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Sample records for oropharyngeal mass biopsy

  1. Renal Mass Biopsy: Always, Sometimes, or Never?

    PubMed

    Kutikov, Alexander; Smaldone, Marc C; Uzzo, Robert G; Haifler, Miki; Bratslavsky, Gennady; Leibovich, Bradley C

    2016-09-01

    Renal mass biopsy is a useful clinical tool; nevertheless, in a majority of patients, renal mass biopsy in its current form does not alter clinical management. Its routine use in all-comers is not indicated outside of clinical protocols. PMID:27085625

  2. Percutaneous biopsy for risk stratification of renal masses

    PubMed Central

    Blute, Michael L.; Drewry, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of abdominal imaging has led to identification of more patients with incidental renal masses, and renal mass biopsy (RMB) has become a popular method to evaluate unknown renal masses prior to definitive treatment. Pathologic data obtained from biopsy may be used to guide decisions for treatment and may include the presence or absence of malignant tumor, renal cell cancer subtype, tumor grade and the presence of other aggressive pathologic features. However, prior to using RMB for risk stratification, it is important to understand whether RMB findings are equivalent to pathologic analysis of surgical specimens and to identify any potential limitations of this approach. This review outlines the advantages and limitations of the current studies that evaluate RMB as a guide for treatment decision in patients with unknown renal masses. In multiple series, RMB has demonstrated low morbidity and a theoretical reduction in cost, if patients with benign tumors are identified from biopsy and can avoid subsequent treatment. However, when considering the routine use of RMB for risk stratification, it is important to note that biopsy may underestimate risk in some patients by undergrading, understaging or failing to identify aggressive tumor features. Future studies should focus on developing treatment algorithms that integrate RMB to identify the optimal use in risk stratification of patients with unknown renal masses. PMID:26425141

  3. The role of renal biopsy in small renal masses

    PubMed Central

    Burruni, Rodolfo; Lhermitte, Benoit; Cerantola, Yannick; Tawadros, Thomas; Meuwly, Jean-Yves; Berthold, Dominik; Jichlinski, Patrice; Valerio, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Renal biopsy is being increasingly proposed as a diagnostic tool to characterize small renal masses (SRM). Indeed, the wide adoption of imaging in the diagnostic workup of many diseases had led to a substantial increased incidence of SRM (diameter ≤4 cm). While modern ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have high sensitivity for detecting SRM, none is able to accurately and reliably characterize them in terms of histological features. This is currently of key importance in guiding clinical decision-making in some situations, and in these cases renal biopsy should be considered. In this review, we aim to summarize the technique, diagnostic performance, and predicting factors of nondiagnostic biopsy, as well as the future perspectives. PMID:26858784

  4. Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... SPR Practice Parameter for the Performance of Image-Guided Percutaneous Needle Biopsy (PNB). Amended 2014 (Resolution 39). ... Thomson KR, Venbrux AC, Morgan RA, eds. Image-Guided Interventions . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014: ...

  5. Biopsy of parotid masses: Review of current techniques.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Sananda; Sinnott, Joseph D; Tekeli, Kemal M; Turner, Samuel S; Howlett, David C

    2016-05-28

    Definitive diagnosis of parotid gland masses is required optimal management planning and for prognosis. There is controversy over whether fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) or ultrasound guided core biopsy (USCB) should be the standard for obtaining a biopsy. The aim of this review is to assess the current evidence available to assess the benefits of each technique and also to assess the use of intra-operative frozen section (IOFS). Literature searches were performed using pubmed and google scholar. The literature has been reviewed and the evidence is presented. FNAC is an accepted and widely used technique. It has been shown to have variable diagnostic capabilities depending on centres and experience of staff. USCB has a highly consistent diagnostic accuracy and can help with tumour grading and staging. However, the technique is more invasive and there is a question regarding potential for seeding. Furthermore, USCB is less likely to be offered as part of a one-stop clinic. IOFS has no role as a first line diagnostic technique but may be reserved as an adjunct or for lesions not amenable to percutaneous biopsy. On balance, USCB seems to be the method of choice. The current evidence suggests it has superior diagnostic potential and is safe. With time, USCB is likely to supplant FNAC as the biopsy technique of choice, replicating that which has occurred already in other areas of medicine such a breast practice. PMID:27247715

  6. Biopsy of parotid masses: Review of current techniques

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Sananda; Sinnott, Joseph D; Tekeli, Kemal M; Turner, Samuel S; Howlett, David C

    2016-01-01

    Definitive diagnosis of parotid gland masses is required optimal management planning and for prognosis. There is controversy over whether fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) or ultrasound guided core biopsy (USCB) should be the standard for obtaining a biopsy. The aim of this review is to assess the current evidence available to assess the benefits of each technique and also to assess the use of intra-operative frozen section (IOFS). Literature searches were performed using pubmed and google scholar. The literature has been reviewed and the evidence is presented. FNAC is an accepted and widely used technique. It has been shown to have variable diagnostic capabilities depending on centres and experience of staff. USCB has a highly consistent diagnostic accuracy and can help with tumour grading and staging. However, the technique is more invasive and there is a question regarding potential for seeding. Furthermore, USCB is less likely to be offered as part of a one-stop clinic. IOFS has no role as a first line diagnostic technique but may be reserved as an adjunct or for lesions not amenable to percutaneous biopsy. On balance, USCB seems to be the method of choice. The current evidence suggests it has superior diagnostic potential and is safe. With time, USCB is likely to supplant FNAC as the biopsy technique of choice, replicating that which has occurred already in other areas of medicine such a breast practice. PMID:27247715

  7. Postobstructive pulmonary edema after biopsy of a nasopharyngeal mass

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Keyur Kamlesh; Ahmad, Sabina Qureshi; Shah, Vikas; Lee, Haesoon

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of 17 year-old male with a nasopharyngeal rhabdomyosarcoma who developed postobstructive pulmonary edema (POPE) after removing the endotracheal tube following biopsy. He developed muffled voice, rhinorrhea, dysphagia, odynophagia, and difficulty breathing through nose and weight loss of 20 pounds in the preceding 2 months. A nasopharyngoscopy revealed a fleshy nasopharyngeal mass compressing the soft and hard palate. Head and neck MRI revealed a large mass in the nasopharynx extending into the bilateral choana and oropharynx. Biopsy of the mass was taken under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Immediately after extubation he developed oxygen desaturation, which did not improve with bag mask ventilation with 100% of oxygen, but improved after a dose of succinylcholine. He was re-intubated and pink, frothy fluid was suctioned from the endotracheal tube. Chest radiograph (CXR) was suggestive of an acute pulmonary edema. He improved with mechanical ventilation and intravenous furosemide. His pulmonary edema resolved over the next 24 h. POPE is a rare but serious complication associated with upper airway obstruction. The pathophysiology of POPE involves hemodynamic changes occurring in the lung and the heart during forceful inspiration against a closed airway due to an acute or chronic airway obstruction. This case illustrates the importance of considering the development of POPE with general anesthesia, laryngospasm and removal of endotracheal tube to make prompt diagnosis and to initiate appropriate management. PMID:26744691

  8. Postobstructive pulmonary edema after biopsy of a nasopharyngeal mass.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Keyur Kamlesh; Ahmad, Sabina Qureshi; Shah, Vikas; Lee, Haesoon

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of 17 year-old male with a nasopharyngeal rhabdomyosarcoma who developed postobstructive pulmonary edema (POPE) after removing the endotracheal tube following biopsy. He developed muffled voice, rhinorrhea, dysphagia, odynophagia, and difficulty breathing through nose and weight loss of 20 pounds in the preceding 2 months. A nasopharyngoscopy revealed a fleshy nasopharyngeal mass compressing the soft and hard palate. Head and neck MRI revealed a large mass in the nasopharynx extending into the bilateral choana and oropharynx. Biopsy of the mass was taken under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Immediately after extubation he developed oxygen desaturation, which did not improve with bag mask ventilation with 100% of oxygen, but improved after a dose of succinylcholine. He was re-intubated and pink, frothy fluid was suctioned from the endotracheal tube. Chest radiograph (CXR) was suggestive of an acute pulmonary edema. He improved with mechanical ventilation and intravenous furosemide. His pulmonary edema resolved over the next 24 h. POPE is a rare but serious complication associated with upper airway obstruction. The pathophysiology of POPE involves hemodynamic changes occurring in the lung and the heart during forceful inspiration against a closed airway due to an acute or chronic airway obstruction. This case illustrates the importance of considering the development of POPE with general anesthesia, laryngospasm and removal of endotracheal tube to make prompt diagnosis and to initiate appropriate management. PMID:26744691

  9. Image guided versus palpation guided core needle biopsy of palpable breast masses: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hari, Smriti; Kumari, Swati; Srivastava, Anurag; Thulkar, Sanjay; Mathur, Sandeep; Veedu, Prasad Thotton

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Biopsy of palpable breast masses can be performed manually by palpation guidance or under imaging guidance. Based on retrospective studies, image guided biopsy is considered more accurate than palpation guided breast biopsy; however, these techniques have not been compared prospectively. We conducted this prospective study to verify the superiority and determine the size of beneficial effect of image guided biopsy over palpation guided biopsy. Methods: Over a period of 18 months, 36 patients each with palpable breast masses were randomized into palpation guided and image guided breast biopsy arms. Ultrasound was used for image guidance in 33 patients and mammographic (stereotactic) guidance in three patients. All biopsies were performed using 14 gauge automated core biopsy needles. Inconclusive, suspicious or imaging-histologic discordant biopsies were repeated. Results: Malignancy was found in 30 of 36 women in palpation guided biopsy arm and 27 of 36 women in image guided biopsy arm. Palpation guided biopsy had sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of 46.7, 100, 100, 27.3 per cent, respectively, for diagnosing breast cancer. Nineteen of 36 women (52.8%) required repeat biopsy because of inadequate samples (7 of 19), suspicious findings (2 of 19) or imaging-histologic discordance (10 of 19). On repeat biopsy, malignancy was found in all cases of imaging-histologic discordance. Image guided biopsy had 96.3 per cent sensitivity and 100 per cent specificity. There was no case of inadequate sample or imaging-histologic discordance with image guided biopsy. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that in palpable breast masses, image guided biopsy was superior to palpation guided biopsy in terms of sensitivity, false negative rate and repeat biopsy rates. PMID:27488003

  10. Transvaginal Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy of Deep Pelvic Masses: How We Do It.

    PubMed

    Plett, Sara K; Poder, Liina; Brooks, Rebecca A; Morgan, Tara A

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the rationale and indications for transvaginal ultrasound-guided biopsy. Transvaginal ultrasound-guided biopsy can be a helpful tool for diagnosis and treatment planning in the evaluation of pelvic masses, particularly when the anatomy precludes a transabdominal or posterior transgluteal percutaneous biopsy approach. A step-by-step summary of the technique with preprocedure and postprocedure considerations is included. PMID:27091918

  11. Accessible or Inaccessible? Diagnostic Efficacy of CT-Guided Core Biopsies of Head and Neck Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Jane D. McCusker, Mark W.; Power, Sarah; PearlyTi, Joanna; Thornton, John; Brennan, Paul; Lee, Michael J.; O’Hare, Alan; Looby, Seamus

    2015-04-15

    PurposeTissue sampling of lesions in the head and neck is challenging due to complex regional anatomy and sometimes necessitates open surgical biopsy. However, many patients are poor surgical candidates due to comorbidity. Thus, we evaluated the use of CT guidance for establishing histopathological diagnosis of head and neck masses.MethodsAll consecutive patients (n = 22) who underwent CT-guided core biopsy of head or neck masses between April 2009 and August 2012 were retrospectively reviewed using the departmental CT interventional procedures database. The indication for each biopsy performed was to establish or exclude a diagnosis of neoplasia in patients with suspicious head or neck lesions found on clinical examination or imaging studies. Patients received conscious sedation and 18 G, semiautomated core needle biopsies were performed by experienced neuroradiologists using 16-slice multidetector row CT imaging guidance (Somatom Definition Siemens Medical Solutions, Germany). Histopathology results of each biopsy were analysed.ResultsSixteen of 22 biopsies that were performed (73 %) yielded a pathological diagnosis. Anatomic locations biopsied included: masticator (n = 7), parapharyngeal (n = 3), parotid (n = 3), carotid (n = 3), perivertebral (n = 3), pharyngeal (n = 2), and retropharyngeal (n = 1) spaces. Six biopsies (27 %) were nondiagnostic due to inadequate tissue sampling, particularly small biopsy sample size and failure to biopsy the true sampling site due to extensive necrosis. No major complications were encountered.ConclusionsThe use of CT guidance to perform core biopsies of head and neck masses is an effective means of establishing histopathological diagnosis and reduces the need for diagnostic open surgical biopsy and general anaesthesia.

  12. CT-guided percutaneous biopsies of head and neck masses

    SciTech Connect

    Gatenby, R.A.; Mulhern, C.B. Jr.; Strawitz, J.

    1983-03-01

    Six patients underwent CT-guided percutaneous pharyngeal or laryngeal biopsies. A retromandibular approach was used in five of these patients. Accurate cytologic information was obtained in all six cases, and no complications were encountered. This technique can be helpful in certain clinical settings.

  13. Percutaneous fine-needle aspiration biopsy of intra-abdominal masses.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, C. S.; Tao, L. C.; McLoughlin, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Percutaneous fine-needle aspiration biopsies were performed in 51 patients with various intra-abdominal masses localized by palpation, radiologic studies, ultrasonography or radioisotope scanning. Biopsy specimens were considered positive for malignant disease in 35 (85%) of the 41 patients with such disease, including 26 (96%) of the 27 with metastases. There was one false-positive diagnosis of malignant disease from the biopsy specimens. Surgery became unnecessary as a result of aspiration biopsy in at least 12 patients. One patient showed evidence of intrahepatic bleeding during liver biopsy but recovered spontaneously, and the liver appeared normal at laparotomy 3 weeks later. Aspiration biopsy is an accurate, relatively painless, inexpensive and safe method of establishing a diagnosis of intraabdominal malignant disease. Considerable experience of the cytologist is necessary for good results. PMID:737606

  14. Diagnostic Accuracy of Renal Mass Biopsy: An Ex Vivo Study of 100 Nephrectomy Specimens.

    PubMed

    von Rundstedt, Friedrich-Carl; Mata, Douglas Alexander; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N; Roth, Stephan; Degener, Stephan; Dreger, Nici Markus; Goedde, Daniel; Assaid, Ahmed; Kamper, Lars; Haage, Patrick; Stoerkel, Stephan; Lazica, David A

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the diagnostic accuracy of renal mass biopsy in an ex vivo model, as well as compared the agreement of the preoperative radiological diagnosis with the final pathologic diagnosis. Two 18-gauge needle-core and 2 vacuum-needle biopsies were performed ex vivo from the tumors of 100 consecutive patients undergoing radical nephrectomy between 2006 and 2010. The median tumor size was 5.5 cm. There was no significant difference with regard to cylinder length or tissue quality between the sampling methods. At least 1 of 4 needle cores contained diagnostic tissue in 88% of patients. Biopsy specimens identified clear cell (54%), papillary (13%), or chromophobe (5%) renal cell carcinoma; urothelial carcinoma (6%); oncocytoma (5%); liposarcoma (1%); metastatic colorectal carcinoma (1%); squamous cell carcinoma (1%); unclassified renal cell neoplasm (1%); and no tumor sampled (12%). The sensitivity of the biopsy for accurately determining the diagnosis was 88% (95% CI: 79% to 93%). The specificity was 100% (95% CI: 17% to 100%). Biopsy grade correlated strongly with final pathology (83.5% agreement). There was no difference in average tumor size in cases with the same versus higher grade on final pathology (5.87 vs 5.97; P = .87). Appraisal of tumor histology by radiology agreed with the pathologic diagnosis in 68% of cases. Provided that the biopsy samples the tumor tissue in a renal mass, pathologic analysis is of great diagnostic value in respect of grade and tumor type and correlates well with excisional pathology. This constitutes strong ground for increasingly used renal mass biopsy in patients considering active surveillance or ablation therapy. PMID:26811388

  15. Breast biopsy prediction using a case-based reasoning classifier for masses versus calcifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilska-Wolak, Anna O.; Floyd, Carey E., Jr.

    2002-05-01

    We investigated how the subdivision of breast biopsy cases into masses and calcifications influences breast cancer prediction for a case-based reasoning (CBR) classifier system. Mammographers' BI-RADS (TM) descriptions of mammographic lesions were used as input to predict breast biopsy outcome. The CBR classifier compared the case to be examined to a reference collection of cases and identified similar cases. The decision variable for each case was formed as the ratio of malignant similar cases to all similar cases. The reference data collection consisted of 1433 biopsy-proven mammography cases, and was divided into 3 categories: mass cases, calcification cases, and other. Performance was evaluated using ROC analysis and Round Robin sampling, and variance was estimated using a bootstrap analysis. The best ROC area for masses was 0.92+/- 0.01. At 98% sensitivity, about 209 (51%) patients with benign mass lesions might have been spared biopsy, while missing 5 (2%) malignancies. The best ROC area for calcifications was only 0.64+/- 0.02. At 98% sensitivity, 50 (12%) benign calcification cases could have been spared, while missing 5 (2%) malignancies. The CBR system performed substantially better on the masses than on the calcifications.

  16. Small renal mass biopsy--how, what and when: report from an international consensus panel.

    PubMed

    Tsivian, Matvey; Rampersaud, Edward N; del Pilar Laguna Pes, Maria; Joniau, Steven; Leveillee, Raymond J; Shingleton, William B; Aron, Monish; Kim, Charles Y; DeMarzo, Angelo M; Desai, Mihir M; Meler, James D; Donovan, James F; Klingler, Hans Christoph; Sopko, David R; Madden, John F; Marberger, Michael; Ferrandino, Michael N; Polascik, Thomas J

    2014-06-01

    To discuss the use of renal mass biopsy (RMB) for small renal masses (SRMs), formulate technical aspects, outline potential pitfalls and provide recommendations for the practicing clinician. The meeting was conducted as an informal consensus process and no scoring system was used to measure the levels of agreement on the different topics. A moderated general discussion was used as the basis for consensus and arising issues were resolved at this point. A consensus was established and lack of agreement to topics or specific items was noted at this point. Recommended biopsy technique: at least two cores, sampling different tumour regions with ultrasonography being the preferred method of image guidance. Pathological interpretation: 'non-diagnostic samples' should refer to insufficient material, inconclusive and normal renal parenchyma. For non-diagnostic samples, a repeat biopsy is recommended. Fine-needle aspiration may provide additional information but cannot substitute for core biopsy. Indications for RMB: biopsy is recommended in most cases except in patients with imaging or clinical characteristics indicative of pathology (syndromes, imaging characteristics) and cases whereby conservative management is not contemplated. RMB is recommended for active surveillance but not for watchful-waiting candidates. We report the results of an international consensus meeting on the use of RMB for SRMs, defining the technique, pathological interpretation and indications. PMID:24119037

  17. Frame-Based Stereotactic Biopsy of Canine Brain Masses: Technique and Clinical Results in 26 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Rossmeisl, John Henry; Andriani, Rudy T.; Cecere, Thomas E.; Lahmers, Kevin; LeRoith, Tanya; Zimmerman, Kurt L.; Gibo, Denise; Debinski, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the methodology, diagnostic yield, and adverse events (AE) associated with frame-based stereotactic brain biopsies (FBSB) obtained from 26 dogs with solitary forebrain lesions. Medical records were reviewed from dogs that underwent FBSB using two stereotactic headframes designed for use in small animals and compatible with computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Stereotactic plans were generated from MR and CT images using commercial software, and FBSB performed both with (14/26) and without intraoperative image guidance. Records were reviewed for diagnostic yield, defined as the proportion of biopsies producing a specific neuropathological diagnosis, AE associated with FBSB, and risk factors for the development of AE. Postprocedural AE were evaluated in 19/26 dogs that did not proceed to a therapeutic intervention immediately following biopsy. Biopsy targets included intra-axial telencephalic masses (24/26), one intra-axial diencephalic mass, and one extra-axial parasellar mass. The median target volume was 1.99 cm3. No differences in patient, lesion, or outcome variables were observed between the two headframe systems used or between FBSB performed with or without intraoperative CT guidance. The diagnostic yield of FBSB was 94.6%. Needle placement error was a significant risk factor associated with procurement of non-diagnostic biopsy specimens. Gliomas were diagnosed in 24/26 dogs, and meningioma and granulomatous meningoencephalitis in 1 dog each. AE directly related to FBSB were observed in a total of 7/26 (27%) of dogs. Biopsy-associated clinical morbidity, manifesting as seizures and transient neurological deterioration, occurred in 3/19 (16%) of dogs. The case fatality rate was 5.2% (1/19 dogs), with death attributable to intracranial hemorrhage. FBSB using the described apparatus was relatively safe and effective at providing neuropathological diagnoses in dogs with focal forebrain lesions. PMID:26664949

  18. Frame-Based Stereotactic Biopsy of Canine Brain Masses: Technique and Clinical Results in 26 Cases.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, John Henry; Andriani, Rudy T; Cecere, Thomas E; Lahmers, Kevin; LeRoith, Tanya; Zimmerman, Kurt L; Gibo, Denise; Debinski, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the methodology, diagnostic yield, and adverse events (AE) associated with frame-based stereotactic brain biopsies (FBSB) obtained from 26 dogs with solitary forebrain lesions. Medical records were reviewed from dogs that underwent FBSB using two stereotactic headframes designed for use in small animals and compatible with computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Stereotactic plans were generated from MR and CT images using commercial software, and FBSB performed both with (14/26) and without intraoperative image guidance. Records were reviewed for diagnostic yield, defined as the proportion of biopsies producing a specific neuropathological diagnosis, AE associated with FBSB, and risk factors for the development of AE. Postprocedural AE were evaluated in 19/26 dogs that did not proceed to a therapeutic intervention immediately following biopsy. Biopsy targets included intra-axial telencephalic masses (24/26), one intra-axial diencephalic mass, and one extra-axial parasellar mass. The median target volume was 1.99 cm(3). No differences in patient, lesion, or outcome variables were observed between the two headframe systems used or between FBSB performed with or without intraoperative CT guidance. The diagnostic yield of FBSB was 94.6%. Needle placement error was a significant risk factor associated with procurement of non-diagnostic biopsy specimens. Gliomas were diagnosed in 24/26 dogs, and meningioma and granulomatous meningoencephalitis in 1 dog each. AE directly related to FBSB were observed in a total of 7/26 (27%) of dogs. Biopsy-associated clinical morbidity, manifesting as seizures and transient neurological deterioration, occurred in 3/19 (16%) of dogs. The case fatality rate was 5.2% (1/19 dogs), with death attributable to intracranial hemorrhage. FBSB using the described apparatus was relatively safe and effective at providing neuropathological diagnoses in dogs with focal forebrain lesions. PMID:26664949

  19. Does the Oropharyngeal Fat Tissue Influence the Oropharyngeal Airway in Snorers? Dynamic CT Study

    PubMed Central

    Akan, Huseyin; Celebi, Mehmet; Sakan, Banu Baglan

    2004-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine if snorers have a narrower oropharyngeal airway area because of fat infiltration, and an elevated body mass index. Materials and Methods Ten control subjects and 19 patients that snored were evaluated. We obtained 2-mm-thick axial CT scan images every 0.6 seconds during expiration and inspiration at the same level of the oropharynx. We selected the largest and the smallest oropharyngeal airway areas and found the differences. From the slice that had the smallest oropharyngeal airway area, the thickness of the parapharyngeal and subcutaneous fat was measured. The measurements from the left and right side were added together and single values for parapharyngeal and subcutaneous fat tissue thickness were then found. Results The conventional measure of body mass index was significantly higher in the snorers (p < 0.05). The difference in the smallest oropharyngeal airway area between snorers and the controls was statistically significant (p < 0.01). The average difference between the largest and the smallest oropharyngeal area in the control group and the snorer group was statistically significant (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the largest oropharyngeal airway area, the total subcutaneous fat width and the total parapharyngeal fat width between snorers and control subjects (p > 0.05). Conclusion We concluded that the oropharyngeal fat deposition in snorers is not an important factor, and it does not predispose a person to the upper airway narrowing. PMID:15235234

  20. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses

    PubMed Central

    Voss, M; Hammel, P; Molas, G; Palazzo, L; Dancour, A; O'Toole, D; Terris, B; Degott, C; Bernades, P; Ruszniewski, P

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To assess the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNAB) in patients with solid pancreatic masses.
METHODS—Ninety nine consecutive patients with pancreatic masses were studied. Histological findings obtained by EUS-FNAB were compared with the final diagnosis assessed by surgery, biopsy of other tumour site or at postmortem examination, or by using a combination of clinical course, imaging features, and tumour markers.
RESULTS—EUS-FNAB was feasible in 90 patients (adenocarcinomas, n = 59; neuroendocrine tumours, n = 15; various neoplasms, n = 6; pancreatitis, n = 10), and analysable material was obtained in 73. Tumour size (⩾ or < 25 mm in diameter) did not influence the ability to obtain informative biopsy samples. Diagnostic accuracy was 74.4% (adenocarcinomas, 81.4%; neuroendocrine tumours, 46.7%; other lesions, 75%; p<0.02). Overall, the diagnostic yield in all 99 patients was 68%. Successful biopsies were performed in six patients with portal hypertension. Minor complications (moderate bleeding or pain) occurred in 5% of cases.
CONCLUSIONS—EUS-FNAB is a useful and safe method for the investigation of pancreatic masses, with a high feasibility rate even when lesions are small. Overall diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNAB seems to depend on the tumour type.


Keywords: pancreas; tumour; endoscopic ultrasound; fine needle aspiration biopsy PMID:10644320

  1. Stages of Oropharyngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  2. Rapid mass spectrometric conversion of tissue biopsy samples into permanent quantitative digital proteome maps

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tiannan; Kouvonen, Petri; Koh, Ching Chiek; Gillet, Ludovic C; Wolski, Witold E; Röst, Hannes L; Rosenberger, George; Collins, Ben C; Blum, Lorenz C; Gillessen, Silke; Joerger, Markus; Jochum, Wolfram; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-01-01

    Clinical specimens are each inherently unique, limited and non-renewable. As such, small samples such as tissue biopsies are often completely consumed after a limited number of analyses. Here we present a method that enables fast and reproducible conversion of a small amount of tissue (approximating the quantity obtained by a biopsy) into a single, permanent digital file representing the mass spectrometry-measurable proteome of the sample. The method combines pressure cycling technology (PCT) and SWATH mass spectrometry (MS), and the resulting proteome maps can be analyzed, re-analyzed, compared and mined in silico to detect and quantify specific proteins across multiple samples. We used this method to process and convert 18 biopsy samples from 9 renal cell carcinoma patients into SWATH-MS fragment ion maps. From these proteome maps we detected and quantified more than 2,000 proteins with a high degree of reproducibility across all samples. The identified proteins clearly separated tumorous kidney tissues from healthy tissue, and differentiated distinct histomorphological kidney cancer subtypes. PMID:25730263

  3. Prostate biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate gland biopsy; Transrectal prostate biopsy; Fine needle biopsy of the prostate; Core biopsy of the prostate; Targeted prostate biopsy; Prostate biopsy - transrectal ultrasound (TRUS); Stereotactic ...

  4. Clinical, biopsy, and mass spectrometry characteristics of renal apolipoprotein A-IV amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Surendra; Amin, Md Shahrier; Kurtin, Paul J; Vrana, Julie A; Theis, Jason D; Grogg, Karen L; Alexander, Mariam P; Nasr, Samih H; Fervenza, Fernando C; Leung, Nelson; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2016-09-01

    Apolipoprotein A-IV associated amyloidosis (AApoAIV amyloidosis) is a rare cause of amyloidosis with only a single reported case. Here we describe the clinical, biopsy, and mass spectrometry characteristics of 11 cases of renal AApoAIV amyloidosis encompassing 9 men and 2 women with a mean age at diagnosis of 63.5 years. Progressive chronic kidney disease (mean serum creatinine 2.9 mg/dl) was the most common cause for biopsy with proteinuria absent or minimal in all except one. Hematological and serological evaluation was negative in 9 patients, while 2 had a monoclonal gammopathy. The renal biopsy findings were striking and showed large amounts of eosinophilic Congo-red positive amyloid deposits restricted to the renal medulla with sparing of the renal cortex. In 6 cases, peritubular amyloid was noted in addition to the interstitial involvement. Immunofluorescence studies were negative for immunoglobulins. Electron microscopy showed nonbranching fibrils measuring 7 to 10 nm in diameter. Laser microdissection of the amyloid deposits followed by mass spectrometry showed large spectra number (a semiquantitative measure of abundance) for AApoAIV protein ranging from 49 to 169 (average 85), serum amyloid protein (average 19), and apolipoprotein E (average 48). Importantly, no peptides were detected for any other forms of known amyloidogenic precursor proteins. Thus, renal AApoAIV amyloidosis typically presents with progressive chronic kidney disease and histologically exhibits extensive medullary involvement with sparing of the cortex. The diagnosis is best established by mass spectrometry. Hence, a high degree of suspicion and examination of the renal medulla is required to make the diagnosis. PMID:27262366

  5. [Imaging mass spectrometry: a new tool for the analysis of skin biopsy. Application in Fabry's disease].

    PubMed

    Roy, S; Touboul, D; Brunelle, A; Germain, D-P; Prognon, P; Laprévote, O; Chaminade, P

    2006-09-01

    The advent of innovative techniques in mass spectrometry, especially in the area of imaging, prompted us to evaluate two promising techniques: secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. For this purpose, sections of cutaneous biopsies from patients affected by Fabry's disease and control patients were analyzed. In the course of this disease, two physiological glycosphingolipids [globotriasylceramide (Gb3) and the galabiosylceramide (Ga2)] accumulate in certain tissues owing to a catabolism failure. The ability of these techniques to localize sites of accumulation in body tissues and their capacity to identify the accumulated lipid structures by mass spectra were evaluated. Results demonstrated that these two techniques provide complementary information:-secondary ion mass spectrometry enabled precise localization of areas of accumulation with lateral resolution in the micrometer range;-the signal obtained with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry was high enough to identify these structures according to their molecular weight. PMID:17095952

  6. Contemporary Issues Surrounding Small Renal Masses: Evaluation, Diagnostic Biopsy, Nephron Sparing, and Novel Treatment Modalities.

