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Sample records for orleans louisiana usa

  1. American Diabetes Association - 76th Scientific Sessions (June 10-14, 2016 - New Orleans, Louisiana, USA).

    PubMed

    Lam, S

    2016-06-01

    The 76th American Diabetes Association (ADA) Scientific Sessions took place in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. The meeting brought together scientists and professionals from a wide range of disciplines in the field of diabetes and provided a platform for networking, allowing experts and researchers to share ideas and learn about the significant advances in diabetes research, treatment and care. Over the course of the 5 days, participants received exclusive access to more than 2,500 original research presentations. PMID:27458613

  2. Earthshots: Satellite images of environmental change – Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adamson, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Landsat recorded the devastation and continues to monitor the region’s wetlands. New Orleans, Louisiana, is near the bottom of the images along the Mississippi River. The city lies just south of Lake Pontchartrain. Hundreds of square miles of wetlands were lost after Katrina. Some marshlands became permanent water bodies. Some projects now aim to bring back marshlands because of their value in defending the coastline from storms.

  3. Effects of ENSO on weather-type frequencies and properties at New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Muller, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    Examination of historical climate records indicates a significant relation between the El Nin??o/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and seasonal temperature and precipitation in Louisiana. In this study, a 40 yr record of twice daily (06:00 and 15:00 h local time) weather types are used to study the effects of ENSO variability on the local climate at New Orleans, Louisiana. Tropical Pacific sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) for the NINO3.4 region are used to define ENSO events (i.e. El Nin??o and La Nin??a events), and daily precipitation and temperature data for New Orleans are used to define weather-type precipitation and temperature properties. Data for winters (December through February) 1962-2000 are analyzed. The 39 winters are divided into 3 categories; winters with NINO3.4 SST anomalies 1??C (El Nin??o events), and neutral conditions (all other years). For each category, weather-type frequencies and properties (i.e. precipitation and temperature) are determined and analyzed. Results indicate that El Nin??o events primarily affect precipitation characteristics of weather types at New Orleans, whereas the effects of La Nin??a events are most apparent in weather-type frequencies. During El Nin??o events, precipitation for some of the weather types is greater than during neutral and La Nin??a conditions and is related to increased water vapor transport from the Tropics to the Gulf of Mexico. The changes in weather-type frequencies during La Nin??a events are indicative of a northward shift in storm tracks and/or a decrease in storm frequency in southern Louisiana.

  4. New Orleans, Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    As one of the best ever views of the city of New Orleans, LA (30.0N, 90.0W) from space, this image allows the study of the city and the region in minute detail. Major city street and highway patterns can easily be traced. Even the Superdome near the old French Quarter can be seen as a large round white circle near the middle of the photo. The French Napoleonic Code land distribution system of long narrow fields fronting the river is also evident.

  5. Space radar image of New Orleans, Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This image of the area surrounding the city of New Orleans, Louisiana in the southeastern United States demonstrates the ability of multi-frequency imaging radar to distinguish different types of land cover. The dark area in the center is Lake Pontchartrain. The thin line running across the lake is a causeway connecting New Orleans to the city of Mandeville. Lake Borgne is the dark area in the lower right of the image. The Mississippi River appears as a dark, wavy line in the lower left. The white dots on the Mississippi are ships. The French Quarter is the brownish square near the left center of the image. Lakefront Airport, a field used mostly for general aviation, is the bright spot near the center, jutting out into Lake Pontchartrain. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) during orbit 39 of space shuttle Endeavour on October 2, 1994. The area is located at 30.10 degrees north latitude and 89.1 degrees west longitude. The area shown is approximately 100 kilometers (60 miles) by 50 kilometers (30 miles). The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and received); blue represents the L-band (vertically transmitted and received). The green areas are primarily vegetation consisting of swamp land and swamp forest (bayou) growing on sandy soil, while the pink areas are associated with reflections from buildings in urban and suburban areas. Different tones and colors in the vegetation areas will be studied by scientists to see how effective imaging radar data is in discriminating between different types of wetlands. Accurate maps of coastal wetland areas are important to ecologists studying wild fowl and the coastal environment.

  6. Louisiana Eyes Plan to Let State Control New Orleans Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2005-01-01

    Seeking to grasp what she called a "golden opportunity for rebirth" out of the wreckage of Hurricane Katrina, Governor Kathleen Babineaux Blanco asked the Louisiana legislature last week to embrace a plan that would give the state control of most New Orleans public schools. This article talks about the governor's plan to let the state take control…

  7. New Orleans, Louisiana: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of New Orleans, LA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  8. Old World Hantaviruses in Rodents in New Orleans, Louisiana

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Robert W.; Waffa, Bradley; Freeman, Ashley; Riegel, Claudia; Moses, Lina M.; Bennett, Andrew; Safronetz, David; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Feldmann, Heinz; Voss, Thomas G.; Bausch, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    Seoul virus, an Old World hantavirus, is maintained in brown rats and causes a mild form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in humans. We captured rodents in New Orleans, Louisiana and tested them for the presence of Old World hantaviruses by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with sequencing, cell culture, and electron microscopy; 6 (3.4%) of 178 rodents captured—all brown rats—were positive for a Seoul virus variant previously coined Tchoupitoulas virus, which was noted in rodents in New Orleans in the 1980s. The finding of Tchoupitoulas virus in New Orleans over 25 years since its first discovery suggests stable endemicity in the city. Although the degree to which this virus causes human infection and disease remains unknown, repeated demonstration of Seoul virus in rodent populations, recent cases of laboratory-confirmed HFRS in some US cities, and a possible link with hypertensive renal disease warrant additional investigation in both rodents and humans. PMID:24639295

  9. Seasonality and Children’s Blood Lead Levels: Developing a Predictive Model Using Climatic Variables and Blood Lead Data from Indianapolis, Indiana, Syracuse, New York, and New Orleans, Louisiana (USA)

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Mark A.S.; Mielke, Howard W.; Filippelli, Gabriel M.; Johnson, David L.; Gonzales, Christopher R.

    2005-01-01

    On a community basis, urban soil contains a potentially large reservoir of accumulated lead. This study was undertaken to explore the temporal relationship between pediatric blood lead (BPb), weather, soil moisture, and dust in Indianapolis, Indiana; Syracuse, New York; and New Orleans, Louisiana. The Indianapolis, Syracuse, and New Orleans pediatric BPb data were obtained from databases of 15,969, 14,467, and 2,295 screenings, respectively, collected between December 1999 and November 2002, January 1994 and March 1998, and January 1998 and May 2003, respectively. These average monthly child BPb levels were regressed against several independent variables: average monthly soil moisture, particulate matter < 10 μm in diameter (PM10), wind speed, and temperature. Of temporal variation in urban children’s BPb, 87% in Indianapolis (R2 = 0.87, p = 0.0004), 61% in Syracuse (R2 = 0.61, p = 0.0012), and 59% in New Orleans (R2 = 0.59, p = 0.0000078) are explained by these variables. A conceptual model of urban Pb poisoning is suggested: When temperature is high and evapotranspiration maximized, soil moisture decreases and soil dust is deposited. Under these combined weather conditions, Pb-enriched PM10 dust disperses in the urban environment and causes elevated Pb dust loading. Thus, seasonal variation of children’s Pb exposure is probably caused by inhalation and ingestion of Pb brought about by the effect of weather on soils and the resulting fluctuation in Pb loading. PMID:15929906

  10. Change Detection Module for New Orleans City of USA Using

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dharmendra

    Internationally, Scientists strive to integrate existing and emerging Earth observation systems into a global network, with enhanced data distribution, models and decision supporting modules. Remote sensing poses an effective tool for this increasing need of a synoptic frame work. The entire earth can be treated as a system that evolves from the interactions of its environment. Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Interferometry allows us, in principle, to measure very small movements of the ground over time and almost continuous monitoring of large areas of Earth's surface is made possible by the availability of data from remote sensing satellites such as ERS (European Remote Sensing (ERS) and RADARSAT. The study area considered is the New Orleans city of USA. New Orleans is located in Southeastern Louisiana along the Mississippi River. This city is among the worst affected area due to land subsidence. Subsidence rate of New Orleans and its surrounding area is computed with on-the-ground measurements using man made reference points. Even though bench marks are carefully chosen, scientists doubt whether reference points are also sinking as well. Subsidence monitoring using satellite images especially SAR interferometry offers a viable alternative by which accurate surface deformations can be calculated. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is a coherent imaging technique capable of generating fine-resolution images of the scene. RADARSAT C-band images are generally unhindered by atmospheric conditions. SAR Interferometry, utilizing phase information also along with intensity, is capable of producing 3-D information about the scene. Repeat pass Interferometry makes use of SAR images of same scene acquired from the same position at different times and this helps in the measurement of small scale deformations of earth's surface. SAR/ SAR Interferometry, hence, offer a powerful mapping tool to measure deformation of earth at an unprecedented spatial details and

  11. 76 FR 45247 - Louisiana Public Service Commission; The Council of the City of New Orleans v. Entergy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Louisiana Public Service Commission; The Council of the City of New Orleans... compliance with the Commission's June 9, 2011 Order, Louisiana Public Service Commission and the Council of the City of New Orleans v. Entergy Corporation,135 FERC ] 61,218 (2011). Any person desiring...

  12. Terrestrial Lidar Datasets of New Orleans, Louisiana, Levee Failures from Hurricane Katrina, August 29, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, Brian D.; Kayen, Robert; Minasian, Diane L.; Reiss, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina made landfall with the northern Gulf Coast on August 29, 2005, as one of the strongest hurricanes on record. The storm damage incurred in Louisiana included a number of levee failures that led to the inundation of approximately 85 percent of the metropolitan New Orleans area. Whereas extreme levels of storm damage were expected from such an event, the catastrophic failure of the New Orleans levees prompted a quick mobilization of engineering experts to assess why and how particular levees failed. As part of this mobilization, civil engineering members of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) performed terrestrial lidar topographic surveys at major levee failures in the New Orleans area. The focus of the terrestrial lidar effort was to obtain precise measurements of the ground surface to map soil displacements at each levee site, the nonuniformity of levee height freeboard, depth of erosion where scour occurred, and distress in structures at incipient failure. In total, we investigated eight sites in the New Orleans region, including both earth and concrete floodwall levee breaks. The datasets extend from the 17th Street Canal in the Orleans East Bank area to the intersection of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (GIWW) with the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet (MRGO) in the New Orleans East area. The lidar scan data consists of electronic files containing millions of surveyed points. These points characterize the topography of each levee's postfailure or incipient condition and are available for download through online hyperlinks. The data serve as a permanent archive of the catastrophic damage of Hurricane Katrina on the levee systems of New Orleans. Complete details of the data collection, processing, and georeferencing methodologies are provided in this report to assist in the visualization and analysis of the data by future users.

  13. Characterization of household hazardous waste from Marin County, California, and New Orleans, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Rathje, W.L.; Wilson, D.C.; Lambou, V.W.; Herndon, R.C.

    1987-09-01

    There is a growing concern that certain constituents of common household products, that are discarded in residential garbage, may be potentially harmful to human health and the environment by adversely affecting the quality of ground and surface water. A survey of hazardous wastes in residential garbage from Marin County, California, and New Orleans, Louisiana, was conducted in order to determine the amount and characteristics of such wastes that are entering municipal landfills. The results of the survey indicate that approximately 642 metric tons of hazardous waste are discarded per year for the New Orleans study area and approximately 259 metric tons are discarded per year for the Marin County study area. Even though the percent of hazardous household waste in the garbage discarded in both study areas was less than 1%, it represents a significant quantity of hazardous waste because of the large volume of garbage involved.

  14. A report from the 60th Annual Scientific Session & Expo and I2 (Innovation and Intervention) Summit of the American College of Cardiology (April 2-5, 2011 - New Orleans, Louisiana, USA).

    PubMed

    Rabasseda, X

    2011-05-01

    As jazz and indeed most music has rhythm at its very core, so does life with the heart steadily pumping blood to the body. But as in jazz rhythm, irregular rhythm is paired with changes in pitch and velocity making melody and harmony, so it is to a large extent in heart disease, with irregular rhythm, irregular pumping effectiveness, arterial stiffness and so many diverse alterations completely changing the melody of life. Pairing music with the heart makes New Orleans a very reasonable place for the American College of Cardiology's scientific session to be held. To keep pace with the rhythm and the music, the following report will complement the meeting by briefly reviewing news reported during the oral and poster sessions that have a direct impact on treatments for cardiovascular diseases and risk factors. PMID:22013568

  15. Chemical quality of depositional sediments and associated soils in New Orleans and the Louisiana peninsula following Hurricane Katrina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, C.; Witt, E.C.; Wang, Jingyuan; Shaver, D.K.; Summers, D.; Filali-Meknassi, Y.; Shi, H.; Luna, R.; Anderson, N.

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina made landfall on the Louisiana peninsula south of New Orleans on Aug 29, 2005. The resulting storm surge caused numerous levy breaches in the parishes of New Orleans as well as on the Louisiana peninsula. This study was conducted to determine the concentrations of inorganic and organic constituents in sediments and associated soils in New Orleans parishes and the Louisiana peninsula after the floodwaters had been removed and/or receded following Hurricane Katrina. A total of 46 sediment and soil samples were analyzed that were collected throughout New Orleans and the Louisiana peninsula. Approximately 20% of the sediment samples were analyzed, including shallow sediment samples from locations that included the top and beneath automobiles, in residential and commercial areas, and near refineries. Gasoline constituents, pesticides, and leachable heavy metals were analyzed using headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), organic extraction GC/MS, and inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry, respectively. A significant number of samples had leachable As and Pb concentrations in excess of drinking water standards. The remaining metals analyzed (i.e., Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, and V) generally had much lower leachable levels. Of the gasoline constituents, only benzene was observed above the limit of detection (of 5 ??g/kg), with no samples observed as being above the method detection limits of 10 ??g/kg. For the 18 pesticides analyzed, most were in the nondetectable range and all were in trace amounts that were orders of magnitude below regulatory guidelines. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  16. Speciation of Heavy Metals in Katrina Sediments from New Orleans, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Amitava; Bianchetti, Christopher; Tittsworth, Roland; Pardue, John

    2007-02-01

    Hurricane Katrina, a Category 4 storm on the Saffir-Simpson scale, struck the Gulf Coast of Louisiana on August 29th, 2005. The storm surge resulted in breaches of the levee system in New Orleans at least at two locations, flooding up to 80% of the city. The floodwater also brought sediment which was left behind once the water receded after a few days. The dry sediment covered large parts of the city. Much of it was made airborne by vehicular traffic and was potentially inhaled. The sediments from the Lakeview area contained an appreciable amount of clay minerals which were absent in samples from Mid City. The speciation of these metals was quantitatively different in two neighborhoods. In one location metallic copper and zinc were present. A small amount of hexavalent chromium was detected at two sites.

  17. Anthropogenic and geologic influences on subsidence in the vicinity of New Orleans, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Cathleen E.; An, Karen; Blom, Ronald G.; Kent, Joshua D.; Ivins, Erik R.; Bekaert, David

    2016-05-01

    New measurements of ongoing subsidence of land proximal to the city of New Orleans, Louisiana, and including areas around the communities of Norco and Lutcher upriver along the Mississippi are reported. The rates of vertical motion are derived from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) applied to Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) data acquired on 16 June 2009 and 2 July 2012. The subsidence trends are similar to those reported for 2002-2004 in parts of New Orleans where observations overlap, in particular in Michoud, the 9th Ward, and Chalmette, but are measured at much higher spatial resolution (6 m). The spatial associations of cumulative surface movements suggest that the most likely drivers of subsidence are groundwater withdrawal and surficial drainage/dewatering activities. High subsidence rates are observed localized around some major industrial facilities and can affect nearby flood control infrastructure. Substantial subsidence is observed to occur rapidly from shallow compaction in highly localized areas, which is why it could be missed in subsidence surveys relying on point measurements at limited locations.

  18. Evaluation of three techniques for classifying urban land cover patterns using LANDSAT MSS data. [New Orleans, Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, P. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    Three computer quantitative techniques for determining urban land cover patterns are evaluated. The techniques examined deal with the selection of training samples by an automated process, the overlaying of two scenes from different seasons of the year, and the use of individual pixels as training points. Evaluation is based on the number and type of land cover classes generated and the marks obtained from an accuracy test. New Orleans, Louisiana and its environs form the study area.

  19. Shallow (0-10) seismic investigation of a distressed earthen levee, New Orleans, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, J. M.; Hicks, J.; Vera, E. E.

    2009-12-01

    Both deep- and near-surface hydrogeologic processes can contribute to the structural failure of artificial earthen levees. Recently, seismic geophysical methods have attempted to develop a proxy for engineering shear strength, by mapping changes in the transmission velocity of shear waves. High fluid content may indicate both weak, under-compacted materials and/or organic-rich sediments. In the absence of electromagnetic methods, Vp/Vs ratios can be used as good indicators of variations in the fluid (water, and air or gas) saturation. Cone penetration borehole tests measure the resistance of soils to penetration of the cone tip and its frictional sliding that can be correlated to sediment types and their physical properties. A distressed section of an artificial earthen levee, suitable for seismic investigation, lies ~15 km S of the city of New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. Open curvilinear fissures, 10 cm wide, 30 cm deep, and up to 100 m in length, exist along the crest at two sites. Between September 2007 and February 2008 we collect horizontally (SH) polarized shear and compressional wave (P) data in pseudo-walkaway tests for the upper 100 m of the subsurface along the protected (west) side of the earthen levee, within 30 m of its crest. One profile lies parallel and adjacent to the damaged levee crest and, for reference, two profiles lie nearby adjacent to undamaged portions of the artificial earthen levee. In the first ~30 m of sediment below the lower delta plain of the Greater New Orleans area, a complex and dynamic interaction of freshwater and marine sedimentary environments juxtaposes a diverse set of facies. We combine of Vp and Vs velocity maps, sedimentary environment interpretations, and cone-penetration-derived sediment/soil and laboratory-derived physical properties to locate possible zones of high fluid concentration, (and perhaps seepage), weak engineering materials, and natural foundation soil shear strength. Under the distressed portion of the

  20. Analyses of water, core material, and elutriate samples collected near New Orleans, Louisiana (Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, and vicinity hurricane protection project)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leone, Harold L.

    1976-01-01

    When a hurricane approaches the New Orleans, Louisiana area, the accompanying tides and heavy rainfall increase the level of water in Lake Borgne, Mississippi Sound, and Lake Pontchartrain and pose a major threat of water damage to the populated areas. During Hurricane Betsy (1965), for example, the level of Lake Pontchartrain rose as much as 13 feet. Nineteen core-material-sampling sites were chosen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as possible borrow areas for fill material to be used in levee construction for flood protection around Lake Pontchartrain. Twenty-three receiving-water sites were also selected to represent the water that will contact the proposed levees. Selected nutrients, metals, pesticides, and other organic constituents were analyzed from bed-material and native-water samples as well as upon elutriate samples of specific core material-receiving water systems. The results of these analyses are presented without interpretation. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 84-281-1607, Federal Grain Inspection Service-USDA (US Department of Agriculture), New Orleans, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhe, R.L.

    1985-07-01

    Environmental and breathing-zone samples were analyzed for phosphine, malathion, carbon-disulfide, carbon tetrachloride, and grain dust at field offices of the Federal Grain Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, New Orleans, Louisiana in October and November, 1984. The evaluation was requested by the inspection service to investigate fumigant exposures at grain sampling and inspection stations in the New Orleans area. Noise monitoring was also performed. The author concludes that a health hazard due to fumigants, grain dust, or noise does not exist at the stations. Recommendations include developing a registry of grain handlers and inspectors and establishing procedures for obtaining information on incoming grain shipments that have been fumigated.

  2. Proceedings of the International Academy for Information Management(IAIM) Annual Conference: International Conference on Informatics Education & Research (ICIER) (16th, New Orleans, Louisiana, December 14-16, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Academy for Information Management.

    This document presents the proceedings of the International Academy for Information Management's International Conference on Informatics Education and Research (ICIER), held December 14-16, 2001 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The keynote address was given by Joseph A. Grace, Jr., founding and current President of the Louisiana Technology Council.…

  3. Sexual risk behavior in men attending Mardi Gras celebrations in New Orleans, Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Benotsch, Eric G; Nettles, Christopher D; Wong, Felicia; Redmann, Jean; Boschini, Jill; Pinkerton, Steven D; Ragsdale, Kathleen; Mikytuck, John J

    2007-10-01

    Previous research with travelers points to higher risk behaviors during vacations. Relative to their day-to-day lives, leisure travelers have more free time to pursue sexual activities and are likely to engage in higher rates of substance use than when at home. Risk behaviors during vacation have not been thoroughly examined in men who have sex with men (MSM), a key group at risk for HIV. The present investigation examined substance use, sexual risk behaviors, and components of the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) Model in MSM attending Mardi Gras celebrations in New Orleans. Almost half of the sexually active men reported having sex with a partner of unknown HIV status while in New Orleans and a similar number did not disclose their own HIV status to all of their sexual partners. Drug use and excessive alcohol use were associated with unprotected sex (ps < .05). Components of the IMB model also predicted sexual risk behavior: individuals with more accurate HIV transmission information reported fewer unprotected sex acts, and motivation to engage in sexual activity on vacation was associated with more unprotected sex (ps < .05). Findings suggest that some MSM on vacation are placing themselves at risk for HIV. Traditional HIV prevention interventions do not readily lend themselves for use with transient populations. New intervention approaches are needed to reduce sexual risk behaviors in persons traveling for leisure. PMID:17922205

  4. Environmental chemical data for perishable sediments and soils collected in New Orleans, Louisiana, and along the Louisiana Delta following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witt, Emitt C.; Shi, Honglan; Karstensen, Krista A.; Wang, Jianmin; Adams, Craig D.

    2008-01-01

    In October 2005, nearly one month after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, a team of scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey and the Missouri University of Science and Technology deployed to southern Louisiana to collect perishable environmental data resulting from the impacts of these storms. Perishable samples collected for this investigation are subject to destruction or ruin by removal, mixing, or natural decay; therefore, collection is time-critical following the depositional event. A total of 238 samples of sediment, soil, and vegetation were collected to characterize chemical quality. For this analysis, 157 of the 238 samples were used to characterize trace element, iron, total organic carbon, pesticide, and polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations of deposited sediment and associated shallow soils. In decreasing order, the largest variability in trace element concentration was detected for lead, vanadium, chromium, copper, arsenic, cadmium, and mercury. Lead was determined to be the trace element of most concern because of the large concentrations present in the samples ranging from 4.50 to 551 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg). Sequential extraction analysis of lead indicate that 39.1 percent of the total lead concentration in post-hurricane sediment is associated with the iron-manganese oxide fraction. This fraction is considered extremely mobile under reducing environmental conditions, thereby making lead a potential health hazard. The presence of lead in post-hurricane sediments likely is from redistribution of pre-hurricane contaminated soils and sediments from Lake Pontchartrain and the flood control canals of New Orleans. Arsenic concentrations ranged from 0.84 to 49.1 mg/kg. Although Arsenic concentrations generally were small and consistent with other research results, all samples exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Human Health Medium-Specific Screening Level of 0.39 mg/kg. Mercury concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 1.30 mg

  5. Chemical constituents in sediment in Lake Pontchartrain and in street mud and canal sediment in New Orleans, Louisiana, following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Wilson, Jennifer T.; Horowitz, Arthur J.; Skrobialowski, Stanley C.; Foreman, William T.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Burkhardt, Mark R.; Elrick, Kent A.; Mahler, Barbara J.; Smith, James J.; Zaugg, Steven D.

    2007-01-01

    Samples of street mud, suspended and bottom sediment in canals discharging to Lake Ponchartrain, and suspended and bottom sediment in the lake were collected and analyzed for chemical constituents to help evaluate the effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and the subsequent unwatering of New Orleans, Louisiana. The approach used for sampling and analysis of chemical data for the study is presented herein. Radionuclides, major and trace elements, and numerous organic compounds in sediment were analyzed. The organic compounds include organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, urban waste indicator compounds, and current-use pesticides. Methods for the analysis of urban waste indicator compounds and current-use pesticides in sediment were developed only recently.

  6. Triatoma sanguisuga Blood Meals and Potential for Chagas Disease, Louisiana, USA

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Julianne; Richards, Bethany; Dorn, Patricia L.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate human risk for Chagas disease, we molecularly identified blood meal sources and prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection among 49 Triatoma sanguisuga kissing bugs in Louisiana, USA. Humans accounted for the second most frequent blood source. Of the bugs that fed on humans, ≈40% were infected with T. cruzi, revealing transmission potential. PMID:25418456

  7. Checklist of insects associated with Salvinia minima (Baker) in Louisiana, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    his study presents a list of adult insects (excluding Diptera and Lepidoptera) collected from an infestation of an invasive aquatic weed, common salvinia (Salvinia minima Baker), in southern Louisiana, USA. Insects were sampled from May – November of 2009 and 2010 using floating pitfall traps. A to...

  8. The Impact of Hurricane Katrina on the Distribution of Subterranean Termite Colonies (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) in City Park, New Orleans, Louisiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of Hurricane Katrina on the distribution of subterranean termites in City Park, New Orleans, LA was determined in four sections of the park where termite activity had been continuously monitored since 2002. Monitoring stations were checked on a monthly basis. Twelve distinct C. formosanu...

  9. Distribution of toxic trace elements in soil/sediment in post-Katrina New Orleans and the Louisiana Delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Su, T.; Shu, S.; Shi, H.; Wang, Jingyuan; Adams, C.; Witt, E.C.

    2008-01-01

    This study provided a comprehensive assessment of seven toxic trace elements (As, Pb, V, Cr, Cd, Cu, and Hg) in the soil/sediment of Katrina affected greater New Orleans region 1 month after the recession of flood water. Results indicated significant contamination of As and V and non-significant contamination of Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg and Pb at most sampling sites. Compared to the reported EPA Region 6 soil background inorganic levels, except As, the concentrations of other six elements had greatly increased throughout the studied area; St. Bernard Parish and Plaquemines Parish showed greater contamination than other regions. Comparison between pre- and post-Katrina data in similar areas, and data for surface, shallow, and deep samples indicated that the trace element distribution in post-Katrina New Orleans was not obviously attributed to the flooding. This study suggests that more detailed study of As and V contamination at identified locations is needed. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. 77 FR 2120 - Environmental Impact Statement for New Orleans Rail Gateway (NORG), Jefferson and Orleans...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-13

    ...FRA is issuing this notice to advise the public that it will prepare an EIS with the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (LA DOTD) to evaluate environmental and related impacts of upgrading the New Orleans Rail Gateway (NORG) and infrastructure in Jefferson and Orleans Parishes, Louisiana (proposed action). FRA is also issuing this notice to solicit public and agency input......

  11. Workshop consensus statement from the 1980 workshop on instrumentation and control for fossil energy processes, January 28-29, 1980, New Orleans, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    1980-05-01

    A workshop on Instrumentation and Controls (I and C) in Fossil Energy Processes was sponsored by the Department of Energy, Fossil Energy in New Orleans, Louisiana, January 28 to 29, 1980. The 82 participants included (approximately): 20% from energy firms (industrial partners), 34% from instrument manufacturers, 12% from architect-engineer and process design firms, 25% from institutions (EPRI, ANL, JPL, etc.), universities and technical societies, and 9% from government. Three major areas of consensus emerged: (1) technical needs, (2) barriers, and (3) communications. Instruments are needed to measure mass flow (solids/gas, solids/liquid), level, high temperature, viscosity, etc. Some needed instruments are unavailable commercially; some have small market, high development cost and risk; operating conditions are generally hostile due to high pressure and temperature, erosion, corrosion, etc. Barriers to I and C technology transfer involve: corporate policy (need to retain patent rights, trade secrets); fear of prosecution by governmental regulatory agencies (Justice, FTC, EPA, etc.) for alleged collusion, restraint of trade, etc.; and fear that candid discussion of I and C problems and deficiencies in plants will lead to loss of funding or job. An ad hoc organization is needed to vigorously pursue communication on I and C between industry and government representatives; and to identify and prioritize I and C needs.

  12. 78 FR 69659 - Chevron U.S.A. Inc. v. Kinder Morgan Louisiana Pipeline LLC; Notice of Complaint

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Chevron U.S.A. Inc. v. Kinder Morgan Louisiana Pipeline LLC; Notice of... Procedures of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission), 18 CFR 385.206, Chevron U.S.A....

  13. Subsidence and its Impact on the Quality of Geospatial Data Used in the Planning and Building of Hurricane Protection for New Orleans and Southeast Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokka, R. K.; Cavell, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    A state-wide digital elevation model (DEM; www.atlas.lsu.edu) based on 1999-2002 LiDAR data is widely used in assessing present and future flooding potential in New Orleans and southeast Louisiana due to storm surge. Although the data were acquired during a time when official vertical controls had been deemed unreliable due to subsidence, the DEM continues to be used for operational modeling and planning. To test its viability, an accuracy assessment of the DEM was performed in 2007 using a statewide real-time kinematic GPS system based on NOAA-sanctioned continuously operating reference stations. Sampling was focused on built structures, i.e., levees, floodwall, and roads, features considered to control surge flow in the low-lying coast. Over 100,000 points were measured and compared to 5X5 m DEM pixels. The vertical accuracy of test points was determined to be +/-10cm (0.3 ft). It is claimed that 90% of the DEM is to accurate to +/-15 cm (0.5 ft).The study had the added benefit of providing a snapshot of the progress being made in augmenting the regional hurricane protection system following the 2005 storms. The study shows that only 40 percent of DEM samples pass the accuracy test, i.e., are +/- 0.8 ft of the true elevation. Where the DEM is too low, it is likely due to: levee augmentation, floodwalls are too narrow to be detected by LiDAR, new levees, and a "levee crown bias", i.e., sampled DEM pixel includes levee slope areas. Where the DEM is too high, the causes can be traced to two factors, inaccurate vertical controls established prior to LiDAR acquisition, and to a lesser degree, post-acquisition subsidence. The DEM south and east of New Orleans overestimates levee elevations by 0-1 m. We conclude, therefore that the state-wide digital elevation model (DEM) is unreliable and inadequate to support present-day surge modeling.

  14. Bottom turbulence on the muddy Atchafalaya Shelf, Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safak, Ilgar; Sheremet, Alexandru; Allison, Mead A.; Hsu, Tian-Jian

    2010-12-01

    Wave, current, and sediment observations collected in approximately 5 m depth on the muddy Atchafalaya clinoform, LA, USA, are used to study the interaction between near-bed wave-induced turbulent flows and suspended sediment characteristics in a muddy environment. Low wave-bias estimates of near-bed Reynolds stresses are strongly correlated with flow accelerations and suspended sediment concentration, as previously observed on sandy beaches, where accelerations have been associated with bed fluidization and sediment transport. A detailed numerical analysis of the observations is performed, based on a uni-dimensional boundary layer model that accounts for the coupling between the fluid and the cohesive sediment phases. The numerical simulations suggest that sediment-induced stratification effects are of the same order of magnitude as turbulent dissipation, and thus play a significant role in the turbulent kinetic energy balance within the tidal boundary layer. However, inside the wave boundary layer, the ratio of stratification to shear-induced turbulence production (i.e., gradient Richardson number) decreases significantly, and shear-induced turbulence production dominates. For these observations, the vertical structures of currents and Reynolds stresses are relatively insensitive to the exact floc size.

  15. Perspectives on Ethnicity in New Orleans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, John, Ed.

    This pamphlet contains several essays on the culture and ethnic groups of New Orleans, Louisiana. Included are: (11 a discussion by Joseph Logsdon on the uniqueness of New Orleans culture, marked by its cuisine, interethnic mixtures, and its politics; (2) an article on theories of ethnicity and neo ethnicity, by Joseph V. Guillotte, III; (3) a…

  16. Prevalence and distribution of three protozoan symbionts in blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) populations across Louisiana, USA.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Holly A; Taylor, Sabrina S; Hawke, John P; Anderson Lively, Julie A

    2015-05-11

    Louisiana has one of the largest blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) fisheries in the USA, but little is known about blue crab diseases, parasites, and symbionts in this area. In 2013-2014, large juvenile and adult blue crabs were collected at 4 diverse sites to determine the prevalence of the protozoan symbionts associated with black gill disease (Lagenophrys callinectes), buckshot crabs (Urosporidium crescens), and bitter crab disease (Hematodinium perezi). A high aggregate prevalence of L. callinectes (93.2%) was identified across all seasons at all 4 collection sites regardless of salinity. A moderately low aggregate prevalence of U. crescens (22.4%) was identified across all seasons and sites. Prevalence of U. crescens depended on site salinity, with only 10% of infections detected at sites with <6.3 ppt salinity, and no infections detected at the low salinity site. While L. callinectes and U. crescens are commensal parasites of blue crabs, infections can result in unmarketable and unappealing meat. In the Louisiana fishery, H. perezi has been blamed circumstantially for adult mortalities in the low salinity nearshore fishing grounds. Despite this, H. perezi was not detected in any of the large crabs sampled, even from the low salinity sites. The prevalence data reported here for these 3 protozoans are the first to include blue crabs sampled seasonally at multiple locations along the Louisiana coast over the period of a year. PMID:25958802

  17. An inventory of wetland impoundments in the coastal zone of Louisiana, USA: Historical trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Richard H.; Holz, Robert K.; Day, John W.

    1990-03-01

    We inventoried wetland impoundments in the Louisiana, USA, coastal zone from the late 1900s to 1985. Historically, impoundment of wetlands for reclamation resulted in direct wetland loss after levees (dikes) failed and the impounded area was permanently flooded, reverting not to wetland, but to open-water habitat. A current management approach is to surround wetlands by levees and water control structures, a practice termed semi-impoundment marsh management. The purpose of this semi-impoundment is to retard saltwater intrusion and reduce water level fluctuations in an attempt to reduce wetland loss, which is a serious problem in coastal Louisiana. In order to quantify the total impounded area, we used historic data and high-altitude infrared photography to map coastal impoundments. Our goal was to produce a documented inventory of wetlands intentionally impounded by levees in the coastal zone of Louisiana in order to provide a benchmark for further research. We inventoried 370,658 ha within the coastal zone that had been intentionally impounded before 1985. This area is equal to about 30% of the total wetland area in the coastal zone. Of that total area, approximately 12% (43,000 ha) is no longer impounded (i.e., failed impoundments; levees no longer exist or only remnants remain). Of the 328,000 ha still impounded, about 65% (214,000 ha) is developed (agriculture, aquaculture, urban and industrial development, and contained spoil). The remaining 35% (114,000 ha) of impoundments are in an undeveloped state (wetland or openwater habitat). In December 1985, approximately 50% (78,000 ha) of the undeveloped and failed impoundments were open-water habitat. This inventory will allow researchers to monitor future change in land-water ratios that occur within impounded wetlands and thus to assess the utility of coastal wetland management using impoundments.

  18. The Louisiana Scholarship Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egalite, Anna J.; Mills, Jonathan N.

    2014-01-01

    The Louisiana Scholarship Program (LSP), also known as the Student Scholarships for Educational Excellence Program, provides public funds for low-income students in low-performing public schools to enroll in local private schools. The program was initially piloted in New Orleans in 2008; Louisiana governor Bobby Jindal and the state legislature…

  19. Analysis of Stomach and Gut Microbiomes of the Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) from Coastal Louisiana, USA

    DOE PAGESBeta

    King, Gary M.; Judd, Craig; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Smith, Conor

    2012-12-12

    In this paper, we used high throughput pyrosequencing to characterize stomach and gut content microbiomes of Crassostrea virginica, the Easter oyster, obtained from two sites, one in Barataria Bay (Hackberry Bay) and the other in Terrebonne Bay (Lake Caillou), Louisiana, USA. Stomach microbiomes in oysters from Hackberry Bay were overwhelmingly dominated by Mollicutes most closely related to Mycoplasma; a more rich community dominated by Planctomyctes occurred in Lake Caillou oyster stomachs. Gut communities for oysters from both sites differed from stomach communities, and harbored a relatively diverse assemblage of phylotypes. Phylotypes most closely related to Shewanella and a Chloroflexi strainmore » dominated the Lake Caillou and Hackberry Bay gut microbiota, respectively. While many members of the stomach and gut microbiomes appeared to be transients or opportunists, a putative core microbiome was identified based on phylotypes that occurred in all stomach or gut samples only. The putative core stomach microbiome comprised 5 OTUs in 3 phyla, while the putative core gut microbiome contained 44 OTUs in 12 phyla. These results collectively revealed novel microbial communities within the oyster digestive system, the functions of the oyster microbiome are largely unknown. Finally, a comparison of microbiomes from Louisiana oysters with bacterial communities reported for other marine invertebrates and fish indicated that molluscan microbiomes were more similar to each other than to microbiomes of polychaetes, decapods and fish.« less

  20. Analysis of Stomach and Gut Microbiomes of the Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) from Coastal Louisiana, USA

    SciTech Connect

    King, Gary M.; Judd, Craig; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Smith, Conor

    2012-12-12

    In this paper, we used high throughput pyrosequencing to characterize stomach and gut content microbiomes of Crassostrea virginica, the Easter oyster, obtained from two sites, one in Barataria Bay (Hackberry Bay) and the other in Terrebonne Bay (Lake Caillou), Louisiana, USA. Stomach microbiomes in oysters from Hackberry Bay were overwhelmingly dominated by Mollicutes most closely related to Mycoplasma; a more rich community dominated by Planctomyctes occurred in Lake Caillou oyster stomachs. Gut communities for oysters from both sites differed from stomach communities, and harbored a relatively diverse assemblage of phylotypes. Phylotypes most closely related to Shewanella and a Chloroflexi strain dominated the Lake Caillou and Hackberry Bay gut microbiota, respectively. While many members of the stomach and gut microbiomes appeared to be transients or opportunists, a putative core microbiome was identified based on phylotypes that occurred in all stomach or gut samples only. The putative core stomach microbiome comprised 5 OTUs in 3 phyla, while the putative core gut microbiome contained 44 OTUs in 12 phyla. These results collectively revealed novel microbial communities within the oyster digestive system, the functions of the oyster microbiome are largely unknown. Finally, a comparison of microbiomes from Louisiana oysters with bacterial communities reported for other marine invertebrates and fish indicated that molluscan microbiomes were more similar to each other than to microbiomes of polychaetes, decapods and fish.

  1. Analysis of Stomach and Gut Microbiomes of the Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) from Coastal Louisiana, USA

    PubMed Central

    King, Gary M.; Judd, Craig; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Smith, Conor

    2012-01-01

    We used high throughput pyrosequencing to characterize stomach and gut content microbiomes of Crassostrea virginica, the Easter oyster, obtained from two sites, one in Barataria Bay (Hackberry Bay) and the other in Terrebonne Bay (Lake Caillou), Louisiana, USA. Stomach microbiomes in oysters from Hackberry Bay were overwhelmingly dominated by Mollicutes most closely related to Mycoplasma; a more rich community dominated by Planctomyctes occurred in Lake Caillou oyster stomachs. Gut communities for oysters from both sites differed from stomach communities, and harbored a relatively diverse assemblage of phylotypes. Phylotypes most closely related to Shewanella and a Chloroflexi strain dominated the Lake Caillou and Hackberry Bay gut microbiota, respectively. While many members of the stomach and gut microbiomes appeared to be transients or opportunists, a putative core microbiome was identified based on phylotypes that occurred in all stomach or gut samples only. The putative core stomach microbiome comprised 5 OTUs in 3 phyla, while the putative core gut microbiome contained 44 OTUs in 12 phyla. These results collectively revealed novel microbial communities within the oyster digestive system, the functions of the oyster microbiome are largely unknown. A comparison of microbiomes from Louisiana oysters with bacterial communities reported for other marine invertebrates and fish indicated that molluscan microbiomes were more similar to each other than to microbiomes of polychaetes, decapods and fish. PMID:23251548

  2. Airborne radar imaging of subaqueous channel evolution in Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, John B.; Ayoub, Francois; Jones, Cathleen E.; Lamb, Michael P.; Holt, Benjamin; Wagner, R. Wayne; Coffey, Thomas S.; Chadwick, J. Austin; Mohrig, David

    2016-05-01

    Shallow coastal regions are among the fastest evolving landscapes but are notoriously difficult to measure with high spatiotemporal resolution. Using Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) data, we demonstrate that high signal-to-noise L band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can reveal subaqueous channel networks at the distal ends of river deltas. Using 27 UAVSAR images collected between 2009 and 2015 from the Wax Lake Delta in coastal Louisiana, USA, we show that under normal tidal conditions, planform geometry of the distributary channel network is frequently resolved in the UAVSAR images, including ~700 m of seaward network extension over 5 years for one channel. UAVSAR also reveals regions of subaerial and subaqueous vegetation, streaklines of biogenic surfactants, and what appear to be small distributary channels aliased by the survey grid, all illustrating the value of fine resolution, low noise, L band SAR for mapping the nearshore subaqueous delta channel network.

  3. Uncertainty Analysis of Downscaled CMIP5 Precipitation Data for Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumi, S. J.; Tamanna, M.; Chivoiu, B.; Habib, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    The downscaled CMIP3 and CMIP5 Climate and Hydrology Projections dataset contains fine spatial resolution translations of climate projections over the contiguous United States developed using two downscaling techniques (monthly Bias Correction Spatial Disaggregation (BCSD) and daily Bias Correction Constructed Analogs (BCCA)). The objective of this study is to assess the uncertainty of the CMIP5 downscaled general circulation models (GCM). We performed an analysis of the daily, monthly, seasonal and annual variability of precipitation downloaded from the Downscaled CMIP3 and CMIP5 Climate and Hydrology Projections website for the state of Louisiana, USA at 0.125° x 0.125° resolution. A data set of daily gridded observations of precipitation of a rectangular boundary covering Louisiana is used to assess the validity of 21 downscaled GCMs for the 1950-1999 period. The following statistics are computed using the CMIP5 observed dataset with respect to the 21 models: the correlation coefficient, the bias, the normalized bias, the mean absolute error (MAE), the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), and the root mean square error (RMSE). A measure of variability simulated by each model is computed as the ratio of its standard deviation, in both space and time, to the corresponding standard deviation of the observation. The correlation and MAPE statistics are also computed for each of the nine climate divisions of Louisiana. Some of the patterns that we observed are: 1) Average annual precipitation rate shows similar spatial distribution for all the models within a range of 3.27 to 4.75 mm/day from Northwest to Southeast. 2) Standard deviation of summer (JJA) precipitation (mm/day) for the models maintains lower value than the observation whereas they have similar spatial patterns and range of values in winter (NDJ). 3) Correlation coefficients of annual precipitation of models against observation have a range of -0.48 to 0.36 with variable spatial distribution by model

  4. Regional Phonological Variants in Louisiana Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubrecht, August Weston

    Based on tape recorded conversations of 28 informants in 18 Louisiana communities, this study investigated regional phonological variants in Louisiana speech. On the basis of settlement history and previous dialect studies, four regions are defined: northern Louisiana, the Florida Parishes, French Louisiana, and New Orleans. The informants are all…

  5. Effects of hurricanes Katrina and Rita on the chemistry of bottom sediments in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, P.C.; Horowitz, A.J.; Mahler, B.J.; Foreman, W.T.; Fuller, C.C.; Burkhardt, M.R.; Elrick, K.A.; Furlong, E.T.; Skrobialowski, S.C.; Smith, J.J.; Wilson, J.T.; Zaugg, S.D.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and the subsequent unwatering of New Orleans, Louisiana, on the sediment chemistry of Lake Pontchartrain were evaluated by chemical analysis of samples of street mud and suspended and bottom sediments. The highest concentrations of urban-related elements and compounds (e.g., Pb, Zn, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and chlordane) in bottom sediments exceeded median concentrations in U.S. urban lakes and sediment-quality guidelines. The extent of the elevated concentrations was limited, however, to within a few hundred meters of the mouth of the 17th Street Canal, similar to results of historical assessments. Chemical and radionuclide analysis of pre- and post-Hurricane Rita samples indicates that remobilization of near-shore sediment by lake currents and storms is an ongoing process. The effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on the sediment chemistry of Lake Pontchartrain are limited spatially and are most likely transitory. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  6. Possible linkages between lignite aquifers, pathogenic microbes, and renal pelvic cancer in northwestern Louisiana, USA.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, Joseph E; Tatu, Calin A; Bushon, Rebecca N; Stoeckel, Donald M; Brady, Amie M G; Beck, Marisa; Lerch, Harry E; McGee, Benton; Hanson, Bradford C; Shi, Runhua; Orem, William H

    2006-12-01

    In May and September, 2002, 14 private residential drinking water wells, one dewatering well at a lignite mine, eight surface water sites, and lignite from an active coal mine were sampled in five Parishes of northwestern Louisiana, USA. Using a geographic information system (GIS), wells were selected that were likely to draw water that had been in contact with lignite; control wells were located in areas devoid of lignite deposits. Well water samples were analyzed for pH, conductivity, organic compounds, and nutrient and anion concentrations. All samples were further tested for presence of fungi (cultures maintained for up to 28 days and colonies counted and identified microscopically) and for metal and trace element concentration by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Surface water samples were tested for dissolved oxygen and presence of pathogenic leptospiral bacteria. The Spearman correlation method was used to assess the association between the endpoints for these field/laboratory analyses and incidence of cancer of the renal pelvis (RPC) based on data obtained from the Louisiana Tumor Registry for the five Parishes included in the study. Significant associations were revealed between the cancer rate and the presence in drinking water of organic compounds, the fungi Zygomycetes, the nutrients PO(4) and NH(3), and 13 chemical elements. Presence of human pathogenic leptospires was detected in four out of eight (50%) of the surface water sites sampled. The present study of a stable rural population examined possible linkages between aquifers containing chemically reactive lignite deposits, hydrologic conditions favorable to the leaching and transport of toxic organic compounds from the lignite into the groundwater, possible microbial contamination, and RPC risk. PMID:17120101

  7. Possible linkages between lignite aquifers, pathogenic microbes, and renal pelvic cancer in northwestern Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunnell, J.E.; Tatu, C.A.; Bushon, R.N.; Stoeckel, D.M.; Brady, A.M.G.; Beck, M.; Lerch, H.E.; McGee, B.; Hanson, B.C.; Shi, R.; Orem, W.H.

