Science.gov

Sample records for orthopedic fixation devices

  1. Orthopedic prosthesis fixation.

    PubMed

    Park, J B

    1992-01-01

    The fixation of orthopedic implants has been one of the most difficult and challenging problems. The fixation can be achieved via: (a) direct mechanical fixation using screws, pins, wires, etc.; (b) passive or interference mechanical fixation where the implants are allowed to move or merely positioned onto the tissue surfaces; (c) bone cement fixation which is actually a grouting material; (d) biological fixation by allowing tissues to grow into the interstices of pores or textured surfaces of implants; (e) direct chemical bonding between implant and tissues; or (f) any combination of the above techniques. This article is concerned with various fixation techniques including the potential use of electrical, pulsed electromagnetic field, chemical stimulation using calcium phosphates for the enhancement of tissue ingrowth, direct bonding with bone by glass-ceramics and resorbable particle impregnated bone cement to take advantages of both the immediate fixation offered by the bone cement and long term fixation due to tissue ingrowth. PMID:1449228

  2. Design and Optimization of Resorbable Silk Internal Fixation Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Dylan S.

    Limitations of current material options for internal fracture fixation devices have resulted in a large gap between user needs and hardware function. Metal systems offer robust mechanical strength and ease of implantation but require secondary surgery for removal and/or result in long-term complications (infection, palpability, sensitivity, etc.). Current resorbable devices eliminate the need for second surgery and long-term complications but are still associated with negative host response as well as limited functionality and more difficult implantation. There is a definitive need for orthopedic hardware that is mechanically capable of immediate fracture stabilization and fracture fixation during healing, can safely biodegrade while allowing complete bone remodeling, can be resterilized for reuse, and is easily implantable (self-tapping). Previous work investigated the use of silk protein to produce resorbable orthopedic hardware for non- load bearing fracture fixation. In this study, silk orthopedic hardware was further investigated and optimized in order to better understand the ability of silk as a fracture fixation system and more closely meet the unfulfilled market needs. Solvent-based and aqueous-based silk processing formulations were cross-linked with methanol to induce beta sheet structure, dried, autoclaved and then machined to the desired device/geometry. Silk hardware was evaluated for dry, hydrated and fatigued (cyclic) mechanical properties, in vitro degradation, resterilization, functionalization with osteoinductive molecules and implantation technique for fracture fixation. Mechanical strength showed minor improvements from previous results, but remains comparable to current resorbable fixation systems with the advantages of self-tapping ability for ease of implantation, full degradation in 10 months, ability to be resterilized and reused, and ability to release molecules for osteoinudction. In vivo assessment confirmed biocompatibility, showed

  3. 21 CFR 886.1290 - Fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fixation device. 886.1290 Section 886.1290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1290 Fixation device. (a) Identification. A...

  4. 21 CFR 886.1290 - Fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fixation device. 886.1290 Section 886.1290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1290 Fixation device. (a) Identification. A...

  5. 21 CFR 886.1290 - Fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fixation device. 886.1290 Section 886.1290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1290 Fixation device. (a) Identification. A...

  6. Application of magnetic rods for fixation in orthopedic treatments.

    PubMed

    Shelyakova, Tatiana; Russo, Alessandro; Visani, Andrea; Dediu, Valentin Alek; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2015-06-01

    Achieving an efficient fixation for complicated fractures and scaffold application treatments is a challenging surgery problem. Although many fixation approaches have been advanced and actively pursued, the optimal solution for long bone defects has not yet been defined. This paper promotes an innovative fixation method based on application of magnetic forces. The efficiency of this approach was investigated on the basis of finite element modeling for scaffold application and analytical calculations for diaphyseal fractures. Three different configurations have been analyzed including combinations of small cylindrical permanent magnets or stainless steel rods, inserted rigidly in the bone intramedullary canals and in the scaffold. It was shown that attractive forces as high as 75 N can be achieved. While these forces do not reach the strength of mechanical forces in traditional fixators, the employment of magnetic rods is expected to be beneficial by reducing considerably the interface micromotions. It can additionally support magneto-mechanical stimulations as well as enabling a magnetically assisted targeted delivery of drugs and other bio-agents. PMID:25880709

  7. Plasma engineered surfaces for orthopedic devices.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Susan; Gilliam, Mary; Samaniego, Cheryl; Dwarshuis, Nate; Carson, Julia; Peterson, Benjamin; Zand, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma was used to graft various biocompatible polymers to the surface of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Polymers used as grafts in this study were poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (PHEMA) and polyethylene glycol (PEG). A significant decrease in contact angle was noted for grafted surfaces, indicating increased hydrophilicity. Surface functionalities were verified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The wear properties of the coatings were determined by weight loss under conditions of a random motion pin-on-plate apparatus with the coated polyethylene plaques immersed in DI water. Based on these tests, the grafted surfaces exhibited an improved resistance to wear, compared to UHMWPE. Cell viability studies were used to confirm that the plasma treatment had no negative effects on the surface bio-toxicity. Based on the results, it is anticipated that the incorporation of these biocompatible polymer-grafted UHMWPE surfaces in metal-on-plastic orthopedic implants should improve their performance and longevity. PMID:26999407

  8. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube in... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube in... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube in... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770...

  11. A video guided solution for screw insertion in orthopedic plate fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magaraggia, J.; Kleinszig, G.; Graumann, R.; Angelopoulou, E.; Hornegger, J.

    2013-03-01

    In orthopedic and trauma surgery, metallic plates are used for reduction and fixation of bone fractures. In clinical practice, the intra-operative planning for screw fixation is usually based on fluoroscopic images. Screw fixation is then performed on a free-hand basis. As such, multiple attempts may be required in order to achieve an optimal positioning of the fixing screws. To help the physician insert the screws in accordance to the planned position, we propose a method for screw insertion guidance. Our approach uses a small video camera, rigidly placed on the drill, and a set of small markers that are rigidly fixed on a variable angle drill sleeve. In order to investigate the achievable accuracy of our setup, we simulate the estimation of the drill bit position under two different marker arrangements, planar and 3D, and different noise levels. Furthermore, we motivate our choices for marker design and position given the limited space available for marker positioning, the requirement for accurate position estimation of the drill bit and the illumination changes that could affect the surgical site. We also describe our proposed marker detection and tracking pipeline. Our simulation results let us conclude that we can achieve an accuracy of 1° and 1mm in the estimation of angular orientation and tip position of the drill bit respectively, provided that we have accurate marker detection.

  12. High energy devices versus low energy devices in orthopedics treatment modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultheiss, Reiner

    2003-10-01

    The orthopedic consensus group defined in 1997 the 42 most likely relevant parameters of orthopedic shock wave devices. The idea of this approach was to correlate the different clinical outcomes with the physical properties of the different devices with respect to their acoustical waves. Several changes in the hypothesis of the dose effect relationship have been noticed since the first orthopedic treatments. The relation started with the maximum pressure p+, followed by the total energy, the energy density; and finally the single treatment approach using high, and then the multiple treatment method using low energy. Motivated by the reimbursement situation in Germany some manufacturers began to redefine high and low energy devices independent of the treatment modality. The OssaTron as a high energy, single treatment electro hydraulic device gained FDA approval as the first orthopedic ESWT device for plantar fasciitis and, more recently, for lateral epicondylitis. Two low energy devices have now also gained FDA approval based upon a single treatment. Comparing the acoustic data, differences between the OssaTron and the other devices are obvious and will be elaborated upon. Cluster analysis of the outcomes and the acoustical data are presented and new concepts will be suggested.

  13. Co-precipitation of tobramycin into biomimetically coated orthopedic fixation pins employing submicron-thin seed layers of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Sörensen, Jan H; Lilja, Mirjam; Åstrand, Maria; Sörensen, Torben C; Procter, Philip; Strømme, Maria; Steckel, Hartwig

    2014-01-01

    The migration, loosening and cut-out of implants and nosocomial infections are current problems associated with implant surgery. New innovative strategies to overcome these issues are emphasized in today's research. The current work presents a novel strategy involving co-precipitation of tobramycin with biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) formation to produce implant coatings that control local drug delivery to prevent early bacterial colonization of the implant. A submicron- thin HA layer served as seed layer for the co-precipitation process and allowed for incorporation of tobramycin in the coating from a stock solution of antibiotic concentrations as high as 20 mg/ml. Concentrations from 0.5 to 20 mg/ml tobramycin and process temperatures of 37 °C and 60 °C were tested to assess the optimal parameters for a thin tobramycin- delivering HA coating on discs and orthopedic fixation pins. The morphology and thickness of the coating and the drug-release profile were evaluated via scanning electron microscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. The coatings delivered pharmaceutically relevant amounts of tobramycin over a period of 12 days. To the best of our knowledge, this is the longest release period ever observed for a fast-loaded biomimetic implant coating. The presented approach could form the foundation for development of combination device/antibiotic delivery vehicles tailored to meet well-defined clinical needs while combating infections and ensuring fast implant in-growth. PMID:24611653

  14. 78 FR 17940 - Certain Computerized Orthopedic Surgical Devices, Software, Implants, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-25

    ... COMMISSION Certain Computerized Orthopedic Surgical Devices, Software, Implants, and Components Thereof..., Software, Implants, and Components Thereof, DN 2945; the Commission is soliciting comments on any public... devices, software, implants, and components thereof. The complaint names as respondents Stanmore...

  15. Optimal Culture Incubation Time in Orthopedic Device-Associated Infections: a Retrospective Analysis of Prolonged 14-Day Incubation

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Peter; Fracheboud, Dominique; Gautier, Emanuel

    2014-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of orthopedic device-associated infections can be challenging. Culture of tissue biopsy specimens is often considered the gold standard; however, there is currently no consensus on the ideal incubation time for specimens. The aim of our study was to assess the yield of a 14-day incubation protocol for tissue biopsy specimens from revision surgery (joint replacements and internal fixation devices) in a general orthopedic and trauma surgery setting. Medical records were reviewed retrospectively in order to identify cases of infection according to predefined diagnostic criteria. From August 2009 to March 2012, 499 tissue biopsy specimens were sampled from 117 cases. In 70 cases (59.8%), at least one sample showed microbiological growth. Among them, 58 cases (82.9%) were considered infections and 12 cases (17.1%) were classified as contaminations. The median time to positivity in the cases of infection was 1 day (range, 1 to 10 days), compared to 6 days (range, 1 to 11 days) in the cases of contamination (P < 0.001). Fifty-six (96.6%) of the infection cases were diagnosed within 7 days of incubation. In conclusion, the results of our study show that the incubation of tissue biopsy specimens beyond 7 days is not productive in a general orthopedic and trauma surgery setting. Prolonged 14-day incubation might be of interest in particular situations, however, in which the prevalence of slow-growing microorganisms and anaerobes is higher. PMID:24153117

  16. 21 CFR 888.3010 - Bone fixation cerclage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bone fixation cerclage. 888.3010 Section 888.3010...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3010 Bone fixation cerclage. (a) Identification. A bone fixation cerclage is a device intended to be implanted that is made of alloys, such...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3010 - Bone fixation cerclage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bone fixation cerclage. 888.3010 Section 888.3010...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3010 Bone fixation cerclage. (a) Identification. A bone fixation cerclage is a device intended to be implanted that is made of alloys, such...

  18. Incorporation of raloxifene-impregnated allograft around orthopedic titanium implants impairs early fixation but improves new bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Hermansen, Lars L; Sørensen, Mette; Barckman, Jeppe; Bechtold, Joan E; Søballe, Kjeld; Baas, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Background The anti-osteoporotic drug raloxifene reduces the risk of vertebral fractures by increasing bone mass density. We investigated whether raloxifene offers any benefits in augmenting early fixation of orthopedic implants in the setting of impaction bone grafting. Methods 24 non-weight-bearing grafted gap implants were inserted bilaterally into the tibia of 12 dogs. The 2.5-mm peri-implant gap was filled with either raloxifene-impregnated or untreated bone allograft. Implants were harvested after 28 days. Implant fixation was assessed by mechanical testing and histomorphometric evaluation. Results Raloxifene-treated allograft reduced early implant fixation compared to untreated allograft, as measured by inferior maximum shear strength (p < 0.001) and apparent shear stiffness (p = 0.001). We found that the raloxifene group had more newly formed bone in the gap around the implant (p = 0.02), but also less allograft (p = 0.03). Interpretation The accelerated allograft resorption in the raloxifene group explained the impaired early fixation, despite its stimulation of new bone formation. Our results with local and possible high-dose treatment are not consistent with current theory regarding the mechanism of how systemic raloxifene administration counteracts the decrease in BMD in postmenopausal women. Instead of being solely anti-resorptive as generally held, our results indicate a possible anabolic side of raloxifene. PMID:25175661

  19. 21 CFR 888.3020 - Intramedullary fixation rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Intramedullary fixation rod. 888.3020 Section 888.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3020 Intramedullary fixation rod. (a) Identification. An intramedullary fixation rod...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3020 - Intramedullary fixation rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Intramedullary fixation rod. 888.3020 Section 888.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3020 Intramedullary fixation rod. (a) Identification. An intramedullary fixation rod...

  1. Mobile Device Trends in Orthopedic Surgery: Rapid Change and Future Implications.

    PubMed

    Andrawis, John P; Muzykewicz, David A; Franko, Orrin I

    2016-01-01

    Mobile devices are increasingly becoming integral communication and clinical tools. Monitoring the prevalence and utilization characteristics of surgeons and trainees is critical to understanding how these new technologies can be best used in practice. The authors conducted a prospective Internet-based survey over 7 time points from August 2010 to August 2014 at all nationwide American Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited orthopedic programs. The survey questionnaire was designed to evaluate the use of devices and mobile applications (apps) among trainees and physicians in the clinical setting. Results were analyzed and summarized for orthopedic surgeons and trainees. During the 48-month period, there were 7 time points with 467, 622, 329, 223, 237, 111, and 134 responses. Mobile device use in the clinical setting increased across all fields and levels of training during the study period. Orthopedic trainees increased their use of Smartphone apps in the clinical setting from 60% to 84%, whereas attending use increased from 41% to 61%. During this time frame, use of Apple/Android platforms increased from 45%/13% to 85%/15%, respectively. At all time points, 70% of orthopedic surgeons believed their institution/hospital should support mobile device use. As measured over a 48-month period, mobile devices have become an ubiquitous tool in the clinical setting among orthopedic surgeons and trainees. The authors expect these trends to continue and encourage providers and trainees to be aware of the limitations and risks inherent with new technology. PMID:26730684

  2. A Review of the Design Process for Implantable Orthopedic Medical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Aitchison, G.A; Hukins, D.W.L; Parry, J.J; Shepherd, D.E.T; Trotman, S.G

    2009-01-01

    The design process for medical devices is highly regulated to ensure the safety of patients. This paper will present a review of the design process for implantable orthopedic medical devices. It will cover the main stages of feasibility, design reviews, design, design verification, manufacture, design validation, design transfer and design changes. PMID:19662153

  3. Stress corrosion cracking of an aluminum alloy used in external fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Cartner, Jacob L; Haggard, Warren O; Ong, Joo L; Bumgardner, Joel D

    2008-08-01

    Treatment for compound and/or comminuted fractures is frequently accomplished via external fixation. To achieve stability, the compositions of external fixators generally include aluminum alloy components due to their high strength-to-weight ratios. These alloys are particularly susceptible to corrosion in chloride environments. There have been several clinical cases of fixator failure in which corrosion was cited as a potential mechanism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of physiological environments on the corrosion susceptibility of aluminum 7075-T6, since it is used in orthopedic external fixation devices. Electrochemical corrosion curves and alternate immersion stress corrosion cracking tests indicated aluminum 7075-T6 is susceptible to corrosive attack when placed in physiological environments. Pit initiated stress corrosion cracking was the primary form of alloy corrosion, and subsequent fracture, in this study. Anodization of the alloy provided a protective layer, but also caused a decrease in passivity ranges. These data suggest that once the anodization layer is disrupted, accelerated corrosion processes occur. PMID:18257055

  4. Comparison of the mechanical performance of trochanteric fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Hersh, C K; Williams, R P; Trick, L W; Lanctot, D; Athanasiou, K

    1996-08-01

    The transtrochanteric surgical approach to the hip is commonly used, especially for revision hip surgery. Failure of the trochanter to heal can lead to hardware failure, persistent pain, and limp. Rigid internal fixation is needed in this approach to achieve an adequate rate of healing. Newer cable and cable grip systems have been designed to improve trochanteric fixation, but have not been compared to the older Charnley wire fixation techniques. In this study, an in vitro mechanical method previously used to test wire fixation methods was used to compare wire, cable, and cable grip fixation methods. A quasistatic mechanical distraction device was used to compare structural stiffness, load to clinical failure, energy to clinical failure, and maximum load resisted by the fixation devices. The cable grip system was found to be stiffer, to resist a larger load to mechanical failure at 1-cm displacement, and to absorb a greater amount of energy to clinical failure when compared with the other systems. These data suggest that use of the cable grip fixation method should result in improved clinical success compared with the Charnley wire technique. PMID:8769467

  5. In-vivo orthopedic implant diagnostic device for sensing load, wear, and infection

    DOEpatents

    Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen; Thundat, Thomas G.; Komistek, Richard D.; Dennis, Douglas A.; Mahfouz, Mohamed

    2006-08-29

    A device for providing in vivo diagnostics of loads, wear, and infection in orthopedic implants having at least one load sensor associated with the implant, at least one temperature sensor associated with the implant, at least one vibration sensor associated with the implant, and at least one signal processing device operatively coupled with the sensors. The signal processing device is operable to receive the output signal from the sensors and transmit a signal corresponding with the output signal.

  6. Evaluation of Absorbable Mesh Fixation Devices at Various Deployment Angles

    PubMed Central

    Zihni, Ahmed M.; Cavallo, Jaime A.; Thompson, Dominic M.; Chowdhury, Nabeel H.; Frisella, Margaret M.; Matthews, Brent D.; Deeken, Corey R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hernia repair failure may occur due to suboptimal mesh fixation by mechanical constructs before mesh integration. Construct design and acute penetration angle may alter mesh-tissue fixation strength. We compared acute fixation strengths of absorbable fixation devices at various deployment angles, directions of loading, and construct orientations. METHODS Porcine abdominal walls were sectioned. Constructs were deployed at 30, 45, 60, and 90 degree angles to fix mesh to the tissue specimens. Lap-shear testing was performed in upward, downward, and lateral directions in relation to the abdominal wall cranial-caudal axis to evaluate fixation. Absorbatack™ (AT), SorbaFix™ (SF), and SecureStrap™ in vertical (SSV) and horizontal (SSH) orientations in relation to the abdominal wall cranial-caudal axis were tested. Ten tests were performed for each combination of device, angle, and loading direction. Failure types and strength data were recorded. ANOVA with Tukey-Kramer adjustments for multiple comparisons and chi-square tests were performed as appropriate (p<0.05 considered significant). RESULTS At 30 degrees, SSH and SSV had greater fixation strengths (12.95 N, 12.98 N, respectively) than SF (5.70 N; p=0.0057, p=0.0053, respectively). At 45 degrees, mean fixation strength of SSH was significantly greater than SF (18.14 N, 11.40 N; p=0.0002). No differences in strength were identified at 60 or 90 degrees. No differences in strength were noted between SSV and SSH with different directions of loading. No differences were noted between SS and AT at any angle. Immediate failure was associated with SF (p<0.0001) and the 30 degree tacking angle (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS Mesh-tissue fixation was stronger at acute deployment angles with SS compared to SF constructs. The 30 degree angle and the SF device were associated with increased immediate failures. Varying construct and loading direction did not generate statistically significant differences in the fixation

  7. The use of silk-based devices for fracture fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, Gabriel S.; Leisk, Gary G.; Lo, Tim J.; Moreau, Jodie E.; Haas, Dylan S.; Papenburg, Bernke J.; Golden, Ethan B.; Partlow, Benjamin P.; Fox, Sharon E.; Ibrahim, Ahmed M. S.; Lin, Samuel J.; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-03-01

    Metallic fixation systems are currently the gold standard for fracture fixation but have problems including stress shielding, palpability and temperature sensitivity. Recently, resorbable systems have gained interest because they avoid removal and may improve bone remodelling due to the lack of stress shielding. However, their use is limited to paediatric craniofacial procedures mainly due to the laborious implantation requirements. Here we prepare and characterize a new family of resorbable screws prepared from silk fibroin for craniofacial fracture repair. In vivo assessment in rat femurs shows the screws to be self-tapping, remain fixed in the bone for 4 and 8 weeks, exhibit biocompatibility and promote bone remodelling. The silk-based devices compare favourably with current poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid fixation systems, however, silk-based devices offer numerous advantages including ease of implantation, conformal fit to the repair site, sterilization by autoclaving and minimal inflammatory response.

  8. Epidural catheter fixation. A comparison of subcutaneous tunneling versus device fixation technique

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashima; Parasa, Sujay Kumar; Tejvath, Kiran; Ramachandran, Gopinath

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The technique of securing the epidural catheter has a major bearing on the efficacy of epidural analgesia. Specific fixator devices, for e.g., Lockit epidural catheter clamp, which successfully prevents catheter migration, are available. The possibility of catheter snapping and surgical retrieval has been reported with tunneling of catheters. These techniques have not been compared for safety, efficacy and appropriateness of achieving secure epidural catheter fixation in the postoperative period. Material and Methods: A total of 200 patients who required postoperative epidural analgesia were included. They were randomized into two groups: Group I (n = 100) in whom epidural catheters were tunneled vertically in the paravertebral subcutaneous tissue and group II (n = 100) wherein a Lockit device was used to fix the catheter. Likert score was used to quantify patient's comfort during procedure. The techniques were compared for migration, catheter dislodgement, local trauma, catheter snapping and catheter obstruction. Results: 12% of tunneled catheters had migrated significantly outward. 22% of patients had erythema and 77% had significant procedural discomfort in group I. In group II, 3% catheters had kinked and 14% had erythema from device adhesive. Conclusion: Our results support the use of Lockit device as a safe and comfortable fixation device compared to subcutaneous tunneling of catheters. PMID:27006544

  9. Optimizing the biomechanical compatibility of orthopedic screws for bone fracture fixation.

    PubMed

    Gefen, A

    2002-06-01

    Progressive loosening of bone fixation screws is a well-documented phenomenon, induced by stress shielding and subsequent adaptive bone remodeling which results in bone loss around the screw. A set of two-dimensional computational (finite element) models was developed in order to test the effect of various engineering designs of fixation screws on the predicted screw-bone stress transfer, and consequently, on the biomechanical conditions for osteosynthesis. A dimensionless set of stress-transfer parameters (STP) was developed to quantify the screw-bone load sharing, enabling a convenient rating to be given of the biomechanical compatibility of practically any given screw design according to the nature of the simulated mechanical interaction. The results indicated that newly proposed screw designs, i.e. a "graded-stiffness" composite screw with a reduced-stiffness-titanium core and outer polymeric threads and an "active-compression" hollow screw which generates compressive stresses on the surrounding bone, are expected to provide significantly better biomechanical performances in terms of the STP criteria, compared with conservative screw designs. Accordingly, the present work demonstrates that finite element computer simulations can be used as a powerful tool for design and evaluation of bone screws, including geometrical features, material characteristics and even coatings. PMID:12052361

  10. Analysis of Orthopedic Screws for Bone Fracture Fixations with Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuib, Solehuddin; Ridzwan, M. I. Z.; Mohamad Ibrahim, M. N.; Tan, C. J.

    In this study, the influence of the orthopedic screws engineering design such as profile shape and geometrical parameters on its biomechanical compatibility in terms of load sharing with adjacent bone tissue was investigated. The study was conducted on a set of three-dimensional finite element design models. A dimension less Stress Transfer Parameter (STP) was utilized for gauging the performances of the different screws according to its load sharing capabilities. Stress-transfer behavior was found to be linear for varying load magnitudes. The geometric properties investigated; pitch, thread length, width, major diameter and thread angle showed different influences on the three different profiles studied (triangular, trapezoidal and rectangular). The results indicated that 13 out of 32 screw designs produced were to achieve STP values greater than 0.3 of these, 6 were the rectangular profile. The best design was of the rectangular profile (Design no. 24) with an STP value of 0.4344. It was concluded that the best biomechanical properties were found in rectangular screw profiles. However, due to mix trends for the different properties, the careful combination and consideration towards pullout strength was necessary to obtain a design with the highest biocompatibility.

  11. Orthopedic medical devices: ethical questions, implant recalls and responsibility.

    PubMed

    Racine, Jennifer

    2013-06-01

    The hip replacement is a surgical procedure to replace the femoral head and acetabulum with prosthetic implants to improve function, increase mobility, and relieve pain caused by damage from disorders such as osteoarthritis and fractures. In recent years, we have seen several recalls of poorly functioning implant systems, most recently, the Johnson and Johnson (J&J) Articular Surface Replacement device. Product recalls are often the results of premature failure of implants requiring additional surgery to exchange the failed device. This raises many questions - technical, medical, regulatory, ethical, and legal - that ultimately put patients at risk, compromise confidence in medicine and regulatory agencies, and important relationships including those between the physician-patient and physician-industry. Where do the responsibilities lie for the patients' suffering, morbidity, and costs of removing the failed device? This article discusses the current recall of the J&J implant, the responsibilities of the manufacturer, surgeons, and the regulatory agency. PMID:23741723

  12. Removal of a Penile Constriction Device with a Large Orthopedic Pin Cutter

    PubMed Central

    Wenzler, David; Fischer, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Penile strangulation is an infrequent clinical condition that has widely been reported. It usually results following placement of a constriction device to enhance sexual stimulation. Early treatment is essential to avoid potential complications, including ischemic necrosis and autoamputation. We describe the use of a Large Orthopedic Pin Cutter to remove a metal penile constriction device in the Emergency Department (ED). This case report describes the relatively safe technique of using an instrument available in many hospitals that can be added to the physician's arsenal in the removal of metal constriction devices. PMID:24707434

  13. Fixation Stability Measurement Using Two Types of Microperimetry Devices

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongting; Bittencourt, Millena G.; Sophie, Raafay; Sepah, Yasir J.; Hanout, Mostafa; Rentiya, Zubir; Annam, Rachel; Scholl, Hendrik P. N.; Nguyen, Quan Dong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We compared the fixation stability measurements obtained with two microperimeters, the Micro Perimeter 1 (MP-1) and the Spectral OCT/SLO (OCT/SLO), in subjects with and without maculopathies. Methods A total of 41 eyes with no known ocular diseases and 45 eyes with maculopathies were enrolled in the study. Both eyes of each participant had a 20-second fixation test using the MP-1 and OCT/SLO. The bivariate contour ellipse area (BCEA) was used for fixation stability evaluation. Results In the normal group, BCEA was 2.93 ± 0.32 log minarc2 on OCT/SLO and 2.89 ± 0.30 log minarc2 on MP-1. In the maculopathy group, BCEA was 3.05 ± 0.41 log minarc2 on OCT/SLO and 3.15 ± 0.46 log minarc2 on MP-1. There was no statistically significant difference between the BCEA measured by OCT/SLO and by MP-1 in both groups. A moderate correlation was found between the two devices (r = 0.45, P < 0.001). The sample size during the fixation test was 535.5 ± 14.6 pairs of coordinates in the normal group and 530.7 ± 14.9 pairs in the maculopathy group with MP-1, while it was 72.3 ± 6.9 and 59.9 ± 10.1, respectively, with OCT/SLO. This was due to different tracking frequencies between the two microperimeters. Conclusion Fixation stability assessment yields similar results using the OCT/SLO and MP-1. A major difference in sampling rate between the two microperimeters does not significantly affect BCEA measurements. Translational Relevance Fixation stability assessments are comparable and interchangeable between the OCT/SLO and the MP-1. PMID:25774329

  14. LASER Additive Manufacturing of Titanium-Tantalum Alloy Structured Interfaces for Modular Orthopedic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerst, Jacob; Medlin, Dana; Carter, Michael; Sears, James; Vander Voort, George

    2015-04-01

    Tantalum is recognized to have better biocompatibility and osseointegrative properties than other more commonly used orthopedic grade alloys. There are several novel methods that tantalum or tantalum-titanium could be used to augment orthopedic implants. A tantalum or tantalum-titanium alloy at the bone/implant or modular component interfaces would substantially increase the longevity and performance of modular devices. Bonding a functional tantalum coating to a titanium orthopedic device is inherently difficult because of the small difference between the melting temperature of tantalum, 3017°C, and the boiling point of titanium, 3287°C. LASER powder deposition (LPD) is a fusion operation using an Nd:YAG to melt a small volume of substrate into which metal powder is sprayed achieving high temperature with a high solidification rate. LPD of Ti-Ta onto a Ti-6Al-4V substrate produced both a solid surface and structured coating with a pore size in the optimal 350-500 μm range.

  15. Snapping scapular syndrome secondary to rib intramedullary fixation device

    PubMed Central

    Zaidenberg, Ezequiel E.; Rossi, Luciano A.; Bongiovanni, Santiago L.; Tanoira, Ignacio; Maignon, Gaston; Ranalletta, Maximiliano

    2015-01-01

    Background Scapulo-thoracic joint disorders, including bursitis and crepitus, are commonly misdiagnosed problems and can be a source of persistent pain and dysfunction Presentation of the case This article describes an unusual case of a snapping scapula syndrome secondary to a migration through the lateral cortex of a rib splint intramedullary fixation device into the scapulothoracic joint. Discussion Recently, the operative fixation of multiple ribs fractures with intramedullary fixation devices has become popular. Despite the good outcomes with new rib splint designs, concern remains about the potential complications related to potential loss of fracture reduction with migration of the wire resulting in pain or additional injury to the surrounding tissues. Conclusion Surgeons should pay attention to any protrusion of intramedullary rib implants, especially in the evaluation of routine X-rays following surgical treatment. We should be aware of the possibility of this rare cause of snapping scapula syndrome to avoid delayed diagnosis and consider removing the implant will resolve the pain. PMID:26629853

  16. Doctors and the Etiquette of Mobile Device Use in Trauma and Orthopedics

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Lydia; Bullock, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Background The etiquette surrounding the use of mobile devices, so-called "mobiquette," has been previously identified as a barrier to use in an educational context. Objective To investigate the influence of mobile device use on patient and staff opinions in the trauma and orthopedics department at a teaching hospital in Wales. Methods A survey of patients at the bedside and staff in their work environment was undertaken. Data included age, frequency of observed use, suspected main reason for use, and whether doctors’ use of a mobile device positively or negatively influenced participants' opinions of them as a professional and as a person. Results A total of 59 patients and 35 staff responded. The modal age range was 40 to 54 years old. Most patients (78%) never see doctors using mobile devices in the workplace, compared with 3% of staff. The main reason for use was thought to be "communicating with colleagues" (48%) followed by "Internet use/applications for work reasons" (40%). Approximately 40% of patients' opinions of doctors were positively influenced by device use, compared with 82% of staff. This difference between patient and staff opinions was statistically significant for both professional (P<.001) and personal (P=.002) opinions. Conclusions Patients are likely to have a negative opinion of doctors using mobile devices in the workplace. This can be balanced by the more positive opinions of colleagues. We advise doctors to remember "mobiquette" around patients. PMID:26116061

  17. 21 CFR 888.3040 - Smooth or threaded metallic bone fixation fastener.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Smooth or threaded metallic bone fixation fastener. 888.3040 Section 888.3040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3040 Smooth or threaded metallic bone fixation fastener....

  18. 21 CFR 888.3040 - Smooth or threaded metallic bone fixation fastener.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Smooth or threaded metallic bone fixation fastener. 888.3040 Section 888.3040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3040 Smooth or threaded metallic bone fixation fastener....

  19. Mechanical testing of a device for subcutaneous internal anterior pelvic ring fixation versus external pelvic ring fixation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although useful in the emergency treatment of pelvic ring injuries, external fixation is associated with pin tract infections, the patient’s limited mobility and a restricted surgical accessibility to the lower abdomen. In this study, the mechanical stability of a subcutaneous internal anterior fixation (SIAF) system is investigated. Methods A standard external fixation and a SIAF system were tested on pairs of Polyoxymethylene testing cylinders using a universal testing machine. Each specimen was subjected to a total of 2000 consecutive cyclic loadings at 1 Hz with sinusoidal lateral compression/distraction (+/−50 N) and torque (+/− 0.5 Nm) loading alternating every 200 cycles. Translational and rotational stiffness were determined at 100, 300, 500, 700 and 900 cycles. Results There was no significant difference in translational stiffness between the SIAF and the standard external fixation when compared at 500 (p = .089), 700 (p = .081), and 900 (p = .266) cycles. Rotational stiffness observed for the SIAF was about 50 percent higher than the standard external fixation at 300 (p = .005), 500 (p = .020), and 900 (p = .005) cycles. No loosening or failure of the rod-pin/rod-screw interfaces was seen. Conclusions In comparison with the standard external fixation system, the tested device for subcutaneous internal anterior fixation (SIAF) in vitro has similar translational and superior rotational stiffness. PMID:24684828

  20. DESIGN AND BIOMECHANICAL EVALUATION OF A RODENT SPINAL FIXATION DEVICE

    PubMed Central

    Shahrokni, Maryam; Zhu, Qingan; Liu, Jie; Tetzlaff, Wolfram; Oxland, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    Structured Abstract Study Design An in vitro and in vivo study in rats. Objectives To design a novel rat spinal fixation device and investigate its biomechanical effectiveness in stabilizing the spine up to eight weeks post injury. Methods A fixation device made of polyetheretherketone was designed to stabilize the spine via bilateral clamping pieces. The device effectiveness was assessed in a Sprague-Dawley rat model after it was applied to a spine with a fracture-dislocation injury produced at C5–C6. Animals were euthanized either immediately (n=6) or eight weeks (n=9) post-injury and the C3-T1 segment of the cervical spine was removed for biomechanical evaluation. Segments of intact spinal columns (C3-T1) (n=6) served as uninjured controls. In these tests, anterior-posterior shear forces were applied to the C3 vertebra to produce flexion and extension bending moments at the injury site (peak 12.8Nmm). The resultant two-dimensional motions at the injury site (i.e. C5–C6) were measured using digital imaging and reported as ranges of motion (ROM) or neutral zones (NZ). Results Flexion/extension ROMs (average ± S.D.) were 18.1 ± 3.3°, 19.9 ± 7.5°, and 1.5 ± 0.7°, respectively for the intact, injured/fixed, and injured/8-week groups, with the differences being highly significant for the injured/8-week group (p=0.0002). Flexion/extension NZs were 3.4 ± 2.8°, 5.0 ± 2.4°, and 0.7 ± 0.5°, respectively for the intact, injured/fixed, and injured/8-week groups, with the differences being significant for the injured/8-week group (p =0.04). Conclusion The device acutely stabilizes the spine and promotes fusion at the site of injury. PMID:22289899

  1. Orthopedic devices; classification for the resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2003-06-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device intended to fill bony voids or gaps of the extremities, spine, and pelvis that are caused by trauma or surgery and are not intrinsic to the stability of the bony structure into class II (special controls). Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing the availability of a class II special controls guidance entitled "Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Resorbable Calcium Salt Bone Void Filler Device; Guidance for Industry and FDA." This action is being undertaken based on new information submitted in a classification proposal from Wright Medical Technology under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1976, the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990, and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997. PMID:12784825

  2. Biologic Response to Carbonated Hydroxyapatite Associated with Orthopedic Device: Experimental Study in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Saoudi, Mongi; Badraoui, Riadh; Rebai, Tarek; Oudadesse, Hassane; Ellouz, Zoubaier; Keskese, Hassib; El Feki, Abdelfattah; El Feki, Hafed

    2012-01-01

    Background Carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) and related calcium phosphates have been studied for many years as implant materials due to their similarity with the mineral phase of bone. The main limitation of CHA ceramics as well as other bioactive materials is that they have poor mechanical proprieties. It is thought that the mechanical device can cause an increase in metabolic activity and bone healing. In this study we investigated the reactivity and tissue behaviour of implanted CHA biomaterial reinforced by mini external fixator. Methods The evaluation of biomaterial biocompatibility and osteogenesis was performed on a rabbit model over a period of 6 weeks by radiological, histological and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray SEM-energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. Results While rabbits treated with CHA exhibited more bone formation, and fibrous tissue was observed when empty bone defects were observed. EDX analysis detected little calcium and phosphorus on the surface of the bone that was not implanted, while high content of calcium (62.7%) and phosphorus (38%) was found on the interface bone cement. Conclusions Bone repairing showed that the mini external fixator stimulated the ossification which was pushed when grafted by CHA. This effect may play an important role in the prevention of implant loosening. PMID:23109978

  3. Strength analysis of clavicle fracture fixation devices and fixation techniques using finite element analysis with musculoskeletal force input.

    PubMed

    Marie, Cronskär

    2015-08-01

    In the cases, when clavicle fractures are treated with a fixation plate, opinions are divided about the best position of the plate, type of plate and type of screw units. Results from biomechanical studies of clavicle fixation devices are contradictory, probably partly because of simplified and varying load cases used in different studies. The anatomy of the shoulder region is complex, which makes it difficult and expensive to perform realistic experimental tests; hence, reliable simulation is an important complement to experimental tests. In this study, a method for finite element simulations of stresses in the clavicle plate and bone is used, in which muscle and ligament force data are imported from a multibody musculoskeletal model. The stress distribution in two different commercial plates, superior and anterior plating position and fixation including using a lag screw in the fracture gap or not, was compared. Looking at the clavicle fixation from a mechanical point of view, the results indicate that it is a major benefit to use a lag screw to fixate the fracture. The anterior plating position resulted in lower stresses in the plate, and the anatomically shaped plate is more stress resistant and stable than a regular reconstruction plate. PMID:25850983

  4. A Technique of Superficial Medial Collateral Ligament Reconstruction Using an Adjustable-Loop Suspensory Fixation Device.

    PubMed

    Deo, Shaneel; Getgood, Alan

    2015-06-01

    This report describes superficial medial collateral ligament reconstruction of the knee using a novel method of graft fixation with the ACL Tightrope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL). After tibial fixation with either a standard interference screw or staple, femoral fixation of the semitendinosus tendon is performed with the adjustable-loop suspensory fixation device, which allows for both initial graft tensioning and re-tensioning after cyclical knee range of motion. This provides the ability for the graft to accommodate for resultant soft-tissue creep and stress relaxation, thereby allowing for optimal soft-tissue tension and reduction in laxity at the end of the procedure. PMID:26258041

  5. A Technique of Superficial Medial Collateral Ligament Reconstruction Using an Adjustable-Loop Suspensory Fixation Device

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Shaneel; Getgood, Alan

    2015-01-01

    This report describes superficial medial collateral ligament reconstruction of the knee using a novel method of graft fixation with the ACL Tightrope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL). After tibial fixation with either a standard interference screw or staple, femoral fixation of the semitendinosus tendon is performed with the adjustable-loop suspensory fixation device, which allows for both initial graft tensioning and re-tensioning after cyclical knee range of motion. This provides the ability for the graft to accommodate for resultant soft-tissue creep and stress relaxation, thereby allowing for optimal soft-tissue tension and reduction in laxity at the end of the procedure. PMID:26258041

  6. The Role of Resorbable Mesh as a Fixation Device in Craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Konofaos, Petros; Goubran, Sameh; Wallace, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to present our experience with endocranial fixation using the Resorb-X mesh (KLS Martin, Jacksonville, FL) in frontoorbital reconstruction. A retrospective review of all patients underwent frontoorbital advancement at our institution from 2003 to 2012 was performed. Inclusion criterion included: pediatric patients who underwent frontoorbital advancement for craniosynostosis; patients underwent treatment of the craniosynostosis only at our center; resorbable fixation devises were applied only endocranially; and follow-up was ≥ 2 years. Patients' evaluation included demographic information, postoperative complications, surgical outcomes, and postoperative computed tomographic imaging if accessible. Thirty-nine patients met the inclusion criteria. Resorbable plates were used in 16 patients and Resorb-X mesh in 23 patients. Observed complications were unrelated to the fixation system used. Resorption of fixation devices was evident in all patients after 20 months following reconstruction. There were no incidents of local reaction to the fixation system. Frontoorbital area contour was deemed good in 24 patients and excellent in 15 patients by both families and attending surgeon. There was a statistical significant difference (P = 0.030) between patients ≤ 12 months and >12 months regarding the complications rate. Endocranial fixation using the Resorb-X mesh is easily applicable, avoids material palpability, and provides stable and secure fixation. This technique is superior to the conventional endocranial osseous fixation with absorbable plates, as it avoids some of its possible complications while providing all the benefits of resorbable fixation. PMID:26674902

  7. Orthopedic services

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007455.htm Orthopedic services To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Orthopedics, or orthopedic services, is the medical specialty that involves the treatment ...

  8. Attention attraction in an ophthalmic diagnostic device using sound-modulated fixation targets.

    PubMed

    Gramatikov, Boris I; Rangarajan, Shreya; Irsch, Kristina; Guyton, David L

    2016-08-01

    This study relates to eye fixation systems with combined optical and audio systems. Many devices for eye diagnostics and some devices for eye therapeutics require the patient to fixate on a small target for a certain period of time, during which the eyes do not move and data from substructures of one or both eyes are acquired and analyzed. With young pediatric patients, a monotonously blinking target is not sufficient to retain attention steadily. We developed a method for modulating the intensity of a point fixation target using sounds appropriate to the child's age and preference. The method was realized as a subsystem of a Pediatric Vision Screener which employs retinal birefringence scanning for detection of central fixation. Twenty-one children, age 2-18, were studied. Modulation of the fixation target using sounds ensured the eye fixated on the target, and with appropriate choice of sounds, performed significantly better than a monotonously blinking target accompanied by a plain beep. The method was particularly effective with children of ages up to 10, after which its benefit disappeared. Typical applications of target modulation would be as supplemental subsystems in pediatric ophthalmic diagnostic devices, such as scanning laser ophthalmoscopes, optical coherence tomography units, retinal birefringence scanners, fundus cameras, and perimeters. PMID:27245750

  9. Orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Gehrig, Laura M B

    2011-09-01

    Orthopedic surgery is a specialty of surgery dedicated to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases and injuries of the musculoskeletal system in all age groups. Careers in orthopedic surgery span the spectrum from general orthopedics to those of subspecialty expertise in orthopedic trauma, hand, pediatrics, total joint, foot and ankle, sports medicine, and oncology to name a few. PMID:21871990

  10. On the accuracy of dose prediction near metal fixation devices for spine SBRT.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhangkai J; Bromley, Regina M; Oborn, Brad; Carolan, Martin; Booth, Jeremy T

    2016-01-01

    The metallic fixations used in surgical procedures to support the spine mechani-cally usually consist of high-density materials. Radiation therapy to palliate spinal cord compression can include prophylactic inclusion of potential tumor around the site of such fixation devices. Determination of the correct density and shape of the spine fixation device has a direct effect on the dose calculation of the radiation field. Even with the application of modern computed tomography (CT), under- or overestimation of dose, both immediately next to the device and in the surround-ing tissues, can occur due to inaccuracies in the dose prediction algorithm. In this study, two commercially available dose prediction algorithms (Eclipse AAA and ACUROS), EGSnrc Monte Carlo, and GAFchromic film measurements were com-pared for a clinical spine SBRT case to determine their accuracy. An open six-field plan and a clinical nine-field IMRT plan were applied to a phantom containing a metal spine fixation device. Dose difference and gamma analysis were performed in and around the tumor region adjacent to the fixation device. Dose calculation inconsistency was observed in the open field plan. However, in the IMRT plan, the dose perturbation effect was not observed beyond 5 mm. Our results suggest that the dose effect of the metal fixation device to the spinal cord and the tumor volume is not observable, and all dose calculation algorithms evaluated can provide clinically acceptable accuracy in the case of spinal SBRT, with the tolerance of 95% for gamma criteria of 3%/3 mm. PMID:27167252

  11. 21 CFR 888.3030 - Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories. 888.3030 Section 888.3030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3030 Single/multiple component...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3030 - Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories. 888.3030 Section 888.3030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3030 Single/multiple component...

  13. COMPARISON OF VOLUMES OCCUPIED BY DIFFERENT INTERNAL FIXATION DEVICES FOR FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Lauxen, Daniel; Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Silva, Marcelo Faria; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Strohaecker, Telmo Roberto; Souza, Ralf Wellis de; Zimmer, Cinthia Gabriely; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this paper is to measure the volume occupied by the most widely used internal fixation devices for treating femoral neck fractures, using the first 30, 40 and 50 mm of insertion of each screw as an approximation. The study aimed to observe which of these implants caused least bone aggression. Methods: Five types of cannulated screws and four types of dynamic hip screws (DHS) available on the Brazilian market were evaluated in terms of volume differences through water displacement. Results: Fixation with two cannulated screws presented significantly less volume than shown by DHS, for insertions of 30, 40 and 50 mm (p=0.01, 0.012 and 0.013, respectively), fixation with three screws did not show any statistically significant difference (p= 0.123, 0.08 and 0.381, respectively) and fixation with four cannulated screws presented larger volumes than shown by DHS (p=0.072, 0.161 and 0.033). Conclusions: Fixation of the femoral neck with two cannulated screws occupied less volume than DHS, with a statistically significant difference. The majority of screw combinations did not reach statistical significance, although fixation with four cannulated screws presented larger volumes on average than those occupied by DHS. PMID:27047886

  14. The design and performance of an experimental external fixation device with load transducers.

    PubMed

    Draper, E R; Wallace, A L; Strachan, R K; Hughes, S P; Nicol, A C; Paul, J P

    1995-12-01

    It is becoming increasingly common that fracture healing is modelled in the laboratory with an osteotomy in the diaphysis of the ovine tibia. External fixation is often used to hold the bones in these models, presenting the problem that the loads on such devices are poorly understood. To help investigate this, a unilateral device has been developed which is capable of measuring the two components of load considered to be the most important, that of axial compression and bending in the plane of the fixator. The device was found to be a rigid system and easy to apply, with the in-vivo measurements being straightforward. The estimated limits of error of the compression transducer are +37.9 N and -21.4 N and those of the bending transducer are +3.6 Nm and -4.2 Nm. Preliminary measurements showed the maximum load during normal walking to 345 N compression and 28 Nm in-plane bending. PMID:8564157

  15. An external fixation method and device to study fracture healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Mark, Hans; Bergholm, Jan; Nilsson, Anders; Rydevik, Björn; Strömberg, Lennart

    2003-08-01

    We wished to establish a reproducible model for fracture fixation to be used in fracture healing research and therefore developed an external fixation construct and surgical procedure adapted to Sprague-Dawley rats. We evaluated the mechanical properties of the construct in brass rods and rat bone, in an Instron test machine with axial and transverse loading, and the in vivo performance. We found that the mechanical properties of the construct in brass rods were predictable and could be repeated in rat femora. In all tests, the axial load was about 10 times the transverse for the same degree of deformation. The stiffness among fixators was uniform. 1 mm pins caused about 50% less stiffness than 1.2 mm pins in axial loading of rat bone (p < 0.001) and brass rods (p < 0.001) as well as in transverse loading of brass rods (p < 0.001). Loosening of 1 or 2 screws that lock the pins to the fixator reduced stiffness by about 50% in axial loading of rat bone (p = 0.009) and brass rods (p = 0.05). A change in the distance between the bone surface and the fixator was linearly related to the stiffness in axial loading of rat bone (p < 0.001) and brass rods (p < 0.001) and in transverse loading of brass rods (p < 0.001). If the bone ends touched each other, the axial stiffness of the construct increased almost 10 times (265 N/mm), as compared to a fracture gap size of 2 mm (31 N/mm). In vivo experiments had a complication rate of less than 10% when we used 1.2 mm pins, 6 mm offset and rats weighing 350-450 g. Our method and device for experimental external fixation of rat femora are reliable and the findings are reproducible. These can be used in bone repair and fracture healing research. PMID:14521302

  16. 21 CFR 888.4540 - Orthopedic manual surgical instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Orthopedic manual surgical instrument. 888.4540... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4540 Orthopedic manual surgical instrument. (a) Identification. An orthopedic manual surgical instrument is a nonpowered hand-held...

  17. The effects of laparoscopic mesh fixation device on bone, costo-chondral junction and tendon site.

    PubMed

    Ekçi, Baki; Altinli, Ediz; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Demir, Mustafa; Tasci, Ihsan

    2011-01-01

    Osteitis pubis is one of the important complications of inguinal hernia repair surgery occurring with the placement of sutures through the periosteum. The aim of this study is to evaluate scintigraphic and histopathological alterations associated with the use of mesh fixation device on pelvic bone, cartilage and tendons in an experimental animal model. Twenty New-Zealand young male rabbits were used. A mesh fixation device was inserted at each animal's costa-chondral junction, superior anterior iliac crest, and achiles tendon. One week prior to the surgery and 16 weeks after the operation, scintigraphic evaluation was performed. Histopathological evaluation was performed at the end of study. No nuclear activity or pathological change was found at bone site (p > 0.05). Foreign body reaction was evident at the tendon and costa-chondral site (p = 0.001). In conclusion; the mesh fixation device leads to foreign body reaction in costa-chondral junction and tendon. It does not cause any nuclear activity increase. PMID:21657163

  18. The influence of a suction device on fixation of a cemented cup using RSA.

    PubMed

    Timperley, A John; Whitehouse, Sarah L; Hourigan, Patrick G

    2009-03-01

    The quality of technique used at the time of socket cementation is crucial in ensuring a durable long-term result of the implant. We asked whether a new instrument, an aspirator retractor introduced into the wing of the ilium before socket preparation and cementation, would enhance cement fixation as defined by RSA and radiographic examination. We randomized 38 patients into two groups. The surgical technique was identical between the groups with the exception of the use of the aspirator retractor. Patients were followed clinically and with radiostereometry at a minimum of 2 years. We compared gross radiographic appearances, including the depth of penetration of cement and the incidence of postoperative and 2-year radiolucent lines. There was no difference in proximal migration between the two groups. No improvement of fixation was proven from the measured translations and rotations of the socket in the suction group. We found no difference in the number or extent of radiolucent lines or the depth of cement penetration when the iliac suction device was used in conjunction with contemporary cementing techniques. Although the data suggest no short-term advantage in this small study, we will continue to follow these patients presuming there will be improved outcomes in the longer term and since the device provides an easier method of obtaining adequate fixation, especially if technical difficulties are encountered during the pressurization procedure. PMID:18998193

  19. A modified presurgical orthopedic (nasoalveolar molding) device in the treatment of unilateral cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Chitravelu Siva; Prasad, N. K. K. Koteswara; Chitharanjan, Arun B.; Liou, Eric Jein Wein

    2016-01-01

    Nasoalveolar molding (NAM) can be done effectively to reshape the nasal cartilage and mold the maxillary dentoalveolar arch before surgical cleft lip repair and primary rhinoplasty. Presurgical NAM helps as an adjunct procedure to enhance the esthetic and functional outcome of the surgical procedures. We have developed a modified NAM device to suit to the needs of the patients coming from distant places for the treatment. This device helps in reducing the number of frequent visits the patient needs to take to the craniofacial center. The purpose of this presentation is to report this treatment technique and discuss its application. PMID:27403068

  20. A modified presurgical orthopedic (nasoalveolar molding) device in the treatment of unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Chitravelu Siva; Prasad, N K K Koteswara; Chitharanjan, Arun B; Liou, Eric Jein Wein

    2016-01-01

    Nasoalveolar molding (NAM) can be done effectively to reshape the nasal cartilage and mold the maxillary dentoalveolar arch before surgical cleft lip repair and primary rhinoplasty. Presurgical NAM helps as an adjunct procedure to enhance the esthetic and functional outcome of the surgical procedures. We have developed a modified NAM device to suit to the needs of the patients coming from distant places for the treatment. This device helps in reducing the number of frequent visits the patient needs to take to the craniofacial center. The purpose of this presentation is to report this treatment technique and discuss its application. PMID:27403068

  1. Comparison of vancomycin and teicoplanin trough serum levels in patients with infected orthopedic devices: new data for old therapies.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Xavier; Loiez, Caroline; Valette, Michel; Migaud, Henri; Dubreuil, Luc; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Senneville, Eric

    2011-06-01

    We compared retrospectively vancomycin and teicoplanin trough serum levels after loading doses and, subsequently, after high daily doses, in 52 patients (26 in each group) who had developed infections after implantation of an orthopedic device. The target trough serum level was > 25 mg/l. Trough levels were significantly higher at 2 days (±1) and 5 days (±1) in patients who received teicoplanin compared with patients who received a continuous perfusion of vancomycin (26.1 vs. 16 mg/l at day 2 ± 1, P = 0.01; 27.8 vs. 19.9 mg/l at day 5 ± 1, P = 0.01). One of the 26 patients taking vancomycin reached the target trough serum level by day 2 (±1), whereas 10 of the 26 patients taking teicoplanin reached the target by that time (P = 0.002). At day 5 (±1), 6/26 patients taking vancomycin reached the target, versus 13/26 patients taking teicoplanin (P = 0.04). However, physicians should remain cautious when administering teicoplanin empirically because of the higher MIC₉₀ values observed for coagulase-negative staphylococci compared with vancomycin. PMID:21053041

  2. Porous metal for orthopedics implants

    PubMed Central

    Matassi, Fabrizio; Botti, Alessandra; Sirleo, Luigi; Carulli, Christian; Innocenti, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Porous metal has been introduced to obtain biological fixation and improve longevity of orthopedic implants. The new generation of porous metal has intriguing characteristics that allows bone healing and high osteointegration of the metallic implants. This article gives an overview about biomaterials properties of the contemporary class of highly porous metals and about the clinical use in orthopaedic surgery. PMID:24133527

  3. Implantable Subcutaneous Venous Access Devices: Is Port Fixation Necessary? A Review of 534 Cases

    SciTech Connect

    McNulty, Nancy J. Perrich, Kiley D.; Silas, Anne M.; Linville, Robert M.; Forauer, Andrew R.

    2010-08-15

    Conventional surgical technique of subcutaneous venous port placement describes dissection of the port pocket to the pectoralis fascia and suture fixation of the port to the fascia to prevent inversion of the device within the pocket. This investigation addresses the necessity of that step. Between October 8, 2004 and October 19, 2007, 558 subcutaneous chest ports were placed at our institution; 24 cases were excluded from this study. We performed a retrospective review of the remaining 534 ports, which were placed using standard surgical technique with the exception that none were sutured into the pocket. Mean duration of port use, total number of port days, indications for removal, and complications were recorded and compared with the literature. Mean duration of port use was 341 days (182,235 total port days, range 1-1279). One port inversion/flip occurred, which resulted in malfunction and necessitated port revision (0.2%). Other complications necessitating port removal included infection 26 (5%), thrombosis n = 2 (<1%), catheter fracture/pinch n = 1 (<1%), pain n = 2 (<1%), and skin erosion n = 3 (1%). There were two arrhythmias at the time of placement; neither required port removal. The overall complication rate was 7%. The 0.2% incidence of port inversion we report is concordant with that previously published, although many previous reports do not specify if suture fixation of the port was performed. Suture fixation of the port, in our experience, is not routinely necessary and may negatively impact port removal.

  4. Negative pressure wound therapy and external fixation device: a simple way to seal the dressing.

    PubMed

    Bulla, Antonio; Farace, Francesco; Uzel, André-Pierre; Casoli, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    Negative pressure therapy is widely applied to treat lower limb trauma. However, sealing a negative pressure dressing in the presence of an external fixation device may be difficult and time consuming. Therefore, screws, pins, wires, etc, may preclude the vacuum, preventing the plastic drape to perfectly adhere to the foam. To maintain the vacuum, we tried to prevent air leaking around the screws putting bone wax at the junction between the pins and the plastic drape. This solution, in our hands, avoids air leakage and helps maintain vacuum in a fast and inexpensive way. PMID:24296597

  5. Orthopedic evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walden, T.

    1978-01-01

    The clinical performance of the Lixiscope in orthopedics was compared with routine radiography. Portability and size were the major advantages of the Lixiscope. The main disadvantage at this point in time was the Lixiscope's inability to study large areas.

  6. Orthopedic services

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot: Bunions Fasciitis Foot and ankle deformities Fractures Hammer toe Heel pain Heel spurs Joint pain and ... of orthopedics include: Amputation Arthroscopic surgeries Bunionectomy and hammer toe repair Cartilage repair or resurfacing procedures Cartilage ...

  7. Orthopedic Prosthetic Infections: Diagnosis and Orthopedic Salvage.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Matthew G; Meaike, Jesse D; Izaddoost, Shayan A

    2016-05-01

    Orthopedic hardware infections are much feared and costly complications that can occur when these devices are implemented both in traumatic cases as well as in joint replacement surgery. Because these infections can lead to great morbidity, it is important to understand their pathophysiology as well as the principles behind their diagnosis and initial treatment. Plastic surgeons are frequently consulted as part of a multidisciplinary team to provide stable soft tissue coverage of the associated defects that result from these infections. A review of the existing literature was performed to identify the potential causes of these infections, to provide established diagnostic criteria guidelines, and to explain how these prosthetic infections are managed from an orthopedic surgery perspective prior to consulting the plastic surgery team. PMID:27152098

  8. Mechanical testing of internal fixation devices: A theoretical and practical examination of current methods.

    PubMed

    Grant, Caroline A; Schuetz, Michael; Epari, Devakar

    2015-11-26

    Successful healing of long bone fractures is dependent on the mechanical environment created within the fracture, which in turn is dependent on the fixation strategy. Recent literature reports have suggested that locked plating devices are too stiff to reliably promote healing. However, in vitro testing of these devices has been inconsistent in both method of constraint and reported outcomes, making comparisons between studies and the assessment of construct stiffness problematic. Each of the methods previously used in the literature were assessed for their effect on the bending of the sample and concordant stiffness. The choice of outcome measures used in in vitro fracture studies was also assessed. Mechanical testing was conducted on seven hole locked plated constructs in each method for comparison. Based on the assessment of each method the use of spherical bearings, ball joints or similar is suggested at both ends of the sample. The use of near and far cortex movement was found to be more comprehensive and more accurate than traditional centrally calculated interfragmentary movement values; stiffness was found to be highly susceptible to the accuracy of deformation measurements and constraint method, and should only be used as a within study comparison method. The reported stiffness values of locked plate constructs from in vitro mechanical testing is highly susceptible to testing constraints and output measures, with many standard techniques overestimating the stiffness of the construct. This raises the need for further investigation into the actual mechanical behaviour within the fracture gap of these devices. PMID:26477405

  9. Medical Issues: Orthopedics

    MedlinePlus

    ... support & care > living with sma > medical issues > orthopedics Orthopedics In SMA, muscle weakness can cause several complications. ... difficulty sitting, standing, or performing normal daily activities. Orthopedic Considerations Doctors and therapists classify individuals with SMA ...

  10. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  11. Fixation filter, device for the rapid in situ preservation of particulate samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, C. D.; Edgcomb, V. P.; Doherty, K. W.; Engstrom, I.; Shanahan, T.; Pachiadaki, M. G.; Molyneaux, S. J.; Honjo, S.

    2015-02-01

    Niskin bottle rosettes have for years been the workhorse technology for collection of water samples used in biological and chemical oceanography. Studies of marine microbiology and biogeochemical cycling that aim to analyze labile organic molecules including messenger RNA, must take into account factors associated with sampling methodology that obscure an accurate picture of in situ activities/processes. With Niskin sampling, the large and often variable times between sample collection and preservation on deck of a ship, and the sometimes significant physico-chemical changes (e.g., changes in pressure, light, temperature, redox state, etc.) that water samples and organisms are exposed to, are likely to introduce artifacts. These concerns are likely more significant when working with phototrophs, deep-sea microbes, and/or organisms inhabiting low-oxygen or anoxic environments. We report here the development of a new technology for the in situ collection and chemical preservation of particulate microbial samples for a variety of downstream analyses depending on preservative choice by the user. The Fixation Filter Unit, version 3 (FF3) permits filtration of water sample through 47 mm diameter filters of the user's choice and upon completion of filtration, chemically preserves the retained sample within 10's of seconds. The stand-alone devices can be adapted to hydrocasting or mooring-based platforms.

  12. Core Concepts: Orthopedic Intern Curriculum Boot Camp.

    PubMed

    Seeley, Mark A; Kazarian, Erick; King, Brandon; Biermann, Janet S; Carpenter, James E; Caird, Michelle S; Irwin, Todd A

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic surgical interns must gain a broad array of clinical skills in a short time. However, recent changes in health care have limited resident-patient exposures. With the reported success of simulation training in the surgical literature, the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS) and Residency Review Committee for Orthopaedic Surgery have required that surgical simulation training be a component of the intern curricula in orthopedic surgical residencies. This study examined the short-term effectiveness of an orthopedic "intern boot camp" covering 7 of 17 simulation training concept modules published by the ABOS. Eight orthopedic post-graduate year 1 (PGY-1) residents (study group) completed a structured 3-month curriculum and were compared with 7 post-graduate year 2 (PGY-2) residents (comparison group) who had just completed their orthopedic surgical internship. Seven core skills were assessed using both task-specific and global rating scales. The PGY-1 residents demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in all 7 modules with respect to their task-specific pre-test scores: sterile technique (P=.001), wound closure (P<.001), knot tying (P=.017), casting and splinting (P<.001), arthrocentesis (P=.01), basics of internal fixation (P<.001), and compartment syndrome evaluation (P=.004). After the camp, PGY-1 and -2 scores in task-specific measures were not significantly different. A 3-month simulation-based boot camp instituted early in orthopedic internship elevated a variety of clinical skills to levels exhibited by PGY-2 residents. PMID:26730688

  13. A Novel Technique Using Customized Headgear for Fixation of Rigid External Distraction Device in an Infant With Crouzon Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hariri, Firdaus; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Mahdah, Saridah; Mathaneswaran, Vickneswaran; Ganesan, Dharmendra

    2015-11-01

    Rigid external distraction device is often indicated for superior midfacial advancement in pediatric syndromic craniosynostosis patients. Even though the technique is proven reliable to treat the functional issues related to the craniofacial deformity, major complications associated with its fixation, such as intracranial pin perforation and migration have been reported. We report a novel technique of using a customized headgear to prevent intracranial pin perforation over a very thin temporal bone region in an 8-month-old infant with Crouzon syndrome who underwent monobloc Le Fort III distraction osteogenesis using a combination of bilateral internal and a rigid external distraction device. The customized headgear provides a protective platform at the temporal region thus preventing intracranial pin perforation and allows stable fixation during the early phase of consolidation period to prevent central component relapse. The headgear can be used short term when rigid external distractor is indicated in infant patient but requires close monitoring because of risks of skin necrosis and temporal region indentation. PMID:26594993

  14. 21 CFR 888.5850 - Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories. 888.5850 Section 888.5850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.5850 Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and...

