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Sample records for osa murdude operatiivne

  1. Intermittent Hypoxemia and OSA

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, F. Javier; Somers, Virend K.

    2015-01-01

    OSA is a common chronic disorder that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality including cardiovascular, metabolic, and neurocognitive disease and increased cancer-related deaths. OSA is characterized by recurrent episodes of apneas and hypopneas associated with repetitive episodes of intermittent hypoxemia, intrathoracic pressure changes, and arousals. Intermittent hypoxemia (IH) is now being recognized as a potential major factor contributing to the pathogenesis of OSA-related comorbidities. OSA-related high-frequency IH is characterized by cycles of hypoxemia with reoxygenation that is distinctly different than sustained low-frequency hypoxia and contributes to ischemia-reperfusion injury. Data from both animal and human studies support mechanistic links between IH and its adverse impact at the tissue level. IH promotes oxidative stress by increased production of reactive oxygen species and angiogenesis, increased sympathetic activation with BP elevation, and systemic and vascular inflammation with endothelial dysfunction that contributes to diverse multiorgan chronic morbidity and mortality affecting cardiovascular disease, metabolic dysfunction, cognitive decline, and progression of cancer. Data from observational studies in large population groups also support the role for hypoxia in the pathogenesis of OSA comorbidity. Treatment with CPAP to reverse OSA-related symptoms and comorbidities has been shown to provide variable benefit in some but not all patient groups. Early treatment with CPAP makes intuitive sense to promote maximal functional recovery and minimize residual injury. More studies are needed to determine the interacting effects of IH and obesity, differential effects of both short-term and long-term hypoxemia, and the effect of CPAP treatment. PMID:25560865

  2. Intraoperative BiPAP in OSA Patients.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhavna P; Ns, Kodandaram

    2015-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) is characterized by recurrent episodes of partial or complete upper airway obstructions during sleep. Severe OSA presents with a number of challenges to the anesthesiologist, the most life threatening being loss of the airway. We are reporting a case where we successfully used intraoperative bi level positive pressure ventilation (BiPAP) with moderate sedation and a regional technique in a patient with severe OSA posted for total knee replacement (TKR). A 55-year-old lady with osteoarthritis of right knee joint was posted for total knee replacement. She had severe OSA with an apnea-hypopnea index of 35. She also had moderate pulmonary hypertension due to her long standing OSA. We successfully used in her a combined spinal epidural technique with intraoperative BiPAP and sedation. She had no complications intraoperatively or post operatively and was discharged on day 5. Patients with OSA are vulnerable to sedatives, anaesthesia and analgesia which even in small doses can cause complete airway collapse. The problem, with regional techniques is that it requires excellent patient cooperation. We decided to put our patient on intraoperative BiPAP hoping that this would allow us to sedate her adequately for the surgery. As it happened we were able to successfully sedate her with slightly lesser doses of the commonly used sedatives without any episodes of desaturation, snoring or exacerbation of pulmonary hypertension. Many more trials are required before we can conclusively say that intraoperative BiPAP allows us to safely sedate OSA patients but we hope that our case report draws light on this possibility. Planning ahead and having a BiPAP machine available inside the operating may allow us to use sedatives in these patients to keep them comfortable under regional anaesthesia. PMID:26023625

  3. Intraoperative BiPAP in OSA Patients

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhavna P

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) is characterized by recurrent episodes of partial or complete upper airway obstructions during sleep. Severe OSA presents with a number of challenges to the anesthesiologist, the most life threatening being loss of the airway. We are reporting a case where we successfully used intraoperative bi level positive pressure ventilation (BiPAP) with moderate sedation and a regional technique in a patient with severe OSA posted for total knee replacement (TKR). A 55-year-old lady with osteoarthritis of right knee joint was posted for total knee replacement. She had severe OSA with an apnea-hypopnea index of 35. She also had moderate pulmonary hypertension due to her long standing OSA. We successfully used in her a combined spinal epidural technique with intraoperative BiPAP and sedation. She had no complications intraoperatively or post operatively and was discharged on day 5. Patients with OSA are vulnerable to sedatives, anaesthesia and analgesia which even in small doses can cause complete airway collapse. The problem, with regional techniques is that it requires excellent patient cooperation. We decided to put our patient on intraoperative BiPAP hoping that this would allow us to sedate her adequately for the surgery. As it happened we were able to successfully sedate her with slightly lesser doses of the commonly used sedatives without any episodes of desaturation, snoring or exacerbation of pulmonary hypertension. Many more trials are required before we can conclusively say that intraoperative BiPAP allows us to safely sedate OSA patients but we hope that our case report draws light on this possibility. Planning ahead and having a BiPAP machine available inside the operating may allow us to use sedatives in these patients to keep them comfortable under regional anaesthesia. PMID:26023625

  4. Using an OSAE to Learn about Life in Two New Delhi Hutments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weller, Kay E.

    2005-01-01

    This manuscript is a description of personal observations of two hutments in New Delhi, India. Data was gathered from my hotel window using the OSAE method of landscape observation. The OSAE is the method I use to understand processes that can be seen when studying a landscape. It is the most useful tool I have ever used when teaching geography.…

  5. Mathematical Objects through the Lens of Two Different Theoretical Perspectives: APOS and OSA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Font Moll, Vicenç; Trigueros, María; Badillo, Edelmira; Rubio, Norma

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a networking of two theories, the APOS Theory and the ontosemiotic approach (OSA), to compare and contrast how they conceptualize the notion of a mathematical object. As context of reflection, we designed an APOS genetic decomposition for the derivative and analyzed it from the point of view of OSA. Results of this study show…

  6. Obesity and obstructive sleep apnea: or is it OSA and obesity?

    PubMed

    Carter, Robert; Watenpaugh, Donald E

    2008-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) consists of repetitive choking spells due to sleep-induced reduction of upper airway muscle tone. Millions of adults and children live unaware of this condition, which can have a profound affect on their health and quality of life. Obesity, gender, genetic, and hormonal factors mediate risk for OSA and interact in a multifaceted manner in the pathogenesis of this disease. Obesity is the most established and primary risk factor given that body mass index, visceral fat, and neck circumference are major predictors in the clinical expression of OSA. Many studies have shown weight loss or gain significantly impacts OSA severity. More recently, accumulating evidence indicates OSA promotes weight gain, obesity, and type II diabetes in a variety of ways, such that obesity and OSA form multiple interleaved vicious cycles. Thus, creative strategies to increase physical activity, improve diet, and otherwise facilitate weight management become particularly vital given the epidemics of obesity and OSA in the United States. In this regard, the American College of Sports Medicine recently launched the "Exercise is Medicine" (initiative exerciseismedicine.org). In the future, medications may emerge to treat obesity, OSA, and their sequelae with minimal side effects. However, there are effective ways to approach these problems now without waiting for "the magic pill". PMID:18573643

  7. Osa-containing Brahma chromatin remodeling complexes are required for the repression of Wingless target genes

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Russell T.; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2000-01-01

    The Wingless signaling pathway directs many developmental processes in Drosophila by regulating the expression of specific downstream target genes. We report here that the product of the trithorax group gene osa is required to repress such genes in the absence of the Wingless signal. The Wingless-regulated genes nubbin, Distal-less, and decapentaplegic and a minimal enhancer from the Ultrabithorax gene are misexpressed in osa mutants and repressed by ectopic Osa. Osa-mediated repression occurs downstream of the up-regulation of Armadillo but is sensitive both to the relative levels of activating Armadillo/Pangolin and repressing Groucho/Pangolin complexes present and to the responsiveness of the promoter to Wingless. Osa functions as a component of the Brahma chromatin-remodeling complex; other components of this complex are likewise required to repress Wingless target genes. These results suggest that altering the conformation of chromatin is an important mechanism by which Wingless signaling activates gene expression. PMID:11124806

  8. The WOPR Domain Protein OsaA Orchestrates Development in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Alkahyyat, Fahad; Ni, Min; Kim, Sun Chang; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Orchestration of cellular growth and development occurs during the life cycle of Aspergillus nidulans. A multi-copy genetic screen intended to unveil novel regulators of development identified the AN6578 locus predicted to encode a protein with the WOPR domain, which is a broadly present fungi-specific DNA-binding motif. Multi-copy of AN6578 disrupted the normal life cycle of the fungus leading to enhanced proliferation of vegetative cells, whereas the deletion resulted in hyper-active sexual fruiting with reduced asexual development (conidiation), thus named as osaA (Orchestrator of Sex and Asex). Further genetic studies indicate that OsaA balances development mainly by repressing sexual development downstream of the velvet regulator VeA. The absence of osaA is sufficient to suppress the veA1 allele leading to the sporulation levels comparable to veA+ wild type (WT). Genome-wide transcriptomic analyses of WT, veA1, and ΔosaA veA1 strains by RNA-Seq further corroborate that OsaA functions in repressing sexual development downstream of VeA. However, OsaA also plays additional roles in controlling development, as the ΔosaA veA1 mutant exhibits precocious and enhanced formation of Hülle cells compared to WT. The OsaA orthologue of Aspergillus flavus is able to complement the osaA null phenotype in A. nidulans, suggesting a conserved role of this group of WOPR domain proteins. In summary, OsaA is an upstream orchestrator of morphological and chemical development in Aspergillus that functions downstream of VeA. PMID:26359867

  9. Audiologic profile of OSAS and simple snoring patients: the effect of chronic nocturnal intermittent hypoxia on auditory function.

    PubMed

    Martines, Francesco; Ballacchino, Antonella; Sireci, Federico; Mucia, Marianna; La Mattina, Eleonora; Rizzo, Serena; Salvago, Pietro

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of nocturnal intermittent hypoxia on auditory function of simple snoring patients and subjects affected by OSAS; we compared the audiologic profile with the severity of OSAS to detect early signs of cochlear damage. One hundred-sixty patients underwent overnight polysomnography, micro-otoscopy, multi-frequency audiometry, acufenometry, TEOAE recording and d-ROMs test. All subjects were divided in four groups, based on presence/absence of AHI (simple snoring without OSAS, mild OSAS, moderate OSAS, severe OSAS). Sixty (37.5 %) patients were not affected by OSAS, 58 (36.25 %) presented a mild OSAS, 18 (11.25 %) a moderate OSAS and 24 (15 %) a severe OSAS; the 57.14 % of moderate to severe OSAS suffered from tinnitus with respect to the 31.03 % of mild OSAS (P = 0.024). A higher percentage (41.66 %) of hearing loss was found among individuals with moderate to severe degree of OSAS (P < 0.0001). All groups were characterized by a mean hearing threshold <25 dB HL for 0.25-3 kHz frequencies and a progressive decrease in hearing sensitivity, particularly for 6-16 kHz frequencies (P < 0.05). The analysis of otoacoustic emissions SNR mean values evidenced a significant difference between simple snoring and severe OSAS individuals for 3 and 4 kHz frequencies (P < 0.05). d-ROM levels resulted higher in patients with severe OSAS with respect to simple snoring subjects (P = 0.004). Our data underline the key role of chronic nocturnal intermittent hypoxia in the development of an early cochlear damage and a more marked high-frequency hearing loss in case of severe OSAS (P < 0.05). PMID:26164293

  10. Comparative Emulsifying Properties of Octenyl Succinic Anhydride (OSA)-Modified Starch: Granular Form vs Dissolved State.

    PubMed

    Matos, María; Marefati, Ali; Gutiérrez, Gemma; Wahlgren, Marie; Rayner, Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    The emulsifying ability of OSA-modified and native starch in the granular form, in the dissolved state and a combination of both was compared. This study aims to understand mixed systems of particles and dissolved starch with respect to what species dominates at droplet interfaces and how stability is affected by addition of one of the species to already formed emulsions. It was possible to create emulsions with OSA-modified starch isolated from Quinoa as sole emulsifier. Similar droplet sizes were obtained with emulsions prepared at 7% (w/w) oil content using OSA-modified starch in the granular form or molecularly dissolved but large differences were observed regarding stability. Pickering emulsions kept their droplet size constant after one month while emulsions formulated with OSA-modified starch dissolved exhibited coalescence. All emulsions stabilized combining OSA-modified starch in granular form and in solution showed larger mean droplet sizes with no significant differences with respect to the order of addition. These emulsions were unstable due to coalescence regarding presence of free oil. Similar results were obtained when emulsions were prepared by combining OSA-modified granules with native starch in solution. The degree of surface coverage of starch granules was much lower in presence of starch in solution which indicates that OSA-starch is more surface active in the dissolved state than in granular form, although it led to unstable systems compared to starch granule stabilized Pickering emulsions, which demonstrated to be extremely stable. PMID:27479315

  11. Development of emulsifying property in Persian gum using octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA).

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, S; Abbasi, S; Scanlon, M G

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, the influence of octenyle succinic anhydride (OSA),gum concentration, pH, temperature and reaction time on esterification of Persian gum (PG), and its soluble (SFPG) and insoluble (IFPG) fractions, were investigated by response surface methodology (RSM) in order to optimize the reaction conditions based on the degree of substitution (DS). The individual effect of all independent variables as well as the interactive effects of temperature-OSA concentration, and OSA-PG concentrations on DS was significant. However, the latter interactive effect (OSA-SFPG) was not significant in case of SFPG. The IFPG did not have any esterification reaction with OSA. The highest DS for PG and SFPG were 0.0285 and 0.0303 at the optimal conditions, respectively. The FTIR spectrums also confirmed the carbonyl group attachment in OSA-PG and OSA-SFPG. The enhancement of emulsifying capability was also confirmed by ECI and EAI values, microscopic images as well as rheological measurements. PMID:27138859

  12. Comparative Emulsifying Properties of Octenyl Succinic Anhydride (OSA)-Modified Starch: Granular Form vs Dissolved State

    PubMed Central

    Marefati, Ali; Gutiérrez, Gemma; Wahlgren, Marie; Rayner, Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    The emulsifying ability of OSA-modified and native starch in the granular form, in the dissolved state and a combination of both was compared. This study aims to understand mixed systems of particles and dissolved starch with respect to what species dominates at droplet interfaces and how stability is affected by addition of one of the species to already formed emulsions. It was possible to create emulsions with OSA-modified starch isolated from Quinoa as sole emulsifier. Similar droplet sizes were obtained with emulsions prepared at 7% (w/w) oil content using OSA-modified starch in the granular form or molecularly dissolved but large differences were observed regarding stability. Pickering emulsions kept their droplet size constant after one month while emulsions formulated with OSA-modified starch dissolved exhibited coalescence. All emulsions stabilized combining OSA-modified starch in granular form and in solution showed larger mean droplet sizes with no significant differences with respect to the order of addition. These emulsions were unstable due to coalescence regarding presence of free oil. Similar results were obtained when emulsions were prepared by combining OSA-modified granules with native starch in solution. The degree of surface coverage of starch granules was much lower in presence of starch in solution which indicates that OSA-starch is more surface active in the dissolved state than in granular form, although it led to unstable systems compared to starch granule stabilized Pickering emulsions, which demonstrated to be extremely stable. PMID:27479315

  13. Pediatric OSAS: Oximetry can provide answers when polysomnography is not available.

    PubMed

    Kaditis, Athanasios; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Gozal, David

    2016-06-01

    Overnight polysomnography is the gold standard tool for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in habitually snoring children, but it is expensive and not always available. Nocturnal oximetry has been proposed as an abbreviated and low-cost testing modality for the diagnosis of OSAS. In this systematic review, 25 original articles were evaluated to: (i) summarize reference values of nocturnal oximetry parameters in healthy children; (ii) identify abnormal oximetry patterns that predict OSAS in habitually snoring children; (iii) delineate abnormalities in oximetry that can predict responses to treatment interventions for OSAS and potential complications. Nocturnal SpO2 drops <90%, more than two clusters of desaturation events (≥4%) and oxyhemoglobin desaturation (≥4%) index (ODI4) >2.2 episodes/h are unusual in children without OSAS. At least three clusters of desaturation events, and at least three SpO2 drops below 90% in a nocturnal oximetry recording are indicative of moderate-to-severe OSAS. An ODI4 >2 episodes/h combined with OSAS symptoms also exhibits high positive predictive value for apnea-hypopnea index >1 episode/h. Children without clusters of desaturation events have low risk of major respiratory complications following adenotonsillectomy. Thus, nocturnal oximetry emerges as a valuable tool that can facilitate treatment decisions when polysomnography is not available. PMID:26146027

  14. The investigation of the sludge reduction efficiency and mechanisms in oxic-settling-anaerobic (OSA) process.

    PubMed

    Demir, Özlem; Filibeli, Ayşe

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to provide a full understanding of the sludge reduction mechanisms in the oxic-settling-anaerobic (OSA) process and presents an evaluation of the sludge reduction efficiencies and sludge characteristics in this process compared to the conventional activated sludge process. Fifty-eight percent reduction in observed yield in the OSA process was achieved compared to the control system at the end of the operational period with no deterioration of effluent quality. The settleability of sludge in the OSA process was also found to be better than that of the control system in terms of sludge volume index. In long-term operation, capillary suction time and specific resistance to filtration values confirmed that the OSA process showed good filterability characteristics. The results of batch experiments showed that higher endogenous respiration in the systems might lead to lower sludge production and that energy uncoupling had only a limited impact on sludge reduction. PMID:27191551

  15. Impact of OSA on Biological Markers in Morbid Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Salord, Neus; Gasa, Mercè; Mayos, Mercedes; Fortuna-Gutierrez, Ana Maria; Montserrat, Josep Maria; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel; Barceló, Antonia; Barbé, Ferran; Vilarrasa, Núria; Monasterio, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: There is compelling evidence that obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) can affect metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular risk, but the intermediate mechanisms through which it occurs have not been well defined. We explored the impact of OSA in morbidly obese patients with MetS on adipokines, pro-inflammatory markers, endothelial dysfunction, and atherosclerosis markers. Methods: We included 52 morbidly obese patients in an observational study matched for age, gender and central obesity in 3 groups (OSA-MetS, Non-OSA-MetS, and Non OSA-non-MetS). Anthropometrical, blood pressure, and fasting blood measurements were obtained the morning after an overnight polysomnography. VEGF, soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L), TNF-α, IL-6, leptin, adiponectin, and chemerin were determined in serum by ELISA. OSA was defined as apnea/ hypopnea index ≥ 15 and MetS by NCEP-ATP III. Results: Cases and control subjects did not differ in age, BMI, waist circumference, and gender (43 ± 10 years, 46 ± 5 kg/m2, 128 ± 10 cm, 71% females). The cases had severe OSA with 47 (32-66) events/h, time spent < 90% SpO2 7% (5%-31%). All groups presented similar serum cytokines, adipokines, VEGF, and sCD40L levels. Conclusions: In a morbidly obese population with established MetS, the presence of OSA did not determine any differences in the studied mediators when matched by central obesity. Morbidly obese NonOSA-NonMetS had a similar inflammatory, adipokine VEGF, and sCD40L profile as those with established MetS, with or without OSA. Obesity itself could overwhelm the effect of sleep apnea and MetS in the studied biomarkers. Citation: Salord N; Gasa M; Mayos M; Fortuna-Gutierrez AM; Montserrat JM; Sánchez-de-la-Torre M; Barceló A; Barbé F; Vilarrasa N; Monasterio C. Impact of OSA on biological markers in morbid obesity and metabolic syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(3):263-270. PMID:24634623

  16. Executive Dysfunction in OSA Before and After Treatment: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Olaithe, Michelle; Bucks, Romola S.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a frequent and often underdiagnosed condition that is associated with upper airway collapse, oxygen desaturation, and sleep fragmentation leading to cognitive dysfunction. There is meta-analytic evidence that subdomains of attention and memory are affected by OSA. However, a thorough investigation of the impact of OSA on different subdomains of executive function is yet to be conducted. This report investigates the impact of OSA and its treatment, in adult patients, on 5 theorized subdomains of executive function. Design: An extensive literature search was conducted of published and unpublished materials, returning 35 studies that matched selection criteria. Meta-analysis was used to synthesize the results from studies examining the impact of OSA on executive functioning compared to controls (21 studies), and before and after treatment (19 studies); 5 studies met inclusion in both categories. Measurements: Research papers were selected which assessed 5 subdomains of executive function: Shifting, Updating, Inhibition, Generativity, and Fluid Reasoning. Results: All 5 domains of executive function demonstrated medium to very large impairments in OSA independent of age and disease severity. Furthermore, all subdomains of executive function demonstrated small to medium improvements with CPAP treatment. Discussion: Executive function is impaired across all five domains in OSA; these difficulties improved with CPAP treatment. Age and disease severity did not moderate the effects found; however, further studies are needed to explore the extent of primary and secondary effects, and the impact of age and premorbid intellectual ability (cognitive reserve). Citation: Olaithe M; Bucks RS. Executive dysfunction in OSA before and after treatment: a meta-analysis. SLEEP 2013;36(9):1297-1305. PMID:23997362

  17. Cloning and characterization of hELD/OSA1, a novel BRG1 interacting protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hurlstone, Adam F L; Olave, Ivan A; Barker, Nick; van Noort, Mascha; Clevers, Hans

    2002-01-01

    A highly conserved multisubunit enzymic complex, SWI/SNF, participates in the regulation of eukaryote gene expression through its ability to remodel chromatin. While a single component of SWI/SNF, Swi2 or a related protein, can perform this function in vitro, the other components appear to modulate the activity and specificity of the complex in vivo. Here we describe the cloning of hELD/OSA1, a 189 KDa human homologue of Drosophila Eld/Osa protein, a constituent of Drosophila SWI/SNF. By comparing conserved peptide sequences in Eld/Osa homologues we define three domains common to all family members. A putative DNA binding domain, or ARID (AT-rich DNA-interacting domain), may function in targetting SWI/SNF to chromatin. Two other domains unique to Eld/Osa proteins, EHD1 and EHD2, map to the C-terminus. We show that EHD2 mediates binding to Brahma-related gene 1 (BRG1), a human homologue of yeast Swi2. EHD1 and EHD2 also appear capable of interacting with each other. Using an antibody raised against EHD2 of hELD/OSA1, we detected Eld/Osa1 in endogenous SWI/SNF complexes derived from mouse brain. PMID:11988099

  18. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) Increases Pedestrian Injury Risk in Children

    PubMed Central

    Avis, Kristin T.; Gamble, Karen L.; Schwebel, David C

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate pedestrian behavior, including reaction time, impulsivity, risk-taking, attention, and decision-making, in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) compared with healthy controls. Study design Using a case control design, sixty 8- to 16-year-olds with newly diagnosed and untreated OSAS engaged in a virtual reality pedestrian environment. Sixty-one healthy children matched using a yoke-control procedure by age, race, gender and household income served as controls. Results Children with OSAS were riskier pedestrians than healthy children of the same age, race, and sex. Children with OSAS waited less time to cross (p<.01). The groups did not differ in looking at oncoming traffic or taking longer to decide to cross. Conclusions Results suggest OSAS may have significant consequences on children’s daytime functioning in a critical domain of personal safety, pedestrian skills. Children with OSAS appeared to have greater impulsivity when crossing streets. Results highlight the need for heightened awareness of the consequences of untreated sleep disorders and identify a possible target for pediatric injury prevention. PMID:25444002

  19. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA): a cephalometric analysis of severe and non-severe OSA patients. Part II: A predictive discriminant function analysis.

    PubMed

    Tangugsorn, V; Krogstad, O; Espeland, L; Lyberg, T

    2000-01-01

    One hundred male obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients were classified into 2 groups on the basis of apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) as severe (AHI > or = 50) and non-severe (AHI < 50). A comprehensive cephalometric analysis of cervicocraniofacial skeletal and upper airway soft tissue morphology was performed in 51 non-severe and 49 severe OSA patients. In addition, a multivariate statistical method (principal component, analysis and predictive discriminant analysis) was performed to identify the components that could correctly differentiate the severe from the non-severe OSA patients. Eight principal components (PCs) of cervicocraniofacial skeletal morphology, 4 PCs of hyoid bone position and head posture, and 7 PCs of upper airway soft tissue morphology, together with the selected demographic variables, were deduced to formulate a linear canonical discriminant function. The equation of a 9-variable model was generated as follows: PDF score = 4.127 - 0.144 (Body Mass Index) - 0.376 (PC1.1) + 0.311 (PC1.4) + 0.214 (PC1.5) + 0.075 (PC 2.1) - 1.309 (PC2.3) + 0.708 (PC3.2) - 0.059 (PC3.3) + 0.609 (PC3.6). The cutoff score was -0.03899. The overall rate of correct classification was 83%. The results showed that Body Mass Index and 8 other PCs contributed significantly to the OSA severity. These analyses are proven to be a useful adjunctive diagnostic tool to select optimal treatment regimens for OSA patients with varying degrees of severity. PMID:11307197

  20. The effect of allergic rhinitis on the degree of stress, fatigue and quality of life in OSA patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Cheol Eon; Shin, Seung Youp; Lee, Kun Hee; Cho, Joong Saeng; Kim, Sung Wan

    2012-09-01

    Both allergic rhinitis (AR) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are known to increase stress and fatigue, but the result of their coexistence has not been studied. The objective of this study was to evaluate the amount of stress and fatigue when AR is combined with OSA. One hundred and twelve patients diagnosed with OSA by polysomnography were enrolled. Among them, 37 patients were diagnosed with AR by a skin prick test and symptoms (OSA-AR group) and 75 patients were classified into the OSA group since they tested negative for allergies. We evaluated the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS), stress score, fatigue score, ability to cope with stress, and rhinosinusitis quality of life questionnaire (RQLQ) with questionnaires and statistically compared the scores of both groups. There were no significant differences in BMI and sleep parameters such as LSAT, AHI, and RERA between the two groups. However, the OSA-AR group showed a significantly higher ESS score compared to the OSA group (13.7 ± 4.7 vs. 9.3 ± 4.8). Fatigue scores were also significantly higher in the OSA-AR group than in the OSA group (39.8 ± 11.0 vs. 30.6 ± 5.4). The OSA-AR group had a significantly higher stress score (60.4 ± 18.6 vs. 51.2 ± 10.4). The ability to cope with stress was higher in the OSA group, although this difference was not statistically significant. RQLQ scores were higher in the OSA-AR group (60.2 ± 16.7 compared to 25.1 ± 13.9). In conclusion, management of allergic rhinitis is very important in treating OSA patients in order to eliminate stress and fatigue and to minimize daytime sleepiness and quality of life. PMID:22207526

  1. Italian recommendations on dental support in the treatment of adult obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS)

    PubMed Central

    Levrini, Luca; Sacchi, Franco; Milano, Francesca; Polimeni, Antonella; Cozza, Paolo; Bernkopf, Edoardo; Segù, Marzia; Zucconi, Marco; Vicini, Claudio; Brunello, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The aim of the present article is to present a set of proposed clinical recommendations aimed at Italian dentists involved in the management of patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome or snoring. Methods With the purpose of creating a study group, some of the most important Italian scientific societies operating in fields relevant to the issue of sleep medicine in dentistry were asked to appoint a representative. Each member of the study group was required to answer questions regarding the clinical management of OSAS and snoring. Results Oral appliances can be used to treat: - simple snoring, in patients who do not respond to, or do not appear to be suitable candidates for behavioral measures such as weight loss or positional therapy; - mild or moderate OSAS, in patients who prefer OAs to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or who are not suitable candidates for CPAP, because of its failure or failure of behavioral approaches like weight loss or positional therapy; - severe OSAS, in patients who do not respond to or do not tolerate CPAP and in whom no indication for either maxillofacial or ENT surgery appears applicable. Conclusions The application of oral appliances is highly desirable in cases of simple snoring or mild to moderate OSAS, whereas considerable caution is warranted when treating severe OSAS. It is fundamental to ensure that the patient understands his problem and, at the same time, to present all the various treatment options. PMID:26941893

  2. Paediatric obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with tonsil colonisation by Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Viciani, Elisa; Montagnani, Francesca; Tavarini, Simona; Tordini, Giacinta; Maccari, Silvia; Morandi, Matteo; Faenzi, Elisa; Biagini, Cesare; Romano, Antonio; Salerni, Lorenzo; Finco, Oretta; Lazzi, Stefano; Ruggiero, Paolo; De Luca, Andrea; Barocchi, Michèle A.; Manetti, Andrea G. O.

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of pathogenic bacteria in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) has yet to be elucidated. We investigated the possible role of group A streptococcus (GAS) in OSAS pathogenesis. In 40 tonsillectomized patients affected by OSAS and 80 healthy controls, significant (p < 0.0001) association of GAS with paediatric OSAS was found. Supernatant from streptolysin O (SLO)-producing GAS induced production of cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) in tonsil mononuclear cells (TMCs). CysLTs-treated TMCs showed significant (p < 0.05) proliferation of CD4+ T, CD19+ and CD19+CD27+CD38+ B lymphocytes. We discovered a SLO-dependent activation of CysLTs production through a pathway involving TOLL-like receptor 4 (TLR4), TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF), Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), and p38 MAP Kinase. In conclusion, we hypothesise that GAS may contribute to paediatric tonsillar hyperplasia through CysLTs production induced by SLO, and this might explain its association with OSAS. PMID:26860261

  3. The chromatin-remodeling protein Osa interacts with CyclinE in Drosophila eye imaginal discs.

    PubMed

    Baig, Jawaid; Chanut, Francoise; Kornberg, Thomas B; Klebes, Ansgar

    2010-03-01

    Coordinating cell proliferation and differentiation is essential during organogenesis. In Drosophila, the photoreceptor, pigment, and support cells of the eye are specified in an orchestrated wave as the morphogenetic furrow passes across the eye imaginal disc. Cells anterior of the furrow are not yet differentiated and remain mitotically active, while most cells in the furrow arrest at G(1) and adopt specific ommatidial fates. We used microarray expression analysis to monitor changes in transcription at the furrow and identified genes whose expression correlates with either proliferation or fate specification. Some of these are members of the Polycomb and Trithorax families that encode epigenetic regulators. Osa is one; it associates with components of the Drosophila SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. Our studies of this Trithorax factor in eye development implicate Osa as a regulator of the cell cycle: Osa overexpression caused a small-eye phenotype, a reduced number of M- and S-phase cells in eye imaginal discs, and a delay in morphogenetic furrow progression. In addition, we present evidence that Osa interacts genetically and biochemically with CyclinE. Our results suggest a dual mechanism of Osa function in transcriptional regulation and cell cycle control. PMID:20008573

  4. Blood Pressure Increases in OSA due to Maintained Neurovascular Sympathetic Transduction: Impact of CPAP

    PubMed Central

    Tamisier, Renaud; Tan, Can Ozan; Pepin, Jean-Louis; Levy, Patrick; Taylor, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To test the hypothesis that greater resting sympathetic activity in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome would not induce a lesser sympathetic neurovascular transduction. Design: Case-controlled cohort study. Participants: 33 patients with newly diagnosed OSA without comorbidities and 14 healthy controls. Interventions: 6 months of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for OSA patients and follow-up for 9 healthy controls. Measurements and Results: We assessed resting sympathetic outflow and sympathetic neurovascular transduction. Sympathetic activity was directly measured (microneurography) at rest and in response to sustained isometric handgrip exercise. Neurovascular transduction was derived from the relationship of sympathetic activity and blood pressure to leg blood flow during exercise. Despite an elevated sympathetic activity of ∼50% in OSA compared to controls, neurovascular transduction was not different (i.e., absence of tachyphylaxis). After six months of CPAP, there were significant declines in diastolic pressure, averaging ∼4 mm Hg, and in sympathetic activity, averaging ∼20% with no change in transduction. Conclusions: Greater sympathetic activity in obstructive sleep apnea does not appear to be associated with lesser neurovascular transduction. Hence, elevated sympathetic outflow without lesser transduction may underlie the prevalent development of hypertension in this population that is well controlled by continuous positive airway pressure treatment. Citation: Tamisier R, Tan CO, Pepin JL, Levy P, Taylor JA. Blood pressure increases in OSA due to maintained neurovascular sympathetic transduction: impact of CPAP. SLEEP 2015;38(12):1973–1980. PMID:26039959

  5. MR image analytics to characterize upper airway architecture in children with OSAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.; Matsumoto, Monica M. S.; Sin, Sanghun; Arens, Raanan

    2015-03-01

    Mechanisms leading to Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) in obese children are not well understood. We previously analyzed polysomnographic and demographic data to study the anatomical characteristics of the upper airway and body composition in two groups of obese children with and without OSAS, where object volume was evaluated. In this paper, in order to better understand the disease we expand the analysis considering a variety of features that include object-specific features such as size, surface area, sphericity, and image intensity properties of fourteen objects in the vicinity of the upper airway, as well as inter-object relationships such as distance between objects. Our preliminary results indicate several interesting phenomena: volumes and surface areas of adenoid and tonsils increase statistically significantly in OSAS. Standardized T2-weighted MR image intensities differ statistically significantly between the two groups, implying that perhaps intrinsic tissue composition undergoes changes in OSAS. Inter-object distances are significantly different between the two groups for object pairs (skin, oropharynx), (skin, fat pad), (skin, soft palate), (mandible, tongue), (oropharynx, soft palate), (left tonsil, oropharynx), (left tonsil, fat pad) and (left tonsil, right tonsil). We conclude that treatment methods for OSAS such as adenotonsillectomy should respect proportional object size relationships and spatial arrangement of objects as they exist in control subjects.

  6. Operative Management of OSAS in a Complex Case of Proteus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cantone, Elena; Cavaliere, Michele; Castagna, Giovanni; Marino, Anna; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Iengo, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common disorder in childhood with high prevalence in syndromic subjects with craniofacial malformations. Proteus Syndrome (PS) is a rare hamartoneoplastic disorder associated with disproportionate and asymmetric overgrowth of body parts and hypertrophy or malformation of lymphatic tissues, such as palatine tonsils. We report a case of a 12-year-old boy diagnosed with Proteus Syndrome (PS) and suffering from OSAS due to asymmetric palatine tonsillar hypertrophy, treated with partial resection of left tonsil. To avoid the risk of a general anesthesia and remove only the obstructive portion of the palatine tonsil bipolar radiofrequency-induced thermotherapy (RFITT) under local anesthesia was performed. Recovery of the obstructive respiratory disease was obtained. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in the literature of partial tonsillar resection performed in a patient with PS suffering from OSAS under local anesthesia. PMID:26199778

  7. 48 CFR 3033.102-90 - Protests on classified solicitations (OSA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Protests on classified... PROTESTS, DISPUTES, AND APPEALS Protests 3033.102-90 Protests on classified solicitations (OSA). To ensure that classified information is protected and appropriate security measures are coordinated as...

  8. 48 CFR 3033.102-90 - Protests on classified solicitations (OSA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Protests on classified... PROTESTS, DISPUTES, AND APPEALS Protests 3033.102-90 Protests on classified solicitations (OSA). To ensure that classified information is protected and appropriate security measures are coordinated as...

  9. 48 CFR 3033.102-90 - Protests on classified solicitations (OSA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Protests on classified... PROTESTS, DISPUTES, AND APPEALS Protests 3033.102-90 Protests on classified solicitations (OSA). To ensure that classified information is protected and appropriate security measures are coordinated as...

  10. Is There a Relationship Between Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and Hearing Loss?

    PubMed

    Ekin, Selami; Turan, Mahfuz; Arısoy, Ahmet; Gunbatar, Hulya; Sunnetcioglu, Aysel; Asker, Selvi; Yıldız, Hanifi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder with an estimated prevalence in the general population of 2-5%. Its main clinical features are loud snoring and breathing stoppage during sleep. Ischemia could be a consequence of noise-induced hearing loss because cochlear oxygen tension is reduced during and after noise exposure. In this study, we evaluated auditory function in patients affected by OSA and simple snoring. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 66 participants (male to female ratio: 40:26) were included in the study, of which 21 were in the control group, 18 were in the simple snoring group, and 27 were in the OSA patient group. Polysomnography and audiometric examination were performed in all participants. RESULTS The mean ages of the participants in the control, simple snoring, and OSA groups were 39.14±9.9, 37.28±8.2, and 41.56±8.99 years, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences among groups regarding age or sex; however, there were statistically significant differences among groups in body mass index, apnea-hypopnea index scores, mean saturation, and duration under 90% saturation. In addition, statistically significant differences were found between the patient group and the control and simple snoring groups concerning the mean saturation, duration under 90% saturation, and the extended high frequency of hearing. CONCLUSIONS These data show that snoring may cause hearing loss at extended high frequencies. PMID:27588548

  11. A novel integrated, compact OSA and ASE source for increased fober optic sensing capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Linda; Eigen, Daryl J.; Chavez-Pirson, Arturo

    2003-11-01

    Typical fiber Bragg sensing systems, in the 1500nm to 1600nm wavelength range, use gratings spaced approximately 5nm apart. This large spacing is preferred since optical power illuminating the gratings is limited and monitoring systems often have low performance and hence have difficulty in differentiating between closely spaced gratings. In this paper, we present a high power ASE source in combination with an extremely high performance Optical Spectrum Analyzer (OSA), that allows sensing gratings to be closely spaced so many sensing elements can be monitored while maintaining very good wavelength and power detection. The integrated unit can be provided on a PCI card, in a box or as an OEM module to enable a robust, handheld unit. The OSA is built around proprietary Compliant Micro Electro Mechanical (CMEMs) tunable filters, primarily developed for very densely populated Telecommunications applications. The OSA is wavelength calibrated and can be matched to the ASE source to compensate for any spectral power characteristic of the source. This integrated OSA and ASE source will allow the sensing industry to increase grating array sizes while maintaining low cost.

  12. OSAS Surgery and Postoperative Discomfort: Phase I Surgery versus Phase II Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Giulio; Pelo, Sandro; Foresta, Enrico; Boniello, Roberto; Romandini, Mario; Cervelli, Daniele; Azzuni, Camillo; Marianetti, Tito Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. This study aims to investigate the reasons that discourage the patients affected by OSAS to undergo orthognathic surgery and compares the postoperative discomfort of phase I (soft tissue surgery) and phase II (orthognathic surgery) procedures for treatment of OSAS. Material and Methods. A pool of 46 patients affected by OSAS was divided into two groups: “surgery patients” who accepted surgical treatments of their condition and “no surgery patients” who refused surgical procedures. The “surgery patients” group was further subdivided into two arms: patients who accepted phase I procedures (IP) and those who accepted phase II (IIP). To better understand the motivations behind the refusal of II phase procedures, we asked the patients belonging to both the IP group and “no surgery” group to indicate the main reason that influenced their decision to avoid II phase procedures. We also monitored and compared five parameters of postoperative discomfort: pain, painkiller assumption, length of hospitalization, foreign body sensation, and diet assumption following IP and IIP procedures. Results. The main reason to avoid IIP procedures was the concern of a more severe postoperative discomfort. Comparison of the postoperative discomfort following IP versus IIP procedures showed that the former scored worse in 4 out of 5 parameters analyzed. Conclusion. IIP procedures produce less postoperative discomfort. IIP procedures, namely, orthognathic surgery, should be the first choice intervention in patients affected by OSAS and dentoskeletal malformation. PMID:25695081

  13. Blood pressure effects of CPAP in nonresistant and resistant hypertension associated with OSA: A systematic review of randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Feldstein, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a rather common chronic disorder, associated with increased prevalence of hypertension. The pathophysiological mechanisms for hypertension in OSA are at least in part linked to intermittent hypoxia developed during nightly hypopneas and apneas. Hypoxemia stimulates sympathetic overactivity, systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction. However, it appears that intermittent hypoxemia is not the only factor in the development of hypertension in OSA. Supplemental oxygen therapy that improved oxyhemoglobin saturation to similar levels to those achieved with CPAP treatment did not reduce BP. In this scenario, it could be proposed that hypoxemia acts as a trigger of sympathetic overdrive, which when set is the main factor in the development of hypertension in OSA. This review appraises evidence provided by randomized controlled trials on the BP-lowering effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment of OSA patients with nonresistant and resistant hypertension. It suggests that CPAP treatment is more effective in treating resistant hypertension than nonresistant hypertension. A possible explanation is that sympathetic overactivity and altered vascular reactivity in OSA could be more severe in resistant hypertension than in nonresistant hypertension. An intricate interaction among compliance, adherence, and their interaction with demographic characteristics, genetic factors, and comorbidities of the population included might explain the differences found between trials on their influence over the antihypertensive effectiveness of CPAP. Further long-term trials are needed in hypertensive OSA patients to assess whether CPAP treatment in OSA patients consistently restores physiological nocturnal BP fall and adjusts resting and circadian heart rate. PMID:27159803

  14. The USC-OSA Student Chapter: goals and benefits for the optics community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Varela, A. I.; Gargallo, Ana; González Núñez, Héctor; Delgado-García, Tamara; Almaguer-Gómez, Citlalli; Cambronero-López, F.; Flores-Arias, M. T.

    2014-07-01

    The USC-OSA Student Chapter has been constituted in March 2013 by members of the University of Santiago de Compostela (USC) in Spain and sponsored by The Optical Society of America (OSA). It is formed by five graduate and one undergraduate students with the common interest in Optics and Photonics research and a professor of the USC is also involved as a faculty advisor. We decided to start this group with the aim of involving kids, precollege and undergraduate students in the world of Optics and Photonics. The activities that the USC-OSA Student Chapter members intend to realize are mainly educational tasks for the spreading of knowledge in Photonics by means of basic experiments, demonstrations and lectures by leading researchers and teachers. Most of the needed resources to accomplish these activities are provided by the OSA, such as educational posters and a portable kit for demonstrating Optics to students. At this moment the USC-OSA Student Chapter is carrying out several activities, as educational journeys at the Santiago de Compostela University Hospital Complex (CHUS), where hospitalized children can approach to Optics through some simple experiments and games. A teaching program is also being organized in collaboration with Galician secondary schools in order to show students the importance and uses of Optics and Photonics and to arouse their interest in this field, as well as encouraging them to develop their scientific thinking. Another activity will take place in November during the Science Week, which includes a program of lectures targeted to undergraduate students and an exposition of several demonstrations

  15. Orbital Signature Analyzer (OSA): A spacecraft health/safety monitoring and analysis tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Steven; Degeorges, Charles; Bush, Joy; Shendock, Robert; Mandl, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    Fixed or static limit sensing is employed in control centers to ensure that spacecraft parameters remain within a nominal range. However, many critical parameters, such as power system telemetry, are time-varying and, as such, their 'nominal' range is necessarily time-varying as well. Predicted data, manual limits checking, and widened limit-checking ranges are often employed in an attempt to monitor these parameters without generating excessive limits violations. Generating predicted data and manual limits checking are both resource intensive, while broadening limit ranges for time-varying parameters is clearly inadequate to detect all but catastrophic problems. OSA provides a low-cost solution by using analytically selected data as a reference upon which to base its limits. These limits are always defined relative to the time-varying reference data, rather than as fixed upper and lower limits. In effect, OSA provides individual limits tailored to each value throughout all the data. A side benefit of using relative limits is that they automatically adjust to new reference data. In addition, OSA provides a wealth of analytical by-products in its execution.

  16. Expansion sphincter pharyngoplasty for the treatment of OSA: a systemic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pang, Kenny P; Pang, Edward B; Win, Ma Thin Mar; Pang, Kathleen A; Woodson, B Tucker

    2016-09-01

    This study seeks to determine the success rates of the expansion sphincter pharyngoplasty and its variants on the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Systematic review and meta-analysis. Two independent searches of MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Cochrane Library and Evidence Based Medicine Reviews to identify publications relevant to OSA and expansion pharyngoplasty. All relevant studies published before 31 March 2015 were included. Five studies were included in the systematic review and meta-analysis. The numbers of patients in each paper ranged from 10 to 85 (total = 155), and mean age ranged from 8 to 56 years. Substantial and consistent improvement in PSG outcomes were observed post-expansion pharyngoplasty patients, with or without multilevel surgery groups. The results showed that the expansion pharyngoplasty technique has significantly lower AHI than control group [Standardised mean difference -7.32, 95 %CI (-11.11, -3.52), p = 0.0002]; however, substantial heterogeneity between these studies were observed. The mean pre-operative AHI (in the five papers) improved from 40.0 ± 12.6 to 8.3 ± 5.2 post-operatively. The overall pro-rated pooled success rate for all the patients was 86.3 %. The expansion pharyngoplasty is effective in the management of patients with OSA. PMID:26541714

  17. Valuation of OSA process and folic acid addition as excess sludge minimization alternatives applied in the activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Martins, C L; Velho, V F; Ramos, S R A; Pires, A S C D; Duarte, E C N F A; Costa, R H R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of the oxic-settling-anaerobic (OSA)-process and the folic acid addition applied in the activated sludge process to reduce the excess sludge production. The study was monitored during two distinct periods: activated sludge system with OSA-process, and activated sludge system with folic acid addition. The observed sludge yields (Yobs) were 0.30 and 0.08 kgTSS kg(-1) chemical oxygen demand (COD), control phase and OSA-process (period 1); 0.33 and 0.18 kgTSS kg(-1) COD, control phase and folic acid addition (period 2). The Yobs decreased by 73 and 45% in phases with the OSA-process and folic acid addition, respectively, compared with the control phases. The sludge minimization alternatives result in a decrease in excess sludge production, without negatively affecting the performance of the effluent treatment. PMID:26901714

  18. A 3-week dietary safety study of octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA)-modified starch in neonatal farm piglets.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Brinda; Thorsrud, Bjorn A; Brorby, Gregory P; Ferguson, Heather E

    2014-10-01

    Octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA)-modified starch functions as both an emulsifier and emulsion stabilizer in foods, and is intended for use in infant formula, follow-on formula, and formulae for special medical purposes. These formulae predominantly include extensively hydrolyzed protein or free amino acids, rather than intact protein, which otherwise would provide emulsifying functionality. The study objectives were to evaluate (1) the safety of OSA-modified starch after three weeks of administration to neonatal farm piglets, beginning 2 days after birth and (2) the impact of OSA-modified starch on piglet growth. OSA-modified starch was added to formula at concentrations of 2, 4, and 20 g/L. The vehicle control, low-dose, and mid-dose diets were supplemented with Amioca™ Powder to balance the nutritional profiles of all formulations. There were no test article-related effects of any diet containing OSA-modified starch on piglet growth and development (clinical observations, body weight, feed consumption), or clinical pathology parameters (hematology, clinical chemistry, coagulation, urinalysis). In addition, there were no adverse effects at terminal necropsy (macro- and microscopic pathology evaluations). Therefore, dietary exposure to OSA-modified starch at concentrations up to 20 g/L was well tolerated by neonatal farm piglets and did not result in adverse health effects or impact piglet growth. PMID:25019245

  19. Recognition of upper airway and surrounding structures at MRI in pediatric PCOS and OSAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, J. K.; Odhner, D.; Sin, Sanghun; Arens, Raanan

    2013-03-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) is common in obese children with risk being 4.5 fold compared to normal control subjects. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) has recently been shown to be associated with OSAS that may further lead to significant cardiovascular and neuro-cognitive deficits. We are investigating image-based biomarkers to understand the architectural and dynamic changes in the upper airway and the surrounding hard and soft tissue structures via MRI in obese teenage children to study OSAS. At the previous SPIE conferences, we presented methods underlying Fuzzy Object Models (FOMs) for Automatic Anatomy Recognition (AAR) based on CT images of the thorax and the abdomen. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the AAR approach is applicable to a different body region and image modality combination, namely in the study of upper airway structures via MRI. FOMs were built hierarchically, the smaller sub-objects forming the offspring of larger parent objects. FOMs encode the uncertainty and variability present in the form and relationships among the objects over a study population. Totally 11 basic objects (17 including composite) were modeled. Automatic recognition for the best pose of FOMs in a given image was implemented by using four methods - a one-shot method that does not require search, another three searching methods that include Fisher Linear Discriminate (FLD), a b-scale energy optimization strategy, and optimum threshold recognition method. In all, 30 multi-fold cross validation experiments based on 15 patient MRI data sets were carried out to assess the accuracy of recognition. The results indicate that the objects can be recognized with an average location error of less than 5 mm or 2-3 voxels. Then the iterative relative fuzzy connectedness (IRFC) algorithm was adopted for delineation of the target organs based on the recognized results. The delineation results showed an overall FP and TP volume fraction of 0.02 and 0.93.

  20. Brain stem activity changes associated with restored sympathetic drive following CPAP treatment in OSA subjects: a longitudinal investigation.

    PubMed

    Lundblad, Linda C; Fatouleh, Rania H; McKenzie, David K; Macefield, Vaughan G; Henderson, Luke A

    2015-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with significantly elevated muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), leading to hypertension and increased cardiovascular morbidity. Although little is known about the mechanisms responsible for the sympathoexcitation, we have recently shown that the elevated MSNA in OSA is associated with altered neural processing in various brain stem sites, including the dorsolateral pons, rostral ventrolateral medulla, medullary raphe, and midbrain. Given the risk associated with elevated MSNA, we aimed to determine if treatment of OSA with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) would reduce the elevated MSNA and reverse the brain stem functional changes associated with the elevated MSNA. We performed concurrent recordings of MSNA and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity of the brain stem, using high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging, in 15 controls and 13 subjects with OSA, before and after 6 mo CPAP treatment. As expected, 6 mo of CPAP treatment significantly reduced MSNA in subjects with OSA, from 54 ± 4 to 23 ± 3 bursts/min and from 77 ± 7 to 36 ± 3 bursts/100 heart beats. Importantly, we found that MSNA-coupled changes in BOLD signal intensity within the dorsolateral pons, medullary raphe, and rostral ventrolateral medulla returned to control levels. That is, CPAP treatment completely reversed brain stem functional changes associated with elevated MSNA in untreated OSA subjects. These data highlight the effectiveness of CPAP treatment in reducing one of the most significant health issues associated with OSA, that is, elevated MSNA and its associated elevated morbidity. PMID:25995345

  1. Brain stem activity changes associated with restored sympathetic drive following CPAP treatment in OSA subjects: a longitudinal investigation

    PubMed Central

    Lundblad, Linda C.; Fatouleh, Rania H.; McKenzie, David K.; Macefield, Vaughan G.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with significantly elevated muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), leading to hypertension and increased cardiovascular morbidity. Although little is known about the mechanisms responsible for the sympathoexcitation, we have recently shown that the elevated MSNA in OSA is associated with altered neural processing in various brain stem sites, including the dorsolateral pons, rostral ventrolateral medulla, medullary raphe, and midbrain. Given the risk associated with elevated MSNA, we aimed to determine if treatment of OSA with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) would reduce the elevated MSNA and reverse the brain stem functional changes associated with the elevated MSNA. We performed concurrent recordings of MSNA and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity of the brain stem, using high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging, in 15 controls and 13 subjects with OSA, before and after 6 mo CPAP treatment. As expected, 6 mo of CPAP treatment significantly reduced MSNA in subjects with OSA, from 54 ± 4 to 23 ± 3 bursts/min and from 77 ± 7 to 36 ± 3 bursts/100 heart beats. Importantly, we found that MSNA-coupled changes in BOLD signal intensity within the dorsolateral pons, medullary raphe, and rostral ventrolateral medulla returned to control levels. That is, CPAP treatment completely reversed brain stem functional changes associated with elevated MSNA in untreated OSA subjects. These data highlight the effectiveness of CPAP treatment in reducing one of the most significant health issues associated with OSA, that is, elevated MSNA and its associated elevated morbidity. PMID:25995345

  2. Characterization of Antibiotic-Loaded Alginate-Osa Starch Microbeads Produced by Ionotropic Pregelation

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Gizele Cardoso; Calado, Verônica Maria Araújo; Rossi, Alexandre Malta; da Rocha-Leão, Maria Helena Miguez

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the penicillin-loaded microbeads composed of alginate and octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA) starch prepared by ionotropic pregelation with calcium chloride and to evaluate their in vitro drug delivery profile. The beads were characterized by size, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), zeta potential, swelling behavior, and degree of erosion. Also, the possible interaction between penicillin and biopolymers was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis. The SEM micrograph results indicated a homogeneous drug distribution in the matrix. Also, based on thermal analyses (TGA/DSC), interactions were detected between microbead components. Although FTIR spectra of penicillin-loaded microbeads did not reveal the formation of new chemical entities, they confirmed the chemical drug stability. XRD patterns showed that the incorporated crystalline structure of penicillin did not significantly alter the primarily amorphous polymeric network. In addition, the results confirmed a prolonged penicillin delivery system profile. These results imply that alginate and OSA starch beads can be used as a suitable controlled-release carrier for penicillin. PMID:23862146

  3. Oryza sativa H+-ATPase (OSA) is Involved in the Regulation of Dumbbell-Shaped Guard Cells of Rice.

    PubMed

    Toda, Yosuke; Wang, Yin; Takahashi, Akira; Kawai, Yuya; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamaji, Naoki; Feng Ma, Jian; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-06-01

    The stomatal apparatus consists of a pair of guard cells and regulates gas exchange between the leaf and atmosphere. In guard cells, blue light (BL) activates H(+)-ATPase in the plasma membrane through the phosphorylation of its penultimate threonine, mediating stomatal opening. Although this regulation is thought to be widely adopted among kidney-shaped guard cells in dicots, the molecular basis underlying that of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocots remains unclear. Here, we show that H(+)-ATPases are involved in the regulation of dumbbell-shaped guard cells. Stomatal opening of rice was promoted by the H(+)-ATPase activator fusicoccin and by BL, and the latter was suppressed by the H(+)-ATPase inhibitor vanadate. Using H(+)-ATPase antibodies, we showed the presence of phosphoregulation of the penultimate threonine in Oryza sativa H(+)-ATPases (OSAs) and localization of OSAs in the plasma membrane of guard cells. Interestingly, we identified one H(+)-ATPase isoform, OSA7, that is preferentially expressed among the OSA genes in guard cells, and found that loss of function of OSA7 resulted in partial insensitivity to BL. We conclude that H(+)-ATPase is involved in BL-induced stomatal opening of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocotyledon species. PMID:27048369

  4. Liver Steatosis and Fibrosis in OSA patients After Long-term CPAP Treatment: A Preliminary Ultrasound Study.

    PubMed

    Buttacavoli, Maria; Gruttad'Auria, Claudia I; Olivo, Mirko; Virdone, Roberto; Castrogiovanni, Alessandra; Mazzuca, Emilia; Marotta, Anna Maria; Marrone, Oreste; Madonia, Salvatore; Bonsignore, Maria R

    2016-01-01

    In cases of morbid obesity, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) was associated with biopsy-proven liver damage. The role of non-invasive techniques to monitor liver changes during OSA treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is unknown. We used non-invasive ultrasound techniques to assess liver steatosis and fibrosis in severe OSA patients at diagnosis and during long-term CPAP treatment. Fifteen consecutive patients with severe OSA (apnea hypopnea index 52.5 ± 19.1/h) were studied by liver ultrasound and elastography (Fibroscan) at 6-mo (n = 3) or 1-y (n = 12) follow-up. Mean age was 49.3 ± 11.9 y, body mass index (BMI) was 35.4 ± 6.4 kg/m(2). Adherence to CPAP was ≥5 h/night. At baseline, most patients had severe liver steatosis independent of BMI; at follow-up, liver steatosis was not statistically different, but a relationship between severity of steatosis and BMI became apparent (Spearman's rho: 0.53, p = 0.03). Significant fibrosis as assessed by Fibroscan was absent at diagnosis or follow-up (failure or unreliable measurements in four markedly obese patients). Therefore, ultrasound liver assessment is feasible in most OSA patients, and CPAP treatment may positively affect liver steatosis. PMID:26385053

  5. Measurement properties of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) in adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA): A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Abma, Inger L; van der Wees, Philip J; Veer, Vik; Westert, Gert P; Rovers, Maroeska

    2016-08-01

    This systematic review summarizes the evidence regarding the quality of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) validated in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We performed a systematic literature search of all PROMs validated in patients with OSA, and found 22 measures meeting our inclusion criteria. The quality of the studies was assessed using the consensus-based standards for the selection of health status measurement instruments (COSMIN) checklist. The results showed that most of the measurement properties of the PROMs were not, or not adequately, assessed. For many identified PROMs there was no involvement of patients with OSA during their development or before the PROM was tested in patients with OSA. Positive exceptions and the best current candidates for assessing health status in patients with OSA are the sleep apnea quality of life index (SAQLI), Maugeri obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (MOSAS) questionnaire, Quebec sleep questionnaire (QSQ) and the obstructive sleep apnea patient-oriented severity index (OSAPOSI). Even though there is not enough evidence to fully judge the quality of these PROMs as outcome measure, when interpreted with caution, they have the potential to add value to clinical research and clinical practice in evaluating aspects of health status that are important to patients. PMID:26433776

  6. Oryza sativa H+-ATPase (OSA) is Involved in the Regulation of Dumbbell-Shaped Guard Cells of Rice

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Yosuke; Wang, Yin; Takahashi, Akira; Kawai, Yuya; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamaji, Naoki; Feng Ma, Jian; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    The stomatal apparatus consists of a pair of guard cells and regulates gas exchange between the leaf and atmosphere. In guard cells, blue light (BL) activates H+-ATPase in the plasma membrane through the phosphorylation of its penultimate threonine, mediating stomatal opening. Although this regulation is thought to be widely adopted among kidney-shaped guard cells in dicots, the molecular basis underlying that of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocots remains unclear. Here, we show that H+-ATPases are involved in the regulation of dumbbell-shaped guard cells. Stomatal opening of rice was promoted by the H+-ATPase activator fusicoccin and by BL, and the latter was suppressed by the H+-ATPase inhibitor vanadate. Using H+-ATPase antibodies, we showed the presence of phosphoregulation of the penultimate threonine in Oryza sativa H+-ATPases (OSAs) and localization of OSAs in the plasma membrane of guard cells. Interestingly, we identified one H+-ATPase isoform, OSA7, that is preferentially expressed among the OSA genes in guard cells, and found that loss of function of OSA7 resulted in partial insensitivity to BL. We conclude that H+-ATPase is involved in BL-induced stomatal opening of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocotyledon species. PMID:27048369

  7. The Osa-containing SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex regulates stem cell commitment in the adult Drosophila intestine

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiankun; Lin, Xinhua; Hou, Steven X.

    2013-01-01

    The proportion of stem cells versus differentiated progeny is well balanced to maintain tissue homeostasis, which in turn depends on the balance of the different signaling pathways involved in stem cell self-renewal versus lineage-specific differentiation. In a screen for genes that regulate cell lineage determination in the posterior midgut, we identified that the Osa-containing SWI/SNF (Brahma) chromatin-remodeling complex regulates Drosophila midgut homeostasis. Mutations in subunits of the Osa-containing complex result in intestinal stem cell (ISC) expansion as well as enteroendocrine (EE) cell reduction. We further demonstrated that Osa regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation into enterocytes by elaborating Notch signaling, and ISC commitment to differentiation into EE cells by regulating the expression of Asense, an EE cell fate determinant. Our data uncover a unique mechanism whereby the commitment of stem cells to discrete lineages is coordinately regulated by chromatin-remodeling factors. PMID:23942514

  8. Impact of CPAP on Activity Patterns and Diet in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA)

    PubMed Central

    Batool-Anwar, Salma; Goodwin, James L.; Drescher, Amy A.; Baldwin, Carol M.; Simon, Richard D.; Smith, Terry W.; Quan, Stuart F.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Patients with severe OSA consume greater amounts of cholesterol, protein, and fat as well as have greater caloric expenditure. However, it is not known whether their activity levels or diet change after treatment with CPAP. To investigate this issue, serial assessments of activity and dietary intake were performed in the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES); a 6-month randomized controlled study of CPAP vs. sham CPAP on neurocognitive outcomes. Methods: Subjects were recruited into APPLES at 5 sites through clinic encounters or public advertisement. After undergoing a diagnostic polysomnogram, subjects were randomized to CPAP or sham if their AHI was ≥ 10. Adherence was assessed using data cards from the devices. At the Tucson and Walla Walla sites, subjects were asked to complete validated activity and food frequency questionnaires at baseline and their 4-month visit. Results: Activity and diet data were available at baseline and after 4 months treatment with CPAP or sham in up to 231 subjects (117 CPAP, 114 Sham). Mean age, AHI, BMI, and Epworth Sleepiness Score (ESS) for this cohort were 55 ± 13 [SD] years, 44 ± 27 /h, 33 ± 7.8 kg/m2, and 10 ± 4, respectively. The participants lacking activity and diet data were younger, had lower AHI and arousal index, and had better sleep efficiency (p < 0.05). The BMI was higher among women in both CPAP and Sham groups. However, compared to women, men had higher AHI only in the CPAP group (50 vs. 34). Similarly, the arousal index was higher among men in CPAP group. Level of adherence defined as hours of device usage per night at 4 months was significantly higher among men in CPAP group (4.0 ± 2.9 vs. 2.6 ± 2.6). No changes in consumption of total calories, protein, carbohydrate or fat were noted after 4 months. Except for a modest increase in recreational activity in women (268 ± 85 vs. 170 ± 47 calories, p < 0.05), there also were no changes in activity patterns. Conclusion

  9. Promoter methylation regulates the abundance of osa-miR393a in contrasting rice genotypes under salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Ganie, Showkat Ahmad; Dey, Narottam; Mondal, Tapan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important molecules that regulate gene expression under salinity stress. Despite their evolutionary conservation, these regulatory elements have been shown to behave differently in different plant species under a particular environmental stress. In this study, we investigated the behavior of salt responsive osa-miR393a and its target gene (TIR1, LOC_Os05g05800) in salt-tolerant (FL478) and salt-sensitive (IR29) rice genotypes. It was found that the mature and precursor sequences of osa-miR393a as well as its cleavage site in TIR1 were conserved among salt tolerant and sensitive genotypes. Promoters of different salt-responsive miRNAs were also found to be less variable between salt-tolerant and salt-susceptible genotypes. Analysis of gene expression, promoter methylation, and cis-element abundance showed that osa-miR393a behaves differently in FL478 and IR29. Salt stress altered the expression pattern of osa-miR393a-TIR1 module in a time-dependent manner in the roots and shoots of two genotypes. Promoter methylation of this regulatory module was also altered at different time points under salt stress. Expression analysis in two genotypes indicated the overall down-regulation of osa-miR393a and up-regulation of TIR1 in FL478 and their reciprocal regulation in IR29. The expression results were complemented by the differential promoter methylation and cis-element abundance of this regulatory module. Together, the results of transcript abundance and promoter methylation of osa-miR393a-TIR1 module signified the association between these two processes which is reported for the first time in plants to the best of our knowledge. PMID:26319531

  10. Landscape-Scale Controls on Aboveground Forest Carbon Stocks on the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Philip; Asner, Gregory; Dahlin, Kyla; Anderson, Christopher; Knapp, David; Martin, Roberta; Mascaro, Joseph; Chazdon, Robin; Cole, Rebecca; Wanek, Wolfgang; Hofhansl, Florian; Malavassi, Edgar; Vilchez-Alvarado, Braulio; Townsend, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Tropical forests store large amounts of carbon in tree biomass, although the environmental controls on forest carbon stocks remain poorly resolved. Emerging airborne remote sensing techniques offer a powerful approach to understand how aboveground carbon density (ACD) varies across tropical landscapes. In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) system to detect top-of-canopy tree height (TCH) and ACD across the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. LiDAR and field-estimated TCH and ACD were highly correlated across a wide range of forest ages and types. Top-of-canopy height (TCH) reached 67 m, and ACD surpassed 225 Mg C ha-1, indicating both that airborne CAO LiDAR-based estimates of ACD are accurate in tall, high-biomass forests and that the Osa Peninsula harbors some of the most carbon-rich forests in the Neotropics. We also examined the relative influence of lithologic, topoedaphic and climatic factors on regional patterns in ACD, which are known to influence ACD by regulating forest productivity and turnover. Analyses revealed a spatially nested set of factors controlling ACD patterns, with geologic variation explaining up to 16% of the mapped ACD variation at the regional scale, while local variation in topographic slope explained an additional 18%. Lithologic and topoedaphic factors also explained more ACD variation at 30-m than at 100-m spatial resolution, suggesting that environmental filtering depends on the spatial scale of terrain variation. Our result indicate that patterns in ACD are partially controlled by spatial variation in geologic history and geomorphic processes underpinning topographic diversity across landscapes. ACD also exhibited spatial autocorrelation, which may reflect biological processes that influence ACD, such as the assembly of species or phenotypes across the landscape, but additional research is needed to resolve how abiotic and biotic factors contribute to ACD

  11. Landscape-Scale Controls on Aboveground Forest Carbon Stocks on the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Philip; Asner, Gregory; Dahlin, Kyla; Anderson, Christopher; Knapp, David; Martin, Roberta; Mascaro, Joseph; Chazdon, Robin; Cole, Rebecca; Wanek, Wolfgang; Hofhansl, Florian; Malavassi, Edgar; Vilchez-Alvarado, Braulio; Townsend, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Tropical forests store large amounts of carbon in tree biomass, although the environmental controls on forest carbon stocks remain poorly resolved. Emerging airborne remote sensing techniques offer a powerful approach to understand how aboveground carbon density (ACD) varies across tropical landscapes. In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) system to detect top-of-canopy tree height (TCH) and ACD across the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. LiDAR and field-estimated TCH and ACD were highly correlated across a wide range of forest ages and types. Top-of-canopy height (TCH) reached 67 m, and ACD surpassed 225 Mg C ha-1, indicating both that airborne CAO LiDAR-based estimates of ACD are accurate in tall, high-biomass forests and that the Osa Peninsula harbors some of the most carbon-rich forests in the Neotropics. We also examined the relative influence of lithologic, topoedaphic and climatic factors on regional patterns in ACD, which are known to influence ACD by regulating forest productivity and turnover. Analyses revealed a spatially nested set of factors controlling ACD patterns, with geologic variation explaining up to 16% of the mapped ACD variation at the regional scale, while local variation in topographic slope explained an additional 18%. Lithologic and topoedaphic factors also explained more ACD variation at 30-m than at 100-m spatial resolution, suggesting that environmental filtering depends on the spatial scale of terrain variation. Our result indicate that patterns in ACD are partially controlled by spatial variation in geologic history and geomorphic processes underpinning topographic diversity across landscapes. ACD also exhibited spatial autocorrelation, which may reflect biological processes that influence ACD, such as the assembly of species or phenotypes across the landscape, but additional research is needed to resolve how abiotic and biotic factors contribute to ACD

  12. Improved stability and controlled release of CLA with spray-dried microcapsules of OSA-modified starch and xanthan gum.

    PubMed

    He, Huizi; Hong, Yan; Gu, Zhengbiao; Liu, Guodong; Cheng, Li; Li, Zhaofeng

    2016-08-20

    The objective of this investigation was to improve the stability of CLA and to allow for its controlled release by encapsulating it with combinations of octenyl-succinic anhydride (OSA) starch and xanthan gum (XG) in three ratios (OSA/XG: 60/1, 80/1, and 100/1, w/w). The wall material was examined using FTIR and TGA. The microcapsules were characterized by laser particle size analysis (LPS) and SEM. Oxidation of the microcapsules was monitored by headspace method. The results revealed that microcapsules created with an OSA/XG ratio of 60/1 provided superior protection to CLA against oxidation. When CLA-microcapsules were subjected to conditions simulating those in the human gastrointestinal system, 12.1%-50.1% of the CLA was released. CLA encapsulation in spray-dried microcapsules of OSA/XG appears to be an effective technique that provides good protection against oxidation and could be useful in the targeted delivery of functional lipids or other bioactive components to the small intestine. PMID:27178930

  13. Phenolic compounds of 'Galega Vulgar' and 'Cobrançosa' olive oils along early ripening stages.

    PubMed

    Peres, Fátima; Martins, Luisa L; Mourato, Miguel; Vitorino, Conceição; Antunes, Paulo; Ferreira-Dias, Suzana

    2016-11-15

    In this study, the lipophilic and hydrophilic phenol composition of virgin olive oils (VOO) obtained from olives from two of the most important Portuguese cultivars ('Galega Vulgar' and 'Cobrançosa'), harvested at different ripening stages and under two irrigation schemes (rain fed and irrigated), was evaluated. Phenolic alcohols (hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol), phenolic acids and derivatives and flavonoids (luteolin and apigenin), as well as tocopherols were quantified. Lipophilic (>300mgkg(-1)) and hydrophilic phenols (>600mgkg(-1)) were present in high contents in both VOO, for early ripening stages. Gamma-tocopherol content is higher in 'Galega Vulgar' VOO. Total phenols showed a decrease between ripening index 2.5 and 3.5. The dialdehydic form of elenolic acid linked to hydroxytyrosol (3,4-DHPEA-EDA), also known as oleacein, was the major phenolic compound identified in both oils. The concentration of free hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol in both VOO is very low while their esterified derivatives, like 3,4-DHPEA-EDA and p-HPEA-EDA, are much more abundant. PMID:27283606

  14. Topographic Distributions of Emergent Trees in Tropical Forests of the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzotti, C.; Asner, G. P.; Taylor, P.; Cole, R. J.; Osborne, B. B.; Cleveland, C. C.; Porder, S.; Townsend, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical rainforests are reservoirs of terrestrial carbon and biodiversity. Large and often emergent trees store disproportionately large amounts of aboveground carbon and greatly influence the structure and functioning of tropical rainforests. Despite their importance, controls on the abundance and distribution of emergent trees are largely unknown across tropical landscapes. Conventional field approaches are limited in their ability to characterize patterns in emergent trees across vast landscapes with varying environmental conditions and floristic composition. Here we used a high-resolution light detection and ranging (LiDAR) sensor, aboard the Carnegie Airborne Observatory Airborne Taxonomic Mapping System (CAO-AToMS), to examine the abundance and distribution of tall emergent tree canopies (ETC) relative to surrounding tree canopies (STC), across the Osa Peninsula, a geologically and topographically diverse region of Costa Rica. The abundance of ETC was clearly influenced by fine-scale topographic variation, with distribution patterns that held across a variety of geologic substrates. Specifically, the density of ETC was much greater on lower slopes and in valleys, compared to upper slopes and ridges. Furthermore, using the CAO high-fidelity imaging spectrometer, ETC had a different spectral signature than that of the STC. Most notably, ETC had lower foliar N than STC, which was verified with an independent field survey of canopy leaf chemistry. The underlying mechanisms to explain the topographic-dependence of ETCs and linkages to canopy N are unknown, and remain an important area of research.

  15. Program for catenary-pantograph analysis, PrOSA statement of methods and validation according EN 50318

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finner, Lars; Poetsch, Gero; Sarnes, Bernhard; Kolbe, Michael

    2015-03-01

    DB Systemtechnik is a high-performing, customer-driven service provider that, as well as authoritatively serving the Deutsche Bahn Group by dint of its specialist knowledge is also increasingly active on the global railway market. Development and testing of pantograph models and catenary systems have been part of the company's essential activity fields from the beginning. Therefore, an efficient and high-performing simulation tool is indispensable. That is why DB Systemtechnik spent high efforts to develop the program PrOSA in cooperation with the Heinz-Nixdorf-Institut (HNI) of the university Paderborn to simulate the interaction of pantograph and catenary. This article gives an overview of the most relevant properties of PrOSA. Furthermore, it is described how the benchmark requirements were implemented and processed.

  16. Protective Effect of Long-Term CPAP Therapy on Cognitive Performance in Elderly Patients with Severe OSA: The PROOF Study

    PubMed Central

    Crawford-Achour, Emilie; Dauphinot, Virginie; Saint Martin, Magali; Tardy, Magali; Gonthier, Régis; Barthelemy, Jean Claude; Roche, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) leads to a deterioration in cognitive functions, with regard to memory and executive functions. However, few studies have investigated the impact of treatment on these cognitive functions in elderly subjects. Methods: The study was conducted in a large cohort of subjects aged 65 years or older (the PROOF cohort). Subjects were not diagnosed or treated for OSA. Subjects underwent a polygraphic recording. Cognitive performance was assessed in all OSA subjects at baseline and 10 years later, whether or not they were receiving continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Results: A group of 126 patients were analyzed. Only 26% of them were treated, with therapy initiated at the discretion of the primary care physician. Among treated subjects, self-reported compliance with therapy was good (> 6 h/night on average), and 66% of them reported an improvement in their quality of life. Patients receiving CPAP treatment had a higher apneahypopnea index (p = 0.006), a higher oxygen desaturation index (p < 0.001), and experienced more pronounced daytime repercussions (p = 0.004). These patients showed a statistically significant improvement in mental agility (similarities test; p < 0.0001) and memory performance (Grober and Buschke delayed free recall; p = 0.02). Conclusion: CPAP treatment is associated with the maintenance of memory performance over time. Citation: Crawford-Achour E, Dauphinot V, Saint Martin M, Tardy M, Gonthier R, Barthelemy JC, Roche F. Protective effect of long-term CPAP therapy on cognitive performance in elderly patients with severe OSA: the PROOF study. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(5):519–524. PMID:25700873

  17. Breath-by-breath detection of apneic events for OSA severity estimation using non-contact audio recordings.

    PubMed

    Rosenwein, T; Dafna, E; Tarasiuk, A; Zigel, Y

    2015-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a prevalent sleep disorder, characterized by recurrent episodes of upper airway obstructions during sleep. We hypothesize that breath-by-breath audio analysis of the respiratory cycle (i.e., inspiration and expiration phases) during sleep can reliably estimate the apnea hypopnea index (AHI), a measure of OSA severity. The AHI is calculated as the average number of apnea (A)/hypopnea (H) events per hour of sleep. Audio signals recordings of 186 adults referred to OSA diagnosis were acquired in-laboratory and at-home conditions during polysomnography and WatchPat study, respectively. A/H events were automatically segmented and classified using a binary random forest classifier. Total accuracy rate of 86.3% and an agreement of κ=42.98% were achieved in A/H event detection. Correlation of r=0.87 (r=0.74), diagnostic agreement of 76% (81.7%), and average absolute difference AHI error of 7.4 (7.8) (events/hour) were achieved in in-laboratory (at-home) conditions, respectively. Here we provide evidence that A/H events can be reliably detected at their exact time locations during sleep using non-contact audio approach. This study highlights the potential of this approach to reliably evaluate AHI in at home conditions. PMID:26738073

  18. Nasal Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure Devices (Provent) for OSA: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Riaz, Muhammad; Certal, Victor; Nigam, Gaurav; Abdullatif, Jose; Zaghi, Soroush; Kushida, Clete A.; Camacho, Macario

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To quantify the effectiveness of nasal expiratory positive airway pressure (nasal EPAP) devices or Provent as treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods. PubMed and six other databases were searched through November 15, 2015, without language limitations. Results. Eighteen studies (920 patients) were included. Pre- and post-nasal EPAP means ± standard deviations (M ± SD) for apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) in 345 patients decreased from 27.32 ± 22.24 to 12.78 ± 16.89 events/hr (relative reduction = 53.2%). Random effects modeling mean difference (MD) was −14.78 events/hr [95% CI −19.12, −10.45], p value < 0.00001. Oxygen desaturation index (ODI) in 247 patients decreased from 21.2 ± 19.3 to 12.4 ± 14.1 events/hr (relative reduction = 41.5%, p value < 0.00001). Lowest oxygen saturation (LSAT) M ± SD improved in 146 patients from 83.2 ± 6.8% to 86.2 ± 11.1%, MD 3 oxygen saturation points [95% CI 0.57, 5.63]. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) M ± SD improved (359 patients) from 9.9 ± 5.3 to 7.4 ± 5.0, MD −2.5 [95% CI −3.2, −1.8], p value < 0.0001. Conclusion. Nasal EPAP (Provent) reduced AHI by 53.2%, ODI by 41.5% and improved LSAT by 3 oxygen saturation points. Generally, there were no clear characteristics (demographic factors, medical history, and/or physical exam finding) that predicted favorable response to these devices. However, limited evidence suggests that high nasal resistance could be associated with treatment failure. Additional studies are needed to identify demographic and polysomnographic characteristics that would predict therapeutic success with nasal EPAP (Provent). PMID:26798519

  19. Automatic anatomy recognition in post-tonsillectomy MR images of obese children with OSAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Sin, Sanghun; Arens, Raanan

    2015-03-01

    Automatic Anatomy Recognition (AAR) is a recently developed approach for the automatic whole body wide organ segmentation. We previously tested that methodology on image cases with some pathology where the organs were not distorted significantly. In this paper, we present an advancement of AAR to handle organs which may have been modified or resected by surgical intervention. We focus on MRI of the neck in pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS). The proposed method consists of an AAR step followed by support vector machine techniques to detect the presence/absence of organs. The AAR step employs a hierarchical organization of the organs for model building. For each organ, a fuzzy model over a population is built. The model of the body region is then described in terms of the fuzzy models and a host of other descriptors which include parent to offspring relationship estimated over the population. Organs are recognized following the organ hierarchy by using an optimal threshold based search. The SVM step subsequently checks for evidence of the presence of organs. Experimental results show that AAR techniques can be combined with machine learning strategies within the AAR recognition framework for good performance in recognizing missing organs, in our case missing tonsils in post-tonsillectomy images as well as in simulating tonsillectomy images. The previous recognition performance is maintained achieving an organ localization accuracy of within 1 voxel when the organ is actually not removed. To our knowledge, no methods have been reported to date for handling significantly deformed or missing organs, especially in neck MRI.