    2006-01-01

    In May and September, 2002, 14 private residential drinking water wells, one dewatering well at a lignite mine, eight surface water sites, and lignite from an active coal mine were sampled in five Parishes of northwestern Louisiana, USA. Using a geographic information system (GIS), wells were selected that were likely to draw water that had been in contact with lignite; control wells were located in areas devoid of lignite deposits. Well water samples were analyzed for pH, conductivity, organic compounds, and nutrient and anion concentrations. All samples were further tested for presence of fungi (cultures maintained for up to 28 days and colonies counted and identified microscopically) and for metal and trace element concentration by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Surface water samples were tested for dissolved oxygen and presence of pathogenic leptospiral bacteria. The Spearman correlation method was used to assess the association between the endpoints for these field/laboratory analyses and incidence of cancer of the renal pelvis (RPC) based on data obtained from the Louisiana Tumor Registry for the five Parishes included in the study. Significant associations were revealed between the cancer rate and the presence in drinking water of organic compounds, the fungi Zygomycetes, the nutrients PO4 and NH3, and 13 chemical elements. Presence of human pathogenic leptospires was detected in four out of eight (50%) of the surface water sites sampled. The present study of a stable rural population examined possible linkages between aquifers containing chemically reactive lignite deposits, hydrologic conditions favorable to the leaching and transport of toxic organic compounds from the lignite into the groundwater, possible microbial contamination, and RPC risk. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006.

  8. Molecular detection of the parasitic dinoflagellate Hematodinium perezi from blue crabs Callinectes sapidus in Louisiana, USA.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Timothy J; Gelpi, Carey G; Neigel, Joseph E

    2016-06-15

    The dinoflagellate Hematodinium perezi is a prolific pathogen of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus along the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts of North America. High prevalence, sometimes approaching 100%, and outbreaks with high mortality are associated with higher salinities. H. perezi has not been reported previously in blue crabs from Louisiana, USA, where salinities in coastal habitats are generally below the parasite's favorable range. However, the possibility that H. perezi infects blue crabs in higher salinity habitats offshore has not been investigated. A PCR-based test for H. perezi was used to screen blue crabs collected from both high and low salinity areas. These included juvenile and adult crabs from inshore marshes where salinities are relatively low and from higher salinity offshore shoals that are spawning sites for females. H. perezi was detected in blue crabs from offshore shoals (prevalence = 5.6%) but not in juvenile or adult crabs from inshore habitats. Megalopae (post-larvae) were also collected from inshore locations. Although megalopae settle inshore where salinities are relatively low, the megalopal stage is preceded by a planktonic phase in higher salinity offshore waters. We detected H. perezi in 11.2% of settling megalopae tested. Although the prevalence of H. perezi was relatively low within our samples, if spawning females and megalopae are especially vulnerable, the impact on the population could be compounded. This is the first report of H. perezi from blue crabs in Louisiana and demonstrates the importance of examining all life stages in determining the prevalence of a harmful parasite. PMID:27304873

  9. Selections from the ABC 2013 Annual Convention, New Orleans, Louisiana: A Gumbo of Favorite Assignments: Global, Communicating Complex Information, Short-Message Packaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalen, D. Joel

    2014-01-01

    This article, the first of a two-part series, catalogs teaching innovations presented at the 2013 Association for Business Communication (ABC) Annual Convention, New Orleans. They were presented during the My Favorite Assignment session. The 11 Favorite Assignments featured here offer the reader a variety of learning experiences including…

  10. All Together Now: Building Strong Communities through Arts and Education Partnerships (New Orleans, Louisiana, February 12-13, 2009). Reflections on the Forum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arts Education Partnership (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    When the members of Arts Education Partnership (AEP) first started thinking of how they might disseminate information about the AEP Winter Forum in New Orleans, they knew they wanted to shake up the format of a traditional Forum report. At this stage in the evolution of the Partnership, and of the arts education field as a whole, they felt they…

  11. PROCEEDINGS: 1987 JOINT SYMPOSIUM ON STATIONARY SOURCE COMBUSTION NOX CONTROL. HELD IN NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA ON MARCH 23-26, 1987

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two-volume proceedings document the 1987 Joint (EPA and EPRI) Symposium on Stationary Combustion NOx Control, held March 23-26, 1987 in New Orleans, LA. The 49 presentations covered: low NOx combustion developments (e.g., reburning and burner design modifications); coal-, oil...

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (EPA) FINE PARTICLE SCRUBBER SYMPOSIUM (2ND) HELD IN NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA ON MAY 2-3, 1977

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents the proceedings, including introductory remarks and 16 technical papers, of the Second Fine Particle Scrubber Symposium, held May 2-3, 1977, in New Orleans. Sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the symposium was held to stimulate and generate...

  13. Indicator geostatistics for reconstructing Baton Rouge aquifer-fault hydrostratigraphy, Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshall, Ahmed S.; Tsai, Frank T.-C.; Hanor, Jeffrey S.

    2013-12-01

    The complex siliciclastic aquifer system underneath the Baton Rouge area, Louisiana (USA), is fluvial in origin and is characterized by strongly binary heterogeneity of sand units and mudstones as pervious and impervious hydrofacies. The east-west trending Baton Rouge fault and Denham Springs-Scotlandville fault cut across East Baton Rouge Parish and play an important role in groundwater flow and aquifer salinization. This study reconstructs the Baton Rouge aquifer-fault system architecture for a Miocene-Pliocene depth interval that consists of the 1,200-foot sand to the 2,000-foot sand. The results show the spatial extent of sand units, their interconnections, and flow paths within each sand unit. The regional-scale formation dip, the sand unit offset on the faults, and the volumetric spatial extent of individual sand units are quantified. The study reveals the complexity of the Baton Rouge aquifer-fault system where the sand deposition is non-uniform, different sand units are interconnected, the sand unit displacement on the faults is significant, and the spatial distribution of flow pathways through the faults is sporadic. The identified locations of flow pathways through the Baton Rouge fault provide useful information on possible windows for saltwater intrusion from the south.

  14. Growth and nutrition of baldcypress families planted under varying salinity regimes in Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krauss, K.W.; Chambers, J.L.; Allen, J.A.; Soileau, D.M., Jr.; DeBosier, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    Saltwater intrusion from the Gulf of Mexico is one important factor in the destruction of baldcypress (Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich.) swamps along the Louisiana Gulf Coast, USA. Recent restoration efforts have focused on identification of baldcypress genotypes with greater tolerance to saline conditions than previously reported. To date, salt tolerance investigations have not been conducted under saline field conditions. In 1996, therefore, three plantations were established with 10 half-sib genotype collections of baldcypress in mesohaline wetlands. Tree survival and growth were measured at the end of two growing seasons, and foliar ion concentrations of Na, Cl, K, and Ca and available soil nutrients were measured during the 1996 growing season. In general, soil nutrient concentrations exceeded averages found in other baldcypress stands in the southeastern United States. Seedlings differed among sites in all parameters measured, with height, diameter, foliar biomass, and survival decreasing as site salinity increased. Average seedling height at the end of two years, for example, was 196.4 cm on the lowest salinity site and 121.6 cm on the highest. Several half-sib families maintained greater height growth increments (ranging from 25.5 to 54.5 cm on the highest salinity site), as well as lower foliar ion concentrations of K, Cl, and Ca. Results indicate that genotypic screening of baldcypress may improve growth and vigor of seedlings planted within wetlands impacted by saltwater intrusion.

  15. Dispersive thermohaline convection near salt domes: a case at Napoleonville Dome, southeast Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidzadeh, Zahra; Tsai, Frank T.-C.; Ghasemzadeh, Hasan; Mirbagheri, Seyed Ahmad; Barzi, Majid Tavangari; Hanor, Jeffrey S.

    2015-08-01

    Density-driven flow around salt domes is strongly influenced by salt concentration and temperature gradients. In this study, a thermohaline convection numerical modeling is developed to investigate flow, salinity, and heat transport around salt domes under the impact of fluid dispersivity and variable density and viscosity. `Dispersive fluid flux of total fluid mass' is introduced to the density-driven flow equation to improve thermohaline modeling in porous media. The dispersive fluid flux term is derived to account for an additional fluid flux driven by the density gradient and mechanical dispersion. The model is first tested by a hypothetical salt-dome problem, where a circulation of flow is induced by an overpressure and density effect. The result shows a distinct salt-transport change due to the inclusion of the dispersive fluid flux and temperature effect. Then, the model is applied to investigate changes of groundwater flow, salinity, and heat transport near the west of Napoleonville salt dome, southeastern Louisiana, USA, due to a salt cavern failure. The result shows that an instant overpressure assumed to be created by the salt-cavern wall breach has little impact on salinity near the ground surface within a period of 3 months. However, salinity is significantly elevated near the breach area of the salt cavern, caused by strong flow velocities.

  16. The morphology and evolution of channels on the Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, John B.; Mohrig, David; Whitman, Spencer K.

    2013-09-01

    deltas are classic depositional systems, but a growing body of literature shows that their channel networks can be erosional. Furthermore, this erosion can attack channel beds of consolidated mud that acts as bedrock. To better understand the channel networks of natural deltas and engineered river diversions, we investigate bathymetric and planimetric change, bed cover, and sediment transport in the Wax Lake Delta (WLD) in coastal Louisiana, USA. Channels have eroded up to 40% of modern flow depth between the WLD's initiation in 1973 and 1999. Aerial image analysis shows that channels have widened by 11% between 1991 and 2009, forcing the downstream migration of islands. Channel beds are composed of 85-98% muddy bedrock, with the remainder covered by alluvial sands. Water velocity, grain size, and suspended sand concentration measurements during the 2009 spring flood show that almost all available grain sizes are transported in suspension. Flow was supply limited during this period, with the calculated sand concentration at the height of the bed load layer is 1-4 orders of magnitude smaller than predicted for saturated sand transport. We test "the cover effect" and "the tools effect" previously proposed for bedrock erosion in upland river channels. Bedrock erosion and alluvial cover are anti-correlated (the cover effect), but the observations do not closely follow previously proposed relationships. The difference in erosion rate between clear water and sand-rich water shows that abrasion by sand (the tools effect) accounts for 51% ± 56% of bedrock erosion when it is present.

  17. Measuring Changes in Consumer Resource Availability to Riverine Pulsing in Breton Sound, Louisiana, USA

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Bryan P.; La Peyre, Megan K.

    2012-01-01

    Resource pulses are thought to structure communities and food webs through the assembly of consumers. Aggregated consumers represent a high quality resource subsidy that becomes available for trophic transfer during and after the pulse. In estuarine systems, riverine flood pulses deliver large quantities of basal resources and make high quality habitat available for exploitation by consumers. These consumers represent a change in resources that may be available for trophic transfer. We quantified this increased consumer resource availability (nekton density, biomass, energy density) provided by riverine flood pulsing in Breton Sound, Louisiana, USA. We used water level differences between an area subject to two experimental riverine flood pulses (inflow) and a reference area not receiving inflow to identify the percentage of nekton standing stock and energy density that may be attributable solely to riverine pulsing and may represent a consumer resource subsidy. Riverine pulsing accounted for more than 60% of resident nekton density (ind m−2), biomass (g m−2), and energy density (cal m−2) on the flooded marsh surface during two experimental pulse events in 2005. Our results document the potential subsidy of resident nekton standing stock from a riverine flood pulse available for export to subtidal habitats. Given predicted large scale changes in river discharge globally, this approach could provide a useful tool for quantifying the effects of changes in riverine discharge on consumer resource availability. PMID:22666363

  18. Morphology and phylogeny of Agmasoma penaei (Microsporidia) from the type host, Litopenaeus setiferus, and the type locality, Louisiana, USA.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Yuliya; Pelin, Adrian; Hawke, John; Corradi, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Since June 2012, samples of wild caught white shrimp, Litopenaeus setiferus, from the Gulf of Mexico, Plaquemines and Jefferson Parishes (Louisiana, USA) with clinical signs of microsporidiosis have been delivered to the Louisiana Aquatic Diagnostic Laboratory for identification. Infection was limited predominantly to female gonads and was caused by a microsporidium producing roundish pansporoblasts with eight spores (3.6×2.1 μm) and an anisofilar (2-3+4-6) polar filament. These features allowed identification of the microsporidium as Agmasoma penaei Sprague, 1950. Agmasoma penaei is known as a microsporidium with world-wide distribution, causing devastating epizootic disease among wild and cultured shrimps. This paper provides molecular and morphological characterisation of A. penaei from the type host and type locality. Comparison of the novel ssrDNA sequence of A. penaei from Louisiana, USA with that of A. penaei from Thailand revealed 95% similarity, which suggests these geographical isolates are two different species. The A. penaei sequences did not show significant homology to any other examined taxon. Phylogenetic reconstructions using the ssrDNA and alpha- and beta-tubulin sequences supported its affiliation with the Clade IV Terresporidia sensu Vossbrink 2005, and its association with parasites of fresh and salt water crustaceans of the genera Artemia, Daphnia and Cyclops. PMID:25449947

  19. Health hazard evaluation of police officers and firefighters after Hurricane Katrina--New Orleans, Louisiana, October 17-28 and November 30-December 5, 2005.

    PubMed

    2006-04-28

    In the weeks after Hurricane Katrina struck the U.S. Gulf Coast on August 29, 2005, reports of increased injuries and symptoms of physical illness and psychological strain among New Orleans police officers and firefighters prompted CDC to conduct a health hazard evaluation of these two groups. Questionnaires were distributed to members of the New Orleans Police Department (NOPD) and New Orleans Fire Department (NOFD) 7-13 weeks after the hurricane. This report summarizes the results of that evaluation, which determined that upper respiratory and skin rash symptoms were the most common physical symptoms reported by police officers and firefighters and lacerations and sprains were the most common injuries. In addition, approximately one third of the respondents reported either depressive symptoms or symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), or both. These results underscore the need to incorporate the safety and health of emergency responders into existing disaster preparedness plans and to provide periodic responder training and education in tasks unique to disaster situations. Clinical follow-up of the physical and psychological health of emergency responders should be conducted to better understand, monitor, and treat their health conditions. PMID:16645571

  20. Comparative study of climate-change scenarios on groundwater recharge, southwestern Mississippi and southeastern Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigi, Ehsan; Tsai, Frank T.-C.

    2015-02-01

    A geographic information system (GIS)-based water-budget framework has been developed to study the climate-change impact on regional groundwater recharge, and it was applied to the Southern Hills aquifer system of southwestern Mississippi and southeastern Louisiana, USA. The framework links historical climate variables and future emission scenarios of climate models to a hydrologic model, HELP3, to quantify spatiotemporal potential recharge variations from 1950 to 2099. The framework includes parallel programming to divide a large amount of HELP3 simulations among multiple cores of a supercomputer, to expedite computation. The results show that a wide range of projected potential recharge for the Southern Hills aquifer system resulted from the divergent projections of precipitation, temperature and solar radiation using three scenarios (B1, A2 and A1FI) of the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Parallel Climate Model 1 (PCM) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Lab's (GFDL) model. The PCM model projects recharge change ranging from -33.7 to +19.1 % for the 21st century. The GFDL model projects less recharge than the PCM, with recharge change ranging from -58.1 to +7.1 %. Potential recharge is likely to increase in 2010-2039, but likely to decrease in 2070-2099. Projected recharge is more sensitive to the changes in the projected precipitation than the projected solar radiation and temperature. Uncertainty analysis confirms that the uncertainty in projected precipitation yields more changes in the potential recharge than in the projected temperature for the study area.

  1. Aspects of petrochemical pollution in southeastern Louisiana (USA): pre-Katrina background and source characterization.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Javed; Gisclair, David; McMillin, Debra J; Portier, Ralph J

    2007-09-01

    Background petroleum pollution before Hurricane Katrina in southeastern Louisiana (USA) coastal sediments was evaluated at 320 locations in three consecutive years for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), saturated alkanes (nC9-nC35), and petroleum biomarker compounds (hopanes, steranes, pristane, and phytane). Approximately 90% of the sample locations had a total PAH concentration of less than 2.0 microg/g and total saturated alkane concentration of less than 17 microg/g, with 50% indicating a total PAH concentration of less than 200 ng/g. Upper limit or baseline high concentration for total PAHs was 1.5 microg/g, comparable to the 2.18 microg/g reported for the National Status and Trends (NST) Program of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Thus, 85% of sites were below the baseline high concentration. Baseline high total PAHs at 6% of the sites (described as land) was 5.1 microg/g, comparable to the 4 microg/g benchmark calculated for NST. The three-year average total PAH concentration for 95% of the sites was less than 7.5 microg/g, a defined limit of fivefold the baseline high concentration. Samples indicated petrogenic, pyrogenic, and natural/biogenic hydrocarbon inputs. Contaminant levels exceeded the state soil screening limits at only 3% of the 320 locations. Federal screening limits proposed by the NOAA for ecological effects were exceeded at only 18% of the sites (including those sites exceeding the state limit). Only 4% of the sites had concentrations exceeding the NOAA effect range-low (ER-L) in more than one collection year. At least 61% of the analytes exceeding the ER-L were pyrogenic source indicators. Source-fingerprint analysis of these selected samples showed 10 samples with notable petroleum contamination, whereas six indicated pyrogenic input. Of all samples collected, only one site showed relatively fresh/lightly weathered petroleum. PMID:17705663

  2. Long-term geochemical evaluation of the coastal Chicot aquifer system, Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrok, David M.; Broussard, Whitney P.

    2016-02-01

    Groundwater is increasingly being overdrafted in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal regions of the United States. Geochemical data associated with groundwater in these aquifers can provide important information on changes in salinity, recharge, and reaction pathways that can be used to improve water management strategies. Here we evaluated long-term geochemical changes associated with the 23,000 km2 Chicot aquifer system in Louisiana, USA. The Chicot aquifer is currently being overdrafted by about 1,320,000 m3 per day. We compiled selected bulk geochemical data from samples collected from 20 wells in the Chicot aquifer from 1993 to 2015. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope measurements were additionally completed for the 2014 samples. We identified three zones of groundwater with distinctive geochemical character; (1) A groundwater recharge zone in the northern part of the study area with low pH, low salinity, and low temperature relative to other groundwater samples, (2) a groundwater recharge zone in the southeastern part of the study area with low temperature, high alkalinity, and higher Ca and Mg concentrations compared to the other groundwater samples, and (3) groundwater in the southwestern part of the aquifer system with high salinity, high temperature, and a ∼1:1 Na/Cl ratio. The geochemistry of these regions has been relatively stable over the last ∼20 years. However, in the drought year of 2011, the estimated extent of zones with elevated salinity increased substantially. Geochemical evidence suggests that there was increased infiltration of deeper, more salt-rich waters into the shallower Chicot aquifer.

  3. The role of deep processes in late 20th century subsidence of New Orleans and coastal areas of southern Louisiana and Mississippi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokka, Roy K.

    2011-06-01

    Geodetic leveling observations from Biloxi, MS, to New Orleans, LA, and water level gauge measurements in the New Orleans-Lake Pontchartrain area were analyzed to infer late 20th century vertical motions. These data were used to test the validity of previous subsidence rate measurements and the models that predict the location and causes of subsidence. Water gauges attached to bridge foundations and benchmarks affixed to deep rods that penetrate Holocene strata subsided as much as 0.8 m locally between 1955 and 1995. The observed deep-seated subsidence far exceeds model predictions and demonstrates that shallow processes such as compaction and consolidation of Holocene sediments are inadequate by themselves to explain late 20th century subsidence. Deep-seated subsidence occurring east and north of the normal faults marking the Gulf of Mexico basin margin can be explained by local groundwater withdrawal, and regional tectonic loading of the lithosphere by the modern Mississippi River delta (MRD). Sharp changes in subsidence coincide with strands of the basin margin normal faults. Displacements are consistent with activity and show motions consonant with fault creep. Deep subsidence of the region to the south, including New Orleans, can be explained by a combination of groundwater withdrawal from shallow upper Pleistocene aquifers, the aforementioned lithospheric loading, and perhaps, nongroundwater-related faulting. Subsidence due to groundwater extraction from aquifers ˜160 to 200 m deep dominated urbanized areas and is likely responsible for helping to lower local flood protection structures and bridges by as much as ˜0.8 m.

  4. New Orleans Eyed as Clean Educational Slate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2005-01-01

    New Orleans will probably never be the same after Hurricane Katrina. But when it comes to schools, many educators and analysts say that might not be all bad. Both in Louisiana and beyond, the wreckage in the Big Easy has sparked thinking about how the city might reinvent its beleaguered school system, in difficult straits long before the storm was…

  5. Photographic copy of September 16, 1931 New Orleans Morning Tribune ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of September 16, 1931 New Orleans Morning Tribune newspaper article. Located in a photo album at the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Archives Center, Work and Industry Division, Washington, D.C. SEPTEMBER 16, 1931 NEW ORLEANS MORNING TRIBUNE NEWSPAPER ARTICLE AND PICTURE OF BRIDGE BID OPENING FEATURING LOUISIANA GOVERNOR HUEY LONG, NEW ORLEANS MAYOR WALMSLEY, STATE HIGHWAY COMMISSION CHAIRMAN O.K. ALLEN AND PUBLIC BELT RAILROAD CHIEF ENGINEER ROBERT BARCLAY. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  6. Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in surface and treated waters of Louisiana, USA and Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Glen R; Reemtsma, Helge; Grimm, Deborah A; Mitra, Siddhartha

    2003-07-20

    A newly developed analytical method was used to measure concentrations of nine pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in samples from two surface water bodies, a sewage treatment plant effluent and various stages of a drinking water treatment plant in Louisiana, USA, and from one surface water body, a drinking water treatment plant and a pilot plant in Ontario, Canada. The analytical method provides for simultaneous extraction and quantification of the following broad range of PPCPs and endocrine-disrupting chemicals: naproxen; ibuprofen; estrone; 17beta-estradiol; bisphenol A; clorophene; triclosan; fluoxetine; and clofibric acid. Naproxen was detected in Louisiana sewage treatment plant effluent at 81-106 ng/l and Louisiana and Ontario surface waters at 22-107 ng/l. Triclosan was detected in Louisiana sewage treatment plant effluent at 10-21 ng/l. Of the three surface waters sampled, clofibric acid was detected in Detroit River water at 103 ng/l, but not in Mississippi River or Lake Pontchartrain waters. None of the other target analytes were detected above their method detection limits. Based on results at various stages of treatment, conventional drinking-water treatment processes (coagulation, flocculation and sedimentation) plus continuous addition of powdered activated carbon at a dosage of 2 mg/l did not remove naproxen from Mississippi River waters. However, chlorination, ozonation and dual media filtration processes reduced the concentration of naproxen below detection in Mississippi River and Detroit River waters and reduced clofibric acid in Detroit River waters. Results of this study demonstrate that existing water treatment technologies can effectively remove certain PPCPs. In addition, our study demonstrates the importance of obtaining data on removal mechanisms and byproducts associated with PPCPs and other endocrine-disrupting chemicals in drinking water and sewage treatment processes. PMID:12826389

  7. Comparison of wetland structural characteristics between created and natural salt marshes in southwest Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, K.R.; Proffitt, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    The use of dredge material is a well-known technique for creating or restoring salt marshes that is expected to become more common along the Gulf of Mexico coast in the future. However, the effectiveness of this restoration method is still questioned. Wetland structural characteristics were compared between four created and three natural salt marshes in southwest Louisiana, USA. The created marshes, formed by the pumping of dredge material into formerly open water areas, represent a chronosequence, ranging in age from 3 to 19 years. Vegetation and soil structural factors were compared to determine whether the created marshes become more similar over time to the natural salt marshes. Vegetation surveys were conducted in 1997, 2000, and 2002 using the line-intercept technique. Site elevations were measured in 2000. Organic matter (OM) was measured in 1996 and 2002, while bulk density and soil particle-size distribution were determined in 2002 only. The natural marshes were dominated by Spartina alterniflora, as were the oldest created marshes; these marshes had the lowest mean site elevations ( 35 cm NGVD) and became dominated by high marsh (S. patens, Distichlis spicata) and shrub (Baccharis halimifolia, Iva frutescens) species. The higher elevation marsh seems to be following a different plant successional trajectory than the other marshes, indicating a relationship between marsh elevation and species composition. The soils in both the created and natural marshes contain high levels of clays (30-65 %), with sand comprising < 1 % of the soil distribution. OM was significantly greater and bulk density significantly lower in two of the natural marshes when compared to the created marshes. The oldest created marsh had significantly greater OM than the younger created marshes, but it may still take several decades before equivalency is reached with the natural marshes. Vegetation structural characteristics in the created marshes take only a few years to become similar

  8. "Caring for Young Black Children at Risk in Louisiana." U.S. House of Representatives, Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families Hearing Summary (New Orleans, Louisiana, July 14, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.

    This document summarizes a field hearing that examined the problems faced by low-income young black children in Louisiana, as well as successful home-, community-, and school-based early intervention programs. Thirteen witnesses testified primarily on child care needs and the health status of the State's children. The following problems were…

  9. Predicting climate change effects on surface soil organic carbon of Louisiana, USA.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Biao; Xu, Yi Jun

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to assess the degree of potential temperature and precipitation change as predicted by the HadCM3 (Hadley Centre Coupled Model, version 3) climate model for Louisiana, and to investigate the effects of potential climate change on surface soil organic carbon (SOC) across Louisiana using the Rothamsted Carbon Model (RothC) and GIS techniques at the watershed scale. Climate data sets at a grid cell of 0.5° × 0.5° for the entire state of Louisiana were collected from the HadCM3 model output for three climate change scenarios: B2, A2, and A1F1, that represent low, higher, and even higher greenhouse gas emissions, respectively. Geo-referenced datasets including USDA-NRCS Soil Geographic Database (STATSGO), USGS Land Cover Dataset (NLCD), and the Louisiana watershed boundary data were gathered for SOC calculation at the watershed scale. A soil carbon turnover model, RothC, was used to simulate monthly changes in SOC from 2001 to 2100 under the projected temperature and precipitation changes. The simulated SOC changes in 253 watersheds from three time periods, 2001-2010, 2041-2050, and 2091-2100, were tested for the influence of the land covers and emissions scenarios using SAS PROC GLIMMIX and PDMIX800 macro to separate Tukey-Kramer (p < 0.01) adjusted means into letter comparisons. The study found that for most of the next 100 years in Louisiana, monthly mean temperature under all three emissions projections will increase; and monthly precipitation will, however, decrease. Under three emission scenarios, A1FI, A2, and B2, the mean SOC in the upper 30-cm depth of Louisiana forest soils will decrease from 33.0 t/ha in 2001 to 26.9, 28.4, and 29.2 t/ha in 2100, respectively; the mean SOC of Louisiana cropland soils will decrease from 44.4 t/ha in 2001 to 36.3, 38.4, and 39.6 t/ha in 2100, respectively; the mean SOC of Louisiana grassland soils will change from 30.7 t/ha in 2001 to 25.4, 26.6, and 27.0 t/ha in 2100, respectively. Annual SOC

  10. Technology Solutions Case Study: Evaluation of the Performance of Houses With and Without Supplemental Dehumidification in a Hot-Humid Climate, New Orleans, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this project by Building Science Corporation was to evaluate the humidity control performance of new single family high performance homes, and compare the interior conditions and mechanical systems operation between two distinct groups of houses: homes with a supplemental dehumidifier installed in addition to HVAC system, and homes without any supplemental dehumidification. The subjects of the study were 10 single-family new construction homes in New Orleans, LA. Data logging equipment was installed at each home in 2012, and interior conditions and various end-use loads were monitored for one year. In terms of averages, the homes with dehumidifiers are limiting elevated levels of humidity in the living space; however, there was significant variation in humidity control between individual houses. An analysis of the equipment operation did not show a clear correlation between energy use and humidity levels. In general, no single explanatory variable appears to provide a consistent understanding of the humidity control in each house. Indoor humidity is likely due to all of the factors we have examined, and the specifics of how they are used by each occupant.

  11. Biodegradation of crude oil from the BP oil spill in the marsh sediments of southeast Louisiana, USA.

    PubMed

    Boopathy, Raj; Shields, Sara; Nunna, Siva

    2012-07-01

    The significant challenges presented by the April 20, 2010 explosion, sinking, and subsequent oil spill of the Deepwater Horizon drilling platform in Canyon Block 252 about 52 miles southeast of Venice, LA, USA greatly impacted Louisiana's coastal ecosystem including the sea food industry, recreational fishing, and tourism. The short-term and long-term impact of this oil spill are significant, and the Deepwater Horizon spill is potentially both an economic and an ecological disaster. Microbes present in the water column and sediments have the potential to degrade the oil. Oil degradation could be enhanced by biostimulation method. The conventional approach to bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon is based on aerobic processes. Anaerobic bioremediation has been tested only in a very few cases and is still considered experimental. The currently practiced conventional in situ biorestoration of petroleum-contaminated soils and ground water relies on the supply of oxygen to the subsurface to enhance natural aerobic processes to remediate the contaminants. However, anaerobic microbial processes can be significant in oxygen-depleted subsurface environments and sediments that are contaminated with petroleum-based compounds such as oil-impacted marshes in Louisiana. The goal of this work was to identify the right conditions for the indigenous anaerobic bacteria present in the contaminated sites to enhance degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. We evaluated the ability of microorganisms under a variety of electron acceptor conditions to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons. Researched microbial systems include sulfate-, nitrate-reducing bacteria, and fermenting bacteria. The results indicated that anaerobic bacteria are viable candidates for bioremediation. Enhanced biodegradation was attained under mixed electron acceptor conditions, where various electron-accepting anaerobes coexisted and aided in degrading complex petroleum hydrocarbon components of marsh sediments in the

  12. Building America Case Study: Evaluation of the Performance of Houses With and Without Supplemental Dehumidification in a Hot-Humid Climate, New Orleans, Louisiana (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    This report, Evaluation of the Performance of Houses with and without Supplemental Dehumidification in a Hot-Humid Climate, describes a research study that that was conducted by the Building Science Corporation (BSC) Building America Research Team. BSC seeks to research and report on the field monitoring of the performance of in-situ supplemental dehumidification systems in low energy, high performance, homes in a Hot-Humid climate. The purpose of this research project was to observe and compare the humidity control performance of new, single family, low energy, and high performance, homes. Specifically, the study sought to compare the interior conditions and mechanical systems operation between two distinct groups of houses, homes with a supplemental dehumidifier installed in addition to HVAC system, and homes without any supplemental dehumidification. The subjects of the study were ten single-family new construction homes in New Orleans, LA. Data logging equipment was installed at each home in 2012. Interior conditions and various end-use loads were monitored for one year. In terms of averages, the homes with dehumidifiers are limiting elevated levels of humidity in the living space. However, there was significant variation in humidity control between individual houses. An analysis of the equipment operation did not show a clear correlation between energy use and humidity levels. In general, no single explanatory variable appears to provide a consistent understanding of the humidity control in each house. Indoor humidity is likely due to all of the factors we have examined, and the specifics of how they are used by each occupant.

  13. Hurricane impact and recovery shoreline change analysis of the Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, USA: 1855 to 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fearnley, Sarah M.; Miner, Michael; Brock, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Results from historical (1855-2005) shoreline change analysis of the Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, demonstrate that tropical cyclone frequency dominates the long-term evolution of this barrier-island arc. The detailed results of this study were published in December 2009 as part of a special issue of Geo-Marine Letters that documents early results from the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility Project.

  14. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (82nd, New Orleans, Louisiana, August 3-8, 1999). Advertising, Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Advertising, Part 2 section of the Proceedings contains the following 8 papers: "Made in Taiwan and the U.S.A.: A Study of Gender Roles in Two Nations' Magazine Advertisements" (Kim E. Karloff and Yi-ching Lee); "The Impact of Culture on Political Advertising: A Comparison between the U.S. and Korean Newspaper Ads" (Chun-Sik Kim and Yoo-Kyoung…

  15. State Education Finance and Governance Profile: Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaikh, Naveed A.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents Louisiana's education finance and governance profile. Louisiana witnessed a 3.9% decline in population during the period from 2000 to 2007. Poverty persists both in urban and rural areas of the state, as demonstrated by visible poverty both in the agricultural parishes and in major cities such as New Orleans and Shreveport…

  16. Looking back to understand the future: The impact of a century of climate change on coastal inundation in New Orleans, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cialone, M.; Irish, J. L.; Grzegorzewski, A. S.; Knutson, T. R.; Jensen, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    climate change. However, through the environmental influences described above, it is conceivable that anthropogenic climate change and land use change may have already altered the odds such that an event with a storm surge as high as Katrina's would be more likely in a statistical sense now than in 1900. A more rigorous quantification of these influences would require further studies beyond that presented in our example. While there are many assumptions and caveats to our analysis, an implication of the analysis is that with future projected anthropogenic climate change, low-lying, densely populated areas such New Orleans may be subject to a growing risk of increased storm surge damage, even aside from the increased damage risk due to coastal development. This in turn may lead to more pronounced regional and national economic and community impacts.

  17. Effects of weir management on marsh loss, Marsh Island, Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyman, John A.; Chabreck, Robert H.; Linscombe, R. G.

    1990-11-01

    Weirs are low-level dams traditionally used in Louisiana's coastal marshes to improve habitat for ducks and furbearers. Currently, some workers hope that weirs may reduce marsh loss, whereas others fear that weirs may accelerate marsh loss. Parts of Marsh Island, Louisiana, have been weir-managed since 1958 to improve duck and furbearer habitat. Using aerial photographs, marsh loss that occurred between 1957 and 1983 in a 2922-ha weir-managed area was compared to that in a 2365-ha unmanaged area. Marsh loss was 0.38%/yr in the weir-managed area, and 0.35%/yr in the unmanaged area. Because marsh loss in the two areas differed less than 0.19%/yr, it was concluded that weirs did not affect marsh loss. The increase in open water between 1957 and 1983 did not result from the expansion of lakes or bayous. Rather, solid marsh converted to broken marsh, and the amount of vegetation within previously existing broken marsh decreased. Solid marsh farthest from large lakes and bayous, and adjacent to existing broken marsh, seemed more likely to break up. Marsh Island has few canals; therefore, marsh loss resulted primarily from natural processes. Weirs may have different effects under different hydrological conditions; additional studies are needed before generalizations regarding weirs and marsh loss can be made.

  18. Disease, parasite, and commensal prevalences for blue crab Callinectes sapidus at shedding facilities in Louisiana, USA.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Holly A; Taylor, Sabrina S; Hawke, John P; Schott, Eric J; Anderson Lively, Julie A

    2015-01-15

    Blue crab diseases, parasites, and commensals are not well studied in the Gulf of Mexico, and their prevalence rates have only been sporadically determined. Commercial soft shell shedding facilities in Louisiana experience high mortality rates of pre-molt crabs, and some of these deaths may be attributable to diseases or parasites. During the active shedding season in 2013, we determined the prevalence of shell disease, Vibrio spp., Lagenophrys callinectes, and Hematodinium perezi at 4 commercial shedding facilities along the Louisiana coast. We also detected Ameson michaelis and reo-like virus infections. Shell disease was moderately prevalent at rates above 50% and varied by shedding facility, collection month, and crab size. Vibrio spp. bacteria were prevalent in the hemolymph of 37% of the pre-molt crabs. Lagenophrys callinectes was highly prevalent in the pre-molt crabs, but because it is a commensal species, it may not cause high mortality rates. Hematodinium perezi was absent in all pre-molt crabs. PMID:25590771

  19. Contaminant exposure of barn swallows nesting on Bayou d'Inde, Calcasieu Estuary, Louisiana, USA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Custer, Christine M.; Goatcher, B.L.; Melancon, M.J.; Matson, C.W.; Bickham, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    Current and historical point source discharges, storm water runoff, and accidental spills have contaminated the water, sediment, and biota within the Calcasieu Estuary in southwestern Louisiana. In 2003, barn swallow (Hirundo rustica) eggs and nestlings were collected beneath two bridges that cross Bayou d'Inde, the most contaminated waterway within the Calcasieu Estuary. Samples were also collected from a bridge over Bayou Teche, a reference site in south central Louisiana. Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations in barn swallow eggs and nestlings were significantly higher at the downstream site on Bayou d'Inde (2.8 micro g/g PCBs in eggs and 1.5 micro g/g PCBs in nestlings) than at the other two sites (< 0.2 micro g/g PCBs in eggs and nestlings at both sites). Ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase activity in nestling livers was significantly higher at the downstream site on Bayou d'Inde (50 pmol/min/mg) compared to the other two locations (24 pmol/min/mg, each), probably because of exposure to PCBs. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and polychlorinated dibenzofuran concentrations in eggs and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in nestlings were at background concentrations at all sites. Trace element concentrations in barn swallow eggs and nestling livers were at background levels and did not differ among the three sites. A biomarker of DNA damage did not differ among sites.

  20. Contaminant exposure of barn swallows nesting on Bayou d'Inde, Calcasieu Estuary, Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Custer, Christine M.; Goatcher, B.L.; Melancon, M.J.; Matson, C.W.; Bickham, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    Current and historical point source discharges, storm water runoff, and accidental spills have contaminated the water, sediment, and biota within the Calcasieu Estuary in southwestern Louisiana. In 2003, barn swallow (Hirundo rustica) eggs and nestlings were collected beneath two bridges that cross Bayou d'Inde, the most contaminated waterway within the Calcasieu Estuary. Samples were also collected from a bridge over Bayou Teche, a reference site in south central Louisiana. Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations in barn swallow eggs and nestlings were significantly higher at the downstream site on Bayou d'Inde (2.8 mu g/g PCBs in eggs and 1.5 mu g/g PCBs in nestlings) than at the other two sites (< 0.2 mu g/g PCBs in eggs and nestlings at both sites). Ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase activity in nestling livers was significantly higher at the downstream site on Bayou d'Inde (50 pmol/min/mg) compared to the other two locations (24 pmol/min/mg, each), probably because of exposure to PCBs. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and polychlorinated dibenzofuran concentrations in eggs and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in nestlings were at background concentrations at all sites. Trace element concentrations in barn swallow eggs and nestling livers were at background levels and did not differ among the three sites. A biomarker of DNA damage did not differ among sites.

  1. Contaminant exposure of barn swallows nesting on Bayou d'Inde, Calcasieu Estuary, Louisiana, USA.

    PubMed

    Custer, Thomas W; Custer, Christine M; Goatcher, Buddy L; Melancon, Mark J; Matson, Cole W; Bickham, John W

    2006-10-01

    Current and historical point source discharges, storm water runoff, and accidental spills have contaminated the water, sediment, and biota within the Calcasieu Estuary in southwestern Louisiana. In 2003, barn swallow (Hirundo rustica) eggs and nestlings were collected beneath two bridges that cross Bayou d'Inde, the most contaminated waterway within the Calcasieu Estuary. Samples were also collected from a bridge over Bayou Teche, a reference site in south central Louisiana. Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations in barn swallow eggs and nestlings were significantly higher at the downstream site on Bayou d'Inde (2.8 micro g/g PCBs in eggs and 1.5 micro g/g PCBs in nestlings) than at the other two sites (< 0.2 micro g/g PCBs in eggs and nestlings at both sites). Ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase activity in nestling livers was significantly higher at the downstream site on Bayou d'Inde (50 pmol/min/mg) compared to the other two locations (24 pmol/min/mg, each), probably because of exposure to PCBs. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and polychlorinated dibenzofuran concentrations in eggs and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in nestlings were at background concentrations at all sites. Trace element concentrations in barn swallow eggs and nestling livers were at background levels and did not differ among the three sites. A biomarker of DNA damage did not differ among sites. PMID:16779575

  2. "Drenched in the Past:" the Evolution of Market-Oriented Reforms in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jabbar, Huriya

    2015-01-01

    As the city with the largest charter-school market share in the United States, New Orleans, Louisiana exemplifies market-oriented models in education. For a city that is so "drenched in the past," the reform movement in New Orleans typically neglects historical context, often dismissing the education system pre-Katrina as simply corrupt…

  3. Theoretical and measured aeolian sand transport on a barrier island, Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dingler, J.R.; Hsu, S.A.; Reiss, T.E.

    1992-01-01

    Over the past 100 yr, the Isles Dernieres, a low lying barrier island chain along the coast of central Louisiana, has undergone more than 1km of northward beach face retreat within the loss of 70% of its surface area. The erosion results from a long term relative sea level rise coupled with day to day wind and wave action that ultimately favours erosion over deposition. The theoretical estimate of 1.28 m3 m-1 for the rate of sand transport by the northerly wind compares well with the measured backshore erosion rate of 1.26m3 m-1, which was determined by comparing beach profiles from the start and end of the period of northerly winds. The theoretical estimate of 0.04m3 m-1 for the rate of sand transport by the southerly wind, however, is notably less than the measured rate of 0.45m3 m-1. -from Authors

  4. Reproductive outcome and survival of common bottlenose dolphins sampled in Barataria Bay, Louisiana, USA, following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    PubMed

    Lane, Suzanne M; Smith, Cynthia R; Mitchell, Jason; Balmer, Brian C; Barry, Kevin P; McDonald, Trent; Mori, Chiharu S; Rosel, Patricia E; Rowles, Teresa K; Speakman, Todd R; Townsend, Forrest I; Tumlin, Mandy C; Wells, Randall S; Zolman, Eric S; Schwacke, Lori H

    2015-11-01

    Common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) inhabit bays, sounds and estuaries across the Gulf of Mexico. Following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, studies were initiated to assess potential effects on these ecologically important apex predators. A previous study reported disease conditions, including lung disease and impaired stress response, for 32 dolphins that were temporarily captured and given health assessments in Barataria Bay, Louisiana, USA. Ten of the sampled dolphins were determined to be pregnant, with expected due dates the following spring or summer. Here, we report findings after 47 months of follow-up monitoring of those sampled dolphins. Only 20% (95% CI: 2.50-55.6%) of the pregnant dolphins produced viable calves, as compared with a previously reported pregnancy success rate of 83% in a reference population. Fifty-seven per cent of pregnant females that did not successfully produce a calf had been previously diagnosed with moderate-severe lung disease. In addition, the estimated annual survival rate of the sampled cohort was low (86.8%, 95% CI: 80.0-92.7%) as compared with survival rates of 95.1% and 96.2% from two other previously studied bottlenose dolphin populations. Our findings confirm low reproductive success and high mortality in dolphins from a heavily oiled estuary when compared with other populations. Follow-up studies are needed to better understand the potential recovery of dolphins in Barataria Bay and, by extension, other Gulf coastal regions impacted by the spill. PMID:26538595

  5. Hg-contaminated terrestrial spiders pose a potential risk to songbirds at Caddo Lake (Texas/Louisiana, USA).

    PubMed

    Gann, Gretchen L; Powell, Cleveland H; Chumchal, Matthew M; Drenner, Ray W

    2015-02-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an environmental contaminant that can have adverse effects on wildlife. Because MeHg is produced by bacteria in aquatic ecosystems, studies of MeHg contamination of food webs historically have focused on aquatic organisms. However, recent studies have shown that terrestrial organisms such as songbirds can be contaminated with MeHg by feeding on MeHg-contaminated spiders. In the present study, the authors examined the risk that MeHg-contaminated terrestrial long-jawed orb weaver spiders (Tetragnatha sp.) pose to songbirds at Caddo Lake (Texas/Louisiana, USA). Methylmercury concentrations in spiders were significantly different in river, wetland, and open-water habitats. The authors calculated spider-based wildlife values (the minimum spider MeHg concentrations causing physiologically significant doses in consumers) to assess exposure risks for arachnivorous birds. Methylmercury concentrations in spiders exceeded wildlife values for Carolina chickadee (Poecile carolinensis) nestlings, with the highest risk in the river habitat. The present study indicates that MeHg concentrations in terrestrial spiders vary with habitat and can pose a threat to small-bodied nestling birds that consume large amounts of spiders at Caddo Lake. This MeHg threat to songbirds may not be unique to Caddo Lake and may extend throughout the southeastern United States. PMID:25378235

  6. Sedimentary signature of Hurricane Isaac in a Taxodium swamp on the western margin of Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K.-B.; McCloskey, T. A.; Ortego, S.; Maiti, K.

    2015-03-01

    Compositional and geochemical profiles were established for a 59-cm sediment core extracted from a small pothole pond in a Taxodium (bald cypress) swamp 830 m inland from Lake Pontchartrain in south-eastern Louisiana, USA. The core consists of a top organic unit (peat to clayey peat) from 0-29 cm above a bottom clay unit at 30-59 cm depth. Four distinct zones, marked by gradual changes in organic content and elemental concentrations, occur in the clay unit. These changes probably reflect two cycles of slowly changing water depths. Hurricane Isaac's signature, a brown clay band at 3-5 cm, is identified based on the stratigraphic and compositional correspondence with the storm's event layer, documented from nearby sites. Sedimentary and geochemical similarities between this material and clastic bands at 15-19 and 23-25 cm identify those two intervals as potentially representing earlier floods. The Cl/Br ratio presents a potentially useful method for distinguishing fluvial and marine flooding.

  7. Reproductive outcome and survival of common bottlenose dolphins sampled in Barataria Bay, Louisiana, USA, following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Suzanne M.; Smith, Cynthia R.; Mitchell, Jason; Balmer, Brian C.; Barry, Kevin P.; McDonald, Trent; Mori, Chiharu S.; Rosel, Patricia E.; Rowles, Teresa K.; Speakman, Todd R.; Townsend, Forrest I.; Tumlin, Mandy C.; Wells, Randall S.; Zolman, Eric S.; Schwacke, Lori H.

    2015-01-01

    Common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) inhabit bays, sounds and estuaries across the Gulf of Mexico. Following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, studies were initiated to assess potential effects on these ecologically important apex predators. A previous study reported disease conditions, including lung disease and impaired stress response, for 32 dolphins that were temporarily captured and given health assessments in Barataria Bay, Louisiana, USA. Ten of the sampled dolphins were determined to be pregnant, with expected due dates the following spring or summer. Here, we report findings after 47 months of follow-up monitoring of those sampled dolphins. Only 20% (95% CI: 2.50–55.6%) of the pregnant dolphins produced viable calves, as compared with a previously reported pregnancy success rate of 83% in a reference population. Fifty-seven per cent of pregnant females that did not successfully produce a calf had been previously diagnosed with moderate–severe lung disease. In addition, the estimated annual survival rate of the sampled cohort was low (86.8%, 95% CI: 80.0–92.7%) as compared with survival rates of 95.1% and 96.2% from two other previously studied bottlenose dolphin populations. Our findings confirm low reproductive success and high mortality in dolphins from a heavily oiled estuary when compared with other populations. Follow-up studies are needed to better understand the potential recovery of dolphins in Barataria Bay and, by extension, other Gulf coastal regions impacted by the spill. PMID:26538595

  8. Relating large-scale climate variability to local species abundance: ENSO forcing and shrimp in Breton Sound, Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piazza, Bryan P.; LaPeyre, Megan K.; Keim, B.D.

