability, reactant phase, phosphorus

  10. The Origin of Alcohol Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.

    2004-01-01

    The origin of the "proof" system for measuring the ethanol content of alcoholic beverages is presented. The proof system was originally established for purposes of taxing liquors according to their alcohol content and is different in different countries.

  11. Origins of GEMS Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Walker, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the Earth s stratosphere contain high abundances of submicrometer amorphous silicates known as GEMS grains. From their birth as condensates in the outflows of oxygen-rich evolved stars, processing in interstellar space, and incorporation into disks around new stars, amorphous silicates predominate in most astrophysical environments. Amorphous silicates were a major building block of our Solar System and are prominent in infrared spectra of comets. Anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) thought to derive from comets contain abundant amorphous silicates known as GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) grains. GEMS grains have been proposed to be isotopically and chemically homogenized interstellar amorphous silicate dust. We evaluated this hypothesis through coordinated chemical and isotopic analyses of GEMS grains in a suite of IDPs to constrain their origins. GEMS grains show order of magnitude variations in Mg, Fe, Ca, and S abundances. GEMS grains do not match the average element abundances inferred for ISM dust containing on average, too little Mg, Fe, and Ca, and too much S. GEMS grains have complementary compositions to the crystalline components in IDPs suggesting that they formed from the same reservoir. We did not observe any unequivocal microstructural or chemical evidence that GEMS grains experienced prolonged exposure to radiation. We identified four GEMS grains having O isotopic compositions that point to origins in red giant branch or asymptotic giant branch stars and supernovae. Based on their O isotopic compositions, we estimate that 1-6% of GEMS grains are surviving circumstellar grains. The remaining 94-99% of GEMS grains have O isotopic compositions that are indistinguishable from terrestrial materials and carbonaceous chondrites. These isotopically solar GEMS grains either formed in the Solar System or were completely homogenized in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, the

  12. Origins of magnetospheric physics

    SciTech Connect

    Van Allen, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    The history of the scientific investigation of the earth magnetosphere during the period 1946-1960 is reviewed, with a focus on satellite missions leading to the discovery of the inner and outer radiation belts. Chapters are devoted to ground-based studies of the earth magnetic field through the 1930s, the first U.S. rocket flights carrying scientific instruments, the rockoon flights from the polar regions (1952-1957), U.S. planning for scientific use of artificial satellites (1956), the launch of Sputnik I (1957), the discovery of the inner belt by Explorers I and III (1958), the Argus high-altitude atomic-explosion tests (1958), the confirmation of the inner belt and discovery of the outer belt by Explorer IV and Pioneers I-V, related studies by Sputniks II and III and Luniks I-III, and the observational and theoretical advances of 1959-1961. Photographs, drawings, diagrams, graphs, and copies of original notes and research proposals are provided. 227 references.

  13. Gould Belt Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Leticia; Loinard, Laurent; Dzib, Sergio

    2013-07-01

    Using archive VLA data and recent observations on the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array it is worked on a semi-automatic python/CASA code to select, reduce and plot several young stars belonging to the Ophiuchus core. This code mean to help to select observations made along the 30 years of the VLA done in the selected area with the wide configurations A and B, and in the X and C band, to determine their position and compare it with the most recent ones. In this way it is possible to determinate their proper motion with very high precision. It is presented the phases of the process and our first results worked on three well know stars: S1, DoAr 21 and VLA1623. This is the tip of a bigger work that includes Taurus molecular cloud and other important recent star formation regions belonging to the Gould Belt. Our goal is to support the most suitable among several theories about Gould Belt origin or provide a new one taking in count the dynamics of those regions.

  14. Eusociality: Origin and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Edward O.; Hölldobler, Bert

    2005-01-01

    In this new assessment of the empirical evidence, an alternative to the standard model is proposed: group selection is the strong binding force in eusocial evolution; individual selection, the strong dissolutive force; and kin selection (narrowly defined), either a weak binding or weak dissolutive force, according to circumstance. Close kinship may be more a consequence of eusociality than a factor promoting its origin. A point of no return to the solitary state exists, as a rule when workers become anatomically differentiated. Eusociality has been rare in evolution, evidently due to the scarcity of environmental pressures adequate to tip the balance among countervailing forces in favor of group selection. Eusociality in ants and termites in the irreversible stage is the key to their ecological dominance and has (at least in ants) shaped some features of internal phylogeny. Their colonies are consistently superior to solitary and preeusocial competitors, due to the altruistic behavior among nestmates and their ability to organize coordinated action by pheromonal communication. PMID:16157878

  15. Origin of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, K.

    1999-12-01

    The origin of the concept of neutron stars can be traced to two brief, incredibly insightful publications. Work on the earlier paper by Lev Landau (Phys. Z. Sowjetunion, 1, 285, 1932) actually predated the discovery of neutrons. Nonetheless, Landau arrived at the notion of a collapsed star with the density of a nucleus (really a "nucleus star") and demonstrated (at about the same time as, and independent of, Chandrasekhar) that there is an upper mass limit for dense stellar objects of about 1.5 solar masses. Perhaps even more remarkable is the abstract of a talk presented at the December 1933 meeting of the American Physical Society published by Walter Baade and Fritz Zwicky in 1934 (Phys. Rev. 45, 138). It followed the discovery of the neutron by just over a year. Their report, which was about the same length as the present abstract: (1) invented the concept and word supernova; (2) suggested that cosmic rays are produced by supernovae; and (3) in the authors own words, proposed "with all reserve ... the view that supernovae represent the transitions from ordinary stars to neutron stars (italics), which in their final stages consist of extremely closely packed neutrons." The abstract by Baade and Zwicky probably contains the highest density of new, important (and correct) ideas in high energy astrophysics ever published in a single paper. In this talk, we will discuss some of the facts and myths surrounding these two publications.

  16. DHCP Origin Traceback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Saugat; Kulkarni, Dhananjay; Ravishankar, Chinya V.

    Imagine that the DHCP server is under attack from malicious hosts in your network. How would you know where these DHCP packets are coming from, or which path they took in the network? This paper investigates the problem of determining the origin of a DHCP packet in a network. We propose a practical method for adding a new option field that does not violate any RFC's, which we believe should be a crucial requirement while proposing any related solution. The new DHCP option will contain the ingress port and the switch MAC address. We recommend that this new option be added at the edge so that we can use the recorded value for performing traceback. The computational overhead of our solution is low, and the related network management tasks are low as well. We also address issues related to securing the field in order to maintain privacy of switch MAC addresses, fragmentation of packets, and possible attack scenarios. Our study shows that the traceback scheme is effective and practical to use in most network environments.

  17. DNA replication origins in archaea

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhenfang; Liu, Jingfang; Yang, Haibo; Xiang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication initiation, which starts at specific chromosomal site (known as replication origins), is the key regulatory stage of chromosome replication. Archaea, the third domain of life, use a single or multiple origin(s) to initiate replication of their circular chromosomes. The basic structure of replication origins is conserved among archaea, typically including an AT-rich unwinding region flanked by several conserved repeats (origin recognition box, ORB) that are located adjacent to a replication initiator gene. Both the ORB sequence and the adjacent initiator gene are considerably diverse among different replication origins, while in silico and genetic analyses have indicated the specificity between the initiator genes and their cognate origins. These replicator–initiator pairings are reminiscent of the oriC-dnaA system in bacteria, and a model for the negative regulation of origin activity by a downstream cluster of ORB elements has been recently proposed in haloarchaea. Moreover, comparative genomic analyses have revealed that the mosaics of replicator-initiator pairings in archaeal chromosomes originated from the integration of extrachromosomal elements. This review summarizes the research progress in understanding of archaeal replication origins with particular focus on the utilization, control and evolution of multiple replication origins in haloarchaea. PMID:24808892

  18. Moon (Form-Origin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2014-05-01

    When the Earth was formed, it was in a state of burning heat. As time went by, temperature on the planet's surface was falling due to radiation and heat transfer, and various components (crusts) began taking solid form at the Earth's poles. The formation of crusts took place at the Earth's poles, because the stirring of burning and fluid masses on the surface of the Earth was significantly slighter there than it was on the equator. Due to centrifugal force and Coriolis Effect, these solid masses headed towards the equator; those originating from the North Pole followed a south-western course, while those originating from the South Pole followed a north-western course and there they rotated from west to east at a lower speed than the underlying burning and liquid earth, because of their lower initial linear velocity, their solid state and inertia. Because inertia is proportional to mass, the initially larger solid body swept all new solid ones, incorporating them to its western side. The density of the new solid masses was higher, because the components on the surface would freeze and solidify first, before the underlying thicker components. As a result, the western side of the initial islet of solid rocks submerged, while the east side elevated. . As a result of the above, this initial islet began to spin in reverse, and after taking on the shape of a sphere, it formed the "heart" of the Moon. The Moon-sphere, rolling on the equator, would sink the solid rocks that continued to descend from the Earth's poles. The sinking rocks partially melted because of higher temperatures in the greater depths that the Moon descended to, while part of the rocks' mass bonded with the Moon and also served as a heat-insulating material, preventing the descended side of the sphere from melting. Combined with the Earth's liquid mass that covered its emerging eastern surface, new sphere-shaped shells were created, with increased density and very powerful structural cohesion. During the

  19. Moon (Form-Origin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2015-04-01

    When the Earth was formed, it was in a state of burning heat. As time went by, temperature on the planet's surface was falling due to radiation and heat transfer, and various components (crusts) began taking solid form at the Earth's poles. The formation of crusts took place at the Earth's poles, because the stirring of burning and fluid masses on the surface of the Earth was significantly slighter there than it was on the equator. Due to centrifugal force and Coriolis Effect, these solid masses headed towards the equator; those originating from the North Pole followed a south-western course, while those originating from the South Pole followed a north-western course and there they rotated from west to east at a lower speed than the underlying burning and liquid earth, because of their lower initial linear velocity, their solid state and inertia. Because inertia is proportional to mass, the initially larger solid body swept all new solid ones, incorporating them to its western side. The density of the new solid masses was higher, because the components on the surface would freeze and solidify first, before the underlying thicker components. As a result, the western side of the initial islet of solid rocks submerged, while the east side elevated. . As a result of the above, this initial islet began to spin in reverse, and after taking on the shape of a sphere, it formed the "heart" of the Moon. The Moon-sphere, rolling on the equator, would sink the solid rocks that continued to descend from the Earth's poles. The sinking rocks partially melted because of higher temperatures in the greater depths that the Moon descended to, while part of the rocks' mass bonded with the Moon and also served as a heat-insulating material, preventing the descended side of the sphere from melting. Combined with the Earth's liquid mass that covered its emerging eastern surface, new sphere-shaped shells were created, with increased density and very powerful structural cohesion. During the

  20. Moon (Form-Origin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2016-04-01

    When the Earth was formed, it was in a state of burning heat. As time went by, temperature on the planet's surface was falling due to radiation and heat transfer, and various components (crusts) began taking solid form at the Earth's poles. The formation of crusts took place at the Earth's poles, because the stirring of burning and fluid masses on the surface of the Earth was significantly slighter there than it was on the equator. Due to centrifugal force and Coriolis Effect, these solid masses headed towards the equator; those originating from the North Pole followed a south-western course, while those originating from the South Pole followed a north-western course and there they rotated from west to east at a lower speed than the underlying burning and liquid earth, because of their lower initial linear velocity, their solid state and inertia. Because inertia is proportional to mass, the initially larger solid body swept all new solid ones, incorporating them to its western side. The density of the new solid masses was higher, because the components on the surface would freeze and solidify first, before the underlying thicker components. As a result, the western side of the initial islet of solid rocks submerged, while the east side elevated. . As a result of the above, this initial islet began to spin in reverse, and after taking on the shape of a sphere, it formed the "heart" of the Moon. The Moon-sphere, rolling on the equator, would sink the solid rocks that continued to descend from the Earth's poles. The sinking rocks partially melted because of higher temperatures in the greater depths that the Moon descended to, while part of the rocks' mass bonded with the Moon and also served as a heat-insulating material, preventing the descended side of the sphere from melting. Combined with the Earth's liquid mass that covered its emerging eastern surface, new sphere-shaped shells were created, with increased density and very powerful structural cohesion. During the

  1. THE COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH

    SciTech Connect

    Green, James C.; Michael Shull, J.; Snow, Theodore P.; Stocke, John; Froning, Cynthia S.; Osterman, Steve; Beland, Stephane; Burgh, Eric B.; Danforth, Charles; France, Kevin; Ebbets, Dennis; Heap, Sara H.; Leitherer, Claus; Sembach, Kenneth; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Savage, Blair D.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Spencer, John; Alan Stern, S.; Welsh, Barry; and others

    2012-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is a moderate-resolution spectrograph with unprecedented sensitivity that was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2009 May, during HST Servicing Mission 4 (STS-125). We present the design philosophy and summarize the key characteristics of the instrument that will be of interest to potential observers. For faint targets, with flux F{sub {lambda}} Almost-Equal-To 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} A{sup -1}, COS can achieve comparable signal to noise (when compared to Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph echelle modes) in 1%-2% of the observing time. This has led to a significant increase in the total data volume and data quality available to the community. For example, in the first 20 months of science operation (2009 September-2011 June) the cumulative redshift pathlength of extragalactic sight lines sampled by COS is nine times than sampled at moderate resolution in 19 previous years of Hubble observations. COS programs have observed 214 distinct lines of sight suitable for study of the intergalactic medium as of 2011 June. COS has measured, for the first time with high reliability, broad Ly{alpha} absorbers and Ne VIII in the intergalactic medium, and observed the He II reionization epoch along multiple sightlines. COS has detected the first CO emission and absorption in the UV spectra of low-mass circumstellar disks at the epoch of giant planet formation, and detected multiple ionization states of metals in extra-solar planetary atmospheres. In the coming years, COS will continue its census of intergalactic gas, probe galactic and cosmic structure, and explore physics in our solar system and Galaxy.