  20. Fatigue, Tiredness, and Lack of Energy Improve with Treatment for OSA

    PubMed Central

    Chotinaiwattarakul, Wattanachai; O'Brien, Louise M.; Fan, Ludi; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Many patients with obstructive sleep apnea complain of fatigue, tiredness, or lack of energy in addition to sleepiness, or instead of sleepiness. We explored whether self-defined fatigue, tiredness, and lack of energy improve, like sleepiness, after treatment with positive airway pressure (PAP). Methods: We conducted a prospective survey of adults referred to a University-based sleep disorders center and confirmed to have obstructive sleep apnea on polysomnography. Surveys were mailed to 1539 patients 6 months to 3 years after they were prescribed PAP for home use. Results: Participants (n = 313) included 183 who reported using PAP ≥ 5 hours per night, 96 who were considered inadequately treated because they had no active treatment or used PAP < 5 hours per night, and 34 treated by surgery or other means and therefore excluded from subsequent analysis. At follow-up in comparison to baseline, subjects adherent to PAP reported less fatigue, tiredness, lack of energy, and sleepiness (p < 0.05 for each). Improvement of each symptom except for lack of energy was significantly better (p < 0.05) among PAP-adherent subjects than among inadequately treated subjects. Conclusions: Patients' complaints of fatigue, tiredness, and lack of energy, like sleepiness, can improve substantially with good adherence to PAP for obstructive sleep apnea. Therefore, patients who prefer a range of common, related terms other than sleepiness to describe their problem may benefit from investigation and treatment for any underlying sleep-disordered breathing. Citation: Chotinaiwattarakul W; O'Brien LM; Fan L; Chervin RD. Fatigue, tiredness, and lack of energy improve with treatment for OSA. J Clin Sleep Med 2009;5(3):240-245. PMID:19960642

  1. Nasal Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure Devices (Provent) for OSA: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Muhammad; Certal, Victor; Nigam, Gaurav; Abdullatif, Jose; Zaghi, Soroush; Kushida, Clete A; Camacho, Macario

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To quantify the effectiveness of nasal expiratory positive airway pressure (nasal EPAP) devices or Provent as treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods. PubMed and six other databases were searched through November 15, 2015, without language limitations. Results. Eighteen studies (920 patients) were included. Pre- and post-nasal EPAP means ± standard deviations (M ± SD) for apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) in 345 patients decreased from 27.32 ± 22.24 to 12.78 ± 16.89 events/hr (relative reduction = 53.2%). Random effects modeling mean difference (MD) was -14.78 events/hr [95% CI -19.12, -10.45], p value < 0.00001. Oxygen desaturation index (ODI) in 247 patients decreased from 21.2 ± 19.3 to 12.4 ± 14.1 events/hr (relative reduction = 41.5%, p value < 0.00001). Lowest oxygen saturation (LSAT) M ± SD improved in 146 patients from 83.2 ± 6.8% to 86.2 ± 11.1%, MD 3 oxygen saturation points [95% CI 0.57, 5.63]. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) M ± SD improved (359 patients) from 9.9 ± 5.3 to 7.4 ± 5.0, MD -2.5 [95% CI -3.2, -1.8], p value < 0.0001. Conclusion. Nasal EPAP (Provent) reduced AHI by 53.2%, ODI by 41.5% and improved LSAT by 3 oxygen saturation points. Generally, there were no clear characteristics (demographic factors, medical history, and/or physical exam finding) that predicted favorable response to these devices. However, limited evidence suggests that high nasal resistance could be associated with treatment failure. Additional studies are needed to identify demographic and polysomnographic characteristics that would predict therapeutic success with nasal EPAP (Provent). PMID:26798519

  2. Identification of impact damage in sandwich structures by application of high speed MEMS-OSA to FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Y.; Minakuchi, S.; Takeda, N.

    2005-05-01

    In this research, the authors developed various detection techniques for particular damages, such as debonding and impact damage, in sandwich panels consisting of composite face-sheets and aluminum honeycomb core with small-diameter optical fiber sensors. First, two methods for debonding detection were established taking advantage of the behavior of fillets formed on the adhesive layer between the core and the skin. One method uses the fracture of optical fibers, and the other one uses the shape recovery of the reflection spectrum from a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor because of the release of thermal residual stress in the fillets. Secondly, as for impact damages, chirped FBG sensors were applied to monitor the change in strain distribution of the face-sheet due to the dent caused by the impact loadings. Furthermore, a newly developed MEMS-optical spectrum analyzer (MEMS-OSA) was introduced to identification of impact points and damages. This system could measure the reflection spectrum at very high speed. The change in the form of the reflection spectrum during the impact loading was found to be different depending on the impact energy and the impact location, and this tendency was confirmed by theoretical simulations using the change in the strain distribution obtained by foil strain gauges. These results show that the high speed measurement of the reflection spectrum by MEMS-OSA has a potential to identify the impact location and damage magnitude through the comparison with theoretical simulations.

  3. Scarlet Macaw (Ara macao, Psittaciformes: Psittacidae) nest characteristics in the Osa Peninsula Conservation Area (ACOSA), Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Guittar, John L; Dear, Fiona; Vaughan, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    The Scarlet Macaw (Ara macao) is an endangered species. In Costa Rica, the Scarlet Macaw population of the Central Pacific Conservation Area (ACOPAC, n =432 individuals) has undergone considdrable study and has been used effectively as a flagship species for regional conservation. Costa Rica's only other viable Scarlet Macaw population, located in the Osa Peninsula Conservation Area (ACOSA, n=800-1200 individuals), remains virtually unstudied. We studied ACOSA Scarlet Macaw nest cavities from February 19th to March 22nd 2006. Through informal interviews with park guards and residents, we found a total of 57 potential nests in 52 trees. Eleven nests were reported as frequently poached. Scarlet Macaws used 14 identified tree species, ten of which are unrecorded in Costa Rica. The most common nesting trees were Caryocar costaricense (n=12, 24%), Schizolobium parahyba (n=9, 18.0%), Ceibapentandra (n=7, 14.0%) and Ficus sp. (n=5, 10.0%). We compare nesting characteristics to those recorded in ACOPAC. A combination of bottom-up and top-down strategies are necessary to ensure the Scarlet Macaw's long-term success, including environmental education in local schools, community stewardship of active nests, and the advertisement of stricter penalties for poaching. PMID:19637716

  4. Underwater topography determines critical breeding habitat for humpback whales near Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica: implications for marine protected areas.

    PubMed

    Oviedo, L; Solís, M

    2008-06-01

    Migrating humpback whales from northern and southern feeding grounds come to the tropical waters near Osa Peninsula, Pacific of Costa Rica, to reproduce and raise their calves. Planning effective marine protected areas that encompass humpback critical habitats require data about which oceanographic features influence distribution during the breeding period. This study examines the relationship between water depth and ocean floor slope with humpback whale distribution, based on sightings during two breeding seasons (2005 and 2006). Data are from the Southern and Northern subpopulations in the Eastern Tropical Pacific (ETP). Analysis followed the basic principles of the Ecological Niche Factors Analysis (ENFA), where indices of Marginality and Tolerance provide insights on the restrictiveness of habitat use. At a fine scale, physical factors such as water depth and slope define the critical breeding and nursing habitat for M. novaeangliae. Divergence in the subsamples means of depths and slope distribution, with the global mean of the study area in both eco-geographical variables, determine habitat requirements restricted by topographic features such as depths (< 100 m) and slope (< 10%), and locate the key breeding and nursing habitat of the species within the continental shelf domains. Proposed Marine Protected Areas (MPA's) network plans should consider connectivity of Cafio Island-Drake Bay and the extension of Corcovado National Park maritime borders. PMID:19256430

  5. Rice microRNA osa-miR1848 targets the obtusifoliol 14α-demethylase gene OsCYP51G3 and mediates the biosynthesis of phytosterols and brassinosteroids during development and in response to stress.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kuaifei; Ou, Xiaojing; Tang, Huadan; Wang, Ren; Wu, Ping; Jia, Yongxia; Wei, Xiaoyi; Xu, Xinlan; Kang, Seung-Hye; Kim, Seong-Ki; Zhang, Mingyong

    2015-11-01

    Phytosterols are membrane components or precursors for brassinosteroid (BR) biosynthesis. As they cannot be transported long distances, their homeostasis is tightly controlled through their biosynthesis and metabolism. However, it is unknown whether microRNAs are involved in their homeostatic regulation. Rice (Oryza sativa) plants transformed with microRNA osa-miR1848 and its target, the obtusifoliol 14α-demethylase gene, OsCYP51G3, were used to investigate the role of osa-miR1848 in the regulation of phytosterol biosynthesis. osa-miR1848 directs OsCYP51G3 mRNA cleavage to regulate phytosterol and BR biosynthesis in rice. The role of OsCYP51G3 as one of the osa-miR1848 targets is supported by the opposite expression patterns of osa-miR1848 and OsCYP51G3 in transgenic rice plants, and by the identification of OsCYP51G3 mRNA cleavage sites. Increased osa-miR1848 and decreased OsCYP51G3 expression reduced phytosterol and BR concentrations, and caused typical phenotypic changes related to phytosterol and BR deficiency, including dwarf plants, erect leaves, semi-sterile pollen grains, and shorter cells. Circadian expression of osa-miR1848 regulated the diurnal abundance of OsCYP51G3 transcript in developing organs, and the response of OsCYP51G3 to salt stress. We propose that osa-miR1848 regulates OsCYP51G3 expression posttranscriptionally, and mediates phytosterol and BR biosynthesis. osa-miR1848 and OsCYP51G3 might have potential applications in rice breeding to modulate leaf angle, and the size and quality of seeds. PMID:26083975

  6. Upper Plate Deformation in Response to Aseismic Ridge Subduction along a Convergent Margin - the Piano Player Model: Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, T. W.; Fisher, D. M.; Morell, K. D.; Cupper, M. L.

    2008-12-01

    The Osa Peninsula, an outer forearc high ~20 km inboard of the Middle America Trench, is deforming in response to short wavelength variations in the bathymetry on the subducting aseismic Cocos Ridge, an elongate region of thickened crust ( up to 40% thicker) created by motion of the Cocos plate across the Galapagos Hotspot. Plate convergence is nearly orthogonal to the trench at ~90 mm/yr and the plate interface occurs at a depth ~5 km under the peninsula. Relief on the Cocos Ridge locally exceeds 1 km with the dominant topography expressed as two nearly parallel, but locally offset ridges separated by an axial graben. The strike of these features is sub-parallel to the convergence vector. Modern topography of the Osa Peninsula, elevation of the basement rocks (Early to Middle Tertiary Osa Mélange), elevations of late Quaternary marine deposits, and distribution of late Quaternary deformation rates directly mirror the bathymetry on the Cocos Ridge just outboard of the MAT. New geologic mapping, radiometric dating and fission track analysis constrain distribution and rates of deformation on the Osa Peninsula. The Osa Peninsula is fragmented into a complex set of blocks that vary in size from several kms on a side to <10 kms on a side. These blocks, which closely match the size, distribution and shape of bathymetric features on the incoming Cocos Ridge, are bounded by trench parallel and trench perpendicular, high angle, normal and reverse faults that extend to the plate interface, allowing for grossly different deformation histories over short distances. Fission track analyses of 4 sandstone samples from the Osa Mélange suggest that the basement rocks reached maximum burial temperatures of 60-80 ° C indicating burial depths of ~3-4 kms assuming a reasonable geothermal gradient of ~20 °/km. This suggests a very thin margin wedge prior to late Neogene unroofing. Rates of late Quaternary deformation are constrained by over 30 radiocarbon and 5 Optically Stimulated

  7. Olive Volatiles from Portuguese Cultivars Cobrançosa, Madural and Verdeal Transmontana: Role in Oviposition Preference of Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Malheiro, Ricardo; Casal, Susana; Cunha, Sara C; Baptista, Paula; Pereira, José Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The olive fly, Bactrocera oleae (Rossi), a serious threat to the olive crop worldwide, displays ovipositon preference for some olive cultivars but the causes are still unclear. In the present work, three Portuguese olive cultivars with different susceptibilities to olive fly (Cobrançosa, Madural, and Verdeal Transmontana) were studied, aiming to determine if the olive volatiles are implicated in this interaction. Olive volatiles were assessed by SPME-GC-MS in the three cultivars during maturation process to observe possible correlations with olive fly infestation levels. Overall, 34 volatiles were identified in the olives, from 7 chemical classes (alcohols, aldehydes, aromatic hydrocarbons, esters, ketones, sesquiterpenes, and terpenes). Generally, total volatile amounts decrease during maturation but toluene, the main compound, increased in all cultivars, particularly in those with higher susceptibility to olive fly. Sesquiterpenes also raised, mainly α-copaene. Toluene and α-copaene, recognized oviposition promoters to olive fly, were correlated with the infestation level of cvs. Madural and Verdeal Trasnmontana (intermediate and highly susceptible cultivars respectively), while no correlations were established with cv. Cobrançosa (less susceptible). No volatiles with inverse correlation were observed. Volatile composition of olives may be a decisive factor in the olive fly choice to oviposit and this could be the basis for the development of new control strategies for this pest. PMID:25985460

  8. The Effect of the Transition to Home Monitoring for the Diagnosis of OSAS on Test Availability, Waiting Time, Patients' Satisfaction, and Outcome in a Large Health Provider System

    PubMed Central

    Etzioni, Tamar; Fliss, Dan; Pillar, Giora; Shapira, Chen

    2014-01-01

    During 2009, the Haifa district of Clalit Health Services (CHS) has switched from in-lab polysomnography (PSG) to home studies for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We assessed the effects of this change on accessibility, waiting time, satisfaction, costs, and CPAP purchase by the patients. Data regarding sleep studies, CPAP purchase, and waiting times were collected retrospectively from the computerized database of CHS. Patients' satisfaction was assessed utilizing a telephone questionnaire introduced to a randomized small sample of 70 patients. Comparisons were made between 2007 and 2008 (in-lab PSGs) and 2010 and 2011 (when most studies were ambulatory). Of about 650000 insured individuals in the Haifa district of CHS, 1471 sleep studies were performed during 2007-2008 compared to 2794 tests during 2010-2011. The average waiting time was 9.9 weeks in 2007-2008 compared to 1.1 weeks in 2010-2011 (P < 0.05). 597 CPAPs were purchased in 2007-2008 compared to 831 in 2010-2011. The overall patients' satisfaction was similar, but discomfort tended to be higher in the in-laboratory group (4.1 vs 2.7 in a scale of 0–10; P = 0.11). Switching to ambulatory diagnosis improved the test accessibility and reduced the waiting times. Patients' satisfaction remained similarly high. The total direct cost of OSA management was reduced. PMID:24876974

  9. Olive Volatiles from Portuguese Cultivars Cobrançosa, Madural and Verdeal Transmontana: Role in Oviposition Preference of Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    PubMed Central

    Malheiro, Ricardo; Casal, Susana; Cunha, Sara C.; Baptista, Paula; Pereira, José Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The olive fly, Bactrocera oleae (Rossi), a serious threat to the olive crop worldwide, displays ovipositon preference for some olive cultivars but the causes are still unclear. In the present work, three Portuguese olive cultivars with different susceptibilities to olive fly (Cobrançosa, Madural, and Verdeal Transmontana) were studied, aiming to determine if the olive volatiles are implicated in this interaction. Olive volatiles were assessed by SPME-GC-MS in the three cultivars during maturation process to observe possible correlations with olive fly infestation levels. Overall, 34 volatiles were identified in the olives, from 7 chemical classes (alcohols, aldehydes, aromatic hydrocarbons, esters, ketones, sesquiterpenes, and terpenes). Generally, total volatile amounts decrease during maturation but toluene, the main compound, increased in all cultivars, particularly in those with higher susceptibility to olive fly. Sesquiterpenes also raised, mainly α-copaene. Toluene and α-copaene, recognized oviposition promoters to olive fly, were correlated with the infestation level of cvs. Madural and Verdeal Trasnmontana (intermediate and highly susceptible cultivars respectively), while no correlations were established with cv. Cobrançosa (less susceptible). No volatiles with inverse correlation were observed. Volatile composition of olives may be a decisive factor in the olive fly choice to oviposit and this could be the basis for the development of new control strategies for this pest. PMID:25985460

  10. Frictional properties of sediments entering the Costa Rica subduction zone offshore the Osa Peninsula: implications for fault slip in shallow subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namiki, Yuka; Tsutsumi, Akito; Ujiie, Kohtaro; Kameda, Jun

    2014-12-01

    We examined the frictional properties of sediments on the Cocos plate offshore the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica, and explored variations in the intrinsic frictional properties of the sediment inputs to the Costa Rica subduction zone. Sediment samples were collected at Site U1381A during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 334, and include hemipelagic clay to silty clay material (Unit I) and pelagic silicic to calcareous ooze (Unit II). The frictional properties of the samples were tested at a normal stress of 5 MPa under water-saturated conditions and with slip velocities ranging from 0.0028 to 2.8 mm/s for up to 340 mm of displacement. The experimental results reveal that the steady-state friction coefficient values of clay to silty clay samples are as low as ~0.2, whereas those of silicic to calcareous ooze samples are as high as 0.6 to 0.8. The clay to silty clay samples show a positive dependence of friction on velocity for all tested slip velocities. In contrast, the silicic to calcareous ooze samples show a negative dependence of friction on velocity at velocities of 0.0028 to 0.28 mm/s and either neutral or positive dependence at velocities higher than 0.28 mm/s. Given the low frictional coefficient values observed for the clay to silty clay samples of Unit I, the décollement at the Costa Rica Seismogenesis Project transect offshore the Osa Peninsula likely initiates in Unit I and is initially very weak. In addition, the velocity-strengthening behavior of the clay to silty clay suggests that faults in the very shallow portion of the Costa Rica subduction zone are stable and thus behave as creeping segments. In contrast, the velocity-weakening behavior of the silicic to calcareous ooze favors unstable slip along faults. The shallow seismicity occurred at a depth as shallow as ~9 km along the Costa Rica margin offshore the Osa Peninsula (Mw 6.4, June 2002), indicating that materials characterized by velocity-weakening behavior constitute the fault

  11. [Prevalence and factors associated with the presence of anemia in the elderly of the municipality of Viçosa, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Milagres, Clarice Santana; de Moraes, Keila Bacelar Duarte; Franceschini, Sylvia Carmo Castro; Sant'Ana, Luciana Ferreira Rocha; Lima, Luciana Moreira; Ribeiro, Andréia Queiroz

    2015-12-01

    Anemia is the most common hematological problem encountered in the elderly population. A cross-sectional, population-based survey was conducted to evaluate the prevalence and factors associated with anemia in the elderly in Viçosa (State of Minas Gerais). Data were collected by means of a household survey and conducting biochemical tests on 349 elderly between June and December 2009. The prevalence of anemia was 11.7% (95% CI 8.3% -15.1%) and was found to be higher among men (15.4%) among those aged 80 years and older (30%) and those who practiced polypharmacy (16.8%). The results obtained indicate anemia determinants similar to those observed in developed countries. The real need of polypharmacy should be evaluated in health care for the elderly, in order to prevent iatrogenic complications, of which anemia is one such complication. PMID:26691798

  12. Interplate seismicity at the CRISP drilling site: The 2002 Mw 6.4 Osa Earthquake at the southeastern end of the Middle America Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo, Ivonne G.; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Ranero, Cesar R.; von Huene, Roland

    2014-07-01

    investigate potential relations between variations in seafloor relief and age of the incoming plate and interplate seismicity. Westward from Osa Peninsula in Costa Rica, a major change in the character of the incoming Cocos Plate is displayed by abrupt lateral variations in seafloor depth and thermal structure. Here a Mw 6.4 thrust earthquake was followed by three aftershock clusters in June 2002. Initial relocations indicate that the main shock occurred fairly trenchward of most large earthquakes along the Middle America Trench off central Costa Rica. The earthquake sequence occurred while a temporary network of OBH and land stations ˜80 km to the northwest were deployed. By adding readings from permanent local stations, we obtain uncommon P wave coverage of a large subduction zone earthquake. We relocate this catalog using a nonlinear probabilistic approach within both, a 1-D and a 3-D P wave velocity models. The main shock occurred ˜25 km from the trench and probably along the plate interface at 5-10 km depth. We analyze teleseismic data to further constrain the rupture process of the main shock. The best depth estimates indicate that most of the seismic energy was radiated at shallow depth below the continental slope, supporting the nucleation of the Osa earthquake at ˜6 km depth. The location and depth coincide with the plate boundary imaged in prestack depth-migrated reflection lines shot near the nucleation area. Aftershocks propagated downdip to the area of a 1999 Mw 6.9 sequence and partially overlapped it. The results indicate that underthrusting of the young and buoyant Cocos Ridge has created conditions for interplate seismogenesis shallower and closer to the trench axis than elsewhere along the central Costa Rica margin.

  13. A pilot study to compare the cerebral hemodynamics between patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and periodic limb movement syndrome (PLMS) during nocturnal sleep with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Fritschi, Ursula; Hügli, Gordana; Lehner, Isabella; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2014-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and periodic limb movement in sleep syndrome (PLMS) are two common sleep disorders. Previous studies showed that OSA and PLMS share common features, such as increased cardio-vascular risk, both apnea events and limb movements occur periodically, they are usually associated with cortical arousals, and both of them can induce declines in peripheral oxygen saturation measured with pulse oximetry. However, the question whether apnea events and limb movements also show similar characteristics in cerebral hemodynamic and oxygenation has never been addressed. In this pilot study, we will first time compare the cerebral hemodynamic changes induced by apnea events and limb movements in patients with OSA (n=4) and PLMS (n=4) with NIRS. In patients with OSA, we found periodic oscillations in HbO2, HHb, and blood volume induced by apnea/hypopnea events, HbO2 and HHb showed reverse changing trends. By contrast, the periodic oscillations linked to limb movements were only found in HbO2 and blood volume in patients with PLMS. These findings of different cerebral hemodynamics patterns between apnea events and limb movements may indicate different regulations of nervous system between these two sleep disorders.

  14. [Implementation and impact of the National Iron Supplementation Program in the city of Viçosa, State of Minas Gerais].

    PubMed

    Cotta, Rosângela Minardi Mitre; Azeredo, Catarina Machado; Silva, Luciana Saraiva da; Franceschini, Sylvia do Carmo Castro; Sant'ana, Luciana Ferreira da Rocha; Cássia Lanes Ribeiro, Rita de

    2011-10-01

    The scope of this work was to evaluate the implementation of the National Iron Supplementation Program (NISP) in Viçosa in the State of Minas Gerais and its impact on 6- to 18-month-old non-anemic infants assisted by the Family Health Teams. Interviews were conducted with the professionals and with the children's mothers/guardians. The non-anemic children who didn't receive the earlier supplementation (n=133) were given ferrous sulphate syrup for six months. Hemoglobin dosage, anthropometric evaluation and a socioeconomic survey were conducted before and after the six-month period. Children who ingested 75% or more of the prescribed dosage were classified as high adhesion, while the others were classified as low adhesion, according to the mothers' testimonials. With respect to the implementation in the city, the distribution system was not always available to the priority group and there was a lack of training and motivation on the part of most Community Health Agents. The lack of promotion of NISP among the priority group was detected, apart from a mothers' awareness drive. Regarding diet supplementation, children showed low adhesion and the dosage wasn't effective in preventing anemia. Therefore, important operational barriers to implementation were observed. PMID:22031130

  15. Genetic similarity among Agistemus pallinii Matioli et al (Acari: Stigmaeidae) found in citrus orchards in Viçosa, Minas Gerais State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Matioli, André L; Pallini, Angelo; Tavares, Mara G

    2009-01-01

    Stigmaeidae are very important predators of mite and insect pests on several crops in Brazil. It is considered the second most important family of predatory mites in citrus orchards in Brazil. However, their identification, especially that of the members of the genus Agistemus, is rather difficult based only on morphology. Hence, this study describes the use of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD-PCR) markers to determine the genetic similarity of an Agistemus pallinii Matioli et al population found in 2004 in a citrus orchard in Viçosa, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, preying on Panonychus citri (McGregor). Amplifi cations were performed with 12 random primers (OPAA8, OPAA19, OPAB1, OPAB5, OPAB18, OPAC9, OPAC17, OPAC19, OPAD10, OPAE9, OPAE12 and OPAE17), which generated 119 bands, with 53.8% polymorphism. The coefficients of genetic similarity among the individuals ranged from 0.68 to 0.99, indicating a high genetic similarity among them. The 3D projection analysis clustered the majority of individuals confirming their high similarity. Though individuals of A. pallinii are minute (+/- 360 microm long), the PCR-RAPD technique can still be used for their identification, complementing morphological analyses or for comparison of populations collected in different geographic regions. This is the first molecular study carried out with stigmaeid mites. PMID:19488517

  16. Retinal Atherosclerosis, Ophthalmologically Reported and Documented with OSA in 1987, is now Totally Reversed, and Recorded, Photographically. The Supposition then was that Equivalent Cortical Damage could Respond to the same Healing Protocol.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Paul N.; O., D.; Mc Leod, David M.; Mc Leod, Roger D.

    2007-10-01

    Documented retinal atherosclerosis, ``silver streaking'' of retinal capillaries, was reported and documented with OSA, in October 1987. That retinal damage, despite claims it usually progresses and is nonreversible, is now completely cleared. The original OSA presentation proposed that equivalent cortical damage was probably present throughout the brain at that time, as attested by failing short-term memory performance and transient ischemic attacks, TIAs, brief vision strokes. The supposition then was that ophthalmologic access to the retina, by some accounts the progenitor of all brain evolution, could provide a means of monitoring the actual circulatory state of inaccessible parts of the brain. To the extent that retinal health was naturopathically restored, and memory performance seems also to have significantly kept pace, is it a tenable premise that such protocols have rather general importance? Can applied optics help establish more appropriate diagnoses, and evaluate treatments for dementia and Alzheimer's disease?

  17. Pre- and in-therapy predictive score models of adult OSAS patients with poor adherence pattern on nCPAP therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yeying; Geater, Alan F; Chai, Yanling; Luo, Jiahong; Niu, Xiaoqun; Hai, Bing; Qin, Jingting; Li, Yongxia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify patterns of adherence to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) use in the first 3 months of therapy among newly diagnosed adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAS) and their predictors. To develop pretherapy and in-therapy scores to predict adherence pattern. Methods Newly diagnosed adult OSAS patients were consecutively recruited from March to August 2013. Baseline clinical information and measures such as Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), Zung’s Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS), and The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) at baseline and at the end of 3rd-week therapy were collected. Twelve weeks’ adherence data were collected from the nCPAP memory card, and K-means cluster analysis was used to explore adherence patterns. Predictive scores were developed from the coefficients of cumulative logit models of adherence patterns using variables available at baseline and after 3 weeks of therapy. Performance of the score was validated using 500 bootstrap resamples. Results Seventy six patients completed a 12-week follow-up. Three patterns were revealed. Patients were identified as developing an adherence pattern that was poor (n=14, mean ± SD, 2.3±0.9 hours per night), moderate (n=19, 5.3±0.6 hours per night), or good (n=43, 6.8±0.3 hours per night). Cumulative logit regression models (good → moderate → poor) revealed independent baseline predictors to be ESS (per unit increase) (OR [95% CI], 0.763 [0.651, 0.893]), SDS (1.461 [1.238, 1.724]), and PSQI (2.261 [1.427, 3.584]); and 3-week therapy predictors to be ESS (0.554 [0.331, 0.926]), PSQI (2.548 [1.454, 4.465]), and the changes (3rd week–baseline data) in ESS (0.459 [0.243, 0.868]), FSS (3.556 [1.788, 7.070]), and PSQI (2.937 [1.273, 6.773]). Two predictive score formulas for poor adherence were developed. The area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves for baseline and 3

  18. Physical property and Textural transition across the Unconformity and Major Seismic Reflectors in the Upper plate of the Costa Rica Subduction zone offshore Osa Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamahashi, M.; Screaton, E.; Tanikawa, W.; Hashimoto, Y.; Martin, K. M.; Saito, S.; Kimura, G.

    2014-12-01

    At the Costa Rica subduction zone offshore Osa Peninsula, the Cocos plate and Cocos Ridge subduct under the Caribbean plate along the Middle America Trench, creating active seismicity. In this region, the Caribbean plate is characterized by a well-consolidated, high velocity framework material beneath the slope sediments, but the nature of the upper plate material is yet unknown. During Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 334 and 344, the unconformity between the slope sediments (Unit 1) and upper plate material (Units 2 and 3) consisting of lithic sedimentary units was penetrated at mid-slope Site 1380. In the current study, to characterize the compaction behavior of the upper plate material, we investigate the physical properties, texture and composition of the sediments at Site 1380 by conducting microstructural observations, resistivity measurements, particle size analyses, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction analyses. The microstructures of sediments observed through the microscope tend to develop dense and cohesive textures in low porosity sediments, and particle size changes across several unconformities. In particular, the small particle-sized lithic fragments compose larger bodies and form cohesive structures. The cross correlation between measured particle size and shipboard porosity show negative correlation especially at Unit 2, indicating that larger sized particles form smaller or fewer pores. From the results of XRF and XRD analyses, we found that Al, K, Ti tend to concentrate in the higher porosity sediments of Unit 1, whereas Si, Ca, P, Mg, Na, and Mn concentrate in the lower porosity sediments of Unit 2 and 3. The higher concentration in Mg, Na, Mn, Si may be due to minerals such as chlorite, serpentine, amphibole, and sodium manganese. The crossplots between porosity and element concentration show negative correlations in Mg, Na, and Mn with porosity, suggesting that the minerals rich in these elements may relate with the

  19. The impact of pasture conversion on nutrient cycles of tropical streams on the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica: a paired catchment approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringhurst, K.; Jordan, P.

    2011-12-01

    Changes in nutrient and hydrologic cycles caused by land disturbance typically lead to detrimental changes to ecosystems. This study utilized a paired, small-catchment approach to examine the effect of deforestation on nutrient transfer and hydrological discharge and the resulting impact on soils and streams of the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. Two first order streams were chosen, the first catchment had been cleared for pasture and the second consisted of undisturbed tropical wet forest. Soil concentrations of organic matter, total and soil available P were higher in the forested catchment with decreases of >33% of each in the deforested catchment. The effect of deforestation on stream discharge was a 59% increase in flow during the wet season and an increase in the Q5:Q95 ratio showing that the deforested stream was flashier. The deforested catchment loss of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) increased 95% over the forested catchment. Soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) showed an increase in load of 43% in the deforested catchment compared to the forested catchment. The molar N:P ratios were lower than the Redfield ratio and both streams were well below the level at which N-limitation of lotic algal growth has been reported, therefore it is hypothesized that N is the limiting nutrient in streams in the study area. Soil nutrient depletion in the deforested catchment, accelerated by a changed hydrologic regime, is the likely trajectory of soil-water interactions in this tropical ecosystem. This will likely be among the secondary impacts should deforestation become widespread along this stretch of the Pacific coastline, with associated eutrophication of receiving transitional and coastal waters.

  20. Risky consumption habits and safety of fluid milk available in retail sales outlets in Viçosa, Minas Gerais State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pieri, Fabio Alessandro; Colombo, Monique; Merhi, Carolina Milner; Juliati, Vinícius Augusto; Ferreira, Marcello Sebe; Nero, Marcelo Antônio; Nero, Luis Augusto

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to assess raw milk consumption habits in the urban population of Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil, and the microbiological safety and quality of the fluid milk available in retail sales outlets in the same region. A simplified questionnaire regarding raw milk consumption was applied to the persons responsible for food acquisition in 411 residences. The regular consumption of raw milk was observed by 18.5% of the interviewers, and lack of knowledge of possible risks related to this food product. Microbiological safety and quality were assessed for raw (n=69), pasteurized (n=80), and ultra-high-temperature (UHT)-treated milk (n=80) by analyzing the counts of mesophilic aerobes, coliforms, and Escherichia coli, and detection of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella spp.; raw milk samples were also subjected to enumeration of coagulase-positive Staphylococcus. Concerning raw milk, 59.4% of the samples were considered as produced in inadequate hygienic conditions, 5.8% of the samples presented counts of coagulase-positive Staphylococcus lower than 100 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL, and no samples presented with positive results for L. monocytogenes or Salmonella spp. All pasteurized and UHT milk samples presented with low counts of mesophilic aerobes and coliforms, while L. monocytogenes and Salmonella spp. were absent. The data demonstrated that raw milk was consumed by the population studied. Despite the absence of potential hazards, raw milk was of poor hygienic quality, in contrast with the processed fluid milk available in retail sales outlets that was safe and of good hygienic quality, highlighting the suitability of pasteurized and UHT milk for human consumption. PMID:24697652

  1. Temporal variations of temperature, salinity and circulation in the Peruípe river estuary (nova Viçosa, BA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro Andutta, Fernando; de Miranda, Luiz Bruner; França Schettini, Carlos Augusto; Siegle, Eduardo; da Silva, Mario Pereira; Massaki Izumi, Vitor; Murai Chagas, Felipe

    2013-11-01

    Eulerian profiles of thermohaline properties and currents have been sampled in the Peruípe River Estuary (Nova Viçosa, BA), southern region of the Caravelas-Peruípe Rivers Estuarine System. One station was located near the mouth (C) and other one up the estuary (E). The Hansen-Rattray diagram classification of the upper reaches of the Peruípe river estuary in the wet season changed from Type 2b (partially mixed and highly stratified—ν=0.88) to Type 1b (highly stratified—ν˜1.00) due to the fortnightly tidal modulation. This region was mainly forced by river discharge (RiE=5.7 and RiE=4.1) and characterized by high (RiL>20) and low stabilities (RiL<20) in the neap and spring tidal cycles. However, near the mouth stratification was strongly modulated by the tide, and its classification alternates from being highly stratified (Type 2b—ν=0.92) in the neap tide to being well mixed with low stratification (Type 1a—ν=1.00); the mouth was dominated by fresh water discharge (RiE=12.9) and tidal stirring (RiE=0.6) in the neap and spring tide, respectively, and were associated with high and low stabilities. The classical steady-state salinity and velocity profiles show good agreement (Skill˜1.0) with the corresponding observational profiles when simulated with a classical analytical model. The main characteristics of the nearly steady-state bidirectional (with a weak barolinic signal) and unidirectional velocity profiles were in good agreement with the estuarine quantitative classifications (Types 2b, 1a and 1b). The rate of change of the potential energy due to fortnightly tidal modulation was slightly higher near the mouth (6.1 J m-3 s-1) than in the upper reaches of the estuary (5.2 J m-3 s-1). However, this was not strong enough to generate halocline erosion in the transitional neap to spring tidal cycle, and the estuary classification remained Type 1b. The main conclusions are summarized as follows: (i) Two stations sampled along the Peruípe river

  2. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography for fingerprint pattern recognition in olive oils produced by two different techniques in Portuguese olive varieties Galega Vulgar, Cobrançosa e Carrasquenha.

    PubMed

    Vaz-Freire, L Torres; da Silva, M D R Gomes; Freitas, A M Costa

    2009-02-01

    For olive oil production a metal hammer-decanter olive processing line was compared to a traditional metal hammer-press line, a discontinuous method which, if properly used, yields high-quality virgin olive oils. Galega, Carrasquenha and Cobrançosa olives (traditional Portuguese varieties) were studied. The analysis of the aroma compounds was performed after headspace-solid phase micro extraction. The analytical results obtained after comprehensive gas chromatography in tandem with time of flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC/ToFMS) for these three different olive oil varieties, from a single year harvest and processed with two different extraction technologies, were compared using statistical image treatment, by means of ImageJ software, for fingerprint recognitions and compared with principal component analysis when the area data of each chromatographic spot of the contour plots were considered. The differences used to classify the olive oils studied under different groups after principal component analysis were observed independently of the treatment used (peak areas or the sum of the pixels counts). When the individual peak areas were considered, more then 75.7% of the total variance is explained by the first two principal components while in the case where the data were subjected to image treatment 84.0% of the total variance is explained by the first two principal components. In both cases the first and second principal components present eigenvalues higher then 1.0. Fingerprint image monitoring of the aroma compounds of the olive oil allowed a rapid differentiation of the three varieties studied as well as the extraction methods used. The volatile compounds responsible for their characterization were tentatively identified in a bi-dimensional polar/non-polar column set in the GCxGC/Tof-MS apparatus. This methodology allowed the reduction of the number of compounds needed for matrices characterization, preserving the efficiency of the discrimination, when

  3. Treatment of patients with OSAS using Nd-YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukwa, Andrzej; Tulibacki, Marek P.; Zajac, Andrzej; Dudziec, Katarzyna

    2000-06-01

    The authors present their clinical experience regarding the possibilities of application of Nd:YAG and Ho:YAG lasers for the treatment of disorders in the are of the upper respiratory tract. The patients with symptoms of Obstructive Sleep Aphnoe Syndrom need a various operations techniques. Lasers techniques makes it possible to perform a number of procedures in local anesthesia which considerably improves the economic effectiveness of the treatment. The surgeries performed using laser beam enabled very good effect of treatment.

  4. Cancer and OSA: Current Evidence From Human Studies.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, Miguel Ángel; Campos-Rodriguez, Francisco; Barbé, Ferrán

    2016-08-01

    Despite the undeniable medical advances achieved in recent decades, cancer remains one of the main causes of mortality. It is thus extremely important to make every effort to discover new risk factors for this disease, particularly ones that can be treated or modified. Various pathophysiologic pathways have been postulated as possible causes of cancer or its increased aggressiveness, and also of greater resistance to antitumoral treatment, in the presence of both intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation (both inherent to sleep apnea). Thus far, these biological hypotheses have been supported by various experimental studies in animals. Meanwhile, recent human studies drawing on preexisting databases have observed an increase in cancer incidence and mortality in patients with a greater severity of sleep-disordered breathing. However, the methodologic limitations of these studies (which are mostly retrospective and lack any measurement of direct markers of intermittent hypoxia or sleep fragmentation) highlight the need for controlled, prospective studies that would provide stronger scientific evidence regarding the existence of this association and its main characteristics, as well as explore its nature and origin in greater depth. The great epidemiologic impact of both cancer and sleep apnea and the potential for clinical treatment make this field of research an exciting challenge. PMID:27164292

  5. Diagnostic and therapeutic iter in paediatric OSAS: personal experience.

    PubMed

    Piumetto, E; Sammartano, A M; Meinardi, G; Dagna, F; Gervasio, F C; Albera, R

    2011-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in a child is characterized by prolonged episodes of obstructive hypopnoea and/or apnoea of upper airway leading to morbidity. The most common risk factor is adeno-tonsillar hypertrophy. Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome diagnosis is based on clinical ENT evaluation and an instrumental approach, such as pulse oximetry or the gold standard overnight polysomnography. The aim is to establish, in a population of children with suspected obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome, the frequency of this disorder, the effect of adenotonsillectomy and the risk of post-operative complications. A total of 481 patients (297 male, 184 female) with suspected obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (aged 2-14 years) were evaluated between March 2007 and April 2010 and divided into 3 morphological phenotypes: classic, adult and congenital. All patients underwent ENT assessment and a pulse oximetry with 4 channels cardiopulmonary monitoring. The examination following the Brouillette criteria was defined as negative, positive or inconclusive; when positive, adenotonsillectomy was the first therapeutic approach. At 6 months after surgery, all patients underwent check-up pulse oximetry. Of the overall sample, 96% of the patients had a classical phenotype, 3% an adult type and 1% a congenital type. The monitoring resulted pathological in 19% (17% of them were at increased post-operative risk), negative in 61% and inconclusive in 20%. All 5 patients with congenital phenotype were positive. Of the positive patients, 86% underwent adenotonsillectomy and a control pulse oximetry 6 months thereafter, 96% resulted negative. Pulse oximetry was efficient in order to avoid incorrect surgery indications, improving appropriateness and safety of adenotonsillectomy in children with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. Adenotonsillectomy showed a success rate of 96% and there were no episodes of post-surgery complications in particular in those patients at increased risk. PMID:22058592

  6. The Rochester OSA Optics Suitcase: 13 years of middle school outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canavesi, Cristina; Donlon, Theresa M.; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2012-10-01

    The Rochester Section of the Optical Society of America (ROSA) developed a youth outreach program in 1999 to be presented in middle schools by scientists, engineers and engineering students. The objective was to kindle interest in technology careers, especially those related to optics, photonics, and optical engineering. Three in-class experiments using individual take-home theme packets that explore color in white light were devised early in the program, and these have proven to be the key to its success. Over the past 13 years, with financial support from a variety of organizations and individuals, ROSA has manufactured and delivered over 450 Optics Suitcases to groups in 34 US states and 54 countries. The presentation guide is now available in 4 languages besides English. In this paper, the elements of an Optics Suitcase presentation are reviewed, and examples of outreach events are used to document its success.

  7. Hydrogeological responses to incoming materials at the erosional subduction margin, offshore Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Jun; Harris, Robert N.; Shimizu, Mayuko; Ujiie, Kohtaro; Tsutsumi, Akito; Ikehara, Minoru; Uno, Masaoki; Yamaguchi, Asuka; Hamada, Yohei; Namiki, Yuka; Kimura, Gaku

    2015-09-01

    Bulk mineral assemblages of sediments and igneous basement rocks on the incoming Cocos Plate at the Costa Rica subduction zone are examined by X-ray diffraction analyses on core samples. These samples are from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 334 reference Site U1381, ˜ 5 km seaward of the trench. Drilling recovered approximately 100 m of sediment and 70 m of igneous oceanic basement. The sediment includes two lithologic units: hemipelagic clayey mud and siliceous to calcareous pelagic ooze. The hemipelagic unit is composed of clay minerals (˜50 wt.%), quartz (˜5 wt.%), plagioclase (˜5 wt.%), calcite (˜15 wt.%) and ˜30 wt.% of amorphous materials, while the pelagic unit is mostly made up of biogenic amorphous silica (˜50 wt.%) and calcite (˜50 wt.%). The igneous basement rock consists of plagioclase (˜50-60 wt.%), clinopyroxene (˜>25 wt.%), and saponite (˜15-40 wt.%). Saponite is more abundant in pillow basalt than in the massive section, reflecting the variable intensity of alteration. We estimate the total water influx of the sedimentary package is 6.9 m3/yr per m of trench length. Fluid expulsion models indicate that sediment compaction during shallow subduction causes the release of pore water while peak mineral dehydration occurs at temperatures of approximately ˜100°C, 40-30 km landward of the trench. This region is landward of the observed updip extent of seismicity. We posit that in this region the presence of subducting bathymetric relief capped by velocity weakening nannofossil chalk is more important in influencing the updip extent of seismicity than the thermal regime.

  8. Phenolic compounds and antimicrobial activity of olive (Olea europaea L. Cv. Cobrançosa) leaves.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ana Paula; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Marcelino, Filipa; Valentão, Patricia; Andrade, Paula B; Seabra, Rosa; Estevinho, Leticia; Bento, Albino; Pereira, José Alberto

    2007-01-01

    We report the determination of phenolic compounds in olive leaves by reversed-phase HPLC/DAD, and the evaluation of their in vitro activity against several microorganisms that may be causal agents of human intestinal and respiratory tract infections, namely gram positive (Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus), gram negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and fungi (Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans). Seven phenolic compounds were identified and quantified: caffeic acid, verbascoside, oleuropein, luteolin 7-O-glucoside, rutin, apigenin 7-O-glucoside and luteolin 4'-O-glucoside. At low concentrations olive leaves extracts showed an unusual combined antibacterial and antifungal action, which suggest their great potential as nutraceuticals, particularly as a source of phenolic compounds. PMID:17873849

  9. Tree Diversity and Dynamics of the Forest of Seu Nico, Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Leyh, Werner; Meira-Neto, João A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background To understand future changes in community composition due to global changes, the knowledge about forest community dynamics is of crucial importance. To improve our understanding about processes and patterns involved in maintaining species rich Neotropical ecosystems, we provide here a dataset from the one hectare Forest of Seu Nico (FSN) Dynamics Plot from Southeastern Brazil. New information We report diameter at breast height, basal area and height measurements of 2868 trees and treelets identified from two census spanning over a nine-year period. Furthermore, soil properties and understory light availability of all 100 10 x 10m subplots from the one hectare FSN Dynamics Plot during the second census are given. PMID:26312053

  10. Normal fault populations across the Costa Rica margin, NW of the Osa Penninsula, and implications for upper plate stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangs, N. L.; McIntosh, K. D.

    2015-12-01

    The upper plate of the Costa Rica subduction zone is dissected by hundreds of normal faults that cut through the uppermost 500 - 1000m of slope sediment cover sequences within the upper slope and outer shelf of the Costa Rica margin. These faults are typically spaced 10s to 100s of m apart and have only small offsets of < 30 m. We have mapped more than 100 of these faults by tracing them along the inline, crossline and horizontal slices through a 3D seismic reflection data volume. These data were acquired on the R/V Langseth in 2011 using a 3,300 in3airgun source and a 6,000 m streamer with inline and crossline spacing of 18.75 m and 12.5 m respectively. Two primary populations of normal faults have conjugate sets that can be mapped across the upper slope and the outer shelf. The first set strikes slightly west of north and rotates systematically from 345° at the northern edge of the survey, which is located midway between the shelf break and the shoreline, to an orientation of 325° beneath the upper slope. We interpret this set as a result of WNW-ESE extension, which has been hypothesized to be a result of the collision between the Cocos Ridge (~75 km to the SE) and the Costa Rica margin (La Femina, et al., 2009). The second set of normal faults strikes east with an azimuth of 85°. This set of faults has a consistent orientation across the shelf and upper slope. This orientation is roughly parallel to the orientation of the subducting basement ridges (78°), which form horst and graben structures on the down going plate. These faults may be a result of uplift and extension as subducting ridges pass underneath. However, beneath the upper slope additional fault populations emerge with dominant azimuths primarily oriented at 5° and 65°. These faults appear to mark the localized extension caused by growth and uplift in the underlying margin wedge. Further, recent movement on shallow thrust faults indicates active shortening of the upper plate. We speculate that the contrast in the variability of fault populations beneath the upper slope and shelf is a result of a change in the competence of upper plate that allows more stress localization within the margin wedge beneath the slope than beneath the shelf. LaFemina, et al. (2009), Fore-arc motion and Cocos Ridge collision in Central America, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 10, Q05S14.

  11. Rapidly evolving narcolepsy-like syndrome coinciding with severe OSA following pharyngoplasty in Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blecher, Gregory; Wainbergas, Natalie; McGlynn, Michael; Teng, Arthur

    2014-09-01

    Our patient with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) not only displayed many typical syndromic features but also presented several unique challenges, with gross velopharyngeal insufficiency necessitating repair and severe obstructive sleep apnea developing thereafter, requiring ongoing non-invasive ventilation. This coincided with development of a narcolepsy-like syndrome, treated with dexamphetamine. Cataplexy, hypnogogic/hypnopompic hallucinations, sleep paralysis were absent and HLA-DQB1*06:02 was negative. Growth hormone (GH) therapy was commenced at 8 months of age and, as recommended, regular polysomnograms were conducted. Adenotonsillar growth on GH therapy is reported as well as several reports of sudden death in PWS patients on GH. Despite GH, lifestyle measures with regular dietician review, and an exercise program, there was progressive excessive weight gain. Our patient also developed moderate tonsil hypertrophy. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of severe obstructive sleep apnea secondary to sphincter pharyngoplasty coinciding with rapidly evolving narcolepsy-like syndrome. PMID:25473585

  12. A 51-Year-Old Woman With Hypoacusia and Increased Respiratory Effort in the Supine Position and OSA.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Barriales, Marcos; Vázquez Marcos, Virginia; Álvarez, Ainhoa; Odriozola, Beatriz; Alonso, Juan; Egea Santaolalla, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    A 51-year-old woman with a personal history of vitiligo, normal thyroid hormone studies, a simple hysterectomy for multiple uterine myomas at age 35 years, and childhood adenotonsillectomy was seen for progressive hearing loss. She reported mild asthenia, cold intolerance, mild dysphagia with frequent choking while eating and drinking, and a progressive increase in inspiratory effort, especially in the supine position. Her partner described a progressively worsening history of snoring and witnessed apneic episodes, mostly in the supine position. Mild to moderate daytime sleepiness was also present. PMID:27502995

  13. A novel locus for canine osteosarcoma (OSA1) maps to CFA34, the canine orthologue of human 3q26.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jeffrey C; Lembcke, Luis; Chamberlin, Tamara

    2010-10-01

    Spontaneous tumors in dogs share many of the same features of their human orthologues including clinical behavior, response to treatment, and molecular defects. It is therefore natural to consider the use of dogs and their spontaneous malignancies in the study of complex disease such as cancer. Scottish Deerhounds are a giant breed of dogs that exhibit a high incidence of bone cancer. Our previous work suggested that osteosarcoma within this breed could be explained by the presence of a major gene of dominant effect. Herein, we use a whole genome mapping approach to evaluate a four-generation pedigree of Scottish Deerhounds for linkage of their osteosarcoma phenotype. Using this approach we found evidence of linkage (Z(max)=5.766) between their phenotype and markers located on CFA34, in a region syntenic to human chromosome 3q26. The identification of this locus provides novel insight into the genetic basis of osteosarcoma in both canines and humans. PMID:20647041

  14. OSA Proceedings on Advanced Solid-State Lasers. Vol. 10 - Proceedings of the Topical Meeting, Hilton Head, SC, Mar. 18-20, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, G.; Chase, L. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA )

    1991-01-01

    The present volume on advanced solid-state lasers discusses Cr(3+), Cr(4+), short-pulse, titanium, F-center, mid-IR, and diode-pumped lasers, and nonlinear optics. Attention is given to the stabilization and a spectral characterization of an alexandrite laser for water vapor lidar measurements, crystal growth and spectroscopy of Cr:LiBaAlF6, a Q-switched tunable forsterite laser, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of chromium-doped forsterite. Topics addressed include efficient frequency doubling of a self-starting additive-pulse mode-locked diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser, recent advances in Ti:Al2O3 unstable-resonator lasers, all-solid-state operation of a CW Ti:Al2O3 laser, and upconversion studies of flashlamp-pumped Cr,T,Ho:YAG. Also discussed are the top output parameters of an Ho-laser, spectroscopy and the 3-micron laser potential of Er crystals, the pulsed operation of microchip lasers, and blue optical parametric generation in LiB3O5.

  15. [The "Em Comum-Idade" community intervention project: contributions to the promotion of health among the elderly of Viçosa in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Almeida, Luciene Fátima Fernandes; de Freitas, Edilaine Lopes; Salgado, Sara Maria Lopes; Gomes, Ivani Soleira; Franceschini, Sylvia do Carmo Castro; Ribeiro, Andréia Queiroz

    2015-12-01

    Actions to promote health among the elderly are extremely important for the prevention of diseases and complications arising from the aging process. In this context, the "Em Comum-Idade" community intervention project emerged. The objective of this article was to evaluate the impact of the actions of this project on anthropometric measurements and functional physical fitness of the participants at the end of the interventions. The variables analyzed were: body mass index, waist circumference, waist hip ratio, waist height ratio, power of the lower members, flexibility of upper and lower members and agility and dynamic balance. The sample consisted of 82 participants. Most participants were female, had not completed elementary school and attended less than 50% of the activities. There were no significant changes in the values of anthropometric measurements between the initial and final evaluations of the participants. Significant improvement was found for the values of tests of functional physical fitness among those who attended most of the actions of the project. It is important to maintain health promotion actions for long periods of time in order to get results that positively impact the health status and quality of life of the elderly. PMID:26691801

  16. Workplace worries: a preliminary look at online sexual activities at the office-emerging issues for clinicians and employers.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Al; Safir, Marilyn P; Rosenmann, Amir

    2006-02-01

    Concerns about the impact of online sexual activities (OSA) on work-life are drastically increasing. This study examined 3,466 respondents who reported OSA, 18.5% of whom reported engaging in OSA at work. They were compared with the 81.5% who engaged in OSA at home, on average time spent in OSA, workplace policies regarding OSA, and relationship status. Two themes were identified and discussed: opportunity and sexual distress. Our findings indicate that participants are cognizant of issues of opportunity (e.g., the OSA from home group was more likely to indicate their workplace has established policies regarding OSA), and privacy, representing an important aspect of this theme (e.g., participants engaging in OSA at work were found to be twice as likely to have extra-marital affairs, compared with the OSA from home group). Secondly, our data suggests that many participants, especially from the OSA at work group, experience OSA-related distress. Engaging in OSA at the workplace may result in decreased productivity, issues of sexual harassment, and concerns about employee well-being. Clearly stated and consistently enforced policies regulating OSA are likely to mitigate workplace OSA. However, a significant minority of employees may have difficulties curbing OSA. Therefore, more sophisticated strategies to deal with workplace OSA should be established. Additional implications of importance for organizations and mental health professionals who support them are discussed. PMID:16497115

  17. Three-year changes of prothrombotic factors in a cohort of South Africans with a high clinical suspicion of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    von Känel, Roland; Malan, Nico T; Hamer, Mark; Lambert, Gavin W; Schlaich, Markus; Reimann, Manja; Malan, Leoné

    2016-01-01

    A hypercoagulable state might be one important mechanism linking obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with incident myocardial infarction and stroke. However, previous studies on prothrombotic factors in OSA are not uniform and cross-sectional. We longitudinally studied prothrombotic factors in relation to OSA risk, adjusting for baseline levels of prothrombotic factors, demographics, metabolic parameters, aspirin use, and life style factors. The Berlin Questionnaire and/or neck circumference were used to define high OSA risk in 329 South African teachers (48.0% male, 44.6% black) at baseline and at three-year follow-up. Von Willebrand factor (VWF), fibrinogen, D-dimer, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, clot lysis time (CLT), and soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) were measured in plasma. At baseline 35.7% of participants had a high risk of OSA. At follow-up, persistently high OSA risk, persistently low OSA risk, OSA risk remission, and new-onset OSA risk were present in 26.1%, 53.2%, 9.4%, and 11.3% of participants, respectively. New-onset OSA risk was associated with a significant and longitudinal increase in VWF, fibrinogen, CLT, and suPAR relative to persistently low OSA risk; in VWF, fibrinogen, and suPAR relative to remitted OSA risk; and in VWF relative to persistently high OSA risk. Persistently high OSA risk was associated with an increase in CLT and suPAR relative to persistently low OSA risk and in D-dimer relative to remitted OSA risk. Remitted OSA risk was associated with D-dimer decrease relative to persistently low OSA risk. In OSA, hypercoagulability is a dynamic process with a most prominent three-year increase in individuals with new-onset OSA risk. PMID:26335891

  18. [The surgical risk in sleep apnea: the implications for tonsillectomies].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Padilla, R; Vázquez-García, J C; Meza-Vargas, S

    1999-01-01

    Hypertrophy of tonsils or adenoids is the commonest cause of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children. Adenotonsillectomy (AT) is frequently curative in children with OSA but riskier than the same procedure without OSA. It is crucial to identify OSA among the patients programmed for AT because they require a detailed evaluation, frequently including total or limited polysomnogram. Patients with OSA need a continuous surveillance before, during, and after surgery, ideally in a referral hospital. PMID:10596490

  19. Hypoglossal nerve conduction findings in obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Ramchandren, Sindhu; Gruis, Kirsten L.; Chervin, Ronald D.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Concannon, Maryann; Wolfe, James; Albers, James W.; Brown, Devin L.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Denervation of oropharyngeal muscles in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been suggested by needle EMG and muscle biopsy, but little is known about oropharyngeal nerve conduction abnormalities in OSA. We sought to compare hypoglossal nerve conduction studies in patients with and without OSA. Methods Unilateral hypoglossal nerve conduction studies were performed on 20 subjects with OSA and 20 age-matched controls using standard techniques. Results Median age was 48 in OSA subjects and 47 in controls. Hypoglossal compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes were significantly reduced (Wilcoxon Signed Rank test, p =0.01), but prolongation of latencies in OSA subjects did not reach significance in comparison to those in controls. Among a subgroup of subjects without polyneuropathy (15 pairs), reduced amplitudes in OSA subjects retained borderline significance (p=0.05). Discussion Hypoglossal nerve conduction abnormalities may distinguish patients with OSA from controls. These abnormalities could potentially contribute to, or arise from, OSA. PMID:20544939

  20. Mild obstructive sleep apnea does not modulate baroreflex sensitivity in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Blomster, Henry; Laitinen, Tomi P; Hartikainen, Juha EK; Laitinen, Tiina M; Vanninen, Esko; Gylling, Helena; Sahlman, Johanna; Kokkarinen, Jouko; Randell, Jukka; Seppä, Juha; Tuomilehto, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a chronic and progressive disease. OSA is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, the risk being more frequently encountered with severe degrees of OSA. Increased sympathetic activation and impaired cardiac autonomic control as reflected by depressed baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS) are possible mechanisms involved in the cardiovascular complications of OSA. However, it is not known at what stage of OSA that changes in BRS appear. The aim of this study was to evaluate BRS in patients with mild OSA. Methods The study population consisted of 81 overweight patients with mild OSA and 46 body weight-matched non-OSA subjects. BRS, apnea-hypopnea index, body mass index, and metabolic parameters were assessed. The phenylephrine test was used to measure BRS. Results Patients in the OSA group were slightly but significantly older than the non-OSA population (50.3±9.3 years vs 45.7±11.1 years, P=0.02). Body mass index, percentage body fat, blood pressure, fasting glucose, insulin, and lipid levels did not differ between the OSA patients and non-OSA subjects. Absolute BRS values in patients with mild OSA and non-OSA subjects (9.97±6.70 ms/mmHg vs 10.51±7.16 ms/mmHg, P=0.67) and BRS values proportional to age-related and sex-related reference values (91.4%±22.7% vs 92.2%±21.8%, P=0.84) did not differ from each other. BRS <50% of the sex-specific reference value was found in 6% of patients with mild OSA and in 2% of non-OSA subjects (P=0.29). Conclusion Patients with mild OSA did not show evidence of disturbed BRS in comparison with weight-matched non-OSA controls. PMID:26203292

  1. Diagnosis and Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Children.

    PubMed

    Tsubomatsu, Chieko; Shintani, Tomoko; Abe, Ayumi; Yajima, Ryoto; Takahashi, Nozomi; Ito, Fumie; Takano, Kenichi; Himi, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is important for children pertaining to their physical and mental growth. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in children has been shown to have different effects as compared to OSAS in adults, including deficits in cognition and neuropsychological functions, hyperactivity, ADHD, behavior problems, aggressive behavior, learning problems and nocturnal enuresis. Hypertrophy of the adenoids and tonsils is a major cause of OSAS in children; therefore, adenotonsillectomy may decrease the effects of OSAS pertaining to physical and mental growth. It is important to accurately diagnose and appropriately treat OSAS in children to prevent OSAS in their adulthood. PMID:27115764

  2. Classification of vibratory patterns of the upper airway during sleep.

    PubMed

    Alshaer, Hisham; Rudzicz, Frank; Falk, Tiago H; Tseng, Wen-Hou; Bradley, T Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Upper airway (UA) narrowing and collapse during sleep results in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We hypothesize that vibratory patterns of snoring can distinguish simple snorers from those with OSA. Samples of breath sounds were collected from 7 snorers without OSA and 5 with OSA. Snoring pitch (F0) contours were found using the robust algorithm for pitch tracking (RAPT). The OSA snoring contours showed fluctuating patterns as compared to the smoother patterns of simple snorers. This suggests that snoring reveals the underlying instabilities of UA tissue in OSA. Conditional random fields, a statistical sequence classifier, gave 75% accuracy in distinguishing the 2 groups. PMID:24110129

  3. Managing Comorbid Illness in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: What Can We Learn from Other Diseases?

    PubMed

    Conwell, Walter D; Tsai, Sheila C

    2016-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with numerous comorbid medical conditions. Symptoms of OSA may mimic those of comorbid conditions. The presence of OSA may worsen outcomes from the primary condition. Conversely, OSA treatment may benefit both sleep symptomatology and comorbid illness. Because of potential significant benefit, it is important to screen for sleep apnea symptoms, to have a low threshold to perform diagnostic testing, to treat OSA if present, and to closely monitor symptoms. OSA management does not necessarily replace, but rather, should be performed in conjunction with primary therapy for comorbid conditions. PMID:27542877

  4. Length of Individual Apnea Events Is Increased by Supine Position and Modulated by Severity of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Töyräs, Juha; Muraja-Murro, Anu; Kupari, Salla; Tiihonen, Pekka; Mervaala, Esa; Kulkas, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Positional obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common among OSA patients. In severe OSA, the obstruction events are longer in supine compared to nonsupine positions. Corresponding scientific information on mild and moderate OSA is lacking. We studied whether individual obstruction and desaturation event severity is increased in supine position in all OSA severity categories and whether the severity of individual events is linked to OSA severity categories. Polygraphic recordings of 2026 patients were retrospectively analyzed. The individual apnea, and hypopnea durations and desaturation event depth, duration, and area of 526 included patients were compared between supine and nonsupine positions in different OSA severity categories. Apnea events were 6.3%, 12.5%, and 11.1% longer (p < 0.001) in supine compared to nonsupine position in mild, moderate, and severe OSA categories, respectively. In moderate and severe OSA categories desaturation areas were 5.7% and 25.5% larger (p < 0.001) in supine position. In both positions the individual event severity was elevated along increasing OSA severity category (p < 0.05). Supine position elevates apnea duration in all and desaturation area in moderate and severe OSA severity categories. This might be more hazardous for supine OSA patients and therefore, estimation of clinical severity of OSA should incorporate also information about individual event characteristics besides AHI. PMID:27051535

  5. Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Hypertension, and Their Additive Effects on Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Damiani, Mario Francesco; Zito, Annapaola; Carratù, Pierluigi; Falcone, Vito Antonio; Bega, Elioda; Scicchitano, Pietro; Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Resta, Onofrio

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims. It is widely accepted that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is independently associated with atherosclerosis. Similar to OSA, hypertension (HTN) is a condition associated with atherosclerosis. However, to date, the impact of the simultaneous presence of OSA and HTN on the risk of atherosclerosis has not been extensively studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the consequences of the coexistence of OSA and HTN on carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and on inflammatory markers of atherosclerosis (such as interleukin- [IL-] 6 and pentraxin- [PTX-] 3). Methods. The study design allowed us to define 4 groups: (1) controls (n = 30); (2) OSA patients without HTN (n = 30); (3) HTN patients without OSA (n = 30); (4) patients with OSA and HTN (n = 30). In the morning after portable monitoring (between 7 am and 8 am), blood samples were collected, and carotid IMT was measured. Results. Carotid IMT, IL-6, and PTX-3 in OSA normotensive patients and in non-OSA HTN subjects were significantly higher compared to control subjects; in addition, in OSA hypertensive patients they were significantly increased compared to OSA normotensive, non-OSA HTN, or control subjects. Conclusions. OSA and HTN have an additive role in the progression of carotid atherosclerosis and in blood levels of inflammatory markers for atherosclerosis, such as interleukin-6 and pentraxin-3. PMID:26697221

  6. The link between rhinitis and rapid-eye-movement sleep breathing disturbances in children with obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Huseni, Shehlanoor; Gutierrez, Maria J.; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E.; Nino, Cesar L.; Perez, Geovanny F.; Pancham, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Background: Rhinitis and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) often coexist during childhood. To delineate this clinical association, we examined OSA severity and polysomnogram (PSG) features in children with rhinitis and OSA. Given that rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep is characterized by nasal congestion, we hypothesized that children with rhinitis have more REM-related breathing abnormalities. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of 145 children with PSG-diagnosed OSA. Outcomes included PSG parameters and obstructive apnea–hypopnea index (OAHI) during REM and non-REM. Linear multivariable models examined the joint effect of rhinitis and OSA parameters with control for potential confounders. Results: Rhinitis was present in 43% of children with OSA (n = 63) but overall OAHI severity was unaffected by the presence of rhinitis. In contrast, OAHI during REM sleep in children with moderate–severe OSA was significantly increased in subjects with rhinitis and OSA (44.1/hr; SE = 6.4) compared with those with OSA alone (28.2/hr; SE = 3.8). Conclusion: Rhinitis is highly prevalent in children with OSA. Although OSA is not more severe in children with rhinitis, they do have a distinct OSA phenotype characterized by more REM-related OSA. Further research is needed to delineate the link between REM-sleep and the physiology of the nose during health and disease. PMID:24717885

  7. Osteocytes serve as a progenitor cell of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Sottnik, Joseph L; Campbell, Brittany; Mehra, Rohit; Behbahani-Nejad, Omid; Hall, Christopher L.; Keller, Evan T.

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OSA) is the most common primary bone tumor in humans. However, the cell of origin of OSA is not clearly defined although there is evidence that osteoblasts may serve as OSA progenitors. The role of osteocytes, terminally differentiated osteoblasts, as OSA progenitors has yet to be described. Analysis of patient cDNA from publicly available microarray data revealed that patients with OSA have increased expression of dentin matrix phosphoprotein 1 (DMP1), a marker of osteocytes. Analysis of multiple murine, human, and canine OSA cell lines revealed DMP1 expression. To test the tumorigenic potential of osteocytes, MLO-Y4, an SV-40 immortalized murine osteocyte cell line, was injected into subcutaneous and orthotopic (intratibial) sites of mice. Tumor growth occurred in both locations. Orthotopic MLO-Y4 tumors produced mixed osteoblastic/osteolytic radiographic lesions; a hallmark of OSA. Together, these data demonstrate for the first time that osteocytes can serve as OSA progenitors. PMID:24700678

  8. Osteocytes serve as a progenitor cell of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sottnik, Joseph L; Campbell, Brittany; Mehra, Rohit; Behbahani-Nejad, Omid; Hall, Christopher L; Keller, Evan T

    2014-08-01

    Osteosarcoma (OSA) is the most common primary bone tumor in humans. However, the cell of origin of OSA is not clearly defined although there is evidence that osteoblasts may serve as OSA progenitors. The role of osteocytes, terminally differentiated osteoblasts, as OSA progenitors has yet to be described. Analysis of patient cDNA from publicly available microarray data revealed that patients with OSA have increased expression of dentin matrix phosphoprotein 1 (DMP1), a marker of osteocytes. Analysis of multiple murine, human, and canine OSA cell lines revealed DMP1 expression. To test the tumorigenic potential of osteocytes, MLO-Y4, a SV-40 immortalized murine osteocyte cell line, was injected into subcutaneous and orthotopic (intratibial) sites of mice. Tumor growth occurred in both locations. Orthotopic MLO-Y4 tumors produced mixed osteoblastic/osteolytic radiographic lesions; a hallmark of OSA. Together, these data demonstrate for the first time that osteocytes can serve as OSA progenitors. PMID:24700678

  9. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea and Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Hou, Yuemei; Po, Sunny S

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent cardiac arrhythmia and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is common among patients with AF. Growing evidence suggests that OSA is associated with the initiation and maintenance of AF. This association is independent of obesity, body mass index and hypertension. OSA not only promotes initiation of AF but also has a significant negative impact on the treatment of AF. Patients with untreated OSA have a higher AF recurrence rate with drug therapy, electrical cardioversion and catheter ablation. Treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been shown to improve AF control in patients with OSA. In this article, we will review and discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms of OSA that may predispose OSA patients to AF as well as the standard and emerging therapies for patients with both OSA and AF. PMID:26835094

  10. Systematic review on noninvasive assessment of subclinical cardiovascular disease in obstructive sleep apnea: new kid on the block!