    2010-01-01

    Climate creates environmental constraints (filters) that affect the abundance and distribution of species. In estuaries, these constraints often result from variability in water flow properties and environmental conditions (i.e. water flow, salinity, water temperature) and can have significant effects on the abundance and distribution of commercially important nekton species. We investigated links between large-scale climate variability and juvenile brown shrimp Farfantepenaeus aztecus abundance in Breton Sound estuary, Louisiana (USA). Our goals were to (1) determine if a teleconnection exists between local juvenile brown shrimp abundance and the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and (2) relate that linkage to environmental constraints that may affect juvenile brown shrimp recruitment to, and survival in, the estuary. Our results identified a teleconnection between winter ENSO conditions and juvenile brown shrimp abundance in Breton Sound estuary the following spring. The physical connection results from the impact of ENSO on winter weather conditions in Breton Sound (air pressure, temperature, and precipitation). Juvenile brown shrimp abundance effects lagged ENSO by 3 mo: lower than average abundances of juvenile brown shrimp were caught in springs following winter El Niño events, and higher than average abundances of brown shrimp were caught in springs following La Niña winters. Salinity was the dominant ENSO-forced environmental filter for juvenile brown shrimp. Spring salinity was cumulatively forced by winter river discharge, winter wind forcing, and spring precipitation. Thus, predicting brown shrimp abundance requires incorporating climate variability into models.

  9. Geophysical data integration, stochastic simulation and significance analysis of groundwater responses using ANOVA in the Chicot Aquifer system, Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rahman, A.; Tsai, F.T.-C.; White, C.D.; Carlson, D.A.; Willson, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    Data integration is challenging where there are different levels of support between primary and secondary data that need to be correlated in various ways. A geostatistical method is described, which integrates the hydraulic conductivity (K) measurements and electrical resistivity data to better estimate the K distribution in the Upper Chicot Aquifer of southwestern Louisiana, USA. The K measurements were obtained from pumping tests and represent the primary (hard) data. Borehole electrical resistivity data from electrical logs were regarded as the secondary (soft) data, and were used to infer K values through Archie's law and the Kozeny-Carman equation. A pseudo cross-semivariogram was developed to cope with the resistivity data non-collocation. Uncertainties in the auto-semivariograms and pseudo cross-semivariogram were quantified. The groundwater flow model responses by the regionalized and coregionalized models of K were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results indicate that non-collocated secondary data may improve estimates of K and affect groundwater flow responses of practical interest, including specific capacity and drawdown. ?? Springer-Verlag 2007.

  10. The interactive effects of herbivory and fire on an oligohaline marsh, Little Lake, Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, K.L.; Grace, J.B.; Guntenspergen, G.R.; Foote, A.L.

    1994-01-01

    Herbivory and fire have been shown to affect the structure and composition of marsh communities. Because fire may alter plant species composition and cover, and these alterations may have an effect on this study, the effects of fire and vertebrate herbivory in a Louisiana oligohaline marsh were studied using small, controlled burns and animal enclosures. Mean total biomass was nearly 2 times greater in the plots protected from herbivory than in the plots subject to natural herbivory. Additionally, mean total biomass was over 1.5 times greater in the plots that remained unburned than in those that were burned. Two dominant perennial species, Spartina patens and Scirpus olneyi, were negatively affected by herbivory, but two annual sedges, Cyperus flavescens and Cyperus odorata, were positively affected. Burning reduced the aboveground biomass of Spartina patens and Bacopa monnieri. No species increased in biomass as a result of fire. No significant differences were found in species richness between herbivory treatments or between fire treatments. Although both herbivory and fire were found to cause significant changes in the vegetation, the interaction between herbivory and fire was not found to produce any significant effects in any test conducted.

  11. NASA, Remote Sensing and Archaeology: An Example from Southeast Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giardino, Marco J.

    2010-01-01

    NASA Stennis Space Center, located in Mississippi, USA, undertook an archaeological survey of the southeastern Louisiana marshes beginning in 2003. Progress on this activity was severely hampered by the 2005 hurricane season when both Katrina and Rita devastated the study area. In 2008, the NASA team reinitiated the analysis of the project data and that work continues today. The project was conducted initially in partnership with the U.S. Army, Corps of Engineers New Orleans District and Tulane University. NASA and its partners utilized a wide variety of satellite and airborne remote sensing instruments combined with field verification surveys to identify prehistoric archeological sites in the Southeastern Louisiana delta, both known and still undiscovered. The main approach was to carefully map known sites and use the spectral characteristics of these sites to locate high probability targets elsewhere in the region. The archaeological activities were conducted in support of Coast 2050 whose stated goals is to sustain and restore a coastal ecosystem that supports and protects the environment, economy and culture of southern Louisiana. As the Coast 2050 report states: [T]he rate of coastal land loss in Louisiana has reached catastrophic proportions. Within the last 50 years, land loss rates have exceeded 40 square miles per year, and in the 1990's the rate has been estimated to be between 25 and 35 square miles each year. This loss represents 80% of the coastal wetland loss in the entire continental United States.

  12. Coastal morphodynamics and Chenier-Plain evolution in southwestern Louisiana, USA: A geomorphic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Randolph A.; Taylor, Matthew J.; Byrnes, Mark R.

    2007-08-01

    Using 28 topographic profiles, air-photo interpretation, and historical shoreline-change data, coastal processes were evaluated along the Chenier Plain to explain the occurrence, distribution, and geomorphic hierarchy of primary landforms, and existing hypotheses regarding Chenier-Plain evolution were reconsidered. The Chenier Plain of SW Louisiana, classified as a low-profile, microtidal, storm-dominated coast, is located west and downdrift of the Mississippi River deltaic plain. This Late-Holocene, marginal-deltaic environment is 200 km long and up to 30 km wide, and is composed primarily of mud deposits capped by marsh interspersed with thin sand- and shell-rich ridges ("cheniers") that have elevations of up to 4 m. In this study, the term "ridge" is used as a morphologic term for a narrow, linear or curvilinear topographic high that consists of sand and shelly material accumulated by waves and other physical coastal processes. Thus, most ridges in the Chenier Plain represent relict open-Gulf shorelines. On the basis of past movement trends of individual shorelines, ridges may be further classified as transgressive, regressive, or laterally accreted. Geomorphic zones that contain two or more regressive, transgressive, or laterally accreted ridges are termed complexes. Consequently, we further refine the Chenier-Plain definition by Otvos and Price [Otvos, E.G. and Price, W.A., 1979. Problems of chenier genesis and terminology—an overview. Marine Geology, 31: 251-263] and define Chenier Plain as containing at least two or more chenier complexes. Based on these definitions, a geomorphic hierarchy of landforms was refined relative to dominant process for the Louisiana Chenier Plain. The Chenier Plain is defined as a first-order feature (5000 km 2) composed of three second-order features (30 to 300 km 2): chenier complex, beach-ridge complex, and spit complex. Individual ridges of each complex type were further separated into third-order features: chenier, beach

  13. Recovery trajectories after in situ burning of an oiled wetland in coastal Louisiana, USA.

    PubMed

    Pahl, James W; Mendelssohn, Irving A; Henry, Charles B; Hess, Thomas J

    2003-02-01

    The high degree of physical disturbance associated with conventional response options to oil spills in wetlands is driving the investigation of alternative cleanup methodologies. In March 1995, a spill of gas condensate in a brackish marsh at Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge in southwestern Louisiana was remediated through the use of in situ burning. An assessment of vegetation recovery was initiated in three treatment marshes: (1) oil-impacted and burned, (2) oil impacted and unburned, and (3) a nonoiled unburned reference. We compared percent cover, stem density, and biomass in the treatment marshes to define ecological recovery of the marsh vegetation and soil hydrocarbon content to determine the efficacy of in situ burning as a cleanup technique. Burning led to a rapid decrease in soil hydrocarbon concentrations in the impacted-and-burned marsh to background levels by the end of the first growing season. Although a management fire accidentally burned the oil-impacted-and-unburned and reference marshes in December 1995, stem density, live biomass, and total percent cover values in the oil-impacted-and-burned marsh were equivalent to those in the other treatment marshes after three years. In addition, plant community composition within the oil-impacted-and-burned marsh was similar to the codominant mix of the grasses Distichlis spicata (salt grass) and Spartina patens (wire grass) characteristic of the surrounding marsh after the same time period. Rapid recovery of the oil-impacted-and-unburned marsh was likely due to lower initial hydrocarbon exposure. Water levels inundating the soil surface of this grass-dominated marsh and the timing of the in situ burn early in the growing season were important factors contributing to the rapid recovery of this wetland. The results of this in situ burn evaluation support the conclusion that burning, under the proper conditions, can be relied upon as an effective cleanup response to hydrocarbon spills in herbaceous wetlands. PMID

  14. Some New Orleans Colleges Predict Bigger Enrollments This Fall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2007-01-01

    After a difficult year for colleges and universities in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina, the enrollment outlook for this fall is a lot brighter. Tulane University reported last week that 1,375 high-school seniors had committed to attending, a 56-percent jump over last year's 882 new freshmen. Xavier University of Louisiana reported that it…

  15. With an Unusually Hands-On Role, State Feels Its Way in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2006-01-01

    This article reports how Louisiana officials take hits amid strain to start schools. A year after Hurricane Katrina wreaked havoc on New Orleans, the state of Louisiana finds itself in the highly unusual position of essentially starting from scratch--and directly operating--a batch of public schools in the city. While much attention has focused on…

  16. No shelter from the storm: reclaiming the right to housing and protecting the health of vulnerable communities in post-Katrina New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Tiffany M; Irwin, Alec; Peterson, Curtis W

    2009-01-01

    This article explores human rights- and health-related aspects of the rebuilding process in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, following the August 2005 assault of Hurricane Katrina. We look at the health and social impacts of post-Katrina redevelopment policies on New Orleans'poor Black communities. We describe systematic violations of poor Black residents' human right to housing, and we explore associations between these rights violations and documented negative trends in community health. The article describes some of the ways that poor constituencies in New Orleans have organized to resist the destruction of their communities and to reclaim their rights to adequate housing, health, and dignity. Post-Katrina violations of the right to housing in New Orleans should be seen as part of a broader pattern in social policy and the control of urban habitats in the United States. Poor Black residents' struggle to assert their human right to housing has implications for the health of local communities and the credibility of democratic processes. PMID:20845845

  17. Hurricane Puts Louisiana Higher Ed Leadership to the Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, Scott

    2005-01-01

    For decades three historically Black colleges and universities have called New Orleans home: (1) Southern University-New Orleans (SUNO), founded in 1956 as a branch of a system known for producing a majority of the state's Black lawyers; (2) Xavier University of Louisiana, founded in 1915 and long known for sending the most African-American…

  18. Groundwater dynamics and surface water-groundwater interactions in a prograding delta island, Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Michael T.; Moffett, Kevan B.

    2015-05-01

    Deltas in coastal environments are assumed to function as chemical "buffers", filtering nutrient-rich terrestrial runoff through the island structures and aquatic ecosystems as it travels to the sea, but the magnitude of this effect cannot be accurately quantified without understanding the physical relationships between the surface water and groundwater. The groundwater hydrology of young, prograding delta systems and its relationship to surrounding surface water dynamics are poorly understood. This study developed a new conceptual model of the hydrology of a prograding delta island groundwater system. The study was based on field data collected at Pintail Island, a 2 km2 island within the Wax Lake Delta in Louisiana. Hydraulic properties and processes were quantified at multiple depths and locations spanning the island elevation gradient. Groundwater and surface water levels were monitored. A weather station recorded precipitation, air, and wind conditions. The groundwater within Pintail Island was both spatially and temporally dynamic throughout the study period of 9-September-2013 to 4-February-2014. The aquifer within the distal limbs of the island responded to surface water dynamics as a connected, saturated unconfined aquifer would, and its groundwater was controlled by the surrounding surface water fluctuations of semi-diurnal winds and tides. The aquifer within the older, higher elevation island apex was a lower-permeability system with subaerial fine sediments overlying deeper, sandier sediments. In contrast to the more bayward zone of the island, this more interior zone was controlled by storm recharge, low-permeability sediments, and low head gradients, but little affected by diurnal surface water fluctuations. Groundwater flow was directed outward from the interior of the island apex and the levees toward the delta channels and the central island lagoon, but storms and high tides temporarily reversed flow directions at some locations and times, likely

  19. Nonlinear and directional effects on wave predictions over muddy bottoms: central chenier plain coast, Western Louisiana Shelf, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying-Po; Safak, Ilgar; Kaihatu, James M.; Sheremet, Alex

    2015-11-01

    The sensitivity of wave-mud interaction on directionality and nonlinearity is investigated. A phase-resolving nonlinear wave model which accounts for directional wave propagation and mud damping is used to simulate wave propagation over a muddy shelf. Field data from an experiment conducted at the central chenier plain coast, western Louisiana, USA are used to validate the model. Recently, verification of a one-dimensional wave model with the field data showed that this model was able to replicate the evolution of wave spectra over muddy bottoms. In this study, unidirectional wave spectra were also run through the parabolic model, but with various initial angles. Linear wave model runs were also performed in order to gauge the effect of nonlinear evolution on the results. Significant wave height and total energy contained in three different spectral bands from the model are compared to the data over the shelf, and correlation metrics calculated. While the model generally performs well no matter the initial angle, at no point does a zero initial angle compare best to the data, indicating that a unidirectional model may be missing some of the dynamical features of wave propagation over a muddy shelf. Furthermore, despite similar correlation scores between linear and nonlinear model comparisons of bulk statistics, it is seen the linear model does not replicate some aspects of the spectral evolution (such as low-frequency generation and amplification) shown in the data and captured by the nonlinear model. Despite the relatively short propagation distance, the effects of both directionality and nonlinearity play a noticeable role in wave evolution over a muddy seabed.

  20. Effect of river sediment on phosphorus chemistry of similarly aged natural and created wetlands in the Atchafalaya Delta, Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poach, M.E.; Faulkner, S.P.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of wetland creation is to produce an artificial wetland that functions as a natural wetland. Studies comparing created wetlands to similarly aged natural wetlands provide important information about creation techniques and their improvement so as to attain that goal. We hypothesized that differences in sediment phosphorus accretion, deposition, and chemistry between created and natural wetlands in the Atchafalaya Delta, Louisiana, USA were a function of creation technique and natural river processes. Sediment deposition was determined with feldspar marker horizons located in created and natural wetlands belonging to three age classes (<3, 5-10, and 15-20 yr old). Phosphorus fractions were measured in these deposited sediments and in suspended and bedload sediment from the Atchafalaya River. Bedload sediment had significantly lower iron- and aluminum-bound, reductant-soluble, and total phosphorus than suspended sediment due to its high sand percentage. This result indicates that wetlands artificially created in the Atchafalaya Delta using bedload sediment will initially differ from natural wetlands of the same age. Even so, similarities between the mudflat stratum of the <1- to 3-yr-old created wetland and the mudflat stratum of the 15- to 20-yr-old natural wetland support the contention that created wetlands in the Atchafalaya Delta can develop natural characteristics through the deposition of river suspended sediment. Differences between three created wetland strata, the 15- to 20-yr-old willow stratum and the < 1- to 3-yr-old willow and mixed marsh strata, and their natural counterparts were linked to design elements of the created wetlands that prevented the direct deposition of the river's suspended sediment. ?? ASA, CSSA, SSSA.

  1. Selections from the ABC 2013 Annual Convention, New Orleans, Louisiana. Part II: All That Favorite Assignment Jazz--Message Packaging and Delivery, Job Interviews, and On-the-Job Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalen, D. Joel

    2014-01-01

    This article, the second in a two-part series, catalogs teaching innovations presented at the 2013 Association for Business Communication Annual Convention, New Orleans. They were presented during the My Favorite Assignment session. The 11 Favorite Assignments featured here offer the reader a variety of learning experiences, including…

  2. New Orleans Seizes Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2010-01-01

    Five years after the hurricane devastated the region, New Orleans schools emerge changed--and challenged. New Orleans finds itself with a transformed educational system and one that continues to evolve. This new reality comes as the city's public school population stood at about 38,000 as of February, well below the estimated 65,000 before the…

  3. Sweet Home New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaffrey, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    New Orleans's collective memory is often long and surprisingly detailed, and it can surface at unexpected moments. In the last few years, a taxi driver taking a fare to the airport has more than once fondly recalled "the librarians" or those "book people" as the first ones to hold a convention in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina devastated the…

  4. "Normal" a Long Way off for Schools in Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2005-01-01

    For now, it appears that both the New Orleans district, Louisiana's largest, and the nearby St. Bernard public schools could be largely out of commission for the whole school year, state Superintendent Cecil J. Picard said. With officials estimating that more than 230,000 public and private school students from Louisiana had been displaced by the…

  5. Impacts of diverted freshwater on dissolved organic matter and microbial communities in Barataria Bay, Louisiana, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Thomas S; Cook, Robert L; Perdue, E Michael; Kolic, Paulina E; Green, Nelson; Zhang, Yaoling; Smith, Richard W; Kolker, Alexander S; Ameen, Alex; King, Gary; Ojwang, Loice M; Schneider, Caroline L; Normand, Anna E; Hetland, Robert

    2011-12-01

    Here we present results of an initial assessment of the impacts of a water diversion event on the concentrations and chemical composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and bacterioplankton community composition in Barataria Bay, Louisiana U.S.A, an important estuary within the Mississippi River Delta complex. Concentrations and spectral properties of DOM, as reflected by UV/visible absorbance and fluorescence, were strikingly similar at 26 sites sampled along transects near two western and two eastern areas of Barataria Bay in July and September 2010. In September 2010, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was significantly higher (568.1-1043 μM C, x=755.6+/-117.7 μM C, n=14) than in July 2010 (249.1-577.1 μM C, x=383.7+/-98.31 μM C, n=14); conversely, Abs254 was consistently higher at every site in July (0.105-0.314) than in September (0.080-0.221), averaging 0.24±0.06 in July and 0.15±0.04 in September. Fluorescence data via the fluorescence index (FI450/500) revealed that only 30% (8 of 26) of the July samples had an FI450/500 above 1.36, compared to 96% (25 of 26) for the September samples. This indicates a more terrestrial origin for the July DOM. Bacterioplankton from eastern sites differed in composition from bacterioplankon in western sites in July. These differences appeared to result from reduced salinities caused by the freshwater diversion. Bacterioplankton communities in September differed from those in July, but no spatial structure was observed. Thus, the trends in bacterioplankton and DOM were likely due to changes in water masses (e.g., input of Mississippi River water in July and a return to estuarine waters in September). Discharge of water from the Davis Pond Freshwater Diversion (DPFD) through Barataria Bay may have partially mitigated some adverse effects of the oil spill, inasmuch as DOM is concerned. PMID:22000271

  6. Autochthonous Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, Louisiana

    PubMed Central

    Perniciaro, Leon; Yabsley, Michael J.; Roellig, Dawn M.; Balsamo, Gary; Diaz, James; Wesson, Dawn

    2007-01-01

    Autochthonous transmission of the Chagas disease parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, was detected in a patient in rural New Orleans, Louisiana. The patient had positive test results from 2 serologic tests and hemoculture. Fifty-six percent of 18 Triatoma sanguisuga collected from the house of the patient were positive for T. cruzi by PCR. PMID:17553277

  7. New Orleans Charity Hospital--your trauma center at work.

    PubMed

    Stockinger, Zsolt T; Holloway, Vicki L; McSwain, Norman E; Thomas, Dwayne; Fontenot, Cathi; Hunt, John P; Mederos, Eileen; Hewitt, Robert L

    2004-01-01

    The Medical Center of Louisiana at New Orleans-Charity Hospital stands with pride as one of only two level I trauma centers in the state and one of the largest trauma centers in the United States, seeing over 4,000 trauma patients per year. Despite perennial funding issues, Charity Hospital's Emergency Department treated almost 200,000 patients in 2003. This brief report gives an overview of the emergency- and trauma-related services provided by Charity Hospital and underscores its value as a critical asset to healthcare in the Louisiana. PMID:15233385

  8. 75 FR 18495 - Louisiana Public Service Commission v. Entergy Corporation, Entergy Services, Inc., Entergy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ... Orleans, Inc., Entergy Gulf States Louisiana, LLC., and Entergy Texas, Inc.; Notice of Complaint April 1... included in the Entergy rough equalization bandwidth formula found ] in Service Schedule MSS-3 of...

  9. Tracking sedimentation from the historic A.D. 2011 Mississippi River flood in the deltaic wetlands of Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Khan, Nicole S.; Horton, Benjamin P.; McKee, Karen L.; Jerolmack, Douglas; Falcini, Federico; Enache, Mihaela D.; Vane, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Management and restoration of the Mississippi River deltaic plain (southern United States) and associated wetlands require a quantitative understanding of sediment delivery during large flood events, past and present. Here, we investigate the sedimentary fingerprint of the 2011 Mississippi River flood across the Louisiana coast (Atchafalaya Delta, Terrebonne, Barataria, and Mississippi River Delta basins) to assess spatial patterns of sedimentation and to identify key indicators of sediment provenance. The sediment deposited in wetlands during the 2011 flood was distinguished from earlier deposits based on biological characteristics, primarily absence of plant roots and increased presence of centric (planktonic) diatoms indicative of riverine origin. By comparison, the lithological (bulk density, organic matter content, and grain size) and chemical (stable carbon isotopes of bulk organic matter) properties of flood sediments were nearly identical to the underlying deposit. Flood sediment deposition was greatest in wetlands near the Atchafalaya and Mississippi Rivers and accounted for a substantial portion (37% to 85%) of the annual accretion measured at nearby monitoring stations. The amount of sediment delivered to those basins (1.1–1.6 g cm−2) was comparable to that reported previously for hurricane sedimentation along the Louisiana coast (0.8–2.1 g cm−2). Our findings not only provide insight into how large-scale river floods influence wetland sedimentation, they lay the groundwork for identifying previous flood events in the stratigraphic record.

  10. Effects of low and high salinity regimes on seasonal gametogenesis of the ribbed mussel Geukensia granosissima in coastal Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honig, Aaron; LaPeyre, Megan K.; Supan, John

    2014-01-01

    Benthic intertidal bivalves play an essential role in estuarine ecosystems by contributing to habitat provision, water filtration, and host vegetation productivity. As such, ecosystem level changes that impact population distributions and persistence of local bivalve populations may have large ecosystem level consequences, making it important to better understand the population ecology of native bivalves. In order to determine potential impacts of shifting salinity and temperature regimes along the northern Gulf of Mexico, the seasonal timing of gametogenesis in the Gulf estuarine ribbed mussel, Geukensia granossisima, was examined across a salinity gradient in southeastern Louisiana, from July 2011 through October 2012. Ten mussels were randomly sampled monthly from low (~ 5) and high (~25) salinity marsh sites in southeastern Louisiana, and histologically processed to determine the seasonal progression of gametogenesis. Peak ripeness occurred at both sites between April and September, was positively correlated with temperature, and coincided with seasonal shifts in salinity. Mussels located in lower salinity waters demonstrated a shorter period of gametogenesis, and lower rates of ripeness indicating that changes in salinity regimes may impact long-term population dynamics.

  11. Destination: New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal, 2009

    2009-01-01

    One can't make the trip to New Orleans for NAESP's Annual Convention and Exposition without checking out a few of the historic and cultural attractions that are within a short walk, or streetcar or cab ride, from the Morial Convention Center and the convention hotels. This article presents a taste of what one can explore between convention events.

  12. New Orleans Nexus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingler, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    The recovery and long-range redevelopment of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast region is a complex undertaking requiring simultaneous planning in a wide range of disciplines. There is a paramount need to create a planning infrastructure that will enhance collaboration and reduce duplication in all of the planning disciplines moving forward. To…

  13. The Vieux Carre: A Creole Neighborhood in New Orleans. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortier, Byron

    The French Quarter ("Vieux Carre" in French) is the heart and soul of modern New Orleans (Louisiana), serving as a continuous reminder of the city's Creole, colonial past. The French Quarter, lying barely above sea level, hugs the bank of the Mississippi River. Buildings with wrought-iron balconies crowd each other and the narrow streets. This…

  14. Public Housing Smarts: Two Universities Discover a Trove of Opportunity in New Orleans' Public Housing System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulard, Garry

    1998-01-01

    Tulane University and Xavier University (Louisiana) are both taking an active role in revitalizing the New Orleans public housing authority, the sixth-largest in the country. In partnership with the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development and the city's housing authority, the two institutions are cooperating in a major renovation…

  15. New Orleans-Style Education Reform: A Guide for Cities--Lessons Learned 2004-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinson, Dana; Boast, Lyria; Hassel, Bryan C.; Kingsland, Neerav

    2012-01-01

    New Schools for New Orleans (NSNO) commissioned this guide, in collaboration with the Louisiana Recovery School District and the Tennessee Achievement School District, to meet the Investing in Innovation (i3) requirement that grantees disseminate the lessons of their work. To create this guide, NSNO worked with Public Impact to build on prior…

  16. New Schools in New Orleans: School Reform Both Exhilarated and Imperiled by Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horne, Jed

    2011-01-01

    Five years after Hurricane Katrina, the New Orleans public schools bear little resemblance to the disintegrating system that was further undone by the catastrophic flood. Two-thirds of city schools in 2004 were rated "Academically Unacceptable" under Louisiana's accountability standards; in 2010, about 4 in 10 rate that designation, and the…

  17. Discipline for Students with Disabilities in the Recovery School District (RSD) of New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffers, Elizabeth K.

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on special education in New Orleans post Hurricane Katrina. After Hurricane Katrina, Louisiana's Recovery School District (RSD) took over 102 of the city's 128 schools with the stated goal of creating a "choice district" for parents. This "choice distric"' is made up of RSD direct-run…

  18. 78 FR 6730 - Safety Zone; Woldenburg Park, Mississippi River, New Orleans, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ...: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... (NPRM) for this Final Rule on December 19, 2012 (77 FR 75079). The comment period for the NPRM expired... Purpose The 2013 National Football League Super Bowl in New Orleans, Louisiana will occur on February...

  19. Leadership for Change in the Educational Wild West of Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beabout, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the perceptions of public school principals in New Orleans, Louisiana during the period of extensive decentralization in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Using the frameworks of systems theory and chaos/complexity theories, iterative interviews with 10 school principals form the core data which examines leaders' experiences…

  20. Should Colleges Conduct Criminal Background Checks before Hiring Instructors? A Louisiana Court Says Yes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fossey, Richard; Vincent, Gregory

    2000-01-01

    In "Harrington v. Louisiana State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education," a Louisiana appellate court ruled that Delgado Community College in New Orleans was liable to a student who was raped by her instructor because the college did not investigate the instructor's background. Discusses implications of this ruling for colleges outside of…

  1. Influence of fipronil compounds and rice-cultivation land-use intensity on macroinvertebrate communities in streams of southwestern Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mize, S.V.; Porter, S.D.; Demcheck, D.K.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory tests of fipronil and its degradation products have revealed acute lethal toxicity at very low concentrations (LC50) of <0.5 ??g/L to selected aquatic macroinvertebrates. In streams draining basins with intensive rice cultivation in southwestern Louisiana, USA, concentrations of fipronil compounds were an order of magnitude larger than the LC50. The abundance (?? = -0.64; p = 0.015) and taxa richness (r2 = 0.515, p < 0.005) of macroinvertebrate communities declined significantly with increases in concentrations of fipronil compounds and rice-cultivation land-use intensity. Macroinvertebrate community tolerance scores increased linearly (r2 = 0.442, p < 0.005) with increases in the percentage of rice cultivation in the basins, indicating increasingly degraded stream conditions. Similarly, macroinvertebrate community-tolerance scores increased rapidly as fipronil concentrations approached about 1 ??g/L. Pesticide toxicity index determinations indicated that aquatic macroinvertebrates respond to a gradient of fipronil compounds in water although stream size and habitat cannot be ruled out as contributing influences.

  2. Undergraduate Program: New Orleans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betsock, Lori

    2008-03-01

    Undergraduate chemical science students—join us in New Orleans on April 6-7, 2008 for an educational program designed specifically for you. Attend symposia on chemistry in sports and health and learn how it impacts your life everyday; meet with graduate school recruiters. Focus on your professional future in chemistry by learning more about careers in public health and how to communicate and work effectively with cross-functional teams. Hear eminent scientist Richard B. Silverman (John Evans Professor of Chemistry, Northwestern University and author of The Organic Chemistry of Drug Design and Drug Action 2004) speak about "Drug Discovery: Ingenuity or Serendipity?" All events will take place at the Hilton Riverside Hotel in New Orleans, except the Undergraduate Research Poster Sessions and Sci-Mix, both of which will be held in Hall A of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center.

  3. Modelling coastal marsh stability in response to sea level rise: a case study in coastal Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chmura, G.L.; Costanza, R.; Kosters, E.C.

    1992-01-01

    In some regions coastal marsh stability is threatened by high rates of sea level rise. The deltaic plain of the Mississippi River is a natural laboratory for the study of marsh stability under conditions of rising sea level because it has been experiencing high rates of local submergence which cause relatively high rates of apparent sea level rise. We constructed a dynamic simulation model to study the relationship of accretion to three components of relative sea level rise: compaction, eustatic rise and submergence. The model is then used to project marsh stability under various future scenarios of sea level rise as well as enhancement of sediment supplies and marsh accretion. The model was calibrated to a 14C-dated sediment deposit which provides a long-term record of sediment accretion. Results indicate that an equilibrium between relative sea level and accretion rates can be attained, but that in this region of coastal Louisiana only the most optimistic assumptions yield coastal marshes that are stable in the long term. ?? 1992.

  4. The effect of Hurricane Katrina on nekton communities in the tidal freshwater marshes of Breton Sound, Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piazza, Bryan P.; La Peyre, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Hurricanes are climatically-induced resource pulses that affect community structure through the combination of physical and chemical habitat change. Estuaries are susceptible to hurricane pulses and are thought to be resilient to habitat change, because biotic communities often return quickly to pre-hurricane conditions. Although several examples provide evidence of quick recovery of estuarine nekton communities following a hurricane, few studies take place in tidal freshwater habitat where physical habitat effects can be extensive and may not be readily mitigated. We examined nekton communities (density, biomass, ?? and ?? diversity, % occurrence by residence status) in tidal freshwater marshes in Breton Sound, Louisiana, before and after a direct hit by Hurricane Katrina (2005). Vegetative marsh loss in the study area was extensive, and elevated salinity persisted for almost 6 months. Post-Katrina nekton density and biomass increased significantly, and the nekton community shifted from one of tidal freshwater/resident species to one containing brackish/migrant species, many of which are characterized by pelagic and benthic life history strategies. By spring 2007, the nekton community had shifted back to tidal freshwater/resident species, despite the enduring loss of vegetated marsh habitat. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. The effect of Hurricane Katrina on nekton communities in the tidal freshwater marshes of Breton Sound, Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, Bryan P.; La Peyre, Megan K.

    2009-06-01

    Hurricanes are climatically-induced resource pulses that affect community structure through the combination of physical and chemical habitat change. Estuaries are susceptible to hurricane pulses and are thought to be resilient to habitat change, because biotic communities often return quickly to pre-hurricane conditions. Although several examples provide evidence of quick recovery of estuarine nekton communities following a hurricane, few studies take place in tidal freshwater habitat where physical habitat effects can be extensive and may not be readily mitigated. We examined nekton communities (density, biomass, α and β diversity, % occurrence by residence status) in tidal freshwater marshes in Breton Sound, Louisiana, before and after a direct hit by Hurricane Katrina (2005). Vegetative marsh loss in the study area was extensive, and elevated salinity persisted for almost 6 months. Post-Katrina nekton density and biomass increased significantly, and the nekton community shifted from one of tidal freshwater/resident species to one containing brackish/migrant species, many of which are characterized by pelagic and benthic life history strategies. By spring 2007, the nekton community had shifted back to tidal freshwater/resident species, despite the enduring loss of vegetated marsh habitat.

  6. CHED Events: New Orleans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wink, Donald J.

    2008-03-01

    These Division of Chemical Education (CHED) Committee meetings and events are planned for the Spring 2008 ACS Meeting in New Orleans. Most will take place in the Hilton Riverside Hotel, 2 Poydras Street; this includes the Sunday evening Reception and Social Event; there will be no CHED Banquet. Exceptions are the Sunday evening Poster Session and the Undergraduate Poster Sessions, which will be in Hall A of the Morial Convention Center.

  7. Who Really Failed New Orleans?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, Thomas D.

    2008-09-01

    I read with unusual interest the Forum ``Earth Scientists and Public Policy: Have We Failed New Orleans?'' in the 4 March issue of Eos (89(10), 2008). As an Earth scientist who lived in New Orleans during most of the early 1960s, I believe strongly that Earth scientists did not fail to recognize infrastructure problems. Further, they tried to communicate these problems and potential dangers to civic leaders in New Orleans and to government officials in Baton Rouge and Washington.

  8. Rapid growth of a Eurasian haplotype of Phragmites australis in a restored brackish marsh in Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, R.J.; Travis, S.E.; Sikes, B.A.

    2008-01-01

    While numerous studies have documented patterns of invasion by non-indigenous plant species, few have considered the invasive properties of non-native genotypes of native species. Characteristics associated with specific genotypes, such as tolerance to disturbance, may mistakenly be applied to an entire species in the absence of genetic information, which consequently may affect management decisions. We report here on the incidence and growth of an introduced lineage of Phragmites australis in the Gulf of Mexico coastal zone of Louisiana. P. australis was collected from nine separate locations for inclusion in a series of growth experiments. Chloroplast DNA analysis indicated that specimens collected from four locations in the Mississippi River Delta represented the introduced Eurasian haplotype; the remainder represented the gulf coast haplotype. Three distinct genotypes, or clones, were identified within each haplotype via analysis using amplified fragment length polymorphisms, which also revealed reduced genetic diversity of the gulf coast clones compared to the Eurasian clones. Clones of each haplotype were planted along with three other native macrophytes at similar densities in a restored brackish marsh and monitored for growth. After 14 months, the Eurasian haplotype had spread vegetatively to cover about 82% of the experimental plots, more than four times the coverage (18%) of the gulf coast haplotype. Thus, the use of P. australis plantings for wetland restoration should consider the genetic lineage of plants used since our results indicate the potential of the Eurasian haplotype to grow rapidly at newly restored sites. This rapid growth may limit the establishment of more slowly growing native species. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  9. Delta lobe degradation and hurricane impacts governing large-scale coastal behavior, South-central Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miner, Michael D.; Kulp, Mark A.; Fitzgerald, Duncan M.; Flocks, James G.; Weathers, H. Dallon

    2009-12-01

    A large deficit in the coastal sediment budget, high rates of relative sea-level rise (~0.9 cm/year), and storm-induced current and wave erosion are forcing barrier shoreface retreat along the periphery of the Mississippi River delta plain. Additionally, conversion of interior wetlands to open water has increased the bay tidal prism, resulting in degradation of barrier islands due to inlet widening, formation of new inlets, and sediment sequestration at ebb-tidal deltas. Single-beam bathymetric surveys along a 165-km stretch of south-central Louisiana barrier coast, from Raccoon Point in Terrebonne Parish to Sandy Point in Plaquemines Parish, were conducted in 2006. These data, combined with historical bathymetry from three time periods (dating to the 1880s), provide a series of digital elevation models that were used to calculate sediment volumetric changes and determine long-term erosional-depositional trends. Dominant patterns during the 125-year period include (1) erosion of ~1.6 × 109 m3 from the shoreface, forcing up to 3 km of shoreface retreat, (2) sediment deposition in coastal bights and at ebb-tidal deltas, and (3) a combined increase in tidal inlet cross-sectional area from ~41,400 m2 to ~139,500 m2. Bathymetric and shoreline change datasets separated by shorter time periods (sub-annual) demonstrate that these long-term trends are driven by processes associated with major hurricane impacts, and that rates of shoreface erosion are an order of magnitude greater during active hurricane seasons compared to long-term trends.

  10. Delta lobe degradation and hurricane impacts governing large-scale coastal behavior, South-central Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miner, M.D.; Kulp, M.A.; FitzGerald, D.M.; Flocks, J.G.; Weathers, H.D.

    2009-01-01

    A large deficit in the coastal sediment budget, high rates of relative sea-level rise (???0.9 cm/year), and storm-induced current and wave erosion are forcing barrier shoreface retreat along the periphery of the Mississippi River delta plain. Additionally, conversion of interior wetlands to open water has increased the bay tidal prism, resulting in degradation of barrier islands due to inlet widening, formation of new inlets, and sediment sequestration at ebb-tidal deltas. Single-beam bathymetric surveys along a 165-km stretch of south-central Louisiana barrier coast, from Raccoon Point in Terrebonne Parish to Sandy Point in Plaquemines Parish, were conducted in 2006. These data, combined with historical bathymetry from three time periods (dating to the 1880s), provide a series of digital elevation models that were used to calculate sediment volumetric changes and determine long-term erosional-depositional trends. Dominant patterns during the 125-year period include (1) erosion of ???1.6????????109 m3 from the shoreface, forcing up to 3 km of shoreface retreat, (2) sediment deposition in coastal bights and at ebb-tidal deltas, and (3) a combined increase in tidal inlet cross-sectional area from ???41,400 m2 to ???139,500 m 2. Bathymetric and shoreline change datasets separated by shorter time periods (sub-annual) demonstrate that these long-term trends are driven by processes associated with major hurricane impacts, and that rates of shoreface erosion are an order of magnitude greater during active hurricane seasons compared to long-term trends. ?? 2009 Springer-Verlag.

  11. The View from New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedford, April Whatley

    2006-01-01

    In this article the author expresses her views concerning the pre- and post-Hurricane Katrina public educational trend in New Orleans. She observes that the segregation that existed before Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, due in part to migration to the suburbs and in part to the proliferation of private and parochial schools, has divided…

  12. Lessons for Louisiana from Florida's K-12 Education Revolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladner, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Louisiana has emerged as one of the most fascinating states in the nation for education reform. The state's creative response to rebuilding the New Orleans education system in the wake of Hurricane Katrina is now considered a potential model for reformers across the nation. Governor Bobby Jindal has carried the reforms further in pushing for…

  13. Recommendations for dextranase application in the 2006 Louisiana grinding season

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the last few years (2003-2005), Dr. Gillian Eggleston, a Lead Scientist at the Southern Regional Research Center of USDA-ARS in New Orleans, and factory co-researchers have worked on optimizing the application of dextranases in the Louisiana sugarcane factories. The recommendations gained from t...

  14. The Location of Displaced New Orleans Residents in the Year After Hurricane Katrina

    PubMed Central

    Sastry, Narayan; Gregory, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Using individual data from the restricted version of the American Community Survey, we examined the displacement locations of pre–Hurricane Katrina adult residents of New Orleans in the year after the hurricane. More than one-half (53 %) of adults had returned to—or remained in—the New Orleans metropolitan area, with just under one-third of the total returning to the dwelling in which they resided prior to Hurricane Katrina. Among the remainder, Texas was the leading location of displaced residents, with almost 40 % of those living away from the metropolitan area (18 % of the total), followed by other locations in Louisiana (12 %), the South region of the United States other than Louisiana and Texas (12 %), and elsewhere in the United States (5 %). Black adults were considerably more likely than nonblack adults to be living elsewhere in Louisiana, in Texas, and elsewhere in the South. The observed race disparity was not accounted for by any of the demographic or socioeconomic covariates in the multinomial logistic regression models. Consistent with hypothesized effects, we found that following Hurricane Katrina, young adults (aged 25–39) were more likely to move further away from New Orleans and that adults born outside Louisiana were substantially more likely to have relocated away from the state. PMID:24599750

  15. The location of displaced New Orleans residents in the year after Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Sastry, Narayan; Gregory, Jesse

    2014-06-01

    Using individual data from the restricted version of the American Community Survey, we examined the displacement locations of pre-Hurricane Katrina adult residents of New Orleans in the year after the hurricane. More than one-half (53 %) of adults had returned to-or remained in-the New Orleans metropolitan area, with just under one-third of the total returning to the dwelling in which they resided prior to Hurricane Katrina. Among the remainder, Texas was the leading location of displaced residents, with almost 40 % of those living away from the metropolitan area (18 % of the total), followed by other locations in Louisiana (12 %), the South region of the United States other than Louisiana and Texas (12 %), and elsewhere in the United States (5 %). Black adults were considerably more likely than nonblack adults to be living elsewhere in Louisiana, in Texas, and elsewhere in the South. The observed race disparity was not accounted for by any of the demographic or socioeconomic covariates in the multinomial logistic regression models. Consistent with hypothesized effects, we found that following Hurricane Katrina, young adults (aged 25-39) were more likely to move further away from New Orleans and that adults born outside Louisiana were substantially more likely to have relocated away from the state. PMID:24599750

  16. Rising Above the Water: New Orleans Implements Energy Efficiency and Sustainability Practices Following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-07-01

    This fact sheet describes the technical assistance that the U.S. Department of Energy, through its National Renewable Energy Laboratory, provided to New Orleans, Louisiana, which helped the city incorporate energy efficiency into its rebuilding efforts for K-12 schools and homes following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. NREL also provided support and analysis on energy policy efforts.

  17. A Fresh Start for New Orleans' Children: Improving Education after Katrina. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Education and Early Childhood Development of the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, United States Senate. One Hundred Ninth Congress, Second Session on Examining the Education System of New Orleans (July 14, 2006, New Orleans, LA). Senate Hearing 109-626

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Senate, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the education system of New Orleans. Statements were presented by: Honorable Lamar Alexander, Chairman, Subcommittee on Education and Early Childhood Development; Honorable Mary L. Landrieu, U.S. Senator from Louisiana; Honorable Richard Burr, U.S. Senator from North Carolina; Linda Johnson, President,…

  18. Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) report. New Orleans Military Ocean Terminal (NOMOT), New Orleans, LA. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Crossman, M.; Ward, L.

    1994-04-11

    This report presents the results of the Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) investigation conducted by Environmental Resources Management (ERM) at New Orleans Military Ocean Terminal (NOMOT), a U.S. Government property selected for closure by the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Commission under Public Laws 100-526 and 101-510. Under CERFA (Public Law 102-426), Federal agencies are required to identify expeditiously real property that can be immediately reused and redeveloped. Satisfying this objective requires the identification of real property where no hazardous substances or petroleum products, regulated by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), were stored for one year or more, known to have been released, or disposed NOMOT is a 17.6-acre site located in New Orleans, Louisiana. NOMOT has been used for warehousing and shipping of equipment since 1919. Environmentally significant operations include routine maintenance and hazardous material handling. ERM reviewed existing investigation documents; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) , State, and county regulatory records; environmental data bases; and title documents pertaining to NOMOT during this investigation. In addition, ERM conducted interviews and visual inspections of NOMOT as well as visual inspections of and data base searches for the surrounding properties. Information in this CERFA report was current as of the site visit by ERM in October 1993. This information was used to divide the installation into two categories of parcels: CERFA Disqualified Parcels and CERFA Parcels, as defined by the Army. New Orleans military ocean terminal, CERF.

  19. Marketing family planning services in New Orleans.

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, J T; Proffitt, B J; Bartlett, T L

    1987-01-01

    The health care profession is witnessing a shift in focus from the interests and needs of the service provider to those of the potential consumer in an effort to attract and maintain clients. This study illustrates the role that marketing research can play in the development of program strategies, even for relatively small organizations. The study was conducted for Planned Parenthood of Louisiana, a recently organized affiliate that began offering clinical services in May 1984, to provide information on the four Ps of marketing: product, price, place, and promotion. Data from telephone interviews among a random sample of 1,000 women 15-35 years old in New Orleans before the clinic opened confirmed that the need for family planning services was not entirely satisfied by existing service providers. Moreover, it indicated that clinic hours and the cost of services were in line with client interests. The most useful findings for developing the promotional strategy were the relatively low name recognition of Planned Parenthood and a higher-than-expected level of interest that young, low income blacks expressed in using the service. PMID:3112854

  20. Green Building Policy Options for New Orleans

    SciTech Connect

    Doris, E.

    2011-09-01

    This document is adapted from a memo and report delivered to the City Council of New Orleans, the office of the Mayor of New Orleans, the Chairperson of the Citizen Stakeholders Group (New Orleans Energy Task Force) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Project Officer in 2008. The report outlines ideas for and potential impacts of various green building policies in New Orleans in the years following Hurricane Katrina.

  1. Education in New Orleans: Some Background

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasheed, Aesha

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the post-storm landscape of education in New Orleans and the metro area requires a grasp of some of the pre-storm realities of New Orleans public schools. This article will provide a brief overview of three arenas important to understanding the educational landscape of New Orleans--parish governance, desegregation and private…

  2. Institutional environmental impact statement, Michoud Assembly Facility, New Orleans, Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A description and analysis of Michoud Assembly Facility as an operational base for both NASA and NASA-related programs and various government tenant-agencies and their contractors is given. Tenant-agencies are governmental agencies or governmental agency contractors which are not involved in a NASA program, but utilize office or manufacturing space at the Michoud Assembly Facility. The statements represent the full description of the likely environmental effects of the facility and are used in the process of making program and project decisions.

  3. New Orleans and Energy Efficiency

    ScienceCinema

    Rosenburg, Zachary

    2013-05-29

    The Saint Bernard Project works tirelessly with volunteers, veterans and homeowners to continue the rebuilding. With the help of the Department of Energy and the Department of Housing and Urban Development they will be able to apply a greater energy efficiency strategy to help New Orleans and the country reduce our dependence on foreign oil.

  4. New Orleans and Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenburg, Zachary

    2010-01-01

    The Saint Bernard Project works tirelessly with volunteers, veterans and homeowners to continue the rebuilding. With the help of the Department of Energy and the Department of Housing and Urban Development they will be able to apply a greater energy efficiency strategy to help New Orleans and the country reduce our dependence on foreign oil.

  5. Staying Afloat in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Dorothy Givens

    2007-01-01

    Following the second anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, most of the attention in New Orleans is still on physical and facility recovery efforts. But buried beneath the news accounts of a city trying to pull itself out of its debris are groups and organizations whose physical infrastructures may not have taken a direct hit from Katrina, but whose…

  6. MAGNETIC DRUM SEPARATOR PERFORMANCE SCALPING SHREDDED TROMMEL OVERFLOW AT NOMINAL DESIGN CONDITIONS. TEST NO. 4.03, RECOVERY 1, NEW ORLEANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the first test of the shredded trommel overs magnetic drum separator at the New Orleans, Louisiana, resource recovery facility. Shredded trommel overs refers to waste which reports to the oversize discharge from the trommel and is subsequently shredded. For ...

  7. 33 CFR 165.812 - Security Zones; Lower Mississippi River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Limited Access Areas Eighth Coast Guard District § 165.812 Security Zones; Lower Mississippi River... Mississippi River mile marker 96.0 in New Orleans, Louisiana. These moving security zones encompass all waters... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zones; Lower...