    PubMed

    Leone, Andrew R; Diorio, Gregory J; Spiess, Philippe E; Gilbert, Scott M

    2016-06-01

    Incidental identification of small renal masses (SRMs) has become increasingly common with widespread adoption of cross-sectional imaging. To date, early detection of SRMs has not translated to a substantial improvement in cancer-specific survival. Guidelines on the management of SRMs are evolving to reflect recent developments in treatment. The major approaches to managing SRMs include active surveillance, partial/radical nephrectomy, and ablative therapies, such as radiofrequency ablation with cryoablation. The goal of treatment is to optimize oncologic and renal function outcomes while avoiding overtreatment and associated morbidity. In this review, we summarize the diagnosis of SRMs, the role of renal mass biopsy, different treatment strategies, and future directions, including emerging molecular biomarkers. PMID:27323710

  7. The role of fine needle aspiration cytology and core biopsy in the diagnosis of palpable breast masses

    PubMed Central

    Kocaay, Akin Firat; Celik, Suleyman Utku; Sevim, Yusuf; Ozyazici, Sefa; Cetinkaya, Omer Arda; Alic, Kamil Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Background: The modern approach to palpable breast masses is to get cytopathologic diagnosis before definitive surgery. We aimed to compare fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) with core biopsy in histopathologic diagnosis of palpable breast masses. Materials and Methods: Data were collected on 123 women who have suspicious palpable breast masses from 2007 to 2010. Results: Of the 123 patients, core biopsies were performed on 64 patients (Group 1) and FNAC on 59 patients (Group 2). Malignancy was confirmed in 25 out of 32 clinically suspicious patients in Group 1 (78.1%), and 20 out of 21 participants in Group 2 (95.2%). Among the clinically suspicious patients, 81.8% of 33 patients in Group 1, and 90.3% of 31 patients in Group 2 were identified malignancy. Sensitivity was 100% for core biopsy and 95% for FNAC. Specificity was 100% in both procedures. False negativity rate in FNAC were 5%. Conclusion: Sensitivity and specificity showed that in the case of true histopathologic classification, core biopsy is superior to FNAC. Nevertheless, FNAC's role as a fast, simple and cheap diagnosis cannot be ignored. It is an effective diagnostic tool in most patients, in comparison to the correct and specific typing of core biopsies in benign lesions which protect patients from the open biopsy.

  8. What is your diagnosis? Biopsy impression smear of a hepatic mass in a yearling Thoroughbred filly.

    PubMed

    Gold, Jenifer R; Warren, Amy L; French, Tracy W; Stokol, Tracy

    2008-09-01

    A 1-year-old Thoroughbred filly was presented to the Cornell University Hospital for Animals with a 10-day history of fever, diarrhea, inappetance, and hypodipsia. Clinical pathology abnormalities found by the referring veterinarian included erythrocytosis, hyperproteinemia, and increased serum gamma-glutamyltransferase and lactate dehydrogenase activities. At Cornell University, the laboratory abnormalities were confirmed and also included thrombocytosis and hypoglycemia. Erythrocytosis persisted despite vigorous fluid therapy. Ultrasound examination revealed an extremely enlarged liver with abnormal echogenicity and a 21 x 25-cm hepatic mass with varied echogenicity. Imprints of an ultrasound-guided biopsy of the mass revealed a neoplastic epithelial population of uncertain origin, although the cells did not resemble hepatocytes. Together with the presenting signs, signalment, ultrasonographic findings, and persistent erythrocytosis, the cytologic findings were considered to be most consistent with hepatoblastoma. Histopathologic examination of the mass at necropsy confirmed the diagnosis and findings also included bone marrow erythroid hyperplasia. Serum erythropoietin concentration was 28.0 mU/mL (reference interval 1.0-11.8 mU/mL), supporting erythropoietin production by the tumor and secondary inappropriate erythrocytosis. To our knowledge, this report is the first to document secondary erythrocytosis with increased erythropoietin concentration in a horse with hepatoblastoma, and also the first to describe the cytopathologic features of this rare tumor. PMID:18761530

  9. Oral sex and oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam P.; Nguyen, Ly M.; Thomas, Sroka; Hong-Ly, Bevan; Chi, Alexander; Vos, Paul; Karlsson, Ulf; Vinh-Hung, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: We aimed to study the prevalence of oral sex and its possible association with human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 infection in the development of oropharyngeal cancer in the US population for possible prevention. Methods: We conduct a systemic review on the prevalence of oral sex among Americans among different age groups, the prevalence of HPV 16 infection reported in oropharyngeal cancer, and correlation between oral sex and oropharyngeal cancer. Results: Oral sex is prevalent among adolescents and sexually active adults. Sixty percent of oropharyngeal cancer reported in the United States is associated with HPV 16 infections. Individuals who practiced oral sex with multiple partners are at risk for developing oropharyngeal cancer and need to be informed about practicing safe sex or getting vaccination. Conclusion: Family physicians will play a key role in prevention and educating the public about the risk of oral sex. PMID:27428229

  10. Oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Huber, Michaell A; Tantiwongkosi, Bundhit

    2014-11-01

    Oral and oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is a complex and often relentless malignancy prone to local invasion and dissemination. Despite advances in understanding of the disease and improved therapeutic interventions, it continues to be diagnosed at an advanced stage and the survival rate remains poor. The financial cost of treating OPC may be the highest of all cancers in the United States and survivors often experience major detriments to quality of life. Major risk factors for OPC are tobacco, alcohol, areca nut, and human papillomavirus infection. This article updates medical practitioners on the causes, presentation, diagnosis, and management of OPC. PMID:25443678

  11. Mouse Model of Oropharyngeal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Norma V.; Filler, Scott G.

    2013-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis is a frequent cause of morbidity in patients with defects in cell-mediated immunity or saliva production. Animal models of this infection are important for studying disease pathogenesis and evaluating vaccines and antifungal therapies. Here we describe a simple murine model of oropharyngeal candidiasis. Mice are rendered susceptible to oral infection by injection with cortisone acetate and then inoculated by placing a swab saturated with Candida albicans sublingually. This process results in a reproducible level of infection, the histopathology of which mimics that of pseudomembranous oropharyngeal candidiasis in patients. Using this model, data are obtained after 5–9 days of work. PMID:22402633

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Oropharyngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  13. General Information about Oropharyngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  14. Robotic Surgery for Oropharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shivani; Goldenberg, David

    2014-01-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer represents a growing proportion of head and neck malignancies. This has been associated with the increase in infection of the oropharynx by oncogenic strains of human papillomavirus (HPV). Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) has opened the door for minimally invasive surgery for HPV-related and non-HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer. Compared to traditional open surgical approaches, TORS has been shown to improve functional outcomes in speech and swallowing, while maintaining good oncologic outcomes. PMID:24808952

  15. Gum biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - gingiva (gums) ... used to close the opening created for the biopsy. ... to eat for a few hours before the biopsy. ... Risks for this procedure include: Bleeding from the biopsy site Infection of the gums Soreness

  16. Diagnosis of a submucosal mass at the staple line after sigmoid colon cancer resection by endoscopic cutting-mucosa biopsy.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Mitsuaki; Koinuma, Koji; Lefor, Alan K; Horie, Hisanaga; Ito, Homare; Sata, Naohiro; Hayashi, Yoshikazu; Sunada, Keijiro; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2016-04-25

    A 48-year-old man underwent laparoscopic sigmoid colon resection for cancer and surveillance colonoscopy was performed annually thereafter. Five years after the resection, a submucosal mass was found at the anastomotic staple line, 15 cm from the anal verge. Computed tomography scan and endoscopic ultrasound were not consistent with tumor recurrence. Endoscopic mucosa biopsy was performed to obtain a definitive diagnosis. Mucosal incision over the lesion with the cutting needle knife technique revealed a creamy white material, which was completely removed. Histologic examination showed fibrotic tissue without caseous necrosis or tumor cells. No bacteria, including mycobacterium, were found on culture. The patient remains free of recurrence at five years since the resection. Endoscopic biopsy with a cutting mucosal incision is an important technique for evaluation of submucosal lesions after rectal resection. PMID:27114752

  17. Diagnosis of a submucosal mass at the staple line after sigmoid colon cancer resection by endoscopic cutting-mucosa biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Mitsuaki; Koinuma, Koji; Lefor, Alan K; Horie, Hisanaga; Ito, Homare; Sata, Naohiro; Hayashi, Yoshikazu; Sunada, Keijiro; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old man underwent laparoscopic sigmoid colon resection for cancer and surveillance colonoscopy was performed annually thereafter. Five years after the resection, a submucosal mass was found at the anastomotic staple line, 15 cm from the anal verge. Computed tomography scan and endoscopic ultrasound were not consistent with tumor recurrence. Endoscopic mucosa biopsy was performed to obtain a definitive diagnosis. Mucosal incision over the lesion with the cutting needle knife technique revealed a creamy white material, which was completely removed. Histologic examination showed fibrotic tissue without caseous necrosis or tumor cells. No bacteria, including mycobacterium, were found on culture. The patient remains free of recurrence at five years since the resection. Endoscopic biopsy with a cutting mucosal incision is an important technique for evaluation of submucosal lesions after rectal resection. PMID:27114752

  18. The emerging role of endoscopic ultrasound-guided core biopsy for the evaluation of solid pancreatic masses.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, M; Koduru, P; Lanke, G; Bruno, M; Maitra, A; Giovannini, M

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a lethal cancer with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Surgical resection is the only curative treatment but only 20% are eligible for resection at the time of diagnosis. Early detection of cancer is of paramount importance in the management. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the preferred modality for obtaining tissue diagnosis of pancreatic masses. However, the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA may be limited by several factors like availability of onsite cytopathology, adequacy of tissue core for histology, location of the mass, presence of underlying chronic pancreatitis, and experience of the endoscopist. Modern oncology is focusing on personalizing treatment based on tissue analysis of genetic aberrations and molecular biomarkers which are now available. Core tissue also aids in the diagnosis of disease entities like lymphoma, metastatic tumors, neuroendocrine tumors and autoimmune pancreatitis whose diagnosis rely on preserved tissue architecture and immunohistochemistry. Making accurate diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses is critical to avoid unnecessary resections in patients with benign lesions like focal lesions of chronic pancreatitis and autoimmune pancreatitis which mimic cancer. To overcome the limitations of FNA and to obtain adequate core tissue, a Tru-Cut biopsy needle was developed which met with variable success due to stiffness, cumbersome operation and technical failure using it in the duodenum/pancreatic head. More recently fine needle biopsy needles, with reverse bevel technology have become available in different sizes (19, 22, 25-gauge). The aim of this article was to review the emerging role of core biopsy needles in acquiring tissue in solid pancreatic masses and discuss its potential role in personalized medicine. PMID:25675155

  19. Higher Body Mass Index Increases the Risk for Biopsy-Mediated Detection of Prostate Cancer in Chinese Men

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi-Shuo; Zhang, Li-Min; Xu, Hua; Na, Rong; Jiang, Hao-Wen; Ding, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and prostate cancer (PCa) risk at biopsy in Chinese men. Patients and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of 1,807 consecutive men who underwent initial multicore (≥10) prostate biopsy under transrectal ultrasound guidance between Dec 2004 and Feb 2014. BMI was categorised based on the Asian classification of obesity as follows: <18.5 (underweight), 18.5–22.9 (normal weight), 23–24.9 (overweight), 25–29.9 (moderately obese), and ≥30 kg/m2 (severely obese). The odds ratios (OR) of each BMI category for risk of PCa and high-grade prostate cancer (HGPCa, Gleason score ≥4+3) detection were estimated in crude, age-adjusted and multivariate-adjusted models. Prevalence ratios and accuracies of PSA predicted PCa were also estimated across BMI groups. Results In total, PCa was detected by biopsy in 750 (45.4%) men, and HGPCa was detected in 419 (25.4%) men. Compared with men of normal weight, underweight men and obese men were older and had higher prostate specific antigen levels. The risk of overall PCa detection via biopsy presented an obvious U-shaped relationship with BMI in crude analysis. Overall, 50.0%, 37.4%, 45.6% 54.4% and 74.1% of the men in the underweight, normal weight, overweight, moderately obese and severely obese groups, respectively, were diagnosed with PCa via biopsy. In multivariate analysis, obesity was significantly correlated with a higher risk of PCa detection (OR = 1.17, 95%CI 1.10–1.25, P<0.001). However, higher BMI was not correlated with HGPCa detection (OR = 1.03, 95%CI 0.97–1.09, P = 0.29). There were no significant differences in the accuracy of using PSA to predict PCa or HGPCa detection across different BMI categories. Conclusion Obesity was associated with higher risk of PCa detection in the present Chinese biopsy population. No significant association was detected between obesity and HGPCa. PMID:25861033

  20. What Are Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... about oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? What are oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? Cancer starts when cells in ... the parts of the mouth and throat. The oral cavity (mouth) and oropharynx (throat) The oral cavity includes ...

  1. Worldwide trends show oropharyngeal cancer rates increasing

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists report that the incidence of oropharyngeal cancer significantly increased during the period 1983-2002 among people in countries that are economically developed. Oropharyngeal cancer occurs primarily in the middle part of the throat behind t

  2. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided sheath placement to guide transbronchial biopsy of mediastinal lymphadenopathy and lung mass: a new technique.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kassem; Bessich, Jamie; Sterman, Daniel H

    2015-04-01

    A patient with a history of lung adenocarcinoma, which was treated with chemoradiation, presented to our interventional pulmonology clinic for suspicion of recurrent lung cancer. The patient had a PET-avid right upper-lobe mass and subcarinal lymphadenopathy. We performed a curvilinear endobronchial ultrasound (CP-EBUS) with transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA), followed by transbronchial EBUS-guided biopsies (TBB) of the subcarinal lymph node using miniforceps. The EBUS needle sheath was inserted over the needle through the bronchial wall and advanced into the lymph node. The EBUS-guided placement of the transbronchial sheath facilitated the miniforcep insertion and the performance of multiple transbronchial biopsies. Given success with this method, we further developed this technique in a second patient with a right lower-lobe mass. In an effort to obtain adequate tissue and minimize repeated efforts at miniforcep guidance into the lesion, we inserted a radial EBUS guide sheath through the curvilinear EBUS scope and guided it into the lesion using the miniforceps. We therefore used the radial sheath as a placeholder while obtaining repeated TBB using miniforceps as described. These modifications of previously described techniques allow for maximal and expeditious sampling of target lymph nodes and masses, with sufficient material obtained for histopathologic analysis. PMID:25887015

  3. Dexamethasone in Reducing Oral Pain and Dry Mouth After Surgery in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-08

    Dysphagia; Pain; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  4. Real-Time 3D Fluoroscopy-Guided Large Core Needle Biopsy of Renal Masses: A Critical Early Evaluation According to the IDEAL Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeze, Stephanie G. C.; Huisman, Merel; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Diest, Paul J. van; Ruud Bosch, J. L. H.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den

    2012-06-15

    Introduction: Three-dimensional (3D) real-time fluoroscopy cone beam CT is a promising new technique for image-guided biopsy of solid tumors. We evaluated the technical feasibility, diagnostic accuracy, and complications of this technique for guidance of large-core needle biopsy in patients with suspicious renal masses. Methods: Thirteen patients with 13 suspicious renal masses underwent large-core needle biopsy under 3D real-time fluoroscopy cone beam CT guidance. Imaging acquisition and subsequent 3D reconstruction was done by a mobile flat-panel detector (FD) C-arm system to plan the needle path. Large-core needle biopsies were taken by the interventional radiologist. Technical success, accuracy, and safety were evaluated according to the Innovation, Development, Exploration, Assessment, Long-term study (IDEAL) recommendations. Results: Median tumor size was 2.6 (range, 1.0-14.0) cm. In ten (77%) patients, the histological diagnosis corresponded to the imaging findings: five were malignancies, five benign lesions. Technical feasibility was 77% (10/13); in three patients biopsy results were inconclusive. The lesion size of these three patients was <2.5 cm. One patient developed a minor complication. Median follow-up was 16.0 (range, 6.4-19.8) months. Conclusions: 3D real-time fluoroscopy cone beam CT-guided biopsy of renal masses is feasible and safe. However, these first results suggest that diagnostic accuracy may be limited in patients with renal masses <2.5 cm.

  5. Biopsy - polyps

    MedlinePlus

    Polyp biopsy ... are treated is the colon. How a polyp biopsy is done depends on the location: Colonoscopy or flexible sigmoidoscopy explores the large bowel Colposcopy-directed biopsy examines the vagina and cervix Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) or ...

  6. Liver biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - liver; Percutaneous biopsy ... the biopsy needle to be inserted into the liver. This is often done by using ultrasound. The ... the chance of damage to the lung or liver. The needle is removed quickly. Pressure will be ...

  7. Teledynamic Evaluation of Oropharyngeal Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malandraki, Georgia A.; McCullough, Gary; He, Xuming; McWeeny, Elizabeth; Perlman, Adrienne L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the present investigation was to test the feasibility and clinical utility of a real-time Internet-based protocol for remote, telefluoroscopic evaluation of oropharyngeal swallowing. Method: In this prospective cohort study, the authors evaluated 32 patients with a primary diagnosis of stroke or head/neck cancer. All…

  8. Detection of graphite using laser microprobe mass analysis of a transbronchial biopsy from a foundry worker with mixed dust pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed

    Domej, Wolfgang; Földes-Papp, Zeno; Schlagenhaufen, Claudia; Wippel, Ruediger; Tilz, Gernot Peter; Krachler, Michael; Demel, Ulrike; Lang, Johanna; Urban-Woltron, Hildegard

    2002-03-28

    Inhalation of dust containing graphite can cause lung disease in foundry workers and workers in graphite mines or mills. Mixed dust pneumoconiosis caused by long-term occupational exposure to graphite dust is a rare disease. Only a few cases of graphite pneumoconiosis have been reported in literature, and these were usually diagnosed post mortem. Our report is of an 80-year-old male patient who had worked in an iron foundry for 20 years and whose work had entailed regular contact with ground graphite and foundry vapors. Chest x-rays revealed both a reticular and nodular pattern in the lung, moderate apical distractions and pleural scarring, all of which were confirmed by high-resolution computed tomography. Bronchoalveolar lavage and transbronchial biopsies were also consistent with mixed dust pneumoconiosis, and due to the long-term dust exposure, graphite pneumoconiosis was strongly suspected. To confirm this diagnosis, the chemical composition of the dark granules in the semi-thin histological sections of the transbronchial biopsies were analyzed using laser microprobe mass spectroscopy. The mass spectra of these black particles were consistent with those of natural graphite powder. Comparative analyses of normal lung tissue did not produce similar spectral patterns. We conclude that histology and cytology does not always suffice to confirm a diagnosis of graphite pneumoconiosis, because black particles are also found in conditions resulting from other exposures, such as heavy smoking or coal mining. Analysis of the composition of particles deposited in the lung tissue offers more precise information, which can be used as evidence in occupational and forensic medicine. Laser microprobe mass spectroscopy can assess the mineral dust load in lung samples. PMID:12238312

  9. Radiation Therapy and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With HPV-Related Oropharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-08

    Human Papillomavirus Infection; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  10. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway. (a... provide a patent airway. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway. (a... provide a patent airway. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  12. Laser secondary neutral mass spectrometry for copper detection in micro-scale biopsies.

    PubMed

    Kriegeskotte, C; Cantz, T; Haberland, J; Zibert, A; Haier, J; Köhler, G; Schöler, H R; Schmidt, H H-J; Arlinghaus, H F

    2009-10-01

    Disease progression and clinical diagnostics of a number of hereditable metabolic diseases are determined by organ involvement in disturbed deposition of certain molecules. Current clinical imaging is unable to visualize this maldistribution with sufficient specificity and sensitivity, such as in Wilson's disease. The quest for understanding cellular Cu distribution in these patients requires element- and molecule-specific images with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. We have used a new cryo-mass spectrometric instrument with an integrated cryosectioning chamber for preparation and analysis of frozen hydrated samples of Wilson's disease tissue. With laser post-ionization secondary neutral mass spectrometry (laser-SNMS), we were able to image Cu and other intrinsic elements and molecules in less than 1 mg of frozen hydrated liver tissue from a murine model of Wilson's disease. A 40-50 times higher Cu concentration was measured in the disease tissue as compared to the control mouse. Furthermore, major histomorphological changes were observed using this advanced nano-science tool. The results showed that the combination of in-vacuum cryosectioning and cryo-laser-SNMS technologies is particularly well suited for identifying specific cell structures and imaging trace element concentrations with subcellular resolution and upper-parts-per-billion sensitivity in biological samples. This technology can provide a novel diagnostic tool for clinical applications in various diseases involving trace elements. PMID:19753579

  13. Early diagnosis of asymptomatic oral and oropharyngeal squamous cancers.

    PubMed

    Mashberg, A; Samit, A

    1995-01-01

    An examination of the oral cavity and oropharynx in asymptomatic patients at high risk requires an orderly visual inspection of the entire oral and oropharyngeal mucosa with particular attention to the tongue, floor of mouth, soft palate, uvula, tonsillar pillars, and the lingual aspects of the retromolar trigones. Completion and clear documentation of the entire examination should be recorded. Detected lesions that do not resolve in a reasonable length of time--two to three weeks--require intense and assiduous investigation. The following specifics should be considered. 1. Alcohol drinkers and cigarette smokers, especially those 40 years of age and older, are at very high risk for the development of upper aerodigestive tract and lung squamous carcinomas. 2. The floor of the mouth, the ventrolateral tongue, and the soft palate complex are the high-risk sites within the oral cavity and oropharynx. 3. Persistent mucosal erythroplasia rather than leukoplakia is the earliest visual sign of oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma. These lesions should not be regarded merely as precancerous changes. The evidence indicates that these lesions in high-risk sites should be considered to be invasive carcinoma or carcinoma in situ unless proven otherwise by biopsy. 4. Toluidine blue staining is a useful diagnostic adjunct, particularly as a method of ruling out false-negative clinical impressions. It may also be used as a rinse in high-risk patients to encompass the entire oral mucosa after a negative clinical examination and as a guide to improve biopsy yields. 5. If oral or oropharyngeal cancer is identified, evaluations of the larynx, hypopharynx, esophagus, and lungs should be performed to rule out multiple primary cancers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7583906

  14. Inflation-Fixation Method for Lipidomic Mapping of Lung Biopsies by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    PubMed

    Carter, Claire L; Jones, Jace W; Farese, Ann M; MacVittie, Thomas J; Kane, Maureen A

    2016-05-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases are among the leading causes of deaths worldwide and major contributors of morbidity and global disease burden. To appropriately investigate lung disease, the respiratory airways must be fixed in their physiological orientation and should be inflated prior to investigations. We present an inflation-fixation method that enables lipidomic investigations of whole lung samples and resected biopsy specimens by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI). Formalin-inflation enables sample preparation to parallel standard clinical and surgical procedures, in addition to greatly reducing the complexity of analysis, by decreasing the number of analytes in the MALDI plume and reducing adduct formation in the resulting mass spectra. The reduced complexity increased sensitivity and enabled high-resolution imaging acquisitions without any loss in analyte detection at 10 and 20 μm scans. We present a detailed study of over 100 lipid ions detected in positive and negative ion modes covering the conducting and respiratory airways and parts of the peripheral nervous tissue running through the lungs. By defining the resolution required for clear definition of the alveolar space and thus the respiratory airways we have provided a guideline for MSI investigations of respiratory diseases involving the airways, including the interstitium. This study has provided a detailed map of lipid species and their localization within larger mammalian lung samples, for the first time, thus categorizing the lipidome for future MALDI-MSI studies of pulmonary diseases. PMID:27028398

  15. The negative predictive value of ultrasound-guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy of breast masses: a validation study of 339 cases

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Darrell R.; Nasute, Paola; Hayes, Malcolm; Warren, Linda J.; Gordon, Paula B.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To determine the negative predictive value of sonographically guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy of breast masses, with detailed analysis of any false-negative cases. Materials and methods: We reviewed 669 cases of sonographically guided 14-gauge core needle biopsies that had benign pathologic findings. Given a benign pathology on core biopsy, true-negatives had either benign pathology on surgical excision or at least 2 years of stable imaging and/or clinical follow-up; false-negatives had malignant histology on surgical excision. Results: Follow-up was available for 339 breast lesions; 117 were confirmed to be benign via surgical excision, and 220 were stable after 2 years or more of imaging or clinical follow-up (mean follow-up time 33.1 months, range 24–64 months). The negative predictive value was determined to be 99.4%. There were 2 false-negative cases, giving a false-negative rate of 0.1%. There was no delay in diagnosis in either case because the radiologist noted discordance between imaging and core biopsy pathology, and recommended surgical excision despite the benign core biopsy pathology. Conclusions: Sonographically guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy provides a high negative predictive value in assessing breast lesions. Radiologic/pathologic correlation should be performed to avoid delay in the diagnosis of carcinoma. PMID:23113970

  16. Kidney Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... right diagnosis. [ Top ] What should a person do days before a kidney biopsy? Days before the procedure, ... Top ] What can a person expect on the day of the kidney biopsy? A person should arrive ...

  17. Prostate biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Aliotta PJ, Fowler GC. Prostate and seminal vesicle ultrasonography and biopsy. In: Pfenninger JL, Fowler GC, eds. ... 1/2015. Trabulsi EJ, Halpern EJ, Gomella LG. Ultrasonography and biopsy of the prostate. In: Wein AJ, ...

  18. Aging effects on oropharyngeal swallow and the role of dental care in oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Logemann, J A; Curro, F A; Pauloski, B; Gensler, G

    2013-11-01

    Difficulty with oropharyngeal swallow requires careful diagnosis and treatment from a team of professionals including the patients' physicians and the speech-language pathologist specializing in dysphagia. The dentist can be a critical team member in prevention, early identification, and management of oropharyngeal dysphagia. This manuscript reviews the physiology of normal oropharyngeal swallow and the effects of normal aging on this physiology. Typical etiologies for oropharyngeal dysphagia are defined as is the most commonly used physiologic diagnostic procedure, the modified barium swallow (MBS). The critical role of the dentist in identifying risk of oropharyngeal dysphagia, making appropriate referrals, and improving oral hygiene to prevent aspiration pneumonia in the elderly is discussed. PMID:23574512

  19. Liver Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations ​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​. Alternate Language URL Español Liver Biopsy Page Content On this page: What is ... Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is a liver biopsy? A liver biopsy is a procedure that ...

  20. Liver Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF, 341 KB)​​​​. Alternate Language URL Español Liver Biopsy Page Content On this page: What is a ... to Remember Clinical Trials What is a liver biopsy? A liver biopsy is a procedure that involves ...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  2. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  3. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  4. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Oropharyngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... called “oropharyngeal cancers.” How does HPV cause cancer? HPV can cause normal cells in infected skin ... unclear if having HPV alone is sufficient to cause oropharyngeal cancers, or if other factors (such as smoking or ...

  5. Reduced-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With or Without Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Advanced Oropharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  6. Prospective Study for Comparison of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Tissue Acquisition Using 25- and 22-Gauge Core Biopsy Needles in Solid Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hee Seung; Lee, Hyun Jik; Park, Jeong Yup; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Kim, Hoguen; Chung, Jae Bock; Bang, Seungmin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Although thicker needles theoretically allow more tissue to be collected, their decreased flexibility can cause mechanical damage to the endoscope, technical failure, and sample blood contamination. The effects of needle gauge on diagnostic outcomes of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) of pancreatic mass lesions remain unknown. This study compared procurement rates of histologic cores obtained from EUS-FNB of pancreatic masses using 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Patients and Methods From March 2014 to July 2014, 66 patients with solid pancreatic mass underwent EUS-FNB with both 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Among them, 10 patients were excluded and thus 56 patients were eligible for the analyses. Needle sequences were randomly assigned, and two passes were made with each needle, consisting of 10 uniform to-and-fro movements on each pass with 10 mL syringe suction. A pathologist blinded to needle sequence evaluated specimens for the presence of histologic core. Results The mean patient age was 65.8 ± 9.5 years (range, 44–89 years); 35 patients (62.5%) were men. The mean pancreatic mass size was 35.3 ± 17.1 mm (range 14–122.3 mm). Twenty-eight patients (50%) had tumors at the pancreas head or uncinate process. There were no significant differences in procurement rates of histologic cores between 25-gauge (49/56, 87.5%) and 22-gauge (46/56, 82.1%, P = 0.581) needles or diagnostic accuracy using only histologic cores (98% and 95%). There were no technical failures or procedure-related adverse events. Conclusions The 25-gauge core biopsy needle could offer acceptable and comparable outcomes regarding diagnostic performance including histologic core procurement rates compared to the 22-gauge core biopsy needle, although the differences were not statistically significant. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01795066 PMID:27149404

  7. Assessment of 1183 screen-detected, category 3B, circumscribed masses by cytology and core biopsy with long-term follow up data.