    PubMed

    Ali, Shozab S; Oni, Ebenezer T; Warraich, Haider J; Blaha, Michael J; Blumenthal, Roger S; Karim, Adil; Shaharyar, Sameer; Jamal, Omar; Fialkow, Jonathan; Cury, Ricardo; Budoff, Matthew J; Agatston, Arthur S; Nasir, Khurram

    2014-10-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have a high burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) but a causal relationship between OSA and atherosclerotic CVD remains unclear. We systematically reviewed the literature analyzing the relationship. A review of the Medline database for studies noninvasively evaluating subclinical CVD in OSA was conducted. A total of fifty-two studies were included in this review. Across the studies the prevalence of atherosclerosis, as assessed by coronary artery calcification, carotid intima-media thickness, brachial artery flow-mediated dilation and pulse wave velocity was higher in patients with OSA and correlated with increasing severity and duration of OSA. This study shows OSA is an independent predictor of subclinical CVD as CVD is more likely to occur in patients with long standing and severe OSA. Further research is however necessary to identify specific OSA populations that would benefit from aggressive screening. PMID:24650521

  11. Ophthalmic Diseases in Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Skorin, Leonid; Knutson, Rachel

    2016-08-01

    Symptomatic obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects 2% of women and 4% of men, but the prevalence of asymptomatic OSA is significantly higher. Several ophthalmic conditions are associated with OSA, including floppy eyelid syndrome, glaucoma, nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, papilledema, keratoconus, and central serous chorioretinopathy. The purpose of this review is to provide primary care physicians with a general knowledge of the signs, symptoms, and management of the ophthalmic diseases associated with OSA. PMID:27455101

  12. American Thoracic Society patient information series. Other therapies for sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    2015-01-15

    Treatment is needed for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) because untreated OSA can result in serious health problems. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is the most common treatment used for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). (see ATS Patient Series http://patients.thoracic.org/wp-content/uploads/ 2014/03/obstructive-sleep-apnea.pdf) For those who cannot use CPAP or want to try another option, there are other therapies that can work for people with OSA. PMID:25590163

  13. Pharmacologic Approaches to the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    White, David P

    2016-06-01

    The concept of pharmacologic therapy for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) treatment has always been considered but no agent has had a large enough effect size to drive substantial adoption. A new construct of the pathophysiology of OSA is that there are 4 primary physiologic traits that dictate who develops OSA. These traits vary substantially between patients, meaning OSA may develop for quite different reasons. This encourages new thinking regarding pharmacologic therapy and continued attempts to find the ideal or acceptable drug. PMID:27236057

  14. Clinical manifestations of sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may manifest in a number of ways from subtle intrusion into daily life to profound sleepiness, snoring, witnessed apneas and other classic symptoms. Although there is increasing evidence suggesting OSA can adversely affect health in a variety of ways, this disorder remains underdiagnosed. The most well-escribed health consequences of OSA relate to the cardiovascular system. Hypertension and arrhythmias have a strong association with OSA, and evidence suggests that treatment of OSA in patients with refractory hypertension and in patients planning cardioversion for atrial fibrillation may be of particularly importance. Significant associations between heart failure and OSA as well as complex sleep apnea have also been well-described. Cerebrovascular insult, impaired neurocognition, and poorly controlled mood disorder are also associated with in OSA. Therapy for OSA may ameliorate atherosclerotic progression and improve outcomes post-cerebrovascular accident (CVA). OSA should be considered in patients complaining of poor concentration at work, actual or near-miss motor vehicle accidents, and patients with severe sleepiness as a component of their co-morbid mood disorders. The metabolic impact of OSA has also been studied, particularly in relation to glucose homeostasis. Also of interest is the potential impact OSA has on lipid metabolism. The adverse effect untreated OSA has on glucose tolerance and lipid levels has led to the suggestion that OSA is yet another constituent of the metabolic syndrome. Some of these metabolic derangements may be related to the adverse effects untreated OSA has on hepatic health. The cardiovascular, neurocognitive, and metabolic manifestations of OSA can have a significant impact on patient health and quality of life. In many instances, evidence exists that therapy not only improves outcomes in general, but also modifies the severity of co-morbid disease. To mitigate the long-term sequela of this disease

  15. Osteocalcin and Osteonectin Expression in Canine Osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Wehrle-Martinez, A S; Dittmer, K E; Aberdein, D; Thompson, K G

    2016-07-01

    Osteosarcoma (OSA) is a malignant heterogeneous primary bone tumor responsible for up to 90% of all primary bone tumors in dogs. In this study, osteocalcin (OC) and osteonectin (ON) immunoreactivity was evaluated in 23 canine OSAs, 4 chondrosarcomas, 4 fibrosarcomas, 2 hemangiosarcomas, and 4 histiocytic sarcomas. The effects of three different decalcification agents (ethylenediaminetetraetic acid [EDTA], formic acid and hydrochloric acid [HCl]) on the immunoreactivity for OC and ON was also assessed. Immunoreactivity to OC was present in 19/23 (83%) cases of OSA and all cases of chondrosarcoma. In three OSAs the extracellular matrix showed immunoreactivity to OC. None of the fibrosarcomas, histiocytic sarcomas or hemangiosarcomas showed immunoreactivity to OC. The sensitivity and specificity for OC in canine OSA in this study was 83% and 71% respectively. For ON, 100% of both OSAs (23/23) and non-OSAs (14/14) showed cytoplasmic immunoreactivity to this antibody, giving a sensitivity of 100% but a complete lack of specificity. There were no significant differences in immunoreactivity for OC and ON between the different decalcification agents used. In conclusion, OC showed high sensitivity for identifying OSA but it failed to distinguish between OSA and chondrosarcoma, and the osteoid produced by neoplastic cells in most cases did not show immunoreactivity to OC. These factors may limit the practical utility of OC in the diagnosis of OSA in dogs when chondrosarcoma is a differential diagnosis. ON showed no specificity in detecting OSA and has little practical application for the diagnosis of OSA in dogs. PMID:26926085

  16. Analysis of the correlations between oxidative stress, gelatinases and their tissue inhibitors in the human subjects with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hopps, E; Lo Presti, R; Montana, M; Canino, B; Calandrino, V; Caimi, G

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is commonly associated with endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disorders. On the basis of this observation, our aim was to examine the oxidative status and the matrix metalloproteases (MMP) profile in a group of subjects with OSAS. We enrolled 48 subjects with OSAS defined after a 1-night cardiorespiratory sleep study, who were subsequently subdivided in two subgroups according to the severity of OSAS (low grade = L-OSAS; high grade= H-OSAS). We measured the parameters of oxidative stress, such as lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, total antioxidant status (TAS), nitric oxide metabolites (NOx), and the plasma concentrations of the gelatinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2). We found a significant impairment of oxidative status in H-OSAS compared to L-OSAS and higher plasma levels of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in H-OSAS compared to L-OSAS. In this study we observed a positive correlation between TBARS and MMP-9, a positive correlation between PC and MMP-9, and a negative correlation between NOx and MMP-9, especially in the whole group of OSAS subjects. These data underline how strong interrelationships among some parameters of the oxidative stress, in particular those reflecting lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and NOx, and MMP-9 are evident in OSAS subjects. All these information may be useful in the clinical practice keeping in mind the cardiovascular complications generally accompanying the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. PMID:26769829

  17. Evidence of neurodegeneration in obstructive sleep apnea: Relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and cognitive dysfunction in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Daulatzai, Mak Adam

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of dementia and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) increases with age. Late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible neurodegenerative disease of the elderly characterized by amyloid β (Aβ) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The disease involves widespread synaptic loss in the neocortex and the hippocampus. Rodent and clinical studies suggest that OSA impairs the structural integrity of several brain regions, including the medial temporal lobe. Indeed, hypoxia, hypertension, hypoperfusion, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and oxidative stress noted in OSA patients also occur in AD patients. This Review highlights pathological commonality, showing that OSA upregulates Aβ, tau hyperphosphorylation, and synaptic dysfunction. Indeed, OSA and hypertension trigger hypoperfusion and hypometabolism of brain regions, including cortex and hippocampus. Several studies show that hypertension-driven brain damage and pathogenic mechanisms lead to an Aβ increase. The pathophysiological mechanism by which OSA enhances hypertension may be linked to sympathoexcitation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction. Strong pathophysiological similarities that exist between OSA and AD are underscored here. For example, the hippocampus is negatively impacted in both OSA and AD. OSA promotes hippocampal atrophy, which is associated with memory impairment. Cognitive impairment, even in the absence of manifest dementia, is an important independent predictor of mortality. However, several pathophysiological mechanisms in OSA are reversible with appropriate therapy. OSA, therefore, is a modifiable risk factor of cognitive dysfunction, and treating OSA prior to mild cognitive impairment may be an effective prevention strategy to reduce risk for cognitive decline and AD in middle-aged persons and the elderly. PMID:26301370

  18. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and the Subsequent Risk of Chronic Rhinosinusitis: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Li-Ting; Hung, Shih-Han; Lin, Herng-Ching; Liu, Chih-Kuang; Huang, Hung-Meng; Wu, Chuan-Song

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) still remains unclear. This retrospective cohort study aimed to investigate the relationship between OSA and subsequent CRS using a population-based dataset. The study used data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. We selected 971 patients with OSA for the study cohort and 4855 patients without OSA for the comparison cohort. Each patient was tracked for 5 years to determine those who were subsequently diagnosed with CRS. Stratified Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were performed to examine the association of OSA with subsequent CRS. The results revealed that 161 (2.76%) of the total sampled patients were subsequently diagnosed with CRS. Subsequent incidences of CRS were found in 64 (6.59%) patients with OSA and 97 (2.00%) patients without OSA. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of subsequent CRS for patients with OSA was 3.18 (95% confidence interval: 2.27~4.45) compared to those without OSA. Furthermore, the HR for CRS was similar for subjects with OSA for both genders (with an adjusted HR of 3.44 for males and 2.63 for females). We concluded that patients with OSA had a higher risk of subsequent CRS compared to patients without OSA regardless of sex. PMID:26861510

  19. Is Floppy Eyelid Syndrome More Prevalent in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Yu, Dao-Jiang; Feng, Gang; Long, Zhen-Hai; Liu, Chang-Jiang; Li, Hui; Zhao, Tian-Lan

    2016-01-01

    Controversial findings are reported about the relationship between floppy eyelid syndrome (FES) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The main goal of this study was to evaluate whether FES is more prevalent in OSAS patients by performing a meta-analysis. A comprehensive literature search of Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane databases was performed. Only studies related to the prevalence of FES in OSAS were included in the meta-analysis. We estimated a pooled odds ratio (OR) for the prevalence of FES in OSAS. In total, 6 studies with 767 participants met the inclusion criteria. Using a fixed-effects model, the pooled OR was 4.12. The test for the overall effect revealed that FES was statistically prevalent in OSAS patients when compared with that in non-OSAS subjects (Z = 4.98, p < 0.00001). In the subgroup analysis by OSAS severity, the incidence of FES in OSAS increased with severity of OSAS as indicated with increased OR values (OR = 2.56, 4.62, and 7.64 for mild, moderate, and severe OSAS). In conclusion, the results indicate that FES is more prevalent in OSAS patients. However, this result was based only on unadjusted estimates. Prospective cohort studies are needed to determine whether OSAS is an independent risk factor for FES. PMID:27366328

  20. Online sexual activity experience of heterosexual students: gender similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Krystelle; Byers, E Sandra; Walsh, Lindsay

    2011-04-01

    This study compared male and female university students' experiences with online sexual activity (OSA) and tested a model explaining gender differences in OSA. OSAs were categorized as non-arousal (e.g., seeking sexuality information), solitary-arousal (e.g., viewing sexually explicit materials), or partnered-arousal (e.g., sharing sexual fantasies). Participants (N = 217) completed measures of OSA experience, sexual attitudes, and sexual experience. Significantly more men than women reported engaging in solitary-arousal and partnered-arousal OSA and doing so more often. However, the men and women who reported having engaged in partnered-arousal activities reported equal frequencies of experience. There were no significant gender differences for engaging in non-arousal OSA experience. These results support the importance of grouping OSAs in terms of the proposed non-arousal, solitary-arousal, and partnered-arousal categories. Attitude toward OSA but not general attitudes toward or experiences with sexuality partially mediated the relationship between gender and frequency of engaging in arousal-oriented OSA (solitary and partnered OSA). This suggests that attitude toward OSA specifically and not gender socialization more generally account for gender differences in OSA experience. PMID:20467798

  1. Urinary proteomic profiling in severe obesity and obstructive sleep apnoea with CPAP treatment

    PubMed Central

    Seetho, Ian W; Ramírez-Torres, Adela; Albalat, Amaya; Mullen, William; Mischak, Harald; Parker, Robert J; Craig, Sonya; Duffy, Nick; Hardy, Kevin J; Burniston, Jatin G; Wilding, John PH

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is common in obesity and is associated with cardiovascular and metabolic complications. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in OSA may lead to physiological changes reflected in the urinary proteome. The aim of this study was to characterise the urinary proteome in severely obese adult subjects with OSA who were receiving CPAP compared with severely obese subjects without OSA. Methods Severely obese subjects with and without OSA were recruited. Subjects with OSA were receiving CPAP. Body composition and blood pressure measurements were recorded. Urinary samples were analysed by Capillary Electrophoresis–Mass Spectrometry (CE–MS). Results Twenty-seven subjects with OSA-on-CPAP (age 49±7years, BMI 43±7 kg/m2) and 25 controls without OSA (age 52±9years, BMI 39±4 kg/m2) were studied. Age and BMI were not significantly different between groups. Mean CPAP use for OSA patients was 14.5±1.0 months. Metabolic syndrome was present in 14(52%) of those with OSA compared with 6(24%) of controls (p=0.039). A urinary proteome comprising 15 peptides was identified showing differential expression between the groups (p<0.01). Although correction for multiple testing did not reach significance, sequences were determined for 8 peptides demonstrating origins from collagens, fibrinogen beta chain and T-cadherin that may be associated with underlying cardiovascular disease mechanisms in OSA. Conclusions The urinary proteome is compared in OSA with CPAP and without OSA in severe obesity. The effects of CPAP on OSA may lead to changes in the urinary peptides but further research work is needed to investigate the potential role for urinary proteomics in characterising urinary peptide profiles in OSA. PMID:26483946

  2. Obstructive Sleep Apnea is Related to Impaired Cognitive and Functional Status after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Aaronson, Justine A.; van Bennekom, Coen A.M.; Hofman, Winni F.; van Bezeij, Tijs; van den Aardweg, Joost G.; Groet, Erny; Kylstra, Wytske A.; Schmand, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder in stroke patients and is associated with prolonged hospitalization, decreased functional outcome, and recurrent stroke. Research on the effect of OSA on cognitive functioning following stroke is scarce. The primary objective of this study was to compare stroke patients with and without OSA on cognitive and functional status upon admission to inpatient rehabilitation. Design: Case-control study. Setting and Patients: 147 stroke patients admitted to a neurorehabilitation unit. Interventions: N/A. Measurements: All patients underwent sleep examination for diagnosis of OSA. We assessed cognitive status by neuropsychological examination and functional status by two neurological scales and a measure of functional independence. Results: We included 80 stroke patients with OSA and 67 stroke patients without OSA. OSA patients were older and had a higher body mass index than patients without OSA. OSA patients performed worse on tests of attention, executive functioning, visuoperception, psychomotor ability, and intelligence than those without OSA. No differences were found for vigilance, memory, and language. OSA patients had a worse neurological status, lower functional independence scores, and a longer period of hospitalization in the neurorehabilitation unit than the patients without OSA. OSA status was not associated with stroke type or classification. Conclusions: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with a lower cognitive and functional status in patients admitted for stroke rehabilitation. This underlines the importance of OSA as a probable prognostic factor, and calls for well-designed randomized controlled trials to study its treatability. Citation: Aaronson JA, van Bennekom CA, Hofman WF, van Bezeij T, van den Aardweg JG, Groet E, Kylstra WA, Schmand B. Obstructive sleep apnea is related to impaired cognitive and functional status after stroke. SLEEP 2015;38(9):1431–1437. PMID

  3. Overview of proteomics studies in obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Feliciano, Amélia; Torres, Vukosava Milic; Vaz, Fátima; Carvalho, Ana Sofia; Matthiesen, Rune; Pinto, Paula; Malhotra, Atul; Bárbara, Cristina; Penque, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an underdiagnosed common public health concern causing deleterious effects on metabolic and cardiovascular health. Although much has been learned regarding the pathophysiology and consequences of OSA in the past decades, the molecular mechanisms associated with such processes remain poorly defined. The advanced high-throughput proteomics-based technologies have become a fundamental approach for identifying novel disease mediators as potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets for many diseases, including OSA. Here, we briefly review OSA pathophysiology and the technological advances in proteomics and the first results of its application to address critical issues in the OSA field. PMID:25770042

  4. Consequences of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Cardiovascular Risk of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Whether Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Reduces that Risk.

    PubMed

    Khayat, Rami; Pleister, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is present in up to 25% of otherwise healthy individuals. OSA is associated with intermittent hypoxia, oxidative stress, sympathetic activation, and an inflammatory response. These perturbations mediate the role of OSA as an independent and modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). OSA can induce CVD or accelerate the progression of CVD into an end-stage disorder, including heart failure and stroke. Current clinical recommendations are based on existing clinical trial data and the clinical experience of our program; current and future clinical trials will help to optimize management of OSA in the setting of CVD. PMID:27542874

  5. Role of the Gut Microbiome in Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Durgan, David J; Ganesh, Bhanu P; Cope, Julia L; Ajami, Nadim J; Phillips, Sharon C; Petrosino, Joseph F; Hollister, Emily B; Bryan, Robert M

    2016-02-01

    Individuals suffering from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are at increased risk for systemic hypertension. The importance of a healthy gut microbiota, and detriment of a dysbiotic microbiota, on host physiology is becoming increasingly evident. We tested the hypothesis that gut dysbiosis contributes to hypertension observed with OSA. OSA was modeled in rats by inflating a tracheal balloon during the sleep cycle (10-s inflations, 60 per hour). On normal chow diet, OSA had no effect on blood pressure; however, in rats fed a high-fat diet, blood pressure increased 24 and 29 mm Hg after 7 and 14 days of OSA, respectively (P<0.05 each). Bacterial community characterization was performed on fecal pellets isolated before and after 14 days of OSA in chow and high-fat fed rats. High-fat diet and OSA led to significant alterations of the gut microbiota, including decreases in bacterial taxa known to produce the short chain fatty acid butyrate (P<0.05). Finally, transplant of dysbiotic cecal contents from hypertensive OSA rats on high-fat diet into OSA recipient rats on normal chow diet (shown to be normotensive) resulted in hypertension similar to that of the donor (increased 14 and 32 mm Hg after 7 and 14 days of OSA, respectively; P<0.05). These studies demonstrate a causal relationship between gut dysbiosis and hypertension, and suggest that manipulation of the microbiota may be a viable treatment for OSA-induced, and possibly other forms of, hypertension. PMID:26711739

  6. An evaluation of the schemes of ocean surface albedo parameterization in shortwave radiation estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Hailin; Zhang, Xiaotong; Liu, Qiang; Feng, Youbin; Li, Xiuhong; Zhang, Jialin; Cai, Erli

    2015-12-01

    The ocean surface albedo (OSA) is a deciding factor on ocean net surface shortwave radiation (ONSSR) estimation. Several OSA schemes have been proposed successively, but there is not a conclusion for the best OSA scheme of estimating the ONSSR. On the base of analyzing currently existing OSA parameterization, including Briegleb et al.(B), Taylor et al.(T), Hansen et al.(H), Jin et al.(J), Preisendorfer and Mobley(PM86), Feng's scheme(F), this study discusses the difference of OSA's impact on ONSSR estimation in condition of actual downward shortwave radiation(DSR). Then we discussed the necessity and applicability for the climate models to integrate the more complicated OSA scheme. It is concluded that the SZA and the wind speed are the two most significant effect factor to broadband OSA, thus the different OSA parameterizations varies violently in the regions of both high latitudes and strong winds. The OSA schemes can lead the ONSSR results difference of the order of 20 w m-2. The Taylor's scheme shows the best estimate, and Feng's result just following Taylor's. However, the accuracy of the estimated instantaneous OSA changes at different local time. Jin's scheme has the best performance generally at noon and in the afternoon, and PM86's is the best of all in the morning, which indicate that the more complicated OSA schemes reflect the temporal variation of OWA better than the simple ones.

  7. Relationship between C-reactive protein levels and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tie, Y X; Fu, Y Y; Xu, Z; Peng, Y

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the relationship between C-reactive protein levels and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). We recruited 30 OSAS patients into the observation group (OSAS group), and subdivided them into mild, moderate and severe groups according to the apnea hypopnea index. In addition, 20 normal individuals were included in the control group. Plasma CRP levels of two groups were measured. As compared with the control group, the CRP levels in the OSAS group were significantly increased (P < 0.05). ANOVA showed that CRP levels in the three subgroups differ; statistically significant differences between the mild and severe OSA patients were observed (P < 0.05). It was hypothesized that OSAS patients show elevated serum CRP levels, and that serum CRP levels are associated with OSAS severity. PMID:27323094

  8. Oil-suspended particulate matter aggregates: Formation mechanism and fate in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Andrew; Shim, Won Joon; Ha, Sung Yong; Yim, Un Hyuk

    2014-12-01

    Oil suspended particulate matter (SPM) aggregates (OSA) are naturally occurring phenomena where oil droplets and particles interact to form aggregates. This aggregation could aid cleanup processes of oil contaminated waters. When OSA is formed, it makes oil less sticky and would facilitate the dispersion of oil into the water column. Increased oil-water surface contact by OSA formation enhances biodegradation of oil. Its applicability as a natural oil clean-up mechanism has been effectively demonstrated over past decades. There are many factors affecting the formation of OSA and its stability in the natural environment that need to be understood. This review provides a current understanding of (1) types of OSA that could be formed in the natural environment; (2) controlling factors and environmental parameters for the formation of OSA; (3) environmental parameters; and (4) fate of OSA and its applicability for oil spill remediation processes.

  9. Manifestations of Insomnia in Sleep Apnea: Implications for Screening and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bailes, Sally; Rizzo, Dorrie; Baltzan, Marc; Grad, Roland; Pavilanis, Alan; Creti, Laura; Fichten, Catherine S; Libman, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the presence, type, and severity of insomnia complaints in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients and to assess the utility of the Sleep Symptom Checklist (SSC) for case identification in primary care. Participants were 88 OSA patients, 57 cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) patients, and 14 healthy controls (Ctrl). Each completed a sleep questionnaire as well as the SSC, which includes insomnia, daytime functioning, psychological, and sleep disorder subscales. Results showed that OSA patients could be grouped according to 3 insomnia patterns: no insomnia (OSA), n = 21; insomnia (OSA-I), n = 30, with a subjective complaint and disrupted sleep; and noncomplaining poor sleepers (OSA-I-NC), n = 37. Comparisons among the OSA, CBT-I, and Ctrl groups demonstrate distinct profiles on the SSC subscales, indicating its potential utility for both case identification and treatment planning. PMID:26437146

  10. Predictive factors warrant screening for obstructive sleep apnea in COPD: a Taiwan National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Liang-Wen; Hsu, Jeng-Yuan; Chang, Chee-Jen; Wang, Hao-Chien; Cheng, Shih-Lung; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Chan, Ming-Cheng; Wang, Chin-Chou; Perng, Diahn-Warng; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives COPD and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) share similar pathological processes and cardiovascular sequelae. Coexisting OSA in COPD – “overlap syndrome” – has worse prognosis than either condition alone, and appropriate treatment improves survival. Our objectives were to ascertain the frequency at which COPD coexists with the risk of OSA in Taiwan and to compare the risk factors, COPD symptoms, and life quality metrics between COPD subgroups with versus without risk of OSA. Methods We conducted a random cross-sectional national telephone survey of adults >40 years old in Taiwan. Participants fulfilling an epidemiological case definition of COPD completed a questionnaire to assess COPD symptoms and OSA risk, comorbidities, and performance of daily activities. Data from COPD cohorts with and without risk of OSA were analyzed and compared. Results Of 6,600 interviews completed, 404 subjects fit the epidemiological case definition of COPD – an overall prevalence of 6.1% in this national sample. Data on OSA risk were available for 292 of this COPD cohort, of whom 29.5% were at risk of OSA. Compared to those without risk of OSA, those with risk of OSA were significantly more likely to have hypertension or cardiovascular disease and diabetes, had significantly higher body mass index and COPD Assessment Test scores, and reported impaired work performance and leisure activities. Conclusion Among adults in Taiwan who fulfill epidemiologic criteria for COPD, 29.5% have coexisting risk of OSA. Comorbid hypertension or cardiovascular disease and diabetes are common and significantly more prevalent among the COPD population at risk of OSA than those who are not. OSA screening is warranted in patients with COPD with those risk factors that are more prevalent in COPD with risk of OSA than without, to target early interventions to reduce adverse cardiovascular sequelae from overlap syndrome. PMID:27099484

  11. Obstructive sleep apnea related to rapid-eye-movement or non-rapid-eye-movement sleep: comparison of demographic, anthropometric, and polysomnographic features

    PubMed Central

    Sunnetcioglu, Aysel; Sertogullarından, Bunyamin; Ozbay, Bulent; Gunbatar, Hulya; Ekin, Selami

    2016-01-01

    Objective : To determine whether there are significant differences between rapid-eye-movement (REM)-related obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and non-REM (NREM)-related OSA, in terms of the demographic, anthropometric, and polysomnographic characteristics of the subjects. Methods : This was a retrospective study of 110 patients (75 males) with either REM-related OSA (n = 58) or NREM-related OSA (n = 52). To define REM-related and NREM-related OSA, we used a previously established criterion, based on the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI): AHI-REM/AHI-NREM ratio > 2 and ≤ 2, respectively. Results : The mean age of the patients with REM-related OSA was 49.5 ± 11.9 years, whereas that of the patients with NREM-related OSA was 49.2 ± 12.6 years. The overall mean AHI (all sleep stages combined) was significantly higher in the NREM-related OSA group than in the REM-related OSA group (38.6 ± 28.2 vs. 14.8 ± 9.2; p < 0.05). The mean AHI in the supine position (s-AHI) was also significantly higher in the NREM-related OSA group than in the REM-related OSA group (49.0 ± 34.3 vs. 18.8 ± 14.9; p < 0.0001). In the NREM-related OSA group, the s-AHI was higher among the men. In both groups, oxygen desaturation was more severe among the women. We found that REM-related OSA was more common among the patients with mild-to-moderate OSA, whereas NREM-related OSA was more common among those with severe OSA. Conclusions : We found that the severity of NREM-related OSA was associated mainly with s-AHI. Our findings suggest that the s-AHI has a more significant effect on the severity of OSA than does the AHI-REM. When interpreting OSA severity and choosing among treatment modalities, physicians should take into consideration the sleep stage and the sleep posture. PMID:26982041

  12. Serum Vitamin D Is Significantly Inversely Associated with Disease Severity in Caucasian Adults with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kerley, Conor P.; Hutchinson, Katrina; Bolger, Kenneth; McGowan, Aisling; Faul, John; Cormican, Liam

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and possible relationships to OSAS severity, sleepiness, lung function, nocturnal heart rate (HR), and body composition. We also aimed to compare the 25(OH)D status of a subset of OSAS patients compared to controls matched for important determinants of both OSAS and vitamin D deficiency (VDD). Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at an urban, clinical sleep medicine outpatient center. We recruited newly diagnosed, Caucasian adults who had recently undergone nocturnal polysomnography. We compared body mass index (BMI), body composition (bioelectrical impedance analysis), neck circumference, sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale), lung function, and vitamin D status (serum 25-hydrpoxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) across OSAS severity categories and non-OSAS subjects. Next, using a case-control design, we compared measures of serum 25(OH)D from OSAS cases to non-OSAS controls who were matched for age, gender, skin pigmentation, sleepiness, season, and BMI. Results: 106 adults (77 male; median age = 54.5; median BMI = 34.3 kg/m2) resident in Dublin, Ireland (latitude 53°N) were recruited and categorized as non-OSAS or mild/moderate/severe OSAS. 98% of OSAS cases had insufficient 25(OH)D (< 75 nmol/L), including 72% with VDD (< 50 nmol/L). 25(OH)D levels decreased with OSAS severity (P = 0.003). 25(OH)D was inversely correlated with BMI, percent body fat, AHI, and nocturnal HR. Subsequent multivariate regression analysis revealed that 25(OH)D was independently associated with both AHI (P = 0.016) and nocturnal HR (P = 0.0419). Our separate case-control study revealed that 25(OH)D was significantly lower in OSAS cases than matched, non-OSAS subjects (P = 0.001). Conclusions: We observed widespread vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in a Caucasian, OSAS population. There were significant, independent, inverse relationships between 25(OH)D and AHI as well as

  13. Clinical Features of Obstructive Sleep Apnea That Determine Its High Prevalence in Resistant Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Min, Hyun Jin; Cho, Yang-Je; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Da Hee; Kim, Ha Yan; Choi, Ji In; Lee, Jeung-Gweon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Resistant hypertension (HTN) occurs in 15-20% of treated hypertensive patients, and 70-80% of resistant hypertensive patients have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The characteristics of resistant HTN that predispose patients to OSA have not been reported. Therefore, we aimed to determine the clinical, laboratory, and polysomnographic features of resistant HTN that are significantly associated with OSA. Materials and Methods Hypertensive patients (n=475) who underwent portable polysomnography were enrolled. The patients were categorized into controlled (n=410) and resistant HTN (n=65) groups. The risk factors for the occurrence of OSA in controlled and resistant hypertensive patients were compared, and independent risk factors that are associated with OSA were analyzed. Results Out of 475 patients, 359 (75.6%) were diagnosed with OSA. The prevalence of OSA in resistant HTN was 87.7%, which was significantly higher than that in controlled HTN (73.7%). Age, body mass index, neck circumference, waist circumference, and hip circumference were significantly higher in OSA. However, stepwise multivariate analyses revealed that resistant HTN was not an independent risk factor of OSA. Conclusion The higher prevalence and severity of OSA in resistant HTN may be due to the association of risk factors that are common to both conditions. PMID:26256968

  14. Inflammatory Markers and Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Obese Children: The NANOS Study

    PubMed Central

    Gileles-Hillel, Alex; Alonso-Álvarez, María Luz; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Peris, Eduard; Cordero-Guevara, José Aurelio; Terán-Santos, Joaquin; Martinez, Mónica Gonzalez; Jurado-Luque, María José; Corral-Peñafiel, Jaime; Duran-Cantolla, Joaquin; Gozal, David

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Obesity and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) are common coexisting conditions associated with a chronic low-grade inflammatory state underlying some of the cognitive, metabolic, and cardiovascular morbidities. Aim. To examine the levels of inflammatory markers in obese community-dwelling children with OSA, as compared to no-OSA, and their association with clinical and polysomnographic (PSG) variables. Methods. In this cross-sectional, prospective multicenter study, healthy obese Spanish children (ages 4–15 years) were randomly selected and underwent nocturnal PSG followed by a morning fasting blood draw. Plasma samples were assayed for multiple inflammatory markers. Results. 204 children were enrolled in the study; 75 had OSA, defined by an obstructive respiratory disturbance index (RDI) of 3 events/hour total sleep time (TST). BMI, gender, and age were similar in OSA and no-OSA children. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels were significantly higher in OSA children, with interleukin-6 concentrations being higher in moderate-severe OSA (i.e., AHI > 5/hrTST; P < 0.01), while MCP-1 levels were associated with more prolonged nocturnal hypercapnia (P < 0.001). Conclusion. IL-6, MCP-1, and PAI-1 are altered in the context of OSA among community-based obese children further reinforcing the proinflammatory effects of sleep disorders such as OSA. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01322763. PMID:24991089

  15. The Association Between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Depression in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Farajzadeh, Mohammad; Hosseini, Meimanat; Mohtashami, Jamileh; Chaibakhsh, Samira; Zagheri Tafreshi, Mansoureh; Ghanei Gheshlagh, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression is the most frequent psychiatric disorder among the elderly. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a chronic and prevalent disease that has an ambiguous role in triggering depression. Several researches with contradictory findings have been performed about the association between OSA and depression. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the association between OSA and depression among elderly. Patients and Methods A total of 350 home residing elderly took part in this case-control study. The participants were selected using clustering method. All cases were divided into two groups of depressed and non-depressed using the geriatric depression scale (GDS). Then they were matched in age, gender, education and body mass index (BMI). Berlin questionnaire (BQ) was used to diagnose OSA. Data analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney U test, t-test, Chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests and odds ratio. Results Totally, 60.6 % of depressed group and 18.9 % of non-depressed group were in high risk for OSA. A significant association was found between OSA and depression (P < 0.001, OR = 6.61, CI 95 % = 4.1 - 10.7). In addition, a significant association was found between gender and OSA (P = 0.008). Conclusions OSA was associated with depression among the elderly patients. Given the high prevalence of OSA in older adults, implementation of screening methods is necessary to identify people at high risk of OSA. PMID:27579333

  16. A clinical approach to obstructive sleep apnea as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Maeder, Micha T; Schoch, Otto D; Rickli, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with cardiovascular risk factors, cardiovascular diseases, and increased mortality. Epidemiological studies have established these associations, and there are now numerous experimental and clinical studies which have provided information on the possible underlying mechanisms. Mechanistic proof-of-concept studies with surrogate endpoints have been performed to demonstrate that treatment of OSA by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has the potential to reverse or at least to attenuate not only OSA but also the adverse cardiovascular effects associated with OSA. However, no randomized studies have been performed to demonstrate that treatment of OSA by CPAP improves clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular risk factors and/or established cardiovascular disease and concomitant OSA. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge on the role of OSA as a potential cardiovascular risk factor, the impact of OSA on cardiac function, the role of OSA as a modifier of the course of cardiovascular diseases such as coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, and heart failure, and the insights from studies evaluating the impact of CPAP therapy on the cardiovascular features associated with OSA. PMID:27051291

  17. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Gene Polymorphisms and Plasma Levels in Children With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Capdevila, Oscar Sans; Bhattacharjee, Rakesh; Gozal, David

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular and metabolic dysfunction in both adults and children. In adults with OSA, serum levels of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) are elevated. Therefore, we assessed plasma MIF levels and MIF allelic variant frequencies in children with and without OSA. Methods A total of 614 consecutive children ages 5–8 years were recruited. Children were divided into those with OSA and without OSA (NOSA) based on the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). In addition to lipid profile, hsCRP, and fasting insulin and glucose levels, plasma MIF levels were assayed using ELISA, and 28 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering the region were genotyped. Linkage disequilibrium and haplotype blocks were analyzed using Haploview version 4.2 software. Results Morning plasma MIF levels were increased in children with OSA. Of the 28 SNPs tested, the frequency of rs10433310 minor allele was significantly decreased in OSA. This SNP was also associated with reduced fasting insulin and hsCRP levels in OSA. The minor allele frequency of all other 27 SNPs was similar in OSA and NOSA groups. Conclusions Childhood OSA is associated with higher plasma MIF, hsCRP, and fasting insulin levels that promote cardiometabolic risk, and the MIF gene SNP rs10433310 may account for some the variance in such risk. PMID:22451332

  18. Recent advances of the impact of obstructive sleep apnea on systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Rodrigo P; Krieger, Eduardo M; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Drager, Luciano F

    2011-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common clinical condition in the general population, especially among patients with cardiovascular diseases. More than just a local phenomenon of upper respiratory tract obstruction, OSA leads to systemic consequences that may include intermittent hypoxia, sudden reduction of the intrathoracic pressure, and the occurrence of micro-awakenings with sleep fragmentation. In the past decades, innumerous evidences have consistently pointed to OSA as an important factor related to the presence of cardiovascular diseases. In particular, the relationship between OSA and systemic hypertension (SH) is the one supported by the largest body of evidence. Currently, there are data suggesting that OSA is an important secondary cause of SH. More importantly, OSA is independently associated with poorer blood pressure control, changes in sleep dip, and presence of target-organ damage such as left ventricular hypertrophy and microalbuminuria. Randomized studies suggest that the management of OSA, especially with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) - which is considered the standard treatment for OSA - promotes a significant 24-hour blood pressure reduction, and this effect is more significant in the subgroup of patients with uncontrolled SH and drug-resistant SH. Despite all those evidences, OSA has still been underdiagnosed. The objective of this review is to discuss the recent advances in the pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical presentation, and treatment of OSA, as well as the benefits this treatment can bring on blood pressure. PMID:21359488

  19. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Hypertension in Adolescents: Effect on Neurobehavioral and Cognitive Functioning.

    PubMed

    Madaeva, Irina; Berdina, Olga; Polyakov, Vladimir; Kolesnikov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Background. There are limited published data in regard to the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and hypertension and neurobehavioral and mental status in adolescence. The aim of our study was to evaluate neurobehavioral patterns and cognitive functions in adolescents with hypertension according to absence or presence of OSA. Methods. This was a retrospective cohort study completed at the Scientific Center for Family Health and Human Reproduction Problems. Participants included adolescents aged 14-17 years and referred for 24-hour ambulance blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and polysomnographic (PSG) studies between 2007 and 2009, inclusive. Results. 18 hypertensive OSA (the 1st group) and 20 hypertensive non-OSA adolescents (the 2nd group) were included in the study. Significant changes of neurobehavioral functioning in OSA patients were shown. Cognitive abilities also were impaired. Verbal and visual memory indexes and attention index were 2.1 and 2.2 times lower, accordingly, in the 1st group than in the 2nd group (P < 0.05). Speech index was significantly 2.8 times lower in OSA patients than in non-OSA patients (P < 0.05). In hypertensive OSA adolescents more significant Spearman correlations between classic sleep parameters and cognitive measures were found compared to patients without OSA. Conclusions. These results suggest that OSA is closely associated with neurobehavioral and cognitive functioning in hypertensive adolescents. PMID:27445534

  20. Systolic pressure response to voluntary apnea predicts sympathetic tone in obstructive sleep apnea as a clinically useful index.

    PubMed

    Jouett, Noah P; Hardisty, Janelle M; Mason, J Ryan; Niv, Dorene; Romano, James J; Watenpaugh, Donald E; Burk, John R; Smith, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation tested the hypotheses that systolic arterial pressure (SAP) responses to voluntary apnea (a) serve as a surrogate of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), (b) can distinguish Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) patients from control subjects and (c) can document autonomic effects of treatment. 9 OSA and 10 control subjects were recruited in a laboratory study; 44 OSA subjects and 78 control subjects were recruited in a clinical study; and 21 untreated OSA subjects and 14 well-treated OSA subjects were recruited into a treatment study. Each subject performed hypoxic and room air voluntary apneas in triplicate. Muscle SNA (MSNA) and continuous AP were measured during each apnea in the laboratory study, while systolic arterial pressure (SAP) responses were measured continuously and by standard auscultation in the clinical and treatment studies. OSA subjects exhibited increased mean arterial pressure (MAP), SAP and MSNA responses to hypoxic apnea (all P<0.01) and the SAP response highly correlated with the MSNA response (R(2)=0.72, P<0.001). Clinical assessment confirmed that OSA subjects exhibited markedly elevated SAP responses (P<0.01), while treated OSA subjects had a decreased SAP response to apnea (P<0.04) compared to poorly treated subjects. These data indicate that (a) OSA subjects exhibit increased pressor and MSNA responses to apnea, and that (b) voluntary apnea may be a clinically useful assessment tool of autonomic dysregulation and treatment efficacy in OSA. PMID:26774324

  1. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Hypertension in Adolescents: Effect on Neurobehavioral and Cognitive Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Madaeva, Irina; Polyakov, Vladimir; Kolesnikov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Background. There are limited published data in regard to the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and hypertension and neurobehavioral and mental status in adolescence. The aim of our study was to evaluate neurobehavioral patterns and cognitive functions in adolescents with hypertension according to absence or presence of OSA. Methods. This was a retrospective cohort study completed at the Scientific Center for Family Health and Human Reproduction Problems. Participants included adolescents aged 14–17 years and referred for 24-hour ambulance blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and polysomnographic (PSG) studies between 2007 and 2009, inclusive. Results. 18 hypertensive OSA (the 1st group) and 20 hypertensive non-OSA adolescents (the 2nd group) were included in the study. Significant changes of neurobehavioral functioning in OSA patients were shown. Cognitive abilities also were impaired. Verbal and visual memory indexes and attention index were 2.1 and 2.2 times lower, accordingly, in the 1st group than in the 2nd group (P < 0.05). Speech index was significantly 2.8 times lower in OSA patients than in non-OSA patients (P < 0.05). In hypertensive OSA adolescents more significant Spearman correlations between classic sleep parameters and cognitive measures were found compared to patients without OSA. Conclusions. These results suggest that OSA is closely associated with neurobehavioral and cognitive functioning in hypertensive adolescents. PMID:27445534

  2. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Patients with Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hee Jung; Kang, Eui Chun; Lee, Junwon; Han, Jinu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Our study aimed to determine whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common among branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) patients without systemic risk factors using a Watch PAT-100 portable monitoring device. Methods The study participants included consecutive patients with BRVO of less than 3 months duration without any risk factors known to be associated with OSA (diabetes, coronary artery disease, stroke, hematologic diseases, autoimmune disease, etc.) except for hypertension. All patients underwent full-night unattended polysomnography by means of a portable monitor Watch PAT-100 device. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was calculated as the average number of apnea and hypopnea events per hour of sleep, and an AHI score of five or more events was diagnosed as OSA. Results Among 19 patients (6 males and 13 females), 42.1% (8 of 19) had an AHI reflective of OSA. In the 13 patients who had no concurrent illness, including hypertension, 30.8% (4 of 13) had positive test results for OSA; three of these patients were ranked as mild OSA, while one had moderate OSA. The OSA group had an average AHI of 12.3 ± 7.8, and the average AHI was 2.0 ± 0.9 in the non-OSA group. Although it was not statistically proven, we found that OSA patients experienced a more severe form of BRVO. Conclusions We found a higher than expected rate of OSA in BRVO patients lacking concomitant diseases typically associated with OSA. Our findings suggest that OSA could be an additional risk factor in the pathogenesis of BRVO or at least a frequently associated condition that could function as a triggering factor. PMID:27051260

  3. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Metabolic Syndrome in Spanish Population

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Bienvenido; Garcia, Luis; Lozano, Lourdes; Almagro, Pere; Quintana, Salvador; Alsina, Monserrat; Heredia, Jose Luis

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a clinical picture characterized by repeated episodes of obstruction of the upper airway. OSA is associated with cardiovascular risk factors, some of which are components of metabolic syndrome (MS). Objectives: First, determine the prevalence of MS in patients with OSA visited in sleep clinic. Second, evaluate whether there is an independent association between MS components and the severity of OSA. Methods: Patients with clinical suspicion of OSA were evaluated by polysomnography. Three groups were defined according to apnea hypoapnea index (AHI): no OSA (AHI <5), mild-moderate (AHI≥ 5 ≤30), and severe (AHI> 30). All patients were determined in fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides and insulin. MS was defined according to criteria of National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP). Results: A total of 141 patients (mean age 54 ± 11 years) were evaluated. According to AIH, 25 subjects had no OSA and 116 had OSA (41mild-moderate and 75 severe). MS prevalence ranged from 43-81% in OSA group. Also, a significant increase in waist circumference, triglycerides, glucose, blood pressure levels, and a decrease in HDL cholesterol levels was observed in more severe OSA patients. All polysomnographic parameters correlated significantly with metabolic abnormalities. After a multiple regression analysis, abdominal obesity (p <0.02), glucose (p <0.01) and HDL cholesterol (p <0.001) were independently associated with OSA. Conclusions: Our findings show high prevalence of MS in OSA, especially in severe group. A significant association between OSA and some of the components of MS was found in Spanish population. PMID:24222804

  4. Obstructive sleep apnea affects the clinical outcomes of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun-jie; Gao, Xiao-fei; Ge, Zhen; Jiang, Xiao-Min; Xiao, Ping-xi; Tian, Nai-liang; Kan, Jing; Lee, Chi-Hang; Chen, Shao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of evidence regarding the association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for coronary artery disease. We sought to investigate whether OSA affects the clinical outcomes of patients undergoing PCI. Patients and methods All enrolled individuals treated with PCI were evaluated for OSA by polysomnography. The primary end point was defined as major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) at 2 years, including cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), and/or target vessel revascularization. Results A total of 340 consecutive patients undergoing PCI were assigned to the OSA (n=152, apnea–hypopnea index ≥15) and non-OSA (n=188, apnea–hypopnea index <15) groups. The incidence of OSA in patients with coronary artery disease undergoing PCI was 44.7%. Patients in the OSA group had more three-vessel disease (34.9%), increased number of total implanted stents (3.3±2.0), and longer total stent length (83.8±53.1 mm) when compared to the non-OSA group (23.4%, P=0.020; 2.8±1.9, P=0.007; 68.7±48.4, P=0.010). After a median follow-up of 2 years, the incidence of MACEs was significantly higher in patients with OSA (25.0% vs 16.0%, P=0.038), mainly driven by the increased periprocedural MI (19.2% vs 11.2%, P=0.038) in the OSA group. By Cox regression multivariable analysis, the independent predictor of MACEs was OSA (hazard ratio: 1.962, 95% confidence interval: 1.036–3.717, P=0.039). Conclusion There was a high prevalence of moderate-to-severe OSA in patients undergoing PCI, and OSA was associated with significantly increased MACE rate, mainly due to the increase in periprocedural MI rate. PMID:27284240

  5. Association between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chiner, Eusebi; Llombart, Mónica; Valls, Joan; Pastor, Esther; Sancho-Chust, José N.; Andreu, Ada Luz; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel; Barbé, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can predispose individuals to lower airway infections and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) due to upper airway microaspiration. This study evaluated the association between OSA and CAP. Methods We performed a case-control study that included 82 patients with CAP and 41 patients with other infections (control group). The controls were matched according to age, sex and body mass index (BMI). A respiratory polygraph (RP) was performed upon admission for patients in both groups. The severity of pneumonia was assessed according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). The associations between CAP and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), OSA, OSA severity and other sleep-related variables were evaluated using logistic regression models. The associations between OSA, OSA severity with CAP severity were evaluated with linear regression models and non-parametric tests. Findings No significant differences were found between CAP and control patients regarding anthropometric variables, toxic habits and risk factors for CAP. Patients with OSA, defined as individuals with an Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI) ≥10, showed an increased risk of CAP (OR = 2·86, 95%CI 1·29–6·44, p = 0·01). Patients with severe OSA (AHI≥30) also had a higher risk of CAP (OR = 3·18, 95%CI 1·11–11·56, p = 0·047). In addition, OSA severity, defined according to the AHI quartile, was also significantly associated with CAP (p = 0·007). Furthermore, OSA was significantly associated with CAP severity (p = 0·0002), and OSA severity was also associated with CAP severity (p = 0·0006). Conclusions OSA and OSA severity are associated with CAP when compared to patients admitted to the hospital for non-respiratory infections. In addition, OSA and OSA severity are associated with CAP severity. These results support the potential role of OSA in the pathogenesis of CAP and could have clinical implications. This link between OSA and infection risk

  6. Potential therapeutic targets in obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Saboisky, Julian P; Chamberlin, Nancy L; Malhotra, Atul

    2009-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a disease of ever-increasing importance due to its association with multiple impairments and rising prevalence in an increasingly susceptible demographic. The syndrome is linked with loud snoring, disrupted sleep and observed apnoeas. Serious co-morbidities associated with OSA appear to be reversed by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment; however, CPAP is variably tolerated leaving many patients untreated and emphasising the need for alternative treatments. Virtually all OSA patients have airways that are anatomically vulnerable to collapse, but numerous pathophysiological factors underlie when and how OSA is manifested. This review describes how the complexity of OSA requires multiple treatment approaches that are individually targeted. This approach may take the form of more specific diagnoses in terms of the mechanisms underlying OSA as well as rational pharmacological treatment directed toward such disparate ends as arousal threshold and ventilatory control/chemosensitivity, and mechanical treatment in the form of surgery and augmentation of lung volumes. PMID:19530985

  7. Consequences of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome on left ventricular geometry and diastolic function.

    PubMed

    Bodez, Diane; Damy, Thibaud; Soulat-Dufour, Laurie; Meuleman, Catherine; Cohen, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a frequent sleep disorder that is known to be an independent risk factor for arterial hypertension (AHT). Potential confounding factors associated with both OSAS and AHT, such as age, diabetes mellitus and obesity, have been explored extensively, and are considered as independent but additive factors. However, these factors are also contributors to left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (LVH) and LV diastolic dysfunction, both of which are important causes of cardiovascular morbidity, and have been reported to be associated with OSAS for decades. In this review, we present an overview of how OSAS may promote changes in LV geometry and diastolic dysfunction through its best-known cardiovascular complication, arterial hypertension. We also summarize the epidemiological links between OSAS and LVH, outline diastolic dysfunction in OSAS patients, and try to highlight the mechanisms responsible, focusing on the effect of confounding factors. PMID:27344377

  8. Obstructive sleep apnea and cancer: effects of intermittent hypoxia?

    PubMed

    Kukwa, Wojciech; Migacz, Ewa; Druc, Karolina; Grzesiuk, Elzbieta; Czarnecka, Anna M

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder characterized by pauses in regular breathing. Apneic episodes lead to recurrent hypoxemia-reoxygenation cycles with concomitant cellular intermittent hypoxia. Studies suggest that intermittent hypoxia in OSA may influence tumorigenesis. This review presents recent articles on the potential role of OSA in cancer development. Relevant research has focused on: molecular pathways mediating the influence of intermittent hypoxia on tumor physiology, animal and epidemiological human studies linking OSA and cancer. Current data relating OSA to risk of neoplastic disease remain scarce, but recent studies reveal the potential for a strong relation. More work is, therefore, needed on the impact of OSA on many cancer-related aspects. Results may offer enlightenment for improved cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26562000

  9. A modified oxic-settling-anaerobic activated sludge process using gravity thickening for excess sludge reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Li, Shi-Yu; Jiang, Feng; Wu, Ke; Liu, Guang-Li; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-09-01

    Oxic-settling-anaerobic process (OSA) was known as a cost-effective way to reduce the excess sludge production with simple upgrade of conventional activated sludge process (CAS). A low oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level was the key factor to sludge decay and lysis in the sludge holding tank of the OSA process. However, the ORP control with nitrogen purge or chemical dosing in the OSA process would induce extra expense and complicate the operation. Hence, in this study, a sludge holding tank using gravity thickening was applied to OSA process to reduce the excess sludge production without any ORP control. Results showed that the modified OSA process not only reduced the excess sludge production effectively but also improved the sludge settleability without affected the treatment capacity. The reduction of the excess sludge production in the modified OSA process resulted from interactions among lots of factors. The key element of the process was the gravity thickening sludge holding tank.

  10. Functional Role of Neural Injury in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Saboisky, Julian P.; Butler, Jane E.; Gandevia, Simon C.; Eckert, Danny J.

    2012-01-01

    The causes of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are multifactorial. Neural injury affecting the upper airway muscles due to repetitive exposure to intermittent hypoxia and/or mechanical strain resulting from snoring and recurrent upper airway closure have been proposed to contribute to OSA disease progression. Multiple studies have demonstrated altered sensory and motor function in patients with OSA using a variety of neurophysiological and histological approaches. However, the extent to which the alterations contribute to impairments in upper airway muscle function, and thus OSA disease progression, remains uncertain. This brief review, primarily focused on data in humans, summarizes: (1) the evidence for upper airway sensorimotor injury in OSA and (2) current understanding of how these changes affect upper airway function and their potential to change OSA progression. Some unresolved questions including possible treatment targets are noted. PMID:22715333

  11. Whole blood hypoxia-related gene expression reveals novel pathways to obstructive sleep apnea in humans.

    PubMed

    Perry, Juliana C; Guindalini, Camila; Bittencourt, Lia; Garbuio, Silverio; Mazzotti, Diego R; Tufik, Sergio

    2013-12-01

    In this study, our goal was to identify the key genes that are associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Thirty-five volunteers underwent full in-lab polysomnography and, according to the sleep apnea hypopnea index (AHI), were classified into control, mild-to-moderate OSA and severe OSA groups. Severe OSA patients were assigned to participate in a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) protocol for 6 months. Blood was collected and the expression of 84 genes analyzed using the RT(2) Profiler™ PCR array. Mild-to-moderate OSA patients demonstrated down-regulation of 2 genes associated with induction of apoptosis, while a total of 13 genes were identified in severe OSA patients. After controlling for body mass index, PRPF40A and PLOD3 gene expressions were strongly and independently associated with AHI scores. This research protocol highlights a number of molecular targets that might help the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:23994550

  12. Cardiovascular consequences of obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Kuniyoshi, Fatima H Sert; Pusalavidyasagar, Snigdha; Singh, Prachi; Somers, Virend K

    2010-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a form of sleep disordered breathing with a high prevalence rate and is often underdiagnosed. OSA is associated with hypertension, coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, heart failure, and arrhythmias. The presence of OSA may be a strong predictor of fatal cardiovascular events in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Increased sympathetic drive, activation of metabolic and inflammatory markers, and impaired vascular function are some of the proposed mechanisms that could explain the association between OSA and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding these mechanisms is important for identifying treatment strategies. The presence of OSA should be considered in clinical practice, especially in patients with CVD. Randomized intervention studies are needed to establish whether early identification and treatment of OSA patients reduces cardiovascular morbidity. PMID:20308745

  13. A modified oxic-settling-anaerobic activated sludge process using gravity thickening for excess sludge reduction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Li, Shi-Yu; Jiang, Feng; Wu, Ke; Liu, Guang-Li; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Oxic-settling-anaerobic process (OSA) was known as a cost-effective way to reduce the excess sludge production with simple upgrade of conventional activated sludge process (CAS). A low oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level was the key factor to sludge decay and lysis in the sludge holding tank of the OSA process. However, the ORP control with nitrogen purge or chemical dosing in the OSA process would induce extra expense and complicate the operation. Hence, in this study, a sludge holding tank using gravity thickening was applied to OSA process to reduce the excess sludge production without any ORP control. Results showed that the modified OSA process not only reduced the excess sludge production effectively but also improved the sludge settleability without affected the treatment capacity. The reduction of the excess sludge production in the modified OSA process resulted from interactions among lots of factors. The key element of the process was the gravity thickening sludge holding tank. PMID:26350761

  14. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, endothelial dysfunction and coronary atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Dursunoğlu, Neşe; Dursunoğlu, Dursun

    2005-01-01

    In obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), repetitive episodes of apnea cause increased sympathetic nerve activity, increased surges in arterial blood pressure, swings in intrathoracic pressure, oxidative stres, hypoxia and hypercapnia. The association of OSAS with some diseases, having endothelial dysfunction in their physiopathology, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, coronary artery diseases, stroke and heart failure is common. Increased sympathetic nerve activity and also endothelial dysfunction which are the results of hypoxia, have important roles in vascular complications of OSAS. When compared with healthy population, an important endothelial dysfunction in OSAS patients and relationship between OSAS severity and endothelial dysfunction have been shown. In this review, the relationship between OSAS and endothelial dysfunction was overviewed. PMID:16258893

  15. [Variable magnetic field of 8 Hz corrects the opioid system activity in mollusks behind the ferromagnetic screening].

    PubMed

    Temur'iants, N A; Kostiuk, A S

    2014-01-01

    The three phases of mollusk nociception alteration as a result of extended ferromagnetic screening combined with exposure to a variable magnetic field of 8 Hz correlated with phase changes in the opioid system activity (OSA) deduced from the naloxone action on the thermal avoidance response. On phase I, OSA inactivation was inhibited and, consequently, hyperalgesia progression was expedited. On phase II, OSA rose so that naloxone annulled completely the antinociceptive effect produced by the ferromagnetic screening. On phase III, OSA declined progressively, as naloxone merely reduced the antinociceptive effect because of apparently, growing OSA tolerance to the ferromagnetic screening. Phase I was absent when mollusks were exposed to the ferromagnetic screening and variable magnetic field; however, OSA changes on phases II and III were present. It was concluded that the variable magnetic field of 8 Hz can be used for correcting changes in the opioid system activity in mollusks behind the ferromagnetic screening. PMID:25163338

  16. Consensus & evidence-based INOSA Guidelines 2014 (first edition).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Surendra K; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan; Mohan, Alladi; Kadhiravan, T; Elavarasi, A; Ragesh, R; Nischal, Neeraj; Sethi, Prayas; Behera, D; Bhatia, Manvir; Ghoshal, A G; Gothi, Dipti; Joshi, Jyotsna; Kanwar, M S; Kharbanda, O P; Kumar, Suresh; Mohapatra, P R; Mallick, B N; Mehta, Ravindra; Prasad, Rajendra; Sharma, S C; Sikka, Kapil; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Shukla, Garima; Suri, J C; Vengamma, B; Grover, Ashoo; Vijayan, V K; Ramakrishnan, N; Gupta, Rasik; Indian Initiative on Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Guidelines Working Group

    2014-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) are subsets of sleep-disordered breathing. Awareness about OSA and its consequences amongst the general public as well as the majority of primary care physcians across India is poor. This necessiated the development of the INdian initiative on Obstructive sleep apnoea (INOSA) guidelines under the auspices of Department of Health Research, Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Government of India. OSA is the occurrence of an average five or more episodes of obstructive respiratory events per hour of sleep with either sleep related symptoms or co-morbidities or ≥ 15 such episodes without any sleep related symptoms or co-morbidities. OSAS is defined as OSA associated with daytime symptoms, most often excessive sleepiness. Patients undergoing routine health check-up with snoring, daytime sleepiness, obesity, hypertension, motor vehicular accidents and high risk cases should undergo a comprehensive sleep evaluation. Medical examiners evaluating drivers, air pilots, railway drivers and heavy machinery workers should be educated about OSA and should comprehensively evaluate applicants for OSA. Those suspected to have OSA on comprehensive sleep evaluation should be referred for a sleep study. Supervised overnight polysomnography (PSG) is the "gold standard" for evaluation of OSA. Positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is the mainstay of treatment of OSA. Oral appliances are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer oral appliances to PAP, or who do not respond to PAP or who fail treatment attempts with PAP or behavioural measures. Surgical treatment is recommended in patients who have failed or are intolerant to PAP therapy. PMID:25366217

  17. Consensus and evidence-based Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea guidelines 2014 (first edition).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Surendra K; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan; Mohan, Alladi; Kadhiravan, T; Elavarasi, A; Ragesh, R; Nischal, Neeraj; Sethi, Prayas; Behera, D; Bhatia, Manvir; Ghoshal, A G; Gothi, Dipti; Joshi, Jyotsna; Kanwar, M S; Kharbanda, O P; Kumar, Suresh; Mohapatra, P R; Mallick, B N; Mehta, Ravindra; Prasad, Rajendra; Sharma, S C; Sikka, Kapil; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Shukla, Garima; Suri, J C; Vengamma, B; Grover, Ashoo; Vijayan, V K; Ramakrishnan, N; Gupta, Rasik

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are subsets of sleep-disordered breathing. Awareness about OSA and its consequences among the general public as well as the majority of primary care physicians across India is poor. This necessitated the development of the Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea (INOSA) guidelines under the auspices of Department of Health Research, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. OSA is the occurrence of an average five or more episodes of obstructive respiratory events per hour of sleep with either sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities or ≥15 such episodes without any sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities. OSAS is defined as OSA associated with daytime symptoms, most often excessive sleepiness. Patients undergoing routine health check-up with snoring, daytime sleepiness, obesity, hypertension, motor vehicular accidents, and high-risk cases should undergo a comprehensive sleep evaluation. Medical examiners evaluating drivers, air pilots, railway drivers, and heavy machinery workers should be educated about OSA and should comprehensively evaluate applicants for OSA. Those suspected to have OSA on comprehensive sleep evaluation should be referred for a sleep study. Supervised overnight polysomnography is the "gold standard" for evaluation of OSA. Positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is the mainstay of treatment of OSA. Oral appliances (OA) are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer OA to PAP, or who do not respond to PAP or who fail treatment attempts with PAP or behavioral measures. Surgical treatment is recommended in patients who have failed or are intolerant to PAP therapy. PMID:26180408

  18. Consensus & Evidence-based INOSA Guidelines 2014 (First edition)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Surendra K.; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan; Mohan, Alladi; Kadhiravan, T.; Elavarasi, A.; Ragesh, R.; Nischal, Neeraj; Sethi, Prayas; Behera, D.; Bhatia, Manvir; Ghoshal, A.G.; Gothi, Dipti; Joshi, Jyotsna; Kanwar, M.S.; Kharbanda, O.P.; Kumar, Suresh; Mohapatra, P.R.; Mallick, B.N.; Mehta, Ravindra; Prasad, Rajendra; Sharma, S.C.; Sikka, Kapil; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Shukla, Garima; Suri, J.C.; Vengamma, B.; Grover, Ashoo; Vijayan, V.K.; Ramakrishnan, N.; Gupta, Rasik

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) are subsets of sleep-disordered breathing. Awareness about OSA and its consequences amongst the general public as well as the majority of primary care physcians across India is poor. This necessiated the development of the INdian initiative on Obstructive sleep apnoea (INOSA) guidelines under the auspices of Department of Health Research, Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Government of India. OSA is the occurrence of an average five or more episodes of obstructive respiratory events per hour of sleep with either sleep related symptoms or co-morbidities or ≥ 15 such episodes without any sleep related symptoms or co-morbidities. OSAS is defined as OSA associated with daytime symptoms, most often excessive sleepiness. Patients undergoing routine health check-up with snoring, daytime sleepiness, obesity, hypertension, motor vehicular accidents and high risk cases should undergo a comprehensive sleep evaluation. Medical examiners evaluating drivers, air pilots, railway drivers and heavy machinery workers should be educated about OSA and should comprehensively evaluate applicants for OSA. Those suspected to have OSA on comprehensive sleep evaluation should be referred for a sleep study. Supervised overnight polysomnography (PSG) is the “gold standard” for evaluation of OSA. Positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is the mainstay of treatment of OSA. Oral appliances are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer oral appliances to PAP, or who do not respond to PAP or who fail treatment attempts with PAP or behavioural measures. Surgical treatment is recommended in patients who have failed or are intolerant to PAP therapy. PMID:25366217

  19. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Modulates Airway Inflammation and Remodelling in Severe Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Taillé, Camille; Rouvel-Tallec, Anny; Stoica, Maria; Danel, Claire; Dehoux, Monique; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Pretolani, Marina; Aubier, Michel; d’Ortho, Marie-Pia

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is frequently observed in severe asthma but the causal link between the 2 diseases remains hypothetical. The role of OSA-related systemic and airway neutrophilic inflammation in asthma bronchial inflammation or remodelling has been rarely investigated. The aim of this study was to compare hallmarks of inflammation in induced sputum and features of airway remodelling in bronchial biopsies from adult patients with severe asthma with and without OSA. Materials and Methods An overnight polygraphy was performed in 55 patients referred for difficult-to-treat asthma, who complained of nocturnal respiratory symptoms, poor sleep quality or fatigue. We compared sputum analysis, reticular basement membrane (RBM) thickness, smooth muscle area, vascular density and inflammatory cell infiltration in bronchial biopsies. Results In total, 27/55 patients (49%) had OSA diagnosed by overnight polygraphy. Despite a moderate increase in apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI; 14.2±1.6 event/h [5–35]), the proportion of sputum neutrophils was higher and that of macrophages lower in OSA than non-OSA patients, with higher levels of interleukin 8 and matrix metalloproteinase 9. The RBM was significantly thinner in OSA than non-OSA patients (5.8±0.4 vs. 7.8±0.4 μm, p<0.05). RBM thickness and OSA severity assessed by the AHI were negatively correlated (rho = -0.65, p<0.05). OSA and non-OSA patients did not differ in age, sex, BMI, lung function, asthma control findings or treatment. Conclusion Mild OSA in patients with severe asthma is associated with increased proportion of neutrophils in sputum and changes in airway remodelling. PMID:26934051

  20. Lack of Impact of Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Sleepiness, Mood and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Stuart F.; Budhiraja, Rohit; Batool-Anwar, Salma; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Eichling, Phillip; Patel, Sanjay; Shen, Wei; Walsh, James K.; Kushida, Clete A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with sleepiness, depression and reduced quality of life. However, it is unclear whether mild OSA has these negative impacts. Using data from the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES), this study determined whether participants with mild OSA had greater sleepiness, more depressive symptoms and poorer quality of life in comparison to those without OSA. Methods 239 individuals evaluated for participation in APPLES with a baseline apnea hypopnea index (AHI) < 15 /hour were assigned to 1 of 2 groups: No OSA (N=40, AHI < 5 /hour) or Mild OSA (N=199, 5 to <15 /hour) based on their screening polysomnogram. Scores on their Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS), Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D), Profile of Mood States (POMS) and Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index (SAQLI) were compared between groups. Results There were no significant differences between the No OSA and Mild OSA groups on any of the 5 measures: ESS (No OSA, 9.8 ± 3.5 vs Mild OSA, 10.6 ± 4.3, p=0.26), SSS,(2.8 ± 0.9 vs. 2.9 ± 1.0, p=0.52), HAM-D (4.6 ± 3.0 vs. 4.9 ± 4.7, p=0.27), POMS (33.5 ± 22.3 vs. 28.7 ± 22.0, p=0.70), SAQLI (4.5 ± 0.8 vs. 4.7 ± 0.7, p=0.39). Conclusion Individuals with mild OSA in this cohort do not have worse sleepiness, mood or quality of life in comparison to those without OSA. PMID:25232509

  1. Consensus & Evidence-based INOSA Guidelines 2014 (First edition).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Surendra K; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan; Mohan, Alladi; Kadhiravan, T; Elavarasi, A; Ragesh, R; Nischal, Neeraj; Sethi, Prayas; Behera, D; Bhatia, Manvir; Ghoshal, A G; Gothi, Dipti; Joshi, Jyotsna; Kanwar, M S; Kharbanda, O P; Kumar, Suresh; Mohapatra, P R; Mallick, B N; Mehta, Ravindra; Prasad, Rajendra; Sharma, S C; Sikka, Kapil; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Shukla, Garima; Suri, J C; Vengamma, B; Grover, Ashoo; Vijayan, V K; Ramakrishnan, N; Gupta, Rasik

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) are subsets of sleep-disordered breathing. Awareness about OSA and its consequences amongst the general public as well as the majority of primary care physcians across India is poor. This necessiated the development of the INdian initiative on Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (INOSA) guidelines under the auspices of Department of Health Research, Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Government of India. OSA is the occurrence of an average five or more episodes of obstructive respiratory events per hour of sleep with either sleep related symptoms or comorbidities or ≥ 15 such episodes without any sleep related symptoms or comorbidities. OSAS is defined as OSA associated with daytime symptoms, most often excessive sleepiness. Patients undergoing routine health check-up with snoring, daytime sleepiness, obesity, hypertension, motor vehicular accidents and high risk cases should undergo a comprehensive sleep evaluation. Medical examiners evaluating drivers, air pilots, railway drivers and heavy machinery workers should be educated about OSA and should comprehensively evaluate applicants for OSA. Those suspected to have OSA on comprehensive sleep evaluation should be referred for a sleep study. Supervised overnight polysomnography (PSG) is the "gold standard" for evaluation of OSA. Positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is the mainstay of treatment of OSA. Oral appliances are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer oral appliances to PAP, or who do not respond to PAP or who fail treatment attempts with PAP or behavioural measures. Surgical treatment is recommended in patients who have failed or are intolerant to PAP therapy. PMID:26410986

  2. Sleep · 8: Paediatric obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, G; Brouillette, R

    2005-01-01

    In the past 25 years there has been increasing recognition of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) as a common condition of childhood. Morbidity includes impairment of growth, cardiovascular complications, learning impairment, and behavioural problems. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition in children differs in many respects from that in adults. We review here the key features of paediatric OSA, highlighting differences from adult OSA, and suggest future directions for research. PMID:15923253

  3. Anthropometric and craniofacial sexual dimorphism in obstructive sleep apnea patients: is there male-female phenotypical convergence?

    PubMed

    Perri, Rita A; Kairaitis, Kristina; Wheatley, John R; Amis, Terence C

    2015-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is more common in men than women. Body size is greater in males (sexual dimorphism), but large body habitus is associated with OSA for both genders. We speculated that male-female phenotypical convergence (reduced sexual dimorphism via identical phenotype acquisition) occurs with OSA and tested hypotheses: (1) phenotypical features pathogenic for OSA differ between OSA and healthy subjects irrespective of gender; and (2) such characteristics exhibit phenotypical convergence. Utilizing an existing database, we calculated male-female (group average) ratios for eight anthropometric and 33 surface cephalometric variables from 104 Caucasian OSA patients [72 males; apnea-hypopnea index (events h(-1) ): males: 42.3 ± 24.7 versus females: 42.6 ± 26.1 (P > 0.9)] and 85 Caucasian, healthy, non-OSA, community volunteers (36 males). Log-transformed data were analysed using a general linear model with post-hoc unpaired t-tests and significance at P < 0.0012 (Bonferroni multiple-comparison correction). OSA patients were older (56.9 ± 14.4 versus 38.0 ± 13.8 years), but there were no within-group gender-based age differences. All anthropometric variables (except height), plus cranial base width, mandibular breadth and retromandibular width diagonal were larger in gender-matched OSA versus healthy comparisons; thus satisfying hypothesis (1). Male-female ratios were mostly >1.0 across groups, but with no significant group × gender interactions no variable satisfied hypothesis (2). Thus, in this exploratory study, OSA patients had gender-common phenotypical differences to healthy subjects, but sexual dimorphism was preserved. Lack of complete phenotypical convergence may indicate gender-based critical phenotype-level attainment for OSA and/or gender-based OSA prevalence arises from factors other than those in this study. PMID:25113616

  4. A longitudinal study of CPAP therapy for patients with chronic cough and obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic cough patients are rendered therapies for gastro-esophageal reflux (GERD), upper airway cough syndrome (UACS) and cough-variant asthma (CVA) with varying benefit. Idiopathic or unexplained cough has emerged as an important clinical entity in both primary care and subspecialty clinics. Recent evidence points to a link between chronic cough and untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods A prospective observational study was done to evaluate the effect of OSA therapy in patients with chronic cough. Patients enrolled into the study underwent questionnaires to evaluate for GERD, UACS and CVA along with screening questionnaires for OSA and daytime sleepiness. The Leicester cough questionnaire (LCQ) was done at baseline and during serial visits to evaluate cough intensity and was used as the primary outcome measure of the effect of CPAP therapy on chronic cough. Results Out of 37 patients enrolled into the study, only 28 patients had follow up LCQ scores available and therefore underwent analysis. 22/28 patients were suspected to have OSA based on abnormal STOP-BANG screening questionnaire scores and overnight oximetry abnormalities. Of these 19/28 patients had overnight attended polysomnography with definitive diagnosis of OSA yielding a 68% prevalence of OSA in our chronic cough population. Chronic cough patients treated for OSA tended to be older with a significantly higher BMI than chronic cough patients without OSA. Significant improvement of LCQ scores occurred with CPAP therapy for OSA in chronic cough patients. Conclusion OSA is significantly prevalent in chronic cough patients. Subjects with chronic cough and OSA tend to be older and obese. Treatment of OSA in chronic cough patients yields significant improvement in their health status. PMID:23845135

  5. Associations between Cardioembolic Stroke and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Lipford, Melissa C.; Flemming, Kelly D.; Calvin, Andrew D.; Mandrekar, Jay; Brown, Robert D.; Somers, Virend K.; Caples, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess etiology of ischemic stroke in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) compared with controls. This information may aid in determining how OSA increases stroke risk and facilitate recurrent stroke prevention in patients with OSA. Design: Retrospective, case-control study. Setting: Academic tertiary referral center. Patients: Consecutive patients who underwent polysomnography and had an ischemic stroke within 1 year were identified. Stroke subtype was determined using two validated algorithms. Polysomnographic results were used to separate patients into OSA cases and controls. Information regarding cardiovascular risks, neuroimaging, and echocardiographic data were collected. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: In 53 subjects, cardioembolic (CE) strokes were more common among OSA cases than controls (72% versus 33%, P = 0.01). The majority of CE strokes occurred in those with moderate to severe OSA. Atrial fibrillation (AF) was more frequent in OSA cases (59% versus 24%, P = 0.01). The association between OSA and CE stroke remained significant after controlling for AF (P = 0.03, odds ratio 4.5). Conclusions: There appears to be a strong association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and cardioembolic (CE) stroke. In patients with OSA presenting with cryptogenic stroke, high clinical suspicion for CE is warranted. This may lead to consideration of diagnostic studies to identify CE risk factors such as paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). CE strokes are more common in patients with OSA even after adjusting for AF. This finding may reflect a high rate of occult paroxysmal AF in this population; alternatively, OSA may lead to CE strokes through mechanisms independent of AF. Citation: Lipford MC, Flemming KD, Calvin AD, Mandrekar J, Brown RD, Somers VK, Caples SM. Associations between cardioembolic stroke and obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2015;38(11):1699–1705. PMID:26237769

  6. Effects of obstructive sleep apnoea risk on postoperative respiratory complications: protocol for a hospital-based registry study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Christina H; Zaremba, Sebastian; Devine, Scott; Nikolov, Milcho; Kurth, Tobias; Eikermann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), the most common type of sleep-disordered breathing, is associated with significant immediate and long-term morbidity, including fragmented sleep and impaired daytime functioning, as well as more severe consequences, such as hypertension, impaired cognitive function and reduced quality of life. Perioperatively, OSA occurs frequently as a consequence of pre-existing vulnerability, surgery and drug effects. The impact of OSA on postoperative respiratory complications (PRCs) needs to be better characterised. As OSA is associated with significant comorbidities, such as obesity, pulmonary hypertension, myocardial infarction and stroke, it is unclear whether OSA or its comorbidities are the mechanism of PRCs. This project aims to (1) develop a novel prediction score identifying surgical patients at high risk of OSA, (2) evaluate the association of OSA risk on PRCs and (3) evaluate if pharmacological agents used during surgery modify this association. Methods Retrospective cohort study using hospital-based electronic patient data and perioperative data on medications administered and vital signs. We will use data from Partners Healthcare clinical databases, Boston, Massachusetts. First, a prediction model for OSA will be developed using OSA diagnostic codes and polysomnography procedural codes as the reference standard, and will be validated by medical record review. Results of the prediction model will be used to classify patients in the database as high, medium or low risk of OSA, and we will investigate the effect of OSA on risk of PRCs. Finally, we will test whether the effect of OSA on PRCs is modified by the use of intraoperative pharmacological agents known to increase upper airway instability, including neuromuscular blockade, neostigmine, opioids, anaesthetics and sedatives. Ethics and dissemination The Partners Human Research Committee approved this study (protocol number: 2014P000218). Study results will be made

  7. Obstructive sleep apnea is a common disorder in the population—a review on the epidemiology of sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) defined at an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5 was a mean of 22% (range, 9-37%) in men and 17% (range, 4-50%) in women in eleven published epidemiological studies published between 1993 and 2013. OSA with excessive daytime sleepiness occurred in 6% (range, 3-18%) of men and in 4% (range, 1-17%) of women. The prevalence increased with time and OSA was reported in 37% of men and in 50% of women in studies from 2008 and 2013 respectively. OSA is more prevalent in men than in women and increases with age and obesity. Smoking and alcohol consumption are also suggested as risk factors, but the results are conflicting. Excessive daytime sleepiness is suggested as the most important symptom of OSA, but only a fraction of subjects with AHI >5 report daytime sleepiness and one study did not find any relationship between daytime sleepiness and sleep apnea in women. Stroke and hypertension and coronary artery disease are associated with sleep apnea. Cross-sectional studies indicate an association between OSA and diabetes mellitus. Patients younger than 70 years run an increased risk of early death if they suffer from OSA. It is concluded that OSA is highly prevalent in the population. It is related to age and obesity. Only a part of subjects with OSA in the population have symptoms of daytime sleepiness. The prevalence of OSA has increased in epidemiological studies over time. Differences and the increase in prevalence of sleep apnea are probably due to different diagnostic equipment, definitions, study design and characteristics of included subjects including effects of the obesity epidemic. Cardiovascular disease, especially stroke is related to OSA, and subjects under the age of 70 run an increased risk of early death if they suffer from OSA. PMID:26380759

  8. An algorithm of dental/dentofacial-based options for managing patients with obstructive sleep apnoea referred to a dentist/dental specialist by a physician.

    PubMed

    Kılınç, D D; Didinen, S

    2016-07-01

    There are so many documents in the literature discoursing the aetiology, nature, diagnosis and treatment planning of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Almost all of them mention that OSA has to be evaluated and treated through the multidisciplinary teamwork of physicians and dentists. Due to a lack in the literature, this article focuses on dentists' and dental specialists' role in the treatment algorithm of OSA. PMID:27388089

  9. Age-Group-Specific Associations between the Severity of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Relevant Risk Factors in Male and Female Patients

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xingqi; Gu, Wei; Li, Yanyan; Liu, Mei; Li, Yan; Gao, Xiwen

    2014-01-01

    Aim To seek accurate and credible correlation manner between gender, age, and obesity; and the severity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in large-scale population. Methods Totals of 1,975 male and 378 female OSA patients were sequentially recruited. Centralized covariant tendencies between age, body mass index (BMI), and waist hip ratio (WHR); and OSA severity, were explored in a gender-specific manner via multiple statistical analyses. The accuracies of observed correlations were further evaluated by adaptive multiple linear regression. Results All of age, BMI, WHR, smoking, drinking, and OSA severity differed between males and females. BMI and WHR were positively and (approximately) linearly associated with OSA severity in both males and females. Restricted cubic spline analysis was more effective than was the Pearson correlation approach in correlating age with AHI, and provided age crossover points allowing further piecewise linear modeling for both males and females. Multiple linear regression showed that increasing age was associated with OSA exacerbation in males aged ≤40 years and in females aged 45–53 years. BMI, WHR, and diabetes were independently associated with OSA severity in males with age-group-specific pattern. In females, only BMI was associated with OSA severity at all ages. Conclusions In male patients, BMI and WHR are prominent risk factors for OSA exacerbation. Age and diabetes are associated with OSA severity in males of particular ages. In females, BMI is also a prominent risk factor for severe OSA, and OSA severity increased with age in the range 45–53 years. PMID:25211035

  10. Which components of the CHA2DS2-VASc score are the most important in obstructive sleep apnea patients with atrial fibrillation?