  15. Regional alterations in long bone 85Sr clearance produced by internal fixation devices. Part II. Histomorphometry.

    PubMed

    Simmons, D J; Daum, W J; Calhoun, J H

    1988-01-01

    The effects of each of the surgical stages involved in compression plating on the development of cortical thinning and porosity were assessed in the intact midshaft, stress-shielded femoral segments of adult mongrel dogs 6 months postoperatively. The data were evaluated in terms of a postsurgical tetracycline-based measure of remodeling and terminal 85Sr clearance (SrC) values for the plated segments of bone. Drilling had no effect on any parameter. Screw application was associated with minimal cortical thinning (p less than 0.05), while plate fixation clearly promoted thinning (p less than 0.01) and porosity (p less than 0.05). The percentage of labeled osteons, a measure of remodeling activity, increased only after plate fixation (p less than 0.05), and the labeling patterns suggested that most osteons had formed during the first 4 postsurgical months. That none of these changes were correlated with the 6-month SrC values suggests that the development of plate-induced osteopenia involves disparate histomorphometric time constants, rather than lack of any association. PMID:3225712

  16. Cost effectiveness of total hip arthroplasty in osteoarthritis: comparison of devices with differing bearing surfaces and modes of fixation.

    PubMed

    Pulikottil-Jacob, R; Connock, M; Kandala, N-B; Mistry, H; Grove, A; Freeman, K; Costa, M; Sutcliffe, P; Clarke, A

    2015-04-01

    Many different designs of total hip arthroplasty (THA) with varying performance and cost are available. The identification of those which are the most cost-effective could allow significant cost-savings. We used an established Markov model to examine the cost effectiveness of five frequently used categories of THA which differed according to bearing surface and mode of fixation, using data from the National Joint Registry for England and Wales. Kaplan-Meier analyses of rates of revision for men and women were modelled with parametric distributions. Costs of devices were provided by the NHS Supply Chain and associated costs were taken from existing studies. Lifetime costs, lifetime quality-adjusted-life-years (QALYs) and the probability of a device being cost effective at a willingness to pay £20 000/QALY were included in the models. The differences in QALYs between different categories of implant were extremely small (< 0.0039 QALYs for men or women over the patient's lifetime) and differences in cost were also marginal (£2500 to £3000 in the same time period). As a result, the probability of any particular device being the most cost effective was very sensitive to small, plausible changes in quality of life estimates and cost. Our results suggest that available evidence does not support recommending a particular device on cost effectiveness grounds alone. We would recommend that the choice of prosthesis should be determined by the rate of revision, local costs and the preferences of the surgeon and patient. PMID:25820881

  17. FLUOROSCOPY DURATION IN ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Salvia, Joao Caron La; de Moraes, Pablo Reis; Ammar, Tiago Yossef; Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the mean length of radiation emission from fluoroscopic devices during several types of orthopedic surgery and which of these required greater use of radiation. Methods: The times taken to perform sixteen different types of surgery (total of 80 procedures) were measured. At the end of each procedure, the length of time for which fluoroscopy was used directly from the image intensifier was ascertained. Results: The mean time required for fluoroscopy per operation was 61 seconds. The procedures that demanded greatest mean duration of radiation use were bilateral proximal femoral epiphysiodesis (5.1 minutes) and femoral shaft osteosynthesis using a locked intramedullary nail (3.33 min). Conclusion: The mean duration of fluoroscopy use in orthopedic operations was 61 seconds. The procedures using an intramedullary device were the ones that required greatest radiation emission. PMID:27027000

  18. Self-dissolution assisted coating on magnesium metal for biodegradable bone fixation devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakbaz, Hadis; Walter, Rhys; Gordon, Timothy; Bobby Kannan, M.

    2014-12-01

    An attempt was made to develop a self-dissolution assisted coating on a pure magnesium metal for potential bone fixation implants. Magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) was coated successfully on the magnesium metal in ammonium dihydrogen phosphate solution. The in vitro degradation behaviour of the MPC coated metal was evaluated using electrochemical techniques. The MPC coating increased the polarisation resistance (RP) of the metal by ˜150% after 2 h immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) and reduced the corrosion current density (icorr) by ˜80%. The RP of the MPC coated metal remained relatively high even after 8 h immersion period. However, post-degradation analysis of the MPC coated metal revealed localized attack. Hence, the study suggests that MPC coating alone may not be beneficial, but this novel coating could provide additional protection if used as a precursor for other potential coatings such as biodegradable polymers or calcium phosphates.

  19. Orthopedic aspects of separation.

    PubMed

    Jones, David

    2015-10-01

    In the management of conjoined twins the orthopedic surgeon may be involved directly, as part of the surgical team at operation or indirectly, in dealing with associated anomalies or the sequelae of surgery. The overwhelming indication for orthopedic involvement is ischiopagus, either tripus or tetrapus. The main role of the orthopedic surgeon is to facilitate midline closure through the use of pelvic osteotomies, which allow the symphysis pubis to be approximated. PMID:26382266

  20. Applications of finite element simulation in orthopedic and trauma surgery.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Cegoñino, José; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Puértolas, Sergio; López, Enrique; Mateo, Jesús; Gracia, Luis

    2012-04-18

    Research in different areas of orthopedic and trauma surgery requires a methodology that allows both a more economic approach and the ability to reproduce different situations in an easy way. Simulation models have been introduced recently in bioengineering and could become an essential tool in the study of any physiological unity, regardless of its complexity. The main problem in modeling with finite elements simulation is to achieve an accurate reproduction of the anatomy and a perfect correlation of the different structures, in any region of the human body. Authors have developed a mixed technique, joining the use of a three-dimensional laser scanner Roland Picza captured together with computed tomography (CT) and 3D CT images, to achieve a perfect reproduction of the anatomy. Finite element (FE) simulation lets us know the biomechanical changes that take place after hip prostheses or osteosynthesis implantation and biological responses of bone to biomechanical changes. The simulation models are able to predict changes in bone stress distribution around the implant, so allowing preventing future pathologies. The development of a FE model of lumbar spine is another interesting application of the simulation. The model allows research on the lumbar spine, not only in physiological conditions but also simulating different load conditions, to assess the impact on biomechanics. Different degrees of disc degeneration can also be simulated to determine the impact on adjacent anatomical elements. Finally, FE models may be useful to test different fixation systems, i.e., pedicular screws, interbody devices or rigid fixations compared with the dynamic ones. We have also developed models of lumbar spine and hip joint to predict the occurrence of osteoporotic fractures, based on densitometric determinations and specific biomechanical models, including approaches from damage and fracture mechanics. FE simulations also allow us to predict the behavior of orthopedic splints

  1. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a polylactic acid-bioactive glass composite for bone fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Vergnol, Gwenaelle; Ginsac, Nathalie; Rivory, Pascaline; Meille, Sylvain; Chenal, Jean-Marc; Balvay, Sandra; Chevalier, Jérôme; Hartmann, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) is nowadays among the most used bioabsorbable materials for medical devices. To promote bone growth on the material surface and increase the degradation rate of the polymer, research is currently focused on organic-inorganic composites by adding a bioactive mineral to the polymer matrix. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of a poly(L,DL-lactide)-Bioglass® (P(L,DL)LA-Bioglass(®) 45S5) composite to be used as a bone fixation device. In vitro cell viability testing of P(l,dl)LA based composites containing different amounts of Bioglass(®) 45S5 particles was investigated. According to the degradation rate of the P(L,DL)LA matrix and the cytocompatibility experiments, the composite with 30 wt % of Bioglass® particles seemed to be the best candidate for further investigation. To study its behavior after immersion in simulated physiological conditions, the degradation of the composite was analyzed by measuring its weight loss and mechanical properties and by proceeding with X-ray tomography. We demonstrated that the presence of the bioactive glass significantly accelerated the in vitro degradation of the polymer. A preliminary in vivo investigation on rabbits shows that the addition of 30 wt % of Bioglass(®) in the P(L,DL)LA matrix seems to trigger bone osseointegration especially during the first month of implantation. This composite has thus strong potential interest for health applications. PMID:25677798

  2. Production of Medical Device Using MIM Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, M. A.; Mustapha, M.; Ali, E. A. G. E.; Subuki, I.; Meh, B.

    2010-03-01

    Metal Injection moulding (MIM) is an advanced near net shape forming process. This paper presents the attempt to manufacture medical devices particularly fracture fixation plates for orthopedic applications for commercial purposes by MIM process. The stainless steel powder with the median particle size of 15 μm and a binder consisting of polyethylene, paraffin wax and stearic acid were mixed at 160° C using a sigma-blade mixer for one hour to prepare the feedstock of the fracture fixation plates. The fracture fixation plate component was injection molded using vertical injection moulding machine with the nozzle temperature of 200° C. Prior to sintering, the specimens were debound using a combination of solvent extraction and thermal pyrolysis method. The specimens were then sintered under vacuum. The properties of the fracture fixation plates such as physical and mechanical properties were presented and discussed. The in-vitro biocompatibility study on the fracture plates produced was examined.

  3. Harmful lifestyles on orthopedic implantation surgery: a descriptive review on alcohol and tobacco use.

    PubMed

    Fini, Milena; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Salamanna, Francesca; Veronesi, Francesca; Martini, Lucia; De Mattei, Monica; Tschon, Matilde

    2011-11-01

    Alcohol abuse and smoking habits have adverse effects on bone health and are a risk factor for osteoporosis, fractures and impaired fracture repair. Osteointegration processes around implanted biomaterials involve a coordinated cascade of complex events that are very similar to those occurring during fracture repair and require a suitable microenvironment and the coordinated action of cells and signal molecules. Therefore, diseases and harmful lifestyles that impair the normal bone healing process can reduce the success of implant surgery and may negatively influence the osteointegration of prostheses and implant devices for fracture fixation such as screws, nails and plates. Understanding the effects of harmful lifestyles on bone implant osteointegration is important for successful implant therapy, orthopedic reconstructive surgery and tissue-engineered-based therapies. However, the mechanisms by which smoking and alcoholism affect bone metabolism, bone mass and the balance of bone resorption and formation, also in the presence of an orthopedic implant, are not completely understood and remain inadequately elucidated. This review aims to analyze in vitro and in vivo studies regarding orthopedic implant integration in the presence of tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption with a focus on pathophysiology and local or systemic mechanisms of action on bone. PMID:21898177

  4. Clinical results of reversed V-shaped high tibial corticotomy with minimally invasive surgery without internal fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Madadi, Firooz; Eajazi, Alireza; Madadi, Firoozeh; Daftari Besheli, Laleh; Rokni, Reza; Abbasian, Mohammad Reza; Bigdeli, Mohammad Reza

    2010-06-01

    High tibial osteotomy is a method of treating knee osteoarthritis due to genu varum in advanced stages. High tibial osteotomy-associated problems continue to be reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical results of a new, innovative method of high tibial osteotomy with 3- to 13-year follow-up. Between 1996 and 2006, our new surgical method was performed on 293 patients with medial compartment osteoarthritis and genu varum. All patients were examined preoperatively, 6 months postoperatively, and at final follow-up. The Hospital for Special Surgery Knee Scoring System (HSS) was used at final follow-up, and limb alignment and patient satisfaction were reassessed. Immediate postoperative complications included varus recurrence, knee instability, and peroneal nerve palsy, and no signs of tibial nonunion or infection were observed. At final follow-up, 3 cases of genu recurvatum, 2 cases of peroneal nerve palsy, and 25 cases of loss of correction were observed. Average postoperative HSS score was 85 (range, 47-97), and 97.8% of the patients were satisfied. This new method is a good alternative for the correction of genu varum because it requires a small incision, is soft tissue friendly, is a corticotomy instead of an osteotomy, requires no internal or external fixation devices, has a shorter duration and an acceptable complication and recurrence rate, and results in satisfactory HSS scores and higher patient satisfaction rates. PMID:20806771

  5. Locking mechanism for orthopedic braces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, J. I.; Epps, C. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An orthopedic brace locking mechanism is described which under standing or walking conditions cannot be unlocked, however under sitting conditions the mechanism can be simply unlocked so as to permit bending of the patient's knee. Other features of the device include: (1) the mechanism is rendered operable, and inoperable, dependent upon the relative inclination of the brace with respect to the ground; (2) the mechanism is automatically locked under standing or walking conditions and is manually unlocked under sitting conditions; and (3) the mechanism is light in weight and is relatively small in size.

  6. Locking mechanism for orthopedic braces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    I-Lechao, J.; Epps, C. H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A locking mechanism for orthopedic braces is described which automatically prevents or permits the relative pivotable movement between a lower brace member and an upper brace member. The upper and lower brace members are provided with drilled bores within which a slidable pin is disposed, and depending upon the inclination of the brace members with respect to a vertical plane, the slidable pin will be interposed between both brace members. The secondary or auxiliary latching device includes a spring biased, manually operable lever bar arrangement which is manually unlatched and automatically latched under the influence of the spring.

  7. Comparison of the Sliding and Femoral Head Rotation among Three Different Femoral Head Fixation Devices for Trochanteric Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chinzei, Nobuaki; Niikura, Takahiro; Tsuji, Mitsuo; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Doita, Minoru; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently, various femoral head fixation devices (HFDs) for trochanteric fractures have become available. However, there are some cases in which femoral head rotation with excessive sliding of the HFD is observed and it is often followed by cutout. The purpose of this study is to compare the ability of the three types of HFDs to prevent femoral head rotation. Methods Between July 2005 and December 2009, 206 patients aged over 60 years with trochanteric fractures who had undergone surgical treatment using a short femoral nail in our institution were enrolled into the study. We used the gamma 3 nail (GMN) as the screw-type HFD in 66 cases, the gliding nail (GLN) as a non-cylindrical blade in 76 cases, and the proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) as a cylindrical blade in 64 cases. The sliding length of HFDs and the occurrence of femoral head rotation were evaluated by assessing radiographs as the main outcome, and the results were compared among these devices. Results A comparison of the degree of sliding in the GMN group showed that femoral head rotation was observed significantly more frequently in cases with rotation. Further, it appeared that femoral head rotation occurred more frequently in comminuted fractures. However, no significant differences between the sliding lengths of the different HFDs were observed among three groups. Femoral head rotation was observed in 15 cases of GMN (22.7%), 0 case of GLN, and 5 case of PFNA (7.8%). Significant differences with regard to the occurrence of femoral head rotation were observed among the three groups. Furthermore, significant differences were also observed between GLN and PFNA with respect to the occurrence of femoral head rotation. Conclusions The ability to stabilize femoral head appears to be greater with blade-type materials than with screw-type materials. Furthermore, we believe that a non-cylindrical blade is preferable to a cylindrical blade for the surgical treatment of comminuted, unstable

  8. Comparison of femoral and tibial pullout forces in bone-patellar tendon-bone anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions with a new interference fixation device.

    PubMed

    Seitz, H; Vécsei, V; Menth-Chiari, W A; Pichl, W; Wielke, B; Marlovits, S

    1999-03-01

    Interference screws have become the standard method for fixing bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) grafts. To avoid the inherent pitfalls and complications of interference screws, a 28-mm long and from 5 to 7 mm spreadable metal bolt with nontapping threads was developed for this study. The technical applicability and biomechanical characteristics of this new BPTB interference fixation device were investigated by dissection or tensile testing of 48 cadaveric knee specimens from young donors. No problems occurred with respect to bone plug anchoring during insertion of the spreading bolts. The clinically important linear load was 920+/-283 N for the femoral and 635+/-247 N for the tibial fixation site. Bone plug pullout was the mode of failure in all specimens. The results of this study indicate that the spreading bolt is a reasonable alternative to interference screws. PMID:10210075

  9. Lasers in orthopedics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherk, Henry H.; Rhodes, Anthony L.; Meller, Menachem M.

    1990-06-01

    Orthopedic Surgery is that surgical discipline which deals with the musculoskeletal system. Orthopedists therefore operate on joints, the spine and long bones and engage in such subsecialities as sports medicine, hand surgery, trauma surgery, and joint replacements. Since they must cut and shape bone, cartilage, tendon, and ligament, orthopedists have developed a number of mechanical techniques to achieve these ends and surgical lasers have found few applications in orthopedics because until now they have not been useful for cutting bone. In the past several years, however, there has been considerable interest in several areas within the field of orthopedic surgery that do not entail actual bone surgery and it is expected that as newer and more powerful lasers become available laser osteotomy may become feasible and even routine.

  10. [Orthopedic shoe treatment : Inserts].

    PubMed

    Schuh, R; Windhager, R

    2016-03-01

    The use of inserts and orthopedic shoe adjustment represents an essential component of the conservative therapy of degenerative diseases and deformities of the musculoskeletal system. Inserts can have supportive, bedding and corrective effects and are used in particular for complaints of the feet and ankles. The combination of diverse materials allows a high level of cushioning and supporting features and corresponding longevity to be accomplished. The production is carried out on an individual basis and if necessary computer-assisted in order to achieve an optimal fit. For severe and rigid deformities the formation of pressure ulcers can be prevented by orthopedic shoe adjustment and by the use of orthopedic tailor-made shoes. PMID:26861757

  11. A 1-piece shape-metal nitinol intramedullary internal fixation device for arthrodesis of the proximal interphalangeal joint in neuropathic patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S

    2009-06-01

    A common complication associated with diabetes is the development of a rigid structural lesser toe contracture, which, when combined with peripheral sensory neuropathy, can lead to ulceration, infection, and amputation. Surgical correction of lesser toe contractures in persons with diabetes has been advocated to decrease the potential for ulceration and amputation. Lesser toe proximal interphalangeal joint arthrodesis employing myriad joint preparation and fixation methods is commonly performed to correct a rigid structural toe contracture. The author performed a retrospective, observational, cohort study involving 10 patients (30 toes) with diabetes, dense peripheral neuropathy, and rigid structural toe contracture treated with a 1-piece shape-memory Nitinol intramedullary internal fixation device for arthrodesis of the proximal interphalangeal joint. Successful fusion was achieved in 28 of 30 toes (93%), with a stable nonunion achieved in the remainder. Complications that arose occurred early in the author's experience with this implant and consisted of secondary contracture of the distal interphalangeal joint (23%), displaced fixation (13%), and malunion (7%). No patient developed ulceration, and no additional surgery has been required to date. When properly performed, the use of this implant for arthrodesis of the proximal interphalangeal joint in neuropathic patients with diabetes appears safe and reliable. PMID:19825764

  12. A controlled antibiotic release system to prevent orthopedic-implant associated infections: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno, Marina; Pinczowski, Pedro; Pérez, Marta; Giorello, Antonella; Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Santamaría, Jesús; Arruebo, Manuel; Luján, Lluís

    2015-01-01

    A new device for local delivery of antibiotics is presented, with potential use as a drug-eluting fixation pin for orthopedic applications. The implant consists of a stainless steel hollow tubular reservoir packed with the desired antibiotic. Release takes place through several orifices previously drilled in the reservoir wall, a process that does not compromise the mechanical properties required for the implant. Depending on the antibiotic chosen and the number of orifices, the release profile can be tailored from a rapid release of the load (ca. 20 h) to a combination of rapid initial release and slower, sustained release for a longer period of time (ca. 200 h). An excellent bactericidal action is obtained, with 4-log reductions achieved in as little as 2 h, and total bacterial eradication in 8 h using 6-pinholed implants filled with cefazolin. PMID:26297104

  13. Posterior Interspinous Fusion Device for One-Level Fusion in Degenerative Lumbar Spine Disease : Comparison with Pedicle Screw Fixation - Preliminary Report of at Least One Year Follow Up

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho Jung; Chun, Hyoung Joon; Oh, Suck Jun; Kang, Tae Hoon; Yang, Moon Sool

    2012-01-01

    Objective Transpedicular screw fixation has some disadvantages such as postoperative back pain through wide muscle dissection, long operative time, and cephalad adjacent segmental degeneration (ASD). The purposes of this study are investigation and comparison of radiological and clinical results between interspinous fusion device (IFD) and pedicle screw. Methods From Jan. 2008 to Aug. 2009, 40 patients underwent spinal fusion with IFD combined with posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). In same study period, 36 patients underwent spinal fusion with pedicle screw fixation as control group. Dynamic lateral radiographs, visual analogue scale (VAS), and Korean version of the Oswestry disability index (K-ODI) scores were evaluated in both groups. Results The lumbar spine diseases in the IFD group were as followings; spinal stenosis in 26, degenerative spondylolisthesis in 12, and intervertebral disc herniation in 2. The mean follow up period was 14.24 months (range; 12 to 22 months) in the IFD group and 18.3 months (range; 12 to 28 months) in pedicle screw group. The mean VAS scores was preoperatively 7.16±2.1 and 8.03±2.3 in the IFD and pedicle screw groups, respectively, and improved postoperatively to 1.3±2.9 and 1.2±3.2 in 1-year follow ups (p<0.05). The K-ODI was decreased significantly in an equal amount in both groups one year postoperatively (p<0.05). The statistics revealed a higher incidence of ASD in pedicle screw group than the IFD group (p=0.029). Conclusion Posterior IFD has several advantages over the pedicle screw fixation in terms of skin incision, muscle dissection and short operative time and less intraoperative estimated blood loss. The IFD with PLIF may be a favorable technique to replace the pedicle screw fixation in selective case. PMID:23133725

  14. 21 CFR 888.3080 - Intervertebral body fusion device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3080 Intervertebral body fusion device. (a) Identification. An intervertebral body fusion device is an implanted single or...

  15. Postoperative infection in patients undergoing inspection of orthopedic damage due to external fixation☆

    PubMed Central

    Foni, Noel Oizerovici; Batista, Felipe Augusto Ribeiro; Rossato, Luís Henrique Camargo; Hungria, José Octavio Soares; Mercadante, Marcelo Tomanik; Christian, Ralph Walter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To conduct a retrospective analysis on cases undergoing inspection of orthopedic damage, at an orthopedic emergency service in a teaching hospital, with the aim of evaluating patients with postoperative infection after conversion to internal osteosynthesis. Methods This was a retrospective analysis covering the period from June 2012 to June 2013, on patients who underwent inspection of orthopedic damage due to external fixation and subsequently were converted to definitive osteosynthesis using a nail or plate. Results We found an infection rate of 13.3% in our sample and, furthermore, found that there had been technical errors in setting up the fixator in 60.4% of the cases. Conclusion We found an infection rate that we considered high, along with inadequacies in constructing the external fixator. We emphasize that this procedure is not risk-free and that training for physicians who perform this procedure should be mandatory.

  16. Sarcopenia in Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bokshan, Steven L; DePasse, J Mason; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a loss of skeletal muscle mass in the elderly that is an independent risk factor for falls, disability, postoperative complications, and mortality. Although its cause is not completely understood, sarcopenia generally results from a complex bone-muscle interaction in the setting of chronic disease and aging. Sarcopenia cannot be diagnosed by muscle mass alone. Diagnosis requires 2 of the following 3 criteria: low skeletal muscle mass, inadequate muscle strength, and inadequate physical performance. Forty-four percent of elderly patients undergoing orthopedic surgery and 24% of all patients 65 to 70 years old are sarcopenic. Although dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and bioelectrical impedance analysis may be used to measure sarcopenia and are relatively inexpensive and accessible, they are generally considered less specific for sarcopenia compared with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Sarcopenia has been shown to predict poor outcomes within the medical and surgical populations and has been directly correlated with increases in taxpayer costs. Strengthening therapy and nutritional supplementation have become the mainstays of sarcopenia treatment. Specifically, the American Medical Directors Association has released guidelines for nutritional supplementation. Although sarcopenia frequently occurs with osteoporosis, it is an independent predictor of fragility fractures. Initiatives to diagnose, treat, and prevent sarcopenia in orthopedic patients are needed. Further investigation must also explore sarcopenia as a predictor of surgical outcomes in orthopedic patients. PMID:26913764

  17. A Novel Guidewire Aiming Device to Improve the Accuracy of Guidewire Insertion in Femoral Neck Fracture Surgery Using Cannulated Screw Fixation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenjing; Xu, Haitao; Xu, Peijun; Hu, Tu; An, Zhiquan; Zhang, Changqing; Sheng, Jiagen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to improve the accuracy of guidewire insertion in the femoral neck fracture surgery using cannulated screw fixation. MATERIAL AND METHODS A novel aiming device was designed and manufactured. Between January 2010 and June 2012, 64 femoral neck fracture patients were included into the study. All 64 patients were divided into 2 groups randomly. The aiming device was used during the operation for patients in the experimental group, but not in the control group. RESULTS There were no statistically significant differences in operative time or bleed volume between the groups (P>0.05). The frequency of guidewire drilling was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). The angle between the first cannulated screw and the central axis of the femoral neck in coronal plane and sagittal plane, and the distance between the bottom cannulated screw and the medial calcar femorale rim, were significantly smaller in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS The aiming device is simple in structure and easy to use. It could help surgeons to accurately insert cannulated screw guidewires. The aiming device is suitable for broad clinical use. PMID:27529374

  18. A Novel Guidewire Aiming Device to Improve the Accuracy of Guidewire Insertion in Femoral Neck Fracture Surgery Using Cannulated Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wenjing; Xu, Haitao; Xu, Peijun; Hu, Tu; An, Zhiquan; Zhang, Changqing; Sheng, Jiagen

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to improve the accuracy of guidewire insertion in the femoral neck fracture surgery using cannulated screw fixation. Material/Methods A novel aiming device was designed and manufactured. Between January 2010 and June 2012, 64 femoral neck fracture patients were included into the study. All 64 patients were divided into 2 groups randomly. The aiming device was used during the operation for patients in the experimental group, but not in the control group. Results There were no statistically significant differences in operative time or bleed volume between the groups (P>0.05). The frequency of guidewire drilling was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). The angle between the first cannulated screw and the central axis of the femoral neck in coronal plane and sagittal plane, and the distance between the bottom cannulated screw and the medial calcar femorale rim, were significantly smaller in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusions The aiming device is simple in structure and easy to use. It could help surgeons to accurately insert cannulated screw guidewires. The aiming device is suitable for broad clinical use. PMID:27529374

  19. Tissue bioengineering in orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Hernigou, Philippe; Homma, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The use of cells for the purpose of orthopedic tissue engineering started more than 300 years ago. The first attempt of bone grafting was reported in 1668 by the Dutch surgeon Job-Van Meek'ren. In 1867, Ollier performed a series of experiments using transplanted periosteum and concluded that transplanted periosteum and bone remained alive and formed new bone. The osteogenic potential of transplanted bone marrow was later documented by Goujon in 1869, then by Macewen in 1881. Efforts of Albee and Phemister highlighted further the utility of bone transplantation for the healing of fractures and bone defects. The techniques for autografting pioneered by these individuals remained largely unchanged until today. Advances in understanding of the biology of osteogenic cells, the availability of many highly purified peptide growth factors, and the capacity to create highly specialized implantable materials have launched an explosion of new advances in bone grafting and bone regeneration, all under the banner of tissue engineering. This new field is rapidly expanding the armamentarium of orthopedic surgeons in every setting in which bone healing is required. Composites of cells and matrices are at the core of this revolution. PMID:22783330

  20. Orthopedic Injury in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gross, Gilad A; George, James W

    2016-09-01

    There are many reasons why a woman's pregnancy can put her at risk for orthopedic pain and injury. Given the high percentage of pregnant patients experiencing some degree of musculoskeletal pain, it is surprising that this is not an area of wider study. This chapter takes an evidence based approach to help the reader understand the implications of the numerous anatomic and physiologic changes associated with the gravid state, and how they act to promote both discomfort and injury. One-third of pregnant women in America are obese, further increasing risk. Exercise in most pregnancies is recommended and regarded as safe and thus obstetric care providers need to understand risk, diagnostic techniques and treatments. PMID:27403586

  1. Commonly missed orthopedic problems.

    PubMed

    Ballas, M T; Tytko, J; Mannarino, F

    1998-01-15

    When not diagnosed early and managed appropriately, common musculoskeletal injuries may result in long-term disabling conditions. Anterior cruciate ligament tears are some of the most common knee ligament injuries. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis may present with little or no hip pain, and subtle or absent physical and radiographic findings. Femoral neck stress fractures, if left untreated, may result in avascular necrosis, refractures and pseudoarthrosis. A delay in diagnosis of scaphoid fractures may cause early wrist arthrosis if nonunion results. Ulnar collateral ligament tears are a frequently overlooked injury in skiers. The diagnosis of Achilles tendon rupture is missed as often as 25 percent of the time. Posterior tibial tendon tears may result in fixed bony planus if diagnosis is delayed, necessitating hindfoot fusion rather than simple soft tissue repair. Family physicians should be familiar with the initial assessment of these conditions and, when appropriate, refer patients promptly to an orthopedic surgeon. PMID:9456991

  2. Proximal spinal muscular atrophy: current orthopedic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Haaker, Gerrit; Fujak, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary neuromuscular disease of lower motor neurons that is caused by a defective “survival motor neuron” (SMN) protein that is mainly associated with proximal progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. Although SMA involves a wide range of disease severity and a high mortality and morbidity rate, recent advances in multidisciplinary supportive care have enhanced quality of life and life expectancy. Active research for possible treatment options has become possible since the disease-causing gene defect was identified in 1995. Nevertheless, a causal therapy is not available at present, and therapeutic management of SMA remains challenging; the prolonged survival is increasing, especially orthopedic, respiratory and nutritive problems. This review focuses on orthopedic management of the disease, with discussion of key aspects that include scoliosis, muscular contractures, hip joint disorders, fractures, technical devices, and a comparative approach of conservative and surgical treatment. Also emphasized are associated complications including respiratory involvement, perioperative care and anesthesia, nutrition problems, and rehabilitation. The SMA disease course can be greatly improved with adequate therapy with established orthopedic procedures in a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. PMID:24399883

  3. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Orthopedic Specialist, Classroom Course 10-13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX. Health Care Research Div.

    These military-developed curriculum materials for a course for orthopedic specialists are targeted for students from grades 11 through the adult level. The course is designed to provide a working knowledge of the application of casts, traction, and splints to orthopedic patients and the removal of these devices; a working knowledge of assisting in…

  4. Acid-resistant calcium silicate-based composite implants with high-strength as load-bearing bone graft substitutes and fracture fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chung-Kai; Ding, Shinn-Jyh

    2016-09-01

    To achieve the excellent mechanical properties of biodegradable materials used for cortical bone graft substitutes and fracture fixation devices remains a challenge. To this end, the biomimetic calcium silicate/gelatin/chitosan oligosaccharide composite implants were developed, with an aim of achieving high strength, controlled degradation, and superior osteogenic activity. The work focused on the effect of gelatin on mechanical properties of the composites under four different kinds of mechanical stresses including compression, tensile, bending, and impact. The evaluation of in vitro degradability and fatigue at two simulated body fluid (SBF) of pH 7.4 and 5.0 was also performed, in which the pH 5.0 condition simulated clinical conditions caused by bacterial induced local metabolic acidosis or tissue inflammation. In addition, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were sued to examine osteogenic activity. Experimental results showed that the appropriate amount of gelatin positively contributed to failure enhancement in compressive and impact modes. The 10wt% gelatin-containing composite exhibits the maximum value of the compressive strength (166.1MPa), which is within the reported compressive strength for cortical bone. The stability of the bone implants was apparently affected by the in vitro fatigue, but not by the initial pH environments (7.4 or 5.0). The gelatin not only greatly enhanced the degradation of the composite when soaked in the dynamic SBF solution, but effectively promoted attachment, proliferation, differentiation, and formation of mineralization of hMSCs. The 10wt%-gelatin composite with high initial strength may be a potential implant candidate for cortical bone repair and fracture fixation applications. PMID:27254281

  5. External fixator configurations in tibia fractures: 1D optimization and 3D analysis comparison.

    PubMed

    Roseiro, Luis M; Neto, M Augusta; Amaro, Ana; Leal, Rogerio P; Samarra, Miguel C

    2014-01-01

    The use of external fixation devices in orthopedic surgery is very common in open tibial fractures. A properly applied fixator may improve the healing process while one improperly applied might delay the healing process. The several external fixator systems used in clinical today, can be categorized into uniplanar-unilateral, uniplanar-bilateral, biplanar and multiplanar. The stability on the fracture focus and, therefore, the fracture healing process, is related with the type of external fixator configuration that is selected. The aim of this study is to discuss the principles for the successful application of unilateral-uniplanar external fixation, the assembly of its components, for the case of a transverse fractures using computational models. In this context, the fixation stiffness characteristics are evaluated using a simplified 1D finite element model for the tibia and external fixator. The beams are modeled with realistic cross-sectional geometry and material properties instead of a simplified model. The VABS (the Variational Asymptotic Beam Section analysis) methodology is used to compute the cross-sectional model for the generalized Timoshenko model, which was embedded in the finite element solver FEAP. The use of Timoshenko beam theory allows accounting for several kinds of loads, including torsion moments. Optimal design is performed with respect to the assembly of fixator components using a genetic algorithm. The optimization procedure is based on the evaluation of an objective function, which is dependent on the displacement at the fracture focus. The initial and optimal results are compared by performing a 3D analysis, for which different three-dimensional finite element models are created. The geometrical model of a tibia is created on the basis of data acquired by CAT scan, made for a healthy tibia of a 22 year old male. The 3D comparison of the 1D optimal results show a clear improvement on the objective function for the several load cases and

  6. Fixation of distal radius fractures in adults: a review.

    PubMed

    Obert, L; Rey, P-B; Uhring, J; Gasse, N; Rochet, S; Lepage, D; Serre, A; Garbuio, P

    2013-04-01

    In patients for whom function is a priority, anatomic reduction and stable fixation are prerequisites for good outcomes. Several therapeutic options exist, including orthopedic treatment and internal fixation with pins (intra- and extrafocal), external fixation which may or may not bridge the wrist, and different internal fixation techniques with dorsal or palmar plates using or not, locking screws. Arthroscopy may be necessary in case of articular fracture. In the presence of significant metaphyseal bone defects, filling of the comminution with phosphocalcic cements provides better graft stability. The level of evidence is too low to allow recommending one type of fixation for one type of fracture; and different fixation options to achieve stable reduction exist, each with its own specific complications. With the new generations of palmar plate, secondary displacement is becoming a thing of the past. PMID:23518070

  7. Roentgen Stereophotogrammetry In Orthopedics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvik, Goran

    1983-07-01

    A system for roentgen stereophotogrammetry has been used in Lund, Sweden, since August 1972 and by August 1982 ten thousand stereo films have been evaluated using this method. Patient investigations started March 1973 and of the more than 500 patients investigated 300 have been referred by orthopedic surgeons. The skeletal parts investigated had been permanently marked with tantalum balls 0.5 or 0.8 mm in diameter. The causes for the investigation have been bone growth disorders in the Lower extremity (134 patients), spinal fusions (35 patients), high tibial osteotomies for gonarthrosis (21 patients) and endoprosthetic replacement of the knee (68 patients) or hip (42 patients) joint. By the roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA), information on for instance the development of angular deformities and staple loosening in the leg, the healing process of the intended fusion in the spine or at the knee, and on the migration and stability of prosthetic components have been obtained. RSA is of value both for prognostic and followup purposes, and is versatile enough in proper setting to be used as a routine clinical investigation.

  8. Plasma Biomedicine in Orthopedics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Satsohi

    2012-10-01

    Various effects of plasmas irradiation on cells, tissues, and biomaterials relevant for orthopedic applications have been examined. For direct application of plasmas to living cells or tissues, dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) with helium flows into ambient air were used. For biomaterial processing, on the other hand, either helium DBDs mentioned above or low-pressure discharges generated in a chamber were used. In this presentation, plasma effects on cell proliferation and plasma treatment for artificial bones will be discussed. First, the conditions for enhanced cell proliferation in vitro by plasma applications have been examined. The discharge conditions for cell proliferation depend sensitively on cell types. Since cell proliferation can be enhanced even when the cells are cultured in a plasma pre-treated medium, long-life reactive species generated in the medium by plasma application or large molecules (such as proteins) in the medium modified by the plasma are likely to be the cause of cell proliferation. It has been found that there is strong correlation between (organic) hydroperoxide generation and cell proliferation. Second, effects of plasma-treated artificial bones made of porous hydroxyapatite (HA) have been examined in vitro and vivo. It has been found that plasma treatment increases hydrophilicity of the surfaces of microscopic inner pores, which directly or indirectly promotes differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells introduced into the pores and therefore causes faster bone growth. The work has been performed in collaboration with Prof. H. Yoshikawa and his group members at the School of Medicine, Osaka University.

  9. 76 FR 20690 - International Consortium of Orthopedic Registries; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... be on a first- come, first-served basis. Non-U.S. citizens are subject to additional security... the performance of orthopedic devices. II. Who is the target audience for this public workshop? Who should attend this public workshop? This workshop is open to all interested parties. The target...

  10. Endoscopic Management of Free Lying Migratory Orthopedic Screw in Bladder.

    PubMed

    P, Puvai Murugan; M, Ramalingam

    2016-09-01

    75-year old gentleman presented with acute urinary retention. He had met with road traffic accident 15 years back and sustained pelvic fracture and bladder rupture, underwent bladder repair and open reduction and internal fixation of pubic symphsis. Imaging studies showed the free lying encrusted orthopedic screw in the bladder, which was removed per urethra using nephroscope. Migratory foreign bodies in the urinary bladder are rare. However there is a possibility of longstanding foreign bodies in adjacent structures to erode and perforate into the bladder. Inside the bladder these foreign bodies act as nidus for stone formation. PMID:27500087

  11. Nanomedicine applications in orthopedic medicine: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Mazaheri, Mozhdeh; Eslahi, Niloofar; Ordikhani, Farideh; Tamjid, Elnaz; Simchi, Abdolreza

    2015-01-01

    The technological and clinical need for orthopedic replacement materials has led to significant advances in the field of nanomedicine, which embraces the breadth of nanotechnology from pharmacological agents and surface modification through to regulation and toxicology. A variety of nanostructures with unique chemical, physical, and biological properties have been engineered to improve the functionality and reliability of implantable medical devices. However, mimicking living bone tissue is still a challenge. The scope of this review is to highlight the most recent accomplishments and trends in designing nanomaterials and their applications in orthopedics with an outline on future directions and challenges. PMID:26451110

  12. Clinical and Analytical Evaluation of a Single-Vial Stool Collection Device with Formalin-Free Fixative for Improved Processing and Comprehensive Detection of Gastrointestinal Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Couturier, Brianne A.; Jensen, Ryan; Arias, Nora; Heffron, Michael; Gubler, Elyse; Case, Kristin; Gowans, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic examination of feces is a standard laboratory method for diagnosing gastrointestinal parasite infections. In North America, the ovum and parasite (O&P) examination is typically performed using stool that is chemically fixed in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and formalin, after which the stool is concentrated by filtration to enhance sensitivity. Mini Parasep solvent-free (SF) tubes allow collection and concentration within a single collection vial. The goal of the study was to determine whether consolidated processing and concentration with the Parasep tubes using an alcohol-based fixative (Alcorfix) provide O&P examinations equivalent to or better than those done by processing of PVA-formalin-fixed stool using a SpinCon concentration device. Parasep tubes revealed filtration performance equivalent to that of the SpinCon concentration device using PVA-formalin-fixed stool containing protozoa. Specimens cocollected in Parasep tubes containing PVA-formalin and Alcorfix revealed comparable morphology and staining for various protozoa. Alcorfix effectively fixed live Cryptosporidium and microsporidia such that morphology and staining were conserved for modified acid-fast and modified trichrome stains. A work flow analysis revealed significant time savings for batches of 10 or 30 O&P specimens in tubes with Alcorfix compared to the amount of time that it took to analyze the same number of specimens in tubes with PVA-formalin. The direct hands-on time savings with Mini Parasep tubes were 17 min and 41 s and 32 min and 1 s for batches of 10 and 30 specimens, respectively. Parasep tubes containing Alcorfix provide significant work flow advantages to laboratories that process medium to high volumes of O&P specimens by streamlining processing and converting to a single tube. These improvements in work flow, reduction of the amount of formalin used in the laboratory, and equivalent microscopy results are attractive advancements in O&P testing for North American

  13. Clinical and Analytical Evaluation of a Single-Vial Stool Collection Device with Formalin-Free Fixative for Improved Processing and Comprehensive Detection of Gastrointestinal Parasites.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Brianne A; Jensen, Ryan; Arias, Nora; Heffron, Michael; Gubler, Elyse; Case, Kristin; Gowans, Jason; Couturier, Marc Roger

    2015-08-01

    Microscopic examination of feces is a standard laboratory method for diagnosing gastrointestinal parasite infections. In North America, the ovum and parasite (O&P) examination is typically performed using stool that is chemically fixed in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and formalin, after which the stool is concentrated by filtration to enhance sensitivity. Mini Parasep solvent-free (SF) tubes allow collection and concentration within a single collection vial. The goal of the study was to determine whether consolidated processing and concentration with the Parasep tubes using an alcohol-based fixative (Alcorfix) provide O&P examinations equivalent to or better than those done by processing of PVA-formalin-fixed stool using a SpinCon concentration device. Parasep tubes revealed filtration performance equivalent to that of the SpinCon concentration device using PVA-formalin-fixed stool containing protozoa. Specimens cocollected in Parasep tubes containing PVA-formalin and Alcorfix revealed comparable morphology and staining for various protozoa. Alcorfix effectively fixed live Cryptosporidium and microsporidia such that morphology and staining were conserved for modified acid-fast and modified trichrome stains. A work flow analysis revealed significant time savings for batches of 10 or 30 O&P specimens in tubes with Alcorfix compared to the amount of time that it took to analyze the same number of specimens in tubes with PVA-formalin. The direct hands-on time savings with Mini Parasep tubes were 17 min and 41 s and 32 min and 1 s for batches of 10 and 30 specimens, respectively. Parasep tubes containing Alcorfix provide significant work flow advantages to laboratories that process medium to high volumes of O&P specimens by streamlining processing and converting to a single tube. These improvements in work flow, reduction of the amount of formalin used in the laboratory, and equivalent microscopy results are attractive advancements in O&P testing for North American

  14. Mechanical properties and cytocompatibility of oxygen-modified β-type Ti-Cr alloys for spinal fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huihong; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Cho, Ken; Narita, Kengo; Şen, Mustafa; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, various amounts of oxygen were added to Ti-10Cr (mass%) alloys. It is expected that a large changeable Young's modulus, caused by a deformation-induced ω-phase transformation, can be achieved in Ti-10Cr-O alloys by the appropriate oxygen addition. This "changeable Young's modulus" property can satisfy the otherwise conflicting requirements for use in spinal implant rods: high and low moduli are preferred by surgeons and patients, respectively. The influence of oxygen on the microstructures and mechanical properties of the alloys was examined, as well as the bending springback and cytocompatibility of the optimized alloy. Among the Ti-10Cr-O alloys, Ti-10Cr-0.2O (mass%) alloy shows the largest changeable Young's modulus following cold rolling for a constant reduction ratio. This is the result of two competing factors: increased apparent β-lattice stability and decreased amounts of athermal ω phase, both of which are caused by oxygen addition. The most favorable balance of these factors for the deformation-induced ω-phase transformation occurred at an oxygen concentration of 0.2mass%. Ti-10Cr-0.2O alloy not only exhibits high tensile strength and acceptable elongation, but also possesses a good combination of high bending strength, acceptable bending springback and great cytocompatibility. Therefore, Ti-10Cr-0.2O alloy is a potential material for use in spinal fixture devices. PMID:25449914

  15. Value Added: the Case for Point-of-View Camera use in Orthopedic Surgical Education

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Geb W.; Taylor, Leah; Liu, Xiaoxing; Anthony, Chris A.; Anderson, Donald D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Orthopedic surgical education is evolving as educators search for new ways to enhance surgical skills training. Orthopedic educators should seek new methods and technologies to augment and add value to real-time orthopedic surgical experience. This paper describes a protocol whereby we have started to capture and evaluate specific orthopedic milestone procedures with a GoPro® point-of-view video camera and a dedicated video reviewing website as a way of supplementing the current paradigm in surgical skills training. We report our experience regarding the details and feasibility of this protocol. Methods Upon identification of a patient undergoing surgical fixation of a hip or ankle fracture, an orthopedic resident places a GoPro® point-of-view camera on his or her forehead. All fluoroscopic images acquired during the case are saved and later incorporated into a video on the reviewing website. Surgical videos are uploaded to a secure server and are accessible for later review and assessment via a custom-built website. An electronic survey of resident participants was performed utilizing Qualtrics software. Results are reported using descriptive statistics. Results A total of 51 surgical videos involving 23 different residents have been captured to date. This includes 20 intertrochanteric hip fracture cases and 31 ankle fracture cases. The average duration of each surgical video was 1 hour and 16 minutes (range 40 minutes to 2 hours and 19 minutes). Of 24 orthopedic resident surgeons surveyed, 88% thought capturing a video portfolio of orthopedic milestones would benefit their education Conclusions There is a growing demand in orthopedic surgical education to extract more value from each surgical experience. While further work in development and refinement of such assessments is necessary, we feel that intraoperative video, particularly when captured and presented in a non-threatening, user friendly manner, can add significant value to the

  16. Moral Dilemmas in Pediatric Orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Mercuri, John J; Vigdorchik, Jonathan M; Otsuka, Norman Y

    2015-12-01

    All orthopedic surgeons face moral dilemmas on a regular basis; however, little has been written about the moral dilemmas that are encountered when providing orthopedic care to pediatric patients and their families. This article aims to provide surgeons with a better understanding of how bioethics and professionalism apply to the care of their pediatric patients. First, several foundational concepts of both bioethics and professionalism are summarized, and definitions are offered for 16 important terms within the disciplines. Next, some of the unique aspects of pediatric orthopedics as a subspecialty are reviewed before engaging in a discussion of 5 common moral dilemmas within the field. Those dilemmas include the following: (1) obtaining informed consent and assent for either surgery or research from pediatric patients and their families; (2) performing cosmetic surgery on pediatric patients; (3) caring for pediatric patients with cognitive or physical impairments; (4) caring for injured pediatric athletes; and (5) meeting the demand for pediatric orthopedic care in the United States. Pertinent considerations are reviewed for each of these 5 moral dilemmas, thereby better preparing surgeons for principled moral decision making in their own practices. Each of these dilemmas is inherently complex with few straightforward answers; however, orthopedic surgeons have an obligation to take the lead and better define these kinds of difficult issues within their field. The lives of pediatric patients and their families will be immeasurably improved as a result. PMID:26652336

  17. Medical photography: principles for orthopedics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Medical photography is used clinically for patient evaluation, treatment decisions, and scientific documentation. Although standards for medical photography exist in many branches of medicine, we have not encountered such criteria in publications in the area of orthopedics. Purpose This study aims to (1) assess the quality of medical images used in an orthopedic publication and (2) to propose standards for medical photography in this area. Methods Clinical photographs were reviewed from all issues of a journal published between the years 2008 and 2012. A quality of clinical images was developed based on the criteria published for the specialties of dermatology and cosmetic surgery. All images were reviewed on the appropriateness of background, patient preparation, and technique. Results In this study, only 44.9% of clinical images in an orthopedic publication adhered to the proposed conventions. Conclusions Standards have not been established for medical photography in orthopedics as in other specialty areas. Our results suggest that photographic clinical information in orthopedic publications may be limited by inadequate presentation. We propose that formal conventions for clinical images should be established. PMID:24708703

  18. Improved orthopedic arm joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dane, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    Joint permits smooth and easy movement of disabled arm and is smaller, lighter and less expensive than previous models. Device is interchangeable and may be used on either arm at the shoulder or at the elbow.

  19. [The beginnings of orthopedic surgery in Israel].

    PubMed

    Tauber, Chanan

    2013-08-01

    In early mandatory Israel, orthopedics was mainly conservative, The first modern orthopedic surgeon was Ernst Spira from Czechoslovakia who established an orthopedic service at the Beilinson Hospital in Petah Tikva and left in 1948 to establish the Orthopedic Department and the Rehabilitation Center in Tel Hashomer, which treated the War of Independence casualties including amputees and victims of spinal cord injuries. A second orthopedic department was opened in Tel Hashomer by Shmuel Weissman who left in 1961 to open the Orthopedic Department at the Ichilov hospital in Tel Aviv. Shmuel Weissman became the first Chairman of Orthopedic Surgery at the Tel Aviv University medical school. In 1955, Myer Makin opened a modern orthopedic department in the Hadassah Hospital in Jerusalem and the Alyn Hospital for crippled children. In 1951, Assaf Harofeh Hospital opened the Department of Orthopedic Surgery headed by Anatol Axer who specialized in the treatment and rehabilitation of polio patients. The majority of the second generation of orthopedic department directors was trained by these four surgeons. Major developments in the 1960s and 1970s were the introduction of the AO system revolutionizing fracture treatment from conservative to operative treatment, the advent of total hip and knee replacements, Harrington instrumentation in spinal surgery and arthroscopy were major advances in orthopedic patient care brought to Israel by the aforementioned second generation of orthopedic surgeons. Hand surgery became an independent subspecialty of orthopedics and was lead by the internationally renowned hand surgeon, Isidore Kessler. PMID:24167938

  20. Prevention of VTE in Orthopedic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Charles W.; Johanson, Norman A.; Curley, Catherine; Dahl, Ola E.; Schulman, Sam; Ortel, Thomas L.; Pauker, Stephen G.; Colwell, Clifford W.

    2012-01-01

    Background: VTE is a serious, but decreasing complication following major orthopedic surgery. This guideline focuses on optimal prophylaxis to reduce postoperative pulmonary embolism and DVT. Methods: The methods of this guideline follow those described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: In patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery, we recommend the use of one of the following rather than no antithrombotic prophylaxis: low-molecular-weight heparin; fondaparinux; dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban (total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty but not hip fracture surgery); low-dose unfractionated heparin; adjusted-dose vitamin K antagonist; aspirin (all Grade 1B); or an intermittent pneumatic compression device (IPCD) (Grade 1C) for a minimum of 10 to 14 days. We suggest the use of low-molecular-weight heparin in preference to the other agents we have recommended as alternatives (Grade 2C/2B), and in patients receiving pharmacologic prophylaxis, we suggest adding an IPCD during the hospital stay (Grade 2C). We suggest extending thromboprophylaxis for up to 35 days (Grade 2B). In patients at increased bleeding risk, we suggest an IPCD or no prophylaxis (Grade 2C). In patients who decline injections, we recommend using apixaban or dabigatran (all Grade 1B). We suggest against using inferior vena cava filter placement for primary prevention in patients with contraindications to both pharmacologic and mechanical thromboprophylaxis (Grade 2C). We recommend against Doppler (or duplex) ultrasonography screening before hospital discharge (Grade 1B). For patients with isolated lower-extremity injuries requiring leg immobilization, we suggest no thromboprophylaxis (Grade 2B). For patients undergoing knee arthroscopy without a history

  1. Growth factors in orthopedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zaharia, C; Despa, N; Simionescu, M; Jinga, V; Fleseriu, I

    2010-01-01

    Growth factors have represented an essential issue of interest for the researchers and clinicians in orthopedics and trauma over the last 40 years. In the last 10 to 15 years, the advances registered in this field have permitted the identification of the most active cellular and humoral factors as well as the improvement of their use in the orthopedic and trauma surgery. Their domain of application has been continuously enlarged and the results have been visible from the beginning. The authors present their appreciation on the actual state of this subject as well as their experience with results and related conclusions. PMID:20302195

  2. Novel posterior fixation keratoprosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Emmanuel

    1992-08-01

    The keratoprosthesis is the last solution for corneally blind patients that cannot benefit from corneal transplants. Keratoprostheses that have been designed to be affixed anteriorly usually necessitate multi-step surgical procedures and are continuously subjected to the extrusion forces generated by the positive intraocular pressure; therefore, clinical results in patients prove inconsistent. We proposed a novel keratoprosthesis concept that utilizes posterior corneal fixation which `a priori' minimizes the risk of aqueous leakage and expulsion. This prosthesis is implanted in a single procedure thereby reducing the number of surgical complications normally associated with anterior fixation devices. In addition, its novel design makes this keratoprosthesis implantable in phakic eyes. With an average follow-up of 13 months (range 3 to 25 months), our results on 21 cases are encouraging. Half of the keratoprostheses were implanted in severe burn cases, with the remainder in cases of pseudo- pemphigus. Good visual results and cosmetic appearance were obtained in 14 of 21 eyes.

  3. Internal fixation: a historical review.

    PubMed

    Greenhagen, Robert M; Johnson, Adam R; Joseph, Alison

    2011-08-01

    Internal fixation has become a pillar of surgical specialties, yet the evolution of these devices has been relatively short. The first known description of medical management of a fracture was found in the Edwin Smith Papyrus of Ancient Egypt (circa 2600 bc). The first description of internal fixation in the medical literature was in the 18th century. The advancement of techniques and technology over the last 150 years has helped to preserve both life and function. The pace of advancement continues to accelerate as surgeons continue to seek new technology for osseous fixation. The authors present a thorough review of the history of internal fixation and the transformation into a multibillion dollar industry. PMID:21944395

  4. Suspensory Anterior Tibial Fixation in the Anatomic Transtibial Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Elazab, Ashraf; Lee, Yong Seuk; Kang, Seo Goo

    2016-01-01

    The transtibial technique is the most relevant among many surgical techniques for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and many types of fixation devices are used for tibial fixation according to the technique and the length of the graft. However, bone density in the fixation areas should be taken into consideration when choosing the fixation device to achieve rigid and stable fixation. However, density is not a substantial issue for anteromedial cortical fixation using a cortical suspension device. We describe tibial fixation with a TightRope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL), which is a cortical suspension device, in anatomic transtibial posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. PMID:27073781

  5. Osteoanabolic Implant Materials for Orthopedic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yun-Fei; Li, Rachel W; Nakai, Masaaki; Majumdar, Trina; Zhang, Dong-Hai; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Birbilis, Nick; Smith, Paul N; Chen, Xiao-Bo

    2016-07-01

    Osteoporosis is becoming more prevalent due to the aging demographics of many populations. Osteoporotic bone is more prone to fracture than normal bone, and current orthopedic implant materials are not ideal for the osteoporotic cases. A newly developed strontium phosphate (SrPO4 ) coating is reported herein, and applied to Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr (wt%), TNTZ, an implant material with a comparative Young's modulus to that of natural bone. The SrPO4 coating is anticipated to modulate the activity of osteoblast (OB) and osteoclast (OC) cells, in order to promote bone formation. TNTZ, a material with excellent biocompatibility and high bioinertness is pretreated in a concentrated alkaline solution under hydrothermal conditions, followed by a hydrothermal coating growth process to achieve complete SrPO4 surface coverage with high bonding strength. Owing to the release of Sr ions from the SrPO4 coating and its unique surface topography, OB cells demonstrate increased proliferation and differentiation, while the cellular responses of OC are suppressed, compared to the control case, i.e., bare TNTZ. This TNTZ implant with a near physiologic Young's modulus and a functional SrPO4 coating provides a new direction in the design and manufacture of implantable devices used in the management of orthopedic conditions in osteoporotic individuals. PMID:27113724

  6. Orthopedic Management of Spina Bifida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Jeffrey D.; Segal, Lee S.

    2010-01-01

    The management of orthopedic problems in spina bifida has seen a dramatic change over the past 10 years. The negative effects of spasticity, poor balance, and the tethered cord syndrome on ambulatory function are better appreciated. There is less emphasis on the hip radiograph and more emphasis on the function of the knee and the prevention of…

  7. The use of a circular external skeletal fixation device for the management of long bone osteotomies in large ruminants: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Aithal, H P; Singh, G R; Hoque, M; Maiti, S K; Kinjavdekar, P; Pawde, A M; Setia, H C

    2004-08-01

    The study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of a simple, inexpensive model of circular external fixator (CEF) for use in large ruminants. A simple model of CEF frames consisting of four full rings (13-19 cm diameter, 4 cm wide and 4 mm thick with 18-24 holes) connected by threaded rods (8 mm diameter, 10-15 cm long) and nuts was developed using mild (low carbon) steel and were nickel-plated. In the first phase of the study, three male cow calves were utilized to study the feasibility of application of the fixators in the metatarsus, tibia and radius, in reference of adaptation and tolerance by animals. In the second phase, the fixators were tested in osteotomized bones. Six bull calves of 1.5-2 years of age weighing about 200-250 kg were utilized for this purpose. After preparing the area for aseptic surgery, under xylazine (at 0.1 mg/kg, i.m.)-ketamine (i.v. till effect) general anaesthesia, the test bone (metatarsus, radius and tibia in two animals each) was approached through the medial surface and an osteotomy was created with a saw and chisel at the mid-diaphysis. The pre-constructed 4-ring CEF was mounted on the limb around the test bone in such a way that it formed a cylinder with the axis of the limb at the centre. Each ring was then fixed to the bone with a pair of beaded wires (316 SS) of 3.5 mm diameter. During the post-operative period, the animals were observed for any change in behaviour, tolerance of the fixators, the weight bearing on the test limb, the status of the fixator, and the level of reduction of the osteotomy, alignment and healing at different intervals. The fixation of CEF was easier in the metatarsus and radius than in the tibia. The inner ring diameters found adequate for metatarsus, radius and tibia were 13-15 cm, 15-17 cm and 17-19 cm, respectively. The fixators applied to different bones were well-tolerated, and the animals could lay down, stand and walk freely with the fixator without any problems. All the animals showed

  8. Computer-Assisted Orthopedic Surgery: Current State and Future Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guoyan; Nolte, Lutz P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduced about two decades ago, computer-assisted orthopedic surgery (CAOS) has emerged as a new and independent area, due to the importance of treatment of musculoskeletal diseases in orthopedics and traumatology, increasing availability of different imaging modalities, and advances in analytics and navigation tools. The aim of this paper is to present the basic elements of CAOS devices and to review state-of-the-art examples of different imaging modalities used to create the virtual representations, of different position tracking devices for navigation systems, of different surgical robots, of different methods for registration and referencing, and of CAOS modules that have been realized for different surgical procedures. Future perspectives will also be outlined. PMID:26779486

  9. Computer-Assisted Orthopedic Surgery: Current State and Future Perspective.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoyan; Nolte, Lutz P

    2015-01-01

    Introduced about two decades ago, computer-assisted orthopedic surgery (CAOS) has emerged as a new and independent area, due to the importance of treatment of musculoskeletal diseases in orthopedics and traumatology, increasing availability of different imaging modalities, and advances in analytics and navigation tools. The aim of this paper is to present the basic elements of CAOS devices and to review state-of-the-art examples of different imaging modalities used to create the virtual representations, of different position tracking devices for navigation systems, of different surgical robots, of different methods for registration and referencing, and of CAOS modules that have been realized for different surgical procedures. Future perspectives will also be outlined. PMID:26779486

  10. Brandon Research, Inc. Orthopedic Implant Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, W.R.

    1999-04-22

    The project was a joint research effort between the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Kansas City Plant (KCP) and Brandon Research, Inc. to develop ways to improve implants used for orthopedic surgery for joint replacement. The primary product produced by this study is design information, which may be used to develop implants that will improve long-term fixation and durability in the host bone environment.

  11. The Application of Virtual Planning and Navigation Devices for Mandible Reconstruction and Immediate Dental Implantation.