    PubMed

    Farshid, G; Downey, P; Gill, Pg; Pieterse, S

    2008-04-01

    Discrete masses are commonly detected during mammographic screening and most such lesions are benign. For lesions without pathognomonically benign imaging features that are still regarded likely to be non-malignant (Tabar grade 3) reliable biopsy results would be a clinically useful alternative to mammographic surveillance. Appropriate institutional guidelines for ethical research were followed. Between Jan 1996--Dec 2005 grade 3B discrete masses detected in the setting of a large, population based, breast cancer screening programme are included. Patient demographics, fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB), core and surgical biopsy results are tabulated. The final pathology of excised lesions was obtained. Information regarding interval cancers was obtained from the State Cancer Registry records and also through long term follow-up of clients in subsequent rounds of screening. A total of 1183 lesions, mean diameter of 13.3 mm (+/-8.3 mm) and mean client age of 55.1 years (+/-8.8 years) are included. After diagnostic work up, 98 lesions (8.3%) were malignant, 1083 were non-malignant and a final histologic diagnosis was not established in two lesions. In the 27 months after assessment, no interval cancers were attributable to these lesions and during a mean follow up of 54.5 months, available in 84.9% of eligible women, only one cancer has developed in the same quadrant as the original lesion, although the two processes are believed to be unrelated. FNAB performed in 1149 cases was definitive in 80.5% cases (882 benign, 43 malignant) with a negative predictive value (NPV) of 99.8% (880 of 882) and a positive predictive value (PPV) of 95.2% (40 of 42, both intraductal papillomas). Core biopsy was performed in 178 lesions, mostly for indefinite cytology. Core biopsy was definitive in 79.8% cases (57% benign 22% malignant) with a PPV of 100% and NPV of 99.0%. In experienced hands FNAB is an accurate first line diagnostic modality for the assessment of 3B screen

  8. Oropharyngeal cancer: an emergent disease?

    PubMed

    Granados-García, Martín

    2016-04-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer incidence has recently increased, thereby attracting public attention. Akin to other malignancies of the upper aerodigestive tract, it has been attributed to the carcinogenic effects of tobacco and alcohol use. However, recent evidence shows that a substantial increase in the disease is attributable to the effects of human papillomavirus (HPV). Marked progress has been made in relation to the knowledge of molecular and genetic mechanisms involved in the genesis and progression of these cancers. This has led to the development of new and promising therapies of a more specific and less toxic nature that have prolonged life and improved its quality. However, these therapies have failed to significantly increase the proportion of patients who are cured. To decrease the mortality associated with these neoplasms, it is necessary to adopt public health measures aimed at prevention and early diagnosis. PMID:27557387

  9. Treatment Options by Stage (Oropharyngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  10. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve biopsy may be done to help diagnose: Axon degeneration (destruction of the axon portion of the nerve cell) Damage to the ... Demyelination Inflammation of the nerve Leprosy Loss of axon tissue Metabolic neuropathies Necrotizing vasculitis Sarcoidosis

  11. Synovial biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Test is Performed Synovial biopsy helps diagnose gout and bacterial infections, or rule out other infections. ... Chronic synovitis Coccidioidomycosis (a fungal infection) Fungal arthritis Gout Hemochromatosis (abnormal buildup of iron deposits) Tuberculosis Synovial ...

  12. Synovial biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    El-Gabalawy HS. Synovial fluid analysis, synovial biopsy, and synovial pathology. In: Firestein GS, Budd RC, Harris ED Jr., et al, eds. Kelley's Textbook of Rheumatology . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2008:chap 48.

  13. Kidney Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... F For More Information National Kidney Foundation MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB) Alternate Language URL Kidney Biopsy Page Content On this page: What is ...

  14. Liver biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Test is Performed The biopsy helps diagnose many liver diseases . The procedure also helps assess the stage (early, advanced) of liver disease. This is especially important in hepatitis C infection. ...

  15. Oral brush biopsy analysis by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry profiling--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Remmerbach, Torsten W; Maurer, Katja; Janke, Sebastian; Schellenberger, Wolfgang; Eschrich, Klaus; Bertolini, Julia; Hofmann, Herbert; Rupf, Stefan

    2011-04-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) often present as advanced tumours requiring aggressive local and regional therapy and result in significant functional impairment. The objective is to develop pre-symptomatic screening detection of OSCC by a brush biopsy method which is less invasive than the conventional biopsy for histology. Given the molecular heterogeneity of oral cancer, it is unlikely that even a panel of tumour markers would provide accurate diagnosis. Therefore, approaches such as the matrix-assisted-laser-desorption/ionisation-time-of-flight-mass-spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) allow several biomarkers or peptide profile patterns to be simultaneously assessed. Brush biopsies from 27 patients with histology-proven OSCCs plus 40 biopsies from 10 healthy controls were collected. MALDI-TOF-MS profiling was performed and additional statistical analysis of the data was used to classify the disease status according to the biological behaviour of the lesion. For classification a support vector machine algorithm was trained using spectra of brush biopsy samples to distinguish healthy control patients from patients with histology-proven OSCC. MALDI-TOF-MS was able to distinguish between healthy patients and OSCC patients with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 93%. In summary, MALDI-TOF-MS in combination with sophisticated bioinformatic methods can distinguish OSCC patients from non-cancer controls with excellent sensitivity and specificity. Further improvement and validation of this approach is necessary to determine its feasibility to assist the pre-symptomatic detection of head and neck cancer screening in routine daily practice. PMID:21354855

  16. Pulmonary Masses: Initial Results of Cone-beam CT Guidance with Needle Planning Software for Percutaneous Lung Biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Braak, Sicco J.; Herder, Gerarda J. M.; Heesewijk, Johannes P. M. van Strijen, Marco J. L. van

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of percutaneous lung biopsy (PLB) findings using cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) guidance (CBCT guidance) and compared to conventional biopsy guidance techniques. Methods: CBCT guidance is a stereotactic technique for needle interventions, combining 3D soft-tissue cone-beam CT, needle planning software, and real-time fluoroscopy. Between March 2007 and August 2010, we performed 84 Tru-Cut PLBs, where bronchoscopy did not provide histopathologic diagnosis. Mean patient age was 64.6 (range 24-85) years; 57 patients were men, and 25 were women. Records were prospectively collected for calculating sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy. We also registered fluoroscopy time, room time, interventional time, dose-area product (DAP), and complications. Procedures were divided into subgroups (e.g., location, size, operator). Results: Mean lesion diameter was 32.5 (range 3.0-93.0) mm, and the mean number of samples per biopsy procedure was 3.2 (range 1-7). Mean fluoroscopy time was 161 (range 104-551) s, room time was 34 (range 15-79) min, mean DAP value was 25.9 (range 3.9-80.5) Gy{center_dot}cm{sup -2}, and interventional time was 18 (range 5-65) min. Of 84 lesions, 70 were malignant (83.3%) and 14 were benign (16.7%). Seven (8.3%) of the biopsy samples were nondiagnostic. All nondiagnostic biopsied lesions proved to be malignant during surgical resection. The outcome for sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy was 90% (95% confidence interval [CI] 86-96), 100% (95% CI 82-100), 100% (95% CI 96-100), 66.7% (95% CI 55-83), and 91.7% (95% CI 86-96), respectively. Sixteen patients (19%) had minor and 2 (2.4%) had major complications. Conclusion: CBCT guidance is an effective method for PLB, with results comparable to CT/CT fluoroscopy guidance.

  17. Oropharyngeal Dermoid Cyst in an Infant with Intermittent Airway Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Matthias W.; Haileselassie, Bereketeab; Kannan, Sujatha; Chen, Cynthia; Poretti, Andrea; Tunkel, David E.; Huisman, Thierry A.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dermoid cysts are benign epithelial inclusions and cystic lesions that may occur in several locations including the oropharynx. We describe the case of a two-month-old baby girl who presented with progressive respiratory distress, hypoxemia, and feeding difficulties because of an oropharyngeal dermoid cyst. The child had an airway work-up that included laryngoscopy. However, the mass remained undetected. This is most likely explained by the mobile nature of the lesion, prolapsing into the high nasopharynx in supine position. In our patient, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), initially performed to rule out brainstem pathology, revealed an oropharyngeal dermoid cyst. This case shows the potential role of neuroimaging in the diagnostic work-up of a young child presenting with respiratory distress by excluding a central nervous system lesion and diagnosing an “unexpected” nasopharyngeal mass lesion. In addition, MRI allowed exclusion of skull base lesions of neural origin such as an anterior meningoencephalocele or heterotopic neuroglial tissue which would be managed differently from pharyngeal masses. PMID:25260210

  18. Ureteral retrograde brush biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - brush - urinary tract; Retrograde ureteral brush biopsy cytology; Cytology - ureteral retrograde brush biopsy ... to be biopsied is rubbed with the brush. Biopsy forceps may be used instead to collect a ...

  19. Epidemiology of HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pytynia, Kristen B.; Dahlstrom, Kristina R.; Sturgis, Erich M.

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx is increasing in incidence in epidemic proportion. This site specific increase in incidence is due to an increase in human papillomavirus (HPV)-related squamous cell carcinoma, while the incidence of tobacco related squamous cell carcinoma is decreasing. In particular, the incidence of HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is increased among middle aged white men, and sexual behavior is a risk factor. HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma represents a growing etiologically distinct subset of head and neck cancers with unique epidemiological, clinical, and molecular characteristics that differ from those of HPV-unassociated cancers. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology of HPV-related OPSCC, the prevalence of oral/oropharyngeal HPV infection, and efforts aimed at reducing the incidence of HPV-related OPSCC. PMID:24461628

  20. Exposure to cigarette smoke causes DNA damage in oropharyngeal tissue in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Natalia; Berrío, Alina; Jaramillo, Jairo Enrique; Urrego, Rodrigo; Arias, María Patricia

    2014-07-15

    More than 40 mutagenic and carcinogenic agents present in cigarette smoke have been identified as causative factors of human cancer, but no relation has been clearly documented in companion animals. In dogs, in addition to smoke inhalation and transdermic absorption, exposure to smoke includes oral ingestion of particles adhered to the animal's fur. This study evaluates the presence and type of histological alterations and DNA integrity in oropharyngeal tissue in dogs exposed and non-exposed to household cigarette smoke by means of histopathology and comet assay studies on biopsy and swab samples. A non-probabilistic convenience sample of 12 dogs were selected and classified in two groups: exposed and non-exposed to cigarette smoke. Non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test was carried out on biopsy and swab data and a Chi(2) test was performed on the information obtained by histopathology. A significance level was set at P<0.05. Statistically significant differences were found between groups in comet assays carried out on biopsy samples. No differences (P>0.05) were found between groups based on comet assays swab samples and histopathology assessment. In conclusion, exposure to cigarette smoke causes DNA damage in dog oropharyngeal tissue. The use of dogs as sentinels for early DNA damage caused by exposure to environmental genotoxic agents like cigarette smoke is reported for the first time. PMID:25344107

  1. Element bioimaging of liver needle biopsy specimens from patients with Wilson's disease by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hachmöller, Oliver; Aichler, Michaela; Schwamborn, Kristina; Lutz, Lisa; Werner, Martin; Sperling, Michael; Walch, Axel; Karst, Uwe

    2016-05-01

    A laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) method is developed and applied for the analysis of paraffin-embedded liver needle biopsy specimens of patients with Wilson's disease (WD), a rare autosomal recessive disorder of the copper metabolism causing various hepatic, neurological and psychiatric symptoms due to a copper accumulation in the liver and the central nervous system. The sample set includes two WD liver samples and one negative control sample. The imaging analysis was performed with a spatial resolution of 10 μm. Besides copper, iron was monitored because an elevated iron concentration in the liver is known for WD. In addition to this, both elements were quantified using an external calibration based on matrix-matched gelatine standards. The presented method offers low limits of detection of 1 and 5 μg/g for copper and iron, respectively. The high detection power and good spatial resolution allow the analysis of small needle biopsy specimen using this method. The two analyzed WD samples can be well differentiated from the control sample due to their inhomogeneous copper distribution and high copper concentrations of up to 1200 μg/g. Interestingly, the WD samples show an inverse correlation of regions with elevated copper concentrations and regions with high iron concentrations. PMID:27049132

  2. Geographic variation in human papillomavirus–related oropharyngeal cancer: Data from 4 multinational randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Natalie; Compton, Natalie; Robinson, Max; Powell, Ned; Biswas–Baldwin, Nigel; Paleri, Vindh; Hartley, Andrew; Fresco, Lydia; Al‐Booz, Hoda; Junor, Elizabeth; El‐Hariry, Iman; Roberts, Sally; Harrington, Kevin; Ang, K. Kian; Dunn, Janet; Woodman, Ciaran

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background There are variations in the proportions of head and neck cancers caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV) between countries and regions. It is unclear if these are true variations or due to different study designs and assays. Methods We tested formalin‐fixed paraffin‐embedded diagnostic biopsies for p16 immunohistochemistry and HPV‐DNA (by polymerase chain reaction [PCR] and in situ hybridization [ISH]) using validated protocols on samples from 801 patients with head and neck cancer recruited prospectively between 2006 and 2011 in 4 randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Results Twenty‐one percent of patients (170 of 801) showed both HPV‐DNA and p16‐positivity, detected almost exclusively in oropharyngeal cancer (55%; 15 of 302); and only 1% of the patients (5 of 499) with nonoropharyngeal cancer were HPV positive. HPV‐positive oropharyngeal cancer differed between Western and Eastern Europe (37%, 155 of 422 vs 6%, 8 of 144; p < .0001) and between Western Europe and Asia (37% vs 2%; 4 of 217; p < .0001). Other independent determinants of HPV positivity were tumor site and smoking. Conclusion This is the first study to establish geographic variability as an independent risk factor in HPV‐positive oropharyngeal cancer prevalence, with higher prevalence in Western Europe. © 2016 The Authors Head & Neck Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E1863–E1869, 2016 PMID:26749143

  3. Nasal mucosal biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - nasal mucosa; Nose biopsy ... to fast for a few hours before the biopsy. ... Nasal mucosal biopsy is usually done when abnormal tissue is seen during examination of the nose. It may also be done ...

  4. Biopsy - biliary tract

    MedlinePlus

    Cytology analysis - biliary tract; Biliary tract biopsy ... A sample for a biliary tract biopsy can be obtained in different ways. A needle biopsy can be done if you have a well-defined tumor. The biopsy site ...

  5. Management of dysphagia in advanced oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Penner, Jamie L; McClement, Susan E; Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V

    2007-05-01

    Individuals with advanced oropharyngeal cancer often experience dysphagia as a result of their illness and its treatment. Research consistently demonstrates that dysphagia and difficulty with oral intake have many implications, including a negative impact on quality of life. Nurses are in a key position to provide support and initiate appropriate interventions for individuals with dysphagia. Using the Human Response to Illness model (Mitchell et al, 1991) as an organising framework, this paper presents a critical review of the empirical literature regarding dysphagia in individuals with advanced oropharyngeal cancer that will: i) provide the reader with a comprehensive understanding of dysphagia; ii) identify current gaps in our knowledge; and iii) establish the foundation for appropriate evidence-based interventions to optimise functioning and quality of life in this patient population. PMID:17577172

  6. Radon exposure and oropharyngeal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Espinosa, Tania; Barros-Dios, Juan Miguel; Ruano-Ravina, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer is a multifactorial disease. Alcohol and tobacco are the main risk factors. Radon is a human carcinogen linked to lung cancer risk, but its influence in other cancers is not well known. We aim to assess the effect of radon exposure on the risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer through a systematic review of the scientific literature. This review performs a qualitative analysis of the available studies. 13 cohort studies were included, most of them mortality studies, which analysed the relationship between occupational or residential radon exposure with oropharyngeal cancer mortality or incidence. Most of the included studies found no association between radon exposure and oral and pharyngeal cancer. This lack of effect was observed in miners studies and in general population studies. Further research is necessary to quantify if this association really exists and its magnitude, specially performing studies in general population, preferably living in areas with high radon levels. PMID:26335172

  7. Screen-detected ductal carcinoma in situ found on stereotactic vacuum-assisted biopsy of suspicious microcalcifications without mass: radiological-histological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Kasprzak, Piotr; Biecek, Przemyslaw; Halon, Agnieszka; Matkowski, Rafal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Commonly identified on screening mammography breast microcalcifications are the predominant manifestation of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between clinico-radiological features and histological findings in patients with screen-detected DCIS. Patients and methods Consecutive 127 patients with pure DCIS found on stereotactic vacuum-assisted biopsy of screen-detected suspicious microcalcifications without mass entered the study. Patient age, type and distribution of microcalcifications, DCIS nuclear grade (NG) and the presence of comedonecrosis were investigated. Association between parameters was statistically analysed with P < 0.05 as a significance level. Results. Powdery microcalcifications were most often clustered while regional were most common of casting-type (P < 0.001). High, intermediate and low NG of DCIS was significantly related to casting-type, crushed stone-like and powdery microcalcifications, respectively (P < 0.01). Low and intermediate NG DCIS were the most common in clustered and grouped microcalcifications while high NG DCIS was the most often when regional distribution was observed (P < 0.05). Comedonecrosis was significantly more common in high NG DCIS (P < 0.01). The association between comedonecrosis and type of microcalcifications was not significant, but with their distribution was close to the significance level (P = 0.07). Patient age was not significantly related to imaging or histological findings. Conclusions The association between pattern of mammographic microcalcifications and histological findings related to more aggressive disease can be helpful in optimal surgery planning in patients with screen-detected DCIS, regarding the extent of breast intervention and consideration of synchronous sentinel node biopsy. PMID:27247546

  8. Bone biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A bone biopsy is performed by making a small incision into the skin. A biopsy needle retrieves a sample of bone and it ... examination. The most common reasons for bone lesion biopsy are to distinguish between benign and malignant bone ...

  9. Muscle biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle biopsy involves removal of a plug of tissue usually by a needle to be later used for examination. Sometimes ... there is a patchy condition expected an open biopsy may be used. Open biopsy involves a small ...

  10. Bone lesion biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Bone biopsy; Biopsy - bone ... needle is gently pushed and twisted into the bone. Once the sample is obtained, the needle is ... sample is sent to a lab for examination. Bone biopsy may also be done under general anesthesia ...

  11. Assessment of the contamination problems resulting from the use of stainless steel needles in liver biopsies by total reflection X-ray fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Imre

    2006-11-01

    Percutaneous human liver biopsies taken from living patients could not be repeated; therefore considerable contamination was indirectly disproved. In the present study, the possible contamination of biopsy samples during sample collection was determined using a porcine liver model. Portions of porcine liver were cut by a quartz blade and treated the same as the steel needle biopsy samples. Concentrations determined in samples taken by a quartz device represented the non-contaminated values and were used to determine reproducibility of measurement and intra-individual variations. Additionally, multiple samples taken from a human liver of a patient suffering steatosis during autopsy were used to determine intra-individual variation of element concentrations. Concentration data of non-contaminated samples were compared to data of steel needle biopsy samples. To investigate the possible release of elements from the steel needles the samples were allowed to contact with the needle for different time in a refrigerator at 4 °C. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were applied for simultaneous determination of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Mo and Pb because of the very low sample demand of the two selected techniques. Although the steel needles in the present study could not be substituted by polypropylene or Teflon utensils, it was demonstrated that the application of needle biopsy sampling in the reported analysis does not involve measurable contamination if contact time is kept to several minutes as usual in the clinical practice.

  12. The epidemiology of oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wahi, P. N.

    1968-01-01

    Records of the Sarojini Naidu Medical College Hospital, Agra, India, suggested that there was a much higher endemicity of oral and oropharyngeal cancer in Mainpuri district, a rural area about 75 miles (120 km) from Agra City, than there was in Agra district itself. It was decided in 1963 to set up a complete cancer registry in Mainpuri district, based on the Sarojini Naidu Medical College and in association with the WHO International Reference Centre for the Histopathological Nomenclature and Classification of Oropharyngeal Tumours, which would, among other duties, undertake a study of the epidemiology by means of an intensive field-programme in the area. The epidemiological survey was carried out between March 1964 and September 1966. All factors considered to have any relevance to the disease were surveyed and particularly strong correlations were discovered between the prevalence of oral cancer and the use of local tobaccos (adulterated to a greater or lesser extent with various other materials), especially for chewing but also for smoking. There was also some correlation between prevalence of oral cancer and the use of certain alcoholic drinks. A number of other factors, most probably influencing or modifying the use of tobacco and alcohol, were found to be significant also. PMID:5302449

  13. Image-Guided Adrenal and Renal Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Karun V.; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Swerdlow, Daniel; DaSilva, Daniel; Beck, Avi; Jain, Nidhi; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided biopsy is a safe and well-established technique that is familiar to most interventional radiologists (IRs). Improvements in image-guidance, biopsy tools and biopsy techniques now routinely allow for safe biopsy of renal and adrenal lesions which traditionally were considered difficult to reach or technically challenging. Image-guided biopsy is used to establish the definitive tissue diagnosis in adrenal mass lesions that can not be fully characterized with imaging or laboratory tests alone. It is also used to establish definitive diagnosis in some cases of renal parenchymal disease and has an expanding role in diagnosis and characterization of renal masses prior to treatment. Although basic principles and techniques for image-guided needle biopsy are similar regardless of organ, this paper will highlight some technical considerations, indications and complications which are unique to the adrenal gland and kidney because of their anatomic location and physiologic features. PMID:20540919

  14. The epidemic of human papillomavirus and oropharyngeal cancer in a Canadian population

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, A.C.; Palma, D.A.; Dhaliwal, S.S.; Tan, S.; Theuer, J.; Chow, W.; Rajakumar, C.; Um, S.; Mundi, N.; Berk, S.; Zhou, R.; Basmaji, J.; Rizzo, G.; Franklin, J.H.; Fung, K.; Kwan, K.; Wehrli, B.; Salvadori, M.I.; Winquist, E.; Ernst, S.; Kuruvilla, S.; Read, N.; Venkatesan, V.; Todorovic, B.; Hammond, J.A.; Koropatnick, J.; Mymryk, J.S.; Yoo, J.; Barrett, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sexually transmitted infection with the human papillomavirus (hpv) is responsible for a significant burden of human cancers involving the cervix, anogenital tract, and oropharynx. Studies in the United States and Europe have demonstrated an alarming increase in the frequency of hpv-positive oropharyngeal cancer, but the same direct evidence does not exist in Canada. Methods Using the London Health Sciences Centre pathology database, we identified tonsillar cancers diagnosed between 1993 and 2011. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was then used on pre-treatment primary-site biopsy samples to test for dna from the high-risk hpv types 16 and 18. The study cohort was divided into three time periods: 1993–1999, 2000–2005, and 2006–2011. Results Of 160 tumour samples identified, 91 (57%) were positive for hpv 16. The total number of tonsillar cancers significantly increased from 1993–1999 to 2006–2011 (32 vs. 68), and the proportion of cases that were hpv-positive substantially increased (25% vs. 62%, p < 0.002). Those changes were associated with a marked improvement in 5-year overall survival (39% in 1993–1999 vs. 84% in 2006–2011, p < 0.001). When all factors were included in a multivariable model, only hpv status predicted treatment outcome. Interpretation The present study is the first to provide direct evidence that hpv-related oropharyngeal cancer is increasing in incidence in a Canadian population. Given the long lag time between hpv infection and clinically apparent malignancy, oropharyngeal cancer will be a significant clinical problem for the foreseeable future despite vaccination efforts. PMID:23904762

  15. Chest Wall Dissemination of Nocardiosis after Percutaneous Transthoracic Needle Biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Shimamoto, Hiroshi Inaba, Yoshitaka; Yamaura, Hidekazu; Sato, Yozo; Kamiya, Mika; Miyazaki, Masaya; Arai, Yasuaki; Horio, Yoshitsugu

    2007-07-15

    We described a case of chest wall dissemination after percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy. A 65-year-old man had a lung nodule which was suspected to be lung carcinoma. He underwent percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy using an 18G semiautomated biopsy needle and pathologic diagnosis showed organizing pneumonia. Two months after the biopsy, chest wall dissemination occurred. Implantation of carcinoma along the biopsy route was suspected, but the mass was actually due to pulmonary nocardiosis.

  16. Internal Jugular Vein Thrombosis following Oropharyngeal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bostanci, Asli; Turhan, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Internal jugular vein thrombosis (IJVT) is a rare condition which may lead to life-threatening complications such as sepsis and pulmonary embolism. Prolonged central venous catheterization, intravenous (IV) drug use, trauma, and radiotherapy are the most frequent causes of the IJVT. IJVT that develops after the oropharyngeal infection is a quite rare situation today. In this paper, a 37-year-old woman was presented; swelling occurred on her neck after acute tonsillitis and she was diagnosed with IJVT through Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging and managed without complications. Early diagnosis and conservative treatment with broad-spectrum IV antibiotics and anticoagulant agents have a critical importance for the prevention of fatal complications. PMID:26457221

  17. Oropharyngeal decontamination in intensive care patients: less is not more.

    PubMed

    Derde, Lennie P G; Bonten, Marc J M

    2009-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common cause of morbidity, antibiotic use, increased length of stay and, possibly, increased mortality in ICU patients. Colonization of the oropharyngeal cavity with potentially pathogenic micro-organisms is instrumental in the pathogenesis of VAP, and selective oropharyngeal decontamination (SOD) with antibiotics (AB-SOD) or antiseptics, such as chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX-SOD), has been associated with reduced incidences of VAP. In a recent issue of Critical Care Scannapieco and colleagues investigated differences in oropharyngeal colonization between mechanically ventilated patients receiving oropharyngeal decontamination with 0.12% CHX-SOD either once or twice daily compared to placebo. CHX-SOD was associated with a reduction in Staphylococcus aureus colonization, but the study was underpowered to demonstrate a reduction in VAP incidence. We urgently need well-designed and adequately powered studies to evaluate the potential benefits of CHX-SOD on patient outcome in ICUs. PMID:19735585

  18. HPV-Associated Oropharyngeal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ethnicity, and Sex, United States, 2008–2012 The graph above shows age-adjusted incidence rates for HPV- ... were diagnosed with HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer. This graph was adapted from Viens LJ, Henley SJ, Watson ...

  19. Optimization of prostate biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, John J.; Zeng, Jianchao; Weir, James; Zhang, Wei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Connelly, Roger R.; Moul, Judd W.; Mun, Seong K.

    1999-05-01

    Urologists routinely use the systematic sextant needle biopsy technique to detect prostate cancer. However, recent evidence suggests that this technique has a significant sampling error. We have developed a novel 3D computer assisted prostate biopsy simulator based upon 201 whole- mounted step-sectioned radical prostatectomy specimens to compare the diagnostic accuracy of various prostate needle biopsy protocols. Computerized prostate models have been developed to accurately depict the anatomy of the prostate and all individual tumor foci. We obtained 18-biopsies of each prostate model to determine the detection rates of various biopsy protocols. As a result, the 10- and 12- pattern biopsy protocols had a 99.0 percent detection rate, while the traditional sextant biopsy protocol rate was only 72.6 percent. The 5-region biopsy protocol had a 90.5 percent detection rate. the lateral sextant pattern revealed a detection rate of 95.5 percent, whereas the 4-pattern lateral biopsy protocol had a 93.5 percent detection rate. Our results suggest that all the biopsy protocols that use laterally placed biopsies based upon the five region anatomical model are superior to the routinely used sextant prostate biopsy pattern. Lateral biopsies in the mid and apical zones of the gland are the most important.

  20. Human Papilloma Virus and Oropharyngeal Carcinoma - Lessons from History.

    PubMed

    Vlantis, Alexander Chris

    2016-03-01

    The human papilloma virus (HPV) is a common virus that infects epithelium in 10% of the world's population. While most sexually active people become infected, the majority with a healthy natural immunity control their infection. When the infection becomes persistent in cervical mucosa for instance, it is associated with nearly all cervical cancers. Fortunately cervical cancer screening is both sensitive and specific and when accessed has led to significant reductions of this disease. Despite this, cervical cancer still remains one of the leading causes of death from cancer. Oropharyngeal mucosa is becoming persistently infected with HPV in an increasing number of people leading to a potential epidemic of oropharyngeal carcinoma. While only 10% of new oropharyngeal infections persist, those in elderly men who smoke are more likely to do so. Some centres report more than 70% of oropharyngeal cancers are associated with HPV infection, which is different to cancers caused by alcohol and tobacco. Other centres report only a 20% association. Education against high-risk sexual behaviour has been met with limited success. Screening for oropharyngeal HPV infection has been disappointing with a pickup rate of only 40%. Some hope lies in detecting viral DNA in both the saliva and plasma. A HPV vaccine has been available since 2006 but is not yet routinely given to both sexes in many countries. Its effect on the incidence of HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinomas is currently unknown. Vigilance by dental and medical colleagues in the meantime is essential. PMID:26981602

  1. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    A cold knife cone biopsy (conization) is surgery to remove a sample of abnormal tissue from the cervix. The ... Cold knife cone biopsy is done to detect cervical cancer or early changes that lead to cancer. ...

  2. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003910.htm Cold knife cone biopsy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A cold knife cone biopsy (conization) is surgery to remove ...

  3. Sentinel node biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Sentinel node biopsy is a technique which helps determine if a cancer has spread (metastasized), or is contained locally. When a ... is closest to the cancer site. Sentinel node biopsy is used to stage many kinds of cancer, ...

  4. Nerve biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve biopsy is the removal of a small piece of nerve for examination. Through a small incision, a sample ... is removed and examined under a microscope. Nerve biopsy may be performed to identify nerve degeneration, identify ...

  5. Bone marrow biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - bone marrow ... A bone marrow biopsy may be done in the health care provider's office or in a hospital. The sample may be taken from the pelvic or breast bone. Sometimes, other areas are used. Marrow is removed ...