    PubMed

    Platek, Anna E; Szymanski, Filip M; Filipiak, Krzysztof J; Kotkowski, Marcin; Karpinski, Grzegorz; Opolski, Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    Elevated thromboembolic risk is observed in patients with atrial fibrillation. The arrhythmia often co-exists with other diseases like obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which adds to the thrombogenic profile and makes the proper assessment of thromboembolic risk difficult. The aim of the study was to establish how the prevalence of thromboembolic risk factors differs in patients with and without OSA. CHA2DS2-VASc score was used to assess thromboembolic risk in continuous atrial fibrillation patients prequalified for atrial fibrillation ablation. All 266 patients included in the study had a polygraphy examination. Patients were divided into a group with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) <15/h, and those with AHI 15/h or above, who were considered as having OSA. The study population was aged 57.6 ± 10.1 years, and 65.0% of the subjects were male. OSA was diagnosed in 47 patients. In OSA patients, the following CHA2DS2-VASc risk factors had significantly higher prevalence: congestive heart failure (6.5 vs. 0.5%; P = 0.02), arterial hypertension (93.5 vs. 70.9%; P = 0.01), diabetes mellitus (26.1 vs. 6.8%; P = 0.003), and history of vascular disease (23.9 vs. 8.2%; P = 0.006) than in non-OSA patients. Nonsignificant differences were noticed in the history of stroke, age categories, or sex. After dividing patients into four groups, that is non-OSA, mild OSA, moderate OSA, and severe OSA the same risk factors as previously stated remained significant (P < 0.05). The strongest contributors, responsible for elevated thromboembolic risk observed in atrial fibrillation patients with OSA are congestive heart failure, arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and vascular disease. Higher comorbidity burden is another argument for including OSA into the risk assessment schemes in atrial fibrillation patients. PMID:27023880

  11. Distinct severity stages of obstructive sleep apnoea are correlated with unique dyslipidaemia: large-scale observational study

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jian; Yi, Hongliang; Zou, Jianyin; Meng, Lili; Tang, Xulan; Zhu, Huaming; Yu, Dongzhen; Zhou, Huiqun; Su, Kaiming; Yang, Mingpo; Chen, Haoyan; Shi, Yongyong; Wang, Yue; Wang, Jian; Yin, Shankai

    2016-01-01

    Background Dyslipidaemia is an intermediary exacerbation factor for various diseases but the impact of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) on dyslipidaemia remains unclear. Methods A total of 3582 subjects with suspected OSA consecutively admitted to our hospital sleep centre were screened and 2983 (2422 with OSA) were included in the Shanghai Sleep Health Study. OSA severity was quantified using the apnoea–hypopnea index (AHI), the oxygen desaturation index and the arousal index. Biochemical indicators and anthropometric data were also collected. The relationship between OSA severity and the risk of dyslipidaemia was evaluated via ordinal logistic regression, restricted cubic spline (RCS) analysis and multivariate linear regressions. Results The RCS mapped a nonlinear dose–effect relationship between the risk of dyslipidaemia and OSA severity, and yielded knots of the AHI (9.4, 28.2, 54.4 and 80.2). After integrating the clinical definition and RCS-selected knots, all subjects were regrouped into four AHI severity stages. Following segmented multivariate linear modelling of each stage, distinguishable sets of OSA risk factors were quantified: low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), apolipoprotein E and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C); body mass index and/or waist to hip ratio; and HDL-C, LDL-C and triglycerides were specifically associated with stage I, stages II and III, and stages II–IV with different OSA indices. Conclusions Our study revealed the multistage and non-monotonic relationships between OSA and dyslipidaemia and quantified the relationships between OSA severity indexes and distinct risk factors for specific OSA severity stages. Our study suggests that a new interpretive and predictive strategy for dynamic assessment of the risk progression over the clinical course of OSA should be adopted. PMID:26883674

  12. Consensus and evidence-based Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea guidelines 2014 (first edition)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Surendra K.; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan; Mohan, Alladi; Kadhiravan, T.; Elavarasi, A.; Ragesh, R.; Nischal, Neeraj; Sethi, Prayas; Behera, D.; Bhatia, Manvir; Ghoshal, A. G.; Gothi, Dipti; Joshi, Jyotsna; Kanwar, M. S.; Kharbanda, O. P.; Kumar, Suresh; Mohapatra, P. R.; Mallick, B. N.; Mehta, Ravindra; Prasad, Rajendra; Sharma, S. C.; Sikka, Kapil; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Shukla, Garima; Suri, J. C.; Vengamma, B.; Grover, Ashoo; Vijayan, V. K.; Ramakrishnan, N.; Gupta, Rasik

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are subsets of sleep-disordered breathing. Awareness about OSA and its consequences among the general public as well as the majority of primary care physicians across India is poor. This necessitated the development of the Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea (INOSA) guidelines under the auspices of Department of Health Research, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. OSA is the occurrence of an average five or more episodes of obstructive respiratory events per hour of sleep with either sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities or ≥15 such episodes without any sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities. OSAS is defined as OSA associated with daytime symptoms, most often excessive sleepiness. Patients undergoing routine health check-up with snoring, daytime sleepiness, obesity, hypertension, motor vehicular accidents, and high-risk cases should undergo a comprehensive sleep evaluation. Medical examiners evaluating drivers, air pilots, railway drivers, and heavy machinery workers should be educated about OSA and should comprehensively evaluate applicants for OSA. Those suspected to have OSA on comprehensive sleep evaluation should be referred for a sleep study. Supervised overnight polysomnography is the “gold standard” for evaluation of OSA. Positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is the mainstay of treatment of OSA. Oral appliances (OA) are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer OA to PAP, or who do not respond to PAP or who fail treatment attempts with PAP or behavioral measures. Surgical treatment is recommended in patients who have failed or are intolerant to PAP therapy. PMID:26180408

  13. A Pediatric Grading Scale for Lingual Tonsil Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Norman R; Prager, Jeremy D; Ruiz, Amanda G; Kezirian, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    Lingual tonsil hypertrophy (LTH) is a common finding for children with residual obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) following an adenotonsillectomy. Secondary to the significant morbidity associated with OSA, identification and treatment of residual OSA are paramount. A dedicated LTH grading scale for children does not exist. The current adult LTH scale is impractical for children. Imaging is not routine for children, since it frequently requires sedation. We present a pediatric LTH grading scale with substantial interrater reliability to facilitate standardization of endoscopy findings and promote outcomes-based research for OSA surgery in children. PMID:26307581

  14. Sleep Disordered Breathing: Hypertension and Cardiac Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Querejeta Roca, Gabriela; Shah, Amil M

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common form of sleep disordered breathing and has a relatively high prevalence in the general population. The frequency and severity of OSA is associated with age, male sex, and obesity, and OSA has been linked to cardiovascular complications and death. Importantly, OSA has a strong association with both prevalent and incidental hypertension and has a particularly high prevalence in patients with resistant hypertension. In these patients, CPAP and other OSA-directed treatments have been proposed as therapy to help control blood pressure (BP), especially in patients who have not attained optimal BP control despite maximum pharmacological therapy. OSA has also been associated with alterations in cardiac structure and function, although most studies are small and highly limited in study design. Existing data suggest an association between OSA greater left ventricle (LV) mass and hypertrophy that appears independent of confounders including hypertension and obesity. Although less clear and more controversial, OSA severity has been linked to LV systolic and diastolic function, pulmonary hypertension, and right ventricular hypertrophy. Further studies are needed to confirm the potential causal role of OSA in these observed associations with cardiac abnormalities. PMID:26493391

  15. Perioperative sleep apnea: a real problem or did we invent a new disease?

    PubMed Central

    Zaremba, Sebastian; Mojica, James E.; Eikermann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Depending on the subpopulation, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can affect more than 75% of surgical patients. An increasing body of evidence supports the association between OSA  and perioperative complications, but some data indicate important perioperative outcomes do not differ between patients with and without OSA. In this review we will provide an overview of the pathophysiology of sleep apnea and the risk factors for perioperative complications related to sleep apnea. We also discuss a clinical algorithm for the identification and management of OSA patients facing surgery. PMID:27006758

  16. Clinical Issues-April 2016.

    PubMed

    Fearon, Mary C; Ogg, Mary J

    2016-04-01

    Creating a just culture Key words: just culture, TeamSTEPPS, human error, briefing, huddle. Circulating while administering moderate sedation/analgesia Key words: moderate sedation/analgesia, RN circulator. Monitoring RN leaving room during administration of moderate sedation Key words: moderate sedation/analgesia, propofol. Screening for obstructive sleep apnea before administering moderate sedation Key words: moderate sedation/analgesia, obstructive sleep apnea, OSA. Assessment for obstructive sleep apnea Key words: moderate sedation/analgesia, obstructive sleep apnea, OSA, OSA questionnaires, OSA checklist. PMID:27004508

  17. Obstructive sleep apnea and vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Lanfranchi, Paola; Somers, Virend A

    2001-01-01

    There is emerging evidence linking obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) to vascular disease, including hypertension. This relationship may be independent of co-morbidity, such as obesity. Even apparently healthy OSA patients have evidence of subtle functional vascular abnormalities that are known to occur in patients with hypertension and atherosclerosis. Untreated OSA may possibly contribute to the initiation and/or progression of pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in hypertension, heart failure, cardiac ischemia and stroke. This brief commentary will examine the evidence and mechanisms linking OSA to vascular disease. PMID:11737928

  18. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy is associated with improvement in overactive bladder symptoms in women with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ipekci, Tumay; Cetintas, Gulgun; Celik, Orcun; Sarac, Sema; Tunckiran, Ahmet; Ilbey, Yusuf Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate the impact of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms in women with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Material and methods One-hundred and fifty women underwent an overnight polysomnography study between May 2014 and September 2014. Their voiding symptoms were evaluated using the OAB symptom score (OABSS) and International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short-Form at OSAS diagnosis and approximately 3-months after CPAP therapy. OSAS severity was assessed according to the apnea-hypopnea-index. Results We evaluated 140 women and 111 of them (79.3%) reported symptoms consistent with OAB. There were no statistically significant differences between OSAS severity with a prevalence of OAB (p = 0.92). The prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) was 35.7% (n = 50) and 39.6% (n = 44) in all patients and patients with OAB, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between UI with OAB (p = 0.58). Baseline OABSS is comparable between OSAS severity (p = 0.143). After 3-months CPAP therapy, OABSS and ICIQ-SF sum scores were significantly decreased in patients with severe and moderate OSAS (p <0.01), however, change of OABSS sum score was insignificant in patients with mild OSAS (p = 0.44). Conclusions CPAP therapy improves the OAB, OABSS and ICIQ-SF scores in women with severe and moderate OSAS. OSAS-induced OAB may be alleviated following CPAP therapy. PMID:27123331

  19. [Multisystemic involvement in obstructive sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Labarca, Gonzalo; Cruz N, Rodrigo; Descalzi, Fernando

    2014-06-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is characterized by repetitive upper airway collapse with apnea/hypopnea and recurrent hypoxia during sleep, which results in fragmented sleep and intermittent drops in arterial blood oxygen saturation (hypoxemia). Several dysfunctions of neurocognitive, endocrine, cardiovascular, and metabolic systems are recognized in patients with OSA. The most commonly reported associations are with obesity, increased cardiovascular risk, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus 2 and liver damage. However, there is a proven relationship between OSA and other diseases, such as polycystic ovary syndrome, gastroesophageal reflux, and chronic kidney disease. The aim of this review is to analyze clinical and experimental evidence linking OSA with other diseases. PMID:25327320

  20. Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP)

    MedlinePlus

    Palate surgery; Uvulopalatal flap procedure; UPPP; Laser-assisted uvulopalaplasty; Radiofrequency palatoplasty; Velopharyngeal insufficiency - UPPP; Obstructive sleep apnea - uvulopalaplasty; OSA - uvulopalaplasty

  1. Consequences of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children.

    PubMed

    Blechner, Michael; Williamson, Ariel A

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has various negative health and behavioral consequences in the pediatric population. As shown in adults, there are metabolic derangements such as obesity, insulin sensitivity, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome, as well as cardiovascular derangements like hypertension, chronic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, ventricular size/function abnormalities, and even elevated pulmonary arterial pressures, that can be seen in children with OSAS. The first two sections will discuss the metabolic and cardiovascular consequences on OSAS in children. The last section summarizes selected studies and reviews on the behavioral, neurocognitive and academic consequences of OSAS in children. PMID:26631839

  2. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea: From pathogenesis to treatment: Current controversies and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, Peter R.; Malhotra, Atul; Palmer, Lyle J.; Kezirian, Eric J.; Horner, Richard L.; Ip, Mary S.; Thurnheer, Robert; Antic, Nick A.; Hillman, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a common disease, recognized as an independent risk factor for a range of clinical conditions, such as hypertension, stroke, depression and diabetes. Despite extensive research over the past two decades, the mechanistic links between OSA and other associated clinical conditions, including metabolic disorders and cardiovascular disease, remain unclear. Indeed, the pathogenesis of OSA itself remains incompletely understood. This review provides opinions from a number of leading experts on issues related to OSA and its pathogenesis, interaction with anaesthesia, metabolic consequences and comorbidities, cardiovascular disease, genetics, measurement and diagnosis, surgical treatment and pharmacotherapeutic targets. PMID:20136736

  3. BMI1 Is Expressed in Canine Osteosarcoma and Contributes to Cell Growth and Chemotherapy Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Withers, Sita S.; Holt, Roseline; Rebhun, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    BMI1, a stem cell factor and member of the polycomb group of genes, has been shown to contribute to growth and chemoresistance of several human malignancies including primary osteosarcoma (OSA). Naturally occurring OSA in the dog represents a large animal model of human OSA, however the potential role of BMI1 in canine primary and metastatic OSA has not been examined. Immunohistochemical staining of canine primary and metastatic OSA tumors revealed strong nuclear expression of BMI1. An identical staining pattern was found in both primary and metastatic human OSA tissues. Canine OSA cell lines (Abrams, Moresco, and D17) expressed high levels of BMI1 compared with canine osteoblasts and knockdown or inhibition of BMI1 by siRNA or by small molecule BMI1-inhibitor PTC-209 demonstrated a role for BMI1 in canine OSA cell growth and resistance to carboplatin and doxorubicin chemotherapy. These findings suggest that inhibition of BMI1 in primary or metastatic OSA may improve response to chemotherapy and that the dog may serve as a large animal model to evaluate such therapy. PMID:26110620

  4. Role of preoperative screening for adult patients for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Selim, Bernardo J; Surani, Salim R; Ramar, Kannan

    2014-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a chronic disease with increasing prevalence. Underdiagnosed in the surgical population, OSA can reach a prevalence of up to 70% in bariatric surgery, and be associated with difficult airways and postoperative cardiopulmonary adverse events. Despite its association with escalation of care, increased health care resource utilization, and length of hospital stay, < 25% of health care institutions in the United States have OSA perioperative protocols to improve patient safety. This is explained in part by a lack of studies that support a widely accepted systematic approach to preoperative screening and risk stratification. This review evaluates the role of preoperative screening tools for adult patients with suspected OSA. PMID:25485922

  5. Effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Sleep Quality, Cognition, and Driving Performance in Patients with Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Jasmohan S; Thacker, Leroy R; Leszczyszyn, David; Taylor, Samuel A; Heuman, Douglas M; Raman, Shekar; Sterling, Richard K; Siddiqui, Muhammad S; Stravitz, R Todd; Sanyal, Arun J; Puri, Puneet; Luketic, Velimir; Matherly, Scott; Fuchs, Michael; White, Melanie B; Noble, Nicole A; Unser, Ariel B; Wade, James B

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims: In patients with cirrhosis, sleep disturbances are assumed to result from hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The effects of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on cognition, sleep parameters, or driving in patients with cirrhosis are unclear. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional, prospective study of 118 subjects. Subjects were assigned to 1 of 4 groups: those with OSA and cirrhosis (without HE or ascites, n=34), those with only cirrhosis (n=30), those with only OSA only (n=29), and those without OSA or cirrhosis (controls, n=25). None of OSA patients were receiving continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Subjects underwent cognitive testing (paper–pencil tests for psychomotor speed and attention, as well as executive function tests), sleep assessment (daytime sleepiness and night-time sleep quality) and a monotonous driving simulation (worsening lane deviations over time indicate poor performance). We also tested patients with OSA, with cirrhosis (n=10) and without cirrhosis (n=7), before and after CPAP therapy. Results: Daytime sleepiness and sleep quality were worse in subjects in the OSA groups (with or without cirrhosis) than subjects with cirrhosis alone or controls. Of subjects with only OSA, 36% had impaired psychomotor speed and attention, compared to >60% of subjects in both cirrhosis groups. In contrast, executive function was uniformly worse in subjects with OSA, with or without cirrhosis, than groups without OSA. Simulator performance (lane deviations) worsened over time in both OSA groups. CPAP therapy significantly increased executive function and sleep quality, and reduced simulator lane deviations and sleepiness, in subjects with and without cirrhosis. After CPAP therapy, performance on the paper–pencil test performance improved significantly only in subjects with OSA without cirrhosis. Conclusion: OSA should be considered in evaluating sleep impairment in patients with cirrhosis. In patients with cirrhosis and OSA

  6. Sleep-disordered breathing in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lal, Chitra; White, David R; Joseph, Jane E; van Bakergem, Karen; LaRosa, Angela

    2015-02-01

    OSA is associated with significant adverse outcomes with far-reaching health-care implications. OSA is much more common and severe in patients with Down syndrome (DS) than in the general population, yet there is a striking lack of literature in this area. In this review article, we have summarized the current state of knowledge and presented the available data on OSA in DS. The higher prevalence and severity of OSA in patients with DS may be related to unique upper airway anatomic features as well as increased risk for obesity, hypothyroidism, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and generalized hypotonia. Although many of the manifestations of OSA in patients with DS are similar to those seen in the general population, the relative morbidity is significantly higher. For individuals with DS who already face cognitive challenges, the added impact of OSA on cognitive function may hinder their ability to function independently and reach their full potential. Screening and evaluation for OSA should be done in children and adults with DS. Treatment of OSA in DS involves the use of CPAP, upper airway surgery, and dental appliances, along with weight-reduction strategies, nasal steroids, and oral leukotriene modifiers as adjunctive treatments. The treatment plan should be individualized for each patient with DS, taking into account age, comorbid conditions, and barriers to treatment adherence. Future research should aim to better characterize OSA, further evaluate neurocognitive outcomes, and evaluate the efficacy of treatments in patients with DS. PMID:25644910

  7. Cytotoxic action of Brazilian propolis in vitro on canine osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cinegaglia, N C; Bersano, P R O; Búfalo, M C; Sforcin, J M

    2013-09-01

    Osteosarcoma (OSA) is a primary bone neoplasm frequently diagnosed in dogs. The biology of OSA in pet dogs is identical to that of pediatric patients, and it has been considered an excellent model in vivo to study human OSA. Since the individual response to chemotherapy is unpredictable and considering that propolis is a natural product with several biological properties, this work evaluated the cytotoxic action of propolis on canine OSA cells. The primary cell culture of canine OSA was obtained from the tumor of a dog with OSA. Cell viability was assessed after incubation with propolis, 70% ethanol (propolis solvent), and carboplatin after 6, 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell viability was analyzed by the crystal violet method. Data showed that canine OSA cells were sensitive to propolis in a dose- and time-dependent manner and had a distinct morphology compared to control. Its solvent (70% ethanol) had no effect on cell viability, suggesting that the cytotoxic action was exclusively due to propolis. Our propolis sample exerted a cytotoxic effect on canine OSA cells, and its introduction as a possible therapeutic agent in vivo could be investigated, providing a new contribution to OSA treatment. PMID:23074147

  8. The Association between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Metabolic Markers and Lipid Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei-Te; Tsai, Su-Shan; Shih, Tung-Sheng; Lin, Ming-Hsiu; Chou, Tzu-Chieh; Ting, Hua; Wu, Trong-Neng; Liou, Saou-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and metabolic markers and whether the elevated risk of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) is related to Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). Methods This cross-sectional study recruited 246 male bus drivers from one transportation company in Taiwan. Each participant was evaluated by a polysomnography (PSG) test and by blood lipids examination. Severity of OSA was categorized according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). Results The results showed that a 73.3% prevalence of MetS in OSA (AHI > 15) and a 80.0% prevalence of MetS in severe OSA (AHI > 30) were found. After adjusting for confounding variables, an increased level of Body-Mass Index (BMI) and two non-MetS cardiovascular risk factors, total cholesterol/HDL-C ratio and TG/HDL-C ratio was significantly associated with AHI in subjects with severe OSA. MetS was about three times to be present in subjects with severe OSA, even adjusted for BMI. Conclusions The findings showed a high prevalence of MetS in OSA among professional drivers, especially in the severe group category. BMI was the major contributing factor to OSA. However, the present study did not find a sensitive clinical marker of a detrimental metabolic profile in OSA patients. PMID:26115005

  9. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Modifications in Sedation: An Update.

    PubMed

    Weatherspoon, Deborah; Sullivan, Debra; Weatherspoon, Christopher A

    2016-06-01

    One factor that may contribute to an increased risk for airway compromise is obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Sedation in this population carries an increased risk for hypopnea. Critical care nurses must decide on the amount and type of sedation to administer at the point of care. It is important for them to understand OSA and the routinely prescribed sedatives that may affect this disorder. This article discusses the pathophysiology of OSA and traits that may help identify patients with undiagnosed OSA. The most commonly prescribed sedative pharmacologic agents and adjunctive airway support mechanisms are reviewed for use in this population. PMID:27215359

  10. Obstructive sleep apnoea in children with craniofacial syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Cielo, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is common in children. Craniofacial anomalies such as cleft palate are among the most common congenital conditions. Children with a variety of craniofacial conditions, including cleft palate, micrognathia, craniosynostosis, and midface hypoplasia are at increased risk for OSAS. Available evidence, which is largely limited to surgical case series and retrospective studies, suggests that OSAS can be successfully managed in these children through both surgical and non-surgical techniques. Prospective studies using larger cohorts of patients and including polysomnograms are needed to better understand the risk factors for this patient population and the efficacy of treatment options for OSAS and their underlying conditions. PMID:25555676

  11. The Specific Characteristics in Children with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Cor Pulmonale

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pi-Chang; Hwang, Betau; Soong, Wen-Jue; Meng, C. C. Laura

    2012-01-01

    Background. The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in the pediatric population is currently estimated at 1-2% of all children. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical and hemodynamic characteristics in pediatric patients with cor pulmonale and OSA. Methods. Thirty children with the diagnosis of OSA were included. These patients consisted of 26 male and 4 female children with a mean age of 7 ± 4 years old. Five of those children were found to be associated with cor pulmonale, and 25 had OSA but without cor pulmonale. Results. The arousal index was much higher in children with OSA and cor pulmonale. The children with OSA and cor pulmonale had much lower mean and minimal oxygen saturation and a higher incidence of bradycardia events. All 5 patients with OSA and cor pulmonale underwent an adenotonsillectomy, and the pulmonary arterial pressure dropped significantly after the surgery. Conclusion. This study demonstrated that the OSA pediatric patients with cor pulmonale had the different clinical manifestations and hemodynamic characteristics from those without cor pulmonale. The adenotonsillectomy had excellent results in both the OSA pediatric patients with and without cor pulmonale. PMID:22645449

  12. Liking for high fat foods in patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea.

    PubMed

    Smith, Simon S; Waight, Catherine; Doyle, Geoffrey; Rossa, Kalina R; Sullivan, Karen A

    2014-07-01

    Excess weight and obesity are factors that are strongly associated with risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA). Weight loss has been associated with improvements in clinical indicators of OSA severity; however, patients' beliefs about diet change have not been investigated. This study utilized a validated behaviour change model to estimate the relationship between food liking, food intake and indices of OSA severity. Two-hundred and six OSA patients recruited from a Sleep Disorders Clinic completed standardized questionnaires of: a) fat and fibre food intake, food liking, and food knowledge and; b) attitudes and intentions towards fat reduction. OSA severity and body mass index (BMI) were objectively measured using standard clinical guidelines. The relationship between liking for high fat food and OSA severity was tested with hierarchical regression. Gender and BMI explained a significant 20% of the variance in OSA severity, Fibre Liking accounted for an additional 6% (a negative relationship), and Fat Liking accounted for a further 3.6% of variance. Although the majority of individuals (47%) were currently "active" in reducing fat intake, overall the patients' dietary beliefs and behaviours did not correspond. The independent relationship between OSA severity and liking for high fat foods (and disliking of high fibre foods) may be consistent with a two-way interaction between sleep disruption and food choice. Whilst the majority of OSA patients were intentionally active in changing to a healthy diet, further emphasis on improving healthy eating practices and beliefs in this population is necessary. PMID:24699392

  13. Validation of the STOP-Bang Questionnaire as a Screening Tool for Obstructive Sleep Apnea among Different Populations: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Auckley, Dennis; Ramachandran, Satya Krishna; Memtsoudis, Stavros; Mokhlesi, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Background Diagnosing obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is clinically relevant because untreated OSA has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The STOP-Bang questionnaire is a validated screening tool for OSA. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the effectiveness of STOP-Bang for screening patients suspected of having OSA and to predict its accuracy in determining the severity of OSA in the different populations. Methods A search of the literature databases was performed. Inclusion criteria were: 1) Studies that used STOP-Bang questionnaire as a screening tool for OSA in adult subjects (>18 years); 2) The accuracy of the STOP-Bang questionnaire was validated by polysomnography—the gold standard for diagnosing OSA; 3) OSA was clearly defined as apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) or respiratory disturbance index (RDI) ≥ 5; 4) Publications in the English language. The quality of the studies were explicitly described and coded according to the Cochrane Methods group on the screening and diagnostic tests. Results Seventeen studies including 9,206 patients met criteria for the systematic review. In the sleep clinic population, the sensitivity was 90%, 94% and 96% to detect any OSA (AHI ≥ 5), moderate-to-severe OSA (AHI ≥15), and severe OSA (AHI ≥30) respectively. The corresponding NPV was 46%, 75% and 90%. A similar trend was found in the surgical population. In the sleep clinic population, the probability of severe OSA with a STOP-Bang score of 3 was 25%. With a stepwise increase of the STOP-Bang score to 4, 5, 6 and 7/8, the probability rose proportionally to 35%, 45%, 55% and 75%, respectively. In the surgical population, the probability of severe OSA with a STOP-Bang score of 3 was 15%. With a stepwise increase of the STOP-Bang score to 4, 5, 6 and 7/8, the probability increased to 25%, 35%, 45% and 65%, respectively. Conclusion This meta-analysis confirms the high performance of the STOP-Bang questionnaire in the sleep

  14. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tahrani, Abd A.; Ali, Asad; Raymond, Neil T.; Begum, Safia; Dubb, Kiran; Altaf, Quratul-ain; Piya, Milan K.; Barnett, Anthony H.; Stevens, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common in type 2 diabetes and increases oxidative stress. Hence, OSA could promote the development and progression of DN. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a cohort study in adults with type 2 diabetes. Patients with known OSA or ESRD were excluded. DN was defined as the presence of albuminuria or an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2. DN progression was based on eGFR measurements. OSA was defined as apnea hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5 events/h. Serum nitrotyrosine abundance (a marker of nitrosative stress) was measured by ELISA. RESULTS A total of 224 patients were included. OSA and DN prevalence was 64.3 and 40.2, respectively. DN prevalence was higher in patients with OSA (OSA+) compared with those without OSA (OSA−) (49.3% vs. 23.8%, P < 0.001). After adjustment, OSA (odds ratio 2.64 [95% CI 1.13–6.16], P = 0.02) remained independently associated with DN. After an average follow-up of 2.5 (0.7) years, eGFR decline was greater in OSA+ compared with OSA− patients (median −6.8% [interquartile range −16.1 to 2.2] vs. −1.6% [−7.7 to 5.3%], P = 0.002). After adjusting, both baseline OSA (B = −3.8, P = 0.044) and AHI (B = −4.6, P = 0.02) remained independent predictors of study-end eGFR. Baseline serum nitrotyrosine abundance (B = −0.24, P = 0.015) was an independent predictor of study-end eGFR after adjustment. CONCLUSIONS OSA is independently associated with DN in type 2 diabetes. eGFR declined faster in patients with OSA. Nitrosative stress may provide a pathogenetic link between OSA and DN. Interventional studies assessing the impact of OSA treatment on DN are needed. PMID:24062320

  15. Topography-specific spindle frequency changes in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sleep spindles, as detected on scalp electroencephalography (EEG), are considered to be markers of thalamo-cortical network integrity. Since obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a known cause of brain dysfunction, the aim of this study was to investigate sleep spindle frequency distribution in OSA. Seven non-OSA subjects and 21 patients with OSA (11 mild and 10 moderate) were studied. A matching pursuit procedure was used for automatic detection of fast (≥13Hz) and slow (<13Hz) spindles obtained from 30min samples of NREM sleep stage 2 taken from initial, middle and final night thirds (sections I, II and III) of frontal, central and parietal scalp regions. Results Compared to non-OSA subjects, Moderate OSA patients had higher central and parietal slow spindle percentage (SSP) in all night sections studied, and higher frontal SSP in sections II and III. As the night progressed, there was a reduction in central and parietal SSP, while frontal SSP remained high. Frontal slow spindle percentage in night section III predicted OSA with good accuracy, with OSA likelihood increased by 12.1%for every SSP unit increase (OR 1.121, 95% CI 1.013 - 1.239, p=0.027). Conclusions These results are consistent with diffuse, predominantly frontal thalamo-cortical dysfunction during sleep in OSA, as more posterior brain regions appear to maintain some physiological spindle frequency modulation across the night. Displaying changes in an opposite direction to what is expected from the aging process itself, spindle frequency appears to be informative in OSA even with small sample sizes, and to represent a sensitive electrophysiological marker of brain dysfunction in OSA. PMID:22985414

  16. Obstructive sleep apnea in young infants with Down syndrome evaluated in a Down syndrome specialty clinic.

    PubMed

    Goffinski, Alida; Stanley, Maria A; Shepherd, Nicole; Duvall, Nichole; Jenkinson, Sandra B; Davis, Charlene; Bull, Marilyn J; Roper, Randall J

    2015-02-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) experience congenital and functional medical issues that predispose them to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Research utilizing stringent age criteria among samples of infants with DS and OSA is limited. This study examines clinical correlates of OSA among infants with DS. A retrospective chart review was conducted of infants ≤6 months of age referred to a DS clinic at a tertiary children's hospital over five-years (n = 177). Chi-square tests and binary logistic regression models were utilized to analyze the data. Fifty-nine infants underwent polysomnography, based on clinical concerns. Of these, 95% (56/59) had studies consistent with OSA. Among infants with OSA, 71% were identified as having severe OSA (40/56). The minimum overall prevalence of OSA among the larger group of infants was 31% (56/177). Significant relationships were found between OSA and dysphagia, congenital heart disease (CHD), prematurity, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and other functional and anatomic gastrointestinal (GI) conditions. Results indicate that odds of OSA in this group are higher among infants with GI conditions in comparison to those without. Co-occurring dysphagia and CHD predicted the occurrence of OSA in 36% of cases with an overall predictive accuracy rate of 71%. Obstructive sleep apnea is relatively common in young infants with DS and often severe. Medical factors including GI conditions, dysphagia and CHD may help to identify infants who are at greater risk and may warrant evaluation. Further studies are needed to assess the impact of OSA in infants with DS. PMID:25604659

  17. Comorbidities Associated with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: a Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Pinto, José Antonio; Ribeiro, Davi Knoll; Cavallini, Andre Freitas da Silva; Duarte, Caue; Freitas, Gabriel Santos

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by partial or complete recurrent upper airway obstruction during sleep. OSA brings many adverse consequences, such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, cardiac and encephalic alterations, behavioral, among others, resulting in a significant source of public health care by generating a high financial and social impact. The importance of this assessment proves to be useful, because the incidence of patients with comorbidities associated with AOS has been increasing consistently and presents significant influence in natural disease history. Objective The objective of this study is to assess major comorbidities associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and prevalence in a group of patients diagnosed clinically and polysomnographically with OSA. Methods This is a retrospective study of 100 charts from patients previously diagnosed with OSA in our service between October 2010 and January 2013. Results We evaluated 100 patients with OSA (84 men and 16 women) with a mean age of 50.05 years (range 19-75 years). The prevalence of comorbidities were hypertension (39%), obesity (34%), depression (19%), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (18%), diabetes mellitus (15%), hypercholesterolemia (10%), asthma (4%), and no comorbidities (33%). Comorbidities occurred in 56.2% patients diagnosed with mild OSA, 67.6% with moderate OSA, and 70% of patients with severe OSA. Conclusion According to the current literature data and the values obtained in our paper, we can correlate through expressive values obesity with OSA and their apnea hypopnea index (AHI) values. However, despite significant prevalence of OSA with other comorbidities, our study could not render expressive significance values able to justify their correlations. PMID:27096019

  18. Support vector machines for automated recognition of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome from ECG recordings.

    PubMed

    Khandoker, Ahsan H; Palaniswami, Marimuthu; Karmakar, Chandan K

    2009-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with cardiovascular morbidity as well as excessive daytime sleepiness and poor quality of life. In this study, we apply a machine learning technique [support vector machines (SVMs)] for automated recognition of OSAS types from their nocturnal ECG recordings. A total of 125 sets of nocturnal ECG recordings acquired from normal subjects (OSAS - ) and subjects with OSAS (OSAS +), each of approximately 8 h in duration, were analyzed. Features extracted from successive wavelet coefficient levels after wavelet decomposition of signals due to heart rate variability (HRV) from RR intervals and ECG-derived respiration (EDR) from R waves of QRS amplitudes were used as inputs to the SVMs to recognize OSAS +/- subjects. Using leave-one-out technique, the maximum accuracy of classification for 83 training sets was found to be 100% for SVMs using a subset of selected combination of HRV and EDR features. Independent test results on 42 subjects showed that it correctly recognized 24 out of 26 OSAS + subjects and 15 out of 16 OSAS - subjects (accuracy = 92.85%; Cohen's kappa value of 0.85). For estimating the relative severity of OSAS, the posterior probabilities of SVM outputs were calculated and compared with respective apnea/hypopnea index. These results suggest superior performance of SVMs in OSAS recognition supported by wavelet-based features of ECG. The results demonstrate considerable potential in applying SVMs in an ECG-based screening device that can aid a sleep specialist in the initial assessment of patients with suspected OSAS. PMID:19129022

  19. Risk of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Lower in Double Reed Wind Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Christopher P.; York, Kaki M.; McCoy, John G.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is caused by a collapse of the upper airway. Respiratory muscle training with a wind instrument (didgeridoo) in patients with moderate OSA has been previously shown to improve OSA symptomology. However, a survey of orchestra members did not indicate a difference in OSA risk between wind and non-wind instrumentalist. The present study examines whether playing of different wind instrument types may affect the risk of OSA. Methods: A national sample of active musicians (n = 906) was surveyed through the internet. Participants' risk for OSA was determined by the Berlin Questionnaire. Additional survey items included questions about general health and musical experience. Results: A binary logistic regression was conducted to determine if OSA risk was predicted by gender, age, number of years playing instrument, number of hours per week playing instrument, and instrument type. Musicians who played a double reed instrument had a lower risk of OSA (p = 0.047) than non-wind instrumentalists. Additionally, in double reed instrumentalists, the number of hours spent playing the instrument predicted lower OSA risk (p = 0.020). The risk for OSA in other wind instruments (i.e., single reed, high brass, and low brass) was not significantly different from non-wind musicians. Conclusions: Playing a double reed musical instrument was associated with a lower risk of OSA. Citation: Ward CP; York KM; McCoy JG. Risk of obstructive sleep apnea lower in double reed wind musicians. J Clin Sleep Med 2012;8(3):251-255. PMID:22701381

  20. Cumulative Association of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity and Short Sleep Duration with the Risk for Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Priou, Pascaline; Le Vaillant, Marc; Meslier, Nicole; Paris, Audrey; Pigeanne, Thierry; Nguyen, Xuan-Lan; Alizon, Claire; Bizieux-Thaminy, Acya; Leclair-Visonneau, Laurene; Humeau, Marie-Pierre; Gagnadoux, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and short sleep duration are individually associated with an increased risk for hypertension (HTN). The aim of this multicenter cross-sectional study was to test the hypothesis of a cumulative association of OSA severity and short sleep duration with the risk for prevalent HTN. Among 1,499 patients undergoing polysomnography for suspected OSA, 410 (27.3%) previously diagnosed as hypertensive and taking antihypertensive medication were considered as having HTN. Patients with total sleep time (TST) <6 h were considered to be short sleepers. Logistic regression procedures were performed to determine the independent association of HTN with OSA and sleep duration. Considering normal sleepers (TST ≥6 h) without OSA as the reference group, the odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence intervals) for having HTN was 2.51 (1.35–4.68) in normal sleepers with OSA and 4.37 (2.18–8.78) in short sleepers with OSA after adjustment for age, gender, obesity, diabetes, depression, current smoking, use of thyroid hormones, daytime sleepiness, poor sleep complaint, time in bed, sleep architecture and fragmentation, and study site. The risk for HTN appeared to present a cumulative association with OSA severity and short sleep duration (p<0.0001 for linear trend). The higher risk for HTN was observed in short sleepers with severe OSA (AHI ≥30) (OR, 4.29 [2.03–9.07]). In patients investigated for suspected OSA, sleep-disordered breathing severity and short sleep duration have a cumulative association with the risk for prevalent HTN. Further studies are required to determine whether interventions to optimize sleep may contribute to lower BP in patients with OSA. PMID:25531468

  1. The Potential Association between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Diabetic Retinopathy in Severe Obesity—The Role of Hypoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Dev; Leong, Wen Bun; Arora, Teresa; Nolen, Melissa; Punamiya, Vikas; Grunstein, Ron; Taheri, Shahrad

    2013-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common in obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and may contribute to diabetic microvascular complications. Methods To investigate the association between OSA, hypoxemia during sleep, and diabetic retinal complications in severe obesity. This was a prospective observational study of 93 obese patients mean (SD) age: 52(10) years; mean (SD) body mass index (BMI): 47.3(8.3) kg/m2) with DM undergoing retinal screening and respiratory monitoring during sleep. OSA was defined as apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of ≥15 events/hour, resulting in two groups (OSA+ vs. OSA−). Results Forty-six patients were OSA+: median (95% CI) AHI = 37(23–74)/hour and 47 were OSA–ve (AHI = 7(4–11)/hour). Both groups were similar for ethnicity, BMI, cardiovascular co-morbidities, diabetes duration, HbA1c, and insulin treatment (p>0.05). The OSA+ group was significantly more hypoxemic. There was no significant difference between OSA+ and OSA− groups for the presence of retinopathy (39% vs. 38%). More OSA+ subjects had maculopathy (22% vs. 13%), but this did not reach statistical significance. Logistic regression analyses showed that AHI was not significantly associated with the presence of retinopathy or maculopathy (p>0.05). Whilst minimum oxygen saturation was not significantly associated with retinopathy, it was an independent predictor for the presence of maculopathy OR = 0.79 (95% CI: 0.65–0.95; p<0.05), after adjustment. Conclusions The presence of OSA, as determined by AHI, was not associated with diabetic retinal complications. In contrast, severity of hypoxemia during sleep (minimum oxygen saturations) may be an important factor. The importance of hypoxia in the development of retinal complications in patients with OSA remains unclear and further studies assessing the pathogenesis of hypoxemia in patients with OSA and diabetic retinal disease are warranted. PMID:24260240

  2. Molecular Signatures of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Adults: A Review and Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Arnardottir, Erna S.; Mackiewicz, Miroslaw; Gislason, Thorarinn; Teff, Karen L.; Pack, Allan I.

    2009-01-01

    The consequences of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are largely mediated by chronic intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation. The primary molecular domains affected are sympathetic activity, oxidative stress and inflammation. Other affected domains include adipokines, adhesion molecules and molecules that respond to endoplasmic reticulum stress. Changes in molecular domains affected by OSA, assessed in blood and/or urine, can provide a molecular signature for OSA that could potentially be used diagnostically and to predict who is likely to develop different OSA-related comorbidities. High-throughput discovery strategies such as microarrays, assessing changes in gene expression in circulating blood cells, have the potential to find new candidates and pathways thereby expanding the molecular signatures for OSA. More research is needed to fully understand the pathophysiological significance of these molecular signatures and their relationship with OSA comorbidities. Many OSA subjects are obese, and obesity is an independent risk factor for many comorbidities associated with OSA. Moreover, obesity affects the same molecular pathways as OSA. Thus, a challenge to establishing a molecular signature for OSA is to separate the effects of OSA from obesity. We propose that the optimal strategy is to evaluate the temporal changes in relevant molecular pathways during sleep and, in particular, the alterations from before to after sleep when assessed in blood and/or urine. Such changes will be at least partly a consequence of chronic intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation that occurs during sleep. Citation: Arnardottir ES; Mackiewicz M; Gislason T; Teff KL; Pack AI. Molecular signatures of obstructive sleep apnea in adults: A review and perspective. SLEEP 2009;32(4):447–470. PMID:19413140

  3. A new approach for the assessment of sleepiness and predictivity of obstructive sleep apnea in drivers: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Quaranta, Vitaliano Nicola; Dragonieri, Silvano; Carratù, Pierluigi; Falcone, Vito Antonio; Carucci, Elisa; Ranieri, Teresa; Ventura, Valentina; Resta, Onofrio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Falling asleep behind the wheel is one of the most relevant consequences of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We created a new screening questionnaire, named the Driver Sleepiness Score (DSS), aiming to assess sleepiness in drivers with suspected OSA. The primary aim of our study was to evaluate sleepiness in drivers with a suspicion of OSA by the DSS in order to assess its correlation with the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), oxygen desaturation index (ODI), and total sleep time with oxyhemoglobin saturation below 90% (TST90). We also aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of DSS for three different cutoffs of AHI (AHI = 5, AHI = 15, AHI = 30), which allow stratification of the severity of OSA. Materials and Methods: Seventy-three driving patients at risk for OSA participated in the study. DSS and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) were both administered in operator-dependent modality and in randomized sequence. Results: The DSS showed higher accuracy in screening patients with mild OSA [area under curve (AUC): 0.88 vs 0.74] and moderate OSA (AUC: 0.88 vs 0.79), whereas ESS showed higher accuracy in screening patients with severe OSA (AUC: 0.91 vs 0.78). A DSS score ≥ 7 is the optimal cutoff for distinguishing true positives from false positives for the presence of OSA and for its different severity levels. The administration of both questionnaires increases the accuracy for the detection of all OSA severity levels. Conclusions: If validated, DSS may qualify as a new screening tool specifically for drivers with the suspicion of having OSA, in combination with the ESS. PMID:26933301

  4. Neurobehavioral Functioning in Adolescents With and Without Obesity and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Xanthopoulos, Melissa S.; Gallagher, Paul R.; Berkowitz, Robert I.; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Bradford, Ruth; Marcus, Carole L.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Children and adults with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) exhibit neurobehavioral abnormalities, but few studies have evaluated the transitional stage of adolescence. Obesity is also associated with neurobehavioral abnormalities, and many patients with OSAS are obese. However, the confounding effect of obesity on neurobehavioral abnormalities in adolescents with OSAS has not been evaluated. We hypothesized that obese adolescents with OSAS would exhibit more neurobehavioral abnormalities than obese and lean adolescents without OSAS. Design: Cross-sectional, case control. Setting: Sleep Center and community. Participants: Obese adolescents with OSAS compared to (1) nonsnoring, obese controls without OSAS, and (2) nonobese, nonsnoring controls. Interventions: Neurobehavioral evaluation. Measurements and Results: Obese adolescents with OSAS had significantly worse executive function and attention compared to both obese (P < 0.001) and lean (P < 0.001) controls, and more depression (P = 0.004) and externalizing symptoms than lean controls (P = 0.008). A higher percentage of participants in the OSAS group scored in the clinically abnormal range on executive functioning, attention, sleepiness, and behavioral functioning than lean controls. Mediation analyses indicated that level of sleep apnea significantly mediated the effect of body mass on executive functioning, attention, and behavior. Conclusions: Obese adolescents with OSAS show impaired executive and behavioral function compared to obese and lean controls, and are more likely to score in the clinically abnormal range on measures of neurobehavioral functioning. These results are especially concerning given that the frontal lobe is still developing during this critical age period. We speculate that untreated OSAS during adolescence may lead to significant neurobehavioral deficits in adulthood. Citation: Xanthopoulos MS, Gallagher PR, Berkowitz RI, Radcliffe J, Bradford R, Marcus CL

  5. Comorbidities Associated with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: a Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, José Antonio; Ribeiro, Davi Knoll; Cavallini, Andre Freitas da Silva; Duarte, Caue; Freitas, Gabriel Santos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by partial or complete recurrent upper airway obstruction during sleep. OSA brings many adverse consequences, such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, cardiac and encephalic alterations, behavioral, among others, resulting in a significant source of public health care by generating a high financial and social impact. The importance of this assessment proves to be useful, because the incidence of patients with comorbidities associated with AOS has been increasing consistently and presents significant influence in natural disease history. Objective The objective of this study is to assess major comorbidities associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and prevalence in a group of patients diagnosed clinically and polysomnographically with OSA. Methods This is a retrospective study of 100 charts from patients previously diagnosed with OSA in our service between October 2010 and January 2013. Results We evaluated 100 patients with OSA (84 men and 16 women) with a mean age of 50.05 years (range 19–75 years). The prevalence of comorbidities were hypertension (39%), obesity (34%), depression (19%), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (18%), diabetes mellitus (15%), hypercholesterolemia (10%), asthma (4%), and no comorbidities (33%). Comorbidities occurred in 56.2% patients diagnosed with mild OSA, 67.6% with moderate OSA, and 70% of patients with severe OSA. Conclusion According to the current literature data and the values obtained in our paper, we can correlate through expressive values obesity with OSA and their apnea hypopnea index (AHI) values. However, despite significant prevalence of OSA with other comorbidities, our study could not render expressive significance values able to justify their correlations. PMID:27096019

  6. A multifactorial model of masticatory performance: the Suita study.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, T; Ono, T; Kida, M; Kikui, M; Yamamoto, M; Yasui, S; Nokubi, T; Maeda, Y; Kokubo, Y; Watanabe, M; Miyamoto, Y

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have identified various factors related to masticatory performance. This study was aimed to investigate variations and impacts of factors related to masticatory performance among different occlusal support areas in general urban population in Japan. A total of 1875 Japanese subjects (mean age: 66·7 years) were included in the Suita study. Periodontal status was evaluated using the Community Periodontal Index (CPI). The number of functional teeth and occlusal support areas (OSA) were recorded, and the latter divided into three categories of perfect, decreased and lost OSA based on the Eichner Index. Masticatory performance was determined by means of test gummy jelly. For denture wearers, masticatory performance was measured with the dentures in place. The multiple linear regression analysis showed that, when controlling for other variables, masticatory performance was significantly associated with sex, number of functional teeth, maximum bite force and periodontal status in perfect OSA. Masticatory performance was significantly associated with number of functional teeth, maximum bite force and periodontal status in decreased OSA. In lost OSA, masticatory performance was significantly associated with maximum bite force. Maximum bite force was a factor significantly influencing masticatory performance that was common to all OSA groups. After controlling for possible confounding factors, the number of functional teeth and periodontal status were common factors in the perfect and decreased OSA groups, and only sex was significant in the perfect OSA group. These findings may help in providing dietary guidance to elderly people with tooth loss or periodontal disease. PMID:26662207

  7. Metabolomics Profiling for Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Simple Snorers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huajun; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Qian, Yingjun; Guan, Jian; Yi, Hongliang; Zou, Jianyin; Wang, Yuyu; Meng, Lili; Zhao, Aihua; Yin, Shankai; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Few clinical studies have explored altered urinary metabolite levels in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Thus, we applied a metabolomics approach to analyze urinary metabolites in three groups of participants: patients with polysomnography (PSG)-confirmed OSA, simple snorers (SS), and normal subjects. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry were used. A total of 21 and 31 metabolites were differentially expressed in the SS and OSA groups, respectively. Patients with OSA had 18 metabolites different from those with SS. Of the 56 metabolites detected among the 3 groups, 24 were consistently higher or lower. A receiver operator curve analysis revealed that the combination of 4-hydroxypentenoic acid, arabinose, glycochenodeoxycholate-3-sulfate, isoleucine, serine, and xanthine produced a moderate diagnostic score with a sensitivity (specificity) of 75% (78%) for distinguishing OSA from those without OSA. The combination of 4-hydroxypentenoic acid, 5-dihydrotestosterone sulfate, serine, spermine, and xanthine distinguished OSA from SS with a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 80%. Multiple metabolites and metabolic pathways associated with SS and OSA were identified using the metabolomics approach, and the altered metabolite signatures could potentially serve as an alternative diagnostic method to PSG. PMID:27480913

  8. Brain Structure Network Analysis in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yun-gang; Wang, Defeng; Liu, Kai; Weng, Jian; Guan, Yuefeng; Chan, Kate C. C.; Chu, Winnie C. W.; Shi, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a sleeping disorder commonly affecting school-aged children and is characterized by repeated episodes of blockage of the upper airway during sleep. In this study, we performed a graph theoretical analysis on the brain morphometric correlation network in 25 OSA patients (OSA group; 5 female; mean age, 10.1 ± 1.8 years) and investigated the topological alterations in global and regional properties compared with 20 healthy control individuals (CON group; 6 females; mean age, 10.4 ± 1.8 years). A structural correlation network based on regional gray matter volume was constructed respectively for each group. Our results revealed a significantly decreased mean local efficiency in the OSA group over the density range of 0.32–0.44 (p < 0.05). Regionally, the OSAs showed a tendency of decreased betweenness centrality in the left angular gyrus, and a tendency of decreased degree in the right lingual and inferior frontal (orbital part) gyrus (p < 0.005, uncorrected). We also found that the network hubs in OSA and controls were distributed differently. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that characterizes the brain structure network in OSA patients and invests the alteration of topological properties of gray matter volume structural network. This study may help to provide new evidence for understanding the neuropathophysiology of OSA from a topological perspective. PMID:26413809

  9. Does Obstructive Sleep Apnea Influence Perioperative Outcome? A Qualitative Systematic Review for the Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine Task Force on Preoperative Preparation of Patients with Sleep-Disordered Breathing.

    PubMed

    Opperer, Mathias; Cozowicz, Crispiana; Bugada, Dario; Mokhlesi, Babak; Kaw, Roop; Auckley, Dennis; Chung, Frances; Memtsoudis, Stavros G

    2016-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a commonly encountered problem in the perioperative setting even though many patients remain undiagnosed at the time of surgery. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate whether the diagnosis of OSA has an impact on postoperative outcomes. We performed a systematic review of studies published in PubMed-MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, and other nonindexed citations, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Health Technology Assessment up to November 2014. Studies of adult patients with a diagnosis of OSA or high risk thereof, published in the English language, undergoing surgery or procedures under anesthesia care, and reporting ≥1 postoperative outcome were included. Overall, the included studies reported on 413,304 OSA and 8,556,279 control patients. The majority reported worse outcomes for a number of events, including pulmonary and combined complications, among patients with OSA versus the reference group. The association between OSA and in-hospital mortality varied among studies; 9 studies showed no impact of OSA on mortality, 3 studies suggested a decrease in mortality, and 1 study reported increased mortality. In summary, the majority of studies suggest that the presence of OSA is associated with an increased risk of postoperative complications. PMID:27101493

  10. Supra-Epiglottic Upper Airway Volume in Elderly Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abdirahman Mohamed Moussa, Syad; Celle, Sébastien; Laurent, Bernard; Barthélémy, Jean-Claude; Barral, Fabrice-Guy; Roche, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Objective Small upper airway measurements areas and high body mass index are recognized risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in non-elderly populations; however, there is limited information regarding elderly patients. We evaluated whether upper airway volume is associated with OSAS and OSAS treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment and whether BMI is correlated with upper airway volume and measurements in elderly subjects. Methods In 60 volunteers aged 75.58±0.9 years: 20 OSAS, 20 OSAS chronically treated with CPAP, and 20 controls, semi-automatic segmentation, retropalatal distance and transverse diameter of the supra-epiglottic upper airway were evaluated using 3DT1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Anteroposterior to transverse diameter ratio was defined as retropalatar diameter/transverse diameter. Results There were no significant differences in supra-epiglottic upper airway volume between OSAS, CPAP treated patients, and controls. There were significant differences in retropalatal distance and anteroposterior to transverse diameter ratio between OSAS, CPAP treated patients, and controls (P = 0.008 and P<0.0001 respectively). There was a significant correlation between body mass index and retropalatal distance (P<0.05) but not with supra-epiglottic upper airway volume. Conclusion In elderly subjects, OSAS and body mass index are not associated with changes in supra-epiglottic upper airway volume but are associated with modification of pharynx shape. PMID:27336305

  11. Evaluation of Anthropometric and Metabolic Parameters in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Yaşar; Yilmaz, Süreyya; Güven, Mehmet; Kılınç, Faruk; Kara, Ali Veysel; Yilmaz, Zülfükar; Kırbaş, Gökhan; Tuzcu, Alpaslan Kemal; Yılmaz Aydın, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Sleep disorders have recently become a significant public health problem worldwide and have deleterious health consequences. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common type of sleep-related breathing disorders. We aimed to evaluate anthropometric measurements, glucose metabolism, and cortisol levels in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Materials and Methods. A total of 50 patients with a body mass index ≥30 and major OSA symptoms were included in this study. Anthropometric measurements of the patients were recorded and blood samples were drawn for laboratory analysis. A 24-hour urine sample was also collected from each subject for measurement of 24-hour cortisol excretion. Patients were divided equally into 2 groups according to polysomnography results: control group with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) <5 (n = 25) and OSA group with an AHI ≥5 (n = 25). Results. Neck and waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, late-night serum cortisol, morning serum cortisol after 1 mg dexamethasone suppression test, and 24-hour urinary cortisol levels were significantly higher in OSA patients compared to control subjects. Newly diagnosed DM was more frequent in patients with OSA than control subjects (32% versus 8%, p = 0.034). There was a significant positive correlation between AHI and neck circumference, glucose, and late-night serum cortisol. Conclusions. Our study indicates that increased waist and neck circumferences constitute a risk for OSA regardless of obesity status. In addition, OSA has adverse effects on endocrine function and glucose metabolism. PMID:26257957

  12. A Prognosis Tool Based on Fuzzy Anthropometric and Questionnaire Data for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kung-Jeng; Chen, Kun-Huang; Huang, Shou-Hung; Teng, Nai-Chia

    2016-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are linked to the augmented risk of morbidity and mortality. Although polysomnography is considered a well-established method for diagnosing OSA, it suffers the weakness of time consuming and labor intensive, and requires doctors and attending personnel to conduct an overnight evaluation in sleep laboratories with dedicated systems. This study aims at proposing an efficient diagnosis approach for OSA on the basis of anthropometric and questionnaire data. The proposed approach integrates fuzzy set theory and decision tree to predict OSA patterns. A total of 3343 subjects who were referred for clinical suspicion of OSA (eventually 2869 confirmed with OSA and 474 otherwise) were collected, and then classified by the degree of severity. According to an assessment of experiment results on g-means, our proposed method outperforms other methods such as linear regression, decision tree, back propagation neural network, support vector machine, and learning vector quantization. The proposed method is highly viable and capable of detecting the severity of OSA. It can assist doctors in pre-diagnosis of OSA before running the formal PSG test, thereby enabling the more effective use of medical resources. PMID:26932370

  13. The Association Between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Alzheimer’s Disease: A Meta-Analysis Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Emamian, Farnoosh; Khazaie, Habibolah; Tahmasian, Masoud; Leschziner, Guy D.; Morrell, Mary J.; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R.; Rosenzweig, Ivana; Sepehry, Amir A.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are highly prevalent, chronic conditions with intriguing, yet poorly understood epidemiological overlap. To date, the amount of OSA syndrome present in patients with AD across literature remains unknown. To address this question, we collected all available published clinical data and analyzed them through a quantitative meta-analytical approach. The results of our quantitative meta-analysis suggest that the aggregate odds ratio for OSA in AD vs. healthy control was 5.05 and homogeneous. This reflects that patients with AD have a five times higher chance of presenting with OSA than cognitively non-impaired individuals of similar age. Moreover, these data suggest that around half of patients with AD have experienced OSA at some point after their initial diagnosis. The additive impact of progressive changes in sleep quality and structure, changes in cerebral blood flow and the cellular redox status in OSA patients may all be contributing factors to cognitive decline and may further aggravate AD progression. It is hoped that the high OSA rate in AD patients, as suggested by the findings of our meta-analysis, might provide a sufficient clinical incentive to alert clinicians the importance of screening patients for OSA in AD, and stimulate further research in this area. PMID:27148046

  14. The Relationship Between Volume Overload in End-Stage Renal Disease and Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Roumelioti, Maria-Eleni; Brown, Lee K; Unruh, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common, underdiagnosed, and undertreated among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). As in all cases, pathogenesis of OSA is related to repeated upper airway (UA) occlusion or narrowing, but in ESRD, additional contributory factors likely include uremic destabilization of central respiratory control and anatomic changes in the UA related to fluid status. Pulmonary congestion is common in acute and chronic kidney failure and is a consequence of cardiomyopathy and fluid overload, two potentially reversible risk factors. Emerging evidence suggests that volume overload also reduces the UA caliber. The diminution in UA area as well as destabilization of ventilatory control in ESRD have been postulated as causes of increased OSA prevalence and severity in these patients, and creates a vicious cycle wherein OSA exacerbates fluid overload disorders such as in congestive heart failure (CHF) and ESRD, which then further worsen OSA. Dialysis modalities may differ in their effects on volume status, the accumulation of uremic toxins, and acid-base status, and as a consequence, on the emergence and severity of OSA. Given the contribution of excess fluid to both the severity of nocturnal hypoxia and UA narrowing, establishing and maintaining dry weight is of particular importance when managing OSA in ESRD. Clinical trials to determine the extent to which more aggressive fluid removal in ESRD patients may alleviate OSA are needed. PMID:25940851

  15. Circulating adhesion molecules in obstructive sleep apnea and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Victoria M.; Grandner, Michael A.; Pack, Allan I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Over 20 years of evidence indicates a strong association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and cardiovascular disease. Although inflammatory processes have been heavily implicated as an important link between the two, the mechanism for this has not been conclusively established. Atherosclerosis may be one of the mechanisms linking OSA to cardiovascular morbidity. This review addresses the role of circulating adhesion molecules in patients with OSA, and how these may be part of the link between cardiovascular disease and OSA. There is evidence for the role of adhesion molecules in cardiovascular disease risk. Some studies, albeit with small sample sizes, also show higher levels of adhesion molecules in patients with OSA compared to controls. There are also studies that show that levels of adhesion molecules diminish with continuous positive airway pressure therapy. Limitations of these studies include small sample sizes, cross-sectional sampling, and inconsistent control for confounding variables known to influence adhesion molecule levels. There are potential novel therapies to reduce circulating adhesion molecules in patients with OSA to diminish cardiovascular disease. Understanding the role of cell adhesion molecules generated in OSA will help elucidate one mechanistic link to cardiovascular disease in patients with OSA. PMID:23618532

  16. New Data Pre-processing on Assessing of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Line Based Normalization Method (LBNM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdemir, Bayram; Güneş, Salih; Yosunkaya, Şebnem

    Sleep disorders are a very common unawareness illness among public. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) is characterized with decreased oxygen saturation level and repetitive upper respiratory tract obstruction episodes during full night sleep. In the present study, we have proposed a novel data normalization method called Line Based Normalization Method (LBNM) to evaluate OSAS using real data set obtained from Polysomnography device as a diagnostic tool in patients and clinically suspected of suffering OSAS. Here, we have combined the LBNM and classification methods comprising C4.5 decision tree classifier and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to diagnose the OSAS. Firstly, each clinical feature in OSAS dataset is scaled by LBNM method in the range of [0,1]. Secondly, normalized OSAS dataset is classified using different classifier algorithms including C4.5 decision tree classifier and ANN, respectively. The proposed normalization method was compared with min-max normalization, z-score normalization, and decimal scaling methods existing in literature on the diagnosis of OSAS. LBNM has produced very promising results on the assessing of OSAS. Also, this method could be applied to other biomedical datasets.

  17. Biomarkers of cardiovascular stress in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Maeder, Micha T; Mueller, Christian; Schoch, Otto D; Ammann, Peter; Rickli, Hans

    2016-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep-related breathing disorder associated with "cardiovascular stress", i.e. cardiovascular risk factors, cardiovascular diseases, and an increased risk of heart failure, stroke, and death. Experimental and clinical studies have characterized potential underlying mechanisms including biventricular dysfunction, atherosclerosis, and arrhythmia. Assessment of these cardiovascular features of OSA requires a spectrum of clinical tools including ECG, echocardiography, exercise testing, and angiography. In contrast to many cardiovascular diseases, the role of blood biomarkers to characterize cardiovascular function and cardiovascular risk in OSA is poorly defined. In the present review we summarize the available data on biomarkers potentially providing information on cardiovascular features in OSA patients without overt cardiovascular disease. The vast majority of studies on biomarkers of cardiovascular stress in OSA evaluated B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP)/N-terminal-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), and cardiac troponins (cTn). Although some studies found significant associations between these cardiac biomarkers and the presence and severity of OSA, data remain conflicting. Also, the detailed pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the link between OSA and hemodynamic cardiac stress (BNP/NT-proBNP) and cardiomyocyte damage (cTn) are poorly understood. Major research efforts are required to establish the clinical role of cardiovascular biomarkers in patients with OSA. PMID:27380998

  18. Cognitive dysfunction in type 2 diabetes patients accompanied with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huanyin; Gong, Qi; Shao, Jinshan; Liu, Xueyuan; Zhao, Yanxin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate cognitive dysfunction of type 2 diabetes patients accompanied with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), and to analyze its relevant characteristics. Methods: Total 115 type 2 diabetes patients were divided into OSAS group (O group, n=83) and non-OSAS group (N group, n=32); Physical examination patients (C1 group, n=64) and OSAS patients without diabetes (C2 group, n=47) served as the control group. Apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), nocturnal lowest saturation of pulse oxygen (LSPO2) and simple mental state examination scale (MMSE) were evaluated. Results: Among diabetes patients, patients with OSAS have lower glycated hemoglobin, platelet count, thrombocytocrit, MMSE score and lowest mean arterial oxygen than non-OSAS patients; cognitive dysfunction state and glycemic control of patients are related to their diabetic duration, and then along with increase of diabetic duration, glycemic control becomes poor, so that cognitive dysfunction becomes more and more obvious. Conclusion: Along with increased diabetic duration in type 2 diabetes accompanied with OSAS, glycemic control becomes poor, so that cognitive dysfunction more easily occurs. Meanwhile, coagulation function of blood system in OSAS patients with diabetes is impacted to some extent. PMID:25674144

  19. Metabolomics Profiling for Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Simple Snorers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huajun; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Qian, Yingjun; Guan, Jian; Yi, Hongliang; Zou, Jianyin; Wang, Yuyu; Meng, Lili; Zhao, Aihua; Yin, Shankai; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Few clinical studies have explored altered urinary metabolite levels in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Thus, we applied a metabolomics approach to analyze urinary metabolites in three groups of participants: patients with polysomnography (PSG)-confirmed OSA, simple snorers (SS), and normal subjects. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry were used. A total of 21 and 31 metabolites were differentially expressed in the SS and OSA groups, respectively. Patients with OSA had 18 metabolites different from those with SS. Of the 56 metabolites detected among the 3 groups, 24 were consistently higher or lower. A receiver operator curve analysis revealed that the combination of 4-hydroxypentenoic acid, arabinose, glycochenodeoxycholate-3-sulfate, isoleucine, serine, and xanthine produced a moderate diagnostic score with a sensitivity (specificity) of 75% (78%) for distinguishing OSA from those without OSA. The combination of 4-hydroxypentenoic acid, 5-dihydrotestosterone sulfate, serine, spermine, and xanthine distinguished OSA from SS with a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 80%. Multiple metabolites and metabolic pathways associated with SS and OSA were identified using the metabolomics approach, and the altered metabolite signatures could potentially serve as an alternative diagnostic method to PSG. PMID:27480913

  20. Nano-encapsulation of coenzyme Q10 using octenyl succinic anhydride modified starch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Octenyl succinic anhydride modified starch (OSA-ST) was used to encapsulate Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). CoQ10 was dissolved in rice bran oil (RBO), and incorporated into an aqueous OSA-ST solution. High pressure homogenization (HPH) of the mixture was conducted at 170 MPa for 5-6 cycles. The resulting ...

  1. Analysis of octenylsuccinate rice and tapioca starches: Distribution of octenylsuccinic anhydride groups in starch granules.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Kristin; Reuhs, Bradley L; Ovando Martinez, Maribel; Simsek, Senay

    2016-11-15

    Characterization of the fine structure of octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA) starch would lead to a better understanding of functional properties. OSA rice and tapioca starches were analyzed using microscopy, liquid chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance. Chain length distribution of amylopectin changed significantly (P<0.05) after OSA esterification. Weight averaged degree of polymerization (DPw) decreased significantly (P<0.05) from 16.47 to 13.29 and from 14.87 to 12.47 in native and OSA rice and tapioca starches, respectively. The chain length distribution of pure amylopectin fractions suggested that OSA groups were not present in the amylopectin portion of the starch. (1)H NMR analysis of pure amylose and amylopectin fractions indicated that OSA substitution was present only in amylose fractions of rice and tapioca starches. Esterification with 3% OSA results in starch that has OSA substituted mainly on amylose chains or possibly on amylopectin chains that have been hydrolyzed from the amylopectin molecules during esterification. PMID:27283674

  2. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Drager, Luciano F.; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2011-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is independently associated with death from cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction and stroke. Myocardial infarction and stroke are complications of atherosclerosis; therefore, over the last decade investigators have tried to unravel relationships between OSA and atherosclerosis. OSA may accelerate atherosclerosis by exacerbating key atherogenic risk factors. For instance, OSA is a recognized secondary cause of hypertension and may contribute to insulin resistance, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. In addition, clinical data and experimental evidence in animal models suggest that OSA can have direct proatherogenic effects inducing systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, vascular smooth cell activation, increased adhesion molecule expression, monocyte/lymphocyte activation, increased lipid loading in macrophages, lipid peroxidation, and endothelial dysfunction. Several cross-sectional studies have shown consistently that OSA is independently associated with surrogate markers of premature atherosclerosis, most of them in the carotid bed. Moreover, OSA treatment with continuous positive airway pressure may attenuate carotid atherosclerosis, as has been shown in a randomized clinical trial. This review provides an update on the role of OSA in atherogenesis and highlights future perspectives in this important research area. PMID:21813534

  3. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: From Phenotype to Genetic Basis

    PubMed Central

    Casale, M; Pappacena, M; Rinaldi, V; Bressi, F; Baptista, P; Salvinelli, F

    2009-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome, characterized by snoring, periodic apnea, hypoxemia during sleep, and daytime hypersomnolence. It affects 4-5% of the general population. Racial studies and chromosomal mapping, familial studies and twin studies have provided evidence for the possible link between the OSAS and genetic factors and also most of the risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of OSAS are largely genetically determined. A percentage of 35-40% of its variance can be attributed to genetic factors. It is likely that genetic factors associated with craniofacial structure, body fat distribution and neural control of the upper airway muscles interact to produce the OSAS phenotype. Although the role of specific genes that influence the development of OSAS has not yet been identified, current researches, especially in animal model, suggest that several genetic systems may be important. In this chapter, we will first define the OSAS phenotype, the pathogenesis and the risk factors involved in the OSAS that may be inherited, then, we will review the current progress in the genetics of OSAS and suggest a few future perspectives in the development of therapeutic agents for this complex disease entity. PMID:19794884

  4. The Interaction between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Parkinson's Disease: Possible Mechanisms and Implications for Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Kaminska, Marta; Lafontaine, Anne-Louise; Kimoff, R. John

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a relentlessly progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with hallmark motor and nonmotor symptoms (NMS) such as sleep disturbances and cognitive dysfunction. While dopaminergic treatments have improved the motor aspects of PD, progression remains inevitable. Research has recently increasingly focused on strategies to modify disease progression and on nonmotor manifestations of PD, given their impact on patients' quality of life. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a treatable sleep disorder, common in the general population, associated with excessive daytime sleepiness and neurocognitive deficits. Neuroimaging has demonstrated structural and functional changes in OSA patients; in animal models, OSA causes brain inflammation and oxidative injury, including in key areas involved in PD pathophysiology such as locus coeruleus. The prevalence of OSA in PD has been variable in studies to date, and potential consequences and interrelationship between the two disorders have not been well studied. There is however emerging evidence that OSA is associated with increased NMS in PD, particularly cognitive dysfunction. This review focuses on the possible interrelationship between OSA and PD. Mechanisms promoting OSA in PD will be reviewed, as well as mechanisms whereby OSA can affect the neurodegenerative process in PD. PMID:26509097

  5. To ED or not to ED--is erectile dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea related to endothelial dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Hoyos, Camilla M; Melehan, Kerri L; Phillips, Craig L; Grunstein, Ronald R; Liu, Peter Y

    2015-04-01

    Both obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and erectile dysfunction (ErectD) are highly prevalent and largely under diagnosed medical conditions. These disorders often co-exist, with about half of the male OSA population having ErectD and vice versa. OSA is strongly associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality while ErectD has been proposed as a phenotypic marker of cardiovascular disease. This implies that the two conditions may be linked by a common pathophysiological mechanism. In this review we provide evidence supporting the hypothesis that endothelial dysfunction (EndoD) may be the common pathophysiological mechanism linking OSA with both ErectD and cardiovascular complications. EndoD is one of the earliest markers of cardiovascular disease and substantial evidence suggests that OSA independently causes EndoD. There is also strong evidence that causally links EndoD with organic ErectD. Further research should be directed at determining the value of simultaneously assessing both ErectD and OSA in patients presenting with symptoms of either condition. In both ErectD and OSA clinics, identifying both conditions could improve overall cardiovascular risk stratification whilst treatment of OSA could reduce both ErectD and cardiovascular risk. PMID:24813467

  6. Biological plausibility linking sleep apnoea and metabolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gileles-Hillel, Alex; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Gozal, David

    2016-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a very common disorder that affects 10-25% of the general population. In the past two decades, OSA has emerged as a cardiometabolic risk factor in both paediatric and adult populations. OSA-induced metabolic perturbations include dyslipidaemia, atherogenesis, liver dysfunction and abnormal glucose metabolism. The mainstay of treatment for OSA is adenotonsillectomy in children and continuous positive airway pressure therapy in adults. Although these therapies are effective at resolving the sleep-disordered breathing component of OSA, they do not always produce beneficial effects on metabolic function. Thus, a deeper understanding of the underlying mechanisms by which OSA influences metabolic dysfunction might yield improved therapeutic approaches and outcomes. In this Review, we summarize the evidence obtained from animal models and studies of patients with OSA of potential mechanistic pathways linking the hallmarks of OSA (intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation) with metabolic dysfunction. Special emphasis is given to adipose tissue dysfunction induced by sleep apnoea, which bears a striking resemblance to adipose dysfunction resulting from obesity. In addition, important gaps in current knowledge and promising lines of future investigation are identified. PMID:26939978

  7. The Effect of Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Quality of Life in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiao, Kai Hsun; Nixon, Gillian M.

    2008-01-01

    Benefits of treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children with cerebral palsy could differ from those in otherwise healthy children. We examined the effects of OSA treatment by comparing a group of children with cerebral palsy treated with adenotonsillectomy or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) by nasal mask with controls who…

  8. A Comparison of Personality Characteristics and Psychiatric Symptomatology between Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome and Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    So, Soo-Jung; Kang, Seung-Gul; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Kim, Leen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the personality characteristics of patients with upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS) and those of patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Methods Eighty-eight patients with UARS and 365 patients with OSAS participated. All patients had a diagnostic full-night attended polysomnography (PSG) and completed the Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Symptom Checklist-90-Revision (SCL-90-R) and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ). Results The UARS group scored significantly higher than the OSAS group on the ESS, AIS, and PSQI (p<0.001). The scores of all SCL-90-R subscales in the UARS group were significantly higher than those in the OSA group (all p<0.001, except for somatization, p=0.016). Patients with UARS scored lower on EPQ-E (extroversion/introversion) (p=0.006) and EPQ-L (lie) (p<0.001) than those with OSA. UARS patients also showed higher scores on EPQ-P (psychoticism) (p=0.002) and EPQ-N (neuroticism) (p<0.001) than OSAS patients. Conclusion Our results suggest that patients with UARS have worse subjective sleep quality than OSAS patients in spite of their better PSG findings. UARS patients tend to have more neurotic and sensitive personalities than patients with OSAS, which may be a cause of the clinical features of UARS. PMID:25866518

  9. The Association Between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Alzheimer's Disease: A Meta-Analysis Perspective.