  2. The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James C.; Froning, Cynthia S.; Osterman, Steve; Ebbets, Dennis; Heap, Sara H.; Leitherer, Claus; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Savage, Blair D.; Sembach, Kenneth; Shull, J. Michael; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Snow, Theodore P.; Spencer, John; Stern, S. Alan; Stocke, John; Welsh, Barry; Beland, Stephane; Burgh, Eric B.; Danforth, Charles; France, Kevin; Keeney, Brian; McPhate, Jason; Penton, Steven V; Andrews, John; Morse, Jon

    2010-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is a moderate-resolution spectrograph with unprecedented sensitivity that was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May 2009, during HST Servicing Mission 4 (STS-125). We present the design philosophy and summarize the key characteristics of the instrument that will be of interest to potential observers. For faint targets, with flux F(sub lambda) approximates 1.0 X 10(exp -14) ergs/s/cm2/Angstrom, COS can achieve comparable signal to noise (when compared to STIS echelle modes) in 1-2% of the observing time. This has led to a significant increase in the total data volume and data quality available to the community. For example, in the first 20 months of science operation (September 2009 - June 2011) the cumulative redshift pathlength of extragalactic sight lines sampled by COS is 9 times that sampled at moderate resolution in 19 previous years of Hubble observations. COS programs have observed 214 distinct lines of sight suitable for study of the intergalactic medium as of June 2011. COS has measured, for the first time with high reliability, broad Lya absorbers and Ne VIII in the intergalactic medium, and observed the HeII reionization epoch along multiple sightlines. COS has detected the first CO emission and absorption in the UV spectra of low-mass circumstellar disks at the epoch of giant planet formation, and detected multiple ionization states of metals in extra-solar planetary atmospheres. In the coming years, COS will continue its census of intergalactic gas, probe galactic and cosmic structure, and explore physics in our solar system and Galaxy.

  3. "Origin," "creation," and "origin of life" some conceptual considerations.

    PubMed

    Charpa, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    This paper opens by drawing attention to the fact that there is some conceptual confusion with regard to "origin" and "creation." This has its historical roots in the beginnings of modern science and undoubtedly affects our positioning towards the evolutionism/creationism-debate. This article argues that there are relevant ontological, epistemological, thematic, methodological, and logical differences between "origin" and "creation." As a result, the analysis suggests keeping the usage of both concepts strictly quite separate. Creation is not simply another word for origin nor does it stand for an (from a rigid scientific point of view) awkward example of an origin. Irrespective of the apparent similarities as explanatory factors, origin and creation belong to fundamentally different types of concepts. Consequently, "origin of life" and those scientific projects connected to it present themselves as something distinct that neither competes nor meshes with thinking about creation. PMID:23316571

  4. Generating original ideas: The neural underpinning of originality.

    PubMed

    Mayseless, Naama; Eran, Ayelet; Shamay-Tsoory, Simone G

    2015-08-01

    One of the key aspects of creativity is the ability to produce original ideas. Originality is defined in terms of the novelty and rarity of an idea and is measured by the infrequency of the idea compared to other ideas. In the current study we focused on divergent thinking (DT) - the ability to produce many alternate ideas - and assessed the neural pathways associated with originality. Considering that generation of original ideas involves both the ability to generate new associations and the ability to overcome automatic common responses, we hypothesized that originality would be associated with activations in regions related to associative thinking, including areas of the default mode network (DMN) such as medial prefrontal areas, as well as with areas involved in cognitive control and inhibition. Thirty participants were scanned while performing a DT task that required the generation of original uses for common objects. The results indicate that the ability to produce original ideas is mediated by activity in several regions that are part of the DMN including the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). Furthermore, individuals who are more original exhibited enhanced activation in the ventral anterior cingulate cortex (vACC), which was also positively coupled with activity in the left occipital-temporal area. These results are in line with the dual model of creativity, according to which original ideas are a product of the interaction between a system that generates ideas and a control system that evaluates these ideas. PMID:26003860

  5. 21. Photocopy of Original Drawing (original in Michigan Department of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Photocopy of Original Drawing (original in Michigan Department of Transportation, 425 West Ottawa, Lansing, MI 48909), Bridge X2 of 11-2-21, Sheet 9, July 23, 1935. EAST ELEVATION, LOOKING WEST - State Route M-139 Bridge, Spanning Ox Creek, Fair Plain, Berrien County, MI

  6. Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, San Bruno, California, Navy # 104-A-9). (Signed) Ralph Whitman, public works officer, "Yard chapel addition to house organ, etc., plans, elevations, details," September 1929. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, St. Peter's Chapel, Walnut Street & Cedar Parkway, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  7. Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, San Bruno, California, Navy # 104-A-13). (Signed) Ralph Whitman, public works officer, "Yard chapel organ addition mill details, exterior window," September 1929. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, St. Peter's Chapel, Walnut Street & Cedar Parkway, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  8. 8. Photocopy of original USRS glass plate slide (from original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photocopy of original USRS glass plate slide (from original slide on file at National Archives, Rocky Mountain Region, Denver, Colorado) Photographer unknown, ca. 1908 The diversion weir of the Okanogan National Irrigation Project - Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, Salmon Creek, Okanogan, Okanogan County, WA

  9. 11. Photocopy of original construction drawing, dated 1934. (Original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of original construction drawing, dated 1934. (Original print in the possession of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, Portland, OR.) ADMINISTRATION BUILDING MAIN FLOOR PLAN. - Bonneville Project, Administration Building, South side of main entrance, Bonneville Project, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  10. 12. Photocopy of original construction drawing, undated. (Original print in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of original construction drawing, undated. (Original print in the possession of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, Portland, OR.) PROPOSED EXTENSION TO ADMINISTRATION BUILDING. - Bonneville Project, Administration Building, South side of main entrance, Bonneville Project, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  11. Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, San Bruno, California, Navy # 104-A-1), showing ground plan. Albert Sutton, plan for yard chapel at U.S. Navy Yard, Mare Island, Cal., November 1900. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, St. Peter's Chapel, Walnut Street & Cedar Parkway, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  12. Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, San Bruno, California, Navy # 104-A-2), showing front elevation and section. Albert Sutton, plan for yard chapel at U.S. Navy Yard, Mare Island, Cal., November 1900. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, St. Peter's Chapel, Walnut Street & Cedar Parkway, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  13. Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, San Bruno, California, Navy # 104-A-3, showing side and rear elevation. Albert Sutton, "plan for yard chapel at the U.S. Navy Yard, Mare Island, Cal.," November 1900. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, St. Peter's Chapel, Walnut Street & Cedar Parkway, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  14. 16. Photocopy of original USRS photograph (from original print in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of original USRS photograph (from original print in the Umatilla Project History 1918, on file at National Archives, Rocky Mountain Region, Denver, Colorado) Photographer unknown, ca. 1918. Office of U.S. Reclamation Service - Hermiston, Umatilla Project, Oregon - Former Umatilla Project Headquarters Buildings, Office, Hermiston, Umatilla County, OR

  15. Photograph of original drawing (original in possession of National Passenger ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photograph of original drawing (original in possession of National Passenger Railroad Corporation). STATION BUILDING: Foundation Plan / Alterations and Additions (dated: 7/17/14) - North Philadelphia Station, 2900 North Broad Street, on northwest corner of Broad Street & Glenwood Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  16. 56. Photograph of Original Plan (original plans in the possession ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. Photograph of Original Plan (original plans in the possession of the Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal Corporation) BAGGAGE AND EXPRESS UNIT, MAIN FLOOR AND BOILER ROOM PLANS, SECTIONS IV-V - Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, Tracks & Shed, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 55. Photograph of Original Plan (original plans in the possession ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. Photograph of Original Plan (original plans in the possession of the Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal Corporation) BAGGAGE AND EXPRESS UNITY, STREET LEVEL FLOOR PLAN, SECTION III - Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, Tracks & Shed, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, San Bruno, California, Navy # 104-A-22), showing current floor plan. Department of the Navy, Bureau of Yards and Docks, "Record drawing, N.D. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, St. Peter's Chapel, Walnut Street & Cedar Parkway, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  19. Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, San Bruno, California, Navy # 104-A-4, showing organ recess. Dept. yards & docks, U.S. Navy, Mare Island, Cal., "Plan & Sections, proposed addition, St. Peter's Chapel, December 1904 - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, St. Peter's Chapel, Walnut Street & Cedar Parkway, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  20. Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, San Bruno, California, Navy # 104-A-5). Depts. Yards & docks, U.S. Navy Mare Island, Cal., "full sized detail of fretwork panels in back of organ recess, St. Peter's Chapel, Mare Island, Cal., December 1904. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, St. Peter's Chapel, Walnut Street & Cedar Parkway, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  1. Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, San Bruno, California, Navy # 104-A-7. "Full size sketch of 2 candelabra stands for St. Peters Chapel, Mare Island, Calif.," October 1908. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, St. Peter's Chapel, Walnut Street & Cedar Parkway, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  2. Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, San Bruno, California, Navy # 104-A-14). Dept. of yards and docks, "Chapel amplifier support," October 1945. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, St. Peter's Chapel, Walnut Street & Cedar Parkway, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  3. 58. Photograph of Original Plan (original plans in the possession ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. Photograph of Original Plan (original plans in the possession of the Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal Corporation) BAGGAGE AND EXPRESS UNIT, ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS, SECTION IV-V - Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, Tracks & Shed, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. 19. Photocopy of original construction drawing, dated April 1924 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Photocopy of original construction drawing, dated April 1924 (original print in possession of Veterans Administration, Oakland Branch, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania). DRAWING 1-1 -- INFIRMARY, BUILDING NO. 1 -- CENTER PORTION -- BASEMENT PLAN. - VA Medical Center, Aspinwall Division, Infirmary Building, 5103 Delafield Avenue (O'Hara Township), Aspinwall, Allegheny County, PA

  5. 29. Photocopy of original construction drawing, dated February 1932 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Photocopy of original construction drawing, dated February 1932 (original print in possession of Veterans Administration, Oakland Branch, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania). DRAWING 1-1 -- INFIRMARY, BUILDING NO. 1 -- ADDITION TO INFIRMARY -- BASEMENT PLAN. - VA Medical Center, Aspinwall Division, Infirmary Building, 5103 Delafield Avenue (O'Hara Township), Aspinwall, Allegheny County, PA

  6. 25. Photocopy of Original Drawing (original in the State of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Photocopy of Original Drawing (original in the State of Michigan Record Center) FALSEWORK DETAILS, TYPICAL HALF ELEVATION OF AN INTERIOR RIB, SECTION NEAR END OF SPAN, AND SECTION NEAR PIER - Monroe Street Bridge, Spanning River Raisin at Monroe Street, Monroe, Monroe County, MI

  7. Photocopy of photograph (original located at Mare Island Archives). Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original located at Mare Island Archives). Original photographer unknown. Dry dock 2 with three submarines and one sailing ship; 1914. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Drydock No. 2, California Avenue, east side near Ninth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  8. 114. Photocopy of original construction drawing, 14 August 1935. (Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    114. Photocopy of original construction drawing, 14 August 1935. (Original print in the possession of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, Portland, OR.) (M-5-8, Sheet No. 14) SPILLWAY DAM FISHWAY ENTRANCE BAY DIFFUSION CHAMBER BEAN DETAILS. - Bonneville Project, Bonneville Dam, Columbia River, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  9. 12. Photocopy of original construction drawing, dated November 1932 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of original construction drawing, dated November 1932 (original print in possession of Veterans Administration, Oakland Branch, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania). DRAWING 32-2 -- ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, BUILDING NO. 32 -- BASEMENT PLAN AND CUPOLA DETAIL. - VA Medical Center, Aspinwall Division, Administration Building, 5103 Delafield Avenue, Aspinwall, Allegheny County, PA

  10. 13. Photocopy of original construction drawing, dated November 1932 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of original construction drawing, dated November 1932 (original print in possession of Veterans Administration, Oakland Branch, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania). DRAWING 32-3 -- ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, BUILDING NO. 32 -- FIRST AND SECOND FLOOR PLANS. - VA Medical Center, Aspinwall Division, Administration Building, 5103 Delafield Avenue, Aspinwall, Allegheny County, PA

  11. Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, San Bruno, California, Navy # A-21). Dept. of the Navy District Public Works Office, "additions, floor plan, elevations & details; architectural, mechanical & electrical," May 1963. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, St. Peter's Chapel, Walnut Street & Cedar Parkway, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  12. Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of original drawings (original located at the National Archives, San Bruno, California, Navy # 104-A-25) William Jeffries Associates, A.I.A., "Repair to stained glass window, building 104, elevation & details," September 1952. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, St. Peter's Chapel, Walnut Street & Cedar Parkway, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  13. The Origins of Soviet Sociolinguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandist, Craig

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the origins of Soviet sociolinguistics and suggests that the historical significance of the reception and reinterpretation of these ideas is considerable, leading to a reconsideration of the origins of sociolinguistics and the relationship between Marxism and the language sciences in the early years of the Soviet Union. (Author/VWL)

  14. Editing Paperback Reprints and Originals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feiwel, Janet

    1982-01-01

    Outlines the functions of an editor of paperback reprint and original children's books at Avon Books, describes the strategies that go into the selection of books for paperback reprinting or original publication, and reviews the approaches to marketing paperback children's books, such as cover art, which distinguish them from hardcovers. (JL)

  15. The Origin of Malignant Malaria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasmodium falciparum is the causative agent of malignant malaria, which is among the most severe human infectious diseases. Despite its overwhelming significance to human health, the parasite’s origins remain unclear. The favored origin hypothesis holds that P. falciparum and its closest known rel...

