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Sample records for oryzae catechol oxidase

  1. Platinum Nanoparticles: Efficient and Stable Catechol Oxidase Mimetics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Wu, Haohao; Chong, Yu; Wamer, Wayne G; Xia, Qingsu; Cai, Lining; Nie, Zhihong; Fu, Peter P; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2015-09-01

    Although enzyme-like nanomaterials have been extensively investigated over the past decade, most research has focused on the peroxidase-like, catalase-like, or SOD-like activity of these nanomaterials. Identifying nanomaterials having oxidase-like activities has received less attention. In this study, we demonstrate that platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) exhibit catechol oxidase-like activity, oxidizing polyphenols into the corresponding o-quinones. Four unique approaches are employed to demonstrate the catechol oxidase-like activity exerted by Pt NPs. First, UV-vis spectroscopy is used to monitor the oxidation of polyphenols catalyzed by Pt NPs. Second, the oxidized products of polyphenols are identified by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) separation followed by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) identification. Third, electron spin resonance (ESR) oximetry techniques are used to confirm the O2 consumption during the oxidation reaction. Fourth, the intermediate products of semiquinone radicals formed during the oxidation of polyphenols are determined by ESR using spin stabilization. These results indicate Pt NPs possess catechol oxidase-like activity. Because polyphenols and related bioactive substances have been explored as potent antioxidants that could be useful for the prevention of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, and Pt NPs have been widely used in the chemical industry and medical science, it is essential to understand the potential effects of Pt NPs for altering or influencing the antioxidant activity of polyphenols. PMID:26305170

  2. Tyrosinase versus Catechol Oxidase: One Asparagine Makes the Difference.

    PubMed

    Solem, Even; Tuczek, Felix; Decker, Heinz

    2016-02-01

    Tyrosinases mediate the ortho-hydroxylation and two-electron oxidation of monophenols to ortho-quinones. Catechol oxidases only catalyze the oxidation of diphenols. Although it is of significant interest, the origin of the functional discrimination between tyrosinases and catechol oxidases has been unclear. Recently, it has been postulated that a glutamate and an asparagine bind and activate a conserved water molecule towards deprotonation of monophenols. Here we demonstrate for the first time that a polyphenoloxidase, which exhibits only diphenolase activity, can be transformed to a tyrosinase by mutation to introduce an asparagine. The asparagine and a conserved glutamate are necessary to properly orient the conserved water in order to abstract a proton from the monophenol. These results provide direct evidence for the crucial importance of a proton shuttle for tyrosinase activity of type 3 copper proteins, allowing a consistent understanding of their different chemical reactivities. PMID:26773413

  3. Structural and spectroscopic studies of a model for catechol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah J; Noble, Christopher J; Palmer, Randahl C; Hanson, Graeme R; Schenk, Gerhard; Gahan, Lawrence R; Riley, Mark J

    2008-05-01

    A binuclear copper complex, [Cu2(BPMP) (OAc)2][ClO4] x H2O, has been prepared using the binucleating ligand 2,6-bis[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethylamino)methyl]-4-methylphenol (H-BPMP). The X-ray crystal structure reveals the copper centers to have a five-coordinate square pyramidal geometry, with the acetate ligands bound terminally. The bridging phenolate occupies the apical position of the square-based pyramids and magnetic susceptibility, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and variable-temperature variable-field magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) measurements indicate that the two centers are very weakly antiferromagnetically coupled (J = -0.6 cm(-1)). Simulation of the dipole-dipole-coupled EPR spectrum showed that in solution the Cu-O-Cu angle was increased from 126 degrees to 160 degrees and that the internuclear distance was larger than that observed crystallographically. The high-resolution spectroscopic information obtained has been correlated with a detailed ligand-field analysis to gain insight into the electronic structure of the complex. Symmetry arguments have been used to demonstrate that the sign of the MCD is characteristic of the tetragonally elongated environment. The complex also displays catecholase activity (k(cat) = 15 +/- 1.5 min(-1), K(M) = 6.4 +/- 1.8 mM), which is compared with other dicopper catechol oxidase models. PMID:18188615

  4. Purification and spectroscopic studies on catechol oxidase from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis).

    PubMed

    Rompel, Annette; Bldt-Karentzopoulos, Klaudia; Molitor, Christian; Krebs, Bernt

    2012-09-01

    A catechol oxidase from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) moCO which only catalyzes the oxidation of catechols to quinones without hydroxylating tyrosine was purified. The molecular mass of the M. officinalis enzyme of 39,370 Da was obtained by MALDI mass spectrometry and the isoelectric point was determined to be 3.4. Addition of 2 eq. H(2)O(2) to the enzyme leads to oxy catechol oxidase. In the UV/Vis spectrum two new absorption bands occur at 343 nm (?=8510 M(-1)cm(-1)) and 580 nm (?=580 M(-1)cm(-1)) due to O(2)(2-)Cu (II) charge transfer transitions in accordance with the oxy forms of other type 3 copper proteins. The N-terminal sequence has been determined by Edman degradation to NPVQAPELDKCGTAT, exhibiting a proline at the second and sixth position conserved in other polyphenol oxidases. PMID:22727580

  5. Quaternary ammonium functionalized clay film electrodes modified with polyphenol oxidase for the sensitive detection of catechol.

    PubMed

    Mbouguen, Justin Kemmegne; Ngameni, Emmanuel; Walcarius, Alain

    2007-09-30

    Naturally occurring Cameroonian smectite clay has been grafted with trimethylpropylammonium (TMPA) groups and the resulting organoclay has been deposited onto a glassy carbon electrode surface as a suitable immobilization matrix for polyphenol oxidase (PPO). High sensitivity of the electrochemical device to catechol biosensing can be achieved when the enzyme was impregnated within the organoclay film subsequent to its deposition due to favorable electrostatic interaction between PPO and the TMPA-clay layer. The bioelectrode preparation method was also compatible with the use of a mediator (i.e., ferrocene) and the best performance was obtained with a three-layer configuration made of glassy carbon coated with a first layer of ferrocene (Fc), which was then covered with the PPO-impregnated TMPA-clay layer, and finally overcoated with an enzyme-free TMPA-clay film acting as a protecting overlayer to avoid leaching of the biomolecule in solution. The electrochemical behavior of the modified film electrodes was first characterized by cyclic voltammetry and, then, they were evaluated for the amperometric biosensing of the model analyte catechol in batch conditions and in flow injection analysis. Various experimental parameters likely to influence the biosensor response have been investigated, including the electrode preparation mode (composition configuration, thickness), the usefulness of a mediator, the operating potential and pH of the medium, as well as the advantageous features of the TMPA-clay in comparison to related film electrodes based on non-functionalized clays. The organoclay was found to provide a favorable environment to enzyme activity and the multilayer configuration of the film electrode to provide a biosensor with good characteristics, such as an extended linear range for catechol detection (2 x 10(-8) to 1.2 x 10(-5)M) and a detection limit in the nanomolar range (9 x 10(-9)M). PMID:17537626

  6. Crystal structure of a plant catechol oxidase containing a dicopper center.

    PubMed

    Klabunde, T; Eicken, C; Sacchettini, J C; Krebs, B

    1998-12-01

    Catechol oxidases are ubiquitous plant enzymes containing a dinuclear copper center. In the wound-response mechanism of the plant they catalyze the oxidation of a broad range of ortho-diphenols to the corresponding o-quinones coupled with the reduction of oxygen to water. The crystal structures of the enzyme from sweet potato in the resting dicupric Cu(II)-Cu(II) state, the reduced dicuprous Cu(I)-Cu(I) form, and in complex with the inhibitor phenylthiourea were analyzed. The catalytic copper center is accommodated in a central four-helix-bundle located in a hydrophobic pocket close to the surface. Both metal binding sites are composed of three histidine ligands. His 109, ligated to the CuA site, is covalently linked to Cys 92 by an unusual thioether bond. Based on biochemical, spectroscopic and the presented structural data, a catalytical mechanism is proposed in which one of the oxygen atoms of the diphenolic substrate binds to CuB of the oxygenated enzyme. PMID:9846879

  7. The studies of FT-IR and CD spectroscopy on catechol oxidase I from tobacco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hourong; Xie, Yongshu; Liu, Qingliang; Xu, Xiaolong; Shi, Chunhua

    2005-10-01

    A novel copper-containing enzyme named COI (catechol oxidase I) has been isolated and purified from tobacco by extracting acetone-emerged powder with phosphate buffer, centrifugation at low temperature, ammonium sulfate fractional precipitation, and column chromatography on DEAE-sephadex (A-50), sephadex (G-75), and DEAE-celluse (DE-52). PAGE, SDS-PAGE were used to detect the enzyme purity, and to determine its molecular weight. Then the secondary structures of COI at different pH, different temperatures and different concentrations of guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) were studied by the FT-IR, Fourier self-deconvolution spectra, and circular dichroism (CD). At pH 2.0, the contents of both ?-helix and anti-parallel ?-sheet decrease, and that of random coil increases, while ?-turn is unchanged compared with the neutral condition (pH 7.0). At pH 11.0, the results indicate that the contents of ?-helix, anti-parallel ?-sheet and ?-turn decrease, while random coil structure increases. According to the CD measurements, the relative average fractions of ?-helix, anti-parallel ?-sheet, ?-turn/parallel ?-sheet, aromatic residues and disulfide bond, and random coil/?-turn are 41.7%, 16.7%, 23.5%, 11.3%, and 6.8% at pH 7.0, respectively, while 7.2%, 7.7%, 15.2%, 10.7%, 59.2% at pH 2.0, and 20.6%, 9.5%, 15.2%, 10.5%, 44.2% at pH 11.0. Both ?-helix and random coil decrease with temperature increasing, and anti-parallel ?-sheet increases at the same time. After incubated in 6 mol/L guanidine hydrochloride for 30 min, the fraction of ?-helix almost disappears (only 1.1% left), while random coil/?-turn increases to 81.8%, which coincides well with the results obtained through enzymatic activity experiment.

  8. Biochemical and spectroscopic characterization of catechol oxidase from sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) containing a type-3 dicopper center.

    PubMed

    Eicken, C; Zippel, F; Bldt-Karentzopoulos, K; Krebs, B

    1998-10-01

    Two catechol oxidases have been isolated from sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) and purified to homogeneity. The two isozymes have been characterized by EXAFS, EPR-, UV/Vis-spectroscopy, isoelectric focusing, and MALDI-MS and have been shown to contain a dinuclear copper center. Both are monomers with a molecular mass of 39 kDa and 40 kDa, respectively. Substrate specificity and NH2-terminal sequences have been determined. EXAFS data for the 39 kDa enzyme reveal a coordination number of four for each Cu in the resting form and suggest a Cu(II)-Cu(II) distance of 2.9 A for the native met form and 3.8 A for the oxy form. PMID:9781698

  9. Functional Analysis of Fructosyl-Amino Acid Oxidases of Aspergillus oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Akazawa, Shin-ichi; Karino, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Nobuyuki; Katsuragi, Tohoru; Tani, Yoshiki

    2004-01-01

    Three active fractions of fructosyl-amino acid oxidase (FAOD-Ao1, -Ao2a, and -Ao2b) were isolated from Aspergillus oryzae strain RIB40. N-terminal and internal amino acid sequences of FAOD-Ao2a corresponded to those of FAOD-Ao2b, suggesting that these two isozymes were derived from the same protein. FAOD-Ao1 and -Ao2 were different in substrate specificity and subunit assembly; FAOD-Ao2 was active toward N?-fructosyl N?-Z-lysine and fructosyl valine (Fru-Val), whereas FAOD-Ao1 was not active toward Fru-Val. The genes encoding the FAOD isozymes (i.e., FAOAo1 and FAOAo2) were cloned by PCR with an FAOD-specific primer set. The deduced amino acid sequences revealed that FAOD-Ao1 was 50% identical to FAOD-Ao2, and each isozyme had a peroxisome-targeting signal-1, indicating their localization in peroxisomes. The genes was expressed in Escherichia coli and rFaoAo2 showed the same characteristics as FAOD-Ao2, whereas rFaoAo1 was not active. FAOAo2 disruptant was obtained by using ptrA as a selective marker. Wild-type strain grew on the medium containing Fru-Val as the sole carbon and nitrogen sources, but strain ?faoAo2 did not grow. Addition of glucose or (NH4)2SO4 to the Fru-Val medium did not affect the assimilation of Fru-Val by wild-type, indicating glucose and ammonium repressions did not occur in the expression of the FAOAo2 gene. Furthermore, conidia of the wild-type strain did not germinate on the medium containing Fru-Val and NaNO2 as the sole carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively, suggesting that Fru-Val may also repress gene expression of nitrite reductase. These results indicated that FAOD is needed for utilization of fructosyl-amino acids as nitrogen sources in A. oryzae. PMID:15466528

  10. Production and characterisation of AoSOX2 from Aspergillus oryzae, a novel flavin-dependent sulfhydryl oxidase with good pH and temperature stability.

    PubMed

    Faccio, Greta; Kruus, Kristiina; Buchert, Johanna; Saloheimo, Markku

    2011-05-01

    Sulfhydryl oxidases have found application in the improvement of both dairy and baking products due to their ability to oxidise thiol groups in small molecules and cysteine residues in proteins. A genome mining study of the available fungal genomes had previously been performed by our group in order to identify novel sulfhydryl oxidases suitable for industrial applications and a representative enzyme was produced, AoSOX1 from Aspergillus oryzae (Faccio et al. BMC Biochem 11:31, 2010). As a result of the study, a second gene coding for a potentially secreted sulfhydryl oxidase, AoSOX2, was identified in the genome of A. oryzae. The protein AoSOX2 was heterologously expressed in Trichoderma reesei and characterised with regard to both biochemical properties as well as preliminary structural analysis. AoSOX2 showed activity on dithiothreitol and glutathione, and to a lesser extent on D/L-cysteine and beta-mercaptoethanol. AoSOX2 was a homodimeric flavin-dependent protein of approximately 78 kDa (monomer 42412 Da) and its secondary structure presents alpha-helical elements. A. oryzae AoSOX2 showed a significant stability to pH and temperature. PMID:21327412

  11. Anion coordination selective [Mn3] and [Mn4] assemblies: synthesis, structural diversity, magnetic properties and catechol oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Pait, Moumita; Shatruk, Michael; Ray, Debashis

    2015-07-14

    Syntheses, crystal structures, magnetic properties and catechol oxidation behavior are presented for [Mn3] and [Mn4] aggregates, [MnMn(II)(O2CMe)4(dmp)2(H2O)2]2H2O (12H2O), [MnMn(II)(O2CCH2Cl)4(dmp)2(H2O)2]H2OMeOH (2H2OMeOH), [Mn(?3-O)(dmp)4(?-DMSO)(N3)(DMSO)(H2O)]ClO4DMSO (3ClO4DMSO), and [Mn(?3-O)(dmp)4(?-DMSO)(ClO4)(DMSO)(H2O)]ClO4DMSO (4ClO4DMSO), developed with single type ligand H2dmp, 2-[(2-hydroxy-1,1-dimethyl-ethylimino)-methyl]-phenol. The successful isolation of 1-4 resulted from a systematic exploration of the effect of Mn(II) salts, added carboxylates, Mn/H2dmp ratio, presence of azide, and other reaction conditions. The cores of 1 and 2 are similar and consist of a linear Mn(III)Mn(II)Mn(III) unit in a carboxylate and H2dmp environment, revealing a central Mn(II) ion in a different environment and terminal Mn(III) ions available for the introduction of structural and magnetic anisotropy to the system. The cores of 3 and 4 are also similar and consist of a distorted incomplete-adamantane type Mn4 coordination assembly in a carboxylate-free environment built on a triangular [Mn(?3-O)] unit. The magnetic behavior of complexes 1-3 is dominated by antiferromagnetic exchange coupling that results in ground state spin values of S = 3/2 for 1 and 2 and S = 0 for 3. In solution, all four complexes 1-4 show catechol oxidation activity towards 3,5-DTBC. The catalytic activity for the oxidation of 3,5-DTBC in air followed the order 4 < 3 < 1 < 2. PMID:26050820

  12. Ligand centered radical pathway in catechol oxidase activity with a trinuclear zinc-based model: Synthesis, structural characterization and luminescence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Sukanta; Chowdhury, Biswajit; Patra, Moumita; Maji, Milan; Biswas, Bhaskar

    2015-06-01

    A new trinuclear zinc(II) complex, [Zn3(L)(NCS)2](NO3)2·CH3OH·H2O (1), of a (N,O)-donor compartmental Schiff base ligand (H2L = N,N‧-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-1,3-diamino-2-propanol), has been synthesized in crystalline phase. The zinc(II) complex has been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction study (PXRD), 1H NMR, EI mass spectrometry and thermogravimetric analysis. PXRD revealed that 1 crystallizes in P - 1 space group with a = 9.218 Å, b = 10.849 Å, c = 18.339 Å, with unit cell volume is 2179.713 (Å)3. Fluorescence spectra in methanolic solution reflect that intensity of emission for 1 is much higher compared to H2L and both the compounds exhibit good fluorescence properties. The complex 1 exhibits significant catalytic activities of biological relevance, viz. catechol oxidase. In methanol, it efficiently catalyzes the oxidation of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol (3,5-DTBC) to corresponding quinone via formation of a dinuclear species as [Zn2(L)(3,5-DTBC)]. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) experiment suggests generation of radicals in the presence of 3,5-DTBC and it may be proposed that the radical pathway is probably responsible for conversion of 3,5-DTBC to 3,5-DTBQ promoted by complex of redox-innocent Zn(II) ion.

  13. Gonadectomy and Hormone Replacement Exert Region- and Enzyme Isoform-Specific Effects on Monoamine Oxidase and Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Activity in Prefrontal Cortex and Neostriatum of Adult Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, B.; D'Agostino, A.; Walker, J.; Kritzer, M. F.

    2010-01-01

    Sex differences and gonadal hormone influences are well known for diverse aspects of forebrain amine and indolamine neurotransmitter systems, the cognitive and affective functions they govern and their malfunction in mental illness. This study explored whether hormone regulation/dysregulation of these systems could be related to gonadal steroid effects on catechol-O-methyltransferase and monoamine oxidase which are principal enzymatic controllers of forebrain dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine levels. Driven by male over female differences in cortical enzyme activities, by male-specific associations between monoamine oxidase and catechol-O-methyltransferase gene polymorphisms and cognitive and dysfunction in disease and by male-specific consequences of gene knockouts in mice, the question of hormone sensitivity was addressed here using a male rat model where prefrontal dopamine levels and related behaviors are also known to be affected. Specifically, quantitative O-methylation and oxidative deamination assays were used to compare the activities of catechol-O-methyltransferase's soluble and membrane-bound isoforms and of monoamine oxidase's A and B isoforms in the pregenual medial prefrontal cortex and dorsal striatum of male rats that were sham operated, gonadectomized or gonadectomized and supplemented with testosterone propionate or with estradiol for 28 days. These studies revealed significant effects of hormone replacement but not gonadectomy on the soluble but not the membrane-bound isorfom of catechol-O-methyltransferase in both striatum and cortex. A significant, cortex-specific testosterone—but not estradiol—attenuated effect (increase) of gonadectomy on monoamine oxidase's A but not B isoform was also observed. Although none of these actions suggest potential roles in the reguation/dysregulation of prefrontal dopamine, the suppressive effects of testosterone on cortical monoamine oxidase-A that were observed could have bearing on the increased incidence of cognitive deficits and symptoms of depression and anxiety that are repeatedly observed in males in conditions of hypogonadalism related to aging, other biological factors or in prostate cancer where androgen deprivation is used as a neoadjuvant treatment. PMID:19909795

  14. Ligand centered radical pathway in catechol oxidase activity with a trinuclear zinc-based model: synthesis, structural characterization and luminescence properties.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sukanta; Chowdhury, Biswajit; Patra, Moumita; Maji, Milan; Biswas, Bhaskar

    2015-06-01

    A new trinuclear zinc(II) complex, [Zn3(L)(NCS)2](NO3)2·CH3OH·H2O (1), of a (N,O)-donor compartmental Schiff base ligand (H2L=N,N'-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-1,3-diamino-2-propanol), has been synthesized in crystalline phase. The zinc(II) complex has been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction study (PXRD), (1)H NMR, EI mass spectrometry and thermogravimetric analysis. PXRD revealed that 1 crystallizes in P-1 space group with a=9.218 Å, b=10.849 Å, c=18.339 Å, with unit cell volume is 2179.713(Å)(3). Fluorescence spectra in methanolic solution reflect that intensity of emission for 1 is much higher compared to H2L and both the compounds exhibit good fluorescence properties. The complex 1 exhibits significant catalytic activities of biological relevance, viz. catechol oxidase. In methanol, it efficiently catalyzes the oxidation of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol (3,5-DTBC) to corresponding quinone via formation of a dinuclear species as [Zn2(L)(3,5-DTBC)]. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) experiment suggests generation of radicals in the presence of 3,5-DTBC and it may be proposed that the radical pathway is probably responsible for conversion of 3,5-DTBC to 3,5-DTBQ promoted by complex of redox-innocent Zn(II) ion. PMID:25754390

  15. Relation between the catalytic efficiency of the synthetic analogues of catechol oxidase with their electrochemical property in the free state and substrate-bound state.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Prateeti; Adhikary, Jaydeep; Ghosh, Bipinbihari; Sanyal, Ria; Chattopadhyay, Shyamal Kumar; Bauz, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio; Zangrando, Ennio; Das, Debasis

    2014-08-18

    A library of 15 dicopper complexes as synthetic analogues of catechol oxidase has been synthesized with the aim to determine the relationship between the electrochemical behavior of the dicopper(II) species in the absence as well as in the presence of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol (3,5-DTBC) as model substrate and the catalytic activity, kcat, in DMSO medium. The complexes have been characterized by routine physicochemical techniques as well as by X-ray single-crystal structure analysis in some cases. Fifteen "end-off" compartmental ligands have been designed as 1 + 2 Schiff-base condensation product of 2,6-diformyl-4-R-phenol (R = Me, (t)Bu, and Cl) and five different amines, N-(2-aminoethyl)piperazine, N-(2-aminoethyl)pyrrolidine, N-(2-aminoethyl)morpholine, N-(3-aminopropyl)morpholine, and N-(2-aminoethyl)piperidine. Interestingly, in case of the combination of 2,6-diformyl-4-methylphenol and N-(2-aminoethyl)morpholine/N-(3-aminopropyl)morpholine/N-(2-aminoethyl)piperidine 1 + 1 condensation becomes the reality and the ligands are denoted as L2(1-3). On reaction of copper(II) nitrate with L2(1-3) in situ complexes 3, 12, and 13 are formed having general formula Cu2(L2(1-3))2(NO3)2. The remaining 12 ligands obtained as 1 + 2 condensation products are denoted as L1(1-12), which produce complexes having general formula Cu2(L1(1-12))(NO3)2. Catecholase activity of all 15 complexes has been investigated in DMSO medium using 3,5-DTBC as model substrate. Treatment on the basis of Michaelis-Menten model has been applied for kinetic study, and thereby turnover number, kcat, values have been evaluated. Cyclic voltametric (CV) and differential pulse voltametric (DPV) studies of the complexes in the presence as well as in the absence of 3,5-DTBC have been thoroughly investigated in DMSO medium. From those studies it is evident that oxidation of 3,5-DTBC catalyzed by dicopper(II) complexes proceed via two steps: first, semibenzoquinone followed by benzoquinone with concomitant reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I). Our study reveals that apparently there is nearly no linear relationship between kcat and E values of the complexes. However, a detailed density functional theory (DFT) calculation sheds light on this subject. A very good correlation prevails in terms of the energetics associated with the Cu(II) to Cu(I) reduction process and kcat values, as revealed from the combined theoretical and experimental approach. PMID:25072328

  16. Segregation and linkage studies of plasma dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH), erythrocyte catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), and platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO): possible linkage between the ABO locus and a gene controlling DBH activity.

    PubMed Central

    Goldin, L R; Gershon, E S; Lake, C R; Murphy, D L; McGinniss, M; Sparkes, R S

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), and monoamine oxidase (MAO) along with 27 polymorphic marker phenotypes were available for 162 patients with major affective disorders and 1,125 of their relatives. Levels of enzymes were previously found not to be associated with illness. Pedigree analysis methods for quantitative traits are used to test single-gene hypotheses for segregation of DBH in 32 families with 411 individuals. COMT in 30 families with 351 individuals, and MAO in 50 families with 309 individuals. The familial distribution of both DBH and COMT are consistent with two codominant alleles at the same locus that account for 56% and 59% of the total variance, respectively. MAO activity cannot be shown to be segregating as a single major gene, but a purely nongenetic hypothesis is also rejected. A possible linkage of a locus for DBH to the ABO locus is indicated by a maximum lod score of 1.82 at 0% and 10% recombination fractions for males and females, respectively. A lod score of 0.61 at 0% recombination for a similar analysis in a single large pedigree was reported by Elston et al., making the combined lod score for the two studies equal to 2.32 at 0% recombination. PMID:6951409

  17. Monoamine Oxidase A (MAOA) and Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) Gene Polymorphisms Interact with Maternal Parenting in Association with Adolescent Reactive Aggression but not Proactive Aggression: Evidence of Differential Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenxin; Cao, Cong; Wang, Meiping; Ji, Linqin; Cao, Yanmiao

    2016-04-01

    To date, whether and how gene-environment (G × E) interactions operate differently across distinct subtypes of aggression remains untested. More recently, in contrast with the diathesis-stress hypothesis, an alternative hypothesis of differential susceptibility proposes that individuals could be differentially susceptible to environments depending on their genotypes in a "for better and for worse" manner. The current study examined interactions between monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) T941G and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met polymorphisms with maternal parenting on two types of aggression: reactive and proactive. Moreover, whether these potential G × E interactions would be consistent with the diathesis-stress versus the differential susceptibility hypothesis was tested. Within the sample of 1399 Chinese Han adolescents (47.2 % girls, M age  = 12.32 years, SD = 0.50), MAOA and COMT genes both interacted with positive parenting in their associations with reactive but not proactive aggression. Adolescents with T alleles/TT homozygotes of MAOA gene or Met alleles of COMT gene exhibited more reactive aggression when exposed to low positive parenting, but less reactive aggression when exposed to high positive parenting. These findings provide the first evidence for distinct G × E interaction effects on reactive versus proactive aggression and lend further support for the differential susceptibility hypothesis. PMID:26932718

  18. Identification of catechol as a new marker for detecting propolis adulteration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuai; Zhang, Cui-Ping; Li, George Q; Sun, Yue-Yi; Wang, Kai; Hu, Fu-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Adulteration of propolis with poplar extract is a serious issue in the bee products market. The aim of this study was to identify marker compounds in adulterated propolis, and examine the transformation of chemical components from poplar buds to propolis. The chemical profiles of poplar extracts and propolis were compared, and a new marker compound, catechol, was isolated and identified from the extracts of poplar buds. The polyphenol oxidase, catechol oxidase, responsible for catalyzing oxidation of catechol was detected in poplar buds and propolis. The results indicate catechol can be used as a marker to detect propolis adulterated with poplar extract. PMID:25025150

  19. Heterogeneous Oxidation of Catechol.

    PubMed

    Pillar, Elizabeth A; Zhou, Ruixin; Guzman, Marcelo I

    2015-10-15

    Natural and anthropogenic emissions of aromatic hydrocarbons from biomass burning, agro-industrial settings, and fossil fuel combustion contribute precursors to secondary aerosol formation (SOA). How these compounds are processed under humid tropospheric conditions is the focus of current attention to understand their environmental fate. This work shows how catechol thin films, a model for oxygenated aromatic hydrocarbons present in biomass burning and combustion aerosols, undergo heterogeneous oxidation at the air-solid interface under variable relative humidity (RH = 0-90%). The maximum reactive uptake coefficient of O3(g) by catechol ?O3 = (7.49 0.35) 10(-6) occurs for 90% RH. Upon exposure of ca. 104-?m thick catechol films to O3(g) mixing ratios between 230 ppbv and 25 ppmv, three main reaction pathways are observed. (1) The cleavage of the 1,2 carbon-carbon bond at the air-solid interface resulting in the formation of cis,cis-muconic acid via primary ozonide and hydroperoxide intermediates. Further direct ozonolysis of cis,cis-muconic yields glyoxylic, oxalic, crotonic, and maleic acids. (2) A second pathway is evidenced by the presence of Baeyer-Villiger oxidation products including glutaconic 4-hydroxy-2-butenoic and 5-oxo-2-pentenoic acids during electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (MS) and ion chromatography MS analyses. (3) Finally, indirect oxidation by in situ produced hydroxyl radical (HO()) results in the generation of semiquinone radical intermediates toward the synthesis of polyhydoxylated aromatic rings such as tri-, tetra-, and penta-hydroxybenzene. Remarkably, heavier polyhydroxylated biphenyl and terphenyl products present in the extracted oxidized films result from coupling reactions of semiquinones of catechol and its polyhydroxylated rings. The direct ozonolysis of 1,2,3- and 1,2,4-trihydroxybenezene yields 2- and 3-hydroxy-cis,cis-muconic acid, respectively. The production of 2,4- or 3,4-dihdroxyhex-2-enedioic acid is proposed to result from the sequential processing of cis,cis-muconic acid, 2- and 3-hydroxy-cis,cis-muconic acid. Overall, these reactions contribute precursors to form aqueous SOA from aromatics in atmospheric aerosols and brown clouds. PMID:26403273

  20. Oxidative calcium release from catechol.

    PubMed

    Riley, Patrick A; Stratford, Michael R L

    2015-04-01

    Oxidation of 4-methylcatechol previously exposed to aqueous calcium chloride was shown by ion chromatography to be associated with release of calcium ions. The catechol was oxidised to the corresponding orthoquinone by the use of tyrosinase from Agaricus bisporus. The oxidative release of calcium from the catechol is ascribed to the diminution of the available hydroxyl functions able to act as chelating groups. Our results suggest that the redox status of melanin may regulate calcium binding and influence calcium levels in pigmented cells. PMID:25740160

  1. Comparative Study of Substrates and Inhibitors of Azospirillum lipoferum and Pyricularia oryzae Laccases

    PubMed Central

    Faure, D.; Bouillant, M.; Bally, R.

    1995-01-01

    Azospirillum lipoferum and Pyricularia oryzae laccases were compared, using several substrates and inhibitors. Sixteen phenolic or nonphenolic compounds were found to be substrates of both fungal and bacterial laccases. In the presence of different phenol oxidase inhibitors, P. oryzae and A. lipoferum laccase activities had similar properties. PMID:16534964

  2. Beyond brown: polyphenol oxidases as enzymes of plant specialized metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Most cloned and/or characterized plant polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) have catechol oxidase activity (i.e., they oxidize o-diphenols to o-quinones) and are localized or predicted to be localized to plastids. As a class, they have broad substrate specificity and are associated with browning of produce and other plant materials. Because PPOs are often induced by wounding or pathogen attack, they are most generally believed to play important roles in plant defense responses. However, a few well-characterized PPOs appear to have very specific roles in the biosynthesis of specialized metabolites via both tyrosinase (monophenol oxidase) and catechol oxidase activities. Here we detail a few examples of these and explore the possibility that there may be many more “biosynthetic” PPOs. PMID:25642234

  3. Alternative respiration and fumaric acid production of Rhizopus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shuai; Xu, Qing; Huang, He; Li, Shuang

    2014-06-01

    Under the conditions of fumaric acid fermentation, Rhizopus oryzae ME-F14 possessed at least two respiratory systems. The respiration of mycelia was partially inhibited by the cytochrome respiration inhibitor antimycin A or the alternative respiration inhibitor salicylhydroxamic acid and was completely inhibited in the presence of both antimycin A and salicylhydroxamic acid. During fumaric acid fermentation process, the activity of alternative respiration had a great correlation with fumaric acid productivity; both of them reached peak at the same time. The alternative oxidase gene, which encoded the mitochondrial alternative oxidase responsible for alternative respiration in R. oryzae ME-F14, was cloned and characterized in Escherichia coli. The activity of alternative respiration, the alternative oxidase gene transcription level, as well as the fumaric acid titer were measured under different carbon sources and different carbon-nitrogen ratios. The activity of alternative respiration was found to be comparable to the transcription level of the alternative oxidase gene and the fumaric acid titer. These results indicated that the activity of the alternative oxidase was regulated at the transcription stage under the conditions tested for R. oryzae ME-F14. PMID:24643733

  4. Purification, characterization, and identification of a novel bifunctional catalase-phenol oxidase from Scytalidium thermophilum.

    PubMed

    Sutay Kocabas, Didem; Bakir, Ufuk; Phillips, Simon E V; McPherson, Michael J; Ogel, Zumrut B

    2008-06-01

    A novel bifunctional catalase with an additional phenol oxidase activity was isolated from a thermophilic fungus, Scytalidium thermophilum. This extracellular enzyme was purified ca. 10-fold with 46% yield and was biochemically characterized. The enzyme contains heme and has a molecular weight of 320 kDa with four 80 kDa subunits and an isoelectric point of 5.0. Catalase and phenol oxidase activities were most stable at pH 7.0. The activation energies of catalase and phenol oxidase activities of the enzyme were found to be 2.7 +/- 0.2 and 10.1 +/- 0.4 kcal/mol, respectively. The pure enzyme can oxidize o-diphenols such as catechol, caffeic acid, and L-DOPA in the absence of hydrogen peroxide and the highest oxidase activity is observed against catechol. No activity is detected against tyrosine and common laccase substrates such as ABTS and syringaldazine with the exception of weak activity with p-hydroquinone. Common catechol oxidase inhibitors, salicylhydroxamic acid and p-coumaric acid, inhibit the oxidase activity. Catechol oxidation activity was also detected in three other catalases tested, from Aspergillus niger, human erythrocyte, and bovine liver, suggesting that this dual catalase-phenol oxidase activity may be a common feature of catalases. PMID:18369615

  5. Spectroscopic Studies of the Catechol Dioxygenases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Que, Lawrence Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The catechol dioxygenases are bacterial iron-containing enzymes that catalyze the oxidative cleavage of catechols. These enzymes serve as a component of nature's mechanisms for degrading aromatic compounds in the environment. The structure and mechanistic aspects of these enzymes are described. (JN)

  6. Catechol concentrations in the hemolymph of the scallop, Placopecten magellanicus.

    PubMed

    Pani, A K; Croll, R P

    2000-04-01

    Catecholamines have previously been detected in numerous tissues and are thought to control a wide variety of physiological functions in bivalve molluscs. In the present study, alumina extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography reveal the presence of significant concentrations of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), dopamine, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) in the hemolymph of the sea scallop, Placopecten magellanicus. The concentration of dopamine in the hemolymph averaged 223.8 ng/ml, (+/-48.4, SEM), equivalent to 10(-7) to 10(-6) M. Neither epinephrine nor norepinephrine was reliably detected in significant quantities. Previous studies have demonstrated physiological responses to dopamine with thresholds of 10(-9) to 10(-6) M, thus suggesting that this catecholamine may have an endocrine function. Furthermore, monitoring hemolymph concentrations of catechols might provide a sensitive measure of the physiological status of bivalves. For example, drugs known to affect catechol concentrations in other tissues also effect hemolymph levels. Administration of monoamine oxidase inhibitors such as pargyline, deprenyl, and clorgyline at 10(-4) M for 1 day of incubation followed by a 2-day wash resulted in decreased hemolymph concentrations of DOPAC and increased concentrations of its precursors, DOPA and dopamine. Incubation in 10(-4) M 3,5-dinitrocatechol, a catecholamine-O-methyl transferase blocker, for 1 day followed by a 2-day wash significantly increased the concentration of dopamine and DOPAC in the hemolymph. Scallops incubated in 10(-5) M alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine, a blocker of tyrosine hydroxylase, for 1 day followed by a 3-day wash in artificial seawater had significantly reduced concentrations of DOPA, dopamine, and DOPAC in the hemolymph. In addition to responding to pharmacological agents, dopamine levels also decreased significantly following thermal induction of spawning, thus suggesting that hemolymph concentrations of catechols might provide indices of reproductive activity and/or stress. PMID:10753566

  7. Hormonal cross-talk between auxin and ethylene differentially regulates the expression of two members of the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase gene family in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Chae, H S; Cho, Y G; Park, M Y; Lee, M C; Eun, M Y; Kang, B G; Kim, W T

    2000-03-01

    Two cDNA clones, pOS-ACO2 and pOS-ACO3, encoding 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidase were isolated from rice seedling cDNA library. pOS-ACO3 is a 1,299 bp full-length clone encoding 321 amino acids (Mr=35.9 kDa), while pOS-ACO2 is 1,072 bp long and is a partial cDNA clone encoding 314 amino acids. These two deduced amino acid sequences share 70% identity, and display a high degree of sequence identity (72-92%) with previously isolated pOS-ACO1 of deepwater rice. The chromosomal location studies show that OS-ACO2 is positioned on the long arm of chromosome 9, while OS-ACO3 on the long arm of chromosome 2 of rice genome. A marked increase in the level of OS-ACO2 transcript was observed in IAA-treated etiolated rice seedlings, whereas the OS-ACO3 mRNA was greatly accumulated by ethylene treatment. Results of ethylene inhibitor studies indicated that auxin promotion of the OS-ACO2 transcription was not mediated through the action of auxin-induced ethylene. Thus, it appears that there are two groups of ACC oxidase transcripts in rice plants, either auxin-induced or ethylene-induced. The auxin-induced OS-ACO2 expression was partially inhibited by ethylene, while ethylene induction of OS-ACO3 transcription was completely blocked by auxin. These results indicate that the expression of ACC oxidase genes is regulated by complex hormonal networks in a gene specific manner in rice seedlings. Okadaic acid, a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase, effectively suppressed the IAA induction of OS-ACO2 expression, suggesting that protein dephosphorylation plays a role in the induction of ACC oxidase by auxin. A scheme of the multiple regulatory pathways for the expression of ACC oxidase gene family by auxin, ethylene and protein phosphatase is presented. PMID:10805599

  8. PEM Anchorage on Titanium Using Catechol Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Marie, Hélène; Barrere, Amélie; Schoentstein, Frédérique; Chavanne, Marie-Hélène; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Mora, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Background This study deals with the anchorage of polyelectrolyte films onto titanium surfaces via a cathecol-based linker for biomedical applications. Methodology The following study uses a molecule functionalized with a catechol and a carboxylic acid: 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid. This molecule is anchored to the TiO2 substrate via the catechol while the carboxylic acid reacts with polymers bearing amine groups. By providing a film anchorage of chemisorption type, it makes possible to deposit polyelectrolytes on the surface of titanium. Principal Findings Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements show that the different steps of grafting have been successfully performed. Conclusions This method based on catechol anchorage of polyelectrolytes open a window towards large possibilities of clinical applications. PMID:23226262

  9. Catecholate Siderophores Protect Bacteria from Pyochelin Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Conrado; Corbalán, Natalia S.; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R.; Pomares, María Fernanda; de Cristóbal, Ricardo E.; Clardy, Jon; Kolter, Roberto; Vincent, Paula A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacteria produce small molecule iron chelators, known as siderophores, to facilitate the acquisition of iron from the environment. The synthesis of more than one siderophore and the production of multiple siderophore uptake systems by a single bacterial species are common place. The selective advantages conferred by the multiplicity of siderophore synthesis remains poorly understood. However, there is growing evidence suggesting that siderophores may have other physiological roles besides their involvement in iron acquisition. Methods and Principal Findings Here we provide the first report that pyochelin displays antibiotic activity against some bacterial strains. Observation of differential sensitivity to pyochelin against a panel of bacteria provided the first indications that catecholate siderophores, produced by some bacteria, may have roles other than iron acquisition. A pattern emerged where only those strains able to make catecholate-type siderophores were resistant to pyochelin. We were able to associate pyochelin resistance to catecholate production by showing that pyochelin-resistant Escherichia coli became sensitive when biosynthesis of its catecholate siderophore enterobactin was impaired. As expected, supplementation with enterobactin conferred pyochelin resistance to the entE mutant. We observed that pyochelin-induced growth inhibition was independent of iron availability and was prevented by addition of the reducing agent ascorbic acid or by anaerobic incubation. Addition of pyochelin to E. coli increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) while addition of ascorbic acid or enterobactin reduced them. In contrast, addition of the carboxylate-type siderophore, citrate, did not prevent pyochelin-induced ROS increases and their associated toxicity. Conclusions We have shown that the catecholate siderophore enterobactin protects E. coli against the toxic effects of pyochelin by reducing ROS. Thus, it appears that catecholate siderophores can behave as protectors of oxidative stress. These results support the idea that siderophores can have physiological roles aside from those in iron acquisition. PMID:23071628

  10. The release of catechol amines from isolated chromaffin granules

    PubMed Central

    Eade, N. R.

    1957-01-01

    Release of catechol amines from the chromaffin granules of the bovine suprarenal medulla has been studied. Aliphatic monoamines and diamines released catechol amines from chromaffin granules under conditions similar to those under which they are known to promote the release of histamine from suspensions of granules. Carbachol and histamine did not release catechol amines from granules. PMID:13413153

  11. The role of catechol-O-methyltransferase in catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suriguga,; Li, Xiao-Fei; Li, Yang; Yu, Chun-Hong; Li, Yi-Ran; Yi, Zong-Chun

    2013-12-15

    Catechol is widely used in pharmaceutical and chemical industries. Catechol is also one of phenolic metabolites of benzene in vivo. Our previous study showed that catechol improved erythroid differentiation potency of K562 cells, which was associated with decreased DNA methylation in erythroid specific genes. Catechol is a substrate for the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT)-mediated methylation. In the present study, the role of COMT in catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells was investigated. Benzidine staining showed that exposure to catechol enhanced hemin-induced hemoglobin accumulation and induced mRNA expression of erythroid specific genes in K562 cells. Treatment with catechol caused a time- and concentration-dependent increase in guaiacol concentration in the medium of cultured K562 cells. When COMT expression was knocked down by COMT shRNA expression in K562 cells, the production of guaiacol significantly reduced, and the sensitivity of K562 cells to cytotoxicity of catechol significantly increased. Knockdown of COMT expression by COMT shRNA expression also eliminated catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. In addition, the pre-treatment with methyl donor S-adenosyl-L-methionine or its demethylated product S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine induced a significant increase in hemin-induced Hb synthesis in K562 cells and the mRNA expression of erythroid specific genes. These findings indicated that O-methylation catalyzed by COMT acted as detoxication of catechol and involved in catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells, and the production of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine partly explained catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation. - Highlights: • Catechol enhanced hemin-induced hemoglobin accumulation. • COMT-catalyzed methylation acted as detoxication of catechol. • COMT involved in catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation.

  12. Biochemical characteristics and thermal inhibition kinetics of polyphenol oxidase extracted from Thompson seedless grape

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was isolated from Thompson seedless grape (Vitis vinifera 'Thompson Seedless') and its biochemical characteristics were studied. Optimum pH and temperature for grape PPO activity were pH 6.0 and 25 degrees C with 10 mM catechol as substrate. The enzyme was heat-stable betwee...

  13. Semiquinone anion radicals of catechol(amine)s, catechol estrogens, and their metal ion complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanaraman, B; Felix, C C; Sealy, R C

    1985-01-01

    The characterization and identification of semiquinone radicals from catechol(amine)s and catechol estrogens by electron spin resonance spectroscopy is addressed. The use of diamagnetic metal ions, especially Mg2+ and Zn2+ ions, to detect transient semiquinone radicals in biological systems and to monitor their reactions, is discussed. A brief account of the identification and reactions of quinones is also presented. PMID:3007089

  14. Rice (Oryza) hemoglobins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice (Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a sin...

  15. Catechol Formation and Melanization by Na+ -Dependent Azotobacter chroococcum: a Protective Mechanism for Aeroadaptation?

    PubMed Central

    Shivprasad, Shailaja; Page, William J.

    1989-01-01

    Aeroadaptive microaerophilic Azotobacter chroococcum 184 produced a cell-associated black pigment when grown at high aeration rates under nitrogen-fixing conditions. This pigment was shown to be a catechol melanin. Polyphenol oxidase activity was detected in cell extracts of cells grown for 72 h. Melanin formation was optimal in the later stages of growth, and there was no correlation between nitrogenase activity and melanization. Nitrogenase activity in strain 184 was optimal at 10% O2, and melanin formation was suppressed by O2 limitation. In the presence of charcoal, an adsorbent of toxic oxygen intermediates, and benzoic acid, a scavenger of hydroxyl radicals, melanization was inhibited. However, in the presence of copper, the intensity of pigment color increased and melanization was accelerated. Copper also eliminated catalase and peroxidase activities of the organism but still permitted aerobic growth. In the presence of low levels of iron, melanization was accelerated under high aeration rates, and under low rates of aeration, melanization was observed only at higher levels of iron. Hydroxamate-siderophore production was detectable in the presence of soluble iron under high rates of aeration but was repressed by the same levels of iron under low aeration rates. Unlike melanization and hydroxamate formation, catechol formation was observed under both low and high rates of aeration under nitrogen-fixing conditions. Catechol formation and melanization were repressed by 14 mM NH4+, at which level nitrogenase activity was also repressed. Copper reversed the repressive effect of NH4+. A role for catechol formation and melanization in aeroadaptation is proposed. PMID:16347974

  16. Diphenol activation of the monophenolase and diphenolase activities of field bean (Dolichos lablab) polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Lalitha R; Paul, Beena

    2002-03-13

    This paper reports a study on the hydroxylation of ferulic acid and tyrosine by field bean (Dolichos lablab) polyphenol oxidase, a reaction that does not take place without the addition of catechol. A lag period similar to the characteristic lag of tyrosinase activity was observed, the length of which decreased with increasing catechol concentration and increased with increasing ferulic acid concentration. The activation constant K(a) of catechol for ferulic acid hydroxylation reaction was 5 mM. The kinetic parameters of field bean polyphenol oxidase toward ferulic acid and tyrosine were evaluated in the presence of catechol. 4-Methyl catechol, L-dihydroxyphenylalanine, pyrogallol, and 2,3,4-trihydroxybenzoic acid, substrates with high binding affinity to field bean polyphenol oxidase, could stimulate this hydroxylation reaction. In contrast, diphenols such as protocatechuic acid, gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, and caffeic acid, which were not substrates for the oxidation reaction, were unable to bring about this activation. It is most likely that only o-diphenols that are substrates for the diphenolase serve as cosubstrates by donating electrons at the active site for the monophenolase activity. The reaction mechanism for this activation is consistent with that proposed for tyrosinase (Sanchez-Ferrer, A.; Rodriguez-Lopez, J. N.; Garcia-Canovas, F.; Garcia-Carmona, F. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1995, 1247, 1-11). The presence of o-diphenols, viz. catechol, L-dihydroxyphenylalanine, and 4-methyl catechol, is also necessary for the oxidation of the diphenols, caffeic acid, and catechin to their quinones by the field bean polyphenol oxidase. This oxidation reaction occurs immediately with no lag period and does not occur without the addition of diphenol. The kinetic parameters for caffeic acid (K(m) = 0.08 mM, V(max) = 32440 u/mg) in the presence of catechol and the activation constant K(a) of catechol (4.6 mM) for this reaction were enumerated. The absence of a lag period for this reaction indicates that the diphenol mechanism of diphenolase activation differs from the way in which the same o-diphenols activate the monophenolase activity. PMID:11879044

  17. Anomalous cage effect of the excited state dynamics of catechol in the 18-crown-6-catechol host-guest complex.

    PubMed

    Morishima, Fumiya; Kusaka, Ryoji; Inokuchi, Yoshiya; Haino, Takeharu; Ebata, Takayuki

    2015-02-12

    We determined the number of isomers and their structures for the 18-crown-6 (18C6)-catechol host-guest complex, and examined the effect of the complex formation on the S1 ((1)??*) dynamics of catechol under a supersonically cooled gas phase condition and in cyclohexane solution at room temperature. In the gas phase experiment, UV-UV hole-burning spectra of the 18C6-catechol 1:1 complex indicate that there are three stable isomers. For bare catechol, it has been reported that two adjacent OH groups have an intramolecular hydrogen (H) bond. The IR-UV double resonance spectra show two types of isomers in the 18C6-catechol 1:1 complex; one of the three 18C6-catechol 1:1 isomers has the intramolecular H-bond between the two OH groups, while in the other two isomers the intramolecular H-bond is broken and the two OH groups are H-bonded to oxygen atoms of 18C6. The complex formation with 18C6 substantially elongates the S1 lifetime from 7 ps for bare catechol and 2.0 ns for the catechol-H2O complex to 10.3 ns for the 18C6-catechol 1:1 complex. Density functional theory calculations of the 18C6-catechol 1:1 complex suggest that this elongation is attributed to a larger energy gap between the S1 ((1)??*) and (1)??* states than that of bare catechol or the catechol-H2O complex. In cyclohexane solution, the enhancement of the fluorescence intensity of catechol was found by adding 18C6, due to the formation of the 18C6-catechol complex in solution, and the complex has a longer S1 lifetime than that of catechol monomer. From the concentration dependence of the fluorescence intensity, we estimated the equilibrium constant K for the 18C6 + catechol ? 18C6-catechol reaction. The obtained value (log K = 2.3) in cyclohexane is comparable to those for alkali metal ions or other molecular ions, indicating that 18C6 efficiently captures catechol in solution. Therefore, 18C6 can be used as a sensitive sensor of catechol derivatives in solution with its high ability of fluorescence enhancement. PMID:25350575

  18. Aluminum complexation by catechol as determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, F.J.; McBride, M.B.

    1989-03-01

    Methods of ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometry were used to determine the stoichiometry and association constant for the Al-catechol complex from pH 3.8 to 4.6. Job's method of continuous variation indicated the Al-catechol complex had a 1:1 stoichiometry in the pH range studied. Aluminum titrations of catechol and pH titrations of catechol plus Al resulted in a shift in the UV spectra due to the formation of an Al-catechol complex absorbing UV radiation uniquely different than that of free catechol. General equations were developed for the determination of association constants assuming an organic and Al-organic complex absorb UV radiation. Aluminum titrations with constant catechol concentration yielded a log k/sub 0.1//sup c/ of 16.22 for a 1:1 Al-catechol complex. Calculated absorbance as a function of pH agree dwell with experimental pH titrations of solutions containing catechol plus Al. The fact that Al can be complexed by catechol at low pH indicates the o-hydroxy group provides a potential source for Al complexation in soil and surface waters.

  19. Nitroderivatives of catechol: from synthesis to application.

    PubMed

    Gavazov, Kiril B

    2012-03-01

    Nitroderivatives of catechol (NDCs) are reviewed with special emphasis on their complexes and applications. Binary, ternary and quaternary NDC complexes with more than 40 elements (aluminum, arsenic, boron, beryllium, calcium, cobalt, copper, iron, gallium, germanium, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, niobium, rare earth elements, silicon, tin, strontium, technetium, thallium, titanium, uranium, vanadium, tungsten, zinc and zirconium) are discussed and the key characteristics of the developed analytical procedures - tabulated. The bibliography includes 206 references. PMID:24061167

  20. Theoretical study of unimolecular decomposition of catechol.

    PubMed

    Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z; Kennedy, Eric M; Mackie, John C

    2010-01-21

    This study develops the reaction pathway map for the unimolecular decomposition of catechol, a model compound for various structural entities present in biomass, coal, and wood. Reaction rate constants at the high-pressure limit are calculated for the various possible initiation channels. It is found that catechol decomposition is initiated dominantly via hydroxyl H migration to a neighboring ortho carbon bearing an H atom. We identify the direct formation of o-benzoquinone to be unimportant at all temperatures, consistent with the absence of this species from experimental measurements. At temperatures higher than 1000 K, water elimination through concerted expulsion of a hydroxyl OH together with an ortho H becomes the most significant channel. Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus simulations are performed to establish the branching ratio between these two important channels as a function of temperature and pressure. All unimolecular routes to the reported major experimental products (CO, 1,3-C(4)H(6) and cyclo-C(5)H(6)) are shown to incur large activation barriers. The results presented herein should be instrumental in gaining a better understanding of the decomposition behavior of catechol-related compounds. PMID:20028002

  1. A new technique for staining catecholic residues in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Kalyani, R; Nellaiappan, K

    1989-01-01

    This technique for localizing catecholic residues in biological samples is based on the condensation of Besthorn's hydrazone (3-methyl-2-benzothiazolinone hydrazone hydrochloride (MBTH) with quinone residues obtained by the oxidation of catechols in the presence of ammonia. The product is a dark pink MBTH-quinone compound. This method is very sensitive and positive to catechol even at the 0.05 microgram level and the final product is chemically stable. PMID:2472680

  2. Catechol Siderophore Transport by Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Allred, Benjamin E.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Payne, Shelley M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Siderophores, small iron-binding molecules secreted by many microbial species, capture environmental iron for transport back into the cell. Vibrio cholerae synthesizes and uses the catechol siderophore vibriobactin and also uses siderophores secreted by other species, including enterobactin produced by Escherichia coli. E. coli secretes both canonical cyclic enterobactin and linear enterobactin derivatives likely derived from its cleavage by the enterobactin esterase Fes. We show here that V. cholerae does not use cyclic enterobactin but instead uses its linear derivatives. V. cholerae lacked both a receptor for efficient transport of cyclic enterobactin and enterobactin esterase to promote removal of iron from the ferrisiderophore complex. To further characterize the transport of catechol siderophores, we show that the linear enterobactin derivatives were transported into V. cholerae by either of the catechol siderophore receptors IrgA and VctA, which also transported the synthetic siderophore MECAM [1,3,5-N,N′,N″-tris-(2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl)-triaminomethylbenzene]. Vibriobactin is transported via the additional catechol siderophore receptor ViuA, while the Vibrio fluvialis siderophore fluvibactin was transported by all three catechol receptors. ViuB, a putative V. cholerae siderophore-interacting protein (SIP), functionally substituted for the E. coli ferric reductase YqjH, which promotes the release of iron from the siderophore in the bacterial cytoplasm. In V. cholerae, ViuB was required for the use of vibriobactin but was not required for the use of MECAM, fluvibactin, ferrichrome, or the linear derivatives of enterobactin. This suggests the presence of another protein in V. cholerae capable of promoting the release of iron from these siderophores. IMPORTANCE Vibrio cholerae is a major human pathogen and also serves as a model for the Vibrionaceae, which include other serious human and fish pathogens. The ability of these species to persist and acquire essential nutrients, including iron, in the environment is epidemiologically important but not well understood. In this work, we characterize the ability of V. cholerae to acquire iron by using siderophores produced by other organisms. We resolve confusion in the literature regarding its ability to use the Escherichia coli siderophore enterobactin and identify the receptor and TonB system used for the transport of several siderophores. The use of some siderophores did not require the ferric reductase ViuB, suggesting that an uncharacterized ferric reductase is present in V. cholerae. PMID:26100039

  3. Interaction of catechol and non-catechol substrates with externally or internally facing dopamine transporters

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ying-Jian; Zhen, Juan; Chen, Nianhang; Reith, Maarten E.A.

    2009-01-01

    Our previous work suggested that collapsing the Na+ gradient and membrane potential converts the dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) to an inward-facing conformation with a different substrate binding profile. Here, DAT expressing HEK 293 cells were permeabilized with digitonin, disrupting ion/voltage gradients and allowing passage of DAT substrates. The potency of p-tyramine and other non-catechols (d-amphetamine, ?-phenethylamine, MPP+) in inhibiting cocaine analog binding to DAT in digitonin-treated cells was markedly weakened to a level similar to that observed in cell-free membranes. In contrast, the potency of DA and another catechol, norepinephrine, was not significantly changed by the same treatment, whereas epinephrine showed only a modest reduction. These findings suggest catechol substrates interact symmetrically with both sides of DAT and non-catechol substrates favor binding to outward-facing transporter. In the cocaine analog binding assay, the mutant W84L displayed enhanced intrinsic binding affinity for substrates in interacting with both outward- and inward- facing states; D313N showed WT-like symmetric binding; but D267L and E428Q showed an apparent improvement in the permeation pathway from the external face towards the substrate site. Thus, the structure of both substrate and transporter play a role in the sidedness and mode of interaction between them. PMID:19519772

  4. Adsorption mechanism and valency of catechol-functionalized hyperbranched polyglycerols

    PubMed Central

    Krysiak, Stefanie; Wei, Qiang; Rischka, Klaus; Hartwig, Andreas; Haag, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nature often serves as a model system for developing new adhesives. In aqueous environments, mussel-inspired adhesives are promising candidates. Understanding the mechanism of the extraordinarily strong adhesive bonds of the catechol group will likely aid in the development of adhesives. With this aim, we study the adhesion of catechol-based adhesives to metal oxides on the molecular level using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The comparison of single catechols (dopamine) with multiple catechols on hyperbranched polyglycerols (hPG) at various pH and dwell times allowed us to further increase our understanding. In particular, we were able to elucidate how to achieve strong bonds of different valency. It was concluded that hyperbranched polyglycerols with added catechol end groups are promising candidates for durable surface coatings. PMID:26150898

  5. Rice ( Oryza) hemoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo-Peter, Raúl; Moran, Jose F.; Sarath, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice ( Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a single copy of the thb gene exist in Oryza sativa var. indica and O. sativa var. japonica, Hb transcripts coexist in rice organs and Hb polypeptides exist in rice embryonic and vegetative organs and in the cytoplasm of differentiating cells. At the structural level, the crystal structure of rice Hb1 has been elucidated, and the structures of the other rice Hbs have been modeled. Kinetic analysis indicated that rice Hb1 and 2, and possibly rice Hb3 and 4, exhibit a very high affinity for O 2, whereas rice Hb5 and tHb possibly exhibit a low to moderate affinity for O 2. Based on the accumulated information on the properties of rice Hbs and data from the analysis of other plant and non-plant Hbs, it is likely that Hbs play a variety of roles in rice organs, including O 2-transport, O 2-sensing, NO-scavenging and redox-signaling. From an evolutionary perspective, an outline for the evolution of rice Hbs is available. Rice nshb and thb genes vertically evolved through different lineages, rice nsHbs evolved into clade I and clade II lineages and rice nshbs and thbs evolved under the effect of neutral selection. This review also reveals lacunae in our ability to completely understand rice Hbs. Primary lacunae are the absence of experimental information about the precise functions of rice Hbs, the properties of modeled rice Hbs and the cis-elements and trans-acting factors that regulate the expression of rice hb genes, and the partial understanding of the evolution of rice Hbs. PMID:25653837

  6. Bioinspired catecholic copolymers for antifouling surface coatings.

    PubMed

    Cho, Joon Hee; Shanmuganathan, Kadhiravan; Ellison, Christopher J

    2013-05-01

    We report here a synthetic approach to prepare poly(methyl methacrylate)-polydopamine diblock (PMMA-PDA) and triblock (PDA-PMMA-PDA) copolymers combining mussel-inspired catecholic oxidative chemistry and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). These copolymers display very good solubility in a range of organic solvents and also a broad band photo absorbance that increases with increasing PDA content in the copolymer. Spin-cast thin films of the copolymer were stable in water and showed a sharp reduction (by up to 50%) in protein adsorption compared to those of neat PMMA. Also the peak decomposition temperature of the copolymers was up to 43°C higher than neat PMMA. The enhanced solvent processability, thermal stability and low protein adsorption characteristics of this copolymer makes it attractive for variety of applications including antifouling coatings on large surfaces such as ship hulls, buoys, and wave energy converters. PMID:23544666

  7. Molecular detection of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola, and Burkholderia glumae in infected rice seeds and leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is particularly useful for plant pathogen detection. In the present study, multiplex PCR and SYBR green real-time PCR were developed to facilitate simultaneous detection of three important rice pathogens, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, X. oryzae pv. oryzicola, and Bur...

  8. Synthesis of catechol estrogens by human uterus and leiomyoma

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, V.V.; Hanjani, P.; Rajan, R.

    1981-02-01

    Homogenates of human endometrial, myometrial and leiomyoma tissues were incubated with (2,4,6,7-/sub 3/H)-estradiol and tritiated catechol estrogens were isolated and identified. Though 2- and 4-hydroxylations were about the same in endometrium, 4-hydroxylation was two to four fold higher than 2-hydroxylation in myometrium and leiomyoma. However, endometrium showed greater capacity to form both 2- and 4-hydroxyestrogens than the other two tissues. Both 2- and 4-hydroxylations were significantly less than in myometrium. In view of the reports indicating that inhibitors of catechol 0-methyl transferase (COMT) might act as antineoplastic agents due to their interference with t-RNA methylases and since catechol estrogens inhibit COMT, the present results suggest that endogenous synthesis of catechol estrogens may play an important role in the pathophysiology of uterine leiomyoma.

  9. OryzaGenome: Genome Diversity Database of Wild Oryza Species.

    PubMed

    Ohyanagi, Hajime; Ebata, Toshinobu; Huang, Xuehui; Gong, Hao; Fujita, Masahiro; Mochizuki, Takako; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Kaminuma, Eli; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Feng, Qi; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Han, Bin; Kurata, Nori

    2016-01-01

    The species in the genus Oryza, encompassing nine genome types and 23 species, are a rich genetic resource and may have applications in deeper genomic analyses aiming to understand the evolution of plant genomes. With the advancement of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, a flood of Oryza species reference genomes and genomic variation information has become available in recent years. This genomic information, combined with the comprehensive phenotypic information that we are accumulating in our Oryzabase, can serve as an excellent genotype-phenotype association resource for analyzing rice functional and structural evolution, and the associated diversity of the Oryza genus. Here we integrate our previous and future phenotypic/habitat information and newly determined genotype information into a united repository, named OryzaGenome, providing the variant information with hyperlinks to Oryzabase. The current version of OryzaGenome includes genotype information of 446 O. rufipogon accessions derived by imputation and of 17 accessions derived by imputation-free deep sequencing. Two variant viewers are implemented: SNP Viewer as a conventional genome browser interface and Variant Table as a text-based browser for precise inspection of each variant one by one. Portable VCF (variant call format) file or tab-delimited file download is also available. Following these SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) data, reference pseudomolecules/scaffolds/contigs and genome-wide variation information for almost all of the closely and distantly related wild Oryza species from the NIG Wild Rice Collection will be available in future releases. All of the resources can be accessed through http://viewer.shigen.info/oryzagenome/. PMID:26578696

  10. OryzaGenome: Genome Diversity Database of Wild Oryza Species

    PubMed Central

    Ohyanagi, Hajime; Ebata, Toshinobu; Huang, Xuehui; Gong, Hao; Fujita, Masahiro; Mochizuki, Takako; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Kaminuma, Eli; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Feng, Qi; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Han, Bin; Kurata, Nori

    2016-01-01

    The species in the genus Oryza, encompassing nine genome types and 23 species, are a rich genetic resource and may have applications in deeper genomic analyses aiming to understand the evolution of plant genomes. With the advancement of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, a flood of Oryza species reference genomes and genomic variation information has become available in recent years. This genomic information, combined with the comprehensive phenotypic information that we are accumulating in our Oryzabase, can serve as an excellent genotype–phenotype association resource for analyzing rice functional and structural evolution, and the associated diversity of the Oryza genus. Here we integrate our previous and future phenotypic/habitat information and newly determined genotype information into a united repository, named OryzaGenome, providing the variant information with hyperlinks to Oryzabase. The current version of OryzaGenome includes genotype information of 446 O. rufipogon accessions derived by imputation and of 17 accessions derived by imputation-free deep sequencing. Two variant viewers are implemented: SNP Viewer as a conventional genome browser interface and Variant Table as a text-based browser for precise inspection of each variant one by one. Portable VCF (variant call format) file or tab-delimited file download is also available. Following these SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) data, reference pseudomolecules/scaffolds/contigs and genome-wide variation information for almost all of the closely and distantly related wild Oryza species from the NIG Wild Rice Collection will be available in future releases. All of the resources can be accessed through http://viewer.shigen.info/oryzagenome/. PMID:26578696

  11. Assessment of genotoxicity of catecholics using impedimetric DNA-biosensor.

    PubMed

    Ensafi, Ali A; Amini, Maryam; Rezaei, B

    2014-03-15

    The potential toxicity of catecholics is a big concern, because the catechol-derived semiquinone radical after the oxidation of catechol (CA) can donate an H-atom to generate quinone, and during this process a superoxide anion radical may be produced. Considering the fact that catecholics are highly consumed in our daily life and some drugs also contain one or more CA moieties, we speculate that CA's toxicity might not be insurmountable. Therefore, finding approaches to investigate catecholics potential toxicity is of great significance. Here in, an electrochemical protocol for direct monitoring of genotoxicity of catecholics is described. CA encapsulated on MWCNTs (CA@MWCNT) through continuous cyclic voltammetric on the surface of pencil graphite electrode (PGE). Subsequently, a DNA functionalized biosensor (DNA/CA@MWCNT/PGE) was prepared and characterized for the detection and the investigation of DNA damage induced by radicals generated from catecholics. The change in the charge transfer resistance (Rct) after the incubation of the DNA biosensor in the damaging solution for a certain time was used as an indicator for DNA damage. Incubation of DNA-modified electrode with CA solution containing Cu(II), Cr(VI) and Fe(III) has been shown to result in oxidative damage to the DNA and change in the electrochemical properties. It was found that the presence of Cu(II), Cr(VI) and Fe(III) in solution caused damage to DNA. The inhibitory effect of glutathione and plumbagin on the CA-mediated DNA damage has also been investigated using the biosensor. The minimum concentration of the metal ions for CA induced DNA damage was investigated. Recognition of suitable matrixes for CA-mediated DNA damage can be assessed using proposed DNA biosensor. Such direct monitoring of the DNA damage holds great promise for designing new biosensors with modification of the biosensor with different damaging agents. PMID:24121207

  12. Catechol conjugates are in vivo metabolites of Salicis cortex.

    PubMed

    Knuth, Susanne; Abdelsalam, Rania M; Khayyal, Mohamed T; Schweda, Frank; Heilmann, Jörg; Kees, Martin Georg; Mair, Georg; Kees, Frieder; Jürgenliemk, Guido

    2013-11-01

    After oral administration of 100 mg/kg b. w. (235.8 µmol/kg) salicortin to Wistar rats, peak serum concentrations of 1.43 mg/L (13.0 µM) catechol were detected after 0.5 h in addition to salicylic acid by HPLC-DAD after serum processing with β-glucuronidase and sulphatase. Both metabolites could also be detected in the serum of healthy volunteers following oral administration of a willow bark extract (Salicis cortex, Salix spec., Salicaceae) corresponding to 240 mg of salicin after processing with both enzymes. In humans, the cmax (1.46 mg/L, 13.3 µM) of catechol was reached after 1.2 h. The predominant phase-II metabolite in humans and rats was catechol sulphate, determined by HPLC analysis of serum samples processed with only one kind of enzyme. Without serum processing with glucuronidase and sulphatase, no unconjugated catechol could be detected in human and animal serum samples. As catechol is described as an anti-inflammatory compound, these results may contribute to the elucidation of the mechanism of the action of willow bark extract. PMID:24146062

  13. Dietary Catechols and their Relationship to Microbial Endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Neil; Walton, Nicholas J

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines the evidence that the ability of neuroendocrine hormones, notably norepinephrine and epinephrine, to stimulate bacterial growth in iron-restricted media is not limited to molecules with a catecholamine structure but is also possessed by a variety of other catechols, many of which are of plant origin and are common in the diet. Catechols derived from the diet, such as the tea flavanols, can be present in the plasma at submicromolar and micromolar concentrations, comparable with the concentrations of catecholamines that have been shown to be effective in promoting bacterial growth under conditions of iron restriction, although many dietary catechols, notably quercetin derivatives, are present in the plasma and tissues largely as conjugates, from which the catechol function has been lost. Finally, although bacterial growth promotion through relief of iron restriction appears to be exhibited by a wide range of catechols, the gene-activation effects of catecholamines demonstrated to occur in some bacteria may be much more specific, although the definitive experiments to establish structure-function relationships have yet to be reported. PMID:26589215

  14. Removal of arsenic compounds from spent catecholated polymer

    DOEpatents

    Fish, Richard H.

    1985-01-01

    Described is a process for removing arsenic from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: a. treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20.degree. to 100.degree. C. with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10 and, b. separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment is in two steps wherein step (a) is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, steps (a) and (b) are repeated using a bicarbonate.

  15. Evaluation of Mut(S) and Mut? Pichia pastoris strains for membrane-bound catechol-O-methyltransferase biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pedro, A Q; Oppolzer, D; Bonifcio, M J; Maia, C J; Queiroz, J A; Passarinha, L A

    2015-04-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT, EC 2.1.1.6) is an enzyme that catalyzes the methylation of catechol substrates, and while structural and functional studies of its membrane-bound isoform (MBCOMT) are still hampered by low recombinant production, Pichia pastoris has been described as an attractive host for the production of correctly folded and inserted membrane proteins. Hence, in this work, MBCOMT biosynthesis was developed using P. pastoris X33 and KM71H cells in shake flasks containing a semidefined medium with different methanol concentrations. Moreover, after P. pastoris glass beads lysis, biologically and immunologically active hMBCOMT was found mainly in the solubilized membrane fraction whose kinetic parameters were identical to its correspondent native enzyme. In addition, mixed feeds of methanol and glycerol or sorbitol were also employed, and its levels quantified using liquid chromatography coupled to refractive index detection. Overall, for the first time, two P. pastoris strains with opposite phenotypes were applied for MBCOMT biosynthesis under the control of the strongly methanol-inducible alcohol oxidase (AOX) promoter. Moreover, this eukaryotic system seems to be a promising approach to deliver MBCOMT in high quantities from fermentor cultures with a lower cost-benefit due to the cheaper cultivation media coupled with the higher titers tipically achieved in biorreactors, when compared with previously reported mammallian cell cultures. PMID:25712908

  16. Iron-Binding Catechols and Virulence in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Henry J.

    1973-01-01

    Previous work suggested that virulent bacteria, which can grow rapidly in serum, must possess a specific mechanism for removing iron from its transferrin complex. Two strains of Escherichia coli were examined with this in mind. Strain O141, which showed inoculum-dependent growth in serum and multiplied in the mouse peritoneum, secreted iron-binding catechols into both synthetic medium and serum. One of these compounds has an association constant for iron similar to that of transferrin. Both transferrin and ethylenediamine-di-o-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid (EDDA), which have very high affinities for ferric iron, induced catechol synthesis in growing cultures of strain O111. This organism was inhibited by normal horse serum. Further work showed that traces of specific antibody inhibited catechol synthesis by O111 exposed to EDDA; therefore, the existence of this inhibitory process means that the organism can no longer obtain Fe3+, which all remains bound to transferrin in serum. In vivo, the inhibition of O111 is similar to that produced by serum in vitro. Neither phagocytosis nor killing by complement appeared to be of any significance during the first 4 h of the infections. Significantly, the purified catechol was capable of abolishing bacteriostasis in vivo. Since these results show that the production of iron-binding catechols is essential for rapid bacterial growth both in vitro and in vivo, these compounds should therefore be considered as true virulence factors. Conversely, any interference by the host with the production or activity of these compounds would constitute an important aspect of antibacterial defense. Images PMID:16558077

  17. Polyphenol oxidase from yacon roots (Smallanthus sonchifolius).

    PubMed

    Neves, Valdir Augusto; da Silva, Maraiza Aparecida

    2007-03-21

    Polyphenol oxidase (E.C. 1.14.18.1) (PPO) extracted from yacon roots (Smallanthus sonchifolius) was partially purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation and separation on Sephadex G-100. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 45 490+/-3500 Da and Km values of 0.23, 1.14, 1.34, and 5.0 mM for the substrates caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, 4-methylcatechol, and catechol, respectively. When assayed with resorcinol, DL-DOPA, pyrogallol, protocatechuic, p-coumaric, ferulic, and cinnamic acids, catechin, and quercetin, the PPO showed no activity. The optimum pH varied from 5.0 to 6.6, depending on substrate. PPO activity was inhibited by various phenolic and nonphenolic compounds. p-Coumaric and cinnamic acids showed competitive inhibition, with Ki values of 0.017 and 0.011 mM, respectively, using chlorogenic acid as substrate. Heat inactivation from 60 to 90 degrees C showed the enzyme to be relatively stable at 60-70 degrees C, with progressive inactivation when incubated at 80 and 90 degrees C. The Ea (apparent activation energy) for inactivation was 93.69 kJ mol-1. Sucrose, maltose, glucose, fructose, and trehalose at high concentrations appeared to protect yacon PPO against thermal inactivation at 75 and 80 degrees C. PMID:17316020

  18. A tyrosinase with an abnormally high tyrosine hydroxylase/dopa oxidase ratio.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Romero, Diana; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio; Solano, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    The sequencing of the genome of Ralstonia solanacearum[Salanoubat M, Genin S, Artiguenave F, et al. (2002) Nature 415, 497-502] revealed several genes that putatively code for polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). This soil-borne pathogenic bacterium withers a wide range of plants. We detected the expression of two PPO genes (accession numbers NP_518458 and NP_519622) with high similarity to tyrosinases, both containing the six conserved histidines required to bind the pair of type-3 copper ions at the active site. Generation of null mutants in those genes by homologous recombination mutagenesis and protein purification allowed us to correlate each gene with its enzymatic activity. In contrast with all tyrosinases so far studied, the enzyme NP_518458 shows higher monophenolase than o-diphenolase activity and its initial activity does not depend on the presence of l-dopa cofactor. On the other hand, protein NP_519622 is an enzyme with a clear preference to oxidize o-diphenols and only residual monophenolase activity, behaving as a catechol oxidase. These catalytic characteristics are discussed in relation to two other characteristics apart from the six conserved histidines. One is the putative presence of a seventh histidine which interacts with the carboxy group on the substrate and controls the preference for carboxylated and decarboxylated substrates. The second is the size of the residue isosteric with the aromatic F261 reported in sweet potato catechol oxidase which acts as a gate to control accessibility to CuA at the active site. PMID:16403014

  19. Inhibition of apple polyphenol oxidase activity by sodium chlorite.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shengmin; Luo, Yaguang; Feng, Hao

    2006-05-17

    Sodium chlorite (SC) was shown to have strong efficacy both as a sanitizer to reduce microbial growth on produce and as a browning inhibitor on fresh-cut apples in previous experiments. This study was undertaken to investigate the inhibitory effect of SC on polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and the associated mechanisms. The experiment showed that SC had a strong inhibition of apple PPO. The extent of inhibition was influenced by SC concentration and pH. Inhibition was most prominent at pH 4.5, at which approximately 30% of enzyme activity was lost in the presence of 10 mM SC, followed closely by that at pH 4.0 with a 26% reduction in PPO activity. The inhibition mode was determined using Dixon and Lineweaver-Burk plots, which established SC to be a mixed inhibitor of apple PPO for the oxidation of catechol. Preincubation of PPO with 8 mM SC for 8 min caused a maximum of 46% activity reduction compared to noninhibited control. However, preincubation of SC with catechol for 8 min resulted in no additional loss of PPO activity. These findings provide further evidence that the inhibition of PPO activity by SC is due to the inhibition of the enzyme itself rather than removal of the substrate. PMID:19127746

  20. A catechol biosensor based on electrospun carbon nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dawei; Pang, Zengyuan; Chen, Xiaodong; Luo, Lei; Cai, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    Summary Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were prepared by combining electrospinning with a high-temperature carbonization technique. And a polyphenol biosensor was fabricated by blending the obtained CNFs with laccase and Nafion. Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) were, respectively, employed to investigate the structures and morphologies of the CNFs and of the mixtures. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry were employed to study the electrocatalysis of the catechol biosensor. The results indicated that the sensitivity of the biosensor was 41 AmM?1, the detection limit was 0.63 M, the linear range was 11310 M and the response time was within 2 seconds, which excelled most other laccase-based biosensor reported. Furthermore, the biosensor showed good repeatability, reproducibility, stability and tolerance to interferences. This novel biosensor also demonstrated its promising application in detecting catechol in real water samples. PMID:24778958

  1. Brain catechol synthesis - Control by brain tyrosine concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, R. J.; Larin, F.; Mostafapour, S.; Fernstrom, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    Brain catechol synthesis was estimated by measuring the rate at which brain dopa levels rose following decarboxylase inhibition. Dopa accumulation was accelerated by tyrosine administration, and decreased by treatments that lowered brain tyrosine concentrations (for example, intraperitoneal tryptophan, leucine, or parachlorophenylalanine). A low dose of phenylalanine elevated brain tyrosine without accelerating dopa synthesis. Our findings raise the possibility that nutritional and endocrine factors might influence brain catecholamine synthesis by controlling the availability of tyrosine.

