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Sample records for orotic aciduria reveals

  1. Hereditary orotic aciduria with epilepsy and without megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Grohmann, Karina; Lauffer, Heinz; Lauenstein, Peter; Hoffmann, Georg F; Seidlitz, Günter

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary orotic aciduria is a rare metabolic disease that results from a defect of uridine-5-monophosphate synthase (UMPS). In affected patients, main clinical symptoms are a markedly increased urinary excretion of orotic acid combined with megaloblastic anemia. This report describes a new case of UMPS deficiency without megaloblastic anemia but with epilepsy. PMID:25757096

  2. Sensitive and Selective Determination of Orotic Acid in Biological Specimens Using a Novel Fluorogenic Reaction.

    PubMed

    Yin, Sheng; Dragusha, Shpend; Ejupi, Valon; Shibata, Takayuki; Kabashima, Tsutomu; Kai, Masaaki

    2015-07-01

    Orotic acid is an intermediate in the synthesis pathway of uridine-5'-monophosphate, and increases in body fluids of patients suffering from hereditary disorders such as orotic aciduria and hyperammonemia. In this study, we developed a spectrofluorometric method with or without high-performance liquid chromatography for the selective and sensitive quantification of orotic acid in human biological specimens, using 4-trifluoromethylbenzamidoxime (4-TFMBAO) as a fluorogenic reagent. This reagent provided intensive fluorescence for only orotic acid amongst 62 compounds including structurally related bio-substances such as nucleic acid bases, nucleosides, nucleotides, amino acids, vitamins, bilirubin, uric acid, urea, creatine, creatinine and sugars. Under optimized reaction conditions, orotic acid was reacted with 4-TFMBAO, K3[Fe(CN)6] and K2CO3 in an aqueous solution. The fluorescence produced from the orotic acid derivative was measured at an excitation of 340 nm and an emission of 460 nm. A concentration of 1.2 μM orotic acid per 1.0 mM creatinine in normal urine and 0.64 nmol orotic acid per 5.0 × 10(5) HeLa cells were determined by this method. The present method permitted the facile quantification of orotic acid in healthy human urine and cultured HeLa cells by spectrofluorometry and/or high-performance liquid chromatography. PMID:26026930

  3. Cytosinium orotate dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Portalone, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    The title compound, C4H6N3O(+)·C5H3N2O4(-)·2H2O or Cyt(+)·Or(-)·2H2O, was synthesized by a reaction between cytosine (4-amino-2-hy-droxy-pyrimidine, Cyt) and orotic acid (2,4-dihy-droxy-6-carb-oxy-pyrimidine, Or) in aqueous solution. The two ions are joined by two N(+)-H⋯O(-) (±)-(CAHB) hydrogen bonds, forming a dimer with graph-set motif R2(2)(8). In the crystal, the ion pairs of the asymmetric unit are joined by four N-H⋯O inter-actions to adjacent dimers, forming hydrogen-bonded rings with R2(2)(8) graph-set motif in a two-dimensional network. The formation of the three-dimensional array is facilitated by water mol-ecules, which act as bridges between structural sub-units linked in R3(2)(8) and R3(2)(7) hydrogen-bonded rings. The orotate anion is essentially planar, as the dihedral angle between the planes defined by the carboxylate group and the uracil fragment is 4.0 (4)°. PMID:23476396

  4. Development of an assay to simultaneously measure orotic acid, amino acids, and acylcarnitines in dried blood spots

    PubMed Central

    Held, Patrice K.; Haynes, Christopher A.; De Jesús, Víctor R.; Baker, Mei W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Orotic aciduria in the presence of hyperammonemia is a key indicator for a defect in the urea cycle, specifically ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency. Current newborn screening (NBS) protocols can detect several defects of the urea cycle, but screening for OTC deficiency remains a challenge due to the lack of a suitable assay. The purpose of this study was to develop a high-throughput assay to measure orotic acid in dried blood spot (DBS) specimens as an indicator for urea cycle dysfunction, which can be readily incorporated into routine NBS. Methods Orotic acid was extracted from DBS punches and analyzed using flow-injection analysis tandem mass spectrometry (FIA–MS/MS) with negative-mode ionization, requiring <2 min/sample run time. This method was then multiplexed into a conventional newborn screening assay for analysis of amino acids, acylcarnitines, and orotic acid. Results We describe 2 assays which can quantify orotic acid in DBS: a stand-alone method and a combined method for analysis of orotic acid, amino acids, and acylcarnitines. Both methods demonstrated orotic acid recovery of 75–85% at multiple levels of enrichment. Precision was also comparable to traditional FIA–MS/MS methods. Analysis of residual presumptively normal NBS specimens demonstrated a 5:1 signal to noise ratio and the average concentration of orotic acid was approximately 1.2 μmol/l. The concentration of amino acids and acylcarnitines as measured by the combined method showed no significant differences when compared to the conventional newborn screening assay. In addition, retrospective analysis of confirmed patients and presumptively normal newborn screening specimens suggests potential for the methods to identify patients with OTC deficiency, as well as other urea cycle defects. Conclusion The assays described here quantify orotic acid in DBS using a simple extraction and FIA–MS/MS analysis procedures that can be implemented into current NBS protocols. PMID

  5. Genetics Home Reference: 2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Climb National Information Centre for Metabolic Diseases (UK) Organic Acidemia Association: D-2 Hydroxyglutaric Aciduria Organic Acidemia Association: L-2 Hydroxyglutaric Aciduria Resource List ...

  6. Milder clinical course of Type IV 3-methylglutaconic aciduria due to a novel mutation in TMEM70.

    PubMed

    Shchelochkov, Oleg A; Li, Fang-Yuan; Wang, Jing; Zhan, Hongli; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Jefferies, John Lynn; Wong, Lee-Jun; Scaglia, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are a large and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders posing a significant diagnostic challenge. Only approximately 10-20% of patients have identifiable alterations in their mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The remaining ~80-90% of affected patients likely harbor mutations in nuclear genes, most of which are still poorly characterized, and therefore not amenable to efficient screening using currently available molecular methods. Here we present a patient, who has been followed since birth after presenting with neonatal hyperammonemia, lactic acidosis, Reye-like syndrome episodes, and ventricular tachyarrhythmia. Initial biochemical work-up revealed hyperalaninemia, normal plasma glutamine, mild orotic aciduria and significant amounts of urinary 3-methylglutaconic (3-MGC) and 3-methylglutaric (3-MGA) acids. Muscle biopsy demonstrated the presence of ragged-red fibers and non-specific structural abnormalities of mitochondria. The activities of respiratory chain enzymes (complexes I-IV) showed no deficiency. Mutational analysis of the entire mitochondrial genome did not reveal deleterious point mutations or large deletions. Long-term follow-up was significant for a later-onset hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, muscle weakness, and exercise intolerance. Although she had frequent episodes of Reye-like episodes in infancy and early childhood, mostly triggered by illnesses, these symptoms improved significantly with the onset of puberty. In the light of recent reports linking cases of type IV 3-methylglutaconic aciduria (3-MGCA) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to mutations in TMEM70, we proceeded with sequencing analysis of this gene. We identified one previously reported splice site mutation, c.317-2A>G and a novel mutation c.494G>A (p.G165D) in an evolutionarily conserved region predicted to be deleterious. This variant was not identified in 100 chromosomes of healthy control subjects and 200 chromosomes of patients with cardiomyopathies. Western

  7. Lithium orotate, carbonate and chloride: pharmacokinetics, polyuria in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D F

    1976-01-01

    1 The pharmacokinetics of the lithium ion administered as lithium orotate were studied in rats. Parallel studies were carried out with lithium carbonate and lithium chloride. 2 No differences in the uptake, distribution and excretion of the lithium ion were observed between lithium orotate, lithium carbonate and lithium chloride after single intraperitoneal, subcutaneous or intragastric injections (0.5-1.0 mEq lithium/kg) or after administration of the lithium salts for 20 days in the food. 3 The findings oppose the notion that the pharmacokinetics of the lithium ion given as lithium orotate differ from lithium chloride or lithium carbonate. 4 Polyuria and polydipsia developed more slowly in rats given lithium orotate than in those given lithium carbonate or lithium chloride, perhaps due to an effect of the orotate anion. PMID:1260219

  8. Production of orotic acid by a Klura3Δ mutant of Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Nuno; Coelho, Eduardo; Gales, Luís; Costa, Vítor; Teixeira, José António; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrated that a Klura3Δ, mutant of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis is able to produce and secrete into the growth medium considerable amounts of orotic acid. Using yeast extract-peptone-glucose (YPD) based media we optimized production conditions in flask and bioreactor cultures. With cells grown in YPD 5% glucose medium, the best production in flask was obtained with a 1:12.5 ratio for flask: culture volume, 180 rpm, 28°C and 200 mM MOPS for pH stabilization at neutral values (initial culture pH at 8.0). The best production in a 2 L bioreactor was achieved at 500 rpm with 1 vvm aeration, 28°C and pH 7.0. Under these optimum conditions, similar rates of orotic acid production were obtained and maximum concentration achieved after 96 h was 6.7 g/L in flask and bioreactor cultures. These results revealed an excellent reproducibility between both systems and provided evidence for the biotechnological potential of Klura3Δ strain to produce orotic acid since the amounts obtained are comparable to the production in flask using a similar mutant of the industrially valuable Corynebacterium glutamicum. PMID:26707627

  9. The 3-methylglutaconic acidurias: what's new?

    PubMed

    Wortmann, Saskia B; Kluijtmans, Leo A; Engelke, Udo F H; Wevers, Ron A; Morava, Eva

    2012-01-01

    The heterogeneous group of 3-methylglutaconic aciduria (3-MGA-uria) syndromes includes several inborn errors of metabolism biochemically characterized by increased urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid. Five distinct types have been recognized: 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type I is an inborn error of leucine catabolism; the additional four types all affect mitochondrial function through different pathomechanisms. We provide an overview of the expanding clinical spectrum of the 3-MGA-uria types and provide the newest insights into the underlying pathomechanisms. A diagnostic approach to the patient with 3-MGA-uria is presented, and we search for the connection between urinary 3-MGA excretion and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:20882351

  10. Accumulation of Pyrimidine Intermediate Orotate Decreases Virulence Factor Production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Niazy, Abdurahman; Hughes, Lee E

    2015-08-01

    The impact of orotate accumulation in the medically important bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa was studied by deleting pyrE, the gene encoding orotate phosphoribosyltransferase and responsible for converting orotate into orotate monophosphate within the de novo pyrimidine synthesis pathway. The pyrE mutant accumulated orotate and exhibited decreased production of hemolysin, casein protease, and elastase. Feeding orotate at a concentration of 51.25 μM to the wild type, PAO1, likewise decreased production of these factors except for hemolysin, which was not affected. A significant increase in the pigments pyocyanin and pyoverdin was also observed. Pyocyanin increase in the pyrE mutant was heightened when the mutant was supplemented with orotate. Although pyoverdin production in the wild-type PAO1 was unaffected by orotate supplementation, a decrease in the mutant's production was observed when supplemented with orotate. These results indicate a significant reduction in virulence factor production in the pyrE mutant and reduction in some virulence factors in the wild type when supplemented with orotate. PMID:25917504

  11. Behr's syndrome and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria.

    PubMed

    Sheffer, R N; Zlotogora, J; Elpeleg, O N; Raz, J; Ben-Ezra, D

    1992-10-15

    We examined three patients from two families of Jewish-Iraqi origin who had progressive reduction of visual acuity and childhood onset of bilateral optic nerve atrophy without additional retinal abnormalities. They had neurologic symptoms compatible with Behr's syndrome. Neurologic signs included increased tendon reflexes, a positive Babinski sign, progressive spastic paraplegia, dysarthria, head nodding, and horizontal nystagmus. Neurologic involvement varied between affected siblings. The patients excreted excessive amounts of 3-methylglutaconic acid and 3-methylglutaric acid in their urine. We compared the characteristic ophthalmic features and the spectrum of neurologic signs encountered in this recently delineated autosomal recessive clinical entity with those of previously described entities associated with 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Patients with early-onset optic atrophy should be examined for neurologic signs and screened for organic aciduria. A detailed ophthalmic examination is important in patients with neurologic abnormalities compatible with Behr's syndrome. PMID:1384336

  12. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum orotate phosphoribosyltransferase with autologous inhibitory protein–protein interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Shiva; Krishnamoorthy, Kalyanaraman; Mudeppa, Devaraja G.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.

    2015-04-21

    P. falciparum orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, a potential target for antimalarial drugs and a conduit for prodrugs, crystallized as a structure with eight molecules per asymmetric unit that included some unique parasite-specific auto-inhibitory interactions between catalytic dimers. The most severe form of malaria is caused by the obligate parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRTase) is the fifth enzyme in the de novo pyrimidine-synthesis pathway in the parasite, which lacks salvage pathways. Among all of the malaria de novo pyrimidine-biosynthesis enzymes, the structure of P. falciparum OPRTase (PfOPRTase) was the only one unavailable until now. PfOPRTase that could be crystallized was obtained after some low-complexity sequences were removed. Four catalytic dimers were seen in the asymmetic unit (a total of eight polypeptides). In addition to revealing unique amino acids in the PfOPRTase active sites, asymmetric dimers in the larger structure pointed to novel parasite-specific protein–protein interactions that occlude the catalytic active sites. The latter could potentially modulate PfOPRTase activity in parasites and possibly provide new insights for blocking PfOPRTase functions.

  13. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum orotate phosphoribosyltransferase with autologous inhibitory protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shiva; Krishnamoorthy, Kalyanaraman; Mudeppa, Devaraja G.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.

    2015-01-01

    The most severe form of malaria is caused by the obligate parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRTase) is the fifth enzyme in the de novo pyrimidine-synthesis pathway in the parasite, which lacks salvage pathways. Among all of the malaria de novo pyrimidine-biosynthesis enzymes, the structure of P. falciparum OPRTase (PfOPRTase) was the only one unavailable until now. PfOPRTase that could be crystallized was obtained after some low-complexity sequences were removed. Four catalytic dimers were seen in the asymmetic unit (a total of eight polypeptides). In addition to revealing unique amino acids in the PfOPRTase active sites, asymmetric dimers in the larger structure pointed to novel parasite-specific protein–protein interactions that occlude the catalytic active sites. The latter could potentially modulate PfOPRTase activity in parasites and possibly provide new insights for blocking PfOPRTase functions. PMID:25945715

  14. The mechanistic study of Leishmania major dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase based on steady- and pre-steady-state kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Reis, Renata A G; Ferreira, Patricia; Medina, Milagros; Nonato, M Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Leishmania major dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase (DHODHLm) has been considered as a potential therapeutic target against leishmaniasis. DHODHLm, a member of class 1A DHODH, oxidizes dihydro-orotate (DHO) to orotate (ORO) during pyrimidine biosynthesis using fumarate (FUM) as the oxidizing substrate. In the present study, the chemistry of reduction and reoxidation of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor in DHODHLm was examined by steady- and pre-steady state kinetics under both aerobic and anaerobic environments. Our results provide for the first time the experimental evidence of co-operative behaviour in class 1A DHODH regulated by DHO binding and reveal that the initial reductive flavin half-reaction follows a mechanism with two steps. The first step is consistent with FMN reduction and shows a hyperbolic dependence on the DHO concentration with a limiting rate (kred) of 110±6 s(-1) and a K(DHO) d of 180±27 μM. Dissociation of the reduced flavin-ORO complex corresponds to the second step, with a limiting rate of 6 s(-1). In the oxidative half-reaction, the oxygen-sensitive reoxidation of the reduced FMN cofactor of DHODHLm by FUM exhibited a hyperbolic saturation profile dependent on FUM concentration allowing estimation of K(FUM) d and the limiting rate (kreox) of 258±53 μM and 35±2 s(-1), respectively. Comparison between steady- and pre-steady-state parameters together with studies of interaction for DHODHLm with both ORO and succinate (SUC), suggests that ORO release is the rate-limiting step in overall catalysis. Our results provide evidence of mechanistic differences between class 1A and class 2 individual half-reactions to be exploited for the development of selective inhibitors. PMID:26656485

  15. [Acute brainstem encephalitis and myelitis in a girl with isolated methylmalonic aciduria due to MUT gene defect].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Peng; Ding, Yuan; Li, Xi-Yuan; Wang, Hai-Jun; Song, Jin-Qing; Ye, Jin-Tang; Wu, Tong-Fei; Yang, Yan-Ling

    2015-10-01

    Methylmalonyl CoA mutase deficiency due to MUT gene defect has been known as the main cause of isolated methylmalonic acidemia in Mainland China. This study reported a patient with isolated methylmalonic aciduria (MUT type) characterized as acute brainstem encephalitis and myelitis. The previously healthy girl presented with fever, lethargy and progressive weakness in her extremities at the age of 3 years and 2 months. Three day later, she had respiratory distress and consciousness. Cranial MRI revealed bilateral symmetrical lesion of pallidum, brain stem and spinal cord, indicating acute brainstem encephalitis and myelitis. Her blood propionylcarnitine (6.83 μmol/L vs normal range 1.0 to 5.0 μmol/L) and urinary methylmalonic acid (133.22 mmol/mol creatinine vs normal range 0.2 to 3.6 mmol/mol creatinine) increased significantly. Plasma total homocysteine was normal. On her MUT gene, a reported mutation (c.1630_1631GG>TA) and a novel mutation (c.1663C>T, p.A555T) were identified, which confirmed the diagnosis of methylmalonic aciduria (MUT type). After cobalamin injection, protein-restricted diet with the supplements of special formula and L-carnitine, progressive improvement has been observed. The clinical manifestation of patients with methylmalonic aciduria is complex. Metabolic study and gene analysis are keys for the diagnosis and treatment of the disorder. PMID:26483233

  16. 33 CFR 334.1420 - Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing range. 334.1420 Section 334.1420... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1420 Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of...

  17. 33 CFR 334.1420 - Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing range. 334.1420 Section 334.1420... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1420 Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of...

  18. 33 CFR 334.1420 - Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing range. 334.1420 Section 334.1420... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1420 Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of...

  19. 33 CFR 334.1420 - Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing range. 334.1420 Section 334.1420... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1420 Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of...

  20. 33 CFR 334.1420 - Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing range. 334.1420 Section 334.1420... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1420 Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of...

  1. A new syndrome with ethylmalonic aciduria and normal fatty acid oxidation in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Burlina, A B; Dionisi-Vici, C; Bennett, M J; Gibson, K M; Servidei, S; Bertini, E; Hale, D E; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, E; Sabetta, G; Zacchello, F

    1994-01-01

    We describe four Italian male infants with a novel clinical phenotype characterized by orthostatic acrocyanosis, relapsing petechiae, chronic diarrhea, progressive pyramidal signs, mental retardation, and brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities. The first symptoms appeared after the termination of breast-feeding and introduction of formula feeding. Marked persistent 2-ethylmalonic aciduria was associated with abnormal excretion of C4-C5(n-butyryl-, isobutyryl-, isovaleryl-, and 2-methylbutyryl-)acylglycines and acylcarnitines and with intermittent lactic acidosis. Short- and branched-chain plasma acylcarnitine levels were also elevated. 2-Ethylmalonic aciduria is generally regarded as being indicative of a defect in fatty acid oxidation. Extensive studies of cultured fibroblasts failed to reveal such a defect. The observation of intermittent urinary excretion of 2-ethylhydracrylic acid pointed to involvement of the isoleucine R pathway in ethylmalonate biosynthesis. This hypothesis was tentatively corroborated by the biochemical responses to an oral isoleucine challenge in two patients. However, fibroblast studies showed normal oxidation rates of (14C)isoleucine (ul), indicating that this is not a defect of isoleucine oxidation expressed in skin fibroblasts. In one of two patients tested, cytochrome c oxidase activity was partially reduced (45%) in cultured fibroblasts. This unique clinical and biochemical phenotype identifies a new metabolic encephalopathy of yet undetermined cause. PMID:8283379

  2. Sensitization of the luminescence of europium and terbium ions by orotic acids in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Davidenko, N.K.; Bukivskaya, G.A.

    1988-03-01

    The stability constants of the complexes of Eu/sup 3 +/ and Tb/sup 3 +/ with the dianions of orotic acid, 2-thioorotic acid, and 3-N-methylorotic acid have been determined at 20/sup 0/C and ..mu.. = 0.15 by a pH-potentiometric method. The influence of orotic acids on the luminescence properties of Eu/sup 3 +/ and Tb/sup 3 +/ has been studied. It has been shown as a result of a study of the excited states of orotic acid and its derivatives by a method based on the sensitized luminescence of the lanthanides that it is preferable to use the Tb/sup 3 +/ ion as an energy acceptor, since quenching of the luminescence by means of a charge-transfer process is observed in the complexes formed by the Eu/sup 3 +/ ion.

  3. A global outer-rise/outer-trench-slope (OR/OTS) earthquake study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wartman, J. M.; Kita, S.; Kirby, S. H.; Choy, G. L.

    2009-12-01

    Using improved seismic, bathymetric, satellite gravity and other geophysical data, we investigated the seismicity patterns and focal mechanisms of earthquakes in oceanic lithosphere off the trenches of the world that are large enough to be well recorded at teleseismic distances. A number of prominent trends are apparent, some of which have been previously recognized based on more limited data [1], and some of which are largely new [2-5]: (1) The largest events and the highest seismicity rates tend to occur where Mesozoic incoming plates are subducting at high rates (e.g., those in the western Pacific and the Banda segment of Indonesia). The largest events are predominantly shallow normal faulting (SNF) earthquakes. Less common are reverse-faulting (RF) events that tend to be deeper and to be present along with SNF events where nearby seamounts, seamount chains and other volcanic features are subducting [Seno and Yamanaka, 1996]. Blooms of SNF OR/OTS events usually occur just after and seaward of great interplate thrust (IPT) earthquakes but are far less common after smaller IPT events. (2) Plates subducting at slow rates (<20 mm/a) often show sparse OR/OTS seismicity. It is unclear if such low activity is a long-term feature of these systems or is a consequence of the long return times of great IPT earthquakes (e.g., the sparse OR/OTS seismicity before the 26 December 2004 M9.2 Sumatra earthquake and many subsequent OR/OTS events). (3) OR/OTS shocks are generally sparse or absent where incoming plates are very young (<20 Ma) (e.g., Cascadia, southern Mexico, Nankai, and South Shetlands). (4) Subducting plates of intermediate age (20 to about 65 Ma) display a diversity of focal mechanisms and seismicity patterns. In the Philippines, NE Indonesia, and Melanesia, bands of reverse faulting events occur at or near the trench and SNF earthquakes are restricted to OR/OTS sites further from the trench. (5) Clustering of OR/OTS events of all types commonly occurs where

  4. Occurrences of methylmalonic aciduria and Hartnup disorder in the same family.

    PubMed

    Shih, V E; Coulombe, J T; Wadman, S K; Duran, M; Waelkens, J J

    1984-09-01

    Methylmalonic aciduria and Hartnup disorder are two rare autosomal recessively inherited metabolic disorders. We have described the coexistence of these disorders within the same pedigree in two unrelated families. This association was not found in 57 other families surveyed because of a proband known to have either methylmalonic aciduria or Hartnup disorder. PMID:6478642

  5. Leucine Loading Test is Only Discriminative for 3-Methylglutaconic Aciduria Due to AUH Defect.

    PubMed

    Wortmann, Saskia B; Kluijtmans, Leo A J; Sequeira, Silvia; Wevers, Ron A; Morava, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Currently, six inborn errors of metabolism with 3-methylglutaconic aciduria as discriminative feature are known. The "Primary 3-methylglutaconic aciduria," 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency or AUH defect, is a disorder of leucine catabolism. For all other subtypes, also denoted "Secondary 3-methylglutaconic acidurias" (TAZ defect or Barth syndrome, SERAC1 defect or MEGDEL syndrome, OPA3 defect or Costeff syndrome, DNAJC19 defect or DCMA syndrome, TMEM70 defect, "not otherwise specified (NOS) 3-MGA-uria"), the origin of 3-methylglutaconic aciduria remains enigmatic but is hypothesized to be independent from leucine catabolism. Here we show the results of leucine loading test in 21 patients with different inborn errors of metabolism who present with 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. After leucine loading urinary 3-methylglutaconic acid levels increased only in the patients with an AUH defect. This strongly supports the hypothesis that 3-methylglutaconic aciduria is independent from leucine breakdown in other inborn errors of metabolism with 3-methylglutaconic aciduria and also provides a simple test to discriminate between primary and secondary 3-methylglutaconic aciduria in regular patient care. PMID:24757000

  6. Glutaric aciduria type 1 as a cause of dystonic cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Sarar; Hamad, Muddathir H.; Hassan, Hamdy H.; Salih, Mustafa A.

    2015-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1) is an inherited inborn error of metabolism caused by a deficiency of the enzyme glutaryl Co-A dehydrogenase (GCDH). Here, we report a 14-month-old Saudi boy with GA1 who presented with severe dystonia and was mis-diagnosed as cerebral palsy (CP). He presented to our institute with encephalopathy following an episode of gastroenteritis. His physical examination showed dystonia and spastic quadriplegia. His investigations revealed elevated both urinary 3-hydroxy glutaric acid, and serum glutarylcarnitine. The DNA analysis confirmed homozygosity for a mutation in the GCDH-coding gene (c.482G>A;p.R161Q). This case alerts pediatricians to consider GA1 as a differential diagnosis of children presenting with dystonic CP. PMID:26593172

  7. Positive-ion thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry: detection of organic acidurias.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, D N; Muenzer, J; Thoene, J G

    1990-12-14

    Positive-ion thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (TSP-LC-MS) is used to detect organic acids via the direct injection of untreated urine from newborns and infants. Two methods are reported for the separation of organic acids. The separation of urinary organic acids is effected in either an acidic, pH 2.5 sulfuric acid, or a non-acidic, 0.05 M ammonium acetate, pH 6.8, mobile phase. Use of pH 2.5 sulfuric acid and an HPX-87H organic acid column produces better separation but has less sensitivity than the use of 0.05 M ammonium acetate, pH 6.8 and a C18 column. Positive ion TSP-LC-MS has been used to detect methylmalonic aciduria, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria, propionic aciduria, isovaleric aciduria and argininosuccinic aciduria. PMID:1709942

  8. Secondary mitochondrial dysfunction in propionic aciduria: a pathogenic role for endogenous mitochondrial toxins

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Marina A.; Sauer, Sven W.; Okun, Jürgen G.; Nijtmans, Leo G. J.; Rodenburg, Richard J. T.; van den Heuvel, Lambert P.; Dröse, Stefan; Brandt, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Georg F.; Ter Laak, Henk; Kölker, Stefan; Smeitink, Jan A. M.

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction during acute metabolic crises is considered an important pathomechanism in inherited disorders of propionate metabolism, i.e. propionic and methylmalonic acidurias. Biochemically, these disorders are characterized by accumulation of propionyl-CoA and metabolites of alternative propionate oxidation. In the present study, we demonstrate uncompetitive inhibition of PDHc (pyruvate dehydrogenase complex) by propionyl-CoA in purified porcine enzyme and in submitochondrial particles from bovine heart being in the same range as the inhibition induced by acetyl-CoA, the physiological product and known inhibitor of PDHc. Evaluation of similar monocarboxylic CoA esters showed a chain-length specificity for PDHc inhibition. In contrast with CoA esters, non-esterified fatty acids did not inhibit PDHc activity. In addition to PDHc inhibition, analysis of respiratory chain and tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes also revealed an inhibition by propionyl-CoA on respiratory chain complex III and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. To test whether impairment of mitochondrial energy metabolism is involved in the pathogenesis of propionic aciduria, we performed a thorough bioenergetic analysis in muscle biopsy specimens of two patients. In line with the in vitro results, oxidative phosphorylation was severely compromised in both patients. Furthermore, expression of respiratory chain complexes I–IV and the amount of mitochondrial DNA were strongly decreased, and ultrastructural mitochondrial abnormalities were found, highlighting severe mitochondrial dysfunction. In conclusion, our results favour the hypothesis that toxic metabolites, in particular propionyl-CoA, are involved in the pathogenesis of inherited disorders of propionate metabolism, sharing mechanistic similarities with propionate toxicity in micro-organisms. PMID:16686602

  9. Expression, purification and crystallization of Trypanosoma cruzi dihydroorotate dehydrogenase complexed with orotate

    SciTech Connect

    Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Takashima, Eizo; Osanai, Arihiro; Shimizu, Hironari; Nara, Takeshi; Aoki, Takashi; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2005-10-01

    The Trypanosoma cruzi dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, a key enzyme in pyrimidine de novo biosynthesis and redox homeostasis, was crystallized in complex with its first reaction product, orotate. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHOD) catalyzes the oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate, the fourth step and the only redox reaction in the de novo biosynthesis of pyrimidine. DHOD from Trypanosoma cruzi (TcDHOD) has been expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Crystals of the TcDHOD–orotate complex were grown at 277 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique using polyethylene glycol 3350 as a precipitant. The crystals diffract to better than 1.8 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation (λ = 0.900 Å). X-ray diffraction data were collected at 100 K and processed to 1.9 Å resolution with 98.2% completeness and an overall R{sub merge} of 7.8%. The TcDHOD crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 67.87, b = 71.89, c = 123.27 Å. The presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit (2 × 34 kDa) gives a crystal volume per protein weight (V{sub M}) of 2.2 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 44%.

  10. N-carbamylglutamate in emergency management of hyperammonemia in neonatal acute onset propionic and methylmalonic aciduria.

    PubMed

    Filippi, Luca; Gozzini, Elena; Fiorini, Patrizio; Malvagia, Sabrina; la Marca, Giancarlo; Donati, Maria Alice

    2010-01-01

    In propionic aciduria and methylmalonic aciduria, hyperammonemia as a symptom of metabolic decompensation is one of the major clinical problems. Hyperammonemia is a true neonatal emergency with high mortality and neurological complications in most survivors. It requires a rapid and vigorous treatment in order to normalize the ammonia concentration as fast as possible. We report on two full-term neonates, one with propionic aciduria and the other with methylmalonic aciduria, whose plasma ammonia concentrations responded dramatically to oral N-carbamylglutamate. N-carbamylglutamate, added to the classic treatment, quickly normalized plasma ammonia levels in both patients and avoided the need of hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. A particularly sudden fall of ammonia was obtained in one patient through beginning N-carbamylglutamate treatment precociously. PMID:19887858

  11. Genetic mapping of glutaric aciduria, type 3, to chromosome 7 and identification of mutations in c7orf10.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Eric A; Strauss, Kevin A; Tortorelli, Silvia; Bennett, Michael J; Knerr, Ina; Morton, D Holmes; Puffenberger, Erik G

    2008-11-01

    While screening Old Order Amish children for glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1) between 1989 and 1993, we found three healthy children who excreted abnormal quantities of glutaric acid but low 3-hydroxyglutaric acid, a pattern consistent with glutaric aciduria type 3 (GA3). None of these children had the GCDH c.1262C-->T mutation that causes GA1 among the Amish. Using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes, we identified a shared homozygous 4.7 Mb region on chromosome 7. This region contained 25 genes including C7orf10, an open reading frame with a putative mitochondrial targeting sequence and coenzyme-A transferase domain. Direct sequencing of C7orf10 revealed that the three Amish individuals were homozygous for a nonsynonymous sequence variant (c.895C-->T, Arg299Trp). We then sequenced three non-Amish children with GA3 and discovered two nonsense mutations (c.322C-->T, Arg108Ter, and c.424C-->T, Arg142Ter) in addition to the Amish mutation. Two pathogenic alleles were identified in each of the six patients. There was no consistent clinical phenotype associated with GA3. In affected individuals, urine molar ratios of glutarate to its derivatives (3-hydroxyglutarate, glutarylcarnitine, and glutarylglycine) were elevated, suggesting impaired formation of glutaryl-CoA. These observations refine our understanding of the lysine-tryptophan degradation pathway and have important implications for the pathophysiology of GA1. PMID:18926513

  12. Genetic Mapping of Glutaric Aciduria, Type 3, to Chromosome 7 and Identification of Mutations in C7orf10

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Eric A.; Strauss, Kevin A.; Tortorelli, Silvia; Bennett, Michael J.; Knerr, Ina; Morton, D. Holmes; Puffenberger, Erik G.