  8. 33 CFR 165.812 - Security Zones; Lower Mississippi River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Limited Access Areas Eighth Coast Guard District § 165.812 Security Zones; Lower Mississippi River... Mississippi River mile marker 96.0 in New Orleans, Louisiana. These moving security zones encompass all waters... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zones; Lower...

  9. 33 CFR 165.812 - Security Zones; Lower Mississippi River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Limited Access Areas Eighth Coast Guard District § 165.812 Security Zones; Lower Mississippi River... Mississippi River mile marker 96.0 in New Orleans, Louisiana. These moving security zones encompass all waters... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security Zones; Lower...

  10. 33 CFR 165.812 - Security Zones; Lower Mississippi River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Limited Access Areas Eighth Coast Guard District § 165.812 Security Zones; Lower Mississippi River... Mississippi River mile marker 96.0 in New Orleans, Louisiana. These moving security zones encompass all waters... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zones; Lower...

  11. 33 CFR 165.812 - Security Zones; Lower Mississippi River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Limited Access Areas Eighth Coast Guard District § 165.812 Security Zones; Lower Mississippi River... Mississippi River mile marker 96.0 in New Orleans, Louisiana. These moving security zones encompass all waters... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zones; Lower...

  12. A Case Study Comparison of Charter and Traditional Schools in New Orleans Recovery School District: Selection Criteria and Service Provision for Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Nikki L.

    2011-01-01

    In post-Katrina New Orleans, Louisiana, there is a growing concentration of charter schools. The Recovery School District (RSD) has oversight of the majority of these schools. To explore charges from community advocates that RSD charter schools restricted admission and provided inadequate services for students with disabilities, the following…

  13. School Health Connection Goes Electronic: Developing a Health Information Management System for New Orleans' School-Based Health Centers. Program Results Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rastorfer, Darl

    2011-01-01

    From February 2008 through April 2011, School Health Connection, a program of the Louisiana Public Health Institute, developed an electronic health information management system for newly established school-based health centers in Greater New Orleans. School Health Connection was established as part of a broader effort to restore community health…

  14. Eugene Island Block 330 Field - development and production history. [Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, R.L.; Dupuy, H.J. Jr.; Holland, D.S.

    1982-01-01

    Eugene Island Block 330 Field is currently the largest oil producing field in federally owned offshore waters of the United States. The field is located about 272 kilometers southwest of New Orleans, Louisiana. This paper discusses the total geological complex and then follows the development and production history of the primary block: Eugene Island Block 330. A discussion of the sand control and safety features used in the offshore is also included. 1 ref.

  15. NONFARM AGRICULTURAL EMPLOYMENT IN SOUTHEAST LOUISIANA--AREA IV--WITH IMPLICATIONS FOR DEVELOPING TRAINING PROGRAMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MONDART, C.L., SR.; AND OTHERS

    AS PART OF A STATEWIDE STUDY OF AGRICULTURAL OCCUPATIONS IN LOUISIANA, AN INTERVIEW SURVEY OF 207 FARM-BASED FIRMS IN THE SOUTHEASTERN AREA, EXCLUDING BATON ROUGE AND NEW ORLEANS, WAS CONDUCTED TO DETERMINE (1) THE IDENTITY OF BUSINESSES AND ORGANIZATIONS HAVING EMPLOYEES WHO NEEDED AGRICULTURAL COMPETENCIES, (2) INFORMATION ABOUT JOBS, AND (3)…

  16. Choice and Opportunity: The Past and Future of Choice-Based Aid in Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Dick M., II; Ross, John K.

    2008-01-01

    On February 29, 2008, Gov. Bobby Jindal presented the Louisiana Legislature with a proposed budget allocating $10 million for a school choice initiative that would enable parents in New Orleans to send their children to the school of their choice, including private schools, with state-funded scholarships. Leaders of the public school establishment…

  17. Review of "The Louisiana Recovery School District: Lessons for the Buckeye State"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buras, Kristen L.

    2012-01-01

    In "The Louisiana Recovery School District: Lessons for the Buckeye State," the Thomas B. Fordham Institute criticizes local urban governance structures and presents the decentralized, charter-school-driven Recovery School District (RSD) in New Orleans as a successful model for fiscal and academic performance. Absent from the review is any…

  18. Predictors of business return in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Lam, Nina S N; Arenas, Helbert; Pace, Kelley; LeSage, James; Campanella, Richard

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the business reopening process in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, which hit the region on August 29, 2005, to better understand what the major predictors were and how their impacts changed through time. A telephone survey of businesses in New Orleans was conducted in October 2007, 26 months after Hurricane Katrina. The data were analyzed using a modified spatial probit regression model to evaluate the importance of each predictor variable through time. The results suggest that the two most important reopening predictors throughout all time periods were the flood depth at the business location and business size as represented by its wages in a logarithmic form. Flood depth was a significant negative predictor and had the largest marginal effects on the reopening probabilities. Smaller businesses had lower reopening probabilities than larger ones. However, the nonlinear response of business size to the reopening probability suggests that recovery aid would be most effective for smaller businesses than for larger ones. The spatial spillovers effect was a significant positive predictor but only for the first nine months. The findings show clearly that flood protection is the overarching issue for New Orleans. A flood protection plan that reduces the vulnerability and length of flooding would be the first and foremost step to mitigate the negative effects from climate-related hazards and enable speedy recovery. The findings cast doubt on the current coastal protection efforts and add to the current debate of whether coastal Louisiana will be sustainable or too costly to protect from further land loss and flooding given the threat of sea-level rise. Finally, a plan to help small businesses to return would also be an effective strategy for recovery, and the temporal window of opportunity that generates the greatest impacts would be the first 6∼9 months after the disaster. PMID:23133530

  19. Reconstruction of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina: a research perspective.

    PubMed

    Kates, R W; Colten, C E; Laska, S; Leatherman, S P

    2006-10-01

    Four propositions drawn from 60 years of natural hazard and reconstruction research provide a comparative and historical perspective on the reconstruction of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Decisions taken over its 288-year history that have made New Orleans so vulnerable to Katrina reflect a long-term pattern of societal response to hazard events--reducing consequences to relatively frequent events, and increasing vulnerability to very large and rare events. Thus Katrina's consequences for New Orleans were truly catastrophic--accounting for most of the estimated 1,570 deaths of Louisiana residents and $40-50 billion in monetary losses. A comparative sequence and timing of recovery provides a calendar of historical experience against which to gauge progress in reconstruction. Using this calendar, the emergency post-disaster period appears to be longer in duration than that of any other studied disaster. The restoration period, the time taken to restore urban services for the smaller population, is in keeping with or ahead of historical experience. The effort to reconstruct the physical environment and urban infrastructure is likely to take 8-11 years. Conflicting policy goals for reconstruction of rapid recovery, safety, betterment, and equity are already evident. Actions taken demonstrate the rush to rebuild the familiar in contrast to planning efforts that emphasize betterment. Because disasters tend to accelerate existing economic, social, and political trends, the large losses in housing, population, and employment after Katrina are likely to persist and, at best, only partly recover. However, the possibility of breaking free of this gloomy trajectory is feasible and has some historical precedent. PMID:17003119

  20. Reconstruction of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina: A research perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kates, R. W.; Colten, C. E.; Laska, S.; Leatherman, S. P.

    2006-01-01

    Four propositions drawn from 60 years of natural hazard and reconstruction research provide a comparative and historical perspective on the reconstruction of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Decisions taken over its 288-year history that have made New Orleans so vulnerable to Katrina reflect a long-term pattern of societal response to hazard events—reducing consequences to relatively frequent events, and increasing vulnerability to very large and rare events. Thus Katrina's consequences for New Orleans were truly catastrophic—accounting for most of the estimated 1,570 deaths of Louisiana residents and $40–50 billion in monetary losses. A comparative sequence and timing of recovery provides a calendar of historical experience against which to gauge progress in reconstruction. Using this calendar, the emergency postdisaster period appears to be longer in duration than that of any other studied disaster. The restoration period, the time taken to restore urban services for the smaller population, is in keeping with or ahead of historical experience. The effort to reconstruct the physical environment and urban infrastructure is likely to take 8–11 years. Conflicting policy goals for reconstruction of rapid recovery, safety, betterment, and equity are already evident. Actions taken demonstrate the rush to rebuild the familiar in contrast to planning efforts that emphasize betterment. Because disasters tend to accelerate existing economic, social, and political trends, the large losses in housing, population, and employment after Katrina are likely to persist and, at best, only partly recover. However, the possibility of breaking free of this gloomy trajectory is feasible and has some historical precedent. PMID:17003119

  1. Predictors of Business Return in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Nina S. N.; Arenas, Helbert; Pace, Kelley; LeSage, James; Campanella, Richard

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the business reopening process in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, which hit the region on August 29, 2005, to better understand what the major predictors were and how their impacts changed through time. A telephone survey of businesses in New Orleans was conducted in October 2007, 26 months after Hurricane Katrina. The data were analyzed using a modified spatial probit regression model to evaluate the importance of each predictor variable through time. The results suggest that the two most important reopening predictors throughout all time periods were the flood depth at the business location and business size as represented by its wages in a logarithmic form. Flood depth was a significant negative predictor and had the largest marginal effects on the reopening probabilities. Smaller businesses had lower reopening probabilities than larger ones. However, the nonlinear response of business size to the reopening probability suggests that recovery aid would be most effective for smaller businesses than for larger ones. The spatial spillovers effect was a significant positive predictor but only for the first nine months. The findings show clearly that flood protection is the overarching issue for New Orleans. A flood protection plan that reduces the vulnerability and length of flooding would be the first and foremost step to mitigate the negative effects from climate-related hazards and enable speedy recovery. The findings cast doubt on the current coastal protection efforts and add to the current debate of whether coastal Louisiana will be sustainable or too costly to protect from further land loss and flooding given the threat of sea-level rise. Finally, a plan to help small businesses to return would also be an effective strategy for recovery, and the temporal window of opportunity that generates the greatest impacts would be the first 6∼9 months after the disaster. PMID:23133530

  2. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey New Orleans Item, Photographer, Circa ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey New Orleans Item, Photographer, Circa 1910 FROM INSIDE FORT LOOKING OUT TOWARD BAYOU ST. JOHN - Spanish Fort, Bayou Saint John at Lake Pontchartrain, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA

  3. Edgar Degas in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Edgar Degas was not yet famous, but was on the point of aesthetic and commercial success when he left Paris in the fall for his New Orleans visit of about four months, during which time he painted 22 major works. It might be said that he was having a midlife crisis at this time. He had been painting ballet and horse pictures to assist his father's…

  4. USGS environmental characterization of flood sediments left in the New Orleans area after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, 2005--Progress Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Lovelace, John K.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Lamothe, Paul J.; Furlong, Edward T.; Demas, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The flooding in the greater New Orleans area that resulted from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in September, 2005, left behind accumulations of sediments up to many centimeters thick on streets, lawns, parking lots, and other flat surfaces. These flood sediment deposits have been the focus of extensive study by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ) due to concerns that the sediments may contain elevated levels of heavy metals, organic contaminants, and microbes. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is characterizing a limited number of flood sediment samples that were collected on September 15-16 and October 6-7, 2005, from the greater New Orleans area by personnel from the USGS Louisiana Water Science Center in Baton Rouge. Small samples (< 3 pints each) of wet to dry flood sediment were collected from 11 localities around downtown New Orleans on September 15, 2005, and two large samples (40 pints each) of wet flood sediment were collected from the Chalmette area on September 16. Twelve additional samples (8-10 pints each) were collected from New Orleans, Slidell, Rigolets, and Violet on October 6 and 7. The USGS characterization studies of these flood sediments are designed to produce data and interpretations regarding how the sediments and any contained contaminants may respond to environmental processes. This information will be of use to cleanup managers and DoI/USGS scientists assessing environmental impacts of the hurricanes and subsequent cleanup activities.

  5. Rebuilding New Orleans Schools after Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the rebuilding of the public school system in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. A group of local and state educators, community leaders, and business people, headed by Tulane University President Scott Cowen, recommended that New Orleans become a hybrid of traditional public schools and charter schools,…

  6. New Orleans Sees School Building Boom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2010-01-01

    Efforts to reinvent public education in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina have drawn such interest that it's easy to lose sight of some very concrete changes that will become obvious over time: A generation of brand-new school buildings is rising across the city. New Orleans is in the early stages of a construction spree both to build and…

  7. New Teachers Are New Orleans Norm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports how hundreds of fresh recruits, many of them new to K-12 teaching, were filling public school classrooms across New Orleans in Katrina's aftermath. The state-led Recovery School District (RSD), which now operates 34 New Orleans public schools, dramatically increased its teacher workforce for this academic year, having hired…

  8. Ship Shoal as a prospective borrow site for barrier island restoration, coastal south-central Louisiana, Usa: Numerical wave modeling and field measurements of hydrodynamics and sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, G.W.; Pepper, D.A.; Xu, Jie; Zhang, X.

    2004-01-01

    Ship Shoal, a transgressive sand body located at the 10 m isobath off south-central Louisiana, is deemed a potential sand source for restoration along the rapidly eroding Isles Dernieres barrier chain and possibly other sites in Louisiana. Through numerical wave modeling we evaluate the potential response of mining Ship Shoal on the wave field. During severe and strong storms, waves break seaward of the western flank of Ship Shoal. Therefore, removal of Ship Shoal (approximately 1.1 billion m3) causes a maximum increase of the significant wave height by 90%-100% and 40%-50% over the shoal and directly adjacent to the lee of the complex for two strong storm scenarios. During weak storms and fair weather conditions, waves do not break over Ship Shoal. The degree of increase in significant wave height due to shoal removal is considerably smaller, only 10%-20% on the west part of the shoal. Within the context of increasing nearshore wave energy levels, removal of the shoal is not significant enough to cause increased erosion along the Isles Dernieres. Wave approach direction exerts significant control on the wave climate leeward of Ship Shoal for stronger storms, but not weak storms or fairweather. Instrumentation deployed at the shoal allowed comparison of measured wave heights with numerically derived wave heights using STWAVE. Correlation coefficients are high in virtually all comparisons indicating the capability of the model to simulate wave behavior satisfactorily at the shoal. Directional waves, currents and sediment transport were measured during winter storms associated with frontal passages using three bottom-mounted arrays deployed on the seaward and landward sides of Ship Shoal (November, 1998-January, 1999). Episodic increases in wave height, mean and oscillatory current speed, shear velocity, and sediment transport rates, associated with recurrent cold front passages, were measured. Dissipation mechanisms included both breaking and bottom friction due to

  9. Geochemistry and solid-phase association of chromium in sediment from the Calcasieu River and estuary, Louisiana, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, N.S.; Demas, C.; d'Angelo, W.

    1994-01-01

    Sediment samples were collected from the lower Calcasieu River and estuary, Louisiana, in a study of the release of metals from sediments to the overlying water column. Whole samples were characterized by analyses that included: (1) determination of total sediment ammonium concentrations; (2) determination of total sediment Cr, Mn and Fe concentrations; (3) extraction of sediment with hydrogen peroxide followed by dilute hydrochloric acid to obtain recoverable metals, including oxides; and (4) extraction of sediment with hydrogen peroxide plus pyrophosphate at a pH of 7-8 to recover organically-bound Cr but not metal oxides. Concentrations of Cr, Mn and Fe in sediment interstitial water were determined. The concentrations of Cr in interstitial water could not be predicted from total sediment concentrations of Cr. Degradation of organic matter appeared to be the mechanism that caused elevated Cr concentrations in the interstitial water. Concentrations of Cr in interstitial water were positively correlated with total concentrations of ammonium in sediment. Concentrations of Cr in interstitial water that exceeded water-column concentrations of Cr were found when the total concentrations of ammonium in sediment exceeded 1 ??mol per gram wet weight. Concentrations of metals in interstitial water that are larger than metal concentrations in the water column create a potential for diffusive flux and metal enrichment of the overlying water column. ?? 1994.

  10. Quantification of Surface Suspended Sediments along a River Dominated Coast with NOAA AVHRR and SeaWiFS Measurements: Louisiana, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myint, S. W.; Walker, N. D.

    2002-01-01

    The ability to quantify suspended sediment concentrations accurately over both time and space using satellite data has been a goal of many environmental researchers over the past few decades This study utilizes data acquired by the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the Orbview-2 Sea-viewing wide field-of-view (SeaWiFS) ocean colour sensor, coupled with field measurements to develop statistical models for the estimation of near-surface suspended sediment and suspended solids "Ground truth" water samples were obtained via helicopter, small boat and automatic water sampler within a few hours of satellite overpasses The NOAA AVHRR atmospheric correction was modified for the high levels of turbidity along the Louisiana coast. Models were developed based on the field measurements and reflectance/radiance measurements in the visible and near infrared Channels of NOAA-14 and Orbview-2 SeaWiFS. The best models for predicting surface suspended sediment concentrations were obtained with a NOAA AVHRR Channel 1 (580-680nm) cubic model, Channel 2 (725-1100 nm) linear mod$ and SeaWiFs Channel 6 (660-68Onm) power modeL The suspended sediment models developed using SeaWiFS Channel 5 (545-565 nm) were inferior, a result that we attribute mainly to the atmospheric correction technique, the shallow depth of the water samples and absorption effects from non-sediment water constituents.

  11. Reducing New Orleans Residential Flood Risk in an Uncertain Future Using Non-Structural Risk Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischbach, J. R.; Groves, D.; Johnson, D.

    2010-12-01

    Five years after Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast, the long-term future of the City of New Orleans remains uncertain. This paper addresses one of New Orleans' most critical challenges: how to make the city more resilient and less vulnerable to future flood damages. Despite recent upgrades to the protection system surrounding the city designed to protect against floods with a 1-in-100 (1%) annual chance of occurrence, New Orleans remains vulnerable to lower-frequency, high-damage events. In addition, uncertain factors that influence flood risk, including coastal land loss and subsidence, rising sea levels, and population recovery and growth, may lead to increasing risk over time. Current proposals for risk reduction in New Orleans and South Louisiana, however, have not fully accounted for these key uncertain drivers. Rather than focus on additional large-scale structural infrastructure investments, this paper considers proposals to augment the existing protection system with ``non-structural" risk mitigation programs. Non-structural risk mitigation includes incentives for elevating existing or new structures, revised building codes, incentives for relocation to lower risk areas, and land use restrictions designed to curtail future growth in the floodplain. This research estimates the risk reduction benefits and implementation costs of non-structural risk mitigation strategies focused on single-family or small multi-family homes in New Orleans. We draw from existing risk models to develop a low-resolution scenario generator, NOLArisk, designed to produce first-order estimates of property risk from 2011-2060 across a range of uncertain future scenarios. We then apply exploratory modeling and Robust Decision Making (RDM) methods to a) suggest strategies that balance risk reduction and implementation costs across many or most plausible futures, and b) identify scenarios in which current alternatives yield negative net economic benefits or excessive levels of

  12. Water quality and phytoplankton communities in Lake Pontchartrain during and after the Bonnet Carré Spillway opening, April to October 2008, in Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mize, Scott V.; Demcheck, Dennis K.

    2009-12-01

    The Bonnet Carré Spillway, located 28 miles northwest of New Orleans, was constructed in the early 1930s as part of an integrated flood-control system for the lower Mississippi River system. From 11 April to 8 May 2008, Mississippi River water was diverted through the spillway into the 629-square-mile Lake Pontchartrain, which is hydraulically connected to the Gulf of Mexico. On 8 April, prior to the opening of the spillway, water-quality instruments were deployed and recorded hourly measurements of water temperature, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, pH, and nitrate. Discrete water-quality and phytoplankton (algae) samples were collected in Lake Pontchartrain from 8 April to 3 October 2008 to assess the water-quality nutrient enrichment effects of the diversion on the lake. The maximum influence of river water in the southern portion of the lake was captured with continuous (hourly) monitoring of nitrate concentrations, and field measurements such as of specific conductance during the critical period in late April to early May. By late May, the deployed instruments had recorded the arrival, peak, and decline of selected constituents associated with the freshwater influx from the Mississippi River/Bonnet Carré Spillway diversion. The continuous monitoring data showed the short-term interactions of high-nitrate, low-specific conductance river water and low-nitrate, high-specific conductance lake water. The phytoplankton community composition, as an indicator of water quality, illustrated an extended response from the river water evident even after the continuous and discrete samples indicated that the lake had returned to pre-diversion conditions. The initial phytoplankton community response to nutrient increases was related to accumulations of diatoms. During periods of low nutrient concentrations, accumulations of blue-greens occurred by July and August. As blue-green algae cell densities and biovolumes increased in the summer, so did the species richness

  13. Water quality and phytoplankton communities in lake Pontchartrain during and after the Bonnet Carre spillway opening, April to October 2008, in Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mize, Scott V.; Demcheck, Dennis K.

    2009-01-01

    The Bonnet Carré Spillway, located 28 miles northwest of New Orleans, was constructed in the early 1930s as part of an integrated flood-control system for the lower Mississippi River system. From 11 April to 8 May 2008, Mississippi River water was diverted through the spillway into the 629-square-mile Lake Pontchartrain, which is hydraulically connected to the Gulf of Mexico. On 8 April, prior to the opening of the spillway, water-quality instruments were deployed and recorded hourly measurements of water temperature, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, pH, and nitrate. Discrete water-quality and phytoplankton (algae) samples were collected in Lake Pontchartrain from 8 April to 3 October 2008 to assess the water-quality nutrient enrichment effects of the diversion on the lake. The maximum influence of river water in the southern portion of the lake was captured with continuous (hourly) monitoring of nitrate concentrations, and field measurements such as of specific conductance during the critical period in late April to early May. By late May, the deployed instruments had recorded the arrival, peak, and decline of selected constituents associated with the freshwater influx from the Mississippi River/Bonnet Carré Spillway diversion. The continuous monitoring data showed the short-term interactions of high-nitrate, low-specific conductance river water and low-nitrate, high-specific conductance lake water. The phytoplankton community composition, as an indicator of water quality, illustrated an extended response from the river water evident even after the continuous and discrete samples indicated that the lake had returned to pre-diversion conditions. The initial phytoplankton community response to nutrient increases was related to accumulations of diatoms. During periods of low nutrient concentrations, accumulations of blue-greens occurred by July and August. As blue-green algae cell densities and biovolumes increased in the summer, so did the species richness

  14. Certain Phases of Rural School Supervision: Abstracts of Addresses Delivered at the Third Conference of Supervisors of the Southern States, Held At New Orleans, LA. December 17 and 18, 1928. Bulletin, 1929, No. 28

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior, 1929

    1929-01-01

    This bulletin contains abstracts of addresses delivered at a two-day conference of State and county rural school supervisors in the Southern States called by the United States Bureau of Education at New Orleans, Louisiana, December 17 and 18, 1928. Abstracts of addresses were prepared from manuscripts submitted by the authors. Section I: Problems…

  15. Exploring the effects of black mangrove (Avicennia germinans) expansions on nutrient cycling in smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) marsh sediments of southern Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, K. M.; Twilley, R. R.

    2011-12-01

    Located at the northernmost extent of mangroves in the Gulf of Mexico, coastal Louisiana (LA) provides an excellent opportunity to study the effects of a climate-induced vegetation shift on nutrient cycling within an ecosystem. Climate throughout the Gulf Coast region is experiencing a general warming trend and scientists predict both hotter summers (+1.5 to 4 °C) and warmer winters (+1.5 to 5.5 °C) by 2100. Over the last two decades, mild winter temperatures have facilitated the expansion of black mangrove trees (Avicennia germinans) into the smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) along parts of the LA coast. Due to differences in morphology and physiology between these two species, the expansion of Avicennia has the potential to greatly alter sediment biogeochemistry, especially nutrient cycling. With such an extensive history of coastal nutrient enrichment and eutrophication in the Mississippi River delta, it is important to understand how nutrient cycling, retention, and removal in this region will be affected by this climate-induced vegetation expansion. We examined the effect of this species shift on porewater salinity, sulfide, and dissolved inorganic nutrient concentrations (nitrite, nitrate, ammonium, and phosphate) as well as sediment oxidation-reduction potential, bulk density, and nutrient content (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus). We also measured net dinitrogen (N2:Ar), oxygen, and dissolved inorganic nutrient fluxes on intact, non-vegetated sediment cores collected from both Spartina and Avicennia habitats. Spartina sediments were more reducing, with higher concentrations of sulfides and ammonium. We found no significant difference between Spartina and Avicennia sediment dinitrogen, oxygen, or dissolved inorganic nutrient fluxes. Net dinitrogen fluxes for both habitat types were predominately positive, indicating higher rates of denitrification than nitrogen fixation at these sites. Sediments were primarily a nitrate sink, but functioned as both a

  16. Childhood sarcoidosis: Louisiana experience.

    PubMed

    Gedalia, Abraham; Khan, Tahir A; Shetty, Avinash K; Dimitriades, Victoria R; Espinoza, Luis R

    2016-07-01

    A retrospective chart review was conducted to detect patients with sarcoidosis seen by pediatric rheumatology service from the period of 1992 to 2013 at Children's hospital of New Orleans. Twenty-seven patients were identified. The average duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 5 (range 1-120) months. Five patients had onset before the age of 5 years and were diagnosed with early-onset sarcoidosis. The most common manifestations at presentation were constitutional symptoms (62 %) followed by ocular (38 %). During the course of illness, 19/27 (70 %) had multiorgan involvement. Common manifestations included uveitis/iritis (77 %), fever (50 %), hilar adenopathy (42 %), arthritis (31 %), peripheral lympadenopathy (31 %), hepatosplenomegaly (31 %), parenchymal lung disease (27 %), and skin rash (19 %). Unusual manifestations included granulomatous bone marrow disease (3 cases), hypertension (2), abdominal aortic aneurysm (large vessel vasculitis; 1), granulomatous hepatitis (1), nephrocalcinosis (1), membranous nephropathy (1), refractory granulomatous interstitial nephritis with recurrence in transplanted kidney (1), CNS involvement (2), parotid gland enlargement (1), and sensorineural hearing loss (1). Biopsy specimen was obtained in 21/27 (77 %) patients, and demonstration of noncaseating granuloma associated with negative stains for mycobacteria and fungi was seen in 18 patients. Elevated angiotensin-converting enzyme level was seen in 74 % of patients. Treatment with oral prednisone was initiated in symptomatic patients with significant clinical improvement. Low-dose methotrexate (MTX) 10-15 mg/m(2)/week orally, as steroid-sparing agent, was administered in 14 patients. Other immunomodulators included cyclophosphamide (2 patients), etanercept (2), infliximab (2), mycophenolate mofetil (1), and tacrolimus (1). Childhood sarcoidosis is prevalent in Louisiana. Most of the affected children present with a multisystem disease associated with

  17. Abstracts From The Annual Louisiana American College Of Physicians Associates Meeting.

    PubMed

    Engel, Lee S; Davis, William

    2015-01-01

    Each year medical students in Louisiana and residents from the eight Internal Medicine training programs in Louisiana are invited to submit abstracts for the Annual Louisiana American College of Physicians (ACP) Associates Meeting. The content of these abstracts includes clinical case vignettes or research activities. The abstracts have all identifying features removed (i.e., names, institutional affiliations, etc.) before being sent to physician judges. Each judge scores each abstract independently and then the scores from all judges are averaged and ranked. This year we are excited to be able to publish the 26 most highly ranked abstracts presented at this year's competition. These abstracts (15 oral; 12 poster) were presented at the Associates Meeting held at Tulane University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans on January 27, 2015. We would like to thank the Journal of the Louisiana State Medical Society and appreciate its efforts to publicize the hard work of these trainees. PMID:27159462

  18. Bathymetric survey of the nearshore from Belle Pass to Caminada Pass, Louisiana: methods and data report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, Nancy T.; Flocks, James G.; Hansen, Mark; Kulp, Mark; Reynolds, B.J.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the University of New Orleans (UNO) and the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (LDNR), conducted a high-resolution, single-beam bathymetric survey along the Louisiana southern coastal zone from Belle Pass to Caminada Pass. The survey consisted of 483 line kilometers of data acquired in July and August of 2005. This report outlines the methodology and provides the data from the survey. Analysis of the data and comparison to a similar bathymetric survey completed in 1989 show significant loss of seafloor and shoreline retreat, which is consistent with previously published estimates of shoreline change in the study area.

  19. Earth Scientists and Public Policy: Have We Failed New Orleans?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Timothy H.; Dokka, Roy K.

    2008-03-01

    Earth scientists rarely influence public policy or urban planning. In defiance of geologic reality, cities are established on or expanded into floodplains, wetlands, earthquake faults, and active volcanoes. One exception to our lack of influence is that shortly after a major natural disaster, there is a brief window of heightened public awareness that may lead to sensible regulation or relocation of infrastructure. After the 1933 Long Beach earthquake, for example, California building codes were improved to reduce earthquake hazard. After Mississippi River flooding in 1993, several U.S. cities designated parts of their low-lying floodplain as green space. How have we done with New Orleans and southern Louisiana, devastated by hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005? Unfortunately, not very well. In the aftermath of those storms, an opportunity existed to educate engineers, policy makers, and the public about long-term hazards associated with land subsidence and sea level rise. This message was not conveyed, and expensive rebuilding has proceeded under the false assumption of relative coastal stability and slow sea level rise.

  20. Design and operation of a pilot-plant for the processing of sugarcane juice into sugar at the Southern Regional Research Center in Louisiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A pilot-plant facility to process sugarcane juice into sugar and molasses has been developed under a limited budget at the Southern Regional Research Center of the United States Department of Agriculture in New Orleans, Louisiana. The batch plant (27.9 m2) includes juice heating, clarification, eva...

  1. Louisiana High School Weathers the Storm to Become a Leader in Student Achievement and High Graduation Rates. "High Schools That Work" Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Warren Easton Charter High School in New Orleans, Louisiana, has weathered changes of many types, including Hurricane Katrina in 2005. After having to close for the 2005-2006 school year, the school reopened as a charter school with a board and stepped up its efforts to raise student achievement. Now the school is receiving attention for the…

  2. Ho 07-613 – A potential new sugarcane variety for Louisiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The clone Ho 07-613 will be up for release to Louisiana sugarcane farmers in May of 2014. This potential new variety is a joint release of the United States Department of Agriculture, the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, and the American Sugar Cane League of the U.S.A., Inc. Ho 07-613...

  3. HoCP 04-838 – A new sugarcane variety for Louisiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    HoCP 04-838 was released to the Louisiana sugar industry on May 3, 2011 by the Agricultural Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture in cooperation with the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, and the American Sugar Cane League of the U.S.A., Inc. HoCP 04-838 re...

  4. HoCP 00-950: an early maturing variety for the Louisiana sugar industry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture, the Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station of the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, and the American Sugar Cane League of the U.S.A., Inc., working cooperatively to develop improved sugarcane varieties...

  5. Man in Louisiana's coastal zone - From reclamation to subsidence

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.W. )

    1990-09-01

    For more than 300 years the US marsh lands were thought to be of no economic value. They were considered useless wastelands. Today, they are recognized as valuable and highly productive environments. As a renewable resource that operates with minimum capital expenditures, the wetlands are epitomized in Louisiana. Even so, south Louisiana's first settlers were unaware of the wetlands value. These coastal lowlands were considered a nuisance. They bred yellow fever-carrying mosquitos and contributed directly and indirectly to flooding. Consequently, to overcome the hardships of being sea-level citizens, for more than 250 years the inhabitants have systematically reclaimed the marshes and swamps. As a result of the intense utilization of levees and pumps, normally wet property began to dry out, losing some of its natural buoyancy, increasing regional subsidence. Man-induced negative land surfaces are producing an urbanized population that must face the realities of subsidence caused by unregulated reclamation. New Orleans has, in fact, become North America's premier sinking city. The population has been forced to learn how to live with the problem. Nevertheless, these people are at risk, particularly if the current predicted sea-level rise of 1.2 mm/yr is correct. In the main, Louisiana's coastal issues will become those of the nation and represent the precursor of things to come. Louisiana's reaction and solutions to these issues will establish a precedent for the remainder of the country to follow.

  6. New Orleans Cuisine: "Hamlet" to Bubble Gum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Betty J.

    Paperback publications are an ideal way to supplement the adopted textbook series of the New Orleans Public Schools or to provide common reading materials for special courses or for special students in special schools. Though established guidelines are helpful in making decisions about what books should be read by students, there is no system-wide…

  7. Rebuilding for the Community in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingler, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Five years after hurricane Katrina, the City of New Orleans is now implementing a far-reaching plan for the systemic renovation and rebuilding of community programmes and infrastructure. A total of USD 3 billion has now been allocated to public building projects. With the student population down to nearly half of pre-storm totals, a recently…

  8. Renovating Charity Hospital or building a new hospital in post-Katrina New Orleans: economic rationale versus political will.

    PubMed

    Leleu, Hervé; Moises, James; Valdmanis, Vivian Grace

    2013-02-01

    Since September 2005, Charity Hospital of New Orleans has been closed due to Hurricane Katrina. A debate following the closing arose about whether this public hospital should be renovated or a new medical center affiliated with the Louisiana State University should be built. Using academic literature, government statistics, and popular press reports, we describe the economic implications that support the view that Charity Hospital should have been renovated. We also address why this policy was not pursued by demonstrating the influence politics and individual stakeholders (specifically, Louisiana State University) had on the eventual policy pursued. In this commentary we also note the political identity movement away from public-sector provision of services to private-sector interests. PMID:23377720

  9. Public health assessment for Agriculture Street Landfill, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, Region 6: CERCLIS number LAD981056997. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-06-02

    Agriculture Street Landfill (ASL) is a former landfill that has been developed in part for residential use. Site contaminants have been detected in soil, dust, air, and garden produce. Residents may be exposed to site contaminants through ingestion, skin contact, or breathing. The primary contaminants are metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), volatile organic compounds, and pesticides. The undeveloped area of the site has been classified as a public health hazard. The highest levels of contaminants have been detected in the undeveloped area. The majority of the residential area and the Press Park Community Center have been classified as no apparent public health hazard since the levels of contaminants in the soil are generally below levels of health concern. Based on the data reviewed, it is recommended that measures be taken to limit residents' exposure to areas where soil is contaminated at levels of health concern.

  10. Community-Based Wetland Restoration Workshop in the Lower Ninth Ward, New Orleans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. F.; Craig, L.; Ross, J. A.; Zepeda, L.; Carpenter, Q.

    2010-12-01

    Since 2007 a workshop class of University of Wisconsin-Madison students has participated in a community-based project in New Orleans to investigate the feasibility of restoring the Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle (BBWT), which is adjacent to the Lower 9th Ward in New Orleans. This 440-acre region is currently open water but was a cypress forest until the 1970s. Restoration would provide protection from storm surges, restored ecological services, and recreational use. The workshop introduced students to the multidisciplinary skills needed to work effectively with the complex and interconnected issues within a project involving many stakeholders. The stakeholders included the Center for Sustainable Engagement and Development (CSED), Lower 9th Ward residents, non-profits (e.g., Sierra Club, Environmental Defense, Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, National Wildlife Federation), government agencies (e.g., New Orleans Sewerage and Water Board, Army Corps of Engineers), neighborhood groups (e.g., Holy Cross Neighborhood Association, The Village), and universities (Tulane, U. of New Orleans, LSU, U. Colorado-Denver, Southeastern Louisiana). The course ran initially as a Water Resources Management practicum in the first two summers and then as a broader multidisciplinary project with student expertise in hydrology, social science, law, planning, policy analysis, community development, GIS, public health, environmental education and ecological restoration. The project divided into three main components: wetland science, social science, and land tenure and planning. Principal activities in wetland science were to monitor water levels and water quality, inventory flora and fauna, and plant grasses on small “floating islands.” The principal social science activity was to conduct a neighborhood survey about knowledge of the wetland and interest in its restoration. The land tenure and planning activity was to investigate ownership and transfer of property within the

  11. Generalized potentiometric surface of aquifers of Pleistocene age, Southern Louisiana, 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Angel, Jr.; Whiteman, Charles D., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A map of potentiometric surface defines generalized water levels for 1980 in the Pleistocene aquifers of southern Louisiana. The map was prepared as part of the Western Gulf Coast Regional Aquifer-System Analysis study. The Pleistocene deposits in southern Louisiana consist of alternating beds of sand, gravel, silt, and clay deposited under fluvial, deltaic, and near-short marine conditions. The aquifers are mainly under artesian conditions and the regional flow direction is primarily southward. Areally definable cones of depression result from heavy pumpage in the Baton Rouge, Lake Charles, and New Orleans metropolitan areas and in the rice irrigation area of southwestern Louisiana. Where water levels differ vertically within the aquifer, the lowest water levels in the vertical section were used because these levels represented the thickest and most heavily pumped unit in the aquifer. The map represents regional water levels in the Pleistocene aquifers, and is not intended to show localized variations near pumping centers. (USGS)

  12. Debating life after disaster: charity hospital babies and bioscientific futures in post-Katrina New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Anne M

    2011-06-01

    In Louisiana's unique, populist-derived charity health system, the self-designation Charity Hospital Baby expresses situational identity anchored in the life cycle and the inversion of racist and authoritative connotations. This article draws on theoretical perspectives of stratified reproduction and the politics of time to examine the controversy in which Babies advocate reopening the Katrina-damaged New Orleans Charity Hospital, and administrators and planners support a new state-of-the-art biosciences district, GNOBED. Babies evoke the present, ethical urgency (kairos) of responding to sickness and disability; GNOBED implies prolonging or saving future lives through biotechnologies under development in accelerated time (chronos). As preservationists and residents threatened with displacement join "re-open Charity" proponents, planners symbolically engage in prolepsis, rhetorically precluding opposing arguments with flash forward of supposedly "done deals." At stake is nothing less than social death for a segment of this ethnically diverse city. [public PMID:21834361

  13. Metal distributions in New Orleans following hurricanes Katrina and Rita: A continuation study.

    PubMed

    Cobb, George P; Abel, Michael T; Rainwater, Thomas R; Austin, Galen P; Cox, Stephen B; Kendall, Ronald J; Marsland, Eric J; Anderson, Todd A; Leftwich, Blair D; Zak, John C; Presley, Steven M

    2006-08-01

    In late October 2005, twenty-seven metals were determined in soils and sediment layers deposited by floodwaters (flood sediments) within New Orleans, Louisiana. Samples originated from 43 sites along four transects, at an industrial canal, and near the Superdome. The sampling design encompassed flooded and nonflooded areas as well as differing economic strata within the city. Results from this effort confirmed findings of our previous study designed to quantify contaminant profiles in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. The expanded sampling from this most recent investigation revealed that arsenic (As) and lead (Pb) concentrations exceeded United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) soil screening criteria indiscriminately throughout the city. However, As and Pb concentrations were lower along St. Charles Avenue, an area largely unaffected by hurricane related flooding. Toxicant concentrations did not exceed soil screening criteria values for lead within any flood sediments or for 32 of 37 soil samples, but arsenic concentrations in 40 of 43 samples exceeded screening criteria. PMID:16913108

  14. 75 FR 11937 - Ternium USA, Inc.; Shreveport, LA; Notice of Termination of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Ternium USA, Inc.; Shreveport, LA; Notice of Termination of..., USA, Inc., Shreveport, Louisiana. The petitioner has requested that the petition be...

  15. The geography of mortality from Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutter, J. C.; Mara, V.; Jayaprakash, S.; None

    2011-12-01

    Hurricane Katrina was one of the highest mortality disasters in US history. Typical hurricanes of the same strength take very few lives. Katrina's mortality is exceeded only by the so-called Galveston Flood (a hurricane) of 1900 that occurred at a time when forecasting was poor and evacuation was possible only by train or horse. The levee failures in New Orleans were a major contributing factor unique to Katrina. An examination of the characteristics of mortality may give insight into the cause of the great scope of the tragedy and the special vulnerability of those who died. We examine the spatial aspects of mortality. The locations of deceased victims were matched with victim information including age, race and gender for approximately 800 victims (data from Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals). From this we can analyze for spatial clustering of mortality. We know that Katrina took a particularly heavy toll on the elderly so we can analyze, for instance, whether the elderly were more likely to die in some locations than in others. Similarly, we analyze for gender and race against age (dividing age into five groups this gives 20 categories) as a factory in the geographic distribution of mortality as a way to recover measures of vulnerability. We can also correlate the spatial characteristics of mortality with underlying causes that might contribute to vulnerability. Data is available at a census block level on household income, poverty rates, education, home ownership, car ownership and a variety of other factors that can be correlated with the spatial mortality data. This allows for a multi-parameter estimation of factors that govern mortality in this unusually high mortality event.

  16. Soil arsenic surveys of New Orleans: localized hazards in children's play areas.

    PubMed

    Mielke, Howard W; Gonzales, Chris R; Cahn, Elise; Brumfield, Jessica; Powell, Eric T; Mielke, Paul W

    2010-10-01

    Arsenic (As) ranks first on the 2005 and 2007 hazardous substances priority lists compiled for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This study describes two New Orleans soil As surveys: (1) a survey of composite soil samples from 286 census tracts and (2) a field survey of soil As at 38 play areas associated with the presence of chromated-copper-arsenate (CCA)-treated wood on residential and public properties. The survey of metropolitan New Orleans soils revealed a median As content of 1.5 mg/kg (range <0.2-16.4) and no distinctive differences between the soils of the city core and outlying areas. Play area accessible soils associated with CCA-treated wood (N = 32) had a median As of 57 mg/kg and 78% of the samples were ≥12 mg/kg, the Louisiana soil As standard. The field survey of play areas for CCA-treated wood (N = 132 samples at 38 sites) was conducted with a portable energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer. Seventy-five of 132 wood samples (56.8%) were deemed CCA-treated wood. Of the 38 play areas surveyed, 14 (36.8%) had CCA-treated wood. A significant association (Fisher's exact p-value = 0.348 × 10(-6)) was found between CCA-treated wood and soil As (N = 75). At one elementary school CCA-treated woodchips (As range 813-1,654 mg As/kg) covered the playgrounds. The situation in New Orleans probably exists in play areas across the nation. These findings support a precautionary program for testing soils and wood for hazardous substances at all play areas intended for children. PMID:20143132

  17. Post-Hurricane Katrina passive sampling of ambient volatile organic compounds in the greater New Orleans area.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kuenja C; Stock, Thomas H; Smith, Luther A; Afshar, Masoud; Liao, Xiaojuan L; Stallings, Casson

    2009-11-01

    On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina made landfall near New Orleans, Louisiana, a major metroplex with petroleum industries. In response to the potential impact of the storm on air quality and to assess the exposures to toxic air pollutants of public health concern, the United States Environmental Protection Agency conducted passive monitoring of air toxics for three months, starting in late October 2005 through early February 2006, at up to 18 sites in the New Orleans area affected by Hurricane Katrina. The overall results of the passive ambient monitoring are summarized with the concentrations for the twenty-nine observed volatile organic chemicals, which include benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes, and the measured concentrations are compared with available health-based screening levels. The results of passive monitoring are also compared with those of the collocated canister sampling at one of the sites. The overall results showed that the outdoor levels of atmospheric volatile organic chemcals in the post-Katrina New Orleans area were very low and far below the available screening levels. The results also confirm the effectiveness of passive monitoring in a large geographical area where conventional methods are not feasible, electrical power is not available, and the need for sampling is urgent, as in the aftermath of natural disasters and other catastrophes. PMID:19733844

  18. A survey of the occurrence of Bacillus anthracis in North American soils over two long-range transects and within post-Katrina New Orleans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Petrosky, Terry; Morman, Suzette A.; Luna, Vicki A.

    2009-01-01

    Soil samples were collected along a north-south transect extending from Manitoba, Canada, to the US-Mexico border near El Paso, Texas in 2004 (104 samples), a group of sites within New Orleans, Louisiana following Hurricane Katrina in 2005 (19 samples), and a Gulf Coast transect extending from Sulphur, Louisiana, to DeFuniak Springs, Florida, in 2007 (38 samples). Samples were collected from the top 40 cm of soil and were screened for the presence of total Bacillus species and Bacillus anthracis (anthrax), specifically using multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Using an assay with a sensitivity of ~170 equivalent colony-forming units (CFU) g-1 field moist soil, the prevalence rate of Bacillus sp./B. anthracis in the north-south transect and the 2005 New Orleans post-Katrina sample set were 20/5% and 26/26%, respectively. Prevalence in the 2007 Gulf Coast sample set using an assay with a sensitivity of ~4 CFU g-1 of soil was 63/0%. Individual transect-set data indicate a positive relation between occurrences of species and soil moisture or soil constituents (i.e., Zn and Cu content). The 2005 New Orleans post-Katrina data indicated that B. anthracis is readily detectable in Gulf Coast soils following flood events. The data also indicated that occurrence, as it relates to soil chemistry, may be confounded by flood-induced dissemination of germinated cells and the mixing of soil constituents for short temporal periods following an event.

  19. A survey of the occurrence of Bacillus anthracis in North American soils over two long-range transects and within post-Katrina New Orleans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Petrosky, T.; Morman, S.A.; Luna, V.A.

    2009-01-01

    Soil samples were collected along a north-south transect extending from Manitoba, Canada, to the US-Mexico border near El Paso, Texas in 2004 (104 samples), a group of sites within New Orleans, Louisiana following Hurricane Katrina in 2005 (19 samples), and a Gulf Coast transect extending from Sulphur, Louisiana, to DeFuniak Springs, Florida, in 2007 (38 samples). Samples were collected from the top 40 cm of soil and were screened for the presence of total Bacillus species and Bacillus anthracis (anthrax), specifically using multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Using an assay with a sensitivity of ???170 equivalent colony-forming units (CFU) g-1 field moist soil, the prevalence rate of Bacillus sp./B. anthracis in the north-south transect and the 2005 New Orleans post-Katrina sample set were 20/5% and 26/26%, respectively. Prevalence in the 2007 Gulf Coast sample set using an assay with a sensitivity of ???4 CFU g-1 of soil was 63/0%. Individual transect-set data indicate a positive relation between occurrences of species and soil moisture or soil constituents (i.e., Zn and Cu content). The 2005 New Orleans post-Katrina data indicated that B. anthracis is readily detectable in Gulf Coast soils following flood events. The data also indicated that occurrence, as it relates to soil chemistry, may be confounded by flood-induced dissemination of germinated cells and the mixing of soil constituents for short temporal periods following an event.

  20. Louisiana Believes: Annual Report 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Louisiana Believes" is the state's comprehensive plan to ensure every student is on track to a professional career or a college degree. This annual report details Louisiana's progress toward that objective during the 2012-2013 school year, along with strategy for the coming school year. "Louisiana Believes" has three…

  1. New Orleans Effective Schools Project. An Interim Report to the Orleans Parish School Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David, Jane L.