  16. 17. Photocopy of original USRS photograph (from original print in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photocopy of original USRS photograph (from original print in the Umatilla Project History 1920, on file at National Archives, Rocky Mountain Region, Denver, Colorado) Photographer unknown, ca. 1920. Project office and employees - reading from left to right: Una H. Keck, Geo. C. Patterson, H.M. Schilling, Maurice D. Scroggs, Carl M. Voyen, Chas. Taylor, C.D. Porter - Former Umatilla Project Headquarters Buildings, Office, Hermiston, Umatilla County, OR

  17. The origins of originality: the neural bases of creative thinking and originality.

    PubMed

    Shamay-Tsoory, S G; Adler, N; Aharon-Peretz, J; Perry, D; Mayseless, N

    2011-01-01

    Although creativity has been related to prefrontal activity, recent neurological case studies postulate that patients who have left frontal and temporal degeneration involving deterioration of language abilities may actually develop de novo artistic abilities. In this study, we propose a neural and cognitive model according to which a balance between the two hemispheres affects a major aspect of creative cognition, namely, originality. In order to examine the neural basis of originality, that is, the ability to produce statistically infrequent ideas, patients with localized lesions in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), and posterior parietal and temporal cortex (PC), were assessed by two tasks involving divergent thinking and originality. Results indicate that lesions in the mPFC involved the most profound impairment in originality. Furthermore, precise anatomical mapping of lesions indicated that while the extent of lesion in the right mPFC was associated with impaired originality, lesions in the left PC were associated with somewhat elevated levels of originality. A positive correlation between creativity scores and left PC lesions indicated that the larger the lesion is in this area the greater the originality. On the other hand, a negative correlation was observed between originality scores and lesions in the right mPFC. It is concluded that the right mPFC is part of a right fronto-parietal network which is responsible for producing original ideas. It is possible that more linear cognitive processing such as language, mediated by left hemisphere structures interferes with creative cognition. Therefore, lesions in the left hemisphere may be associated with elevated levels of originality. PMID:21126528

  18. Origines de la nomenclature astrale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchesne-Guillemin, J.

    Within a survey of the Indo-European, Sumero-Babylonian, Greek, Arabic, and modern origins of the names of the constellations, stars, planets, satellites, asteroids, etc., an explanation is offered of the Omega sign used in Greek horoscopes for the lunar nodes but already appearing on Babylonian reliefs. Its origin is traced back to the Sumerian constellations of the Yoke, later called the Dragon.

  19. Origin of the sinus impulse.

    PubMed

    Schuessler, R B; Boineau, J P; Bromberg, B I

    1996-03-01

    It was generally accepted that the site of normal impulse origin within the atria was a single static focus within the sinus node. This review will examine how this model of impulse origin came about and has evolved. Early on, conflicting data suggested that the sinus node focus was not static and changed with interventions that changed heart rate, such as vagal stimulation. Furthermore, even with removal of the sinus node, a normal atrial rhythm was generated. High-resolution mapping in humans and dogs showed that the initiation of the impulse was dynamic and could be multicentric, with more than one focus initiating a single beat. Shifts in the site of origin correlated with changes in rate and were consistent with P wave changes routinely observed in the standard ECG. These studies suggested multiple pacemakers were responsible for impulse initiation. However, it was not clear how these widespread pacemakers were coordinated to function synchronously. Recent canine data suggest that the node may be partially insulated from the surrounding atrium, resulting in multicentric origin starting from a single site within the node. What has evolved is a model of impulse origin with a sinus node having discrete exit sites and a dominant pacemaker within the node that can shift to other nodal sites. Complex and changing conduction out of the node, coupled with extranodal pacemakers, which can assume dominance over the node, combine with the autonomic nervous system to control heart rate and the pattern of impulse origin within the atria. PMID:8867301

  20. The origins of research into the origins of life.

    PubMed

    Fry, Iris

    2006-03-01

    Most scientists at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century chose to ignore the question of the origin of life on Earth, regarding it as too mysterious and complex to handle. Yet, in the early 1950s an experimental field devoted to the study of the problem made its first steps. The pioneering theories of several scientists in the first decades of the 20th century played a major role in this transformation, notably those of the Russian biochemist Alexander I. Oparin and the British geneticist and biochemist J.B.S. Haldane. The ideas of the lesser-known American psycho-physiologist Leonard Troland also made a significant contribution to subsequent developments in origin-of-life research. Therefore, it is well worth taking a look at the professional, philosophical and ideological commitments that shaped the approaches of the three scientists to origin-of-life research. PMID:16469383

  1. Endosymbiotic theories for eukaryote origin.

    PubMed

    Martin, William F; Garg, Sriram; Zimorski, Verena

    2015-09-26

    For over 100 years, endosymbiotic theories have figured in thoughts about the differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. More than 20 different versions of endosymbiotic theory have been presented in the literature to explain the origin of eukaryotes and their mitochondria. Very few of those models account for eukaryotic anaerobes. The role of energy and the energetic constraints that prokaryotic cell organization placed on evolutionary innovation in cell history has recently come to bear on endosymbiotic theory. Only cells that possessed mitochondria had the bioenergetic means to attain eukaryotic cell complexity, which is why there are no true intermediates in the prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition. Current versions of endosymbiotic theory have it that the host was an archaeon (an archaebacterium), not a eukaryote. Hence the evolutionary history and biology of archaea increasingly comes to bear on eukaryotic origins, more than ever before. Here, we have compiled a survey of endosymbiotic theories for the origin of eukaryotes and mitochondria, and for the origin of the eukaryotic nucleus, summarizing the essentials of each and contrasting some of their predictions to the observations. A new aspect of endosymbiosis in eukaryote evolution comes into focus from these considerations: the host for the origin of plastids was a facultative anaerobe. PMID:26323761

  2. Endosymbiotic theories for eukaryote origin

    PubMed Central

    Martin, William F.; Garg, Sriram; Zimorski, Verena

    2015-01-01

    For over 100 years, endosymbiotic theories have figured in thoughts about the differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. More than 20 different versions of endosymbiotic theory have been presented in the literature to explain the origin of eukaryotes and their mitochondria. Very few of those models account for eukaryotic anaerobes. The role of energy and the energetic constraints that prokaryotic cell organization placed on evolutionary innovation in cell history has recently come to bear on endosymbiotic theory. Only cells that possessed mitochondria had the bioenergetic means to attain eukaryotic cell complexity, which is why there are no true intermediates in the prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition. Current versions of endosymbiotic theory have it that the host was an archaeon (an archaebacterium), not a eukaryote. Hence the evolutionary history and biology of archaea increasingly comes to bear on eukaryotic origins, more than ever before. Here, we have compiled a survey of endosymbiotic theories for the origin of eukaryotes and mitochondria, and for the origin of the eukaryotic nucleus, summarizing the essentials of each and contrasting some of their predictions to the observations. A new aspect of endosymbiosis in eukaryote evolution comes into focus from these considerations: the host for the origin of plastids was a facultative anaerobe. PMID:26323761

  3. The origin of the moon.

    PubMed

    Boss, A P

    1986-01-24

    The origin of the moon is considered within the theory of formation of the terrestrial planets by accumulation of planetesimals. The theory predicts the occurrence of giant impacts, suggesting that the moon formed after a roughly Mars-sized body impacted on the protoearth. The impact blasted portions of the protoearth and the impacting body into geocentric orbit, forming a prelunar disk from which the moon later accreted. Although other mechanisms for formation of the moon appear to be dynamically impossible or implausible, fundamental questions must be answered before a giant impact origin can be considered both possible and probable. PMID:17735007

  4. Increasing Originality in Written Expression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belasco, Jack Thomas

    This study partially replicated Moss's "A Study of the Effect of Selected Methods of Instruction Designed to Increase Originality in Written Expression," except for the fact that this investigator taught a 5th grade and an 11th grade class for most of a school year. Some of the conclusions of the study were: no particular teaching technique was…

  5. Climate Drives Polar Bear Origins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In their provocative analysis of northern bears (“Nuclear genomic sequences reveal that polar bears are an old and distinct bear lineage,” Reports, 20 April, p. 344), F. Hailer et al. use independent nuclear loci to show that polar bears originated during the middle Pleistocene, rather than during t...

  6. Originism - Ethics and Extraterrestrial Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockell, C. S.

    How should we treat extraterrestrial life, if we ever find it, and does a different origin of life imply a different ethical status? The most likely source of an ethical difference, or `originism,' is the inability to find a coherent definition of `life,' required to assess moral relevance in the first place. Although from a normative point of view biochemical architecture, in itself, does not provide a reason for a difference, there are numerous positions that might encourage us to treat an independent origin of life differently to life that is related to life on Earth. For example, from an instrumental point of view it would provide an opportunity to study another biological data point; it will be a new source of information about the evolution of life, and thus it might be afforded special status. We might consider extraterrestrial life to be special as prudence against the possibility of its mistreatment through an erroneous moral assessment of its worth. Whether extraterrestrial life exists of an independent origin or not, this analysis ultimately can provide a useful device for considering how we should treat entities on Earth whose status as `living' organisms is disputed, specifically viruses.

  7. The Origin of Roman Numerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dapre, P. A.

    1977-01-01

    A theory on the origin of Roman numerals proposes that the principal numbers can be stylized in terms of a square. It is speculated that the abacus or its equivalents, such as the counter or chequer-board, was used to count before the alphabet became common. (SW)

  8. The Moon and Its Origin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urey, Harold C.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the origin of the Moon on the basis of the Apollo expeditions as an accumulated gas sphere at its very beginning and, later, a satellite captured by the Earth. Indicates that the model would be substantially believable if further observations should be proved to exist as estimated. (CC)

  9. Origin of Water on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J. I.; Morbidelli, A.; Chambers, J. E.

    2002-01-01

    Dynamical simulations suggest that the Earth's water budget was delivered primarily from the asteroid belt, in the form of large planetary embryos. The same simulations present a very different picture for Mars its water came from a mixture of cometary and small asteroidal bodies. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. The origin of the constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Archie E.

    The problem of the origin of the stellar constellations familiar to western astronomers from ancient times is discussed in an attempt to answer the classical detective story questions: Who? When? Why? and Where? The available astronomical, literary and archaeological evidence is examined to suggest a possible solution.

  11. Hybrid origin of Audubon's warbler.

    PubMed

    Brelsford, Alan; Milá, Borja; Irwin, Darren E

    2011-06-01

    Several animal species have recently been shown to have hybrid origins, but no avian examples have been documented with molecular evidence. We investigate whether the Audubon's warbler (Dendroica auduboni), one of four visually distinct species in the yellow-rumped warbler complex, has originated through hybridization between two other species in this group, the myrtle warbler (D. coronata) and black-fronted warbler (D. nigrifrons). Analysis of nuclear amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and sequence markers shows that Audubon's warblers are genetically intermediate and carry a mixture of alleles otherwise found only in one or the other of their putative parental species. Audubon's warblers also carry two deeply divergent mitochondrial DNA lineages, each shared with only one putative parental form. Broad clines between Audubon's and black-fronted warblers in AFLP markers call into question the validity of these two forms as full species; nevertheless, our results suggest that the Audubon's warbler probably originated through hybridization between two long-diverged species. It is likely that more cases of avian species of hybrid origin will be revealed by surveys of variation in nuclear DNA and other traits. PMID:21435063

  12. Origin of the 'Extra Entropy'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R.

    2008-01-01

    I will discuss how one can determine the origin of the 'extra entropy' in groups and clusters and the feedback needed in models of galaxy formation. I will stress the use of x-ray spectroscopy and imaging and the critical value that Con-X has in this regard.

  13. The Chemistry of Life's Origin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, James P.

    1984-01-01

    From an understanding of how the solar system was formed, scientists have determined the conditions under which life probably originated on earth and, by experiment, have demonstrated a number of possible theories. These conditions, experiments, theories, and related topics are discussed. (JN)

  14. Historical Development of Origins Research

    PubMed Central

    Lazcano, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Following the publication of the Origin of Species in 1859, many naturalists adopted the idea that living organisms were the historical outcome of gradual transformation of lifeless matter. These views soon merged with the developments of biochemistry and cell biology and led to proposals in which the origin of protoplasm was equated with the origin of life. The heterotrophic origin of life proposed by Oparin and Haldane in the 1920s was part of this tradition, which Oparin enriched by transforming the discussion of the emergence of the first cells into a workable multidisciplinary research program. On the other hand, the scientific trend toward understanding biological phenomena at the molecular level led authors like Troland, Muller, and others to propose that single molecules or viruses represented primordial living systems. The contrast between these opposing views on the origin of life represents not only contrasting views of the nature of life itself, but also major ideological discussions that reached a surprising intensity in the years following Stanley Miller’s seminal result which showed the ease with which organic compounds of biochemical significance could be synthesized under putative primitive conditions. In fact, during the years following the Miller experiment, attempts to understand the origin of life were strongly influenced by research on DNA replication and protein biosynthesis, and, in socio-political terms, by the atmosphere created by Cold War tensions. The catalytic versatility of RNA molecules clearly merits a critical reappraisal of Muller’s viewpoint. However, the discovery of ribozymes does not imply that autocatalytic nucleic acid molecules ready to be used as primordial genes were floating in the primitive oceans, or that the RNA world emerged completely assembled from simple precursors present in the prebiotic soup. The evidence supporting the presence of a wide range of organic molecules on the primitive Earth, including membrane

  15. The Enigma of Angiosperm Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Norman Francis

    2005-07-01

    The origins of angiosperms are still debated, despite many years of work by scientists from differing disciplines. The progress made toward resolving the problem is reviewed in this book. The author suggests that the only fruitful method of study is the total integrated use of the fossil record, particularly dispersed palynomorphs. This includes the use of electron microscopy and refined data handling to record the occurrence of microscopic fossils, rather than the extensive use of morphology and cladistics. The methods advocated in this book could result in a rethinking of the current classification of living plants, and it is hoped that the ideas presented will initiate discussion between both professionals and students of paleontology and plant science on the wider possibilities that may clarify the enigmatic origins of the dominant flowering plant groups.

  16. The Enigma of Angiosperm Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Norman Francis

    1994-09-01

    The origins of angiosperms are still debated, despite many years of work by scientists from differing disciplines. The progress made toward resolving the problem is reviewed in this book. The author suggests that the only fruitful method of study is the total integrated use of the fossil record, particularly dispersed palynomorphs. This includes the use of electron microscopy and refined data handling to record the occurrence of microscopic fossils, rather than the extensive use of morphology and cladistics. The methods advocated in this book could result in a rethinking of the current classification of living plants, and it is hoped that the ideas presented will initiate discussion between both professionals and students of paleontology and plant science on the wider possibilities that may clarify the enigmatic origins of the dominant flowering plant groups.