    PubMed

    Emamian, Farnoosh; Khazaie, Habibolah; Tahmasian, Masoud; Leschziner, Guy D; Morrell, Mary J; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R; Rosenzweig, Ivana; Sepehry, Amir A

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are highly prevalent, chronic conditions with intriguing, yet poorly understood epidemiological overlap. To date, the amount of OSA syndrome present in patients with AD across literature remains unknown. To address this question, we collected all available published clinical data and analyzed them through a quantitative meta-analytical approach. The results of our quantitative meta-analysis suggest that the aggregate odds ratio for OSA in AD vs. healthy control was 5.05 and homogeneous. This reflects that patients with AD have a five times higher chance of presenting with OSA than cognitively non-impaired individuals of similar age. Moreover, these data suggest that around half of patients with AD have experienced OSA at some point after their initial diagnosis. The additive impact of progressive changes in sleep quality and structure, changes in cerebral blood flow and the cellular redox status in OSA patients may all be contributing factors to cognitive decline and may further aggravate AD progression. It is hoped that the high OSA rate in AD patients, as suggested by the findings of our meta-analysis, might provide a sufficient clinical incentive to alert clinicians the importance of screening patients for OSA in AD, and stimulate further research in this area. PMID:27148046

  10. PAHs in leachates from thermal power plant wastes and ash-based construction materials.

    PubMed

    Irha, Natalya; Reinik, Janek; Jefimova, Jekaterina; Koroljova, Arina; Raado, Lembi-Merike; Hain, Tiina; Uibu, Mai; Kuusik, Rein

    2015-08-01

    The focus of the current study is to characterise the leaching behaviour of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from oil shale ashes (OSAs) of pulverised firing (PF) and circulating fluidised-bed (CFB) boilers from Estonian Thermal Power Plant (Estonia) as well as from mortars and concrete based on OSAs. The target substances were 16 PAHs from the EPA priority pollutant list. OSA samples and OSA-based mortars were tested for leaching, according to European standard EN 12457-2 (2002). European standard CEN/TC 15862(2012) for monolithic matter was used for OSA-based concrete. Water extracts were analysed by GC-MS for the concentration of PAHs. Naphthalene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene and pyrene were detected. Still, the release of PAHs was below the threshold limit value for inert waste. The amount of the finest fraction (particle size <0.045 mm), the content of the Al-Si glass phase and the surface characteristics were the main factors, which could affect the accessibility of PAHs for leaching. The mobility of PAHs from OSA of CFB and PF boilers was 20.2 and 9.9%, respectively. Hardening of OSA-based materials did not lead to the immobilisation of soluble PAHs. Release of PAHs from the monolith samples did not exceed 0.5 μg/m(2). In terms of leaching of PAHs, OSA is safe to be used for construction purposes. PMID:25869435

  11. Disparities and genetic risk factors in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Katherine A; Patel, Sanjay R

    2016-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an increasingly prevalent condition. A growing body of literature supports substantial racial disparities in the prevalence, risk factors, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of this disease. Craniofacial structure among Asians appears to confer an elevated risk of OSA despite lower rates of obesity. Among African Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanics, OSA prevalence is increased, likely due in part to obesity. The burden of symptoms, particularly excessive daytime sleepiness, is higher among African Americans, although Hispanics more often report snoring. Limited data suggest that African Americans may be more susceptible to hypertension in the setting of OSA. While differences in genetic risk factors may explain disparities in OSA burden, no definitive genetic differences have yet been identified. In addition to disparities in OSA development, disparities in OSA diagnosis and treatment have also been identified. Increased severity of disease at diagnosis among African Americans suggests a delay in diagnosis. Treatment outcomes are also suboptimal among African Americans. In children, tonsillectomy is less likely to cure OSA and more commonly associated with complications in this group. Among adults, adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is substantially lower in African Americans. The reasons for these disparities, particularly in outcomes, are not well understood and should be a research priority. PMID:26428843

  12. Risk of post-operative pneumocephalus in patients with obstructive sleep apnea undergoing transsphenoidal surgery.

    PubMed

    White-Dzuro, Gabrielle A; Maynard, Ken; Zuckerman, Scott L; Weaver, Kyle D; Russell, Paul T; Clavenna, Matthew J; Chambless, Lola B

    2016-07-01

    Patients undergoing transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) have an anterior skull base defect that limits the use of positive pressure ventilation post-operatively. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can be seen in these patients and is treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). In our study we documented the incidence of pre-existing OSA and reported the incidence of diagnosed pneumocephalus and its relationship to OSA. A retrospective review was conducted from a surgical outcomes database. Electronic medical records were reviewed, with an emphasis on diagnosis of OSA and documented symptomatic pneumocephalus. A total of 324 patients underwent 349 TSS for sellar mass resection. The average body mass index of the study cohort was 32.5kg/m(2). Sixty-nine patients (21%) had documented OSA. Only 25 out of 69 (36%) had a documented post-operative CPAP plan. Out of all 349 procedures, there were two incidents of pneumocephalus diagnosed. Neither of the patients had pre-existing OSA. One in five patients in our study had pre-existing OSA. Most patients returned to CPAP use within several weeks of TSS for resection of a sellar mass. Neither of the patients with pneumocephalus had pre-existing OSA and none of the patients with early re-initiation of CPAP developed this complication. This study provides preliminary evidence that resuming CPAP early in the post-operative period might be less dangerous than previously assumed. PMID:26916903

  13. Iowa gambling task performance in overweight children and adolescents at risk for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    McNally, Kelly A; Shear, Paula K; Tlustos, Sarah; Amin, Raouf S; Beebe, Dean W

    2012-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a nocturnal respiratory disorder associated with cognitive and behavioral sequelae, including impairments in executive functioning (EF). Previous literature has focused on "cool" EF, meaning abilities such as working memory and planning that do not involve affective control requirements. Little is known about the impact OSA may have on "hot" EF that involves regulation of affect and risk-related decision-making, and that may be particularly salient during adolescence, when these skills are rapidly developing. This study examined performance on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), a task believed to assess aspects of "hot" EF, in overweight adolescents at risk for OSA. Consistent with hypotheses, individuals without OSA made more beneficial decisions on the IGT over time, but participants with OSA did not benefit from feedback and continued to make choices associated with higher initial rewards, but greater long-term losses. The relationship between developmental level and IGT performance was moderated by OSA status. Individuals with OSA did not demonstrate the expected developmental gains in performance during the IGT. This finding suggests that OSA may impact the development of critical aspects of EF, or at least the expression of these skills during the developmentally important period of adolescence. PMID:22300670

  14. Diagnostic Accuracy of Obstructive Airway Adult Test for Diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Giulio; Vicini, Claudio; De Benedetto, Michele; Salamanca, Fabrizio; Sorrenti, Giovanni; Romandini, Mario; Bosi, Marcello; Saponaro, Gianmarco; Foresta, Enrico; Laforì, Andreina; Meccariello, Giuseppe; Bianchi, Alessandro; Toraldo, Domenico Maurizio; Campanini, Aldo; Montevecchi, Filippo; Rizzotto, Grazia; Cervelli, Daniele; Moro, Alessandro; Arigliani, Michele; Gobbi, Riccardo; Pelo, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Rationale. The gold standard for the diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is polysomnography, whose access is however reduced by costs and limited availability, so that additional diagnostic tests are needed. Objectives. To analyze the diagnostic accuracy of the Obstructive Airway Adult Test (OAAT) compared to polysomnography for the diagnosis of OSA in adult patients. Methods. Ninety patients affected by OSA verified with polysomnography (AHI ≥ 5) and ten healthy patients, randomly selected, were included and all were interviewed by one blind examiner with OAAT questions. Measurements and Main Results. The Spearman rho, evaluated to measure the correlation between OAAT and polysomnography, was 0.72 (p < 0.01). The area under the ROC curve (95% CI) was the parameter to evaluate the accuracy of the OAAT: it was 0.91 (0.81–1.00) for the diagnosis of OSA (AHI ≥ 5), 0.90 (0.82–0.98) for moderate OSA (AHI ≥ 15), and 0.84 (0.76–0.92) for severe OSA (AHI ≥ 30). Conclusions. The OAAT has shown a high correlation with polysomnography and also a high diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of OSA. It has also been shown to be able to discriminate among the different degrees of severity of OSA. Additional large studies aiming to validate this questionnaire as a screening or diagnostic test are needed. PMID:26636102

  15. Sleep Apnea in Patients with and without a Right-to-Left Shunt

    PubMed Central

    Mojadidi, Mohammad Khalid; Bokhoor, Pooya Isaac; Gevorgyan, Rubine; Noureddin, Nabil; MacLellan, W. Cameron; Wen, Eugenia; Aysola, Ravi; Tobis, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the presence of right-to-left shunting (RLS) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and compare clinical characteristics and parameters of the sleep studies of patients with and without RLS. Background: The most common cause of RLS is due to intermittent flow through a patent foramen ovale (PFO). PFO occurs more frequently in patients with OSA and may be involved in the exacerbation of OSA. Methods: Patients with an abnormal polysomnogram seen at UCLA-Santa Monica Sleep Medicine Clinic were enrolled. A diagnosis of RLS was made using a transcranial Doppler (TCD) bubble study. Gender and age-matched controls were drawn from patients referred for cardiac catheterization who underwent a TCD. The frequency of RLS in OSA patients and the controls was evaluated. Clinical characteristics and polysomnogram parameters were compared between OSA patients with and without a RLS. Results: A total of 100 OSA patients and 200 controls participated in the study. The prevalence of RLS was higher in patients with OSA compared to the control group (42% versus 19%; p < 0.0001). Patients with OSA and a RLS had a lower apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), less obstructive apnea, and fewer hypopnea episodes than patients with OSA without a RLS. The baseline and nadir SpO2 were similar in both groups and did not correlate with the level of RLS assessed by TCD. The degree of desaturation for a given respiratory disturbance, as measured by oxygen desaturation index (ODI)/AHI ratio, was higher in OSA patients with RLS versus OSA patients without RLS (0.85 ± 0.07 versus 0.68 ± 0.04; p < 0.0001). Conclusion: RLS, most commonly due to a PFO, occurs 2.2 times more frequently in OSA patients compared to a control population that was matched for age and gender. The severity of sleep apnea is not greater in OSA patients who have a PFO. However, patients with OSA and a PFO are more likely to become symptomatic at a younger age with an equivalent decrease in nocturnal SpO2

  16. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Impairs Postexercise Sympathovagal Balance in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cepeda, Felipe X.; Toschi-Dias, Edgar; Maki-Nunes, Cristiane; Rondon, Maria Urbana P.B.; Alves, Maria Janieire N.N.; Braga, Ana Maria F.W.; Martinez, Daniel G.; Drager, Luciano F.; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Negrao, Carlos E.; Trombetta, Ivani C.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: The attenuation of heart rate recovery after maximal exercise (ΔHRR) is independently impaired by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Therefore, we tested the hypotheses: (1) MetS + OSA restrains ΔHRR; and (2) Sympathetic hyperactivation is involved in this impairment. Design: Cross-sectional study. Participants: We studied 60 outpatients in whom MetS had been newly diagnosed (ATP III), divided according to apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥ 15 events/h in MetS + OSA (n = 30, 49 ± 1.7 y) and AHI < 15 events/h in MetS - OSA (n = 30, 46 ± 1.4 y). Normal age-matched healthy control subjects (C) without MetS and OSA were also enrolled (n = 16, 46 ± 1.7 y). Interventions: Polysomnography, microneurography, cardiopulmonary exercise test. Measurements and Results: We evaluated OSA (AHI - polysomnography), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA - microneurography) and cardiac autonomic activity (LF = low frequency, HF = high frequency, LF/HF = sympathovagal balance) based on spectral analysis of heart rate (HR) variability. ΔHRR was calculated (peak HR minus HR at first, second, and fourth minute of recovery) after cardiopulmonary exercise test. MetS + OSA had higher MSNA and LF, and lower HF than MetS - OSA and C. Similar impairment occurred in MetS - OSA versus C (interaction, P < 0.01). MetS + OSA had attenuated ΔHRR at first, second, and at fourth minute than did C, and attenuated ΔHRR at fourth minute than did MetS - OSA (interaction, P < 0.001). Compared with C, MetS - OSA had attenuated ΔHRR at second and fourth min (interaction, P < 0.001). Further analysis showed association of the ΔHRR (first, second, and fourth minute) and AHI, MSNA, LF and HF components (P < 0.05 for all associations). Conclusions: The attenuation of heart rate recovery after maximal exercise is impaired to a greater degree where metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) than by MetS with no or

  17. The use of portable monitoring for sleep apnea diagnosis in adults.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marcia G; Garbuio, Silvério; Treptow, Erika C; Polese, Jessica F; Tufik, Sergio; Nery, Luiz E; Bittencourt, Lia

    2014-02-01

    Due to increasing demand for sleep services, there has been growing interest in ambulatory models of care for patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The implementation of alternative approaches to the current management by full polysomnography (PSG) in the sleep laboratory is necessary for diagnosing this syndrome due to the high cost of full-night PSG. A good alternative option for OSA diagnosis is portable monitoring (PM), which is known for its accuracy, ease of management and lower cost when compared with full PSG. PM has not been well validated for OSA diagnosis in patients with medical comorbidities or in elderly individuals and children. PM may be recommended as an alternative method to PSG for patients with high clinical risk for OSA. In the present review, we describe the use of PM for OSA diagnosis and evaluate the current progress, costs, limitations and applications of these devices in various groups of patients, particularly for patients with comorbid diseases. PMID:24308652

  18. Obstructive sleep apnea and hypertension: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Mohsenin, Vahid

    2014-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a prevalent sleep disorder which is characterized by recurrent upper closure with oxygen desaturation and sleep disruption. OSA increases the risk of vascular disorders in the form of stroke, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and hypertension. The mechanisms underlying the vascular disorders are several and include intermittent hypoxia with release of cytokines, angiogenic inhibitors, free radicals, and adhesion molecules. During apneas, arterial blood pressure gradually rises and surges abruptly after the termination of apnea. Two thirds of patients with OSA will ultimately have diurnal hypertension. This review discusses the literature supporting the significant role of OSA in hypertension and the effect of OSA treatment on blood pressure. PMID:25139780

  19. Differences in perceptions of the diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea and continuous positive airway pressure therapy among adherers and nonadherers.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Amy M; Deatrick, Janet A; Kuna, Samuel T; Weaver, Terri E

    2010-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients' consistent use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is critical to realizing improved functional outcomes and reducing untoward health risks associated with OSA. We conducted a mixed methods, concurrent, nested study to explore OSA patients' beliefs and perceptions of the diagnosis and CPAP treatment that differentiate adherent from nonadherent patients prior to and after the first week of treatment, when the pattern of CPAP use is established. Guided by social cognitive theory, themes were derived from 30 interviews conducted postdiagnosis and after 1 week of CPAP use. Directed content analysis, followed by categorization of participants as adherent/nonadherent from objectively measured CPAP use, preceded across-case analysis among 15 participants with severe OSA. Beliefs and perceptions that differed between adherers and nonadherers included OSA risk perception, symptom recognition, self-efficacy, outcome expectations, treatment goals, and treatment facilitators/ barriers. Our findings suggest opportunities for developing and testing tailored interventions to promote CPAP use. PMID:20354236

  20. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in a publicly funded healthcare system.

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Dana; Wallace, Jeanne

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite its current recognition as a major health concern, little has been published about obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) as a health problem in public healthcare systems where limited resources, language and cultural differences may present barriers to detection and treatment. OBJECTIVE: To describe patients referred for suspected OSAS in a large county-funded healthcare system. METHOD: A retrospective, descriptive observational study that included all patients referred for an OSAS evaluation between September 2000 and September 2002. RESULTS: Only 123 patients were referred and 115 completed an evaluation during the two-year period: 99% met OSAS diagnostic criteria, which was severe in 79% and frequently complicated by related comorbid conditions. CPAP acceptance was lower than in the previous series, especially among Hispanics. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that referral for OSAS evaluation was limited to those most severely affected and raise the possibility of underdetection and undertreatment in the ublic sector. PMID:15779501

  1. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in North American Commercial Drivers

    PubMed Central

    KALES, Stefanos N.; STRAUBEL, Madeleine G.

    2013-01-01

    The most common medical cause of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Specifically, among an estimated 14 million US commercial drivers, 17–28% or 2.4 to 3.9 million are expected to have OSA. Based on existing epidemiologic evidence, most of these drivers are undiagnosed and not adequately treated. Untreated OSA increases the risk of vehicular crashes as documented in multiple independent studies and by meta-analysis. Therefore, identifying commercial drivers with OSA and having them effectively treated should decrease crash-related fatalities and injuries. Several strategies are available for screening and identifying drivers with OSA. The simplest and most effective objective strategies use body mass index (BMI) cutoffs for obesity. Functional screens are promising adjuncts to other objective tests. The most effective approach will likely be a combination of a good questionnaire; BMI measures; and a careful physician-obtained history complemented by a functional screen. PMID:24317450

  2. Sleep Disturbances in Persons Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Taibi, Diana M.

    2012-01-01

    Up to 70% of persons living with HIV (PLWH) experience sleep disturbances. Insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are common disorders seen in the primary care of PLWH. This paper reviews the current evidence and practice recommendations for treating these conditions. Insomnia is evaluated by clinical interview, questionnaires, and sleep diaries. The recommended first-line treatment is cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), delivered by a trained therapist. Certain sedative medications may be useful, but over-the-counter treatments (particularly those containing antihistamines) are not recommended. OSAS is diagnosed by overnight sleep study but can be screened for in primary care. The STOP-BANG is a useful 8-item screening tool. The gold standard of treatment for OSAS is the use of a continuous positive airway pressure device. Treatment of insomnia and OSAS is important for improving quality of life and preventing associated health problems (especially cardiovascular disease in OSAS) in PLWH. PMID:23290379

  3. Where There Is Smoke…There Is Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Dixon-Williams, Sherrie; Thornton, J. Daryl

    2014-01-01

    Smoking and OSA are widely prevalent and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It has been hypothesized that each of these conditions adversely affects the other, leading to increased comorbidity while altering the efficacy of existing therapies. However, while the association between smoking and OSA is plausible, the evidence is less than conclusive. Cigarette smoking may increase the severity of OSA through alterations in sleep architecture, upper airway neuromuscular function, arousal mechanisms, and upper airway inflammation. Conversely, some evidence links untreated OSA with smoking addiction. Smoking cessation should improve OSA, but the evidence to support this is also limited. This article reviews the current evidence linking both conditions and the efficacy of various treatments. Limitations of the current evidence and areas in need of future investigation are also addressed. PMID:25451354

  4. Obstructive sleep apnea and metabolic bone disease: Insights in to the relationship between bone and sleep

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Christine M.; Shea, Steven A.; Stone, Katie L.; Cauley, Jane A.; Rosen, Clifford J.; Redline, Susan; Karsenty, Gerard; Orwoll, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and low bone mass are two prevalent conditions, particularly among older adults, a section of the U.S. population that is expected to grow dramatically over the coming years. OSA, the most common form of sleep disordered breathing, has been linked to multiple cardiovascular, metabolic, hormonal and inflammatory derangements and may have adverse effects on bone. However, little is known about how OSA (including the associated hypoxia and sleep loss) affects bone metabolism. In order to gain insight into the relationship between sleep and bone, we review the growing information on OSA and metabolic bone disease and discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms by which OSA may affect bone metabolism/architecture. PMID:25639209

  5. Update on paediatric obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Dehlink, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is one of the most common causes of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in children. It is associated with significant morbidity, potentially impacting on long-term neurocognitive and behavioural development, as well as cardiovascular outcomes and metabolic homeostasis. The low grade systemic inflammation and increased oxidative stress seen in this condition are believed to underpin the development of these OSA-related morbidities. The significant variance in degree of end organ morbidity in patients with the same severity of OSA highlights the importance of the interplay of genetic and environmental factors in determining the overall OSA phenotype. This review seeks to summarize the current understanding of the aetiology and mechanisms underlying OSA, its risk factors, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26904263

  6. Cognitive impairment in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, K; Baril, A-A; Gagnon, J-F; Fortin, M; Décary, A; Lafond, C; Desautels, A; Montplaisir, J; Gosselin, N

    2014-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterised by repetitive cessation or reduction of airflow due to upper airway obstructions. These respiratory events lead to chronic sleep fragmentation and intermittent hypoxemia. Several studies have shown that OSA is associated with daytime sleepiness and cognitive dysfunctions, characterized by impairments of attention, episodic memory, working memory, and executive functions. This paper reviews the cognitive profile of adults with OSA and discusses the relative role of altered sleep and hypoxemia in the aetiology of these cognitive deficits. Markers of cognitive dysfunctions such as those measured with waking electroencephalography and neuroimaging are also presented. The effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on cognitive functioning and the possibility of permanent brain damage associated with OSA are also discussed. Finally, this paper reviews the evidence suggesting that OSA is a risk factor for developing mild cognitive impairment and dementia in the aging population and stresses the importance of its early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25070768

  7. Differences in Perceptions of the Diagnosis and Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy Among Adherers and Nonadherers

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Amy M.; Deatrick, Janet A.; Kuna, Samuel T.; Weaver, Terri E.

    2010-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients’ consistent use of CPAP is critical to realizing improved functional outcomes and reducing untoward health risks associated with OSA. We conducted a mixed methods concurrent, nested study to describe OSA patients’ beliefs and perceptions of the diagnosis and CPAP treatment that importantly differentiate adherent from nonadherent patients prior to and after the first week of treatment when the pattern of CPAP use is established. Guided by social cognitive theory, themes were derived from 30 interviews conducted post-diagnosis and after one week CPAP use. Directed content analysis followed by categorization of participants as adherent/nonadherent from objectively measured CPAP use preceded across-case analysis among 15 participants with severe OSA. Beliefs and perceptions that differed between adherers and nonadherers included OSA risk perception, symptom recognition, self-efficacy, outcome expectations, treatment goals, and treatment facilitators/barriers. Our findings suggest opportunities for developing and testing tailored interventions to promote CPAP use. PMID:20354236

  8. Effect of telemetric monitoring in the first 30 days of continuous positive airway pressure adaptation for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome - a controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Frasnelli, Matthias; Baty, Florent; Niedermann, Jolanda; Brutsche, Martin H; Schoch, Otto D

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is characterised by repetitive collapse of the upper airway during sleep. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) applied via a mask is the standard treatment for OSAS. CPAP adherence is crucial in therapy to prevent the deleterious consequences of OSAS. We hypothesised that a combination of supervision by telemetry together with targeted telephone support in the first month of CPAP would increase CPAP adherence and treatment success. A total of 113 OSAS patients followed by telemetry-triggered interventions used the device for 5.3 h/night on 28/30 nights, significantly more than the 110 OSAS patients in the control group with 4.6 h/night and 27/30 nights. Telemetry-triggered interventions have a significant impact on adherence rate in early CPAP treatment. These results can be reached with an acceptable additional effort. PMID:26253747

  9. PubMed Central

    DE NUCCIO, F.; DE BENEDETTO, M.; SCODITTI, E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with severe cerebro-cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. It is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis, arterial thrombosis and metabolic syndrome, and recently has been associated with an increased incidence of cancer and death. A causal link between OSAS and atherosclerosis has been partially established. Recent research on atherosclerosis in OSAS has focused on thrombotic tendency and blood viscosity, providing new insight into disease mechanisms. Hypoxia is a critical pathophysiological element in OSAS that leads to intensive sympathetic activity, in association with inflammation, oxidative stress and procoagulant activity. Hypoxia and the induction of oxidative stress can simultaneously represent an underlying mechanism in the pathogenesis of cancer development and progression. This mini-review will discuss the latest findings on the association and potential relationship between OSA and pathological vascular sequelae. PMID:26019388

  10. [Cephalometric indices in patients with sleep apnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    de Vega Gómez, A; Corrales Zarauza, M; Payo Losa, F; Cobo Plana, J

    1995-02-01

    The cephalometric indexes of 16 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) were compared with those of 12 controls in order to determine if fundamental anatomical changes were present in the patients and to identify a pattern of facial features that might be characteristic of individuals with OSAS. Our results point to micrognathia of the upper maxilla in OSAS patients (indicated by significantly lower indexes for convexity, Mx 1, and the angles SNA and ANB). We also found a longer soft palate and a functionally shallower pharynx. Together theses features reduce the permeability of the posterior pharyngeal air space. Additionally, we observed a dolichocephalic facial pattern in OSAS patients, along with a tendency to morbid anterior opening. We analyze the limitations of conventional cephalometry. While recognizing its usefulness in establishing baseline indexes before treatment and in postsurgical assessment, we nevertheless point out that it cannot be relied upon as the only test for evaluating surgical correction in OSAS patients. PMID:7704391

  11. Obstructive sleep apnea in North American commercial drivers.

    PubMed

    Kales, Stefanos N; Straubel, Madeleine G

    2014-01-01

    The most common medical cause of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Specifically, among an estimated 14 million US commercial drivers, 17-28% or 2.4 to 3.9 million are expected to have OSA. Based on existing epidemiologic evidence, most of these drivers are undiagnosed and not adequately treated. Untreated OSA increases the risk of vehicular crashes as documented in multiple independent studies and by meta-analysis. Therefore, identifying commercial drivers with OSA and having them effectively treated should decrease crash-related fatalities and injuries. Several strategies are available for screening and identifying drivers with OSA. The simplest and most effective objective strategies use body mass index (BMI) cutoffs for obesity. Functional screens are promising adjuncts to other objective tests. The most effective approach will likely be a combination of a good questionnaire; BMI measures; and a careful physician-obtained history complemented by a functional screen. PMID:24317450

  12. Ionic liquids as novel solvents for biosynthesis of octenyl succinic anhydride-modified waxy maize starch.

    PubMed

    Li, Dandan; Zhang, Xiwen; Tian, Yaoqi

    2016-05-01

    Biosynthesis of octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA) starch was investigated using ionic liquids (ILs) as reaction media. Waxy maize starch was pretreated in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chlorine and then esterified with OSA in 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate by using Novozyme 435 as catalyst. The degree of substitution of OSA starch reached 0.0130 with 5 wt% starch concentration and 1 wt% lipase dosage based on ILs weight at 50 °C for 3h. The formation of OSA starch was confirmed by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction revealed that the morphology and crystal structure of starch were significantly destroyed. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that esterification decreased the thermal stability of starch. The successful lipase-catalyzed synthesis of OSA starch in ILs suggests that ILs are potential replacement of traditional organic solvents for starch ester biosynthesis. PMID:26797225

  13. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness changes in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: one year follow-up results

    PubMed Central

    Zengin, Mehmet Ozgur; Tuncer, Ibrahim; Karahan, Eyyup

    2014-01-01

    AIM To investigate the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness changes in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) for one year follow-up. To discuss the possibility of detecting tendency of glaucoma in this population by using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (3D-OCT-2000 Spectral domain). METHODS After polysomnographic study, all subjects (64 OSAS patients and 40 controls) underwent detailed ophthalmological examination. After these examinations, patients with glaucoma and patients who had ophthalmological and/or systemic disease were excluded from the study. Totally, 20 patients in OSAS group and five patients in controls were excluded from the study in the first examination and follow-up period. The RNFL thickness was assessed with OCT. Forty-four OSAS patients and 35 control subjects were followed up 12mo. RNFL thickness change and OSAS patients were evaluated for severity of disease by Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI). RESULTS Forty-four OSAS patients and 35 controls were enrolled in the study. Statistically significance was found between OSAS patients and controls at the 12th mo. Average RNFL thickness was found to be significantly lower in last measurements in OSAS patients when compared with first measurements and control subjects (P<0.001, 0.002, respectively). There was a statistically significant correlation among AHI, and RNFL thickness (P<0.05). CONCLUSION The results suggest that the patients with OSAS were related with a proportional decrease in the RNFL thickness. These patients should be followed up regularly for glaucomatous changes. Detecting more RNFL thinning in severe OSAS was important. PMID:25161947

  14. Effect of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Leão, Sílvia; Conde, Bebiana; Fontes, Paulo; Calvo, Teresa; Afonso, Abel; Moreira, Ilídio

    2016-04-01

    The effect of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on clinical outcomes after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is incompletely defined. We sought to determine the prevalence of OSA in patients with ACS and evaluate prognostic impact of OSA and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in these patients. This was a prospective longitudinal cohort study of 73 patients admitted on cardiac intensive care unit for ACS. Cardiorespiratory sleep study and/or polysomnography were performed in all patients. CPAP was recommended if Apnea-Hypopnea Index ≥5. The main study outcome was a composite of death for any cause, myocardial infarction, and myocardial revascularization. OSA was diagnosed in 46 patients (63%). Age and cardiovascular risk factors were not significantly different between groups. OSA was classified as mild (m-OSA) in 14 patients (30%) and as moderate-to-severe (s-OSA) in 32 patients (70%). After a median follow-up of 75 months (interquartile range 71 to 79), patients with s-OSA had lower event-free survival rate. After adjustment for gender, patients with s-OSA showed a significantly higher incidence of the composite end point (hazard ratio 3.58, 95% CI 1.09 to 17.73, p = 0.035). Adherence to CPAP occurred in 19 patients (41%), but compliance to CPAP therapy did not reduce the risk of composite end point (hazard ratio 0.87, 95% CI 0.31 to 2.46, p = 0.798). In conclusion, OSA is an underdiagnosed disease with high prevalence in patients with ACS. It is urgent to establish screening protocols because those have high diagnostic yield and allow identifying a group of patients with manifestly unfavorable prognosis. PMID:26857162

  15. The Relationship between Depressive Symptoms and Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Pediatric Populations: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Elif; Sedky, Karim; Bennett, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: A higher incidence of depressive disorders and symptoms has been suggested among children suffering from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Yet, the extent to which OSA is related to increased depression is unclear. Objectives: To evaluate (a) the relationship between depressive symptoms and OSA in pediatric populations, and (b) the efficacy of adenotonsillectomy (AT) for decreasing depressive symptoms among children with OSA. Methods: A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the relationship between depressive symptoms and OSA, and the efficacy of AT for decreasing depressive symptoms. Studies reporting depressive symptoms of children with OSA through January 2013 were included. Results: Eleven studies assessed depressive symptoms in both children diagnosed with OSA (n = 894) and a comparison group (n = 1,096). A medium relationship was found between depressive symptoms and OSA (Hedges' g = 0.43, 95% CI: 0.22-0.64; p = 0.0005). Addressing the second question, 9 studies (n = 379 children) examined depressive symptoms pre- and post-AT. A medium improvement in depressive symptoms was found at follow-up (Hedge's g = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.20-0.62; p ≤ 0.001). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that depressive symptoms are higher among children with OSA. Therefore, patients with depressive symptomatology should receive screening for sleep disordered breathing. Treatment of OSA with AT might decrease clinical symptoms of depression, reduce pharmacotherapy, improve sleep patterns, and promote better health. Citation: Yilmaz E; Sedky K; Bennett DS. The relationship between depressive symptoms and obstructive sleep apnea in pediatric populations: a meta-analysis. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(11):1213-1220. PMID:24235907

  16. Risk of obstructive sleep apnea among Saudis with chronic renal failure on hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Wali, Siraj Omar; Alkhouli, Abeer; Howladar, Mohannad; Ahmad, Ibrahim; Alshohaib, Saad; Al-Ghamdi, Saeed; Krayem, Ayman

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients was reported to be 10-fold that in the general population. OSA can worsen the clinical symptoms and cardiovascular complications of ESRD. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of symptoms and risk of OSA among Saudi patients with ESRD. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: This multi-center, cross-sectional study was conducted in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, between June 2012 and September 2013. METHODS: The prevalence of OSA was assessed using the Berlin questionnaire. The presence of daytime sleepiness was evaluated using the Epworth sleepiness scale. Data were also collected on the medical history, clinical, and laboratory findings of participants. RESULTS: In all, 355 patients (61% male) were enrolled (mean age: 45.5 ± 15.4 years). The overall prevalence of high-risk of OSA was 44.2% (males, 47.3%; females, 44.8%; P = 0.65). The prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) was 74%. Controlling for age, gender and body mass index, multivariate analysis revealed that hypertension and hepatitis C infection were the only comorbidities significantly associated with OSA (odds ratio [OR]: 3.827 and 0.559; confidence interval [CI]: 2.120-6.906 and 0.324-0.964; P < 0.0001 and 0.036, respectively). OSA was also strongly associated with EDS (OR: 3.054; CI: 1.676-5.565; P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: In Saudi Arabia, the risk of OSA is more common in ESRD patients than in the general population. OSA is strongly associated with EDS. Interestingly, a significant negative correlation between OSA and hepatitis C infection was noted, which warrants further investigation. PMID:26664564

  17. Bioinformatics analysis of differentially expressed pathways related to the metastatic characteristics of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Ma, Xiaojun; Shen, Jiakang; Yin, Fei; Wang, Chongren; Cai, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, gene expression data of osteosarcoma (OSA) were analyzed to identify metastasis-related biological pathways. Four gene expression data sets (GSE21257, GSE9508, GSE49003 and GSE66673) were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). An analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) was performed using the Significance Analysis of Microarray (SAM) method. Gene expression levels were converted into scores of pathways by the Functional Analysis of Individual Microarray Expression (FAIME) algorithm and the differentially expressed pathways (DEPs) were then disclosed by a t-test. The distinguishing and prediction ability of the DEPs for metastatic and non-metastatic OSA was further confirmed using the principal component analysis (PCA) method and 3 gene expression data sets (GSE9508, GSE49003 and GSE66673) based on the support vector machines (SVM) model. A total of 616 downregulated and 681 upregulated genes were identified in the data set, GSE21257. The DEGs could not be used to distinguish metastatic OSA from non-metastatic OSA, as shown by PCA. Thus, an analysis of DEPs was further performed, resulting in 14 DEPs, such as NRAS signaling, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) regulation of cytokines and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF)-mediated interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) activation. Cluster analysis indicated that these pathways could be used to distinguish between metastatic OSA from non-metastatic OSA. The prediction accuracy was 91, 66.7 and 87.5% for the data sets, GSE9508, GSE49003 and GSE66673, respectively. The results of PCA further validated that the DEPs could be used to distinguish metastatic OSA from non-metastatic OSA. On the whole, several DEPs were identified in metastatic OSA compared with non-metastatic OSA. Further studies on these pathways and relevant genes may help to enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying metastasis and may thus aid in

  18. Upper Airway Genioglossal Activity in Children with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jingtao; Pinto, Swaroop J.; Allen, Julian L.; Arens, Raanan; Bowdre, Cheryl Y.; Jawad, Abbas F.; Mason, Thornton B.A.; Ohene-Frempong, Kwaku; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Marcus, Carole L.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in sickle cell disease (SCD) has been reported to be higher than that in the general pediatric population. However, not all subjects with SCD develop OSAS. We hypothesized that SCD patients with OSAS have a blunted neuromuscular response to subatmospheric pressure loads during sleep, making them more likely to develop upper airway collapse. Design: Subjects with SCD with and without OSAS underwent pressure-flow measurements during sleep using intraoral surface electrodes to measure genioglossal EMG (EMGgg). Two techniques were applied to decrease the nasal pressure (PN) to subatmospheric levels, resulting in an activated and relatively hypotonic upper airway. The area under the curve of the inspiratory EMGgg moving time average was analyzed. EMGgg activity was expressed as a percentage of baseline. Changes in EMGgg in response to decrements in nasal pressure were expressed as the slope of the EMGgg vs. nasal pressure (slope of EMGgg-PN). Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: 4 children with SCD and OSAS and 18 children with SCD but without OSAS. Results: The major findings of this study were: (1) using the activated but not the hypotonic technique, the slope of EMGgg-PN was more negative in SCD controls than SCD OSAS; (2) the slope of EMGgg-PN was significantly lower using the activated technique compared to the hypotonic technique in SCD controls only; (3) similarly, the critical closing pressure, Pcrit, was more negative using the activated technique than the hypotonic technique in SCD controls but not in SCD OSAS. Conclusion: This preliminary study has shown that children with SCD but without OSAS have more prominent upper airway reflexes than children with SCD and OSAS. Citation: Huang J; Pinto SJ; Allen JL; Arens R; Bowdre CY; Jawad AF; Mason TBA; Ohene-Frempong K; Smith-Whitely K; Marcus CL. Upper airway genioglossal activity in children with sickle cell disease. SLEEP 2011

  19. Respiratory cortical processing to inspiratory resistances during wakefulness in children with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, Joseph M.; Huang, Jingtao; Marcus, Carole L.; Gallagher, Paul R.; Shults, Justine; Davenport, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Children with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) have impaired respiratory afferent cortical processing during sleep that persists after treatment of OSAS. However, it is unknown whether this impairment is present during wakefulness and, if so, whether it improves after OSAS treatment. We hypothesized that children with OSAS, during wakefulness, have abnormal cortical processing of respiratory stimuli manifested by blunted respiratory-related evoked potentials (RREP) and that this resolves after OSAS treatment. We measured RREP during wakefulness in 26 controls and 21 children with OSAS before and after treatment. Thirteen participants with OSAS repeated testing 3–6 mo after adenotonsillectomy. RREP were elicited by interruption of inspiration by total occlusion and 30 and 20 cmH2O/l per s resistances. Nf at Fz latency elicited by occlusion was longer in children with OSAS at baseline compared with controls (78.8 ± 24.8 vs. 63.9 ± 19.7 ms, P = 0.05). All other peak amplitudes and latencies were similar between the two groups. After OSAS treatment, Nf at Fz latency elicited by 30 cmH2O/l per s decreased significantly (before, 88 ± 26 vs. after, 71 ± 25 ms, P = 0.02), as did that elicited by 20 cmH2O/l per s (85 ± 27 vs. 72 ± 24 ms, P = 0.004). The amplitude of N1 at Cz elicited by occlusion increased from −3.4 ± 5.6 to −7.4 ± 3 μV (P = 0.049) after treatment. We concluded that children with OSAS have partial delay of respiratory afferent cortical processing during wakefulness that improves after treatment. PMID:25539930

  20. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among OEF/OIF/OND Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Colvonen, Peter J.; Masino, Tonya; Drummond, Sean P.A.; Myers, Ursula S.; Angkaw, Abigail C.; Norman, Sonya B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study examined: (a) the relationship between self-reported posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in a younger, Iraq and Afghanistan (OEF/OIF/OND) veteran sample seeking treatment for PTSD; and (b) the relationships between PTSD symptom scores and each risk factor of OSA (snoring, fatigue, high blood pressure/BMI). Methods: Participants were 195 Iraq and Afghanistan veterans presenting to a VA outpatient PTSD clinic for evaluation. Veterans were 21 to 59 years old (mean 33.40, SD 8.35) and 93.3% male (n = 182). Logistic regressions were run to examine whether veterans with greater PTSD symptom severity had an increased probability of screening as high risk for OSA, even after controlling for known risk factors (older age, positive smoking status, and use of CNS depressants). Results: Of 159 veterans screened, 69.2% were assessed as being at high risk for OSA. PTSD symptom severity increased the risk of screening positive for OSA. PTSD symptom severity increased risk of screening positive for snoring and fatigue, but not high blood pressure/BMI. Conclusions: OEF/OIF/OND veterans with PTSD screen as high risk for OSA at much higher rates than those seen in community studies and may not show all classic predictors of OSA (i.e., older and higher BMI). This study is the first to suggest that the Berlin may be a useful screener for OSA in a younger OEF/OIF/OND veteran population with PTSD. Screening of younger veterans with PTSD for OSA should be standard care, and polysomnography and OSA interventions should be readily available to younger veterans. Citation: Colvonen PJ, Mosino T, Drummond SP, Myers US, Angkaw AC, Norman SB. Obstructive sleep apnea and posttraumatic stress disorder among OEF/OIF/OND veterans. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(5):513–518. PMID:25665698

  1. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Debaun, Michael R.; Strunk, Robert C.; Redline, Susan; Seicean, Sinziana; Craven, Daniel I.; Gavlak, Johanna C.D.; Wilkey, Olu; Inusa, Baba; Roberts, Irene; Goodpaster, R. Lucas; Malow, Beth; Rodeghier, Mark; Kirkham, Fenella J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain the prevalence of and risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA). METHODS: Cross-sectional baseline data were analyzed from the Sleep and Asthma Cohort Study, a multicenter prospective study designed to evaluate the contribution of sleep and breathing abnormalities to SCA-related morbidity in children ages 4 to 18 years, unselected for OSAS symptoms or asthma. Multivariable logistic regression assessed the relationships between OSAS status on the basis of overnight in-laboratory polysomnography and putative risk factors obtained from questionnaires and direct measurements. RESULTS: Participants included 243 children with a median age of 10 years; 50% were boys, 99% were of African heritage, and 95% were homozygous for βS hemoglobin. OSAS, defined by obstructive apnea hypopnea indices, was present in 100 (41%) or 25 (10%) children at cutpoints of ≥1 or ≥5, respectively. In univariate analyses, OSAS was associated with higher levels of habitual snoring, lower waking pulse oxygen saturation (Spo2), reduced lung function, less caretaker education, and non–preterm birth. Lower sleep-related Spo2 metrics were also associated with higher obstructive apnea hypopnea indices. In multivariable analyses, habitual snoring and lower waking Spo2 remained risk factors for OSAS in children with SCA. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of OSAS in children with SCA is higher than in the general pediatric population. Habitual snoring and lower waking Spo2 values, data easily obtained in routine care, were the strongest OSAS risk factors. Because OSAS is a treatable condition with adverse health outcomes, greater efforts are needed to screen, diagnose, and treat OSAS in this high-risk, vulnerable population. PMID:25022740

  2. Nocturnal Hypoxemia Is Associated with White Matter Hyperintensities in Patients with a Minor Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shiel K.; Hanly, Patrick J.; Smith, Eric E.; Chan, Wesley; Coutts, Shelagh B.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a risk factor for stroke, which is modulated by accompanying nocturnal hypoxemia. White matter hyperintensities (WMH) share many of the same risk factors as stroke. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether OSA and nocturnal hypoxemia are associated with white matter disease in patients with minor stroke and transient ischemic attack. Methods: Patients with minor stroke or TIA were recruited. Level 3 diagnostic sleep testing was used to diagnose OSA and quantify nocturnal hypoxemia. Significant OSA was defined as respiratory disturbance index ≥ 15, and nocturnal hypoxemia was defined as oxyhemoglobin saturation < 90% for ≥ 12% of total monitoring time. WMH were assessed and quantified on FLAIR MRI. The volume of WMH was compared between those with and without significant OSA and between those with and without nocturnal hypoxemia. Results: One hundred nine patients were included. Thirty-four (31%) had OSA and 37 (34%) had nocturnal hypoxemia. Total WMH volume was significantly greater in the OSA than in the non-OSA groups (p = 0.04). WMH volume was also significantly higher in the hypoxic than the non-hypoxic groups (p = 0.001). Mutivariable analysis with adjustment for age, hypertension, and diabetes showed that nocturnal hypoxemia was independently associated with WMH volume (p = 0.03) but OSA was not (p = 0.29). Conclusions: We conclude that nocturnal hypoxemia, predominantly related to OSA, is independently associated with WMH in patients who present with minor ischemic stroke and TIA and may contribute to its pathogenesis. Citation: Patel SK, Hanly PJ, Smith EE, Chan W, Coutts SB. Nocturnal hypoxemia is associated with white matter hyperintensities in patients with a minor stroke or transient ischemic attack. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(12):1417–1424. PMID:26194729

  3. Obstructive Sleep Apnea as a Risk Factor for Cerebral White Matter Change in a Middle-Aged and Older General Population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun; Yun, Chang-Ho; Thomas, Robert Joseph; Lee, Seung Hoon; Seo, Hyung Suk; Cho, Eo Rin; Lee, Seung Ku; Yoon, Dae Wui; Suh, Sooyeon; Shin, Chol

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) contributes to the development of systemic hypertension, and hypertension strongly predicts the development of white matter change (WMC). Thus, it is plausible that OSA mediates WMC. The goal of the current study is to determine whether a contextual relationship exists between OSA and cerebral WMC. Design: Cross-sectional analyses conducted in a population-based study. Setting: Korean community-based sample from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES) who attended examinations in 2011 at a medical center. Participants: There were 503 individuals (mean ± SD, age 59.63 ± 7.48 y) who were free of previously diagnosed cardiovascular and neurologic diseases. Measurements and Results: Participants underwent 1-night polysomnography and were classified as no OSA (obstructive apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] < 5, n = 289), mild OSA (AHI 5-15, n = 161), and moderate to severe OSA (AHI ≥ 15, n = 53). WMC was identified with brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and was found in 199 individuals (39.56%). Multivariate logistic regression analyses adjusted for covariates revealed that moderate to severe OSA was significantly associated with the presence of WMC (odds ratio [OR] 2.08, 95%, confidence interval [CI] 1.05-4.13) compared with no OSA. Additional adjustment of hypertension to the model did not alter the significance of the association (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.02-4.05). Conclusions: Moderate to severe OSA is an independent risk factor for WMC in middle-aged and older individuals. Thus, early recognition and treatment of OSA could reduce the risk of stroke and vascular dementia. Citation: Kim H; Yun CH; Thomas RJ; Lee SH; Seo HS; Cho ER; Lee SK; Yoon DW; Suh S; Shin C. Obstructive sleep apnea as a risk factor for cerebral white matter change in a middle-aged and older general population. SLEEP 2013;36(5):709-715. PMID:23633753

  4. Which oropharyngeal factors are significant risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea? An age-matched study and dentist perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ruangsri, Supanigar; Jorns, Teekayu Plangkoon; Puasiri, Subin; Luecha, Thitisan; Chaithap, Chariya; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep breathing disorder. Untreated OSA may lead to a number of cardiovascular complications. Dentists may play an important role in OSA detection by conducting careful oral examinations. This study focused on the correlation of oral anatomical features in Thai patients who presented with OSA. Methods We conducted a prospective comparative study at a sleep/hypertension clinic and a dental clinic at Khon Kaen University in Thailand. Patients with OSA were enrolled in the study, along with age-matched patients with non-OSA (controls). Baseline characteristics, clinical data, and oropharyngeal data of all patients were compared between the two groups. Oropharyngeal measurements included tongue size, torus mandibularis, Mallampati classification, palatal space, and lateral pharyngeal wall area. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with OSA. Results During the study period, there were 156 patients who met the study criteria; 78 were patients with OSA and the other 78 were healthy control subjects. In the OSA group, there were 43 males with a mean age of 53 (standard deviation 12.29) years and a mean BMI of 30.86 kg/mm2. There were 37 males in the control group with a mean age of 50 (standard deviation 12.04) years and a mean BMI of 24.03 kg/mm2. According to multivariate logistic analysis, three factors were perfectly associated with OSA, including torus mandibularis class 6, narrow lateral pharyngeal wall, and Mallampati class 4. There were two other significant factors associated with having OSA, namely, BMI and Mallampati classification. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of these two factors were 1.445 (1.017, 2.052) and 5.040 (1.655, 15.358), respectively. Conclusion Dentists may play an important role in the detection of OSA in patients with high BMI through careful oropharyngeal examination in routine dental treatment. A large torus mandibularis

  5. Prevalence and Predisposing Factors for Depressive Status in Chinese Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea: A Large-Sample Survey

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yaozhang; Li, Xuewu; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Sihua; Sang, Jianzhong; Tian, Xiufen; Cao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Recently, there are few studies reporting on depressive status and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in China. A large-sample survey was to be performed to explore the prevalence of depressive status and related factors in Chinese patients with OSA. Methods From among a randomly-selected group of OSA patients, 1,327 met inclusion criteria. After screening with the Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90) and Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS), patients were assigned to OSA without depressive status (control group, n = 698) and OSA with depressive status (n = 629) groups. Using chi-squared testing, the correlation analyses between the depressive status and OSA patient demographic and clinical variables were tested. Then depression-related risk factors in OSA patients were analysed using stepwise linear regression analysis. The effects of family and social factors on depressive status in OSA patients were investigated using Mann-Whitney U (one of nonparametric test). Results The prevalence of depressive status was 47.4% in OSA patients. Depressive status was significantly associated with female gender, single status, Family Burden Scale of Disease (FBS), Family APGAR Index (APGAR), apnoea-hypopnea index (AHI), and Perceived Social Support Scale (PSSS). Stepwise linear regression analysis further indicated that single status, hypoxemia, APGAR, AHI, PSSS, AHI, and FBS were all risk factors for depressive status in OSA patients. The total of the FBS score and three of its sub-factors scores (family daily activities, family relationships and mental health of family members) were higher, and the total of the APGAR score and two of its sub-factors scores (adaptability and affection) were lower in OSA with depressive status compared with the control group. Besides, the total score for the PSSS and scores for its two sub-factors (family support and social support) were all lower in OSA patients with depressive status than those of the control group. Conclusions

  6. Morning cortisol levels and glucose metabolism parameters in moderate and severe obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Bozic, Josko; Galic, Tea; Supe-Domic, Daniela; Ivkovic, Natalija; Ticinovic Kurir, Tina; Valic, Zoran; Lesko, Josip; Dogas, Zoran

    2016-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been associated with dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and alterations in glucose metabolism with increased risk for type 2 diabetes. The aim of the current study was to compare morning plasma cortisol levels and glucose metabolism parameters between moderate (apnea-hypopnea index (AHI): 15-30 events/h) and severe OSA patients (AHI >30 events/h), with respective controls. A total of 56 male OSA patients, 24 moderate (AHI = 21.1 ± 5.3) and 32 severe (AHI = 49.7 ± 18.1), underwent a full-night polysomnography, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and measurement of morning plasma cortisol levels. These groups were compared to 20 matched subjects in a control group. Morning plasma cortisol levels were statistically lower in severe OSA group than in moderate OSA and control groups (303.7 ± 93.5 vs. 423.9 ± 145.1 vs. 417.5 ± 99.8 pmol/L, P < 0.001). Significant negative correlations were found between morning plasma cortisol levels and AHI (r = -0.444, P = 0.002), as well as oxygen desaturation index (r = -0.381, P = 0.011). Fasting plasma glucose (5.0 ± 0.5 vs. 5.4 ± 0.7 vs. 4.9 ± 0.6 mmol/L, P = 0.009) was higher in the severe OSA group compared to moderate OSA and controls. Homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was higher in the severe OSA group compared to moderate OSA and controls (4.6 ± 3.7 vs. 2.7 ± 2.0 and 2.2 ± 1.8, respectively, P = 0.006). In conclusion, our study showed that morning plasma cortisol levels measured at 8 a.m. were significantly lower in severe OSA patients than those in moderate OSA group and controls. Morning plasma cortisol levels showed a negative correlation with AHI and oxygen desaturation index. Additionally, this study confirmed the evidence of glucose metabolism impairment in moderate and severe OSA patients, with more pronounced effect in the severe OSA patients group. PMID:27000083

  7. Pulmonary artery dilation indicates severe obstructive sleep apnea in patients with resistant hypertension: the Resist-POL Study.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Piotr; Florczak, Elżbieta; Klisiewicz, Anna; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Rybicka, Justyna; Śliwiński, Paweł; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Hoffman, Piotr

    2016-04-29

    INTRODUCTION The effect of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on right ventricular (RV) function and pulmonary circulation parameters is unclear. OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to determine whether newly diagnosed OSA and its severity has any impact on RV performance and echocardiographic parameters of pulmonary circulation in patients with true resistant hypertension. PATIENTS AND METHODS The study included 155 patients (93 men and 62 women; mean age, 47.5 ±10 years). The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), end-diastolic and end-systolic area of the right ventricle, main pulmonary artery diameter (MPAd) at diastole, acceleration time (AccT), tricuspid annular systolic velocity wave, and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion were evaluated. RESULTS Patients were divided into 4 groups: without OSA (AHI <5; n = 43), with mild OSA (AHI = 5-15; n = 45), moderate OSA (AHI = 15-30; n = 27), and severe OSA (AHI >30; n = 40). There were no differences in RV systolic function between the groups. Patients with severe OSA had a wider MPAd (26.0 ±2.6 vs 23.1 ±3.7 mm; P <0.0001) and shorter AccT (114.2 ±15.7 vs 133.4 ±22.1 ms; P <0.001) in comparison with patients without OSA. The cut-off for the best predictive value of severe OSA was an MPAd of 25 mm or higher with a sensitivity of 63.6% and specificity of 78.9%. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for severe OSA in relation to an MPAd of 25 mm or higher was 0.766 (95% confidence interval, 0.673-0.859; P <0.0001). Factors independently associated with an MPAd of 25 mm or higher were severe OSA and nighttime diastolic blood pressure levels. CONCLUSIONS Our study showed a relationship between pulmonary artery dilation and the presence of newly diagnosed severe OSA. Among the parameters studied, an MPAd of 25 mm or higher turned out to be the most useful parameter in identifying patients with severe OSA. PMID:27129085

  8. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Surgery: Quality Improvement Imperatives and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Julie L.

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is more common in surgical candidates than in the general population and may increase susceptibility to perioperative complications that range from transient desaturation to catastrophic injuries. Understanding the potential impact of OSA on patients’ surgical risk profile is of particular interest to otolaryngologists, who routinely perform airway procedures—including surgical procedures for treatment of OSA. Whereas the effects of OSA on long-term health outcomes are well documented, the relationship between OSA and surgical risk is not collinear, and clear consensus on the nature of the association is lacking. Better guidelines for optimization of pain control, perioperative monitoring, and surgical decision making are potential areas for quality improvement efforts. Many interventions have been suggested to mitigate the risk of adverse events in surgical patients with OSA, but wide variations in clinical practice remain. We review the current literature, emphasizing recent progress in understanding the complex pathophysiologic interactions noted in OSA patients undergoing surgery and outlining potential strategies to decrease perioperative risks. PMID:25013745

  9. Uncontrolled blood pressure and risk of sleep apnea among blacks: findings from the metabolic syndrome outcome (MetSO) study.

    PubMed

    Seixas, A; Ravenell, J; Williams, N J; Williams, S K; Zizi, F; Ogedegbe, G; Jean-Louis, G

    2016-03-01

    Uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) is linked to increased risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, few studies have assessed the impact of this relationship among blacks with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Data for this study were collected from 1035 blacks (mean age=62±13 years) enrolled in the Metabolic Syndrome Outcome study. Patients with a score ⩾6 on the Apnea Risk Evaluation System were considered at risk for OSA. Of the sample, 77.1% were low-to-high OSA risk and 92.3% were hypertensive, of which 16.8% had uncontrolled BP levels. Analysis also showed that 60.4% were diabetic, 8.9% had a stroke history, 74.3% had dyslipidemia, 69.8% were obese and 30.9% had a history of heart disease. Logistic regression analyses were employed to investigate associations between uncontrolled BP and OSA risk, while adjusting for known covariates. Findings showed that uncontrolled BP independently increased the odds of OSA risk twofold (odds ratio=2.02, 95% confidence interval=1.18-3.48, P<0.05). In conclusion, our findings show that uncontrolled BP was associated with a twofold greater risk of OSA among blacks, suggesting that those with MetS and who have uncontrolled BP should be screened for the presence of OSA. PMID:26246311

  10. The Impact of Obstructive Sleep Apnoea and Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Circulating Ischaemia-Modified Albumin Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Uygur, Firat; Tanriverdi, Hakan; Can, Murat; Ornek, Tacettin; Erboy, Fatma; Altinsoy, Bulent; Atalay, Figen; Damar, Murat; Kokturk, Furuzan; Tor, Meltem

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) and the effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on circulating ischaemia-modified albumin (IMA) concentrations. The study included 97 newly diagnosed OSAS patients and 30 nonapnoeic controls. Blood samples were obtained in the morning after polysomnography. After 3 months of CPAP treatment, 31 patients with moderate-severe OSAS were reassessed for serum IMA concentrations. Significantly higher serum IMA concentrations were measured in the OSAS group than in the control group [0.518 ± 0.091 absorbance units (ABSU), 0.415 ± 0.068 ABSU, P < 0.001]. Serum IMA concentrations correlated significantly with the apnoea-hypopnoea index, mean SaO2, desaturation index, and C-reactive protein concentrations. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that OSAS increased the serum IMA concentration independent of age, sex, body mass index, smoking habit, and cardiovascular disease. After 3 months of treatment with CPAP, OSAS patients had significantly lower serum IMA concentrations (0.555 ± 0.062 ABSU to 0.431 ± 0.063 ABSU, P < 0.001). The results showed that OSAS is associated with elevated concentrations of IMA, which can be reversed by effective CPAP treatment. PMID:26903714

  11. Investigation of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome prevalence among long-distance drivers from Zonguldak, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) in long-distance drivers located in the Zonguldak area and to show the correlation between OSAS and traffic accidents. Methods In this study, 241 long-distance drivers who were residents of Zonguldak province were interviewed face-to-face and a questionnaire regarding OSAS symptoms, occupational histories, and numbers of accidents was administered. Body mass measurements were also taken from participants. Patients who exhibited evidence of OSAS underwent polysomnography (PSG). Results Snoring was detected in 56% out of all participants, daytime sleepiness was observed in 26.6% and apnoea in 11.6%. All-night PSG was applied to 42 participants who had a high probability of clinical OSAS. Among these, eight had an apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) < 5. The prevalence of OSAS was 14.1%. There was a significant relationship between the ratio of traffic accidents per professional years and AHI (r = 0.571; p < 0.005). Conclusions OSAS prevalence was higher among long-distance drivers in the Zonguldak region. Disease severity was directly proportional to traffic-accident risk, and thus represents a serious social problem. PMID:23388467

  12. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; Clement, Karine; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2016-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and more importantly its hallmark, chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), are established factors in the pathogenesis and exacerbation of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This has been clearly demonstrated in rodent models exposed to intermittent hypoxia, and strong evidence now also exists in both paediatric and adult human populations. OSA and CIH induce insulin-resistance and dyslipidemia which are involved in NAFLD physiopathogenesis. CIH increases the expression of the hypoxia inducible transcription factor HIF1α and that of downstream genes involved in lipogenesis, thereby increasing β-oxidation and consequently exacerbating liver oxidative stress. OSA also disrupts the gut liver axis, increasing intestinal permeability and with a possible role of gut microbiota in the link between OSA and NAFLD. OSA patients should be screened for NAFLD and vice versa those with NAFLD for OSA. To date there is no evidence that treating OSA with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) will improve NAFLD but it might at least stabilize and slow its progression. Nevertheless, these multimorbid patients should be efficiently treated for all their metabolic co-morbidities and be encouraged to follow weight stabilization or weight loss programs and physical activity life style interventions. PMID:27324067

  13. Effect of the degree of substitution of octenyl succinic anhydride-banana starch on emulsion stability.

    PubMed

    Bello-Pérez, Luis A; Bello-Flores, Christopher A; Nuñez-Santiago, María del Carmen; Coronel-Aguilera, Claudia P; Alvarez-Ramirez, J

    2015-11-01

    Banana starch was esterified with octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA) at different degree substitution (DS) and used to stabilize emulsions. Morphology, emulsion stability, emulsification index, rheological properties and particle size distribution of the emulsions were tested. Emulsions dyed with Solvent Red 26 showed affinity for the oil phase. Backscattering light showed three regions in the emulsion where the emulsified region was present. Starch concentration had higher effect in the emulsification index (EI) than the DS used in the study because similar values were found with OSA-banana and native starches. However, OSA-banana presented greater stability of the emulsified region. Rheological tests in emulsions with OSA-banana showed G'>G" values and low dependence of G' with the frequency, indicating a dominant elastic response to shear. When emulsions were prepared under high-pressure conditions, the emulsions with OSA-banana starch with different DS showed a bimodal distribution of particle size. The emulsion with OSA-banana starch and the low DS showed similar mean droplet diameter than its native counterpart. In contrast, the highest DS led to the highest mean droplet diameter. It is concluded that OSA-banana starch with DS can be used to stabilize specific emulsion types. PMID:26256319

  14. Study of the sludge reduction in an oxic-settling-anaerobic activated sludge process based on UNITANK.

    PubMed

    Sun, L P; Chen, J F; Guo, W Z; Fu, X P; Tan, J X; Wang, T J

    2015-01-01

    An oxic-settling-anaerobic process (OSA) can effectively reduce sludge production, but most of the research studies on the OSA process have been either under laboratory test conditions or based on synthetic wastewater, which cannot fully reflect the performance and sludge reduction efficiency in existing OSA process. Thus, aiming at examining the sludge reduction efficiency and the stability of the OSA process, UNITANK and UNITANK-OSA processes were performed in a 120 m(3)/d pilot-scale system using actual sewage. The results indicate that UNITANK-OSA achieved a 48% reduction of the sludge compared to the reduction due to UNITANK, not considering the accumulation of the effluent-suspended solids. The effluent quality was not found to change significantly, except that the total phosphorus concentration increased slightly. The extracellular polymeric substances metal floc theory may, to some extent, explain this reduction in this study. The OSA process could be used to reform the classic wastewater treatment process to get lower sludge mass. PMID:25607677

  15. Contesting medicalisation, doubting the diagnosis: patients' ambivalence towards the diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnoea.

    PubMed

    Zarhin, Dana

    2015-06-01

    Whereas social scientific studies have investigated the emergence of the category Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA), the most commonly diagnosed sleep disorder, no study has examined whether and how the ways in which OSA emerged affect patients' reception of the diagnosis. This article fills this gap by drawing upon in-depth interviews with 65 Israelis who received a laboratory diagnosis of OSA. This study finds that many patients doubt the accuracy of their diagnosis, and argues that this scepticism derives from contested macro-level medicalisation processes that preceed and surround the development of OSA as a diagnostic category. Specifically, past and present controversies over the definitions of OSA and its precursor the 'Pickwickian syndrome' created images of 'OSA patients' as sleepy and obese. Consequently, patients whose self-perception conflicted with this image questioned their diagnosis. Other patients argued that one night of sleep at a laboratory could not reflect their quality of sleep at home, thereby implicitly criticising the ways in which OSA was medicalised. This study enhances our understanding of the underexplored dynamics between the macro and micro levels of medicalisation. PMID:25683493

  16. Wireless Wearable Multisensory Suite and Real-Time Prediction of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Episodes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Changqing; Sangasoongsong, Akkarapol; Wongdhamma, Woranat; Bukkapatnam, Satish T. S.

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder found in 24% of adult men and 9% of adult women. Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has emerged as a standard therapy for OSA, a majority of patients are not tolerant to this treatment, largely because of the uncomfortable nasal air delivery during their sleep. Recent advances in wireless communication and advanced (“bigdata”) preditive analytics technologies offer radically new point-of-care treatment approaches for OSA episodes with unprecedented comfort and afforadability. We introduce a Dirichlet process-based mixture Gaussian process (DPMG) model to predict the onset of sleep apnea episodes based on analyzing complex cardiorespiratory signals gathered from a custom-designed wireless wearable multisensory suite. Extensive testing with signals from the multisensory suite as well as PhysioNet's OSA database suggests that the accuracy of offline OSA classification is 88%, and accuracy for predicting an OSA episode 1-min ahead is 83% and 3-min ahead is 77%. Such accurate prediction of an impending OSA episode can be used to adaptively adjust CPAP airflow (toward improving the patient's adherence) or the torso posture (e.g., minor chin adjustments to maintain steady levels of the airflow). PMID:27170854

  17. Hippocampal hypertrophy and sleep apnea: a role for the ischemic preconditioning?

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, Ivana; Kempton, Matthew J; Crum, William R; Glasser, Martin; Milosevic, Milan; Beniczky, Sandor; Corfield, Douglas R; Williams, Steven C; Morrell, Mary J

    2013-01-01

    The full impact of multisystem disease such as obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) on regions of the central nervous system is debated, as the subsequent neurocognitive sequelae are unclear. Several preclinical studies suggest that its purported major culprits, intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation, can differentially affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Although the prospective biphasic nature of chronic intermittent hypoxia in animal models of OSA has been acknowledged, so far the evidence for increased 'compensatory' neurogenesis in humans is uncertain. In a cross-sectional study of 32 patients with mixed severity OSA and 32 non-apnoeic matched controls inferential analysis showed bilateral enlargement of hippocampi in the OSA group. Conversely, a trend for smaller thalami in the OSA group was noted. Furthermore, aberrant connectivity between the hippocampus and the cerebellum in the OSA group was also suggested by the correlation analysis. The role for the ischemia/hypoxia preconditioning in the neuropathology of OSA is herein indicated, with possible further reaching clinical implications. PMID:24349453

  18. Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry-Based Biomarkers in the Field of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huajun; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Jia, Wei; Yin, Shankai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Biomarker assessment is based on quantifying several proteins and metabolites. Recent developments in proteomics and metabolomics have enabled detection of these small molecules in biological samples and exploration of the underlying disease mechanisms in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This systemic review was performed to identify biomarkers, which were only detected by chromatography and/or mass spectrometry (MS) and to discuss the role of these biomarkers in the field of OSA. We systemically reviewed relevant articles from PubMed and EMBASE referring to proteins and metabolite profiles of biological samples in patients with OSA. The analytical platforms in this review were focused on chromatography and/or MS. In total, 30 studies evaluating biomarkers in patients with OSA using chromatography and/or MS methods were included. Numerous proteins and metabolites, including lipid profiles, adrenergic/dopaminergic biomarkers and derivatives, amino acids, oxidative stress biomarkers, and other micromolecules were identified in patients with OSA. Applying chromatography and/or MS methods to detect biomarkers helps develop an understanding of OSA mechanisms. More proteomic and metabolomic studies are warranted to develop potential diagnostic and clinical monitoring methods for OSA. PMID:26448002

  19. Prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea among patients with coronary artery disease in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Wali, Siraj O.; Alsharif, Muath A.; Albanji, Mohammed H.; Baabbad, Murad S.; Almotary, Haneen M.; Alama, Nabil; Mimish, Layth; Alsulami, Adil; Abdelaziz, Muntasir M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and coronary artery disease (CAD), few studies have investigated this issue in Saudi Arabia. Objectives This study aimed to identify the prevalence of OSA among CAD patients. Subjects and methods This was a cross-sectional (descriptive) study conducted at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia from April 2012 to December 2013. All consecutive patients referred to the cardiac catheterization lab for coronary angiography who exhibited evidence of CAD were included in this study. This study was conducted in two stages. During the first stage, each participant was interviewed individually. The administered interview collected data pertaining to demographics, comorbidities, and the STOP-BANG questionnaire score. The second stage of this study consisted of a diagnostic overnight polysomnography (PSG) of 50% of the subjects at high risk for OSA according to the STOP-BANG questionnaire. Results Among the patients with CAD (N = 156), 128 (82%) were categorized as high risk for developing OSA. PSG was conducted on 48 patients. The estimated prevalence of OSA in the study sample was 56.4%. Approximately 61% of the documented sleep apnea patients suffered from moderate to severe OSA. Conclusion This local study concurs with reports in the literature indicating that OSA is very common among CAD patients. PMID:26557740

  20. An Obstructive Sleep Apnea Detection Approach Using a Discriminative Hidden Markov Model From ECG Signals.

    PubMed

    Song, Changyue; Liu, Kaibo; Zhang, Xi; Chen, Lili; Xian, Xiaochen

    2016-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome is a common sleep disorder suffered by an increasing number of people worldwide. As an alternative to polysomnography (PSG) for OSA diagnosis, the automatic OSA detection methods used in the current practice mainly concentrate on feature extraction and classifier selection based on collected physiological signals. However, one common limitation in these methods is that the temporal dependence of signals are usually ignored, which may result in critical information loss for OSA diagnosis. In this study, we propose a novel OSA detection approach based on ECG signals by considering temporal dependence within segmented signals. A discriminative hidden Markov model (HMM) and corresponding parameter estimation algorithms are provided. In addition, subject-specific transition probabilities within the model are employed to characterize the subject-to-subject differences of potential OSA patients. To validate our approach, 70 recordings obtained from the Physionet Apnea-ECG database were used. Accuracies of 97.1% for per-recording classification and 86.2% for per-segment OSA detection with satisfactory sensitivity and specificity were achieved. Compared with other existing methods that simply ignore the temporal dependence of signals, the proposed HMM-based detection approach delivers more satisfactory detection performance and could be extended to other disease diagnosis applications. PMID:26560867

  1. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Using Watch-PAT 200 Is Independently Associated With an Increase in Morning Blood Pressure Surge in Never-Treated Hypertensive Patients.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung Sun; Ihm, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Chan Joon; Park, Mahn-Won; Her, Sung-Ho; Park, Gyung-Min; Kim, Tae-Seok

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to examine the association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and morning blood pressure surge in never-treated patients with essential hypertension. This prospective study included a total of 58 patients (mean age, 51.7 years; 55.2% men) with never-treated essential hypertension. The patients were divided into non-OSA (n=23, 49.3±12.7 years) and OSA (n=35, 53.2±9.8 years) groups. The OSA group was defined as having an apnea-hypopnea index level >5 as measured by the Watch-PAT 200. The authors collected 24-hour ambulatory BP, plasma aldosterone concentration, and plasma renin activity data from all of the patients. The measured sleep-trough morning systolic blood pressure (SBP) increases were higher in the OSA group than in the non-OSA group (28.7±11.8 mm Hg vs 19.6±12.8 mm Hg, P=.008). The sleep-trough morning SBP increase was inversely correlated with the lowest oxygen saturation (r=-0.272, P=.039). OSA known to be associated with increased daytime and nocturnal sympathetic activity was associated with significantly higher sleep-trough morning SBP levels in this study. PMID:26033308

  2. The Prioritization of Clinical Risk Factors of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity Using Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process

    PubMed Central

    Maranate, Thaya; Pongpullponsak, Adisak; Ruttanaumpawan, Pimon

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been a problem of shortage of sleep laboratories that can accommodate the patients in a timely manner. Delayed diagnosis and treatment may lead to worse outcomes particularly in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). For this reason, the prioritization in polysomnography (PSG) queueing should be endorsed based on disease severity. To date, there have been conflicting data whether clinical information can predict OSA severity. The 1,042 suspected OSA patients underwent diagnostic PSG study at Siriraj Sleep Center during 2010-2011. A total of 113 variables were obtained from sleep questionnaires and anthropometric measurements. The 19 groups of clinical risk factors consisting of 42 variables were categorized into each OSA severity. This study aimed to array these factors by employing Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process approach based on normalized weight vector. The results revealed that the first rank of clinical risk factors in Severe, Moderate, Mild, and No OSA was nighttime symptoms. The overall sensitivity/specificity of the approach to these groups was 92.32%/91.76%, 89.52%/88.18%, 91.08%/84.58%, and 96.49%/81.23%, respectively. We propose that the urgent PSG appointment should include clinical risk factors of Severe OSA group. In addition, the screening for Mild from No OSA patients in sleep center setting using symptoms during sleep is also recommended (sensitivity = 87.12% and specificity = 72.22%). PMID:26221183

  3. Metabolic dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea: A critical examination of underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    MESARWI, Omar A.; SHARMA, Ellora V.; JUN, Jonathan C.; POLOTSKY, Vsevolod Y.

    2015-01-01

    It has recently become clear that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an independent risk factor for the development of metabolic syndrome, a disorder of defective energy storage and use. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this finding, drawing upon the characteristics that define OSA. In particular, intermittent hypoxia, sleep fragmentation, elevated sympathetic tone, and oxidative stress – all consequences of OSA – have been implicated in the progression of poor metabolic outcomes in OSA. In this review we examine the evidence to support each of these disease manifestations of OSA as a unique risk for metabolic dysfunction. Tissue hypoxia and sleep fragmentation are each directly connected to insulin resistance and hypertension, and each of these also may increase sympathetic tone, resulting in defective glucose homeostasis, excessive lipolysis, and elevated blood pressure. Oxidative stress further worsens insulin resistance and in turn, metabolic dysfunction also increases oxidative stress. However, despite many studies linking each of these individual components of OSA to the development of metabolic syndrome, there are very few reports that actually provide a coherent narrative about the mechanism underlying metabolic dysfunction in OSA. PMID:26412981

  4. Obstructive Sleep Apnea is Linked to Depression and Cognitive Impairment: Evidence and Potential Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Nancy A; Roose, Steven P

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent but very frequently undiagnosed. OSA is an independent risk factor for depression and cognitive impairment/dementia. Herein the authors review studies in the literature pertinent to the effects of OSA on the cerebral microvascular and neurovascular systems and present a model to describe the key pathophysiologic mechanisms that may underlie the associations, including hypoperfusion, endothelial dysfunction, and neuroinflammation. Intermittent hypoxia plays a critical role in initiating and amplifying these pathologic processes. Hypoperfusion and impaired cerebral vasomotor reactivity lead to the development or progression of cerebral small vessel disease (C-SVD). Hypoxemia exacerbates these processes, resulting in white matter lesions, white matter integrity abnormalities, and gray matter loss. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) hyperpermeability and neuroinflammation lead to altered synaptic plasticity, neuronal damage, and worsening C-SVD. Thus, OSA may initiate or amplify the pathologic processes of C-SVD and BBB dysfunction, resulting in the development or exacerbation of depressive symptoms and cognitive deficits. Given the evidence that adequate treatment of OSA with continuous positive airway pressure improves depression and neurocognitive functions, it is important to identify OSA when assessing patients with depression or cognitive impairment. Whether treatment of OSA changes the deteriorating trajectory of elderly patients with already-diagnosed vascular depression and cognitive impairment/dementia remains to be determined in randomized controlled trials. PMID:27139243

  5. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Kidney Disease: A Potential Bidirectional Relationship?