  2. Glucose oxidase--an overview.

    PubMed

    Bankar, Sandip B; Bule, Mahesh V; Singhal, Rekha S; Ananthanarayan, Laxmi

    2009-01-01

    Glucose oxidase (beta-D-glucose:oxygen 1-oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.2.3.4) catalyzes the oxidation of beta-D-glucose to gluconic acid, by utilizing molecular oxygen as an electron acceptor with simultaneous production of hydrogen peroxide. Microbial glucose oxidase is currently receiving much attention due to its wide applications in chemical, pharmaceutical, food, beverage, clinical chemistry, biotechnology and other industries. Novel applications of glucose oxidase in biosensors have increased the demand in recent years. Present review discusses the production, recovery, characterization, immobilization and applications of glucose oxidase. Production of glucose oxidase by fermentation is detailed, along with recombinant methods. Various purification techniques for higher recovery of glucose oxidase are described here. Issues of enzyme kinetics, stability studies and characterization are addressed. Immobilized preparations of glucose oxidase are also discussed. Applications of glucose oxidase in various industries and as analytical enzymes are having an increasing impact on bioprocessing. PMID:19374943

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of the African Strain AXO1947 of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Huguet-Tapia, J C; Peng, Z; Yang, B; Yin, Z; Liu, S; White, F F

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae is the etiological agent of bacterial rice blight. Three distinct clades of X. oryzae pv. oryzae are known. We present the complete annotated genome of the African clade strain AXO194 using long-read single-molecule PacBio sequencing technology. The genome comprises a single chromosome of 4,674,975 bp and encodes for nine transcriptional activator-like (TAL) effectors. The approach and data presented in this announcement provide information for complex bacterial genome organization and the discovery of new virulence effectors, and they facilitate target characterization of TAL effectors. PMID:26868406

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of the African Strain AXO1947 of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Huguet-Tapia, J. C.; Peng, Z.; Yang, B.; Yin, Z.; Liu, S.

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae is the etiological agent of bacterial rice blight. Three distinct clades of X. oryzae pv. oryzae are known. We present the complete annotated genome of the African clade strain AXO194 using long-read single-molecule PacBio sequencing technology. The genome comprises a single chromosome of 4,674,975 bp and encodes for nine transcriptional activator-like (TAL) effectors. The approach and data presented in this announcement provide information for complex bacterial genome organization and the discovery of new virulence effectors, and they facilitate target characterization of TAL effectors. PMID:26868406

  5. The role of DNA methylation in catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiao-Fei; Wu, Xiao-Rong; Xue, Ming; Wang, Yan; Wang, Jie; Li, Yang; Suriguga,; Zhang, Guang-Yao; Yi, Zong-Chun

    2012-11-15

    Catechol is one of phenolic metabolites of benzene in vivo. Catechol is also widely used in pharmaceutical and chemical industries. In addition, fruits, vegetables and cigarette smoke also contain catechol. Our precious study showed that several benzene metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone, and 1,2,4-benzenetriol) inhibited erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. In present study, the effect of catechol on erythroid differentiation of K562 cells was investigated. Moreover, to address the role of DNA methylation in catechol-induced effect on erythroid differentiation in K562 cells, methylation levels of erythroid-specific genes were analyzed by Quantitative MassARRAY methylation analysis platform. Benzidine staining showed that exposure to catechol enhanced hemin-induced hemoglobin accumulation in K562 cells in concentration- and time-dependent manners. The mRNA expression of erythroid specific genes, including α-globin, β-globin, γ-globin, erythroid 5-aminolevulinate synthase, erythroid porphobilinogen deaminase, and transcription factor GATA-1 genes, showed a significant concentration-dependent increase in catechol-treated K562 cells. The exposure to catechol caused a decrease in DNA methylation levels at a few CpG sites in some erythroid specific genes including α-globin, β-globin and erythroid porphobilinogen deaminase genes. These results indicated that catechol improved erythroid differentiation potency of K562 cells at least partly via up-regulating transcription of some erythroid related genes, and suggested that inhibition of DNA methylation might be involved in up-regulated expression of some erythroid related genes. -- Highlights: ► Catechol enhanced hemin-induced hemoglobin accumulation. ► Exposure to catechol resulted in up-regulated expression of erythroid genes. ► Catechol reduced methylation levels at some CpG sites in erythroid genes.

  6. Biological degradation of catechol in wastewater using the sequencing continuous-inflow reactor (SCR)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Catechol is used in many industries. It can be removed from wastewater by various methods but biological processes are the most superior and commonly used technology. The SCR is a modified form of SBR used to degrade catechol. The objective of this study was to investigate the performance of SCR for biodegradation and mineralization of catechol under various inlet concentrations (6301500 mg/L) and hydraulic retention times (HRT) (189 h). This study used a bench scale SCR setup to test catechol degradation. The acclimation time of biomass for catechol at degradation at 630 mg/L was 41 d. The SCR operating cycle time was 6 h and the consecutive times taken for aerating, settling and decanting were 4, 1.5 and 0.5 h, respectively. This study investigated the effects of inlet catechol concentration (6301560 mg/L) and HRT (189 h). The average catechol removal efficiencies in steady-state conditions of 630, 930, 12954 and 1559 mg/L of catechol were 98.5%, 98.5%, 98.2% and 96.9% in terms catechol and 97.8%, 97.7%, 96.4% and 94.3% for COD, respectively. SCR with acclimated biomasses could effectively remove the catechol and the corresponding COD from wastewater with concentrations of up to 1560, at the loading rate of 5.38 kg COD/m3.d and at a HRT of up to 13 h. The HRT was determined as an important variable affecting catechol removal from wastewater. Reducing the HRT to below 13 h led to reduced removal of catechol and COD. PMID:24499534

  7. Submergence enhances expression of a gene encoding 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase in deepwater rice.

    PubMed

    Mekhedov, S I; Kende, H

    1996-06-01

    Partial submergence greatly stimulates internodal growth in deep water rice (Oryza sativa L.). Previous work has shown that the effect of submergence is, at least in part, mediated by ethylene, which accumulates in the air spaces of submerged internodes. To investigate the expression of the genes encoding ethylene biosynthetic enzymes during accelerated growth of deep water rice, we cloned a 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidase cDNA (OS-ACO1) from internodes of submerged plants and measured the activity of the enzyme in tissue extracts with an improved assay. We found an increase in ACC oxidase mRNA levels and enzyme activity after 4 to 24 h of submergence. Thus, it is likely that ethylene biosynthesis in internodes of deep water rice is controlled, at least in part, at the level of ACC oxidase. PMID:8759917

  8. Spinach thylakoid polyphenol oxidase isolation, activation, and properties of the native chloroplast enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Golbeck, J.H.; Cammarata, K.V.

    1981-05-01

    Polyphenol oxidase activity (E.C. 1.14,18.1) has been found in two enzyme species isolated from thylakoid membranes of spinach chloroplasts. The proteins were released from the membrane by sonication and purified >900-fold by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration, and ion-exchange chromatography. The enzymes appear to be the tetramer and monomer of a subunit with a molecular weight of 42,500 as determined by lithium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. Sonication releases polyphenol oxidase from the membrane largely in the latent state. In the absence of added fatty acids, the isolated enzyme spontaneously, but slowly, activates with time. Purified polyphenol oxidase utilizes o-diphenols as substrates and shows no detectable levels of monophenol or p-diphenol oxidase activities. Suitable substrates include chlorogenic acid, catechol, caffeic acid, pyrogallol, and dopamine; however, the enzyme is substrate-inhibited by the last four at concentrations near their K/sub m/. A large seasonal variation in polyphenol oxidase activity may result from a decrease in enzyme content rather than inhibition of the enzyme present.

  9. Excess boron reduces polyphenol oxidase activities in embryo and endosperm of maize seed during germination.

    PubMed

    Oler, Hillya; Kocaaliskan, Ismail

    2007-01-01

    The effects of increasing concentrations of boron (0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 20 mM) as boric acid on the rate of germination and polyphenol oxidase activities in embryo and endosperm tissues of maize seeds (Zea mays L. cv. Arifiye) were studied. The germination percentage of maize seeds was not affected by boron concentrations up to 10 mM, and decreased by 20 mM. Distilled water and lower boron concentrations (0.1 and 1 mM) increased polyphenol oxidase activities at the beginning of germination up to 12 h whereas its excess levels (10 and 20 mM) decreased polyphenol oxidase activities in embryos and endosperm during germination. Polyphenol oxidase activities with o-diphenolic substrates (caffeic acid, catechol and dopa) were found to be higher than with a monophenolic substrat (tyrosine) in both embryos and endosperms. Further, caffeic acid oxidizing polyphenol oxidase was found to show more activity in embryos of the seeds germinating in distilled water when compared to other substrates. PMID:17425115

  10. CHARACTERISTICS OF POLYPHENOL OXIDASES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO, EC 1.14.18.1 or EC 1.10.3.1) catalyzes the oxidation of o-diphenols to o-quinones. Highly reactive o-quinones couple with phenolics and specific amino acids on proteins to form the characteristic browning products in many wounded fruits, vegetables, and leaf tissues of plant...

  11. Rice, Japonica (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Main, Marcy; Frame, Bronwyn; Wang, Kan

    2015-01-01

    The importance of rice, as a food crop, is reflected in the extensive global research being conducted in an effort to improve and better understand this particular agronomic plant. In regard to biotechnology, this has led to the development of numerous genetic transformation protocols. Over the years, many of these methods have become increasingly straightforward, rapid, and efficient, thereby making rice valuable as a model crop for scientific research and functional genomics. The focus of this chapter is on one such protocol that uses Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Oryza sativa L. ssp. Japonica cv. Nipponbare with an emphasis on tissue desiccation. The explants consist of callus derived from mature seeds which are cocultivated on filter paper postinfection. Hygromycin selection is used for the recovery of subsequent genetically engineered events. PMID:25300839

  12. Characterization of polyphenol oxidase from Cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana L.) fruit.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Karent; Osorio, Edison

    2016-04-15

    Cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana) is an exotic fruit highly valued, however it is a very rich source of polyphenol oxidase (PPO). In this study, Cape gooseberry PPO was isolated and biochemically characterized. The enzyme was extracted and purified using acetone and aqueous two-phase systems. The data indicated that PPO had the highest substrate affinity for chlorogenic acid, 4-methylcatechol and catechol. Chlorogenic acid was the most suitable substrate (Km=0.56±0.07 mM and Vmax=53.15±2.03 UPPO mL(-1) min(-1)). The optimal pH values were 5.5 for catechol and 4-methylcatechol and 5.0 for chlorogenic acid. Optimal temperatures were 40°C for catechol, 25°C for 4-methylcatechol and 20°C for chlorogenic acid. In inhibition tests, the most potent inhibitor was found to be ascorbic acid followed by L-cysteine and quercetin. This study shows possible treatments that can be implemented during the processing of Cape gooseberry fruits to prevent browning. PMID:26616939

  13. A homolog of an Escherichia coli phosphate-binding protein gene from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, C. M.; White, F. F.; Heaton, L. A.; Guikema, J. A.; Leach, J. E.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    A Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae gene with sequence similarity to an Escherichia coli phosphate-binding protein gene (phoS) produces a periplasmic protein of apparent M(r) 35,000 when expressed in E. coli. Amino terminal sequencing revealed that a signal peptide is removed during transport to the periplasm in E. coli.

  14. Partial purification and characterization of polyphenol oxidase from persimmon.

    PubMed

    Navarro, José L; Tárrega, Amparo; Sentandreu, Miguel A; Sentandreu, Enrique

    2014-08-15

    Activity of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) from "Rojo Brillante" persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.) fruits was characterized. Crude extracts were used for characterization of enzyme activity and stability at different temperatures (60, 70 and 80 °C), pHs (from 3.5 to 7.5) and substrate concentrations (catechol from 0 to 0.5M). Maximum enzyme activity was reached at pH 5.5 and 55 °C. Enzyme stability was higher than PPO activities found in other natural sources, since above pH 5.5 the minimum time needed to achieve an enzyme inactivation of 90% was 70 min at 80 °C. However, at pH 4.0 the enzyme stability decreased, reaching inactivation levels above 90% after 10 min even at 60 °C. Thus it was concluded that acidification can circumvent browning problems caused by PPO activity. Moreover, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the enriched extract revealed the presence of at least four bands with strong oxidase activity, suggesting the existence of different PPO isoforms. PMID:24679782

  15. A SENSITIVE METHOD FOR THE ASSAY OF CATECHOL AMINES.

    PubMed

    ARMITAGE, A K; VANE, J R

    1964-02-01

    A strip of fundus from a rat's stomach was suspended in Krebs solution containing 5-hydroxytryptamine. Movements of the muscle were recorded by means of a frontal writing lever giving a magnification of sixteen-times. The strip relaxed when isoprenaline, adrenaline or noradrenaline was added to the organ-bath in concentrations of 0.2 to 2 ng/ml. The preparation was most sensitive to isoprenaline and least sensitive to noradrenaline. The components of a mixture of two catechol amines could be assayed by superfusing the rat stomach and a chick rectum in the same stream of fluid. PMID:14126052

  16. Detection of Catechol by Potentiometric-Flow Injection Analysis in the Presence of Interferents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsford, Suzanne K.; Widera, Justyna; Zhang, Hong

    2007-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate analytical chemistry experiment developed to teach instrumental lab skills while incorporating common interferents encountered in the real-world analysis of catechol. The lab technique incorporates potentiometric-flow injection analysis on a dibenzo-18-crown-6 dual platinum electrode to detect catechol in

  17. Removal of airborne toxic chemicals by porous organic polymers containing metal-catecholates.

    PubMed

    Weston, Mitchell H; Peterson, Gregory W; Browe, Matthew A; Jones, Paulette; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T; Nguyen, Sonbinh T

    2013-04-14

    Porous organic polymers bearing metal-catecholate groups were evaluated for their ability to remove airborne ammonia, cyanogen chloride, sulphur dioxide, and octane by micro-breakthrough analysis. For ammonia, the metal-catecholate materials showed remarkable uptake under humid conditions. PMID:23463320

  18. Detection of Catechol by Potentiometric-Flow Injection Analysis in the Presence of Interferents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsford, Suzanne K.; Widera, Justyna; Zhang, Hong

    2007-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate analytical chemistry experiment developed to teach instrumental lab skills while incorporating common interferents encountered in the real-world analysis of catechol. The lab technique incorporates potentiometric-flow injection analysis on a dibenzo-18-crown-6 dual platinum electrode to detect catechol in…

  19. Purification and structural analysis of membrane-bound polyphenol oxidase from Fuji apple.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Zhao, Jin-Hong; Wen, Xin; Ni, Yuan-Ying

    2015-09-15

    Membrane-bound polyphenol oxidase (mPPO) in Fuji apple (Malus domestica Borkh. cv. Red Fuji) was purified and analyzed with a nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometer. The three-dimensional model and binding site of mPPO to 4-methyl catechol were also studied using molecular docking. mPPO was purified 54.41-fold using temperature-induced phase partitioning technique and ion exchange chromatography. mPPO had a molecular weight of 67.3kDa. Even though a significant level of homology was observed between mPPO and the soluble polyphenol oxidase in the copper binding sequence, there was another region, rich in histidine residues, which differed in 13 amino acids. The three-dimensional structure of mPPO consisted of six ?-helices, two short ?-strands, and ten random coils. The putative substrate-binding pocket contained six polar or charged amino acids, His191, His221, Trp224, Trp228, Phe227, and Val190. Trp224 and Trp228 formed hydrogen bonds with 4-methyl-catechol. PMID:25863612

  20. Evaluation of the oxidase like activity of nanoceria and its application in colorimetric assays.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Akhtar; Cunningham, Jessica; Bulbul, Gonca; Andreescu, Silvana

    2015-07-23

    Nanomaterial-based enzyme mimics have attracted considerable interest in chemical analysis as alternative catalysts to natural enzymes. However, the conditions in which such particles can replace biological catalysts and their selectivity and reactivity profiles are not well defined. This work explored the oxidase like properties of nanoceria particles in the development of colorimetric assays for the detection of dopamine and catechol. Selectivity of the system with respect to several phenolic compounds, the effect of interferences and real sample analysis are discussed. The conditions of use such as buffer composition, selectivity, pH, reaction time and particle type are defined. Detection limits of 1.5 and 0.2?M were obtained with nanoceria for dopamine and catechol. The same assay could be used as a general sensing platform for the detection of other phenolics. However, the sensitivity of the method varies significantly with the particle type, buffer composition, pH and with the structure of the phenolic compound. The results demonstrate that nanoceria particles can be used for the development of cost effective and sensitive methods for the detection of these compounds. However, the selection of the particle system and experimental conditions is critical for achieving high sensitivity. Recommendations are provided on the selection of the particle system and reaction conditions to maximize the oxidase like activity of nanoceria. PMID:26231899

  1. Role of the tertiary structure in the diphenol oxidase activity of Octopus vulgaris hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Campello, S; Beltramini, M; Giordano, G; Di Muro, P; Marino, S M; Bubacco, L

    2008-03-15

    The functional differences between the oxygen transport protein Hemocyanin and the enzymes Tyrosinase and Catechol oxidase are believed to be governed, at least in part, by the tertiary structure, which differs in these molecules and controls the accessibility of their copper containing active site for substrate(s). Accordingly, Octopus vulgaris Hemocyanin catalyses the o-diphenol oxidation to o-quinone at a very low rate. The crystallographic structure of one of the functional units (called Odg) of O. dofleini Hemocyanin shows two domains, a mainly alpha-helical domain that directly binds the copper ions of the reaction center and a beta-strand domain that precludes access to the active site to ligands bigger than molecular oxygen. In this work, we have first cleaved the whole protein and then purified different oxygen binding functional units from O. vulgaris Hemocyanin. These functional units were used in activity assays with l-DOPA, the paradigmatic substrate for Catechol oxidase. All functional units show a negligible enzymatic activity. The procedure to generate the functional units induces in only one of them a proteolytic cleavage. Amino terminal sequencing and mass spectroscopy of the fragments allow to place the cleavage site between the alpha and beta domains of the functional unit homologous to Odd, in the O. dofleini sequence. An increase, up to three orders of magnitude, of Tyrosinase-like activity was observed when the cleaved Odd-like was incubated with the substrate in the presence of trifluoroethanol or hexafluoroisopropanol. PMID:18237542

  2. Synthesis of tripodal catecholates and their immobilization on zinc oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Klitsche, Franziska; Ramcke, Julian; Migenda, Julia; Hensel, Andreas; Vossmeyer, Tobias; Weller, Horst

    2015-01-01

    Summary A common approach to generate tailored materials and nanoparticles (NPs) is the formation of molecular monolayers by chemisorption of bifunctional anchor molecules. This approach depends critically on the choice of a suitable anchor group. Recently, bifunctional catecholates, inspired by mussel-adhesive proteins (MAPs) and bacterial siderophores, have received considerable interest as anchor groups for biomedically relevant metal surfaces and nanoparticles. We report here the synthesis of new tripodal catecholates as multivalent anchor molecules for immobilization on metal surfaces and nanoparticles. The tripodal catecholates have been conjugated to various effector molecules such as PEG, a sulfobetaine and an adamantyl group. The potential of these conjugates has been demonstrated with the immobilization of tripodal catecholates on ZnO NPs. The results confirmed a high loading of tripodal PEG-catecholates on the particles and the formation of stable PEG layers in aqueous solution. PMID:26124871

  3. Concerted actions of the catechol O-methyltransferase and the cytosolic sulfotransferase SULT1A3 in the metabolism of catecholic drugs.

    PubMed

    Kurogi, Katsuhisa; Alazizi, Adnan; Liu, Ming-Yih; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Sugahara, Takuya; Liu, Ming-Cheh

    2012-11-01

    Catecholic drugs had been reported to be metabolized through conjugation reactions, particularly methylation and sulfation. Whether and how these two Phase II conjugation reactions may occur in a concerted manner, however, remained unclear. The current study was designed to investigate the methylation and/or sulfation of five catecholic drugs. Analysis of the spent media of HepG2 cells metabolically labeled with [(35)S]sulfate in the presence of individual catecholic drugs revealed the presence of two [(35)S]sulfated metabolites for dopamine, epinephrine, isoproterenol, and isoetharine, but only one [(35)S]sulfated metabolite for apomorphine. Further analyses using tropolone, a catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitor, indicated that one of the two [(35)S]sulfated metabolites of dopamine, epinephrine, isoproterenol, and isoetharine was a doubly conjugated (methylated and sulfated) product, since its level decreased proportionately with increasing concentrations of tropolone added to the labeling media. Moreover, while the inhibition of methylation resulted in a decrease of the total amount of [(35)S]sulfated metabolites, sulfation appeared to be capable of compensating the suppressed methylation in the metabolism of these four catecholic drugs. A two-stage enzymatic assay showed the sequential methylation and sulfation of dopamine, epinephrine, isoproterenol, and isoetharine mediated by, respectively, the COMT and the cytosolic sulfotransferase SULT1A3. Collectively, the results from the present study implied the concerted actions of the COMT and SULT1A3 in the metabolism of catecholic drugs. PMID:22917559

  4. Phenol oxidase activity in secondary transformed peat-moorsh soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sty?a, K.; Szajdak, L.

    2009-04-01

    The chemical composition of peat depends on the geobotanical conditions of its formation and on the depth of sampling. The evolution of hydrogenic peat soils is closely related to the genesis of peat and to the changes in water conditions. Due to a number of factors including oscillation of ground water level, different redox potential, changes of aerobic conditions, different plant communities, and root exudes, and products of the degradation of plant remains, peat-moorsh soils may undergo a process of secondary transformation conditions (Sokolowska et al. 2005; Szajdak et al. 2007). Phenol oxidase is one of the few enzymes able to degrade recalcitrant phenolic materials as lignin (Freeman et al. 2004). Phenol oxidase enzymes catalyze polyphenol oxidation in the presence of oxygen (O2) by removing phenolic hydrogen or hydrogenes to from radicals or quinines. These products undergo nucleophilic addition reactions in the presence or absence of free - NH2 group with the eventual production of humic acid-like polymers. The presence of phenol oxidase in soil environments is important in the formation of humic substances a desirable process because the carbon is stored in a stable form (Matocha et al. 2004). The investigations were carried out on the transect of peatland 4.5 km long, located in the Agroecological Landscape Park host D. Chlapowski in Turew (40 km South-West of Pozna?, West Polish Lowland). The sites of investigation were located along Wysko? ditch. The following material was taken from four chosen sites marked as Zbechy, Bridge, Shelterbelt and Hirudo in two layers: cartel (0-50cm) and cattle (50-100cm). The object of this study was to characterize the biochemical properties by the determination of the phenol oxidize activity in two layers of the four different peat-moors soils used as meadow. The phenol oxidase activity was determined spectrophotometrically by measuring quinone formation at ?max=525 nm with catechol as substrate by method of Perucci et al. (2000). In peat the highest activities of phenol oxidase was observed in the combinations marked as Shelterbelt and whereas the lowest - in Zbechy, Bridge and Hirudo. Activities of this enzyme in peat ranged from 15.35 to 38.33 ?mol h-1g d.m soil. Increased activities of phenol oxidase have been recorded on the depth 50-100cm - catotelm (21.74-38.33 ?mol h-1g d.m soil) in comparison with the depth 0-50cm - acrotelm (15.35-28.32 ?mol h-1g d.m soil). References Freeman, C., Ostle N.J., Fener, N., Kang H. 2004. A regulatory role for phenol oxidase during decomposition in peatlands. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 36, 1663-1667. Matocha Ch.J., Haszler G.R., Grove J.H. 2004. Nitrogen fertilization suppresses soil phenol oxidase enzyme activity in no-tillage systems. Soil Science, 169/10, 708-714. Perucci P., Casucci C., Dumontet S. 2000. An improved method to evaluate the o-diphenol oxidase activity of soil. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 32, 1927-1933. Sokolowska Z., Szajdak L., Matyka-Sarzy?ska D. 2005. Impact of the degree of secondary transformation on amid-base properties of organic compounds in mucks. Geoderma, 127, 80-90. Szajdak L., Szczepa?ski M., Bogacz A. 2007. Impact of secondary transformation of peat-moorsh soils on the decrease of nitrogen and carbon compounds in ground water. Agronomy Research, 5/2, 189-200.

  5. Inhibitory effects of catechol accumulation on benzene biodegradation in Pseudomonas putida F1 cultures.

    PubMed

    Muoz, R; Daz, L F; Bordel, S; Villaverde, S

    2007-06-01

    The influence of benzene concentration on the specific growth rate (mu), CO(2) and metabolite production, and cellular energetic content (i.e., ATP content), during benzene biodegradation by Pseudomonas putida F1 was investigated. Within the concentration range tested (5-130mg benzene l(-1)) the mu, the specific CO(2) production, and the ATP content remained constant at 0.42-0.48h(-1), 1.86+/-0.21g CO(2) g(-1) biomass, and 5.3+/-0.4x10(-6)mol ATP g(-1) biomass, respectively. Catechol accumulated during process start-up at all tested concentrations. Catechol specific production increased with increasing benzene inlet concentrations. This confirms that the transformation of this intermediate was the limiting step during benzene degradation. It was shown that catechol inhibited both the conversion of benzene to catechol and its further transformation. In addition, catechol concentrations higher than 10mgl(-1) significantly decreased both benzene and catechol associated respiration, confirming the highly inhibitory effect of this intermediate. This inhibitory threshold concentration was approximately two orders of magnitude lower than the concentrations present in the culture medium during process start-up, suggesting that cellular activity was always far below its maximum. Thus, due to its toxic and inhibitory nature and its tendency to accumulate at high benzene loading, catechol must be carefully monitored during process operation. PMID:17316748

  6. Bio-inspired adhesive catechol-conjugated chitosan for biomedical applications: A mini review.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Ji Hyun; Hong, Seonki; Lee, Haeshin

    2015-11-01

    The development of adhesive materials, such as cyanoacrylate derivatives, fibrin glues, and gelatin-based adhesives, has been an emerging topic in biomaterial science because of the many uses of these materials, including in wound healing patches, tissue sealants, and hemostatic materials. However, most bio-adhesives exhibit poor adhesion to tissue and related surfaces due to the presence of body fluid. For a decade, studies have aimed at addressing this issue by developing wet-resistant adhesives. Mussels demonstrate robust wet-resistant adhesion despite the ceaseless waves at seashores, and mussel adhesive proteins play a key role in this adhesion. Adhesive proteins located at the distal end (i.e., those that directly contact surfaces) are composed of nearly 60% of amino acids called 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (DOPA), lysine, and histidine, which contain side chains of catechol, primary amines, and secondary amines, respectively. Inspired by the abundant catecholamine in mussel adhesive proteins, researchers have developed various types of polymeric mimics, such as polyethylenimine-catechol, chitosan-catechol, and other related catecholic polymers. Among them, chitosan-catechol is a promising adhesive polymer for biomedical applications. The conjugation of catechol onto chitosan dramatically increases its solubility from zero to nearly 60mg/mL (i.e., 6% w/v) in pH 7 aqueous solutions. The enhanced solubility maximizes the ability of catecholamine to behave similar to mussel adhesive proteins. Chitosan-catechol is biocompatible and exhibits excellent hemostatic ability and tissue adhesion, and thus, chitosan-catechol will be widely used in a variety of medical settings in the future. This review focuses on the various aspects of chitosan-catechol, including its (1) preparation methods, (2) physicochemical properties, and (3) current applications. PMID:26318801

  7. Crystallization of Mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Takayuki; Tanaka, Masashi; Wakabayashi, Takashi

    1982-12-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (ferrocytochrome c:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.9.3.1) was purified from beef heart mitochondria. By washing the oxidase with detergent on a hydrophobic interaction column, phospholipids were depleted to the level of 1 mol of cardiolipin per mol of heme a. Hydrophobic impurities and partially denatured oxidase were separated from the intact oxidase on an affinity column with cytochrome c as the specific ligand. The final preparation of the oxidase contained seven distinct polypeptides. The molecular weight of the oxidase was estimated to be 130,000 from its specific heme a and copper content and from the subunit composition. Crystals of the oxidase were obtained by slow removal of the detergent from the buffer in which the oxidase was dissolved. The needle-shaped crystals were 100 ? m in average length and 5 ? m in width, and they strongly polarized visible light. Electron diffraction patterns were obtained with an unstained glutaraldehyde-fixed single crystal by electron microscopy using 1,000-kV electrons. From electron micrographs and the diffraction patterns of the crystal, it was concluded that the crystal is monoclinic in the space group P21, with unit cell dimensions a = 92 angstrom, b = 84 angstrom, and c = 103 angstrom, and ? =? 90 degrees, ? = 126 degrees.

  8. Potentiometric and spectrophotometric equilibrium study on Fe(III) and new catechol-bisphosphonate conjugates.

    PubMed

    Crisponi, Guido; Nurchi, Valeria Marina; Pivetta, Tiziana

    2008-02-01

    The coordination properties of mixed catechol-bisphosphonates towards Fe(III) are presented. From the potentiometric and spectroscopic results it was possible to state that iron coordination takes place only on the bisphosphonate moiety at acidic pH, and involves both catechol and bisphosphonate groups on two different iron(III) ions at higher pH values. Steric constracts keep both groups from chelating the same metal ion. Quantum mechanical calculations confirm this statement and allow to determine the minimum length of the linker for a stable conformation of complexes in which the same iron(III) ion is coordinated by both catechol and bisphosphonate. PMID:17854902

  9. Quinone Reductase 2 Is a Catechol Quinone Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yue; Buryanovskyy, Leonid; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2008-09-05

    The functions of quinone reductase 2 have eluded researchers for decades even though a genetic polymorphism is associated with various neurological disorders. Employing enzymatic studies using adrenochrome as a substrate, we show that quinone reductase 2 is specific for the reduction of adrenochrome, whereas quinone reductase 1 shows no activity. We also solved the crystal structure of quinone reductase 2 in complexes with dopamine and adrenochrome, two compounds that are structurally related to catecholamine quinones. Detailed structural analyses delineate the mechanism of quinone reductase 2 specificity toward catechol quinones in comparison with quinone reductase 1; a side-chain rotational difference between quinone reductase 1 and quinone reductase 2 of a single residue, phenylalanine 106, determines the specificity of enzymatic activities. These results infer functional differences between two homologous enzymes and indicate that quinone reductase 2 could play important roles in the regulation of catecholamine oxidation processes that may be involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease.

  10. Multicopper oxidases and oxygenases

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, E.I.; Sundaram, U.M.; Machonkin, T.E.

    1996-11-01

    Copper is an essential trace element in living systems, present in the parts per million concentration range. It is a key cofactor in a diverse array of biological oxidation-reduction reactions. These involve either outer-sphere electron transfer, as in the blue copper proteins and the Cu{sub A} site of cytochrome oxidase and nitrous oxide redutase, or inner-sphere electron transfer in the binding, activation, and reduction of dioxygen, superoxide, nitrite, and nitrous oxide. Copper sites have historically been divided into three classes based on their spectroscopic features, which reflect the geometric and electronic structure of the active site: type 1 (T1) or blue copper, type 2 (T2) or normal copper, and type 3 (T3) or coupled binuclear copper centers. 428 refs.

  11. NADPH oxidase and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Hernandes, Marina S; Britto, Luiz R G

    2012-12-01

    NADPH oxidase (Nox) is a unique, multi-protein, electron transport system that produces large amounts of superoxide via the reduction of molecular oxygen. Nox-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to be involved in a variety of physiological processes, including host defense and signal transduction. However, over the past decade, the involvement of (Nox)-dependent oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of several neurodegenerative diseases has been increasingly recognized. ROS produced by Nox proteins contribute to neurodegenerative diseases through distinct mechanisms, such as oxidation of DNA, proteins, lipids, amino acids and metals, in addition to activation of redox-sensitive signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the recent literature on Nox involvement in neurodegeneration, focusing on Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases. PMID:23730256

  12. NADPH Oxidase and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hernandes, Marina S; Britto, Luiz R G

    2012-01-01

    NADPH oxidase (Nox) is a unique, multi-protein, electron transport system that produces large amounts of superoxide via the reduction of molecular oxygen. Nox-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to be involved in a variety of physiological processes, including host defense and signal transduction. However, over the past decade, the involvement of (Nox)-dependent oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of several neurodegenerative diseases has been increasingly recognized. ROS produced by Nox proteins contribute to neurodegenerative diseases through distinct mechanisms, such as oxidation of DNA, proteins, lipids, amino acids and metals, in addition to activation of redox-sensitive signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the recent literature on Nox involvement in neurodegeneration, focusing on Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases. PMID:23730256

  13. Correction: Synthesis and antibiotic activity of oxazolidinone-catechol conjugates against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Paulen, Aurlie; Gasser, Vronique; Hoegy, Franoise; Perraud, Quentin; Pesset, Bndicte; Schalk, Isabelle J; Mislin, Gatan L A

    2015-12-14

    Correction for 'Synthesis and antibiotic activity of oxazolidinone-catechol conjugates against Pseudomonas aeruginosa' by Aurlie Paulen, et al., Org. Biomol. Chem., 2016, DOI: 10.1039/c5ob01859e. PMID:26555129

  14. BIOLOGICAL ADHESIVES. Adaptive synergy between catechol and lysine promotes wet adhesion by surface salt displacement.

    PubMed

    Maier, Greg P; Rapp, Michael V; Waite, J Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Butler, Alison

    2015-08-01

    In physiological fluids and seawater, adhesion of synthetic polymers to solid surfaces is severely limited by high salt, pH, and hydration, yet these conditions have not deterred the evolution of effective adhesion by mussels. Mussel foot proteins provide insights about adhesive adaptations: Notably, the abundance and proximity of catecholic Dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) and lysine residues hint at a synergistic interplay in adhesion. Certain siderophores—bacterial iron chelators—consist of paired catechol and lysine functionalities, thereby providing a convenient experimental platform to explore molecular synergies in bioadhesion. These siderophores and synthetic analogs exhibit robust adhesion energies (E(ad) ≥-15 millijoules per square meter) to mica in saline pH 3.5 to 7.5 and resist oxidation. The adjacent catechol-lysine placement provides a "one-two punch," whereby lysine evicts hydrated cations from the mineral surface, allowing catechol binding to underlying oxides. PMID:26250681

  15. Adaptive synergy between catechol and lysine promotes wet adhesion by surface salt displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Greg P.; Rapp, Michael V.; Waite, J. Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Butler, Alison

    2015-08-01

    In physiological fluids and seawater, adhesion of synthetic polymers to solid surfaces is severely limited by high salt, pH, and hydration, yet these conditions have not deterred the evolution of effective adhesion by mussels. Mussel foot proteins provide insights about adhesive adaptations: Notably, the abundance and proximity of catecholic Dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) and lysine residues hint at a synergistic interplay in adhesion. Certain siderophores—bacterial iron chelators—consist of paired catechol and lysine functionalities, thereby providing a convenient experimental platform to explore molecular synergies in bioadhesion. These siderophores and synthetic analogs exhibit robust adhesion energies (Ead ≥-15 millijoules per square meter) to mica in saline pH 3.5 to 7.5 and resist oxidation. The adjacent catechol-lysine placement provides a “one-two punch,” whereby lysine evicts hydrated cations from the mineral surface, allowing catechol binding to underlying oxides.

  16. Utilization of acorn fringe for ellagic acid production by Aspergillus oryzae and Endomyces fibuliger.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen; Li, Zhenshan; Niu, Hai; Li, Lulu; Lin, Wensheng; Yang, Jinshui

    2008-06-01

    Conversion of acorn fringe extract into ellagic acid production by Aspergillus oryzae and Endomyces fibuliger were investigated. The results showed that ellagic acid production was maximized when co-fermentation of the two fungi was performed at 30 degrees C and pH 5.0 with 5.7 g/l of initial substrate concentration, which were close to the optimal values for both fungi to yield an appropriate consortium of hydrolytic enzymes. Meanwhile, it was found that the co-fermentation could compensate the deficiencies in the level of polyphenol oxidase activity from pure A. oryzae and the levels of ellagitannin acyl hydrolase and beta-glucosidase activities from pure E. fibuliger, resulting in. 0.91 g/l of biomass concentration containing 1.84 g/l of ellagic acid. The research not only demonstrates that the co-fermentation is an effective approach to utilize forest byproduct for ellagic acid production, but also provides more evidences for understanding evolution of ellagic acid production with enzymes actions, which is important for process control of ellagic acid production in industrial application. PMID:17826988

  17. Sensitive Detection of Xanthomonas oryzae Pathovars oryzae and oryzicola by Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Jillian M.; Langlois, Paul; Nguyen, Marian Hanna R.; Triplett, Lindsay R.; Purdie, Laura; Holton, Timothy A.; Djikeng, Appolinaire; Vera Cruz, Casiana M.; Verdier, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Molecular diagnostics for crop diseases can enhance food security by enabling the rapid identification of threatening pathogens and providing critical information for the deployment of disease management strategies. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a PCR-based tool that allows the rapid, highly specific amplification of target DNA sequences at a single temperature and is thus ideal for field-level diagnosis of plant diseases. We developed primers highly specific for two globally important rice pathogens, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the causal agent of bacterial blight (BB) disease, and X. oryzae pv. oryzicola, the causal agent of bacterial leaf streak disease (BLS), for use in reliable, sensitive LAMP assays. In addition to pathovar distinction, two assays that differentiate X. oryzae pv. oryzae by African or Asian lineage were developed. Using these LAMP primer sets, the presence of each pathogen was detected from DNA and bacterial cells, as well as leaf and seed samples. Thresholds of detection for all assays were consistently 104 to 105 CFU ml−1, while genomic DNA thresholds were between 1 pg and 10 fg. Use of the unique sequences combined with the LAMP assay provides a sensitive, accurate, rapid, simple, and inexpensive protocol to detect both BB and BLS pathogens. PMID:24837384

  18. A Novel Mechanism for Adenylyl Cyclase Inhibition from the Crystal Structure of its Complex with Catechol Estrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Steegborn,C.; Litvin, T.; Hess, K.; Capper, A.; Taussig, R.; Buck, J.; Levin, L.; Wu, H.

    2005-01-01

    Catechol estrogens are steroid metabolites that elicit physiological responses through binding to a variety of cellular targets. We show here that catechol estrogens directly inhibit soluble adenylyl cyclases and the abundant trans-membrane adenylyl cyclases. Catechol estrogen inhibition is non-competitive with respect to the substrate ATP, and we solved the crystal structure of a catechol estrogen bound to a soluble adenylyl cyclase from Spirulina platensis in complex with a substrate analog. The catechol estrogen is bound to a newly identified, conserved hydrophobic patch near the active center but distinct from the ATP-binding cleft. Inhibitor binding leads to a chelating interaction between the catechol estrogen hydroxyl groups and the catalytic magnesium ion, distorting the active site and trapping the enzyme substrate complex in a non-productive conformation. This novel inhibition mechanism likely applies to other adenylyl cyclase inhibitors, and the identified ligand-binding site has important implications for the development of specific adenylyl cyclase inhibitors.

  19. Structural and thermochemical characterization of lipoxygenase-catechol complexes.

    PubMed

    Pham, C; Jankun, J; Skrzypczak-Jankun, E; Flowers, R A; Funk, M O

    1998-12-22

    A complex between native, iron(II) soybean lipoxygenase 3 and 4-nitrocatechol, a known inhibitor of the enzyme, has been detected by isothermal titration calorimetry and characterized by X-ray crystallography. The compound moors in the central cavity of the protein close to the essential iron atom, but not in a bonding arrangement with it. The iron ligands experience a significant rearrangement upon formation of the complex relative to their positions in the native enzyme; a water molecule becomes bound to iron in the complex, and one histidine ligand moves away from the iron to become involved in a hydrogen bonding interaction with the catechol. These changes in position result in a trigonal pyramid coordination geometry for iron in the complex. Molecular modeling and force field calculations predict more than one stable complex between 4-nitrocatechol and the central cavity of lipoxygenase 3, but the interaction having the small molecule in the same orientation as the one found in the crystal structure was the most favorable. These observations reveal specific details of the interaction between lipoxygenase and a small molecule and raise the possibility that changes in the ligand environment of the iron atom could be a feature of the product activation reaction or the catalytic mechanism. PMID:9922163

  20. Bioconversion of Capsaicin by Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minji; Cho, Jeong-Yong; Lee, Yu Geon; Lee, Hyoung Jae; Lim, Seong-Il; Park, So-Lim; Moon, Jae-Hak

    2015-07-01

    This study identified metabolites of capsaicin bioconverted by Aspergillus oryzae, which is generally used for mass production of gochujang prepared by fermenting red pepper powder in Korea. A. oryzae was incubated with capsaicin in potato dextrose broth. Capsaicin decreased depending on the incubation period, but new metabolites increased. Five capsaicin metabolites purified from the ethyl acetate fraction of the capsaicin culture were identified as N-vanillylcarbamoylbutyric acid, N-vanillyl-9-hydroxy-8-methyloctanamide, ?-hydroxycapsaicin, 8-methyl-N-vanillylcarbamoyl-6(E)-octenoic acid, and 2-methyl-N-vanillylcarbamoyl-6(Z)-octenoic acid by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS). The capsaicin metabolites in gochujang were confirmed and quantitated by selective multiple reaction monitoring detection after liquid chromatography electrospray ionization MS using the isolated compounds as external standards. On the basis of the structures of the capsaicin metabolites, it is proposed that capsaicin metabolites were converted by A. oryzae by ?-hydroxylation, alcohol oxidation, hydrogenation, isomerization, and ?- and/or ?-oxidation. PMID:26072923

  1. Characterization of polyphenol oxidase activity in Ataulfo mango.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Summervir; Sommerhalter, Monika

    2015-03-15

    Crude extracts of Ataulfo exhibited polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity with pyrogallol, 3-methylcatechol, catechol, gallic acid, and protocatechuic acid. The substrate dependent pH optima ranged from pH 5.4 to 6.4 with Michaelis-Menten constants between 0.84 ± 0.09 and 4.6 ± 0.7 mM measured in MES or phosphate buffers. The use of acetate buffers resulted in larger Michaelis-Menten constants, up to 14.62 ± 2.03 mM. Sodium ascorbate, glutathione, and kojic acid are promising inhibitors to prevent enzymatic browning in Ataulfo. PPO activity increased with ripeness and was always higher in the skin compared to the pulp. Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) enhanced PPO activity, with pulp showing a stronger increase than skin. SDS-PAGE gels stained for catecholase activity showed multiple bands, with the most prominent bands at apparent molecular weights of 53, 112, and 144 kDa. PMID:25308684

  2. Purification and characterization of polyphenol oxidase from fresh ginseng

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Joon; Kim, Woo-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was purified from fresh ginseng roots using acetone precipitation, carboxymethyl (CM)-Sepharose chromatography, and phenyl-Sepharose chromatography. Two isoenzymes (PPO 1 and PPO 2) were separated using an ion-exchange column with CM-Sepharose. PPO 1 was purified up to 13.2-fold with a 22.6% yield. PPO 2 bound to CM-Sepharose, eluted with NaCl, and was purified up to 22.5-fold with a 17.4% yield. PPO 2 was further chromatographed on phenyl-Sepharose. The molecular weight of the purified PPO 2 from fresh ginseng was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and was about 40 kDa. The optimum temperature and pH were 20? and 7.0, respectively, using catechol as a substrate. Pyrogallol showed the highest substrate specificity. The effect of a PPO inhibitor showed that its activity increased slightly in the presence of a low concentration of citric acid. High concentrations of acidic compounds and sulfite agents significantly inhibited purified ginseng PPO 2. PMID:23717165

  3. O-Methylation of Catechol Estrogens by Human Placental Catechol-O-Methyltransferase: Interindividual Differences in Sensitivity to Heat Inactivation and to Inhibition by Dietary Polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bao Ting; Wu, Karen Y.; Wang, Pan; Cai, May Xiaoxin

    2010-01-01

    The human catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is a polymorphic enzyme that catalyzes the O-methylation of catechol estrogens. Recent animal studies showed that placental COMT is involved in the development of placentas and embryos, probably via the formation of 2-methoxyestradiol. In this study, we analyzed a total of 36 human term placentas to determine their cytosolic COMT activity for the O-methylation of catechol estrogens as well as their sensitivity to inhibition by heat and dietary compounds. Large variations (up to 4-fold) in the COMT activity for the formation of methoxyestrogens were noted with different human placental samples. The cytosolic COMTs in different human placentas also displayed considerable differences in their sensitivity to heat inactivation. This differential sensitivity was not associated with the overall catalytic activity for the O-methylation of catechol estrogen substrates. It was observed that there was a positive correlation (r = 0.760) between the sensitivity of the human placental COMT to heat inactivation and its sensitivity to inhibition by (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (a well known tea polyphenol with COMT-inhibiting activity) but an inverse correlation (r = 0.544) between heat inactivation and inhibition by quercetin (another dietary COMT inhibitor). The differences in inhibition by these two dietary compounds are due to different mechanisms of COMT inhibition involved. PMID:20606002

  4. Distribution of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae DNA Modification Systems in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seong Ho; Vera Cruz, Casiana M.; Leach, Jan E.

    1998-01-01

    The presence or absence of two DNA modification systems, XorI and XorII, in 195 strains of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae collected from different major rice-growing countries of Asia was assessed. All four possible phenotypes (XorI+ XorII+, XorI+ XorII?, XorI? XorII+ and XorI? XorII?) were detected in the population at a ratio of approximately 1:2:2:2. The XorI+ XorII+ and XorI? XorII+ phenotypes were observed predominantly in strains from southeast Asia (Philippines, Malaysia, and Indonesia), whereas strains with the phenotypes XorI? XorII? and XorI+ XorII? were distributed in south Asia (India and Nepal) and northeast Asia (China, Korea, and Japan), respectively. Based on the prevalence and geographic distribution of the XorI and XorII systems, we suggest that the XorI modification system originated in northeast Asia and was later introduced to southeast Asia, while the XorII system originated in southeast Asia and moved to northeast Asia and south Asia. Genomic DNA from all tested strains of X. oryzae pv. oryzae that were resistant to digestion by endonuclease XorII or its isoschizomer PvuI also hybridized with a 7.0-kb clone that contained the XorII modification system, whereas strains that were digested by XorII or PvuI lacked DNA that hybridized with the clone. Size polymorphisms were observed in fragments that hybridized with the 7.0-kb clone. However, a single hybridization pattern generally was found in XorII+ strains within a country, indicating clonal maintenance of the XorII methyltransferase gene locus. The locus was monomorphic for X. oryzae pv. oryzae strains from the Philippines and all strains from Indonesia and Korea. PMID:9572933

  5. NADPH Oxidases in Vascular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Konior, Anna; Schramm, Agata; Czesnikiewicz-Guzik, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a critical role in vascular disease. While there are many possible sources of ROS, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases play a central role. They are a source of “kindling radicals,” which affect other enzymes, such as nitric oxide synthase endothelial nitric oxide synthase or xanthine oxidase. This is important, as risk factors for atherosclerosis (hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and smoking) regulate the expression and activity of NADPH oxidases in the vessel wall. Recent Advances: There are seven isoforms in mammals: Nox1, Nox2, Nox3, Nox4, Nox5, Duox1 and Duox2. Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, and Nox5 are expressed in endothelium, vascular smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, or perivascular adipocytes. Other homologues have not been found or are expressed at very low levels; their roles have not been established. Nox1/Nox2 promote the development of endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, and inflammation. Nox4 may have a role in protecting the vasculature during stress; however, when its activity is increased, it may be detrimental. Calcium-dependent Nox5 has been implicated in oxidative damage in human atherosclerosis. Critical Issues: NADPH oxidase-derived ROS play a role in vascular pathology as well as in the maintenance of normal physiological vascular function. We also discuss recently elucidated mechanisms such as the role of NADPH oxidases in vascular protection, vascular inflammation, pulmonary hypertension, tumor angiogenesis, and central nervous system regulation of vascular function and hypertension. Future Directions: Understanding the role of individual oxidases and interactions between homologues in vascular disease is critical for efficient pharmacological regulation of vascular NADPH oxidases in both the laboratory and clinical practice. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2794–2814. PMID:24180474

  6. Purification and characterization of polyphenol oxidase from jackfruit ( Artocarpus heterophyllus ) bulbs.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yi-Ming; Yao, Le-Yi; Qin, Qiu-Yan; Shen, Wang

    2013-12-26

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) from jackfruit bulb was purified through acetone precipitation, ion-exchange column, and gel filtration column. PPO was a dimer with the molecular weight of 130 kDa determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and gel filtration. The Km was 8.3 and 18.2 mM using catechol and 4-methylcatechol as substrates, respectively. The optimum pH was 7.0 (catechol as the substrate) or 6.5 (4-methylcatechol as the substrate). The optimum temperature was 8 °C. The enzyme was stable below 40 °C. The activation energy (Ea) of heat inactivation was estimated to be 103.30 kJ/mol. The PPO activity was activated by Mn(2+), SDS, Tween-20, Triton X-100, citric acid, and malic acid but inhibited by K(+), Zn(2+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Ba(2+), cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), kojic acid, tropolone, glutathione (GSH), cysteine (Cys), and ascorbic acid (AA). Cys and AA were effective to reduce browning of jackfruit bulbs during the storage at 8 °C for 15 days. PMID:24325285

  7. Purification and characterization of a polyphenol oxidase from the seeds of field bean (Dolichos lablab).

    PubMed

    Paul, B; Gowda, L R

    2000-09-01

    The polyphenol oxidase from field bean (Dolichos lablab) seeds has been purified to apparent homogeneity by a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE-Sephacel chromatography, phenyl agarose chromatography, and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. The purified enzyme has a molecular weight of 120 +/- 3 kDa and is a tetramer of 30 +/- 1.5 kDa. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified enzyme revealed the presence of a single isoform with an observed pH optimum of 4.0. 4-Methyl catechol is the best substrate, followed by catechol, and L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, all of which exhibited a phenomenon of inhibition by excess substrate. No activity was detected toward chlorogenic acid, catechin, caffeic acid, gallic acid, and monophenols. Tropolone, both a substrate analogue and metal chelator, proved to be the most effective competitive inhibitor with an apparent K(i) of 5.8 x 10(-)(7) M. Ascorbic acid, metabisulfite, and cysteine were also competitive inhibitors. PMID:10995279

  8. Immobilization of polyphenol oxidase on chitosan-SiO2 gel for removal of aqueous phenol.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jian; Ge, Huimin; Yang, Yumin

    2007-06-01

    A partially purified potato polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was immobilized in a cross-linked chitosan-SiO2 gel and used to treat phenol solutions. Under optimized conditions (formaldehyde 20 mg/ml, PPO 4 mg/ml and pH 7.0), the activity of immobilized PPO was 1370 U/g and its Km value for catechol was 12 mM at 25 degrees C. The highest activity of immobilized enzyme was at pH 7.4. Immobilization stabilized the enzyme with 73 and 58% retention of activity after 10 and 20 days, respectively, at 30 degrees C whereas most of the free enzyme was inactive after 7 days. The efficiency of removing phenol (10 mg phenol/l) by the immobilized PPO was 86%, and about 60% removal efficiency was retained after five recycles. The immobilized PPO may thus be a useful for removing phenolic compounds from industrial waste-waters. PMID:17417695

  9. Relation Between the Adsorbed Quantity and the Immersion Enthalpy in Catechol Aqueous Solutions on Activated Carbons

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Pirajn, Juan Carlos; Blanco, Diego; Giraldo, Liliana

    2012-01-01

    An activated carbon, CarbochemTMPS230, was modified by chemical and thermal treatment in flow of H2, in order to evaluate the influence of the activated carbon chemical characteristics in the adsorption of the catechol. The catechol adsorption in aqueous solution was studied along with the effect of the pH solution in the adsorption process of modified activated carbons and the variation of immersion enthalpy of activated carbons in the aqueous solutions of catechol. The interaction solid-solution is characterized by adsorption isotherms analysis, at 298 K and pH 7, 9 and 11 in order to evaluate the adsorption value above and below that of the catechol pKa. The adsorption capacity of carbons increases when the solution pH decreases. The retained amount increases slightly in the reduced carbon to maximum adsorption pH and diminishes in the oxidized carbon. Similar conclusions are obtained from the immersion enthalpies, whose values increase with the solute quantity retained. In granular activated carbon (CAG), the immersion enthalpies obtained are between 21.5 and 45.7 Jg?1 for catechol aqueous solutions in a range of 20 at 1500 mgL?1. PMID:22312237

  10. A mediated polyphenol oxidase biosensor immobilized by electropolymerization of 1,2-diamino benzene.

    PubMed

    Akyilmaz, Erol; Kozgus, Ozge; Trkmen, Hayati; Cetinkaya, Bekir

    2010-06-01

    A biosensor based on a partially purified polyphenol oxidase (PPO) enzyme was developed by using electropolymerization of [(2,2'-bipyridine)(chloro)(p-cymene)rutenium(II)]chloride] mediator complex and 1,2-diamino benzene (DAB) on a screen printing Pt electrode (1mm diameter). The electropolymerization was carried out at +0.7V for 45min in phosphate buffer (50mM, pH 7.0) which contained 14.0U/10mL polyphenole oxidase, 200mM DAB and 2.5mM Ru-mediator complex solutions. Measurement is based on the detection of the oxidation current of the Ru-mediator complex that related to the enzymatic reaction catalyzed by PPO at +0.65V. The phosphate buffer (50mM, pH 7.0 containing 0.1M KCl) and 30 degrees C were established as being the optimum working conditions. Under the optimum experimental conditions a linear calibration curve was obtained between 5 and 100microM catechol concentration. The detection limit of the biosensor is 2.385microM. In the characterization studies of the biosensor some parameters such as effect of Ru-mediator types on the biosensor response, substrate specificity, reproducibility and storage stability were studied. From the experiments, the average value (x), standard deviation (SD) and coefficient of variation (CV%) were found to be 48.75microM,+/-1.56microM, and 3.2% respectively for 50microM catechol standard. PMID:19783226

  11. MAPPING R-GENES IN RICE WILD RELATIVES (ORYZA SPP.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani Khn and leaf blast caused by Magnaporthe grisea (T.T. Herbert) Yaegashi & Udagawa are major fungal diseases of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.). Rice wild relatives (Oryza spp.) are the source of several resistance (R-) genes including those for bla...

  12. 21 CFR 173.130 - Carbohydrase derived from Rhizopus oryzae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.130 Carbohydrase derived from Rhizopus oryzae. Carbohydrase from Rhizopus oryzae may be safely used in the production of dextrose from starch in... carbohydrase product. (e) The carbohydrase is maintained under refrigeration from production to use and...

  13. REACTION OF RICE (ORYZA SATIVA) CULTIVARS TO PENETRATION AND INFECTION BY CURVULARIA TUBERCULATA AND C. ORYZAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isolates of Curvularia species were collected from weedy Cyperaceae species and are being evaluated as possible biocontrol agents of sedge weeds in rice (Oryza sativa). Curvularia species have been reported from rice; thus cultivars of rice were tested to determine rice seedling responses to these ...

  14. Expression of alternative oxidase in tomato

    SciTech Connect

    Kakefuda, M.; McIntosh, L. )

    1990-05-01

    Tomato fruit ripening is characterized by an increase in ethylene biosynthesis, a burst in respiration (i.e. the climacteric), fruit softening and pigmentation. As whole tomatoes ripened from mature green to red, there was an increase in the alternative oxidase capacity. Aging pink tomato slices for 24 and 48 hrs also showed an increase of alternative oxidase and cytochrome oxidase capacities. Monoclonal antibodies prepared to the Sauromatum guttatum alternative oxidase were used to follow the appearance of alternative oxidase in tomato fruits. There is a corresponding increase in a 36kDa protein with an increase in alternative oxidase capacity. Effects of ethylene and norbornadiene on alternative oxidase capacity were also studied. We are using an alternative oxidase cDNA clone from potato to study the expression of mRNA in ripening and wounded tomatoes to determine if the gene is transcriptionally regulated.

  15. Hordeum vulgare Seedlings Amine Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Cogoni, Antonina; Piras, Carla; Farci, Raffaele; Melis, Antonello; Floris, Giovanni

    1990-01-01

    Although no amine oxidase could be detected in crude extracts, the enzyme has been purified to apparent homogeneity from Hordeum vulgare seedlings using ammonium sulfate precipitation and chromatography on DEAE cellulose, Hydroxylapatite, and Sephadex G200 columns. Gel filtration experiments indicate a molecular weight of about 150,000. The pH optimum of the enzyme was found to be 7.5 in potassium phosphate buffer. The spectrum of ultraviolet and visible regions were similar to Cuamine oxidase from Leguminosae. PMID:16667542

  16. Quantitative structure-activity relationship of catechol derivatives inhibiting 5-lipoxygenase.

    PubMed

    Naito, Y; Sugiura, M; Yamaura, Y; Fukaya, C; Yokoyama, K; Nakagawa, Y; Ikeda, T; Senda, M; Fujita, T

    1991-07-01

    Various catechol derivatives (beta-substituted 3,4-dihydroxystyrenes, 1-substituted 3,4-dihydroxybenzenes, and 6-substituted 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalenes) were synthesized and their inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase was assayed. Their structure-activity relationships were examined quantitatively with substituent and structural parameters and regression analysis. The variations in the inhibitory activity were explained in bilinear hydrophobic parameter (log P) terms, and steric (molecular thickness) and electronic (proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) chemical shift of the proton adjacent to the catechol group) parameter terms. The hydrophobicity of the inhibitor molecule was important, and the optimum value of logP was about 4.3-4.6, beyond which inhibition did not increase further. A lower electron density of the aromatic ring containing the catechol group and the greater thickness of the lipophilic side chains were unfavorable to the activity. The results added a physicochemical basis for the selection of candidate compounds for developmental studies. PMID:1777927

  17. Multimodal underwater adsorption of oxide nanoparticles on catechol-based polymer nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shunsuke; Uchiyama, Shun; Miyashita, Tokuji; Mitsuishi, Masaya

    2016-03-01

    Multimodal underwater adsorption behaviour of catechol units was demonstrated by examining the adsorption of different oxide nanoparticles on nanoscale-integrated polymer nanosheets. Catechol-based polymer nanosheets were fabricated using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique with random copolymers (p(DDA/DMA)s) of N-dodecylacrylamide (DDA) and dopamine methacrylamide (DMA). The p(DDA/DMA) nanosheets were immersed into water dispersions of SiO2, Al2O3, and WO3 nanoparticles (NPs) respectively. The results show that the adsorption properties can be altered by varying the NP type: SiO2 NP adsorption was observed only below pH = 6, at which the o-quinone form in p(DDA/DMA) nanosheets transforms into the catechol form or vice versa. However, their transition point for Al2O3 NP adsorption was found at approximately pH 10, at which the surface potential of Al2O3 NPs changes the charge polarity, indicating that the electrostatic interaction is predominant. For WO3 NPs, adsorption was observed when citric acid, which modifies the surface of WO3 NPs by complex formation, was used as a pH-controlling agent, but no adsorption was found for hydrochloric acid used as a pH controlling agent. FT-IR measurements proved that miniscule amounts of water molecules were trapped in p(DDA/DMA) nanosheets and that they acquired hydrogen bonding network formations, which might assist nanoparticle adsorption underwater and make the catechol units adjustable. The results indicate that the nanoscale spatial arrangements of catechol units in films are crucially important for the application of multimodal adsorption of oxide nanoparticles on catechol-based polymer materials.Multimodal underwater adsorption behaviour of catechol units was demonstrated by examining the adsorption of different oxide nanoparticles on nanoscale-integrated polymer nanosheets. Catechol-based polymer nanosheets were fabricated using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique with random copolymers (p(DDA/DMA)s) of N-dodecylacrylamide (DDA) and dopamine methacrylamide (DMA). The p(DDA/DMA) nanosheets were immersed into water dispersions of SiO2, Al2O3, and WO3 nanoparticles (NPs) respectively. The results show that the adsorption properties can be altered by varying the NP type: SiO2 NP adsorption was observed only below pH = 6, at which the o-quinone form in p(DDA/DMA) nanosheets transforms into the catechol form or vice versa. However, their transition point for Al2O3 NP adsorption was found at approximately pH 10, at which the surface potential of Al2O3 NPs changes the charge polarity, indicating that the electrostatic interaction is predominant. For WO3 NPs, adsorption was observed when citric acid, which modifies the surface of WO3 NPs by complex formation, was used as a pH-controlling agent, but no adsorption was found for hydrochloric acid used as a pH controlling agent. FT-IR measurements proved that miniscule amounts of water molecules were trapped in p(DDA/DMA) nanosheets and that they acquired hydrogen bonding network formations, which might assist nanoparticle adsorption underwater and make the catechol units adjustable. The results indicate that the nanoscale spatial arrangements of catechol units in films are crucially important for the application of multimodal adsorption of oxide nanoparticles on catechol-based polymer materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08739b

  18. Structure and kinetics of formation of catechol complexes of ferric soybean lipoxygenase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, M.J.; Brennan, B.A.; Chase, D.B. |

    1995-11-21

    Ferric soybean lipoxygenase forms stable complexes with 4-substituted catechols. The structure of the complex between the enzyme and 3,4-dihydroxybenzonitrile has been studied by resonance Raman, electron paramagnetic resonance, visible, and X-ray spectroscopies. It is a bidentate iron-catecholate complex with at least one water ligand. The kinetics of formation of complexes between lipoxygenase and 3,4-dihydroxybenzonitrile and 3,4-dihydroxyacetophenone have been studied by stopped-flow spectroscopy. The data are consistent with two kinetically distinct, reversible steps. The pH dependence of the first step suggests that the substrate for the reaction is the catechol monoanion. When these results are combined, plausible mechanisms for the complexation reaction are suggested. 51 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. 5-Hydroxytryptamine and myoclonus induced by 1,2-di-hydroxybenzene (catechol) in the guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, D.; Jenner, P.; Marsden, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    Myoclonus induced by catechol in the guinea-pig is not altered by manipulation of cerebral 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). The administration of catechol does not alter brain levels of 5-HT or its metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid. This form of myoclonus therefore is not of relevance to the 5-HT-sensitive post-anoxic action myoclonus occurring in man. PMID:93500

  20. Multimodal underwater adsorption of oxide nanoparticles on catechol-based polymer nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shunsuke; Uchiyama, Shun; Miyashita, Tokuji; Mitsuishi, Masaya

    2016-03-21

    Multimodal underwater adsorption behaviour of catechol units was demonstrated by examining the adsorption of different oxide nanoparticles on nanoscale-integrated polymer nanosheets. Catechol-based polymer nanosheets were fabricated using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique with random copolymers (p(DDA/DMA)s) of N-dodecylacrylamide (DDA) and dopamine methacrylamide (DMA). The p(DDA/DMA) nanosheets were immersed into water dispersions of SiO2, Al2O3, and WO3 nanoparticles (NPs) respectively. The results show that the adsorption properties can be altered by varying the NP type: SiO2 NP adsorption was observed only below pH = 6, at which the o-quinone form in p(DDA/DMA) nanosheets transforms into the catechol form or vice versa. However, their transition point for Al2O3 NP adsorption was found at approximately pH 10, at which the surface potential of Al2O3 NPs changes the charge polarity, indicating that the electrostatic interaction is predominant. For WO3 NPs, adsorption was observed when citric acid, which modifies the surface of WO3 NPs by complex formation, was used as a pH-controlling agent, but no adsorption was found for hydrochloric acid used as a pH controlling agent. FT-IR measurements proved that miniscule amounts of water molecules were trapped in p(DDA/DMA) nanosheets and that they acquired hydrogen bonding network formations, which might assist nanoparticle adsorption underwater and make the catechol units adjustable. The results indicate that the nanoscale spatial arrangements of catechol units in films are crucially important for the application of multimodal adsorption of oxide nanoparticles on catechol-based polymer materials. PMID:26911546

  1. Au nanoparticles and graphene quantum dots co-modified glassy carbon electrode for catechol sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuan; He, Dawei; Wang, Yongsheng; Hu, Yin; Fu, Chen

    2016-03-01

    In this letter, the gold nanoparticles and graphene quantum dots were applied to the modification of glassy carbon electrode for the detection of catechol. The synergist cooperation between gold nanoparticles and graphene quantum dots can increase specific surface area and enhance electronic and catalytic properties of glassy carbon electrode. The detection limit of catechol is 0.869 μmol/L, demonstrating the superior detection efficiency of the gold nanoparticles and graphene quantum dots co-modified glassy carbon electrode as a new sensing platform.

  2. Intramolecular interactions in ortho-methoxyalkylphenylboronic acids and their catechol esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk-Wo?niak, Agnieszka; Borys, Krzysztof M.; Czerwi?ska, Karolina; Gierczyk, B?a?ej; Jakubczyk, Micha?; Madura, Izabela D.; Sporzy?ski, Andrzej; Tomecka, Ewelina

    2013-12-01

    Catechol esters of ortho-methoxyalkylphenylboronic acids have been synthesized and characterized by 17O NMR spectroscopy. The results were compared with the data for the parent acids. The influence of intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonds on the properties of the boronic acids has been discussed. The 17O NMR data for the boronic esters proved that there are no O ? B interactions in the investigated compounds. This fact is connected with weak Lewis acidity of the parent acids and their low sugars' receptors activity. Crystal structure of ortho-methoxyphenylboronic acid catechol ester was determined.

  3. Unexpected formation of a novel pyridinium-containing catecholate ligand and its manganese(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, Tippu S; Watkinson, Michael; Motevalli, Majid; Lesin, Jocelyne F

    2010-01-01

    Nucleophilic aromatic substitution of tetrachloro-o-benzoquinone by pyridine and reduction of the o-quinone to the catechol by hydroxylamine forms 1,2-dihydroxy-3,5,6-trichlorobenzene-4-pyridinium chloride. This compound reacts with manganese(II) acetate in air to form chlorobis(3,5,6-trichlorobenzene 4-pyridinium catecholate)manganese(III), which represents the first complex of this ligand class to be structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction; this complex is active in the catalytic reduction of dioxygen to hydrogen peroxide under ambient conditions and turnover frequencies (TOFs) >10,000 h(-1) can be obtained. PMID:20023930

  4. Protoporphyrinogen Oxidase-Inhibiting Herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protoporphyrinogen oxidase-inhibiting herbicides (also referred to as Protox- or PPO-inhibiting herbicides) were commercialized in the 1960s and their market share reached approximately 10% (total herbicide active ingredient output) in the late 1990’s. The wide-spread adoption of glyphosate-resista...

  5. Chromate reduction by rabbit liver aldehyde oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, R.B.; Cooke, R.T. Jr.

    1986-05-29

    Chromate was reduced during the oxidation of 1-methylnicotinamide chlorine by partially purified rabbit liver aldehyde oxidase. In addition to l-methylnicotinamide, several other electron donor substrates for aldehyde oxidase were able to support the enzymatic chromate reduction. The reduction required the presence of both enzyme and the electron donor substrate. The rate of the chromate reduction was retarded by inhibitors or aldehyde oxidase but was not affected by substrates or inhibitors of xanthine oxidase. These results are consistent with the involvement of aldehyde oxidase in the reduction of chromate by rabbit liver cytosolic enzyme preparations.

  6. NADPH oxidases regulate septin-mediated cytoskeletal remodeling during plant infection by the rice blast fungus

    PubMed Central

    Ryder, Lauren S.; Dagdas, Yasin F.; Mentlak, Thomas A.; Kershaw, Michael J.; Thornton, Christopher R.; Schuster, Martin; Chen, Jisheng; Wang, Zonghua; Talbot, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae infects plants with a specialized cell called an appressorium, which uses turgor to drive a rigid penetration peg through the rice leaf cuticle. Here, we show that NADPH oxidases (Nox) are necessary for septin-mediated reorientation of the F-actin cytoskeleton to facilitate cuticle rupture and plant cell invasion. We report that the Nox2NoxR complex spatially organizes a heteroligomeric septin ring at the appressorium pore, required for assembly of a toroidal F-actin network at the point of penetration peg emergence. Maintenance of the cortical F-actin network during plant infection independently requires Nox1, a second NADPH oxidase, which is necessary for penetration hypha elongation. Organization of F-actin in appressoria is disrupted by application of antioxidants, whereas latrunculin-mediated depolymerization of appressorial F-actin is competitively inhibited by reactive oxygen species, providing evidence that regulated synthesis of reactive oxygen species by fungal NADPH oxidases directly controls septin and F-actin dynamics. PMID:23382235

  7. Mechanisms of product formation from the pyrolytic thermal degradation of catechol.

    PubMed

    Lomnicki, Slawomir; Truong, Hieu; Dellinger, Barry

    2008-09-01

    Catechol has been identified as one of the most abundant organic products in tobacco smoke and a major molecular precursor for semiquinone type radicals in the combustion of biomass material. The high-temperature gas-phase pyrolysis of catechol under hydrogen-rich and hydrogen-lean conditions was studied using a fused-silica tubular flow reactor coupled to an in-line GC/MS analytical system. Thermal degradation of catechol over temperature range of 250-1000 degrees C with a reaction time of 2.0s yielded a variety products including phenol, benzene, dibenzofuran, dibenzo-p-dioxin, phenylethyne, styrene, indene, anthracene, naphthalene, and biphenylene. Ortho-benzoquinone which is typically associated with the presence of semiquinone radicals was not observed and is proposed to be the result of fast decomposition reactions that lead to a variety of other reaction products. This is in contrast to the decomposition of hydroquinone that produced para-benzoquinone as the major product. A detailed mechanism of the degradation pathway of catechol is proposed. PMID:18640699

  8. Association of Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) Polymorphism and Academic Achievement in a Chinese Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Chang, Chun-Yen; Hu, Chung-Yi; Yeh, Ting-Chi; Lin, Ming-Yeh

    2009-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is a methylation enzyme that catalyzes the degradation pathway and inactivation of dopamine. It is accepted widely as being involved in the modulation of dopaminergic physiology and prefrontal cortex (PFC) function. The COMT Val158Met polymorphism is associated with variation in COMT activity. COMT 158Met allele

  9. Development of an iron(II)-catalyzed aerobic catechol cleavage and biomimetic synthesis of betanidin.

    PubMed

    Guimond, Nicolas; Mayer, Peter; Trauner, Dirk

    2014-07-28

    An aerobic iron(II)-catalyzed cleavage of catechols was developed. This reaction allows for the preparation of 2-methoxy-2?H-pyrans that can be employed as versatile building blocks for synthesis. The utility of this biomimetic oxidative cleavage is featured in the synthesis of betanidin, a natural colorant with antioxidant properties. PMID:24957632

  10. Salicylate and catechol levels are maintained in nahG transgenic poplar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic profiling was used to investigate the molecular phenotypes of transgenic Populus tremula x P. alba bybrids expressing the nahG transgene, a bacterial gene encoding salicylate hydroxylase that converts salicylic acid to catechol. Despite the efficacy of this transgenic approach to reducing...

  11. Removal of arsenic, vanadium and/or nickel compounds from spent catecholated polymer

    DOEpatents

    Fish, Richard H.

    1987-01-01

    Described is a process for removing arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. For vanadium and nickel removal an amine, preferably a diamine is included. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: treating the spent polymer containing any vanadium and/or nickel with an aqueous acid to achieve an acid pH; and, separating the solids from the liquid; and then treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20.degree. to 100.degree. C. with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10; and, separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment of arsenic containing catecholated polymer is in two steps wherein the first step is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, the steps are repeated using a bicarbonate.

  12. Removal of arsenic, vanadium and/or nickel compounds from spent catecholated polymer

    DOEpatents

    Fish, R.H.

    1987-04-21

    Described is a process for removing arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. For vanadium and nickel removal an amine, preferably a diamine is included. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: treating the spent polymer containing any vanadium and/or nickel with an aqueous acid to achieve an acid pH; and, separating the solids from the liquid; and then treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20 to 100 C with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10; and, separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment of arsenic containing catecholated polymer is in two steps wherein the first step is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, the steps are repeated using a bicarbonate.