  17. Origin of lunar light plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, E. C. T.; Hodges, C. A.; Boyce, J. M.; Soderblom, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    In order to determine the origin of Cayley-type lunar light plains, their physical properties, distribution, and relative ages are examined from Apollo orbital and Lunar Orbiter photographs. The distribution and apparent age of the plains deposits and data on highly feldspathic breccias indicate that these superficial materials are neither locally derived nor part of the Imbrium ejecta. The existence of a planar facies of continuous ejecta at Orientale and in the ejecta blankets of small craters is demonstrated. The data and interpretation presented support the hypothesis that the surface and near-surface materials of some light plains, including those at the Apollo 16 site, are at least partly composed of ejecta from the Orientale basin and that the materials of many rugged areas, such as the Descartes highlands, are overlain by similar material. The possibility that some Cayley-type plains may have a different origin is not excluded.

  18. Determination of plutonium metal origins

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, K.J.

    1995-02-01

    Forensic signatures are present in any Pu sample that can determine the sample`s origin: isotopic ratio of Pu, progeny species that grow into the sample, and contaminant species left over from incomplete purification of the Pu in fuel reprocessing. In the context of intelligence information, this can result in attribution of responsibility for the product of clandestine proliferant operations or material smuggled from existing stockpiles. A list of signature elements and what can be determined from them have been developed. Work needs to be done in converting concentrations of signature species into a quantitative forensic analysis, particularly in regard to reactor performance, but this should require only a small effort. A radiochemical analysis scheme has been developed for measuring these nuclides; more work is needed, particularly for determining fission product concentrations. A sample of Pu metal has been analyzed and several parameters determined that are strong indicators of its point of origin.

  19. Massive ascites of unknown origin

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2014-01-01

    Massive ascites of unknown origin is an uncommon condition, which represent a diagnostic challenge. Patients with delayed diagnosis and treatment may have a poor prognosis. A 22-year-old female was referred to this hospital due to a 4-year progressive abdominal distension with massive ascites of unknown origin. By thorough investigations, she was eventually diagnosed as chronic calcified constrictive pericarditis. She received pericardiectomy and had an uneventful postoperative course. With a few day paracentesis, ascites did not progress any more. She was doing well at 5-month follow-up and has returned to work. Extracardiac manifestations, such as massive ascites and liver cirrhosis, were rare in patients with constrictive pericarditis. Pericardiectomy can be a radical solution for the treatment of chronic constrictive pericarditis. In order to avoid delayed diagnosis and treatment, physicians have to bear in mind this rare manifestation of chronic calcified constrictive pericarditis. PMID:24600502

  20. The origin of risk aversion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruixun; Brennan, Thomas J.; Lo, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    Risk aversion is one of the most basic assumptions of economic behavior, but few studies have addressed the question of where risk preferences come from and why they differ from one individual to the next. Here, we propose an evolutionary explanation for the origin of risk aversion. In the context of a simple binary-choice model, we show that risk aversion emerges by natural selection if reproductive risk is systematic (i.e., correlated across individuals in a given generation). In contrast, risk neutrality emerges if reproductive risk is idiosyncratic (i.e., uncorrelated across each given generation). More generally, our framework implies that the degree of risk aversion is determined by the stochastic nature of reproductive rates, and we show that different statistical properties lead to different utility functions. The simplicity and generality of our model suggest that these implications are primitive and cut across species, physiology, and genetic origins. PMID:25453072

  1. The Origin of the Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Edward

    2012-11-20

    The world around us is made of atoms. Did you ever wonder where these atoms came from? How was the gold in our jewelry, the carbon in our bodies, and the iron in our cars made? In this lecture, we will trace the origin of a gold atom from the Big Bang to the present day, and beyond. You will learn how the elements were forged in the nuclear furnaces inside stars, and how, when they die, these massive stars spread the elements into space. You will learn about the origin of the building blocks of matter in the Big Bang, and we will speculate on the future of the atoms around us today.

  2. The Origin of the Elements

    ScienceCinema

    Murphy, Edward

    2014-08-06

    The world around us is made of atoms. Did you ever wonder where these atoms came from? How was the gold in our jewelry, the carbon in our bodies, and the iron in our cars made? In this lecture, we will trace the origin of a gold atom from the Big Bang to the present day, and beyond. You will learn how the elements were forged in the nuclear furnaces inside stars, and how, when they die, these massive stars spread the elements into space. You will learn about the origin of the building blocks of matter in the Big Bang, and we will speculate on the future of the atoms around us today.

  3. The diapsid origin of turtles.

    PubMed

    Schoch, Rainer R; Sues, Hans-Dieter

    2016-06-01

    The origin of turtles has been a persistent unresolved problem involving unsettled questions in embryology, morphology, and paleontology. New fossil taxa from the early Late Triassic of China (Odontochelys) and the Late Middle Triassic of Germany (Pappochelys) now add to the understanding of (i) the evolutionary origin of the turtle shell, (ii) the ancestral structural pattern of the turtle skull, and (iii) the phylogenetic position of Testudines. As has long been postulated on the basis of molecular data, turtles evolved from diapsid reptiles and are more closely related to extant diapsids than to parareptiles, which had been suggested as stem group by some paleontologists. The turtle cranium with its secondarily closed temporal region represents a derived rather than a primitive condition and the plastron partially evolved through the fusion of gastralia. PMID:26934902

  4. The origins of human ageing.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkwood, T B

    1997-01-01

    The origins of human ageing are to be found in the origins and evolution of senescence as a general feature in the life histories of higher animals. Ageing is an intriguing problem in evolutionary biology because a trait that limits the duration of life, including the fertile period, has a negative impact on Darwinian fitness. Current theory suggests that senescence occurs because the force of natural selection declines with age and because longevity is only acquired at some metabolic cost. In effect, organisms may trade late survival for enhanced reproductive investments in earlier life. The comparative study of ageing supports the general evolutionary theory and reveals that human senescence, while broadly similar to senescence in other mammalian species, has distinct features, such as menopause, that may derive from the interplay of biological and social evolution. PMID:9460059

  5. The origin of risk aversion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruixun; Brennan, Thomas J; Lo, Andrew W

    2014-12-16

    Risk aversion is one of the most basic assumptions of economic behavior, but few studies have addressed the question of where risk preferences come from and why they differ from one individual to the next. Here, we propose an evolutionary explanation for the origin of risk aversion. In the context of a simple binary-choice model, we show that risk aversion emerges by natural selection if reproductive risk is systematic (i.e., correlated across individuals in a given generation). In contrast, risk neutrality emerges if reproductive risk is idiosyncratic (i.e., uncorrelated across each given generation). More generally, our framework implies that the degree of risk aversion is determined by the stochastic nature of reproductive rates, and we show that different statistical properties lead to different utility functions. The simplicity and generality of our model suggest that these implications are primitive and cut across species, physiology, and genetic origins. PMID:25453072

  6. [Severe hemobilia of cholecystic origin].

    PubMed

    Miguil, M; Abassi, O; Margad, B; Harti, A; Benslama, A; Benaguida, M

    1991-02-01

    The authors report a case of severe hematobilia originating in the gall bladder itself ans associated with a cholecysto-colic fistula. They review the different etiologies of hematobilia and stress the major value of selective arteriography of the coeliac trunk and possible pitfalls in this condition. This case highlights the rare complications of cholelithiasis (hematobilia and cholecyto-colic fistula) and the severity of blood spoliation. Therapy is reviewed as a function of the lesion causing hematobilia. PMID:2026679

  7. Microbial origin of desert varnish.

    PubMed

    Dorn, R I; Oberlander, T M

    1981-09-11

    Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analyses of desert varnish reveal that microorganisms concentrate ambient manganese that becomes greatly enhanced in brown to black varnish. Specific characteristics of desert varnish and of varnish bacteria support a microbial origin for manganese-rich films. Varnish microbes can be cultured and produce laboratory manganese films. Accordingly, natural desert varnish and also manganese-rich rock varnishes in nondesert environments appear to be a product of microbial activity. PMID:17744757

  8. Dual origin of avian lymphatics.

    PubMed

    Wilting, Jörg; Aref, Yama; Huang, Ruijin; Tomarev, Stanislav I; Schweigerer, Lothar; Christ, Bodo; Valasek, Petr; Papoutsi, Maria

    2006-04-01

    The earliest signs of the lymphatic vascular system are the lymph sacs, which develop adjacent to specific embryonic veins. It has been suggested that sprouts from the lymph sacs form the complete lymphatic vascular system. We have studied the origin of the jugular lymph sacs (JLS), the dermal lymphatics and the lymph hearts of avian embryos. In day 6.5 embryos, the JLS is an endothelial-lined sinusoidal structure. The lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) stain (in the quail) positive for QH1 antibody and soybean agglutinin. As early as day 4, the anlagen of the JLS can be recognized by their Prox1 expression. Prox1 is found in the jugular section of the cardinal veins, and in scattered cells located in the dermatomes along the cranio-caudal axis and in the splanchnopleura. In the quail, such cells are positive for Prox1 and QH1. In the jugular region, the veins co-express the angiopoietin receptor Tie2. Quail-chick-chimera studies show that the peripheral parts of the JLS form by integration of cells from the paraxial mesoderm. Intra-venous application of DiI-conjugated acetylated low-density lipoprotein into day 4 embryos suggests a venous origin of the deep parts of the JLS. Superficial lymphatics are directly derived from the dermatomes, as shown by dermatome grafting. The lymph hearts in the lumbo-sacral region develop from a plexus of Prox1-positive lymphatic capillaries. Both LECs and muscle cells of the lymph hearts are of somitic origin. In sum, avian lymphatics are of dual origin. The deep parts of the lymph sacs are derived from adjacent veins, the superficial parts of the JLS and the dermal lymphatics from local lymphangioblasts. PMID:16457798

  9. Mechanisms and origin of multiferroicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Paolo; Picozzi, Silvia

    2015-03-01

    Motivated by the potential applications of their intrinsic cross-coupling properties, the interest in multiferroic materials has constantly increased recently, leading to significant experimental and theoretical advances. From the theoretical point of view, recent progresses have allowed one to identify different mechanisms responsible for the appearance of ferroelectric polarization coexisting-and coupled-with magnetic properties. This chapter aims at reviewing the fundamental mechanisms devised so far, mainly in transition-metal oxides, which lie at the origin of multiferroicity.

  10. Swine origin influenza (swine flu).

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Meghna R; Lodha, Rakesh; Kabra, S K

    2009-08-01

    Swine origin influenza was first recognized in the border area of Mexico and United States in April 2009 and during a short span of two months became the first pandemic. The currently circulating strain of swine origin influenza virus of the H1N1 strain has undergone triple reassortment and contains genes from the avian, swine and human viruses. It is transmitted by droplets or fomites. Incubation period is 2 to 7 days. Common clinical symptoms are indistinguishable by any viral respiratory illness, and include fever, cough, sore throat and myalgia. A feature seen more frequently with swine origin influenza is GI upset. Less than 10% of patients require hospitalization. Patients at risk of developing severe disease are - younger than five years, elderly, pregnant women, with chronic systemic illnesses, adolescents on aspirin. Of the severe manifestations of swine origin influenza, pneumonia and respiratory failure are the most common. Unusual symptoms reported are conjunctivitis, parotitis, hemophagocytic syndrome. Infants may present with fever and lethargy with no respiratory symptoms. Diagnosis is based on RT PCR, Viral culture or increasing neutralizing antibodies. Principle of treatment consist of isolation, universal precautions, good infection control practices, supportive care and use of antiviral drugs. Antiviral drugs effective against H1N1 virus include: oseltamivir and zamanavir. With good supportive care case fatality is less than 1%. Preventive measures include: social distancing, practicing respiratory etiquette, hand hygiene and use of chemoprohylaxis with antiviral drugs. Vaccine against H1N1 is not available at present, but will be available in near future. PMID:19802552

  11. The prenatal origins of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Glenn M.; Carter, Daniel R.; Cheung, Belamy B.; Liu, Tao; Mateos, Marion K.; Meyerowitz, Justin G.; Weiss, William A.

    2014-01-01

    The concept that some childhood malignancies arise from postnatally persistent embryonal remnant or rest cells has a long history. Recent research has strengthened the links between driver mutations, and, embryonal and early postnatal development. This evidence, coupled with much greater detail on the cell of origin and the initial steps in embryonal cancer initiation, has identified important therapeutic targets and provided renewed interest in strategies for the early detection and prevention of childhood cancer. PMID:24599217

  12. Fetal Origins of Adult Disease

    PubMed Central

    Calkins, Kara; Devaskar, Sherin U.