    The primary goal of the Southern Coalition for Educational Equity's New Orleans Effective Schools Project is to improve academic achievement at one middle school, Martin Behrman, in ways that can be replicated by schools facing similar problems. The Project is based on research findings about school improvement from the school effectiveness…

  2. New Orleans Colleges Slog toward Recovery from Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Twenty-eight months after Hurricane Katrina forced the closures of more than a half-dozen New Orleans colleges and universities, many of them are still struggling to regain their enrollments and restore buildings damaged by floodwater and mold. Over all, college enrollment in New Orleans increased slightly in the fall of 2007, reaching 74 percent…

  3. Depleted New Orleans Teachers' Union Vows to Rebuild

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honawar, Vaishali

    2006-01-01

    The three-story building that was once the United Teachers of New Orleans' office is dark and deserted, the first floor damaged by Hurricane Katrina's floodwaters. The union membership, which numbered 4,700 before the storm, is now down to 300. Of the 25 schools that are now open in New Orleans, only five are regular public schools. The rest are…

  4. Steps to Developing the New Orleans Strategic Energy Plan (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation was given by NREL's Elizabeth Doris (Brown) to the New Orleans City Council in January 2008. NREL was funded by DOE to provide technical assistance to New Orleans after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The presentation provides an overview of strategic energy planning, case studies, and suggested next steps for implementing energy efficiency and renewable energy into the city's rebuilding efforts.

  5. The Future of Public Education in New Orleans. After Katrina: Rebuilding Opportunity and Equity into the "New" New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Paul; Hannaway, Jane

    2006-01-01

    Long before the onslaught of Hurricane Katrina or the chaos of evacuation, New Orleans' social infrastructure was failing. News coverage of the overcrowded Superdome and the city's flooded streets exposed the poverty and vulnerability of many residents, especially African Americans. As New Orleans begins to rebuild, can the city avoid the mistakes…

  6. Analyses of water, core material, and elutriate samples collected near Buras, Louisiana (New Orleans to Venice, Louisiana, Hurricane Protection Project)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leone, Harold A.

    1977-01-01

    Eight core-material-sampling sites were chosen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as possible borrow areas for fill material to be used in levee contruction near Buras, La. Eleven receiving-water sites also were selected to represent the water that will contact the porposed levees. Analyses of selected nutrients, metals, pesticides, and other organic constitutents were performed upon these bed-material and native-water samples as well as upon elutriate samples of specific core material-receiving water systems. The results of these analyses are presented without interpretation. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. LOUISIANA INVASIVE SPECIES PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identify the species, locations, and effects of invasive species within the state and the effects of these invasive species in Louisiana. Also identify how these species are spread, and the authorities that exist to manage and control them. With this information, create a m...

  8. Louisiana Adolescent Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimbrell, Joe, Ed.; Daly, Maureen, Ed.; Sterne, Sylvia, Ed.; Howard, Sharon, Ed.; Evans, Trina, Ed.; Lowenthal, Nancy, Ed.; Galatas, Kate, Ed.; Sumrall, Liz, Ed.

    This report provides a comprehensive review of the status of Louisiana's youth and is designed to be used in planning efforts and in developing priorities for improving the health and welfare of the youth of the state. Chapter 1 of the report examines the concept of expanding the definition of health to include social and emotional development,…

  9. Louisiana and SREB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with Louisiana and 15 other member states to improve education at every level--from pre-K to postdoctoral study--through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead" Goals for Education, which call for the region to lead the…

  10. Geographic Education in Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Anthony J.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author analyzes and summarizes geographic education in Louisiana from a historical perspective with a specific emphasis on the degree to which geography was implemented into the state's standards. To accomplish that, he draws from the following three sources of information: active and retired social studies teachers from a…

  11. Suicide mortality rates in Louisiana, 1999-2010.

    PubMed

    Straif-Bourgeois, Susanne; Ratard, Raoult

    2012-01-01

    This report is a descriptive study on suicide deaths in Louisiana occurring in the years 1999 to 2010. Mortality data was collected from death certificates from this 12-year period to describe suicide mortality by year, race, sex, age group, and methods of suicide. Data were also compared to national data. Rates and methods used to commit suicide vary greatly according to sex, race, and age. The highest rates were observed in white males, followed by black males, white females, and black females. Older white males had the highest suicide rates. The influence of age was modulated by the sex and race categories. Firearm was the most common method used in all four categories. Other less common methods were hanging/strangulation/suffocation (HSS) and drugs/alcohol. Although no parish-level data were systematically analyzed, a comparison of suicide rates post-Katrina versus pre-Katrina was done for Orleans Parish, the rest of the Greater New Orleans area, and a comparison group. It appears that rates observed among whites, particularly males, were higher after Katrina. Data based on mortality do not give a comprehensive picture of the burden of suicide, and their interpretation should be done with caution. PMID:23362593

  12. Photographic copy of October 4, 1931 New Orleans Morning Tribune ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of October 4, 1931 New Orleans Morning Tribune newspaper article. Located in a photo album at the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Archives Center, Work and Industry Division, Washington, D.C. OCTOBER 4, 1931 NEW ORLEANS MORNING TRIBUNE NEWSPAPER ARTICLE ANNOUNCING THAT THE WORK ON THE NEW BRIDGE IS EXPECTED TO START IN 90 DAYS. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  13. Photographic images captured while sampling for bald eagles near the Davis Pond freshwater diversion structure in Barataria Bay, Louisiana (2009-10)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Jeske, Clinton W.; Allain, Larry K.

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of freshwater diversions in large-scale coastal restoration schemes presents several scientific and management considerations. Large-scale environmental restructuring necessitates aquatic biomonitoring, and during such field studies, photographs that document animals and habitat may be captured. Among the biomonitoring studies performed in conjunction with the Davis Pond freshwater diversion structure south of New Orleans, Louisiana, only postdiversion study images are readily available, and these are presented here.

  14. Monitoring Inland Storm Surge and Flooding From Hurricane Gustav in Louisiana, September 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, Benton D.; Goree, Burl B.; Tollett, Roland W.; Mason, Jr., Robert R.

    2008-01-01

    On August 29-31, 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) deployed a mobile monitoring network consisting of 124 pressure transducers (sensors) (figs. 1, 2) at 80 sites over an area of about 4,200 square miles to record the timing, extent, and magnitude of inland hurricane storm surge and coastal flooding generated by Hurricane Gustav, which made landfall in southeastern Louisiana on September 1. One-hundred twenty-one sensors from 61 sites (fig. 3) were recovered. Thirty-seven sites from which sensors were recovered were in the New Orleans area, and the remaining 24 sites were distributed throughout southeastern Louisiana. Sites were categorized as surge (21), riverine flooding (18), anthropogenic (affected by the operation of gates or pumps) (17), or mixed/uncertain on the basis of field observations and the appearance of the water-level data (5).

  15. Survival and recovery: maintaining the educational mission of the Louisiana state university school of medicine in the aftermath of hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Dicarlo, Richard P; Hilton, Charles W; Chauvin, Sheila W; Delcarpio, Joseph B; Lopez, Fred A; McClugage, Samuel G; Letourneau, Janis G; Smith, Ronnie; Hollier, Larry H

    2007-08-01

    Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans and the coastlines of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama on August 29, 2005. The flooding in New Orleans left hundreds of thousands of people homeless and threatened to close businesses and institutions, including Louisiana State University (LSU) School of Medicine and its two principle training sites in New Orleans, Charity Hospital and University Hospital. In the weeks immediately after the storm, LSU School of Medicine resumed undergraduate and graduate medical education in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and elsewhere. The authors discuss the specific challenges they faced in relocating administrative operations, maintaining the mission of medical education, and dealing with the displacement of faculty, staff, residents, students, and patients, and the processes used to overcome these challenges. They focus on the school's educational missions, but challenges faced by the offices of student affairs, faculty affairs, and admissions are also discussed. LSU School of Medicine's experience provides lessons about organizational preparedness for a mass disaster that may be of interest to other medical schools. PMID:17762247

  16. Business Return in New Orleans: Decision Making Amid Post-Katrina Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Nina S. N.; Pace, Kelley; Campanella, Richard; LeSage, James; Arenas, Helbert

    2009-01-01

    Background Empirical observations on how businesses respond after a major catastrophe are rare, especially for a catastrophe as great as Hurricane Katrina, which hit New Orleans, Louisiana on August 29, 2005. We analyzed repeated telephone surveys of New Orleans businesses conducted in December 2005, June 2006, and October 2007 to understand factors that influenced decisions to re-open amid post-disaster uncertainty. Methodology/Principal Findings Businesses in the group of professional, scientific, and technical services reopened the fastest in the near term, but differences in the rate of reopening for businesses stratified by type became indistinguishable in the longer term (around two years later). A reopening rate of 65% was found for all businesses by October 2007. Discriminant analysis showed significant differences in responses reflecting their attitudes about important factors between businesses that reopened and those that did not. Businesses that remained closed at the time of our third survey (two years after Katrina) ranked levee protection as the top concern immediately after Katrina, but damage to their premises and financing became major concerns in subsequent months reflected in the later surveys. For businesses that had opened (at the time of our third survey), infrastructure protection including levee, utility, and communications were the main concerns mentioned in surveys up to the third survey, when the issue of crime became their top concern. Conclusions/Significance These findings underscore the need to have public policy and emergency plans in place prior to the actual disaster, such as infrastructure protection, so that the policy can be applied in a timely manner before business decisions to return or close are made. Our survey results, which include responses from both open and closed businesses, overcome the “survivorship bias” problem and provide empirical observations that should be useful to improve micro-level spatial economic

  17. Convention Proceedings Digest (New Orleans, Louisiana, December 4-9, 1970).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Association, Inc., Washington, DC.

    To provide current information on vocational education, proceedings of the 1970 American Vocational Association Convention were prepared by recorders appointed for each area. Sections are: (1) General Sessions, (2) Awards and Citations, (3) House of Delegates, (4) Program of Work and Policy Resolutions, (5) Departments of Adult, Postsecondary,…

  18. AERA Vocational Education Special Interest Group Proceedings (New Orleans, Louisiana, April 24-28, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truell, Allen D., Ed.

    This document contains six papers on vocational education. "Blurring the Boundaries: The Emergence of the New Vocational Student" (Mario Delci) documents the benefits of combining an academic curriculum with vocational coursework. "Observable Teaching Effectiveness and Personality Types of Selected Beginning Career and Technical Education…

  19. Address by Vernon E. Jordan, Jr. at National Alliance of Black School Educators, New Orleans, Louisiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Vernon E., Jr.

    The economic gains and educational advances that social activism of the 1960's brought for blacks and minorities are now being cut back. Abandonment of beneficial programs is being rationalized in a new conservative recession economy. The National Urban League, in seeking to bring about an educational system "from the cradle throughout retirement…

  20. Design review for Strategic Petroleum Reserve office, Big Hill, Texas, New Orleans, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    The Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage site is designed to store 140 million barrels of oil in underground storage caverns. The major facilities of the Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage site are: the main operations area; the storage cavern area; the Raw Water Intake Structure at the Intracoastal Waterway; the raw water pipeline between the Big Hill operations area and Raw Water Intake Structure; the brine disposal pipeline from the Big Hill complex to 3-1/2 miles into the Gulf of Mexico; and, the crude oil pipeline between the Sunoco Terminals in Nederland and Big Hill Complex. These facilities are designed to solution mine the storage caverns from naturally occurring salt domes below the Big Hill complex site, as well as, to transport the crude oil in and out of the caverns to/from the Sunoco Terminals. Bechtel Petroleum, Inc. through Bechtel Advanced Technologies has been engaged to conduct a review of the design of the Big Hill facilities. The purpose of this design review is to audit design and construction documents to: ensure that the design complies with established design criteria; ensure the constructability of the design; and ensure that the interfaces between the construction packages are adequate. To this end, Bechtel was provided with construction contract packages, most design calculations and various pre-design documents. A summary of the scope of each contract package can be found on Table I.

  1. American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) Proceedings (New Orleans, Louisiana, December 10-13, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Education Research Association.

    This document contains 14 research paper presentations and 5 "mini-tips" from the 1998 American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) annual meeting. The first section includes three papers on international and distance education: "Determining Success of Vocational Students Enrolled in Distance Education Courses" (Michael K. Swan,…

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE FROM MARIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, AND NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a growing concern that certain constituents of common household products, that are discarded in residential garbage, may be potentially harmful to human health and the environment by adversely affecting the quality of ground and surface water. A survey of hazardous waste...

  3. ADCIS Conference Proceedings (27th, New Orleans, Louisiana, February 3-6, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for the Development of Computer-based Instructional Systems.

    The 52 papers in this volume, which represent recent research and applications in the field of computer-based instruction, are grouped under 10 general topic areas: (1) computer-based training; (2) elementary, secondary, junior college, and math education; (3) health; (4) home economics; (5) implementation; (6) mini-microcomputers; (7) PILOT; (8)…

  4. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Green Coast Enterprises, New Orleans, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-04-01

    This builder worked with Building Science Corporation to build moisture- and flood-resistant HERS- 65 affordable homes on pier foundations, with borate pressure-treated lumber, wind-resistant OSB sheathing, hurricane strapping, roofing membrane, and closed-cell spray foam in attic, walls, and under floor.

  5. Examining the Aftereffects of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans: A Qualitative Study of Faculty and Staff Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, Joy J.; Hooper, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have reported how Hurricane Katrina has affected teachers who work with Kindergarten to Grade 12 (K-12), yet little is known about how the natural disaster has affected other important K-12 faculty and staff (e.g., coaches, librarians, school counselors, and cafeteria workers). Missing from the literature is the impact that this natural disaster has had on these formal (school counselors) and informal (coaches, librarians) helpers of K-12 students. Using a focus group methodology, the authors examined the aftereffects of Hurricane Katrina on 12 school employees in New Orleans, Louisiana, 18 months after the hurricane. Informed by qualitative content analysis, three emergent themes were identified: emotion-focused aftereffects, positive coping, and worry and fear. The implications for future research and promoting hope in mental health counseling are discussed. PMID:22629217

  6. The development of manufactured flood risk: New Orleans' mid-century growth machine and the hurricane of 1947.

    PubMed

    Youngman, Nicole

    2015-10-01

    Much of the flood risk faced by coastal and riparian populations worldwide is manufactured rather than strictly natural--the outcome of human development projects involving municipal growth machines. This paper details the impacts of the hurricane of September 1947 on New Orleans, Louisiana, United States, and its relationship with the urban development and expansion efforts undertaken during and after the Second World War of 1939-45. New Orleans' newest drainage and shipping canals, which were a major part of its mid-twentieth century development initiative, funnelled the storm surge into the city, a pattern that would repeat itself in subsequent years. Unlike more infamous hurricanes, such as Betsy and Katrina of 1965 and 2005, respectively, the 1947 event is not well-known among disaster researchers. Yet, it provides a fundamental example of how local elites have continuously exacerbated flood risk throughout the city and surrounding area, leaving it simultaneously dependent on and endangered by its embedded system of drainage and shipping canals. PMID:26395107

  7. Louisiana's Children of the Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junkin, William J., Jr.; Faser, Patricia F.

    Louisiana, like other agricultural states, has long known the cyclic demand for large numbers of seasonal farm workers. These migrant workers are being replaced by machines, except during harvesting of crops which resist mechanization (e.g., strawberries). Families migrate to Louisiana to pick berries. Due to this influx of educatables, the local…

  8. Webinars at Louisiana Virtual School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Allen

    2009-01-01

    Delivering meaningful professional development, engaging students in exciting yet practical curricula, and effectively communicating with faculty and staff members are challenges in any school setting. At the Louisiana Virtual School, a state-funded virtual school run by the Louisiana Department of Education, the 6,000 students, 115 instructors,…

  9. KISATCHIE HILLS WILDERNESS, LOUISIANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haley, Boyd R.; Ryan, George S.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey of the Kisatchie Hills Wilderness, Louisiana indicated little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. There is insufficient data on oil and gas producing formations that underlie the area to evaluate the oil and gas resource potential. All the oil fields of Wilcox age are less than 40 acres in extent; therefore, closer spaced deeper wells might find additional fields in sediments of Wilcox age. Oil and natural gas have been produced from older reservoirs (Cretaceous age) to the northwest of the wilderness, and deeper wells might find oil and natural gas in sediments of Cretaceous and older age in the vicinity of the wilderness.

  10. Comparison of methods for the removal of organic carbon and extraction of chromium, iron and manganese from an estuarine sediment standard and sediment from the Calcasieu River estuary, Louisiana, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, N.S.; Hatcher, S.A.; Demas, C.

    1992-01-01

    U.S. National Bureau of Standards (NBS) estuarine sediment 1646 from the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, and surface sediment collected at two sites in the Calcasieu River estuary, Louisiana, were used to evaluate the dilute hydrochloric acid extraction of Cr, Fe and Mn from air-dried and freeze-dried samples that had been treated by one of three methods to remove organic carbon. The three methods for the oxidation and removal of organic carbon were: (1) 30% hydrogen peroxide; (2) 30% hydrogen peroxide plus 0.25 mM pyrophosphate; and (3) plasma oxidation (low-temperature ashing). There was no statistically significant difference at the 95% confidence level between air- and freeze-dried samples with respect to the percent of organic carbon removed by the three methods. Generally, there was no statistically significant difference at the 95% confidence level between air- and freeze-dried samples with respect to the concentration of Cr, Fe and Mn that was extracted, regardless of the extraction technique that was used. Hydrogen peroxide plus pyrophosphate removed the most organic carbon from sediment collected at the site in the Calcasieu River that was upstream from industrial outfalls. Plasma oxidation removed the most organic carbon from the sediment collected at a site in the Calcasieu River close to industrial outfalls and from the NBS estuarine sediment sample. Plasma oxidation merits further study as a treatment for removal of organic carbon. Operational parameters can be chosen to limit the plasma oxidation of pyrite which, unlike other Fe species, will not be dissolved by dilute hydrochloric acid. Preservation of pyrite allows the positive identification of Fe present as pyrite in sediments. ?? 1992.

  11. New Orleans and Hurricane Katrina. IV: Orleans East Bank (Metro) protected basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seed, R.B.; Bea, R.G.; Athanasopoulos-Zekkos, A.; Boutwell, G.P.; Bray, J.D.; Cheung, C.; Cobos-Roa, D.; Cohen-Waeber, J.; Collins, B.D.; Harder, L.F., Jr.; Kayen, R.E.; Pestana, J.M.; Riemer, M.F.; Rogers, J.D.; Storesund, R.; Vera-Grunauer, X.; Wartman, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    This paper addresses damage caused by Hurricane Katrina to the main Orleans East Bank protected basin. This basin represented the heart of New Orleans, and contained the main downtown area, the historic French Quarter, the Garden District, and the sprawling Lakefront and Canal Districts. Nearly half of the loss of life during this hurricane, and a similar fraction of the overall damages, occurred in this heavily populated basin. There are a number of important geotechnical lessons, as well as geo-forensic lessons, associated with the flooding of this basin. These include the difficulties associated with the creation and operation of regional-scale flood protection systems requiring federal and local cooperation and funding over prolonged periods of time. There are also a number of engineering and policy lessons regarding (1) the accuracy and reliability of current analytical methods; (2) the shortcomings and potential dangers involved in decisions that reduced short-term capital outlays in exchange for increased risk of potential system failures; (3) the difficulties associated with integrating local issues with a flood risk reduction project; and (4) the need to design and maintain levees as systems; with each of the many individual project elements being required to mesh seamlessly. These lessons are of interest and importance for similar flood protection systems throughout numerous other regions of the United States and the world. ?? 2008 ACSE.

  12. InSAR Remote Sensing of Localized Surface Layer Subsidence in New Orleans, LA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, K.; Jones, C. E.; Blom, R. G.; Kent, J. D.; Ivins, E. R.

    2015-12-01

    More than half of Louisiana's drinking water is dependent on groundwater, and extraction of these resources along with high oil and gas production has contributed to localized subsidence in many parts of New Orleans. This increases the vulnerability of levee failure during intense storms such as Hurricane Katrina in 2005, before which rapid subsidence had already been identified and contributed to the failing levees and catastrophic flooding. An interferogram containing airborne radar data from NASA's UAVSAR was combined with local geographic information systems (GIS) data for 2009-12 to help identify the sources of subsidence and mask out unrelated features such as surface water. We have observed the highest vertical velocity rates at the NASA Michoud Assembly Facility (high water use) and Norco (high oil/gas production). Many other notable features such as the: Bonnet-Carre Spillway, MRGO canal, levee lines along the Lower 9th Ward and power plants, are also showing concerning rates of subsidence. Even new housing loads, soil type differences, and buried beach sands seem to have modest correlations with patterns seen in UAVSAR. Current hurricane protection and coastal restoration efforts still have not incorporated late 20th century water level and geodetic data into their projections. Using SAR interferometry and local GIS datasets, areas of subsidence can be identified in a more efficient and economical manner, especially for emergency response.

  13. Shared experiences of CRNAs who were on duty in New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Geisz-Everson, Marjorie A; Dodd-McCue, Dianne; Bennett, Marsha

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this focused ethnography was to describe the shared experiences of certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) who were on duty in New Orleans, Louisiana, during Hurricane Katrina as well as to elucidate the psychosocial impact the storm had on them. Ten CRNAs participated in 1 of 3 focus groups that were audio recorded. The audio recordings were transcribed and analyzed using qualitative data analysis computer software (NVivo 8, QSR International, Melbourne, Australia). Six major themes emerged from the study: caught off guard; sense of duty; uncertainty/powerlessness/frustration; group identity and cohesiveness; anger; and life-changing event. The themes represented how the CRNAs appraised and coped with the stressful events surrounding Hurricane Katrina. The psychosocial impact of Hurricane Katrina on the CRNAs resulted mainly in short-term sleep disturbances and increased drinking. Only 2 CRNAs expressed long-term psychosocial effects from the storm. The results of this study should be used to guide policies regarding disaster activation of CRNAs, to educate CRNAs on preparing for disaster duty, and to provide a framework for future disaster studies regarding CRNAs. PMID:22848982

  14. Making Connections: New Orleans Evacuees’ Experiences in Obtaining Drugs1

    PubMed Central

    Dunlap, Eloise; Johnson, Bruce D.; Kotarba, Joseph; Fackler, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Between August 29 and September 7, 2005, almost all New Orleans residents were evacuated from the area in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. News reports indicate that almost 130,000 New Orleans Evacuees (NOEs) were evacuated to Houston, Texas, the largest recipient of the civilian population from New Orleans. Many of these NOEs were active participants in the illicit drug market in New Orleans prior to the hurricane. Their displacement to Houston and other locations provided a unique opportunity to study what occurs when illicit drug markets are disrupted. The period between the flooding and nearly complete evacuation of New Orleans provided a unique opportunity to systematically learn about the disruption of illicit drug markets since populations of illicit drug users and purchasers could no longer routinely obtain their drugs in predictable ways. Utilizing qualitative data from in-depth interviews and focus groups, this article describes the ways NOEs (1) managed their drug acquisition and use following evacuation; (2) located new sources of drugs in Houston and elsewhere by tapping into shared drug culture; and (3) gained access to and learned the argot for drugs in the local drug market in new settings. This report contributes to the nascent literature on disrupted drug markets. PMID:19999675

  15. Making connections: New Orleans Evacuees' experiences in obtaining drugs.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Eloise; Johnson, Bruce D; Kotarba, Joseph A; Fackler, Jennifer

    2009-09-01

    Between August 29 and September 7, 2005, almost all New Orleans residents were evacuated from the area in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. News reports indicate that almost 130,000 New Orleans Evacuees (NOEs) were evacuated to Houston, Texas, the largest recipient of the civilian population from New Orleans. Some of these NOEs were active participants in the illicit drug market in New Orleans prior to the hurricane. The period between the flooding and the nearly complete evacuation of New Orleans as well as their subsequent displacement to Houston and other locations provided unique opportunities to study what occurs when illicit drug markets are disrupted, since populations of illicit drug users and purchasers could no longer routinely obtain their drugs in predictable ways. Utilizing qualitative data from in-depth interviews and focus groups, this article describes the ways NOEs (1) managed their drug acquisition and use following evacuation; (2) located new sources of drugs in Houston and elsewhere by tapping into shared drug culture; and (3) gained access to and learned the argot for drugs in the local drug market in new settings. This report contributes to the nascent literature on disrupted drug markets. PMID:19999675

  16. Educational Greenfield: A Critical Policy Analysis of Plans to Transform New Orleans Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torregano, Michelle Early; Shannon, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    New Orleans is known as a unique city. It is the birthplace of jazz, delicious food, and a "gumbo" of warm friendly people. On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina roared ashore, leaving death and destruction in her wake. New Orleans Mayor C. Ray Nagin recognized that rebuilding the city of New Orleans would be a daunting task; one that he believed…

  17. NASA Analyzes Deadly Louisiana Flooding

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's IMERG data from Aug. 8 to Aug. 15, 2016 showed over 20 inches (508 mm) of rainfall was estimated in large areas of southeastern Louisiana and extreme southern Mississippi. Even greater rainf...

  18. Tracing the Effects of Hurricane Katrina on the Population of New Orleans: The Displaced New Orleans Residents Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sastry, Narayan

    2009-01-01

    The Displaced New Orleans Residents Pilot Study was designed to examine the current location, well-being, and plans of people who lived in the City of New Orleans when Hurricane Katrina struck on 29 August 2005. The study is based on a representative sample of pre-Katrina dwellings in the city. Respondents were administered a short paper-and-pencil interview by mail, by telephone, or in person. The pilot study was fielded in the fall of 2006, approximately one year after Hurricane Katrina. In this paper, we describe the motivation for the pilot study, outline its design, and describe the fieldwork results using a set of fieldwork outcome rates and multivariate logistic models. We end with a discussion of the lessons learned from the pilot study for future studies of the effects of Hurricane Katrina on the population of New Orleans. The results point to the challenges and opportunities of studying this unique population. PMID:20161061

  19. The Vietnamese of New Orleans: Problems of America's Newest Immigrants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soberano, Rawlein

    New Orleans ranks as the city with the largest Vietnamese community in the nation. With their growing number, problems with the Plaquemines Parish community as well as with some black organizations have developed, particularly in the areas of employment and housing. Several individuals have argued that local businesses hired large numbers of…

  20. New Teachers Search for Place in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zubrzycki, Jaclyn

    2013-01-01

    Derek Roguski and Hannah Sadtler came to New Orleans in 2008 through Teach For America. The competitive program provided five weeks' training and helped place them in schools, and both young teachers were eager to learn to teach and help the city's students. But they quickly found that they had more questions than answers about the schools they…

  1. As Year Ends, Questions Remain for New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2008-01-01

    In rebuilding public schooling in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, education reformers have managed to hire energetic teachers, break ground on a few new school buildings, raise public confidence, and show progress on test scores. But fundamental questions remain as the 2007-08 academic year draws to a close, including how the city's…

  2. 77 FR 22495 - Safety Zone; Lake Pontchartrain, New Orleans, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... Orleans, LA in the Federal Register (77 FR 9879). We received no comments on the proposed rule, and no... 1812 Blue Angels Air Show, during the War of 1812 Commemoration. The Air Show ] includes a 12,000' x 3,000' aerobatic display area and requires the surface of the water to be sterile of...

  3. Breakup of New Orleans Households after Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendall, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Theory and evidence on disaster-induced population displacement have focused on individual and population-subgroup characteristics. Less is known about impacts on households. I estimate excess incidence of household breakup resulting from Hurricane Katrina by comparing a probability sample of pre-Katrina New Orleans resident adult household heads…

  4. Resource Issues: A Case Study from New Orleans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garvin, James R.; Young, Alma H.

    1993-01-01

    One major obstacle to collaboration is perception of value--especially in urban areas where resources are shrinking and social problems are increasing. Sharing of resources is weighted by considerations of proximal benefit and proximal concern. This article shows how a New Orleans full-services school pilot project successfully garnered funding…

  5. LOUISIANA EXOTIC INVASIVE SPECIES SYMPOSIUM MX964256

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Louisiana Exotic Invasive Species Symposium will provide a multi-state collaboration among agency representatives, scientists, and the affected public to address the problem of exotic invasive species and to improve coastal environmental conditions in Louisiana.

  6. Libraries in Louisiana: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/louisiana.html Libraries in Louisiana To use the sharing features on ... Dept. of Veterans Affairs Medical Center/AHEC LRC Library Service (142D) P.O Box 69004 2495 Shreveport ...

  7. Defining Pre-Katrina New Orleans: The Structural Transformation of Public Education in New Orleans and Historical Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boselovic, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Although considerable work has been done around the supposed successes and failures of education reform in post-Katrina New Orleans, concerns about the public/private qualities of new policies are often not discussed explicitly. In kind, this article serves to investigate theoretical conceptions of the public as they relate to education while…

  8. Teaching about the Louisiana Purchase. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, John J.

    The year 2003 marks the bicentennial of the 1803 Treaty of France, by which the United States of America acquired the Louisiana Territory, an area of more than 828,000 square miles. Upon this acquisition, known as the Louisiana Purchase, the territory of the United States doubled. Historians consider the Louisiana Purchase to be a landmark event…

  9. An information and dialogue conference on the human genome project (HGP) for the minority communities in the state of Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    Zeta Phi Beta Sorority National Educational Foundation, in cooperation with Xavier University of New Orleans, and the New Orleans District Office of the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, held the Information and Dialogue Conference on the Human Genome Project for the Minority Communities in the State of Louisiana on April 16-17, 1999. The Conference was held on the campus of Xavier University in New Orleans. Community leaders, government officials, minority professional and social organizations leaders, religious leaders, persons from the educational and academic community, and students were invited. Conference objectives included bringing HGP information and a focus in the minority community on the project, in clear and understandable terms, to spread the work in the minority community about the project; to explore the likely positive implications with respect to health care and related matters; to explore possible negative results and strategies to meet them; to discuss the social, legal, and ethical implications; and to facilitate minority input into the HGP as it develops.

  10. Water-quality, bed-sediment, and discharge data for the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet and adjacent waterways, southeastern Louisiana, August 2008 through December 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Mize, Scott V.; Lovelace, John K.

    2012-01-01

    The Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet navigation channel (MRGO) was constructed in the early 1960s to provide a safer and shorter route between the Gulf of Mexico and the Port of New Orleans for deep-draft, ocean-going vessels and to promote the economic development of the Port of New Orleans. In 2006, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers developed a plan to de-authorize the MRGO. The plan called for a rock barrier to be constructed across the MRGO near Bayou La Loutre. In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Louisiana Coastal Area Science and Technology Program began a study to document the impacts of the rock barrier on water-quality and flow before, during, and after its construction. Water-quality, bed-sediment, and discharge data were collected in the MRGO and adjacent water bodies from August 2008 through December 2009.

  11. Remarks of Charles D. Ferris, Chairman, Federal Communications Commission before the 27th Annual Convention, National Cable Television Association, New Orleans Hilton, New Orleans, Louisiana, May 2, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Charles D.

    If cable television is to survive in the competitive marketplace, it will have to show increased foresight in designing new services and facilities. Cable television regulations, which may have been an impediment to past growth, should be fully reviewed by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and deleted or corrected if necessary; but cable…

  12. An International Dialogue on Community Colleges in a Changing World. [Symposium Report of] New Orleans Jam Session (New Orleans, Louisiana, January 8-9, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Stuart; Liston, Cynthia

    This document details a symposium that brought together U.S., Canadian, and European experts, college leaders, and policy makers for an "International Dialogue on Community Colleges in a Changing World." Discussion centered on the following four topics: (1) Community colleges are the largest source of postsecondary education for immigrants and…

  13. LOUISIANA BARRIER ISLAND EROSION STUDY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger,, Asbury H., Jr.; Penland, Shea; Williams, S. Jeffress; Suter, John R.

    1987-01-01

    During 1986, the U. S. Geological Survey and the Louisiana Geological Survey began a five-year cooperative study focused on the processes which cause erosion of barrier islands. These processes must be understood in order to predict future erosion and to better manage our coastal resources. The study area includes the Louisiana barrier islands which serve to protect 41% of the nation's wetlands. These islands are eroding faster than any other barrier islands in the United States, in places greater than 20 m/yr. The study is divided into three parts: geological development of barrier islands, quantitative processes of barrier island erosion and applications of results. The study focuses on barrier islands in Louisiana although many of the results are applicable nationwide.

  14. The Louisiana Go Local Experience

    PubMed Central

    Fahrmann, Melissa; Pesch, Wendy T.

    2012-01-01

    Between 2006 and 2009, two health sciences librarians at Baton Rouge General Medical Center created and launched the Louisiana segment of the National Library of Medicine’s Go Local program, whose ultimate goal was to improve the health information-seeking experience of the general public. Louisiana Go Local was successfully launched in October 2009, but in spring 2010, the national umbrella project was cancelled by the National Library of Medicine. This article describes the three-year development of a statewide database of health services descriptions and contact information to assist non-expert health information seekers in finding those health care providers located geographically closest to them. PMID:22347810

  15. Environmental and health disparities in residential communities of New Orleans: the need for soil lead intervention to advance primary prevention.

    PubMed

    Mielke, Howard W; Gonzales, Christopher R; Powell, Eric T; Mielke, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    Urban environments are the major sites for human habitation and this study evaluates soil lead (Pb) and blood Pb at the community scale of a U.S. city. There is no safe level of Pb exposure for humans and novel primary Pb prevention strategies are requisite to mitigate children's Pb exposure and health disparities observed in major cities. We produced a rich source of environmental and Pb exposure data for metropolitan New Orleans by combining a large soil Pb database (n=5467) with blood Pb databases (n=55,551 pre-Katrina and 7384 post-Katrina) from the Louisiana Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (LACLPPP). Reanalysis of pre- and post-Hurricane Katrina soil samples indicates relatively unchanged soil Pb. The objective was to evaluate the New Orleans soil Pb and blood Pb database for basic information about conditions that may merit innovative ways to pursue primary Pb exposure prevention. The city was divided into high (median census tract soil≥100 mg/kg) and low Pb areas (median census tract soil<100mg/kg). Soil and blood Pb concentrations within the high and low Pb areas of New Orleans were analyzed by permutation statistical methods. The high Pb areas are toward the interior of the city where median soil Pb was 367, 313, 1228, and 103 mg/kg, respectively for samples collected at busy streets, residential streets, house sides, and open space locations; the low Pb areas are in outlying neighborhoods of the city where median soil Pb was 64, 46, 32, and 28 mg/kg, respectively for busy streets, residential streets, house sides, and open spaces (P-values<10(-16)). Pre-Katrina children's blood Pb prevalence of ≥5 μg/dL was 58.5% and 24.8% for the high and low Pb areas, respectively compared to post-Katrina prevalence of 29.6% and 7.5%, for high and low Pb areas, respectively. Elevated soil Pb permeates interior areas of the city and children living there generally lack Pb safe areas for outdoor play. Soil Pb medians in outlying areas were safer by

  16. Fungal fragments in moldy houses: A field study in homes in New Orleans and Southern Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reponen, Tiina; Seo, Sung-Chul; Grimsley, Faye; Lee, Taekhee; Crawford, Carlos; Grinshpun, Sergey A.

    Smaller-sized fungal fragments (<1 μm) may contribute to mold-related health effects. Previous laboratory-based studies have shown that the number concentration of fungal fragments can be up to 500 times higher than that of fungal spores, but this has not yet been confirmed in a field study due to lack of suitable methodology. We have recently developed a field-compatible method for the sampling and analysis of airborne fungal fragments. The new methodology was utilized for characterizing fungal fragment exposures in mold-contaminated homes selected in New Orleans, Louisiana and Southern Ohio. Airborne fungal particles were separated into three distinct size fractions: (i) >2.25 μm (spores), (ii) 1.05-2.25 μm (mixture), and (iii) <1.0 μm (submicrometer-sized fragments). Samples were collected in five homes in summer and winter and analyzed for (1→3)- β- D-glucan. The total (1→3)- β- D-glucan varied from 0.2 to 16.0 ng m -3. The ratio of (1→3)- β- D-glucan mass in fragment size fraction to that in spore size fraction ( F/ S) varied from 0.011 to 2.163. The mass ratio was higher in winter (average=1.017) than in summer (0.227) coinciding with a lower relative humidity in the winter. Assuming a mass-based F/ S-ratio=1 and the spore size=3 μm, the corresponding number-based F/ S-ratio (fragment number/spore number) would be 10 3 and 10 6, for the fragment sizes of 0.3 and 0.03 μm, respectively. These results indicate that the actual (field) contribution of fungal fragments to the overall exposure may be very high, even much greater than that estimated in our earlier laboratory-based studies.

  17. Simulation studies of flow and sediment transport using a mathematical model, Atchafalaya River Basin, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, M.E.; Land, L.F.

    1977-01-01

    Simulation studies were made of flow and sediment transport for the Atchafalaya River basin, Louisiana using a mathematical model calibrated and supplied by the Hydrologic Engineering Center and the New Orleans District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The study results are based on three, 50-year computer simulations for the following alternatives: (1) no-action alternative, (2) channelization with a center-channel flow area of 80,000 sq ft, and (3) channelization with a center-channel flow area of 100,000 sq ft. Analyses of the simulated data base for depth-frequency, inundated-area, floodway cross-section and water-surface profile relationships were made for 10 flow rates. The analyses indicate a general trend of aggradation in the lower part of the floodway with a consequent trend toward increasing the inundated area, especially at higher flood flows. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. The effect of Hurricane Katrina on the prevalence of health impairments and disability among adults in New Orleans: differences by age, race, and sex.

    PubMed

    Sastry, Narayan; Gregory, Jesse

    2013-03-01

    We examined the effects of Hurricane Katrina on disability-related measures of health among adults from New Orleans, U.S.A., in the year after the hurricane, with a focus on differences by age, race, and sex. Our analysis used data from the American Community Survey to compare disability rates between the pre-Katrina population of New Orleans with the same population in the year after Katrina (individuals were interviewed for the study even if they relocated away from the city). The comparability between the pre- and post-Katrina samples was enhanced by using propensity weights. We found a significant decline in health for the adult population from New Orleans in the year after the hurricane, with the disability rate rising from 20.6% to 24.6%. This increase in disability reflected a large rise in mental impairments and, to a lesser extent, in physical impairments. These increases were, in turn, concentrated among young and middle-aged black females. Stress-related factors likely explain why young and middle-aged black women experienced worse health outcomes, including living in dwellings and communities that suffered the most damage from the hurricane, household breakup, adverse outcomes for their children, and higher susceptibility. PMID:23321678

  19. Murder Rates in New Orleans, La, 2004–2006

    PubMed Central

    VanLandingham, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    Murder rates for New Orleans, La, during 2005 and 2006 were calculated with the best available population trajectories for these 2 atypical years. These calculations showed that the murder rate increased substantially during this period compared with 2004. The increase in 2005 from 2004 was 14%. The best estimate of the increase in the murder rate in 2006 compared with 2004 was 69%; the large increase in 2006 began during the second quarter of that year. PMID:17666685

  20. Louisiana Migrant Education Support Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Billie Jean

    Prepared for school directors, social workers, counselors, recruiters, teachers, and migrant supporters, this booklet presents practical information that can be used to assist Louisiana's migrant children and their families in the areas of health, clothing, nutrition, education, and family services. Information given pertains to: the Community…

  1. New Orleans After Hurricane Katrina: An Unnatural Disaster?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D.; Werner, B.; Kelso, A.

    2005-12-01

    Motivated by destruction in New Orleans following hurricane Katrina, we use a numerical model to explore how natural processes, economic development, hazard mitigation measures and policy decisions intertwine to produce long periods of quiescence punctuated by disasters of increasing magnitude. Physical, economic and policy dynamics are modeled on a grid representing the subsiding Mississippi Delta region surrounding New Orleans. Water flow and resulting sediment erosion and deposition are simulated in response to prescribed river floods and storms. Economic development operates on a limited number of commodities and services such as agricultural products, oil and chemical industries and port services, with investment and employment responding to both local conditions and global constraints. Development permitting, artificial levee construction and pumping are implemented by policy agents who weigh predicted economic benefits (tax revenue), mitigation costs and potential hazards. Economic risk is reduced by a combination of private insurance, federal flood insurance and disaster relief. With this model, we simulate the initiation and growth of New Orleans coupled with an increasing level of protection from a series of flooding events. Hazard mitigation filters out small magnitude events, but terrain and hydrological modifications amplify the impact of large events. In our model, "natural disasters" are the inevitable outcome of the mismatch between policy based on short-time-scale economic calculations and stochastic forcing by infrequent, high-magnitude flooding events. A comparison of the hazard mitigation response to river- and hurricane-induced flooding will be discussed. Supported by NSF Geology and Paleontology and the Andrew W Mellon Foundation.

  2. Subsurface geology and potential for geopressured-geothermal energy in the Turtle Bayou field-Kent Bayou field area, Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.R.

    1982-09-01

    A 216 square mile area approximately 65 miles southwest of New Orleans, Louisiana, has been geologically evaluated to determine its potential for geopressured-geothermal energy production. The structural and stratigraphic analyses were made with emphasis upon the Early and Middle Miocene age sediments which lie close to and within the geopressured section. Three geopressured sands, the Robulus (43) sand, Cibicides opima sand, and Cristellaria (I) sand, are evaluated for their potential of producing geothermal energy. Two of these sands, the Robulus (43) sand and the Cibicides opima sand, meet several of the United States Department of Energy's suggested minimum requirements for a prospective geopressured-geothermal energy reservoir.

  3. Pilot oil atlas for Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgoyne, A.T. Jr.; Kimbrell, C.; Gao, Weigang.

    1993-01-01

    An interdisciplinary research team of engineers, geologists, and computer scientists was assembled at LSU to develop unproved methods for prospecting for bypassed oil and to support oil and gas producers in Louisiana. The overall objective of the project was to develop methods for extending the producing life of several types of reservoirs by reducing the amount of oil being bypassed and abandoned. As part of this work, the team collected information available from public sources for several example reservoirs. One task of the project was to develop a format for the compilation of the extensive but cumbersome Louisiana reservoir data so that it could be used by government and industry to evaluate the resource and plan future activities. The existing information system maintained by Louisiana is a Production Audit Reporting System (PARS). It was designed to allow auditing of oil and gas production and severance taxes associated with this production. It was not intended to be used as a database for determining reservoir recovery efficiency or prospecting for oil and gas. Its use for these purposes, however, has been increasing. The database format suggested in this report would allow production information to be easily displayed by reservoir as well as by lease, unit, or well. The data collected as part of the bypassed-oil study was used to illustrate the proposed new format. This pilot database, or atlas, contains information available for 15 reservoirs. It is recommended that LSU continue to compile and publish database information on the potential for bypassed oil in Louisiana's active reservoirs. This technology-transfer activity should focus each year on those active reservoirs involved in hearings of the Louisiana Office of Conservation. It should also focus on reservoirs being screened by LSU for EOR.

  4. Directional analysis of the storm surge from Hurricane Sandy 2012, with applications to Charleston, New Orleans, and the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Drews, Carl; Galarneau, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy in late October 2012 drove before it a storm surge that rose to 4.28 meters above mean lower low water at The Battery in lower Manhattan, and flooded the Hugh L. Carey automobile tunnel between Brooklyn and The Battery. This study examines the surge event in New York Harbor using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model and the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave- Sediment Transport/Regional Ocean Modeling System (COAWST/ROMS). We present a new technique using directional analysis to calculate and display maps of a coastline's potential for storm surge; these maps are constructed from wind fields blowing from eight fixed compass directions. This analysis approximates the surge observed during Hurricane Sandy. The directional analysis is then applied to surge events at Charleston, South Carolina, New Orleans, Louisiana, and Tacloban City, the Philippines. Emergency managers could use these directional maps to prepare their cities for an approaching storm, on planning horizons from days to years. PMID:25822480

  5. Directional Analysis of the Storm Surge from Hurricane Sandy 2012, with Applications to Charleston, New Orleans, and the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Drews, Carl; Galarneau, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy in late October 2012 drove before it a storm surge that rose to 4.28 meters above mean lower low water at The Battery in lower Manhattan, and flooded the Hugh L. Carey automobile tunnel between Brooklyn and The Battery. This study examines the surge event in New York Harbor using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model and the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave- Sediment Transport / Regional Ocean Modeling System (COAWST/ROMS). We present a new technique using directional analysis to calculate and display maps of a coastline's potential for storm surge; these maps are constructed from wind fields blowing from eight fixed compass directions. This analysis approximates the surge observed during Hurricane Sandy. The directional analysis is then applied to surge events at Charleston, South Carolina, New Orleans, Louisiana, and Tacloban City, the Philippines. Emergency managers could use these directional maps to prepare their cities for an approaching storm, on planning horizons from days to years. PMID:25822480

  6. Horizontal technology helps spark Louisiana`s Austin chalk trend

    SciTech Connect

    Koen, A.D.

    1996-04-29

    A handful of companies paced by some of the most active operators in the US are pressing the limits of horizontal technology to ramp up Cretaceous Austin chalk exploration and development (E and D) across Louisiana. Companies find applications in Louisiana for lessons learned drilling horizontal wells to produce chalk intervals in Texas in Giddings, Pearsall, and Brookeland fields. Continuing advances in horizontal well technology are helping operators deal with deeper, hotter reservoirs in more complex geological settings that typify the chalk in Louisiana. Better horizontal drilling, completion, formation evaluation, and stimulation techniques have enabled operators to produce oil and gas from formations previously thought to be uneconomical. Most of the improved capabilities stem from better horizontal tools. Horizontal drilling breakthroughs include dual powered mud motors and retrievable whipstocks, key links in the ability to drill wells with more than one horizontal lateral. Better geosteering tools have enabled operators to maintain horizontal wellbores in desired intervals by signaling bit positions downhole while drilling. This paper reviews the technology and provides a historical perspective on the various drilling programs which have been completed in this trend. It also makes predictions on future drilling successes.

  7. Pancreatic cancer mortality in Louisiana.

    PubMed Central

    Pickle, L W; Gottlieb, M S

    1980-01-01

    As a preliminary step in the investigation of high pancreas-cancer mortality among White males in a cluster of Louisiana parishes, we examined 876 pairs of certificates of death which occurred in this area during 1960--75. The pancreas-cancer death records were matched to controls by age, race, sex, year of death, and parish of residence. The odds ratios were increased about two-fold for workers in the oil refining and paper manufacturing industries, and slight elevations were seen among residents near refineries and food processing plants. Despite the limited residential and occupational information available on death certificates, this study suggests leads to environmental factors that can be further investigated by a case-control interview study in Louisiana. PMID:7356088

  8. 78 FR 69743 - Environmental Impact Statement: Caddo Parish, Louisiana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... Administrator, Louisiana Division, Federal Highway Administration, 5304 Flanders Drive, Suite A, Baton Rouge, LA.... Bolinger, Division Administrator, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. BILLING CODE 4910-22-P...