    PubMed

    Abuyassin, Bisher; Sharma, Kumar; Ayas, Najib T; Laher, Ismail

    2015-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with high mortality rates and heavy economic and social burdens. Nearly 10% of the United States population suffer from CKD, with fatal outcomes increased by 16-40 times even before reaching end-stage renal disease. The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is between 3% and 7% in the general population, and has increased dramatically during the last 2 decades along with increased rates of obesity. However, the prevalence of OSA is much greater in patients with CKD. In addition, aggressive dialysis improves OSA. The current literature suggests a bidirectional association between CKD and OSA through a number of potential pathological mechanisms, which increase the possibility of both diseases being possible risk factors for each other. CKD may lead to OSA through a variety of mechanisms, including alterations in chemoreflex responsiveness, pharyngeal narrowing due to fluid overload, and accumulation of uremic toxins. It is also being increasingly recognized that OSA can also accelerate loss of kidney function. Moreover, animals exposed to intermittent hypoxia suffer histopathological renal damage. Potential mechanisms of OSA-associated renal dysfunction include renal hypoxia, hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, activation of the sympathetic nervous system, and increased oxidative stress. PMID:25845900

  6. Heart failure and sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Parati, Gianfranco; Lombardi, Carolina; Castagna, Francesco; Mattaliano, Paola; Filardi, Pasquale Perrone; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe

    2016-07-01

    Awareness of the importance of sleep-related disorders in patients with cardiovascular diseases is growing. In particular, sleep-disordered breathing, short sleep time, and low sleep quality are frequently reported by patients with heart failure (HF). Sleep-disordered breathing, which includes obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and central sleep apnoea (CSA), is common in patients with HF and has been suggested to increase the morbidity and mortality in these patients. Both OSA and CSA are associated with increased sympathetic activation, vagal withdrawal, altered haemodynamic loading conditions, and hypoxaemia. Moreover, OSA is strongly associated with arterial hypertension, the most common risk factor for cardiac hypertrophy and failure. Intrathoracic pressure changes are also associated with OSA, contributing to haemodynamic alterations and potentially affecting overexpression of genes involved in ventricular remodelling. HF treatment can decrease the severity of both OSA and CSA. Indeed, furosemide and spironolactone administration, exercise training, cardiac resynchronization therapy, and eventually heart transplantation have shown a positive effect on OSA and CSA in patients with HF. At present, whether CSA should be treated and, if so, which is the optimal therapy is still debated. By contrast, more evidence is available on the beneficial effects of OSA treatment in patients with HF. PMID:27173772

  7. Increased Risk of Parkinson's Disease in Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Population-Based, Propensity Score-Matched, Longitudinal Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Nai-Cheng; Tien, Kai-Jen; Yang, Chun-Ming; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Weng, Shih-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), characterized by repetitive episodes of apnea/hypopnea and hypoxia, is associated with systemic inflammation and induces metabolic, endocrine, and cardiovascular diseases. Inflammation might have an impact on neurodegenerative diseases. This study investigates the possible association between OSA and Parkinson's disease (PD). Random samples out of 1 million individuals were collected from Taiwan's National Health Insurance database. A total of 16,730 patients with newly diagnosed OSA from 2002 to 2008 were recruited and compared with a cohort of 16,730 patients without OSA matched for age, gender, and comorbidities using propensity scoring. All patients were tracked until a diagnosis of PD, death, or the end of 2011.During the mean 5.6-year follow-up period, the incidence rates of PD were 2.30 per 1000 person-years in the OSA cohort and 1.71per 1000 person-years in the comparison group. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) for PD was greater in older patients (≧ 65 years) and male patients with OSA than the controls, respective IRRs being 1.34 and 1.47. After adjustment for the comorbidities, patients with OSA were 1.37 times more likely to have PD than patients without (95% CI = 1.12-1.68, P < 0.05). Subgroup analysis showed that older patients and patients with coronary artery disease, stroke, or chronic kidney disease had a higher risk for PD than their counter parts. Log-rank analysis revealed that patients with OSA had significantly higher cumulative incidence rates of PD than the comparison group (P = 0.0048). Patients with OSA are at an increased risk for subsequent PD, especially elderly male patients. PMID:26765405

  8. Prevalence and risks of habitual snoring and obstructive sleep apnea symptoms in adult dental patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jewair, Thikriat S.; Nazir, Mohammed A.; Al-Masoud, Naif N.; Alqahtani, Nasser D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of habitual snoring and risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) among dental patients and investigate factors associated with high-risk OSA. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed at the Department of Preventive Dental Sciences, College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, between October and December 2014. A total of 200 consecutive female and male dental patients were included in this study. Subjective and objective assessments were carried out. Habitual snoring and risk of OSA were assessed using the Arabic version of the Berlin questionnaire. Two trained investigators carried out the objective measurements of anthropometric data, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, pulse rate, and clinical examination of upper-airway, and dental occlusion. Results: Habitual snoring was present in 18.2% of the females and 81.8% of the males (p<0.05). Breathing pauses during sleep of more than once a week occurred in 9% (n=17) of the sample. Of the males, 78.3% were at high risk of OSA compared with 21.7% of the females. Multivariate analysis for risk of OSA revealed that obese patients were almost 10 times more likely to report OSA symptoms than their non-obese counterparts (odds ratio: 9.9, 95% confidence intervals: 4.4-22.1). Tongue indentations, tonsil size, and a high Epworth Sleepiness Scale score were also independent risks of OSA. Conclusion: Tongue indentations and tonsil grades III and IV were significantly associated with risk of OSA. This validates the important role of dentists in the recognition of the signs and symptoms of OSA. PMID:26837402

  9. Associations between brain white matter integrity and disease severity in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Tummala, Sudhakar; Roy, Bhaswati; Park, Bumhee; Kang, Daniel W; Woo, Mary A; Harper, Ronald M; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by recurrent upper airway blockage, with continued diaphragmatic efforts to breathe during sleep. Brain structural changes in OSA appear in various regions, including white matter sites that mediate autonomic, mood, cognitive, and respiratory control. However, the relationships between brain white matter changes and disease severity in OSA are unclear. This study examines associations between an index of tissue integrity, magnetization transfer (MT) ratio values (which show MT between free and proton pools associated with tissue membranes and macromolecules), and disease severity (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI]) in OSA subjects. We collected whole-brain MT imaging data from 19 newly diagnosed, treatment-naïve OSA subjects (50.4 ± 8.6 years of age, 13 males, AHI 39.7 ± 24.3 events/hr], using a 3.0-Tesla MRI scanner. With these data, whole-brain MT ratio maps were calculated, normalized to common space, smoothed, and correlated with AHI scores by using partial correlation analyses (covariates, age and gender; P < 0.005). Multiple brain sites in OSA subjects, including superior and inferior frontal regions, ventral medial prefrontal cortex and nearby white matter, midfrontal white matter, insula, cingulate and cingulum bundle, internal and external capsules, caudate nuclei and putamen, basal forebrain, hypothalamus, corpus callosum, and temporal regions, showed principally lateralized negative correlations (P < 0.005). These regions showed significant correlations even with correction for multiple comparisons (cluster-level, family-wise error, P < 0.05), except for a few superior frontal areas. Predominantly negative correlations emerged between local MT values and OSA disease severity, indicating potential usefulness of MT imaging for examining the OSA condition. These findings indicate that OSA severity plays a significant role in white matter injury. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27315771

  10. Risk of Common Mental Disorders in Relation to Symptoms of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome among Ethiopian College Students

    PubMed Central

    Rutagarama, Ornella; Gelaye, Bizu; Tadesse, Mahlet G; Lemma, Seblewengel; Berhane, Yemane; Williams, Michelle A

    2016-01-01

    Background The Berlin and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) are simple, validated, and widely used questionnaires designed to assess symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) a common but often unrecognized cause of morbidity and mortality. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 2,639 college students to examine the extent to which symptoms of OSAS are associated with the odds of common mental disorders (CMDs). The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) was used to evaluate the presence of CMDs while the Berlin and ESS were used to assess high-risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and excessive daytime sleepiness, respectively. Logistic regression procedures were used to derive odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) assessing the independent and joint associations of high-risk for OSA and excessive daytime sleepiness with odds of CMDs. Results Approximately 19% of students had high-risk for OSA while 26.4% had excessive daytime sleepiness. Compared to students without high-risk for OSA and without excessive daytime sleepiness (referent group), students with excessive daytime sleepiness only (OR=2.01; 95%CI: 1.60-2.52) had increased odds of CMDs. The odds of CMDs for students with high-risk OSA only was 1.26 (OR=1.26; 95%CI 0.94-1.68). Students with both high-risk for OSA and excessive daytime sleepiness, compared to the referent group, had the highest odds of CMDs (OR=2.45; 95%CI: 1.69-3.56). Conclusion Our findings indicate that symptoms of OSAS are associated with increased risk of CMDs. These findings emphasize the comorbidity of sleep disorders and CMDs and suggest that there may be benefits to investing in educational programs that extend the knowledge of sleep disorders in young adults. PMID:26925424

  11. A method to screen obstructive sleep apnea using multi-variable non-intrusive measurements.

    PubMed

    de Silva, S; Abeyratne, U R; Hukins, C

    2011-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a serious sleep disorder. The current standard OSA diagnosis method is polysomnography (PSG) testing. PSG requires an overnight hospital stay while physically connected to 10-15 channels of measurement. PSG is expensive, inconvenient and requires the extensive involvement of a sleep technologist. As such, it is not suitable for community screening. OSA is a widespread disease and more than 80% of sufferers remain undiagnosed. Simplified, unattended and cheap OSA screening methods are urgently needed. Snoring is commonly associated with OSA but is not fully utilized in clinical diagnosis. Snoring contains pseudo-periodic packets of energy that produce characteristic vibrating sounds familiar to humans. In this paper, we propose a multi-feature vector that represents pitch information, formant information, a measure of periodic structure existence in snore episodes and the neck circumference of the subject to characterize OSA condition. Snore features were estimated from snore signals recorded in a sleep laboratory. The multi-feature vector was applied to a neural network for OSA/non-OSA classification and K-fold cross-validated using a random sub-sampling technique. We also propose a simple method to remove a specific class of background interference. Our method resulted in a sensitivity of 91 ± 6% and a specificity of 89 ± 5% for test data for AHI(THRESHOLD) = 15 for a database consisting of 51 subjects. This method has the potential as a non-intrusive, unattended technique to screen OSA using snore sound as the primary signal. PMID:21383492

  12. Factors predictive of obstructive sleep apnea in patients undergoing pre-operative evaluation for bariatric surgery and referred to a sleep laboratory for polysomnography

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Ricardo Luiz de Menezes; Magalhães-da-Silveira, Flavio José

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the main predictive factors for obtaining a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients awaiting bariatric surgery. Methods: Retrospective study of consecutive patients undergoing pre-operative evaluation for bariatric surgery and referred for in-laboratory polysomnography. Eight variables were evaluated: sex, age, neck circumference (NC), BMI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score, snoring, observed apnea, and hypertension. We employed ROC curve analysis to determine the best cut-off value for each variable and multiple linear regression to identify independent predictors of OSA severity. Results: We evaluated 1,089 patients, of whom 781 (71.7%) were female. The overall prevalence of OSA-defined as an apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) ≥ 5.0 events/h-was 74.8%. The best cut-off values for NC, BMI, age, and ESS score were 42 cm, 42 kg/m2, 37 years, and 10 points, respectively. All eight variables were found to be independent predictors of a diagnosis of OSA in general, and all but one were found to be independent predictors of a diagnosis of moderate/severe OSA (AHI ≥ 15.0 events/h), the exception being hypertension. We devised a 6-item model, designated the NO-OSAS model (NC, Obesity, Observed apnea, Snoring, Age, and Sex), with a cut-off value of ≥ 3 for identifying high-risk patients. For a diagnosis of moderate/severe OSA, the model showed 70.8% accuracy, 82.8% sensitivity, and 57.9% specificity. Conclusions: In our sample of patients awaiting bariatric surgery, there was a high prevalence of OSA. At a cut-off value of ≥ 3, the proposed 6-item model showed good accuracy for a diagnosis of moderate/severe OSA. PMID:26578136

  13. Obstructive sleep apnea, diagnosed by the Berlin questionnaire and association with coronary artery disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Ghazal, Abdullatef; Roghani, Farshad; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Amra, Babak; Kermani-Alghoraishi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a highly prevalent sleep-related disorder that is associated with increased risk of hypertension (HTN) and coronary heart disease. This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between the OSAS and coronary artery disease (CAD) severity. METHODS The cross-sectional study was conducted from September 2012 to December 2013. We enrolled 127 patients with chronic stable angina who were referred for coronary angiographic studies in Shahid Chamran and Nour Hospitals in Isfahan, Iran. The Berlin questionnaire (BQ) was used for estimate the probability of OSAS in patients as a low or high probability. Demographic characteristics and metabolic risk factors including diabetes mellitus, HTN, obesity, and smoking also were recorded. The severity of CAD was assessed and compared based on the Gensini score with Mann-Whitney U statistical test. Independent t-test for continuous variables and chi-square test for categorical variables were used. RESULTS Totally, 65.4% of subjects were considered as high and 34.6% as low probability for OSAS, which 81.1% of them had CAD. There was a significant difference between body mass index, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and ischemic heart disease drug consumption with OSAS probability (P < 0.0500). CAD was accompanied by OSAS significantly (P = 0.0260). The Gensini score was significantly higher in patients with high OSAS probability (100.4 ± 69.1 vs. 65.3 ± 68.9; P = 0.0030). OSAS also increase odds of CAD based on regression analysis (odds ratio, 95% confidence interval = 2.7). CONCLUSION This study indicates that more severe CAD is associated with high OSAS probability identified by BQ. PMID:26715932

  14. Cerebrovascular Reactivity in Young Subjects with Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Buterbaugh, John; Wynstra, Charles; Provencio, Natalie; Combs, Daniel; Gilbert, Michael; Parthasarathy, Sairam

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Regional brain alterations may be involved in the pathogenesis and adverse consequences of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The objectives for the current study were to (1) determine cerebrovascular reactivity in the motor areas that control upper airway musculature in patients with OSA, and (2) determine whether young patients with OSA have decreased cerebrovascular reactivity in response to breath holding. Design: Case-control study. Setting: Academic center. Participants: Twelve subjects with OSA (age 24–42 y; apnea-hypopnea index 17; interquartile range [IQR] 9, 69 per hour) and control subjects (n = 10; age 29–44 y; AHI 2; IQR 1, 3 per hour). Measurements and Results: Subjects underwent blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) while awake, swallowing, and breath holding. In subjects with OSA, during swallowing, there was less activity in the brainstem than in controls (P = 0.03) that remained reduced after adjusting for cortical motor strip activity (P = 0.036). In OSA subjects, brain regions of increased cerebrovascular reactivity (38; IQR 17, 96 cm3) was smaller than that in controls (199; IQR 5, 423 cm3; P = 0.01). In OSA subjects, brain regions of decreased cerebrovascular reactivity during breath hold was greater (P = 0.01), and the ratio of increased-to-decreased brain regions was lower than that of controls (P = 0.006). Adjustment for cerebral volumes, body mass index, and white matter lesions did not change these results substantively. Conclusions: In patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), diminished change in brainstem activity during swallowing and reduced cerebrovascular reactivity may contribute to the etiopathogenesis and adverse cerebrovascular consequences, respectively. We speculate that decreased cerebral auto-regulation may be causative of gray matter loss in OSA. Citation: Buterbaugh J, Wynstra C, Provencio N, Combs D, Gilbert M, Parthasarathy S. Cerebrovascular reactivity in

  15. Interrelationships between Body Mass, Oxygen Desaturation, and Apnea-Hypopnea Indices in a Sleep Clinic Population

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Ivan T.; James, Alan L.; Hillman, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the relationship between oxygen desaturation index (ODI), body mass index (BMI), and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) in a large sleep clinic population. Design: Retrospective observational. Setting: Sleep disorders clinic. Patients or Participants: 11,448 individuals undergoing diagnostic polysomnography (PSG) at a sleep disorders clinic. Measurements and Results: Polysomnography were scored using Chicago criteria. ODI at 2%, 3%, and 4% threshold levels were derived. The study population was subdivided into BMI categories in steps of 5 kg/m2. Mean ODI and the accuracy of ODI for detecting an AHI ≥ 15 (moderate-severe OSA) or ≥ 30 (severe OSA) were examined by BMI category, using the area under the curve (AUC) of receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves for the 3 ODI thresholds. Based on AUC, ODI-3% performed best overall, achieving a significantly higher AUC than ODI-2% and ODI-4% for the diagnosis of moderate-severe OSA, and a higher AUC than ODI-2% for the diagnosis of severe OSA. When examining the effect of BMI, ODI-3% achieved a significantly higher AUC than ODI-2% in all BMI categories, and ODI-4% in non-obese subjects. The sensitivity of ODI for detecting OSA increased with BMI, while specificity decreased. Conclusions: ODI-3% performed best overall, and when combined with appropriate clinical assessment, could be considered as an initial diagnostic test for OSA. OSA is more frequently associated with oxygen desaturation in obese subjects. BMI influences the accuracy of ODI for the diagnosis of OSA, and ODI should not be used in isolation as a test for OSA in subjects with a BMI below 25kg/m2. Citation: Ling IT; James AL; Hillman DR. Interrelationships between body mass, oxygen desaturation, and apnea-hypopnea indices in a sleep clinic population. SLEEP 2012;35(1):89-96. PMID:22215922

  16. A Pilot Study of the Inability to Fit Hands Around Neck as a Predictor of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Peter J; Edmonds, Lee C

    2015-01-01

    Background: Considering the high estimates of undiagnosed and untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), there is a need for simple and accurate diagnostic tests. Neck circumference has long been correlated with OSA, but its usefulness as a diagnostic tool has been limited. Aims: We proposed to evaluate the value of a simple neck grasp test to help identify OSA. We hypothesized that the inability of a patient in a sleep clinic to fit their hands around their neck is predictive of OSA. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of medical records of patients evaluated in a general sleep clinic was performed. Easy sleep apnea predictor (ESAP) positive was defined as the inability to place the hands around the neck with digits touching in the anterior and posterior. ESAP negative was the ability to place hands around the neck. Positive for OSA in this symptomatic sleep clinic population was defined as an apnea–hypopnea index (AHI) of ≥5. Results: A total of 47 subjects (36% female) had ESAP data available, which were reviewed. The mean age was 51.6 years (SD 14.4, range 29-81 years). The mean body mass index (BMI) was 38.8 (SD 9.9, range 20.4-69.5). Review showed 87.2% (N = 41) tested positive for OSA by AHI of ≥5. The sensitivity and specificity of ESAP were 68.3% and 100%, respectively. The positive predictive power was 100% and the negative predictive power was 31.6%. Conclusion: As we hypothesized, ESAP positive (inability to span neck) was predictive of OSA in a population of sleep clinic patients. An ESAP positive test was 100% predictive of the presence of OSA (AHI of ≥5). ESAP shows promise for ease of clinical use to predict the presence of OSA in a general sleep clinic population. PMID:26942131

  17. Increased Risk of Parkinson's Disease in Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Nai-Cheng; Tien, Kai-Jen; Yang, Chun-Ming; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Weng, Shih-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), characterized by repetitive episodes of apnea/hypopnea and hypoxia, is associated with systemic inflammation and induces metabolic, endocrine, and cardiovascular diseases. Inflammation might have an impact on neurodegenerative diseases. This study investigates the possible association between OSA and Parkinson's disease (PD). Random samples out of 1 million individuals were collected from Taiwan's National Health Insurance database. A total of 16,730 patients with newly diagnosed OSA from 2002 to 2008 were recruited and compared with a cohort of 16,730 patients without OSA matched for age, gender, and comorbidities using propensity scoring. All patients were tracked until a diagnosis of PD, death, or the end of 2011. During the mean 5.6-year follow-up period, the incidence rates of PD were 2.30 per 1000 person-years in the OSA cohort and 1.71per 1000 person-years in the comparison group. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) for PD was greater in older patients (≧ 65 years) and male patients with OSA than the controls, respective IRRs being 1.34 and 1.47. After adjustment for the comorbidities, patients with OSA were 1.37 times more likely to have PD than patients without (95% CI = 1.12–1.68, P < 0.05). Subgroup analysis showed that older patients and patients with coronary artery disease, stroke, or chronic kidney disease had a higher risk for PD than their counter parts. Log-rank analysis revealed that patients with OSA had significantly higher cumulative incidence rates of PD than the comparison group (P = 0.0048). Patients with OSA are at an increased risk for subsequent PD, especially elderly male patients. PMID:26765405

  18. A Novel Echocardiographic Method for Assessing Arterial Stiffness in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Akyol, Aytac; Cakmak, Huseyin Altug; Gunbatar, Hulya; Asker, Muntecep; Babat, Naci; Tosu, Aydin Rodi; Yaman, Mehmet; Gumrukcuoglu, Hasan Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with increased arterial stiffness and cardiovascular complications. The objective of this study was to assess whether the color M-mode-derived propagation velocity of the descending thoracic aorta (aortic velocity propagation, AVP) was an echocardiographic marker for arterial stiffness in OSAS. Subjects and Methods The study population included 116 patients with OSAS and 90 age and gender-matched control subjects. The patients with OSAS were categorized according to their apnea hypopnea index (AHI) as follows: mild to moderate degree (AHI 5-30) and severe degree (AHI≥30). Aortofemoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), and AVP were measured to assess arterial stiffness. Results AVP and FMD were significantly decreased in patients with OSAS compared to controls (p<0.001). PWV and CIMT were increased in the OSAS group compared to controls (p<0.001). Moreover, AVP and FMD were significantly decreased in the severe OSAS group compared to the mild to moderate OSAS group (p<0.001). PWV and CIMT were significantly increased in the severe group compared to the mild to moderate group (p<0.001). AVP was significantly positively correlated with FMD (r=0.564, p<0.001). However, it was found to be significantly inversely related to PWV (r=-0.580, p<0.001) and CIMT (r=-0.251, p<0.001). Conclusion The measurement of AVP is a novel and practical echocardiographic method, which may be used to identify arterial stiffness in OSAS. PMID:26617653

  19. Comparison of Anthropometric Data Between Asian and Caucasian Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jae Hoon; Choi, Ji Ho; Suh, Jeffrey D.; Ryu, Seungho; Cho, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Obesity is considered to be one of the most important risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) but less is known about the role of ethnicity in OSA. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interethnic difference of obesity-related phenotypes in OSA and to reveal the role of ethnicity in OSA. Methods We searched MEDLINE, LILACS, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library using the key words “sleep apnea,” “body mass index,” “neck circumference,” “waist circumference,” “waist to hip ratio,” etc. Inclusion criteria were adults over 18 years of age, and studies that included polysomnography, obesity-related parameters, and a clear demarcation of ethnicity in the patient population. Included studies were reviewed by 2 independent reviewers. The following information was collected for controls and OSA: number, age, gender, country, ethnicity (Asian or Caucasian), study design, apnea-hypopnea index/respiratory disturbance index, body mass index (BMI), neck circumference (NC), waist circumference (WC), and/or waist to hip ratio (WHR). Results A total of 8,312 publications were retrieved with a subsequent 19 manuscripts that met the selection criteria. A total of 2,966 patients were included for analysis. The main findings were as follows: There was no difference in BMI, WC, and WHR between patients with OSA and controls after accounting for publication bias; Patients with OSA have greater NC than controls (standard mean difference, 0.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.63 to 1.14); and There was no difference in NC between Asian and Caucasians patients (P=0.178). Conclusion OSA might not be related with BMI, WC, and WHR. Only NC demonstrated a strong association with OSA, and this finding was not different between Asians and Caucasians. PMID:26976019

  20. Sensorimotor function of the upper-airway muscles and respiratory sensory processing in untreated obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Danny J; Lo, Yu L; Saboisky, Julian P; Jordan, Amy S; White, David P; Malhotra, Atul

    2011-12-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated upper-airway neuromuscular abnormalities during wakefulness in snorers and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. However, the functional role of sensorimotor impairment in OSA pathogenesis/disease progression and its potential effects on protective upper-airway reflexes, measures of respiratory sensory processing, and force characteristics remain unclear. This study aimed to gain physiological insight into the potential role of sensorimotor impairment in OSA pathogenesis/disease progression by comparing sensory processing properties (respiratory-related evoked potentials; RREP), functionally important protective reflexes (genioglossus and tensor palatini) across a range of negative pressures (brief pulses and entrained iron lung ventilation), and tongue force and time to task failure characteristics between 12 untreated OSA patients and 13 controls. We hypothesized that abnormalities in these measures would be present in OSA patients. Upper-airway reflexes (e.g., genioglossus onset latency, 20 ± 1 vs. 19 ± 2 ms, P = 0.82), early RREP components (e.g., P1 latency 25 ± 2 vs. 25 ± 1 ms, P = 0.78), and the slope of epiglottic pressure vs. genioglossus activity during iron lung ventilation (-0.68 ± 1.0 vs. -0.80 ± 2.0 cmH(2)O/%max, P = 0.59) were not different between patients and controls. Maximal tongue protrusion force was greater in OSA patients vs. controls (35 ± 2 vs. 27 ± 2 N, P < 0.01), but task failure occurred more rapidly (149 ± 24 vs. 254 ± 23 s, P < 0.01). Upper-airway protective reflexes across a range of negative pressures as measured by electromyography and the early P1 component of the RREP are preserved in OSA patients during wakefulness. Consistent with an adaptive training effect, tongue protrusion force is increased, not decreased, in untreated OSA patients. However, OSA patients may be vulnerable to fatigue of upper-airway dilator muscles, which could contribute to disease progression. PMID:21885797

  1. Oral airway resistance during wakefulness in eucapnic and hypercapnic sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Chi; Wu, Kun-Ming; Chou, Chon-Shin; Liaw, Shwu-Fang

    2004-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether there was an abnormal increase of upper airway resistance in the sitting and supine positions in hypercapnic obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients compared with eucapnic OSAS or normal controls as measured by impulse oscillometry (IOS) while awake. Twenty subjects without OSAS served as controls (group I), and 20 patients with moderate or severe eucapnic OSAS (group II) and another eight hypercapnic severe OSAS patients (group III) were studied. Group II was further divided into two subgroups. Group IIa consisted of 14 subjects whose BMI was less than 35 and group IIb of six subjects whose BMI was greater than 35. All subjects also had an overnight sleep study. Oral airway resistance (AR) (including impedance (Zrs), resistance (R) and reactance (X)) was measured by impulse oscillometry (IOS) (MasterScreen IOS, VIASYS Healthcare GmbH, Germany) in the upright (seated) position and then in the supine position while awake. The results demonstrated that in both group I and group II, Zrs was normal in the sitting position. However, there was a high Zrs in the supine position for group II patients. In contrast, in group III patients, there was a high Zrs in both the sitting and supine positions. In conclusion, upper airway resistance was increased both sitting and supine in the hypercapnic OSAS patients; this would presumably increase the work of breathing and might explain why these subjects were hypercapnic while awake, while eucapnic OSAS patients and normal controls were not. Secondly, the increased upper airway resistance in the supine position in the eucapnic OSAS patients may contribute to their OSAS. PMID:15123004

  2. Abnormal resting-state functional connectivity within the default mode network subregions in male patients with obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-Jun; Nie, Xiao; Gong, Hong-Han; Zhang, Wei; Nie, Si; Peng, De-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Abnormal resting-state functional connectivity (rs-FC) between the central executive network and the default mode network (DMN) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been reported. However, the effect of OSA on rs-FC within the DMN subregions remains uncertain. This study was designed to investigate whether the rs-FC within the DMN subregions was disrupted and determine its relationship with clinical symptoms in patients with OSA. Methods Forty male patients newly diagnosed with severe OSA and 40 male education- and age-matched good sleepers (GSs) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) examinations and clinical and neuropsychologic assessments. Seed-based region of interest rs-FC method was used to analyze the connectivity between each pair of subregions within the DMN, including the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), hippocampus formation (HF), inferior parietal cortices (IPC), and medial temporal lobe (MTL). The abnormal rs-FC strength within the DMN subregions was correlated with clinical and neuropsychologic assessments using Pearson correlation analysis in patients with OSA. Results Compared with GSs, patients with OSA had significantly decreased rs-FC between the right HF and the PCC, MPFC, and left MTL. However, patients with OSA had significantly increased rs-FC between the MPFC and left and right IPC, and between the left IPC and right IPC. The rs-FC between the right HF and left MTL was positively correlated with rapid eye movement (r=0.335, P=0.035). The rs-FC between the PCC and right HF was negatively correlated with delayed memory (r=-0.338, P=0.033). Conclusion OSA selectively impairs the rs-FC between right HF and PCC, MPFC, and left MTL within the DMN subregions, and provides an imaging indicator for assessment of cognitive dysfunction in OSA patients. PMID:26855576

  3. Ventilatory Responses to Hypercapnia during Wakefulness and Sleep in Obese Adolescents With and Without Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Haibo; Pinto, Swaroop J.; Huang, Jingtao; McDonough, Joseph M.; Ward, Michelle B.; Lee, Yin N.; Bradford, Ruth M.; Gallagher, Paul R.; Shults, Justine; Konstantinopoulou, Sophia; Samuel, John M.; Katz, Eliot S.; Hua, Shucheng; Tapia, Ignacio E.; Marcus, Carole L.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Abnormal ventilatory drive may contribute to the pathophysiology of the childhood obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Concomitant with the obesity epidemic, more adolescents are developing OSAS. However, few studies have specifically evaluated the obese adolescent group. The authors hypothesized that obese adolescents with OSAS would have a blunted hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR) while awake and blunted ventilatory responses to carbon dioxide (CO2) during sleep compared with obese and lean adolescents without OSAS. Design: CVR was measured during wakefulness. During nonrapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, respiratory parameters and genioglossal electromyogram were measured during CO2 administration in comparison with room air in obese adolescents with OSAS, obese control study participants, and lean control study participants. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: Twenty-eight obese patients with OSAS, 21 obese control study participants, and 37 lean control study participants. Results: The obese OSAS and obese control groups had a higher HCVR compared with the lean control group during wakefulness. During both sleep states, all 3 groups had a response to CO2; however, the obese OSAS group had lower percentage changes in minute ventilation, inspiratory flow, inspiratory time, and tidal volume compared with the 2 control groups. There were no significance differences in genioglossal activity between groups. Conclusions: HCVR during wakefulness is increased in obese adolescents. Obese adolescents with OSAS have blunted ventilatory responses to CO2 during sleep and do not have a compensatory prolongation of inspiratory time, despite having normal CO2 responsivity during wakefulness. Central drive may play a greater role than upper airway neuromotor tone in adapting to hypercapnia. Citation: Yuan H; Pinto SJ; Huang J; McDonough JM; Ward MB; Lee YN; Bradford RM; Gallagher PR; Shults J; Konstantinopoulou S

  4. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea with mandibular advancement appliance over prostheses: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Thais Moura; Colen, Sâmia; Cunali, Paulo Afonso; Rossi, Rowdley; Dal-Fabbro, Cibele; Ferraz, Otávio; Tufik, Sergio; Bittencourt, Lia

    2015-01-01

    Treatment with a mandibular advancement device (MAD) is recommended for mild obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), primary snoring and as a secondary option for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure, because it has better adherence and acceptance. However, edentulous patients do not have supports to hold the MAD. This study aimed to present a possible to OSA treatment with MAD in over complete upper and partial lower dentures. The patient, a 38-year-old female with mild OSA, was treated with a MAD. The respiratory parameter, such as apnea–hypopnea index, arousal index and oxyhemoglobin saturation was improved after treatment. PMID:26483952

  5. Exhaled breath analysis, a simple tool to study the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Bikov, Andras; Hull, James H; Kunos, Laszlo

    2016-06-01

    Accelerated airway inflammation may play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA); however this phenomenon has been investigated only in a limited number of studies. The analysis of exhaled breath represents a promising, non-invasive tool to evaluate airway inflammation in this context. The knowledge on exhaled biomarkers in OSA has been growing with an emerging number of methodological studies which help to interpret exhaled breath data. This article not only summarises the results of studies on exhaled breath condensate (EBC) biomarkers, exhaled volatile compounds and exhaled monoxides in OSA, but also aims to critically review methodological limitations and provide some guideline for further research. PMID:26426372

  6. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children: controversies in diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Carol L

    2004-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common, under-recognized condition in childhood with significant morbidities if undiagnosed and untreated. The American Academy of Pediatrics recently issued a clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis and management of childhood OSAS. It was accompanied by a comprehensive evidence-based technical report that summarized the available literature supporting the guideline. The current review highlights areas of controversy and uncertainty that limit the development of more definitive standards of practice, updates the reader to several newer publications relevant to diagnosis and treatment of childhood OSAS, and identifies future directions for clinical research. PMID:15008587

  7. PubMed Central

    PASSÀLI, D.; TATTI, P.; TORALDO, M.; DE BENEDETTO, M.; PEVERINI, F.; CARUSO, G.; MARZETTI, A.; PASSÀLI, F.M.; BELLUSSI, L.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY This draft of the Official Round Table held during the 99th SIO National Congress is an updated review on the diagnostic tools, the importance of polysomnographic recording and a critical analysis of the surgical techniques in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). The review and analysis of available publications is the premise along with a specific analysis of the relationship between OSAS and metabolic and vascular disorders. In addition, the most recent investigations on sleep disorders and altered glucose metabolism are summarised and discussed together with the results of a study by the authors involving a fairly large number of patients with OSAS and diabetes. PMID:24882924

  8. Effects of adenotonsillectomy on polysomnographic parameters in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Finch, Paul; Stocks, Rose Mary; Smeltzer, Matthew P; Kimble, Amy; Schoumacher, Robert; Hankins, Jane S

    2013-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in the pediatric sickle cell disease (SCD) population can promote nightly hemoglobin oxygen desaturation, which increases the risk of central nervous system insult and may impair cognitive function. Adenotonsillectomy can ameliorate OSA symptoms, but its effect in children with SCD has not been fully investigated. We reviewed the effects of adenotonsillectomy in thirteen children with SCD by comparison of pre and post-adenotonsillectomy polysomnography (PSG) parameters. Significant reduction in hemoglobin oxygen desaturation, decreased apnea-hypopnea index, and increased rapid eye movement sleep occurred after adenotonsillectomy. Adenotonsillectomy promotes improvement in sleep quality in children with SCD and PSG-confirmed OSA. PMID:23382091

  9. Comprehensive evaluation of functional and anatomical disorders of the patients with distal occlusion and accompanying obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabiev, F. H.; Dobrodeev, A. S.; Libin, P. V.; Kotov, I. I.; Ovsyannikov, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    The paper defines the therapeutic and rehabilitation approach to the patients with Angle's classification Class II dento-facial anomalies, accompanied by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The proposed comprehensive approach to the diagnostics and treatment of patients with posterior occlusion, accompanied by OSA, allows for objective evaluation of intensity of a dento-facial anomaly and accompanying respiratory disorders in the nasal and oral pharynx, which allows for the pathophysiological mechanisms of OSA to be identified, and an optimal plan for surgical procedures to be developed. The proposed comprehensive approach to the diagnostics and treatment of patients with Angle's classification Class II dento-facial anomalies provides high functional and aesthetic results.

  10. Atrial fibrosis in a chronic murine model of obstructive sleep apnea: mechanisms and prevention by mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background OSA increases atrial fibrillation (AF) risk and is associated with poor AF treatment outcomes. However, a causal association is not firmly established and the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. The aims of this work were to determine whether chronic obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) induces an atrial pro-arrhythmogenic substrate and to explore whether mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are able to prevent it in a rat model of OSA. Methods A custom-made setup was used to mimic recurrent OSA-like airway obstructions in rats. OSA-rats (n = 16) were subjected to 15-second obstructions, 60 apneas/hour, 6 hours/day during 21 consecutive days. Sham rats (n = 14) were placed in the setup but no obstructions were applied. In a second series of rats, MSC were administered to OSA-rats and saline to Sham-rats. Myocardial collagen deposit was evaluated in Picrosirius-red stained samples. mRNA expression of genes involved in collagen turnover, inflammation and oxidative stress were quantified by real time PCR. MMP-2 protein levels were quantified by Western Blot. Results A 43% greater interstitial collagen fraction was observed in the atria, but not in the ventricles, of OSA-rats compared to Sham-rats (Sham 8.32 ± 0.46% vs OSA 11.90 ± 0.59%, P < 0.01). Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) and Interleukin 6 (IL-6) expression were significantly increased in both atria, while Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression was decreased. MSC administration blunted OSA-induced atrial fibrosis (Sham + Saline 8.39 ± 0.56% vs OSA + MSC 9.57 ± 0.31%, P = 0.11), as well as changes in MMP-2 and IL-6 expression. Interleukin 1-β (IL-1β) plasma concentration correlated to atrial but not ventricular fibrosis. Notably, a 2.5-fold increase in IL-1β plasma levels was observed in the OSA group, which was prevented in rats receiving MSC. Conclusions OSA induces selective atrial fibrosis in a chronic murine model, which can be mediated in part

  11. Cluster headache with obstructive sleep apnea and periodic limb movements during sleep: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pelin, Zerrin; Bozluolcay, Melda

    2005-01-01

    We report the case of a man with episodic cluster headache who suffered from severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) as well as periodic limb movements during sleep (PLMS). His attacks of headache occurred primarily during sleep being timely to REM sleep as 90 to 120 minutes interval. OSAs were more frequent and prolonged during REM sleep and oxygen saturation decreased to 81% during this sleep period. Periodic limb movements were also observed in our patient that were more frequent during the first half of the polysomnographic recordings. This case is one of the few reporting cases with CH who had both OSA and PLMS. PMID:15663620

  12. Residual Daytime Sleepiness in Obstructive Sleep Apnea After Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Optimization: Causes and Management.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Julia L; Serinel, Yasmina; Marshall, Nathaniel S; Grunstein, Ronald R

    2016-09-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is common in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), but it is also common in the general population. When sleepiness remains after continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment of OSA, comorbid conditions or permanent brain injury before CPAP therapy may be the cause of the residual sleepiness. There is currently no broad approach to treating residual EDS in patients with OSA. Individual assessment must be made of comorbid conditions and medications, and of lifestyle factors that may be contributing to the sleepiness. Modafinil and armodafinil are the only pharmacologic agents indicated for residual sleepiness in these patients. PMID:27542881

  13. Worsening of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Associated with Catheter-Related Superior Vena Cava Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jouvenot, Marie; Willoteaux, Serge; Meslier, Nicole; Gagnadoux, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that fluid accumulation in the neck contributes to the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We describe a case of catheter-related superior v ena cava (SVC) thrombosis revealed by rapid onset of typical symptoms of OSA. A marked improvement in OSA severity was observed after central venous catheter removal, anticoagulant therapy, and SVC angioplasty Citation: Jouvenot M, Willoteaux S, Meslier N, Gagnadoux F. Worsening of obstructive sleep apnea associated with catheter-related superior vena cava syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(6):681–682. PMID:25766698

  14. Generic architectures for future flight systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    Generic architecture for future flight systems must be based on open system architectures (OSA). This provides the developer and integrator the flexibility to optimize the hardware and software systems to match diverse and unique applications requirements. When developed properly OSA provides interoperability, commonality, graceful upgradability, survivability and hardware/software transportability to greatly minimize life cycle costs and supportability. Architecture flexibility can be achieved to take advantage of commercial developments by basing these developments on vendor-neutral commercially accepted standards and protocols. Rome Laboratory presently has a program that addresses requirements for OSA.

  15. A novel derivative of doxorubicin, AD198, inhibits canine transitional cell carcinoma and osteosarcoma cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Kusum; Cekanova, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is one of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic treatments for a wide range of cancers. N-benzyladriamycin-14-valerate (AD198) is a lipophilic anthracycline that has been shown to target conventional and novel isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC) in cytoplasm of cells. Because of the adverse effects of DOX, including hair loss, nausea, vomiting, liver dysfunction, and cardiotoxicity, novel derivatives of DOX have been synthesized and validated. In this study, we evaluated the effects of DOX and its derivative, AD198, on cell viability of three canine transitional cell carcinoma (K9TCC) (K9TCC#1-Lillie, K9TCC#2-Dakota, K9TCC#4-Molly) and three canine osteosarcoma (K9OSA) (K9OSA#1-Zoe, K9OSA#2-Nashville, K9OSA#3-JJ) primary cancer cell lines. DOX and AD198 significantly inhibited cell proliferation in all tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. AD198 inhibited cell viability of tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines more efficiently as compared to DOX at the same concentration using MTS (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2h-tetrazolium) assay. AD198 had lower IC50 values as compared to DOX for all tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines. In addition, AD198 increased apoptosis in all tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines. AD198 increased the caspase activity in tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines, which was confirmed by caspase-3/7 assay, and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) was confirmed by Western blotting analysis. In addition, AD198 cleaved PKC-δ, which subsequently activated the p38 signaling pathway, resulting in the apoptosis of tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines. Inhibition of the p38 signaling pathway by SB203580 rescued DOX- and AD198-induced apoptosis in tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines. Our in vitro results suggest that AD198 might be considered as a new treatment option for K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines cancers in vivo. PMID:26451087

  16. Sex differences in sleep apnea predictors and outcomes from home sleep apnea testing

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Alyssa; Poulos, Greg; Bogan, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Study objectives To evaluate sex differences in predictors of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) as per outcomes from home sleep apnea testing. Design This was a retrospective analysis of a large repository of anonymous test results and pretest risk factors for OSA. Setting and patients A total of 272,705 patients were referred for home sleep apnea testing from a variety of clinical practices for suspected sleep disordered breathing across North America from 2009 to 2013. Interventions Not applicable. Measurements and results Predictors of OSA (apnea hypopnea index4%≥5) were evaluated by multiple logistic regression; sex differences were evaluated by interaction effects. Middle age was the single most robust predictor of OSA for both sexes and was particularly foretelling for females (P<0.001) even after controlling for measures of adiposity and medical conditions. Females over the age of 45 years were much more likely to have OSA compared to their younger counterparts (78.7% vs 42.5%, respectively; odds ratio: 5.0) versus males (88.1% vs 68.8%, respectively; odds ratio: 3.4). Snoring, although more frequently reported by males, was similarly predictive of OSA for both sexes. Witnessed apneas and measures of adiposity were better predictors of OSA for males than females. Insomnia, depression, and use of sleep medication, although more commonly reported in females, did not predict OSA. Hypertension, although equally reported by both sexes, performed better as a predictor in females (P<0.001), even after controlling for age, measures of adiposity, and other medical conditions. Diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and sleepiness did not contribute unique variance in OSA in adjusted models. Conclusion This study found that males and females report different symptoms upon clinical evaluation for suspected sleep apnea, with some of the “classic” OSA features to be more common in and robustly predictive for males. The finding that advancing age uniquely and robustly

  17. Update on obstructive sleep apnea and its relation to COPD

    PubMed Central

    Mieczkowski, Brian; Ezzie, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common and preventable lung disease that affects millions of people in the United States. Sleep disorders including obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are also common. It is not surprising that many people with COPD also suffer from OSA. This relationship, however, puts people at risk for more nocturnal desaturations and potential complications related to this, including pulmonary hypertension and heart rhythm disturbances. This update focuses on the physiology of sleep disturbances in COPD as well as the clinical implications of OSA in COPD. PMID:24748786

  18. Severe onychophagia and finger mutilation associated with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Nino, Gustavo; Singareddy, Ravi

    2013-04-15

    Untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can lead to important neurobehavioral consequences including cognitive deficits, hyperactivity/inattention, daytime sleepiness, and mood disturbances. Interestingly, the potential role of OSA in the pathogenesis of impulse-control disorders such as nail biting (onychophagia) is currently unknown. We present a case of a man with severe onychophagia and biting-induced finger mutilation that was completely resolved after diagnosis and treatment of severe OSA. Accordingly, this report represents an important clinical observation that suggests a connection between sleep physiology and the neurobiological circuits implicated in the regulation of impulse-control behaviors. Further research in this area may improve our current understanding of the neurobehavioral consequences of untreated OSA. PMID:23585754

  19. Obstructive sleep apnea and insight into mechanisms of sympathetic overactivity

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, François; Kumar, Ravinder

    2014-01-01

    Nearly two decades ago, we evaluated ten patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We determined that alarming nocturnal oscillations in arterial pressure and sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) were caused by regulatory coupling and neural interactions among SNA, apnea, and ventilation. Patients with OSA exhibited high levels of SNA when awake, during normal ventilation, and during normoxia, which contributed to hypertension and organ damage. Additionally, we achieved a beneficial and potentially lifesaving reduction in SNA through the application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), which remains a primary therapeutic approach for patients with OSA. With these results in hindsight, we herein discuss three concepts with functional and therapeutic relevance to the integrative neurobiology of autonomic cardiovascular control and to the mechanisms involved in excessive sympathoexcitation in OSA. PMID:24691480

  20. New developments in the use of positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Boeder, Schafer; Malhotra, Atul; Patel, Sanjay R.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a disorder which afflicts a large number of individuals around the world. OSA causes sleepiness and is a major cardiovascular risk factor. Since its inception in the early 1980’s, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has emerged as the major treatment of OSA, and it has been shown to improve sleepiness, hypertension, and a number of cardiovascular indices. Despite its successes, adherence with treatment remains a major limitation. Herein we will review the evidence behind the use of positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy, its various modes, and the methods employed to improve adherence. We will also discuss the future of PAP therapy in OSA and personalization of care. PMID:26380760

  1. Health promotion in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Camila de Castro; Blasca, Wanderléia Quinhoneiro; Berretin-Felix, Giédre

    2015-04-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), which is commonly underdiagnosed, has a high occurrence in the world population. Health education concerning sleep disorders and OSAS should be implemented. Objectives The objective was to identify studies related to preventive actions on sleep disorders, with emphasis on OSAS. Data Synthesis A literature review was conducted using Lilacs, Medline, PubMed, and Scopus by combining the following keywords: "Health Promotion," "Sleep Disorders," "Primary Prevention," "Health Education," and "Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndromes." Initially, 1,055 papers, from 1968 to 2013, were located, with the majority from the Scopus database. The inclusion criteria were applied, and four articles published between 2006 and 2012 were included in the present study. Conclusions The studies on preventive actions in sleep disorders, with emphasis on OSAS, involved the general population and professionals and students in the health field and led to increased knowledge on sleep disorders and more appropriate practices. PMID:25992174

  2. Preparation and Characterization of Octenyl Succinic Anhydride Modified Taro Starch Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Suisui; Dai, Lei; Qin, Yang; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2016-01-01

    The polar surface and hydrophilicity of starch nanoparticles (SNPs) result in their poor dispersibility in nonpolar solvent and poor compatibility with hydrophobic polymers, which limited the application in hydrophobic system. To improve their hydrophobicity, SNPs prepared through self-assembly of short chain amylose debranched from cooked taro starch, were modified by octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA). Size via dynamic light scattering of OSA-SNPs increased compared with SNPs. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data indicated the OSA-SNPs had a new absorption peak at 1727 cm-1, which was the characteristic peak of carbonyl, indicating the formation of the ester bond. The dispersibility of the modified SNPs in the mixture of water with nonpolar solvent increased with increasing of degree of substitution (DS). OSA-SNPs appear to be a potential agent to stabilize the oil-water systems. PMID:26918568

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... the upper airway for obstructive sleep apnea in adults. Sleep . 2010;33:1408-1413. PMID: 21061864 www. ...

  4. The effect of treatment on diaphragm contractility in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    El-Kabir, Desiree R; Polkey, Michael I; Lyall, Rebecca A; Williams, Adrian J; Moxham, John

    2003-09-01

    In untreated obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) inspiratory efforts are made against an occluded airway and diaphragm fatigue might therefore complicate OSAS. To test this hypothesis we measured twitch transdiaphragmatic pressure (Tw Pdi) in response to bilateral cervical magnetic stimulation of the phrenic nerve roots in nine patients with OSAS before and one month after successful therapy with nasal continuous positive airways pressure (nCPAP). The mean Tw Pdi before therapy was 23.2cm H2O and after therapy was 22.8cm H2O (P = 0.59); the mean change after initiation of nCPAP was 0.4cm H2O with 95% confidence intervals of -1.3cm H2O and +2.1 cm H2O. We conclude that low frequency diaphragm fatigue does not complicate untreated OSAS. PMID:14509556

  5. [Experimental study of non-invasive percutaneous electrical stimulator for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and its clinical effect].

    PubMed

    Hu, Lianggang; Xu, Xiaomei; Gong, Yongsheng; Fan, Xiaofang; Wang, Liangxing

    2006-08-01

    To study the stimulation of the genioglossus with percutaneous biphasic current pulses as a new therapeutical method to treat the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), polysomnography (PSG) was used to synchronously monitor the patient. When OSAS was occurring, the stimulation with the optimal parameter was given in time to make the tongue move forward, the glossopharyngeal airway dilated, the resistance of the upper respiratory tract reduced, the hypoxia at night to be improved and the sleeping structure to be ameliorated because of the function of the dilated muscle of the upper airway. The results of the clinical therapeutic effect indicated that 17 of 22 patients with OSAS had cured effects, 2 of whom improved and 3 of whom were without effect. The effective rate was 77.27%. It is preliminarily proved that this is a new method in the treatment of patients suffered from OSAS. PMID:17002124

  6. Glaucoma and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Faridi, Omar; Park, Sung Chul; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Ritch, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Glaucoma is increasingly recognized as a manifestation of both ocular and systemic risk factors. A number of disorders associated with reduced blood flow and ischaemia, collectively termed vascular risk factors, such as migraine, Raynaud's phenomenon, atrial fibrillation and reduced nocturnal blood pressure, lead to decreased ocular perfusion pressure. During sleep, alterations occur in cardiovascular physiology that are balanced by autoregulation to maintain homeostasis. However, in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), the normal physiological balance is upset. A potentially modifiable risk factor, OSA has been increasingly associated with glaucoma independent of intraocular pressure. OSA may alter blood flow to the optic nerve head and, in combination with other predisposing factors, lead to decreased ocular perfusion pressure. This in turn may directly affect the optic nerve or it may indirectly increase its susceptibility to other insults. The purpose of this review is to shed light on the association between OSA and glaucoma. PMID:22339817

  7. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  8. Design and performance analysis of a bio-optical sub-assembly for diffuse optical technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Je-Myung; Park, Kyoungsu; Kim, Sehwan

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a compact, multi-wavelength, and high-frequency-response light source named the bio-optical sub-assembly (BiOSA). The BiOSA is used to measure the absorption and the reduced scattering coefficients from diffuse optics-based biomedical systems. It is equipped with six laser diodes and one optical fiber with a 400- μm diameter core. Simulations can be used to determine the design parameters and to confirm the feasibility of the BiOSA. The evaluation results indicate that the coupling efficiency of the fabricated BiOSA is 80 ˜ 85%, and the frequency response is up to 3.38 GHz.

  9. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical features of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Madani, Mansoor; Madani, Farideh

    2009-11-01

    The normal cycle of respiration includes a unique balancing force between many upper airway structures that control its dilation and closure. Alteration of this delicate equilibrium, possibly by an increased airflow resistance, can cause various degrees of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). OSA is now recognized as a major illness, an important cause of medical morbidity and mortality affecting millions of people worldwide, and a major predisposing factor for several systemic conditions, such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes, and even sexual dysfunction. Initial evaluation for possible OSA may be done by dental professionals who can provide guidance for its comprehensive evaluation and management. Because of the complexity of the disease, factors contributing to its development must be identified. Some factors caused by the patient's anatomic structures are slightly easier to rectify, whereas others may relate to the patient's age, sex, habits, or associated illnesses, including obesity. In this article, various epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical features of OSA are discussed. PMID:19944337

  10. The sympathetic nervous system and catecholamines metabolism in obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Bisogni, Valeria; Pengo, Martino F.; Maiolino, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is the most common sleep disorder of breathing in middle-aged and overweight subjects. It features recurrent episodes of upper airway total (apnoea) o partial (hypopnea) collapse during sleep, which are associated with a reduction in blood oxygen saturation and with arousal from sleep to re-establish airway patency. An association of OSA with dysregulation of the autonomous nervous system (ANS) and altered catecholamines (CAs) metabolism has been contended for years. However, the pathophysiology mechanisms underlying these alterations remain to be fully clarified. Nonetheless, these alterations are deemed to play a key pathogenic role in the established association of OSA with several conditions besides arterial hypertension (HT), including coronary artery disease, stroke, and, more in general, with increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) events. Hence, in this review we will analyse the relationship between the sleep disturbances associated with OSA and the altered function of the ANS, including CAs metabolism. PMID:26904265

  11. Preparation and Characterization of Octenyl Succinic Anhydride Modified Taro Starch Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Suisui; Dai, Lei; Qin, Yang; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2016-01-01

    The polar surface and hydrophilicity of starch nanoparticles (SNPs) result in their poor dispersibility in nonpolar solvent and poor compatibility with hydrophobic polymers, which limited the application in hydrophobic system. To improve their hydrophobicity, SNPs prepared through self-assembly of short chain amylose debranched from cooked taro starch, were modified by octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA). Size via dynamic light scattering of OSA-SNPs increased compared with SNPs. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data indicated the OSA-SNPs had a new absorption peak at 1727 cm-1, which was the characteristic peak of carbonyl, indicating the formation of the ester bond. The dispersibility of the modified SNPs in the mixture of water with nonpolar solvent increased with increasing of degree of substitution (DS). OSA-SNPs appear to be a potential agent to stabilize the oil-water systems. PMID:26918568

  12. Breaking through Limbo: Experiences of Adults Living with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a potentially devastating condition that diminishes quality of life and leads to serious consequences without treatment. Diagnosis often is delayed and, once diagnosed, adherence to prescribed therapy tends to be a major barrier to management. This grounded theory study was focused on the experiences of a diverse group of 82 adults who were at various points in the process of obtaining a diagnosis and living with OSA. Participants described being in “limbo” and needing to break through that limbo to be successful at managing their OSA. Results provide new insights into the experience of living with OSA that can be beneficial in promoting treatment and shaping effective management of the condition. PMID:23570652

  13. Nasal CPAP

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIPPV; Non-invasive ventilation; NIV; OSA - CPAP; Obstructive sleep apnea - CPAP ... CPAP can successfully treat most people with obstructive sleep apnea . It is safe and works well for people ...

  14. Robust Spectral Analysis of Thoraco-Abdominal Motion and Oxymetry in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Nino, Cesar L.; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E.; Gutierrez, Maria J.; Singareddi, Ravi; Nino, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Standard PSG montage involves the use of nasal-oral airflow sensors to visualize cyclic episodes of upper airflow interruption, which are considered diagnostic of sleep apnea. Given the high-cost and discomfort associated with in-laboratory PSG, there is an emergent need for novel technology that simplifies OSA screening and diagnosis with less expensive methods. The main goal of this project was to identify novel OSA signatures based on the spectral analysis of thoraco-abdominal motion channels. Our main hypothesis was that proper spectral analysis can detect OSA cycles in adults using simultaneous recording of SaO2 and either, chest or abdominal motion. The impact of this new approach is that it may allow the design of more comfortable and reliable portable devices for screening, diagnosis and monitoring of OSA, functioning only with oximetry and airflow-independent (abdominal or chest) breathing sensors. PMID:24110335

  15. Does Neck-to-Waist Ratio Predict Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Sherri Lynne; Vaccani, Jean-Philippe; Barrowman, Nick; Momoli, Franco; Bradbury, Carol L.; Murto, Kimmo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Central adiposity and large neck circumference are associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in adults but have not been evaluated in children as predictors of OSA. Study objectives were to determine whether (1) anthropometric measures including neck-to-waist ratio are associated with OSA in older children; (2) body fat distribution, measured by neck-to-waist ratio, is predictive of OSA in overweight/obese children. Methods: Cross-sectional study involving children 7-18 years scheduled to undergo polysomnography at a tertiary care children's hospital. OSA was defined as total apnea-hypopnea index > 5 events/h and/or obstructive apnea index > 1 event/h. Recursive partitioning was used to select candidate predictors of OSA from: age, sex, height and weight percentile, body mass index (BMI) z-score, neck-to-waist ratio, tonsil size, and Mallampati score. These were then evaluated using log binomial models and receiver operator characteristic analysis. Results: Two hundred twenty-two participants were included; 133 (60%) were overweight/obese, 121 (55%) male,47 (21%) had OSA. Neck-to-waist ratio (relative risk [RR] 1.97 per 0.1 units, 95% CI 1.48 to 2.84) and BMI z-score (RR 1.63 per unit, 95% CI 1.30 to 2.05) were identified as independent predictors of OSA. Considering only overweight/obese children, neck-to-waist ratio (RR 2.16 per 0.1 units, 95% CI 1.79 to 2.59) and BMI z-score (RR 2.02 per unit, 95% CI 1.25 to 3.26) also independently predicted OSA. However, in children not overweight/obese, these variables were not predictive of OSA. Conclusions: Neck-to-waist ratio, an index of body fat distribution, predicts OSA in older children and youth, especially in those who were overweight/obese. Citation: Katz SL, Vaccani JP, Barrowman N, Momoli F, Bradbury CL, Murto K. Does neck-to-waist ratio predict obstructive sleep apnea in children? J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(12):1303-1308. PMID:25325606

  16. A comparison to schemes of ocean surface albedo parameterization and their impact on shortwave radiatation estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, H.; Liu, Q.; Zhang, X.; Feng, Y.; Li, X.; Zhang, J.; Cai, E.

    2015-12-01

    The ocean covers 71% of the Earth's surface and plays a pivotal role in the earth radiation energy balance. The ocean surface albedo(OSA) is a deciding factor on ocean net surface shortwave radiation(ONSSR) estimation. Several OSA schemes have been proposed successively, but there is not a conclusion for the best OSA scheme of estimating the ONSSR. This study, on the base of analyzing currently existing OSA parameterization, including Briegleb et al.(B), Taylor et al.(T), Hansen et al.(H), Jin et al.(J), Preisendorfer and Mobley(PM86), Feng's scheme(F), discusses the difference of OSA's impact on ONSSR estimation in condition of actual downward shortwave radiation(DSR). Then we evaluate the necessity and applicability for the climate models to integrate the more complicated OSA scheme. We got some conclusions: The SZA and the wind speed are the two most significant effect factor to broadband OSA, thus the different OSA parameterizations varies violently in the regions of both high latitudes and strong winds. In the summer, the Northern Hemisphere(NH) is high ONSSR, but small deviations compared with Northern Hemisphere(SH),and contrary in the winter. The OSA schemes can lead the ONSSR results difference of the order of 20 w m-2 by the analysis of the ONSSR reanalysis dataset, the Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA).The simple scheme of Taylor and the more complicate schemes of Jin and Feng is very similar, and the scheme B and H is close to each other, the PM86 is more close to MERRA. We use the COVE ocean platform observation data to validate the several scheme result, and the RMSE is 10.96 w m-2, 5.24 w m-2, 12.88 w m-2, 6.52 w m-2, 6.33 w m-2, 6.30 w m-2 for B,T,H,J,PM86,F, respectively. The Taylor's scheme shows the best estimate, and Feng's result just following Taylor's. However, the accuracy of the estimated instantaneous OSA changes at different local time. Jin's scheme has the best performance generally at noon and in

  17. Derived Arterial Stiffness is Increased in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Periodic Limb Movements during Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Drakatos, Panagis; Higgins, Sean; Pengo, Martino F.; Kent, Brian D.; Muza, Rex; Karkoulias, Kiriakos; Leschziner, Guy; Williams, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Both periodic limb movements during sleep (PLMS) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). OSA has also been linked to increased large arterial stiffness, which is considered an independent risk factor for CVD. We utilized a previously validated index of large artery stiffness (SIDVP) derived from the digital volume pulse (DVP) to seek comparison in patients with PLMS and OSA. Methods: Forty-nine adult male subjects, without known comorbidities that could affect arterial stiffness or on vasoactive medication, were retrospectively identified and categorized into controls (n = 8), PLMS (n = 13), OSA (n = 17), and OSA/PLMS (n = 11). The cutoff for PLMS was a periodic limb movement index (PLMI) > 15 events/h, and for OSA an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) > 10 events/h. SIDVP was derived from the raw data of photoplethysmography of the nocturnal polysomnography, averaged for 2 min prior to sleep study initiation (baseline), after completion in the morning, and every half hour after sleep onset. Results: The groups were age/body mass index-matched. Controls showed lower baseline, morning, and overall SIDVP compared to the other groups (p < 0.01). Patients with PLMS (PLMI: 50.69 ± 9.7 events/h) and the OSA group (AHI: 29.7 ± 2 events/h) demonstrated similar overall SIDVP (6.78 ± 0.08 versus 6.94 ± 0.04, respectively, p = 0.5), whereas the OSA/PLMS (AHI: 29.35 ± 8, PLMI: 50.63 ± 7.2) group demonstrated the highest (7.40 ± 0.06, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Based on an easily reproducible and applicable marker of large arterial stiffness, patients with significant PLMS had higher SIDVP when compared to controls and comparable to those with moderate/severe OSA. The OSA/PLMS group had the highest SIDVP, implying a possible additive effect of OSA and PLMS on arterial stiffness. Citation: Drakatos P, Higgins S, Pengo MF, Kent BD, Muza R, Karkoulias K, Leschziner G, Williams A. Derived arterial

  18. Decreased retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Cheng-Lin; Zhou, Li-Xiao; Dang, Yalong; Huo, Yin-Ping; Shi, Lei; Chang, Yong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To investigate the changes of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients. Methods: Relevant studies were selected from 3 major literature databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE) without language restriction. Main inclusion criteria is that a case-control study in which RNFL thickness was measured by a commercial available optical coherence tomography (OCT) in OSAS patients. Meta-analysis was performed using STATA 12.0 software. Efficacy estimates were evaluated by weighted mean difference with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Primary outcome evaluations were: the average changes of RNFL thickness in total OSAS patients, subgroup analysis of RNFL thickness changes in patients of different OSAS stages, and subgroup analysis of 4-quadrant RNFL thickness changes in total OSAS patients. Results: Of the initial 327 literatures, 8 case-control studies with 763 eyes of OSA patients and 474 eyes of healthy controls were included (NOS scores ≥6). For the people of total OSAS, there had an average 2.92 μm decreased RNFL thickness compared with controls (95% CI: −4.61 to −1.24, P = 0.001). For subgroup analysis of OSAS in different stages, the average changes of RNFL thickness in mild, moderate, severe, and moderate to severe OSAS were 2.05 (95% CI: −4.40 to 0.30, P = 0.088), 2.32 (95% CI: −5.04 to 0.40, P = 0.094), 4.21 (95% CI: −8.36 to −0.06, P = 0.047), and 4.02 (95% CI: −7.65 to −0.40, P = 0.03), respectively. For subgroup analysis of 4-quadrant, the average changes of RNFL thickness in Superior, Nasal, Inferior, and Temporal quadrant were 2.43 (95% CI: −4.28 to −0.57, P = 0.01), 1.41 (95% CI: −3.33 to 0.51, P = 0.151), 3.75 (95% CI: −6.92 to −0.59, P = 0.02), and 0.98 (95% CI: −2.49 to 0.53, P = 0.203), respectively. Conclusion: Our study suggests that RNFL thickness in OSAS patients is much thinner than

  19. Urinary Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin (NGAL) in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Robert J.; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Parikh, Samir M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a well-established risk factor for hypertension and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. More recently, OSA has been implicated as an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease. Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a well-accepted early biomarker of subclinical kidney tubular injury, preceding an increase in serum creatinine. The goal of this study was to determine if an association exists between OSA and increased urinary NGAL levels. Methods We prospectively enrolled adult patients from the sleep clinic of an academic medical center. Each underwent polysomnography and submitted a urine specimen upon enrollment. We measured NGAL and creatinine levels on all urine samples before participants received treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), and, in a subset of OSA patients, after CPAP therapy. We compared the urinary NGAL/creatinine ratio between untreated participants with and without OSA, and within a subset of 11 OSA patients also after CPAP therapy. Results A total of 49 subjects were enrolled: 16 controls based on an apnea-hypopnea index (events with at least 4% oxygen desaturation; AHI-4%) <5 events/hour (mean AHI-4% = 0.59 +/- 0.60); 33 OSA patients based on an AHI-4% >5 events/hour (mean AHI-4% = 43.3 +/- 28.1). OSA patients had a higher mean body-mass index than the control group (36.58 +/- 11.02 kg/m2 vs. 26.81 +/- 6.55 kg/m2, respectively; p = 0.0005) and were more likely to be treated for hypertension (54.5% vs. 6.25% of group members, respectively; p = 0.0014). The groups were otherwise similar in demographics, and there was no difference in the number of diabetic subjects or in the mean serum creatinine concentration (control = 0.86 +/- 0.15 mg/dl, OSA = 0.87 +/- 0.19 mg/dl; p = 0.7956). We found no difference between the urinary NGAL-to-creatinine ratios among untreated OSA patients versus control subjects (median NGAL/creatinine = 6.34 ng/mg vs. 6.41 ng

  20. When to Suspect Sleep Apnea and What to Do About It.

    PubMed

    Kimoff, R John

    2015-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which is characterized by recurrent upper airway obstruction during sleep with resultant hypoxia-reoxygenation and sleep fragmentation, is prevalent among patients with cardiovascular disease. Refractory hypertension, nocturnal angina or arrhythmias, and stroke in particular should prompt consideration of OSA. The symptoms of OSA include snoring and excessive daytime sleepiness; risk factors include obesity and reduced upper airway dimensions. Up to 50% of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) may manifest OSA, central sleep apnea-Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSA-CSR), or both. Patients with CSA-CSR may present with fatigue, disrupted sleep, and paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. Objective sleep recording is required to document the nature and severity of sleep apnea. The gold standard is in-laboratory overnight polysomnography (PSG), including monitoring of electroencephalography and other signals to determine sleep-wake state, and recording of body position, airflow, respiratory effort, and pulse oximetry. Portable cardiorespiratory recorders are now approved for diagnosis in patients without comorbidities. Full PSG is recommended for diagnosis in all other cases, although OSA and CSA-CSR can be identified from portable recorders in some patients with CHF and other conditions. The objectives of treatment are to improve symptoms, quality of life, and cardiovascular outcomes. The mainstay of treatment for moderate-to-severe OSA is positive airway pressure (PAP). Automated PAP devices may be used in uncomplicated OSA, whereas continuous fixed PAP is the treatment of choice for other patients with OSA, and may also treat a proportion of patients with CSA-CSR. A form of bi-level PAP known as adaptive servoventilation is effective in treating a majority of patients with CSA-CSR. PMID:26112305

  1. Perceived consequences of casual online sexual activities on heterosexual relationships: a u.s. Online survey.

    PubMed

    Grov, Christian; Gillespie, Brian Joseph; Royce, Tracy; Lever, Janet

    2011-04-01

    Some researchers have illustrated how the Internet can provide users with an ideal atmosphere to explore sexuality; however, most have stressed the Internet's negative impact on intimate relationships. Notably, much of this research has focused on the small minority of men who compulsively engage in online sexual activities (OSA), overlooking the majority of men and women who use OSA recreationally (either individually or with a partner). Addressing these limitations, data on heterosexual adults in committed relationships were taken from the 2004 "ELLE/msnbc.com Cyber-sex and Romance Survey" (n = 8,376). In quantitative analyses, men were less likely than women to express concerns and more likely to hold favorable attitudes about their partner's OSA. With regard to the impact of OSA on intimate relationships, men and women did not differ in becoming "more open to new things," and finding it easier "to talk about what [they] want sexually." Negative impacts were also identified, with women more likely to indicate they had less sex as a result of a partner's OSA, and men more likely to indicate they were less aroused by real sex as a result of their own OSA. Generally, qualitative results mirrored quantitative ones. Additionally, qualitative data suggested that moderate or light amounts of OSA yield relationship benefits for both female and male users, including increases in the quality and frequency of sex, and increased intimacy with real partners. In addition, men who used the Internet moderately, and men and women who reported being light users, stated that engaging in tandem OSA fostered better sexual communication with partners. Findings underscore the need to explore further the impact that online sexual activities can have on real-life committed relationships. PMID:20174862

  2. [Role of immune system in the pathomechanism of obstructive sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna; Kedzior, Marta E

    2008-01-01

    Immune system plays an essential role in the pathomechanism of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA), in the development of certain OSA complications, like the increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. Indeed, it is the sleep fragmentation and chronic intermittent hypoxia/reoxygenation, that stimulates increased immunoreactivity and chronic inflammatory response, both systemic and local in the upper airways. This review summarizes current evidence on the most important regulatory mechanisms involving immune cells and mediators. PMID:18464225

  3. Evaluation of Bone Mineral Density by Computed Tomography in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Satoshi; Ikezoe, Kohei; Hirai, Toyohiro; Oguma, Tsuyoshi; Tanizawa, Kiminobu; Inouchi, Morito; Handa, Tomohiro; Oga, Toru; Mishima, Michiaki; Chin, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Clinical studies have investigated whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can modulate bone metabolism but data are conflicting. Bone mineral density (BMD) measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is the standard technique for quantifying bone strength but has limitations in overweight patients (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 25 kg/m2). The aim of this study was to examine the association between OSA and BMD by examining CT images that allow true volumetric measurements of the bone regardless of BMI. Methods: Lumbar vertebrae BMD was evaluated in 234 persons (180 males and 54 females) by CT scan. The method was calibrated by a phantom containing a known concentration of hydroxyapatite. Results: BMD was lower in male patients with severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥ 30/h) than non OSA (AHI < 5; p < 0.05), while OSA and BMD had no association in females. Linear and multiple regression analyses revealed that age (p < 0.0001, β = −0.52), hypertension (p = 0.0068, β = −0.17), and the alveolar-arterial oxygen pressure difference (A-aDO2) (p = 0.012, β = −0.15) in males were associated with BMD, while only age (p < 0.0001, β = −0.68) was associated with BMD in females. Conclusion: Males with severe OSA had a significantly lower BMD than non OSA participants. Age, hypertension, and elevation of A-aDO2 were significant factors for BMD by CT imaging. The usefulness of measuring BMD in OSA patients by CT scanning should be studied in future. Citation: Hamada S, Ikezoe K, Hirai T, Oguma T, Tanizawa K, Inouchi M, Handa T, Oga T, Mishima M, Chin K. Evaluation of bone mineral density by computed tomography in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(1):25–34. PMID:26235157

  4. Evidence Supports No Relationship between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Premolar Extraction: An Electronic Health Records Review

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Ann J.; Rindal, D. Brad; Hatch, John P.; Kane, Sheryl; Asche, Stephen E.; Carvalho, Chris; Rugh, John

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A controversy exists concerning the relationship, if any, between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the anatomical position of the anterior teeth. Specifically, there has been speculation that extraction orthodontics and retraction of the anterior teeth contributes to OSA by crowding the tongue and decreasing airway space. This retrospective study utilized electronic medical and dental health records to examine the association between missing premolars and OSA. Methods: The sample (n = 5,584) was obtained from the electronic medical and dental health records of HealthPartners in Minnesota. Half of the subjects (n = 2,792) had one missing premolar in each quadrant. The other half had no missing premolars. Cases and controls were paired in a 1:1 match on age range, gender, and body mass index (BMI) range. The outcome was the presence or absence of a diagnosis of OSA confirmed by polysomnography. Results: Of the subjects without missing premolars, 267 (9.56%) had received a diagnosis of OSA. Of the subjects with four missing premolars, 299 (10.71%) had received a diagnosis of OSA. The prevalence of OSA was not significantly different between the groups (OR = 1.14, p = 0.144). Conclusion: The absence of four premolars (one from each quadrant), and therefore a presumed indicator of past “extraction orthodontic treatment,” is not supported as a significant factor in the cause of OSA. Citation: Larsen AJ, Rindal DB, Hatch JP, Kane S, Asche SE, Carvalho C, Rugh J. Evidence supports no relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and premolar extraction: an electronic health records review. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(12):1443–1448. PMID:26235151

  5. Standards for reporting the optical aberrations of eyes.

    PubMed

    Thibos, Larry N; Applegate, Raymond A; Schwiegerling, James T; Webb, Robert

    2002-01-01

    In response to a perceived need in the vision community, an OSA taskforce was formed at the 1999 topical meeting on vision science and its applications (VSIA-99) and charged with developing consensus recommendations on definitions, conventions, and standards for reporting of optical aberrations of human eyes. Progress reports were presented at the 1999 OSA annual meeting and at VSIA-2000 by the chairs of three taskforce subcommittees on (1) reference axes, (2) describing functions, and (3) model eyes. PMID:12361175

  6. Choroidal Blood-Flow Responses to Hyperoxia and Hypercapnia in Men with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Tonini, Matthieu; Khayi, Hafid; Pepin, Jean-Louis; Renard, Elisabeth; Baguet, Jean-Philippe; Lévy, Patrick; Romanet, Jean-Paul; Geiser, Martial H.; Chiquet, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) impacts on macrovasculature and autonomic function and may therefore interfere with ocular microvascular regulation. We hypothesized that choroidal vascular reactivity to hyperoxia and hypercapnia was altered in patients with OSA compared with matched control subjects and would improve after treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Methods: Sixteen healthy men were matched 1:1 for body mass index, sex, and age with 16 men with newly diagnosed OSA without comorbidities. Subjects underwent sleep studies, 24-hour blood pressure monitoring, arterial stiffness measurements, and cardiac and carotid echography. Overall, patients were middle-aged, lean, and otherwise healthy except for having OSA with a limited amount of desaturation, with, at most, subclinical lesions of the cardiovascular system, stage 1 hypertension, or both. Choroidal laser Doppler flowmetry provides a unique opportunity to assess microvascular function by measuring velocity, (ChBVel), volume (ChBVol), and relative subfoveal choroidal blood flow (ChBF). Vascular choroidal reactivity was studied during hyperoxia and hypercapnia (8% CO2) challenges before and after treatment with nasal CPAP. Results: Patients with OSA and control subjects exhibited similar choroidal reactivity during hyperoxia (stability of choroidal blood flow) and hypercapnia (significant increases in ChBVel of 13.5% and in ChBF of 16%). Choroidal vasoreactivity to CO2 was positively associated with arterial stiffness in patients with OSA. Gas choroidal vasoreactivity was unchanged after 6 to 9 months of CPAP treatment. Conclusion: This study showed unimpaired choroidal vascular reactivity in otherwise healthy men with OSA. This suggests that patients with OSA, without comorbidities, have long-term adaptive mechanisms active in ocular microcirculation. Citation: Tonini M; Khayi H; Pepin JL; Renard E; Baguet JP; Lévy P; Romanet JP; Geiser MH; Chiquet C. Choroidal blood

  7. Epigenetics modifications and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: The EPIOSA study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Epidemiological and animal models studies generate hypotheses for innovative strategies in OSA management by interfering intermediates mechanisms associated with cardiovascular complications. We have thus initiated the Epigenetics modification in Obstructive Sleep Apnea (EPIOSA) study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02131610). Methods/design EPIOSA is a prospective cohort study aiming to recruit 350 participants of caucasian ethnicity and free of other chronic or inflammatory diseases: 300 patients with prevalent OSA and 50 non-OSA subjects. All of them will be follow-up for at least 5 years. Recruitment and study visits are performed in single University-based sleep clinic using standard operating procedures. At baseline and at each one year follow-up examination, patients are subjected to a core phenotyping protocol. This includes a standardized questionnaire and physical examination to determine incident comorbidities and health resources utilization, with a primary focus on cardiovascular events. Confirmatory outcomes information is requested from patient records and the regional Department of Health Services. Every year, OSA status will be assessed by full sleep study and blood samples will be obtained for immediate standard biochemistry, hematology, inflammatory cytokines and cytometry analysis. For biobanking, aliquots of serum, plasma, urine, mRNA and DNA are also obtained. Bilateral carotid echography will be performed to assess subclinical atherosclerosis and atherosclerosis progression. OSA patients are treated according with national guidelines. Discussion EPIOSA will enable the prospective evaluation of inflammatory and epigenetics mechanism involved in cardiovascular complication of treated and non-treated patients with OSA compared with non OSA subjects. PMID:25016368

  8. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea exhibit genioglossus dysfunction that is normalized after treatment with continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Carrera, M; Barbé, F; Sauleda, J; Tomás, M; Gómez, C; Agustí, A G

    1999-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by repetitive episodes of pharyngeal closure during sleep. The pathogenesis of OSAS is unclear. We hypothesized that the genioglossus (GG), the most important pharyngeal dilator muscle, would be abnormal in patients with OSAS. Further, because treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is very effective clinically in these patients, we investigated the effects of CPAP upon the structure and function of the GG. We studied 16 patients with OSAS (nine of them at diagnosis and seven after having been under treatment with CPAP for at least 1 yr) and 11 control subjects in whom OSAS was excluded clinically. A biopsy of the GG was obtained in each subject, mounted in a tissue bath, and stimulated through platinum electrodes. The following measurements were obtained: maximal twitch tension, contraction time, half-relaxation time, the force-frequency relationship, and the response to a fatiguing protocol. The percentage of type I ("slow twitch") and type II ("fast twitch") fibers was also quantified. Patients with OSAS showed a greater GG fatigability than did control subjects (ANOVA, p < 0.001). Interestingly, this abnormality was entirely corrected by CPAP. Likewise, the percentage of type II fibers was significantly higher in patients with OSAS (59 +/- 4%) than in control subjects (39 +/- 4%, p < 0.001) and, again, these structural changes were corrected by CPAP (40 +/- 3%, p < 0.001). These results show that the function and structure of the GG is abnormal in patients with OSAS. Because these abnormalities are corrected by CPAP, we suggest that they are likely a consequence, not a cause, of the disease. PMID:10351945

  9. SYSTEMS BIOLOGY ANALYSES OF GENE EXPRESSION AND GENOME WIDE ASSOCIATION STUDY DATA IN OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YU; PATEL, SANJAY; NIBBE, ROD; MAXWELL, SEAN; CHOWDHURY, SALIM A.; KOYUTURK, MEHMET; ZHU, XIAOFENG; LARKIN, EMMA K.; BUXBAUM, SARAH G; PUNJABI, NARESH M.; GHARIB, SINA A.; REDLINE, SUSAN; CHANCE, MARK R.