    2008-01-01

    While screening Old Order Amish children for glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1) between 1989 and 1993, we found three healthy children who excreted abnormal quantities of glutaric acid but low 3-hydroxyglutaric acid, a pattern consistent with glutaric aciduria type 3 (GA3). None of these children had the GCDH c.1262C→T mutation that causes GA1 among the Amish. Using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes, we identified a shared homozygous 4.7 Mb region on chromosome 7. This region contained 25 genes including C7orf10, an open reading frame with a putative mitochondrial targeting sequence and coenzyme-A transferase domain. Direct sequencing of C7orf10 revealed that the three Amish individuals were homozygous for a nonsynonymous sequence variant (c.895C→T, Arg299Trp). We then sequenced three non-Amish children with GA3 and discovered two nonsense mutations (c.322C→T, Arg108Ter, and c.424C→T, Arg142Ter) in addition to the Amish mutation. Two pathogenic alleles were identified in each of the six patients. There was no consistent clinical phenotype associated with GA3. In affected individuals, urine molar ratios of glutarate to its derivatives (3-hydroxyglutarate, glutarylcarnitine, and glutarylglycine) were elevated, suggesting impaired formation of glutaryl-CoA. These observations refine our understanding of the lysine-tryptophan degradation pathway and have important implications for the pathophysiology of GA1. PMID:18926513

  13. Orotate phosphoribosyl transferase MoPyr5 is involved in uridine 5'-phosphate synthesis and pathogenesis of Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhongqiang; Liu, Muxing; Dong, Yanhan; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Haifeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2016-04-01

    Orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRTase) plays an important role in de novo and salvage pathways of nucleotide synthesis and is widely used as a screening marker in genetic transformation. However, the function of OPRTase in plant pathogens remains unclear. In this study, we characterized an ortholog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ura5, the OPRTase MoPyr5, from the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. Targeted gene disruption revealed that MoPyr5 is required for mycelial growth, appressorial turgor pressure and penetration into plant tissues, invasive hyphal growth, and pathogenicity. Interestingly, the ∆Mopyr5 mutant is also involved in mycelial surface hydrophobicity. Exogenous uridine 5'-phosphate (UMP) restored vegetative growth and rescued the defect in pathogenicity on detached barley and rice leaf sheath. Collectively, our results show that MoPyr5 is an OPRTase for UMP biosynthesis in M. oryzae and indicate that UTP biosynthesis is closely linked with vegetative growth, cell wall integrity, and pathogenicity of fungus. Our results also suggest that UMP biosynthesis would be a good target for the development of novel fungicides against M. oryzae. PMID:26810198

  14. Glutaric aciduria type I: outcome in the Republic of Ireland.

    PubMed

    Naughten, E R; Mayne, P D; Monavari, A A; Goodman, S I; Sulaiman, G; Croke, D T

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-one patients have been diagnosed with glutaric aciduria type I over a 16-year period in the Republic of Ireland, 11 following clinical presentation and 10 following a high-risk screen. Nineteen have been managed with diet. Eight patients have died, of whom 7 were diagnosed clinically. Six had dystonic and one spastic cerebral palsy. Of the 11 patients who did not have cerebral palsy, 10 were diagnosed following a high-risk screen. Seven of the 11 have no abnormal neurological signs; 6 of the 7 have abnormal CT or MRI findings; and no case of striatal degeneration has occurred during the past 14 years in the high-risk screened group. PMID:15505400

  15. IDH2 mutations in patients with D-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria.

    PubMed

    Kranendijk, Martijn; Struys, Eduard A; van Schaftingen, Emile; Gibson, K Michael; Kanhai, Warsha A; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Amiel, Jeanne; Buist, Neil R; Das, Anibh M; de Klerk, Johannis B; Feigenbaum, Annette S; Grange, Dorothy K; Hofstede, Floris C; Holme, Elisabeth; Kirk, Edwin P; Korman, Stanley H; Morava, Eva; Morris, Andrew; Smeitink, Jan; Sukhai, Rám N; Vallance, Hilary; Jakobs, Cornelis; Salomons, Gajja S

    2010-10-15

    Heterozygous somatic mutations in the genes encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 and -2 (IDH1 and IDH2) were recently discovered in human neoplastic disorders. These mutations disable the enzymes' normal ability to convert isocitrate to 2-ketoglutarate (2-KG) and confer on the enzymes a new function: the ability to convert 2-KG to d-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG). We have detected heterozygous germline mutations in IDH2 that alter enzyme residue Arg(140) in 15 unrelated patients with d-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria (D-2-HGA), a rare neurometabolic disorder characterized by supraphysiological levels of D-2-HG. These findings provide additional impetus for investigating the role of D-2-HG in the pathophysiology of metabolic disease and cancer. PMID:20847235

  16. An interesting case of metabolic dystonia: L-2 hydroxyglutaric aciduria.

    PubMed

    Balaji, Padma; Viswanathan, V; Chellathurai, Amarnath; Panigrahi, Debasis

    2014-01-01

    L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria (L-2-HGA), a neurometabolic disorder caused by mutations in the L-2 hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase (L-2-HGDH) gene, presents with psychomotor retardation, cerebellar ataxia, extrapyramidal symptoms, macrocephaly and seizures. Characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings include subcortical cerebral white matter abnormalities with T2 hyperintensities of the dentate nucleus, globus pallidus, putamen and caudate nucleus. The diagnosis can be confirmed by elevated urinary L-2 hydroxyglutaric acid and mutational analysis of the L-2-HGDH gene. We report two siblings with dystonia diagnosed by classical neuroimaging findings with elevated urinary 2 hydroxyglutaric acid. Riboflavin therapy has shown promising results in a subset of cases, thus highlighting the importance of making the diagnosis in these patients. PMID:24753671

  17. An interesting case of metabolic dystonia: L-2 hydroxyglutaric aciduria

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, Padma; Viswanathan, V.; Chellathurai, Amarnath; Panigrahi, Debasis

    2014-01-01

    L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria (L-2-HGA), a neurometabolic disorder caused by mutations in the L-2 hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase (L-2-HGDH) gene, presents with psychomotor retardation, cerebellar ataxia, extrapyramidal symptoms, macrocephaly and seizures. Characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings include subcortical cerebral white matter abnormalities with T2 hyperintensities of the dentate nucleus, globus pallidus, putamen and caudate nucleus. The diagnosis can be confirmed by elevated urinary L-2 hydroxyglutaric acid and mutational analysis of the L-2-HGDH gene. We report two siblings with dystonia diagnosed by classical neuroimaging findings with elevated urinary 2 hydroxyglutaric acid. Riboflavin therapy has shown promising results in a subset of cases, thus highlighting the importance of making the diagnosis in these patients. PMID:24753671

  18. [A case of late-onset cobalamin C disease (methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria, cobalamin C type)].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Mikie; Yasui, Kenichi; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Kowa, Hisanori; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Nakashima, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of an 18-year-old Japanese woman with cobalamin (cbl) C disease. She was born between non- consanguineous parents, and had easy fatigability from a childhood. At 14 years old, she developed renal failure, and had repeated psychosis during 2 years. At 16 old, she developed her gait disturbance and her symptoms fluctuated, but the cause of gait disturbance was unclear. At 18 years old, she was admitted with worsening of gait disturbance. Physical examination revealed spastic paraparesis and bilateral peroneal nerve paralyses. Homocystinuria and methylmalonic aciduria were detected, although serum vitamin B12 was within normal range. Gene mutation analysis revealed Gly147Asp (440G>A) and Trp157Ser (470G>C) in the MMACHC gene as a compound heterozygous mutation. We diagnosed her as having late-onset cbl C disease, and her gait disturbance and renal failure improved after intramuscular hydroxocobalamin administration. Although late-onset cbl C disease is rare in Japan, it an important to consider this congenital disease because symptoms are expected to improve by medical intervention. PMID:25672861

  19. Chronic intermittent form of isovaleric aciduria in a 2-year-old boy

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jin Min; Lee, Beom Hee; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Kim, Yoo-Mi; Choi, Jin-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Isovaleric aciduria (IVA) is caused by an autosomal recessive deficiency of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase (IVD). IVA presents either in the neonatal period as an acute episode of fulminant metabolic acidosis, which may lead to coma or death, or later as a "chronic intermittent form" that is associated with developmental delays, with or without recurrent acidotic episodes during periods of stress, such as infections. Here, we report the case of a 2-year old boy with IVA who presented with the chronic intermittent form. He was admitted to Asan Medical Center Children's Hospital with recurrent vomiting. Metabolic acidosis, hyperammonemia, elevated serum lactate and isovalerylcarnitine levels, and markedly increased urine isovalerylglycine concentration were noted. Sequence analysis of the IVD gene in the patient revealed the novel compound mutations-a missense mutation, c.986T>C (p.Met329Thr) and a frameshift mutation, c.1083del (p.Ile361fs*11). Following stabilization during the acute phase, the patient has remained in a stable condition on a low-leucine diet. PMID:24019846

  20. Exome sequencing identifies a new mutation in SERAC1 in a patient with 3-methylglutaconic aciduria.

    PubMed

    Tort, Frederic; García-Silva, María Teresa; Ferrer-Cortès, Xènia; Navarro-Sastre, Aleix; Garcia-Villoria, Judith; Coll, Maria Josep; Vidal, Enrique; Jiménez-Almazán, Jorge; Dopazo, Joaquín; Briones, Paz; Elpeleg, Orly; Ribes, Antonia

    2013-01-01

    3-Methylglutaconic aciduria (3-MGA-uria) is a heterogeneous group of syndromes characterized by an increased excretion of 3-methylglutaconic and 3-methylglutaric acids. Five types of 3-MGA-uria (I to V) with different clinical presentations have been described. Causative mutations in TAZ, OPA3, DNAJC19, ATP12, ATP5E, and TMEM70 have been identified. After excluding the known genetic causes of 3-MGA-uria we used exome sequencing to investigate a patient with Leigh syndrome and 3-MGA-uria. We identified a homozygous variant in SERAC1 (c.202C>T; p.Arg68*), that generates a premature stop codon at position 68 of SERAC1 protein. Western blot analysis in patient's fibroblasts showed a complete absence of SERAC1 that was consistent with the prediction of a truncated protein and supports the pathogenic role of the mutation. During the course of this project a parallel study identified mutations in SERAC1 as the genetic cause of the disease in 15 patients with MEGDEL syndrome, which was compatible with the clinical and biochemical phenotypes of the patient described here. In addition, our patient developed microcephaly and optic atrophy, two features not previously reported in MEGDEL syndrome. We highlight the usefulness of exome sequencing to reveal the genetic bases of human rare diseases even if only one affected individual is available. PMID:23707711

  1. Correction of Methylmalonic Aciduria In Vivo Using a Codon-Optimized Lentiviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Edward S.Y.; McIntyre, Chantelle; Peters, Heidi L.; Ranieri, Enzo; Anson, Donald S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Methylmalonic aciduria is a rare disorder of organic acid metabolism with limited therapeutic options, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Positive results from combined liver/kidney transplantation suggest, however, that metabolic sink therapy may be efficacious. Gene therapy offers a more accessible approach for the treatment of methylmalonic aciduria than organ transplantation. Accordingly, we have evaluated a lentiviral vector–mediated gene transfer approach in an in vivo mouse model of methylmalonic aciduria. A mouse model of methylmalonic aciduria (Mut−/−MUTh2) was injected intravenously at 8 weeks of age with a lentiviral vector that expressed a codon-optimized human methylmalonyl coenzyme A mutase transgene, HIV-1SDmEF1αmurSigHutMCM. Untreated Mut−/−MUTh2 and normal mice were used as controls. HIV-1SDmEF1αmurSigHutMCM-treated mice achieved near-normal weight for age, and Western blot analysis demonstrated significant methylmalonyl coenzyme A enzyme expression in their livers. Normalization of liver methylmalonyl coenzyme A enzyme activity in the treated group was associated with a reduction in plasma and urine methylmalonic acid levels, and a reduction in the hepatic methylmalonic acid concentration. Administration of the HIV-1SDmEF1αmurSigHutMCM vector provided significant, although incomplete, biochemical correction of methylmalonic aciduria in a mouse model, suggesting that gene therapy is a potential treatment for this disorder. PMID:24568291

  2. Expression, purification and crystallization of Trypanosoma cruzi dihydroorotate dehydrogenase complexed with orotate.

    PubMed

    Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Takashima, Eizo; Osanai, Arihiro; Shimizu, Hironari; Nara, Takeshi; Aoki, Takashi; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2005-10-01

    Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHOD) catalyzes the oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate, the fourth step and the only redox reaction in the de novo biosynthesis of pyrimidine. DHOD from Trypanosoma cruzi (TcDHOD) has been expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Crystals of the TcDHOD-orotate complex were grown at 277 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique using polyethylene glycol 3350 as a precipitant. The crystals diffract to better than 1.8 A resolution using synchrotron radiation (lambda = 0.900 A). X-ray diffraction data were collected at 100 K and processed to 1.9 A resolution with 98.2% completeness and an overall Rmerge of 7.8%. The TcDHOD crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 67.87, b = 71.89, c = 123.27 A. The presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit (2 x 34 kDa) gives a crystal volume per protein weight (VM) of 2.2 A3 Da(-1) and a solvent content of 44%. PMID:16511183

  3. Inborn errors of metabolism with 3-methylglutaconic aciduria as discriminative feature: proper classification and nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Wortmann, Saskia B; Duran, Marinus; Anikster, Yair; Barth, Peter G; Sperl, Wolfgang; Zschocke, Johannes; Morava, Eva; Wevers, Ron A

    2013-11-01

    Increased urinary 3-methylglutaconic acid excretion is a relatively common finding in metabolic disorders, especially in mitochondrial disorders. In most cases 3-methylglutaconic acid is only slightly elevated and accompanied by other (disease specific) metabolites. There is, however, a group of disorders with significantly and consistently increased 3-methylglutaconic acid excretion, where the 3-methylglutaconic aciduria is a hallmark of the phenotype and the key to diagnosis. Until now these disorders were labelled by roman numbers (I-V) in the order of discovery regardless of pathomechanism. Especially, the so called "unspecified" 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type IV has been ever growing, leading to biochemical and clinical diagnostic confusion. Therefore, we propose the following pathomechanism based classification and a simplified diagnostic flow chart for these "inborn errors of metabolism with 3-methylglutaconic aciduria as discriminative feature". One should distinguish between "primary 3-methylglutaconic aciduria" formerly known as type I (3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency, AUH defect) due to defective leucine catabolism and the--currently known--three groups of "secondary 3-methylglutaconic aciduria". The latter should be further classified and named by their defective protein or the historical name as follows: i) defective phospholipid remodelling (TAZ defect or Barth syndrome, SERAC1 defect or MEGDEL syndrome) and ii) mitochondrial membrane associated disorders (OPA3 defect or Costeff syndrome, DNAJC19 defect or DCMA syndrome, TMEM70 defect). The remaining patients with significant and consistent 3-methylglutaconic aciduria in whom the above mentioned syndromes have been excluded, should be referred to as "not otherwise specified (NOS) 3-MGA-uria" until elucidation of the underlying pathomechanism enables proper (possibly extended) classification. PMID:23296368

  4. A case of L-2 hydroxyglutaric aciduria presenting as febrile seizure.

    PubMed

    Calik, M; Tuncer, F N; Sarikaya, S; Karakas, O; Cece, H; Iscan, A

    2014-01-01

    L-2 hydroxyglutaric aciduria (L2HGA) is a rare, infantile-onset, autosomal recessive organic aciduria affecting exclusively the central nervous system. A case is reported here of L2HGA presenting with macrocephaly and febrile seizure. Although there have been reports of epilepsy associated with L2HGA, to the best of our knowledge this is the second case in literature of febrile seizure in a patient with L2HGA. This report suggests that detailed neurological evaluation of macrocephalic children with febrile convulsion is important. Moreover, metabolic and genetic investigations may be necessary for these kinds of patients. PMID:25804013

  5. 5-fluoro-orotic acid induces chromosome alterations in genetically manipulated strains of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Wellington, Melanie; Kabir, M Anaul; Rustchenko, Elena

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported the occurrence of chromosome alterations in a Candida albicans prototrophic strain 3153A treated with 5-fluoro-orotic acid (5-FOA). In this study we investigated the mutagenic properties of 5-FOA with two derivatives of C. albicans strain CAF4-2 (ura3/ura3), each containing an ectopic copy of URA3 gene (ura3/ ura3 URA3) on a different chromosome. As expected, after the ura3/ura3 URA3 constructs were applied to 5-FOA containing solid medium, the "pop-outs" that lost URA3 appeared. However most of the "pop-outs" acquired various chromosome alterations. Thus constructs exposed to 5-FOA should be examined for chromosome alterations or the use of 5-FOA should be avoided. PMID:17040068

  6. Structural Properties, Order-Disorder Phenomena, and Phase Stability of Orotic Acid Crystal Forms.

    PubMed

    Braun, Doris E; Nartowski, Karol P; Khimyak, Yaroslav Z; Morris, Kenneth R; Byrn, Stephen R; Griesser, Ulrich J

    2016-03-01

    Orotic acid (OTA) is reported to exist in the anhydrous (AH), monohydrate (Hy1), and dimethyl sulfoxide monosolvate (SDMSO) forms. In this study we investigate the (de)hydration/desolvation behavior, aiming at an understanding of the elusive structural features of anhydrous OTA by a combination of experimental and computational techniques, namely, thermal analytical methods, gravimetric moisture (de)sorption studies, water activity measurements, X-ray powder diffraction, spectroscopy (vibrational, solid-state NMR), crystal energy landscape, and chemical shift calculations. The Hy1 is a highly stable hydrate, which dissociates above 135 °C and loses only a small part of the water when stored over desiccants (25 °C) for more than one year. In Hy1, orotic acid and water molecules are linked by strong hydrogen bonds in nearly perfectly planar arranged stacked layers. The layers are spaced by 3.1 Å and not linked via hydrogen bonds. Upon dehydration the X-ray powder diffraction and solid-state NMR peaks become broader, indicating some disorder in the anhydrous form. The Hy1 stacking reflection (122) is maintained, suggesting that the OTA molecules are still arranged in stacked layers in the dehydration product. Desolvation of SDMSO, a nonlayer structure, results in the same AH phase as observed upon dehydrating Hy1. Depending on the desolvation conditions, different levels of order-disorder of layers present in anhydrous OTA are observed, which is also suggested by the computed low energy crystal structures. These structures provide models for stacking faults as intergrowth of different layers is possible. The variability in anhydrate crystals is of practical concern as it affects the moisture dependent stability of AH with respect to hydration. PMID:26741914

  7. Structural Properties, Order–Disorder Phenomena, and Phase Stability of Orotic Acid Crystal Forms

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Orotic acid (OTA) is reported to exist in the anhydrous (AH), monohydrate (Hy1), and dimethyl sulfoxide monosolvate (SDMSO) forms. In this study we investigate the (de)hydration/desolvation behavior, aiming at an understanding of the elusive structural features of anhydrous OTA by a combination of experimental and computational techniques, namely, thermal analytical methods, gravimetric moisture (de)sorption studies, water activity measurements, X-ray powder diffraction, spectroscopy (vibrational, solid-state NMR), crystal energy landscape, and chemical shift calculations. The Hy1 is a highly stable hydrate, which dissociates above 135 °C and loses only a small part of the water when stored over desiccants (25 °C) for more than one year. In Hy1, orotic acid and water molecules are linked by strong hydrogen bonds in nearly perfectly planar arranged stacked layers. The layers are spaced by 3.1 Å and not linked via hydrogen bonds. Upon dehydration the X-ray powder diffraction and solid-state NMR peaks become broader, indicating some disorder in the anhydrous form. The Hy1 stacking reflection (122) is maintained, suggesting that the OTA molecules are still arranged in stacked layers in the dehydration product. Desolvation of SDMSO, a nonlayer structure, results in the same AH phase as observed upon dehydrating Hy1. Depending on the desolvation conditions, different levels of order–disorder of layers present in anhydrous OTA are observed, which is also suggested by the computed low energy crystal structures. These structures provide models for stacking faults as intergrowth of different layers is possible. The variability in anhydrate crystals is of practical concern as it affects the moisture dependent stability of AH with respect to hydration. PMID:26741914

  8. Dynamic Changes of Striatal and Extrastriatal Abnormalities in Glutaric Aciduria Type I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harting, Inga; Neumaier-Probst, Eva; Seitz, Angelika; Maier, Esther M.; Assmann, Birgit; Baric, Ivo; Troncoso, Monica; Muhlhausen, Chris; Zschocke, Johannes; Boy, Nikolas P. S.; Hoffmann, Georg F.; Garbade, Sven F.; Kolker, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    In glutaric aciduria type I, an autosomal recessive disease of mitochondrial lysine, hydroxylysine and tryptophan catabolism, striatal lesions are characteristically induced by acute encephalopathic crises during a finite period of brain development (age 3-36 months). The frequency of striatal injury is significantly less in patients diagnosed as…

  9. Nitric-oxide supplementation for treatment of long-term complications in argininosuccinic aciduria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) is required for the synthesis and channeling of L-arginine to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) for nitric oxide (NO) production. Congenital ASL deficiency causes argininosuccinic aciduria (ASA), the second most common urea cycle disorder, and leads to deficiency of both urea...

  10. The peripartum management of a patient with glutaric aciduria type 1.

    PubMed

    Ituk, Unyime S; Allen, Terrence K; Habib, Ashraf S

    2013-03-01

    The management of cesarean delivery for a parturient with placenta previa at 36 weeks' gestation and glutaric aciduria type 1 is presented. The management goal was to prevent encephalopathic crisis by ensuring adequate caloric intake with dextrose infusion and to provide carnitine supplementation and adequate anesthesia. PMID:23352788

  11. Useful second-tier tests in expanded newborn screening of isovaleric acidemia and methylmalonic aciduria.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Yosuke; Hata, Ikue; Tajima, Go

    2010-10-01

    Common use of pivalate-generating antibiotics in newborns in Japan and low cutoff value of C5-acylcarnitine (C5) to detect mild forms of isovaleric acidemia (IVA) led to 1,065 positive results from IVA screening among 146,000 newborns tested by tandem mass spectrometry over the last 3 years. Using our method to determine isovalerylglycine (IVG) levels in dried blood spots (DBS) as a second-tier test with IVG cutoff value of 0.5 nmol/ml in DBS, one patient with severe IVA was identified, and no recall of the second DBS was needed. Retrospective analysis revealed that most patients with moderate to severe forms of IVA have decreased free-carnitine levels shortly after birth and higher levels of IVG than those of C5, which suggests that this method is useful in evaluating the severity of IVA. Another second-tier test, to measure methylmalonic acid (MMA) levels in DBS by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), has been developed to overcome difficulties in screening methylmalonic aciduria (MMAU) and propionic acidemia. Methanol extract from DBS was dried and derivatized using N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide. GC/MS was performed using splitless injection, electron-impact ionization, and selected ion monitoring for data recording. MMAU patients had much higher DBS concentrations of MMA (24.2-321.9 nmol/ml) than control newborns (0.34 ± 0.11 nmol/ml). MMA measurement in DBS was thought to provide useful information about the severity of MMAU, as MMAU patients with high levels of MMA had decreased levels of free carnitine and mildly increased levels of propionylcarnitine. PMID:20440648

  12. Molecular and biochemical alterations in tubular epithelial cells of patients with isolated methylmalonic aciduria.

    PubMed

    Ruppert, T; Schumann, A; Gröne, H J; Okun, J G; Kölker, S; Morath, M A; Sauer, S W

    2015-12-15

    Methylmalonic acidurias (MMAurias) are a group of inherited disorders in the catabolism of branched-chain amino acids, odd-chain fatty acids and cholesterol caused by complete or partial deficiency of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (mut(0) and mut(-) subtype respectively) and by defects in the metabolism of its cofactor 5'-deoxyadenosylcobalamin (cblA, cblB or cblD variant 2 type). A long-term complication found in patients with mut(0) and cblB variant is chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis. The underlying pathomechanism has remained unknown. We established an in vitro model of tubular epithelial cells from patient urine (hTEC; 9 controls, 5 mut(0), 1 cblB). In all human tubular epithelial cell (hTEC) lines we found specific tubular markers (AQP1, UMOD, AQP2). Patient cells showed disturbance of energy metabolism in glycolysis, mitochondrial respiratory chain and Krebs cycle in concert with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Electron micrographs indicated increased autophagosome production and endoplasmic reticulum stress, which was supported by positive acridine orange staining and elevated levels of LC3 II, P62 and pIRE1. Screening mTOR signaling revealed a release of inhibition of autophagy. Patient hTEC produced and secreted elevated amounts of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL8, which was highly correlated with the acridine orange staining. Summarizing, hTEC of MMAuria patients are characterized by disturbed energy metabolism and ROS production that lead to increased autophagy and IL8 secretion. PMID:26420839

  13. Vascular dysfunction as an additional pathomechanism in glutaric aciduria type I.

    PubMed

    Mühlhausen, C; Ergün, S; Strauss, K A; Koeller, D M; Crnic, L; Woontner, M; Goodman, S I; Ullrich, K; Braulke, T

    2004-01-01

    The metabolic hallmark of glutaric aciduria type I (GA I) is the deficiency of glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH) with subsequent accumulation of glutaric acid, 3-hydroxglutaric acid (3-OH-GA) and glutaconic acid. Current concepts regarding pathomechanisms of GA I focus on investigations of excitotoxic effects of 3-OH-GA. To identify pathogenetically relevant genes, microarray analyses were performed using brain material from GCDH-deficient (GCDH (-/-)) and control mice. These microarray data confirmed recent pathogenic models, but also revealed alterations in genes that had previously not been correlated to the disease, e.g. genes concerning vascular biology. Subsequent in vitro and in vivo experiments confirmed direct effects of 3-OH-GA on vascular permeability and endothelial integrity. Clinical observations underscore the involvement of vascular dysfunction. In MRI scans of GA I patients, subdural effusions as well as dilated transarachnoid vascular plexuses were detected independently of encephalopathic crises. In fact, some of these findings are already detectable shortly after birth. MRI scans of a GA I patient performed during an acute encephalopathic crisis detected a dilated intrastriatal vasculature with perivascular hyperintensity, indicating local extravasation. In conclusion, we hypothesize that 3-OH-GA affects prenatal development of vessels, thus leading to an increased vulnerability of endothelial structures and subsequent vascular dysfunction. These observations display an additional pathomechanism in GA I and might explain frontotemporal hypoplasia and chronic subdural effusions in this disease. Elucidation of the pathomechanisms of vascular dysfunction may give further insights into the pathogenesis of GA I. PMID:15505389

  14. Argininosuccinate Lyase Deficiency – Argininosuccinic Aciduria and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Erez, Ayelet; Sreenath Nagamani, Sandesh C.; Lee, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    The urea cycle consists of six consecutive enzymatic reactions that convert waste nitrogen into urea. Deficiencies of any of these enzymes of the cycle result in urea cycle disorders (UCD), a group of inborn errors of hepatic metabolism that often result in life threatening hyperammonemia. Argininosuccinate Lyase (ASL) is a cytosolic enzyme which catalyzes the fourth reaction in the cycle and the first degradative step, i.e. the breakdown of argininosuccinic acid to arginine and fumarate. Deficiency of ASL results in an accumulation of argininosuccinic acid in tissues, and excretion of argininosuccinic acid in urine leading to the condition argininosuccinic aciduria, ASA. ASA is an autosomal recessive disorder and is the second most common urea cycle disorder. In addition to the accumulation of argininosuccinic acid, ASL deficiency results in decreased synthesis of arginine which is in common with all UCDs except argininemia. Arginine is not only the precursor for the synthesis of urea and ornithine as part of the urea cycle but it is also the substrate for the synthesis of nitric oxide, polyamines, proline, glutamate, creatine and agmatine. Hence, while ASL is the only enzyme in the body able to generate arginine, at least four enzymes use arginine as substrate: arginine decarboxylase, arginase, nitric oxide synthetase (NOS) and arginine/glycine aminotransferase. In the liver, the main function of ASL is ureagenesis, and hence, there is no net synthesis of arginine. In contrast, in most other tissues, its role is to generate arginine that is designated for the specific cell’s needs. While patients with ASA share the acute clinical phenotype of hyperammonemia, encephalopathy and respiratory alkalosis common to other UCD, they also present with unique chronic complications most probably caused by a combination of tissue specific deficiency of arginine and/or elevation of argininosuccinic acid. This review article summarizes the clinical characterization

  15. Investigation of vital pathogenic target orotate phosphoribosyltransferases (OPRTase) from Thermus thermophilus HB8: Phylogenetic and molecular modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Surekha, Kanagarajan; Prabhu, Damodharan; Richard, Mariadasse; Nachiappan, Mutharasappan; Biswal, Jayashree; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman

    2016-06-01

    Biosynthesis pathways of pyrimidine and purine are shown to play an important role in regular cellular activities. The biosynthesis can occur either through de novo or salvage pathways based on the requirement of the cell. The pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway has been linked to several disorders and various autoimmune diseases. Orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRTase) is an important enzyme which catalyzes the conversion of orotate to orotate monophosphate in the fifth step of pyrimidine biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analysis of 228 OPRTase sequences shows the distribution of proteins across different living forms of life. High structural similarities between Thermusthermophilus and other organisms kindled us to concentrate on OPRTase as an anti-pathogenic target. In this study, a homology model of OPRTase was constructed using 2P1Z as a template. About 100 ns molecular dynamics simulation was performed to investigate the conformational stability and dynamic patterns of the protein. The amino acid residues (Met1, Asp2, Glu43, Ala44, Glu47, Lys51, Ala157 and Leu158) lining in the binding site were predicted using SiteMap. Further, structure based virtual screening was performed on the predicted binding site using ChemBridge, Asinex, Binding, NCI, TosLab and Zinc databases. Compounds retrieved from the screening collections were manually clustered. The resultant protein-ligand complexes were subjected to molecular dynamics simulations, which further validates the binding modes of the hits. The study may provide better insight for designing potent anti-pathogenic agent. PMID:26861612

  16. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase localizes to the Golgi complex and its expression levels affect the sensitivity to anti-cancer drug 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Hozumi, Yasukazu; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Nakano, Tomoyuki; Matsui, Hirooki; Nasu, Takashi; Koike, Shuji; Kakehata, Seiji; Ito, Tsukasa; Goto, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRT) is engaged in de novo pyrimidine synthesis. It catalyzes oronitine to uridine monophosphate (UMP), which is used for RNA synthesis. De novo pyrimidine synthesis has long been known to play an important role in providing DNA/RNA precursors for rapid proliferative activity of cancer cells. Furthermore, chemotherapeutic drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is taken up into cancer cells and is converted to 5-fluoro-UMP (FUMP) by OPRT or to 5-fluoro-dUMP (FdUMP) through intermediary molecules by thymidine phosphorylase. These 5-FU metabolites are misincorporated into DNA/RNA, thereby producing dysfunction of these information processing. However, it remains unclear how the subcellular localization of OPRT and how its variable expression levels affect the response to 5-FU at the cellular level. In this study, immunocytochemical analysis reveals that OPRT localizes to the Golgi complex. Results also show that not only overexpression but also downregulation of OPRT render cells susceptible to 5-FU exposure, but it has no effect on DNA damaging agent doxorubicin. This study provides clues to elucidate the cellular response to 5-FU chemotherapy in relation to the OPRT expression level. PMID:26700594

  17. Impaired energy metabolism and abnormal muscle histology in mut- methylmalonic aciduria.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, E; Wibrand, F; Ørngreen, M C; Vissing, J; Horn, N

    2005-09-27

    The authors report a 27-year-old man with B12-responsive mut- methylmalonic aciduria associated with pure muscle symptoms. Two mutations were found in the methylmalonyl-CoA mutase gene. An exercise test showed a reduced maximal workload and reduced oxygen uptake, and a muscle biopsy showed subsarcolemmal accumulation of mitochondria and normal respiratory chain enzyme activities. These findings may be caused by inhibition of mitochondrial energy metabolism by methylmalonate or its metabolites. PMID:16186538

  18. [Peripheral nervous impairment in a patient with methylmalonic aciduria combined with hyperhomocysteinemia].

    PubMed

    Ji, Tao-yun; Zhang, Yue-hua; Li, Fei-tian; Qin, Jiong; Yang, Yan-ling

    2013-04-18

    Methylmalonic aciduria combined homocysteinemia can cause multisystemic damages, mainly involving central nervous system, while the peripheral nerves are rarely impaired. A 10-year-old boy complained of weakness of both lower extremities for 1 month. His past history showed mildly delay of intelligence as well as motor development. He had proteinuria when he was 3 years old and was diagnosed as epilepsy, which was controlled by sodium valproate when he was 8 years 6 months old. His physical examination showed attenuated bilateral knee jerk reflex, while the bilateral achilles tendon reflex was absent; the examination of sensation was normal and the bilateral Babinski sign was positive. The electromyography indicated injury of peripheral nerves. The elevated levels of urine methylmalonic aciduria and plasma homocysteinemia were consistent with the diagnosis of methylmalonic aciduria combined homocysteinemia. The pathogenic gene was confirmed as MMACHC, on which two pathogenic mutations (c.365A>T and c.609G>A) were detected. cblC defect was confirmed. He was treated by vitamin B12, calcium folinate, L-carnitine and betaine supplementation, and significant improvement was observed after 6 months. According to this case, we suggest that urinary organic acid analysis and plasma homocysteine should be performed in patients with unknown peripheral neuropathy, especially combined with multisystemic damages.Early diagnosis and treatment are important to improve the prognosis. PMID:23591356

  19. Molecular Genetic Characterization of 151 Mut-Type Methylmalonic Aciduria Patients and Identification of 41 Novel Mutations in MUT.

    PubMed

    Forny, Patrick; Schnellmann, Anne-Sophie; Buerer, Celine; Lutz, Seraina; Fowler, Brian; Froese, D Sean; Baumgartner, Matthias R

    2016-08-01

    Isolated methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) is an autosomal-recessive disorder of propionate metabolism that is most commonly caused by mutations in the methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MUT) gene (mut-type MMA). We investigated a cohort of 151 patients, classifying 114 patients as mut(0) and 32 as mut(-) (five not defined). As per the definition, mut(-) patients showed a higher propionate incorporation ratio in vitro, which was correlated to a considerably later age of onset compared with mut(0) patients. In all patients, we found a total of 110 different mutations, of which 41 were novel. While the missense alleles p.Asn219Tyr, p.Arg369His, and p.Arg694Trp recurred in >10 alleles, 47 mutations were identified only once, suggesting many patients carry private mutations. Deficient alleles in the mut(-) subclass were almost exclusively caused by missense mutations, found disproportionately in the C-terminal cofactor binding domain. On the contrary, only half of the mut(0) mutations were of the missense type. Western blot analysis revealed reduced MUT protein for all 34 cell lines (27 mut(0) , seven mut(-) ) tested, suggesting protein instability as a major mechanism of deficiency in mut-type MMA. This large-scale evaluation helps to characterize the landscape of MUT mutations and their relationship to dysfunction and disease. PMID:27167370

  20. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase is overexpressed in malignant pleural mesothelioma: Dramatically responds one case in high OPRT expression

    PubMed Central

    Hamamoto, Yoichiro; Takeoka, Shinjiro; Mouri, Atsuto; Fukusumi, Munehisa; Wakuda, Kazushige; Ibe, Tatsuya; Honma, Chie; Arimoto, Yoshihito; Yamada, Kazuaki; Wagatsuma, Miyuki; Tashiro, Akito; Kamoshida, Shingo; Kamimura, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare and aggressive, treatment-resistant cancer. Pemetrexed, an inhibitor of thymidylate synthase (TS), is used worldwide for MPM as a first-line chemotherapy regimen. However, there is little consensus for a second-line chemotherapy. S-1, a highly effective dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD)-inhibitory fluoropyrimidine, mainly acts via a TS inhibitory mechanism similar to pemetrexed. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRT) is a key enzyme related to the first step activation of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for inhibiting RNA synthesis. We investigated 5-FU related-metabolism proteins, especially focusing on OPRT expression, in MPM Methods and Patients: Fifteen MPM patients who were diagnosed between July 2004 and December 2013 were enrolled. We examined the protein levels of 5-FU metabolism-related enzymes (TS, DPD, OPRT, and thymidine phosphorylase [TP]) in 14 cases Results: High TS, DPD, OPRT, and TP expressions were seen in 28.6%, 71.4%, 85.7%, and 35.7% of patients, respectively. We found that OPRT expression was extremely high in MPM tissue. We experienced one remarkable case of highly effective S-1 combined therapy for pemetrexed refractory MPM. This case also showed high OPRT protein expression Conclusion: The present study suggests that OPRT expression is high in MPM tumors. Although pemetrexed is mainly used for MPM chemotherapy as a TS inhibitor, S-1 has potential as an anticancer drug not only as a TS inhibitor but also inhibiting RNA synthesis through the OPRT pathway. This is the first report investigating OPRT protein expressions in MPM. PMID:27274438

  1. Dietary sea cucumber cerebroside alleviates orotic acid-induced excess hepatic adipopexis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent chronic liver disease in industrialized countries. The present study was undertaken to explore the preventive effect of dietary sea cucumber cerebroside (SCC) extracted from Acaudina molpadioides in fatty liver rats. Methods Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups including normal control group, NAFLD model group, and two SCC-treated groups with SCC at 0.006% and 0.03% respectively. The fatty liver model was established by administration of 1% orotic acid (OA) to the rats. After 10d, serum and hepatic lipid levels were detected. And the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities were also determined. Besides, to gain the potential mechanism, the changes of key enzymes and gene expressions related to the hepatic lipid metabolism were measured. Results Dietary SCC at the level of 0.006% and 0.03% ameliorated the hepatic lipid accumulation in fatty liver rats. SCC administration elevated the serum triglyceride (TG) level and the ALT, AST activities in OA-fed rats. The activities of hepatic lipogenic enzymes including fatty acid synthase (FAS), malic enzyme (ME) and glucose-6-phosphatedehydrogenase (G6PDH) were inhibited by SCC treatment. And the gene expressions of FAS, ME, G6PDH and sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP-1c) were also reduced in rats fed SCC. However, dietary SCC didn't affect the activity and mRNA expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) in liver. Besides, suppression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) activity was observed in SCC-feeding rats. Conclusions These results suggested that dietary SCC could attenuate hepatic steatosis due to its inhibition of hepatic lipogenic gene expression and enzyme activity and the enhancement of TG secretion from liver. PMID:22569330

  2. Methylmalonic aciduria with homocystinuria: biochemical studies, treatment, and clinical course of a Cbl-C patient.

    PubMed

    Ribes, A; Briones, P; Vilaseca, M A; Lluch, M; Rodes, M; Maya, A; Campistol, J; Pascual, P; Suormala, T; Baumgartner, R

    1990-03-01

    A patient with infantile onset methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria (Cbl-C mutant) is described. Therapy with hydroxycobalamin, folate and vitamin B6 improved his condition. As hypomethioninaemia and homocystinaemia persisted, he was treated with intramuscular methylcobalamin, but without success. Treatment with betaine started at 25 months of age, normalized plasma methionine and elicited disappearance of homocystinaemia. Results of biochemical studies in cultured fibroblasts paralleled those described for other Cbl-C patients except that methylmalonyl-coenzyme A mutase activity in disrupted fibroblasts was in the normal range. PMID:2332011

  3. Insights into the mechanism of oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate catalysed by human class 2 dihydroorotate dehydrogenase: a QM/MM free energy study.