    2015-01-01

    Dr. David Barker first popularized the concept of fetal origins of adult disease (FOAD). Since its inception, FOAD has received considerable attention. The FOAD hypothesis holds that events during early development have a profound impact on one’s risk for development of future adult disease. Low birth weight, a surrogate marker of poor fetal growth and nutrition, is linked to coronary artery disease, hypertension, obesity, and insulin resistance. Clues originally arose from large 20th century, European birth registries. Today, large, diverse human cohorts and various animal models have extensively replicated these original observations. This review will focus on the pathogenesis related to FOAD and examines Dr. David Barker’s landmark studies, along with additional human and animal model data. Implications of the FOAD extend beyond the low birth weight population and include babies exposed to stress, both nutritional and non-nutritional, during different critical periods of development, which ultimately result in a disease state. By understanding FOAD, health care professionals and policy makers will make this issue a high healthcare priority and implement preventative measures and treatment for those at higher risk for chronic diseases. PMID:21684471

  13. Fetal origins of adult disease.

    PubMed

    Calkins, Kara; Devaskar, Sherin U

    2011-07-01

    Dr. David Barker first popularized the concept of fetal origins of adult disease (FOAD). Since its inception, FOAD has received considerable attention. The FOAD hypothesis holds that events during early development have a profound impact on one's risk for development of future adult disease. Low birth weight, a surrogate marker of poor fetal growth and nutrition, is linked to coronary artery disease, hypertension, obesity, and insulin resistance. Clues originally arose from large 20th century, European birth registries. Today, large, diverse human cohorts and various animal models have extensively replicated these original observations. This review focuses on the pathogenesis related to FOAD and examines Dr. David Barker's landmark studies, along with additional human and animal model data. Implications of the FOAD extend beyond the low birth weight population and include babies exposed to stress, both nutritional and nonnutritional, during different critical periods of development, which ultimately result in a disease state. By understanding FOAD, health care professionals and policy makers will make this issue a high health care priority and implement preventive measures and treatment for those at higher risk for chronic diseases. PMID:21684471

  14. The HORUS Origins Science Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, J.; Scowen, P.; Beasley, M.; Woodruff, R.; HORUS MIssion Development

    2004-12-01

    The HORUS Origins Science Mission is a 2.4-meter class space observatory that will address key components in the NASA Origins Roadmap. HORUS will provide 100 times greater imaging efficiency than currently exists on HST and will restore UV spectroscopic capabilities with >10 times greater sensitivity than previous HST instruments. We present a synopsis of the requirements, technical implementation, and technology roadmap for this mission for conducting critical observations of the formation of planets, stars, and galaxies. The HORUS mission has a well-defined Origins scientific program at its heart: a systematic survey of local, intermediate, and high-redshift sites and indicators of star formation to investigate and understand the range of environments, feedback mechanisms, and other factors that most affect the outcome of the star and planet formation process and the path from the Big Bang to people. This program relies on focused capabilities unique to space and that no other planned NASA mission will provide: near-UV/visible (200-1100nm) wide-field, diffraction-limited imaging; and high-sensitivity, low- and medium-resolution UV (100-320nm) spectroscopy. This work is supported by NASA grant number NNG04GR33G to the Arizona State University.

  15. Changing ideas about eukaryotic origins

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Tom A.; Embley, T. Martin

    2015-01-01

    The origin of eukaryotic cells is one of the most fascinating challenges in biology, and has inspired decades of controversy and debate. Recent work has led to major upheavals in our understanding of eukaryotic origins and has catalysed new debates about the roles of endosymbiosis and gene flow across the tree of life. Improved methods of phylogenetic analysis support scenarios in which the host cell for the mitochondrial endosymbiont was a member of the Archaea, and new technologies for sampling the genomes of environmental prokaryotes have allowed investigators to home in on closer relatives of founding symbiotic partners. The inference and interpretation of phylogenetic trees from genomic data remains at the centre of many of these debates, and there is increasing recognition that trees built using inadequate methods can prove misleading, whether describing the relationship of eukaryotes to other cells or the root of the universal tree. New statistical approaches show promise for addressing these questions but they come with their own computational challenges. The papers in this theme issue discuss recent progress on the origin of eukaryotic cells and genomes, highlight some of the ongoing debates, and suggest possible routes to future progress. PMID:26323752

  16. [The origin of eukaryotic cells and origination of apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Galitskiĭ, V A

    2005-01-01

    The unified conception of the origin of eukaryotic cells has been proposed. In the author's opinion, evolutionary transformation of prokaryotic cell into eukaryotic cell took place 3.3-1.4 billion years ago and involved the next four stages: 1) the appearance of intracellular membranes due to prokaryotic cell plasmalemma invaginating into its cytoplasm; 2) the cell nucleus formation by the double sheet of intracellular membrane surrounding and sequestrating genetic material of the cell; 3) the appearance of cytoskeleton in parallel with mitotic spindle formation and gradual transition from prokaryotic way of cell division to mitosis; 4) the establishment of symbiosis between the evolving nucleated cell and prokaryotic microorganicsms that subsequently transform into mitochondria and chloroplasts. Apoptosis of cells of the present day multicellular eukaryotic organisms is supposed to be an evolutionary altered response of mitochondrian predecessors to the influence of factors, which are able to damage eukaryotic host cell. The initial biological significance of this reaction pertained to attempts of endosymbionts to leave the host cell as soon as possible, if the probability of its irreversible injury was very high, and by this to escape from their death. It is possible that numerous proteins, known as sensors or transducers of proapoptotic signals in Bcl-2--p53-dependent apoptotic pathway, were initially encoded by mitochondrial genome, whereas antiapoptotic factors and also components of receptor-mediated and granzyme B perforin dependent apoptotic pathways have cellular origin. PMID:16706173

  17. 7 CFR 201.14 - Origin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.14 Origin. (a) Alfalfa, red clover, white clover, and field corn (except hybrid seed corn) shall be labeled to show: (1) The origin, if known; or (2) if the origin is not known... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Origin. 201.14 Section 201.14 Agriculture...

  18. Musical emotions: Functions, origins, evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlovsky, Leonid

    2010-03-01

    Theories of music origins and the role of musical emotions in the mind are reviewed. Most existing theories contradict each other, and cannot explain mechanisms or roles of musical emotions in workings of the mind, nor evolutionary reasons for music origins. Music seems to be an enigma. Nevertheless, a synthesis of cognitive science and mathematical models of the mind has been proposed describing a fundamental role of music in the functioning and evolution of the mind, consciousness, and cultures. The review considers ancient theories of music as well as contemporary theories advanced by leading authors in this field. It addresses one hypothesis that promises to unify the field and proposes a theory of musical origin based on a fundamental role of music in cognition and evolution of consciousness and culture. We consider a split in the vocalizations of proto-humans into two types: one less emotional and more concretely-semantic, evolving into language, and the other preserving emotional connections along with semantic ambiguity, evolving into music. The proposed hypothesis departs from other theories in considering specific mechanisms of the mind-brain, which required the evolution of music parallel with the evolution of cultures and languages. Arguments are reviewed that the evolution of language toward becoming the semantically powerful tool of today required emancipation from emotional encumbrances. The opposite, no less powerful mechanisms required a compensatory evolution of music toward more differentiated and refined emotionality. The need for refined music in the process of cultural evolution is grounded in fundamental mechanisms of the mind. This is why today's human mind and cultures cannot exist without today's music. The reviewed hypothesis gives a basis for future analysis of why different evolutionary paths of languages were paralleled by different evolutionary paths of music. Approaches toward experimental verification of this hypothesis in

  19. On the Origin of Monsoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Winston C.; Chen, Baode; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    It is a long-held fundamental belief that the basic cause of a monsoon is land-sea thermal contrast on the continental scale. Through general circulation model experiments we demonstrate that this belief should be changed. The Asian and Australian summer monsoon circulations are largely intact in an experiment in which Asia, maritime continent, and Australia are replaced by ocean. It is also shown that the change resulting from such replacement is in general due more to the removal of topography than to the removal of land-sea contrast. Therefore, land-sea contrast plays only a minor modifying role in Asian and Australian summer monsoons. This also happens to the Central American summer monsoon. However, the same thing cannot be said of the African and South American summer monsoons. In Asian and Australian winter monsoons land-sea contrast also plays only a minor role. Our interpretation for the origin of monsoon is that the summer monsoon is the result of ITCZ's (intertropical convergence zones) peak being substantially (more than 10 degrees) away from the equator. The origin of the ITCZ has been previously interpreted by Chao. The circulation around thus located ITCZ, previously interpreted by Chao and Chen through the modified Gill solution and briefly described in this paper, explains the monsoon circulation. The longitudinal location of the ITCZs is determined by the distribution of surface conditions. ITCZ's favor locations of higher SST as in western Pacific and Indian Ocean, or tropical landmass, due to land-sea contrast, as in tropical Africa and South America. Thus, the role of landmass in the origin of monsoon can be replaced by ocean of sufficiently high SST. Furthermore, the ITCZ circulation extends into the tropics in the other hemisphere to give rise to the winter monsoon circulation there. Also through the equivalence of land-sea contrast and higher SST, it is argued that the basic monsoon onset mechanism proposed by Chao is valid for all monsoons.

  20. Musical emotions: functions, origins, evolution.

    PubMed

    Perlovsky, Leonid

    2010-03-01

    Theories of music origins and the role of musical emotions in the mind are reviewed. Most existing theories contradict each other, and cannot explain mechanisms or roles of musical emotions in workings of the mind, nor evolutionary reasons for music origins. Music seems to be an enigma. Nevertheless, a synthesis of cognitive science and mathematical models of the mind has been proposed describing a fundamental role of music in the functioning and evolution of the mind, consciousness, and cultures. The review considers ancient theories of music as well as contemporary theories advanced by leading authors in this field. It addresses one hypothesis that promises to unify the field and proposes a theory of musical origin based on a fundamental role of music in cognition and evolution of consciousness and culture. We consider a split in the vocalizations of proto-humans into two types: one less emotional and more concretely-semantic, evolving into language, and the other preserving emotional connections along with semantic ambiguity, evolving into music. The proposed hypothesis departs from other theories in considering specific mechanisms of the mind-brain, which required the evolution of music parallel with the evolution of cultures and languages. Arguments are reviewed that the evolution of language toward becoming the semantically powerful tool of today required emancipation from emotional encumbrances. The opposite, no less powerful mechanisms required a compensatory evolution of music toward more differentiated and refined emotionality. The need for refined music in the process of cultural evolution is grounded in fundamental mechanisms of the mind. This is why today's human mind and cultures cannot exist without today's music. The reviewed hypothesis gives a basis for future analysis of why different evolutionary paths of languages were paralleled by different evolutionary paths of music. Approaches toward experimental verification of this hypothesis in

  1. On the origin of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Monot, Marc; Honoré, Nadine; Garnier, Thierry; Araoz, Romulo; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Lacroix, Céline; Sow, Samba; Spencer, John S; Truman, Richard W; Williams, Diana L; Gelber, Robert; Virmond, Marcos; Flageul, Béatrice; Cho, Sang-Nae; Ji, Baohong; Paniz-Mondolfi, Alberto; Convit, Jacinto; Young, Saroj; Fine, Paul E; Rasolofo, Voahangy; Brennan, Patrick J; Cole, Stewart T

    2005-05-13

    Leprosy, a chronic human disease with potentially debilitating neurological consequences, results from infection with Mycobacterium leprae. This unculturable pathogen has undergone extensive reductive evolution, with half of its genome now occupied by pseudogenes. Using comparative genomics, we demonstrated that all extant cases of leprosy are attributable to a single clone whose dissemination worldwide can be retraced from analysis of very rare single-nucleotide polymorphisms. The disease seems to have originated in Eastern Africa or the Near East and spread with successive human migrations. Europeans or North Africans introduced leprosy into West Africa and the Americas within the past 500 years. PMID:15894530

  2. Planetary Origin Evolution and Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, David J.

    2005-01-01

    This wide-ranging grant supported theoretical modeling on many aspects of the formation, evolution and structure of planets and satellites. Many topics were studied during this grant period, including the evolution of icy bodies; the origin of magnetic fields in Ganymede; the thermal histories of terrestrial planets; the nature of flow inside giant planets (especially the coupling to the magnetic field) and the dynamics of silicate/iron mixing during giant impacts and terrestrial planet core formation. Many of these activities are ongoing and have not reached completion. This is the nature of this kind of research.

  3. The origin of membrane bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Lane, Nick; Martin, William F

    2012-12-21

    Harnessing energy as ion gradients across membranes is as universal as the genetic code. We leverage new insights into anaerobe metabolism to propose geochemical origins that account for the ubiquity of chemiosmotic coupling, and Na(+)/H(+) transporters in particular. Natural proton gradients acting across thin FeS walls within alkaline hydrothermal vents could drive carbon assimilation, leading to the emergence of protocells within vent pores. Protocell membranes that were initially leaky would eventually become less permeable, forcing cells dependent on natural H(+) gradients to pump Na(+) ions. Our hypothesis accounts for the Na(+)/H(+) promiscuity of bioenergetic proteins, as well as the deep divergence between bacteria and archaea. PMID:23260134

  4. New perspectives on anthropoid origins

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Blythe A.; Kay, Richard F.; Kirk, E. Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive shifts associated with human origins are brought to light as we examine the human fossil record and study our own genome and that of our closest ape relatives. However, the more ancient roots of many human characteristics are revealed through the study of a broader array of living anthropoids and the increasingly dense fossil record of the earliest anthropoid radiations. Genomic data and fossils of early primates in Asia and Africa clarify relationships among the major clades of primates. Progress in comparative anatomy, genomics, and molecular biology point to key changes in sensory ecology and brain organization that ultimately set the stage for the emergence of the human lineage. PMID:20212104

  5. Origins of the "Western" Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Roslyn M.

    The development of the 48 Greek constellations is analyzed as a complex mixture of cognitive layers deriving from different cultural traditions and dating back to different epochs. The analysis begins with a discussion of the zodiacal constellations, goes on to discuss the stellar lore in Homer and Hesiod, and then examines several theories concerning the origins of the southern non-zodiacal constellations. It concludes with a commentary concerning the age and possible cultural significance of stars of the Great Bear constellation in light of ethnohistorical documentation, folklore, and beliefs related to European bear ceremonialism.