  13. Silicon-Induced Systemic Defense Responses in Perennial Ryegrass Against Infection by Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Alamgir; Wallis, Christopher M; Uddin, Wakar

    2015-06-01

    Sustainable integrated disease management for gray leaf spot of perennial ryegrass may involve use of plant defense elicitors with compatible traditional fungicides to reduce disease incidence and severity. Silicon (Si) has previously been identified as a potential inducer or modulator of plant defenses against different fungal pathogens. To this end, perennial ryegrass was inoculated with the causal agent of gray leaf spot, Magnaporthe oryzae, when grown in soil that was nonamended or amended with three different levels of calcium silicate (1, 5, or 10 metric tons [t]/ha). When applied at a rate of 5 t/ha, calcium silicate was found to significantly suppress gray leaf spot in perennial ryegrass, including a significant reduction of disease incidence (39.5%) and disease severity (47.3%). Additional studies observed nonpenetrated papillae or cell-wall appositions harboring callose, phenolic autofluorogens, and lignin-associated polyphenolic compounds in grass grown in the Si-amended soil. Regarding defense-associated enzyme levels, only following infection did grass grown in Si-amended soil exhibit greater activities of peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase than equivalent inoculated control plants. Also following infection with M. oryzae, grass levels of several phenolic acids, including chlorogenic acid and flavonoids, and relative expression levels of genes encoding phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PALa and PALb) and lipoxygenase (LOXa) significantly increased in Si-amended plants compared with that of nonamended control plants. These results suggest that Si-mediated increase of host defense responses to fungal pathogens in perennial ryegrass has a great potential to be part of an effective integrated disease management strategy against gray leaf spot development. PMID:25738553

  14. Polyaniline-iron oxide nanohybrid film as multi-functional label-free electrochemical and biomagnetic sensor for catechol.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Sudeshna; Lang, Heinrich; Bahadur, Dhirendra

    2013-09-17

    Polyaniline-iron oxide magnetic nanohybrid was synthesized and characterized using various spectroscopic, microstructural and electrochemical techniques. The smart integration of Fe3O4 nanoparticles within the polyaniline (PANI) matrix yielded a mesoporous nanohybrid (Fe3O4@PANI) with high surface area (94 m(2) g(-1)) and average pore width of 12.8 nm. Catechol is quasi-reversibly oxidized to o-quinone and reduced at the Fe3O4@PANI modified electrodes. The amperometric current response toward catechol was evaluated using the nanohybrid and the sensitivity and detection limit were found to be 312 μA μL(-1) and 0.2 nM, respectively. The results from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) indicated that the increased solution resistance (Rs) was due to elevated adsorption of catechol on the modified electrodes. Photoluminescence spectra showed ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) between p-π orbitals of the phenolate oxygen in catechol and the d-σ* metal orbital of Fe3O4@PANI nanohybrid. Potential dependent spectroelectrochemical behavior of Fe3O4@PANI nanohybrid toward catechol was studied using UV/vis/NIR spectroscopy. The binding activity of the biomagnetic particles to catechol through Brownian relaxation was evident from AC susceptibility measurements. The proposed sensor was used for successful recovery of catechol in tap water samples. PMID:23998532

  15. Dynamic and Coordinated Expression Changes of Rice Small RNAs in Response to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying-Tao; Wang, Meng; Wang, Zhi-Min; Fang, Rong-Xiang; Wang, Xiu-Jie; Jia, Yan-Tao

    2015-11-20

    Endogenous small RNAs are newly identified players in plant immune responses, yet their roles in rice (Oryza sativa) responding to pathogens are still less understood, especially for pathogens that can cause severe yield losses. We examined the small RNA expression profiles of rice leaves at 2, 6, 12, and 24hours post infection of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) virulent strain PXO99, the causal agent of rice bacterial blight disease. Dynamic expression changes of some miRNAs and trans-acting siRNAs were identified, together with a few novel miRNA targets, including an RLK gene targeted by osa-miR159a.1. Coordinated expression changes were observed among some small RNAs in response to Xoo infection, with small RNAs exhibiting the same expression pattern tended to regulate genes in the same or related signaling pathways, including auxin and GA signaling pathways, nutrition and defense-related pathways. These findings reveal the dynamic and complex roles of small RNAs in rice-Xoo interactions, and identify new targets for regulating plant responses to Xoo. PMID:26674380

  16. The purification and properties of a ribonucleoenzyme, o-diphenol oxidase, from potatoes.

    PubMed

    Balasingam, K; Ferdinand, W

    1970-06-01

    1. o-Diphenol oxidase was isolated from potato tubers by a new approach that avoids the browning due to autoxidation. 2. There are at least three forms of the enzyme, of different molecular weights. The major form, of highest molecular weight, was separated from the others in good yield and with high specific activity by gel filtration through Bio-Gel P-300. 3. The major form is homogeneous by disc electrophoresis but regenerates small amounts of the species of lower molecular weight, as shown by rechromatography on Bio-Gel P-300. 4. There is an equal amount of RNA and protein by weight in the fully active enzyme. The RNA cannot be removed without loss of activity, and is not attacked by ribonuclease. 5. The pH optimum of the enzyme is at pH5.0 when assayed with 4-methylcatechol as substrate. It is ten times more active with this substrate than with chlorogenic acid or catechol. The enzyme is fully active in 4m-urea. 6. A minimal molecular weight of 36000 is indicated by copper content and amino acid analysis of the protein component of the enzyme. 7. The protein contains five half-cystinyl residues per 36000 daltons, a value similar to that found in o-diphenol oxidase from mushrooms. It also contains tyrosine residues although, when pure, it does not turn brown by autoxidation. PMID:4990583

  17. Effects of Metal Oxides on a Fungal Laccase Activity and Catechol Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, M.; Dec, J.; Bollag, J.

    2003-12-01

    The transformation of naturally occurring phenols to humic polymers is generally catalyzed by various phenoloxidases commonly present in soil. Some poorly crystalline metal oxides and hydroxides may also participate in these reactions. In this study, catechol (0.1 M) was incubated with a fungal laccase (950 unit/mL) in the presence of poorly crystalline minerals (ferrihydrite; 50 mg/mL: birnessite; 1 mg/mL: aluminum hydroxide; 50 mg/mL) to examine the interaction between these soil components under field conditions. Birnessite had an inhibitory effect on the laccase-mediated transformation of catechol (by up to 40%). Enzyme inhibition was possibly caused by the rapid production of humic-like polymers by birnessite. An additional inhibitory effect was caused by Manganese ion released from birnessite as it oxidized catechol (up to 70% loss in enzyme activity). In contrast to birnessite, aluminum hydroxide had an additive effect on the disappearance of catechol despite the rapid adsorption of the enzyme by this mineral (Xm=6.18μ g/mg). Apparently, the adsorbed laccase retained some enzyme activity. Ferrihydrite also had an additive effect on catechol transformation. However, as compared to aluminum hydroxide, ferrihydrite adsorbed less laccase (Xm=0.89μ g/mg) and more humic-like polymers. Unlike birnessite, aluminum hydroxide and ferrihydrite released negligible amounts of metal ions. In conclusion, under field conditions, phenoloxidase activity may be diminished by the presence of birnessite, but the presence of either ferrihydrite or aluminum hydroxide is less likely to inhibit enzyme activity, and may even enhance substrate transformation.

  18. Catechol formation: a novel pathway in the metabolism of sterigmatocystin and 11-methoxysterigmatocystin.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Erika; Fleck, Stefanie C; Metzler, Manfred

    2014-12-15

    The mycotoxin sterigmatocystin (STC) has an aflatoxin-like structure including a furofuran ring system. Like aflatoxin B1, STC is a liver carcinogen and forms DNA adducts after metabolic activation to an epoxide at the furofuran ring. In incubations of STC with human P450 isoforms, one monooxygenated and one dioxygenated STC metabolite were recently reported, and a GSH adduct was formed when GSH was added to the incubations. However, the chemical structures of these metabolites were not unambiguously elucidated. We now report that hepatic microsomes from humans and rats predominantly form the catechol 9-hydroxy-STC via hydroxylation of the aromatic ring. No STC-1,2-oxide and only small amounts of STC-1,2-dihydrodiol were detected in microsomal incubations, suggesting that epoxidation is a minor pathway compared to catechol formation. Catechol formation was also much more pronounced than furofuran epoxidation in the microsomal metabolism of 11-methoxysterigmatocystin (MSTC). In support of the preference of catechol formation, only trace amounts of the thiol adduct of the 1,2-oxides but large amounts of the thiol adducts of the 9-hydroxy-8,9-quinones were obtained when N-acetyl-l-cysteine was added to the microsomal incubations of STC and MSTC. In addition to hydroxylation at C-9, smaller amounts of 12c-hydroxylated, 9,12c-dihydroxylated, and 9,11-dihydroxylated metabolites were formed. Our study suggests that hydroxylation of the aromatic ring, yielding a catechol, represents a major and novel pathway in the oxidative metabolism of STC and MSTC, which may contribute to the toxic and genotoxic effects of these mycotoxins. PMID:25380456

  19. Urate oxidase: primary structure and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, X W; Lee, C C; Muzny, D M; Caskey, C T

    1989-01-01

    Urate oxidase, or uricase (EC 1.7.3.3), is a peroxisomal enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of uric acid to allantoin in most mammals. In humans and certain other primates, however, the enzyme has been lost by some unknown mechanism. To identify the molecular basis for this loss, urate oxidase cDNA clones were isolated from pig, mouse, and baboon, and their DNA sequences were determined. The mouse urate oxidase open reading frame encodes a 303-amino acid polypeptide, while the pig and baboon urate oxidase cDNAs encode a 304-amino acid polypeptide due to a single codon deletion/insertion event. The authenticity of this single additional codon was confirmed by sequencing the mouse and pig genomic copies of the gene. The urate oxidase sequence contains a domain similar to the type 2 copper binding motif found in other copper binding proteins, suggesting that the copper ion in urate oxidase is coordinated as a type 2 structure. Based upon a comparison of the NH2-terminal peptide and deduced sequences, we propose that the maturation of pig urate oxidase involves the posttranslational cleavage of a six-amino acid peptide. Two nonsense mutations were found in the human urate oxidase gene, which confirms, at the molecular level, that the urate oxidase gene in humans is nonfunctional. The sequence comparisons favor the hypothesis that the loss of urate oxidase in humans is due to a sudden mutational event rather than a progressive mutational process. Images PMID:2594778

  20. Characterization of the gene encoding an extracellular laccase of Myceliophthora thermophila and analysis of the recombinant enzyme expressed in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed Central

    Berka, R M; Schneider, P; Golightly, E J; Brown, S H; Madden, M; Brown, K M; Halkier, T; Mondorf, K; Xu, F

    1997-01-01

    A genomic DNA segment encoding an extracellular laccase was isolated from the thermophilic fungus Myceliophthora thermophila, and the nucleotide sequence of this gene was determined. The deduced amino acid sequence of M. thermophila laccase (MtL) shows homology to laccases from diverse fungal genera. A vector containing the M. thermophila laccase coding region, under transcriptional control of an Aspergillus oryzae alpha-amylase gene promoter and terminator, was constructed for heterologous expression in A. oryzae. The recombinant laccase expressed in A. oryzae was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by anion-exchange chromatography. Amino-terminal sequence data suggests that MtL is synthesized as a preproenzyme. The molecular mass was estimated to be approximately 100 to 140 kDa by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300 and to be 85 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Carbohydrate analysis revealed that MtL contains 40 to 60% glycosylation. The laccase shows an absorbance spectrum that is typical of blue copper oxidases, with maxima at 276 and 589 nm, and contains 3.9 copper atoms per subunit. With syringaldazine as a substrate, MtL has optimal activity at pH 6.5 and retains nearly 100% of its activity when incubated at 60 degrees C for 20 min. This is the first report of the cloning and heterologous expression of a thermostable laccase. PMID:9251203

  1. Reactivity and selectivity differences between catecholate and catechothiolate Ru complexes. Implications regarding design of stereoselective olefin metathesis catalysts.

    PubMed

    Khan, R Kashif M; Torker, Sebastian; Hoveyda, Amir H

    2014-10-15

    The origins of the unexpected finding that Ru catechothiolate complexes, in contrast to catecholate derivatives, promote exceptional Z-selective olefin metathesis reactions are elucidated. We show that species containing a catechothiolate ligand, unlike catecholates, preserve their structural integrity under commonly used reaction conditions. DFT calculations indicate that, whereas alkene coordination is the stereochemistry-determining step with catecholate complexes, it is through the metallacyclobutane formation that the identity of the major isomer is determined with catechothiolate systems. The present findings suggest that previous models for Z selectivity, largely based on steric differences, should be altered to incorporate electronic factors as well. PMID:25268949

  2. Improving Pharmaceutical Protein Production in Oryza sativa

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yu-Chieh; Tan, Chia-Chun; Ku, Jung-Ting; Hsu, Wei-Cho; Su, Sung-Chieh; Lu, Chung-An; Huang, Li-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Application of plant expression systems in the production of recombinant proteins has several advantages, such as low maintenance cost, absence of human pathogens, and possession of complex post-translational glycosylation capabilities. Plants have been successfully used to produce recombinant cytokines, vaccines, antibodies, and other proteins, and rice (Oryza sativa) is a potential plant used as recombinant protein expression system. After successful transformation, transgenic rice cells can be either regenerated into whole plants or grown as cell cultures that can be upscaled into bioreactors. This review summarizes recent advances in the production of different recombinant protein produced in rice and describes their production methods as well as methods to improve protein yield and quality. Glycosylation and its impact in plant development and protein production are discussed, and several methods of improving yield and quality that have not been incorporated in rice expression systems are also proposed. Finally, different bioreactor options are explored and their advantages are analyzed. PMID:23615467

  3. Septin-Dependent Assembly of the Exocyst Is Essential for Plant Infection by Magnaporthe oryzae[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kershaw, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is the causal agent of rice blast disease, the most devastating disease of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) and a continuing threat to global food security. To cause disease, the fungus elaborates a specialized infection cell called an appressorium, which breaches the cuticle of the rice leaf, allowing the fungus entry to plant tissue. Here, we show that the exocyst complex localizes to the tips of growing hyphae during vegetative growth, ahead of the Spitzenkörper, and is required for polarized exocytosis. However, during infection-related development, the exocyst specifically assembles in the appressorium at the point of plant infection. The exocyst components Sec3, Sec5, Sec6, Sec8, and Sec15, and exocyst complex proteins Exo70 and Exo84 localize specifically in a ring formation at the appressorium pore. Targeted gene deletion, or conditional mutation, of genes encoding exocyst components leads to impaired plant infection. We demonstrate that organization of the exocyst complex at the appressorium pore is a septin-dependent process, which also requires regulated synthesis of reactive oxygen species by the NoxR-dependent Nox2 NADPH oxidase complex. We conclude that septin-mediated assembly of the exocyst is necessary for appressorium repolarization and host cell invasion. PMID:26566920

  4. African rice (Oryza glaberrima): History and future potential

    PubMed Central

    Linares, Olga F.

    2002-01-01

    The African species of rice (Oryza glaberrima) was cultivated long before Europeans arrived in the continent. At present, O. glaberrima is being replaced by the introduced Asian species of rice, Oryza sativa. Some West African farmers, including the Jola of southern Senegal, still grow African rice for use in ritual contexts. The two species of rice have recently been crossed, producing a promising hybrid. PMID:12461173

  5. Multicopper oxidase-3 is a laccase associated with the peritrophic matrix of Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Lang, Minglin; Kanost, Michael R; Gorman, Maureen J

    2012-01-01

    The multicopper oxidase (MCO) family of enzymes includes laccases, which oxidize a broad range of substrates including polyphenols and phenylendiamines; ferroxidases, which oxidize ferrous iron; and several other oxidases with specific substrates such as ascorbate, bilirubin or copper. The genome of Anopheles gambiae, a species of mosquito, encodes five putative multicopper oxidases. Of these five, only AgMCO2 has known enzymatic and physiological functions: it is a highly conserved laccase that functions in cuticle pigmentation and tanning by oxidizing dopamine and dopamine derivatives. AgMCO3 is a mosquito-specific gene that is expressed predominantly in adult midguts and Malpighian tubules. To determine its enzymatic function, we purified recombinant AgMCO3 and analyzed its activity. AgMCO3 oxidized hydroquinone (a p-diphenol), the five o-diphenols tested, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), and p-phenylenediamine, but not ferrous iron. The catalytic efficiencies of AgMCO3 were similar to those of cuticular laccases (MCO2 orthologs), except that AgMCO3 oxidized all of the phenolic substrates with similar efficiencies whereas the MCO2 isoforms were less efficient at oxidizing catechol or dopa. These results demonstrate that AgMCO3 can be classified as a laccase and suggest that AgMCO3 has a somewhat broader substrate specificity than MCO2 orthologs. In addition, we observed AgMCO3 immunoreactivity in the peritrophic matrix, which functions as a selective barrier between the blood meal and midgut epithelial cells, protecting the midgut from mechanical damage, pathogens, and toxic molecules. We propose that AgMCO3 may oxidize toxic molecules in the blood meal leading to detoxification or to cross-linking of the molecules to the peritrophic matrix, thus targeting them for excretion. PMID:22479493

  6. Measurement of haplotypic variation in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae within a single field by rep-PCR and RFLP analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Vera Cruz, C.M.; Leach, J.E.; Ardales, E.Y.; Talag, J.

    1996-12-01

    The haplotypic variation of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae in a farmer;s field that had endemic bacterial blight in the Philippines was evaluated at a single time. The genomic structure of the field population was analyzed by repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction with oligonucleotide primers corresponding to interspersed repeated sequences in prokaryotic genomes and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) with the insertion sequence IS1113. The techniques and specific probes and primers were selected because they grouped consistently into the same lineages a set of 30 selected X. oryzae pv. oryzae strains that represented the four distinct RFLP lineages found in the Philippines did. Strains (155) were systematically collected from a field planted to rice cv. Sinandomeng, which is susceptible to the indigenous pathogen population. Two of the four Philippine lineages, B and C, which included race 2 and races 3 and 9, respectively, were detected in the field. Lineage C was the predominant population (74.8%). The haplotypic diversities of 10 of the 25 blocks were significantly greater than the total haplotypic diversity of the collection in the entire field; however, between individual blocks the haplotypic diversities were not significantly different. Haplo-types from both lineages were distributed randomly across the field. Analysis of genetic diversity at the microgeographic scale provided insights into the finer scale of variation of X. oryzae pv. oryzae, which are useful in designing experiments to study effects of host resistance on the population structure of the bacterial blight pathogen. 46 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of LipA, a secretory lipase/esterase from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    SciTech Connect

    Aparna, Gudlur; Chatterjee, Avradip; Jha, Gopaljee; Sonti, Ramesh V.; Sankaranarayanan, Rajan

    2007-08-01

    The crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of LipA, a lipase/esterase secreted by X. oryzae pv. oryzae during its infection of rice plants, are reported. Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae is the causal agent of bacterial leaf blight, a serious disease of rice. Several enzymes that are secreted through the type II secretion system of this bacterium play an important role in the plant–microbe interaction, being important for virulence and also being able to induce potent host defence responses. One of these enzymes is a secretory lipase/esterase, LipA, which shows a very weak homology to other bacterial lipases and gives a positive tributyrin plate assay. In this study, LipA was purified from the culture supernatant of an overexpressing clone of X. oryzae pv. oryzae and two types of crystals belonging to space group C2 but with two different unit-cell parameters were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Type I crystals diffract to a maximum resolution of 1.89 Å and have unit-cell parameters a = 93.1, b = 62.3, c = 66.1 Å, β = 90.8°. Type II crystals have unit-cell parameters a = 103.6, b = 54.6, c = 66.3 Å, β = 92.6° and diffract to 1.86 Å. Solvent-content analysis shows one monomer in the asymmetric unit in both the crystal forms.

  8. Comparison of membrane-bound and soluble polyphenol oxidase in Fuji apple (Malus domestica Borkh. cv. Red Fuji).

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Zhao, Jin-Hong; Gan, Zhi-Lin; Ni, Yuan-Ying

    2015-04-15

    This study compared membrane-bound with soluble polyphenol oxidase (mPPO and sPPO, respectively) from Fuji apple. Purified mPPO and partially purified sPPO were used. mPPO was purified by temperature-induced phase partitioning and ion exchange chromatography. The specific activity of mPPO was 34.12 higher than that of sPPO. mPPO was more stable than sPPO at pH 5.0-8.5. Although mPPO was more easily inactivated at 25-55 C, it is still more active than sPPO in this temperature range. The optimum substrate of mPPO was 4-methyl catechol, followed by catechol. L-cysteine had the highest inhibitory effects on mPPO followed by ascorbic acid and glutathione. Surprisingly, EDTA increased mPPO activity. The results revealed that purified mPPO is a dimer with a molecular weight of approximately 67 kDa. PMID:25465998

  9. Polyphenol oxidase and herbivore defense in trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides): cDNA cloning, expression, and potential substrates.

    PubMed

    Haruta, Miyoshi; Pedersen, Jens A.; Constabel, C. Peter

    2001-08-01

    The biochemical anti-herbivore defense of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) was investigated in a molecular analysis of polyphenol oxidase (PPO; EC 1.10.3.2). A PPO cDNA was isolated from a trembling aspen wounded leaf cDNA library and its nucleotide sequence determined. Southern analysis indicated the presence of two PPO genes in the trembling aspen genome. Expression of PPO was found to be induced after herbivory by forest tent caterpillar, by wounding, and by methyl jasmonate treatment. Wound induction was systemic, and occurred in unwounded leaves on wounded plants. This pattern of expression is consistent with a role of this enzyme in insect defense. A search for potential PPO substrates in ethanolic aspen leaf extracts using electron spin resonance (ESR) found no pre-existing diphenolic compounds. However, following a brief delay and several additions of oxygen, an ESR signal specific for catechol was detected. The source of this catechol was most likely the aspen phenolic glycosides tremulacin or salicortin which decomposed during ESR experiments. This was subsequently confirmed in experiments using pure salicortin. PMID:11473716

  10. A pharmacological study of the spontaneous convulsive activity induced by 1,2-dihydroxybenzene (catechol) in the anaesthetized mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Angel, A; Clarke, K A; Dewhurst, D G

    1977-01-01

    1. The convulsive activity induced by catechol has been examined in anaesthetized mice either by determining the CD50 for the convulsions in drug-treated and control animals, or by studying the effects of various drugs on the total whole body activity. 2. The results indicate that catecholamines play no part in the mechanism of action of catechol. Drugs which alter cerebral catecholamine levels had no effect on the convulsions, nor did the alpha- and beta-adrenoceptor blocking drugs. 3. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) could possibly be important, though results with drugs which either change brain 5-HT levels, or block 5-HT receptors were inconsistent. 4. gamma-Aminobutyric acid also appears not to be involved in the mechanism of action of catechol. 5. The results strongly suggest that catechol primarily activates a central cholinergic system, in that muscarinic and nicotinic receptor blocking drugs inhibit, and anticholinesterases potentiate the convulsions. PMID:145258

  11. Synthesis and structure/antioxidant activity relationship of novel catecholic antioxidant structural analogues to hydroxytyrosol and its lipophilic esters.

    PubMed

    Bernini, Roberta; Crisante, Fernanda; Barontini, Maurizio; Tofani, Daniela; Balducci, Valentina; Gambacorta, Augusto

    2012-08-01

    A large panel of novel catecholic antioxidants and their fatty acid or methyl carbonate esters has been synthesized in satisfactory to good yields through a 2-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX)-mediated aromatic hydroxylation as the key step. The new catechols are structural analogues of naturally occurring hydroxytyrosol (3,4-DHE). To evaluate structure/activity relationships, the antioxidant properties of all catecholic compounds were evaluated in vitro by ABTS assay and on whole cells by DCF fluorometric assay and compared with that of the corresponding already known hydroxytyrosyl derivatives. Results outline that all of the new catechols show antioxidant capacity in vitro higher than that of the corresponding hydroxytyrosyl derivatives. Less evident positive effects have been detected in whole cells experiments. Cytotoxicity experiments, using MTT assay, on a representative set of compounds evidenced no influence in cell survival. PMID:22780104

  12. pH-dependent cross-linking of catechols through oxidation via Fe(3+) and potential implications for mussel adhesion.

    PubMed

    Fullenkamp, Dominic E; Barrett, Devin G; Miller, Dusty R; Kurutz, Josh W; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2014-01-01

    The mussel byssus is a remarkable attachment structure that is formed by injection molding and rapid in-situ hardening of concentrated solutions of proteins enriched in the catecholic amino acid 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (DOPA). Fe(3+), found in high concentrations in the byssus, has been speculated to participate in redox reactions with DOPA that lead to protein polymerization, however direct evidence to support this hypothesis has been lacking. Using small molecule catechols, DOPA-containing peptides, and native mussel foot proteins, we report the first direct observation of catechol oxidation and polymerization accompanied by reduction of Fe(3+) to Fe(2+). In the case of the small molecule catechol, we identified two dominant dimer species and characterized their connectivities by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the C6-C6 and C5-C6 linked species as the major and minor products, respectively. For the DOPA-containing peptide, we studied the pH dependence of the reaction and demonstrated that catechol polymerization occurs readily at low pH, but is increasingly diminished in favor of metal-catechol coordination interactions at higher pH. Finally, we demonstrate that Fe(3+) can induce cross-links in native byssal mussel proteins mefp-1 and mcfp-1 at acidic pH. Based on these findings, we discuss the potential implications to the chemistry of mussel adhesion. PMID:25243062

  13. Effects of biochar and the geophagous earthworm Metaphire guillelmi on fate of (14)C-catechol in an agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Shan, Jun; Wang, Yongfeng; Gu, Jianqiang; Zhou, Wenqiang; Ji, Rong; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2014-07-01

    Both biochar and earthworms can exert influence on behaviors of soil-borne monomeric phenols in soil; however, little was known about the combined effects of biochar and earthworm activities on fate of these chemicals in soil. Using (14)C-catechol as a representative, the mineralization, transformation and residue distribution of phenolic humus monomer in soil amended with different amounts of biochar (0%, 0.05%, 0.5%, and 5%) without/with the geophagous earthworm Metaphire guillelmi were investigated. The results showed biochar at amendment rate <0.5% did not affect (14)C-catechol mineralization, whereas 5% biochar amendment significantly inhibited the mineralization. Earthworms did not affect the mineralization of (14)C-catechol in soil amended with <0.5% biochar, but significantly enhanced the mineralization in 5% biochar amended soil when they were present in soil for 9 d. When earthworms were removed from the soil, the mineralization of (14)C-catechol was significantly lower than that of in earthworm-free soil indicating that (14)C-catecholic residues were stabilized during their passage through earthworm gut. The assimilation of (14)C by earthworms was low (1.2%), and was significantly enhanced by biochar amendment, which was attributed to the release of biochar-associated (14)C-catecholic residues during gut passage of earthworm. PMID:24875877

  14. Development of Catechol 2,3-Dioxygenase-Specific Primers for Monitoring Bioremediation by Competitive Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Mesarch, Matthew B.; Nakatsu, Cindy H.; Nies, Loring

    2000-01-01

    Benzene, toluene, xylenes, phenol, naphthalene, and biphenyl are among a group of compounds that have at least one reported pathway for biodegradation involving catechol 2,3-dioxygenase enzymes. Thus, detection of the corresponding catechol 2,3-dioxygenase genes can serve as a basis for identifying and quantifying bacteria that have these catabolic abilities. Primers that can successfully amplify a 238-bp catechol 2,3-dioxygenase gene fragment from eight different bacteria are described. The identities of the amplicons were confirmed by hybridization with a 238-bp catechol 2,3-dioxygenase probe. The detection limit was 102 to 103 gene copies, which was lowered to 100 to 101 gene copies by hybridization. Using the dioxygenase-specific primers, an increase in catechol 2,3-dioxygenase genes was detected in petroleum-amended soils. The dioxygenase genes were enumerated by competitive quantitative PCR with a 163-bp competitor that was amplified using the same primers. Target and competitor sequences had identical amplification kinetics. Potential PCR inhibitors that could coextract with DNA, nonamplifying DNA, soil factors (humics), and soil pollutants (toluene) did not impact enumeration. Therefore, this technique can be used to accurately and reproducibly quantify catechol 2,3-dioxygenase genes in complex environments such as petroleum-contaminated soil. Direct, non-cultivation-based molecular techniques for detecting and enumerating microbial pollutant-biodegrading genes in environmental samples are powerful tools for monitoring bioremediation and developing field evidence in support of natural attenuation. PMID:10653735

  15. Lab-on-valve (LOV) system coupled to irreversible biamperometric detection for the on-line monitoring of catechol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Yao, Guojun; Zhu, Peihua; Hu, Xiaoya; Xu, Qin; Yang, Chun

    2010-09-15

    The analytical performance of lab-on-valve (LOV) system using irreversible biamperometry for the determination of catechol was evaluated. By integrating miniaturized electrochemical flow cell (EFC) designed and processed which is furnished with two identical polarized platinum electrodes, into the LOV unit, the lab-on-valve system combines sampling with analysis, realizing automated on-line analysis for catechol in a closed system. The biamperometric detection system was established to record the relationship between oxidation current and time by coupling the irreversible oxidation of catechol at one pretreated platinum electrode with the irreversible reduction of platinum oxide at the other pretreated platinum electrode. Factors influencing the analytical performance were optimized, including the potential difference (DeltaE), buffer solution and pH, and flow variables in the LOV. A linear calibration curve was obtained within the range of 1.0 x 10(-6)-5.0 x 10(-4) mol L(-1) of catechol with the detection limit (3 sigma) of 5.09 x 10(-7)mol L(-1). The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) was 2.39% for 11 successive determinations of 1 x 10(-5)mol L(-1) catechol and the sample throughput was 35h(-1). Moreover, this proposed method was applied to the analysis of catechol in beer sample, which was testified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). PMID:20801363

  16. Surface charge-transfer complex formation of catechol on titanium(IV) oxide and the application to bio-sensing.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yusuke; Hori, Hiroshige; Taga, Atsushi; Tada, Hiroaki

    2015-11-15

    Adsorption properties of 2-hydroxyphenol (catechol) on TiO2 particles has been studied at 298K. The adsorption proceeds from the aqueous solution with the Langmuir type behavior. Diffuse reflectance infrared spectra of the catechol-adsorbed TiO2 suggested that catechol is adsorbed on TiO2 solution via the chelation to the surface Ti ions. The adsorption induces a strong absorption in the whole visible region, of which intensity increases with an increase in the adsorption amount. Photoelectrochemical experiments and molecular orbital calculations indicate that the absorption stems from the charge-transfer (CT) transition from the HOMO of catechol to the conduction band of TiO2. Time courses for the adsorption of catechol on mesoporous TiO2 nanocrystalline film-coated glass was traced by measuring the change in the absorbance of the CT band, and analyzed on the basis of the Langmuir model. This study would present a new simple technique for sensing of important biomolecules bearing the catechol moiety. PMID:26247381

  17. Development of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase-specific primers for monitoring bioremediation by competitive quantitative PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Mesarch, M.B.; Nakatsu, C.H.; Nies, L.

    2000-02-01

    Benzene, toluene, xylenes, phenol, naphthalene, and biphenyl are among a group of compounds that have at least one reported pathway for biodegradation involving catechol 2,3-dioxygenase enzymes. Thus, detection of the corresponding catechol 2,3-dioxygenase genes can serve as a basis for identifying and quantifying bacteria that have these catabolic abilities. Primes that can successfully amplify a 238-bp catechol 2,3-dioxygenase gene fragment from eight different bacteria are described. The identities of the amplicons were confirmed by hybridization with a 238-bp catechol 2,3-dioxygenase probe. The detection limit was 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 3} gene copies, which was lowered to 10{sup 0} to 10{sup 1} gene copies of hybridization. Using the dioxygenase-specific primers, an increase in catechol 2,3-dioxygenase genes was detected in petroleum-amended soils. The dioxygenase genes were enumerated by competitive quantitative PCR and a 163-bp competitor that was amplified using the same primers. Target and competitor sequences had identical amplification kinetics. Potential PCR inhibitors that could coextract with DNA, nonamplifying DNA, soil factors (humics), and soil pollutants (toluene) did not impact enumeration. Therefore, this technique can be used to accurately and reproducibly quantify catechol 2,3-dioxygenase genes in complex environments such as petroleum-contaminated soil. Direct, non-cultivation-based molecular techniques for detecting and enumerating microbial pollutant-biodegrading genes in environmental samples are powerful tools for monitoring bioremediation and developing field evidence in support of natural attenuation.

  18. Glucose oxidase activity of actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    St Vlahov, S

    1978-01-01

    The ability of 311 actiomycete, belonging to 12 species to produce glucose oxidase was studied. It was found that 174 of them formed exoenzymes on solid medium and 133 in liquid medium. The composition of the nutrient medium has an essential effect on the amount of enzyme formed. Strains with considerably higher activity form a greater amount of exoenzymes on soya meal medium and on synthetic medium with KNO2. The highest activity of the culture liquid of some strains was observed between the 6th and 7th day of cultivation. During this phase of growth the highest productivity of the biomas was established. PMID:76424

  19. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Remick, Ronald A.; Froese, Colleen

    1990-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are effective antidepressant agents. They are increasingly and effectively used in a number of other psychiatric and non-psychiatric medical syndromes. Their potential for serious toxicity (i.e., hypertensive reaction) is far less than original reports suggest, and newer reversible substrate-specific MAOIs may offer even less toxicity. The author reviews the pharmacology, mechanism of action, clinical indications, and dosing strategies of MAOIs. The common MAOI side-effects (hypotension, weight gain, sexual dysfunction, insomnia, daytime sedation, myoclonus, and hypertensive episodes) are described and management techniques suggested. Recent clinical developments involving MAOIs are outlined. PMID:21233984

  20. Theoretical calculations of a compound formed by Fe(+3) and tris(catechol).

    PubMed

    Kara, ?zzet; Kara, Ye?im; ztrk Kiraz, Asl?; Mammadov, Ramazan

    2015-10-01

    Phenolic compounds generally have special smell, easily soluble in water, organic solvents (alcohols, esters, chloroform, ethyl acetate), in aqueous solutions of bases, colorless or colorful, crystalline and amorphous materials. Phenols form colorful complexes when they form compounds with heavy metals. In this study, the structural properties of a compound formed by catechol and Fe(+3) are investigated theoretically. The electronic and thermodynamic properties of the complex were also investigated in gas phase and organic solvents at B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) and B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The formation of Fe-tris(catechol) complex compound is exothermic, and it is difficult to obtain the complex as the temperature increases. The observed and calculated FT-IR and geometric parameters spectra are in good agreement with empirical. PMID:25983060

  1. Catechols and 3-hydroxypyridones as inhibitors of the DNA repair complex ERCC1-XPF.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Timothy M; Gillen, Kevin J; Wallace, Claire; Lee, Maximillian T; Bakrania, Preeti; Khurana, Puneet; Coombs, Peter J; Stennett, Laura; Fox, Simon; Bureau, Emilie A; Brownlees, Janet; Melton, David W; Saxty, Barbara

    2015-10-01

    Catechol-based inhibitors of ERCC1-XPF endonuclease activity were identified from a high-throughput screen. Exploration of the structure-activity relationships within this series yielded compound 13, which displayed an ERCC1-XPF IC50 of 0.6 μM, high selectivity against FEN-1 and DNase I and activity in nucleotide excision repair, cisplatin enhancement and γH2AX assays in A375 melanoma cells. Screening of fragments as potential alternatives to the catechol group revealed that 3-hydroxypyridones are able to inhibit ERCC1-XPF with high ligand efficiency, and elaboration of the hit gave compounds 36 and 37 which showed promising ERCC1-XPF IC50 values of <10 μM. PMID:26318993

  2. Studies on Polyphenol Content, Activities and Isozymes of Polyphenol Oxidase and Peroxidase During Air-Curing in Three Tobacco Types 1

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, S. J.; Calvert, J.

    1969-01-01

    The change in polyphenol content in the primed leaves of burley, flue-cured, and Turkish tobaccos during air-curing was related to the activities and isozymes of polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase. The quantity of chlorogenic acid was rapidly reduced during the first week of curing. The decrease in rutin content during curing was less significant, especially when the concentration of chlorogenic acid was high in leaf tissues. This result was further confirmed by in vitro assays with partially purified tobacco polyphenol oxidase. The polyphenol oxidase activity did not differ at any stage of curing in the 3 tobaccos. When the activity was measured by the oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine it rose rapidly during the first day of curing and then decreased sharply so that in the fully cured leaf only 15% activity remained. The increase in activity was not observed when chlorogenic acid was used as the substrate. A similar level of peroxidase activity was found in the 3 tobaccos before curing. Peroxidase activities increased rapidly during the first 24 hr of curing, declined thereafter, and remained highest in the flue-cured tobacco, less in the Turkish line, and least in the burley at the end of curing process. By polyacrylamide gel block electrophoresis, 10 peroxidase isozyme bands, 2 cationic and 8 anionic, appeared identical in all 3 tobaccos. When catechol replaced benzidine-2 HCl as the electron donor, 1 cationic and 2 anionic peroxidase isozymes did not form. Of interest is that the same 10 peroxidase isozyme bands also exhibited polyphenol oxidase activities when treated with 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine or chlorogenic acid. Results suggest that in the crude tobacco leaf extract the peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase may associate as protein complexes, and peroxidase isozymes may differ in electron-donor requirements. Isozyme patterns for both oxidases at various curing intervals differed only quantitatively. Images PMID:16657046

  3. Synthesis of Non-spherical Glycopolymer-Decorated Nanoparticles: Combing Thiol-ene with Catecholic Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Zhang, Weidong; Chen, Gaojian

    2016-01-01

    Glycopolymers with carbohydrate side chains are currently being applied in many fields, with much potential for disease treatment. The shape of glycopolymer-bearing nanoparticles has obvious effects on the nanoparticle-cell interaction and is therefore important for the applications of glycopolymers in biological systems. Here a synthetic approach to prepare non-spherical glycopolymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles is provided, by combing the convenience of inorganic shape control, catecholic chemistry, and thiol-ene reaction. PMID:26537471

  4. Bioinspired pH and magnetic responsive catechol-functionalized chitosan hydrogels with tunable elastic properties.

    PubMed

    Ghadban, Ali; Ahmed, Anansa S; Ping, Yuan; Ramos, Ricardo; Arfin, Najmul; Cantaert, Bram; Ramanujan, Raju V; Miserez, Ali

    2015-12-24

    We have developed pH- and magnetic-responsive hydrogels that are stabilized by both covalent bonding and catechol/Fe(3+) ligands. The viscoelastic properties of the gels are regulated by the complexation valence and can be used to tune drug release profiles. The stable incorporation of magnetic nanoparticles further expands control over the mechanical response and drug release, in addition to providing magnetic stimuli-responsivity to the gels. PMID:26558317

  5. Versatile tuning of supramolecular hydrogels through metal complexation of oxidation-resistant catechol-inspired ligands

    PubMed Central

    Menyo, Matthew S.

    2013-01-01

    The mussel byssal cuticle employs DOPA-Fe3+ complexation to provide strong, yet reversible crosslinking. Synthetic constructs employing this design motif based on catechol units are plagued by oxidation-driven degradation of the catechol units and the requirement for highly alkaline pH conditions leading to decreased performance and loss of supramolecular properties. Herein, a platform based on a 4-arm poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel system is used to explore the utility of DOPA analogues such as the parent catechol and derivatives, 4-nitrocatechol (nCat) and 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinonone (HOPO), as structural crosslinking agents upon complexation with metal ions. HOPO moieties are found to hold particular promise, as robust gelation with Fe3+ occurs at physiological pH and is found to be largely resistant to oxidative degradation. Gelation is also shown to be triggered by other biorelevant metal ions such as Al3+, Ga3+ and Cu2+ which allows for tuning of the release and dissolution profiles with potential application as injectable delivery systems. PMID:24285981

  6. Isolation and characterization of two novel halotolerant Catechol 2, 3-dioxygenases from a halophilic bacterial consortium

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Guang; Fang, Tingting; Wang, Chongyang; Huang, Yong; Tian, Fang; Cui, Qijia; Wang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Study of enzymes in halophiles will help to understand the mechanism of aromatic hydrocarbons degradation in saline environment. In this study, two novel catechol 2,3-dioxygenases (C23O1 and C23O2) were cloned and overexpressed from a halophilic bacterial consortium enriched from an oil-contaminated saline soil. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the novel C23Os and their relatives formed a new branch in subfamily I.2.A of extradiol dioxygenases and the sequence differences were further analyzed by amino acid sequence alignment. Two enzymes with the halotolerant feature were active over a range of 0–30% salinity and they performed more stable at high salinity than in the absence of salt. Surface electrostatic potential and amino acids composition calculation suggested high acidic residues content, accounting for their tolerance to high salinity. Moreover, two enzymes were further characterized. The enzymes activity both increased in the presence of Fe3+, Fe2+, Cu2+ and Al3+ and showed no significant inhibition by other tested metal ions. The optimal temperatures for the C23Os were 40 °C and 60 °C and their best substrates were catechol and 4-methylcatechol respectively. As the firstly isolated and characterized catechol dioxygenases from halophiles, the two halotolerant C23Os presented novel characteristics suggesting their potential application in aromatic hydrocarbons biodegradation. PMID:26621792

  7. Isolation and characterization of two novel halotolerant Catechol 2, 3-dioxygenases from a halophilic bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Guo, Guang; Fang, Tingting; Wang, Chongyang; Huang, Yong; Tian, Fang; Cui, Qijia; Wang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Study of enzymes in halophiles will help to understand the mechanism of aromatic hydrocarbons degradation in saline environment. In this study, two novel catechol 2,3-dioxygenases (C23O1 and C23O2) were cloned and overexpressed from a halophilic bacterial consortium enriched from an oil-contaminated saline soil. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the novel C23Os and their relatives formed a new branch in subfamily I.2.A of extradiol dioxygenases and the sequence differences were further analyzed by amino acid sequence alignment. Two enzymes with the halotolerant feature were active over a range of 0-30% salinity and they performed more stable at high salinity than in the absence of salt. Surface electrostatic potential and amino acids composition calculation suggested high acidic residues content, accounting for their tolerance to high salinity. Moreover, two enzymes were further characterized. The enzymes activity both increased in the presence of Fe(3+), Fe(2+), Cu(2+) and Al(3+) and showed no significant inhibition by other tested metal ions. The optimal temperatures for the C23Os were 40 °C and 60 °C and their best substrates were catechol and 4-methylcatechol respectively. As the firstly isolated and characterized catechol dioxygenases from halophiles, the two halotolerant C23Os presented novel characteristics suggesting their potential application in aromatic hydrocarbons biodegradation. PMID:26621792

  8. Reaction Kinetics of Catechol (1,2-Benzenediol) and Guaiacol (2-Methoxyphenol) with Ozone.

    PubMed

    Zein, Atallah El; Coeur, Ccile; Obeid, Emil; Lauraguais, Amlie; Fagniez, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    The kinetic reactions of 1,2-benzenediol (catechol) and 2-methoxyphenol (guaiacol) with ozone were studied in a simulation chamber (8 m(3)) under dark conditions. The rate coefficients were measured at 294 2 K, atmospheric pressure and dry conditions (relative humidity, RH < 1%), except for 1,2-benzenediol where they were also measured as a function of relative humidity (RH = 1-80%). The concentrations of organic compounds were followed by a PTR-ToF-MS for a continuous monitoring of gas-phase species. The O3 rate coefficients were obtained using both the pseudo-first-order and relative rate methods. The values (in cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)) determined for catechol and guaiacol under dry conditions are (13.5 1.1) 10(-18) and (0.40 0.31) 10(-18), respectively. The rate coefficient of catechol was found to be independent of RH below 20% and above 60%, whereas for RH between 20% and 60% it decreases with increasing RH. The determined rate coefficients have been used to evaluate the atmospheric lifetime of each compound with respect to O3. To our knowledge, this study represents the first determination of the ozone rate coefficient with guaiacol and is also the first kinetic investigation for the influence of the relative humidity on the oxygenated aromatic ozonolysis. PMID:26053029

  9. Isolation and characterization of two novel halotolerant Catechol 2, 3-dioxygenases from a halophilic bacterial consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Guang; Fang, Tingting; Wang, Chongyang; Huang, Yong; Tian, Fang; Cui, Qijia; Wang, Hui

    2015-12-01

    Study of enzymes in halophiles will help to understand the mechanism of aromatic hydrocarbons degradation in saline environment. In this study, two novel catechol 2,3-dioxygenases (C23O1 and C23O2) were cloned and overexpressed from a halophilic bacterial consortium enriched from an oil-contaminated saline soil. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the novel C23Os and their relatives formed a new branch in subfamily I.2.A of extradiol dioxygenases and the sequence differences were further analyzed by amino acid sequence alignment. Two enzymes with the halotolerant feature were active over a range of 0–30% salinity and they performed more stable at high salinity than in the absence of salt. Surface electrostatic potential and amino acids composition calculation suggested high acidic residues content, accounting for their tolerance to high salinity. Moreover, two enzymes were further characterized. The enzymes activity both increased in the presence of Fe3+, Fe2+, Cu2+ and Al3+ and showed no significant inhibition by other tested metal ions. The optimal temperatures for the C23Os were 40 °C and 60 °C and their best substrates were catechol and 4-methylcatechol respectively. As the firstly isolated and characterized catechol dioxygenases from halophiles, the two halotolerant C23Os presented novel characteristics suggesting their potential application in aromatic hydrocarbons biodegradation.

  10. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence of quantum dots with lucigenin as coreactant for sensitive detection of catechol.

    PubMed

    Dong, YongPing; Zhou, Ying; Wang, Jiao; Dong, YuQiong; Wang, ChengMing

    2016-01-01

    Electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of quantum dots (QDs), including CdS, CdSe, CdTe, and CdSe@ZnS QDs, was comparatively studied in neutral lucigenin solution without coreactants. Cathodic ECL signals were obtained at -1.2V at different QDs modified gold electrodes (QDs/GEs) and the strongest ECL emission was obtained at the CdSe@ZnS QDs modified GE, which is nearly 7-times larger than other QDs modified GEs. The electrochemical results and the ECL spectrum revealed that the luminophor of the cathodic ECL is the excited state of QDs but not lucigenin, revealing that lucigenin can act as coreactant to generate cathodic ECL with QDs. Several impact factors, such as the amount of QDs, the supporting electrolytes, and the pH were investigated. Under the optimal condition, catechol exhibited apparent inhibiting effect on the cathodic ECL signal, based on which a new ECL sensor was developed and applied in the sensitive detection of catechol. The inhibited ECL intensity varied linearly with catechol concentration in the range of 5-1000nM with a detection limit of 2nM (S/N=3). The ECL sensor exhibited satisfied stability, repeatability, and selectivity. The mechanism of cathodic ECL was also proposed. PMID:26695262

  11. Immunological comparison of sulfite oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, V.; Barber, M.J. )

    1991-03-11

    Polyclonal antibodies (rabbit), elicited against FPLC-purified chicken and rat liver sulfite oxidase (SO), have been examined for inhibition and binding to purified chicken (C), rat (R), bovine (B), alligator (A) and shark (S) liver enzymes. Anti-CSO IgG cross-reacted with all five enzymes, with varying affinities, in the order CSO=ASO{gt}RSO{gt}BSO{gt}SSO. Anti-ROS IgG also cross-reacted with all five enzymes in the order RSO{gt}CSO=ASO{gt}BSO{gt}SSO. Anti-CSO IgG inhibited sulfite:cyt. c reductase (S:CR), sulfite:ferricyanide reductase (S:FR) and sulfite:dichlorophenolindophenol reductase (S:DR) activities of CSO to different extents (S:CR{gt}S:FR=S:DR). Similar differential inhibition was found for anti-ROS IgG and RSO S:CR, S:FR and S:DR activities. Anti-CSO IgG inhibited S:CR activities in the order CSO=ASO{much gt}SSO{gt}BSO. RSO was uninhibited. For anti-RSO IgG the inhibition order was RSO{gt}SSO{gt}BSO{gt}ASO. CSO was uninhibited. Anti-CSO and RSO IgGs partially inhibited Chlorella nitrate reductase (NR). Minor cross-reactivity was found for xanthine oxidase. Common antigenic determinants for all five SO's and NR are indicated.

  12. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rak, Malgorzata; Bénit, Paule; Chrétien, Dominique; Bouchereau, Juliette; Schiff, Manuel; El-Khoury, Riyad; Tzagoloff, Alexander; Rustin, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    As with other mitochondrial respiratory chain components, marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity is observed in patients with a cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. This constitutes a considerable diagnostic challenge and raises a number of puzzling questions. So far, pathological mutations have been reported in more than 30 genes, in both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, affecting either structural subunits of the enzyme or proteins involved in its biogenesis. In this review, we discuss the possible causes of the discrepancy between the spectacular advances made in the identification of the molecular bases of cytochrome oxidase deficiency and the lack of any efficient treatment in diseases resulting from such deficiencies. This brings back many unsolved questions related to the frequent delay of clinical manifestation, variable course and severity, and tissue-involvement often associated with these diseases. In this context, we stress the importance of studying different models of these diseases, but also discuss the limitations encountered in most available disease models. In the future, with the possible exception of replacement therapy using genes, cells or organs, a better understanding of underlying mechanism(s) of these mitochondrial diseases is presumably required to develop efficient therapy. PMID:26846578

  13. Kinetic mechanism of monoamine oxidase A.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, R R

    1991-05-01

    Steady-state kinetic data for monoamine oxidase A in crude extracts suggest an exclusively ping-pong mechanism, in contrast to those for monoamine oxidase B, which indicate alternate mechanisms involving either a binary or ternary complex. In this study, with use of purified monoamine oxidase A, steady-state data for the inhibition by D-amphetamine of the oxidation of primary amines indicate the possibility of a ternary complex mechanism for monoamine oxidase A also. Stopped-flow studies demonstrate that the rate of reoxidation of reduced enzyme is enhanced by substrates but not by the product, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium. Thus, for the A enzyme, the ternary complex with substrate, but not product, is reoxidized at a faster rate than the free, reduced enzyme. For both the A and B forms of monoamine oxidase, the mechanism is determined by competition between alternate pathways on the basis of the relative rate constants and dissociation constants. PMID:2021654

  14. The polyamine oxidase from lycophyte Selaginella lepidophylla (SelPAO5), unlike that of angiosperms, back-converts thermospermine to norspermidine.

    PubMed

    Sagor, G H M; Inoue, Masataka; Kim, Dong Wook; Kojima, Seiji; Niitsu, Masaru; Berberich, Thomas; Kusano, Tomonobu

    2015-10-01

    In the phylogeny of plant polyamine oxidases (PAOs), clade III members from angiosperms, such as Arabidopsis thaliana PAO5 and Oryza sativa PAO1, prefer spermine and thermospermine as substrates and back-convert both of these substrates to spermidine in vitro. A clade III representative of lycophytes, SelPAO5 from Selaginella lepidophylla, also prefers spermine and thermospermine but instead back-converts these substrates to spermidine and norspermidine, respectively. This finding indicates that the clade III PAOs of lycophytes and angiosperms oxidize thermospermine at different carbon positions. We discuss the physiological significance of this difference. PMID:26348400

  15. Morphological and molecular characterization of fungal pathogen, Magnaphorthe oryzae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Nor'Aishah; Rafii, Mohd Y.; Rahim, Harun A.; Ali, Nusaibah Syd; Mazlan, Norida; Abdullah, Shamsiah

    2016-02-01

    Rice is arguably the most crucial food crops supplying quarter of calories intake. Fungal pathogen, Magnaphorthe oryzae promotes blast disease unconditionally to gramineous host including rice species. This disease spurred an outbreaks and constant threat to cereal production. Global rice yield declining almost 10-30% including Malaysia. As Magnaphorthe oryzae and its host is model in disease plant study, the rice blast pathosystem has been the subject of intense interest to overcome the importance of the disease to world agriculture. Therefore, in this study, our prime objective was to isolate samples of Magnaphorthe oryzae from diseased leaf obtained from MARDI Seberang Perai, Penang, Malaysia. Molecular identification was performed by sequences analysis from internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of nuclear ribosomal RNA genes. Phylogenetic affiliation of the isolated samples were analyzed by comparing the ITS sequences with those deposited in the GenBank database. The sequence of the isolate demonstrated at least 99% nucleotide identity with the corresponding sequence in GenBank for Magnaphorthe oryzae. Morphological observed under microscope demonstrated that the structure of conidia followed similar characteristic as M. oryzae. Finding in this study provide useful information for breeding programs, epidemiology studies and improved disease management.

  16. Identification and QTL mapping of blast resistance in wild Oryza species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf blast disease of rice (Oryza sativa L.) caused by Magnaporthe oryzae B. Couch is one of the most devastating rice fungal diseases worldwide. Wild relatives of rice (Oryza spp.) may contain novel genes for biotic and abiotic stress resistance lost during domestication. A collection of 67 wild ...

  17. Differential gene expression in response to phenol and catechol reveals different metabolic activities for the degradation of aromatic compounds in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Tam, Le Thi; Eymann, Christine; Albrecht, Dirk; Sietmann, Rabea; Schauer, Frieder; Hecker, Michael; Antelmann, Haike

    2006-08-01

    Aromatic organic compounds that are present in the environment can have toxic effects or provide carbon sources for bacteria. We report here the global response of Bacillus subtilis 168 to phenol and catechol using proteome and transcriptome analyses. Phenol induced the HrcA, sigmaB and CtsR heat-shock regulons as well as the Spx disulfide stress regulon. Catechol caused the activation of the HrcA and CtsR heat-shock regulons and a thiol-specific oxidative stress response involving the Spx, PerR and FurR regulons but no induction of the sigmaB regulon. The most surprising result was that several catabolite-controlled genes are derepressed by catechol, even if glucose is taken up under these conditions. This derepression of the carbon catabolite control was dependent on the glucose concentration in the medium, as glucose excess increased the derepression of the CcpA-dependent lichenin utilization licBCAH operon and the ribose metabolism rbsRKDACB operon by catechol. Growth and viability experiments with catechol as sole carbon source suggested that B. subtilis is not able to utilize catechol as a carbon-energy source. In addition, the microarray results revealed the very strong induction of the yfiDE operon by catechol of which the yfiE gene shares similarities to glyoxalases/bleomycin resistance proteins/extradiol dioxygenases. Using recombinant His6-YfiE(Bs) we demonstrate that YfiE shows catechol-2,3-dioxygenase activity in the presence of catechol as the metabolite 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde was measured. Furthermore, both genes of the yfiDE operon are essential for the growth and viability of B. subtilis in the presence of catechol. Thus, our studies revealed that the catechol-2,3-dioxygenase YfiE is the key enzyme of a meta cleavage pathway in B. subtilis involved in the catabolism of catechol. PMID:16872404

  18. In-vitro oxidation of bisphenol A: Is bisphenol A catechol a suitable biomarker for human exposure to bisphenol A?

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaoyun; Zhou, Xiaoliu; Needham, Larry L; Calafat, Antonia M

    2011-01-01

    The extensive use of bisphenol A (BPA) in the manufacture of consumer products results in widespread human exposure to the chemical. In the body, BPA undergoes first-pass metabolism to form BPA glucuronide, considered to be a major BPA byproduct. Concentrations of total (free plus conjugated) urinary species of BPA are used to assess human exposure to BPA. However, because BPA can be present in numerous consumer and household products, potential contamination with parent BPA during collection and handling may pose a challenge when measuring BPA in such biological samples as blood or urine. In this study we investigated the in-vitro phase I metabolism of BPA in rat and human liver microsomes by using on-line solid-phase extraction-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to identify phase I metabolites (e.g., BPA oxidation products) that could be used as potential alternative biomarkers of BPA exposure. We unambiguously identified 5-hydroxy BPA (BPA catechol) as an in-vitro oxidative metabolite of BPA, but human microsomes oxidized only about 10% of BPA to BPA catechol. We evaluated the usefulness of BPA catechol as a potential biomarker of human exposure to BPA by measuring total concentrations of BPA catechol and BPA in 20 urine samples. We detected BPA catechol at much lower concentrations and frequency than those of BPA. Furthermore, we found that free BPA catechol was rather unstable in urine, which highlights the importance of sampling techniques to adequate interpretation of biomonitoring data. Together, these findings suggest that BPA catechol may not be a suitable biomarker of environmental exposure to BPA, but could be used to confirm BPA exposure in special populations or in situations when urine specimens were potentially contaminated with BPA. PMID:21058032

  19. ISOLATION AND PROPERTIES OF POLYPHENOL OXIDASE FROM BASIDIOCARPS OF Lactarius pergamenus Fr. (Fr.) FUNGI.

    PubMed

    Tsivinska, M V; Antonyuk, V O; Stoika, R S

    2015-01-01

    Fresh juice of basidiocarps of Lactarius pergamenus Fr. (Fr.) fungi was subjected to ion exchange chromatography with used DEAE-toyopearl and CM-cellulose columns, as well as preparative electrophoresis in 7.5% polyacrylamide gels (pH 8.6). Three isoforms of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) were discovered and two isoforms (1-l and 1-2) were purified with a release of protein 0.42 mg/kg and 0.15 mg/kg of basidiocarps, respectively. These isoforms differ in the mobility at disc-electrophoresis in 7.5% PAGE in alkaline buffer system (pH 8.6). Specfic activity of isoform 1-2 is 4.8 times higher than that of the isoforms 1-1. The molecular weight determination by gel chromatography on the Toyopearl HW-55 demonstrated that both isoforms 1-1 and 1-2 have the same 64 ± 2 kDa molecular mass. Electrophoresis in 15% PAGE in the presence of sodium dodecylsulphate and β-mercaptoethanol revealed one band with molecular mass of 64 ± 1 kDa which suggests the presence of one polypeptide chain in the molecule ofthe enzyme. The enzyme has demonstrated the highest activity at pH 6.0 and temperature +10 °C, and at +70 °C the enzyme was inactivated. The PPO activity was the highest in young mushrooms and it decreased with their age and positively correlated with the content ofthe milky juice. Ortho-aminophenol was most effective among all the tested substrates to determine the activity of PPO (o-, m- and p-aminophenol, catechol, tyrosine, resorcinol, phloroglucinol) and its relative activity was 129% of the activity of catechol. Ascorbic acid was the most effective inhibitor of the polyphenol oxidase activity which was completely blocked at 1 mM concentration, whereas the same concentration of thiourea and sodium sulphite decreased the enzymatic activity by 40-45%. The PPO in L. pergamenus fungi basidiocarps was mainly localized in the mushroom milky juice where its high activity may be associated with protection of basidiocarps against various pathogens. PMID:26255339

  20. Polymer-supported sulfonated catechol and linear catechol amide ligands and their use in selective metal ion removal and recovery from aqueous solutions

    DOEpatents

    Fish, Richard H.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention concerns the synthesis of several biomimetically important polymer-supported, sulfonated catechol (PS-CATS), sulfonated bis-catechol linear amide (PS-2-6-LICAMS) and sulfonated 3,3-linear tris-catechol amide (PS-3,3-LICAMS) ligands, which chemically bond to modified 6% crosslinked macroporous polystyrene-divinylbenzene beads (PS-DVB). These polymers are useful for the for selective removal and recovery of environmentally and economically important metal ions from aqueous solution, as a function of pH. The Fe.sup.3+ ion selectivity shown for PS-CATS, PS-2-6-LICAMS, and PS-3,3-LICAMS polymer beads in competition with a similar concentration of Cu.sup.2+, Zn.sup.2+, Mn.sup.2+, Ni.sup.2+,Mg.sup.2+, Al.sup.3+, and Cr.sup.3+ ions at pH 1-3. Further, the metal ion selectivity is changed at higher pH values in the absence of Fe.sup.3+ (for example, Hg.sup.2+ at pH 3). The rates of selective removal and recovery of the trivalent metal ions, e.g. Fe.sup.3+ Al.sup.3+ ion etc. with the PS-CATS, PS-2-6-LICAMS, and PS-3,3-LICAMS polymer beads use determined are useful as well as equilibrium selectivity coefficient (K.sub.m) values for all metal competition studies. The chelate effect for the predisposed octahedral PS-3,3-LICAMS polymer pendant ligand is the reason that this ligand has a more pronounced selectivity for Fe.sup.3+ ion in comparison to the PS-CATS polymer beads. The predisposed square planar PS-2-6-Mn.sup.2+, Ni.sup.2+, and Mg.sup.2+, than either PS-CATS or PS-3,3-LICAMS. However, Fe.sup.3+ ion still dominates in competition with other divalent and trivalent metal ions. In the absence of Fe.sup.3+, the polymer ligand is selective for Al.sup.3+, Cu.sup.2+ or Hg.sup.2+. The changing of the cavity size from two CH.sub.2 groups to six CH.sub.2 groups in the PS-2-6-LICAMS polymer pendant ligand series does not effect the order of metal ion selectivity.

  1. Polymer-supported sulfonated catechol and linear catechol amide ligands and their use in selective metal ion removal recovery from aqueous solutions

    DOEpatents

    Fish, R.H.

    1998-11-10

    The present invention concerns the synthesis of several biomimetically important polymer-supported, sulfonated catechol (PS-CATS), sulfonated bis-catechol linear amide (PS-2-6-LICAMS) and sulfonated 3,3-linear tris-catechol amide (PS-3,3-LICAMS) ligands, which chemically bond to modified 6% crosslinked macroporous polystyrene-divinylbenzene beads (PS-DVB). These polymers are useful for the for selective removal and recovery of environmentally and economically important metal ions from aqueous solution, as a function of pH. The Fe{sup 3+} ion selectivity shown for PS-CATS, PS-2-6-LICAMS, and PS-3,3-LICAMS polymer beads in competition with a similar concentration of Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Al{sup 3+}, and Cr{sup 3+} ions at pH 1--3. Further, the metal ion selectivity is changed at higher pH values in the absence of Fe{sup 3+} (for example, Hg{sup 2+} at pH 3). The rates of selective removal and recovery of the trivalent metal ions, e.g. Fe{sup 3+}, Al{sup 3+} ion etc. with the PS-CATS, PS-2-6-LICAMS, and PS-3,3-LICAMS polymer beads used determined are useful as well as equilibrium selectivity coefficient (K{sub m}) values for all metal competition studies. The chelate effect for the predisposed octahedral PS-3,3-LICAMS polymer pendant ligand is the reason that this ligand has a more pronounced selectivity for Fe{sup 3+} ion in comparison to the PS-CATS polymer beads. The predisposed square planar PS-2,6-LICAMS series of polymer pendant ligands are more selective to divalent metal ions Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, and Mg{sup 2+}, than either PS-CATS or PS-3,3-LICAMS. However, Fe{sup 3+} ion still dominates in competition with other divalent and trivalent metal ions. In the absence of Fe{sup 3+}, the polymer ligand is selective for Al{sup 3+}, Cu{sup 2+} or Hg{sup 2+}. The changing of the cavity size from two CH{sub 2} groups to six CH{sub 2} groups in the PS-2-6-LICAMS polymer pendant ligand series does not effect the order of metal ion selectivity. 9 figs.

  2. Polymer-supported sulfonated catechol and linear catechol amide ligands and their use in selective metal ion removal recovery from aqueous solutions

    DOEpatents

    Fish, Richard H.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention concerns the synthesis of several biomimetically important polymer-supported, sulfonated catechol (PS-CATS), sulfonated bis-catechol linear amide (PS-2-6-LICAMS) and sulfonated 3,3-linear tris-catechol amide (PS-3,3-LICAMS) ligands, which chemically bond to modified 6% crosslinked macroporous polystyrene-divinylbenzene beads (PS-DVB). These polymers are useful for the for selective removal and recovery of environmentally and economically important metal ions from aqueous solution, as a function of pH. The Fe.sup.3+ ion selectivity shown for PS-CATS, PS-2-6-LICAMS, and PS-3,3-LICAMS polymer beads in competition with a similar concentration of Cu.sup.2+, Zn.sup.2+, Mn.sup.2+, Ni.sup.2+, Mg.sup.2+, Al.sup.3+, and Cr.sup.3+ ions at pH 1-3. Further, the metal ion selectivity is changed at higher pH values in the absence of Fe.sup.3+ (for example, Hg.sup.2+ at pH 3). The rates of selective removal and recovery of the trivalent metal ions, e.g. Fe.sup.3+ Al.sup.3+ ion etc. with the PS-CATS, PS-2-6-LICAMS, and PS-3,3-LICAMS polymer beads used determined are useful as well as equilibrium selectivity coefficient (K.sub.m) values for all metal competition studies. The chelate effect for the predisposed octahedral PS-3,3-LICAMS polymer pendant ligand is the reason that this ligand has a more pronounced selectivity for Fe.sup.3+ ion in comparison to the PS-CATS polymer beads. The predisposed square planar PS-2,6-LICAMS series of polymer pendant ligands are more selective to divalent metal ions Cu.sup.2+, Zn.sup.2+, Mn.sup.2+, Ni.sup.2+, and Mg.sup.2+, than either PS-CATS or PS-3,3-LICAMS. However, Fe.sup.3+ ion still dominates in competition with other divalent and trivalent metal ions. In the absence of Fe.sup.3+, the polymer ligand is selective for Al.sup.3+, Cu.sup.2+ or Hg.sup.2+. The changing of the cavity size from two CH.sub.2 groups to six CH.sub.2 groups in the PS-2-6-LICAMS polymer pendant ligand series does not effect the order of metal ion selectivity.

  3. Polymer-supported sulfonated catechol and linear catechol amide ligands and their use in selective metal ion removal and recovery from aqueous solutions

    DOEpatents

    Fish, R.H.

    1997-04-22

    The present invention concerns the synthesis of several biomimetically important polymer-supported, sulfonated catechol (PS-CATS), sulfonated bis-catechol linear amide (PS-2-6-LICAMS) and sulfonated 3,3-linear tris-catechol amide (PS-3,3-LICAMS) ligands, which chemically bond to modified 6% crosslinked macroporous polystyrene-divinylbenzene beads (PS-DVB). These polymers are useful for the for selective removal and recovery of environmentally and economically important metal ions from aqueous solution, as a function of pH. The Fe{sup 3+} ion selectivity shown for PS-CATS, PS-2-6-LICAMS, and PS-3,3-LICAMS polymer beads in competition with a similar concentration of Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Al{sup 3+}, and Cr{sup 3+} ions at pH 1--3. Further, the metal ion selectivity is changed at higher pH values in the absence of Fe{sup 3+} (for example, Hg{sup 2+} at pH 3). The rates of selective removal and recovery of the trivalent metal ions, e.g. Fe{sup 3+}, Al{sup 3+} ion etc. with the PS-CATS, PS-2-6-LICAMS, and PS-3,3-LICAMS polymer beads use determined are useful as well as equilibrium selectivity coefficient (K{sub m}) values for all metal competition studies. The chelate effect for the predisposed octahedral PS-3,3-LICAMS polymer pendant ligand is the reason that this ligand has a more pronounced selectivity for Fe{sup 3+} ion in comparison to the PS-CATS polymer beads. The predisposed square planar PS-2-6-Mn{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, and Mg{sup 2+}, than either PS-CATS or PS-3,3-LICAMS. However, Fe{sup 3+} ion still dominates in competition with other divalent and trivalent metal ions. In the absence of Fe{sup 3+}, the polymer ligand is selective for Al{sup 3+}, Cu{sup 2+} or Hg{sup 2+}. The changing of the cavity size from two CH{sub 2} groups to six CH{sub 2} groups in the PS-2-6-LICAMS polymer pendant ligand series does not effect the order of metal ion selectivity. 9 figs.

  4. Cyclopiazonic Acid Biosynthesis of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Perng-Kuang; Ehrlich, Kenneth C.; Fujii, Isao

    2009-01-01

    Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) is an indole-tetramic acid neurotoxin produced by some of the same strains of A. flavus that produce aflatoxins and by some Aspergillus oryzae strains. Despite its discovery 40 years ago, few reviews of its toxicity and biosynthesis have been reported. This review examines what is currently known about the toxicity of CPA to animals and humans, both by itself or in combination with other mycotoxins. The review also discusses CPA biosynthesis and the genetic diversity of CPA production in A. flavus/oryzae populations. PMID:22069533

  5. Factors Affecting Reaction Kinetics of Glucose Oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kristin A.

    2002-01-01

    Basic principles of enzyme kinetics are demonstrated using the enzyme glucose oxidase. The glucose oxidase enzymatic reaction is coupled to horseradish peroxidase, which in turn catalyzes the oxidation of a dye to a bright blue-green color. The appearance of the blue-green dye is used to monitor the course of the reaction and is quite visible in a classroom setting. A series of reactions are arranged that vary the enzyme concentration, substrate concentration, temperature, and the substrate used in the reaction. By monitoring the rate of the color change in each beaker, the reaction kinetics of glucose oxidase in each series is observed.

  6. Catechol, a bioactive degradation product of salicortin, reduces TNF-? induced ICAM-1 expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Knuth, Susanne; Schbel, Helmut; Hellemann, Martin; Jrgenliemk, Guido

    2011-07-01

    The phenolic glucoside salicortin was isolated from a Willow bark extract, and its ability to reduce the TNF- ? induced ICAM-1 expression (10 ng/mL, 30 min pretreatment with salicortin) was tested IN VITRO on human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1). After 24 h, 25 M salicortin decreased the TNF- ? induced ICAM-1 expression to 65.9 % compared to cells which were treated only with TNF- ?. In parallel, the stability of 25 M salicortin under assay conditions was determined by HPLC. Within 24 h, the salicortin concentration decreased to 3.1 M whereas catechol, a known NF- ?B inhibitor, rose as a metabolite. After 8 h the catechol concentration was relatively constant and varied between 8.2 and 10.9 M. Considering this degradation in the IN VITRO test system, 10 M catechol was added 8 h after TNF- ? stimulation, and 16 h later the ICAM-1 expression was determined. In this setting, the ICAM-1 expression was reduced to 74.8 %. This is comparable to the effect obtained from 25 M salicortin and indicates that its activity is related to the generation of catechol, as salicin, saligenin, and salicylic acid are only marginally active or inactive in this test system in a concentration up to 50 M. These results indicate catechol as an important bioactive metabolite from salicortin. PMID:21305449

  7. Catechol-Functionalized Synthetic Polymer as a Dental Adhesive to Contaminated Dentin Surface for a Composite Restoration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Bae; Gonzlez-Cabezas, Carlos; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kuroda, Kenichi

    2015-08-10

    This study reports a synthetic polymer functionalized with catechol groups as dental adhesives. We hypothesize that a catechol-functionalized polymer functions as a dental adhesive for wet dentin surfaces, potentially eliminating the complications associated with saliva contamination. We prepared a random copolymer containing catechol and methoxyethyl groups in the side chains. The mechanical and adhesive properties of the polymer to dentin surface in the presence of water and salivary components were determined. It was found that the new polymer combined with an Fe(3+) additive improved bond strength of a commercial dental adhesive to artificial saliva contaminated dentin surface as compared to a control sample without the polymer. Histological analysis of the bonding structures showed no leakage pattern, probably due to the formation of Fe-catechol complexes, which reinforce the bonding structures. Cytotoxicity test showed that the polymers did not inhibit human gingival fibroblast cells proliferation. Results from this study suggest a potential to reduce failure of dental restorations due to saliva contamination using catechol-functionalized polymers as dental adhesives. PMID:26176305

  8. Catechol-Functionalized Synthetic Polymer as a Dental Adhesive to Contaminated Dentin Surface for a Composite Restoration

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a synthetic polymer functionalized with catechol groups as dental adhesives. We hypothesize that a catechol-functionalized polymer functions as a dental adhesive for wet dentin surfaces, potentially eliminating the complications associated with saliva contamination. We prepared a random copolymer containing catechol and methoxyethyl groups in the side chains. The mechanical and adhesive properties of the polymer to dentin surface in the presence of water and salivary components were determined. It was found that the new polymer combined with an Fe3+ additive improved bond strength of a commercial dental adhesive to artificial saliva contaminated dentin surface as compared to a control sample without the polymer. Histological analysis of the bonding structures showed no leakage pattern, probably due to the formation of Fe–catechol complexes, which reinforce the bonding structures. Cytotoxicity test showed that the polymers did not inhibit human gingival fibroblast cells proliferation. Results from this study suggest a potential to reduce failure of dental restorations due to saliva contamination using catechol-functionalized polymers as dental adhesives. PMID:26176305

  9. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase PheB from Bacillus stearothermophilus BR219

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Keisuke; Matsufuzi, Kazuki; Ohnuma, Hiroaki; Senda, Miki; Fukuda, Masao; Senda, Toshiya

    2006-02-01

    PheB, an extradiol-cleaving catecholic dioxygenase, was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 4000 as a precipitant. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic system, space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, and diffracts to 2.3 resolution. Class II extradiol-cleaving catecholic dioxygenase, a key enzyme of aromatic compound degradation in bacteria, cleaves the aromatic ring of catechol by adding two O atoms. PheB is one of the class II extradiol-cleaving catecholic dioxygenases and shows a high substrate specificity for catechol derivatives, which have one aromatic ring. In order to reveal the mechanism of the substrate specificity of PheB, PheB has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 4000 as a precipitant. The space group of the obtained crystal was P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 65.5, b = 119.2, c = 158.7 . The crystal diffracted to 2.3 resolution.