    PubMed

    Alves, Cláudio Nahum; Silva, José Rogério A; Roitberg, Adrian E

    2015-07-21

    The dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHOD) enzyme catalyzes the unique redox reaction in the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway. In this reaction, the oxidation of dihydroorotate (DHO) to orotate (OA) and reduction of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor is catalysed by DHOD. The class 2 DHOD, to which the human enzyme belongs, was experimentally shown to follow a stepwise mechanism but the data did not allow the determination of the order of bond-breaking in a stepwise oxidation of DHO. The goal of this study is to understand the reaction mechanism at the molecular level of class 2 DHOD, which may aid in the design of inhibitors that selectively impact the activity of only certain members of the enzyme family. In this paper, the catalytic mechanism of oxidation of DHO to OA in human DHOD was studied using a hybrid Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical (QM/MM) approach and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The free energy barriers calculated reveal that the mechanism in human DHOD occurs via a stepwise reaction pathway. In the first step, a proton is abstracted from the C5 of DHO to the deprotonated Ser215 side chain. Whereas, in the second step, the transfer of the hydride or hydride equivalent from the C6 of DHO to the N5 of FMN, where free energy barrier calculated by the DFT/MM level is 10.84 kcal mol(-1). Finally, a residual decomposition analysis was carried out in order to elucidate the influence of the catalytic region residues during DHO oxidation. PMID:26087682

  4. Glutaric aciduria type 2 presenting with acute respiratory failure in an adult.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, Ebru Ortac; Rama, Dorina; Ünal, Özlem; Sivri, Serap; Topeli, Arzu

    2015-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria (GTA) type II can be seen as late onset form with myopathic phenotype. We present a case of a 19-year old female with progressive muscle weakness was admitted in intensive care unit (ICU) with respiratory failure and acute renal failure. Patient was unconscious. Pupils were anisocoric and light reflex was absent. She had hepatomegaly. The laboratory results showed a glucose level of 70 mg/dl and the liver enzymes were high. The patient also had hyponatremia (117 mEq/L) and lactate level of 3.9 mmol/L. Tandem MS and organic acid analysis were compatible with GTA type II. Carnitine 1gr, riboflavin 100 mg and co-enzymeQ10 100 mg was arranged. After four months from beginning of treatment tandem MS results are improved. Respiratory failure, acute renal failure due to profound proximal myopathy can be due to glutaric aciduria type II that responded rapidly to appropriate therapy. PMID:26236614

  5. Glutaric aciduria type 2 presenting with acute respiratory failure in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy, Ebru Ortac; Rama, Dorina; Ünal, Özlem; Sivri, Serap; Topeli, Arzu

    2015-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria (GTA) type II can be seen as late onset form with myopathic phenotype. We present a case of a 19-year old female with progressive muscle weakness was admitted in intensive care unit (ICU) with respiratory failure and acute renal failure. Patient was unconscious. Pupils were anisocoric and light reflex was absent. She had hepatomegaly. The laboratory results showed a glucose level of 70 mg/dl and the liver enzymes were high. The patient also had hyponatremia (117 mEq/L) and lactate level of 3.9 mmol/L. Tandem MS and organic acid analysis were compatible with GTA type II. Carnitine 1gr, riboflavin 100 mg and co-enzymeQ10 100 mg was arranged. After four months from beginning of treatment tandem MS results are improved. Respiratory failure, acute renal failure due to profound proximal myopathy can be due to glutaric aciduria type II that responded rapidly to appropriate therapy. PMID:26236614

  6. Identification of the gene responsible for the cblB complementation group of vitamin B12-dependent methylmalonic aciduria.

    PubMed

    Dobson, C Melissa; Wai, Timothy; Leclerc, Daniel; Kadir, Hakan; Narang, Monica; Lerner-Ellis, Jordan P; Hudson, Thomas J; Rosenblatt, David S; Gravel, Roy A

    2002-12-15

    The methylmalonic acidurias are metabolic disorders resulting from deficient methylmalonyl-CoA mutase activity, a vitamin B(12)-dependent enzyme. We have cloned the gene for the cblB complementation group caused by deficient activity of a cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase. This was accomplished by searching bacterial genomes for genes in close proximity to the methylmalonyl-CoA mutase gene that might encode a protein with the properties of an adenosyltransferase. A candidate was identified in the Archaeoglobus fulgidus genome and was used to probe the human genome database. It yielded a gene on chromosome 12q24 that encodes a predicted protein of 250 amino acids with 45% similarity to PduO in Salmonella enterica, a characterized cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase. A northern blot revealed an RNA species of 1.1 kb predominating in liver and skeletal muscle. The gene was evaluated for deleterious mutations in cblB patient cell lines. Several mutations were identified including a 5 bp deletion (5del572gggcc576), two splice site mutations (IVS2-1G>T, IVS3-1G>A), andt several point mutations (A135T, R186W, R191W and E193K). Two additional amino acid substitutions (R19Q and M239K) were found in several patient cell lines but were found to be common polymorphisms (36% and 46%) in control alleles. The R186W mutation, which we suggest is disease-linked, is present in four of the six patient cell lines examined (homoallelic in two) and in 4 of 240 alleles in control samples. These data confirm that the identified gene, MMAB, corresponds to the cblB complementation group and has the appearance of a cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase, as predicted from biochemical data. PMID:12471062

  7. Long-term fatty liver-induced insulin resistance in orotic acid-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiuqing; Liu, Chunhua; Xue, Yong; Wang, Jingfeng; Xue, Changhu; Yanagita, Teruyoshi; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Yuming

    2016-04-01

    We investigated whether fatty liver preceded insulin resistance or vice versa using a long-term orotic acid (OA)-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) model without the confounding effects of obesity and hyperlipidemia and explored the role of the liver in insulin resistance. Male Wistar rats were fed with or without OA supplementation for 30, 60, and 90 days. The NAFLD group showed increased liver lipid at 30, 60, and 90 days; glucose intolerance was noted at 60 and 90 days. Furthermore, partial liver proteins and gene expressions related to upstream signaling of insulin were decreased. However, the liver glycogen content was elevated, and gluconeogenesis genes expressions were obviously decreased at 90 days. The occurrence of fatty liver preceded insulin resistance in OA-induced NAFLD without the interference of obesity and hyperlipidemia, and hepatic insulin resistance may not play a conclusive role in insulin resistance in this model. PMID:26775542

  8. A Mouse Model of L-2-Hydroxyglutaric Aciduria, a Disorder of Metabolite Repair

    PubMed Central

    Rzem, Rim; Achouri, Younes; Marbaix, Etienne; Schakman, Olivier; Wiame, Elsa; Marie, Sandrine; Gailly, Philippe; Vincent, Marie-Françoise; Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Van Schaftingen, Emile

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to progress in our understanding of the pathophysiology of L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria, due to a defect in L-2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase, by creating and studying a mouse model of this disease. L-2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase-deficient mice (l2hgdh-/-) accumulated L-2-hydroxyglutarate in tissues, most particularly in brain and testis, where the concentration reached ≈ 3.5 μmol/g. Male mice showed a 30% higher excretion of L-2-hydroxyglutarate compared to female mice, supporting that this dicarboxylic acid is partially made in males by lactate dehydrogenase C, a poorly specific form of this enzyme exclusively expressed in testes. Involvement of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase in the formation of L-2-hydroxyglutarate was supported by the commensurate decrease in the formation of this dicarboxylic acid when down-regulating this enzyme in mouse l2hgdh-/- embryonic fibroblasts. The concentration of lysine and arginine was markedly increased in the brain of l2hgdh-/- adult mice. Saccharopine was depleted and glutamine was decreased by ≈ 40%. Lysine-α-ketoglutarate reductase, which converts lysine to saccharopine, was inhibited by L-2-hydroxyglutarate with a Ki of ≈ 0.8 mM. As low but significant activities of the bifunctional enzyme lysine-α-ketoglutarate reductase/saccharopine dehydrogenase were found in brain, these findings suggest that the classical lysine degradation pathway also operates in brain and is inhibited by the high concentrations of L-2-hydroxyglutarate found in l2hgdh-/- mice. Pathological analysis of the brain showed significant spongiosis. The vacuolar lesions mostly affected oligodendrocytes and myelin sheats, as in other dicarboxylic acidurias, suggesting that the pathophysiology of this model of leukodystrophy may involve irreversible pumping of a dicarboxylate in oligodendrocytes. Neurobehavioral testing indicated that the mice mostly suffered from a deficit in learning capacity. In

  9. Glutaric aciduria type II: biochemical investigation and treatment of a child diagnosed prenatally.

    PubMed

    Bennett, M J; Curnock, D A; Engel, P C; Shaw, L; Gray, R G; Hull, D; Patrick, A D; Pollitt, R J

    1984-01-01

    Two sibs with the acute neonatal form of glutaric aciduria type II (deficient in vivo activity of multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenases) are described. In the second case diagnosis was made prenatally on the basis of reduced oxidation of palmitate by cultured amniotic fluid cells. With prompt intervention in the neonatal period and a carefully controlled diet later, this second progressed well up to 4 months of age but died suddenly of cardiac failure, probably attributable to accumulation of fat. Neither patient showed any congenital morphological abnormality. Cultured fibroblasts from the second case showed a marked defect in the oxidation of a range of substrates requiring acyl-CoA dehydrogenases for their catabolism, but residual activity for some substrates was quite high. Large quantities of sarcosine were excreted in urine, again suggesting that the mutation leaves some residual dehydrogenation activity. Butyryl-, octanoyl- and palmitoyl-CoA dehydrogenases were present in essentially normal quantities in postmortem liver. PMID:6207379

  10. The child with glutaric aciduria type I: anesthetic and perioperative management.

    PubMed

    Tsiotou, Adelais G; Malisiova, Anna; Bouzelos, Nikolaos; Velegrakis, Dimitrios

    2011-04-01

    Glutaric aciduria type I (GA-1) is an inborn error of metabolism caused by a deficiency of glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase. It presents early in life, usually after an episode of fever, dehydration, infection or fasting, and results in metabolic decompensation and neurologic damage. We report the perioperative management of a 5-year-old boy admitted to the hospital for surgery because of neurogenic hip dislocation. Here we present the preoperative preparation, which focused on appropriate fluid administration and therapy intensification, as well as the safe anesthetic management with inhalation anesthesia and remifentanil, taking into consideration the mitochondrial basis of the disease. Furthermore, the role of postoperative care is emphasized in relation to stress response prophylaxis and the avoidance of complications related to the disorder. PMID:21221659

  11. White matter abnormalities in an adult patient with l-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Yoshioka, Seiichiro; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Shino, Shimada; Shimojima, Keiko; Shigematsu, Yosuke; Takeuchi, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-01-01

    l-2-Hydroxyglutaric aciduria (l-2-HGA) is a rare inborn error of metabolism. Mainly, patients with this disorder exhibit neurological symptoms and characteristic neuroradiological findings, such as subcortical white matter abnormalities, which are believed to be caused by the toxicity of the accumulation of l-2-hydroxyglutaric acid. A genotype-first approach of the whole exome sequence was used to identify compound heterozygous mutations, c.584A>G (p.Y195C) and c.772T>C (p.C258R), in L2HGDH, the gene responsible for this disorder, in an adult patient with intellectual disability and intractable epilepsy. A retrospective assay confirmed the increased concentrations of 2-hydroxyglutaric acid in the urine. These results suggested that neuroradiological findings of subcortical white matter abnormalities are characteristic of l-2-HGA and that clinical exome sequencing has sufficient power to compensate for insufficient clinical evaluations. PMID:25982940

  12. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria with bilateral basal ganglia lesion: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HAO, XIAOSHENG; WANG, JIANGTAO; LIU, SONGYAN; CHEN, YINBO; ZHANG, YAN; HAO, YUNPENG

    2016-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria (3-HMG, OMIN 246450) is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by a deficiency of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase, a key enzyme in leucine metabolism and ketone body synthesis. Acute episodes of 3-HMG may be triggered by fasting or infection, and symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy and hypotonia. If left untreated, prolonged hypoglycemia and metabolic acidosis may cause breathing problems, seizures, and coma. In addition, 3-HMG is associated with damage to the central nervous system, and there are several reports of white matter abnormality or cerebral atrophy. The presence of bilateral basal ganglia damage in 3-HMG has been rarely reported. Here, we present a case report of a 20-month old male with severe 3-HMG and prominent bilateral lesions in the basal ganglia. PMID:27284350

  13. Molecular and phenotypic characteristics of seven novel mutations causing branched-chain organic acidurias.

    PubMed

    Stojiljkovic, M; Klaassen, K; Djordjevic, M; Sarajlija, A; Brasil, S; Kecman, B; Grkovic, S; Kostic, J; Rodriguez-Pombo, P; Desviat, L R; Pavlovic, S; Perez, B

    2016-09-01

    Specific mitochondrial enzymatic deficiencies in the catabolism of branched-chain amino acids cause methylmalonic aciduria (MMA), propionic acidemia (PA) and maple syrup urine disease (MSUD). Disease-causing mutations were identified in nine unrelated branched-chain organic acidurias (BCOA) patients. We detected eight previously described mutations: p.Asn219Tyr, p.Arg369His p.Val553Glyfs*17 in MUT, p.Thr198Serfs*6 in MMAA, p.Ile144_Leu181del in PCCB, p.Gly288Valfs*11, p.Tyr438Asn in BCKDHA and p.Ala137Val in BCKDHB gene. Interestingly, we identified seven novel genetic variants: p.Leu549Pro, p.Glu564*, p.Leu641Pro in MUT, p.Tyr206Cys in PCCB, p.His194Arg, p.Val298Met in BCKDHA and p.Glu286_Met290del in BCKDHB gene. In silico and/or eukaryotic expression studies confirmed pathogenic effect of all novel genetic variants. Aberrant enzymes p.Leu549Pro MUT, p.Leu641Pro MUT and p.Tyr206Cys PCCB did not show residual activity in activity assays. In addition, activity of MUT enzymes was not rescued in the presence of vitamin B12 precursor in vitro which was in accordance with non-responsiveness or partial responsiveness of patients to vitamin B12 therapy. Our study brings the first molecular genetic data and detailed phenotypic characteristics for MMA, PA and MSUD patients for Serbia and the whole South-Eastern European region. Therefore, our study contributes to the better understanding of molecular landscape of BCOA in Europe and to general knowledge on genotype-phenotype correlation for these rare diseases. PMID:26830710

  14. Effects of candesartan cilexetil and amlodipine orotate on receptor for advanced glycation end products expression in the aortic wall of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OETFF) type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Kyu; Chung, Woo-Baek; Hong, Seul-Ki; Kim, Ok-Ran; Ihm, Sang-Hyun; Chang, Kiyuk; Seung, Ki-Bae

    2016-04-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays a key role in the development of vascular inflammation and acceleration of atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes. We investigated the effect of candesartan cilexetil (CDRT) and amlodipine orotate (AMDP) on the expression of RAGE in the aortic walls of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats and AGE-treated endothelial cells. Twenty five-week-old OLETF rats were randomized to 8 week treatments consisting of CDRT (n = 8), AMDP (n = 8) or saline (control, n = 8). Immunohistochemical and dihydroethidine staining revealed reduced RAGE and reactive oxygen species (ROS) signals in rats treated with CDRT or AMDP compared with control rats. Both CDRT and AMDP suppressed the expression of p22phox and p47phox NADPH oxidase subunits. However, only CDRT significantly reduced expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase (pERK)1/2 in the aortic wall of OLETF rats. In addition, both drugs reduced RAGE expression and total and mitochondrial ROS production in the AGE-treated endothelial cells. Both ARBs and CCBs reduced RAGE expression in the aortic walls of OLETF rats, which was attributed to decreased ROS production through inhibition of NADPH oxidase. In addition, only CDRT reduced aortic expression of RAGE via suppression of the ERK1/2 pathway unlike AMDP. PMID:26960737

  15. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase from baker's yeast: I. Kinetic analysis, chemical modification, and proton NMR spectroscopy of the enzyme substrate complex. II. Amino acid analysis and NMR spectroscopy of the protein

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    Kinetic analysis of the effect of pH on the reversible reaction catalyzed by orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRTase) from Baker's yeast revealed that different amino acid residues may enable the enzyme-catalyzed reactions to proceed in the forward and reverse directions, respectively. For the forward reaction, there appear to be at least two critical amino acid residues (pK's 4.6 and 7.1) which must be in a deprotonated state to reach a maximum activity near pH 8 which is maintained through pH 9.5. For the reverse reaction, maximum activity is reached near pH 7 (pK's at 5.4) and then the activity decreases at higher pH (pK's at 7.9 and possibly above 9). A theoretical proton NMR spectrum was generated for OPRTase, based on its amino acid composition. The spectrum thus produced has a similar number of major peaks to that of the actual spectrum taken at 300 MHz. Spectra collected at various pH values between 8 and 5, were consistent with the maintenance of the gross conformational structure of the enzyme over that pH range.

  16. Dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase is physically associated with the respiratory complex and its loss leads to mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Fang, JingXian; Uchiumi, Takeshi; Yagi, Mikako; Matsumoto, Shinya; Amamoto, Rie; Takazaki, Shinya; Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Nonaka, Kazuaki; Kang, Dongchon

    2012-01-01

    Some mutations of the DHODH (dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase) gene lead to postaxial acrofacial dysostosis or Miller syndrome. Only DHODH is localized at mitochondria among enzymes of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway. Since the pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway is coupled to the mitochondrial RC (respiratory chain) via DHODH, impairment of DHODH should affect the RC function. To investigate this, we used siRNA (small interfering RNA)-mediated knockdown and observed that DHODH knockdown induced cell growth retardation because of G2/M cell-cycle arrest, whereas pyrimidine deficiency usually causes G1/S arrest. Inconsistent with this, the cell retardation was not rescued by exogenous uridine, which should bypass the DHODH reaction for pyrimidine synthesis. DHODH depletion partially inhibited the RC complex III, decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, and increased the generation of ROS (reactive oxygen species). We observed that DHODH physically interacts with respiratory complexes II and III by IP (immunoprecipitation) and BN (blue native)/SDS/PAGE analysis. Considering that pyrimidine deficiency alone does not induce craniofacial dysmorphism, the DHODH mutations may contribute to the Miller syndrome in part through somehow altered mitochondrial function. PMID:23216091

  17. Type III 3-Methylglutaconic Aciduria (Optic Atrophy Plus Syndrome, or Costeff Optic Atrophy Syndrome): Identification of the OPA3 Gene and Its Founder Mutation in Iraqi Jews

    PubMed Central

    Anikster, Yair; Kleta, Robert; Shaag, Avraham; Gahl, William A.; Elpeleg, Orly

    2001-01-01

    Type III 3-methylglutaconic aciduria (MGA) (MIM 258501) is a neuro-ophthalmologic syndrome that consists of early-onset bilateral optic atrophy and later-onset spasticity, extrapyramidal dysfunction, and cognitive deficit. Urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid and of 3-methylglutaric acid is increased. The disorder has been reported in ∼40 patients of Iraqi Jewish origin, allowing the mapping of the disease to chromosome 19q13.2-q13.3, by linkage analysis. To isolate the causative gene, OPA3, we sequenced four genes within the critical interval and identified, in the intronic sequence of a gene corresponding to cDNA clone FLJ22187, a point mutation that segregated with the type III MGA phenotype. The FLJ22187-cDNA clone, which we identified as the OPA3 gene, consists of two exons and encodes a peptide of 179 amino acid residues. Northern blot analysis revealed a primary transcript of ∼5.0 kb that was ubiquitously expressed, most prominently in skeletal muscle and kidney. Within the brain, the cerebral cortex, the medulla, the cerebellum, and the frontal lobe, compared to other parts of the brain, had slightly increased expression. The intronic G→C mutation abolished mRNA expression in fibroblasts from affected patients and was detected in 8 of 85 anonymous Israeli individuals of Iraqi Jewish origin. Milder mutations in OPA3 should be sought in patients with optic atrophy with later onset, even in the absence of additional neurological abnormalities. PMID:11668429

  18. Fetal progenitor cell transplantation treats methylmalonic aciduria in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, Nicole E.; Pennell, Samuel D.; Wood, Leonie R.; Pitt, James J.; Allen, Katrina J.; Peters, Heidi L.

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fetal cells were transplanted into a methylmalonic acid mouse model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell engraftment was detected in liver, spleen and bone marrow. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biochemical disease correction was measured in blood samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A double dose of 5 million cells (1 week apart) proved more effective. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher levels of engraftment may be required for greater disease correction. -- Abstract: Methylmalonic aciduria is a rare disorder caused by an inborn error of organic acid metabolism. Current treatment options are limited and generally focus on disease management. We aimed to investigate the use of fetal progenitor cells to treat this disorder using a mouse model with an intermediate form of methylmalonic aciduria. Fetal liver cells were isolated from healthy fetuses at embryonic day 15-17 and intravenously transplanted into sub-lethally irradiated mice. Liver donor cell engraftment was determined by PCR. Disease correction was monitored by urine and blood methylmalonic acid concentration and weight change. Initial studies indicated that pre-transplantation sub-lethal irradiation followed by transplantation with 5 million cells were suitable. We found that a double dose of 5 million cells (1 week apart) provided a more effective treatment. Donor cell liver engraftment of up to 5% was measured. Disease correction, as defined by a decrease in blood methylmalonic acid concentration, was effected in methylmalonic acid mice transplanted with a double dose of cells and who showed donor cell liver engraftment. Mean plasma methylmalonic acid concentration decreased from 810 {+-} 156 (sham transplanted) to 338 {+-} 157 {mu}mol/L (double dose of 5 million cells) while mean blood C3 carnitine concentration decreased from 20.5 {+-} 4 (sham transplanted) to 5.3 {+-} 1.9 {mu}mol/L (double dose of 5 million cells). In conclusion, higher levels of engraftment may

  19. Nitric-Oxide Supplementation for Treatment of Long-Term Complications in Argininosuccinic Aciduria

    PubMed Central

    Nagamani, Sandesh C.S.; Campeau, Philippe M.; Shchelochkov, Oleg A.; Premkumar, Muralidhar H.; Guse, Kilian; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Chen, Yuqing; Sun, Qin; Tang, Yaoping; Palmer, Donna; Reddy, Anilkumar K.; Li, Li; Slesnick, Timothy C.; Feig, Daniel I.; Caudle, Susan; Harrison, David; Salviati, Leonardo; Marini, Juan C.; Bryan, Nathan S.; Erez, Ayelet; Lee, Brendan

    2012-01-01

    Argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) is required for the synthesis and channeling of L-arginine to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) for nitric oxide (NO) production. Congenital ASL deficiency causes argininosuccinic aciduria (ASA), the second most common urea-cycle disorder, and leads to deficiency of both ureagenesis and NO production. Subjects with ASA have been reported to develop long-term complications such as hypertension and neurocognitive deficits despite early initiation of therapy and the absence of documented hyperammonemia. In order to distinguish the relative contributions of the hepatic urea-cycle defect from those of the NO deficiency to the phenotype, we performed liver-directed gene therapy in a mouse model of ASA. Whereas the gene therapy corrected the ureagenesis defect, the systemic hypertension in mice could be corrected by treatment with an exogenous NO source. In an ASA subject with severe hypertension refractory to antihypertensive medications, monotherapy with NO supplements resulted in the long-term control of hypertension and a decrease in cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, the NO therapy was associated with an improvement in some neuropsychological parameters pertaining to verbal memory and nonverbal problem solving. Our data show that ASA, in addition to being a classical urea-cycle disorder, is also a model of congenital human NO deficiency and that ASA subjects could potentially benefit from NO supplementation. Hence, NO supplementation should be investigated for the long-term treatment of this condition. PMID:22541557

  20. CLPB Variants Associated with Autosomal-Recessive Mitochondrial Disorder with Cataract, Neutropenia, Epilepsy, and Methylglutaconic Aciduria

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Carol; Smith, Laurie; Wibrand, Flemming; Ravn, Kirstine; Bross, Peter; Thiffault, Isabelle; Christensen, Mette; Atherton, Andrea; Farrow, Emily; Miller, Neil; Kingsmore, Stephen F.; Ostergaard, Elsebet

    2015-01-01

    3-methylglutaconic aciduria (3-MGA-uria) is a nonspecific finding associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, including defects of oxidative phosphorylation. 3-MGA-uria is classified into five groups, of which one, type IV, is genetically heterogeneous. Here we report five children with a form of type IV 3-MGA-uria characterized by cataracts, severe psychomotor regression during febrile episodes, epilepsy, neutropenia with frequent infections, and death in early childhood. Four of the individuals were of Greenlandic descent, and one was North American, of Northern European and Asian descent. Through a combination of homozygosity mapping in the Greenlandic individuals and exome sequencing in the North American, we identified biallelic variants in the caseinolytic peptidase B homolog (CLPB). The causative variants included one missense variant, c.803C>T (p.Thr268Met), and two nonsense variants, c.961A>T (p.Lys321∗) and c.1249C>T (p.Arg417∗). The level of CLPB protein was markedly decreased in fibroblasts and liver of affected individuals. CLPB is proposed to function as a mitochondrial chaperone involved in disaggregation of misfolded proteins, resulting from stress such as heat denaturation. PMID:25597511

  1. CLPB variants associated with autosomal-recessive mitochondrial disorder with cataract, neutropenia, epilepsy, and methylglutaconic aciduria.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Carol; Smith, Laurie; Wibrand, Flemming; Ravn, Kirstine; Bross, Peter; Thiffault, Isabelle; Christensen, Mette; Atherton, Andrea; Farrow, Emily; Miller, Neil; Kingsmore, Stephen F; Ostergaard, Elsebet

    2015-02-01

    3-methylglutaconic aciduria (3-MGA-uria) is a nonspecific finding associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, including defects of oxidative phosphorylation. 3-MGA-uria is classified into five groups, of which one, type IV, is genetically heterogeneous. Here we report five children with a form of type IV 3-MGA-uria characterized by cataracts, severe psychomotor regression during febrile episodes, epilepsy, neutropenia with frequent infections, and death in early childhood. Four of the individuals were of Greenlandic descent, and one was North American, of Northern European and Asian descent. Through a combination of homozygosity mapping in the Greenlandic individuals and exome sequencing in the North American, we identified biallelic variants in the caseinolytic peptidase B homolog (CLPB). The causative variants included one missense variant, c.803C>T (p.Thr268Met), and two nonsense variants, c.961A>T (p.Lys321*) and c.1249C>T (p.Arg417*). The level of CLPB protein was markedly decreased in fibroblasts and liver of affected individuals. CLPB is proposed to function as a mitochondrial chaperone involved in disaggregation of misfolded proteins, resulting from stress such as heat denaturation. PMID:25597511

  2. Interaction of Glutaric Aciduria Type 1-Related glutaryl-CoA Dehydrogenase with Mitochondrial Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schmiesing, Jessica; Schlüter, Hartmut; Ullrich, Kurt; Braulke, Thomas; Mühlhausen, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1) is an inherited neurometabolic disorder caused by mutations in the GCDH gene encoding glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH), which forms homo- and heteromeric complexes in the mitochondrial matrix. GA1 patients are prone to the development of encephalopathic crises which lead to an irreversible disabling dystonic movement disorder. The clinical and biochemical manifestations of GA1 vary considerably and lack correlations to the genotype. Using an affinity chromatography approach we report here for the first time on the identification of mitochondrial proteins interacting directly with GCDH. Among others, dihydrolipoamide S-succinyltransferase (DLST) involved in the formation of glutaryl-CoA, and the β-subunit of the electron transfer flavoprotein (ETFB) serving as electron acceptor, were identified as GCDH binding partners. We have adapted the yellow fluorescent protein-based fragment complementation assay and visualized the oligomerization of GCDH as well as its direct interaction with DLST and ETFB in mitochondria of living cells. These data suggest that GCDH is a constituent of multimeric mitochondrial dehydrogenase complexes, and the characterization of their interrelated functions may provide new insights into the regulation of lysine oxidation and the pathophysiology of GA1. PMID:24498361

  3. A diet-induced mouse model for glutaric aciduria type I.

    PubMed

    Zinnanti, William J; Lazovic, Jelena; Wolpert, Ellen B; Antonetti, David A; Smith, Michael B; Connor, James R; Woontner, Michael; Goodman, Stephen I; Cheng, Keith C

    2006-04-01

    In the autosomal recessive human disease, glutaric aciduria type I (GA-1), glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH) deficiency disrupts the mitochondrial catabolism of lysine and tryptophan. Affected individuals accumulate glutaric acid (GA) and 3-hydroxyglutaric acid (3-OHGA) in the serum and often suffer acute striatal injury in childhood. Prior attempts to produce selective striatal vulnerability in an animal model have been unsuccessful. We hypothesized that acute striatal injury may be induced in GCDH-deficient (Gcdh-/-) mice by elevated dietary protein and lysine. Here, we show that high protein diets are lethal to 4-week-old and 8-week-old Gcdh-/- mice within 2-3 days and 7-8 days, respectively. High lysine alone resulted in vasogenic oedema and blood-brain barrier breakdown within the striatum, associated with serum and tissue GA accumulation, neuronal loss, haemorrhage, paralysis, seizures and death in 75% of 4-week-old Gcdh-/- mice after 3-12 days. In contrast, most 8-week-old Gcdh-/- mice survived on high lysine, but developed white matter lesions, reactive astrocytes and neuronal loss after 6 weeks. Thus, the Gcdh-/- mouse exposed to high protein or lysine may be a useful model of human GA-1 including developmentally dependent striatal vulnerability. PMID:16446282

  4. CLPB Mutations Cause 3-Methylglutaconic Aciduria, Progressive Brain Atrophy, Intellectual Disability, Congenital Neutropenia, Cataracts, Movement Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wortmann, Saskia B.; Ziętkiewicz, Szymon; Kousi, Maria; Szklarczyk, Radek; Haack, Tobias B.; Gersting, Søren W.; Muntau, Ania C.; Rakovic, Aleksandar; Renkema, G. Herma; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Strom, Tim M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Rubio-Gozalbo, M. Estela; Chrusciel, Elzbieta; Distelmaier, Felix; Golzio, Christelle; Jansen, Joop H.; van Karnebeek, Clara; Lillquist, Yolanda; Lücke, Thomas; Õunap, Katrin; Zordania, Riina; Yaplito-Lee, Joy; van Bokhoven, Hans; Spelbrink, Johannes N.; Vaz, Frédéric M.; Pras-Raves, Mia; Ploski, Rafal; Pronicka, Ewa; Klein, Christine; Willemsen, Michel A.A.P.; de Brouwer, Arjan P.M.; Prokisch, Holger; Katsanis, Nicholas; Wevers, Ron A.

    2015-01-01

    We studied a group of individuals with elevated urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid, neutropenia that can develop into leukemia, a neurological phenotype ranging from nonprogressive intellectual disability to a prenatal encephalopathy with progressive brain atrophy, movement disorder, cataracts, and early death. Exome sequencing of two unrelated individuals and subsequent Sanger sequencing of 16 individuals with an overlapping phenotype identified a total of 14 rare, predicted deleterious alleles in CLPB in 14 individuals from 9 unrelated families. CLPB encodes caseinolytic peptidase B homolog ClpB, a member of the AAA+ protein family. To evaluate the relevance of CLPB in the pathogenesis of this syndrome, we developed a zebrafish model and an in vitro assay to measure ATPase activity. Suppression of clpb in zebrafish embryos induced a central nervous system phenotype that was consistent with cerebellar and cerebral atrophy that could be rescued by wild-type, but not mutant, human CLPB mRNA. Consistent with these data, the loss-of-function effect of one of the identified variants (c.1222A>G [p.Arg408Gly]) was supported further by in vitro evidence with the mutant peptides abolishing ATPase function. Additionally, we show that CLPB interacts biochemically with ATP2A2, known to be involved in apoptotic processes in severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) 3 (Kostmann disease [caused by HAX1 mutations]). Taken together, mutations in CLPB define a syndrome with intellectual disability, congenital neutropenia, progressive brain atrophy, movement disorder, cataracts, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. PMID:25597510

  5. Purification of human dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase and its inhibition by A77 1726, the active metabolite of leflunomide.