  6. Complications of Transjugular Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Navuluri, Rakesh; Ahmed, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Transvenous biopsy was first performed in 1964 by Charles Dotter. Now routinely performed in the liver and kidney by interventional radiologists, the transjugular approach to biopsy has assumed a central role in coagulopathic patients. Major arterial complications from transjugular liver and renal biopsy are rare. In this article, the authors describe such complications in both organs that necessitated selective endovascular coil embolization. PMID:25762847

  7. Serum trace elements in elderly frail patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Leibovitz, Arthur; Lubart, Emilia; Wainstein, Julio; Dror, Yosef; Segal, Refael

    2009-01-01

    Microelements have an important role in many vital enzymatic functions. Their optimal intake and serum concentration are not properly defined. For nursing home residents, this issue is further complicated by the high prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia. The purpose of this study was to measure microelement concentrations in 3 groups of elderly subjects that differ in their feeding methods and functional state. Forty-six frail elderly patients, in stable clinical condition, 15 on naso-gastric tube (NGT) feeding, 15 orally fed (OF), from skilled nursing departments were recruited to this study. As controls, we studied a group of 16 elderly independent ambulatory patients. A battery of 16 microelements was examined using the Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The OF frail elderly patients had significantly lower levels of chromium as compared to the NGT fed and the control group. Both frail elderly groups had lower levels of zinc and copper as compared to the controls. In contrast, in the nursing groups, we found higher levels of aluminum, boron, barium, bromine and nickel. Elderly, in particular frail and disabled subjects, are vulnerable to insufficiency or overload of microelements. There is a need to evaluate the actual requirements for each microelement for this population. PMID:19926926

  8. Skin biopsy: Biopsy issues in specific diseases.

    PubMed

    Elston, Dirk M; Stratman, Erik J; Miller, Stanley J

    2016-01-01

    Misdiagnosis may result from biopsy site selection, technique, or choice of transport media. Important potential sources of error include false-negative direct immunofluorescence results based on poor site selection, uninformative biopsy specimens based on both site selection and technique, and spurious interpretations of pigmented lesions and nonmelanoma skin cancer based on biopsy technique. Part I of this 2-part continuing medical education article addresses common pitfalls involving site selection and biopsy technique in the diagnosis of bullous diseases, vasculitis, panniculitis, connective tissue diseases, drug eruptions, graft-versus-host disease, staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, hair disorders, and neoplastic disorders. Understanding these potential pitfalls can result in improved diagnostic yield and patient outcomes. PMID:26702794

  9. Oropharyngeal leprosy in art, history, and medicine.

    PubMed

    Scollard, D M; Skinsnes, O K

    1999-04-01

    Advanced lesions of the face, nasopharynx, and oropharynx have played an important role in the medical and social history of Hansen's disease. Renaissance artists included detailed portrayals of these lesions in some of their paintings, a testimony not only to their artistic skill and powers of observation but also to the common presence of these patients in European cities and towns of the period. The disease is now understood as a broad immunologic spectrum of host responses to Mycobacterium leprae, with a variety of clinical and pathologic manifestations in nerve, soft tissues, and bone. This review incorporates the findings of 2 extraordinary studies (one from Europe and the other from Japan) of pharyngeal and facial lesions. In the 1950s, studies of skeletal remains from the churchyard of a Danish leprosarium revealed a triad of maxillofacial lesions unique to leprosy and designated facies leprosa. In pre-World War II Japan, before effective treatment had been discovered, a prominent otorhinolaryngologist studying oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal lesions prepared watercolor illustrations of the natural progression of untreated Hansen's disease. As a result of effective antimicrobial therapy, such advanced lesions are now rarely seen, but the presenting signs and symptoms of leprosy still occasionally arise in the nasal and oral mucosa. The nasopharynx and oropharynx may be important early sites of inoculation and infection by M leprae, and they require additional emphasis in worldwide efforts toward early diagnosis and treatment of Hansen's disease. PMID:10225629

  10. What Are the Key Statistics about Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? What are the key statistics about oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? The American ... increase the risk for these second cancers. For statistics related to survival, see the section “ Survival rates ...

  11. Utility of synovial biopsy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Synovial biopsies, gained either by blind needle biopsy or minimally invasive arthroscopy, offer additional information in certain clinical situations where routine assessment has not permitted a certain diagnosis. In research settings, synovial histology and modern applications of molecular biology increase our insight into pathogenesis and enable responses to treatment with new therapeutic agents to be assessed directly at the pathophysiological level. This review focuses on the diagnostic usefulness of synovial biopsies in the light of actual developments. PMID:19951395

  12. HPV and oropharyngeal cancer: etiology and prognostic importance.

    PubMed

    Yom, Sue S

    2015-12-01

    HPV is the most common sexually transmitted disease, but the overwhelming majority of individuals clear the infection. A small percentage of individuals develop persistence of oncogenic HPV types, especially HPV-16; and as a result, squamous cell carcinoma can develop in the tonsils and base of the tongue. Over 70% of oropharyngeal cancers are now thought to be associated with oncogenic HPV infection. Immunohistochemistry for p16 protein is often used as a surrogate marker for oncogenic HPV in the oropharyngeal tissues, although alternative HPV DNA testing methods are under intensive study. The clinical profile of patients with HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) differs quite notably from that of traditional head and neck cancer patients, and the prognosis for HPV-associated OPC is significantly better. As a result, experimental clinical trials are focused on de-intensification of therapies with the hope of preserving an improved long-term quality of life for these patients. PMID:26650695

  13. Semilobar Holoprosencephaly with Congenital Oropharyngeal Stenosis in a Term Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Hishikawa, Kenji; Fujinaga, Hideshi; Nagata, Chie; Higuchi, Masataka; Ito, Yushi

    2015-01-01

    Background Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is often accompanied by a deficit in midline facial development; however, congenital oropharyngeal stenosis in neonates with HPE has not been reported before. We describe a case of a neonate with prenatally diagnosed semilobar HPE accompanied by congenital oropharyngeal stenosis. Case Report The patient was born at 39 weeks of gestation and developed dyspnea shortly after. Laryngoscopic test revealed oropharyngeal stenosis. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure, high-flow nasal cannula, and nasopharyngeal airway did not resolve her dyspnea; tracheostomy was required. Conclusion Neonates with HPE might be at higher risk of pharyngeal stenosis because of the functional and/or anatomical abnormalities. In the case of dyspnea in neonates with HPE, laryngoscopic evaluation should be considered. PMID:26495165

  14. Advances in radiation oncology for the management of oropharyngeal tumors.

    PubMed

    Gunn, G Brandon; Frank, Steven J

    2013-08-01

    The major benefits of modern radiation therapy (eg, intensity-modulated [x-ray] radiation therapy [IMRT]) for oropharyngeal cancer are reduced xerostomia and better quality of life. Intensity-modulated proton therapy may provide additional advantages over IMRT by reducing radiation beam-path toxicities. Several acute and late treatment-related toxicities and symptom constellations must be kept in mind when designing and comparing future treatment strategies, particularly because currently most patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma present with human papillomavirus-positive disease and are expected to have a high probability of long-term survival after treatment. PMID:23910474

  15. Bone marrow biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - bone marrow ... A bone marrow biopsy may be done in the health care provider's office or in a hospital. The sample may ... This captures a tiny sample, or core, of bone marrow within the needle. The sample and needle are ...

  16. Complications of skin biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Abhishek, Kumar; Khunger, Niti

    2015-01-01

    Skin biopsy is the most commonly performed procedure by the dermatologist. Though it is a safe and easy procedure yet complications may arise. Post operative complications like wound infection and bleeding may occur. It is essential to keep the potential complications of skin biopsy in mind and be meticulous in the technique, for better patient outcomes. PMID:26865792

  17. Evidence of the causal role of human papillomavirus type 58 in an oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Baboci, Lorena; Boscolo-Rizzo, Paolo; Holzinger, Dana; Bertorelle, Roberta; Biasini, Lorena; Michel, Angelika; Schmitt, Markus; Spinato, Giacomo; Bussani, Rossana; Alemany, Laia; Tirelli, Giancarlo; Da Mosto, Maria Cristina; Del Mistro, Annarosa; Pawlita, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Persistent human papillomavirus infection (HPV) is recognized as an important etiologic factor for a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), especially those arising from the oropharynx. Whereas HPV16 accounts for the majority of HPV DNA-positive oropharyngeal SCC, infections with other mucosal high-risk HPV types are quite rare and biological data demonstrating their causal involvement are insufficient. Here we present the first case of an oropharyngeal SCC driven by HPV type 58. A 69-year-old Caucasian woman presented with an enlarged and firm left tonsil. A computed tomography scan showed a left tonsillar mass, extending to the soft palate and the glossotonsillar sulcus. The patient underwent extended radical tonsillectomy and ipsilateral selective neck dissection. Pathology confirmed an infiltrating, poorly differentiated SCC of the left tonsil with node metastasis (pT2N1). Adjuvant external beam radiation therapy (60 Grays (Gy)) was administered. After 1 year of follow-up, the patient is well with no evidence of cancer recurrence. HPV analyses of the tumor tissue by BSGP5+/6+ -PCR/MPG, targeting 51 mucosal HPV types, showed single positivity for HPV type 58. Presence of HPV58 E6*I RNA demonstrated biological activity of the virus in the tumor tissue, and presence of serum antibodies to HPV58 oncoproteins E6 and E7 indicated presence of an HPV58-driven cancer. Overexpression of cellular protein p16INK4a and reduced expression of pRb, two cellular markers for HPV-induced cell transformation, were observed. Exons 4-10 of TP53 showed no mutations or polymorphisms. The presence of HPV58 as single HPV infection in combination with a broad variety of direct and indirect markers of HPV transformation provides comprehensive evidence that this oropharyngeal SCC was driven by HPV58. PMID:24220072

  18. Association between Chronic Periodontitis and Oral/Oropharyngeal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Renata Costa de; Dias, Fernando Luiz; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo da Silva; Fischer, Ricardo Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this case control study was to assess the association between the extent and severity of chronic periodontitis and oral cavity and/or oropharyngeal cancer. The case group comprised 35 patients (mean age 56.1±8.4), diagnosed for oral and/or oropharyngeal cancer. The control group comprised 40 individuals (mean age 55.4±9.4) without diagnostic of cancer. All individuals were subjected to a periodontal examination, including bleeding on probing, plaque index, gingival index, probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment loss (CAL), and decayed, extracted and filled teeth index (DMFT). The case group had significantly more sites with plaque. GI and BOP had similar values in both groups. The median PPD and CAL values were significantly higher for the case group. Chronic generalized periodontitis was predominant in 80% of patients with oral and/or oropharyngeal cancer. Eighty nine percent of the patients in the case group presented severe chronic periodontitis. There was no significant difference between groups for median values of DMFT. The extent and severity of chronic periodontitis remained as risk indicators for oral cavity and/or oropharyngeal cancer even after the adjustments for traditional confound factors, i.e. smoking and alcohol consumption. PMID:27224557

  19. Technicalities of endoscopic biopsy.

    PubMed

    Tytgat, G N; Ignacio, J G

    1995-11-01

    Despite the wealth of biopsy forceps currently available, it is obvious that there are sufficient drawbacks and shortcomings to reconsider the overall design of the endoscopic biopsy depth, the short lifespan of reusable forceps, damage to the working channel, excessive time consumption, cleaning and disinfection difficulties, etc. Improvements should be possible that approach the same degree of sophistication as is currently available in endoscopic equipment. Fully-automated, repetitive, quickly targeted biopsy sampling should be possible, but it will require the utmost technical ingenuity and expertise to achieve. PMID:8903983

  20. Biopsy of the right adrenal gland by the transhepatic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.B.; Bernardino, M.E.; Berkman, W.A.; Sones, P.J. Jr.; Torres, W.E.

    1983-08-01

    A transhepatic computed-tomographic-guided biopsy of a right adrenal mass is described. This method is simpler to perform than the usual posterior biopsy carried out with the patient prone and is less likely to cause a complicating pneumothorax. In seven of eight patients with right adrenal masses, adrenal tissue was obtained and an accurate diagnosis was possible. No complications resulted.

  1. Breast biopsy - stereotactic

    MedlinePlus

    ... several types of breast biopsies, including open, ultrasound-guided , and lumpectomy . This article focuses on stereotactic breast ... a special machine, a needle or sheath is guided to the exact location of the abnormal area. ...

  2. Breast biopsy - stereotactic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Biopsy results may show conditions such as: Atypical ductal hyperplasia Atypical lobular hyperplasia Intraductal papilloma Flat epithelial atypia Radial scar Lobular carcinoma-in-situ Abnormal results may mean that you have breast ...

  3. Breast biopsy - ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Biopsy results may show conditions such as: Atypical ductal hyperplasia Atypical lobular hyperplasia Flat epithelial atypia Radial scar Intraductal papilloma Lobular carcinoma-in-situ Abnormal results may mean that you have breast ...

  4. Pleural needle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 19. Ly A. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy technique and specimen ... Respiratory system. In: Watson N. Chapman and Nakielny's Guide ...

  5. Pleural needle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the pleural membrane. Pleural biopsy can diagnose tuberculosis , cancer, and other diseases. If this type of ... lung cancer , malignant mesothelioma , and metastatic pleural tumor ), tuberculosis, other infections, or collagen vascular disease. Risks There ...

  6. Open pleural biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... due to a virus, fungus, or parasite Mesothelioma Tuberculosis Risks There is a slight chance of: Air ... More Metastatic pleural tumor Pleural needle biopsy Pulmonary tuberculosis Tumor Update Date 11/4/2014 Updated by: ...

  7. Mediastinoscopy with biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... procedure is also done for certain infections (tuberculosis, sarcoidosis) and autoimmune disorders . Normal Results Biopsies of lymph ... findings may indicate: Hodgkin disease Lung cancer Lymphoma Sarcoidosis The spread of disease from one body part ...

  8. Renal Tumor Biopsy Technique

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Xue-Song; Zhou, Li-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To review hot issues and future direction of renal tumor biopsy (RTB) technique. Data Sources: The literature concerning or including RTB technique in English was collected from PubMed published from 1990 to 2015. Study Selection: We included all the relevant articles on RTB technique in English, with no limitation of study design. Results: Computed tomography and ultrasound were usually used for guiding RTB with respective advantages. Core biopsy is more preferred over fine needle aspiration because of superior accuracy. A minimum of two good-quality cores for a single renal tumor is generally accepted. The use of coaxial guide is recommended. For biopsy location, sampling different regions including central and peripheral biopsies are recommended. Conclusion: In spite of some limitations, RTB technique is relatively mature to help optimize the treatment of renal tumors. PMID:27174334

  9. Thyroid gland biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a sample of cells is needed from the thyroid gland a fine needle biopsy can be performed. During ... procedure, a skinny needle is inserted into the thyroid gland, and a sample of thyroid cells and fluid ...

  10. Salivary gland biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - salivary gland ... You have several pairs of salivary glands that drain into your mouth: A major pair in front of the ears (parotid glands) Another major pair beneath your jaw (submandibular ...

  11. [Blindness after prostate biopsy].

    PubMed

    Heinzelbecker, J; von Zastrow, C; Alken, P

    2009-02-01

    We report on a case of sepsis-associated irreversible blindness in a patient after transrectal rebiopsy of the prostate. The patient was on immunosuppressive and long-term antibiotic treatment. Such a severe complication after transrectal biopsy of the prostate is unusual. Peri-interventional antibiotic prophylaxis reduces the general risk for infections after needle biopsy of the prostate. To avoid severe complications, suitable antibiotic prophylaxis in high-risk patients is recommended. PMID:19037622

  12. A New Apparatus for Standardized Rat Kidney Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Schirutschke, Holger; Gladrow, Lars; Norkus, Christian; Parmentier, Simon Paul; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Survival biopsies are frequently applied in rat kidney disease models, but several drawbacks such as surgical kidney trauma, bleeding risk and variable loss of kidney tissue are still unsolved. Therefore, we developed an easy-to-use core biopsy instrument and evaluated whether two consecutive kidney biopsies within the same kidney can be carried out in a standardized manner. On day 0, 18 Lewis rats underwent a right nephrectomy and 9 of these rats a subsequent first biopsy of the left kidney (Bx group). 9 control rats had a sham biopsy of the left kidney (Ctrl group). On day 7, a second kidney biopsy/sham biopsy was performed. On day 42, all animals were sacrificed and their kidneys were removed for histology. Biopsy cylinders contained 57±28 glomeruli per transversal section, representing an adequate sample size. PAS staining showed that the biopsy depth was limited to the renal cortex whereas surgical tissue damage was limited to the area immediately adjacent to the taken biopsy cylinder. On day 42, the reduction of functional renal mass after two biopsies was only 5.2% and no differences of body weight, blood pressure, proteinuria, serum creatinine, glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis or number of ED-1 positive macrophages were found between both groups. In summary, our apparatus offers a safe method to perform repetitive kidney biopsies with minimal trauma and sufficient sample size and quality even in experimental disease models restricted to one single kidney. PMID:25506931

  13. Breast Biopsy System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) are high technology silicon chips that connect light directly into electronic or digital images, which can be manipulated or enhanced by computers. When Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) scientists realized that existing CCD technology could not meet scientific requirements for the Hubble Space Telescope Imagining Spectrograph, GSFC contracted with Scientific Imaging Technologies, Inc. (SITe) to develop an advanced CCD. SITe then applied many of the NASA-driven enhancements to the manufacture of CCDs for digital mammography. The resulting device images breast tissue more clearly and efficiently. The LORAD Stereo Guide Breast Biopsy system incorporates SITe's CCD as part of a digital camera system that is replacing surgical biopsy in many cases. Known as stereotactic needle biopsy, it is performed under local anesthesia with a needle and saves women time, pain, scarring, radiation exposure and money.

  14. Review of paraneoplastic syndromes associated with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Deepu George; Rooban, T; Janani, V; Joshua, E; Rao, UK; Ranganathan, K

    2010-01-01

    Malignancies are usually preceded by the presence of various paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS), which could be the indirect and/or remote effects of the metabolites produced by neoplastic cells. PNS manifested by oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas, which is the most common head and neck malignancy, are highlighted in this review. Knowledge of the clinical spectrum of these syndromes will equip the oral physician for early diagnosis and management of these hidden malignancies, especially of the pharyngeal region. PMID:21731261

  15. Screening for oropharyngeal dysphagia in stroke: insufficient evidence for guidelines.

    PubMed

    Martino, R; Pron, G; Diamant, N

    2000-01-01

    There is no evaluation of the evidence for the screening of oropharyngeal dysphagia in stroke. We reviewed the literature on clinical screening for oropharyngeal dysphagia in adults with stroke to determine (a) the accuracy of different screening tests used to detect dysphagia defined by abnormal oropharyngeal physiology on videofluoroscopy and (b) the health outcomes reported and whether screening alters those outcomes. Peer-reviewed English-language and human studies were sought through Medline (from 1966 to July 1997) by using the key words cerebrovascular disorders and deglutition disorders, relevant Internet addresses, and extensive hand searching of bibliographies of identified articles. Of the 154 sources identified, 89 articles were original, peer-reviewed, and focused on oropharyngeal dysphagia in stroke patients. To evaluate the evidence, the next selection identified 10 articles on the comparison of screening and videofluoroscopic findings and three articles on screening and health outcomes. Evidence was rated according to the level of study design by using the values of the Canadian Task Force on Periodic Health Examination. From the identified screening tests, most of the screenings were related to laryngeal signs (63%) and most of the outcomes were related to physiology (74%). Evidence for screening accuracy was limited because of poor study design and the predominant use of aspiration as the diagnostic reference. Only two screening tests were identified as accurate: failure on the 50-ml water test (likelihood ratio = 5.7, 95% confidence interval = 2.5-12.9) and impaired pharyngeal sensation (likelihood ratio = 2.5, 95% confidence interval = 1.7-3.7). Limited evidence for screening benefit suggested a reduction in pneumonia, length of hospital stay, personnel costs, and patient charges. In conclusion, screening accuracy needs to be assessed by using both abnormal physiology and aspiration as diagnostic markers for dysphagia. Large well-designed trials

  16. Evaluation of Microbial Load in Oropharyngeal Mucosa from Tannery Workers

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos-Arévalo, Diana C.; Castellanos-Arévalo, Andrea P.; Camarena-Pozos, David A.; Colli-Mull, Juan G.; Maldonado-Vega, María

    2014-01-01

    Background Animal skin provides an ideal medium for the propagation of microorganisms and it is used like raw material in the tannery and footware industry. The aim of this study was to evaluate and identify the microbial load in oropharyngeal mucosa of tannery employees. Methods The health risk was estimated based on the identification of microorganisms found in the oropharyngeal mucosa samples. The study was conducted in a tanners group and a control group. Samples were taken from oropharyngeal mucosa and inoculated on plates with selective medium. In the samples, bacteria were identified by 16S ribosomal DNA analysis and the yeasts through a presumptive method. In addition, the sensitivity of these microorganisms to antibiotics/antifungals was evaluated. Results The identified bacteria belonged to the families Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, Neisseriaceae, Alcaligenaceae, Moraxellaceae, and Xanthomonadaceae, of which some species are considered as pathogenic or opportunistic microorganisms; these bacteria were not present in the control group. Forty-two percent of bacteria identified in the tanners group are correlated with respiratory diseases. Yeasts were also identified, including the following species: Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida albicans, and Candida krusei. Regarding the sensitivity test of bacteria identified in the tanners group, 90% showed sensitivity to piperacillin/tazobactam, 87% showed sensitivity to ticarcillin/clavulanic acid, 74% showed sensitivity to ampicillin/sulbactam, and 58% showed sensitivity to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Conclusion Several of the bacteria and yeast identified in the oropharyngeal mucosa of tanners have been correlated with infections in humans and have already been reported as airborne microorganisms in this working environment, representing a health risk for workers. PMID:25830072

  17. Bone marrow trephine biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Bain, B

    2001-01-01

    Trephine biopsies of the bone marrow should be carried out, when clinically indicated, by trained individuals following a standard operating procedure. A bone marrow aspiration should be performed as part of the same procedure. For patient safety and convenience, biopsies are usually performed on the posterior iliac crest. The biopsy specimen should measure at least 1.6 cm and, if it does not, consideration should be given to repeating the procedure, possibly on the contralateral iliac crest. If bone marrow aspiration is found to be impossible, imprints from the biopsy specimen should be obtained. Otherwise, the specimen is placed immediately into fixative and after fixation is embedded in a resin or, more usually, decalcified and embedded in paraffin wax. Thin sections are cut and are stained, as a minimum, with haematoxylin and eosin and with a reticulin stain. A Giemsa stain is also desirable. A Perls' stain does not often give useful information and is not essential in every patient. The need for other histochemical or immunohistochemical stains is determined by the clinical circumstances and the preliminary findings. Trephine biopsy sections should be examined and reported in a systematic manner, assessment being made of the bones, the vessels and stroma, and the haemopoietic and any lymphoid or other tissue. Assessment should begin with a very low power objective, the entire section being examined. Further examination is then done with an intermediate and high power objective. Ideally, reporting of trephine biopsy sections should be done by an individual who is competent in both histopathology and haematology, and who is able to make an appropriate assessment of both the bone marrow aspirate and the trephine biopsy sections. When this is not possible, there should be close consultation between a haematologist and a histopathologist. The report should both describe the histological findings and give an interpretation of their importance. A signed or computer

  18. Quality of life in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Infante-Cossio, P; Torres-Carranza, E; Cayuela, A; Gutierrez-Perez, J L; Gili-Miner, M

    2009-03-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is an important aspect in the clinical assessment and management of patients with cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate QoL at the time of diagnosis in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer and to establish the influence of variables such as gender, age, tumor location and tumor staging. The authors studied 149 patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer for 2 years. QoL was measured using the EORTC QLQ-C30 and its specific modules for head and neck cancer QLQ-H&N 35. Variable deterioration of QoL was observed before therapy. The emotional domain showed the greatest alterations, while pain was the most remarkable symptom variable. QoL seems to be associated with gender (female patients obtained worse scores in most of the functional scales), age (patients < 65 years scored better), tumor location (orpharyngeal tumors showed worse prognosis) and tumor staging (early stages obtained better scores than advances ones). Many patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer show poor QoL before initiating treatment. The present study of a homogeneous group of patients is the first carried out in Spain following the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire and its results may serve for future reference. These results are similar to those obtained in populations from the north and centre of Europe. PMID:19135864

  19. DNA repair and mutagen sensitivity of epithelial cells and lymphocytes in oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    REITER, MAXIMILIAN; BAUMEISTER, PHILIPP; JAISER, SONJA; REISS, ANDREAS; SCHWENK-ZIEGER, SABINA; KLEINSASSER, NORBERT; HARRÉUS, ULRICH

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco-associated nitrosamines are known carcinogens causing DNA damage in epithelial cells of the head and neck. A matched case-control study was performed to evaluate the sensitivity of patients with squamous cell cancer (SCC) of the oropharynx, and controls to tobacco-associated nitrosamines. Quantitative DNA repair was evaluated following a period of 15 and 30 min. Fresh biopsies from 100 male donors of macroscopically healthy oropharyngeal cells and lymphocytes (50 SCC patients and 50 controls) were incubated with N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) or N-nitrosonornicotine (NNN). DNA damage in epithelial cells and lymphocytes was assessed using the comet assay. Following incubation with NDEA, cells underwent a period of DNA repair. All of the nitrosamines caused equivalent genotoxic damage in mucosal cells and lymphocytes of the two groups. Lymphocyte DNA repair capacity in the control group (26.8 and 37.1% after 15 and 30 min) was comparable to the tumor group (23.6 and 40.6%). However, epithelial cell DNA repair capacity of carcinoma patients was significantly reduced to 17.1% (15 min) and 23% (30 min) compared to the DNA repair of the control group (36.2%, 15 min and 46.0%, 30 min). Mutagen sensitivity was comparable in patients and controls. Thus, reduced epithelial cell DNA repair capacity of tumor patients is a possible endogenous risk factor for the development of head and neck squamous cell cancer. PMID:22740863

  20. Skin lesion biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... This may include deep layers of skin and fat. The area is closed with stitches to place the skin back together. If a large area is biopsied, the surgeon may use a skin graft or flap to replace the skin that was ...

  1. Lung needle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... when there is an abnormal condition near the surface of the lung, in the lung itself, or on the chest wall. Most often, it is done to rule out cancer. The biopsy is usually done after abnormalities appear on a chest x-ray or CT ...

  2. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia after Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Karen K.; Arnold, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Review. Objective Postoperative oropharyngeal dysphagia is one of the most common complications following anterior cervical spine surgery (ACSS). We review and summarize recent literature in order to provide a general overview of clinical signs and symptoms, assessment, incidence and natural history, pathophysiology, risk factors, treatment, prevention, and topics for future research. Methods A search of English literature regarding dysphagia following anterior cervical spine surgery was conducted using PubMed and Google Scholar. The search was focused on articles published since the last review on this topic was published in 2005. Results Patients who develop dysphagia after ACSS show significant alterations in swallowing biomechanics. Patient history, physical examination, X-ray, direct or indirect laryngoscopy, and videoradiographic swallow evaluation are considered the primary modalities for evaluating oropharyngeal dysphagia. There is no universally accepted objective instrument for assessing dysphagia after ACSS, but the most widely used instrument is the Bazaz Dysphagia Score. Because dysphagia is a subjective sensation, patient-reported instruments appear to be more clinically relevant and more effective in identifying dysfunction. The causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia after ACSS are multifactorial, involving neuronal, muscular, and mucosal structures. The condition is usually transient, most often beginning in the immediate postoperative period but sometimes beginning more than 1 month after surgery. The incidence of dysphagia within one week after ACSS varies from 1 to 79% in the literature. This wide variance can be attributed to variations in surgical techniques, extent of surgery, and size of the implant used, as well as variations in definitions and measurements of dysphagia, time intervals of postoperative evaluations, and relatively small sample sizes used in published studies. The factors most commonly associated with an

  3. Stereotactic (Mammographically Guided) Breast Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z Stereotactic Breast Biopsy Stereotactic breast biopsy uses mammography – a specific type of breast imaging that uses ... the breast are often detected by physical examination, mammography, or other imaging studies. However, it is not ...

  4. Gram stain of tissue biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003453.htm Gram stain of tissue biopsy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Gram stain of tissue biopsy test involves using crystal ...

  5. Celiac Disease Diagnosis: Endoscopic Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... This is done in a procedure called a biopsy: the physician eases a long, thin tube called ... the tissue using instruments passed through the endoscope. Biopsy of the small intestine is the only way ...

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Vitreous Biopsy Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Skeie, Jessica M.; Brown, Eric N.; Martinez, Harryl D.; Russell, Stephen R.; Birkholz, Emily S.; Folk, James C.; Boldt, H. Culver; Gehrs, Karen M.; Stone, Edwin M.; Wright, Michael E.; Mahajan, Vinit B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare vitreous biopsy methods using analysis platforms employed in proteomics biomarker discovery. Methods Vitreous biopsies from 10 eyes were collected sequentially using a 23-gauge needle and a 23-gauge vitreous cutter instrument. Paired specimens were evaluated by UV absorbance spectroscopy, SDS-PAGE, and mass-spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results The total protein concentration obtained with a needle and vitrectomy instrument biopsy averaged 1.10 mg/ml (SEM = 0.35) and 1.13 mg/ml (SEM = 0.25), respectively. In eight eyes with low or medium viscidity, there was a very high correlation (R2 = 0.934) between the biopsy methods. When data from two eyes with high viscidity vitreous were included, the correlation was reduced (R2 = 0.704). The molecular weight protein SDS-PAGE profiles of paired needle and vitreous cutter samples were similar, except for a minority of pairs with single band intensity variance. Using LC-MS/MS, equivalent peptides were identified with similar frequencies (R2 ≥ 0.90) in paired samples. Conclusion Proteins and peptides collected from vitreous needle biopsies are nearly equivalent to those obtained from a vitreous cutter instrument. This study suggests both techniques may be used for most proteomic and biomarker discovery studies of vitreoretinal diseases, although a minority of proteins and peptides may differ in concentration. PMID:23095728

  7. Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow KidsHealth > For Teens > Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow Print A A A Text Size What's in ... Risks If You Have Questions What It Is Bone marrow aspirations and biopsies are performed to examine bone ...

  8. Radiologically Guided Bone Biopsy: Results of 502 Biopsies

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Chaan S.; Salisbury, Jonathan R.; Darby, Alan J.; Gishen, Philip

    1998-03-15

    Purpose: To analyze the results of 502 biopsies over a 19-year period for the purpose of highlighting the results that can be expected from such a large study, with emphasis on needle choice and anesthetic methods. Methods: The histological, cytological, and microbiological results of 477 patients who had 502 bone biopsies carried out between July 1977 and March 1996 were studied. Less than 5% of patients required second biopsies. There were almost equal numbers of males and females in the group. The lesions were visible radiologically and most of the biopsies were carried out by a single operator. The lesions were classified on their histopathological, cytopathological, and microbiological findings. Results: Tumors accounted for 40% of the biopsies, and infection for 16%. Biopsies which did not yield a 'positive' diagnosis accounted for 31%; these included specimens reported as normal, or as showing reactive changes, repair, remodelling, non-specific features, inflammation (but not clearly infective), or no evidence of malignancy or inflammation. Less than 4% of biopsies were incorrect, and some of these were re-biopsied. Conclusion: Bone biopsy is a valuable technique for positive diagnosis of malignancy or infection, as it enables a definitive plan for treatment and management of patients to be established. Exclusion of serious pathology is almost equally important. In principle, any osseous site can be biopsied using fluoroscopic or computed tomographic guidance. Care in the biopsy technique and selection of the bone needle is required.