  6. Olmec origins of Mesoamerican writing.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Mary E D; Pope, Kevin O; von Nagy, Christopher

    2002-12-01

    A cylinder seal and carved greenstone plaque bearing glyphs dating to approximately 650 B.C. have been uncovered near the Olmec center of La Venta in Tabasco, Mexico. These artifacts, which predate others containing writing, reveal that the key aspects of the Mesoamerican scripts were present in Olmec writing: the combination of pictographic and glyphic elements to represent speech; the use of the sacred 260-day calendar; and the connection between writing, the calendar, and kingship. They imply that Mesoamerican writing originated in the La Venta polity. PMID:12471256

  7. Origin and History of Magnolias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebda, R. J.; Irving, E.

    2004-12-01

    The classic disjunct distribution of living magnolias between southeast Asia and the Americas has been a puzzle for more than a century and a half. We propose a scheme for the origin and history of magnolias to explain this distribution by integrating paleogeographic, paleoclimatic, paleobotanical, and phytogeographic data. Our scheme is based on paleomagnetically determined latitudes. We assume that the moist warm temperate climate favoured by most extant magnolias has always been their preference. Molecular analyses (largely chloroplast DNA) reveal that several North American species are distinct and basal forms suggesting that magnolias likely originated in North America, a conclusion supported by the fossil record. We identify four evolutionary stages: (1) Ancestral magnolias originate in the Late Cretaceous of North America in high mid-latitudes (45° -60° N) at low altitudes under greenhouse climates. (2) During the exceptionally warm climate (super-greenhouse) of the Eocene, magnolias spread eastwards via the Iceland-Faroes isthmuses, to Europe and then across west and central Asia possibly to east Asia, still at low altitudes and high mid-latitudes. (3) With global cooling from the mid-Cenozoic, magnolias shift their core range to lower mid-latitudes (30° -45° N), become extinct in Europe and southern Siberia, breaking the once continuous distribution into two. (4) In the late Cenozoic, as ice-house conditions develop, magnolias diversify rapidly and expand southward into moist warm temperate uplands in newly uplifted mountain ranges of South and Central America, southeast Asia and the High Archipelago between southeast Asia and Australia. The late Cenozoic evolution of magnolias is characterized by the impoverishment of northerly species and diversification of southerly species. Thus, the centre of origin is not the center of diversity today. Disjunction at the generic level likely occurred as part of the mid-Tertiary southward displacement of the

  8. "Magic melters" have geometrical origin.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Kavita; Krishnamurty, Sailaja; Kanhere, D G

    2006-04-01

    Recent experimental reports bring out extreme size sensitivity in the heat capacities of gallium and aluminum clusters. In the present work we report results of our extensive ab initio molecular dynamical simulations on Ga30 and Ga31, the pair which has shown rather dramatic size sensitivity. We trace the origin of this size sensitive heat capacities to the relative order in their respective ground state geometries. Such an effect of nature of the ground state on the characteristics of heat capacity is also seen in case of small gallium and sodium clusters, indicating that the observed size sensitivity is a generic feature of small clusters. PMID:16712002

  9. ``Magic Melters'' Have Geometrical Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Kavita; Krishnamurty, Sailaja; Kanhere, D. G.

    2006-04-01

    Recent experimental reports bring out extreme size sensitivity in the heat capacities of gallium and aluminum clusters. In the present work we report results of our extensive ab initio molecular dynamical simulations on Ga30 and Ga31, the pair which has shown rather dramatic size sensitivity. We trace the origin of this size sensitive heat capacities to the relative order in their respective ground state geometries. Such an effect of nature of the ground state on the characteristics of heat capacity is also seen in case of small gallium and sodium clusters, indicating that the observed size sensitivity is a generic feature of small clusters.

  10. Activation of a dormant replication origin is essential for Haloferax mediterranei lacking the primary origins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haibo; Wu, Zhenfang; Liu, Jingfang; Liu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Lei; Cai, Shuangfeng; Xiang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    The use of multiple origins for chromosome replication has been demonstrated in archaea. Similar to the dormant origins in eukaryotes, some potential origins in archaea appear to be inactive during genome replication. We have comprehensively explored the origin utilization in Haloferax mediterranei. Here we report three active chromosomal origins by genome-wide replication profiling, and demonstrate that when these three origins are deleted, a dormant origin becomes activated. Notably, this dormant origin cannot be further deleted when the other origins are already absent and vice versa. Interestingly, a potential origin that appears to stay dormant in its native host H. volcanii lacking the main active origins becomes activated and competent for replication of the entire chromosome when integrated into the chromosome of origin-deleted H. mediterranei. These results indicate that origin-dependent replication is strictly required for H. mediterranei and that dormant replication origins in archaea can be activated if needed. PMID:26374389

  11. On the Origin of Heterotrophy.

    PubMed

    Schönheit, Peter; Buckel, Wolfgang; Martin, William F

    2016-01-01

    The theory of autotrophic origins of life posits that the first cells on Earth satisfied their carbon needs from CO2. At hydrothermal vents, spontaneous synthesis of methane via serpentinization links an energy metabolic reaction with a geochemical homologue. If the first cells were autotrophs, how did the first heterotrophs arise, and what was their substrate? We propose that cell mass roughly similar to the composition of Escherichia coli was the substrate for the first chemoorganoheterotrophs. Amino acid fermentations, pathways typical of anaerobic clostridia and common among anaerobic archaea, in addition to clostridial type purine fermentations, might have been the first forms of heterotrophic carbon and energy metabolism. Ribose was probably the first abundant sugar, and the archaeal type III RubisCO pathway of nucleoside monophosphate conversion to 3-phosphoglycerate might be a relic of ancient heterotrophy. Participation of chemiosmotic coupling and flavin-based electron bifurcation--a soluble energy coupling process--in clostridial amino acid and purine fermentations is consistent with an autotrophic origin of both metabolism and heterotrophy, as is the involvement of S(0) as an electron acceptor in the facilitated fermentations of anaerobic heterotrophic archaea. PMID:26578093

  12. Ancient voyaging and Polynesian origins.

    PubMed

    Soares, Pedro; Rito, Teresa; Trejaut, Jean; Mormina, Maru; Hill, Catherine; Tinkler-Hundal, Emma; Braid, Michelle; Clarke, Douglas J; Loo, Jun-Hun; Thomson, Noel; Denham, Tim; Donohue, Mark; Macaulay, Vincent; Lin, Marie; Oppenheimer, Stephen; Richards, Martin B

    2011-02-11

    The "Polynesian motif" defines a lineage of human mtDNA that is restricted to Austronesian-speaking populations and is almost fixed in Polynesians. It is widely thought to support a rapid dispersal of maternal lineages from Taiwan ~4000 years ago (4 ka), but the chronological resolution of existing control-region data is poor, and an East Indonesian origin has also been proposed. By analyzing 157 complete mtDNA genomes, we show that the motif itself most likely originated >6 ka in the vicinity of the Bismarck Archipelago, and its immediate ancestor is >8 ka old and virtually restricted to Near Oceania. This indicates that Polynesian maternal lineages from Island Southeast Asia gained a foothold in Near Oceania much earlier than dispersal from either Taiwan or Indonesia 3-4 ka would predict. However, we find evidence in minor lineages for more recent two-way maternal gene flow between Island Southeast Asia and Near Oceania, likely reflecting movements along a "voyaging corridor" between them, as previously proposed on archaeological grounds. Small-scale mid-Holocene movements from Island Southeast Asia likely transmitted Austronesian languages to the long-established Southeast Asian colonies in the Bismarcks carrying the Polynesian motif, perhaps also providing the impetus for the expansion into Polynesia. PMID:21295281

  13. Entropic origin of allometry relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.; West, Damien

    2015-03-01

    The theoretical allometry relation (AR) between the size of a network Y and a property of the network X is of the form X = aYb and has been known for nearly two centuries. The allometry coefficient a and allometry exponent b have been fit by various data sets over that time. The ubiquity of ARs in biology, sociology, ecology and indeed in virtually all the other science disciplines entreats science to find the origin of ARs. Data analysis indicates that the empirical AR is obtained with the replacements X → and Y → and the brackets denote an average over an ensemble of realizations of the network. It has been shown that the empirical AR cannot usually be derived from the theoretical one by simple averaging due to the fractal statistics of the fluctuations. Consequently we hypothesize that a possible origin of AR is the Principle of Minimum Entropy Generation (PMEG). We establish in support of this hypothesis that if the fluctuations in the allometry variables have fractal statistics then the PMEG entails the AR between a complex host network and a subnetwork strongly coupled to it.

  14. The origin of light hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D.

    2000-04-01

    The light hydrocarbons (LHs) are probably intermediates in the catalytic decomposition of oil to gas. Two lines of evidence support this possibility. First, the reaction was duplicated experimentally under moderate conditions. Second, natural LHs exhibit the characteristics of catalytic products, in particular a proportionality between isomers: (xy{sub i})/(x{sub i}y) = {alpha} (where x and x{sub i} are isomers; y and y{sub i} are isomers that are structurally similar to x and x{sub i}; and {alpha} is a constant). All oils exhibit this relationship with coefficients of correlation reaching 0.99. Isomer ratios change systematically with concentrations, some approaching thermodynamic equilibrium, others not. The correlations reported are the strongest yet disclosed for the LHs. Isomers are related in triads (e.g., n-hexane {leftrightarrow} 2-methylpentane {leftrightarrow} 3-methylpentane), consistent with cyclopropane precursors. The LHs obtained experimentally are indistinguishable from natural LHs in (xy{sub i})/(x{sub i}y). These relationships are not explained by physical fractionations, equilibrium control, or noncatalytic modes of origin. A catalytic origin, on the other hand, has precedence, economy and experimental support.

  15. Ancient origin of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, G William; Zhuo, Lisheng; Kimata, Koji; Lam, Bing K; Satoh, Nori; Stevens, Richard L

    2014-08-22

    The sentinel roles of mammalian mast cells (MCs) in varied infections raised the question of their evolutionary origin. We discovered that the test cells in the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis morphologically and histochemically resembled cutaneous human MCs. Like the latter, C. intestinalis test cells stored histamine and varied heparin·serine protease complexes in their granules. Moreover, they exocytosed these preformed mediators when exposed to compound 48/80. In support of the histamine data, a C. intestinalis-derived cDNA was isolated that resembled that which encodes histidine decarboxylase in human MCs. Like heparin-expressing mammalian MCs, activated test cells produced prostaglandin D2 and contained cDNAs that encode a protein that resembles the synthase needed for its biosynthesis in human MCs. The accumulated morphological, histochemical, biochemical, and molecular biology data suggest that the test cells in C. intestinalis are the counterparts of mammalian MCs that reside in varied connective tissues. The accumulated data point to an ancient origin of MCs that predates the emergence of the chordates >500million years ago, well before the development of adaptive immunity. The remarkable conservation of MCs throughout evolution is consistent with their importance in innate immunity. PMID:25094046

  16. Origin of marine planktonic cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Baracaldo, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Marine planktonic cyanobacteria contributed to the widespread oxygenation of the oceans towards the end of the Pre-Cambrian and their evolutionary origin represents a key transition in the geochemical evolution of the Earth surface. Little is known, however, about the evolutionary events that led to the appearance of marine planktonic cyanobacteria. I present here phylogenomic (135 proteins and two ribosomal RNAs), Bayesian relaxed molecular clock (18 proteins, SSU and LSU) and Bayesian stochastic character mapping analyses from 131 cyanobacteria genomes with the aim to unravel key evolutionary steps involved in the origin of marine planktonic cyanobacteria. While filamentous cell types evolved early on at around 2,600–2,300 Mya and likely dominated microbial mats in benthic environments for most of the Proterozoic (2,500–542 Mya), marine planktonic cyanobacteria evolved towards the end of the Proterozoic and early Phanerozoic. Crown groups of modern terrestrial and/or benthic coastal cyanobacteria appeared during the late Paleoproterozoic to early Mesoproterozoic. Decrease in cell diameter and loss of filamentous forms contributed to the evolution of unicellular planktonic lineages during the middle of the Mesoproterozoic (1,600–1,000 Mya) in freshwater environments. This study shows that marine planktonic cyanobacteria evolved from benthic marine and some diverged from freshwater ancestors during the Neoproterozoic (1,000–542 Mya). PMID:26621203

  17. The Origin of Cosmic Rays

    ScienceCinema

    Blasi, Pasquale [INAF/Arcetri-Italy and Fermilab, Italy

    2010-01-08

    Cosmic Rays reach the Earth from space with energies of up to more than 1020 eV, carrying information on the most powerful particle accelerators that Nature has been able to assemble. Understanding where and how cosmic rays originate has required almost one century of investigations, and, although the last word is not written yet, recent observations and theory seem now to fit together to provide us with a global picture of the origin of cosmic rays of unprecedented clarity. Here we will describe what we learned from recent observations of astrophysical sources (such as supernova remnants and active galaxies) and we will illustrate what these observations tell us about the physics of particle acceleration and transport. We will also discuss the ?end? of the Galactic cosmic ray spectrum, which bridges out attention towards the so called ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). At ~1020 eV the gyration scale of cosmic rays in cosmic magnetic fields becomes large enough to allow us to point back to their sources, thereby allowing us to perform ?cosmic ray astronomy?, as confirmed by the recent results obtained with the Pierre Auger Observatory. We will discuss the implications of these observations for the understanding of UHECRs, as well as some questions which will likely remain unanswered and will be the target of the next generation of cosmic ray experiments.

  18. Origins of Giant Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostriker, E. C.; Kim, W.-T.

    2004-12-01

    The material in giant molecular clouds (GMCs) constitutes a large proportion of the Milky Way's ISM, and determining how cloud-formation processes affect the properties and spatial distribution of GMCs is important to understanding the structure of the Milky Way. Understanding the formation of GMCs is also key to theories of galactic evolution because it represents the first stage in the overall process of star formation. Several lines of evidence point to a need for relatively rapid GMC formation via coherent dynamical instabilities, and both Parker- and Jeans- type modes have been proposed as potential cloud-forming mechanisms. Recent numerical simulations have investigated these instabilities directly, using spatially-localized models of the interstellar medium that self-consistently incorporate rotational shear, self-gravity, and magnetic fields, as well as the effects of stellar spiral arms. These models have demonstrated that condensation via gravitational instability, aided by magnetic torques, is the most likely candidate for explaining the formation of GMCs. The models have also shown that spiral arm ``spurs'' -- clearly seen as regular projections from dust lanes in at least one external galaxy -- may originate as magneto-gravitational instabilities of the ISM within the dense portions of stellar spiral arms. This raises the interesting possibility that spur structures with similar dynamical origins could potentially be present in the Milky Way as well.