  10. Comparison between the removal of phenol and catechol by modified montmorillonite with two novel hydroxyl-containing Gemini surfactants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuening; Gao, Manglai; Gu, Zheng; Luo, Zhongxin; Ye, Yage; Lu, Laifu

    2014-02-28

    Na-montmorillonites were modified with two novel hydroxyl-containing Gemini surfactants, 1,3-bis(hexadecyldimethylammonio)-2-hydroxypropane dichloride (BHHP) and 1,3-bis(octyldimethylammonio)-2-hydroxypropane dichloride (BOHP), via ion-exchange reaction in this study. The modified samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Phenol and catechol were removed from aqueous solution by these two kinds of organo-montmorillonites in a batch system. Important parameters have been investigated, which affect the adsorption efficiency, such as the amount of modifier, temperature, pH and contact time. The adsorption kinetics of phenol and catechol were discussed using pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intra-particle diffusion model. It indicated that the experimental data fitted very well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the equilibrium adsorption data was proved in good agreement with the Langmuir isotherm. The result also showed the adsorption capacity of catechol was higher than that of phenol in the same conditions, which might result from the extra hydroxyl in the structure of catechol. Thermodynamic quantities such as Gibbs free energy (?G), the enthalpy (?H), and the entropy change of sorption (?S) were also determined. These parameters suggested the adsorption of phenol was a spontaneous and exothermic process, while the sorption of catechol was endothermic. PMID:24413053

  11. Activation of Polyphenol Oxidase of Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Tolbert, N. E.

    1973-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase of leaves is located mainly in chloroplasts isolated by differential or sucrose density gradient centrifugation. This activity is part of the lamellar structure that is not lost on repeated washing of the plastids. The oxidase activity was stable during prolonged storage of the particles at 4 C or 18 C. The Km (dihydroxyphenylalanine) for spinach leaf polyphenol oxidase was 7 mm by a spectrophotometric assay and 2 mm by the manometric assay. Polyphenol oxidase activity in the leaf peroxisomal fraction, after isopycnic centrifugation on a linear sucrose gradient, did not coincide with the peroxisomal enzymes but was attributed to proplastids at nearly the same specific density. Plants were grouped by the latency properties for polyphenol oxidase in their isolated chloroplasts. In a group including spinach, Swiss chard, and beet leaves the plastids immediately after preparation from fresh leaves required a small amount of light for maximal rates of oxidation of dihydroxyphenylalanine. Polyphenol oxidase activity in the dark or light increased many fold during aging of these chloroplasts for 1 to 5 days. Soluble polyphenol oxidase of the cytoplasm was not so stimulated. Chloroplasts prepared from stored leaves were also much more active than from fresh leaves. Maximum rates of dihydroxyphenylalanine oxidation were 2 to 6 mmoles mg?1 chlorophyll hr?1. Equal stimulation of latent polyphenol oxidase in fresh or aged chloroplasts in this group was obtained by either light, an aged trypsin digest, 3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea, or antimycin A. A variety of other treatments did not activate or had little effect on the oxidase, including various peptides, salts, detergents, and other proteolytic enzymes. Activation of latent polyphenol oxidase in spinach chloroplasts by trypsin amounted to as much as 30-fold. The trypsin activation occurred even after the trypsin had been treated with 10% trichloroacetic acid, 1.0 n HCl or boiled for 30 minutes. No single peptide from the digested trypsin was found to be the sole activating factor. About 0.25 ?g of trypsin activated 50% the polyphenol oxidase activity in a standard chloroplast assay containing 2.1 ?g of chlorophyll. Treatment of spinach chloroplasts with tris buffer or ethylenediamine tetraacetate extracted the ATPase activity, but the polyphenol oxidase activity remained with the broken plastids. However these treatments increased the latent polyphenol oxidase activity 50- to 100-fold. Chloroplasts from a second group of plants, including alfalfa, wheat, oats, peas, and sugarcane leaves, oxidized dihydroxyphenylalanine at a rate of 11 to 120 ?moles mg?1 chlorophyll hr?1. Polyphenol oxidase in these chloroplasts required a low intensity of red light for activity. Fifty or 75% activation of the oxidase in wheat chloroplasts required 4 to 6 foot candles of light and more light was required for alfalfa chloroplasts. Blue or far red light were ineffective. Trypsin was inhibitory. Upon aging chloroplasts from wheat leaves, but not alfalfa or peas, for 5 to 7 days at 4 C the total polyphenol oxidase activity did not increase, but the activation characteristics changed to those of chloroplasts from the spinach group. Chloroplasts from a third group of plants, including bean, tomato, and corn leaves, slowly oxidized dihydroxyphenylalanine in the dark and exhibited no latency. PMID:16658308

  12. 21 CFR 173.130 - Carbohydrase derived from Rhizopus oryzae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carbohydrase derived from Rhizopus oryzae. 173.130 Section 173.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations...

  13. An uncommon cause of allergic fungal sinusitis: Rhizopus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Devars du Mayne, Marie; Gratacap, Maxime; Malinvaud, David; Grenouillet, Frederic; Bonfils, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We report what we believe is the first case of allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS) caused by the fungus Rhizopus oryzae. Our patient was a 32-year-old woman who presented with unilateral nasal polyps and chronic nasal dysfunction. Computed tomography of the sinuses detected left-sided pansinusitis and bone erosion. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a signal void that suggested the presence of a fungal infection. The patient underwent unilateral ethmoidectomy. Histologic examination of the diseased tissue identified allergic mucin with 70% eosinophils and no fungal hyphae. Mycologic culture detected R oryzae. After a short period of improvement, the patient experienced a recurrence, which was confirmed by radiology. A second surgery was performed, and the same fungal hyphae were found in the mucus and on culture, which led us to suspect AFRS. Since no IgE test for R oryzae was available, we developed a specific immunologic assay that confirmed the presence of specific IgG, which identified a high degree of immunologic reaction against our homemade R oryzae antigens. With a long course of systemic antifungal treatment, the patient's symptoms resolved and no recurrence was noted at 5 years of follow-up. PMID:25606840

  14. CBS domain-containing proteins are Rhizopus oryzae ferrioxamine receptors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Iron-overload patients treated with deferoxamine are uniquely susceptible to mucormycosis, because Rhizopus spp. can obtain iron from ferrioxamine (deferoxamine + Fe**3+). Previously we have identified two closely related, ferrioxamine-inducible R. oryzae genes (FOB1 and FOB2) in which ...

  15. EVALUATING RICE WILDE RELATIVES (ORYZA SPP.) FOR DISEASE RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice wild relatives (Oryza spp.) are an important source of novel pest resistance genes, as well as tolerance to abiotic stresses and yield enhancing traits. Rice sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani Khn and leaf blast, Magnaporthe grisea (T.T. Herbert) Yaegashi & Udagawa, are major fungal d...

  16. Cyclopiazonic Acid Biosynthesis of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus oryzae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) is an indole-tetramic acid neurotoxin produced by some of the same strains of A. flavus that produce aflatoxins and by some Aspergillus oryzae strains. Despite its discovery 40 years ago, few reviews of its toxicity and biosynthesis have been reported. This review examines w...

  17. RNA silencing of lactate dehydrogenase gene in Rhizopus oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Gheinani, Ali Hashemi; Jahromi, Neda Haghayegh; Feuk-Lagerstedt, Elisabeth; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2011-01-01

    Rhizopus oryzae is a filamentous fungus, belonging to the order Mucorales. It can ferment a wide range of carbohydrates hydrolyzed from lignocellulosic materials and even cellobiose to produce ethanol. However, R. oryzae also produces lactic acid as a major metabolite, which reduces the yield of ethanol. In this study, we show that significant reduction of lactic acid production could be achieved by short (25nt) synthetic siRNAs targeting the ldhA gene. The average yield of lactic acid production by R. oryzae during the batch fermentation process, where glucose had been used as a sole carbon source, diminished from 0.07gm/gm in wild type to 0.01gm/gm in silenced samples. In contrast, the average yield of ethanol production increased from 0.39gm/gm in wild type to 0.45gm/gm in silenced samples. These results show 85.7% (gm/gm) reduction in lactic acid production as compared with the wild type R. oryzae, while an increase of 15.4% (gm/gm) in ethanol yield. PMID:21769297

  18. 21 CFR 173.130 - Carbohydrase derived from Rhizopus oryzae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carbohydrase derived from Rhizopus oryzae. 173.130 Section 173.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD...

  19. 21 CFR 173.130 - Carbohydrase derived from Rhizopus oryzae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carbohydrase derived from Rhizopus oryzae. 173.130 Section 173.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD...

  20. 21 CFR 173.130 - Carbohydrase derived from Rhizopus oryzae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carbohydrase derived from Rhizopus oryzae. 173.130 Section 173.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD...

  1. Lead and catechol hematotoxicity in vitro using human and murine hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Van Den Heuvel, R L; Leppens, H; Schoeters, G E

    1999-04-01

    In vitro cloning assays for hematopoietic myeloid and erythroid precursor cells have been used as screening systems to investigate the hematotoxic potential of environmental chemicals in humans and mice. Granulocyte-monocyte progenitors (CFU-GM) from human umbilical cord blood and from mouse bone marrow (Balb/c and B6C3F1) were cultured in the presence of lead and the benzene metabolite catechol. Erythroid precursors (BFU-E) from human umbilical cord blood were cultured in the presence of lead. The in vitro exposure of the human and murine cells resulted in a dose-dependent depression of the colony numbers. The concentration effect relationship was studied. Results showed that: (1) Based on calculated IC50 values, human progenitors are more sensitive to lead and catechol than are murine progenitors. The dose that caused a 50% decrease in colony formation after catechol exposure was 6 times higher for murine cells (IC50 = 24 micromol/L) than for human cord blood cells (IC50 = 4 micromol/L). Lead was 10-15 times more toxic to human hematopoietic cells (IC50 = 61 micromol/L) than to murine bone marrow cells from both mice strains tested (Balb/c, IC50 = 1060 micromol/L; B6C3F1, IC50 = 536 micromol/L). (2) A lineage specificity was observed after exposure to lead. Human erythroid progenitors (hBFU-E) (IC50 = 3.31 micromol/L) were found to be 20 times more sensitive to the inhibitory effect of lead than were myeloid precursors (hCFU-GM) (IC50 = 63.58 micromol/L). (3) Individual differences in the susceptibility to the harmful effect of lead were seen among cord blood samples. (4) Toxicity of lead to progenitor cells occurred at environmentally relevant concentrations. PMID:10408357

  2. Structural insights into mechanisms for inhibiting amyloid ?42 aggregation by non-catechol-type flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Hanaki, Mizuho; Murakami, Kazuma; Akagi, Ken-Ichi; Irie, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-15

    The prevention of 42-mer amyloid ?-protein (A?42) aggregation is promising for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. We previously described the site-specific inhibitory mechanism for A?42 aggregation by a catechol-type flavonoid, (+)-taxifolin, targeting Lys16,28 after its autoxidation. In contrast, non-catechol-type flavonoids (morin, datiscetin, and kaempferol) inhibited A?42 aggregation without targeting Lys16,28 with almost similar potencies to that of (+)-taxifolin. We herein provided structural insights into their mechanisms for inhibiting A?42 aggregation. Physicochemical analyses revealed that their inhibition did not require autoxidation. The (1)H-(15)N SOFAST-HMQC NMR of A?42 in the presence of morin and datiscetin revealed the significant perturbation of chemical shifts of His13,14 and Gln15, which were close to the intermolecular ?-sheet region, Gln15-Ala21. His13,14 also played a role in radical formation at Tyr10, thereby inducing the oxidation of Met35, which has been implicated in A?42 aggregation. These results suggest the direct interaction of morin and datiscetin with the A?42 monomer. Although only kaempferol was oxidatively-degraded during incubation, its degradation products as well as kaempferol itself suppressed A?42 aggregation. However, neither kaempferol nor its decomposed products perturbed the chemical shifts of the A?42 monomer. Aggregation experiments using 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol-treated A?42 demonstrated that kaempferol and its degradation products inhibited the elongation rather than nucleation phase, implying that they interacted with small aggregates of A?42, but not with the monomer. In contrast, morin and datiscetin inhibited both phases. The position and number of hydroxyl groups on the B-ring of non-catechol-type flavonoids could be important for their inhibitory potencies and mechanisms against A?42 aggregation. PMID:26719209

  3. Overexpression of alcohol oxidase in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    de Hoop, M J; Cregg, J; Keizer-Gunnink, I; Sjollema, K; Veenhuis, M; Ab, G

    1991-10-21

    The protein import capacity of peroxisomes in methylotrophic yeasts was studied using Pichia pastoris containing one or two extra copies of the gene encoding the peroxisomal protein alcohol oxidase. The alcohol oxidase overproduced in this strain was only partially imported and assembled into the active, octameric form of the protein. The excess remained in the cytosol as protein aggregates composed of monomers. These results are discussed in view of the possible application of peroxisomes as storage compartments for heterologous proteins. PMID:1936277

  4. Torsional Motion of the Chromophore Catechol following the Absorption of Ultraviolet Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, J. D.; Staniforth, M.; Paterson, M. J.; Stavros, V. G.

    2015-06-01

    The ability to probe energy flow in molecules, following the absorption of ultraviolet light, is crucial to unraveling photophysical phenomena. Here we excite a coherent superposition of vibrational states in the first excited electronic state (S1 ) in catechol, resulting in a vibrational wave packet. The observed quantum beats, assigned to superpositions of the low-frequency, and strongly mixed, O-H torsional mode ?2 , elegantly demonstrate how changes in geometry upon photoionization from the S1 state to the ground state of the cation (D0 ) enables one to probe energy flow at the very early stages of photoexcitation in this biological chromophore.

  5. Catechol-derivatized poly(vinyl alcohol) as a coating molecule for magnetic nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnand, David; Monnier, Christophe A.; Redjem, Anthony; Schaefer, Mark; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Kilbinger, Andreas; Petri-Fink, Alke

    2015-04-01

    Surface functionalization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) remains indispensable in promoting colloidal stability and biocompatibility. We propose a well-defined and characterized synthesis of a new catechol-functionalized RAFT (reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer) poly(vinyl alcohol) polymer, which can be anchored onto hydrophobic SPIONs via a one-pot emulsion ligand exchange process. Both single and clustered nanoparticles are obtained and can be separated from each other. As clustered SPIONs are receiving increasing attention, this new macroligand might be of considerable interest for both basic and applied sciences.

  6. Eight-coordinate stereochemistries of U(IV) catecholate and aquo complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Uddin, Jamal; Firman, Timothy K.

    2004-01-01

    An extended MM3 model has been used to identify all low energy configurations for U(IV) complexes with catecholate and aquo ligands. Both stochastic and systematic conformational analyses of[U(cat)n(OH2)8-n]4-2n complexes, n= 1 - 4, establish that 20 of the 67 possible stereochemistries are minima on the MM3 potential surface. The stable stereochemistries are reported for each stoichiometry and, where possible, the results are compared with experimental data and with the predictions from prior repulsion energy calculations.

  7. Purification and Some Properties of Two Polyphenol Oxidases from Bartlett Pears 1

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus Rivas, Nilo; Whitaker, John R.

    1973-01-01

    Two polyphenol oxidases (enzymes A and B) from Bartlett pear (Pyrus communis) peelings were purified to electrophoretic homogeneity according to polyacrylamide gel by a combination of Sephadex gel filtration, diethylaminoethyl cellulose chromatography and hydroxyl apatite chromatography. While the two enzymes differ electrophoretically at pH 9.3, chromatographically on hydroxyl apatite, and in the effect of ionic strength on activity, they are similar with respect to chromatography on diethylaminoethyl cellulose, substrate specificity, pH activity relations, inhibition by p-coumaric and benzoic acids, and heat stability. The two enzymes are o-diphenol oxidases with no detectable monophenolase or laccase activities. Pyrocatechol, 4-methyl catechol, chlorogenic acid, and d-catechin are good substrates of the enzymes with Km values in the range of 2 to 20 mm. Dependences of activity on oxygen and chlorogenic acid concentrations indicate a sequential mechanism for binding of these substrates to enzyme B. Vmax and Km values for oxygen and chlorogenic acid were 103 μmoles O2 uptake per minute per milligram of enzyme, 0.11 mm and 7.2 mm, respectively, for enzyme B at pH 4.0. Both enzymes had maximum activity at pH 4.0 on chlorogenic acid. Km values for chlorogenic acid were independent of pH from 3 to 7; the Vmax values for both enzymes gave bell-shaped curves as a function of pH. p-Coumaric acid is a simple, linear noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to chlorogenic acid at pH 6.2 with Ki values of 0.38 and 0.50 mm for enzymes A and B, respectively. Benzoic acid is a linear competitive inhibitor with respect to chlorogenic acid at pH 4.0 with Ki values of 0.04 and 0.11 mm for enzymes A and B, respectively. PMID:16658592

  8. A biosensor based on gold nanoparticles, dihexadecylphosphate, and tyrosinase for the determination of catechol in natural water.

    PubMed

    Campanhã Vicentini, Fernando; Garcia, Lívia L C; Figueiredo-Filho, Luiz C S; Janegitz, Bruno C; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a biosensor using a glassy carbon electrode modified with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and tyrosinase (Tyr) within a dihexadecylphosphate film is proposed. Cystamine and glutaraldehyde crosslinking agents were used as a support for Tyr immobilization. The proposed biosensor was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and cyclic voltammetry in the presence of catechol. The determination of catechol was carried out by amperometry and presented a linear concentration range from 2.5×10(-6) to 9.5×10(-5)molL(-1) with a detection limit of 1.7×10(-7)molL(-1). The developed biosensor showed good repeatability and stability. Moreover, this novel amperometric method was successfully applied in the determination of catechol in natural water samples. The results were in agreement with a 95% confidence level for those obtained using the official spectrophotometric method. PMID:26827770

  9. In situ formation of adhesive hydrogels based on PL with laterally grafted catechol groups and their bonding efficacy to wet organic substrates.

    PubMed

    Ye, Mingming; Jiang, Rui; Zhao, Jin; Zhang, Juntao; Yuan, Xubo; Yuan, Xiaoyan

    2015-12-01

    Adhesives with catechol moieties have been widely investigated in recent years. However, actually how much catechol groups for these mussel bio-inspired adhesives, especially in their natural form under physiological condition, is appropriate to bond with organic substrates has not been studied intensively. This study blends ?-polylysine (PL), featuring laterally grafted catechols under physiological conditions (pH 7.4), with oxidized dextran to form a hydrogel in situ via the Schiff base without introducing small cytotoxic molecules as crosslinking agents. It finds that the amount of catechol groups imposes an obvious influence on gelation time, swelling behavior, and hydrogel morphology. Both the storage modulus and adhesion strength are found to increase first and decrease afterwards with an increase of pendent catechol content. Furthermore, catechol hydrogen interactions and the decrease in the crosslink density derived from the decrease of amino groups on PL are simultaneously found to affect the storage modulus. Meanwhile, multiple hydrogen-bonding interactions of catechol with amino, hydroxyl, and carboxyl groups, which are in abundance on the surface of tissue, are mainly found to provide an adhesive force. The study finds that with more catechol, there is a greater chance that the cohesive force will weaken, making the entire adhesion strength of the hydrogel decrease. Using a cytotoxicity test, the nontoxicity of the hydrogel towards the growth of L929 cells is proven, indicating that hydrogels have potential applications in soft tissue repair under natural physiological conditions. PMID:26518013

  10. Proteins interacting with mitochondrial ATP-dependent Lon protease (MAP1) in Magnaporthe oryzae are involved in rice blast disease.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiao; Wei, Yi; Wang, Yu-Han; Li, Jian; Wong, Fuk-Ling; Zheng, Ya-Jie; Yan, Hai; Liu, Shao-Shuai; Liu, Jin-Liang; Jia, Bao-Lei; Zhang, Shi-Hong

    2015-10-01

    The ATP-dependent Lon protease is involved in many physiological processes. In bacteria, Lon regulates pathogenesis and, in yeast, Lon protects mitochondia from oxidative damage. However, little is known about Lon in fungal phytopathogens. MAP1, a homologue of Lon in Magnaporthe oryzae, was recently identified to be important for stress resistance and pathogenesis. Here, we focus on a novel pathogenic pathway mediated by MAP1. Based on an interaction system between rice and a tandem affinity purification (TAP)-tagged MAP1 complementation strain, we identified 23 novel fungal proteins from infected leaves using a TAP approach with mass spectrometry, and confirmed that 14 of these proteins physically interact with MAP1?in?vivo. Among these 14 proteins, 11 candidates, presumably localized to the mitochondria, were biochemically determined to be substrates of MAP1 hydrolysis. Deletion mutants were created and functionally analysed to further confirm the involvement of these proteins in pathogenesis. The results indicated that all mutants showed reduced conidiation and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Appressorial formations were not affected, although conidia from certain mutants were morphologically altered. In addition, virulence was reduced in four mutants, enhanced (with lesions forming earlier) in two mutants and remained unchanged in one mutant. Together with the known virulence-related proteins alternative oxidase and enoyl-CoA hydratase, we propose that most of the Lon-interacting proteins are involved in the pathogenic regulation pathway mediated by MAP1 in M.?oryzae. Perturbation of this pathway may represent an effective approach for the inhibition of rice blast disease. PMID:25605006

  11. Novel lead compound optimization and synthesized based on the target structure of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae GlmU.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaojuan; Deng, Wenjun; Gao, Min; Mao, Bangqiang; Xu, Shengzhen; Chen, Changshui; Zhang, Qingye

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial leaf blight, caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, is one of the most destructive diseases of rice worldwide. N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmU) was an attractive target for the development of antimicrobial agents. To develop novel, more potent and even more selective inhibitors of the uridyltransferase activity of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae GlmU (Xo-GlmU), three types of novel target compounds were optimized and synthesized based on the Xo-GlmU structure in this study. The biological testing results showed that all of the target compounds displayed the higher inhibition than the lead compound with the IC50 values in the 10.82-23.31?M range, and the inhibition rates were increased by 30%-67%. The binding mode and the possible inhibitory mechanism of the target compounds in the active site were also analyzed by the molecular docking based on the uridyltransferase active site of Xo-GlmU. PMID:26071803

  12. A novel thermostable and organic solvent-tolerant lipase from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae YB103: screening, purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Mo, Qiurun; Liu, Aili; Guo, Hailun; Zhang, Yan; Li, Mu

    2016-03-01

    Thermostable lipases offer major biotechnological advantages over mesophilic lipases. In this study, an intracellular thermostable and organic solvent-tolerant lipase-producing strain YB103 was isolated from soil samples and identified taxonomically as Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. The lipase from X. oryzae pv. oryzae YB103 (LipXO) was purified 101.1-fold to homogeneity with a specific activity of 373.9 U/mg. The purified lipase showed excellent thermostability, exhibiting 51.1 % of its residual activity after incubation for 3 days at 70 °C. The enzyme showed optimal activity at 70 °C, suggesting it is a thermostable lipase. LipXO retained 75.1-154.1 % of its original activity after incubation in 20 % (v/v) hydrophobic organic solvents at 70 °C for 24 h. Furthermore, LipXO displayed excellent stereoselectivity (e.e.p >99 %) toward (S)-1-phenethyl alcohol in n-hexane. These unique properties of LipXO make it promising as a biocatalyst for industrial processes. PMID:26791383

  13. Azide inhibition of urate oxidase.

    PubMed

    Gabison, Laure; Colloc'h, Nathalie; Prangé, Thierry

    2014-07-01

    The inhibition of urate oxidase (UOX) by azide was investigated by X-ray diffraction techniques and compared with cyanide inhibition. Two well characterized sites for reagents are present in the enzyme: the dioxygen site and the substrate-binding site. To examine the selectivity of these sites towards azide inhibition, several crystallization conditions were developed. UOX was co-crystallized with azide (N3) in the presence or absence of either uric acid (UA, the natural substrate) or 8-azaxanthine (8AZA, a competitive inhibitor). In a second set of experiments, previously grown orthorhombic crystals of the UOX-UA or UOX-8AZA complexes were soaked in sodium azide solutions. In a third set of experiments, orthorhombic crystals of UOX with the exchangeable ligand 8-nitroxanthine (8NXN) were soaked in a solution containing uric acid and azide simultaneously (competitive soaking). In all assays, the soaking periods were either short (a few hours) or long (one or two months). These different experimental conditions showed that one or other of the sites, or the two sites together, could be inhibited. This also demonstrated that azide not only competes with dioxygen as cyanide does but also competes with the substrate for its enzymatic site. A model in agreement with experimental data would be an azide in equilibrium between two sites, kinetically in favour of the dioxygen site and thermodynamically in favour of the substrate-binding site. PMID:25005084

  14. Heme/copper terminal oxidases

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson-Miller, S.; Babcock, G.T.

    1996-11-01

    Spatially well-organized electron-transfer reactions in a series of membrane-bound redox proteins form the basis for energy conservation in both photosynthesis and respiration. The membrane-bound nature of the electron-transfer processes is critical, as the free energy made available in exergonic redox chemistry is used to generate transmembrane proton concentration and electrostatic potential gradients. These gradients are subsequently used to drive ATP formation, which provides the immediate energy source for constructive cellular processes. The terminal heme/copper oxidases in respiratory electron-transfer chains illustrate a number of the thermodynamic and structural principles that have driven the development of respiration. This class of enzyme reduces dioxygen to water, thus clearing the respiratory system of low-energy electrons so that sustained electron transfer and free-energy transduction can occur. By using dioxygen as the oxidizing substrate, free-energy production per electron through the chain is substantial, owing to the high reduction potential of O{sub 2} (0.815 V at pH 7). 122 refs.

  15. Application of p-toluidine in chromogenic detection of catechol and protocatechuate, diphenolic intermediates in catabolism of aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, D. )

    1992-08-01

    In the presence of p-toluidine and iron, protocatechuate and catechols yield color. Inclusion of p-toluidine in media facilities the screening of microbial strains for alterations affecting aromatic catabolism. Such strains include mutants affected in the expression of oxygenases and Escherichia coli colonies carrying cloned or subcloned aromatic catabolic genes which encode enzymes giving rise to protocatechuate or catechol. The diphenolic detection system can also be applied to the creation of vectors relying on insertion of cloned DNA into one of the latter marker genes.

  16. Catechol 1,2-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida in organic media--an electron paramagnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Sanakis, Y; Mamma, D; Christakopoulos, P; Stamatis, H

    2003-11-01

    The ability of an isolated isozyme of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida DSM 437 to function in a non-aqueous environment was investigated. The lyophilized enzyme is able to keep its catalytic function catalyzing the oxidation of catechol in n-hexane. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at liquid helium temperatures was applied to compare the properties of the non-heme iron of the enzyme in the organic solvent and in the aqueous solution. The catalytic performance of the enzyme in the organic solvent is correlated with the spectroscopic properties of the non-heme iron. PMID:14599591

  17. Experimental and Computational Evidence for the Mechanism of Intradiol Catechol Dioxygenation by Non-Heme Iron(III) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Jastrzebski, Robin; Quesne, Matthew G; Weckhuysen, Bert M; de Visser, Sam P; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A

    2014-01-01

    Catechol intradiol dioxygenation is a unique reaction catalyzed by iron-dependent enzymes and non-heme iron(III) complexes. The mechanism by which these systems activate dioxygen in this important metabolic process remains controversial. Using a combination of kinetic measurements and computational modelling of multiple iron(III) catecholato complexes, we have elucidated the catechol cleavage mechanism and show that oxygen binds the iron center by partial dissociation of the substrate from the iron complex. The iron(III) superoxide complex that is formed subsequently attacks the carbon atom of the substrate by a rate-determining C=O bond formation step. PMID:25322920

  18. Targeting NADPH oxidases in vascular pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Schramm, Agata; Matusik, Paweł; Osmenda, Grzegorz; Guzik, Tomasz J

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a molecular dysregulation in reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism, which plays a key role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, vascular inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. It is characterized by a loss of nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Large clinical trials such as HOPE and HPS have not shown a clinical benefit of antioxidant vitamin C or vitamin E treatment, putting into question the role of oxidative stress in cardiovascular disease. A change in the understanding of the molecular nature of oxidative stress has been driven by the results of these trials. Oxidative stress is no longer perceived as a simple imbalance between the production and scavenging of ROS, but as a dysfunction of enzymes involved in ROS production. NADPH oxidases are at the center of these events, underlying the dysfunction of other oxidases including eNOS uncoupling, xanthine oxidase and mitochondrial dysfunction. Thus NADPH oxidases are important therapeutic targets. Indeed, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) as well as drugs interfering with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibit NADPH oxidase activation and expression. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, AT1 receptor antagonists (sartans) and aliskiren, as well as spironolactone or eplerenone, have been discussed. Molecular aspects of NADPH oxidase regulation must be considered, while thinking about novel pharmacological targeting of this family of enzymes consisting of several homologs Nox1, Nox2, Nox3, Nox4 and Nox5 in humans. In order to properly design trials of antioxidant therapies, we must develop reliable techniques for the assessment of local and systemic oxidative stress. Classical antioxidants could be combined with novel oxidase inhibitors. In this review, we discuss NADPH oxidase inhibitors such as VAS2870, VAS3947, GK-136901, S17834 or plumbagin. Therefore, our efforts must focus on generating small molecular weight inhibitors of NADPH oxidases, allowing the selective inhibition of dysfunctional NADPH oxidase homologs. This appears to be the most reasonable approach, potentially much more efficient than non-selective scavenging of all ROS by the administration of antioxidants. PMID:22405985

  19. Characterization of germin-like protein with polyphenol oxidase activity from Satsuma mandarine.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xi; Huang, Xingjian; Liu, Siyu; Tang, Mi; Hu, Wanfeng; Pan, Siyi

    2014-07-01

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) catalyzing the oxygen dependent oxidation of phenols to quinones are ubiquitously distributed in plants and are assumed to be involved in plant defense against pests and pathogens. A protein with high PPO activity was identified in Satsuma mandarine, extracted with Tris-HCl buffer, purified by salt precipitation and column chromatography, and characterized by mass spectrometry as germin-like protein (GLP), which belongs to pathogenesis related protein (PR) family. In the present study, the structure and enzymatic properties of GLP were characterized using spectroscopy methods. Based on native PAGE analysis, the molecular weight of GLP was estimated to be 108 kDa and GLP was identified as a pentamer containing five subunits of 22 kDa. The optimum pH and temperature for PPO catalyzing activity of GLP was 6.5 and 65°C, respectively. Kinetic constants were 0.0365 M and 0.0196 M with the substrates catechol and pyrogallol, respectively. The structural characterization of GLP provided better insights into the regions responsible for its PPO activity. PMID:24845377

  20. Purification and partial biochemical characterization of polyphenol oxidase from mango (Mangifera indica cv. Manila).

    PubMed

    Palma-Orozco, Gisela; Marrufo-Hernández, Norma A; Sampedro, José G; Nájera, Hugo

    2014-10-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) is an enzyme widely distributed in the plant kingdom that has been detected in most fruits and vegetables. PPO was extracted and purified from Manila mango (Mangifera indica), and its biochemical properties were studied. PPO was purified 216-fold by hydrophobic interaction and ion exchange chromatography. PPO was purified to homogeneity, and the estimated PPO molecular weight (MW) by SDS-PAGE was ≈31.5 kDa. However, a MW of 65 kDa was determined by gel filtration, indicating a dimeric structure for the native PPO. The isolated PPO showed the highest affinity to pyrogallol (Km = 2.77 mM) followed by 4-methylcatechol (Km = 3.14 mM) and catechol (Km = 15.14 mM). The optimum pH for activity was 6.0. PPO was stable in the temperature range of 20-70 °C. PPO activity was completely inhibited by tropolone, ascorbic acid, sodium metabisulfite, and kojic acid at 0.1 mM. PMID:25211397

  1. Pathogenesis-Related Gene Expression in Rice is Correlated with Developmentally Controlled Xa21-mediated Resistance against Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease resistance mediated by the resistance gene Xa21 is developmentally controlled in rice. We examined the relationship between pathogenesis related (PR) defense gene expression and Xa21-mediated developmental disease resistance induced by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). OsPR1a, OsPR1b, a...

  2. Bio-inspired multifunctional catecholic assembly for photo-programmable biointerface.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Jen; Wang, Lin-Chuan

    2015-10-01

    This article reports a novel multifunctional mussel-inspired zwitterionic catecholic assembly to form a photoresponsive biointerface. The assembly is the combination of the antifouling sulfobetaine and photocleavable o-nitrophenyl moieties into a molecule, becoming sulfobetaine nitrodopamine (SB-nDA). We demonstrated the formation of a compact thin SB-nDA film on TiO? by using the pH transition approach. The film thickness, surface wettability and elemental composition were characterized using ellipsometry, contact angle goniometer, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The SB-nDA thin films can effectively resist adhesion of both Gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis and Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa by more than 95% relative to bare TiO?. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) sensor was employed for protein fouling tests, showing the comparable antifouling property of SB-nDA with thiol- or silane-based surface ligands. More importantly, the spatiotemporal control over the bioinertness by UV irradiation has been studied with bacterial and protein adsorption. Therefore, the catecholic chemistry can be used for programmable tailoring of interfacial properties, permitting potential application in light-guided targeting for nanomedicine. PMID:26208296

  3. Mechanics of metal-catecholate complexes: The roles of coordination state and metal types

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    There have been growing evidences for the critical roles of metal-coordination complexes in defining structural and mechanical properties of unmineralized biological materials, including hardness, toughness, and abrasion resistance. Their dynamic (e.g. pH-responsive, self-healable, reversible) properties inspire promising applications of synthetic materials following this concept. However, mechanics of these coordination crosslinks, which lays the ground for predictive and rational material design, has not yet been well addressed. Here we present a first-principles study of representative coordination complexes between metals and catechols. The results show that these crosslinks offer stiffness and strength near a covalent bond, which strongly depend on the coordination state and type of metals. This dependence is discussed by analyzing the nature of bonding between metals and catechols. The responsive mechanics of metal-coordination is further mapped from the single-molecule level to a networked material. The results presented here provide fundamental understanding and principles for material selection in metal-coordination-based applications. PMID:24107799

  4. Reduction of laccase type 1 copper by 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and other catechol derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wynn, M; Stevens, G; Knaff, D B; Holwerda, R A

    1983-06-01

    3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) is not a preferred substrate of Rhus vernicifera laccase, as rate constants for the anaerobic reduction of the type 1 cupric atom by L-DOPA (6.3 X 10(1) M-1 s-1), D-DOPA (2.6 X 10(1) M-1 s-1), and L-DOPA methyl ester (2.6 X 10(1) M-1 s-1) are considerably smaller than k1 (catechol) (7 X 10(2) M-1 s-1) and rate constants characteristic of numerous other nonphysiological organic substrates (25 degrees C, pH 7.0, I = 0.5 M). The reactions of DOPA derivatives with laccase are unique, however, in that a two-term rate law pertains: kobsd = k0 + k1[phenol]; k0(L-DOPA) = 7 X 10(-2) s-1. The reactivities of other catechol derivatives (pyrogallol, gallic acid, and methyl gallate) with laccase type 1 copper were also examined. PMID:6222699

  5. Ormosil gels doped with engineered catechol 1,2 dioxygenases for chlorocatechol bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Micalella, Chiara; Caglio, Raffaella; Mozzarelli, Andrea; Valetti, Francesca; Pessione, Enrica; Giunta, Carlo; Bruno, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes entrapped in wet, nanoporous silica gel have great potential as bioreactors for bioremediation because of their improved thermal, chemical, and mechanical stability with respect to enzymes in solution. The B isozyme of catechol 1,2 dioxygenase from Acinetobacter radioresistens and its mutants of Leu69 and Ala72, designed for an increased reactivity toward the environmental pollutant chlorocatechols, were encapsulated using alkoxysilanes and alkyl alkoxysilanes as precursors in varying proportions. Encapsulation of the mutants in a hydrophobic tetramethoxysilane/dimethoxydimethylsilane-based matrix yielded a remarkable 10- to 12-fold enhancement in reactivity toward chlorocatechols. These gels also showed a fivefold increase in relative reactivity toward chlorocatechols with respect to the natural substrate catechol, thus compensating for their relatively low activity for these substrates in solution. The encapsulated enzyme, unlike the enzyme in solution, proved resilient in assays carried out in urban wastewater and bacteria-contaminated solutions mimicking environmentally relevant conditions. Overall, the combination of a structure-based rational design of enzyme mutants, and the selection of a suitable encapsulation material, proved to be a powerful approach for the production and optimization of a potential bioremediation device, with increased activity and resistance toward bacterial degradation. PMID:24571591

  6. Facile fabrication of gold nanoparticle on zein ultrafine fibers and their application for catechol biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Li, Dawei; Li, Guohui; Luo, Lei; Ullah, Naseeb; Wei, Qufu; Huang, Fenglin

    2015-02-01

    A novel laccase biosensor based on a new composite of laccase-gold nanoparticles (Au NPs)-crosslinked zein ultrafine fibers (CZUF) has been fabricated for catechol determination in real solution samples. Firstly, crosslinked zein ultrafine fibers containing gold nanoparticles (A-CZUF) were prepared by combining electrospinning and one-step reduction method using poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) as reducing and crosslinking agent. A smooth morphology and relative average distribution of A-CZUF were depicted by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis indicated that PEI molecules attached to the surface of the zein ultrafine fibers via the reaction of functional groups between PEI and glyoxal. The results obtained from ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV-vis spectroscopy), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) for A-CZUF confirmed the existence of Au NPS coated on the surface of CZUF. Square wave voltammetry (SWV) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) were used to detect the electrochemical performance of the proposed biosensor. The results demonstrated that this biosensor possessed a high sensitive detection to catechol, which was attributed to the direct electron transfer (DET) facilitated by Au NPs and high catalytic ability obtained from laccase. In addition, the proposed biosensor exhibited good reproducibility, stability and selectivity.

  7. Catechol determination in compost bioremediation using a laccase sensor and artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lin; Zeng, Guangming; Liu, Jianxiao; Xu, Xiangmin; Zhang, Yi; Shen, Guoli; Li, Yuanping; Liu, Can

    2008-05-01

    An electrochemical biosensor based on the immobilization of laccase on magnetic core-shell (Fe(3)O(4)-SiO(2)) nanoparticles was combined with artificial neural networks (ANNs) for the determination of catechol concentration in compost bioremediation of municipal solid waste. The immobilization matrix provided a good microenvironment for retaining laccase bioactivity, and the combination with ANNs offered a good chemometric tool for data analysis in respect to the dynamic, nonlinear, and uncertain characteristics of the complex composting system. Catechol concentrations in compost samples were determined by using both the laccase sensor and HPLC for calibration. The detection range varied from 7.5 × 10(-7) to 4.4 × 10(-4) M, and the amperometric response current reached 95% of the steady-state current within about 70 s. The performance of the ANN model was compared with the linear regression model in respect to simulation accuracy, adaptability to uncertainty, etc. All the results showed that the combination of amperometric enzyme sensor and artificial neural networks was a rapid, sensitive, and robust method in the quantitative study of the composting system. PMID:18398603

  8. Suicide inactivation of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 by 3-halocatechols

    SciTech Connect

    Bartels, I.; Knackmuss, H.J.; Reineke, W.

    1984-03-01

    The inactivation of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 by 3-chloro- and 3-fluorocatechol and the iron-chelating agent Tiron (catechol-3,5-disulfonate) was studied. Whereas inactivation by Tiron is an oxygen-independent and mostly reversible process, inactivation by the 3-halocatechols was only observed in the presence of oxygen and was largely irreversible. The rate constants for inactivation (K/sub 2/) were 1.62 x 10/sup -3/ sec/sup -1/ for 3-chlorocatechol and 2.38 x 10/sup -3/ sec/sup -1/ for 3-fluorocatechol. The inhibitor constants (K/sub i/) were 23 ..mu..M for 3-chlorocatechol and 17 ..mu..M for 3-fluorocatechol. The kinetic data for 3-fluorocatechol could only be obtained in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. Besides inactivated enzyme, some 2-hydroxyhexa-2,4-dienoic acid as the actual suicide product of meta-cleavage. A side product of 3-fluorocatechol cleavage is a yellow compound with the spectral characteristics of a 2-hydroxy-6-oxohexa-2,4-dienoci acid indicating 1,6-cleavage. Rates of inactivation by 3-fluorocatechol were reduced in the presence of superoxide dismutase, catalase, formate, and mannitol, which implies that superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical exhibit additional inactivation. 64 references.

  9. Time-resolved photoelectron imaging of excited state relaxation dynamics in phenol, catechol, resorcinol, and hydroquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingstone, Ruth A.; Thompson, James O. F.; Iljina, Marija; Donaldson, Ross J.; Sussman, Benjamin J.; Paterson, Martin J.; Townsend, Dave

    2012-11-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron imaging was used to investigate the dynamical evolution of the initially prepared S1 (??*) excited state of phenol (hydroxybenzene), catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene), resorcinol (1,3-dihydroxybenzene), and hydroquinone (1,4-dihydroxybenzene) following excitation at 267 nm. Our analysis was supported by ab initio calculations at the coupled-cluster and CASSCF levels of theory. In all cases, we observe rapid (<1 ps) intramolecular vibrational redistribution on the S1 potential surface. In catechol, the overall S1 state lifetime was observed to be 12.1 ps, which is 1-2 orders of magnitude shorter than in the other three molecules studied. This may be attributed to differences in the H atom tunnelling rate under the barrier formed by a conical intersection between the S1 state and the close lying S2 (??*) state, which is dissociative along the O-H stretching coordinate. Further evidence of this S1/S2 interaction is also seen in the time-dependent anisotropy of the photoelectron angular distributions we have observed. Our data analysis was assisted by a matrix inversion method for processing photoelectron images that is significantly faster than most other previously reported approaches and is extremely quick and easy to implement.

  10. [Preparation and identification of recombinant sarcosine oxidase].

    PubMed

    Pu, Jing; Wang, Rui; Yao, Mingdong; He, Zhongjie; Zhao, Ming; Meng, Yao

    2014-10-01

    An important index determination for clinical diagnosis of renal function is to assay the creatinine concentration in serum. In the analytical process applied with coupled-enzyme, the quality control of sarcosine oxidase (SOX) as a key enzyme is the first problem to be solved. In order to establish an efficient and laboratory-scale production of SOX, the recombinant sarcosine oxidase (r-SOX) gene was a high-level expression in E. coli induced with lactose on a large-scale fermentation in 300 L fermenter. The results suggested that the biomass concentration reached OD600 of 22 and the expression of recombinant sarcosine oxidase in E. coli accounted for about 25% of total soluble protein in culture after fermentation. The cell-free extract obtained from high pressure homogenizer was processed by selective thermal denaturation and then purified with Ni-Sepharose FF chromatography. The sarcosine oxidase with 97% purity, 25 U/mg specific activity and 92.4% activity recovery was obtained. The molecular weight with single peptide chain of 53 kD and 55 kD of recombinant sarcosine oxidase was assessed by SDS-PAGE in presence or absence of 2-mercaptoehanol and Sephacryl S-200 chromatography. This sarcosine oxidase was found to be a conjugated protein, yellow enzyme, which combined with FAD as prosthetic group by covalent linkage. The contaminant of catalase was not detected in the sample pool of this enzyme. In addition, a further test to the thermal stability of sarcosine oxidase was done. According to the above results, the development and utilization of this enzyme has been set up on a reliable foundation. PMID:25764728

  11. Immunoblot analyses of the elicited Sanguinaria canadensis enzyme, dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase: evidence for resolution from a polyphenol oxidase isozyme.

    PubMed

    Ignatov, A; Neuman, M C; Barg, R; Krueger, R J; Coscia, C J

    1997-11-15

    In our initial purification of dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase from Sanguinaria canadensis plant cell cultures, we reported that our most purified preparations contained a major band at 77 kDa and minor lower Mr bands. Here we present evidence on highly purified dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase from elicited S. canadensis cultures to indicate that this enzyme is the 77-kDa protein and that lower Mr bands include an isozyme(s) of the polyphenol oxidase family that copurifies with it. An antibody raised against the 77-kDa protein and an anti-polyphenol oxidase antibody that recognizes a 70-kDa band were used to monitor chromatographic fractions by immunoblot analysis of the oxidases. Oxidase-containing eluates from DEAE-Sephadex, CM, and HiTrap blue were compared to corresponding flow-through fractions. Bands at 77 and 88 kDa were detected with anti-dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase antibody in eluates displaying high dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase activity. Polyphenol oxidase specific activity and immunoreactivity partitioned both in flow-through and eluate fractions of the CM and HiTrap columns. Estimation of the dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase and polyphenol oxidase specific activities for each step showed increasing enrichment of alkaloidal enzyme accompanied by variable dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase/polyphenol oxidase activity ratios. Taken together these observations indicate that the dihydrobenzophenanthridine and polyphenol oxidases have Mr values of 77 and 70 kDa, respectively, and the two enzymes are different entities. PMID:9367526

  12. Selected biochemical properties of polyphenol oxidase in butter lettuce leaves (Lactuca sativa L. var. capitata) elicited with dl-β-amino-n-butyric acid.

    PubMed

    Złotek, Urszula; Gawlik-Dziki, Urszula

    2015-02-01

    The study concentrated on changes in certain biochemical parameters of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) from lettuce leaves caused by dl-β-amino-n-butyric acid (BABA) elicitation. PPO from control plants demonstrated the highest affinity toward catechol, whereas PPO from BABA-elicited lettuce showed the highest affinity to 4-methylcatechol. The optimum temperature for enzymes from control plants was 35°C, whereas from plants elicited with 1mM BABA this was 25°C. PPO from plants elicited with BABA was also more sensitive to the tested inhibitors than PPO from control plants. l-Cysteine was the most effective inhibitor. Native gel stained for PPO activity in control samples showed two isoforms. However, in BABA-treated lettuce three bands visualising PPO activity were observed. The information obtained in this study will be valuable for the development of treatment technology and storage conditions to control undesirable browning reactions in elicited lettuce. PMID:25172730

  13. The composition of milk xanthine oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Hart, L. I.; McGartoll, Mary A.; Chapman, Helen R.; Bray, R. C.

    1970-01-01

    The composition of milk xanthine oxidase has been reinvestigated. When the enzyme is prepared by methods that include a selective denaturation step in the presence of sodium salicylate the product is obtained very conveniently and in high yield, and is homogeneous in the ultracentrifuge and in recycling gel filtration. It has specific activity higher than previously reported preparations of the enzyme and its composition approximates closely to 2mol of FAD, 2g-atoms of Mo and 8g-atoms of Fe/mol of protein (molecular weight about 275000). In contrast, when purely conventional preparative methods are used the product is also homogeneous by the above criteria but has a lower specific activity and is generally comparable to the crystallized enzyme described previously. Such samples also contain 2mol of FAD/mol of protein but they have lower contents of Mo (e.g. 1.2g-atom/mol). Amino acid compositions for the two types of preparation are indistinguishable. These results confirm the previous conclusion that conventional methods give mixtures of xanthine oxidase with an inactive modification of the enzyme now termed `de-molybdo-xanthine oxidase', and show that salicylate can selectively denature the latter. The origin of de-molybdo-xanthine oxidase was investigated. FAD/Mo ratios show that it is present not only in enzyme purified by conventional methods but also in `milk microsomes' (Bailie & Morton, 1958) and in enzyme samples prepared without proteolytic digestion. We conclude that it is secreted by cows together with the active enzyme and we discuss its occurrence in the preparations of other workers. Studies on the milks of individual cows show that nutritional rather than genetic factors determine the relative amounts of xanthine oxidase and de-molybdo-xanthine oxidase. A second inactive modification of the enzyme, now termed `inactivated xanthine oxidase', causes variability in activity relative to E450 or to Mo content and formation of it decreases these ratios during storage of enzyme samples including samples free from demolybdo-xanthine oxidase. We conclude that even the best purified xanthine oxidase samples described here and by other workers are contaminated by significant amounts of the inactivated form. This may complicate the interpretation of changes in the enzyme taking place during the slow phase of reduction by substrates. Attempts to remove iron from the enzyme by published methods were not successful. ImagesFig. 2. PMID:5441374

  14. The composition of milk xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Hart, L I; McGartoll, M A; Chapman, H R; Bray, R C

    1970-03-01

    The composition of milk xanthine oxidase has been reinvestigated. When the enzyme is prepared by methods that include a selective denaturation step in the presence of sodium salicylate the product is obtained very conveniently and in high yield, and is homogeneous in the ultracentrifuge and in recycling gel filtration. It has specific activity higher than previously reported preparations of the enzyme and its composition approximates closely to 2mol of FAD, 2g-atoms of Mo and 8g-atoms of Fe/mol of protein (molecular weight about 275000). In contrast, when purely conventional preparative methods are used the product is also homogeneous by the above criteria but has a lower specific activity and is generally comparable to the crystallized enzyme described previously. Such samples also contain 2mol of FAD/mol of protein but they have lower contents of Mo (e.g. 1.2g-atom/mol). Amino acid compositions for the two types of preparation are indistinguishable. These results confirm the previous conclusion that conventional methods give mixtures of xanthine oxidase with an inactive modification of the enzyme now termed ;de-molybdo-xanthine oxidase', and show that salicylate can selectively denature the latter. The origin of de-molybdo-xanthine oxidase was investigated. FAD/Mo ratios show that it is present not only in enzyme purified by conventional methods but also in ;milk microsomes' (Bailie & Morton, 1958) and in enzyme samples prepared without proteolytic digestion. We conclude that it is secreted by cows together with the active enzyme and we discuss its occurrence in the preparations of other workers. Studies on the milks of individual cows show that nutritional rather than genetic factors determine the relative amounts of xanthine oxidase and de-molybdo-xanthine oxidase. A second inactive modification of the enzyme, now termed ;inactivated xanthine oxidase', causes variability in activity relative to E(450) or to Mo content and formation of it decreases these ratios during storage of enzyme samples including samples free from demolybdo-xanthine oxidase. We conclude that even the best purified xanthine oxidase samples described here and by other workers are contaminated by significant amounts of the inactivated form. This may complicate the interpretation of changes in the enzyme taking place during the slow phase of reduction by substrates. Attempts to remove iron from the enzyme by published methods were not successful. PMID:5441374

  15. The interactions of milacemide with monoamine oxidase.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, E M; Tipton, K F; McCrodden, J M; Youdim, M B

    1994-02-11

    The interactions of the anticonvulsant drug milacemide (2-n-pentylaminoacetamide) with rat liver mitochondrial monoamine oxidases-A and -B have been studied. The compound acts as a substrate for the B-form of the enzyme, with an apparent Km value of 49 +/- 4.7 microM and a Vmax value of 1.1 +/- 0.2 nmol/min/mg. It is also a time-dependent irreversible inhibitor of that enzyme. Any activity of monoamine oxidase-A towards this substrate was too low to allow accurate determinations to be made by either luminometric determination of H2O2 formation or spectrophotometric coupling of aldehyde formation to NAD+ reduction in the presence of aldehyde dehydrogenase. Milacemide was a reversible competitive inhibitor towards monoamine oxidase-A. The inhibitor constant (Ki) was 115 +/- 35 microM indicating a higher affinity than that towards monoamine oxidase-B, which was also competitively inhibited in the absence of enzyme-inhibitor preincubation (Ki = 331 +/- 185 microM). Determination of the formation of H2O2 and the aldehyde product of the oxidative cleavage of milacemide by purified monoamine oxidase-B from ox liver indicated that cleavage resulted solely in the formation of pentanal and glycinamide. There was no evidence for alternative cleavage to pentylamine and oxamaldehyde. PMID:8129740

  16. Proteasome inhibition in human breast cancer cells with high catechol-O-methyltransferase activity by green tea polyphenol EGCG analogs.

    PubMed

    Huo, Congde; Yang, Huanjie; Cui, Qiuzhi Cindy; Dou, Q Ping; Chan, Tak Hang

    2010-02-01

    A pro-drug 8 of a synthetic analog 7 is more active in its antiproliferative activity against human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells possessing high catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity than the pro-drugs of EGCG and the analog 5. The higher activity of 8 is attributed to it not being a substrate of COMT. PMID:20045338

  17. VISCOSITY AND BINDER COMPOSITION EFFECTS ON TYROSINASE-BASED CARBON PASTE ELECTRODE FOR DETECTION OF PHENOL AND CATECHOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The systematic study of the effect of binder viscosity on the sensitivity of a tyrosinase-based carbon paste electrode (CPE) biosensor for phenol and catechol is reported. Silicon oil binders with similar (polydimethylsiloxane) chemical composition were used to represent a wid...

  18. Laccase immobilized on a PAN/adsorbents composite nanofibrous membrane for catechol treatment by a biocatalysis/adsorption process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingqing; Cui, Jing; Li, Guohui; Zhang, Jinning; Li, Dawei; Huang, Fenglin; Wei, Qufu

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of catechol via biocatalysis and adsorption with a commercial laccase immobilized on polyacrylonitrile/montmorillonite/graphene oxide (PAN/MMT/GO) composite nanofibers was evaluated with a homemade nanofibrous membrane reactor. The properties in this process of the immobilized laccase on PAN, PAN/MMT as well as PAN/MMT/GO with different weight ratios of MMT and GO were investigated. These membranes were successfully applied for removal of catechol from an aqueous solution. Scanning electron microscope images revealed different morphologies of the enzyme aggregates on different supports. After incorporation of MMT or MMT/GO, the optimum pH showed an alkaline shift to 4, compared to 3.5 for laccase immobilized on pure PAN nanofibers. The optimum temperature was at 55 °C for all the immobilized enzymes. Besides, the addition of GO improved the operational stability and storage stability. A 39% ± 2.23% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal from the catechol aqueous solution was achieved. Experimental results suggested that laccase, PAN, adsorbent nanoparticles (MMT/GO) can be combined together for catechol treatment in industrial applications. PMID:24651612

  19. [Catechol biosensor based on immobilizing laccase to modified core-shell magnetic nanoparticles supported on carbon paste electrode].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zeng, Guang-ming; Tang, Lin; Yu, Hong-yan; Li, Jian-bing

    2007-10-01

    A catechol biosensor was developed and used to analyze compost extracts based on the immobilization of laccase on the surface of modified magnetic core-shall (Fe3O4-SiO2) nanoparticles. Laccase was convalently immobilized on the magnetic nanoparticles by glutaraldehyde, which were modified with amino groups on its surface. The resulting magnetic bio-nanoparticles were attached to the surface of carbon paste electrode with the help of a permanent magnet to determine catechol. The immobilization matrix provided a good microenvironment for retaining the bioactivity of laccase. The linear range for catechol determination was 7.5 x 10(-7)-2.75 x 10(-4) mol/L, with a detection limit of 7.5 x 10(-7) mol/L. The detection current reached 95% of the steady-state current within about 70 s. Catechol concentration in compost extracts were determined by laccase biosensor and HPLC, with approximately the same result. PMID:18268999

  20. The Key Role of Chlorocatechol 1,2-Dioxygenase in Phytoremoval and Degradation of Catechol by Transgenic Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yang; Zhou, Xiao; Yu, Jin; Cao, Yajun; Li, Xian; Kuai, Benke

    2006-01-01

    Transgenic exploitation of bacterial degradative genes in plants has been considered a favorable strategy for degrading organic pollutants in the environment. The aromatic ring characteristic of these pollutants is mainly responsible for their recalcitrance to degradation. In this study, a Plesiomonas-derived chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase (TfdC) gene (tfdC), capable of cleaving the aromatic ring, was introduced into Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Morphology and growth of transgenic plants are indistinguishable from those of wild-type plants. In contrast, they show significantly enhanced tolerances to catechol. Transgenic plants also exhibit strikingly higher capabilities of removing catechol from their media and high efficiencies of converting catechol to cis,cis-muconic acid. As far-less-than-calculated amounts of cis,cis-muconic acid were accumulated within the transgenic plants, existence of endogenous TfdD- and TfdE-like activities was postulated and, subsequently, putative orthologs of bacterial tfdD and tfdE were detected in Arabidopsis. However, no TfdC activity and no putative orthologs of either tfdC or tfdF were identified. This work indicates that the TfdC activity, conferred by tfdC in transgenic Arabidopsis, is a key requirement for phytoremoval and degradation of catechol, and also suggests that microbial degradative genes may be transgenically exploited in plants for bioremediation of aromatic pollutants in the environment. PMID:16935988

  1. Iron transport-mediated antibacterial activity of and development of resistance to hydroxamate and catechol siderophore-carbacephalosporin conjugates.

    PubMed Central

    Minnick, A A; McKee, J A; Dolence, E K; Miller, M J

    1992-01-01

    Peptides containing residues of N5-acetyl-N5-hydroxy-L-ornithine were evaluated as potential artificial siderophores of beta-lactam-hypersusceptible Escherichia coli X580. Only those peptides which were capable of forming a hexadentate complex around ferric iron, which is analogous to the natural siderophore ferrichrome, were able to reverse the growth inhibition effects of the ferric iron chelator ethylenediamine di(o-hydroxyphenylacetic acid). A synthetic bis(catechol) spermidine derivative, similar to the natural siderophores enterobactin and agrobactin, also exhibited siderophore activity with this strain. Conjugation of the N5-acetyl-N5-hydroxy-L-ornithine tripeptide and the bis(catechol) siderophore to the potent carbacephalosporin loracarbef and closely related analogs provided compounds which exhibited antibacterial activity against E. coli X580. As was observed with the naturally occurring albomycins, the initial bactericidal effect was followed by the appearance of survivors that were resistant to the test compound. An enhanced killing effect was observed when the parent was incubated simultaneously with hydroxamate and catechol siderophore-antibiotic conjugates. Natural and synthetic siderophore growth promotion experiments with survivors resistant to the conjugates strongly suggested that disabled ferrichrome and enterobactin-catechol assimilation mechanisms may be responsible for the observed resistance. One isolated survivor was postulated to be a tonB mutant. The antibacterial activities of the described siderophore-carbacephalosporin conjugates appear to be related to an iron transport assimilation mechanism and would not have been detected during routine MIC testing procedures. PMID:1503447

  2. Caffeoyltartronic acid from catnip (Nepeta cataria): A precursor for catechol in lubber grasshopper (Romalea guttata) defensive secretions.

    PubMed

    Snook, M E; Blum, M S; Whitman, D W; Arrendale, R F; Costello, C E; Harwood, J S

    1993-09-01

    Adults of the lubber grasshopper (Romalea guttata) secrete increased amounts of catechol from their defensive glands when fed diets containing only catnip leaves (Nepeta cataria). Model compound bioassays showed that these insects were able to sequester and biomagnify simple phenols, such as catechol and hydroquinone, in their defense gland secretions. Excessive catechol secretions from caffeic acid-fortified diets indicated metabolic pathways exist to perform efficiently more complex biochemical conversions. Reverse-phase HPLC of methanol extracts of catnip revealed only one major caffeoyl-polyphenol as a possible precursor for the observed elevated catechol secretions, when this plant is fed to lubbers. The compound was shown to be caffeoyltartronic acid (CTA). During analysis of CTA by probe-MS or gas chromatography (of its silylated derivative), CTA decomposed by loss of carbon dioxide to form caffeoylglycolic acid (CGA), making identification by these methods ambiguous. Only fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS, negative mode) gave a true molecular weight. Groundivy (Glecoma hederacea), a relative of catnip, was also shown to contain CTA. The mung bean (Phaseolus radiatus=Vigna radiata), a species totally unrelated to catnip, is the only other reported plant source of CTA. Catnip leaves were found to contain about twice as much CTA as mung bean leaves. PMID:24249371

  3. RATE AND CAPACITY OF HEPATIC MICROSOMAL RING HYDROXYLATION OF PHENOL TO HYDROQUINONE AND CATECHOL IN RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow trout liver microsomes were used to study the rate of ring-hydroxylation of phenol (PH) by directly measuring the production of hydroquinone (HQ), the primary metabolite, and catechol (CAT), a secondary metabolite. An HPLC method with integrated ultroviolet (UV) and elect...

  4. RATE AND CAPACITY OF HEPATIC MICROSOMAL RING HYDROXYLATION OF PHENOL TO HYDROQUINONE AND CATECHOL IN RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver microsomes were used to study the rate of ring-hydroxylation of phenol PH) by directly measuring the production of hydroquinone (HQ), the primary metabolite, and catechol (CAT), a secondary metabolite. An HPLC method with integrated ultra...

  5. Mannitol and Mannitol Dehydrogenases in Conidia of Aspergillus oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Horikoshi, Koki; Iida, Shigeji; Ikeda, Yonosuke

    1965-01-01

    Horikoshi, Koki (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Tokyo, Japan), Shigeji Iida, and Yonosuke Ikeda. Mannitol and mannitol dehydrogenases in conidia of Aspergillus oryzae. J. Bacteriol. 89:326330. 1965.A sugar alcohol was isolated from the conidia of Aspergillus oryzae and identified as d-mannitol. Two types of d-mannitol dehydrogenases, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-linked and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-linked, were found in the conidia. Substrate specificities, pH optima, Michaelis-Menton constants, and the effects of inhibitors were studied. d-Mannitol was converted to fructose by the dehydrogenases. Synthesis of d-mannitol dehydrogenases was not observed during germination; the content of d-mannitol decreased at an early stage of germination. It was assumed, therefore, that d-mannitol might be used as the source of endogenous respiration and provide energy for the germination. PMID:14255698

  6. Niclosamide inhibits leaf blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae in rice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Il; Song, Jong Tae; Jeong, Jin-Yong; Seo, Hak Soo

    2016-01-01

    Rice leaf blight, which is caused by the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), results in huge losses in grain yield. Here, we show that Xoo-induced rice leaf blight is effectively controlled by niclosamide, an oral antihelminthic drug and molluscicide, which also functions as an anti-tumor agent. Niclosamide directly inhibited the growth of the three Xoo strains PXO99, 10208 and K3a. Niclosamide moved long distances from the site of local application to distant rice tissues. Niclosamide also increased the levels of salicylate and induced the expression of defense-related genes such as OsPR1 and OsWRKY45, which suppressed Xoo-induced leaf wilting. Niclosamide had no detrimental effects on vegetative/reproductive growth and yield. These combined results indicate that niclosamide can be used to block bacterial leaf blight in rice with no negative side effects. PMID:26879887

  7. Niclosamide inhibits leaf blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae in rice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Il; Song, Jong Tae; Jeong, Jin-Yong; Seo, Hak Soo

    2016-01-01

    Rice leaf blight, which is caused by the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), results in huge losses in grain yield. Here, we show that Xoo-induced rice leaf blight is effectively controlled by niclosamide, an oral antihelminthic drug and molluscicide, which also functions as an anti-tumor agent. Niclosamide directly inhibited the growth of the three Xoo strains PXO99, 10208 and K3a. Niclosamide moved long distances from the site of local application to distant rice tissues. Niclosamide also increased the levels of salicylate and induced the expression of defense-related genes such as OsPR1 and OsWRKY45, which suppressed Xoo-induced leaf wilting. Niclosamide had no detrimental effects on vegetative/reproductive growth and yield. These combined results indicate that niclosamide can be used to block bacterial leaf blight in rice with no negative side effects. PMID:26879887

  8. Effect of naphthalene on cytochrome oxidase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that naphthalene inhibits oxygen consumption in Daphnia magna tissue culture cells, and intact mitochondria and submitochondrial particles. These studies were extended to algal mitochondrial respiration as well as photosynthetic activity. The authors were able to demonstrate the specific site of apparent respiratory inhibition to be coenzyme Q (ubiquinone, UQ) and later to demonstrate the molecular basis of this inhibition at ubiquinone. The authors previously could not demonstrate an effect of naphthalene on cytochrome oxidase activity. However, the observation that naphthalene can stimulate respiration in algae prompted the reinvestigation of the effect of naphthalene on the kinetics of cytochrome oxidase. Cytochrome oxidase is a multi-subunit membranous protein responsible for the oxidation of cytochrome c and the reduction of molecular oxygen to water. Because of the complicated nature and mechanism of this enzyme, the potential exists for multiple and possibly opposite effects of naphthalene on its function.

  9. Molecular identification of a novel victorivirus from the phytopathogenic fungus Nigrospora oryzae.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jie; Zhou, Qian; Hu, Yue; Zhu, Hong Jian; Da Gao, Bi

    2016-02-01

    Nigrospora oryzae is a worldwide phytopathogenic fungus that can infect many plant host species. In this study, complete sequence of a novel mycovirus from N. oryzae was reported. The viral genome is 5100 base pairs in length and possesses two overlapping open reading frames (ORFs). The two ORFs potentially encode proteins that showed significant similarity to the capsid protein and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, in the family Totiviridae, respectively. Phylogenetic tree showed that this novel mycovirus is a new member of the genus Victorivirus in the family Totiviridae. We here designated the virus as Nigrospora oryzae victorivirus 1 (NoRV1), the first putative victorivirus identified in N. oryzae. PMID:26757943

  10. Effect of Preexposure to Triazoles on Susceptibility and Virulence of Rhizopus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Albert, Nathaniel D; Lewis, Russell E; Walsh, Thomas J; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2015-12-01

    Triazole prophylaxis has become the norm in patients with hematological malignancies. Breakthrough infections caused by Mucorales during triazole prophylaxis remain a challenging problem. We found that preexposure of Rhizopus oryzae to antifungal triazoles (fluconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, and itraconazole) did not modify the in vitro susceptibility of Rhizopus oryzae to posaconazole. In contrast, preexposure of Rhizopus to triazoles was associated with the enhanced in vitro susceptibility of R. oryzae to amphotericin B. Preexposure to posaconazole did not alter the virulence of R. oryzae in the fly model of mucormycosis. PMID:26392499

  11. A comparative study of hydroxyindole oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Blaschko, H.; Levine, W. G.

    1960-01-01

    A comparative study has been carried out of the oxidation of 5-hydroxytryptamine and related compounds by the oxidase present in the gill plates of Mytilus edulis and of caeruloplasmin, the copper containing oxidase of mammalian plasma. Both preparations oxidized indole derivatives carrying a hydroxyl group in the 4-, 5-, 6-, or 7- position. The oxidation of bufoteni ne was compared with that of its 4- and 6-hydroxy analogues; the 4-hydroxy analogue is psil ocine, a naturally occurring hallucinogenic compound. Bufotenine and the 6-hydroxy analogue were oxidized by both preparations with the formation of brown pigments; psilocine was more rapidly oxidized with the appearance of a blue colour. 4-Hydroxytryptamine and 7-hydroxytryptamine were also oxidized, the former with the formation of a blue compound. The N-1-methyl derivatives of both bufotenine and psilocine were also oxidized. The Mytilus preparation acted also on 4-, 5-, and 7-hydroxytryptophan and on 5-hydroxyindole, none of which was oxidized by caeruloplasmin. The Mytilus enzyme also oxidized 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid. Paraphenylenediamine, a very good substrate of caeruloplasmin, was much more slowly oxidized by the gill plate enzyme. The evidence suggests that the two enzymes catalyse the same reactions, but that the substrate specificity of the mammalian oxidase is somewhat more restricted. Both enzymes are hydroxyindole oxidases, not specific for 5-hydroxyindoles alone. Inhibitors of the Mytilus oxidase included inhibitors of copper enzymes but not edetate or carbon monoxide. The action of pig serum on 5-hydroxytryptamine was due to caeruloplasmin and not to amine oxidase. PMID:19108143

  12. Neuronal effects of 4-t-Butylcatechol: A model for catechol-containing antioxidants

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Y.-C. Liu Yuxin; Lin, Y.-C.; Shih, Y.-T.; Liu, C.-M.; Burka, Leo T.

    2008-04-15

    Many herbal medicines and dietary supplements sold as aids to improve memory or treat neurodegenerative diseases or have other favorable effects on the CNS contain a catechol or similar 1,2-dihydroxy aromatic moiety in their structure. As an approach to isolate and examine the neuroprotective properties of catechols, a simple catechol 4-t-Butylcatechol (TBC) has been used as a model. In this study, we investigated the effects of TBC on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated microglial-induced neurotoxicity by using the in vitro model of coculture murine microglial-like cell line HAPI with the neuronal-like human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. We also examined the effects of TBC on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. TBC at concentrations from 0.1-10 {mu}M had no toxic effect on HAPI cells and SH-SY5Y cells, and it inhibited LPS (100 ng/ml)-induced increases of superoxide, intracellular ROS, gp91{sup Phox}, iNOS and a decrease of HO-1 in HAPI cells. Under coculture condition, TBC significantly reduced LPS-activated microglia-induced dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells death. Moreover, TBC (0.1-10 {mu}M) inhibited 6-OHDA-induced increases of intracellular ROS, iNOS, nNOS, and a decrease of mitochondria membrane potential, and cell death in SH-SY5Y cells. However, the neurotoxic effects of TBC (100 {mu}M) on SH-SY5Y cells were also observed including the decrease in mitochondria membrane potential and the increase in COX-2 expression and cell death. TBC-induced SH-SY5Y cell death was attenuated by pretreatment with NS-398, a selective COX-2 inhibitor. In conclusion, this study suggests that TBC might possess protective effects on inflammation- and oxidative stress-related neurodegenerative disorders. However, the high concentration of TBC might be toxic, at least in part, for increasing COX-2 expression.

  13. Crystal structures of human 108V and 108M catechol O-methyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, K.; Le Trong, I.; Stenkamp, R.E.; Parson, W.W.

    2008-08-01

    Catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) plays important roles in the metabolism of catecholamine neurotransmitters and catechol estrogens. The development of COMT inhibitors for use in the treatment of Parkinson's disease has been aided by crystallographic structures of the rat enzyme. However, the human and rat proteins have significantly different substrate specificities. Additionally, human COMT contains a common valine-methionine polymorphism at position 108. The methionine protein is less stable than the valine polymorph, resulting in decreased enzyme activity and protein levels in vivo. Here we describe the crystal structures of the 108V and 108M variants of the soluble form of human COMT bound with S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and a substrate analog, 3,5-dinitrocatechol. The polymorphic residue 108 is located in the {alpha}5-{beta}3 loop, buried in a hydrophobic pocket {approx}16 {angstrom} from the SAM-binding site. The 108V and 108M structures are very similar overall [RMSD of C{sup {alpha}} atoms between two structures (C{sup {alpha}} RMSD) = 0.2 {angstrom}], and the active-site residues are superposable, in accord with the observation that SAM stabilizes 108M COMT. However, the methionine side chain is packed more tightly within the polymorphic site and, consequently, interacts more closely with residues A22 ({alpha}2) and R78 ({alpha}4) than does valine. These interactions of the larger methionine result in a 0.7-{angstrom} displacement in the backbone structure near residue 108, which propagates along {alpha}1 and {alpha}5 toward the SAM-binding site. Although the overall secondary structures of the human and rat proteins are very similar (C{sup {alpha}} RMSD = 0.4 {angstrom}), several nonconserved residues are present in the SAM-(I89M, I91M, C95Y) and catechol- (C173V, R201M, E202K) binding sites. The human protein also contains three additional solvent-exposed cysteine residues (C95, C173, C188) that may contribute to intermolecular disulfide bond formation and protein aggregation.

  14. Reduction of aflatoxins by Rhizopus oryzae and Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Hackbart, H C S; Machado, A R; Christ-Ribeiro, A; Prietto, L; Badiale-Furlong, E

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the ability of the microorganisms Rhizopus oryzae (CCT7560) and Trichoderma reesei (QM9414), producers of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) enzymes, to reduce the level of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, G2, and M1. The variables considered to the screening were the initial number of spores in the inoculum and the culture time. The culture was conducted in contaminated 4% potato dextrose agar (PDA) medium, and the residual mycotoxins were determined every 24h by HPLC-FL. The fungus R. oryzae has reduced aflatoxins B1, B2, and G1 in the 96h and aflatoxins M1 and G2 in the range of 120h of culture by approximately 100%. The fungus T. reesei has reduced aflatoxins B1, B2, and M1 in the 96h and aflatoxin G1 in the range of 120h of culture by approximately 100%. The highest reduction occurred in the middle of R. oryzae culture. PMID:24925827

  15. Iron starvation induces apoptosis in Rhizopus oryzae in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Fazal; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Ibrahim, Ashraf S

    2015-01-01

    Mortality associated with mucormycosis remains high despite current antifungals. Iron-starvation strategies have been shown to have promising activity against Mucorales. We hypothesized that iron starvation enhances apoptosis in Rhizopus oryzae. Apoptosis was characterized in R. oryzae transformed with RNAi plasmid targeting FTR1 expression (iron permease mutant) or empty plasmid grown in iron rich (0.125% FeCl3) and iron depleted media (YNB+1mM ferrozine and 1 mM ascorbic acid). Increased apoptosis was observed with dihydrorhodamine-123 and rhodamine-123 staining in the iron starved mutant FTR1 when compared to empty plasmid, followed by increased extracellular ATP levels. In addition, DNA fragmentation and metacaspase activity were prominent in FTR1. In contrast, Rhizopus strains grown in iron-rich medium displayed minimal apoptosis. Our results demonstrate a metacaspase dependent apoptotic process in iron deprived condition and further support the role of iron starvation strategies as an adjunct treatment for mucormycosis, a mechanism by which iron starvation affects R. oryzae. PMID:25830548

  16. Site-specific inhibitory mechanism for amyloid β42 aggregation by catechol-type flavonoids targeting the Lys residues.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mizuho; Murakami, Kazuma; Uno, Mayumi; Nakagawa, Yu; Katayama, Sumie; Akagi, Ken-ichi; Masuda, Yuichi; Takegoshi, Kiyonori; Irie, Kazuhiro

    2013-08-01

    The aggregation of the 42-residue amyloid β-protein (Aβ42) is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Numerous flavonoids exhibit inhibitory activity against Aβ42 aggregation, but their mechanism remains unclear in the molecular level. Here we propose the site-specific inhibitory mechanism of (+)-taxifolin, a catechol-type flavonoid, whose 3',4'-dihydroxyl groups of the B-ring plays a critical role. Addition of sodium periodate, an oxidant, strengthened suppression of Aβ42 aggregation by (+)-taxifolin, whereas no inhibition was observed under anaerobic conditions, suggesting the inhibition to be associated with the oxidation to form o-quinone. Because formation of the Aβ42-taxifolin adduct was suggested by mass spectrometry, Aβ42 mutants substituted at Arg(5), Lys(16), and/or Lys(28) with norleucine (Nle) were prepared to identify the residues involved in the conjugate formation. (+)-Taxifolin did not suppress the aggregation of Aβ42 mutants at Lys(16) and/or Lys(28) except for the mutant at Arg(5). In addition, the aggregation of Aβ42 was inhibited by other catechol-type flavonoids, whereas that of K16Nle-Aβ42 was not. In contrast, some non-catechol-type flavonoids suppressed the aggregation of K16Nle-Aβ42 as well as Aβ42. Furthermore, interaction of (+)-taxifolin with the β-sheet region in Aβ42 was not observed using solid-state NMR unlike curcumin of the non-catechol-type. These results demonstrate that catechol-type flavonoids could specifically suppress Aβ42 aggregation by targeting Lys residues. Although the anti-AD activity of flavonoids has been ascribed to their antioxidative activity, the mechanism that the o-quinone reacts with Lys residues of Aβ42 might be more intrinsic. The Lys residues could be targets for Alzheimer disease therapy. PMID:23792961

  17. A novel l-arabinose-responsive regulator discovered in the rice-blast fungus Pyricularia oryzae (Magnaporthe oryzae).