    PubMed Central

    Bruneau, J M; Yea, C M; Spinella-Jaegle, S; Fudali, C; Woodward, K; Robson, P A; Sautès, C; Westwood, R; Kuo, E A; Williamson, R A; Ruuth, E

    1998-01-01

    Leflunomide is currently in phase-III clinical trials for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, we have focused our efforts on the study of the mechanism of action of the active metabolite of leflunomide, A77 1726, in cells and tissue of human origin. The human high-affinity binding protein for radiolabelled A77 1726 was purified from solubilized U937 membranes by following the binding activity through the purification process and was characterized as the mitochondrial enzyme dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase (DHO-DH). The human and murine enzyme displayed identical pI and molecular mass values on SDS/PAGE (43 kDa), which contrasts notably with previous reports suggesting a molecular mass of 50 kDa for the human enzyme. DHO-DH activity was inhibited by A77 1726 and its analogue HR325 with similar potency in U937 and human spleen membrane preparations. HR325 was found to be anti-proliferative for phytohaemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, at the same concentrations that caused accumulation of DHO and depletion of uridine. Supplementation of the cultures with exogenous uridine led to partial abrogation of the anti-proliferative effect. This is in line with our recent demonstration that the anti-proliferative effect in vitro of A77 1726 on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse spleen cells was mediated by DHO-DH inhibition [Williamson, Yea, Robson, Curnock, Gadher, Hambleton, Woodward, Bruneau, Hambleton, Moss et al., (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 22467-22472]. Thus, DHO-DH inhibition by A77 1726 and its analogues is responsible for the anti-proliferative effects in vitro of the compounds on human cells and is likely to be responsible for some of its effects in vivo. PMID:9820804

  6. Complementation studies of isovaleric acidemia and glutaric aciduria type II using cultured skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Dubiel, B; Dabrowski, C; Wetts, R; Tanaka, K

    1983-01-01

    Using cultured skin fibroblasts, we studied the heterogeneity of inborn errors of leucine metabolism such as isovaleric acidemia (IVA), glutaric aciduria type II (GA II), and multiple carboxylase deficiency (MC). We first developed a simple macromolecular-labeling test to measure the ability of cells to oxidize [1-14C]isovaleric acid in situ in culture. Cells from two different lines were fused using polyethylene glycol, and the ability of the heterokaryons to oxidize [1-14C]isovaleric acid was tested by the macromolecular-labeling test. The MC line complemented with all 10 IVA lines tested; heterokaryons showed 99 +/- 68% more activity than the unfused mixture of component cells. GA II/IVA heterokaryons exhibited poor growth, but when the culture remained confluent, the GA II cells complemented with all six IVA lines tested, showing a 71 +/- 41% increase in activity. The relatively large standard deviations are due to a few experiments in which significant enhancement of macromolecular-labeling test activity was not observed upon fusion, but significant complementation was clearly observed in repeats of the same combinations. These results are consistent with our previous findings, which indicated that the decreased ability of GA II cells to oxidize isovaleryl-CoA involves a defective electron-transporting system rather than a defective isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase. IVA/IVA heterokaryons showed no complementation in any combination tested, indicating no detectable heterogeneity in isovaleric acidemia. This finding indicates that the same gene is mutated in all IVA lines. Previous results indicated that this gene codes for isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase. PMID:6630517

  7. Pharmacological chaperones as a potential therapeutic option in methylmalonic aciduria cblB type.

    PubMed

    Jorge-Finnigan, Ana; Brasil, Sandra; Underhaug, Jarl; Ruíz-Sala, Pedro; Merinero, Begoña; Banerjee, Ruma; Desviat, Lourdes R; Ugarte, Magdalena; Martinez, Aurora; Pérez, Belén

    2013-09-15

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) cblB type is caused by mutations in the MMAB gene. This encodes the enzyme ATP:cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase (ATR), which converts reduced cob(I)alamin to an active adenosylcobalamin cofactor. We recently reported the presence of destabilizing pathogenic mutations that retain some residual ATR activity. The aim of the present study was to seek pharmacological chaperones as a tailored therapy for stabilizing the ATR protein. High-throughput ligand screening of over 2000 compounds was performed; six were found to enhance the thermal stability of purified recombinant ATR. Further studies using a well-established bacterial system in which the recombinant ATR protein was expressed in the presence of these six compounds, showed them all to increase the stability of the wild-type ATR and the p.Ile96Thr mutant proteins. Compound V (N-{[(4-chlorophenyl)carbamothioyl]amino}-2-phenylacetamide) significantly increased this stability and did not act as an inhibitor of the purified protein. Importantly, compound V increased the activity of ATR in patient-derived fibroblasts harboring the destabilizing p.Ile96Thr mutation in a hemizygous state to within control range. When cobalamin was coadministrated with compound V, mutant ATR activity further improved. Oral administration of low doses of compound V to C57BL/6J mice for 12 days, led to increase in steady-state levels of ATR protein in liver and brain (disease-relevant organs). These results hold promise for the clinical use of pharmacological chaperones in MMA cblB type patients harboring chaperone-responsive mutations. PMID:23674520

  8. Pharmacological chaperones as a potential therapeutic option in methylmalonic aciduria cblB type

    PubMed Central

    Jorge-Finnigan, Ana; Brasil, Sandra; Underhaug, Jarl; Ruíz-Sala, Pedro; Merinero, Begoña; Banerjee, Ruma; Desviat, Lourdes R.; Ugarte, Magdalena; Martinez, Aurora; Pérez, Belén

    2013-01-01

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) cblB type is caused by mutations in the MMAB gene. This encodes the enzyme ATP:cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase (ATR), which converts reduced cob(I)alamin to an active adenosylcobalamin cofactor. We recently reported the presence of destabilizing pathogenic mutations that retain some residual ATR activity. The aim of the present study was to seek pharmacological chaperones as a tailored therapy for stabilizing the ATR protein. High-throughput ligand screening of over 2000 compounds was performed; six were found to enhance the thermal stability of purified recombinant ATR. Further studies using a well-established bacterial system in which the recombinant ATR protein was expressed in the presence of these six compounds, showed them all to increase the stability of the wild-type ATR and the p.Ile96Thr mutant proteins. Compound V (N-{[(4-chlorophenyl)carbamothioyl]amino}-2-phenylacetamide) significantly increased this stability and did not act as an inhibitor of the purified protein. Importantly, compound V increased the activity of ATR in patient-derived fibroblasts harboring the destabilizing p.Ile96Thr mutation in a hemizygous state to within control range. When cobalamin was coadministrated with compound V, mutant ATR activity further improved. Oral administration of low doses of compound V to C57BL/6J mice for 12 days, led to increase in steady-state levels of ATR protein in liver and brain (disease-relevant organs). These results hold promise for the clinical use of pharmacological chaperones in MMA cblB type patients harboring chaperone-responsive mutations. PMID:23674520

  9. Increased oxidative stress in patients with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Mello, Mariana; Ribas, Graziela Schmitt; Wayhs, Carlos Alberto Yasin; Hammerschmidt, Tatiane; Guerreiro, Gilian Batista Balbueno; Favenzani, Jéssica Lamberty; Sitta, Ângela; de Moura Coelho, Daniella; Wajner, Moacir; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2015-04-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria (HMGA; OMIM 246450) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, caused by the deficiency of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase (4.1.3.4), which results in the accumulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric (HMG) and 3-methylglutaric (MGA) acids in tissues and biological fluids of affected individuals. Recent in vivo and in vitro animal studies have demonstrated that the accumulation of these metabolites can disturb the cellular redox homeostasis, which can contribute to the neurological manifestations presented by the patients. So, in the present work, we investigated oxidative stress parameters in plasma and urine samples from HMGA patients, obtained at the moment of diagnosis of this disorder and during therapy with low-protein diet and L-carnitine supplementation. It was verified that untreated HMGA patients presented higher levels of urinary di-tyrosine and plasma thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS), which are markers of protein and lipid oxidative damage, respectively, as well as a reduction of the urinary antioxidant capacity. Treated HMGA patients also presented an increased protein oxidative damage, as demonstrated by their higher concentrations of plasma protein carbonyl groups and urinary di-tyrosine, as well as by the reduction of total sulfhydryl groups in plasma, in relation to controls. On the other hand, HMGA patients under therapy presented normal levels of TBA-RS and urinary antioxidant capacity, which can be related, at least in part, to the antioxidant and antiperoxidative effects exerted by L-carnitine. The results of this work are the first report showing that a redox imbalance occurs in patients with HMGA what reinforces the importance of the antioxidant therapy in this disorder. PMID:25557019

  10. Bi-allelic CLPB mutations cause cataract, renal cysts, nephrocalcinosis and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, a novel disorder of mitochondrial protein disaggregation.

    PubMed

    Kanabus, Marta; Shahni, Rojeen; Saldanha, José W; Murphy, Elaine; Plagnol, Vincent; Hoff, William Van't; Heales, Simon; Rahman, Shamima

    2015-03-01

    Whole exome sequencing was used to investigate the genetic cause of mitochondrial disease in two siblings with a syndrome of congenital lamellar cataracts associated with nephrocalcinosis, medullary cysts and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Autosomal recessive inheritance in a gene encoding a mitochondrially targeted protein was assumed; the only variants which satisfied these criteria were c.1882C>T (p.Arg628Cys) and c.1915G>A (p.Glu639Lys) in the CLPB gene, encoding a heat shock protein/chaperonin responsible for disaggregating mitochondrial and cytosolic proteins. Functional studies, including quantitative PCR (qPCR) and Western blot, support pathogenicity of these mutations. Furthermore, molecular modelling suggests that the mutations disrupt interactions between subunits so that the CLPB hexamer cannot form or is unstable, thus impairing its role as a protein disaggregase. We conclude that accumulation of protein aggregates underlies the development of cataracts and nephrocalcinosis in CLPB deficiency, which is a novel genetic cause of 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. A common mitochondrial cause for 3-methylglutaconic aciduria appears to be disruption of the architecture of the mitochondrial membranes, as in Barth syndrome (tafazzin deficiency), Sengers syndrome (acylglycerol kinase deficiency) and MEGDEL syndrome (impaired remodelling of the mitochondrial membrane lipids because of SERAC1 mutations). We now propose that perturbation of the mitochondrial membranes by abnormal protein aggregates leads to 3-methylglutaconic aciduria in CLPB deficiency. PMID:25595726

  11. Effect of betaine on the hepatic damage from orotic acid-induced fatty liver development in rats.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jae-Young; Kim, Hyeong-Soo; Moon, Hyung-In; Cho, Young-Su

    2011-12-13

    Betaine prevents hepatic damage caused by ethanol and carbone tetrachloride (CCl4) in rats. Present study was to investigate the effect of betaine on the hepatic microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) mRNA expression in orotic acid (OA)-induced fatty liver in rats. OA feeding was attributed to the significant increase in the hepatic levels of triglyceride and the serum levels of ALT and AST and resulted in typical histology of fatty liver contained numerous largely fat droplets. While concomitant supplementation of betaine to OA diet was slightly reduced the hepatic triglyceride concentrations and was significantly decreased ALT activity. Hepatic MTP mRNA expression by OA treatment increased by 14% despite triglyceride accumulation in the liver in OA treatment rats relative to rats fed a normal diet without OA supplemented, but MTP expression by simultaneous supplementation of OA and betaine was slightly decreased by 7.9% as compared to the OA-feeding rats. A significant elevation of TBARS contents in the liver homogenate, microsome, and mitochondrial fractions of the OA-feeding rats compared with the normal rats, however, these increases were significantly or slightly decreased by simultaneous addition of OA and betaine. The increases of hepatic OA and betaine levels in OA feeding rats was also found when compared to the normal rats, but these increases were significantly lowered in the concomitant supplementation OA and betaine. The content of Fe was significantly increased in the OA feeding rats, but this elevation showed significantly recovered as low as the normal level by concomitant with OA and betaine. Zinc content was also significantly decreased in the OA feeding rats compared with the normal rats, but this reduction was more significantly elevated by concomitant with OA and betaine. Hepatic glutathione content in the OA feeding rats was similar to that of the normal rats, but this content was slightly reduced without statistically significant

  12. Increased hepatic mitochondrial capacity in rats with hydroxy-cobalamin[c-lactam]-induced methylmalonic aciduria.

    PubMed Central

    Krahenbuhl, S; Ray, D B; Stabler, S P; Allen, R H; Brass, E P

    1990-01-01

    Treatment of rats with the vitamin B12 analogue hydroxy-cobalamin[c-lactam] (HCCL) impairs methylmalonyl-CoA mutase function and leads to methylmalonic aciduria due to intracellular accumulation of propionyl and methylmalonyl-CoA. Since accumulation of these acyl-CoAs disrupts normal cellular regulation, the present investigation characterized metabolism in hepatocytes and liver mitochondria from rats treated subcutaneously with HCCL or saline (control) by osmotic minipump. Consistent with decreased methylmalonyl-CoA mutase activity, 14CO2 production from 1-14C-propionate (1 mM) was decreased by 76% and 82% after 2-3 wk and 5-6 wk of HCCL treatment, respectively. In contrast, after 5-6 wk of HCCL treatment, 14CO2 production from 1-14C-pyruvate (10 mM) and 1-14C-palmitate (0.8 mM) were increased by 45% and 49%, respectively. In isolated liver mitochondria, state 3 oxidation rates were unchanged or decreased, and activities of the mitochondrial enzymes, citrate synthetase, succinate dehydrogenase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase, and glutamate dehydrogenase (expressed per milligram mitochondrial protein) were unaffected by HCCL treatment. In contrast, activities of the same enzymes were significantly increased in both liver homogenate (expressed per gram liver) and isolated hepatocytes (expressed per 10(6) cells) from HCCL-treated rats. The mitochondrial protein per gram liver, calculated on the basis of the recovery of the mitochondrial enzymes, increased by 39% in 5-6 wk HCCL-treated rats. Activities of lactate dehydrogenase, catalase, cyanide-insensitive palmitoyl-CoA oxidation, and arylsulfatase A in liver were not affected by HCCL treatment. Hepatic levels of mitochondrial mRNAs were elevated up to 10-fold in HCCL-treated animals as assessed by Northern blot analysis. Thus, HCCL treatment is associated with enhanced mitochondrial oxidative capacity and an increased mitochondrial protein content per gram liver. Increased mitochondrial oxidative capacity may be a

  13. Glutaric aciduria type II: observations in seven patients with neonatal- and late-onset disease.

    PubMed

    al-Essa, M A; Rashed, M S; Bakheet, S M; Patay, Z J; Ozand, P T

    2000-03-01

    The clinical, biochemical, and neuroradiologic findings and clinical follow-up of seven patients with glutaric aciduria type II are reported. Three phenotypes of the disease are encountered: neonatal-onset form with congenital anomalies (two patients) or without congenital anomalies (three patients) and late-onset form (two patients). The neonatal-onset form presents as an overwhelming illness, with severe hypoglycemia and metabolic acidosis leading to rapid death. Frequently it is associated with perinatal energy deprivation, a neonate with low birth weight and prematurity. The late-onset form presents with intermittent episodes of vomiting, hypoglycemia, and acidosis especially after meals rich in fat and/or proteins. All parents are consanguineous and have a first- or second-degree relationship. Initially, in the two phenotypes with neonatal onset and during crisis in the late-onset phenotype, routine laboratory evaluation showed severe metabolic acidosis, with an increased anion gap, hypoglycemia without ketonuria, and disturbed liver function tests. In the majority of patients with neonatal-onset forms, the kidneys, liver, and at times the spleen are enlarged with an increased echogenic pattern; however, no hepatic or renal cysts are detected. Cardiomegaly is observed in most patients. The diagnosis can be easily and rapidly reached through tandem mass spectrometry study of the blood and can further be confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of the urine organic acids. In this report, the magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography brain studies showed brain atrophy, white matter disease, and in one patient, fluid-filled cavities in the periventricular area and putamina. Fluorine-18-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomographic (FDG PET) brain studies in two patients with late-onset disease showed slightly decreased activity in the cerebral cortex in one and in the caudate nuclei in the other. Brain FDG PET scan and

  14. Brain damage in methylmalonic aciduria: 2-methylcitrate induces cerebral ammonium accumulation and apoptosis in 3D organotypic brain cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Methylmalonic aciduria is an inborn error of metabolism characterized by accumulation of methylmalonate (MMA), propionate and 2-methylcitrate (2-MCA) in body fluids. Early diagnosis and current treatment strategies aimed at limiting the production of these metabolites are only partially effective in preventing neurological damage. Methods To explore the metabolic consequences of methylmalonic aciduria on the brain, we used 3D organotypic brain cell cultures from rat embryos. We challenged the cultures at two different developmental stages with 1 mM MMA, propionate or 2-MCA applied 6 times every 12 h. In a dose–response experiment cultures were challenged with 0.01, 0.1, 0.33 and 1 mM 2-MCA. Immunohistochemical staining for different brain cell markers were used to assess cell viability, morphology and differentiation. Significant changes were validated by western blot analysis. Biochemical markers were analyzed in culture media. Apoptosis was studied by immunofluorescence staining and western blots for activated caspase-3. Results Among the three metabolites tested, 2-MCA consistently produced the most pronounced effects. Exposure to 2-MCA caused morphological changes in neuronal and glial cells already at 0.01 mM. At the biochemical level the most striking result was a significant ammonium increase in culture media with a concomitant glutamine decrease. Dose–response studies showed significant and parallel changes of ammonium and glutamine starting from 0.1 mM 2-MCA. An increased apoptosis rate was observed by activation of caspase-3 after exposure to at least 0.1 mM 2-MCA. Conclusion Surprisingly, 2-MCA, and not MMA, seems to be the most toxic metabolite in our in vitro model leading to delayed axonal growth, apoptosis of glial cells and to unexpected ammonium increase. Morphological changes were already observed at 2-MCA concentrations as low as 0.01 mM. Increased apoptosis and ammonium accumulation started at 0.1 mM thus suggesting that ammonium

  15. Crystal Structure And Mutagenisis of the Metallochaperone MeaB: Insight Into the Causes of the Methylmalonic Aciduria

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, P.A.; Padovani, D.; Labunska, T.; Mahlstedt, S.A.; Banerjee, R.; Drennan, C.L.

    2009-06-01

    MeaB is an auxiliary protein that plays a crucial role in the protection and assembly of the B{sub 12}-dependent enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. Impairments in the human homologue of MeaB, MMAA, lead to methylmalonic aciduria, an inborn error of metabolism. To explore the role of this metallochaperone, its structure was solved in the nucleotide-free form, as well as in the presence of product, GDP. MeaB is a homodimer, with each subunit containing a central {alpha}/{beta}-core G domain that is typical of the GTPase family, as well as a-helical extensions at the N and C termini that are not found in other metalloenzyme chaperone GTPases. The C-terminal extension appears to be essential for nucleotide-independent dimerization, and the N-terminal region is implicated in protein-protein interaction with its partner protein, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. The structure of MeaB confirms that it is a member of the G3E family of P-loop GTPases, which contains other putative metallochaperones HypB, CooC, and UreG. Interestingly, the so-called switch regions, responsible for signal transduction following GTP hydrolysis, are found at the dimer interface of MeaB instead of being positioned at the surface of the protein where its partner protein methylmalonyl-CoA mutase should bind. This observation suggests a large conformation change of MeaB must occur between the GDP- and GTP-bound forms of this protein. Because of their high sequence homology, the missense mutations in MMAA that result in methylmalonic aciduria have been mapped onto MeaB and, in conjunction with mutagenesis data, provide possible explanations for the pathology of this disease.

  16. Two novel compound heterozygous mutations in OPA3 in two siblings with OPA3-related 3-methylglutaconic aciduria

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Christina; Gallo, Linda K.; Dineen, Richard; Ciccone, Carla; Dorward, Heidi; Hoganson, George E.; Wolfe, Lynne; Gahl, William A.; Huizing, Marjan

    2014-01-01

    OPA3-related 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, or Costeff Optic Atrophy syndrome, is a neuro-ophthalmologic syndrome of early-onset bilateral optic atrophy and later-onset spasticity, and extrapyramidal dysfunction. Urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid and of 3-methylglutaric acid is markedly increased. OPA3-related 3-methylglutaconic aciduria is due to mutations in the OPA3 gene located at 19q13.2-13.3. Here we describe two siblings with novel compound heterozygous variants in OPA3: c.1A>G (p.1M>V) in the translation initiation codon in exon 1 and a second variant, c.142+5G>C in intron 1. On cDNA sequencing the c.1A>G appeared homozygous, indicating that the allele without the c.1A>G variant is degraded. This is likely due to an intronic variant; possibly the IVS1+5 splice site variant. The older female sibling initially presented with motor developmental delay and vertical nystagmus during her first year of life and was diagnosed subsequently with optic atrophy. Her brother presented with mildly increased hip muscle tone followed by vertical nystagmus within the first 6 months of life, and was found to have elevated urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid and 3-methylglutaric acid, and optic atrophy by 1.5 years of age. Currently, ages 16 and 7, both children exhibit ataxic gaits and dysarthric speech. Immunofluorescence studies on patient’s cells showed fragmented mitochondrial morphology. Thus, though the exact function of OPA3 remains unknown, our experimental results and clinical summary provide evidence for the pathogenicity of the identified OPA3 variants and provide further evidence for a mitochondrial pathology in this disease. PMID:24749080

  17. C6-C10-dicarboxylic aciduria: biochemical considerations in relation to diagnosis of beta-oxidation defects.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, N; Kølvraa, S; Mortensen, P B; Rasmussen, K

    1982-01-01

    By means of gas chromatographic methods substantial amounts of the C6-C10-dicarboxylic acids, i.e. adipic, suberic and sebacic acids, have been found in the urine from children with unexplained attacks of lethargy and hypotonia, presumably related to episodes of fever and/or insufficient food intake. The course have once been fatal and is often characterized by severe hypoglycemia without ketonuria. Systematic gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric determinations of selected organic acid metabolites in the urine, together with enzymatic measurements in fibroblasts and clinical data from 4 patients of this category, have shown that the biochemical basis of this syndrome can be inborn errors of the beta-oxidation of fatty acids, localized to the medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenation system. The biosynthesis of adipic, suberic and sebacic acids was studied using ketotic rats as the model, since ketosis in rats and humans is accompanied by excessive urinary excretion of adipic and suberic acids. A probable pathway for the production of the three dicarboxylic acids was found to be an initial omega-oxidation of the medium-chain C10-C14-monocarboxylic acids followed by beta-oxidation of the resulting medium-chain dicarboxylic acids. It is argued that the source of the omega-oxidizable monocarboxylic acids in ketosis most probably is the fat deposites, and it is speculated that the patients with beta-oxidation defects supplement this source with beta-oxidation intermediate medium-chain monocarboxylic acids, accumulated as a result of the defect. The ratio between the excreted amounts of adipic acid and sebacic acid in the urine from the patients with beta-oxidation defects is less than 50. This is in contrast to the ratio in urine from ketotic patients, where it is greater than 100. Adipic acid/sebacic acid ratio-measured by means of a gas chromatographic analysis-is therefore suggested as a tool in the diagnosis of dicarboxylic acidurias. Based on the clinical picture and

  18. Biomarker analysis in patients with advanced gastric cancer treated with S-1 plus cisplatin chemotherapy: orotate phosphoribosyltransferase expression is associated with treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Choi, In Sil; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Keun-Wook; Kim, Haeryoung; Kim, Ki Hwan; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kim, Woo Ho; Lee, Jong Seok

    2011-12-01

    This study was performed to analyze the impact of protein expression related to fluoropyrimidine and cisplatin metabolism (thymidylate synthase, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, thymidine phosphorylase, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase [OPRT], excision repair cross-complementation 1, Fanconi anemia complementation group D2, glutathione S-transferase P1, and X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1) on treatment outcomes in patients with metastatic or relapsed gastric cancer (MRGC) receiving S-1/cisplatin chemotherapy. Protein expression was measured by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Of the 43 patients who had received S-1 (80 mg/m2/day; days 1-14) and cisplatin (60 mg/m2; day 1) every 3 weeks and had available tissue blocks, IHC was successfully performed in 41 patients. Patients with high OPRT levels in tumor tissues (IHC score≥6) had superior progression-free survival (PFS) (23.3 vs. 14.1 weeks [median]) and overall survival (OS) (72.4 vs. 55.4 weeks [median]) to those with low OPRT levels (IHC score≤5; P-values<.05). Expression levels of other proteins were not predictive of treatment outcomes. In multivariate analysis, both a good performance status and a high OPRT level were independently associated with prolonged PFS and OS. The OPRT expression level may be a good predictive marker in S-1/cisplatin-treated patients with MRGC. PMID:20533001

  19. Ten novel HMGCL mutations in 24 patients of different origin with 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaric aciduria.

    PubMed

    Menao, Sebastián; López-Viñas, Eduardo; Mir, Cecilia; Puisac, Beatriz; Gratacós, Esther; Arnedo, María; Carrasco, Patricia; Moreno, Susana; Ramos, Mónica; Gil, María Concepción; Pié, Angeles; Ribes, Antonia; Pérez-Cerda, Celia; Ugarte, Magdalena; Clayton, Peter T; Korman, Stanley H; Serra, Dolors; Asins, Guillermina; Ramos, Feliciano J; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Hegardt, Fausto G; Casals, Nuria; Pié, Juan

    2009-03-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder that affects ketogenesis and L-leucine catabolism. The clinical acute symptoms include vomiting, convulsions, metabolic acidosis, hypoketotic hypoglycaemia and lethargy. To date, 33 mutations in 100 patients have been reported in the HMGCL gene. In this study 10 new mutations in 24 patients are described. They include: 5 missense mutations: c.109G>A, c.425C>T, c.521G>A, c.575T>C and c.598A>T, 2 nonsense mutations: c.242G>A and c.559G>T, one small deletion: c.853delC, and 2 mutations in intron regions: c.497+4A>G and c.750+1G>A. Two prevalent mutations were detected, 109G>T (E37X) in 38% of disease alleles analyzed and c.504_505delCT in 10% of them. Although patients are mainly of European origin (71%) and mostly Spanish (54%), the group is ethnically diverse and includes, for the first time, patients from Pakistan, Palestine and Ecuador. We also present a simple, efficient method to express the enzyme and we analyze the possible functional effects of missense mutations. The finding that all identified missense mutations cause a >95% decrease in the enzyme activity, indicates that the disease appears only in very severe genotypes." PMID:19177531

  20. N-Carbamylglutamate Is an Effective Treatment for Acute Neonatal Hyperammonaemia in a Patient with Methylmalonic Aciduria.

    PubMed

    Yap, Sufin; Leong, Huey Yin; Abdul Aziz, Fadzlina; Hassim, Haszlin; Sthaneshwar, Pavai; Teh, Ser Huy; Abdullah, Ili Syazwana; Ngu, Lock Hock; Mohamed, Zulqarnain

    2016-01-01

    N-carbamylglutamate (NCG) has been used in combination with ammonia scavengers (sodium benzoate, sodium phenylbutyrate) and dialysis to treat hyperammonaemia in methylmalonic aciduria (MMA). The sole use of NCG for acute neonatal hyperammonaemia secondary to MMA is demonstrated in a neonate presenting at day 9 with encephalopathy, severe metabolic acidosis, hyperammonaemia (1,089 μmol/l), ketonuria and urinary methylmalonic acids. Emergency treatment included discontinuing protein feeds, providing high calories, carnitine and hydroxocobalamin. NCG 200 mg given at 0 and 90 min decreased plasma ammonia dramatically from 1,089 to 567 µmol/l at 90 min and further to 236 µmol/l at 6 h. Normalisation of ammonia was achieved at 12 h with two further doses of NCG 100 mg. This allowed for early re-institution of feeds at 14 h, followed by metabolic stabilization and recovery. Due to the effectiveness of NCG in this case, the use of the more invasive conventional ammonia-lowering therapeutic options could be avoided. PMID:26907495

  1. Oral and craniofacial findings in a patient with methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria: review and a case report.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, G; Tagariello, T; Piana, G

    2010-03-01

    Combined methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria (MMA-HC) is a rare metabolic disease characterized by an inborn defect in B12 vitamin metabolism. This case report concerns an 11-year-old patient with MMA-HC, which developed during the neonatal period. The patient shows some of the facial features that were already reported in the literature (high forehead, large floppy, low-set ears, flat philtrum and hypotonia of perioral and masticatory muscles) but no dolichocephalic skull nor long face. The patient also shows signs that had not been previously described: epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, long and flat philtrum, amimic expression and, particularly, a postural alteration (the head is rotated and bent towards the left shoulder, which is lower than the right one). Such alteration can be attributed to visual impairment and is responsible for breaking muscular and skeletal balance in the frontal plane, thus causing the horizontal planes of both maxillary bones to converge towards the right--as highlighted by the cephalometric analysis of the Teleradio-graph of the skull in Posteroanterior projection according to Ricketts. As for the patient's teeth, eruption times are normal, but there are anomalies of shape (chisel-like central incisors). As far as dental caries is concerned, the patient's DMFT is 4 (D=4, M=0, F=0). This clinical case highlights the need for dental prevention programs suggested by the pediatrician once the pathology is diagnosed. PMID:20357739

  2. Dilated cardiomyopathy due to type II X-linked 3-methylglutaconic aciduria: successful treatment with pantothenic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Ostman-Smith, I; Brown, G; Johnson, A; Land, J M

    1994-01-01

    A case of dilated cardiomyopathy in a young boy secondary to type II 3-methylglutaconic aciduria is described. A metabolic cause for his dilated cardiomyopathy was suspected because of the development on the electrocardiogram of an unusual "camel's hump" shape of the T waves, and of progressive thickening with increasing echogenicity of the left ventricular wall. He initially improved on digoxin treatment, but did not maintain the response with conventional dietary treatment for this condition. Supplementation with L-carnitine was associated with rapid deterioration in cardiac state, and may be contraindicated in this condition. At a point when the patient was moribund, large doses of pantothenic acid, a precursor of coenzyme A, produced a dramatic and sustained improvement in myocardial function and in growth, neutrophil cell count, hypocholesterolaemia, and hyperuricaemia, which suggests that limitation of availability of coenzyme A is a fundamental pathological process in this condition. The clinical improvement has been maintained for 13 months, and myocardial function is now nearly normal. Oral pantothenol, unlike pantothenic acid, is not efficacious. PMID:7833193

  3. Radioautographic visualization of differences in the pattern of (/sup 3/H)uridine and (/sup 3/H)orotic acid incorporation into the RNA of migrating columnar cells in the rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Uddin, M.; Altmann, G.G.; Leblond, C.P.

    1984-05-01

    The epithelium of rat small intestine was radioautographed to examine whether RNA is synthesized by the salvage pathway as shown after (/sup 3/H)uridine injection or by the de novo pathway as shown after (/sup 3/H)orotic acid injection. The two modes of RNA synthesis were thus investigated during the migration of columnar cells from crypt base to villus top, and the rate of synthesis was assessed by counting silver grains over the nucleolus and nucleoplasm at six levels along the duodenal epithelium - that is, in the base, mid, and top regions of the crypts and in the base, mid, and top regions of the villi. Concomitant biochemical analyses established that, after injection of either (5-/sup 3/H)uridine or (5-/sup 3/H)orotic acid: (a) buffered glutaraldehyde fixative was as effective as perchloric acid or trichloroacetic acid in insolubilizing the nucleic acids of rat small intestine; (b) a major fraction of the nucleic acid label was in RNA, that is, 91% after (/sup 3/H)uridine and 72% after (/sup 3/H)orotic acid, with the rest in DNA; and (c) a substantial fraction of the RNA label was in poly A/sup +/ RNA (presumed to be messenger RNA). In radioautographs of duodenum prepared after (/sup 3/H)uridine injection, the count of silver grains was high over nucleolus and nucleoplasm in crypt base cells and gradually decreased at the upper levels up to the villus base. In the rest of the villus, the grain count over the nucleolus was negligible, while over the nucleoplasm it was low but significant.

  4. Dietary saponins of sea cucumber alleviate orotic acid-induced fatty liver in rats via PPARα and SREBP-1c signaling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common chronic liver disease in the world, and is becoming increasingly prevalent. Saponins of sea cucumber (SSC) are proven to exhibit various biological activities. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to examine the effect of saponins extracted from sea cucumber (Pearsonothuria graeffei) on the preventive activity of fatty liver in rats. Methods Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups, including normal control group, fatty liver model group, SSC-treated group with SSC at levels of 0.01%, 0.03% and 0.05%. Model rats were established by administration with 1% orotic acid (OA). After the experiment period, serum total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), and hepatic lipid concentrations were determined. To search for a possible mechanism, we examined the changes of key enzymes and transcriptional factors involved in hepatic lipids biosynthesis, fatty acid β-oxidation. Results Both 0.03% and 0.05% SSC treatment alleviated hepatic steatosis and reduced serum TG and TC concentration significantly in OA fed rats. Hepatic lipogenic enzymes, such as fatty acid synthase (FAS), malic enzyme (ME), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) activities were inhibited by SSC treatment. SSC also decreased the gene expression of FAS, ME, G6PDH and sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP-1c). Otherwise, the rats feeding with SSC showed increased carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT) activity in the liver. Hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARα), together with its target gene CPT and acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO) mRNA expression were also upregulated by SSC. Conclusions According to our study, the lipids-lowering effect of dietary SSC may be partly associated with the enhancement of β-oxidation via PPARα activation. In addition, the inhibited SREBP-1c- mediated lipogenesis caused by SSC may also contribute to alleviating fatty liver. PMID:20211032

  5. Renal involvement in a patient with cobalamin A type (cblA) methylmalonic aciduria: a 42-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Haarmann, A; Mayr, M; Kölker, S; Baumgartner, E R; Schnierda, J; Hopfer, H; Devuyst, O; Baumgartner, M R

    2013-12-01

    Chronic renal failure is a well-known long-term complication of methylmalonic aciduria (MMA-uria), occurring even under apparently optimal metabolic management. The onset of renal dysfunction seems to be dependent on the type of defect and vitamin B12-responsiveness. We report on a patient with a vitamin B12-responsive cobalamin A type (cblA) MMA-uria caused by a homozygous stop mutation (p.R145X) in the cobalamin A gene (MMAA). She was diagnosed with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage III at the age of 12 years. Following re-evaluation, the patient received vitamin B12 (hydroxocobalamin) treatment, resulting in a significant decrease in the concentration of methylmalonic acid (MMA) in urine and plasma. Until age 29 years glomerular filtration rate remained stable probably due to hydroxocobalamin treatment slowing down progression to end-stage renal failure. Kidney biopsies showed non-specific manifestations of chronic interstitial inflammation. The patient received a renal transplant at age 35 years. Under continuous treatment with hydroxocobalamin there is no evidence of kidney damage due to MMA-uria until the last follow-up 6 years after transplantation. This case report illustrates (i) a long-term follow-up of a patient with MMA-uria due to cblA deficiency, (ii) the involvement of the kidney as a target organ and (iii) the importance of early and adequate vitamin B12 substitution in responsive patients. Further investigation will be necessary to prove the protective effect of hydroxocobalamin in the kidney in vitamin B12-responsive patients. PMID:24095221

  6. Multifactorial modulation of susceptibility to l-lysine in an animal model of glutaric aciduria type I.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Sven W; Opp, Silvana; Komatsuzaki, Shoko; Blank, Anna-Eva; Mittelbronn, Michel; Burgard, Peter; Koeller, D M; Okun, Jürgen G; Kölker, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Glutaric aciduria type I is an inherited defect in L-lysine, L-hydroxylysine and L-tryptophan degradation caused by deficiency of glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH). The majority of untreated patients presents with accumulation of neurotoxic metabolites - glutaric acid (GA) and 3-hydroxyglutaric acid (3-OHGA) - and striatal injury. Gcdh(-/-) mice display elevated levels of GA and 3-OH-GA but do not spontaneously develop striatal lesions. L-lysine-enriched diets (appr. 235 mg/d) were suggested to induce a neurological phenotype similar to affected patients. In our hands 93% of mice stressed according to the published protocol remained asymptomatic. To understand the underlying mechanism, we modified their genetic background (F1 C57BL6/Jx129/SvCrl) and increased the daily oral L-lysine supply (235-433 mg). We identified three modulating factors, (1) gender, (2) genetic background, and (3) amount of L-lysine. Male mice displayed higher vulnerability and inbreeding for more than two generations as well as elevating L-lysine supply increased the diet-induced mortality rate (up to 89%). Onset of first symptoms leads to strongly reduced intake of food and, thus, L-lysine suggesting a threshold for toxic metabolite production to induce neurological disease. GA and 3-OH-GA tissue concentrations did not correlate with dietary L-lysine supply but differed between symptomatic and asymptomatic mice. Cerebral activities of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex, and aconitase were decreased. Symptomatic mice did not develop striatal lesions or intracerebral hemorrhages. We found severe spongiosis in the hippocampus of Gcdh(-/-) mice which was independent of dietary L-lysine supply. In conclusion, the L-lysine-induced pathology in Gcdh(-/-) mice depends on genetic and dietary parameters. PMID:25558815

  7. Multiple Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenation Deficiency (Glutaric Aciduria Type II) with a Novel Mutation of Electron Transfer Flavoprotein-Dehydrogenase in a Cat.