    PubMed

    Rahimov, Chingiz R; Farzaliyev, Ismayil M; Fathi, Hamid Reza; Davudov, Mahammad M; Aliyev, Anar; Hasanov, Emin

    2016-06-01

    Routine reconstruction of subtotal defects of the mandible and orthopedic rehabilitation supported by dental implants is achieved by means of detailed planning and lasts over a year. This article shows the outcomes of single-stage surgical treatment and immediate orthopedic rehabilitation performed with the help of preoperative virtual computer simulation. 3D investigation of pathological and donor sites, virtual simulation of tumor resection, positioning of the dental implants into fibula, virtual flap bending and transfer, virtual bending of fixing reconstruction plates, and fabrication of navigation templates and bridge prosthesis supported by dental implants were done preoperatively. The surgery included tumor resection, insertion of dental implants into fibula, elevation of fibula osteocutaneous free flap, rigid fixation within recipient site, and immediate loading by bridge orthopedic device. On 10-month follow-up, functional and esthetic results were asses as reasonable. Radiography showed dental implants to be integrated and positioned appropriately. We found that successful rehabilitation of the patients with extensive defects of the jaws could be achieved by ablative tumor resection, dental implants insertion prior to flap elevation guided by navigation templates, further osteotomy, modeling of the flap based on navigation template, flap transfer, and rigid fixation within recipient site by prebended plates, with application of prefabricated prosthesis. PMID:27162568

  12. Implant materials for fracture fixation: a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Disegi, J A; Wyss, H

    1989-01-01

    The optimum management of traumatic skeletal fractures may involve the installation of high quality surgical implants by a skilled orthopedic surgeon. Satisfactory clinical results are very dependent on the ability to maintain stable fracture fixation. Well designed contemporary implants rely on precise control of material composition and properties to achieve a well tolerated level of biological response. Metallic materials, such as 316L stainless steel, pure titanium, and titanium alloys, demonstrate an acceptable combination of strength, ductility, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. Polymers, composites, and biodegradable materials may offer selected opportunities for fracture fixation. An understanding of relevant clinical factors is essential to evaluate potential applications for advanced materials. PMID:2915951

  13. Latarjet Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Alvi, Hasham M.; Monroe, Emily J.; Muriuki, Muturi; Verma, Rajat N.; Marra, Guido; Saltzman, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Attritional bone loss in patients with recurrent anterior instability has successfully been treated with a bone block procedure such as the Latarjet. It has not been previously demonstrated whether cortical or cancellous screws are superior when used for this procedure. Purpose: To assess the strength of stainless steel cortical screws versus stainless steel cannulated cancellous screws in the Latarjet procedure. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Ten fresh-frozen matched-pair shoulder specimens were randomized into 2 separate fixation groups: (1) 3.5-mm stainless steel cortical screws and (2) 4.0-mm stainless steel partially threaded cannulated cancellous screws. Shoulder specimens were dissected free of all soft tissue and a 25% glenoid defect was created. The coracoid process was osteomized, placed at the site of the glenoid defect, and fixed in place with 2 parallel screws. Results: All 10 specimens failed by screw cutout. Nine of 10 specimens failed by progressive displacement with an increased number of cycles. One specimen in the 4.0-mm screw group failed by catastrophic failure on initiation of the testing protocol. The 3.5-mm screws had a mean of 274 cycles (SD, ±171 cycles; range, 10-443 cycles) to failure. The 4.0-mm screws had a mean of 135 cycles (SD, ±141 cycles; range, 0-284 cycles) to failure. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 types of screws for cycles required to cause failure (P = .144). Conclusion: There was no statistically significant difference in energy or cycles to failure when comparing the stainless steel cortical screws versus partially threaded cannulated cancellous screws. Clinical Relevance: Latarjet may be performed using cortical or cancellous screws without a clear advantage of either option. PMID:27158630

  14. Vascular Injury in Orthopedic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Panagopoulos, George N; Kokkalis, Zinon T; Koulouvaris, Panayiotis; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Igoumenou, Vasilios; Mantas, George; Moulakakis, Konstantinos G; Sfyroeras, George S; Lazaris, Andreas; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2016-07-01

    Vascular injury in orthopedic trauma is challenging. The risk to life and limb can be high, and clinical signs initially can be subtle. Recognition and management should be a critical skill for every orthopedic surgeon. There are 5 types of vascular injury: intimal injury (flaps, disruptions, or subintimal/intramural hematomas), complete wall defects with pseudoaneurysms or hemorrhage, complete transections with hemorrhage or occlusion, arteriovenous fistulas, and spasm. Intimal defects and subintimal hematomas with possible secondary occlusion are most commonly associated with blunt trauma, whereas wall defects, complete transections, and arteriovenous fistulas usually occur with penetrating trauma. Spasm can occur after either blunt or penetrating trauma to an extremity and is more common in young patients. Clinical presentation of vascular injury may not be straightforward. Physical examination can be misleading or initially unimpressive; a normal pulse examination may be present in 5% to 15% of patients with vascular injury. Detection and treatment of vascular injuries should take place within the context of the overall resuscitation of the patient according to the established principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols. Advances in the field, made mostly during times of war, have made limb salvage the rule rather than the exception. Teamwork, familiarity with the often subtle signs of vascular injuries, a high index of suspicion, effective communication, appropriate use of imaging modalities, sound knowledge of relevant technique, and sequence of surgical repairs are among the essential factors that will lead to a successful outcome. This article provides a comprehensive literature review on a subject that generates significant controversy and confusion among clinicians involved in the care of trauma patients. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):249-259.]. PMID:27322172

  15. Thromboembolic Disease After Orthopedic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Paul S; Jahangir, A Alex

    2016-04-01

    Orthopedic trauma results in systemic physiologic changes that predispose patients to venous thromboembolism (VTE). In the absence of prophylaxis, VTE incidence may be as high as 60%. Mechanical and pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis are effective in decreasing rates of VTE. Combined mechanical and pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis is more efficacious for decreasing VTE incidence than either regimen independently. If pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis is contraindicated, mechanical prophylaxis should be used. Patients with isolated lower extremity fractures who are ambulatory, or those with isolated upper extremity trauma, do not require pharmacologic prophylaxis in the absence of other VTE risk factors. PMID:26772942

  16. Orthopedics

    SciTech Connect

    Stoker, D.J.; Tilley, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    This book presents a method of assessing a variety of entities with pathologic impact on the skeleton. The book covers 97 skeletal abnormalities or diseases. Each case is presented as a question (consisting of a radiography followed by a short clinical history and a query such as What is the abnormality '') followed by an answer (consisting of additional radiographs, an explanation of the radiographic abnormality and causative disease process, and one or two references).

  17. Orthopedic surgery in ancient Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-01-01

    Background — Ancient Egypt might be considered the cradle of medicine. The modern literature is, however, sometimes rather too enthusiastic regarding the procedures that are attributed an Egyptian origin. I briefly present and analyze the claims regarding orthopedic surgery in Egypt, what was actually done by the Egyptians, and what may have been incorrectly ascribed to them. Methods — I reviewed the original sources and also the modern literature regarding surgery in ancient Egypt, concentrating especially on orthopedic surgery. Results — As is well known, both literary sources and the archaeological/osteological material bear witness to treatment of various fractures. The Egyptian painting, often claimed to depict the reduction of a dislocated shoulder according to Kocher’s method, is, however, open to interpretation. Therapeutic amputations are never depicted or mentioned in the literary sources, while the specimens suggested to demonstrate such amputations are not convincing. Interpretation — The ancient Egyptians certainly treated fractures of various kinds, and with varying degrees of success. Concerning the reductions of dislocated joints and therapeutic amputations, there is no clear evidence for the existence of such procedures. It would, however, be surprising if dislocations were not treated, even though they have not left traces in the surviving sources. Concerning amputations, the general level of Egyptian surgery makes it unlikely that limb amputations were done, even if they may possibly have been performed under extraordinary circumstances. PMID:25140982

  18. Strategies for achieving orthopedic service line success.

    PubMed

    Lang, Stacey; Powers, Kristi

    2013-12-01

    Healthcare finance leaders can work with orthopedic surgeons to support better outcomes, clinically and financially, by: Establishing innovative partnerships among hospital leaders, orthopedic surgeons, and implant vendors. Developing and enforcing expectations around contracting and vendor behavior. Establishing a forum for open communication. Building a bundled payment structure. Finding ways to differentiate from the competition. PMID:24380256

  19. Using Aerospace Technology To Design Orthopedic Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Mraz, P. J.; Davy, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    Technology originally developed to optimize designs of composite-material aerospace structural components used to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants. Development effort focused on designing knee implants, long-term goal to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants in general.

  20. Sawbones laboratory in orthopedic surgical training

    PubMed Central

    Hetaimish, Bandar M.

    2016-01-01

    Sawbones are artificial bones designed to simulate the bone architecture, as well as the bone’s physical properties. The incorporation of sawbones simulation laboratories in many orthopedic training programs has provided the residents with flexibility in learning and scheduling that align with their working hour limitations. This review paper deliberates the organization of sawbones simulation in orthopedic surgical training to enhance trainee’s future learning. In addition, it explores the implications of sawbones simulation in orthopedic surgical teaching and evaluation. It scrutinizes the suitability of practicing on sawbones at the simulation laboratory to improve orthopedic trainee’s learning. This will be followed with recommendations for future enhancement of sawbones simulation-based learning in orthopedic surgical training. PMID:27052276

  1. [Tranexamic acid in orthopedic surgery].

    PubMed

    Aguilera-Roig, X; Jordán-Sales, M; Natera-Cisneros, L; Monllau-García, J C; Martínez-Zapata, M J

    2014-01-01

    Perioperative bleeding may require blood transfusions, which are sometimes not without complications and risks, with the subsequent increase in health care costs. Among other prevention methods, treatment with tranexamic acid (ATX) has shown to be effective in reducing surgical blood loss, especially in the immediate postoperative period. In this regard, studies evaluating ATX in orthopedic surgery show that it is effective and safe when administered intravenously or intra-articularly. The usual evaluated intravenous doses range between 10mg/Kg and 20mg/kg or a fixed dose of 1g to 2g; while intra-articularly, it varies between 250 mg and 3g. ATX, as an anti-fibrinolytic has a potential thrombotic effect, thus it is contraindicated in those patients at risk or with a history of thrombosis. Its topical administration may be safer, but studies are needed to confirm this. PMID:24126146

  2. [Bone grafts in orthopedic surgery].

    PubMed

    Zárate-Kalfópulos, Barón; Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro

    2006-01-01

    In orthopedic surgery the demand for the use of bone grafts increases daily because of the increasing quantity and complexity of surgical procedures. At present, the gold standard is the autologous bone graft but the failure rate, morbidity of the donor site and limited availability have stimulated a proliferation for finding materials that work as bone graft substitutes. In order to have good success, we must know the different properties of these choices and the environment where the graft is going to be used. As bone graft substitutes and growth factors become clinical realities, a new gold standard will be defined. Tissue engineering and gene therapy techniques have the objective to create an optimum bone graft substitute with a combination of substances with properties of osteconduction, osteogenesis and osteoinduction. PMID:16875525

  3. A robot-assisted orthopedic telesurgery system.

    PubMed

    Kong, M; Du, Z; Sun, L; Fu, L; Jia, Z; Wu, D

    2005-01-01

    A robot-assisted orthopedic telesurgery system, named HIT-RAOTS, has been developed according to Chinese conventional operation method. Its main function includes obtaining images with information of position and orientation of fracture, providing fracture information for doctors, assisting the doctors to complete the reposition of fracture and locking operation of intramedullary nail. In this system, a 6-dof force-reflecting master device, with a pantographic parallelogram mechanisms driven by harmonic DC servomotors, is used to control the slave manipulator movement and to translate the force from the operating room to the surgeon console; A slave robot system integrated a 6-dof force sensor, with a parallel manipulator actuated by six AC servomotors, is applied for the accurate repositioning; A virtual simulation system and human-machine interface are also developed. PI controller based on local network is used to realize the teleoperation. Only little irradiation is issued during the reposition. It can assist surgeons to perform bone-setting more safely by reducing irradiation damage to both surgeries and patients, more easily by releasing the surgeons from the heavy operation and more perfect by improving accuracy of reposition. PMID:17282120

  4. Physical modification of polyetheretherketone for orthopedic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Ya-Wei; Zhang, Li-Nan; Hou, Zeng-Tao; Ye, Xin; Gu, Hong-Sheng; Yan, Guo-Ping; Shang, Peng

    2014-12-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is regarded as one of the most potential candidates for replacing current implant applications. To obtain good bone-implant interfaces, many modification methods have been developed to enable PEEK and PEEK-based composites from bio-inert to bioactive. Among them, physical methods have aroused significant attention and been widely used to modify PEEK for orthopedic implants. This review summarizes current physical modification techniques of PEEK for orthopedic applications, which include composite strategies, surface coating methods and irradiation treatments. The positive consequences of those modification methods will encourage continuing investigations and stimulate the wide range of applications of PEEK-based implants in orthopedics.

  5. Orthopedic Prosthetic Infections: Plastic Surgery Management.

    PubMed

    Meaike, Jesse D; Kaufman, Matthew G; Izaddoost, Shayan A

    2016-05-01

    Orthopedic prosthetic infections are potentially devastating complications. Plastic surgeons are frequently consulted to aid in the management of the soft tissue defects that are created by these infections. A review of the existing literature was performed to identify established treatment methods for soft tissue coverage of orthopedic hardware infections for a variety of anatomic locations. The following treatment guidelines and soft tissue reconstructive options were identified as viable options for the management of exposed or infected orthopedic hardware. This review provides descriptions of the various soft tissue reconstructive options available as well as adjunctive treatment methods. PMID:27152099

  6. An Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Technique With 4-Strand Semitendinosus Grafts, Using Outside-In Tibial Tunnel Drilling and Suspensory Fixation Devices.

    PubMed

    Colombet, Philippe; Graveleau, Nicolas

    2015-10-01

    We describe an anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a 4-strand semitendinosus graft fixed with 2 Pullup adjustable suspensory fixation systems (SBM, Lourdes, France). Outside-in full tibial tunnel drilling represents a secure option for length management of the graft. The preferred graft choice is a 4-strand semitendinosus autologous graft. A special technique is used to stitch the graft with a figure-of-8 stitch to load the 4 strands. The Pullup adjustable loop is equipped with 2 buttons of different sizes: a small button for the standard Pullup system on the femoral side and a large button for the Pullup XL system on the tibial side. With this method, graft tension is equally distributed among the 4 strands and the graft cannot bottom out in the tibial tunnel in case of inadequate graft length. PMID:26697313

  7. An Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Technique With 4-Strand Semitendinosus Grafts, Using Outside-In Tibial Tunnel Drilling and Suspensory Fixation Devices

    PubMed Central

    Colombet, Philippe; Graveleau, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We describe an anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a 4-strand semitendinosus graft fixed with 2 Pullup adjustable suspensory fixation systems (SBM, Lourdes, France). Outside-in full tibial tunnel drilling represents a secure option for length management of the graft. The preferred graft choice is a 4-strand semitendinosus autologous graft. A special technique is used to stitch the graft with a figure-of-8 stitch to load the 4 strands. The Pullup adjustable loop is equipped with 2 buttons of different sizes: a small button for the standard Pullup system on the femoral side and a large button for the Pullup XL system on the tibial side. With this method, graft tension is equally distributed among the 4 strands and the graft cannot bottom out in the tibial tunnel in case of inadequate graft length. PMID:26697313

  8. 3D scaffold alters cellular response to graphene in a polymer composite for orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sachin; Azam, Dilkash; Raj, Shammy; Kolanthai, Elayaraja; Vasu, K S; Sood, A K; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2016-05-01

    Graphene-based polymer nanocomposites are being studied for biomedical applications. Polymer nanocomposites can be processed differently to generate planar two-dimensional (2D) substrates and porous three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds. The objective of this work was to investigate potential differences in biological response to graphene in polymer composites in the form of 2D substrates and 3D scaffolds. Polycaprolactone (PCL) nanocomposites were prepared by incorporating 1% of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO). GO increased modulus and strength of PCL by 44 and 22% respectively, whereas RGO increased modulus and strength by 22 and 16%, respectively. RGO increased the water contact angle of PCL from 81° to 87° whereas GO decreased it to 77°. In 2D, osteoblast proliferated 15% more on GO composites than on PCL whereas RGO composite showed 17% decrease in cell proliferation, which may be attributed to differences in water wettability. In 3D, initial cell proliferation was markedly retarded in both GO (36% lower) and RGO (55% lower) composites owing to increased roughness due to the presence of the protruding nanoparticles. Cells organized into aggregates in 3D in contrast to spread and randomly distributed cells on 2D discs due to the macro-porous architecture of the scaffolds. Increased cell-cell contact and altered cellular morphology led to significantly higher mineralization in 3D. This study demonstrates that the cellular response to nanoparticles in composites can change markedly by varying the processing route and has implications for designing orthopedic implants such as resorbable fracture fixation devices and tissue scaffolds using such nanocomposites. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 732-749, 2016. PMID:26482196

  9. Presurgical Dentofacial Orthopedic Management of the Cleft Patient.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin S; Henry, Byron T; Scott, Michelle A

    2016-05-01

    Over the last decade, presurgical orthopedic molding for the patient with cleft lip and palate has become much more common; it is even reasonable to assume it may be the standard of care for those wide unilateral and bilateral clefts with substantial dentofacial deformities. In 2013, there was a comparative study of nasoalveolar molding methods, comparing the Grayson-NAM device and DynaCleft. The results showed the 2 to be equivocal with both methods significantly reducing the cleft width and improving the nasal asymmetry. PMID:27150304

  10. Antimicrobial technology in orthopedic and spinal implants.

    PubMed

    Eltorai, Adam Em; Haglin, Jack; Perera, Sudheesha; Brea, Bielinsky A; Ruttiman, Roy; Garcia, Dioscaris R; Born, Christopher T; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-06-18

    Infections can hinder orthopedic implant function and retention. Current implant-based antimicrobial strategies largely utilize coating-based approaches in order to reduce biofilm formation and bacterial adhesion. Several emerging antimicrobial technologies that integrate a multidisciplinary combination of drug delivery systems, material science, immunology, and polymer chemistry are in development and early clinical use. This review outlines orthopedic implant antimicrobial technology, its current applications and supporting evidence, and clinically promising future directions. PMID:27335811

  11. Antimicrobial technology in orthopedic and spinal implants

    PubMed Central

    Eltorai, Adam EM; Haglin, Jack; Perera, Sudheesha; Brea, Bielinsky A; Ruttiman, Roy; Garcia, Dioscaris R; Born, Christopher T; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    Infections can hinder orthopedic implant function and retention. Current implant-based antimicrobial strategies largely utilize coating-based approaches in order to reduce biofilm formation and bacterial adhesion. Several emerging antimicrobial technologies that integrate a multidisciplinary combination of drug delivery systems, material science, immunology, and polymer chemistry are in development and early clinical use. This review outlines orthopedic implant antimicrobial technology, its current applications and supporting evidence, and clinically promising future directions. PMID:27335811

  12. Orthopedic issues in vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Samantha A; Sorger, Joel

    2014-08-01

    Vascular malformations impact the musculoskeletal system depending on the tissue involved (skin, subcutis, muscle, cartilage, or bone), the extent of involvement, and the type of anomalous vessels (arteries, capillaries, veins, or lymphatics). These malformations can cause a multitude of musculoskeletal problems for the patient and their Orthopedic Surgeon to manage. Leg-length discrepancy, intra-articular involvement, muscular lesions, and primary or secondary scoliosis are just to name a few. All of these problems can cause pain, deformity, and a range of functional limitations. Surgical and nonsurgical treatment plans both have a role in the care of these patients. Patients with vascular malformations may also suffer from life-threatening cardiovascular and hematologic abnormalities. For those patients who undergo surgery, thromboembolic risk is elevated, wound breakdown and infection are much more common, and bleeding risk continues well into the postoperative course. Because of the complex nature of these disorders, the clinician must have a full understanding of the types of lesions, their natural history, appropriate diagnostic studies, associated medical problems, indications for treatment, and all the treatment options. For severe malformations, especially syndromes such as CLOVES and Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, interdisciplinary team management is essential for the best outcomes. PMID:25241103

  13. Transpedicular vertebral body augmentation reinforced with pedicle screw fixation in fresh traumatic A2 and A3 lumbar fractures: comparison between two devices and two bone cements.

    PubMed

    Korovessis, Panagiotis; Vardakastanis, Konstantinos; Repantis, Thomas; Vitsas, Vasilios

    2014-07-01

    This retrospective study compares efficacy and safety of balloon kyphoplasty (BK) with calcium phosphate (Group A) versus KIVA implant with PMMA (Group B) reinforced with three vertebrae pedicle screw constructs for A2 and A3 single fresh non-osteoporotic lumbar (L1-L4) fractures in 38 consecutive age- and diagnosis-matched patient populations. Extracanal leakage of both low-viscosity PMMA and calcium phosphate (CP) as well as the following roentgenographic parameters: segmental kyphosis (SKA), anterior (AVBHr) and posterior (PVBHr) vertebral body height ratio, spinal canal encroachment (SCE) clearance, and functional outcome measures: VAS and SF-36, were recorded and compared between the two groups. All patients in both groups were followed for a minimum 26 (Group A) and 25 (Group B) months. Extracanal CP and PMMA leakage was observed in four (18 %) and three (15 %) vertebrae/patients of group A and B, respectively. Hybrid fixation improved AVBHr, SKA, SCE, but PVBHr only in group B. VAS and SF-36 improved postoperatively in the patients of both groups. Short-segment construct with the novel KIVA implant restored better than BK-fractured lumbar vertebral body, but this had no impact in functional outcome. Since there was no leakage difference between PMMA and calcium phosphate and no short-term adverse related to PMMA use were observed, we advice the use of PMMA in fresh traumatic lumbar fractures. PMID:23982115

  14. Mesh fixation alternatives in laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Muysoms, Filip E; Novik, Bengt; Kyle-Leinhase, Iris; Berrevoet, Frederik

    2012-12-01

    Since the introduction of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair, there has been an ongoing dispute over the optimal method of fixating the mesh against the abdominal wall. In general, one could say that the more penetrating the fixation used, the stronger the fixation, but at the cost of increased acute postoperative pain. The occurrence of chronic pain in some patients has led to the search for less permanent penetrating fixation, but without risking a less stable mesh fixation and increased recurrences due to shift or shrinkage of the mesh. Avoiding transfascial sutures by using a double crown of staples has been proposed and recently absorbable fixation devices have been developed. Some surgeons have proposed fixation with glue to reduce the number of staples, or even eliminate them entirely. The continuously increasing multitude of marketed meshes and fixating devices leads to unlimited options in mesh fixation combination and geometry. Therefore, we will never be able to get a clear view on the benefits and pitfalls of every specific combination. Clearance of the anterior abdominal wall from peritoneal fatty tissue and correct positioning of the mesh with ample overlap of the hernia defect are possibly as important as the choice of mesh and fixation. Other topics that are involved in successful outcomes but not addressed in this article are adequate training in the procedure, appropriate selection of patients, and careful adhesiolysis to minimize accidental visceral injuries. PMID:23225589

  15. Klebsiella pneumoniae carrying blaNDM-1 gene in orthopedic practice

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Varsha; Bansal, Neha; Gupta, Ravi; Chander, Jagdish

    2014-01-01

    Emergence and spread of carbapenemases in Enterobacteriaceae is a cause of concern worldwide, the latest threat being New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM-1). This report is of an orthopedic case with fracture femur managed with internal fixation and bone grafting, who subsequently developed secondary infection with Klebsiella pneumoniae harboring blaNDM-1 gene. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of imipenem was ≥8 μg/ml by E-test, suggestive of carbapenemase production. Phenotypic and further genotypic detection confirmed the presence of blaNDM-1 gene. The isolate remained susceptible only to tigecycline, colistin, and polymyxin B. PMID:25298566

  16. Biofilms in periprosthetic orthopedic infections

    PubMed Central

    McConoughey, Stephen J; Howlin, Rob; Granger, Jeff F; Manring, Maurice M; Calhoun, Jason H; Shirtlif, Mark; Kathju, Sandeep; Stoodley, Paul

    2015-01-01

    As the number of total joint arthroplasty and internal fixation procedures continues to rise, the threat of infection following surgery has significant clinical implications. These infections may have highly morbid consequences to patients, who often endure additional surgeries and lengthy exposures to systemic antibiotics, neither of which are guaranteed to resolve the infection. Of particular concern is the threat of bacterial biofilm development, since biofilm-mediated infections are difficult to diagnose and effective treatments are lacking. Developing therapeutic strategies have targeted mechanisms of biofilm formation and the means by which these bacteria communicate with each other to take on specialized roles such as persister cells within the biofilm. In addition, prevention of infection through novel coatings for prostheses and the local delivery of high concentrations of antibiotics by absorbable carriers has shown promise in laboratory and animal studies. Biofilm development, especially in an arthoplasty environment, and future diagnostic and treatment options are discussed. PMID:25302955

  17. 21 CFR 872.4880 - Intraosseous fixation screw or wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. 872.4880 Section 872.4880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES.... (a) Identification. An intraosseous fixation screw or wire is a metal device intended to be...

  18. Biological Strategies for Improved Osseointegration and Osteoinduction of Porous Metal Orthopedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Riester, Scott M.; Bonin, Carolina A.; Kremers, Hilal Maradit; Dudakovic, Amel; Kakar, Sanjeev; Cohen, Robert C.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    The biological interface between an orthopedic implant and the surrounding host tissue may have a dramatic effect upon clinical outcome. Desired effects include bony ingrowth (osseointegration), stimulation of osteogenesis (osteoinduction), increased vascularization, and improved mechanical stability. Implant loosening, fibrous encapsulation, corrosion, infection, and inflammation, as well as physical mismatch may have deleterious clinical effects. This is particularly true of implants used in the reconstruction of load-bearing synovial joints such as the knee, hip, and the shoulder. The surfaces of orthopedic implants have evolved from solid-smooth to roughened-coarse and most recently, to porous in an effort to create a three-dimensional architecture for bone apposition and osseointegration. Total joint surgeries are increasingly performed in younger individuals with a longer life expectancy, and therefore, the postimplantation lifespan of devices must increase commensurately. This review discusses advancements in biomaterials science and cell-based therapies that may further improve orthopedic success rates. We focus on material and biological properties of orthopedic implants fabricated from porous metal and highlight some relevant developments in stem-cell research. We posit that the ideal primary and revision orthopedic load-bearing metal implants are highly porous and may be chemically modified to induce stem cell growth and osteogenic differentiation, while minimizing inflammation and infection. We conclude that integration of new biological, chemical, and mechanical methods is likely to yield more effective strategies to control and modify the implant–bone interface and thereby improve long-term clinical outcomes. PMID:25348836

  19. Fixation: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Fixation and regression were considered complementary by Freud. You tend to regress to a point of fixation. They are both opposed to progression. In the general area, Anna Freud has written (The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defence. London: Hogarth and the Psycho-Analytic Institute, 1937), Sears has evaluated (Survey of Objective Studies of…

  20. Nanosurfaces and nanostructures for artificial orthopedic implants.

    PubMed

    Streicher, Robert M; Schmidt, Martin; Fiorito, Silvana

    2007-12-01

    Nanomaterials and structures, such as nanoparticles, nanofibers, nanosurfaces, nanocoatings, nanoscaffolds and nanocomposites, are considered for various applications in orthopedics and traumatology. This review looks at proposed nanotechnology inspired applications for implants from the perspective of the orthopedic industry. Investigations support consistently the theory that most nanomaterials in various physical forms are able to enhance the cell response selectively for biological tissue integration or increase the strength and wear resistance of current orthopedic materials. At this stage, most of the studies are at the laboratory scale or in early in vivo testing. Significant basic and applied research and development is needed to realize their full clinical potential and biological, manufacturing, economic and regulatory issues have to be addressed. Nevertheless, a crucial factor for success is well-coordinated multimethod and multidiscipline teamwork with profound industrial and medical expertise. PMID:18095851

  1. Strontium-impregnated bioabsorbable composite for osteoporotic fracture fixation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chang-Chin; Kuo, Chih-Lin; Fan, Fang-Yu; Yang, Kai-Chiang

    2015-10-01

    Osteoporosis impairs the bone-healing process as well as bone fracture fixation. The intervention of osteoporosis is considered to be one part of bone fracture treatment. Thus, orthopedic fixators impregnated with antiosteoporosis regimens will improve fracture fixation in osteoporotic bone. In this study, the strontium (Sr) and calcium phosphate ceramic (CPC) were mixed first and then mixed with poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) to fabricate a bioactive and bioabsorbable bone fixators. The prepared Sr-CPC/PCL screws were implanted into the distal femur of ovariectomized rabbits. The results showed that Sr-CPC/PCL composite had the appropriate mechanical properties, good biocompatibility, and radio-opacity. The Sr addition created a porous structure and accelerated the degradation of bone screws, but the degradation products did not acidify the surrounding environment. For osteoporotic animals, favorable osteointegration around the Sr-CPC/PCL screws was found, and the total porosity of trabecular bone was decreased under the inspections of micro-computerized tomography. Compared with PCL or CPC/PCL screw, animals which received Sr-CPC/PCL were found to have better results in terms of trabecular number, thickness, and separation. This study reveals that the Sr-impregnated bone fixator improves osseointegration in osteoporotic animals. Sr-CPC/PCL composite is a good candidate material for osteofixation in osteoporotic patients. PMID:25847487

  2. Role of soft tissues in metacarpal fracture fixation.

    PubMed

    Ouellette, Elizabeth Anne; Dennis, Jay J; Milne, Edward L; Latta, Loren L; Makowski, Anna-Lena

    2003-07-01

    The contribution of soft tissues in stabilizing fracture fixation in metacarpals is appreciated clinically, but no quantitative biomechanical study of their role has been done. All previous studies of fracture fixation in vitro have been done on metacarpals denuded of soft tissues. To quantify the role of soft tissues in metacarpal fracture fixation, the biomechanical effectiveness of four fixation devices was examined in human cadaver metacarpals with and without soft tissues. Values were compared for three nonrigid methods (expandable intramedullary fixation devices, crossed Kirschner wires, and single half-pin frames) and one rigid method (dorsal plates) in 45 disarticulated metacarpals stripped of soft tissues (denuded) and in 46 metacarpals in whole hands with all soft tissues remaining (intact). Mechanical testing to complete failure in three-point apex dorsal bending was done in all specimens. Ultimate moment (strength) of each of the four fixation methods was significantly greater in intact specimens than in denuded specimens. Crossed Kirschner wires were most stable in intact specimens, and dorsal plates were more stable in denuded specimens. The results show that soft tissues contribute to the strength of fracture fixation. Clinically, surgeons may be able to use a less invasive fixation method than plating without compromising the strength of metacarpal fixation in patients whose soft tissues are not severely disrupted and the fracture configuration allows. Plating may offer optimum stability in patients whose soft tissues are damaged severely and provide less strengthening of the fracture construct. PMID:12838068

  3. ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY AMONG THE ELDERLY: CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    PubMed Central

    Leme, Luiz Eugênio Garcez; Sitta, Maria do Carmo; Toledo, Manuella; da Silva Henriques, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Care for elderly patients undergoing orthopedic surgery, particularly for those requiring emergency surgery, needs to take into account an analysis of physical capacity and risks specific to elderly individuals, in an attempt to reduce the risks. Nevertheless, these remain high in this group. Despite the risks, procedures developed promptly have a positive effect on these patients’ evolution. Coordinated care, composed of teams of specialists within clinical medicine, geriatrics, orthopedics, anesthesiology and critical care, along with other healthcare professionals, may be highly beneficial for this group of patients. PMID:27027017

  4. Atlantoaxial rotatory fixation in a child after bilateral otoplastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Tauchi, Ryoji; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Muramoto, Akio; Matsui, Hiroki; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Ukai, Junichi; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2014-07-01

    Atlantoaxial rotatory fixation (AARF), which is a dislocation or subluxation of the atlantoaxial joint, is a well-recognized condition in children. We present a case of AARF after otoplastic surgery for bilateral cryptotia performed by plastic surgeons. The pediatric patient presented with neck pain and torticollis after the surgery, and an orthopedic surgeon diagnosed AARF. The patient was treated successfully with conservative treatment incorporating mild manual manipulation, neck traction, and a collar for 1.5 months. Physicians should consider the possibility of AARF when a patient presents with neck pain and torticollis after otoplastic surgery; diagnosis and treatment should be started immediately. PMID:23754633

  5. Orthopedic Injuries and Their Treatment in Children During Earthquakes: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Ilaria; Sabbadini, Maria Grazia; Bortolin, Michelangelo

    2015-10-01

    Orthopedic injuries commonly affect children during earthquakes, but reports about them are rare. This setting may lead to different standards of care, but guidelines are still missing in this field. A systematic review was performed to: (1) assess type and body distribution of pediatric earthquake-related injuries, treatment performed, length of stay, and complications; and (2) identify starting points to define standards of care. PubMed database was researched for papers (1999-2014 period) in agreement with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) Statement. Inclusion criteria were: English, French, Spanish, or Italian language and data reported about orthopedic lesions in children (≤18 years old). Reviews, letters, commentaries, editorials, and single case reports were excluded. Two independent reviewers selected articles after abstract and full-text reading. Traumatic injuries caused child hospital admissions ranging from 46.9% to 100.0%; 16% to 53% suffered fractures. Lower limbs mostly were involved. Soft-tissue injuries affected 55% of patients. Debridement and external fixation (EF) were the most frequent surgical treatments. Amputation rates varied from 5% to 11%. This study revealed that field hospitals should be prepared to: (1) treat mainly lower extremities fractures in children; and (2) use especially EF techniques. The presence of orthopedic surgeons familiar with pediatric traumatology should be considered. PMID:26286704

  6. Concepts of orthopedic disorders in Avicenna's Canon of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Ahmadreza

    2011-03-01

    This manuscript offers a brief review of the orthopedic subjects in the Canon of Medicine. Highlights include, but are not limited to, the anatomy of the musculoskeletal system, fractures and dislocations, nerve and tendon injuries, different types of wounds and ulcers, and bone infections. Some of the concepts regarding musculoskeletal disorders remain relevant to current orthopedic knowledge. Reviewing the orthopedic subjects in the Canon of Medicine reveals that Avicenna has made a significant contribution to the evolution of orthopedic knowledge. PMID:21361728

  7. [Thoughts and proposals for quality assurance in orthopedics in the community pharmacy].

    PubMed

    Callanquin, J; Labrude, P; Rouyer, A

    2007-05-01

    This review begins with an examination of the notion of quality in the industrial setting, its definition and the steps taken to achieve quality assurance. The review then considers what is meant by quality in the field of health, and in particular for orthopedic devices dispensed in a community pharmacy. Special attention is given to dispensing standard orthopedic devices; five aspects are considered: organization, personal competence, products, services, and relationship with the patient. The first aspect, organization, involves the selling area, stocks, different sizes and sale prices, and the introduction of new devices. Dispensing involves, reception and physical examination of the patient, information delivery, decision-making on the choice of an orthesis, measurement, trial and application, as well as complementary advice and completion of the patient's file. Quality is measured in terms of patient needs. PMID:17489074

  8. Preoperative Planning of Orthopedic Procedures using Digitalized Software Systems.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Ely L; Segev, Eitan; Drexler, Michael; Ben-Tov, Tomer; Nimrod, Snir

    2016-06-01

    The progression from standard celluloid films to digitalized technology led to the development of new software programs to fulfill the needs of preoperative planning. We describe here preoperative digitalized programs and the variety of conditions for which those programs can be used to facilitate preparation for surgery. A PubMed search using the keywords "digitalized software programs," "preoperative planning" and "total joint arthroplasty" was performed for all studies regarding preoperative planning of orthopedic procedures that were published from 1989 to 2014 in English. Digitalized software programs are enabled to import and export all picture archiving communication system (PACS) files (i.e., X-rays, computerized tomograms, magnetic resonance images) from either the local working station or from any remote PACS. Two-dimension (2D) and 3D CT scans were found to be reliable tools with a high preoperative predicting accuracy for implants. The short learning curve, user-friendly features, accurate prediction of implant size, decreased implant stocks and low-cost maintenance makes digitalized software programs an attractive tool in preoperative planning of total joint replacement, fracture fixation, limb deformity repair and pediatric skeletal disorders. PMID:27468530

  9. PEEK Biomaterials in Trauma, Orthopedic, and Spinal Implants

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, S. M.; Devine, J. N.

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1980s, polyaryletherketones (PAEKs) have been increasingly employed as biomaterials for trauma, orthopedic, and spinal implants. We have synthesized the extensive polymer science literature as it relates to structure, mechanical properties, and chemical resistance of PAEK biomaterials. With this foundation, one can more readily appreciate why this family of polymers will be inherently strong, inert, and biocompatible. Due to its relative inertness, PEEK biomaterials are an attractive platform upon which to develop novel bioactive materials, and some steps have already been taken in that direction, with the blending of HA and TCP into sintered PEEK. However, to date, blended HA-PEEK composites have involved a trade-off in mechanical properties in exchange for their increased bioactivity. PEEK has had the greatest clinical impact in the field of spine implant design, and PEEK is now broadly accepted as a radiolucent alternative to metallic biomaterials in the spine community. For mature fields, such as total joint replacements and fracture fixation implants, radiolucency is an attractive but not necessarily critical material feature. PMID:17686513

  10. Billing and coding knowledge: a comparative survey of professional coders, practicing orthopedic surgeons, and orthopedic residents.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Kevin F; Yousuf, Tariq; Pasque, Charles B; Yousuf, Khalid

    2014-06-01

    Medical knowledge and surgical skills are necessary to become an effective orthopedic surgeon. To run an efficient practice, the surgeon must also possess a basic understanding of medical business practices, including billing and coding. In this study, we surveyed and compared the level of billing and coding knowledge among current orthopedic residents PGY3 and higher, academic and private practice attending orthopedic surgeons, and orthopedic coding professionals. According to the survey results, residents and fellows have a similar knowledge of coding and billing, regardless of their level of training or type of business education received in residency. Most residents would like formal training in coding, billing, and practice management didactics; this is consistent with data from previous studies. PMID:24945481

  11. Molecular imaging promotes progress in orthopedic research.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp; Boskey, Adele L

    2006-11-01

    Modern orthopedic research is directed towards the understanding of molecular mechanisms that determine development, maintenance and health of musculoskeletal tissues. In recent years, many genetic and proteomic discoveries have been made which necessitate investigation under physiological conditions in intact, living tissues. Molecular imaging can meet this demand and is, in fact, the only strategy currently available for noninvasive, quantitative, real-time biology studies in living subjects. In this review, techniques of molecular imaging are summarized, and applications to bone and joint biology are presented. The imaging modality most frequently used in the past was optical imaging, particularly bioluminescence and near-infrared fluorescence imaging. Alternate technologies including nuclear and magnetic resonance imaging were also employed. Orthopedic researchers have applied molecular imaging to murine models including transgenic mice to monitor gene expression, protein degradation, cell migration and cell death. Within the bone compartment, osteoblasts and their stem cells have been investigated, and the organic and mineral bone phases have been assessed. These studies addressed malignancy and injury as well as repair, including fracture healing and cell/gene therapy for skeletal defects. In the joints, molecular imaging has focused on the inflammatory and tissue destructive processes that cause arthritis. As described in this review, the feasibility of applying molecular imaging to numerous areas of orthopedic research has been demonstrated and will likely result in an increase in research dedicated to this powerful strategy. Molecular imaging holds great promise in the future for preclinical orthopedic research as well as next-generation clinical musculoskeletal diagnostics. PMID:16843078

  12. Imaging of orthopedic trauma and surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Berquist, T.H.

    1986-01-01

    This book discusses imaging of orthopedia trauma and surgery. A review of the pertinent anatomy, mechanism of injury, and radiology and orthopedic classification is provided for each topic discussed. The book employs recent advances in technique and focuses on adult skeletal trauma, and joint replacement.

  13. Acne mechanica due to an orthopedic crutch.

    PubMed

    Kang, Y C; Choi, E H; Hwang, S M; Lee, W S; Lee, S H; Ahn, S K

    1999-08-01

    Acne mechanica describes local irritation due to the skin being pressured, occluded, rubbed, squeezed, stretched, or heated. Examples of various physical traumas that provoke lesions in acne patients are given. Users of orthopedic crutches are at particular risk for such conditions. A crutch is another extrinsic factor to be added to the list of causes of acne mechanica. PMID:10467500

  14. Orthopedically Handicapped Children in Ohio Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naples, Victor J.; Todd, Joseph H.

    The historical development of programs for orthopedically handicapped children, class units and hospital classes approved during 1967-68, and the number of therapy units established are presented. Tables give data on program population: enrollment for years 1962-68, percent of handicaps enrolled, and IQ distributions. Aspects of occupational…

  15. Photographic fixative poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Photographic developer poisoning; Hydroquinone poisoning; Quinone poisoning; Sulfite poisoning ... Hydroquinones Quinones Sodium thiosulfate Sodium sulfite/bisulfite Boric acid Photographic fixative can also break down (decompose) to form sulfur dioxide gas.

  16. 21 CFR 878.3250 - External facial fracture fixation appliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false External facial fracture fixation appliance. 878.3250 Section 878.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices §...

  17. 21 CFR 878.3250 - External facial fracture fixation appliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false External facial fracture fixation appliance. 878.3250 Section 878.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices §...

  18. Characteristics of highly successful orthopedic surgeons: a survey of orthopedic chairs and editors

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Guy; Hussain, Nasir; Sprague, Sheila; Mehlman, Charles T.; Dogbey, Godwin; Bhandari, Mohit

    2013-01-01

    Background Highly successful orthopedic surgeons are a small group of individuals who exert a large influence on the orthopedic field. However, the characteristics of these leaders have not been well-described or studied. Methods Orthopedic surgeons who are departmental chairs, journal editors, editorial board members of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (British edition), or current or past presidents of major orthopedic associations were invited to complete a survey designed to provide insight into their motivations, academic backgrounds and accomplishments, emotional and physical health, and job satisfaction. Results In all, 152 surgeons completed the questionnaire. We identified several characteristics of highly successful surgeons. Many have contributed prolific numbers of publications and book chapters and obtained considerable funding for research. They were often motivated by a “desire for personal development (interesting challenge, new opportunities),” whereas “relocating to a new institution, financial gain, or lack of alternative candidates” played little to no role in their decisions to take positions of leadership. Most respondents were happy with their specialty choice despite long hours and high levels of stress. Despite challenges to their time, successful orthopedic surgeons made a strong effort to maintain their health; compared with other physicians, they exercise more, are more likely to have a primary care physician and feel better physically. Conclusion Departmental chairs, journal editors and presidents of orthopedic associations cope with considerable demands of clinical, administrative, educational and research duties while maintaining a high level of health, happiness and job satisfaction. PMID:23706848

  19. Open reduction internal fixation of distal clavicle fracture with supplementary button coracoclavicular fixation.

    PubMed

    Hanflik, Andrew; Hanypsiak, Bryan T; Greenspoon, Joshua; Friedman, Darren J

    2014-10-01

    Distal clavicle fractures are common, and no standard treatment exists. Many different surgical modalities exist. This report describes an open reduction internal fixation technique that achieves both plate and coracoclavicular stabilization using a button device. A precontoured superior-lateral plate is secured to the clavicle. A 3.2-mm spade-tipped drill bit is drilled across the clavicle and coracoid, passing through 4 cortices. The button is loaded onto an insertion device, passed across the 4 cortices, and captured on the undersurface of the coracoid under fluoroscopic guidance. This construct is linked to the distal clavicle plate by heavy sutures using a second button that sits in the plate. The lateral locking holes are then filled to finalize fixation. This technique provides for a simplified way to achieve coracoclavicular stabilization when using a plate for fixation of distal clavicle fractures. PMID:25473604

  20. Open Reduction Internal Fixation of Distal Clavicle Fracture With Supplementary Button Coracoclavicular Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Hanflik, Andrew; Hanypsiak, Bryan T.; Greenspoon, Joshua; Friedman, Darren J.

    2014-01-01

    Distal clavicle fractures are common, and no standard treatment exists. Many different surgical modalities exist. This report describes an open reduction internal fixation technique that achieves both plate and coracoclavicular stabilization using a button device. A precontoured superior-lateral plate is secured to the clavicle. A 3.2-mm spade-tipped drill bit is drilled across the clavicle and coracoid, passing through 4 cortices. The button is loaded onto an insertion device, passed across the 4 cortices, and captured on the undersurface of the coracoid under fluoroscopic guidance. This construct is linked to the distal clavicle plate by heavy sutures using a second button that sits in the plate. The lateral locking holes are then filled to finalize fixation. This technique provides for a simplified way to achieve coracoclavicular stabilization when using a plate for fixation of distal clavicle fractures. PMID:25473604

  1. Regulatory perspective on characterization and testing of orthopedic bone cements.

    PubMed

    Demian, H W; McDermott, K

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides a general regulatory background of acrylic bone cements, chemical composition information on several commercially available bone cements, physical and chemical methods of analyses, mechanical test methods, and risks and failure mechanisms of acrylic bone cements. Suggestions and recommendations presented in Tables 2 and 3 are not mandatory requirements but reflect data and methodologies which the FDA's Orthopedic Devices Branch (ORDB) believes to be acceptable to evaluate most pre-clinical data. FDA may require information in addition to that contained in this paper. In some instances, a sponsor may be able to sufficiently justify the omission of some tests. Although this paper describes certain administrative requirements, it does not take the place of the requirements contained in Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR) Parts 801, 807, 812, and 814 or those found in the statute. PMID:9830987

  2. Mechanical performance of the standard Orthofix external fixator.

    PubMed

    Chao, E Y; Hein, T J

    1988-07-01

    Static and fatigue tests of the standard Orthofix unilateral external fixator (Orthofix SRL, Verona, Italy) were performed. Under similar fixation configurations, the Orthofix device offered higher bending stiffness in both directions, equal torsional stiffness, and lower axial stiffness when compared to the Hoffmann-Vidal quadrilateral frame with full pins. The bending resistance of the Orthofix ball joint was found to be proportional to its locking cam tightening torque. After applying 2 million loading cycles to the bone ends fixed by the device, the overall stiffness characteristics of the frame did not change significantly. Repetitive manual tightening and loosening of the ball joint caused abrasive wear on the cam and bushing surfaces. The locking position of the cam migrated for a mean of 45 degrees. After 50 cycles of tightening and bending to failure, the ball joint locking strength was reduced by 20% to 25%, but the stiffness did not change. Wear and stripping of the seat of the fixator body locking screw and the pin fixation screw threads were also noted. Based on the test results, the standard Orthofix device could be re-used, but certain fixator components must be inspected and replaced. The ball joint locking cam and fixation screws required periodic tightening during clinical application to prevent loss of frame stiffness under repetitive loading. Modifications of the fixator design are recommended to improve its mechanical performance. PMID:3405906

  3. Redefining the Economics of Geriatric Orthopedics

    PubMed Central

    Nacca, Christopher; Paller, David; Daniels, Alan H

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The heath care system in the United States is in the midst of a transition, in large part to help accommodate an older and more medically complex population. Central to the current evolution is the reassessment of value based on the cost utility of a particular procedure compared to alternatives. The existing contribution of geriatric orthopedics to the societal burden of disease is substantial, and literature focusing on the economic value of treating elderly populations with musculoskeletal injuries is growing. Materials and Methods: A literature review of peer-reviewed publications and abstracts related to the cost-effectiveness of treating geriatric patients with orthopedic injuries was carried out. Results: In our review, we demonstrate that while cost-utility studies generally demonstrate net society savings for most orthopedic procedures, geriatric populations often contribute to negative net society savings due to decreased working years and lower salaries while in the workforce. However, the incremental cost-effective ratio for operative intervention has been shown to be below the financial willingness to treat threshold for common procedures including joint replacement surgery of the knee (ICER US$8551), hip (ICER US$17 115), and shoulder (CE US$957) as well as for spinal procedures and repair of torn rotator cuffs (ICER US$12 024). We also discuss the current trends directed toward improving institutional value and highlight important complementary next steps to help overcome the growing demands of an older, more active society. Conclusion: The geriatric population places a significant burden on the health care system. However, studies have shown that treating this demographic for orthopedic-related injuries is cost effective and profitable for providers under certain scenarios. PMID:26246943

  4. The orthopedic management of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, M J; Haas, R H

    1988-01-01

    Musculoskeletal deformity sufficiently severe to require orthopedic surgery is a significant problem in Rett syndrome. Preliminary results from the study of 16 patients suggest deformity in nearly all patients. Eight patients in stage III and seven patients in stage IV showed clinical evidence of scoliosis. Radiographic studies confirmed a structural curve in nine of ten patients studied. Heel cord tightening was seen in nine of 16 patients. Hip instability was identified as an area of potential concern in the Rett patient. PMID:3198902

  5. Improving Carbon Fixation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ducat, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    A recent resurgence in basic and applied research on photosynthesis has been driven in part by recognition that fulfilling future food and energy requirements will necessitate improvements in crop carbon-fixation efficiencies. Photosynthesis in traditional terrestrial crops is being reexamined in light of molecular strategies employed by photosynthetic microbes to enhance the activity of the Calvin cycle. Synthetic biology is well-situated to provide original approaches for compartmentalizing and enhancing photosynthetic reactions in a species independent manner. Furthermore, the elucidation of alternative carbon-fixation routes distinct from the Calvin cycle raises possibilities that alternative pathways and organisms can be utilized to fix atmospheric carbon dioxide into useful materials. PMID:22647231

  6. Improving carbon fixation pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Ducat, DC; Silver, PA

    2012-08-01

    A recent resurgence in basic and applied research on photosynthesis has been driven in part by recognition that fulfilling future food and energy requirements will necessitate improvements in crop carbon-fixation efficiencies. Photosynthesis in traditional terrestrial crops is being reexamined in light of molecular strategies employed by photosynthetic microbes to enhance the activity of the Calvin cycle. Synthetic biology is well-situated to provide original approaches for compartmentalizing and enhancing photosynthetic reactions in a species independent manner. Furthermore, the elucidation of alternative carbon-fixation routes distinct from the Calvin cycle raises possibilities that novel pathways and organisms can be utilized to fix atmospheric carbon dioxide into useful materials.

  7. Monitoring in vivo load transmission through an external fixator.

    PubMed

    Grasa, J; Gómez-Benito, M J; González-Torres, L A; Asiaín, D; Quero, F; García-Aznar, J M

    2010-03-01

    This work presents a portable non-invasive external fixator to assess and monitor fracture healing in real time. To evaluate the potential of this fixator, a transverse osteotomy was performed in the tibia of six adult sheep (mean age 3+/-0.5 years and weight 63+/-5 kg). The fractures were stabilized by a specially designed unilateral external fixator, which was instrumented by means of a set of strain gauges. Strains in the external surface of the fixator were monitored during all the healing process. A wireless, remote monitoring of the implant was developed through a specially designed external telemetric device. The strain gauges were arranged in two different half-bridge Wheatstone configurations, allowing easy post-processing of the signal. Thus, bending loads were measured in two planes of the external fixator acting as a load cell. The load through the fixator was evaluated for the gait cycle during all the healing process. Full weight bearing of the injured leg was observed from the beginning. The load transmission mechanism in the fixator was quite similar in all operated tibias and radiographic images showed a successful healing in all animals. Although the fixator has only been tested in an animal model, after further testing this system may have clinical potential. PMID:20052616

  8. Multipurpose external fixator for intraarticular fracture of distal radius.

    PubMed

    Siripakarn, Yongyuth; Siripakarn, Zongyuti

    2010-12-01

    Fracture of distal radius is one of a complicated injury which can be difficult in reduction and maintaining its alignment and may result in malunion and shortening following a variety of fixation. Since Anderson's and O'neil described the use of sustain traction by extraskeletal device anchored to the radius and the first metacarpal of the hand. Vidal et al [1979] demonstrated that the ligamentotaxis could be used to reduce the fracture around the wrist, ankle, hip and knee. The external fixation frame can maintain radial length and inclination by the pullout force from the radial styloid. External fixation is useful for management of complex intraarticular fracture of distal radius. There are few types of commercially available fixator. It is important to use one that allow versatility and follow biomechanic principles of ligamentotaxis, which can be used to reduce the severe comminution and the most difficult fracture by distraction and stabilization effectively. The ideal characteristic of the external fixation are: Telescoping connecting frame fixed externally compose of two joints which can be easily adjust in any direction, two pins clamp connected to the external connecting rod. Our TU Multipurpose external fixator can be designed as a multiplana, can be used as a bridge or non bridge fixation, and can be adjusted to any direction which require for the treatment of distal radius fracture. It is differed to other commercially available devices. PMID:21294433

  9. Fixation of a human rib by an intramedullary telescoping splint anchored by bone cement.

    PubMed

    Liovic, Petar; Šutalo, Ilija D; Marasco, Silvana F

    2016-09-01

    A novel concept for rib fixation is presented that involves the use of a bioresorbable polymer intramedullary telescoping splint. Bone cement is used to anchor each end of the splint inside the medullary canal on each side of the fracture site. In this manner, rib fixation is achieved without fixation device protrusion from the rib, making the splint completely intramedullary. Finite element analysis is used to demonstrate that such a splint/cement composite can preserve rib fixation subjected to cough-intensity force loadings. Computational fluid dynamics and porcine rib experiments were used to study the anchor formation process required to complete the fixation. PMID:26733094

  10. Update: Biological Nitrogen Fixation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Alan; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Updates knowledge on nitrogen fixation, indicating that investigation of free-living nitrogen-fixing organisms is proving useful in understanding bacterial partners and is expected to lead to development of more effective symbioses. Specific areas considered include biochemistry/genetics, synthesis control, proteins and enzymes, symbiotic systems,…

  11. The Fixation of Nitrogen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrew, S. P. S.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen in the form of ammonia as one of the foundations of modern chemical industry. The article describes ammonia production and synthesis, purifying the hydrogen-nitrogen mix, nitric acid production, and its commericial plant. (HM)

  12. 21 CFR 888.3080 - Intervertebral body fusion device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Intervertebral body fusion device. 888.3080... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3080 Intervertebral body fusion device. (a) Identification. An intervertebral body fusion device is an implanted single or...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3080 - Intervertebral body fusion device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Intervertebral body fusion device. 888.3080... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3080 Intervertebral body fusion device. (a) Identification. An intervertebral body fusion device is an implanted single or...

  14. Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course: A Collaboration between Anatomists and Orthopedic Surgeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFriez, Curtis B.; Morton, David A.; Horwitz, Daniel S.; Eckel, Christine M.; Foreman, K. Bo; Albertine, Kurt H.

    2011-01-01

    A challenge for new residents and senior residents preparing for board examinations is refreshing their knowledge of basic science disciplines, such as human gross anatomy. The Department of Orthopaedics at the University of Utah School of Medicine has for many years held an annual Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course during the summer months…

  15. Biomechanical Analysis of Pedicle Screw Fixation for Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Matthew; Shah, Kalpit N; Paller, David J; Thakur, Nikhil A; Koruprolu, Sarath; Palumbo, Mark A; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-05-01

    Treatment of unstable thoracolumbar burst fractures remains controversial. Long-segment pedicle screw constructs may be stiffer and impart greater forces on adjacent segments compared with short-segment constructs, which may affect clinical performance and long-term out come. The purpose of this study was to biomechanically evaluate long-segment posterior pedicle screw fixation (LSPF) vs short-segment posterior pedicle screw fixation (SSPF) for unstable burst fractures. Six unembalmed human thoracolumbar spine specimens (T10-L4) were used. Following intact testing, a simulated L1 burst fracture was created and sequentially stabilized using 5.5-mm titanium polyaxial pedicle screws and rods for 4 different constructs: SSPF (1 level above and below), SSPF+L1 (pedicle screw at fractured level), LSPF (2 levels above and below), and LSPF+L1 (pedicle screw at fractured level). Each fixation construct was tested in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation; range of motion was also recorded. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was performed to identify differences between treatment groups and functional noninstrumented spine. Short-segment posterior pedicle screw fixation did not achieve stability seen in an intact spine (P<.01), whereas LSPF constructs were significantly stiffer than SSPF constructs and demonstrated more stiffness than an intact spine (P<.01). Pedicle screws at the fracture level did not improve either SSPF or LSPF construct stability (P>.1). Long-segment posterior pedicle screw fixation constructs were not associated with increased adjacent segment motion. Al though the sample size of 6 specimens was small, this study may help guide clinical decisions regarding burst fracture stabilization. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e514-e518.]. PMID:27135451

  16. Three-Dimensional Printing in Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Eltorai, Adam E M; Nguyen, Eric; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is emerging as a clinically promising technology for rapid prototyping of surgically implantable products. With this commercially available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used to create graspable objects from 3D reconstructed images. Models can enhance patients' understanding of their pathology and surgeon preoperative planning. Customized implants and casts can be made to match an individual's anatomy. This review outlines 3D printing, its current applications in orthopedics, and promising future directions. PMID:26558661

  17. Imaging of orthopedic trauma and surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on imaging techniques for diagnosis of trauma of bones. A comparative evaluation is presented for planning of proper diagnosis and treatment. Various techniques discussed are routine radiography; computerized tomography, NMR imaging, angiography, ultrasonography; and use of radioisotopes. The mechanism of injury of bone joints of upper and lower limbs and spine is discussed after discussing the anatomy of each in the beginning of each paper. Topics titled are healing of fractures; fractures of pelvis; knee; shoulder; foot and ankle; fractures of humerus; stress fractures; and orthopedic radiology. Prosthesis use and plastic surgery of joints is also discussed.

  18. Hunting stand-related injuries in orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Lebus, George F; Krueger, Chad A; Stinner, Daniel J; Mir, Hassan R

    2014-09-01

    Hunting remains an extremely popular recreational activity, with nearly 15 million Americans receiving a hunting license annually. Precautions have helped decrease accidents, but hunting-related injuries remain relatively common. The majority of severe, hunting-related accidents involve either a fall from a hunting platform or an accidental shooting. Both of these mechanisms frequently result in orthopedic injuries, many of which require operative care. Although firearms-associated injury has seemingly decreased, hunting platform falls and their sequelae are increasing. Understanding the mechanisms of these injuries and increasing awareness of them may minimize their morbidity and mortality or help prevent them altogether. PMID:25188622

  19. Legal issues affecting ancillaries and orthopedic practice.

    PubMed

    Glaser, David M

    2008-01-01

    The federal and state governments have imposed significant regulations on health care generally and on ancillary services in particular. This article focuses on how state and federal laws shape the ability of an orthopedic physician to offer ancillary services, whether as an individual, through a group practice, or as part of a joint venture. It focuses on how the Stark law, the Medicare anti-kickback statute, state anti-kickback, fee-splitting provisions, certificate of need laws, and various Medicare billing and supervision requirements impact the provision of ancillary services. It also briefly discusses how physicians should prepare for and respond to government investigations. PMID:18061773

  20. Sludge fixation and stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.H.

    1982-08-03

    The physical and chemical fixation and stabilization of waste products from a sulfur-fuel burning unit through controlled crystallization of dissolved calcium sulfite. A low ph calcium sulfite solution is added to the waste containing aqueous sludge produced by a gas desulfurization unit thereby raising the ph of the calcium sulfite to crystalize the calcium sulfite and bind and encapsulate the waste products into a solid mass.

  1. CARBON DIOXIDE FIXATION.

    SciTech Connect

    FUJITA,E.

    2000-01-12

    Solar carbon dioxide fixation offers the possibility of a renewable source of chemicals and fuels in the future. Its realization rests on future advances in the efficiency of solar energy collection and development of suitable catalysts for CO{sub 2} conversion. Recent achievements in the efficiency of solar energy conversion and in catalysis suggest that this approach holds a great deal of promise for contributing to future needs for fuels and chemicals.

  2. Deformation measurement of the bone fixed with external fixator using holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Arata; Ogawa, Ryokei; Izuchi, N.; Yamamoto, Manabu; Nishimoto, T.; Matsumoto, Toshiro

    1991-08-01

    Mechanical properties of tibia fixed with an external fixative device (external fixator) were investigated under some simulated loading conditions. Deformation measurements were performed using double exposure holographic interferometry and real-time holographic interferometry. According to the results of the holographic interferometry, strains on the fixation pins and rods were also measured using strain gauges. The results showed that, with most types of external fixator, dislocations of both fractured ends were mainly caused by decrease in strength of the fixation pins. With increase in strength of fixation pins, angular deformation of the rod was more obvious. Increase in the strength of the rod was not always effective in decreasing dislocation of both fractured ends. Changes in bracing technique with marked change in rigidity of external fixator were useful to decrease dislocation of both fractured ends.

  3. Biomaterials and Biomedical Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanker, Jacob S.; Giammara, Beverly L.

    1988-11-01

    This review discusses the factors important in the incorporation or integration of biomaterials and devices by tissue. Methods for surface modification and surface-sensitive techniques for analysis are cited. In vitro methods to evaluate the biocompatibility or efficacy of certain biomaterials and devices are presented. Present and future directions in neural prostheses, cardiovascular materials, blood or bone substitutes, controlled drug delivery, orthopedic prostheses, dental materials, artificial organs, plasma- and cytapheresis, and dialysis are discussed.

  4. RAPID MANUFACTURING SYSTEM OF ORTHOPEDIC IMPLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Relvas, Carlos; Reis, Joana; Potes, José Alberto Caeiro; Fonseca, Fernando Manuel Ferreira; Simões, José Antonio Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    This study, aimed the development of a methodology for rapid manufacture of orthopedic implants simultaneously with the surgical intervention, considering two potential applications in the fields of orthopedics: the manufacture of anatomically adapted implants and implants for bone loss replacement. This work innovation consists on the capitation of the in situ geometry of the implant by direct capture of the shape using an elastomeric material (polyvinylsiloxane) which allows fine detail and great accuracy of the geometry. After scanning the elastomeric specimen, the implant is obtained by machining using a CNC milling machine programmed with a dedicated CAD/CAM system. After sterilization, the implant is able to be placed on the patient. The concept was developed using low cost technology and commercially available. The system has been tested in an in vivo hip arthroplasty performed on a sheep. The time increase of surgery was 80 minutes being 40 minutes the time of implant manufacturing. The system developed has been tested and the goals defined of the study achieved enabling the rapid manufacture of an implant in a time period compatible with the surgery time. PMID:27004181

  5. The orthopedic characterization of Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amanda; Hunt, Thomas R

    2016-03-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH), also known as Goltz syndrome, is a rare condition in which congenital anomalies result in a multitude of defects that affect many systems of the body. These defects can involve the eyes, skin, teeth, and cardiovascular, skeletal, and gastrointestinal systems. There have been many associated abnormalities reported in the literature. An appreciation of the clinical presentation of Goltz syndrome is important because physicians rely heavily on recognition of key physical characteristics in order to help make a diagnosis. In this report, we summarize the clinical findings observed when we were afforded the unique opportunity to interview and physically examine 19 patients, the largest group of individuals with Goltz syndrome brought together in one place to date. The findings are intended to characterize the orthopedic phenotypic manifestations of Goltz syndrome. This collection of data revealed that the most common orthopedic findings were syndactyly (68%), ectrodactyly (68%), leg length discrepancy (57%), and reduction defects of long bones (52%). Nail irregularities were present in 89% of the patients seen. PMID:26867035

  6. RAPID MANUFACTURING SYSTEM OF ORTHOPEDIC IMPLANTS.

    PubMed

    Relvas, Carlos; Reis, Joana; Potes, José Alberto Caeiro; Fonseca, Fernando Manuel Ferreira; Simões, José Antonio Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    This study, aimed the development of a methodology for rapid manufacture of orthopedic implants simultaneously with the surgical intervention, considering two potential applications in the fields of orthopedics: the manufacture of anatomically adapted implants and implants for bone loss replacement. This work innovation consists on the capitation of the in situ geometry of the implant by direct capture of the shape using an elastomeric material (polyvinylsiloxane) which allows fine detail and great accuracy of the geometry. After scanning the elastomeric specimen, the implant is obtained by machining using a CNC milling machine programmed with a dedicated CAD/CAM system. After sterilization, the implant is able to be placed on the patient. The concept was developed using low cost technology and commercially available. The system has been tested in an in vivo hip arthroplasty performed on a sheep. The time increase of surgery was 80 minutes being 40 minutes the time of implant manufacturing. The system developed has been tested and the goals defined of the study achieved enabling the rapid manufacture of an implant in a time period compatible with the surgery time. PMID:27004181

  7. Delay to orthopedic consultation for isolated limb injury

    PubMed Central

    Rouleau, Dominique M.; Feldman, Debbie Ehrmann; Parent, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe referral mechanisms for referral to orthopedic surgery for isolated limb injuries in a public health care system and to identify factors affecting access. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey. SETTING Orthopedic surgery service in a level 1 trauma centre in Montreal, Que. PARTICIPANTS We conducted a prospective study of 166 consecutive adults (mean age 48 years) referred to orthopedic surgery for isolated limb injuries during a 4-month period. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Self-reported data on the nature of the trauma, the elapsed time between injury and orthopedic consultation, the number and type of previous primary care consultations, sociodemographic characteristics, and the level of satisfaction with care. RESULTS Average time between the injury and orthopedic consultation was 89 hours (range 3 to 642), with an average of 68 hours (range 0 to 642) for delay between primary care consultation and orthopedic consultation. A total of 36% of patients with time-sensitive diagnoses had unacceptable delays to orthopedic consultation according to the Quebec Orthopaedic Association guidelines. Lower limb injury, consulting first at another hospital, living far from the trauma centre, patient perception of low severity, and having a soft tissue injury were associated with longer delays. CONCLUSION Identifying gaps and risk factors for slower access might help improve referral mechanisms for orthopedic consultation. PMID:19826162

  8. Young Children's Attitudes toward Orthopedic and Sensory Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeGrella, Lanier H.; Green, Virginia P.