    2015-01-01

    The precise molecular etiology of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is unknown; however recent research indicates that several interconnected aberrant pathways and molecular abnormalities are contributors to OSA. Identifying the genes and pathways associated with OSA can help to expand our understanding of the risk factors for the disease as well as provide new avenues for potential treatment. Towards these goals, we have integrated relevant high dimensional data from various sources, such as genome-wide expression data (microarray), protein-protein interaction (PPI) data and results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in order to define sub-network elements that connect some of the known pathways related to the disease as well as define novel regulatory modules related to OSA. Two distinct approaches are applied to identify sub-networks significantly associated with OSA. In the first case we used a biased approach based on sixty genes/proteins with known associations with sleep disorders and/or metabolic disease to seed a search using commercial software to discover networks associated with disease followed by information theoretic (mutual information) scoring of the sub-networks. In the second case we used an unbiased approach and generated an interactome constructed from publicly available gene expression profiles and PPI databases, followed by scoring of the network with p-values from GWAS data derived from OSA patients to uncover sub-networks significant for the disease phenotype. A comparison of the approaches reveals a number of proteins that have been previously known to be associated with OSA or sleep. In addition, our results indicate a novel association of Phosphoinositide 3-kinase, the STAT family of proteins and its related pathways with OSA. PMID:21121029

  10. The comparative absorption of silicon from different foods and food supplements.

    PubMed

    Sripanyakorn, Supannee; Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Dissayabutr, Wacharee; Anderson, Simon H C; Thompson, Richard P H; Powell, Jonathan J

    2009-09-01

    Dietary Si (orthosilicic acid; OSA) appears important in connective tissue health, and although the sources and intakes of Si are well established, its absorption is not. Si absorption was measured from eight high-Si-containing sources: alcohol-free beer; OSA solution (positive control); bananas; green beans; supplemental choline-stabilised OSA (ChOSA); supplemental monomethyl silanetriol (MMST); supplemental colloidal silica (CS); magnesium trisilicate British Pharmacopoeia antacid (MTBP). Two of the supplements and the antacid were pre-selected following an in vitro dissolution assay. Fasting, healthy subjects (CS, n 3; others, n > or = 5) each ingested two of the sources separated by a 1-week wash-out period. Blood and urine were collected and measured for total Si concentrations by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Absorption, based on urinary Si excretion, was highest for MMST and alcohol-free beer (64% of dose), followed by green beans (44%), OSA (43%), ChOSA (17%), bananas and MTBP (4%) and CS (1%). Peak serum concentrations occurred by 0.5 h for MMST and green beans, 1.5 h for OSA and alcohol-free beer, 2 h for ChOSA and CS, and 4 h for MTBP. Area under the serum curves correlated positively with urinary Si output (r 0.82; P < 0.0001). Absorption of Si from supplements and antacids was consistent with their known chemical speciation and kinetics of dissolution under simulated gastrointestinal conditions. Monomeric silicates were readily absorbed, while particulate silicates were decreasingly well absorbed with increasing polymerisation. The present results highlight the need to allow for relative absorption of Si from different foods or supplements in subsequent epidemiological and intervention studies. PMID:19356271

  11. New Approaches to Positive Airway Pressure Treatment in Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Kuźniar, Tomasz J

    2016-06-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a mainstay of therapy in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This technology has gone through tremendous changes that resulted in devices that can recognize and differentiate sleep-disordered breathing events, adjust their output to these events, monitor usage, and communicate with the treatment team. This article discusses recent developments in treatment of OSA with PAP. PMID:27236053

  12. Effect of CPAP therapy on endothelial function in obstructive sleep apnoea: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Esther I; Puhan, Milo A; Schlatzer, Christian; Stradling, John R; Kohler, Malcolm

    2015-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a prevalent sleep-related breathing disorder associated with adverse cardiovascular outcome. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the proposed mechanistic links between OSA and the increased cardiovascular risk. Treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) may reverse this detrimental pathophysiological consequence of OSA. Most studies on the effect of CPAP on endothelial function in OSA are limited by their low sample size. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the effect CPAP therapy on endothelial function in patients with OSA. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis searching literature databases up to August 2013 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effect of CPAP on endothelial function in OSA, assessed by flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and other validated techniques. The primary outcome for the meta-analysis (DerSimonian/Laird random-effects method) was the treatment effect on FMD. Eight RCTs comparing the effects of therapeutic CPAP versus subtherapeutic CPAP (or no intervention) on endothelial function involving 245 OSA patients were included in the systematic review. The studies are consistent in effect direction, showing an improvement of endothelial function by CPAP. Four RCTs involving 150 patients could be used for the meta-analysis. Compared to the control group, CPAP therapy (range 2-24 weeks) significantly increased absolute % FMD by 3.87% (95% confidence interval: 1.93-5.80, P < 0.001). In patients with OSA, CPAP therapy improves endothelial function significantly and to a clinically important extent. PMID:26073295

  13. Screening for obstructive sleep apnea in children treated at a major craniofacial center.

    PubMed

    Paliga, J Thomas; Tahiri, Youssef; Silvestre, Jason; Taylor, Jesse A

    2014-09-01

    Timely diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with craniofacial disorders may help prevent long-term adverse sequelae of upper airway obstruction, namely pulmonary hypertension, failure to thrive, and impaired neurocognitive development. Currently, little is known about the incidence of OSA in this high-risk population. A prospective study examining the incidence of positive screening for OSA in patients cared for by the craniofacial team at a large, urban referral center was performed. From January 2011 to August 2013, all patient families were asked to complete the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire. This validated tool has a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 87% in predicting a positive sleep study when the ratio of positive-total responses is 0.33 or greater. Screening results were evaluated via Chi-squared and Fisher tests according to demographic and clinical variables. A total of 234 children seen in our craniofacial clinic completed the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire. The mean screening age was 8.38 years, and 47% were male (110/234). Total incidence of positive OSA screening was 28.2% (66/234). Of the total population, 128 patients had an underlying syndrome (54.7%), whereas 106 patients were nonsyndromic (45.3%). Both groups were at equivalent risk for screening positive for OSA (28.1% versus 28.3%, P = 1.0). Among children with a craniofacial diagnosis, patients with a cleft lip and/or palate were at equivalent risk for screening positive for OSA as patients without a cleft (25.5% versus 32.6%, P = 0.24). The OSA symptoms affect almost one third of patients seen by our craniofacial team. Syndromic and nonsyndromic patients seem to be at equivalent risk as those patients with and without an oropharyngeal cleft. Future work will correlate these findings with formal polysomnography and may serve to heighten awareness of OSA in this at-risk population. PMID:25162551

  14. OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA AND CENTRAL SEROUS CHORIORETINOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    BRODIE, FRANK L.; CHARLSON, EMILY S.; ALEMAN, TOMAS S.; SALVO, REBECCA T.; GEWAILY, DINA Y.; LAU, MARISA K.; FARREN, NEIL D.; ENGELHARD, STEPHANIE B.; PISTILLI, MAXWELL; BRUCKER, ALEXANDER J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine if there is an association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR). Methods Patients with CSCR without a history of steroid use or secondary retinal disease were matched based on age/gender/body mass index with control patients and administered the Berlin Questionnaire to assess for OSA risk. Patients were scored “OSA+” if they were at “high risk” on the Berlin Questionnaire or reported a previous OSA diagnosis. Rates of OSA+ were compared between the 2 groups, odds ratio and its 95% confidence interval was calculated using exact conditional logistic regression. Results Forty-eight qualifying patients with CSCR were identified. There were no statistically significant differences between the CSCR and control groups by age (mean = 55 years), gender (79% male), body mass index (mean = 28.2), history of diabetes, or hypertension. Within the CSCR group, 22 patients (45.8%) were OSA+ versus 21 control patients (43.8%) (difference = 2.1%; 95% confidence interval, −18.2% to 22.2%; exact odds ratio = 1.08, 95% confidence interval, 0.47–2.49; P = 1.00). Conclusion When compared with matched controls, patients with CSCR did not have statistically significant higher rates of OSA risk or previous diagnosis. This finding contrasts with previous work showing a strong association between the diseases. The divergence is likely due to our matching controls for body mass index, a significant risk factor for OSA. PMID:25127049

  15. The Relationship Between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Self-Reported Stroke or Coronary Heart Disease in Overweight and Obese Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Thomas B.; Foster, Gary D.; Sanders, Mark H.; Unruh, Mark; Reboussin, David; Kuna, Samuel T.; Millman, Richard; Zammit, Gary; Wing, Rena R.; Wadden, Thomas A.; Kelley, David; Pi-Sunyer, Xavier; Newman, Anne B.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are common, increasingly recognized as comorbid conditions, and individually implicated in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We sought to determine the association between OSA and CVD in an overweight and obese population with T2DM. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Ancillary study to the Look AHEAD trial. Participants: Three hundred five participants of the Sleep AHEAD study who underwent unattended full polysomnography at home with measurement of the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). Measurements and Results: Self-reported prevalent CVD was obtained at the initial assessment of the parent study and included a history of the following conditions: stroke, carotid endarterectomy, myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass grafting, and percutaneous coronary intervention. Logistic regression was used to assess the association of OSA, measured continuously and categorically, with prevalent CVD. OSA was present (AHI ≥ 5) in 86% of the population, whereas the prevalence of all forms of CVD was just 14%. The AHI was associated with stroke with an adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 2.57 (1.03, 6.42). Neither the continuously measured AHI nor the categories of OSA severity were significantly associated with the other forms of CVD assessed. Conclusions: We found suggestive evidence of a greater prevalence of stroke at greater values of the AHI. OSA was not associated with prevalent coronary heart disease in the Sleep AHEAD trial. Future studies should confirm the link between OSA and stroke and examine mechanisms that link OSA to stroke in adults with T2DM. Citation: Rice TB; Foster GD; Sanders MH; Unruh M; Reboussin D; Kuna ST; Millman R; Zammit G; Wing RR; Wadden TA; Kelley D; Pi-Sunyer X; Newman AB. The relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and self-reported stroke or coronary heart disease in overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus

  16. Genomic instability and telomere fusion of canine osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Junko; Yurkon, Charles R; Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Masami; Genet, Stefan C; Roybal, Erica J; Rota, Garrett W; Saffer, Ethan R; Rose, Barbara J; Hanneman, William H; Thamm, Douglas H; Kato, Takamitsu A

    2012-01-01

    Canine osteosarcoma (OSA) is known to present with highly variable and chaotic karyotypes, including hypodiploidy, hyperdiploidy, and increased numbers of metacentric chromosomes. The spectrum of genomic instabilities in canine OSA has significantly augmented the difficulty in clearly defining the biological and clinical significance of the observed cytogenetic abnormalities. In this study, eight canine OSA cell lines were used to investigate telomere fusions by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a peptide nucleotide acid probe. We characterized each cell line by classical cytogenetic studies and cellular phenotypes including telomere associated factors and then evaluated correlations from this data. All eight canine OSA cell lines displayed increased abnormal metacentric chromosomes and exhibited numerous telomere fusions and interstitial telomeric signals. Also, as evidence of unstable telomeres, colocalization of γ-H2AX and telomere signals in interphase cells was observed. Each cell line was characterized by a combination of data representing cellular doubling time, DNA content, chromosome number, metacentric chromosome frequency, telomere signal level, cellular radiosensitivity, and DNA-PKcs protein expression level. We have also studied primary cultures from 10 spontaneous canine OSAs. Based on the observation of telomere aberrations in those primary cell cultures, we are reasonably certain that our observations in cell lines are not an artifact of prolonged culture. A correlation between telomere fusions and the other characteristics analyzed in our study could not be identified. However, it is important to note that all of the canine OSA samples exhibiting telomere fusion utilized in our study were telomerase positive. Pending further research regarding telomerase negative canine OSA cell lines, our findings may suggest telomere fusions can potentially serve as a novel marker for canine OSA. PMID:22916246

  17. Impact of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Liver Fat Accumulation According to Sex and Visceral Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Toyama, Yoshiro; Tanizawa, Kiminobu; Kubo, Takeshi; Chihara, Yuichi; Harada, Yuka; Murase, Kimihiko; Azuma, Masanori; Hamada, Satoshi; Hitomi, Takefumi; Handa, Tomohiro; Oga, Toru; Chiba, Tsutomu; Mishima, Michiaki; Chin, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Associations between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and liver fat accumulation have been frequently investigated because both morbidities are common. Visceral fat was reported to be closely related to OSA and liver fat accumulation. Recently, sex differences in the association between OSA and mortality have gained much attention. Objectives To investigate the associations among OSA, liver fat accumulation as determined by computed tomography, and visceral fat area and their sex differences. Methods Studied were 188 males and 62 females who consecutively underwent polysomnography and computed tomography. Results Although the apnea-hypopnea index was positively correlated with liver fat accumulation in the total males, none of the OSA-related factors was independently associated with liver fat accumulation in either the total male or female participants in the multivariate analyses. When performing subanalyses using a specific definition for Japanese of obesity or visceral obesity (body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg/m2 or visceral fat area ≥100 cm2), in only males without visceral obesity, percent sleep time with oxygen saturation <90%, in addition to BMI, insulin resistance, and serum triglyceride values, was independently correlated with liver fat accumulation (R2 = 15.1%, P<0.001). In males, percent sleep time of oxygen saturation <90% was also a determining factor for alanine aminotransferase values regardless of visceral fat area. In contrast, OSA was not associated with liver fat accumulation or alanine aminotransferase values in females whether or not visceral obesity was absent. Conclusions Sex differences in the visceral fat-dependent impact of OSA on liver fat accumulation existed. Although the mechanisms are not known and ethnic differences may exist in addition to the specific criteria of visceral obesity in Japan, the treatment of male patients with OSA might be favorable from the viewpoint of preventing liver fat accumulation and liver

  18. Serum Levels of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3 in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients: Effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Archontogeorgis, Kostas; Nena, Evangelia; Papanas, Nikolaos; Xanthoudaki, Maria; Hatzizisi, Olga; Kyriazis, Georgios; Tsara, Venetia; Maltezos, Efstratios; Froudarakis, Marios; Steiropoulos, Paschalis

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: Hypoxia, a major feature of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), modifies Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3 (IGFBP-3) levels, which contribute to atherogenesis and occurrence of cardiovascular (CV) events. We assessed and compared serum levels of VEGF and IGFBP-3 in newly diagnosed OSA patients and controls, to explore associations with anthropometric and sleep parameters and to study the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on these levels. Materials and Methods: Serum levels of VEGF and IGFBP-3 were measured in 65 OSA patients and 31 age- and body mass index- matched controls. In OSA patients, measurements were repeated after 6 months of CPAP therapy. All participants were non-smokers, without any comorbidities or systemic medication use. Results: At baseline, serum VEGF levels in OSA patients were higher compared with controls (p<0.001), while IGFBP-3 levels were lower (1.41±0.56 vs. 1.61±0.38 μg/ml, p=0.039). VEGF levels correlated with apnea-hypopnea index (r=0.336, p=0.001) and oxygen desaturation index (r=0.282, p=0.007). After 6 months on CPAP treatment, VEGF levels decreased in OSA patients (p<0.001), while IGFBP-3 levels increased (p<0.001). Conclusion: In newly diagnosed OSA patients, serum levels of VEGF are elevated, while IGFBP-3 levels are low. After 6 months of CPAP treatment these levels change. These results may reflect an increased CV risk in untreated OSA patients, which is ameliorated after CPAP therapy. PMID:27006717

  19. Effect of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on corneal thickness.

    PubMed

    Koseoglu, Handan Inonu; Kanbay, Asiye; Ortak, Huseyin; Karadağ, Remzi; Demir, Osman; Demir, Selim; Gunes, Alper; Doruk, Sibel

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) might be a risk factor for the development of eye disorders. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of OSAS on central corneal thickness (CCT). A total of 195 patients were enrolled in the study, and underwent polysomnography. Patients were divided according to their apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) scores into control group (AHI < 5), mild (AHI, 5-15), moderate (AHI, 15-30), and severe OSAS (AHI > 30) groups. In ophthalmological examinations, CCT, auto refractometer measurement, tear break-up time, and Schrimer's test results were evaluated. Central corneal thickness was significantly decreased in patients with OSAS compared to the control group (542.14 ± 31.21 vs. 569.92 ± 13.46, p < 0.001). As the severity of OSAS increased, CCT decreased (mild OSAS = 567.48 ± 23 mm, moderate OSAS = 530.21 ± 30.2 mm, and severe OSAS = 557.97 ± 16.52 mm, respectively, p < 0.001). The mean values of auto refractometer, tear break-up time, and Schrimer's test were similar between the groups (p > 0.05). CCT was negatively correlated with AHI, oxygen desaturation index, desaturation percentages, and positively correlated with minimum oxygen saturation values (p < 0.05). This study showed that central corneal thickness is inversely correlated with the severity of OSAS. OSAS affects all organ systems particularly cardiovascular and neurological mechanisms. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the effect of OSAS treatment on CCT. PMID:26292644

  20. The Use of Clinical Parameters to Predict Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Severity in Children

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Ron B.; Garetz, Suzan; Moore, Reneé H.; Rosen, Carol L.; Marcus, Carole L.; Katz, Eliot S.; Arens, Raanan; Chervin, Ronald D.; Paruthi, Shalini; Amin, Raouf; Elden, Lisa; Ellenberg, Susan S.; Redline, Susan

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE It is important to distinguish children with different levels of severity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) preoperatively using clinical parameters. This can identify children who most need polysomnography (PSG) prior to adenotonsillectomy (AT). OBJECTIVE To assess whether a combination of factors, including demographics, physical examination findings, and caregiver reports from questionnaires, can predict different levels of OSAS severity in children. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Baseline data from 453 children from the Childhood Adenotonsillectomy (CHAT) study were analyzed. Children 5.0 to 9.9 years of age with PSG-diagnosed OSAS, who were considered candidates for AT, were included. INTERVENTIONS Polysomnography for diagnosis of OSAS. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Linear or logistic regression models were fitted to identify which demographic, clinical, and caregiver reports were significantly associated with the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) and oxygen desaturation index (ODI). RESULTS Race (African American), obesity (body mass index z score > 2), and the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ) total score were associated with higher levels of AHI and ODI (P = .05). A multivariable model that included the most significant variables explained less than 3% of the variance in OSAS severity as measured by PSG outcomes. Tonsillar size and Friedman palate position were not associated with increased AHI or ODI. Models that tested for potential effect modification by race or obesity showed no evidence of interactions with any clinical measure, AHI, or ODI (P > .20 for all comparisons). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE This study of more than 450 children with OSAS identifies a number of clinical parameters that are associated with OSAS severity. However, information on demographics, physical findings, and questionnaire responses does not robustly discriminate different levels of OSAS severity. TRIAL REGISTRATION clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00560859 PMID

  1. [How do you really know if the obese patient has sleep apnea?].

    PubMed

    Quilliot, D; Petit, F X; Cornette, A; Ziegler, O

    2002-12-01

    Obesity is known to predispose to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a condition characterized by repeated episodes of apnea or hypopnea during sleep, due to the interruption of airflow through the nose and mouth. These episodes lead to the fragmentation of sleep and to decrease in oxyhaemoglobin saturation. Patients with massive obesity, with or without daytime hypersomnolence should be systematically screened for OSA, because many of them appear to be asymptomatic and unaware of their breathing abnormalities during sleep. Polysomnography (PSG) in an attended hospital laboratory setting is the gold standard for the diagnosis of OSA. However portable recording devices can be used for screening with good sensibility and specificity, and even for diagnosis when the apnea-hypopnea index is high. However the final diagnosis can only be carried out in a sleep laboratory using PSG by highly-qualified personnel, because of the limitations of the portable recording device. There is a strong association between OSA and the risk of traffic accidents. It has been established that OSA affects quality of life. There is also increasing evidence that OSA is an independent risk factor for cardio-vascular diseases. This has been successfully demonstrated for hypertension by prospective studies. But the evidence remains weak for myocardial infarction, stroke or mortality. Treating OSA with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the treatment of choice. CPAP improves quality of life, driving simulator performance, blood pressure and sleepiness, as demonstrated by randomised placebo controlled trials. The majority of obese OSA patients are currently not being offered diagnosis testing and treatment. It's a real challenge due to the epidemic increase of obesity prevalence. Portable recording devices could be available outside the sleep laboratory in nutrition department, where morbid obesity is treated. This emphasizes the need for a real collaboration between these departments and

  2. Relationship between Body Fat Distribution and Upper Airway Dynamic Function during Sleep in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Haibo; Schwab, Richard J.; Kim, Christopher; He, Jiwei; Shults, Justine; Bradford, Ruth; Huang, Jingtao; Marcus, Carole L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with increased visceral adipose tissue (VAT) in adults; however, few studies have evaluated VAT in relation to upper airway function in adolescents. We hypothesized that increased neck circumference (NC) and VAT would be associated with increased upper airway collapsibility. Methods: Adolescents (24 obese patients with OSAS, 22 obese control patients, and 29 lean control patients) underwent abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, and measurement of upper airway pressure-flow relationships in the activated and hypotonic upper airway states. Results: Patients with OSAS had a greater activated slope of the pressure-flow relationship (SPF) than control groups (P < 0.001), whereas hypotonic SPF was greater in both obese groups compared with lean control patients (P = 0.01). NC and VAT were greater in obese control patients and those with OSAS than in lean control patients (P < 0.001), but did not differ between obese patients with OSAS and obese control patients. In lean control patients and those with OSAS, increased NC was associated with increased activated SPF, whereas in obese control patients it was associated with decreased activated SPF (P = 0.03). In contrast, increased NC was associated with increased hypotonic SPF in all groups (P < 0.001). There was no significant effect of VAT on either activated or hypotonic SPF for any of the three groups. Conclusions: Increased neck circumference was associated with increased upper airway collapsibility in adolescents in the hypotonic but not activated state. These data suggest that obese adolescents without OSAS, despite a narrowed upper airway from adipose tissue, are protected from developing OSAS by upper airway neuromotor activation. Neither neck circumference nor visceral adipose tissue is useful in predicting upper airway collapsibility in obese adolescents. Citation: Yuan H; Schwab RJ; Kim C; He J; Shults J; Bradford R; Huang J; Marcus CL

  3. Upper Airway Collapsibility and Genioglossus Activity in Adolescents during Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jingtao; Pinto, Swaroop J.; Yuan, Haibo; Katz, Eliot S.; Karamessinis, Laurie R.; Bradford, Ruth M.; Gallagher, Paul R.; Hannigan, James T.; Nixon, Thomas; Ward, Michelle B.; Lee, Yin N.; Marcus, Carole L.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obese patients develop obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), at least in part because of a narrowed upper airway. However, many obese adolescents do not develop OSAS, despite having a presumably narrower airway. The reasons for this phenomenon are unclear. The authors hypothesized that obese controls have a compensatory neuromuscular response to subatmospheric pressure loads during sleep, making them less likely to develop upper airway collapse. Design: Patients underwent pressure-flow measurements during sleep while wearing intraoral electrodes to measure genioglossal electromyography (EMGgg). Two techniques were applied to decrease nasal pressure (PN) to subatmospheric levels, resulting in an activated and relatively hypotonic upper airway. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: There were 35 obese patients with OSAS, 28 obese controls, and 43 lean controls. Results: In the activated state, the two control groups had a flatter slope of the pressure-flow relationship and a more negative critical closing pressure (less collapsible) than the OSAS group. In the hypotonic state, the lean controls had a flatter slope of the pressure-flow relationship than the OSAS and obese control groups. In the activated state, the slope of EMGgg versus PN was greater in the obese control group than in the OSAS or lean control groups (P = 0.002 and P = 0.028, respectively); there were no differences in the hypotonic state. Conclusions: Obese controls have vigorous upper airway neuromuscular responses during sleep. Upper airway reflexes normally decline during adolescent development. It is speculated that obese adolescents without OSAS maintain protective upper airway reflexes during adolescent development, whereas those who go on to develop OSAS do not. Citation: Huang J; Pinto SJ; Yuan H; Katz ES; Karamessinis LR; Bradford RM; Gallagher PR; Hannigan JT; Nixon T; Ward MB; Lee YN; Marcus CL. Upper airway collapsibility and genioglossus activity in adolescents

  4. Heterogeneous recurrence analysis of heartbeat dynamics for the identification of sleep apnea events.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Changqing; Kan, Chen; Yang, Hui

    2016-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder that affects 24% of adult men and 9% of adult women. It occurs due to the occlusion of the upper airway during sleep, thereby leading to a decrease of blood oxygen level that triggers arousals and sleep fragmentation. OSA significantly impacts the quality of sleep and it is known to be responsible for a number of health complications, such as high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes. Traditional diagnosis of OSA relies on polysomnography, which is expensive, time-consuming and inaccessible to the general population. Recent advancement of sensing provides an unprecedented opportunity for the screening of OSA events using single-channel electrocardiogram (ECG). However, existing approaches are limited in their ability to characterize nonlinear dynamics underlying ECG signals. As such, hidden patterns of OSA-altered cardiac electrical activity cannot be fully revealed and understood. This paper presents a new heterogeneous recurrence model to characterize the heart rate variability for the identification of OSA. A nonlinear state space is firstly reconstructed from a time series of RR intervals that are extracted from single-channel ECGs. Further, the state space is recursively partitioned into a hierarchical structure of local recurrence regions. A new fractal representation is designed to efficiently characterize state transitions among segmented sub-regions. Statistical measures are then developed to quantify heterogeneous recurrence patterns. In addition, we integrate classification models with heterogeneous recurrence features to differentiate healthy subjects from OSA patients. Experimental results show that the proposed approach captures heterogeneous recurrence patterns in the transformed space and provides an effective tool to detect OSA using one-lead ECG signals. PMID:27228436

  5. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Is Associated with Liver Damage and Atherosclerosis in Patients with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Petta, Salvatore; Marrone, Oreste; Torres, Daniele; Buttacavoli, Maria; Cammà, Calogero; Di Marco, Vito; Licata, Anna; Lo Bue, Anna; Parrinello, Gaspare; Pinto, Antonio; Salvaggio, Adriana; Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Craxì, Antonio; Bonsignore, Maria Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims We assessed whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and nocturnal hypoxemia are associated with severity of liver fibrosis and carotid atherosclerosis in patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD and low prevalence of morbid obesity. Secondary aim was to explore the association of OSA and hypoxemia with NASH and severity of liver pathological changes. Methods Consecutive patients (n = 126) with chronically elevated ALT and NAFLD underwent STOP-BANG questionnaire to estimate OSA risk and ultrasonographic carotid assessment. In patients accepting to perform cardiorespiratory polygraphy (PG, n = 50), OSA was defined as an apnea/hypopnea index ≥5. A carotid atherosclerotic plaque was defined as a focal thickening >1.3 mm. Results Prevalence of high OSA risk was similar in patients refusing or accepting PG (76% vs 68%, p = 0.17). Among those accepting PG, overall OSA prevalence was significantly higher in patients with F2-F4 fibrosis compared to those without (72% vs 44%; p = 0.04). Significant fibrosis was independently associated with mean nocturnal oxygen saturation (SaO2)<95% (OR 3.21, 95%C.I. 1.02–7.34; p = 0.04). Prevalence of OSA tended to be higher in patients with, than in those without, carotid plaques (64% vs 40%; p = 0.08). Carotid plaques were independently associated with %time at SaO2<90% >1 (OR 6.30, 95%C.I. 1.02–12.3; p = 0.01). Conclusions In NAFLD patients with chronically elevated ALT at low prevalence of morbid obesity, OSA was highly prevalent and indexes of SaO2 resulted independently associated with severity of liver fibrosis and carotid atherosclerosis. These data suggest to consider sleep disordered breathing as a potential additional therapeutic target in severe NAFLD patients. PMID:26672595

  6. Impact of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on the Levels of Placental Growth Factor (PlGF) and Their Value for Predicting Short-Term Adverse Outcomes in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Barcelo, Antonia; Bauça, Josep Miquel; Yañez, Aina; Fueyo, Laura; Gomez, Cristina; de la Peña, Monica; Pierola, Javier; Rodriguez, Alberto; Sanchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel; Abad, Jorge; Mediano, Olga; Amilibia, Jose; Masdeu, Maria Jose; Teran, Joaquin; Montserrat, Josep Maria; Mayos, Mercè; Sanchez-de-la-Torre, Alicia; Barbé, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Background Placental growth factor (PlGF) induces angiogenesis and promotes tissue repair, and plasma PlGF levels change markedly during acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Currently, the impact of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with AMI is a subject of debate. Our objective was to evaluate the relationships between PlGF levels and both the severity of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and short-term outcomes after ACS in patients with and without OSA. Methods A total of 538 consecutive patients (312 OSA patients and 226 controls) admitted for ACS were included in this study. All patients underwent polygraphy in the first 72 hours after hospital admission. The severity of disease and short-term prognoses were evaluated during the hospitalization period. Plasma PlGF levels were measured using an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Results Patients with OSA were significantly older and more frequently hypertensive and had higher BMIs than those without OSA. After adjusting for age, smoking status, BMI and hypertension, PlGF levels were significantly elevated in patients with OSA compared with patients without OSA (19.9 pg/mL, interquartile range: 16.6–24.5 pg/mL; 18.5 pg/mL, interquartile range: 14.7–22.7 pg/mL; p<0.001), and a higher apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was associated with higher PlGF concentrations (p<0.003). Patients with higher levels of PlGF had also an increased odds ratio for the presence of 3 or more diseased vessels and for a Killip score>1, even after adjustment. Conclusions The results of this study show that in patients with ACS, elevated plasma levels of PlGF are associated with the presence of OSA and with adverse outcomes during short-term follow-up. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01335087 PMID:26930634

  7. Estrogen/ERR-α signaling axis is associated with fiber-type conversion of upper airway muscles in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, H H; Lu, J; Guan, Y F; Li, S J; Hu, T T; Xie, Z S; Wang, F; Peng, X H; Liu, X; Xu, X; Zhao, F P; Yu, B L; Li, X P

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen is related with the low morbidity associated with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAS) in women, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this study, we examined the relationship between OSAS and estrogen related receptor-α (ERR-α). We found that the expression levels of ERR-α and Myh7 were both downregulated in palatopharyngeal tissues from OSAS patients. In addition, we report that ERR-α is dynamically expressed during differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts. Knockdown of ERR-α via instant siRNA resulted in reduced expression of Myh7, but not Myh4. Furthermore, differentiation of C2C12 cells under 3% chronic intermittent hypoxia, a model resembling human OSAS, was impaired and accompanied by a obvious reduction in Myh7 expression levels. Moreover, activation of ERR-α with 17β-estradiol (E2) increased the expression of Myh7, whereas pretreatment with the ERR-α antagonist XCT790 reversed the E2-induced slow fiber-type switch. A rat ovariectomy model also demonstrated the switch to fast fiber type. Collectively, our findings suggest that ERR-α is involved in estrogen-mediated OSAS by regulating Myhc-slow expression. The present study illustrates an important role of the estrogen/ERR-α axis in the pathogenesis of OSAS, and may represent an attractive therapeutic target, especially in postmenopausal women. PMID:27250523

  8. Cone-beam CT analysis of patients with obstructive sleep apnea compared to normal controls

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ruben; Looney, Stephen; Kalathingal, Sajitha; De Rossi, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the upper airway dimensions of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and control subjects using a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) unit commonly applied in clinical practice in order to assess airway dimensions in the same fashion as that routinely employed in a clinical setting. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective analysis utilizing existing CBCT scans to evaluate the dimensions of the upper airway in OSA and control subjects. The CBCT data of sixteen OSA and sixteen control subjects were compared. The average area, average volume, total volume, and total length of the upper airway were computed. Width and anterior-posterior (AP) measurements were obtained on the smallest axial slice. Results OSA subjects had a significantly smaller average airway area, average airway volume, total airway volume, and mean airway width. OSA subjects had a significantly larger airway length measurement. The mean A-P distance was not significantly different between groups. Conclusion OSA subjects have a smaller upper airway compared to controls with the exception of airway length. The lack of a significant difference in the mean A-P distance may indicate that patient position during imaging (upright vs. supine) can affect this measurement. Comparison of this study with a future prospective study design will allow for validation of these results. PMID:27051634

  9. Sleep Apnea and Fatty Liver Are Coupled Via Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Arısoy, Ahmet; Sertoğullarından, Bunyamin; Ekin, Selami; Özgökçe, Mesut; Bulut, Mehmet Deniz; Huyut, Mehmet Tahir; Ölmez, Şehmus; Turan, Mahfuz

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep-related breathing disorder characterized by intermittent hypoxia. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between OSA and fatty liver. MATERIAL AND METHODS We enrolled 176 subjects to this study who underwent polysomnography (PSG) for suspected OSA. The control group included 42 simple snoring subjects. PSG, biochemical tests, and ultrasonographic examination were performed all subjects. RESULTS The simple snoring and mild, moderate, and severe OSA groups included 18/42 (42.86%), 33/52 (63.5%), 27/34 (79.4%), and 28/48 (79.2%) subjects with hepatosteatosis, respectively. There were significant differences in hepatosteatosis and hepatosteatosis grade between the simple snoring and the moderate and severe OSA groups. Logistic regression analysis showed that BMI and average desaturation were independently and significantly related to hepatic steatosis. CONCLUSIONS Our study shows that BMI and the average desaturation contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver in subjects with OSA. In this regard, sleep apnea may trigger metabolic mitochondrial energy associated processes thereby altering lipid metabolism and obesity as well. PMID:26993969

  10. Speech Signal and Facial Image Processing for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza-Cuadros, Fernando; Fernández-Pozo, Rubén; Toledano, Doroteo T.; Alcázar-Ramírez, José D.; López-Gonzalo, Eduardo; Hernández-Gómez, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder characterized by recurring breathing pauses during sleep caused by a blockage of the upper airway (UA). OSA is generally diagnosed through a costly procedure requiring an overnight stay of the patient at the hospital. This has led to proposing less costly procedures based on the analysis of patients' facial images and voice recordings to help in OSA detection and severity assessment. In this paper we investigate the use of both image and speech processing to estimate the apnea-hypopnea index, AHI (which describes the severity of the condition), over a population of 285 male Spanish subjects suspected to suffer from OSA and referred to a Sleep Disorders Unit. Photographs and voice recordings were collected in a supervised but not highly controlled way trying to test a scenario close to an OSA assessment application running on a mobile device (i.e., smartphones or tablets). Spectral information in speech utterances is modeled by a state-of-the-art low-dimensional acoustic representation, called i-vector. A set of local craniofacial features related to OSA are extracted from images after detecting facial landmarks using Active Appearance Models (AAMs). Support vector regression (SVR) is applied on facial features and i-vectors to estimate the AHI. PMID:26664493

  11. Increased cerebrovascular sensitivity to endothelin-1 in a rat model of obstructive sleep apnea: a role for endothelin receptor B.

    PubMed

    Durgan, David J; Crossland, Randy F; Lloyd, Eric E; Phillips, Sharon C; Bryan, Robert M

    2015-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with cerebrovascular diseases. However, little is known regarding the effects of OSA on the cerebrovascular wall. We tested the hypothesis that OSA augments endothelin-1 (ET-1) constrictions of cerebral arteries. Repeated apneas (30 or 60 per hour) were produced in rats during the sleep cycle (8 hours) by remotely inflating a balloon implanted in the trachea. Four weeks of apneas produced a 23-fold increase in ET-1 sensitivity in isolated and pressurized posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs) compared with PCAs from sham-operated rats (EC50=10(-9.2) mol/L versus 10(-10.6) mol/L; P<0.001). This increased sensitivity was abolished by the ET-B receptor antagonist, BQ-788. Constrictions to the ET-B receptor agonist, IRL-1620, were greater in PCAs from rats after 2 or 4 weeks of apneas compared with that from sham-operated rats (P=0.013). Increased IRL-1620 constrictions in PCAs from OSA rats were normalized with the transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) blocker, SKF96365, or the Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, Y27632. These data show that OSA increases the sensitivity of PCAs to ET-1 through enhanced ET-B activity, and enhanced activity of TRPCs and ROCK. We conclude that enhanced ET-1 signaling is part of a pathologic mechanism associated with adverse cerebrovascular outcomes of OSA. PMID:25425077

  12. Impact of non-dipping on cardiovascular outcomes in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Nobuo; Ozono, Ryoji; Edahiro, Yoshinobu; Ishii, Kiyomi; Seto, Ayako; Okita, Tomomi; Teramen, Kazushi; Fujiwara, Saeko; Kihara, Yasuki

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a risk factor for cardiovascular events. However, it is unclear how OSAS contributes to the events. We investigated the impact of non-dipping on the incidence of cardiovascular events in a retrospective cohort study comprising 251 patients with OSAS. OSAS was diagnosed by overnight polysomnography and all patients underwent 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Non-dipping was diagnosed when reduction in sleep blood pressure was <10% of awake blood pressure. Over a mean 43-month follow-up period, 15 patients (6.0%) developed cardiovascular events including stroke, heart failure, and ischemic heart disease. Significantly higher cardiovascular events were observed in the non-dipping group than those without it by Kaplan-Meier analyses. Cox regression analysis revealed that the presence of non-dipping was significantly and independently associated with the incidence of cardiovascular events (hazard ratio, 3.88; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-17.41; p < 0.05), after adjusting for severity of OSAS, and CPAP therapy. Thus, non-dipping was a marker for a poor prognosis in patients with OSAS. PMID:26395950

  13. Obstructive sleep apnea, pain, and opioids: is the riddle solved?

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Karen K.; Kunder, Samuel; Wong, Jean; Doufas, Anthony G.; Chung, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Perioperative opioid-based pain management of patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may present challenges because of concerns over severe ventilatory compromise. The interaction between intermittent hypoxia, sleep fragmentation, pain, and opioid responses in OSA, is complex and warrants a special focus of perioperative outcomes research. Recent findings Life-threatening opioid-related respiratory events are rare. Epidemiologic evidence suggests that OSA together with other serious renal and heart disease, is among those conditions predisposing patients for opioid-induced ventilatory impairment (OIVI) in the postoperative period. Both intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation, two distinct components of OSA, enhance pain. Intermittent hypoxia may also potentiate opioid analgesic effects. Activation of major inflammatory pathways may be responsible for the effects of sleep disruption and intermittent hypoxia on pain and opioid analgesia. Recent experimental evidence supports that these, seemingly contrasting, phenotypes of pain-increasing and opioid-enhancing effects of intermittent hypoxia, are not mutually exclusive. Although the effect of intermittent hypoxia on OIVI has not been elucidated, opioids worsen postoperative sleep-disordered breathing in OSA patients. A subset of these patients, characterized by decreased chemoreflex responsiveness and high arousal thresholds, might be at higher risk for OIVI. Summary OSA may complicate opioid-based perioperative management of pain by altering both pain processing and sensitivity to opioid effect. PMID:26545144

  14. Assessment of Change in Palatal Sensation in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients by Using Two-Point Palatal Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kyung-Hwa; Yang, Youngsoo; Choi, Hye Rang; Cho, Jae Hoon; Kim, Gee-Tae; Kim, Jin Kook

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) have impaired responses to inspiratory resistive loading during sleep. This may be due, in part, to a change in the upper airway sensation. Therefore, we hypothesized that patients with OSAS have diminished upper airway sensation due to snoring. Methods. A total of 53 participants were selected based on clinical evaluation and polysomnography. Two-point discrimination was measured with modified calipers in the tongue and soft palate. Results. A total of 10 participants were included in the control group, 12 participants in the simple snoring group, and 27 participants in the OSAS group. There were 12 patients in the impaired sensation group of the OSAS group. On comparing polysomnography, patients with impairment of their palatal sensory input in two-point discrimination (TPD) had a more protracted duration of the longest snoring episode than those with simple snoring and normal sensation. Patients with decreased sensory input in TPD had longer average duration of snoring episodes and relative snoring time than those with simple snoring and normal sensory input in cold uvular TPD. Comparison of the cold uvular TPD for normal sensation and impaired sensation in patients with OSAS after treatment showed a different trend. Conclusion. Impaired sensation of the soft palate was correlated with the longest snoring episode duration, average snoring episode duration, and relative snoring time. It is helpful in detecting the early stage of neural degradation in OSAS patients by assessing snoring components of polysomnography and TPD in the soft palate. PMID:27095515

  15. Pathophysiologic considerations for the interactions between obstructive sleep apnea and sickle hemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed

    Okoli, Kelechi; Irani, Farzan; Horvath, William

    2009-05-01

    There are contradictory reports about the effects of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on clinical vaso-occlusive events in sickle hemoglobinopathies. The discourse has focused on the possible effects of OSA-associated hypoxemia on hemoglobin S (HbS) polymerization. Advances in understanding the pathogenesis of sickle vaso-occlusion and the physiologic consequences of OSA suggest that the potential for interaction exceeds simple hypoxemia. HbS polymerization, red cell-endothelial cell interactions, hypercoagulability, neutrophil activation and vasoactive factors constitute the multi-pathway model of sickle cell vaso-occlusion. These processes are abnormal in OSA and theoretically these abnormalities may initiate or potentiate vaso-occlusion. If this hypothesis is correct, OSA may convert the clinically benign genetic carrier state of sickle cell trait to a clinically overt disease. Reported clinical events in sickle cell trait are usually related to exposure to relative hypoxia, and are limited to the spleen and renal medulla. Studies to compare the prevalence of events (splenic infarction and hematuria) in sickle cell trait with and without OSA, as well as their relationship to exposure to environmental hypoxia will be a first step in verifying this hypothesis. PMID:19138828

  16. Prevalence of Risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and Association With Risk Factors in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Kenia Vieira; Rosa, Maria Luiza Garcia; Jorge, Antônio José Lagoeiro; Leite, Adson Renato; Correia, Dayse Mary Silva; Silva, Davi de Sá; Cetto, Diego Bragatto; Brum, Andreia da Paz; Netto, Pedro Silveira; Rodrigues, Gustavo Domingos

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a chronic, progressive disease with high morbidity and mortality. It is underdiagnosed, especially among women. Objective To study the prevalence of high risk for OSAS globally and for the Berlin Questionnaire (BQ) categories, and to evaluate the reliability of the BQ use in the population studied. Methods Observational, cross-sectional study with individuals from the Niterói Family Doctor Program, randomly selected, aged between 45 and 99 years. The visits occurred between August/2011 and December/2012. Variables associated with each BQ category and with high risk for OSAS (global) were included in logistic regression models (p < 0.05). Results Of the total (616), 403 individuals (65.4%) reported snoring. The prevalence of high risk for OSA was 42.4%, being 49.7% for category I, 10.2% for category II and 77.6% for category III. Conclusion BQ showed an acceptable reliability after excluding the questions Has anyone noticed that you stop breathing during your sleep? and Have you ever dozed off or fallen asleep while driving?. This should be tested in further studies with samples mostly comprised of women and low educational level individuals. Given the burden of OSAS-related diseases and risks, studies should be conducted to validate new tools and to adapt BQ to better screen OSAS. PMID:27142651

  17. Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea at Altitude.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Konrad E; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Ulrich, Silvia

    2015-06-01

    Bloch, Konrad E., Tsogyal D. Latshang, and Silvia Ulrich. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea at altitude. High Alt Med Biol 16:110-116, 2015.--Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent in the general population, in particular in men and women of older age. In OSA patients sleeping near sea level, the apneas/hypopneas associated with intermittent hypoxemia are predominantly due to upper airway collapse. When OSA patients stay at altitudes above 1600 m, corresponding to that of many tourist destinations, hypobaric hypoxia promotes frequent central apneas in addition to obstructive events, resulting in combined intermittent and sustained hypoxia. This induces strong sympathetic activation with elevated heart rate, cardiac arrhythmia, and systemic hypertension. There are concerns that these changes expose susceptible OSA patients, in particular those with advanced age and co-morbidities, to an excessive risk of cardiovascular and other adverse events during a stay at altitude. Based on data from randomized trials, it seems advisable for OSA patients to use continuous positive airway pressure treatment with computer controlled mask pressure adjustment (autoCPAP) in combination with acetazolamide during an altitude sojourn. If CPAP therapy is not feasible, acetazolamide alone is better than no treatment at all, as it improves oxygenation and sleep apnea and prevents excessive blood pressure rises of OSA patients at altitude. PMID:25973669

  18. Pharyngeal fat in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Shelton, K E; Woodson, H; Gay, S; Suratt, P M

    1993-08-01

    Although most patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are obese, it is not known how obesity contributes to airway collapse during sleep. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the volume of adipose tissue adjacent to the pharyngeal airway in humans is related to the degree of OSA. We studied 30 subjects, nine without OSA and 21 with OSA; two subjects were studied before and after weight loss. Adipose tissue was detected with magnetic resonance imaging using T1-weighted spin echo sequences. The volume of adipose tissue adjacent to the upper airway was determined by measuring the volume of all pixels in the intensity range of adipose tissue within the region bounded by the ramus of the mandible, the spine, the anterior border of the soft palate, and the hard palate. Polysomnography was performed with conventional techniques. All subjects had a collection of adipose tissue adjacent to the upper airway; the volume of this adipose tissue correlated with the number of apneas plus hypopneas per hour of sleep (r = 0.59, p < 0.001). Both patients who lost weight and had fewer apneas and hypopneas had a marked decrease in the pharyngeal adipose tissue volume. We conclude that adipose tissue is deposited adjacent to the pharyngeal airway in patients with OSA and that the volume of this tissue is related to the presence and degree of OSA. PMID:8342912

  19. Pathogenesis of Cognitive Dysfunction in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Hypothesis with Emphasis on the Nucleus Tractus Solitarius

    PubMed Central

    Daulatzai, Mak Adam

    2012-01-01

    OSA is characterized by the quintessential triad of intermittent apnea, hypoxia, and hypoxemia due to pharyngeal collapse. This paper highlights the upstream mechanisms that may trigger cognitive decline in OSA. Three interrelated steps underpin cognitive dysfunction in OSA patients. First, several risk factors upregulate peripheral inflammation; these crucial factors promote neuroinflammation, cerebrovascular endothelial dysfunction, and oxidative stress in OSA. Secondly, the neuroinflammation exerts negative impact globally on the CNS, and thirdly, important foci in the neocortex and brainstem are rendered inflamed and dysfunctional. A strong link is known to exist between neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. A unique perspective delineated here underscores the importance of dysfunctional brainstem nuclei in etiopathogenesis of cognitive decline in OSA patients. Nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) is the central integration hub for afferents from upper airway (somatosensory/gustatory), respiratory, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular (baroreceptor and chemoreceptor) and other systems. The NTS has an essential role in sympathetic and parasympathetic systems also; it projects to most key brain regions and modulates numerous physiological functions. Inflamed and dysfunctional NTS and other key brainstem nuclei may play a pivotal role in triggering memory and cognitive dysfunction in OSA. Attenuation of upstream factors and amelioration of the NTS dysfunction remain important challenges. PMID:23470865

  20. Changes in cerebral metabolites in obstructive sleep apnea: a systemic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yunyan; Fu, Yiqun; Xu, Huajun; Guan, Jian; Yi, Hongliang; Yin, Shankai

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is associated with changes in cerebral metabolites in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Several studies have used magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to detect variations in cerebral metabolites; however, the results have been inconsistent. This meta-analysis summarizes the differences in cerebral metabolites between patients with OSA and controls. Two electronic databases, PubMed and Embase, were searched for articles (published before March 31, 2016) describing studies that used MRS to evaluate the cerebral metabolite changes. The overall effects were measured using the weighted mean difference with a 95% confidence interval. Subgroup analysis and sensitivity analysis were used to explore the sources of between-study heterogeneity and the stability of the results. Publication bias was also evaluated. Thirteen studies were ultimately included. In the hippocampus, the N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine ratio was lower in patients with OSA. In the frontal lobe, only the NAA/choline ratio was lower in patients with OSA. Cerebral metabolites are significantly altered in the hippocampus in patients with OSA. Further clinical studies are needed to explore the underlying mechanisms between OSA and the changes in cerebral metabolites in the brain. PMID:27349417

  1. Slow digestion property of octenyl succinic anhydride modified waxy maize starch in the presence of tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shanli; Xue, Lei; Leng, Xue; Yang, Ruobing; Zhang, Genyi; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2015-03-18

    The in vivo slow digestion property of octenyl succinic anhydride modified waxy corn starch (OSA-starch) in the presence of tea polyphenols (TPLs) was studied. Using a mouse model, the experimental results showed an extended and moderate postprandial glycemic response with a delayed and significantly decreased blood glucose peak of OSA-starch after cocooking with TPLs (5% starch weight base). Further studies revealed an increased hydrodynamic radius of OSA-starch molecules indicating an interaction between OSA-starch and TPLs. Additionally, decreased gelatinization temperature and enthalpy and reduced viscosity and emulsifiability of OSA-starch support their possible complexation to form a spherical OSA-starch-TPLs (OSAT) complex. The moderate and extended postprandial glycemic response is likely caused by decreased activity of mucosal α-glucosidase, which is noncompetitively inhibited by tea catechins released from the complex during digestion. Meanwhile, a significant decrease of malondialdehyde (MDA) and increased DPPH free radical scavenging activity in small intestine tissue demonstrated the antioxidative functional property of the OSAT complex. Thus, the complex of OSAT, acting as a functional carbohydrate material, not only leads to a flattened and prolonged glycemic response but also reduces the oxidative stress, which might be beneficial to health. PMID:25715909

  2. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    Ghaleh Bandi, Mir Farhad; Naserbakht, Morteza; Tabasi, Abdolreza; Marghaiezadeh, Azin; Riazee Esfahani, Mohammad; Golzarian, Zohre

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sleep apnea is temporary cessation or absence of breathing during sleep. Significant increase in blood pressure is clinically seen in apneic episodes. The aim of this study was to examine sleep apnea syndrome as a risk factor for non- arthritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) in a case control study. Methods: Nineteen NAION patients (9 men and 10 women) and 31 age and sex matched control participants (18 men and 13 women) were evaluated for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Full night polysomnography was performed and proportion of OSAS was compared between the NAION patients and the control group. Other risk factors for NAION such as hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, ischemic heart disease and tobacco consumption were also evaluated. Chi square test and independent samples t-test were used for statistical analysis. Results: OF the 19 NAION patients, 18 (95%) had OSAS, and of the control group 13 (41.9%) had OSAS. The frequency of OSAS was significantly higher among NAION patients compared to the controls (p< 0.001). The Mean Respiratory Disturbance Index (RDI) was 37.65/h SD= 37.61/h in NAION patients and it was 15.05/h SD= 11.97/h (p= 0.018) in controls. The frequency of diabetes and hypertension was significantly higher in the NAION patients than in controls. Conclusion: based on the results of this study, it seems that there is an association between NAION and OSAS. PMID:26913263

  3. Effects of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Cognitive Functions: Evidence for a Common Nature

    PubMed Central

    Andreou, Georgia; Makanikas, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) show similar neurocognitive impairments. Effects are more apparent in severe cases, whereas in moderate and mild cases the effects are equivocal. The exact mechanism that causes cognitive dysfunctions in both diseases is still unknown and only suggestions have been made for each disease separately. The primary objective of this review is to present COPD and OSAS impact on cognitive functions. Secondly, it aims to examine the potential mechanisms by which COPD and OSAS can be linked and provide evidence for a common nature that affects cognitive functions in both diseases. Patients with COPD and OSAS compared to normal distribution show significant deficits in the cognitive abilities of attention, psychomotor speed, memory and learning, visuospatial and constructional abilities, executive skills, and language. The severity of these deficits in OSAS seems to correlate with the physiological events such as sleep defragmentation, apnea/hypopnea index, and hypoxemia, whereas cognitive impairments in COPD are associated with hypoventilation, hypoxemia, and hypercapnia. These factors as well as vascocerebral diseases and changes in systemic hemodynamic seem to act in an intermingling and synergistic way on the cause of cognitive dysfunctions in both diseases. However, low blood oxygen pressure seems to be the dominant factor that contributes to the presence of cognitive deficits in both COPD and OSAS. PMID:24649370

  4. Relationship between growth of facial morphology and chronologic age in preschool children with obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Shigeto; Ueda, Koichiro; Shinohara, Mitsuyo; Mano, Mikiko; Kanegae, Haruhide; Namaki, Shunsuke

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between facial morphology using cephalometry and chronologic age in preschool children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Materials and Methods From a group of lateral cephalometric radiographs taken of 35 children with OSA for diagnostic purposes, 15 were selected for the present investigation based on head position. The subjects consisted of preschool children with both OSA and primary dentition, all of them with a lowest documented SpO2 <90% and a lowest 0 OSA children had a narrower pharyngeal airway space related to OSA. In addition, we found that, although there were direct correlations between heights, nasal floor and corpus length, with chronologic age in the controls, there was no significant correlation between height, nasal floor length or corpus length with age in the OSA children. Conclusion Obstructive sleep apnea in children may be associated with growth disturbances of the nasal floor and corpus length. PMID:25756027

  5. Brain function in obstructive sleep apnea: results from the Brain Resource International Database.

    PubMed

    Wong, Keith K H; Grunstein, Ronald R; Bartlett, Delwyn J; Gordon, Evian

    2006-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is expected to impair vigilance and executive functioning, owing to the sensitivity of the prefrontal cortex to the effects of sleep fragmentation and intermittent hypoxia. Studies examining the pattern of cognitive dysfunction show variable results, with the heterogeneity in part due to small sample sizes in current studies and little consistency of the tests used. We examined a group of fifty subjects from the Brain Resource International Database (BRID), predicted to have OSA on the basis of the Multivariable Apnea Prediction Index, and compared them with 200 matched controls. On electrophysiological tests, the OSA group showed reduced eyes closed alpha power, increased auditory oddball N100 and P200 amplitude, but reduced N200 and P300 amplitude. The latency to P300 was not significantly different between groups, but latencies to N200 and P200 were prolonged in the OSA group. Performance testing of the executive function found that verbal interference and the switching of attention were impaired in the OSA group. We have demonstrated that a diagnostic algorithm based on apnea symptoms and demographic factors can be used to select a group with likely OSA manifesting deficits in information processing and executive function. PMID:16544369

  6. Bone mineral density and changes in bone metabolism in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Rabia; Yılmaz, Zahide

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences between patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and phenotypically similar subjects without OSAS in terms of bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover markers. The study was conducted on 30 males diagnosed with OSAS and 20 healthy males. All subjects underwent polysomnographic testing. Calcium, phosphorus parathyroid hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, osteocalcin, and beta-CrossLaps (β-CTx) were measured. BMD in the lumbar spine (L1-L4) and femoral neck was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of demographic data with the exception of bone mass index and waist circumference. (p < 0.05). Analyses showed significantly lower BMD measurements in the femoral neck and T-scores in the femoral neck in patients diagnosed with OSAS. Serum β-CTx levels were found to be statistically significantly higher in the OSAS group (p = 0.017). In multivariate assessments performed for apnea/hypopnea index values, mean saturation O2 levels were found to be significantly associated with osteocalcin levels and neck BMD. OSAS patients might represent a risk group with respect to loss of BMD and bone resorption. It is important to evaluate bone loss in these patients. Further studies should be carried out on larger study populations to evaluate the effects of chronic hypoxia on BMD in detail. PMID:26204846

  7. Estrogen/ERR-α signaling axis is associated with fiber-type conversion of upper airway muscles in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H. H.; Lu, J.; Guan, Y. F.; Li, S. J.; Hu, T. T.; Xie, Z. S.; Wang, F.; Peng, X. H.; Liu, X.; Xu, X.; Zhao, F. P.; Yu, B. L.; Li, X. P.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen is related with the low morbidity associated with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAS) in women, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this study, we examined the relationship between OSAS and estrogen related receptor-α (ERR-α). We found that the expression levels of ERR-α and Myh7 were both downregulated in palatopharyngeal tissues from OSAS patients. In addition, we report that ERR-α is dynamically expressed during differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts. Knockdown of ERR-α via instant siRNA resulted in reduced expression of Myh7, but not Myh4. Furthermore, differentiation of C2C12 cells under 3% chronic intermittent hypoxia, a model resembling human OSAS, was impaired and accompanied by a obvious reduction in Myh7 expression levels. Moreover, activation of ERR-α with 17β-estradiol (E2) increased the expression of Myh7, whereas pretreatment with the ERR-α antagonist XCT790 reversed the E2-induced slow fiber-type switch. A rat ovariectomy model also demonstrated the switch to fast fiber type. Collectively, our findings suggest that ERR-α is involved in estrogen-mediated OSAS by regulating Myhc-slow expression. The present study illustrates an important role of the estrogen/ERR-α axis in the pathogenesis of OSAS, and may represent an attractive therapeutic target, especially in postmenopausal women. PMID:27250523

  8. Canine osteosarcoma cell lines contain stem-like cancer cells: biological and pharmacological characterization.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Monica; Wurth, Roberto; Vito, Guendalina; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Campanella, Chiara; Thellung, Stefano; Maniscalco, Lorella; De Maria, Raffaella; Villa, Valentina; Corsaro, Alessandro; Nizzari, Mario; Bajetto, Adriana; Ratto, Alessandra; Ferrari, Angelo; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2016-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a small subpopulation of cells responsible for tumor formation and progression, drug resistance, tumor recurrence and metastasization. CSCs have been identified in many human tumors including osteosarcoma (OSA). CSC distinctive properties are the expression of stem cell markers, sustained growth, self-renewal and tumorigenicity. Here we report the isolation of stem-like cells from two canine OSA cultures, characterized by self-renewal, evaluated by sphere formation ability, differential marker expression, and in vitro proliferation when cultured in a medium containing EGF and bFGF. Current therapies for OSA increased survival time, but prognosis remains poor, due to the development of drug resistance and metastases. Chemotherapy shrinks the tumor mass but CSCs remain unaffected, leading to tumor recurrence. Metformin, a drug for type 2 diabetes, has been shown to possess antitumor properties affecting CSC survival in different human and animal cancers. Here we show that metformin has a significant antiproliferative effect on canine OSA stem-like cells, validating this in vitro model for further pre-clinical drug evaluations. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining CSC-enriched cultures from primary canine OSA cells as a promising model for biological and pharmacological studies of canine and human OSAs. PMID:27506084

  9. Changes in cerebral metabolites in obstructive sleep apnea: a systemic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yunyan; Fu, Yiqun; Xu, Huajun; Guan, Jian; Yi, Hongliang; Yin, Shankai

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is associated with changes in cerebral metabolites in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Several studies have used magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to detect variations in cerebral metabolites; however, the results have been inconsistent. This meta-analysis summarizes the differences in cerebral metabolites between patients with OSA and controls. Two electronic databases, PubMed and Embase, were searched for articles (published before March 31, 2016) describing studies that used MRS to evaluate the cerebral metabolite changes. The overall effects were measured using the weighted mean difference with a 95% confidence interval. Subgroup analysis and sensitivity analysis were used to explore the sources of between-study heterogeneity and the stability of the results. Publication bias was also evaluated. Thirteen studies were ultimately included. In the hippocampus, the N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine ratio was lower in patients with OSA. In the frontal lobe, only the NAA/choline ratio was lower in patients with OSA. Cerebral metabolites are significantly altered in the hippocampus in patients with OSA. Further clinical studies are needed to explore the underlying mechanisms between OSA and the changes in cerebral metabolites in the brain. PMID:27349417

  10. Anticancer Effects of Geopropolis Produced by Stingless Bees on Canine Osteosarcoma Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cinegaglia, Naiara Costa; Bersano, Paulo Ricardo Oliveira; Araújo, Maria José Abigail Mendes; Búfalo, Michelle Cristiane; Sforcin, José Maurício

    2013-01-01

    Geopropolis is produced by indigenous stingless bees from the resinous material of plants, adding soil or clay. Its biological properties have not been investigated, such as propolis, and herein its cytotoxic action on canine osteosarcoma (OSA) cells was evaluated. OSA is a primary bone neoplasm diagnosed in dogs being an excellent model in vivo to study human OSA. spOS-2 primary cultures were isolated from the tumor of a dog with osteosarcoma and incubated with geopropolis, 70% ethanol (geopropolis solvent), and carboplatin after 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours. Cell viability was analyzed by the crystal violet method. Geopropolis was efficient against canine OSA cells in a dose- and time-dependent way, leading to a distinct morphology compared to control. Geopropolis cytotoxic action was exclusively due to its constituents since 70% ethanol (its solvent) had no effect on cell viability. Carboplatin had no effect on OSA cells. Geopropolis exerted a cytotoxic effect on canine osteosarcoma, and its introduction as a possible therapeutic agent in vivo could be investigated, providing a new contribution to OSA treatment. PMID:23690851

  11. Anticancer effects of geopropolis produced by stingless bees on canine osteosarcoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cinegaglia, Naiara Costa; Bersano, Paulo Ricardo Oliveira; Araújo, Maria José Abigail Mendes; Búfalo, Michelle Cristiane; Sforcin, José Maurício

    2013-01-01

    Geopropolis is produced by indigenous stingless bees from the resinous material of plants, adding soil or clay. Its biological properties have not been investigated, such as propolis, and herein its cytotoxic action on canine osteosarcoma (OSA) cells was evaluated. OSA is a primary bone neoplasm diagnosed in dogs being an excellent model in vivo to study human OSA. spOS-2 primary cultures were isolated from the tumor of a dog with osteosarcoma and incubated with geopropolis, 70% ethanol (geopropolis solvent), and carboplatin after 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours. Cell viability was analyzed by the crystal violet method. Geopropolis was efficient against canine OSA cells in a dose- and time-dependent way, leading to a distinct morphology compared to control. Geopropolis cytotoxic action was exclusively due to its constituents since 70% ethanol (its solvent) had no effect on cell viability. Carboplatin had no effect on OSA cells. Geopropolis exerted a cytotoxic effect on canine osteosarcoma, and its introduction as a possible therapeutic agent in vivo could be investigated, providing a new contribution to OSA treatment. PMID:23690851

  12. Serotnin as a possible biomarker in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Lipford, Melissa C; Ramar, Kannan; Liang, Yao-Jen; Lin, Chii-Wann; Chao, Yun-Ting; An, Jen; Chiu, Chih-Hsien; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Shu, Chih-Hung; Lee, Fei-Peng; Chiang, Rayleigh Ping-Ying

    2016-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a highly prevalent disease which carries substantial public health burden. Polysomnography is the standard procedure used to diagnose OSA. However cost, accessibility, technical requirements, and skilled interpretation needs constrain its widespread use and have a role in the under-diagnosis of sleep disordered breathing. There is a clinical need to develop expedient and widely accessible tools to detect this disorder., Several biochemical markers have recently been proposed as diagnostic tools in OSA. Numerous neurochemicals directly influence the activity of upper airway dilator motor neurons, which subsequently influence respiration during sleep. Serotonin (5-HT) is one such neurochemical that has a key role in ventilatory stimulation. Herein, we review the current evidence demonstrating relationships between multiple biomarkers and sleep disordered breathing and focus on relationships between OSA and 5-HT. We discuss the possibility of biomarker-driven detection technology in the future as a means of diagnosing and monitoring OSA. Finally, we explore the specific role 5-HT may have in the future in both the diagnosis and treatment of OSA. PMID:26694311

  13. [Epworth drowsiness scale value in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Uribe Echevarría, E M; Alvarez, D; Giobellina, R; Uribe Echevarría, A M

    2000-01-01

    Hypersomnia is one of the most consulted symptoms among patients evaluated at sleep disorder centers and it is frequently related to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Our hypothesis is that Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) is the parameter with the greatest predictive value in the OSAS diagnosis. We compared patients with OSAS diagnosis to a control group. In both groups we compared ESS with body mass index (BMI), neck circumference (NC), waist perimeter (WP). Anthropometric index (BMI, NC and WC), were similar in both groups (p < 0.10). When we analyzed ESS, a score greater than 10 was observed in the OSAS group, with a significant difference between groups (p < 0.001). Epworth sleepiness scale yielded 60% of sensibility, 82% of specificity and a positive predictive value of 85%. The negative predictive value was 52%. Confidence index was 70%. The relationship between OSAS and ESS scale was significant (Pearson Chi-Square value 7.5). Odds Ratio for apneas was 15 and its confidence interval was lower than 1.5 and upper than 141. We conclude that with ESS score exceeding 10 points OSAS should be suspected. PMID:11436699

  14. Sleep Apnea and Fatty Liver Are Coupled Via Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Arısoy, Ahmet; Sertoğullarından, Bunyamin; Ekin, Selami; Özgökçe, Mesut; Bulut, Mehmet Deniz; Huyut, Mehmet Tahir; Ölmez, Şehmus; Turan, Mahfuz

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep-related breathing disorder characterized by intermittent hypoxia. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between OSA and fatty liver. Material/Methods We enrolled 176 subjects to this study who underwent polysomnography (PSG) for suspected OSA. The control group included 42 simple snoring subjects. PSG, biochemical tests, and ultrasonographic examination were performed all subjects. Results The simple snoring and mild, moderate, and severe OSA groups included 18/42 (42.86%), 33/52 (63.5%), 27/34 (79.4%), and 28/48 (79.2%) subjects with hepatosteatosis, respectively. There were significant differences in hepatosteatosis and hepatosteatosis grade between the simple snoring and the moderate and severe OSA groups. Logistic regression analysis showed that BMI and average desaturation were independently and significantly related to hepatic steatosis. Conclusions Our study shows that BMI and the average desaturation contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver in subjects with OSA. In this regard, sleep apnea may trigger metabolic mitochondrial energy associated processes thereby altering lipid metabolism and obesity as well. PMID:26993969

  15. Speech Signal and Facial Image Processing for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Assessment.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Cuadros, Fernando; Fernández-Pozo, Rubén; Toledano, Doroteo T; Alcázar-Ramírez, José D; López-Gonzalo, Eduardo; Hernández-Gómez, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder characterized by recurring breathing pauses during sleep caused by a blockage of the upper airway (UA). OSA is generally diagnosed through a costly procedure requiring an overnight stay of the patient at the hospital. This has led to proposing less costly procedures based on the analysis of patients' facial images and voice recordings to help in OSA detection and severity assessment. In this paper we investigate the use of both image and speech processing to estimate the apnea-hypopnea index, AHI (which describes the severity of the condition), over a population of 285 male Spanish subjects suspected to suffer from OSA and referred to a Sleep Disorders Unit. Photographs and voice recordings were collected in a supervised but not highly controlled way trying to test a scenario close to an OSA assessment application running on a mobile device (i.e., smartphones or tablets). Spectral information in speech utterances is modeled by a state-of-the-art low-dimensional acoustic representation, called i-vector. A set of local craniofacial features related to OSA are extracted from images after detecting facial landmarks using Active Appearance Models (AAMs). Support vector regression (SVR) is applied on facial features and i-vectors to estimate the AHI. PMID:26664493

  16. Abdominal Adiposity Correlates with Adenotonsillectomy Outcome in Obese Adolescents with Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Nino, Gustavo; Gutierrez, Maria J.; Ravindra, Anjani; Nino, Cesar L.; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Obese adolescents with Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) have a unique pathophysiology that combines adenotonsillar hypertrophy and increased visceral fat distribution. We hypothesized that in this population waist circumference (WC), as a clinical marker of abdominal fat distribution, correlates with the likelihood of response to AT. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of obese adolescents (BMI ≥ 97th percentile) that underwent AT for therapy of severe OSA (n = 21). We contrasted WC and covariates in a group of subjects that had complete resolution of severe OSA after AT (n = 7) with those obtained in subjects with residual OSA after AT (n = 14). Multivariate linear and logistic models were built to control possible confounders. Results. WC correlated negatively with a positive AT response in young adolescents and the percentage of improvement in obstructive apnea-hypopnea index (OAHI) after AT (P ≤ 0.01). Extended multivariate analysis demonstrated that the link between WC and AT response was independent of demographic variables, OSA severity, clinical upper airway assessment, obesity severity (BMI), and neck circumference (NC). Conclusion. The results suggest that in obese adolescents, abdominal fat distribution determined by WC may be a useful clinical predictor for residual OSA after AT. PMID:23251797

  17. Cerebral hemodynamics in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during positive airways pressure (CPAP) therapy: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Fritschi, Ursula; Lehner, Isabella; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2014-03-01

    In obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) the periodic reduction or cessation of breathing due to narrowing or occlusion of the upper airway during sleep leads to daytime symptoms and increased cardiovascular risk, including stroke. The higher risk of stroke is related to the impairment in cerebral vascular autoregulation. Continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) therapy at night is the most effective treatment for OSA. However, there is no suitable bedside monitoring method evaluating the treatment efficacy of CPAP therapy, especially to monitor the recovery of cerebral hemodynamics. NIRS is ideally suited for non-invasive monitoring the cerebral hemodynamics during sleep. In this study, we will for first time assess dynamic changes of cerebral hemodynamics during nocturnal CPAP therapy in 3 patients with OSA using NIRS. We found periodic oscillations in HbO2, HHb, tissue oxygenation index (TOI) and blood volume associated with periodic apnea events without CPAP in all OSA patients. These oscillations were gradually attenuated and finally eliminated with the stepwise increments of CPAP pressures. The oscillations were totally eliminated in blood volume earlier than in other hemodynamic parameters. These results suggested that 1) the cerebral hemodynamic oscillations induced by OSA events can effectively be attenuated by CPAP therapy, and 2) blood flow and blood volume recovered first during CPAP therapy, followed by the recovery of oxygen consumption. Our study suggested that NIRS is a useful tool to evaluate the efficacy of CPAP therapy in patients with OSA bedside and in real time.

  18. Meta-analysis of effects of obstructive sleep apnea on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ze-Ning; Wei, Yong-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common cause of resistant hypertension, which has been proposed to result from activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS). We meta-analyzed the effects of OSA on plasma levels of RAAS components. Methods Full-text studies published on MEDLINE and EMBASE analyzing fasting plasma levels of at least one RAAS component in adults with OSA with or without hypertension. OSA was diagnosed as an apnea-hypopnea index or respiratory disturbance index ≥ 5. Study quality was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale, and heterogeneity was assessed using the I2 statistic. Results from individual studies were synthesized using inverse variance and pooled using a random-effects model. Subgroup analysis, sensitivity analysis, and meta-regression were performed, and risk of publication bias was assessed. Results The meta-analysis included 13 studies, of which 10 reported results on renin (n = 470 cases and controls), 7 on angiotensin II (AngII, n = 384), and 9 on aldosterone (n = 439). AngII levels were significantly higher in OSA than in controls [mean differences = 3.39 ng/L, 95% CI: 2.00–4.79, P < 0.00001], while aldosterone levels were significantly higher in OSA with hypertension than OSA but not with hypertension (mean differences = 1.32 ng/dL, 95% CI: 0.58–2.07, P = 0.0005). Meta-analysis of all studies suggested no significant differences in aldosterone between OSA and controls, but a significant pooled mean difference of 1.35 ng/mL (95% CI: 0.88–1.82, P < 0.00001) emerged after excluding one small-sample study. No significant risk of publication bias was detected among all included studies. Conclusions OSA is associated with higher AngII and aldosterone levels, especially in hypertensive patients. OSA may cause hypertension, at least in part, by stimulating RAAS activity. PMID:27403143

  19. Physical Inactivity Is Associated with Moderate-Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Laila; McArdle, Nigel; Eastwood, Peter R.; Ward, Kim L.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Wilson, Annette C.; Hillman, David R.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Mukherjee, Sutapa

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate whether low levels of physical activity were associated with an increased occurrence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), OSA-related symptoms, and cardiometabolic risk. Methods: A case-control study design was used. OSA cases were patients referred to a sleep clinic for suspected OSA (n = 2,340). Controls comprised participants from the Busselton community (n = 1,931). Exercise and occupational activity were derived from questionnaire data. Associations were modelled using logistic and linear regression and adjusted for confounders. Results: In comparison with moderate exercise, the high, low, and nil exercise groups had an odds ratio (OR) for moderate-severe OSA of 0.6 (95% CI 0.5–0.8), 1.6 (95% CI 1.2–2.0), and 2.7 (95% CI 1.9–3.7), respectively. Relative to men in heavy activity occupations, men in medium, light and sedentary occupations had an OR for moderate-severe OSA of 1.7 (95% CI 1.1–2.5), 2.1 (95% CI 1.4–3.2), and 1.8 (95% CI 1.2–2.8), respectively. Relative to women in medium activity occupations, women in light and sedentary occupations had an OR for moderate-severe OSA of 4.2 (95% CI 2.6–7.2) and 3.5 (2.0–6.0). OSA patients who adequately exercised had lower: levels of doctor-diagnosed depression (p = 0.047); symptoms of fatigue (p < 0.0001); systolic (p = 0.015) and diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.015); and C-reactive protein (CRP) (p = 0.003). Conclusions: Low levels of physical activity were associated with moderate-severe OSA. Exercise in individuals with OSA is associated with lower levels of depression, fatigue, blood pressure and CRP. Citation: Simpson L, McArdle N, Eastwood PR, Ward KL, Cooper MN, Wilson AC, Hillman DR, Palmer LJ, Mukherjee S. Physical inactivity is associated with moderate-severe obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(10):1091–1099. PMID:26285117

  20. Bioinformatics analysis of differentially expressed pathways related to the metastatic characteristics of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Ma, Xiaojun; Shen, Jiakang; Yin, Fei; Wang, Chongren; Cai, Zhengdong

    2016-08-01

    In this study, gene expression data of osteosarcoma (OSA) were analyzed to identify metastasis-related biological pathways. Four gene expression data sets (GSE21257, GSE9508, GSE49003 and GSE66673) were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). An analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) was performed using the Significance Analysis of Microarray (SAM) method. Gene expression levels were converted into scores of pathways by the Functional Analysis of Individual Microarray Expression (FAIME) algorithm and the differentially expressed pathways (DEPs) were then disclosed by a t-test. The distinguishing and prediction ability of the DEPs for metastatic and non-metastatic OSA was further confirmed using the principal component analysis (PCA) method and 3 gene expression data sets (GSE9508, GSE49003 and GSE66673) based on the support vector machines (SVM) model. A total of 616 downregulated and 681 upregulated genes were identified in the data set, GSE21257. The DEGs could not be used to distinguish metastatic OSA from non-metastatic OSA, as shown by PCA. Thus, an analysis of DEPs was further performed, resulting in 14 DEPs, such as NRAS signaling, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) regulation of cytokines and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF)-mediated interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) activation. Cluster analysis indicated that these pathways could be used to distinguish between metastatic OSA from non-metastatic OSA. The prediction accuracy was 91, 66.7 and 87.5% for the data sets, GSE9508, GSE49003 and GSE66673, respectively. The results of PCA further validated that the DEPs could be used to distinguish metastatic OSA from non-metastatic OSA. On the whole, several DEPs were identified in metastatic OSA compared with non-metastatic OSA. Further studies on these pathways and relevant genes may help to enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying metastasis

  1. A 5-Year Follow-up Study on the Relationship between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Jau-Jiuan; Lee, Hsin-Chien; Lin, Herng-Ching; Kao, Li-Ting; Chung, Shiu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: Sleep disturbances are among the most common nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson disease. However, no large epidemiological data regarding the association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and Parkinson disease have been reported. The goal of this study was to investigate the risk for Parkinson disease during a 5-y follow-up period after a diagnosis of OSA using a population-based dataset. Methods: The data for this retrospective longitudinal cohort study were retrieved from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. We identified 1,532 patients with OSA as the study cohort and randomly selected 7,660 patients as the comparison cohort. Each subject was individually followed up for a 5-y period to identify those in whom Parkinson disease subsequently developed. Stratified Cox proportional hazard regressions were performed as a means of comparing the 5-y risk of subsequent Parkinson disease between the study cohort and comparison cohort. Results: Of the 9,192 total patients, Parkinson disease developed in 0.73% during the 5-y follow-up period: 1.24% and 0.63% in the OSA and control cohorts, respectively. After censoring patients who died during the follow-up period and adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics, the hazard ratio (HR) of Parkinson disease during the 5-y follow-up period for patients with OSA was 2.26 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.32–3.88) compared with comparison patients. In addition, among females, the adjusted HR of Parkinson disease was 3.54 (95% CI = 1.50–8.34) for patients with OSA compared to patients without OSA. However, among males, there was no significantly increased hazard of Parkinson disease for patients with OSA compared to those without OSA. Conclusions: Female patients with OSA were found to be at a significant risk of subsequent Parkinson disease during a 5-y follow-up period. Citation: Sheu JJ, Lee HC, Lin HC, Kao LT, Chung SD. A 5-year follow-up study on the relationship between

  2. The Prevalence of Depression among Untreated Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients Using a Standardized Psychiatric Interview

    PubMed Central

    Björnsdóttir, Erla; Benediktsdóttir, Bryndís; Pack, Allan I.; Arnardottir, Erna Sif; Kuna, Samuel T.; Gíslason, Thorarinn; Keenan, Brendan T.; Maislin, Greg; Sigurdsson, Jón Fridrik

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aims of this study were: (1) to use a standardized psychiatric interview, conducted by a trained psychologist to assess the prevalence of depression among patients with untreated OSA, and (2) to identify if OSA severity or other comorbid disorders (insomnia, hypertension, and diabetes) are related to depression among patients with untreated OSA. Methods: Participants were newly diagnosed patients with OSA (n = 284) waiting to start positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) was used to assess depression. Results: Overall, 15.5% of the sample met the diagnosis for dysthymia. Women had a significantly higher prevalence (29.5% versus 11.7% among men, p < 0.001). The prevalence of major depression was 6% in the overall sample and there was no difference in the prevalence among sexes (5.8% among men versus 6.6 % among women). Obesity, daytime sleepiness, low physical activity, initial and late insomnia, low quality of life, and sleep medication and antidepressant use were all related to depression, whereas OSA severity, as measured by apnea-hypopnea index or oxygen desaturation index, was not. Daytime sleepiness, initial insomnia, and sleep medication use were the strongest predictors of depression in multivariable analyses. Conclusions: Sleep medication use, daytime sleepiness, and symptoms of initial insomnia were independently related to depression but OSA severity was not. Increased awareness of the relationship between depression and OSA and the appropriate use of assessment tools might substantially improve diagnostic accuracy as well as treatment outcome for both disorders. Citation: Björnsdóttir E, Benediktsdóttir B, Pack AI, Arnardottir ES, Kuna ST, Gíslason T, Keenan BT, Maislin G, Sigurdsson JF. The prevalence of depression among untreated obstructive sleep apnea patients using a standardized psychiatric interview. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(1):105–112. PMID:26350608

  3. Impact of obstructive sleep apnea on cardiovascular outcomes in patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention: rationale and design of the sleep and stent study.