  19. Origins of narcissism in children

    PubMed Central

    Brummelman, Eddie; Thomaes, Sander; Nelemans, Stefanie A.; Orobio de Castro, Bram; Overbeek, Geertjan; Bushman, Brad J.

    2015-01-01

    Narcissism levels have been increasing among Western youth, and contribute to societal problems such as aggression and violence. The origins of narcissism, however, are not well understood. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first prospective longitudinal evidence on the origins of narcissism in children. We compared two perspectives: social learning theory (positing that narcissism is cultivated by parental overvaluation) and psychoanalytic theory (positing that narcissism is cultivated by lack of parental warmth). We timed the study in late childhood (ages 7–12), when individual differences in narcissism first emerge. In four 6-mo waves, 565 children and their parents reported child narcissism, child self-esteem, parental overvaluation, and parental warmth. Four-wave cross-lagged panel models were conducted. Results support social learning theory and contradict psychoanalytic theory: Narcissism was predicted by parental overvaluation, not by lack of parental warmth. Thus, children seem to acquire narcissism, in part, by internalizing parents’ inflated views of them (e.g., “I am superior to others” and “I am entitled to privileges”). Attesting to the specificity of this finding, self-esteem was predicted by parental warmth, not by parental overvaluation. These findings uncover early socialization experiences that cultivate narcissism, and may inform interventions to curtail narcissistic development at an early age. PMID:25775577

  20. Origins of narcissism in children.

    PubMed

    Brummelman, Eddie; Thomaes, Sander; Nelemans, Stefanie A; Orobio de Castro, Bram; Overbeek, Geertjan; Bushman, Brad J

    2015-03-24

    Narcissism levels have been increasing among Western youth, and contribute to societal problems such as aggression and violence. The origins of narcissism, however, are not well understood. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first prospective longitudinal evidence on the origins of narcissism in children. We compared two perspectives: social learning theory (positing that narcissism is cultivated by parental overvaluation) and psychoanalytic theory (positing that narcissism is cultivated by lack of parental warmth). We timed the study in late childhood (ages 7-12), when individual differences in narcissism first emerge. In four 6-mo waves, 565 children and their parents reported child narcissism, child self-esteem, parental overvaluation, and parental warmth. Four-wave cross-lagged panel models were conducted. Results support social learning theory and contradict psychoanalytic theory: Narcissism was predicted by parental overvaluation, not by lack of parental warmth. Thus, children seem to acquire narcissism, in part, by internalizing parents' inflated views of them (e.g., "I am superior to others" and "I am entitled to privileges"). Attesting to the specificity of this finding, self-esteem was predicted by parental warmth, not by parental overvaluation. These findings uncover early socialization experiences that cultivate narcissism, and may inform interventions to curtail narcissistic development at an early age. PMID:25775577

  1. On the origin of life.

    PubMed

    Szostak, Jack W

    2016-01-01

    The origin of life is a very rich field, filled with possibilities and ripe for discovery. RNA replication requires chemical energy and vesicle division is easy to do with mechanical energy. These requirements point to a surface lake, perhaps at some time following the period of concentrated cyanide chemistry that gave rise to nucleotides, amino acids and (maybe) fatty acids. A second requirement follows specifically from the nature of the RNA replication cycle, which requires generally cool to moderate temperatures for the copying chemistry, punctuated by brief periods of high temperature for strand separation. Remarkably, lakes in a geothermal active area provide just such a fluctuating temperature environment, because lakes similar to Yellowstone can be generally cool (even ice covered in winter), but they contain numerous hydrothermal vents that emit streams of hot water. Protocells in such an environment would occasionally be swept into these hot water streams, where the transient high temperature exposure would cause RNA strand separation. However, the protocells would be quickly mixed with surrounding cold water, and would therefore cool quickly, before their delicate RNA molecules could be destroyed by heat. Because of the combination of favorable chemical and physical environments, this could be the most likely scenario for the early Earth environment that nurtured the origin of life. PMID:27576276

  2. Origin of marine planktonic cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Baracaldo, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Marine planktonic cyanobacteria contributed to the widespread oxygenation of the oceans towards the end of the Pre-Cambrian and their evolutionary origin represents a key transition in the geochemical evolution of the Earth surface. Little is known, however, about the evolutionary events that led to the appearance of marine planktonic cyanobacteria. I present here phylogenomic (135 proteins and two ribosomal RNAs), Bayesian relaxed molecular clock (18 proteins, SSU and LSU) and Bayesian stochastic character mapping analyses from 131 cyanobacteria genomes with the aim to unravel key evolutionary steps involved in the origin of marine planktonic cyanobacteria. While filamentous cell types evolved early on at around 2,600-2,300 Mya and likely dominated microbial mats in benthic environments for most of the Proterozoic (2,500-542 Mya), marine planktonic cyanobacteria evolved towards the end of the Proterozoic and early Phanerozoic. Crown groups of modern terrestrial and/or benthic coastal cyanobacteria appeared during the late Paleoproterozoic to early Mesoproterozoic. Decrease in cell diameter and loss of filamentous forms contributed to the evolution of unicellular planktonic lineages during the middle of the Mesoproterozoic (1,600-1,000 Mya) in freshwater environments. This study shows that marine planktonic cyanobacteria evolved from benthic marine and some diverged from freshwater ancestors during the Neoproterozoic (1,000-542 Mya). PMID:26621203

  3. The origins of modern divorce.

    PubMed

    Coontz, Stephanie

    2007-03-01

    High rates of marital dissolution and easy access to divorce are not unprecedented, historically or cross-culturally. But contemporary divorce in North America and Western Europe has different origins and features than divorce in previous cultures. The origins of modern divorce patterns date back more than 200 years, to the invention of the historically unprecedented idea that marriage should be based on love and mutual affection. Ironically, then, the fragility of modern marriage stems from the same values that have elevated the marital relationship above all other personal and familial commitments: the concentration of emotion, passion, personal identity, and self-validation in the couple relationship and the attenuation of emotional attachments and obligations beyond the conjugal unit. The immediate causes of divorce may range from factors as diverse as the personal psychological characteristics of one or both spouses to the stresses of economic hardship and community disintegration. But in a larger perspective, the role of divorce in modern societies and its relatively high occurrence both flow from the same complex of factors that have made good marriages so much more central to people's happiness than through most of the past, and deterioration of a marital relationship so much more traumatic. PMID:17375725

  4. Langerhans cell origin and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Matthew; Milne, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To summarize recent research on the ontogeny of Langerhans cells and regulation of their homeostasis in quiescent and inflamed conditions Recent findings Langerhans cells (LCs) originate pre-natally and may endure throughout life, independently of bone marrow derived precursors. Fate mapping experiments have recently resolved the relative contribution of primitive yolk sac and fetal liver hematopoiesis to the initial formation of LCs. In post-natal life, local self-renewal restores LC numbers following chronic or low grade inflammatory insults. However, severe inflammation recruits de novo bone marrow derived precursors in two waves; a transient population of classical monocytes followed by uncharacterized myeloid precursors that form a stable self-renewing LC network as inflammation subsides. Human CD1c+ dendritic cells have LC potential in vitro, raising the possibility that DC progenitors provide the second wave. LC development depends upon TGFβ receptor signaling with distinct pathways active during differentiation and homeostasis. LC survival is mediated by multiple pathways including mTOR and ERK signaling, mechanisms that become highly relevant in LC neoplasia. Summary The study of LCs continues to provide novel and unexpected insights into the origin and regulation of myeloid cell populations. The melding of macrophage and DC biology, shaped by a unique habitat, is a special feature of LCs. PMID:26554892

  5. Geochemical Origin of Biological Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2013-04-01

    A model for the geochemical origin of biological molecules is presented. Rocks such as peridotites and basalts, which contain ferromagnesian minerals, evolve in the presence of water. Their hydrolysis is an exothermic reaction which generates heat and a release of H2 and of minerals with modified structures. The hydrogen reacts with the CO2 embedded inside the rock or with the CO2 of the environment to form CO in an hydrothermal process. With the N2 of the environment, and with an activation source arising from cosmic radiation, ferromagnesian rocks might evolve towards the abiotic formation of biological molecules, such as peptide like macromolecules which produce amino acids after acid hydrolysis. The reactions concerned are described. The production of hydrothermal CO is discussed in geological sites containing ferromagnesian silicate minerals and the low intensity of the Earth's magnetic field during Paleoarchaean Era is also discussed. It is concluded that excitation sources arising from cosmic radiation were much more abundant during Paleoarchaean Era and that macromolecular structures of biological relevance might consequently form during Archaean Eon, as a product of the chemical evolution of the rocks and of their mineral contents. This synthesis of abiotically formed biological molecules is consecutively discussed for meteorites and other planets such as Mars. This model for the geochemical origin of biological molecules has first been proposed in 2008 in the context of reactions involving catalysers such as kaolinite [Bassez 2008a] and then presented in conferences and articles [Bassez 2008b, 2009, 2012; Bassez et al. 2009a to 2012b]. BASSEZ M.P. 2008a Synthèse prébiotique dans les conditions hydrothermales, CNRIUT'08, Lyon 29-30/05/2008, Conf. and open access article:http://liris.cnrs.fr/~cnriut08/actes/ 29 mai 11h-12h40. BASSEZ M.P. 2008b Prebiotic synthesis under hydrothermal conditions, ISSOL'08, P2-6, Firenze-Italy, 24-29/08/2008. Poster at the

  6. Origins and Evolution of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargaud, Muriel; López-García, Purificación; Martin, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    Part I. What Is Life?: 1. Problems raised by a definition of life M. Morange; 2. Some remarks about uses of cosmological anthropic 'principles' D. Lambert; 3. Minimal cell: the biologist point of view C. Brochier-Armanet; 4. Minimal cell: the computer scientist point of view H. Bersini; 5. Origins of life: computing and simulation approaches B. Billoud; Part II. Astronomical and Geophysical Context of the Emergence of Life: 6. Organic molecules in interstellar medium C. Ceccarelli and C. Cernicharo; 7. Cosmochemical evolution and the origin of life: insights from meteorites S. Pizzarello; 8. Astronomical constraints on the emergence of life M. Gounelle and T. Montmerle; 9. Formation of habitable planets J. Chambers; 10. The concept of galactic habitable zone N. Prantzos; 11. The young Sun and its influence on planetary atmospheres M. Güdel and J. Kasting; 12. Climates of the Earth G. Ramstein; Part III. Role of Water in the Emergence of Life: 13. Liquid water: a necessary condition to all forms of life K. Bartik, G. Bruylants, E. Locci and J. Reisse; 14. The role of water in the formation and evolution of planets T. Encrenaz; 15. Water on Mars J. P. Bibring; Part IV. From Non-Living Systems to Life: 16. Energetic constraints on prebiotic pathways: application to the emergence of translation R. Pascal and L. Boiteau; 17. Comparative genomics and early cell evolution A. Lazcano; 18. Origin and evolution of metabolisms J. Peretó; Part V. Mechanisms for Life Evolution: 19. Molecular phylogeny: inferring the patterns of evolution E. Douzery; 20. Horizontal gene transfer: mechanisms and evolutionary consequences D. Moreira; 21. The role of symbiosis in eukaryotic evolution A. Latorre, A. Durbán, A. Moya and J. Peretó; Part VI. Life in Extreme Conditions: 22. Life in extreme conditions: Deinococcus radiodurans, an organism able to survive prolonged desiccation and high doses of ionising radiation S. Sommer and M. Toueille; 23. Molecular effects of UV and ionizing

  7. The origin of electrochemical nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Giddens, W R

    2001-09-01

    This article is about the origin and development of certain words that are important in the vocabulary of all physicians and scientists. The words that make up the electrochemical nomenclature were created in 1833 by Michael Faraday and several of his friends. Terms such as electrolyte, ion, and electrode were invented in a fashion that ignored theory but fitted the experimental facts of the laboratory. This nomenclature, derived from Greek, was so accurate and functional that is has been completely incorporated into modern chemistry, a fact that seems remarkable since the structure of the atom was completely unknown at the time. To fully develop the etymology of these words, the life of Faraday is summarized and the deliberations of the men involved are reviewed. PMID:11686262

  8. Multiple origins of asteroid pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Seth A.

    2016-01-01

    Rotationally fissioned asteroids produce unbound asteroid pairs that have very similar heliocentric orbits. Backward integration of their current heliocentric orbits provides an age of closest proximity that can be used to date the rotational fission event. Most asteroid pairs follow a predicted theoretical relationship between the primary spin period and the mass ratio of the two pair members that is a direct consequence of the YORP-induced rotational fission hypothesis. If the progenitor asteroid has strength, asteroid pairs may have higher mass ratios or faster rotating primaries. However, the process of secondary fission leaves the originally predicted trend unaltered. We also describe the characteristics of pair members produced by four alternative routes from a rotational fission event to an asteroid pair. Unlike direct formation from the event itself, the age of closest proximity of these pairs cannot generally be used to date the rotational fission event since considerable time may have passed.

  9. Evolutionary Origins of Rhizarian Parasites.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Roberto; Cañas-Duarte, Silvia J; Burki, Fabien; Schwelm, Arne; Fogelqvist, Johan; Dixelius, Christina; González-García, Laura N; Gile, Gillian H; Slamovits, Claudio H; Klopp, Christophe; Restrepo, Silvia; Arzul, Isabelle; Pawlowski, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The SAR group (Stramenopila, Alveolata, Rhizaria) is one of the largest clades in the tree of eukaryotes and includes a great number of parasitic lineages. Rhizarian parasites are obligate and have devastating effects on commercially important plants and animals but despite this fact, our knowledge of their biology and evolution is limited. Here, we present rhizarian transcriptomes from all major parasitic lineages in order to elucidate their evolutionary relationships using a phylogenomic approach. Our results suggest that Ascetosporea, parasites of marine invertebrates, are sister to the novel clade Apofilosa. The phytomyxean plant parasites branch sister to the vampyrellid algal ectoparasites in the novel clade Phytorhiza. They also show that Ascetosporea + Apofilosa + Retaria + Filosa + Phytorhiza form a monophyletic clade, although the branching pattern within this clade is difficult to resolve and appears to be model-dependent. Our study does not support the monophyly of the rhizarian parasitic lineages (Endomyxa), suggesting independent origins for rhizarian animal and plant parasites. PMID:26681153

  10. On the origin of Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celebonovic, V.

    1986-01-01

    The origin of Triton, based on the theory of materials under high pressure by Savic and Kasanin (1962, 1965), is described. The mean molecular weight (A) and the volume of one gram mole of Triton's material (V) are evaluated using its values of mass and radius; it is calculated that A = 67 + or - 2 and V = 3 + or - 2. These values are compared with Celebonovic's (1983) model of Neptune; it is observed that the mean molecular weight of Triton is ten times larger than Neptune's. The cause of this large variation in chemical composition is investigated. It is hypothesized that Triton and Neptune formed in different regions of the solar system, and that Triton was ejected from its primordial orbit and was later captured by Neptune.