    1984-01-01

    Attitudes of 64 nondisabled children (three to seven years old) toward orthopedic and sensory disabilities were examined via the Test of Early Attitudes toward Disability. Responses indicated that bias against orthopedic and sensory disabilities increases with age but is not present among three-year-olds. (Author/CL)

  9. Improving Response Rates among Students with Orthopedic and Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkens, Christian P.; Kuntzler, Patrice M.; Cardenas, Shaun; O'Malley, Eileen; Phillips, Carolyn; Singer, Jacqueline; Stoeger, Alex; Kindler, Keith

    2014-01-01

    One challenge teachers of students with orthopedic and multiple disabilities face is providing sufficient time and opportunity to communicate. This challenge is universal across countries, schools, and settings: teachers want students to communicate because communication lies at the core of what makes us human. Yet students with orthopedic and…

  10. Intrafocal pin plate fixation of distal ulna fractures associated with distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Foster, Brian J; Bindra, Randy R

    2012-02-01

    Subcapital ulnar fractures in association with distal radius fractures in elderly patients increase instability and pose a treatment challenge. Fixation of the ulnar fracture with traditional implants is difficult due to the subcutaneous location, comminution, and osteoporosis. We describe an intrafocal pin plate that provides fixation by a locking plate on the distal ulna and intramedullary fixation within the shaft. The low profile and percutaneous technique make this device a useful alternative for treatment of subcapital ulna fractures in the elderly. PMID:22192166

  11. Treatment of Unstable Thoracolumbar Fractures through Short Segment Pedicle Screw Fixation Techniques Using Pedicle Fixation at the Level of the Fracture: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changqing; Zhou, Yue; Wang, Hongwei; Liu, Jun; Xiang, Liangbi

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the von Mises stresses of the internal fixation devices among different short segment pedicle screw fixation techniques to treat thoracic 12 vertebral fractures, especially the mono-segment pedicle screw fixation and intermediate unilateral pedicle screw fixation techniques. Methods Finite element methods were utilised to investigate the biomechanical comparison of the four posterior short segment pedicle screw fixation techniques (S4+2: traditional short-segment 4 pedicle screw fixation [SPSF]; M4+2: mono-segment pedicle screw fixation; I6+2: intermediate bilateral pedicle screw fixation; and I5+2: intermediate unilateral pedicle screw fixation). Results The range of motion (ROM) in flexion, axial rotation, and lateral bending was the smallest in the I6+2 fixation model, followed by the I5+2 and S4+2 fixation models, but lateral bending was the largest in the M4+2 fixation model. The maximal stress of the upper pedicle screw is larger than the lower pedicle screw in S4+2 and M4+2. The largest maximal von Mises stress was observed in the upper pedicle screw in the S4+2 and M4+2 fixation models and in the lower pedicle screw in the I6+2 and I5+2 fixation models. The values of the largest maximal von Mises stress of the pedicle screws and rods during all states of motion were 263.1 MPa and 304.5 MPa in the S4+2 fixation model, 291.6 MPa and 340.5 MPa in the M4+2 fixation model, 182.9 MPa and 263.2 MPa in the I6+2 fixation model, and 269.3 MPa and 383.7 MPa in the I5+2 fixation model, respectively. Comparing the stress between different spinal loadings, the maximal von Mises stress of the implants were observed in flexion in all implanted models. Conclusion Additional bilateral pedicle screws at the level of the fracture to SPSF may result in a stiffer construct and less von Mises stress for pedicle screws and rods. The largest maximal von Mises stress of the pedicle screws during all states of motion were observed in the mono-segment pedicle

  12. Biomaterial systems for orthopedic tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoerke, Erik David

    2003-06-01

    The World Health Organization has estimated that one out of seven Americans suffers from a musculoskeletal impairment, annually incurring 28.6 million musculoskeletal injuries---more than half of all injuries. Bone tissue engineering has evolved rapidly to address this continued health concern. In the last decade, the focus of orthopedic biomaterials design has shifted from the use of common engineering metals and plastics to smart materials designed to mimic nature and elicit favorable bioresponse. Working within this new paradigm, this thesis explores unique chemical and materials systems for orthopedic tissue engineering. Improving on current titanium implant technologies, porous titanium scaffolds were utilized to better approximate the mechanical and structural properties of natural bone. These foam scaffolds were enhanced with bioactive coatings, designed to enhance osteoblastic implant colonization. The biopolymer poly(L-lysine) was incorporated into both hydroxypatite and octacalcium phosphate mineral phases to create modified organoapatite and pLys-CP coatings respectively. These coatings were synthesized and characterized on titanium surfaces, including porous structures such as titanium mesh and titanium foam. In addition, in vitro osteoblastic cell culture experiments probed the biological influences of these coatings. Organoapatite (OA) accelerated preosteoblastic colonization of titanium mesh and improved cellular ingrowth into titanium foam. Alternatively, the thin, uniform pLys-CP coating demonstrated significant potential as a substrate for chemically binding biological molecules and supramolecular assemblies. Biologically, pLys-CP demonstrated enhanced cellular attachment over titanium and inorganic calcium phosphate controls. Supramolecular self-assembled nanofiber assemblies were also explored both as stand-alone tissue engineering gels and as titanium coatings. Self-supporting nanofiber gels induced accelerated, biomimetic mineralization

  13. Biomechanical Study of Acetabular Tridimensional Memoryalloy Fixation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin-Wei; Xu, Shuo-Gui; Zhang, Yun-Tong; Zhang, Chun-Cai

    2011-07-01

    We developed the acetabular tridimensional memoryalloy fixation system (ATMFS), which is made of NiTi shape memory alloy, according to the specific mechanical properties of biological memory material, NiTi shape memory alloy and measured distribution of contact area and pressure between the acetabulum and the femoral head of cadaveric pelvis. Seven formalin-preserved cadaveric pelves were used for this investigation. Pressure-sensitive film was used to measure contact area and pressure within the anterior, superior, and posterior regions of the acetabulum. The pelves were loaded under the following four conditions: (1) intact; (2) following a creation posterior wall fracture defect; (3) following reduction and standard internal fixation with reconstruction plate; and (4) following reduction and internal fixation with a new shape memory alloy device named ATMFS. A posterior wall fracture was created along an arc of 40° to 90° about the acetabulur rim. Creation of a posterior wall defect resulted in increased load in the superior acetabulum (1485 N) as compared to the intact condition (748 N, P = 0.009). Following reduction and internal fixation, the load distributed to the superior acetabulum (1545 N) was not statistically different from the defect condition. Following the fixation with ATMFS, the load seen at the superior region of the actabulum (964 N) was familiar with fixation with reconstruction plate and was not different from intact state ( P = 0.45). These data indicate that the use of ATMFS as a fracture internal fixation device resulted a partial restoration of joint loading parameters toward the intact state. ATMFS fixation may result in a clinical benefit.

  14. Nitrogen fixation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Hao-Lin

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O.sub.2 /cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N.sub.2. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N.sub.2 at a much quicker rate than unexcited N.sub.2, greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed.

  15. Co-Management Arrangements in Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bushnell, Brandon D

    2015-06-01

    A co-management arrangement (CMA) is a contractual relationship between physicians and a hospital that results in a shared-responsibility management structure for a specific service line. In orthopedic surgery, CMAs are becoming increasingly popular as stakeholders in the health care market seek increased value (ie, higher-quality care at lower costs). A CMA can significantly improve the efficiency and the outcomes of a musculoskeletal service line if it adheres to the basic principles of a focus on the patient, evidence-based decision-making, physician leadership, appropriate physician compensation, transparency, reasonable and modifiable goals, and accountability. While the specifics of each CMA will vary, all CMAs have common operational elements that include the arrangement's legal structure, legal compliance, leadership and reporting structure, facilities management, personnel management, clinical data management, financial data management, and quality and effectiveness reporting. PMID:26047000

  16. Bioactive glass coatings for orthopedic metallic implants

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Fujino, Sigheru; Oku, Takeo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2003-06-30

    The objective of this work is to develop bioactive glass coatings for metallic orthopedic implants. A new family of glasses in the SiO2-Na2O-K2O-CaO-MgO-P2O5 system has been synthesized and characterized. The glass properties (thermal expansion, softening and transformation temperatures, density and hardness) are in line with the predictions of established empirical models. The optimized firing conditions to fabricate coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been determined and related to the glass properties and the interfacial reactions. Excellent adhesion to alloys has been achieved through the formation of 100-200 nm thick interfacial layers (Ti5Si3 on Ti-based alloys and CrOx on Co-Cr). Finally, glass coatings, approximately 100 mu m thick, have been fabricated onto commercial Ti alloy-based dental implants.

  17. Orthopedic applications of silicon nitride ceramics.

    PubMed

    Bal, B S; Rahaman, M N

    2012-08-01

    Silicon nitride (Si(3)N(4)) is a ceramic material developed for industrial applications that demand high strength and fracture resistance under extreme operating conditions. Recently, Si(3)N(4) has been used as an orthopedic biomaterial, to promote bone fusion in spinal surgery and to develop bearings that can improve the wear and longevity of prosthetic hip and knee joints. Si(3)N(4) has been implanted in human patients for over 3 years now, and clinical trials with Si(3)N(4) femoral heads in prosthetic hip replacement are contemplated. This review will provide background information and data relating to Si(3)N(4) ceramics that will be of interest to engineering and medical professionals. PMID:22542731

  18. Caring for the incarcerated: an orthopedic perspective.

    PubMed

    Munns, Justin; Samora, Julie Balch; Granger, Jeffrey F; Ng, Vincent Y

    2013-12-01

    According to the 1976 Supreme Court case of Estelle v Gamble, the government is required to provide prisoners access to the necessary care for known, serious medical needs. Failure to do so violates the Eighth Amendment prohibiting the imposition of "cruel and unusual punishment." Currently, more than 2.5 million Americans are imprisoned, the highest per capita rate in the world. In the current fiscal climate and with burgeoning health care costs for society as a whole, providing care for prisoners poses both moral and logistical challenges. From an orthopedic standpoint, caring for the incarcerated raises uniquely challenging issues due to the nature of this patient population and their types of musculoskeletal conditions. PMID:24309118

  19. The Use of Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced (CFR) PEEK Material in Orthopedic Implants: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan Silvia; Vannabouathong, Christopher; Sprague, Sheila; Bhandari, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) has been successfully used in orthopedic implants. The aim of this systematic review is to investigate the properties, technical data, and safety of CFR-PEEK biomaterial and to evaluate its potential for new innovation in the design of articulating medical devices. A comprehensive search in PubMed and EMBASE was conducted to identify articles relevant to the outcomes of CFR-PEEK orthopedic implants. The search was also expanded by reviewing the reference sections of selected papers and references and benchmark reports provided by content experts. A total of 23 articles were included in this review. There is limited literature available assessing the performance of CFR-PEEK, specifically as an implant material for arthroplasty systems. Nevertheless, available studies strongly support CFR-PEEK as a promising and suitable material for orthopedic implants because of its biocompatibility, material characteristics, and mechanical durability. Future studies should continue to investigate CFR-PEEK's potential benefits. PMID:25780341

  20. Regenerative treatments to enhance orthopedic surgical outcome.

    PubMed

    Murrell, William D; Anz, Adam W; Badsha, Humeira; Bennett, William F; Boykin, Robert E; Caplan, Arnold I

    2015-04-01

    In orthopedic surgery there has been a never-ending quest to improve surgical outcome and the patient's experience. Progression has been marked by the refinement of surgical techniques and instruments and later by enhanced diagnostic imaging capability, specifically magnetic resonance. Over time implant optimization was achieved, along with the development of innovative minimally invasive arthroscopic technical skills to leverage new versions of classic procedures and implants to improve short-term patient morbidity and initial, mid-term, and long-term patient outcomes. The use of regenerative and/or biological adjuncts to aid the healing process has followed in the drive for continual improvement, and major breakthroughs in basic science have significantly unraveled the mechanisms of key healing and regenerative pathways. A wide spectrum of primary and complementary regenerative treatments is becoming increasingly available, including blood-derived preparations, growth factors, bone marrow preparations, and stem cells. This is a new era in the application of biologically active material, and it is transforming clinical practice by providing effective supportive treatments either at the time of the index procedure or during the postoperative period. Regenerative treatments are currently in active use to enhance many areas of orthopedic surgery in an attempt to improve success and outcome. In this review we provide a comprehensive overview of the peer-reviewed evidence-based literature, highlighting the clinical outcomes in humans both with preclinical data and human clinical trials involving regenerative preparations within the areas of rotator cuff, meniscus, ligament, and articular cartilage surgical repair. PMID:25864660

  1. Orthopedic surgical analyzer for percutaneous vertebroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tack, Gye Rae; Choi, Hyung Guen; Lim, Do H.; Lee, Sung J.

    2001-05-01

    Since the spine is one of the most complex joint structures in the human body, its surgical treatment requires careful planning and high degree of precision to avoid any unwanted neurological compromises. In addition, comprehensive biomechanical analysis can be very helpful because the spine is subject to a variety of load. In case for the osteoporotic spine in which the structural integrity has been compromised, it brings out the double challenges for a surgeon both clinically and biomechanically. Thus, we have been developing an integrated medical image system that is capable of doing the both. This system is called orthopedic surgical analyzer and it combines the clinical results from image-guided examination and the biomechanical data from finite element analysis. In order to demonstrate its feasibility, this system was applied to percutaneous vertebroplasty. Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a surgical procedure that has been recently introduced for the treatment of compression fracture of the osteoporotic vertebrae. It involves puncturing vertebrae and filling with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Recent studies have shown that the procedure could provide structural reinforcement for the osteoporotic vertebrae while being minimally invasive and safe with immediate pain relief. However, treatment failures due to excessive PMMA volume injection have been reported as one of complications. It is believed that control of PMMA volume is one of the most critical factors that can reduce the incidence of complications. Since the degree of the osteoporosis can influence the porosity of the cancellous bone in the vertebral body, the injection volume can be different from patient to patient. In this study, the optimal volume of PMMA injection for vertebroplasty was predicted based on the image analysis of a given patient. In addition, biomechanical effects due to the changes in PMMA volume and bone mineral density (BMD) level were investigated by constructing clinically

  2. Colored Indicator Undergloves Increase the Detection of Glove Perforations by Surgeons During Small Animal Orthopedic Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Oliver P.; Parsons, Kevin J.; Burton, Neil J.; Langley‐Hobbs, Sorrel J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether use of colored indicator gloves affects perforation detection rate and to identify risk factors for glove perforation during veterinary orthopedic surgery. Study Design Prospective randomized controlled trial. Sample Population 574 double pairs of gloves worn during 300 orthopedic surgical procedures (2,296 gloves). Methods Primary and assistant surgeons double‐gloved for all orthopedic surgical procedures. Type of inner glove (standard or colored indicator) was randomized for the first 360 double pairs of gloves worn by surgeons during 180 procedures. Perforations detected by surgeons were recorded and gloves changed if requested. For a further 120 procedures, indicator gloves were used exclusively. All gloves were leak‐tested after surgery to identify perforations. Association between potential risk factors and perforation was explored using multivariate logistical regression analysis. Results Glove perforations occurred during 43% of surgeries with a mean of 2.3 holes/surgery. Inner gloves were intact in 63% of glove pairs where an outer perforation occurred. Intraoperative perforation detection was improved when colored indicator gloves were worn (83% sensitivity) vs. standard gloves (34% sensitivity; P<.001). Independent risk factors for perforation were placement of plates and/or screws (P=.001; OR=2.4; 95% CI, 1.4–4.0), placement of an external skeletal fixator (P=.002; OR=7.0; 95% CI, 2.1–23.8), use of orthopedic wire (P=.011; OR=2.4; 95% CI, 1.2–4.7), and primary surgeon being board‐certified (P=.016; OR=1.9; 95% CI, 1.1–3.1). Conclusion Increased surgeon recognition of glove perforations through use of colored indicator gloves enables prompt change of gloves if perforation occurs and may reduce potential contamination of the surgical site. PMID:27412490

  3. Closed Reduction and Percutaneous Fixation of Calcaneal Fractures in Children.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yongzeng; Yu, Yang; Shui, Xiaolong; Ying, Xiaozhou; Cai, Leyi; Hong, Jianjun

    2016-07-01

    Open reduction and internal fixation has been widely used to treat displaced intra-articular calcaneus fractures in children. However, the complications of surgical trauma and the wound created through the extended lateral approach cannot be ignored. This study analyzed the outcomes of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures in children treated with closed reduction and percutaneous fixation. Medical records of pediatric patients who had displaced intra-articular calcaneus fractures and underwent closed reduction and percutaneous fixation at the study institution between January 2008 and January 2013 were reviewed. Preoperative radiographs and computed tomography scans were used to evaluate and classify the fractures. Clinical outcomes and radiographic findings were assessed at postoperative follow-up. The study included 14 displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures in 11 patients (7 boys and 4 girls). Mean patient age was 11.18 years (range, 6-16 years), and average follow-up time was 42.8 months postoperatively (range, 12-72 months). There were 6 tongue-type fractures and 8 joint depression-type fractures, based on the Essex-Lopresti classification, and there were 11 type II and 3 type III fractures, based on the Sanders classification. Average Böhler angle was 8.00° (range, -5° to 18°) preoperatively and 30.79° (range, 26° to 40°) postoperatively (P<.001). Average subjective American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfoot score was 65.7 (range, 52-68). No patients had wound breakdown or infection. In the treatment of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures in pediatric patients, closed reduction and percutaneous fixation achieved good outcomes, with few complications. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e744-e748.]. PMID:27111072

  4. Insights into Avicenna's knowledge of the science of orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Dalfardi, Behnam; Yarmohammadi, Hassan; Meibodi, Mohammad Kalantari

    2014-01-18

    The art of orthopedics traces its history back to ancient civilizations like those of the Egyptians. The evolution of this branch of medicine is indebted to investigations of many scientists, including Greek, Roman and Persian scholars. The Persian physician Avicenna (980-1037 AD) is one such scientist who investigated different aspects of orthopedics. It is possible to analyze Avicenna's knowledge of orthopedics and his contributions to this branch of medicine by an examination of his epic encyclopedia of medicine, Al-Qanun fi al-Tibb (The Canon of Medicine). PMID:24649417

  5. Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

  6. Intramedullary Fixation of Clavicle Fractures: Anatomy, Indications, Advantages, and Disadvantages.

    PubMed

    Eichinger, Josef K; Balog, Todd P; Grassbaugh, Jason A

    2016-07-01

    Historically, management of displaced midshaft clavicle fractures has consisted of nonsurgical treatment. However, recent literature has supported surgical repair of displaced and shortened clavicle fractures. Several options exist for surgical fixation, including plate and intramedullary (IM) fixation. IM fixation has the potential advantages of a smaller incision and decreased dissection and soft-tissue exposure. For the last two decades, the use of Rockwood and Hagie pins represented the most popular form of IM fixation, but concerns exist regarding stability and complications. The use of alternative IM implants, such as Kirschner wires, titanium elastic nails, and cannulated screws, also has been described in limited case series. However, concerns persist regarding the complications associated with the use of these implants, including implant failure, migration, skin complications, and construct stability. Second-generation IM implants have been developed to reduce the limitations of earlier IM devices. Although anatomic and clinical studies have supported IM fixation of midshaft clavicle fractures, further research is necessary to determine the optimal fixation method. PMID:27227985

  7. External fixation of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Slutsky, David J

    2007-12-01

    External fixation has been used for the treatment of distal radius fractures for more than 50 years. Although the fixator configurations have undergone considerable modification over time, the type of fixator itself is not as important as the underlying principles that provide the foundation for external fixation. Although volar plate fixation is currently in vogue, the indications for external fixation remain largely unchanged. Newer fixator designs have also expanded the traditional usage to include nonbridging applications that allow early wrist motion. The following discussion focuses on the myriad uses for external fixation as well as the shortcomings and potential pitfalls. PMID:18070654

  8. The Effects of Standardized Feedback on Orthopedic Patient Evaluation Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DaRosa, Debra A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A study examined whether there are performance differences between surgery clerks provided corrective reinforcement on orthopedic history and physical examination write-ups and those assessed by traditional feedback means when both groups are exposed to the feedback instrument. (MLW)

  9. Orthopedic Health: Osteoarthritis— What You Should Know (quiz)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Orthopedic Health Osteoarthritis— What You Should Know Past Issues / Spring 2009 ... Javascript on. How much do you know about osteoarthritis, its causes, and its therapies? Take this quiz ...

  10. Orthopedic Health: Joint Health and Care: Prevention, Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Orthopedic Health Joint Health and Care: Prevention, Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of Contents ... or the sound of bone rubbing on bone Diagnosis No single test can diagnose osteoarthritis. It is ...

  11. Fixation by active accommodation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlavan, Kourosh; Uhlin, Tomas; Eklundh, Jan-Olof

    1992-11-01

    The field of computer vision has long been interested in disparity as the cue for the correspondence between stereo images. The other cue to correspondence, blur, and the fact that vergence is a combination of the two processes, accommodative vergence and disparity vergence, have not been equally appreciated. Following the methodology of active vision that allows the observer to control all his visual parameters, it is quite natural to take advantage of the powerful combination of these two processes. In this article, we try to elucidate such an integration and briefly analyze the cooperation and competition between accommodative vergence and disparity vergence on one hand and disparity and blur stimuli on the other hand. The human fixation mechanism is used as a guide-line and some virtues of this mechanism are used to implement a model for vergence in isolation. Finally, some experimental results are reported.

  12. Clostridial orthopedic infections: case reports and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lazzarini, L; Conti, E; Ditri, L; Turi, G; de Lalla, F

    2004-02-01

    Clostridia are anaerobic Gram-positive bacilli that can be isolated from the soil and the intestinal tract of humans. These microorganisms are recognized as the cause of devastating soft tissue infections, such as cellulitis, myositis, and gas gangrene. However, such bacteria may also be involved in various postoperative orthopedic infections, including prosthetic joint infection. We present three clinical cases of clostridial orthopedic infection and review the related medical literature. PMID:15078006

  13. Comparison of outcome of tibial plafond fractures managed by hybrid external fixation versus two-stage management with final plate fixation

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, Luis Natera; Gómez, Mireia; Alvarez, Carlos; Millán, Angélica; De Caso, Julio; Soria, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tibial platfond fractures are usually associated with massive swelling of the foot and ankle, as well as with open wounds. This swelling may cause significant decrease of the blood flow, so the state of the soft tissue is determinant for the surgical indication and the type of implant. This retrospective study compares the union times in cases of tibial plafond fractures managed with a hybrid external fixation as a definitive procedure versus those managed with a two stage strategy with final plate fixation. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study in a polytrauma referral hospital was performed between 2005 and 2011. Patients with a tibial plafond fracture, managed with a hybrid external fixation as a definitive procedure or managed with a two stage strategy with the final plate fixation were included in the study. Postoperative radiographs were evaluated by two senior surgeons. Fracture healing was defined as callus bridging of one cortex, seen on both lateral and anteroposterior X-ray. The clinical outcome was evaluated by means of 11 points Numerical Rating Scale for pain and The American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle score, assessed at the last followup visit. Thirteen patients had been managed with a hybrid external fixation and 18 with a two-stage strategy with the final plate fixation. There were 14 males and 17 females with a mean age of 48 years (range 19–82 years). The mean followup was 24 months (range 24–70 months). Results: The mean time from surgery to weight bearing was 7 ± 6.36 days for the hybrid fixation group and 57.43 ± 15.46 days for the plate fixation group (P < 0.0001); and the mean time from fracture to radiological union was 133.82 ± 37.83) and 152.8 ± 72.33 days respectively (P = 0.560). Conclusion: Besides the differences between groups regarding the baseline characteristics of patients, the results of this study suggest that in cases of tibial plafond fractures, the management with a hybrid external

  14. Modern Orthopedic Inpatient Care of the Orthopedic Patient With Diabetic Foot Disease.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Antony H; Bradford, Sara; Hester, Thomas W; Kubelka, Igor; Tremlett, Jennifer; Morris, Victoria; Pendry, Elizabeth; Kavarthapu, Venu; Edmonds, Michael E

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we describe emergency and elective pathways within our orthopedic multidisciplinary inpatient care of patients with diabetic foot problems. We performed a retrospective cohort review of 19 complex patients requiring orthopedic surgical treatment of infected ulceration or Charcot feet or deformity at our institution. A total of 30 admissions (19 emergency, 11 elective) were included. The pathways were coordinated by a multidisciplinary team and comprised initial assessment and investigation and a series of key events, which consisted of emergency and elective surgery together with the introduction, and change of intravenous antibiotics when indicated. Patients had rigorous microbiological assessment, in the form of deep ulcer swabs, operative tissue specimens, joint aspirates, and blood cultures according to their clinical presentation as well as close clinical and biochemical surveillance, which expedited the prompt institution of key events. Outcomes were assessed using amputation rates and patient satisfaction. In the emergency group, there were 5.6 ± 3.0 (mean ± SD) key events per admission, including 4.2 ± 2.1 antibiotic changes. In the elective group, there were 4.8 ± 1.4 key events per inpatient episode, with 3.7 ± 1.3 antibiotic changes. Overall, there were 3 minor amputations, and no major amputations. The podiatric and surgical tissue specimens showed a wide array of Gram-positive, Gram-negative, aerobic and anaerobic isolates and 15% of blood cultures showed bacteremia. When 9 podiatric specimens were compared with 9 contemporaneous surgical samples, there was concordance in 2 out of 9 pairs. We have described the successful modern care of the orthopedic diabetic foot patient, which involves close clinical, microbiological, and biochemical surveillance by the multidisciplinary team directing patients through emergency and elective pathways. This has enabled successful surgical intervention involving debridement, pressure relief, and

  15. Orthopedic surgery and its complication in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Anselm

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-systemic immune-complex mediated autoimmune condition which chiefly affects women during their prime year. While the management of the condition falls into the specialty of internal medicine, patients with SLE often present with signs and symptoms pertaining to the territory of orthopedic surgery such as tendon rupture, carpal tunnel syndrome, osteonecrosis, osteoporotic fracture and infection including septic arthritis, osteomyelitis and spondylodiscitis. While these orthopedic-related conditions are often debilitating in patients with SLE which necessitate management by orthopedic specialists, a high index of suspicion is necessary in diagnosing these conditions early because lupus patients with potentially severe orthopedic conditions such as osteomyelitis frequently present with mild symptoms and subtle signs such as low grade fever, mild hip pain and back tenderness. Additionally, even if these orthopedic conditions can be recognized, complications as a result of surgical procedures are indeed not uncommon. SLE per se and its various associated pharmacological treatments may pose lupus patients to certain surgical risks if they are not properly attended to and managed prior to, during and after surgery. Concerted effort of management and effective communication among orthopedic specialists and rheumatologists play an integral part in enhancing favorable outcome and reduction in postoperative complications for patients with SLE through thorough pre-operative evaluation, careful peri-operative monitoring and treatment, as well as judicious postoperative care. PMID:24653977

  16. Are academic orthopedic surgeons interested in global health?

    PubMed

    Makhni, Melvin C; Miao, Diana; Zurakowski, David; Day, Charles S

    2014-03-01

    Two thirds of the world's population lack orthopedic services. Natural disasters such as the 2010 Haiti earthquake temporarily increased volunteering, but the decision to volunteer regularly is likely multifactorial. In the study reported here, we investigated whether academic orthopedic surgeons are interested in volunteering abroad and identified factors that influence participation. Academic orthopedic surgeons were identified through the faculty listings of all 154 orthopedic residency programs listed by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Electronic Residency Application Service and were sent surveys by e-mail. Of the 3,697 eligible academic orthopedic surgeons, 600 were randomly selected, and 109 completed the survey. Of the 109 respondents, 52% had volunteered abroad previously, and 62% said they were highly likely to volunteer abroad in the future. The most common barriers were scheduling, and family and social commitments (65% and 66%, respectively), followed by lack of specialty-specific opportunities (40%). In a multivariate model, the only barrier significantly decreasing likelihood to volunteer abroad was concern for medical safety (P = .015). Altruistic motivations (P = .005), religious sentiments (P = .006), international networking (P = .004), and fulfilling the true medical creed (P = .015) significantly increased likelihood. Academic orthopedic surgeons are interested in volunteering abroad. Addressing common motivations and barriers may help improve care in the developing world. PMID:24660182

  17. 21 CFR 888.3030 - Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., such as screws and nails, or bolts, nuts, and washers. These devices are used for fixation of fractures..., supracondylar, or condylar fractures of the femur; for fusion of a joint; or for surgical procedures...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3030 - Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., such as screws and nails, or bolts, nuts, and washers. These devices are used for fixation of fractures..., supracondylar, or condylar fractures of the femur; for fusion of a joint; or for surgical procedures...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3030 - Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., such as screws and nails, or bolts, nuts, and washers. These devices are used for fixation of fractures..., supracondylar, or condylar fractures of the femur; for fusion of a joint; or for surgical procedures...

  20. The white blood cell scan in orthopedics

    SciTech Connect

    Propst-Proctor, S.L.; Dillingham, M.F.; McDougall, I.R.; Goodwin, D.

    1982-08-01

    A new nuclear scanning technique was found more specific for bone, joint, and soft tissue infections than any previously described scanning technique. The leukocyte scan, whereby a patient's own cells are labeled with a radioactive tagging agent (/sup 111/In oxine), can distinguish an active infectious process from other pain-inducing conditions. Ninety-seven /sup 111/In labeled autologous leukocyte scans were performed in 88 patients. The findings in 17 of 40 patients scanned for possible acute osteomyelitis, six of nine for suspected septic arthritis, and six for possible soft tissue infections, were positive. Subsequent clinical courses verified the infectious nature of these processes in all patients. Patients who had chronic osteomyelitis (14), bony metastases (four patients), heterotopic ossification (three), and degenerative arthritis (two) demonstrated negative findings. Of the seven patients scanned for acute long-bone fractures, one demonstrated positive findings. Nine scans demonstrated positive findings without determined causes. The leukocyte scan is a useful addition to the diagnostic tools of the orthopedic surgeon.

  1. Physician-Hospital Alignment in Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bushnell, Brandon D

    2015-09-01

    The concept of "alignment" between physicians and hospitals is a popular buzzword in the age of health care reform. Despite their often tumultuous histories, physicians and hospitals find themselves under increasing pressures to work together toward common goals. However, effective alignment is more than just simple cooperation between parties. The process of achieving alignment does not have simple, universal steps. Alignment will differ based on individual situational factors and the type of specialty involved. Ultimately, however, there are principles that underlie the concept of alignment and should be a part of any physician-hospital alignment efforts. In orthopedic surgery, alignment involves the clinical, administrative, financial, and even personal aspects of a surgeon's practice. It must be based on the principles of financial interest, clinical authority, administrative participation, transparency, focus on the patient, and mutual necessity. Alignment can take on various forms as well, with popular models consisting of shared governance and comanagement, gainsharing, bundled payments, accountable care organizations, and other methods. As regulatory and financial pressures continue to motivate physicians and hospitals to develop alignment relationships, new and innovative methods of alignment will also appear. Existing models will mature and evolve, with individual variability based on local factors. However, certain trends seem to be appearing as time progresses and alignment relationships deepen, including regional and national collaboration, population management, and changes in the legal system. This article explores the history, principles, and specific methods of physician-hospital alignment and its critical importance for the future of health care delivery. PMID:26375539

  2. Functionally graded materials for orthopedic applications - an update on design and manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Sola, Antonella; Bellucci, Devis; Cannillo, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGMs) are innovative materials whose composition and/or microstructure gradually vary in space according to a designed law. As a result, also the properties gradually vary in space, so as to meet specific non-homogeneous service requirements without any abrupt interface at the macroscale. FGMs are emerging materials for orthopedic prostheses, since the functional gradient can be adapted to reproduce the local properties of the original bone, which helps to minimize the stress shielding effect and, at the same time, to reduce the shear stress between the implant and the surrounding bone tissue, two critical prerequisites for a longer lifespan of the graft. After a brief introduction to the origin of the FGM concept, the review surveys some representative examples of graded systems which are present in nature and, in particular, in the human body, with a focus on bone tissue. Then the rationale for using FGMs in orthopedic devices is discussed more in detail, taking into account both biological and biomechanical requirements. The core of the paper is dedicated to two fundamental topics, which are essential to benefit from the use of FGMs for orthopedic applications, namely (1) the computational tools for materials design and geometry optimization, and (2) the manufacturing techniques currently available to produce FGM-based grafts. This second part, in its turn, is structured to consider the production of functionally graded coatings (FGCs), of functionally graded 3D parts, and of special devices with a gradient in porosity (functionally graded scaffolds). The inspection of the literature on the argument clearly shows that the integration of design and manufacturing remains a critical step to overpass in order to achieve effective FGM-based implants. PMID:26757264

  3. Multidimensional Sternal Fixation to Overcome a “Floating” Sternum

    PubMed Central

    Rothstein, William; Spata, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes the repair of a complete sternal dehiscence of the lower right sternum using sternal wires, manubrial plates, and a Talon closure device for rigid, multidimensional sternal fixation. Sternal dehiscence is a rare but significant cause of morbidity for patients undergoing median sternotomy. The risk factors for this complication are well described and although sternal wires have traditionally been used for primary closure, rigid fixation with sternal plates is a viable alternative to avoid dehiscence in this high-risk cohort. PMID:25379318

  4. Surface integrity of biodegradable Magnesium-Calcium orthopedic implant by burnishing.

    PubMed

    Salahshoor, M; Guo, Y B

    2011-11-01

    Magnesium-Calcium (MgCa) alloy as an emerging biodegradable implant material has received considerable attention in orthopedic fixation applications. The biodegradable MgCa alloys avoid stress shielding and secondary surgery inherent with permanent metallic implant materials. They also provide sufficient mechanical strength in load carrying applications as opposed to biopolymers. However, the key issue facing a biodegradable MgCa implant is the fast corrosion in the human body environment. The ability to adjust the degradation rate of MgCa alloys is critical in the successful development of biodegradable orthopedic materials. Burnishing as a low plastic deformation process is a promising technique to tune surface integrity of MgCa implant surface for biodegradation control. However, the poor ductility of MgCa alloys imposes a great challenge for burnishing. This study focuses on the basic understanding of surface mechanical behavior of burnished biodegradable MgCa0.8 (wt%) alloy. The effects of burnishing parameters, i.e., pressure, feed, speed, number of path, and burnishing pattern on surface integrity factors such as surface topography, roughness, microhardness, microstructure, and residual stresses are investigated. The burnished surfaces are shinier and smoother than the as-machined ones. The MgCa alloy can be safely burnished at suitable burnishing conditions since no cracks are produced at the surface and in the subsurface. The microstructure including grain size does not show a noticeable change after burnishing. The machined surfaces are harder than the burnished ones down to the deep subsurface (∼200 μm) as opposed to the shallow hardened depth (∼50 μm) in cutting. Residual stresses are highly compressive especially at low burnishing pressure. PMID:22098888

  5. Molecular Biology of Nitrogen Fixation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanmugam, K. T.; Valentine, Raymond C.

    1975-01-01

    Reports that as a result of our increasing knowledge of the molecular biology of nitrogen fixation it might eventually be possible to increase the biological production of nitrogenous fertilizer from atmospheric nitrogen. (GS)

  6. Comparison of surgical outcomes between fixation with hook plate and loop suspensory fixation for acute unstable acromioclavicular joint dislocation: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Arirachakaran, Alisara; Boonard, Manusak; Piyapittayanun, Peerapong; Phiphobmongkol, Vajarin; Chaijenkij, Kornkit; Kongtharvonskul, Jatupon

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of acute (≤4 weeks) high-grade acromioclavicular (AC) joint separation (types III-VI) is still controversial. Currently, the two modern techniques that are widely used include hook plate fixation and coracoclavicular (CC) ligament fixation using a suspensory loop device (tightrope, synthetic ligament or absorbable polydioxansulfate sling). These techniques are both reported to have superior clinical outcomes. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to assess and compare clinical outcomes of hook plate fixation versus fixation of the CC ligament using a loop suspensory fixation (LSF) device for the treatment of AC joint injury. These clinical outcomes consist of the Constant-Murley score (CMS), pain visual analog score (VAS) and postoperative complications. Relevant comparative studies were identified from MEDLINE and Scopus from inception to October 5, 2015. Five of 571 studies were eligible; 5, 3, 3, and 5 studies were included in the pooling of CMS, pain VAS, surgical time and postoperative complications, respectively. The unstandardized mean difference (UMD) of the CMS for LSF was 4.43 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.73, 8.14], which was statistically significantly higher than the CMS in hook plate fixation. For VAS, the UMD was 0.02 points (95 % CI -3.54, 3.73) higher than LSF but without statistical significance. The surgical time of LSF was 16.21 min (95 % CI 6.27, 26.15) statistically significantly higher than hook plate fixation. LSF had a lower chance of postoperative complications by 0.62 units (95 % CI 0.30, 1.32) when compared to hook plate fixation, but this also was not statistically significant. In acute high-grade AC joint injuries, loop suspensory fixation had higher postoperative functional CMS and mean surgical time when compared to hook plate fixation. However, for postoperative VAS and complication rates, there were no statistically significant differences between groups. PMID:27334621

  7. Managing orthopedics and neurosciences costs through standard treatment protocols.

    PubMed

    McGinnity, E S; Pluth, T E

    1994-06-01

    High-cost, high-volume specialty programs such as orthopedics and neurosciences find themselves in a position of evaluating the costs and in some cases the appropriateness of medical practices in response to payer scrutiny and provider selection processes. Orthopedics and neurosciences programs are at a stage of development analogous to that of cardiovascular care several years ago. Many of the same trends have come into play, such as payer "carve-outs" for orthopedic services, payer selection of centers of excellence based on cost and quality, reduction of Medicare reimbursement, greater use of high-cost technology, the decline of profitability due to "older, sicker, and tougher" patients, and the recent emergence of national orthopedic specialty networks oriented to national contracts for care. In an era in which payers demand value on both sides of the cost-plus-quality equation, programs are challenged to maximize the return on a patient population rife with "no-win" situations. In the orthopedic service line these include a high proportion of Medicare patients and chronic conditions such as workers' compensation medical back cases or repetitive motion injuries, which can be elusive to diagnose and expensive to treat. Many hospitals continue to lose money on joint replacement surgeries, the largest-volume orthopedic inpatient service, primarily because of the high Medicare population and the cost of implants. Neuroservices, while still relatively well reimbursed, face a rising proportion of Medicare payments as patients live longer and develop chronic, degenerative conditions. Inpatient days are decreasing due to payer pressures to limit hospital stays and to shift inpatient care to outpatient services. Some hospitals "have lost interest in (the orthopedic) service line during the last five years because of recent trends in orthopedic-related inpatient volume and payment." But by managing costs strategically, both the neurosciences and orthopedics service lines

  8. The Economic Burden of Orthopedic Surgery Residency Interviews on Applicants

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Harold A.; Finkler, Elissa S.; Wu, Karen; Schiff, Adam P.; Nystrom, Lukas M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The intense competition for orthopedic surgery residency positions influences the interview process. The financial impact on residency applicants is less well understood. The purpose of the present study was to define the economic burden of the orthopedic surgery residency interview process while additionally describing how applicants finance the expense. Methods We distributed surveys to 48 nonrotating applicants at our institution’s residency interview days for the 2015 match year. The survey consisted of eleven questions specific to the costs of interviewing for orthopedic surgery residency positions. Results The survey response rate was 90% (43/48). Applicants applied to a median of 65 orthopedic surgery residency programs (range 21-88) and targeted a median of 15 interviews (range 12-25). The mean cost estimate for a single interview was $450 (range $200-800) and the cost estimate for all interviews was $7,119 (range $2,500-15,000). Applicants spent a mean of $344 (range $0-750) traveling to our interview. Seventy-two percent borrowed money to finance their interview costs and 28% canceled interviews for financial reasons. Conclusions The financial cost of interviewing for orthopedic surgery is substantial and a majority of applicants add to their educational debt by taking out loans to finance interviews. Future considerations should be made to minimize these costs for an already financially burdened population. PMID:27528831

  9. Does thromboprophylaxis prevent venous thromboembolism after major orthopedic surgery?*,**

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Evrim Eylem; Hosgün, Derya; Akan, Burak; Ates, Can; Gülhan, Meral

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pulmonary embolism (PE) is an important complication of major orthopedic surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and factors influencing the development of VTE in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery in a university hospital. METHODS: Patients who underwent major orthopedic surgery (hip arthroplasty, knee arthroplasty, or femur fracture repair) between February of 2006 and June of 2012 were retrospectively included in the study. The incidences of PE and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) were evaluated, as were the factors influencing their development, such as type of operation, age, and comorbidities. RESULTS: We reviewed the medical records of 1,306 patients. The proportions of knee arthroplasty, hip arthroplasty, and femur fracture repair were 63.4%, 29.9%, and 6.7%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of PE and DVT in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery was 1.99% and 2.22%, respectively. Most of the patients presented with PE and DVT (61.5% and 72.4%, respectively) within the first 72 h after surgery. Patients undergoing femur fracture repair, those aged ≥ 65 years, and bedridden patients were at a higher risk for developing VTE. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that VTE was a significant complication of major orthopedic surgery, despite the use of thromboprophylaxis. Clinicians should be aware of VTE, especially during the perioperative period and in bedridden, elderly patients (≥ 65 years of age). PMID:23857692

  10. Orthostetrics: Management of Orthopedic Conditions in the Pregnant Patient.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Leslie J; McConda, David B; Lalli, Trapper A J; Daffner, Scott D

    2015-10-01

    Managing orthopedic conditions in pregnant patients leads to challenges that must be carefully considered so that the safety of both the mother and the fetus is maintained. Both perioperative and intraoperative considerations must be made based on physiologic changes during pregnancy, risks of radiation, and recommendations for monitoring. Operative timing, imaging, and medication selection are also factors that may vary based on trimester and clinical scenario. Pregnancy introduces unique parameters that can result in undesirable outcomes for both mother and fetus if not handled appropriately. Ultimately, pregnant patients offer a distinct challenge to the orthopedic surgeon in that the well-being of 2 patients must be considered in all aspects of care. In addition, not only does pregnancy affect the management of orthopedic conditions but the pregnant state also causes physiologic changes that may actually induce various pathologies. These pregnancy-related orthopedic conditions can interfere with an otherwise healthy pregnancy and should be recognized as possible complications. Although the management of orthopedic conditions in pregnancy is often conservative, pregnancy does not necessarily preclude safely treating pathologies operatively. When surgery is considered, regional anesthesia provides less overall drug exposure to the fetus and less variability in fetal heart rate. Intraoperative fluoroscopy can be used when appropriate, with 360° fetal shielding if possible. Lateral decubitus positioning is ideal to prevent hypotension associated with compression of the inferior vena cava. PMID:26488781

  11. Finite Element Analysis of Sacroiliac Joint Fixation under Compression Loads

    PubMed Central

    Bruna-Rosso, Claire; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean; Bianco, Rohan-Jean; Godio-Raboutet, Yves; Fradet, Léo

    2016-01-01

    Background Sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a known chronic pain-generator. The last resort of treatment is the arthrodesis. Different implants allow fixation of the joint, but to date there is no tool to analyze their influence on the SIJ biomechanics under physiological loads. The objective was to develop a computational model to biomechanically analyze different parameters of the stable SIJ fixation instrumentation. Methods A comprehensive finite element model (FEM) of the pelvis was built with detailed SIJ representation. Bone and sacroiliac joint ligament material properties were calibrated against experimentally acquired load-displacement data of the SIJ. Model evaluation was performed with experimental load-displacement measurements of instrumented cadaveric SIJ. Then six fixation scenarios with one or two implants on one side with two different trajectories (proximal, distal) were simulated and assessed with the FEM under vertical compression loads. Results The simulated S1 endplate displacement reduction achieved with the fixation devices was within 3% of the experimentally measured data. Under compression loads, the uninstrumented sacrum exhibited mainly a rotation motion (nutation) of 1.38° and 2.80° respectively at 600 N and 1000 N, with a combined relative translation (0.3 mm). The instrumentation with one screw reduced the local displacement within the SIJ by up to 62.5% for the proximal trajectory vs. 15.6% for the distal trajectory. Adding a second implant had no significant additional effect. Conclusion A comprehensive finite element model was developed to assess the biomechanics of SIJ fixation. SIJ devices enable to reduce the motion, mainly rotational, between the sacrum and ilium. Positioning the implant farther from the SIJ instantaneous rotation center was an important factor to reduce the intra-articular displacement. Clinical relevance Knowledge provided by this biomechanical study enables improvement of SIJ fixation through optimal implant

  12. Orthopedic Manifestations of Mobius Syndrome: Case Series and Survey Study.

    PubMed

    McClure, Philip; Booy, David; Katarincic, Julia; Eberson, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mobius Syndrome is a rare disease defined by bilateral congenital 7th nerve palsy. We focus on reporting the prevalence of orthopedic disease in this population. Methods. Twenty-three individuals with Mobius Syndrome underwent orthopedic physical examination, and additional 96 patients filled out a survey for self-reported orthopedic diagnoses. Results. Clubfoot was present in 60% of individuals in the physical exam series and 42% of those in the survey. Scoliosis was present in 26% and 28%, respectively. Poland's Syndrome was present in 17% and 30%. In addition to these findings, 27% of patients reported having difficulty with anesthesia, including difficulty in intubation and airway problems. Conclusion. An increased prevalence of scoliosis, clubfoot, transverse limb deficiencies, and Poland's Syndrome is identified in the setting of Mobius Syndrome. In the setting of several deformities often requiring surgical correction, a high incidence of anesthetic difficulty is noted and should be discussed with patients and other providers during surgical planning. PMID:26977161

  13. Orthopedic Manifestations of Mobius Syndrome: Case Series and Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Philip; Booy, David; Katarincic, Julia; Eberson, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mobius Syndrome is a rare disease defined by bilateral congenital 7th nerve palsy. We focus on reporting the prevalence of orthopedic disease in this population. Methods. Twenty-three individuals with Mobius Syndrome underwent orthopedic physical examination, and additional 96 patients filled out a survey for self-reported orthopedic diagnoses. Results. Clubfoot was present in 60% of individuals in the physical exam series and 42% of those in the survey. Scoliosis was present in 26% and 28%, respectively. Poland's Syndrome was present in 17% and 30%. In addition to these findings, 27% of patients reported having difficulty with anesthesia, including difficulty in intubation and airway problems. Conclusion. An increased prevalence of scoliosis, clubfoot, transverse limb deficiencies, and Poland's Syndrome is identified in the setting of Mobius Syndrome. In the setting of several deformities often requiring surgical correction, a high incidence of anesthetic difficulty is noted and should be discussed with patients and other providers during surgical planning. PMID:26977161

  14. Evidence-based orthopedic surgery: is it possible?

    PubMed

    Suk, Michael; Hanson, Beate; Helfet, David L

    2010-04-01

    The promise of evidence-based medicine is to integrate the highest levels of clinical data with patient outcomes. After framing the question and identifying appropriate studies, evaluating their relevance to clinical practice is highly dependent on the instruments and measures selected to demonstrate outcomes. Currently, there are hundreds of outcomes measures available in the orthopedic literature evaluating these treatments, and it is not uncommon for different measures to produce conflicting results. Consequently, the ability to evaluate an outcomes measure is critical in determining the value of a specific treatment intervention. Similarly, selecting the appropriate outcomes measure for research or clinical purposes is an important decision that may have far reaching implications on reimbursement, surgeon reputation, and patient treatment success. Evidence-based orthopedic surgery is indeed possible, but demands a detailed understanding of why appropriate outcomes selection is important, the difference between clinician-based and patient-reported outcomes (PROs), and potential future directions in orthopedics outcomes research. PMID:20399353

  15. Pulmonary and cardiovascular consequences of immediate fixation or conservative management of long-bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Lozman, J; Deno, D C; Feustel, P J; Newell, J C; Stratton, H H; Sedransk, N; Dutton, R; Fortune, J B; Shah, D M

    1986-09-01

    We randomly assigned patients with multiple trauma who had tibial or femoral fractures to one of two groups--one group received immediate fixation of all fractures, and the second group received conservative orthopedic management, consisting of traction or plaster casts. Studies were conducted twice each day for four days following injury. Mean cardiac index was 1.3 L/min/m2 higher and mean shunt was 5.2% lower in the immediate fixation group compared with the group receiving conservative treatment. Other pulmonary and systemic hemodynamic variables did not differ between the groups. The incidence of fat macroglobules in blood aspirated from the pulmonary capillaries was higher when compared with that in pulmonary arterial blood but was not significantly different between the two treatment groups. Platelet count was significantly lower and fibrinogen concentration was significantly higher in the group receiving immediate fixation. We found no diagnostic significance of the incidence of fat macroglobules in samples of blood aspirated from the pulmonary circulation. We conclude that patients receiving immediate fixation had less pulmonary dysfunction following multiple trauma and long-bone fractures. PMID:3741107

  16. [Technical orthopedics. Importance in an increasingly operatively oriented faculty].

    PubMed

    Greitemann, B; Maronna, U

    2013-10-01

    The foundation of the German Society for Orthopedics in 1901 was due to a separation from the faculty of surgery because a surgical approach alone did not adequately deal with the symptoms. Orthopedists were initially considered as a fringe group. The conservative treatment approach was initially at the forefront and operative measures were a side line. The main aim was the rehabilitation of patients into a normal life as best as possible. In the conservative area treatment with orthopedic technical aids and appliances rapidly came to play an important role and a great multitude of technical appliances were developed with sometimes very different possible applications. Despite the clearly improved operative treatment approaches in orthopedics and trauma surgery, technical orthopedics still plays a substantial role even today. Healing and supportive aids and appliances are of decisive importance for the treatment of a multitude of diseases and handicaps. They stabilize and improve operative treatment results and often result in new approaches. This depends on cooperation between technicians, therapists and physicians in a team, even in the scientific field. Evidence-based studies on the effectiveness of technical aids are currently still uncommon but recently some clear evidence for effectiveness could be shown. Scientifically this is a very varied field of work. The demographic development presents new requirements which must be dealt with. Technical solutions are often very promising especially in this field. Technical orthopedics remains an important component of the specialty of orthopedics and trauma surgery and with an increasing tendency due to more recent research and development. PMID:23955523

  17. Applications of Metal Additive Manufacturing in Veterinary Orthopedic Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrysson, Ola L. A.; Marcellin-Little, Denis J.; Horn, Timothy J.

    2015-03-01

    Veterinary medicine has undergone a rapid increase in specialization over the last three decades. Veterinarians now routinely perform joint replacement, neurosurgery, limb-sparing surgery, interventional radiology, radiation therapy, and other complex medical procedures. Many procedures involve advanced imaging and surgical planning. Evidence-based medicine has also become part of the modus operandi of veterinary clinicians. Modeling and additive manufacturing can provide individualized or customized therapeutic solutions to support the management of companion animals with complex medical problems. The use of metal additive manufacturing is increasing in veterinary orthopedic surgery. This review describes and discusses current and potential applications of metal additive manufacturing in veterinary orthopedic surgery.

  18. [Orthopedic aspects in interdisciplinary multimodal therapy of chronic back pain].

    PubMed

    Weh, L; Marnitz, U

    2011-06-01

    The effect of interdisciplinary multimodal therapy of chronic back pain is well documented. With elapsing time changing diagnostic focuses, therapeutic strategies and objectives have to be considered. The chronicity leads to a modification of the relevance of structure-related diagnosis and therapy and changes the significance of the classic orthopedic instruments. The requirement of a rational causal therapy in chronic back pain still remains but the focal points shift to the consideration of somatic, psychological and social disposing and supporting factors.The aim of this paper is to reflect the necessary orthopedic expertise in the context of the pathomechanics of chronic back pain and the interdisciplinary teamwork. PMID:21523420

  19. Use of lasers in orthopedic surgery: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Abelow, S P

    1993-05-01

    A surgical laser is a new, multipurpose tool that can cut, coagulate, and vaporize tissues. It utilizes a low profile handpiece that allows easy access to tight places and small joints. The holmium laser at 2.1 microns wavelength is gaining wide acceptance among orthopedic surgeons as a useful arthroscopic surgical tool. It has a minimal amount of thermal necrosis and is able to cut and ablate tissues with great ease. Current investigation with laser tissue--agglutination and tissue welding--may make it possible to repair torn tissues with laser energy. The future will bring minimally invasive and minimally damaging laser orthopedic surgery. PMID:8327382

  20. Computer-assisted diagnosis of orthopedic gait disorders.

    PubMed

    Tracy, K B; Montague, E C; Gabriel, R P; Kent, B E

    1979-03-01

    A computer program was developed to help diagnose orthopedic gait disorders. Designing and implementing the program, as well as the program's method of operation are described. The main features of the program include: a knowledge base of facts about orthopedic gait, organized into premise-conclusion pairs; a goal-directed reasoning chain that causally relates the facts; and a symbolic structure that allows limited English discourse between the user and the computer. Results of the project indicate that the complex area of gait analysis does lend itself to diagnosis by computer and that this prototype has potential as an aid to physical therapists in the classroom and in the clinic. PMID:84393

  1. [Means of developing personnel potentials of dental orthopedic service in southern regions of Tiumen' oblast].

    PubMed

    Voznyĭ, A V; Dolgintsev, V I; Semeniuk, V M; Ivanova, L A

    2005-01-01

    The article exposes overall analysis and objective evaluation of personnel potential of orthopedic dental service in southern region of Tyumen oblast. Actual issues of enhancement of orthopedic dental service in this region are discussed. PMID:16821315

  2. Orthopedic Health: Healthy Joints for a Lifetime / Keep Your Moving Parts Moving

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Orthopedic Health Healthy Joints for a Lifetime Past Issues / ... being made every day in the world of orthopedic health and disease treatment —our bones, muscles, tendons, ...

  3. Bisphosphonate-Based Strategies for Bone Tissue Engineering and Orthopedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Cattalini, Juan Pablo; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Lucangioli, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are a group of well-established drugs that are applied in the development of metabolic bone disorder-related therapies. There is increasing interest also in the application of BPs in the context of bone tissue engineering, which is the topic of this review, in which an extensive overview of published studies on the development and applications of BPs-based strategies for bone regeneration is provided with special focus on the rationale for the use of different BPs in three-dimensional (3D) bone tissue scaffolds. The different alternatives that are investigated to address the delivery and sustained release of these therapeutic drugs in the nearby tissues are comprehensively discussed, and the most significant published approaches on bisphosphonate-conjugated drugs in multifunctional 3D scaffolds as well as the role of BPs within coatings for the improved fixation of orthopedic implants are presented and critically evaluated. Finally, the authors' views regarding the remaining challenges in the fields and directions for future research efforts are highlighted. PMID:22440082

  4. Orthopedics nursing patients' profile of a public hospital in Salvador-Bahia

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Renata Reis Matutino; Ribeiro, Natália Fonseca; de Andrade, Aline Mendonça; Jaques, Bruno Dórea

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the profile of patients treated in the trauma and orthopedics nursing of a trauma care referral public hospital of in the state of Bahia. METHODS: Cross-sectional study in which data were collected from medical records of patients in the period from July to December 2008. RESULTS: The profile of the patients involved was formed by subjects mostly male young subjects, victims of trauma from accidents, especially those with motorcycles or car runover. On the other hand,the most frequent traumas associated with urban violence were perforations by gunshot and stab wounds. The primary injury presented by these individuals was exposed fracture of the femur and the most common treatment was external fixation. The most frequent in-hospital complication was wound infection, which required another surgical approach. Most inpatients were discharged and only one death was reported during this period. CONCLUSION: The results of this study corroborate those from other institutions in the country, which may contribute to elaborate public policies for accidents and violence prevention. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453666

  5. Surface modification of magnesium alloys developed for bioabsorbable orthopedic implants: a general review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiali; Tang, Jian; Zhang, Peng; Li, Yangde; Wang, Jue; Lai, Yuxiao; Qin, Ling

    2012-08-01

    As a bioabsorbable metal with mechanical properties close to bone, pure magnesium or its alloys have great potential to be developed as medical implants for clinical applications. However, great efforts should be made to avoid its fast degradation in vivo for orthopedic applications when used for fracture fixation. Therefore, how to decease degradation rate of pure magnesium or its alloys is one of the focuses in Research and Development (R&D) of medical implants. It has been recognized that surface modification is an effective method to prevent its initial degradation in vivo to maintain its desired mechanical strength. This article reviews the recent progress in surface modifications for prevention of fast degradation of magnesium or its alloys using in vitro testing model, a fast yet relevant model before moving towards time-consuming and expensive in vivo testing. Pros and cons of various surface modifications are also discussed for the goal to design available products to be applied in clinical trials. PMID:22566412

  6. Effects of microstructure on the corrosion behavior of CoCr porous coatings on orthopedic implants.

    PubMed

    Placko, H E; Brown, S A; Payer, J H

    1998-02-01

    Cobalt-chromium alloy porous coatings have become increasingly popular as a means of achieving a stable, longer lasting fixation on orthopedic implants. However, sintering heat treatments cause changes in the microstructure that result in changes in the corrosion behavior of the porous coatings. Experiments were conducted to examine the effects of microstructure on the corrosion of CoCr porous coatings. Four distinct microstructures were characterized. Light microscopy revealed microstructures A and B had relatively fewer carbides and a large-grain structure, microstructures C and D displayed a finer grain size with significant carbide formation, predominantly within grains and fusion zones. Accelerated anodic corrosion experiments were conducted to study the localized attack of each microstructure. Experiments were conducted using metallographically polished porous-coated disks for durations of 1, 4, 16, 24, and 72 h. The disks were examined with SEM and EDS to observe preferential attack and element depletion. Results showed a progressive dissolution of the matrix, with preferential attack of the grain boundaries and regions adjacent to the carbides due to sensitization. A precipitation layer was found to be Cr-rich and possibly composed of chromium hydroxide or a chromium orthophosphate. In addition, the solution became yellow in color with longer exposure times, possibly due to the presence of chromate ions, as indicated by an increased chromium level detected by AAS. PMID:9457560

  7. Minimally invasive dynamic hip screw for fixation of hip fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Michael; Garau, Giorgio; Walley, Gayle; Oliva, Francesco; Panni, Alfredo Schiavone; Longo, Umile Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    We compared a minimally invasive surgical technique to the conventional (open approach) surgical technique used in fixation of hip fractures with the dynamic hip screw (DHS) device. Using a case-control design (44 cases and 44 controls), we tested the null hypothesis that there is no difference between the two techniques in the following outcome measures: duration of surgery, time to mobilisation and weight bearing postoperatively, length of hospital stay, mean difference of pre- and postoperative haemoglobin levels, position of the lag screw of the DHS device in the femoral head, and the tip–apex distance. The minimally invasive DHS technique had significantly shorter duration of surgery and length of hospital stay. There was also less blood loss in the minimally invasive DHS technique. The minimally invasive DHS technique produces better outcome measures in the operating time, length of hospital stay, and blood loss compared to the conventional approach while maintaining equal fixation stability. PMID:18478227

  8. Left-Handed Preschool Children with Orthopedic Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banham, Katharine M.

    1983-01-01

    The mental development of 332 preschool-age children with orthopedic disabilities was assessed at a children's hospital over a 10-year period, and comparisons were made for right-handed and left-handed. The left-handed children were slower than right-handed children in learning speech and language skills (Author/SEW)

  9. 45 CFR 1308.12 - Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment. 1308.12 Section 1308.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD START PROGRAM HEAD...

  10. The Special Orthopedic Hospital—Past and Present

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Harry

    1964-01-01

    Pioneer orthopedic institutions established in Europe in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, and in the U.S.A. in the second half of the 19th and the first decade of the 20th century, can trace their ancestry in ideas back to the practice and teachings of Hippocrates. Experience in treatment of great numbers of injured soldiers in the First World War opened a new era in reconstructive surgery of the locomotor system. After the Second World War, in advanced nations the pattern of crippling diseases showed a spectacular change. Problems that justify the existence of large special orthopedic hospitals are, in children, the more complex congenital deformities, cerebral palsies, and the increasing number of injuries due to hazards of modern life; in the adult, the reconstructive surgery of trauma and of arthritis. In modern orthopedic hospitals physicians have joined orthopedic surgeons in the study of the natural history of the various forms of arthritis. These centres provide facilities for biomechanical research and postgraduate training which acute general hospitals cannot offer. PMID:14228224

  11. 45 CFR 1308.12 - Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment. 1308.12 Section 1308.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD START PROGRAM HEAD...

  12. Higher Education and Students with Orthopedic Disabilities: A Survey Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Delar K.