    PubMed

    Wakitani, Shoichi; Torisu, Shidow; Yoshino, Taiki; Hattanda, Kazuhisa; Yamato, Osamu; Tasaki, Ryuji; Fujita, Haruo; Nishino, Koichiro

    2014-01-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (MADD; also known as glutaric aciduria type II) is a human autosomal recessive disease classified as one of the mitochondrial fatty-acid oxidation disorders. MADD is caused by a defect in the electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or ETF dehydrogenase (ETFDH) molecule, but as yet, inherited MADD has not been reported in animals. Here we present the first report of MADD in a cat. The affected animal presented with symptoms characteristic of MADD including hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, vomiting, diagnostic organic aciduria, and accumulation of medium- and long-chain fatty acids in plasma. Treatment with riboflavin and L-carnitine ameliorated the symptoms. To detect the gene mutation responsible for MADD in this case, we determined the complete cDNA sequences of feline ETFα, ETFβ, and ETFDH. Finally, we identified the feline patient-specific mutation, c.692T>G (p.F231C) in ETFDH. The affected animal only carries mutant alleles of ETFDH. p.F231 in feline ETFDH is completely conserved in eukaryotes, and is located on the apical surface of ETFDH, receiving electrons from ETF. This study thus identified the mutation strongly suspected to have been the cause of MADD in this cat. PMID:24142280

  8. Next generation sequencing of patients with mut methylmalonic aciduria: Validation of somatic cell studies and identification of 16 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jordan; Pupavac, Mihaela; Watkins, David; Tian, Xia; Feng, Yanming; Chen, Stella; Fenter, Remington; Zhang, Victor W; Wang, Jing; Wong, Lee-Jun; Rosenblatt, David S

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in the MUT gene, which encodes the mitochondrial enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, are responsible for the mut form of methylmalonic aciduria (MMA). In this study, a next generation sequencing (NGS) based gene panel was used to analyze 53 patients that had been diagnosed with mut MMA by somatic cell complementation analysis. A total of 54 different mutations in MUT were identified in 48 patients; 16 novel mutations were identified, including 1 initiation site mutation (c.2T>C [p.M1?]), 1 missense mutation (c.566A>T [p.N189I]), 2 nonsense mutations (c.129G>A [p.W43*] and c.1975C>T [p.Q659*]), 2 mutations affecting splice sites (c.753+3A>G and c.754-2A>G), 8 small insertions, deletions, and duplications (c.29dupT [p.L10Ffs*39], c.55dupG [p.V19Gfs*30], c.631_633delGAG [p.E211del], c.795_796insT [p.M266Yfs*7], c.1061delCinsGGA [p.S354Wfs*20], c.1065_1068dupATGG [p.S357Mfs*5], c.1181dupT [p.L394Ffs*30], c.1240delG [p.E414Kfs*17]), a large insertion (c.146_147ins279), and a large deletion involving exon 13. Phenotypic rescue and cDNA analysis were used to confirm that the c.146_147ins279 and c.631_633delGAG mutations were associated with the decreased methylmalonyl-CoA mutase function observed in the patient fibroblasts. In five patients, the NGS panel did not confirm the diagnosis made by complementation analysis. One of these patients was found to carry 2 novel mutations (c.433G > A [p.E145K] and c.511A>C [p.N171H]) in the SUCLG1 gene. PMID:27233228

  9. Methylmalonic and propionic acidurias: management without or with a few supplements of specific amino acid mixture.

    PubMed

    Touati, G; Valayannopoulos, V; Mention, K; de Lonlay, P; Jouvet, P; Depondt, E; Assoun, M; Souberbielle, J C; Rabier, D; Ogier de Baulny, H; Saudubray, J-M

    2006-01-01

    In a series of 137 patients with methylmalonic acidaemia (MMA) and propionic acidaemia (PA) diagnosed since the early 1970s, we report in more detail 81 patients (51 MMA and 30 PA) diagnosed between 1988 and 2005. In this series, 14% of patients died at initial access revealing the disease before or despite treatment, 18% died later, and the remainder (68%) are still alive. All patients were treated with the same protocol of enteral feeds with a low-protein diet adjusted to individual tolerance, carnitine, antibiotics, and only occasional use of an amino acid (AA) mixture. There was intensive follow-up and monitoring using measurements of urinary urea. Thirty-nine patients with severe forms, followed for more than 3 years, are analysed in particular detail. Of the 17 PA patients, 6 had moderate disability (all neonatal-onset forms), whereas 11 were normal or slightly delayed in their mental development. Four presented with cardiomyopathy, of whom 2 died. Of the 22 MMA patients, 13 presented in the neonatal period, of whom 3 died later, 2 are in renal failure and only 5 are still alive and have a normal or slightly delayed mental development. In the 9 patients with late-onset forms, there were no deaths and all patients but one have normal mental development. Among the 39 patients, only 40% were given an AA supplement at 3 years, and 50% between 6 and 11 years. The actual intake of natural protein was 0.92, 0.78 and 0.77 g/kg per day at 3, 6 and 11 years, respectively, in patients without AA supplementation, whereas it was 0.75, 0.74 and 0.54 g/kg per day in the group who received small quantities of AA (0.4-0.6 g/kg per day). In both groups, feeding disorders were frequent: 55% at 3 years, 35% at 6 years and 12% at 11 years. Many patients were given a food supplement by tube overnight or were even exclusively tube fed: 60% at 3 years, 48% at 6 years and still 27% at 11 years. Growth velocity was near the normal values. Plasma valine and isoleucine were low to very

  10. Proteomic and Biochemical Studies of Lysine Malonylation Suggest Its Malonic Aciduria-associated Regulatory Role in Mitochondrial Function and Fatty Acid Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Colak, Gozde; Pougovkina, Olga; Dai, Lunzhi; Tan, Minjia; Te Brinke, Heleen; Huang, He; Cheng, Zhongyi; Park, Jeongsoon; Wan, Xuelian; Liu, Xiaojing; Yue, Wyatt W; Wanders, Ronald J A; Locasale, Jason W; Lombard, David B; de Boer, Vincent C J; Zhao, Yingming

    2015-11-01

    The protein substrates of sirtuin 5-regulated lysine malonylation (Kmal) remain unknown, hindering its functional analysis. In this study, we carried out proteomic screening, which identified 4042 Kmal sites on 1426 proteins in mouse liver and 4943 Kmal sites on 1822 proteins in human fibroblasts. Increased malonyl-CoA levels in malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD)-deficient cells induces Kmal levels in substrate proteins. We identified 461 Kmal sites showing more than a 2-fold increase in response to MCD deficiency as well as 1452 Kmal sites detected only in MCD-/- fibroblast but not MCD+/+ cells, suggesting a pathogenic role of Kmal in MCD deficiency. Cells with increased lysine malonylation displayed impaired mitochondrial function and fatty acid oxidation, suggesting that lysine malonylation plays a role in pathophysiology of malonic aciduria. Our study establishes an association between Kmal and a genetic disease and offers a rich resource for elucidating the contribution of the Kmal pathway and malonyl-CoA to cellular physiology and human diseases. PMID:26320211

  11. Nucleic acid labeling with ( sup 3 H)orotic acid and nucleotide profile in rats in protein deprivation, enteral and parenteral essential amino acid administration, and 5-fluorouracil treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsson, B.; el Hag, I.A.; Andersson, M.; Christensson, P.I.; Stenram, U. )

    1990-09-01

    Rats were fed a 0% casein diet for 1 week, with or without enteral or parenteral administration of essential amino acids, or a 25% casein diet, in one group supplemented with 5-fluorouracil treatment. Ninety minutes before sacrifice the rats were given a tracer of (3H)orotic acid. Incorporation into the acid soluble fraction, RNA, and DNA was determined in liver, small intestine, bone marrow, and kidney. Nucleotide profile was examined in liver and intestine. Protein deficiency caused inter alia a decrease in body weight; a decrease in RNA/DNA ratio and an increase in the specific RNA labeling in liver and kidney; an altered nucleotide profile in the liver; an increase in the nucleotide/DNA and RNA/DNA ratios and a decrease in the specific labeling of the acid soluble fraction, RNA, and DNA in the bone marrow. These changes were prevented to the same extent by giving essential amino acids, either orally or intravenously. The minor changes in intestinal nucleotide profile in protein deprivation were prevented to a slightly larger extent by amino acids orally than parenterally. 5-Fluorouracil treatment gave a decrease in the RNA/DNA ratio in the liver and kidney but an increase in the nucleotide/DNA and RNA/DNA ratios in the bone marrow. Nucleotide profiles were unaltered. The amount of DNA per gram of tissue decreased in bone marrow and increased in kidney. Parenteral administration per se resulted in almost no changes.

  12. Genetic and cellular studies of oxidative stress in methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) cobalamin deficiency type C (cblC) with homocystinuria (MMACHC).

    PubMed

    Richard, Eva; Jorge-Finnigan, Ana; Garcia-Villoria, Judit; Merinero, Begoña; Desviat, Lourdes R; Gort, Laura; Briones, Paz; Leal, Fátima; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Ribes, Antonia; Ugarte, Magdalena; Pérez, Belén

    2009-11-01

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) cobalamin deficiency type C (cblC) with homocystinuria (MMACHC) is the most frequent genetic disorder of vitamin B(12) metabolism. The aim of this work was to identify the mutational spectrum in a cohort of cblC-affected patients and the analysis of the cellular oxidative stress and apoptosis processes, in the presence or absence of vitamin B(12). The mutational spectrum includes nine previously described mutations: c.3G>A (p.M1L), c.217C>T (p.R73X), c.271dupA (p.R91KfsX14), c.331C>T (p.R111X), c.394C>T (p.R132X), c.457C>T (p.R153X), c.481C>T (p.R161X), c.565C>A (p.R189S), and c.615C>G (p.Y205X), and two novel changes, c.90G>A (p.W30X) and c.81+2T>G (IVS1+2T>G). The most frequent change was the known c.271dupA mutation, which accounts for 85% of the mutant alleles characterized in this cohort of patients. Owing to its high frequency, a real-time PCR and subsequent high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis for this mutation has been established for diagnostic purposes. All cell lines studied presented a significant increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, and also a high rate of apoptosis, suggesting that elevated ROS levels might induce apoptosis in cblC patients. In addition, ROS levels decreased in hydroxocobalamin-incubated cells, indicating that cobalamin might either directly or indirectly act as a scavenger of ROS. ROS production might be considered as a phenotypic modifier in cblC patients, and cobalamin supplementation or additional antioxidant drugs might suppress apoptosis and prevent cellular damage in these patients. PMID:19760748

  13. First reported case of lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI) in Lithuania, confirmed biochemically and by DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Cimbalistiene, Loreta; Lehnert, Willy; Huoponen, Kirsi; Kucinskas, Vaidutis

    2007-01-01

    We report on an 18-year-old Lithuanian girl with hepatosplenomegaly noticed at birth, which progressed thereafter. The patient had to wait about 17 years for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate therapy. Lactase deficiency, congenital cataract of the right eye, and osteoporosis were observed. Episodes of drowsiness were caused by intake of high-protein food. Laboratory findings included slight hyperammonaemia, high plasma Citr, Ala, Gly, Glu, Ser levels, as well as citrullinuria, lysinuria, glutaminuria, alaninuria, argininuria, prolinuria, hydroxyprolinuria, ornithinuria, and orotic aciduria. Aversion to high-protein diet strongly suggested a disorder resulting in hyperammonaemia. Citrullinaemia was suspected. Subsequently the diagnosis of LPI was made on the basis of biochemical and clinical features. Molecular genetic testing revealed a mutation in the SLC7A7 gene, confirming the diagnosis. PMID:17666782

  14. Genetics Home Reference: argininosuccinic aciduria

    MedlinePlus

    ... belongs to a class of genetic diseases called urea cycle disorders. The urea cycle is a sequence of reactions that occur ... by the body, to make a compound called urea that is excreted by the kidneys. In argininosuccinic ...

  15. Revealing Rembrandt

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The power and significance of artwork in shaping human cognition is self-evident. The starting point for our empirical investigations is the view that the task of neuroscience is to integrate itself with other forms of knowledge, rather than to seek to supplant them. In our recent work, we examined a particular aspect of the appreciation of artwork using present-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our results emphasized the continuity between viewing artwork and other human cognitive activities. We also showed that appreciation of a particular aspect of artwork, namely authenticity, depends upon the co-ordinated activity between the brain regions involved in multiple decision making and those responsible for processing visual information. The findings about brain function probably have no specific consequences for understanding how people respond to the art of Rembrandt in comparison with their response to other artworks. However, the use of images of Rembrandt's portraits, his most intimate and personal works, clearly had a significant impact upon our viewers, even though they have been spatially confined to the interior of an MRI scanner at the time of viewing. Neuroscientific studies of humans viewing artwork have the capacity to reveal the diversity of human cognitive responses that may be induced by external advice or context as people view artwork in a variety of frameworks and settings. PMID:24795552

  16. Revealing Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prockter, L. M.; Solomon, S. C.; Head, J. W.; Watters, T. R.; Murchie, S. L.; Robinson, M. S.; Chapman, C. R.; McNutt, R. L.

    2009-04-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, developed under NASA's Discovery Program, launched in August 2004. En route to insertion into orbit about Mercury in 2011, MESSENGER flies by Mercury three times. The first and second of these encounters were accomplished in January and October of 2008. These flybys viewed portions of Mercury's surface that were not observed by Mariner 10 during its reconnaissance of somewhat less than half of the planet in 1974-1975. All MESSENGER instruments operated during each flyby and returned a wealth of new data. Many of the new observations were focused on the planet's geology, including monochrome imaging at resolutions as high as 100 m/pixel, multispectral imaging in 11 filters at resolutions as high as 500 m/pixel, laser altimetry tracks extending over several thousands of kilometers, and high-resolution spectral measurements of several types of terrain. Here we present an overview of the first inferences on the global geology of Mercury from the MESSENGER observations. Whereas evidence for volcanism was equivocal from Mariner 10 data, the new MESSENGER images and altimetry provide compelling evidence that volcanism was widespread and protracted on Mercury. Color imaging reveals three common spectral units on the surface: a higher-reflectance, relatively red material occurring as a distinct class of smooth plains, typically with distinct embayment relationships interpreted to indicate volcanic emplacement; a lower-reflectance, relatively blue material typically excavated by impact craters and therefore inferred to be more common at depth; and a spectrally intermediate terrain that constitutes much of the uppermost crust. Three more minor spectral units are also seen: fresh crater ejecta, reddish material associated with rimless depressions interpreted to be volcanic centers, and high-reflectance deposits seen in some crater floors. Preliminary measurements of crater size

  17. How Are Preferences Revealed?

    PubMed Central

    Beshears, John; Choi, James J.; Laibson, David; Madrian, Brigitte C.

    2009-01-01

    Revealed preferences are tastes that rationalize an economic agent’s observed actions. Normative preferences represent the agent’s actual interests. It sometimes makes sense to assume that revealed preferences are identical to normative preferences. But there are many cases where this assumption is violated. We identify five factors that increase the likelihood of a disparity between revealed preferences and normative preferences: passive choice, complexity, limited personal experience, third-party marketing, and intertemporal choice. We then discuss six approaches that jointly contribute to the identification of normative preferences: structural estimation, active decisions, asymptotic choice, aggregated revealed preferences, reported preferences, and informed preferences. Each of these approaches uses consumer behavior to infer some property of normative preferences without equating revealed and normative preferences. We illustrate these issues with evidence from savings and investment outcomes. PMID:24761048

  18. N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency and the treatment of hyperammonemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Elpeleg, Orly; Shaag, Avraham; Ben-Shalom, Efrat; Schmid, Tal; Bachmann, Claude

    2002-12-01

    Carbamylphosphate synthase is the first enzymatic reaction of the urea cycle. Its activator, N-acetylglutamate, is synthesized from acetyl-CoA and glutamate in a reaction catalyzed by N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS). We have identified the putative human NAGS gene and report the first mutation in this gene in a family with carbamylglutamate responsive hyperammonemia and normal activity of the urea cycle enzymes. Mutation analysis has a higher diagnostic specificity than the enzymatic assay in NAGS deficiency. A therapeutic trial with carbamylglutamate is recommended whenever hyperammonemia without an organic aciduria, increased orotate excretion, or diagnostic amino acidemia/uria is detected. PMID:12447942

  19. US weapons secrets revealed

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, R.S.; Arkin, W.M.

    1993-03-01

    Extraordinary details have only recently been revealed about the struggle over the control of early U.S. nuclear weapons and their initial deployments abroad. The information comes from a newly declassified top secret report, part of a larger study, The History of the Strategic Arms Competition, 1945-1972, commissioned by Defense Secretary James R. Schlisinger in summer 1974.

  20. Revealing power in truth

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kelley

    2015-01-01

    Jeremy Shiffman’s editorial appropriately calls on making all forms of power more apparent and accountable, notably productive power derived from expertise and claims to moral authority. This commentary argues that relationships based on productive power can be especially difficult to reveal in global health policy because of embedded notions about the nature of power and politics. Yet, it is essential to recognize that global health is shot through with power relationships, that they can take many forms, and that their explicit acknowledgement should be part of, rather than factored out of, any reform of global health governance. PMID:25844390

  1. The Universe Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Pam

    1998-10-01

    The Universe is a bewildering place to the uninitiated. The concepts and theories that govern space seem complex and often contradictory. The Universe Revealed provides the keys to unlocking the wonders of the cosmos. Elegantly written and lavishly illustrated, it begins with the Sun and stretches through our solar system into deepest space. Lucid prose, written by many of the people who have shaped our current thinking on space, and spectacular photographs make the physics of the Universe accessible and provide a solid background for understanding the most recent astronomical discoveries. Covering the most intriguing features of the cosmos, the topics discussed range from the Earth and global warming to cosmic collisions and the size of the Universe. Major sections examine the Solar System, stars, galaxies, cosmology, and the observational techniques used by astronomers, both amateur and professional. The Universe Revealed represents the collaboration of internationally renowned experts in astronomy and cosmology, with contributions from authors including David Malin, F. Duccio Macchetto, Iain Nicholson, Neil Bone, Ian Ridpath, Seth Shostak, Mike Lancaster, Steve Miller, Ken Croswell, Geoff McNamara, and Steven Young. This extraordinary blend of astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology, will appeal to amateur and armchair astronomers alike.

  2. Gusev's Rim Revealed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this panoramic camera image on sol 91 (April 5, 2004). Spirit is looking to the southeast, and through the martian haze has captured the rim of Gusev Crater approximately 80 kilometers (49.7 miles) away on the horizon.

    The right side of this image reveals the portion of the crater edge that descends into the mouth of Ma'adim Vallis, a channel that opens into Gusev Crater. Spirit is currently traveling toward the informally named 'Columbia Hills,' which lie to the left of the region pictured here.

    This image is similar to a panoramic camera image taken on sol 68, but Gusev's ridge is more visible here because the atmospheric dust caused by winter dust storms has settled. Scientists expect to get even clearer images than this one in upcoming sols.

    This image has been modified to make the crater rim more visible.

  3. Titan Casts Revealing Shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    A rare celestial event was captured by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory as Titan -- Saturn's largest moon and the only moon in the Solar System with a thick atmosphere -- crossed in front of the X-ray bright Crab Nebula. The X-ray shadow cast by Titan allowed astronomers to make the first X-ray measurement of the extent of its atmosphere. On January 5, 2003, Titan transited the Crab Nebula, the remnant of a supernova explosion that was observed to occur in the year 1054. Although Saturn and Titan pass within a few degrees of the Crab Nebula every 30 years, they rarely pass directly in front of it. "This may have been the first transit of the Crab Nebula by Titan since the birth of the Crab Nebula," said Koji Mori of Pennsylvania State University in University Park, and lead author on an Astrophysical Journal paper describing these results. "The next similar conjunction will take place in the year 2267, so this was truly a once in a lifetime event." Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Chandra's observation revealed that the diameter of the X-ray shadow cast by Titan was larger than the diameter of its solid surface. The difference in diameters gives a measurement of about 550 miles (880 kilometers) for the height of the X-ray absorbing region of Titan's atmosphere. The extent of the upper atmosphere is consistent with, or slightly (10-15%) larger, than that implied by Voyager I observations made at radio, infrared, and ultraviolet wavelengths in 1980. "Saturn was about 5% closer to the Sun in 2003, so increased solar heating of Titan may account for some of this atmospheric expansion," said Hiroshi Tsunemi of Osaka University in Japan, one of the coauthors on the paper. The X-ray brightness and extent of the Crab Nebula made it possible to study the tiny X-ray shadow cast by Titan during its transit. By using Chandra to precisely track Titan's position, astronomers were able to measure a shadow one arcsecond in

  4. Revealing the Beast Within

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    Deeply Embedded Massive Stellar Clusters Discovered in Milky Way Powerhouse Summary Peering into a giant molecular cloud in the Milky Way galaxy - known as W49 - astronomers from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) have discovered a whole new population of very massive newborn stars . This research is being presented today at the International Astronomical Union's 25th General Assembly held in Sydney, Australia, by ESO-scientist João Alves. With the help of infrared images obtained during a period of excellent observing conditions with the ESO 3.5-m New Technology Telescope (NTT) at the La Silla Observatory (Chile), the astronomers looked deep into this molecular cloud and discovered four massive stellar clusters, with hot and energetic stars as massive as 120 solar masses. The exceedingly strong radiation from the stars in the largest of these clusters is "powering" a 20 light-year diameter region of mostly ionized hydrogen gas (a "giant HII region"). W49 is one of the most energetic regions of star formation in the Milky Way. With the present discovery, the true sources of the enormous energy have now been revealed for the first time, finally bringing to an end some decades of astronomical speculations and hypotheses. PR Photo 21a/03 : Colour Composite of W49A (NTT+SOFI). PR Photo 21b/03 : Radio and Near-Infrared Composite of W49A Giant molecular clouds Stars form predominantly inside Giant Molecular Clouds which populate our Galaxy, the Milky Way. One of the most prominent of these is W49 , which has a mass of a million solar masses. It is located some 37,000 light-years away and is the most luminous star-forming region known in our home galaxy: its luminosity is several million times the luminosity of our Sun. A smaller region within this cloud is denoted W49A - this is one of the strongest radio-emitting areas known in the Galaxy . Massive stars are excessive in all ways. Compared to their smaller and ligther brethren, they form at an Olympic speed and

  5. Genetics Home Reference: combined malonic and methylmalonic aciduria

    MedlinePlus

    ... plays a role in the formation (synthesis) of fatty acids. Fatty acids are building blocks used to make fats (lipids). ... malonyl-CoA, which is the first step of fatty acid synthesis in cellular structures called mitochondria . Based on ...

  6. Ischemic Colitis Revealing Polyarteritis Nodosa

    PubMed Central

    Hamzaoui, Amira; Litaiem, Noureddine; Smiti Khanfir, M.; Ayadi, Sofiene; Nfoussi, Haifa; Houman, M. H.

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic colitis is one of the most common intestinal ischemic injuries. It results from impaired perfusion of blood to the bowel and is rarely caused by vasculitis. We report a case of ischemic colitis revealing polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) in a 55-year-old man. Histological examination of the resected colon led to the diagnosis of PAN. PMID:24382967

  7. Electrocardiograph abnormalities revealed during laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Dubrey, Simon William

    2010-01-01

    This brief case presents a well patient in whom an electrocardiograph abnormality consistent with an accessory pathway was found during a routine procedure. We present the electrocardiographs, explain the underlying condition, and consider why the abnormality was revealed in this manner. PMID:22419949

  8. Urticarial vasculitis reveals unsuspected thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Olga; Mota, Alberto; Baudrier, Teresa; Azevedo, Filomena

    2012-01-01

    A 38-year-old woman presented with erythematous, violaceous plaques with a serpiginous and unusual appearance located on the left shoulder, left thigh, and right buttock, evolving for 5 days, which eventually became generalized. A skin biopsy revealed leukocytoclastic vasculitis and a diagnosis of urticarial vasculitis was made. The complete blood count, biochemistry, complement levels, and other immunological test results were unremarkable. However, antithyroid antibody titers were increased. Despite having normal thyroid function tests and an absence of specific symptoms, the patient underwent a thyroid ultrasound, which revealed features of thyroiditis, and was subsequently referred to an endocrinologist. Several diseases can be associated with urticarial vasculitis, namely infections and autoimmune connective-tissue disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren syndrome. Thyroiditis is an uncommon association. PMID:23000939

  9. Identification of metabolites produced by Phanerochaete chrysosporium in the presence of amlodipine orotate using metabolomics.

    PubMed

    De Sotto, R B; Kim, K I; Kim, S; Song, K G; Park, Y

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals are very useful in treating human diseases but they are excreted to the environment sometimes in their original form or as byproducts of human metabolism. Pharmaceuticals and their metabolites have been proven by studies to be harmful to non-target ecological species and may be persistent in different water matrices. In this regard, there is an emergent need to eliminate these compounds to prevent their adverse effects on aquatic species. Biodegradation using white-rot fungi is a promising technology for the removal of recalcitrant compounds; however, products of fungal biodegradation can also be detrimental. In this novel study, we evaluated the ability of Phanerochaete chrysosporium to degrade amlodipine, an anti-hypertensive drug which was recently found in water systems. Analysis of amlodipine metabolites was done using quadrupole time-of-flight liquid chromatography mass spectrometry after the degradation set-up of 120 hours. Pharmaceutical degradation was seen using triple quadrupole liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Ninety-two significant metabolites (P-value ≤ 0.05) were significantly expressed after false discovery rate adjustment at a significance threshold of q = 0.05. Pyridine derivatives which were identified from samples became the basis of the proposed degradation pathway of amlodipine in this study. PMID:26398029

  10. CMB source apportionment during REVEAL

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenthal, D.H.; Gertler, A.W.; Wittorff, D.; Sakiyama, S.

    1997-01-01

    Source contributions to PM{sub 2.5} aerosol measured at Chilliwack and Pitt Meadows in the Lower Fraser Valley, B.C., Canada, during the REVEAL study, were estimated using chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor modeling. ON average, motor vehicles accounted for 34 and 43% of PM{sub 2.5} at Chilliwack and Pitt Meadows, respectively. Secondary sulfate and secondary nitrate were the next most significant PM{sub 2.5} components, accounting for 25 and 27%, respectively, at Chilliwack, and 27 and 12%, respectively, at Pitt Meadows. Geological material accounted for 3 and 5% of PM{sub 2.5} at Chilliwack and Pitt Meadows, respectively. A significant contribution of wood smoke was estimated for both sites: 8% at Chilliwack and 9% at Pitt Meadows.

  11. Archimedes: Accelerator Reveals Ancient Text

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2004-02-24

    Archimedes (287-212 BC), who is famous for shouting 'Eureka' (I found it) is considered one of the most brilliant thinkers of all times. The 10th-century parchment document known as the 'Archimedes Palimpsest' is the unique source for two of the great Greek's treatises. Some of the writings, hidden under gold forgeries, have recently been revealed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory at SLAC. An intense x-ray beam produced in a particle accelerator causes the iron in original ink, which has been partly erased and covered, to send out a fluorescence glow. A detector records the signal and a digital image showing the ancient writings is produced. Please join us in this fascinating journey of a 1,000-year-old parchment from its origin in the Mediterranean city of Constantinople to a particle accelerator in Menlo Park.

  12. Plan competitions reveal entrepreneurial talent

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, Alison L.

    2011-05-15

    Monthly economic diversity column for Tri-City Herald business section. Excerpt below: There’s something to be said for gaining valuable real-world experience in a structured, nurturing environment. Take for instance learning to scuba dive in the comfort of my resort pool rather than immediately hanging out with sharks while I figure out little things like oxygen tanks and avoiding underwater panic attacks. Likewise, graduate students are getting some excellent, supportive real-world training through university business plan competitions. These competitions are places where smart minds, new technologies, months of preparation and coaching, and some healthy pre-presentation jitters collide to reveal not only solid new business ideas, but also some promising entrepreneurial talent. In fact, professionals from around our region descend upon college campuses every spring to judge these events, which help to bridge the gap between academics and the real technology and business-driven economy.

  13. Revealing ontological commitments by magic.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Thomas L

    2015-03-01

    Considering the appeal of different magical transformations exposes some systematic asymmetries. For example, it is more interesting to transform a vase into a rose than a rose into a vase. An experiment in which people judged how interesting they found different magic tricks showed that these asymmetries reflect the direction a transformation moves in an ontological hierarchy: transformations in the direction of animacy and intelligence are favored over the opposite. A second and third experiment demonstrated that judgments of the plausibility of machines that perform the same transformations do not show the same asymmetries, but judgments of the interestingness of such machines do. A formal argument relates this sense of interestingness to evidence for an alternative to our current physical theory, with magic tricks being a particularly pure source of such evidence. These results suggest that people's intuitions about magic tricks can reveal the ontological commitments that underlie human cognition. PMID:25490128

  14. Dunes reveal Titan's recent history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Christopher J.; Radebaugh, Jani

    2010-04-01

    Large fields of linear dunes are abundant on Titan, covering nearly 20% of the surface. They are among the youngest features and represent interactions between near-surface winds and sediment. This interaction may vary from area to area creating unique populations of eolian features identified by dune field parameters such as crest-to-crest spacing, dune width and orientation. These parameters respond to changes in near-surface conditions over periods of time ranging from minutes to many thousands of years depending on dune size and the duration of the changes. While pattern analysis of dune field parameters on Earth and, in this study, Titan reveals much about current climatic conditions, such as wind regimes and wetter vs. drier areas, many inferences about past conditions can also be made. Initial pattern analysis of linear dunes on Titan reveals a single population of linear dunes representing a large percentage of all observed dunes. This single population is the result of two leading possibilities: Either there has been only one long period of dune building, leading to very old cores that have been built upon over long periods of time, perhaps punctuated with few or many intervals of non-deposition; or the current conditions of dune building have persisted long enough to completely erase any evidence of previous conditions. We have not yet worked through all the input parameters to adjust Earth's time scales to Titan's, and thus it is not yet possible to give a precise age for Titan's dunes. However, if these large linear dunes are similar to Earth's large linear dunes, they may represent at least several thousand years of dune building.

  15. Erosion and what it Reveals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 20 November 2003

    This image is located near the boundary between Syrtis Major and Isidis Planitia. The top of the image shows rough material that has eroded away from the lower portion of the image, revealing an underlying surface that has many small craters. It also reveals an ancient flow lobe that is barely discernable, crossing the southern part of the image (this flow lobe is much easier to see as a smooth region in the context image).

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 16.4, Longitude 77.9 East (282.1 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  16. APEX reveals glowing stellar nurseries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Illustrating the power of submillimetre-wavelength astronomy, an APEX image reveals how an expanding bubble of ionised gas about ten light-years across is causing the surrounding material to collapse into dense clumps that are the birthplaces of new stars. Submillimetre light is the key to revealing some of the coldest material in the Universe, such as these cold, dense clouds. Glowing Stellar Nurseries ESO PR Photo 40/08 Glowing Stellar Nurseries The region, called RCW120, is about 4200 light years from Earth, towards the constellation of Scorpius. A hot, massive star in its centre is emitting huge amounts of ultraviolet radiation, which ionises the surrounding gas, stripping the electrons from hydrogen atoms and producing the characteristic red glow of so-called H-alpha emission. As this ionised region expands into space, the associated shock wave sweeps up a layer of the surrounding cold interstellar gas and cosmic dust. This layer becomes unstable and collapses under its own gravity into dense clumps, forming cold, dense clouds of hydrogen where new stars are born. However, as the clouds are still very cold, with temperatures of around -250˚ Celsius, their faint heat glow can only be seen at submillimetre wavelengths. Submillimetre light is therefore vital in studying the earliest stages of the birth and life of stars. The submillimetre-wavelength data were taken with the LABOCA camera on the 12-m Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope, located on the 5000 m high plateau of Chajnantor in the Chilean Atacama desert. Thanks to LABOCA's high sensitivity, astronomers were able to detect clumps of cold gas four times fainter than previously possible. Since the brightness of the clumps is a measure of their mass, this also means that astronomers can now study the formation of less massive stars than they could before. The plateau of Chajnantor is also where ESO, together with international partners, is building a next generation submillimetre telescope, ALMA

  17. Hubble Images Reveal Jupiter's Auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    These images, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, reveal changes in Jupiter's auroral emissions and how small auroral spots just outside the emission rings are linked to the planet's volcanic moon, Io. The images represent the most sensitive and sharply-detailed views ever taken of Jovian auroras.

    The top panel pinpoints the effects of emissions from Io, which is about the size of Earth's moon. The black-and-white image on the left, taken in visible light, shows how Io and Jupiter are linked by an invisible electrical current of charged particles called a 'flux tube.' The particles - ejected from Io (the bright spot on Jupiter's right) by volcanic eruptions - flow along Jupiter's magnetic field lines, which thread through Io, to the planet's north and south magnetic poles. This image also shows the belts of clouds surrounding Jupiter as well as the Great Red Spot.

    The black-and-white image on the right, taken in ultraviolet light about 15 minutes later, shows Jupiter's auroral emissions at the north and south poles. Just outside these emissions are the auroral spots. Called 'footprints,' the spots are created when the particles in Io's 'flux tube' reach Jupiter's upper atmosphere and interact with hydrogen gas, making it fluoresce. In this image, Io is not observable because it is faint in the ultraviolet.

    The two ultraviolet images at the bottom of the picture show how the auroral emissions change in brightness and structure as Jupiter rotates. These false-color images also reveal how the magnetic field is offset from Jupiter's spin axis by 10 to 15 degrees. In the right image, the north auroral emission is rising over the left limb; the south auroral oval is beginning to set. The image on the left, obtained on a different date, shows a full view of the north aurora, with a strong emission inside the main auroral oval.

    The images were taken by the telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 between May 1994 and September 1995.

    This image and

  18. Pharmacophore Modeling for Anti-Chagas Drug Design Using the Fragment Molecular Orbital Method

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Kazuki; Orita, Masaya; Inoue, Masayuki; Shiba, Tomoo; Harada, Shigeharu; Honma, Teruki; Balogun, Emmanuel Oluwadare; da Rocha, Josmar Rodrigues; Montanari, Carlos Alberto; Kita, Kiyoshi; Sekijima, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a neglected tropical disease that causes severe human health problems. To develop a new chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of Chagas disease, we predicted a pharmacophore model for T. cruzi dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (TcDHODH) by fragment molecular orbital (FMO) calculation for orotate, oxonate, and 43 orotate derivatives. Methodology/Principal Findings Intermolecular interactions in the complexes of TcDHODH with orotate, oxonate, and 43 orotate derivatives were analyzed by FMO calculation at the MP2/6-31G level. The results indicated that the orotate moiety, which is the base fragment of these compounds, interacts with the Lys43, Asn67, and Asn194 residues of TcDHODH and the cofactor flavin mononucleotide (FMN), whereas functional groups introduced at the orotate 5-position strongly interact with the Lys214 residue. Conclusions/Significance FMO-based interaction energy analyses revealed a pharmacophore model for TcDHODH inhibitor. Hydrogen bond acceptor pharmacophores correspond to Lys43 and Lys214, hydrogen bond donor and acceptor pharmacophores correspond to Asn67 and Asn194, and the aromatic ring pharmacophore corresponds to FMN, which shows important characteristics of compounds that inhibit TcDHODH. In addition, the Lys214 residue is not conserved between TcDHODH and human DHODH. Our analysis suggests that these orotate derivatives should preferentially bind to TcDHODH, increasing their selectivity. Our results obtained by pharmacophore modeling provides insight into the structural requirements for the design of TcDHODH inhibitors and their development as new anti-Chagas drugs. PMID:25961853

  19. Revealing ionic motion molecular solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurzo, I.; Zahn, D. R. T.

    2006-01-01

    Thin films of mixed valence semiconductor copper-tetracyano-quinodimethane (Cu-TCNQ) and small molecule tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum (Alq3) were investigated by current-voltage (I-V) and admittance (C-V,G-V) techniques in single-layer configuration with different combinations of electrodes. The predicted hysteresis of I-V curves and nearly constant loss (NCL) could be observed for both materials. When cycling devices between negative and positive biases, slowly decaying ionic transient currents interfere with steady-state currents and point to unidirectional motions of the ionic species with subsequent redox reaction at one of the electrodes. Plotting the frequency f dependence of the equivalent parallel capacitance at zero bias as log10 C(0) versus log10(f), the dielectric behavior of Cu-TCNQ and Alq3 complies with the effective-medium model for NCL in ionic conductors [J. R. Macdonald J. Appl. Phys. 94, 558 (2003)]. It also holds for a similar plot of the equivalent parallel zero-bias conductance G(0). The nature of the revealed mobile ions is discussed with emphasis on their sources.