  9. Bilateral Blindness Following Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, K. Liang; Kuruvilla, Sara; Sanatani, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a life-threatening neurologic complication of thiamine deficiency. Though the presentation of symptoms can vary widely, the classical triad is founded on ophthalmoplegia, alteration of mental status, and gait disturbance. We describe a case of Wernicke's encephalopathy in an oncology patient shortly after concurrent 5-fluorouracil, carboplatin, and radiotherapy for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer, presenting as complete bilateral blindness, ataxia, nystagmus, and confusion. Thiamine was given based on clinical suspicion and rapid improvement of clinical findings occurred. An MRI performed later supported the diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy. A multifactorial etiology of thiamine deficiency from nutritional deficits and neurotoxic effects of chemotherapy are hypothesized. PMID:26623207

  10. A dielectrophoretic method of discrimination between normal oral epithelium, and oral and oropharyngeal cancer in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Graham, K A; Mulhall, H J; Labeed, F H; Lewis, M P; Hoettges, K F; Kalavrezos, N; McCaul, J; Liew, C; Porter, S; Fedele, S; Hughes, M P

    2015-08-01

    Despite the accessibility of the oral cavity to clinical examination, delays in diagnosis of oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma (OOPC) are observed in a large majority of patients, with negative impact on prognosis. Diagnostic aids might help detection and improve early diagnosis, but there remains little robust evidence supporting the use of any particular diagnostic technology at the moment. The aim of the present feasibility first-in-human study was to evaluate the preliminary diagnostic validity of a novel technology platform based on dielectrophoresis (DEP). DEP does not require labeling with antibodies or stains and it is an ideal tool for rapid analysis of cell properties. Cells from OOPC/dysplasia tissue and healthy oral mucosa were collected from 57 study participants via minimally-invasive brush biopsies and tested with a prototype DEP platform using median membrane midpoint frequency as main analysis parameter. Results indicate that the current DEP platform can discriminate between brush biopsy samples from cancerous and healthy oral tissue with a diagnostic sensitivity of 81.6% and a specificity of 81.0%. The present ex vivo results support the potential application of DEP testing for identification of OOPC. This result indicates that DEP has the potential to be developed into a low-cost, rapid platform as an assistive tool for the early identification of oral cancer in primary care; given the rapid, minimally-invasive and non-expensive nature of the test, dielectric characterization represents a promising platform for cost-effective early cancer detection. PMID:26086875

  11. Telepathology and Optical Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer-Roca, Olga

    2009-01-01

    The ability to obtain information about the structure of tissue without taking a sample for pathology has opened the way for new diagnostic techniques. The present paper reviews all currently available techniques capable of producing an optical biopsy, with or without morphological images. Most of these techniques are carried out by physicians who are not specialized in pathology and therefore not trained to interpret the results as a pathologist would. In these cases, the use of telepathology or distant consultation techniques is essential. PMID:20339507

  12. Alterations in oropharyngeal sensory evoked potentials (PSEP) with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pitts, Teresa; Hegland, Karen Wheeler; Sapienza, Christine M; Bolser, Donald C; Davenport, Paul W

    2016-07-15

    Movement of a food bolus from the oral cavity into the oropharynx activates pharyngeal sensory mechanoreceptors. Using electroencephalography, somatosensory cortical-evoked potentials resulting from oropharyngeal mechanical stimulation (PSEP) have been studied in young healthy individuals. However, limited information is known about changes in processing of oropharyngeal afferent signals with Parkinson's disease (PD). To determine if sensory changes occurred with a mechanical stimulus (air-puff) to the oropharynx, two stimuli (S1-first; S2-s) were delivered 500ms apart. Seven healthy older adults (HOA; 3 male and 4 female; 72.2±6.9 years of age), and thirteen persons diagnosed with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD; 11 male and 2 female; 67.2±8.9 years of age) participated. Results demonstrated PSEP P1, N1, and P2 component peaks were identified in all participants, and the N2 peak was present in 17/20 participants. Additionally, the PD participants had a decreased N2 latency and gated the P1, P2, and N2 responses (S2/S1 under 0.6). Compared to the HOAs, the PD participants had greater evidence of gating the P1 and N2 component peaks. These results suggest that persons with PD experience changes in sensory processing of mechanical stimulation of the pharynx to a greater degree than age-matched controls. In conclusion, the altered processing of sensory feedback from the pharynx may contribute to disordered swallow in patients with PD. PMID:27090350

  13. Narrow band imaging: clinical applications in oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vu, A; Farah, C S

    2016-07-01

    Narrow Band Imaging (NBI) is an endoscopic optical imaging enhancement technology that improves the contrast of mucosal surface texture, and enhances visualisation of mucosal and submucosal vasculature. White light is filtered to emit two 30-nm narrow bands of blue (415 nm) and green light (540 nm) light simultaneously, the former corresponding to the main peak absorption spectrum of haemoglobin, and the latter allowing visualisation of blood vessels in the deeper mucosal and submucosal layers. NBI has been used to better assess oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD), identify oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and to define surgical margins of head and neck malignancies. NBI shows great potential in improving detection rates of OPMD, facilitating better assessment of oral and oropharyngeal SCC, and reducing the risk of recurrence for oral SCC. Although further research is required to better understand and define intrapapillary capillary loop (IPCL) patterns and to relate these with clinical, histopathological and molecular parameters especially for early mucosal changes, there is building evidence to recommend its use as the new gold standard for endoscopic assessment in head and neck oncology. PMID:26713751

  14. Oropharyngeal reconstruction with a pedicled submandibular gland flap.

    PubMed

    Mashrah, Mubarak A; Zhou, Shang-Hui; Abdelrehem, Ahmed; Ma, Chunyue; Xu, Liqun; He, Yue; Zhang, Chen-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Locoregional flaps are widely used for reconstruction of small and medium defects in the oral cavity. The submandibular gland flap is a pedicled flap, which derives its blood supply from the facial artery, based on the submandibular gland. We describe the use of the flap in 20 patients who required oropharyngeal reconstruction with a pedicled submandibular gland flap after resection of a tumour between July 2012 and October 2014. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma were excluded. All flaps were pedicled on the facial vessels (inferiorly in 17 patients and superiorly in 3). The indications were: reconstruction of intraoral mucosal defects (n=13), filling the parapharyngeal dead space (n=6), and obliteration of the mastoid (n=1). All the flaps atrophied, but with no clinical effect. One patient developed partial loss of the flap, and one early leakage. There were no cases of xerostomia, and no signs of recurrence during the postoperative follow-up period of 3-26 months. The flap is useful, as it is simple and reliable for reconstruction of small to medium oropharyngeal defects in carefully selected cases, and gives good cosmetic and functional results. PMID:26388070

  15. CE: Human Papillomavirus-Related Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Review of Nursing Considerations.

    PubMed

    McKiernan, Janet; Thom, Bridgette

    2016-08-01

    : The overall incidence of head and neck cancer-which includes laryngeal, hypopharyngeal, nasal cavity, paranasal sinus, nasopharyngeal, oral, oropharyngeal, and salivary gland cancers-has declined in the United States over the past 30 years with the concomitant reduction in tobacco use. Over that same period, however, the worldwide incidence of oropharyngeal cancer has escalated significantly, most notably among men and women under age 60 who live in developed countries. This epidemic rise in oropharyngeal cancer is largely attributed to certain genotypes of the human papillomavirus (HPV). In the United States, HPV prevalence in oropharyngeal tumors increased dramatically, from roughly 16% between 1984 and 1989 to nearly 73% between 2000 and 2004, and the annual incidence of HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer is expected to surpass that of HPV-related cervical cancer by 2020.This article provides an overview of head and neck cancer-its incidence, risk factors, treatment, and posttreatment sequelae-with a focus on HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer. Unlike other forms of head and neck cancer, HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer tends to affect younger patients with few or none of the traditional risk factors and has a distinctive presentation, histology, and natural course. In order to provide appropriate patient education and to help these patients monitor and manage late and long-term treatment effects, it is important for nurses to be aware of this disease and its treatment, and of the unique survivorship issues that arise for affected patients. PMID:27428508

  16. Identification of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas with active HPV16 involvement by immunohistochemical analysis of the retinoblastoma protein pathway.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Dana; Flechtenmacher, Christa; Henfling, Nataly; Kaden, Ines; Grabe, Niels; Lahrmann, Bernd; Schmitt, Markus; Hess, Jochen; Pawlita, Michael; Bosch, Franz X

    2013-09-15

    Viral oncogene RNA expression is regarded as reliable biomarker to identify oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC) with active HPV16 involvement. This study addressed whether the expression profile of the cellular proteins p16(INK4a), pRb, Cyclin D1 and p53 provide surrogate marker combinations that identify OPSCC with active HPV16 in situations where only formalin-fixed biopsies are available. Protein expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays created from 188 OPSCC of which the HPV16 DNA and RNA status had been established previously from snap-frozen biopsies. Associations of single markers and of marker combinations with HPV16 DNA, viral RNA expression patterns and overall survival as primary end point were evaluated by statistical analysis. Most tumors with active HPV16 involvement (RNA(+) group; n = 40) showed a specific protein pattern, that is, high p16(INK4a) (80%), low pRb (85%), low Cyclin D1 (95%) and normal p53 (73%). This pattern was significantly different from the pattern observed in HPV DNA-negative tumors (HPV(-) group) and in HPV16 DNA-positive tumors lacking viral RNA expression patterns (RNA(-) group). The combination of high p16(INK4a) and low pRb levels was distinctly superior to p16(INK4a) alone; it was strongly associated with RNA(+) tumors (OR 41.4, 95%CI 10.7-162.5), with improved survival (HR 0.37, 95%CI 0.2-0.8) and had best predictive values (78% sensitivity, 93% specificity, 78% PPV, 93% NPV). In conclusion, if only formalin-fixed biopsy material is available, the marker combination high p16(INK4a) /low pRb is well suited to identify OPSCC with biologically active HPV16 which represent a distinct OPSCC entity with improved prognosis. PMID:23457055

  17. Palatopharyngoplasty with bilateral buccal mucosal graft repair to alleviate oropharyngeal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Jared J; Vaughn, Cory A; Shaikh, Faisal A; Stocks, Rose Mary; Thompson, Jerome W

    2015-09-01

    Oropharyngeal stenosis is rare, but known complication from tonsillectomy procedure. A 15-year-old female presented with refractory dyspnea, mild obstructive sleep apnea, and dysphagia. She underwent tonsillectomy 3 years prior. Severe cicatricial oropharyngeal scar involving soft palate, anterior tonsillar pillars, and base of tongue, resulted in 1-cm(2) airway. Case report describing lysis of severe palatopharyngeal scar bands from tonsillectomy misadventure with immediate buccal mucosal grafts to repair resultant oropharyngeal defects. Patient no longer complains of difficulty breathing or dysphagia. PMID:26145205

  18. Genome Damage in Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients Treated by Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gamulin, Marija; Kopjar, Nevenka; Grgić, Mislav; Ramić, Snježana; Bišof, Vesna; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera

    2008-01-01

    Aim To estimate genome damage in oropharyngeal cancer patients before, during, and after radiotherapy and to measure the persistence of caused genome damage relevant in the evaluation of secondary cancer risk. Methods DNA damage was evaluated in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 10 oropharyngeal cancer patients using alkaline comet assay, analysis of structural chromosome aberrations, and micronucleus assay. Blood samples were taken 2 hours before irradiation on day 1 of the first radiotherapy cycle, 2 hours after the application of the first dose, in the middle of the radiotherapy cycle, within 2 hours after the last received radiotherapy dose, and after 6 and 12 months after radiotherapy. Results In most participants, the highest level of primary DNA damage was recorded in blood samples collected after the administration of first radiation dose (mean tail length 25.04 ± 6.23 μm). Most patients also had increased frequency of comets with long tail-nucleus (LTN comets) after the administration of the first radiation dose (mean, 10.50 ± 7.71 per 100 comets), which remained increased in the middle of radiotherapy (mean, 18.30 ± 27.62 per 100 comets). Later on, the levels of primary DNA damage as recorded by the comet assay, slightly diminished. The frequency of structural chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes gradually increased during the radiation cycle (26.50 ± 27.72 per 100 metaphases at the end of the therapy), as well as the frequency of micronuclei (mean total number of micronuclei 167.20 ± 35.69; per 1000 binuclear cells). Conclusion Oropharyngeal cancer patients had relatively high levels of primary DNA damage in their peripheral blood lymphocytes even before therapy. The frequency of complex structural chromosome aberrations and the frequency of micronuclei increased with the progression of the radiation cycle and the doses delivered. As the frequency of chromosomal aberrations a year after radiotherapy mostly did not return to pre

  19. Negative Biopsy after Referral for Biopsy-Proven Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tae, Chung Hyun; Lee, Jun Haeng; Min, Byung-Hoon; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kim, Jae J.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Repeat endoscopy with biopsy is often performed in patients with previously diagnosed gastric cancer to determine further treatment plans. However, biopsy results may differ from the original pathologic report. We reviewed patients who had a negative biopsy after referral for gastric cancer. Methods A total of 116 patients with negative biopsy results after referral for biopsy-proven gastric cancer were enrolled. Outside pathology slides were reviewed. Images of the first and second endoscopic examinations were reviewed. We reviewed the clinical history from referral to the final treatment. Results Eighty-eight patients (76%) arrived with information about the lesion from the referring physician. Among 96 patients with available outside slides, the rate of interobserver variation was 24%. Endoscopy was repeated at our institution; 85 patients (73%) were found to have definite lesions, whereas 31 patients (27%) had indeterminate lesions. In the group with definite lesions, 71% of the lesions were depressed in shape. The most common cause of a negative biopsy was mistargeting. In the group with indeterminate lesions, 94% had insufficient information. All patients with adequate follow-up were successfully treated based on the findings in the follow-up endoscopy. Conclusions A negative biopsy after referral for biopsy-proven gastric cancer is mainly caused by mistargeting and insufficient information during the referral. PMID:25963084

  20. A Case of Propofol-Induced Oropharyngeal Angioedema and Bronchospasm

    PubMed Central

    You, Byung-Chul; Han, Ji-Su; Cheon, Hong-Woo; Park, Jong-Suk; Lee, June-Hyuk; Park, Sung-Woo; Kim, Do-Jin; Park, Choon-Sik

    2012-01-01

    Propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol) is an ultrashort-acting sedative agent with sedative and amnestic effects that is used not only for anesthesia but also for sedation during minor outpatient procedures and endoscopic examinations. Rare cases of anaphylaxis following propofol administration have been reported in the medical literature. Documentation of anaphylaxis is often lacking because the cause and effect relationship is often hard to prove. Only a minority of patients get referred for allergy testing to confirm the offending drug. Here we report a 74-year-old woman who had an anaphylactic reaction with severe oropharyngeal edema and bronchospasm for a few minutes after receiving propofol during endoscopic examination. An allergy skin test was positive for both propofol and soybean. Soybean in the intralipid is one component of propofol, and we concluded that this anaphylaxis was caused by soybean. PMID:22211170

  1. Enhanced mucosal reactions in AIDS patients receiving oropharyngeal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, E.B.; Findlay, P.; Gelmann, E.; Lane, H.C.; Zabell, A.

    1987-09-01

    The oropharynx and hypopharynx are common sites of involvement in AIDS patients with mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. The radiotherapist is often asked to intervene with these patients due to problems with pain, difficulty in swallowing, or impending airway obstruction. We have noted an unexpected decrease in normal tissue tolerance of the oropharyngeal mucosa to irradiation in AIDS patients treated in our department. Data on 12 patients with AIDS and Kaposi's sarcoma receiving oropharyngeal irradiation are presented here. Doses ranged from 1000 cGy to 1800 cGy delivered in 150-300 cGy fractions. Seven of eight patients receiving doses of 1200 cGy or more developed some degree of mucositis, four of these developed mucositis severe enough to require termination of treatment. All patients in this study received some form of systemic therapy during the course of their disease, but no influence on mucosal response to irradiation was noted. Four patients received total body skin electron treatments, but no effect on degree of mucositis was seen. Presence or absence of oral candidiasis was not an obvious factor in the radiation response of the oral mucosa in these patients. T4 counts were done on 9 of the 12 patients. Although the timing of the T4 counts was quite variable, no correlation with immune status and degree of mucositis was found. The degree of mucositis seen in these patients occurred at doses much lower than expected based on normal tissue tolerances seen in other patient populations receiving head and neck irradiations. We believe that the ability of the oral mucosa to repair radiation damage is somehow altered in patients with AIDS.

  2. FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER TORS FOR OROPHARYNGEAL CANCER: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Hutcheson, Katherine A.; Holsinger, F. Christopher; Kupferman, Michael E.; Lewin, Jan S.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Summarize functional outcomes after transoral robotic surgery (TORS) ± adjuvant therapy for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). STUDY DESIGN A systematic review was conducted. The MEDLINE database was searched (MeSH terms: transoral robotic surgery, pharyngeal neoplasms, oropharyngeal neoplasms). METHODS Peer-reviewed human subject papers published through December, 2013 were included. Exclusion criteria were: 1) case report design (n<10), 2) review article, or 3) technical, animal or cadaver studies. Functional outcomes extracted included feeding tube dependence, swallow examination findings, speech ratings, velopharyngeal insufficiency, pneumonia, and oral intake measures. RESULTS Twelve papers comprising 441 patients with OPC treated with TORS ± adjuvant therapy were included. Feeding tube rates were the most commonly reported functional outcome. Excluding prophylactic placement, 18% to 39% of patients required gastrostomy placement, typically during adjuvant therapy. Chronic gastrostomy dependence ranged from 0% to 7% (mean follow-up: 11–26 months), regardless of disease stage. Composite MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) scores ranged from 65.2 to 78 (89 patients, 3 series, mean follow-up: 12–13 months). Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies were not systematically reported. Incidence of postoperative pneumonia was 0% to 7%. Predictors of swallowing function included baseline function, T-stage, N-stage, tongue base primary tumors, and adjuvant chemoradiation. Rates of transient hypernasality were 4% to 9%. A single study suggested dose-dependent effects of adjuvant therapy (none, radiation alone, chemoradiation) on diet scores at 6- and 12-months. CONCLUSIONS Crude endpoints of functional recovery after TORS ± adjuvant therapy suggest promising swallowing outcomes, depending on the functional measure reported. PMID:24643851

  3. [MRI-guided musculoskeletal biopsy].

    PubMed

    Daecke, W; Libicher, M; Mädler, U; Rumpf, C; Bernd, L

    2003-02-01

    MRI-guided musculoskeletal biopsy has been mentioned to be a minimally invasive method to obtain specimens for diagnostic purposes in bone tumors. To evaluate the viability, to assess the accuracy, and to record possible complications of this method, clinical data of 19 MRI-guided biopsies were analyzed. Interventions were performed on 18 patients (1-78 years) as an outpatient procedure: 15 skeletal and 4 soft tissue biopsies were taken from the pelvis, upper limb,or lower limb. We used T1-weighted gradient echoes (GE) for locating the puncture site and T2-weighted turbo spin echoes (TSE) for visualization of needle position. In 14 of 18 MRI-guided biopsies, a definite histological diagnosis was obtained. According to the pathologist, the inadequate size of the specimen was the main reason for missing the diagnoses in four cases.Long intervention time and inappropriate biopsy tools proved to be the main disadvantages of MRI-guided biopsy, but technical improvement might solve these technical problems in future.A postbiopsy hematoma was the only complication observed. Once technically improved, MRI-guided biopsy could be a precise alternative routine method for musculoskeletal biopsies in future. PMID:12607083

  4. Use of a frameless computed tomography-guided stereotactic biopsy system for nasal biopsy in five dogs.

    PubMed

    Kuhlman, Gregory M; Taylor, Amanda R; Thieman-Mankin, Kelley M; Griffin, Jay; Cook, Audrey K; Levine, Jonathan M

    2016-04-15

    CASE DESCRIPTION 5 dogs (median age, 9 years; median body weight, 31 kg [68.2 lb]) with undefined nasal masses were examined after undergoing CT of the head and nasal biopsy via a rostral rhinoscopic or unaided (blind) approach because histologic results for collected biopsy specimens (inflammatory, necrotic, or hemorrhagic disease) suggested the specimens were nonrepresentative of the underlying disease process identified via CT (aggressive or malignant disease). CLINICAL FINDINGS Clinical signs at the time dogs were evaluated included open-mouth breathing, sneezing, or unilateral epistaxis. Histologic findings pertaining to the original biopsy specimens were suggestive of benign processes such as inflammation. In an attempt to obtain better representative specimens, a frameless CT-guided stereotactic biopsy system (CTSBS) was used to collect additional biopsy specimens from masses within the nasal and sinus passages of the dogs. The second set of biopsy specimens was histologically evaluated. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Histologic evaluation of biopsy specimens collected via the CTSBS revealed results suggestive of malignant neoplasia (specifically, chondrosarcoma, hemangiopericytoma, or undifferentiated sarcoma) for 3 dogs, mild mixed-cell inflammation for 1 dog, and hamartoma for 1 dog. No complications were reported. These findings resulted in a change in treatment recommendations for 3 dogs and confirmed that no additional treatment was required for 1 dog (with hamartoma). For the remaining dog, in which CT findings and clinical history were strongly suggestive of neoplasia, the final diagnosis was rhinitis. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Biopsy specimens were safely collected from masses within the nasal and sinus passages of dogs by use of a frameless CTSBS, allowing a definitive diagnosis that was unachievable with other biopsy approaches. PMID:27031420

  5. FLUOROSCOPIC EVALUATION OF ORO-PHARYNGEAL DYSPHAGIA: ANATOMY, TECHNIQUE, AND COMMON ETIOLOGIES

    PubMed Central

    Edmund, Dr; Au, Frederick Wing-Fai; Steele, Catriona M.

    2015-01-01

    Target Audience Radiologists and other professionals involved in imaging of oropharyngeal swallowing Objectives To review anatomy of the upper GI tract To review techniques and contrast agents used in the fluoroscopic examination of the oropharynx and hypopharynx To provide a pictorial review of some important causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia, and to link these to key findings in the clinical history to assist in establishing a clinical diagnosis To provide self-assessment questions to reinforce key learning points PMID:25539237

  6. Renal biopsy: methods and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Vaden, Shelly L

    2004-07-01

    Renal biopsy most often is indicated in the management of dogs and cats with glomerular disease or acute renal failure. Renal biopsy can readily be performed in dogs and cats via either percutaneous or surgical methods. Care should be taken to ensure that proper technique is used. When proper technique is employed and patient factors are properly addressed, renal biopsy is a relatively safe procedure that minimally affects renal function. Patients should be monitored during the post biopsy period for severe hemorrhage, the most common complication. Accurate diagnosis of glomerular disease, and therefore, accurate treatment planning,requires that the biopsy specimens not only be evaluated by light microscopy using special stains but by electron and immunofluorescent microscopy. PMID:15223207

  7. MR-TRUS Fusion Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Daniel J A

    2016-06-01

    The leading application of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) of the prostate is for lesion detection with the intention of tissue sampling (biopsy). Although direct in-bore magnetic resonance (MR)-guided biopsy allows for confirmation of the biopsy site, this can be expensive, time-consuming, and most importantly limited in availability. MR-transrectal ultrasound (MR-TRUS) image fusion targeted biopsy (TBx) allows for lesions identified on MRI to be targeted with the ease, efficiency, and availability of ultrasound.The learning objectives are optimized mpMRI protocol and reporting for image fusion targeted biopsy; methods of TRUS TBx; performance and limitations of MR-TRUS TBx; future improvements and applications. PMID:27187163

  8. Low coherence interferometry approach for aiding fine needle aspiration biopsies.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ernest W; Gardecki, Joseph; Pitman, Martha; Wilsterman, Eric J; Patel, Ankit; Tearney, Guillermo J; Iftimia, Nicusor

    2014-01-01

    We present portable preclinical low-coherence interference (LCI) instrumentation for aiding fine needle aspiration biopsies featuring the second-generation LCI-based biopsy probe and an improved scoring algorithm for tissue differentiation. Our instrument and algorithm were tested on 38 mice with cultured tumor mass and we show the specificity, sensitivity, and positive predictive value of tumor detection of over 0.89, 0.88, and 0.96, respectively. PMID:25375634

  9. 16S community profiling identifies proton pump inhibitor related differences in gastric, lung and oropharyngeal microflora

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Rachel; Hu, Lan; Amirault, Janine; Khatwa, Umakanth; Ward, Doyle V.; Onderdonk, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To test the hypothesis that PPI use results in changes in gastric microflora which, through full column reflux, results in lung and oropharyngeal microflora changes. Study design We performed a prospective, cross sectional cohort study of 116 children (57 off and 59 on PPIs) undergoing simultaneous bronchoscopy and upper endoscopy for the evaluation of chronic cough. We performed 16S sequencing on gastric, bronchoalveolar lavage and oropharyngeal fluid. Fifty patients also underwent multichannel intraluminal impedance (pH-MII) testing. Results Streptococcus was more abundant in the gastric fluid of patients taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and there was a significant correlation with PPI dose (mg/kg/day) and abundance of gastric Streptococcus (p=0.01). There was also a significant difference in the abundance of oropharyngeal Streptococcus in PPI treated patients. Eight unique bacterial genera were found in the gastric and lung fluid but not in the oropharyngeal suggesting exchange between the two sites and two of the seven (Lactococcus, Acinetobacter) were more abundant in patients with more full column reflux, suggesting direct aspiration. Principal component analysis revealed greater overlap between gastric and lung than oropharyngeal microflora. Conclusions PPI use was associated with differences in gastric, lung and oropharyngeal microflora. Although microflora exchange can occur between all three sites, gastric and lung microflora are more closely related and the mechanism of exchange between sites may be aspiration of full column reflux. PMID:25661411

  10. [Management of pulmonary masses by guided transthoracic fine needle biopsy under computed tomography. Contribution from the Pathology and Radiology Departments of the Percy Military Hospital (Clamart, France) over 10 years].

    PubMed

    Harket, A; Weber-Donat, G; Tériitéhau, C; Saint-Blancard, P

    2010-09-01

    Examining 260 samples of pulmonary nodules obtained by percutaneous biopsy under tomodensitometric control from the departments of radiology and pathology over 10 years, the authors note the advantages and disadvantages of this technique, provide the results of their experience and emphasise the importance of these biopsies in malignant pathology. The results of this series can be superposed with those found in the literature. Malignant tumours account for 75 % of the cases, with a clear prevalence of primitive adenocarcinoma. Benign pathology (approximately, 14 % of the cases) was represented by necrosis without any specificity, fibrous reaction and infectious causes. The act had to be repeated for the false negatives (7 %). PMID:20933168

  11. The current role of percutaneous needle biopsies of renal tumours.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Alessandro; Terrone, Carlo; Scarpa, Roberto M

    2009-06-01

    The role of percutaneous biopsy of renal masses has been traditionally limited by concerns about its safety, accuracy and sampling errors. The increasing incidence in the diagnosis of incidental small renal masses (SRMs), the development of conservative and minimally invasive treatments for low risk renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) and the discovery of novel targeted treatments for metastatic disease are now leading to wider indications for renal tumor biopsy. Percutaneous biopsy of renal tumors can be performed in an outpatient setting under ultrasound and/or CT guidance. 18 gauge needles loaded in an automatic biopsy gun are used to retrieve cores and 21 gauge needles to obtain FNA specimens through a 17 gauge coaxial cannula placed close to the tumor. A careful check of the quality of biopsies and aspirates is paramount to maximize the diagnostic yield of the procedure. With the development of new biopsy techniques the risk of tumor seeding appears negligible and significant bleeding is unusual and very rarely clinically significant. In centres with expertise, needle core biopsy with or without FNA can provide adequate specimens for an accurate diagnosis in over 90% of cases. Incidental SRMs are frequently detected in elderly patients and have a very heterogeneous biological behaviour At surgery up to one third have benign histologies and most of those that are malignant are low grade RCCs. Pretreatment percutaneous biopsy can significantly decrease the number of unnecessary surgeries for benign disease and assist the urologist in clinical decision making, especially for elderly and unfit patients who are possible candidates for active surveillance and/or minimally invasive ablative therapies. Finally, there is potential for stratifying initial therapy of metastatic RCC by histological subtype on needle biopsies. PMID:19760866

  12. HPV-related methylation signature predicts survival in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kostareli, Efterpi; Holzinger, Dana; Bogatyrova, Olga; Hielscher, Thomas; Wichmann, Gunnar; Keck, Michaela; Lahrmann, Bernd; Grabe, Niels; Flechtenmacher, Christa; Schmidt, Christopher R; Seiwert, Tanguy; Dyckhoff, Gerhard; Dietz, Andreas; Höfler, Daniela; Pawlita, Michael; Benner, Axel; Bosch, Franz X; Plinkert, Peter; Plass, Christoph; Weichenhan, Dieter; Hess, Jochen

    2013-06-01

    High-risk types of human papilloma virus (HPV) are increasingly associated with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Strikingly, patients with HPV-positive OPSCC are highly curable with ionizing radiation and have better survival compared with HPV-negative patients, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. We applied an array-based approach to monitor global changes in CpG island hypermethylation between HPV-negative and HPV-positive OPSCCs and identified a specific pattern of differentially methylated regions that critically depends on the presence of viral transcripts. HPV-related alterations were confirmed for the majority of candidate gene promoters by mass spectrometric, quantitative methylation analysis. There was a significant inverse correlation between promoter hypermethylation of ALDH1A2, OSR2, GATA4, GRIA4, and IRX4 and transcript levels. Interestingly, Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that a combined promoter methylation pattern of low methylation levels in ALDH1A2 and OSR2 promoters and high methylation levels in GATA4, GRIA4, and IRX4 promoters was significantly correlated with improved survival in 3 independent patient cohorts. ALDH1A2 protein levels, determined by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays, confirmed the association with clinical outcome. In summary, our study highlights specific alterations in global gene promoter methylation in HPV-driven OPSCCs and identifies a signature that predicts the clinical outcome in OPSCCs. PMID:23635773

  13. Influence of Smoking History on Imaging Characteristics among HPV-Positive Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients: A Blinded Matched-Pair Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cantrell, Sarah C.; Reid, Holly H.; Li, Guojun; Wei, Qingyi; Sturgis, Erich M.; Ginsberg, Lawrence E.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal cancers represent a distinct clinical entity with more favorable prognosis than HPV-negative oropharyngeal cancers. However, among patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinomas, those with a significant smoking history have a much worse prognosis. Recently, imaging characteristics of oropharyngeal cancers were identified as markers of poor prognosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether nodal imaging characteristics differ between smokers and never/light smokers with HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer. Materials and Methods Review of 130 pretreatment CT examinations of HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancers in smokers (>10 pack-years) and never/light smokers (≤10 pack-years) matched for T stage and tumor subsite was performed with the reviewing radiologist blinded to HPV status, smoking history, and clinical stage. An additional 24 pretreatment CT examinations of patients with HPV-negative oropharyngeal cancers were also reviewed in a blinded fashion. Imaging characteristics of metastatic nodal disease were compared using chi-square testing (Fisher exact testing where appropriate) and McNemar chi-square testing for the matched-pair analysis. Results As expected, those with HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer were more likely to be younger, male, non-Hispanic white, never/former smokers, and never drinkers than those with HPV-negative oropharyngeal cancer. Furthermore, the HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancers were more likely to be in the tonsil, smaller T-category, higher N-category, poorly differentiated, tonsil primaries, smaller T-category, higher N-category, and poorly differentiated than HPV-negative oropharyngeal cancers. However, among the HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancers, we could identify no obvious difference in the pretreatment imaging characteristics of paired smokers and never/light smokers. Conclusions Among patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer, no

  14. Gastric tissue biopsy and culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - gastric tissue; Biopsy - gastric tissue ... of organisms that cause infection. A gastric tissue culture may be considered normal if it does not show certain bacteria. Stomach acids normally prevent too much bacteria from growing.