    A survey instrument is presented that was used in a national survey of 160 colleges and universities to explore facilities and services to students with orthopedic disabilities. The survey contains 33 items that focus on the following areas: structural accessibility, academic accessibility, dorm-living, and recreational opportunities. The total…

  13. Supporting the Educational Needs of Students with Orthopedic Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Swinehart-Jones, Dawn

    2003-01-01

    This article provides information on orthopedic impairments and the unique knowledge and skills required to provide these students with an appropriate education. Information on current practice is provided, as well as training and technical assistance models that can be used to help provide teachers with the necessary training. (Contains…

  14. Office orthopedics: thumb spica casting for scaphoid fractures.

    PubMed

    Richard, J R

    1995-09-15

    Fracture of the scaphoid bone of the wrist is a common orthopedic problem and is accurately diagnosed by determining the mechanism of injury based on the history, performing a specific physical examination maneuvers and interpreting radiographic findings. Skill in the application of the thumb spica cast enables the family physician to provide appropriate and definitive care for many of these patients. PMID:7668203

  15. 45 CFR 1308.12 - Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment. 1308.12 Section 1308.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD START PROGRAM HEAD...

  16. 45 CFR 1308.12 - Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment. 1308.12 Section 1308.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD START PROGRAM HEAD...

  17. Looking at the Social Activity for Adolescents with Orthopedic Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biastro, Leslie; Frank, Heather; Larwin, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents with identified orthopedic impairments are often less likely to participate in social activities outside of the school setting. However, the adolescents who are able to participate in activities have higher social skills, more academic successes, and show more satisfaction in their roles as family member or friend. The aim of this…

  18. Prevention of Thumb Web Space Contracture With Multiplanar External Fixation.

    PubMed

    Harper, Carl M; Iorio, Matthew L

    2016-09-01

    Thumb web space contracture following hand trauma can be disabling with numerous reconstructive procedures existing to correct the resultant deformity. Following marked soft tissue injury to the hand we utilized the Stryker Hoffmann II Micro External Fixator System to link the first and second metacarpals by a multiplanar system using 1.6 or 2.0 mm self-drilling half-pins and 3 mm carbon fiber connecting rods. This facilitated placement of the thumb in maximal palmar abduction as well as allowed adjustment of thumb position throughout the postoperative period. This technique was performed on 5 patients. Two patients were treated with a first web space external fixator for table saw injuries to the radial aspect of the hand. An additional 2 patients were treated with a first web space external fixator following metacarpophalangeal joint capsular release in the setting of thermal burns. A fifth patient underwent second ray amputation, trapeziectomy and trapezoidectomy for squamous cell carcinoma with subsequent stabilization with the external fixator. The external fixator was left in place until soft tissues were healed (average 5.5 wk). The patients were allowed to mobilize their hand in as much as the external fixator allowed, and no device-associated complications were noted. Thumb web space was preserved with passive and supple thumb circumduction and web space abduction/adduction in all patients at an average follow-up of 5 months. The average Quick Dash Score was 35±5 and the average Modern Activity Subjective Survey of 2007 was 30±8. PMID:27203276

  19. Missing nitrogen fixation in the Benguela region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasmund, Norbert; Struck, Ulrich; Hansen, Anja; Flohr, Anita; Nausch, Günther; Grüttmüller, Annett; Voss, Maren

    2015-12-01

    Opposing opinions on the importance of nitrogen fixation in the northern Benguela upwelling region provoked us to investigate the magnitude of nitrogen fixation in front of northern Namibia and southern Angola. Measurements of nitrogen fixation rates using the 15N method at 66 stations during seven cruises from 2008 to 2014 showed that, in general, the 15N content in the biomass did not increase after tracer incubation with 15N2, indicating that no nitrogen fixation occurred. Correspondingly, the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium was almost not present. The abundant picocyanobacteria did obviously not perform nitrogen fixation to a significant degree. The artificial improvement of conditions for nitrogen fixation in mesocosm experiments, including phosphate and iron additions and a warmer temperature, failed to induce nitrogen fixation. A plausible explanation of these findings is a lack of conditioned cells for nitrogen fixation in the Benguela region.

  20. First metatarsophalangeal joint arthrodesis: current fixation options.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jared L; McGlamry, Michael C

    2011-04-01

    This article reviews the current literature on first metatarsophalangeal joint arthrodesis rates using various forms of fixation, as well as reviewing biomechanical studies comparing the strengths of the different fixation options that are available. PMID:21669346

  1. Complement fixation test to C. burnetii

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/003520.htm Complement fixation test to C burnetii To use the sharing features on this ... JavaScript. The complement fixation test to Coxiella burnetii ( C burnetti ) is a blood test that checks for ...

  2. Two-Pin Fixation of Proximal Interphalangeal Joint Fusion for Hammertoe Correction.

    PubMed

    Boffeli, Troy J; Thompson, Jonathan C; Tabatt, Jessica A

    2016-01-01

    Single-pin external Kirschner wire (K-wire) fixation has traditionally been a mainstay in proximal interphalangeal joint fusion for central hammertoe repair. Concerns over cosmesis, inconvenience, pin tract infection, hardware failure, nonunion, and early hardware removal have led to the development of implantable internal fixation devices. Although numerous implantable devices are now available and represent viable options for hammertoe repair, they are costly and often pose a challenge in the event removal becomes necessary. An alternative fixation option not typically used is a 2-pin K-wire fixation technique. The perceived advantage of obtaining 2 points of fixation compared with 1 across the fusion site is improved stability against the rotational and bending forces, thus decreasing the potential for pin-related complications. A retrospective assessment of 91 consecutive hammertoe repairs consisting of proximal interphalangeal joint fusion with 2-pin fixation in 60 patients was performed. The K-wires were removed at 6 weeks postoperatively, and the overall postoperative follow-up duration was 28.56 (range 1.40 to 86.83) months. Of the 91 digits, 89 (98%) did not encounter a complication postoperatively and 2 (2.20%) had sustained loosened or broken hardware. No postoperative infection was encountered. The low incidence of complications observed supports the 2-pin K-wire fixation technique as a low-cost and viable construct for proximal interphalangeal joint fusion hammertoe repair. PMID:26878808

  3. Weakly Supervised Human Fixations Prediction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luming; Li, Xuelong; Nie, Liqiang; Yang, Yi; Xia, Yingjie

    2016-01-01

    Automatically predicting human eye fixations is a useful technique that can facilitate many multimedia applications, e.g., image retrieval, action recognition, and photo retargeting. Conventional approaches are frustrated by two drawbacks. First, psychophysical experiments show that an object-level interpretation of scenes influences eye movements significantly. Most of the existing saliency models rely on object detectors, and therefore, only a few prespecified categories can be discovered. Second, the relative displacement of objects influences their saliency remarkably, but current models cannot describe them explicitly. To solve these problems, this paper proposes weakly supervised fixations prediction, which leverages image labels to improve accuracy of human fixations prediction. The proposed model hierarchically discovers objects as well as their spatial configurations. Starting from the raw image pixels, we sample superpixels in an image, thereby seamless object descriptors termed object-level graphlets (oGLs) are generated by random walking on the superpixel mosaic. Then, a manifold embedding algorithm is proposed to encode image labels into oGLs, and the response map of each prespecified object is computed accordingly. On the basis of the object-level response map, we propose spatial-level graphlets (sGLs) to model the relative positions among objects. Afterward, eye tracking data is employed to integrate these sGLs for predicting human eye fixations. Thorough experiment results demonstrate the advantage of the proposed method over the state-of-the-art. PMID:26168451

  4. Progress and outlook of inorganic nanoparticles for delivery of nucleic acid sequences related to orthopedic pathologies: a review.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Darcy E; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2012-02-01

    The anticipated growth in the aging population will drastically increase medical needs of society; of which, one of the largest components will undoubtedly be from orthopedic-related pathologies. There are several proposed solutions being investigated to cost-effectively prepare for the future--pharmaceuticals, implant devices, cell and gene therapies, or some combination thereof. Gene therapy is one of the more promising possibilities because it seeks to correct the root of the problem, thereby minimizing treatment duration and cost. Currently, viral vectors have shown the highest efficacies, but immunological concerns remain. Nonviral methods show reduced immune responses but are regarded as less efficient. The nonviral paradigms consist of mechanical and chemical approaches. While organic-based materials have been used more frequently in particle-based methods, inorganic materials capable of delivery have distinct advantages, especially advantageous in orthopedic applications. The inorganic gene therapy field is highly interdisciplinary in nature, and requires assimilation of knowledge across the broad fields of cell biology, biochemistry, molecular genetics, materials science, and clinical medicine. This review provides an overview of the role each area plays in orthopedic gene therapy as well as possible future directions for the field. PMID:21707439

  5. Understanding Nitrogen Fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Paul J. Chirik

    2012-05-25

    synthesis of ammonia, NH{sub 3}, from its elements, H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}, via the venerable Haber-Bosch process is one of the most significant technological achievements of the past century. Our research program seeks to discover new transition metal reagents and catalysts to disrupt the strong N {triple_bond} N bond in N{sub 2} and create new, fundamental chemical linkages for the construction of molecules with application as fuels, fertilizers and fine chemicals. With DOE support, our group has discovered a mild method for ammonia synthesis in solution as well as new methods for the construction of nitrogen-carbon bonds directly from N{sub 2}. Ideally these achievements will evolve into more efficient nitrogen fixation schemes that circumvent the high energy demands of industrial ammonia synthesis. Industrially, atmospheric nitrogen enters the synthetic cycle by the well-established Haber-Bosch process whereby N{sub 2} is hydrogenated to ammonia at high temperature and pressure. The commercialization of this reaction represents one of the greatest technological achievements of the 20th century as Haber-Bosch ammonia is responsible for supporting approximately 50% of the world's population and serves as the source of half of the nitrogen in the human body. The extreme reaction conditions required for an economical process have significant energy consequences, consuming 1% of the world's energy supply mostly in the form of pollution-intensive coal. Moreover, industrial H{sub 2} synthesis via the water gas shift reaction and the steam reforming of methane is fossil fuel intensive and produces CO{sub 2} as a byproduct. New synthetic methods that promote this thermodynamically favored transformation ({Delta}G{sup o} = -4.1 kcal/mol) under milder conditions or completely obviate it are therefore desirable. Most nitrogen-containing organic molecules are derived from ammonia (and hence rely on the Haber-Bosch and H{sub 2} synthesis processes) and direct synthesis from

  6. Options for acetabular fixation surfaces.

    PubMed

    Klika, Alison K; Murray, Trevor G; Darwiche, Hussein; Barsoum, Wael K

    2007-01-01

    Aseptic loosening is the most common cause for revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). Due to poor long-term results with cemented acetabular components, cementless implants that rely on biologic fixation became popular in the United States for both primary and revision procedures in the early 1980s. Cementless acetabular components used in THA have been reported to have superior radiographic performance compared with cemented fixation, although the optimal method of acetabular fixation remains controversial. Cementless acetabular components require initial implant stability to allow for bone ingrowth and remodeling into the acetabular shell, providing long-term durability of the prosthesis. Many improved implant materials are available to facilitate bone growth and remodeling, including the 3 most common surface treatments; fibermesh, sintered beads, and plasma spray coatings. Recently added to these are porous metal surfaces, which have increased porosity and optimal pore sizes when compared with titanium fibermesh. The most studied of these materials is the titanium fibermesh fixation surface, which has demonstrated a mechanical failure rate of 1% at 10 to 15 years. This technology utilizes the diffusion bonding process to attach fiber metal pads to a titanium substrate using heat and pressure. The sintered bead fixation surface offers a porous coating of various sizes of spherical beads, achieved by the sintering process, and has been shown to provide long-term fixation. While there are less long-term published data regarding the titanium plasma spray surface, its early results have provided evidence of its durability, even in the face of significant osteolysis. The most recently added alternative fixation surface is porous tantalum metal, which offers potentially greater bone ingrowth and bone graft incorporation due to its high porosity (80%) and low modulus of elasticity (3 MPa). Porous tantalum implants have shown early favorable clinical results and have

  7. Carbon-carbon composites for orthopedic prosthesis and implants. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T D; Klett, J W; Strizak, J P; Baker, C

    1998-01-21

    The prosthetic implant market is extensive. For example, because of arthritic degeneration of hip and knee cartilage and osteoporotic fractures of the hip, over 200,000 total joint replacements (TJRs) are performed in the United States each year. Current TJR devices are typically metallic (stainless steel, cobalt, or titanium alloy) and are fixed in the bone with polymethylacrylate (PMMA) cement. Carbon-carbon composite materials offer several distinct advantages over metals for TJR prosthesis. Their mechanical properties can be tailored to match more closely the mechanical properties of human bone, and the composite may have up to 25% porosity, the size and distribution of which may be controlled through processing. The porous nature of carbon-carbon composites will allow for the ingrowth of bone, achieving biological fixation, and eliminating the need for PMMA cement fixation.

  8. Tissue fixation and the effect of molecular fixatives on downstream staining procedures.

    PubMed

    Howat, William J; Wilson, Beverley A

    2014-11-01

    It is impossible to underplay the importance of fixation in histopathology. Whether the scientist is interested in the extraction of information on lipids, proteins, RNA or DNA, fixation is critical to this extraction. This review aims to give a brief overview of the current "state of play" in fixation and focus on the effect fixation, and particularly the effect of the newer brand of "molecular fixatives" have on morphology, histochemistry, immunohistochemistry and RNA/DNA analysis. A methodology incorporating the creation of a fixation tissue microarray for the study of the effect of fixation on histochemistry is detailed. PMID:24561827

  9. Mainstreaming Preschoolers: Children with Orthopedic Handicaps. A Guide for Teachers, Parents, and Others Who Work with Orthopedically Handicapped Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieran, Shari Stokes; And Others

    This guide to mainstreaming preschoolers with orthopedic handicaps is one of a series of eight manuals on mainstreaming preschoolers developed by Project Head Start. The guide is addressed to parents, teachers, and other professionals and paraprofessionals. Chapter I presents information on the meaning, benefits and implementation of…

  10. Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected orthopedic prostheses with ceftazidime-ciprofloxacin antibiotic combination.

    PubMed

    Brouqui, P; Rousseau, M C; Stein, A; Drancourt, M; Raoult, D

    1995-11-01

    Indwelling device infections are associated with considerable morbidity and extremely high cost. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most frequent gram-negative etiologic agent associated with infections of indwelling catheters and foreign body implants. It is generally agreed that eradication of infection in the presence of a foreign body requires removal of the foreign body. Using a combination of ceftazidime and ciprofloxacin, we cured nine of nine patients with P. aeruginosa-infected osteosynthetic material and four of five patients with hip and knee prostheses without removing the foreign material. Follow-up was for a mean of 21 months (range, 6 to 60 months). Some patients experienced minor side effects (arthralgia in one patient and rash in another patient). We conclude that this combination is effective and safe and should be useful in the treatment of P. aeruginosa-infected orthopedic implants. PMID:8585720

  11. Role of Sonication in the Microbiological Diagnosis of Implant-Associated Infections: Beyond the Orthopedic Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Alessandra; Pavone, Paola; D'Abramo, Alessandra; Iannetta, Marco; Mastroianni, Claudio Maria; Vullo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Implant-associated infections are difficult-to-treat conditions associated with high morbidity, mortality and length of hospitalization. They are characterized by biofilm formation on implant surface, which makes the microbiological diagnosis difficult and requires a complete device removal for the correct management. The sonication method, which is based on the application of long-wave ultrasounds radiating in a liquid medium, has been recently validated for the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infections. Additionally, this technique has been considered a potential tool in order to improve the microbiological diagnosis of infections associated with other foreign bodies, such as breast, urinary, endovascular and cerebral implants. In the present study, the application of sonication in the setting of implant-associated infections other than orthopedics will be reviewed. PMID:26566645

  12. A simple method of intramedullary fixation for proximal interphalangeal arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Canales, Michael B; Razzante, Mark C; Ehredt, Duane J; Clougherty, Coleman O

    2014-01-01

    Lesser digital arthrodesis has become one of the most widely used techniques in foot and ankle surgery. When performing digital arthrodesis, surgeons have an abundance of options for implantable devices. We provide information on a simple method of achieving successful arthrodesis. An intramedullary Kirschner wire is implanted into the proximal phalanx with the intermediate phalanx compressed over the wire for rigid internal fixation to avoid the use of an external device. We have had results similar to those from the published data of more expensive implants. PMID:24846156

  13. Effects of gold coating on experimental implant fixation

    PubMed Central

    Zainali, Kasra; Danscher, Gorm; Jakobsen, Thomas; Jakobsen, Stig S.; Baas, Jørgen; Møller, Per; Bechtold, Joan E.; Soballe, Kjeld

    2013-01-01

    Insertions of orthopedic implants are traumatic procedures that trigger an inflammatory response. Macrophages have been shown to liberate gold ions from metallic gold. Gold ions are known to act in an antiinflammatory manner by inhibiting cellular NF-κB–DNA binding and suppressing I-κ B-kinase activation. The present study investigated whether gilding implant surfaces augmented early implant osseointegration and implant fixation by its modulatory effect on the local inflammatory response. Ion release was traced by autometallographic silver enhancement. Gold-coated cylindrical porous coated Ti6Al4V implants were inserted press-fit in the proximal part of tibiae in nine canines and control implants without gold inserted contralateral. Observation time was 4 weeks. Biomechanical push-out tests showed that implants with gold coating had ~50% decrease in mechanical strength and stiffness. Histomorphometrical analyses showed gold-coated implants had a decrease in overall total bone-to-implant contact of 35%. Autometallographic analysis revealed few cells loaded with gold close to the gilded implant surface. The findings demonstrate that gilding of implants negatively affects mechanical strength and osseointegration because of a significant effect of the released gold ions on the local inflammatory process around the implant. The possibility that a partial metallic gold coating could prolong the period of satisfactory mechanical strength, however, cannot be excluded. PMID:18335533

  14. Evolution of the Hoffmann Fixators.

    PubMed

    Seligson, David

    2015-09-01

    Dr. Raoul Hoffmann of Geneva, Switzerland with the collaboration of Henri Jaquet developed the original Hoffmann external fixateur as a system for treating broken bones without necessarily opening a fracture site to reposition the bone ends. This system has evolved to a more flexible, modular concept with input from surgeons and engineers. In this chapter the modifications of the Hoffmann family of fixators are traced and the important steps in the development of the concept and the instrumentation emphasized. PMID:26458297

  15. Radiation exposure from fluoroscopy during orthopedic surgical procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, S.A. )

    1989-11-01

    The use of fluoroscopy has enabled orthopedic surgeons to become technically more proficient. In addition, these surgical procedures tend to have less associated patient morbidity by decreasing operative time and minimizing the area of the operative field. The trade-off, however, may be an increased risk of radiation exposure to the surgeon on an annual or lifetime basis. The current study was designed to determine the amount of radiation received by the primary surgeon and the first assistant during selected surgical procedures involving the use of fluoroscopy. Five body sites exposed to radiation were monitored for dosage. The results of this study indicate that with appropriate usage, (1) radiation exposure from fluoroscopy is relatively low; (2) the surgeon's dominant hand receives the most exposure per case; and (3) proper maintenance and calibration of fluoroscopic machines are important factors in reducing exposure risks. Therefore, with proper precautions, the use of fluoroscopy in orthopedic procedures can remain a safe practice.

  16. A Pediatric Comminuted Talar Fracture Treated by Minimal K-Wire Fixation Without Using a Tourniquet

    PubMed Central

    Inal, Sermet; Inal, Canan

    2014-01-01

    Background Pediatric comminuted talar fractures are reported to be rare, and treatment options such as minimal internal K-wire fixation without using a tourniquet to prevent avascular necrosis have not previously been investigated. Case Description We report a case of a comminuted talar body and a non-displaced neck fracture with dislocation of the tibiotalar, talonavicular and subtalar joints with bimalleolar epiphyseal fractures in an 11-year-old boy due to a fall from height. We present radiological findings, the surgical procedure and clinical outcomes of minimal internal K-wire fixation without using a tourniquet. Literature Review Avascular necrosis rates are reported to be between 0 % and 66 % after fractures of the neck of the talus and the talar body in children. The likelihood of developing avascular necrosis increases with the severity of the fracture. Clinical Relevance To avoid avascular necrosis in a comminuted talar fracture accompanied by tibiotalar, talonavicular, subtalar dislocations and bimalleolar epiphyseal fractures, a minimal internal K-wire fixation without the use of a tourniquet was performed. The outcome was evaluated by the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society score (AOFAS). A score of 90 (excellent) was found at the end of the second year of follow up. Radiology revealed preservation of the joint with no evidence of avascular necrosis, and clinical findings revealed a favorable functional outcome after two years. Level of Evidence 4 PMID:25328479

  17. Methods to shorten the duration of an external fixator in the management of tibial infections

    PubMed Central

    Emara, Khaled M; Ghafar, Khaled Abd Al; Al Kersh, Mohamed Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Massive segmental bone loss due to chronic osteomyelitis represents a considerable challenge to orthopedic surgeons and is a limb threatening condition. The only option available in such a clinical situation is segment transport using the Ilizarov technique of distraction osteogenesis; yet the most common problem in cases of bone transport with the Ilizarov technique in massive bone loss, is the long duration of the fixator. In addition to autologous bone grafting, several mechanical, biologic, and external physical treatment modalities may be employed to promote bone formation and maturation during segment transport in osteomyelitis patients. Mechanical approaches include compressive loading of the distraction regenerate, increased frequency of small increments of distraction, and compression-distraction. Intramedullary nailing and hemicorticotomy can reduce the time in external fixation; however, these techniques are associated with technical difficulties and complications. Exogenous application of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound or pulsed electromagnetic fields may shorten the duration of external fixation. Other promising modalities include diphosphonates, physician-directed use (off-label use) of bone morphogenetic proteins, and local injection of bone marrow aspirate and platelet gel at the osteotomy site. Well-designed clinical studies are needed to establish safe and effective guidelines for various modalities to enhance new bone formation during distraction osteogenesis after segment transfer. PMID:22474640

  18. Fixation strategies for retinal immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Stradleigh, Tyler W; Ishida, Andrew T

    2015-09-01

    Immunohistochemical and ex vivo anatomical studies have provided many glimpses of the variety, distribution, and signaling components of vertebrate retinal neurons. The beauty of numerous images published to date, and the qualitative and quantitative information they provide, indicate that these approaches are fundamentally useful. However, obtaining these images entailed tissue handling and exposure to chemical solutions that differ from normal extracellular fluid in composition, temperature, and osmolarity. Because the differences are large enough to alter intercellular and intracellular signaling in neurons, and because retinae are susceptible to crush, shear, and fray, it is natural to wonder if immunohistochemical and anatomical methods disturb or damage the cells they are designed to examine. Tissue fixation is typically incorporated to guard against this damage and is therefore critically important to the quality and significance of the harvested data. Here, we describe mechanisms of fixation; advantages and disadvantages of using formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde as fixatives during immunohistochemistry; and modifications of widely used protocols that have recently been found to improve cell shape preservation and immunostaining patterns, especially in proximal retinal neurons. PMID:25892361

  19. Fixation Strategies For Retinal Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Stradleigh, Tyler W.; Ishida, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Immunohistochemical and ex vivo anatomical studies have provided many glimpses of the variety, distribution, and signaling components of vertebrate retinal neurons. The beauty of numerous images published to date, and the qualitative and quantitative information they provide, indicate that these approaches are fundamentally useful. However, obtaining these images entailed tissue handling and exposure to chemical solutions that differ from normal extracellular fluid in composition, temperature, and osmolarity. Because the differences are large enough to alter intercellular and intracellular signaling in neurons, and because retinae are susceptible to crush, shear, and fray, it is natural to wonder if immunohistochemical and anatomical methods disturb or damage the cells they are designed to examine. Tissue fixation is typically incorporated to guard against this damage and is therefore critically important to the quality and significance of the harvested data. Here, we describe mechanisms of fixation; advantages and disadvantages of using formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde as fixatives during immunohistochemistry; and modifications of widely used protocols that have recently been found to improve cell shape preservation and immunostaining patterns, especially in proximal retinal neurons. PMID:25892361

  20. Online reviews of orthopedic surgeons: an emerging trend.

    PubMed

    Frost, Chelsea; Mesfin, Addisu

    2015-04-01

    Various websites are dedicated to rating physicians. The goals of this study were to: (1) evaluate the prevalence of orthopedic surgeon ratings on physician rating websites in the United States and (2) evaluate factors that may affect ratings, such as sex, practice sector (academic or private), years of practice, and geographic location. A total of 557 orthopedic surgeons selected from the 30 most populated US cities were enrolled. The study period was June 1 to July 31, 2013. Practice type (academic vs private), sex, geographic location, and years since completion of training were evaluated. For each orthopedic surgeon, numeric ratings from 7 physician rating websites were collected. The ratings were standardized on a scale of 0 to 100. Written reviews were also collected and categorized as positive or negative. Of the 557 orthopedic surgeons, 525 (94.3%) were rated at least once on 1 of the physician rating websites. The average rating was 71.4. The study included 39 female physicians (7.4%) and 486 male physicians (92.6%). There were 204 (38.9%) physicians in academic practice and 321 (61.1%) in private practice. The greatest number of physicians, 281 (50.4%), practiced in the South and Southeast, whereas 276 (49.6%) practiced in the West, Midwest, and Northeast. Those in academic practice had significantly higher ratings (74.4 vs 71.1; P<.007). No significant difference based on sex (72.5 male physicians vs 70.2 female physicians; P=.17) or geographic location (P=.11) were noted. Most comments (64.6%) were positive or extremely positive. Physicians who were in practice for 6 to 10 years had significantly higher ratings (76.9, P<.01) than those in practice for 0 to 5 years (70.5) or for 21 or more years (70.7). PMID:25901617

  1. Pediatric orthopedic surgical simulation at Boston Children's Hospital.

    PubMed

    Bae, Donald S; Waters, Peter M

    2016-07-01

    Orthopedic surgical simulation has become an increasing valuable means for optimizing patient care, promoting patient safety, improving education, and fostering clinical research. The purpose of this review was to discuss the rationale for simulation training, describe current simulation efforts within the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Boston Children's Hospital, and provide an example of how these simulation efforts touch both patient care and clinical research. PMID:27058820

  2. Blood conservation strategies in orthopedic surgeries: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Balaji; Batra, Sahil; Gupta, Rajat; Agrawal, Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    In orthopedics management of surgical blood loss is an important aspect which has evolved along with modern surgeries. Replacement of lost blood by transfusion alone is not the answer as was considered earlier. Complications like infection and immune reaction due to blood transfusion are a major concern. Today numerous techniques are available in place of allogenic blood transfusion which can be employed safely and effectively. In this article we have reviewed these techniques, their merits and demerits. PMID:26403876

  3. Application of nano composites in the fixation and processing of histological material.

    PubMed

    Burkadze, G; Kikalishvili, N; Kargareteli, V

    2015-04-01

    The pathological examination is one of the longest in the list of medical tests. Most of this time is spent on preparation of the microslide, which involves the following phases: fixation, processing, cutting and staining. Our objective was to develop optimal regime of fixation and processing (namely, 1 and 2 stage of processing) by applying Nano composites for the development of quick, cheap and qualitative protocol of material processing. 24 various types and concentration Nano composite fixation device were used in study, made by applying single-layer, surface modified carbon nanotubes in the conditions of ultrasound treatment by UP200HT device. Also was developed Nano tubular network integration method in bio-material in the conditions of ultrasound treatment, when besides Nano composite fixation devices various Nano composite reagents (namely, 0.003% and 0.005% Nano composite alcohols) were used in material processing. There were carried out 126 experiments in sum and experiments were checked through standard processing. Fixation devices produced from formalin and alcohol base showed good result of fixation - by using them in the conditions of ultrasound treatment, practically 24 times decreased the period of fixation (as a standard of fixation was applied minimal rate of ASCO/Cap guideline dated by 2008 - 6 hours). The best way was considered Nano composite fixation device of NH2 functionalization of the 0.002% concentration on alcohol base A19 (according to the fixation rate 15 minutes with ultrasound maintenance). Nano tubular network integration method enabled us to have decreased the number of alcohols of ascending concentration and delay time in them. High time efficiency factor - Tk = 47.5% (time of new processing/ standard processing time X100) and high efficiency factor of the expense of reagents - Rk = 33% (number of reagents spent at the time of new processing/number of spent reagents at the time of standard processing X100) is obtained as a result

  4. Orthopedic cellular therapy: An overview with focus on clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Moon Jong; Lee, Kwan Hee

    2015-01-01

    In this editorial, the authors tried to evaluate the present state of cellular therapy in orthopedic field. The topics the authors try to cover include not only the clinical trials but the various research areas as well. Both the target diseases for cellular therapy and the target cells were reviewed. New methods to activate the cells were interesting to review. Most advanced clinical trials were also included because several of them have advanced to phase III clinical trials. In the orthopedic field, there are many diseases with a definite treatment gap at this time. Because cellular therapies can regenerate damaged tissues, there is a possibility for cellular therapies to become disease modifying drugs. It is not clear whether cellular therapies will become the standard of care in any of the orthopedic disorders, however the amount of research being performed and the number of clinical trials that are on-going make the authors believe that cellular therapies will become important treatment modalities within several years. PMID:26601056

  5. Clinical conundrums and challenges during geriatric orthopedic emergency surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Despite so many advancements and innovations in anesthetic techniques, expectations and challenges have also grown in plenty. Cardiac, pediatric, obstetric and neuro-anesthesia have perfectly developed to fulfill the desired needs of respective patient population. However, geriatric anesthesia has been shown a lesser interest in teaching and clinical practices over the years as compared with other anesthetic sub-specialties. The large growing geriatric population globally is also associated with an increase number of elderly patients presenting for orthopedic emergency surgeries. Orthopedic emergency surgery in geriatric population is not only a daunting clinical challenge but also has numerous socio-behavioral and economic ramifications. Decision making in anesthesia is largely influenced by the presence of co-morbidities, neuro-cognitive functions and the current socio-behavioral status. Pre-anesthetic evaluation and optimization are extremely important for a better surgical outcome but is limited by time constraints during emergency surgery. The current review aims to highlight comprehensively the various clinical, social, behavioral and psychological aspects during pre-anesthetic evaluation associated with emergency orthopedic surgery in geriatric population. PMID:25810963

  6. Student opinions on orthopedic residency selection, education, and work hours.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Waqas; Hussain, Haroon; Manning, David W

    2013-08-01

    Other articles have been written about resident selection, musculoskeletal education, work hours, and call coverage, but none has described orthopedic applicants' opinions on these issues. We conducted a study to gain insight into applicants' attitudes about issues relevant to the specialty. We distributed a survey to 53 applicants interviewing for an orthopedic residency. The survey used both a multiple-choice format and a Likert scale ranging from 1 (strongly disagree or least important) to 5 (strongly agree or most important). Respondents rated the adequacy of musculoskeletal education in medical school a mean standard deviation (SD) of 2.00 (0.8) on the Likert scale. Ranking the factors most valuable to an orthopedic surgery application, they rated United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 board examination scores a mean (SD) of 4.26 (0.9). In addition, of the 53 respondents, 46 (87%) anticipated working as a resident more than 80 hours per week, and 36 (68%) anticipated working as an attending 60 to 70 hours per week or less. Respondents also agreed that they should receive compensation for call coverage. Therefore, students agreed that medical school education is insufficient, rated USMLE scores the most important application factor, anticipated working more than 80 hours per week, and agreed that call coverage should be compensated. PMID:24078953

  7. Anesthetic considerations in orthopedic patients with or without trauma.

    PubMed

    Chohan, Amandeep S

    2010-05-01

    Anesthetic management of orthopedic patients could vary from normal routine management to more challenging critical management depending on the state in which the patient is presented. Multimodal pain management strategies incorporating opioids, which are the mainstay drugs for pain management, along with adjunctive drugs like local anesthetics (eg, lidocaine), dissociative anesthetics (eg, ketamine), and alpha-2 agonists (eg, dexmedetomidine), could improve overall patient comfort and help prevent establishment of chronic pain pathways. Also, use of local nerve blocks can prevent nociception right at the point of origin. Orthopedic patients with multiple organ traumas like head injuries, spinal injuries, pulmonary fat embolism, compartment syndrome, or thoracic injuries are high-risk patients in which any life-threatening organ pathology should be addressed before the patient is put under general anesthesia. Interactions of various drugs like antibiotics and neuromuscular blocking agents used in the perioperative period in orthopedic patients should warrant a careful consideration with respect to their interactions with each other and other anesthetic drugs used. PMID:20515674

  8. Tissue fixation and the effect of molecular fixatives on downstream staining procedures

    PubMed Central

    Howat, William J.; Wilson, Beverley A.

    2014-01-01

    It is impossible to underplay the importance of fixation in histopathology. Whether the scientist is interested in the extraction of information on lipids, proteins, RNA or DNA, fixation is critical to this extraction. This review aims to give a brief overview of the current “state of play” in fixation and focus on the effect fixation, and particularly the effect of the newer brand of “molecular fixatives” have on morphology, histochemistry, immunohistochemistry and RNA/DNA analysis. A methodology incorporating the creation of a fixation tissue microarray for the study of the effect of fixation on histochemistry is detailed. PMID:24561827

  9. An oculomotor continuum from exploration to fixation

    PubMed Central

    Otero-Millan, Jorge; Macknik, Stephen L.; Langston, Rachel E.; Martinez-Conde, Susana

    2013-01-01

    During visual exploration, saccadic eye movements scan the scene for objects of interest. During attempted fixation, the eyes are relatively still but often produce microsaccades. Saccadic rates during exploration are higher than those of microsaccades during fixation, reinforcing the classic view that exploration and fixation are two distinct oculomotor behaviors. An alternative model is that fixation and exploration are not dichotomous, but are instead two extremes of a functional continuum. Here, we measured the eye movements of human observers as they either fixed their gaze on a small spot or scanned natural scenes of varying sizes. As scene size diminished, so did saccade rates, until they were continuous with microsaccadic rates during fixation. Other saccadic properties varied as function of image size as well, forming a continuum with microsaccadic parameters during fixation. This saccadic continuum extended to nonrestrictive, ecological viewing conditions that allowed all types of saccades and fixation positions. Eye movement simulations moreover showed that a single model of oculomotor behavior can explain the saccadic continuum from exploration to fixation, for images of all sizes. These findings challenge the view that exploration and fixation are dichotomous, suggesting instead that visual fixation is functionally equivalent to visual exploration on a spatially focused scale. PMID:23533278

  10. Overcoming fixation with repeated memory suppression.

    PubMed

    Angello, Genna; Storm, Benjamin C; Smith, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Fixation (blocks to memories or ideas) can be alleviated not only by encouraging productive work towards a solution, but, as the present experiments show, by reducing counterproductive work. Two experiments examined relief from fixation in a word-fragment completion task. Blockers, orthographically similar negative primes (e.g., ANALOGY), blocked solutions to word fragments (e.g., A_L_ _GY) in both experiments. After priming, but before the fragment completion test, participants repeatedly suppressed half of the blockers using the Think/No-Think paradigm, which results in memory inhibition. Inhibiting blockers did not alleviate fixation in Experiment 1 when conscious recollection of negative primes was not encouraged on the fragment completion test. In Experiment 2, however, when participants were encouraged to remember negative primes at fragment completion, relief from fixation was observed. Repeated suppression may nullify fixation effects, and promote creative thinking, particularly when fixation is caused by conscious recollection of counterproductive information. PMID:24575886

  11. Biomechanical comparison between CentraLoc and Intrafix fixation of quadrupled semitendinosus-gracilis allografts in cadaveric tibiae with low bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Krupp, R; Nyland, J; Smith, C; Nawab, A; Burden, R; Caborn, D N M

    2007-08-01

    Supplementary or back-up tibial tunnel fixation of a quadruple semitendinosus-gracilis (STG) graft is often performed when the knee surgeon questions the integrity of intra-tunnel fixation. Back-up fixation devices such as staples however may contribute to increased knee pain and dysfunction. Both primary extra-tunnel and intra-tunnel fixation devices may provide sufficient quadruple STG graft fixation in a tibial tunnel to preclude the need for back-up fixation. This biomechanical study compared the fixation of quadruple STG allografts in standard drilled tunnels prepared in low apparent bone mineral density (BMD) cadaveric tibiae using either an Intrafix device with primary intra-tunnel fixation in a region of predominantly cancellous trabecular bone, or a CentraLoc device with primary extra-tunnel fixation in a region of predominantly cortical bone. The study hypothesis was that the CentraLoc device would display superior fixation in these low apparent BMD cadaveric tibiae. Matched pair tibiae and quadruple STG allografts were divided into two groups of seven specimens each. Extraction drilled tunnels matched allograft diameter. Constructs were pretensioned on a servo hydraulic device between 10 and 50 N for 10 cycles and isometric pretensioned at 50 N for 1 min prior to undergoing 500 loading cycles (50-250 N) and load to failure testing (20 mm/min). The CentraLoc group displayed superior load at failure (448.4+/-171 N vs. 338.4+/-119 N, P=0.04) and survived more loading cycles (410+/-154 cycles vs. 196+/-230 cycles, P=0.04) than the Intrafix group. Most CentraLoc group specimens (6/7, 85.7%) failed by device pullout with intact quadruple STG allograft strands while all Intrafix group specimens (7/7, 100%) failed by slippage of one or more strands (P=0.005). PMID:17490882

  12. Proximal tibial fractures with impending compartment syndrome managed by fasciotomy and internal fixation: A retrospective analysis of 15 cases

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Naveen; Singh, Varun; Agrawal, Ashish; Bhargava, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proximal tibia fractures with compartment syndrome present a challenge for orthopedic surgeons. More often than not these patients are subjected to multiple surgeries and are complicated by infection osteomyelitis and poor rehabilitation. There is no consensus in the management of these fractures. Most common mode is to do early fasciotomy with external fixation, followed by second stage definitive fixation. We performed a retrospective study of proximal tibia fractures with impending compartment syndrome treated by single stage fasciotomy and internal fixation. Results in terms of early fracture union, minimum complications and early patient mobilization were very good. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients who were operated between July 2011 and June 2012 were selected for the study. All documents from their admission until the last followup in December 2013 were reviewed, data regarding complications collected and results were evaluated using Oxford Knee scoring system. Results: At the final outcome, there was anatomical or near anatomical alignment with no postoperative problems with range of motion of near complete flexion (>120) in all patients within 3 months. 13 patients started full weight bearing walking at 3 months. Delayed union in two patients and skin necrosis in one patient was observed. Conclusions: Since the results are encouraging and the rehabilitation time is much less when compared to conventional approaches, it is recommended using this protocol to perform early fasciotomy with the definitive internal fixation as single stage surgery to obtain excellent followup results and to reduce rehabilitation time, secondary trauma, expense of treatment and infection rate. PMID:26538755

  13. Temporary Stabilization with External Fixator in ‘Tripolar’ Configuration in Two Steps Treatment of Tibial Pilon Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Daghino, Walter; Messina, Marco; Filipponi, Marco; Alessandro, Massè

    2016-01-01

    Background: The tibial pilon fractures represent a complex therapeutic problem for the orthopedic surgeon, given the frequent complications and outcomes disabling. The recent medical literature indicates that the best strategy to reduce amount of complications in tibial pilon fractures is two-stages procedure. We describe our experience in the primary stabilization of these fractures. Methods: We treated 36 cases with temporary external fixation in a simple configuration, called "tripolar": this is an essential structure (only three screws and three rods), that is possible to perform even without the availability of X-rays and with simple anesthesia or sedation. Results: We found a sufficient mechanical stability for the nursing post-operative, in absence of intraoperative and postoperative problems. The time between trauma and temporary stabilization ranged between 3 and 144 hours; surgical average time was 8.4 minutes. Definitive treatment was carried out with a delay of a minimum of 4 and a maximum of 15 days from the temporary stabilization, always without problems, both in case of ORIF (open reduction, internal fixation) or circular external fixation Conclusion: Temporary stabilization with external fixator in ‘tripolar’ configuration seems to be the most effective strategy in two steps treatment of tibial pilon fractures. These preliminary encouraging results must be confirmed by further studies with more cases. PMID:27123151

  14. Nitrogen fixation method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Chen, H.L.

    1983-08-16

    A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O[sub 2]/cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N[sub 2]. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N[sub 2] at a much quicker rate than unexcited N[sub 2], greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed. 1 fig.

  15. Image recorder with microwave fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Hosono, N.; Isaka, K.

    1984-11-13

    The present invention is directed to improvement in an image recorder for recording developed images or toner images by microwave fixation. According to the invention there is used a novel thermoplastic developer comprising of two components. The first component contains a dielectric material which is able to absorb microwave and generate heat by dielectric loss. The second component contains magnetic loss exothermic material. The microwave absorbing power of the first component is improved by heating the first component with heat generated from the second component.

  16. Nitrogen fixation method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Hao-Lin

    1983-01-01

    A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O.sub.2 /cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N.sub.2. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N.sub.2 at a much quicker rate than unexcited N.sub.2, greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed.

  17. Suture Button Fixation Treatment of Chronic Lisfranc Injury in Professional Dancers and High-Level Athletes.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Timothy; Boe, Chelsea; Thordarson, David B

    2015-12-01

    Chronic Lisfranc injury is a subtle and severe injury in high-level athletes, including dancers. This patient population is generally intolerant of intra-articular screw fixation and can develop significant post-traumatic arthritis with potentially career ending complications. Flexible fixation with suture-button devices provides potential restoration of physiologic motion at the joint, with appropriate support for healing that may facilitate return to en pointe activities for dancers. We hypothesized that the suture-button device would restore motion at the Lisfranc joint and allow for return to activities in this particular population without the limitations and complications of rigid fixation. We operated on seven dancers and high-level athletes with diagnosed Lisfranc injuries by installing a suture-button device. All patients had failed conservative management after late presentation. They were allowed to return to sport in 6 months, preoperative and postoperative American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Score (AOFAS) foot scores were obtained, and patients were followed for a minimum of 15 months. All seven returned to full activities in 6 months, with radiographic evidence of fixation and no complications to date. AOFAS foot scores improved from an average of 65 preoperatively to an average of 97 postoperatively at latest follow-up. It is concluded that flexible fixation with suture-button type device represents a viable alternative to screw fixation or fusion that may allow dancers and athletes to return to previous levels of activity after Lisfranc injury. This case series represents to our knowledge the first application of this device to a unique population that requires flexibility at the Lisfranc joint for performance. PMID:26641700

  18. Trends in the orthopedic job market and the importance of fellowship subspecialty training.

    PubMed

    Morrell, Nathan T; Mercer, Deana M; Moneim, Moheb S

    2012-04-01

    Previous studies have examined possible incentives for pursuing orthopedic fellowship training, but we are unaware of previously published studies reporting the trends in the orthopedic job market since the acceptance of certain criteria for fellowship programs by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) in 1985. We hypothesized that, since the initiation of accredited postresidency fellowship programs, job opportunities for fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons have increased and job opportunities for nonfellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons have decreased. We reviewed the job advertisements printed in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, American Volume, for the years 1984, 1994, 2004, and 2009. We categorized the job opportunities as available for either a general (nonfellowship-trained) orthopedic surgeon or a fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeon. Based on the advertisements posted in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, American Volume, a trend exists in the orthopedic job market toward seeking fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons. In the years 1984, 1994, 2004, and 2009, the percentage of job opportunities seeking fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons was 16.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.1%-20.3%), 40.6% (95% CI, 38.1%-43.1%), 52.2% (95% CI, 48.5%-55.9%), and 68.2% (95% CI, 65.0%-71.4%), respectively. These differences were statistically significant (analysis of variance, P<.05). Fellowship training is thus a worthwhile endeavor. PMID:22495859

  19. Biomechanical Comparison Between Bashti Bone Plug Technique and Biodegradable Screw for Fixation of Grafts in Ligament surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bashti, Kaveh; Tahmasebi, Mohammad N; Kaseb, Hasan; Farahmand, Farzam; Akbar, Mohammad; Mobini, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ligament reconstruction is a common procedure in orthopedic surgery. Although several popular techniques are currently in use, new methods are proposed for secure fixation of the tendon graft into the bone tunnel. Purposes: We sought to introduce our new technique of Bashti bone plug for fixation of soft tissue graft in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and to compare its biomechanical features with conventional absorbable interference screw technique in a bovine model. Methods: Twenty pairs of bovine knees were harvested after death. Soft tissue was removed and the Achilles tendon was harvested to be used as an ACL graft. It was secured into the bone tunnel on the tibial side via two different methods: Bashti Bone Plug technique and conventional screw method. Biomechanical strength was measured using 200 N and 300 N cyclic loading on the graft. Pull out strength was also tested until the graft fails. Results: No graft failure was observed after 200 N and 300 N cyclic loading in either fixation methods. When testing for pull out failure, 21 tendons (53%) were torn and 19 tendons (48%) slipped out. No fixation failure occurred, which did not reveal a significant difference between the bone plug or interference screw group (P=0.11). The mean pull out force until failure of the graft was 496±66 N in the screw group and 503±67 N in the bone plug group (P=0.76). Conclusions: Our suggested fixation technique of Bashti bone plug is a native, cheap, and feasible method that provides comparable biomechanical strength with interference screw when soft tissue fixation was attempted in bovine model. PMID:25692166

  20. Bone Anchor Fixation in Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: A Useful Adjunct in Suprapubic and Para-iliac Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Blair, Laurel J; Cox, Tiffany C; Huntington, Ciara R; Ross, Samuel W; Kneisl, Jeffrey S; Augenstein, Vedra A; Heniford, B Todd

    2015-07-01

    Suprapubic hernias, parailiac or flank hernias, and lumbar hernias are difficult to repair and are associated with high-recurrence rates owing to difficulty in obtaining substantive overlap and especially mesh fixation due to bone being a margin of the hernia. Orthopedic suture anchors used for ligament reconstruction have been used to attach prosthetic material to bony surfaces and can be used in the repair of these hernias where suture fixation was impossible. A prospective, single institution study of ventral hernia repairs involving bone anchor mesh fixation was performed. Demographics, operative details, and outcomes data were collected. Twenty patients were identified, with a mean age 53 (range: 35-70 years) and mean body mass index 28.4 kg/m(2) (range 21-38). Ten lumbar, seven suprapubic, and three parailiac hernias were studied. The majority were recurrent hernias (n = 13), with one to seven previously failed repairs. The mean hernia defect size was very large (270 cm(2); range: 56-832 cm(2)) with average mesh size of 1090 cm(2) (range 224-3640 cm(2)). Both Mitek GII (Depuy, Raynham, MA) and JuggerKnot 2.9-mm (Biomet, Biomedical Instruments, Warsaw, IN) anchors were used, with an average of four anchors/case (range: 1-16). Mean operative time was 218 minutes (120-495). There were three minor complications, no operative mortality, and no recurrences during an average follow-up of 24 months. Pelvic bone anchors permit mesh fixation in high-recurrence areas not amenable to traditional suture fixation. The ability to safely and effectively use bone anchor fixation is an essential tool in complex open ventral hernia repair. PMID:26140889

  1. Do Fixation Cues Ensure Fixation Accuracy in Split-Fovea Studies of Word Recognition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Timothy R.; Paterson, Kevin B.; Kurtev, Stoyan; Xu, Mengyun

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have claimed that hemispheric processing is split precisely at the foveal midline and so place great emphasis on the precise location at which words are fixated. These claims are based on experiments in which a variety of fixation procedures were used to ensure fixation accuracy but the effectiveness of these procedures is unclear. We…

  2. Chiropractic Management of Infantile Torticollis With Associated Abnormal Fixation of One Eye: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hobaek Siegenthaler, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the chiropractic management of a child with abnormal fixation of one eye and torticollis. Clinical Features A mother presented with a concern regarding her 23-month-old son who had a history of torticollis and an abnormal fixation of the right eye. She noticed the head tilt when he was about 7 months old and abnormal alignment of the right eye when the boy was 18 months old. At 15 months when he took his first steps, his head tilt became worse. At 21 months old, a neurological and orthopedic examination at the regional university children`s hospital ruled out presence of a tumor of the cervical spine or posterior fossa. The orthopedist sent the baby for chiropractic evaluation and treatment. Chiropractic exam found decreased active and passive range of motion in the cervical spine and no evidence of mass or contracture of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Segmental palpation showed a decreased joint play and pain reaction at level C1/C2 on the right. Intervention and Outcome The chiropractic treatment consisted of spinal manipulative therapy of the cervical spine in addition to massage and stretching of the neck muscles. Within a period of 4 weeks (3 chiropractic treatments) the torticollis was nearly resolved and the abnormal fixation of the right eye was no longer apparent. No relapse of the symptomatology was observed at a follow-up consultation at 26 months. Conclusion The patient responded favorably to chiropractic care, showing a possible mechanical spinal cause for his torticollis and for the secondarily developed abnormal fixation of the right eye. PMID:26693217

  3. Venting during prophylactic nailing for femoral metastases: current orthopedic practice

    PubMed Central

    Dalgorf, Dustin; Borkhoff, Cornelia M.; Stephen, David J.G.; Finkelstein, Joel; Kreder, Hans J.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction Reamed intramedullary nailing, recommended for impending fracture of a femur weakened by bone metastases, causes a rise in intramedullary pressure and increases the risk of a fat embolism syndrome. The pressure can be equalized by the technique of venting — drilling a hole into the distal cortex of the femur. Our objective was to study the current practice of orthopedic surgeons in Ontario with respect to venting during prophylactic intramedullary nailing for an impending femoral fracture due to bone metastases. Methods We mailed a questionnaire to all orthopedic surgeons from the Province of Ontario listed in the 1999 Canadian Medical Directory or on the Canadian Orthopaedic Association membership list, asking if they vent when prophylactically nailing an impending pathologic femoral fracture. The responses were modelled as a function of surgeon volume and year of graduation. Results Of the 415 surveys mailed, 223 (54%) surgeons responded. Of these, 81% reported having prophylactically treated a femoral metastatic lesion during the previous year; 67% treated 1 to 3 metastatic lesions and 14% treated more than 3; 19% did not treat a metastatic femoral lesion prophylactically. Over two-thirds of surgeons had never considered venting, whereas one-third always or sometimes vented the femoral canal. More recent graduates were 3 times more likely to vent than earlier (before 1980) graduates (odds ratio [OR] = 3.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6–6.5) as were those who treat a greater number of impending fractures (OR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.1–1.7). Conclusions Although there is a theoretical rationale for routine venting, there is disagreement among Ontario orthopedic surgeons regarding the use of this technique during prophylactic nailing for femoral metastatic lesions. Prospective evidence will be required to warrant a change in the standard of care. PMID:14680349

  4. Minocycline-Induced Cutaneous Hyperpigmentation in an Orthopedic Patient Population

    PubMed Central

    Hanada, Yuri; Berbari, Elie F.; Steckelberg, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The objectives of this study were to estimate the incidence and evaluate risk factors for development of minocycline-induced cutaneous hyperpigmentation in patients with orthopedic infections. Methods. Patients with orthopedic infections evaluated at Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN) and treated with minocycline from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2011 were retrospectively identified. Long-term minocycline suppression was defined as daily minocycline use for at least 3 months. A proportional hazards model was used to evaluate potential risk factors. Results. Of 291 patients receiving long-term minocycline suppression, 54% (156 of 291) developed hyperpigmentation after a mean follow-up of 4.8 years (range, 0.3–13.2 years); 88% involved blue-gray pigmentation of normal skin that appeared most commonly in the lower (75%) and upper extremities (44%). The mean duration of minocycline therapy before hyperpigmentation was 1.5 years (range, 0.1–9 years) with a mean cumulative dosage of 107.3 g (range, 8.6–657 g). Notable risk factors include a history of vitamin D deficiency (relative risk [RR], 6.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.91–15.27; P = .0052), presence of a shoulder prosthesis (RR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.23–6.56; P = .0062), noncirrhotic liver pathology (RR, 3.63; 95% CI, 1.11–8.75; P = .0359), and use of a concurrent medication also known to cause hyperpigmentation (RR, 4.75; 95% CI, 1.83–10.1; P = .0029). Conclusions. Hyperpigmentation associated with the use of long-term minocycline suppression in patients with orthopedic infections is common. PMID:26835479

  5. [Orthokin as new therapeutic option for orthopedic diseases].

    PubMed

    Heyll, U

    2004-03-01

    The synthesis and introduction of interleukin-1 receptor antagonists established a promising strategy in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. This kind of therapy is claimed now to be available for osteoarthritis and other orthopedic disorders also. In the case of "orthokin", the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist is produced by stimulation of own blood-cells. It is not possible, to evaluate the practicability of this therapeutic approach because there are no published experimental data. We also found no results of clinical studies, which would allow an estimation of the effectiveness and the risks of this method. Therefore treatment with "orthokin" cannot be recommended at present. PMID:15049471

  6. RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIALS IN ORTHOPEDICS: DIFFICULTIES AND LIMITATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Imamura, Marta; Fregni, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) are considered to be the gold standard for evidence-based medicine nowadays, and are important for directing medical practice through consistent scientific observations. Steps such as patient selection, randomization and blinding are fundamental for conducting a RCT, but some additional difficulties are presented in trials that involve surgical procedures, as is common in orthopedics. The aim of this article was to highlight and discuss some difficulties and possible limitations on RCTs within the field of surgery. PMID:27027037

  7. Surface evaluation of orthopedic hip implants marketed in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, M. M.; Trommer, R. M.; Maru, M. M.; Roesler, C. R. M.; Barros, W. S.; Dutra, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    One of the factors that contribute to the quality of total hip prostheses is the degree of accuracy in the manufacturing of the joint surfaces. The dimensional control of joint components is important because of its direct influence on the durability and, consequently, in the patients’ life quality. This work presents studies on the form and roughness of orthopedic hip prostheses marketed in Brazil. The results provide data for quality control of the surfaces of the femoral heads and acetabular components of hip prostheses and indicate the need of improvement in the procedures used to this control.

  8. Femoral neck fracture fixation: rigidity of five techniques compared.

    PubMed Central

    Mackechnie-Jarvis, A C

    1983-01-01

    Artificial cadaveric femoral neck fractures were internally fixed with five different devices and subjected to cyclical loading of 0-1.0 kilonewtons (approximately one body weight) whilst in an anatomical position. Displacement of the proximal fragment was detected by a transducer and charted. Bone strength was assessed by a preliminary control loading phase on the intact bone. Efficiency of each fracture fixator could then be directly compared by the relative movement in each case. Five specimens each were tested with Moore's Pins, Trifin Nail, Garden Screws and a sliding screw-plate (OEC Ltd). By the criteria of the experiment, which put a severe shearing load on the implant, none of these devices reliably bore the representative body weight. An extended barrel-plate, which supported the sliding screw almost up to the fracture line, was then made. This device, employing some of Charnley's concepts, tolerated body weight in four cases out of five. PMID:6887186

  9. Biochemical Approaches to Improved Nitrogen Fixation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legumes has emerged again as an important topic on the world scene due to the energy crisis and lack of access to nitrogen fertilizer in developing countries. We have taken a biochemical genomics approach to improving symbiotic nitrogen fixation in legumes. L...

  10. Whole Animal Perfusion Fixation for Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Gage, Gregory J.; Kipke, Daryl R.; Shain, William

    2012-01-01

    The goal of fixation is to rapidly and uniformly preserve tissue in a life-like state. While placing tissue directly in fixative works well for small pieces of tissue, larger specimens like the intact brain pose a problem for immersion fixation because the fixative does not reach all regions of the tissue at the same rate 5,7. Often, changes in response to hypoxia begin before the tissue can be preserved 12. The advantage of directly perfusing fixative through the circulatory system is that the chemical can quickly reach every corner of the organism using the natural vascular network. In order to utilize the circulatory system most effectively, care must be taken to match physiological pressures 3. It is important to note that physiological pressures are dependent on the species used. Techniques for perfusion fixation vary depending on the tissue to be fixed and how the tissue will be processed following fixation. In this video, we describe a low-cost, rapid, controlled and uniform fixation procedure using 4% paraformaldehyde perfused via the vascular system: through the heart of the rat to obtain the best possible preservation of the brain for immunohistochemistry. The main advantage of this technique (vs. gravity-fed systems) is that the circulatory system is utilized most effectively. PMID:22871843

  11. Awake craniotomy using electromagnetic navigation technology without rigid pin fixation.

    PubMed

    Morsy, Ahmed A; Ng, Wai Hoe

    2015-11-01

    We report our institutional experience using an electromagnetic navigation system, without rigid head fixation, for awake craniotomy patients. The StealthStation® S7 AxiEM™ navigation system (Medtronic, Inc.) was used for this technique. Detailed preoperative clinical and neuropsychological evaluations, patient education and contrast-enhanced MRI (thickness 1.5mm) were performed for each patient. The AxiEM Mobile Emitter was typically placed in a holder, which was mounted to the operating room table, and a non-invasive patient tracker was used as the patient reference device. A monitored conscious sedation technique was used in all awake craniotomy patients, and the AxiEM Navigation Pointer was used for navigation during the procedure. This offers the same accuracy as optical navigation, but without head pin fixation or interference with intraoperative neurophysiological techniques and surgical instruments. The application of the electromagnetic neuronavigation technology without rigid head fixation during an awake craniotomy is accurate, and offers superior patient comfort. It is recommended as an effective adjunctive technique for the conduct of awake surgery. PMID:26249245

  12. Outcome comparison of Lisfranc injuries treated through dorsal plate fixation versus screw fixation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sun-jun; Chang, Shi-min; Li, Xiao-hua; Yu, Guang-rong

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this prospective study was to test whether the treatment of Lisfranc injuries with open reduction and dorsal plate fixation would have the same or better functional outcomes as treatment with standard trans-articular screw fixation. METHODS: Sixty patients with primarily isolated Lisfranc joint injury were treated by open reduction and dorsal plate fixation or standard screw fixation. The patients were followed on average for 31 months. Evaluation was performed with patients' chief complaint, clinical examination, radiography, and AOFAS Midfoot Scale. RESULTS: Thirty two patients were treated with open reduction and dorsal plate fixation, and twenty eight patients were treated with open reduction and screw fixation. After two years follow-up, the mean AOFAS Midfoot score was 83.1 points in the dorsal plate fixation group and 78.5 points in the screw fixation group (p<0.01). Of the dorsal plate fixation group, radiographic analysis revealed anatomic reduction in twenty-nine patients (90.6%, 29/32) and nonanatomic reduction in three patients. Of the screw fixation group, radiographic analysis revealed anatomic reduction in twenty-three patients and nonanatomic reduction in five patients (82.1%, 23/28). CONCLUSIONS: Open reduction and dorsal plate fixation for a dislocated Lisfranc injury do have better short and median term outcome and a lower reoperation rate than standard screw ORIF. In our experience, we recommend using dorsal plate in ORIF on dislocated Lisfranc injuries. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Comparative Study. PMID:25538478

  13. Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation. Final program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

  14. Optimizing Stability in Femoral Neck Fracture Fixation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ye; Hao, Jiandong; Mauffrey, Cyril; Hammerberg, E Mark; Stahel, Philip F; Hak, David J

    2015-10-01

    Optimizing stability of femoral neck fracture fixation is important in obtaining a successful outcome. The mechanical problems and strategies for achieving optimal stability differ depending on patients' age and degree of osteoporosis. Femoral neck fractures in younger adults usually result from high-energy trauma and have a vertical fracture pattern. Strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include placing additional screws at right angles to the fracture plane and medial buttress plate augmentation. In elderly patients, screw position relative to the intact cortical femoral neck bone is of critical importance. Additional strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include the concept of length stable fixation, use of adjunctive calcium phosphate cement, and use of novel fixed angle fixation implants. PMID:26488776

  15. Visual Fixation in Chiari Type II Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Michael S.; Sharpe, James A.; Lillakas, Linda; Dennis, Maureen; Steinbach, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Chiari type II malformation is a congenital deformity of the hindbrain. Square wave jerks are horizontal involuntary saccades that interrupt fixation. Cerebellar disorders may be associated with frequent square wave jerks or saccadic oscillations such as ocular flutter. The effects of Chiari type II malformation on visual fixation are unknown. We recorded eye movements using an eye tracker in 21 participants with Chiari type II malformation, aged 8 to 19 years while they fixated a target for 1 minute. Thirty-eight age-matched healthy participants served as controls. Square wave jerks’ parameters were similar in the 2 groups. Saccadic oscillations were not seen. Chiari type II malformation is not associated with pathological square wave jerks or abnormal saccadic oscillations. The congenital nature of this deformity may permit compensation that preserves stable visual fixation. Alternatively, the deformity of Chiari type II malformation may spare parts of the cerebellum that usually cause fixation instability when damaged. PMID:19182152

  16. Amputated Lower Limb Fixation to the Fracture Table.

    PubMed

    Gamulin, Axel; Farshad, Mazda

    2015-11-01

    Fractures of the proximal and diaphyseal femur are frequently internally fixed using a fracture table with fracture reduction obtained by traction and adequate rotation exerted on the slightly abducted extremity. Although rare, these fractures may occur on an amputated limb. If so, standard use of a fracture table is not possible. To address this situation, the authors describe a simple novel technique allowing rigid fixation of the amputated limb to the traction device of the fracture table that provides accurate control of reduction in all planes. PMID:26558660

  17. A new fixation aid for the radiotherapy of eye tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Buchgeister, Markus; Grisanti, Salvatore; Suesskind, Daniela; Bamberg, Michael; Paulsen, Frank

    2007-12-15

    A modified swim goggle holding a light spot as an optical guide for actively aligning the eye in a reproducible orientation has been constructed to perform radiotherapy of ocular tumors. This device is compatible with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging systems. Image fusion of these data sets yielded clinically acceptable results. The reproducibility of the eye's positioning is tested by repeated CT. The eye's alignment during radiotherapy is monitored by an infrared TV camera with individual markings of the eye's position on the TV-monitor screen. From 2003-2006, 50 patients were treated with this fixation aid by radiosurgery with good patient compliance.