  20. Plant transcriptomes reveal hidden guests.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiao; Wang, Guirong; Pelosi, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    With the wide adoption of transcriptome sequencing an ever increasing amount of information is becoming available, together with spurious data originating from contamination. We show that sometimes errors and inaccuracy can turn beneficial, revealing insect and arthropod pests when analysing plant transcriptomes. We have found a large number of soluble olfactory proteins, odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) and chemosensory proteins (CSPs), in plant databases, likely due to contamination by guest insects. In fact, both classes of proteins are only expressed in insects, with few CSPs also present in other arthropods. In addition, we found many sequences of the Niemann-Pick (Npc2) family, proteins dedicated to cholesterol transport in vertebrates and hypothesised to be involved in chemical communication in insects, but absent in plants. In several cases we were able to trace down members of the three classes of proteins to the insect or arthopod species responsible for contamination. Our work suggests that genes found in plants and recognised as contaminants can be turned into useful information to investigate plant-insect relationships or to identify new sequences from insects species not yet investigated. PMID:27130825

  1. Reveal for Salmonella test system.

    PubMed

    Bird, C B; Miller, R L; Miller, B M

    1999-01-01

    The Reveal for Salmonella (RSS) test system is a presumptive qualitative test that detects the presence of Salmonella organisms in foods within 21 h total testing time, allowing the user to release negative products 24 h earlier than when using other rapid test kits. Foods are enriched with a proprietary resuscitation medium called Revive and then selectively enriched with either Selenite Cystine or Rappaport-Vassiliadis selective media. The enriched culture is used to inoculate the RSS detection device, which initiates a lateral flow through a reagent zone containing anti-Salmonella antibodies conjugated to colloidal gold particles that capture antigens present in the culture. The antigen-antibody complex migrates farther and is captured by an additional anti-Salmonella antibody, causing the colloidal gold to precipitate and form a visual line, indicating a positive result. A procedural control line also will form regardless of the presence of Salmonella organisms to indicate the test is working properly. Existing AOAC Official Methods for Salmonella organisms require a 48 h enrichment before testing. Hence, a food product has to be held before release, adding extra cost to the company and the consumer. The RSS test system was evaluated by quantitative spiking studies. Although AOAC encourages inclusion of naturally contaminated foods, almost all microbiological AOAC validation studies have been performed with artificially contaminated foods for absolute control over the study. The RSS test system is designed to test many food types for Salmonella organisms and has a limit of detection of 5-10 colony-forming units (cfu)/25 g with a false-negative rate of < 1% and a false-positive rate of < 5.0%. It showed an 81% overall agreement with the traditional procedure of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety Inspection Service. PMID:10367381

  2. Focus groups reveal consumer ambivalence.

    PubMed

    1983-01-01

    According to qualitative research, Salvadoreans are ambivalent about the use of contraceptives. Since complete responsibility for management of the CSM project was accepted by the Association Demografica Salvadorena (ADS), the agency which operates the contraceptive social marketing project in El Salvador, in November 1980, the need for decisions in such areas as product price increases, introduction of new condom brands, promotion of the vaginal foaming tablet, and assessment of product sales performance had arisen. The ICSMP funded market research, completed during 1983, was intended to provide the data on which such decisions by ADS could be based. The qualitative research involved 8 focus groups, comprised of men and women, aged 18-45, contraceptive users and nonusers, from the middle and lower socioeconomic strata of the city of San Salvador and other suburban areas. In each group a moderator led discussion of family planning and probed respondents for specific attitudes, knowledge, and behavior regarding the use of contraceptives. To assess attitudes at a more emotional level, moderators asked respondents to "draw" their ideas on certain issues. A marked discrepancy was revealed between respondents' intellectual responses to the issues raised in group discussion, as opposed to their feelings expressed in the drawings. Intellectually, participants responded very positively to family planning practice, but when they were asked to draw their perceptions, ambivalent feelings emerged. Drawings of both the user and the nonuser convey primarily negative aspects for either choice. The user is tense and moody toward her children; the nonuser loses her attractiveness and "dies." Figures also show drawings of some of the attitudes of single and married male participants. 1 drawing shows an incomplete and a complete circle, symbolizing a sterilized man (incomplete) and a nonsterilized man (complete). Another picture depicts a chained man who has lost his freedom

  3. Structure of Human B12 Trafficking Protein CblD Reveals Molecular Mimicry and Identifies a New Subfamily of Nitro-FMN Reductases.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazuhiro; Gherasim, Carmen; Banerjee, Ruma; Koutmos, Markos

    2015-12-01

    In mammals, B12 (or cobalamin) is an essential cofactor required by methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. A complex intracellular pathway supports the assimilation of cobalamin into its active cofactor forms and delivery to its target enzymes. MMADHC (the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type D protein), commonly referred to as CblD, is a key chaperone involved in intracellular cobalamin trafficking, and mutations in CblD cause methylmalonic aciduria and/or homocystinuria. Herein, we report the first crystal structure of the globular C-terminal domain of human CblD, which is sufficient for its interaction with MMADHC (the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type C protein), or CblC, and for supporting the cytoplasmic cobalamin trafficking pathway. CblD contains an α+β fold that is structurally reminiscent of the nitro-FMN reductase superfamily. Two of the closest structural relatives of CblD are CblC, a multifunctional enzyme important for cobalamin trafficking, and the activation domain of methionine synthase. CblD, CblC, and the activation domain of methionine synthase share several distinguishing features and, together with two recently described corrinoid-dependent reductive dehalogenases, constitute a new subclass within the nitro-FMN reductase superfamily. We demonstrate that CblD enhances oxidation of cob(II)alamin bound to CblC and that disease-causing mutations in CblD impair the kinetics of this reaction. The striking structural similarity of CblD to CblC, believed to be contiguous in the cobalamin trafficking pathway, suggests the co-option of molecular mimicry as a strategy for achieving its function. PMID:26364851

  4. A New Mouse Model of Mild Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency (spf-j) Displays Cerebral Amino Acid Perturbations at Baseline and upon Systemic Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Tarasenko, Tatyana N.; Rosas, Odrick R.; Singh, Larry N.; Kristaponis, Kara; Vernon, Hilary; McGuire, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD, OMIM# 311250) is an inherited X-linked urea cycle disorder that is characterized by hyperammonemia and orotic aciduria. In this report, we describe a new animal model of OTCD caused by a spontaneous mutation in the mouse Otc gene (c.240T>A, p.K80N). This transversion in exon 3 of ornithine transcarbamylase leads to normal levels of mRNA with low levels of mature protein and is homologous to a mutation that has also been described in a single patient affected with late-onset OTCD. With higher residual enzyme activity, spf-J were found to have normal plasma ammonia and orotate. Baseline plasma amino acid profiles were consistent with mild OTCD: elevated glutamine, and lower citrulline and arginine. In contrast to WT, spf-J displayed baseline elevations in cerebral amino acids with depletion following immune challenge with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid. Our results indicate that the mild spf-J mutation constitutes a new mouse model that is suitable for mechanistic studies of mild OTCD and the exploration of cerebral pathophysiology during acute decompensation that characterizes proximal urea cycle dysfunction in humans. PMID:25647322

  5. Propionic acidemia and hyperlysinemia in a case with ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Krieger, I; Bachmann, C; Gronemeyer, W H; Cejka, J

    1976-10-01

    A female infant with episodic hyperammonemia due to a disorder of the urea cycle and who had hyperlysinemia and an unusual elevation of short chain fatty acids, mainly propionate, is described. Both occurred apparently only during attacks of hyperammonemia. Propionic acidemia was ruled out by enzyme studies. OTC deficiency was diagnosed on the basis of: 1) decreased enzyme activity in leukocytes;2) hyperammonemia in response to protein intakes in excess of 2.0 g/kg/day; 3) orotic aciduria in the patient and her asymptomatic mother; 4) suggestive evidence of x-linked dominant inheritance; and 5) exclusion of citrullinemia, argininosuccinic aciduria, argininemia, and disorders of lysine metabolism that are associated with hyperammonemia. Homocitrullinuria, presence of epsilon-N-acetyl-l-lysine in urine, and absence of saccharopine indicate deficiency of the saccharopine pathway of lysine degradation. However, alpha-ketoglutarate reductase was normal in fibroblasts. Since these metabolites were observed only in conjunction with hyperammonemia but not after a lysine load, we suggest that there was competition between ammonia and lysine for alpha-ketoglutarate. The link between disorders of the urea cycle and short chain fatty acid metabolism remains unexplained.. PMID:977722

  6. REVEAL: Software Documentation and Platform Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Veibell, Victoir T.; Freudinger, Lawrence C.

    2008-01-01

    The Research Environment for Vehicle Embedded Analysis on Linux (REVEAL) is reconfigurable data acquisition software designed for network-distributed test and measurement applications. In development since 2001, it has been successfully demonstrated in support of a number of actual missions within NASA s Suborbital Science Program. Improvements to software configuration control were needed to properly support both an ongoing transition to operational status and continued evolution of REVEAL capabilities. For this reason the project described in this report targets REVEAL software source documentation and deployment of the software on a small set of hardware platforms different from what is currently used in the baseline system implementation. This report specifically describes the actions taken over a ten week period by two undergraduate student interns and serves as a final report for that internship. The topics discussed include: the documentation of REVEAL source code; the migration of REVEAL to other platforms; and an end-to-end field test that successfully validates the efforts.

  7. Revealing advantage in a quantum network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Kaushiki; Paul, Biswajit; Sarkar, Debasis

    2016-07-01

    The assumption of source independence was used to reveal nonlocal (apart from standard Bell-CHSH scenario) nature of correlations generated in entanglement swapping experiments. In this work, we have discussed the various utilities of this assumption to reveal nonlocality (via generation of nonbilocal correlations) and thereby exploiting quantumness under lesser requirements compared to some standard means of doing the same. We have also provided with a set of sufficient criteria, imposed on the states (produced by the sources) under which source independence can reveal nonbilocal nature of correlations in a quantum network.

  8. Hiding personal information reveals the worst

    PubMed Central

    John, Leslie K.; Barasz, Kate; Norton, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    Seven experiments explore people’s decisions to share or withhold personal information, and the wisdom of such decisions. When people choose not to reveal information—to be “hiders”—they are judged negatively by others (experiment 1). These negative judgments emerge when hiding is volitional (experiments 2A and 2B) and are driven by decreases in trustworthiness engendered by decisions to hide (experiments 3A and 3B). Moreover, hiders do not intuit these negative consequences: given the choice to withhold or reveal unsavory information, people often choose to withhold, but observers rate those who reveal even questionable behavior more positively (experiments 4A and 4B). The negative impact of hiding holds whether opting not to disclose unflattering (drug use, poor grades, and sexually transmitted diseases) or flattering (blood donations) information, and across decisions ranging from whom to date to whom to hire. When faced with decisions about disclosure, decision-makers should be aware not just of the risk of revealing, but of what hiding reveals. PMID:26755591

  9. REVEAL: Software Documentation and Platform Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Veibell, Victoir T.

    2011-01-01

    The Research Environment for Vehicle Embedded Analysis on Linux (REVEAL) is reconfigurable data acquisition software designed for network-distributed test and measurement applications. In development since 2001, it has been successfully demonstrated in support of a number of actual missions within NASA's Suborbital Science Program. Improvements to software configuration control were needed to properly support both an ongoing transition to operational status and continued evolution of REVEAL capabilities. For this reason the project described in this report targets REVEAL software source documentation and deployment of the software on a small set of hardware platforms different from what is currently used in the baseline system implementation. This presentation specifically describes the actions taken over a ten week period by two undergraduate student interns and serves as an overview of the content of the final report for that internship.

  10. Omics strategies for revealing Yersinia pestis virulence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruifu; Du, Zongmin; Han, Yanping; Zhou, Lei; Song, Yajun; Zhou, Dongsheng; Cui, Yujun

    2012-01-01

    Omics has remarkably changed the way we investigate and understand life. Omics differs from traditional hypothesis-driven research because it is a discovery-driven approach. Mass datasets produced from omics-based studies require experts from different fields to reveal the salient features behind these data. In this review, we summarize omics-driven studies to reveal the virulence features of Yersinia pestis through genomics, trascriptomics, proteomics, interactomics, etc. These studies serve as foundations for further hypothesis-driven research and help us gain insight into Y. pestis pathogenesis. PMID:23248778

  11. Eye Movements Reveal Dynamics of Task Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ulrich; Kuhns, David; Rieter, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    With the goal to determine the cognitive architecture that underlies flexible changes of control settings, we assessed within-trial and across-trial dynamics of attentional selection by tracking of eye movements in the context of a cued task-switching paradigm. Within-trial dynamics revealed a switch-induced, discrete delay in onset of…

  12. PULMONARY ARTERY ACCELERATED FLOW REVEALING HODGKIN'S LYMPHOMA.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Tony; Chehab, Ghassan; Saliba, Zakhia; Smayra, Tarek; Baz, Maria; Abdo, Lynn; Haddad, Fady; Abdel-Massih, Tony

    2016-01-01

    We present a case in which transthoracic echocardiography was the first diagnostic tool to suspect mediastinal Hodgkin's lymphoma by revealing a change in the hemodynamic of left pulmonary artery flow, and it was used as a follow-up method for monitoring treatment efficacy by demonstrating a normalization of pulmonary artery hemodynamics. PMID:27169170

  13. Revealing a Child's Pathology: Physicians' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scelles, Regine; Aubert-Godard, Anne; Gargiulo, Marcela; Avant, Monique; Gortais, Jean

    2010-01-01

    In this study, 12 physicians and 12 care-givers were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. We explored physicians' experiences when they revealed a diagnosis. We also tried to understand which family members the physician was thinking of, with whom they identified themselves, and their first choice of the person to whom they prefer to…

  14. [Factor VII deficiency revealed by intracranial hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Sfaihi Ben Mansour, L; Thabet, A; Aloulou, H; Turki, H; Chabchoub, I; Mhiri, F; Mnif, Z; Ben Ali, H; Kammoun, T; Hachicha, M

    2009-07-01

    Constitutional factor VII deficiency is a hereditary disease with recessive autosomic transmission. Its incidence is estimated to be 1/1,000,000 in the general population. We report a case of severe factor VII deficiency in infancy revealed by an intracranial hemorrhage in a 2-month-old infant. We describe the clinical, biological and therapeutic characteristics of this disease. PMID:19409767

  15. [Skin metastases revealing a bronchial adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Zemmez, Youssef; Zegmout, Adil; Hamama, Jalal; Bouhamidi, Ahmed; El Amraoui, Mohammed; El Azhari, Jaouad; Boui, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of bronchial carcinoma revealed by metastatic skin nodules on the scalp. This fairly common mode of discovery is often associated with poor prognosis. This study aims to underline the importance of directing the search for a primary lung cancer in cases of secondary skin involvement. PMID:27583066

  16. The cattle genome reveals its secrets

    PubMed Central

    Burt, David W

    2009-01-01

    The domesticated cow is the latest farm animal to have its genome sequenced and deciphered. The members of the Bovine Genome Consortium have published a series of papers on the assembly and what the sequence reveals so far about the biology of this ruminant and the consequences of its domestication. PMID:19439025

  17. Septic sacroiliitis revealing an infectious endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Hariz, Anis; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 43-year-old man admitted for right hip ache and fever. Physical examination revealed a fever, an ache at the manipulation of the sacroiliac joint and a limitation of abduction and external rotation of the right hip. There was no murmur in cardiac auscultation. No anomaly was found at the conventional radiographs of the sacroiliac joint, while the pelvic MRI confirmed a right sacroiliitis. A sacroiliac puncture with a study of synovial fluid demonstrated the presence of Streptococcus viridans. The blood culture revealed the same germ. Transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography confirmed infectious endocarditis with vegetation in the mitral valve. He received penicillin G and gentamicin relayed by pristinamycin because of an allergy to penicillin G with a total duration of treatment of 40 days. His symptoms and the laboratory and radiological tests abnormalities resolved totally with no recurrence. PMID:25123569

  18. Orbital tumor revealing a systemic sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Hannanachi Sassi, Samia; Dhouib, Rim; Kanchal, Fatma; Doghri, Raoudha; Boujelbene, Nadia; Bouguila, Hedi; Mrad, Karima

    2015-01-01

    Ocular involvement is seen in approximately 25% of patients with sarcoidosis. Uveitis is the most common ocular manifestation, but sarcoidosis may involve any part of the eye. Orbital manifestations of sarcoidosis are uncommon with few series in the literature. A 65-year-old woman presented with redness of the right eye and painless, unilateral eyelid swelling. Orbital scanning revealed mass infiltrating the soft tissue of the inferior right orbital quadrant. Biopsy results showed nodular, noncaseating granulomas consistent with sarcoidosis. The complete systemic workup revealed systemic manifestations of sarcoidosis at the time of examination with hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathies noted on CT scan. The orbital surgical treatment was followed by systemic prednisone therapy with good response. Although rare, orbital sarcoidosis must be considered in the evaluation of orbital tumors in elderly patients. A search for systemic findings should be undertaken and appropriate therapy should be instituted. PMID:25796029

  19. Mediastinal Mature Teratoma Revealed by Empyema.

    PubMed

    Raoufi, Mohammed; Herrak, Laila; Benali, Anas; Achaachi, Leila; El Ftouh, Mustapha; Bellarbi, Salma; Tilfine, Charaf; Taouarsa, Firdaous

    2016-01-01

    Teratomas are germ cell tumors, manifested with a great variety of clinical features; the most common extragonadal site is the anterior mediastinum. In this case, we report the patient with a large mature mediastinal teratoma with several components of ectodermal and endothermal epithelium. A 24-year-old female patient presented with history of persistent chest pain and progressively aggravating dyspnea for the previous 3 months. A chest X-ray showed a large opacity of the entire left hemithorax. Transcutaneous needle aspiration revealed a purulent fluid. The tube thoracostomy was introduced and the effusion was evacuated. Some weeks later, patient was seen in emergency for persistent cough and lateral chest pain. CT scan revealed a mass of the left hemithorax. The mass showed heterogeneous density, without compressing mediastinum great vessels and left hilar structures. Lipase value was elevated in needle aspiration. The patient underwent a total resection of the mediastinum mass via a left posterolateral thoracotomy. Microscopy revealed a mature teratoma with cystic structures. The patient subsequently made a full recovery. This case provide benign mediastinal teratoma with total atelectasis of left lung and elevated lipase value in needle transcutaneous aspiration; this event is explained by pancreatic component in the cystic tumor. Total removal of the tumor is adequate treatment for this type of teratoma and the prognosis is excellent. PMID:27144046

  20. Mediastinal Mature Teratoma Revealed by Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Raoufi, Mohammed; Herrak, Laila; Benali, Anas; Achaachi, Leila; El Ftouh, Mustapha; Bellarbi, Salma; Tilfine, Charaf; Taouarsa, Firdaous

    2016-01-01

    Teratomas are germ cell tumors, manifested with a great variety of clinical features; the most common extragonadal site is the anterior mediastinum. In this case, we report the patient with a large mature mediastinal teratoma with several components of ectodermal and endothermal epithelium. A 24-year-old female patient presented with history of persistent chest pain and progressively aggravating dyspnea for the previous 3 months. A chest X-ray showed a large opacity of the entire left hemithorax. Transcutaneous needle aspiration revealed a purulent fluid. The tube thoracostomy was introduced and the effusion was evacuated. Some weeks later, patient was seen in emergency for persistent cough and lateral chest pain. CT scan revealed a mass of the left hemithorax. The mass showed heterogeneous density, without compressing mediastinum great vessels and left hilar structures. Lipase value was elevated in needle aspiration. The patient underwent a total resection of the mediastinum mass via a left posterolateral thoracotomy. Microscopy revealed a mature teratoma with cystic structures. The patient subsequently made a full recovery. This case provide benign mediastinal teratoma with total atelectasis of left lung and elevated lipase value in needle transcutaneous aspiration; this event is explained by pancreatic component in the cystic tumor. Total removal of the tumor is adequate treatment for this type of teratoma and the prognosis is excellent. PMID:27144046

  1. Infections Revealing Complement Deficiency in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Audemard-Verger, A.; Descloux, E.; Ponard, D.; Deroux, A.; Fantin, B.; Fieschi, C.; John, M.; Bouldouyre, A.; Karkowsi, L.; Moulis, G.; Auvinet, H.; Valla, F.; Lechiche, C.; Davido, B.; Martinot, M.; Biron, C.; Lucht, F.; Asseray, N.; Froissart, A.; Buzelé, R.; Perlat, A.; Boutboul, D.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V.; Isnard, S.; Bienvenu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Complement system is a part of innate immunity, its main function is to protect human from bacterial infection. As genetic disorders, complement deficiencies are often diagnosed in pediatric population. However, complement deficiencies can also be revealed in adults but have been poorly investigated. Herein, we describe a case series of infections revealing complement deficiency in adults to study clinical spectrum and management of complement deficiencies. A nationwide retrospective study was conducted in French university and general hospitals in departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases enrolling patients older than 15 years old who had presented at least one infection leading to a complement deficiency diagnosis. Forty-one patients included between 2002 and 2015 in 19 different departments were enrolled in this study. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3 and the mean age at diagnosis was 28 ± 14 (15–67) years. The main clinical feature was Neisseria meningitidis meningitis 75% (n = 31/41) often involving rare serotype: Y (n = 9) and W 135 (n = 7). The main complement deficiency observed was the common final pathway deficiency 83% (n = 34/41). Half of the cohort displayed severe sepsis or septic shock at diagnosis (n = 22/41) but no patient died. No patient had family history of complement deficiency. The mean follow-up was 1.15 ± 1.95 (0.1–10) years. Half of the patients had already suffered from at least one infection before diagnosis of complement deficiency: meningitis (n = 13), pneumonia (n = 4), fulminans purpura (n = 1), or recurrent otitis (n = 1). Near one-third (n = 10/39) had received prophylactic antibiotics (cotrimoxazole or penicillin) after diagnosis of complement deficiency. The vaccination coverage rate, at the end of the follow-up, for N meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Haemophilius influenzae were, respectively, 90% (n = 33/37), 47% (n = 17/36), and 35

  2. What Eye Movements Reveal about Deaf Readers

    PubMed Central

    Bélanger, Nathalie N.; Rayner, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Levels of illiteracy in the deaf populations around the world have been extremely high for decades and much higher than the illiteracy levels found in the general population. Research has mostly focused on deaf readers’ difficulties rather than on their strengths, which can then inform reading education. Deaf readers are a unique population. They process language and the world surrounding them mostly via the visual channel and this greatly affects how they read or might learn to read. The study of eye movements in reading provides highly sophisticated information about how words and sentences are processed and our research with deaf readers reveals the importance of their uniqueness. PMID:26594098

  3. Trench Reveals Two Faces of Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This approximate true-color image mosaic from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a trench dug by the rover in the vicinity of the 'Anatolia' region. Two imprints from the rover's Mossbauer spectrometer instrument were left in the exposed soils. Detailed comparisons between soils exposed at the surface and those found at depth reveal that surface soils have higher levels of hematite while subsurface soils show fine particles derived from basalt. The trench is approximately 11 centimeters deep. This image was taken on sol 81 with the panoramic camera's 430-, 530- and 750-nanometer filters.

  4. Reveal quantum correlation in complementary bases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shengjun; Ma, Zhihao; Chen, Zhihua; Yu, Sixia

    2014-01-01

    An essential feature of genuine quantum correlation is the simultaneous existence of correlation in complementary bases. We reveal this feature of quantum correlation by defining measures based on invariance under a basis change. For a bipartite quantum state, the classical correlation is the maximal correlation present in a certain optimum basis, while the quantum correlation is characterized as a series of residual correlations in the mutually unbiased bases. Compared with other approaches to quantify quantum correlation, our approach gives information-theoretical measures that directly reflect the essential feature of quantum correlation. PMID:24503595

  5. Cerebral venous thrombosis revealing an ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Taous, Abdellah; Berri, Maha Aït; Lamsiah, Taoufik; Zainoun, Brahim; Ziadi, Tarik; Rouimi, Abdelhadi

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) has been reported as an uncommon and devastating complication of ulcerative colitis (UC), with an annual incidence varying between 0,5 to 6,7%. It is suspected to be a consequence of the hypercoagulable state occurring during disease relapse. We report a case of 22-year-old female patient presenting with CVT revealing an UC. Our case raises the awareness among health professionals about the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) as a rare etiology of CVT, and signifies the importance of considering antithrombotic prophylaxis in all hospitalised IBD patients, especially those with active disease. PMID:27279947

  6. Apocalypto: revealing lost text with XMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, David; Davis, Graham R.; Lai, Yu-kun; Rosin, Paul

    2014-09-01

    "Can brute-force high-contrast tomography techniques and image processing techniques retrieve textual content from damaged heritage materials?" The Dental Institute at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) is the leading centre for very high contrast X-Ray Microtomography imaging. The Apocalypto Project is our collaboration with the heritage community and experts in Computer Vision systems in the Computer Science Department at Cardiff University. This collaboration has developed techniques and a workflow that allows us to reveal textual content from moisture-damaged parchment rolls. This article will also present some initial results from burned and heat shrunken parchment rolls, an insect damaged Mamluk cap and a birch bark roll.

  7. Middle atmosphere composition revealed by satellite observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, J. M., III; Solomon, S.; Mccormick, M. P.; Miller, A. J.; Barnett, J. J.; Jones, R. L.; Rusch, D. W.

    1986-01-01

    A series of plots that describe the state of the stratosphere and to some degree, the mesosphere as revealed by satellite observations are shown. The pertinent instrument features, spatial and temporal coverage, and details of accuracy and precision for the experiments providing the data were described. The main features of zonal mean cross sections and polar stereographic projections were noted and intercomparisons were discussed where a parameter was measured by more than one experiment. The main purpose was to collect the available data in one place and provide enough inforamation on limitations or cautions about the data so that they could be used in model comparisons and science studies.

  8. Metabolic biology of 3-methylglutaconic acid-uria: a new perspective

    PubMed Central

    Su, Betty; Ryan, Robert O.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Over the past twenty-five years a growing number of distinct syndromes / mutations associated with compromised mitochondrial function have been identified that share a common feature: urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid (3MGA). In the leucine degradation pathway, carboxylation of 3-methylcrotonyl CoA leads to formation of 3-methylglutaconyl CoA while 3-methylglutaconyl CoA hydratase converts this metabolite to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG CoA). In “primary” 3MGA-uria, mutations in the hydratase are directly responsible for the accumulation of 3MGA. On the other hand, in all “secondary” 3MGA-urias, no defect in leucine catabolism exists and the metabolic origin of 3MGA is unknown. Herein, a path to 3MGA from mitochondrial acetyl CoA is proposed. The pathway is initiated when syndrome-associated mutations / DNA deletions result in decreased Krebs cycle flux. When this occurs, acetoacetyl CoA thiolase condenses two acetyl CoA into acetoacetyl CoA plus CoASH. Subsequently, HMG CoA synthase 2 converts acetoacetyl CoA and acetyl CoA to HMG CoA. Under syndrome-specific metabolic conditions, 3-methylglutaconyl CoA hydratase converts HMG CoA into 3-methylglutaconyl CoA in a reverse reaction of the leucine degradation pathway. This metabolite fails to proceed further up the leucine degradation pathway owing to the kinetic properties of 3-methylcrotonyl CoA carboxylase. Instead, hydrolysis of the CoA moiety of 3-methylglutaconyl CoA generates 3MGA, which appears in urine. If experimentally confirmed, this pathway provides an explanation for the occurrence of 3MGA in multiple disorders associated with compromised mitochondrial function. PMID:24407466

  9. The neuropsychological profile of patients with 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type III, Costeff syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sofer, S; Schweiger, A; Blumkin, L; Yahalom, G; Anikster, Y; Lev, D; Ben-Zeev, B; Lerman-Sagie, T; Hassin-Baer, S

    2015-04-01

    Costeff syndrome is a rare genetic neuro-ophthalmological syndrome consisting of early-onset bilateral optic atrophy along with a progressive complex motor disorder with elevated levels of urinary 3-methylglutaconic acid and 3-methylglutaric acid. While borderline to mild cognitive deficits have been considered to be common in patients with this syndrome, a comprehensive cognitive assessment has never been performed. The aim of the current study was to explore the cognitive profile associated with Costeff syndrome. Sixteen adult patients diagnosed with Costeff syndrome were administered a neuropsychological test battery that was composed of standardized verbal tests adapted for the blind. General intelligence ranged from average to borderline, with a group mean consistent with intact general cognitive functioning (VIQmean  = 85, z = -1) in the low-average range of the general population. The auditory immediate and delayed memory indexes were in the average range and were significantly higher than the general cognitive functioning, whereas the working memory index was significantly lower than the general cognitive functioning. Adult patients with Costeff syndrome have intact global cognition and learning abilities and strong auditory memory performance. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25657044

  10. Exertional rhabdomyolysis and exercise intolerance revealing dystrophinopathies.

    PubMed

    Figarella-Branger, D; Baeta Machado, A M; Putzu, G A; Malzac, P; Voelckel, M A; Pellissier, J F

    1997-07-01

    Exercise intolerance associated with myalgias, muscle cramps or myoglobinuria may be associated with a dystrophinopathy. A search for abnormal dystrophin expression (using immunohistochemistry, immunoblot and DNA analysis) was carried out in a series of 15 patients. They were selected because they presented exercise intolerance, negative biochemical tests (lipid, glycogen and mitochondrial metabolism) and abnormal immunohistochemistry with at least one anti-dystrophin antibody (anti-Dys 1, rod domain; anti-Dys 2, C terminus; anti-Dys 3, N terminus). Lack of anti-Dys 1 immunoreactivity was seen in three patients and abnormal immunoreactivity with all three anti-dystrophin antibodies in two. Immunoblot confirmed the dystrophinopathy in these five patients only, and multiplex polymerase chain reaction DNA analysis revealed a deletion in the dystrophin gene in two of these patients, affecting the proximal part of the rod domain in one and the distal part of this domain in the other. The clinical, biological and histopathological features of the five patients reported here, together with the previous cases reported in the literature, are described and reveal that exercise intolerance associated with dystrophinopathy displays characteristic clinical, biological and immunohistochemical features and defines a new dystrophinopathy phenotype. The absence of staining in the rod domain provides a secure diagnosis of this syndrome. Dystrophinopathy is one etiology of idiopathic myoglobinuria, requiring genetic counseling. PMID:9224530

  11. Mammalian phylogeny reveals recent diversification rate shifts.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Tanja

    2011-04-12

    Phylogenetic trees of present-day species allow investigation of the rate of evolution that led to the present-day diversity. A recent analysis of the mammalian phylogeny challenged the view of explosive mammalian evolution after the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) boundary (65 Mya). However, due to lack of appropriate methods, the diversification (speciation minus extinction) rates in the more recent past of mammalian evolution could not be determined. In this paper, I provide a method that reveals that the tempo of mammalian evolution did not change until ∼ 33 Mya. This constant period was followed by a peak of diversification rates between 33 and 30 Mya. Thereafter, diversification rates remained high and constant until 8.55 Mya. Diversification rates declined significantly at 8.55 and 3.35 Mya. Investigation of mammalian subgroups (marsupials, placentals, and the six largest placental subgroups) reveals that the diversification rate peak at 33-30 Mya is mainly driven by rodents, cetartiodactyla, and marsupials. The recent diversification rate decrease is significant for all analyzed subgroups but eulipotyphla, cetartiodactyla, and primates. My likelihood approach is not limited to mammalian evolution. It provides a robust framework to infer diversification rate changes and mass extinction events in phylogenies, reconstructed from, e.g., present-day species or virus data. In particular, the method is very robust toward noise and uncertainty in the phylogeny and can account for incomplete taxon sampling. PMID:21444816

  12. Saturn's secrets revealed - A special report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, C.

    1980-11-01

    Scientific results of the encounter of Voyager 1 with Saturn are reported. Instruments on the Voyager spacecraft, which was launched on September 5, 1977 and flew within 124,200 km of the Saturn cloud tops on November 12, 1980, revealed the presence of several hundred rings within the six visible from earth, as well as eccentric rings, braiding and clumps within the narrow F ring, and spoke-like structures in the B ring. During its flight beneath the ring plane, Voyager 1 also discovered that the rings extend toward the visible surface of the cloud tops, and are composed of ice chunks or silicate with an icy coating about a meter in diameter. Observations of Titan revealed the satellite to have a dense atmosphere, composed primarily of molecular nitrogen, with as many as three layers of haze above the cloud tops. Three additional moons of Saturn were discovered apparently focusing ring particles, and the moon Janus, discovered from earth in 1966, was shown to be actually two moons. Close approaches to other Saturn satellites show Mimas, Tethys, Dione and Rhea to be heavily cratered, icy bodies, some with features indicating they had been struck by objects almost large enough to shatter them. Surface features on Saturn, which is covered by a deep layer of haze, and the details of the Saturn magnetosphere have also been observed.

  13. Interior Evolution of Ceres Revealed by Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Carol A.; Park, Ryan S.; Konopliv, Alex S.; Bland, Michael T.; Marchi, Simone; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; McCord, Thomas B.; Jaumann, Ralf; Russell, Christopher T.; Prettyman, Thomas H.

    2015-11-01

    Dawn's exploration of Ceres has revealed its geophysical characteristics, informing the processes that have shaped it. Dawn has determined the average diameter of Ceres to be 940 km, smaller than the previously estimated 975 km [1]. This implies a density of 2160 kg/m3, indicating that Ceres is less differentiated than predicted [2]. The low-degree gravity field is consistent with the body being in hydrostatic equilibrium and the magnitude of J2 implies some central condensation. Ceres' entire surface is cratered, implying the lack of a thick (10's of km) water ice layer at the surface. Variability in Ceres' crater morphology indicates that the near-surface layer has variable strength and rheology, likely due to heterogeneity in the near-surface mixture of rock, ice and salt. The lack of a number of expected large impact basins on Ceres can be interpreted to be the result of viscous relaxation, resurfacing or a combination of both. These data provide insights into Ceres' thermal evolution and mechanical properties, which appear to be unique to this warm, icy body.[1] Thomas, P. C., et al., Differentiation of the asteroid Ceres as revealed by its shape, Nature, 437, 224-226, 2005; [2] McCord et al., Ceres: Its Origin, Evolution and Structure and Dawn's Potential Contribution, Space Sci Rev DOI 10.1007/s11214-010-9729-9, 2011.

  14. Open chromatin reveals the functional maize genome

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers-Melnick, Eli; Vera, Daniel L.; Bass, Hank W.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular processes mediated through nuclear DNA must contend with chromatin. Chromatin structural assays can efficiently integrate information across diverse regulatory elements, revealing the functional noncoding genome. In this study, we use a differential nuclease sensitivity assay based on micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion to discover open chromatin regions in the maize genome. We find that maize MNase-hypersensitive (MNase HS) regions localize around active genes and within recombination hotspots, focusing biased gene conversion at their flanks. Although MNase HS regions map to less than 1% of the genome, they consistently explain a remarkably large amount (∼40%) of heritable phenotypic variance in diverse complex traits. MNase HS regions are therefore on par with coding sequences as annotations that demarcate the functional parts of the maize genome. These results imply that less than 3% of the maize genome (coding and MNase HS regions) may give rise to the overwhelming majority of phenotypic variation, greatly narrowing the scope of the functional genome. PMID:27185945

  15. Social patterns revealed through random matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Camellia; Jalan, Sarika

    2014-11-01

    Despite the tremendous advancements in the field of network theory, very few studies have taken weights in the interactions into consideration that emerge naturally in all real-world systems. Using random matrix analysis of a weighted social network, we demonstrate the profound impact of weights in interactions on emerging structural properties. The analysis reveals that randomness existing in particular time frame affects the decisions of individuals rendering them more freedom of choice in situations of financial security. While the structural organization of networks remains the same throughout all datasets, random matrix theory provides insight into the interaction pattern of individuals of the society in situations of crisis. It has also been contemplated that individual accountability in terms of weighted interactions remains as a key to success unless segregation of tasks comes into play.

  16. Open chromatin reveals the functional maize genome.

    PubMed

    Rodgers-Melnick, Eli; Vera, Daniel L; Bass, Hank W; Buckler, Edward S

    2016-05-31

    Cellular processes mediated through nuclear DNA must contend with chromatin. Chromatin structural assays can efficiently integrate information across diverse regulatory elements, revealing the functional noncoding genome. In this study, we use a differential nuclease sensitivity assay based on micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion to discover open chromatin regions in the maize genome. We find that maize MNase-hypersensitive (MNase HS) regions localize around active genes and within recombination hotspots, focusing biased gene conversion at their flanks. Although MNase HS regions map to less than 1% of the genome, they consistently explain a remarkably large amount (∼40%) of heritable phenotypic variance in diverse complex traits. MNase HS regions are therefore on par with coding sequences as annotations that demarcate the functional parts of the maize genome. These results imply that less than 3% of the maize genome (coding and MNase HS regions) may give rise to the overwhelming majority of phenotypic variation, greatly narrowing the scope of the functional genome. PMID:27185945

  17. Revealing effective classifiers through network comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallos, Lazaros K.; Fefferman, Nina H.