  15. Bone biopsy in haematological disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, R; Frisch, B; Bartl, R

    1982-01-01

    Bone marrow biopsies are now widely used in the investigation and follow-up of many diseases. Semi-thin sections of 8216 undecalcified biopsies of patients with haematological disorders were studied. Observations were made on the cytopenias and the myelodysplastic syndromes, the acute leukaemias the myeloproliferative disorders, Hodgkin's disease and the malignant lymphomas including multiple myeloma, hairy cell leukaemia and angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy. Bone marrow biopsies are essential for the differential diagnosis of most cytopenias and for the early recognition of fibrosis which most frequently occurred as a consequence of megakaryocytic proliferation in the myeloproliferative disorders. Different patterns of bone marrow involvement were found in the lymphoproliferative disorders and both their type and extent constituted factors of prognostic significance. A survey of the literature is given and the conclusion is drawn that bone marrow biopsies provide indispensible information for the diagnostic evaluation and the follow-up of patients with haematological disorders. Images PMID:7040489

  16. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Quigg

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  17. Current trends in initial management of oropharyngeal cancer: the declining use of open surgery.

    PubMed

    Haigentz, Missak; Silver, Carl E; Corry, June; Genden, Eric M; Takes, Robert P; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2009-12-01

    The widespread availability of novel primary treatment approaches against oropharyngeal cancers has provided several potentially curative surgical and nonsurgical treatment options for patients, generating both hope and controversy. As treatment is usually curative in intent, management considerations must include consideration of primary tumor and nodal disease control as well as long-term toxicities and functional outcomes. Anatomical and functional organ preservation (speech and deglutition) remains of paramount importance to patients with oropharyngeal cancer and the physicians involved in their care, accounting for the growing popularity of chemoradiotherapy and transoral surgical techniques for this indication. These novel approaches have greatly diminished the role of open surgery as initial therapy for oropharyngeal cancers. Open surgery which is often reserved for salvage on relapse, may still be an appropriate therapy for certain early stage primary lesions. The growing treatment armamentarium requires careful consideration for optimal individualized care. The identification of oncogenic human papillomavirus as a predictive and prognostic marker in patients with oropharyngeal cancer has great potential to further optimize the choice of treatment. In this review, novel primary therapies against oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma are presented in the context of anatomical, quality of life, and emerging biological considerations. PMID:19866522

  18. Advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: Pathogenesis, treatment, and novel therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Swiecicki, Paul L; Malloy, Kelly M; Worden, Francis P

    2016-01-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer accounts for approximately 2.8% of newly cancer cases. Although classically a tobacco related disease, most cases today are related to infection with human papilloma virus (HPV) and present with locally advanced tumors. HPV related tumors have been recognized as a molecularly distinct entity with higher response rates to therapy, lower rates of relapse, and improved overall survival. Treatment of oropharyngeal cancer entails a multi-disciplinary approach with concomitant chemoradiation. The role of induction chemotherapy in locally advanced tumors continues to be controversial however large studies have demonstrated no difference in survival or time to treatment failure. Surgical approaches may be employed with low volume oropharyngeal cancers and with development new endoscopic tools, more tumors are able to be resected via an endoscopic approach. Given advances in the understanding of HPV related oropharyngeal cancer, ongoing research is looking at ways to minimize toxicities via de-intensification of therapy. Unfortunately, some patients develop recurrent or metastatic disease. Novel therapeutics are currently being investigated for this patient population including immunotherapeutics. This review discusses the current understanding of the pathogenesis of oropharyngeal cancer and treatment. We also discuss emerging areas of research as it pertains to de-intensification as well novel therapeutics for the management of metastatic disease. PMID:26862488

  19. Needle biopsy of the breast.

    PubMed

    Millis, R R

    1984-01-01

    Recently, there has been a considerable increase in the use of both fine-needle aspiration biopsy (aspiration cytology) and tissue-core needle biopsy of the breast. In patients with suspected breast cancer, needle biopsy is frequently used to confirm the diagnosis before treatment is planned. This allows a more thoughtful approach to the patient and full screening for possible metastatic disease prior to definitive surgery. Needle biopsy techniques are simple, rapid, can be performed in the doctor's office, and save time, equipment, and hospital beds. Complications are few. Aspiration cytology has the advantage that it is quick to perform, the preparation can be examined almost immediately and, in the event of an unsatisfactory smear, the procedure can be repeated. However, the diagnosis is based on purely cytological evaluation, and the information obtained is somewhat limited. Reported accuracy rates range from 42 to 96%. False positive reports are rare but have occurred in most centers, and a high degree of accuracy will only be obtained by experienced practitioners. Tissue-core needle biopsy has the advantage that the diagnosis is based on histopathological assessment, but the procedure is slightly more time consuming, is more traumatic for the patient, and the equipment is more expensive. Accuracy rates range from 67 to 98.5%. During the past 4 years, 329 tissue-core (Tru-Cut) biopsies have been performed in the Guy's Hospital Breast Unit, with an accuracy rate of 83% in the diagnosis of carcinoma. The procedure has been acceptable to most patients, and complications have been minimal. Studies comparing the use of aspiration cytology and tissue-core needle biopsy in the diagnosis of mammary carcinoma have produced variable results. Both methods have advantages and disadvantages, and the choice of technique must depend on the clinical situation and the preferences and skills of the practitioners involved in the management of the patient. PMID:6377049

  20. [Liquid Biopsy and Laboratory Medicine].

    PubMed

    Furuta, Koh

    2015-09-01

    Recent progress in cancer biology has revealed the fact that molecular profiles of primary and metastatic cancer are not necessarily the same. Furthermore, evidence of intra-tumor heterogeneity has been disclosed repeatedly. In addition to these, acquiring resistances to chemoradiation therapy is far more rapid than typical predictions. Under these circumstances, physicians are realizing that one biopsy is not enough to predict the direction of cancer progression or extension. Repeated biopsy was proposed in this context. For "re-biopsy", acquiring blood is much easier compared to regular biopsies of acquiring body tissues. Therefore, CTC or Cell-free DNA is one of the hot topics in clinical and molecular diagnostic fields. The term "liquid biopsy" is used to include these two materials. We utilized a CTC isolation device based on microfluidic principles. Procedures for the extraction of DNA from plasma (Cell-free DNA) is also available. Based on this background, we performed a feasibility study of NGS (Next Generation Sequencing) by analyzing materials from advanced gastrointestinal cancer patients. We have successfully acquired NGS results using these liquid biopsies. We have also investigated the possibility of storing CTCs by evaluating procedures after cytospin using H1975 cells with various fixation conditions under a DIC microscope examination. Because of the paucity of the number of isolated CTCs, H1975 cells were used for this purpose. After cytospin, 95% ETOH and then -80 degrees C storage provided the best results. Attempts at not only NGS but also storage in this sequence of studies have opened new fields of liquid biopsy in clinical laboratories. PMID:26731900

  1. Effect of perorally administered pivmecillinam on the normal oropharyngeal, intestinal and skin microflora.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, A; Edlund, C; Svenungsson, B; Emtestam, L; Nord, C E

    2001-06-01

    To study the ecological effects of pivmecillinam on the human oropharyngeal, intestinal and skin microflora, 15 healthy volunteers were given pivmecillinam tablets 400 mg twice daily for 7 days. Saliva, stool and skin specimens were taken before (days -3 and 0) and on the 2nd, 4th and 7th days during the administration period and 14 and 21 days after the start of administration. Mecillinam caused no major changes in the aerobic or anaerobic oropharyngeal microflora. In the aerobic intestinal microflora there was a decrease in the numbers of Escherichia coli while no changes occurred in the anaerobic microflora. In the skin microflora there was a transient decrease in the numbers of Propionibacterium spp. underneath the wing of the nose. The major effect of pivmecillinam was seen on E. coli and to some extent on Propionibacterium spp. No further ecological disturbances were noticed in the oropharyngeal, intestinal or skin microflora. PMID:11450889

  2. The role for surgical management of HPV-related oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Genden, Eric M

    2012-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated oropharyngeal carcinoma has become the predominate cause of oropharyngeal carcinoma in the United States and Europe. Management of this disease is controversial. Traditional open surgical techniques gave way to concurrent chemoradiotherapy following several American and European organ-preservation trials suggesting that both modalities were equally efficacious. More recently, minimally invasive surgical techniques have gained popularity. These techniques provide an opportunity to achieve a complete surgical resection without the treatment-related morbidity associated with open surgery. Proponents of this technique contend that transoral surgical techniques provide a means to analyze the tumor tissue, prognosticate, and personally direct therapy. Skeptics suggest that HPV-associated oropharyngeal carcinoma responds well to chemoradiotherapy and that surgery may not provide a treatment advantage. Both approaches provide a unique perspective and both are currently being studied under trial. PMID:22782229

  3. Human papillomavirus prevalence in oropharyngeal cancer before vaccine introduction, United States.

    PubMed

    Steinau, Martin; Saraiya, Mona; Goodman, Marc T; Peters, Edward S; Watson, Meg; Cleveland, Jennifer L; Lynch, Charles F; Wilkinson, Edward J; Hernandez, Brenda Y; Copeland, Glen; Saber, Maria S; Hopenhayn, Claudia; Huang, Youjie; Cozen, Wendy; Lyu, Christopher; Unger, Elizabeth R

    2014-05-01

    We conducted a study to determine prevalence of HPV types in oropharyngeal cancers in the United States and establish a prevaccine baseline for monitoring the impact of vaccination. HPV DNA was extracted from tumor tissue samples from patients in whom cancer was diagnosed during 1995-2005. The samples were obtained from cancer registries and Residual Tissue Repository Program sites in the United States. HPV was detected and typed by using PCR reverse line blot assays. Among 557 invasive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas, 72% were positive for HPV and 62% for vaccine types HPV16 or 18. Prevalence of HPV-16/18 was lower in women (53%) than in men (66%), and lower in non-Hispanic Black patients (31%) than in other racial/ethnic groups (68%-80%). Results indicate that vaccines could prevent most oropharyngeal cancers in the United States, but their effect may vary by demographic variables. PMID:24751181

  4. Gastrostomy Tube Use after Transoral Robotic Surgery for Oropharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Al-khudari, Samer; Bendix, Scott; Lindholm, Jamie; Simmerman, Erin; Hall, Francis; Ghanem, Tamer

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate factors that influence gastrostomy tube (g-tube) use after transoral robotic surgery (TORS) for oropharyngeal (OP) cancer. Study Design/Methods. Retrospective review of TORS patients with OP cancer. G-tube presence was recorded before and after surgery at followup. Kaplan-Meier and Cox hazards model evaluated effects of early (T1 and T2) and advanced (T3, T4) disease, adjuvant therapy, and free flap reconstruction on g-tube use. Results. Sixteen patients had tonsillar cancer and 13 tongue base cancer. Of 22 patients who underwent TORS as primary therapy, 17 had T1 T2 stage and five T3 T4 stage. Seven underwent salvage therapy (four T1 T2 and three T3 T4). Nine underwent robotic-assisted inset free flap reconstruction. Seventeen received adjuvant therapy. Four groups were compared: primary early disease (PED) T1 and T2 tumors, primary early disease with adjunctive therapy (PEDAT), primary advanced disease (PAD) T3 and T4 tumors, and salvage therapy. Within the first year of treatment, 0% PED, 44% PEDAT, 40% PAD, and 57% salvage patients required a g-tube. Fourteen patients had a temporary nasoenteric tube (48.3%) postoperatively, and 10 required a g-tube (34.5%) within the first year. Four of 22 (18.2%) with TORS as primary treatment were g-tube dependent at one year and had received adjuvant therapy. Conclusion. PED can be managed without a g-tube after TORS. Similar feeding tube rates were found for PEDAT and PAD patients. Salvage patients have a high rate of g-tube need after TORS. PMID:23936676

  5. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in oropharyngeal cancer: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Andrew P.; Saha, Sandeep; Kraninger, Jennifer L.; Swick, Adam D.; Yu, Menggang; Lambertg, Paul F.; Kimple, Randall

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The global incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) has been increasing, and it has been proposed that a rising rate of human papillomavirus (HPV) associated cancers is driving the observed changes in OPSCC incidence. We carried out this systematic review to further examine the prevalence of HPV in OPSCC over time worldwide. Methods A systematic literature search was performed to identify all articles through January 31, 2014 that reported on the prevalence of HPV in OPSCC. Articles that met inclusion criteria were divided into four time frames (pre-1995, 1995—1999, 2000—2004, and 2005—present) based on the median year of the study's sample collection period. Employing a weighted analysis of variance (ANOVA) model, we examined the trends of HPV-positivity over time worldwide, in North America, and in Europe. Results Our literature search identified 699 unique articles. 175 underwent review of the entire study and 105 met inclusion criteria. These 105 articles reported on the HPV prevalence in 9541 OPSCC specimens across 23 nations. We demonstrated significant increases in the percentage change of HPV-positive OPSCCs from pre-1995 to present: 20.6% worldwide (p-value for trend: p<0.001), 21.6% in North America (p=0.013) and 21.5% in Europe (p=0.033). Discussion Interestingly, while in Europe there was a steady increase in HPV prevalence across all time frames, reaching nearly 50% most recently, in North America HPV prevalence appears to have plateaued over the past decade at about 65%. These findings may have important implications regarding predictions for the future incidence of OPSCC. PMID:26049691

  6. Association of marijuana smoking with oropharyngeal and oral tongue cancers: Pooled analysis from the INHANCE Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Morgan A.; Chaturvedi, Anil K.; Kelsey, Karl; Straif, Kurt; Berthiller, Julien; Schwartz, Stephen M; Smith, Elaine; Wyss, Annah; Brennan, Paul; Olshan, Andrew F.; Wei, Qingyi; Sturgis, Erich M.; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Morgenstern, Hal; Muscat, Joshua; Lazarus, Philip; McClean, Michael; Chen, Chu; Vaughan, Thomas L.; Wunsch-Filho, Victor; Curado, Maria Paula; Koifman, Sergio; Matos, Elena; Menezes, Ana; Daudt, Alexander W.; Fernandez, Leticia; Posner, Marshall; Boffetta, Paolo; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Hashibe, Mia; D’Souza, Gypsyamber

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence of oropharyngeal and oral tongue cancers have increased over the last twenty years which parallels increased use of marijuana among individuals born after 1950. Methods Pooled analysis of individual-level data from nine case-control studies from the U.S. and Latin America in the INHANCE consortium. Self-reported information on marijuana smoking, demographic, and behavioral factors was obtained from 1,921 oropharyngeal cases, 356 oral tongue cases, and 7,639 controls. Results Compared with never marijuana smokers, ever marijuana smokers had an elevated risk of oropharyngeal (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 1.24; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06, 1.47) and a reduced risk of oral tongue cancer (aOR: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.29, 0.75). The risk of oropharyngeal cancer remained elevated among never tobacco and alcohol users. The risk of oral tongue cancer decreased with increasing frequency (ptrend=0.005), duration (ptrend=0.002), and joint-years of marijuana use (ptrend=0.004), and was reduced among never users tobacco and alcohol users. Sensitivity analysis adjusting for potential confounding by HPV exposure attenuated the association of marijuana use with oropharyngeal cancer (aOR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.71, 1.25), but had no effect on the oral tongue cancer association. Conclusions These results suggest that the association of marijuana use with Head and Neck Carcinoma may differ by tumor site. Impact The associations of marijuana use with oropharyngeal and oral tongue cancer are consistent with both possible pro- and anti-carcinogenic effects of cannabinoids. Additional work is needed to rule out various sources of bias, including residual confounding by HPV infection and misclassification of marijuana exposure. PMID:24351902

  7. [Evaluation of the oropharyngeal tularemia cases admitted to our hospital from the provinces of Central Anatolia].

    PubMed

    Uyar, Melek; Cengiz, Buğra; Unlü, Murat; Celebi, Bekir; Kılıç, Selçuk; Eryılmaz, Adil

    2011-01-01

    Tularemia caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis is a zoonotic infection which has re-emerged in Turkey in recent years as water-borne endemics. Oropharyngeal form is the most frequently reported form of the disease from Turkey. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and laboratory findings of oropharyngeal tularemia patients admitted to ear, nose & throat outpatient clinic between January-March 2010. A total of 10 patients (age range: 16-80 years, mean age: 43.9 years; nine were male) inhabiting in the provinces in Central Anatolia, Turkey, were admitted to our hospital with the complaints of fever, sore throat and painful cervical lump. They have been previously diagnosed as tonsillo-pharyngitis at different medical centers and empirical antibiotic therapy has initiated, however, their complaints have not recovered. Endoscopic laryngoscopic examination revealed that oropharynx, larynx and hypopharynx were normal. Physical examination of the neck yielded localized fixed masses with diameters between 2-7 cm. The lesions were localized at right submandibular (n= 4), upper jugular (n=3) and one of each at left posterior cervical, left submandibular and left jugulodigastric regions. The patients were hospitalized with the pre-diagnosis of "neck mass with unknown origin" for further investigation and treatment. The mean white blood cell count of the cases was 9730 (7500-15.100) cells/µl; the mean erythrocyte sedimantation rate was 68.7 (46-85) mm3/hours and the mean C-reactive protein level was 4.3 (1.5-7.4) µg/dl. Salmonella, Brucella, Toxoplasma gondii, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, Epstein-Barr virus and viral hepatitis serology did not indicate acute infections. Serum and tissue samples were sent to Refik Saydam National Public Health Agency in order to test for tularemia, namely culture, microagglutination test (MAT), direct fluorescence antibody (DFA) test and in-house polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All of the patients

  8. SU-E-T-352: Why Is the Survival Rate Low in Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z; Feng, Y; Rasmussen, K; Rice, J; Stephenson, S; Ferreira, Maria C; Liu, T; Yuh, K; Wang, R; Grecula, J; Lo, S; Mayr, N; Yuh, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Tumors are composed of a large number of clonogens that have the capability of indefinite reproduction. Even when there is complete clinical or radiographic regression of the gross tumor mass after treatment, tumor recurrence can occur if the clonogens are not completely eradicated by radiotherapy. This study was to investigate the colonogen number and its association with the tumor control probability (TCP) in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCCA). Methods: A literature search was conducted to collect clinical information of patients with OSCCA, including the prescription dose, tumor volume and survival rate. The linear-quadratic (LQ) model was incorporated into TCP model for clinical data analysis. The total dose ranged from 60 to 70 Gy and tumor volume ranged from 10 to 50 cc. The TCP was calculated for each group according to tumor size and dose. The least χ{sup 2} method was used to fit the TCP calculation to clinical data while other LQ model parameters (α, β) were adopted from the literature, due to the limited patient data. Results: A total of 190 patients with T2–T4 OSCCA were included. The association with HPV was not available for all the patients. The 3-year survival rate was about 82% for T2 squamous cell carcinoma and 40% for advanced tumors. Fitting the TCP model to the survival data, the average clonogen number was 1.56×10{sup 12}. For the prescription dose of 70 Gy, the calculated TCP ranged from 40% to 90% when the tumor volume varied from 10 to 50 cc. Conclusion: Our data suggests variation between the clonogen number and TCP in OSCCA. Tumors with larger colonogen number tend to have lower TCP and therefore dose escalation above 70 Gy may be indicated in order to improve the TCP and survival rate. Our result will require future confirmation with a large number of patients.

  9. Lateral Oropharyngeal Wall and Supraglottic Airway Collapse Associated With Failure in Sleep Apnea Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Danny; Sinawe, Hadeer; Folbe, Adam J.; Yoo, George; Badr, Safwan; Rowley, James A.; Lin, Ho-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis To identify patterns of airway collapse during preoperative drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) as predictors of surgical failure following multilevel airway surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). Study Design Retrospective clinical chart review. Methods Medical records of patients who underwent site-specific surgical modification of the upper airway for treatment of OSHAS were reviewed. Patients were included in this study if they had a preoperative airway evaluation with DISE as well as preoperative and postoperative polysomnography. Airway obstruction on DISE was described according to airway level, severity, and axis of collapse. Severe airway obstruction was defined as >75% collapse on endoscopy. Surgical success was described as a postoperative apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of <20 and a >50% decrease in preoperative AHI. Results A total of 34 patients were included in this study. The overall surgical success rate was 56%. Surgical success (n = 19) and surgical failure (n = 15) patients were similar with regard to age, gender, body mass index, preoperative AHI, Friedman stage, adenotonsillar grades, and surgical management. DISE findings in the surgical failure group demonstrated greater incidence of severe lateral oropharyngeal wall collapse (73.3% vs. 36.8%, P = .037) and severe supraglottic collapse (93.3% vs. 63.2%, P = .046) as compared to the surgical success group. Conclusions The presence of severe lateral pharyngeal wall and/or supraglottic collapse on preoperative DISE is associated with OSAHS surgical failure. The identification of this failure-prone collapse pattern may be useful in preoperative patient counseling as well as in directing an individualized and customized approach to the treatment of OSHAS. PMID:22253047

  10. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy. When is it most beneficial?

    PubMed

    Peterson, I M; Brink, W J

    1990-09-01

    When fine-needle aspiration biopsy is done skillfully, it is an accurate, efficient, and cost-effective method for diagnosing many diseases in selected patients. This article describes its uses for palpable masses of the thyroid, breast, and peripheral lymph nodes and some nonpalpable lesions. The authors also discuss its advantages and disadvantages and technical considerations that affect accuracy. PMID:2399196

  11. Giant Undifferentiated Oropharyngeal Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sepúlveda, Ilson; Frelinghuysen, Michael; García, Cesar; Platin, Enrique; Spencer, M. Loreto; Ortega, Pablo; Ulloa, David

    2014-01-01

    We report on a patient who presented to the Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) clinic with swelling of the neck, dysphagia, headache, dyspnea and stridor. Imaging studies revealed an expansive heterogeneous process to the left retropharyngeal region. The mass was ovoid in shape, displaying moderate enhancement after intravenous contrast administration. Subsequently, a biopsy revealed the presence of undifferentiated sarcoma. The patient was treated with chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy, but follow-up exams at 6 months posttreatment revealed that while the tumor was stable, it persisted. Consequently, the patient was enrolled in a palliative care and pain control program and is currently being followed. PMID:25493085

  12. Biopsy techniques for intraocular tumors.

    PubMed

    Rishi, Pukhraj; Dhami, Abhinav; Biswas, Jyotirmay

    2016-06-01

    Biopsy involves the surgical removal of a tissue specimen for histopathologic evaluation. Most intraocular tumors are reliably diagnosed based on the clinical evaluation or with noninvasive diagnostic techniques. However, accurately diagnosing a small percentage of tumors can be challenging. A tissue biopsy is thus needed to establish a definitive diagnosis and plan the requisite treatment. From fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) to surgical excision, all tissue collection techniques have been studied in the literature. Each technique has its indications and limitations. FNAB has been reported to provide for 88-95% reliable and safe ophthalmic tumor diagnosis and has gained popularity for prognostic purposes and providing eye conserving treatment surgeries. The technique and instrumentation for biopsy vary depending upon the tissue involved (retina, choroid, subretinal space, vitreous, and aqueous), suspected diagnosis, size, location, associated retinal detachment, and clarity of the media. The cytopathologist confers a very important role in diagnosis and their assistance plays a key role in managing and planning the treatment for malignancies. PMID:27488148

  13. [Percutaneous biopsy of the liver].

    PubMed

    Skladaný, L; Jarcuska, P; Oltman, M; Hrusovský, S

    2003-08-01

    Percutaneous liver biopsy represents the most specific examination of the nature and severity of liver diseases. P. Ehrlich was the first physician in history having done the intervention in 1880. The new history begins with the Menghini's publication on s.c. one-second biopsy in 1957. The present paper deals exclusively with diffuse diseases of the liver including the most frequent ones--virus hepatitis, alcohol and non-alcohol steatohepatitis. The contraindications include mainly coagulation disorders and non-cooperative patients. The percutaneous biopsy is mostly executed after ultrasonographic examination or under the control of various image-forming techniques and by means of various types of needles; the authors analyze advantages and disadvantages of individual techniques. If the contraindications are respected, the percutaneous biopsy is a safe method of examination, which may be done on out-patient basis. A large series of complications exists, but their frequency is generally low. Morbidity is referred in 0.2% of patients, the most frequent complications being pain and hypotension from vaso-vagal reactions, extensive intraperitoneal bleeding and hemobilia. Mortality is extremely low, the mean in large studies being 0.001%. PMID:14518095

  14. Vacuum enhanced cutaneous biopsy instrument

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    A syringe-like disposable cutaneous biopsy instrument equipped with a tubular blade at its lower end, and designed so that a vacuum is created during use, said vacuum serving to retain undeformed a plug of tissue cut from a patient's skin.