  18. Subperiosteal brow lifts without fixation.

    PubMed

    Troilius, Carl

    2004-11-01

    Most surgeons today advocate an endoscopic subperiosteal brow lift for surgical correction of the upper third of the face. At the author's clinic, this operation has been performed since 1994 and the subgaleal bicoronal brow lift is no longer used. In earlier investigations, the author showed that the subperiosteal approach (n = 60) gives a better result than the subgaleal method (n = 60) when compared 1 year after surgery. In the literature, however, there are no published data regarding the long-term results of subperiosteal brow lifts. The author took material from his earlier investigations and looked at the same patients 5 years postoperatively. He compared the subperiosteal approach (n = 30) with the subgaleal brow lift (n = 15) and found that after 5 years the brows of the subgaleal patients were on the same level as they were before surgery, but in the group of subperiosteal brow lifts, almost all of the brows were higher 5 years after surgery than they were 1 year after surgery, with a mean increase in height of 2.5 mm. These findings led the author to the question whether scalp fixation was necessary at all when performing a subperiosteal brow lift. He performed 20 subperiosteal endoscopic brow lifts where scalp fixation was not used at all, relying only on changing the balance of muscle vectors around the eyebrows. Using a computerized instrument, measurements were made of the distance between the medial canthus and the top of the eyebrow, the midpupil and the top of the eyebrow, and the lateral canthus and the top of the eyebrow. All patients were measured before and 1 year after surgery. The author found an increase of the vertical height from the midpupil to the top of the brow, with an average increase of 3.9 mm. There were no differences between patients who had only a brow lift and those who had a brow lift and an upper blepharoplasty at the same time. The author concludes that for most cases where an increased vertical height of the brows of more

  19. Protocol for a randomized controlled trial on risk adapted damage control orthopedic surgery of femur shaft fractures in multiple trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Rixen, Dieter; Steinhausen, Eva; Sauerland, Stefan; Lefering, Rolf; Meier, Matthias; Maegele, Marc G; Bouillon, Bertil; Neugebauer, Edmund AM

    2009-01-01

    Background Fractures of the long bones and femur fractures in particular are common in multiple trauma patients, but the optimal management of femur fractures in these patients is not yet resolved. Although there is a trend towards the concept of "Damage Control Orthopedics" (DCO) in the management of multiple trauma patients with long bone fractures as reflected by a significant increase in primary external fixation of femur fractures, current literature is insufficient. Thus, in the era of "evidence-based medicine", there is the need for a more specific, clarifying trial. Methods/Design The trial is designed as a randomized controlled open-label multicenter study. Multiple trauma patients with femur shaft fractures and a calculated probability of death between 20 and 60% will be randomized to either temporary fracture fixation with fixateur externe and defined secondary definitive treatment (DCO) or primary reamed nailing (early total care). The primary objective is to reduce the extent of organ failure as measured by the maximum sepsis-related organ failure assessment (SOFA) score. Discussion The Damage Control Study is the first to evaluate the risk adapted damage control orthopedic surgery concept of femur shaft fractures in multiple trauma patients in a randomized controlled design. The trial investigates the differences in clinical outcome of two currently accepted different ways of treating multiple trauma patients with femoral shaft fractures. This study will help to answer the question whether the "early total care" or the „damage control” concept is associated with better outcome. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN10321620 PMID:19691847

  20. Abnormal Fixational Eye Movements in Amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Otero-Millan, Jorge; Kumar, Priyanka; Ghasia, Fatema F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Fixational saccades shift the foveal image to counteract visual fading related to neural adaptation. Drifts are slow eye movements between two adjacent fixational saccades. We quantified fixational saccades and asked whether their changes could be attributed to pathologic drifts seen in amblyopia, one of the most common causes of blindness in childhood. Methods Thirty-six pediatric subjects with varying severity of amblyopia and eleven healthy age-matched controls held their gaze on a visual target. Eye movements were measured with high-resolution video-oculography during fellow eye-viewing and amblyopic eye-viewing conditions. Fixational saccades and drifts were analyzed in the amblyopic and fellow eye and compared with controls. Results We found an increase in the amplitude with decreased frequency of fixational saccades in children with amblyopia. These alterations in fixational eye movements correlated with the severity of their amblyopia. There was also an increase in eye position variance during drifts in amblyopes. There was no correlation between the eye position variance or the eye velocity during ocular drifts and the amplitude of subsequent fixational saccade. Our findings suggest that abnormalities in fixational saccades in amblyopia are independent of the ocular drift. Discussion This investigation of amblyopia in pediatric age group quantitatively characterizes the fixation instability. Impaired properties of fixational saccades could be the consequence of abnormal processing and reorganization of the visual system in amblyopia. Paucity in the visual feedback during amblyopic eye-viewing condition can attribute to the increased eye position variance and drift velocity. PMID:26930079

  1. Open reduction and internal fixation compared to closed reduction and external fixation in distal radial fractures

    PubMed Central

    Kopylov, Philippe; Geijer, Mats; Tägil, Magnus

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose In unstable distal radial fractures that are impossible to reduce or to maintain in reduced position, the treatment of choice is operation. The type of operation and the choice of implant, however, is a matter of discussion. Our aim was to investigate whether open reduction and internal fixation would produce a better result than traditional external fixation. Methods 50 patients with an unstable or comminute distal radius fracture were randomized to either closed reduction and bridging external fixation, or open reduction and internal fixation using the TriMed system. The primary outcome parameter was grip strength, but the patients were followed for 1 year with objective clinical assessment, subjective outcome using DASH, and radiographic examination. Results At 1 year postoperatively, grip strength was 90% (SD 16) of the uninjured side in the internal fixation group and 78% (17) in the external fixation group. Pronation/supination was 150° (15) in the internal fixation group and 136° (20) in the external fixation group at 1 year. There were no differences in DASH scores or in radiographic parameters. 5 patients in the external fixation group were reoperated due to malunion, as compared to 1 in the internal fixation group. 7 other cases were classified as radiographic malunion: 5 in the external fixation group and 2 in the internal fixation group. Interpretation Internal fixation gave better grip strength and a better range of motion at 1 year, and tended to have less malunions than external fixation. No difference could be found regarding subjective outcome. PMID:19857180

  2. Angiogenesis and osteogenesis in an orthopedically expanded suture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, H. N.; Garetto, L. P.; Potter, R. H.; Katona, T. R.; Lee, C. H.; Roberts, W. E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the angiogenic and the subsequent osteogenic responses during a 96-hour time-course after sutural expansion. Fifty rats were divided into: (1) a control group that received only angiogenic induction through injection of 5 ng/gm recombinant human endothelial cell growth factor (rhECGF); (2) an experimental group that received orthopedic expansion and rhECGF; (3) a sham group that received expansion and sodium chloride (NaCl) injection; and (4) a baseline group that received no expansion or injection. All rats were injected with 3H-thymidine (1.0 microCi/gm) 1 hour before death to label the DNA of S-phase cells. Demineralized sections (4 microm thick) were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Angiogenesis and cell migration were analyzed with a previously established cell kinetics model. Analysis of variance was used to test the hypothesis that enhancement of angiogenesis stimulates reestablishment of osteogenic capability. Blood vessel number, area, and endothelial cell-labeled index significantly increased in experimental groups, but no difference was found between control and baseline groups. Labeled-pericyte index and activated pericyte numbers in the experimental group were also higher than in the sham groups. These results show that supplemental rhECGF enhances angiogenesis in expanded sutures but not in nonexpanded sutures. Data also suggest that pericytes are the source of osteoblasts in an orthopedically expanded suture.

  3. Experimental and clinical performance of porous tantalum in orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Levine, Brett Russell; Sporer, Scott; Poggie, Robert A; Della Valle, Craig J; Jacobs, Joshua J

    2006-09-01

    Porous tantalum, a new low modulus metal with a characteristic appearance similar to cancellous bone, is currently available for use in several orthopedic applications (hip and knee arthroplasty, spine surgery, and bone graft substitute). The open-cell structure of repeating dodecahedrons is produced via carbon vapor deposition/infiltration of commercially pure tantalum onto a vitreous carbon scaffolding. This transition metal maintains several interesting biomaterial properties, including: a high volumetric porosity (70-80%), low modulus of elasticity (3MPa), and high frictional characteristics. Tantalum has excellent biocompatibility and is safe to use in vivo as evidenced by its historical and current use in pacemaker electrodes, cranioplasty plates and as radiopaque markers. The bioactivity and biocompatibility of porous tantalum stems from its ability to form a self-passivating surface oxide layer. This surface layer leads to the formation of a bone-like apatite coating in vivo and affords excellent bone and fibrous in-growth properties allowing for rapid and substantial bone and soft tissue attachment. Tantalum-chondrocyte composites have yielded successful early results in vitro and may afford an option for joint resurfacing in the future. The development of porous tantalum is in its early stages of evolution and the following represents a review of its biomaterial properties and applications in orthopedic surgery. PMID:16737737

  4. An orthopedic tissue adhesive for targeted delivery of intraoperative biologics.

    PubMed

    Simson, Jacob; Crist, Joshua; Strehin, Iossif; Lu, Qiaozhi; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2013-03-01

    Tissue adhesives can bind together damaged tissues and serve as tools to deliver and localize therapeutics to facilitate regeneration. One emerging therapeutic trend in orthopedics is the use of intraoperative biologics (IOB), such as bone marrow (BM) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP), to stimulate healing. Here, we introduce the application of the biomaterial chondroitin sulfate succinimidyl succinate (CS-NHS) to deliver IOB in a hydrogel adhesive. We demonstrate the biomaterial's ability to bind various tissue types and its cellular biocompatibility with encapsulated human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Further, we examine in detail the CS-NHS adhesive combined with BM aspirate for use in bone applications. hMSCs were encapsulated in CS-BM and cultured for 5 weeks in osteogenic medium. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated osteogenesis via upregulation of the osteogenic transcription factor Runx2 and bone markers alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin. Significant deposition of calcium and osteocalcin was detected using biochemical, histological, and immunohistochemical techniques. Shear testing demonstrated that the CS-BM adhesive exhibited an adhesive strength approximately an order of magnitude stronger than fibrin glue and approaching that of a cyanoacrylate adhesive. These results indicate that CS-NHS is a promising delivery tool for IOB in orthopedic applications requiring a strong, degradable, and biocompatible adhesive that supports bone growth. PMID:23097279

  5. Dynamic Patterns of Expertise: The Case of Orthopedic Medical Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Marwan, Norbert; Neuman, Yair; Salai, Moshe; Rath, Ehud

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze dynamic patterns for scanning femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) radiographs in orthopedics, in order to better understand the nature of expertise in radiography. Seven orthopedics residents with at least two years of expertise and seven board-certified orthopedists participated in the study. The participants were asked to diagnose 15 anteroposterior (AP) pelvis radiographs of 15 surgical patients, diagnosed with FAI syndrome. Eye tracking data were recorded using the SMI desk-mounted tracker and were analyzed using advanced measures and methodologies, mainly recurrence quantification analysis. The expert orthopedists presented a less predictable pattern of scanning the radiographs although there was no difference between experts and non-experts in the deterministic nature of their scan path. In addition, the experts presented a higher percentage of correct areas of focus and more quickly made their first comparison between symmetric regions of the pelvis. We contribute to the understanding of experts’ process of diagnosis by showing that experts are qualitatively different from residents in their scanning patterns. The dynamic pattern of scanning that characterizes the experts was found to have a more complex and less predictable signature, meaning that experts’ scanning is simultaneously both structured (i.e. deterministic) and unpredictable. PMID:27414794

  6. Dynamic Patterns of Expertise: The Case of Orthopedic Medical Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Assaf, Dan; Amar, Eyal; Marwan, Norbert; Neuman, Yair; Salai, Moshe; Rath, Ehud

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze dynamic patterns for scanning femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) radiographs in orthopedics, in order to better understand the nature of expertise in radiography. Seven orthopedics residents with at least two years of expertise and seven board-certified orthopedists participated in the study. The participants were asked to diagnose 15 anteroposterior (AP) pelvis radiographs of 15 surgical patients, diagnosed with FAI syndrome. Eye tracking data were recorded using the SMI desk-mounted tracker and were analyzed using advanced measures and methodologies, mainly recurrence quantification analysis. The expert orthopedists presented a less predictable pattern of scanning the radiographs although there was no difference between experts and non-experts in the deterministic nature of their scan path. In addition, the experts presented a higher percentage of correct areas of focus and more quickly made their first comparison between symmetric regions of the pelvis. We contribute to the understanding of experts' process of diagnosis by showing that experts are qualitatively different from residents in their scanning patterns. The dynamic pattern of scanning that characterizes the experts was found to have a more complex and less predictable signature, meaning that experts' scanning is simultaneously both structured (i.e. deterministic) and unpredictable. PMID:27414794

  7. Inferior vena cava filter placement in orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bass, Anne R; Mattern, Christopher J; Voos, James E; Peterson, Margaret G E; Trost, David W

    2010-09-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters were developed for the treatment of venous thromboembolism but in high-risk patients are often used for prophylaxis instead. In the study reported here, we reviewed all the orthopedic surgery cases in which IVC filters were used at our institution in 2005. Charts were analyzed and patients contacted by telephone for long-term follow-up. IVC filters were used in 90 (0.96%) of the 9,348 inpatient orthopedic surgeries. Sixty-one percent of filters were placed for prophylaxis, though only 42% of patients with prophylactic filters had a contraindication to anticoagulation. Eighty-one percent of patients with prophylactic filters who received anticoagulation received warfarin. Ratios of prophylactic-to-treatment filters were 3.25 for fracture surgeries, 2.1 for arthroplasties, and 0.89 for spine surgeries. Five percent of patients with prophylactic filters developed deep vein thrombosis. Fifty-two percent of filters were retrievable, but only 40% of those were removed a mean of 5.1 months (SD, 3.9 months) after placement. Filter removal was associated with complications in 11% of patients, and in another 10% the filter could not be removed. Forty-one patients were contacted a mean of 21 months (SD, 3 months) after filter placement. Only 32% of those who still had filters were on anticoagulation at follow-up. PMID:21290021

  8. Guidelines for the Implementation of Programs for Pupils Who Are Orthopedically Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Robert S.; Fusco, Carol B.

    Guidelines are provided for the development of programs in South Carolina for orthopedically handicapped (OH) pupils. Basic information is given concerning the definition of orthopedic handicap, the legal mandates on the education of OH pupils, funding sources, authorized programs (whether self-contained programs, resource rooms, or itinerant…

  9. The Orthopedically Disabled Child: Psychological Implications with an Individual Basis. July 1984 Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigmon, Scott B.

    This study describes the implications of the Individual Psychology of Alfred Adler and field theory associated with Kurt Lewin in understanding orthopedically disabled children and points out that orthopedically disabled youngsters have a remarkable range of individual differences both in type of disability as well as level of adjustment.…

  10. Age, Physical Activity, Physical Fitness, Body Composition, and Incidence of Orthopedic Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Effects of age, physical activity, physical fitness, and body mass index (BMI) on the occurrence of orthopedic problems were examined. For men, physical fitness, BMI, and physical activity were associated with orthopedic problems; for women, physical activity was the main predictor. Age was not a factor for either gender. (JD)

  11. Dance for Students with Orthopedic Conditions--Popular, Square, Folk, Modern, [and] Ballet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Cordelia Graves

    1979-01-01

    Preparation for teaching dance to orthopedically handicapped students is discussed in addition to specific suggestions for teaching popular dance, square dance, folk dance, modern dance, and ballet. Dancing is seen as a way to give orthopedically handicapped students physical education success without competition. Recommended music for each type…

  12. Complement fixation by rheumatoid factor.

    PubMed Central

    Tanimoto, K; Cooper, N R; Johnson, J S; Vaughan, J H

    1975-01-01

    The capacity for fixation and activation of hemolytic complement by polyclonal IgM rheumatoid factors (RF) isolated from sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and monoclonal IgM-RF isolated from the cryoprecipitates of patients with IgM-IgG mixed cryoglobulinemia was examined. RF mixed with aggregated, reduced, and alkylated human IgG (Agg-R/A-IgG) in the fluid phase failed to significantly reduce the level of total hemolytic complement, CH50, or of individual complement components, C1, C2, C3, and C5. However, sheep erythrocytes (SRC) coated with Agg-R/A-IgG or with reduced and alkylated rabbit IgG anti-SRC antibody were hemolyzed by complement in the presence of polyclonal IgM-RF. Human and guinea pig complement worked equally well. The degree of hemolysis was in direct proportion to the hemagglutination titer of the RF against the same coated cells. Monoclonal IgM-RF, normal human IgM, and purified Waldenström macroglobulins without antiglobulin activity were all inert. Hemolysis of coated SRC by RF and complement was inhibited by prior treatment of the complement source with chelating agents, hydrazine, cobra venom factor, specific antisera to C1q, CR, C5, C6, or C8, or by heating at 56 degrees C for 30 min. Purified radiolabeled C4, C3, and C8 included in the complement source were bound to hemolysed SRC in direct proportion to the degree of hemolysis. These data indicate that polyclonal IgM-RF fix and activate complement via the classic pathway. The system described for assessing complement fixation by isolated RF is readily adaptable to use with whole human serum. PMID:1078825

  13. Salient in space, salient in time: Fixation probability predicts fixation duration during natural scene viewing.

    PubMed

    Einhäuser, Wolfgang; Nuthmann, Antje

    2016-09-01

    During natural scene viewing, humans typically attend and fixate selected locations for about 200-400 ms. Two variables characterize such "overt" attention: the probability of a location being fixated, and the fixation's duration. Both variables have been widely researched, but little is known about their relation. We use a two-step approach to investigate the relation between fixation probability and duration. In the first step, we use a large corpus of fixation data. We demonstrate that fixation probability (empirical salience) predicts fixation duration across different observers and tasks. Linear mixed-effects modeling shows that this relation is explained neither by joint dependencies on simple image features (luminance, contrast, edge density) nor by spatial biases (central bias). In the second step, we experimentally manipulate some of these features. We find that fixation probability from the corpus data still predicts fixation duration for this new set of experimental data. This holds even if stimuli are deprived of low-level images features, as long as higher level scene structure remains intact. Together, this shows a robust relation between fixation duration and probability, which does not depend on simple image features. Moreover, the study exemplifies the combination of empirical research on a large corpus of data with targeted experimental manipulations. PMID:27627736

  14. Factors affecting interest in orthopedics among female medical students: a prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Keith; Namdari, Surena; Bowers, Andrea; Keenan, Mary Ann; Levin, L Scott; Ahn, Jaimo

    2011-12-01

    The field of orthopedics has a limited ability to recruit high-quality female applicants. The purpose of this study was to determine whether early exposure to the field affects a woman's decision to pursue orthopedics. We performed a prospective, nonrandomized cohort study between academic years 2005 and 2009 and compared interest in orthopedic surgery among female (n=271) and male (n=71) medical students at 2 urban teaching institutions. Elective lectures and orthopedic literature were distributed via e-mail to the study participants. These materials included articles published in the medical literature, materials produced and distributed by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, and Web sites providing educational materials. The primary outcome was the likelihood of application for orthopedic residency. We studied the influence of demographics, exposure, and attitudes on interest in pursuing an orthopedic career. Men had a significantly higher baseline level of interest in orthopedic surgery than women (P=.005). Younger age (P<.001) and personal (P<.001), independent (P<.001), and school (P=.023) exposures to orthopedics were significantly related to interest among women. At final follow-up, total personal exposures (P=.003) and total independent exposures (P<.001) in the form of our literature and lectures were correlated with final interest in women. Female interest was decreased by the long hours, physical demands, and predominantly male nature of the field. Early exposure to orthopedic educational resources may be useful in generating female interest. Perceptions and attitudes regarding orthopedic surgery must to be changed to attract the best and brightest minds, regardless of sex. PMID:22146211

  15. Level of billing as a function of resident documentation and orthopedic subspecialty at an academic multispecialty orthopedic surgery practice.

    PubMed

    Dezfuli, Bobby; Smith, Jordan L

    2012-11-01

    Documentation, coding, and billing for physician-patient encounters have evolved over time and have significant variability. Appropriate and complete documentation of these encounters can contribute to the financial viability of private and academic medical centers. The objectives of this study were to assess the financial effect of documentation on billing and to compare the authors' institution's distribution of billing level compared with Medicare normative data. Four orthopedic surgery subspecialty clinics were evaluated at a university outpatient clinic over a 1-year period. A single full-day clinic per week was used for each subspecialty. Residents dictated the majority of the reports. All reports were transcribed by medical transcriptionists and coded by certified professional coders. The sports medicine subspecialty generated the highest volume of patient clinic visits, followed by foot and ankle, trauma, and spine (P<.01). The majority of the reports were billed at level 3 (P<.05). Significant differences existed between subspecialty and percentage distribution of billing level (P<.05). Compared with Medicare normative data, a significantly greater percentage of level 3 reports and a lower percentage of level 2 and 4 reports existed in the orthopedic practice (P<.01). The estimated loss of revenue from the fewer level 4 reports was $81,281.11 for 1 year. These findings highlight the need for greater educational interventions to improve provider documentation, coding, and billing. The effect of new electronic medical record systems that prompt providers to include key evaluation and management components will likely affect practices and warrant further analysis. PMID:23127460

  16. Kennedy Space Center Fixation Tube (KFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Stephanie E.; Levine, Howard G.; Romero, Vergel

    2016-01-01

    Experiments performed on the International Space Station (ISS) frequently require the experimental organisms to be preserved until they can be returned to earth for analysis in the appropriate laboratory facility. The Kennedy Fixation Tube (KFT) was developed to allow astronauts to apply fixative, chemical compounds that are often toxic, to biological samples without the use of a glovebox while maintaining three levels of containment (Fig. 1). KFTs have been used over 200 times on-orbit with no leaks of chemical fixative. The KFT is composed of the following elements: a polycarbonate main tube where the fixative is loaded preflight, the sample tube where the plant or other biological specimens is placed during operations, the expansion plug, actuator, and base plug that provides fixative containment (Fig. 2). The main tube is pre-filled with 25 mL of fixative solution prior to flight. When actuated, the specimen contained within the sample tube is immersed with approximately 22 mL (+/- 2 mL) of the fixative solution. The KFT has been demonstrated to maintain its containment at ambient temperatures, 4degC refrigeration and -100 C freezing conditions.

  17. Immaturity of Visual Fixations in Dyslexic Children

    PubMed Central

    Tiadi, Aimé; Gérard, Christophe-Loïc; Peyre, Hugo; Bui-Quoc, Emmanuel; Bucci, Maria Pia

    2016-01-01

    To our knowledge, behavioral studies recording visual fixations abilities in dyslexic children are scarce. The object of this article is to explore further the visual fixation ability in dyslexics compared to chronological age-matched and reading age-matched non-dyslexic children. Fifty-five dyslexic children from 7 to 14 years old, 55 chronological age-matched non-dyslexic children and 55 reading age-matched non-dyslexic children participated to this study. Eye movements from both eyes were recorded horizontally and vertically by a video-oculography system (EyeBrain® T2). The fixation task consisted in fixating a white-filled circle appearing in the center of the screen for 30 s. Results showed that dyslexic children produced a significantly higher number of unwanted saccades than both groups of non-dyslexic children. Moreover, the number of unwanted saccades significantly decreased with age in both groups of non-dyslexic children, but not in dyslexics. Furthermore, dyslexics made more saccades during the last 15 s of fixation period with respect to both groups of non-dyslexic children. Such poor visual fixation capability in dyslexic children could be due to impaired attention abilities, as well as to an immaturity of the cortical areas controlling the fixation system. PMID:26924975

  18. Distal Humerus Fractures: Open Reduction Internal Fixation.

    PubMed

    Mighell, Mark A; Stephens, Brent; Stone, Geoffrey P; Cottrell, Benjamin J

    2015-11-01

    Distal humerus fractures are challenging injuries for the upper extremity surgeon. However, recent techniques in open reduction internal fixation have been powerful tools in getting positive outcomes. To get such results, the surgeon must be aware of how to properly use these techniques in their respective practices. The method of fixation depends on the fracture, taking the degree of comminution and the restoration of the columns and articular surface into account. This article helps surgeons understand the concepts behind open reduction internal fixation of the distal humerus and makes them aware of pitfalls that may lead to negative results. PMID:26498548

  19. Arthroscopic fixation of type III acromioclavicular dislocations.

    PubMed

    Somers, Jan F A; Van der Linden, Dietert

    2007-10-01

    Type III Acromio-Clavicular Joint dislocations can be treated successfully by surgical stabilisation in situ, with or without reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments. The authors describe a simple and reliable mode of fixation, performed arthroscopically. The technique can be used for in situ fixation, or as part of an arthroscopically assisted Weaver and Dunn procedure. Using a metallic anchor loaded with a braided polyfilament suture, a strong and reliable fixation of the clavicle to the coracoid process is obtained. No hardware removal is necessary. Concomitant glenohumeral pathology can be treated simultaneously. PMID:18019910

  20. Photoactive TiO2 antibacterial coating on surgical external fixation pins for clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Villatte, Guillaume; Massard, Christophe; Descamps, Stéphane; Sibaud, Yves; Forestier, Christiane; Awitor, Komla-Oscar

    2015-01-01

    External fixation is a method of osteosynthesis currently used in traumatology and orthopedic surgery. Pin tract infection is a common problem in clinical practice. Infection occurs after bacterial colonization of the pin due to its contact with skin and the local environment. One way to prevent such local contamination is to create a specific coating that could be applied in the medical field. In this work, we developed a surface coating for external fixator pins based on the photocatalytic properties of titanium dioxide, producing a bactericidal effect with sufficient mechanical strength to be compatible with surgical use. The morphology and structure of the sol-gel coating layers were characterized using, respectively, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The resistance properties of the coating were investigated by mechanical testing. Photodegradation of acid orange 7 in aqueous solution was used as a probe to assess the photocatalytic activity of the titanium dioxide layers under ultraviolet irradiation. The bactericidal effect induced by the process was evaluated against two strains, ie, Staphylococcus aureus and multiresistant Staphylococcus epidermidis. The coated pins showed good mechanical strength and an efficient antibacterial effect after 1 hour of ultraviolet irradiation. PMID:26005347

  1. Validity of subjective smoking status in orthopedic patients

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Daniel; Haubruck, Patrick; Boxriker, Sonja; Korff, Sebastian; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Moghaddam, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In this level 1 diagnostic study, we analyzed the validity of subjective smoking status and, as secondary research question, the smoking cessation adherence in orthopedic patients during a routine hospital stay of nonunion patients by measuring serum cotinine. Methods We included patients undergoing revision surgery due to nonunion of long bones. Patients were interviewed about their smoking status. Blood samples were taken from all the patients prior to surgery and for an additional 6 weeks following surgery. Serum levels of cotinine were measured, and coherence between subjective smoking status and objective cotinine analysis was evaluated. Results Between March 2012 and August 2014, we enrolled 136 patients. Six of the 26 “previous smokers” (23%) and four of the 65 “nonsmokers” (6%) had serum cotinine above cutoff levels. In self-labeled smokers, serum cotinine levels averaged at 2,367.4±14,885.9 ng/mL (with a median of 100 ng/mL), whereas in previous smokers the levels averaged at 4,270±19,619.4 ng/mL (with a median of 0 ng/mL) and in the nonsmokers group the levels averaged at 12±53.9 ng/mL (with a median of 0.03 ng/mL). Overall, the subjective smoking status matched serum cotinine testing in 88% of the cases. Sensitivity was 79.6% and specificity was 93.1%. Ninety-one percent of the patients with preoperative positive serum values were still positive at follow-up. Conclusion In this study, we could show that subjective smoking status in orthopedic patients is predominantly reliable as validated by objective cotinine measurements; however, patients who declare themselves as “previous smokers” are at elevated risk for underreporting continued smoking and patients who smoked preoperatively are at high risk for continuing their habit. In the future, caregivers should consider introducing effective treatments for smoking cessation to smokers and furthermore offer effective treatments to maintain smoking cessation in previous smokers during

  2. Indication for Partial Vertebral Osteotomy and Realignment in Posterior Spinal Fixation for Osteoporotic Thoracolumbar Vertebral Collapse with Neurological Deficits.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Hanakita, Junya; Kawaoka, Taigo; Ohtake, Yasufumi; Adachi, Hiromasa; Shimizu, Kampei

    2016-08-15

    Instrumented spinal fixation is ordinarily required in patients who present with myelopathy or cauda equina syndrome secondary to vertebral collapse following osteoporotic thoracolumbar fracture. Posterior spinal fixation is a major surgical option, and partial vertebral osteotomy (PVO) through a posterior approach is occasionally reasonable for achievement of complete neural decompression and improvement of excessive local kyphosis. However, the indications and need for PVO remain unclear. The objectives of this retrospective study were to determine the efficacy and safety of posterior spinal fixation with or without PVO for osteoporotic thoracolumbar vertebral collapse and identify patients who require neural decompression and alignment correction by PVO. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of 20 patients (13 females, 7 males; mean age, 67.1 years) who underwent instrumented posterior fixation for osteoporotic thoracolumbar vertebral fracture. Clinical outcomes were assessed by the Japanese Orthopedic Association score and visual analog scale scores in the lumbar and leg areas. PVO was added with posterior spinal fixation in eight patients because neural decompression was incomplete after laminectomy as indicated by intraoperative echo imaging. Neurological and functional recovery significantly improved during follow-up. Clinical outcomes in patients who underwent PVO were similar to those in patients who did not undergo PVO. However, correction of the local kyphotic angle and improvement of spinal canal compromise after surgery was significant in patients who underwent PVO. The patients who required PVO had a less local kyphotic angle in the supine position and higher occupation rate of the fractured fragment in the spinal canal in the preoperative examination. PMID:27021642

  3. Indication for Partial Vertebral Osteotomy and Realignment in Posterior Spinal Fixation for Osteoporotic Thoracolumbar Vertebral Collapse with Neurological Deficits

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Toshiyuki; HANAKITA, Junya; KAWAOKA, Taigo; OHTAKE, Yasufumi; ADACHI, Hiromasa; SHIMIZU, Kampei

    2016-01-01

    Instrumented spinal fixation is ordinarily required in patients who present with myelopathy or cauda equina syndrome secondary to vertebral collapse following osteoporotic thoracolumbar fracture. Posterior spinal fixation is a major surgical option, and partial vertebral osteotomy (PVO) through a posterior approach is occasionally reasonable for achievement of complete neural decompression and improvement of excessive local kyphosis. However, the indications and need for PVO remain unclear. The objectives of this retrospective study were to determine the efficacy and safety of posterior spinal fixation with or without PVO for osteoporotic thoracolumbar vertebral collapse and identify patients who require neural decompression and alignment correction by PVO. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of 20 patients (13 females, 7 males; mean age, 67.1 years) who underwent instrumented posterior fixation for osteoporotic thoracolumbar vertebral fracture. Clinical outcomes were assessed by the Japanese Orthopedic Association score and visual analog scale scores in the lumbar and leg areas. PVO was added with posterior spinal fixation in eight patients because neural decompression was incomplete after laminectomy as indicated by intraoperative echo imaging. Neurological and functional recovery significantly improved during follow-up. Clinical outcomes in patients who underwent PVO were similar to those in patients who did not undergo PVO. However, correction of the local kyphotic angle and improvement of spinal canal compromise after surgery was significant in patients who underwent PVO. The patients who required PVO had a less local kyphotic angle in the supine position and higher occupation rate of the fractured fragment in the spinal canal in the preoperative examination. PMID:27021642

  4. Neural correlates of fixation duration in natural reading: Evidence from fixation-related fMRI.

    PubMed

    Henderson, John M; Choi, Wonil; Luke, Steven G; Desai, Rutvik H

    2015-10-01

    A key assumption of current theories of natural reading is that fixation duration reflects underlying attentional, language, and cognitive processes associated with text comprehension. The neurocognitive correlates of this relationship are currently unknown. To investigate this relationship, we compared neural activation associated with fixation duration in passage reading and a pseudo-reading control condition. The results showed that fixation duration was associated with activation in oculomotor and language areas during text reading. Fixation duration during pseudo-reading, on the other hand, showed greater involvement of frontal control regions, suggesting flexibility and task dependency of the eye movement network. Consistent with current models, these results provide support for the hypothesis that fixation duration in reading reflects attentional engagement and language processing. The results also demonstrate that fixation-related fMRI provides a method for investigating the neurocognitive bases of natural reading. PMID:26151101

  5. Modified arthroscopic suture fixation of a displaced tibial eminence fracture.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Ronald A; Murphy, Kevin P; Machen, M Shaun; Kuklo, Timothy R

    2003-02-01

    This study describes a new arthroscopic method using a whip-stitch technique for treating a displaced type III tibial eminence fracture. A 12-year-old girl who sustained a displaced type III tibial eminence fracture was treated with arthroscopic fixation using the Arthrosew disposable suture device (Surgical Dynamics, Norwalk, CT) to place a whip stitch into the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The Arthrex ACL guide (Arthrex, Naples, FL) was used to reduce the avulsed tibial spine fragment. Sutures were then passed through the tibial tunnel and secured over a bony bridge with the knee in 20 degrees of flexion. At 9 months, the patient has a full range of motion with normal Lachman and anterior drawer testing, and she has returned to competitive basketball. Radiographs show complete fracture healing. KT-1000 and isokinetic testing at 9-month follow-up show only minimal side-to-side differences. The Arthrosew device provides a significant advantage in the treatment of type III and IV fractures of the tibial eminence by obtaining arthroscopic fixation within the substance of the ACL, thus obviating arthrotomy and hardware placement. This technique also restores the proper length and tension to the ACL, and provides a simplified, reproducible method of treatment for this injury. PMID:12579135

  6. ADVANCES IN THE USE OF STEM CELLS IN ORTHOPEDICS

    PubMed Central

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Narazaki, Douglas Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Primordial cells or stem cells are multipotent undifferentiated cells with the capacity to originate any type of cell in the organism. They may have their origins in the blastocyst and thus are classified as embryonic, or tissues developed in fetuses, newborns or adults and thus are known as somatic stem cells. Bone marrow is one of the main locations for isolating primordial cells, and there are two lineages: hematopoietic and mesenchymal progenitor cells. There are several uses for these undifferentiated cells in orthopedics, going from cartilaginous lesions in osteoarthrosis, osteochondritis dissecans and patellar chondromalacia, to bone lesions like in pseudarthrosis or bone losses, or nerve lesions like in spinal cord trauma. Studying stem cells is probably the most promising field of study of all within medicine, and this is shortly going to revolutionize all medical specialties (both clinical and surgical) and thus provide solutions for diseases that today are difficult to deal with. PMID:27027022

  7. Cultural Nuance in Orthopedic Foreign Aid: Differences in Patient Concerns.

    PubMed

    Kavolus, Joseph J; Ritter, Merrill A; Claverie, J Guillermo; Salas, Marcos D; Kavolus, Christopher H; Trousdale, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic aid to developing nations is expanding and becoming a unique facet of the specialty. This investigation seeks to compare patient impressions and concerns regarding the care patients receive as part of an itinerant surgical aid trip in 2 nations. In 2013 and 2014, patients from 2 separate nations completed a Likert scale survey assessing impressions of the care they received at the hands of a surgical team from abroad. Mean response scores were calculated and compared using a t test. This is the first investigation to compare patient concerns across 2 nations in a surgical aid trip setting. The results highlight the importance of culture in understanding patients and the impressions of the care they receive. PMID:26350258

  8. Barriers to the Clinical Translation of Orthopedic Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have been the subject of increasingly intensive research for over 20 years, and there is concern in some quarters over the lack of clinically useful products despite the large sums of money invested. This review provides one perspective on orthopedic applications from a biologist working in academia. It is suggested that the delay in clinical application is not atypical of new, biologically based technologies. Some barriers to progress are acknowledged and discussed, but it is also noted that preclinical studies have identified several promising types of cells, scaffolds, and morphogenetic signals, which, although not optimal, are worth advancing toward human trials to establish a bridgehead in the clinic. Although this transitional technology will be replaced by more sophisticated, subsequent systems, it will perform valuable pioneering functions and facilitate the clinical development of the field. Some strategies for achieving this are suggested. PMID:21682607

  9. Congenital and acquired orthopedic abnormalities in patients with myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Westcott, M A; Dynes, M C; Remer, E M; Donaldson, J S; Dias, L S

    1992-11-01

    This article presents a radiologic review of the spectrum of acquired and congenital orthopedic abnormalities found in patients with myelomeningocele. These abnormalities are caused predominantly by muscle imbalance, paralysis, and decreased sensation in the lower extremity. Iatrogenic injury, such as a postoperative tethered cord, may also cause bone abnormalities. Selected images were obtained from more than 800 children. Important entities presented include spinal curvatures such as kyphosis, scoliosis, and lordosis; subluxation and dislocation of the hip, coxa valga, contractures of the hip, and femoral torsion; knee deformities; rotational abnormalities of the lower extremity and external and internal torsion; ankle and foot abnormalities such as ankle valgus, calcaneus foot, congenital vertical talus (rocker-bottom deformity), and talipes equinovarus; and metaphyseal, diaphyseal, and physeal fractures. Familiarity with congenital abnormalities and an understanding of the pathogenesis of acquired disorders in patients with myelomeningocele are essential for proper radiologic interpretation and timely therapy. PMID:1439018

  10. Power harvesting using PZT ceramics embedded in orthopedic implants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Liu, Ming; Jia, Chen; Wang, Zihua

    2009-09-01

    Battery lifetime has been the stumbling block for many power-critical or maintenance-free real-time embedded applications, such as wireless sensors and orthopedic implants. Thus a piezoelectric material that could convert human motion into electrical energy provides a very attractive solution for clinical implants. In this work, we analyze the power generation characteristics of stiff lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics and the equivalent circuit through extensive experiments. Our experimental framework allows us to explore many important design considerations of such a PZT-based power generator. Overall we can achieve a PZT element volume of 0.5 x 0.5 x 1.8 cm, which is considerably smaller than the results reported so far. Finally, we outline the application of our PZT elements in a total knee replacement (TKR) implant. PMID:19812004

  11. Barriers to the clinical translation of orthopedic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Evans, Christopher H

    2011-12-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have been the subject of increasingly intensive research for over 20 years, and there is concern in some quarters over the lack of clinically useful products despite the large sums of money invested. This review provides one perspective on orthopedic applications from a biologist working in academia. It is suggested that the delay in clinical application is not atypical of new, biologically based technologies. Some barriers to progress are acknowledged and discussed, but it is also noted that preclinical studies have identified several promising types of cells, scaffolds, and morphogenetic signals, which, although not optimal, are worth advancing toward human trials to establish a bridgehead in the clinic. Although this transitional technology will be replaced by more sophisticated, subsequent systems, it will perform valuable pioneering functions and facilitate the clinical development of the field. Some strategies for achieving this are suggested. PMID:21682607

  12. Distal Humeral Fixation of an Intramedullary Nail Periprosthetic Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Divecha, Hiren M.; Marynissen, Hans A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Distal humeral periprosthetic fractures below intramedullary nail devices are complex and challenging to treat, in particular due to the osteopenic/porotic nature of bone found in these patients. Fixation is often difficult to satisfactorily achieve around the intramedullary device, whilst minimising soft tissue disruption. Descriptions of such cases in the current literature are very rare. We present the case of a midshaft humeral fracture treated with a locking compression plate that developed a nonunion, in a 60-year old female. This went on to successful union after exchange for an intramedullary humeral nail. Unfortunately, the patient developed a distal 1/5th humeral periprosthetic fracture, which was then successfully addressed with a single-contoured, extra-articular, distal humeral locking compression plate (Synthes) with unicortical locking screws and cerclage cables proximally around the distal nail tip region. An excellent postoperative range of motion was achieved. PMID:23662231

  13. Ocular Fixation Abnormality in Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirama, Aya; Kanai, Chieko; Kato, Nobumasa; Kashino, Makio

    2016-01-01

    We examined the factors that influence ocular fixation control in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) including sensory information, individuals' motor characteristics, and inhibitory control. The ASD group showed difficulty in maintaining fixation especially when there was no fixation target. The fixational eye movement characteristics of…

  14. Orthopedic correction of growing hyperdivergent, retrognathic patients with miniscrew implants.

    PubMed

    Buschang, Peter H; Carrillo, Roberto; Rossouw, P Emile

    2011-03-01

    Traditional orthodontic treatments do not adequately address the skeletal problems of retrognathic, hyperdivergent, Class II adolescents; the few approaches that do address them require long-term patient compliance. This article introduces a novel approach using miniscrew implants (MSIs) and growth to treat retrognathic, hyperdivergent adolescents. Nine consecutive patients were evaluated at the start of treatment (aged 13.2 ± 1.1 years) and again at the end of the orthopedic phase (after 1.9 ± 0.3 years). Each patient had 2 MSIs placed in either side of the palate. Coil springs (150 g) extended from the MSIs to a rapid palatal expander, which served as a rigid segment for intruding the maxillary premolar and molars. Two additional MSIs were placed between the first mandibular molars and second premolars; coil spring (150 g) extended from the MSIs to hold or intrude the mandibular molars. Before treatment, the patients exhibited substantial and significant mandibular retrusion (Z score = -1.0), facial convexity (Z score = 0.7), and hyperdivergence (Z score = 1.6). Treatment produced consistent and substantial orthopedic effects. The chin was advanced by a mean of 2.4 mm, the sella-nasion-basion (SNB) angle increased by 2.1°, the mandibular plane angle decreased by 3.9°, and facial convexity decreased by approximately 3.2°. Questionnaires showed that this treatment approach was not painful or uncomfortable; the majority of the patients indicated that they were very likely to recommend the treatment to others. Treatment was accomplished by titrating the amount of orthodontic intrusion performed based on the individual's growth potential. PMID:21236539

  15. Prevalence of Internet and Social Media Usage in Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Emily; Nguyen, Joseph; Matzkin, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Prior studies in other specialties have shown that social networking and Internet usage has become an increasingly important means of patient communication and referral. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of Internet or social media usage in new patients referred to a major academic orthopedics center and to identify new avenues to optimize patient recruitment and communication. New patients were surveyed (n=752) between December 2012 to January 2013 in a major academic orthopaedic center to complete a 15-item questionnaire including social media and Internet usage information. Data was collected for all orthopaedic sub-specialties and statistical analysis was performed. Fifty percent of patients use social networking sites, such as Facebook. Sports medicine patients tend to be higher social networking users (35.9%) relative to other services (9.8-17.9%) and was statistically higher when compared to the joints/tumor service (P<0.0001). Younger age was the biggest indicator predicting the use of social media. Patients that travelled between 120 to 180 miles from the hospital for their visits were significantly more likely to be social media users, as were patients that did research on their condition prior to their new patient appointment. We conclude that orthopedic patients who use social media/Internet are more likely to be younger, researched their condition prior to their appointment and undergo a longer average day’s travel (120-180 miles) to see a physician. In an increasingly competitive market, surgeons with younger patient populations will need to utilize social networking and the Internet to capture new patient referrals. PMID:25317312

  16. Perioperative coagulation assessment of patients undergoing major elective orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Spiezia, Luca; Vasques, Francesco; Behr, Astrid; Campello, Elena; Maggiolo, Sara; Berizzi, Antonio; Gavasso, Sabrina; Woodhams, Barry; Biancari, Fausto; Simioni, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Traditional coagulative parameters are of limited use in identifying perioperative coagulopathy occurring in patients undergoing major elective orthopedic surgery (MEOS). The aim of our study was to evaluate the coagulation changes in patients undergoing MEOS and to facilitate an early detection of perioperative coagulopathy in patients experiencing major intraoperative bleeding. We enrolled 40 consecutive patients (M/F 10/30, age range 34-90 years) who underwent MEOS at the Orthopedic Unit of the Padua University Hospital, Italy, between January 2014 and January 2015. Blood samples were obtained at the following time points: T0-pre: 30 min before surgery; T0-post: 30 min after the end of the procedure; T1: morning of the first postoperative day; T2: 7 ± 2 days after surgery. Patients who experienced an intraoperative blood loss ≥250 mL/h were considered as cases. Routine coagulative parameters, thromboelastometry and thrombin generation (TG) profiles were evaluated. At baseline, a significantly lower platelet count and FIBTEM MCF/AUC were observed in patents with excessive bleeding (p < 0.05 and 0.02/0.01, respectively). At T0-post and T1 intervals, cases showed hypocoagulation characterized by a significantly low platelet count (p = 0.001), prolonged CFT INTEM/EXTEM, reduction of alpha-angle and MaxV INTEM/EXTEM, MCF and AUC INTEM/EXTEM/FIBTEM (p < 0.05 in all comparisons). The only TG parameter standing out between study groups was time to peak at T0-pre. A low platelet count and fibrinogen activity were associated with significant intraoperative bleeding in patients undergoing MEOS. Thromboelastometry performed by ROTEM(®) identifies patients with coagulopathy. PMID:26951189

  17. Orthopedic Correction of Growing Hyperdivergent, Retrognathic, Patients with Miniscrew Implants

    PubMed Central

    Buschang, Peter H.; Carrillo, Roberto; Rossouw, P. Emile

    2010-01-01

    Traditional orthodontic treatments do not adequately address the skeletal problems of retrognathic, hyperdivergent, Class II adolescents; the few approaches that do require long-term patient compliance. This paper introduces a novel approach using miniscrew implants (MSIa) and growth to treat retrognathic hyperdivergent adolescents. Nine consecutive patients were evaluated at the start of treatment (13.2 ±1.1 years of age) and again at the end of the orthopedic phase (after 1.9 ±0.3 years). Each patient had two MSIs placed in either side of the palate. Coil springs (150 g) extended from the MSIs to a RPE, which served as a rigid segment for intruding the maxillary premolar and molars. Two additional MSIs were placed between the first mandibular molars and second premolars; coil spring (150 g) extended from the MSIs to hold or intrude the mandibular molars. Prior to treatment, the patients exhibited substantial and significant mandibular retrusion (Z-score=−1.0), facial convexity (Z-score=0.7), and hyperdivergence (Z-score=1.6). Treatment produced consistent and substantial orthopedic effects. The chin was advanced an average of 2.4 mm, the SNB angle increased by 2.1°, the mandibular plane angle decreased 3.9°, and facial convexity decreased by approximately 3.2°. Questionnaires showed that this treatment approach was not painful or uncomfortable; the majority of the patients indicated that they were very likely to recommend the treatment to others. Treatment was accomplished by titrating the amount of orthodontic intrusion performed based on the individuals’ growth potential. PMID:21236539

  18. Surface Functionalization of Orthopedic Titanium Implants with Bone Sialoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, Ulrike; Ackermann, Angelika; Anthonissen, Joris; Kaufmann, Kerstin B.; Brendel, Christian; Götz, Hermann; Rommens, Pol M.; Hofmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic implant failure due to aseptic loosening and mechanical instability remains a major problem in total joint replacement. Improving osseointegration at the bone-implant interface may reduce micromotion and loosening. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) has been shown to enhance bone formation when coated onto titanium femoral implants and in rat calvarial defect models. However, the most appropriate method of BSP coating, the necessary level of BSP coating, and the effect of BSP coating on cell behavior remain largely unknown. In this study, BSP was covalently coupled to titanium surfaces via an aminosilane linker (APTES), and its properties were compared to BSP applied to titanium via physisorption and untreated titanium. Cell functions were examined using primary human osteoblasts (hOBs) and L929 mouse fibroblasts. Gene expression of specific bone turnover markers at the RNA level was detected at different intervals. Cell adhesion to titanium surfaces treated with BSP via physisorption was not significantly different from that of untreated titanium at any time point, whereas BSP application via covalent coupling caused reduced cell adhesion during the first few hours in culture. Cell migration was increased on titanium disks that were treated with higher concentrations of BSP solution, independent of the coating method. During the early phases of hOB proliferation, a suppressive effect of BSP was observed independent of its concentration, particularly when BSP was applied to the titanium surface via physisorption. Although alkaline phosphatase activity was reduced in the BSP-coated titanium groups after 4 days in culture, increased calcium deposition was observed after 21 days. In particular, the gene expression level of RUNX2 was upregulated by BSP. The increase in calcium deposition and the stimulation of cell differentiation induced by BSP highlight its potential as a surface modifier that could enhance the osseointegration of orthopedic implants. Both

  19. Hydroxyapatite-nanotube composites and coatings for orthopedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, Debrupa

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) has received wide attention in orthopedics, due to its biocompatibility and osseointegration ability. Despite these advantages, the brittle nature and low fracture toughness of HA often results in rapid wear and premature fracture of implant. Hence, there is a need to improve the fracture toughness and wear resistance of HA without compromising its biocompatibility. The aim of the current research is to explore the potential of nanotubes as reinforcement to HA for orthopedic implants. HA- 4 wt.% carbon nanotube (CNT) composites and coatings are synthesized by spark plasma sintering and plasma spraying respectively, and investigated for their mechanical, tribological and biological behavior. CNT reinforcement improves the fracture toughness (>90%) and wear resistance (>66%) of HA for coating and free standing composites. CNTs have demonstrated a positive influence on the proliferation, differentiation and matrix mineralization activities of osteoblasts, during in-vitro biocompatibility studies. In-vivo exposure of HA-CNT coated titanium implant in animal model (rat) shows excellent histocompatibility and neobone integration on the implant surface. The improved osseointegration due to presence of CNTs in HA is quantified by the adhesion strength measurement of single osteoblast using nano-scratch technique. Considering the ongoing debate about cytotoxicity of CNTs in the literature, the present study also suggests boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) as an alternative reinforcement. BNNT with the similar elastic modulus and strength as CNT, were added to HA. The resulting composite having 4 wt.% BNNTs improved the fracture toughness (˜85%) and wear resistance (˜75%) of HA in the similar range as HA-CNT composites. BNNTs were found to be non-cytotoxic for osteoblasts and macrophages. In-vitro evaluation shows positive role of BNNT in osteoblast proliferation and viability. Apatite formability of BNNT surface in ˜4 days establishes its osseointegration

  20. Orthopedic specialty hospitals: centers of excellence or greed machines?

    PubMed

    Badlani, Neil; Boden, Scott; Phillips, Frank

    2012-03-01

    Orthopedic specialty hospitals have recently been the subject of debate. They are patient-centered, physician-friendly health care alternatives that take advantage of the economic efficiencies of specialization. Medically, they provide a higher quality of care and increase patient and physician satisfaction. Economically, they are more efficient and profitable than general hospitals. They also positively affect society through the taxes they pay and the beneficial aspects of the competition they provide to general hospitals. Their ability to provide a disruptive innovation to the existing hospital industry will lead to lower costs and greater access to health care. However, critics say that physician ownership presents potential conflicts of interest and leads to overuse of medical care. Some general hospitals are suffering as a result of unfair specialty hospital practices, and a few drastic medical complications have occurred at specialty hospitals. Specialty hospitals have been scrutinized for increasing the inequality of health care and continue to be a target of government regulations. In this article, the pros and cons are examined, and the Emory Orthopaedics and Spine Hospital is analyzed as an example. Orthopedic specialty hospitals provide excellent care and are great assets to society. Competition between specialty and general hospitals has provided added value to patients and taxpayers. However, physicians must take more responsibility in their appropriate and ethical leadership. It is critical to recognize financial conflicts of interest, disclose ownership, and act ethically. Patient care cannot be compromised. With thoughtful and efficient leadership, specialty hospitals can be an integral part of improving health care in the long term. PMID:22385456

  1. Tibial rotational osteotomy with intramedullary nail fixation

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Peter M.

    2009-01-01

    There are several theoretic advantages of using intramedullary rod fixation for tibial osteotomy fixation. We performed a retrospective review of patients who were treated with a mid-diaphyseal osteotomy of the tibia fixed with an intramedullary rod for isolated, symptomatic tibial torsion. Forty patients (59 tibias) were included in the study and were followed for a minimum of 12 months or until rod removal (average follow-up 22.6 months). Major complication rate was 8.5%, which is comparable to alternative methods of fixation. We believe that intramedullary rods are a safe alternative for fixation of tibial rotational osteotomy in patients with physeal closure. PMID:19941168

  2. Periprosthetic fracture fixation in osteoporotic bone.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Mark; Lehmann, Wolfgang; Wähnert, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    Fixation techniques of periprosthetic fractures are far from ideal although the number of this entity is rising. The presence of an intramedullary implant generates its own fracture characteristics since stiffness is altered along the bone shaft and certain implant combinations affect load resistance of the bone. Influencing factors are cement fixation of the implant, intramedullary locking and extramedullary or intramedullary localization of the implant and the cortical thickness of the surrounding bone. Cerclage wires are ideally suited to fix radially displaced fragments around an intramedullary implant but they are susceptible to axial and torsional load. Screws should be added if these forces have to be neutralized. Stability of the screw fixation itself can be enhanced by embracement configuration around the intramedullary implant. Poor bone stock quality, often being present in metaphyseal areas limits screw fixation. Cement augmentation is an attractive option in this field to enhance screw purchase. PMID:27338227

  3. Bicondylar tibial fractures: Internal or external fixation?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gunasekaran; Peterson, Nicholas; Narayan, Badri

    2011-03-01

    Bicondylar fractures of the tibia, representing the Schatzker V and VI fractures represent a challenging problem. Any treatment protocol should aim at restoring articular congruity and the metaphyseo-diaphsyeal dissociation (MDD)-both of these are equally important to long-term outcome. Both internal and external fixations have their proponents, and each method of treatment is associated with its unique features and complications. We review the initial and definitive management of these injuries, and the advantages and disadvantages of each method of definitive fixation. We suggest the use of a protocol for definitive management, using either internal or external fixation as deemed appropriate. This protocol is based on the fracture configuration, local soft tissue status and patient condition. In a nutshell, if the fracture pattern and soft tissue status are amenable plate fixation (single or double) is performed, otherwise limited open reduction and articular surface reconstruction with screws and circular frame is performed. PMID:21430865

  4. A simple and inexpensive external fixator.

    PubMed

    Noor, M A

    1988-11-01

    A simple and inexpensive external fixator has been designed. It is constructed of galvanized iron pipe and mild steel bolts and nuts. It can easily be manufactured in a hospital workshop with a minimum of tools. PMID:3267638

  5. Methanotrophy Induces Nitrogen Fixation in Boreal Mosses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiirola, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Many methanotrophic bacterial groups fix nitrogen in laboratory conditions. Furthermore, nitrogen (N) is a limiting nutrient in many environments where methane concentrations are highest. Despite these facts, methane-induced N fixation has previously been overlooked, possibly due to methodological problems. To study the possible link between methanotrophy and diazotrophy in terrestrial and aquatic habitats, we measured the co-occurrence of these two processes in boreal forest, peatland and stream mosses using a stable isotope labeling approach (15 N2 and 13 CH4 double labeling) and sequencing of the nifH gene marker. N fixation associated with forest mosses was dependent on the annual N deposition, whereas methane stimulate N fixation neither in high (>3 kg N ha -1 yr -1) nor low deposition areas, which was in accordance with the nifH gene sequencing showing that forest mosses (Pleurozium schreberi and Hylocomium splendens ) carried mainly cyanobacterial N fixers. On the other extreme, in stream mosses (Fontinalis sp.) methane was actively oxidized throughout the year, whereas N fixation showed seasonal fluctuation. The co-occurrence of the two processes in single cell level was proven by co-localizing both N and methane-carbon fixation with the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) approach. Methanotrophy and diazotrophy was also studied in peatlands of different primary successional stages in the land-uplift coast of Bothnian Bay, in the Siikajoki chronosequence, where N accumulation rates in peat profiles indicate significant N fixation. Based on experimental evidence it was counted that methane-induced N fixation explained over one-third of the new N input in the younger peatland successional stages, where the highest N fixation rates and highest methane oxidation activities co-occurred in the water-submerged Sphagnum moss vegetation. The linkage between methanotrophic carbon cycling and N fixation may therefore constitute an important mechanism in the rapid

  6. Tamponade following sternoclavicular dislocation surgical fixation.

    PubMed

    Bensafi, H; Laffosse, J-M; Taam, S A; Molinier, F; Chaminade, B; Puget, J

    2010-05-01

    The authors report a case of posterior sternoclavicular dislocation surgically reduced and stabilized with tenodesis, according to the Burrows technique completed by temporary wire fixation. The patient presented postoperative pericardiac tamponade appearing progressively from brachiocephalic blood vessels bleeding. Emergency drainage was surgically placed associated with removal of the material, thus curing the patient. This complication, although exceptional, formally contraindicates the use of wire fixation in surgery of the sternoclavicular joint. PMID:20488152

  7. Tips and Tricks in Mallet Fracture Fixation.

    PubMed

    Chin, Yuin Cheng; Foo, Tun-Lin

    2016-10-01

    We describe three steps to aid fracture assessment and fixation in the extensor block pin technique for mallet fractures. The first step is the use of fluoroscopy in the initial assessment to determine indication for fixation. Next is the use of supplementary extension block pin to control larger dorsal fragments. The third technique described details the steps of open reduction of nascently malunited fractures. PMID:27595969

  8. Fixational eye movements predict visual sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Scholes, Chris; McGraw, Paul V; Nyström, Marcus; Roach, Neil W

    2015-10-22

    During steady fixation, observers make small fixational saccades at a rate of around 1-2 per second. Presentation of a visual stimulus triggers a biphasic modulation in fixational saccade rate-an initial inhibition followed by a period of elevated rate and a subsequent return to baseline. Here we show that, during passive viewing, this rate signature is highly sensitive to small changes in stimulus contrast. By training a linear support vector machine to classify trials in which a stimulus is either present or absent, we directly compared the contrast sensitivity of fixational eye movements with individuals' psychophysical judgements. Classification accuracy closely matched psychophysical performance, and predicted individuals' threshold estimates with less bias and overall error than those obtained using specific features of the signature. Performance of the classifier was robust to changes in the training set (novel subjects and/or contrasts) and good prediction accuracy was obtained with a practicable number of trials. Our results indicate a tight coupling between the sensitivity of visual perceptual judgements and fixational eye control mechanisms. This raises the possibility that fixational saccades could provide a novel and objective means of estimating visual contrast sensitivity without the need for observers to make any explicit judgement. PMID:26468244

  9. Maxwellian Eye Fixation during Natural Scene Perception

    PubMed Central

    Duchesne, Jean; Bouvier, Vincent; Guillemé, Julien; Coubard, Olivier A.