  11. Huge waves of meteorite origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelinovsky, Efim; Kozelkov, Andrey; Kurkin, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Asteroid and meteorite risk is now actively investigated in various aspects. If the meteorite falls in the ocean it can generate huge waves with heights exceeded 10 m. For whole history about 10-20 events related with entry of meteorite in water are known. The last event occurred on February 15, 2013 when the meteorite exploded in sky of Chelyabinsk (Russia) and its big piece entered in the Chebarkul Lake. Very often, huge waves of meteorite origin are computed using the conception of equivalent (parametrical) source, whose parameters are determined through meteorite characteristics. Recently, direct methods based on numerical simulations of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) have been applied to study wave processes generated by the entry of meteorite. These approaches and their applications to the historic events are discussed in paper.

  12. The origin of cellular life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    This essay presents a scenario of the origin of life that is based on analysis of biological architecture and mechanical design at the microstructural level. My thesis is that the same architectural and energetic constraints that shape cells today also guided the evolution of the first cells and that the molecular scaffolds that support solid-phase biochemistry in modern cells represent living microfossils of past life forms. This concept emerged from the discovery that cells mechanically stabilize themselves using tensegrity architecture and that these same building rules guide hierarchical self-assembly at all size scales (Sci. Amer 278:48-57;1998). When combined with other fundamental design principles (e.g., energy minimization, topological constraints, structural hierarchies, autocatalytic sets, solid-state biochemistry), tensegrity provides a physical basis to explain how atomic and molecular elements progressively self-assembled to create hierarchical structures with increasingly complex functions, including living cells that can self-reproduce.

  13. The evolutionary origins of friendship.

    PubMed

    Seyfarth, Robert M; Cheney, Dorothy L

    2012-01-01

    Convergent evidence from many species reveals the evolutionary origins of human friendship. In horses, elephants, hyenas, dolphins, monkeys, and chimpanzees, some individuals form friendships that last for years. Bonds occur among females, among males, or between males and females. Genetic relatedness affects friendships. In species where males disperse, friendships are more likely among females. If females disperse, friendships are more likely among males. Not all friendships, however, depend on kinship; many are formed between unrelated individuals. Friendships often involve cooperative interactions that are separated in time. They depend, at least in part, on the memory and emotions associated with past interactions. Applying the term "friendship" to animals is not anthropomorphic: Many studies have shown that the animals themselves recognize others' relationships. Friendships are adaptive. Male allies have superior competitive ability and improved reproductive success; females with the strongest, most enduring friendships experience less stress, higher infant survival, and live longer. PMID:21740224

  14. Magnetars: Properties, Origin and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereghetti, Sandro; Pons, José A.; Melatos, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Magnetars are neutron stars in which a strong magnetic field is the main energy source. About two dozens of magnetars, plus several candidates, are currently known in our Galaxy and in the Magellanic Clouds. They appear as highly variable X-ray sources and, in some cases, also as radio and/or optical pulsars. Their spin periods (2-12 s) and spin-down rates (˜10-13-10-10 s s-1) indicate external dipole fields of ˜1013-15 G, and there is evidence that even stronger magnetic fields are present inside the star and in non-dipolar magnetospheric components. Here we review the observed properties of the persistent emission from magnetars, discuss the main models proposed to explain the origin of their magnetic field and present recent developments in the study of their evolution and connection with other classes of neutron stars.

  15. Origins of life systems chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, J.

    2015-10-01

    By reconciling previously conflicting views about the origin of life - in which one or other cellular subsystem emerges first, and then 'invents' the others - a new modus operandi for its study is suggested. Guided by this, a cyanosulfidic protometabolism is uncovered which uses UV light and the stoichiometric reducing power of hydrogen sulfide to convert hydrogen cyanide, and a couple of other prebiotic feedstock molecules which can be derived therefrom, into nucleic acid, peptide and lipid building blocks. Copper plays several key roles in this chemistry, thus, for example, copper(I) catalysed cross coupling and copper(II) driven oxidative crosscoupling reactions generate key feedstock molecules. Geochemical scenarios consistent with this protometabolism are outlined. Finally, the transition of a system from the inanimate to the animate state is considered in the context of there being intermediate stages of partial 'aliveness'.

  16. Gene losses during human origins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Grus, Wendy E; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2006-03-01

    Pseudogenization is a widespread phenomenon in genome evolution, and it has been proposed to serve as an engine of evolutionary change, especially during human origins (the "less-is-more" hypothesis). However, there has been no comprehensive analysis of human-specific pseudogenes. Furthermore, it is unclear whether pseudogenization itself can be selectively favored and thus play an active role in human evolution. Here we conduct a comparative genomic analysis and a literature survey to identify 80 nonprocessed pseudogenes that were inactivated in the human lineage after its separation from the chimpanzee lineage. Many functions are involved among these genes, with chemoreception and immune response being outstandingly overrepresented, suggesting potential species-specific features in these aspects of human physiology. To explore the possibility of adaptive pseudogenization, we focus on CASPASE12, a cysteinyl aspartate proteinase participating in inflammatory and innate immune response to endotoxins. We provide population genetic evidence that the nearly complete fixation of a null allele at CASPASE12 has been driven by positive selection, probably because the null allele confers protection from severe sepsis. We estimate that the selective advantage of the null allele is about 0.9% and the pseudogenization started shortly before the out-of-Africa migration of modern humans. Interestingly, two other genes related to sepsis were also pseudogenized in humans, possibly by selection. These adaptive gene losses might have occurred because of changes in our environment or genetic background that altered the threat from or response to sepsis. The identification and analysis of human-specific pseudogenes open the door for understanding the roles of gene losses in human origins, and the demonstration that gene loss itself can be adaptive supports and extends the "less-is-more" hypothesis. PMID:16464126

  17. Evolutionary origin of cardiac malformations.

    PubMed

    Taussig, H B

    1988-10-01

    The author has proposed in previous publications that isolated cardiac malformations have an evolutionary origin. This is partly supported by the fact that isolated cardiac malformations found in humans occur also in other placental mammals as well as in birds. External gross examination of the heart in just over 5,000 birds was carried out during a 3 year period. Anomalies included one instance of duplicate hearts, two specimens in which no heart could be identified and in a fourth, a yellow-rumped warbler, the heart lay in the neck outside of the thoracic cavity. Published reports of similar occurrences of an ectopically placed heart concern birds, cattle and humans. The fact that various species of both placental mammals and birds show evidence of heritability for heart defects, and that these species cannot interbreed, combined with the fact that birds and mammals have many similar malformations, points to either a common external causative factor or a common origin. Genes that code the malformed heart must be transmitted with that part of the genetic makeup common to all birds and mammals. Malformations caused by teratogens produce widespread organ injury to a potentially normal embryo whereas the evolutionary malformation is an organ-specific anomaly in an otherwise normal mammal or bird and occurs in widely separated species. The implications of this theory are important for parents of children with an isolated congenital heart defect who may have ingested one or another drug or chemical or have been exposed to toxins or infectious agents before or after conception of the affected offspring. PMID:3047192

  18. Impact origin of the Moon

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, W.L.

    1998-12-31

    A few years after the Apollo flights to the Moon, it became clear that all of the existing theories on the origin of the Moon would not satisfy the growing body of constraints which appeared with the data gathered by the Apollo flights. About the same time, researchers began to realize that the inner (terrestrial) planets were not born quietly -- all had evidences of impacts on their surfaces. This fact reinforced the idea that the planets had formed by the accumulation of planetesimals. Since the Earth`s moon is unique among the terrestrial planets, a few researchers realized that perhaps the Moon originated in a singular event; an event that was quite probable, but not so probable that one would expect all the terrestrial planets to have a large moon. And thus was born the idea that a giant impact formed the Moon. Impacts would be common in the early solar system; perhaps a really large impact of two almost fully formed planets of disparate sizes would lead to material orbiting the proto-earth, a proto-moon. This idea remained to be tested. Using a relatively new, but robust, method of doing the hydrodynamics of the collision (Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics), the author and his colleagues (W. Benz, Univ. of Arizona, and A.G.W. Cameron, Harvard College Obs.) did a large number of collision simulations on a supercomputer. The author found two major scenarios which would result in the formation of the Moon. The first was direct formation; a moon-sized object is boosted into orbit by gravitational torques. The second is when the orbiting material forms a disk, which, with subsequent evolution can form the Moon. In either case the physical and chemical properties of the newly formed Moon would very neatly satisfy the physical and chemical constraints of the current Moon. Also, in both scenarios the surface of the Earth would be quite hot after the collision. This aspect remains to be explored.

  19. 2009 Swine Flu Originated in Mexico

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159679.html 2009 Swine Flu Originated in Mexico Genetic analysis pinpoints source ... FRIDAY, July 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The 2009 swine flu pandemic originated in pigs in a small ...

  20. The Origin of the Chemical Elements, 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selbin, Joel

    1973-01-01

    The problem of the origin is inextricably interwoven with such matters as the origin of the universe, the structure and evolution of galaxies, stars and other astronomical objects, and with nuclear physics. (Author/DF)

  1. 5 CFR 2500.3 - Original classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2500.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATION, EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT INFORMATION SECURITY REGULATION § 2500.3 Original classification. No one in the Office of Administration has been granted authority for original classification of information....

  2. The interplanetary superhighway and the Origins Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, M. W.

    2002-01-01

    The origin of the universe and of life itself have been central to human inquiries since the dawn of consciousness. To develop and use the technologies to answer these timeless and profound questions is the mission of NASA's Origins Program.

  3. 5 CFR 2500.3 - Original classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2500.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATION, EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT INFORMATION SECURITY REGULATION § 2500.3 Original classification. No one in the Office of Administration has been granted authority for original classification of information....

  4. Ambient neutrons of natural origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Anatoly; Martin, Inacio; Shkevov, Rumen; Alves, Mauro

    2016-07-01

    The laboratory of environmental radiation of ITA (São José dos Campos, 23°11'11″S, 45°52'43″W, 650 MAMSL) performs simultaneous monitoring of a natural radiation background and meteorological parameters. Neutron flux in the energy range of 0.02 eV - 10 MeV is registered with two sets of proportional ^{3}He tubes placed into cylindrical paraffin thermalizers: an {bf outdoor detector }of 250 cm² area and {bf indoor detector }of 70 cm² area located on the second floor of a concrete building. The counter efficiency for thermal neutrons is 80%. The characteristics of the observed flux variation are quite different from those inherent to the neutrons of the cosmic ray origin. {bf Four types of the outdoor flux variations }are observed: 1) {bf seasonal }with a maxima in wet seasons; 2) {bf diurnal }with maximum at about 6 h local time and an amplitude up to several dozens; 3) {bf abrupt transient} ( 1 min) increases with magnitudes up to two orders higher than the mean daily flux; 4) short (several days) {bf quasi-periodic enhancements }with amplitudes up to several times higher than the mean daily flux. A large variation of the outdoor flux and its phase synchronism with that of the radon decay products means with a high probability their common origin. An apparent source of the neutrons observed is nuclear reactions of decay α-particles with the ground matter. In this case the dynamics of the outdoor flux variations of the first two types is controlled by those of the meteorological parameters in the locality. The third type events correlate with lightning strokes in the vicinity (<200 m) of the detector. The more rare fourth type correlate neither with geomagnetic disturbances nor with meteorological phenomena and are probably a result of natural radon release from the Earth's crust triggered by minor seismological activity. The indoor flux is quite stable with a possible weak maximum at16 h not exceeding 0.1.

  5. 7 CFR 201.14 - Origin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.14 Origin. (a) Alfalfa, red clover, white clover, and field corn (except hybrid seed corn) shall be labeled to show: (1) The origin, if known; or (2) if the origin is not...

  6. The Origins of Competency-Based Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Steven

    2007-01-01

    This article attempts to trace the origins of competency-based training (CBT), the theory of vocational education that underpins the National Training Framework in Australia. A distinction is made between societal and theoretical origins. This paper argues that CBT has its societal origins in the United States of America during the 1950s, 60s and…

  7. 19 CFR 10.2014 - Originating goods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Originating goods. 10.2014 Section 10.2014 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Rules of Origin § 10.2014 Originating goods. Except as otherwise provided in this subpart and...

  8. Darwin's Book: On the Origin of Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, Jonathan

    2013-09-01

    This essay is an interpretation of Charles Darwin's Origin of Species. It focuses on the contents of the Origin as Darwin intended them to be understood and the background to the work, thus revealing the originality (or otherwise) of the work.

  9. 7 CFR 201.5 - Origin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... declaration of origin could not be obtained. (b) Each country shipper shall retain a copy of each declaration... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Origin. 201.5 Section 201.5 Agriculture Regulations of... Records for Agricultural and Vegetable Seeds § 201.5 Origin. (a) The complete record for any lot of...

  10. 22 CFR 9.4 - Original classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Original classification. 9.4 Section 9.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL SECURITY INFORMATION REGULATIONS § 9.4 Original classification. (a) Definition. Original classification is the initial determination that certain information requires protection against unauthorized...