  15. Biopsy techniques for intraocular tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rishi, Pukhraj; Dhami, Abhinav; Biswas, Jyotirmay

    2016-01-01

    Biopsy involves the surgical removal of a tissue specimen for histopathologic evaluation. Most intraocular tumors are reliably diagnosed based on the clinical evaluation or with noninvasive diagnostic techniques. However, accurately diagnosing a small percentage of tumors can be challenging. A tissue biopsy is thus needed to establish a definitive diagnosis and plan the requisite treatment. From fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) to surgical excision, all tissue collection techniques have been studied in the literature. Each technique has its indications and limitations. FNAB has been reported to provide for 88–95% reliable and safe ophthalmic tumor diagnosis and has gained popularity for prognostic purposes and providing eye conserving treatment surgeries. The technique and instrumentation for biopsy vary depending upon the tissue involved (retina, choroid, subretinal space, vitreous, and aqueous), suspected diagnosis, size, location, associated retinal detachment, and clarity of the media. The cytopathologist confers a very important role in diagnosis and their assistance plays a key role in managing and planning the treatment for malignancies. PMID:27488148

  16. Prediction of concurrent chemoradiotherapy outcome in advanced oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    HASEGAWA, MASAHIRO; MAEDA, HIROYUKI; DENG, ZEYI; KIYUNA, ASANORI; GANAHA, AKIRA; YAMASHITA, YUKASHI; MATAYOSHI, SEN; AGENA, SHINYA; TOITA, TAKAFUMI; UEHARA, TAKAYUKI; SUZUKI, MIKIO

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate human papillomavirus (HPV) infection as a predictor of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) response and indicator of planned neck dissection (PND) for patients with advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC; stage III/IV). Overall, 39 OPSCC patients (32 men, 7 women; median age 61 years, range 39–79 years) were enrolled. The primary lesion and whole neck were irradiated up to 50.4 Gy, and subsequently the primary site and metastatic lymph nodes were boosted with a further 16.2 Gy. Although several chemotherapy regimens were employed, 82.1% of OPSCC patients received the combination of nedaplatin and 5-fluorouracil. HPV-related OPSCC (16 cases) was defined as both HPV DNA-positive status by polymerase chain reaction and p16INK4a overexpression by immunohistochemistry. Patients with N2 and N3 disease received PND 2–3 months after CCRT completion. Compared to non-responders, CCRT responders showed significantly lower nodal stage (N0 to N2b) and HPV-positive status in univariate analysis. Patients with HPV-related OPSCC had longer time to treatment failure (TTF) than those with HPV-unrelated OPSCC (p=0.040). Three-year TTF was 81.3 and 47.8% in the HPV-related and HPV-unrelated groups, respectively. There were also significant differences in disease-free survival (DFS) between the two OPSCC patient groups (p=0.042). Three-year DFS was 93.8 and 66.7% in patients with HPV-related and HPV-unrelated OPSCC, respectively. Multivariate logistic analysis showed a lower risk of TTF event occurrence in HPV-related OPSCC (p=0.041) than in HPV-unrelated OPSCC. Thus, HPV testing in addition to nodal stage was useful for predicting CCRT response, especially in advanced OPSCC. Because patients who received PND showed moderate locoregional control, PND is an effective surgical procedure for controlling neck lesions in patients with advanced HPV-unrelated disease. PMID:24969413

  17. Steerable real-time sonographically guided needle biopsy.

    PubMed

    Buonocore, E; Skipper, G J

    1981-02-01

    A method for dynamic real-time ultrasonic guidance for percutaneous needle biopsy has been successful in obtaining cytologic and histologic specimens from abdominal masses. The system depends on a real-time ultrasonic transducer that has been rigidly attached to a laterally placed steerable needle holder. Using simple trigonometric functions, a chart has been derived that gives the exact angulation and needle length to produce quick, reliable, guided needle placements. Examples of successful renal, hepatobiliary, and retroperitoneal biopsies are presented. Advantages of this technique include speed, accuracy, low cost, three-dimensional format, and the omission of contrast media and radiation. PMID:6781264

  18. Different Clinical Utility of Oropharyngeal Bacterial Screening prior to Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Oncological and Neurological Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dastych, Milan; Senkyrik, Michal; Pavlik, Tomas; Prokesova, Jitka; Jecmenova, Marketa; Dolina, Jiri; Hep, Ales

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to monitor oropharyngeal bacterial colonization in patients indicated for percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG). Methods. Oropharyngeal swabs were obtained from patients prior to PEG placement. A development of peristomal infection was evaluated. The analysis of oropharyngeal and peristomal site pathogens was done. Results. Consecutive 274 patients referred for PEG due to neurological disorder or cancer completed the study. Oropharyngeal colonization with pathogens was observed in 69% (190/274), dominantly in the neurologic subgroup of patients (P < 0.001). Peristomal infection occurred in 30 (10.9%) of patients and in 57% of them the correlation between oropharyngeal and peristomal agents was present. The presence of oropharyngeal pathogens was assessed as an important risk factor for the development of peristomal infection only in oncological patients (OR = 8.33, 95% CI: 1.66–41.76). Despite a high prevalence of pathogens in neurological patients, it did not influence the risk of peristomal infection with the exception for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriers (OR 4.5, 95% CI: 1.08–18.76). Conclusion. During oropharyngeal microbial screening prior to the PEG insertion, the detection of pathogens may be a marker of the increased risk of peristomal infection in cancer patients only. In neurological patients the benefit of the screening is limited to the detection of MRSA carriers. PMID:25243153

  19. Oral and oropharyngeal perceptions of fluid viscosity across the age span.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christina H; Logemann, Jeri A; Burghardt, Wesley R; Zecker, Steven G; Rademaker, Alfred W

    2006-10-01

    Research demonstrates that varying sensory input, including the characteristics of a bolus, changes swallow physiology. Altering the consistency of fluids is a common compensatory technique used in dysphagia management to facilitate change. However, it is not known what variations in viscosity can be perceived in the oral cavity or oropharynx or if age affects oral and oropharyngeal perceptions of fluid viscosity. This study aims to establish the ability of normal adults to perceive fluid viscosity in the oral cavity and oropharynx and to determine if, within this population, there are age-related changes in oral and oropharyngeal perceptions. Sensitivity was established by deriving the exponent for the psychophysical law for fluid viscosity in both the oral cavity and the oropharynx, using modulus-free magnitude estimation with Newtonian fluids of corn syrup and water. Sixty normal volunteers, aged 21-84 years, participated. Results indicate that the exponent for oral perception of fluid viscosity was 0.3298, while for oropharyngeal perception it was 0.3148. Viscosity perception deteriorates with increasing age. Men exhibited a more marked deterioration in sensitivity than women. This study contributes to the literature on oral and oropharyngeal perceptions and on aging. The results provide a basis for work with individuals with dysphagia. PMID:17203333

  20. The Utility of Pitch Elevation in the Evaluation of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia: Preliminary Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malandraki, Georgia A.; Hind, Jacqueline A.; Gangnon, Ronald; Logemann, Jeri A.; Robbins, JoAnne

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of a pitch elevation task in the assessment of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Method: This study was a pilot prospective cohort study including 40 consecutive patients (16 male and 24 female) who were referred by their physician for a swallowing evaluation. Patients were evaluated with a noninstrumental clinical…

  1. Leptin receptor expression and Gln223Arg polymorphism as prognostic markers in oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, P R S; Maia, L L; Santos, M; Peterle, G T; Alves, L U; Takamori, J T; Souza, R P; Barbosa, W M; Mercante, A M C; Nunes, F D; Carvalho, M B; Tajara, E H; Louro, I D; Silva-Conforti, A M A

    2015-01-01

    The leptin gene product is released into the blood stream, passes through the blood-brain barrier, and finds the leptin receptor (LEPR) in the central nervous system. This hormone regulates food intake, hematopoiesis, inflammation, immunity, differentiation, and cell proliferation. The LEPR Gln223Arg polymorphism has been reported to alter receptor function and expression, both of which have been related with prognostics in several tumor types. Furthermore, several studies have shown a relationship between the Gln223Arg polymorphism and tumor development, and its role in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma is now well understood. In this study, 315 DNA samples were used for LEPR Gln223Arg genotyping and 87 primary oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas were used for immunohistochemical expression analysis, such that a relationship between these and tumor development and prognosis could be established. Homozygous LEPR Arg223 was found to be associated with a 2-fold reduction in oral and oropharyngeal cancer risk. In contrast, the presence of the Arg223 allele in tumors was associated with worse disease-free and disease-specific survival. Low LEPR expression was found to be an independent risk factor, increasing the risk for lymph node metastasis 4-fold. In conclusion, the Gln223Arg polymorphism and LEPR expression might be valuable markers for oral and oropharyngeal cancer, suggesting that LEPR might serve as a potential target for future therapies. PMID:26634459

  2. Chronic Inflammation-Related HPV: A Driving Force Speeds Oropharyngeal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Ma, Xiangrui; Lei, Zhengge; Feng, Hao; Wang, Shasha; Cen, Xiao; Gao, Shiyu; Jiang, Yaping; Jiang, Jian; Chen, Qianming; Tang, Yajie; Tang, Yaling; Liang, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) has been known to be a highly aggressive disease associated with human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. To investigate the relationship between HPV and chronic inflammation in oropharyngeal carcinogenesis, we collected 140 oral mucous fresh specimens including 50 OPSCC patients, 50 cancer in situ, 30 precancerous lesions, and 10 normal oral mucous. Our data demonstrated that there was a significantly higher proportion of severe chronic inflammation in dysplastic epithelia in comparison with that in normal tissues (P<0.001). The positive rate of HPV 16 was parallel with the chronic inflammation degrees from mild to severe inflammation (P<0.05). The positive rate of HPV 16 was progressively improved with the malignant progression of oral mucous (P<0.05). In addition, CD11b+ LIN- HLA-DR-CD33+ MDSCs were a critical cell population that mediates inflammation response and immune suppression in HPV-positive OPSCC. These indicated that persistent chronic inflammation-related HPV infection might drive oropharyngeal carcinogenesis and MDSCs might pay an important role during this process. Thus, a combination of HPV infection and inflammation expression might become a helpful biomedical marker to predict oropharyngeal carcinogenesis. PMID:26193368

  3. A Therapeutic Maneuver for Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Valter Nilton; Corrêa, Sabrina Mello Alves; Soares, Renato José

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study investigates resources to provide better conditions for oropharyngeal swallowing for improvement in the quality of life of Parkinson’s disease patients. METHOD Three men and one woman with an average age of 70.25 years had been afflicted with Parkinson’s disease for an average of 9.25 years. The patients were submitted to a rehabilitation program for oropharyngeal dysphagia after a clinical evaluation of swallowing. The rehabilitation program consisted of daily sessions for two consecutive weeks during which a biofeedback resource adapted especially for this study was used. The patients were then reevaluated for swallowing ability at follow-up. RESULTS The patients presenting difficulties with swallowing water displayed no such problems after rehabilitation. Only one patient exhibited slow oral transit of food and other discrete oropharyngeal food remnants when swallowing a biscuit. The sample variance was used to analyze the pressure measurements, demonstrating a numerical similarity of the results obtained with the swallowing of saliva or of biscuits (VAR = 4.41). A statistical difference was observed between the swallowing of saliva and biscuits, showing a significant pressure increase at the end of the rehabilitation program (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION The effortful swallow maneuver reinforced by using biofeedback appears to be a therapeutic resource in the rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in Parkinson’s disease patients. PMID:18925327

  4. Oropharyngeal Tularemia Outbreak Associated with Drinking Contaminated Tap Water, Turkey, July–September 2013

    PubMed Central

    Celebi, Bekir; Isik, Mehmet Emirhan; Tutus, Celal; Ozturk, Huseyin; Temel, Fehminaz; Kizilaslan, Mecit; Zhu, Bao-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, an oropharyngeal tularemia outbreak in Turkey affected 55 persons. Drinking tap water during the likely exposure period was significantly associated with illness (attack rate 27% vs. 11% among non–tap water drinkers). Findings showed the tap water source had been contaminated by surface water, and the chlorination device malfunctioned. PMID:26584074

  5. The Growing Epidemic of HPV-Positive Oropharyngeal Carcinoma: A Clinical Review for Primary Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kevin A; Mehta, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    While the rate of head and neck cancer has decreased in recent decades, the prevalence of oropharynx cancer has dramatically increased due to human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal cancer. Three of 4 newly diagnosed oropharyngeal carcinomas are HPV-positive, and by 2020 it is projected that the prevalence of this disease will overtake that of HPV-related cervical cancer. Recognized in recent years as a malignant entity distinct from HPV-negative oropharyngeal carcinoma, HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer is associated with younger age at diagnosis, oral sexual behavior as a primary risk factor, nonspecific presentation, and improved treatment response compared with HPV-negative disease. Early recognition and referral for definitive treatment are paramount in decreasing morbidity and mortality, as well as improving the quality of life of these patients. Primary care providers are in an ideal position to improve patient outcomes through early recognition and referral, as well as coordination of comprehensive care of patients with this potentially devastating disease. Awareness of risk factors, a high index of suspicion, counseling patients and parents on the importance of vaccination against HPV, and coordinated care between primary care providers and specialists are vital to achieving improved outcomes for patients with this increasingly prevalent cancer. PMID:26152442

  6. Biopsies

    MedlinePlus

    ... computed tomography (CT) , fluoroscopy , ultrasound , or MRI . A mammography unit is a rectangular box that houses the ... seen. Some lesions, such as clustered calcifications on mammography are not as clearly shown with ultrasound as ...

  7. Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sections of the JAOCD JAOCD Archive Published Members Online Dermatology Journals Edit This Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes ... 2/2017 2017 AOCD Spring Current Concepts in Dermatology Meeting more Latest News ... Surveys About AOCD The AOCD was recognized in ...

  8. Biopsy of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Mansell, Joanne; Willard, Michael D

    2003-09-01

    Gastrointestinal biopsy is a potentially powerful tool, but it is easy to do it incorrectly. If clinicians are careless in performing or submitting biopsies, or if they blindly believe whatever the histopathology report says, they are abdicating their responsibility to the client and patient. Two comments seem most appropriate. First, the goal of endoscopy is not to be able to place the tip of an endoscope in a particular location; rather, the goal of endoscopy is to be able to access a particular location and then take a diagnostic specimen well enough that surgery can be avoided. Second, attention to detail is worth at least as much if not more than technology. PMID:14552163

  9. Liquid biopsy in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Labgaa, Ismail; Villanueva, Augusto

    2015-04-01

    Liver cancer has become the second cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Most patients are still diagnosed at intermediate or advanced stage, where potentially curative treatment options are not recommended. Unlike other solid tumors, there are no validated oncogenic addiction loops and the only systemic agent to improve survival in advanced disease is sorafenib. All phase 3 clinical trials testing molecular therapies after sorafenib have been negative, none of which selected patients based on predictive biomarkers of response. Theoretically, analysis of circulating cancer byproducts (e.g., circulating tumor cells, cell-free nucleic acids), namely "liquid biopsy," could provide easy access to molecular tumor information, improve patients' stratification and allow to assess tumor dynamics over time. Recent technical developments and preliminary data from other malignancies indicate that liquid biopsy might have a role in the future management of cancer patients. PMID:25977189

  10. Will targeting oropharyngeal gonorrhoea delay the further emergence of drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains?

    PubMed

    Lewis, D A

    2015-06-01

    Gonorrhoea is an important sexually transmitted infection associated with serious complications and enhanced HIV transmission. Oropharyngeal infections are often asymptomatic and will only be detected by screening. Gonococcal culture has low sensitivity (<50%) for detecting oropharyngeal gonorrhoea, and, although not yet approved commercially, nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT) are the assay of choice. Screening for oropharyngeal gonorrhoea should be performed in high-risk populations, such as men-who-have-sex-with-men(MSM). NAATs have a poor positive predictive value when used in low-prevalence populations. Gonococci have repeatedly thwarted gonorrhoea control efforts since the first antimicrobial agents were introduced. The oropharyngeal niche provides an enabling environment for horizontal transfer of genetic material from commensal Neisseria and other bacterial species to Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This has been the mechanism responsible for the generation of mosaic penA genes, which are responsible for most of the observed cases of resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESC). As antimicrobial-resistant gonorrhoea is now an urgent public health threat, requiring improved antibiotic stewardship, laboratory-guided recycling of older antibiotics may help reduce ESC use. Future trials of antimicrobial agents for gonorrhoea should be powered to test their efficacy at the oropharynx as this is the anatomical site where treatment failure is most likely to occur. It remains to be determined whether a combination of frequent screening of high-risk individuals and/or laboratory-directed fluoroquinolone therapy of oropharyngeal gonorrhoea will delay the further emergence of drug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae strains. PMID:25911525

  11. Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer Download Printable Version [ ... on the topics below to get started. Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer How is cancer ...

  12. Biopsy of soft-tissue tumors.

    PubMed

    Shives, T C

    1993-04-01

    Biopsy is an integral part of the overall management of patients with soft-tissue sarcoma. The types of biopsy are fine needle, trocar, open incision or en bloc excision. There are advantages and disadvantages of each. Open biopsy requires strict adherence to a number of surgical principles. Proper execution requires determination of appropriate biopsy site, meticulous technique, and close collaboration with an experienced pathologist. Failure to adhere to these principles may result in untoward consequences for patients. PMID:8472430

  13. Transumbilical videolaparoscopic (single site) liver biopsy with laparoscopy equipment

    PubMed Central

    Góis e Cunha, Jorge Ricardo; de Oliveira, Izabele Rabelo; Lima, Milena Passos; Júnior, Antônio Alves

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Liver diseases have a high incidence in the whole world. In order to diagnose, stage and follow these diseases it is often necessary the execution of liver biopsy. There are many possible ways to perform the procedure and the rise of transumbilical endoscopic surgery (TUES) brings to the medical practice an additional good option. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study is prospective, nonrandomised and cohort type. It involves 42 patients who underwent liver biopsy through TUES using conventional video laparoscopic material. RESULTS: Among the patients 18 (42.86%) underwent isolated liver biopsy and 24 (57.14%) to liver biopsy associated with umbilical hernia repair. Within those, 27 (64.28%) were male and 15 (35.71%) female. The average body mass index (BMI) was of 27.26 kg/m2, 10 were in the normal BMI range, 24 (57.14%) were in the overweight range, 6 (14.28%) had class I obesity and 2 (4.76%) had class II obesity. In none of the cases the procedure was converted to regular video laparoscopy, all the patients were discharged in the day after the procedure and reported a satisfactory aesthetic result. CONCLUSIONS: The study shows that liver biopsy using TUES has applicability and good results, including in obese patients that would have a contraindication to other methods. PMID:27073305

  14. 20 CFR 718.106 - Autopsy; biopsy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Autopsy; biopsy. 718.106 Section 718.106... PNEUMOCONIOSIS Criteria for the Development of Medical Evidence § 718.106 Autopsy; biopsy. (a) A report of an autopsy or biopsy submitted in connection with a claim shall include a detailed gross macroscopic...

  15. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 protein is overexpressed in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Koole, Koos; van Kempen, Pauline M W; Swartz, Justin E; Peeters, Ton; van Diest, Paul J; Koole, Ron; van Es, Robert J J; Willems, Stefan M

    2016-02-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is a member of the fibroblast growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase family. It has been identified as a promising therapeutic target in multiple types of cancer. We have investigated FGFR3 protein expression and FGFR3 gene copy-numbers in a single well-documented cohort of oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Tissue microarray sets containing 452 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues were immunohistochemically stained with an anti-FGFR3 antibody and hybridized with a FGFR3 fluorescence in situ hybridization probe. FGFR3 protein expression was correlated with clinicopathological and survival data, which were retrieved from electronic medical records. FGFR3 mRNA data of 522 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) were retrieved from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) protein was overexpressed in 48% (89/185) of oral and 59% (124/211) of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Overexpression of FGFR3 protein was not related to overall survival or disease-free survival in oral (HR[hazard ratio]: 0.94; 95% CI: 0.64-1.39; P = 0.77, HR: 0.94; 95% CI: 0.65-1.36; P = 0.75) and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HR: 1.21; 95% CI: 0.81-1.80; P = 0.36, HR: 0.42; 95% CI: 0.79-1.77; P = 0.42). FGFR3 mRNA was upregulated in 3% (18/522) of HNSCC from the TCGA. The FGFR3 gene was gained in 0.6% (1/179) of oral squamous cell carcinoma but no amplification was found in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. In conclusion, FGFR3 protein is frequently overexpressed in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, it may serve as a potential therapeutic target for FGFR3-directed therapies in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26711175

  16. Endomyocardial biopsy under echocardiographic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Giuseppe; Gambino, Antonio; Bagozzi, Lorenzo; Guariento, Alvise; D'Amico, Gianpiero; Fedrigo, Marny; Gerosa, Gino

    2016-01-01

    Endomyocardial biopsy is a common procedure for monitoring cardiac allograft rejection; several techniques have been described so far, throughout different access sites and under echocardiographic or X-ray control. We describe the routine technique adopted at our centre based on echo-guided puncture of jugular vein and echocardiographic assessment of endomyocardial sampling with direct visualization of the bioptome tip. We also report the most common complications of the procedure, especially concerning the risk of iatrogenic tricuspid regurgitation, and same examples of histopathological findings drawn from our own iconographic collection. PMID:27247327

  17. Origin of Tumor Recurrence After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Raktoe, Sawan A.S.; Dehnad, Homan; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.; Braunius, Weibel; Terhaard, Chris H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To model locoregional recurrences of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) treated with primary intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in order to find the origins from which recurrences grow and relate their location to original target volume borders. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of OSCC treated with primary IMRT between January 2002 and December 2009. Locoregional recurrence volumes were delineated on diagnostic scans and coregistered rigidly with treatment planning computed tomography scans. Each recurrence was analyzed with two methods. First, overlapping volumes of a recurrence and original target were measured ('volumetric approach') and assessed as 'in-field', 'marginal', or 'out-field'. Then, the center of mass (COM) of a recurrence volume was assumed as the origin from where a recurrence expanded, the COM location was compared with original target volume borders and assessed as 'in-field', 'marginal', or 'out-field'. Results: One hundred thirty-one OSCC were assessed. For all patients alive at the end of follow-up, the mean follow-up time was 40 months (range, 12-83 months); 2 patients were lost to follow-up. The locoregional recurrence rate was 27%. Of all recurrences, 51% were local, 23% were regional, and 26% had both local and regional recurrences. Of all recurrences, 74% had imaging available for assessment. Regarding volumetric analysis of local recurrences, 15% were in-field gross tumor volume (GTV), and 65% were in-field clinical tumor volume (CTV). Using the COM approach, we found that 70% of local recurrences were in-field GTV and 90% were in-field CTV. Of the regional recurrences, 25% were volumetrically in-field GTV, and using the COM approach, we found 54% were in-field GTV. The COM of local out-field CTV recurrences were maximally 16 mm outside CTV borders, whereas for regional recurrences, this was 17 mm. Conclusions: The COM model is practical and specific for recurrence assessment. Most

  18. Basics of kidney biopsy: A nephrologist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, S. K.; Sethi, S.; Dinda, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of the kidney biopsy is one of the major events in the history of nephrology. Primary indications of kidney biopsy are glomerular hematuria/proteinuria with or without renal dysfunction and unexplained renal failure. Kidney biopsy is usually performed in prone position but in certain situations, supine and lateral positions may be required. Biopsy needles have changed with times from Vim–Silverman needle to Tru-cut needle to spring-loaded automatic gun. The procedure has also changed from blind bedside kidney biopsy to ultrasound marking to real-time ultrasound guidance to rarely computerized tomography guidance and laparoscopic and open biopsy. In very specific situations, transjugular kidney biopsy may be required. Most of the centers do kidney biopsy on short 1-day admission, whereas some take it as an outdoor procedure. For critical interpretation of kidney biopsy, adequate sample and clinical information are mandatory. Tissue needs to be stained with multiple stains for delineation of various components of kidney tissue. Many consider that electron microscopy (EM) is a must for all kidney biopsies, but facilities for EM are limited even in big centers. Sophisticated tests such as immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization are useful adjuncts for definitive diagnosis in certain situations. PMID:23960337

  19. Prevention and treatment of oropharyngeal mucositis following cancer therapy: are there new approaches?

    PubMed

    Kwong, Karis K F

    2004-01-01

    Oropharyngeal mucositis is an acute and distressing toxic effect of chemotherapy and head and neck irradiation. This oral sequela significantly impairs the daily functioning and quality of life of patients. The biological basis of mucositis is quite complex, involving sequential interaction of chemotherapeutic drugs or irradiation on mitosis of proliferating epithelium, a number of cytokines, and elements of oral microbial environment. Various interventions based on biological attenuation have been tested for mucositis. Such interventions have been reviewed elsewhere; however, most reviews focus on biomedical outcomes. Little attention has been paid to mucositis outcomes with oral morbidity or psychosocial aspects. The purpose of this article is to review the current research studies on the prevention and treatment of oropharyngeal mucositis following chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and bone marrow transplantation with an emphasis on biomedical, oral symptomatic, and functional impairment outcomes. In addition, further avenues of mucositis management, including psychotherapeutic intervention and integrated and stage-based treatment approaches are discussed. PMID:15238805

  20. From HPV-positive towards HPV-driven oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Boscolo-Rizzo, Paolo; Pawlita, Michael; Holzinger, Dana

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of HPV-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), which is both biologically and clinically distinct from tobacco- and alcohol-related OPSCC, is dramatically increasing. The finding that individuals with HPV-positive local/regionally advanced OPSCC have a significantly better prognosis than their negative counterparts have led to efforts to de-escalate treatment in those patients to avoid serious side effects and to improve their long-term quality of life, while maintaining treatment efficacy. Identifying diagnostic tests that are able to distinguish cancers etiologically associated with HPV is thus becoming a pressing challenge for researchers. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the diagnostic tools presently available to evaluate HPV status in patients with OPSCC and, in particular, to discuss their strengths and weaknesses in identifying those infections that are the real driving force in the oropharyngeal carcinogenesis process. PMID:26547133

  1. Oropharyngeal cancer and human papilloma virus: evolving diagnostic and management paradigms.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Lisa; Gupta, Ruta; Ashford, Bruce; Jabbour, Joe; Clark, Jonathan R

    2016-06-01

    The significant increase in human papilloma virus (HPV)-associated oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) over recent years has lead to a surge in research and an improved understanding of the disease. Most patients with HPV-associated OPC present with cystic nodal metastases with a small primary tumour, and respond well to all treatment modalities including primary surgery and primary chemoradiotherapy. Current research is evaluating treatment de-escalation to reduce long-term treatment-associated morbidities. Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) is particularly relevant as the transoral approach allows small primary tumours to be removed with lower morbidity than traditional surgical approaches. The current American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system for oropharyngeal cancer does not appropriately stratify HPV-associated OPC; hence, alternative risk stratification and staging classifications are being proposed. PMID:26687076

  2. Oropharyngeal airway changes after rapid maxillary expansion: the state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Ortu, Eleonora; Giannoni, Mario; Ortu, Maurizio; Gatto, Roberto; Monaco, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to elucidate the state of the art about how rapid maxillary expansion (RME) produces changes in the oropharyngeal airways in terms of CBCT (Cone Beam Computed Tomography) data during the growth period, according to the available literature. Electronic search was done from January 2009 to April 2014 on PubMed and Scopus databases; in addition manual search was conducted as well. According to keywords, seven papers were eligible for our purpose, but definitely five papers were selected in agreement with the inclusion/exclusion criteria. The current literature suggests that the potential relationship between RME and oropharyngeal airway changes is still unclear. In fact, although the pharyngeal airway changes after the rapid palatal expansion are evident clinically, current orthodontic literature does not provide conclusive evidence about the nature of this relationship. PMID:25126159

  3. The Oropharyngeal Morphology in the Semiaquatic Giant Asian Pond Turtle, Heosemys grandis, and Its Evolutionary Implications

    PubMed Central

    Lintner, Monika; Weissenbacher, Anton; Heiss, Egon

    2012-01-01

    The oropharynx as a functional entity plays a fundamental role in feeding. Transitions from aquatic to terrestrial lifestyles in vertebrates demanded major changes of the oropharynx for the required adaptations to a different feeding environment. Extant turtles evolved terrestrial feeding modes in three families (testudinids, emydids, geoemydids)–independently from other amniotes–and are therefore important model organisms to reconstruct morpho-functional changes behind aquatic-terrestrial transitions. In this study we hypothesized that the oropharyngeal morphology in semiaquatic turtles of the geoemydid family shows parallels to testudinids, the only purely terrestrial extant lineage. We provide an in-depth description of the oropharynx in the semiaquatic geoemydid Heosemys grandis by using a combination of micro computed tomography (micro-CT) and subsequent digital in situ 3-D reconstruction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and histology. We show that H. grandis has a large tongue with rough papillose surface and well-developed lingual muscles. The attachment sites of the lingual muscles on the hyolingual skeleton and their courses within the tongue are nearly identical with testudinids. The hyolingual skeleton itself is mainly cartilaginous and shows distinct–but compared to testudinids rather small–anterior extensions of the hyoid body and hypoglossum. Oral glands are well developed in H. grandis but are smaller and simpler than in testudinids. Similarly, oropharyngeal keratinization was minimal and found only in the anterior palate, regions close to the beak, and tongue tip. We conclude that H. grandis shows distinct oropharyngeal morpho-functional adaptations for a terrestrial lifestyle but still retains characters typical for aquatic forms. This makes this species an important example showing the oropharyngeal adaptations behind aquatic-terrestrial transitions in turtles. PMID:23029486

  4. [Oropharyngeal form of the Lasthenie de Ferjol syndrome. Apropos of a case].