    PubMed

    Klaubauf, Sylvia; Zhou, Miaomiao; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; de Vries, Ronald P; Battaglia, Evy

    2016-02-01

    In this study we identified the l-arabinose-responsive regulator of Pyricularia oryzae that regulates l-arabinose release and catabolism. Previously we identified the Zn2Cys6 transcription factor (TF), AraR, that has this role in the Trichocomaceae family (Eurotiales), but is absent in other fungi. Candidate Zn2Cys6 TF genes were selected according to their transcript profiles on l-arabinose. Deletion mutants of these genes were screened for their growth phenotype on l-arabinose. One mutant, named ?ara1, was further analyzed. Our analysis demonstrated that Ara1 from P. oryzae is the functional analog of AraR from A. niger, while there is no significant sequence similarity between them. PMID:26790567

  18. 21 CFR 866.2420 - Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Section 866.2420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2420 Oxidase... ingredient that will react with cytochrome oxidase. When cytochrome oxidase is present, the swab turns a...

  19. 21 CFR 866.2420 - Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Section 866.2420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2420 Oxidase... ingredient that will react with cytochrome oxidase. When cytochrome oxidase is present, the swab turns a...

  20. 21 CFR 866.2420 - Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Section 866.2420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2420 Oxidase... ingredient that will react with cytochrome oxidase. When cytochrome oxidase is present, the swab turns a...

  1. Antiplatelet Effect of Catechol Is Related to Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase, Reactive Oxygen Species, ERK/p38 Signaling and Thromboxane A2 Production

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tong-Mei; Lin, Bor-Ru; Yeung, Sin-Yuet; Yeh, Chien-Yang; Cheng, Ru-Hsiu; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2014-01-01

    Catechol (benzenediol) is present in plant-derived products, such as vegetables, fruits, coffee, tea, wine, areca nut and cigarette smoke. Because platelet dysfunction is a risk factor of cardiovascular diseases, including stroke, atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the anti-platelet and anti-inflammatory effect of catechol and its mechanisms. The effects of catechol on cyclooxygenase (COX) activity, arachidonic acid (AA)-induced aggregation, thromboxane B2 (TXB2) production, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/p38 phosphorylation were determined in rabbit platelets. In addition, its effect on IL-1?-induced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production by fibroblasts was determined. The ex vivo effect of catechol on platelet aggregation was also measured. Catechol (5-25 M) suppressed AA-induced platelet aggregation and inhibited TXB2 production at concentrations of 0.55 M; however, it showed little cytotoxicity and did not alter U46619-induced platelet aggregation. Catechol (1050 M) suppressed COX-1 activity by 2944% and COX-2 activity by 2950%. It also inhibited IL-1?-induced PGE2 production, but not COX-2 expression of fibroblasts. Moreover, catechol (110 M) attenuated AA-induced ROS production in platelets and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-induced ROS production in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Exposure of platelets to catechol decreased AA-induced ERK and p38 phosphorylation. Finally, intravenous administration of catechol (2.55 mole/mouse) attenuated ex vivo AA-induced platelet aggregation. These results suggest that catechol exhibited anti-platelet and anti-inflammatory effects, which were mediated by inhibition of COX, ROS and TXA2 production as well as ERK/p38 phosphorylation. The anti-platelet effect of catechol was confirmed by ex vivo analysis. Exposure to catechol may affect platelet function and thus cardiovascular health. PMID:25122505

  2. Co-metabolism of methyl- and chloro-substituted catechols by an Achromobacter sp. possessing a new meta-cleaving oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, R. S.

    1970-01-01

    Co-metabolism of 3-methylcatechol, 4-chlorocatechol and 3,5-dichlorocatechol by an Achromobacter sp. was shown to result in the accumulation of 2-hydroxy-3-methylmuconic semialdehyde, 4-chloro-2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde and 3,5-dichloro-2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde respectively. Formation of these products indicated that cleavage of the aromatic nucleus of the substituted catechols was accomplished by a new meta-cleaving enzyme, catechol 1,6-oxygenase. This enzyme was equally active on both chloro- and methyl-substituted catechols. PMID:5492853

  3. The thiG Gene Is Required for Full Virulence of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae by Preventing Cell Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaoyue; Liang, Xiaoyu; Liu, Kexue; Dong, Wenxia; Wang, Jianxin; Zhou, Ming-guo

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial blight of rice is an important serious bacterial diseases of rice in many rice-growing regions, caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). The thiG gene from Xoo strain ZJ173, which is involved with thiazole moiety production in the thiamine biosynthesis pathway, is highly conserved among the members of Xanthomonas. The thiG deletion mutant displayed impaired virulence and growth in thiamine-free medium but maintained its normal growth rate in the rice tissues, indicating that the thiG gene is involved in Xoo virulence. Compared to the wild type strain, the formation of cell-cell aggregates was affected in thiG deletion mutants. Although biofilm formation was promoted, motility and migration in rice leaves were repressed in the thiG mutants, and therefore limited the expansion of pathogen infection in rice. Quorum sensing and extracellular substance are two key factors that contribute to the formation of cell-cell aggregates. Our study found that in the thiG mutant the expression of two genes, rpfC and rpfG, which form a two-component regulatory signal system involved in the regulation of biofilm formation by a second messenger cyclic di-GMP is down-regulated. In addition, our study showed that xanthan production was not affected but the expression of some genes associated with xanthan biosynthesis, like gumD, gumE, gumH and gumM, were up-regulated in thiG mutants. Taken together, these findings are the first to demonstrate the role of the thiazole biosynthsis gene, thiG, in virulence and the formation of aggregates in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. PMID:26222282

  4. Evidence for HrpXo-Dependent Expression of Type II Secretory Proteins in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Furutani, Ayako; Tsuge, Seiji; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Oku, Takashi; Tsuno, Kazunori; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Ochiai, Hirokazu; Kaku, Hisatoshi; Kubo, Yasuyuki

    2004-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae is a causal agent of bacterial leaf blight of rice. Recently, an efficient hrp-inducing medium, XOM2, was established for this bacterium. In this medium, more than 10 proteins were secreted from the wild-type strain of X. oryzae pv. oryzae. Many of these proteins disappeared or decreased in amount in culture on XOM2 when incubated with the strain that has a mutation in the hrp regulatory gene. Interestingly, the secretory protein profile of a mutant lacking a type III secretion system (TTSS), components of which are encoded by hrp genes, was similar to that of the wild-type strain except that a few proteins had disappeared. This finding suggests that many HrpXo-dependent secretory proteins are secreted via systems other than the TTSS. By isolating mutant strains lacking a type II secretion system, we examined this hypothesis. As expected, many of the HrpXo-dependent secretory proteins disappeared or decreased when the mutant was cultured in XOM2. By determining the N-terminal amino acid sequence, we identified one of the type II secretory proteins as a cysteine protease homolog, CysP2. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that cysP2 has an imperfect plant-inducible-promoter box, a consensus sequence which HrpXo regulons possess in the promoter region, and a deduced signal peptide sequence at the N terminus. By reverse transcription-PCR analysis and examination of the expression of CysP2 by using a plasmid harboring a cysP2::gus fusion gene, HrpXo-dependent expression of CysP2 was confirmed. Here, we reveal that the hrp regulatory gene hrpXo is also involved in the expression of not only hrp genes and type III secretory proteins but also some type II secretory proteins. PMID:14973015

  5. Antihyperglycemic activity of phenylpropanoyl esters of catechol glycoside and its dimers from Dodecadenia grandiflora.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manmeet; Rawat, Preeti; Rahuja, Neha; Srivastava, Arvind Kumar; Maurya, Rakesh

    2009-01-01

    Bioactivity-guided separation of an antihyperglycemic extract from the leaves of Dodecadenia grandiflora afforded two phenylpropanoyl esters of catechol glycosides (1 and 4) and two lignane bis(catecol glycoside)esters (2 and 3). Their structures were established on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis (1D and 2D-NMR, MS). Compounds 2 and 3 are believed to be derived from dimerization via the two phenylpropanoid units of 1. Compounds 1-4 showed significant antihyperglycemic activity in streptozotocin-induced (STZ) diabetic rats, which is comparable to the standard drug metformin. Our results provide support to explain the use of D. grandiflora as antihyperglycemic agent by the traditional medical practitioners. PMID:19700178

  6. The catechol-O-methyltransferase gene (COMT) and cognitive function from childhood through adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Gaysina, Darya; Xu, Man K.; Barnett, Jennifer H.; Croudace, Tim J.; Wong, Andrew; Richards, Marcus; Jones, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation in the catechol-O-methyltransferase gene (COMT) can influence cognitive function, and this effect may depend on developmental stage. Using a large representative British birth cohort, we investigated the effect of COMT on cognitive function (verbal and non-verbal) at ages 8 and 15 years taking into account the possible modifying effect of pubertal stage. Five functional COMT polymorphisms, rs6269, rs4818, rs4680, rs737865 and rs165599 were analysed. Associations between COMT polymorphisms and cognition were tested using regression and latent variable structural equation modelling (SEM). Before correction for multiple testing, COMT rs737865 showed association with reading comprehension, verbal ability and global cognition at age 15 years in pubescent boys only. Although there was some evidence for age- and sex-specific effects of the COMT rs737865 none remained significant after correction for multiple testing. Further studies are necessary in order to make firmer conclusions. PMID:23178897

  7. Catechol-O-methyltransferase genotype and response to Compensatory Cognitive Training in outpatients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Burton, Cynthia Z; Vella, Lea; Kelsoe, John R; Bilder, Robert M; Twamley, Elizabeth W

    2015-06-01

    The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) ValMet polymorphism is associated with cognitive functioning in schizophrenia and may predict cognitive training outcomes. This study aimed to explore the contribution of COMT genotype in predicting improvement following Compensatory Cognitive Training (CCT). We conducted mixed factorial analysis of variance to examine COMT genotype as a predictor of response to CCT (i.e. improved cognitive performance) in 41 participants with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. We also explored the effect of CCT treatment and COMT genotype on psychiatric symptom severity, functional capacity, and subjective quality of life. Met carrier status did not predict CCT treatment outcomes. COMT genotype may exert only modest effects on cognitive training response. Further research with larger samples is needed to establish genetic predictors of response to cognitive training. PMID:25748092

  8. The catechol-O-methyltransferase gene (COMT) and cognitive function from childhood through adolescence.

    PubMed

    Gaysina, Darya; Xu, Man K; Barnett, Jennifer H; Croudace, Tim J; Wong, Andrew; Richards, Marcus; Jones, Peter B

    2013-02-01

    Genetic variation in the catechol-O-methyltransferase gene (COMT) can influence cognitive function, and this effect may depend on developmental stage. Using a large representative British birth cohort, we investigated the effect of COMT on cognitive function (verbal and non-verbal) at ages 8 and 15 years taking into account the possible modifying effect of pubertal stage. Five functional COMT polymorphisms, rs6269, rs4818, rs4680, rs737865 and rs165599 were analysed. Associations between COMT polymorphisms and cognition were tested using regression and latent variable structural equation modelling (SEM). Before correction for multiple testing, COMT rs737865 showed association with reading comprehension, verbal ability and global cognition at age 15 years in pubescent boys only. Although there was some evidence for age- and sex-specific effects of the COMT rs737865 none remained significant after correction for multiple testing. Further studies are necessary in order to make firmer conclusions. PMID:23178897

  9. A two-electron shell game: Intermediates of the extradiol-cleaving catechol dioxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Fielding, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Extradiol catechol ring-cleaving dioxygenases function by binding both the organic substrate and O2 at a divalent metal center in the active site. They have proven to be a particularly versatile group of enzymes with which to study the O2 activation process. Here, recent studies of homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase (HPCD) are summarized with the objective of showing how Nature can utilize the enzyme structure and the properties of the metal and the substrate to select among many possible chemical paths to achieve both specificity and efficiency. Possible intermediates in the mechanism have been trapped by swapping active site metals, introducing active site amino acid substituted variants, and using substrates with different electron donating capacities. While each of these intermediates could form part of a viable reaction pathway, kinetic measurements significantly limit the likely candidates. Structural, kinetic, spectroscopic and computational analysis of the various intermediates shed light on how catalytic efficiency can be achieved. PMID:24615282

  10. Catecholate receptor proteins in Salmonella enterica: role in virulence and implications for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Williams, P H; Rabsch, W; Methner, U; Voigt, W; Tschpe, H; Reissbrodt, R

    2006-05-01

    Three outer membrane proteins of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium function as catecholate siderophore receptors. IroN promotes uptake of enterobactin, salmochelins and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoylserine, FepA transports enterobactin and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoylserine, and Cir is a receptor for 2,3-dihydroxybenzoylserine. In addition, all three proteins are required for l-norepinephrine-facilitated iron uptake from transferrin as judged by failure of a fepA iroN cir triple mutant to grow in serum-containing medium in the presence of l-norepinephrine. Moreover, pre-treatment of mice with l-norepinephrine resulted in enhanced systemic spread of the parental strain, but had no effect on the fepA iroN cir mutant. Inoculation of mice with the triple mutant, which is significantly attenuated, elicited a significant protective effect against subsequent challenge with the parental strain. PMID:16154248

  11. Enhanced biological denitrification in the cyclic rotating bed reactor with catechol as carbon source.

    PubMed

    Moussavi, Gholamreza; Jafari, Seyed Javad; Yaghmaeian, Kamyar

    2015-08-01

    The performance of CRBR in denitrification with catechol carbon source is presented. The influence of inlet nitrate concentration, hydraulic retention time (HRT), media filling ratio and rotational speed of media on the performance of CRBR was investigated. The bioreactor could denitrify over 95% of the nitrate at an inlet concentration up to 1000 mg NO3(-)/L and a short HRT as low as 18 h. The optimum media filling ratio at which the maximum denitrification was achieved in the CRBR was 30% and the contribution of media at this condition was around 36%. The optimum ratio of media filling at which the maximum denitrification was 20 rpm and the contribution of rotational speed under this condition was around 17%. According to the findings, the CRBR is a high rate bioreactor and thus serves as an appropriate technology for denitrification of wastewaters containing a high concentration of nitrate and toxic organic compounds. PMID:25898088

  12. QTL mapping and introgression of yield-related traits from Oryza glumaepatula to cultivated rice ( Oryza sativa) using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Brondani, C.; Rangel, N.; Brondani, V.; Ferreira, E.

    2002-05-01

    Rice ( Oryza sativa) cultivar development currently faces the task of overcoming yield plateaus, which is difficult due to the narrow genetic base of breeding programs. Oryza glumaepatula is a diploid wild relative of cultivated rice, native to Central and South America, and is therefore a potential source of alleles of agronomic importance to rice breeding programs. We studied 11 agronomic traits in BC(2)F(2) families of the interspecific cross Oryza sativa x O. glumaepatula. Transgressive lines which are almost isogenic to the elite recurrent O. sativa parent were identified for most of these traits. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was performed by single-point and interval mapping using a molecular map based on 157 microsatellite and STS markers. Marker regions accounting for 14.5 to 72.9% of a phenotypic variation trait were identified in 9 of the 12 rice chromosomes. Positive QTL effects from O. glumaepatula were observed in chromosomal regions associated with tillering and panicle-number traits. PMID:12582630

  13. Transcriptome-Based Identification of Differently Expressed Genes from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae Strains Exhibiting Different Virulence in Rice Varieties

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Tae-Hwan; Song, Eun-Sung; Kim, Hong-Il; Kang, Mi-Hyung; Park, Young-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial blight (BB) in rice (Oryza sativa L.). In this study, we investigated the genome-wide transcription patterns of two Xoo strains (KACC10331 and HB1009), which showed different virulence patterns against eight rice cultivars, including IRBB21 (carrying Xa21). In total, 743 genes showed a significant change (p-value < 0.001 in t-tests) in their mRNA expression levels in the HB1009 (K3a race) strain compared with the Xoo KACC10331 strain (K1 race). Among them, four remarkably enriched GO terms, DNA binding, transposition, cellular nitrogen compound metabolic process, and cellular macromolecule metabolic process, were identified in the upregulated genes. In addition, the expression of 44 genes was considerably higher (log2 fold changes > 2) in the HB1009 (K3a race) strain than in the Xoo KACC10331 (K1 race) strain. Furthermore, 13 and 12 genes involved in hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) and two-component regulatory systems (TCSs), respectively, were upregulated in the HB1009 (K3a race) strain compared with the Xoo KACC10331 (K1 race) strain, which we determined using either quantitative real-time PCR analysis or next-generation RNA sequencing. These results will be helpful to improve our understanding of Xoo and to gain a better insight into the Xoo–rice interactions. PMID:26907259

  14. Transcriptome-Based Identification of Differently Expressed Genes from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae Strains Exhibiting Different Virulence in Rice Varieties.

    PubMed

    Noh, Tae-Hwan; Song, Eun-Sung; Kim, Hong-Il; Kang, Mi-Hyung; Park, Young-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial blight (BB) in rice (Oryza sativa L.). In this study, we investigated the genome-wide transcription patterns of two Xoo strains (KACC10331 and HB1009), which showed different virulence patterns against eight rice cultivars, including IRBB21 (carrying Xa21). In total, 743 genes showed a significant change (p-value < 0.001 in t-tests) in their mRNA expression levels in the HB1009 (K3a race) strain compared with the Xoo KACC10331 strain (K1 race). Among them, four remarkably enriched GO terms, DNA binding, transposition, cellular nitrogen compound metabolic process, and cellular macromolecule metabolic process, were identified in the upregulated genes. In addition, the expression of 44 genes was considerably higher (log2 fold changes > 2) in the HB1009 (K3a race) strain than in the Xoo KACC10331 (K1 race) strain. Furthermore, 13 and 12 genes involved in hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) and two-component regulatory systems (TCSs), respectively, were upregulated in the HB1009 (K3a race) strain compared with the Xoo KACC10331 (K1 race) strain, which we determined using either quantitative real-time PCR analysis or next-generation RNA sequencing. These results will be helpful to improve our understanding of Xoo and to gain a better insight into the Xoo-rice interactions. PMID:26907259

  15. Electrochemical study of the catechol-modified chitosan system for clozapine treatment monitoring.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Thomas E; Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Chocron, Sheryl E; Kim, Eunkyoung; Kelly, Deanna L; Payne, Gregory F; Ghodssi, Reza

    2014-12-01

    This work presents a thorough electrochemical and reliability analysis of a sensing scheme for the antipsychotic clozapine. We have previously demonstrated a novel detection approach for this redox-active drug, highly effective in schizophrenia treatment, based on a catechol-modified chitosan film. The biomaterial film enables amplification of the oxidative current generated by clozapine through redox cycling. Here, we study critical electrochemical and material aspects of the redox cycling system to overcome barriers in point-of-care monitoring in complex biological samples. Specifically, we explore the electrochemical parameter space, showing that enhanced sensing performance depends on the presence of a reducing mediator as well as the electrochemical technique applied. These factors account for up to 1.75-fold and 2.47-fold signal enhancement, respectively. Looking at potential interferents, we illustrate that the redox cycling system allows for differentiation between selected redox-active species, clozapine's structurally largely analogous metabolite norclozapine as well as the representative catecholamine dopamine. Furthermore, we investigate material stability and fouling with reuse as well as storage. We find no evidence of film fouling due to clozapine; slow overall biomaterial degradation with successive use accounts for a 2.2% absolute signal loss and can be controlled for. Storage of the redox cycling system appears feasible over weeks when kept in solution with only 0.26%/day clozapine signal degradation, while ambient air exposure of three or more days reduces performance by 58%. This study not only advances our understanding of the catechol-modified chitosan system, but also further establishes the viability of applying it toward sensing clozapine in a clinical setting. Such point-of-care monitoring will allow for broader use of clozapine by increasing convenience to patients as well as medical professionals, thus improving the lives of people affected by schizophrenia through personalized medicine. PMID:25383917

  16. Relative Efficiencies of Plasma Catechol Levels and Ratios for Neonatal Diagnosis of Menkes Disease

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Courtney S.; Kaler, Stephen G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Menkes disease is an X-linked recessive neurodevelopmental disorder resulting from mutation in a copper-transporting ATPase gene. Menkes disease can be detected by relatively high concentrations of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites compared to norepinephrine (NE) and its metabolites, presumably because dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) requires copper as a co-factor. The relative diagnostic efficiencies of levels of catechol analytes, alone or in combination, in neonates at genetic risk of Menkes disease have been unknown. Methods Plasma from 44 at-risk neonates less than 30 days old were assayed for DA, NE, and other catechols. Of the 44, 19 were diagnosed subsequently with Menkes disease, and 25 were unaffected. Results Compared to unaffected at-risk infants, those with Menkes disease had high plasma DA (P < 10?6) and low NE (P < 10?6) levels. Considered alone, neither DA nor NE levels had perfect sensitivity, whereas the ratio of DA:NE was higher in all affected than in all unaffected subjects (P = 2 10?8). Analogously, levels of the DA metabolite, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and the NE metabolite, dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG), were imperfectly sensitive, whereas the DOPAC:DHPG ratio was higher in all affected than in all unaffected subjects (P = 2 10?4). Plasma dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and the ratio of epinephrine (EPI):NE levels were higher in affected than in unaffected neonates (P = 0.0015; P = 0.013). Conclusions Plasma DA:NE and DOPAC:DHPG ratios are remarkably sensitive and specific for diagnosing Menkes disease in at-risk newborns. Affected newborns also have elevated DOPA and EPI:NE ratios, which decreased DBH activity alone cannot explain. PMID:19234788

  17. Formation and Processing of Secondary Organic Aerosol from Catechol as a Model for Atmospheric HULIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofner, Johannes; Krger, Heinz-Ulrich; Grothe, Hinrich; Zetzsch, Cornelius

    2010-05-01

    A particular fraction of the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) termed HUmic Like Substances (HULIS) attracted attention only recently in atmospheric aerosol, initiating a discourse about their aromaticity and other properties, such as reactivity and hygroscopicity. A major portion of HULIS originates from volatile organic compounds, which are formed by abiotic oxidation reactions involving mainly OH radicals, ozone, nitrogen oxides and possibly halogens. Subsequently, the particles provide surface for heterogeneous reactions with atmospheric trace gases. Thus, aerosol smog-chamber studies with appropriate precursors are needed to generate SOA with HULIS qualities in situ inside the smog chamber and study their possible interactions. Catechol and guaiacol were chosen as aromatic precursors for synthetic HULIS production. The SOA was produced in a 700 L aerosol smog chamber, equipped with a solar simulator. SOA formation from each precursor was investigated at simulated environmental conditions (humidity, light, and presence of oxidizers) and characterized with respect to HULIS properties by particle classifiers, Fourier Transform IR spectroscopy (by long-path absorption and attenuated total reflection), UV/VIS spectroscopy, high-resolution mass-spectroscopy and temperature-programmed-desorption mass-spectrometry. High-resolution imaging was obtained using Field Emission Gun Scanning Electron Microscopy (FEGSEM). After HULIS formation the aerosol particles were exposed to atmospheric halogen species to study their processing with those trace gases, released by sea salt-activation. Those investigations show that aromatic precursors like catechol and guaiacol are suitable to form synthetic HULIS for laboratory-scale measurements with physical and chemical properties described in literature. However, sunlight and relative humidity play a major role in particle production and composition of functional groups, which are the anchor points for heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry. Possible reaction pathways of those synthetic particles with atmospheric halogen species could be identified forming gaseous and solid halogenated compounds.

  18. Relationship between Disease Resistance and Rice Oxalate Oxidases in Transgenic Rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xian Yong; Nie, Zhuan Hua; Wang, Wen Juan; Leung, David W. M.; Xu, Da Gao; Chen, Bai Ling; Chen, Zhe; Zeng, Lie Xian; Liu, E. E.

    2013-01-01

    Differential expression of rice oxalate oxidase genes (OsOxO1-4) in rice leaves (Oryza sativa L.) in response to biotic stress was assayed using RT-PCR. OsOxO4 was induced transiently at 12 h in plants inoculated with the pathogens of bacterial blight and that of the wounding control. Inoculation with the rice blast pathogen induced OsOxO2 expression compared to the mock spray control. Overexpressing OsOxO1 or OsOxO4 in rice resulted in elevated transcript levels of the respective transgene as well as OsOxO3 in leaves compared to that in untransformed wild type (WT). In a line of RNA-i transgenic rice plants (i-12), expression of all four OsOxO genes except that of OsOxO2 was severely inhibited. Oxalate oxidase (OxO, EC 1.2.3.4) activity in plants overexpressing OsOxO1 or OsOxO4 was substantially higher than that in WT and the RNA-i lines. It was found that transgenic rice plants with substantially higher OxO activity were not more resistant to rice blast and bacterial blight than WT. In contrast, some RNA-i lines with less OxO activity seemed to be more resistant to rice blast while some overexpressing lines were more susceptible to rice blast than WT. Therefore, OxO might not be a disease resistance factor in rice. PMID:24205207

  19. Inhibitory effects of phenolics on xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Chang, W S; Chang, Y H; Lu, F J; Chiang, H C

    1994-01-01

    The stems of Bougainvillea spectabillis Wild (Nyctaginaceae) have been used in folk medicine against hepatitis. Spinasterol, 22, 23-dihydrospinasterol and caffeic acid were isolated from the plant stems and characterized. Caffeic acid has not been previously isolated from this plant but spinasterol has been isolated from the leaves. Caffeic acid was found to be the active principle exhibiting strong inhibition of xanthine oxidase in this study (IC50 = 39.21 microM). In order to study the structure-activity relationship of the phenolics as regards xanthine oxidase inhibition, twelve naturally occurring phenolics (esculetin, scopoletin, scoparone, barbaloin, berberine chloride, sinomenine, osthole, paeonol, honokiol, magnolol, methyleugenol and 6-gingerol) were tested for their inhibitory effects on xanthine oxidase. The results showed that esculetin displayed the strongest activity (IC50 = 28.4 microM), and induced competitive inhibition of the enzyme with respect to the substrate xanthine. The apparent inhibition constant (Ki) of esculetin was 2.369 x 10(-6) M. Since xanthine oxidase serum levels are increased in hepatic and brain tumors, caffeic acid and esculetin should be tested as anti-hepatitis or/and anticancer agents. PMID:8017853

  20. NADPH oxidase involvement in cellular integrity.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Neil; Takeda, Seiji; Shang, Zhonglin; Dark, Adeeba; Mortimer, Jennifer C; Brownlee, Colin; Dolan, Liam; Davies, Julia M

    2008-05-01

    NADPH oxidase activity is involved in plant adaptation and development. The reactive oxygen species sourced by NADPH oxidase activity may contribute to wall strength and protoplast volume adjustment. Root hair bulge apices of the NADPH oxidase mutant rhd2/Atrbohc were more robust than the kjk cellulose synthase mutant, but burst more readily than the wild type (WT). Root epidermal wall appeared impaired in rhd2/Atrbohc, as revealed by the number of protoplasts released by wall-degrading enzymes. Root hair bulges of rhd2/Atrbohc burst more than the WT when challenged in situ with hypo-osmotic low ionic strength medium. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity with diphenylene iodonium caused WT to phenocopy the rhd2/Atrbohc bursting in response to hypo-osmotic shock. This implicates RHD2/AtRBOHC in softening the cell wall to permit protoplast expansion. Overall, the results point to a role for RHD2/AtRBOHC in contributing to wall strength. PMID:18317797

  1. The First Mammalian Aldehyde Oxidase Crystal Structure

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Catarina; Mahro, Martin; Trinco, Jos; Carvalho, Alexandra T. P.; Ramos, Maria Joo; Terao, Mineko; Garattini, Enrico; Leimkhler, Silke; Romo, Maria Joo

    2012-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidases (AOXs) are homodimeric proteins belonging to the xanthine oxidase family of molybdenum-containing enzymes. Each 150-kDa monomer contains a FAD redox cofactor, two spectroscopically distinct [2Fe-2S] clusters, and a molybdenum cofactor located within the protein active site. AOXs are characterized by broad range substrate specificity, oxidizing different aldehydes and aromatic N-heterocycles. Despite increasing recognition of its role in the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics, the physiological function of the protein is still largely unknown. We have crystallized and solved the crystal structure of mouse liver aldehyde oxidase 3 to 2.9 ?. This is the first mammalian AOX whose structure has been solved. The structure provides important insights into the protein active center and further evidence on the catalytic differences characterizing AOX and xanthine oxidoreductase. The mouse liver aldehyde oxidase 3 three-dimensional structure combined with kinetic, mutagenesis data, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics studies make a decisive contribution to understand the molecular basis of its rather broad substrate specificity. PMID:23019336

  2. Characterization of Recombinant Lysyl Oxidase Propeptide

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Siddharth R.; Guo, Ying; Stephens, Danielle N.; Salih, Erdjan; Vu, Emile D.; Kirsch, Kathrin H.; Sonenshein, Gail E.; Trackman, Philip C.

    2010-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase enzyme activity is critical for the biosynthesis of mature and functional collagens and elastin. In addition, lysyl oxidase has tumor suppressor activity that has been shown to depend on the propeptide region (LOX-PP) derived from pro-lysyl oxidase (Pro-LOX), and not on lysyl oxidase enzyme activity. Pro-LOX is secreted as a 50 kDa proenzyme, and then undergoes biosynthetic proteolytic processing to active ~30 kDa LOX enzyme and LOX-PP. The present study reports the efficient recombinant expression and purification of rat LOX-PP. Moreover, using enzymatic deglycosylation and DTT derivatization combined with mass spectrometry technologies, it is shown for the first time that rLOX-PP and naturally occurring LOX-PP contain both N- and O-linked carbohydrates. Structure predictions furthermore suggest that LOX-PP is a mostly disordered protein, which was experimentally confirmed in circular dichroism studies. Due to its high isoelectric point and its disordered structure, we propose that LOX-PP can associate with extracellular and intracellular binding partners to affect its known biological activities as a tumor suppressor and inhibitor of cell proliferation. PMID:20192271

  3. Regulation of NADPH Oxidase Activity in Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Debeurme, Franck; Picciocchi, Antoine; Dagher, Marie-Claire; Grunwald, Didier; Beaumel, Sylvain; Fieschi, Franck; Stasia, Marie-Jos

    2010-01-01

    The X+-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X+-CGD) variants are natural mutants characterized by defective NADPH oxidase activity but with normal Nox2 expression. According to the three-dimensional model of the cytosolic Nox2 domain, most of the X+-CGD mutations are located in/or close to the FAD/NADPH binding regions. A structure/function study of this domain was conducted in X+-CGD PLB-985 cells exactly mimicking 10 human variants: T341K, C369R, G408E, G408R, P415H, P415L, ?507QKT509-HIWAinsert, C537R, L546P, and E568K. Diaphorase activity is defective in all these mutants. NADPH oxidase assembly is normal for P415H/P415L and T341K mutants where mutation occurs in the consensus sequences of NADPH- and FAD-binding sites, respectively. This is in accordance with their buried position in the three-dimensional model of the cytosolic Nox2 domain. FAD incorporation is abolished only in the T341K mutant explaining its absence of diaphorase activity. This demonstrates that NADPH oxidase assembly can occur without FAD incorporation. In addition, a defect of NADPH binding is a plausible explanation for the diaphorase activity inhibition in the P415H, P415L, and C537R mutants. In contrast, Cys-369, Gly-408, Leu-546, and Glu-568 are essential for NADPH oxidase complex assembly. However, according to their position in the three-dimensional model of the cytosolic domain of Nox2, only Cys-369 could be in direct contact with cytosolic factors during oxidase assembly. In addition, the defect in oxidase assembly observed in the C369R, G408E, G408R, and E568K mutants correlates with the lack of FAD incorporation. Thus, the NADPH oxidase assembly process and FAD incorporation are closely related events essential for the diaphorase activity of Nox2. PMID:20724480

  4. Structure–function characterization reveals new catalytic diversity in the galactose oxidase and glyoxal oxidase family

    PubMed Central

    Yin, DeLu (Tyler); Urresti, Saioa; Lafond, Mickael; Johnston, Esther M.; Derikvand, Fatemeh; Ciano, Luisa; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Henrissat, Bernard; Walton, Paul H.; Davies, Gideon J.; Brumer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol oxidases, including carbohydrate oxidases, have a long history of research that has generated fundamental biological understanding and biotechnological applications. Despite a long history of study, the galactose 6-oxidase/glyoxal oxidase family of mononuclear copper-radical oxidases, Auxiliary Activity Family 5 (AA5), is currently represented by only very few characterized members. Here we report the recombinant production and detailed structure–function analyses of two homologues from the phytopathogenic fungi Colletotrichum graminicola and C. gloeosporioides, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx, respectively, to explore the wider biocatalytic potential in AA5. EPR spectroscopy and crystallographic analysis confirm a common active-site structure vis-à-vis the archetypal galactose 6-oxidase from Fusarium graminearum. Strikingly, however, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx are essentially incapable of oxidizing galactose and galactosides, but instead efficiently catalyse the oxidation of diverse aliphatic alcohols. The results highlight the significant potential of prospecting the evolutionary diversity of AA5 to reveal novel enzyme specificities, thereby informing both biology and applications. PMID:26680532

  5. Structure-function characterization reveals new catalytic diversity in the galactose oxidase and glyoxal oxidase family.

    PubMed

    Yin, DeLu Tyler; Urresti, Saioa; Lafond, Mickael; Johnston, Esther M; Derikvand, Fatemeh; Ciano, Luisa; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Henrissat, Bernard; Walton, Paul H; Davies, Gideon J; Brumer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol oxidases, including carbohydrate oxidases, have a long history of research that has generated fundamental biological understanding and biotechnological applications. Despite a long history of study, the galactose 6-oxidase/glyoxal oxidase family of mononuclear copper-radical oxidases, Auxiliary Activity Family 5 (AA5), is currently represented by only very few characterized members. Here we report the recombinant production and detailed structure-function analyses of two homologues from the phytopathogenic fungi Colletotrichum graminicola and C. gloeosporioides, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx, respectively, to explore the wider biocatalytic potential in AA5. EPR spectroscopy and crystallographic analysis confirm a common active-site structure vis--vis the archetypal galactose 6-oxidase from Fusarium graminearum. Strikingly, however, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx are essentially incapable of oxidizing galactose and galactosides, but instead efficiently catalyse the oxidation of diverse aliphatic alcohols. The results highlight the significant potential of prospecting the evolutionary diversity of AA5 to reveal novel enzyme specificities, thereby informing both biology and applications. PMID:26680532

  6. Combination Patterns of Major R Genes Determine the Level of Resistance to the M. oryzae in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ling; Pan, Cunhong; Li, Yuhong; Zhang, Xiaoxiang; Liu, Guangqing; Dai, Zhengyuan; Pan, Xuebiao; Li, Aihong

    2015-01-01

    Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is the most devastating disease of rice and poses a serious threat to world food security. In this study, the distribution and effectiveness of 18 R genes in 277 accessions were investigated based on pathogenicity assays and molecular markers. The results showed that most of the accessions exhibited some degree of resistance (resistance frequency, RF >50%). Accordingly, most of the accessions were observed to harbor two or more R genes, and the number of R genes harbored in accessions was significantly positively correlated with RF. Some R genes were demonstrated to be specifically distributed in the genomes of rice sub-species, such as Pigm, Pi9, Pi5 and Pi1, which were only detected in indica-type accessions, and Pik and Piz, which were just harbored in japonica-type accessions. By analyzing the relationship between R genes and RF using a multiple stepwise regression model, the R genes Pid3, Pi5, Pi9, Pi54, Pigm and Pit were found to show the main effects against M. oryzae in indica-type accessions, while Pita, Pb1, Pik, Pizt and Pia were indicated to exhibit the main effects against M. oryzae in japonica-type accessions. Principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis revealed that combination patterns of major R genes were the main factors determining the resistance of rice varieties to M. oryzae, such as ‘Pi9+Pi54’, ‘Pid3+Pigm’, ‘Pi5+Pid3+Pigm’, ‘Pi5+Pi54+Pid3+Pigm’, ‘Pi5+Pid3’ and ‘Pi5+Pit+Pid3’ in indica-type accessions and ‘Pik+Pib’, ‘Pik+Pita’, ‘Pik+Pb1’, ‘Pizt+Pia’ and ‘Pizt+Pita’ in japonica-type accessions, which were able to confer effective resistance against M. oryzae. The above results provide good theoretical support for the rational utilization of combinations of major R genes in developing rice cultivars with broad-spectrum resistance. PMID:26030358

  7. Aspergillus oryzae NRRL 35191 from coffee, a non-toxigenic endophyte with the ability to synthesize kojic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus oryzae was isolated as an endophyte from coffee leaves and found to produce kojic acid in culture. When inoculated in cacao seedlings (Theobroma cacao L.), A. oryzae grew endophytically and synthesize kojic acid in planta. Cacao seedlings inoculated with A. oryzae produced higher levels...

  8. Instability of the Magnaporthe oryzae Avirulence gene AVR-Pita alters virulence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The avirulence gene AVR-Pita of Magnaporthe oryzae determines the efficacy of the resistance gene Pi-ta in rice. The structures of the AVR-Pita alleles in 39 US isolates of M. oryzae were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction. A series of allele-specific primers were developed from the AVR-Pita...

  9. Analysis of genomic variation of rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta in oryza species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The resistance gene Pi-ta in rice has been deployed worldwide to prevent the infection by the blast pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae. The genomic region spanning Pi-ta in 144 accessions composed of seven Oryza species has been sequenced to determine DNA sequence variation of Pi-ta. Presently, three si...

  10. Identification, Biochemical Characterization, and Evolution of the Rhizopus oryzae 99-880 Polygalacturonase Gene Family

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A search of the recently sequenced Rhizopus oryzae strain 99-880 genome database uncovered 18 putative polygalacturonase genes with 2 genes being identical and only 1 with similarity to a previously reported R. oryzae polygalacturonase gene. The 17 different genes share 50% to greater than 90% iden...

  11. Foliar and cane rot of Arundo donax caused by Nigrospora oryzae in Europe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A fungus was isolated consistently from dead shoot tips and flag leaves of Arundo donax L. (Poaceae) in France, Crete, Cyprus, Italy, Morocco, and Spain during April through September of 2003 to 2005. The fungus was identified as Nigrospora oryzae (Berk. & Br.) Petch (teleomorph Khuskia oryzae) usi...

  12. Rubisco activity is associated with photosynthetic thermotolerance in a wild rice (Oryza meridionalis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oryza meridionalis is a wild species of rice, endemic to tropical Australia. It shares a significant genome homology with the common domesticated rice Oryza sativa. Exploiting the fact that the two species are highly related but O. meridionalis has superior heat tolerance, experiments were undertake...

  13. Characterization of field isolates of Magnaporthe oryzae with mating type, DNA fingerprinting, and pathogenicity assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the harmful nature of the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae, it is beneficial to characterize field isolates to help aid in the deployment of resistance (R) genes in rice. In the present study, 190 field isolates of M. oryzae, collected from rice fields of Yunnan province in China, were a...

  14. New insights into Oryza genome evolution: high gene colinearity and differential retrotransposon amplification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genomic region (~247kb) from an FF genome, wild Oryza species, O. brachyantha L., was sequenced and compared to the orthologous region (~450 kb) from AA genome rice, O. sativa L. ssp japonica ¬ the first such comparison reported between cultivated Oryza and a distantly related wild species. Among ...

  15. Alternatively spliced transcripts of Pi-ta blast resistance gene in Oryza sativa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pi-ta gene in rice (Oryza sativa L.) confers resistance to races of Magnaporthe oryzae containing its cognate avirulence gene AVR-Pita. Pi-ta is a single-copy gene belonging to the nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) class of plant resistance (R) genes. In the present study, w...

  16. Resistance among U.S. wheat Triticum aestivum cultivars to the wheat pathotype of Magnaporthe oryzae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Magnaporthe oryzae is the causal agent of blast on several graminaceous plants. The M. oryzae population causing wheat blast has not been found outside South America. U.S. wheat production is at risk to this pathogen if introduced and established. Proactive testing of US wheat cultivars for their re...

  17. Oryza rufipogon as a source of yield improvement in cultivated rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oryza rufipogon is a wild relative of the cultivated species, Oryza sativa, and has been found to possess genes associated with yield improvement and resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. We have been exploring the use of O. rufipogon as a genetic resource for yield improvement in the USA rice ...

  18. High Affinity Iron Permease is Required for Virulence of Rhizopus oryzae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizopus oryzae is the most common cause of mucormycosis. Clinical and animal model data clearly demonstrate that the presence of elevated available serum iron predisposes the host to develop mucormycosis. The high affinity iron permease gene (rFTR1) is required for R. oryzae iron transport in iro...

  19. Monoclonal antibodies to the alternative oxidase of higher plant mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Elthon, T.E.; Nickels, R.L.; McIntosh, L. )

    1989-04-01

    The higher plant mitochondrial electron transport chain contains, in addition to the cytochrome chain which terminates with cytochrome oxidase, an alternative pathway that terminates with an alternative oxidase. The alternative oxidase of Sauromatum guttatum Schott has recently been identified as a cluster of proteins with apparent M{sub r} of 37, 36, and 35 kilodaltons (kD). Monoclonal antibodies have now been prepared to these proteins and designated as AOA (binding all three proteins of the alternative oxidase cluster), AOU (binding the upper or 37 kD protein), and AOL (binding the lower or 36 and 35 kD proteins). All three antibodies bind to their respective alternative oxidase proteins whether the proteins are in their native or denatured states. AOA and AOU inhibit alternative oxidase activity around 49%, whereas AOL inhibits activity only 14%. When coupled individually to Sepharose 4B, all three monoclonal resins were capable of retaining the entire cluster of alternative oxidase proteins, suggesting that these proteins are physically associated in some manner. The monoclonals were capable of binding similar mitochondrial proteins in a number of thermogenic and nonthermogenic species, indicating that they will be useful in characterizing and purifying the alternative oxidase of different systems. The ability of the monoclonal-Sepharose 4B resins to retain the cluster of previously identified alternative oxidase proteins, along with the inhibition of alternative oxidase activity by these monoclonals, supports the role of these proteins in constituting the alternative oxidase.

  20. The rice endophyte Harpophora oryzae genome reveals evolution from a pathogen to a mutualistic endophyte

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xi-Hui; Su, Zhen-Zhu; Wang, Chen; Kubicek, Christian P.; Feng, Xiao-Xiao; Mao, Li-Juan; Wang, Jia-Ying; Chen, Chen; Lin, Fu-Cheng; Zhang, Chu-Long

    2014-01-01

    The fungus Harpophora oryzae is a close relative of the pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae and a beneficial endosymbiont of wild rice. Here, we show that H. oryzae evolved from a pathogenic ancestor. The overall genomic structures of H. and M. oryzae were found to be similar. However, during interactions with rice, the expression of 11.7% of all genes showed opposing trends in the two fungi, suggesting differences in gene regulation. Moreover, infection patterns, triggering of host defense responses, signal transduction and nutritional preferences exhibited remarkable differentiation between the two fungi. In addition, the H. oryzae genome was found to contain thousands of loci of transposon-like elements, which led to the disruption of 929 genes. Our results indicate that the gain or loss of orphan genes, DNA duplications, gene family expansions and the frequent translocation of transposon-like elements have been important factors in the evolution of this endosymbiont from a pathogenic ancestor. PMID:25048173

  1. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: guaiacol and catechol derivatives effectively inhibit certain human carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes (hCA I, II, IX and XII).

    PubMed

    Scozzafava, Andrea; Passaponti, Maurizio; Supuran, Claudiu T; Gülçin, İlhami

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are widespread metalloenzymes in higher vertebrates including humans. A series of phenolic compounds, including guaiacol, 4-methylguaiacol, 4-propylguaiacol, eugenol, isoeugenol, vanillin, syringaldehyde, catechol, 3-methyl catechol, 4-methyl catechol and 3-methoxy catechol were investigated for their inhibition of all the catalytically active mammalian isozymes of the Zn(2+)-containing CA (EC 4.2.1.1). All the phenolic compounds effectively inhibited human carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes (hCA I, II, IX and XII), with Kis in the range of 2.20-515.98 μM. The various isozymes showed diverse inhibition profiles. Among the tested phenolic derivatives, compounds 4-methyl catechol and 3-methoxy catechol showed potent activity as inhibitors of the tumour-associated transmembrane isoforms (hCA IX and XII) in the submicromolar range, with high selectivity. The results obtained from this research may lead to the design of more effective carbonic anhydrase isoenzyme inhibitors (CAIs) based on such phenolic compound scaffolds. PMID:25373500

  2. Poly(ethylene glycol) adlayers immobilized to metal oxide substrates through catechol derivatives: influence of assembly conditions on formation and stability.

    PubMed

    Malisova, Barbora; Tosatti, Samuele; Textor, Marcus; Gademann, Karl; Zrcher, Stefan

    2010-03-16

    We have investigated five different poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG, 5 kDa) catechol derivatives in terms of their spontaneous surface assembly from aqueous solution, adlayer stability, and resistance to nonspecific blood serum adsorption as a function of the type of catechol-based anchor, assembly conditions (temperature, pH), and type of substrate (SiO(2), TiO(2), Nb(2)O(5)). Variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) was used for layer thickness evaluation, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for layer composition, and ultraviolet-visible optical spectroscopy (UV-vis) for cloud point determination. Polymer surface coverage was influenced by the type of catechol anchor, type of the substrate, as well as pH and temperature (T) of the assembly solution. Furthermore, it was found to be highest for T close to the cloud point (T(CP)) and pH of the assembly solution close to pK(a1) (dissociation constant of the first catechol hydroxy group) of the polymer and to the isoelectric point (IEP) of the substrate. T(CP) turned out to depend on not only the ionic strength of the assembly solution, but also the type of catechol derivative and pH. PEG-coating dry thickness above 10 A correlated with low serum adsorption. We therefore conclude that optimum coating protocols for catechol-based polymer assembly at metal oxide interfaces have to take into account specific physicochemical properties of the polymer, anchor, and substrate. PMID:20146501

  3. Polymorphic minisatellites in the mitochondrial DNAs of Oryza and Brassica.

    PubMed

    Honma, Yujiro; Yoshida, Yu; Terachi, Toru; Toriyama, Kinya; Mikami, Tetsuo; Kubo, Tomohiko

    2011-08-01

    Polymorphic analyses of angiosperm mitochondrial DNA are rare in comparison with chloroplast DNA, because few target sequences in angiosperm mitochondrial DNA are known. Minisatellites, a tandem array of repeated sequences with a repeat unit of 10 to ~100bp, are popular target sequences of animal mitochondria, but Beta vulgaris is the only known angiosperm species for which such an analysis has been conducted. From this lack of information, it was uncertain as to whether polymorphic minisatellites existed in other angiosperm species. Ten plant mitochondrial DNAs were found to contain minisatellite-like repeated sequences, most of which were located in intergenic regions but a few occurred in gene coding and intronic regions. Oryza and Brassica accessions were selected as models for the investigation of minisatellite polymorphism because substantial systematic information existed. PCR analysis of 42 Oryza accessions revealed length polymorphisms in four of the five minisatellites. The mitochondrial haplotypes of the 16 Oryza accessions with chromosomal complement (genome) types of CC, BBCC and CCDD were identical but were clearly distinguished from BB-genome accessions, a result consistent with the notion that the cytoplasmic donor parent of the amphidiploid species might be the CC-genome species. Twenty-nine accessions of six major cultivated species of Brassica were classified into five mitochondrial haplotypes based on two polymorphic minisatellites out of six loci. The haplotypes of Brassica juncea and Brassica carinata accessions were identical to Brassica rapa and Brassica nigra accessions, respectively. The haplotypes of Brassica napus accessions were heterogeneous and unique, results that were consistent with previous studies. PMID:21562713

  4. [Expression of endopolygalacturonase A of Aspergillus oryzae in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Ling; Zhao, Qing-Xin; Zhu, Hong; Sun, Jing; Han, Feng-Min; Yuan, Sheng

    2007-01-01

    Pectinases are mainly used in the food industry to clarify fruit juices and wine, improve oil extraction, remove the peel from the citrus fruit, increase the firmness of some fruits and degum fibres. The filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae, used for the production of traditional fermented foods, only could produce less pectinases under general conditions. So far only a few of PGs expressed in yeast or E. coli were reported but they did not show higher activity. The cDNA of mature PGA (without signal peptide) was synthesized with specific primers from total RNA of Aspergillus oryzae by RT-PCR. PGA cDNA was ligated into pET-28a( + ) expression vector, creating plasmid pET-28a( + )-pgA. The plasmid pET-28a( + )-pgA was transformed into E. coli Turner (DE3) plac I cells to express PGA heterogeneously. For improving the efficiency of PGA expression in E. coli, the conditions for expression of the PGA in E. coli were optimized. E. coli Turner (DE3) plac I cells with pET-28a( + )-pgA was first cultivated at 37 degrees, 220r/min until OD600nm reached about 0.8. Then, cultivation broth was added with 0.5 mmol/L IPTG and incubated at 15 degrees C, 170r/min for other 24 h for induced-expression of PGA. Our data showed that the activity of recombinant expressed PGA could reach to 70u/mL medium, which is 87.5-fold of the activity of PGA produced in culture of A. oryzae and superior than known recombinant expression amount of PGA reported by other researchers. PMID:17366896

  5. The RpfB-Dependent Quorum Sensing Signal Turnover System Is Required for Adaptation and Virulence in Rice Bacterial Blight Pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing-Yu; Zhou, Lian; Yang, Jun; Ji, Guang-Hai; He, Ya-Wen

    2016-03-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the bacterial blight pathogen of rice, produces diffusible signal factor (DSF) family quorum sensing signals to regulate virulence. The biosynthesis and perception of DSF family signals require components of the rpf (regulation of pathogenicity factors) cluster. In this study, we report that RpfB plays an essential role in DSF family signal turnover in X. oryzae pv. oryzae PXO99A. The production of DSF family signals was boosted by deletion of the rpfB gene and was abolished by its overexpression. The RpfC/RpfG-mediated DSF signaling system negatively regulates rpfB expression via the global transcription regulator Clp, whose activity is reversible in the presence of cyclic diguanylate monophosphate. These findings indicate that the DSF family signal turnover system in PXO99A is generally consistent with that in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. Moreover, this study has revealed several specific roles of RpfB in PXO99A. First, the rpfB deletion mutant produced high levels of DSF family signals but reduced extracellular polysaccharide production, extracellular amylase activity, and attenuated pathogenicity. Second, the rpfB/rpfC double-deletion mutant was partially deficient in xanthomonadin production. Taken together, the RpfB-dependent DSF family signal turnover system is a conserved and naturally presenting signal turnover system in Xanthomonas spp., which plays unique roles in X. oryzae pv. oryzae adaptation and pathogenesis. PMID:26667598

  6. Hydrogen Bonding Controls the Dynamics of Catechol Adsorbed on a TiO2(110) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebold, Ulrike; Li, Shao-Chun; Chu, Li-Na; Gong, Xue-Qing

    2011-03-01

    Direct studies of how organic molecules diffuse on metal oxide surfaces can provide insights into catalysis and molecular assembly processes. We studied individual catechol molecules, C6 H4 (OH)2 , on a rutile Ti O2 (110) surface with scanning tunnelingmicroscopy. Surface hydroxyls enhanced the diffusivity of adsorbed catecholates. The capture and release of a proton caused individual molecules to switch between mobile and immobile states within a measurement period of minutes. Density functional theory calculations showed that the transfer of hydrogen from surface hydroxyls to the molecule and its interaction with surface hydroxyls substantially lowered the activation barrier for rotational motion across the surface. Hydrogen bonding can play an essential role in the initial stages of the dynamics of molecular assembly.

  7. In Situ Synthesis of Antimicrobial Silver Nanoparticles within Antifouling Zwitterionic Hydrogels by Catecholic Redox Chemistry for Wound Healing Application.

    PubMed

    GhavamiNejad, Amin; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2016-03-14

    A multifunctional hydrogel that combines the dual functionality of both antifouling and antimicrobial capacities holds great potential for many bioapplications. Many approaches and different materials have been employed to synthesize such a material. However, a systematic study, including in vitro and in vivo evaluation, on such a material as wound dressings is highly scarce at present. Herein, we report on a new strategy that uses catecholic chemistry to synthesize antimicrobial silver nanoparticles impregnated into antifouling zwitterionic hydrogels. For this purpose, hydrophobic dopamine methacrylamide monomer (DMA) was mixed in an aqueous solution of sodium tetraborate decahydrate and DMA monomer became soluble after increasing pH to 9 due to the complexation between catechol groups and boron. Then, cross-linking polymerization of zwitterionic monomer was carried out with the solution of the protected dopamine monomer to produce a new hydrogel. When this new hydrogel comes in contact with a silver nitrate solution, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are formed in its structure as a result of the redox property of the catechol groups and in the absence of any other external reducing agent. The results obtained from TEM and XRD measurements indicate that AgNPs with diameters of around 20 nm had formed within the networks. FESEM images confirmed that the silver nanoparticles were homogeneously incorporated throughout the hydrogel network, and FTIR spectroscopy demonstrated that the catechol moiety in the polymeric backbone of the hydrogel is responsible for the reduction of silver ions into the AgNPs. Finally, the in vitro and in vivo experiments suggest that these mussel-inspired, antifouling, antibacterial hydrogels have great potential for use in wound healing applications. PMID:26891456

  8. Xanthine dehydrogenase to xanthine oxidase conversion in ischemic rat intestine

    SciTech Connect

    McKelvey, T.G.; Engerson, T.D.; Elmore, C.R.; Jones, H.P. )

    1990-02-26

    The ischemic conversion of the NADH-producing xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) to an oxidase form, that produces both superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide, has been proposed as an important step in initiating oxygen radical-mediated ischemia-reperfusion injury. It has also been reported that two forms of converted oxidase are produced in ischemic rat liver; a reversible xanthine oxidase produced through sulfhydryl oxidation, that can be reconverted to XDH by incubation with 10mM dithiothreitol (Dtt) at 37{degrees}C, and a Dtt-irreversible oxidase produced via proteolysis. The authors report that increased oxidase in the ischemic rat intestine results from significant increases in both the Dtt-reversible and Dtt-irreversible forms of xanthine oxidase. Total oxidase activity (Irreversible + Dtt-reversible) was 19% of the total enzyme activity (XDH + XO) in control ileum and distal jejunum, increased to 26% after 1 hour of ischemia at 37{degrees}C, and significantly to 36% after 1.5 hours. After 3 hours 73% of the activity was in the oxidase form. Irreversible oxidase comprised 15% of the total activity in control intestine, significantly increased to 25% after 2 hours, and further to 42% after 3 hours. Dtt-reversible oxidase was 3% of the total activity in controls, increased to 13% after 1.5 hours, and significantly to 29% after 2 hours.

  9. Natural Compounds as Modulators of NADPH Oxidases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are cellular signals generated ubiquitously by all mammalian cells, but their relative unbalance triggers also diseases through intracellular damage to DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. NADPH oxidases (NOX) are the only known enzyme family with the sole function to produce ROS. The NOX physiological functions concern host defence, cellular signaling, regulation of gene expression, and cell differentiation. On the other hand, increased NOX activity contributes to a wide range of pathological processes, including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegeneration, organ failure, and cancer. Therefore targeting these enzymatic ROS sources by natural compounds, without affecting the physiological redox state, may be an important tool. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge of the role of NOX enzymes in physiology and pathology and provides an overview of the currently available NADPH oxidase inhibitors derived from natural extracts such as polyphenols. PMID:24381714

  10. Xanthine oxidase biosensor for monitoring meat spoilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanegas, D. C.; Gomes, C.; McLamore, E. S.

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we have designed an electrochemical biosensor for real-time detection of specific biomarkers of bacterial metabolism related to meat spoilage (hypoxanthine and xanthine). The selective biosensor was developed by assembling a `sandwich' of nanomaterials and enzymes on a platinum-iridium electrode (1.6 mm tip diameter). The materials deposited on the sensor tip include amorphous platinum nanoclusters (i.e. Pt black), reduced graphene oxide, nanoceria, and xanthine oxidase. Xanthine oxidase was encapsulated in laponite hydrogel and used for the biorecognition of hypoxanthine and xanthine (two molecules involved in the rotting of meat by spoilage microorganisms). The developed biosensor demonstrated good electrochemical performance toward xanthine with sensitivity of 2.14 +/- 1.48 ?A/mM, response time of 5.2 +/- 1.5 sec, lower detection limit of 150 +/- 39 nM, and retained at least 88% of its activity after 7 days of continuous use.

  11. Human copper-dependent amine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Finney, Joel; Moon, Hee-Jung; Ronnebaum, Trey; Lantz, Mason; Mure, Minae

    2014-03-15

    Copper amine oxidases (CAOs) are a class of enzymes that contain Cu(2+) and a tyrosine-derived quinone cofactor, catalyze the conversion of a primary amine functional group to an aldehyde, and generate hydrogen peroxide and ammonia as byproducts. These enzymes can be classified into two non-homologous families: 2,4,5-trihydroxyphenylalanine quinone (TPQ)-dependent CAOs and the lysine tyrosylquinone (LTQ)-dependent lysyl oxidase (LOX) family of proteins. In this review, we will focus on recent developments in the field of research concerning human CAOs and the LOX family of proteins. The aberrant expression of these enzymes is linked to inflammation, fibrosis, tumor metastasis/invasion and other diseases. Consequently, there is a critical need to understand the functions of these proteins at the molecular level, so that strategies targeting these enzymes can be developed to combat human diseases. PMID:24407025

  12. Biomimetic PEG-catecholates for stabile antifouling coatings on metal surfaces: applications on TiO2 and stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Faiza; Franzmann, Elisa; Ramcke, Julian; Dakischew, Olga; Lips, Katrin S; Reinhardt, Alexander; Heisig, Peter; Maison, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Trimeric catecholates have been designed for the stable immobilization of effector molecules on metal surfaces. The design of these catecholates followed a biomimetic approach and was inspired by natural multivalent metal binders, such as mussel adhesion proteins (MAPs) and siderophores. Three catecholates have been conjugated to central scaffolds based on adamantyl or trisalkylmethyl core structures. The resulting triscatecholates have been immobilized on TiO2 and stainless steel. In a proof of concept study we have demonstrated the high stability of the resulting nanolayers at neutral and slightly acidic pH. Furthermore, polyethylene glycol (PEG) conjugates of our triscatecholates have been synthesized and were immobilized on TiO2 and stainless steel. The PEG coated surfaces showed excellent antifouling properties upon exposure to human blood and bacteria as demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy, ellipsometry and a bacterial assay with Staphylococcus epidermidis. In addition, our PEG-triscatecholates showed no cytotoxicity against bone-marrow stem cells on TiO2. PMID:24632391

  13. Diazonium modification of porous graphitic carbon with catechol and amide groups for hydrophilic interaction and attenuated reversed phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Chad D; Zhang, Ya; Lucy, Charles A

    2015-11-27

    Porous graphitic carbon (PGC) is an increasingly popular and attractive phase for HPLC on account of its chemical and thermal stability, and its unique separation mechanism. However, native PGC is strongly hydrophobic and in some instances excessively retentive. As part of our effort to build a library of hydrophilic covalently modified PGC phases, we functionalized PGC with catechol and amide groups by means of aryl diazonium chemistry to produce two new phases. Successful grafting was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Under HILIC conditions, the Catechol-PGC showed up to 5-fold increased retention relative to unmodified PGC and selectivity that differed from four other HILIC phases. Under reversed phase conditions, the Amide-PGC reduced the retentivity of PGC by almost 90%. The chromatographic performance of Catechol-PGC and Amide-PGC is demonstrated by separations of nucleobases, nucleosides, phenols, alkaline pharmaceuticals, and performance enhancing stimulants. These compounds had retention factors (k) ranging from 0.5 to 13. PMID:26506445

  14. Cloning and expression of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus catechol 1,2-dioxygenase structural gene catA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Neidle, E L; Ornston, L N

    1986-01-01

    Catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (EC 1.13.1.1), the product of the catA gene, catalyzes the first step in catechol utilization via the beta-ketoadipate pathway. Enzymes mediating subsequent steps in the pathway are encoded by the catBCDE genes which are carried on a 5-kilobase-pair (kbp) EcoRI restriction fragment isolated from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. This DNA was used as a probe to identify Escherichia coli colonies carrying recombinant pUC19 plasmids with overlapping sequences. Repetition of the procedure yielded an A. calcoaceticus 6.7-kbp EcoRI restriction fragment which contained the catA gene and bordered the original 5-kbp EcoRI restriction fragment. When the catA-containing fragment was placed under the control of the lac promoter on pUC19 and induced with isopropylthiogalactopyranoside, catechol dioxygenase was formed in E. coli at twice the level found in fully induced cultures of A. calcoaceticus. A. calcoaceticus strains with mutations in the catA gene were transformed to wild type by DNA from lysates of E. coli strains carrying the catA gene on recombinant plasmids. Thus, A. calcoaceticus strains with a mutated gene can be used in a transformation assay to identify E. coli clones in which at least part of the wild-type gene is present but not necessarily expressed. Images PMID:3536862

  15. A synthesis of the phenolic lipid, 3-[(Z)-pentadec-8-enyl] catechol, (15:1)-urushiol.

    PubMed

    Tyman, John H P; Schofield, Brian G; Khor, Choong H

    2002-12-01

    A synthesis of (15:1)-urushiol, urushiol monoene, 3-[(Z)-pentadec-8-enyl] catechol, 1,2-dihydroxy-3-[(Z)-pentadec-8-enyl] benzene, one of the toxic principles of Rhus toxicodendron and of Rhus vernicifera is described. 6-Chlorohexan-1-ol protected at the OH group with ethyl vinyl ether reacted with 2,3-dimethoxybenzaldehyde in the presence of lithium to give, after removal of the protective group with methanolic 4-toluenesulphonic acid, 1-(2,3-dimethoxyphenyl) heptane-1,7-diol. Catalytic hydrogenolysis in ethanol with palladium-carbon selectively afforded 7-(2,3-dimethoxyphenyl)heptane-1-ol accompanied by a small proportion of the 7-(3-methoxyphenyl)heptane-1-diol, formed by demethoxylation. Reaction of the dimethoxy compound with boron tribromide resulted in both bromination and demethylation to give 7-(2,3-dihydroxyphenyl) heptylbromide. This bromide in tetrahydrofuran (THF) containing hexamethylphosphoric triamide reacted with excess lithium oct-1-yne to give 3-(pentadec-8-enyl)catechol which, by catalytic hydrogenation in ethyl acetate containing quinoline, selectively formed the required cis product, 3-[(Z)-pentadec-8-enyl]catechol which was identical chromatographically and spectroscopically with urushiol monoene separated from the natural product. PMID:12426079

  16. A solid-state electrochemiluminescence sensing platform for detection of catechol based on novel luminescent composite nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoying; Wang, Xiaobing; Gao, Sumeng; Zheng, Yi; Tang, Meng; Chen, Baoan

    2013-03-30

    A solid-state electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensing platform based on the novel luminescent composite nanofibers for detection of catechol has been developed. The carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and ruthenium(II) tris-(bipyridine) (Ru(bpy)3(2+)) doped nylon 6 (PA6) luminescent composite nanofibers (Ru-MWNTs-PA6) were successfully fabricated by a one-step electrospinning technique. The Ru-MWNTs-PA6 nanofibers, with unique 3D nanostructure, large specific surface area and a larger amount of immobilized-Ru(bpy)3(2+), maintained the photoelectric properties of the Ru(bpy)3(2+) ions and exhibited excellent ECL behaviors on glassy carbon (GC) electrode. As a solid-state ECL sensing platform, the Ru-MWNTs-PA6 nanofibers can sensitively detect low concentration catechol by monitoring the phenol-dependent ECL intensity change. The detection limit for catechol is 1.0 nM, which is comparable or better than that in the reported assays. The solid-state ECL sensor displayed wide linear range, high sensitivity and good stability. It holds promise for the electrospun nanofibers-based ECL sensors have a great potential for routine analyses. PMID:23598202

  17. Amperometric catechol biosensor based on laccase immobilized on nitrogen-doped ordered mesoporous carbon (N-OMC)/PVA matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Meiqing; Wang, Hefeng; Huang, Di; Han, Zhijun; Li, Qiang; Wang, Xiaojun; Chen, Jing

    2014-06-01

    A functionalized nitrogen-containing ordered mesoporous carbon (N-OMC), which shows good electrical properties, was synthesized by the carbonization of polyaniline inside a SBA-15 mesoporous silica template. Based on this, through entrapping laccase onto the N-OMC/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) film a facilely fabricated amperometric biosensor was developed. Laccase from Trametes versicolor was assembled on a composite film of a N-OMC/PVA modified Au electrode and the electrochemical behavior was investigated. The results indicated that the N-OMC modified electrode exhibits electrical properties towards catechol. The optimum experimental conditions of a biosensor for the detection of catechol were studied in detail. Under the optimal conditions, the sensitivity of the biosensor was 0.29 A*M-1 with a detection limit of 0.31 μM and a linear detection range from 0.39 μM to 8.98 μM for catechol. The calibration curve followed the Michaelis-Menten kinetics and the apparent Michaelis-Menten \\left( K_{M}^{app} \\right) was 6.28 μM. This work demonstrated that the N-OMC/PVA composite provides a suitable support for laccase immobilization and the construction of a biosensor.

  18. Iron(III)-chelating properties of the novel catechol O-methyltransferase inhibitor entacapone in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Orama, M; Tilus, P; Taskinen, J; Lotta, T

    1997-07-01

    The iron(III) complex formation of entacapone, a novel catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitor, has been studied at 25 degrees C in aqueous 0.1 mol/L NaCl solution by using the electromotive force titration method. Entacapone functions as a bidentate ligand chelating through the catecholate oxygen atoms and forms stable iron(III) complexes with the formation constant of a tris complex: log beta-613 ([FeL3(3-)][H]6+/[Fe3+][H2L]3) = -6.9 +/- 0.1. Distribution curves show that entacapone is highly effective for iron(III) in moderately dilute solution (10(-3) mol/L) whereas in very dilute solution (10(-6) mol/L) the iron hydroxo complexes together with FeL3(3-) dominate under physiological pH 7.4. Comparison of iron(III) species distribution in a competitive two-ligand entacapone-catechol system reveals that the complexation of entacepone is favored at high and low dilution. PMID:9232524

  19. Evidence for Biotrophic Lifestyle and Biocontrol Potential of Dark Septate Endophyte Harpophora oryzae to Rice Blast Disease

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhen-Zhu; Mao, Li-Juan; Li, Na; Feng, Xiao-Xiao; Yuan, Zhi-Lin; Wang, Li-Wei; Lin, Fu-Cheng; Zhang, Chu-Long

    2013-01-01

    The mutualism pattern of the dark septate endophyte (DSE) Harpophora oryzae in rice roots and its biocontrol potential in rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae were investigated. Fluorescent protein-expressing H. oryzae was used to monitor the colonization pattern. Hyphae invaded from the epidermis to the inner cortex, but not into the root stele. Fungal colonization increased with root tissue maturation, showing no colonization in the meristematic zone, slight colonization in the elongation zone, and heavy colonization in the differentiation zone. H. oryzae adopted a biotrophic lifestyle in roots accompanied by programmed cell death. Real-time PCR facilitated the accurate quantification of fungal growth and the respective plant response. The biocontrol potential of H. oryzae was visualized by inoculation with eGFP-tagged M. oryzae in rice. H. oryzae protected rice from M. oryzae root invasion by the accumulation of H2O2 and elevated antioxidative capacity. H. oryzae also induced systemic resistance against rice blast. This systemic resistance was mediated by the OsWRKY45-dependent salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway, as indicated by the strongly upregulated expression of OsWRKY45. The colonization pattern of H. oryzae was consistent with the typical characteristics of DSEs. H. oryzae enhanced local resistance by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and high antioxidative level and induced OsWRKY45-dependent SA-mediated systemic resistance against rice blast. PMID:23637814

  20. Ligand interactions with galactose oxidase: mechanistic insights.

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, M M; Whittaker, J W

    1993-01-01

    Interactions between galactose oxidase and small molecules have been explored using a combination of optical absorption, circular dichroism, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies to detect complex formation and characterize the products. Anions bind directly to the cupric center in both active and inactive galactose oxidase, converting to complexes with optical and EPR spectra that are distinctly different from those of the starting aquo enzyme. Azide binding is coupled to stoichiometric proton uptake by the enzyme, reflecting the generation of a strong base (pKa > 9) in the active site anion adduct. At low temperature, the aquo enzyme converts to a form that exhibits the characteristic optical and EPR spectra of an anion complex, apparently reflecting deprotonation of the coordinated water. Anion binding results in a loss of the optical transition arising from coordinated tyrosine, implying displacement of the axial tyrosine ligand on forming the adduct. Nitric oxide binds to galactose oxidase, forming a specific complex exhibiting an unusual EPR spectrum with all g values below 2. The absence of Cu splitting in this spectrum and the observation that the cupric EPR signal from the active site metal ion is not significantly decreased in the complex suggest a nonmetal interaction site for NO in galactose oxidase. These results have been interpreted in terms of a mechanistic scheme where substrate binding displaces a tyrosinate ligand from the active site cupric ion, generating a base that may serve to deprotonate the coordinated hydroxyl group of the substrate, activating it for oxidation. The protein-NO interactions may probe a nonmetal O2 binding site in this enzyme. PMID:8386015

  1. Imaging Monoamine Oxidase in the Human Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J. S.; Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G-J.; Logan, Jean

    1999-11-10

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies mapping monoamine oxidase in the human brain have been used to measure the turnover rate for MAO B; to determine the minimum effective dose of a new MAO inhibitor drug lazabemide and to document MAO inhibition by cigarette smoke. These studies illustrate the power of PET and radiotracer chemistry to measure normal biochemical processes and to provide information on the effect of drug exposure on specific molecular targets.