  9. How Policymakers Define "Evidence": The Politics of Research Use in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jabbar, Huriya; La Londe, Priya Goel; Debray, Elizabeth; Scott, Janelle; Lubienski, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Nearly ten years after Katrina and the implementation of a host of new and radical education reforms in New Orleans, there remains little evidence about whether the changes have improved school performance. Despite this lack of evidence, the New Orleans model is held up as a reform success, and is being adopted by other cities. In this article the…

  10. 33 CFR 117.458 - Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. 117.458 Section 117.458 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. (a) The draws of the SR 46 (St. Claude Avenue) bridge, mile...

  11. 33 CFR 117.458 - Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. 117.458 Section 117.458 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. (a) The draws of the SR 46 (St. Claude Avenue) bridge, mile...

  12. 33 CFR 117.458 - Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. 117.458 Section 117.458 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. (a) The draws of the SR 46 (St. Claude Avenue) bridge, mile...

  13. 33 CFR 117.458 - Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. 117.458 Section 117.458 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. (a) The draws of the SR 46 (St. Claude Avenue) bridge, mile...

  14. 33 CFR 117.458 - Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. 117.458 Section 117.458 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. (a) The draws of the SR 46 (St. Claude Avenue) bridge, mile...

  15. 78 FR 7427 - Council of the City of New Orleans; Mississippi Public Service Commission; Arkansas Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Council of the City of New Orleans; Mississippi Public Service... of Practice and Procedure 18 CFR 385.207, the Council of the City of New Orleans, the...

  16. 33 CFR 165.T08-0994 - Security Zone; Mississippi River, New Orleans, LA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zone; Mississippi River, New Orleans, LA. 165.T08-0994 Section 165.T08-0994 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.T08-0994 Security Zone; Mississippi River, New Orleans, LA. (a) Location. Lower Mississippi...

  17. New Orleans Homecoming: Students Return to Campuses that Are Forever Changed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper; Hoover, Eric; Mangan, Katherine S.

    2006-01-01

    Nearly five months after Hurricane Katrina swept them off their campuses in and around New Orleans, thousands of college administrators, faculty members, and students began a new semester in January 2006. Students came back with a new spirit of determination to adapt to the new realities of New Orleans, and to campuses that are forever changed,…

  18. Connecting the Disconnected: Scholar Activists and Education Reform in Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Daniella Ann

    2014-01-01

    When Hurricane Katrina slammed into New Orleans on August 29, 2005, the failure of the levees resulted in the largest single human-made disaster in the United States. In addition to the physical devastation of the city, the landscape of public schools in New Orleans was permanently altered, as was the national dialogue about school reform in the…

  19. Contribution of soil lead in children: A study from New Orleans, LA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the last four years, a significant number of environmental studies have been conducted in New Orleans, LA and surrounding Gulf Coast areas due in part to the occurrence of hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Data collected from studies in the New Orleans area indicate that inorganic contaminants in...

  20. Participatory Research in Support of Quality Public Education in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Burel, Deirdre; Drame, Elizabeth; Frattura, Elise

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, two years after Hurricane Katrina, several education and child advocacy groups began discussing the depleted conditions of the New Orleans public school district. These groups came together to discuss how to create a sustainable education reform movement post Katrina. New Orleans-based community groups and outside university researchers…

  1. The Value of Wetlands in Protecting Southeast Louisiana from Hurricane Storm Surges

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, Edward B.; Georgiou, Ioannis Y.; Enchelmeyer, Brian; Reed, Denise J.

    2013-01-01

    The Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004 and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 have spurred global interest in the role of coastal wetlands and vegetation in reducing storm surge and flood damages. Evidence that coastal wetlands reduce storm surge and attenuate waves is often cited in support of restoring Gulf Coast wetlands to protect coastal communities and property from hurricane damage. Yet interdisciplinary studies combining hydrodynamic and economic analysis to explore this relationship for temperate marshes in the Gulf are lacking. By combining hydrodynamic analysis of simulated hurricane storm surges and economic valuation of expected property damages, we show that the presence of coastal marshes and their vegetation has a demonstrable effect on reducing storm surge levels, thus generating significant values in terms of protecting property in southeast Louisiana. Simulations for four storms along a sea to land transect show that surge levels decline with wetland continuity and vegetation roughness. Regressions confirm that wetland continuity and vegetation along the transect are effective in reducing storm surge levels. A 0.1 increase in wetland continuity per meter reduces property damages for the average affected area analyzed in southeast Louisiana, which includes New Orleans, by $99-$133, and a 0.001 increase in vegetation roughness decreases damages by $24-$43. These reduced damages are equivalent to saving 3 to 5 and 1 to 2 properties per storm for the average area, respectively. PMID:23536815

  2. The value of wetlands in protecting southeast louisiana from hurricane storm surges.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Edward B; Georgiou, Ioannis Y; Enchelmeyer, Brian; Reed, Denise J

    2013-01-01

    The Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004 and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 have spurred global interest in the role of coastal wetlands and vegetation in reducing storm surge and flood damages. Evidence that coastal wetlands reduce storm surge and attenuate waves is often cited in support of restoring Gulf Coast wetlands to protect coastal communities and property from hurricane damage. Yet interdisciplinary studies combining hydrodynamic and economic analysis to explore this relationship for temperate marshes in the Gulf are lacking. By combining hydrodynamic analysis of simulated hurricane storm surges and economic valuation of expected property damages, we show that the presence of coastal marshes and their vegetation has a demonstrable effect on reducing storm surge levels, thus generating significant values in terms of protecting property in southeast Louisiana. Simulations for four storms along a sea to land transect show that surge levels decline with wetland continuity and vegetation roughness. Regressions confirm that wetland continuity and vegetation along the transect are effective in reducing storm surge levels. A 0.1 increase in wetland continuity per meter reduces property damages for the average affected area analyzed in southeast Louisiana, which includes New Orleans, by $99-$133, and a 0.001 increase in vegetation roughness decreases damages by $24-$43. These reduced damages are equivalent to saving 3 to 5 and 1 to 2 properties per storm for the average area, respectively. PMID:23536815

  3. In Brief: Protecting Louisiana's coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2007-12-01

    With numerous wetlands restoration and protection projects slated for Louisiana, a well-developed implementation strategy that can address a number of uncertainties is important for the success of these projects, according to a 14 December report by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO). GAO specifically urged maintaining the collaborative process that is used by Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and Restoration Act (CWPPRA) program agencies, with scientists, engineers, and others working together to plan and design restoration projects. The report also noted the need to address such other issues as having an integrated monitoring system to determine whether goals and objectives are met as well as to understand that projects can encounter significant setbacks due to storms and hurricanes, landscape and structural causes, and spiraling project costs. Louisiana state officials anticipate the state could receive about $8.5 billion over the next 10 years for coastal restoration and protection. Nearly 40% of all coastal wetlands in the lower 48 U.S. states are located in Louisiana. For more information, visit the Web site: http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d08130.pdf.

  4. Parental Voucher Enrollment Decisions: Choice within Choice in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beabout, Brian R.; Cambre, Belinda M.

    2013-01-01

    Set in the context of a choice-saturated public school system, this study examines the school choice process of low-income parents who participated in Louisiana's 2008 voucher program. Based on semistructured interviews with 16 parents at 1 Catholic school, we report that spirituality, small class and school size, character/values,…

  5. Saltwater Sources for Saltwater Intrusion in Shallow Aquifers in South Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoessell, R. K.; Prochaska, L.

    2005-05-01

    Shallow southward-dipping Quaternary and Upper Neogene aquifers across South Louisiana are used as sources of freshwater. Local accumulations of brackish waters occur within these aquifers on the north shore of Lake Pontchartrain, in the Baton Rouge area, in Southwest and South-central Louisiana, and in the New Orleans area. The low Br/Cl ratios, high Na/Cl ratios, low K/Cl ratios and low 87Sr/86Sr ratios in these brackish waters form linear mixing trends which are inconsistent with the saline-water sources being in situ marine formation fluids of similar age. Extrapolation of these ratios to fluids of high salinity suggests the saline-water sources are Lower Neogene or Paleogene marine formation fluids that dissolved halite. South Louisiana overlies the deep Jurassic Louan salt, which is the source of salt diapirs. The region is cut by a series of east-west trending gravity faults with southward-dipping fault planes. Deeper migrating formation fluids are hypothesized to be dissolving halite through contact with salt diapirs and moving up fault planes to enter shallow aquifers and mix with the in situ groundwaters. High freshwater withdrawal rates are accelerating this process, causing updip movement of the shallow saltwater fronts, e.g., within the Pliocene and Upper Miocene Baton Rouge aquifers and in the Pleistocene Lake Charles "500-foot" sand. Conversely, the absence of significant freshwater withdrawal has apparently caused a static saltwater front, e.g., in the Pliocene Big Branch Aquifer on the north shore of Lake Pontchartrain.

  6. Louisiana Barrier Island Comprehensive Monitoring (BICM) Program Summary Report: Data and Analyses 2006 through 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kindinger, Jack G.; Buster, Noreen A.; Flocks, James G.; Bernier, Julie C.; Kulp, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    The Barrier Island Comprehensive Monitoring (BICM) program was implemented under the Louisiana Coastal Area Science and Technology (LCA S&T) office as a component of the System Wide Assessment and Monitoring (SWAMP) program. The BICM project was developed by the State of Louisiana (Coastal Protection Restoration Authority [CPRA], formerly Department of Natural Resources [DNR]) to complement other Louisiana coastal monitoring programs such as the Coastwide Reference Monitoring System-Wetlands (CRMS-Wetlands) and was a collaborative research effort by CPRA, University of New Orleans (UNO), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The goal of the BICM program was to provide long-term data on the barrier islands of Louisiana that could be used to plan, design, evaluate, and maintain current and future barrier-island restoration projects. The BICM program used both historical and newly acquired (2006 to 2010) data to assess and monitor changes in the aerial and subaqueous extent of islands, habitat types, sediment texture and geotechnical properties, environmental processes, and vegetation composition. BICM datasets included aerial still and video photography (multiple time series) for shoreline positions, habitat mapping, and land loss; light detection and ranging (lidar) surveys for topographic elevations; single-beam and swath bathymetry; and sediment grab samples. Products produced using BICM data and analyses included (but were not limited to) storm-impact assessments, rate of shoreline and bathymetric change, shoreline-erosion and accretion maps, high-resolution elevation maps, coastal-shoreline and barrier-island habitat-classification maps, and coastal surficial-sediment characterization maps. Discussions in this report summarize the extensive data-collection efforts and present brief interpretive analyses for four coastal Louisiana geographic regions. In addition, several coastal-wide and topical themes were selected that integrate the data and analyses within a

  7. Louisiana Folklife: A Guide to the State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitzer, Nicholas R., Ed.

    Louisiana is composed of a vast array of traditional cultures and activities. This resource directory to Louisiana folk arts and folk communities aims to promote better understanding and preservation of the cultural settings and meanings of those things already well known and to explicate the lesser-known activities that comprise living folk…

  8. Managing damaging freeze events in Louisiana sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposure of sugarcane to damaging frosts occurs in approximately 25% of the sugarcane producing countries of the world, but is most frequent on the mainland of the United States, especially in the state of Louisiana. The frequent winter freezes that occur in the sugarcane areas of Louisiana have fo...

  9. Smart Bodies: Louisiana Responds to Youth Overweight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Ellen P.; Holston, Denise; Tuuri, Georgianna

    2005-01-01

    In Louisiana, it is estimated that almost 33% of school-age children are at risk for becoming overweight or are already overweight (Louisiana Office of Public Health, 2004). Studies have shown that poor nutrition, physical inactivity, and weight problems often associated with being overweight adversely affect academic performance in school…

  10. The Progress of Education in Louisiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finley, Sandra J.

    This document is a product of the Promoting Instructional Coherence Project. The paper describes the progress of education in Louisiana and is designed to help educators as they construct a comprehensive approach to teaching and learning. Louisiana typically ranks near the bottom of the 50 states on educational quality and effectiveness, and its…

  11. Unique cover crops for Louisiana sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Louisiana sugarcane production practices provide a tremendous opportunity for the use of cover crops following the final sugarcane harvest in the fall of one year and prior to replanting sugarcane during the summer of the next year. A Louisiana sugarcane field is typically replanted every four years...

  12. Politician of the Year 2008: Lifting Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2008-01-01

    This article features Mitch Landrieu and his contributions to the upliftment of Louisiana through libraries. After the onslaught of hurricanes Katrina and Rita, Landrieu said they realized how important libraries are. Now in his second term as lieutenant governor of Louisiana, Landrieu oversees the Office of the State Library along with the…

  13. Participants Assess the Louisiana Consent Decree.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginsberg, Rick; Carter, Marie

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of 602 administrators, faculty, and students from Louisiana's public universities revealed attitudes about the Louisiana Consent Decree (LCD) to preserve Black institutions, including the following: (1) Blacks are more positive than Whites about the LCD; (2) LCD has caused more cooperation among Black and White schools; and (3) many are…

  14. Breeding for sugarcane borer resistance in Louisiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growing resistant varieties is a key component of the Integrated Pest Management Program for managing the sugarcane borer in Louisiana; however, the release of resistant varieties to growers is sporadic. The challenge facing the Louisiana industry is how to increase resistance in its varieties witho...

  15. Break-up of New Orleans Households after Hurricane Katrina

    PubMed Central

    Rendall, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Theory and evidence on disaster-induced population displacement have focused on individual and population-subgroup characteristics. Less is known about impacts on households. I estimate excess incidence of household break-up due to Hurricane Katrina by comparing a probability sample of pre-Katrina New Orleans resident adult household heads and non–household heads (N = 242), traced just over a year later, with a matched sample from a nationally representative survey over an equivalent period. One in three among all adult non–household heads, and one in two among adult children of household heads, had separated from the household head 1 year post-Katrina. These rates were, respectively, 2.2 and 2.7 times higher than national rates. A 50% higher prevalence of adult children living with parents in pre-Katrina New Orleans than nationally increased the hurricane’s impact on household break-up. Attention to living arrangements as a dimension of social vulnerability in disaster recovery is suggested. PMID:21709733

  16. Amistad Symposium on Southern Civil Rights Litigation Records for the 1960s (New Orleans, Louisiana, December 8-9, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillard Univ., New Orleans, LA. Armistad Research Center.

    This report contains transcripts of speeches given at the Amistad Symposium by lawyers, judges, and others active in the civil rights movement since the 1960s. Speakers include Clifton Johnson, J. Skelly Wright, John P. Nelson, Edwin King, Fred L. Banks, Jr., Lawrence A. Aschenbrenner, Frank R. Parker, Henry Schwarzschild, and Richard B. Sobol.…

  17. 75 FR 28568 - Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 2, under Alternative Site Framework, New Orleans, Louisiana...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ..., the Board adopted the alternative site framework (ASF) in December 2008 (74 FR 1170, 01/12/09; correction 74 FR 3987, 01/22/09) as an option for the establishment or reorganization of general-purpose... the Federal Register (74 FR 68041-68042, 12/22/2009) and the application has been processed...

  18. AERA Business Education and Information Systems Research SIG Proceedings (New Orleans, Louisiana, April 24-28, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Educational Research Association, Washington, DC. Business Education and Information Systems Research Special Interest Group.

    This document contains 1 conference paper abstract and 10 papers from a conference on business education and information systems research. The document begins with the abstract of the paper "The Relationships among Work-Based Learning Initiatives, Anticipated Benefits, and Stakeholder Involvement" (Bridget N. O'Connor). The remainder of the…

  19. U.S. Geological Survey national computer technology meeting; program and abstracts, New Orleans, Louisiana, April 10-15, 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balthrop, B. H., (compiler); Baker, E.G.

    1994-01-01

    This report contains some of the abstracts of papers that were presented at the National Computer Technology Meeting that was held in April 1994. This meeting was sponsored by the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey, and was attended by more than 200 technical and managerial personnel representing all the Divisions of the U.S. Geological Survey. Computer-related information from all Divisions of the U.S. Geological Survey are discussed in this compilation of abstracts. Some of the topics addressed are data transfer, data-base management, hydrologic applications, national water information systems, and geographic information systems applications and techniques.

  20. Acoustical tree evaluation of Coptotermes Formosanus (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) with imidacloprid and noviflumeron in historic Jackson Square, New Orleans, Louisiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nine years of periodic acoustical monitoring of 93 trees active with Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, evaluated imidacloprid tree foam and noviflumuron bait on activity in trees. Long term, imidacloprid suppressed but did not eliminate termite activity in treated trees...

  1. Seasonal Changes in the Caste Distribution of Foraging Populations of Formosan Subterranean Termite in New Orleans, Louisiana

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Mary L.; Osbrink, Weste L. A.; Gallatin, Erin M.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between temperature, precipitation, soil composition, levels of feeding damage, and the caste distribution (workers, soldiers, nymphs) of the Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, collected in underground monitoring stations over a 12 mo period. Because nymphs are the caste that develops into alates, the seasonal abundance of nymphs was examined over a 5 yr period. Numbers of workers, soldiers, and soldier/worker ratio were significantly affected by month. Recruitment and retention of foraging termites in stations was significantly affected by the level of feeding damage. The number of nymphs collected in monitoring stations was highly variable. In the 12 mo test, there was a significant correlation between numbers of nymphs and level of feeding damage, temperature, precipitation, and soil composition. Over a 5 yr period, significantly more nymphs were collected in 2011 than in 2007 and 2008. Peak nymph collections varied from year to year. Overall, peak nymph collections were more likely to occur in Mar., Sept., and Oct. Increasing our knowledge of the environmental factors that influence recruitment and retention of foraging termites in monitoring stations could influence termite bait placement and improve baiting strategies for termite control. Identifying the key factors that cause aggregations of nymphs in underground stations could increase our ability to predict the intensity and location of alate swarms. PMID:26246441

  2. Investing in Youth: A Compilation of Recommended Policies and Practices. National Conference (New Orleans, Louisiana, December 9-11, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Governors' Association, Washington, DC.

    These proceedings include 13 "perspectives from the field" and 9 selected papers (with abstracts) from a national conference on recommended policies and practices for investing in youth. The 13 perspectives papers are as follows: "Saving the Next Generation" (Berlin); "Effective Strategies for Investing in Youth" (El-Amin); "Policies and Issues…

  3. PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION (8TH) HELD AT NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA, NOVEMBER 1983. VOLUME 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document the eighth in a series of symposiums (the second cosponsored by EPA and the Electric Power Research Institute) on flue gas desulfurization (FGD). It provided a forum for the exchange of technical developments and regulatory information on FGD systems and ...

  4. PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION (8TH) HELD AT NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA, NOVEMBER 1983. VOLUME 2

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document the eighth in a series of symposiums (the second cosponsored by EPA and the Electric Power Research Institute) on flue gas desulfurization (FGD). It provided a forum for the exchange of technical developments and regulatory information on FGD systems and ...

  5. Seasonal changes in the caste distribution of foraging populations of formosan subterranean termite in New Orleans, Louisiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined the relationship between temperature, precipitation, soil composition and levels of feeding damage and the caste distribution of the Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, collected in underground monitoring stations over a 12 mo period. In addition, the s...

  6. National Conference on American Pluralism and Identity Program Book (New Orleans, Louisiana, January 18-19, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community Colleges, Washington, DC.

    This program book contains progress reports for the colleges that participated in the American Association of Community Colleges' (AACC) Exploring America's Communities (EAC) project, which works to strengthen the teaching of American history, literature, and culture at the community college level. Parts 1, 2, and 3 describe the National…

  7. Application of a run around coil system to a roof fan house at Michoud Assembly Facility at New Orleans, Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of the proposed run around coil system indicates that it offers a decrease in steam, electricity and water consumptions. The run around coil system consist of two coils, a precooling coil which will be located at up stream and a reheating coil which will be located at down stream of the chilled water spray chamber. This system will provide the necessary reheat in summer, spring and fall. At times, if the run around coil system can not provide the necessary reheat, the existing reheat coil could be utilized.

  8. Application of chemical dehumidification system to a roof fan house at Michoud Assembly Facility at New Orleans, Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of a chemical dehumidification system to reduce the energy consumption associated with dehumidification of the chilled air is assessed. A comparative energy consumption and cost analysis of the chemical dehumidification and existing systems and the savings offered by the proposed chemical dehumidification system over the existing air washer-reheat system are presented.

  9. [Papers Presented at the American Medical Association's Air Pollution Medical Research Conference (New Orleans, Louisiana, October 5-7, 1970).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Medical Association, Chicago, IL.

    This is a collection of twenty speeches presented at the American Medical Association's Air Pollution Medical Conference, October 5-7, 1970. Speeches included: Air Pollution Control: The Physician's Role; Air Pollution Problems in Nuclear Power Development; Airway Resistance and Collateral Ventilation; Asbestos Air Pollution in Urban Areas;…

  10. Proceedings of the American Council on Consumer Interests Annual Conference (36th, New Orleans, Louisiana, March 28-31, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carsky, Mary L., Ed.

    Among these education-related papers in this collection are "Consumer Issues and the Elderly" (Moon); "The Relationship between Perceived Life Satisfaction and Measures of Economic Well-Being" (Douthitt, MacDonald, Mullis); "Research Data Priorities as Assessed by Users" (Chern, Hushak, Tweeten); "New Directions in Data, Information Systems and…

  11. Mobilizing Resources for Independent Living: A National Conference (New Orleans, Louisiana, August 5-7, 2002). Participant's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Male, Richard; Schulz, Lee; Jones, Darrell Lynn; Buppapong, Raweewan; Langbehn, Kristy; George, Carri; Petty, Richard; Heinsohn, Dawn

    The participant's manual contains training materials for a national conference on mobilizing resources and fund raising in agencies concerned with promoting independent living for people with disabilities. Preliminary materials include the conference agenda, background information about the trainers, organizational information on Independent…

  12. Proceedings of the Annual National Agricultural Education Association Meeting (11th, New Orleans, Louisiana, November 30, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Association, Arlington, VA. Agricultural Education Div.

    This document contains the texts of 27 presentations given at the National Agricultural Education Research Meeting. The papers in the proceedings are grouped under 10 themes with a critique for each group. The themes (with speakers' names in parentheses) are as follows: supervised occupational experiences (Gregory W. Fletcher, David L. Williams,…

  13. Teacher Corps Alumni Network. Symposia Proceedings (New Orleans, Louisiana, November 1988) and (St. Louis, Missouri, February 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teacher Corps Alumni Network.

    Selected papers are presented from two symposia addressing the need for recruitment and retention of minority persons into education. The first, by Bess C. Howard, offers an historical perspective on black educators and discusses the need for recruiting Black teachers. In the second paper, Judy Minier discusses the role played by the Teacher Corps…

  14. Illicit Drug Markets Among New Orleans Evacuees Before and Soon After Hurricane Katrina

    PubMed Central

    Dunlap, Eloise; Johnson, Bruce D.; Morse, Edward

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes illicit drug markets in New Orleans before and after Hurricane Katrina and access to drug markets following evacuation at many locations and in Houston. Among New Orleans arrestees pre-Katrina, rates of crack and heroin use and market participation was comparable to New York and higher than in other southern cities. Both cities have vigorous outdoor drug markets. Over 100 New Orleans evacuees provide rich accounts describing the illicit markets in New Orleans and elsewhere. The flooding of New Orleans disrupted the city’s flourishing drug markets, both during and immediately after the storm. Drug supplies, though limited, were never completely unavailable. Subjects reported that alcohol or drugs were not being used in the Houston Astrodome, and it was a supportive environment. Outside the Astrodome, they were often approached by or could easily locate middlemen and drug sellers. Evacuees could typically access illegal drug markets wherever they went. This paper analyzes the impact of a major disaster upon users of illegal drugs and the illegal drug markets in New Orleans and among the diaspora of New Orleans evacuees following Hurricane Katrina. This analysis includes data from criminal justice sources that specify what the drug markets were like before this disaster occurred. This analysis also includes some comparison cities where no disaster occurred, but which help inform the similarities and differences in drug markets in other cities. The data presented also include an initial analysis of ethnographic interview data from over 100 New Orleans Evacuees recruited in New Orleans and Houston. PMID:19081751

  15. Pregnant Women in Louisiana Are Not Meeting Dietary Seafood Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Drewery, M L; Gaitán, A V; Thaxton, C; Xu, W; Lammi-Keefe, C J

    2016-01-01

    Background. The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that pregnant women and women of childbearing ages consume 8-12 oz. of seafood per week. Fish are the major dietary source of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, which have benefits for the mother and fetus. Methods. In this observational study, we investigated dietary habits of pregnant women in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA, to determine if they achieve recommended seafood intake. A print survey, which included commonly consumed foods from protein sources (beef, chicken, pork, and fish), was completed by pregnant women at a single-day hospital convention for expecting families in October 2015. Women (n = 221) chose from six predefined responses to answer how frequently they were consuming each food. Results. Chicken was consumed most frequently (75% of women), followed by beef (71%), pork (65%), and fish (22%), respectively. Consumption frequency for the most consumed fish (catfish, once per month) was similar to or lower than that of the least consumed beef, chicken, and pork foods. Consumption frequency for the most consumed chicken and beef foods was at least once per week. Conclusion. Our data indicate that pregnant women in Louisiana often consume protein sources other than fish and likely fail to meet dietary seafood recommendations. PMID:27504202

  16. Pregnant Women in Louisiana Are Not Meeting Dietary Seafood Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Lammi-Keefe, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that pregnant women and women of childbearing ages consume 8–12 oz. of seafood per week. Fish are the major dietary source of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, which have benefits for the mother and fetus. Methods. In this observational study, we investigated dietary habits of pregnant women in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA, to determine if they achieve recommended seafood intake. A print survey, which included commonly consumed foods from protein sources (beef, chicken, pork, and fish), was completed by pregnant women at a single-day hospital convention for expecting families in October 2015. Women (n = 221) chose from six predefined responses to answer how frequently they were consuming each food. Results. Chicken was consumed most frequently (75% of women), followed by beef (71%), pork (65%), and fish (22%), respectively. Consumption frequency for the most consumed fish (catfish, once per month) was similar to or lower than that of the least consumed beef, chicken, and pork foods. Consumption frequency for the most consumed chicken and beef foods was at least once per week. Conclusion. Our data indicate that pregnant women in Louisiana often consume protein sources other than fish and likely fail to meet dietary seafood recommendations. PMID:27504202

  17. Horizontal gas-condensate find brightens Louisiana chalk outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Petzet, G.A.

    1994-12-19

    A ray of hope may have appeared in the Louisiana portion of the Cretaceous Austin chalk trend after several years of expensive disappointment. OXY USA Inc. plans to use dual leg horizontal wells to develop a fracture chalk reservoir named Masters Creek field in Rapides Parish. The state has approved four 1,920 acre spacing units, one of which contains OXY's A1 Monroe well. The A1 Monroe flowed 6.6 MMcfd of gas with 2,162 b/d of 48[degree] gravity condensate, not oil as previously reported, through a 26/64 in. choke with 6,196 psi flowing tubing pressure from a single southward 4,000 ft horizontal leg at 14,803 ft true vertical depth. Bottomhole pressure is 13,100 psi. OXY called A1 Monroe a significant discovery and said it has additional exploration acreage blocks along the trend. Louisiana exempts production from horizontal wells from state severance tax until all project costs are returned. The paper briefly discusses OXY's program.

  18. A Psychosocial Comparison of New Orleans and Houston Crack Smokers in the Wake of Hurricane Katrina

    PubMed Central

    TIMPSON, SANDRA; RATLIFF, ERIC; ROSS, MICHAEL; WILLIAMS, MARK; ATKINSON, JOHN; BOWEN, ANNE; MCCURDY, SHERYL

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare psychological distress in a sample of African American crack cocaine users who relocated to Houston from New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina to African American drug users resident in Houston. Fifty-four African Americans from New Orleans were compared to a sample of 162 people in Houston. Data were collected between June 2002 and December 2005. There were no significant differences between the two groups on either depression or anxiety, but the New Orleans sample scored higher on the self-esteem scale and scored slightly lower on the risk-taking scale. PMID:19895301

  19. New Orleans Topography, Radar Image with Colored Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for the animation

    About the animation: This simulated view of the potential effects of storm surge flooding on Lake Pontchartrain and the New Orleans area was generated with data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. Although it is protected by levees and sea walls against storm surges of 18 to 20 feet, much of the city is below sea level, and flooding due to storm surges caused by major hurricanes is a concern. The animation shows regions that, if unprotected, would be inundated with water. The animation depicts flooding in one-meter increments.

    About the image: The city of New Orleans, situated on the southern shore of Lake Pontchartrain, is shown in this radar image from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). In this image bright areas show regions of high radar reflectivity, such as from urban areas, and elevations have been coded in color using height data also from the SRTM mission. Dark green colors indicate low elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations.

    New Orleans is near the center of this scene, between the lake and the Mississippi River. The line spanning the lake is the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, the world's longest overwater highway bridge. Major portions of the city of New Orleans are actually below sea level, and although it is protected by levees and sea walls that are designed to protect against storm surges of 18 to 20 feet, flooding during storm surges associated with major hurricanes is a significant concern.

    Data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface

  20. Death, drugs, and disaster: mortality among New Orleans' homeless.

    PubMed

    Rayburn, Rachel L; Pals, Heili; Wright, James D

    2012-01-01

    Tracking homeless individuals over time has proved to be extremely difficult; thus, only limited longitudinal data on the homeless exist. We analyze longitudinal data originally collected from the New Orleans Homeless Substance Abusers Program in 1991-1993, supplemented with mortality data for the same sample by year 2010. We use social bonding theory to examine the effect of conventional social ties on mortality among a sample of substance abusing homeless people. This is of special concern when researching the older homeless persons. We find that social bonding theory does not help to understand mortality among this population. However, alcohol abuse, as compared to crack cocaine, does increase the likelihood of early mortality. PMID:22616445

  1. New Orleans full-scale trommel evaluation: interim test report

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.

    1981-06-01

    This report presents the data from five tests of a full-scale trommel processing unsegregated municipal solid waste at throughtputs ranging from 58% to 175% of design capacity, or 32 to 98 Mg/h (36 to 109 tph). The tests were conducted between December 1980 and March 1981 at the Recovery 1 solid waste processing facility in New Orleans, La. Included in the report are a description of the equipment, discussion of the test procedures and primary summaries of data on the trommel mass balance and separation efficiency, and on the analysis of infeed and product samples for size, composition, density, and moisture. Heat content and ash values of the trommel oversize and recovery results on surrogate aluminum cans and flakes also are reported.

  2. TRACKING FRESHWATER DIVERSIONS AND ALGAL BLOOMS THAT IMPACT THE NEW ORLEANS STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREA -

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will monitor selected water quality parameters, including water temperature, turbidity, salinity, and algal blooms to assess the impacts of freshwater diversions for several selected areas within the New Orleans metropolitan area. The specific areas of study include ...

  3. The Rebirth of Montessori: Rebuilding a Public Charter Montessori School in Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvidge, Ellen

    2008-01-01

    "Pre-Katrina" and "Post-Katrina" are common terms for time frames these days in New Orleans, often reminding me of the BCE/CE timeline distinctions. You hear "Pre-Katrina" and "Post-Katrina" on the news, in the paper, and in everyday conversations. Although more and more people have moved back to New Orleans, businesses and restaurants are open,…

  4. 77 FR 58902 - Louisiana Disaster #LA-00049

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Louisiana Disaster LA-00049 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing And Disbursement...

  5. 77 FR 58902 - Louisiana Disaster #LA-00048

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ...This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Louisiana (FEMA-4080-DR), dated 08/31/ 2012. Incident: Hurricane Isaac. Incident Period: 08/26/2012 through...

  6. The Internet for Louisiana physicians.

    PubMed

    Ellis, M S

    2000-09-01

    Fewer than 50% of Louisiana physicians actively use the Internet, and many of them confine their usage to e-mailing among family and friends. The purpose of this article is to acquaint the reader with many of the benefits of exploiting the incredible potential of this technological invention. I provide addresses and information about sites that I believe warrant usage by our colleagues. Of the vast smorgasbord of data available we highlight educational Web sites for professionals and the public, how to determine credibility of information, clinical research of scientific articles, computer security, federal and state government sites, newspapers, political and socioeconomic functions, medical supply shops, e-mail and other computerized communication, electronic medical records, personal or professional Web sites, and future medical internet uses. It is hoped that this process will encourage nonparticipating colleagues to begin using this modality while also supplying sites that current users may not yet have discovered. PMID:11064554

  7. Guide to Louisiana's ground-water resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, C.G.; Knochenmus, D.D.; McGee, B.D.

    1994-01-01

    Ground water is one of the most valuable and abundant natural resources of Louisiana. Of the 4-.4 million people who live in the State, 61 percent use ground water as a source for drinking water. Most industrial and rural users and half of the irrigation users in the State rely on ground water. Quantity, however, is not the only aspect that makes ground water so valuable; quality also is important for its use. In most areas, little or no water treatment is required for drinking water and industrial purposes. Knowledge of Louisiana's ground-water resources is needed to ensure proper development and protection of this valuable resource. This report is designed to inform citizens about the availability and quality of ground water in Louisiana. It is not intended as a technical reference; rather, it is a guide to ground water and the significant role this resource plays in the state. Most of the ground water that is used in the State is withdrawn from 13 aquifers and aquifer systems: the Cockfield, Sparta, and Carrizo-Wilcox aquifersin northern Louisiana; Chicot aquifer system, Evangeline aquifer, Jasper aquifer system, and Catahoula aquifer in central and southwestern Louisiana; the Chicot equivalent, Evangeline equivalent, and Jasper equivalent aquifer systems in southeastern Louisiana; and the MississippiRiver alluvial, Red River alluvial, and upland terrace aquifers that are statewide. Ground water is affected by man's activities on the land surface, and the major ground-water concerns in Louisiana are: (1) contamination from surface disposal of hazardous waste, agricultural chemicals, and petroleum products; (2) contamination from surface wastes and saltwater through abandoned wells; (3) saltwater encroachment; and (4) local overdevelopment. Information about ground water in Louisiana is extensive and available to the public. Several State and Federal agencies provide published and unpublished material upon request.

  8. Seismic depth conversion problems associated with the Mississippi Canyon in the vicinity of Ewing Bank Block 305 field, offshore Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Leveille, G.P. ); Sahai, K.S.; McDaniel, P.G.

    1990-05-01

    Ewing Bank Block 305 field is located on the outermost edge of the continental shelf, approximately 145 km south of New Orleans, Louisiana. The geology of the field is fairly typical of other fields found offshore of Louisiana, except there is a huge, partly filled, Pleistocene submarine canyon that overlies the field. This canyon, which is commonly referred to as the Mississippi Canyon, causes a large seismic depth conversion problem that makes it virtually impossible to correctly map the structure of the field using normally processed marine seismic data The Mississippi Canyon is a large erosional feature that was formed at the mouth of the ancestral Mississippi River during the last glacial sea level lowstand. In the vicinity of the field, the canyon is about 10 km wide and 1 km deep, which is approximately two-thirds the size of the Grand Canyon of the Colorado River, and is filled mostly with Holocene sediments. Because the sediments that fill the canyon are very young, their interval velocities are much lower than the interval velocities of the sediments that form the canyon walls. This creates abrupt near surface lateral velocity variations that distort the geometry of seismic reflectors such that the time geometries seen on seismic lines are not at all indicative of the structure of the subsurface. Using a model-based processing technique and available well control, the authors have been able to solve this difficult depth conversion problem and have gained a better understanding of the geology of this field.

  9. Applications of Radarsat-1 synthetic aperture radar imagery to assess hurricane-related flooding of coastal Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiage, L.M.; Walker, N.D.; Balasubramanian, S.; Babin, A.; Barras, J.

    2005-01-01

    The Louisiana coast is subjected to hurricane impacts including flooding of human settlements, river channels and coastal marshes, and salt water intrusion. Information on the extent of flooding is often required quickly for emergency relief, repairs of infrastructure, and production of flood risk maps. This study investigates the feasibility of using Radarsat-1 SAR imagery to detect flooded areas in coastal Louisiana after Hurricane Lili, October 2002. Arithmetic differencing and multi-temporal enhancement techniques were employed to detect flooding and to investigate relationships between backscatter and water level changes. Strong positive correlations (R2=0.7-0.94) were observed between water level and SAR backscatter within marsh areas proximate to Atchafalaya Bay. Although variations in elevation and vegetation type did influence and complicate the radar signature at individual sites, multi-date differences in backscatter largely reflected the patterns of flooding within large marsh areas. Preliminary analyses show that SAR imagery was not useful in mapping urban flooding in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina's landfall on 29 August 2005. ?? 2005 Taylor & Francis.

  10. Potential Next Steps for the New Orleans City Council Energy Efficiency Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Doris, E.

    2011-09-01

    This document is adapted from an actual February 2008 deliverable memo and report delivered by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to the City Council of New Orleans, the office of the Mayor of New Orleans, the Chairperson of the Citizen Stakeholders Group (New Orleans Energy Task Force) and the Department of Energy Project Officer in February of 2008. In January 2008, the New Orleans Utility Committee requested review, commentary, and suggestions for Utility Committee next steps related to the Energy Efficiency Resolution (the Resolution) passed by the City Council in December 2007. The suggestions are reprinted here as: (1) An illustration of opportunities for other local governments for the development and implementation of effective energy efficiency ordinances and resolutions; and (2) An example of the type of policy technical assistance that DOE/NREL provides to communities. For more information on the strategy for delivering assistance, please see: www.nrel.gov/docs/fy11osti/48689.pdf. Based on experience in other communities and energy efficiency policies and programs, NREL found the Resolution to be a solid framework for increasing the responsible use of energy efficiency and reaping the associated economic and environmental benefits in the city of New Orleans. The remainder of this document provides the requested suggestions for next steps in implementing the word and spirit of the resolution. These suggestions integrate the extensive work of other entities, including the New Orleans Mayor's office, the New Orleans Energy Advisory Committee, the Energy Efficiency Initiative, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency. In general, three actions were suggested for funding mechanisms, two for near-term successes, and two for longer-term success.

  11. Building Energy-Efficient Schools in New Orleans: Lessons Learned (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-12-01

    This case study presents the lessons learned from incorporating energy efficiency in the rebuilding and renovating of New Orleans K-12 schools after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Hurricane Katrina was the largest natural disaster in the United States, striking the Gulf Coast on August 29, 2005, and flooding 80% of New Orleans; to make matters worse, the city was flooded again only three weeks later by the effects of Hurricane Rita. Many of the buildings, including schools, were heavily damaged. The devastation of schools in New Orleans from the hurricanes was exacerbated by many years of deferred school maintenance. This case study presents the lessons learned from incorporating energy efficiency in the rebuilding and renovating of New Orleans K-12 schools after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The experiences of four new schools-Langston Hughes Elementary School, Andrew H. Wilson Elementary School (which was 50% new construction and 50% major renovation), L.B. Landry High School, and Lake Area High School-and one major renovation, Joseph A. Craig Elementary School-are described to help other school districts and design teams with their in-progress and future school building projects in hot-humid climates. Before Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans had 128 public schools. As part of the recovery planning, New Orleans Public Schools underwent an assessment and planning process to determine how many schools were needed and in what locations. Following a series of public town hall meetings and a district-wide comprehensive facility assessment, a Master Plan was developed, which outlined the renovation or construction of 85 schools throughout the city, which are expected to be completed by 2017. New Orleans Public Schools expects to build or renovate approximately eight schools each year over a 10-year period to achieve 21st century schools district-wide. Reconstruction costs are estimated at nearly $2 billion.

  12. FERROUS METALS RECOVERY AT RECOVERY 1, NEW ORLEANS: PERFORMANCE OF THE MODIFIED SYSTEM. TEST NO. 4.05 AND TEST NO. 4.09, RECOVERY 1, NEW ORLEANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents two series of samplings and the monitoring of enery consumption and shredder hammer wear of the upgraded ferrous recovery system that produces a light ferrous product from the processing of municipal refuse at the New Orleans resource recovery project. A ser...

  13. The Head-off Environmental Asthma in Louisiana (HEAL) Study—Methods and Study Population

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Suzanne; Mvula, Mosanda M.; Jaffee, Katy; Wildfire, Jeremy; Thornton, Eleanor; Cohn, Richard D.; Grimsley, L. Faye; Mitchell, Herman; El-Dahr, Jane; Sterling, Yvonne; Martin, William J.; White, LuAnn; Stephens, Kevin U.; Lichtveld, Maureen

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the city of New Orleans, Louisiana, and surrounding parishes (NOLA), children with asthma were perilously impacted by Hurricane Katrina as a result of disrupted health care, high home mold and allergen levels, and high stress. Objectives: The Head-off Environmental Asthma in Louisiana (HEAL) study was conducted to examine relationships between the post-Katrina environment and childhood asthma in NOLA and assess a novel asthma counselor intervention that provided case management and guidance for reducing home mold and allergen levels. Methods: Children (4–12 years old) with moderate-to-severe asthma were recruited from NOLA schools. Over 1 year, they received two clinical evaluations, three home environmental evaluations, and the asthma intervention. Quarterly end points included symptom days, medication use, and unscheduled emergency department or clinic visits. A community advisory group was assembled and informed HEAL at all phases. Results: Of the children (n = 182) enrolled in HEAL, 67% were African American, and 25% came from households with annual incomes < $15,000. HEAL children were symptomatic, averaging 6.6 symptom days in the 2 weeks before baseline, and had frequent unscheduled visits to clinics or emergency departments (76% had at least one unscheduled visit in the preceding 3 months). In this report, we describe study design and baseline characteristics of HEAL children. Conclusions: Despite numerous challenges faced by investigators, study staff, and participants, including destroyed infrastructure, disrupted lives, and lost jobs, HEAL was successful in terms of recruitment and retention, the high quality of data collected that will provide insight into asthma-allergen relationships, and the asthma intervention. This success was attributable to using an adaptive approach and refining processes as needed. PMID:22895349

  14. Louisiana KIDS COUNT Special Report on Child Care, 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agenda for Children, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The "2006 Agenda for Children Louisiana Kids Count Special Report on Child Care" documents and describes the supply and affordability of child care and early education in each of Louisiana's 64 parishes. Seventy-eight percent (78%) of Louisiana's children under the age of five are cared for by someone other than a parent or guardian on a regular…

  15. Fait A La Main: A Source Book of Louisiana Crafts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergeron, Maida, Ed.

    The Louisiana Crafts Program is an economic development program that strives to stimulate several markets for Louisiana craftsmen. This publication is a directory of juried Louisiana craftsmen of various types; it is intended as a source book for anyone interested in handmade crafts. It is divided into two sections: "Folk Craftsmen" and…

  16. Louisiana hydrologic atlas map no. 2 : Areal extent of freshwater in major aquifers of Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smoot, Charles W.

    1986-01-01

    The areal availability of freshwater (cl content < 250 mg/L) in 14 major aquifers in Louisiana was investigated. The depth of occurrence of fresh groundwater in Louisiana is variable. The aquifers were mapped to show their areal extent from the outcrop or subcrop to the downdip limit of freshwater. Water in each aquifer becomes saline downdip; but in most areas an overlying (younger) aquifer contains freshwater. None of the major aquifer contains freshwater in northern Louisiana where the Vicksburg and Jackson groups crop out and the underlying Cockfield aquifer (Cockfield Formation) contains saline water. (Peters-PTT)

  17. Analyses of native water and dredged material from southern Louisiana waterways, 1975-76

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demas, Charles R.; Higgins, Patricia C.

    1977-01-01

    From June 1975 to July 1976 the U.S. Geological Survey conducted nine dredging and seven postdredging studies related to water quality in selected reaches of major navigable waterways of southern Louisiana. Samples were collected from the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet, Mississippi River at Southwest Pass, Mississippi River at New Orleans, Bayou Rigaud near Grand Isle, Barataria Bay and Waterway, Bayou La Carpe near Houma, Atchafalaya Bay (Ship Channel), Lower Atchafalaya River area, Intracoastal Waterway near Calumet, Intracoastal Waterway (Port Allen to Morgan City), Petite Anse area, and Calcasieu River and Ship Channel. These studies were conductd to determine potential environmental effects of dredging activities in the waterways. The Geological survey collected, treated, and analyzed 383 water and water-sediment mixture samples from 85 dredging sites and 142 postdredging samples (72 sites). Water samples were collected 100 yards upstream and downstream from the dredge effluent, from the disposal area, and from the effluent outfall during the dredge phase of the study; samples were collected at former dredge sites during the postdredging phase. Samples were analyzed for selected metals, pesticides, nutrients, and organic constituents. The analytical data are presented in tables. Sampling sites are shown on maps. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. The 1802 Saint-Domingue yellow fever epidemic and the Louisiana Purchase.

    PubMed

    Marr, John S; Cathey, John T

    2013-01-01

    Epidemics have been pivotal in the history of the world as exemplified by a yellow fever epidemic in the Caribbean that clearly altered New World geopolitics. By the end of the 18th century, yellow fever--then an "emerging disease"--was widespread throughout the Caribbean and particularly lethal in Saint-Domingue (present day Haiti). From 1793 to 1798, case fatality rates among British troops in the West Indies (including Saint-Domingue) were as high as 70%. A worse fate befell newly arrived French armed forces in 1802, ostensibly sent by Napoleon to suppress a rebellion and to reestablish slavery. Historians have disagreed on why Napoleon initially dispatched nearly 30,000 soldiers and sailors to the island. Evidence suggests the troops were actually an expeditionary force with intensions to invade North America through New Orleans and to establish a major holding in the Mississippi valley. However, lacking knowledge of basic prevention and control measures, mortality from the disease left only a small and shattered fraction of his troops alive, thwarting his secret ambition to colonize and hold French-held lands, which later became better known as the Louisiana Purchase. If an event of the magnitude of France's experience were to occur in the 21st century, it might also have profound unanticipated consequences. PMID:23169407

  19. Pilot oil atlas for Louisiana. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgoyne, A.T. Jr.; Kimbrell, C.; Gao, Weigang

    1993-01-01

    An interdisciplinary research team of engineers, geologists, and computer scientists was assembled at LSU to develop unproved methods for prospecting for bypassed oil and to support oil and gas producers in Louisiana. The overall objective of the project was to develop methods for extending the producing life of several types of reservoirs by reducing the amount of oil being bypassed and abandoned. As part of this work, the team collected information available from public sources for several example reservoirs. One task of the project was to develop a format for the compilation of the extensive but cumbersome Louisiana reservoir data so that it could be used by government and industry to evaluate the resource and plan future activities. The existing information system maintained by Louisiana is a Production Audit Reporting System (PARS). It was designed to allow auditing of oil and gas production and severance taxes associated with this production. It was not intended to be used as a database for determining reservoir recovery efficiency or prospecting for oil and gas. Its use for these purposes, however, has been increasing. The database format suggested in this report would allow production information to be easily displayed by reservoir as well as by lease, unit, or well. The data collected as part of the bypassed-oil study was used to illustrate the proposed new format. This pilot database, or atlas, contains information available for 15 reservoirs. It is recommended that LSU continue to compile and publish database information on the potential for bypassed oil in Louisiana`s active reservoirs. This technology-transfer activity should focus each year on those active reservoirs involved in hearings of the Louisiana Office of Conservation. It should also focus on reservoirs being screened by LSU for EOR.