    PubMed

    Loo, Germaine; Koo, Chieh-Yang; Zhang, Junjie; Li, Ruogu; Sethi, Rithi; Ong, Thun-How; Tai, Bee-Choo; Lee, Chi-Hang

    2014-05-01

    Elucidating the effects of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on cardiovascular outcomes is crucial in risk assessments and therapeutic recommendations for affected individuals. The Sleep and Stent Study is a multicenter observational study investigating the relationships between OSA and cardiovascular outcomes in patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Eight centers in 5 countries (Singapore, China and Hong Kong, India, Myanmar, and Brazil) are participating in the study, and the recruitment target is 1600 patients. Adult patients age 18 to 80 years who have undergone successful PCI are eligible. Recruited patients will undergo an overnight sleep study using a level-3 portable diagnostic device before hospital discharge. The sleep tracings will be analyzed by a certified sleep technologist and audited by a sleep physician, both of whom will be blinded to other study data. The patients will be divided into 2 groups based on apnea-hypopnea index (AHI): OSA (AHI ≥15) and non-OSA (AHI <15) groups. The primary study endpoint of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, and unplanned revascularization will be compared between the OSA and non-OSA groups at a median follow-up of 2 years. Secondary endpoints include all-cause mortality, target-vessel revascularization, stent thrombosis, and hospitalization for heart failure. As of December 31, 2013, a total of 1358 patients have been recruited. Based on the complete preliminary results of the first 785 recruited patients, the prevalence of OSA was 48.3%. We expect the follow-up for primary endpoint to be completed in late 2015; study results will be presented in 2016. PMID:24945037

  4. Association of obstructive sleep apnoea with the presence and severity of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Musso, G; Cassader, M; Olivetti, C; Rosina, F; Carbone, G; Gambino, R

    2013-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are common in clinical practice. NAFLD encompasses simple steatosis and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH): both confer an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes; NASH increases also liver-related risk. Growing experimental evidence connects chronic intermittent hypoxia of OSAS to NAFLD. We reviewed English and non-English articles and international meeting abstracts through December 2012. Observational studies were included if they assessed OSAS by polysomnography and NAFLD by histological, radiological or biochemical criteria. Two reviewers evaluated retrieved articles by appropriate quality scores. Main outcomes were pooled using random- or fixed-effects models. The effect of age, sex and body mass index (BMI) on effect estimates was assessed by meta-regression. Eighteen cross-sectional studies (2,183 participants) were included. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) of OSAS for the presence of NAFLD, as defined by histology, radiology, and AST or ALT elevation, were 2.01(95% CI: 1.36-2.97), 2.99(1.79-4.99), 2.36(1.46-3.82) and 2.60(1.88-3.61), respectively. Pooled ORs of OSAS for NASH, fibrosis-any stage, or advanced fibrosis in biopsy-proven NAFLD patients were 2.37(1.59-3.51), 2.16(1.45-3.20) and 2.30(1.21-4.38). The magnitude and direction of effects were unaffected by age, sex and BMI. In conclusion, OSAS is associated with an increased risk of NAFLD, NASH and fibrosis. OSAS patients should be screened for the presence and severity of NAFLD. PMID:23387384

  5. Impact of rail medical standard on obstructive sleep apnoea prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Colquhoun, C. P.

    2016-01-01

    Background The 2004 edition of the National Standard for Health Assessment of Rail Safety Workers (the standard) used the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) to screen for excessive daytime sleepiness related to obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). The 2012 edition of the standard expanded the OSA screening matrix to include body mass index, comorbid hypertension and type 2 diabetes as triggers requiring a sleep study to be undertaken irrespective of the ESS. Aims To assess the impact of the new standard on the estimated prevalence of OSA in railway workers. Methods An analysis of data on safety critical employees referred for rail safety health assessment during the 2013 calendar year and meeting the criteria for sleep study referral. Sleep study outcomes were used to assess the predictive value of screening under the new standard. Results A total of 200/4311 workers were investigated with a sleep study. One hundred and ninety-three met the new risk factor criteria and 182 (91%) were newly diagnosed with OSA. The prevalence of OSA in the study population was 7%, compared with 2% in 2009. No worker reported an elevated ESS. The false positive to true positive ratio was 0.1 (95% CI 0.06–0.16). Conclusions The new medical standard has resulted in an increased estimate of the prevalence of OSA in rail workers. This study supports the use of objective clinical risk factors to select workers for further investigation, aiming to minimize the risk of accidents associated with excessive daytime sleepiness and other comorbid conditions of OSA. PMID:26276756

  6. Optic Nerve Dysfunction in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: An Electrophysiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Claudio; Palmieri, Maria Giuseppina; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Cesareo, Massimo; Romigi, Andrea; Izzi, Francesca; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Oliva, Corrado; Mercuri, Nicola Biagio; Placidi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the integrity of the visual system in patients affected by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by means of electroretinogram (ERG) and visual evoked potential (VEP). Methods: We performed electrophysiological study of the visual system in a population of severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea events/time in bed ≥ 30/h) patients without medical comorbidities compared to a group of healthy controls similar for age, sex, and body mass index. Patients and controls did not have visual impairment or systemic disorders with known influence on the visual system. ERG and VEP were elicited by a reversal pattern generated on a television monitor at low (55') and high (15') spatial frequencies stimulation. Daytime sleepiness was assessed using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) in both patients and controls. Results: In comparison with healthy controls (n = 27), patients with OSA (n = 27) showed a significant latency delay coupled with a significant amplitude reduction of P100 wave of VEP at all spatial frequencies in both eyes. No significant differences between groups were detected as concerning ERG components. No correlations were found between polygraphic parameters, ESS scores, or VEP and ERG components in OSA patients. Conclusions: This study documented that patients with OSA, without medical comorbidities, present VEP alteration as documented by lower amplitude and longer latency of the P100 component than healthy controls. These altered electrophysiological findings may be the expression of optic nerve dysfunction provoked by hypoxia, acidosis, hypercarbia and airway obstruction, frequently observed in patients with OSA. Hence, we hypothesize that OSA per se may impair optic nerve function. Citation: Liguori C, Palmieri MG, Pierantozzi M, Cesareo M, Romigi A, Izzi F, Marciani MG, Oliva C, Mercuri NB, Placidi F. Optic nerve dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea: an electrophysiological study. SLEEP 2016;39(1):19–23. PMID

  7. Association between Glaucoma and Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuhua; Liu, Panpan; Guan, Jian; Lu, Yan; Su, Kaiming

    2015-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common disease that increases the risk of diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. However, studies of an association between OSAS and glaucoma neuropathy have reported controversial findings. Objective The main purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a significant association exists between OSAS and glaucoma by performing a meta-analysis of previous studies. Methods A comprehensive literature search using the PubMed and Embase databases was performed to identify cross-sectional, case-control, and cohort studies related to the topic. We estimated a pooled odds ratio (OR) for the association between OSAS and glaucoma, by a fixed- or random-effects model. Results In total, 16 studies with 2,278,832 participants met the inclusion criteria: one retrospective cohort study reported an adjusted hazard ratio of glaucoma of 1.67 (95% CI = 1.30–2.17). Using a fixed-effects model, the pooled OR of six case-control studies was 1.96 (95% CI = 1.37 2.80). A significant association was also identified in a meta-analysis of nine cross-sectional studies using a random-effects model, which showed a pooled OR of 1.41 (95% CI = 1.11 1.79). However, the reported pooled estimates for case control studies and cross-sectional studies were based on unadjusted ORs. Conclusions Our results suggest that OSAS is associated with the prevalence of glaucoma. However, this result was based only on unadjusted estimates. Prospective cohort studies designed to take into consideration potential confounders, or examination of data from interventional trials to determine whether a reduction in OSAS status is associated with a reduced incidence of glaucoma, are needed to clarify whether OSAS is an independent risk factor for glaucoma. PMID:25705901

  8. Craniocervical Posture in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Piccin, Chaiane Facco; Pozzebon, Daniela; Scapini, Fabricio; Corrêa, Eliane Castilhos Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Introduction  Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is characterized by repeated episodes of upper airway obstruction during sleep. Objective  The objective of this study is to verify the craniofacial characteristics and craniocervical posture of OSA and healthy subjects, determining possible relationships with the apnea/hypopnea index (AHI). Methods  This case-control study evaluated 21 subjects with OSA, who comprised the OSA group (OSAG), and 21 healthy subjects, who constituted the control group (CG). Cephalometry analyzed head posture measurements, craniofacial measurements, and air space. Head posture was also assessed by means of photogrammetry. Results  The groups were homogeneous regarding gender (12 men and 9 women in each group), age (OSAG = 41.86 ± 11.26 years; GC = 41.19 ± 11.20 years), and body mass index (OSAG = 25.65 ± 2.46 kg/m2; CG = 24.72 ± 3.01 kg/m2). We found significant differences between the groups, with lower average pharyngeal space and greater distance between the hyoid bone and the mandibular plane in OSAG, when compared with CG. A positive correlation was found between higher head hyperextension and head anteriorization, with greater severity of OSA as assessed by AHI. Conclusion  OSAG subjects showed changes in craniofacial morphology, with lower average pharyngeal space and greater distance from the hyoid bone to the mandibular plane, as compared with healthy subjects. Moreover, in OSA subjects, the greater the severity of OSA, the greater the head hyperextension and anteriorization. PMID:27413397

  9. Regional Cerebral Blood Flow during Wakeful Rest in Older Subjects with Mild to Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Baril, Andrée-Ann; Gagnon, Katia; Arbour, Caroline; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Montplaisir, Jacques; Gagnon, Jean-François; Gosselin, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during wakeful rest in older subjects with mild to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and healthy controls, and to identify markers of OSA severity that predict altered rCBF. Design: High-resolution 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT imaging during wakeful rest. Setting: Research sleep laboratory affiliated with a University hospital. Participants: Fifty untreated OSA patients aged between 55 and 85 years, divided into mild, moderate, and severe OSA, and 20 age-matched healthy controls. Interventions: N/A. Measurements: Using statistical parametric mapping, rCBF was compared between groups and correlated with clinical, respiratory, and sleep variables. Results: Whereas no rCBF change was observed in mild and moderate groups, participants with severe OSA had reduced rCBF compared to controls in the left parietal lobules, left precentral gyrus, bilateral postcentral gyri, and right precuneus. Reduced rCBF in these regions and in areas of the bilateral frontal and left temporal cortex was associated with more hypopneas, snoring, hypoxemia, and sleepiness. Higher apnea, microarousal, and body mass indexes were correlated to increased rCBF in the basal ganglia, insula, and limbic system. Conclusions: While older individuals with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) had hypoperfusion in the sensorimotor and parietal areas, respiratory variables and subjective sleepiness were correlated with extended regions of hypoperfusion in the lateral cortex. Interestingly, OSA severity, sleep fragmentation, and obesity correlated with increased perfusion in subcortical and medial cortical regions. Anomalies with such a distribution could result in cognitive deficits and reflect impaired vascular regulation, altered neuronal integrity, and/or undergoing neurodegenerative processes. Citation: Baril AA, Gagnon K, Arbour C, Soucy JP, Montplaisir J, Gagnon JF, Gosselin N. Regional cerebral blood flow during wakeful rest in older

  10. Reliability of Home Respiratory Polygraphy for the Diagnosis of Sleep Apnea in Children

    PubMed Central

    Terán-Santos, Joaquin; Ordax Carbajo, Estrella; Cordero-Guevara, José Aurelio; Navazo-Egüia, Ana Isabel; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Gozal, David

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic reliability of home respiratory polygraphy (HRP) in children with a clinical suspicion of OSA-hypopnea syndrome (OSAS). METHODS: A prospective blind evaluation was performed. Children between the ages of 2 to 14 years with clinical suspicion of OSAS who were referred to the Sleep Unit were included. An initial HRP followed by a later date, same night, in-laboratory overnight respiratory polygraphy and polysomnography (PSG) in the sleep laboratory were performed. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI)-HRP was compared with AHI-PSG, and therapeutic decisions based on AHI-HRP and AHI-PSG were analyzed using intraclass correlation coefficients, Bland-Altman plots, and receiver operator curves (ROCs). RESULTS: Twenty-seven boys and 23 girls, with a mean age of 5.3 ± 2.5 years, were studied, and 66% were diagnosed with OSAS based on a PSG-defined obstructive respiratory disturbance index ≥ 3/h total sleep time. Based on the availability of concurrent HRP-PSG recordings, the optimal AHI-HRP corresponding to the PSG-defined OSAS criterion was established as ≥ 5.6/h The latter exhibited a sensitivity of 90.9% (95% CI, 79.6%-100%) and a specificity of 94.1% (95% CI, 80%-100%). CONCLUSIONS: HRP recordings emerge as a potentially useful and reliable approach for the diagnosis of OSAS in children. However, more research is required for the diagnosis of mild OSAS using HRP in children. PMID:25539419

  11. Clinical Effect of Surgical Correction for Nasal Pathology on the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chong Yoon; Hong, Joon Hyeong; Lee, Jae Heon; Lee, Kyu Eun; Cho, Hyun Sang; Lim, Su Jin; Kwak, Jin Wook; Kim, Kyung Soo; Kim, Hyun Jik

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the hypothesis that relief of nasal obstruction in subjects with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) would lead to reduce OSA severity and to discuss the available evidence on the clinical efficacy of nasal surgery as a treatment modality for OSA. Study Design Twenty-five subjects who had reduced patency of nasal cavity and narrowing of retroglossal or retropalatal airways were diagnosed with OSA and underwent nasal surgery, such as septoplasty or turbinoplasty to correct nasal pathologies. The effect of the surgery on nasal patency was quantified by measuring minimal cross-sectional area (MCA) using acoustic rhinometry. The watch-PAT-derived respiratory disturbance index (RDI), apnea and hypopnea index (AHI), lowest oxygen saturation, and valid sleep time were measured before and after nasal surgery. Results The present study shows that the AHI and RDI decreased significantly and the lowest oxygen saturation and valid sleep time rose after nasal surgery in 25 OSA subjects. In addition, a reduction in subjective symptoms was observed in subjects and mean MCA increased after nasal surgery. Fourteen subjects were classified as responders and 11 subjects as non-responders. Responders showed considerable improvement of their subjective symptoms and the AHI and RDI were significantly lower after surgery. We found that the changes between pre- and post-operative AHI and RDI values were minimal in 11 non-responders. However, daytime somnolence and REM sleep time improved after nasal surgery in non-responders. Conclusions Our study provides evidence that the surgical treatment of nasal pathology improves nasal airway patency and reduces OSA severity in 56% subjects. Furthermore, correction of nasal pathology appears to result in improved sleep quality in both responder and non-responders OSA subjects. PMID:24896824

  12. Influence of obstructive sleep apnea on ischemia-modified albumin levels and carotid intima-media thickness.

    PubMed

    Karamanli, Harun; Kiyici, Aysel; Arik, Bilal; Efe, Duran; Akgedik, Recep

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis. Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) is strongly associated with the presence of significant risk factors for cardiovascular disturbances. A disturbance in the oxidative/antioxidative balance is involved in the pathogenesis of OSA and cardiovascular diseases. Ischemia-modified albumin (IMA) is suggested as a novel marker of oxidative stress; IMA can be defined as decreased binding of transitional metal ions to serum albumin in oxidative status. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the influence of OSA on IMA levels and CIMT. In total, 61 individuals with OSA with no comorbidities and 24 healthy controls with a similar body mass index and age were enrolled in this study. Serum levels of IMA, CIMT (estimated radiologically), and polysomnographic parameters, were determined and interpreted. Serum IMA levels were significantly higher in individuals with OSA compared with the control group (p=0.0003). CIMT was significantly higher in the OSA group compared with the control group (0.88± 0.26 mm vs 0.75±0.17 mm, p=0.005). The CIMT and serum IMA levels were positively correlated with the apnea-hypopnea index (r=0.35 and r=0.32, respectively), and with the oxygen desaturation index (r=0.34 and r=0.29, respectively) at baseline. Increased IMA levels and CIMT may be related to increased oxidative stress and risk of atherosclerosis in individuals with OSA. PMID:27029471

  13. Effects of Exercise and Weight Loss in Older Adults with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Dobrosielski, Devon A.; Patil, Susheel; Schwartz, Alan R.; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Stewart, Kerry J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is prevalent among older individuals and is linked to increased cardiovascular disease morbidity. This study examined the change in OSA severity following exercise training and dietary induced weight loss in older adults and the association between the changes in OSA severity, body composition and aerobic capacity with arterial distensibility. Methods Obese adults (n=25) with OSA, aged 60 years or older, were instructed to participate in supervised exercise (3 days/week) and follow a calorie-restricted diet. Baseline assessments of OSA parameters, body weight and composition, aerobic capacity and arterial distensibility were repeated at 12 weeks. Results Nineteen participants completed the intervention. At 12 weeks, there were reductions in body weight (−9%) and percentage total body fat (−5%) and trunk fat (−8%), while aerobic capacity improved by 20% (all p’s<0.01). The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) decreased by 10 events per hour (p<0.01) and nocturnal SaO2 (mean SaO2) improved from 94.9% at baseline to 95.2% post intervention (p=0.01). Arterial distensibility for the group was not different from baseline (p=0.99), yet individual changes in distensibility were associated with the change in nocturnal desaturations (r=−0.49, p=0.03), but not with the change in body weight, AHI or aerobic capacity. Conclusion The severity of OSA was reduced following an exercise and weight loss program among older adults, suggesting that this lifestyle approach may be an effective first line non-surgical and non-pharmacological treatment for older patients with OSA. PMID:24870569

  14. Clinical Prediction Models for Sleep Apnea: The Importance of Medical History over Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ustun, Berk; Westover, M. Brandon; Rudin, Cynthia; Bianchi, Matt T.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a treatable contributor to morbidity and mortality. However, most patients with OSA remain undiagnosed. We used a new machine learning method known as SLIM (Supersparse Linear Integer Models) to test the hypothesis that a diagnostic screening tool based on routinely available medical information would be superior to one based solely on patient-reported sleep-related symptoms. Methods: We analyzed polysomnography (PSG) and self-reported clinical information from 1,922 patients tested in our clinical sleep laboratory. We used SLIM and 7 state-of-the-art classification methods to produce predictive models for OSA screening using features from: (i) self-reported symptoms; (ii) self-reported medical information that could, in principle, be extracted from electronic health records (demographics, comorbidities), or (iii) both. Results: For diagnosing OSA, we found that model performance using only medical history features was superior to model performance using symptoms alone, and similar to model performance using all features. Performance was similar to that reported for other widely used tools: sensitivity 64.2% and specificity 77%. SLIM accuracy was similar to state-of-the-art classification models applied to this dataset, but with the benefit of full transparency, allowing for hands-on prediction using yes/no answers to a small number of clinical queries. Conclusion: To predict OSA, variables such as age, sex, BMI, and medical history are superior to the symptom variables we examined for predicting OSA. SLIM produces an actionable clinical tool that can be applied to data that is routinely available in modern electronic health records, which may facilitate automated, rather than manual, OSA screening. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 159. Citation: Ustun B, Westover MB, Rudin C, Bianchi MT. Clinical prediction models for sleep apnea: the importance of medical history over symptoms

  15. Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea assessment using pulse oximetry and dual RIP bands.

    PubMed

    Mason, David G; Iyer, Kartik; Terrill, Philip I; Wilson, Stephen J; Suresh, Sadasivam

    2010-01-01

    The diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) in children presents a challenging diagnostic problem given the high prevalence (2-3%), the resource intensity of the overnight polysomnography investigation, and the realisation that OSA poses a serious threat to the healthy growth and development of children. Previous attempts to develop OSA diagnostic systems using home pulse oximetry studies have failed to meet the accuracy requirements - particularly the low false normal rate (FNR) - required for a pre-PSG screening test. Thus the aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of an OSA severity diagnostic system based on both oximetry and dual respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) bands. A total of 90 PSG studies (30 each of normal, mild/moderate and severe OSA) were retrospectively analyzed. Quantifications of oxygen desaturations (S), respiratory events (E) and heart rate arousals (A) were calculated and extracted and an empirical rule-based SEA classifier model for normal, mild/moderate and severe OSA defined and developed. In addition, an automated classifier using a decision tree algorithm was trained and tested using a 10-fold cross-validation. The empirical classification system showed a correct classification rate (CCR) of 0.83 (Cohen's Kappa κ=0.81, FNR=0.08), and the decision tree classifier achieved a CCR of 0.79 (κ=0.73, FNR=0.08) when compared to gold standard PSG assessment. The relatively high CCR, and low FNR indicate that a OSA severity system based on dual RIP and oximetry is feasible for application as a pre-PSG screening tool. PMID:21097147

  16. A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Surgery for Middle-Aged Men with Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea Intolerant of CPAP

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kelvin B.; Toh, Song Tar; Guilleminault, Christian; Holty, Jon-Erik C.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Conventional OSA therapy necessitates indefinite continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Although CPAP is an effective treatment modality, up to 50% of OSA patients are intolerant of CPAP. We explore whether surgical modalities developed for those intolerant of CPAP are cost-effective. Methods: We construct a lifetime semi-Markov model of OSA that accounts for observed increased risks of stroke, cardiovascular disease, and motor vehicle collisions for a 50-year-old male with untreated severe OSA. Using this model, we compare the cost-effectiveness of (1) no treatment, (2) CPAP only, and (3) CPAP followed by surgery (either palatopharyngeal reconstructive surgery [PPRS] or multilevel surgery [MLS]) for those intolerant to CPAP. Results: Compared with the CPAP only strategy, CPAP followed by PPRS (CPAP-PPRS) adds 0.265 quality adjusted life years (QALYs) for an increase of $2,767 (discounted 2010 dollars) and is highly cost effective with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $10,421/QALY for a 50-year-old male with severe OSA. Compared to a CPAP-PPRS strategy, the CPAP-MLS strategy adds 0.07 QALYs at an increase of $6,213 for an ICER of $84,199/QALY. The CPAP-PPRS strategy appears cost-effective over a wide range of parameter estimates. Conclusions: Palatopharyngeal reconstructive surgery appears cost-effective in middle-aged men with severe OSA intolerant of CPAP. Further research is warranted to better define surgical candidacy as well as short-term and long-term surgical outcomes. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 509. Citation: Tan KB, Toh ST, Guilleminault C, Holty JE. A cost-effectiveness analysis of surgery for middle-aged men with severe obstructive sleep apnea intolerant of CPAP. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(5):525–535. PMID:25700871

  17. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Risk of Motor Vehicle Crash: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tregear, Stephen; Reston, James; Schoelles, Karen; Phillips, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: We performed a systematic review of the OSA-related risk of crash in commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers. The primary objective involved determining whether individuals with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are at an increased risk for a motor vehicle crash when compared to comparable individuals who do not have the disorder. A secondary objective involved determining what factors are associated with an increased motor vehicle crash risk among individuals with OSA. Design/Setting: Seven electronic databases (MEDLINE, PubMed (PreMEDLINE), EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, TRIS, and the Cochrane library) were searched (through May 27, 2009), as well as the reference lists of all obtained articles. We included controlled studies (case-control or cohort) that evaluated crash risk in individuals with OSA. We evaluated the quality of each study and the interplay between the quality, quantity, robustness, and consistency of the body of evidence, and tested for publication bias. Data were extracted by 2 independent analysts. When appropriate, data from different studies were combined in a fixed- or random-effects meta-analysis. Results: Individuals with OSA are clearly at increased risk for crash. The mean crash-rate ratio associated with OSA is likely to fall within the range of 1.21 to 4.89. Characteristics that may predict crash in drivers with OSA include BMI, apnea plus hypopnea index, oxygen saturation, and possibly daytime sleepiness. Conclusions: Untreated sleep apnea is a significant contributor to motor vehicle crashes. Citation: Tregear S; Reston J; Schoelles K; Phillips B. Obstructive sleep apnea and risk of motor vehicle crash: systematic review and meta-analysis. J Clin Sleep Med 2009;5(6):573-581. PMID:20465027

  18. The effect of choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid on microelements and silicon concentration, photosynthesis activity and yield of tomato grown under Mn stress.

    PubMed

    Kleiber, Tomasz; Calomme, Mario; Borowiak, Klaudia

    2015-11-01

    The aim of experiments was to assess the efficiency of choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid (ch-OSA; complex of orthosilicic acid with choline and a bioavailable source of silicon) application under increasing manganese (Mn) stress on the micronutritional composition and yielding of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. cvs. 'Alboney F1' and 'Emotion F1'). Plants were grown in rockwool with the application of a nutrient solution varied the Mn concentrations (in mg dm(-3)): 9.6 and 19.2 which cause strong oxidative stress of plants comparing with optimal concentration of that microelement in nutrient solution. The effect of ch-OSA application (at Si concentration of 0.3 mg dm(-3) nutrient solution) was investigated at both Mn-levels. Increasing Mn stress modified the concentration of microelements and silicon (Si) in tomato leaves. Application of ch-OSA also influenced the concentration of nutrients, but the determined changes were generally multidirectional and varied depending on Mn-level and cultivar. Under the increasing Mn stress a significant downward trend was observed for the mean concentration of Fe (in both cultivars) in fruits--but changes of Mn, Zn and Cu were varied depend on cultivar. In the case of cv. 'Alboney F1' ch-OSA application caused an increase the mean concentrations of Fe, Zn and Cu, while in the case of cv. 'Emotion F1' the reduction of mean concentrations of Zn and Cu was recorded. Ch-OSA treatment did not influence on the Mn concentrations in fruits. A beneficial role of ch-OSA was also found in photosynthesis activity. This was especially valid for lower levels of Mn. Application of ch-OSA improved significantly the marketable yield of tomato under stress by a low Mn level. PMID:26285179

  19. The status of cephalometry in the prediction of non-CPAP treatment outcome in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Denolf, Petra L; Vanderveken, Olivier M; Marklund, Marie E; Braem, Marc J

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is the most common sleep disordered breathing disorder (SDB) in adults and is characterized by a recurrent partial or complete collapse of the upper airway during sleep. This can be caused by many factors, sometimes interacting, such as skeletal malformations, soft tissue crowding, respiratory instability and the various effects of aging, obesity and gender that dictate craniofacial and upper airway anatomy. Research has demonstrated that the majority of patients exhibit at least one anatomical component such as retrognathia or a narrow posterior airway space that predisposes to the development of OSAS. Within the predisposing elements for OSAS many seem to point to anatomical characteristics. A standardized and relatively simple radiologic technique to evaluate anatomical craniofacial relationships is cephalometry. This has been used already for a long time in orthodontics, but is now gradually being introduced in OSAS treatment to envisage optimal treatment selection as well as to predict treatment outcomes. The purpose of the present review is to evaluate the contribution of cephalometry in the prediction of outcomes from OSAS treatments that depend on the upper airway morphology in their mechanisms of action such as oral appliances that advance the mandible as well as various surgical methods. In addition, an overview of imaging modalities and methods that currently are being used in cephalometric analysis in OSAS patients is provided. The findings indicate that isolated cephalometric parameters cannot be used to reliably predict treatment outcomes from mandibular advancement devices and surgical methods for OSAS. Extreme or outlying values of cephalometric parameters may rather be used as contra-indicators or 'red flags' instead of predictors. PMID:26452001

  20. Slowly digestible waxy maize starch prepared by octenyl succinic anhydride esterification and heat-moisture treatment: glycemic response and mechanism.

    PubMed

    He, Jinhua; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Genyi

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism and molecular structure of the slowly digestible waxy maize starch prepared by octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA) esterification and heat-moisture treatment were investigated. The in vitro Englyst test showed a proportion of 28.3% slowly digestible starch (SDS) when waxy maize starch was esterified with 3% OSA (starch weight based, and it is named OSA-starch), and a highest SDS content of 42.8% was obtained after OSA-starch (10% moisture) was further heated at 120 degrees C for 4 h (named HOSA-starch). The in vivo glycemic response of HOSA-starch, which showed a delayed appearance of blood glucose peak and a significant reduction (32.2%) of the peak glucose concentration, further confirmed its slow digestion property. Amylopectin debranching analysis revealed HOSA-starch had the highest resistance to debranching enzymes of isoamylase and pullulanase, and a simultaneous decrease of K m and V m (enzyme kinetics) was also shown when HOSA-starch was digested by either alpha-amylase or amyloglucosidase, indicating that the slow digestion of HOSA-starch resulted from an uncompetitive inhibition of enzyme activity during digestion. Size exclusion chromatography analysis of HOSA-starch showed fragmented amylopectin molecules with more nonreducing ends that are favorable for RS conversion to SDS by the action of amyloglucosidase in the Englyst test. Further solubility analysis indicates that the water-insolubility of HOSA-starch is caused by OSA-mediated cross-linking of amylopectin and the hydrophobic interaction between OSA-modified starch molecules. The water-insolubility of HOSA-starch would decrease its enzyme accessibility, and the digestion products with attached OSA molecules might also directly act as the uncompetitive inhibitor to reduce the enzyme activity leading to a slow digestion of HOSA-starch. PMID:18067261

  1. Study of Exhaled Nitric Oxide in Subjects with Suspected Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Pilot Study in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Duong-Quy, Sy; Hua-Huy, Thong; Tran-Mai-Thi, Huyen-Tran; Le-Dong, Nhat-Nam; Craig, Timothy J; Dinh-Xuan, Anh-Tuan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective. The concentration of exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), reflecting the activity of inducible NO synthase in airway epithelium, has been found to increase in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This study aimed to measure eNO concentration in patients with suspected OSA and to correlate different eNO parameters with clinical and sleep apnea characteristics. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, all patients underwent in-lab overnight polysomnography (PSG) and eNO measurement using a method of multiple flow rates before and after PSG (pre- and post-PSG). Results. According to the result of PSG, 82 persons were divided into two groups: control subjects (n = 30; 54 ± 14 years) and patients with OSA defined as apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥ 5/hour (n = 52; 53 ± 12 years). Body mass index (BMI) and neck and abdomen circumferences of OSA patients were significantly higher than those from control subjects. In OSA group, post-PSG alveolar NO concentration (CANO) (5.3 ± 1.9 ppb) was significantly higher than pre-PSG CANO (4.0 ± 1.7 ppb; P < 0.001). Significant correlations have been found between CANO and AHI (P < 0.001) and between CANO and nadir SpO2 (P < 0.05). The daytime CANO value of more than 4.1 ppb can be used to screen symptomatic subjects for the presence of OSA with a high specificity of 93.3%. Conclusion. Our findings indicate CANO as a surrogate marker for OSA in persons with suggestive symptoms. PMID:26881073

  2. Effect of eplerenone on the severity of obstructive sleep apnea and arterial stiffness in patients with resistant arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Krasińska, Beata; Miazga, Angelika; Cofta, Szczepan; Szczepaniak-Chicheł, Ludwina; Trafas, Tomasz; Krasiński, Zbigniew; Pawlaczyk-Gabriel, Katarzyna; Tykarski, Andrzej

    2016-05-27

    INTRODUCTION    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is considered to be one of the major causes of resistant arterial hypertension (RAH). Apnea episodes cause hypoxia, which triggers the activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. This leads to water retention and swelling in the neck region, exacerbating OSA symptoms. It is assumed that the use of eplerenone may reduce the swelling and thus alleviate the severity of OSA. OBJECTIVES    We aimed to prospectively assess the impact of eplerenone on the severity of OSA and arterial stiffness in patients with RAH. PATIENTS AND METHODS    The study included 31 patients with RAH and OSA. The exclusion criteria were as follows: secondary hypertension, myocardial infarction, stroke 6 months prior to the study, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney failure, alcohol or drug addiction, and active cancer. In all patients, the following tests were performed: blood pressure (BP) measurement (traditionally and using ambulatory BP measuring [ABPM]), applanation tonometry, polysomnography, and the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) calculation. The tests were done before and after 3 months of eplerenone therapy. Patients received 50 mg of oral eplerenone daily, along with other hypertensive drugs. RESULTS    The mean age of participants was 57.76 ±6.16 years. After 3 months of eplerenone therapy, we observed a significant reduction in the AHI, neck circumference, BP, aortic pulse wave, and arterial wall stiffness. There were significant correlations between the AHI and mean BP measured by ABPM and between the AHI and arterial stiffness parameters. CONCLUSIONS    Our results provide evidence for the clinical significance of eplerenone, not only as an antihypertensive medication but also as a drug that may reduce the severity of OSA and arterial stiffness in patients with RAH and OSA. PMID:27230560

  3. Thyroid Hormone Levels and TSH Activity in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bielicki, P; Przybyłowski, T; Kumor, M; Barnaś, M; Wiercioch, M; Chazan, R

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by complete cessation of inspiratory flow (apnea) or upper airway airflow limitation (hypopnea) with increased respiratory muscle activity, which is repeatedly observed during sleep. Hypothyroidism has been described as a rare cause of OSAS, but it is considered to be the main cause of breathing disorders during sleep in patients in whom an improvement of OSAS is observed after thyroid hormone replacement therapy. Nevertheless, euthyreosis due to thyroxine replacement in patients with OSAS often does not improve the breathing disorder and treatment with continuous positive airway pressure is usually applied. The aim of this study was to assess thyroid function in patients with OSAS. We studied 813 patients in whom severe OSAS was diagnosed; the mean apnea-hypopnea index was 44.0. Most of the patients were obese (mean BMI 33.1 ± 6.6 kg/m2) and had excessive daytime sleepiness (ESS 12.8 ± 6.6). With the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration as the major criterion, hypothyroidism was diagnosed in 38 (4.7%) and hyperthyroidism was diagnosed in 31 (3.8%) patients. Analysis of basic anthropometric data, selected polysomnography results, and TSH, fT3, and fT4 values did not reveal any significant correlations. In conclusion, the incidence of thyroid function disorders seems to be no different in OSAS than that in the general population. We did not find correlations between TSH activity and the severity of breathing disorders during sleep. PMID:26542600

  4. Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Obstructive Sleep Apnea Screening and Treatment in the United States: An Update and Recommendation Overview

    PubMed Central

    Colvin, Loretta J.; Collop, Nancy A.

    2016-01-01

    No regulatory mandate exists in the United States (U.S.) for comprehensive obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) risk assessment and stratification for commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers. Current Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) requirements are outdated and depend largely on subjective report, a less reliable strategy in an occupational setting. Without FMCSA standards, sleep specialists, occupational medical examiners and employers rely on a collection of medical consensus recommendations to establish standards of care. These recommendations advise OSA risk assessment through a combination of focused medical history, physical examination, questionnaires, and accident history, which increase OSA detection compared to current FMCSA standards. For those diagnosed with OSA, consensus-based risk stratification helps identify CMV drivers who may benefit from OSA treatment and establish minimum standards for assessing treatment efficacy and adherence. Unfortunately no consolidated recommendation exists; rather, publications span medical and governmental literature in a patchwork fashion that no longer fully reflect current practice due to subsequent advances in OSA diagnosis, treatment, and technology. Based on searches of medical literature, internet materials, and reference lists from existing publications, an overview and discussion of key published recommendations regarding OSA assessment and treatment in CMV operators is provided. Suggestions for incorporating these recommendations into clinical sleep medicine practice in the U.S. are presented. The challenge for sleep specialists is maintaining the delicate balance between recommendations impacting standard of care and associated medico-legal impact with stakeholder interests from medical, regulatory, industry and public perspectives while providing high quality and efficient care. Citation: Colvin LJ, Collop NA. Commercial motor vehicle driver obstructive sleep apnea screening and treatment in the

  5. Evaluation of a Decision Support System for Obstructive Sleep Apnea with Nonlinear Analysis of Respiratory Signals

    PubMed Central

    Kaimakamis, Evangelos; Tsara, Venetia; Bratsas, Charalambos; Sichletidis, Lazaros; Karvounis, Charalambos; Maglaveras, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder requiring the time/money consuming polysomnography for diagnosis. Alternative methods for initial evaluation are sought. Our aim was the prediction of Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI) in patients potentially suffering from OSA based on nonlinear analysis of respiratory biosignals during sleep, a method that is related to the pathophysiology of the disorder. Materials and Methods Patients referred to a Sleep Unit (135) underwent full polysomnography. Three nonlinear indices (Largest Lyapunov Exponent, Detrended Fluctuation Analysis and Approximate Entropy) extracted from two biosignals (airflow from a nasal cannula, thoracic movement) and one linear derived from Oxygen saturation provided input to a data mining application with contemporary classification algorithms for the creation of predictive models for AHI. Results A linear regression model presented a correlation coefficient of 0.77 in predicting AHI. With a cutoff value of AHI = 8, the sensitivity and specificity were 93% and 71.4% in discrimination between patients and normal subjects. The decision tree for the discrimination between patients and normal had sensitivity and specificity of 91% and 60%, respectively. Certain obtained nonlinear values correlated significantly with commonly accepted physiological parameters of people suffering from OSA. Discussion We developed a predictive model for the presence/severity of OSA using a simple linear equation and additional decision trees with nonlinear features extracted from 3 respiratory recordings. The accuracy of the methodology is high and the findings provide insight to the underlying pathophysiology of the syndrome. Conclusions Reliable predictions of OSA are possible using linear and nonlinear indices from only 3 respiratory signals during sleep. The proposed models could lead to a better study of the pathophysiology of OSA and facilitate initial evaluation/follow up of suspected patients OSA

  6. Quality Measures for the Care of Pediatric Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kothare, Sanjeev V.; Rosen, Carol L.; Lloyd, Robin M.; Paruthi, Shalini; Thomas, Sherene M.; Troester, Matthew M.; Carden, Kelly A.

    2015-01-01

    The Board of Directors of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) commissioned a Task Force to develop quality measures as part of its strategic plan to promote high quality patient-centered care. Among many potential dimensions of quality, the AASM requested Workgroups to develop outcome and process measures to aid in evaluating the quality of care of five common sleep disorders: insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea in adults, obstructive sleep apnea in children, restless legs syndrome, and narcolepsy. This paper describes the rationale, background, general methods development, and considerations in implementation of these quality measures in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children. This document describes measurement methods for five desirable process measures: assessment of symptoms and risk factors of OSA, initiation of an evidence-based action plan, objective evaluation of high-risk children with OSA by obtaining a polysomnogram (PSG), reassessment of signs and symptoms of OSA within 12 months, and documentation of objective assessment of positive airway pressure adherence. When these five process measures are met, clinicians should be able to achieve the two defined outcomes: improve detection of childhood OSA and reduce signs and symptoms of OSA after initiation of a management plan. The AASM recommends the use of these measures as part of quality improvement programs that will enhance the ability to improve care for patients with childhood OSA. Citation: Kothare SV, Rosen CL, Lloyd RM, Paruthi S, Thomas SM, Troester MM, Carden KA. Quality measures for the care of pediatric patients with obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):385–404. PMID:25700879

  7. Sleep Perception in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Study Using Polysomnography and the Multiple Sleep Latency Test

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hyunwoo; Lim, Jae-Sung; Kim, Jun-Soon; Lee, Keon-Joo; Koo, Dae Lim

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Discrepancies between objectively measured sleep and subjective sleep perception in patients with insomnia have been reported. However, few studies have investigated sleep-state misperception in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We designed this study to 1) delineate the factors that could affect this discrepancy and 2) infer an underlying mechanism in patients with OSA. Methods We recruited patients who visited our sleep clinic for the evaluation of their snoring and/or observed OSA. Participants completed a structured questionnaire and underwent overnight polysomnography. On the following day, five sessions of the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) were applied. We divided the patients into two groups: normal sleep perception and abnormal perception. The abnormal-perception group included patients whose perceived total sleep time was less than 80% of that measured in polysomnography. Results Fifty OSA patients were enrolled from a university hospital sleep clinic. Excessive daytime sleepiness, periodic limb movement index (PLMI), and the presence of dreaming were positively associated with poor sleep perception. REM sleep near the sleep termination exerted important effects. Respiratory disturbance parameters were not related to sleep perception. There was a prolongation in the sleep latency in the first session of the MSLT and we suspected that a delayed sleep phase occurred in poor-sleep perceivers. Conclusions As an objectively good sleep does not match the subjective good-sleep perception in OSA, physicians should keep in mind that OSA patients who perceive that they have slept well does not mean that their OSA is less severe. PMID:27074296

  8. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children: Epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and sequelae.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sun Jung; Chae, Kyu Young

    2010-10-01

    The prevalence of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is approximately 3% in children. Adenotonsillar hypertrophy is the most common cause of OSAS in children, and obesity, hypotonic neuromuscular diseases, and craniofacial anomalies are other major risk factors. Snoring is the most common presenting complaint in children with OSAS, but the clinical presentation varies according to age. Agitated sleep with frequent postural changes, excessive sweating, or abnormal sleep positions such as hyperextension of neck or abnormal prone position may suggest a sleep-disordered breathing. Night terror, sleepwalking, and enuresis are frequently associated, during slow-wave sleep, with sleep-disordered breathing. Excessive daytime sleepiness becomes apparent in older children, whereas hyperactivity or inattention is usually predominant in younger children. Morning headache and poor appetite may also be present. As the cortical arousal threshold is higher in children, arousals are not easily developed and their sleep architectures are usually more conserved than those of adults. Untreated OSAS in children may result in various problems such as cognitive deficits, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, poor academic achievement, and emotional instability. Mild pulmonary hypertension is not uncommon. Rarely, cardiovascular complications such as cor pulmonale, heart failure, and systemic hypertension may develop in untreated cases. Failure to thrive and delayed development are serious problems in younger children with OSAS. Diagnosis of pediatric OSAS should be based on snoring, relevant history of sleep disruption, findings of any narrow or collapsible portions of upper airway, and confirmed by polysomnography. Early diagnosis of pediatric OSAS is critical to prevent complications with appropriate interventions. PMID:21189956

  9. Action-Monitoring Dysfunction in Obstructive Sleep Apnea - A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ping-Song; Hsu, Chung-Yao; Wu, Meng-Ni; Liou, Li-Min; Lu, Shinag-Ru; Liu, Ching-Kuan; Lai, Chiou-Lian

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with a broad range of frontal lobe dysfunctions. However, no study has investigated action monitoring, a crucial domain of frontal cognitive functions, in patients with OSA. By using the modified Flanker task, we tested the hypothesis that patients with OSA have an impaired action monitoring function. We recruited 25 untreated patients with moderate–severe OSA and 12 control participants who were matched for age, sex, apolipoprotein E4, and education level. Every enrolled participant underwent a standard overnight laboratory-based polysomnography and completed a modified Flanker task. Compared with the controls, the patients with OSA presented a significantly lower correct response rate in all trials (78.9% vs 95.9%, P = .008), congruent trials (84.7% vs 98.3%, P = .016), and incongruent trials (77.4% vs 94.7%, P = .009). The post-error correction rate was significantly lower in the patients with OSA than in the controls (74.9% vs 93.8%, P = .005). Furthermore, strong significant correlations were observed between the arousal index and correct rate in all trials (r = −0.390, P < .05) and in the incongruent trials (r = −0.429, P < .01), as well as between the arousal index and rate of post-error correction (r = −0.435, P < .01). We concluded that the action monitoring function was impaired in the patients with OSA. Sleep fragmentation was a major determinant of impaired action monitoring in these patients. PMID:27300504

  10. Sleep Apnea Symptoms as a Predictor of Fatigue in an Urban HIV Clinic.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Umesh; Baker, Jason V; Wang, Qi; Khalil, Wajahat; Kunisaki, Ken M

    2015-11-01

    Fatigue is common among persons living with HIV (PLWH), and risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) such as older age and obesity are increasingly prevalent. Studies of OSA among PLWH are lacking, so we aimed to characterize OSA symptoms and associated clinical consequences (e.g., fatigue) among a contemporary population of PLWH. Self-administered surveys containing 23 items that included self-reported snoring, witnessed apneas, estimated sleep duration, the Epworth Sleepiness Score (ESS), and the FACIT-Fatigue score were mailed to PLWH receiving care at an urban HIV clinic. Clinical/demographic data were collected from the medical record. Multivariable linear regression models were created to study relationships between fatigue, clinical variables, and OSA symptoms. Of 535 surveys, 203 (38%) responded. Eight patients (3.9%) had known OSA. Among those without known OSA, mean respondent characteristics included: age 47 years; 80% male, 41% African American, 48% Caucasian, BMI 26.4 kg/m(2), duration of HIV diagnosis 12 years, 93% on antiretroviral therapy, and 81% with <50 HIV RNA copies/mL. 27% reported snoring, 24% reported witnessed apneas, and 38% had excessive daytime sleepiness. Witnessed apnea was the strongest independent predictor of fatigue (lower FACIT-Fatigue score; β = -6.49; p < 0.001); this difference of 6.49 points exceeds the accepted minimal clinically important difference of 3.0 points. Other predictors included opioid use (β = -5.53; p < 0.001), depression (β = -4.18; p = 0.02), antidepressant use (β = -4.25; p = 0.02), and sleep duration < 6 h (β = -3.42; p = 0.02). Our data strongly support the need for increased efforts directed at OSA screening and treatment in PLWH. PMID:26376124

  11. Towards an understanding of Internet-based problem shopping behaviour: The concept of online shopping addiction and its proposed predictors

    PubMed Central

    ROSE, SUSAN; DHANDAYUDHAM, ARUN

    2014-01-01

    Background: Compulsive and addictive forms of consumption and buying behaviour have been researched in both business and medical literature. Shopping enabled via the Internet now introduces new features to the shopping experience that translate to positive benefits for the shopper. Evidence now suggests that this new shopping experience may lead to problematic online shopping behaviour. This paper provides a theoretical review of the literature relevant to online shopping addiction (OSA). Based on this selective review, a conceptual model of OSA is presented. Method: The selective review of the literature draws on searches within databases relevant to both clinical and consumer behaviour literature including EBSCO, ABI Pro-Quest, Web of Science – Social Citations Index, Medline, PsycINFO and Pubmed. The article reviews current thinking on problematic, and specifically addictive, behaviour in relation to online shopping. Results: The review of the literature enables the extension of existing knowledge into the Internet-context. A conceptual model of OSA is developed with theoretical support provided for the inclusion of 7 predictor variables: low self-esteem, low self-regulation; negative emotional state; enjoyment; female gender; social anonymity and cognitive overload. The construct of OSA is defined and six component criteria of OSA are proposed based on established technological addiction criteria. Conclusions: Current Internet-based shopping experiences may trigger problematic behaviours which can be classified on a spectrum which at the extreme end incorporates OSA. The development of a conceptual model provides a basis for the future measurement and testing of proposed predictor variables and the outcome variable OSA. PMID:25215218

  12. Computational fluid dynamics endpoints to characterize obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Haiyan; Persak, Steven C.; Sin, Sanghun; McDonough, Joseph M.; Isasi, Carmen R.; Arens, Raanan

    2013-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis may quantify the severity of anatomical airway restriction in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) better than anatomical measurements alone. However, optimal CFD model endpoints to characterize or assess OSAS have not been determined. To model upper airway fluid dynamics using CFD and investigate the strength of correlation between various CFD endpoints, anatomical endpoints, and OSAS severity, in obese children with OSAS and controls. CFD models derived from magnetic resonance images were solved at subject-specific peak tidal inspiratory flow; pressure at the choanae was set by nasal resistance. Model endpoints included airway wall minimum pressure (Pmin), flow resistance in the pharynx (Rpharynx), and pressure drop from choanae to a minimum cross section where tonsils and adenoids constrict the pharynx (dPTAmax). Significance of endpoints was analyzed using paired comparisons (t-test or Wilcoxon signed rank test) and Spearman correlation. Fifteen subject pairs were analyzed. Rpharynx and dPTAmax were higher in OSAS than control and most significantly correlated to obstructive apnea-hypopnea index (oAHI), r = 0.48 and r = 0.49, respectively (P < 0.01). Airway minimum cross-sectional correlation to oAHI was weaker (r = −0.39); Pmin was not significantly correlated. CFD model endpoints based on pressure drops in the pharynx were more closely associated with the presence and severity of OSAS than pressures including nasal resistance, or anatomical endpoints. This study supports the usefulness of CFD to characterize anatomical restriction of the pharynx and as an additional tool to evaluate subjects with OSAS. PMID:24265282

  13. The D3 bacteriophage α-polymerase inhibitor (Iap) peptide disrupts O-antigen biosynthesis through mimicry of the chain length regulator Wzz in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Véronique L; Udaskin, Molly L; Islam, Salim T; Lam, Joseph S

    2013-10-01

    Lysogenic bacteriophage D3 causes seroconversion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 from serotype O5 to O16 by inverting the linkage between O-specific antigen (OSA) repeat units from α to β. The OSA units are polymerized by Wzy to modal lengths regulated by Wzz1 and Wzz2. A key component of the D3 seroconversion machinery is the inhibitor of α-polymerase (Iap) peptide, which is able to solely suppress α-linked long-chain OSA production in P. aeruginosa PAO1. To establish the target specificity of Iap for Wzyα, changes in OSA phenotypes were examined via Western immunoblotting for wzz1 and wzz2 single-knockout strains, as well as a wzz1 wzz2 double knockout, following the expression of iap from a tuneable vector. Increased induction of Iap expression completely abrogated OSA production in the wzz1 wzz2 double mutant, while background levels of OSA production were still observed in either of the single mutants. Therefore, Iap inhibition of OSA biosynthesis was most effective in the absence of both Wzz proteins. Sequence alignment analyses revealed a high degree of similarity between Iap and the first transmembrane segment (TMS) of either Wzz1 or Wzz2. Various topology prediction analyses of the Iap sequence consistently predicted the presence of a single TMS, suggesting a propensity for Iap to insert itself into the inner membrane (IM). The compromised ability of Iap to abrogate Wzyα function in the presence of Wzz1 or Wzz2 provides compelling evidence that inhibition occurs after Wzyα inserts itself into the IM and is achieved through mimicry of the first TMS from the Wzz proteins of P. aeruginosa PAO1. PMID:23955007

  14. Upper Airway Collapsibility During REM Sleep in Children with the Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jingtao; Karamessinis, Laurie R.; Pepe, Michelle E.; Glinka, Stephen M.; Samuel, John M.; Gallagher, Paul R.; Marcus, Carole L.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: In children, most obstructive events occur during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. We hypothesized that children with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), in contrast to age-matched control subjects, would not maintain airflow in the face of an upper airway inspiratory pressure drop during REM sleep. Design: During slow wave sleep (SWS) and REM sleep, we measured airflow, inspiratory time, inspiratory time/total respiratory cycle time, respiratory rate, tidal volume, and minute ventilation at a holding pressure at which flow limitation occurred and at 5 cm H2O below the holding pressure in children with OSAS and in control subjects. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: Fourteen children with OSAS and 23 normal control subjects. Results: In both sleep states, control subjects were able to maintain airflow, whereas subjects with OSAS preserved airflow in SWS but had a significant decrease in airflow during REM sleep (change in airflow of 18.58 ± 12.41 mL/s for control subjects vs −44.33 ± 14.09 mL/s for children with OSAS, P = 0.002). Although tidal volume decreased, patients with OSAS were able to maintain minute ventilation by increasing the respiratory rate and also had an increase in inspiratory time and inspiratory time per total respiratory cycle time Conclusion: Children with OSAS do not maintain airflow in the face of upper-airway inspiratory-pressure drops during REM sleep, indicating a more collapsible upper airway, compared with that of control subjects during REM sleep. However, compensatory mechanisms exist to maintain minute ventilation. Local reflexes, central control mechanisms, or both reflexes and control mechanisms need to be further explored to better understand the pathophysiology of this abnormality and the compensation mechanism. Citation: Huang J; Karamessinis LR; Pepe ME; Glinka SM; Samuel JM; Gallagher PR; Marcus CL. Upper airway collapsibility during REM sleep in children with the obstructive sleep apnea

  15. Cortical Processing of Respiratory Afferent Stimuli during Sleep in Children with the Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jingtao; Colrain, Ian M.; Melendres, M. Cecilia; Karamessinis, Laurie R.; Pepe, Michelle E.; Samuel, John M.; Abi-Raad, Ronald F.; Trescher, William H.; Marcus, Carole L.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: Children with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) have blunted upper airway responses to negative pressure, but the underlying cause remains unknown. Cortical processing of respiratory afferent information can be tested by measuring respiratory-related evoked potentials (RREPs). We hypothesized that children with OSAS have blunted RREP responses compared to normal children during sleep. Design: During sleep, RREPs were obtained from EEG electrodes Fz, Cz, Pz during stage 2 sleep, slow wave sleep (SWS), and REM sleep. RREPs were produced with multiple short occlusions of the upper airway. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: 9 children with OSAS and 12 normal controls. Measurements and Results: Children with OSAS had significantly decreased evoked K-complex production in stage 2 sleep and slow wave sleep and significantly reduced RREP N350 and P900 components in slow wave sleep. There were no significant differences in any of the measured RREP components in stage 2 sleep, and the only REM difference was decreased P2 amplitude. Conclusions: Results indicate that in children with OSAS, cortical processing of respiratory-related information measured with RREPs persists throughout sleep; however, RREPs during SWS are blunted compared to those seen in control children. Possible causes for this difference include a congenital deficit in neural processing reflective of a predisposition to develop OSAS, or changes in the upper airway rendering the airway less capable of transducing pressure changes following occlusion. Further research is required to evaluate RREPs after effective surgical treatment of OSAS in children, in order to distinguish between these alternatives. Citation: Huang J; Colrain IM; Melendres MC; Karamessinis LR; Pepe ME; Samuel JM; Abi-Raad RF; Trescher WH; Marcus CL. Cortical processing of respiratory afferent stimuli during sleep in children with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. SLEEP 2007;31(3):403-410. PMID:18363317

  16. Trazodone Effects on Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Non-REM Arousal Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Bradley A.; Deyoung, Pam N.; McSharry, David G.; Wellman, Andrew; Velasquez, Adrian; Owens, Robert; Orr, Jeremy E.; Malhotra, Atul

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: A low respiratory arousal threshold is a physiological trait involved in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) pathogenesis. Trazodone may increase arousal threshold without compromising upper airway muscles, which should improve OSA. Objectives: We aimed to examine how trazodone alters OSA severity and arousal threshold. We hypothesized that trazodone would increase the arousal threshold and improve the apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) in selected patients with OSA. Methods: Subjects were studied on two separate nights in a randomized crossover design. Fifteen unselected subjects with OSA (AHI ≥ 10/h) underwent a standard polysomnogram plus an epiglottic catheter to measure the arousal threshold. Subjects were studied after receiving trazodone (100 mg) and placebo, with 1 week between conditions. The arousal threshold was calculated as the nadir pressure before electrocortical arousal from approximately 20 spontaneous respiratory events selected randomly. Measurements and Main Results: Compared with placebo, trazodone resulted in a significant reduction in AHI (38.7 vs. 28.5 events/h, P = 0.041), without worsening oxygen saturation or respiratory event duration. Trazodone was not associated with a significant change in the non-REM arousal threshold (−20.3 vs. −19.3 cm H2O, P = 0.51) compared with placebo. In subgroup analysis, responders to trazodone spent less time in N1 sleep (20.1% placebo vs. 9.0% trazodone, P = 0.052) and had an accompanying reduction in arousal index, whereas nonresponders were not observed to have a change in sleep parameters. Conclusions: These findings suggest that trazodone could be effective therapy for patients with OSA without worsening hypoxemia. Future studies should focus on underlying mechanisms and combination therapies to eliminate OSA. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01817907). PMID:25719754

  17. Abnormalities of Lipoprotein Concentrations in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Are Related to Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Alice; Cardell, James; Ariel, Danit; Lamendola, Cindy; Abbasi, Fahim; Kim, Sun H.; Holmes, Tyson H.; Tomasso, Vanessa; Mojaddidi, Hafasa; Grove, Kaylene; Kushida, Clete A.; Reaven, Gerald M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: Prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increased in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), possibly related to dyslipidemia in these individuals. Insulin resistance is also common in OSA, but its contribution to dyslipidemia of OSA is unclear. The study's aim was to define the relationships among abnormalities of lipoprotein metabolism, clinical measures of OSA, and insulin resistance. Design: Cross-sectional study. OSA severity was defined by the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) during polysomnography. Hypoxia measures were expressed as minimum and mean oxygen saturation, and the oxygen desaturation index. Insulin resistance was quantified by determining steady-state plasma glucose (SSPG) concentrations during the insulin suppression test. Fasting plasma lipid/lipoprotein evaluation was performed by vertical auto profile methodology. Setting: Academic medical center. Participants: 107 nondiabetic, overweight/obese adults. Measurements and Results: Lipoprotein particles did not correlate with AHI or any hypoxia measures, nor were there differences noted by categories of OSA severity. By contrast, even after adjustment for age, sex, and BMI, SSPG was positively correlated with triglycerides (r = 0.30, P < 0.01), very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and its subclasses (VLDL1+2) (r = 0.21–0.23, P < 0.05), and low density lipoprotein subclass 4 (LDL4) (r = 0.30, P < 0.01). SSPG was negatively correlated with high density lipoprotein (HDL) (r = −0.38, P < 0.001) and its subclasses (HDL2 and HDL3) (r = −0.32, −0.43, P < 0.01), and apolipoprotein A1 (r = −0.33, P < 0.01). Linear trends of these lipoprotein concentrations across SSPG tertiles were also significant. Conclusions: Pro-atherogenic lipoprotein abnormalities in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are related to insulin resistance, but not to OSA severity or degree of hypoxia. Insulin resistance may represent the link between OSA-related dyslipidemia and increased cardiovascular disease

  18. Obstructive sleep apnea screening by integrating snore feature classes.

    PubMed

    Abeyratne, U R; de Silva, S; Hukins, C; Duce, B

    2013-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a serious sleep disorder with high community prevalence. More than 80% of OSA suffers remain undiagnosed. Polysomnography (PSG) is the current reference standard used for OSA diagnosis. It is expensive, inconvenient and demands the extensive involvement of a sleep technologist. At present, a low cost, unattended, convenient OSA screening technique is an urgent requirement. Snoring is always almost associated with OSA and is one of the earliest nocturnal symptoms. With the onset of sleep, the upper airway undergoes both functional and structural changes, leading to spatially and temporally distributed sites conducive to snore sound (SS) generation. The goal of this paper is to investigate the possibility of developing a snore based multi-feature class OSA screening tool by integrating snore features that capture functional, structural, and spatio-temporal dependences of SS. In this paper, we focused our attention to the features in voiced parts of a snore, where quasi-repetitive packets of energy are visible. Individual snore feature classes were then optimized using logistic regression for optimum OSA diagnostic performance. Consequently, all feature classes were integrated and optimized to obtain optimum OSA classification sensitivity and specificity. We also augmented snore features with neck circumference, which is a one-time measurement readily available at no extra cost. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated using snore recordings from 86 subjects (51 males and 35 females). Data from each subject consisted of 6-8 h long sound recordings, made concurrently with routine PSG in a clinical sleep laboratory. Clinical diagnosis supported by standard PSG was used as the reference diagnosis to compare our results against. Our proposed techniques resulted in a sensitivity of 93±9% with specificity 93±9% for females and sensitivity of 92±6% with specificity 93±7% for males at an AHI decision threshold of 15 events

  19. Cerebral Blood Flow Response to Hypercapnia in Children with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Busch, David R.; Lynch, Jennifer M.; Winters, Madeline E.; McCarthy, Ann L.; Newland, John J.; Ko, Tiffany; Cornaglia, Mary Anne; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; McDonough, Joseph M.; Samuel, John; Matthews, Edward; Xiao, Rui; Yodh, Arjun G.; Marcus, Carole L.; Licht, Daniel J.; Tapia, Ignacio E.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) often experience periods of hypercapnia during sleep, a potent stimulator of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Considering this hypercapnia exposure during sleep, it is possible that children with OSAS have abnormal CBF responses to hypercapnia even during wakefulness. Therefore, we hypothesized that children with OSAS have blunted CBF response to hypercapnia during wakefulness, compared to snorers and controls. Methods: CBF changes during hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR) were tested in children with OSAS, snorers, and healthy controls using diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS). Peak CBF changes with respect to pre-hypercapnic baseline were measured for each group. The study was conducted at an academic pediatric sleep center. Results: Twelve children with OSAS (aged 10.1 ± 2.5 [mean ± standard deviation] y, obstructive apnea hypopnea index [AHI] = 9.4 [5.1–15.4] [median, interquartile range] events/hour), eight snorers (11 ± 3 y, 0.5 [0–1.3] events/hour), and 10 controls (11.4 ± 2.6 y, 0.3 [0.2–0.4] events/hour) were studied. The fractional CBF change during hypercapnia, normalized to the change in end-tidal carbon dioxide, was significantly higher in controls (9 ± 1.8 %/mmHg) compared to OSAS (7.1 ± 1.5, P = 0.023) and snorers (6.7 ± 1.9, P = 0.025). Conclusions: Children with OSAS and snorers have blunted CBF response to hypercapnia during wakefulness compared to controls. Noninvasive DCS blood flow measurements of hypercapnic reactivity offer insights into physiopathology of OSAS in children, which could lead to further understanding about the central nervous system complications of OSAS. Citation: Busch DR, Lynch JM, Winters ME, McCarthy AL, Newland JJ, Ko T, Cornaglia MA, Radcliffe J, McDonough JM, Samuel J, Matthews E, Xiao R, Yodh AG, Marcus CL, Licht DJ, Tapia IE. Cerebral blood flow response to hypercapnia in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. SLEEP 2016

  20. Clinical factors associated with extreme sleep apnoea [AHI>100 events per hour] in Peruvian patients: A case-control study–A preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Rey de Castro, Jorge; Huamaní, Charles; Escobar-Córdoba, Franklin; Liendo, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The severity of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) ranges from mild or moderate to severe sleep apnoea. However, there is no information available on the clinical characteristics associated with cases involving more than 100 events per hour. This is a preliminary report and our goal was to characterise the demographics and sleep characteristics of patients with Extreme OSA and compare with patients with sleep apnoea of lesser severity. We hypothesised that patients with Extreme OSA (AHI>100) is associated with an increased comorbidities and/or risk factors. Methods We carried out a case-control study on male patients with OSA who were seen in a private hospital in Lima, Peru between 2006 and 2012. Cases were identified if their apnoea/hypopnea index (AHI) was higher than 100 (Extreme OSA), and four controls were selected per case: two with 15–29 AHI and two with 30–50 AHI, matched according to case diagnosis dates. We evaluated demographic, past medical history, and oxygen saturation variables Results We identified 19 cases that were matched with 54 controls. In the multivariate model, only arterial hypertension, neck circumference, age, and over 10% in SatO2Hb≤90% in total sleep time (T90) were associated with Extreme OSA. Arterial hypertension had an OR=6.31 (CI95%: 1.71–23.23) of Extreme OSA. Each 5-cm increment in neck circumference was associated with an increase of OR=4.34 (CI95%: 1.32–14.33), while T90>10% had an OR=19.68 (CI95%: 4.33–89.49). Age had a marginal relevance (OR=0.95; CI95%: 0.92–0.99) Conclusion Our results suggest that arterial hypertension, neck circumference, and over 10% SatO2Hb≤90% in total sleep time were associated with a higher probability of Extreme OSA. We recommend investigators to study this population of Extreme OSA looking for an early diagnosis and the identification of prognostic factors in comparison with moderate to severe levels. PMID:26483940

  1. Erectile Dysfunction and Sexual Hormone Levels in Men With Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Efficacy of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Bin; Lin, Qi-Chang; Zeng, Hui-Qing; Jiang, Xing-Tang; Chen, Bo; Chen, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) and serum sexual hormone levels were evaluated in men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In these patients, the efficacy of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was determined. The 207 men (mean age 44.0 ± 11.1 years) enrolled in the study were stratified within four groups based on their apnea-hypopnea index score: simple snoring (n = 32), mild OSA (n = 29), moderate OSA (n = 38), and severe OSA (n = 108). The International Index of Erectile Dysfunction-5 (IIEF-5) score was obtained from each patient, and blood samples for the analysis of sexual hormones (prolactin, luteotropin, follicle-stimulating hormone, estradiol, progestin, and testosterone) were drawn in the morning after polysomnography. The IIEF-5 test and serum sexual hormone measurements were repeated after 3 months of CPAP treatment in 53 men with severe OSA. The prevalence of ED was 60.6 % in OSA patients overall and 72.2 % in those with severe OSA. Compared with the simple snoring group, patients with severe OSA had significantly lower testosterone levels (14.06 ± 5.62 vs. 17.02 ± 4.68, p = .018) and lower IIEF-5 scores (16.33 ± 6.50 vs. 24.09 ± 1.94, p = .001). The differences in the other sexual hormones between groups were not significant. After 3 months of CPAP treatment, there were no significant changes in sexual hormone levels, but the IIEF-5 score had improved significantly (18.21 ± 4.05 vs. 19.21 ± 3.86, p = .001). Severe OSA patients have low testosterone concentration and high ED prevalence. IIEF-5 scores increased significantly after CPAP treatment, but there was no effect on serum testosterone levels. PMID:26370402

  2. Cost Minimization Using an Artificial Neural Network Sleep Apnea Prediction Tool for Sleep Studies

    PubMed Central

    Teferra, Rahel A.; Grant, Brydon J. B.; Mindel, Jesse W.; Siddiqi, Tauseef A.; Iftikhar, Imran H.; Ajaz, Fatima; Aliling, Jose P.; Khan, Meena S.; Hoffmann, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: More than a million polysomnograms (PSGs) are performed annually in the United States to diagnose obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Third-party payers now advocate a home sleep test (HST), rather than an in-laboratory PSG, as the diagnostic study for OSA regardless of clinical probability, but the economic benefit of this approach is not known. Objectives: We determined the diagnostic performance of OSA prediction tools including the newly developed OSUNet, based on an artificial neural network, and performed a cost-minimization analysis when the prediction tools are used to identify patients who should undergo HST. Methods: The OSUNet was trained to predict the presence of OSA in a derivation group of patients who underwent an in-laboratory PSG (n = 383). Validation group 1 consisted of in-laboratory PSG patients (n = 149). The network was trained further in 33 patients who underwent HST and then was validated in a separate group of 100 HST patients (validation group 2). Likelihood ratios (LRs) were compared with two previously published prediction tools. The total costs from the use of the three prediction tools and the third-party approach within a clinical algorithm were compared. Measurements and Main Results: The OSUNet had a higher +LR in all groups compared with the STOP-BANG and the modified neck circumference (MNC) prediction tools. The +LRs for STOP-BANG, MNC, and OSUNet in validation group 1 were 1.1 (1.0–1.2), 1.3 (1.1–1.5), and 2.1 (1.4–3.1); and in validation group 2 they were 1.4 (1.1–1.7), 1.7 (1.3–2.2), and 3.4 (1.8–6.1), respectively. With an OSA prevalence less than 52%, the use of all three clinical prediction tools resulted in cost savings compared with the third-party approach. Conclusions: The routine requirement of an HST to diagnose OSA regardless of clinical probability is more costly compared with the use of OSA clinical prediction tools that identify patients who should undergo this procedure when OSA is expected to

  3. Associations of Sleep Apnea, NRG1 Polymorphisms, Alcohol Consumption, and Cerebral White Matter Hyperintensities: Analysis with Genome-Wide Association Data

    PubMed Central

    Baik, Inkyung; Seo, Hyung Suk; Yoon, Daewui; Kim, Seong Hwan; Shin, Chol

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: There are few studies on gene-environment interactions with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Our study aimed to explore genetic polymorphisms associated with OSA using genome-wide association (GWA) data and evaluate the effects of relevant polymorphisms on the association between risk factors, including obesity and alcohol consumption, and OSA. We also investigated on these associations in relation to cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on magnetic resonance images. Design: A cross-sectional design. Setting: A polysomnography study embedded in a population-based cohort from the Korean Genome Epidemiology Study was conducted in 2011–2013. Participants: 1,763 participants aged 48–78 years. Results: 251 individuals were identified to have OSA with an apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 15. A common polymorphism of neuregulin-1 gene (NRG1), rs10097555, was selected as the most suggestive locus associated with OSA (P value < 10−5) based on the results of GWA analysis in a matched case-control subsample (n = 470). Among 1,763 participants, we found that the presence of the NRG1 polymorphism is inversely associated with OSA (P value < 0.01) even after taking into account potential risk factors; the multivariate odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for the mutant alleles was 0.57 (0.39–0.82) compared with the wild-type. We observed that this association is modified by alcohol consumption (P < 0.05), not by obesity. We also observed that WMH are positively associated with OSA independent of the NRG1 polymorphism and alcohol consumption (P < 0.05). Conclusions: These findings suggest that the neuregulin-1 gene (NRG1) may be involved in the etiological mechanisms of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and that carriers of a particular NRG1 mutation may be less likely to have OSA if they do not drink alcoholic beverages. Citation: Baik I, Seo HS, Yoon D, Kim SH, Shin C. Associations of sleep apnea, NRG1 polymorphisms, alcohol consumption, and cerebral white

  4. The human leucocyte antigen DQB1*0602 allele is associated with electroencephelograph differences in individuals with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Manzotte, Thais; Guindalini, Camila; Mazzotti, Diego R; Palombini, Luciana; de Souza, Altay L; Poyares, Dalva; Bittencourt, Lia R A; Tufik, Sergio

    2013-04-01

    Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) DQB1*0602 allele, a well-known genetic risk factor for narcolepsy, has been associated with sleep parameters in healthy subjects. We aimed to assess the association of this allele with daytime sleepiness and altered sleep electroencephalogram characteristics in the general population and in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). Eight hundred and ninety-four individuals from the Epidemiologic Study of Sleep were genotyped for the HLA DQB1*0602 allele. Full-night polysomnography was performed, and daytime sleepiness was analysed according to the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. HLA-DQB1*0602 allele-positive and -negative subjects in the general population, as well as in patients with OSAS, exhibited similar sleep parameters and levels of daytime sleepiness. However, spectral analysis showed that allele-positive individuals with OSAS exhibited higher theta power during sleep Stage 1 (P < 0.05) in occipital derivations, and lower delta power during sleep Stages 1 and 2 (P < 0.01) compared with individuals negative for the allele, even after correction for potential confounders as age, sex, body mass index and European ancestry. No significant differences in the electroencephalogram variables were found in individuals without OSAS. The data highlight the HLA-DQB1*0602 as a potential genetic factor influencing sleep physiology in individuals diagnosed with OSAS. PMID:23136848

  5. Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Preoperative Screening and Postoperative Care.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Robert M; Pomerantz, Jonathan; Miller, Deborah E; Weiss-Coleman, Rebecca; Solomonides, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has reached epidemic proportions, and it is an often unrecognized cause of perioperative morbidity and mortality. Profound hypoxic injury from apnea during the postoperative period is often misdiagnosed as cardiac arrest due to other causes. Almost a quarter of patients entering a hospital for elective surgery have OSA, and >80% of these cases are undiagnosed at the time of surgery. The perioperative period puts patients at high risk of apneic episodes because of drug effects from sedatives, narcotics, and general anesthesia, as well as from the effects of postoperative rapid eye movement sleep changes and postoperative positioning in the hospital bed. For adults, preoperative screening using the STOP or STOP-Bang questionnaires can help to identify adult patients at increased risk of OSA. In the pediatric setting, a question about snoring should be part of every preoperative examination. For patients with known OSA, continuous positive airway pressure should be continued postoperatively. Continuous pulse oximetry monitoring with an alarm system can help to prevent apneic catastrophes caused by OSA in the postoperative period. PMID:26957384

  6. Utility of portable monitoring in the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswamy, U; Aneja, A; Kumar, R Mohan; Kumar, T Prasanna

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common but underdiagnosed sleep disorder, which is associated with systemic consequences such as hypertension, stroke, metabolic syndrome, and ischemic heart disease. Nocturnal laboratory-based polysomnography (PSG) is the gold standard test for diagnosis of OSA. PSG consists of a simultaneous recording of multiple physiologic parameters related to sleep and wakefulness including electroencephalography (EEG), electrooculography (EOG), surface electromyography (EMG), airflow measurement using thermistor and nasal pressure transducer, pulse oximetry and respiratory effort (thoracic and abdominal). Multiple alternative and simpler methods that record respiratory parameters alone for diagnosing OSA have been developed in the past two decades. These devices are called portable monitors (PMs) and enable performing sleep studies at a lower cost with shorter waiting times. It has been observed and reported that comprehensive sleep evaluation coupled with the use of PMs can fulfill the unmet need for diagnostic testing in various out-of-hospital settings in patients with suspected OSA. This article reviews the available medical literature on PMs in order to justify the utility of PMs in the diagnosis of OSA, especially in resource-poor, high-disease burden settings. The published practice parameters for the use of these devices have also been reviewed with respect to their relevance in the Indian setting. PMID:26440391

  7. Online sexual activity: cross-national comparison between United States and Peruvian college students.

    PubMed

    Velezmoro, Rodrigo; Negy, Charles; Livia, Jose

    2012-08-01

    The current generation of college students commonly uses the Internet for myriad sexually-related purposes. Yet, it has been suggested that usage of the Internet for sexual purposes might lead to psychological problems. In this study, undergraduate students from a public university in the U.S. (n = 320) and Peru (n = 251) completed questionnaires addressing their online sexual activity (OSA), psychological adjustment, and family environment and communication. Results indicated that Peruvians used the Internet significantly more than U.S. students to view sexually-explicit material (SEM), find sexual partners, and search for sex-related information. Men, irrespective of nationality, used the Internet to view SEM significantly more than women. Social support, religiosity, and erotophilia were found to moderate the relations between nationality and OSA. In absolute terms, both national groups, on average, engaged in OSA a relatively low number of hours each week. Further, no differences were found in maladjustment between those who engage in OSA and those who do not, suggesting that concerns over OSA are probably unwarranted. PMID:22083655

  8. Increased internalization of complement inhibitor CD59 may contribute to endothelial inflammation in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Emin, Memet; Wang, Gang; Castagna, Francesco; Rodriguez-Lopez, Josanna; Wahab, Romina; Wang, Jing; Adams, Tessa; Wei, Ying; Jelic, Sanja

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), characterized by intermittent hypoxia (IH) during transient cessation of breathing, triples the risk for cardiovascular diseases. We used a phage display peptide library as an unbiased approach to investigate whether IH, which is specific to OSA, activates endothelial cells (ECs) in a distinctive manner. The target of a differentially bound peptide on ECs collected from OSA patients was identified as CD59, a major complement inhibitor that protects ECs from the membrane attack complex (MAC). A decreased proportion of CD59 is located on the EC surface in OSA patients compared with controls, suggesting reduced protection against complement attack. In vitro, IH promoted endothelial inflammation predominantly via augmented internalization of CD59 and consequent MAC deposition. Increased internalization of endothelial CD59 in IH appeared to be cholesterol-dependent and was reversed by statins in a CD59-dependent manner. These studies suggest that reduced complement inhibition may mediate endothelial inflammation and increase vascular risk in OSA patients. PMID:26738794

  9. Cephalometric analysis and long-term outcomes of orthognathic surgical treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Ubaldo, E D; Greenlee, G M; Moore, J; Sommers, E; Bollen, A-M

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe skeletal and posterior airway changes after orthodontic treatment and surgical jaw advancement, and to evaluate whether there is a correlation between increasing advancement and a long-term reduction in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Lateral cephalograms and polysomnography (apnoea-hypopnoea index, AHI) were collected from patients treated with bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) or maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) in combination with orthodontics. Patients completed a questionnaire and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) to assess long-term outcomes. Descriptive statistics for cephalometric measurements and linear regression were performed to find estimates of the final OSA (AHI and ESS) as a function of mandibular advancement. Forty-three patients with surgical advancement of the maxilla (5.2mm) and mandible (8.3mm) had a 4-mm increase in posterior airway. Thirty-three patients completed the long-term survey (6.3±2.6 years after treatment); 91% reported a reduction of OSA and were pleased with their facial appearance. The maxillomandibular and posterior airway increased. There was no evidence of a linear relationship between greater amounts of mandibular advancement and improvement of OSA. Patients with less than 10mm advancement had successful objective short-term and subjective long-term OSA reduction. PMID:25703596