    2012-01-01

    When we explore a visual scene, our eyes make saccades to jump rapidly from one area to another and fixate regions of interest to extract useful information. While the role of fixation eye movements in vision has been widely studied, their random nature has been a hitherto neglected issue. Here we conducted two experiments to examine the Maxwellian nature of eye movements during fixation. In Experiment 1, eight participants were asked to perform free viewing of natural scenes displayed on a computer screen while their eye movements were recorded. For each participant, the probability density function (PDF) of eye movement amplitude during fixation obeyed the law established by Maxwell for describing molecule velocity in gas. Only the mean amplitude of eye movements varied with expertise, which was lower in experts than novice participants. In Experiment 2, two participants underwent fixed time, free viewing of natural scenes and of their scrambled version while their eye movements were recorded. Again, the PDF of eye movement amplitude during fixation obeyed Maxwell's law for each participant and for each scene condition (normal or scrambled). The results suggest that eye fixation during natural scene perception describes a random motion regardless of top-down or of bottom-up processes. PMID:23226987

  10. Maxwellian eye fixation during natural scene perception.

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Jean; Bouvier, Vincent; Guillemé, Julien; Coubard, Olivier A

    2012-01-01

    When we explore a visual scene, our eyes make saccades to jump rapidly from one area to another and fixate regions of interest to extract useful information. While the role of fixation eye movements in vision has been widely studied, their random nature has been a hitherto neglected issue. Here we conducted two experiments to examine the Maxwellian nature of eye movements during fixation. In Experiment 1, eight participants were asked to perform free viewing of natural scenes displayed on a computer screen while their eye movements were recorded. For each participant, the probability density function (PDF) of eye movement amplitude during fixation obeyed the law established by Maxwell for describing molecule velocity in gas. Only the mean amplitude of eye movements varied with expertise, which was lower in experts than novice participants. In Experiment 2, two participants underwent fixed time, free viewing of natural scenes and of their scrambled version while their eye movements were recorded. Again, the PDF of eye movement amplitude during fixation obeyed Maxwell's law for each participant and for each scene condition (normal or scrambled). The results suggest that eye fixation during natural scene perception describes a random motion regardless of top-down or of bottom-up processes. PMID:23226987

  11. Variable Nitrogen Fixation in Wild Populus.

    PubMed

    Doty, Sharon L; Sher, Andrew W; Fleck, Neil D; Khorasani, Mahsa; Bumgarner, Roger E; Khan, Zareen; Ko, Andrew W K; Kim, Soo-Hyung; DeLuca, Thomas H

    2016-01-01

    The microbiome of plants is diverse, and like that of animals, is important for overall health and nutrient acquisition. In legumes and actinorhizal plants, a portion of essential nitrogen (N) is obtained through symbiosis with nodule-inhabiting, N2-fixing microorganisms. However, a variety of non-nodulating plant species can also thrive in natural, low-N settings. Some of these species may rely on endophytes, microorganisms that live within plants, to fix N2 gas into usable forms. Here we report the first direct evidence of N2 fixation in the early successional wild tree, Populus trichocarpa, a non-leguminous tree, from its native riparian habitat. In order to measure N2 fixation, surface-sterilized cuttings of wild poplar were assayed using both 15N2 incorporation and the commonly used acetylene reduction assay. The 15N label was incorporated at high levels in a subset of cuttings, suggesting a high level of N-fixation. Similarly, acetylene was reduced to ethylene in some samples. The microbiota of the cuttings was highly variable, both in numbers of cultured bacteria and in genetic diversity. Our results indicated that associative N2-fixation occurred within wild poplar and that a non-uniformity in the distribution of endophytic bacteria may explain the variability in N-fixation activity. These results point to the need for molecular studies to decipher the required microbial consortia and conditions for effective endophytic N2-fixation in trees. PMID:27196608

  12. Variable Nitrogen Fixation in Wild Populus

    PubMed Central

    Doty, Sharon L.; Sher, Andrew W.; Fleck, Neil D.; Khorasani, Mahsa; Bumgarner, Roger E.; Khan, Zareen; Ko, Andrew W. K.; Kim, Soo-Hyung; DeLuca, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    The microbiome of plants is diverse, and like that of animals, is important for overall health and nutrient acquisition. In legumes and actinorhizal plants, a portion of essential nitrogen (N) is obtained through symbiosis with nodule-inhabiting, N2-fixing microorganisms. However, a variety of non-nodulating plant species can also thrive in natural, low-N settings. Some of these species may rely on endophytes, microorganisms that live within plants, to fix N2 gas into usable forms. Here we report the first direct evidence of N2 fixation in the early successional wild tree, Populus trichocarpa, a non-leguminous tree, from its native riparian habitat. In order to measure N2 fixation, surface-sterilized cuttings of wild poplar were assayed using both 15N2 incorporation and the commonly used acetylene reduction assay. The 15N label was incorporated at high levels in a subset of cuttings, suggesting a high level of N-fixation. Similarly, acetylene was reduced to ethylene in some samples. The microbiota of the cuttings was highly variable, both in numbers of cultured bacteria and in genetic diversity. Our results indicated that associative N2-fixation occurred within wild poplar and that a non-uniformity in the distribution of endophytic bacteria may explain the variability in N-fixation activity. These results point to the need for molecular studies to decipher the required microbial consortia and conditions for effective endophytic N2-fixation in trees. PMID:27196608

  13. Treatment of Spinal Tuberculosis by Debridement, Interbody Fusion and Internal Fixation via Posterior Approach Only.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ming-xing; Zhang, Hong-qi; Wang, Yu-xiang; Guo, Chao-feng; Liu, Jin-yang

    2016-02-01

    Surgical treatment for spinal tuberculosis includes focal tuberculosis debridement, segmental stability reconstruction, neural decompression and kyphotic deformity correction. For the lesions mainly involved anterior and middle column of the spine, anterior operation of debridement and fusion with internal fixation has been becoming the most frequently used surgical technique for the spinal tuberculosis. However, high risk of structural damage might relate with anterior surgery, such as damage in lungs, heart, kidney, ureter and bowel, and the deformity correction is also limited. Due to the organs are in the front of spine, there are less complications in posterior approach. Spinal pedicle screw passes through the spinal three-column structure, which provides more powerful orthopedic forces compared with the vertebral body screw, and the kyphotic deformity correction effect is better in posterior approach. In this paper, we report a 68-year-old male patient with thoracic tuberculosis who underwent surgical treatment by debridement, interbody fusion and internal fixation via posterior approach only. The patient was placed in prone position under general anesthesia. Posterior midline incision was performed, and the posterior spinal construction was exposed. Then place pedicle screw, and fix one side rod temporarily. Make the side of more bone destruction and larger abscess as lesion debridement side. Resect the unilateral facet joint, and retain contralateral structure integrity. Protect the spinal cord, nerve root. Clear sequestrum, necrotic tissue, abscess of paravertebral and intervertebral space. Specially designed titanium mesh cages or bone blocks were implanted into interbody. Fix both side rods and compress both sides to make the mesh cages and bone blocks tight. Reconstruct posterior column structure with allogeneic bone and autologous bone. Using this technique, the procedures of debridement, spinal cord decompression, deformity correction, bone grafting

  14. Treatment of Spinal Tuberculosis by Debridement, Interbody Fusion and Internal Fixation via Posterior Approach Only

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ming‐xing; Wang, Yu‐xiang; Guo, Chao‐feng; Liu, Jin‐yang

    2016-01-01

    Surgical treatment for spinal tuberculosis includes focal tuberculosis debridement, segmental stability reconstruction, neural decompression and kyphotic deformity correction. For the lesions mainly involved anterior and middle column of the spine, anterior operation of debridement and fusion with internal fixation has been becoming the most frequently used surgical technique for the spinal tuberculosis. However, high risk of structural damage might relate with anterior surgery, such as damage in lungs, heart, kidney, ureter and bowel, and the deformity correction is also limited. Due to the organs are in the front of spine, there are less complications in posterior approach. Spinal pedicle screw passes through the spinal three‐column structure, which provides more powerful orthopedic forces compared with the vertebral body screw, and the kyphotic deformity correction effect is better in posterior approach. In this paper, we report a 68‐year‐old male patient with thoracic tuberculosis who underwent surgical treatment by debridement, interbody fusion and internal fixation via posterior approach only. The patient was placed in prone position under general anesthesia. Posterior midline incision was performed, and the posterior spinal construction was exposed. Then place pedicle screw, and fix one side rod temporarily. Make the side of more bone destruction and larger abscess as lesion debridement side. Resect the unilateral facet joint, and retain contralateral structure integrity. Protect the spinal cord, nerve root. Clear sequestrum, necrotic tissue, abscess of paravertebral and intervertebral space. Specially designed titanium mesh cages or bone blocks were implanted into interbody. Fix both side rods and compress both sides to make the mesh cages and bone blocks tight. Reconstruct posterior column structure with allogeneic bone and autologous bone. Using this technique, the procedures of debridement, spinal cord decompression, deformity correction, bone

  15. Enhanced osseous implant fixation with strontium-substituted bioactive glass coating.

    PubMed

    Newman, Simon D; Lotfibakhshaiesh, Nasrin; O'Donnell, Matthew; Walboomers, X Frank; Horwood, Nicole; Jansen, John A; Amis, Andrew A; Cobb, Justin P; Stevens, Molly M

    2014-07-01

    The use of endosseous implants is firmly established in skeletal reconstructive surgery, with rapid and permanent fixation of prostheses being a highly desirable feature. Implant coatings composed of hydroxyapatite (HA) have become the standard and have been used with some success in prolonging the time to revision surgery, but aseptic loosening remains a significant issue. The development of a new generation of more biologically active coatings is a promising approach for tackling this problem. Bioactive glasses are an ideal candidate material due to the osteostimulative properties of their dissolution products. However, to date, they have not been formulated with stability to devitrification or thermal expansion coefficients (TECs) that are suitable for stable coating onto metal implants while still retaining their bioactive properties. Here, we present a strontium-substituted bioactive glass (SrBG) implant coating which has been designed to encourage peri-implant bone formation and with a TEC similar to that of HA. The coating can be successfully applied to roughened Ti6Al4V and after implantation into the distal femur and proximal tibia of twenty-seven New Zealand White rabbits for 6, 12, or 24 weeks, it produced no adverse tissue reaction. The glass dissolved over a 6 week period, stimulating enhanced peri-implant bone formation compared with matched HA coated implants in the contralateral limb. Furthermore, superior mechanical fixation was evident in the SrBG group after 24 weeks of implantation. We propose that this coating has the potential to enhance implant fixation in a variety of orthopedic reconstructive surgery applications. PMID:24471799

  16. Arthroscopic Suture Fixation in Femoral-Sided Avulsion Fracture of Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Prasathaporn, Niti; Umprai, Vantawat; Laohathaimongkol, Thongchai; Kuptniratsaikul, Somsak; Kongrukgreatiyos, Kitiphong

    2015-01-01

    A femoral-sided avulsion fracture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a rare and challenging condition. Most reported cases have occurred in childhood or adolescence. Many techniques of ACL repair have been reported, and in recent years, techniques in arthroscopic surgery have been developed and have become ever more popular with orthopaedic surgeons. We created a technique of arthroscopic ACL repair with suture anchor fixation for a femoral-sided ACL avulsion fracture. This technique saves the natural ACL stump. It is available for cases in which creation of a tibial tunnel is not allowed. Moreover, it does not require a skin incision for fixation on the far femoral cortex and, therefore, does not require a second operation to remove the fixation device. The arthroscopic technique also has a good cosmetic outcome. PMID:26258035

  17. Assessment of external fixator reusability using load- and cycle-dependent tests.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Maiko; Lounici, Smain; Inoue, Nozomu; Walulik, Stephen; Chao, Edmund Y S

    2003-01-01

    No standard method has been established for investigating repeated use of an external fixator. The purpose of the current study was to establish a fatigue testing method for assessing fixator frame reuse. A unilateral DynaFix trade mark external fixator system was tested using high-load and low-cycle (900-150 N at 5 Hz) and low-load and high-cycle (450-100 N at 10 Hz) tests (assumed one use of 500,000 and 1 million cycles, respectively). These loading conditions were selected to simulate single clinical use and to satisfy Food and Drug Administration requirements. In the high-load low-cycle test, substantial failure of the serrated joint occurred before completion of the first simulated use. In the low-load high-cycle test, all fixators completed three simulated clinical uses without failure, although (1/4) of the serrated joint components had hairline cracks. The high-load low-cycle test identified the fixator components which should be examined and replaced if reuse of the fixator is to be considered. Wear and deformation of the set screw on the rotary joint and telescoping mechanisms were observed in the low-load high-cycle test but not in the high-load low-cycle test. Therefore, if the unilateral DynaFix trade mark fixators are being considered for reusability, the number of reuses should be limited as the whole structure of the device will experience fatigue damage as the loading cycle increases. PMID:12579028

  18. Coronary Sinus Lead Removal: A Comparison between Active and Passive Fixation Leads

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Yalin; Gosau, Nils; Aydin, Ali; Willems, Stephan; Treede, Hendrik; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Hakmi, Samer

    2016-01-01

    Background Implantation of coronary sinus (CS) leads may be a difficult procedure due to different vein anatomies and a possible lead dislodgement. The mode of CS lead fixation has changed and developed in recent years. Objectives We compared the removal procedures of active and passive fixation leads. Methods Between January 2009 and January 2014, 22 patients at our centre underwent CS lead removal, 6 active and 16 passive fixation leads were attempted using simple traction or lead locking devices with or without laser extraction sheaths. Data on procedural variables and success rates were collected and retrospectively analyzed. Results The mean patient age was 67.2 ± 9.8 years, and 90.9% were male. The indication for lead removal was infection in all cases. All active fixation leads were Medtronic® Attain StarFix™ Model 4195 (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA). The mean time from implantation for the active and passive fixation leads was 9.9 ± 11.7 months (range 1.0–30.1) and 48.7 ± 33.6 months (range 5.7–106.4), respectively (p = 0.012). Only 3 of 6 StarFix leads were successfully removed (50%) compared to 16 of 16 (100%) of the passive fixation CS leads (p = 0.013). No death or complications occurred during the 30-day follow-up. Conclusion According to our experience, removal of the Starfix active fixation CS leads had a higher procedural failure rate compared to passive. PMID:27119368

  19. The beginnings of Orthopedic Surgery at the Mayo Clinic: A Review of the First Orthopedic Patients who Presented Over 100 Years Ago

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Christopher L.; Morrey, Bernard F; Trousdale, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    Background Formalized training in the specialty of orthopedic surgery began at the Mayo Clinic nearly 100 years ago, and treatment of patients with musculoskeletal injuries and disease began even earlier. A robust historical patient database provides the opportunity for review of the first recorded orthopedic cases at our institution, which date back to 1907. Methods The first 400 sequential medical charts of the Mayo Clinic’s patient record database were comprehensively reviewed in order to identify the first documented orthopedic cases. Results Of the first 400 patients reviewed, 15 (4%) received specific orthopedic diagnoses. All presented during a three week period in 1907, and they traveled from all over the region for evaluation. The diagnoses included skeletal tuberculosis (n=6), traumatic fracture (n=3), osteomyelitis (n=2), syphilitic pathologic fracture (n=1), syphilitic ostitis of the tibia and radius (n=1), painful flat foot (n=1), and Morton’s toe (n=1). Included with the records are patient demographics, diagnoses, symptoms, physical examination findings, radiograph reports, operative reports, and detailed drawings of symptomatology. Conclusion Although the technology and science has advanced since the early practice of orthopedic surgery that took place over a century ago, we consider ourselves to be merely an extension of those who established the field before us. Just as the past relies on the future for the continuation of what it began so many years ago, we rely on our founders for the groundwork that they laid in creating this field of surgical medicine PMID:27528834

  20. Cost of external fixation vs external fixation then nailing in bone infection

    PubMed Central

    Emara, Khaled Mohamed; Diab, Ramy Ahmed; Ghafar, Khaled Abd EL

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the cost benefit of external fixation vs external fixation then nailing in treatment of bone infection by segment transfer. METHODS: Out of 71 patients with infected nonunion tibia treated between 2003 and 2006, 50 patients fitted the inclusion criteria (26 patients were treated by external fixation only, and 24 patients were treated by external fixation early removal after segment transfer and replacement by internal fixation). Cost of inpatient treatment, total cost of inpatient and outpatient treatment till full healing, and the weeks of absence from school or work were calculated and compared between both groups. RESULTS: The cost of hospital stay and surgery in the group of external fixation only was 22.6 ± 3.3 while the cost of hospital stay and surgery in the group of early external fixation removal and replacement by intramedullary nail was 26.0 ± 3.2. The difference was statistically significant regarding the cost of hospital stay and surgery in favor of the group of external fixation only. The total cost of medical care (surgery, hospital stay, treatment outside the hospital including medications, dressing, physical therapy, outpatient laboratory work, etc.) in group of external fixation only was 63.3 ± 15.1, and total absence from work was 38.6 ± 6.6 wk. While the group of early removal of external fixation and replacement by IM nail, total cost of medical care was 38.3 ± 6.4 and total absence from work or school was 22.7 ± 4.1. The difference was statistically significant regarding the total cost and absence from work in favor of the group of early removal and replacement by IM nail. CONCLUSION: Early removal of external fixation and replacement by intramedullary nail in treatment of infected nonunion showed more cost effectiveness. Orthopaedic society needs to show the cost effectiveness of different procedures to the community, insurance, and health authorities. PMID:25621219

  1. Nitrogen Fixation in Denitrified Marine Waters

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Camila; Farías, Laura; Ulloa, Osvaldo

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation is an essential process that biologically transforms atmospheric dinitrogen gas to ammonia, therefore compensating for nitrogen losses occurring via denitrification and anammox. Currently, inputs and losses of nitrogen to the ocean resulting from these processes are thought to be spatially separated: nitrogen fixation takes place primarily in open ocean environments (mainly through diazotrophic cyanobacteria), whereas nitrogen losses occur in oxygen-depleted intermediate waters and sediments (mostly via denitrifying and anammox bacteria). Here we report on rates of nitrogen fixation obtained during two oceanographic cruises in 2005 and 2007 in the eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP), a region characterized by the presence of coastal upwelling and a major permanent oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Our results show significant rates of nitrogen fixation in the water column; however, integrated rates from the surface down to 120 m varied by ∼30 fold between cruises (7.5±4.6 versus 190±82.3 µmol m−2 d−1). Moreover, rates were measured down to 400 m depth in 2007, indicating that the contribution to the integrated rates of the subsurface oxygen-deficient layer was ∼5 times higher (574±294 µmol m−2 d−1) than the oxic euphotic layer (48±68 µmol m−2 d−1). Concurrent molecular measurements detected the dinitrogenase reductase gene nifH in surface and subsurface waters. Phylogenetic analysis of the nifH sequences showed the presence of a diverse diazotrophic community at the time of the highest measured nitrogen fixation rates. Our results thus demonstrate the occurrence of nitrogen fixation in nutrient-rich coastal upwelling systems and, importantly, within the underlying OMZ. They also suggest that nitrogen fixation is a widespread process that can sporadically provide a supplementary source of fixed nitrogen in these regions. PMID:21687726

  2. Percutaneous limited internal fixation combined with external fixation to treat open pelvic fractures concomitant with perineal lacerations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Linwei; Zhang, Guoyou; Wu, Yaoshen; Guo, Xiaoshan; Yuan, Wen

    2011-12-01

    External fixation combined with colostomy is a traditional management of the pelvic fractures associated with perineal lacerations. However, malunion and dysfunction caused by malreduction and loss of reduction are common. One-stage definitive fixation without soft tissue harassment is requisite for the treatment. The purpose of this study was to assess the outcome of 1-stage definitive fixation by combining percutaneous limited internal fixation and external fixation in the treatment of pelvic fractures with perineal lacerations. Eighteen adults with high-energy unstable pelvic ring fractures associated with perineal lacerations were admitted between June 2003 and December 2010. Mean follow-up was 28 months. After wound closure and colostomy, 10 patients received external fixation and percutaneous screw fixation, and 8 patients underwent external fixation. Demographics, wound and fracture classification, and Injury Severity Score were comparable between the groups (P>.05). Initial reduction quality was comparable between the groups (P=.14), but the loss of reduction during follow-up was more significant in the external fixation group (P=.004). Combined fixation achieved better functional results than external fixation (P=.02). There were 2 cases of superficial wound infection in each group (P=1.0). By combining debridement, wound closure, colostomy, percutaneous limited internal fixation, and external fixation, we improved pelvic fracture recovery while reducing the risk of infection. One-stage definitive fixation is a better choice than external fixation in the treatment of open pelvic fracture concomitant with perineal wound. PMID:22146197

  3. Rational design of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bing; Xie, Jingwei; Jiang, Jiang; Shuler, Franklin D; Bartlett, David E

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews recent significant advances in the design of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration. It begins with a brief introduction on the limitations of current approaches for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration. It then illustrates that rationally designed scaffolds made up of electrospun nanofibers could be a promising solution to overcome the problems that current approaches encounter. The article also discusses the intriguing properties of electrospun nanofibers, including control of composition, structures, orders, alignments and mechanical properties, use as carriers for topical drug and/or gene sustained delivery, and serving as substrates for the regulation of cell behaviors, which could benefit musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration. It further highlights a few of the many recent applications of electrospun nanofiber scaffolds in repairing and regenerating various orthopedic tissues. Finally, the article concludes with perspectives on the challenges and future directions for better design, fabrication and utilization of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue engineering. PMID:23987110

  4. [Progresses in the orthopedic-reconstructive surgery by microsurgery (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Friedebold, G; Zilch, H; Gaudin, B

    1979-04-01

    After a short description of the microsurgical technique for operations of periphere nerves and small vessels, the possibilities for reconstructive operations in orthopedic surgery are demonstrated. The actual experiences allow a critical but also cautious prospective statement. PMID:463213

  5. Posterior Fixation Techniques in the Subaxial Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Ghori, Ahmer; Makanji, Heeren; Cha, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the historical context, indications, techniques, and complications of four posterior fixation techniques to stabilize the subaxial cervical spine. Specifically, posterior wiring, laminar screw fixation, lateral mass fixation, and pedicle screw fixation are among the common methods of operative fixation of the subaxial cervical spine. While wiring and laminar screw fixation are now rarely used, both lateral mass and pedicle screw fixation are technically challenging and present the risk of significant complications if performed incorrectly. With a sound understanding of anatomy and rigorous preoperative evaluation of bony structures, both lateral mass and pedicle screw fixation provide a safe and reliable method for subaxial cervical spine fixation. PMID:26594602

  6. [Visual fixation features after treatment of exudative age macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Surguch, V K; Surnina, Z V; Sizova, M V

    2011-01-01

    Changes of visual fixation in patients with choroidal neovascularitation (CNV) associated with age macular degeneration (AMD) after bevacizumab are studied. 45 patients (45 eyes) with active CNV treated with intravitreal bevacizumab were enrolled into the study. Visual fixation was studied before and 3-6 months after treatment using original method that included fundus foto and fluorescein angiography. Fixation relative to fovea and lesion was evaluated. Foveal fixation beyond lesion was found in 9%, foveal fixation within lesion--in 47%, extrafoveal fixation beyond lesion--in 18%, extrafoveal fixation within lesion--in 26% of patients. Changes of fixation localization after treatment was found in 24% patients. Examination of visual fixation may be useful for prognosis of anti-VEGF treatment efficacy in patients with CNV. PMID:21721271

  7. Nanophase hydroxyapatite coatings for dental and orthopedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Michiko

    In order to improve dental and orthopedic implant performance, the objective of this study was to synthesize nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA) powders to coat metals (specifically, titanium and tantalum). Precipitated HA powders were either sintered in order to produce UltraCaP HA (or microcrystalline size HA) or were treated hydrothermally to produce nanocrystalline HA. Some of the UltraCaP and nanocrystalline HA powders were doped with yttrium (Y) since previous in vitro studies demonstrated that Y-doped HA in bulk improved osteoblast (or bone-forming cell) function over undoped HA. The nanocrystalline HA powders were also mixed with nanophase titania powders because previous studies demonstrated that titania/HA composite coatings increased coating adhesive strength and HA nucleation. These powders were then deposited onto titanium by a novel room-temperature process, called IonTiteT(TM). The results demonstrated that the chemical properties and crystallite size of the original HA powders were maintained in the coatings. More importantly, in vitro studies showed increased osteoblast (bone-forming cell) adhesion on the single phase nanocrystalline HA and nano-titania/HA coatings compared to traditionally used plasma-sprayed HA coatings and uncoated metals. Results further demonstrated greater amounts of calcium deposition by osteoblasts cultured on nanocrystalline HA coatings compared to UltraCaP coatings and conventionally used plasma-sprayed HA coatings. To elucidate mechanisms that influenced osteoblast functions on the HA coatings, the amount of proteins (fibronectin and vitronectin) onto the HA powders and the adsorbed fibronectin conformation were investigated. Exposure of cell integrin binding domains (in fibronectin III10 segments) was greater in fibronectin adsorbed onto 1.2 mole% Y-doped UltraCaP HA coatings compared to nanocrystalline HA coatings tested. However, 1.2 mole% Y-doped UltraCaP HA coatings did not increase mineralization by osteoblasts

  8. Do Astronauts Havbe a Higher Rate of Orthopedic Shoulder Conditions Than a Cohort of Working Professionals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, M. S.; Murray, J. D.; Young, M.; Wear, M. L.; Van Baalen, M.; Tarver, W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Occupational surveillance of astronaut shoulder injuries began with operational concerns at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) during Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) training. Orthopedic shoulder injury and surgery rates were calculated [1], but classifying the rates as normal, high or low was highly dependent on the comparison group. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify a population of working professionals and compare orthopedic shoulder consultation and surgery rates.

  9. Bioactive ceramic coating on orthopedic implants for enhanced bone tissue integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniket

    Tissue integration between bone and orthopedic implant is essential for implant fixation and longevity. An immunological response leads to fibrous encapsulation of metallic implants leading to implant instability and failure. Bioactive ceramics have the ability to directly bond to bone; however, they have limited mechanical strength for load bearing applications. Coating bioactive ceramics on metallic implant offers the exciting opportunity to enhance bone formation without compromising the mechanical strength of the implant. In the present study, we have developed a novel bioactive silica-calcium phosphate nanocomposite (SCPC) coating on medical grade Ti-6Al-4V orthopedic implant using electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and evaluated bone tissue response to the coated implant at the cellular level. The effect of SCPC composition and suspending medium pH on the zeta potential of three different SCPC formulations; SCPC25, SCPC50 and SCPC75 were analyzed. The average zeta potential of SCPC50 in pure ethanol was more negative than that of SCPC25 or SCPC75; however the difference was not statistically significant. Ti-6Al-4V discs were passivated, coated with SCPC50 (200 nm - 10 mum) and thermally treated at 600 - 800 ºC to produce a coating thickness in the range of 43.1 +/- 5.7 to 30.1 +/- 4.6 μm. After treatment at 600, 700 and 800 ºC, the adhesion strength at the SCPC50/Ti-6Al-4V interface was 42.6 +/- 3.6, 44.7 +/- 8.7 and 47.2 +/- 4.3 MPa, respectively. XRD analyses of SCPC50 before and after EPD coating indicated no change in the crystallinity of the material. Fracture surface analyses showed that failure occurred within the ceramic layer or at the ceramic/polymer interface; however, the ceramic/metal interface was intact in all samples. The adhesion strength of SCPC50-coated substrates after immersion in PBS for 2 days (11.7 +/- 3.9 MPa) was higher than that measured on commercially available hydroxyapatite (HA) coated substrates (5.5 +/- 2.7 MPa), although the

  10. Pedicle Screw Fixation Study in Immature Porcine Spines to Improve Pullout Resistance during Animal Testing

    PubMed Central

    Le Cann, Sophie; Cachon, Thibaut; Viguier, Eric; Miladi, Lotfi; Odent, Thierry; Rossi, Jean-Marie; Chabrand, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The porcine model is frequently used during development and validation of new spinal devices, because of its likeness to the human spine. These spinal devices are frequently composed of pedicle screws with a reputation for stable fixation but which can suffer pullouts during preclinical implantation on young animals, leading to high morbidity. With a view to identifying the best choices to optimize pedicle screw fixation in the porcine model, this study evaluates ex vivo the impact of weight (age) of the animal, the level of the vertebrae (lumbar or thoracic) and the type of screw anchorage (mono- or bi-cortical) on pedicle screw pullouts. Among the 80 pig vertebrae (90- and 140-day-old) tested in this study, the average screw pullout forces ranged between 419.9N and 1341.2N. In addition, statistical differences were found between test groups, pointing out the influence of the three parameters stated above. We found that the the more caudally the screws are positioned (lumbar level), the greater their pullout resistance is, moreover, screw stability increases with the age, and finally, the screws implanted with a mono-cortical anchorage sustained lower pullout forces than those implanted with a bi-cortical anchorage. We conclude that the best anchorage can be obtained with older animals, using a lumbar fixation and long screws traversing the vertebra and inducing bi-cortical anchorage. In very young animals, pedicle screw fixations need to be bi-cortical and more numerous to prevent pullout. PMID:26451947

  11. Review of 31 cases of anterior thoracolumbar fixation with the anterior thoracolumbar locking plate system.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J A; Bowen, S; Branch, C L; Meredith, J W

    1999-07-15

    Anterior fixation devices for the thoracolumbar spine have gained wide acceptance as viable alternatives to long-segment posterior fixation in cases of thoracolumbar spine trauma. This review was undertaken to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the Synthes anterior thoracolumbar locking plate (ATLP) system. Over a 3-year period, 31 patients with unstable traumatic fractures of the thoracolumbar spine underwent corpectomy, placement of a structural bone graft, and anterior fixation in which the Synthes ATLP system was used. Long-term follow-up data were obtained in 29 patients. Two patients were lost to follow up, one at 4 months and the other at 1 year. In the remaining patients, the average length of follow up was 20 months. In all patients radiographic evidence of solid bone fusion was demonstrated on follow-up plain x-ray films, and there were no signs or symptoms of pseudarthrosis. No patient suffered neurological deterioration as a result of surgery, and there was relatively little morbidity associated with this plating system. To date, none of the patients in this study has developed any delayed complications related to the fixation device. In one patient, who had sustained a severe flexion injury, loosening of the anterior fixation device occurred, and the patient developed progressive kyphosis, which required a posterior stabilization procedure. These results appear slightly better than those obtained in published studies in which other anterior plating systems were used, indicating that this system is safe and effective in the treatment of unstable fractures of the thoracolumbar spine. PMID:16918232

  12. Development of Ti-Nb-Zr alloys with high elastic admissible strain for temporary orthopedic devices.

    PubMed

    Ozan, Sertan; Lin, Jixing; Li, Yuncang; Ipek, Rasim; Wen, Cuie

    2015-07-01

    A new series of beta Ti-Nb-Zr (TNZ) alloys with considerable plastic deformation ability during compression test, high elastic admissible strain, and excellent cytocompatibility have been developed for removable bone tissue implant applications. TNZ alloys with nominal compositions of Ti-34Nb-25Zr, Ti-30Nb-32Zr, Ti-28Nb-35.4Zr and Ti-24.8Nb-40.7Zr (wt.% hereafter) were fabricated using the cold-crucible levitation technique, and the effects of alloying element content on their microstructures, mechanical properties (tensile strength, yield strength, compressive yield strength, Young's modulus, elastic energy, toughness, and micro-hardness), and cytocompatibilities were investigated and compared. Microstructural examinations revealed that the TNZ alloys consisted of β phase. The alloy samples displayed excellent ductility with no cracking, or fracturing during compression tests. Their tensile strength, Young's modulus, elongation at rupture, and elastic admissible strain were measured in the ranges of 704-839 MPa, 62-65 GPa, 9.9-14.8% and 1.08-1.31%, respectively. The tensile strength, Young's modulus and elongation at rupture of the Ti-34Nb-25Zr alloy were measured as 839 ± 31.8 MPa, 62 ± 3.6 GPa, and 14.8 ± 1.6%, respectively; this alloy exhibited the elastic admissible strain of approximately 1.31%. Cytocompatibility tests indicated that the cell viability ratios (CVR) of the alloys are greater than those of the control group; thus the TNZ alloys possess excellent cytocompatibility. PMID:25818950

  13. Surface characterization of Ti-Si-C-ON coatings for orthopedic devices: XPS and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Cristina; Galindo, R. Escobar; Palacio, C.; Calderon V, S.; Almeida, B. G.; Henriques, M.; Espinosa, A.; Carvalho, S.

    2011-01-01

    Ti-Si-C-ON films were deposited by DC reactive magnetron sputtering and their chemical properties, biofilm formation and toxicity were characterized. Based on the films composition three different growth regimes were identified on the films; (I) N/Ti = 2.11 (high atomic ratio) and low oxygen content; (II) 0.77 ≤ N/Ti ≤ 1.86 (intermediate atomic ratio) and (III) N/Ti ≤ 0.12 (low ratio) and high oxygen content. The phase composition varied from mainly TiN on regime I to TiCN on regime 2 and titanium oxides on regime III. Taking into account the results of biological characterization (biofilm formation and cytotoxicity), it was possible to conclude that samples with a high TiN content (regime I) presented more favorable biocompatibility, since it was less prone to microbial colonization and also displayed a low cytotoxicity.

  14. Single and reciprocal friction testing of micropatterned surfaces for orthopedic device design.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, N; Eljach, C; Lodge, B; Sharp, J L; Desjardins, J D; Kennedy, M S

    2012-03-01

    The use of micropatterning to create uniform surface morphologies has been cited as yielding improvements in the coefficient of friction during high velocity sliding contact. Studies have not been preformed to determine if these micropatterns could also be useful in biomedical applications, such as total joint replacement surfaces, where the lower sliding velocities are used. In addition, other factors such as lubricant viscosities and materials used are more tightly constrained. In this study, the effect of pattern geometry, feature size and lubricant on contact friction and surface damage was investigated using 316L steel in sliding contact with a stainless steel and polyethylene pins. Using a novel proprietary forming process that creates millions of microstructures in parallel, a variety of micropatterned surfaces were fabricated to study the influence of shape (oval, circular, square), geometry (depressions, pillars) and feature size (10, 50 and 100 mm) on both contact friction and surface damage. All samples were 316L stainless steel and the static and dynamic coefficients of friction when in contact with either a stainless steel or polyethylene counterface were measured in dry and lubricated conditions. All samples were characterized for surface uniformity and pattern aspect ratio using white light interferometry and optical microscope image analysis, and the coefficients of friction were measured for each surface/lubricant/pin system using a CETR scratch testing system. Results showed that round depressions with diameters of 10 μm had a significantly lower steady state coefficient of friction than the non-patterned substrates or substrates with greater diameter depression patterns. In addition, our results showed that the single-pass coefficient of friction measurements were not good predictors of the steady state coefficient of friction values measured. PMID:22340690

  15. Biofilm Disrupting Technology for Orthopedic Implants: What’s on the Horizon?

    PubMed Central

    Connaughton, Alexander; Childs, Abby; Dylewski, Stefan; Sabesan, Vani J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of orthopedic implants in joints has revolutionized the treatment of patients with many debilitating chronic musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis. However, the introduction of foreign material into the human body predisposes the body to infection. The treatment of these infections has become very complicated since the orthopedic implants serve as a surface for multiple species of bacteria to grow at a time into a resistant biofilm layer. This biofilm layer serves as a protectant for the bacterial colonies on the implant making them more resistant and difficult to eradicate when using standard antibiotic treatment. In some cases, the use of antibiotics alone has even made the bacteria more resistant to treatment. Thus, there has been surge in the creation of non-antibiotic anti-biofilm agents to help disrupt the biofilms on the orthopedic implants to help eliminate the infections. In this study, we discuss infections of orthopedic implants in the shoulder then we review the main categories of anti-biofilm agents that have been used for the treatment of infections on orthopedic implants. Then, we introduce some of the newer biofilm disrupting technology that has been studied in the past few years that may advance the treatment options for orthopedic implants in the future. PMID:25705632

  16. Orthopedic disorders of the knee in hemophilia: A current concept review

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; Valentino, Leonard A

    2016-01-01

    The knee is frequently affected by severe orthopedic changes known as hemophilic arthropathy (HA) in patients with deficiency of coagulation factor VIII or IX and thus this manuscript seeks to present a current perspective of the role of the orthopedic surgeon in the management of these problems. Lifelong factor replacement therapy (FRT) is optimal to prevent HA, however adherence to this regerous treatment is challenging leading to breakthrough bleeding. In patients with chronic hemophilic synovitis, the prelude to HA, radiosynovectomy (RS) is the optimal to ameliorate bleeding. Surgery in people with hemophilia (PWH) is associated with a high risk of bleeding and infection, and must be performed with FRT. A coordinated effort including orthopedic surgeons, hematologists, physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians, physiotherapists and other team members is key to optimal outcomes. Ideally, orthopedic procedures should be performed in specialized hospitals with experienced teams. Until we are able to prevent orthopedic problems of the knee in PWH will have to continue performing orthopedic procedures (arthrocentesis, RS, arthroscopic synovectomy, hamstring release, arthroscopic debridement, alignment osteotomy, and total knee arthroplasty). By using the aforementioned procedures, the quality of life of PWH will be improved. PMID:27335812

  17. Greater osteoblast functions on multiwalled carbon nanotubes grown from anodized nanotubular titanium for orthopedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirivisoot, Sirinrath; Yao, Chang; Xiao, Xingcheng; Sheldon, Brian W.; Webster, Thomas J.

    2007-09-01

    Titanium (Ti) is the most widely implanted orthopedic material. However, current formulations of Ti have an average orthopedic implant functional lifetime of only 10-15 years. While there are many reasons why orthopedic implants fail, one is a lack of initial and sustained integration into juxtaposed bone. To improve the cytocompatibility properties of Ti for orthopedic applications, parallel multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown from the pores of anodized nanotubular Ti by a chemical vapor deposition process in the present study. The results of this study provided evidence, for the first time, that osteoblast (bone forming cell) functions (specifically, alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition) were significantly greater on CNTs grown from anodized Ti than on anodized Ti without CNTs and currently-used Ti in orthopedics for up to 21 days. In summary, this study showed that bone growth could possibly be enhanced on currently-used Ti implants with protruding CNTs and, thus, they should be further studied for orthopedic applications.

  18. Orthopedic disorders of the knee in hemophilia: A current concept review.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; Valentino, Leonard A

    2016-06-18

    The knee is frequently affected by severe orthopedic changes known as hemophilic arthropathy (HA) in patients with deficiency of coagulation factor VIII or IX and thus this manuscript seeks to present a current perspective of the role of the orthopedic surgeon in the management of these problems. Lifelong factor replacement therapy (FRT) is optimal to prevent HA, however adherence to this regerous treatment is challenging leading to breakthrough bleeding. In patients with chronic hemophilic synovitis, the prelude to HA, radiosynovectomy (RS) is the optimal to ameliorate bleeding. Surgery in people with hemophilia (PWH) is associated with a high risk of bleeding and infection, and must be performed with FRT. A coordinated effort including orthopedic surgeons, hematologists, physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians, physiotherapists and other team members is key to optimal outcomes. Ideally, orthopedic procedures should be performed in specialized hospitals with experienced teams. Until we are able to prevent orthopedic problems of the knee in PWH will have to continue performing orthopedic procedures (arthrocentesis, RS, arthroscopic synovectomy, hamstring release, arthroscopic debridement, alignment osteotomy, and total knee arthroplasty). By using the aforementioned procedures, the quality of life of PWH will be improved. PMID:27335812

  19. Academic characteristics of orthopedic team physicians affiliated with high school, collegiate, and professional teams.

    PubMed

    Makhni, Eric C; Buza, John A; Byram, Ian; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2015-11-01

    We conducted a study to determine the academic involvement and research productivity of orthopedic team physicians at high school, college, and professional levels of sport. Through Internet and telephone queries, we identified 1054 team physicians from 362 institutions, including 120 randomly selected high schools and colleges and 122 professional teams (baseball, basketball, football, hockey). For all physicians included in the study, we performed a comprehensive search of the Internet and of a citation database to determine academic affiliations, number of publications, and h-index values. Of the 1054 physicians, 678 (64%) were orthopedic surgeons. Percentage of orthopedic team physicians affiliated with an academic medical center was highest in professional sports (64%; 173/270) followed by collegiate sports (36%; 98/275) and high school sports (20%; 27/133). Median number of publications per orthopedic team physician was significantly higher in professional sports (30.6) than in collegiate sports (10.7) or high school sports (6). Median number of publications by orthopedic physicians also varied by sport, with the highest number in Major League Baseball (37.9; range, 0-225) followed by the National Basketball Association (32.0; range, 0-227) and the National Football League (30.4; range, 0-460), with the lowest number within the National Hockey League (20.7; range, 0-144). Academic affiliation and research productivity of orthopedic team physicians vary by competition level and professional sporting league. PMID:26566551

  20. Lumbopelvic fixation for multiplanar sacral fractures with spinopelvic instability.

    PubMed

    Tan, Guo-qing; He, Ji-liang; Fu, Bai-sheng; Li, Lian-xin; Wang, Bo-min; Zhou, Dong-sheng

    2012-08-01

    Sacral fractures with both transverse and bilateral vertical fracture components are by definition multiplanar fractures, and often present with spinopelvic instability and cauda equina deficits. The treatment is challenging. Between 2006 and 2009, we treated nine such patients at our trauma centre. There were six men and three women, with a mean age of 32.2 years. Preoperative neurologic deficits were noted in seven patients; four patients had complete cauda equina paralysis, and three patients had incomplete cauda equina syndrome. All patients were treated using lumbopelvic instrumented fixation without other devices for their multiplanar sacral fractures. Six patients who had neurological deficits and sacral canal compression underwent decompression laminectomy. The mean postoperative follow-up time was 21.7 months (range, 14-32 months). All fractures went on to union without loss of reduction or hardware failure. The mean Gibbons score improved from 3.5 preoperatively to 2.3 postoperatively among the patients who underwent decompression laminectomy. Eight out of nine patients had fair or better results based on radiographic criteria and the Majeed pelvic fracture outcome score. Our experience suggests lumbopelvic fixation can be used for the treatment of multiplanar sacral fractures with spinopelvic instability with a low rate of complications. Neurologic improvement can be expected, but whether surgical decompression results in substantially better neurologic recovery than conservative treatment remains uncertain. PMID:22632803

  1. A minimally invasive approach to long-term head fixation in behaving nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Davis, T.S.; Torab, K.; House, P.; Greger, B.

    2009-01-01

    We have designed a device for long-term head fixation for use in behaving nonhuman primates that is robust yet minimally invasive and simple to use. This device is a modified version of the halo system that is used in humans for cervical traction and stabilization after spinal column injuries. This device consists of an aluminum halo with four titanium skull pins offset from the halo by aluminum posts. The titanium pins insert onto small segments of cranially reinforcing titanium plate, which are attached to the skull with titanium cortex screws. The surgery involves four scalp incisions, placement of the reinforcing plates, insertion of the pins for attachment of the halo, and incision closure. After the halo is attached, the animal’s head can be fixed to a primate chair using a custom-built attachment arm that provides three degrees of adjustability for proper positioning during behavioral tasks. We have installed this device on two Macaque monkeys weighing seven and ten kilograms. The halos have been in place on these animals for up to eight months without signs of discomfort or loss of fixation. Using this method of head fixation, we have been able to track the animals’ eye positions with an accuracy of less than two visual degrees while they perform behavioral tasks. PMID:19394360

  2. Chemical and physical basics of routine formaldehyde fixation

    PubMed Central

    Thavarajah, Rooban; Mudimbaimannar, Vidya Kazhiyur; Elizabeth, Joshua; Rao, Umadevi Krishnamohan; Ranganathan, Kannan

    2012-01-01

    Formaldehyde is the widely employed fixative that has been studied for decades. The chemistry of fixation has been studied widely since the early 20th century. However, very few studies have been focused on the actual physics/chemistry aspect of process of this fixation. This article attempts to explain the chemistry of formaldehyde fixation and also to study the physical aspects involved in the fixation. The factors involved in the fixation process are discussed using well documented mathematical and physical formulae. The deeper understanding of these factors will enable pathologist to optimize the factors and use them in their favor. PMID:23248474

  3. Chemical and physical basics of routine formaldehyde fixation.

    PubMed

    Thavarajah, Rooban; Mudimbaimannar, Vidya Kazhiyur; Elizabeth, Joshua; Rao, Umadevi Krishnamohan; Ranganathan, Kannan

    2012-09-01

    Formaldehyde is the widely employed fixative that has been studied for decades. The chemistry of fixation has been studied widely since the early 20(th) century. However, very few studies have been focused on the actual physics/chemistry aspect of process of this fixation. This article attempts to explain the chemistry of formaldehyde fixation and also to study the physical aspects involved in the fixation. The factors involved in the fixation process are discussed using well documented mathematical and physical formulae. The deeper understanding of these factors will enable pathologist to optimize the factors and use them in their favor. PMID:23248474

  4. Innovation in catheter securement devices: minimising risk of infection, trauma and pain.

    PubMed

    Holroyd, Sharon

    2016-05-01

    Urinary catheters are one of the most common invasive devices used in the NHS. The risks are well-documented and the practice of catheterisation of the bladder has been around for years. Traditionally catheter fixation devices have not been widely used, despite many best practice guidelines advising on their use as a standard within catheter care and maintenance. This article considers some of the evidence around urinary catheterisation and the benefits and limitations of fixation devices. There will be a product focus on the Optimum Medical Ugo Fix Gentle catheter fixation device, with case histories to demonstrate patient satisfaction with the product. PMID:27170410

  5. Substance P and Acute Pain in Patients Undergoing Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lisowska, Barbara; Siewruk, Katarzyna; Lisowski, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is a limited information about the role of Substance P (SP) in acute pain nociception following surgical stimulation in patients with a chronic inflammatory state not to mention the link between this neuropeptide level changes and intensity of pain. The goal of the research was to find the correlation between SP level changes and acute pain intensity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis undergoing elective orthopedic surgery. Material and Methods Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were enrolled in the study. The correlation between acute pain intensity and concentration of SP in serum as well as in drainage fluid from postoperative wound was assessed in patients with RA who underwent Total Knee Replacement (TKA) under spinal anesthesia. Results In patients with RA a correlation between intensity of acute pain and serum SP was found postoperatively, whereas there was no correlation between intensity of acute pain and concentration of SP in drainage fluid. Conclusions 1. The correlation between acute pain intensity and SP serum concentration was found postoperatively in patients with RA. 2. The correlation between acute pain intensity and SP concentration in drainage fluid was not found postoperatively in patients with RA. PMID:26731421

  6. Parametric analysis of orthopedic screws in relation to bone density.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Elisabetta M; Salaorno, Massimiliano; Grasso, Giovanni; Audenino, Alberto L

    2009-01-01

    A global study of geometry and material properties of orthopedic screws was performed, considering not only the effect of each single factor (screw pitch, number of threads, fillet angle, etc.) but also their interactions with respect to bone density.The stress patterns resulting from different screw geometries and bone densities were analyzed using finite element techniques, taking into account different levels of osseointegration between the screw and the bone. These numerical models where validated through experimental pull-out tests, where a pull out force of 120 N produced localized failure of the last thread (stresses above 0.42 MPa). The results of the numerical simulations were then summarised using a multi-factorial parametric analysis. This demonstrated the great relevance of the interaction between bone density and screw pitch, showing that the optimal screw pitch can vary by more than 25% for different densities (0.35 g/cm(3) and 0.47 g/cm(3), respectively).The parameters calculated by means of the multi-factorial analysis allow the pull out force to be estimated for different osseointegration levels, different screw geometries and material properties, and for different bone densities. The final objective is to determine the best choice of implant for each individual patient. PMID:19587807

  7. Biomaterials for orthopedics: a roughness analysis by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Covani, Ugo; Giacomelli, Luca; Krajewski, Adriano; Ravaglioli, Antonio; Spotorno, Lorenza; Loria, Patrizia; Das, Saradindu; Nicolini, Claudio

    2007-09-01

    We conducted an AFM analysis of roughness on 7 materials widely used in bone reconstruction. Roughness was evaluated by measuring Root Mean Square (RMS) values and RMS/average height (AH) ratio, in different dimensional ranges, varying from 100 microns square to a few hundreds of nanometers. The results showed that Titanium presented a lower roughness than the other materials analyzed, frequently reaching statistical significance. On the contrary, bioactive materials, such as hydroxyapatite (HA) and bioactive glasses, demonstrated an overall higher roughness. In particular, this study focuses attention on AP40 and especially RKKP, which proved to have a significant higher roughness at low dimensional ranges. This determines a large increase in surface area, which is strongly connected with osteoblast adhesion and growth and to protein absorption. Therefore, the biointegration properties of bioactive glasses can also be given as answer in terms of surface structures in which chemical composition can influence directly the biological system (e.g. with chemical exchanges and development of specific surface electrical charge) and indirectly, via the properties induced on tribological behavior that expresses itself during the smoothing of the surfaces. We also test two new bioactive glasses, RBP1 and RBP2, with a chemical composition similar to AP40, but with some significant small additions and substitutions of components, in order to make preliminary considerations on their potential role in orthopedics. PMID:17326227

  8. Amino acid containing glass-ionomer cement for orthopedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei

    Amino acid containing glass-ionomer cements were synthesized, formulated, and evaluated for orthopedic application. The formulation of different amino acid containing glass-ionomer bone cements was optimized, and conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer bone cements were compared. Properties of interest included handling characteristics, physical and chemical properties, and mechanical strength of the bone cement. The study was based on the synthesis of different vinyl containing amino acids, different polyelectrolytes containing these amino acid residues, and different resin-modified polyelectrolytes, as well as formulation and evaluation of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer bone cements using these polyelectrolytes. Systematic preparation of polyelectrolytes and formulation of glass-ionomer bone cements were essential features of this work, since we anticipated that the mechanical properties of the glass-ionomer bone cements could be strongly affected by the nature of the polyelectrolytes and formulation. Mechanical properties were evaluated in a screw driven mechanical testing machine, and structure-property relationships were determined by scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation of the fracture surface of the specimens. How the structure of polyelectrolytes, such as different amino acid residues, molecular weight, different modifying resin, and formulation of glass-ionomer bone cement, affected the mechanical properties was also studied.

  9. Traumatic Finger Injuries: What the Orthopedic Surgeon Wants to Know.

    PubMed

    Wieschhoff, Ged G; Sheehan, Scott E; Wortman, Jeremy R; Dyer, George S M; Sodickson, Aaron D; Patel, Ketan I; Khurana, Bharti

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic finger injuries account for a substantial number of emergency visits every year. Imaging plays an important role in diagnosis and in directing management of these injuries. Although many injuries can be managed conservatively, some require more invasive interventions to prevent complications and loss of function. Accurate diagnosis of finger injuries can often be difficult, given the complicated soft-tissue anatomy of the hand and the diverse spectrum of injuries that can occur. To best serve the patient and the treating physician, radiologists must have a working knowledge of finger anatomy, the wide array of injury patterns that can occur, the characteristic imaging findings of different finger injuries, and the most appropriate treatment options for each type of injury. This article details the intricate anatomy of the hand as it relates to common finger injuries, illustrates the imaging findings of a range of injuries, presents optimal imaging modalities and imaging parameters for the diagnosis of different injury types, and addresses which findings have important management implications for the patient and the orthopedic surgeon. With this fund of knowledge, radiologists will be able to recommend the most appropriate imaging studies, make accurate diagnoses, convey clinically relevant imaging findings to the referring physician, and suggest appropriate follow-up examinations. In this way, the radiologist will help improve patient care and outcomes. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27399238

  10. Why medical students choose orthopedic surgery as a specialty?

    PubMed Central

    Erraji, Moncef; Kharraji, Abdessamad; Abbasi, Najib; Najib, Abdeljawad; Yacoubi, Hicham

    2015-01-01

    Before the crisis announced the Moroccan surgery, the objectives of this study were to analyze the choice of specialties newly appointed to the internal review and the guidance of medical students and to determine the factors influencing this choice. Data on specialty choice students were analyzed and a questionnaire was offered to students of Morocco at the beginning of academic year 2013-20014 The form consisted of questions on the year of study. sex, professional guidelines and reasons for choice. candidates were male, the average age of our residents was 28 years. We also noted the importance of the passage as well as external service trauma. Care provided to patients, lifestyle and income reported by 85% of respondents to be the most important factors to pursue orthopedics as a career. The TR-Orth is now a specialty that responds to a positive choice. The choice of TR-Orth by students at the end of medical school curriculum is reinforced by teaching and practicing the specialty during the internship. The overall training is unsatisfactory overall. Students would deepen in some areas. This study confirms that there is currently a shift in trauma surgery, mostly induced by an a priori negative for particular workloads. PMID:26185556

  11. Infection Mitigation Efficacy of Photoactive Titania on Orthopedic Implant Materials

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed; Hershey, Ryan; Aboelzahab, Asem; Goel, Vijay

    2011-01-01

    In order to impede infection and achieve accelerated wound healing in the postorthopaedic surgery patients, a simple and benign procedure for creating nanotubular or nanofibrillar structure of photoactive TiO2 on the surface of Ti plates and wires is described. The nanoscale TiO2 films on titanium were grown by hydrothermal processing in one case and by anodization in the presence of dilute mineral acids under mild and benign conditions in the other. Confocal microscopy results demonstrated at least 50% reduction in the population of E. coli colonies (concentration 2.15 × 107 cells/mL) on TiO2-coated implants upon an IR exposure of up to 30 s; it required ∼20 min of exposure to UV beam for the same effect. These findings suggest the probability of eliminating wound infection during and after orthopedic surgical procedures by brief illumination of photoactive titania films on the implants with an IR beam. PMID:21994891

  12. Hydroxyapatite electrodeposition on anodized titanium nanotubes for orthopedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parcharoen, Yardnapar; Kajitvichyanukul, Puangrat; Sirivisoot, Sirinrath; Termsuksawad, Preecha

    2014-08-01

    Nanotubes modification for orthopedic implants has shown interesting biological performances (such as improving cell adhesion, cell differentiation, and enhancing osseointegration). The purpose of this study is to investigate effect of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotube feature on performance of hydroxyapatite-coated titanium (Ti) bone implants. TiO2 nanotubes were prepared by anodization using ammonium fluoride electrolyte (NH4F) with and without modifiers (PEG400 and Glycerol) at various potential forms, and times. After anodization, the nanotubes were subsequently annealed. TiO2 nanotubes were characterized by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffractometer. The amorphous to anatase transformation due to annealing was observed. Smooth and highly organized TiO2 nanotubes were found when high viscous electrolyte, NH4F in glycerol, was used. Negative voltage (-4 V) during anodization was confirmed to increase nanotube thickness. Length of the TiO2 nanotubes was significantly increased by times. The TiO2 nanotube was electrodeposited with hydroxyapatite (HA) and its adhesion was estimated by adhesive tape test. The result showed that nanotubes with the tube length of 560 nm showed excellent adhesion. The coated HA were tested for biological test by live/dead cell straining. HA coated on TiO2 nanotubes showed higher cells density, higher live cells, and more spreading of MC3T3-E1 cells than that growing on titanium plate surface.

  13. EARLY COMPLICATIONS IN THE ORTHOPEDIC TREATMENT OF BONE METASTASES

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Luiz Eduardo Moreira; Miranda, Ricardo Horta; Ghedini, Daniel Ferreira; Aguilar, Rafael Bazílio; Novais, Eduardo Nilo Vasconcelos; de Abreu e Silva, Guilherme Moreira; Araújo, Ivana Duval; de Andrade, Marco Antônio Percope

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the early complications in the orthopedic treatment of metastatic bone lesions and the factors associated with these complications. Method: There were assessed, retrospectively, 64 patients that underwent surgical treatment for bone metastases, analyzing the complications that occurred in the pre-operative and early post- operative period and associating them with the tumor origin, type of procedure done, the need of blood reposition before the surgery, the need of new surgical procedures and the mortality due to the complications. Results: Early complications in the treatment were observed in 17 (26.6%) patients, of which six (35.2%) ended up dying due to these complications. Regarding the type, 15 (23.8%) cases were due to surgical complications, four (6.3%) clinical and three (4.7%) patients showed clinical and surgical complications. There was no significant difference in the frequency of complications or mortality when assessed the type of reconstruction or affected region. The tumors with a renal origin needed more blood reposition and showed a bigger frequency of complications. Conclusion: The complications occurred in 26.6%. The complications are not related to the kind of treatment performed or to the region affected. The renal origin tumors showed a higher risk of hemorrhage. PMID:27077063

  14. Biometric recognition via fixation density maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigas, Ioannis; Komogortsev, Oleg V.

    2014-05-01

    This work introduces and evaluates a novel eye movement-driven biometric approach that employs eye fixation density maps for person identification. The proposed feature offers a dynamic representation of the biometric identity, storing rich information regarding the behavioral and physical eye movement characteristics of the individuals. The innate ability of fixation density maps to capture the spatial layout of the eye movements in conjunction with their probabilistic nature makes them a particularly suitable option as an eye movement biometrical trait in cases when free-viewing stimuli is presented. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, the method is evaluated on three different datasets containing a wide gamut of stimuli types, such as static images, video and text segments. The obtained results indicate a minimum EER (Equal Error Rate) of 18.3 %, revealing the perspectives on the utilization of fixation density maps as an enhancing biometrical cue during identification scenarios in dynamic visual environments.

  15. Anatomic Locking Plate Fixation for Scaphoid Nonunion

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Just; Sapienza, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Nonunion can occur relatively frequently after scaphoid fracture and appears to be associated with severity of injury. There have been a number of techniques described for bone grafting with or without screw fixation to facilitate fracture healing. However, even with operative fixation of scaphoid fractures with bone grafting nonunion or malunion rates of 5 to 10 percent are still reported. This is the first report of an anatomic locking plate for scaphoid fracture repair in a 25-year-old right hand dominant healthy male. PMID:27366338

  16. Comminuted long bone fractures in children. Could combined fixation improve the results?

    PubMed

    El-Alfy, Barakat; Ali, Ayman M; Fawzy, Sallam I

    2016-09-01

    Comminuted diaphyseal fractures in the pediatric age group represent a major orthopedic problem. It is associated with a high incidence of complications and poor outcomes because of the instability and difficulty in treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of combined external skeletal fixation and flexible intramedullary nails in reconstruction of comminuted diaphyseal fracture in skeletally immature patients. Combined external fixator and elastic stable intramedullary nails were used in the management of 27 pediatric patients (15 males and 12 females) with unstable comminuted diaphyseal fractures of the tibia and femur. There were 19 fractures of the femur and eight fractures of the tibia. The average age of the patients was 8.7 years (range 7-14 years) for the femur and 10.8 years (range 6-15 years) for the tibia. Fractures were classified according to the system of Winquist and Hansen as grade II (five cases), grade III (nine cases), and grade IV (13 cases). All cases were operated within 6 days (range 0-6 days) after injury. The mean follow-up period was 2.8 years (range 2-3.5 years). The average duration of the external fixation was 1.6 months for fractures of the tibia, whereas it was 1.4 months for fractures of the femur. The average time for tibia fracture union was 2.8 months for fractures of the tibia, whereas it was 1.9 months for fractures of the femur. Malalignment in varus less than 5° was noted in one patient. One patient had a limb-length discrepancy of 1.5 cms. There were five cases (18.5%) with pin-tract infection. According to the Association for the Study and Application of the Methods of Ilizarov evaluation system, bone results were excellent in 23 cases (85.2%), good in three cases (11.1%), and poor in one case (3.7%). Functional results were excellent in 22 (81.5%) cases and good in five (18.5%) cases. Combined use of external fixators and elastic intramedullary nails is a good method for the treatment of comminuted

  17. Monoaxial Pedicle Screws Are Superior to Polyaxial Pedicle Screws and the Two Pin External Fixator for Subcutaneous Anterior Pelvic Fixation in a Biomechanical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Rahul; Onwudiwe, Ndidi; Roth, Matthew; Sethi, Anil

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Comparison of monoaxial and polyaxial screws with the use of subcutaneous anterior pelvic fixation. Methods. Four different groups each having 5 constructs were tested in distraction within the elastic range. Once that was completed, 3 components were tested in torsion within the elastic range, 2 to torsional failure and 3 in distraction until failure. Results. The pedicle screw systems showed higher stiffness (4.008 ± 0.113 Nmm monoaxial, 3.638 ± 0.108 Nmm Click-x; 3.634 ± 0.147 Nmm Pangea) than the exfix system (2.882 ± 0.054 Nmm) in distraction. In failure testing, monoaxial pedicle screw system was stronger (360 N) than exfixes (160 N) and polyaxial devices which failed if distracted greater than 4 cm (157 N Click-x or 138 N Pangea). The exfix had higher peak torque and torsional stiffness than all pedicle systems. In torsion, the yield strengths were the same for all constructs. Conclusion. The infix device constructed with polyaxial or monoaxial pedicle screws is stiffer than the 2 pin external fixator in distraction testing. In extreme cases, the use of reinforcement or monoaxial systems which do not fail even at 360 N is a better option. In torsional testing, the 2 pin external fixator is stiffer than the pedicle screw systems. PMID:24368943

  18. Antimicrobial efficacy of combined clarithromycin plus daptomycin against biofilms-formed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on titanium medical devices.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Shigeru; Sato, Tetsuro; Hayakawa, Sachiko; Kawamura, Masato; Furukawa, Emiko; Watanabe, Akira

    2015-10-01

    In vitro efficacy of combined eradication therapy with clarithromycin and daptomycin against biofilm-formed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on the orthopedic titanium devices was evaluated. The bactericidal effect of this antibiotic was investigated by a re-culture test, the scanning electron microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy using a double-staining dyes. Clarithromycin decreased the amount to half in 24 h. Although MRSA biofilms were not eradicated with clarithromycin or daptomycin alone, clarithromycin combined with daptomycin was useful to sterilize titanium devices within 72 h. This in vitro study showed that combined treatment with clarithromycin plus daptomycin is useful to eradicate staphylococcal biofilms formed on orthopedic devices. PMID:26162777

  19. A Comparison of the Contact Force Distributions on the Acetabular Surface Due to Orthopedic Treatments for Developmental Hip Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Flórez, Kalenia M; Silva, Octavio; Narváez-Tovar, Carlos A; Garzón-Alvarado, Diego A

    2016-07-01

    We used a three-dimensional rigid body spring model (RBSM) to compare the contact force distributions on the acetabular surface of the infant hip joint that are produced by three orthopedic treatments for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). We analyzed treatments using a Pavlik harness, a generic rigid splint, and a spica cast. The joint geometry was modeled from tomography images of a 1-year-old female. The articular cartilage was modeled as linear springs connecting the surfaces of the acetabulum and the femoral head, whereas the femur and the hip bone were considered as rigid bodies. The hip muscles were modeled as tensile-only preloaded springs. The treatments with the Pavlik harness and the generic rigid splint were modeled for an infant in supine position with a hip flexion angle of 90 deg. Also, since rigid splints are often recommended when children are initiating their gait phase, we modeled the treatment with the infant in standing position. For the spica cast, we only considered the infant in standing position with a flexion angle of 0 deg, and the fixation bar at two heights: at the ankle and at the knee. In order to analyze the effect of the hip abduction angle over the contact force distribution, different abduction angles were used for all the treatments modeled. We have found that the treatments with the infant in supine position, with a flexion angle of 90 deg and abduction angles between 60 deg and 80 deg, produce a more homogenous contact force distribution compared to those obtained for the treatments with the infant in standing position. PMID:27150210

  20. Postoperative Risk of Hepatic Decompensation after Orthopedic Surgery in Patients with Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, Eric M.; Batech, Michael; Cheetham, T. Craig; Pio, Jose R.; Caparosa, Susan L.; Chocas, Mary Alice; Singh, Anshuman

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and Aims: Previous studies have shown increased hepatic decompensation in patients with cirrhosis undergoing surgery. However, there are little data available in cirrhotics undergoing orthopedic surgery compared to cirrhotics who did not undergo surgery. The aim of this study was to examine the demographics, comorbid conditions, and clinical factors associated with hepatic decompensation within 90 days in cirrhotics who underwent orthopedic surgery. Methods: This is a retrospective matched cohort study. Inclusion criteria were cirrhosis diagnosis, age > 18 years, ≥ 6 months continuous health plan membership, and a procedure code for orthopedic surgery. Up to five cirrhotic controls without orthopedic surgery were matched on age, gender, and cirrhosis diagnosis date. Data abstraction was performed for demographics, socioeconomics, clinical, and decompensation data. Chart review was performed for validation. Multivariable analysis estimated relative risk of decompensation. Results: Eight hundred fifty-three orthopedic surgery cases in cirrhotics were matched with 4,263 cirrhotic controls. Among the cases and matched controls, the mean age was 60.5 years, and 52.2% were female. Within 90 days after surgery, cases had more decompensation compared to matched controls (12.8% vs 4.9%). Using multivariable analysis, orthopedic surgery, a 0.5 g/dL decrease in serum albumin, and a 1-unit increase in Charlson Comorbidity Index were associated with a significant increase in decompensation within 90 days of surgery. Diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and chronic kidney disease were seen with increased frequency in cases vs. matched controls. Conclusions: Cirrhotics who underwent orthopedic surgery had a significant increase in hepatic decompensation within 90 days of surgery compared to matched controls. An incremental decrease in serum albumin and an incremental increase in the Charlson Comorbidity Index were significantly associated with

  1. Orthopedic manifestations in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome) enrolled in the Hunter Outcome Survey

    PubMed Central

    Link, Bianca; de Camargo Pinto, Louise Lapagesse; Giugliani, Roberto; Wraith, James Edmond; Guffon, Nathalie; Eich, Elke; Beck, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II or Hunter syndrome) is a rare, inherited disorder caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase. As a result of this deficiency, glycosaminoglycans accumulate in lysosomes in many tissues, leading to progressive multisystemic disease. The cardiopulmonary and neurological problems associated with MPS II have received considerable attention. Orthopedic manifestations are common but not as well characterized. This study aimed to characterize the prevalence and severity of orthopedic manifestations of MPS II and to determine the relationship of these signs and symptoms with cardiovascular, pulmonary and central nervous system involvement. Orthopedic manifestations of MPS II were studied using cross-sectional data from the Hunter Outcome Survey (HOS). The HOS is a global, physician-led, multicenter observational database that collects information on the natural history of MPS II and the long-term safety and effectiveness of enzyme replacement therapy. As of January 2009, the HOS contained baseline data on joint range of motion in 124 males with MPS II. In total, 79% of patients had skeletal manifestations (median onset, 3.5 years) and 25% had abnormal gait (median onset, 5.4 years). Joint range of motion was restricted for all joints assessed (elbow, shoulder, hip, knee and ankle). Extension was the most severely affected movement: the exception to this was the shoulder. Surgery for orthopedic problems was rare. The presence of orthopedic manifestations was associated with the presence of central nervous system and pulmonary involvement, but not so clearly with cardiovascular involvement. Orthopedic interventions should be considered on an individual-patient basis. Although some orthopedic manifestations associated with MPS II may be managed routinely, a good knowledge of other concurrent organ system involvement is essential. A multidisciplinary approach is required. PMID:21808707

  2. A noninvasive eye fixation monitoring system for CyberKnife radiotherapy of choroidal and orbital tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Daftari, I. K.; Petti, P. L.; Larson, D. A.; O'Brien, J. M.; Phillips, T. L.