  20. Historical Use of Cultivars as Parents in Florida and Louisiana Sugarcane Breeding Programs.

    PubMed

    Todd, James; Glaz, Barry; Burner, David; Kimbeng, Collins

    2015-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum L. spp. hybrids) growers depend on breeding programs for new, high-yielding cultivars that have resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses, so breeders continually seek out widely adapted, high yielding germplasm to be used as parents for their programs. Cultivars are sometimes used for this purpose, but their use may be minimized to prevent genetic diversity erosion. The purpose of this study was to determine the importance of cultivars as parents in three USA (one in Florida and two in Louisiana) sugarcane breeding programs by quantifying the percentage of cultivars that had these parental groupings based on published registrations and crossing records. The percentage of cultivars with at least one commercial parent for each program was 81.8%, 77.5%, and 64.3% for the Houma (Ho), Louisiana, Canal Point (CP), Florida and Louisiana State University (LSU) programs, respectively, but cultivars were recently used as parents in only 11.8% (Ho), 16.39% (CP), and 34.3% (LSU) of crosses. The results indicate that the CP and Ho programs should consider increasing the use of cultivars as parents in their breeding programs to increase the probability of selecting potential commercial genotypes, but this should be balanced with high diversity crosses to avoid the loss of diversity. PMID:27347510

  1. Historical Use of Cultivars as Parents in Florida and Louisiana Sugarcane Breeding Programs

    PubMed Central

    Kimbeng, Collins

    2015-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum L. spp. hybrids) growers depend on breeding programs for new, high-yielding cultivars that have resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses, so breeders continually seek out widely adapted, high yielding germplasm to be used as parents for their programs. Cultivars are sometimes used for this purpose, but their use may be minimized to prevent genetic diversity erosion. The purpose of this study was to determine the importance of cultivars as parents in three USA (one in Florida and two in Louisiana) sugarcane breeding programs by quantifying the percentage of cultivars that had these parental groupings based on published registrations and crossing records. The percentage of cultivars with at least one commercial parent for each program was 81.8%, 77.5%, and 64.3% for the Houma (Ho), Louisiana, Canal Point (CP), Florida and Louisiana State University (LSU) programs, respectively, but cultivars were recently used as parents in only 11.8% (Ho), 16.39% (CP), and 34.3% (LSU) of crosses. The results indicate that the CP and Ho programs should consider increasing the use of cultivars as parents in their breeding programs to increase the probability of selecting potential commercial genotypes, but this should be balanced with high diversity crosses to avoid the loss of diversity.

  2. An operational application of ERTS-1 imagery to the environmental inventory process. [environmental impact statement for Atchafalaya basin of Louisiana and Mississippi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneal, J. D.; Bwins, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A discussion is presented of how The Engineer Agency for Resources Inventories utilized ERTS remotely sensed imagery as a/supplement to airphotos and collateral data for an environmental impact study of the Atchafalaya Basin for the New Orleans engineer district. This single overall inventory permitted a systematic approach and substantial economy for a number of engineering projects for which environmental impact statements would be required. The study area covered approximately 25,000 square miles and included all or part of 36 parishes in Louisiana and 8 counties in Mississippi. It was concluded that as a supplementary source, used in conjunction with airphotos, ERTS had proven itself as a significant means of economy. As a primary source, the Engineer Agency is not yet ready to accept ERTS for their own particular applications.

  3. Export of Dissolved Lignin from Coastal Wetlands to the Louisiana Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, T. S.; Dimarco, S. F.; Smith, R. W.; Schreiner, K. M.

    2008-12-01

    Here we report on spatial and temporal changes in the concentration and composition of dissolved lignin- phenols in surface and bottom waters off the Louisiana coast (USA). Samples were collected at 7 stations on 2 cruises (April, and July, 2008) along a transect that spanned from inside Terrebonne Bay, Louisiana (12 m water depth) to the outer-most station on the inner Louisiana shelf (21 m water depth). The highest average concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved lignin, during both cruises, occurred at the interface between Terrebonne Bay and the inner shelf. Average DOC and dissolved lignin concentrations were significantly higher in April than in July across most stations. Based on hydrologic data, these higher concentrations clearly reflect a combined mixing of DOM from plume waters to the west and local marsh inputs. The cinnamyl/vanillyl (C/V) and syringyl/vanillyl (S/V) ratios indicated that the predominant source of lignin was from non-woody angiosperms - likely the dominant species of wetland plants Spartina alterniflora and S. patens (Spartina spp.) that border the entire bay. The high vanillic acid to vanillin (Ad/Al)v ratios for all stations were typical of that found near estuarine boundaries, where biologically- and photochemically-mediated lignin decay processes are important. This preliminary data indicates that wetlands provide another source of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to the Louisiana shelf that likely contributes to microbial food resources and hence hypoxia, especially in the context of the instability and extensive erosion of these marshes over the past ca. 50 years. This has important implications for the current management plan to reduce hypoxia in the GOM, particularly in those regions that extend west of the nutrient-rich highly productive near-field zones of Atchafalaya-Mississippi river plumes.

  4. Experimental inoculation of Louisiana red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV).

    PubMed

    Pace, Barcley T; Hawke, John P; Subramanian, Ramesh; Green, Christopher C

    2016-07-01

    The red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii represents an important aquaculture species responsible for over half of all commercial aquaculture profits in Louisiana, USA. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is highly pathogenic in crustacean species and induces mass mortality in aquaculture operations worldwide. Natural outbreaks of WSSV occur yearly in cultured populations of crayfish in Louisiana. The goal of this study was to better understand the infectivity of WSSV in P. clarkii, by determining the minimum lethal dose necessary to initiate infection and to measure the resulting cumulative mortality following infection with different doses. A real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) method was used to detect WSSV in DNA extracted from gill tissue to ensure P. clarkii study populations were WSSV-free before the start of trials. Viable viral particles were isolated from naturally infected P. clarkii gill tissue and quantified using a novel digital PCR approach. Three infectivity trials were performed, and WSSV inocula were created by serial dilution, generating 5 treatments per trial. Five crayfish (weighing ~25 g) per dilution per trial received viral inoculations. Mortality was monitored daily for the duration of the trial in order to construct a median lethal dose (LD50) curve, and probit regression analysis was used to determine LD50 concentrations of viral particles. Knowledge of the infectivity of WSSV in native crayfish populations is of critical importance to the management of the commercial crayfish aquaculture industry in Louisiana. This is the first study to investigate the infectivity and to determine the LD50 of the Louisiana strain of WSSV in native crayfish. PMID:27409237

  5. Hurricane Public Health Research Center at Louisiana State University a Case of Academia Being Prepared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heerden, I. L.

    2006-12-01

    Recent floods along the Atlantic and Gulf seaboards and elsewhere in the world before Katrina had demonstrated the complexity of public health impacts including trauma; fires; chemical, sewerage, and corpse contamination of air and water; and diseases. We realized that Louisiana's vulnerability was exacerbated because forty percent of the state is coastal zone in which 70% of the population resides. Ninety percent of this zone is near or below sea level and protected by man-made hurricane-protection levees. New Orleans ranked among the highest in the nation with respect to potential societal, mortality, and economic impacts. Recognizing that emergency responders had in the past been unprepared for the extent of the public health impacts of these complex flooding disasters, we created a multi-disciplinary, multi-campus research center to address these issues for New Orleans. The Louisiana Board of Regents, through its millennium Health Excellence Fund, awarded a 5-year contract to the Center in 2001. The research team combined the resources of natural scientists, social scientists, engineers, and the mental health and medical communities. We met annually with a Board of Advisors, made up of federal, state, local government, and non-governmental agency officials, first responders and emergency managers. Their advice was invaluable in acquiring various datasets and directing aspects of the various research efforts. Our center developed detailed models for assessment and amelioration of public health impacts due to hurricanes and major floods. Initial research had showed that a Category 3 storm would cause levee overtopping, and that most levee systems were unprotected from the impacts of storm-induced wave erosion. Sections of levees with distinct sags suggested the beginnings of foundation and subsidence problems. We recognized that a slow moving Cat 3 could flood up to the eaves of houses and would have residence times of weeks. The resultant mix of sewage, corpses

  6. Evaluation of the Louisiana Nutrition Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, J. H., Jr.

    In 1969, 385 Louisiana Cooperative Extension Service aides conducted an eight week nutrition education program (expanded to 12 weeks in three parishes) for over 18,000 low income homemakers and children in 31 parishes. Initial interviews were used to ascertain nutrition habits and influences thereon, knowledge levels, homemakers' age and…

  7. Wide row spacing in Louisiana sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is growing interest in the Louisiana sugarcane industry for a wider 8 foot row spacing than the conventional 6 foot row spacing. The wide row provides room for two drills of cane about 30 inches apart on each row. This type of wide row spacing lowers acre-feet from 7260 to 5445, thus reducing ...

  8. Economically important sugarcane diseases in Louisiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Major diseases with potential to cause economic losses in the Louisiana sugarcane industry include ratoon stunt and leaf scald caused by bacterial pathogens, mosaic and yellow leaf caused by virus pathogens, and brown and orange rusts and smut caused by fungal pathogens. The most efficient method o...

  9. Early harvest affects ratooning ability in Louisiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Similar to sugarcane industries around the world, economies of scale often lead to decreases in total number of manufacturing centers such as sugar mills. One of the consequences of mill closures has been an increase in the duration of the crushing season in Louisiana, which has historically bee...

  10. Jackpot for Insurgent in Louisiana Contest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Campaigns for state school board are typically quiet affairs, eliciting only modest interest from the public and even less from political donors. But the race last fall for the District 2 seat on Louisiana's board of elementary and secondary education was a remarkable exception. The contest attracted the attention of education activists and…

  11. A catalog of Louisiana's nesting seabird colonies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fontenot, William R.; Cardiff, Steve W.; DeMay, Richard A.; Dittmann, Donna L.; Hartley, Stephen B.; Jeske, Clinton W.; Lorenz, Nicole; Michot, Thomas C.; Purrington, Robert Dan; Seymour, Michael; Vermillion, William G.

    2012-01-01

    collective habitats which comprise Louisiana's now fragile coastal zone have taken major hits from commercial/residential, oil & gas, and other industrial development, primarily in the form of coastal erosion exacerbated by these and other factors (Portnoy 1978, Spendelow and Patton 1988, Martin and Lester 1990, Green, et al. 2006). Moreover, during this same period, both geologic subsidence rates (Tornqvist et al. 2008) and mean sea-level (Tornqvist et al. 2002) have increased, along with significant tropical storm activity; all of which have combined to impact available marsh, barrier island, beach, and dredge spoil nesting habitat for waterbirds, especially seabirds, throughout the coastal zone of Louisiana. The primary objective of this publication is to detail those coastal Louisiana colonial seabird nesting sites for which we have reasonably accurate data, in a tabular, site-by-site format. All major survey (1976-2008) data of site-by-site seabird species counts, as well as several smaller data sets, referred to in the site history tables as “miscellaneous observations” obtained during the May-June seabird breeding period, are included. It is our hope that these data will provide a dependable foundation from which future colonial seabird nesting surveys might be planned and carried out, as well as showcase the importance of coastal Louisiana's seabird rookeries, and contribute to their conservation.

  12. Louisiana: Status Summary of Statewide Library Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coco, Carolyn, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This summary of library initiatives in Louisiana relating to information technology describes academic library initiatives; multitype library initiatives, including library networks that provide access to the Internet; the state library and public library initiatives, including interlibrary loan services; school library initiatives; and state…

  13. Spring reflections on Louisiana sugar cane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Louisiana sugar industry continues to produce high cane and sugar yields despite a short growing season. Spring fallow land management is essential for the upcoming crop. In the past few years, wide row spacing, billet cane planting, and cover-cropping have received significant attention. The ei...

  14. Unique cropping systems for Louisiana sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Louisiana sugarcane field is typically replanted every four years due to declining yields, and, although, it is a costly process, it is both necessary and an opportunity to maximize the financial return during the next four year cropping cycle. Fallow planting systems (FPS) during the fallow perio...

  15. Hybrid Computation at Louisiana State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corripio, Armando B.

    Hybrid computation facilities have been in operation at Louisiana State University since the spring of 1969. In part, they consist of an Electronics Associates, Inc. (EAI) Model 680 analog computer, an EAI Model 693 interface, and a Xerox Data Systems (XDS) Sigma 5 digital computer. The hybrid laboratory is used in a course on hybrid computation…

  16. Where in Louisiana [with] Teacher Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillan, Bob; Williams, Ross

    The first part of this document is a report describing "Where in Louisiana," a program model using IBM LinkWay (i.e., a multimedia software package providing tools to merge text and graphics) that was created as a cooperative learning activity to enhance and expand state studies. The introductory report discusses ways the model promotes learning,…

  17. 40 CFR 81.319 - Louisiana.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.319 Louisiana... James Par, and St Mary Par areas are maintenance areas for the 1-hour NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part... Register citations affecting § 81.319 see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the...

  18. 40 CFR 81.319 - Louisiana.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.319 Louisiana... areas for the 1-hour NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Louisiana—NO2 (1971 Annual Standard... Register citations affecting § 81.319 see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the...

  19. 40 CFR 81.319 - Louisiana.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.319 Louisiana... Mary Par areas are maintenance areas for the 1-hour NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X... otherwise noted. Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 81.319 see the List of...

  20. Louisiana Programs and Practices File. 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Louisiana Dissemination Network.

    This catalog presents interesting programs and practices developed by educational systems and practitioners throughout Louisiana. These exemplary programs were nominated for presentation at the annual workshops that disseminate the programs and practices. Descriptions of each of the 26 programs include: program title and location, age group…

  1. Survey of Computer Usage in Louisiana Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Peggy C.; And Others

    A survey of computer usage in 179 randomly selected public elementary and secondary schools in Louisiana was conducted in the spring of 1988. School principals responded to questions about school size, the socioeconomic status of the student population, the number of teachers certified in computer literacy and computer science, and the number of…

  2. Crime Victimization among Immigrant Latino Day Laborers in Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Negi, Nalini Junko; Cepeda, Alice; Valdez, Avelardo

    2013-01-01

    Reports indicate that the criminal victimization of Latino immigrants in the United States has been increasing yet is often underreported. This may be especially true in new immigrant settlement cities that lack an established Latino community to provide support and feelings of security. New Orleans is an important context to investigate criminal…

  3. SCHOOL DESEGREGATION IN NEW ORLEANS, A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE FAILURE OF SOCIAL CONTROL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CRAIN, ROBERT L; AND OTHERS

    THE ISSUE OF SCHOOL DESEGREGATION WAS STUDIED AS IT OCCURED IN SEVEN SOUTHERN CITIES OF THE UNITED STATES, RESULTING FROM THE 1954 "BROWN" DECISION OF THE SUPREME COURT. THESE CITIES WERE COLUMBUS, JACKSONVILLE, NEW ORLEANS, MONTGOMERY, ATLANTA, MIAMI, AND BATON ROUGE. CASE STUDY DATA WERE GATHERED THROUGH INTERVIEW RESPONSES AND PERSONAL FILES OF…

  4. New Orleans: Public Attitudes About Crime. A National Crime Survey Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paez, Adolfo L., Ed.

    The National Crime Survey (NCS) program has conducted a continuous national survey and separate surveys in 26 central cities to study the impact of crime on American society. Attitudinal information obtained from a 1974 survey of occupants of 4,918 housing units (9,301 residents age 16 and over) in New Orleans reflects crime trends, fear of crime,…

  5. Catholic Schools Reopening after Katrina: Officials Are Pleased by Turnout in Archdiocese of New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    Last week, in the Archdiocese of New Orleans students returned to class in 37 Roman Catholic schools that opened for the first time since Hurricane Katrina blasted the region six weeks ago. School officials were surprised to see families returning much sooner and in greater numbers than expected. With the reopening of six high schools and 30…

  6. DISASTER AND YOUTH VIOLENCE: THE EXPERIENCE OF SCHOOL ATTENDING YOUTH IN NEW ORLEANS

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Aubrey S.; Johnson, Carolyn C.; Clum, Gretchen A.; Brown, Lisanne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although disaster exposure is linked with increased child aggression, population-level trends are unknown. Pre- to post-Katrina changes in violence-related behaviors among New Orleans high school youth (ages 12-18) were assessed. Methods Data from the 2003 (pre-Katrina), 2005 (pre-Katrina) and 2007 (post-Katrina) New Orleans Youth Risk Behavior Survey (n=5,267) were utilized. Crude comparisons across years of population characteristics and violence behavior prevalence were made with chi-square analyses. Changes in violence-related behaviors over time were assessed with logistic regression models including indicators for survey years and controls for compositional changes. Results Age, gender and race/ethnicity of school-attending youth were stable across years. In models controlling for demographics, most behaviors were stable over time. Some changes were observed for all groups: dating violence and forced sex increased prior to the storm; weapon carrying and missing school due to feeling unsafe decreased after the storm. Among African American adolescents only, being threatened at school increased before Katrina. Conclusions Results do not support significant population-level increases in violent behavior among New Orleans school-attending youths post-Katrina. Factors that buffered New Orleans students from post-Katrina violence increases, such as population composition changes or increased supportive services, may explain these findings. PMID:21783056

  7. Rookie Teachers, Stressed Students Confront Realities of New Orleans' Schools after Storm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2007-01-01

    John McDonogh Senior High School's challenges, and similar hardship at other public schools that have reopened in New Orleans, were not part of the vision advanced by politicians and educators who saw Hurricane Katrina's destruction as an unprecedented opportunity for schools. To them, Katrina, terrible though it was, had delivered a chance to…

  8. "No Excuses" in New Orleans: The Silent Passivity of Neoliberal Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sondel, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on ethnographic data, this article critically analyzes pedagogy in "no excuses" charter schools in New Orleans. Employing Ladson-Billings's framework for culturally relevant pedagogy, the author describes the level of academic rigor, cultural competence, and critical consciousness development across classrooms. This study…

  9. Spiritual and Religious Supports Part 10: Congruence in Faith and Action--Inclusivity in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The First Congregational Church has a heart of mission. Yet, when the mission hits a situation that's personal and makes one squirm a bit, it becomes more of a challenge. Seven teams have been sent from the church to help the rebuilding in New Orleans. The first teams did the mucking, getting all of the belongings out of the house and putting them…

  10. "Listen to the Voice of Reason": The "New Orleans Tribune" as Advocate for Public, Integrated Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melancon, Kristi Richard; Hendry, Petra Munro

    2015-01-01

    The "New Orleans Tribune" (1864-1870), the first black daily newspaper in the United States, was the singular text in the public South at its time to staunchly advocate for public, integrated education, anticipating the ruling of "Brown v. Board of Education," and arguing that separate education would always be synonymous with…

  11. Why Here and Why Now? Teacher Motivations for Unionizing in a New Orleans Charter School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beabout, Brian R.; Gill, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The rigidity of teachers unions has been given as a primary reason for their lack of representation among America's rapidly growing, although still relatively small, charter school sector. In the case of post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans, the city rapidly converted from a union-backed teacher workforce to a largely nonunionized charter school…

  12. Linda Finch speaks to children during World Flight in New Orleans, La.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Linda Finch, who re-created the flight of Amelia Earhardt's flight around the world 60 years ago, landed at New Orleans Lakefront Airport to speak to groups of inner-city school children during World Flight 1997. Stennis Space Center's Educator Resource Center played a role in the event by providing SSC-developed Geomap software to aid students in tracking Finch's flight.

  13. Intermediary Organizations in Charter School Policy Coalitions: Evidence from New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBray, Elizabeth; Scott, Janelle; Lubienski, Christopher; Jabbar, Huriya

    2014-01-01

    This article develops a framework for investigating research use, using an "advocacy coalition framework" and the concepts of a "supply side" (mainly organizations) and "demand side" (policymakers). Drawing on interview data and documents from New Orleans about the charter school reforms that have developed there…

  14. Pedagogy, Policy, and the Privatized City: Stories of Dispossession and Defiance from New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buras, Kristen L.; Randels, Jim; Salaam, Kalamu ya

    2010-01-01

    In cities across the nation, communities of color find themselves resisting state disinvestment and the politics of dispossession. Students at the Center--a writing initiative based in several New Orleans high schools--takes on this struggle through a close examination of race and schools. The book builds on the powerful stories of marginalized…

  15. Hope for an Uncertain Future: Recovery and Rebuilding Efforts in New Orleans's Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Karen A.

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the documented degree of the destruction triggered by Hurricane Katrina, the impact on the Orleans Parish School District (OPSD), and the efforts that have been made to recover, rebuild, and reopen the public schools. Using a framework that examines historical inequalities and long-term neglect of OPSD schools pre-Katrina,…

  16. 75 FR 4693 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Inner Harbor Navigational Canal, New Orleans, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... they bike across the bridge for the Ochsner Ironman 70.3 New Orleans event. This deviation allows the... questions on this rule, call or e-mail Lindsey Middleton, Bridge Administration Branch; telephone 504-671-2128, e-mail Lindsey.R.Middleton@uscg.mil . If you have questions on viewing the docket, call Renee...

  17. The Double-Edged Sword of "Disaster Volunteerism": A Study of New Orleans Rebirth Movement Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heldman, Caroline; Israel-Trummel, Mackenzie

    2012-01-01

    We examine the political and personal effects of disaster volunteerism with participants of the New Orleans Rebirth Movement (NORM) using four waves of pre- and postsurveys and qualitative analysis of participant journals. Significant increases are found in internal political efficacy, desire to be active in politics, and value placed on social…

  18. Surviving Hurricane Katrina: Winds of Change Transform a New Orleans Addiction Treatment Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toriello, Paul J.; Pedersen-Wasson, Else; Crisham, Erin M.; Ellis, Robert; Morse, Patricia; Morse, Edward V.

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina's impact on the operations of the largest residential, addiction treatment organization in New Orleans is described. Pre- and post-Katrina experiences are discussed and augmented with organizational performance data. Suggestions for future research are provided. (Contains 4 figures.)

  19. Education Reform in New Orleans: Voices from the Recovery School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciolino, Max S.; Kirylo, James D.; Mirón, Luis; Frazier, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    In the post-Katrina education landscape in New Orleans, teachers in charter schools and district-run schools in the Recovery School District are uniquely situated to provide a direct eyewitness account of the successes and failures of the city's new direction in public education. This narrative presents the opinions of teachers in a critical…

  20. The Visible Hand: Markets, Politics, and Regulation in Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jabbar, Huriya

    2016-01-01

    In this article Huriya Jabbar examines how the regulatory environment in post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans has influenced choice, incentives, and competition among schools. While previous research has highlighted the mechanisms of competition and individual choice--the "invisible hand"--and the creation of markets in education, Jabbar…

  1. Assessment of Hurricane Katrina Damage to New Orleans Public School Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of the Great City Schools, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast of the United States on August 29, 2005, and triggered one of the most devastating natural disasters in the history of the nation. New Orleans, in particular, and the schools that served the community's children, suffered severe storm damage and massive flooding. Central to the city's strategy of getting back…

  2. Teaching New Orleans: A Cultural Immersion and Service Learning Travel Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luquet, Wade J.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a travel course to New Orleans that allows students the opportunity to study a unique culture in the United States. Students in the course are able to study how the culture developed through its immigration patterns, its food, its architecture, and the development of jazz. Since the flooding following Hurricane Katrina, a…

  3. Out of New Orleans: Race, Class, and Researching the Katrina Diaspora

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Jerome E.

    2008-01-01

    The torrential rains from Hurricane Katrina, the breaking of the levees, and the subsequent flooding of New Orleans resulted in another Black Diaspora. This article focuses on Black children and families who were displaced by Hurricane Katrina but now reside in cities, towns, and suburbs outside of the Crescent City. Informed by the author's…

  4. School Choice, Student Mobility, and School Quality: Evidence from Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Richard O.; Duque, Matthew; McEachin, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, school choice policies predicated on student mobility have gained prominence as urban districts address chronically low-performing schools. However, scholars have highlighted equity concerns related to choice policies. The case of post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans provides an opportunity to examine student mobility patterns in…

  5. Hurricane Chasers in New Orleans: Latino Immigrants as a Source of a Rapid Response Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fussell, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the Latino workers who came to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina to clean up and repair the city. The author uses data from surveys collected at the visits of the Brazilian, Mexican, and Nicaraguan consulates (N = 253) to study the internally mobile immigrants who arrived after Katrina and who anticipate leaving New Orleans…

  6. Selling Schools: Marketing and Recruitment Strategies in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jabbar, Huriya

    2016-01-01

    Under new school-choice policies, schools feel increasing pressure to market their schools to parents and students. I examine how school leaders in New Orleans used different marketing strategies based on their positions in the market hierarchy and the ways in which they used formal and informal processes to recruit students. This study relied on…

  7. Feet to the Fire: New Orleans Kids Rethink Their Devastated School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wholey, Jane; Burkes, Betty

    2015-01-01

    Kids Rethink New Orleans Schools is an organization of primarily middle school youth that formed after Hurricane Katrina destroyed most of the city's schools. This chapter describes Rethink's first six years of operation, which culminated in school system policy changes and an HBO documentary about the organization's groundbreaking work.

  8. Floating Foundations: "Kairos," Community, and a Composition Program in Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, T. R.; Letter, Joe; Livingston, Judith Kemerait

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe their individual and collective experiences reconstructing their New Orleans-based university composition program in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. They emphasize how the concept of "floating foundations" helps account for changes in their students' interests, and they suggest that this idea is applicable to the work of…

  9. Good News for New Orleans: Early Evidence Shows Reforms Lifting Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Douglas N.

    2015-01-01

    What happened to the New Orleans public schools following the tragic levee breeches after Hurricane Katrina is truly unprecedented. Within the span of one year, all public-school employees were fired, the teacher contract expired and was not replaced, and most attendance zones were eliminated. The state took control of almost all public schools…

  10. 77 FR 75079 - Safety Zone; Woldenburg Park, Mississippi River, New Orleans, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Public Participation and Request for..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public..., Captain, U.S. Coast Guard, Captain of the Port New Orleans. FR Doc. 2012-30626 Filed 12-18-12; 8:45...

  11. New Orleans's Unique School Reform Effort and Its Potential Implications for Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Timothy E.

    2010-01-01

    Four years following the decimation of the New Orleans Public Schools by Hurricane Katrina the city has been described as the center of a unique urban public school reform effort. This effort is a combination of events that transpired just before the storm and those that have occurred as a result of it. In particular some claim that the emerging…

  12. Environmental monitoring at designed geopressured-geothermal well sites, Louisiana and Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This document covers the activities of monitoring environmental aspects at designated geothermal wells in Texas and Louisiana during the second quarter of 1990 by the Louisiana Geological Survey, Louisiana State University under contract with US DOE. 1 fig. (FSD)

  13. Water resources data, Louisiana, water year 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baumann, Todd; Goree, B.B.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montogmery, P.A.; Resweber, J.C.; Ross, Garron B.; Ward, Aub N.; Walters, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2004 water year for Louisiana consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 77 gaging stations; stage only for 86 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 60 surface-water stations (including 42 gaging stations) and 112 wells; and water levels for 304 observation wells. Also included are data for 158 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Louisiana.

  14. Water Resources Data, Louisiana, Water Year 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goree, B.B.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.; Resweber, J.C.; Labbe, Charles K.; Walters, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2002 water year for Louisiana consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 85 gaging stations; stage only for 79 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 52 surface-water stations (including 40 gaging stations) and 104 wells; and water levels for 300 observation wells. Also included are data for 143 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Louisiana.

  15. Louisiana NASA EPSCoR Preparation Grant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, John P.; Savoie, E. Joseph

    2002-01-01

    In August, 1999, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration issued a Cooperative Agreement (CA) to the State of Louisiana, through the Louisiana Board of Regents (BOB), for the performance of scientific research and graduate fellowships under the NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) -- Preparation Grant. Originally constructed as a one year program, with an optional one year continuation, this federal-state partnership culminated on 14 August 2002, including a successful continuation proposal and a no cost extension. The total value of the project reached $450K in NASA funding, matched by state funds and institutional contributions. The purpose of the Preparation Grant program was to develop and nurture strong research ties between the state and NASA field centers and Enterprises, in order to prepare for the upcoming full competition for NASA EPSCoR.

  16. Water Resources Data, Louisiana, Water Year 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goree, B.B.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.; Resweber, J.C.; Sasser, D.C., Jr.; Walters, David J.

    2002-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2001 water year for Louisiana consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 71 gaging stations; stage only for 73 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 66 surface-water stations (including 39 gaging stations) and 92 wells; and water levels for 205 observation wells. Also included are data for 166 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Louisiana.

  17. Water resources data, Louisiana, water year 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baumann, Todd; Goree, B.B.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.; Resweber, J.C.; Ross, Garron B.; Sasser, D.C., Jr.; Walters, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2003 water year for Louisiana consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 76 gaging stations; stage only for 86 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 56 surface-water stations (including 44 gaging stations) and 142 wells; and water levels for 313 observation wells. Also included are data for 158 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal and State agencies in Louisiana.

  18. Water Resources Data, Louisiana, Water Year 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goree, B.B.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.; Resweber, J.C.; Sasser, D.C., Jr.; Walters, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2000 water year for Louisiana consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 66 gaging stations; stage only for 70 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 45 surface-water stations (including 25 gaging stations) and 108 wells; and water levels for 221 observation wells. Also included are data for 204 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Louisiana.

  19. Regional and local subsidence in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Trahan, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    The measurement of local, man-induced subsidence is especially critical in areas with high rates of land loss. To measure this subsidence, absolute historical geodetic movements have been estimated by adjusting all movements along the first-order vertical control network from northeast to southwest Louisiana as related to the Monroe uplift. The adjustment will serve as a base line by which local subsidence or uplift can be measured. A generalized trend of increasing subsidence to the south in Louisiana probably reflects increasing sediment thickness and weight toward the axis of the Gulf Coast basin. Anomalous values as low as -17.6 mm/y (-0.7 in./y) occur in areas overlying Pleistocene and Holocene fluvial elements. Positive movement as high as +4.1 mm/y (+0.2 in./y), has been found to be associated with the Iberian structural axis in south-central Louisiana. Land subsidence due to natural causes may far outweigh subsidence resulting from fluid withdrawal or depressurization of geopressured aquifers. The effects of regional and local natural processes should not be underestimated in any systematic approach to measuring subsidence.

  20. Application of InSAR to detection of localized subsidence and its effects on flood protection infrastructure in the New Orleans area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Cathleen; Blom, Ronald; Latini, Daniele

    2014-05-01

    acquisition, a dramatic increase of persistent scatter density in urban areas, and improved measurement of very small displacements (Crosetto et al., 2010). We compare the L-band UAVSAR results with permanent scatterer (PS-InSAR) and Short Baseline Subsets (SBAS) interferometric analyses of a stack composed by 28 TerraSAR X-band images acquired over the same period, to determine the influence of different radar frequencies and analyses techniques. Our applications goal is to demonstrate a technique to inform targeted ground surveys, identify areas of persistent subsidence, and improve overall monitoring and planning in flood risk areas. Dokka, 2011, The role of deep processes in late 20th century subsidence of New Orleans and coastal areas of southern Louisiana and Mississippi: J. Geophys. Res., 116, B06403, doi:10.1029/2010JB008008. Jones, C. E., G. Bawden, S. Deverel, J. Dudas, S. Hensley, Study of movement and seepage along levees using DINSAR and the airborne UAVSAR instrument, Proc. SPIE 8536, SAR Image Analysis, Modeling, and Techniques XII, 85360E (November 21, 2012); doi:10.1117/12.976885. Crosetto, M., Monserrat, O., Iglesias, R., & Crippa, B. (2010). Persistent Scatterer Interferometry: Potential, limits and initial C-and X-band comparison. Photogrammetric engineering and remote sensing, 76(9), 1061-1069. Acknowledgments: This research was carried out in part at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  1. Involving REU interns in community-based research in southern Louisiana - Lessons learned from a summer on the Bayou

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haacker-Santos, R.; Pandya, R. E.; Sloan, V.; Peterson, K.; Laska, S.; Foret, J.; Denning, S.

    2012-12-01

    Many students from under-represented communities choose not to pursue graduate school in geoscience in part because they see few immediate and concrete opportunities to serve society by doing so. To address this, RESESS and SOARS, two long-standing undergraduate-to-graduate geoscience research internships, offer interested students the opportunity work with local and indigenous communities to design and conduct research with clear societal relevance . Our presentation will describe one such community-based research project in coastal areas of Louisiana. This summer, RESESS and SOARS worked with the Center for Hazards Assessment, Response and Technology (CHART) at the University of New Orleans to introduce our interns to projects that support community viability in the face of current and historical ecosystem change by integrating physical science, geospatial technology and traditional ecological knowledge. For nine weeks, three interns lived and worked in Louisiana coastal communities and learned how projects can be defined by, guided by and assessed against community priorities. CHART introduced our interns to participatory action research (PAR) and helped them apply PAR to their research. The interns developed and implemented community-based research projects around land-loss, ecology of culturally important plants, and water quality. The experience has earned positive informal feedback from the students and the communities they worked with and we have already learned valuable lessons about doing community-based work. After the completion of the summer program, student and mentor experiences will be assessed formally through surveys and interviews. Our presentation will describe the projects our three interns worked on, lessons-learned by the interns and our programs, and share recommendations for a successful off-site summer experience for other programs considering community-based research.

  2. Evaluating elements of trust: Race and class in risk communication in post-Katrina New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Battistoli, B F

    2016-05-01

    This study seeks to determine the relative influence of race and class on trust in sources of messages of environmental risk in post-Katrina New Orleans. It poses two hypotheses to test that influence: H1-African-Americans ("Blacks") trust risk message sources less than European American ("Whites") do and H2-The higher the socioeconomic class, the lower the trust in risk message sources. A 37-question telephone survey (landlines and cellphones) was conducted in Orleans Parish in 2012 (n = 414). The overall margin of error was ±4.8% at a 95% confidence interval. A hierarchical regression analysis revealed that the first hypothesis was rejected, while the second was supported. Additional data analysis revealed that frequency of use of sources of risk information appears to be a positive factor in building trust. PMID:25814512

  3. Post-Katrina Fecal Contamination in Violet Marsh near New Orleans

    PubMed Central

    Furey, John S.; Fredrickson, Herbert; Foote, Chris; Richmond, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Fecal material entrained in New Orleans flood waters was pumped into the local environment. Violet Marsh received water pumped from St. Bernard Parish and the Lower Ninth Ward. Sediment core samples were collected from canals conducting water from these areas to pump stations and from locations within Violet Marsh. Viable indicator bacteria and fecal sterols were used to assess the levels of fecal material in sediment deposited after the levee failures and deeper sediments deposited before. Most of the cores had fecal coliform levels that exceed the biosolids criterion. All of the cores had fecal sterols that exceeded the suggested environmental quality criterion. Our data show both a long history of fecal contamination in Violet Marsh and an increase in fecal loading corresponding to the failure of the levee system. The work was performed as part of the Interagency Performance Evaluation Task Force investigation into the consequences of the failures of the New Orleans levee system. PMID:17617670

  4. Evidence-based design for healthcare in post-katrina new orleans: current dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Verderber, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    New Orleans continues to struggle to rebuild from the devastation inflicted by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. More than 1,800 perished in its aftermath. Katrina stands as the costliest catastrophe in U.S. history, and the city's healthcare infrastructure is similarly striving to resuscitate itself. The incorporation of evidence-based design and research (EBD&R) in the reconstitution of the city's healthcare infrastructure offers a promising direction to improve healthcare outcomes. Recent efforts to incorporate EBD&R in New Orleans' recovery are summarized. EBD&R interventions are needed that take certain key dilemmas into consideration-embracing the adaptive reuse possibilities of historic healthcare facilities, private-public sector collaborations in acute care and in neighborhood-based outpatient care environments, and interventions to serve the city's growing population of medically underserved residents. PMID:21161902

  5. Displaced New Orleans Residents in the Aftermath of Hurricane Katrina: Results from a Pilot Survey.

    PubMed

    Sastry, Narayan

    2009-12-01

    This article introduces us to the complexities of conducting social scientific research in a major urban disaster zone and reports on results from the most systematic survey at the time aimed at tracking the whereabouts of pre-Katrina residents during the first year of recovery, the Displaced New Orleans Residents Pilot Survey. This survey drew an area-probability sample of pre-Katrina residents and set out to interview them approximately twelve months after the storm, when educated guesses placed the New Orleans's city population at roughly half its pre-Katrina total. Results confirm that early returnees tended to be disproportionately white, elderly, better educated, and far less likely to have homes rendered uninhabitable by the disaster. These patterns begin to show how demographic processes triggered by the disaster exacerbated existing inequalities in the region, allowing more advantaged residents to return while leaving less advantaged residents dispersed across numerous destinations. PMID:20361011

  6. Louisiana Education Quality Trust Fund: Annual Report Fiscal Year 2004.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, John

    2004-01-01

    The Louisiana Education Quality Trust Fund (LEQTF) was established in 1986 by Louisiana voters to improve the quality of education in the state. The LEQTF receives funds through the Federal Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act and deposits them in what is known as the Permanent Fund. From this Permanent Fund, a separate Support Fund (also known as…

  7. Production Practices of Commercial Catfish Producers in Northeast Louisiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letlow, Richard M.; Verma, Satish

    A study determined the yields obtained and the production practices followed by Louisiana commercial catfish farmers in Catahoula, Concordia, and Franklin Parishes. This information was used by the Louisiana Cooperative Extension Service (LCES) faculty to develop a catfish education program. The study: (1) determined use of selected recommended…

  8. Resilience and Redirection: Information Literacy in Louisiana Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchings, Jessica; Willey, Malia

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a 2012 survey conducted by members of the Louisiana Academic Library and Information Network Consortium (LALINC) to determine the status of the curricular integration of information literacy instruction following numerous budget cuts to Louisiana higher education since 2008. The article also discusses the 2012 deletion of…

  9. Evaluation of rapidly produced Louisiana-grown satsuma juice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As of 2010, the Louisiana Citrus Industry involved about 550 growers who produced roughly 1000 acres of citrus for an estimated gross farm value of almost $7.5 million; consisting predominately of Satsuma oranges, which have adapted well to the southern Louisiana growing conditions. Unfortunately, ...

  10. Mud Bugs: Supply, Demand, and Natural Resources in Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Louisiana's land, coast, and inland waterways are home to many natural resources such as seafood, petroleum, natural gas, and timber--and freshwater crawfish, or "mudbugs" as the locals like to call them. These natural resources are vital to Louisiana's economy. The author describes a unit of study on economics in which a teacher taught and…

  11. Energy Cane Breeding and Selection in Louisiana - A Progress Report

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2001, United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service scientists at the Sugarcane Research Laboratory (SRL) in Houma, Louisiana, began assessing the energy potential of high-fiber sugarcanes (Saccharum spp.) in the Louisiana sugar belt. Test sites were selected geographica...

  12. Teach Louisiana Consortium: A Fifth Year Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haj-Broussard, Michelle; Stringer, Angelle

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a fifth year program evaluation of a private provider program for teacher certification in Louisiana. The study sought to evaluate the success of the Teach Louisiana Consortium program in terms of teacher placement, teacher retention, administrative satisfaction, teacher attitudes, and teacher pedagogical knowledge. Initial…

  13. Local School Finances in Louisiana: Disparities, Discrepancies, and Disgrace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Dwight

    Because Louisiana is facing financial difficulties, the impact of reductions in federal aid since 1980 has been severe. With a state economy dependent on gas, oil, and agriculture, Louisiana suffers when oil prices are low and farming costs are high. Reduced tax income for the state lowers state spending, forcing additional enterprises out of…

  14. 77 FR 54599 - Louisiana; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Louisiana; Emergency and Related Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of the Presidential declaration of an emergency for the State of Louisiana (FEMA-3347-EM), dated August 27, 2012, and...

  15. Kids Count Data Book on Louisiana's Children, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agenda for Children, New Orleans, LA.

    This Kids Count data book provides statistics on the well-being of children in Louisiana. Data are provided for the state as a whole and for each of Louisiana's 64 parishes. An introduction summarizes findings for 1999, and a final section summarizes trends in the data over the past several years. Indicators used in the report to measure child…

  16. Employment Trends; Eating and Beverage Establishments 1958 to 1968, Louisiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Employment Security, Baton Rouge

    Employment in eating and beverage establishments has grown tremendously in Louisiana. In 1940, United States Census figures showed that 18,400 were employed in the industry, and by 1969, the number had increased to 31,000. The situation in Louisiana may not be typical of other states because of a sharp increase in catering services to offshore oil…

  17. 78 FR 63136 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Inner Harbor Navigational Canal, New Orleans, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ...The Coast Guard proposes to modify the operating schedules that govern the US 90 (Danzinger) Bridge across the Inner Harbor Navigational Canal (IHNC), mile 3.1 and the Senator Ted Hickey (Leon C. Simon Blvd./Seabrook) bridge across the IHNC, mile 4.6, both at New Orleans, LA. This proposed change would allow for the safe navigation of vessels while reflecting the low volume of vessel traffic......

  18. Risk to life due to flooding in post-Katrina New Orleans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A.; Jonkman, S. N.; Van Ledden, M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the catastrophic flooding of New Orleans due to Hurricane Katrina in 2005, the city's hurricane protection system has been improved to provide protection against a hurricane load with a 1/100 per year exceedance frequency. This paper investigates the risk to life in post-Katrina New Orleans. In a flood risk analysis the probabilities and consequences of various flood scenarios have been analyzed for the central area of the city (the metro bowl) to give a preliminary estimate of the risk to life in the post-Katrina situation. A two-dimensional hydrodynamic model has been used to simulate flood characteristics of various breaches. The model for estimation of fatality rates is based on the loss of life data for Hurricane Katrina. Results indicate that - depending on the flood scenario - the estimated loss of life in case of flooding ranges from about 100 to nearly 500, with the highest life loss due to breaching of the river levees leading to large flood depths. The probability and consequence estimates are combined to determine the individual risk and societal risk for New Orleans. When compared to risks of other large-scale engineering systems (e.g., other flood prone areas, dams and the nuclear sector) and acceptable risk criteria found in literature, the risks for the metro bowl are found to be relatively high. Thus, despite major improvements to the flood protection system, the flood risk to life of post-Katrina New Orleans is still expected to be significant. Indicative effects of reduction strategies on the risk level are discussed as a basis for further evaluation and discussion.

  19. Risk to life due to flooding in post-Katrina New Orleans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A.; Jonkman, S. N.; Van Ledden, M.

    2014-01-01

    After the catastrophic flooding of New Orleans due to hurricane Katrina in the year 2005, the city's hurricane protection system has been improved to provide protection against a hurricane load with a 1/100 per year exceedance frequency. This paper investigates the risk to life in post-Katrina New Orleans. In a risk-based approach the probabilities and consequences of various flood scenarios have been analyzed for the central area of the city (the metro bowl) to give a preliminary estimate of the risk to life in the post-Katrina situation. A two-dimensional hydrodynamic model has been used to simulate flood characteristics of various breaches. The model for estimation of fatality rates is based on the loss of life data for Hurricane Katrina. Results indicate that - depending on the flood scenario - the estimated loss of life in case of flooding ranges from about 100 to nearly 500, with the highest life loss due to breaching of the river levees leading to large flood depths. The probability and consequence estimates are combined to determine the individual risk and societal risk for New Orleans. When compared to risks of other large scale engineering systems (e.g. other flood prone areas, dams and the nuclear sector) and acceptable risk criteria found in literature, the risks for the metro bowl are found to be relatively high. Thus, despite major improvements to the flood protection system, the flood risk of post-Katrina New Orleans is still expected to be significant. Effects of reduction strategies on the risk level are discussed as a basis for further evaluation.

  20. Louisiana Interlibrary Loan Code and Procedure Manual: An Official Publication of the Louisiana Library Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motley, Drucilla; And Others

    The growth and development of interlibrary loan among libraries is necessary to meet the needs of users of all libraries. This manual, developed for personnel in interlibrary loan departments of all types of Louisiana libraries, consists of a code outlining the general philosophy; limitations and scope of interlibrary loan in the state; and a…

  1. The ingredients of a successful field extension - Lake Washington field, Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.E.

    1991-03-01

    Old oil and gas field often lack the integration of modern seismic and paleontology. As the result, additional reserves can be overlooked. The 1985 discovery on the southeast flank of Lake Washington field by Rosewood Resources, Inc., et al., is such an example. Located 40 mi south-southeast of New Orleans is Lake Washington field, Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. The field was discovered in 1931 and has produced in excess of 350 MMBOE from over 400 wells completed in numerous upper and middle Miocene deltaic sands. The tectonic setting is that typically associated with a piercement salt/shale diapir. With the complexity of normal listric and radial faulting, sand/shale pinch-outs, and unconformities, the development of the discovery had to incorporate all information from the geoscientists and engineers. In assembling the subsurface maps, the reservoir model had to honor the seismic, paleontology, and individual well production performances. Six fold seismic data shot in 1968 on the southeast flank of the field identified two main bounding down-to-the-coast normal listric faults forming the fault trap. This untested fault block was originally drilled in 1982. Due to mechanical problems, the well was abandoned. Before abandonment, a TDTK log was run. Because of poor gamma-ray and sigma response and no mud-log shows, the response was due to masking caused by the thick casing dollars. In 1984, new 24 fold seismic data were shot. The updated interpretation of the seismic and subsurface data, along with a detail bathymetric ecological study, was incorporated into the geological model. This synergism of the disciplines resulted in the discovery of an additional 8 MMBO.

  2. Recovery Migration to the City of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina: A Migration Systems Approach

    PubMed Central

    Fussell, Elizabeth; Curtis, Katherine J.; DeWaard, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina’s effect on the population of the City of New Orleans provides a model of how severe weather events, which are likely to increase in frequency and strength as the climate warms, might affect other large coastal cities. Our research focuses on changes in the migration system – defined as the system of ties between Orleans Parish and all other U.S. counties – between the pre-disaster (1999–2004) and recovery (2007–2009) periods. Using Internal Revenue Service county-to-county migration flow data, we find that in the recovery period Orleans Parish increased the number of migration ties with and received larger migration flows from nearby counties in the Gulf of Mexico coastal region, thereby spatially concentrating and intensifying the in-migration dimension of this predominantly urban system, while the out-migration dimension contracted and had smaller flows. We interpret these changes as the migration system relying on its strongest ties to nearby and less damaged counties to generate recovery in-migration. PMID:24729651

  3. Recovery Migration to the City of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina: A Migration Systems Approach.