    2014-11-01

    The ability to compare complex systems can provide new insight into the fundamental nature of the processes captured, in ways that are otherwise inaccessible to observation. Here, we introduce the n-tangle method to directly compare two networks for structural similarity, based on the distribution of edge density in network subgraphs. We demonstrate that this method can efficiently introduce comparative analysis into network science and opens the road for many new applications. For example, we show how the construction of a “phylogenetic tree” across animal taxa according to their social structure can reveal commonalities in the behavioral ecology of the populations, or how students create similar networks according to the University size. Our method can be expanded to study many additional properties, such as network classification, changes during time evolution, convergence of growth models, and detection of structural changes during damage.

  18. Semantic priming revealed by mouse movement trajectories.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Kunchen; Yamauchi, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Congruency effects are taken as evidence that semantic information can be processed automatically. However, these effects are often weak, and the straightforward association between primes and targets can exaggerate congruency effects. To address these problems, a mouse movement method is applied to scrutinize congruency effects. In one experiment, participants judged whether two numbers were the same ("3\\3") or different ("3\\5"), preceded by briefly presented pictures with either positive or negative connotations. Participants indicated their responses by clicking a "Same" or "Different" button on the computer screen, while their cursor trajectories were recorded for each trial. The trajectory data revealed greater deviation to unselected buttons in incongruent trials (e.g., "3\\5" preceded by a green traffic light picture). This effect was influenced by the type of responses but not by prime durations. We suggest that the mouse movement method can complement the reaction time to study masked semantic priming. PMID:24797040

  19. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Jeffrey; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Kang, Misun; Voisin, Sophie; Cheng, Chu-Lin; Horita, Jusuke; Perfect, Edmund

    2013-01-01

    Many terrestrial ecosystem processes are constrained by water availability and transport within the soil. Knowledge of plant water fluxes is thus critical for assessing mechanistic processes linked to biogeochemical cycles, yet resolution of root structure and xylem water transport dynamics has been a particularly daunting task for the ecologist. Through neutron imaging, we demonstrate the ability to non-invasively monitor individual root functionality and water fluxes within Zea mays L. (maize) and Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass) seedlings growing in a sandy medium. Root structure and growth were readily imaged by neutron radiography and neutron computed tomography. Seedlings were irrigated with water or deuterium oxide and imaged through time as a growth lamp was cycled on to alter leaf demand for water. Sub-millimeter scale resolution reveals timing and magnitudes of root water uptake, redistribution within the roots, and root-shoot hydraulic linkages, relationships not well characterized by other techniques.

  20. Chain networking revealed by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yexin; Tsige, Mesfin; Wang, Shi-Qing

    Based on Kremer-Grest model for entangled polymer melts, we demonstrate how the response of a polymer glass depends critically on the chain length. After quenching two melts of very different chain lengths (350 beads per chain and 30 beads per chain) into deeply glassy states, we subject them to uniaxial extension. Our MD simulations show that the glass of long chains undergoes stable necking after yielding whereas the system of short chains is unable to neck and breaks up after strain localization. During ductile extension of the polymer glass made of long chain significant chain tension builds up in the load-bearing strands (LBSs). Further analysis is expected to reveal evidence of activation of the primary structure during post-yield extension. These results lend support to the recent molecular model 1 and are the simulations to demonstrate the role of chain networking. This work is supported, in part, by a NSF Grant (DMR-EAGER-1444859)

  1. Metabolomics reveals metabolic biomarkers of Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, J.K.; Willing, B.; Lucio, M.; Fekete, A.; Dicksved, J.; Halfvarson, J.; Tysk, C.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.

    2009-06-01

    The causes and etiology of Crohn's disease (CD) are currently unknown although both host genetics and environmental factors play a role. Here we used non-targeted metabolic profiling to determine the contribution of metabolites produced by the gut microbiota towards disease status of the host. Ion Cyclotron Resonance Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry (ICR-FT/MS) was used to discern the masses of thousands of metabolites in fecal samples collected from 17 identical twin pairs, including healthy individuals and those with CD. Pathways with differentiating metabolites included those involved in the metabolism and or synthesis of amino acids, fatty acids, bile acids and arachidonic acid. Several metabolites were positively or negatively correlated to the disease phenotype and to specific microbes previously characterized in the same samples. Our data reveal novel differentiating metabolites for CD that may provide diagnostic biomarkers and/or monitoring tools as well as insight into potential targets for disease therapy and prevention.

  2. Licking Microstructure Reveals Rapid Attenuation of Neophobia

    PubMed Central

    Monk, Kevin J.; Rubin, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    Many animals hesitate when initially consuming a novel food and increase their consumption of that food between the first and second sessions of access—a process termed attenuation of neophobia (AN). AN has received attention as a model of learning and memory; it has been suggested that plasticity resulting from an association of the novel tastant with “safe outcome” results in a change in the neural response to the tastant during the second session, such that consumption increases. Most studies have reported that AN emerges only an hour or more after the end of the first exposure to the tastant, consistent with what is known of learning-related plasticity. But these studies have typically measured consumption, rather than real-time behavior, and thus the possibility exists that a more rapidly developing AN remains to be discovered. Here, we tested this possibility, examining both consumption and individual lick times in a novel variant of a brief-access task (BAT). When quantified in terms of consumption, data from the BAT accorded well with the results of a classic one-bottle task—both revealed neophobia/AN specific to higher concentrations (for instance, 28mM) of saccharin. An analysis of licking microstructure, however, additionally revealed a real-time correlate of neophobia—an explicit tendency, similarly specific for 28-mM saccharin, to cut short the initial bout of licks in a single trial (compared with water). This relative hesitancy (i.e., the shortness of the first lick bout to 28-mM saccharin compared with water) that constitutes neophobia not only disappeared between sessions but also gradually declined in magnitude across session 1. These data demonstrate that the BAT accurately measures AN, and that aspects of AN—and the processes underlying familiarization—begin within minutes of the very first taste. PMID:24363269

  3. Ceres Revealed in a Grain of Salt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Bodnar, R. J.; Fries, M.; Chan, Q. H.-S.; Kebukawa, Y.; Mikouchi, T.; Hagiya, K.; Komatsu, M.; Ohsumi, K.; Steele, A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Zag and Monahans (1998) are H chondrite regolith breccias containing 4.5 giga-year-old halite crystals which contain abundant inclusions of aqueous fluids, solids and organics. These all originated on a cryo-volcanically-active C class asteroid, probably 1 Ceres; the halite was transported to the regolith of the H chondrite parent asteroid, potentially 6 Hebe. Detailed analysis of these solids will thus potentially reveal the mineralogy of Ceres. Mineralogy of solids in the Monahans Halite Solid grains are present in the halites, which were entrained within the mother brines during eruption, including material from the interior and surface of the erupting body. The solids include abundant, widely variable organics that could not have been significantly heated (which would have resulted in the loss of fluids from the halite). Our analyses by Raman microprobe, SEM/EDX, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, UPLC-FD/QToF-MS, C-XANES and TEM reveal that these trapped grains include macromolecular carbon (MMC) similar in structure to CV3 chondrite matrix carbon, aliphatic carbon compounds, olivine (Fo99-59), high- and low-Ca pyroxene, feldspars, phyllosilicates, magnetite, sulfides, metal, lepidocrocite, carbonates, diamond, apatite and zeolites. Conclusions: The halite in Monahans and Zag derive from a water and carbon-rich object that was cryo-volcanically active in the early solar system, probably Ceres. The Dawn spacecraft found that Ceres includes C chondrite materials. Our samples include both protolith and aqueously-altered samples of the body, permitting understanding of alteration conditions. Whatever the halite parent body, it was rich in a wide variety of organics and warm, liquid water at the solar system's dawn.

  4. [Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. Apropos of a case with demonstration of this enzyme deficiency].

    PubMed

    Collet, J P; Divry, P; Blanc, J F; Guibaud, P; David, M; Macabeo, V; Vibert, J; Hermier, M

    1984-12-01

    The medium chain acyl-CoA deshydrogenase defect: a new inherited metabolic disorder. This enzymatic defect blocks the catabolism of non esterified fatty acids during fasting. Thus, this disease is revealed by a coma due to hypoglycemia in a young child; the presence of dicarboxylic aciduria in such a situation is the main evidence for this diagnosis. Finally, the enzymatic studies performed on skin fibroblasts show a defect in medium chain acyl-CoA deshydrogenase. When a child is investigated away from a coma episode, the ketotic diet induces dicarboxylic aciduria but must be performed in an intensive care unit for its dangers. PMID:6535973

  5. Revealing the Hot Side of Epsilon Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoard, Donald; Stencel, Robert; Howell, Steve

    2012-12-01

    We request a small investment of 24 minutes of Spitzer time, to obtain four IRAC observations of epsilon Aurigae. A naked eye object located near Capella, epsilon Aurigae is the eclipsing binary star with the longest known orbital period, showing a single long duration (~2 yr) eclipse every 27.1 yr. For much of the last 200 years, the nature of the eclipsing object defied explanation. We recently demonstrated that epsilon Aurigae consists of a high luminosity F0 post-AGB star in orbit with a B5 V star surrounded by a solar system sized (~8 AU diameter) disk of cool, dust-dominated material. The eclipse of epsilon Aurigae is a rare event; moreover, it is a unique astrophysical opportunity, since the backlighting of the disk by the high luminosity eclipsed star reveals details that cannot be detected in similar dusty disks around single stars. The current eclipse started in August 2009 and ended in July 2011; we are now in the post-eclipse phase, when the irradiation-heated side of the disk will begin rotating into view. The goals for these observations include: (1) extend our ongoing IRAC monitoring campaign covering the current eclipse to post-eclipse visits; (2) provide a consistent, well-calibrated space-based set of IR photometry for comparison with ongoing ground-based work; and (3) use the composite results to constrain the thermal profile of the disk. A key expectation of these particular observations is to reveal the irradiation-heated portion of the disk, which will be visible on its trailing side following eclipse. Observations of this side of the disk will be crucial to test and constrain new models of disk structure. As part of our overall monitoring campaign with Spitzer, Hubble, Herschel, and numerous ground-based facilities, these proposed observations will make an important contribution to the understanding of stellar evolution in binary stars, including mass transfer and evolution studies, along with new insights into astrophysical disks and post

  6. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, J.; Bilheux, H.; Kang, M.; Voisin, S.; Cheng, C.; Horita, J.; Perfect, E.

    2011-12-01

    In situ quantification of soil-plant water fluxes have not been fully successful due to a lack of non-destructive techniques capable of revealing roots or water fluxes at relevant spatial scales. Neutron imaging is a unique non-invasive tool that can assess sub-millimeter scale material properties and transport in situ, and which has been successfully applied to characterize soil and plant water status. Here, we have applied neutron radiography and tomography to quantify water transport through individual maize roots in response to internal plant demand. Zea mays seedlings were grown for 10 days in Flint silica sand within 2.6 cm diameter Al chambers. Using a reactor-based neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (HFIR), water fluxes were tracked through the maize soil-root systems by collecting consecutive neutron radiographs over a 12 h period following irrigation with D2O. D has a much lower neutron attenuation than H, thus D2O displacement of existing H2O within the plant vascular system, or influx of D2O into previously dry tissue or soil is readily tracked by changes in image intensity through time. Plant water release and uptake was regulated by periodically cycling on a high-intensity grow light. From each maize replicate, selected regions of interest (ROI) were delineated around individual roots, root free soil, stem and leaf segments. Changes in ROI were tracked through time to reveal patterns of water flux. The hydration of root and stem tissue cycled in response to illumination; root water content often increased during darkness, then decreased with illumination as water was transported from the root into the stem. Relative root-shoot hydration through time illustrates the balance between demand, storage capacity and uptake, which varies depending on root characteristics and its localized soil environment. The dynamic transport of water between soil, individual roots, stems and leaves was readily visualized and quantified illustrating the value

  7. Revealing Invisible Photonic Inscriptions: Images from Strain.

    PubMed

    Ding, Tao; Cao, Guoshuai; Schäfer, Christian G; Zhao, Qibin; Gallei, Markus; Smoukov, Stoyan K; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2015-06-24

    Photonic structural materials have received intensive interest and have been strongly developed over the past few years for image displays, sensing, and anticounterfeit materials. Their "smartness" arises from their color responsivity to changes of environment, strain, or external fields. Here, we introduce a novel invisible photonic system that reveals encrypted images or characters by simply stretching, or immersing in solvents. This type of intriguing photonic material is composed of regularly arranged core-shell particles that are selectively cross-linked by UV irradiation, giving different strain response compared to un-cross-linked regions. The images reversibly appear and disappear when cycling the strain and releasing it. The unique advantages of this soft polymer opal system compared with other types of photonic gels are that it can be produced in roll to roll quantities, can be vigorously deformed to achieve strong color changes, and has no solvent evaporation issues because it is a photonic rubber system. We demonstrate potential applications together with a fabrication procedure which is straightforward and scalable, vital for user take-up. Our work deepens understanding of this rubbery photonic system based on core-shell nanospheres. PMID:26039279

  8. Chimaeric sounds reveal dichotomies in auditory perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Zachary M.; Delgutte, Bertrand; Oxenham, Andrew J.

    2002-03-01

    By Fourier's theorem, signals can be decomposed into a sum of sinusoids of different frequencies. This is especially relevant for hearing, because the inner ear performs a form of mechanical Fourier transform by mapping frequencies along the length of the cochlear partition. An alternative signal decomposition, originated by Hilbert, is to factor a signal into the product of a slowly varying envelope and a rapidly varying fine time structure. Neurons in the auditory brainstem sensitive to these features have been found in mammalian physiological studies. To investigate the relative perceptual importance of envelope and fine structure, we synthesized stimuli that we call `auditory chimaeras', which have the envelope of one sound and the fine structure of another. Here we show that the envelope is most important for speech reception, and the fine structure is most important for pitch perception and sound localization. When the two features are in conflict, the sound of speech is heard at a location determined by the fine structure, but the words are identified according to the envelope. This finding reveals a possible acoustic basis for the hypothesized `what' and `where' pathways in the auditory cortex.

  9. Bone structure as revealed by microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrand, Tor; Laib, Andres; Ulrich, Dieter; Kohlbrenner, Adrian; Ruegsegger, Peter

    1997-10-01

    The appearance of cancellous bone architecture is different for various skeletal sites and various disease states. In the iliac crest it is more plate-like, whereas in the spine rods dominate. During aging and disease plates are perforated and connecting rods are dissolved. There is a continuous shift from one structural type to the other. So traditional histomorphometric procedures, which are based on a fixed model type, will lead to questionable results. 3D microtomography allows to assess model independent structural parameters so that trabecular thickness, for example, can be determined directly. Not only mean thicknesses are available but also thickness histograms which are helpful to identify pathological states. Other features such as trabecular separation, degree of anisotropy and structural type index can be extracted from the 3D images and allow to characterize cancellous bone and its changes due to aging, disease and treatment. To fully exploit the significance of bone structure on bone strength large scale finite element (FE) analyses are performed. Hence microtomography, performed with a sufficiently fine isotropic spatial resolution, reveals information on the structural features of cancellous bone which were not available so far and which will, hopefully, lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of bone diseases and subsequently to improved treatment regimes.

  10. Biosignatures as revealed by spectropolarimetry of Earthshine.

    PubMed

    Sterzik, Michael F; Bagnulo, Stefano; Palle, Enric

    2012-03-01

    Low-resolution intensity spectra of Earth's atmosphere obtained from space reveal strong signatures of life ('biosignatures'), such as molecular oxygen and methane with abundances far from chemical equilibrium, as well as the presence of a 'red edge' (a sharp increase of albedo for wavelengths longer than 700 nm) caused by surface vegetation. Light passing through the atmosphere is strongly linearly polarized by scattering (from air molecules, aerosols and cloud particles) and by reflection (from oceans and land). Spectropolarimetric observations of local patches of Earth's sky light from the ground contain signatures of oxygen, ozone and water, and are used to characterize the properties of clouds and aerosols. When applied to exoplanets, ground-based spectropolarimetry can better constrain properties of atmospheres and surfaces than can standard intensity spectroscopy. Here we report disk-integrated linear polarization spectra of Earthshine, which is sunlight that has been first reflected by Earth and then reflected back to Earth by the Moon. The observations allow us to determine the fractional contribution of clouds and ocean surface, and are sensitive to visible areas of vegetation as small as 10 per cent. They represent a benchmark for the diagnostics of the atmospheric composition, mean cloud height and surfaces of exoplanets. PMID:22382980

  11. Niche engineering reveals complementary resource use.

    PubMed

    Gable, Jacob T; Crowder, David W; Northfield, Tobin D; Steffan, Shawn A; Snyder, William E

    2012-09-01

    Greater resource use by diverse communities might result from species occupying complementary niches. Demonstrating niche complementarity among species is challenging, however, due to the difficulty in relating differences between species in particular traits to their use of complementary resources. Here, we overcame this obstacle by exploiting plastic foraging behavior in a community of predatory insects common on Brassica oleracea plants in Washington, USA. These predators complemented one another by partitioning foraging space, with some species foraging primarily along leaf edges and others at leaf centers. We hypothesized that emergent biodiversity effects would occur when predators partitioned foraging space on leaves, but not when spatial complementarity was dampened. Indeed, on intact leaves, edge- and center-foraging predators combined to kill more prey than any single predator species could by itself. These emergent diversity effects, however, disappeared on plants damaged by the caterpillar Plutella xylostella. Caterpillar chew-holes brought edge habitats to the center of leaves, so that all predator species could attack aphids anywhere on plants. With spatial niche differences diminished, there were no benefits of predator diversity; the most voracious single predator species killed the most aphids. Thus, caterpillar herbivory determined whether multi-predator-species effects reflected complementarity or species' individual impacts. Our study provides direct evidence for a causative relationship between niche differentiation and increased resource consumption by diverse communities, as revealed by ecological engineers that homogenize the foraging environment. PMID:23094370

  12. VISTA Reveals the Secret of the Unicorn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    A new infrared image from ESO's VISTA survey telescope reveals an extraordinary landscape of glowing tendrils of gas, dark clouds and young stars within the constellation of Monoceros (the Unicorn). This star-forming region, known as Monoceros R2, is embedded within a huge dark cloud. The region is almost completely obscured by interstellar dust when viewed in visible light, but is spectacular in the infrared. An active stellar nursery lies hidden inside a massive dark cloud rich in molecules and dust in the constellation of Monoceros. Although it appears close in the sky to the more familiar Orion Nebula it is actually almost twice as far from Earth, at a distance of about 2700 light-years. In visible light a grouping of massive hot stars creates a beautiful collection of reflection nebulae where the bluish starlight is scattered from parts of the dark, foggy outer layers of the molecular cloud. However, most of the new-born massive stars remain hidden as the thick interstellar dust strongly absorbs their ultraviolet and visible light. In this gorgeous infrared image taken from ESO's Paranal Observatory in northern Chile, the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA [1], eso0949) penetrates the dark curtain of cosmic dust and reveals in astonishing detail the folds, loops and filaments sculpted from the dusty interstellar matter by intense particle winds and the radiation emitted by hot young stars. "When I first saw this image I just said 'Wow!' I was amazed to see all the dust streamers so clearly around the Monoceros R2 cluster, as well as the jets from highly embedded young stellar objects. There is such a great wealth of exciting detail revealed in these VISTA images," says Jim Emerson, of Queen Mary, University of London and leader of the VISTA consortium. With its huge field of view, large mirror and sensitive camera, VISTA is ideal for obtaining deep, high quality infrared images of large areas of the sky, such as the Monoceros R2 region

  13. Overnight lexical consolidation revealed by speech segmentation.

    PubMed

    Dumay, Nicolas; Gareth Gaskell, M

    2012-04-01

    Two experiments explored the consolidation of spoken words, and assessed whether post-sleep novel competitor effects truly reflect engagement of these novel words in competition for lexical segmentation. Two types of competitor relationships were contrasted: the onset-aligned case (such as "frenzylk"), where the novel word is a close variant of the existing word: they start at the same time point and overlap on most of their segments; and the fully embedding case (such as "lirmucktoze"), where the existing word corresponds to a smaller embedded portion of its novel competitor and is thus less noticeable. Experiment 1 (pause detection) revealed a similar performance for both cases, with no competitor effect immediately after exposure, but significant inhibition after 24 h and seven days. Experiment 2 (word spotting) produced exactly the same pattern; however, as is the case with existing word carriers (cf. McQueen, Norris, & Cutler, 1994), the inhibition was much stronger for fully embedded than for onset-aligned targets (e.g., "lirmuckt" vs. "frenzyl"). Meanwhile, explicit measures of learning, i.e., free recall and recognition, improved over time. These results cannot be explained by either consolidation of episodic traces or acquisition of new phonological/dialectal variants. We argue instead that they reflect a general trait of vocabulary learning and consolidation. PMID:22261419

  14. Sequence tagging reveals unexpected modifications in toxicoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Surendra; Chambers, Matthew C.; Codreanu, Simona G.; Liebler, Daniel C.; Collins, Ben C.; Pennington, Stephen R.; Gallagher, William M.; Tabb, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Toxicoproteomic samples are rich in posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins. Identifying these modifications via standard database searching can incur significant performance penalties. Here we describe the latest developments in TagRecon, an algorithm that leverages inferred sequence tags to identify modified peptides in toxicoproteomic data sets. TagRecon identifies known modifications more effectively than the MyriMatch database search engine. TagRecon outperformed state of the art software in recognizing unanticipated modifications from LTQ, Orbitrap, and QTOF data sets. We developed user-friendly software for detecting persistent mass shifts from samples. We follow a three-step strategy for detecting unanticipated PTMs in samples. First, we identify the proteins present in the sample with a standard database search. Next, identified proteins are interrogated for unexpected PTMs with a sequence tag-based search. Finally, additional evidence is gathered for the detected mass shifts with a refinement search. Application of this technology on toxicoproteomic data sets revealed unintended cross-reactions between proteins and sample processing reagents. Twenty five proteins in rat liver showed signs of oxidative stress when exposed to potentially toxic drugs. These results demonstrate the value of mining toxicoproteomic data sets for modifications. PMID:21214251

  15. Chandra Reveals Remains of Giant Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a photo taken by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory that reveals the remains of an explosion in the form of two enormous arcs of multimillion-degree gas in the galaxy Centaurus A that appear to be part of a ring 25,000 light years in diameter. The size and location of the ring suggest that it could have been an explosion that occurred about 10 million years ago. A composite image made with radio (red and green), optical (yellow-orange), and X-ray data (blue) presents a sturning tableau of a turbulent galaxy. A broad band of dust and cold gas is bisected at an angle by opposing jets of high-energy particles blasting away from the supermassive black hole in the nucleus. Lying in a plane perpendicular to the jets are the two large arcs of x-ray emitting multi-million degree gas. This discovery can help astronomers better understand the cause and effect of violent outbursts from the vicinity of supermassive black holes of active galaxies. The Chandra program is managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

  16. Revealing the values behind convenience food consumption.

    PubMed

    Botonaki, Anna; Mattas, Konstadinos

    2010-12-01

    The increasing importance of convenience in consumer food choices has attracted researchers' interest. In the effort to understand how convenience affects consumers' food preferences, values are believed to play an important role. The present study attempts to examine the way personal values suggested by Schwartz (1992) are associated with behaviour and attitudes regarding convenience food. A number of constructs describing food related attitudes and behaviours were developed and their relationship with personal values was analyzed following the methodology proposed by Brunsø, Scholderer, and Grunert (2004). Data were collected through a questionnaire survey from a random sample of consumers in Thessaloniki city, Greece. The results reveal that convenience food consumption and convenience orientation in the food domain are mainly connected with values that motivate people to seek new experiences, act independently and enhance their own personal interests, while are in conflict with values of conservation and self-transcendence. The opposite holds for other food related attitudes and behaviours like involvement with cooking and variety in diet. The findings seem to be of particular interest not only for marketers of food products, but also for food policy makers. PMID:20875475

  17. VISTA Reveals the Secret of the Unicorn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    A new infrared image from ESO's VISTA survey telescope reveals an extraordinary landscape of glowing tendrils of gas, dark clouds and young stars within the constellation of Monoceros (the Unicorn). This star-forming region, known as Monoceros R2, is embedded within a huge dark cloud. The region is almost completely obscured by interstellar dust when viewed in visible light, but is spectacular in the infrared. An active stellar nursery lies hidden inside a massive dark cloud rich in molecules and dust in the constellation of Monoceros. Although it appears close in the sky to the more familiar Orion Nebula it is actually almost twice as far from Earth, at a distance of about 2700 light-years. In visible light a grouping of massive hot stars creates a beautiful collection of reflection nebulae where the bluish starlight is scattered from parts of the dark, foggy outer layers of the molecular cloud. However, most of the new-born massive stars remain hidden as the thick interstellar dust strongly absorbs their ultraviolet and visible light. In this gorgeous infrared image taken from ESO's Paranal Observatory in northern Chile, the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA [1], eso0949) penetrates the dark curtain of cosmic dust and reveals in astonishing detail the folds, loops and filaments sculpted from the dusty interstellar matter by intense particle winds and the radiation emitted by hot young stars. "When I first saw this image I just said 'Wow!' I was amazed to see all the dust streamers so clearly around the Monoceros R2 cluster, as well as the jets from highly embedded young stellar objects. There is such a great wealth of exciting detail revealed in these VISTA images," says Jim Emerson, of Queen Mary, University of London and leader of the VISTA consortium. With its huge field of view, large mirror and sensitive camera, VISTA is ideal for obtaining deep, high quality infrared images of large areas of the sky, such as the Monoceros R2 region

  18. Dynamic Environmental Photosynthetic Imaging Reveals Emergent Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Jeffrey A; Savage, Linda J; Zegarac, Robert; Hall, Christopher C; Satoh-Cruz, Mio; Davis, Geoffry A; Kovac, William Kent; Chen, Jin; Kramer, David M

    2016-06-22

    Understanding and improving the productivity and robustness of plant photosynthesis requires high-throughput phenotyping under environmental conditions that are relevant to the field. Here we demonstrate the dynamic environmental photosynthesis imager (DEPI), an experimental platform for integrated, continuous, and high-throughput measurements of photosynthetic parameters during plant growth under reproducible yet dynamic environmental conditions. Using parallel imagers obviates the need to move plants or sensors, reducing artifacts and allowing simultaneous measurement on large numbers of plants. As a result, DEPI can reveal phenotypes that are not evident under standard laboratory conditions but emerge under progressively more dynamic illumination. We show examples in mutants of Arabidopsis of such "emergent phenotypes" that are highly transient and heterogeneous, appearing in different leaves under different conditions and depending in complex ways on both environmental conditions and plant developmental age. These emergent phenotypes appear to be caused by a range of phenomena, suggesting that such previously unseen processes are critical for plant responses to dynamic environments. PMID:27336966

  19. Revealing Invisible Photonic Inscriptions: Images from Strain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Photonic structural materials have received intensive interest and have been strongly developed over the past few years for image displays, sensing, and anticounterfeit materials. Their “smartness” arises from their color responsivity to changes of environment, strain, or external fields. Here, we introduce a novel invisible photonic system that reveals encrypted images or characters by simply stretching, or immersing in solvents. This type of intriguing photonic material is composed of regularly arranged core–shell particles that are selectively cross-linked by UV irradiation, giving different strain response compared to un-cross-linked regions. The images reversibly appear and disappear when cycling the strain and releasing it. The unique advantages of this soft polymer opal system compared with other types of photonic gels are that it can be produced in roll to roll quantities, can be vigorously deformed to achieve strong color changes, and has no solvent evaporation issues because it is a photonic rubber system. We demonstrate potential applications together with a fabrication procedure which is straightforward and scalable, vital for user take-up. Our work deepens understanding of this rubbery photonic system based on core–shell nanospheres. PMID:26039279

  20. [The life of human hair follicle revealed].

    PubMed

    Bernard, Bruno A

    2006-02-01

    The human hair follicle is a unique appendage which results from epithelio-mesenchymal interactions initiated around the 3rd month of development. This appendage has a very complex structure, with a dermal compartment and an epithelial compartment. The dermal compartment comprises the connective tissue sheath and the dermal papilla, both of which are irrigated by microvessels. The epithelial compartment is made of highly replicating matrix cells giving rise to three concentrical domains, namely the outer root sheath, the inner root sheath and the hair shaft. The pigmentation unit, responsible for hair color, is made of fully active melanocytes located on top of the dermal papilla. Altogether a hair follicle contains more than 20 different cell types, engaged in different differentiation pathways and/or interacting with each other. This complex appendage has a unique behavior in mammals since, after a hair production phase, it involutes in place before entering a resting phase after which it renews itself under a cyclical but stochastic way, out of a double reservoir of pluripotent stem cells able to also regenerate epidermis. For yet unknown reasons, this well ordered process can be disturbed, provoking alopecia. The pigmentation unit also renews itself under a cyclical way, out of a melanocyte progenitor reservoir which progressively declines with time, provoking the hair whitening process. Finally, the shape of the hair shaft is programmed from the bulb. What makes this appendage unique and fascinating is its high degree of autonomy, its incredibly complex though stable structure, the number of different cell types interacting under an equilibrated way and its potential of regeneration. It represents a true paradigm of tissue homeostasis, exemplifying in a small living cylinder all the fundamental laws of cell-cell and tissue interactions. This life is revealed in this short synthesis. PMID:16457752

  1. NASA's Hyperwall Revealing the Big Picture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, Piers

    2011-01-01

    NASA:s hyperwall is a sophisticated visualization tool used to display large datasets. The hyperwall, or video wall, is capable of displaying multiple high-definition data visualizations and/or images simultaneously across an arrangement of screens. Functioning as a key component at many NASA exhibits, the hyperwall is used to help explain phenomena, ideas, or examples of world change. The traveling version of the hyperwall is typically comprised of nine 42-50" flat-screen monitors arranged in a 3x3 array (as depicted below). However, it is not limited to monitor size or number; screen sizes can be as large as 52" and the arrangement of screens can include more than nine monitors. Generally, NASA satellite and model data are used to highlight particular themes in atmospheric, land, and ocean science. Many of the existing hyperwall stories reveal change across space and time, while others display large-scale still-images accompanied by descriptive, story-telling captions. Hyperwall content on a variety of Earth Science topics already exists and is made available to the public at: eospso.gsfc.nasa.gov/hyperwall. Keynote and PowerPoint presentations as well as Summary of Story files are available for download on each existing topic. New hyperwall content and accompanying files will continue being developed to promote scientific literacy across a diverse group of audience members. NASA invites the use of content accessible through this website but requests the user to acknowledge any and all data sources referenced in the content being used.

  2. Saturn Probe: Revealing Solar System Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    Comparative studies of the gas giant and ice giant planets are needed to reliably discriminate among competing theories of the origin and evolution of giant planets and the solar system, but we lack critical measurements. A Saturn atmospheric entry probe mission would fill a vital part of that gap, allowing comparative studies of Jupiter and Saturn, providing the basis for later comparisons with the ice giants Uranus and Neptune, and informing studies of extrasolar planetary systems now being characterized. The Galileo Probe mission provided the first in situ studies of Jupiter's atmosphere. Similar measurements at Saturn, Uranus and Neptune would provide an important comparative planetology context for the Galileo results. Cassini's "Proximal Orbits" in 2017 will reveal Saturn's internal structure to complement the Juno mission's similar measurements at Jupiter. A Saturn entry probe, complementing the Galileo Probe investigations at Jupiter, would complete a solid basis for improved understanding of both Jupiter and Saturn, an important stepping stone to understanding Uranus and Neptune and solar system formation and evolution. The 2012 Decadal Survey ("DS") added Saturn Probe science objectives to NASA's New Frontiers Program: highest-priority Tier 1 objectives any New Frontiers implementation must achieve, and Tier 2, high priority but lower than Tier 1. A DS mission concept study using extremely conservative assumptions concluded that a Saturn Probe project could fit within New Frontiers resource constraints, giving a PI confidence that they could pursue some Tier 2 objectives, customizing for the proper balance of science return, science team composition, procured or contributed instruments, etc. Contributed instruments could significantly enhance the payload and the science team for greater science return. They also provide international collaboration opportunities, with science benefits well demonstrated by missions such as Cassini-Huygens and Rosetta.

  3. World population profile reveals bleak data.

    PubMed

    1998-06-01

    This article presents selected demographic and HIV/AIDS indicators for 1998 and projections for 2010 for selected African countries. The statistics are provided by the US Bureau of the Census. The Census HIV/AIDS database is one of the best in the world. Findings reveal that Africa is the worst affected by AIDS. Eight countries are particularly affected: Zimbabwe, Namibia, Botswana, Swaziland, Zambia, Kenya, Malawi, and South Africa. In 1998, life expectancy declined by 25.7 years. Population growth is expected to decline from 2.5% to 1.1% due to the impact of AIDS mortality. HIV continues to spread in African countries and its spread and impact is not recorded in present data. With AIDS, life expectancy is likely to decline in Zimbabwe from 39.2 to 38.8 years during 1998-2010; without AIDS, it is expected to rise from 64.9 to 69.5 years during the same time period. Only in Zambia is there a slight increase in life expectancy with AIDS. The overwhelming poor life prospects for Africans are reflected in this article, which can provide statistics only for 21 of 53 African countries. The absence of data may mean low HIV prevalence, lack of data, or the beginning of the HIV epidemic. The UNDP provides a Human Poverty Index with indicators for deprivation in knowledge, deprivation in living standards, and longevity. African countries are likely to shift to the bottom of this index due to the impact of AIDS. PMID:12294386

  4. Passive seismology reveals biannual calving periodicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomaus, T. C.; Larsen, C. F.; West, M. E.; Oneel, S.