  2. Arabidopsis alternative oxidase sustains Escherichia coli respiration.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A M; Sll, D

    1992-11-15

    Glutamyl-tRNA reductase, encoded by the hemA gene, is the first enzyme in porphyrin biosynthesis in many organisms. Hemes, important porphyrin derivatives, are essential components of redox enzymes, such as cytochromes. Thus a hemA Escherichia coli strain (SASX41B) is deficient in cytochrome-mediated aerobic respiration. Upon complementation of this strain with an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library, we isolated a clone which permitted the SASX41B strain to grow aerobically. The clone encodes the gene for Arabidopsis alternative oxidase, whose deduced amino acid sequence was found to have 71% identity with that of the enzyme from the voodoo lily, Sauromatum guttatum. The Arabidopsis protein is expressed as a 31-kDa protein in E. coli and confers on this organism cyanide-resistant growth, which in turn is sensitive to salicylhydroxamate. This implies that a single polypeptide is sufficient for alternative oxidase activity. Based on these observations we propose that a cyanide-insensitive respiratory pathway operates in the transformed E. coli hemA strain. Introduction of this pathway now opens the way to genetic/molecular biological investigations of alternative oxidase and its cofactor. PMID:1438286

  3. Unique features of plant mitochondrial sulfhydryl oxidase.

    PubMed

    Levitan, Alexander; Danon, Avihai; Lisowsky, Thomas

    2004-05-01

    The yeast and human mitochondrial sulfhydryl oxidases of the Erv1/Alr family have been shown to be essential for the biogenesis of mitochondria and the cytosolic iron sulfur cluster assembly. In this study we identified a likely candidate for the first mitochondrial flavin-linked sulfhydryl oxidase of the Erv1-type from a photosynthetic organism. The central core of the plant enzyme (AtErv1) exhibits all of the characteristic features of the Erv1/Alr protein family, including a redox-active YPCXXC motif, noncovalently bound FAD, and sulfhydryl oxidase activity. Transient expression of fusion proteins of AtErv1 and the green fluorescence protein in plant protoplasts showed that the plant enzyme preferentially localizes to the mitochondria. Yet AtErv1 has several unique features, such as the presence of a CXXXXC motif in its carboxyl-terminal domain and the absence of an amino-terminally localized cysteine pair common to yeast and human Erv1/Alr proteins. In addition, the dimerization of AtErv1 is not mediated by its amino terminus but by its unique CXXXXC motif. In vitro assays with purified protein and artificial substrates demonstrate a preference of AtErv1 for dithiols with a defined space between the thiol groups, suggesting a thioredoxin-like substrate. PMID:14996837

  4. Peroxiredoxin-6 and NADPH oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Ambruso, Daniel R

    2013-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prdxs) are a family of proteins which catalyze the reduction of H2O2 through the interaction of active site cysteine residues. Conserved within all plant and animal kingdoms, the function of these proteins is related to protection from oxidation or participation of signaling through degradation of H2O2. Peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6), a protein belonging to the class of 1-cys Prdxs, was identified in polymorphonuclear leukocytes or neutrophils, defined by amino acid sequence and activity, and found associated with a component of the NADPH oxidase (Nox2), p67(phox). Prdx6 plays an important role in neutrophil function and supports the optimal activity of Nox2. In this chapter, methods are described for determining the Prdx activity of Prdx6. In addition, the approach for assessing the effect of Prdx6 on Nox2 in the SDS-activated, cell-free system of NADPH oxidase activity is presented. Finally, the techniques for suppressing Prdx6 expression in phox-competent K562 cells and cultured myeloid cells with siRNA and shRNA methods are described. With these approaches, the role of Prdx6 in Nox2 activity can be explored with intact cells. The biochemical mechanisms of the Prdx6 effect on the NADPH oxidase can be investigated with the experimental strategies described. PMID:23830630

  5. Purification and biochemical characterization of ionically unbound polyphenol oxidase from Musa paradisiaca leaf.

    PubMed

    Diwakar, Sanjeev Kumar; Mishra, Sarad Kumar

    2011-01-01

    An ionically unbound and thermostable polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was extracted from the leaf of Musa paradisiaca. The enzyme was purified 2.54-fold with a total yield of 9.5% by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration chromatography. The purified enzyme exhibited a clear single band on native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) PAGE. It was found to be monomeric protein with molecular mass of about 40 kD. The zymographic study using crude extract as enzyme source showed a very clear band around 40 kD and a faint band at around 15 kD, which might be isozymes. The enzyme was optimally active at pH 7.0 and 50C temperature. The enzyme was active in wide range of pH (4.0-9.0) and temperature (30-90C). From the thermal inactivation studies in the range 60-75C, the half-life (t(1/2)) values of the enzyme ranged from 17 to 77min. The inactivation energy (Ea) value of PPO was estimated to be 91.3kJ mol(-1). It showed higher specificity with catechol (K(m)=8mM) as compared to 4-methylcatechol (K(m)=10mM). Among metal ions and reagents tested, Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Hg(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), protocatechuic acid, and ferrulic acid enhanced the enzyme activity, while K(+), Na(+), Co(2+), kojic acid, ascorbic acid, ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), sodium azide, ?-mercaptoethanol, and L-cysteine inhibited the activity of the enzyme. PMID:21442554

  6. Toward understanding of rice innate immunity against Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Azizi, P; Rafii, M Y; Abdullah, S N A; Nejat, N; Maziah, M; Hanafi, M M; Latif, M A; Sahebi, M

    2016-02-01

    The blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae, causes serious disease on a wide variety of grasses including rice, wheat and barley. The recognition of pathogens is an amazing ability of plants including strategies for displacing virulence effectors through the adaption of both conserved and variable pathogen elicitors. The pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) were reported as two main innate immune responses in plants, where PTI gives basal resistance and ETI confers durable resistance. The PTI consists of extracellular surface receptors that are able to recognize PAMPs. PAMPs detect microbial features such as fungal chitin that complete a vital function during the organism's life. In contrast, ETI is mediated by intracellular receptor molecules containing nucleotide-binding (NB) and leucine rich repeat (LRR) domains that specifically recognize effector proteins produced by the pathogen. To enhance crop resistance, understanding the host resistance mechanisms against pathogen infection strategies and having a deeper knowledge of innate immunity system are essential. This review summarizes the recent advances on the molecular mechanism of innate immunity systems of rice against M. oryzae. The discussion will be centered on the latest success reported in plant-pathogen interactions and integrated defense responses in rice. PMID:25198435

  7. Enhanced acid tolerance of Rhizopus oryzae during fumaric acid production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Lv, Chunwei; Xu, Qing; Li, Shuang; Huang, He; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2015-02-01

    Ensuring a suitable pH in the culture broth is a major problem in microorganism-assisted industrial fermentation of organic acids. To address this issue, we investigated the physiological changes in Rhizopus oryzae at different extracellular pH levels and attempted to solve the issue of cell shortage under low pH conditions. We compared various parameters, such as membrane fatty acids' composition, intracellular pH, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration. It was found that the shortage of intracellular ATP might be the main reason for the low rate of fumaric acid production by R. oryzae under low pH conditions. When 1 g/l citrate was added to the culture medium at pH 3.0, the intracellular ATP concentration increased from 0.4 to 0.7 mol/mg, and the fumaric acid titer was enhanced by 63% compared with the control (pH 3.0 without citrate addition). The final fumaric acid concentration at pH 3.0 reached 21.9 g/l after 96 h of fermentation. This strategy is simple and feasible for industrial fumaric acid production under low pH conditions. PMID:25190324

  8. Expression of CENH3 alleles in synthesized allopolyploid Oryza species.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Lu, Li; Heng, Yanfang; Qin, Rui; Xing, Yongzhong; Jin, Weiwei

    2010-10-01

    Synthesized allopolyploids are valuable materials for comparative analyses of two or more distinct genomes, such as the expression changes (activation, inactivation or differential expression) of orthologous genes following allopolyploidization. CENH3 is a centromere- specific histone H3 variant and has been regarded as a central component in kinetochore formation and centromere function. In this study, interspecific hybrids of Oryza genus (AA CC, AA CCDD) and their backcross progenies were produced, and the genome constitutions were identified as AC, ACC, ACD, AACD, or AA(CD) by Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). We further cloned and sequenced the CENH3 genes from O. sativa (AA), O. officinalis (CC) and O. latifolia (CCDD). Sequencing of RT-PCR products revealed that CENH3_C2 and CENH3_D, the two CENH3 alleles from O. latifolia, showed polymorphism in several sites, while CENH3_C2 and CENH3_C1 from O. officinalis were different at only two amino acids positions. Moreover, we found that the CENH3 genes from both parents are expressed in interspecific hybrids and their progenies. Specifically, based on our cDNA sequencing data, the ratio of expression level between CENH3_A and CENH3_C1 was approximately 1 in AC and 0.5 in ACC genomes, respectively. As a result, the CENH3 expression patterns shed more light on the inter-coordination between varied centromeric DNA sequences and highly conserved kinetochore protein in synthesized allopolyploids of Oryza genus. PMID:21035096

  9. Cloning and expression of A. oryzae ?-glucosidase in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zizhong; Liu, Shan; Jing, Haijun; Sun, Rong; Liu, Moyang; Chen, Hui; Wu, Qi; Han, Xueyi

    2014-11-01

    A ?-glucosidase gene (bgl) from Aspergillus oryzae GIF-10 was cloned, sequenced and expressed. Its full-length DNA sequence was 2,903 bp and included three introns. The full-length cDNA sequence contained an open reading frame of 2,586 nucleotides, encoding 862 amino acids with a potential secretion signal. The A. oryzae GIF-10 bgl was functionally expressed in Pichia pastoris. After 7-day induction, protein yield reached 321 mg/mL. Using salicin as the substrate, the specific activity of the purified enzyme reached 215 U/mg. The purified recombinant ?-glucosidase was a 110-kDa glycoprotein with optimum catalytic activity at pH 5.0 and 50 C. The enzyme was stable between 20 and 60 C, and retained 65% of its activity after being held at 60 C for 30 min. The recombinant ?-glucosidase was relatively stable in a broad range of pHs, from 4.0 to 6.5. It showed broad specific activity, hydrolyzing a range of (1-4)-?-diglycosides and (1-4)-?-diglycosides, and Mn(2+) stimulated its activity significantly. PMID:25123895

  10. Safety evaluation of AMP deaminase from Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Okado, Nobuo; Sugi, Mai; Ueda, Maya; Mizuhashi, Fukutaro; Lynch, Barry S; Vo, Trung D; Roberts, Ashley S

    2015-12-01

    Adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP) deaminase is an enzyme used to increase concentrations of 5'-inosine monophosphate in certain foods and beverages for flavoring purposes. One commercial source of this enzyme is Aspergillus oryzae, a filamentous fungus with a history of safe use in Asia as a fermentation organism used in the production of miso sauce and sake liquors. Noting the use of the enzyme in food intended for human consumption and potential presence at trace levels in finished goods, a series of safety studies including an in vitro Ames test and chromosome aberration assay with Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts were conducted along with a 90-day oral toxicity study in rats. AMP deaminase showed no evidence of genotoxicity in the in vitro tests. Following gavage administration of Sprague-Dawley rats at dosages of 19.8, 198.4, or 1984 mg total organic solids (TOS)/kg body weight (bw)/day for 90 days, no adverse effects on body weight gain, food consumption, hematology, clinical chemistry, urinalysis, ophthalmological and histopathological examinations were observed. The no-observed-adverse-effect level was considered to be 1984 mg TOS/kg bw/day, the highest dose tested. Results of the genotoxicity studies and subchronic rat study support the safe use of AMP deaminase produced from A. oryzae in food production. PMID:26559900

  11. Some studies of alpha-amylase production using Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Esfahanibolandbalaie, Z; Rostami, K; Mirdamadi, S S

    2008-11-15

    The extracellular alpha-amylase production by Aspergillus oryzae was studied in submerged fermentation using an Adlof-Kuhner orbital shaker. The effect of initial pH values in the range of 4 to 7.5 on enzyme production was investigated and initial pH medium of 6.2 +/- 0.1 resulted in enhanced alpha-amylase production. The effect of carbon and nitrogen source and composition was examined and it has been observed that corn starch concentration of 15 g L(-1) has sound effect on enzyme production. The medium containing corn starch, sodium nitrate resulted in considerable higher enzyme production. Further, the yeast extract of 2.5 g L(-1) in the medium produced higher enzyme in view to other organic nitrogen sources. The effect of temperature on alpha-amylase production from 20 to 40 degrees C has been studied and at 35 +/- 1 degrees C higher alpha-amylase has been obtained. The effect of shaker's speed on alpha-amylase production from 50 to 200 rpm was investigated. And at about 180 rpm higher enzyme production has been observed. In the present study, it has been found that glucose has repressing effect on a-amylase production using A. oryzae PTCC5164. PMID:19260332

  12. Magnaporthe oryzae aminosugar metabolism is essential for successful host colonization.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Ghosh, Sumit; Bhatt, Dharmendra Nath; Narula, Alka; Datta, Asis

    2016-03-01

    Pathogens encounter and metabolize a range of host-derived metabolites while proliferating inside the host. Our understanding of these metabolites and their metabolic processes has remained largely incomplete. We investigated the role of the Magnaporthe oryzae N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) catabolic pathway during rice infection. The catabolic pathway is composed of a GlcNAc transporter (MoNgt1), hexokinase(s), a GlcNAc-6-phosphate deacetylase (MoDac) and a GlcN-6-phosphate deaminase (MoDeam). A detailed characterization of the Δmongt1, Δmodac and Δmodeam null mutants revealed that a defect in GlcNAc catabolism impairs the pathogenicity of M. oryzae. These mutants showed severely reduced virulence in susceptible rice cultivar due to their inability to neutralize host-derived reactive oxygen species and their failure to develop invasive hyphal growth within the host tissue. Interestingly, during oxidative stress, M. oryzae proliferated efficiently in GlcNAc-containing media compared with other sugars, and the expression of fungal antioxidant genes was upregulated following GlcNAc treatment. However, GlcNAc inhibited the growth of the Δmodac and Δmodeam mutants, and this growth inhibition was enhanced during oxidative stress. These results suggest that GlcNAc helps fungus to overcome oxidative stress inside its host, perhaps by activating an antioxidant defence. In the absence of a functional catabolic pathway, GlcNAc becomes toxic to the cells. PMID:26754109

  13. Adsorption behavior of rhodamine B on Rhizopus oryzae biomass.

    PubMed

    Das, Sujoy K; Bhowal, Jayati; Das, Akhil R; Guha, Arun K

    2006-08-15

    The removal of a carcinogenic dye rhodamine B (C. I. 45170) from wastewater by biomass of different moulds and yeasts is described. Among all of the fungal species tested, the biomass of Rhizopus oryzae MTCC 262 is found to be the most effective. Dye adsorption reaches maximum with the biomass harvested from the early stationary phase of growth. The optimum temperature and pH for adsorption are observed to be 40 degrees C and 7.0, respectively. The adsorption rate is very fast initially and attains equilibrium after 5 h. The adsorption isotherm follows the Langmuir isotherm model satisfactorily within the studied dye concentration range. Of the different metabolic inhibitors tested, 2,4-ditrophenol (DNP) and N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) decrease dye adsorption by approximately 30% suggesting the role of energy metabolism in the process. Spectrophotometric study indicates that the removal of rhodamine B by R. oryzae biomass involves an adsorption process. Scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopic investigations have been carried out to understand the probable mechanism of the dye-biomass interaction. PMID:16893225

  14. [Cloning and sequencing of ACC oxidase gene from sugarcane].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zi-Zhang; Li, Yang-Rui; Zhang, Shu-Zhen; Lin, Jun-Fang; Guo, Li-Qiong

    2003-01-01

    The plant hormone ethylene is not only responsible for the initiation of fruit ripening, senescence and dormancy but also for regulating many other plant developmental processes, such as seed germination, root initiation, growth, floral differentiation, sex differentiation and responding to environment stresses. One of the rate-limiting steps for ethylene biosynthesizing in plant is catalyzed by 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidase. Understanding of ethylene expressive pattern in plant is an entrance to understand the roles of ethylene on plant. In this paper, two degenerate oligonucleotide primers were designed, coding for two conservative amino acid regions in ACC oxidase protein family, the sequences of the two primers were TAGAGCTCGATGC[TA]TG [CT]GA[GA]AA[AC]TGGGG and CGTCTAGAGCTTC[GA]AATCTTGGCTCCTT respectively. A PCR amplification was performed on sugarcane (Saccharum L. Hybrid cv. ROC16) DNA template, and produced a fragment of 940 bp. By using the program of BLAST on NCBI GenBank database, the sequence presented a very high match with the ACC oxidase genes from other plants, 63 searched out sequences were all ACC oxidase genes. After alignment on PCgene program, the identities of the cloned fragment with ACC oxidase genes from rice and bamboo were both reaching about 88%. So we can concluded that the cloned sequence was a member of ACC oxidase genes fragment from sugarcane. The sequence has been submitted to the GenBank database, the accession number is AF442821. According to the ACC oxidase protein family, a 'intron' of 103 bp was excluded and the sequence coded 279 amino acids, which spanned 88% of the putative whole sequence in length. Alignment and phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequence deduced from this fragment and the ACC oxidase sequences of other plants retrieved from GenBank were carried out by using PCgene program. The putative amino acid sequence shared a homology of 86% with the ACC oxidases of bamboo and rice, 74.6% with banana, 70% with tomato and potato and 68% with melon and carnation, which showed that the homology of sugarcane ACC oxidase with monocot was higher than with dicot. The results of phylogenetic analysis showed that ACC oxidase from sugarcane and ACC oxidases from rice clustered together firstly, and then came those from banana, ACC oxidases of dicot from potato, tomato, petunia, melon, Arabidopsis thaliana and carnation came subsequently. It indicated that sugarcane ACC oxidase had a closer phylogenetic affinities to the monocot ACC oxidase sequences than to the dicot ACC oxidases sequences. The clustering results of ACC oxidase molecules accorded with morphological classification system. PMID:12812078

  15. Various applications of immobilized glucose oxidase and polyphenol oxidase in a conducting polymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Cil, M; Bykbayram, A E; Kiralp, S; Toppare, L; Ya?ci, Y

    2007-06-01

    In this study, glucose oxidase and polyphenol oxidase were immobilized in conducting polymer matrices; polypyrrole and poly(N-(4-(3-thienyl methylene)-oxycarbonyl phenyl) maleimide-co-pyrrole) via electrochemical method. Fourier transform infrared and scanning electron microscope were employed to characterize the copolymer of (N-(4-(3-thienyl methylene)-oxycarbonyl phenyl) maleimide) with pyrrole. Kinetic parameters, maximum reaction rate and Michealis-Menten constant, were determined. Effects of temperature and pH were examined for immobilized enzymes. Also, storage and operational stabilities of enzyme electrodes were investigated. Glucose and polyphenol oxidase enzyme electrodes were used for determination of the glucose amount in orange juices and human serum and phenolic amount in red wines, respectively. PMID:17291580

  16. Metabolism of benzene and phenol by a reconstituted purified phenobarbital induced rat liver mixed function oxidase system

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450 and the electron-donor, NADPH-cytochrome c reductase were isolated from phenobarbital induced rat liver microsomes. Both benzene and its primary metabolite phenol, were substrates for the reconstituted purified phenobarbital induced rat liver mixed function oxidase system. Benzene was metabolized to phenol and the polyhydroxylated metabolites; catechol, hydroquinone and 1,2,4 benzenetriol. Benzene elicited a Type I spectral change upon its interaction with the cytochrome P-450 while phenol's interaction with the cytochrome P-450 produced a reverse Type I spectra. The formation of phenol showed a pH optimum of 7.0 compared with 6.6-6.8 for the production of the polyhyrdoxylated metabolites. Cytochrome P-450 inhibitors, such as metyrapone and SKF 525A, diminished the production of phenol from benzene but not the production of the polyhydroxylated metabolites from phenol. The radical trapping agents, DMSO, KTBA and mannitol, decreased the recovery of polyhydroxylated metabolites, from /sup 14/C-labeled benzene and/or phenol. As KTBA and DMSO interacted with OH. There was a concomitant release of ethylene and methane, which was measured. Desferrioxamine, an iron-chelator and catalase also depressed the recovery of polyhydroxylated metabolites. In summary, benzene and phenol were both substrates for this reconstituted purified enzyme system, but they differed in binding to cytochrome P-450, pH optima and mode of hydroxylation.

  17. The conformational state of polyphenol oxidase from field bean (Dolichos lablab) upon SDS and acid-pH activation.

    PubMed

    Kanade, Santosh R; Paul, Beena; Rao, A G Appu; Gowda, Lalitha R

    2006-05-01

    Field bean (Dolichos lablab) contains a single isoform of PPO (polyphenol oxidase)--a type III copper protein that catalyses the o-hydroxylation of monophenols and oxidation of o-diphenols using molecular oxygen--and is a homotetramer with a molecular mass of 120 kDa. The enzyme is activated manyfold either in the presence of the anionic detergent SDS below its critical micellar concentration or on exposure to acid-pH. The enhancement of kcat upon activation is accompanied by a marked shift in the pH optimum for the oxidation of t-butyl catechol from 4.5 to 6.0, an increased sensitivity to tropolone, altered susceptibility to proteolytic degradation and decreased thermostability. The Stokes radius of the native enzyme is found to increase from 49.1+/-2 to 75.9+/-0.6 A (1 A=0.1 nm). The activation by SDS and acid-pH results in a localized conformational change that is anchored around the catalytic site of PPO that alters the microenvironment of an essential glutamic residue. Chemical modification of field bean and sweet potato PPO with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodi-imide followed by kinetic analysis leads to the conclusion that both the enzymes possess a core carboxylate essential to activity. This enhanced catalytic efficiency of PPO, considered as an inducible defence oxidative enzyme, is vital to the physiological defence strategy adapted by plants to insect herbivory and pathogen attack. PMID:16393141

  18. The conformational state of polyphenol oxidase from field bean (Dolichos lablab) upon SDS and acid-pH activation

    PubMed Central

    Kanade, SantoshR.; Paul, Beena; Rao, A.G.Appu; Gowda, LalithaR.

    2006-01-01

    Field bean (Dolichos lablab) contains a single isoform of PPO (polyphenol oxidase) a type III copper protein that catalyses the o-hydroxylation of monophenols and oxidation of o-diphenols using molecular oxygen and is a homotetramer with a molecular mass of 120kDa. The enzyme is activated manyfold either in the presence of the anionic detergent SDS below its critical micellar concentration or on exposure to acid-pH. The enhancement of kcat upon activation is accompanied by a marked shift in the pH optimum for the oxidation of t-butyl catechol from 4.5 to 6.0, an increased sensitivity to tropolone, altered susceptibility to proteolytic degradation and decreased thermostability. The Stokes radius of the native enzyme is found to increase from 49.12 to 75.90.6 (1 =0.1nm). The activation by SDS and acid-pH results in a localized conformational change that is anchored around the catalytic site of PPO that alters the microenvironment of an essential glutamic residue. Chemical modification of field bean and sweet potato PPO with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodi-imide followed by kinetic analysis leads to the conclusion that both the enzymes possess a core carboxylate essential to activity. This enhanced catalytic efficiency of PPO, considered as an inducible defence oxidative enzyme, is vital to the physiological defence strategy adapted by plants to insect herbivory and pathogen attack. PMID:16393141

  19. Mussel inspired modification of polypropylene separators by catechol/polyamine for Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Wu, Junjie; Cai, Chao; Guo, Jing; Fan, Haosen; Zhu, Caizhen; Dong, Haixia; Zhao, Ning; Xu, Jian

    2014-04-23

    Inspired by the remarkable adhesion of mussel, dopamine, a mimicking adhesive molecule, has been widely used for surface modification of various materials ranging from organic to inorganic. However, dopamine and its derivatives are expensive which impede their application in large scale. Herein, we replaced dopamine with low-cost catechol and polyamine (only 8% of the cost of dopamine), which could be polymerized in an alkaline solution and deposited on the surfaces of various materials. By using this cheap and simple modification method, polypropylene (PP) separator could be transformed from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, while the pore structure and mechanical property of the separator remained intact. The uptake of electrolyte increased from 80% to 270% after the hydrophilic modification. Electrochemical studies demonstrated that battery with the modified PP separator had a better Coulombic efficiency (80.9% to 85.3%) during the first cycle at a current density of 0.1 C, while the discharging current density increased to 15 C and the discharge capacity increased by 1.4 times compared to the battery using the bare PP separator. Additionally, the modification allowed excellent stability during manifold cycles. This study provides new insights into utilizing low-cost chemicals to mimic the mussel adhesion and has potential practical application in many fields. PMID:24684271

  20. Gauging and Tuning Cross-Linking Kinetics of Catechol-PEG Adhesives via Catecholamine Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Paez, Julieta I; Ustahseyin, Oya; Serrano, Cristina; Ton, Xuan-Anh; Shafiq, Zahid; Auernhammer, Gnter K; d'Ischia, Marco; Del Campo, Arnzazu

    2015-12-14

    The curing time of an adhesive material is determined by the polymerization and cross-linking kinetics of the adhesive formulation and needs to be optimized for the particular application. Here, we explore the possibility of tuning the polymerization kinetics and final mechanical properties of tissue-adhesive PEG gels formed by polymerization of end-functionalized star-PEGs with catecholamines with varying substituents. We show strong differences in cross-linking time and cohesiveness of the final gels among the catecholamine-PEG variants. Installation of an electron-withdrawing but ?-electron donating chloro substituent on the catechol ring resulted in faster and more efficient cross-linking, while opposite effects were observed with the strongly electron-withdrawing nitro group. Chain substitution slowed down the kinetics and hindered cross-linking due either to chain breakdown (?-OH group, in norepinephrine) or intramolecular cyclization (?-carboxyl group, in DOPA). Interesting perspectives derive from use of mixtures of catecholamine-PEG precursors offering further opportunities for fine-tuning of the curing parameters. These are interesting properties for the application of catecholamine-PEG gels as tissue glues or biomaterials for cell encapsulation. PMID:26583428

  1. Antiproliferative and Antiestrogenic Activities of Bonediol an Alkyl Catechol from Bonellia macrocarpa

    PubMed Central

    Moo-Puc, Rosa; Caamal-Fuentes, Edgar; Peraza-Sánchez, Sergio R.; Slusarz, Anna; Jackson, Glenn; Drenkhahn, Sara K.; Lubahn, Dennis B.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate antiproliferative activity of bonediol, an alkyl catechol isolated from the Mayan medicinal plant Bonellia macrocarpa. Bonediol was assessed for growth inhibition of androgen-sensitive (LNCaP), androgen-insensitive (PC-3), and metastatic androgen-insensitive (PC-3M) human prostate tumor cells; toxicity on normal cell line (HEK 293) was also evaluated. Hedgehog pathway was evaluated and competitive 3H-estradiol ligand binding assay was performed. Additionally, antioxidant activity on Nrf2-ARE pathway was evaluated. Bonediol induced a growth inhibition on prostate cancer cell lines (IC50 from 8.5 to 20.6 µM). Interestingly, bonediol binds to both estrogen receptors (ERα (2.5 µM) and ERβ (2.1 µM)) and displaces the native ligand E2 (17β-estradiol). No significant activity was found in the Hedgehog pathway. Additionally, activity of bonediol on Nrf2-ARE pathway suggested that bonediol could induce oxidative stress and activation of detoxification enzymes at 1 µM (3.8-fold). We propose that the compound bonediol may serve as a potential chemopreventive treatment with therapeutic potential against prostate cancer. PMID:26557704

  2. Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Gene Polymorphisms in Specific Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Patients' Subgroups.

    PubMed

    Melo-Felippe, Fernanda Brito; de Salles Andrade, Juliana Braga; Giori, Isabele Gomes; Vieira-Fonseca, Tamiris; Fontenelle, Leonardo Franklin; Kohlrausch, Fabiana Barzotti

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological data and animal models support the hypothesis that the dopaminergic (DA) system is implicated in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Therefore, this case-control study assessed whether genetics variations in catechol-O-methyltransferase gene (COMT) could influence susceptibility to OCD and OCD features in a Brazilian sample. A sample of 199 patients with OCD and 200 healthy individuals was genotyped for -287A?>?G (rs2075507) and Val158Met (rs4680) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by TaqMan() or restriction mapping. We observed a statistically significant predominance of the Met low-activity allele in the male patient group as compared to the male healthy control group. The -287A?>?G polymorphism's genotypes and alleles were significantly overrepresented among male individuals with ordering and female subjects with washing symptoms. We also found female hoarders to exhibit a significant higher frequency of the low activity Met/Met genotype of Val158Met polymorphism compared to female patients who did not express this dimension. Our data suggest an influence of COMT polymorphisms on OCD and OCD patients' features, such as gender, and ordering, washing, and hoarding symptom dimensions. Further studies to confirm the clinical importance of COMT SNPs in OCD are warranted. PMID:26687156

  3. Schistosome and liver fluke derived catechol-estrogens and helminth associated cancers

    PubMed Central

    Correia da Costa, Jos M.; Vale, Nuno; Gouveia, Maria J.; Botelho, Mnica C.; Sripa, Banchob; Santos, Lcio L.; Santos, Jlio H.; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Brindley, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Infection with helminth parasites remains a persistent public health problem in developing countries. Three of these pathogens, the liver flukes Clonorchis sinensis, Opisthorchis viverrini and the blood fluke Schistosoma haematobium, are of particular concern due to their classification as Group 1 carcinogens: infection with these worms is carcinogenic. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) approaches, we identified steroid hormone like (e.g., oxysterol-like, catechol estrogen quinone-like, etc.) metabolites and related DNA-adducts, apparently of parasite origin, in developmental stages including eggs of S. haematobium, in urine of people with urogenital schistosomiasis, and in the adult stage of O. viverrini. Since these kinds of sterol derivatives are metabolized to active quinones that can modify DNA, which in other contexts can lead to breast and other cancers, helminth parasite associated sterols might induce tumor-like phenotypes in the target cells susceptible to helminth parasite associated cancers, i.e., urothelial cells of the bladder in the case of urogenital schistosomiasis and the bile duct epithelia or cholangiocytes, in the case of O. viverrini and C. sinensis. Indeed we postulate that helminth induced cancers originate from parasite estrogen-host epithelial/urothelial cell chromosomal DNA adducts, and here we review recent findings that support this conjecture. PMID:25566326

  4. Genetic influences on insight problem solving: the role of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weili; Shang, Siyuan; Su, Yanjie

    2015-01-01

    People may experience an “aha” moment, when suddenly realizing a solution of a puzzling problem. This experience is called insight problem solving. Several findings suggest that catecholamine-related genes may contribute to insight problem solving, among which the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene is the most promising candidate. The current study examined 753 healthy individuals to determine the associations between 7 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms on the COMT gene and insight problem-solving performance, while considering gender differences. The results showed that individuals carrying A allele of rs4680 or T allele of rs4633 scored significantly higher on insight problem-solving tasks, and the COMT gene rs5993883 combined with gender interacted with correct solutions of insight problems, specifically showing that this gene only influenced insight problem-solving performance in males. This study presents the first investigation of the genetic impact on insight problem solving and provides evidence that highlights the role that the COMT gene plays in insight problem solving. PMID:26528222

  5. Catechol--an oviposition stimulant for cigarette beetle in roasted coffee beans.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Atsuhiko; Kamada, Yuji; Kosaka, Yuji; Arakida, Naohiro; Hori, Masatoshi

    2014-05-01

    The cigarette beetle, Lasioderma serricorne, is a serious global pest that preys on stored food products. Larvae of the beetle cannot grow on roasted coffee beans or dried black or green tea leaves, although they oviposit on such products. We investigated oviposition by the beetles on MeOH extracts of the above products. The number of eggs laid increased with an increase in dose of each extract, indicating that chemical factors stimulate oviposition by the beetles. This was especially true for \\ coffee bean extracts, which elicited high numbers of eggs even at a low dose (0.1 g bean equivalent/ml) compared to other extracts. Coffee beans were extracted in hexane, chloroform, 1-butanol, MeOH, and 20% MeOH in water. The number of eggs laid was higher on filter papers treated with chloroform, 1-butanol, MeOH, and 20% MeOH in water extracts than on control (solvent alone) papers. The chloroform extract was fractionated by silica-gel column chromatography. Nine compounds were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry from an active fraction. Of these compounds, only a significant ovipositional response to catechol was observed. PMID:24752858

  6. Synthesis, Characterization, and Preliminary Investigation of Cell Interaction of Magnetic Nanoparticles with Catechol-Containing Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Kerstin; Seemann, Thomas; Wyrwa, Ralf; Clement, Joachim H.; Mller, Robert; Nietzsche, Sandor; Schnabelrauch, Matthias

    2010-12-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide cores were synthesized by co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts and subsequently stabilized by coating with different catechols (levodopa, dopamine, hydrocaffeic acid, dopamine-containing carboxymethyl dextran) known to act as high-affinity, bidentate ligands for Fe(III). The prepared stable magnetic fluids were characterized with regard to their chemical composition (content of iron and shell material, Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio) and their physical properties (size, surface charge, magnetic parameters). The nanoparticles showed no or only slight cytotoxic effects within 1 and 4 days of incubation with 3T3 fibroblast cells. Preliminary experiments were performed to study the interaction of the prepared nanoparticles with human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and leukocytes. An intense interaction of the MCF-7 cells with these particles was found whereas the leukocytes showed a lower tendency of interaction. Based on these finding, the novel magnetic nanoparticles possess the potential for use in depletion of tumor cells from peripheral blood.

  7. Laccase Biosensor Based on Electrospun Copper/Carbon Composite Nanofibers for Catechol Detection

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jiapeng; Qiao, Hui; Li, Dawei; Luo, Lei; Chen, Ke; Wei, Qufu

    2014-01-01

    The study compared the biosensing properties of laccase biosensors based on carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and copper/carbon composite nanofibers (Cu/CNFs). The two kinds of nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning and carbonization under the same conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy were employed to investigate the morphologies and structures of CNFs and Cu/CNFs. The amperometric results indicated that the Cu/CNFs/laccase(Lac)/Nafion/glass carbon electrode (GCE) possessed reliable analytical performance for the detection of catechol. The sensitivity of the Cu/CNFs/Lac/Nafion/GCE reached 33.1 μA/mM, larger than that of CNFs/Lac/Nafion/GCE. Meanwhile, Cu/CNFs/Lac/Nafion/GCE had a wider linear range from 9.95 × 10−6 to 9.76 × 10−3 M and a lower detection limit of 1.18 μM than CNFs/Lac/Nafion/GCE. Moreover, it exhibited a good repeatability, reproducibility, selectivity and long-term stability, revealing that electrospun Cu/CNFs have great potential in biosensing. PMID:24561403

  8. [Effect of Catechol-O-methyltransferase deficiency on reinforcing effects of cocaine (experimental study)].

    PubMed

    Mus, L V; Dravolina, O A; Bespalov, A Iu; Kenmki, M; Talka, R; Salminen, O; Tuominen, R K; Mnnisti, P T; Zvartau, E E

    2012-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) remains an important regulatory element in prefrontal cortex dopamine homeostasis. The literature data suggest that individual differences in COMT activity (Val158Met polymorphism) might have indirect downstream effects on the reward system. The aim of the present study was to examine whether COMT deletion affects reinforcing effects of cocaine in mice. The study was conducted in male mice with homozygous COMT deletion as well as their C57BL/6J wild-type littermates. Animals were trained to nose-poke to receive response-contingent intravenous infusions of cocaine (0.3 mg/kg per infusion; final schedule of reinforcement - fixed ratio (FR) 3 time out 30 s). Following the initial acquisition phase, cocaine self-administration dose-effect functions (0.03, 0.1, 0.3, 1, and 3 mg/kg per infusion) were determined under FR3 and progressive ratio (PR) schedules of reinforcement. Cocaine dose-dependently maintained responding under FR3 and PR schedule of reinforcement when the unit dose of cocaine was varied across the sessions. The total cocaine intake did not differ in COMT deletion mice and wild-type mice. The results of this study suggest that individual differences in COMT activity do not affect primary reinforcing effects of cocaine in mice. PMID:23011431

  9. Self-assembly of catecholic macroinitiator on various substrates and surface-initiated polymerization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolong; Ye, Qian; Gao, Tingting; Liu, Jianxi; Zhou, Feng

    2012-02-01

    A catechol-containing macroinitiator has been designed for the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) from various substrates at ambient temperature. Temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (PNIPAM) brushes were successfully grafted from a range of substrates surfaces, including metals and polyimides, via SI-ATRP using the resulting macroinitiator, which were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), water contact angle measurements, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Effects of the temperature response behavior of PNIPAM brushes on the water contact angles and the impedance of the modified surfaces were also exhibited. The self-assembled film of macroinitiator and the resulting polymer brushes were both stable to soaking of basic solvents, and the brushes did not show any exfoliation or delamination even after 2 h of ultrasonic test. The advantages of the macroinitiator in strong interactions with surfaces and high stability and convenience make it possible to modify the native materials with polymer brushes in a convenient and nondestructive way. Importantly, the macroinitiator is compatible with microcontact printing, and patterned polymer brushes on Ti plate were demonstrated by microcontact printing of BrDOPAMA and the following SI-ATRP. PMID:22204660

  10. Catechol-O-methyltransferase, a new target for pancreatic cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenming; Wu, Qiao; Hong, Xiafei; Zhou, Li; Zhang, Jie; You, Lei; Wang, Wenze; Wu, Huanwen; Dai, Hongmei; Zhao, Yupei

    2015-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is an important molecule in different types of cancers. Its biological effect and therapeutic significance, however, rarely been investigated fully in pancreatic cancer. Immunohistologically, high COMT expression was significantly correlated with the longer overall survival of patients (P<0.05), indicating its protective nature. The effects of COMT on cell growth, apoptosis, and invasion were evaluated using overexpression and silencing methods. In detail, we carried out experiments using one stably transduced and two transiently transfected pancreatic cancer cell lines in vitro, and one stably transduced cell line in vivo mice xenograft models. In vitro experiments showed that COMT inhibited cell proliferation, enhanced gemcitabine-induced apoptosis, and inhibited cell invasion in stably transduced and transiently transfected cell lines by regulating the PI3K/Akt pathway, p53, and E-cadherin. The COMT overexpressed and silenced cell lines showed significantly inhibited and enhanced growth capacities in in vivo xenograft models, respectively. In conclusion, COMT suppressed pancreatic cancer and its high expression predicted longer survival time. The interaction of COMT with the PI3K/Akt pathway makes it a potential target for therapy. PMID:25711924

  11. Characterization of Non-Nitrocatechol Pan and Isoform Specific Catechol-O-methyltransferase Inhibitors and Substrates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Reduced dopamine neurotransmission in the prefrontal cortex has been implicated as causal for the negative symptoms and cognitive deficit associated with schizophrenia; thus, a compound which selectively enhances dopamine neurotransmission in the prefrontal cortex may have therapeutic potential. Inhibition of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT, EC 2.1.1.6) offers a unique advantage, since this enzyme is the primary mechanism for the elimination of dopamine in cortical areas. Since membrane bound COMT (MB-COMT) is the predominant isoform in human brain, a high throughput screen (HTS) to identify novel MB-COMT specific inhibitors was completed. Subsequent optimization led to the identification of novel, non-nitrocatechol COMT inhibitors, some of which interact specifically with MB-COMT. Compounds were characterized for in vitro efficacy versus human and rat MB and soluble (S)-COMT. Select compounds were administered to male Wistar rats, and ex vivo COMT activity, compound levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and CSF dopamine metabolite levels were determined as measures of preclinical efficacy. Finally, novel non-nitrocatechol COMT inhibitors displayed less potent uncoupling of the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) compared to tolcapone as well as nonhepatotoxic entacapone, thus mitigating the risk of hepatotoxicity. PMID:22860182

  12. Sexual dimorphisms in the immune system of catechol-O-methyltransferase knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Stubelius, Alexandra; Wilhelmson, Anna S; Gogos, Joseph A; Tivesten, Asa; Islander, Ulrika; Carlsten, Hans

    2012-08-01

    The enzyme catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is part of the metabolic pathway of 17β-estradiol, converting 2-hydroxyestradiol to 2-methoxyestradiol. We recently showed that administration of the COMT product 2-methoxyestradiol has anti-inflammatory and anti-osteoporotic effects. We have now investigated whether COMT affects the immune system, by immunologically phenotyping COMT deficient (COMT(-/-)) mice. Immunoglobulin production, T lymphocyte proliferation, NK cell cytotoxicity and oxygen radical production were assessed. In male COMT(-/-)-mice, the total number of T-, and B-lymphocytes from spleen increased but the T-cell proliferative response decreased. The NK cell population shifted toward less mature cells, leaving cytotoxic capacity unaffected. In COMT(-/-)-females, a higher frequency of neutrophils was found but the oxygen radical production was unaltered. In conclusion, only minor changes of the immune system were seen in COMT deficient mice, and the changes were usually seen in males. This study provides clues into how COMT activity, and hence gender differences, affects the immune system. PMID:22658921

  13. Sildenafil citrate rescues fetal growth in the catechol-O-methyl transferase knockout mouse model.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Joanna L; Andersson, Irene J; Poudel, Rajan; Rueda-Clausen, Christian F; Sibley, Colin P; Davidge, Sandra T; Baker, Philip N

    2012-05-01

    Preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction are responsible for the majority of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality associated with complicated pregnancies. Although their etiologies are complex and multifactorial, both are associated with increased uterine artery resistance. Sildenafil citrate is able to rescue the dysfunction observed ex vivo in uterine arteries of women with preeclampsia. The ability of sildenafil citrate to increase uterine artery vasodilation, thereby decreasing uterine artery resistance and, hence, ameliorated preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction, was tested in a mouse model of preeclampsia, the catechol-O-methyl transferase knockout mouse (COMT(-/-)). COMT(-/-) and C57BL/6J mice were treated (0.2 mg/mL in drinking water, n=6-12) from gestational day 12.5 to 18.5. Measures of pup growth, including body weight, crown/rump length, and abdominal circumference, were reduced in COMT(-/-) mice; this was normalized after treatment with Sildenafil. COMT(-/-) mice also demonstrated abnormal umbilical Doppler waveforms, including reverse arterial blood flow velocity. This was normalized after treatment with Sildenafil. Abnormal uterine artery Doppler waveforms were not demonstrated in COMT(-/-) mice, although ex vivo responses of uterine arteries to phenylephrine were increased; moreover, treatment with Sildenafil did improve ex vivo sensitivity to an endothelium-dependent vasodilator. The data presented here demonstrate that Sildenafil can rescue pup growth and improve abnormal umbilical Doppler waveforms, providing support for a potential new therapeutic strategy targeting fetal growth restriction. PMID:22392899

  14. Src supports UDP-glucuronosyltransferase-2B7 detoxification of catechol estrogens associated with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Partha S; Basu, Nikhil K; Owens, Ida S

    2009-05-15

    Mammary gland-distributed and ER-bound UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)-2B7 metabolizes genotoxic catechol-estrogens (CE) associated with breast cancer initiation. Although UGT2B7 has 3 PKC- and 2 tyrosine kinase (TK)-sites, its inhibition by genistein, herbimycin-A and PP2 with parallel losses in phospho-tyrosine and phospho-Y438-2B7 content indicated it requires tyrosine phosphorylation, unlike required PKC phosphorylation of UGT1A isozymes. 2B7 mutants at PKC-sites had essentially normal activity, while its TK-sites mutants, Y236F- and Y438F-2B7, were essentially inactive. Overexpression of regular or active Src, but not dominant-negative Src, in 2B7-transfected COS-1 cells increased 2B7 activity and phospho-Y438-2B7 by 50%. Co-localization of 2B7 and regular SrcTK in COS-1 cells that was dissociated by pretreatment with Src-specific PP2-inhibitor provided strong evidence Src supports 2B7 activity. Consistent with these findings, evidence indicates an appropriate set of ER proteins with Src-homology binding-domains, including 2B7 and well-known multi-functional Src-engaged AKAP12 scaffold, supports Src-dependent phosphorylation of CE-metabolizing 2B7 enabling it to function as a tumor suppressor. PMID:19289110

  15. Analysis of Oxidative Stress Status, Catalase and Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Polymorphisms in Egyptian Vitiligo Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mehaney, Dina A.; Darwish, Hebatallah A.; Hegazy, Rehab A.; Nooh, Mohammed M.; Tawdy, Amira M.; Gawdat, Heba I.; El-Sawalhi, Maha M.

    2014-01-01

    Vitiligo is the most common depigmentation disorder of the skin. Oxidative stress is implicated as one of the probable events involved in vitiligo pathogenesis possibly contributing to melanocyte destruction. Evidence indicates that certain genes including those involved in oxidative stress and melanin synthesis are crucial for development of vitiligo. This study evaluates the oxidative stress status, the role of catalase (CAT) and catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) gene polymorphisms in the etiology of generalized vitiligo in Egyptians. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels as well as CAT exon 9 T/C and COMT 158 G/A polymorphisms were determined in 89 patients and 90 age and sex-matched controls. Our results showed significantly lower TAC along with higher MDA levels in vitiligo patients compared with controls. Meanwhile, genotype and allele distributions of CAT and COMT polymorphisms in cases were not significantly different from those of controls. Moreover, we found no association between both polymorphisms and vitiligo susceptibility. In conclusion, the enhanced oxidative stress with the lack of association between CAT and COMT polymorphisms and susceptibility to vitiligo in our patients suggest that mutations in other genes related to the oxidative pathway might contribute to the etiology of generalized vitiligo in Egyptian population. PMID:24915010

  16. Is catechol-o-methyltransferase gene polymorphism a risk factor in the development of premenstrual syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Deveci, Esma Ozturk; Selek, Salih; Camuzcuoglu, Aysun; Hilali, Nese Gul; Camuzcuoglu, Hakan; Erdal, Mehmet Emin; Vural, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate whether there was a correlation between catechol-o-methyltransferase (COMT) gene polymorphism, which is believed to play a role in the etiology of psychotic disorders, and premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Methods Fifty-three women with regular menstrual cycles, aged between 18 and 46 years and diagnosed with PMS according to the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecology criteria were included in this study as the study group, and 53 healthy women having no health problems were selected as the controls. Venous blood was collected from all patients included in the study and kept at -18℃ prior to analysis. Results There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of demographic features such as age, body mass index, number of pregnancies, parity, and number of children. No statistically significant difference was observed in terms of COMT gene polymorphism (p=0.61) between women in the PMS and the control groups. However, a significant difference was found between arthralgia, which is an indicator of PMS, and low-enzyme activity COMT gene (Met/Met) polymorphism (p=0.04). Conclusion These results suggested that there was no significant relationship between PMS and COMT gene polymorphism. Since we could not find a direct correlation between the COMT gene polymorphism and PMS, further studies including alternative neurotransmitter pathways are needed to find an effective treatment for this disease. PMID:25045629

  17. Synthesis, Characterization, and Preliminary Investigation of Cell Interaction of Magnetic Nanoparticles with Catechol-Containing Shells

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Kerstin; Seemann, Thomas; Wyrwa, Ralf; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Clement, Joachim H.; Mueller, Robert; Nietzsche, Sandor

    2010-12-02

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide cores were synthesized by co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts and subsequently stabilized by coating with different catechols (levodopa, dopamine, hydrocaffeic acid, dopamine-containing carboxymethyl dextran) known to act as high-affinity, bidentate ligands for Fe(III). The prepared stable magnetic fluids were characterized with regard to their chemical composition (content of iron and shell material, Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio) and their physical properties (size, surface charge, magnetic parameters). The nanoparticles showed no or only slight cytotoxic effects within 1 and 4 days of incubation with 3T3 fibroblast cells. Preliminary experiments were performed to study the interaction of the prepared nanoparticles with human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and leukocytes. An intense interaction of the MCF-7 cells with these particles was found whereas the leukocytes showed a lower tendency of interaction. Based on these finding, the novel magnetic nanoparticles possess the potential for use in depletion of tumor cells from peripheral blood.

  18. Polyoxometalate/laccase-mediated oxidative polymerization of catechol for textile dyeing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suyeon; Silva, Carla; Evtuguin, Dmitry V; Gamelas, José A F; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2011-02-01

    The synergistic effect between polyoxometalates (POMs), namely K(5)[SiW(11)V(V)O(40)]·11H(2)O and H(5)[PMo(10)V(V) (2)O(40)]·13H(2)O and laccase from ascomycete Myceliophthora thermophila has been employed for the first time in oxidative polymerization of catechol. Such a laccase-mediator system allowed the formation of a relatively high molecular weight polycatechol as confirmed by size exclusion chromatography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) (3990 Da when using K(5)[SiW(11)V(V)O(40)]·11H(2)O and 3600 Da with H(5)[PMo(10)V(V) (2)O(40)]·13H(2)O). The synthesized polymers were applied as dyes for the dyeing of flax fabrics. The color intensity of flax fabrics colored with polymer solutions was evaluated by diffuse reflectance spectrophotometry via k/s measurements (+10% of fixation ratio). A new synthetic process allowed a dyeing polymer, provided upon flax coloration, better color fixation and color resistance when compared to that obtained by conventional synthesis with laccase solely or with addition of organic mediator (1-hydroxybenzotriazole). PMID:20953600

  19. Gravity Responsive NADH Oxidase of the Plasma Membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing gravity using an NADH oxidase of the plasma membrane which has been found to respond to unit gravity and low centrifugal g forces. The oxidation rate of NADH supplied to the NADH oxidase is measured and translated to represent the relative gravitational force exerted on the protein. The NADH oxidase of the plasma membrane may be obtained from plant or animal sources or may be produced recombinantly.

  20. The plasma membrane NADPH oxidase OsRbohA plays a crucial role in developmental regulation and drought-stress response in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Zhang, Mao-Mao; Wang, Ya-Jing; Gao, Yin-Tao; Li, Ri; Wang, Gang-Feng; Li, Wen-Qiang; Liu, Wen-Ting; Chen, Kun-Ming

    2016-04-01

    Plasma membrane NADPH oxidases are major producers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant cells under normal growth and stress conditions. In the present study the total activity of rice NADPH oxidases and the transcription of OsRbohA, which encodes an Oryza sativa plasma membrane NADPH oxidase, were stimulated by drought. OsRbohA was expressed in all tissues examined throughout development. Its mRNA was upregulated by a number of factors, including heat, drought, salt, oxidative stress and methyl jasmonate treatment. Compared with wild-type (WT), the OsRbohA-knockout mutant osrbohA exhibited upregulated expression of other respiratory burst oxidase homolog genes and multiple abnormal agronomic traits, including reduced biomass, low germination rate and decreased pollen viability and seed fertility. However, OsRbohA-overexpressing transgenic plants showed no differences in these traits compared with WT. Although osrbohA leaves and roots produced more ROS than WT, the mutant had lesser intracellular ROS. In contrast, OsRbohA-overexpressing transgenic plants exhibited higher ROS production at the intracellular level and in tissues. Ablation of OsRbohA impaired the tolerance of plants to various water stresses, whereas its overexpression enhanced the tolerance. In addition, a number of genes related to energy supply, substrate transport, stress response and transcriptional regulation were differentially expressed in osrbohA plants even under normal growth conditions, suggesting that OsRbohA has fundamental and broad functions in rice. These results indicate that OsRbohA-mediated processes are governed by complex signaling pathways that function during the developmental regulation and drought-stress response in rice. PMID:26400148

  1. Efficient expression of a Phanerochaete chrysosporium manganese peroxidase gene in Aspergillus oryzae

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, P.; Whitwam, R.E.; Tien, Ming

    1996-03-01

    A manganese peroxidase (mnp1) from Phanerochaete chrysosporium was efficiently expressed in Aspergillus oryzae. Expression was achieved by fusing the mature cDNA of mnp1 with the A. oryzae Taka amylase promoter and secretion signal. The 3{prime} untranslated region of the glucoamylase gene of Asperigillus awamori provided the terminator. The recombinant protein (rMnP) was secreted in an active form, permitting rapid detection and purification. Physical and kinetic properties of rMnP were similar to those of the native protein. The A. oryzae expression system is well suited for both mechanistic and site-directed mutagenesis studies. 34 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Five phylogenetically close rice SWEET genes confer TAL effector-mediated susceptibility to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Streubel, Jana; Pesce, Cline; Hutin, Mathilde; Koebnik, Ralf; Boch, Jens; Szurek, Boris

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial plant-pathogenic Xanthomonas strains translocate transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors into plant cells to function as specific transcription factors. Only a few plant target genes of TAL effectors have been identified, so far. Three plant SWEET genes encoding putative sugar transporters are known to be induced by TAL effectors from rice-pathogenic Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). We predict and validate that expression of OsSWEET14 is induced by a novel TAL effector, Tal5, from an African Xoo strain. Artificial TAL effectors (ArtTALs) were constructed to individually target 20 SWEET orthologs in rice. They were used as designer virulence factors to study which rice SWEET genes can support Xoo virulence. The Tal5 target box differs from those of the already known TAL effectors TalC, AvrXa7 and PthXo3, which also induce expression of OsSWEET14, suggesting evolutionary convergence on key targets. ArtTALs efficiently complemented an Xoo talC mutant, demonstrating that specific induction of OsSWEET14 is the key target of TalC. ArtTALs that specifically target individual members of the rice SWEET family revealed three known and two novel SWEET genes to support bacterial virulence. Our results demonstrate that five phylogenetically close SWEET proteins, which presumably act as sucrose transporters, can support Xoo virulence. PMID:23879865

  3. Mapping of quantitative trait loci for fiber and lignin contents from an interspecific cross Oryza sativaOryza rufipogon *

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jian-kun; Kong, Xiang-li; Chen, Jie; Hu, Biao-lin; Wen, Piao; Zhuang, Jie-yun; Bao, Jin-song

    2011-01-01

    Rice straw is always regarded as a by-product of rice production, but it could be a significant energy source for ruminant animals. Knowledge of the genetic variation and genetic architecture of cell wall traits will facilitate rice breeders by improving relevant traits through selective breeding and genetic engineering. The common wild rice, Oryza rufipogon Griff., which is considered to be the progenitor of Oryza sativa, has been widely utilized for the identification of genes of agronomic importance for rice genetic improvement. In the present study, the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for acid detergent fiber (ADF), neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent lignin (ADL), and ADL/NDF ratio was carried out in two environments using a backcrossed inbred line (BIL) population derived from a cross between the recurrent parent Xieqingzao B (XB) and an accession of Dongxiang wild rice (DWR). The results indicated that all four traits tested were continuously distributed among the BILs, but many BILs showed transgressive segregation. A total of 16 QTLs were identified for the four traits, but no QTLs were in common in two environments, suggesting that environment has dramatic effects on fiber and lignin syntheses. Compared to the QTL positions for grain yield-related traits, there were no unfavorable correlations between grain yield components and cell wall traits in this population. The QTLs identified in this study are useful for the development of dual-purpose rice varieties that are high in grain yield and are also high in straw quality. PMID:21726058

  4. Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae RpfE Regulates Virulence and Carbon Source Utilization without Change of the DSF Production

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jung-Hee; Yoon, Joo-Mi; Lee, Sang-Won; Noh, Young-Hee; Cha, Jae-Soon

    2013-01-01

    It has been known that most regulation of pathogenicity factor (rpf) genes in xanthomonads regulates virulence in response to the diffusible signal factor, DSF. Although many rpf genes have been functionally characterized, the function of rpfE is still unknown. We cloned the rpfE gene from a Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) Korean race KACC10859 and generated mutant strains to elucidate the role of RpfE with respect to the rpf system. Through experiments using the rpfE-deficient mutant strain, we found that mutation in rpfE gene in Xoo reduced virulence, swarm motility, and production of virulence factors such as cellulase and extracellular polysaccharide. Disease progress by the rpfE-deficient mutant strain was significantly slowed compared to disease progress by the wild type and the number of the rpfE-deficient mutant strain was lower than that of the wild type in the early phase of infection in the inoculated rice leaf. The rpfE mutant strain was unable to utilize sucrose or xylose as carbon sources efficiently in culture. The mutation in rpfE, however, did not affect DSF synthesis. Our results suggest that the rpfE gene regulates the virulence of Xoo under different nutrient conditions without change of DSF production. PMID:25288965

  5. Targeting NADPH Oxidases for the Treatment of Cancer and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Michael Y.; Arbiser, Jack L

    2015-01-01

    NADPH oxidases are a family of oxidases that utilize molecular oxygen to generate hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, thus indicating physiological functions of these Highly reactive and short lived species. The regulation of these NADPH oxidases (nox) enzymes is complex, with many members of this family exhibiting complexity in subunit composition, cellular location, and tissue specific expression. While the complexity of the nox family (Nox1–5, Duox1,2) is daunting, the complexity also allows for targeting of NADPH oxidases in disease states. This review will discuss which inflammatory and malignant disorders can be targeted by nox inhibitors, as well as clinical experience in the use of nox inhibitors. PMID:22581366

  6. Cell Wall Degrading Enzyme Induced Rice Innate Immune Responses Are Suppressed by the Type 3 Secretion System Effectors XopN, XopQ, XopX and XopZ of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Dipanwita; Gupta, Mahesh Kumar; Patel, Hitendra Kumar; Ranjan, Ashish; Sonti, Ramesh V.

    2013-01-01

    Innate immune responses are induced in plants and animals through perception of Damage Associated Molecular Patterns. These immune responses are suppressed by pathogens during infection. A number of studies have focussed on identifying functions of plant pathogenic bacteria that are involved in suppression of Pathogen Associated Molecular Pattern induced immune responses. In comparison, there is very little information on functions used by plant pathogens to suppress Damage Associated Molecular Pattern induced immune responses. Xanthomonasoryzae pv. oryzae, a gram negative bacterial pathogen of rice, secretes hydrolytic enzymes such as LipA (Lipase/Esterase) that damage rice cell walls and induce innate immune responses. Here, we show that Agrobacterium mediated transient transfer of the gene for XopN, a X. oryzae pv. oryzae type 3 secretion (T3S) system effector, results in suppression of rice innate immune responses induced by LipA. A xopN- mutant of X. oryzae pv. oryzae retains the ability to suppress these innate immune responses indicating the presence of other functionally redundant proteins. In transient transfer assays, we have assessed the ability of 15 other X. oryzae pv. oryzae T3S secreted effectors to suppress rice innate immune responses. Amongst these proteins, XopQ, XopX and XopZ are suppressors of LipA induced innate immune responses. A mutation in any one of the xopN, xopQ, xopX or xopZ genes causes partial virulence deficiency while a xopN- xopX- double mutant exhibits a greater virulence deficiency. A xopN- xopQ- xopX- xopZ- quadruple mutant of X. oryzae pv. oryzae induces callose deposition, an innate immune response, similar to a X. oryzae pv. oryzae T3S- mutant in rice leaves. Overall, these results indicate that multiple T3S secreted proteins of X. oryzae pv. oryzae can suppress cell wall damage induced rice innate immune responses. PMID:24086651

  7. Induced systemic resistance responses in perennial ryegrass against Magnaporthe oryzae elicited by semi-purified surfactin lipopeptides and live cells of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Alamgir; Uddin, Wakar; Wenner, Nancy G

    2015-08-01

    The suppressive ability of several strains of cyclic lipopeptide-producing Bacillus rhizobacteria to grey leaf spot disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae has been documented previously; however, the underlying mechanism(s) involved in the induced systemic resistance (ISR) activity in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) remains unknown. Root-drench application of solid-phase extraction (SPE)-enriched surfactin and live cells of mutant Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain FZB42-AK3 (produces surfactin, but not bacillomycin D and fengycin) significantly reduced disease incidence and severity on perennial ryegrass. The application of the treatments revealed a pronounced multilayered ISR defence response activation via timely and enhanced accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), elevated cell wall/apoplastic peroxidase activity, and deposition of callose and phenolic/polyphenolic compounds underneath the fungal appressoria in nave leaves, which was significantly more intense in treated plants than in mock-treated controls. Moreover, a hypersensitive response (HR)-type reaction and enhanced expression of LpPrx (Prx, peroxidase), LpOXO4 (OXO, oxalate oxidase), LpPAL (PAL, phenylalanine ammonia lyase), LpLOXa (LOX, lipoxygenase), LpTHb (putative defensin) and LpDEFa (DEFa, putative defensin) in perennial ryegrass were associated with SPE-enriched surfactin and live AK3 cell treatments, acting as a second layer of defence when pre-invasive defence responses failed. The results indicate that ISR activity following surfactin perception may sensitize H2O2 -mediated defence responses, thereby providing perennial ryegrass with enhanced protection against M.?oryzae. PMID:25285593

  8. Genomic Analysis of Xanthomonas oryzae Isolates from Rice Grown in the United States Reveals Substantial Divergence from Known X. oryzae Pathovars ?

    PubMed Central

    Triplett, L. R.; Hamilton, J. P.; Buell, C. R.; Tisserat, N. A.; Verdier, V.; Zink, F.; Leach, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    The species Xanthomonas oryzae is comprised of two designated pathovars, both of which cause economically significant diseases of rice in Asia and Africa. Although X. oryzae is not considered endemic in the United States, an X. oryzae-like bacterium was isolated from U.S. rice and southern cutgrass in the late 1980s. The U.S. strains were weakly pathogenic and genetically distinct from characterized X. oryzae pathovars. In the current study, a draft genome sequence from two U.S. Xanthomonas strains revealed that the U.S. strains form a novel clade within the X. oryzae species, distinct from all strains known to cause significant yield loss. Comparative genome analysis revealed several putative gene clusters specific to the U.S. strains and supported previous reports that the U.S. strains lack transcriptional activator-like (TAL) effectors. In addition to phylogenetic and comparative analyses, the genome sequence was used for designing robust U.S. strain-specific primers, demonstrating the usefulness of a draft genome sequence in the rapid development of diagnostic tools. PMID:21515727

  9. Genomic analysis of Xanthomonas oryzae isolates from rice grown in the United States reveals substantial divergence from known X. oryzae pathovars.

    PubMed

    Triplett, L R; Hamilton, J P; Buell, C R; Tisserat, N A; Verdier, V; Zink, F; Leach, J E

    2011-06-01

    The species Xanthomonas oryzae is comprised of two designated pathovars, both of which cause economically significant diseases of rice in Asia and Africa. Although X. oryzae is not considered endemic in the United States, an X. oryzae-like bacterium was isolated from U.S. rice and southern cutgrass in the late 1980s. The U.S. strains were weakly pathogenic and genetically distinct from characterized X. oryzae pathovars. In the current study, a draft genome sequence from two U.S. Xanthomonas strains revealed that the U.S. strains form a novel clade within the X. oryzae species, distinct from all strains known to cause significant yield loss. Comparative genome analysis revealed several putative gene clusters specific to the U.S. strains and supported previous reports that the U.S. strains lack transcriptional activator-like (TAL) effectors. In addition to phylogenetic and comparative analyses, the genome sequence was used for designing robust U.S. strain-specific primers, demonstrating the usefulness of a draft genome sequence in the rapid development of diagnostic tools. PMID:21515727

  10. Convergent Loss of Awn in Two Cultivated Rice Species Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima Is Caused by Mutations in Different Loci

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Tomoyuki; Komeda, Norio; Asano, Kenji; Uehara, Kanako; Gamuyao, Rico; Angeles-Shim, Rosalyn B.; Nagai, Keisuke; Doi, Kazuyuki; Wang, Diane R.; Yasui, Hideshi; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Wu, Jianzhong; McCouch, Susan R.; Ashikari, Motoyuki

    2015-01-01

    A long awn is one of the distinct morphological features of wild rice species. This organ is thought to aid in seed dispersal and prevent predation by animals. Most cultivated varieties of Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima, however, have lost the ability to form long awns. The causal genetic factors responsible for the loss of awn in these two rice species remain largely unknown. Here, we evaluated three sets of chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) in a common O. sativa genetic background (cv. Koshihikari) that harbor genomic fragments from Oryza nivara, Oryza rufipogon, and Oryza glaberrima donors. Phenotypic analyses of these libraries revealed the existence of three genes, Regulator of Awn Elongation 1 (RAE1), RAE2, and RAE3, involved in the loss of long awns in cultivated rice. Donor segments at two of these genes, RAE1 and RAE2, induced long awn formation in the CSSLs whereas an O. sativa segment at RAE3 induced long awn formation in O. glaberrima. These results suggest that the two cultivated rice species, O. sativa and O. glaberrima, have taken independent paths to become awnless. PMID:26338659

  11. Nox NADPH Oxidases and the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Thaís L.S.; Abrahão, Thalita B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Understanding isoform- and context-specific subcellular Nox reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase compartmentalization allows relevant functional inferences. This review addresses the interplay between Nox NADPH oxidases and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an increasingly evident player in redox pathophysiology given its role in redox protein folding and stress responses. Recent Advances: Catalytic/regulatory transmembrane subunits are synthesized in the ER and their processing includes folding, N-glycosylation, heme insertion, p22phox heterodimerization, as shown for phagocyte Nox2. Dual oxidase (Duox) maturation also involves the regulation by ER-resident Duoxa2. The ER is the activation site for some isoforms, typically Nox4, but potentially other isoforms. Such location influences redox/Nox-mediated calcium signaling regulation via ER targets, such as sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA). Growing evidence suggests that Noxes are integral signaling elements of the unfolded protein response during ER stress, with Nox4 playing a dual prosurvival/proapoptotic role in this setting, whereas Nox2 enhances proapoptotic signaling. ER chaperones such as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) closely interact with Noxes. PDI supports growth factor-dependent Nox1 activation and mRNA expression, as well as migration in smooth muscle cells, and PDI overexpression induces acute spontaneous Nox activation. Critical Issues: Mechanisms of PDI effects include possible support of complex formation and RhoGTPase activation. In phagocytes, PDI supports phagocytosis, Nox activation, and redox-dependent interactions with p47phox. Together, the results implicate PDI as possible Nox organizer. Future Directions: We propose that convergence between Noxes and ER may have evolutive roots given ER-related functional contexts, which paved Nox evolution, namely calcium signaling and pathogen killing. Overall, the interplay between Noxes and the ER may provide relevant insights in Nox-related (patho)physiology. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2755–2775. PMID:24386930

  12. Involvement of polyamine oxidase in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Riccardo; Tisi, Alessandra; Rea, Giuseppina; Chen, Martha M; Botta, Maurizio; Federico, Rodolfo; Cona, Alessandra

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is involved in plant defense responses that follow mechanical damage, such as those that occur during herbivore or insect attacks, as well as pathogen attack. H(2)O(2) accumulation is induced during wound healing processes as well as by treatment with the wound signal jasmonic acid. Plant polyamine oxidases (PAOs) are H(2)O(2) producing enzymes supposedly involved in cell wall differentiation processes and defense responses. Maize (Zea mays) PAO (ZmPAO) is a developmentally regulated flavoprotein abundant in primary and secondary cell walls of several tissues. In this study, we investigated the effect of wounding on ZmPAO gene expression in the outer tissues of the maize mesocotyl and provide evidence that ZmPAO enzyme activity, protein, and mRNA levels increased in response to wounding as well as jasmonic acid treatment. Histochemically detected ZmPAO activity especially intensified in the epidermis and in the wound periderm, suggesting a tissue-specific involvement of ZmPAO in wound healing. The role played by ZmPAO-derived H(2)O(2) production in peroxidase-mediated wall stiffening events was further investigated by exploiting the in vivo use of N-prenylagmatine (G3), a selective and powerful ZmPAO inhibitor, representing a reliable diagnostic tool in discriminating ZmPAO-mediated H(2)O(2) production from that generated by peroxidase, oxalate oxidase, or by NADPH oxidase activity. Here, we demonstrate that G3 inhibits wound-induced H(2)O(2) production and strongly reduces lignin and suberin polyphenolic domain deposition along the wound, while it is ineffective in inhibiting the deposition of suberin aliphatic domain. Moreover, ZmPAO ectopic expression in the cell wall of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants strongly enhanced lignosuberization along the wound periderm, providing evidence for a causal relationship between PAO and peroxidase-mediated events during wound healing. PMID:17993545

  13. Magnetic interactions in milk xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Barber, M J; Salerno, J C; Siegel, L M

    1982-03-30

    The relaxation behavior of the EPR signals of MoV, FAD semiquinone, and the reduced Fe/S I center was measured in the presence and absence of other paramagnetic centers in milk xanthine oxidase. Specific pairs of prosthetic groups were rendered paramagnetic by poising the native enzyme or its desulfo glycol inhibited derivative at appropriate potentials and pH values. Magnetic interactions were found between the following species: Mo--Fe/S I (100-fold increase in microwave power required to saturate the MoV EPR signal at 103 K when Fe/S I is reduced as opposed to oxidized), FAD--Fe/S I and FAD--Fe/S II (70-fold increase in power required to saturate the FADH.EPR signal at 173 K when either Fe/S center is reduced), and Fe/S I--Fe/S II (2.5-fold increase in power to saturate the reduced Fe/S I EPR signal at 20 K when Fe/S II is reduced). The Mo--Fe/S I interaction was also detected as a reduced Fe/S I induced splitting of the MoV EPR spectrum at 30 K. No splittings of the FADH. or Fe/S center spectra were detected. No magnetic interactions were found between FAD and Mo or between Mo and Fe/S II. These results, together with those of Coffman & Buettner [Coffman, R. E., & Buettner, G. R. (1979) J. Phys. Chem. 83, 2392-2400], were used to estimate the following approximate distances between the electron carrying prosthetic groups of milk xamthine oxidase: Mo--Fe/S I, 11 +/- 3 A; Fe/S I-Fe/S II, 15 +/- 4 A; FAD-Fe/S I, 16 +/- 4 A; FAD-Fe/S II, 16 +/- 4 A. A model for the arrangement of these groups within the xanthine oxidase molecule is suggested. PMID:6282313

  14. Ligand Trapping by Cytochrome c Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Parul, Dzmitry; Palmer, Graham; Fabian, Marian

    2010-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is a member of the heme-copper family of oxygen reductases in which electron transfer is linked to the pumping of protons across the membrane. Neither the redox center(s) associated with proton pumping nor the pumping mechanism presumably common to all heme-copper oxidases has been established. A possible conformational coupling between the catalytic center (Fea33+CuB2+) and a protein site has been identified earlier from ligand binding studies, whereas a structural change initiated by azide binding to the protein has been proposed to facilitate the access of cyanide to the catalytic center of the oxidized bovine enzyme. Here we show that cytochrome oxidase pretreated with a low concentration of azide exhibits a significant increase in the apparent rate of cyanide binding relative to that of free enzyme. However, this increase in rate does not reflect a conformational change enhancing the rapid formation of a Fea33+CNCuB2+ complex. Instead the cyanide-induced transition of a preformed Fea33+N3CuB2+ to the ternary complex of Fea33+N3 CuB2+CN is the most likely reason for the observed acceleration. Significantly, the slow rate of azide release from the ternary complex indicates that cyanide ligated to CuB blocks a channel between the catalytic site and the solvent. The results suggest that there is a pathway that originates at CuB and that, during catalysis, ligands present at this copper center control access to the iron of heme a3 from the bulk medium. PMID:20037139

  15. Modulation of lysyl oxidase by dietary copper in rats.

    PubMed

    Rucker, R B; Romero-Chapman, N; Wong, T; Lee, J; Steinberg, F M; McGee, C; Clegg, M S; Reiser, K; Kosonen, T; Uriu-Hare, J Y; Murphy, J; Keen, C L

    1996-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase levels were estimated in rat tissues using an enzyme-linked immunosorption assay (ELISA) and a functional assay standardized against known amounts of purified lysyl oxidase. High concentrations of lysyl oxidase (> or = 150 micrograms/g of tissue or packed cells) were detected in connective tissues, such as tendon and skin. Values for aorta, kidney, lung and liver ranged from 30 to 150 micrograms/g of tissue; values for skeletal muscle and diaphragm were < 30 micrograms/g tissue. Purified rat skin lysyl oxidase catalyzed the release of 50-100 Bq of tritium per micrograms enzyme in assays that used 3H-elastin-rich substrates. In dense connective tissues, good agreement was obtained for the values from ELISA and those derived from measurements of functional activity in aorta, lung, skin and tendon (r2 > 0.9). When egg white-based experimental diets containing 2 or 10 micrograms/g added copper were fed to weanling rats, values for skin lysyl oxidase functional activity in the group fed 2 micrograms/g added copper were one-third to one-half the values for skin lysyl oxidase functional activity in rats fed 10 micrograms/g copper. This reduction in lysyl oxidase activity, however, had minimal effect on indices of collagen maturation in rat skin, e.g., collagen solubility in neutral salt and dilute acid or the levels of acid stable cross-links. Moreover, copper deficiency did not influence the steady-state levels of lysyl oxidase specific mRNA in rat skin or the apparent amounts of lysyl oxidase in rat skin as determined by ELISA. These observations underscore that the concentration of lysyl oxidase is relatively high in dense corrective tissues, and although decreasing dietary copper influences functional activity, there is little apparent effect on the production of lysyl oxidase protein. PMID:8558325

  16. Effect of hydrothermal processing on antioxidant contents and capacities in pigmented rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purple and red bran rice cultivars (Oryza sativa L.) are rich sources of antioxidants including lipophilic antioxidants (vitamin E homologues and '-oryzanol), soluble phenolics (including anthocyanidins and proanthocyanidins), and cell-wall-bound phenolics. This study investigated impacts of hydroth...

  17. Polymer pendant ligand chemistry. 3. A biomimetic approach to selective metal ion removal and recovery from aqueous solution with polymer-supported sulfonated catechol and linear catechol amide ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Song-Ping; Li, Wei; Franz, K.J.; Albright, R.L.; Fish, R.H.

    1995-05-24

    The design of organic ligands to selectively remove and recover metal ions from aqueous solution is a new and important area of environmental inorganic chemistry. One approach to designing organic ligands for these purposes is to use biological systems as examples for selective metal ion complexation. Thus, the authors report results on the synthesis of several biomimetically important polymer-supported, sulfonated catechol (PS-CATS), sulfonated bis(catechol) linear amide (PS-2-6-LICAMS), and sulfonated 3.3-linear tris(catechol) amide (PS-3,3-LICAMS) ligands that are chemically bonded to modified 6% cross-linked macroporous polystyrene-divinylbenzene beads (PS-DVB) for selective removal and recovery of environmentally and economically important metal ions from aqueous solution, as a function of pH. The Fe{sup 3+} ion selectivity was dramatically shown for PS-CATS, PS-2-6-LICAMS and PS-3,3-LICAMS polymer beads in competition with a similar concentration of Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Al{sup 3+}, and Cr{sup 3+} ions at pH 1-3, while metal ion selectivity could be changed at higher pH values in the absence of Fe{sup 3+} (for example, Hg{sup 2+} at pH 3). Rates of removal and recovery of the Fe{sup 3+} ion with the PS-CATS, PS-2-6LICAMS and PS-3,3-LICAMS polymer beads were also studied as well as relative equilibrium selectivity coefficient (K{sub m}) values for all metal competition studies.

  18. Monoolein production by triglycerides hydrolysis using immobilized Rhizopus oryzae lipase.

    PubMed

    Ghattas, Nesrine; Abidi, Ferid; Galai, Said; Marzouki, M Nejib; Salah, Abderraouf Ben

    2014-07-01

    Lipase extracted from Rhizopus oryzae was immobilized in alginate gel beads. The effects of the immobilization conditions, such as, alginate concentration, CaCl2 concentration and amount of initial enzyme on retained activity (specific activity ratio of entrapped active lipase to free lipase) were investigated. The optimal conditions for lipase entrapment were determined: 2% (w/v) alginate concentration, 100mM CaCl2 and enzyme ratio of 2000IU/mL.In such conditions, immobilized lipase by inclusion in alginate showed a highest stability and activity, on olive oil hydrolysis reaction where it could be reused for 10 cycles. After 15min of hydrolysis reaction, the mass composition of monoolein, diolein and triolein were about 78%, 10% and 12%. Hydrolysis' products purification by column chromatography lead to a successful separation of reaction compounds and provide a pure fraction of monoolein which is considered as the widest used emulsifier in food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:24755261

  19. Cloning and characterization of two flavohemoglobins from Aspergillus oryzae

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Shengmin; Fushinobu, Shinya; Nakanishi, Yoshito; Kim, Sang-Wan; Wakagi, Takayoshi; Shoun, Hirofumi

    2009-03-27

    Two flavohemoglobin (FHb) genes, fhb1 and fhb2, were cloned from Aspergillus oryzae. The amino acid sequences of the deduced FHb1 and FHb2 showed high identity to other FHbs except for the predicted mitochondrial targeting signal in the N-terminus of FHb2. The recombinant proteins displayed absorption spectra similar to those of other FHbs. FHb1 and FHb2 were estimated to be a monomer and a dimer in solution, respectively. Both of the isozymes exhibit high NO dioxygenase (NOD) activity. FHb1 utilizes either NADH or NADPH as an electron donor, whereas FHb2 can only use NADH. These results suggest that FHb1 and FHb2 are fungal counterparts of bacterial FHbs and act as NO detoxification enzymes in the cytosol and mitochondria, respectively. This study is the first to show that a microorganism contains two isozymes of FHb and that intracellular localization of the isozymes could differ.