    PubMed

    Fussell, Elizabeth; Curtis, Katherine J; Dewaard, Jack

    2014-03-01

    Hurricane Katrina's effect on the population of the City of New Orleans provides a model of how severe weather events, which are likely to increase in frequency and strength as the climate warms, might affect other large coastal cities. Our research focuses on changes in the migration system - defined as the system of ties between Orleans Parish and all other U.S. counties - between the pre-disaster (1999-2004) and recovery (2007-2009) periods. Using Internal Revenue Service county-to-county migration flow data, we find that in the recovery period Orleans Parish increased the number of migration ties with and received larger migration flows from nearby counties in the Gulf of Mexico coastal region, thereby spatially concentrating and intensifying the in-migration dimension of this predominantly urban system, while the out-migration dimension contracted and had smaller flows. We interpret these changes as the migration system relying on its strongest ties to nearby and less damaged counties to generate recovery in-migration. PMID:24729651

  4. Mass medical evacuation: Hurricane Katrina and nursing experiences at the New Orleans airport.

    PubMed

    Klein, Kelly R; Nagel, Nanci E

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina, a category 4 storm, struck the U.S. Gulf states in late August, 2005, resulting in the most costly and second most deadly natural disaster in recent United States history. The storm and subsequent flooding due to levee failure necessitated the evacuation of 80% of the city of New Orleans' 484,674 residents. Most of the city's hospitals and other health care resources were destroyed or inoperable. The hurricane devastated many communities, stranding people in hospitals, shelters, homes, and nursing homes. Nurses and other health care providers deployed to New Orleans to provide medical assistance experienced substantial challenges in making triage and treatment decisions for patients whose numbers far exceeded supplies and personnel. This article describes the experiences and solutions of nurses and other personnel from 3 Disaster Medical Assistance Teams assigned to the New Orleans airport responsible for perhaps the most massive patient assessment, stabilization, and evacuation operation in U.S. history. As the frequency of disasters continues to rise, it is imperative that the nursing profession realize its value in the disaster arena and continually take leadership roles. PMID:17517364

  5. Geologic technical assessment of the Chacahoula Salt Dome, Louisiana, for potential expansion of the U.S. strategic petroleum reserve.

    SciTech Connect

    Snider, Anna C.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Looff, Karl M.

    2006-03-01

    The Chacahoula salt dome, located in southern Louisiana, approximately 66 miles southwest of New Orleans, appears to be a suitable site for a 160-million-barrel-capacity expansion facility for the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve, comprising sixteen 10-million barrel underground storage caverns. The overall salt dome appears to cover an area of some 1800 acres, or approximately 2.8 square miles, at a subsea elevation of 2000 ft, which is near the top of the salt stock. The shallowest known salt is present at 1116 ft, subsea. The crest of the salt dome is relatively flatlying, outward to an elevation of -4000 ft. Below this elevation, the flanks of the dome plunge steeply in all directions. The dome appears to comprise two separate spine complexes of quasi-independently moving salt. Two mapped areas of salt overhang, located on the eastern and southeastern flanks of the salt stock, are present below -8000 ft. These regions of overhang should present no particular design issues, as the conceptual design SPR caverns are located in the western portion of the dome. The proposed cavern field may be affected by a boundary shear zone, located between the two salt spines. However, the large size of the Chacahoula salt dome suggests that there is significant design flexibility to deal with such local geologic issues.

  6. 4. Photocopy of drawing (from Gibson's Guide and Directory of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photocopy of drawing (from Gibson's Guide and Directory of the State of Louisiana and the Cities of New Orleans and Lafayette (New Orleans: John Gibson, Publisher, 1838), p. 313) FRONT AND SIDE (Orleans Theatre on left) - Orleans Ball Room, 717 Orleans Street, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA

  7. Water resources of West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; Lovelace, John K.; Tomaszewski, Dan J.; Griffith, Jason M.

    2014-01-01

    Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for stewardship of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is discussed. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

  8. Minerals yearbook, 1992: Louisiana. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.H.; Marsalis, W.E.

    1994-03-01

    Louisiana's nonfuel mineral production in 1992 totaled $309.3 million. This was a $42.5 million decline in value from that reported by the mineral industry in 1991. Although there was an increase in the value of gemstones, lime, and industrial sand and gravel, it failed to offset a decline in the demand and sales of gypsum, construction sand and gravel, salt, crushed stone, and sulfur. The values of these five mineral commodities fell $53.9 million between 1991 and 1992. The State ranked 32d nationally in mineral value and accounted for 35% of the Nation's salt tonnage and 42% of the Frasch sulfur production.

  9. High Energy Physics Research at Louisiana Tech

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Lee; Greenwood, Zeno; Wobisch, Marcus

    2013-06-28

    The goal of this project was to create, maintain, and strengthen a world-class, nationally and internationally recognized experimental high energy physics group at Louisiana Tech University, focusing on research at the energy frontier of collider-based particle physics, first on the DØ experiment and then with the ATLAS experiment, and providing leadership within the US high energy physics community in the areas of jet physics, top quark and charged Higgs decays involving tau leptons, as well as developing leadership in high performance computing.

  10. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in natural and farmed Louisiana crayfish populations: prevalence and implications.

    PubMed

    Brannelly, Laura A; McMahon, Taegan A; Hinton, Mitchell; Lenger, Daniel; Richards-Zawacki, Corinne L

    2015-01-15

    The pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has been linked to global declines and extinctions of amphibians, making it one of the most devastating wildlife pathogens known. Understanding the factors that affect disease dynamics in this system is critical for mitigating infection and protecting threatened species. Crayfish are hosts of this pathogen and can transmit Bd to amphibians. Because they co-occur with susceptible amphibian communities, crayfish may be important alternative hosts for Bd. Understanding the prevalence and seasonal dynamics of crayfish infections is of agricultural and ecological interest in areas where crayfish are farmed and traded for human consumption. We conducted a survey of Bd in farmed and natural crayfish (Procambarus spp.) populations in Louisiana, USA. We found that Bd prevalence and infection intensity was low in both farmed and native populations and that prevalence varied seasonally in wild Louisiana crayfish. This seasonal pattern mirrors that seen in local amphibians. As crayfish are an important globally traded freshwater taxon, even with low prevalence, they could be an important vector in the spread of Bd. PMID:25590773

  11. Large freshwater and sediment impoundments between the Mississippi River and the Louisiana coastline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, G. R.; Hall, B.; Aieta, E. M.

    2015-03-01

    An innovative system-level sediment and freshwater management plan is proposed for the coastal regions of Louisiana, USA. It involves the construction of large sediment and freshwater impoundments between the river and coastline fed periodically through large spillway structures during the rising hydrograph of the river when the highest concentration of sediment is in the water column. Sediment directing and trapping technologies are proposed for the river channel and spillways to capture the coarser-grained sediments. The embankments can be constructed from dredging and then enlarged by land-based harvesting of coarse-grained sediments from the traps. These impoundments will permit the continuous introduction of freshwater and finer-grained sediments to coastal marshlands for vegetation, land augmentation, protection from storm surges and salt water intrusion, while removing large amounts of sand from the river and decreasing annual maintenance dredging costs.

  12. Andrew shortens lifetime of Louisiana Barrier Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan

    Because the Isles Dernieres, a series of four barrier islands off the coast of Louisiana, have one of the most rapidly eroding shorelines in the world, geologists at the U.S. Geological Survey and the Louisiana Geological Survey have been monitoring erosion activity over the last several years, said Jeff Williams of the USGS in Reston, Va. Hurricane Andrew, which struck the state on August 26, caused severe erosional damage to these islands that has shortened their lifetimes.Before Andrew struck, geologists projected that Raccoon Island would disappear below sea level by the year 2001 and that Whiskey Island would disappear by 2016. Now, due to the severe erosion from Hurricane Andrew, the scientists claim that the islands may disappear before the turn of the century, and the other islands in the Dernieres chain are expected to follow suit within 2 decades. Raccoon, Whiskey, Trinity, and East islands make up the Isles Dernieres, which existed as one island, known as the Isle Derniere, before an 1856 hurricane and subsequent erosion.

  13. Fiscal year 1990 program report: Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Constant, W.D.

    1991-10-01

    The 1990 cooperative research program of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute (LWRRI) addressed priority water resources problem areas identified for Louisiana - management of surface water supplies, groundwater control and restoration, wastewater treatment alternatives, and treatment of point and nonpoint sources of pollution. Four research projects funded to address these priority issues were: (1) A Feasibility Analysis of the Use of Louisiana Wetlands for Wastewater Treatment, (2) Use of Soil Biofilter Beds for Treating High Organic, Low Toxicity Wastewater, (3) Studies on the Uptake, Accumulation and Metabolism of 2,4-Dichlorophenol and Pentachlorophenol by Lemna gibba, and (4) Application of Colloidal Gas Aphrons for Soil Washing and Groundwater Remediation.

  14. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (82nd, New Orleans, Louisiana, August 3-8, 1999). Minorities and Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Minorities and Communication section of the Proceedings contains the following 15 papers: "An Analysis of Role Portrayal in U.S. Spanish-Language Television Promotional Announcements" (Jami J. Armstrong and Alice Kendrick); "A Critical Analysis of the Newspaper Coverage of Native Americans by 'The Daily Oklahoman' Newspaper for 1998" (Dianne…

  15. PlainTalk about Education: Transforming Crisis Into Success. Proceeding of the PLAINTALK Summit (New Orleans, Louisiana, February 8-10, 1999). A Desk Reference on Educational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Robert D., Ed.; Thomas, Alice P., Ed.

    This reference includes presentations that cover current research, best practices, and solutions to improve student achievement. The 25 chapters are: (1) "The Three Stories of Educational Reform: Inside; Inside/Out; Outside/In" (Michael Fullan); (2) "Hey, You with the Frontal Lobes: Brains for Educators, Educators of Brains" (Priscilla Vail); (3)…

  16. Developmental Studies of Computer Programming Skills. A Symposium: Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (New Orleans, Louisiana, April 23-27, 1984). Technical Report No. 29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurland, D. Midian, Ed.

    The five papers in this symposium contribute to a dialog on the aims and methods of computer education, and indicate directions future research must take if necessary information is to be available to make informed decisions about the use of computers in schools. The first two papers address the question of what is required for a student to become…

  17. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (82nd, New Orleans, Louisiana, August 3-8, 1999). History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The History section of the Proceedings contains the following 13 papers: "The Big, Not-So-Bad, Wolf: Cultivating a New Media Image" (Richard Gross); "The Forgotten Battles: Congressional Hearings on Television Violence in the 1950s" (Keisha L. Hoerrner); "President Nixon's China Initiative: A Publicly Prepared Surprise" (Zixue Tai); "Passion and…

  18. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (82nd, New Orleans, Louisiana, August 3-8, 1999). Newspaper, Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Newspaper, Part 1 section of the Proceedings contains the following 10 papers: "Local News Coverage Strategies in a Three-Way Daily Newspaper Competitive Market" (Patsy G. Watkins); "Enterprise and Investigative Reporting at Ohio Metropolitan Newspapers in 1980 and in 1995" (Joseph Bernt and Marilyn Greenwald); "The Great Home Run Race of 1998…

  19. Symposium on the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS:88) and the NELS:88 Field Test (New Orleans, Louisiana, April 5-9, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingels, Steven J.; And Others

    The National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS:88) is a major new panel study of educational outcomes sponsored by the Center for Education Statistics of the United States Department of Education. The NELS:88 is designed to provide trend data about critical transitions experienced by young people as they develop, attend school, and embark…

  20. Refereed Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Southwest Region of the Association for Business Communication (New Orleans, Louisiana, March 4-5, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clipson, Timothy W., Ed.; Bayless, Marsha L., Ed.

    Papers presented in the proceedings discuss: business communication skills; job searching; technology; effective oral communication skills; ethics; and innovative instruction in business communication classes. Papers are: "Communication Skills in Employment Ads of Major United States Newspapers" (M. Casady and F. S. Wayne); "A Collegiate Model for…

  1. School Negotiations in the Mid-Seventies: Proceedings of the Annual Convention of the Association of Educational Negotiators (7th, New Orleans, Louisiana, March 31-April 2, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Richard G., Ed.

    This volume is a collection of the nine papers presented at the annual convention of the Association of Educational Negotiators. These papers deal with different aspects of influence (from school management's point of view) in the collective bargaining process. Specific topics include how a chief negotiator can influence his school board to set…

  2. Technology for the Next Decade. Proceedings of the RESNA Annual Conference (12th, New Orleans, Louisiana, June 25-30, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presperin, Jessica J., Ed.

    These conference proceedings contain papers on practical applications of rehabilitation and assistive technology in vocational and educational situations as well as independent living settings. Most of the papers are two pages in length. The papers are organized into the following categories, with the number of papers in each category appearing in…

  3. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (82nd, New Orleans, Louisiana, August 3-8, 1999). Status of Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Status of Women section of the Proceedings contains the following 8 papers: "Coverage of Mars Exploration: Media Messages about Women Scientists" (Karon R. Speckman and Lois A. Bichler); "The Case of President Clinton and the Feminists: Discourses of Feminism in the News" (Dustin Harp); "Liberal Feminist Theory and Women's Images in Mass…

  4. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (82nd, New Orleans, Louisiana, August 3-8, 1999). Public Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Public Relations section of the Proceedings contains the following 8 papers: "The Cultural Competence Spiral: An Assessment and Profile of U.S. Public Relations Practitioners' Preparation for International Assignments" (Alan R. Freitag); "Trust, Communication, and Quality Relationships in the Workplace: Comparing Views of CEOs and Top…

  5. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (82nd, New Orleans, Louisiana, August 3-8, 1999). Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Law section of the Proceedings contains the following 10 papers: "The Driver's Privacy Protection Act of 1994: Does Congress Have the Constitutional Authority to Override State FOI Laws by Regulating Access to State Driver's Licenses?" (Joey Senat); "The Truth Hurts: Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress as a Cause of Action Against the…

  6. Arts and Learning Research, 1994. The Journal of the Arts and Learning Special Interest Group of the American Educational Research Association (New Orleans, Louisiana, April 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Lorrie, Ed.; Morbey, Mary Leigh, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    The research papers gathered in this volume were presented at the 1994 meeting of the American Educational Research Association as part of the Arts and Learning Special Interest Group program. Papers collected in the volume represent an eclectic view of arts education and include music education. Following an editorial, papers are: "Arts and…

  7. Business Communication: From the Ideal to the Practicable. Association for Business Communication Southwest Division 1985 Proceedings (New Orleans, Louisiana, March 7-9, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruno, Sam J., Ed.

    These proceedings present 12 articles that suggest opportunities for scholars and practitioners to contribute to business communication. The papers are organized into four sections, each composed of three papers. The papers in Part I, Specialized Communication Techniques, are: "Does Style Affect the Reader's Image of the Writer?" (James Suchan),…

  8. Employment Outcomes for Persons with Acquired Brain Injury. Report from the Institute on Rehabilitation Issues Study Group (20th, New Orleans, Louisiana, November 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corthell, David W., Ed.

    This document provides a resource and problem-solving guide for vocational rehabilitation counselors serving people with brain injuries acquired through trauma or other circumstances. An introduction defines acquired brain injury, characterizes the uniqueness of people with acquired brain injury, and describes community resources. Chapter 2,…

  9. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Southwest Society of Philosophy and History Education (44th, September 23-25, 1993, New Orleans, Louisiana).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Wayne, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This annual publication offers a collection of papers, essays, and speeches related to the history and philosophy of education. This volume contains: (1) "The Presidential Address: The Educational Revolution in Kentucky, or How To Build the Plane After You're Off the Ground" (Wayne Willis); (2) "The Seventh Annual William E. Drake Lecture: Was…

  10. Higher Education Reform in the 1990s. Minutes of the Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (116th, New Orleans, Louisiana, May 9-11, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bixby, Pamela, Ed.

    This membership meeting focused on higher education reform in the 1990s and the mission of educational institutions in the face of changes in educational philosophy, cultural and demographic changes, and shifts in public policy. It is argued that the ongoing academic revolution will define higher education in the next decade, and that research…

  11. 1995--Planning and Managing the Odyssey. Proceedings of the National Conference of CAUSE (New Orleans, Louisiana, December 10-13, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    The 1985 annual meeting of CAUSE, the Professional Association for Computing and Information Technology in Higher Education, addressed the current state and the future of higher education computing from a planning and management perspective, and provided participants with a forum to share special problems and opportunities confronting…

  12. PROCEEDINGS OF THE STATIONARY SOURCE COMBUSTION SYMPOSIUM (2ND), HELD AT NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA, ON AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 1, 1977. VOLUME IV. FUNDAMENTAL COMBUSTION RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contents: Fundamental combustion research applied to pollution control; Chemical reactions in the conversion of fuel nitrogen to NOx--fuel pyrolysis studies; Fate of fuel nitrogen during pyrolysis and oxidation; Interactions between sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides in combustion...

  13. CHANGES IN THE DISTRIBUTION OF SUBTERRANEAN TERMITE COLONIES (ISOPTERA: RHINOTERMITIDAE) IN CITY PARK, NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA IN THE AFTERMATH OF HURRICANE KATRINA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Termite activity had been continuously monitored in four sections of City Park since 2002. Between 2002 and 2005, 12 distinct Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, colonies had been delineated using mark-release-recapture techniques. This study examines how the distribution ...

  14. Culture and Disability in the Pacific. Summaries of Papers Prepared for a Working Session of the Association for Social Anthropology in Oceania (New Orleans, Louisiana, February 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Maureen, Ed.; Armstrong, Jocelyn, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This newsletter issue is devoted to summaries of 12 papers on culture and disability issues in the Pacific. The summaries presented span Oceania and are based on papers representing Polynesia, Micronesia, and Melanesia. Papers have the following titles and authors: "Nstasinge: The Sickness of a Small Boy from the Finisterre Range in Papua New…

  15. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (82nd, New Orleans, Louisiana, August 3-8, 1999). Qualitative Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Qualitative Studies section of the Proceedings contains the following 14 papers: "Disabling or Enabling? Reading Bodies, Technologies, and the Borg of Star Trek" (Mia Consalvo); "Inverted Pyramids Versus Hypertexts: A Qualitative Study of Readers' Responses to Competing Narrative Forms" (Robert Huesca, Brenda Dervin, John Burwell, Denise…

  16. School Law in Review--1988. Proceedings of the NSBA Council of School Attorneys Annual School Law Seminar (New Orleans, Louisiana, March 25-26, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gittins, Naomi E., Ed.; Gray, Geoffrey W., Ed.

    This book is composed of the presentations delivered at the 1988 School Law Seminar. Experienced attorneys presented topics covering a wide range of current issues, all vital to competent legal representation of public school boards. The following articles are included: (1) "Secular Humanism and the Schools" (August W. Steinhilber); (2) "Sexual…

  17. Employee Involvement: The Competitive Edge. Transactions of the IAQC Annual Conference and Resource Mart (9th, New Orleans, Louisiana, April 6-9, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Quality and Participation, Cincinnati, OH.

    Among the 96 papers presented at this conference are the following: "Team Building Techniques that Get Results" (Berg); "The Subtleties of Communication in Small Group Meetings" (Henry); "Feedback--Its Role in Team Building" (Lucas); "Group Dynamics--Success through Interaction" (Manning, Johnson); "The Able-Bodied Handicapped: Bridging the Gap"…

  18. Arts and Learning SIG Proceedings: American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting (New Orleans, Louisiana, April 23-27, 1984). Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koroscik, Judith S., Ed.; Barrett, Terry, Ed.

    Sixteen conference papers representing diverse topics concerning research in the arts and presented as part of the 1984 Arts and Learning Special Interest Group (SIG) program of the American Educational Research Association are presented in the second of two volumes. Papers presented include: "First Graders' Conversations about Art Making: Social…

  19. PROCEEDINGS OF THE STATIONARY SOURCE COMBUSTION SYMPOSIUM (2ND) HELD AT NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA ON AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 1, 1977. VOLUME V. ADDENDUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contents: Effects of fuel and atomization on NOx control for heavy liquid fuel-fired package boilers, NOx control techiques for package boilers - Comparison of burner design, fuel modification and combustion modification; Design and scale-up of low emission burners for industrial...

  20. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (82nd, New Orleans, Louisiana, August 3-8, 1999). Advertising, Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Advertising, Part 1 section of the Proceedings contains the following 12 papers: "Incorporating a Promotional Products Teaching Component into the Advertising Campaigns Course: A Partnership Pilot Program" (Denise E. DeLorme); "Information Cues in Renmin Ribao Advertisements (1979-1998)" (Susanna W. Y. Kwok); "Impact of Soft-Money-Sponsored…

  1. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (82nd, New Orleans, Louisiana, August 3-8, 1999). Media and Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Media and Disabilities section of the Proceedings contains the following 5 papers: "Wrestling with Stereotypes: Images of the Mentally Ill in the WWF" (Marie Hardin and Brent Hardin); "Investigating Media Influence on Attitudes Toward People with Disabilities and Euthanasia" (Kimberly A. Lauffer and Sarah Bembry); "Print Advertising Images of…

  2. A Simple Model Framework to Explore the Deeply Uncertain, Local Sea Level Response to Climate Change. A Case Study on New Orleans, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Alexander; Louchard, Domitille; Keller, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Sea-level rise threatens many coastal areas around the world. The integrated assessment of potential adaptation and mitigation strategies requires a sound understanding of the upper tails and the major drivers of the uncertainties. Global warming causes sea-level to rise, primarily due to thermal expansion of the oceans and mass loss of the major ice sheets, smaller ice caps and glaciers. These components show distinctly different responses to temperature changes with respect to response time, threshold behavior, and local fingerprints. Projections of these different components are deeply uncertain. Projected uncertainty ranges strongly depend on (necessary) pragmatic choices and assumptions; e.g. on the applied climate scenarios, which processes to include and how to parameterize them, and on error structure of the observations. Competing assumptions are very hard to objectively weigh. Hence, uncertainties of sea-level response are hard to grasp in a single distribution function. The deep uncertainty can be better understood by making clear the key assumptions. Here we demonstrate this approach using a relatively simple model framework. We present a mechanistically motivated, but simple model framework that is intended to efficiently explore the deeply uncertain sea-level response to anthropogenic climate change. The model consists of 'building blocks' that represent the major components of sea-level response and its uncertainties, including threshold behavior. The framework's simplicity enables the simulation of large ensembles allowing for an efficient exploration of parameter uncertainty and for the simulation of multiple combined adaptation and mitigation strategies. The model framework can skilfully reproduce earlier major sea level assessments, but due to the modular setup it can also be easily utilized to explore high-end scenarios and the effect of competing assumptions and parameterizations.

  3. Charter and Direct Run Schools of the Recovery School District (RSD) and Orleans Parish School Board (OPSB) Comparison of High Stakes Tests and Dropout Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andry, Beverly Guillory

    2011-01-01

    The city of New Orleans has embarked on an historic experiment reinventing its schools--once considered among the worst in the country--from a centralized, single district model of education to a two district model in which both the Recovery School District (RSD) and the preexisting Orleans Parish School Board (OPSB) both operate direct run and…

  4. Phenotypes and Virulence among Staphylococcus aureus USA100, USA200, USA300, USA400, and USA600 Clonal Lineages

    PubMed Central

    King, Jessica M.; Kulhankova, Katarina; Stach, Christopher S.; Vu, Bao G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus diseases affect ~500,000 individuals per year in the United States. Worldwide, the USA100, USA200, USA400, and USA600 lineages cause many of the life-threatening S. aureus infections, such as bacteremia, infective endocarditis, pneumonia, toxic shock syndrome, and surgical site infections. However, the virulence mechanisms associated with these clonal lineages, in particular the USA100 and USA600 isolates, have been severely understudied. We investigated the virulence of these strains, in addition to strains in the USA200, USA300, and USA400 types, in well-established in vitro assays and in vivo in the rabbit model of infective endocarditis and sepsis. We show in the infective endocarditis and sepsis model that strains in the USA100 and USA600 lineages cause high lethality and are proficient in causing native valve infective endocarditis. Strains with high cytolytic activity or producing toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) or staphylococcal enterotoxin C (SEC) caused lethal sepsis, even with low cytolytic activity. Strains in the USA100, USA200, USA400, and USA600 lineages consistently contained genes that encode for the enterotoxin gene cluster proteins, SEC, or TSST-1 and were proficient at causing infective endocarditis, while the USA300 strains lacked these toxins and were deficient in promoting vegetation growth. The USA100, USA200, and USA400 strains in our collection formed strong biofilms in vitro, whereas the USA200 and USA600 strains exhibited increased blood survival. Hence, infective endocarditis and lethal sepsis are multifactorial and not intrinsic to any one individual clonal group, further highlighting the importance of expanding our knowledge of S. aureus pathogenesis to clonal lineages causative of invasive disease. IMPORTANCE S. aureus is the leading cause of infective endocarditis in the developed world, affecting ~40,000 individuals each year in the United States, and the second leading cause of bacteremia (D

  5. Phenotypes and Virulence among Staphylococcus aureus USA100, USA200, USA300, USA400, and USA600 Clonal Lineages.

    PubMed

    King, Jessica M; Kulhankova, Katarina; Stach, Christopher S; Vu, Bao G; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus diseases affect ~500,000 individuals per year in the United States. Worldwide, the USA100, USA200, USA400, and USA600 lineages cause many of the life-threatening S. aureus infections, such as bacteremia, infective endocarditis, pneumonia, toxic shock syndrome, and surgical site infections. However, the virulence mechanisms associated with these clonal lineages, in particular the USA100 and USA600 isolates, have been severely understudied. We investigated the virulence of these strains, in addition to strains in the USA200, USA300, and USA400 types, in well-established in vitro assays and in vivo in the rabbit model of infective endocarditis and sepsis. We show in the infective endocarditis and sepsis model that strains in the USA100 and USA600 lineages cause high lethality and are proficient in causing native valve infective endocarditis. Strains with high cytolytic activity or producing toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) or staphylococcal enterotoxin C (SEC) caused lethal sepsis, even with low cytolytic activity. Strains in the USA100, USA200, USA400, and USA600 lineages consistently contained genes that encode for the enterotoxin gene cluster proteins, SEC, or TSST-1 and were proficient at causing infective endocarditis, while the USA300 strains lacked these toxins and were deficient in promoting vegetation growth. The USA100, USA200, and USA400 strains in our collection formed strong biofilms in vitro, whereas the USA200 and USA600 strains exhibited increased blood survival. Hence, infective endocarditis and lethal sepsis are multifactorial and not intrinsic to any one individual clonal group, further highlighting the importance of expanding our knowledge of S. aureus pathogenesis to clonal lineages causative of invasive disease. IMPORTANCE S. aureus is the leading cause of infective endocarditis in the developed world, affecting ~40,000 individuals each year in the United States, and the second leading cause of bacteremia (D. R

  6. Social Reproduction and the Student Decision to Follow the Louisiana Career/Basic Core Diploma Path at a Large, Affluent High School in Northeastern Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittock, Tammy

    2013-01-01

    Through this mixed-method study, the researcher investigated social reproduction in a student's decision to follow the Louisiana Career/Basic Core Diploma Path. In 2008-2009, Louisiana's cohort graduation rate was 67.3%, which was well below the national average of 75.5%, ranking Louisiana forty-sixth in the country. This rate led to the…

  7. 'You fix my community, you have fixed my life': the disruption and rebuilding of ontological security in New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Robert L; Maurer, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Using the concept of ontological security, this paper examines the physical and psychological loss of home and community following Hurricane Katrina. This qualitative longitudinal study includes 40 heads of households with school-age children who lived in New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina. Participants describe a breakdown in their social fabric at the individual and structural/community levels that contributes to a sense of community loss and social displacement, disrupting their ontological security--their notion of safety, routine and trust in a stable environment. Three interrelated reactions were common: 1) experiencing nostalgia for their old neighbourhoods specifically and New Orleans in general; 2) experiencing a sense of loss of people and things that represented a level of security or constancy; 3) initiation of a process for re-establishing ontological security whether or not they returned to New Orleans. The paper concludes that intangible losses have an important psychological effect on community redevelopment and recovery from trauma. PMID:20735461

  8. Economic Prosperity and the Responsibility of Public Education in Metro New Orleans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gary, Lee P., Jr.

    It is the theme of this paper that economic prosperity and public education are inseparable; yet, both are lacking in Louisiana. The lack of excellence in education is a liability for stimulating and accelerating the growth and diversification of business and industry. In particular, educational mediocrity is evidenced in the following: (1)…

  9. Medical treatment at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport after hurricane Katrina: the experience of disaster medical assistance teams WA-1 and OR-2.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Christopher; Jui, Jonathan; Miller, Helen C; Jobe, Kathleen A

    2007-07-01

    In the week following Hurricane Katrina, over 3000 patients were evacuated by air from a triage and medical treatment station at the Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport. This represents the largest air evacuation in history. Over 24,000 additional evacuees were transported from the airport to shelters. Disaster Medical Assistance Teams (DMATs) from several US states were deployed to the Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport to provide medical care to those evacuated from New Orleans. Despite warning from the US National Weather Service of catastrophic damage to New Orleans, adequate medical staffing was not attained at the airport triage station until 6 days after the hurricane struck. Organizational lapses, including inadequate medical and operational planning, understaffing of medical personnel, and failure to utilize Incident Command System, diminished the effectiveness of the Hurricane Katrina New Orleans Medical Operation. PMID:17574144

  10. Significant gas field fans out in S. Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-18

    This paper reports on the completion of producing wells in Chalkley Oligocene Miogypsinoides gas/condensate field of Cameron Parish, La. The field appears to be one of the largest gas discoveries in South Louisiana in several years.

  11. 40 CFR 282.68 - Louisiana State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... accordance with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Louisiana obtains... Quality, 7290 Bluebonnet Road, Baton Rouge, LA 70810-1612. (1) State statutes and regulations. (i)...

  12. 40 CFR 282.68 - Louisiana State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... accordance with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Louisiana obtains... Quality, 7290 Bluebonnet Road, Baton Rouge, LA 70810-1612. (1) State statutes and regulations. (i)...

  13. 40 CFR 282.68 - Louisiana State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... accordance with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Louisiana obtains... Quality, 7290 Bluebonnet Road, Baton Rouge, LA 70810-1612. (1) State statutes and regulations. (i)...

  14. 40 CFR 282.68 - Louisiana State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... accordance with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Louisiana obtains... Quality, 7290 Bluebonnet Road, Baton Rouge, LA 70810-1612. (1) State statutes and regulations. (i)...

  15. 40 CFR 282.68 - Louisiana State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... accordance with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Louisiana obtains... Quality, 7290 Bluebonnet Road, Baton Rouge, LA 70810-1612. (1) State statutes and regulations. (i)...

  16. Satellite Sees Tropical Storm Isaac Move Slowly Over Louisiana

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of NOAA's GOES-13 satellite observations from August 28-30, 2012, shows Hurricane Isaac make two landfalls in southeastern Louisiana on Aug. 28 at 7:45 p.m. EDT (1145 UTC) and Aug. 29 ...

  17. EAARL coastal topography--North Shore, Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Fredericks, Xan; Wright, C.W.; Brock, J.C.; Nagle, D.B.; Vivekanandan, Saisudha; Barras, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    This DVD contains lidar-derived coastal topography GIS datasets of a portion of the north shore of Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana. These datasets were acquired on February 28, March 1, and March 5, 2010.

  18. Developmental Toxicity of Louisiana Crude Oiled Sediment to Zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Embryonic exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and petroleum products cause a characteristic suite of developmental defects in a variety of fish species. We exposed zebrafish embryos to sediment mixed with laboratory weathered South Louisiana crude oil. Oiled sedi...

  19. Manganese, Iron, and sulfur cycling in Louisiana continental shelf sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfate reduction is considered the primary pathway for organic carbon remineralization on the northern Gulf of Mexico Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) where bottom waters are seasonally hypoxic, yet limited information is available on the importance of iron and manganese cyclin...

  20. Phytoplankton Communities in Louisiana coastal waters and the continental shelf

    EPA Science Inventory

    Louisiana coastal waters and the adjacent continental shelf receive large freshwater and nutrient inputs from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers, creating favorable conditions for increased phytoplankton productivity. To examine inshore-offshore patterns in phytoplankton comm...

  1. The Louisiana State University Law Center's Bijural Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costonis, John J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the bijural program of Louisiana State University Law Center. The program educates all first-degree law students in both the common law and civil law traditions, preparing them for the increasing globalization of legal practice. (EV)

  2. 77 FR 56250 - Louisiana Disaster Number LA-00048

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Louisiana Disaster Number LA-00048 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... information in the original declaration remains unchanged. (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance...

  3. Skylab 3 crewmen aboard prime recovery ship, U.S.S. New Orleans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The three crewmen of the Skylab 3 mission are seen aboard the prime recovery ship, U.S.S. New Orleans, following their successful 59-day visit to the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. They are, left to right, Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, pilot; Scientist-Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, science pilot; and Astronaut Alan L. Bean, commander. They are seated atop a platform of a fork-lift dolly. Recovery support personnel are wearing face masks to prevent exposing the crewmen to disease.

  4. Best Practices Case Study: Green Coast Enterprises - Project Home Again, New Orleans, LA

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-04-01

    Case study about Green Coast Enterprises, who received design assistance and analysis from Building America team Building Science Corporation to build 100 homes for New Orleans families displaced by Hurricane Katrina. The homes incorporate a host of weather-resistant techniques: pier foundations, all borate pressure-treated lumber; hurricane strapping; moisture-resistant closed-cell spray foam insulation under the subfloor, in walls, and under the roof line to seal out moisture-laden air and glue the structure together to resist high winds; roof sheathing seams sealed with butyl-adhesive flashing tape; and a fully adhered roofing membrane over eaves and gable ends.

  5. Wave evolution across the Louisiana shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelstad, Anita; Janssen, Tim; Herbers, T. H. C.; van Vledder, Gerbrant; Elgar, Steve; Raubenheimer, Britt; Trainor, Lincoln; Garcia-Garcia, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Observations and third-generation wave model hindcasts of ocean surface gravity waves propagating across the Louisiana shelf show that the effects of the mud environment on wave evolution are complex and episodic. Whereas low-frequency waves (0.04-0.20 Hz) show a consistent decay similar to earlier studies, the presence of mud also appears to suppress the development of short waves (0.20-0.25 Hz) under fetch-limited growth conditions. Significant suppression of wave development under wind-forced conditions is found to occur almost exclusively during easterly winds when satellite images show the Atchafalaya mud plume extends into the study area. These results suggest that episodic sediment suspension events with high mud concentrations in the upper water column can affect the evolution of wind waves.

  6. Flood tracking chart, Amite River basin, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Callender, Lawrence; McCallum, Brian E.; Brazelton, Sebastian R.

    1996-01-01

    The Amite River Basin flood tracking chart is designed to assist emergency response officials and the local public in making informed decisions about the safety of life and property during floods along the Amite and Comite Rivers and Bayou Manchac in southeastern Louisiana. This chart is similar in concept to the charts used to track hurricanes; the user can record the latest river stage information at selected gaging stations and the latest flood crest predictions. The latest stage data can be compared to historical flood peaks as well as to the slab or pier elevation of a threatened property. The chart also discusses how to acquire the latest river stage data from the Internet and a recorded voice message.

  7. Flood tracking chart, Amite River Basin, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Callender, Lawrence E.; McCallum, Brian E.; Brazelton, Sebastian R.; Anderson, Mary L.; Ensminger, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    The Amite River Basin flood tracking chart is designed to assist emergency response officials and the local public in making informed decisions about the safety of life and property during floods along the Amite and Comite Rivers and Bayou Manchac in southeastern Louisiana. This chart is similar in concept to the charts used to track hurricanes; the user can record the latest river stage information at selected gaging stations and the latest flood crest predictions. The latest stage data can be compared to historical flood peaks as well as to the slab or pier elevation of a threatened property. The chart also discusses how to acquire the latest river stage data from the Internet and a recorded voice message.

  8. Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    John, C.J.

    1992-10-01

    Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing.

  9. Geodetic subsidence rate in coastal Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahzadeh, M.; Dixon, T. H.; Malservisi, R.

    2013-12-01

    Southern coastal Louisiana is experiencing significant subsidence, leading to land loss and increasing the risk of storm-related flooding. Several processes contribute to this subsidence, with differing spatial and temporal variations. Here we report on regional subsidence as measured by a network of continuously recording, high precision GPS stations, and attempt to characterize it. Our results show that the short-term subsidence rate of parts of the Mississippi delta is considerably higher than surrounding coastal areas. Sediment compaction, low-angle faulting and regional subsidence associated with mass loading appear to be the major factors controlling subsidence in the delta. The coastal regions outside of the delta undergo slower subsidence, probably related to factors such as fluid withdrawal (ground water, petroleum and natural gas extraction).

  10. Louisiana, Texas fabrication yards on busy upswing

    SciTech Connect

    Pagano, S.S. )

    1994-04-01

    Responding to the continued push to produce natural gas reserves, Texas and Louisiana fabrication yards anticipate a busy 1994 season. Sixty-five oil and gas production platforms are under construction for major companies and independents; total platforms built in 1994 could approach 100. While oil prices are still volatile, most projects are focusing on shallow-water fields. Advanced technology has helped fabricators improve designs by making structures lighter and more cost-effective. PC-Based software helps yards perform more thorough analyses of a structure, which means towers and fixed platforms can be more economically built. Software also enables yards to design cost-effective structures to develop fields with a marginal level of reserves. Several projects currently under development or recently completed are described.

  11. Quaternary geology of Avery Island, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Autin, W.J.; McCulloh, R.P.; Davison, A.T.

    1986-09-01

    Avery Island, one of the Five Islands salt domes of south-central Louisiana, is a piercement-type dome that has been uplifted from several kilometers' depth. It is nearly circular in plan with a maximum elevation approximately 50 m above the surrounding coastal marsh. Dissection has produced a terrain of gullies and steep slopes. The features identified indicate a complex geologic history for Avery Island. Deposition of late Pleistocene sediments in a low-relief alluvial plain and subsequent soil development predate domal uplift. The stratigraphy of loess and colluvial silts indicates the island was emergent during loess depositions. The degree of dissection, distribution of colluvium, and shearing of Quaternary sediments reflects continual uplift after loess deposition.

  12. Louisiana NASA EPSCoR Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, John P.

    2002-01-01

    In 1994, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration issued a Cooperative Agreement (CA) to the State of Louisiana, through the Louisiana Board of Regents (BOB), for the performance of scientific research under the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) Project. Originally constructed as a three-year program with an optional two-year follow on, this federal-state partnership culminated on 31 October 2001, including two CA extensions. The total value of the project reached $3.3M in NASA funding, matched by $2.75M in BOB funds, and supplemented by several million dollars in institutional contributions. Three Research Clusters comprised the state-wide research effort coupled with scientific/technical management and a teacher involvement component. The three research clusters addressed the Enterprises of Space Science, Earth Science and Aerospace Technology with research in High Energy Astrophysics, the Global Carbon Cycle, and Propulsion. Ten universities, over two dozen faculty, over 150 students and numerous support personnel were involved. All of the scientific and technical objectives were met or exceeded. In aggregate, the clusters generated about $18M in outside support, better than a 2:1 return on investment (better than 5:1 considering only the NASA investment). Moreover, two of the clusters have advanced to the level of applying for major NSF research center designation. This project was a trial of the model of building research infrastructure through mentoring. While not completely successful, the results at the smaller institutions were, none the less, positive. Faculty were engaged in major research and involved their students. Administrations improved their capabilities to handle grants and contracts. Faculty release time was granted, research space was provided and, in some cases, equipment was made available for the research. Some of the faculty at these schools have remained involved in research and/or formed

  13. Physiology and Endocrinology Symposium. Factors controlling puberty in beef heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Physiology and Endocrinology Symposium on “Factors controlling puberty in beef heifers” was held at the joint annual meeting of the American Dairy Science Association and the American Society of Animal Science in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, July 10 to 14, 2011. The objective of the symposium w...

  14. RHABDITIS RAINAI N. SP. (NEMATODA: RHABDITIDA) ASSOCIATED WITH THE FORMOSAN SUBTERRANEAN TERMITE, COPTOTERMES FORMOSANUS (ISOPTERA: RHINOTERMITIDAE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematodes were discovered in the gut of sick Formosan termites (Coptotermes formosanus) in New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.A. Rhabditis (Prerecditis) rainai is described as a new subgenus and species of hermaphroditic Rhabditis with a unique prerectum, four denticles at the base of the stoma, male spic...

  15. A bill to designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 2000 Louisiana Avenue in New Orleans, Louisiana, as the "Roy Rondeno, Sr. Post Office Building".

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Landrieu, Mary L. [D-LA

    2009-12-11

    05/25/2010 Held at the desk. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.3951, which became Public Law 111-193 on 6/28/2010. Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  16. Impacts of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on the microbial landscape of the New Orleans area

    PubMed Central

    Sinigalliano, C. D.; Gidley, M. L.; Shibata, T.; Whitman, D.; Dixon, T. H.; Laws, E.; Hou, A.; Bachoon, D.; Brand, L.; Amaral-Zettler, L.; Gast, R. J.; Steward, G. F.; Nigro, O. D.; Fujioka, R.; Betancourt, W. Q.; Vithanage, G.; Mathews, J.; Fleming, L. E.; Solo-Gabriele, H. M.

    2007-01-01

    Floodwaters in New Orleans from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita were observed to contain high levels of fecal indicator bacteria and microbial pathogens, generating concern about long-term impacts of these floodwaters on the sediment and water quality of the New Orleans area and Lake Pontchartrain. We show here that fecal indicator microbe concentrations in offshore waters from Lake Pontchartrain returned to prehurricane concentrations within 2 months of the flooding induced by these hurricanes. Vibrio and Legionella species within the lake were more abundant in samples collected shortly after the floodwaters had receded compared with samples taken within the subsequent 3 months; no evidence of a long-term hurricane-induced algal bloom was observed. Giardia and Cryptosporidium were detected in canal waters. Elevated levels of fecal indicator bacteria observed in sediment could not be solely attributed to impacts from floodwaters, as both flooded and nonflooded areas exhibited elevated levels of fecal indicator bacteria. Evidence from measurements of Bifidobacterium and bacterial diversity analysis suggest that the fecal indicator bacteria observed in the sediment were from human fecal sources. Epidemiologic studies are highly recommended to evaluate the human health effects of the sediments deposited by the floodwaters. PMID:17488814

  17. New music to an old melody: The 66th AAAAI meeting in New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Rabasseda, Xavier

    2010-04-01

    With the images of the earthquake in Haiti still fresh in the memory, and a similar disaster just occurring in Chile, coming again to New Orleans brought back vivid images of the Hurricane Katrina disaster. The city has for the most part recovered from that experience, although molds persist in many historical and ancient buildings, putting allergy sufferers at risk as they breathe in allergens. The city of New Orleans is almost fully restored to its former glory, however, and music again pours out through doors and windows of the French Quarter, calling people in to share drinks and food while clearly stating which specific products contain or may contain traces of nuts, so that people with allergies do not need to run to their epinephrine autoinjector to treat life-threatening anaphylactic attacks. Against this background, and under heavy, rainy and windy skies, the American Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (AAAAI) held its 2010 annual meeting in the Ernst E. Memorial Convention Center, where 4 days packed with presentations and discussions displaced most other thoughts from the attendees' minds. Indeed, nights on Bourbon Street had never been so uncrowded as they were during the meeting, suggesting that attendees were perhaps sequestered in their hotel rooms, working with new information obtained at the meeting. PMID:20440423

  18. Preliminary effects of Marcellus shale drilling on Louisiana waterthrush in West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.; Sheehan, J.; Wood, P.B.; Edenborn, H.M.

    2011-01-01

    Preliminary effects of Marcellus shale drilling on Louisiana Waterthrush in West Virginia Page 1 of 1 Doug Becker and James Sheehan, WV Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV 26506, USA; Petra Bohall Wood, U.S. Geological Survey, WV Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV 26506, USA; Harry Edenborn, National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236, USA. Spurred by technological advances and high energy prices, extraction of natural gas from Marcellus shale is increasing in the Appalachian Region. Because little is known about effects on wildlife populations, we studied immediate impacts of oil and gas CO&G) extraction on demographics and relative abundance of Louisiana Waterthrush'CLOWA), a riparian obligate species, to establish a baseline for potential future changes. Annually in 2008-2010, we conducted point counts, monitored Mayfield nesting success, spotted-mapped territories, and measured habitat quality using the EPA Rapid Bioassessment protocol for high gradient streams and a LOWA Habitat Suitability Index CHSI) on a 4,100 ha study area in northern West Virginia. On 11 streams, the stream length affected by O&G activities was 0-58%. Relative abundance, territory denSity, and nest success varied annually but were not significantly different across years. Success did not differ between impacted and unimpacted nests, but territory density had minimal correlation with percent of stream impacted by O&G activities. Impacted nests had lower HSI values in 2010 and lower EPA indices in 2009. High site fidelity could mask the immediate impacts of habitat disturbance from drilling as we measured return rates of 57%. All returning individuals were on the same stream they were banded and 88% were within 250 m of their territory from the previous year. We also observed a spatial shift in LOWA territories, perhaps in response to drilling activities

  19. Research in elementary particle physics. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State Univ,. Baton Rouge, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, L.H; Haymaker, R.; Imlay, R.; McNeil, R.; Metcalf, W.; Svoboda, R.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical work on effective action expansion on an effective low; energy theory of hadron, dynamical symmetry breaking, and lattice gauge theories is described. The high-energy experimental group at Louisiana State University has analyzed data on a neutrino oscillation experiment at LAMPF. Preparations for the LSND neutrino experiment have stated. IMB data have also been analyzed. On the ZEUS electron n-proton colliding bean experiment, the production of the barrel calorimeter has been completed. Several modules of the calorimeter have been tested at Fermilab, and preparations for data taking are underway.

  20. From 9/11 to 8/29: Post-Disaster Recovery and Rebuilding in New York and New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gotham, Kevin Fox; Greenberg, Miriam

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the process of post-disaster recovery and rebuilding in New York City since 9/11 and in New Orleans since the Hurricane Katrina disaster (8/29). As destabilizing events, 9/11 and 8/29 forced a rethinking of the major categories, concepts and theories that long dominated disaster research. We analyze the form, trajectory and…