    PubMed

    Eisenfiz, M; Chabolle, F; Ferreri, M; Meyer, B; Chouard, C H

    1988-01-01

    The Lasthenie de Ferjol Syndrome associates an iron-deficient anemia by blood auto-spoliation with mental disorders. In this paper, the authors present an oropharyngeal form of this disease. Based on this case review (and those reported in the literature), they remind us this syndrome's mains characteristics, underlying how exceptional and particular this clinical report is. At least they point out how to diagnose, manage, and treat patients with this strange illness. PMID:3260763

  5. Nasopharyngeal versus oropharyngeal sampling for detection of pneumococcal carriage in adults.

    PubMed

    Watt, James P; O'Brien, Katherine L; Katz, Scott; Bronsdon, Melinda A; Elliott, John; Dallas, Jean; Perilla, Mindy J; Reid, Raymond; Murrow, Laurel; Facklam, Richard; Santosham, Mathuram; Whitney, Cynthia G

    2004-11-01

    Several studies have shown that nasopharyngeal sampling is more sensitive than oropharyngeal sampling for the detection of pneumococcal carriage in children. The data for adults are limited and conflicting. This study was part of a larger study of pneumococcal carriage on the Navajo and White Mountain Apache Reservation following a clinical trial of a seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Persons aged 18 years and older living in households with children enrolled in the vaccine trial were eligible. We collected both nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal specimens by passing a flexible calcium alginate wire swab either nasally to the posterior nasopharynx or orally to the posterior oropharynx. Swabs were placed in skim milk-tryptone-glucose-glycerin medium and frozen at -70 degrees C. Pneumococcal isolation was performed by standard techniques. Analyses were based on specimens collected from 1,994 adults living in 1,054 households. Nasopharyngeal specimens (11.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 9.8 and 12.6%) were significantly more likely to grow pneumococci than were oropharyngeal specimens (5.8%; 95% CI, 4.8 to 6.9%) (P < 0.0001). Few persons had pneumococcal growth from both specimens (1.7%). Therefore, both tests together were more likely to identify pneumococcal carriage (15.2%; 95% CI, 13.7 to 16.9%) than either test alone. Although we found that nasopharyngeal sampling was more sensitive than oropharyngeal sampling, nasopharyngeal sampling alone would have underestimated the prevalence of pneumococcal carriage in this adult population. Sampling both sites may give more accurate results than sampling either site alone in studies of pneumococcal carriage in adults. PMID:15528682

  6. Klebsiella pneumoniae Oropharyngeal Carriage in Rural and Urban Vietnam and the Effect of Alcohol Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Dao, Trinh Tuyet; Liebenthal, Dror; Tran, Toan Khanh; Ngoc Thi Vu, Bich; Ngoc Thi Nguyen, Diep; Thi Tran, Huong Kieu; Thi Nguyen, Chuc Kim; Thi Vu, Huong Lan; Fox, Annette; Horby, Peter; Van Nguyen, Kinh; Wertheim, Heiman F. L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Community acquired K. pneumoniae pneumonia is still common in Asia and is reportedly associated with alcohol use. Oropharyngeal carriage of K. pneumoniae could potentially play a role in the pathogenesis of K. pneumoniae pneumonia. However, little is known regarding K. pneumoniae oropharyngeal carriage rates and risk factors. This population-based cross-sectional study explores the association of a variety of demographic and socioeconomic factors, as well as alcohol consumption with oropharyngeal carriage of K. pneumoniae in Vietnam. Methods and Findings 1029 subjects were selected randomly from age, sex, and urban and rural strata. An additional 613 adult men from a rural environment were recruited and analyzed separately to determine the effects of alcohol consumption. Demographic, socioeconomic, and oropharyngeal carriage data was acquired for each subject. The overall carriage rate of K. pneumoniae was 14.1% (145/1029, 95% CI 12.0%–16.2%). By stepwise logistic regression, K. pneumoniae carriage was found to be independently associated with age (OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.02–1.04), smoking (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.3–2.9), rural living location (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.4), and level of weekly alcohol consumption (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.04–2.8). Conclusion Moderate to heavy weekly alcohol consumption, old age, smoking, and living in a rural location are all found to be associated with an increased risk of K. pneumoniae carriage in Vietnamese communities. Whether K. pneumoniae carriage is a risk factor for pneumonia needs to be elucidated. PMID:24667800

  7. Gastric ulcer penetrating to liver diagnosed by endoscopic biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Kayacetin, Ertugrul; Kayacetin, Serra

    2004-01-01

    Liver penetration is a rare but serious complication of peptic ulcer disease. Usually the diagnosis is made by operation or autopsy. Clinical and laboratory data were no specific. A 64-year-old man was admitted with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Hepatic penetration was diagnosed as the cause of bleeding. Endoscopy showed a large gastric ulcer with a pseudotumoral mass protruding from the ulcer bed. Definitive diagnosis was established by endoscopic biopsies of the ulcer base. PMID:15188520

  8. Prognostic significance of NDRG1 expression in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Marcelo; da Cunha Mercante, Ana Maria; Nunes, Fábio Daumas; Leopoldino, Andréia Machado; de Carvalho, Marcos Brasilino; Gazito, Diana; López, Rossana Verónica Mendoza; Chiappini, Paula Blandina Olga; de Carvalho Neto, Paulo Bentes; Fukuyama, Erica Erina; Tajara, Eloiza Helena; Louro, Iúri Drumond; da Silva, Adriana Madeira Álvares

    2012-12-01

    Human N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is a metastasis suppressor gene with several potential functions, including cell differentiation, cell cycle regulation and response to hormones, nickel and stress. The purpose of this study was to investigate the immunoexpression of NDRG1 in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas searching for its role in the clinical course of these tumors. We investigated immunohistochemical expression of NDRG1 protein in 412 tissue microarray cores of tumor samples from 103 patients with oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas and in 110 paraffin-embedded surgical margin sections. The results showed NDRG1 up-regulation in 101/103 (98.1 %) tumor samples, but no expression in any normal tissue sample. Western blot assays confirmed the immunohistochemical findings, suggesting that lower levels of NDRG1 are associated with a high mortality rate. NDRG1 overexpression was related to long-term specific survival (HR = 0.38; p = 0.009), whereas the presence of lymph-node metastasis showed the opposite association with survival (HR = 2.45; p = 0.013). Our findings reinforce the idea that NDRG1 plays a metastasis suppressor role in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas and may be a useful marker for these tumors. PMID:22972152

  9. Oropharyngeal 24-Hour pH Monitoring in Children With Airway-Related Problems

    PubMed Central

    Mesallam, Tamer A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Diagnosis and clinical presentation of pediatric laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is still controversial. The aims of this work were to study the possibility of performing 24-hour oropharyngeal pH monitoring for children in the outpatient clinic setup and to explore the results of this test in correlation to airway-related problems. Methods In this descriptive qualitative study, 26 children suffering from airway-related problems were included. Oropharyngeal 24-hour pH monitoring was performed for all subjects in the outpatient clinic setting. The distribution of airway diagnoses among the study group was studied versus the results of the pH monitoring. Results There were 16 males and 10 females participated in the study with a mean age of 6.88 (SD, ±5.77) years. Thirty-five percent of the patients were under the age of 3 years (range, 11 months to 3 years). Eight-five percent of the patients tolerated the pH probe insertion and completed 24-hour of pH recording. Laryngomalacia and subglottic stenosis (SGS) were more frequently reported in the positive LPR patients (77%). Conclusion Oropharyngeal 24-hour pH monitoring can be conducted for children in the outpatient setup even in young age children below 3 years old. Among the positive LPR group, SGS and laryngomalacia were the most commonly reported airway findings. PMID:27090271

  10. Helicobacter pylori in tonsillar and adenoid tissue and its possible role in oropharyngeal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lukes, P; Astl, J; Pavlík, E; Potuzníková, B; Sterzl, I; Betka, J

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a well-known gastric pathogen. It plays a major role in the pathogenesis of chronic gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcers, adenocarcinoma and gastric lymphoma. HP infection is one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. Recently, the oral cavity was proposed as an extragastric reservoir of HP infection. HP was detected by culture and PCR in both dental plaque and saliva. It is supposed that HP infection can cause the same immunological changes in the oropharyngeal mucosa as in gastric mucosa and can also contribute to the progression of oropharyngeal diseases. HP can induce production of different cytokines and regulatory molecules, which are suggested to play a role in carcinogenesis of the oropharynx. Only a few studies have explored the presence of HP in tonsillar and adenoid tissue, where MALT is present similar to the gastric mucosa. The results of these studies were inconsistent. The question of persistence of HP in tonsillar and adenoid tissue and its role in the pathogenesis of oropharyngeal diseases still remains unclear. In this review, recent findings about oral HP are considered. Possibilities of diagnostics of HP in oral specimens are discussed. PMID:18498719

  11. Comparison between bioluminescence imaging technique and CFU count for the study of oropharyngeal candidiasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Elena; Roselletti, Elena; Luciano, Eugenio; Sabbatini, Samuele; Mosci, Paolo; Pericolini, Eva

    2015-05-01

    We recently described a bioluminescence in vivo imaging technique, representing a powerful tool to test the real-time progression of oropharyngeal candidiasis, hence potentially useful to evaluate the efficacy of antifungal therapies. In this study, the in vivo imaging technique was compared with CFU measurement of target organs (tongue, esophagus and stomach) for monitoring and quantifying oropharyngeal candidiasis. We have correlated these two analytical methods at different times post-infection using engineered, luminescent Candida albicans in mice rendered susceptible to oral candidiasis by cortisone-acetate. Scatter plots, Pearson correlation and Student's t test were used to compare the methods. We observed that the bioluminescence in vivo imaging technique was more reliable than CFU counts in detecting early infection of, and its extent in, the oral cavity of the mouse. This was also evident following the introduction of a variable such as treatment with fluconazole. The results described in this study could validate the bioluminescence in vivo imaging technique as a method to monitor and quantify oropharyngeal candidiasis and to assess early discovery of active compounds in vivo. PMID:25820122

  12. Transoral Surgery or Radiotherapy for Oropharyngeal Carcinoma - Is It Either Or…?

    PubMed

    Evans, M; Jones, T M

    2016-07-01

    The management of oropharyngeal carcinoma represents an increasing clinical challenge, because of its rising incidence, particularly in younger patients as a result of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and because significant technological advances have occurred in radiotherapy and surgery over the last 10 years that have increased treatment options for patients, with little robust evidence yet of their relative merits. As a result, there is a lack of clinical consensus on the optimum treatment modality, reflected in wide variation in practice between different cancer networks across the UK. Here, we consider the evidence base for minimally invasive transoral surgery and for intensity-modulated radiotherapy-based primary treatment for oropharyngeal cancer, in terms of both oncological and functional outcomes. Management strategies for HPV-positive and HPV-negative disease, and for different stages of the disease, are considered. There is currently an unparalleled opportunity to shape the future management of oropharyngeal cancer, which is dependent on recruiting patients to ongoing clinical trials, in order to build an evidence base to support a clinical consensus on the optimal treatment strategies. It appears likely that future evidence-based decision-making will use both primary radiotherapy and primary surgical treatment modalities to maximise patient benefit. PMID:26988463

  13. Imaging guided mediastinal percutaneal core biopsy--technique and complications.

    PubMed

    Azrumelashvili, T; Mizandari, M; Magalashvili, D; Dundua, T

    2015-05-01

    and biopsy procedure success high rate proves the use of IGMPCB as a first choice procedure when the mediastinal mass morphology is needed. PMID:26042444

  14. Percutaneous needle biopsy of the irradiated skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Edeiken, B.; deSantos, L.A.

    1983-03-01

    Percutaneous needle biopsy was performed in 20 patients who had radiologic abnormalities after irradiation of the skeleton. The biopsies were performed to determine the nature of the bone changes and to differentiate radiation necrosis from metastases or local tumor extension. Eleven patients had tumors, two of which were radiation-induced sarcomas; nine patients did not show evidence of tumor. One patient had osteomyelitis rather than the suspected tumor. The value of percutaneous needle biopsy in the postirradiated skeleton is discussed.

  15. Photoacoustic biopsy: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Tomlins, Scott A.; Siddiqui, Javed; Davis, Mandy A.; Kunju, Lakshmi P.; Wei, John T.; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) measurements encode the information associated with both physical microstructures and chemical contents in biological tissues. A two-dimensional physio-chemical spectrogram (PCS) can be formulated by combining the power spectra of PA signals acquired at a series of optical wavelengths. The analysis of PCS, or namely PA physio-chemical analysis (PAPCA), enables the quantification of the concentrations and the spatial distributions of a variety of chemical components in the tissue. The chemical components and their distribution are the two major features observed in the biopsy procedures which have been regarded as the gold standard of the diagnosis of many diseases. Taking non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and prostate cancer for example, this study investigates the feasibility of PAPCA in characterizing the histopathological changes in the diseased conditions in biological tissue. A catheter based setup facilitating measurement in deep tissues was also proposed and tested.

  16. Prostate biopsy tracking with deformation estimation.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Michael; Mozer, Pierre; Daanen, Vincent; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2012-04-01

    Transrectal biopsies under 2D ultrasound (US) control are the current clinical standard for prostate cancer diagnosis. The isoechogenic nature of prostate carcinoma makes it necessary to sample the gland systematically, resulting in a low sensitivity. Also, it is difficult for the clinician to follow the sampling protocol accurately under 2D US control and the exact anatomical location of the biopsy cores is unknown after the intervention. Tracking systems for prostate biopsies make it possible to generate biopsy distribution maps for intra- and post-interventional quality control and 3D visualisation of histological results for diagnosis and treatment planning. They can also guide the clinician toward non-ultrasound targets. In this paper, a volume-swept 3D US based tracking system for fast and accurate estimation of prostate tissue motion is proposed. The entirely image-based system solves the patient motion problem with an a priori model of rectal probe kinematics. Prostate deformations are estimated with elastic registration to maximize accuracy. The system is robust with only 17 registration failures out of 786 (2%) biopsy volumes acquired from 47 patients during biopsy sessions. Accuracy was evaluated to 0.76±0.52 mm using manually segmented fiducials on 687 registered volumes stemming from 40 patients. A clinical protocol for assisted biopsy acquisition was designed and implemented as a biopsy assistance system, which allows to overcome the draw-backs of the standard biopsy procedure. PMID:21705263

  17. Adequate histologic sectioning of prostate needle biopsies.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, David G; Kahane, Hillel

    2013-08-01

    No standard method exists for sampling prostate needle biopsies, although most reports claim to embed 3 cores per block and obtain 3 slices from each block. This study was undertaken to determine the extent of histologic sectioning necessary for optimal examination of prostate biopsies. We prospectively compared the impact on cancer yield of submitting 1 biopsy core per cassette (biopsies from January 2010) with 3 cores per cassette (biopsies from August 2010) from a large national reference laboratory. Between 6 and 12 slices were obtained with the former 1-core method, resulting in 3 to 6 slices being placed on each of 2 slides; for the latter 3-core method, a limit of 6 slices was obtained, resulting in 3 slices being place on each of 2 slides. A total of 6708 sets of 12 to 18 core biopsies were studied, including 3509 biopsy sets from the 1-biopsy-core-per-cassette group (January 2010) and 3199 biopsy sets from the 3-biopsy-cores-percassette group (August 2010). The yield of diagnoses was classified as benign, atypical small acinar proliferation, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and cancer and was similar with the 2 methods: 46.2%, 8.2%, 4.5%, and 41.1% and 46.7%, 6.3%, 4.4%, and 42.6%, respectively (P = .02). Submission of 1 core or 3 cores per cassette had no effect on the yield of atypical small acinar proliferation, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, or cancer in prostate needle biopsies. Consequently, we recommend submission of 3 cores per cassette to minimize labor and cost of processing. PMID:23764163

  18. For Women Facing a Breast Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Live Chat 800-227-2345 Home Learn About Cancer Stay Healthy Find Support & Treatment Explore Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Find Support & Treatment » Understanding Your Diagnosis » Exams and Test Descriptions » For Women Facing a Breast Biopsy » For Women Facing a Breast Biopsy Share ...

  19. Core needle biopsy guidance based on EMOCT imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Park, Jesung; Maguluri, Gopi

    2016-03-01

    We present a novel method, based on encoder mapping OCT imaging, for real-time guidance of core biopsy procedures. This method provides real-time feedback to the interventional radiologist, such that he/she can reorient the needle during the biopsy and sample the most representative area of the suspicious mass that is being investigated. This aspect is very important for tailoring therapy to the specific cancer based on biomarker analysis, which will become one of the next big advances in our search for the optimal cancer therapy. To enable individualized treatment, the genetic constitution and the DNA repair status in the affected areas is needed for each patient. Thus, representative sampling of the tumor is needed for analyzing various biomarkers, which are used as a tool to personalize cancer therapy. The encoder-based OCT enables samping of large size masses and provides full control on the imaging probe, which is passed through the bore of the biopsy guidance needle. The OCT image is built gradually, based on the feedback of an optical encoder which senses the incremental movement of the needle with a few microns resolution. Tissue mapping is independent of the needle speed, while it is advanced through the tissue. The OCT frame is analyzed in real-time and tissue cellularity is reported in a very simple manner (pie chart). Our preliminary study on a rabbit model of cancer has demonstrated the capability of this technology for accurately differentiating between viable cancer and heterogeneous or necrotic tissue.

  20. Peroral small-intestinal biopsy: experience with the hydraulic multiple biopsy instrument in routine clinical practice.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, B B; Losowsky, M S

    1976-01-01

    Experience of the peroral, hydraulic, multiple, small-bowel biopsy instrument is recorded and compared with reported experience of other peroral biopsy instruments. It is concluded that, in routine clinical practice, there is no particular danger associated with this instrument despite warnings to the contrary. Furthermore, biopsies are obtained at least as quickly as with other instruments and with great reliability. Since this instrument also enables multiple, precisely located biopsies to be taken from various levels of the small intestine, it could be considered the instrument of choice for peroral jejunal biopsy. PMID:1086269

  1. Core biopsy as a simple and effective diagnostic tool in head and neck focal myositis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chun Yee; Chong, Sheldon; Shaw, Chi-Kee Leslie

    2015-12-01

    Most unilateral head and neck masses are benign, although malignancy is a possibility in some cases. However, there are other rare causes of unilateral neck masses, such as focal myositis, which is a rare, benign condition belonging to the family of inflammatory pseudotumors of the skeletal muscles, with rare presentations in the head and neck region. Focal myositis presents as a rapidly enlarging neck mass that can be misdiagnosed by fine-needle aspiration biopsy and/or radiologic imaging as either an infective or a neoplastic process. To date, there are only 5 reported cases of adult focal myositis of the sternocleidomastoid muscle in the medical literature. In this article, the authors present 2 cases involving patients with focal myositis of the sternocleidomastoid muscle that were successfully diagnosed with core-needle biopsy and managed conservatively. The pros and cons of fine-needle aspiration biopsy and core-needle biopsy are discussed. Based on the authors' results, fine-needle aspiration biopsy universally fails to provide the diagnosis of focal myositis. In contrast, core-needle biopsy successfully diagnosed focal myositis in both of our patients. Both of them had complete resolution with conservative management. PMID:26670758

  2. 21 CFR 876.1075 - Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument. 876... Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument. (a) Identification. A gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument is a... generic type of device includes the biopsy punch, gastrointestinal mechanical biopsy instrument,...

  3. Infrahyoid flap in oropharyngeal reconstruction following carcinoma resection: A study of 6 patients and literature review

    PubMed Central

    INFANTE-COSSIO, PEDRO; GONZALEZ-CARDERO, EDUARDO; LOPEZ-MARTOS, RICARDO; NUÑEZ-VERA, VICTORIA; OLMOS-JUAREZ, ERIKA; RUIZ-MOYA, ALEJANDRO; HARO-LUNA, JUAN-JOSE; TORRES-CARRRANZA, EUSEBIO

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to describe the techniques used and the results obtained with the infrahyoid flap for the reconstruction of medium-sized oropharyngeal defects following resection for advanced squamous cell cancer. During a period of 1 year, six patients with oropharyngeal defects were reconstructed using the infrahyoid flap. The tumor characteristics, location and size of the defect, resective and reconstructive techniques employed and the complications and outcomes of the speech and swallowing functions, as identified in the follow-up visits every 3 months, were evaluated. All flaps were performed simultaneously in association with tumoral excision and ipsilateral supraomohyoid neck dissection. The mean size of the skin paddle was 7.0×3.5 cm. The donor site was primarily sutured. The postoperative course was uneventful and all flaps were viable. One case of marginal skin paddle loss occurred without affecting the survival of the flap. Five patients received postoperative radiotherapy and one patient received concurrent postoperative chemotherapy. During the follow-up period (mean, 63 months), all patients showed excellent oral swallowing. Speech was excellent in five patients and in one patient speech was classified as good. The aesthetic results of the cervical donor site were good. Based on the present case report and the literature review, the infrahyoid flap is a simple and safe procedure for the reconstruction of the oropharynx, with a high success rate, minimal donor site morbidity and good aesthetic and functional results. The infrahyoid flap is a valid surgical option that may be considered in selected oncological patients undergoing reconstruction of medium-size oropharyngeal defects. PMID:27123141

  4. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy With Helical Tomotherapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Preliminary Result

    SciTech Connect

    Shueng, Pei-Wei; Wu, Le-Jung; Chen, Shiou-Yi

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To review the experience with and evaluate the treatment plan for helical tomotherapy for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between November 1, 2006 and January 31, 2009, 10 histologically confirmed oropharyngeal cancer patients were enrolled. All patients received definitive concurrent chemoradiation with helical tomotherapy. The prescription dose to the gross tumor planning target volume, the high-risk subclinical area, and the low-risk subclinical area was 70Gy, 63Gy, and 56Gy, respectively. During radiotherapy, all patients were treated with cisplatin, 30mg/m{sup 2}, plus 5-fluorouracil (425mg/m{sup 2})/leucovorin (30mg/m{sup 2}) intravenously weekly. Toxicity of treatment was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Several parameters, including maximal or median dose to critical organs, uniformity index, and conformal index, were evaluated from dose-volume histograms. Results: The mean survival was 18 months (range, 7-22 months). The actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, locoregional control, and distant metastasis-free rates at 18 months were 67%, 70%, 80%, and 100%, respectively. The average for uniformity index and conformal index was 1.05 and 1.26, respectively. The mean of median dose for right side and left side parotid glands was 23.5 and 23.9Gy, respectively. No Grade 3 toxicity for dermatitis and body weight loss and only one instance of Grade 3 mucositis were noted. Conclusion: Helical tomotherapy achieved encouraging clinical outcomes in patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma. Treatment toxicity was acceptable, even in the setting of concurrent chemotherapy. Long-term follow-up is needed to confirm these preliminary findings.

  5. Risk Factors and Dose-Effect Relationship for Mandibular Osteoradionecrosis in Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ik Jae; Koom, Woong Sub; Lee, Chang Geol; Kim, Yong Bae; Yoo, Sei Whan; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Gwi Eon; Choi, Eun Chang; Cha, In Ho

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze risk factors and the dose-effect relationship for osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the mandible after radiotherapy of oral and oropharyngeal cancers. Materials and Methods: One-hundred ninety-eight patients with oral (45%) and oropharyngeal cancer (55%) who had received external radiotherapy between 1990 and 2000 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had a dental evaluation before radiotherapy. The median radiation dose was 60 Gy (range, 16-75 Gy), and the median biologically effective dose for late effects (BED{sub late}) in bone was 114 Gy{sub 2} (range, 30-167 Gy{sub 2}). Results: The frequency of ORN was 13 patients (6.6%). Among patients with mandibular surgery, eight had ORN at the surgical site. Among patients without mandibular surgery, five patients had ORN on the molar area of the mandible. The median time to ORN was 22 months (range, 1-69 months). Univariate analysis revealed that mandibular surgery and Co-60 were significant risk factors for ORN (p = 0.01 and 0.04, respectively). In multivariate analysis, mandibular surgery was the most important factor (p = 0.001). High radiation doses over BED 102.6 Gy{sub 2} (conventional dose of 54 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction) were also a significant factor for ORN (p = 0.008) and showed a positive dose-effect relationship in logistic regression (p = 0.04) for patients who had undergone mandibular surgery. Conclusions: Mandibular surgery was the most significant risk factor for ORN of mandible in oral and oropharyngeal cancers patients. A BED of 102.6 Gy{sub 2} or higher to the mandible also significantly increases the risk of ORN.

  6. Dose Uncertainties in IMPT for Oropharyngeal Cancer in the Presence of Anatomical, Range, and Setup Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Kraan, Aafke C.; Water, Steven van de; Teguh, David N.; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Madden, Tom; Kooy, Hanne M.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Setup, range, and anatomical uncertainties influence the dose delivered with intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT), but clinical quantification of these errors for oropharyngeal cancer is lacking. We quantified these factors and investigated treatment fidelity, that is, robustness, as influenced by adaptive planning and by applying more beam directions. Methods and Materials: We used an in-house treatment planning system with multicriteria optimization of pencil beam energies, directions, and weights to create treatment plans for 3-, 5-, and 7-beam directions for 10 oropharyngeal cancer patients. The dose prescription was a simultaneously integrated boost scheme, prescribing 66 Gy to primary tumor and positive neck levels (clinical target volume-66 Gy; CTV-66 Gy) and 54 Gy to elective neck levels (CTV-54 Gy). Doses were recalculated in 3700 simulations of setup, range, and anatomical uncertainties. Repeat computed tomography (CT) scans were used to evaluate an adaptive planning strategy using nonrigid registration for dose accumulation. Results: For the recalculated 3-beam plans including all treatment uncertainty sources, only 69% (CTV-66 Gy) and 88% (CTV-54 Gy) of the simulations had a dose received by 98% of the target volume (D98%) >95% of the prescription dose. Doses to organs at risk (OARs) showed considerable spread around planned values. Causes for major deviations were mixed. Adaptive planning based on repeat imaging positively affected dose delivery accuracy: in the presence of the other errors, percentages of treatments with D98% >95% increased to 96% (CTV-66 Gy) and 100% (CTV-54 Gy). Plans with more beam directions were not more robust. Conclusions: For oropharyngeal cancer patients, treatment uncertainties can result in significant differences between planned and delivered IMPT doses. Given the mixed causes for major deviations, we advise repeat diagnostic CT scans during treatment, recalculation of the dose, and if required, adaptive

  7. Incidence, Trends and Ethnic Differences of Oropharyngeal, Anal and Cervical Cancers: Singapore, 1968-2012

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Jennifer O.; Lim, Wei-Yen; Chow, Khuan-Yew; D’Souza, Gypsyamber

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, several Western countries have reported an increase in oropharyngeal and anal cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Trends in HPV-associated cancers in Asia have not been as well described. We describe the epidemiology of potentially HPV-related cancers reported to the Singapore Cancer Registry from 1968–2012. Analysis included 998 oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), 183 anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) and 8,019 invasive cervical cancer (ICC) cases. Additionally, 368 anal non-squamous cell carcinoma (ANSCC) and 2,018 non-oropharyngeal head and neck carcinoma (non-OP HNC) cases were included as comparators. Age-standardized incidence rates (ASR) were determined by gender and ethnicity (Chinese, Malay and Indian). Joinpoint regression was used to evaluate annual percentage change (APC) in incidence. OPSCC incidence increased in both genders (men 1993–2012, APC = 1.9%, p<0.001; women 1968–2012, APC = 2.0%, p = 0.01) and was 5 times higher in men than women. In contrast, non-OP HNC incidence declined between 1968–2012 among men (APC = -1.6%, p<0.001) and women (APC = -0.4%, p = 0.06). ASCC and ANSCC were rare (ASR = 0.2 and 0.7 per 100,000 person-years, respectively) and did not change significantly over time except for increasing ANSCCs in men (APC = 2.8%, p<0.001). ICC was the most common HPV-associated cancer (ASR = 19.9 per 100,000 person-years) but declined significantly between 1968–2012 (APC = -2.4%). Incidence of each cancer varied across ethnicities. Similar to trends in Western countries, OPSCC incidence increased in recent years, while non-OP HNC decreased. ICC remains the most common HPV-related cancer in Singapore, but Pap screening programs have led to consistently decreasing incidence. PMID:26720001

  8. Species distribution & antifungal susceptibility pattern of oropharyngeal Candida isolates from human immunodeficiency virus infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Das, Partha Pratim; Saikia, Lahari; Nath, Reema; Phukan, Sanjib Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The changing spectrum of Candida species in causation of oropharyngeal candidiasis and their antifungal susceptibility pattern among the HIV infected individuals has made the identification to species level mandatory and detection of drug resistance necessary for patient care. The present study was carried out to determine the species distribution and antifungal susceptibility profile of oral Candida isolates colonizing or infecting both HIV seropositive and seronegative individuals. Methods: A case-control study was conducted including 141 consecutive, non-repeat HIV-seropositive individuals and an equal number of sex and age matched HIV-seronegative control. Speciation of the oropharyngeal Candida isolates was done using standard yeast identification protocol. Antifungal susceptibility testing was done by the disk-diffusion method as well as by Fungitest method. Results: From the 59 culture positive HIV seropositive cases, 61 Candida isolates were recovered; Candida albicans (n=47, 77.0%), C. dubliniensis (n=9, 14.7%), C. parapsilosis (n=2, 3.2%), C. glabrata (n=2, 3.2%), and C. famata (n=1, 1.6%). Candida colonization in HIV-seropositive individuals was significantly higher than that of HIV-seronegative (control) group. Antifungal susceptibility testing revealed (n=6, 9.3%) C. albicans isolates resistant to voriconazole and fluconazole by disk-diffusion method whereas no resistance was seen by Fungitest method. Interpretation & conclusions: C. albicans was the commonest Candida species infecting or colonizing HIV seropositive individuals. Oropharyngeal Candida isolates had high level susceptibility to all the major antifungals commonly in use. Increased level of immunosuppression in HIV-seropositives and drug resistance of non-albicans Candida species makes identification and susceptibility testing of Candida species necessary in different geographical areas of the country. PMID:27377507

  9. Transoral Laser Microsurgery (TLM) ± Adjuvant Therapy for Advanced Stage Oropharyngeal Cancer: Outcomes and Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Jason T.; Milov, Simon; Lewis, James S.; Thorstad, Wade L.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Haughey, Bruce H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Document survival, prognostic variables, and functional outcomes of patients with AJCC stage III or IV oropharyngeal cancer, treated with transoral laser microsurgery (TLM) ± adjuvant therapy. Study Design Analysis of prospectively assembled data pertaining to the above-described patient cohort. Methods Patients treated with TLM for AJCC stage III or IV oropharyngeal cancer at Washington University School of Medicine from 1996 to 2006 were followed for a minimum of 2 years. Recurrence, survival, functional, and human papilloma virus data were analyzed. Results Eighty-four patients met inclusion criteria. Mean follow-up was 52.6 months. Overall AJCC stages were: III 15% and IV 85%. T stages were T1–2, 74%; T3–4, 26%. Eighty-three patients underwent neck dissection, 50 received adjuvant radiotherapy, and 28 received adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Overall survival at 2 and 5 years was 94% and 88%, respectively. Disease-specific survival at 2 and 5 years was 96% and 92%, respectively. Six patients recurred (7%): locally (one), regionally (four), and distant (five). T stage, positive margins, and p16 status significantly impacted survival. The addition of adjuvant chemo-therapy in high-risk patients did not significantly impact survival. Five patients (6%) had major surgical complications, but without mortality. Eighty-one percent of patients had acceptable swallowing function at last follow-up. Immediately postoperatively, 17% required G-tubes, which dropped to 3.4% of living patients at 3 years. Conclusions In this population, our findings validate TLM ± adjuvant therapy as a highly effective strategy for survival, locoregional control, and swallowing recovery in AJCC stage III and IV oropharyngeal cancer. Our finding also show that p16 positivity improves survival. PMID:19572271

  10. Active Tobacco Smoking and Distant Metastasis in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Sean M.; Ali, Nawal N.; Margalit, Danielle N.; Chan, Annie W.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Distant metastasis is the site of first relapse in approximately one-third of patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma, irrespective of human papillomavirus status. Yet the risk factors associated with distant metastasis are not well characterized. We sought to characterize the relationship between smoking status and distant metastasis. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the association between tobacco smoking status and distant metastasis in a retrospective cohort study of 132 patients who underwent definitive radiation therapy and chemotherapy for Stage III-IVA/B oropharyngeal cancer. Information on tobacco smoking was prospectively collected by patient questionnaires and physician notes at the time of diagnosis. Thirty-three percent of the patients were nonsmokers, 51% were former smokers, 16% were active smokers. The cumulative lifetime tobacco smoking in pack-years was 20 (range, 0-150). Results: With a median follow-up time of 52 months, the overall rate of distant metastasis at 4 years was 8%. Distant metastasis was the most common first site of relapse, occurring in 56% of the patients with recurrences. Active smokers had higher rates of distant metastasis than non-active smokers (including never- and former smokers; 31% vs. 4%, p < 0.001) and former smokers (31% vs. 3%, p < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in the risk of distant metastasis for patients with lifetime cumulative pack-years >20 and {<=}20 (10% vs. 4%, p = 0.19). In univariate analysis, active smoking (p = 0.0004) and N category (p = 0.009) were predictive of increased risk of distant metastasis. In multivariate analysis, active smoking was the most significant predictive factor for increased risk of distant metastasis (hazard ratio, 12.7, p < 0.0001). Conclusions: This study identified a strong association between active smoking and distant metastasis in patients with oropharyngeal cancer.