  20. The whole chloroplast genome of wild rice (Oryza australiensis).

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiqiang; Ge, Song

    2016-03-01

    The whole chloroplast genome of wild rice (Oryza australiensis) is characterized in this study. The genome size is 135,224  bp, exhibiting a typical circular structure including a pair of 25,776  bp inverted repeats (IRa,b) separated by a large single-copy region (LSC) of 82,212  bp and a small single-copy region (SSC) of 12,470  bp. The overall GC content of the genome is 38.95%. 110 unique genes were annotated, including 76 protein-coding genes, 4 ribosomal RNA genes, and 30t RNA genes. Among these, 18 are duplicated in the inverted repeat regions, 13 genes contain one intron, and 2 genes (rps12 and ycf3) have two introns. PMID:24960559

  1. Interaction of malathion, an organophosphorus pesticide with Rhizopus oryzae biomass.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Subhankar; Das, Sujoy K; Chakravarty, Rajdeep; Chakrabarti, Adrita; Ghosh, Subrata; Guha, Arun K

    2010-02-15

    Adsorption of malathion on Rhizopus oryzae biomass (ROB) with special reference to binding mechanism has been described. ROB has been found to adsorb approximately 85% of malathion from its aqueous solution as against 47-68% by other fungal biomasses. Hydrogen ion concentration does not influence the adsorption of malathion by ROB which follows Langmuir-Freundlich dual equilibrium isotherm model (r(2)=0.998). Both physical and chemical interactions are responsible for binding of malathion on ROB. Scanning electron micrographs and EDXA spectra exhibit adsorption of the pesticide on cell surface of ROB. Studies with cell surface polysaccharides show that chitosan through its amine groups contributes largely in the adsorption of malathion. Extraction of lipids from ROB decreases its adsorption capacity to the extent of 36.37-94.02%, depending on the polarity of the solvent. PMID:19783095

  2. Improved annotation through genome-scale metabolic modeling of Aspergillus oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Olsen, Peter; Hansen, Kim; Krogsgaard, Steen; Nielsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Background Since ancient times the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae has been used in the fermentation industry for the production of fermented sauces and the production of industrial enzymes. Recently, the genome sequence of A. oryzae with 12,074 annotated genes was released but the number of hypothetical proteins accounted for more than 50% of the annotated genes. Considering the industrial importance of this fungus, it is therefore valuable to improve the annotation and further integrate genomic information with biochemical and physiological information available for this microorganism and other related fungi. Here we proposed the gene prediction by construction of an A. oryzae Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) library, sequencing and assembly. We enhanced the function assignment by our developed annotation strategy. The resulting better annotation was used to reconstruct the metabolic network leading to a genome scale metabolic model of A. oryzae. Results Our assembled EST sequences we identified 1,046 newly predicted genes in the A. oryzae genome. Furthermore, it was possible to assign putative protein functions to 398 of the newly predicted genes. Noteworthy, our annotation strategy resulted in assignment of new putative functions to 1,469 hypothetical proteins already present in the A. oryzae genome database. Using the substantially improved annotated genome we reconstructed the metabolic network of A. oryzae. This network contains 729 enzymes, 1,314 enzyme-encoding genes, 1,073 metabolites and 1,846 (1,053 unique) biochemical reactions. The metabolic reactions are compartmentalized into the cytosol, the mitochondria, the peroxisome and the extracellular space. Transport steps between the compartments and the extracellular space represent 281 reactions, of which 161 are unique. The metabolic model was validated and shown to correctly describe the phenotypic behavior of A. oryzae grown on different carbon sources. Conclusion A much enhanced annotation of the A. oryzae genome was performed and a genome-scale metabolic model of A. oryzae was reconstructed. The model accurately predicted the growth and biomass yield on different carbon sources. The model serves as an important resource for gaining further insight into our understanding of A. oryzae physiology. PMID:18500999

  3. Multicopper oxidase-1 orthologs from diverse insect species have ascorbate oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zeyu; Dittmer, Neal T; Lang, Minglin; Brummett, Lisa M; Braun, Caroline L; Davis, Lawrence C; Kanost, Michael R; Gorman, Maureen J

    2015-04-01

    Members of the multicopper oxidase (MCO) family of enzymes can be classified by their substrate specificity; for example, ferroxidases oxidize ferrous iron, ascorbate oxidases oxidize ascorbate, and laccases oxidize aromatic substrates such as diphenols. Our previous work on an insect multicopper oxidase, MCO1, suggested that it may function as a ferroxidase. This hypothesis was based on three lines of evidence: RNAi-mediated knock down of Drosophila melanogaster MCO1 (DmMCO1) affects iron homeostasis, DmMCO1 has ferroxidase activity, and DmMCO1 has predicted iron binding residues. In our current study, we expanded our focus to include MCO1 from Anopheles gambiae, Tribolium castaneum, and Manduca sexta. We verified that MCO1 orthologs have similar expression profiles, and that the MCO1 protein is located on the basal surface of cells where it is positioned to oxidize substrates in the hemolymph. In addition, we determined that RNAi-mediated knock down of MCO1 in A. gambiae affects iron homeostasis. To further characterize the enzymatic activity of MCO1 orthologs, we purified recombinant MCO1 from all four insect species and performed kinetic analyses using ferrous iron, ascorbate and two diphenols as substrates. We found that all of the MCO1 orthologs are much better at oxidizing ascorbate than they are at oxidizing ferrous iron or diphenols. This result is surprising because ascorbate oxidases are thought to be specific to plants and fungi. An analysis of three predicted iron binding residues in DmMCO1 revealed that they are not required for ferroxidase or laccase activity, but two of the residues (His374 and Asp380) influence oxidation of ascorbate. These two residues are conserved in MCO1 orthologs from insects and crustaceans; therefore, they are likely to be important for MCO1 function. The results of this study suggest that MCO1 orthologs function as ascorbate oxidases and influence iron homeostasis through an unknown mechanism. PMID:25701385

  4. Open study of the catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitor tolcapone in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Fava, M; Rosenbaum, J F; Kolsky, A R; Alpert, J E; Nierenberg, A A; Spillmann, M; Moore, C; Renshaw, P; Bottiglieri, T; Moroz, G; Magni, G

    1999-08-01

    Tolcapone is a catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitor that has shown efficacy in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. The authors undertook the first study on the efficacy of this COMT inhibitor in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). The authors also wanted to assess the effects of tolcapone on the choline and myoinositol resonances in the left caudate and dorsolateral frontal lobe through proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and on whole blood levels of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe). The study enrolled 21 adults (10 men and 11 women; mean age, 42.6 +/- 9.6 years) with MDD, which was diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, and an initial score of > or = 16 on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D-17). Patients were then treated openly for 8 weeks with tolcapone 400 mg twice daily. Treatment efficacy was assessed with the HAM-D-17, the Clinical Global Impressions Severity (CGI-S) scale, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Among all subjects (N = 21), there were significant (p < .0001) decreases at endpoint in HAM-D-17 scores (from 19.4 +/- 2.9 to 10.7 +/- 5.5), CGI-S scores (from 3.9 +/- 0.6 to 2.4 +/- 1.1), and BDI scores (from 21.6 +/- 8.1 to 12.3 +/- 8.6). Eight patients (38%) dropped out before completing the 8-week open study because of diarrhea, elevated liver function tests, increased anxiety, and noncompliance. No significant effects were noted on choline and myoinositol resonance or on SAMe levels in whole blood before and after 2 weeks of tolcapone treatment. The preliminary results suggest that tolcapone may be a promising agent in the treatment of MDD. Furthermore, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies are necessary to confirm this impression. PMID:10440460

  5. Breast Cancer Risk Reduction and Membrane-Bound Catechol O-Methyltransferase Genetic Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yuan; Olson, Janet; Zhang, Jianping; Hildebrandt, Michelle; Wang, Liewei; Ingle, James; Fredericksen, Zachary; Sellers, Thomas; Miller, William R.; Dixon, J. Michael; Brauch, Hiltrud; Eichelbaum, Michel; Justenhoven, Christina; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon; Brning, Thomas; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Schaid, Daniel; Weinshilboum, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT)-catalyzed methylation of catecholestrogens has been proposed to play a protective role in estrogen-induced genotoxic carcinogenesis. We have taken a comprehensive approach to test the hypothesis that genetic variation in COMT might influence breast cancer risk. Fifteen COMT SNPs selected on the basis of in-depth resequencing of the COMT gene were genotyped in 1482 DNA samples from a Mayo Clinic breast cancer case-control study. Two common SNPs in the distal promoter for membrane-bound (MB) COMT, rs2020917 and rs737865, were associated with breast cancer risk reduction in premenopausal women in the Mayo Clinic study, with allele-specific odds ratios of 0.70 (95% CI = 0.520.95) and 0.68 (95% CI = 0.510.92), respectively. These two SNPs were then subjected to functional genomic analysis and were genotyped in an additional 3683 DNA samples from two independent case-control studies (GENICA and GESBC). Functional genomic experiments showed that these SNPs could up-regulate transcription and that they altered DNA-protein binding patterns. Furthermore, substrate kinetic and exon array analyses suggested a role for MB-COMT in catecholestrogen inactivation. The GENICA results were similar to the Mayo case-control observations, with ORs of 0.85 (95% CI = 0.721.00) and 0.85 (95% CI = 0.721.01) for the two SNPs. No significant effect was observed in the GESBC study. These studies demonstrated that two SNPs in the COMT distal promoter were associated with breast cancer risk reduction in 2 of 3 case-control studies, compatible with the results of functional genomic experiments, suggesting a role for MB-COMT in breast cancer risk. PMID:18632656

  6. Influence of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene polymorphisms in pain sensibility of Brazilian fibromialgia patients.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Flvia Regina; Matsuda, Josie Budag; Mazucato, Mendelson; de Castro Frana, Suzelei; Zingaretti, Snia Marli; da Silva, Lucienir Maria; Martinez-Rossi, Nilce Maria; Jnior, Milton Faria; Marins, Mozart; Fachin, Ana Lcia

    2012-02-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FS) is a rheumatic syndrome affecting to 2-3% of individuals of productive age, mainly women. Neuroendocrine and genetic factors may play a significant role in development of the disease which is characterized by diffuse chronic pain and presence of tender points. Several studies have suggested an association between FS, especially pain sensitivity, and polymorphism of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene. The aim of the present study was to characterize the SNPs rs4680 and rs4818 of the COMT gene and assess its influence in pain sensitivity of patients with fibromyalgia screened by the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ). DNA was extracted from peripheral blood of 112 patients with fibromyalgia and 110 healthy individuals and was used as template in PCR for amplification of a 185-bp fragment of the COMT gene. The amplified fragment was sequenced for analyses of the SNPs rs4680 and rs4818. The frequency of mutant genotype AA of SNP rs6860 was 77.67% in patients with FS and 28.18% for the control group. For the SNP rs4818, the frequency of mutant genotype CC was 73.21 and 39.09% for patients with FS and controls, respectively. Moreover, the FIQ score was higher in patients with the homozygous mutant genotype for SNPs rs4680 (87.92 points) and rs4818 (86.14 points). These results suggest that SNPs rs4680 and rs4818 of the COMT gene may be associated with fibromyalgia and pain sensitivity in FS Brazilian patients. PMID:21120493

  7. How Metal Substitution Affects the Enzymatic Activity of Catechol-O-Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Sparta, Manuel; Alexandrova, Anastassia N.

    2012-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) degrades catecholamines, such as dopamine and epinephrine, by methylating them in the presence of a divalent metal cation (usually Mg(II)), and S-adenosyl-L-methionine. The enzymatic activity of COMT is known to be vitally dependent on the nature of the bound metal: replacement of Mg(II) with Ca(II) leads to a complete deactivation of COMT; Fe(II) is slightly less than potent Mg(II), and Fe(III) is again an inhibitor. Considering the fairly modest role that the metal plays in the catalyzed reaction, this dependence is puzzling, and to date remains an enigma. Using a quantum mechanical / molecular mechanical dynamics method for extensive sampling of protein structure, and first principle quantum mechanical calculations for the subsequent mechanistic study, we explicate the effect of metal substitution on the rate determining step in the catalytic cycle of COMT, the methyl transfer. In full accord with experimental data, Mg(II) bound to COMT is the most potent of the studied cations and it is closely followed by Fe(II), whereas Fe(III) is unable to promote catalysis. In the case of Ca(II), a repacking of the protein binding site is observed, leading to a significant increase in the activation barrier and higher energy of reaction. Importantly, the origin of the effect of metal substitution is different for different metals: for Fe(III) it is the electronic effect, whereas in the case of Ca(II) it is instead the effect of suboptimal protein structure. PMID:23056605

  8. Differential regulation of catechol-O-methyltransferase expression in a mouse model of aggression

    PubMed Central

    Che, Shaoli; Hashim, Audrey; Zavadil, Jiri; Cancro, Robert; Lee, Sang H.; Petkova, Eva; Sershen, Henry W.; Volavka, Jan

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to understand molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying aggressive behaviors in mice exposed to repeated interactions in their homecage with conspecifics. A resident–intruder procedure was employed whereby two males were allowed to interact for 10 min trials, and aggressive and/or submissive behaviors (e.g., degree of attacking, biting, chasing, grooming, rearing, or upright posture) were assessed. Following 10 days of behavioral trials, brains were removed and dissected into specific regions including the cerebellum, frontal cortex, hippocampus, midbrain, pons, and striatum. Gene expression analysis was performed using real-time quantitative polymerase-chain reaction (qPCR) for catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Compared to naive control mice, significant up regulation of COMT expression of residents was observed in the cerebellum, frontal cortex, hippocampus, midbrain, and striatum; in all of these brain regions the COMT expression of residents was also significantly higher than that of intruders. The intruders also had a significant down regulation (compared to naive control mice) within the hippocampus, indicating a selective decrease in COMT expression in the hippocampus of submissive subjects. Immunoblot analysis confirmed COMT up regulation in the midbrain and hippocampus of residents and down regulation in intruders. qPCR analysis of TH expression indicated significant up regulation in the midbrain of residents and concomitant down regulation in intruders. These findings implicate regionally- and behaviorally-specific regulation of COMT and TH expression in aggressive and submissive behaviors. Additional molecular and cellular characterization of COMT, TH, and other potential targets is warranted within this animal model of aggression. PMID:21512897

  9. Immunoaffinity purification and partial amino acid sequence analysis of catechol-O-methyltransferase from pig liver.

    PubMed

    Bertocci, B; Garotta, G; Da Prada, M; Lahm, H W; Zrcher, G; Virgallita, G; Miggiano, V

    1991-10-25

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the soluble form (S-COMT) of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT, EC 2.1.1.6) were produced using a purified preparation of the enzyme from pig liver as antigen. The selected monoclonal antibodies recognized the enzyme with different capacities. One of them (Co60-1B/7) showed a significant cross reaction with S-COMT from rat and human liver. A protein band of 23 kDa was recognized by the mAbs on Western blots of the soluble fraction of pig liver. The mAbs were also able to recognize the membrane-bound form of the enzyme, which was found to be mainly localized in the microsomal fraction of pig and rat liver as well as of the human hepatoma cell line Hep G2. The protein bands detected in microsomes had a molecular mass of 26 kDa in pig and rat liver and displayed a slightly higher molecular mass (29 kDa) in the Hep G2 cell line. A single step method for the immunoaffinity purification of pig liver S-COMT was developed by using a Sepharose 4B column to which the mAb Co54-5F/8 was covalently coupled. Acid elution conditions were optimized to obtain the enzyme in active form with a good yield. SDS-PAGE analysis of the purified preparation revealed a single protein band with a molecular mass of 23 kDa with 154-fold enrichment in enzyme activity over the starting material. Since the N-terminus was blocked, purified enzyme preparations were cleaved with trypsin. Two fragments of 22 and 33 amino acids in length could be sequenced by Edman degradation. PMID:1932084

  10. Catechols in post-mortem brain of patients with Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, D. S.; Sullivan, P.; Holmes, C.; Kopin, I. J.; Basile, M. J.; Mash, D. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), a cytotoxic metabolite of dopamine, is the focus of the catecholaldehyde hypothesis about the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease. This study explored whether DOPAL is detectable in human striatum especially in the putamen (Pu), the main site of dopamine depletion in Parkinson disease and is related to other neurochemical indices of catecholamine stores and metabolism in Parkinson disease. Methods Putamen, caudate (Cd), and frontal cortex (Ctx) catechols were measured in tissue from patients with pathologically proven end-stage Parkinson disease (N = 15) and control subjects (N = 14) of similar age with similar post-mortem intervals. Results Putamen DOPAL (3% of dopamine in controls) correlated with dopamine and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid both across all subjects and within the Parkinson disease and control groups. Pu dopamine was decreased by 93% and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid 95% in Parkinson disease vs. controls, with smaller decreases of DOPAL (83%) and norepinephrine (73%) in Pu and of dopamine (74%) and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (82%) in Cd. In Parkinson disease, Pu DOPAL:dihydroxyphenylacetic acid averaged 3.4 times and DOPAL:dopamine 4.4 times control (P = 0.03 each). The main catecholamine in Ctx was norepinephrine, which was decreased by 51% in Parkinson disease patients. Conclusions Correlated decreases of DOPAL, dopamine, and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid in Parkinson disease reflect severe loss of Pu dopamine stores, which seems more extensive than loss of Pu norepinephrine or Cd dopamine stores. Increased Pu DOPAL:dihydroxyphenylacetic acid ratios in Parkinson disease suggest decreased detoxification of DOPAL by aldehyde dehydrogenase. Elevated levels of cytosolic DOPAL might contribute to loss of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson disease. PMID:21073636

  11. Catechol-O-methyltransferase gene haplotypes in Mexican and Spanish patients with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Alarcn, Gilberto; Fragoso, Jos-Manuel; Cruz-Robles, David; Vargas, Anglica; Vargas, Alfonso; Lao-Villadniga, Jos-Ignacio; Garca-Fructuoso, Ferrn; Ramos-Kuri, Manuel; Hernndez, Fernando; Springall, Rashidi; Bojalil, Rafael; Vallejo, Maite; Martnez-Lavn, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is frequent in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Heart rate variability analyses have demonstrated signs of ongoing sympathetic hyperactivity. Catecholamines are sympathetic neurotransmitters. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), an enzyme, is the major catecholamine-clearing pathway. There are several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the COMT gene associated with the different catecholamine-clearing abilities of the COMT enzyme. These SNPs are in linkage disequilibrium and segregate as 'haplotypes'. Healthy females with a particular COMT gene haplotype (ACCG) producing a defective enzyme are more sensitive to painful stimuli. The objective of our study was to define whether women with FM, from two different countries (Mexico and Spain), have the COMT gene haplotypes that have been previously associated with greater sensitivity to pain. All the individuals in the study were female. Fifty-seven Mexican patients and 78 Spanish patients were compared with their respective healthy control groups. All participants filled out the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ). Six COMT SNPs (rs2097903, rs6269, rs4633, rs4818, rs4680, and rs165599) were genotyped from peripheral blood DNA. In Spanish patients, there was a significant association between three SNPs (rs6269, rs4818, and rs4680) and the presence of FM when compared with healthy controls. Moreover, in Spanish patients with the 'high pain sensitivity' haplotype (ACCG), the disease, as assessed by the FIQ, was more severe. By contrast, Mexican patients displayed only a weak association between rs6269 and rs165599, and some FIQ subscales. In our group of Spanish patients, there was an association between FM and the COMT haplotype previously associated with high pain sensitivity. This association was not observed in Mexican patients. Studies with a larger sample size are needed in order to verify or amend these preliminary results. PMID:17961261

  12. Specific cation binding site in mammalian cytochrome oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kirichenko, A; Vygodina, T; Mkrtchyan, H M; Konstantinov, A

    1998-02-27

    Calcium ion binds reversibly with cytochrome c oxidase from beef heart mitochondria (Kd approximately 2 microM) shifting alpha- and gamma-absorption bands of heme a to the red. Two sodium ions compete with one Ca2+ for the binding site with an average dissociation constant square root[K1(Na) x K2(Na)] approximately 3.6 mM. The Ca2+-induced spectral shift of heme a is specific for mammalian cytochrome c oxidase and is not observed in bacterial or yeast aa3 oxidases although the Ca2+-binding site has been revealed in the bacterial enzyme [Ostermeier, C., Harrenga, A., Ermler, U. and Michel, H. (1997) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94, 10547-10553]. As His-59 and Gln-63 involved in Ca2+ binding with Subunit I of P. denitrificans oxidase are not conserved in bovine oxidase, these residues have to be substituted by alternative ligands in mammalian enzyme, which is indeed the case as shown by refined structure of bovine heart cytochrome oxidase (S. Yoshikawa, personal communication). We propose that it is interaction of Ca2+ with the species-specific ligand(s) in bovine oxidase that accounts for perturbation of heme a. The Ca2+/Na2+-binding site may be functionally associated with the exit part of 'pore B' proton channel in subunit I of mammalian cytochrome c oxidase. PMID:9515733

  13. Bilirubin oxidase bioelectrocatalytic cathodes: the impact of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Milton, Ross D; Giroud, Fabien; Thumser, Alfred E; Minteer, Shelley D; Slade, Robert C T

    2014-01-01

    Mediator-less, direct electro-catalytic reduction of oxygen to water by bilirubin oxidase (Myrothecium sp.) was obtained on anthracene-modified, multi-walled carbon nanotubes. H2O2 was found to significantly and irreversibly affect the electro-catalytic activity of bilirubin oxidase, whereas similar electrodes comprised of laccase (Trametes versicolor) were reversibly inhibited. PMID:24185735

  14. Effect of contraceptive steroids on monoamine oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Southgate, Jennifer; Collins, G. G. S.; Pryse-Davies, J.; Sandler, M.

    1969-01-01

    Cyclical variations in monoamine oxidase activity during the human menstrual cycle, specific to the endometrium and modified in women undergoing contraceptive steroid treatment, may reflect changes in hormonal environment. Treatment of rats with individual constituents of the contraceptive pill causes analogous changes: oestrogens inhibit and progestogens potentiate uterine monoamine oxidase activity. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3

  15. Partial characterization of lysyl oxidase from several human tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Kuivaniemi, H

    1985-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase activity was assayed in urea extracts of a number of human tissues, proving to be highest in skin. Antibodies to human placental lysyl oxidase completely inhibited the activity of crude lysyl oxidase from all the human tissues studied, with no significant differences in the amounts of antiserum required for 50% inhibition. By contrast, marked differences were found in this value between skin tissue samples from different species. The Mr of lysyl oxidase in crude extracts of human skin and in the medium of cultured human skin fibroblasts was 30 000 by gel filtration, no active species with a higher Mr being detectable. Four forms of lysyl oxidase activity were seen in DEAE-cellulose chromatography of urea extract from human skin, all having Mr 30 000. Antibodies to human placental lysyl oxidase stained a 30 000-Mr protein in urea extracts of all the human tissues studied and in the medium of cultured human skin fibroblasts when examined by immunoblotting after sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-slab-gel electrophoresis, but they also stained high-Mr material. The findings suggest that there are no immunologically distinct lysyl oxidase isoenzymes in the various human tissues and that the true Mr of lysyl oxidase in crude urea extracts is 30 000. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2865951

  16. Rapid diversification of five Oryza AA genomes associated with rice adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qun-Jie; Zhu, Ting; Xia, En-Hua; Shi, Chao; Liu, Yun-Long; Zhang, Yun; Liu, Yuan; Jiang, Wen-Kai; Zhao, You-Jie; Mao, Shu-Yan; Zhang, Li-Ping; Huang, Hui; Jiao, Jun-Ying; Xu, Ping-Zhen; Yao, Qiu-Yang; Zeng, Fan-Chun; Yang, Li-Li; Gao, Ju; Tao, Da-Yun; Wang, Yue-Ju; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Comparative genomic analyses among closely related species can greatly enhance our understanding of plant gene and genome evolution. We report de novo-assembled AA-genome sequences for Oryza nivara, Oryza glaberrima, Oryza barthii, Oryza glumaepatula, and Oryza meridionalis. Our analyses reveal massive levels of genomic structural variation, including segmental duplication and rapid gene family turnover, with particularly high instability in defense-related genes. We show, on a genomic scale, how lineage-specific expansion or contraction of gene families has led to their morphological and reproductive diversification, thus enlightening the evolutionary process of speciation and adaptation. Despite strong purifying selective pressures on most Oryza genes, we documented a large number of positively selected genes, especially those genes involved in flower development, reproduction, and resistance-related processes. These diversifying genes are expected to have played key roles in adaptations to their ecological niches in Asia, South America, Africa and Australia. Extensive variation in noncoding RNA gene numbers, function enrichment, and rates of sequence divergence might also help account for the different genetic adaptations of these rice species. Collectively, these resources provide new opportunities for evolutionary genomics, numerous insights into recent speciation, a valuable database of functional variation for crop improvement, and tools for efficient conservation of wild rice germplasm. PMID:25368197

  17. Aspergillus oryzae-based cell factory for direct kojic acid production from cellulose

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Kojic acid (5-Hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)-4-pyrone) is one of the major secondary metabolites in Aspergillus oryzae. It is widely used in food, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. The production cost, however, is too high for its use in many applications. Thus, an efficient and cost-effective kojic acid production process would be valuable. However, little is known about the complete set of genes for kojic acid production. Currently, kojic acid is produced from glucose. The efficient production of kojic acid using cellulose as an inexpensive substrate would help establish cost-effective kojic acid production. Results A kojic acid transcription factor gene over-expressing the A. oryzae strain was constructed. Three genes related to kojic acid production in this strain were transcribed in higher amounts than those found in the wild-type strain. This strain produced 26.4g/L kojic acid from 80g/L glucose. Furthermore, this strain was transformed with plasmid harboring 3 cellulase genes. The resultant A. oryzae strain successfully produced 0.18g/L of kojic acid in 6days of fermentation from the phosphoric acid swollen cellulose. Conclusions Kojic acid was produced directly from cellulose material using genetically engineered A. oryzae. Because A. oryzae has efficient protein secretion ability and secondary metabolite productivity, an A. oryzae-based cell factory could be a platform for the production of various kinds of bio-based chemicals. PMID:24885968

  18. Genomics of Aspergillus oryzae: Learning from the History of Koji Mold and Exploration of Its Future

    PubMed Central

    Machida, Masayuki; Yamada, Osamu; Gomi, Katsuya

    2008-01-01

    At a time when the notion of microorganisms did not exist, our ancestors empirically established methods for the production of various fermentation foods: miso (bean curd seasoning) and shoyu (soy sauce), both of which have been widely used and are essential for Japanese cooking, and sake, a magical alcoholic drink consumed at a variety of ritual occasions, are typical examples. A filamentous fungus, Aspergillus oryzae, is the key organism in the production of all these traditional foods, and its solid-state cultivation (SSC) has been confirmed to be the secret for the high productivity of secretory hydrolases vital for the fermentation process. Indeed, our genome comparison and transcriptome analysis uncovered mechanisms for effective degradation of raw materials in SSC: the extracellular hydrolase genes that have been found only in the A. oryzae genome but not in A. fumigatus are highly induced during SSC but not in liquid cultivation. Also, the temperature reduction process empirically adopted in the traditional soy-sauce fermentation processes has been found to be important to keep strong expression of the A. oryzae-specific extracellular hydrolases. One of the prominent potentials of A. oryzae is that it has been successfully applied to effective degradation of biodegradable plastic. Both cutinase, responsible for the degradation of plastic, and hydrophobin, which recruits cutinase on the hydrophobic surface to enhance degradation, have been discovered in A. oryzae. Genomic analysis in concert with traditional knowledge and technology will continue to be powerful tools in the future exploration of A. oryzae. PMID:18820080

  19. The Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PilZ Domain Proteins Function Differentially in Cyclic di-GMP Binding and Regulation of Virulence and Motility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fenghuan; Tian, Fang; Chen, Huamin; Hutchins, William; Yang, Ching-Hong; He, Chenyang

    2015-07-01

    The PilZ domain proteins have been demonstrated to be one of the major types of receptors mediating cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling pathways in several pathogenic bacteria. However, little is known about the function of PilZ domain proteins in c-di-GMP regulation of virulence in the bacterial blight pathogen of rice Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. Here, the roles of PilZ domain proteins PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 in c-di-GMP binding, regulation of virulence and motility, and subcellular localization were characterized in comparison with PXO_02715, identified previously as an interactor with the c-di-GMP receptor Filp to regulate virulence. The c-di-GMP binding motifs in the PilZ domains were conserved in PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 but were less well conserved in PXO_02715. PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 but not PXO_02715 proteins bound to c-di-GMP with high affinity in vitro, and the R(141) and R(10) residues in the PilZ domains of PXO_00049 and PXO_02374, respectively, were crucial for c-di-GMP binding. Gene deletion of PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 resulted in significant increases in virulence and hrp gene transcription, indicating their negative regulation of virulence via type III secretion system expression. All mutants showed significant changes in sliding motility but not exopolysaccharide production and biofilm formation. In trans expression of the full-length open reading frame (ORF) of each gene in the relevant mutants led to restoration of the phenotype to wild-type levels. Moreover, PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 displayed mainly multisite subcellular localizations, whereas PXO_02715 showed nonpolar distributions in the X. oryzae pv. oryzae cells. Therefore, this study demonstrated the different functions of the PilZ domain proteins in mediation of c-di-GMP regulation of virulence and motility in X. oryzae pv. oryzae. PMID:25911481

  20. The Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PilZ Domain Proteins Function Differentially in Cyclic di-GMP Binding and Regulation of Virulence and Motility

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fenghuan; Tian, Fang; Chen, Huamin; Hutchins, William; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The PilZ domain proteins have been demonstrated to be one of the major types of receptors mediating cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling pathways in several pathogenic bacteria. However, little is known about the function of PilZ domain proteins in c-di-GMP regulation of virulence in the bacterial blight pathogen of rice Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. Here, the roles of PilZ domain proteins PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 in c-di-GMP binding, regulation of virulence and motility, and subcellular localization were characterized in comparison with PXO_02715, identified previously as an interactor with the c-di-GMP receptor Filp to regulate virulence. The c-di-GMP binding motifs in the PilZ domains were conserved in PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 but were less well conserved in PXO_02715. PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 but not PXO_02715 proteins bound to c-di-GMP with high affinity in vitro, and the R141 and R10 residues in the PilZ domains of PXO_00049 and PXO_02374, respectively, were crucial for c-di-GMP binding. Gene deletion of PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 resulted in significant increases in virulence and hrp gene transcription, indicating their negative regulation of virulence via type III secretion system expression. All mutants showed significant changes in sliding motility but not exopolysaccharide production and biofilm formation. In trans expression of the full-length open reading frame (ORF) of each gene in the relevant mutants led to restoration of the phenotype to wild-type levels. Moreover, PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 displayed mainly multisite subcellular localizations, whereas PXO_02715 showed nonpolar distributions in the X. oryzae pv. oryzae cells. Therefore, this study demonstrated the different functions of the PilZ domain proteins in mediation of c-di-GMP regulation of virulence and motility in X. oryzae pv. oryzae. PMID:25911481

  1. Purification and characterization of estrogen-2/4-hydroxylase activity from rabbit hypothalami: peroxidase-mediated catechol estrogen formation.

    PubMed

    Mondschein, J S; Hersey, R M; Weisz, J

    1986-09-01

    Estrogen-2/4-hydroxylase (E-2/4-H) activity of rabbit hypothalamic tissue was previously found to be localized in the soluble subcellular fraction. In the present study, the enzymatic activity responsible for catechol estrogen formation in this subcellular fraction of the rabbit hypothalamus was purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation, ion exchange chromatography, and chromatofocusing. E-2/4-H activity was found to be associated with a group of hemoproteins with peroxidase activity. The characteristics of this hypothalamic E-2/4-H activity were reestablished in light of a peroxidatic mechanism for catechol estrogen formation. Organic hydroperoxides stimulated E-2/4-H activity, presumably by serving as oxidizing cosubstrate required for peroxidase-mediated reactions. E-2/4-H activity in a 17,500 X g supernatant of hypothalamic tissue was linear with time for at least 10 min and with protein concentration to at least 100 micrograms/150 microliter. It displayed a pH optimum of 6 and an apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of 32 microM with respect to estradiol. The amounts of 4-hydroxyestradiol formed were comparable to those of 2-hydroxyestradiol. The characteristics established in this study for the peroxidase-type E-2/4-H were distinct from those of the particulate, NADPH-dependent 2-hydroxylases found in rat liver and in porcine blastocyst and ovary. These differences provide a basis for differentiating between the two types of enzymatic activity that can lead to catechol estrogen formation in vitro. PMID:3015566

  2. Cytochrome c Oxidase Dysfunction in Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Satish; Avadhani, Narayan G.

    2012-01-01

    Cytochrome c Oxidase (CcO) is the terminal oxidase of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. This bigenomic enzyme in mammals contains 13 subunits, of which, three catalytic subunits are encoded by the mitochondrial genes. The remaining ten subunits with suspected roles in the regulation, and/or, assembly are coded by the nuclear genome. The enzyme contains two heme groups (heme a and a3) and two Cu2+ centers (Cu2+ A and Cu2+ B) as catalytic centers and handles more than 90% of molecular O2 respired by the mammalian cells and tissues. CcO is a highly regulated enzyme which is believed to be the pace setter for mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and ATP synthesis. The structure and function of the enzyme is affected in a wide variety of diseases including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, myocardial ischemia/reperfusion, bone and skeletal diseases and diabetes. Despite handling a high O2 load the role of CcO in the production of reactive oxygen species still remains a subject of debate. However, a volume of evidence suggests that CcO dysfunction is invariably associated with increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and cellular toxicity. In this article we review literature on mechanisms of multimodal regulation of CcO activity by a wide spectrum of physiological and pathological factors. We also review an array of literature on the direct or indirect roles of CcO in reactive oxygen species production. PMID:22841758

  3. Interheme electron tunneling in cytochrome c oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Kaila, Ville R. I.; Johansson, Mikael P.; Sundholm, Dage; Wikstrm, Mrten

    2010-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain that catalyzes respiratory reduction of dioxygen (O2) to water in all eukaryotes and many aerobic bacteria. CcO, and its homologs among the heme-copper oxidases, has an active site composed of an oxygen-binding heme and a copper center in the vicinity, plus another heme group that donates electrons to this site. In most oxidoreduction enzymes, electron transfer (eT) takes place by quantum-mechanical electron tunneling. Here we show by independent molecular dynamics and quantum-chemical methods that the heme-heme eT in CcO differs from the majority of cases in having an exceptionally low reorganization energy. We show that the rate of interheme eT in CcO may nevertheless be predicted by the Moser-Dutton equation if reinterpreted as the average of the eT rates between all individual atoms of the donor and acceptor weighed by the respective packing densities between them. We argue that this modification may be necessary at short donor/acceptor distances comparable to the donor/acceptor radii. PMID:21106766

  4. Oxidation of polysaccharides by galactose oxidase.

    PubMed

    Parikka, Kirsti; Leppnen, Ann-Sofie; Pitknen, Leena; Reunanen, Markku; Willfr, Stefan; Tenkanen, Maija

    2010-01-13

    Galactose oxidase was used as a catalyst to oxidize selectively the C-6 hydroxyls of terminal galactose to carbonyl groups. The polysaccharides studied included spruce galactoglucomannan, guar galactomannan, larch arabinogalactan, corn fiber arabinoxylan, and tamarind seed xyloglucan, with terminal galactose contents varying from 6% to 40%. A multienzyme system was used, with catalase and horseradish peroxidase to enhance the action of galactose oxidase. An analysis technique was developed for the quantification of the reactive aldehydes with GC-MS, utilizing NaBD4 reduction and acidic methanolysis. The best oxidation degrees of terminal galactosyls were obtained with xyloglucan (85% of galactose) and spruce galactoglucomannan (65% of galactose). The highest oxidation degree based on total carbohydrates was achieved with guar gum (28%), which had the highest galactose content. The oxidation resulted in changes in the physicochemical properties of the polysaccharide solutions, and the changes observed varied between the polysaccharides. The clearest change was in tamarind xyloglucan, which formed a gel after the oxidation. After the oxidation, larger particles were present in the solution of spruce galactoglucomannan, but changes in its rheological properties were not observed. PMID:20000571

  5. The complex roles of NADPH oxidases in fungal infection

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Deborah; Wheeler, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary NADPH oxidases play key roles in immunity and inflammation that go beyond the production of microbicidal reactive oxygen species (ROS). The past decade has brought a new appreciation for the diversity of roles played by ROS in signaling associated with inflammation and immunity. NADPH oxidase activity affects disease outcome during infections by human pathogenic fungi, an important group of emerging and opportunistic pathogens that includes Candida, Aspergillus and Cryptococcus species. Here we review how alternative roles of NADPH oxidase activity impact fungal infection and how ROS signaling affects fungal physiology. Particular attention is paid to roles for NADPH oxidase in immune migration, immunoregulation in pulmonary infection, neutrophil extracellular trap formation, autophagy and inflammasome activity. These recent advances highlight the power and versatility of spatiotemporally controlled redox regulation in the context of infection, and point to a need to understand the molecular consequences of NADPH oxidase activity in the cell. PMID:24905433

  6. Simultaneous Detection and Estimation of Catechol, Hydroquinone, and Resorcinol in Binary and Ternary Mixtures Using Electrochemical Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Md. Uzzal; Rahman, Md. Toufiqur; Ehsan, Md. Qamrul

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) were performed with a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with polyglutamic acid (PGA) on the three dihydroxybenzene isomers, catechol (CT), hydroquinone (HQ), and resorcinol (RS). At bare GCE, these isomers exhibited voltammograms with highly overlapped redox peaks that impeded their simultaneous detection in binary and ternary mixtures. On the contrary, at PGA modified GCE binary and ternary mixtures of the dihydroxybenzene isomers showed well-resolved redox peaks in both CV and DPV experiments. This resolving ability of PGA modified GCE proves its potential to be exploited as an electrochemical sensor for the simultaneous detection of these isomers. PMID:26770198

  7. The Role of Human Aldo-Keto Reductases in the Metabolic Activation and Detoxication of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Interconversion of PAH Catechols and PAH o-Quinones

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Jin, Yi; Huang, Meng; Penning, Trevor M.

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants. They are procarcinogens requiring metabolic activation to elicit their deleterious effects. Aldo-keto reductases (AKR) catalyze the oxidation of proximate carcinogenic PAH trans-dihydrodiols to yield electrophilic and redox-active PAH o-quinones. AKRs are also found to be capable of reducing PAH o-quinones to form PAH catechols. The interconversion of o-quinones and catechols results in the redox-cycling of PAH o-quinones to give rise to the generation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent oxidative DNA damage. On the other hand, PAH catechols can be intercepted through phase II metabolism by which PAH o-quinones could be detoxified and eliminated. The aim of the present review is to summarize the role of human AKRs in the metabolic activation/detoxication of PAH and the relevance of phase II conjugation reactions to human lung carcinogenesis. PMID:23162467

  8. Population genetic structure of Oryza rufipogon and Oryza nivara: implications for the origin of O. nivara.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Zheng, Xiao-Ming; Zhou, Lian; Zhou, Hai-Fei; Ge, Song

    2015-10-01

    Ecological speciation plays a primary role in driving species divergence and adaptation. Oryza rufipogon and Oryza nivara are two incipient species at the early stage of speciation with distinct differences in morphology, life history traits and habitat preference, and therefore provide a unique model for the study of ecological speciation. However, the population genetic structure of the ancestral O. rufipogon has been controversial despite substantial study, and the origin of the derivative O. nivara remains unclear. Here, based on sequences of 10 nuclear and two chloroplast loci from 26 wild populations across the entire geographic ranges of the two species, we conducted comprehensive analyses using population genetics, phylogeography and species distribution modelling (SDM) approaches. In addition to supporting the two previously reported major subdivisions, we detected four genetically distinct groups within O. rufipogon and found no correlation between the genetic groups and either species identity or geographical regions. The SDM clearly showed substantial change in the distribution range of O. rufipogon in history, demonstrating that the repeated extinction and colonization of local populations due to multiple glacial-interglacial cycles during the Quaternary was most likely the main factor shaping the confounding population genetic structure of O. rufipogon. Moreover, we found significant differences between the two species in climate preferences, suggestive of an important role for climatic factors in the adaptation, persistence and expansion of O. nivara. Finally, based on the genetic pattern and dynamics of the O. nivara populations, we hypothesize that O. nivara might have independently originated multiple times from different O. rufipogon populations. PMID:26340227

  9. Gene structure and quinol oxidase activity of a cytochrome bd-type oxidase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, J; Koga, E; Mizuta, T; Sato, C; Noguchi, S; Sone, N

    1999-04-21

    Gram-positive thermophilic Bacillus species contain cytochrome caa3-type cytochrome c oxidase as their main terminal oxidase in the respiratory chain. We previously identified and purified an alternative oxidase, cytochrome bd-type quinol oxidase, from a mutant of Bacillus stearothermophilus defective in the caa3-type oxidase activity (J. Sakamoto et al., FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 143 (1996) 151-158). Compared with proteobacterial counterparts, B. stearothermophilus cytochrome bd showed lower molecular weights of the two subunits, shorter wavelength of alpha-band absorption maximum due to heme D, and lower quinol oxidase activity. Preincubation with menaquinone-2 enhanced the enzyme activity up to 40 times, suggesting that, besides the catalytic site, there is another quinone-binding site which largely affects the enzyme activity. In order to clarify the molecular basis of the differences of cytochromes bd between B. stearothermophilus and proteobacteria, the genes encoding for the B. stearothermophilus bd was cloned based on its partial peptide sequences. The gene for subunit I (cbdA) encodes 448 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 50195 Da, which is 14 and 17% shorter than those of Escherichia coli and Azotobacter vinelandii, respectively, and CbdA lacks the C-terminal half of the long hydrophilic loop between the putative transmembrane segments V and VI (Q loop), which has been suggested to include the substrate quinone-binding site for the E. coli enzyme. The gene for subunit II (cbdB) encodes 342 residues with a molecular weight of 38992 Da. Homology search indicated that the B. stearothermophilus cbdAB has the highest sequence similarity to ythAB in B. subtilis genome rather than to cydAB, the first set of cytochrome bd genes identified in the genome. Sequence comparison of cytochromes bd and their homologs from various organisms demonstrates that the proteins can be classified into two subfamilies, a proteobacterial type including E. coli bd and a more widely distributed type including the B. stearothermophilus enzyme, suggesting that the latter type is evolutionarily older. PMID:10216161

  10. Purification and characterization of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous NCIMB 13259 and cloning and sequencing of its catA gene.

    PubMed Central

    Strachan, P D; Freer, A A; Fewson, C A

    1998-01-01

    A method was developed for the purification of catechol 1, 2-dioxygenase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous NCIMB 13259 that had been grown in the presence of benzyl alcohol. The enzyme has very similar apparent Km (1-2 microM) and Vmax (13-19 units/mg of protein) values for the intradiol cleavage of catechol, 3-methylcatechol and 4-methylcatechol and it is optimally active at pH9. Cross-linking studies indicate that the enzyme is a homodimer. It contains 0.6 atoms of Fe per subunit. The enzyme was crystallized with 15% (w/v) poly(ethylene glycol) 4000/0.33 M CaCl2/25 mM Tris (pH7.5) by using a microseeding technique. Preliminary X-ray characterization showed that the crystals are in space group C2 with unit-cell dimensions a=111.9 A, b=78.1 A, c=134.6 A, beta=100 degrees. An oligonucleotide probe, made by hemi-nested PCR, was used to clone the gene encoding catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (catA). The deduced 282-residue sequence corresponds to a protein of molecular mass 31539 Da, close to the molecular mass of 31558 Da obtained by electrospray MS of the purified enzyme. catA was subcloned into the expression vector pTB361, allowing the production of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase to approx. 40% of the total cellular protein. The deduced amino acid sequence of the enzyme has 56% and 75% identity with the catechol 1, 2-dioxygenases of Arthrobacter mA3 and Rhodococcus erythropolis AN-13 respectively, but less than 35% identity with intradiol catechol and chlorocatechol dioxygenases of Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:9677336

  11. Identification and Characterization of Two Novel DSF-Controlled Virulence-Associated Genes Within the nodB-rhgB Locus of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola Rs105.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhiwei; Zhao, Yancun; Zhou, Xingyang; Wu, Guichun; Zhang, Yuqiang; Qian, Guoliang; Liu, Fengquan

    2015-05-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola and X. oryzae pv. oryzae are two pathovars of X. oryzae that cause leaf streak and blight in rice, respectively. These two bacterial pathogens cause different disease symptoms by utilizing different infection sites on rice. Compared with X. oryzae pv. oryzae, the molecular virulence mechanism of X. oryzae pv. oryzicola remains largely unknown. Previously, we identified a unique diffusible signal factor (DSF)-controlled virulence-related gene (hshB) in X. oryzae pv. oryzicola Rs105 located in the nodB-rghB locus, which is absent in X. oryzae pv. oryzae PXO99(A). In the present study, we identified two additional genes within this locus (hshA and hshC) that were unique to X. oryzae pv. oryzicola Rs105 compared with X. oryzae pv. oryzae PXO99(A), and we found that the transcription of these genes was regulated by DSF signaling in X. oryzae pv. oryzicola. The mutation of these genes impaired the virulence of the wild-type Rs105 when using a low inoculation density of X. oryzae pv. oryzicola. In contrast to hshB, the mutation of these genes did not have any visible effect on characterized virulence-related functions, including in vitro growth, extracellular polysaccharide production, extracellular protease activity, and antioxidative ability. However, we found that mutation of hshA or hshC significantly reduced the in planta growth ability and epiphytic survival level of X. oryzae pv. oryzicola cells, which was the probable mechanisms of involvement of these two genes in virulence. Collectively, our studies of X. oryzae pv. oryzicola have identified two novel DSF-controlled virulence-associated genes (hshA and hshC), which will add to our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of conserved DSF virulence signaling in Xanthomonas species. PMID:26020828

  12. Expression of the alternative oxidase complements cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Dassa, Emmanuel P; Dufour, Eric; Gonalves, Srgio; Paupe, Vincent; Hakkaart, Gertjan A J; Jacobs, Howard T; Rustin, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency is associated with a wide spectrum of clinical conditions, ranging from early onset devastating encephalomyopathy and cardiomyopathy, to neurological diseases in adulthood and in the elderly. No method of compensating successfully for COX deficiency has been reported so far. In vitro, COX-deficient human cells require additional glucose, pyruvate and uridine for normal growth and are specifically sensitive to oxidative stress. Here, we have tested whether the expression of a mitochondrially targeted, cyanide-resistant, alternative oxidase (AOX) from Ciona intestinalis could alleviate the metabolic abnormalities of COX-deficient human cells either from a patient harbouring a COX15 pathological mutation or rendered deficient by silencing the COX10 gene using shRNA. We demonstrate that the expression of the AOX, well-tolerated by the cells, compensates for both the growth defect and the pronounced oxidant-sensitivity of COX-deficient human cells. PMID:20049701

  13. Non-innocent ligand behaviour of a bimetallic Cu complex employing a bridging catecholate.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Tim J; Chiang, Linus; Ramogida, Caterina F; Webb, Michael I; Savard, Didier; Sakaguchi, Miyuki; Ogura, Takashi; Shimazaki, Yuichi; Storr, Tim

    2012-07-14

    The geometric and electronic structure of a bimetallic Cu Schiff-base complex and its one-electron oxidized form have been investigated. The two salen units in the neutral complex 1 are linked via a bridging catecholate function, and the coupling between the two Cu(II) d(9) centres was determined to be weakly antiferromagnetic on the basis of solid-state magnetic studies (J = -3 cm(-1)), and variable-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) (J = -3 cm(-1)). Theoretical calculations (DFT) were in agreement with the experimental results (J = -7 cm(-1)), and provided insight into the coupling mechanism for the neutral system. One-electron oxidation provided [1](+) which was observed to have limited stability in solution. The oxidized complex was determined to be a ligand radical species in solution, with the electron hole potentially localized on the redox-active dioxolene, the phenolate ligands, or delocalized over the entire ligand system. Electrochemical experiments and UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy, in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, provided insight into the locus of oxidation and the degree of delocalization in this system. The ligand radical for [1?](+) was determined experimentally to be localized on the dioxolene bridge with a small amount of spin density on the outer phenolate moieties predicted by the calculations. This assignment was aided via comparison to data for the Ni analogue (Inorg. Chem., 2011, 50, 6746). The resonance Raman spectrum of [1?](+) (?(ex) = 413 nm) in CH(2)Cl(2) solution clearly exhibited a new band at 1308 cm(-1) in comparison to 1, supporting semiquinone formation. Variable-temperature EPR on the three-spin system [1?](+) did not provide definitive information on the coupling interaction, possibly due to a very small difference in energy between the S = 3/2 and S = 1/2 states and/or a very small zero-field splitting, in combination with significant line-broadening. The data is consistent with a description of the overall electronic structure of [1?](+) as a bimetallic Cu(II) complex with a bridge-localized semiquinone ligand radical species. PMID:22576939

  14. Bioactive surface modification of metal oxides via catechol-bearing modular peptides: multivalent-binding, surface retention, and peptide bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wen; Policastro, Gina M; Hua, Geng; Guo, Kai; Zhou, Jinjun; Wesdemiotis, Chrys; Doll, Gary L; Becker, Matthew L

    2014-11-19

    A series of multivalent dendrons containing a bioactive osteogenic growth peptide (OGP) domain and surface-binding catechol domains were obtained through solid phase synthesis, and their binding affinity to hydroxyapatite, TiO2, ZrO2, CeO2, Fe3O4 and gold was characterized using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-d). Using the distinct difference in binding affinity of the bioconjugate to the metal oxides, TiO2-coated glass slides were selectively patterned with bioactive peptides. Cell culture studies demonstrated the bioavailability of the OGP and that OGP remained on the surface for at least 2 weeks under in vitro cell culture conditions. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteocalcein (OCN) markers were upregulated 3-fold and 60-fold, respectively, relative to controls at 21 days. Similarly, 3-fold more calcium was deposited using the OGP tethered dendron compared to TiO2. These catechol-bearing dendrons provide a fast and efficient method to functionalize a wide range of inorganic materials with bioactive peptides and have the potential to be used in coating orthopaedic implants and fixation devices. PMID:25343707

  15. The Influence of the Amide Linkage in the Fe(III) -Binding Properties of Catechol-Modified Rosamine Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Queirs, Carla; Leite, Andreia; G M Couto, Maria; Cunha-Silva, Lus; Barone, Giampaolo; de Castro, Baltazar; Rangel, Maria; M N Silva, Andr; M G Silva, Ana

    2015-10-26

    The two new fluorescent ligands RosCat1 and RosCat2 contain catechol receptors connected to rosamine platforms through an amide linkage and were synthesized by using microwave-assisted coupling reactions of carboxyl- or amine-substituted rosamines with the corresponding catechol units and subsequent deprotection. RosCat1 possesses a reverse amide, whereas RosCat2 has the usual oriented amide bond (HNCO vs. CONH, respectively). The ligands were characterized by means of NMR spectroscopy, mass-spectrometry, and DFT calculations and X-ray crystallography studies for RosCat1. The influence of the amide linkage on the photophysical properties of the fluorescent ligands was assessed in different solvents and showed a higher fluorescence quantum yield for RosCat1. The coordination chemistry of these ligands with a Fe(III) center has been rationalized by mass-spectrometric analysis and semiempirical calculations. Octahedral Fe(III) complexes were obtained by the chelation of three RosCat1 or RosCat2 ligands. Interestingly, the unconventional amide connectivity in RosCat1 imposes the formation of an eight-membered ring on the chelate complex through a "salicylate-type" mode of coordination. PMID:26493881

  16. Comparison of two binuclear vanadium-catecholate complexes: Synthesis, X-ray structure and effects in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Zixiang; Zhu, Linli; Lu, Xiaoming

    2011-08-01

    Two binuclear vanadium-catecholate complexes [Et 3NH] 2[V VO 2(?-cat)] 2( 1) and [Et 3NH] 2[V VO 2(?-N-2,3-D)] 2( 2) (cat = catechol, N-2,3-D = naphthalene-2,3-diol) have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, IR, UV-vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry (CV). X-ray analysis reveals that the structures of complexes 1 and 2 are both in the anion form of V. Et 3N works as counter-ions and connects the main frame by hydrogen bonding. The electrochemical behavior of the two complexes is studied in comparison to that of the free ligands and the two complexes display different redox potentials. Pharmaceutical screenings of complexes 1 and 2 have been made against two representative cancer cell-lines A-549 (lung cancer) and Bel-7402 (liver cancer) by MTT assay. The inhibition of cell proliferation was determined 72 h after cells were exposed to the tested compounds at a concentration of 5 ?g/mL. Complex 1 exhibits well inhibition ratio against both two cell-lines (76.28% and 75.94%), while 2 displays positive and negative effect (65.36% and -68.82%) respectively. In association with X-ray and electrochemistry, a preliminary analysis about the possible inhibitory mechanism is provided.

  17. Recyclable and stable silver deposited magnetic nanoparticles with poly (vinyl pyrrolidone)-catechol coated iron oxide for antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Mosaiab, Tamim; Jeong, Chan Jin; Shin, Gyo Jic; Choi, Kyung Ho; Lee, Sang Kug; Lee, Iksoo; In, Insik; Park, Sung Young

    2013-10-01

    This paper introduces a facile method to make highly stable and recyclable antimicrobial magnetic nanoparticles (NPs). Initially, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) were coated with poly (vinyl pyrrolidone) conjugated catechol (PVP-CCDP). Afterward, silver nanoparticles (Ag(0)) were deposited onto PVP-CCDP coated IONPs using remain catechol. The prepared nanoparticles showed long term (~4 weeks) colloidal stability and redispersibility, respectively, against external magnetic field and over a broad range of pH (4-12). The NPs were characterized by UV-vis, SEM, XPS, and XRD measurements. TEM and DLS analyses showed that the mean particle size of PVP-CCDP coated IONPs/Ag(0) were about 72 nm. The recyclable magnetic NPs possessed a high antibacterial effect against the model microbes Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and could be separated easily using magnet following antibacterial test for repeated uses and maintained 100% antibacterial efficiency during three cycles. In MTT assay, the magnetic nanoparticles possessed no measureable cytotoxicity to live cells. PMID:23910278

  18. Molecular-level spectroscopic investigations of the complexation and photodegradation of catechol to/by iron(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Abadleh, Hind; Tofan-Lazar, Julia; Situm, Arthur; Slikboer, Samantha

    2014-05-01

    Surface water plays a crucial role in facilitating or inhibiting surface reactions in atmospheric aerosols. Little is known about the role of surface water in the complexation of organic molecules to transition metals in multicomponent aerosol systems. We will show results from real time diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) experiments for the in situ complexation of catechol to Fe(III) and its photosensitized degradation under dry and humid conditions. Catechol was chosen as a simple model for humic-like substances (HULIS) in aerosols and aged polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). It has also been detected in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed from the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with benzene. Given the importance of the iron content in aerosols and its biogeochemistry, our studies were conducted using FeCl3. For comparison, these surface-sensitive studies were complemented with bulk aqueous ATR-FTIR, UV-vis, and HPLC measurements for structural, quantitative and qualitative information about complexes in the bulk, and potential degradation products. The implications of our studies on understanding interfacial and condensed phase chemistry relevant to multicomponent aerosols, water thin islands on buildings, and ocean surfaces containing transition metals will be discussed.

  19. Significance of the Henri-Michaelis-Menten theory in abiotic catalysis: catechol oxidation by δ-MnO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidja, A.; Huang, P. M.

    2002-05-01

    The Henri-Michaelis-Menten theory, for more than eight decades, was only restricted to homogeneous enzymatic catalysis. A mimic of an enzymatic kinetics based on the Henri-Michaelis-Menten concept was experimentally observed in heterogeneous catalysis in the present study with δ-MnO 2 as an abiotic catalyst in the oxidation of catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene). Using the derived linear forms of Lineweaver-Burk or Hofstee, the data show that similar to the enzyme tyrosinase, the kinetics of the catechol oxidation catalyzed by δ-MnO 2 can be described by the Henri-Michaelis-Menten equation, V0= VmaxS/( Km+ S), where Vmax is the maximum velocity and Km the concentration of the substrate ( S) corresponding to an initial velocity ( V0) half of Vmax. By analogy to the enzymatic kinetics, the parameters Vmax and Km for an heterogeneous abiotic catalysis were derived for the first time. Further, based on the concentration of the active centers of the mineral oxide, the kinetic constants kcat and kcat/ Km, respectively, representing the turnover frequency and the efficiency of the mineral catalyst, were also determined from the derived general rate equation of Briggs and Haldane. As an abiotic catalyst, δ-MnO 2 has a paramount role in the oxidation of phenolic compounds in soil, sediment and water environments. Therefore, the present observation is of fundamental and practical significance in elucidating the affinity between an abiotic catalyst and a substrate based on the Henri-Michaelis-Menten theory.

  20. Construction of mussel-inspired coating via the direct reaction of catechol and polyethyleneimine for efficient heparin immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yujie; Luo, Rifang; Shen, Fangyu; Tang, Linlin; Wang, Jin; Huang, Nan

    2015-02-01

    Dopamine could self-polymerize to form the coating on various substrates and the co-existence of catechols and amines was crucial in performing such polymerization process. In this work, a mimetic approach of coating formation was carried out based on the co-polymerization of catechol (CA) and polyethyleneimine (PEI). Mussel-inspired CA/PEI coating was deposited on 316L stainless steel (SS). Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) demonstrated the successful coating formation. QCM measurement showed good affinity of heparin immobilization on CA/PEI coating surface ascribed to the amine groups. Herein, vascular cell-material interactions like endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were also investigated. Interestingly, CA/PEI and heparin modified coatings presented no cytotoxicity to ECs, however to a certain extent, decreased SMCs proliferation. Moreover, heparin-binding surface presented significant anti-platelet adhesion and activation properties. These results effectively suggested that the mussel-inspired CA/PEI coating might be promising when served as a platform for biomolecule immobilization.

  1. The structure and inhibition of human diamine oxidase,

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Aaron P; Hilmer, Kimberly M; Collyer, Charles A; Shepard, Eric M; Elmore, Bradley O.; Brown, Doreen E; Dooley, David M; Guss, J Mitchell

    2009-01-01

    Humans have three functioning genes that code for copper-containing amine oxidases. The product of the AOC1 gene is a so-called diamine oxidase (hDAO), named for its substrate preference for diamines, particularly histamine. hDAO has been cloned and expressed in insect cells and the structure of the native enzyme determined by X-ray crystallography to a resolution of 1.8 . The homodimeric structure has the archetypal amine oxidase fold. Two active sites, one in each subunit, are characterized by the presence of a copper ion and a topaquinone residue formed by the post-translational modification of a tyrosine. Although hDAO shares 37.9 % sequence identity with another human copper amine oxidase, semicarbazide sensitive amine oxidase or vascular adhesion protein-1, its substrate binding pocket and entry channel are distinctly different in accord with the different substrate specificities. The structures of two inhibitor complexes of hDAO, berenil and pentamidine, have been refined to resolutions of 2.1 and 2.2 , respectively. They bind non-covalently in the active site channel. The inhibitor binding suggests that an aspartic acid residue, conserved in all diamine oxidases but absent from other amine oxidases, is responsible for the diamine specificity by interacting with the second amino group of preferred diamine substrates. PMID:19764817

  2. Dephenolization of industrial wastewaters catalyzed by polyphenol oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Atlow, S.C.; Bonadonna-Aparo, L.; Klibanov, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    A new enzymatic method for the removal of phenols from industrial aqueous effluents has been developed. The method uses the enzyme polyphenol oxidase which oxidizes phenols to the corresponding o-quinones; the latter then undergo a nonenzymatic polymerization to form water-insoluble aggregates. Therefore, the enzyme in effect precipitates phenols from water. Polyphenol oxidase has been found to nearly completely dephenolize solutions of phenol in the concentration range from 0.01 to 1.0 g/L. The enzymatic treatment is effective over a wide range of pH and temperature; a crude preparation of polyphenol oxidase (mushroom extract) is as effective as a purified, commercially obtained version. In addition to phenol itself, polyphenol oxidase is capable of precipitating from water a number of substituted phenols (cresols, chlorophenols, naphthol, etc.). Also, even pollutants which are unreactive towards polyphenol oxidase can be enzymatically coprecipitated with phenol. The polyphenol oxidase treatment has been successfully used to dephenolize two different real industrial wastewater samples, from a plant producing triarylphosphates and from a coke plant. The advantage of the polyphenol oxidase dephenolization over the peroxidase-catalyzed one previously elaborated by the authors is that the former enzyme uses molecular oxygen instead of costly hydrogen peroxide (used by peroxidase) as an oxidant.

  3. Plastid terminal oxidase 2 (PTOX2) is the major oxidase involved in chlororespiration in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Houille-Vernes, Laura; Rappaport, Fabrice; Wollman, Francis-Andr; Alric, Jean; Johnson, Xenie

    2011-01-01

    By homology with the unique plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX) found in plants, two genes encoding oxidases have been found in the Chlamydomonas genome, PTOX1 and PTOX2. Here we report the identification of a knockout mutant of PTOX2. Its molecular and functional characterization demonstrates that it encodes the oxidase most predominantly involved in chlororespiration in this algal species. In this mutant, the plastoquinone pool is constitutively reduced under dark-aerobic conditions, resulting in the mobile light-harvesting complexes being mainly, but reversibly, associated with photosystem I. Accordingly, the ptox2 mutant shows lower fitness than wild type when grown under phototrophic conditions. Single and double mutants devoid of the cytochrome b6f complex and PTOX2 were used to measure the oxidation rates of plastoquinols via PTOX1 and PTOX2. Those lacking both the cytochrome b6f complex and PTOX2 were more sensitive to light than the single mutants lacking either the cytochrome b6f complex or PTOX2, which discloses the role of PTOX2 under extreme conditions where the plastoquinone pool is overreduced. A model for chlororespiration is proposed to relate the electron flow rate through these alternative pathways and the redox state of plastoquinones in the dark. This model suggests that, in green algae and plants, the redox poise results from the balanced accumulation of PTOX and NADPH dehydrogenase. PMID:22143777

  4. Visualization of monoamine oxidase in human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.J.; Pappas, N.; Shea, C.; MacGregor, R.R.; Logan, J.

    1996-12-31

    Monoamine oxidase is a flavin enzyme which exists in two subtypes, MAO A and MAO B. In human brain MAO B predominates and is largely compartmentalized in cell bodies of serotonergic neurons and glia. Regional distribution of MAO B was determined by positron computed tomography with volunteers after the administration of deuterium substituted [11C]L-deprenyl. The basal ganglia and thalamus exhibited the greatest concentrations of MAO B with intermediate levels in the frontal cortex and cingulate gyrus while lowest levels were observed in the parietal and temporal cortices and cerebellum. We observed that brain MAO B increases with are in health normal subjects, however the increases were generally smaller than those revealed with post-mortem studies.

  5. NADPH Oxidases in Chronic Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Joy X.; Török, Natalie J.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a common feature observed in a wide spectrum of chronic liver diseases including viral hepatitis, alcoholic, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases (NOXs) are emerging as major sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Several major isoforms are expressed in the liver, including NOX1, NOX2, and NOX4. While the phagocytic NOX2 has been known to play an important role in Kupffer cell and neutrophil phagocytic activity and inflammation, the nonphagocytic NOX homologues are increasingly recognized as key enzymes in oxidative injury and wound healing. In this review, we will summarize the current advances in knowledge on the regulatory pathways of NOX activation, their cellular distribution, and their role in the modulation of redox signaling in liver diseases. PMID:26436133

  6. Degradation of pentachlorophenol by potato polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Hou, Mei-Fang; Tang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Wei-De; Liao, Lin; Wan, Hong-Fu

    2011-11-01

    In this study, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was extracted from commercial potatoes. Degradation of pentachlorophenol by potato PPO was investigated. The experimental results show that potato PPO is more active in weak acid than in basic condition and that the optimum pH for the reaction is 5.0. The degradation of pentachlorophenol by potato PPO reaches a maximum at 298 K. After reaction for 1 h, the removal of both pentachlorophenol and total organic carbon is >70% with 6.0 units/mL potato PPO at pH 5.0 and 298 K. Pentachlorophenol can be degraded through dechlorination and ring-opening by potato PPO. The work demonstrates that pentachlorophenol can be effectively eliminated by crude potato PPO. PMID:21967325

  7. The Oryza map alignment project: Construction, alignment and analysis of 12 BAC fingerprint/end sequence framework physical maps that represent the 10 genome types of genus Oryza

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Oryza Map Alignment Project (OMAP) provides the first comprehensive experimental system for understanding the evolution, physiology and biochemistry of a full genus in plants or animals. We have constructed twelve deep-coverage BAC libraries that are representative of both diploid and tetraploid...

  8. Natural variation of the rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta in Oryza species and its corresponding avirulence gene AVR-Pita in Magnaporthe oryzae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pi-ta gene prevents the infections of M. oryzae races containing the corresponding avirulence gene AVR-Pita in a gene-for-gene manner. Pi-ta is a putative NBS type major resistance gene, and can directly recognize the AVR-Pita putative metalloprotease in triggering effective resistance. We hav...

  9. MAPPING QUANTITATVE TRAIT LOCI FOR YIELD, YIELD COMPONENTS AND MORPHOLOGICAL TRAITS IN AN ADVANCED BACKCROSS POPULATION BETWEEN ORYZA RUFIPOGON AND THE ORYZA SATIVA CULTIVAR JEFFERSON

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A BC2F2 population developed from an interspecific cross between IR64 (Oryza sativa) and O. rufipogon (IRGC 105491) was used in an advanced backcross QTL analysis to identify and introduce agronomically useful genes from this wild relative into the cultivated gene pool. Two hundred eighty five famil...

  10. Direct regulation of cytochrome c oxidase by calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Vygodina, Tatiana; Kirichenko, Anna; Konstantinov, Alexander A

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase from bovine heart binds Ca(2+) reversibly at a specific Cation Binding Site located near the outer face of the mitochondrial membrane. Ca(2+) shifts the absorption spectrum of heme a, which allowed previously to determine the kinetics and equilibrium characteristics of the binding. However, no effect of Ca(2+) on the functional characteristics of cytochrome oxidase was revealed earlier. Here we report that Ca(2+) inhibits cytochrome oxidase activity of isolated bovine heart enzyme by 50-60% with Ki of ?1 M, close to Kd of calcium binding with the oxidase determined spectrophotometrically. The inhibition is observed only at low, but physiologically relevant, turnover rates of the enzyme (?10 s(-1) or less). No inhibitory effect of Ca(2+) is observed under conventional conditions of cytochrome c oxidase activity assays (turnover number >100 s(-1) at pH 8), which may explain why the effect was not noticed earlier. The inhibition is specific for Ca(2+) and is reversed by EGTA. Na(+) ions that compete with Ca(2+) for binding with the Cation Binding Site, do not affect significantly activity of the enzyme but counteract the inhibitory effect of Ca(2+). The Ca(2+)-induced inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase is observed also with the uncoupled mitochondria from several rat tissues. At the same time, calcium ions do not inhibit activity of the homologous bacterial cytochrome oxidases. Possible mechanisms of the inhibition are discussed as well as potential physiological role of Ca(2+) binding with cytochrome oxidase. Ca(2+)- binding at the Cation Binding Site is proposed to inhibit proton-transfer through the exit part of the proton conducting pathway H in the mammalian oxidases. PMID:24058566

  11. Immobilization of Pichia pastoris cells containing alcohol oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Maleknia, S; Ahmadi, H; Norouzian, D

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives The attempts were made to describe the development of a whole cell immobilization of P. pastoris by entrapping the cells in polyacrylamide gel beads. The alcohol oxidase activity of the whole cell Pichia pastoris was evaluated in comparison with yeast biomass production. Materials and Methods Methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris was obtained from Collection of Standard Microorganisms, Department of Bacterial Vaccines, Pasteur Institute of Iran (CSMPI). Stock culture was maintained on YPD agar plates. Alcohol oxidase was strongly induced by addition of 0.5% methanol as the carbon source. The cells were harvested by centrifugation then permeabilized. Finally the cells were immobilized in polyacrylamide gel beads. The activity of alcohol oxidase was determined by method of Tane et al. Results At the end of the logarithmic phase of cell culture, the alcohol oxidase activity of the whole cell P. Pastoris reached the highest level. In comparison, the alcohol oxidase activity was measured in an immobilized P. pastoris when entrapped in polyacrylamide gel beads. The alcohol oxidase activity of cells was induced by addition of 0.5% methanol as the carbon source. The cells were permeabilized by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and immobilized. CTAB was also found to increase the gel permeability. Alcohol oxidase activity of immobilized cells was then quantitated by ABTS/POD spectrophotometric method at OD 420. There was a 14% increase in alcohol oxidase activity in immobilized cells as compared with free cells. By addition of 2-butanol as a substrate, the relative activity of alcohol oxidase was significantly higher as compared with other substrates added to the reaction media. Conclusion Immobilization of cells could eliminate lengthy and expensive procedures of enzyme separation and purification, protect and stabilize enzyme activity, and perform easy separation of the enzyme from the reaction media. PMID:22530090

  12. Current status of NADPH oxidase research in cardiovascular pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Rodiño-Janeiro, Bruno K; Paradela-Dobarro, Beatriz; Castiñeiras-Landeira, María Isabel; Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; González-Juanatey, José R; Álvarez, Ezequiel

    2013-01-01

    The implications of reactive oxygen species in cardiovascular disease have been known for some decades. Rationally, therapeutic antioxidant strategies combating oxidative stress have been developed, but the results of clinical trials have not been as good as expected. Therefore, to move forward in the design of new therapeutic strategies for cardiovascular disease based on prevention of production of reactive oxygen species, steps must be taken on two fronts, ie, comprehension of reduction-oxidation signaling pathways and the pathophysiologic roles of reactive oxygen species, and development of new, less toxic, and more selective nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase inhibitors, to clarify both the role of each NADPH oxidase isoform and their utility in clinical practice. In this review, we analyze the value of NADPH oxidase as a therapeutic target for cardiovascular disease and the old and new pharmacologic agents or strategies to prevent NADPH oxidase activity. Some inhibitors and different direct or indirect approaches are available. Regarding direct NADPH oxidase inhibition, the specificity of NADPH oxidase is the focus of current investigations, whereas the chemical structure-activity relationship studies of known inhibitors have provided pharmacophore models with which to search for new molecules. From a general point of view, small-molecule inhibitors are preferred because of their hydrosolubility and oral bioavailability. However, other possibilities are not closed, with peptide inhibitors or monoclonal antibodies against NADPH oxidase isoforms continuing to be under investigation as well as the ongoing search for naturally occurring compounds. Likewise, some different approaches include inhibition of assembly of the NADPH oxidase complex, subcellular translocation, post-transductional modifications, calcium entry/release, electron transfer, and genetic expression. High-throughput screens for any of these activities could provide new inhibitors. All this knowledge and the research presently underway will likely result in development of new drugs for inhibition of NADPH oxidase and application of therapeutic approaches based on their action, for the treatment of cardiovascular disease in the next few years. PMID:23983473

  13. Multilayered Polyelectrolyte Microcapsules: Interaction with the Enzyme Cytochrome C Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Pastorino, Laura; Dellacasa, Elena; Noor, Mohamed R.; Soulimane, Tewfik; Bianchini, Paolo; D'Autilia, Francesca; Antipov, Alexei; Diaspro, Alberto; Tofail, Syed A. M.; Ruggiero, Carmelina

    2014-01-01

    Cell-sized polyelectrolyte capsules functionalized with a redox-driven proton pump protein were assembled for the first time. The interaction of polyelectrolyte microcapsules, fabricated by electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly, with cytochrome c oxidase molecules was investigated. We found that the cytochrome c oxidase retained its functionality, that the functionalized microcapsules interacting with cytochrome c oxidase were permeable and that the permeability characteristics of the microcapsule shell depend on the shell components. This work provides a significant input towards the fabrication of an integrated device made of biological components and based on specific biomolecular functions and properties. PMID:25372607

  14. Immunological identification of the alternative oxidase of Acanthamoeba castellanii mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jarmuszkiewicz, W; Wagner, A M; Wagner, M J; Hryniewiecka, L

    1997-07-01

    Mitochondria of the protozoa Acanthamoeba castellanii possess a cyanide-insensitive oxidase cross-reacting with monoclonal antibodies raised against the plant alternative oxidase. Immunoblotting revealed three monomeric forms (38, 35, and 32 kDa) and very low amounts of a single 65 kDa dimeric form. Cross-linking studies suggest that while in plants the alternative oxidase occurs as a dimer, in amoeba it functions as a monomer. Immunologically detectable protein levels change with the age of amoeba cell culture. Increased amounts of the 35 kDa protein are accompanied by an increase in the activity of cyanide-resistant respiration. PMID:9247153

  15. Aiding and abetting roles of NOX oxidases in cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Block, Karen; Gorin, Yves

    2013-01-01

    NADPH oxidases of the NADPH oxidase (NOX) family are dedicated reactive oxygen species-generating enzymes that broadly and specifically regulate redox-sensitive signalling pathways that are involved in cancer development and progression. They act at specific cellular membranes and microdomains through the activation of oncogenes and the inactivation of tumour suppressor proteins. In this Review, we discuss primary targets and redox-linked signalling systems that are influenced by NOX-derived ROS, and the biological role of NOX oxidases in the aetiology of cancer. PMID:22918415

  16. Glycolate Oxidase Content of Microbodies as Affected by Nitrate 1

    PubMed Central

    Roth-Bejerano, Nurit; Lips, S. Herman

    1975-01-01

    Glycolate oxidase is loosely held by microbodies obtained from etiolated barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) leaves depleted of nitrate. Defined centrifugation conditions cause the complete detachment of the enzyme from the microbodies. Addition of nitrate to these plants brings about a greater retention of glycolate oxidase by the microbodies. Synthesis of a nitrate-induced protein seems to be responsible for the enhanced retention of glycolate oxidase. Catalase, on the contrary, is strongly attached to the microbodies under all nutritional and experimental conditions considered. PMID:16659064

  17. CotA, a Multicopper Oxidase from Bacillus pumilus WH4, Exhibits Manganese-Oxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jianmei; Bao, Peng; Bai, Tenglong; Deng, Lin; Wu, Hui; Liu, Fan; He, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Multicopper oxidases (MCOs) are a family of enzymes that use copper ions as cofactors to oxidize various substrates. Previous research has demonstrated that several MCOs such as MnxG, MofA and MoxA can act as putative Mn(II) oxidases. Meanwhile, the endospore coat protein CotA from Bacillus species has been confirmed as a typical MCO. To study the relationship between CotA and the Mn(II) oxidation, the cotA gene from a highly active Mn(II)-oxidizing strain Bacillus pumilus WH4 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli strain M15. The purified CotA contained approximately four copper atoms per molecule and showed spectroscopic properties typical of blue copper oxidases. Importantly, apart from the laccase activities, the CotA also displayed substantial Mn(II)-oxidase activities both in liquid culture system and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The optimum Mn(II) oxidase activity was obtained at 53C in HEPES buffer (pH 8.0) supplemented with 0.8 mM CuCl2. Besides, the addition of o-phenanthroline and EDTA both led to a complete suppression of Mn(II)-oxidizing activity. The specific activity of purified CotA towards Mn(II) was 0.27 U/mg. The Km, Vmax and kcat values towards Mn(II) were 14.851.17 mM, 3.0110?60.21 Mmin?1 and 0.320.02 s?1, respectively. Moreover, the Mn(II)-oxidizing activity of the recombinant E. coli strain M15-pQE-cotA was significantly increased when cultured both in Mn-containing K liquid medium and on agar plates. After 7-day liquid cultivation, M15-pQE-cotA resulted in 18.2% removal of Mn(II) from the medium. Furthermore, the biogenic Mn oxides were clearly observed on the cell surfaces of M15-pQE-cotA by scanning electron microscopy. To our knowledge, this is the first report that provides the direct observation of Mn(II) oxidation with the heterologously expressed protein CotA, Therefore, this novel finding not only establishes the foundation for in-depth study of Mn(II) oxidation mechanisms, but also offers a potential biocatalyst for Mn(II) removal. PMID:23577125

  18. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of XometC, a cystathionine γ-lyase-like protein from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    SciTech Connect

    Ngo, Phuong-Thuy Ho; Kim, Jin-Kwang; Kim, Hyesoon; Jung, Junho; Ahn, Yeh-Jin; Kim, Jeong-Gu; Lee, Byoung-Moo; Kang, Hee-Wan; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2008-08-01

    XometC, a cystathionine γ-lyase-like protein from X. oryzae pv. oryzae and an antibacterial drug-target protein against bacterial blight, was cloned, purified and crystallized. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of XometC crystals was carried out. Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial blight of rice (Oryza sativa L.), one of the most devastating diseases of rice in most rice-growing countries. XometC, a cystathionine γ-lyase (CGL) like protein that is an antibacterial drug-target protein against Xoo, was cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. CGL catalyzes the second step in the reverse-transsulfuration pathway, which is essential for the metabolic interconversion of the sulfur-containing amino acids cysteine and methionine. Crystals of two different shapes, plate-shaped and pyramid-shaped, diffracted to 2.9 and 3.2 Å resolution and belonged to the primitive orthogonal space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and the tetragonal space group P4{sub 1} (or P4{sub 3}), with unit-cell parameters a = 73.0, b = 144.9, c = 152.3 Å and a = b = 78.2, c = 300.7 Å, respectively. For the P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} crystals, three or four monomers exist in the asymmetric unit with a corresponding V{sub M} of 3.02 or 2.26 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 59.3 or 45.7%. For the P4{sub 1} (or P4{sub 3}) crystals, four or five monomers exist in the asymmetric unit with a corresponding V{sub M} of 2.59 or 2.09 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 52.5 or 40.6%.