    2009-03-15

    A new noninvasive monitoring system for fixing the eye has been developed to treat orbital and choroidal tumors with CyberKnife-based radiotherapy. This device monitors the eye during CT/MRI scanning and during treatment. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of the fixation light system for CyberKnife-based treatments of orbital and choroidal tumors and supports the idea that larger choroidal melanomas and choroidal metastases could be treated with CyberKnife without implanting fiducial markers.

  3. Updating memory after mild traumatic brain injury and orthopedic injuries.

    PubMed

    Hanten, Gerri; Li, Xiaoqi; Ibarra, Alyssa; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Barnes, Amanda; McCauley, Stephen R; McCarthy, James; Hoxhaj, Shkelzen; Mendez, Donna; Hunter, Jill V; Levin, Harvey S; Smith, Douglas H

    2013-04-15

    Few studies have examined the trajectory of recovery of executive function (EF) after mild TBI (mTBI). Therefore, consensus has not been reached on the incidence and extent of EF impairment after mTBI. The present study investigated trajectory of change in executive memory over 3 months after mTBI on 59 right-handed participants with mTBI, as defined by Centers for Disease Control criteria, ages 14-30 years, recruited within 96 hours post-injury and tested <1 week (baseline), 1 month, and 3 months after injury. Also included were 58 participants with orthopedic injury (OI) and 27 typically developing (TD) non-injured participants with similar age, socioeconomic status, sex, and ethnicity. MRI data were acquired at baseline and 3 months. Although criteria included a normal CT scan, lesions were detected by MRI in 19 mTBI patients. Participants completed the KeepTrack task, a verbal recall task placing demands on goal maintenance, semantic memory, and memory updating. Scores reflected items recalled and semantic categories maintained. The mTBI group was divided into two groups: high (score ≥12) or low (score <12) symptoms based on the Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire (RPQ). Mixed model analyses revealed the trajectory of change in mTBI patients (high and low RPQ), OI patients, and TD subjects were similar over time (although the TD group differed from other groups at baseline), suggesting no recovery from mTBI up to 90 days. For categories maintained, differences in trajectory of recovery were discovered, with the OI comparison group surprisingly performing similar to those in the mTBI group with high RPQ symptoms, and different from low RPQ and the TD groups, bringing up questions about utility of OIs as a comparison group for mTBI. Patients with frontal lesions (on MRI) were also found to perform worse than those without lesions, a pattern that became more pronounced with time. PMID:23227898

  4. Corrosion behavior of a welded stainless-steel orthopedic implant.

    PubMed

    Reclaru, L; Lerf, R; Eschler, P Y; Meyer, J M

    2001-02-01

    The corrosion behavior of combinations of materials used in an orthopedic implant: the spherical part (forged or forged and annealed) constituting the head, the weld (tungsten inert gas (TIG) or electron beam (EB) techniques), and the cylindrical part (annealed) constituting the shaft of a femoral prosthesis - has been investigated. Open-circuit potentials, potentiodynamic curves, Tafel slope, mixed potential theory and susceptibility to intergranular attack are electrochemical and chemical procedures selected for this work. Electrochemical measurements using a microelectrode have been made in the following zones: spherical part, cylindrical part, weld, and weld/sphere, and weld/shaft interfaces. To detect intergranular attack, the Strauss test has been used. At the interfaces, corrosion currents, measured (Icorr) and predicted (Icouple) are low, in the order of the pico- to nanoampere. The electrochemical behavior of the electron beam (EB) weld is better than that of the tungsten inert gas (TIG). Welds at interfaces can behave either anodically or cathodically. It is better if welds, which are sensitive parts of the femoral prosthesis, behave cathodically. In this way, the risk of starting localized corrosion (pitting, crevice or intergranular corrosion) from a galvanic couple, remains low. From this point of view, the sample with the EB weld offers the best behavior. All the other samples containing a TIG type of weld exhibit a less favorable behavior. The mechanical treatments (forged, and forged and annealed) of the steel sphere did not show any difference in the corrosion behavior. No intergranular corrosion has been observed at the weld/steel interface for unsensitized samples. With sensitized samples, however, a TIG sample has exhibited some localized intergranular corrosion at a distance of 500 microm along the weld/stainless steel (sphere) interface. PMID:11197502

  5. Sarcopenia and Sarcopenic Obesity in Patients Undergoing Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hyung-Min; Han, Jun; Jin, Dong San; Suh, Hyunseok; Chung, Yoon-Sok

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence of sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity among patients who underwent orthopedic surgery (OS). Methods A total of 222 patients were reviewed immediately after or prior to OS. In the control group, 364 patients from outpatient departments (OPDs) who did not have any OS were enrolled. Whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to analyze body composition. Skeletal muscle mass was adjusted for height squared, total body weight, and height and fat mass (residuals). Obesity was defined as body mass index (BMI) > 25.0 kg/m2. Results The prevalence of sarcopenia in the OS group was 25.7%, 44.1%, and 26.6%, respectively, according to the 3 different criteria. The prevalence was significantly lower in the OPD group (6.0%, 33.1%, and 14.8%, respectively). The highest rates of sarcopenia with height-adjusted definition were seen in patients with a femoral neck fracture. In the multivariate analysis, factors associated with sarcopenia were male gender, older age, and lower BMI (odds ratio [OR]: 28.38, 1.03, and 1.83, respectively) when muscle mass was adjusted for height, whereas male gender, older age, and higher BMI were associated with sarcopenia (OR: 1.04, 2.57, and 1.83, respectively) when adjusted for weight. When residuals were used as a cutoff, decreased BMI and total hip bone mineral density (0.1 g/cm2) were independent risk factors associated with sarcopenia (OR: 1.09 and 1.05). The prevalence of sarcopenic obesity ranged from 1.8% to 21.2%. Conclusions Our study demonstrated a high prevalence of sarcopenia among OS patients. PMID:27247746

  6. Chitosan for gene delivery and orthopedic tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Raftery, Rosanne; O'Brien, Fergal J; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy involves the introduction of foreign genetic material into cells in order exert a therapeutic effect. The application of gene therapy to the field of orthopaedic tissue engineering is extremely promising as the controlled release of therapeutic proteins such as bone morphogenetic proteins have been shown to stimulate bone repair. However, there are a number of drawbacks associated with viral and synthetic non-viral gene delivery approaches. One natural polymer which has generated interest as a gene delivery vector is chitosan. Chitosan is biodegradable, biocompatible and non-toxic. Much of the appeal of chitosan is due to the presence of primary amine groups in its repeating units which become protonated in acidic conditions. This property makes it a promising candidate for non-viral gene delivery. Chitosan-based vectors have been shown to transfect a number of cell types including human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and human cervical cancer cells (HeLa). Aside from its use in gene delivery, chitosan possesses a range of properties that show promise in tissue engineering applications; it is biodegradable, biocompatible, has anti-bacterial activity, and, its cationic nature allows for electrostatic interaction with glycosaminoglycans and other proteoglycans. It can be used to make nano- and microparticles, sponges, gels, membranes and porous scaffolds. Chitosan has also been shown to enhance mineral deposition during osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in vitro. The purpose of this review is to critically discuss the use of chitosan as a gene delivery vector with emphasis on its application in orthopedic tissue engineering. PMID:23676471

  7. Interpretation time in an ethnically diverse pediatric orthopedic clinic.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moon; Sobralske, Mary; Raney, Ellen; Carino, Brian

    2016-06-20

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to determine whether there were differences in clinical encounter time between patients who speak English and those who require an interpretation service in an ethnically diverse pediatric clinic. Design/methodology/approach - Encounter time with patients requiring interpretation was compared to encounter time with patients who spoke English. The sample consisted of 310 encounters at a pediatric orthopedic clinic where patients spoke over 18 primary languages. Data were analyzed using ANOVA to compare four types of encounters. Findings - Approximately 12 percent (n=38) required interpretation and encounters requiring interpretation took 30 percent (nine minutes) longer than those that did not, p < 0.01(25 vs 16 minutes). Furthermore, this difference was mainly among new patients: Approximately, 53 percent increase in time for new patient encounters requiring interpretation (36 vs 23 minutes) while only 25 percent increase in encounter time for established patients (20 vs 16 minutes) was detected. Research limitations/implications - Preventing problems due to language barriers requires time for interpretation which places demands on staff resources and presents clinical challenges. However, long-term benefits of quality health care outweigh the costs associated with interpretation service. Originality/value - To the knowledge, this is the first study to investigate actual encounter time differences in a pediatric clinical setting. The authors found that clinical encounters requiring interpretation took approximately nine minutes longer in general and four minutes longer for established patients. These findings could give much needed information for hospital administrators to allocate appropriate amounts of time and resources to care for those who need interpretation services. However, they also indicate a broader concern of the reduction of clinical encounter time for overall health care system in the country that might need

  8. WHITE LUPIN NITROGEN FIXATION UNDER PHOSPHORUS DEFICIENCY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White lupin is highly adapted to growth in a low P environment. The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether white lupin grown under P-stress has adaptations in nodulation and N2 fixation that facilitate continued functioning. Nodulated plants were grown in silica sand supplied with N-...

  9. Trichodesmium and nitrogen fixation in the Kuroshio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozaki, T.; Takeda, S.; Itoh, S.; Kodama, T.; Liu, X.; Hashihama, F.; Furuya, K.

    2015-07-01

    Nitrogen fixation in the Kuroshio influences nitrogen balance in the North Pacific Ocean. The genus Trichodesmium is recognized as a major diazotroph in the Kuroshio. Although its abundance is higher in the Kuroshio than in adjacent waters, the reason for this difference remains unclear. The present study investigated the abundance of Trichodesmium spp. and nitrogen fixation together with concentrations of dissolved iron and phosphate, whose availabilities potentially control diazotrophy, in the Kuroshio and its marginal seas. We performed the observations near the Miyako Islands, which form part of the Ryukyu Islands, situated along the Kuroshio, since satellite analysis suggested that material transport could occur from the islands to the Kuroshio. Trichodesmium spp. bloomed (> 20 000 filaments L-1) near the Miyako Islands, and the abundance was high in the Kuroshio and the Kuroshio bifurcation region of the East China Sea, but was low in the Philippine Sea. The abundance of Trichodesmium spp. was significantly correlated with the total nitrogen fixation activity. The surface concentrations of dissolved iron (0.19-0.89 nM) and phosphate (< 3-36 nM) were similar for all of the study areas, indicating that the nutrient distribution could not explain the spatial differences in Trichodesmium spp. abundance and nitrogen fixation. We used a numerical model to simulate the transportation of water around the Ryukyu Islands to the Kuroshio. Our results indicate that Trichodesmium growing around the islands situated along the Kuroshio is potentially important for determining diazotrophy in this region.

  10. Binocular Fixation in the Newborn Baby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Alan M.; Findlay, John M.

    1975-01-01

    Three experiments are reported in which 15 babies were presented with visual stimuli which varied in shape and distance from the eye. Results indicated that the majority of subjects binocularly fixated all three stimuli and it was concluded that the newborn baby has the basic requirements for binocular vision. (Author/GO)

  11. Bone cement improves suture anchor fixation.

    PubMed

    Giori, Nicholas J; Sohn, David H; Mirza, Faisal M; Lindsey, Derek P; Lee, Arthur T

    2006-10-01

    Suture anchor fixation failure can occur if the anchor pulls out of bone. We hypothesized that suture anchor fixation can be augmented with polymethylmethacrylate cement, and that polymethylmethacrylate can be used to improve fixation in a stripped anchor hole. Six matched cadaveric proximal humeri were used. On one side, suture anchors were placed and loaded to failure using a ramped cyclic loading protocol. The stripped anchor holes then were injected with approximately 1 cc polymethylmethacrylate, and anchors were replaced and tested again. In the contralateral humerus, polymethylmethacrylate was injected into anchor holes before anchor placement and testing. In unstripped anchors, polymethylmethacrylate increased the number of cycles to failure by 34% and failure load by 71% compared with anchors not augmented with polymethylmethacrylate. Polymethylmethacrylate haugmentation of stripped anchors increased the cycles to failure by 31% and failure load by 111% compared with unstripped uncemented anchors. No difference was found in cycles to failure or failure load between cemented stripped anchors and cemented unstripped anchors. Polymethylmethacrylate can be used to augment fixation, reducing the risk of anchor pull-out failure, regardless whether the suture anchor hole is stripped or unstripped. PMID:16702922

  12. Introduction to Lumbosacral and Sacropelvic Fixation Strategies.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Patrick C; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2016-07-01

    We are pleased to present this Neurosurgical Focus video supplement on lumbosacral and sacropelvic fixation strategies. Despite advancement in surgical techniques and technologies in spine, achieving consistent solid fusion across the lumbosacral junction remains a major challenge. The anatomy of the lumbosacral junction allows for a higher range of motion compared to other areas of the thoracolumbar spine. The L5-S1 interspace is exposed to significant shear forces. As a result, complications such as pseudoarthrosis, screw pull-out, implant fracture, or sacral fractures can occur. Complications are particularly seen in long fusion constructs ending across the lumbosacral junction. To reduce these complications, various lumbosacral and sacropelvic fixation techniques have been developed and utilized. The current supplement is intended to provide instructional videos that illustrate several current techniques for lumbosacral and sacropelvic fixation. The collection includes techniques for anterior L5-S1 interbody fusion, minimally invasive L5-S1 interbody fusions, lumbosacral pedicle screw placement, sacroiliac fusion, and sacro-alar-iliac screw placement. The authors of the videos in the supplement have provided detailed narration and video illustration to describe the nuances of the various open and minimally invasive techniques for lumbosacral and sacral-pelvic fixation. We are pleased to have such a collection of quality video illustration from experts in the field. It's been our privilege to serve as guest editors for this supplement and we believe that you will enjoy the contents of this supplement. PMID:27364425

  13. Postmortem inflation and fixation of human lungs

    PubMed Central

    Wright, B. M.; Slavin, G.; Kreel, L.; Callan, K.; Sandin, Brenda

    1974-01-01

    Wright, B. M., Slavin, G., Kreel, L., Callan, K., and Sandin, Brenda (1974).Thorax, 29, 189-194. Postmortem inflation and fixation of human lungs. A method of fixing lungs by inflating them with heated formalin vapour is described. This method facilitates postmortem correlations between radiographic and histological appearances. Images PMID:4598582

  14. Unfixing Design Fixation: From Cause to Computer Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Andy; Sarkar, Somwrita

    2011-01-01

    This paper argues that design fixation, in part, entails fixation at the level of meta-representation, the representation of the relation between a representation and its reference. In this paper, we present a mathematical model that mimics the idea of how fixation can occur at the meta-representation level. In this model, new abstract concepts…

  15. [Three-dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Biomechanical Effect of Rigid Fixation and Elastic Fixation on Lumbar Interbody Fusion].

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiangbo; Song, Yueming; Liu, Limin; Zhou, Chunguan; Yang, Xi

    2015-04-01

    This study was aimed to compare the mechanical characteristics under different physiological load conditions with three-dimensional finite element model of rigid fixation and elastic fixation in the lumbar. We observed the stress distribution characteristics of a sample of healthy male volunteer modeling under vertical, flexion and extension torque situation. The outcomes showed that there existed 4-6 times pressure on the connecting rod of rigid fixation compared with the elastic fixations under different loads, and the stress peak and area of force on elastic fixation were much higher than that of the rigid fixations. The elastic fixation has more biomechanical advantages than rigid fixation in promoting interbody lumbar fusion after surgery. PMID:26211247

  16. Development and application of compact piezoelectric ESWT devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginter, Siegfried; Krau, Werner; Bauer, Edgar; Dreyer, Thomas; Liebler, Marko

    2003-10-01

    The usage of shockwave devices permanently expands from initially lithotripsy to orthopedics and perhaps to drug-delivery in future applications. This demands more compact and cheaper but still powerful shockwave devices, which should generate reproducible sound fields and should be adjustable in some way to the special requirements of the therapy. Here several self-focusing piezoelectric transducers based on a double-layer piezo technology are presented. Sound field measurement results show that it is possible to obtain maximal peak pressure amplitudes from 58 to 132 MPa from small to medium sized sources with diameters of aperture ranging from 70 to 220 mm. The peak pressure amplitude and the amount of energy delivered to the focal region can be adjusted in a wide range. Clinical results demonstrate the therapeutic effectiveness for the treatment of orthopedic indications. These compact devices have the ability to meet the requirements of an extended range of therapeutic applications.

  17. OrthoEvidence™: A Clinical Resource for Evidence-Based Orthopedics

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Sheila; Smith, Chris; Bhandari, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of musculoskeletal issues in clinical practice, and the limited focus placed upon musculoskeletal conditions by current electronic summary resources, highlights the need for a resource that provides access to simple and concise summaries of top-quality orthopedic literature for orthopedic surgeons and allied healthcare professionals. OrthoEvidence™ is an online clinical resource that addresses the paucity of adequate evidence-based summary tools in the field of orthopedic surgery. OrthoEvidence™ uses a rigorous, transparent, and unique process to review, evaluate, and summarize high quality research studies and their implications for orthopedic clinical practice. Randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses are identified and reviewed by an expert medical writing team, who prepare Advanced Clinical Evidence (ACETM) reports: one or two detailed pages including critical appraisals and synopses of key research. These timely and targeted reports provide a clear understanding about the quality of evidence associated with each summarized study, and can be organized by users to identify trending information. OrthoEvidence™ allows members to use their time efficiently and to stay current by having access to a breadth of timely, high-quality research output. OrthoEvidence™ is easily accessible through the internet and is available at the point-of-care, which allows treating orthopedic surgeons and allied health professionals to easily practice the principles of evidence-based medicine within their clinical practices.. PMID:26330990

  18. Opioid use for Chronic Pain Management in Italy: Results from the Orthopedic Instant Pain Survey Project

    PubMed Central

    Fanelli, Guido; Cherubino, Paolo; Compagnone, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a common symptom in orthopedic patients, but is managed sub-optimally, partly due to scarce opioid use in severe cases. The aim of the Orthopedic Instant Pain Survey (POIS) was to evaluate changes in pain management in Italian orthopedic practice 2 years after a legislative change (Law 38/2010) simplifying opioid access for pain control. A web-based survey on the knowledge of this law and trends observed in clinical practice for severe pain treatment was administered to 143 Italian orthopedic specialists. In total, 101 (70%) respondents showed a high level of knowledge. Nevertheless, 54.5% stated that they do not use opioids for severe osteo-articular pain management. Main barriers to opioid use are fear of adverse events (61.4%), especially nausea/vomiting and constipation, and patient resistance (29.7%). A modest knowledge of pain classification was also demonstrated. Opioid use remains very limited in Italian orthopedic practice. Physicians’ fear of side effects showed poor knowledge of strategies for effective management of opioid-related adverse events, such as combined oral prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone. Continuing educational programs could improve delivery of evidence-based pain management. PMID:25002934

  19. Parametric study of orthopedic insole of valgus foot on partial foot amputation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun-Chao; Wang, Li-Zhen; Chen, Wei; Du, Cheng-Fei; Mo, Zhong-Jun; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic insole was important for partial foot amputation (PFA) to achieve foot balance and avoid foot deformity. The inapposite insole orthosis was thought to be one of the risk factors of reamputation for foot valgus patient, but biomechanical effects of internal tissues on valgus foot had not been clearly addressed. In this study, plantar pressure on heel and metatarsal regions of PFA was measured using F-Scan. The three-dimensional finite element (FE) model of partial foot evaluated different medial wedge angles (MWAs) (0.0°-10.0°) of orthopedic insole on valgus foot. The effect of orthopedic insole on the internal bone stress, the medial ligament tension of ankle, plantar fascia tension, and plantar pressure was investigated. Plantar pressure on medial heel region was about 2.5 times higher than that of lateral region based on the F-Scan measurements. FE-predicted results showed that the tension of medial ankle ligaments was the lowest, and the plantar pressure was redistributed around the heel, the first metatarsal, and the lateral longitudinal arch regions when MWA of orthopedic insole ranged from 7.5° to 8.0°. The plantar fascias maintained about 3.5% of the total load bearing on foot. However, the internal stresses from foot bones increased. The simulation in this study would provide the suggestion of guiding optimal design of orthopedic insole and therapeutic planning to pedorthist. PMID:26291149

  20. Retrograde intramedullary fixation of long bone fractures through ipsilateral traumatic amputation sites.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Scott C; Chi, Benjamin B; Gordon, Wade T; Potter, Benjamin K

    2015-06-01

    The technique of retrograde intramedullary fixation of fractures through open traumatic amputations has not been previously described. We performed a retrospective case series at a tertiary-care military hospital setting. Ten patients met inclusion criteria. All were male, and all were injured through improvised explosive device. Outcome measures included the incidence of fracture nonunion, osteomyelitis or acute infection, heterotopic ossification (HO), as well as successful prosthesis fitting and ambulation. Average time to fixation after injury and amputation closure was 11.7 and 12.2 days, respectively. Follow-up averaged 20.2 months. The radiographic union rate was 100%, and time to osseous union averaged 7.5 months. One patient had an amputation site infection requiring revision, but none of the nails was removed for infectious reasons. HO occurred in 7 patients, and 2 patients required revision for symptomatic HO. All patients were successfully fitted with prostheses and able to ambulate. To our knowledge, this is the only series in the literature to specifically describe retrograde intramedullary fixation of long bone fractures through the zone of traumatic amputation sites. The infectious risk is relatively low, whereas the union rate (100%) and successful prosthesis fitting are high. For patients with similar injuries, retrograde intramedullary fixation through the zone of amputation is a viable treatment option. PMID:25272202

  1. Assessment of specimen fixation in a surgical pathology service.

    PubMed Central

    Start, R. D.; Cross, S. S.; Smith, J. H.

    1992-01-01

    The quality of specimen fixation was examined within a routine diagnostic histopathology service. For each specimen the adequacy of fixation was assessed and the transit time between operating theatre and the laboratory was measured. Preliminary fixation was found to be inadequate in 25% of specimens and some form of manipulation to assist fixation was required in 36% of specimens. The mean transit time was 22 (SD 10.7) hours. Specimen fixation and transport are additional factors to consider in quality assurance of histopathology. PMID:1306049

  2. Dark Carbon Fixation: An Important Process in Lake Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Ana Lúcia; Bastviken, David; Gudasz, Cristian; Tranvik, Lars; Enrich-Prast, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Close to redox boundaries, dark carbon fixation by chemoautotrophic bacteria may be a large contributor to overall carbon fixation. Still, little is known about the relative importance of this process in lake systems, in spite the potentially high chemoautotrophic potential of lake sediments. We compared rates of dark carbon fixation, bacterial production and oxygen consumption in sediments from four Swedish boreal and seven tropical Brazilian lakes. Rates were highly variable and dark carbon fixation amounted up to 80% of the total heterotrophic bacterial production. The results indicate that non-photosynthetic carbon fixation can represent a substantial contribution to bacterial biomass production, especially in sediments with low organic matter content. PMID:23776549

  3. Assessment of visual fixation in vegetative and minimally conscious states

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Visual fixation plays a key role in the differentiation between vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness (VS/UWS) syndrome and minimally conscious state (MCS). However, the use of different stimuli changes the frequency of visual fixation occured in patients, thereby possibly affecting the accuracy of the diagnosis. In order to establish a standardized assessment of visual fixation in patients in disorders of consciousness (DOC), we compared the frequency of visual fixation elicited by mirror,a ball and a light. Method Visual fixation was assessed in eighty-one post-comatose patients diagnosed with a MCS or VS/UWS. Occurrence of fixation to different stimuli was analysis used Chi-square testing. Result 40 (49%) out of the 81 patients showed fixation to visual stimuli. Among those, significantly more patients (39, 48%) had visual fixation elicited by mirror compared to a ball (23, 28%) and mirror compared to a light (20, 25%). Conclusion The use of a mirror during the assessment of visual fixation showed higher positive response rate, compared to other stimuli in eliciting a visual fixating response. Therefore, fixation elicited by a mirror can be a very sensitive and accurate test to differentiate the two disorders of consciousness. PMID:25027769

  4. Computer navigation in orthopedic trauma: safer surgeries with less irradiation and more precision.

    PubMed

    Akins, Ralitsa; Abdelgawad, Amr A; Kanlic, Enes M

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of patients and practitioners to ionizing radiation for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes has become the norm rather than the exception. This article discusses the findings from a literature review of intraoperative risks from ionizing radiation to patients and surgeons and the validity of substituting the conventional intraoperative fluoroscopy with computer-assisted orthopedic surgery (CAOS) in orthopedic trauma surgery. Diversity of study designs and measurements exists in reporting intraoperative ionizing radiation, making direct study comparisons difficult. CAOS can effectively reduce the amount of radiation exposure. There are definite advantages and disadvantages for using CAOS in the field of orthopedic trauma. Implementation of CAOS may hold the answer to better patient and surgeon intraoperative radiation safety with decreased operative time and increased procedure precision. The increased safety for patients and surgeons is a critical consideration in recommending CAOS in trauma surgery. PMID:23327842

  5. Alternative procedures for reducing allogeneic blood transfusion in elective orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Kleinert, Kathrin; Theusinger, Oliver M; Nuernberg, Johannes; Werner, Clément M L

    2010-09-01

    Perioperative blood loss is a major problem in elective orthopedic surgery. Allogeneic transfusion is the standard treatment for perioperative blood loss resulting in low postoperative hemoglobin, but it has a number of well-recognized risks, complications, and costs. Alternatives to allogeneic blood transfusion include preoperative autologous donation and intraoperative salvage with postoperative autotransfusion. Orthopedic surgeons are often unaware of the different pre- and intraoperative possibilities of reducing blood loss and leave the management of coagulation and use of blood products completely to the anesthesiologists. The goal of this review is to compare alternatives to allogeneic blood transfusion from an orthopedic and anesthesia point of view focusing on estimated costs and acceptance by both parties. PMID:21886535

  6. Difficulties in the fixation of prostheses for voice rehabilitation after laryngectomy.

    PubMed

    Ten Hallers, E J O; Marres, H A M; Rakhorst, G; Hagen, R; Staffieri, A; Van Der Laan, B F A M; Van Der Houwen, E B; Verkerke, G J

    2005-08-01

    In most patients with advanced or recurrent laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer, total laryngectomy is indicated. This means the loss of three main functions: phonation; respiration; and the prevention of aspiration during deglutition. Laryngectomy patients have various options to restore phonation: an oesophageal voice; an electrolaryngeal voice; or a tracheo-oesophageal voice. In the last case a silicone rubber shunt valve is placed in the tracheo-oesophageal wall and phonation is generated when exhaled air is forced through the oesophagus and neopharynx. This method is widely applied in Western Europe. In this paper we review the literature on fixation problems with shunt valves, tracheostoma valves and heat and moisture exchange (HME) filters. Tracheo-oesophageal speech without a valve is not considered. Despite 22 years of experience with the implantation of tracheo-esophageal shunt valves and many improvements in the design, problems still remain, such as biofilm formation with subsequent leakage through the valve, the need for frequent and inconvenient replacements, fistula enlargement leading to leakage around the device and reduced fixation, and infections. The high cost of shunt valves is a drawback to their use worldwide. To enable hands-free speech, different types of tracheostoma valve have been developed. These valves are fixed to the skin or to the tracheostoma by means of an intra-tracheal device. An HME filter is used to protect the airway and maintain physiological balance. Such devices are only suitable for a selected group of patients as fixation to the skin or trachea can be a major problem. Speaking and coughing cause pressure increases, which often result in mucous leakage and disconnection of the valve and/or HME filter. Recommendations are made for future improvements in fixation techniques. PMID:16158525

  7. MRI analysis of the ISOBAR TTL internal fixation system for the dynamic fixation of intervertebral discs: a comparison with rigid internal fixation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we analyzed the efficacy of the posterior approach lumbar ISOBAR TTL internal fixation system for the dynamic fixation of intervertebral discs, with particular emphasis on its effects on degenerative intervertebral disc disease. Methods We retrospectively compared the MRIs of 54 patients who had previously undergone either rigid internal fixation of the lumbar spine or ISOBAR TTL dynamic fixation for the treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis. All patients had received preoperative and 6-, 12-, and 24-month postoperative MRI scans of the lumbar spine with acquisition of both routine and diffusion-weighted images (DWI). The upper-segment discs of the fusion were subjected to Pfirrmann grading, and the lumbar intervertebral discs in the DWI sagittal plane were manually drawn; the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value was measured. Results ADC values in the ISOBAR TTL dynamic fixation group measured at the 6-, 12-, and 24-month postoperative MRI studies were increased compared to the preoperative ADC values. The ADC values in the ISOBAR TTL dynamic fixation group at 24 months postoperatively were significantly different from the preoperative values (P < 0.05). At 24 months, the postoperative ADC values were significantly different between the rigid fixation group and the ISOBAR TTL dynamic fixation group (P < 0.05). Conclusion MRI imaging findings indicated that the posterior approach lumbar ISOBAR TTL internal fixation system can prevent or delay the degeneration of intervertebral discs. PMID:24898377

  8. [Bioabsorbable osteofixation devices].

    PubMed

    Iera, D; Haddad, A J; Sándor, G K B; Ashmmakhi, N

    2005-12-01

    There is continued interest in the development of new biomaterials. The application of new implantable biomaterials requires intense research and thorough evaluation. Much time and effort has been required to overcome the risks and problems associated with the bioabsorbable devices. For surgical bone fixation, these materials were investigated since the 1960's. Different polymer properties were explored to ensure adequate strength and biocompatibility. High-molecular-weight bioabsorbable polymers were initially used, followed by addition of reinforcement materials. The most recent materials are self-reinforced, small yet strong devices. The newer generations contain bioactive substances such as antibiotics and growth factors. Bioabsorbable materials are constantly changing as we try to adopt the principles of tissue engineering. Surgeons are using new techniques to exploit these polymers and their bioabsorbable properties. It is hoped that this multidisciplinary approach of surgery and research will continue to help the further evolution of biomaterial science. PMID:16181721

  9. The TROJAN Project: Creating a Customized International Orthopedic Training Program for Junior Doctors

    PubMed Central

    Kalraiya, Ashish; Buddhdev, Pranai

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal problems account for a vast proportion of presentations encountered by doctors globally, with figures ranging from 15-36%. However, the time medical schools allocate to learning orthopedics is by no means proportional to this. This study aims to bridge this gap by developing an international orthopedic teaching program tailored to the specific knowledge and skills required by junior doctors in different countries. This prospective study asked fifty junior doctors, who had recently completed an orthopedics job, what three orthopedic teaching topics taught retrospectively would have benefitted their clinical practice. The most requested topics were used to design educational workshops for junior doctors and these consequently comprised the TROJAN (Teaching Requested by Orthopaedic Juniors And Novices) training program. Data was collected from twenty-five junior doctors in KwaZulu-Natale State, South Africa, and twenty-five in London, UK. It is therefore in these two countries that the TROJAN program was subsequently made available. Participants who selected topics were within two years of graduating medical school and had worked an orthopedic or Accident and Emergency job within the last year. 49% of topics chosen by SA doctors were practical skills such as wrist and ankle fracture reduction techniques, and management of open fractures. The most requested topic by UK doctors (11 out of 25) was management of neck of femur fractures. This is rationalized by the fact South African doctors require more hands-on responsibility in their daily practice whereas in the UK greater emphasis is placed on optimizing patients for theatre and making sound management plans. TROJAN currently develops orthopedic skills and knowledge in junior doctors in South Africa and United Kingdom with teaching customized based upon location. Feedback has been exceptionally positive with every candidate thus far rating the usefulness of TROJAN as the highest option, very useful

  10. High Disparity Between Orthopedic Resident Interest and Participation in International Health Electives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Steven; Shultz, Paul; Daniels, Alan; Ackelman, Edward; Kamal, Robin N

    2016-07-01

    Few orthopedic surgical residency programs offer international health electives (IHEs). Efforts to expand these programs have been increasing across medical disciplines. Whether orthopedic residents will participate remains unknown. This study quantified and characterized orthopedic resident interest and barriers to IHEs in US residency programs. A web-based survey was administered to residents from 154 US orthopedic residency programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education 2014 to 2015. Questions assessed demographics and program background, previous medical experience abroad, barriers to participation, and level of interest in participating in an international health elective during their training and beyond. Twenty-seven (17.5%) residency programs responded. Chi-square analysis showed that residents who expressed interest in participating were significantly more likely to have experience abroad compared with those who expressed no interest (P<.004). Analysis using Mann-Whitney U test suggested that those who expressed interest were more likely to believe IHEs are important to resident training (P<.0011; mean Likert scale score of 3.7 vs 2.6), provide valuable experience (P<.001; mean Likert scale score of 4.2 vs 3.2), and should be required for orthopedic residencies (P<.001; mean Likert scale score of 2.8 vs 1.9). Residents are strongly interested in participating in IHEs during their training, and many may integrate global health into future practices. Residents perceive lack of funding and scheduling flexibility as barriers preventing them from participating. Prior experience abroad influences level of interest, and international clinical experience may enhance future perception of its value. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e680-e686.]. PMID:27111074

  11. Thirty-Day Readmission Rates in Orthopedics: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bernatz, James T.; Tueting, Jonathan L.; Anderson, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospital readmission rates are being used to evaluate performance. A survey of the present rates is needed before policies can be developed to decrease incidence of readmission. We address three questions: What is the present rate of 30-day readmission in orthopedics? How do factors such as orthopedic specialty, data source, patient insurance, and time of data collection affect the 30-day readmission rate? What are the causes and risk factors for 30-day readmissions? Methods/Findings A review was first registered with Prospero (CRD42014010293, 6/17/2014) and a meta-analysis was performed to assess the current 30-day readmission rate in orthopedics. Studies published after 2006 were retrieved, and 24 studies met the inclusion criteria. The 30-day readmission rate was extrapolated from each study along with the orthopedic subspecialty, data source, patient insurance, time of collection, patient demographics, and cause of readmission. A sensitivity analysis was completed on the stratified groups. The overall 30-day readmission rate across all orthopedics was 5.4 percent (95% confidence interval: 4.8,6.0). There was no significant difference between subspecialties. Studies that retrieved data from a multicenter registry had a lower 30-day readmission rate than those reporting data from a single hospital or a large national database. Patient populations that only included Medicare patients had a higher 30-day readmission rate than populations of all insurance. The 30-day readmission rate has decreased in the past ten years. Age, length of stay, discharge to skilled nursing facility, increased BMI, ASA score greater than 3, and Medicare/Medicaid insurance showed statistically positive correlation with increased 30-day readmissions in greater than 75 percent of studies. Surgical site complications accounted for 46 percent of 30-day readmissions. Conclusions This meta-analysis shows the present rate of 30-day readmissions in orthopedics. Demonstrable

  12. Risk Factors for the Postoperative Transfusion of Allogeneic Blood in Orthopedics Patients With Intraoperative Blood Salvage

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jia-Hua; Lyu, Yi; Cheng, Li-Ming; Li, Ying-Chuan; Gou, Da-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to explore the risk factors affecting the postoperative transfusion of allogeneic blood in patients undergoing orthopedics surgery with intraoperative blood salvage (IBS). A retrospective study of 279 patients undergoing orthopedic surgeries with IBS from May 2013 to May 2015 was enrolled. The binary logistic regression was used to find out the risk factors associated with postoperative transfusion of allogeneic blood in orthopedics patients with IBS, and then receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn to determine the optimal threshold of the regression model. Single factor analysis showed that age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade, preoperative hemoglobin, operation time, received autologous blood, the laying time of autologous blood, bleeding volume, and postoperative drainage volume had significant effects on postoperative allogeneic blood transfusion. In binary logistic regression analysis, the independent factors predicting orthopedic patients with IBS need to transfuse allogeneic blood after surgeries were age (odds ratio [OR] = 0.415, P = 0.006), ASA grade (OR = 2.393, P = 0.035), preoperative hemoglobin (OR = 0.532, P = 0.022), and postoperative drainage volume (OR = 4.279, P = 0.000). The area under ROC curve was 0.79 and the predicted accuracy rate of the model was 81.58%. After operation, the orthopedic patients with IBS still have a high allogeneic blood transfusion rate, and IBS is not a perfect blood protection method. The logistic regression model of our study provides a reliable prediction for postoperative transfusion of allogeneic blood in orthopedic patients with IBS, which have a certain reference value. PMID:26937919

  13. Extra Corporeal Fixation of Fractured Mandibular Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy K, Vandana; Kengagsubbiah, Srivatsa; V, Sathyabhama; Priya, Vishnu

    2014-01-01

    Condylar fracture is the second most common site in the mandibular fractures. Motor vehicle accident and fall are the major causes of such fractures. Because of the anatomical weakness of the condyle and the shape of the condylar head the antero-medial dislocation of the condyle is common. Open reduction and closed reduction is always debatable. The open reduction will bring back the normal function much earlier than closed reduction. Medially dislocated condylar fracture fragments are always managed with open method. In superior or high condylar fractures,exact reduction with conventional open reduction can be difficult due to the limited surgical and visual fields. In such cases extracorporeal fixation of condyle using vertical ramus osteotomy may be better choice to achieve perfect alignment and absolute maintaince of vertical height of the ramus and facial symmetry. We here present a case of extracorporeal fixation of unilateral left high condylar fracture. PMID:25386546

  14. Do Astronauts have a Higher Rate of Orthopedic Shoulder Conditions than a Cohort of Working Professionals?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Mitzi S.; Murray, Jocelyn D.; Young, Millenia; Wear, Mary L.; Tarver, W. J.; Van Baalen, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Occupational surveillance of astronaut shoulder injuries began with operational concerns at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) during Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) training. NASA has implemented several occupational health initiatives during the past 20 years to decrease the number and severity of injuries, but the individual success rate is unknown. Orthopedic shoulder injury and surgery rates were calculated, but classifying the rates as normal, high or low was highly dependent on the comparison group. The purpose of this study was to identify a population of working professionals and compare orthopedic shoulder consultation and surgery rates.

  15. Third year Evaluation of a Model Home-Based Program for Severely Orthopedically Impaired/Mentally Retarded Children & Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meehan, Merrill L.

    The Orthopedic Homebound Program was meant to prevent the institutionalization of orthopedically impaired, mentally retarded children and to involve parents in their training. The program was proposed and managed by the Shawnee Hills Community Mental Health/Mental Retardation Center in rural West Virginia. Each child's developmental needs were…

  16. Effectiveness of external fixator combined with T-plate internal fixation for the treatment of comminuted distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Han, L R; Jin, C X; Yan, J; Han, S Z; He, X B; Yang, X F

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy between external fixator combined with palmar T-plate internal fixation and simple plate internal fixation for the treatment of comminuted distal radius fractures. A total of 61 patients classified as type C according to the AO/ASIF classification underwent surgery for comminuted distal radius fractures. There were 54 and 7 cases of closed and open fractures, respectively. Moreover, 19 patients received an external fixator combined with T-plate internal fixation, and 42 received simple plate internal fixation. All patients were treated successfully during 12-month postoperative follow-up. The follow-up results show that the palmar flexion and dorsiflexion of the wrist, radial height, and palmar angle were significantly better in those treated with the external fixator combined with T-plate compared to those treated with the simple plate only (P < 0.05); however, there were no significant differences in radial-ulnar deviation, wrist range of motion, or wrist function score between groups (P > 0.05). Hence, the effectiveness of external fixator combined with T-plate internal fixation for the treatment of comminuted distal radius fractures was satisfactory. Patients sufficiently recovered wrist, forearm, and hand function. In conclusion, compared to the simple T-plate, the external fixator combined with T-plate internal fixation can reduce the possibility of the postoperative re-shifting of broken bones and keep the distraction of fractures to maintain radial height and prevent radial shortening. PMID:25867441

  17. Patient Satisfaction After Limb Lengthening With Internal and External Devices.

    PubMed

    Landge, Vikrant; Shabtai, Lior; Gesheff, Martin; Specht, Stacy C; Herzenberg, John E

    2015-01-01

    External fixation has long been used for limb lengthening but can result in many complications, such as tethering of the soft tissues, pain, decreased joint motion, scarring, and nerve injury. Recently, a controllable, telescopic, internal lengthening nail was developed to address many of these issues and hopefully improve the overall experience for the patient. The satisfaction rates of internal and external fixation for limb lengthening were compared in 16 patients, all of whom have experienced both methods. Thirteen out of 16 patients responded to a limb-lengthening questionnaire, developed by the authors for this patient population. Patients preferred the internal device with respect to overall satisfaction, reduced pain, ease of physical therapy, and better cosmetic appearance. When asked which device they would prefer if another surgery was required, all patients chose the internal device. From the patients' perspective, the internal lengthening device is an improvement over the traditional external fixator. PMID:26688988

  18. [The construction of a medical discipline and its challenges: Orthopedics in Switzerland during the 19th and 20th centuries].

    PubMed

    Kaba, Mariama

    2015-07-01

    During the 19th century, numerous figures, with different qualifications, claimed to practice orthopedics: doctors, surgeons, inventors of equipment and instruments, and other empiricists. They performed certain types of techniques, massages, surgical operationsand/or fitted prostheses. The polysemous notion of orthopedics had created conflicts of interest that would reach their height at the end of the 19th century. The integration of orthopedics into the training at the university level enhanced its proximity to surgery, a discipline that has dominated the so-called modern medicine. During the 20th century, various medical branches defend the legitimacy of certain orthopedic practices, thereby threating to a degree the title itself of this specialization. By examining the challenges that have shaped the history of orthopedics in Switzerland, this article also seeks to shed light on the strategies that were implemented in adopting a medical and technical discipline within a transforming society. PMID:26111839

  19. A magnetorheological fluid based orthopedic active knee brace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zite, Jamaal L.; Ahmadkhanlou, Farzad; Neelakantan, Vijay A.; Washington, Gregory N.

    2006-03-01

    The disadvantage of current knee braces ranges from high cost for customization to a loss in physical mobility and limited rehabilitative value. One approach to solving this problem is to use a Magnetorheological (MR) device to make the knee brace have a controllable resistance. Our design solution is to replace the manufacturer's joint with an rotary MR fluid based shear damper. The device is designed based on a maximum yield stress, a corresponding magnetic field, a torque and the MR fluid viscosity. The analytical and experimental results show the advantages and the feasibility of using the proposed MR based controllable knee braces.

  20. One Month Old Neglected Lisfrancs Fracture Dislocation Treated with Wagner’s External Fixator and Percutaneous Screw Fixation : A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Dinesh R; Khadabadi, Nikhil A; Putti, Babu B; Jatti, Ravi S

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Lisfrancs Fracture dislocation is not commonly seen and it often goes missed leading to numerous complications. We present a case of neglected Lisfrancs fracture dislocation who presented after 1 month and its management. Case Report: A 27-year-old man came with the complaints of pain and swelling of the right foot following a fall from a motorcycle 1 month back. On Radiographic evaluation it showed presence Lisfrancs fracture Dislocation with comminuted fracture of the proximal phalanx of the great toe and distal fibula fracture. Closed reduction was attempted initially which was unsuccessful and was followed by open reduction which also failed. Reduction was then achieved using Wagner’s external fixation distractor device and supplemented with percutaneously passed screws. The external fixator was continued for 3 weeks followed by below knee cast for 6 weeks. The patient regained normal gait and returned to work and his previous physical activity level without recurrent dislocation. Conclusion: This report highlights the necessity of prompt open reduction and the need of external fixation to achieve and maintain reduction in case of neglected cases. We advocate this approach to achieve reduction in neglected cases where open reduction is unsuccessful. PMID:27298958

  1. Selective laser sintering of calcium phosphate materials for orthopedic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Goonhee

    control of micro and macro pore structure, to maximize bone healing and provide sufficient mechanical strength. It also permits the complete removal of the polymeric binders that are resided in the SLS process. In collaboration with the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and BioMedical Enterprises, Inc., porous implants based on anatomical geometry have been successfully implanted in rabbits and dogs. These histologic animal studies reveal excellent biocompatibility and show its great potential for commercial custom-fit implant manufacture. The second research effort involves fabrication of fully dense bone for application in dental restoration and load-bearing orthopedic functions. Calcium phosphate glass melts, proven to be biocompatible in the first effort, were cast into carbon molds. Processes were developed for preparing the molds. These carbon molds of anatomic shape can be prepared from either Computer Numerical Control (CNC) milling of slab stock or SLS processing of thermoset-coated graphite powder. The CNC milling method provides accurate dimension of the molds in a short period of time, however, the capable geometries are limited; generally two pieces of molds are required for complex shapes. The SLS method provides very complex shape green molds. However, they need to go through pyrolysis of thermoset binder to provide the high temperature capability reached at calcium phosphate melt temperatures (1100°C) and noticeable shrinkage was observed during pyrolysis. The cast glass was annealed to develop polycrystalline calcium phosphate. This process also exhibits great potential.

  2. Retrospective Comparison of Percutaneous Fixation and Volar Internal Fixation of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Calderón, Santiago A.; Doornberg, Job N.

    2007-01-01

    A change in the practice of a single surgeon provided an opportunity for retrospective comparison of comparable cohorts treated with percutaneous fixation (17 patients) or a volar plate and screws (23 patients) an average of 30 months after surgery. The final evaluation was performed according to the Gartland and Werley and Mayo rating systems and the DASH questionnaire. There were no significant differences on the average scores for the percutaneous and volar plating groups, respectively: Gartland and Werley, 4 vs 5; Mayo, 82 vs 83; and DASH score 13 for both cohorts. Motion, grip, and radiographical parameters were likewise comparable. Volar internal plate and screw fixation can achieve results comparable to percutaneous fixation techniques in the treatment of fractures of the distal radius. PMID:18780085

  3. Internal fixation of distal tibiofibular syndesmotic injuries: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Ma, Xin; Wang, Xu; Huang, Jiazhang; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Li

    2013-09-01

    No consensus had been reached about the optimal method for syndesmotic fixation. The present study analysed syndesmotic fixation based on the highest level of clinical evidence in order to obtain more reliable results. Medline, Embase and Cochrane database were searched through the OVID retrieval engine. Manual searching was undertaken afterward to identify additional studies. Only randomized controlled trials (RCT) and prospective comparative studies were selected for final inclusion. Study screening and data extraction were completed independently by two reviewers. All study characteristics were summarized into a table. The extracted data were used for data analysis. Twelve studies were finally included: six of them were RCTs, two were quasi-randomized studies and four were prospective comparative studies. Four comparisons with traditional metallic screw were identified in terms of bioabsorbable screws, tricortical fixation method, suture-button device as well as non-fixation choice in low syndesmotic injuries. Both absorbable screws and the tricortical fixation method showed almost no better results than traditional quadricortical metallic screw (p > 0.05). Additionally, existing studies could not illustrate their efficiency of reducing hardware removal rate. The suture button technique had significantly better functional score (p = 0.003), ankle motion (p = 0.02), time to full weightbearing (p < 0.0001) and much less complications (p = 0.0008) based on short and intermediate term follow-up data. Transfixation in low syndesmotic injuries showed poorer results than the non fixed group in all outcome measurements, but didn't reach a significant level (p > 0.05). The present evidence still couldn't find superior performance of the bioabsorbable screw and tricortical fixation method. Their true effects in decreasing second operation rate need further specific studies. Better results of the suture-button made it a promising technique, but it still needs long

  4. A Novel Method of Head Fixation for the Study of Rodent Facial Function

    PubMed Central

    Hadlock, Tessa; Kowaleski, Jeffrey; Mackinnon, Susan; Heaton, James T.

    2007-01-01

    The rodent vibrissial system offers an excellent model for the study of both sensory and motor function. It has been widely employed to gather data pertaining to sensory and motor function involving the 5th and 7th cranial nerves and the central nervous system. Existing methods of head fixation for precise measurements of ocular and vibrissial function involve exposing the cranium and applying dental cement from which two or more threaded rods emerge. This common approach is suboptimal, requiring a relatively complicated implantation procedure, and results in a large, chronic interface between the scalp and environmentally-exposed implant material attached to the skull. Here we describe a head fixation device that is inexpensive, easy to build, less prone to infection, preserves access to the cranial midline, and permits repeated measurements over many months. PMID:17397835

  5. The mechanical performance of the standard Hoffmann-Vidal external fixation apparatus.

    PubMed

    Briggs, B T; Chao, E Y

    1982-04-01

    A standard Hoffmann-Vidal quadrilateral fixation system for tibial fractures was analyzed using different geometric and material variations of the basic configuration. The fixation stiffness properties were quantitated to provide objective comparison. The results have shown that the bone-pin interface is the least-stiff link in the entire structure, particularly under the anterior-posterior bending mode. Rigidity of the device can be substantially improved by increasing the number of pins, using full threaded pins with a larger diameter, decreasing side connecting-rod distances, and increasing pin-separation distances in each pin group. Symmetrical tightening of the compression screws by hand is sufficient to produce compression of bone at the fracture site. The use of titanium pins tends to reduce stiffness, but using a frame made of titanium can significantly decrease the weight of the apparatus without decreasing its stiffness. PMID:7068699

  6. Periprosthetic femoral fractures around well fixed implants: a simple method of fixation using LC-DCP with trochanteric purchase.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ramesh; Prasad, Prabhudev; Kumar, Senthil; Nagi, Onkarnath

    2007-04-01

    Periprosthetic fractures of the femur are among the most serious complications in hip surgery. Various classifications have been suggested. At present the Vancouver classification system probably comes closest to the ideal. Most authors recommend internal fixation of the fractures in well-fixed implants (Vancouver type B1). However as the fixation to the proximal fragment has always been a problem, many types of fixation devices have been used. This retrospective study was done to evaluate the efficacy of an LC-DCP with trochanteric purchase, in the fixation of Vancouver type B1 periprosthetic femoral fractures. Our study included 12 patients, 7 male and 5 female with a mean age of 73 years (range: 57 to 91). One patient died due to complications not related to surgery and in another patient the plate was found broken with a loose implant, which was revised. All cases were primary arthroplasties. A long broad LC-DCP was used for the fixation. Purchase in the proximal fragment was obtained with screws in the greater trochanter. Ten fractures united in an average period of 7 months. The mean duration of follow-up was 6.5 years. The final results were evaluated using the Harris hip score. The mean Harris hip score was 85 with a range of 75 to 94. PMID:17515232

  7. Late orthopedic effects in children with Wilms' tumor treated with abdominal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rate, W.R.; Butler, M.S.; Robertson, W.W. Jr.; D'Angio, G.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Between 1970 and 1984, 31 children with biopsy-proven Wilms' tumor received nephrectomy, chemotherapy, and abdominal irradiation and were followed beyond skeletal maturity. Three patients (10%) developed late orthopedic abnormalities requiring intervention. Ten children received orthovoltage irradiation, and all cases requiring orthopedic intervention or developing a scoliotic curve of greater than 20 degrees were confined to this group, for a complication frequency of 50%. Those children who developed a significant late orthopedic abnormality (SLOA) as defined were treated to a higher median dose (2,890 cGy) and a larger field size (150 cm2) than those who did not (2,580 cGy and 120 cm2). Age at irradiation, sex, and initial stage of disease did not appear to influence the risk of developing an SLOA. No child who received megavoltage irradiation developed an SLOA despite treatment up to 4,000 cGy or to field sizes of 400 cm2. We conclude that modern radiotherapy techniques rarely lead to significant late orthopedic abnormalities previously associated with abdominal irradiation in children with Wilms' tumor.

  8. The Physical Fitness of Sensory and Orthopedically Impaired Youth: Project UNIQUE. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winnick, Joseph P.; Short, Francis X.

    The report summarizes findings from an examination of the physical fitness of orthopedically and sensory impaired students (10-17 years old). Physical fitness was hypothesized to include six areas: body composition, muscular strength/endurance, speed, agility, flexibility, and cardiorespiratory endurance. A chapter on methods details subject…

  9. A Survey on Transfusion Status in Orthopedic Surgery at a Trauma Center

    PubMed Central

    Soleimanha, Mehran; Haghighi, Mohammad; Mirbolook, Ahmadreza; Sedighinejad, Abbas; Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Naderi-Nabi, Bahram; Chavoshi, Tahereh; Mehrnoosh, Mehrnoosh Ghandili

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increased costs and mortality associated with inappropriate blood transfusions have led to investigations about blood request and blood transfusion techniques. We investigated the transfusion status in patients who underwent orthopedic surgery in Poursina Hospital (Rasht, Iran) to optimizing blood usage and determine if a scheduled transfusion program for every orthopedic surgery could improve blood transfusion management. Method: In this descriptive-prospective study, all orthopedic surgeries in Poursina Hospital, Rasht, between April to June 2013 were reviewed. All patient information was recorded, including: demographics, type of surgery, hemoglobin level, cross-match test, duration of surgery, and blood loss, and transfusion. Based on the one-way ANOVA and independent samples test analysis, cross-match to transfusion ratio and transfusion possibility, the transfusion index, and maximal surgical blood order schedule were calculated to determine blood transfusion status. Results: Among 872 selected orthopedic surgery candidates, 318 of them were cross-matched and among those, 114 patients received a blood transfusion. In this study, the cross-match to transfusion ratio was 6.4, transfusion possibility 36.47%, transfusion index 0.6, and maximal surgical blood order schedule 0.9. Conclusion: We found that blood ordering was moderately higher than the standard; so it is highly recommended to focus on the knowledge of evidence based on transfusion and standard guidelines for blood transfusion to avoid over-ordering. PMID:26894223

  10. An Evaluation Design for the Educational Programs for Pupils Who Are Orthopedically Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Programs for the Handicapped.

    The booklet provides forms for the teacher of the orthopedically handicapped to use in systematically collecting data and designing an appropriate educational blueprint for each student. Pupil development assessment sheets include columns for recording assessment date, date of mastery, level of achievement, and comments for each behavioral…

  11. The Effect of Orthopedic Advertising and Self-Promotion on a Naïve Population.

    PubMed

    Mohney, Stephen; Lee, Daniel J; Elfar, John C

    2016-01-01

    There has been a marked increase in the number of physicians marketing themselves directly to patients and consumers. However, it is unclear how different promotional styles affect patients' perceptions of their physicians. We hypothesized that self-promoting orthopedic surgeons enjoy a more positive impact on nonphysician patients as compared to non-self-promoting surgeons, as well as a corresponding negative impact on their peer-surgeons. Surgeon websites were selected from the 5 largest population centers in the United States. Subjects with varying degrees of familiarity with orthopedic surgery evaluated Internet profiles of surgeons on a forced choice Likert scale to measure the amount of self-promotion. The naïve subjects judged self-promoting surgeons more favorably than the orthopedic surgeons. In contrast, board-certified orthopedic surgeons viewed self-promoting surgeons more negatively than did their nonphysician counterparts. In summary, the present study revealed that the potential for self-promotion to unduly influence potential patients is real and should be a considerable concern to surgeons, patients, and the profession. PMID:27327932

  12. Orthopedic Surgery in Rural American Hospitals: A Survey of Rural Hospital Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weichel, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Rural American residents prefer to receive their medical care locally. Lack of specific medical services in the local community necessitates travel to a larger center which is less favorable. This study was done to identify how rural hospitals choose to provide orthopedic surgical services to their communities. Methods: All hospitals in 5 states…

  13. Social Networking as a Tool for Lifelong Learning with Orthopedically Impaired Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ersoy, Metin; Güneyli, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses how Turkish Cypriot orthopedically impaired learners who are living in North Cyprus use social networking as a tool for leisure and education, and to what extent they satisfy their personal development needs by means of these digital platforms. The case study described, conducted in North Cyprus in 2015 followed a qualitative…

  14. Aging and orthopedics: how a lifespan development model can inform practice and research

    PubMed Central

    Gautreau, Sylvia; Gould, Odette N.; Forsythe, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic surgical care, like all health care today, is in flux owing to an aging population and to chronic medical conditions leading to an increased number of people with illnesses that need to be managed over the lifespan. The result is an ongoing shift from curing acute illnesses to the management and care of chronic illness and conditions. Theoretical models that provide a useful and feasible vision for the future of health care and health care research are needed. This review discusses how the lifespan development model used in some disciplines within the behavioural sciences can be seen as an extension of the biopsychosocial model. We posit that the lifespan development model provides useful perspectives for both orthopedic care and research. We present key concepts and recommendations, and we discuss how the lifespan development model can contribute to new and evolving perspectives on orthopedic outcomes and to new directions for research. We also offer practical guidelines on how to implement the model in orthopedic practice. PMID:27240129

  15. The Effectiveness of Active and Traditional Teaching Techniques in the Orthopedic Assessment Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nottingham, Sara; Verscheure, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Active learning is a teaching methodology with a focus on student-centered learning that engages students in the educational process. This study implemented active learning techniques in an orthopedic assessment laboratory, and the effects of these teaching techniques. Mean scores from written exams, practical exams, and final course evaluations…

  16. Combined regional and general anesthesia for ambulatory peripheral orthopedic surgery in children.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Claudine E L; Dagher, Christine; Ghanem, Ismat; Naccache, Nicole; Jawish, Dolly; Yazbeck, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Pediatric orthopedic surgery is rarely done in an outpatient setting because of the postoperative pain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the children's comfort and parents' satisfaction after ambulatory peripheral pediatric orthopedic surgery performed under general anesthesia combined with regional anesthesia (RA). Sixty consecutive children were enrolled in this prospective study. All children fulfilled inclusion criteria for outpatient and for RA and parents received proper information regarding their child postoperative care. Postoperative pain control was sustained for 48 h using routine paracetamol, ibuprofen, and oral tramadol if needed. A telephone survey was conducted on day 1 and day 2 to evaluate pain scores, limb motor function, occurrence of postoperative nausea and vomiting, and feeding, sleep or play disturbance. The parents were also asked about their overall satisfaction rate and the choice of ambulatory mode versus inpatient admission in case of future orthopedic procedure. A total of 34 soft tissue procedures and 26 bony procedures were performed. 63.3% recovered motor function before discharge from the postanesthesia care unit. Low pain scores and good postoperative comfort were observed. Parents' satisfaction was greater than eight out of 10 in 88.3% of the cases, and 85% of the parents would choose ambulatory surgery in case of a second procedure. RA used with level I or II analgesics is compatible with ambulatory peripheral pediatric orthopedic surgery. Resulting good analgesia and postoperative comfort render the ambulatory mode to be favored by the parents. PMID:19020468

  17. A Prototype Robotic Arm for Use by Severely Orthopedically Handicapped Students. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Richard

    This 18-month pilot project, which ran from October 1, 1987 to March 31, 1989, developed a prototype robotic arm for educational use by students with severe orthopedic disabilities in the Columbus (Ohio) Public Schools. The developmental effort was intended first, to provide direct access to currently available instructional materials and, second,…

  18. Stem Cells in Orthopedics: A Comprehensive Guide for the General Orthopedist.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, Bryan M; Kuhns, Benjamin D; Weber, Alexander E; Yanke, Adam; Nho, Shane J

    2016-01-01

    The use of biologic adjuvants in the treatment of operative and nonoperative orthopedic injuries continues to expand in concert with our understanding of the acute and chronic healing process of musculoskeletal injuries. Stem cell treatments in orthopedics are among the most commonly explored options, and have found varying levels of success in promoting osseous and soft tissue healing. Basic science and translational studies have demonstrated the potential for broad application of stem cells in the treatment of a growing number of musculoskeletal injuries. Emerging clinical studies have also provided promising results, although the vast majority of studies have featured small sample sizes and limited duration of follow-up. In addition, a number of important questions remain regarding the clinical safety, treatment delivery, and overall efficacy of stem cell augmentation of injured tissue in orthopedics. The objective of the current review is to present a broad overview of the current state of stem cell treatments in orthopedic surgery, with an emphasis on soft tissue healing. This review of stem cell treatment covers the basic science behind biologic augmentation, advantages of the various stem cell sources, preclinical results, and current and future clinical applications. PMID:27552451

  19. Perceptions of Practice Problems Encountered by Family Physicians, Pediatricians, and Orthopedic Surgeons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Gang; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Information about practice problems was solicited through a structured questionnaire completed by 59 family physicians, 101 pediatricians, and 102 orthopedic surgeons. Across all three groups, a lack of personal time was the major concern. Practice concerns vary among the specialties, a finding of interest to physician education. (SLD)

  20. Enhanced osteoblast adhesion on nanostructured selenium compacts for anti-cancer orthopedic applications

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Phong; Webster, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    Metallic bone implants possess numerous problems limiting their long-term efficacy, such as poor prolonged osseointegration, stress shielding, and corrosion under in vivo environments. Such problems are compounded for bone cancer patients since numerous patients receive orthopedic implants after cancerous bone resection. Unfortunately, current orthopedic materials were not originally developed to simultaneously increase healthy bone growth (as in traditional orthopedic implant applications) while inhibiting cancerous bone growth. The long-term objective of the present research is to investigate the use of nano-rough selenium to prevent bone cancer from re-occurring while promoting healthy bone growth for this select group of cancer patients. Selenium is a well known anti-cancer chemical. However, what is not known is how healthy bone cells interact with selenium. To determine this, selenium, spherical or semispherical shots, were pressed into cylindrical compacts and these compacts were then etched using 1N NaOH to obtain various surface structures ranging from the micron, submicron to nano scales. Changes in surface chemistry were also analyzed. Through these etching techniques, results of this study showed that biologically inspired surface roughness values were created on selenium compacts to match that of natural bone roughness. Moreover, results showed that healthy bone cell adhesion increased with greater nanometer selenium roughness (more closely matching that of titanium). In this manner, this study suggests that nano-rough selenium should be further tested for orthopedic applications involving bone cancer treatment. PMID:18990948