    2013-12-01

    Iceberg calving is a large and variable component of the total mass loss from marine-terminating glaciers worldwide. However, the processes that control the size and variability of calving fluxes are poorly understood. Even more basic descriptions of iceberg calving, such as its seasonality, are uncertain. Here, we present nearly two years of automatically-estimated calving fluxes at Yahtse Glacier, a tidewater glacier whose terminus flows at ~7 km/yr towards the Gulf of Alaska. At the terminus, ice losses to calving and submarine melt total approximately 1.5 km^3/yr. In order to identify temporal variability in this mean rate, we develop a statistical model of calving size based on characteristics of calving-generated icequakes. These characteristics include 4 amplitude-based variables and 5 variables related to the shape of the icequake envelope. We build our model by combining automatically-detected icequakes (O'Neel et al., 2007) located at the terminus of Yahtse Glacier (Jones et al., 2013) with a training set of 1400 icequakes produced by visually-observed calving events (Bartholomaus et al., 2012). In each of the models tested (regression trees, multinomial logistic regression and multiple linear regession), icequake duration emerges as the single best predictor of iceberg size, consistent with past studies (Qamar, 1988; O'Neel et al., 2007). Additional predictors, such as the mean icequake amplitude and the kurtosis of the icequake envelope improve the predictive capability of the model and reduce the mean squared error to well-within the error of the in-person classification. Once validated, we apply our model to ~ 400,000 icequakes produced by calving events at Yahtse Glacier between June 2009 and September 2011. These results reveal fluctuations in calving rate at a range of timescales, including twice per year. We suggest that the roughly 50%, biannual variation in calving rate is the result of the trade-off between two competing processes at the

  5. Microradiometers Reveal Ocean Health, Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    When NASA researcher Stanford Hooker is in the field, he pays close attention to color. For Hooker, being in the field means being at sea. On one such research trip to the frigid waters of the Arctic, with a Coast Guard icebreaker looming nearby and the snow-crusted ice shelf a few feet away, Hooker leaned over the edge of his small boat and lowered a tethered device into the bright turquoise water, a new product devised by a NASA partner and enabled by a promising technology for oceanographers and atmospheric scientists alike. Color is a function of light. Pure water is clear, but the variation in color observed during a visit to the beach or a flight along a coastline depends on the water s depth and the constituents in it, how far down the light penetrates and how it is absorbed and scattered by dissolved and suspended material. Hooker cares about ocean color because of what it can reveal about the health of the ocean, and in turn, the health of our planet. "The main thing we are interested in is the productivity of the water," Hooker says. The seawater contains phytoplankton, microscopic plants, which are the food base for the ocean s ecosystems. Changes in the water s properties, whether due to natural seasonal effects or human influence, can lead to problems for delicate ecosystems such as coral reefs. Ocean color can inform researchers about the quantities and distribution of phytoplankton and other materials, providing clues as to how the world ocean is changing. NASA s Coastal Zone Color Scanner, launched in 1978, was the first ocean color instrument flown on a spacecraft. Since then, the Agency s ocean color research capabilities have become increasingly sophisticated with the launch of the SeaWiFS instrument in 1997 and the twin MODIS instruments carried into orbit on NASA s Terra (1999) and Aqua (2002) satellites. The technology provides sweeping, global information on ocean color on a scale unattainable by any other means. One issue that arises from

  6. Frantic activity revealed in dusty stellar factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-01-01

    Thanks to the Very Large Telescope's acute and powerful near-infrared eye, astronomers have uncovered a host of new young, massive and dusty stellar nurseries in nearby galaxy NGC 253. The centre of this galaxy appears to harbour a twin of our own Milky Way's supermassive black hole. ESO PR Photo 02a/09 The Spiral Galaxy NGC 253 Astronomers from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (Spain) used NACO, a sharp-eyed adaptive optics instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), to study the fine detail in NGC 253, one of the brightest and dustiest spiral galaxies in the sky. Adaptive Optics (AO) corrects for the blurring effect introduced by the Earth's atmosphere. This turbulence causes the stars to twinkle in a way that delights poets, but frustrates astronomers, since it smears out the images. With AO in action the telescope can produce images that are as sharp as is theoretically possible, as if the telescope were in space. NACO revealed features in the galaxy that were only 11 light-years across. "Our observations provide us with so much spatially resolved detail that we can, for the first time, compare them with the finest radio maps for this galaxy -- maps that have existed for more than a decade," says Juan Antonio Fernández-Ontiveros, the lead author of the paper reporting the results [1]. Astronomers identified 37 distinct bright regions, a threefold increase on previous results, packed into a tiny region at the core of the galaxy, comprising just one percent of the galaxy's total size. The astronomers combined their NACO images with data from another VLT instrument, VISIR, as well as with images from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and radio observations made by the Very Large Array and the Very Large Baseline Interferometer. Combining these observations, taken in different wavelength regimes, provided a clue to the nature of these regions. "We now think that these are probably very active nurseries that contain many stars bursting from their

  7. Shocking Detail of Superstar's Activity Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-10-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has imaged Eta Carinae and revealed a hot inner core around this mysterious superstar. The new X-ray observation shows three distinct structures: an outer, horseshoe shaped ring about two light years in diameter, a hot inner core about 3 light months in diameter, and a hot central source less than a light month in diameter which may contain the superstar. All three structures are thought to represent shock waves produced by matter rushing away from the superstar at supersonic speeds. The temperature of the shock-heated gas ranges from 60 million degrees Celsius in the central regions to 3 million degrees Celsius on the outer structure. An earlier image of Eta Carinae by the Hubble Space Telescope revealed two spectacular bubbles of gas expanding in opposite directions away from a central bright region at speeds in excess of a million miles per hour. The inner region visible in the Chandra image has never been resolved before, and appears to be associated with a central disk of high velocity gas rushing out at much higher speeds perpendicular to the bipolar optical nebula. "It is not what I expected," said Dr. Fred Seward of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. "I expected to see a strong point source with a little diffuse emission cloud around it. Instead, we see just the opposite- a bright cloud of diffuse emission, and much less radiation from the center." "The Chandra image contains some puzzles for existing ideas of how a star can produce such hot and intense X-rays," agreed Prof. Kris Davidson of the University of Minnesota. "In the most popular theory, X-rays are made by colliding gas streams from two stars so close together that they'd look like a point source to us. But what happens to gas streams that escape to farther distances? The extended hot stuff in the middle of the new image gives demanding new conditions for any theory to meet." Eta Carinae is one of the most enigmatic and intriguing objects in our

  8. Chandra Data Reveal Rapidly Whirling Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    A new study using results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory provides one of the best pieces of evidence yet that many supermassive black holes are spinning extremely rapidly. The whirling of these giant black holes drives powerful jets that pump huge amounts of energy into their environment and affects galaxy growth. A team of scientists compared leading theories of jets produced by rotating supermassive black holes with Chandra data. A sampling of nine giant galaxies that exhibit large disturbances in their gaseous atmospheres showed that the central black holes in these galaxies must be spinning at near their maximum rates. People Who Read This Also Read... NASA’s Swift Satellite Catches First Supernova in The Act of Exploding Black Holes Have Simple Feeding Habits Jet Power and Black Hole Assortment Revealed in New Chandra Image Erratic Black Hole Regulates Itself "We think these monster black holes are spinning close to the limit set by Einstein's theory of relativity, which means that they can drag material around them at close to the speed of light," said Rodrigo Nemmen, a visiting graduate student at Penn State University, and lead author of a paper on the new results presented at American Astronomical Society in Austin, Texas. The research reinforces other, less direct methods previously used which have indicated that some stellar and supermassive black holes are spinning rapidly. According to Einstein's theory, a rapidly spinning black hole makes space itself rotate. This effect, coupled with gas spiraling toward the black hole, can produce a rotating, tightly wound vertical tower of magnetic field that flings a large fraction of the inflowing gas away from the vicinity of the black hole in an energetic, high-speed jet. Computer simulations by other authors have suggested that black holes may acquire their rapid spins when galaxies merge, and through the accretion of gas from their surroundings. "Extremely fast spin might be very common for large

  9. 21 CFR 1.21 - Failure to reveal material facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Failure to reveal material facts. 1.21 Section 1... GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS General Labeling Requirements § 1.21 Failure to reveal material facts. (a... to reveal facts that are: (1) Material in light of other representations made or suggested...

  10. 21 CFR 1.21 - Failure to reveal material facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Failure to reveal material facts. 1.21 Section 1... GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS General Labeling Requirements § 1.21 Failure to reveal material facts. (a) Labeling of a food, drug, device, or cosmetic shall be deemed to be misleading if it fails to reveal...

  11. 21 CFR 1.21 - Failure to reveal material facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Failure to reveal material facts. 1.21 Section 1... GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS General Labeling Requirements § 1.21 Failure to reveal material facts. (a) Labeling of a food, drug, device, or cosmetic shall be deemed to be misleading if it fails to reveal...

  12. The lower atmosphere of Pluto revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-03-01

    ), attached to ESO's Very Large Telescope, have now revealed that the atmosphere as a whole, not just the upper atmosphere, has a mean temperature of minus 180 degrees Celsius, and so it is indeed "much hotter" than the surface. In contrast to the Earth's atmosphere [2], most, if not all, of Pluto's atmosphere is thus undergoing a temperature inversion: the temperature is higher, the higher in the atmosphere you look. The change is about 3 to 15 degrees per kilometre. On Earth, under normal circumstances, the temperature decreases through the atmosphere by about 6 degrees per kilometre. "It is fascinating to think that with CRIRES we are able to precisely measure traces of a gas in an atmosphere 100 000 times more tenuous than the Earth's, on an object five times smaller than our planet and located at the edge of the Solar System," says co-author Hans-Ulrich Käufl. "The combination of CRIRES and the VLT is almost like having an advanced atmospheric research satellite orbiting Pluto." The reason why Pluto's surface is so cold is linked to the existence of Pluto's atmosphere, and is due to the sublimation of the surface ice; much like sweat cools the body as it evaporates from the surface of the skin, this sublimation has a cooling effect on the surface of Pluto. In this respect, Pluto shares some properties with comets, whose coma and tails arise from sublimating ice as they approach the Sun. The CRIRES observations also indicate that methane is the second most common gas in Pluto's atmosphere, representing half a percent of the molecules. "We were able to show that these quantities of methane play a crucial role in the heating processes in the atmosphere and can explain the elevated atmospheric temperature," says Lellouch. Two different models can explain the properties of Pluto's atmosphere. In the first, the astronomers assume that Pluto's surface is covered with a thin layer of methane, which will inhibit the sublimation of the nitrogen frost. The second scenario invokes

  13. Dramatic Outburst Reveals Nearest Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    Sgr. The radio observations revealed the presence of a jet escaping from the system at mind-boggling speeds. Only three other galactic X-ray stellar systems have been found to eject material at such speeds. They have been dubbed "microquasars" because, on a smaller scale, they resemble quasars, which lie at the hearts of distant galaxies and also spew out high-velocity jets of particles. In galaxy-core quasars, the black holes are millions of times more massive than the Sun; in the more nearby microquasars the black holes are roughly three to twenty times more massive than the Sun. The extremely high velocity of the jets suggests that their origin lies close to the event horizon of a black hole. Microquasar activity is thought to arise when the black hole in the binary system draws material away from its companion star. The material surrounding the black hole forms a rapidly spinning disk called an accretion disk. This disk is heated by friction to millions of degrees, causing it to emit X-rays. As spiralling gas moves into the gravity well of the black hole, it moves faster and faster. Magnetic fields in the disk are believed to expel the charged subatomic particles at speeds close to that of light. As the charged particles interact with the magnetic fields, they emit radio waves. If some of the material escapes by being magnetically expelled into space, the matter may continue moving at the tremendous speed it had attained near the black hole. After their ejection, the jets of particles expand and cool, fading from astronomers' view. V4641 Sgr excites astronomers because it is close and because it acted so differently from other microquasars. In other microquasars, outbursts have dimmed more slowly over weeks or months rather than hours. "There's something fundamentally different about this one; it's more extreme than any other example," Hjellming said. "And because this system happens to be so close to us, `it is very likely that there are more objects like V4641

  14. What Facial Appearance Reveals Over Time: When Perceived Expressions in Neutral Faces Reveal Stable Emotion Dispositions.

    PubMed

    Adams, Reginald B; Garrido, Carlos O; Albohn, Daniel N; Hess, Ursula; Kleck, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    It might seem a reasonable assumption that when we are not actively using our faces to express ourselves (i.e., when we display nonexpressive, or neutral faces), those around us will not be able to read our emotions. Herein, using a variety of expression-related ratings, we examined whether age-related changes in the face can accurately reveal one's innermost affective dispositions. In each study, we found that expressive ratings of neutral facial displays predicted self-reported positive/negative dispositional affect, but only for elderly women, and only for positive affect. These findings meaningfully replicate and extend earlier work examining age-related emotion cues in the face of elderly women (Malatesta et al., 1987a). We discuss these findings in light of evidence that women are expected to, and do, smile more than men, and that the quality of their smiles predicts their life satisfaction. Although ratings of old male faces did not significantly predict self-reported affective dispositions, the trend was similar to that found for old female faces. A plausible explanation for this gender difference is that in the process of attenuating emotional expressions over their lifetimes, old men reveal less evidence of their total emotional experiences in their faces than do old women. PMID:27445944

  15. What Facial Appearance Reveals Over Time: When Perceived Expressions in Neutral Faces Reveal Stable Emotion Dispositions

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Reginald B.; Garrido, Carlos O.; Albohn, Daniel N.; Hess, Ursula; Kleck, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    It might seem a reasonable assumption that when we are not actively using our faces to express ourselves (i.e., when we display nonexpressive, or neutral faces), those around us will not be able to read our emotions. Herein, using a variety of expression-related ratings, we examined whether age-related changes in the face can accurately reveal one’s innermost affective dispositions. In each study, we found that expressive ratings of neutral facial displays predicted self-reported positive/negative dispositional affect, but only for elderly women, and only for positive affect. These findings meaningfully replicate and extend earlier work examining age-related emotion cues in the face of elderly women (Malatesta et al., 1987a). We discuss these findings in light of evidence that women are expected to, and do, smile more than men, and that the quality of their smiles predicts their life satisfaction. Although ratings of old male faces did not significantly predict self-reported affective dispositions, the trend was similar to that found for old female faces. A plausible explanation for this gender difference is that in the process of attenuating emotional expressions over their lifetimes, old men reveal less evidence of their total emotional experiences in their faces than do old women. PMID:27445944

  16. Stated and revealed inequality aversion in three subject pools

    PubMed Central

    Beranek, Benjamin; Cubitt, Robin; Gächter, Simon

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports data from three subject pools (n=717 subjects) using techniques based on those of Loewenstein, et al. (1989) and Blanco, et al. (2011) to obtain parameters, respectively, of stated and revealed inequality aversion. We provide a replication opportunity for those papers, with two innovations: (i) a design which allows stated and revealed preferences to be compared at the individual level; (ii) assessment of robustness of findings across subjects from a UK university, a Turkish university and Amazon Mechanical Turk. Our findings on stated aversion to inequality are qualitatively similar to those of Loewenstein, et al. in each of our subject pools, whereas there are notable differences between some of our findings on revealed preference and those of Blanco, et al. We find that revealed advantageous inequality aversion is often stronger than revealed dis-advantageous inequality aversion. In most subject pools, we find some (weak) correlation between corresponding parameters of stated and revealed inequality aversion. PMID:27069847

  17. 21 CFR 1.21 - Failure to reveal material facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Failure to reveal material facts. 1.21 Section 1.21 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... to reveal facts that are: (1) Material in light of other representations made or suggested...

  18. Everett Weinreb, Photographer, April 1989 FOUNDATION DETAIL REVEALED AS RESULT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Everett Weinreb, Photographer, April 1989 FOUNDATION DETAIL REVEALED AS RESULT OF HOUSE DEMOLITION - Irvine Ranch Agricultural Headquarters, Boyd Tenant House, Southeast of Intersection of San Diego & Santa Ana Freeways, Irvine, Orange County, CA

  19. 14. DETAIL VIEW, FLUTED PILASTER AND PANELLED REVEAL IN DOORWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL VIEW, FLUTED PILASTER AND PANELLED REVEAL IN DOORWAY BETWEEN VESTIBULE AND STAIRHALL (NOTE WOOD GRAINING), WITH SCALE - Bowieville, 522 Church Road South, Leeland, Prince George's County, MD

  20. General view of the archaeological site showing excavation and revealing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of the archaeological site showing excavation and revealing the steps leading down into the eighteenth-century burial vault - Harry Buck House, North of Main Street (14800 Governor Oden Bowie Drive), Upper Marlboro, Prince George's County, MD

  1. [An original revealing mode of sarcoidosis: Sweet's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bricha, Myriem; Sqalli, Fatimazzahra; Hammi, Sanae; Bourkadi, Jamal Eddine

    2016-01-01

    Sweet's syndrome is a neutrophilic dermatosis which usually presents as an idiopathic disorder. The combination of Sweet's syndrome and sarcoidosis is rare. We report the clinical case of a Sweet's syndrome revealing sarcoidosis. PMID:27279949

  2. Revealing the molecular signatures of host-pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Advances in sequencing technology and genome-wide association studies are now revealing the complex interactions between hosts and pathogen through genomic variation signatures, which arise from evolutionary co-existence. PMID:22011345

  3. Revealing ecological networks using Bayesian network inference algorithms.

    PubMed

    Milns, Isobel; Beale, Colin M; Smith, V Anne

    2010-07-01

    Understanding functional relationships within ecological networks can help reveal keys to ecosystem stability or fragility. Revealing these relationships is complicated by the difficulties of isolating variables or performing experimental manipulations within a natural ecosystem, and thus inferences are often made by matching models to observational data. Such models, however, require assumptions-or detailed measurements-of parameters such as birth and death rate, encounter frequency, territorial exclusion, and predation success. Here, we evaluate the use of a Bayesian network inference algorithm, which can reveal ecological networks based upon species and habitat abundance alone. We test the algorithm's performance and applicability on observational data of avian communities and habitat in the Peak District National Park, United Kingdom. The resulting networks correctly reveal known relationships among habitat types and known interspecific relationships. In addition, the networks produced novel insights into ecosystem structure and identified key species with high connectivity. Thus, Bayesian networks show potential for becoming a valuable tool in ecosystem analysis. PMID:20715607

  4. Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1999 Spotlight on Research 2012 July 2012 (historical) Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma A ... out to see if a technology called whole genome sequencing would help them find other genetic risk ...

  5. Direct sequencing of the human microbiome readily reveals community differences

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Culture-independent studies of human microbiota by direct genomic sequencing reveal quite distinct differences among communities, indicating that improved sequencing capacity can be most wisely utilized to study more samples, rather than more sequences per sample. PMID:20441597

  6. Revealing of HII-regions in Galaxies with Panoramic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakopian, S. A.; Balayan, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    Observations intended to investigation and revealing of nodes of processes of nuclear and starforming activity in galaxies were performed via panoramic spectroscopy. Data obtained on Mrk 1050 revealed evidence of starforming activity also outside the central engine of high surface brightness. Two small HII-regions, being likely a part of the chain, are located in the part of the spiral branch coming from the nucleus part.

  7. Hyperammonemia-induced encephalopathy: A rare devastating complication of bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kromas, Michelle L; Mousa, Omar Y; John, Savio

    2015-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of hyperammonemia are usually easily identifiable to the clinician when associated with liver disease and lead to prompt diagnosis and treatment. However, hyperammonemia-induced encephalopathy is rare in adults in the absence of overt liver disease, thus diagnosis is often delayed or missed leading to potentially life threatening complications. Without proper treatment, such patients can decompensate rapidly with poor outcomes including seizures, coma, and death. Early assessment of plasma ammonia levels in patients with normal hepatic function and characteristic symptoms of encephalopathy can lead to early intervention while investigating the underlying etiology. We describe a patient who presented with a 2-year progression of waxing and waning acute mental status changes after a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. He was found to have elevated ammonia level as well as orotic aciduria; results consistent with a urea cycle disorder. After consulting neurology as well as toxicology, he ultimately improved after dietary protein restriction, sodium benzoate and lactulose therapy. While rare, clinicians should have a high index of suspicion for late onset urea cycle disorders in symptomatic patients presenting with encephalopathy secondary to hyperammonemia. PMID:25954483

  8. Camelid genomes reveal evolution and adaptation to desert environments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huiguang; Guang, Xuanmin; Al-Fageeh, Mohamed B; Cao, Junwei; Pan, Shengkai; Zhou, Huanmin; Zhang, Li; Abutarboush, Mohammed H; Xing, Yanping; Xie, Zhiyuan; Alshanqeeti, Ali S; Zhang, Yanru; Yao, Qiulin; Al-Shomrani, Badr M; Zhang, Dong; Li, Jiang; Manee, Manee M; Yang, Zili; Yang, Linfeng; Liu, Yiyi; Zhang, Jilin; Altammami, Musaad A; Wang, Shenyuan; Yu, Lili; Zhang, Wenbin; Liu, Sanyang; Ba, La; Liu, Chunxia; Yang, Xukui; Meng, Fanhua; Wang, Shaowei; Li, Lu; Li, Erli; Li, Xueqiong; Wu, Kaifeng; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Junyi; Yin, Ye; Yang, Huanming; Al-Swailem, Abdulaziz M; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus), dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) and alpaca (Vicugna pacos) are economically important livestock. Although the Bactrian camel and dromedary are large, typically arid-desert-adapted mammals, alpacas are adapted to plateaus. Here we present high-quality genome sequences of these three species. Our analysis reveals the demographic history of these species since the Tortonian Stage of the Miocene and uncovers a striking correlation between large fluctuations in population size and geological time boundaries. Comparative genomic analysis reveals complex features related to desert adaptations, including fat and water metabolism, stress responses to heat, aridity, intense ultraviolet radiation and choking dust. Transcriptomic analysis of Bactrian camels further reveals unique osmoregulation, osmoprotection and compensatory mechanisms for water reservation underpinned by high blood glucose levels. We hypothesize that these physiological mechanisms represent kidney evolutionary adaptations to the desert environment. This study advances our understanding of camelid evolution and the adaptation of camels to arid-desert environments. PMID:25333821

  9. [Ovarian torsion revealing an ovarian cavernous hemangioma in a child].

    PubMed

    M'pemba Loufoua-Lemay, A-B; Peko, J-F; Mbongo, J-A; Mokoko, J-C; Nzingoula, S

    2003-11-01

    The authors report one case of cavernous hemangioma of the left ovary, which was revealed by ovarian torsion. Such benign tumors of the blood vessels are rare in ovaries during childhood. This hemangioma was observed in a 13-year-old patient, who presented with abdominal and pelvic pain and vomiting. The pelvic mass was noted and sonography revealed a cystic tumor. An annexectomia was realized. Histology showed narcotized ovary cells, with an increased number of vascular channels composed of thin walled vessels, whose wall consisted of an endothelium. This aspect evoked a cavernous hemangioma of the ovary. PMID:14613693

  10. Nilaja Sun's "No Child"...: Revealing Teaching and Learning through Theater

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetland, Lois

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of Nilaja Sun's one-woman play, "No Child" . . ., that applies the Studio Habits of Mind framework to reveal essential features of great teaching artistry and great teaching. The play conveys much about twenty-first century schools and the policies that control them; about respect, equity, justice, and the lack of…

  11. The Basics of How to Reveal Epilepsy--Part Two

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittan, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    In the April 2009 edition of "Exceptional Parent," Part One of this series explored why, for their own emotional well-being, it is so important for parents to tell others about their or their child's epilepsy. This month's installment will discuss the basics of how to reveal epilepsy to others, including some additional advantages one receives in…

  12. Carbohydrate active enzymes revealed in Coptotermes formosanus transcriptome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A normalized cDNA library of Coptotermes formosanus was constructed using mixed RNA isolated from workers, soldiers, nymphs and alates of both sexes. Sequencing of this library generated 131,637 EST and 25,939 unigenes were assembled. Carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes) revealed in this library we...

  13. [Ulcerated duodenitis revealing Henoch-Schönlein purpura].

    PubMed

    Marting, A; Defrance, P; Wain, E; Van Severen, M; Deflandre, J

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and duodenal ulcers can meet many etiologies. We report the case of a young adult with an ulcerated duodenitis revealing Henoch-Schönlein purpura. The abdominal symptoms preceded the emergence of the classical cutaneous signs of the disease. PMID:26376566

  14. Natural Disasters that Reveal Cracks in Our Social Foundation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langer, Nieli

    2004-01-01

    The recent deaths of more than 13,000 French elderly in the European heat wave of 2003 revealed cracks in the social foundation of urban communities, here and abroad. The breakdown occurred in community services, neighborhood networks, and governmental agencies that were responsible for warning of impending dangers to at-risk elderly. This paper…

  15. Perspective view. Fivestory reinforced concrete factory building reveals the structural ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view. Five-story reinforced concrete factory building reveals the structural frame on the exterior of the facade. Twelve bay facade facing onto Clay Avenue (north facade) has first floor openings bricked up. Mix of typical factory windows and glass block windows fill the majority of the openings on the rest of building - Russell Industrial Center, 1600 Clay Avenue, Detroit, MI

  16. Experimentally implementable criteria revealing substructures of genuine multipartite entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Marcus; Schimpf, Hans; Gabriel, Andreas; Spengler, Christoph; Bruss, Dagmar; Hiesmayr, Beatrix C.

    2011-02-15

    We present a general framework that reveals substructures of genuine multipartite entanglement. Via simple inequalities it is possible to discriminate different sets of multipartite qubit states. These inequalities are beneficial regarding experimental examinations as only local measurements are required. Furthermore, the number of observables scales favorably with system size. In exemplary cases we demonstrate the noise resistance and discuss implementations.

  17. In Reporting Lobbying Expenses, Some Institutions Do Not Reveal All.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lederman, Douglas

    1998-01-01

    On a federal tax form, only 75 of 475 colleges and universities surveyed reported that they had spent money on lobbying, defined as direct contacts with legislators or executive-branch officials about specific bills. Guidelines concerning reporting are unclear and confusing, and some institutions reveal as little as possible. Data on 78…

  18. Adaptation to High Ethanol Reveals Complex Evolutionary Pathways.

    PubMed

    Voordeckers, Karin; Kominek, Jacek; Das, Anupam; Espinosa-Cantú, Adriana; De Maeyer, Dries; Arslan, Ahmed; Van Pee, Michiel; van der Zande, Elisa; Meert, Wim; Yang, Yudi; Zhu, Bo; Marchal, Kathleen; DeLuna, Alexander; Van Noort, Vera; Jelier, Rob; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2015-11-01

    Tolerance to high levels of ethanol is an ecologically and industrially relevant phenotype of microbes, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this complex trait remain largely unknown. Here, we use long-term experimental evolution of isogenic yeast populations of different initial ploidy to study adaptation to increasing levels of ethanol. Whole-genome sequencing of more than 30 evolved populations and over 100 adapted clones isolated throughout this two-year evolution experiment revealed how a complex interplay of de novo single nucleotide mutations, copy number variation, ploidy changes, mutator phenotypes, and clonal interference led to a significant increase in ethanol tolerance. Although the specific mutations differ between different evolved lineages, application of a novel computational pipeline, PheNetic, revealed that many mutations target functional modules involved in stress response, cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and respiration. Measuring the fitness effects of selected mutations introduced in non-evolved ethanol-sensitive cells revealed several adaptive mutations that had previously not been implicated in ethanol tolerance, including mutations in PRT1, VPS70 and MEX67. Interestingly, variation in VPS70 was recently identified as a QTL for ethanol tolerance in an industrial bio-ethanol strain. Taken together, our results show how, in contrast to adaptation to some other stresses, adaptation to a continuous complex and severe stress involves interplay of different evolutionary mechanisms. In addition, our study reveals functional modules involved in ethanol resistance and identifies several mutations that could help to improve the ethanol tolerance of industrial yeasts. PMID:26545090

  19. Chemical milling solution reveals stress corrosion cracks in titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braski, D. N.

    1967-01-01

    Solution of hydrogen flouride, hydrogen peroxide, and water reveals hot salt stress corrosion cracks in various titanium alloys. After the surface is rinsed in water, dried, and swabbed with the solution, it can be observed by the naked eye or at low magnification.

  20. Revealing Evidence of Spin in Galactic Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. M.; Fabian, A. C.; Reynolds, C. S.; Nowak, M.; Wijnands, R.; Homan, J.; Belloni, T.; van der Klis, M.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    2002-12-01

    Our observations of Galactic black holes with Chandra and XMM-Newton have recently revealed broad, skewed Fe K-alpha emission lines similar to those seen in some AGN. If such lines are produced near the inner edge of the accretion disk, they can serve as an excellent spin diagnostic. Our analysis of the XMM-Newton spectrum of XTE J1650-500 reveals a strong, skewed Fe K-alpha emission line that requires near-maximal spin; with RXTE, we have discovered a 250 Hz QPO in this source which may also be produced near to the black hole. Although many Galactic black holes have been studied extensively, it is extremely rare that spectroscopic and timing studies both reveal features plausibly associated with the inner accretion disk. We will present the results of our XMM-Newton, Chandra, and RXTE observations of XTE J1650-500, as well as the results of our Chandra observations of Cygnus X-1 and preliminary results from our observations of GX 339-4 with XMM-Newton. We will discuss these results within the context of the relativistic Fe K lines reported by our group and others, and comment on the prospects for revealing evidence of spin in future observations. (JMM acknowledges support from the NSF through the Astronomy and Astrophysics Fellowship program.)

  1. 24. Demolitin of Pier G reveals the center bays at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Demolitin of Pier G reveals the center bays at the track well in transverse section. Note structural system of first, second, and third floors, as well as the monitor roof. - Lehigh Valley Railroad, Pier G, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  2. Adaptation to High Ethanol Reveals Complex Evolutionary Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anupam; Espinosa-Cantú, Adriana; De Maeyer, Dries; Arslan, Ahmed; Van Pee, Michiel; van der Zande, Elisa; Meert, Wim; Yang, Yudi; Zhu, Bo; Marchal, Kathleen; DeLuna, Alexander; Van Noort, Vera; Jelier, Rob; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance to high levels of ethanol is an ecologically and industrially relevant phenotype of microbes, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this complex trait remain largely unknown. Here, we use long-term experimental evolution of isogenic yeast populations of different initial ploidy to study adaptation to increasing levels of ethanol. Whole-genome sequencing of more than 30 evolved populations and over 100 adapted clones isolated throughout this two-year evolution experiment revealed how a complex interplay of de novo single nucleotide mutations, copy number variation, ploidy changes, mutator phenotypes, and clonal interference led to a significant increase in ethanol tolerance. Although the specific mutations differ between different evolved lineages, application of a novel computational pipeline, PheNetic, revealed that many mutations target functional modules involved in stress response, cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and respiration. Measuring the fitness effects of selected mutations introduced in non-evolved ethanol-sensitive cells revealed several adaptive mutations that had previously not been implicated in ethanol tolerance, including mutations in PRT1, VPS70 and MEX67. Interestingly, variation in VPS70 was recently identified as a QTL for ethanol tolerance in an industrial bio-ethanol strain. Taken together, our results show how, in contrast to adaptation to some other stresses, adaptation to a continuous complex and severe stress involves interplay of different evolutionary mechanisms. In addition, our study reveals functional modules involved in ethanol resistance and identifies several mutations that could help to improve the ethanol tolerance of industrial yeasts. PMID:26545090

  3. When Values and Behaviors Conflict: Immigrant BSW Students' Experiences Revealed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calderwood, Kimberly; Harper, Kim; Ball, Kellie; Liang, David

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study reveals the discomfort seven immigrant bachelor of social work students reported experiencing when the behaviors expected of them as Canadian social workers conflicted with their fundamental family values. Behaviorally, participants had assimilated to Canadian and to social work cultures; however, the values they held from…

  4. Detail of south granite pier revealing riveted truss ends and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of south granite pier revealing riveted truss ends and iron footing plates on top of granite cap stones. View north - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Fort Point Channel Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  5. Direct visualization reveals kinetics of meiotic chromosome synapsis

    SciTech Connect

    Rog, Ofer; Dernburg, Abby  F.

    2015-03-17

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a conserved protein complex that stabilizes interactions along homologous chromosomes (homologs) during meiosis. The SC regulates genetic exchanges between homologs, thereby enabling reductional division and the production of haploid gametes. Here, we directly observe SC assembly (synapsis) by optimizing methods for long-term fluorescence recording in C. elegans. We report that synapsis initiates independently on each chromosome pair at or near pairing centers—specialized regions required for homolog associations. Once initiated, the SC extends rapidly and mostly irreversibly to chromosome ends. Quantitation of SC initiation frequencies and extension rates reveals that initiation is a rate-limiting step in homolog interactions. Eliminating the dynein-driven chromosome movements that accompany synapsis severely retards SC extension, revealing a new role for these conserved motions. This work provides the first opportunity to directly observe and quantify key aspects of meiotic chromosome interactions and will enable future in vivo analysis of germline processes.

  6. Benign Cystic Peritoneal Mesothelioma Revealed by Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bray Madoué, Kaimba; Boniface, Moifo; Annick Laure, Edzimbi; Pierre, Herve

    2016-01-01

    Benign cystic peritoneal mesothelioma is a rare tumor which frequently occurs in women of reproductive age. Abdominal pain associated with pelvic or abdominal mass is the common clinical presentation. We report the case of a 22-year-old woman with a pathological proved benign cystic mesothelioma of the peritoneum revealed by a small bowel obstruction and a painful left-sided pelvic mass with signs of psoitis. Contrast enhanced abdominal CT-scan demonstrated a large pelvic cystic mass with mass effect on rectosigmoid and pelvic organs. The patient underwent surgical removal of the tumor. Pathological examination revealed the diagnosis of benign cystic mesothelioma of the peritoneum. The outcome was excellent with a 12-month recoil. PMID:27066288

  7. [Deep dorsal penile vein thrombosis revealing Behcet's disease].

    PubMed

    Beddouche, Ali; Ouaziz, Hicham; Zougaghi, Sinane; Alaoui, Abdelilah; Dergamoun, Hamza; El Sayegh, Hachem; Iken, Ali; Benslimane, Lounis; Nouini, Yassine

    2016-01-01

    Deep dorsal penile vein thrombosis (DDPVT)is a rare and little known urologic emergency. It requires an early etiological and symptomatic approach to preserve erectile function and prevent recurrences. This study reports a case of dorsal penile vein thrombosis revealed by spontaneous priapism that didn't resolve adequately and confirmed by penile Doppler ultrasound. After management of priapism and DDPVT, the etiological investigation revealed Behcet's disease whose diagnosis was based on the association of a major criteria, such as oral aphthous ulcers with 3 minor criteria such as: genital aphthous ulcers, ocular involvement, and a positive skin pathergy test within 24h. The patient underwent etiological treatment with good clinical evolution and preservation of erectile function. PMID:27583081

  8. Stable Chromosome Condensation Revealed by Chromosome Conformation Capture.

    PubMed

    Eagen, Kyle P; Hartl, Tom A; Kornberg, Roger D

    2015-11-01

    Chemical cross-linking and DNA sequencing have revealed regions of intra-chromosomal interaction, referred to as topologically associating domains (TADs), interspersed with regions of little or no interaction, in interphase nuclei. We find that TADs and the regions between them correspond with the bands and interbands of polytene chromosomes of Drosophila. We further establish the conservation of TADs between polytene and diploid cells of Drosophila. From direct measurements on light micrographs of polytene chromosomes, we then deduce the states of chromatin folding in the diploid cell nucleus. Two states of folding, fully extended fibers containing regulatory regions and promoters, and fibers condensed up to 10-fold containing coding regions of active genes, constitute the euchromatin of the nuclear interior. Chromatin fibers condensed up to 30-fold, containing coding regions of inactive genes, represent the heterochromatin of the nuclear periphery. A convergence of molecular analysis with direct observation thus reveals the architecture of interphase chromosomes. PMID:26544940

  9. Benign Cystic Peritoneal Mesothelioma Revealed by Small Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Bray Madoué, Kaimba; Boniface, Moifo; Annick Laure, Edzimbi; Pierre, Herve

    2016-01-01

    Benign cystic peritoneal mesothelioma is a rare tumor which frequently occurs in women of reproductive age. Abdominal pain associated with pelvic or abdominal mass is the common clinical presentation. We report the case of a 22-year-old woman with a pathological proved benign cystic mesothelioma of the peritoneum revealed by a small bowel obstruction and a painful left-sided pelvic mass with signs of psoitis. Contrast enhanced abdominal CT-scan demonstrated a large pelvic cystic mass with mass effect on rectosigmoid and pelvic organs. The patient underwent surgical removal of the tumor. Pathological examination revealed the diagnosis of benign cystic mesothelioma of the peritoneum. The outcome was excellent with a 12-month recoil. PMID:27066288

  10. Ascites and other incidental findings revealing undiagnosed systemic rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Szeto, Matthew Chak Hin; Disney, Benjamin; Perkins, Philip; Wood, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of a 43-year-old man presenting to the gastroenterology outpatient department with exudative ascites. Mediastinal lymphadenopathy, pericardial effusion and pleural effusion were detected on further imaging. Further clinical examination revealed subcutaneous nodules on the left arm, which were confirmed to be rheumatoid nodules on histology. Inflammatory markers were elevated with positive serology for rheumatoid factor and anticyclic citrullinated protein antibody. Our investigations excluded tuberculosis, pancreatitis and malignancy in the patient. Following review by a rheumatologist, a diagnosis of systemic rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was made. Pleuritis and pericarditis are well recognised as extra-articular manifestation of RA. Ascites, however, is rarely recognised as a manifestation of RA. Our literature search revealed two other cases of ascites due to RA disease activity, and both patients had long-standing known RA. This case adds to the discussion on whether ascites and peritonitis should be classified as extra-articular manifestations of RA. PMID:26055583