  19. The Rice Dwarf Virus P2 Protein Interacts with ent-Kaurene Oxidases in Vivo, Leading to Reduced Biosynthesis of Gibberellins and Rice Dwarf Symptoms1

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shifeng; Gao, Feng; Cao, Xuesong; Chen, Mao; Ye, Gongyin; Wei, Chunhong; Li, Yi

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms of viral diseases are a major focus of biology. Despite intensive investigations, how a plant virus interacts with host factors to cause diseases remains poorly understood. The Rice dwarf virus (RDV), a member of the genus Phytoreovirus, causes dwarfed growth phenotypes in infected rice (Oryza sativa) plants. The outer capsid protein P2 is essential during RDV infection of insects and thus influences transmission of RDV by the insect vector. However, its role during RDV infection within the rice host is unknown. By yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation assays, we report that P2 of RDV interacts with ent-kaurene oxidases, which play a key role in the biosynthesis of plant growth hormones gibberellins, in infected plants. Furthermore, the expression of ent-kaurene oxidases was reduced in the infected plants. The level of endogenous GA1 (a major active gibberellin in rice vegetative tissues) in the RDV-infected plants was lower than that in healthy plants. Exogenous application of GA3 to RDV-infected rice plants restored the normal growth phenotypes. These results provide evidence that the P2 protein of RDV interferes with the function of a cellular factor, through direct physical interactions, that is important for the biosynthesis of a growth hormone leading to symptom expression. In addition, the interaction between P2 and rice ent-kaurene oxidase-like proteins may decrease phytoalexin biosynthesis and make plants more competent for virus replication. Moreover, P2 may provide a novel tool to investigate the regulation of GA metabolism for plant growth and development. PMID:16299167

  20. Characterization of a novel lipolytic enzyme from Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Takuya; Asai, Shungo; Saito, Natsumi; Mori, Masayo; Sakaguchi, Yasuko; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Shiono, Yoshihito

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we report the characterization of a protein from Aspergillus oryzae, exhibiting sequence identity with paraben esterase from the genus Aspergillus. The coding region of 1,586bp, including a 77-bp intron, encoded a protein of 502 amino acids. The gene without the signal peptide of 19 amino acids was cloned into a vector, pPICZ?C, and expressed successfully in Pichia pastoris as an active extracellular protein. The purified recombinant protein had pH and temperature optima of 7.0-8.0 and 30C, respectively, and was stable at the pH range of 7.0-10.0 and up to 40C. The optimal substrate for hydrolysis by the purified recombinant protein, among a panel of ?-naphthyl esters (C2-C16), was ?-naphthyl butyrate (C4), with activity of 0.16units/mg protein. The considerable hydrolytic activity of the purified recombinant enzyme toward tributyrin was determined. However, no paraben esterase activity was detected toward the ethyl, propyl, and butyl esters of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. In addition, no activity was detected toward the methyl esters of ferulic, p-coumaric, caffeic, and sinapic acids that would indicate feruloyl esterase activity. PMID:23001008

  1. Proteomics study of silver nanoparticles toxicity on Oryza sativa L.

    PubMed

    Mirzajani, Fateme; Askari, Hossein; Hamzelou, Sara; Schober, Yvonne; Rmpp, Andreas; Ghassempour, Alireza; Spengler, Bernhard

    2014-10-01

    The increasing use of silver nanoparticles, (AgNPs), will inevitably result in their release into the environment and thereby cause the exposure to plants. It was claimed that using AgNPs is a safe and efficient method to preserve and treat agents of disease in agriculture. This study tries to understand the protein populations and sub-populations and follow up environmental AgNPs stresses. To accomplish these, the action of homemade spherical AgNPs colloidal suspension against Oryza sativa L. was investigated by a proteomic approach (2-DE and NanoLC/FT-ICR MS identification). Twenty-eight responsive (decrement/increment in abundance) proteins were identified. Proteomic results revealed that an exposure of O. sativa L., root with different concentrations of AgNPs resulted in an accumulation of protein precursors, indicative of the dissipation of a proton motive force. The identified proteins are involved in oxidative stress tolerance, Ca(2+) regulation and signaling, transcription and protein degradation, cell wall and DNA/RNA/protein direct damage, cell division and apoptosis. The expression pattern of these proteins and their possible involvement in the nontoxicity mechanisms were discussed. PMID:25124680

  2. Systematic analysis of rice (Oryza sativa) metabolic responses to herbivory.

    PubMed

    Alamgir, Kabir Md; Hojo, Yuko; Christeller, John T; Fukumoto, Kaori; Isshiki, Ryutaro; Shinya, Tomonori; Baldwin, Ian T; Galis, Ivan

    2016-02-01

    Plants defend against attack from herbivores by direct and indirect defence mechanisms mediated by the accumulation of phytoalexins and release of volatile signals, respectively. While the defensive arsenals of some plants, such as tobacco and Arabidopsis are well known, most of rice's (Oryza sativa) defence metabolites and their effectiveness against herbivores remain uncharacterized. Here, we used a non-biassed metabolomics approach to identify many novel herbivory-regulated metabolic signatures in rice. Most were up-regulated by herbivore attack while only a few were suppressed. Two of the most prominent up-regulated signatures were characterized as phenolamides (PAs), p-coumaroylputrescine and feruloylputrescine. PAs accumulated in response to attack by both chewing insects, i.e. feeding of the lawn armyworm (Spodoptera mauritia) and the rice skipper (Parnara guttata) larvae, and the attack of the sucking insect, the brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens, BPH). In bioassays, BPH insects feeding on 15% sugar solution containing p-coumaroylputrescine or feruloylputrescine, at concentrations similar to those elicited by heavy BPH attack in rice, had a higher mortality compared to those feeding on sugar diet alone. Our results highlight PAs as a rapidly expanding new group of plant defence metabolites that are elicited by herbivore attack, and deter herbivores in rice and other plants. PMID:26386366

  3. Phylogeny of Plant CAMTAs and Role of AtCAMTAs in Nonhost Resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Hafizur; Yang, Juan; Xu, You-Ping; Munyampundu, Jean-Pierre; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA) constitutes one of the most important Ca2+/CaM-regulated transcription factor families in plants. Nevertheless, the phylogeny, protein interaction network, and role in nonhost resistance of plant CAMTAs are not well understood. In this study, 200 CAMTA genes were identified from 35 species representing four major plant lineages. The CAMTA genes were conserved in multicellular land plants but absent in unicellular eukaryotes, and were likely to emerge from the fusion of two separate genes encoding a CAMTA-like protein and an IQ/CaM binding motif containing protein, respectively, in the embryophyta lineage ancestor. Approximately one fourth of plant CAMTAs did not contain a TIG domain. This non-TIG class of CAMTAs seems to have newly evolved through mutation of some key amino acids in the TIG domain of flowering land plants after divergence from the non-flowering plants. Phylogenetic analysis classified CAMTA proteins into three major groups and nine distinct subgroups, a result supported by protein domain and motif conservation analyses. Most (59.0 and 21.5%) of the identified CAMTA genes contained 12 or 11 introns, respectively. Gene duplication, intron invasion, enlargement and turnover, as well as exon rearrangements and skipping have apparently occurred during evolution of the CAMTA family. Moreover, 38 potential interactors of six Arabidopsis CAMTAs were predicted and 10 predicted target genes of AtCAMTA3 exhibited changes in expression between Atcamta3 mutants and wild-type plants. The majority of predicted interactors are transcription factors and/or Ca2+/CaM-regulated proteins, suggesting that transcriptional regulation of the target genes might be the dominant functional mechanism of AtCAMTAs, and AtCAMTAs might act together with other Ca2+ signaling components to regulate Ca2+-related biological processes. Furthermore, functional analyses employing Atcamta mutants revealed that AtCAMTA3 negatively regulated the immunity triggered by flg22 and nonhost resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae via repressing accumulation of reactive oxygen species probably by targeting CBP60G, EDS1, and NDR1 and involving SA pathway. PMID:26973658

  4. Phylogeny of Plant CAMTAs and Role of AtCAMTAs in Nonhost Resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Hafizur; Yang, Juan; Xu, You-Ping; Munyampundu, Jean-Pierre; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA) constitutes one of the most important Ca(2+)/CaM-regulated transcription factor families in plants. Nevertheless, the phylogeny, protein interaction network, and role in nonhost resistance of plant CAMTAs are not well understood. In this study, 200 CAMTA genes were identified from 35 species representing four major plant lineages. The CAMTA genes were conserved in multicellular land plants but absent in unicellular eukaryotes, and were likely to emerge from the fusion of two separate genes encoding a CAMTA-like protein and an IQ/CaM binding motif containing protein, respectively, in the embryophyta lineage ancestor. Approximately one fourth of plant CAMTAs did not contain a TIG domain. This non-TIG class of CAMTAs seems to have newly evolved through mutation of some key amino acids in the TIG domain of flowering land plants after divergence from the non-flowering plants. Phylogenetic analysis classified CAMTA proteins into three major groups and nine distinct subgroups, a result supported by protein domain and motif conservation analyses. Most (59.0 and 21.5%) of the identified CAMTA genes contained 12 or 11 introns, respectively. Gene duplication, intron invasion, enlargement and turnover, as well as exon rearrangements and skipping have apparently occurred during evolution of the CAMTA family. Moreover, 38 potential interactors of six Arabidopsis CAMTAs were predicted and 10 predicted target genes of AtCAMTA3 exhibited changes in expression between Atcamta3 mutants and wild-type plants. The majority of predicted interactors are transcription factors and/or Ca(2+)/CaM-regulated proteins, suggesting that transcriptional regulation of the target genes might be the dominant functional mechanism of AtCAMTAs, and AtCAMTAs might act together with other Ca(2+) signaling components to regulate Ca(2+)-related biological processes. Furthermore, functional analyses employing Atcamta mutants revealed that AtCAMTA3 negatively regulated the immunity triggered by flg22 and nonhost resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae via repressing accumulation of reactive oxygen species probably by targeting CBP60G, EDS1, and NDR1 and involving SA pathway. PMID:26973658

  5. Organization of chromosome ends in the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Rehmeyer, Cathryn; Li, Weixi; Kusaba, Motoaki; Kim, Yun-Sik; Brown, Doug; Staben, Chuck; Dean, Ralph; Farman, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic pathogens of humans often evade the immune system by switching the expression of surface proteins encoded by subtelomeric gene families. To determine if plant pathogenic fungi use a similar mechanism to avoid host defenses, we sequenced the 14 chromosome ends of the rice blast pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae. One telomere is directly joined to ribosomal RNA-encoding genes, at the end of the ?2 Mb rDNA array. Two are attached to chromosome-unique sequences, and the remainder adjoin a distinct subtelomere region, consisting of a telomere-linked RecQ-helicase (TLH) gene flanked by several blocks of tandem repeats. Unlike other microbes, M.oryzae exhibits very little gene amplification in the subtelomere regionsout of 261 predicted genes found within 100 kb of the telomeres, only four were present at more than one chromosome end. Therefore, it seems unlikely that M.oryzae uses switching mechanisms to evade host defenses. Instead, the M.oryzae telomeres have undergone frequent terminal truncation, and there is evidence of extensive ectopic recombination among transposons in these regions. We propose that the M.oryzae chromosome termini play more subtle roles in host adaptation by promoting the loss of terminally-positioned genes that tend to trigger host defenses. PMID:16963777

  6. Analyses of Old “Prokaryotic” Proteins Indicate Functional Diversification in Arabidopsis and Oryza sativa

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anupama; Jethva, Minesh; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L.; Pareek, Ashwani; Kushwaha, Hemant R.

    2016-01-01

    During evolution, various processes such as duplication, divergence, recombination, and many other events leads to the evolution of new genes with novel functions. These evolutionary events, thus significantly impact the evolution of cellular, physiological, morphological, and other phenotypic trait of organisms. While evolving, eukaryotes have acquired large number of genes from the earlier prokaryotes. This work is focused upon identification of old “prokaryotic” proteins in Arabidopsis and Oryza sativa genome, further highlighting their possible role(s) in the two genomes. Our results suggest that with respect to their genome size, the fraction of old “prokaryotic” proteins is higher in Arabidopsis than in Oryza sativa. The large fractions of such proteins encoding genes were found to be localized in various endo-symbiotic organelles. The domain architecture of the old “prokaryotic” proteins revealed similar distribution in both Arabidopsis and Oryza sativa genomes showing their conserved evolution. In Oryza sativa, the old “prokaryotic” proteins were more involved in developmental processes, might be due to constant man-made selection pressure for better agronomic traits/productivity. While in Arabidopsis, these proteins were involved in metabolic functions. Overall, the analysis indicates the distinct pattern of evolution of old “prokaryotic” proteins in Arabidopsis and Oryza sativa. PMID:27014324

  7. Genome-scale analysis of the high-efficient protein secretion system of Aspergillus oryzae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The koji mold, Aspergillus oryzae is widely used for the production of industrial enzymes due to its particularly high protein secretion capacity and ability to perform post-translational modifications. However, systemic analysis of its secretion system is lacking, generally due to the poorly annotated proteome. Results Here we defined a functional protein secretory component list of A. oryzae using a previously reported secretory model of S. cerevisiae as scaffold. Additional secretory components were obtained by blast search with the functional components reported in other closely related fungal species such as Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus niger. To evaluate the defined component list, we performed transcriptome analysis on three ?-amylase over-producing strains with varying levels of secretion capacities. Specifically, secretory components involved in the ER-associated processes (including components involved in the regulation of transport between ER and Golgi) were significantly up-regulated, with many of them never been identified for A. oryzae before. Furthermore, we defined a complete list of the putative A. oryzae secretome and monitored how it was affected by overproducing amylase. Conclusion In combination with the transcriptome data, the most complete secretory component list and the putative secretome, we improved the systemic understanding of the secretory machinery of A. oryzae in response to high levels of protein secretion. The roles of many newly predicted secretory components were experimentally validated and the enriched component list provides a better platform for driving more mechanistic studies of the protein secretory pathway in this industrially important fungus. PMID:24961398

  8. An overproduction of astellolides induced by genetic disruption of chromatin-remodeling factors in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Yasutomo; Kawatani, Makoto; Futamura, Yushi; Osada, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Yasuji

    2016-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae is an important industrial mold. Recent genomic analysis indicated that A. oryzae has a large number of biosynthetic genes for secondary metabolites (SMs), but many of the SMs they produce have not been identified. For better understanding of SMs production by A. oryzae, we screened a gene-disruption library of transcription factors including chromatin-remodeling factors and found two gene disruptions that show similarly altered SM production profiles. One is a homolog of Aspergillus nidulans cclA, a component of the histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase complex of proteins associated with Set1 complex, and the other, sppA, is an ortholog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae SPP1, another component of a complex of proteins associated with Set1 complex. The cclA and sppA disruptions in A. oryzae are deficient in trimethylation of H3K4. Furthermore, one of the SMs that increased in the cclA disruptant was identified as astellolide F (14-deacetyl astellolide B). These data indicate that both cclA and sppA affect production of SMs including astellolides by affecting the methylation status of H3K4 in A. oryzae. PMID:26126743

  9. Differentiation in MALDI-TOF MS and FTIR spectra between two pathovars of Xanthomonas oryzae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Mengyu; Li, Bin; Wang, Li; Tao, Zhongyun; Mao, Shengfeng; Wang, Yangli; Xie, Guanlin; Sun, Guochang

    2014-12-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) strains are closely related phenotypically and genetically, which make it difficult to differentiate between the two pathovars based on phenotypic and DNA-based methods. In this study, a fast and accurate method was developed based on the differences in MALDI-TOF MS and FTIR spectra between the two pathovars. MALDI-TOF MS analysis revealed that 9 and 10 peaks are specific to Xoo and Xoc, respectively, which can be used as biomarkers to identify and differentiate the two closely related pathovars. Furthermore, FTIR analysis showed that there is a significant difference in both the band frequencies and absorption intensity of various functional groups between the two pathovars. In particular, the 6 peaks at 3433, 2867, 1273, 1065, 983 and 951 cm-1 were specific to the Xoo strains, while one peak at 1572 cm-1 was specific to the Xoc strains. Overall, this study gives the first attempt to identify and differentiate the two pathovars of X. oryzae based on mass and FTIR spectra, which will be helpful for the early detection and prevention of the two rice diseases caused by both X. oryzae pathovars.

  10. Deletion of creB in Aspergillus oryzae Increases Secreted Hydrolytic Enzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, A. J.; Morris, T. A.; Jin, B.; Saint, C. P.

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus oryzae has been used in the food and beverage industry for centuries, and industrial strains have been produced by multiple rounds of selection. Targeted gene deletion technology is particularly useful for strain improvement in such strains, particularly when they do not have a well-characterized meiotic cycle. Phenotypes of an Aspergillus nidulans strain null for the CreB deubiquitinating enzyme include effects on growth and repression, including increased activity levels of various enzymes. We show that Aspergillus oryzae contains a functional homologue of the CreB deubiquitinating enzyme and that a null strain shows increased activity levels of industrially important secreted enzymes, including cellulases, xylanases, amylases, and proteases, as well as alleviated inhibition of spore germination on glucose medium. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis showed that the increased levels of enzyme activity in both Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus oryzae are mirrored at the transcript level, indicating transcriptional regulation. We report that Aspergillus oryzae DAR3699, originally isolated from soy fermentation, has a similar phenotype to that of a creB deletion mutant of the RIB40 strain, and it contains a mutation in the creB gene. Collectively, the results for Aspergillus oryzae, Aspergillus nidulans, Trichoderma reesei, and Penicillium decumbens show that deletion of creB may be broadly useful in diverse fungi for increasing production of a variety of enzymes. PMID:23835170

  11. Mitochondrial respiratory pathways inhibition in Rhizopus oryzae potentiates activity of posaconazole and itraconazole via apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Fazal; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of mucormycosis has increased drastically in immunocompromised patients. Also the array of targets whose inhibition results in Mucorales death is limited. Recently, researchers identified mitochondria as important regulators of detoxification and virulence mechanisms in fungi. In this context, targeting the mitochondrial respiratory chain may provide a new platform for antifungal development. We hypothesized that targeting respiratory pathways potentiates triazoles activity via apoptosis. We found that simultaneous administration of antimycin A (AA) and benzohydroxamate (BHAM), inhibitors of classical and alternative mitochondrial pathways respectively, resulted in potent activity of posaconazole (PCZ) and itraconazole (ICZ) against Rhizopus oryzae. We observed cellular changes characteristic of apoptosis in R. oryzae cells treated with PCZ or ICZ in combination with AA and BHAM. The fungicidal activity of this combination against R. oryzae was correlated with intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation (ROS), phosphatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and increased caspase like activity. DNA fragmentation and condensation assays also revealed apoptosis of R. oryzae cells. These apoptotic features were prevented by the addition of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine. Taken together, these findings suggest that the use of PCZ or ICZ in combination with AA and BHAM makes R. oryzae exquisitely sensitive to treatment with triazoles via apoptosis. This strategy may serve as a new model for the development of improved or novel antifungal agents. PMID:23696824

  12. Mitochondrial Respiratory Pathways Inhibition in Rhizopus oryzae Potentiates Activity of Posaconazole and Itraconazole via Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Fazal; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of mucormycosis has increased drastically in immunocompromised patients. Also the array of targets whose inhibition results in Mucorales death is limited. Recently, researchers identified mitochondria as important regulators of detoxification and virulence mechanisms in fungi. In this context, targeting the mitochondrial respiratory chain may provide a new platform for antifungal development. We hypothesized that targeting respiratory pathways potentiates triazoles activity via apoptosis. We found that simultaneous administration of antimycin A (AA) and benzohydroxamate (BHAM), inhibitors of classical and alternative mitochondrial pathways respectively, resulted in potent activity of posaconazole (PCZ) and itraconazole (ICZ) against Rhizopus oryzae. We observed cellular changes characteristic of apoptosis in R. oryzae cells treated with PCZ or ICZ in combination with AA and BHAM. The fungicidal activity of this combination against R. oryzae was correlated with intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation (ROS), phosphatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and increased caspase like activity. DNA fragmentation and condensation assays also revealed apoptosis of R. oryzae cells. These apoptotic features were prevented by the addition of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine. Taken together, these findings suggest that the use of PCZ or ICZ in combination with AA and BHAM makes R. oryzae exquisitely sensitive to treatment with triazoles via apoptosis. This strategy may serve as a new model for the development of improved or novel antifungal agents. PMID:23696824

  13. Receptor for catecholamines responding to catechol which potentiates voltage-dependent calcium current in single cells from guinea-pig taenia caeci.

    PubMed Central

    Muraki, K.; Bolton, T. B.; Imaizumi, Y.; Watanabe, M.

    1994-01-01

    1. Single isolated cells were obtained from the taenia of the guinea-pig's caecum by enzymic digestion and held under voltage clamp. The effects of various catecholamines, sympathomimetics and related compounds were tested for their ability to potentiate the voltage-dependent calcium current (ICa) evoked in these cells by a depolarizing step. 2. ICa was potentiated by up to 60% by isoprenaline, adrenaline, and noradrenaline which were equipotent. The EC50 for isoprenaline was about 40 nM. 3. The racemic mixtures of the optical isomers of isoprenaline, adrenaline, and noradrenaline, and (+)-isoprenaline, were equipotent with the (-)-isomers of these drugs. Dopamine, L-dopa, and catechol were equipotent with these catecholamines. 4. Removal or substitution of one or more of the hydroxy groups of the catechol moiety, as in phenylephrine, salbutamol, procaterol, methoxamine, terbutaline, BRL 37344, ICI 215001 or tyramine substantially reduced efficacy and/or potency. 5. The adrenoceptor blockers propranolol, phentolamine, dihydroergotamine, atenolol, CGP 20712A and ICI 118551, or the dopamine receptor blockers, haloperidol or flupenthixol, did not block the potentiating action of catechol or the catecholamines. 6. The receptor activated by catecholamines to increase ICa we suggest should be called a C-receptor in view of its sensitivity to catechol. It may arise by enzymic modification of a conventional adrenoceptor but its transduction also involves a novel mechanism which might indicate that it is present in the muscle cells before enzyme treatment. PMID:8032602

  14. Biochar, activated carbon, and carbon nanotubes have different effects on fate of (14)C-catechol and microbial community in soil.

    PubMed

    Shan, Jun; Ji, Rong; Yu, Yongjie; Xie, Zubin; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of biochar, activated carbon (AC)-, and single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) in various concentrations (0, 0.2, 20, and 2,000?mg/kg dry soil) on the fate of (14)C-catechol and microbial community in soil. The results showed that biochar had no effect on the mineralization of (14)C-catechol, whereas AC at all amendment rates and SWCNTs at 2,000?mg/kg significantly reduced mineralization. Particularly, MWCNTs at 0.2?mg/kg significantly stimulated mineralization compared with the control soil. The inhibitory effects of AC and SWCNTs on the mineralization were attributed to the inhibited soil microbial activities and the shifts in microbial communities, as suggested by the reduced microbial biomass C and the separated phylogenetic distance. In contrast, the stimulatory effects of MWCNTs on the mineralization were attributed to the selective stimulation of specific catechol-degraders by MWCNTs at 0.2?mg/kg. Only MWCNTs amendments and AC at 2,000?mg/kg significantly changed the distribution of (14)C residues within the fractions of humic substances. Our findings suggest biochar, AC, SWCNTs and MWCNTs have different effects on the fate of (14)C-catechol and microbial community in soil. PMID:26515132

  15. Metabolism of Benzoic Acid by Bacteria: 3,5- Cyclohexadiene-1,2-Diol-1-Carboxylic Acid Is an Intermediate in the Formation of Catechol

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Albey M.

    1971-01-01

    3,5-Cyclohexadiene-1,2-diol-1-carboxylic acid (1,2-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxy-benzoic acid) is converted enzymatically to catechol in cell extracts from Acinetobacter, Alcaligenes, Azotobacter, and three Pseudomonas species. This enzymatic activity is present only in cultures which have been grown in the presence of benzoic acid, and which convert benzoic acid to catechol rather than to protocatechuic acid. The reaction is assayed by the concomitant formation of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. The conversion of [14C]benzoic acid to [14C]dihydrodihydroxybenzoic acid is demonstrated in cell extracts. A scheme for the conversion of benzoic acid to catechol in bacteria is presented, involving the formation of dihydrodihydroxybenzoic acid from benzoic acid by a dioxygenase which is unstable in cell extracts, followed by the dehydrogenation and decarboxylation of dihydrodihydroxybenzoic acid to catechol by a previously undescribed enzyme. Experiments with anthranilic acid and phthalic acid suggest that dihydrodihydroxybenzoic acid is a metabolite unique to benzoic acid metabolism. Two new methods for assaying benzoic acid dioxygenase are suggested. PMID:4399343

  16. Catechol-O-Methyltransferase "Val[superscript 158]Met" Genotype, Parenting Practices and Adolescent Alcohol Use: Testing the Differential Susceptibility Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laucht, Manfred; Blomeyer, Dorothea; Buchmann, Arlette F.; Treutlein, Jens; Schmidt, Martin H.; Esser, Gunter; Jennen-Steinmetz, Christine; Rietschel, Marcella; Zimmermann, Ulrich S.; Banaschewski, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Background: Recently, first evidence has been reported for a gene-parenting interaction (G x E) with regard to adolescent alcohol use. The present investigation set out to extend this research using the catechol-O-methyltransferase ("COMT") "Val[superscript 158]Met" polymorphism as a genetic susceptibility factor. Moreover, the current study

  17. Biochar, activated carbon, and carbon nanotubes have different effects on fate of 14C-catechol and microbial community in soil

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jun; Ji, Rong; Yu, Yongjie; Xie, Zubin; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of biochar, activated carbon (AC)-, and single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) in various concentrations (0, 0.2, 20, and 2,000 mg/kg dry soil) on the fate of 14C-catechol and microbial community in soil. The results showed that biochar had no effect on the mineralization of 14C-catechol, whereas AC at all amendment rates and SWCNTs at 2,000 mg/kg significantly reduced mineralization. Particularly, MWCNTs at 0.2 mg/kg significantly stimulated mineralization compared with the control soil. The inhibitory effects of AC and SWCNTs on the mineralization were attributed to the inhibited soil microbial activities and the shifts in microbial communities, as suggested by the reduced microbial biomass C and the separated phylogenetic distance. In contrast, the stimulatory effects of MWCNTs on the mineralization were attributed to the selective stimulation of specific catechol-degraders by MWCNTs at 0.2 mg/kg. Only MWCNTs amendments and AC at 2,000 mg/kg significantly changed the distribution of 14C residues within the fractions of humic substances. Our findings suggest biochar, AC, SWCNTs and MWCNTs have different effects on the fate of 14C-catechol and microbial community in soil. PMID:26515132

  18. Biochar, activated carbon, and carbon nanotubes have different effects on fate of 14C-catechol and microbial community in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Jun; Ji, Rong; Yu, Yongjie; Xie, Zubin; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of biochar, activated carbon (AC)-, and single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) in various concentrations (0, 0.2, 20, and 2,000 mg/kg dry soil) on the fate of 14C-catechol and microbial community in soil. The results showed that biochar had no effect on the mineralization of 14C-catechol, whereas AC at all amendment rates and SWCNTs at 2,000 mg/kg significantly reduced mineralization. Particularly, MWCNTs at 0.2 mg/kg significantly stimulated mineralization compared with the control soil. The inhibitory effects of AC and SWCNTs on the mineralization were attributed to the inhibited soil microbial activities and the shifts in microbial communities, as suggested by the reduced microbial biomass C and the separated phylogenetic distance. In contrast, the stimulatory effects of MWCNTs on the mineralization were attributed to the selective stimulation of specific catechol-degraders by MWCNTs at 0.2 mg/kg. Only MWCNTs amendments and AC at 2,000 mg/kg significantly changed the distribution of 14C residues within the fractions of humic substances. Our findings suggest biochar, AC, SWCNTs and MWCNTs have different effects on the fate of 14C-catechol and microbial community in soil.

  19. Catechol-O-Methyltransferase "Val[superscript 158]Met" Genotype, Parenting Practices and Adolescent Alcohol Use: Testing the Differential Susceptibility Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laucht, Manfred; Blomeyer, Dorothea; Buchmann, Arlette F.; Treutlein, Jens; Schmidt, Martin H.; Esser, Gunter; Jennen-Steinmetz, Christine; Rietschel, Marcella; Zimmermann, Ulrich S.; Banaschewski, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Background: Recently, first evidence has been reported for a gene-parenting interaction (G x E) with regard to adolescent alcohol use. The present investigation set out to extend this research using the catechol-O-methyltransferase ("COMT") "Val[superscript 158]Met" polymorphism as a genetic susceptibility factor. Moreover, the current study…

  20. Degradation and COD removal of catechol in wastewater using the catalytic ozonation process combined with the cyclic rotating-bed biological reactor.

    PubMed

    Aghapour, Ali Ahmad; Moussavi, Gholamreza; Yaghmaeian, Kamyar

    2015-07-01

    The effect of ozonation catalyzed with MgO/granular activated carbon (MgO/GAC) composite as a pretreatment process on the performance of cyclic rotating-bed biological reactor (CRBR) for the catechol removal from wastewater has been investigated. CRBR with acclimated biomasses could efficiently remove catechol and its related COD from wastewater at organic loading rate (OLR) of 7.82kg COD/m(3).d (HRT of 9h). Then, OLR increased to 15.64kg COD/m(3).d (HRT of 4.5h) and CRBR failed. Catalytic ozonation process (COP) used as a pre-treatment and could improve the performance of the failed CRBR. The overall removal efficiency of the combined process attained respective steady states of 91% and 79% for degradation and COD removal of catechol. Therefore, the combined process is more effective in degradation and COD removal of catechol; it is also a viable alternative for upgrading industrial wastewater treatment plant. PMID:25913467

  1. Native and Modified Lactate Dehydrogenase Expression in a Fumaric Acid Producing isolate Rhizopus oryzae 99-880

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizopus oryzae is a filamentous fungus that is of broad importance to the industrial, agricultural, and medical community. R. oryzae can be subdivided into two groups based on genetic and phenotypic differences. Type-I isolates accumulate primarily lactic acid when grown in the presence of a ferm...

  2. Characterizing virulence phenotypes among U.S. isolates of Magnaporthe oryzae using IRRI NILs, US germplasm, and NERICA lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast disease, caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, is a major constraint to rice production in most rice production areas, including the Southern U.S. In continued efforts to evaluate the effectiveness of resistance (R) genes, a total of 33 field and 12 U.S. reference isolates of M. oryzae were eval...

  3. MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF THE INSTABILITY OF AVIRULENCE GENE AVR-PITA IN RICE BLAST FUNGUS MAGNAPORTHE ORYZAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast, caused by Magnaporthe Oryzae, is one of the most serious diseases of rice worldwide. The Pi-ta gene in rice confers resistance to M. Oryzae isolates containing the corresponding avirulence gene AVR-Pita. In the southern U.S., rice cultivars containing Pi-ta have been widely utilized sinc...

  4. Preliminary assessment of resistance among U.S. wheat cultivars to the Triticum pathotype of Magnaporthe oryzae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Magnaporthe oryzae is the causal agent of blast disease on several graminaceous plants. The M. oryzae population causing wheat blast has not been officially reported outside South America. U.S. wheat production is at risk to this pathogen if it is introduced and established. Proactive testing of U.S...

  5. Mapping two major resistance genes in an indica cultivar Zhe733 to the race IE-1K of Magnaporthe oryzae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance (R) genes in rice confer resistance to races of Magnaporthe oryzae that contain the corresponding avirulence genes. The race IE-1K of M. oryzae recovered from the southern US overcomes R gene Pi-ta. The objectives of the present study were to identify new resistance sources to IE-1k an...

  6. Diversification and evolution of the avirulence gene AVR-Pita1 in field isolates of Magnaporthe oryzae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of the evolution of the AVR-Pita1 genes should benefit the deployment of the resistance gene Pi-ta for protecting rice production. The AVR-Pita1 avirulence gene in races of Magnaporthe oryzae triggers an effective resistance response when M. oryzae infects rice plants that contain the Pi-...

  7. Expression profiling of common and specific defense responses of rice to Magnaporthe oryzae infection using deep sequencing technologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is a serious disease in rice production. Wild type Nipponbare and transgenic rice plants (carrying the Pi9 blast resistance gene) were challenged with the rice blast strain KJ201 to identify the early, mid and late host responses to M. oryzae infection at the ...

  8. L-lactic acid production from starch by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation in a genetically engineered Aspergillus oryzae pure culture.

    PubMed

    Wakai, Satoshi; Yoshie, Toshihide; Asai-Nakashima, Nanami; Yamada, Ryosuke; Ogino, Chiaki; Tsutsumi, Hiroko; Hata, Yoji; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-12-01

    Lactic acid is a commodity chemical that can be produced biologically. Lactic acid-producing Aspergillus oryzae strains were constructed by genetic engineering. The A. oryzae LDH strain with the bovine L-lactate dehydrogenase gene produced 38 g/L of lactate from 100g/L of glucose. Disruption of the wild-type lactate dehydrogenase gene in A. oryzae LDH improved lactate production. The resulting strain A. oryzae LDHΔ871 produced 49 g/L of lactate from 100g/L of glucose. Because A. oryzae strains innately secrete amylases, A. oryzae LDHΔ871 produced approximately 30 g/L of lactate from various starches, dextrin, or maltose (all at 100 g/L). To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of lactate from starch using a pure culture of transgenic A. oryzae. Our results indicate that A. oryzae could be a promising host for the bioproduction of useful compounds such as lactic acid. PMID:25314668

  9. Southern U.S. weedy red rice(Oryza sativa) accessions for entry into the National Small Grains Collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice (Oryza sativa) is a troublesome weed in rice (Oryza sativa) production systems in the southern U.S. and throughout the world, especially where direct seeding methods are employed. Diverse biotypes of red rice infest rice in the southern U.S. This creates a challenge for management and con...

  10. rFTR1 is Required for Pathogenesis, and appears to be an Essential Gene, of Rhizopus oryzae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Rhizopus oryzae is a multinucleated fungus responsible for the majority of cases of mucormycosis. The high affinity iron permease gene (rFTR1) is required for R. oryzae iron transport in iron-limited environments. We sought to disrupt the gene to define its role in virulence. METHODS: ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase deficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the body. It is unclear exactly how VLCFA accumulation leads to the specific features of peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase deficiency. However, researchers suggest that the abnormal fatty acid accumulation triggers inflammation in the nervous system that leads ...

  12. Influence of Chemical Kinetics on Postcolumn Reaction in a Capillary Taylor Reactor with Catechol Analytes and Photoluminescence Following Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Moon Chul; Weber, Stephen G.

    2006-01-01

    Postcolumn derivatization reactions can enhance detector sensitivity and selectivity, but their successful combination with capillary liquid chromatography has been limited because of the small peak volumes in capillary chromatography. A capillary Taylor reactor (CTR), developed in our laboratory, provides simple and effective mixing and reaction in a 25-?m-radius postcolumn capillary. Homogenization of reactant streams occurs by radial diffusion, and a chemical reaction follows. Three characteristic times for a given reaction process can be predicted using simple physical and chemical parameters. Two of these times are the homogenization time, which governs how long it takes the molecules in the analyte and reagent streams to mix, and the reaction time, which governs how long the molecules in a homogeneous solution take to react. The third characteristic time is an adjustment to the reaction time called the start time, which represents an estimate of the average time the analyte stream spends without exposure to reagent. In this study, laser-induced fluorescence monitored the extent of the postcolumn reaction (reduction of Os(bpy)33+ by analyte to the photoluminescent Os(bpy)32+) in a CTR. The reaction time depends on the reaction rates. Analysis of product versus time data yielded second-order reaction rate constants between the PFET reagent, tris(2,2?-bipyridine)osmium, and standards ((ferrocenylmethyl)trimethylammonium cation and p-hydroquinone) or catechols (dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid. The extent of the reactions in a CTR were then predicted from initial reaction conditions and compared to experimental results. Both the theory and experimental results suggested the reactions of catechols were generally kinetically controlled, while those of the standards were controlled by mixing time (12 s). Thus, the extent of homogenization can be monitored in a CTR using the relatively fast reaction of the reagent and p-hydroquinone. Kinetically controlled reactions of catechols, however, could be also completed in a reasonable time at increased reagent concentration. A satisfactory reactor, operating at 1.7 cm/s (2 ?L/min) velocity with solutes having diffusion coefficients in the 5 10?6 cm2/s range, can be constructed from 8.0 cm of 25-?m-radius capillary. Slower reactions require longer reaction times, but theoretical calculations expect that a CTR does not broaden a chromatographic peak (N = 14 000) from a 100-?m-capillary chromatography column by 10% if the pseudo-first-order rate constant is larger than 0.1 s?1. PMID:15858975

  13. Purification and characterization of protocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase from Bacillus macerans: a new extradiol catecholic dioxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Wolgel, S A; Dege, J E; Perkins-Olson, P E; Jaurez-Garcia, C H; Crawford, R L; Münck, E; Lipscomb, J D

    1993-01-01

    Protocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase (2,3-PCD) from Bacillus macerans JJ1b has been purified to homogeneity for the first time. The enzyme catalyzes proximal extradiol ring cleavage of protocatechuate (PCA) with the attendant incorporation of both atoms of oxygen from O2. The holoenzyme has a mass of 143 +/- 7 kDa as determined by ultracentrifugation and other techniques. It is composed of four apparently identical subunits with M(r)s of 35,500, each containing one iron atom. Mössbauer spectroscopy of 57Fe-enriched enzyme showed that the irons are indistinguishable and are high spin (S = 2) Fe2+ in both the uncomplexed and substrate-bound enzyme. However, the quadrupole splitting, delta EQ, and isomer shift, delta, of the Mössbauer spectrum changed from delta EQ = 2.57 mm/s and delta = 1.29 mm/s to delta EQ = 2.73 mm/s and delta = 1.19 mm/s upon PCA binding to the enzyme, showing that the iron environment is altered when substrate is present. The enzyme was also found to bind variable and substoichiometric amounts of Mn2+, but this metal could be removed without loss of activity or stability. The inherently electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-silent Fe2+ of the enzyme reversibly bound nitric oxide to produce an EPR-active species (g = 4.11, 3.95; S = 3/2). The specific activity of the enzyme was found to be correlated with the amount of the S = 3/2 species formed, showing that activity is dependent on Fe2+. Anaerobic addition of substrates to the enzyme-nitric oxide complex significantly altered the EPR spectrum, suggesting that substrates bind to or near the iron. The enzyme was inactivated by reagents that oxidize the Fe2+, such as H2O2 and K3FE(CN)6; full activity was restored after reduction of the iron by ascorbate. Steady-state kinetic data were found to be consistent with an ordered bi-uni mechanism in which the organic substrate must add to 2,3-PCD before O2. The enzyme has the broadest substrate range of any of the well-studied catecholic dioxygenases. All substrates have vicinal hydroxyl groups on the aromatic ring except 4-NH2-3-hydroxybenzoate. This is the first substrate lacking vicinal hydroxyl groups reported for catecholic extradiol dioxygenases. 2,3-PCD is the final member of the PCA dioxygenase family to be purified. It is compared with other members of this family as well as other catecholic dioxygenases. Images PMID:8392511

  14. Development and mapping of Oryza glumaepatula-derived microsatellite markers in the interspecific cross Oryza glumaepatula x O. sativa.

    PubMed

    Brondani, C; Brondani, R P; Rangel, P H; Ferreira, M E

    2001-01-01

    Wild germplasm of domesticated crops is a source of genetic variation little utilized in breeding programs. Interspecific crosses can potentially uncover novel gene combinations that can be important for quantitative trait analysis. The combined use of wide crosses and genetic maps of chromosomal regions associated with quantitative traits can be used to broaden the genetic basis of rice breeding programs. Oryza glumaepatula is a diploid (AA genome) wild rice species native from South and Central America. A genetic map was constructed with 162 PCR-based markers (155 microsatellite and 7 STS markers) using a backcross population derived from the cross O. glumaepatula, accession RS-16 from the Brazilian Amazon Region x O. sativa BG-90-2, an elite rice inbred line. The map included 47 new SSR markers developed from an O. glumaepatula genomic library enriched for AG/TC sequences. All SSR markers were able to amplify the O. sativa genome, indicating a high degree of SSR flanking region conservation between O. glumaepatula and O. sativa species. The map covered 1500.4 cM, with an average of one marker every 10 cM. Despite some chromosomes being more densely mapped, the overall coverage was similar to other maps developed for rice. The advantage to construct a SSR-based map is to permit the combination of the speed of the PCR reaction, and the codominant nature of the SSR marker, facilitating the QTL analysis and marker assisted selection for rice breeding programs. PMID:11525066

  15. PCR-based INDEL markers co-dominant between Oryza sativa, japonica cultivars and closely-related wild Oryza species

    PubMed Central

    Niihama, Mitsuru; Mochizuki, Misato; Kurata, Nori; Nonomura, Ken-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Wild relatives genetically close to cultivars are precious genetic resources for plant breeding. Oryza rufipogon, O. barthii, O. glumaepatula, O. meridionalis and O. longistaminata are such wild species, and are also categorized as AA genome species based on their structural similarities. Chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) are a powerful resource in breeding and genetics, and numerous rice CSSLs have been produced. This study aimed to develop DNA markers for evaluation of CSSLs directly by PCR and subsequent gel electrophoresis. We confirmed that up to 155 of 188 markers developed for detection of japonica-indica INDELs could also detect INDELs between rice cultivars and wild AA-species accessions. Percentages of applicable markers were higher in O. rufipogon accessions (61.7 to 85.6%), and lower in accessions of other four AA species (39.8 to 51.4%). These markers were distributed throughout the rice chromosomes, and will be useful for genotyping of CSSLs and other genetic resources derived from crosses between rice cultivars and closely related wild species. PMID:26366120

  16. Data set from the phosphoproteomic analysis of Magnaporthe oryzae-responsive proteins in susceptible and resistant rice cultivars.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfeng; Ye, Zhijian; Nie, Yanfang; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Guo-Liang; Wang, Zhenzhong

    2015-06-01

    Rice blast, caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, is the most destructive disease of rice and causes tremendous losses of rice yield worldwide. To explore the molecular mechanisms involved in the rice-M. oryzae interaction, we conducted a time-course phosphoproteomic analysis of leaf samples from resistant and susceptible rice cultivars infected with M. oryzae. This data article contains additional results and analysis of M. oryzae-regulated phosphoproteins in rice leaves [1]. We report the analysis of M. oryzae-regulated phosphoproteins at all time points, including Venn diagram analysis, close-up views, relative intensities, and functional category, and the MS spectra of representative phosphoprotein and representative phosphorylated peptides. PMID:26217708

  17. Systemic exposure to and disposition of catechols derived from Salvia miltiorrhiza roots (Danshen) after intravenous dosing DanHong injection in human subjects, rats, and dogs.

    PubMed

    Li, Meijuan; Wang, Fengqing; Huang, Yhong; Du, Feifei; Zhong, Chenchun; Olaleye, Olajide E; Jia, Weiwei; Li, Yanfen; Xu, Fang; Dong, Jiajia; Li, Jian; Lim, Justin B R; Zhao, Buchang; Jia, Lifu; Li, Li; Li, Chuan

    2015-05-01

    DanHong injection is a Danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza roots)-based injectable solution for treatment of coronary artery disease and ischemic stroke. Danshen catechols are believed to be responsible for the injection's therapeutic effects. This study aimed to characterize systemic exposure to and elimination of Danshen catechols in human subjects, rats, and dogs receiving intravenous DanHong injection. A total of 28 catechols were detected, with content levels of 0.002-7.066 mM in the injection, and the major compounds included tanshinol, protocatechuic aldehyde, salvianolic acid B, rosmarinic acid, salvianolic acids A and D, and lithospermic acid with their daily doses ?10 ?mol/subject. After dosing, tanshinol, salvianolic acid D, and lithospermic acid exhibited considerable exposure in human subjects and rats. However, only tanshinol had considerable exposure in dogs. The considerable exposure to tanshinol was due to its having the highest dose, whereas that to salvianolic acid D and lithospermic acid was due to their relatively long elimination half-lives in the human subjects and rats. Protocatechuic aldehyde and rosmarinic acid circulated in the bloodstream predominantly as metabolites; salvianolic acids A and B exhibited low plasma levels with their human plasma metabolites little or not detected. Tanshinol and salvianolic acid D were eliminated mainly via renal excretion. Elimination of other catechols involved hepatobiliary and/or renal excretion of their metabolites. Methylation was found to be the primary metabolism for most Danshen catechols and showed intercompound and interspecies differences in rate and degree in vitro. The information gained here is relevant to pharmacological and toxicological research on DanHong injection. PMID:25670806

  18. Genome-wide identification of lineage-specific genes in Arabidopsis, Oryza and Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaohan; Jawdy, Sara; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2009-01-01

    Protein sequences were compared among Arabidopsis, Oryza and Populus to identify differential gene (DG) sets that are in one but not the other two genomes. The DG sets were screened against a plant transcript database, the NR protein database and six newly-sequenced genomes (Carica, Glycine, Medicago, Sorghum, Vitis and Zea) to identify a set of species-specific genes (SS). Gene expression, protein motif and intron number were examined. 192, 641 and 109 SS genes were identified in Arabidopsis, Oryza and Populus, respectively. Some SS genes were preferentially expressed in flowers, roots, xylem and cambium or up-regulated by stress. Six conserved motifs in Arabidopsis and Oryza SS proteins were found in other distant lineages. The SS gene sets were enriched with intronless genes. The results reflect functional and/or anatomical differences between monocots and eudicots or between herbaceous and woody plants. The Populus-specific genes are candidates for carbon sequestration and biofuel research.

  19. Soft Rot of Rhizopus oryzae as a Postharvest Pathogen of Banana Fruit in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jae-San; Chi, Tran Thi Phuong; Shen, Shun-Shan; Choi, Okhee

    2012-01-01

    Soft rot on banana fruit caused by Rhizopus oryzae was identified for the first time in Korea. Colonies were white to light brown and formed numerous sporangiospores. Optimum temperature for mycelial growth was 30?. Sporangia were globose and 30~200 m. Sporangiophores were usually straight, 8~20 m, and rhizoids usually in groups of 3~5. Columella were globose to sub-globose and 90~110 m. Sporangiospores were sub-globose or oval and 4~10 m. Based on its mycological characteristics, molecular analysis, and pathogenicity to host plants, this fungus was identified as Rhizopus oryzae Went & Prisen Geerligs. This is the first report of soft rot on banana caused by Rhizopus oryzae in Korea. PMID:23115518

  20. Difficidin and bacilysin from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 have antibacterial activity against Xanthomonas oryzae rice pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liming; Wu, Huijun; Chen, Lina; Yu, Xinfang; Borriss, Rainer; Gao, Xuewen

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial blight and bacterial leaf streak are serious, economically damaging, diseases of rice caused by the bacteria Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and X. oryzae pv. oryzicola. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 was shown to possess biocontrol activity against these Xanthomonas strains by producing the antibiotic compounds difficidin and bacilysin. Analyses using fluorescence, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy revealed difficidin and bacilysin caused changes in the cell wall and structure of Xanthomonas. Biological control experiments on rice plants demonstrated the ability of difficidin and bacilysin to suppress disease. Difficidin and bacilysin caused downregulated expression of genes involved in Xanthomonas virulence, cell division, and protein and cell wall synthesis. Taken together, our results highlight the potential of B. amyloliquefaciens FZB42 as a biocontrol agent against bacterial diseases of rice, and the utility of difficidin and bacilysin as antimicrobial compounds. PMID:26268540

  1. Morphological and molecular characterization of Magnaporthe oryzae (fungus) from infected rice leaf samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muni, Nurulhidayah Mat; Nadarajah, Kalaivani

    2014-09-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is a plant-pathogenic fungus that causes a serious disease affecting rice called rice blast. Outbreaks of rice blast have been a threat to the global production of rice. This fungal disease is estimated to cause production losses of US55 million each year in South and Southeast Asia. It has been used as a primary model for elucidating various aspects of the host-pathogen interaction with its host. We have isolated five isolates of Magnaporthe oryzae from diseased leaf samples obtained from the field at Kompleks Latihan MADA, Kedah, Malaysia. We have identified the isolates using morphological and microscopic studies on the fungal spores and the lesions on the diseased leaves. Amplification of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) was carried out with universal primers ITS1 and ITS4. The sequence of each isolates showed at least 99% nucleotide identity with the corresponding sequence in GenBank for Magnaporthe oryzae.

  2. Difficidin and bacilysin from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 have antibacterial activity against Xanthomonas oryzae rice pathogens.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liming; Wu, Huijun; Chen, Lina; Yu, Xinfang; Borriss, Rainer; Gao, Xuewen

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial blight and bacterial leaf streak are serious, economically damaging, diseases of rice caused by the bacteria Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and X. oryzae pv. oryzicola. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 was shown to possess biocontrol activity against these Xanthomonas strains by producing the antibiotic compounds difficidin and bacilysin. Analyses using fluorescence, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy revealed difficidin and bacilysin caused changes in the cell wall and structure of Xanthomonas. Biological control experiments on rice plants demonstrated the ability of difficidin and bacilysin to suppress disease. Difficidin and bacilysin caused downregulated expression of genes involved in Xanthomonas virulence, cell division, and protein and cell wall synthesis. Taken together, our results highlight the potential of B. amyloliquefaciens FZB42 as a biocontrol agent against bacterial diseases of rice, and the utility of difficidin and bacilysin as antimicrobial compounds. PMID:26268540

  3. The genome sequence of African rice (Oryza glaberrima) and evidence for independent domestication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Muhua; Yu, Yeisoo; Haberer, Georg; Marri, Pradeep Reddy; Fan, Chuanzhu; Goicoechea, Jose Luis; Zuccolo, Andrea; Song, Xiang; Kudrna, Dave; Ammiraju, Jetty S S; Cossu, Rosa Maria; Maldonado, Carlos; Chen, Jinfeng; Lee, Seunghee; Sisneros, Nick; de Baynast, Kristi; Golser, Wolfgang; Wissotski, Marina; Kim, Woojin; Sanchez, Paul; Ndjiondjop, Marie-Noelle; Sanni, Kayode; Long, Manyuan; Carney, Judith; Panaud, Olivier; Wicker, Thomas; Machado, Carlos A; Chen, Mingsheng; Mayer, Klaus F X; Rounsley, Steve; Wing, Rod A

    2014-09-01

    The cultivation of rice in Africa dates back more than 3,000 years. Interestingly, African rice is not of the same origin as Asian rice (Oryza sativa L.) but rather is an entirely different species (i.e., Oryza glaberrima Steud.). Here we present a high-quality assembly and annotation of the O. glaberrima genome and detailed analyses of its evolutionary history of domestication and selection. Population genomics analyses of 20 O. glaberrima and 94 Oryza barthii accessions support the hypothesis that O. glaberrima was domesticated in a single region along the Niger river as opposed to noncentric domestication events across Africa. We detected evidence for artificial selection at a genome-wide scale, as well as with a set of O. glaberrima genes orthologous to O. sativa genes that are known to be associated with domestication, thus indicating convergent yet independent selection of a common set of genes during two geographically and culturally distinct domestication processes. PMID:25064006

  4. Establishment of a new method to quantitatively evaluate hyphal fusion ability in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Tsukasaki, Wakako; Maruyama, Jun-Ichi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Hyphal fusion is involved in the formation of an interconnected colony in filamentous fungi, and it is the first process in sexual/parasexual reproduction. However, it was difficult to evaluate hyphal fusion efficiency due to the low frequency in Aspergillus oryzae in spite of its industrial significance. Here, we established a method to quantitatively evaluate the hyphal fusion ability of A. oryzae with mixed culture of two different auxotrophic strains, where the ratio of heterokaryotic conidia growing without the auxotrophic requirements reflects the hyphal fusion efficiency. By employing this method, it was demonstrated that AoSO and AoFus3 are required for hyphal fusion, and that hyphal fusion efficiency of A. oryzae was increased by depleting nitrogen source, including large amounts of carbon source, and adjusting pH to 7.0. PMID:25229867

  5. A flax-retting endopolygalacturonase-encoding gene from Rhizopus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhizhuang; Wang, Shaozhao; Bergeron, Hlne; Zhang, Jianchun; Lau, Peter C K

    2008-11-01

    A polygalacturonase from the filamentous fungus Rhizopus oryzae strain sb (NRRL 29086), previously shown to be effective in the retting of flax fibers, was shown by the analysis of its reaction products on polygalacturonic acid to be an endo-type. By zymogram analysis, the enzyme in the crude culture filtrate appeared as two active species of 37 and 40 kD. The endopolygalacturonase-encoding gene was cloned in Escherichia coli and its translated 383-amino acid sequence found to be identical to that of a presumed exopolygalacturonase found in R. oryzae strain YM9901 and 96% identical to a hypothetical protein (RO3G_04731.1) in the sequenced genome of R. oryzae strain 99-880. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of an unique cluster of Rhizopus polygalacturonase sequences that are separate from other fungal polygalacturonases. Conservation of 12 cysteines appears to be a special feature of this family of Rhizopus polygalacturonase sequences. PMID:18704748

  6. Lysyl oxidase activity regulates oncogenic stress response and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wiel, C; Augert, A; Vincent, D F; Gitenay, D; Vindrieux, D; Le Calv, B; Arfi, V; Lallet-Daher, H; Reynaud, C; Treilleux, I; Bartholin, L; Lelievre, E; Bernard, D

    2013-01-01

    Cellular senescence, a stable proliferation arrest, is induced in response to various stresses. Oncogenic stress-induced senescence (OIS) results in blocked proliferation and constitutes a fail-safe program counteracting tumorigenesis. The events that enable a tumor in a benign senescent state to escape from OIS and become malignant are largely unknown. We show that lysyl oxidase activity contributes to the decision to maintain senescence. Indeed, in human epithelial cell the constitutive expression of the LOX or LOXL2 protein favored OIS escape, whereas inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity was found to stabilize OIS. The relevance of these in vitro observations is supported by in vivo findings: in a transgenic mouse model of aggressive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), increasing lysyl oxidase activity accelerates senescence escape, whereas inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity was found to stabilize senescence, delay tumorigenesis, and increase survival. Mechanistically, we show that lysyl oxidase activity favors the escape of senescence by regulating the focal-adhesion kinase. Altogether, our results demonstrate that lysyl oxidase activity participates in primary tumor growth by directly impacting the senescence stability. PMID:24113189

  7. The Impact of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms on Human Aldehyde OxidaseS

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Tobias; Terao, Mineko; Garattini, Enrico; Teutloff, Christian; Alfaro, Joshua F.; Jones, Jeffrey P.; Leimkhler, Silke

    2012-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AO) is a complex molybdo-flavoprotein that belongs to the xanthine oxidase family. AO is active as a homodimer, and each 150-kDa monomer binds two distinct [2Fe2S] clusters, FAD, and the molybdenum cofactor. AO has an important role in the metabolism of drugs based on its broad substrate specificity oxidizing aromatic aza-heterocycles, for example, N1-methylnicotinamide and N-methylphthalazinium, or aldehydes, such as benzaldehyde, retinal, and vanillin. Sequencing the 35 coding exons of the human AOX1 gene in a sample of 180 Italian individuals led to the identification of relatively frequent, synonymous, missense and nonsense single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Human aldehyde oxidase (hAOX1) was purified after heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was obtained with a purity of 95% and a yield of 50 ?g/l E. coli culture. Site-directed mutagenesis of the hAOX1 cDNA allowed the purification of protein variants bearing the amino acid changes R802C, R921H, N1135S, and H1297R, which correspond to some of the identified SNPs. The hAOX1 variants were purified and compared with the wild-type protein relative to activity, oligomerization state, and metal content. Our data show that the mutation of each amino acid residue has a variable impact on the ability of hAOX1 to metabolize selected substrates. Thus, the human population is characterized by the presence of functionally inactive hAOX1 allelic variants as well as variants encoding enzymes with different catalytic activities. Our results indicate that the presence of these allelic variants should be considered for the design of future drugs. PMID:22279051

  8. The bioenergetic role of dioxygen and the terminal oxidase(s) in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Paumann, Martina; Regelsberger, Gnther; Obinger, Christian; Peschek, Gnter A

    2005-01-01

    Owing to the release of 13 largely or totally sequenced cyanobacterial genomes (see and ), it is now possible to critically assess and compare the most neglected aspect of cyanobacterial physiology, i.e., cyanobacterial respiration, also on the grounds of pure molecular biology (gene sequences). While there is little doubt that cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) do form the largest, most diversified and in both evolutionary and ecological respects most significant group of (micro)organisms on our earth, and that what renders our blue planet earth to what it is, viz. the O(2)-containing atmosphere, dates back to the oxygenic photosynthetic activity of primordial cyanobacteria about 3.2x10(9) years ago, there is still an amazing lack of knowledge on the second half of bioenergetic oxygen metabolism in cyanobacteria, on (aerobic) respiration. Thus, the purpose of this review is threefold: (1) to point out the unprecedented role of the cyanobacteria for maintaining the delicate steady state of our terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere through a major contribution to the poising of oxygenic photosynthesis against aerobic respiration ("the global biological oxygen cycle"); (2) to briefly highlight the membrane-bound electron-transport assemblies of respiration and photosynthesis in the unique two-membrane system of cyanobacteria (comprising cytoplasmic membrane and intracytoplasmic or thylakoid membranes, without obvious anastomoses between them); and (3) to critically compare the (deduced) amino acid sequences of the multitude of hypothetical terminal oxidases in the nine fully sequenced cyanobacterial species plus four additional species where at least the terminal oxidases were sequenced. These will then be compared with sequences of other proton-pumping haem-copper oxidases, with special emphasis on possible mechanisms of electron and proton transfer. PMID:15863101

  9. Crucial Roles of Abscisic Acid Biogenesis in Virulence of Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Carla A.; Lakshmanan, Venkatachalam; Donofrio, Nicole; Bais, Harsh P.

    2015-01-01

    Rice suffers dramatic yield losses due to blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. Pseudomonas chlororaphis EA105, a bacterium that was isolated from the rice rhizosphere, inhibits M. oryzae. It was shown previously that pre-treatment of rice with EA105 reduced the size of blast lesions through jasmonic acid (JA)- and ethylene (ETH)-mediated ISR. Abscisic acid (ABA) acts antagonistically toward salicylic acid (SA), JA, and ETH signaling, to impede plant defense responses. EA105 may be reducing the virulence of M. oryzae by preventing the pathogen from up-regulating the key ABA biosynthetic gene NCED3 in rice roots, as well as a ?-glucosidase likely involved in activating conjugated inactive forms of ABA. However, changes in total ABA concentrations were not apparent, provoking the question of whether ABA concentration is an indicator of ABA signaling and response. In the rice-M. oryzae interaction, ABA plays a dual role in disease severity by increasing plant susceptibility and accelerating pathogenesis in the fungus itself. ABA is biosynthesized by M. oryzae. Further, exogenous ABA increased spore germination and appressoria formation, distinct from other plant growth regulators. EA105, which inhibits appressoria formation, counteracted the virulence-promoting effects of ABA on M. oryzae. The role of endogenous fungal ABA in blast disease was confirmed through the inability of a knockout mutant impaired in ABA biosynthesis to form lesions on rice. Therefore, it appears that EA105 is invoking multiple strategies in its protection of rice from blast including direct mechanisms as well as those mediated through plant signaling. ABA is a molecule that is likely implicated in both tactics. PMID:26648962

  10. Transferability of microsatellite and sequence tagged site markers in Oryza species.

    PubMed

    Brondani, Claudio; Rangel, Paulo Hideo Nakano; Borba, Tereza Cristina Oliveira; Brondani, Rosana Pereira Vianello

    2003-01-01

    The genus Oryza comprises 22 species which are potentially useful as a source of genetic variability that can be introgressed into the worldwide cultivated rice, Oryza sativa. Molecular markers are useful tools for monitoring gene introgressions and for detecting polymorphism among species. In this study, cross-amplification was estimated among 28 accessions of 16 Oryza species, representing the genomes AA, BB, CC, BBCC and CCDD, using 59 microsatellite (OG, OS and RM series) and 15 STS (Sequence Tagged Sites) markers. All markers amplified at least one Oryza species, indicating different levels of transferability across species. Markers based on microsatellite sequences amplified 37 % of the accessions, with an average of 6.58 alleles per locus and an average polymorphism information content (PIC) of 70 %. For STS markers, the amplification level was 53.3 %, and the average number of alleles and PIC values were 1.6 and 10 %, respectively. These Results showed that although the STS markers detected a reduced level of genetic diversity, the transferability was higher, indicating that they can be used for genetic analysis when evaluating less genetically related species of Oryza. Among the microsatellite markers, an analysis of species with an AA genome showed that the OG markers produced the highest level of polymorphic loci (54.6 %), followed by RM markers (48 %). Highly polymorphic and transferable molecular markers in Oryza can be useful for exploiting the genetic resources of this genus, for detecting allelic variants in loci associated with important agronomic traits, and for monitoring alleles introgressed from wild relatives to cultivated rice. PMID:14641482

  11. Crucial Roles of Abscisic Acid Biogenesis in Virulence of Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Spence, Carla A; Lakshmanan, Venkatachalam; Donofrio, Nicole; Bais, Harsh P

    2015-01-01

    Rice suffers dramatic yield losses due to blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. Pseudomonas chlororaphis EA105, a bacterium that was isolated from the rice rhizosphere, inhibits M. oryzae. It was shown previously that pre-treatment of rice with EA105 reduced the size of blast lesions through jasmonic acid (JA)- and ethylene (ETH)-mediated ISR. Abscisic acid (ABA) acts antagonistically toward salicylic acid (SA), JA, and ETH signaling, to impede plant defense responses. EA105 may be reducing the virulence of M. oryzae by preventing the pathogen from up-regulating the key ABA biosynthetic gene NCED3 in rice roots, as well as a ?-glucosidase likely involved in activating conjugated inactive forms of ABA. However, changes in total ABA concentrations were not apparent, provoking the question of whether ABA concentration is an indicator of ABA signaling and response. In the rice-M. oryzae interaction, ABA plays a dual role in disease severity by increasing plant susceptibility and accelerating pathogenesis in the fungus itself. ABA is biosynthesized by M. oryzae. Further, exogenous ABA increased spore germination and appressoria formation, distinct from other plant growth regulators. EA105, which inhibits appressoria formation, counteracted the virulence-promoting effects of ABA on M. oryzae. The role of endogenous fungal ABA in blast disease was confirmed through the inability of a knockout mutant impaired in ABA biosynthesis to form lesions on rice. Therefore, it appears that EA105 is invoking multiple strategies in its protection of rice from blast including direct mechanisms as well as those mediated through plant signaling. ABA is a molecule that is likely implicated in both tactics. PMID:26648962

  12. Efficient formation of heterokaryotic sclerotia in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Wada, Ryuta; Jin, Feng Jie; Koyama, Yasuji; Maruyama, Jun-ichi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Heterokaryon formation by hyphal fusion occurs during a sexual/parasexual cycle in filamentous fungi, and therefore, it is biotechnologically important for crossbreeding. In the industrial filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae, a parasexual cycle has been reported, and it was recently suggested that sexual reproduction should be possible. However, as A. oryzae enters into hyphal fusion with a much lower frequency than Neurospora crassa, the process of heterokaryon formation has not been extensively characterized in A. oryzae. Here, we developed a detection system for heterokaryon formation by expressing red or green fluorescent proteins in nuclei and conferring uridine/uracil or adenine auxotrophy to MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 strains of A. oryzae. The heterokaryon formation of A. oryzae was investigated in paired culture using the genetically modified strains. No sclerotial formation was observed in the hyphal contact regions of the two strains with the same auxotrophy, whereas numerous sclerotia were formed between the strains with different auxotrophies. In most of the formed sclerotia, the uridine/uracil and adenine auxotrophies were complemented, and both red and green fluorescence were detected, indicating that heterokaryotic fusants were formed by hyphal fusion before or during sclerotial formation. Moreover, overexpressing the sclR gene, which encodes a transcription factor promoting sclerotial formation, increased the number of heterokaryotic sclerotia formed between the two auxotrophic strains. Notably, these effects in sclerotial formation of heterokaryotic fusants were observed independently of the mating type pairing combinations. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that paring of different auxotrophs and sclR overexpression promote the formation of heterokaryotic sclerotia in A. oryzae. PMID:24201891

  13. Yeast cytochrome c oxidase: A model system to study mitochondrial forms of the haem–copper oxidase superfamily☆

    PubMed Central

    Maréchal, Amandine; Meunier, Brigitte; Lee, David; Orengo, Christine; Rich, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    The known subunits of yeast mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase are reviewed. The structures of all eleven of its subunits are explored by building homology models based on the published structures of the homologous bovine subunits and similarities and differences are highlighted, particularly of the core functional subunit I. Yeast genetic techniques to enable introduction of mutations into the three core mitochondrially-encoded subunits are reviewed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Respiratory Oxidases. PMID:21925484

  14. Oxidation of catechols and catecholamines by horseradish peroxidase and lactoperoxidase: ESR spin stabilization approach combined with optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Rosa Pia; Laurenti, Enzo; Casella, Luigi; Poli, Sonia

    1993-08-01

    Oxidation of catechols and catecholamines by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) has been studied by electron spin resonance (ESR) and electronic spectroscopies. The ESR technique has been used as an ESR spin stabilization approach by complexation of o-semiquinone free radicals with Zn II ions. ESR spectra and parameters of these free radical complexed forms are in good agreement with those obtained previously for complexed and uncomplexed species. The K m values obtained with the two methods show stereoselective effects towards the chiral substrates L- and D-dopa from HRP and LPO. Furthermore, these enzymes display opposite stereochemical interactions, in agreement with the analogous effects observed on L- and D-tyrosine by electronic and NMR binding studies.

  15. Reversible swelling-shrinking behavior of hydrogen-bonded free-standing thin film stabilized by catechol reaction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiaxing; Su, Chao; Zhang, Xuejian; Yin, Wenjing; Xu, Jian; Yang, Shuguang

    2015-05-12

    Dopamine-modified poly(acrylic acid) (PAA-dopa) and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVPON) was layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled to prepare thin film based on hydrogen bonding. The carboxylic group of acrylic acid and the phenolic hydroxyl group of dopamine can both act as hydrogen bond donors. The critical assembly and the critical disintegration pH values of PVPON/PAA-dopa film are enhanced compared with PVPON/PAA film. The hydrogen-bonded PVPON/PAA-dopa thin film can be cross-linked via catechol chemistry of dopamine. After cross-linking, the film can be exfoliated from the substrate in alkaline solution to get a free-standing film. Moreover, by tuning the pH value, deprotonation and protonation of PAA will make the hydrogen bond in the film break and reconstruct, which induces that the free-standing film has a reversible swelling-shrinking behavior. PMID:25899235

  16. Theoretical study of the Pb(II)-catechol system in dilute aqueous solution: Complex structure and metal coordination sphere determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapouge, Christine; Cornard, Jean-Paul

    2010-04-01

    We investigated the unknown interaction of Pb(II) with catechol ligand in diluted aqueous solution by electronic spectroscopies combined with quantum chemical calculations. The aim of this work is the determination of the complete structure of the complex formed and particularly the metal coordination sphere. Three successive steps have been necessary to reach this goal: (i) the comparison of the experimental electronic absorption spectrum with theoretical spectra calculated from various hypothetical structures, (ii) complexation reaction pathways calculations in vacuum and with taking into account the solvent effects and finally (iii) the fluorescence emission wavelength calculations. All these investigations led to identify a monodentate complex with the monodeprotonated ligand, in which the Pb atom presents a coordination number of five. The formula of the complex is [Pb(Hcat)(HO)4]mono+.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of chromium(III) Schiff base complexes: Antimicrobial activity and its electrocatalytic sensing ability of catechol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveen Kumar, S.; Suresh, R.; Giribabu, K.; Manigandan, R.; Munusamy, S.; Muthamizh, S.; Narayanan, V.

    2015-03-01

    A series of acyclic Schiff base chromium(III) complexes were synthesized with the aid of microwave irradiation method. The complexes were characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, spectral analysis such as UV-Visible, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies and electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry. Electrochemical analysis of the complexes indicates the presence of chromium ion in +3 oxidation state. Cr (III) ion is stabilized by the tetradentate Schiff base ligand through its nitrogen and phenolic oxygen. From the spectral studies it is understood that the synthesized chromium(III) complexes exhibits octahedral geometry. Antimicrobial activity of chromium complexes was investigated towards the Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. In the present work, an attempt was made to fabricate a new kind of modified electrode based on chromium Schiff base complexes for the detection of catechol at nanomolar level.

  18. Impact of catechol-O-methyltransferase Val(108/158) Met genotype on hippocampal and prefrontal gray matter volume.

    PubMed

    Cerasa, Antonio; Gioia, Maria C; Labate, Angelo; Liguori, Maria; Lanza, Pierluigi; Quattrone, Aldo

    2008-03-01

    A variation in catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene (Val(108/158)Met) affects the physiological response of hippocampal-prefrontal circuits, predicts variation in human memory and is associated with increased risk for psychiatric disorders. Using optimized voxel-based morphometry we studied the effect of this functional polymorphism on the anatomy of the hippocampus, and the prefrontal cortex. Fifty-seven healthy participants were investigated (nine had Met/Met, 30 Val/Met, and 14 Val/Val). Voxel-based morphometry showed that individuals who are homozygous for the Val-COMT allele had greater gray matter volume of the prefrontal cortex bilaterally, whereas Met-COMT carriers were associated with increased tissue volume of the hippocampus bilaterally. This study provides evidence that the Val(108/158)Met polymorphism of the COMT gene might be responsible for individual variation in the human brain morphology. PMID:18287936

  19. Hydrogen bonding in aprotic solvents, a new strategy for gelation of bioinspired catecholic copolymers with N-isopropylamide.

    PubMed

    Vatankhah-Varnoosfaderani, Mohammad; GhavamiNejad, Amin; Hashmi, Saud; Stadler, Florian J

    2015-03-01

    Copolymers of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) and dopamine methacrylate can establish a reversible, self-healing 3D network in aprotic solvents based on hydrogen bonding. The reactivity and hydrogen bonding formation of catechol groups in copolymer chains are studied by UV-vis and (1) H NMR spectroscopy, while reversibility from sol to gel and inverse as well as self-healing properties are tested rheologically. The produced reversible organogel can self-encapsulate physically interacting or chemically bonded solutes such as drugs due to thermosensitivity of the used copolymer. This system offers dual-targeted and controlled drug delivery and release-by slowing down release kinetics by supramolecular bonding of the drug and by reducing diffusion rates due to modulus increase. PMID:25594749

  20. Association Between the Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Val158Met Polymorphism and Self-Perceived Social Acceptance in Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    Dearing, Karen F.; Joormann, Jutta; Gotlib, Ian H.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Low perceived social acceptance is a significant risk factor for emotional difficulties in children. No studies, however, have examined genetic factors that may underlie individual differences in perceived social acceptance. In the present study we examined the relation between polymorphisms on the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met and serotonin transporter promoter (5-HTTLPR) genes and perceived social acceptance in 103 adolescent girls. Only the COMT polymorphism was related to perceived social acceptance: Val-allele carriers reported greater perceived social acceptance than did homozygous Met-allele carriers. In a subsample of these participants, homozygous Val-allele carriers reported greater maintenance of positive emotions during stress. This, in turn, predicted social acceptance, suggesting that COMT exerts its effects on social functioning through emotion regulation. These data are the first to show an association between COMT and social functioning in children. Future research might profitably examine emotion regulation as a mediator between COMT and social acceptance. PMID:19702491